Preface
EtherWAN
Preface
This manual describes how to install and use the EtherWAN
24-port Ethernet switch, Xpresso 1624. It features twenty-four ports
that auto negotiate the presence of 100/10Mbps and full or half
duplex mode. An optional 100BASE-FX multi-mode module
enables long-distance connection. An optional BNC connection for
the module enables backwards compatibility.
To get the most out of this manual, you should have an
understanding of networking concepts such as bridging, IEEE
802.3 Ethernet and 100BASE-TX Fast Ethernet, and local area
networks (LANs).
For more information about these topics, please refer to the
Appendices.
In this manual, you will find:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Benefits of Ethernet switches
Xpresso 1624 and its features
LED functions illustration
Installation instructions
Configuration instructions for VLAN and port speed
Specifications
Ethernet technology, LAN, and VLAN tutorial
information
• Definitions of terms used in this manual
EtherWAN
Table of Contents
Preface ................................................................................1
Introduction.........................................................................3
Benefits of Switching .......................................................3
EtherWAN Xpresso 1624 Switch .....................................4
Product Features ..................................................................6
Packing List .....................................................................7
Xpresso 1624 Front Panel LEDs ..........................................8
Installation.........................................................................11
Selecting a Site for the Switch ........................................11
Connecting to Power ......................................................12
Connecting to Your Network..........................................12
Optional Module Installation ..........................................13
Networking Examples ....................................................15
VLAN and Speed/Duplex Port Settings..............................16
Establishing Console Port Connection ............................18
Valid Commands: .......................................................20
Virtual LAN ...............................................................21
Port Settings ...............................................................23
Specifications ....................................................................26
Appendix A - Connector Pinouts........................................28
Appendix B - Introduction to LAN & Ethernet Technologies
..........................................................................................29
Appendix C – VLANs .......................................................32
Appendix D – Glossary......................................................34
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EtherWAN
Introduction
Benefits of Switching
Ethernet switching technology dramatically boosted the total
bandwidth of a network, eliminated congestion problems inherent
with carrier sense multiple access with collision detection
(CSMA/CD) protocol, and greatly reduced unnecessary
transmissions.
This revolutionized networking. First, by allowing two-way,
simultaneous transmissions over the same port (full-duplex), which
essentially doubled the bandwidth. Second, by reducing the
collision domain to a single switch-port, which eliminated the need
for carrier sensing. Third, by using the store-and-forward
technology’s approach of inspecting each packet to intercept
corrupt or redundant data, switching eliminated unnecessary
transmissions that slow the network. Fourth, by employing addresslearning, which replaced the inefficient method of constant
broadcasting to every node in search of the correct receiving port.
Ethernet switching technology supplied higher performance at costs
lower than other solutions.
Wider bandwidth, no congestion, and the reduction in traffic is why
switching is replacing expensive routers and inefficient hubs as the
ultimate networking solution. Switching brought a whole new way
of thinking to networking, and raised the level of expectations for
high-end users.
Today, the demand is for higher transmission speed. Although
10BASE-T Ethernet, at 10Mbps, had been the standard, current
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EtherWAN
applications require fast Ethernet, at 100Mbps. At ten times the
speed, fast Ethernet satisfies the demands of power-users and those
using engineering software and multi-media applications.
With this quick rise to higher speed, many users were left with
slower, but still serviceable switches. To solve this problem, quality
switches now automatically negotiate between 10BASE-T Ethernet
and 100BASE-TX fast Ethernet, efficiently integrating legacy
equipment into a higher performance network. Auto-negotiation
ensures a path for users to add, change, and migrate to fast Ethernet
as warranted.
Ultimately, switching provides a low cost answer to today’s
computing needs.
EtherWAN Xpresso 1624 Switch
The EtherWAN Xpresso 1624 is a 24-port Fast Ethernet switch. It
has twenty-four RJ-45 ports and each of them is capable of autonegotiating 10/100 Mbps and full or half-duplex mode.
Addressing the demand for fiber, EtherWAN provides an optional
multi-mode or single-mode fiber module for Xpresso 1624 as an
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EtherWAN
optimum solution for long-distance connectivity. The module
supports one SC, ST, MT-RJ, or VF-45 port. An available BNC
connection addresses the backwards compatibility issue.
The Xpresso 1624 enables the linking of a 100Mbps Fast Ethernet
network to an existing 10Mbps Ethernet network. Its internal cache
buffers the traffic from the higher bandwidth 100Mbps segment to
the 10Mbps segment. If you later decide to make both segments
100Mbps Fast Ethernet, the EtherWAN Xpresso 1624 will
automatically sense the change and adjust to 100Mbps operation.
In addition to the integration of 10Mbps and 100Mbps networks,
the EtherWAN Xpresso 1624 switch also provides for segmentation
to reduce excess traffic that bogs down the network. By splitting
the network into several segments and bridging them, you can cut
the traffic load on your network and reduce collisions on each
segment.
Through the store-and-forward architecture, Xpresso 1624
automatically examines and appropriately forwards each packet to
the right destination. This reduces broadcasting to each node in the
network and increases the data flow on each segment. Further
reduction in traffic is achieved by connecting users that
communicate most frequently within the same segment.
The EtherWAN Xpresso 1624 fully complies with IEEE802.3u,
100BASE-TX/FX, and IEEE802.3, 10BASE-T standards.
Xpresso 1624 facilitates an affordable and efficient migration path
to 100Mbps fast Ethernet while providing the fiber connection
necessary for today.
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EtherWAN
Product Features
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
6
24 ports with auto-negotiation 10/100Mbps
Optional 1-port module
Plug-and-play
Auto-negotiation for speed and duplexity
True non-blocking architecture
Full wire speed forwarding
Store-and-forward mechanism
Back pressure and IEEE 802.3x compliant flow
control
Supports 1K MAC address
Port based VLAN
Programmable re-configuration for fixed speed
and duplex modes
One uplink port activated by the push of a button
Front panel reset button
Front panel status LEDs
Standard 19" rack-mountable size
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EtherWAN
Packing List
When you unpack this product, you should find the items listed
below. Please inspect the contents, and report any apparent damage
or missing items immediately to your authorized reseller.
•
•
•
•
•
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Xpresso 1624
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AC power cord
Rack Mount Ears with screws
Serial Cable
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EtherWAN
Xpresso 1624 Front Panel LEDs
The array of LED indicators on the front panel conveys status and
configuration information to help you monitor and trouble-shoot
the switch.
1X
2X
3X
4X
5X
6X
7X
8X
RESET
POWER
24 port 10/100 switch
Figure 1: Xpresso 1624 LEDs
¶ Power
Indicates that there is electrical power to the switch.
· Reset Button
Push to reset the switch should it become unresponsive.
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EtherWAN
¸ Status LEDs
A set of three LEDs displays the status of each port. Consult the
following chart for clarification.
Table 1: Status LEDs
LED
State
Steady
LNK/ACT
Flashing
100
Steady
Steady
FDX/COL
Flashing
Off
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Indication
LINK: The port has established a
valid network connection
ACTIVITY: The port is
transmitting or receiving data
100Mbps: The port has
established a valid 100Mbps
network connection
FULL-DUPLEX: The connection
is in full duplex mode
COLLISION: Collision occurred
in the 10/100 domain.
The connection is in half duplex
mode
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EtherWAN
17X
18X
19X
20X
EXTENSION SLOT
21X
22X
23X
24X
Figure 2: Optional module LEDs and uplink button
¹ Uplink Button
Depress for uplink function or leave in normal port operation.
Affects port 24 only.
º Status LEDs
A set of three LEDs displays the status of the optional modular
port. Consult the following chart for clarification.
Table 2: Optional module port LEDs
LED
State
Indication
Steady
The port has established a valid
network connection
Flashing
The port is transmitting data
RX
Flashing
The port is receiving data
FDX/COL
Steady
The connection is in full duplex
mode
Flashing
The port is receiving data
LNK/ACT
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EtherWAN
Installation
Selecting a Site for the Switch
As with any electronic device, do not subject the EtherWAN
Xpresso 1624 to extreme temperatures, humidity, or
electromagnetic interference. Specifically, the site you select
should meet the following requirements:
•
Room temperature of between 32 and 104 degrees
Fahrenheit (0 to 40 degrees Celsius).
•
Relative humidity of less than 90 percent,
non-condensing.
•
Adequate ventilation. Do not block the ventilation
holes on the side of the switch or the fan exhaust
port on the rear of the switch.
•
Power outlet located within 1.8 Meter of the switch.
•
Electromagnetic field (RFC) of any other
surrounding devices not to exceed standards for IEC
801-3, Level 2 (3V/M) field strength.
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EtherWAN
Connecting to Power
Connect the supplied AC power cord to the receptacle on the back
of the switch, and then plug the cord into a standard AC outlet with
a voltage range from 100 to 240 VAC.
Turn on the EtherWAN Xpresso 1624 by flipping the ON/OFF
switch on the rear of the unit to the I (ON) position. The O position
is OFF.
Connecting to Your Network
Prepare cable with corresponding connectors for each type of port
in use. Consult Table 3 below for cabling requirements based on
connectors and speed. Once the connections are made, the switch is
operational.
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EtherWAN
Table 3: Cable Specifications
Speed
Connector
Port
Speed
Half/Full
Duplex
Cable
Distance
100BASETX
RJ-45
100/200
Mbps
Category 5
UTP
100
meters
10BASE-T
BNC
10/20Mbps
Coaxial
na
10BASE-T
RJ-45
10/20
Mbps
Category 3,
4, or 5 UTP
100
meters
100BASEFX
ST, SC,
MT-RJ,
VF-45
200 Mbps
62.5/125
micron
fiber-optic
cable
2 km
Optional Module Installation
The Xpresso 1624 offers an optional one-port module. It is
available in either single or multi-mode. The multi-mode fiber
module supports either SC, ST, MT-RJ, or VF-45. BNC connection
can be substituted to allow for even more versatility.
The optional module is inserted in the extension slot and the
module utilizes port 20. Before installation, ensure that the power is
disconnected. The module is not hot-swappable. Unscrew the cover
plate in the extension slot. Pull out the cover plate, which has a
non-wired board attached. Slide the module in slowly, following
the metal guides. Once it is slid in fully, snap in the module to
make a proper connection and tighten the screws.
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EtherWAN
Figure 3: Removal of cover plate
Jumper Settings
The module arrives with pre-set jumpers and should not be reset.
Use the jumper settings for trouble-shooting purposes only.
Figure 4: Proper jumper settings for fiber module (BNC
connection does not have a jumper)
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EtherWAN
Networking Examples
The following illustrates ways in which the Xpresso 1624 is
utilized.
Xpresso-1624
200Mbps
10Mbps
Half-duplex
Ethernet
Workstation
Printer server
Full-duplex
Fast Ethernet
Workstation
Full-duplex
Fast Ethernet
Server
Figure 5: High-speed connections for a small workgroup
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EtherWAN
10Base-T Hub
10Mbps
200Mbps
Xpresso-1624
Xpresso-1624
200Mbps
100Mbps
100Base-TX Hub
100Mbps
10Mbps
10Base-T Hub
Server 1
Server 2
Figure 6: Collapsed backbone for workgroups
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EtherWAN
100Base-TX Hub
10Base-T Hub
10Mbps
100Mbps
Xpresso-1624
10Mbps
100Mbps
10Base-T Hub
100Base-TX Hub
Figure 7: Bridging existing hub-based 100BASE-TX and
10BASE-T network
VLAN and Speed/Duplex Port Settings
This section explains the port operations through which the VLAN,
flow-control, speed, and duplex function is accessed for more
advanced configurations.
Virtual Local Area Networking (VLAN) enables efficient traffic
separation, provides better bandwidth utilization, and alleviates
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EtherWAN
scaling issues by logically segmenting the physical LAN so that
packets are switched only between ports within the same VLAN.
This creates secure segments and the resulting security is yet
another reason to utilize a VLAN.
Auto-negotiation regulates the speed and duplex of each port, based
on the capability of both devices. Flow-control allows transmission
from a 100Mbps node to a 10Mbps node without loss of data.
Auto-negotiation and flow-control may require disablement for
some networking operations involving legacy equipment. Disabling
the auto-negotiation is accomplished by fixing the speed or duplex
of a port. Disablement of flow-control is also performed on an
individual port basis.
Establishing Console Port Connection
For these features to operate through the console port, it is
necessary to first configure in DOS or a terminal emulation
program such as HyperTerminal.
•
•
18
Check all switches, cables, and computers for proper
installation before configuration.
Attach a PC or any VT100 compatible terminal to the console
port on the back of the switch (see figure 8) using the
following settings:
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EtherWAN
Terminal type
VT100
Port type
(COM 1~4)
Communication
Mode
8 data bits, 1 stop bit, no
parity and 9600bps
(for initial configuration)
Flow Control
None
Hardware
Compression
NA
Console Port
Figure 8: Console Port
•
Turn on the switch and press any key to view the
main menu shown below:
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EtherWAN
VLAN
-------V1
V2
V3
V4
Port List
--------1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24
<empty>
<empty>
<empty>
Port
----1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Mode
------AutoAutoAuto-,
AutoAutoAutoAutoAutoAutoAutoAutoAuto-
Flw
----On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
VLAN List
------------V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
Port Mode
-----------13 Auto
14 Auto
15 Auto
16 Auto
17 Auto
18 Auto
19 Auto
20 Auto
21 Auto
22 Auto
23 Auto
24 Auto
Flw
---On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
VLAN List
------------V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
VLAN, Mode, Default (V/M/D) ?
Figure 9: Console port displaying default settings
Valid Commands:
[V] Configure VLAN groups
[M] Select 10/100Mbps and half or full-duplex mode
[D] Restore the default settings
[ESC] Abort and return to the menu
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EtherWAN
Default Settings:
All ports are in the V1 group with auto-negotiation, and flow
control while the default setting is active.
Virtual LAN
Virtual Local Networks (VLANs) enable segmentation of the LAN
without regards to physical location. Assign each port to a group or
set of groups according to accessibility needs.
Follow these steps to assign ports to a VLAN group.
• Enter [V] from the Main Menu
• Select a VLAN group:
[V1], [V2], [V3], or [V4]
• Enter the port #.
To return to the default settings, enter [D] from the main menu. A
prompt appears to verify this action.
The system only allows one VLAN group definition with each
entry. Continue selecting each desired VLAN group and assigning
ports until all ports are assigned to at least one VLAN group.
Though each VLAN grouping does not need to be utilized, each
port must be assigned to at least one VLAN group. Hit the [ESC]
key when done.
VLAN Example:
• Key [V1] (no [enter])
• Key 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12
or 1-12
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EtherWAN
•
[ENTER]
Proceed with the assignment of the remainder of the ports into any
VLAN grouping. Ports may be assigned to more than one VLAN.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Key [V2] (no [ENTER])
Key 13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20
or 13-20
[ENTER]
Key [V3] (no [ENTER])
Key 21,22,23,24
or 21-24
[ENTER]
Note: [ESC] key will not return the screen to the main menu until
each port is assigned to a VLAN.
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EtherWAN
VLAN
-------V1
V2
V3
V4
Port List
--------1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,
13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20
21,22,23,24
<empty>
Port
----1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Mode
------AutoAutoAuto-,
AutoAutoAutoAutoAutoAutoAutoAutoAuto-
Flw
----On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
VLAN List
------------V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
Port Mode
----------13 Auto
14 Auto
15 Auto
16 Auto
17 Auto
18 Auto
19 Auto
20 Auto
21 Auto
22 Auto
23 Auto
24 Auto
Flw
---On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
VLAN List
------------V2
V2
V2
V2
V2
V2
V2
V2
V3
V3
V3
V3
Please enter the VLAN# or ESC to Abort (V1-V4)->
Figure 10: Console port displaying revised VLAN assignments
according to above example.
Port Settings
The duplex and speed of each port can be altered and the flowcontrol can be turned off to accommodate special needs.
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EtherWAN
Follow these steps to change the speed/duplex mode setting or to
toggle flow control ON/OFF:
•
•
•
•
Key [M] (no [ENTER])
Select a port
[ENTER]
Select the media from the list that appears on the
screen
Note: Only one port can be changed at a time.
Consult the following charts for a brief description:
Table 4: TX Port Settings
0
Communication
Media
Flow Control
1
Auto
Auto-Negotiation
2
100 FL
100Mbps at full-duplex
3
100 HF
100Mbps at half-duplex
4
10 FL
10Mbps at full-duplex
5
10 HF
10Mbps at half-duplex
#
Description
Toggles ON/OFF
Media Setting Example:
• Key [M] (no [enter])
• Select port 10
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EtherWAN
•
Select mode 5
Hit the [ESC] key when done. To return to the default settings,
enter [D]. A prompt appears to verify this command.
VLAN
-------V1
V2
V3
V4
Port List
--------1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24
<empty>
<empty>
<empty>
Port
Mode
List
------AutoAutoAuto-,
AutoAutoAutoAutoAutoAuto10 HF
AutoAuto-
----1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Flw
VLAN List Port Mode
Flw
VLAN
----On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
------------V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
---On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
On
-----------V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
V1
-----------13 Auto
14 Auto
15 Auto
16 Auto
17 Auto
18 Auto
19 Auto
20 Auto
21 Auto
22 Auto
23 Auto
24 Auto
VLAN,Mode,Default (V/M/D) ?
Figure 11: Console port displaying mode change
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EtherWAN
Specifications
Xpresso 1624
Applicable
Standards
10BASE-T, IEEE 802.3
100BASE-TX & 100BASE-FX, IEEE 802.3u
Ports
24 10/100-BASE-T/TX
Speed
100BASE-FX:
100BASE-TX:
10BASE-TX:
200Mbps full-duplex
100Mbps half-duplex
200Mbps full-duplex
100Mbps half-duplex
20Mbps full-duplex 10Mbps
half-duplex
Performance
148,800pps forwarding rate per port.
LED
Indicators
Power, Link, Activity, 100Mbps, Fullduplex,Collision
Module
LED
Indicators
Link, Activity, Full-duplex
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EtherWAN
Dimensions
440 X 205 X 45 mm Rackmount Size
17.3 X 8.1 X 1.8 in Rackmount Size
Weight
kg
lb
Power Input
100 ~ 250 Vac, 47/63 Hz, 2 A
Power
Consumption
20 W
Operating
Temperature
0° ~ 40°C
32° ~ 104°F
Humidity
10 ~ 90%, non-condensing
Altitude
3048 m
10,000 ft
Emissions
FCC part 15 Class A, CISPR Class A,
VCCI-I CE Mark
Safety
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UL, CSA, TUV/GS
27
EtherWAN
Appendix A - Connector Pinouts
Pin arrangement of RJ-45 connectors
Figure 12: RJ-45 Connector and Cable Pins
The following table lists the pinout of 10/100BASE-T/TX ports
Table 5: Connector Pin-Out
Pin
Regular Ports
1
Input Receive Data +
2
Input Receive Data 3
Output Transmit Data +
4
NC
5
NC
6
Output Transmit Data 7
NC
8
NC
28
Uplink port
Output Transmit Data +
Output Transmit Data Input Receive Data +
NC
NC
Input Receive Data NC
NC
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EtherWAN
Appendix B - Introduction to LAN &
Ethernet Technologies
As communication and business applications become increasingly
complex, computer networking has evolved as a very important
part of the infrastructure.
Communication systems like Local Area Network (LAN) evolved
into sophisticated, powerful, yet flexible technology. Among the
different types of LAN technologies, Ethernet represents the best in
speed, cost, ease of installation, and supportability.
LAN
Local Area Network (LAN) technology gave personal computers
the power to share resources of hardware and software. LAN
connects personal computers, file servers, printers, etc. together
within a geographical area, usually a single building. Multiple,
widely dispersed LAN systems are referred to as a wide area
network (WAN).
Ethernet Technologies
More than 80 percent of all LANs utilize Ethernet technology. The
Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) standardized
Ethernet in IEEE 802.3, which provides for configuration rules,
interaction requirements, types of media, and data rate.
Fast Ethernet
For networks that need higher transmission speeds, a faster speed
was developed and IEEE next established IEEE 802.3u, raising the
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EtherWAN
Ethernet speed from 10 Mbps to 100 Mbps. Thus, fast Ethernet
arose and users quickly began converting from 10Mbps to
100Mbps.
Ethernet Gigabit
The demand for even higher speed created the gigabit Ethernet at
1000Mbps (or 1Gbps). The newer IEEE standard for gigabit
Ethernet is IEEE 802.3z. The only cabling media approved is the
fiber-optic pair. Watch for 10gig Ethernet.
Ethernet Products
Hub
One of the earlier connection solutions for Ethernet, a hub (also
called a repeater) operates by broadcasting data to all ports
simultaneously, only to repeat it when it is not received. The hub
works through a “shared network” with all of the nodes in the
network segment sharing the same collision domain. Switches and
bridges emerged because of a need to separate collision domains
that are too large, therefore improving performance and network
reliability.
Switch
A switch solves the collision problem by working as a single
domain. A Switch maps the physical Ethernet addresses of the
nodes residing on each network segment and then allows only the
necessary traffic to pass through. Packets of data are transmitted
along with the destination and source segment.
There are two basic architectures of LAN switches, cut-through and
store-and-forward. Cut-through switches consider only the
destination address before forwarding it on to its destination
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EtherWAN
segment, but store-and-forward architecture accepts and then
analyzes the entire packet before forwarding. This allows the
switch to stop certain packet errors from propagating through the
network. The store-and forward switch eliminates redundant or
corrupted packets, thus increasing the efficiency of the network
transmission.
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EtherWAN
Appendix C – VLANs
Virtual local area network (VLAN) is a network configuration in
which nodes are grouped into logical, rather than physical
networks. Figure 13 & 14 below shows the difference between
LAN and VLAN. The segmentation in VLAN creates secured areas
where sensitive information is not shared and creates its own
broadcast domain within the group to effectively reduce broadcast
traffic, providing higher network efficiency and security.
LAN 1
LAN 2
LAN 2
Figure 13: LAN Segmentation
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EtherWAN
VLAN 1
VLAN 2
Figure 14: VLAN Segmentation
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EtherWAN
Appendix D – Glossary
networking standard for twisted-pair cabling
capable of carrying data at 10Mbps; also
called Twisted Pair Ethernet
networking standard for twisted-pair cabling
capable of carrying data at 100Mbps; also
100BASE-T
called Fast Ethernet
networking standard for two pairs of high100BASE-TX quality twisted-pair wires carrying data at
100Mbps
networking standard for fiber-optic cabling
10BASE-F
capable of carrying data at 10Mbps
networking standard for fiber-optic cabling
100BSE-FX
capable of carrying data at 100Mbps
networking standard for carrying data at
100BASE-X
100Mbps
expansion card that enables a computer to
Adapter
attach to a network
(network)
application-specific integrated circuit; a chip
designed for a particular application and
built by connecting an existing arrangement
of circuit building blocks in new ways;
ASIC
ASICs are commonly used in networking
devices to maximize performance with
minimum cost
asynchronous transfer mode; network
ATM
technology capable of transmitting data,
voice, video, and frame-relay traffic in real
time
10BASE-T
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EtherWAN
Autodiscovery
Autonegotiation
Backbone
Backplane
Bandwidth
Broadcast
Bus
Bus-type
stack
Category 5
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process by which a network device
automatically searches through a range of
network addresses and discovers all known
types of devices present in that range
two-part process by which a network device
automatically senses the speed and duplex
capability of another device
interconnection within a LAN or WAN
between subnetworks or workgroups within
an enterprise
bus or switching matrix that resides within a
switch or hub chassis; all traffic through
such a device crosses the backplane at least
once
amount of data that can be transmitted in a
fixed amount of time; usually expressed in
bits or bytes per second
message forwarded to all destinations on a
network
connector or set of connectors that serve as
the interconnection between related devices;
common bus types in personal computers
include Industry-Standard Architecture
(ISA), Extended Industry-Standard
Architecture (EISA), and Peripheral
Component Interconnect (PCI)
stack arrangement where the individual
components are connected along a single
shared cable
networking standard certifying that a copper
wire cable can carry data at up to 100Mbps
35
EtherWAN
distributed computing model where desktop
"clients" can access and share information
resources from multiple "servers"
LAN architecture in which the subnetwork
Collapsed
interconnection is concentrated within a
backbone
switching hub or router
concurrent Ethernet transmissions from two
Collision
or more devices on the same segment
Concentrator device used in a LAN to combine
transmissions from a cluster of nodes; often
called a hub
cyclical redundancy check; a procedure used
CRC
to check for errors in data transmission
dual-attach station; a type of node that offers
DAS
two connections, with each connection going
to another node or concentrator
a switching hub designed to support a single
Desktop
MAC address, or client on each port
switch
Ethernet in, FDDI out
EIFO
networking standard for transmitting data at
Ethernet
10Mbps
Fast Ethernet networking standard for transmitting data at
100Mbps
fiber distributed data interface; networking
FDDI
standard for 100Mbps fiber-optic LANs;
widely used as a backbone technology to
interconnect several Ethernet or Token Ring
networks
cable made of thin glass threads that carry
Fiber-optic
data in the form of light pulses
cable
software routines that are permanently
Firmware
written onto read-only memory
communications technique that allows twoFull-duplex
way, simultaneous transmission between two
Client/
Server
36
User’s Manual
EtherWAN
way, simultaneous transmission between two
devices on a single 10BASE-T segment
networking standard for transmitting data at
Gigabit
1000Mbps
Ethernet
a communications technique in which one
half-duplex
device on a segment transmits while the
other receives, then the process is reversed
HTTP server software that serves HTML documents and
associated files requested by clients such as
Web browsers
a device providing a common connection
Hub
among computers in a star-type network; all
ports within a hub share the total bandwidth
of the domain
set of Institute of Electrical and Electronic
IEEE 802
Engineers standards for defining methods of
access and control on LANs
transmission of control information within
In-band
the bandwidth frequencies that transfer a
network's data
local area network; a network where
LAN
computers are connected in close proximity,
such as in the same building or office park; a
system of LANs connected at a distance is
called a wide-area network (WAN)
MAC address media access control address; a hardware
address that uniquely identifies each node of
a network
management information base; a database
MIB
containing the names of all the information
resources a management program might
need
User’s Manual
37
EtherWAN
Master
Mbps
MDA
OEM
Out-of-band
PCI
Port density
Port
mirroring
PowerLink(tm)
RMON
Runt
38
any device that controls another device;
controlled devices are called slaves
millions of bits per second
media-dependent adapter
original equipment manufacturer; a
manufacturer that typically purchases
components from other manufacturers,
integrates them into its own products, and
sell the products to the public
transmission of control information outside
the bandwidth frequencies that transfer a
network's data
peripherals component interface; a standard
developed by Intel Corporation that defines a
local bus system; most modern PCs include a
PCI bus in addition to a more general ISA
expansion bus
number of ports, either physical or logical,
per network device
advanced feature of switching hubs that
allows one port's MAC layer data to be
replicated to another port for monitoring by a
network analyzer
group of port connections between switches
that allow traffic loads to be balanced among
these connections to increase the total
bandwidth of the interconnection; this term
is trademarked by NPI
remote monitoring; a network management
protocol that allows network information to
be gathered at a single workstation
any frame that is shorter than the minimum
valid size of 64 bytes; runt frames are
usually caused by collisions or faulty
User’s Manual
EtherWAN
Segment
SAS
Slave
SNMP
Spanningtree
algorithm
Stand-alone
Star-type
stack
Store-andforward
User’s Manual
usually caused by collisions or faulty
network interface cards
section of a network that is bounded by
bridges, routers, hubs, or switches; dividing
an Ethernet into multiple segments is a
common way to increase bandwidth on a
LAN
single-attach station; a type of node that
allows for a single cable connection to a
concentrator
any device that is controlled by another
device; the controlling device is called a
master
simple network management protocol; a
standard for gathering statistical data about
network traffic and the behavior of network
components; SNMP uses management
information bases (MIBs), which define
what information is available from any
manageable network device
a process used to eliminate redundant data
routes and increase network efficiency
type of device that does not require support
from another device to function
stack arrangement with the components
connected to one another via a centralized
hub
switching feature where the receiving port
receives the entire incoming frame and
stores it in the buffers before forwarding it to
the destination port; unlike cut-through
switching, this method checks for runts and
error frames and forwards only the good
39
EtherWAN
Switch
Switch
motherboard
Switching
fabric
UTP
VAR
VLAN
WAN
Wire speed
Work Group
40
error frames and forwards only the good
packets to the destination
device that filters and forwards packets
between LAN segments
main board inside a switch where the
switching circuitry is located
a term used to specify the maximum
bandwidth of a switch at the backplane
unshielded twisted pair; cabling with wires
that are twisted around each other; the
individual wires are uninstalled
value-added reseller; a company that buys
hardware and software and resells it to the
public with added services such as user
support
virtual LAN; a process that defines network
segment membership through the use of
software; VLANs allow the network
administrator to resegement the network
without physically rearranging the devices or
network connections
wide-area network; a network that uses
telecommunications technology to connect
computers or networks over long distances
the ability to handle the fastest rate of traffic
that a generator can deliver without dropping
packets; on a 100Mbps connection, wirespeed traffic is 148,809 packets per second
using 64 byte frames or 8,127 packets per
second using 1,518 byte frames
collection of computers that are grouped for
sharing resources such as data and peripheral
User’s Manual
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