Manual - Galco Industrial Electronics

Manual - Galco Industrial Electronics
Durant.
INSTALLATION AND OPERATION
MANUAL Number 58820-900-06
MODEL 5882-0400 and MODEL 5882-1400
SINGLE PRESET 5 DIGIT ELECTRONIC CONTROL
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1 General Description
3 Specifications
6 Description of Operating Modes
9 Installation Instructions
14 Installation Instructions/Wiring
21 Operation
26 Programming Procedures
30 Scale Factors
37 Serial Communications
41 Application Examples
50 Troubleshooting
55 Accessories and Replacement Parts List
Cutler-Hammer
E:T-oN
WARRANTY
WARRANTY: Eaton Corporation warrants all products against defects in material and workmanship for a
period of one (1) year from date of shipment to Buyer. This is a limited warranty limited to its terms. This
warranty is void if the product has been altered, misused, taken apart or otherwise abused. ALL OTHER
WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, ARE EXCLUDED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR PURPOSE.
BUYER’S REMEDIES: Eaton Corporation’s obligations and liabilities under the foregoing warranty are limited
to repair or replacement of the product without charge, provided it is mailed prepaid to Durant Products, 901
South 12th Street, Watertown, Wisconsin, 53094. A charge is made for repairing after the expiration of the
warranty. IN NO EVENT SHALL CUTLER HAMMER-EATON CORPORATION BE LIABLE FOR CLAIMS
BASED UPON BREACH OF EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTY OR NEGLIGENCE OR ANY OTHER
DAMAGES WHETHER DIRECT, IMMEDIATE, FORESEEABLE, CONSEQUENTIAL OR SPECIAL OR FOR
ANY EXPENSES INCURRED BY REASON OF THE USE OR MISUSE, SALE OR FABRICATION OF
PRODUCTS WHICH DO ORDO NOT CONFORM TO THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF THIS CONTRACT.
INDEMNIFICATION: Buyer agrees to hold Eaton Corporation harmless from, defend and indemnify Eaton
Corporation against damages, claims and expenses arising out of subsequent sales of Durant products or
products containing components manufactured byEaton Corporation and based upon personal injuries, deaths,
property damage, lost profits and other matters for which Buyer its employees or sub-contractors are or may
be to any extent liable, including without limitation penalties imposed by the Consumer Product Safety Act
(P.L.92-573) and liability imposed upon any person pursuant to the Mansion-Moss Warranty Act (P.L.93-637),
as now in effect or amended hereafter. The warranties and remedies provided for herein are available to
Buyer and shall not extend to any other person.
COMPLIANCE WITH OSHA: Eaton Corporation offers no warranty and makes no representation that its
products comply with the provisions or standards of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, or any
regulations issued thereunder. In no event shall Eaton Corporation be liable for any loss, damages, fines,
penalty or expense arising under said Act.
This manual constitutes proprietary information of Eaton Corporation, and is furnished for the customer’s use
in operating the Series 5882 Count Control. Reproduction of this material for purposes other than the support
of the 5882 Control or related products is prohibited without the prior written consent of Eaton Corporation.
In the construction of the Control described herein, the full intent of the specifications will be met. Eaton
Corporation, however reserves the right to make, from time to time and without prior written notice, such
departures from the detail specifications as may be required to permit improvements in the design of the
product.
The information included herein is believed to be accurate and reliable, however, no responsibility is assume
to Eaton Corporation for its use; nor for any infringements of patents or other rights of third parties which may
result from its use.
WARNING: This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and if not installed and
used in accordance with the instructions manual, may cause interference to radio communications. It has
been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A computing device pursuant to Subpart J of Part
15 of FCC Rules, which are designed to provide reasonable protection against such interference when operated
in a commercial environment. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause interference
in which case the user at his own expense will be required to take whatever measures may be required to
correct the interference.
Printed in U.S.A.
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
The Durant Model 5882 is a versatile, five-digit,
single preset, bi-directional count control with both
relay and transistor outputs. The control functions
either as a “Reset to Preset” control with outputs
occurring when the count reaches zero or as a
“Reset to Zero” control with outputs occurring when
the count is equal to the preset number.
The 5882-1400 Model also features the ability to
scale incoming counts. This means that for each
pulse received on the count inputs, a fraction or
multiple of that pulse is indicated on the display.
Scaling is useful to make conversions between
different units of measure (inches to centimeters,
for example) or to totalize parts produced from
multiple part manufacturing processes (such as six
parts produced for each operation of a press).
The scale factor can be a number from 0.0001 to
9.9999. This number becomes a factor by which
incoming count pulses are multiplied. The result of
the multiplication is shown on the front panel display.
A non-volatile memory insures that the setup
instructions will not be lost if power is interrupted.
Count values will also be retained if a power loss
interrupts a process or machine cycle.
Model 58825-400 includes a 1/tau ratemeter
function. The word “Rate” is added above the “4”
button. Pressing this button toggles the display
between count and rate. All count and control
functions continue while viewing the rate value. All
other features are the same as the 58821-400
model. See page 55 for a full description of the rate
feature.
The front panel of the control, Figure 1, is framed
by a bezel that seals the panel to the mounting
surface. A large, five-digit high visibility red LED
display with a programmable decimal point position
is located in the upper left portion of the panel. The
keyboard has a polycarbonate Lexan front face and
consists of ten data keys (0 through 9), “COUNT”
key, “RESET” key, “FUNCTION” key and “ENTER”
key. The “1” data key also serves as the “PRESET”
key. The upper right portion of the front panel
contains two yellow LED indicators for Count and
Preset operation.
The rear panel, Figure 2, contains screw terminals
for use with stripped wire, either solid or stranded
from 28 to 14 gauge. The rear panel also contains
a plug-in type replaceable relay with two “form-C”
contacts.
5 DIGITS OF 0.58” HIGH
RED LED DISPLAY WITH
PROGRAMMABLE
DECIMAL POINT
KEYBOARD
PROGRAMMING OF
PRESET DATA
SEALED TOUCH
SWITCH KEYBOARD \ oN-vOLATILE MEMORY
YELLOW LIGHT BARS
INDICATE IF DISPLAY IS
SHOWING COUNT VALUE
OR PRESET VALUE
FUNCTION
KEY PERMITS
PROGRAMMING
OF OPERATING
FUNCTIONS
BEZELS SEALS TO
PANEL SURFACE
WHEN MOUNTED
Figure 1. 5882 Single Preset 5-Digit Electronic Control
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
QUICK CONNECT SCREW
TERMINALS WORK
DIRECTLY WITH
TO RELAY)
STRIPPED WIRE
1 23 4 5 6718
A
0 4 115/2304
+ + EE a | S0/60HZ |
19 20 2122 2324 2526 27 28
PLUG-IN REPLACEABLE
RELAY WITH 2
"FORM-C" CONTACTS
TRANSISTOR OUTPUT
(OPERATES IN PARALLEL
10 111213 1415 16 1718
+ INT
A
K2
Fr |
29 30 3132 33 34 3536
PROGRAM INHIBIT
TERMINAL (JUMPER
TO DC COMMON TO
PREVENT PROGRAM
CHANGES)
USE
EXTERNAL
FUSE!
Figure 2. 5882 Rear Panel
The counter provides two-way serial communication
with remote devices using standard ASCII code and
three selectable Baud rates. Count and preset data
can be sent and preset data and print request
commands can be received by the control via two
20-milliampere current loops. On Model 5882-1400
the Scale Factor may also be transmitted and
received. Optional accessories are available to
convert the communication loop to RS232, parallel
BCD and multiplexed BCD formats.
The relay and transistor outputs can be timed from
0.01 to 99.99 seconds inclusive, latched until reset
complete, unlatched at reset or remain latched until
an unlatched input occurs. Outputs can also be
operated in the Reverse mode.
The count input circuit provides the user with several
options:
1. Separate add and subtract inputs.
2. Count input with up/down control input.
3. Quadrature input.
4. Count doubling in any of the three above
configurations.
5. Count up input with count inhibit input.
6. High or low speed operation. Low speed
operation provides maximum immunity to
contact bounce and noise.
The control is equipped with self-diagnostics which
test the internal memories for faults. Should a fault
be detected, an indication is given on the display.
Displays and indicators are turned on in a patterned
sequence for visual examination.
SPECIFICATIONS
POWER REQUIREMENTS:
AC Operation:
115/230 VAC (+10%, -20%) 47-63 Hz
DC Operation:
11-28 VDC
Power:
18 watts
DC POWER OUTPUT:
15 VDC (+1, -2).
150 mA if powered from AC or less than 24 VDC
100 mA if powered from 24 VDC or greater
NOTE: DC power output is only
regulated if unit is powered by AC or
greater than 18.5 VDC.
ENVIRONMENT:
Operating Temperature:
32 to 130° F (0 to 55° C)
Storage Temperature:
-40 to 160° F (-40 to 70° C)
Operating Humidity:
85% non-condensing relative
PHYSICAL:
Case Dimensions:
5.28” Wx 2.62” H x 5.91" D
(136.7mm W x 66.5mm H x 150.1mm D)
Bezel Dimensions:
5.80” W x 3.04” Hx 0.17” D
(147.3mm W x 77.2mm H x 4.3mmD)
LIP:
0.2 (Bmm)
Panel Cut-out Dimensions:
543” W x 2.68" H
(138mm W x 68mm H, DIN)
Mounting Panel Thickness:
0.58” (14.7mm) maximum
(without optional spacer provided)
0.077” (1.96mm) maximum
(with optional spacer provided)
Front panel will provide watertight seal with
gasket provided.
Case Material:
Cadon FRX plastic case with Lexan front face
overlay
Weight:
2.2 Ibs. (1.0 Kg)
Display Size:
5 digits, 0.56” (14.2mm) H
(with programmable decimal point location)
Memory Types:
PROM, RAM, Non-volatile NVRAM
Power Output:
15 VDC, (+1, -2), 100 milliamps
(Output power is available only when the control
is powered by AC line.)
COUNTER:
Count Range:
5 digits (0 to 99,999) with rollover
Preset Range:
5 digits (0 to 99,999)
Count Modes:
Count with Add and Subtract inputs
Count with Up/Down direction input
(Hardware doubling for above modes is
provided.)
Count with Count Inhibit input
Quadrature
Doubled Quadrature
Count Speed (Model 5882-0400)
0to 10,000 counts per second (CPS) with Durant
Shaft Encoders or solid state sensors with
internal pull-up resistor.
0 to 7,500 CPS minimum for sensors with open
collector transistor output.
0 to 5,000 CPS when hardware doubling is
implemented
0to 150 CPS when Low Frequency jumpers are
installed.
Count Speeds for Model 5882-1400 are shown in
Figure 20.
SPECIFICATIONS
COUNT INPUT RATINGS:
The count inputs are designed to work with current
sinking sensors (open-collector NPN transistor
output with or without passive pull-up resistor) or
contact closures to DC Common.
Input Voltage:
High state (Logical “1”, sensor off or contact
open):
10.5 to 24.5 VDC when control is powered by
AC line
7.0 to 24.5 VDC when control is powered by
11 VDC
11.0 to 24.5 VDC when control is powered by
16 VDC
Low state (Logical “0”, sensor on or contact closed):
0 to 4.5 VDC when control is powered by AC line
0 to 3.0 VDC when control is powered by DC supply
Input Impedance:
6800 ohms to 15 VDC when control is powered
by AC line
6800 ohms to 10 VDC when control is powered
by DC supply
Input Current:
20 mA peak, 3 mA steady state
Input Response:
High State (Logical “1”, sensor off or contact
open)
High Speed (Low Speed jumpers not
connected):
110usec minimum at 15 VDC (6,800 ohms to
+DC)
160usec minimum at 13.5 VDC (50,000 ohms
to +DC
High State (Logical “1”, sensor off or contact open)
Low Speed (Low Speed jumpers connected):
5.5 msec minimum at 15 VDC (6,800 ohms to +DC)
7.5 msec minimum at 13.5 VDC (50,000 ohms to
+DC
Low State (Logical “0”, sensor on or contact closed)
High Speed (Low Speed jumpers not connected):
20 psec minimum at 0.1 VDC (0 ohms to DC
Common)
45 psec minimum at 1.5 VDC (500 ohms to DC
Common)
Low State (Logical “0”, sensor on or contact closed)
Low Speed (Low Speed jumpers connected):
1.0 msec minimum at 0.1 VDC (0 ohms to DC
Common)
2.0 msec minimum at 1.5 VDC (500 ohms to DC
Common)
CONTROL INPUTS:
Impedance:
4.75K ohms to +5 VDC.
Threshold:
High +3.5 to +22 VDC.
Low +0.0 to +1.0 VDC.
Response Time:
Min. High 5.3 mS.
Min. Low 3.9 mS.
NOTE: The reset and unlatch signals will both occur
in less than 200 microseconds after the input signal
is detected. The start of the print will occur within 2
milliseconds after the input is detected if the unit is
not counting.
OUTPUT RATINGS:
Relay Contacts
Type: Form C (SPDT)
U.L./C.S.A. Contact Ratings:
10 amps, resistive, @ 24 VDC or 230 VAC
1/3 HP @ 115 VAC or 230 VAC
150 VDC maximum switched voltage
Mechanical Life: 5,000,000 operations
Electrical Life: 100,000 operations at resistive
rating
Transistor Outputs
Type: Open collector NPN transistor with
Zener diode transient surge protection.
Load Voltage: 30 VDC maximum
Load Current: 300 milllamps maximum per
transistor. 480 milliamps total for all
transistors.
Rev. 50-59:
Use 90 milliamps per relay coil when calculating
total transistor current.
Rev. 60-up:
Use 5 milliamps per relay coil when calculating
total transistor current.
SPECIFICATIONS
TIMEOUT:
Duration: 0.01 to 99.99 seconds
Accuracy: +£0.01 second for timeout values
below 1 second
+1 for time values above 1 second
OUTPUT OPERATING MODES:
Turn On:
At preset value (Reset mode)
At zero (Preset mode)
Turn Off:
After timeout
At unlatch input signal
When reset energized (Unlatch At Reset)
When reset deenergized (Latch Until Reset
Complete)
Reverse:
Reversed operation of relay and transistor
COUNTER OPERATING MODES:
Reset:
Reset to zero and count to preset
Preset:
Reset to preset and count to zero
Auto Recycle
Maintained Reset
Momentary Reset
DIAGNOSTIC MODES:
ROM Checksum
RAM Bit Test
NVRAM Read/Write Test
NVRAM Store Test
NVRAM Checksum
Watchdog Timer
Display and LED Indicator Test
COMMUNICATIONS:
Interface Type:
Dual port 20 milliamp current loop
Speed:
110, 300 and 1200 Baud, user selectable
Data Type:
Standard ASCII code
Format:
Start bit, 7 ASCII data bits, Parity bit, one or
two Stop bits
(Even parity for Serial Data Output, no
parity for Serial Data Input)
Information Transmitted:
Count value
Preset value
Scale Factor (Model 5882-1400 only)
Information Received:
Print request
Preset value
Scale Factor (Model 5882-1400 only)
SCALE FACTOR (MODEL 5882-1400 ONLY):
Range:
5 digits (0.0001 to 9.9999)
DESCRIPTION OF OPERATING MODES
COUNT MODES
The control has five count modes, which are: Count
with separate add and subtract inputs, Count with
direction control input, Count up with inhibit control
input, Quadrature, and Doubled Quadrature.
Add and Subtract Inputs
The add and subtract mode allows separate signals
to simultaneously add and subtract counts. It can
be used to indicate material stretch, subtract
defective parts from total parts produced, etc.
Count With Directional Control
Count with direction control modes uses one input
for incoming count pulses and the other to inform
the control whether the pulses should be used to
add or subtract counts. Count with direction may
be used when an item must be measured or
positioned. Many types of sensors or control
systems utilize count signals of this nature.
In both of the above count modes, the counter will
normally increment or decrement on the falling edge
of the incoming count pulses. (The falling edge is
defined as the moment in time when the pulse
changes state from +DC to DC Common potential.)
Doubling allows the counter to increment or
decrement on both the falling and the rising edges
of the pulse. (The rising edge is defined as the
moment when the pulse changes state from DC
Common to +DC potential.)
Count With Inhibit Control
The count up with inhibit control mode provides an
input which increments the control and an input
which causes incoming count pulses to be ignored.
This mode can be used when defective material
must be ignored or when inspection samples are
taken without incrementing the counter. The count
up with inhibit control mode may not be doubled.
Quadrature Inputs
Quadrature counting makes use of two count signals
which are phase shifted by 90 degrees. The
detection of which signal is rising first allows the
counter to know in what direction the shaft is turning.
When Quadrature count sources are being used,
the Double Input must always be connected to DC
Common to allow the quadrature signals to be
decoded.
Quadrature Input Doubled
Doubled Quadrature is implemented by
programming. This mode allows the counter to
count on both the rising and falling edges of the
incoming count pulses. The number of pulses per
revolution of the shaft encoder is effectively doubled,
increasing the resolution without any loss of
accuracy.
COUNT SCALING
When the 5882-1400 receives a count pulse in any
count mode, the 1 pulse is multiplied by the Scale
Factor. The 5882-1400 adds the scaled value to
the result for count-up pulses and subtracts the
scaled value from the result for count-down pulses.
The display shows the accumulated total in whole
increments.
DECIMAL POINT LOCATION
The location of the decimal point on the display is
programmed and may be located between any two
digits on the display, or omitted. When a printer is
connected to the serial communication output, the
decimal point is printed.
The decimal point remains on the display whenever
the actual value of the counter or the preset value is
being displayed. It is not lit when function codes or
other function entries are being displayed. The
timeout function automatically displays the decimal
point to indicate 0.01 second increments.
COUNTER OPERATING MODES
Reset Mode vs. Preset Mode
Reset mode is used when the counter should start
at zero and count up to a preset value. Reset mode
implies that when the “RESET” key is pressed or
the Reset input is energized, the counter is reset to
zero. In most cases when the Reset mode is
programmed, the counter is initialized to zero before
the process being controlled is started. When the
control is in the Reset mode, the transistor and relay
output turn on when the counter reaches the preset
value (assuming Normal Output mode of operation).
Preset mode is used when the control should start
at a preset value and count down to zero. Preset
mode implies that when the “RESET” key is pressed
or the Reset input is energized, the control is reset
to preset; that is, forced to have a value equal to the
preset value. In most cases when the Preset mode
DESCRIPTION OF OPERATING MODES
Is programmed, the counter is initialized to the preset
value before the process is started. When the
control is in the Preset mode, the transistor output
and relay turn on when the counter reaches zero
(assuming Normal Output mode operation).
Automatic Recycle Operation
It may be desirable to have the control automatically
reset itself for repeated cycles. Programming the
Auto Recycle mode causes the control to
automatically reset at the end of a cycle. When in
the Reset mode and the control reaches coincidence
with the preset value, the transistor output and relay
turn on and the counter is automatically reset to zero.
When in the Preset mode and the control reaches
zero, the transistor output and relay turn on and the
counter is automatically reset to the preset value.
OUTPUT AND RELAY OPERATION
The relay and transistor output of the control are
operated in parallel. Whenever the transistor output
is on, the relay is on. When the counter is in the
Reset mode and the actual value of the counter
reaches the preset value, the transistor output turns
on (conducting to DC Common) and the relay
energizes. When the counter is in the Preset mode
and the actual value of the counter reaches zero,
the transistor output turns on and the relay
energizes.
Several of the user programmed functions affect the
operation of the transistor output and relay. Figure
3 provides a table showing the various functions and
their effects on the transistor output and relay. The
functions shown are:
-Output and Relay Status Operation (NORMAL/
REVERSE)
-Latch Until Reset Complete (LURC)
-Unlatch At Reset (UAR)
-Reset or Preset mode select (RESET/PRESET)
Note that if the transistor output and relay are already
off when the event specified occurs and the table
indicates that they should be turned off, they remain
off. Likewise, if they are on and the table shows
that they should turn on, they remain on.
/N WARNING
A POWER OUTAGE CAUSES THE
OUTPUT AND RELAY TO TURN OFF
REGARDLESS OF THE OPERATING
MODE SELECTED. BE SURE THAT THIS
EFFECT IS NOT HAZARDOUS TO THE
OPERATOR.
FUNCTIONAL OPTIONS SELECTED
RESET MODE PRESET MODE
NORMAL OUTPUTS | REVERSE OUTPUTS | NORMAL OUTPUTS | REVERSE OUTPUTS
EVENT NORMAL | LURC | UAR | NORMAL | LURC | UAR | NORMAL | LURC | UAR [NORMAL | LURC| UAR
Counter reaches a Preset
value ON ON | ON | OFF OFF | OFF
Counter reaches zero ON ON | ON| OFF OFF | OFF
"RESET" key pressed or
Reset input energized OFF ON OFF ON
"RESET" key released or
Reset input deenergized OFF ON OFF ON
Unlatch input energized OFF | OFF |OFF| ON | ON |ON| OFF | OFF |OFF| ON | ON | ON
Timeout function (if used)
times out OFF OFF [OFF] ON ON | ON| OFF OFF | OFF| ON ON | ON
"ON" indicates that the Transistor output and relay turn on
"OFF" indicates that the Transistor output and relay turn off
indicates that there is no change
Figure 3. Output and Relay Operation Table
7
DESCRIPTION OF OPERATING MODES
Once the transistor output and relay are energized,
they remain on until unlatched by energizing the
Output Unlatch input.
The Timeout function allows the transistor output
and relay to remain on for a time period which is
user adjustable. The range of time allowable is from
0.01 to 99.99 seconds. At the end of the time
duration specified, the transistor output and relay
automatically turn off. As the table in Figure 3 shows,
this operation is reversed if the Reverse Operation
of the transistor output and relay has been
programmed. A value of 0.00 causes the Timeout
function to be inhibited. In this case the transistor
output and relay remain on until the Unlatch input is
energized.
The “RESET” key or the Reset input may also be
used to turn the transistor output and relay off if the
Latch Until Reset Complete function or the Unlatch
At Reset function has also been programmed.
Unlatch at Reset turns them off when the “RESET”
key is pressed or the Reset input is energized. Latch
Until Reset Complete turns them off when the
“RESET” key is released or the Reset input is
deenergized.
If either the Unlatch At Reset or Latch Until Reset
Complete mode is selected, the “RESET” key or
input, the Unlatch input, or the Timeout function will
unlatch the relay and transistor output. In this case
the relay and transistor are unlatched by whichever
occurs first.
RATE MODE (Model 58825-400 only)
See Page 55.
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
GENERAL GENERAL WIRING PRACTICES
When mounting, the location selected must provide 1. Disconnect all power before wiring terminals. A
for adequate air circulation space around the unit. safety hazard exists if this precaution
Avoid locating the unit near instruments and/or is not observed. Treat all control and
equipment that generate excessive heat. Figure 4 count inputs as hazardous since they
shows recommended cutout and product may carry line voltage.
dimensions as well as mounting details.
735" +,02"
(18.7mm +.5mm)
< 5.433" + 04" /
(138.mm + 1.0mm) i I |
V in
H- J
RECOMMENDED = Е
2.677" +03" PANEL CC CC © =
(68mm +.7mm) CUTOUT — — a 8
\ |
) 1
&— 5.53" + .015" (140.5mm + amm) — 95" + 04"
<—— 5.78" + .02" (146.8mm + .smm) —— >| | (24.1mm
<—— 5.91" + .03" (150.1mm + .8mm) >| +1.0mm)
> 5.80" +.015" — — — —
(147.31 m +.4mm)
| A Al ]
Durant | DUO OVAS OOO]
5 ) 0 He 1 23 4567 89 19,11 1213 44,15 16 17 18
Count =
3.04" +.015" Le) USE
Preset 1 Preset 2 (77.2mm A EXTERNAL
K1 K2 FUSE!
+0, 4mm) A
IN QUT Ki 1157 250ve+ a
y 19 20 5152 2 2125 26 7 2859 30 45 33 34 3536 Lr
8 99D OOOO OVVA|
< 5.38" + .02" (136.7mm +.5mm) >
GASKETS | 6.25" + .02" (158mm +.5mm) ——>
1 GASKET STANDARD
2ND GASKET AND SPACER
PANEL
Ne — OPTIONAL
REDUCES UNIT DEPTH
FROM 5.91" (150.1mm)
TO 5.38" (137.3mm)
N
NN
N \ N Бо
N NN
NOR R
N IN
N N MOUNTING CLIP (2)
N N N
NN +
N N
N N
NOTE: USE OF OPTIONAL NR m m
SPACER AND GASKET NN — —
NN
N N
NR
&— MAX PANEL THICKNESS W/O SPACER -- .61" (15.49mm)
MAX. PANEL THICKNESS W/SPACER -- 11" (2.78mm)
y
—"
Figure 4. Panel Mounting Dimensions
9
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
2. Use shielded cables for count signals, control 5. Provide “clean” power to the counter. In severe
input and communications signals. Connect cases, power may have to be filtered or a
shield to common (terminal 2, 3, or 4) of counter separate power source used. Do not use the
to terminate properly. same power source that is supplying the loads.
Keep all signal lines as short as possible. 6. Use 18 ga. minimum (1mm*, 600V) and 14 ga.
maximum (2.1mm*, 600V) wire for AC power
Do NOT bundle or route signal lines with power wiring.
or machine control wiring. Use separate conduit
for power and signal wires. 7. See Figure 8 for the correct fuse to be used in
the power input wiring.
QOQSSOOEH SOSSOSOOSS
1 23 4 5 6718
= |
K1
о
A
A
4 115/2304
7 | 50/60 HZ
19 20 2122 23 24 25 26 27 2829 30 31 32 33 34 3536
9 10 111213 1415 16 1718
N = IN1
USE
EXTERNAL
K2 FUSE!
|
К2
1 O
SOGOGOGSOS
ТОТО
TERMINAL IDENTIFICATION
NOTE: Terminals not listed are unidentified and must remain unconnected.
1 -
2 - OUTPUT UNLATCH
3
4 -
5 - TRANSISTOR OUTPUT
6 -
7 -
8 - DC COMMON
9 - DC COMMON
10 - COUNT INPUT 2
11 - LOW FREQUENCY SELECT 2
12 - DC COMMON
13 - LOW FREQUENCY SELECT 1
14 - COUNT INPUT 1
15 - PROGRAM INHIBIT
16 - PRINT REQUEST/DISPLAY LATCH
17 - RESET
18 - DOUBLE INPUT
19 - 11-16V DC SUPPLY
20 - 15V DC POWER OUTPUT
21 - DC COMMON
22 - RELAY CONTACT NC
23 - RELAY CONTACT COM
24 - RELAY CONTACT NO
25 - AC POWER INPUT
26 - AC POWER INPUT
27 - AC POWER INPUT
28 - AC POWER INPUT
29 - RELAY CONTACT NC
30 - RELAY CONTACT COM
31 - RELAY CONTACT NO
32 - CHASSIS GROUND
33 - SERIAL DATA INPUT -
34 - SERIAL DATA INPUT +
35 - SERIAL DATA OUTPUT +
36 - SERIAL DATA OUTPUT -
Figure 5. Terminal Designations
10
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
TERMINAL ASSIGNMENTS AND FUNCTIONS
#2 - RELAY AND TRANSISTOR OUTPUT
UNLATCH INPUT
When this input terminal is connected to DC
Common through a contact closure or current
sinking solid state sensor, the relay and transistor
output unlatch. If the relay and transistor output are
not energized, connection to this terminal has no
effect. If the relay and transistor output have been
programmed to time out and the time out period has
begun, energization of this input will turn the output
“OFF” prematurely. If the Reverse-Outputs mode
Is selected, this input Latches rather than Unlatches
the output and relay.
#5 - TRANSISTOR OUTPUT
The output is an open collector NPN transistor with
built-in transient overvoltage protection in the form
of zener diode clamping. The transistor is rated at
30 VDC maximum and can sink up to 300 milliamps.
#8, 9, 12 AND 21 - DC COMMON
These terminals are internally connected to the
negative side of the DC power supply.
#10 AND 14 - COUNT INPUTS
These two count inputs are used to increment or
decrement the counter. Terminal #14 is labeled
“COUNT INPUT 1” and terminal #10 is “COUNT
INPUT 2.” The table shown in Figure 6 lists the
operation of the two count inputs as related to the
count function, and indicates how each input causes
the counter to operate when a DC Common signal
is applied.
#11 AND #13-LOW FREQUENCY SELECT
INPUTS
When contact closures are used for count sources,
it must be remembered that the contacts will bounce
slightly each time they close. This slight bounce
can cause extra counts to be entered into the
counter. Contact bounce can be eliminated by
limiting the allowable frequency response at the
count inputs. The low frequency select terminals
reduce the count input frequency response from
7500 PPS to 150 PPS when they are connected to
DC Common. Terminal #13 is LOW FREQUENCY
SELECT for COUNT INPUT 1 (terminal #14) and
terminal #11 is LOW FREQUENCY SELECT for
COUNT INPUT 2 (terminal #10). Low frequency is
selected by placing a jumper between terminal #11
and/or terminal #13 and DC Common. Use the Low
Frequency inputs whenever possible to guard
against electrical noise and interference.
#15 - PROGRAM INHIBIT INPUT
The PROGRAM INHIBIT terminal, when connected
to DC Common through the use of a jumper,
prevents all of the programming functions from being
changed. Modification of the Preset value can also
be prevented with this jumper if Function Code 41,
Preset Lock is set to a “1”.
#16 - PRINT REQUEST/DISPLAY LATCH INPUT
When the PRINT REQUEST terminal is connected
to DC Common, the current count value, the current
preset value or both are immediately transmitted
through the SERIAL DATA OUTPUT terminals, #35
COUNT MODE INPUT 1 INPUT 2
(Term. #14) (Term. #10)
Separate add and subtract Subtract counts Add counts
Count up with inhibit control Add counts
Quadrature * Input A
Count with up/down control Count input
Doubled quadrature * Input A
Inhibit counts
Input B
Up/Down control
Input B
*NOTE: For both Quadrature modes, the wires to inputs #1 and #2 may be interchanged to reverse count direction. Terminal
#18 must also be tied to DC Common (terminal #8 or #12) for proper quadrature operation.
Figure 6. Count Input Operating Modes
11
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
and #36. The data is transmitted once each time
the Print Request input is energized. The input must
be deenergized and reenergized for each
transmission. The type of information transmitted
is controlled by the Send Data function.
The terminal also serves to latch the value on the
display while the control continues counting. When
this terminal is energized, the count value being
displayed is stored on the display and remains
latched while the input is energized. The display
returns to showing the value of the counter when
the input is deenergized.
#17 - RESET INPUT
When terminal #17 is connected to DC Common
through an external switch, relay, or sensor, the
counter is remotely reset. If the counter is
programmed to be in the Reset mode, energizing
this input returns the counter value to zero. If the
counter is programmed to be in the Preset mode,
the counter value is changed to the preset value. In
either case, if the Unlatch At Reset or Latch Until
Reset Complete mode of operation is selected, this
input unlatches the transistor output and relay, in
addition to resetting the control. The Reset input
has the same function as the front panel “RESET”
key.
#18 - DOUBLE INPUT
Connecting the Double Input to DC Common selects
count doubling for either the Add and Subtract or
the Count With Direction Control count modes.
When either Quadrature or Doubled Quadrature
count mode is selected, the Double Input must be
connected to DC Common for proper operation.
#19 - BATTERY OR EXTERNAL 15 VDC SUPPLY
The power source can be either an external battery
(11 to 16 volts) ora 15 VDC power supply. Connect
this terminal to the positive side of the external low
voltage supply and a DC Common terminal to the
negative side.
#20 - 15 VDC POWER OUTPUT
This terminal may be used to power external devices
such as sensors, a shaft encoder, or indicator lamps.
The terminal supplies a regulated 15 VDC (+1V, -
2V) to the loads at a maximum of 100 milliamps.
The 15 VDC supply is generated only when the unit
is powered by 115 or 230 VAC.
12
#22 THROUGH #24 AND #29 THROUGH #31 -
RELAY CONTACTS
The internal relay provides two 5 amp resistive dry
form “C” contacts (DPDT) rated at 115 or 230 VAC.
Terminal #23 is common to terminal #22(NC) and
terminal #24(NO). Terminal #30 is common to
terminal #29(NC) and terminal #31 (NO).
#25 THROUGH #28 - AC POWER INPUT
For 115 VAC operation, jumper terminal #25 to #28,
and #26 to #27. Connect the AC line power to #25
and #26.
For 230 VAC operation, jumper #26 to #28. Connect
the AC line power to #25 and #27.
#32 - CHASSIS GROUND
This terminal must be connected to earth ground to
provide proper noise immunity. When shielded cable
is used for sensors or communications wiring,
connect the shields to this terminal.
When the unit is being used in a mobile, battery-
powered application, this terminal MUST be
connected to CHASSIS GROUND.
A factory installed green wire connects this terminal
to DC Common. This is done to provide added
immunity to static discharge and electrical
interference. In control systems incorporating
several electronic devices, it is accepted practice to
provide one SYSTEM grounding point. In this case
the green wire as provided may be removed and
SEPARATE green wires attached to both Chassis
Ground and DC Common for connection to the
common system grounding point.
For applications which require isolated DC Common
and chassis ground, the green jumper may be
removed entirely. However, extra care must be
taken to route current carrying wires away from the
counter as much as possible. Shields in transducer
cables should be connected to chassis ground
wherever possible.
#33 AND #34 - SERIAL DATA INPUT
The serial communications input is used to receive
new preset values and print requests. The interface
utilized is a standard 20 milliamp current loop with a
user selectable Baud rate.
Terminal #33 is the negative side of the current loop
and #34 is the positive side. When connecting serial
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS
communications between the unit and any other
device, note that SERIAL DATA OUT PLUS (SDO+)
from the transmitting device is wired to the SERIAL
DATA IN MINUS (SDI-) of the counter. Likewise,
SDO- from the transmitting device is wired to SDI+
of the counter.
#35 AND #36 - SERIAL DATA OUTPUT
The counter has serial communications output which
may be used to transmit the current count value,
the preset value, or both. The Baud rate of the 20
milliamp current loop is user selectable. However,
the Baud rate selected is the same for serial input
and serial output communications.
13
Terminal #36 is the negative side of the output
current loop and terminal #35 is the positive side.
When connecting serial communications between
the counter and any other device, note that SERIAL
DATA OUT PLUS (SDO+) from the counter is wired
to the SERIAL DATA IN MINUS (SDI-) of the devices
receiving the data. Likewise, SDO- from the counter
is wired to SDI+ of the receiving device.
INTERCONNECTION
After determining the desired operating mode, select
the appropriate figures 7 through 18 for connection
diagrams for the application.
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS/WIRING
PANEL MOUNTING
The panel mounting kit includes: (1) mounting
gasket, (2) mounting clips and (2) screws.
Refer to the dimension diagram in Figure 4 for a
drawing of the correct installation of these parts.
The mounting gasket is coated on one side with a
contact adhesive and a paper backing. Care should
be taken during the gasket installation that the
gasket be correctly positioned on the panel at the
first attempt. Attempting to re-position the gasket
once the adhesive has come in contact with the
panel is likely to deform or tear the gasket. This
may result in an improper seal. For best results,
follow these directions:
1. Stand the counter on a desk or table with its
display down, screw terminals up.
2. Remove and discard the center square of the
gasket at the scribe marks in the gasket and
paper backing. Do not remove the backing from
the remaining outer rim.
3. Slide the gasket down the unit until it is in position
at the rear of the unit's front bezel. The paper
backing side should be up.
Insert the tip of a knife between the paper and
the gasket and, while holding the gasket down
to the unit with the knife, peel off the paper
backing.
Slide the unit through the panel cutout until the
gasket firmly adheres to the panel.
Install the mounting clips and screws as shown
in the diagram above. Do not overtighten the
mounting screws. The screws should be tight
enough to firmly hold the unit in place, but not
so tight as to squeeze the gasket out from behind
the front bezel.
A switch shall be included in the building
installation:
e Itshall bein close proximity to the equipment
and within easy reach of the operator.
e |t shall be marked as the disconnecting
device for the equipment.
e Switches and circuit breakers in Europe
must comply with IEC 947.
1
23456718
USE
A EXTERNAL
К K2 FUSE!
A
10 111213 1415 16 17 18
N2 + IN1
Fuse Size
AC Powerin US. European
115V, 60 H2 1/8amp Í + T125ma, 250 V
115V,50 Hz 1/4amp <T + T250 ma, 250 V
IN OT, = К ST | = ® e 230 V, 60 Hz 1/16 amp-+- T 60 mA, 250 V
19 20 21'22 23 24!25 26 27 28/29 30 31'32 33 34 3536 230 V, 50 Hz 1/8 amp 4 E T125 mA, 250 V
CHASSIS GROUND - GREEN
WHITE
| 115 VAC BLACK
7
THIS GREEN WIRE CONNECTS DC
COMMON AND CHASSIS GROUND.
(See Text forTerminal #32)
Figure 7. 115 VAC 47/63 Hz Power Connection
14
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS/WIRING
AC Power In
115 V, 60 Hz
115 V, 50 Hz
230 V, 60 Hz
230 V, 50 Hz
1
2 3 4 5 6 718 10 11 1213 1415 16 1718
N + IN1
Fuse Size
U.S. European
1/8 amp 1 + T125mA, 250 V
1/4amp 1 + T250 mA, 250 V
1/16 amp-4 + T 60 ma, 250 V
1/8 amp 1 T125 mA, 250 V
EUROPE
RED
$230 VAC
THIS GREEN WIRE CONNECTS DC
COMMON AND CHASSIS GROUND.
(See Text for Terminal 432)
USE
A EXTERNAL
K1 K2 FUSE! US.
IN OUT К1 15723047. K2
+ + = — | 50/60 HZ == 7 |
1 2122 2324 2526 27 3132 33 34 35
GREEN | GREEN/YELLOW
BLACK | BLUE
BROWN
CHASSIS GROUND
Figure 8. 230 VAC 47/63 Hz Power Connection
1 23456718 10 111213 1415 16 17 18
№ + INT
USE
EXTERNAL
FUSE!
A
1 115 / 230v + K2
[PF — | 50/60 HZ г |
19 20 2122 2324 2526 27 2829 30 31 32 33 34 3536
THIS GREEN WIRE
CONNECTS DC
COMMON AND COMMON
CHASSIS GROUN +12V
(See Text for
Terminal #32)
CHASSIS GROUND
. 12 VDC POWER
SUPPLY OR BATTERY
*@ 1 AMP
Figure 9. 12 VDC Power Connection
15
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS/WIRING
COUNT INPUT 2
NOTE:
NOTE:
INSTALL LOW FREQUENCY
JUMPER(S) WHEN COUNT SOURCE
IS CONTACT CLOSURE.
COUNT INPUT 1
QO 000PP 00
K1 A
A
115 1 230v ~
IN С i 50/60HZ | ==
1 1920 2122 2324 2526 ?7 28
1 2 3 4 5 6 718 Pp 10 111213 1415 16 1718
№ +: IN1
29 30
OQ 208
USE
EXTERNAL
K2 FUSE!
3
31
32 33 34 3536 гг
GOSGOSOSOS|SGOGOSSOSOOO
COUNT SOURCES CAN
BE OPEN COLLECTOR
TRANSISTOR, TRANSISTOR
WITH OR WITHOUT
PULL-UP RESISTOR OR
CONTACT CLOSURE
+15 VDC
|
в" О © =»
=
DC COMMON
Figure 10. Count Input Wiring
y
NOTE: COUNT DOUBLING JUMPER MUST
BE INSTALLED FOR PROPER
QUADRATURE OPERATION.
000966000
SOSSSOOSOSOS
1 23 4 5 6 7189
10 11 1213 14 15 16 17 18
IN2 + IN1
K1 A K2
A
USE
EXTERNAL
FUSE!
NOTE: IF COUNTER COUNTS IN WRONG
DIRECTION, INTERCHANGE LEADS
ON TERMINALS 10 AND 14.
SHAFT
ENCODER
1151 230v~
E 11 50/60HZ | = =,
1 10 20 21122 232412526 27 2829 30 3132 33 34 3536 1 A
DURANT
CONNECTING CABLE
GREEN 29665-200
QUADRATURE ENCODER
+15 VDC RED
COUNT | INPUT 2 BLUE
DISC
COUNT | INPUT 1 AND
mo SQUARE
WAVE
GENERATOR
DC COMMON BLACK
TERMINALS
Figure 11. Quadrature Encoder Count Input Wiring
16
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS/WIRING
NOTE: TO DOUBLE COUNT
INSTALL JUMPER.
N BLUE
DURANT
CONNECTING
CABLE SINGLE
29665-200 CHANNEL ENCODER
1 23 435368718 10 111213 1415 16 17 18
IN2 + IN1
A EXTERNAL DISC
AND
K1 K2 FUSE! SQUARE
/N WAVE
GENERAT
1151 230v ~ Ko
NL 0 0760 HZ
г 1 @
1
2!
1 5115 27
(Е) YELLOW - NO CONNECTION
COUNT UP
COUNT DOWN
Figure 12. Encoder with Directional Control Count Input Wiring
NOTE: INSTALL LOW FREQUENCY
JUMPER(S) WHEN COUNT SOURCE
IS A CONTACT CLOSURE.
1 23 4 5 6 78 10 111213 1415 16 1718
№ + IN1
USE
А EXTERNAL
FUSE!
/N COUNT
IN OUT К1 572304 7 K2 НР
+ + += 50/60 HZ = O
1 — 17
19 20 51152 2324 2526 27 28/39 30 3132 33 34 3536
Figure 13. Add and Subtract Count Input Wiring
17
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS/WIRING
RESET
SWITCH
1.23 4567
10 111213 14 15 16 17 18
+ IN1
USE
A EXTERNAL
К! K2 FUSE!
A
IN OUT KA 115 / 2304
+ + = + | 50 / 60 HZ
1 2122 2324 25 27
K2
— 1 ©
3132 33 34 35
Figure 14. Remote Reset Wiring
UNLATCH
SWITCH
10 111213 1415 16 1718
+ INT
USE
EXTERNAL
K2 FUSE!
IN OUT KA 115 / 2304 —
+ + = + | 50 / 60 HZ
1 2122 2324 25 27
— 1
119
31132 33 34 35
Figure 15. Latch Until Contact Closure Wiring
18
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS/WIRING
EXTERNAL
EXTERNAL
POWER DC RELAY
SUPPLY — (300 MA
30 VDC MAX MAX.)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 |8 10 111213 1415 16 1718
N2 INT
USE
EXTERNAL
K2 FUSE!
A
A
115 /230v ^-
IN + | 5, 50 / 60 HZ к ©
1 21'22 23 2 25 27 3 32 33 35
Figure 16. Using Transistor Outputs to Drive Loads
NOTE:
JUMPER MAY BE
INSTALLED FOR
PERMANENT — >»
PROGRAM INHIBIT. пл ‘
# "
A y el
KEYLOCK
OOOSOSO6OSHP SOSSSOSSS SWITCH
1 23 4 5 67 9 10,11 1213 14 14 15 16 17 18
С USE SWITCH MUST BE
EXTERNAL CLOSED TO PREVENT
K1 K2 FUSE! FROM BEING CHANGED
IN O к ZN
+ 50 / 60 HZ | = Te
г 19 20 21129 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 3132 33 34 3535 Fm r]
GOSOSSSOSGSSSOSOOO
Figure 17. Program Inhibit Wiring
19
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS/WIRING
000000000 00008 080]
123 4 5 6 718 10 111213 14 15 16 17 18
№ + INT
USE
A EXTERNAL
K1 K2 FUSE!
IN OUT K4 115/230v~ K2
+ + = 4 | 50/60 HZ = 1 |
22 23 24 25 26 27 2829 30 3132 33 34 3536 PU
QO SYS OS SS DO
1 159 20 21
SHIELD profane DUAL, TWISTED PAIR
SHIELDED CABLE +1 58801-460/461
| 20 MA LOOP TO
> у RS-232 ADAPTOR
A \ SPLICE
\
SDI+
— SDI-
RS-232
— SDO-
coos CABLE
Figure 18. Serial Communications to Durant Communications Convertor
20
OPERATION
DISPLAY
The five-digit numeric display normally indicates the
counter value. When functions are being
programmed, the display indicates either the
function code or the data being programmed. When
power is applied to the counter, the display flashes
at 1/2 second intervals for 4 seconds. The counter
will accept counts during this period.
INDICATORS
Two yellow LED indicators in the form of “light bars”
are located to the right of the display. These light
bars indicate if the information displayed is the count
value or preset value. Both are off when functions
are being interrogated or modified.
KEYBOARD
Data Entry Keys (0 through 9)
The data entry keys are used to enter preset values,
function codes and parameters.
“PRESET” KEY (1)
The “1” key also serves as the “PRESET” key. The
“PRESET” key is used to select the preset value for
interrogation or modification.
“RATE” KEY (4) (Model 58825-400 only)
The “4” key also serves as a toggle between the
count value and the rate value. All count and control
functions continue while viewing the rate value.
“COUNT” KEY
The use of this key after an interrogation or
modification of an operating function will cause the
count to display.
“FUNCTION” KEY
The “FUNCTION” key is used to change the
programmable functions. When this key is pressed
and followed by 2 digit code, the function to be
interrogated or modified is selected.
The “FUNCTION” key permits the programming of
all functions except preset.
“RESET” KEY
The “RESET” key is used to reset the counter. If
the “Unlatch at Reset” or the “Latch Until Reset
Complete” function is programmed, the “RESET”
21
key may be used to unlatch the transistor output
and relay.
“ENTER” KEY
When the “FUNCTION?” key is pressed and a code
is specified, the “ENTER” key is used to terminate
and enter the code. The “ENTER” key is also used
to terminate and enter a programmed value.
FUNCTION CODES
The control has many different programmable
operating modes and selectable options. The user
must select which of these functions will be used
and how they should operate by specifying a
Function Code on the keyboard and entering the
correct value choice to select the desired mode. The
functions may be reprogrammed at any time if the
Program Inhibit terminal (terminal #15) is not
connected to DC Common.
While the user is programming the various functions
and their entry choices, the counter continues to
operate normally, even though the display does not
indicate the current value of the counter. This allows
the operating parameters to be changed while the
process being controlled is running. See Figure 19
for a complete table of the functions and their
allowable entry choices.
/N WARNING
CHANGING FUNCTION CODE VALUES
WHILE THE PROCESS IS OPERATING
MAY BE HAZARDOUS TO THE
OPERATOR AND/OR THE MACHINERY.
USE EXTREME CAUTION. IT IS
RECOMMENDED THAT THE PROCESS
BE STOPPED BEFORE FUNCTION CODE
VALUES ARE MODIFIED WHENEVER
POSSIBLE.
If an invalid Function Code is specified, the control
ignores the selection and displays the current count
value. An invalid Function Code is any code not
listed in Figure 19.
If an invalid value is entered in a Function Code,
the control ignores the entry and retains the previous
setting. An invalid value is any value other than
those allowable values listed in Figure 19.
OPERATION
FUNCTION ENTRY
FUNCTION CODE CHOICES DESCRIPTION
CURRENT COUNT VALUE | COUNT KEY | NONE [Shows current count value.
PRESET 1 PRESET 1 *O to Defines Preset value. (Factory set value is
KEY ("1" KEY)| 99,999 |zero.)
SCALE FACTOR 5 0.0001 to [Defines scale factor value.
(Model 5882-1400 only) 9.9999
*1.0000 |(Factory set value is 1.0000)
COUNT OPERATION MODE 60 *О Count with separate add (Input 2) and subtract
(Input 1).
1 Count up (Input 1) with Inhibit control (Input 2)
NOTE: This mode cannot be doubled with
double input.
1 Quadrature. NOTE: Double input MUST be
connected to DC Common.
2 Count (Input 1) with up/down control (Input 2).
3 Doubled Quadrature. NOTE: Double Input
MUST be connected to DC Common.
DECIMAL POINT DISPLAY 62 *О No decimal points are displayed.
LOCATION 1 0000.0
2 000.00
3 00.000
4 0.0000
RELAY AND TRANSISTOR 30 .00 No timeout. Relay remains closed and
OUTPUT TIMEOUT transistor output remains on until unlatched via
OPERATION Unlatch input.
0.01 Seconds of delay before relay and transistor
to output unlatch.
99.99
*10.00 |Factory set value.
RELAY AND TRANSISTOR 33 *О Normal Output
OUTPUT OPERATION 1 Reversed Output
(See Figure 3 for description)
RELAY AND TRANSISTOR 36 *О № LURC
OUTPUT LATCH UNTIL 1 LURC
RESET COMPLETE (See Figure 3 for description)
RELAY AND TRANSISTOR 39 *О No UAR
OUTPUT UNLATCH 1 UAR
AT RESET (See Figure 3 for description)
PRESET LOCK 41 *О Preset is Unlocked
1 Preset is Locked when Program Inhibit
(terminal 15) is connected to DC Common
NOTE: Choices shown with asterisks are the factory set values.
Figure 19. Function Code Programming Table
22
OPERATION
FUNCTION | ENTRY
FUNCTION CODE CHOICES DESCRIPTION
RESET/PRESET MODE 80 *0 Reset mode. Counter is reset to zero when the
SELECT "RESET" key is pressed or the reset input
(terminal #17) is energized. Relay and transistor
output change state when the value of the counter
reaches the preset number.
1 Preset mode. Counter is reset to the preset
number when the "RESET" key is pressed or the
reset input (terminal #17) is energized. The relay
and transistor output change state when the value
of the counter reaches zero.
AUTO RECYCLE 81 *О No Auto Recycle. Counter continues to count
after coincidence is reached.
1 Auto Recycle. Counter automatically resets
(Reset mode) or presets (Preset mode) at
coincidence.
RESET INPUT 82 "O Maintained. Counter remains reset until the reset
OPERATING MODE input is deenergized or the "RESET" key is
released.
1 Momentary. Instantaneously reset when input is
energized or when "RESET" key is pressed.
Then allows counter to operate normally
regardless of whether reset input is held
energized or "RESET" key is continuously being
pressed.
SCALER RESET 83 0 Reset Scaler when "RESET" key is pressed or
when Reset Input is energized.
(Model 5882-1400 only) *1 Reset Scaler as above or when Counter performs
Auto Recycle.
COMMUNICATIONS 90 0 110 Baud (Send and receive data at 110 bits per
SPEED second.
1 300 Baud.
2 1200 Baud.
COMMUNICATING TYPE 91 *О Transmit count and preset values when Print
Request input is energized or a Print Request
incoming communication (ASCII "?") is received.
(Model 5882-0400 only)
Transmit count only as above.
Transmit preset only as above.
№ —
NOTE: Choices shown with asterisks are the factory set values.
Figure 19. Function Code Programming Table (continued)
23
OPERATION
PARAMETERS
FUNCTION | ENTRY
FUNCTION CODE |CHOICES DESCRIPTION
COMMUNICATING TYPE 91 "У" Мане
Proper selection of two digits, *О Transmit count and preset values when Print
"XY", determines combination Request input is energized or a Print Request
of values to be transmitted. incoming communication (ASCII "?") is received.
"00" transmits all values, 1 Transmit count only as above.
"13" transmits no values. 2 Transmit preset only as above.
3 Allow no transmission of count or preset.
(Model 5882-1400 only) "X" Value
*О Transmit Scale Factor as above.
1 Allow no transmission of Scale Factor.
PRINT ON RESET 92 *О No Print on Reset. Print when Print Request
input is energized or Print Request
communication (ASCII "?") is received.
1 Print on Reset. Print as above or when Reset
input is energized. Then automatically reset. No
counts are lost with the Print on Reset option.
SELF-DIAGNOSTIC MODE 40 *О Return to normal operation.
1 Perform self-diagnostics. Returns to "0" upon
successful completion.
SELECT FACTORY-SET 43 O Return to normal operation.
Reset all function codes to the factory set values.
NOTE: Choices shown with asterisks are the factory set values.
Figure 19. Function Code Programming Table (continued)
NOTE: For ratemeter function codes, see page 62.
24
OPERATION
When shipped from the factory, the control is
programmed with the Function Codes set as
indicated in Figure 19 with asterisks (*). When the
user changes the values for any or all of the
functions, the new values are stored in the non-
volatile memory of the counter. This means that
the new values are permanently stored until
reprogrammed, even if power fails.
If it is desired to return the control to the factory set
values after being reprogrammed, enter a value of
“1” in function 43.
CHANGING THE PRESET VALUE
The Preset value may be changed at any time
regardless of whether the Program Inhibit jumper is
installed or not. However, if FUNCTION CODE 41,
Preset Lock, is set to “1” and the PROGRAM
INHIBIT jumper is installed, the Preset is “locked”
and cannot be changed unless the Program Inhibit
jumper is first removed.
To change the value of the Preset, follow these
steps:
1. Pressthe “PRESET” key. The display will show
the current Preset value. If the value displayed
is the same as the desired value, proceed to
step 4.
2. Key in the new Preset value. Upon pressing
the first key, the current preset value disappears
and the digit which was pressed appears. Each
successive digit displays as it is pressed.
3. Pressthe “ENTER” key. The display blanks for
a moment and then redisplays the new preset.
This confirms that the new value has been
entered.
4. Press the “COUNT” key. The display returns to
showing the current count value.
PREVENTING PRESET MODIFICATION
To avoid accidental change to the preset value, itis
recommended that the ability to change the Preset
be inhibited whenever possible.
25
To allow the Preset to be inhibited, function code
41, Preset Lock, must be set to a “1”. In this mode,
the Preset value cannot be changed when the
Program Inhibit input is energized (see “Inhibiting
Program Modifications” below).
DISABLING THE FRONT PANEL RESET KEY
Select the Momentary Reset mode (enter “1” in
function 82) and install a jumper from the reset input
(terminal 17) to DC Common. This disables the
Front Panel Reset key and prevents the operator
from accidentally resetting the counter.
The jumper may be replaced by a normally closed
contact. In this case, the counter is reset externally
by opening and closing this contact.
If power is interrupted, the counter is not reset when
power is reapplied.
INHIBITING PROGRAMMING MODIFICATIONS
The function codes and their values may be
accessed and modified whenever the control has
power applied, including times when the process
being controlled is running.
/N WARNING
CHANGING FUNCTION CODE VALUES
WHILE THE PROCESS IS RUNNING MAY
BE HAZARDOUS TO THE OPERATOR
AND/OR THE MACHINERY. USE
EXTREME CAUTION. WHENEVER
POSSIBLE, STOP THE PROCESS
BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO MODIFY
FUNCTION CODE VALUES.
To avoid accidental change to the function code
values, it is recommended that the ability to change
them be removed by installing a jumper between
the PROGRAM INHIBIT terminal and DC Common
on the rear of the control. When installed, all of the
functions may be interrogated but not modified.
PROGRAMMING PROCEDURES
GENERAL
This section deals with the selection and entry of
the function codes and their values. The step-by-
step procedure is given for entry of function codes
followed by a discussion of the procedure used to
determine which combination of features is needed
to satisfy a specific application of the control. Once
a decision has been made, certain parts of this
section may be skipped as indicated.
PROGRAMMING FUNCTION CODES
Function codes may be programmed or interrogated
at any time while the control is operating.
/N WARNING
CHANGING FUNCTION CODE VALUES
WHILE THE PROCESS IS OPERATING
MAY BE HAZARDOUS TO THE
OPERATOR AND/OR THE MACHINERY.
USE EXTREME CAUTION. WHENEVER
POSSIBLE, STOP THE PROCESS
BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO MODIFY
FUNCTION CODE VALUES.
All functions including the preset value can be
protected from accidental change by installing a
jumper between the PROGRAM INHIBIT input
(terminal #15) and DC Common. Modification to
the Preset value is also inhibited in this mode if
function code 41 is set to a “1”. All functions may
be interrogated but not changed with the jumper
installed.
To change the operation of a function with the
PROGRAM INHIBIT jumper removed, follow these
steps:
1. Pressthe “FUNCTION” key. The display blanks
indicating that the key has been pressed.
2. Select the two digit function code for the desired
function. For example, press “30” to select the
relay and transistor timeout value. The display
indicates the two digits pressed for the function
code. If more than two digits are pressed, the
display only retains the last two digit entries.
3. Press the “ENTER” key. The current value for
the specified function is displayed. If the value
does not need to be changed, a new function
26
may be chosen by returning to step 1. The
“COUNT” key may also be pressed to return to
the count value.
4. Press the digit keys for the desired entry. Using
the above example, a value of 100 could be
entered to select 1.00 seconds of timeout. The
display shows the value as the keys are pressed.
5. Press the ENTER” key to store the new data.
The display blanks temporarily as the control
stores the information. If the entry is out of range
forthe selected function, the control ignores the
entry and the previous value is retained.
6. The nextfunction to be interrogated or modified
may be specified. If no additional functions need
to be selected, the control can be returned to
displaying the current count value by pressing
the “COUNT” key.
SELECTING MODES OF OPERATION
Count Input Mode
Depending on the configuration of the count sensors,
the manner in which the counter operates must be
selected. If two discrete sensors or contact closures
are utilized, the counter should use the Separate
Add and Subtract count mode, the Count with
Direction Control mode or the Count Up with Inhibit
Control mode. If a single channel shaft encoder is
being used, the Count with Direction Control mode
or Count Up with Inhibit mode can be selected. If
the count source is a quadrature shaft encoder,
either of the two Quadrature count modes should
be used. Program Function 60 according to Figure
19 to select the count mode.
Reset Mode or Preset Mode
When the “RESET” key is pressed or the reset input
Is energized, should the control start at zero and
count to the preset value or start at the preset value
and count to zero? If the former is desired, select
the Reset mode with Function 80 (enter “0”) and
proceed with the “Reset Mode Operation” section
following. If the latter, select the Preset mode (enter
“1”) and proceed on to the “Preset Mode Operation”
section, skipping the “Reset Mode Operation”
discussion which follows.
PROGRAMMING PROCEDURES
Reset Mode Operation
Normal Output/Reverse Output
When in the Reset mode, and the counter value
reaches the value of the preset, the relay and
transistor output turn on. This is considered Normal
Output operation. If the relay and transistor output
are reversed, they turn off when the counter value
reaches the preset value.
The relay output has both normally open and
normally closed contacts. When the control is in
the Normal Output mode, the relay is deenergized
until the Preset is reached. If the Reverse Output
mode is selected, the relay operates so the normally
closed contacts are held open and the normally open
contacts are held closed until the preset is reached.
/N WARNING
A POWER OUTAGE CAUSES THE RELAY
AND TRANSISTOR OUTPUT TO TURN
OFF REGARDLESS OF THE OPERATING
MODE SELECTED. BE SURE THAT THIS
EFFECT IS NOT HAZARDOUS TO THE
OPERATOR.
To select Normal or Reverse output operation,
specify Function 33 and enter “0” for Normal Outputs
or “1” for Reverse Outputs.
NOTE
For ease of understanding, the following
paragraphs presume Normal Output
operation and show Reverse operation
within brackets. For example, stating that
the relay and transistor output turn ON [OFF]
at the preset value indicates that they turn
ON in the Normal mode and OFF in the
Reverse mode.
Turning The Outputs OFF [ON]
Next, determine what should cause the relay and
transistor output to turn OFF [ON] after reaching the
preset value. Several choices exist:
1. Timeout Function
First, the Timeout Function may be utilized. If the
relay and transistor output should turn OFF [ON]
after a time delay, specify the length of the time delay
for the Timeout Function, Function 30. If the timeout
27
is NOT to be utilized, ensure that the value
programmed for Function 30 is 0.00, which disables
the Timeout Function.
2. Unlatch Input
Second, the relay and transistor output may be
turned OFF [ON] by energizing the Unlatch Input.
The Timeout and the Unlatch Input may both be
used. In this case, whichever occurs first causes
the relay and transistor output to turn OFF [ON].
3. Unlatch at Reset
The third choice is the Unlatch At Reset operation
mode. When this mode is enabled by entering a
value of “1” in Function 39, the relay and transistor
output turn OFF [ON] whenever the RESET key is
pressed or the reset input is energized.
4. Latch Until Reset Complete
The fourth choice for turning OFF [ON] the relay
and transistor output is the Latch Until Reset
Complete operation mode. If this mode is enabled
by entering a value of “1” in Function 36, the relay
and transistor output turn OFF [ON] whenever the
“RESET” key is released or the Reset Input is
deenergized.
If neither the Unlatch At Reset or the Latch Until
Reset Complete operation is desired, enter a value
of “0” for both Function 36 and Function 39.
If either the Unlatch At Reset or the Latch Until Reset
Complete mode is selected, it usually implies that
the Timeout Function is not utilized. However, the
Unlatch Input may still be used to turn OFF [ON] the
relay and transistor output without resetting the
counter.
Auto Recycle
Should the control automatically reset to zero when
the preset value is reached? If so, enable the Auto
Recycle mode by entering a “1” in Function 81.
Note that the Auto Recycle mode has no effect on
the relay and transistor output. To turn the relay
and transistor output OFF [ON] when the Auto
Recycle mode is selected, the Timeout Function
must be programmed, the Unlatch Input must be
energized or (if either the Unlatch At Reset or the
Latch Until Reset Complete mode is selected) the
“RESET” key pressed or Reset Input energized.
PROGRAMMING PROCEDURES
If the Auto Recycle mode is not utilized, enter a value
of “0” in Function 81.
Reset Input Operating Mode
The next decision involves the manner in which the
control responds to the “RESET” key being pressed
orthe Reset Input being energized. If the Maintained
mode is selected (entering “0” in Function 82), the
counter is held at zero as long as the key is pressed
orthe input is energized. When the key is released
or the Input deenergized, the counter is allowed to
accumulate counts normally. If the Unlatch At Reset
mode is selected, the relay and transistor output turn
OFF [ON] when the “RESET” key is pressed or the
Reset Input is energized. If the Latch Until Reset
Complete mode is selected, the relay and transistor
output turn OFF [ON] when the key is released or
the input deenergized.
If the Momentary mode is selected (entering “1” in
Function 82), the counter is instantaneously reset
to zero when the “RESET” key is pressed or the
Reset Input is energized. Then the counter can
accumulate counts normally regardless of whether
the key or input is maintained or not. The counter is
not reset again until the key is released and pressed
again or the input is deenergized and energized
again. If the Unlatch At Reset mode or the Latch
Until Reset Complete mode is selected, the relay
and transistor output turn OFF [ON] at the moment
the key is pressed or the input is energized.
Disabling the Front Panel Reset Key
Select the Momentary Reset mode (enter “1” in
function 82) and install a jumper from the reset input
(terminal 17) to DC Common. This disables the
Front Panel Reset key and prevents the operator
from accidentally resetting the counter.
The jumper may be replaced by a normally closed
contact. In this case, the counter is reset externally
by opening and closing this contact.
If power is interrupted, the counter is not reset when
power is reapplied.
To continue programming, skip “PRESET MODE
OPERATION”, following, and proceed to the
“SCALE FACTORS” section on page 30.
28
Preset Mode Operation
Normal Output/Reverse Output
When in the Preset mode and the counter value
reaches the value of zero, the relay and transistor
output turn on. This is considered Normal Output
operation. If the relay and transistor output are
reversed, they turn off when the counter value
reaches zero.
The relay output has both normally open and
normally closed contacts. When the control is in
the Normal Output mode, the relay is deenergized
until zero is reached. If the Reverse Output mode
is selected, the relay operates such that the normally
closed contacts are held open and the normally open
contacts are held closed until zero is reached.
/N WARNING
A POWER OUTAGE CAUSES THE RELAY
AND TRANSISTOR OUTPUT TO TURN
OFF REGARDLESS OF THE OPERATING
MODE SELECTED. BE SURE THAT THIS
EFFECT IS NOT HAZARDOUS TO THE
OPERATOR.
To select Normal or Reversed outputs, specify
Function 33 and enter a “0” for Normal Outputs or a
“1” for Reversed Outputs.
NOTE
For ease of understanding, the following
paragraphs presume Normal Output
operation and show Reverse operation
within brackets. For example, stating that
the relay and transistor output turn ON [OFF]
at zero indicates that they turn ON in the
Normal mode and OFF in the Reverse
mode.
Turning The Outputs OFF [ON]
Next, determine what should cause the relay and
transistor output to turn OFF [ON] after reaching
zero. Several choices exist:
1. Timeout Function
First, the Timeout Function may be utilized. If the
relay and transistor output should turn OFF [ON]
after a time delay, specify the length of the time delay
forthe Timeout Function (Function 30). If the timeout
PROGRAMMING PROCEDURES
is NOT to be utilized, ensure that the value
programmed for Function 30 is 0.00, which disables
the Timeout Function.
2. Unlatch Input
Second, the relay and transistor output may be
turned OFF [ON] by energizing the Unlatch Input.
Typically, this is the result of an operator action. The
Timeout and the Unlatch Input may both be used.
In this case, whichever occurs first causes the relay
and transistor output to turn OFF [ON].
3. Unlatch At Reset
The third choice is the Unlatch At Reset operation
mode. When this mode is enabled by entering a
value of “1” in Function 39, the relay and transistor
output turn OFF [ON] whenever the “RESET” key is
pressed or the Reset input is energized.
4. Latch Until Reset Complete
The fourth choice for turning OFF [ON] the relay
and transistor output is the Latch Until Reset
Complete operation mode. If this mode is enabled
by entering a value of “1” in Function 36, the relay
and transistor output turn OFF [ON] whenever the
“RESET” key is released or the Reset Input is
deenergized.
If neither the Unlatch At Reset nor the Latch Until
Reset Complete operation is desired, enter a value
of “0” for both Function 36 and Function 39.
Auto Recycle
Should the control automatically reset to the preset
number when zero is reached? If so, enable the
Auto Recycle mode by entering a “1” in Function
81.
Note that the Auto Recycle mode has no effect on
the relay and transistor output. In order to turn the
relay and transistor output OFF [ON], the Timeout
Function must be programmed, the Unlatch input
must be energized or (if the Unlatch At Reset mode
or the Latch Until Reset Complete mode is selected)
the “RESET” key pressed or Reset Input energized.
29
If the Auto Recycle mode is not utilized, enter a value
of “0” in Function 81.
Reset Input Operating Mode
The next decision involves the manner in which the
control responds to the “RESET” key being pressed
orthe Reset Input being energized. If the Maintained
mode is selected (entering “0” in Function 82), the
counter is held at the preset value as long as the
key is pressed or the input is energized. When the
key is released or the Input deenergized, the counter
is allowed to operate normally. If the Unlatch At
Reset mode is selected, the relay and transistor
output turn OFF [ON] when the “RESET” key is
pressed or the Reset Input is energized. If the Latch
Until Reset Complete mode is selected, the relay
and transistor output turn OFF [ON] when the key is
released or the input deenergized.
If the Momentary mode is selected (entering “1” in
Function 82), the counter is instantaneously reset
to the preset value when the “RESET” key is pressed
orthe Reset input is energized. Then the counter is
allowed to operate normally regardless of whether
the key or input is maintained or not. The counter is
not preset again until either the key is released and
pressed again or the input is deenergized and
energized again. If either the Unlatch At Reset mode
or the Latch Until Reset Complete mode is selected,
the relay and transistor output turn OFF [ON] at the
moment the key is pressed or the input is energized.
Disabling the Front Panel Reset Key
Select the Momentary Reset mode (enter “1” in
function 82) and install a jumper from the reset input
(terminal 17) to DC Common. This disables the
Front Panel Reset key and prevents the operator
from accidentally resetting the counter.
The jumper may be replaced by a normally closed
contact. In this case, the counter is reset externally
by opening and closing this contact.
If power is interrupted, the counter is not reset when
power is reapplied.
SCALE FACTORS
NOTICE: This section applies only to Model
5882-1400, which has the Scaling ability. For
Model 5882-0400, which does not have Scaling,
this section should be ignored.
The Model 5882-1400 Control includes the ability
to scale incoming counts. This means that for each
pulse received on the count inputs, a fraction or
multiple of that pulse is counted. Scaling can be
used to compensate for wear on measuring wheels,
consistent material slippage or material stretch, to
make conversions between different units of
measure) inches to centimeters, for example) or to
totalize parts produced from multiple part
manufacturing processes (such as 6 parts produced
for each operation of a press).
The scale factor can be a number from 0.0001 to
9.9999. This number becomes a factor by which
incoming count pulses are multiplied. The sum of
the scaled count pulses is shown on the front panel
display.
SCALE FACTOR COUNT SPEED (PULSES PER SECOND)
Normal Count Quadrature and/or Doubled
Count
0.0001 to 0.9999 6,250 3,125
1.0000 7,500 3,750
1.0001 to 1.9999 5,000 2,500
2.0000 6,250 3,125
2.0001 to 2.9999 4,250 2,125
3.0000 5,250 2,625
3.0001 to 3.9999 3,750 1,875
4.0000 4,500 2,250
4.0001 to 4.9999 3,250 1,625
5.0000 3,750 1,875
5.0001 to 5.9999 3,000 1,500
6.0000 3,500 1,750
6.0001 to 6.9999 2,750 1,375
7.0000 3,000 1,500
7.0001 to 7.9999 2,500 1,250
8.0000 2,750 1,375
8.0001 to 8.9999 2,250 1,125
9.0000 2,500 1,250
9.0001 to 9.9999 2,000 1,000
Figure 20. Table of Scale Factors versus Count Speed
30
SCALE FACTORS
ENTERING A SCALE FACTOR
Function 5 selects the Scale Factor. Note that any
jumper connected to the Program Inhibit terminal
on the rear panel of the counter must first be
disconnected before the Scale Factor may be
modified. To change the Scale Factor, follow these
steps:
1. Pressthe “FUNCTION” key. The display blanks
to indicate that the key has been pressed.
2. Press the “5” key. The display indicates this
digit.
3. Press the “ENTER” key. The current value for
the Scale Factor is displayed. If the value does
not need to be changed, proceed on to step 6
below.
4. Press the digit keys for the desired entry. Note
that for a Scale Factor of 1 the entry of 10000
must be made since the scale factor is displayed
in the X.XXXX format. The display shows the
value as each key is pressed.
5. Press the ENTER” key to store the new data.
The display blanks momentarily as the control
stores the information. If a zero is entered as
the Scale Factor, the counter defaults to the
value of 1.0000.
6. The nextfunction to be interrogated or modified
may be specified. If no additional functions need
to be selected, the counter may be returned to
displaying the current count value by pressing
the “COUNT” key.
COUNT SPEED VERSUS SCALE FACTOR
The scale factor entered into the counter has a direct
effect on the maximum rate at which the counter
can receive count pulses. Generally, the larger the
scale factor the slower the counter can receive
pulses. Atable indicating count speed versus scale
factor values is given in Figure 20.
In this table, the Normal Count columns represent
the speed at which the counter can receive pulses
when it is operating in the Add/Subtract, Count with
Direction Control or Count Up with Inhibit Control
modes. The Quadrature and Doubled Count
columns indicate speed whenever the hardware
doubling (jumper installed between the Double Input
and DC Common) is utilized.
31
OPERATION OF THE SCALER
When the counter receives a count pulse, the scaler
recognizes that fact and multiplies the 1 pulse by
the scale factor. The scaled value, which will be a
number from 0.0001 to 9.9999 since this is the range
of the scale factor, is added to a resultant total. This
resultant is shown on the display. However, the
result can have up to four decimal places of value.
The display only shows whole increments of counts.
For example, a scale factor of 1.2000 is entered
into the counter. For each pulse received, 1.2000
is added to the result. But since the display only
indicates whole numbers, after the first pulse it
shows “1”. After 5 pulses it shows “6”. This is shown
in Figure 21.
PULSES RESULT DISPLAY
RECEIVED CALCULATED VALUE
0 0.0000 0
1 1.2000 1
2 2.4000 2
3 3.6000 3
4 4.8000 4
5 6.0000 6
6 7.2000 7
7 8.4000 8
8 9.6000 9
9 10.8000 10
10 12.0000 12
Figure 21. Pulses Received versus Displayed
Value Using Scale Factor of 1.2000
The scaler stores any remaining partial count and
adds that to the next scaled pulse value when it is
received. This allows accumulation of scaled partial
counts.
When a Preset is established on a control with
scaling, the control activates the related output when
the displayed count value reaches the preset value.
But when scaling is used, the count value is not
necessarily a whole number. The partial count
remainder can affect when the output(s) change
state.
With the example of Figure 21, a Preset of 11 is
entered into the control. After the first pulse the
display shows 1 and after the ninth pulse it shows
10. But, the next pulse changes the display to show
12, bypassing the presetof 11. The counter, during
SCALE FACTORS
the process of adding the scaled result to the total,
actually counts from 10 through 11 to 12. This occurs
so swiftly that the value of 11 cannot be seen on the
display. However, the counter does recognize
coincidence at the value of 11 and changes the state
of the output.
As a second example, a Scale Factor of 0.5000 is
entered into the control. Figure 22 gives a table of
pulses received versus displayed value for this
example.
PULSES RESULT DISPLAY
RECEIVED | CALCULATED VALUE
0 0.0000 0
1 0.5000 0
2 1.0000 1
3 1.5000 1
4 2.0000 2
5 2.5000 2
6 3.0000 3
7 3.5000 3
8 4.0000 4
9 4.5000 4
10 5.0000 5
11 5.5000 5
12 6.0000 6
13 6.5000 6
14 7.0000 7
15 7.5000 7
16 8.0000 8
Figure 22. Pulses Received versus Displayed
Value Using Scale Factor of 0.50000
A Preset of 5 is entered into the control. From Figure
22, it is evident that the output will turn on when the
10" pulse is received on the count input. It is when
the 10” pulse is received that the display changes
from 4 to 5. However, if the counter is used in the
Reset to Preset mode, the display shows 5 when
the Reset key is pressed. The first pulse received
changes the display to show 4, and the ninth pulse
changes the display to O. But, it is the TENTH pulse
that causes the output to change state. This is
because after the ninth pulse, there is a remainder
of 0.5000 counts in the counter and, therefore, the
value in the counter is not actually zero until after
the next pulse.
HOW SCALE FACTORS AFFECT PROCESSES
When the use of Scale Factors results in partial count
remainders, those remainders can affectthe manner
32
in which the process being controlled will function.
For example, if a Scale Factor of 1.3000 is entered
into a control and a Preset of 15 is utilized, a table
as shown in Figure 23 results.
The control is used in the Reset mode. When reset,
the counter starts at zero and counts to the Preset
value. If the Auto Recycle mode is implemented,
the counter recycles when the Preset value is
reached. But, with a Preset of 15, the counter has
actually accumulated 15.6000 counts. Thus, when
it recycles, a value of 0.6000 counts remains. When
the next pulse is received, 1.3000 counts is added
and the count value is 1.9000. The “Second Cycle
Display” column shows the displayed value for the
second cycle.
It is obvious from the last column that slightly more
counts are accumulated for the second part than
were accumulated for the first. If this table were
carried out for the third part, we would find that the
third part is cut off one pulse too early. Clearly, the
carryover of the remaining partial count causes
problems in these types of applications.
As a solution, a function code has been provided
which allows the choice of whether the remaining
partial count is carried over into the next cycle or
not. Function 83, Scaler Reset on Recycle, allows
selection of this option. If Function 83 has a value
of “0” entered, the scaler is not reset when an Auto
Recycle occurs. If a value of “1” is entered, the scaler
Is reset each time an Auto Recycle occurs. This
forces any remaining partial count to be reset to zero,
eliminating the problem described above. The unit
is shipped from the factory with the Scaler Reset on
Recycle Mode enabled (Function 83 has a value of
“17).
It should be noted that the remaining partial count
is typically an extremely small part of the total length
of the part being produced (typically less than 1%).
In those applications where the measurement
system may be chosen, the rule of thumb is that the
measurement device should have a minimum of
twice the resolution (generate at least twice as many
pulses per unit of measure) as the desired part
accuracy.
For example, if a 10.00 inch part is to be made and
the tolerance of the part may be plus or minus 0.02
inches, the measurement system should generate
at least one pulse for each 0.01 inches of material
SCALE FACTORS
PULSES RESULT DISPLAY VALUE | SECOND CYCLE SECOND CYCLE
RECEIVED CALCULATED RESULT DISPLAY
1 1.3000 1 1.9000 1
2 2.6000 2 3.2000 3
3 3.9000 3 4.5000 4
4 5.2000 5 5.8000 5
5 6.5000 6 7.1000 7
6 7.8000 7 8.4000 8
7 9.1000 9 9.7000 9
8 10.4000 10 11.0000 11
9 11.7000 11 12.3000 12
10 13.0000 13 13.6000 13
11 14.3000 14 14.9000 14
12 15.6000 15 16.2000 16
Figure 23. Pulses Received versus Display Value Using Scale Factor of 1.3000
being measured. Thus, after the display shows
10.00 inches (1000 counts), there may be a
remaining partial count of 0.400 due to the use of a
Scale Factor. The percentage of error is calculated
by 0.400/1000. This yields 0.04% error.
Even though the error is so small, compensation
should still be made for the extra partial count at the
end of a part by entering a “1” in Function 83. This
Is because the error is cumulative; that is, each
successive part grows longer by 0.004 inches.
Eventually, this cumulative error will cause the part
to be out of tolerance.
Typically, those applications which require Function
83 to have a value of “1” are cut-to-length
applications. When the application is performing a
repetitive process such as punching equally spaced
holes in a single part, the scaler should retain partial
counts for the next measurement. In these cases,
Function 83 should be set to “0”.
Whenever the Reset key is pressed or the Reset
Input is energized, the scaler is always reset,
eliminating any remaining partial counts. This is
regardless of the value entered in Function 83.
CALCULATING THE SCALE FACTOR
There are four general categories of applications
which require scaling. The method of calculating
the scale factor differs for each. The categories are:
1. Allowances for wear of measurement devices
and material stretch applications.
2. Unit conversions (Typically when the
measurement system is set up for measuring in
33
one unit and the part must be made in another,
l.e., inches versus millimeters.)
3. Scaling of pulses received from flowmeters or
other sensors which produce a non-standard
number of pulses per unit of measure.
4. Allowing multiple parts to be made for each
operation of a machine.
A discussion of the means of calculating the scale
factor for each category and special problems
involved follows.
Allowances for Wear or Stretch
Over a period of time a measuring wheel will begin
to wear. The wheel allows accurate measurement
only when its circumference is a known, fixed value.
Thus, as the wheel wears, the error in the
measurement increases because the circumference
of the wheel becomes less and less. Scaling
provides a means to compensate for the decreasing
wheel circumference. This allows the useful life of
the measuring wheel to be extended, decreasing
Cost.
In applications where the material stretches or
shrinks by a fixed amount, scaling allows
compensation for gained or lost material. These
applications require that the amount of stretch or
shrinkage be known, measurable or calculable and
thatit be consistent from machine cycle to machine
cycle.
In either case, the scale factor is calculated by using
the formula:
SCALE FACTORS
600 PPR
SHAFT
ENCODER
12 INCH CIRCUMFERENCE
MEASURING WHEEL
PART BEING PRODUCED
COUNT DOUBLED
Figure 24. Wheel Wear Correction Application
Measured or Calculated Distance
Scale Factor = Theoretical Distance
In the above formula, the Theoretical Distance is
the distance that would be measured if the
measuring wheel were new or within design
tolerance of new. For stretch or shrinkage
applications, it is the amount of material fed into the
process before the stretching or shrinkage occurs.
The Measured or Calculated Distance is the length
which results upon completion of the part or process.
For example, if the counter is intended to produce
12.00 inch parts but the parts come out of the
machine only 11.93 inches long, the Measure
Distance is 11.93 inches. (The Theoretical Distance
in this example is 12.00 inches.) Figure 24 shows
graphically what takes place in this application.
The shaft encoder in Figure 24 produces 600 pulses
per revolution. Doubling is used in the counter to
result in 1200 pulses per revolution. The
measurement wheel is intended to have a 12.00 inch
circumference. This should result in 1 pulse per
34
0.01 inches. Since a 12.00 inch is desired, a Preset
of 1200 is entered into the counter with a scale factor
of 1.0000.
However, when the process is run, the parts
consistently come out of the machine only 11.93
inches long. The counter is counting 1200 pulses
and the output of the counter is energized at that
time. Obviously, the wheel is not the 12.00 inch
circumference which it should be. Rather than
replacing the measurement wheel, a scale factor
can be entered to compensate for the discrepancy.
Using the formula on the previous page, the scale
factor is calculated by:
11.93” (Measured)
Scale Factor =12.00” (Theoretical) = 0.9942
With this scale factor entered, the display still shows
12.00 counts for each part, but each pulse received
Is worth only 0.9942 counts. Thus, more than 1200
pulses are received by the counter for each part
being produced and the part is made to the correct
length.
SCALE FACTORS
600 PPR ENCODER
WITH 12 INCH WHEEL
STRETCHING
ROLLERS
SHEAR
DURANT
5882-1400
COUNTER
Figure 25. Material Stretch Application
For applications where the material is stretched or
shrunk, the measurement device may be located
on the front end of the process where the unaffected
material is fed in. Yet the counter can have a scale
factor entered which allows it to measure the finished
parts. Figure 25 shows a typical process which
results in material stretch.
Again, a 12.00 inch part is desired. A Preset of 12.00
is entered into the control with a scale factor of
1.0000 and a sample part is produced. When itis
measured, it is found to be 12.37 inches long. The
scale factor needed to produce a 12.00 inch part is
calculated by plugging these values into the formula:
12.37” (Measured)
Scale Factor = 12.00” (Desired) = 1.0308
When the scale factor of 1.0308 is entered into the
control, parts are produced at 12.00 inches as
desired. Since the material is stretched in the
process, each pulse received by the counter is worth
1.0308 counts. Thus, less than 1200 pulses need
to be received to produce each 12.00 inch finished
part and display 1200 counts.
35
Unit Conversions
In some cases, the measurement system is set up
to measure in one engineering unit but the parts
made are produced in a different engineering unit.
This may be the difference between ounces and
gallons, inches and feet, feet and yards, inches and
millimeters, quarts and liters or any other
combination. In these applications, the scale factor
may be chosen from the table given in Figure 26 or
calculated using any standard conversion factor
carried out to four decimal places.
Scaling Pulses Received From Flowmeters or
Other Sensors
Typically, flowmeters generate large numbers of
pulses for each unit of measure. Additionally, the
number of pulses per unit is usually not easily
divisible or massaged to allow a standard counter
to increment in a common engineering unit.
The scale factor to be entered into the counter is
easily calculated by using the formula:
1 (Unit of Measure)
Scale Factor = Pulses Produced
per Unit of Measure
SCALE FACTORS
DISPLAY
MEASUREMENT | MUST SCALE
SYSTEM SHOW FACTOR
MEASURES QUANTITY TO BE
IN: IN: USED:
Inches Centimeters 2.5400
Centimeters Inches 0.3937
Feet Yards 0.3333
Yards Feet 3.0000
Feet Meters 0.3048
Yards Meters 0.9144
Meters Feet 3.2808
Meters Yards 1.0936
Gallons (US) Liters 3.7854
Galons (Imp.) Liters 4.5428
Liters Gallons (US) 0.2642
Liters Gallons (Imp.) 0.2201
Quarts (US) Liters 0.9463
Liters Quarts (US) 1.0567
Figure 26. Unit Conversion Scale Factor
For example, a flowmeter might produce 146 pulses
per gallon of flow. If the counter is to count gallons
of flow, the incoming pulses must be divided by 146.
If the display should indicate whole gallons of flow
accumulated, the scale factor is determined by:
Scale Factor = 1 / 146 = 0.0068
If the display should rather show gallons and tenths
of gallons, the scale factor may be multiplied by 10
to yield 0.0685. (Note that in this case the decimal
point on the counter should be placed between the
first and second digits for proper indication of units.)
When the output from other sensors must be scaled,
the same formula can be used to calculate the scale
factor. Itis sometimes easier to change the definition
of the terms in order to find the scale factor, however.
For example, a quadrature shaft encoder which
produces 600 pulses per revolution is used to
indicate rotation of a shaft. Usually, rotation is given
in degrees with 360 degrees per revolution. If the
doubled Quadrature count mode is used, 1200
pulses per revolution are received by the counter.
This results in 3.3333 pulses per degree of rotation.
36
Given this information, finding the scale factor
necessary for proper operation can be confusing.
But if the terms of the formula are changed as:
Desired Display Value
Scale Factor = Actual Pulses Received
Filling in the terms the scale factor is found by:
360(Counts Per Revolution)
Scale Factor=1200(Pulses Per Revolution)=0.3000
With the Scale Factor of 0.3000, the display will
indicate 360 degrees per revolution from a 1200
PPR encoder.
Allowing Multiple Parts per Machine Operation
If a single machine operation causes one pulse to
be received by the counter and that single machine
operation produces several parts simultaneously, the
scale factor is simply the number of parts produced
per pulse. For example, if six parts are produced
per cycle of the machine, a scale factor of 6.0000
should be entered into the control.
In this example, if one of the six cavities requires
repair and is not producing parts, the scale factor
may be reduced from 6.0000 to 5.0000. This
adjustment can be made without resetting the
counter. The machine must be stopped, the
Program Inhibit jumper removed if installed, and the
Scale Factor changed. Then the Program Inhibit
jumper may be reinstalled and the process started
up again. This allows in-process service and
adjustment of machine malfunctions without losing
track of how many parts have been produced so
far.
It may be desirable in this type of application to have
the Program Inhibit terminal wired to a key-lock
switch, allowing easier adjustment when needed.
An additional consideration in this application is that
even if the Preset is set to a multiple of six and only
five parts are made per cycle, the Preset does not
need to be adjusted. This is true because the
counter checks the preset for each of the five
increments per cycle individually and will energize
the output when coincidence is established.
However, in this example, up to four extra parts may
be produced when the output is energized.
SERIAL COMMUNICATIONS
Several types of information may be transmitted or
received by the control. The serial communications
capability allows the count value, either the preset
value or both to be printed, remotely displayed, or
sent to a host computer or other peripheral device
for processing. The characteristics of the
communication are controlled by function codes.
COMMUNICATION FORMAT
The control uses a 20 milliamp current loop type
of electrical interface for serial communications. The
control has a separate 20 milliamp current loop for
incoming communications and another loop for
outgoing communications.
Since serial communication (either in or out) is done
through only two wires, each character transmitted
or received must be generated by a series of on
and off states called bits. Each character has its
own unique code or sequence of bits that allows
the receiving device to understand what character
it is receiving. The character “5”, for example, has
a series of bits which are different from the series of
bits for the character “6”. In fact, eight individual
bits are needed to express a single character.
Seven bits identify the character itself and the eighth
is used for error checking to allow the receiving
device to make sure that the previous seven are
correct when they are received. This eighth bit is
called the parity bit and shows “even parity” to the
receiving device when transmitting data. When the
counter is receiving serial data, it ignores the parity
bit.
There are several different standard rates at which
serial communications occur. Each is a function of
the number of bits transmitted per second. The term
which defines transmission rate is “Baud,” which is
understood to mean “bits per second.”
The standard transmission rates the control can be
set up to use are 110 Baud, 300 Baud, and 1200
Baud.
While each character requires eight individual bits
to be uniquely expressed, a few additional bits must
be sent between characters. These are called “start”
and “stop” bits. The “start” bit signifies that this is
the beginning of the character and the next eight
bits are the character itself. After the character is
transmitted, either one or two “stop” bits are sent
to indicate that the character has been completely
37
transmitted. When the control is operating at 110
Baud, two “stop” bits are sent and at 300 or 1200
Baud one is sent. Thus, at 300 Baud, for example,
each character requires ten bits to be transmitted:
one “start” bit, eight data bits and one “stop” bit. If
information is being communicated at 300 Baud, 30
characters per second are communicated since a
total of ten bits per character are required.
The standard set of codes used by the control for
communicating information serially is called the
ASCII character table. ASCII stands for American
Standard Code for Information Interchange. The
control uses ASCII codes for all its communications.
A typical character transmitted or received is shown
in Figure 27. In this figure, the character is shown
with the “start” bit, seven data bits, the even parity
bit, and one “stop” bit.
SENDING DATA
Data transmission can be initiated by either of two
methods. The first is by connecting the PRINT
REQUEST terminal (terminal #16) to DC Common.
The second is by a special code transmitted to the
control via the serial communications.
Once a transmission has been initiated, the counter
will first transmit the “Carriage Return” and “Line
Feed” characters (described in the following
paragraphs and illustrated in Figure 28) followed by
the numeric information selected for printing. The
“Carriage Return” and “Line Feed” characters cause
the printer to provide spacing between printouts.
When the control transmits either the actual value
or the preset value through the SERIAL DATA
OUTPUT (SDO) terminals, it sends the characters
“0” through “9” as necessary to express the value.
It transmits the most significant digit (MSD) first. For
example, if the current value of the counter is 1357,
the control sends the ASCII code for “0” since the
most significant digit is blank and has a value of
zero, then the code for “1”, then the code for “3”,
then “5”, and finally “7”.
After the entire value has been transmitted, the
control sends two more characters. These are called
“Carriage Return” (CR) and “Line Feed” (LF). A
printer, host computer or other peripheral uses these
characters to identify when a transmission is
complete. In the case of the printer, the “CR”
instructs it to return the printing carriage and the
SERIAL COMMUNICATIONS
START
TRANSMISSION
20 MA
О МА
=
—
—
N
=
Ww
to
г
A
[
с
START
BIT
LEAST
SIGNIFICANT BIT
w
+
BIT |
BIT |
1
BIT |
2
3
7 DATA BITS
©
4
BIT
г
O
y
an
NOTE: THE 7 BITS CAN BE WRITTEN AS 1011001.
STOP
TRANSMISSION
TIME —>
г
N
[
Co
[
O
г
À
+
t10
ost OT
EVEN PARITY BIT
STOP BIT 1
(110 BAUD ONLY)
STOPBT2 __
oP
+ SIGNIFICANT BIT
Figure 27. Organization of Typical Serially Transmitted Character
| 5 | 1-0 | | + |
START z Ta > STOP
TRANSMISSION IS I soul | $ | TRANSMISSION
LL IoE= i
I5 >El ха! 55H
1228, Sow 1609 LINE
=wnn IO a Чо FEED
"CR" | "LE" | "СУ" | "N" | "TT |SPACE| "4" | "2" | "a" | | "4" | "E" | A |
tc0 tc1 tc2 tc3 tc4 tc5 tc6 tc’ tc8 tc9 Te tc11 tc12 tc13 tc14
DECIMAL CARRIAGE
POINT RETURN IME»
Figure 28. Serial Transmission of a Complete Value,
Including “CNT” Label, Value, “CR” and “LF”
“LF” tells it to advance the paper one line. The “CR”
and “LF” are transmitted after each value the control
sends.
By selecting the associated value for the
Communications Type function (Function 91) the
control can transmit the counter value, the preset
value or both. Before the value(s) are sent, the
control sends an identifier which indicates what
information is to follow. When the control is
connected to a printer, these identifiers are also
printed. The label “CNT” is printed before the value
38
of the counter and “PS1” is printed before the preset
value. If a decimal point has been specified by
programming Function 62, the decimal point is
inserted into the printout at the appropriate place.
Figure 28 shows graphically how a typical value is
transmitted. Each block shown consists of the bit
organization as indicated in Figure 27.
Figure 29 shows sample printout when the control
has been set up to print both the counter and preset
values with a decimal point before the second digit.
SERIAL COMMUNICATIONS
CNT 123.45
PS1 500.00
Figure 29. Typical Printout of Transmitted
Values
If both the count value and the preset value are to
be transmitted, the count value is always transmitted
first.
The control can be programmed to automatically
transmit the count and/or preset values when it is
reset. This mode is selected by entering a “1” in
Function 92. Upon pressing the “RESET” key or
having the Reset input energized, the control
internally stores the count value, then resets the
counter. Once the control is reset, the stored count
value is transmitted. This allows the count value to
be recorded while the process is running without
losing any counts. For proper operation, the count
value must be allowed to be transmitted by entering
a value of “0” or “1” in Function 91.
When the Print on Reset mode is selected, the Print
Request input may be energized or the ASCII “?”
received through serial communication to cause a
printout without resetting the counter.
RECEIVING DATA
The control can receive a command through the
serial communications input which instructs it to
automatically transmit the information of the counter
or preset (depending on Function 91). This
command has the same effect as energizing the
Print Request input. The ASCII character “?” asks
the control to send its data.
In addition, the value of the preset can be changed
through the serial communication input when a new
value is received from a remote preset peripheral, a
host computer or another compatible peripheral.
The new value must be preceded by the ASCII
character “A” which informs the control that a new
preset value is forthcoming. After the 1 to 5 digits
forthe new preset are received, the ASCII character
“” must be received to tell the control that the end
of the preset value has been received. When the
“* is received, the new preset is automatically
entered.
A sample command to change the Preset via serial
communications is shown in Figure 31. Note that
each block shown contains the bit organization as
indicated in Figure 28.
The Baud rate of the incoming serial
communications is the same rate as set for the
outgoing communications. Any serial data the
control receives is ignored if it is not either preceded
by an “A” or a “?”. The control ignores any decimal
points which are received during a transmission of
a new preset, but inserts the decimal point
automatically after the new preset has been entered
LIE +
upon receipt of the *”.
SERIAL COMMUNICATIONS SET-UP
Communications Speed
If the control is to communicate to or from another
device, it must be set up to do so. The first question
is: what speed of communication is required by the
other device? There are three possible answers
TRANSMISSION
START STOP
TRANSMISSION
tcO tc tc2 tc3 tc4
TIME —p>
Figure 30. Typical Preset Change Serially Communicated
SERIAL COMMUNICATIONS
acceptable: 110 Baud, 300 Baud, and 1200 Baud.
One of these three speeds should be chosen based
on the capabilities of the other transmitting or
receiving device. For example, if the Durant
President Printer is to be receiving information from
the control, 1200 Baud should be selected by
entering a value of “2” in Function 90. Note that the
President printer must also be set up to receive at
this rate.
If one of the several standard 5880 series
peripherals is connected, see the Installation/
Operation manuals for these devices to determine
the necessary communication speed setting.
Communication Type
If the control is to transmit information to a receiving
device, the second question is: what information
does the receiving device need to know? The control
allows one of three answers. Either the current count
value, or the preset value, or both may be
transmitted. Enter a value of “1”, “2” or “0”,
respectively, in Function 91 to select.
FUNCTION 91 Value “XY” (two digit entry)
“X” | Scale Factor “Y”| Count Preset
0 Y 0 Y
1 1 V
2 Y
3 | (No Transmission)
Figure 31. Function 91 codes for the 5882-1400
Transmitting Scale Factors
For Model 5882-1400, the Scale Factor can be
transmitted with other values when a printout is
generated. Function 91, Communicating Type is
40
CNT 01567 (Count Value)
PS1 10000 (Preset 1 Value)
SCA 1.0000 (Scale Factor)
Figure 32. Sample Printout of Values
from a 5882-1400
enhanced in the 5882-1400 to provide transmission
control of the Scale Factor. Figure 31 shows the
selection values for Function 91 in the model 5882 -
1400. Use this table to select which of the values
will be transmitted.
When the Scale Factor is printed, the value is
preceded by the identifying label “SCA”, indicating
Scale Factor. A sample printout of all values from a
model 5882-1400 control is given in Figure 32.
Receiving Scale Factors
A Scale Factor can also be sent to one of these
controls through serial communications. In this case,
the Scale Factor must be preceded by an ASCII “S”.
The Scale Factor itself can be up to five digits long
in ASCII characters and followed by an ASCII “*”.
For example, a Scale Factor of 5.0000 is transmitted
as “550000”.
Print on Reset
The third question concerning serial communication
IS:
When the control is reset, should it also print? If the
control should automatically print when reset, enter
a value of “1” in Function 92 to select the Print on
Reset mode.
If a printout is not desired when the control is reset,
enter a “0” in Function 92.
APPLICATION EXAMPLES
GENERAL
This section provides several typical applications for
the control. Each gives a description of the process,
details how the process works, and indicates which
features are utilized to satisfy the requirements.
Where necessary, a sketch and/or wiring diagram
is also provided.
Application examples utilizing the Durant series
5882 counter are given as a means of illustrating
control applications. Consequently, complete
information sufficient for installation and operation
purposes is not necessarily given. The information
has been checked and is believed to be entirely
reliable. However, no responsibility is assumed for
inaccuracies.
MATERIAL CUT-TO-LENGTH APPLICATION
Description
Continuously moving roll-formed material must be
cut to a length adjustable by the operator. The
material is dispensed from a roll, fed through
straightening rollers and into the roll former. The
means of cutting is a “flying shear’ which shears
the formed material at the end of the line.
Operation
The shear requires approximately 1 second to
complete a shearing operation. The counter must
be reset at the same time the shear is energized to
allow the next part to be measured accurately. The
material is measured by a 600 pulse per revolution,
single channel shaft encoder and 12" circumference
measuring wheel combination which results in 1
pulse per .02" of dispensed material.
Set-up
Since a single channel shaft encoder is utilized and
the measurement system produces one pulse per
.02" of material, the control is set up to use
DOUBLING. This increases the measurement
resolution to one pulse per .01”, making the entry of
preset information much simpler. Since the Count
Up with Inhibit Control mode does not allow doubling,
the Count With Direction Control mode is selected
by entering a “2” in Function 60. The decimal point
is located to allow the display to indicate hundredths
of inches by entering a “2” in Function 62.
41
The control should start at zero and count up to the
preset value. The Reset mode of operation is
selected by entering a value of “0” in Function 80.
The relay output of the control is used to energize
the shear. The shear remains unenergized until the
Preset is reached. Then it must remain energized
for 1.00 second. The Normal Output mode is
selected by entering “0” in Function 33 (Output
Status Operation) and the 1 second time-out by
entering “1.00” in Function 30 (Output Time-out). A
“0” is entered in Function 36 to disable the Latch
Until Reset Complete mode and in Function 39 to
disable the Unlatch at Reset mode.
Since the control must reset at the moment that the
Preset is reached, a “1” is entered in Function 81 to
select the Auto Recycle mode. The “RESET” key
on the front panel may be held depressed to hold
the counter reset as material is being dispensed for
elimination of defects, quality control sample or
starting a new roll of material. Thus, the Maintained
Reset mode is selected by entering a “0” in Function
82 (Reset Input operating mode).
No communication is to be done to or from other
devices so Functions 90 and 91 are left unchanged,
and Function 92 is set to “0”.
Wiring for this application is shown in Figure 33.
BATCH QUANTITY CONTROL APPLICATION
Description
Ball bearings are dispensed into a shipping
container. While the batch is being dispensed, the
container is shaken by a shaker table to settle the
bearings so that the operator may seal it. The
dispensing gate is not allowed to operate after the
container has been filled. The operator must press
a pushbutton after positioning a new container to
begin the next cycle.
Operation
A proximity detector is used to sense the bearings.
It is desired that the control indicate the quantity of
bearings yet to be dispensed. The count stars at
Preset and counts down to zero. The output relay
controls the dispensing gate. Pressing the “RESET”
key on the counter resets the counter and latches
the relay, energizing the dispensing gate. When
zero is reached, the relay unlatches, turning off the
APPLICATION EXAMPLES
INPUT 2
LOW
FREQUENCY
1
23 4 5 6 7 8
K1
IN QUT KA 1151 230v ~
+ += 50 / 60 HZ
= | "1
1 2122 2324 25
o
27
115
VAC
SHEAR
JUMPER ~~
A\
A
10 1112 13 1415 16 17 18
N2 + IN1
DC COMMON
COUNT INPUT 1
+\/
39700-600
SHAFT
ENCODER
NO
CONNECTION
GND
COUNT DOUBLING
— JUMPER
USE
EXTERNAL
FUSE!
K2
3
31
O
32 33
35
Figure 33. Material Cut-To-Length Application Wiring
dispensing gate. On power-up, the relay must be
off to prevent bearings from being dispensed.
Set-up
The counter must count down; thus, the Separate
Add and Subtract Count mode is selected by
entering a “0” in Function 60. Count Input 2 (count
up) is left unconnected while input 1 (count down)
is wired to the output of the proximity detector. The
count being displayed is in whole units so a “0” is
entered in Function 62 selecting no decimal point.
Low Frequency for Input 2 is connected to DC
42
Common to increase the noise immunity of the
unconnected input.
Preset mode is selected by entering a “1” in Function
80 since the control must start at the Preset value
and count down to zero. Since the relay must
energize when the process is started and deenergize
when zero is reached, a value of “1” is entered in
Function 33, selecting Reverse Output operation and
the NORMALLY OPEN contacts of the relay are
used to control the dispensation gate and the motor
of the shaker table. This is preferred to using the
NORMALLY CLOSED contacts with Normal Output
APPLICATION EXAMPLES
operation since a power outage causes the output
and relay to turn off (which would energize the
dispensation gate) regardless of the operating mode
selected. Using the Reverse Output mode and the
NORMALLY OPEN contacts insures that the shaker
table and the dispensation gate will be off whenever
power is applied.
The relay must stay unlatched until the “RESET”
key is pressed, providing the lockout of the
dispensing gate operation. Thus, no timeout is
desired and a value of 0.00 seconds is entered in
Function 30 (Output Time-out operation). The Latch
Until Reset Complete mode is desired so a “1” is
entered in Function 36. This allows the relay to turn
4
о
4
N.O. DISPENSE
| CONTROL A tv
|
K1A OUT | PROXIMITY
NO. SENSOR
| Om GND
---
K1B SHAKER TABLE = >
= 2
Q >
о 3 LOW
FREQUENCY
4! JUMPER
000000000 00000 00S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 18 B 10 111213 1415 16 17 18
N2 + IN1
USE
A EXTERNAL
K1 K2 FUSE!
IN ou к 115 / 230м ^- K2
+ = | 50160 HZ | Г 1 ©
‚г 19 20 21 22 23 24 2526 27 2829 30 31 32 33 34 3538 FA
CNNZINNNON NINNNNINI
x
DU o
HOT SHAKER
115 GND TABLE
VAC\ NEUTRAL |
DISPENSATION GATE
Figure 34. Batch Quality Control Application Wiring
43
APPLICATION EXAMPLES
on when the “RESET” key is pressed, which starts
the next cycle. The Unlatch at Reset mode is
disabled by entering a “0” in Function 39. The Auto
Recycle mode is disabled by entering a “0” in
Function 81. The Reset input must instantaneously
reset the counter when energized. Function 82,
Reset Input Operating Mode, is set momentary by
entering “1”.
No communication is to be done to or from other
devices so Functions 90 and 91 are left unchanged,
and a value of “0” is entered in Function 92.
Wiring for this application is shown in Figure 34.
WIRE RESPOOLING APPLICATION
Description
Finished electrical wire must be rewound from a very
large roll onto smaller rolls in order to remove
sections with faulty insulation, nicks or cuts, lumps,
splices, or high potential insulation failures. The wire
has been previously marked to indicate the location
of the fault and it is known how much good wire
exists between faults. The operator decides what
combination of roll sizes may be rewound between
faults and enters preset values correspondingly.
Figure 35 is a sketch of the wire respooler.
The operator loads the correct size of small spool
onto the rewinder, attaches it to the end of the wire
from the large roll, sets the length of wire to be wound
(typically 500', 1000, 5000', etc.) and presses a
“START” button. When the preset length of wire is
rewound, brakes on both spools are energized.
When the wire has come to rest, the operator
presses a “RELEASE” button to disengage the
brakes so that the wire on the finished roll may be
cut and fastened. The operator cuts out the bad
section of wire, unloads the full small spool, attaches
the end of the wire from the large spool to the next
small spool and repeats the process.
The rewinding may be stopped manually by the
operator and the wire direction reversed to allow
removal of a visually detected fault not previously
marked.
The operator requests a printout from the counter
whenever a small spool is finished or an unmarked
fault is removed. The printed value of the counter
Is attached to the spool to indicate how much wire
Is on that spool so that it may later be properly
marked or respooled, as necessary.
PRESIDENT
PRINTER
BRAKE
1
QUADRATURE 5882 ?
SHAFT CONTROL
ENCODER WITH
MEASUREMENT PRINT о
WHEEL © воров аа
START RELEASE
A | 2 | © ©
REV
STOP Fwy
|| I
Figure 35. Wire Respooling Application Sketch
44
APPLICATION EXAMPLES
Operation
The control is reset by the operator by pressing the
RESET key on the front panel when a new large roll
is installed on the rewinder. The relay output of the
counter controls the brakes of both spools when the
Preset value is reached. A separate contact from
the relay operates each brake. A set of contacts
from a manual control switch parallels the output
relay to allow manual operation of the brakes.
An encoder measures the wire and produces one
pulse per foot of wire dispensed. Since the operator
may manually stop the rewinding and reverse it to
remove a visually detected fault, the encoder used
is a Quadrature type. This allows the control to count
in both directions, tracking the actual movement of
the wire in either direction.
A Durant President printer is wired to the serial
communications output of the control to provide the
printout to be attached to the respooled wire. To
provide fastest response, 1200 Baud is specified
as the serial communications speed.
Set-up
The Quadrature counting mode is selected by
entering a value of “1” in Function 60 and connecting
the Double input to DC Common on the rear of the
counter. The display indicates “whole feet” of wire
so a “0” is entered in Function 62, specifying no
decimal point.
The control starts at zero and counts to the Preset
value. This is necessary since the operator may
manually stop the wire, cut out a bad section and
request a printout to attach to the small spool
showing how much wire has been wound. Reset
mode is selected by entering “0” in Function 80. The
relay turns on when the Preset is reached to
energize the brakes. The Normal Output mode is
selected by entering “0” in Function 33. Since the
brakes are manually released, no timeout is desired,
and a value of “0.00” is entered in Function 30
(Output Timeout). The Unlatch input is used to
deenergize the relay. Resetting the counter should
not unlatch the relay (in most cases the relay is
already unlatched when the RESET key is pressed).
Thus, the Latch Until Reset Complete and Unlatch
at Reset modes are disabled by entering a “0” in
Function 36 and Function 39.
45
The control should not self reset. The Auto Recycle
mode is disabled by entering a “0” in Function 81.
The RESET INPUT on the rear panel is used to start
the control from zero when a cut has been made.
The RESET INPUT may be used to cause the
control to print, then reset whenever a printout is
requested. In this case, the counter is not reset
until the value of the counter has transmitted. A
value of “1” is entered into Function 92 to select
Print on Reset. The Maintained mode for the Reset
Input is selected by entering a “0” in Function 82
(Reset Input operating mode).
Serial Communication to a printer requires the
transmission speed to be selected. Since the
President printer is capable of receiving data at the
1200 Baud rate, the control is set to transmit at 1200
Baud by entering a value of “2” in Function 90
(Communications Speed). Only the actual value of
the counter need be printed. A “1” is entered in
Function 91 (Communications Type) to select that
the count only is transmitted when requested.
Wiring for this application is shown in Figure 36.
PRODUCTION INCENTIVE MONITOR
APPLICATION
Description
Piece parts are made on a machine which involves
operator assistance. The operator is paid on an
incentive basis for the quantity of parts produced
per hour over a minimum base quantity. Each
operation of the machine produces one part. It is
desired to monitor the operator's output on an hourly
basis and provide a hard copy printout of parts-per-
hour produced.
A lamp on the operator station is lit when the operator
surpasses the base quantity of parts for a given hour.
This informs the operator that the parts produced
during this time are incentive parts; that is, additional
pay is received for parts produced while the lamp is
lit. At the end of the hour, the lamp is extinguished
and the count of parts is reset to zero.
Operation
A switch is mounted on the machine which indicates
when a part has been produced. Each time the
switch closes, the counter increments. The base
quantity of parts is entered in the Preset. Whenever
APPLICATION EXAMPLES
+V
ora QUADRATURE
Li o SHAFT
ure ENCODER
GND
SELLE.
L2
d— MD 20 14 10 12 18 О
28 5882-X400 27 |
© CONTROL * O—
2 8 17 35 36
—O 9 O——
о ©
SDO+ SDO-
С
RELEASE PRINT
BLACK WHITE
SDI- SDI+
©
O PRESIDENT
O
PRINTER
MANUAL START
23 5882 o STOP
K1A CRI
23 KIA 24 1CR1
|
| BRAKE 1
ag 7882 a,
KIB
FORWARD REVERSE REWIND
2CR1
rd
IF © (9)
co
Figure 36. Wire Respooling Application Wiring
46
APPLICATION EXAMPLES
the quantity is exceeded, the output relay is
energized, lighting the lamp.
A contact closure from the plants master clock
system signals the beginning of each hour. This
signal is used to cause the control to print, reset the
counter to zero and unlatch the relay, extinguishing
the lamp if it has been energized. The serial
communications output of the control is connected
to a printer which is located in the foreman’s office
and keeps an hourly record of the machine.
The printout indicates not only the quantity of parts
produced, but also the base quantity against which
the operator is working. This allows the difference
between the two values to be easily calculated and
used in the generation of the incentive pay.
Set-up
The contact closure from the machine should cause
the control to count up. One side of the contact is
wired into INPUT 2 (terminal 10) and the other side
to DC Common. The separate Add and Subtract
count mode is selected by entering a “0” in Function
60. Since the counter should start at zero and count
to the Preset, a “0” is entered in Function “80”
selecting Reset mode. The display indicates whole
parts so a decimal point is not desired and a “0” is
entered in Function 62.
The output relay turns on at the Preset value and
off when the Unlatch Input is energized. The Normal
Outputs mode is selected by entering a “0” in
Function 33. Since the relay remains energized until
remotely unlatched, no timeout is desired and a
value of “0.00” is entered in Function 30. Latch Until
Reset Complete and Unlatch at Reset modes are
not required, thus a “0” is entered in Function 36
and Function 39.
A “0” is entered in Function 81 since the control
should not Auto Recycle. The counter should
instantaneously reset upon energization of the Reset
Input since incoming count pulses should not be
ignored at any time. The momentary mode is
selected by entering a “1” in Function 82, Reset Input
Operation mode.
The Preset value and the Count value are to be
printed. A “0” is entered in Function 91
(Communications Type) to specify this. The values
are transmitted to a Durant President printer which
47
is capable of receiving information at 1200 Baud.
The control is set to 1200 Baud by entering a “2” in
Function 90, Communications Speed. The
President printer must also be set up to receive at
1200 Baud. Since the counter must print whenever
it is reset, Print on Reset mode is selected by
entering a “1” in Function 92.
The wiring diagram and sample printout for this
application is given in Figure 37.
STOPPED MOTION DETECTOR APPLICATION
Description
A conveyor line transports parts from one
workstation to the next automatically. If one
workstation falls behind or jams, the conveyor stops.
A “stopped motion” detector is required to signal the
maintenance personnel that the automatic line has
a problem.
Operation
A shaft encoder is mounted to a shaft on the
conveyor such that as the conveyor moves, the
encoder rotates. The number of pulses per
revolution of the encoder is dependent on the speed
of the conveyor. It must be noted that at maximum
conveying speed, the shaft encoder should not
generate more pulses per second than the control
will recognize. A Preset value of “1” is entered into
the control. Each time the counter receives a pulse,
the output and relay are energized. The timeout
feature is utilized to deenergize the relay.
The timeout value is chosen to allow the slowest
desired speed of the conveyor to occur without
allowing the relay to deenergize. For example, if
the shaft encoder produces 1 count every 17
milliseconds (58.9 pps) when the conveyor is
running at its slowest speed, a Preset value of 17 or
higher could be entered. When the machine is set
in motion, the output relay energizes and remains
energized until motion stops for a period longer than
the timeout value. An alarm is wired to the Normally
Closed side of the relay on the control and will sound
when the relay deenergizes.
Set-up
The Count with Direction Control mode is selected
by entering a “2” in Function 60. No decimal point
is needed and a “0” is entered in Function 62
APPLICATION EXAMPLES
PLANT
MASTER 1 PULSE PER
CLOCK HOUR OUTPUT 5 |
(MINIMUM 15 = PART
— | | MILLISECOND = | COUNT
DURATION) О =
5 © >
Z | |=
Dr
; 3922 3
O = rus <
< 33 >
7 3 Q о ©
O
y
CNT 02000 1
Ре1 02100 QOQSOSOSOHH SOOOSOOOO
1 23 4 5 6 718 BP 10 111213 1415 16 1718
N + INT
|
PS1 02100 К! A K2 FUSE!
por, NES m
+ + == г
o 00 ir 19 20 21159 23 24 2526 27 2829 30 3113 33 34 3536 гг
PS
O00 ONO НОО SOQQ
1 di
CNT 02206
PS1 02100 =f
HOT
"BASE
1MSVAC EXCEEDED" Y
NEUTRAL Q =
L
GND a
+ +
D
PRESIDENT
PRINTER
Figure 37. Production Incentive Monitor Application Wiring
48
APPLICATION EXAMPLES
(Decimal Point location). The Reset mode is is received. A “1” is entered in Function 81 to specify
selected by entering a “0” in Function 80. A “0” is this. The Reset key and input are not used so
entered in Function 33 selecting Normal Outputs Function 82 (Reset Input Operating mode) is left
mode. Latch Until Reset Complete and Unlatch at unchanged. No communication takes place so
Reset modes are not needed. A “0” is entered in Functions 90 and 91 are left unchanged and a “0” is
both Function 36 and Function 39 for this purpose. entered in Function 92.
Auto Recycle mode is desired since the counter Wiring for this application is shown in Figure 38.
should automatically reset to zero whenever a pulse
+\/
OUT
SHAFT
ENCODER
GND
DC COMMON
1
23456718 10 111213 1415 16 17 18
N + IN1
USE
EXTERNAL
K2 FUSE!
NO K1 115 /230v-
IN OUT
+ + =| | 50/60 HZ
1 21°22 2324 2526 27
K2
— 1
31
O
32 33
35
115 и и
МАС LINEISTOPPED
ALARM
NEUTRAL
Figure 38. Stopped Motion Detector Application Wiring
49
TROUBLESHOOTING
GENERAL
Most problems encountered when applying the
control are due to wiring errors, improperly set
Function codes, and sensors which are not correctly
installed. This section provides guidelines for the
detection and correction of these types of problems.
Additionally, a description of the diagnostic program
included in the control is discussed.
/N CAUTION
BEFORE APPLYING POWER TO THE
EQUIPMENT, RECHECK ALL WIRING TO
INSURE PROPER CONNECTIONS. MAKE SURE
THE AC LINE VOLTAGE IS CONNECTED ONLY
TO SCREW TERMINALS #25, #26, #27 AND #28.
CONNECTING AC POWER TO ANY OTHER
SIGNAL TERMINALS WILL CAUSE SEVERE
DAMAGE TO THE CONTROL.
PROBLEM
POSSIBLE CAUSES
REMEDIES
Display does not light when 1.
AC power is turned on.
No power applied on terminals
#25, #26, #27 and #28.
2. Terminals #25, #26, #27 and 2.
#28 are improperly jumpered.
3. Short between terminals #19 or | 3.
#20 and DC Common.
—
Check wiring, fuses and primary
AC power source.
Check jumper installation.
Immediately disconnect AC power
supply, check wiring.
Counter does not increment or | 1.
decrement when sensor is
Sensor malfunction, improperly
installed or connected.
—
Check sensor wiring, installation
and operation.
reversed.
activated.
2. Incorrect count mode selected |2. Check function code diagram (Fig.
for type of sensor being used. 19) for proper value selection for
Function 60.
3. Reset input (terminal #17) 3. Check wiring.
connected to DC Common.
4. Low frequency select terminals | 4. Disconnect low frequency
(terminals #11 and #13) terminals.
connected to DC Common
when sensor generates count
pulses less than 1 msec long.
Counter counts in wrong 1. Quadrature shaft encoder 1. Reverse wiring on inputs 1 and 2
direction. outputs A and B reversed. (terminals #14 and #10).
2. Add and Subtract signals 2.
Reverse wiring on inputs 1 and 2
(terminals #14 and #10).
Figure 39. Troubleshooting
50
TROUBLESHOOTING
printer not set up to the same
value.
PROBLEM POSSIBLE CAUSES REMEDIES
Counter counts in wrong 3. Improper count mode 3. Check Function Code diagram (Fig. 19)
direction (continued) selected for sensor for proper value selection for Function
configuration utilized. 60.
4. Polarity of up/down control 4. Invert up/down control signal on
signal reversed when Count terminal #10 with an external relay or
With Direction Control mode is transistor.
selected.
Counter accumulates too | 1. Electrical noise causing extra |1a. Check sensor lead installation to insure
many counts. counts. they are not bundled with other power
wiring.
1b. Connect low frequency select terminals
(terminals #11 and #13) to DC Common
If pulses from the sensor are longer
than 1 msec.
1c. Use shielded cable for wiring sensors
to Count Inputs (terminals #10 and #14)
and connect the shield to terminal #32.
2. Loose wires between sensors | 2. Check external sensor wiring.
and count inputs.
3. Sensor generating extra 3. Check sensor mounting and motion of
pulses due to vibration, machine to determine if these
oscillation, chatter or jitter. characteristics cause extra count. Use
Quadrature encoders where applicable.
No printout or incorrect 1. No AC power applied to 1. Check AC power connections and fuse
printout is generated printer. in printer.
when the control is
connected to a printer.
2. Printer improperly set up. 2. Check printer DIP switches for correct
set up. (See printer operation manual.)
3. Serial communications output | 3. Check the SDO+ (terminal #36) on
incorrectly wired to printer. control is connected to SDI- on printer
and SDO- (terminal #35) is connected
to SDI +.
4. Baud rates of control and 4. Check that the Baud rates of the
control and the printer are the same.
Figure 39. Troubleshooting (continued)
51
TROUBLESHOOTING
CHECK-OUT PROCEDURE
If the control does not perform satisfactorily, check
all connections, proceed through the troubleshooting
chart on the previous pages, and check all function
codes for proper set-up according to the table given
in Figure 19. If these tests proceed correctly and
the control is still not properly functioning, remove
ALL wiring from the back of the control and proceed
through the following steps. If the control fails to
function in any of the steps, return it to Durant
Products, 901 South 12" Street, Watertown, WI
53094, Attention: Repair Department. Enclose a
letter describing the malfunction.
Power Input
Connect 115 VAC between terminals #25 and #26.
Jumper terminal #25 to terminal #28 and jumper
terminal #26 to terminal #27. The display should
flash for a short period of time and then remain lit.
Place electrical tape over terminals #25 through #28
to prevent electrical shock during the next tests.
Keyboard
Press the “FUNCTION” key, the display should
blank. Press “43” which the display should indicate.
Press ENTER, the display should show “0”. Press
“1” which the display should indicate. Press
“ENTER”, the display should flash “0” and the
“COUNT” indicator for a short period of time then
remain lit.
Count Up
Make a momentary connection between terminals
#10 and #12. The display should increment several
counts. Make a connection with a short piece of
wire between terminals #11 and #12 and repeat the
count test between terminals #10 and #12. Retain
the connection between terminals #11 and #12.
Count Down
Make a momentary connection between terminals
#14 and #12. The display should decrement several
counts. Make a connection with a short piece of
wire between terminals #13 and #12 and repeat the
count test between terminals #14 and #12. Retain
the connection between terminals #13 and #12.
Decrement the counter until the display indicates
less than “5”.
52
Preset
Press the “RESET” key and the display should show
“0”. Press the “5” key, which the display should
indicate. Press the “ENTER” key. The display
should blank for one half second then remain lit.
Press the “COUNT” key, the display should indicate
the previous count value. Make a momentary
connection between terminals #10 and #12 at least
five times. You should hear the output relay actuate.
Relay Timeout
Ten seconds after the relay actuates, you should
hear it release.
Reset
Press the “RESET” key. The display should show
“O”.
Unlatch
Again, make a momentary connection between
terminals #10 and #12 at least five times. Before
the ten second timeout elapses, make a momentary
connection between terminals #2 and #8. You
should hear the output relay release. Press the
“RESET” key again.
Latch Until Reset Complete
Press the “FUNCTION” key, press “36”, then press
“ENTER”. The display should indicate “0”. Press
the “1” key, then “ENTER”. The display should show
“1”, blank for one half second then remain lit. Press
the “FUNCTION” key, press 30, then press
“ENTER”. The display should show “10.00”, press
the “0”, then “ENTER”. The display should show
“0.00”, blank for one half second then remain lit.
Press the “COUNT” key, the display should indicate
“0” and the COUNT indicator lit. Make a momentary
connection between terminals #10 and #12 at least
five times. You should hear the output relay activate.
Press the “RESET” key. The display should display
“0” and you should hear the relay release.
Auto Recycle
Press the “FUNCTION” key, press “81”, then press
“ENTER”. The display should indicate “0”. Press
the “1” key, then “ENTER”. The display should show
“1”, blank for one half second, then remain lit. Press
the “COUNT” key, the display should indicate “0”
and the COUNT indicator lit. Make a momentary
connection between terminals #10 and #12 five
TROUBLESHOOTING
times. You should hear the output relay activate
and the display should show “O”.
Power Outage
Disconnect the AC power. You should hear the relay
release.
INTERNAL DIAGNOSTICS
The control has several internal diagnostic routines
which allow it to self-test various operational
characteristics. When power is applied, the control
tests its memory to determine if it has retained all of
the values and function code parameters previously
entered. It also tests to insure that all of the internal
memory is functional. During these self-tests, the
display is blanked. Since the tests are performed
very quickly, the user usually does not notice the
short delay on power-up.
The user also has the ability to initiate the control
self-test diagnostics at any time. Function code 40
is used to initiate the diagnostics. If the control fails
any of the diagnostic routines, either on power-up
or upon manual command, the display will flash a
number indicating which of the six self-tests failed.
If no failures are found, the control returns
automatically to normal operation.
NOTE
The self-diagnostics should not be
performed while the process being
controlled is running. The control responds
to count pulses but ignores any incoming
control signals while the diagnostics are
operating.
Description of the Diagnostics
The diagnostics while are included and their related
test numbers are as follows.
#1-ROM (Read Only Memory) 16 Bit Checksum
#2 -Internal RAM (Random Access Memory) Bit Test
#3-Non-Volatile RAM Read/Write Bit Test
#4-Non-Volatile RAM Store Test
#5-Non-Volatile RAM 8 Bit Checksum
#6-Watch Dog Timer (1.3 Seconds) Timeout
53
ROM (Read Only Memory) 16 Bit Checksum -
Test #1
This test determines if the permanent memory which
controls how the control operates is good.
Internal RAM (Random Access Memory) Bit Test
- Test #2
This routine tests the temporary workspace memory
used for normal operation and communication. If a
failure occurs, the counter may change or lose
values or operating characteristics unexpectedly.
Non-Volatile RAM Read/Write Bit Test - Test #3
This test checks the memory which permanently
stores the operating characteristics and values when
a power outage occurs.
Non-Volatile RAM Store Test - Test #4
This test insures that the non-volatile memory
accurately stores and retrieves the programmed
operating characteristics and values upon a power
outage. If a failure of this type occurs, the counter
will operate correctly but could change its values or
operating characteristics upon a power failure or
power drop-out.
/N CAUTION
TO INSURE PROPER OPERATION
CHECK ALL FUNCTION CODE VALUES
BEFORE STARTING THE PROCESS.
NOTE THAT A TEMPORARY POWER
INTERRUPTION MAY CHANGE THE
VALUES OF FUNCTION CODES DURING
THE PROCESS IF TEST 44 HAS FAILED.
Non-Volatile RAM 8 Bit Checksum Test - Test 45
A checksum test is performed on the non-volatile
memory to insure that none of the information stored
was changed while the control was unpowered. If
this test fails, check all function code values and
the values of the counter and preset to insure they
are correct. Then disconnect and reconnect power
to perform this test again. If the test fails the second
time, return the counter for repair.
Watch Dog Timer (1.3 Seconds) - Test #6
While the control is operating, an internal Watch Dog
Timer is incremented every millisecond. Under
TROUBLESHOOTING
normal operation, the control automatically resets
the Watch Dog Timer at least once per second. If
the control would malfunction during operation, the
Watch Dog Timer may time out (depending on the
type of malfunction) and an error code of “6” flashes
on the display. If this type of failure occurs, run the
diagnostics using Function 40. Excessive electrical
interference may cause this type of failure without
damage to the control or the operating
characteristics. If the diagnostics find no other fault,
it is reasonable to assume that the control is fully
operational, unless this failure is recurring.
OPERATION OF DIAGNOSTICS
When power is applied, the control begins by
performing tests #1, #2, #3 and #5. If all of these
pass, the counter is ready to operate as indicated
by flashing the count value on the display at one
half second intervals for four seconds, then
remaining lit.
To select the self-diagnostic mode, specify Function
code 40 and enter a value of “1”. The control
immediately turns on all display segments and LED
indicators for 2 seconds. Then the displays blank
and the control steps through all five tests. If all five
pass, the control begins a display and LED test
routine. This routine sequences through flashing
the numbers “0” through “9” on the displays,
alternates the Preset and Count LED indicators and
moving the decimal point from digit to digit. When
the display sequence is finished, the control shows
the count value and the Count indicator is lit.
NOTE
The self-diagnostics should not be
performed while the process being
controlled is running. The control responds
to count pulses but ignores any incoming
control signals while the diagnostics are
operating.
54
Performing the diagnostic routines does not affect
the Function code parameters. Thus, when the
diagnostics are finished, the control retains all of
the operational characteristics previously
programmed.
WHAT TO DO IF THE CONTROL FAILS A
DIAGNOSTIC TEST
If the control flashes a single digit number
continuously on power-up or when the self-
diagnostics are performed, it indicates which one of
the tests has failed. When the number displayed is
“4” “5” or “6”, the control can be allowed to operate
by pressing the FUNCTION key to clear the display.
/N WARNING
RUNNING THE COUNTER AFTER A
FAILURE HAS BEEN DETECTED
CREATES A SERIOUS RISK TO THE
OPERATOR AND/OR MACHINERY.
As a minimum safety precaution, the Function code
Default mode (Function 43) should be selected
(enter a value of “1”) and the Function codes
reprogrammed. This will insure that the failure has
not altered any of the operating characteristics of
the counter. Selecting the default parameters with
Function 43 also performs the power-up self test,
which could give another failure indication (for tests
#1, #2 or #3). If this occurs, return the control for
repair immediately.
Address units to be repaired to:
Durant Products
901 South 127 Street
Watertown, WI 53094
ATTENTION: REPAIR DEPARTMENT
RATEMETER OPERATION (MODEL 58825-400 ONLY)
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
Model 58825-400 has a 1/Tau ratemeter added to
all of the other functions of the count control. The
counter and ratemeter features of this unit operate
simultaneously at all times.
The ratemeter allows an indication of the speed of
the process based on the period of the pulses
received at the count inputs. The ratemeter uses
only up-count pulses when the counter is used in
the Reset to Zero mode, and only down-count pulses
when it is used in the Reset to Preset mode. The
ratemeter function determines the frequency of the
pulses by a calculation which measures the amount
of time that elapses between pulses. Ratemeters
which use this type of rate calculation are known as
“One-over-Tau” ratemeters. The calculation includes
a multiplication by an adjustable constant or “Meter
Factor” in order to have the ratemeter display a value
in units of measurement that relate to the process
such as Feet Per Minute, Revolutions Per Minute,
Products Per Hour, Inches Per Second, etc.
For higher frequency operations, the ratemeter will
average a number of pulses in order to maintain a
display update time within the range of 0.5 to 3
seconds. The calculation is based on a sample of
1, 3, 10, 30, 100, 300, 1000, or 3000 pulses. The
sample size can be selected automatically or
manually.
For lower frequency operations, the ratemeter will
allow a sample time of up to 90 seconds. This means
that a valid rate display can be obtained when the
input frequency is as low as one pulse every 90
seconds (0.011 Pulses Per Second).
These units can be programmed to power up with
either COUNT or RATE displayed. Pressing the
COUNT key displays the count value and pressing
the “4” key displays the RATE value. The unit can
also be programmed to automatically alternate the
display between COUNT and RATE. The RATE
function can be programmed to fix the decimal point
in a specified position or allow it to float. In the
floating decimal point mode, the display will show
four significant digits.
When the serial communication feature of the 5882
is used, the RATE value is transmitted with the prefix
“RTE” followed by the rate value, including the
decimal point in the proper location, if applicable.
55
SPECIFICATIONS
Models which have the ratemeter option have
slightly reduced maximum count speed. Note that
the values below are replacements for the values
found in the specification section of this manual.
The maximum count speed of scaled President
counters is determined by the Scale Factor selected.
The table below shows the maximum count speed
for different scale factors and count modes.
58825-400
QUAD OR
SCALE FACTOR | ADD/SUB DOUB
.0001 - .9999 4.20 kHz 2.10 kHz
1.0000 7.50 kHz 3.75 kHz
1.0001 - 1.9999 3.45 kHz 1.72 kHz
2.0000 6.25 kHz 3.12 kHz
2.0001 - 2.9999 3.02 kHz 1.51 kHz
3.0000 5.25 kHz 2.62 kHz
3.0001 - 3.9999 2.77 kHz 1.39 kHz
4.0000 4.50 kHz 2.25 kHz
4.0001 - 4.9999 2.50 kHz 1.25 kHz
5.0000 3.75 kHz 1.87 kHz
5.0001 - 5.9999 2.40 kHz 1.20 kHz
6.0000 3.50 kHz 1.75 kHz
6.0001 - 6.9999 2.28 kHz 1.14 kHz
7.0000 3.00 kHz 1.50 kHz
7.0001 - 7.9999 2.50 kHz 1.25 kHz
8.0000 2.75 kHz 1.37 kHz
8.0001 - 8.9999 2.00 kHz 1.37 kHz
9.0000 2.50 kHz 1.25 kHz
9.0001 - 9.9999 1.80 kHz 900 Hz
Figure 40. Maximum Count Speeds
RATE INDICATION ACCURACY: +.1% or +1 least
significant digit, whichever is greater.
MINIMUM COUNT INPUT FREQUENCY FOR
VALID RATE INDICATION: 1 pulse per 90 seconds
(0.011 Hz).
RATEMETER OPERATION (MODEL 58825-400 ONLY)
OTHER SIGNIFICANT CHANGES OVER
MODELS 58820-400 AND 58821-400
The Presidents with Rate have the addition of a
“Rate” LED which is lit whenever the Rate value is
being displayed. Additionally, the “4” key is used to
display the Rate value and is so labeled.
The count value can be “frozen” on the display
whenever the “Count” key is pressed and held.
When the key is released, the display updates
continuously to the current Count value, as normal.
This allows a reading to be taken as a process is
operating, since it effectively stops the display
without affecting operation of the process and/or
control functions.
The display does not latch when a serial
communications interrogation of the counter is
performed, nor does it latch when a Print on Reset
function is initiated. The display will only latch when
the Print Request/Display Latch terminal on the rear
panel is energized or when the “Count” key is
pressed and held.
RATEMETER THEORY OF OPERATION
The ratemeter function of the President counters
calculate the rate to be displayed by measuring the
time it takes for two consecutive pulses to be
received on one of the count inputs. For count
modes where the count function is resetting to zero
and counting up, the ratemeter uses pulses that
increment the count display. If a decrementing pulse
is received by the counter, it is ignored by the
ratemeter. Likewise, for count modes where the
count function is resetting to the Preset and counting
down, the ratemeter uses pulses that decrement the
count display. If an incrementing pulse is received
by the counter in this case, it is ignored by the
ratemeter.
On units with count scaling, the rate function can be
programmed to incorporate or ignore the COUNT
scale factor. This capability is referred to as RATE
TRACKING. To simplify the ratemeter explanations
which follow, it will be assumed that the RATE
TRACKING feature is programed in the INPUT
PULSE MODE (ignore scale factor).
Figure 41 shows how the ratemeter measures the
time between pulses. The Rate is calculated by
using the formula: Rate - 1/Pulse Time.
METER FACTORS
In order to allow the ratemeter display to show a
value that relates to the process and represents the
desired units of measurement (i.e., Feet Per Minute,
Tons Per Hours, Sheets Per Second, Parts Per Hour,
etc.), the ratemeter adjusts the rate value by a meter
factor. This is done by using the formula:
Display Rate (in Pulses
Value = Per Second) x Meter Factor
IMPORTANT: The Meter Factor can be almost any
value. However, itis possible to select a value which
will cause the Rate display to overflow. This means
that the display is not capable of showing all of the
significant digits of the resultant Rate value. Usually,
this is caused by the combination of a large meter
factor and a high pulse rate on the count inputs.
The Ratemeter indicates the overflow condition by
lighting all of the decimal points on the display when
— |
Count
Pulses
Pulse Time / \
|
Display Update e
Figure 41. Measuring the Pulse Time
RATEMETER OPERATION (MODEL 58825-400 ONLY)
the Rate value is being viewed. The value shown
on the display is the correct Rate value except that
the most significant digit or digits are not visible
because they have been effectively rotated off the
display to the left. The error display is reset when
the overflow condition ceases to exist, which would
result when the incoming pulse rate is reduced, or
the Meter Factor is changed.
In addition to the error display when an overflow
condition occurs, the message “RTE MU_ER”
(which stands for Rate Multiplier Error) is transmitted
through the serial communications port whenever a
print request is made. A print request is initiated by
energizing the Print Request terminal on the rear of
the counter or by sending an ASCII “?” to the counter
through the serial communications port.
Automatic Period Averaging
When the pulses are presented to the counter at
faster frequencies, the ratemeter automatically
accumulates time for a number of pulses so that a
greater accuracy of the measurement can be
achieved. The ratemeter will switch from timing one
pulse to accumulating the time for a group of 3, 10,
30, 100, 300, 1000, or 3000 pulses, depending on
the frequency of the input. The ratemeter selects
the appropriate range to allow the display update
time to remain within the range of 0.5 to 3 seconds.
This avoids display flicker for high frequency signals
and allows a faster update time for very slow signals.
The Figure 42 shows how time is accumulated for a
series of pulses when the pulse frequency is
sufficiently high to cause the ratemeter to use an
averaging range of 3. The rate is then calculated
by using the formula:
Pulse Quantity
Rate = Accumulated Time
Forced Period Averaging
In some applications, it may be desirable to bypass
the automatic selection of the period averaging.
Typically, this is true when the pulses being
generated by the process are not equally spaced.
An example of this is when products or boxes are
being placed on a conveyor somewhat randomly
and it is desired to know the parts per hour being
produced. In this case, measuring individual times
between consecutive items will yield a rate display
that will vary directly with the varying space between
the items. But, by averaging the time it takes for 10
or 30 items to pass by on the conveyor, the display
can show AVERAGE parts per hour and remain fairly
stable.
While it is possible to select the MINIMUM number
of pulses to average, the ratemeter will still
automatically adjust to a higher averaging range if
it receives pulses too quickly for the selected range.
The manual selection only picks the minimum
number of pulses to average. The ratemeter will
never automatically adjust to an averaging range
lower than that selected manually.
When an averaging range is selected manually, the
ratemeter does not update the display until the
selected quantity of pulses has been received. For
example, if a range of 10 is selected manually and
Accumulated 3Pulse Time /
l 4 à
|" ”
Count
Pulses
SOUL
Display Update e
N
v_
A
Figure 42. Measuring Pulse Time for Period Averaging
57
RATEMETER OPERATION (MODEL 58825-400 ONLY)
pulses are being received at a rate of one per
second, the display will not update for 10 seconds.
IMPORTANT: When a Forced Period Averaging
value is used, the number of pulses which are to be
averaged must be received within 90 seconds. If
90 seconds elapses before the minimum average
quantity of pulses has been received, an error
condition is generated.
For example, if an Averaging Range of 300 is
selected, 300 pulses must be received within 90
seconds for the ratemeter to be able to generate a
rate display. If the pulse quantity is not satisfied
within 90 seconds, the ratemeter will display an error
condition indicated by having the display digits blank
and all of the decimal points lit. The error display is
reset the next time that the ratemeter updates the
display.
In addition to the error display when an Averaging
Range error condition occurs, the message “RTE
AV_ER” (which stands for Rate Averaging Error) is
transmitted through the serial communications port
whenever a print request is made. A print request
is initiated by energizing the Print Request terminal
on the rear of the counter or by sending an ASCII
“?” to the counter through the serial communications
port.
Zero Indication Timeout
For very low frequency count signals (less than 1
pulse per second), the display on the ratemeter
updates every time it receives a pulse. Itis capable
of providing an accurate rate display value when
the pulse rate is as slow as one every ten seconds.
However, when the pulses stop completely, the
ratemeter must have some means of knowing when
to set the display to zero.
For this purpose, the Zero Indication Timeout is
included. This internal timer is reset each time a
pulse is received. But, if no pulse is received before
the timer completes its time duration, the ratemeter
sets the display to show zero. The time value is
adjustable from 1 to 90 seconds in one second
increments.
CONFIGURATION PROCEDURE
Decimal Point
Decide at which location on the display the decimal
point should be located when the rate value is
58
displayed. Then refer to the table in Figure 43 and
enter the value for the desired location in Function
code 63.
If you choose to have the ratemeter automatically
locate the decimal point, enter a value of “9” in
Function Code 63. When this option is selected,
the ratemeter automatically locates the decimal point
to maintain at least four significant digits of display
value. The decimal point will shift right or left as the
pulse rate increases or decreases.
Func.
63 Decimal Point Location DP#
0 (NONE) XXXXX. 1
1 XXXX. X 10
2 XXX. XX 100
3 XX. XXX| 1000
4 XIX! 10000
9 Floating-4 significant digits 1
Figure 43. Decimal Point Location
Calculating the Meter Factor
The meter factor required to obtain a desired
resulting display can be calculated by using the
formula:
# Seconds Per Time Unit x DP#
# Input Pulses Per Item
(x2 if Count Doubling is Used)
M.F. =
Where:
# SEC. PER TIME UNIT: Items per Second=1, Items
per Minute=60, Items per Hour=3600.
DP# (DECIMAL POINT NUMBER): Number
determined by Decimal Point Location. Refer to
Figure 43.
# INPUT PULSES PER ITEM: Number of pulses
per item. Double this value if Count Doubling is
used. Items can be Revolutions, Feet, Gallons, etc.
The Meter Factor must then be expressed in
scientific notation. This means that it must be
expressed as a number less than “1” raised to a
power of 10. For example, a meter factor of 10.34
would be expressed as 0.1034 times ten to the
second power (since the decimal point was shifted
RATEMETER OPERATION (MODEL 58825-400 ONLY)
two positions to the left). The resultant value entered
into the Meter Factor Function Code (Function 64)
would be 10342. Note that the last digit is always
the power of ten and the display would show this
value as “1034.2” with the decimal point flashing
once per second.
Example 1:
A rotating shaft normally operates at approximately
600 RPM. A magnetic proximity sensor is used to
monitor the shaft and produces one pulse per
revolution. The display should show whole RPM
(Func 63 = 0).
TIME UNIT: Minute = 60 secs.
DP# (XXXXX.) =1
PULSES PER REV =1
60 x 1
Meter Factor = 1 = 60 = .6000 x 10?
Function 64 should be programmed as “6000.2”
Example 2:
Using the process from Example 1, it is desired to
fix the decimal point such that the display would read
“600.0” RPM.
TIME UNIT: Minute = 60 secs.
DP# (XXXX.X) =10
PULSES PER REV =1
60 x 10
Meter Factor = 1 = 600 = .6000 x 10°
Function 64 should be programmed as “6000.3”
Example 3:
A flowmeter monitors movement of a liquid through
a pipe. The flowmeter generates 20 pulses per
gallon. Calculate the meter factor to display the Flow
Rate in whole gallons per minute (Func 63 = 0).
TIME UNIT: Minute = 60 secs.
DP# (XXXXX.) =1
PULSES PER GAL =20
60 x 1
Meter Factor= 20 =3 =.3000 x 10’
Function 64 should be programmed as “3000.1”
59
Forced Averaging Range
Normally, the ratemeter should be allowed to
automatically select the averaging range to provide
a consistent update time for the display value.
However, in irregular processes where the pulses
are spaced at random intervals, the ratemeter will
show widely varying values when it is operating at
low speeds. In these applications, it is advisable to
establish the minimum number of pulses to average,
to avoid a fluctuating display value.
Selection of the averaging range will depend on how
fast the process is running and how much variation
will be seen in the spacing of the pulses. In most
cases where minimum averaging is required, the
range will be selected by trial and error to minimize
the amount of fluctuation of the display value. Start
at a low average range and gradually increase until
the display seems moderately stable from update
to update.
To select an average range, refer to Figure 44 and
enter the appropriate value into Function Code 65.
Minimum Pulse Average
Qty. Function 65 Value
No minimum (automatic) 0
3
10
30
100
300
1000
^`1 |6) |1 | |602 |0
3000
Figure 44. Average Ranges and Function 65
Values
IMPORTANT: Selecting a forced averaging range
defeats the ability of the ratemeter to maintain an
update time of between 0.5 and 3 seconds at lower
pulse rates. The display will be updated only after
the selected number of pulses have been received,
unless the pulse frequency is adequately fast to
cause the ratemeter to select a higher averaging
range automatically.
RATEMETER OPERATION (MODEL 58825-400 ONLY)
Example 4:
A bottling process produces approximately 4000
bottles per hour. The bottles are transferred on a
conveyor. The bottles may be spaced unequally on
the conveyor as they pass the sensor. Typically,
the rate of 10 bottles can be averaged to determine
and display the average production rate. Therefore,
the Minimum Forced Averaging Range is adjusted
to “10” by entering a value of “2” in Function Code
65.
Calculate the Meter Factor required to display
Bottles Per Hour. Use the Floating Decimal Point
feature (Func 63 = 9).
TIME UNIT: Hour = 3600 secs.
DP# (FLOATING) = 1
PULSES PER BOTTLE =1
3600 x 1
Meter Factor = 1 = 3600 = .3600 x 10°
Function 64 should be programmed as “3600.4”
Example 5:
Calculate the Meter Factor for a system that is using
a 600 pulse per revolution encoder with a 1 foot
circumference measuring wheel to monitor the travel
of material through a roll former. The counterisina
DOUBLED count mode so that each count is
equivalent to .01 inch. The desired rate display is
Feet Per Minute with a floating decimal point (Func
63 = 9).
TIME UNIT: Minute = 60 secs.
DP# (FLOATING) = 1
PULSES PER FOOT(x2) = 1200
60 x 1
Meter Factor = 1200 =.05 = .0500 х 10°
Function 64 should be programmed as “0500.0”
RATE TRACKING
The RATE TRACKING feature of this device allows
the user to select whether or not the displayed rate
is affected by the COUNT SCALE FACTOR. When
Function 68 is set equal to 1 (SCALED COUNT
MODE) the rate is affected by the COUNT SCALE
FACTOR. When Function 68 is set equal to O
60
(INPUT PULSE MODE) the COUNT SCALE
FACTOR is ignored by the ratemeter.
In applications where the scale factor is being used
to convert pulses to engineering units, it is desirable
to use the SCALED COUNT MODE. Any changes
that are made to the scale factor are automatically
taken into account by the ratemeter. In other words,
it is not necessary to re-calculate the Meter Factor
each time the Scale Factor is changed when using
the SCALED COUNT MODE.
Example 6:
Re-calculate the Meter Factor required for example
3 if the Rate Tracking feature is set to the SCALED
COUNT MODE (Func 68=1) and the Count Scale
Factor is set to count in whole gallons. Remember,
the application involves a flow meter that generates
20 pulses per gallon and it is desired to have the
counter count in whole gallons while displaying the
rate in whole gallons per minute (Func 63=1).
COUNT SCALE 1 (GALLON)
FACTOR (Func 5) = 20 (PULSES) =.0500
THE METER FACTOR FORMULA FOR THE
SCALED COUNT MODE IS:
# SECONDS PER TIME UNIT X DP#
M.F.= # SCALED COUNTS PER ITEM
TIME UNIT: Minute = 60 secs.
DP# (XXXXX.) — 1
SCALED COUNTS PER ITEM = 1
60 x 1
Meter Factor= 1 = 60.00 = .6000 x 10°
Function 64 should be programmed as “6000.2”
If changes are made to the Count Scale Factor for
calibration purposes, the Meter Factor will remain
“6000.2”.
Power-Up Display Value
In some applications, the normal operating display
desired is the Rate display rather than the Count
value. The President counters normally power up
with the Count value on the display. This would
require an operator to press the “Rate” key each
time the machine was turned on in order to monitor
the rate.
RATEMETER OPERATION (MODEL 58825-400 ONLY)
President Ratemeters have the ability to allow the
power-up display to be either the Count value or
the Rate value. This is done by changing the value
of Function Code 67. If it has a value of “0”, the
counter will power up showing the Count value. If it
has a value of “1”, the Rate will be displayed on
power up.
Regardless of which value is showing after power
up, the Count value can be viewed by pressing the
“Count” key and the Rate value by pressing the
“Rate” key. Once one of these keys is pressed, that
value will remain on the display until a different
selection is made or until power is removed from
the counter.
Alternating Display
It is possible to program the President Ratemeters
to automatically alternate the display between Count
and Rate. This allows both items to be monitored
without the need to select them from the keyboard.
The length of time each item is displayed before
switching to the other is selectable from 1 to 9
seconds. Program Function 69 with a number from
1 to 9 to select the Alternating Display mode and
the length of time each item is displayed. For
example, when Function 69 = 3, Count and Rate
will each be displayed in alternating 3 second
intervals.
Communications Type
President Ratemeters have the ability to transmit
the Rate value through the serial communications
output. This is in addition to all of the other values
that can otherwise be transmitted. If the serial
communications output is utilized, refer to the section
of the Function code table (Figure 46) dealing with
Function Code 91. For the specific model of counter
you have to select the desired combination of values
to be communicated. Note that when the Rate value
IN CASE OF DIFFICULTY
This section deals with difficulties that may be encountered specifically with the Ratemeter function.
For problems with functions other than the Ratemeter, refer to the "Troubleshooting" section of the
Operator's Manual.
PROBLEM
POSSIBLE CAUSES
REMEDIES
Rate display shows a value
being lit. Displayed value
seems incorrect.
frequency.
Meter Factor set at too high a
with all of the decimal points|value for the range of input
Adjust Meter Factor to a lower value.
Typically, this can be accomplished by
changing units of measurement of the
display value. (l.e., items/minute instead
of items/hour).
all decimal points are lit.
90 seconds.
Rate display is blank except [Forced Averaging is being
used and input frequency is
low such that the average
quantity is not satisfied within
Adjust Forced Averaging (Function Code
65) to a lower value.
Rate display value is
Incorrect.
Factor entered.
1. Improper Meter Factor
selected for desired display
2. Incorrect exponent for Meter|2. Be sure that the least significant digit
1. Recalculate the Meter Factor and
enter in Function Code 64.
of Meter Factor is exponent.
Rate Display is always zero.| Count pulses being received
on incorrect input for
operational mode selected.
Insure that pulses are additive when
Counter is set to Reset to Zero mode
and subtractive when Counter is set to
Reset to Preset mode.
Figure 45. Ratemeter Function Troubleshooting Table
61
RATEMETER OPERATION (MODEL 58825-400 ONLY)
is printed, it is preceded by the characters “RTE” which identify Rate. Model 58825-400 has additional function
codes which are associated with the operation of the Ratemeter. Selection and modification of these Function
Codes utilize the same procedures as the other Function Codes.
FUNCTION | ENTRY
FUNCTION CODE CHOICES DESCRIPTION
Ratemeter Value Rate Key None |Shows current Rate value.
('4" key)
Ratemeter Decimal 63 0 No decimal point is displayed
1 ХХХХ.Х
2 XXXXX
3 XX XXX
4 XIX
*9 Floating decimal point. (Decimal Point is automatically
located to maintain four significant digits of display
value.
Ratemeter Meter Factor 64 0001.1 to | 0001 times 10'
9999.9 |.9999 times 10”
"1000.1 |Factory set value (.1000 times 10")
Minimum Forced 65 *О Automatic averaging selection (Ratemeter selects
Averaging Range appropriate range.)
1 Average 3 pulses minimum
2 Average 10 pulses minimum
3 Average 30 pulses minimum
4 Average 100 pulses minimum
5 Average 300 pulses minimum
6 Average 1000 pulses minimum
7 Average 3000 pulses minimum
Ratemeter Zero 66 1t090 [Seconds of time delay before display resets to zero
Indication Timeout when no pulses are received on the count input.
*10 Factory set value.
Power-Up Display Value 67 *О Display Count Value on Power-Up.
1 Display Rate Value on Power-Up.
Rate Tracking 68 *0 INPUT PULSE MODE (Rate is calculated from Unscaled
Count signal - Scale Factor does NOT affect Rate).
1 SCALED COUNT MODE (Rate is calculated from
Scaled Count signal - Scale Factor does affect Rate).
2 COINCIDENCE MODE (Rate is calculated from the
time period between coincidence outputs of the
counter. This allows piece rates to be displayed when
the counter is being used to measure out the pieces.
Figure 46. Model 58825-400 Additional Function Codes
*NOTE: Values shown with asterisks are the factory set values.
62
RATEMETER OPERATION (MODEL 58825-400 ONLY)
FUNCTION ENTRY
FUNCTION CODE CHOICES DESCRIPTION
Display Operation 69 *0 MANUAL MODE (Press "COUNT" key to display
Count. Press "4" key to display Rate.)
1-9 ALTERNATING MODE (Display automatically
alternates between Count and Rate displays.
Number entered is the number of seconds each
item is displayed before alternating.
Transmit Data Select 91 Select a two-digit value for Function 91 which
transmits the desired data. The options are
shown below.
TENS DIGIT
*0 Transmit Rate & Scale Factor
1 Transmit Rate
2 Transmit Scale Factor
3 Omit Rate & Scale Factor
UNITS DIGIT
*0 Transmit Count & Preset
1 Transmit Count
2 Transmit Preset
3 Omit Count and Preset
Figure 46. Model 58825-400 Additional Function Codes (continued)
*NOTE: Values shown with asterisks are the factory set values.
METER FACTOR FORMULAS
Input Pulse Mode (Function 68 =0)
# Secs. Per Time Unit x Decimal #
0
© rr ON =
M.F. = Input Pulses per ltem (x2 if Count
Doubling Used)
Function 63
M.F.= # Scaled Counts per ltem
Scaled Count Mode (Function 68 = 1)
Secs. Per Time Unit x Decimal
Decimal Point Location Decimal #
XXXXX (None) 1
ХХХХ.Х 10
XXX. XX 100
XX XXX 1000
XXXXX 10000
Floating-4 significant digits 1
Figure 47. Meter Factor Formulas
63
RATEMETER OPERATION (MODEL 58825-400 ONLY)
Transistor
Output
K1 22
Count Mode Logic Scaler Coincidence Counter Output Logic A = 23
— Input 1
14 Р up Бе > Up Scaled [ty | Up Coincidence | a3 | Latch Normal |— 0
Count Count Up Count Input Output (Normal Output >e han +15V 0
1077 put 2| Eon] Output Input Output Down Output On) > 7
0 3 unc
Count Func > Input Display
Mode ae oun Unlatch R =
Down Scaled everse 37e y
output | (| 7 Count Count utpd _ Q
p Input Output Preset (Normal)
30
0 1 Func 80
. 8,9,12,21 ol 1 .
18 Func 80 pane de (7) ? Output Uniatoh
Double = 0
Jumper Func 36 e
> eee Mor39”
+ —— —e
Rate Meter \ \ .
1
0
Function 64 ——€e — — #
Meter Factor Е DA | Output Timer **NOTE:
‚ unc 68 .
Signal | , Scale Factor | ФО _ Func 36: Sa a ee
Diol Input [+ > 1 Compensation une 30 releases
Rae ————— elease
Press 3 € € <— 7 Func 39: Causes an unlatch
4 | .01-99.99 Sec. signal when reset is
Reset \ J %10.00 Sec. initiated
^ Start/Reset
- Input
17 Reset In
A
0 Rate Timer KEY
Func 69% 1-90 Sec. Im COUNT MODE LOGIC
* 10 Sec. Function Code Information — Maintained Signal FUNC INP1 INP2 DOUB
Not Illustrated by Signal Paths *60 | (214 (10 | 18
| TL Momentary (One-Shof) Signal 0 Subtract Add Option
Star/Reset [| indicates Key Stroke(s)
npu
€ —>- Signals Flow in Direction of 1 Count | Inhibit No
Q Back Panel Screw Terminal Arrows Only
1 Quadrature X1 Yes
Function Codes Drawn ¥ Factory Setting of Function Code
In Factory Settings That Has a Range of Values 2 Count | Direction Option
To Restore All Functions to
Factory Settings Program
® Func43=1. DC Common 3 | Quadrature X2 | Yes
1 Terminals 8, 9, 12, 21
Figure 48. 58825-400 Block Diagram
64
ACCESSORIES AND REPLACEMENT PARTS LISTS
TRANSDUCERS
Medium Duty Shaft Heavy Duty Shaft
Encoder Encoder
Single Channel--381500-
XXX
Quadrature -- 38151-XXX
Single Channel--48370-
XXX
Quadrature--48371-XXX
60, 100, 120 and 600 PPR are stocked ratios for encoders.
Any number from 001 to 600 is available. Substitute the
desired PPR for “XXX” in the part numbers.
12” Measuring Wheels Rotary & Lineal
with 3/8” Bore | Contactor
Aluminum Rimmed ES-9513-RS
20156-301
Rubber Rimmed
20154-301
Urethane Rimmed
20144-301
Connector for Encoder
29729-300
Mounting Bracket for
ES-9513-RS
40460-400
Shown with ES-9513-RS
and 12” measuring wheel
Connector with 10
Foot Cable
29665-300
65
ACCESSORIES AND REPLACEMENT PARTS LISTS
Serial to Parallel BCD Communications Converter 58801-410
The Serial to Parallel BCD Communications Converter (SPCC) is a serial to parallel
BCD adaptor which provides a means of interfacing a Durant counter to a ladder
logic based Programmable Control. The SPCC converts the serial data from the
counter’s 20ma current loop to eight digits of binary coded decimal data for use
by the Programmable Control. The BCD output is connected to the I/O structure
of the PC. Several options, conveniently selected by a four position DIP switch,
eliminates the need for a special configuration for each different application. The
SPCC has a self contained power supply which requires 120VAC power.
Parallel BCD To Serial Communications Converter 58801-411
The Parallel BCD to Serial Communications Converter (PSCC) is a parallel BCD
to serial adaptor which provides a means of interfacing a Durant counter with a
ladder logic based Programmabe Control. The PSCC converts eight digits of
binary coded decimal data from a PC to serial data to be input to the Durant
counter through the counter's 20ma current loop. The BCD input is connected
from the I/O structure of the PC. Several options, conveniently selected by a four
position DIP switch, eliminates the need for a special configuration for each different
application. The PSCC has a self contained power supply which requires 120VAC
power.
Simultaneous Input Processor
The Simultaneous Input Processor (SIP) is used as an accessory with Durant
counters to insure that all counts are recorded when multiple sources of count
signal are required (counts can occur simultaneously).
8 Input 49990-408
16 Input 49990-416
Timer Module 48160-440
The Durant Timer Module, 48160-440, provides a series of timed output pulses at
a rate selectable by the user. The selection is made by setting a DIP switch
located on the side of the module. A variety of pulse rates, from 1,000 pulses per
second to 10 pulses per minute, can be set on the switch. The timer module will
convert any Durant electronic counter or count control with a high speed (5000
Hertz) input into a timer.
66
ACCESSORIES AND REPLACEMENT PARTS LISTS
Input Signal Conditioner 48160-400
The Model 48160-400 Signal Conditioner converts a wide range of input signals
to a level that is compatible with Durant Electronic Controls. It will accept differential
inputs from 50 millivolts to 400 volts and ground referenced inputs from 2.4 volts
to 100 volts.
Relay Module
This unit has two relays that may be operated by transistors that are rated to carry
at least .075A in a 12-volt circuit. Each relay has DPDT contacts for controlling
external loads. The relays are plug-in type for easy replacement. The 12-volt
power for the relays is provided from the AC input.
120 VAC input power 51611-400
240 VAC iinput power 51611-401
Desk Mounting Kits
These attractive desk mounting kits fit the Durant Series 5880 count controls for
installation on any flat surface. The convenient two piece “snap together” design
requires no tools for assembly. Four non-skid rubber feet prevent the control from
sliding on the mounting surface. Standard conduit knockouts are provided on the
rear of the kit for wiring to the process. The 58802-410 kit fits the 58810-400
Totalizer. The 58802-420 kit fits all other 5880 series count controls.
58802-410
58802-420
REPLACEMENT PARTS
Replacement Relay Front Panel Spacer
Revision 60 - up
Adapter to JIC
Eaton No.: 38133-202 enclosures
All Controls
Aromat No.: 38820-400
JW1FEN-B-DC5V Totalizer (58810-400)
38810-400
Front Panel Gaskets Mounting Clip
48433-200
All Controls
28720-216 Screw
29801-187
Totalizer (58810-400)
28720-215
67
. SA Cutler-Hammer
Printed in U.S 901 South 12th Street
Watertown, WI 53094
920-261-4070 . 800-540-9242 . FAX 920-261-9097
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement