SDV Comprehensive Safety Plan

SDV Comprehensive Safety Plan
SDV Comprehensive
Safety Plan
January 2012
Table of Contents
Safety and Health Plan ......................................................................................................................... 4
Accident/Event Reporting and Investigation Plan ............................................................................... 7
Aerial Lift Safety Program................................................................................................................. 10
Daily Inspection Checklist: ............................................................................................................ 13
Crane Safety Program ........................................................................................................................ 14
Safety Disciplinary Policy ................................................................................................................. 17
Safety Disciplinary Policy Form .................................................................................................... 18
Electrical Safety Plan for Construction.............................................................................................. 19
Appendix ........................................................................................................................................ 35
Excavation Safety Program................................................................................................................ 43
Fall Protection Safety Program .......................................................................................................... 46
Fire Prevention Program .................................................................................................................... 50
First Aid Program .............................................................................................................................. 53
Gases, Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists Safety Program ................................................................. 55
Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter Program ......................................................................................... 57
Hand and Power Tool Safety Program .............................................................................................. 58
Hazard Communication Program ...................................................................................................... 63
Hearing Conservation Program.......................................................................................................... 68
Hoisting & Rigging Safety Program .................................................................................................. 70
Housekeeping Program ...................................................................................................................... 74
Industrial Hygiene Program ............................................................................................................... 78
Lead Safety Program.......................................................................................................................... 81
Lockout/Tagout Program ................................................................................................................... 84
Attachment A ................................................................................................................................. 89
Attachment B ................................................................................................................................. 90
Attachment C ................................................................................................................................. 91
Attachment D ................................................................................................................................. 92
Attachment E ................................................................................................................................. 93
Liquid Petroleum (Lp) Gas Compliance Program ............................................................................. 95
Machine/Equipment & Guarding Plan............................................................................................... 97
Permit-Required Confined Space Entry Program ............................................................................ 100
Power Industrial Truck Program ...................................................................................................... 106
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Program ............................................................................... 109
Respiratory Protection Program ....................................................................................................... 114
Scaffolding Safety Program ............................................................................................................. 120
Stairways and Ladder Safety Program ............................................................................................. 124
Steel Erection Safety Program ......................................................................................................... 127
Vehicle Policy .................................................................................................................................. 137
Welding & Cutting Program ............................................................................................................ 140
Work Site Identification (ASM Bulletin Board) .............................................................................. 143
Safety and Health Plan
Purpose
We at SDV Construction, Inc. are committed to the safety and health of our employees, and know
that our strength as a company is only as good as the strength of each individual. We will strive to
place safety and health above all else, and will involve all employees at every level in establishing,
implementing, and evaluating our efforts. This written Safety and Health Plan is intended to
eliminate, or reduce the severity of job-related illnesses and injuries at this company. It is our intent
to comply with the requirements of 29 CFR 1926.20 and .21, which require employers to maintain
programs as necessary to keep employees from working in hazardous or dangerous conditions. This
Safety and Health Plan is required reading for all employees and subcontractors prior to starting
work under any contract, and subcontractors are contractually obligated to comply with this plan.
Management Leadership
Our Safety Officer is the Safety and Health Plan Administrator. He/She coordinates the Safety and
Health Program elements for our company.
He/She is responsible for setting up and managing the program so that Superintendents, Foremen,
employees, and Subcontractors know what our company expects. Our Program Administrator is
accountable for meeting these responsibilities. He/She has the authority (delegated ability to take
action) to carry out his/her duties in a timely manner so that progress is made in meeting program
goals. He/She is also provided with sufficient resources, information, and training to meet those
responsibilities.
Our Safety Officer has examined our existing policies and practices to ensure that they encourage
and do not discourage reporting and participation in our program. In this way, early reporting of
injuries, illnesses, and hazards and meaningful employee participation in the program are more
likely to occur. The reporting of injuries, illnesses, and hazards is especially important because the
success of the program depends on such reporting.
Our Safety Officer communicates with employees and Subcontractors about the program so they
have the information necessary to protect themselves from hazards and have effective input into the
operation of the program. All Subcontractors must follow safety rules and procedures incorporated
by SDV Construction and this Safety Plan.
Each of our company on site safety officers will maintain the minimum qualifications as outlined in
the current SDV Construction SOP’s. They each have several years of documented experience in
safety inspection and coordination and are knowledgeable in the safety principles and practices of
the construction industry. Each safety officer will remain knowledgeable in occupational health and
safety laws and procedures thru formal courses and annual evaluation. They are responsible for
ensuring that all aspects of our plan are being followed in a daily basis and periodically evaluating
the effectiveness of this plan.
Our company safety officers are also responsible for ensuring that the Foreman, Superintendent or
they conduct documented daily safety inspection. As needed we will hire independent safety
consultants to assist in safety inspections. These third party inspections are solely to ensure that
employees of SDV Construction are working in a safe and healthy manner. These inspections are
built into field operations for each project. If a specific project requires a safety officer to be
present on site during active construction activities, the individual will be identified on that
particular project specific safety plan along with method of compliance and required documentation
that will need to be maintained on site for that particular project.
Employee Participation and Training
All SDV employees and subcontractor employees will be properly trained and expected to
understand our safety and health plan. Each employee and subcontractor employee will have
adequate training for the tasks that they are employed to perform, and will not be allowed to
perform them prior to receiving training. At a minimum, each employee who will, or may have
access to jobsites shall have a minimum of 10-Hours OSHA Training in construction safety and
health. As required, field employees will have specific OSHA subpart training, and refresher
training for tasks and activities they will be involved in.
Visitors
All visitors who wish to enter the job site must report to the onsite Superintendent or Foreman
before entering the site. Visitors will receive an onsite briefing of the hazards associated with the
work being performed at that time and how to enter and evacuate the site. This will be documented
with a sign in sheet. No visitor will be allowed onsite without the proper PPE which will be
indicated by the posted signage.
Contractor/Subcontractor Safety Compliance
All employees, subcontractors, employees of subcontractors tiers and visitors that are accessing a
jobsite on behalf of SDV is required to comply with all safety rules set forth by all regulatory
compliance agencies, SDV, and any written plans applicable to the respective project. Failure to do
so will result in immediate removal from the site until SDV has had the opportunity to meet with
the employee and management. At a minimum the individual and/or company will be required to
re-review the project specific safety plan and be coached on the issues by our designated safety
officer. If a determination is made each that an action was intentional, negligent or serious enough
to have potentially caused harm to another individual or property, immediate termination will be
enforced.
Definitions
The following definitions and abbreviations will apply throughout this document:
 Subcontractor: Refers to any company and their employees under contract to SDV
Construction, Inc. for the execution of work as defined in the contract documents.
 Competent Person: Person capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the
surroundings or working conditions that are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to
employees, and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them.
 Qualified Person: Person whom, by possession of recognized degree, certificate, or
professional standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training, and experience, has
successfully demonstrated the ability to solve or resolve problems related to the subject
matter, the work, or the project.
References
It is the intent to meet, or exceed all applicable regulations and guidelines in compliance with
environmental, safety and health laws, rules and regulations of the Federal, State and Local
governments while in the performance of construction and service work.
The standards include:
ANSI…Requirements for Personal Protective Equipment will be used when applicable for
demolition and construction work.
29CFR Part 1910…General Industry Occupational Safety and Health Standards, which are
applicable to construction, work.
29CFR1926…Safety and Health Regulations for Construction. The 29CFR 1926-revised
edition dated February 1, 1999 was used for preparation of this plan.
Environmental Protection agency (EPA)…Storm Water Management for Construction
Activities: Developing Pollution Prevention Plans and Best Known Methods as written and
when applicable for construction.
National Electrical Code…Applicable sections and articles dependent on the type of work to
be performed. The latest edition will be used.
NFPA…National Fire Protection Association: where applicable to construction.
NFPA 70E…Electrical safety requirements for employees. Applicable sections will be
addressed as required and specifically addressing PPE. The latest edition will be used.
INTERNAL FIRE CODE (IFC) ANSI Z49.1, Sections 4.3 and E4…As applicable to fire
safety and general work practices.
Nature of Work
SDV Construction in Albuquerque, N.M. is a General Building Contractor whose scope of expertise
includes interior and exterior general construction of walls, floors, concrete, architectural finishes,
millwork, glazing, door installations, etc. Electrical systems include panel boards and interior
lighting with associated controls. Mechanical systems is removing the old system and adding a
HVAC system, and limited plumbing necessary for kitchen equipment. This list is not meant to be
a comprehensive list but rather a representative sample of previous projects.
All work shall be performed in accordance with the design drawings and specifications, lists, and
schedules as indicated on the Master List generated for each project.
Accident/Event Reporting and Investigation Plan
Purpose
This Accident/Event Reporting and Investigation Plan prescribe methods and practices for reporting
and investigating accidents. No matter how conscientious the safety effort at a company, accidents
happen occasionally due to human or system error.
Therefore, this written plan is intended to provide a means to deal with all workplace
accidents/events in a standardized way and demonstrate our company's compliance with the
reporting requirements of 29 CFR 1904. In addition, it is the policy of the company to comply with
all workers' compensation laws and regulations.
Administrative Duties
Our Safety Officer is responsible for developing and maintaining this written Accident/Event
Reporting and Investigation Plan. This person is solely responsible for all facets of the plan and has
full authority to make necessary decisions to ensure the success of this plan.
Event Reporting
At any time if a SDV employee or subcontractor becomes aware of a circumstance that would
impact workers, the public, the environment or an unplanned disruption of normal operations, the
circumstance must be reported. If the event could quickly become an emergency situation follow
the “Emergency Action Plan” described below. All accidents and near misses are investigated.
Accident Reporting Procedures
All accidents, injuries, or illnesses, and equipment damage must be reported immediately to their
foreman or direct supervisor. All incidents will be investigated to the appropriate level with regards
to incident severity. The injured employee will fill out the "Notice of Accident" form. The foreman
and the injured employee will fill out together the "Accident Investigation" form. SDV
Construction, Inc. will not conduct accident investigations in order to place blame or find fault. A
fair investigation will identify the "Root Cause" that, if corrected, will prevent recurrence of the
accident. When an accident has occurred, the accident area shall be undisturbed (as much as
possible) until the investigation is conducted.
Emergency Action
Emergency Action for life threatening injuries or illnesses; immediately call for medical assistance
by dialing 911 on touchtone telephone.
1. Post medical and non-medical emergency numbers conspicuously at Project site. Ensure
that all employees are aware of medical and non-medical numbers emergency numbers.
2. Transport personnel with non life-threatening injuries or illnesses that require medical
attention to contractor’s identified medical facility. Concentra Medical Centers, 5700
Harper NE, Alb., NM PH. 823-9166 or 801 Encino Place NE, Alb., NM PH. 842-5151
(Subject to change, confirm with Safety Officer)
3. Electrical Shock: Accompany an employee that has received an electrical shock for
immediate attention to the above designated medical facility during standard working hours,
no matter how minor the shock appears. For non-standard working hours, seek medical
attention in off-site facility. Notify Project Manager, Superintendent, or Safety Officer
immediately after transporting individual to any medical facility.
4. Notification of Accidents, Injuries, or Illnesses: Verbal notification to Safety Officer shall be
performed as soon as possible. Submit document “Report of Occupational Injury/Illness” to
Safety Officer within 3 days.
a. Non-Emergency Medical Incident: Notify Safety Officer or Superintendent within 24
hours
b. Serious or Life-Threatening Accident or Illness: Notify Safety Officer and
Superintendent after taking emergency action.
5. Substance Abuse Prevention and Testing: Use of drugs (including misuse of prescribed
substances) or alcohol on site shall be grounds for removal of individual from work site, and
may include other corrective actions.
Accident Investigation Procedures
Thorough accident investigations will help the company determine why accidents occur, where they
happen, and any trends that might be developing. Such identification is critical to preventing and
controlling hazards and potential accidents. Our Safety Officer will conduct investigations and is
properly trained to do so. Proper equipment will be made available to assist in conducting an
investigation by the safety officer. Interviews will be conducted and witnesses will be documented
and be kept anonymous if so chosen. Witness statements are used to find a root cause of the incident
and ways to avoid future incidents. Follow up inspection verifying that issues addressed have been
solved and a similar incident will not occur.
Employee Involvement and Training
This plan is an internal document guiding the action and behaviors of employees. When hired or as
needed our Safety Officer thoroughly explains to all employees why the Accident Reporting and
Investigation Plan were prepared and how employees may be affected by it. Employees are
informed on how to report an injury or illness.
Employees, and their representatives, are also provided limited access to our injury and illness
records.
Copies of relevant OSHA 300 logs are provided by the next business day to all employees, former
employees, and representatives who request them. Employees, former employees, and personal
representatives who request "Notice of Accident" will also receive them by the end of the next
business day. However, authorized employee representatives will only receive requested "Notice of
Accident" within seven calendar days. All names will be removed.
The nature of injuries, root cause and corrective actions section will be provided and reviewed with
all employees. All initial copies are provided to requesters free of charge. Additional copies involve
a reasonable charge.
Our company does not discriminate against employees for:
 Reporting a work-related fatality, injury, or illness;
 Filing a safety and health complaint;
 Asking for access to occupational injury and illness records; or
 Exercising any rights afforded by the Occupational Safety and Health Act.
Event Notification
If any employee or subcontractor becomes aware of an event that could adversely impact work, the
public, or the environment, or unplanned disruptions of normal operations it must be reported to the
onsite supervisor as soon as possible.
If there is a situation in which atmospheric air monitoring is required on a job and the monitor
indicates a possible or potential exposure based on the most recent PEL’s published in the most
current copy of the limits established by OSHA or ACGIH the exposure must be reported to the
onsite supervisor as soon as possible.
Aerial Lift Safety Program
Purpose
It is SDV Construction, Inc. purpose in issuing these procedures to further ensure a safe workplace
based on the following formal, written procedures for all employees or subcontractors who use
aerial lifts on SDV Construction, Inc. jobsites. These procedures will be reviewed and updated as
needed to comply with new OSHA and ANSI regulations. Our Safety Officer is the plan
coordinator and is responsible for its implementation.
These standards are in effect for the following aerial lifts;
 Extendable boom platforms
 Aerial ladders
 Articulating boom platforms
 Vertical towers
 Scissor Lifts
 One man lifts
General Requirements
Aerial lifts have replaced ladders and scaffolding on many job sites due to their mobility and
flexibility. They may be made of metal, fiber glass reinforced plastic, or other materials. They may
be powered or manually operated, and are considered to be aerial lifts whether or not they can rotate
around a primarily vertical axis. Many workers are injured or killed on aerial lifts each year. OSHA
provides standards for aerial lift safety. The following requirements must be understood by all
employees who will be working off aerial lifts at any point during employment at SDV
Construction, Inc. Employees will test lift controls each day prior to use to determine they are in
safe working condition and conduct a pre-start inspection to ensure the aerial lift is running
properly. Fall Protection must be worn and a lanyard attached to the boom or basket when working
from an aerial lift. We have listed requirements below for Operating, traveling and loading aerial
lifts while at our jobsites. OSHA also has requirements for overhead protection and employee
training those employees must understand prior to operating a lift for this company.
Pre-start Inspection
Prior to each work shift, conduct a pre-start inspection to verify that the equipment and all its
components are in safe operating condition. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations and
include a check of:
Vehicle components
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Proper fluid levels (oil, hydraulic, fuel and coolant)
Leaks of fluids
Wheels and tires
Battery and charger
Lower-level controls
Horn, gauges, lights and backup alarms
Steering and brakes
Lift components
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Operating and emergency controls
Personal protective devices
Hydraulic, air, pneumatic, fuel and electrical systems
Fiberglass and other insulating components
Missing or unreadable placards, warnings, or operational, instructional and control markings
Mechanical fasteners and locking pins
Cable and wiring harnesses
Outriggers, stabilizers and other structures
Loose or missing parts
Guardrail systems
Do not operate any aerial lift if any of these components are defective until it is repaired by a
qualified person. Remove defective aerial lifts from service (tag out) until repairs are made.
Fall Protection
Fall protection is very important when employees are working from aerial lifts. The following
requirements must be followed by all employees;
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Use a body harness with a lanyard attached to the bucket.
Ensure that access gates or openings are closed.
Stand firmly on the floor of the bucket or lift platform.
Do not climb on or lean over guardrails or handrails.
Do not use planks, ladders, or other devices as a working position.
Do not belt-off to adjacent structures or poles while in the bucket.
Operation/Traveling/Loading
Although the following information will be covered during lift training employees must follow the
rules listed below at all times while using aerial lifts at this company;
 Do not exceed the load-capacity limits. Take the combined weight of the worker(s), tools
and materials into account when calculating the load.
 Do not use the aerial lift as a crane.
 Do not carry objects larger than the platform.
 Do not drive with the lift platform raised (unless the manufacturer’s instructions allow this).
 Do not operate lower level controls unless permission is obtained from the worker(s) in the
lift (except in emergencies).
 Do not exceed vertical or horizontal reach limits.
 Do not operate an aerial lift in high winds above those recommended by the manufacturer.
 Do not override hydraulic, mechanical, or electrical safety devices.
 Do not operate lift in high winds!
Overhead Protection
Overhead hazards are present almost all the time when using aerial lifts. The following rules are in
place for employee protection from overhead hazards;
 Be aware of overhead clearance and overhead objects, including ceilings.
 Do not position aerial lifts between overhead hazards if possible.
 Treat all overhead power lines and communication cables as energized, and stay at least 10
feet (3 meters) away.
 Ensure that the power utility or power line workers de-energize power lines in the vicinity of
the work.
Training
Initial Training
Only trained and authorized persons are allowed to operate an aerial lift. Training should include:
 Explanations of electrical, fall, and falling object hazards
 Procedures for dealing with hazards
 Recognizing and avoiding unsafe conditions in the work setting
 Instructions for correct operation of the lift (including maximum intended load and load
capacity)
 Demonstrations of the skills and knowledge needed to operate an aerial lift before operating
it on the job
 When and how to perform inspections; and Manufacturer’s requirements.
Employees Who Need Retraining
When we have reason to believe that one of our employees lacks the skill or understanding needed
for safe work involving aerial lifts we will re-train the employee so that the requisite proficiency is
regained. Retraining will be done in at least the following situations:
 Where changes at the worksite present a hazard about which the employee has not been
previously trained.
 Where changes in the types of aerial lifts in which an employee has not been previously
trained.
 Where inadequacies in an affected employee's work involving aerial lifts indicate that the
employee has not retained the requisite proficiency.
Daily Inspection Checklist:
Date:
Operator’s Name:
Operator’s Signature:
Aerial or Scissor Lift ID #
VEHICLE INSPECTION
____Oil level
____Hydraulic oil level
____Fuel level
____Check the lift and surrounding area for leaks
____Coolant level
____Tire pressure and condition of wheels and tires
____Battery and charger
____Ground control switches
CHECK OPERATIONS
____Horn
____Gauges
____Brakes
____Lights
____Steering
____Attachments or accessories
____Backup alarm or warning buzzer
____Warning lights
PLATFORM LIFT EQUIPMENT INSPECTION
____Lift and travel controls and switches
____Placards, decals and control ID labels
____Handrails, guardrails and safety chains
____Platform deck and toe boards
____Steering
____Attachments or accessories
____Backup alarm or warning buzzer
____Warning lights
If the aerial or scissor lift fails any part of the inspection, remove the key and report the problem
to your supervisor. Do not attempt to make repairs unless you are a trained and authorized
service person. RECORD ANY MALFUNCTIONS, DAMAGES OR PROBLEMS:
________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________
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Crane Safety Program
Purpose
The purpose of the Crane Safety Program is to define the work practices and the inspection
procedures to help ensure that the operators of the overhead cranes at the SDV Construction Inc.
jobsites. Our goal is to protect employees from potential hazards associated with the movement of
equipment and material. It is out intent to comply with Occupational Safety and Health
Administration (OSHA) entitled “Overhead Cranes” (Code of Federal Regulations, 29CFR
1910.179, 1926.550). American National Standards Institute (ANSI) guidelines are also applicable
to the operation and maintenance of overhead cranes (ANSI B30.2, ANSI B30.0, and ANSI
B30.9C).
Administrative Duties
Our Safety Officer is our Crane Safety Program Administrator and is responsible for The
Reviewing the Crane Safety Program on an annual basis and revises it as necessary.
Provide the technical assistance regarding the regulatory requirements of cranes, chains, slings, and
hoists. Provide or arrange training for the safe operation of overhead cranes, and the inspection
procedure for chains, slings and hoists.
Operator
The operator of overhead cranes (cranes and hoists that are two tons or larger) must be a physically
fit and thoroughly trained, competent individual, and not using any drug that could impair physical,
visual, or mental reactions or capabilities, and must understand all the regulations regarding crane
safety. The operator has the authority to stop and refuse to handle loads whenever there is a safety
concern.
Inspections
Overhead crane inspections are divided into two general classifications: Frequent Inspections and
Periodic Inspections. Inspection checklists are completed as part of the inspection process and must
be completed by the designated competent person. Inspection checklists shall be available for
inspection.
Frequent Inspection
Rope slings, hooks and other lifting equipment shall be visually inspected prior to each day’s use.
All parts including chains, cables, ropes, hooks, etc., on overhead and gantry cranes shall be
visually inspected daily for deformation, cracks, excessive wear, twists, stretch, or other signs of
deterioration that may pose a hazard during use.
Hooks and chains shall be visually inspected daily, and monthly with a certification record which
documents the date of inspection, the signature of the person who performed the inspection, and
serial number or other identifier from the equipment. Hooks that have cracks should be replaced.
Periodic Inspections
Periodic inspections shall be conducted by a factory trained employee or a contract certified
inspection service.
A complete inspection of the crane shall be performed at least every 12 months. The inspection
should include the following:
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Noting any cracked corroded, worn or loose members or parts.
Noting and replacing loose bolts and tightening those bolts.
Testing the limit indicators (wind, load, etc), power plant and electrical apparatus.
Load testing must be performed at no more than 125 percent of the rated load, unless it is
otherwise recommended by the equipment manufacturer.
Examining the electrical apparatus for any signs of pitting, or any deterioration of controller
contactors, limit switches and push button stations.
Travel distance steering.
Testing the braking system for excessive wear on the lining, pawls and ratchets.
Hooks and cables.
If any adjustments have to be made to the unit, the crane will not be operated until all the guards
have been installed, all safety devices reactivated, and all maintenance equipment moved. If any
defect is found, the crane will not be operated until the repair or the adjustment is made.
Mobile Cranes
It is our intent to comply with the manufacturer’s specifications and limitations applicable to the
operation of any or all cranes or derricks. The attachments that are used with a crane shall not
exceed the capacity, rating or scope recommended by the manufacturer. The rated load capacities,
recommended operating speeds, and special hazard warnings or instruction shall be conspicuously
posted on all equipment.
The requirements are:
 A designated competent person will inspect all machinery and equipment prior to each use
and during use, to make sure that it is in safe operating condition. If a defective part is
found, all parts should be repaired or replaced.
 A thorough annual inspection of the hoisting machinery shall be made by a competent
person. The dates and the result of the inspections for each hoisting machine and piece of
equipment will be maintained by each department. The department will prepare a
certification record which will include the date the crane items were inspected and serial
number or other identifier for the crane that was inspected. The most recent certification
will be retained on file until a new one is prepared.
 A signal person must be provided if the operator's view is obstructed
 All accessible areas within the swing radius of the rear of the rotating superstructure of the
crane shall be barricaded in such a manner as to prevent an employee from being struck or
crushed by the crane.
 All safety devices must be in proper working order before operation begins.
 Cranes must not be used unless ground conditions are able to support the equipment and any
supporting materials per the manufacturer's specifications.
 All exhaust pipes shall be guarded or insulated in areas where contact by employees is
possible in the performance of normal duties.
 All windows in cabs shall be safety glass, or equivalent. There should be no visible
distortion that will interfere with the safe operation of the machine. Guard rails, handholds,
and steps shall be provided on cranes for easy access to the car and the cab.
 Platforms and walkways shall have anti-skid surfaces.
 Manufacturer instructions and prohibitions must be followed when assembling and/or
disassembling equipment. This can only be done by a qualified or competent person.
 Modifications or additions that may affect the capacity or safe operation of the equipment
must not be made without written approval from the manufacturer.
 An accessible fire extinguisher of 2ABC rating or higher shall be available at all operator
stations or cabs of equipment.
Working near power lines
If the equipment or machinery must be operated next to electrical lines, then the following
procedures must be followed:
 For electrical lines that are rated 50 KV or below, the minimum clearance between the lines
and any part of the crane or load shall be 10 feet.
 For lines rated over 50 KV, the minimum clearance between the lines and any part of the
crane or load shall be 10 feet plus 0.4 inch for each 1 KV over 50 KV, or twice the length of
the line insulator, but never less than 10 feet.
 If the equipment is in transit with no load and boom lowered, the equipment clearance shall
be a minimum of 4 feet for voltages less than 50 KV and 10 feet for voltages over 50 KV, up
to and including 345KV, and 16 feet for voltages up to and including 750 KV.
 A safety observer shall be designated to observe clearance of the equipment and give timely
warning for all operations where it is difficult for the operator to maintain the desired
clearance by visual means.
 Any overhead wire shall be considered to be an energized line unless documentation is
available to determine that the electrical lines are de-energized.
Crane Operators Certification
Crane operators shall be properly trained and experienced in operation of crane or hoisting device.
Crane operator shall have one of the following in possession during crane inspection and operation:
Valid State of New Mexico Crane Operator’s License or Certification that indicates completion of
an industry-recognized, in-house training course based on American National Standards Institute
(ANSI) standards for hoisting operators, and who is employed by the entity that taught the training
course or contracted to have the training course taught.
Safety Disciplinary Policy
1. All employee’s must comply with the Safety Rules and Standards established by the corporation
and the customers we serve. Company officials will conduct physical inspections of the work
areas and employees are also expected to inspect their work areas for safety hazards.
2. The company expects each of its employees to adhere to the highest standards of personal
conduct. When an employee fails to follow Safety standards, violates Safety rules of the
corporation and our customers or deviates from the norms of safe behavior SDV Construction
will take any necessary disciplinary action warranted including up to immediate termination.
3. Other-than-serious hazard disciplinary action:
a. 1st offense-Verbal warning
b. 2nd offense-Employee will be written up
c. 3rd offense –Employee will be written up and suspended up to 5 days without pay
d. 4th offense-Termination
4. Serious and Imminent Danger Violation: The disciplinary action will depend on the opinion of
the Safety Manager and/or the Supervisor of the employee and/or the Customer.
5. PPE: If an employee is found not wearing their Personal Protective Equipment in accordance
with the company policy, they will be giving a verbal warning for the 1st offense, Written up for
the 2nd offense, Suspended without pay up to 5 days on the 3rd offense, and Terminated on the
4th offense.
Other-than-serious hazard means any condition or practice which would be classified as an otherthan-serious violation of applicable federal or state statutes, regulations or standards, based on
criteria contained in the current OSHA field instructions or approved State Plan counterpart.
Serious hazard means any condition or practice which would be classified as a serious violation of
applicable federal or state statutes, regulations or standards, based on criteria contained in the
current OSHA field instructions or approved State Plan counterpart, except that the element of
employer knowledge shall not be considered.
Imminent danger means any conditions or practices in a place of employment which are such that
a danger exists which could reasonably be expected to cause death or serious physical harm
immediately.
The Vice President of Operations is responsible for management of the safety disciplinary policy.
All Project Managers, Superintendents, Foremen, and Safety Mangers/Coordinators are responsible
for the enforcement of the safety program.
Safety Disciplinary Policy Form
Employee’s Name________________________________________________________
Job #________________ Job Location______________________________________
Date of Violation________________ Time of Violation_______________________
Brief Description_________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Employee Comments _____________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Type of Violation:
______ Other Than Serious ______ Serious _____ Imminent Danger
Action:
_______Verbal Warning
_______Written Warning
_______Suspension Days without Pay
_______ Termination
________ Suspension
Other than Serious Hazard Disciplinary Action:
Employee’s Signature_______________________________________________
Supervisors Signature_______________________________________________
Electrical Safety Plan for Construction
Purpose
The purpose of this program is to:
 Demonstrate SDV Construction, Inc., compliance with OSHA electrical safety requirements
necessary for the practical safeguarding of employees involved in construction work, found
in Subpart K of 29 CFR 1926; and NFPA 70E
 Establish specific written procedures to protect the health and safety of all employees.
A written description of the program, including the specific procedures adopted by us, is available
at all job sites for review by OSHA and any affected employee. This program applies to all work
performed by SDV employees regardless of job site location.
Administrative Duties
 We have designated our Safety Officer to implement this electrical safety program. He is
responsible for developing and maintaining this written Electrical Safety Plan for
Construction. Our Safety Officer will evaluate work being performed and determine
compliance with this program. Other responsibilities include:
 Provide or assist in the task of specific training for electrical work qualifications.
 Training recordkeeping.
 Periodically review and update this written program.
 Provide or coordinate general training for work units on the content of this program.
 Evaluate the overall effectiveness of the electrical safety program on a periodic basis.
 Assist work units in the implementation of this program.
Our Supervisors also play a crucial role in our safety program, their duties include:
 Promote electrical safety awareness to all employees.
 Ensure employees comply with ALL provisions of the electrical safety program.
 Ensure employees receive training appropriate to their assigned electrical tasks and maintain
documentation of such training.
 Develop and maintain a listing of all qualified employees under their supervision.
 Ensure employees are provided with and use appropriate protective equipment.
Definitions
Authorized Lockout/Tagout Employee - A person who has completed the required hazardous
energy control training and is authorized to lockout or tagout a specific machine or equipment to
perform service or maintenance. A person must be certified as an Authorized Lockout/Tagout
Employee in order to apply a lock or tag to control hazardous energy. All Authorized
Lockout/Tagout Employees must be trained in:
 Electrical Safety/Lockout/Tagout Training
 Equipment specific procedures in their individual work units
Confined space - An enclosed space which has limited egress and access, and has an atmospheric
hazard (e.g., explosive atmosphere or asphyxiating hazard) and/or other serious safety hazards (e.g.,
electrical hazard).
Damp location - Partially protected locations subject to moderate degrees of moisture, such as
some basements.
De-energized electrical work - Electrical work that is performed on equipment that has been
previously energized and is now free from any electrical connection to a source of potential
difference and from electrical charges.
Disconnecting (or Isolating) switch - A device designed to close and/or open an electric circuit.
Dry location - Locations not normally subject to dampness or wetness, as in the case of a building
under construction.
Energized electrical work - Repair, maintenance, troubleshooting, or testing on electrical circuits,
components, or systems while energized (i.e., live).
Energy source - Any source of electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical, thermal, or
other energy.
Exposed electrical parts - Energized parts that can be inadvertently touched or approached nearer
than a safe distance by a person. Parts not suitably guarded, isolated, or insulated. Examples
include terminal contacts or lugs, and bare wiring.
Flash Protection Boundary - An approach limit distance from exposed live parts within which a
person could receive a second degree burn if an electrical arc flash were to occur.
Ground Fault Circuit Interrupt (GFCI) - A device whose function is to interrupt the electric
circuit to the load when a fault current to ground exceeds a predetermined value that is less than that
required to operate the over-current protective device of the supply circuit.
Ground - A conducting connection, whether intentional or accidental, between an electrical circuit
or equipment and the earth or to some conducting body that serves in place of the earth.
Hazardous Location - An area in which an airborne flammable dust, vapor or gas may be present
and would represent a hazard if a source of ignition were present (see National Fire Protection
Association (NFPA) Class I & II and Division 1 & 2).
Interlock - An electrical, mechanical, or key-locked device intended to prevent an undesired
sequence of operations.
Isolating Switch - A switch intended for isolating an electric circuit from the source of power. It
has no interrupting rating, and is intended to operate only after the circuit has been opened by some
other means.
Life Safety Equipment - Equipment that provides critical protection for safety in the event of an
emergency or other serious hazard. Life safety equipment, which is electrically energized, should be
worked on using Energized Electrical Equipment (EEW) procedures to ensure that the protection
provided by the equipment is not lost (e.g., fire alarm and evacuation).
Limited Approach Boundary – An approach limit is a distance from an exposed live part within
which a shock hazard exists.
Lockout - The placement of a lock on an energy-isolating device according to procedure, ensuring
that the energy isolating device and the equipment being controlled cannot be operated until the
lockout device is removed.
Lockout / tagout - A standard that covers the servicing and maintenance of machines and
equipment in which the unexpected re-energization of the equipment or release of stored energy
could cause injury to employees. It establishes performance requirements for the control of such
hazardous energy.
Prohibited Approach Boundary – An approach limit distance from an exposed live part within
which work is considered the same as making contact with the live part.
Qualified Electrical Worker – A qualified person trained and knowledgeable of construction and
operation of equipment or a specific work method and is trained to recognize and avoid the
electrical hazards that might be present with respect to that equipment or work method.
Qualified electrical workers shall be familiar with the proper use of the special precautionary
techniques, personal protective equipment (PPE), including arc-flash, insulating and shielding
materials, and insulated tools and test equipment. A person can be considered qualified with respect
to certain equipment and methods but is unqualified for others.
 An employee who is undergoing on-the-job training and who, in the course of such training,
has performed duties safely at his or her level of training and who is under the direct
supervision of a qualified person shall be considered to be qualified.
 Only a Qualified Electrical Worker is allowed to work on energized circuits.
 Qualified electrical workers shall not be assigned to work alone, except for replacing fuses,
operating switches, or other operations that do not require the employee to contact energized
high voltage conductors or energized parts of equipment, clearing trouble, or emergencies
involving hazard to life or property.
Restricted Approach Boundary – An approach limit distance from an exposed live part within
which there is an increased risk of shock, due to electrical arc-over combined with inadvertent
movement, for personnel working in close proximity to the live part.
Remote-control Circuit - Any electric circuit that controls any other circuit through a relay or an
equivalent device.
Service - The conductors and equipment for delivering energy from the electricity supply system to
the wiring system of the premises served.
Service Equipment - The necessary equipment, usually consisting of a circuit breaker or switch
and fuses, and their accessories, located near the entrance of supply conductors to the building and
intended to constitute the main control and means of cutoff of the supply.
Setting Up - Any work performed to prepare a machine or equipment to perform its normal
production operation.
Switching Devices - Devices designed to close and/or open one or more electric circuits. Included
in this category are circuit breakers, cutouts, disconnecting (or isolating) switches, disconnecting
means, interrupter switches, and oil (filled) cutouts.
Tagout - The placement of a tagout device on an energy-isolating device according to procedure to
indicate that the equipment may not be operated until the tagout device is removed.
Voltage (of a circuit) - The greatest root-mean-square (effective) difference of potential between
any two conductors of the circuit concerned.
Voltage, high - Circuits with a nominal voltage more than 50 volts.
Voltage, low - Circuits with a nominal voltage less than or equal to 50 volts.
Voltage, nominal - An approximate value assigned to a circuit or system for the purpose of
conveniently designating its voltage class, e.g., 120/240, 480/277, and 600.
Wet location - Installations subject to saturation with water or other liquids.
Electrical Hazards
Electricity-related hazards include electric shock and burns, arc-flash burns, arc-blast impacts, and
falls.
 Electric shock and burns. An electric shock occurs when electric current passes through
the body. This can happen when touching an energized part. If the electric current passes
across the chest or head, death can result. At high voltages, severe burns can result.
 Arc-flash burns. An electric arc flash can occur if a conductive object gets too close to a
high-amp current source or by equipment failure (for instance, while opening or closing
disconnects). The arc can heat the air to temperatures as high as 35,000o F, and vaporize
metal in the equipment. The arc flash can cause severe skin burns by direct heat exposure
and by igniting clothing.
 Arc-blast impacts. The heating of air and vaporization of metal creates a pressure wave that
can damage hearing and cause memory loss (from concussion) and other injuries. Flying
metal parts are also a hazard.
 Falls. Electric shocks and arc blasts can cause falls, especially from ladders or unguarded
scaffolding.
Portable Electrical Equipment and Extension Cords
The following requirements apply to the use of cord-and-plug-connected equipment and flexible
cord sets (extension cords):
 Extension cords may only be used to provide temporary power.
 Portable cord-and-plug connected equipment and extension cords must be visually inspected
before use on any shift for external defects such as loose parts, deformed and missing pins,
or damage to outer jacket or insulation, and for possible internal damage such as pinched or
crushed outer jacket. Any defective cord or cord-and-plug-connected equipment must be
removed from service and no person may use it until it is repaired and tested to ensure it is
safe for use.
 Extension cords must be of the three-wire type. Extension cords and flexible cords must be
designed for hard or extra hard usage (for example, types S, ST, and SO). The rating or
approval must be visible.
 Job-made extension cords are forbidden per the electrical code.
 Personnel performing work on renovation or construction sites using extension cords or
where work is performed in damp or wet locations must be provided, and must use, a
ground-fault circuit interrupter (GFCI).
 Portable equipment must be handled in a manner that will not cause damage. Flexible
electric cords connected to equipment may not be used for raising or lowering the
equipment.
 Extension cords must be protected from damage. Sharp corners and projects must be
avoided. Flexible cords may not be run through windows or doors unless protected from
damage, and then only on a temporary basis. Flexible cords may not be run above ceilings
or inside or through walls, ceilings or floors, and may not be fastened with staples or
otherwise hung in such a fashion as to damage the outer jacket or insulation.
 Cords must be covered by a cord protector or tape when they extend into a walkway or other
path of travel to avoid creating a trip hazard.
 Extension cords used with grounding-type equipment must contain an equipment-grounding
conductor (i.e., the cord must accept a three-prong, or grounded, plug).
 Attachment plugs and receptacles may not be connected or altered in any way that would
interrupt the continuity of the equipment grounding conductor. Additionally, these devices
may not be altered to allow the grounding pole to be inserted into current connector slots.
Clipping the grounding prong from an electrical plug is prohibited.
 Flexible cords may only be plugged into grounded receptacles. The continuity of the ground
in a two-prong outlet must be verified before use. Adapters that interrupt the continuity of
the equipment grounding connection may not be used.
 All portable electric equipment and flexible cords used in highly conductive work locations,
such as those with water or other conductive liquids, or in places where employees are likely
to contact water or conductive liquids, must be approved for those locations.
 Employee's hands must be dry when plugging and unplugging flexible cords and
cord-and-plug connected equipment if energized equipment is involved.
 If the connection could provide a conducting path to employees hands (for example, if a
cord connector is wet from being immersed in water), the energized plug and receptacle
connections must be handled only with insulating protective equipment.
 Locking-type connectors must be properly locked into the connector.
 Lamps for general illumination must be protected from breakage, and metal shell sockets
must be grounded.
 Temporary lights must not be suspended by their cords unless they have been designed for
this purpose.
 Portable lighting used in wet or conductive locations, such as tanks or boilers, must be
operated at no more than 12 volts or must be protected by GFCI’s.
 Extension cords are considered to be temporary wiring, and must also comply with the
section on “Requirements for Temporary Wiring” in this program.
Requirements for Temporary Wiring
Temporary electrical power and lighting installations 600 volts or less, including flexible cords,
cables and extension cords, may only be used during and for renovation, maintenance, repair, or
experimental work. The duration for temporary wiring used for decorative lighting for special
events and similar purposes may not exceed 90 days. The following additional requirements apply:
 Ground-fault protection (e.g., ground-fault circuit interrupters or GFCI) must be provided on
all temporary-wiring circuits, including extension cords, used on construction sites.
 In general, all equipment and tools connected by cord and plug must be grounded. Listed or
labeled double insulated tools and appliances need not be grounded.
 Feeders must originate in an approved distribution center, such as a panel board, that is rated
for the voltages and currents the system is expected to carry.
 Branch circuits must originate in an approved power outlet or panel board.
 Neither bare conductors nor earth returns may be used for the wiring of any temporary
circuit.
 Receptacles must be of the grounding type. Each branch circuit must contain a separate
equipment-grounding conductor, and all receptacles must be electrically connected to the
grounding conductor.
 Flexible cords and cables must be of an approved type and suitable for the location and
intended use. They may only be used for pendants, wiring of fixtures, connection of
portable lamps or appliances, elevators, hoists, connection of stationary equipment where
frequently interchanged, prevention of transmission of noise or vibration, data processing
cables, or where needed to permit maintenance or repair. They may not be used as a
substitute for the fixed wiring, where run through holes in walls, ceilings or floors, where
run through doorways, windows or similar openings, where attached to building surfaces, or
where concealed behind building walls, ceilings or floors.
 Suitable disconnecting switches or plug connects must be installed to permit the
disconnection of all ungrounded conductors of each temporary circuit.
 Lamps for general illumination must be protected from accidental contact or damage, either
by elevating the fixture or by providing a suitable guard. Hand lamps supplied by flexible
cord must be equipped with a handle of molded composition or other approved material and
must be equipped with a substantial bulb guard.
 Flexible cords and cables must be protected from accidental damage. Sharp corners and
projections are to be avoided. Flexible cords and cables must be protected from damage
when they pass through doorways or other pinch points.
Wet or Damp Locations
Work in wet or damp work locations (i.e., areas surrounded or near water or other liquids) should
not be performed unless it is absolutely critical. Electrical work should be postponed until the
liquid can be cleaned up. The following special precautions must be incorporated while performing
work in damp locations:
 Only use electrical cords that have Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCIs);
 Place a dry barrier over any wet or damp work surface;
 Remove standing water before beginning work. Work is prohibited in areas where there is
standing water;
 Do not use electrical extension cords in wet or damp locations; and
 Keep electrical cords away from standing water.
Working on De-energized equipment
Electrically Safe Condition
The most important principle of electrical safety is to assume all electric circuits are energized
unless each involved worker ensures they are not. Every circuit and conductor must be tested
every time work is done on them. Proper PPE must be worn until the equipment is proven to be deenergized.
 Voltage rated gloves and leather protectors must be worn
 Electrically insulated shoes should be worn
 Approved insulating mats
 Safety glasses must be worn
 The required Arc Flash PPE must also be worn
The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) lists six steps to ensure conditions for electrically
safe work.
1. Identify all sources of power to the equipment. Check applicable up-to-date drawings,
diagrams, and identification tags.
2. Remove the load current, and then open the disconnecting devices for each power source.
3. Where possible, visually verify that blades of disconnecting devices are fully open or that
drawout-type circuit breakers are fully withdrawn.
4. Apply lockout/tagout devices in accordance with a formal, written policy.
5. Test each phase conductor or circuit part with an adequately rated voltage detector to verify
that the equipment is de-energized. Test each phase conductor or circuit part both phase-tophase and phase-to-ground. Check the voltage detector before and after each test to be sure
it is working.
6. Properly ground all possible sources of induced voltage and stored electric energy (such as,
capacitors) before touching. If conductors or circuit parts that are being de-energized could
contact other exposed conductors or circuit parts, apply ground-connecting devices rated for
the available fault current.
The process of de-energizing is "live" work and can result in an arc flash due to equipment
failure. When de-energizing, follow the procedures described in "Working On or Near Live
Equipment."
Vehicular and Mechanical Equipment
When work must be performed near overhead lines, the lines shall be de-energized and grounded, or
other protective measures shall be provided before work is started.
 If the lines are to be de-energized, arrangements shall be made with the person or
organization that operates or controls the electric circuits involved to de-energize and
ground them.
 If protective measures, such as guarding, isolating or insulating are provided, these
precautions shall prevent employees from contacting such lines directly with any part of
their body or indirectly through conductive materials, tools or equipment
Working on or near energized equipment
Working on live circuits means actually touching energized parts. Working near live circuits means
working close enough to energized parts to pose a risk even though work is on de-energized parts.
Common tasks where there may be a need to work on or near live circuits include:





Taking voltage measurements
Opening and closing disconnects and breakers
Racking breakers on and off the bus
Removing panels and dead fronts
Opening electric equipment doors for inspection
Facilities should adopt standard written procedures and training for these common tasks. For
instance, when opening and closing disconnects, use the left-hand rule when possible (stand to the
right side of the equipment and operate the disconnect switch with the left hand).
Energized Electrical Work Permit For 240 Volts and Higher
 If live parts are not placed in an electrically safe condition, work to be performed shall be
considered energized electrical work and shall be performed by written permit only.
 Work related to testing, troubleshooting, and voltage measuring may be completed without a
permit provided appropriate safe work practices and PPE are used.
 The permit must be originated by the qualified electrical worker.
 Energized Work Permits shall be submitted to the appropriate supervisor for each job site.
 The permit must be posted in an appropriate location where the energized work is taking
place for the duration of the task.
Approach Distances to Exposed Live Parts
The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) defines 3 approach distances for shock hazards
and one for arc flash.
 The limited approach boundary is the distance from an exposed live part within which a
shock hazard exists.
 The restricted approach boundary is the closest distance to exposed live parts a qualified
person can approach with without proper PPE and tools. Inside this boundary, accidental
movement can put a part of the body or conductive tools in contact with live parts or inside
the prohibited approach boundary. To cross the restricted approach boundary, the qualified
person must:
1. Have an energized work permit that is approved by the supervisor or manager
responsible for the safety plan.
2. Use PPE suitable for working near exposed lived parts and rated for the voltage and
energy level involved.
3. Be certain that no part of the body enters the prohibited space.
4. Minimize the risk from unintended movement, by keeping as much of the body as
possible out of the restricted space; body parts in the restricted space should be
protected.
 The prohibited approach boundary is the minimum approach distance to exposed live
parts to prevent flashover or arcing. Approaching any closer is comparable to making direct
contact with a live part. To cross the prohibited approach boundary, the qualified person
must:
1. Have specified training to work on exposed live parts.
2. Have a permit with proper written work procedures and justifying the need to work
that close.
3. Do a risk analysis.
4. Have (2) and (3) approved by the appropriate supervisor.
5. Use PPE appropriate for working near exposed live parts and rated for the voltage
and energy level involved.
 The Flash Protection Boundary is the approach limit at a distance from exposed live parts
within which a person could receive a second degree burn if an electrical arc flash were to
occur.
1. Use PPE appropriate for working near exposed live parts and rated for the voltage and
energy level involved.
2. For systems of 600 volts and less, the flash protection boundary is 4 feet, based on an
available bolted fault current of 50 kA and a clearing time of 6 cycles for the circuit breaker
to act, or any combination of fault currents and clearing times not exceeding 300 kA cycles.
3. When working on de-energized parts and inside the flash protection boundary for nearby
live exposed parts:
a. If the parts cannot be de-energized, use barriers such as insulted blankets to protect
against accidental contact or wear proper PPE.
Other Precautions
When working on de-energized the parts, but still inside the flash protection boundary for nearby
live exposed parts:
 If the parts cannot be de-energized, barriers such as insulated blankets must be used to
protect against accidental contact or PPE must be worn.
 Employees shall not reach blindly into areas that might contain exposed live parts.
 Employees shall not enter spaces containing live parts unless illumination is provided that
allows the work to be performed safely.
 Conductive articles of jewelry and clothing (such as watchbands, bracelets, rings, key
chains, necklaces, metalized aprons, cloth with conductive thread, metal headgear, or metal
frame glasses) shall not be worn where they present an electrical contact hazard with
exposed live parts.
 Conductive materials, tools, and equipment that are in contact with any part of an
employee’s body shall be handled in a manner that prevents accidental contact with live
parts. Such materials and equipment include, but are not limited to long conductive objects
such as ducts, pipes, tubes, conductive hose and rope, metal-lined rules and scales, steel
tapes, pulling lines, metal scaffold parts, structural members, and chains.
 When an employee works in a confined space or enclosed spaces (such as a manhole or
vault) that contains exposed live parts, the employee shall use protective shields, barriers or
insulating materials as necessary to avoid contact with these parts. Doors, hinged panels,
and the like shall be secured to prevent them from swinging into employees. Refer to the
confined space
Personal Protective Equipment
General Requirements
 Employees working in areas where there are potential electrical hazards must be provided
with and use personal protective equipment (PPE) that is appropriate for the specific work to
be performed. The electrical tools and protective equipment must be specifically approved,
rated, and tested for the levels of voltage of which an employee may be exposed.
 Each facility shall provide electrical protective equipment (Arc Flash Gear)) required by this
program. Such equipment shall include 11 calorie, and 40 calorie rated Arc Flash apparel
(until a full arc flash hazard analysis is made), eye protection, head protection, hand
protection, insulated footwear, and face shields where necessary.
Protective Clothing Characteristics
Category
0
1
2
3
Cal/cm2
1.2
5
8
25
4
40
Clothing
Untreated Cotton
Flame retardant (FR) shirt and FR pants
Cotton underwear, FR shirt and FR pants
Cotton underwear, FR shirt, FR pants and FR coveralls
Cotton underwear, FR shirt, FR pants and double layer
switching coat and pants
 Employees shall wear nonconductive head protection whenever there is a danger of head
injury from electric shock or burns due to contact with live parts or from flying objects
resulting from an electrical explosion.
 Employees shall wear protective equipment for the eyes whenever there is a danger of injury
from electric arcs, flashes, or from flying objects resulting from an electrical explosion.
 Employees shall wear rubber insulating gloves where there is a danger of hand or arm
contact with live parts or possible exposure to arc flash burn.
 Where insulated footwear is used as protection against step and touch potential, dielectric
overshoes shall be required. Insulated soles shall not be used as primary electrical
protection.
 Face shields without arc rating shall not be used for electrical work. Safety glasses or
goggles must always be worn underneath face shields.
 Additional illumination may be needed when using tinted face shields as protection during
electrical work.
 Electrical Protective Equipment must be selected to meet the criteria established by the
American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) and by the America National Standards
Institute (ANSI).
 Insulating equipment made of materials other than rubber shall provide electrical and
mechanical protection at least equal to that of rubber equipment.
 PPE must be maintained in a safe, reliable condition and be inspected for damage before
each day's use and immediately following any incident that can reasonably be suspected of
having caused damage.
 Employees must use insulated tools and handling equipment that are rated for the voltages to
be encountered when working near exposed energized conductors or circuit. Tools and
handling equipment should be replaced if the insulating capability is decreased due to
damage. Protective gloves must be used when employees are working with exposed
electrical parts above fifty (50) volts.
 Fuse handling equipment (insulated for circuit voltage) must be used to remove or install
fuses when the fuse terminals are energized. Ropes and hand lines used near exposed
energized parts must be non-conductive.
 Protective shields, barriers or insulating materials must be used to protect each employee
from shock, burns, or other electrical injuries while that person is working near exposed
energized parts that might be accidentally contacted or where dangerous electric heating or
arcing might occur.
Flame-Resistant Apparel & Under Layers
 FR apparel shall be visually inspected before each use. FR apparel that is contaminated or
damaged shall not be used. Protective items that become contaminated with grease, oil
flammable liquids, or combustible liquids shall not be used.
 The garment manufacturer’s instructions for care and maintenance of FR apparel shall be
followed.
 When the apparel is worn to protect an employee, it shall cover all ignitable clothing and
allow for movement and visibility.
 FR apparel must cover potentially exposed areas as completely as possible. FR shirt sleeves
must be fastened and FR shirts/jackets must be closed at the neck.
 Non-melting, flammable garments (i.e. cotton, wool, rayon, silk, or blends of these
materials) may be used as under layers beneath FR apparel.
 Meltable fibers such as acetate, nylon, polyester, polypropylene, and spandex shall not be
permitted in fabric under layers next to skin. (An incidental amount of elastic used on nonmelting fabric underwear or socks shall be permitted).
 FR garments worn as outer layers over FR apparel (i.e. jackets or rainwear) must also be
made from FR material.
 Flash suits must permit easy and rapid removal by the user.
Rubber Insulating Equipment
 Rubber insulating equipment includes protective devices such as gloves, sleeves, blankets,
and matting.
 Insulating equipment must be inspected for damage before each day’s use and immediately
following any incident that could have caused damage.
 An air test must be performed on rubber insulating gloves before each use.
 Insulating equipment found to have defects that might affect its insulating properties must be
removed from service until testing indicates that it is acceptable for continued use.
 Where the insulating capability of protective equipment is subject to damage during use, the
insulating material shall be protected by an outer covering of leather or other appropriate
materials.
 Rubber insulating equipment must be tested according to the schedule supplied by the
manufacturer.
 Rubber insulating equipment must be stored in an area protected from light, temperature
extremes, excessive humidity, ozone, and other substances and conditions that my cause
damage.
 No repairs to rubber insulating equipment shall be attempted without the approval of the
safety manager or coordinator.
Insulated Tools and Materials
 Only insulated tools and equipment shall be used within the Limited Approach Boundary of
exposed energized parts.
 Insulated tools shall be rated for the voltages on which they are used.
 Insulated tools shall be designed and constructed for the environment to which they are
exposed and the manner in which they are used.
 Fuse or fuse holder handling equipment, insulated for the circuit voltage, shall be used to
removed or install a fuse if the fuse terminals are energized.
 Ropes and hand-lines used near exposed energized parts shall be nonconductive.
 Portable ladders used for electrical work shall have nonconductive side rails.
Access Limiting Equipment
 Barricades shall be used in conjunction with safety signs to prevent or limit access to work
areas containing live parts. Conductive barricades shall not be used where they might cause
an electrical hazard. Barricades shall be placed no closer than the Limited Approach
Boundary.
 If signs and barricades do not provide sufficient protection, an attendant will be assigned to
warn and protect pedestrians. The primary duty of the attendant shall be to keep an
unqualified person out of the work area where an electrical hazard exists. The attendant
shall remain in the area as long as there is a potential exposure to electrical hazards.
Working Space
 Spaces about Electric Equipment. Sufficient access and working space shall be provided
and maintained about all electric equipment to permit ready and safe operating and
maintenance of such equipment. Enclosures that house electric apparatus and are controlled
by lock and key shall be considered accessible to qualified persons.
 Working Space. Working space for equipment operating at 600 volts, nominal, or less to
ground and likely to require examination, adjustment, services or maintenance while
energized shall comply with the dimensions of 70E 400.15(A)(1), 400.15(A)(2), and
400.15(A)(3) or as required or permitted elsewhere in the 70E Standard.
 Depth of Working Space. The depth of the working space in the direction of live parts
shall be not less than that indicated in Table 400.15(A)(1) unless the requirements of
400.15(A)(1)(a), 400.15(A)(1)(b), or 400.15(A)(1)(c) are met. Distances shall be measured
from the exposed live parts if such are exposed or from the enclosure or opening if the live
parts are enclosed.
Table 400.15(A)(1) Working Spaces
Nominal Voltage to Ground
0-150
151-600
Condition 1
900mm(3 ft)
900mm(3 ft)
Minimum Clear Distance
Condition 2
Condition 3
900 mm(3 ft)
900mm(3 ft)
1m(3-1/2 ft)
1.2 m (4 ft)
Condition 1: Exposed live parts on one side and no live or grounded parts on the other side of the
working space, or exposed live parts on both sides effectively guarded by suitable wood or other
insulating materials. Insulated wire or insulated busbars operating at not over 300 volts to ground
shall not be considered live parts.
Condition 2: Exposed live parts on one side and grounded parts on the other side. Concrete, brick,
or tile walls shall be considered as grounded surfaces.
Condition 3: Exposed live parts on both sides of the work space (not guarded as provided in
condition 1) with the operator between.
 Dead-front Assemblies. Working space shall not be required in the back or sides of
assemblies, such as dead-front switchboards or motor control centers, where all connections
and all renewable or adjustable parts, such as fuses or switches, are accessible from
locations other than the back or sides. Where rear access is required to work on nonelectrical parts on the back of enclosed equipment, a minimum horizontal working space of
762mm (30 in) shall be provided.
 Low Voltage. Smaller working spaces can be permitted where all un-insulated parts operate
at not greater than 30 volts RMS, 42 volts peak, or 60 volts dc.
 Existing Buildings. In existing buildings were electric equipment is being replaced,
Condition 2 working clearance shall be permitted between dead-front switch boards, panel
boards, or motor control centers located across the aisle from each other where conditions of
maintenance and supervision ensure that written procedures have been adopted to prohibit
equipment on bother sides of the aisle from being open at the same time. Qualified
electrical workers who are authorized will service the installation.
Width of Working Space. The width of the working space in front of the electrical equipment
shall be the width of the equipment or 750 mm (30 in), whichever is greater. In all cases, the work
space shall permit at least a 90 degree opening of equipment doors or hinged panels.
Height of Working Space. The workspace shall be clear and extend from the grade, floor, or
platform to the height required by 70E 400.15(E). Within the height requirements of this section,
other equipment that is associated with the electrical installation and is located above or below the
electrical equipment shall be permitted to extend not more than 150 mm (6 in) beyond the front of
the electrical equipment.
Clear Spaces. Working space required by the 70E standard shall not be used for storage. When
normally enclosed live parts operating at 50 volts or more are exposed for inspection or service, the
working space, if in a passageway or general open spaced shall be suitably guarded.
Access and Entrance to Working Space
 Minimum Required. At least one entrance of sufficient area shall be provided to give access
to the working space about electric equipment.
 Large Equipment. For equipment rated 1200 amperes or more and over 1.8 m (6ft) wide
that contains over current devices, switching devices, or control devices, there shall be one
entrance to the required working space not less than 610 mm (24in) wide and 2.0 m (6-1/2
ft) high at each end of the working space. Where the entrance has a personnel door(s0, the
doors (s) shall open in the direction of egress and be equipped with panic bars, pressure
plates, or other devices that are normally latched but open under simple pressures. A single
entrance to the required working space shall be permitted where either of the conditions in
400.14(c)(2)(a) or 400.14(c)(2)(b) is met.
 Unobstructed Exit. Where the location permits a continuous and unobstructed way of exit
travel, a single entrance to the working space shall be permitted.
 Extra Working Space. Where the depth of the working space is twice that required by
400.15(A)(1), a singled entrance shall be permitted. It shall be located so that the distance
from the equipment to the nearest edge of the entrance is not less than the minimum clear
distance specified in Table 400.15(A)(1) for equipment operating at that voltage and in that
condition.
Illumination
Illumination shall be provided for all working spaces about service equipment, switchboards, panel
boards, or motor control centers installed indoors. Additional lighting outlets shall not be required
where the work space is illuminated by an adjacent light source. In electrical equipment rooms, the
illumination shall not be controlled by automatic means only.
Headroom
The minimum headroom of working spaces about service equipment, switchboards, panel boards, or
motor control centers shall be 2.0 m (6-1.2 ft). Where the electrical equipment exceeds 2.0 m (61/2
ft) in height, the minimum headroom shall not be less than the height of the equipment.
Dedicated Equipment Space
All switchboards, panel boards, distribution boards, and motor control centers shall be located in
dedicated spaces and protected from damage. Exception: Control equipment that by its very nature
or because of other rules of the standard must be adjacent to or within sight of the operating
machinery shall be permitted in those locations.
Training Requirements
Workers near energized, or potentially energized electrical circuitry of fifty (50) volts to ground or
greater, shall be trained in energized electrical safe work practices and procedures and retrained as
necessary.
Qualified Electrical Worker
Employees must receive training in avoiding the electrical hazards associated with working on or
near exposed energized parts prior to performing energized electrical work. Such training will be
provided when the employee is initially assigned to the job and refresher training will be provided
every three years or when conditions change.
The following items are to be included in the training of Qualified Electrical Workers:
 Demonstrate a working knowledge of the National Electrical Code.
 The Lockout/Tagout Training Program including safe work practices required to safely deenergize electrical equipment.
 Universal electrical safety procedures.
 Skills and techniques necessary to distinguish exposed live parts from other parts of electric
equipment.
 Perform on-the-job training with a qualified electrical worker.
 Skills and techniques necessary to determine the nominal voltage of exposed live parts.
 The approach distances specified in Table 130.2(C) and the corresponding voltages to which
the qualified electrical worker will be exposed.
 Selection and use of proper work practices, personal protective equipment, tools, insulating
and shielding materials and equipment for working on or near energized parts.
Qualified Electrical Workers must be also be trained in recognizing signs and symptoms of electric
shock, heart fibrillation, electric burns, and proper first aid protocols for these conditions. They
must have the following training:
 Basic Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)
 Automatic External Defibrillator (AED)
 Contacting emergency personnel and basic first aid.
Documentation of Training and Experience
Documentation of training shall be kept by each institution, campus or agency. Experience received
by Qualified Electrical Workers must be maintained for all personnel covered by this program.
Documentation is necessary to demonstrate that individuals have met the training and experience
requirements for the types of work being performed.
Appendix
Energized Electrical Work Permit.
Electrical Safety Training Checklist
Hazard/Risk Category Selections Table
PPE Matrix Table
Protective Clothing Characteristics Table
Simplified Protective Clothing Table
Table 130(2). Approach boundaries to live parts for shock prevention
(All dimensions are distance from live part to employee)
Limited approach boundary
Nominal system
Exposed
voltage range,
movable
phase to phase
conductor
0 to 50 volts
Not specified
Exposed
Restricted approach
Prohibited
fixed- circuit boundary (allowing for
approach
part
accidental movement)
boundary
Not specified Not specified
Not specified
51 to 300 volts
10 ft. 0 in.
3 ft. 6 in.
Avoid contact
Avoid contact
301 to 750 volts
10 ft. 0 in.
3 ft. 6 in.
1 ft. 0 in.
0 ft. 1 in.
751 to 15 kV
10 ft. 0 in.
5 ft. 0 in.
2 ft. 2 in.
0 ft. 7 in.
15.1 kV to 36 kV
10 ft. 0 in.
6 ft. 0 in
2 ft. 7 in.
0 ft. 10 in.
36.1 kV to 46 kV
10 ft. 0 in.
8 ft. 0 in
2 ft 9 in.
1 ft. 5 in.
46.1 kV to 72.5 kV 10 ft. 0 in.
8 ft. 0 in.
3 ft 2 in.
2 ft. 1 in.
72.6 kV to 121 kV 10 ft. 8 in.
8 ft. 0 in.
3 ft. 3 in.
2 ft. 8 in.
138 to 145
11 ft 0 in
10 ft. 0 in.
3 ft. 7 in
3 ft. 1 in.
161 kV to 169 kV
11 ft 8 in.
11 ft. 8 in.
4 ft. 0 in.
3 ft. 6 in.
230 kV to 242 kV
13 ft. 0 in.
13 ft. 0 in.
5 ft. 3 in.
4 ft. 9 in.
345 kV to 262 kV
15 ft. 4 in
15 ft. 4 in.
8ft. 6 in.
8 ft. 0 in.
Source: From a portion of table 2-1.3.4, Approach Boundaries to Live Parts for Shock Protection
(NFPA 70E Standard for Electrical Safety Requirements for Employee Workplaces, 2004 edition).
FR - flame resistant. ATPV - arc thermal performance exposure value of the clothing in
calories/cm2. Source: Based on Table F-1 in appendix F of NFPA 70E, Electrical Safety
Requirements for Employee Workplaces, 2000.
ENERGIZED ELECTRICAL WORK PERMIT
(For Applications of 240 volts or greater)
1.
Work Location:
2.
Work order/project #:
3.
Description of the work to be done:
4.
Check the following considerations when they apply:
Work is within the restricted approach boundary and there is a work plan
Work is within the prohibited approach boundary, it is very hazardous and there is a work
plan
Request to shut down equipment was made
Conducted a shock hazard analysis
Shock protection boundaries have been determined
Flash hazard analysis has been made and the results are known
Flash protection boundary has been determined
Personal protective equipment including tools needed for the job have been determined and
are available
Unqualified persons are restricted from the work area
Safe work practices that need to be employed have been considered
Job can be done safely
(Signature, Electrically Qualified Person)
(Date)
(Signature, Immediate Supervisor)
(Date)
ELECTRICAL SAFETY TRAINING CHECKLIST
ELECTRICAL SAFETY TRAINING CHECKLIST
TRAINING ITEM
YES N/A
SCOPE AND TRAINING
1. All employees who work on, near or with premises wiring,
wiring for connections to supply, other wiring, and installation
of optical fiber cable along with electrical conductors have
been trained as either qualified or unqualified workers.
2. Unqualified person have been trained in and are familiar with
any electrically related safety practices not covered by this
standard but necessary for their safety.
3. Qualified persons trained in and familiar with:
a)
b)
c)
d)
Skills and techniques necessary to distinguish exposed
live parts from other parts of electric equipment.
Voltage determination.
Clearance distances that must be maintained.
Training conducted has been specific to the hazards to
which the employee may or will be exposed and their
particular job duties.
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SELECTION AND USE OF WORK PRACTICES
1. Work practices used to prevent electric shock and other
injuries address de-energized parts which may be energized.
2. Work practices used to prevent electric shock and other
injuries address exposure to energized parts.
3. Procedure provided for work on or near exposed de-energized
parts includes:
a)
b)
Written procedures specific to the equipment or
worksite.
De-energizing equipment.
c)
Application of locks and tags.
4. Working on or near exposed energized parts:
COMMENTS
a)
b)
c)
d)
e)
f)
All employees near enough to be exposed to a hazard
have been trained, and are aware of the practices that
must be followed to protect them from the hazard.
Only qualified employees work on energized parts.
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Overhead lines de-energized and grounded prior to
working near them or other protective measures used.
Unqualified persons working near overhead lines are
aware that they may not come approach, or use
conductive objects closer than, 10 feet for lines up to
50 kV, or 10 feet plus 4 inches for every 10 kV over 50
kV.
Qualified persons have a working knowledge of the
allowable approach distances of this program.
Vehicle and mechanical equipment operators
understand that they must maintain:
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i)
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ii)
A clear distance of 10 feet plus 4 inches for
every 10 kV over 50 kV while working near
energized overhead lines.
A clear distance of 4 feet plus 4 inches for
every 10 kV over 50 kV while in transit.
TRAINING ITEM
iii)
g)
h)
i)
Insulating barriers are used and installed as
required.
iv)
Insulated aerial lift operated by a qualified
person must comply with the separation
distances.
v)
Employees standing on the ground understand
they may not contact the vehicle unless using
protective equipment rated for the voltage or
the equipment located so no un-insulated part
can provide a conductive path to persons on the
ground.
Illumination is provided at all worksites to assure safe
work.
Protective shields and barriers provided and used for
work in confined spaces to prevent contact with
exposed energized parts.
All conductive materials such as pipes, rods, etc. are
handled so as to prevent contact with exposed
energized parts.
YES N/A
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COMMENTS
j)
k)
l)
m)
Conductive articles of clothing and jewelry such as
watches, rings, etc. are not worn if they might contact
exposed energized parts unless rendered
nonconductive.
Portable ladders with nonconductive side rails are used
when working near or on exposed energized
conductors.
Housekeeping conducted only when exposed energized
parts may not be contacted. Barriers provided and
nonconductive cleaning materials used.
Only qualified persons allowed to defeat electrical
interlocks on temporary basis while they work on
equipment.
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USE OF EQUIPMENT
1. Portable electric equipment such as cord-and-plug connected
equipment, including flexible cords:
a)
b)
c)
d)
e)
f)
g)
h)
i)
j)
k)
Handled in a manner to avoid damage.
Not used to raise or lower equipment.
Not fastened with staples or hung so as to damage
insulation.
Visually inspected before each use on each shift.
Defective items removed from service and not used
until rendered safe.
Plugs and receptacles mate properly.
Flexible grounding-type cords have a grounding
conductor.
Grounding plug not defeated.
Adapters which interrupt grounding continuity not
used.
Approved equipment used for work in conductive work
locations (e.g. wet locations, etc.).
Locking-type connectors are properly secured after
connection.
TRAINING ITEM
Y
ES
N/
A
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ELECTRIC POWER AND LIGHTING CIRCUITS
1. Only load rated switches or circuit breakers used as
disconnecting means.
2. Circuits not manually reenergized until it is determined
that it is safe to do so.
3. Overcurrent protection of circuits not modified.
TEST INSTRUMENTS AND EQUIPMENT
1. Used by qualified persons only.
2. Visually inspected before use.
3. If circuit tested is over 600 volts, nominal, test
instrument tested for proper operation before and
immediately after the test.
4. Test instrument rated for the circuit to be tested and
appropriate for the environment.
5. Electrical equipment capable of igniting flammable or
ignitable materials not used if present in the worksite.
SAFEGUARDS FOR PERSONNEL PROTECTION
1. Protective equipment used when there is exposure to
potential electrical hazards.
2. Protective equipment maintained in safe and reliable
condition and tested and inspected as required.
3. Protective equipment protected from damage during
use.
4. Approved electrically rated hardhats used as needed to
protect head from electric shock or burns.
5. Safety glasses or goggles used as needed to protect
eyes or face when there is a danger of arcs, flashes or
flying objects.
6. Approved gloves worn that are appropriate for the
hazard present
7. Insulated tools or handling equipment used when
conductors may be contacted.
8. Insulated fuse handling equipment used to remove or
install fuses when terminals are energized.
COMMENTS
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1. Safety signs and tags used when necessary to warn
employees about electrical hazards.
2. Barricades used with safety signs when necessary to
prevent or limit employee access to work areas with
un-insulated energized conductors or parts.
3. Attendants stationed as needed to warn when signs or
barricades are not sufficient to prevent unauthorized
access.
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Name of Trainer:
Date:
9. Ropes and hand lines used near energized parts are
nonconductive and are protected from moisture.
10. Protective shields, barriers or insulating materials are
used to protect employees working near exposed
energized parts.
ALERTING TECHNIQUES
Employee Name
Employee Name
Employee Name
Excavation Safety Program
Purpose
One of the preventable hazards of construction work is the danger of trench cave-ins. Yet every year
in the U.S., there are an estimated 75 to 200 deaths and more than 1,000 lost workdays per year
from trenching accidents. Other hazards associated with trenches include contact with numerous
underground utilities, hazardous atmospheres, water accumulation, and collapse of adjacent
structures. For these reasons, we have written Excavation Procedures for both our daily and
occasional excavation workers. It is the policy at SDV Construction, Inc. to permit only trained and
authorized personnel to create or work in excavations.
Administrative Duties
Our Safety Officer is responsible for developing and maintaining the written Excavation
Procedures. These procedures are kept at the following location(s): main office/site office.
Our Excavation Procedures are administered under the direction of our competent person. The
following employee(s) is considered a competent person(s) for our company:
Superintendents/Foremen. Our competent person inspects excavations daily and during poor
weather.
Dangers of Trenching and Excavations
Cave-ins pose the greatest risk and are more likely than in any other excavation related accident.
Other potential hazards include fall, falling objects, hazardous atmospheres and incidents involving
mobile equipment. For these reasons we have the following requirements on all our jobsites.
General Employee Safety
 Employees exposed to public vehicular traffic must wear warning vests or other suitable
garments made of reflective or high-visibility material.
 The estimated location of utility installations, such as sewer, telephone, fuel, electric, water
lines, or any other underground installations that reasonably may be expected to be
encountered during excavation work, shall be determined prior to opening an excavation.
 Employees are not permitted under loads that are handled by lifting or digging equipment.
Employees are not allowed to work in the excavation above other employees unless the
lower level employees are adequately protected.
 While the excavation is open, underground installations are protected, supported, or
removed as necessary to safeguard employees. Adjacent structures are supported to prevent
possible collapse.
 Employees are not permitted to work in excavations where water has accumulated or is
accumulating unless adequate precautions have been taken. Diversion ditches, dikes, or
other means are used to prevent surface water from entering an excavation and to provide
drainage to the adjacent area.
 A warning system is used to alert operators of heavy equipment and other employees at the
work site of the edge of an excavation.
 Adequate protection is provided to protect employees from falling rock, soil, or other
materials and equipment. Protection is provided by placing and keeping such materials or
equipment at least 2 feet from the edge of excavations, or by the use of retaining devices that
are sufficient to prevent materials or equipment from falling or rolling into excavations, or
by a combination of both if necessary.
Protective Support Systems
The company protects each employee in an excavation from cave-ins during an excavation by an
adequate protective system designed in accordance with OSHA standards. Protective system
options include;
 Properly sloping or benching of the sides of the excavations
 Supporting the sides of the excavations with timber shoring, aluminum shoring or hydraulic
shoring
 Placing a shield between the side of the excavation and the work area. (Trench box)
SDV Construction, Inc. has the following standard operating procedures regarding protective
support systems for excavations, in accordance with safe practices and procedures and OSHA
excavation regulations:
 If the excavation is made entirely of stable rock, then no protective system is necessary or
used.
 If the excavation is less than 5 feet in depth (provided there is no indication of a potential
cave-in), then no protective system is necessary or used.
 If the excavation is less than or equal to 20 feet in depth, then * A competent person chooses
the most practical design approach (that meets required performance criteria) for the
particular circumstance, and/or
 A registered professional engineer designs all protective systems for use in the excavation.
Sloping
When sloping is used to protect against cave-ins, these options can be chosen for designing sloping
systems:
 If a soil classification is not made, then slope the sides of the excavation to an angle not
steeper than one and one-half horizontal to one vertical (34 degrees). A slope of this
gradation or less is considered safe for any type of soil.
 Use Appendices A and B of 29 CFR 1926, Subpart P to determine the maximum allowable
slope and allowable configurations for sloping systems. The soil type must be determined in
order to use this option.
 Use other tabulated data approved by a registered professional engineer.
 Have an engineer design and approve the system to be used.
The competent person chooses the best option for sloping for the job at hand.
Benching
When benching is used to protect against cave-ins, these options can be chosen for designing
benching systems:
 In Type A soil, excavations 20 feet or less with vertically sided lower portions that are
supported or shielded shall have a maximum allowable slope of 3/4H: 1V the support or
shield system must extend at least 18 inches above the top of the vertical side.
 In Type B soil, all excavations 20 feet or less which have vertically sided lower portions
shall be shielded or supported to a height at least 18 inches above the top of the vertical side.
The excavation shall have a maximum allowable slope of 1H:1V.
 In Type C soil, all excavations 20 feet or less which have vertically sided lower portions
shall be shielded or supported to a height at least 18 inches above the top of the vertical side.
The excavation shall have a maximum allowable slope of 1-1/2 H: 1V.
 When an excavation contains layers of different types of soils, the general sloping
requirements do not apply. The excavation must be sloped according to Appendix B-1.4 of
29 CFR 1926, Subpart P
The competent person chooses the best option for sloping for the job at hand.
Hazardous Atmospheres
Before an employee enters an excavation greater than 4 feet in depth, the competent person must
test the atmosphere where oxygen deficiency or a hazardous atmosphere exists or could reasonably
exist (i.e., excavations in landfill areas or excavations in areas where hazardous substances are
stored nearby). Emergency rescue equipment is readily available and attended when hazardous
atmospheric conditions exist or may develop. Confined space procedures may have to be utilized.
Access and Egress
 Sufficient means for exiting excavations 4 feet deep or more are provided and are within 25
feet of lateral travel for employees.
 Guardrails are provided if there are walkways or bridges crossing over an excavation.
Training
Our Safety Officer will identify all new employees in the employee orientation program and make
arrangements with management to schedule training. A designated training organization will
conduct initial training and evaluation. This instructor has the necessary knowledge, training, and
experience to train excavation workers.
During an excavation worker’s initial training, the instructor(s) uses classroom instruction that
includes these formats: Lecture, discussion, videotape, practical training.
You may contact our Safety Officer for a current copy of the training material and the course
outline.
Training Certification
After an employee has completed the training program, our company keeps records certifying that
each excavation worker has successfully completed excavation training. The certificate includes the
name of the worker, the date(s) of the training, and the signature of the person who did the training.
The Safety Officer is responsible for keeping a copy of all training certification records. Under no
circumstances shall an employee create or work in an excavation until he/she has successfully
completed this company’s excavation training program. This includes all new excavation workers
regardless of claimed previous experience.
Fall Protection Safety Program
Purpose
SDV Construction, Inc. is dedicated to the protection of its employees from on-the-job injuries.
OSHA currently regulates fall protection for construction under Part 1926, Subpart M. The
standards for regulating fall protection systems and procedures are intended to prevent employees
from falling off, onto or through working levels and to protect employees from falling objects. Fall
protection requirements under the OSHA Construction regulations require considerable planning
and preparation.
All employees of SDV Construction, Inc. have the responsibility to work safely on the job. The
purpose of this plan is to:
 Supplement our standard safety policy by providing safety standards specifically designed to
cover fall protection on this job.
 Ensure that each employee is trained and made aware of the safety provisions, which are to
be implemented by this plan prior to the start of erection.
This program informs interested persons, including employees that SDV Construction, Inc. is
complying with OSHA's Fall Protection requirements, (29 CFR 1926.500 to .503). This program
applies to all employees who might be exposed to fall hazards, except when designated employees
are inspecting, investigating, or assessing workplace conditions before the actual start of
construction work or after all construction work has been completed.
Our Duty to Provide Fall Protection
To prevent falls SDV Construction, Inc. has a duty to anticipate the need to work at heights and to
plan our work activities accordingly. Careful planning and preparation lay the necessary
groundwork for an accident-free jobsite. All fall protection systems selected for each application
will be installed before an employee is allowed to go to work in an area that necessitates the
protection. All fall protection equipment will meet the requirements of applicable ANSI, ASTM, or
OSHA requirements. Our Safety Officer is the program coordinator/manager and is responsible for
its implementation. Certain employees are authorized to inspect, investigate, or assess workplace
conditions before construction work begins or after all construction work has been completed.
These employees are exempt from the fall protection rule during the performance of these duties.
These authorized employees determine if all walking/working surfaces on which our employees
work have the strength and structural integrity to support the employees. Our employees will not be
allowed to work on these surfaces until they have the requisite strength and structural integrity.
Worksite Assessment and Fall Protection System Selection
This written plan is for Industrial/Commercial. There are situations at this worksite that will require
fall protection.
This fall protection plan is intended to anticipate the particular fall hazards to which our employees
may be exposed. Specifically, we:
 Inspect the area to determine what hazards exist or may arise during the work.
 Identify the hazards and select the appropriate measures and equipment.
 Give specific and appropriate instructions to workers to prevent exposure to unsafe
conditions.
 Ensure employees follow procedures given and understand training provided.
 Apprise us of the steps our specialty subcontractors have taken to meet their fall protection
requirements.
Providing fall protection requires an assessment of each fall situation at a given jobsite. Our criteria
for selecting a given fall protection system follow those established in 29 CFR 1926.502, fall
protection systems criteria and practices. Each employee exposed to these situations must be trained
as outlined later in this plan.
Unprotected Sides and Edges
Our employees must be protected when they are exposed to falls from unprotected sides and edges
of walking/working surfaces (horizontal and vertical surfaces), which are 6 feet or more above
lower levels. We know that OSHA has determined that there is no "safe" distance from an
unprotected side or edge that would render fall protection unnecessary.
Each employee who is constructing a leading edge 6 feet (1.8 m) or more above lower levels shall
be protected from falling by guardrail systems, safety net systems, or personal fall arrest systems.
We will maintain the fall protection system(s) chosen until all work has been completed or until the
permanent elements of the structure, which will eliminate the exposure to falling hazards, are in
place.
Leading Edge Work
Leading edges are defined as the edge of a floor, roof, or formwork that changes location as
additional floor, roof, or formwork sections are placed, formed, or constructed. If work stops on a
leading edge it will be considered to be an "unprotected side or edge" and will be covered by the
section of this plan on unprotected sides and edges.
Each employee who is constructing a leading edge 6 feet or more above lower levels will be
protected from falling by guardrail systems, safety net systems, or personal fall arrest systems.
Employees who are not constructing the leading edge, but who are on walking/working surfaces
where leading edges are under construction, are also protected from a fall by the above listed
personal fall arrest systems.
Holes
Each employee on walking/working surfaces will be protected from falling through holes (including
skylights) more than 6 feet (1.8 m) above lower levels, by personal fall arrest systems, covers, or
guardrail systems erected around such holes.
Formwork and Reinforcing Steel
Each employee on the face of formwork or reinforcing steel will be protected from falling 6 feet or
more to lower levels by personal fall arrest systems, safety net systems, or positioning device
systems.
Excavations
Each employee at the edge of an excavation 6 feet or more in depth will be protected from falling
by guardrail systems, fences, or barricades when the excavations are not readily seen because of
plant growth or other visual barriers.
Dangerous Equipment
Each employee less than 6 feet above dangerous equipment shall be protected from falling into or
onto the dangerous equipment by guardrail systems or by equipment guards. (Rebar caps)
Each employee 6 feet (1.8 m) or more above dangerous equipment shall be protected from fall
hazards by guardrail systems, personal fall arrest systems, or safety net systems.
Roofing
When performing roofing work on low-slope roofs with unprotected sides and edges 6 feet or more
above lower levels shall be protected from falling by;
 Guardrail systems, or
 Safety net systems, or
 Personal fall arrest system, or
 A combination of warning line system and guardrail system, or
 A warning line system and safety net system, or
 Warning line system and personal fall arrest system, or
 Warning line system and safety monitoring system.
On roofs 50-feet or less in width, the use of a safety monitoring system alone [i.e. without the
warning line system] is permitted.
"Steep roofs." Each employee on a steep roof with unprotected sides and edges 6 feet or more above
lower levels shall be protected from falling by guardrail systems with toe boards, safety net systems,
or personal fall arrest systems. Warning line and safety monitor are not to be used on steep roofs.
SDV Construction, Inc. chooses fall protection based on a hazard assessment and varies from job to
job. We believe in 100% fall protection on all jobsite.
Falling object protection
 Toe boards, when used as falling object protection, shall be erected along the edge of the
overhead walking/working surface for a distance sufficient to protect employees below. Toe
boards shall be capable of withstanding, without failure, a force of at least 50 pounds applied
in any downward or outward direction at any point along the toe board.
 Materials and equipment shall not be stored within 6 feet (1.8 m) of a roof edge unless
guardrails are erected at the edge.
 Canopies, when used as falling object protection, shall be strong enough to prevent collapse
and to prevent penetration by any objects which may fall onto the canopy.
Training
All employees that work on SDV Construction, Inc. Projects that utilize any type of fall protection
are required to be trained in fall protection. Training must include the following:
 The nature of fall hazards in the work area.
 The correct procedures for erecting, maintaining, disassembling and inspecting fall
protection systems.
 The use and operation of guardrail systems, personal fall arrest systems, safety nets, and
warning lines.
 The role of each employee in a safety monitoring system and when it can be utilized.
Our company will verify compliance with training requirements and will maintain written
certification records. The written certification record shall contain the name or other identity of the
employee trained, the date(s) of the training, and the signature of the person who conducted the
training or the signature of the employer.
Employees Who Need Retraining:
When we have reason to believe that one of our employees lacks the skill or understanding needed
for safe work involving any aspect of our fall protection safety program we will re-train the
employee so that the requisite proficiency is regained. Retraining will be done in at least the
following situations:
 Where changes at the worksite present a hazard about which the employee has not been
previously trained.
 Where changes in the types of fall protection, falling object protection, or other equipment
present a hazard about which an employee has not been previously trained.
 Where inadequacies in an affected employee's work involving fall protection indicate that
the employee has not retained the requisite proficiency
Fire Prevention Program
Purpose
OSHA's Fire Prevention Plan regulations, found at 29 CFR 1926.24 and Subpart F do not
specifically require a written plan, but do require specific program elements. This plan addresses
fire emergencies reasonably anticipated to occur through all phases of the construction, repair,
alteration, or demolition at our construction sites.
This Fire Prevention Plan (FPP) is in place at this company to control and reduce the possibility of
fire and to specify the type of equipment to use in case of fire. This plan addresses the following
issues:
 Major workplace fire hazards and their proper handling and storage procedures.
 Potential ignition sources for fires and their control procedures.
 The type of fire protection equipment or systems, which can control a fire involving them.
 Regular job titles of personnel responsible for maintenance of equipment and systems
installed to prevent or control ignition of fires and for control of fuel source hazards.
Under this plan, our employees will be informed of the plan's purpose, preferred means of reporting
fires and other emergencies, types of evacuations to be used in various emergency situations, and
the alarm system.
Our Safety Officer has overall responsibility for this fire protection plan. The written plan is kept in
Main Office/Site Office. Safety Officer will review and update the plan as necessary.
If after reading this plan, you find that improvements can be made, please contact the Plan
Coordinator. We encourage all suggestions because we are committed to the success of our Fire
Prevention Plan. We strive for clear understanding, safe behavior, and involvement in the plan from
every level of the company.
Responsibilities
Here at SDV Construction, Inc., the Safety Officer is responsible for the following activities.
He or She must:
1. Maintain a written Fire Prevention Plan for regular and after-hours work conditions.
2. Immediately notify the local fire department or police departments, and the building
owner/superintendent in the event of a fire affecting the facility.
3. Integrate the FPP with the existing general emergency plan covering the building occupied.
4. Distribute procedures for reporting a fire, the location of fire exits, and evacuation routes to
each employee.
5. Conduct drills to acquaint the employees with fire procedures, and to judge their
effectiveness.
6. Satisfy all local fire codes and regulations as specified.
7. Train designated employees in the use of fire extinguishers and the application of medical
first-aid techniques.
8. Keep key management personnel home telephone numbers in a safe place in the facility for
immediate use in the event of a fire. Distribute a copy of the list to key persons to be
retained in their homes for use in communicating a fire occurring during non-work hours.
9. Decide to have employees and non-employees remain in or evacuate the facility in the event
of a fire.
10. If evacuation is deemed necessary, the Plan Coordinator ensures that:
 All employees are notified and evacuated and a head count is taken to confirm total
evacuation of all employees.
 When practical, equipment is placed and locked in storage rooms or desks for
protection.
 The building owner/superintendent is contacted, informed of the action taken, and
asked to assist in coordinating security protection.
 In locations where the building owner/superintendent is not available, security
measures to protect employee records and property are arranged as necessary.
Fire Hazards
Fire can be represented by a simple equation: Fire = Ignition Source + Fuel + Oxygen. Without any
one of these three elements, a fire cannot start. Likewise, during a fire, if you take away any one of
these three elements, you can successfully put out a fire. It is our company's intent to prevent these
three elements from reacting to produce a fire.
Fuel is used throughout the facility as an energy source for various systems or equipment. This fuel
can be a significant fire hazard and must be monitored and controlled.
Fire Protection Equipment
Fire protection equipment, selected and purchased by the Safety Officer, in use at this company
includes the following extinguishers: 2A; ABC
Maintenance of Fire Protection Equipment
Once hazards are evaluated and equipment is installed to control them all equipment must be
inspected on a regular basis to make sure it continues to function properly. The foremen are
responsible for maintaining equipment and systems installed to prevent or control fires.
Our guidelines for maintaining the equipment is as follows:
 Visual inspection before use
 Monthly documented inspection (Documented on extinguisher tag)
 Annually re-certification. (New inspection tag will be placed at that time)
Fire Prevention
At the time of a fire, employees should know what type of evacuation is necessary and what their
role is in carrying out the plan. In cases where the fire is large, total and immediate evacuation of all
employees is necessary. In smaller fires, a partial evacuation of nonessential employees with a
delayed evacuation of others may be necessary for continued operation. We must be sure that
employees know what is expected of them during a fire to assure their safety.
SDV Construction, Inc. has chosen to train employees through presentation followed by a drill. We
cover our Fire Protection Program information at that time.
Training, conducted on initial assignment, includes:
 What to do if employee discovers a fire
 Demonstration of alarm, if more than one type exists
 How to recognize fire exits
 Evacuation routes
 Assisting employees with disabilities
 Measures to contain fire (e.g., closing office doors, windows, etc. in immediate vicinity)
 Head count procedures (see EAP for details)
 Return to building after the "all-clear" signal
If the Plan Coordinator has reason to believe an employee does not have the understanding required,
the employee must be retrained. Our Safety Officer certifies in writing that the employee has
received and understands the Fire Prevention Plan training. Any employee who does not comply
with this plan will be disciplined.
SDV Construction, Inc. has informed its employees of their duties and responsibilities under the
plan. Each employer in the facility has a copy of the standardized plan and it is accessible by
affected employees.
Fire Protection Equipment (Extinguisher) Training
The Safety Officer coordinates training for each employee who is required to use fire protection
equipment. Employees shall not use fire protection equipment without appropriate training.
Training, before an individual is assigned responsibility to fight a fire, includes:
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Types of fires
Types of fire prevention equipment
Location of fire prevention equipment
How to use fire prevention equipment
Limitations of fire prevention equipment
Proper care and maintenance of assigned fire prevention equipment
Employees must demonstrate an understanding of the training and the ability to use the equipment
properly before they are allowed to perform work requiring the use of the equipment. Training will
be conducted prior to initial assignment and at least annually thereafter.
If the Safety Officer has reason to believe an employee does not have the understanding or skill
required, the employee must be retrained. Our Safety Officer verifies that the employee has
received and understands the fire protection equipment training.
First Aid Program
Purpose
SDV Construction, Inc. is dedicated to the protection of its employees from on-the-job injuries and
illnesses. However, when injuries or illnesses do occur, we are prepared to immediately respond to
the needs of the injured or ill.
This written First Aid Program is intended to ensure that SDV Construction, Inc. meets the
requirements of 29 CFR 1926.23, First Aid and Medical Attention, 29 CFR 1926.50, Medical
Services and First Aid, and Specification Section 01065 1.10 Medical/Health Protection.
Administrative Duties
Our Safety Officer is our First Aid Program Administrator and is responsible for establishing and
implementing the written First Aid Program. This person has full authority to make necessary
decisions to ensure the success of this program. Our onsite safety officer will be first aid and CPR
trained and also has the responsibility that there are trained CPR and First Aid employees on site.
If after reading this program, you find that improvements can be made, please contact the Safety
Officer. We encourage all suggestions because we are committed to the success of this written
program.
Hazard and Medical Services Assessment
Our Safety Officer assesses SDV Construction, Inc. for hazards to determine whether any pose the
risk of a life-threatening or permanently disabling injury or illness.
When hazards or locations change, our Safety Officer re-assesses our risk and determines whether
or not we are required to train an on-site employee in first aid.
First Aid Supplies and Equipment
It is important that our first aid supplies and equipment meet the specific needs of our Workplace.
Our Safety Officer has ensured that adequate first aid supplies are readily available, including:
Meets Federal ANSI and FDA specifications, as well as the IH Construction Safety
Representative’s approval.
We provide these fully stocked first aid kits located Main Office, Shop, and Company Vehicles.
Our Safety Officer and Superintendants will check the first aid kits frequently. First Aid Kit
supplies are replaced promptly when expended.
Because it is reasonably anticipated that employees will be exposed to blood or other potentially
infectious materials while rendering first aid, we provide the following personal protective
equipment:
 Nitrile Gloves
 Face shield
 Biohazard disposal bag
Training
Training is the heart of our First Aid Program. Employees should NOT attempt to rescue or treat an
injured or ill employee unless they are qualified to do so. Instead, they should contact someone who
is qualified. Employees who are qualified to render first aid have completed SDV Construction
Inc.'s first aid training program. Safety Officer is responsible for coordinating CPR and First Aid
training. A designated company conducts CPR and First aid training. That training ensures that
trainees are knowledgeable in First Aid/CPR.
Training Certification
After an employee has completed our training program, the trainer will determine whether the
employee can safely perform first aid. Safety Officer is responsible for keeping records verifying
certification of each employee who has successfully completed training. Each certificate is a valid
certificate in first-aid training, must be obtained from the U.S. Bureau of Mines, the American Red
Cross, National Safety Council, or equivalent training that can be verified by documentary evidence
and includes the name of the employee, the date(s) of the training, and the signature of the person
who performed the training and evaluation.
Retraining
Trained employees are re-trained every 2 years to keep their knowledge and skills current.
Record keeping
Safety Officer is responsible for maintaining the following records and documentation relating to
first aid, injuries, illnesses, and accidents: OSHA 200/300 log
Program Evaluation
By having our Safety Officer thoroughly evaluate and, as necessary, revise our program, we ensure
our program's effectiveness and prevent or eliminate any problems. Program evaluation is
performed annually.
Gases, Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists Safety Program
Purpose
The purpose of this program is to inform interested persons, including employees, that SDV is
complying with OSHA's Gases, Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists standard, Title 29 Code of
Federal Regulations 1926.55 and other OSHA rules as needed to ensure that no employee is
exposed to inhalation, ingestion, skin absorption, or contact with any material or substance at a
concentration above those specified in the "Threshold Limit Values of Airborne Contaminants for
1970" of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists found in Appendix A of
29 CFR 1926.55.
To achieve compliance we must first implement all feasible administrative and engineering
controls. However, when such controls are not feasible, we will use protective equipment or other
protective measures to keep the exposure of employees to air contaminants within the limits
prescribed in Appendix A of 29 CFR 1926.55. All equipment and technical measures used to
achieve compliance will first be approved for each particular use by a competent industrial
hygienist or other technically qualified person.
This program applies to all work (including alteration, repair, painting, and decorating) where one
of our employees may be occupationally exposed to gases, vapors, fumes, dusts, and mists at
concentrations above those specified in Appendix A of 29 CFR 1926.55. For SDV, these gases,
vapors, fumes, dusts, and mists will be identified as jobsite specific hazards.
Administrative Duties
This written safety program is for the work site. Our Safety Officer is the program
coordinator/manager and is responsible for its implementation. Copies of the written program may
be obtained at the corporate office.
Recordkeeping
We know recordkeeping is critical for our gases, vapors, fumes, dusts, and mists operations. Our
recordkeeping tasks, at a minimum, include:
 Material Safety Data Sheets
 Training regard hazard awareness
 Recorded analytical data provided via JSHE
Training and information
We will provide our workers with training that includes:
 Hazard Communication
 Hazard Recognition
 PPE
 CSSP review
Methods of compliance
This section contains our description of the specific means that we will employ to achieve
compliance with the requirements of 29 CFR 1926.27, .51, .55, .95, .100 - .105, and .200. Methods
of compliance will be evaluated for the appropriate level of protection prior to selection.
Administrative procedures, engineering controls, and good work practices
Exposures to gases, vapors, fumes, dusts, and mists can be controlled through the use of engineering
controls and work practices. Engineering controls are hazard controls designed into equipment and
workplaces. Work practices are procedures followed by employers and workers to control hazards.
Some of the engineering controls and work practices we may use during work that generate gases,
vapors, fumes, dust, and mists are:
 Alternative products
 Wet methods
 Ventilation
 Use of respiratory protection (see Respiratory Protection Plan)
Protective clothing
We will take the following steps to assure that gas, vapor, fume, dust, and mist work clothing do not
contaminate cars, homes, or work sites outside the dusty area:
 Disposable clothing on top of standard PPE (e.g., Tyvek).
 Coordination with Superintendent of proper disposal of potentially contaminated clothing.
 Protective Clothing that is contaminated will be contained while being transported.
Respirators and the respiratory protection program
We know the OSHA regulation requires us to implement a respirator program when engineering,
administrative, and good work practices are not enough to keep gases, vapors, fumes, dusts, and
mists below their permissible exposure limit (PEL) as found in 29 CFR 1926.55.
We will not use respirators as the primary means of preventing or minimizing exposures to airborne
contaminants. Instead, we will use effective source controls such as:
 Substitution,
 Automation,
 Enclosed systems,
 Local exhaust ventilation,
 Wet methods, and
 Good work practices.
Such measures will be the primary means of protecting our workers. However, when source
controls cannot keep exposures below the PEL, controls will be supplemented with the use of
respirators.
Our Respirator Program is attached to this written program and follows the requirements of 29 CFR
1926.103.
Communication of Hazards
We will post warning signs to mark the boundaries of work areas contaminated with gases, vapors,
fumes, dusts, and/or mists at or above their PEL’s as well as inform employees utilizing the CSSP
when required. SDV will only allow properly trained personnel to work in areas where the potential
of exposure exists. All training will be verified prior to the start of any work.
Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter Program
Purpose
OSHA’s Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters rules and regulation will be followed by SDV
Construction, Inc by providing (a) ground fault circuit interrupters on construction sites for
receptacle outlets in use and not part of the permanent wiring of the building or structure. Our safety
officer is our competent person and is responsible for implementing and enforcing our Ground Fault
Circuit Interrupter Program.
Inspections
Each cord set, attachment cap, plug and receptacle of cord sets, and any equipment connected by
cord and plug, except cord sets and receptacles which are fixed and not exposed to damage, shall be
visually inspected before each day's use for external defects, such as deformed or missing pins or
insulation damage, and for indications of possible internal damage. Equipment found damaged or
defective shall not be used until repaired.
Testing
Tests are performed as required by OSHA are to be recorded. This test record shall identify each
receptacle, cord set, and cord- and plug-connected equipment that passed the test and shall indicate
the last date it was tested or the interval for which it was tested. This record shall be kept by means
of logs, color coding, or other effective means and shall be maintained until replaced by a more
current record. The record shall be documented and made available on the jobsite.
Training
Training is provided to ensure that employees are familiar with the requirements of this plan. This
training is provided to employees annually.
Our Safety Officer is responsible for conducting training or designating an outside training agency
to conduct the training.
Hand and Power Tool Safety Program
Purpose
The purpose of this Hand and Power Tool Program is to ensure that employees of SDV
Construction, Inc., and subcontractors are properly protected against all occupational exposures to
hand and power tools, in al forms in all construction work where an employee may be potentially
exposed.
General Safety Precautions
Employees who use hand and power tools and who are exposed to the hazards of falling, flying,
abrasive and splashing objects, or exposed to harmful dusts, fumes, mists, vapors, or gases will be
provided with the appropriate equipment needed, including Personal Protective Equipment, to
protect them from the hazard. PPE includes:
 Hard hats
 Safety glasses
 Gloves
All hazards involved in the use of power tools can be prevented by following some basic safety
rules:
 Keep all tools in good condition with regular maintenance;
 Use the right tool for the job;
 Inspect each tool for damage before use. If tool if found to be unsafe by tags need to be
placed render the tools inoperable.
 Operate according to the manufacturer’s instructions;
 Utilize the proper protective equipment.
 Participating in safety training. *Employees shall not operate any tool unless properly
trained in the hazards associated with the tool!
SDV Construction, Inc. believes that us and our employees have a responsibility to work together to
establish safe working procedures. SDV Construction, Inc. believes all hand and power tools shall
be maintained in a safe condition. If a hazardous situation is encountered, it shall be brought to the
attention of the Supervisor and/or Safety Officer for evaluation and corrective action.
Hand Tools
Hand tools are non-powered. They include anything from axes to wrenches. The greatest hazards
posed
by
hand
tools
result
from
misuse
and
improper
maintenance.
Some examples of misuse include the following:
 Using a screwdriver as a chisel may cause the tip of the screwdriver to break and fly, hitting
the user or other employees;
 Using a tool with a wooden handle (e.g., hammer) if the handle is loose, splintered, or
cracked, the head of the tool may fly off and strike the user or another worker;
 Using a wrench if its jaws are sprung, because it might slip; and
 Using impact tools (e.g., chisels, wedges) if they have mushroomed heads since the heads
might shatter on impact, sending sharp fragments flying.
Hand tool precautions including the following:
 Employers shall caution employees that saw blades, knives or other tools be directed away
from aisle areas and other employees working in close proximity. Knives and scissors shall
be sharp. Dull tools can be more hazardous than sharp ones;
 Floors shall be kept as clean and dry as possible to prevent accidental slips with or around
dangerous hand tools; and
 Around flammable substances, sparks produced by iron and steel hand tools can be a
dangerous ignition source. Where this hazard exists, spark-resistant tools made from brass,
plastic, aluminum or wood shall be used.
Power Tools
Power tools can be hazardous when improperly used. There are several types of power tools, based
on the power source they use: electric, pneumatic, liquid fuel, hydraulic and powder-actuated.
The following general precautions shall be observed by power tool users:
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Never carry a tool by the cord or hose;
Never remove prongs from any cords;
Never stand in or near water when using tools;
Always use a Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI) with electrical tools if working in a
wet environment;
Never “yank” the cord or the hose to disconnect it from the receptacle;
Keep cords and hoses away from heat, oil and sharp edges;
Replace all frayed and/or damaged extension cords. Do not try to tape cords;
Disconnect tools when not in use, before servicing and when changing accessories such as
blades, bits and cutters;
All observers shall be kept at a safe distance away from the work area;
Secure work with clamps or a vise, freeing both hands to operate the tool;
Avoid accidental starting. The worker shall not hold a finger on the switch button while
carrying a plugged-in tool;
Tools shall be maintained with care. They shall be kept sharp and clean for the best
performance. Follow instructions in the user’s manual for maintenance, lubricating and
changing accessories;
Maintain good footing and balance;
Avoid loose fitting clothes, ties or jewelry such as bracelets, watches or rings, which can
become caught in moving parts;
Use tools that are either double-insulated or grounded (three-pronged);
Keep work area well lighted when operating electric tools;
Ensure that cords and hoses do not pose as a tripping hazard; and
All portable electric tools that are damaged shall be removed from use and tagged “Do Not
Use”. This shall be done by supervisors and/or employees.
Guards
Hazardous moving parts of a power tool need to be safeguarded. For example, belts, gears, shafts,
pulleys, sprockets, spindles, drums, fly wheels, chains, or other reciprocating, rotating, or moving
parts of equipment shall be guarded if such parts are exposed to contact by employees.
Guards, as necessary, shall be provided to protect the operator and others from the following:
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Point of operation
Nip points
Rotating parts
Flying chips
Sparks
Safety guards shall never be removed when a tool is being used.
Safety Switches
The following hand-held power tools shall be equipped with a momentary contact “on-off” control
switch: drills, tappers, fastener drivers, horizontal, vertical and angle grinders with wheels larger
than two inches in diameter, disc and belt sanders, reciprocating saws, saber saws and other similar
tools. These tools also may be equipped with a lock-on control provided that turnoff can be
accomplished by a single motion of the same finger or fingers that turn it on.
The following hand-held powered tools may be equipped with only a positive “on-off” control
switch: platen sanders, disc sanders with discs two inches or less in diameter; grinders with wheels
two inches or less in diameter; routers, planers, laminate trimmers, nibblers, shears, scroll saws and
jigsaws with blade shanks quarter inch wide or less.
Other hand-held powered tools such as circular saws having a blade diameter greater than two
inches, chain saws and percussion tools without positive accessory holding means shall be equipped
with a constant pressure switch that will shut off the power when the pressure is released.
Electric Tools
Employees using electric tools shall be aware of several dangers with the most serious being the
possibility of electrocution.
Among the chief hazards of electric-powered tools are burns and slight shocks which can lead to
injuries or even heart failure.
To protect the user from shock, tools shall either have a three-wire cord with ground and be
grounded or be double insulated or be powered by a low-voltage isolation transformer.
These general practices shall be followed when using electric tools:
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Electric tools shall be operated within their design limitations;
Gloves, eye protection, and safety footwear are recommended during use of electric tools;
When not in use, tools shall be stored in a dry place;
Electric tools shall not be used in damp or wet locations; and
Work areas shall be well lit, even if this means the operators has to augment the work
surface illumination by other appropriate means.
Powered Abrasive Wheel Tools
Powered abrasive grinding, cutting, polishing and wire buffing wheels create special safety
problems because they may throw off flying fragments or excessive dust.
Before an abrasive wheel is mounted, it shall be inspected closely and sound- or ring-tested to
ensure that it is free from cracks or defects. To test, wheels shall be tapped gently with a light nonmetallic instrument. If the wheel sounds cracked or dead, they could fly apart in operation and shall
not be used. A sound and undamaged wheel will give a clear metallic tone or “ring.” To prevent the
wheel from cracking, the user shall be sure it fits freely on the spindle. The spindle nut shall be
tightened enough to hold the wheel in place, without distorting the flange. Follow the
manufacturer’s recommendations. Care shall be taken to ensure that the spindle wheel does not
exceed the abrasive wheel specifications.
Due to the possibility of a wheel disintegrating (exploding) during start-up, the employee shall
never stand directly in front of the wheel as it accelerates to full operating speed.
Portable grinding tools need to be equipped with safety guards to protect workers not only from the
moving wheel surface, but also from flying fragments in case of breakage.
In addition, when using a power grinder:
 Always use eye protection and a dust mask;
 Turn off the power when not in use; and
 Never clamp a hand-held grinder in a vise.
Pneumatic Tools
Pneumatic tools are powered by compressed air and include chippers, drills, hammers, and sanders.
There are several dangers encountered in the use of pneumatic tools. The main one is the danger of
getting hit by one of the tool’s attachments or by some kind of fastener the worker is using with the
tool.
Eye protection is required and face protection is recommended for employees working with
pneumatic tools. When sanders are used, dust masks shall also be worn.
Noise is another hazard. Working with noisy tools (e.g. jackhammers) requires proper, effective use
of hearing protection.
When using pneumatic tools, employees shall ensure they are fastened securely to the hose to
prevent them from becoming disconnected. A short wire or positive locking device attaching the air
hose to the tool will serve as an added safeguard.
A safety clip or retainer shall be installed to prevent attachments, such as chisels on a chipping
hammer, from being unintentionally shot from the barrel.
Screens shall be set up to protect nearby workers from being struck by flying fragments around
chippers, riveting guns, staplers or air drills.
Compressed air guns shall never be pointed toward anyone. Users shall never “dead-end” it against
themselves or anyone else. It is recommended to use air guns equipped with safety tips that have
relief ports to reduce pressure if blockage or dead-ending occurs.
Powder-Actuated Tools
Powder-actuated tools operate like a loaded gun and shall be treated with the same respect and
precautions.
Safety precautions to remember include the following:
 These tools shall not be used in an explosive or flammable atmosphere;
 Before using the tool, the worker shall inspect it to determine that it is clean, all moving
parts operate freely, and the barrel is free from obstructions;
 Employees shall not modify tools;
 The tool shall never be pointed at anybody;
 The tool shall not be loaded unless it is to be used immediately. A loaded tool shall not be
left unattended, especially where it could be available to unauthorized persons;
 Hands shall be kept clear of the barrel end;
 To prevent the tool from firing accidentally, two separate motions are required for firing:
one to bring the tool into position and another to pull the trigger;
 The tools shall not be able to operate until they are pressed against the work surface with a
force of at least five pounds greater than the total weight of the tool;
 If a powder-actuated tool misfires, the employee shall wait at least 30 seconds, then try
firing it again;
 If it still will not fire, the user shall wait another 30 seconds so that the faulty cartridge is
less likely to explode then carefully remove the load. The bad cartridge shall be put in water;
 Suitable eye and face protection are essential when using a powder-actuated tool;
 The muzzle end of the tool shall have a protective shield or guard centered perpendicularly
on the barrel to confine any flying fragments or particles that might otherwise create a
hazard when the tool is fired. The tool shall be designed so that it will not fire unless it has
this kind of safety device;
 All powder-actuated tools shall be designed for varying powder charges so that the user can
select a powder level necessary to do the work without excessive force; and
 If the tool develops a defect during use, it shall be tagged and taken out of service
immediately until it is properly repaired.
Hydraulic Power Tools
The fluid used in hydraulic power tools shall be an approved fire-resistant fluid and shall retain its
operating characteristics at the most extreme temperatures to which it will be exposed.
The manufacturer’s recommended safe operating pressure for hoses, valves, pipes, filters and other
fittings shall not be exceeded.
Hazard Communication Program
Purpose
It is SDV Construction, Inc. purpose to comply with the requirements of OSHA's Hazard
Communication Standard for construction by compiling a list of hazardous chemicals, using
Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS), ensuring that containers are labeled, and training our workers
present at a given construction site. In addition, we provide this same information to subcontractors
involved in a specific project so that they may provide this information and train their employees.
This Written Hazard Communication program applies to all work operations in our company where
employees may be exposed to hazardous substances under normal working conditions or during an
emergency situation.
General Requirements
Our Safety Officer is the program coordinator and has overall responsibility for the program
and will review and update the program, as necessary. Copies of the written program may be
obtained from Superintendent in the jobsite trailer or at the main office.
All employees, or their designated representatives, can obtain further information on this written
program, the hazard communication standard, applicable MSDS’s, and chemical information lists
from the Superintendent or the jobsite trailer or main office. Under this program, our employees
will be informed of the contents of the Hazard Communication Standard, the hazardous properties
of chemicals with which they work, safe handling procedures, and measures to take to protect
themselves from these chemicals. Our employees will also be informed of the hazards associated
with non-routine tasks, and the hazards associated with hazardous chemicals through toolbox talks
and safety meetings.
If after reading this program, if you find that improvements can be made, please
contact our Safety Officer. We encourage all suggestions because we are committed to the success
of our written hazard communication program. We strive for clear understanding, safe behavior,
and involvement in the program from every level of the company.
List of Hazardous Chemicals
Our chemical inventory is a list of hazardous chemicals known to be present in our workplace.
Anyone who comes into contact with the hazardous chemicals on the list needs to know what those
chemicals are and how to protect themselves.
That is why it is so important that hazardous chemicals are identified, whether they are found in a
container or generated in work operations (for example, welding fumes, dusts, and exhaust fumes).
The hazardous chemicals on the list can cover a variety of physical forms including liquids, solids,
gases, vapors, fumes, and mists. Sometimes hazardous chemicals can be identified using purchase
orders. Identification of others requires an actual inventory of the facility. Each time a new
hazardous chemical is introduced to the company whether at the jobsite or main office, that
chemical must be accompanied by a MSDS and be presented to the Safety Officer for approval and
filing. Our Safety Officer updates the inventory as necessary.
Our Safety Officer keeps the chemical inventory list, along with related work practices used in our
facility and is located in the jobsite trailer and main office where it is accessible during work hours.
The company does not manufacture any chemicals and, therefore, does not make any hazard
determinations.
After the chemical inventory is compiled, it serves as a list of every chemical for which an MSDS
must be maintained.
Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs)
The MSDSs we use are fact sheets for chemicals that pose a physical or health hazard in the
workplace. MSDSs provide our employees with specific information on the chemicals they use.
Our Safety Officer/Superintendent is responsible for obtaining/maintaining the MSDSs at our
facility. He/she will contact the chemical manufacturer or vendor if additional research is necessary.
The material safety data sheets are kept at the jobsite trailer and in the main office.
The procedure followed if the MSDS is not received at time of first shipment is: The supplier and/or
manufacturer of the product will be notified and a copy will be requested immediately and prior to
use of the hazardous chemical.
We do not generate MSDSs.
No alternatives to MSDSs are used in this workplace.
Labels and Other Forms of Warning
Labels list at least the chemical identity, appropriate hazard warnings, and the name and address of
the manufacturer, importer or other responsible party.
The chemical identity is found on the label, the MSDS, and the chemical inventory. Therefore, the
chemical identity links these three sources of information. The chemical identity used by the
supplier may be a common or trade name, or a chemical name. The hazard warning is a brief
statement of the hazardous effects of the chemical (i.e., "flammable," or "causes lung damage").
Labels frequently contain other information, such as precautionary measures (i.e., "do not use near
open flame"), but this information is provided voluntarily by our company and is not required by
the rule. Our labels are legible and prominently displayed, though their sizes and colors can vary.
Our Superintendents/Foremen and Safety Officer are responsible for ensuring that all hazardous
chemicals in in-plant containers are properly labeled and updated, as necessary. Our
Superintendents/Safety Officer also ensures that newly purchased materials are checked for labels
prior to use.
Our Superintendents/Foremen and Safety Officer is responsible for ensuring the proper labeling of
any shipped containers.
Our Superintendents/Safety Officer will refer to the corresponding MSDS to assist employees in
verifying label information.
The labeling system used on in-plant and shipped containers are: Labels on incoming container of
hazardous chemicals shall not be removed or defaced, unless, the container is immediately marked
with the required information. The Superintendent will instruct employees when this is necessary.
Each container of hazardous chemicals on the jobsite must be labeled, tagged, or marked, with the
following information:
 The identity of the hazardous chemical(s) contained therein; and
 Appropriate hazard warnings. Since such information is supplied on the Material Safety
Data Sheet, also, it shall be made available to the employee upon request.
 Labels shall be legible, and in English.
If employees transfer chemicals from a labeled container to a portable container that is intended
only for their IMMEDIATE use, no labels are required on the portable container.
An alternative to labeling of containers for chemicals is to use the following method(s):
Signs, placards, process sheets, batch tickets, or operating procedures, or other such written
materials, as long as the alternative method identifies the containers to which it is applicable.
The written materials shall be readily accessible to the employees in their work area.
Training
Everyone who works with or is potentially "exposed" to hazardous chemicals will receive initial
training and any necessary retraining on the Hazard Communication Standard and the safe use of
those hazardous chemicals by our Safety Officer.
"Exposure" means "an employee is subjected to a hazardous chemical in the course of employment
through any route of entry (inhalation, ingestion, skin contact or absorption, etc.) and includes
potential (e.g., accidental or possible) exposure." Whenever a new hazard is introduced or an old
hazard changes, additional training is provided.
Information and training is a critical part of the hazard communication program.
We train our employees to read and understand the information on labels and MSDSs, determine
how the information can be obtained and used in their own work areas, and understand the risks of
exposure to the chemicals in their work areas as well as the ways to protect themselves.
Our goal is to ensure employee comprehension and understanding including being aware that they
are exposed to hazardous chemicals, knowing how to read and use labels and MSDSs, and
appropriately following the protective measures we have established. We ask our employees to ask
our Safety Officer/Superintendent questions. As part of the assessment of the training program, our
Safety Officer asks for input from employees regarding the training they have received, and their
suggestions for improving it. In this way, we hope to reduce any incidence of chemical source
illnesses and injuries.
All employees receive training for hazard communication.
Training Content
The training plan emphasizes these elements:
 Reviewing and understanding all sections of the material safety data sheets including
o Chemical Manufacturer responsibilities to develop and distribute the MSDS to
employers who purchase those chemicals and that all information must be presented
in English regardless of the chemicals origin.
o Chemical identity and whether it is a single substance or mixture.
o Chemical’s common name and health or physical hazards associated with the
chemical or any of its contents.
o Physical and chemical characteristics of the chemical (i.e., flashpoint, vapor
pressure) and potential for fire, explosion and reactivity.
o Health hazards of the chemical including signs of exposure, chemical intoxication,
long term effects and short term effects.
o Primary routes of entry, PEL’s, ACGIH TLV’s, listings on the NTP annual report of
Carcinogens or finding of potential carcinogens IARC monograph or by OSHA.
o Applicable precautions for safe handling including hygienic practices and protective
measures.
o Emergency and first aid procedures
o Date of data preparation
o Manufacturer contact information.
 Summary of the standard and this written program, including what hazardous chemicals are
present, the labeling system used, and access to MSDS information and what it means.
 Chemical and physical properties of hazardous materials (e.g., flash point, reactivity) and
methods that can be used to detect the presence or release of chemicals (including chemicals
in unlabeled pipes).
 Physical hazards of chemicals (e.g., potential for fire, explosion, etc.).
 Health hazards, including signs and symptoms of exposure, associated with exposure to
chemicals and any medical condition known to be aggravated by exposure to the chemical.
 Procedures to protect against hazards (e.g., engineering controls; work practices or methods
to assure proper use and handling of chemicals; personal protective equipment required, and
its proper use, and maintenance; and procedures for reporting chemical emergencies).
The procedure to train new employees at the time of their initial assignment is to present this
information at the new hire orientation. We train employees when a new hazard is introduced by representing the information to all affected employees at that time. Proof of training for each
employee is documented and kept at the main office.
When employees are required to perform non-routine tasks that have the potential to expose
workers to hazardous chemicals, we inform employees of these hazards. At this time, the work task
will be addressed with the Superintendent.
Multi-Employer Facility
When contractors or any other employers' workers (i.e., painters, electricians, or plumbers) will be
working at this workplace, the Safety Officer will:
 Provide the other employer(s) with MSDSs for any of our chemicals to which their
employees may be exposed, and
 Relay necessary label and/or emergency precautionary information to the other employer(s)
Each contractor bringing chemicals on-site must provide with the appropriate hazard information on
these substances, including the MSDSs, the labels used and the precautionary measures to be taken
in working with these chemicals.
Additional Information
All employees, or their designated representatives, can obtain further information on this written
program, the hazard communication standard, applicable MSDSs, and chemical information lists
from the jobsite Superintendent or at the main office.
Hearing Conservation Program
Purpose
This written Hearing Conservation Program Safety describes methods and practices this company
has instituted for our construction workers to prevent any temporary or permanent noise-induced
hearing loss to employees. SDV Construction intends to comply with the federal OSHA standards
found at 29 CFR 1910.95 and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists
(ACGIH) most recent publication of Threshold Limit Values. (TLV’s) Our Safety Officer or
designated safety representative has overall responsibility for coordinating safety and health
programs in this company. Our Company will review and update the program, as necessary.
In the rare event that there is high noise levels and employees may be exposed to excessive noise
SDV Construction will notify all employees exposed at or above an 8-hour time-weighted average
of 85 decibels of the results. We will provide an opportunity for affected employees or their
representatives to observe any noise measurements conducted.
Audiometric Testing Program
SDV does not anticipate performing tasks that will over expose employees to high noise levels.
This plan and training are strictly precautionary and in some cases a requirement under
designated contracts.
Through our hazard assessments we will select proper hearing devices for all potentially affected
employees. Monitoring is repeated whenever a change in production, process, equipment or controls
increases noise exposures to the extent that either additional employee may be exposed at or above
the action level or the attenuation provided by hearing protectors being used by employees may be
rendered inadequate to meet the requirements of noise reduction. The audiometric testing program
is in place and available at no cost to all affected employees to ensure that noise exposures are kept
at proper levels. Within 6 months of an employee's first exposure at or above the action level, the
employer shall establish a valid baseline audiogram against which subsequent audiograms can be
compared.
Audiometric tests shall be performed by a licensed or certified audiologist, otolaryngologist, or
other physician, or by a technician who is certified by the Council of Accreditation in Occupational
Hearing Conservation, or who has satisfactorily demonstrated competence in administering
audiometric examinations, obtaining valid audiograms, and properly using, maintaining and
checking calibration and proper functioning of the audiometers being used. A technician who
operates microprocessor audiometers does not need to be certified.
A technician who performs audiometric tests must be responsible to an audiologist, otolaryngologist
or physician. We will provide for an annual audiogram and if a standard threshold shift has occurred
the employee will be notified in writing within 21 days of determination.
Hearing Protection
The company makes hearing protectors (ear plugs) available to all employees exposed to an 8-hour
time-weighted average of 85 decibels or greater at no cost to the employees.
The company ensures that employees have a variety of suitable protectors that attenuate (lower)
employee exposure at least to an 8-hour time-weighted average of 85 decibels or lower for
employees who have experienced a standard threshold shift in their hearing.
The company ensures evaluation for adequacy of the hearing protection attenuation for the specific
noise environments in which the protector will be used, according to specifications given in an
appendix to the standard. The company reevaluates attenuation whenever employee noise exposures
increase to the extent that current hearing protectors no longer provide adequate attenuation, and
then provides more effective hearing protection.
Training and Information
SDV Construction, Inc. has a hearing protection-training program for all employees exposed to
noise at or above an 8-hour time-weighted average of 85 decibels.
The company ensures all employees participate in the hearing protection-training program. Copies
of the OSHA standard requirements are available to affected employees or their representatives.
Our company assures that the training material is updated to be consistent with changes in the
protective equipment and work processes.
The company assures that each affected employee is informed of at least the following information:
 The effects of noise on hearing;
 The purpose of hearing protectors, the advantages, disadvantages, and attenuation of various
types, and instructions on selection, fitting, use, and care; and
 The purpose of audiometric testing, and an explanation of test procedures.
Recordkeeping
SDV Construction, Inc. maintains accurate records of employee’s exposure measurements for two
years. Records area available on request from the main office. All Audiometric records are also
kept. Audiometric records include
 Name and job classification of the employee.
 Date of the audiogram
 Examiners name
 Date of last acoustic or exhaustive calibration of the audio meter
 Employee’s most recent noise exposure assessment.
Hoisting & Rigging Safety Program
Purpose
The ability to safely move materials from one location to another is a vital part of many activities
here at SDV Construction, Inc. Hoisting and Rigging operations are often used when materials are
too heavy or bulky to be safely moved manually. Because hoists rely upon slings to hold their
suspended loads, slings are the most commonly used materials-handling apparatus. Because of the
complex nature of the seemingly simple task of lifting an object, an effective hoisting and rigging
safety program is necessary. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
requirements for hoisting and rigging safety are described in this section and apply to all jobsites
where hoisting techniques are used.
Program Requirements
Overhead Loads
No employees are allowed to be under overhead loads. Proper barricading must be in place to
reduce overhead hazards for employees and the public.
Selection, Use and Inspection of Slings
Workers involved in hoisting and rigging must exercise care when selecting and using slings. The
selection of slings should be based upon the size and type of the load, and the environmental
conditions of the workplace. All rigging equipment for material handling shall be inspected prior to
use and on each shift and as necessary during its use to ensure that it is safe. If any defects in
material or rigging equipment is found it shall be taken out of service immediately. Improper use of
hoisting equipment, including slings, may result in overloading, excessive speed (e.g., taking up
slack with a sudden jerk, shock loading), or sudden acceleration or deceleration of equipment.
Rigging equipment shall not be loaded in excess of its recommended safe working load.
There are generally six types of slings:
 Chain
 Wire rope,
 Metal mesh
 Natural fiber rope
 Synthetic fiber rope
 Synthetic web
Each type of sling has its own particular advantages and disadvantages. Factors to consider when
choosing the best sling for the job include size, weight, shape, temperature, and sensitivity of the
material being moved, and the environmental conditions under which the sling will be used.
Hooks on overhaul ball assemblies, lower load blocks, or other attachment assemblies shall be of a
type that can be closed and locked, eliminating the hook throat opening. Alternatively, an alloy
anchor type shackle with a bolt, nut and retaining pin may be used.
Latches will be in place on all hooks! The following guide may be useful in selecting the
appropriate sling:
Chains
Alloy steel chains are strong and able to adapt to the shape of the load. Care should be taken when
using chain slings because sudden shocks will damage them. This may result in sling failure and
possible injury to workers or damage to the load.
Chain slings must be visually inspected prior to use. During the inspection, employees should pay
particular attention to any stretching, nicks, gouges, and wear in excess of the allowances made by
the manufacturer. These signs indicate that the sling may be unsafe and must be removed from
service immediately.
Wire
Rope
Wire rope is composed of individual wires that have been twisted to form strands. Strands are then
twisted to form a wire rope. When wire rope has a fiber core, it is usually more flexible but less
resistant to environmental damage. Conversely, wire rope with a core that is made of a wire rope
strand tends to have greater strength and is more resistant to heat damage.
When selecting a wire rope sling to give the best service, there are four characteristics to consider:
 Strength – Strength of wire rope is a function of its size (e.g., diameter of the rope), grade,
and construction, and must be sufficient to accommodate the maximum applied load.
 Fatigue (Bending without Failure) – Fatigue failure of wire rope is caused by the
development of small cracks during small radius bends. The best means for preventing
fatigue failure of wire rope slings is to use blocking or padding to increase the bend radius.
 Abrasive Wear – The ability of wire rope to withstand abrasion is determined by the size
and number of the individual wires used to make up the rope. Smaller wires bend more
readily and offer greater flexibility, but are less able to withstand abrasion. Larger wires are
less flexible, but withstand abrasion better.
 Abuse – Misuse or abuse of wire rope slings will result in their failure long before any other
factor. Abuse can lead to serious structural damage, resulting in kinks or bird caging.
 (In bird caging, the wire rope strands are forcibly untwisted and become spread
outwards.) To prevent injuries to workers and prolong the life of the sling, strictly adhered
to safe and proper use of wire rope slings.
Wire rope slings must be visually inspected before use. Slings with excessive broken wires, severe
corrosion, localized wear, damage to end-fittings (e.g., hooks, rings, links, or collars), or damage to
the rope structure (e.g., kinks, bird caging, distortion) must be removed from service and discarded.
Fiber Rope and Synthetic Web
Fiber rope and synthetic web slings are used primarily for, highly finished or fragile parts, and
delicate equipment. Fiber rope slings deteriorate on contact with acids and caustics and, therefore,
must not be used around these substances. Fiber rope slings that exhibit cuts, gouges, worn surface
areas, brittle or discolored fibers, melting, or charring must be discarded. A buildup of powder-like
sawdust on the inside of a fiber rope indicates excessive internal wear and that the sling is
unsafe. Finally, if the rope fibers separate easily when scratched with a fingernail, it indicates that
the sling has suffered some kind of chemical damage and should be discarded.
Synthetic web slings must be inspected before use and should be removed from service if found to
have acid or caustic burns, melting or charring of any part of the surface, snags, tears, or cuts,
broken stitches, distorted fittings, or wear or elongation beyond the manufacturer’s specifications.
All rigging equipment, when not in use, shall be removed from the immediate work area to reduce
possibilities of trips, slips and falls.
Training
Workers involved in hoisting and rigging operations should receive training in the following:
 Sling and hitch types
 Sling capacity determination
 Equipment inspection, care, and maintenance
 Load weight and center of gravity determination
 Safe lifting techniques
Crane Safety
Mobile Cranes
Prior to start of hoisting and rigging using a mobile crane, notify Superintendent or Safety Officer
forty-eight hours in advance of scheduled arrival time. This notification allows time to review the
project documentation, and to conduct an inspection of the crane coming onto project site. Crane
inspection by the Safety Officer shall include, but not be limited to verification of license or
training, load charts, inspection reports, and physical verification of ropes, slings, undercarriage,
outriggers, and boom.
Additionally, Safety Officer shall document review of crane placement, and lifting plan or sequence
with the Contractor and Contractor’s crane operator.
Proof of inspection and load tests in accordance with 29 CFR 1926 and ANSI B30.5 must be
available upon request.
Crane operators shall be properly trained and experienced in operation of crane or hoisting device.
Crane operator shall have one of the following in possession during crane inspection and operation:
Valid State of New Mexico Crane Operator’s License or Certification that indicates completion of
an industry-recognized, in-house training course based on American National Standards Institute
(ANSI) standards for hoisting operators, and who is employed by the entity that taught the training
course or contracted to have the training course taught.
Documented Lift Plan
All lift meeting the criteria described below will be documented. Documentation will be onsite
during the lifting operation and shall be available for review. A documented lift plan will be
required for all lifts meeting the following criteria:
 Greater than 75% of manufacturer’s load chart capacity.
 Lifts involving field designed and installed lifting points when manufacturer’s lift points
cannot be utilized.
 Tag lines shall be used on all lifts unless their use creates an unsafe condition.
Lift plan shall include: lift calculations, qualified person in charge (PIC), and method utilized to
approve filed designed lifting points when manufacturer’s lifting points cannot be utilized.
Critical Lift Plan
A lift shall be designated as a critical lift if collision, upset, or dropping could result in any one of
the following:
 Unacceptable risk of personnel injury or significant adverse health impact (onsite or offsite).
 Significant release of radioactive or other hazardous material or other undesirable
conditions.
 Undetectable damage that would jeopardize future operations or the safety of a facility.
 Damage that would result in unacceptable delay to schedule or other significant program
impact such as loss of vital data.
A lift should also be designated as critical if the load requires exceptional care in handling because
of size, weight, close-tolerance installation, high susceptibility to damage, or other unusual factors.
Housekeeping Program
Purpose
Good housekeeping is a necessary requirement for maintaining safety at construction sites. Clean
and tidy work sites hold fewer hazards for all employees. Accidents and injuries are avoided and
productivity improved where good housekeeping is a daily occurrence. This document informs
interested persons, including employees that our company is complying with OSHA's housekeeping
requirements, including:
 29 CFR 1926.25 - Housekeeping, and
 29 CFR 1926.151 - Fire Prevention.
Many other regulations also lead to housekeeping procedures. Common sense and safety concerns
encourage standardization of housekeeping measures in the workplace. SDV Construction, Inc. has
developed a set of written housekeeping procedures. In this way we have standardized
housekeeping measures and are providing clear expectations and procedures for housekeeping at
our company.
Good housekeeping is possibly the most visible evidence of management and employee concern for
safety and health that a company displays on a day-to-day basis. Orderliness in our workplace
contributes to a safe working environment by minimizing obstacles and potential safety and health
threats such as spills, trip hazards, etc. In fact, we have nine good reasons for housekeeping:
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Prevents accidents
Prevents fire
Saves time
Gives control to our workers
Increases production
Gives our workers the freedom to move
Gives our workers pride
Protects our products and equipment
Reduces our waste.
Our Written Housekeeping Program begins with a purpose statement. Then it provides a section to
explain our expectations for a walk-around assessment. We have also included specific
housekeeping procedures. Because no program can be successful without employee participation,
we train our employees in the procedures. Plus, we have a system to promptly address and resolve
any housekeeping-related accidents and hazard reports.
Administrative Duties
Our Safety Officer is responsible for developing and maintaining the program. Employees may
review a copy of the plan. It is located in main office. If after reading this program, you find that
improvements can be made, please contact the Safety Officer. We encourage all suggestions
because we are committed to the success of our written housekeeping program.
We strive for clear understanding, safe behavior, and involvement from every level of the company.
Walk-Around Assessment
Our Safety Officer walks around the facility weekly for an assessment to identify main
housekeeping issues, which are documented on the assessment form. These persons look for a lack
of order, un-removed spills or obstructions, or other hazards due to poor organization or poor
housekeeping. They ask employees working in each area to identify and recommend corrective
actions for their area. They also walk around the grounds to see if there is refuse or an untidy
appearance due to storing materials haphazardly. In addition, they check the OSHA Form 300
injury and illness records. To see if one or more incidents such as slips, trips, falls, or other types of
accidents were related in some way to poor housekeeping.
Housekeeping Procedures
It is the intent of this company to standardize housekeeping measures, meet OSHA requirements,
and encourage safety. The procedures listed below cover many locations in our facility.
Our facility controls any vegetation problems outside the facility in the following manner:
 Cutting and removal of vegetation
Our facility securely stores material by piling or arranging it in an orderly manner. Our
housekeeping procedures for storage areas, which keep them free from accumulation of materials
that, constitute hazards from tripping, fire, explosion, or pest harborage.
Open yard storage housekeeping procedures include:
 Combustible materials must be piled with due regard to the stability of piles and in no case
higher than 20 feet.
 Driveways between and around combustible storage piles must be at least 15 feet wide and
maintained free from accumulation of rubbish, equipment, or other articles or materials.
Driveways must be so spaced that a maximum grid system unit of 50 feet by 150 feet is
produced.
 The entire storage site must be kept free from accumulation of unnecessary combustible
materials. Weeds and grass must be kept down and a regular procedure provided for the
periodic cleanup of the entire area.
 When there is a danger of an underground fire, that land must not be used for combustible or
flammable storage.
 Method of piling must be solid wherever possible and in orderly and regular piles. No
combustible material may be stored outdoors within 10 feet of a building or structure.
Indoor Storage Housekeeping Measures:
 Storage may not obstruct, or adversely affect, means of exit.
 All materials must be stored, handled, and piled with due regard to their fire characteristics.
 A barrier having a fire resistance of at least 1 hour must segregate non-compatible materials,
which may create a fire hazard.
 Material must be piled to minimize the spread of fire internally and to permit convenient
access for firefighting. Stable piling shall be maintained at all times. Aisle space shall be
maintained to safely accommodate the widest vehicle that may be used within the building
for firefighting purposes.
 Clearance of at least 36 inches must be maintained between the top level of the stored
material and the sprinkler deflectors.
 Clearance must be maintained around lights and heating units to prevent ignition of
combustible materials.
 A clearance of 24 inches must be maintained around the path of travel of fire doors unless a
barricade is provided, in which case no clearance is needed. Material must not be stored
within 36 inches of a fire door opening.
Chemical Storage
Because we have chemicals at our facility, we have attached our Written Hazard Communication
Program to this Written Housekeeping Program.
Note: Flammable and combustible substance storage is not allowed in office areas UNLESS it is
required for maintenance and operation of building and operation of equipment.
Our housekeeping for Aisles, Walkways, and Floors
Our facility does the following things to keep aisles, walkways and floors clean and open:
 Provide sufficient safe clearances and access to any and all work stations and work areas,
fire aisles, fire extinguishers, fire blankets, electrical disconnects, safety showers, other
emergency aids, doors, and access to stairways.
 Clearly mark to distinguish walkways from areas not for pedestrian traffic.
 Keep aisles and walkways free of physical obstructions that would prevent access, including
path-blocking objects, liquid or solid spills, and other obstructions.
 Keep aisles at least 3 feet wide where necessary for reasons of access to doors, windows, or
standpipe connections.
 Keep stairs clean, dry, and free of waste, well lit, and provided with adequate handrails and
treads that are in good condition.
 Keep floors clean; dry (dry as possible); slip-resistant; and free of waste, unnecessary
material, oil and grease, protruding nails, splinters, holes, or loose boards.
 Provide an adequate number of waste receptacles at accessible locations throughout all work
areas.
Our housekeeping procedures for our production areas include:
 Maintain adequate lighting systems in a clean and efficient manner and replace bulbs as
soon as possible after failure.
 Properly maintain walls.
 Keep windows clean by washing them regularly.
 Keep blinds clean by washing regularly.
 Properly maintain doors and windows in a good working order and repair any damage to
doors and windows as soon as possible.
 Provide adequate ventilation to all work areas to keep air free of dust and other
contaminants.
 Maintain and clean all ventilation systems and HVAC systems at regular intervals.
Outside the Facility
Our housekeeping procedures for keeping our grounds and building faces/sides neat and orderly
include:
 Keep the parts of buildings that are visible to public roads cleaned by washing them at
regular intervals.
 Keep the other parts of buildings cleaned at regular intervals.
 Keep all doors and loading docks completely free of debris, shrubs, or other obstructions.
 Maintain visibility through all windows by washing at regular intervals.
 Keep doors and windows properly maintained in good working order.
 Repair any damage to doors and windows at regular intervals.
 Provide any stairs or platforms adjacent to or leading into the building(s) with adequate rails,
adequate treads to climb and an area clean and free of materials.
 Keep grounds neat and orderly, free of refuse and unnecessary materials.
 Store materials outdoors only in designated areas of the grounds.
 Provide designated walkways through grounds, preferably paved and kept clear of snow, ice,
materials, or any other physical hazards.
 Provide a lighting system that is adequate to allow employees to navigate around the
grounds as necessary at dusk and after dark.
 Maintain a neat landscaping appearance--trim lawn, trees and shrubs in such a way as to
minimize any possible safety hazards.
 Trim grass short enough to prevent trip hazards to employees.
 Prevent trees and shrubs from obstructing doors and windows.
Training
All of our employees, including maintenance and contractor employees, need to fully understand
the safety and health hazards of poor housekeeping and improper chemical storage to protect
themselves, their fellow employees, and the citizens of nearby communities. While training in
Hazard Communication will help employees to be more knowledgeable about the chemicals they
work with as well as familiarize them with reading and understanding MSDS’s, we will also train
them as part of our Housekeeping Program, covering housekeeping procedures and safe work
practices, hazard reporting, and other areas pertinent to housekeeping.
The Safety Officer trains employees on housekeeping procedures. He/she trains new employees at
the time of their initial assignment and keeps track of their training. When a new procedure is
introduced, he/she retrains all employees and keeps track of their retraining as above.
Employees sign certificates upon completion of their training. All training and retraining records
contain the identity of the employee, the date of training, and the means used to verify that they
understood their training.
Employee Participation
Our employees are a significant in implementing and maintaining an effective housekeeping
program for the facility. SDV Construction, Inc. strongly encourages employees to participate in:
 Conducting and developing the housekeeping program elements and hazard assessments as
well as incident investigation findings.
 Obtaining access to the housekeeping program including any hazard analyses.
Industrial Hygiene Program
Purpose
The purpose of the IH Program is to ensure that all chemical and physical hazards are identified,
evaluated, and controlled in order to reduce the risk of work-related disease or illness. This is
accomplished through worker exposure and is assessed through workplace exposure monitoring and
observation of work when determined appropriate.
Objectives
 Assess exposure to determine the potential for worker exposure in order to reduce the risk of
work-related disease or illness.
 Provide workplace monitoring to assess worker exposure to chemical and physical hazards
through appropriate workplace monitoring (including personal, area, wipe, and bulk
sampling as appropriate); biological monitoring; and observation by qualified industrial
hygienists.
 Document exposure assessments performed and any workplace monitoring.
 Communicate information concerning IH-related hazards to all affected workers and
management. The transmittal of IH-related hazards is accomplished by means of the Hazard
Communication Program (See the Hazard Communication Program).
Jobsite Hazard Assessment and Hazard Control Planning
The assessment of jobsite hazards and hazard control planning are initiated through communication
of upcoming job scopes and work plans. In the absence of written work plans, job scopes and work
plans will be communicated verbally to the employees before work is performed. Job scopes and
work plans include:




Job Site Hazard Evaluations (JSHEs) documents provided.
Other documents communicating job scopes or work plans provided.
Documents communicating work hazards, such as Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs).
Other SDV Construction developed documents that communicate job scopes or work plans
for work to be performed.
These documents are reviewed by our safety officer and by the qualified industrial hygienist (QIH)
to provide an initial assessment of all IH-related hazards to be encountered on a job. This
assessment will be documented by the safety officer and QIH. The information is then delivered and
communicated to the appropriate Foreman and/or Project Managers performing the work.
Information provided supervisors and workers include:
 Initial identification of IH-related hazards;
 Control methods to control identified hazards;
 Instructions for further assessment by the IH Team if necessary during the performance of
the job;
 Exposure assessments.
Occupational Exposure Limits
The Occupational Exposure Limits (OELs) used by the IH Program include the Occupational Safety
and Health Administration (OSHA) Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs) as well as the current
edition of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) Threshold
Limit Values (TLVs) for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure
Indices (BEIs), which are issued annually. The goal of IH Program is to comply with these OELs.
In cases where the current edition of the ACGIH TLV or BEIs is more protective than the OSHA
PELs, the ACGIH limit is used. Additional requirements from applicable OSHA standards are
complied with in conjunction with ACGIH TLVs.
For the IH-related physical hazards of occupational noise and thermal stress, the IH Program also
complies with the requirements of the ACGIH TLVs.
Meeting and maintaining compliance with the OELs is accomplished by the IH Team using
methods described throughout this IH Program.
Workplace Exposure Monitoring
Workplace monitoring is designed to assess worker exposure to chemical and physical hazards
(including personal, area, wipe, and bulk sampling). Workplace monitoring is performed by the
Industrial Hygienist when it is necessary to meet the objectives of a Comprehensive Work Activity
Assessment
Equipment and technical measures used as part of workplace monitoring are performed by qualified
individuals. All equipment and technical measures used shall conform to current prescribed
analytical methods:
 OSHA/ACGIH prescribed monitoring equipment specifications;
 Validated monitoring and analysis methodology by OSHA and the National Institute of
Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), or in the absence of validated methods, partially
validated methods;
 Analysis of samples by an American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) accredited
laboratory.
Hazard Control Methods
When necessary in order to control IH-related hazards in the workplace (e.g., gases, vapors, fumes,
dusts, and mists; noise; heat stress; non-ionizing radiation), engineering, administrative and/or
personal protective equipment controls are employed to keep worker exposures within prescribed
limits and to meet requirements of applicable construction specifications. Implementation of
controls follows the hierarchy of first implementing engineering controls when feasible and
practical, then administrative controls. If these control methods cannot be utilized reasonably or
feasibly, then PPE is prescribed.
Assessment Notification and Documentation
 When necessary all exposure assessments conducted by the Industrial Hygienist will be
documented in an IH report and kept on record at our main office.
 All monitoring results are recorded in these reports, which describe the tasks and locations
where monitoring occurred, identity of workers monitored and represented by the
monitoring, and identify the sampling methods, sampling durations, control measures in
place during monitoring (including the use of PPE), and any other factors that may have
affected sampling results.
 Written notification of monitoring results are made to personnel monitored and those
represented by monitoring within the timeframes specified in applicable portions of Title 29
CFR Parts 1910 and 1926.
 When requested, monitoring results will be available and transmitted to the appropriate
individuals within one working day of receipt.
 All records will be kept at the SDV main office for storage and retrieval.
Reporting
SDV Construction will immediately notify the appropriate personnel in the event that personnel
exposure to chemical, biological or physical hazards are above the TLV’s observed.
Integrated Work Management (IWM)
This plan has been developed, in its entirety, based on ISMS principles. Every contract the SDV
will consider will include the implementation and execution of these principles. Documentation
will be developed for every project to include:
1. Assigned management personnel responsible for safety of that particular project who will be
accountable for the protection of the public, workers and the environment.
2. Defined, documented lines of authority for ensuring the safety of the project at all levels.
3. Only qualified and accountable personnel who have appropriate authority to make and
execute decisions will be names in these roles.
4. Safety will be priority over all other goals of the project and personnel will commit to this
ideal.
5. Safety standards will be acknowledged, hazards addressed and clear awareness as well as
mitigation will be determined prior to the start or continuation of any/all work. The public,
workers an environment will all be considered during this evaluation.
6. Administrative and engineering controls will be implemented first and foremost. Hazards
will be addressed on each individual project and mitigation will be accomplished
accordingly.
7. All operations requirements will be clearly communicated to all tiers of the project and
commitment to understanding and execution will be received prior to the start of any
activities that are affected by the ISMS principles.
8. Work will always be
a. Planned
b. Hazards analyzed
c. Hazards controlled or mitigated
d. Work will be performed
e. Feedback requested from employees and subcontractors regarding adequacy of
policy implementation, documentation, communication and necessary modifications
to our process.
Lead Safety Program
Purpose
The purpose of SDV Construction, Inc. written Lead Awareness Program is to:
 Prevent lead exposure of all workers, and their families.
 Provide employees who must work on lead abatement projects the tools to protect
themselves, to protect the inhabitants of the buildings, and to protect the environment.
 Prevent potential environmental contamination with lead from any construction activities
 Make employees aware of the health risks associated with exposure to lead in the workplace
 State clearly that only licensed and certified employees are allowed to abate lead-containing
materials, specifically lead-containing paint
 Provide guidelines for non licensed or certified employees in recognizing lead -containing
materials and working safely with them.
 Comply with lead regulations issued by OSHA, EPA and other state and federal agencies
 Insure no employee be exposed to lead at concentrations greater than fifty micrograms per
cubic meter of air averaged over an 8-hour period.
References
 OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1025, including Appendices A, B, C, D: Lead in General Industry
 OSHA 29 CFR 1926.62: Lead in Construction Industries
 EPA 40 CFR, Part 745, Lead-based paint poisoning prevention, including Sub-Parts D, E, F,
and L
Scope
This program is applicable to all employees of SDV Construction, Inc. and any subcontractor
working at an SDV Construction jobsite. This program is applicable to all locations where
elemental lead, inorganic lead compounds, or lead-containing paint is present. With regard to
OSHA, this program applies to, but is not limited to the disturbance of lead which involves manual
demolition of structures, scraping, sanding, heat gun applications, power tool cleaning, cleanup, and
spray painting of lead paint, using lead containing mortar, lead burning, rivet busting, abrasive
blasting, welding, cutting, and torch burning. Described in general terms, it applies to removal or
encapsulation, installation of lead materials, new construction or renovation, emergency cleanup,
transportation, disposal, and storage of lead materials.
Elements of the Program
Regulations addressing working with lead-containing materials are extensive and complex, and
often confusing. Consequently, this program is broken into the elements most commonly
encountered. Elements are:
 Removal of lead-containing paint
 Other operations where lead-containing items may be machined, heated, or otherwise
handled in a manner where lead may be released into the air.
 Total (100%) removal of lead, per EPA criteria and definition.
 Working with lead- other
These four elements will be handled individually throughout all sections of this program.
Working with paint containing lead (removal, disposal)
OSHA and the EPA have set forth requirements for certification and training of employees involved
in removal of lead paint. Only a “Certified Firm” may participate in lead paint removal (SDV is not
certified and will subcontract the work and monitoring out to third party certified contractors).
There must also be a “Lead Abatement Supervisor” who oversees all lead paint removal. Work may
be done by “trained lead abatement workers” – workers who have been trained by following EPA
guidelines, to understand and properly handle lead-containing paint.
All paint removal projects must be reviewed by SDV Construction Inc. If necessary we will test the
paint for lead content before any removal work begins. The testing will usually be conducted onsite,
using an XRF (X-Ray Fluorescence) Spectrum Analyzer or equivalent testing devices; these
processes do not disturb the integrity of the lead paint. If necessary, paint chips may be collected
and submitted to an authorized laboratory for quantitative analysis. All analytical work must be
completed before paint removal can begin.
Working with welding, cutting and soldering of lead-containing materials
Lead vaporizes at 1100 o F, and these vapors can be inhaled by unprotected workers. These
processes can also generate minute particles of lead dust which can be inhaled. Improperly handled
wastes from these processes pose a potential hazard to human health and the environment.
When there is reason to expect that the materials to be welded, cut, or otherwise disturbed contain
lead, the materials should be tested prior to beginning the work. If lead is present, use of appropriate
respirators, and/or exhaust ventilation, is required. Where exhaust ventilation is used to control
employee exposures to acceptable levels, quarterly exhaust performance assessments are required.
Welding, cutting and soldering lead-containing materials must be done in well-ventilated areas.
Areas where lead dust or debris may accumulate must be covered before the operations begin, and
the covering material and waste disposed of in an appropriate covered container labeled “Lead
Waste”.
Working with lead – other
Employees must be made aware of the hazards associated with each process, and the steps to protect
themselves from exposure to the lead. For each unique process, written instructions must be
developed and made readily available to all who utilize the given process. Signs and barricades will
be posted informing potential exposed workers and the public that there is lead present.
If these processes have the potential to generate lead fumes or dusts, workers must wear appropriate
respirators, gloves, protective clothing, and practice good hygiene (i.e., no food or drink in the work
area, through washing of hands and other exposed surfaces before leaving the work area). PPE will
be provided to workers at no cost to them. Workers must collaborate with the designated safety
representative to identify the risks associated with the various processes, and participate in a
respiratory protection program, where appropriate.
Total Removal of lead
When total removal of lead is required, EPA dictates the use of very specific procedures (EPA 40
CFR Part 745, section L.) It is not anticipated that total removal will be done by SDV Construction,
Inc. Should this become an issue, the certified licensed abatement company will be utilized.
Training
All employees who may be in contact with lead containing material should be trained in the hazards
associated with their tasks. Employees in areas where lead is present but will not be disturbed
should have at minimum a lead awareness course. Employees removing lead should be trained per
EPA guidelines. All training will be documented and kept on site. Training records will be provided
if required.
PPE (Personal Protective Equipment)
All PPE worn will be provided by the SDV Construction, Inc. If respiratory protection is required
all procedures will be followed per company safety policy.
When the job is completed, all waste will be bagged and treated as lead-containing waste. All
disposable PPE will also be bagged and disposed of accordingly. Respirators should be thoroughly
cleaned.
Definitions
 Action Level: Employee exposure, without regard to use of respirators, to an airborne
concentration of lead of 30 micrograms per cubic meter of air averaged over an 8-hour
period.
 Blood Lead Level (BLL): A measure of the amount of blood present in an individual’s
blood, measured in micrograms per deciliter of blood
 Certified lead abatement worker: A worker who has taken the training and testing that
permits him to remove lead-containing paint, and to supervise other trained workers at this
task; Training workers per EPA-approved curriculum is required.
 Lead: Metallic lead, all inorganic lead compounds, and organic lead soaps. Excluded from
this definition per OSHA are all other organic lead compounds.
 Lead-based Paint: Paint containing at least 0.7 milligrams of lead per square centimeter
(per OSHA) (or 1.0 milligram of lead per square centimeter of surface area, per EPA), or
0.5% lead by weight
 Lead-Containing Material (LCM): Any material that has been confirmed through
laboratory analysis to contain any detectable quantity of lead
 Lead Hazard Assessment: Determination of employee exposure to lead by sampling /
monitoring the employee’s regular exposure to lead, typically in an eight-hour work day.
 Permissible Exposure Limit: concentrations less than fifty micrograms per cubic meter of
air, averaged over an 8-hour period.
 Renovation: Modification of a structure that disturbs lead paint
 Prohibited Practices: work practices prohibited during renovation:
o open-flame burning or torching of paint; sanding, grinding, planning by machine
unless machine is EPA-approved operating a heat gun above 1100oF on lead paint
Lockout/Tagout Program
Purpose
The purpose of this Lockout/Tagout Program is to establish a means of positive control to prevent
the accidental starting or activating of machinery or systems while they are being repaired, cleaned
and/or serviced. We also want to incorporate applicable requirements for the lock out and tag out of
energized electrical and pressurized systems from 29 CFR 1926 and 29 CFR 1910 for construction
and service work, respectively. This program serves to:
 Establish a safe and positive means of shutting down machinery, equipment and systems.
 Prohibit unauthorized personnel or remote control systems from starting machinery or
equipment while it is being serviced.
 Provide a secondary control system (tagout) when it is impossible to positively lockout the
machinery or equipment.
 Establish responsibility for implementing and controlling lockout/tagout procedures.
 Ensure that only approved locks, standardized tags and fastening devices provided by the
company will be utilized in the lockout/tagout procedures.
Administrative Duties
Our Safety Officer will be responsible for implementing the lockout/tagout program. Our Project
Managers and Superintendents are responsible for enforcing the program and insuring compliance
with the procedures in their departments. Our Safety Officer is responsible for monitoring the
compliance of this procedure and will conduct the annual inspection and certification of the
authorized employees.
 Authorized employees are responsible for following established lockout/tagout procedures.
 Affected employees (all other employees) are responsible for insuring they do not attempt to
restart or re-energize machines or equipment which are locked out or tagged out.
Procedures
The ensuing items are to be followed to ensure both compliance with the OSHA Control of
Hazardous Energy Standard and the safety of our employees.
Preparation for Lockout or Tagout
Employees who are required to utilize the lockout/tagout procedure must be knowledgeable of the
different energy sources and the proper sequence of shutting off or disconnecting energy means.
The four types of energy sources are:
 Electrical (Most Common)
 Hydraulic or Pneumatic
 Fluids and Gases
 Mechanical
More than one energy source may be utilized on some equipment and the proper procedure must be
followed in order to identify energy sources and lockout/tagout accordingly.
General Requirements
Lockout/Tagout (LO/TO): Notify Superintendent a minimum of 24 hours in advance of activity
requiring utility or equipment shutdown.
 Verify that normal stopping procedures have occurred.
 Relieve, restrain, or otherwise render safe all potentially hazardous stored energy.
 Operate the associated controls to make certain there is no release of energy and return the
controls to the neutral, off or blanked position.
 Install locks and tags on de-energized equipment, systems or circuits at isolation devices
capable of being locked out.
 Install individual locks with tag that has the name and phone number of individual
authorized to place and remove lock, date of service was locked out, and why service is
locked out will be affixed at each lockout location.
 If there is a possibility of re-accumulation of stored energy to a hazardous level, verification
of isolation shall be continued until the servicing or maintenance is completed, or until the
possibility of such accumulation no longer exists.
 Verification of isolation. Prior to starting work on machines or equipment that have been
locked out or tagged out; the authorized employee shall verify that isolation and deenergization of the machine or equipment have been accomplished.
 Group lockout or tagout devices shall be used in accordance with the procedures required by
paragraph (c)(4) of this section including, but not necessarily limited to, the following
specific requirements:
 Primary responsibility is vested in an authorized employee for a set number of employees
working under the protection of a group lockout or tagout device (such as an operations
lock);
 When more than one crew, craft, department, etc. is involved, assignment of overall jobassociated lockout or tagout control responsibility to an authorized employee designated to
coordinate affected work forces and ensure continuity of protection; and
 Each authorized employee shall affix a personal lockout or tagout device to the group
lockout device, group lockbox, or comparable mechanism when he or she begins work, and
shall remove those devices when he or she stops working on the machine or equipment
being serviced or maintained.
Electrical
 Shut off power at machine and disconnect.
 Disconnecting means must be locked or tagged.
 Press start button to see that correct systems are locked out.
 All controls must be returned to their safest position.
 Points to remember:
If a machine or piece of equipment contains capacitors, they must be drained of stored energy.
Possible disconnecting means include the power cord, power panels (look for primary and
secondary voltage), breakers, the operator's station, motor circuit, relays, limit switches, and
electrical interlocks. Some equipment may have a motor isolating shut-off and a control isolating
shut-off. If the electrical energy is disconnected by simply unplugging the power cord, the cord
must be kept under the control of the authorized employee or the plug end of the cord must be
locked out or tagged out.
Hydraulic/Pneumatic
 Shut off all energy sources (pumps and compressors). If the pumps and compressors supply
energy to more than one piece of equipment, lockout or tagout the valve supplying energy to
the piece of equipment being serviced.
 Stored pressure from hydraulic/pneumatic lines shall be drained/bled when release of stored
energy could cause injury to employees.
 Make sure controls are returned to their safest position (off, stop, standby, inch, jog, etc.).
Fluids and Gases
 Identify the type of fluid or gas and the necessary personal protective equipment.
 Close valves to prevent flow, and lockout/tagout.
 Determine the isolating device, then close and lockout/tagout.
 Drain and bleed lines to zero energy state.
 Some systems may have electrically controlled valves. If so, they must be shut off and
locked/tagged out.
 Check for zero energy state at the equipment.
Mechanical Energy
Mechanical energy includes gravity activation, energy stored in springs, etc.
 Block out or use die ram safety chain.
 Lockout or tagout safety device.
 Shut off, lockout or tagout electrical system.
 Check for zero energy state.
 Return controls to safest position.
Release from Lockout/Tagout
 Inspection: Make certain the work is completed and inventory the tools and equipment that
were used.
 Clean-up: Remove all towels, rags, work-aids, etc.
 Replace guards: Replace all guards possible. Sometimes a particular guard may have to be
left off until the start sequence is over due to possible adjustments. However, all other
guards should be put back into place.
 Check controls: All controls should be in their safest position. The work area shall be
checked to ensure that all employees have been safely positioned or removed and notified
that the lockout/tagout devices are being removed.
 Remove locks/tags: Remove only your lock or tag.
LO/TO Involving More than One Person
When service and/or maintenance is performed by more than one person, each authorized employee
shall place his own lock or tag on the energy isolating source. This shall be done by utilizing a
multiple lock scissors clamp if the equipment is capable of being locked out. If the equipment
cannot be locked out, then each authorized employee must place his tag on the equipment.
Removal of an Authorized Employee’s Lockout/Tagout by the Company
Each location must develop written emergency procedures that comply with 1910.147(e)(3) to be
utilized at that location. Emergency procedures for removing lockout/tagout should include the
following:
 Verification by employer that the authorized employee who applied the device is not in the
facility.
 Make reasonable efforts to advise the employee that his/her device has been removed. (This
can be done when he/she returns to the facility).
 Ensure that the authorized employee has this knowledge before he/she resumes work at the
facility.
Shift or Personnel Changes
Each site must develop written procedures based on specific needs and capabilities. Each procedure
must specify how the continuity of lockout or tagout protection will be ensured at all times.
Procedures for Outside Personnel/Contractors
 Outside personnel/contractors shall be advised that the company has and enforces the use of
lockout/tagout procedures. They will be informed of the use of locks and tags and notified
about the prohibition of attempts to restart or re-energize machines or equipment that are
locked out or tagged out.
 The company will obtain information from the outside personnel/contractor about their
lockout/tagout procedures and advise affected employees of this information.
 The outside personnel/contractor will be required to sign a certification form. If outside
personnel/contractor has previously signed a certification that is on file, additional signed
certification is not necessary.
Training
Each authorized employee who will be utilizing the lockout/tagout procedure will be trained in the
recognition of applicable hazardous energy sources, type and magnitude of energy available in the
work place, and the methods and means necessary for energy isolation and control.
Each affected employee (all employees other than authorized employees utilizing the lockout/tagout
procedure) shall be instructed in the purpose and use of the lockout/tagout procedure, and the
prohibition of attempts to restart or re-energize machines or equipment that are locked out or tagged
out.
Training will be certified using Attachment B (Authorized Personnel) or Attachment C (Affected
Personnel). The certifications will be retained in the employee personnel files.
Retraining
When we have reason to believe that one of our employees lacks the skill or understanding needed
for safe work involving any aspect of our LO/TO program we will re-train the employee so that the
requisite proficiency is regained. Retraining will be done in at least the following situations:
 Where changes at the worksite present a hazard about which the employee has not been
previously trained.
 When there is a change in job assignments, in machines, a change in the energy control
procedures, or a new hazard is introduced.
 Where inadequacies in an affected employee's work involving LO/TO indicate that the
employee has not retained the requisite proficiency.
Periodic Inspection
A periodic inspection (at least annually) will be conducted of each authorized employee under the
lockout/tagout procedure. This inspection shall be performed by the Vice President of Operations.
If Vice President of Operations is also using the energy control procedure being inspected, then the
inspection shall be performed by another party.
The inspection will include a review between the inspector and each authorized employee of that
employee's responsibilities under the energy control (lockout/tagout) procedure. The inspection
will also consist of a physical inspection of the authorized employee while performing work under
the procedures.
The Safety Officer shall certify in writing that the inspection has been performed. The written
certification shall be retained in the individual's personnel file.
Attachment A
List of Authorized Personnel
For
Lockout/Tagout Procedures
NAME
JOB TITLE
Attachment B
Certification of Training
(Authorized Personnel)
I certify that I received training as an authorized employer under SDV Construction Inc’s
Lockout/Tagout program. I further certify that I understand the procedures and will abide by those
procedures.
AUTHORIZED EMPLOYEE SIGNATURE
DATE
Attachment C
Certification of Training
(Affected Personnel)
I certify that I received training as an Affected Employee under SDV Construction Inc’s
Lockout/Tagout Program. I further certify and understand that I am prohibited from attempting to
restart or re-energize machines or equipment that are locked out or tagged out.
AFFECTED EMPLOYEE SIGNATURE
DATE
Attachment D
Lockout/Tagout Inspection Certification
I certify that
was inspected on this date utilizing lockout/tagout
procedures. The inspection was performed while working on
.
AUTHORIZED EMPLOYEE SIGNATURE
DATE
INSPECTOR’S SIGNATURE
DATE
Attachment E
Lockout/Tagout
Energy Control Procedures
Specific to Each Machine
Preparation for Shut Down
1.
Identify equipment to be shut down:
2.
Location in facility:
3.
Procedures to notify all affected employees:
4.
Identify all power sources:
a) Electrical:
b) Air:
c) Steam:
d) Hydraulic:
e) Gravity:
f) Other:
5. Identify lockout/tagout devices to be used:
Shut Down
Description of the shut down procedures:
Isolation
Procedures for isolation of equipment from all power sources:
Lockout/Tagout Device Application
Procedure for locking out or tagging out equipment:
Release of Stored Energy
Procedures for the release of stored energy (where applicable):
Verification of Isolation
Procedures to ensure that equipment is isolated from all power sources:
Start-Up
1. Visual inspection of the machine and equipment. Ensure all tools have been removed.
Return guards to place.
2. Notify all affected employees and other employees of the start up.
3. Remove all lockout/tagout devices and restore power.
Liquid Petroleum (Lp) Gas Compliance Program
Purpose
Liquefied petroleum (LP) gases are flammable, nontoxic gases. Because SDV Construction, Inc.
uses these gases as a fuel to operate equipment and systems; we are dedicated to the protection of
employees who store, handle, use, or work around LP gas.
This written LP Gas Compliance Program is intended to help us protect the safety and health of our
employees and meet the applicable requirements of 29 CFR 1926.153, Liquefied Petroleum Gas
(LP-Gas).
Administrative Duties
Our Safety Officer is our company's LP Gas Compliance Program Administrator, is responsible for
developing and maintaining the written LP Gas Compliance Program. This person is solely
responsible for all facets of the program and has full authority to make necessary decisions to
ensure the success of this program.
Copies of the program may be obtained from the Safety Officer at the main office. If after reading
this program, you find that improvements can be made, please contact the Safety Officer.
We encourage all suggestions because we are committed to the success of this written program.
Program Requirements
LP gas systems are installed to operate a variety of, heating units and electrical generators. The
exhaust fumes from burning LP gas contain carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide gas is odorless and
can cause death or serious brain injury if inhaled. You can die or be brain damaged by Carbon
Monoxide. The following are OSHA requirements and should be followed by all SDV Construction
employees;
 Do not store LP gas tanks inside buildings! LP gas can be used indoors to heat the work area
but tanks should be kept and stored outside when not in use. They should be stored upright
and secured from falling.
LP gas leaks can result in fire or explosion. If LP gas is detected
 Do not touch electrical switches
 Open doors for ventilation
 Shut off LP gas supply at the LP tank
 Leave the area until odor clears
 Do not use a flame to locate the source of an LP gas leak.
Our Safety Officer is responsible for maintaining the ongoing mechanical integrity of LP-gas
containers, equipment, and systems.
Protective Equipment
Our Safety Officer is responsible for ensuring that the following provisions are met. All protective
equipment, including personal protective equipment (PPE), used at this company will be provided
without cost to employees. Protective equipment will be chosen based on anticipated hazards and
will be provided to employees.
Fire Prevention and Protection
Because LP gas is flammable, fire and explosion are two important hazards to prevent. This is done
by 2A: ABC Fire Extinguisher. Should a fire occur, our company has provided and maintained
suitable fire control equipment at the LP gas location.
Training
Under no circumstances may an employee install, remove, operate, and maintain LP gas containers,
equipment, or systems until he/she has successfully completed this company's training program
under the LP Gas Compliance Program. This includes all new employees, regardless of claimed
previous experience. Our Safety Officer will identify new trainees and those employees who need
retraining.
Program Evaluation
Although we may not be able to eliminate all problems in our LP Gas Compliance Program, we try
to eliminate as many problems as possible to improve employee protection and encourage employee
safe practices. By having our program administrator, Our Safety Officer, thoroughly evaluate and,
as necessary, revise our program, we can eliminate problems effectively.
Machine/Equipment & Guarding Plan
Purpose
It is the policy of this company to permit only trained and authorized employees to operate
machinery, tools, or equipment at any time. This policy is applicable to:
 Daily operators of machinery, tools, and equipment; and
 Those who only occasionally have cause to use machinery, tools, or equipment.
This written Machine/Equipment Safety and Guarding Plan describes methods and practices for
care and use of machines, equipment, and tools that can be read and understood by all managers,
supervisors, and employees at SDV Construction, Inc. This written plan is intended to be used to:
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Create an awareness of the hazards among our workforce,
Standardize procedures for use and care of the equipment,
Provide a consistent format for training employees on the proper procedures to be used,
Minimize the possibility of injury or harm to our employees, and
Demonstrate SDV Construction, Inc.'s compliance with machine safety and equipment
usage requirements for general industry in Subpart O and P of 29 CFR 1910.
As our company is a construction employer, this plan is also intended to demonstrate SDV
Construction, Inc.'s compliance with machine and tool safety requirements for construction in
Subpart I of 29 CFR 1926.
Administrative Duties
Our Safety Officer is responsible for developing and maintaining this written Machine/Equipment
Safety and Guarding Plan. This person is solely responsible for all facets of the plan and has full
authority to make necessary decisions to ensure the success of this plan. Appropriate training and
experience that is commensurate with the complexity of the plan, to administer or oversee our
machine/equipment safety program and conduct the required evaluations.
If, after reading this plan, you find that improvements can be made, please contact the Safety
Officer. We encourage all suggestions because we are committed to creating a safe workplace for
all our employees and a safe and effective machine/equipment safety and guarding program is an
important component of our overall safety plan. We strive for clear understanding, safe work
practices, and involvement in the program from every level of the company.
Pre-Operational Procedures
Hand tools must be inspected prior to use to ensure that:
 For tools with jaws, jaws are not sprung to the point of slippage.
 For impact tools, they are free of mushroom heads.
 For tools with wooden handles, the handles are free of splinters or crack and are tight in the
tool.
 The tool is otherwise safe for use.
Any machine or power-operated tool, function, or process, which may cause injury, will be guarded.
All permanent guards are securely attached in good working order and all removable guards are in
place on the machine or equipment before starting use. Guards meet these minimum general
requirements:
 Prevent contact - The guards prevent hands, arms, or any part of an employee's body or
clothing from making contact with dangerous moving parts.
 Secure - Guards are not easy to remove or alter. Guards and safety devices are made of
durable material that will withstand the conditions of normal use. They are firmly secured to
the machine.
 Protect from falling objects - The guards ensure that no objects can fall into moving parts.
 Create no new hazards - If a guard creates a hazard of its own such as shear point, a jagged
edge, or an unfinished surface that can cause a laceration, then employees must not use the
piece of machinery or equipment.
If a guard is defective, damaged, or in any way does not meet the requirements of these procedures,
employees may not use the machine, and must immediately notify our Safety Officer.
Where the operation of a machine or accidental contact with it can injure employees in the vicinity,
the hazard is either controlled or eliminated.
Employees must locate and put on necessary and appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE)
for use with the machinery or equipment before beginning use. PPE can be obtained from the Safety
Officer.
Employees must make sure that work areas are well lit, dry, and clean before beginning work.
Sawdust, paper and oily rags are a fire hazard and can damage machinery and equipment.
Employees must change clothing or take off jewelry that could become entangled in the machinery
or equipment they are to use.
Only qualified personnel may install or repair equipment. Employees must notify the Safety Officer
if machinery or equipment is in need of any type of repair.
If a lock or tag is in place on a piece of machinery or equipment, it may not be removed and the
machinery or equipment may not be used.
Operating Procedures
Employees may not remove a guard for any reason while operating any piece of machinery or
equipment.
All necessary personal protective equipment (PPE) is worn while the machinery or equipment is
running.
If an employee is distracted or unable to focus on the work with the machinery or equipment, they
must stop work with that machinery or equipment.
Upon finishing with a piece of equipment, tool, or machine, basic maintenance must be performed.
It should be kept sharp, oiled, and stored properly, as appropriate.
Problem equipment must be immediately reported to Superintendent or Foreman so it can be
repaired or replaced.
Employees must always use the proper piece of machinery or equipment for the job.
Electric cables and cords are kept clean and free from kinks. Equipment may never be carried by its
cord.
New Equipment Start-up Inspection Procedures
The procedures in this section are required at the following times:
 During and after the installation of new equipment,
 During and after the rearrangement of existing equipment into a new layout, and
 During the relocation of existing equipment.
Corrections that need implementation during the installation should be done as needed. Before
operation of the equipment in the workplace, all specialty departments must signify that the
equipment meets all expectations in their area of concern. Foremen are accountable for all phases of
installation and for making sure all equipment is safe and efficient to run before letting employees
operate it. Once Foremen have verified completion, the equipment can be put into service.
Permit-Required Confined Space Entry Program
Purpose
The purpose of this program is to inform interested persons, including employees that SDV
Construction, Inc. is complying with the OSHA Confined Space Standard, Title 29 Code of Federal
Regulations 1910.146. We have determined that because our jobsites occasionally include confined
spaces we have a need for written procedures for the evaluation of confined spaces, and where
permit-required spaces are identified, we have developed and implemented a permit-required
confined space entry program. This program applies to all work operations where employees and/or
our subcontractors must enter a permit-required confined space as part of their job duties. Copies of
the written program may be obtained from the safety officer in the main office.
Under this program, we identify permit-required spaces in at the jobsites, and provide training for
our employees according to their responsibilities in the permit space. These employees receive
instructions for safe entry into our specific type of confined spaces, including testing and
monitoring, appropriate personal protective equipment, rescue procedures, and attendant
responsibilities.
This program is designed to ensure that safe work practices are utilized during all activities
regarding the permit space to prevent personal injuries and illnesses that could occur.
General Information
A confined space is defined as any location that has limited openings for entry and egress, is not
intended for continuous employee occupancy, and is so enclosed that natural ventilation may not
reduce air contaminants to levels below the threshold limit value (TLV).
Examples of confined spaces include: manholes, stacks, pipes, storage tanks, trailers, tank cars,
pits, sumps, hoppers, and bins. Entry into confined spaces without proper precautions could result in
injury, impairment, or death due to:
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Hazardous atmospheres that may be flammable or explosive (Above LEL)
Oxygen Deficient Atmospheres (Less than 19.5% oxygen)
Exposure to toxic materials (Methane gas, carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide)
General safety or work area hazards such as steam or high pressure materials
Administrative Duties
Our Safety Officer is our Permit Required Confined Space Administrator and is responsible for
establishing and implementing the written Permit Required Confined Space Program. This person
has full authority to make necessary changes. If you have any questions contact the safety officer.
Our Written Confined Space Program is located at the main office.
Hazard Evaluation for Permit Spaces
To determine if there are permit-required confined spaces at the jobsite we will conduct a hazard
evaluation of the workplace. This evaluation has provided information necessary to identify the
existence and location of permit-required confined spaces their workplace that must be covered by
the Permit-Required Confined Space Entry Program. This written hazard evaluation is available at
the main office.
Preventing Unauthorized Entry
To provide a safe work environment and to prevent exposed employees from accidentally entering a
permit space, the following procedures are implemented to inform all employees of the existence,
location, and danger posed by permit spaces. To inform employees of the existence of a permit
space, we use the hazard evaluation information accompanied by our work orders. To ensure that
unauthorized employees do not enter and work in permit spaces, we communicate those areas
identified on the hazard evaluation and work order prior to work being started in the area. A sign
reading DANGER -- PERMIT-REQUIRED CONFINED SPACE, DO NOT ENTER should be
placed to keep out personnel that are not part of the confined space team.
Safe Permit Space Entry Procedures
The Entry Supervisor responsible for authorizing entry and issuing entry permits for work in our
permit spaces. The file of permits and related documents are to be coordinated as specific to that
jobsite. The procedures we follow for preparing, issuing, and canceling entry permits will also be
coordinated and followed as specific to that site. All employees have the responsibility to read and
understand confined space permits. If you do not understand any aspect of the permit contact entry
supervisor.
Pre-Entry Evaluation
To ensure the safety and health of our employees, before allowing authorized workers to enter a
permit space, we evaluate conditions in that space to determine if the conditions are safe for entry.
Any employee, who enters the space, or that employee’s authorized representative, has the
opportunity to observe the pre-entry and any subsequent testing. The authorized entrant or that
employee’s representative also has the option of requesting a reevaluation of the space if they feel
that the evaluation was not adequate.
Our company follows the procedures to evaluate each permit space before entry according to
1910.146(c)(5)(ii)(C). This includes testing the internal atmosphere with a calibrated direct-reading
instrument for:
 Oxygen content (Must be between 19.5% to 23.5% oxygen)
 Flammable gases and vapors (Must be less than 10% of the LEL)
 Potential toxic air contaminants (Toxicity)
Periodic Evaluations
We also periodically test the atmosphere of the space to ensure that the continuous ventilation is
preventing the accumulation of a hazardous atmosphere.
Hazard Reevaluation
Our Safety Officer will identify and reevaluate hazards based on possible changes in activities or
other physical or environmental conditions that could adversely affect work. A master inventory of
confined spaces shall be maintained. Any change in designation of a confined space will be routed
to all affected personnel by the Safety Officer.
Hazard Controls
Hazard controls shall be instituted to address changes in the work processes and/or working
environment. Hazard controls must be able to control the health hazards by eliminating the
responsible agents, reduce health hazards below harmful levels, or prevent the contaminants from
coming into contact with the workers.
The following order of precedence shall be followed in reducing confined space risks.
 Engineering Controls -Engineering controls are those controls that eliminate or reduce the
hazard through implementation of sound engineering practices. Ventilation is one of the
most common engineering controls used in confined spaces. When ventilation is used to
remove atmospheric contaminants from a confined space, the space shall be ventilated until
the atmosphere is within the acceptable ranges. Ventilation shall be maintained during the
occupancy if there is a potential for the atmospheric conditions to move out of the
acceptable range.
When conditions necessitate and can accommodate continuous forced air ventilation, the
following precautions shall be followed:
Employees shall not enter the space until the forced air ventilation has eliminated any
hazardous atmosphere. Forced air ventilation shall be directed so as to ventilate the
immediate areas where an employee is or will be present within the space. Continuous
ventilation shall be maintained until all employees have left the space. Air supply or forced
air ventilation shall originate from a clean source.
 Work Practice Controls - Work practice (administrative) controls are those controls which
eliminate or reduce the hazard through changes in the work practices (i.e., rotating workers,
reducing the amount of worker exposure, and housekeeping).
 Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) - If the hazard cannot be eliminated or reduced to a
safe level through engineering and/or work practice controls, PPE should be used. The
Safety Officer shall determine the appropriate PPE needed by all personnel entering the
confined space, including rescue teams. PPE that meets the specifications of applicable
standards shall be selected in accordance with the requirements of the job to be performed.
Entry Permits
The Confined Space Entry Permit is the most essential tool for assuring safety during entry in
confined spaces with known hazards, or with unknown or potentially hazardous atmospheres. The
entry permit process guides the supervisor and workers through a systematic evaluation of the space
to be entered. The permit should be used to establish appropriate conditions. Before each entry into
a confined space, an entry permit will be completed by the entry supervisor. The entry supervisor
will then communicate the contents of the permit to all employees involved in the operation, and
post the permit conspicuously near the work location. A standard entry permit shall be used for all
entries.
A standard entry permit shall contain the following items:
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Space to be entered
Purpose of entry
Date and authorized duration of the entry permit
Name of authorized entrants within the permit space
Means of identifying authorized entrants inside the permit space (i.e., rosters or tracking
systems)
Name(s) of personnel serving as Attendant(s) for the permit duration
Name of individual serving as Entry Supervisor, with a space for the signature or initials of
the Entry Supervisor who originally authorized the entry
Hazards of the permit space to be entered
Measures used to isolate the permit space and to eliminate or control permit space hazards
before entry (i.e., lockout/tagout of equipment and procedures for purging, ventilating, and
flushing permit spaces)
Acceptable entry conditions
Results of initial and periodic tests performed, accompanied by the names or initials of the
testers and the date(s) when the tests were performed
Rescue and emergency services that can be summoned, and the means of contacting those
services (i.e., equipment to use, phone numbers to call).
Communication procedures used by authorized entrants and Attendant(s) to maintain contact
during the entry.
Equipment to be provided for compliance with this Confined Space Program (i.e., PPE,
testing, communications, alarm systems, and rescue).
Other information necessary for the circumstances of the particular confined space that will
help ensure employee safety.
Additional permits, such as hot work permits, which have been issued to authorize work on
the permit space.
Permit Scope and Duration
A permit is only valid for one shift. For a permit to be renewed, the following conditions shall be
met before each reentry into the confined space:
 Atmospheric testing shall be conducted and the results should be within acceptable limits. If
atmospheric test results are not within acceptable limits, precautions to protect entrants
against the hazards should be addressed on the permit and should be in place.
 The entry supervisor shall verify that all precautions and other measures called for on the
permit are still in effect.
 Only operations or work originally approved on the permit shall be conducted in the
confined space.
A new permit shall be issued, or the original permit will be reissued if possible, whenever changing
work conditions or work activities introduce new hazards into the confined space. The Entry
Supervisor shall retain each canceled entry permit for at least one (1) year to facilitate the review of
the Confined Space Entry Program. Any problems encountered during an entry operation shall be
noted on the respective permit(s) so that appropriate revisions to the confined space permit program
can be made.
Confined Space Team Duties
Authorized Entrants
Those persons who have completed the training and are authorized to enter our permit spaces and
are assigned specific duties and responsibilities that they must perform when they work in the
permit space. Their duties and responsibilities are determined by the scope of work. The elements
covered in the training program for authorized entrants include information regarding the scope of
work to be performed and existing and/or potential hazards that may be created while working.
Entrants enter the space and perform tasks per the confined space permit.
Authorized Attendants
Those persons who have completed the training and have been designated as permit space
attendants are assigned specific duties and responsibilities that they must perform in permit space
job duties. Attendants are located outside the space and are responsible to maintain communication
with the entrant at all times. In the event of an emergency the attendant is responsible to contact
rescue services and is NOT to enter the space to conduct rescue.
Entry Supervisors
Those persons who have completed the training and have been designated as permit space entry
supervisors are assigned specific duties and responsibilities that they must perform in permit space
job duties. Entry supervisors are considered the “competent person” for the entry. Supervisors must
review permits with entrants and attendants as well as making sure the confined space is monitored.
Rescue and Emergency Services
SDV Construction, Inc. is not qualified to perform rescue services in the event of a permit space
emergency. Therefore these services will be coordinated and addressed specifically for each job. At
a minimum the designated customer or subcontractor assigned to perform rescue and emergency
services must:
Perform the assigned rescue duties such as performing basic first-aid and cardiopulmonary
resuscitation (CPR). SDV Construction, Inc. will ensure that at least one member of the rescue
team holds a current certification in first-aid and CPR, and that affected employees practice making
permit space rescues by means of simulated rescue operations in which they remove dummies,
manikins, or actual persons from the actual permit spaces or from representative permit spaces.
Post-operations Procedures
Upon completion of work in a permit space, we will ensure that procedures to close off the space
and cancel the permit are followed as required by the customer procedures.
Enforcement
Constant awareness of and respect for permit-required confined space entry hazards, and
compliance with all safety rules are considered conditions of employment. SDV Construction, Inc.
reserve the right to issue disciplinary warnings to employees, up to and including termination, for
failure to follow the guidelines of this permit entry program.
Multi-Employer Facility
When contractors or any other employers' workers (i.e., painters, electricians, or plumbers) will be
working at this workplace, the Entry Supervisor will coordinate entry operations when employees
of more than one employer are working simultaneously as authorized entrants in a permit space, so
that employees of one employer do not endanger the employees of any other employer. This will be
done prior to entry into the confined space.
Training
All employees who will enter confined spaces shall be trained in entry procedures. Personnel
responsible for supervising, planning, entering, or participating in confined space entry and rescue
shall be adequately trained in their functional duties prior to any confined space entry. Training
shall include:
 Explanation of the general hazards associated with confined spaces.
 Discussion of specific confined space hazards associated with the facility, location, or
operation.
 Reason for, proper use, and limitations of personal protective equipment and other safety
equipment required for entry into confined spaces.
 Explanation of permits and other procedural requirements for conducting a confined space
entry.
 A clear understanding of what conditions would prohibit entry.
 Procedures for responding to emergencies.
 Duties and responsibilities of the confined space entry team.
 Description of how to recognize symptoms of overexposure to probable air contaminants in
themselves and co-workers, and method(s) for alerting Attendant(s).
Refresher training shall be conducted as needed to maintain employee competence in entry
procedures and precautions. Training is documented and all training records are kept at the main
office.
Power Industrial Truck Program
Purpose
It's hard to imagine any tool more important to materials handling than the powered industrial truck
(Forklift). Like many companies, SDV Construction, Inc. relies on these versatile vehicles to load,
unload, and move stock and other materials.
This written Power Industrial Truck Program establishes guidelines to be followed whenever any of
our employees work with powered industrial trucks at this company. The rules established are to be
followed to:
 Provide a safe working environment,
 Govern operator use of powered industrial trucks, and
 Ensure proper care and maintenance of powered industrial trucks.
The procedures here establish uniform requirements designed to ensure that powered industrial
truck safety training, operation, and maintenance practices are communicated to and understood by
the affected employees. These requirements also are designed to ensure that procedures are in place
to safeguard the health and safety of all employees.
It is our intent to comply with the requirements of OSHA's 29 CFR 1926.600, 1926.602(c), and
1926.441 for construction activities as well as ANSI B56.1-1969. These regulations have
requirements for powered industrial truck operations.
Administrative Duties
Our Safety Officer is responsible for maintaining this Powered Industrial Truck Program and has
overall responsibility for the plan. Our Safety Officer will maintain all training records and evaluate
Powered Industrial Truck operators in order ensure compliance with OSHA and ANSI standards.
Copies of this written program may be obtained from the Safety Officer or the main office.
Training
Our Safety Officer will identify all powered industrial truck operators and ensure that prior to
operation of the powered industrial truck the employees receive training per Power Industrial Truck
Standards. Only trained and certified employees may operate forklifts on our jobsites.
Before we begin training an employee, our Safety Officer will determines if the potential powered
industrial truck operator is capable of performing the duties necessary to be a competent and safe
driver. This is based upon his/her physical and mental abilities to perform job functions that are
essential to the operation of the vehicle.
These capabilities include the level at which the operator must:
 See and hear within reasonably acceptable limits, (this includes the ability to see at a
distance and peripherally, and in certain instances, it is also necessary for the driver to
discern different colors, primarily red, yellow, and green);
 Endure the physical demands of the job; and
 Endure the environmental extremes of the job, such as the ability of the person to work in
areas of excessive cold or heat. An operator must be able to climb onto and off of a truck, to
sit in the vehicle for extended periods of time, and to turn his/her body to look in the
direction of travel when driving in reverse.
Once it is determined that a potential operator is capable of performing powered industrial truck
duties, a designated training organization with a qualified instructor will conduct initial training and
evaluation. This/These instructor(s) have the necessary knowledge, training, and experience to train
new powered industrial truck operators.
Initial Training
During an operator's initial training, the instructor(s) combine(s) both classroom instruction and
practical training. The classroom instruction includes the following formats: Lecture, discussion,
interactive computer learning, videos, or written material. Classroom instruction, itself, covers the
following topics:
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Classes of powered industrial trucks
Pre-operational Inspections of the powered industrial trucks
Safe operation of the powered industrial truck and hazards associated with operation.
Load handling and understanding how to read load charts
Safe fueling of the unit
The practical training includes practical hands on exercises by the trainee. All powered industrial
truck operators are trained and tested on the equipment they will be driving before they begin their
job.
If each potential operator has received training in any of the elements of our training program, and
is evaluated to be competent, they need not be retrained in those elements before initial assignment
in our workplace. The training must be specific for the types of trucks that employee will be
authorized to operate and for the type of workplace in which the trucks will be operated.
Training Certification
After an employee has completed the training program, the instructor will determine whether the
potential driver can safely perform the job. At this point, the trainee will take a performance test or
practical exercise through which the instructor(s) will decide if the training has been adequate. All
powered industrial truck trainees are tested on the equipment they will be driving.
Each certificate includes the name of the driver, the date(s) of the training, and the name of the
person who did the training and evaluation.
Performance Evaluation
Each certified powered industrial truck operator is evaluated at least once every 3 years to verify
that the operator has retained and uses the knowledge and skills needed to drive safely this
evaluation is done by our Safety Officer or designated training organization. If the evaluation shows
that the operator is lacking the appropriate skills and knowledge, the operator is retrained by our
instructor(s).
Refresher Training
Refresher training is triggered by any of the following situations:
 If the operator is involved in an accident or a near-miss incident;
 If the operator has been observed driving the vehicle in an unsafe manner;
 When the operator is assigned to a different type of truck;
 If it has been determined during an evaluation that the operator needs additional training; or
 When there are changes in the workplace that could affect safe operation of the truck. This
could include a different type of paving, reconfiguration of the storage racks, new
construction leading to narrower aisles, or restricted visibility.
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
We have assessed our workplace and determined that the personal protective equipment needed to
operate a forklift is as follows:
 Safety glasses
 Hard hats
 Gloves
Pedestrians
Because powered industrial trucks are typically used near pedestrians, we require both pedestrians
and powered industrial truck operators to watch out for each other. All powered industrial truck
operators must allow pedestrians to have the right away. As a powered industrial truck operator you
operators are responsible for all aspects concerning safety of equipment and pedestrians.
Driving Into Trailers
When driving into trailers the operator must verify trailer chocks, supports, and dock plates prior to
loading/unloading.
Maintenance
Investing time and effort into the proper upkeep of our equipment results in day-to-day reliability.
Keeping up with the manufacturer's recommended maintenance and lubrication schedules, and
completing the proper records, will also increase our trucks' longevity and enhance its resale value.
Periodic maintenance (those completed monthly, every 6 months, or annually) is done by a factorytrained expert or a dealer. Our company retains all maintenance records. When renting equipment if
any defects are found in equipment during the pre-operational inspection the rental company will be
notified of defects and forklift will not be used.
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Program
This written program documents steps SDV Construction, Inc. has taken to minimize injury
resulting from various occupational hazards present at our construction sites by protecting workers
through the use of PPE when the hazards cannot be eliminated.
Our Safety Officer is the program coordinator and has overall responsibility for the program. The
safety and health manager will designate appropriate foremen to assist in training employees and
monitoring their use of PPE. Our Safety Officer will review and update the program as necessary.
Copies of this program may be obtained from our Safety Officer.
PPE shall conform to applicable standards, and be in good working condition. PPE shall be
appropriate for work hazard to be encountered, and is considered to be the last line of defense
against injury or illness.
We at SDV Construction, Inc. believe it is our obligation to provide necessary (PPE) equipment for
a hazard free environment to our employees. Any employee encountering hazardous conditions
must be protected against the potential hazards.
The purpose of protective clothing and equipment (PPE) is to shield or isolate individuals from
chemical, physical, biological, or other hazards that may be present in the workplace. (See separate
documents for respiratory protection and hearing conservation programs.)
Establishing an overall written PPE program detailing how employees use PPE makes it easier to
ensure that they use PPE properly in the workplace and document our PPE efforts in the event of an
OSHA inspection. SDV Construction, Inc.'s PPE program covers:
 Purpose
 Hazard assessment
 PPE selection
 Employee training
 Cleaning and maintenance of PPE
 PPE specific information
If after reading this program, you find that improvements can be made, please contact the Safety
Officer. We encourage all suggestions because we are committed to the success of our Personal
Protective Equipment Program. We strive for clear understanding, safe behavior, and involvement
in the program from every level of the company.
Purpose of Program
The basic element of any PPE program is an in depth evaluation of the equipment needed to protect
against the hazards at the workplace; this is the initial hazard assessment for which written
documentation is required. Two basic objectives of any PPE program should be to protect the
wearer from incorrect use and/or malfunction of PPE. The purpose of this Personal Protective
Equipment (PPE) Program is to document the hazard assessment, protective measures in place, and
PPE in use at this company. PPE devices are not to be relied on as the only means to provide
protection against hazards, but are used in conjunction with guards, engineering controls, and sound
manufacturing practices. If possible, hazards will be abated first through engineering controls, with
PPE to provide protection against hazards that cannot reasonably be abated otherwise.
Hazard Assessment
In order to assess the need for PPE the following steps are taken:
The Safety Officer, along with the foremen, identifies job classifications where exposures occur or
could occur.
The Safety Officer or designee examines the following records to identify and rank jobs according
to exposure hazards:
 Injury/illness records
 First aid logs
The Safety Officer conducts a walk through survey of workplace areas where hazards exist or may
exist to identify sources of hazards to employees. They consider these basic hazard categories:
 Impact
 Heat
 Penetration
 Harmful dust
 Compression (roll over)
 Light (optical) radiation
 Chemical
During the walk through survey the Safety Officer observes and records the following hazards
along with PPE currently in use:
 Sources of motion; i.e., machinery or processes where any movement of tools, machine
elements or particles could exist, or movement of personnel that could result in collision
with stationary objects.
 Sources of high temperatures that could result in burns, eye injury or ignition of protective
equipment, etc
 Types of chemical exposures.
 Sources of harmful dust.
 Sources of light radiation, i.e., welding, brazing, cutting, furnaces, heat treating, high
intensity lights, etc.
 Sources of falling objects or potential for dropping objects
 Sources of sharp objects that might pierce the feet or cut the hands
 Sources of rolling or pinching objects that could crush the feet
 Layout of workplace and location of co-workers
 Certain electrical hazards.
Following the walk through survey, the Safety Officer organizes the data and information for use in
the assessment of hazards to analyze the hazards and enable proper selection of protective
equipment. An estimate of the potential for injuries is now made. Each of the basic hazards is
reviewed and a determination made as to the frequency, type, level of risk, and seriousness of
potential injury from each of the hazards found. The existence of any situations where multiple
exposures occur or could occur is considered.
The Safety Officer documents the hazard assessment via a written certification that identifies the
workplace evaluated, the person certifying that the evaluation has been performed, the date(s) of the
hazard assessment, and that the document is a certification of hazard assessment.
Employee Training
The Safety Officer provides training for each employee who is required to use personal protective
equipment. Training includes:
 When PPE is necessary?
 What PPE is necessary?
 How to wear assigned PPE?
 Limitations of PPE
 The proper care, maintenance, useful life, and disposal of assigned PPE
Employees must demonstrate an understanding of the training and the ability to use the PPE
properly before they are allowed to perform work requiring the use of the equipment. Employees
are prohibited from performing work without donning appropriate PPE to protect them from the
hazards they will encounter in the course of that work.
If the Safety Officer has reason to believe an employee does not have the understanding or skill
required the employee must be retrained. Since an employee's supervisor is in the best position to
observe any problems with PPE use by individual employees, the Safety Officer will seek this
person's input when making this determination.
Circumstances where retraining may be required include changes in the workplace or changes in the
types of PPE to be used, which would render previous training obsolete. Also, inadequacies in an
affected employee's knowledge or use of the assigned PPE, which indicates that the employee has
not retained the necessary understanding or skills, would require retraining.
The Safety Officer certifies in writing that the employee has received and understands the PPE
training.
Because failure to comply with company policy concerning PPE can result in OSHA citations and
fines as well as employee injury, an employee who does not comply with this program will be
disciplined for noncompliance according to the following schedule:
 Verbal warning for the first offense accompanied by retraining
 Written reprimand for the second offense that goes in the employee's permanent record
 Suspension without pay for a third offense and documentation in the permanent record
 Dismissal as a last resort.
Cleaning and Maintenance
It is important that all PPE be kept clean and properly maintained by the employee to whom it is
assigned. Cleaning is particularly important for eye and face protection where dirty or fogged lenses
could impair vision. PPE is to be inspected, cleaned, and maintained by employees at regular
intervals as part of their normal job duties so that the PPE provides the requisite protection.
Supervisors are responsible for ensuring compliance with cleaning responsibilities by employees. If
PPE is for general use, the Safety Officer has responsibility for cleaning and maintenance. If a piece
of PPE is in need of repair or replacement it is the responsibility of the employee to bring it to the
immediate attention of his or her supervisor or the Safety Manager. It is against work rules to use
PPE that is in disrepair or not able to perform its intended function. Contaminated PPE that cannot
be decontaminated is disposed of in a manner that protects employees from exposure to hazards.
PPE Specific Information
Eye and face protection
It is the policy of this company that as a condition of employment, all regular full time, part time,
and temporary employees working in designated work areas and/or job assignments are required to
wear ANSI approved goggles/face shields to help prevent eye and face injuries, including those
resulting from flying particles, molten metal, liquid chemicals, acids or caustic liquids, chemical
gases or vapors, or light radiation, for example.
Employees from temporary work agencies and sub contractors are required to wear goggles/face
shields if assigned to work in the designated work areas.
All supervisors and managers are responsible for ensuring employees under their charge are in
compliance with this policy.
All employees who work in designated work areas and/or job assignments are responsible for
wearing company provided goggles/face shields to comply with this policy. Failure to comply will
result in disciplinary action up to and including discharge.
All employees required to wear goggles/face shields must routinely inspect and properly care for
their goggles/face shields.
Foot Protection-Safety Shoes
It is the policy of this company that as a condition of employment, all regular full time, part time,
and temporary employees working in designated work areas and /or job assignments are required to
wear ANSI Z41-approved safety-toe and /or chemical resistant footwear when work operations
present hazards such as falling objects, pinch points, or material handling which may result in injury
to the foot. Otherwise, wear sturdy and durable work boots or shoes in good repair to help prevent
foot injuries, ankle injuries, slips, and falls. Athletic shoes such as running shoes, tennis shoes,
clogs, or sandals are not acceptable.
All employees who work in designated work areas and/or job assignments are responsible for
purchasing and wearing work shoes to comply with this policy. Failure to comply will result in
disciplinary action up to and including discharge.
Our Safety Officer is responsible for informing new employees who are assigned to the designated
work areas of the safety shoe policy and the procedures for obtaining them. The new employee is
responsible for reporting to his/her first day of work wearing sturdy work boots.
Hand Protection -- Gloves
It is the policy of this company that as a condition of employment, all regular full time, part time,
and temporary employees working in designated work areas and/or job assignments are required to
wear gloves to help prevent hand injuries, This includes the proper insulated gloves needed to
perform electrical tasks.
Employees from temporary work agencies and sub contractors are required to wear protective
gloves as needed if assigned to work in the designated work areas.
All supervisors and managers are responsible for ensuring employees under their charge are in
compliance with this policy.
All employees who work in designated work areas and/or job assignments are responsible for
wearing company provided gloves to comply with this policy. (Note we only provide voltage rated
gloves.) Failure to comply will result in disciplinary action up to and including discharge.
All employees required to wear protective gloves must routinely inspect and properly care for their
assigned gloves (if the gloves are not disposable).
Head protection -- Hard hats
It is the policy of this company that as a condition of employment, all regular full time, part time,
and temporary employees working in designated work areas and/or job assignments are required to
wear ANSI Z89.1-approved hard hats to help prevent head injuries, including those resulting from
falling objects, bumping the head against a fixed object, or electrical shock.
Employees from temporary work agencies and sub contractors are required to wear hard hats if
assigned to work in the designated work areas.
All supervisors and managers are responsible for ensuring employees under their charge are in
compliance with this policy.
All employees who work in designated work areas and/or job assignments are responsible for
wearing company provided hard hats to comply with this policy. Failure to comply will result in
disciplinary action up to and including discharge.
All employees are required to wear hard hats at all times during the performance of work for
construction or service work, unless written waiver is obtained from Safety Officer. Waiver must
be posted at job site, or have waiver in possession during performance of work. Hard hats must be
routinely inspected and properly cared for.
Clothing
Wear clothing appropriate for task. Shorts, cutoffs, and sleeveless shirts (i.e., muscle shirts, tank
tops) are not permitted. Bare backs (shirtless) are not permitted on work site.
Where Employees Provide Their Own PPE
Generally SDV Construction, Inc. provides all Personal Protective Equipment for employees.
However on the rare occasion where an employee provides their own SDV Construction, Inc. will
assure its adequacy, including proper maintenance, and sanitation of such equipment.
Respiratory Protection Program
Purpose
SDV does not anticipate performing tasks that requires the use of respiratory protection at any
jobsite this plan and training are strictly precautionary and in some cases a requirement under
designated contracts.
This Respiratory Protection Program specifies standard operating procedures to protect all
construction site employees from respiratory hazards, according to the requirements of 29 CFR
1926.103 which simply refers to 29 CFR 1910.134 and ANSI Z88.2. Respirators are to be used only
where engineering control of respirator hazards is not feasible, while engineering controls are being
installed, or in emergencies. In the event respiratory protection is required the following procedures
will be followed and only trained personnel or contractors will be allowed to conduct such tasks.
Respirator Selection
Our Safety Officer is our Respirator Program Administrator and is responsible for implementing our
program. Our Safety Officer will select respirators and coordinate all essential aspects of our
program. Respirators are selected on the basis of respiratory hazards to which the worker is exposed
and workplace and user factors that affect respirator performance and reliability.
Detailed procedures will be will be written addressing hazards and proper selection for respiratory
protection. Outside consultation, manufacturer's assistance, and other recognized authorities will be
consulted if there is any doubt regarding proper selection.
*Our company's selection procedures include coverage of the following OSHA requirements, when
selecting any respirator in general SDV Construction, Inc. will:
 Select and provide respirators based on respiratory hazard(s) to which a worker is exposed
and workplace and user factors that affect respirator performance and reliability.
 Select a NIOSH-certified respirator. (NIOSH stands for the National Institute for
Occupational Safety and Health)
 Identify and evaluate the respiratory hazard(s) in the workplace, including a reasonable
estimate of employee exposures to respiratory hazard(s) and an identification of the
contaminant's chemical state and physical form. Consider the atmosphere to be immediately
dangerous to life or health (IDLH) if you cannot identify or reasonably estimate employee
exposure.
 Select respirators from a sufficient number of respirator models and sizes so that the
respirator is acceptable to, and correctly fits, the user.
*Our company's selection procedures include coverage of the following OSHA requirements, when
selecting respirators for IDLH atmospheres SDV Construction, Inc. will provide the following type
of respirators at no cost to employees:
 A full face piece pressure demand self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) certified by
NIOSH for a minimum service life of thirty minutes, or
 A combination full face piece pressure demand supplied-air respirator Self-contained
breathing apparatus (SAR) with auxiliary self-contained air supply.
 Provide respirators NIOSH-certified for escape from the atmosphere in which they will be
used when they are used only for escape from IDLH atmospheres.
Consider all oxygen-deficient atmospheres to be IDLH. Only NIOSH-certified respirators are
selected and used. Where practicable, the respirators will be assigned to individual workers for their
exclusive use.
Medical Evaluations
A medical evaluation to determine whether an employee or contractor is able to use a given
respirator is an important element of an effective Respiratory Protection Program and is necessary
to prevent injuries, illnesses, and even, in rare cases, death from the physiological burden imposed
by respirator use.
At SDV Construction, Inc. employees or subcontractors will not be assigned to tasks requiring use
of respirators nor fit tested unless it has been determined that they are physically able to perform the
work and use the respirator.
All medical questionnaires and examinations are confidential and handled during the employee's
normal working hours or at a time and place convenient to the employee. The medical questionnaire
is administered so that the employee understands its content. All employees are provided an
opportunity to discuss the questionnaire and examination results with their physician or other
licensed health care professional (PLHCP).
Before any initial examination or questionnaire is given, we supply the PLHCP with the following
information so that he/she can make the best recommendation concerning an employee's ability to
use a respirator:
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Type and weight of the respirator to be used by the employee;
Duration and frequency of respirator use (including use for rescue and escape);
Expected physical work effort;
Additional protective clothing and equipment to be worn;
Temperature and humidity extremes that may be encountered.
Once the PLHCP determines whether the employee has the ability to use or not use a respirator,
he/she sends SDV Construction, Inc. a written recommendation containing only the following
information:
 Limitations on respirator use related to the medical condition of the employee, or relating to
the workplace conditions in which the respirator will be used, including whether or not the
employee is medically able to use the respirator;
 The need, if any, for follow-up medical evaluations; and
 A statement that the PLHCP has provided the employee with a copy of the PLHCP's written
recommendation.
Follow-up medical examination:
A follow-up medical examination will be provided if a positive response is given to any question
among questions 1 through 8 in Section 2, Part A of Appendix C of 29 CFR 1910.134 or if an
employee's initial medical examination demonstrates the need for a follow-up medical examination.
Our follow-up medical examination includes tests, consultations, or diagnostic procedures that the
PLHCP deems necessary to make a final determination.
If the respirator is a negative pressure respirator and the PLHCP finds a medical condition that may
place the employee's health at increased risk if the respirator is used, our company will provide a
powered air-purifying respirator (PAPR) if the PLHCP's medical evaluation finds that the employee
can use such a respirator. If a subsequent medical evaluation finds that the employee is medically
able to use a negative pressure respirator, then we are no longer required to provide a PAPR.
Additional medical examinations:
Our company provides additional medical evaluations if:
 An employee reports medical signs or symptoms that are related to ability to use a
respirator;
 A PLHCP, supervisor, or the respirator program administrator informs the employer that an
employee needs to be reevaluated;
 Information from the respiratory protection program, including observations made during fit
testing and program evaluation, indicates a need for employee reevaluation; or
 A change occurs in workplace conditions (e.g., physical work effort, protective clothing, and
temperature) that may result in a substantial increase in the physiological burden placed on
an employee.
Fit Testing Procedures
All respirators must fit properly to provide protection. If a tight seal is not maintained between the
face piece and the employee's face, contaminated air will be drawn into the face piece and be
breathed by the employee. Fit testing seeks to protect the employee against breathing contaminated
ambient air and is one of the core provisions of our respirator program.
In general, fit testing may be either qualitative or quantitative.
Qualitative fit testing (QLFT) involves the introduction of a gas, vapor, or aerosol test agent into an
area around the head of the respirator user. If that user can detect the presence of the test agent
through subjective means, such as odor, taste, or irritation, the respirator fit is inadequate.
In a quantitative respirator fit test (QNFT), the adequacy of respirator fit is assessed by measuring
the amount of leakage into the respirator, either by generating a test aerosol as a test atmosphere,
using ambient aerosol as a test agent, or using controlled negative pressure to measure the
volumetric leak rate. Appropriate instrumentation is required to quantify respirator fit in QNFT.
SDV Construction, Inc. makes sure those employees are fit tested at the following times with the
same make, model, style, and size of respirator that will be used:
 Before any of our employees are required to use any respirator with a negative or positive
pressure tight-fitting face piece;
 Whenever a different respirator face piece (size, style, model, or make) is used;
 At least annually;
 Whenever the employee reports, or our company, PLHCP, supervisor, or Program
Administrator makes visual observations of changes in the employee's physical condition
that could affect respirator fit. Such conditions include, but are not limited to, facial scarring,
dental changes, cosmetic surgery, or an obvious change in body weight; and
 When the employee, subsequently after passing a QLFT or QNFT, notifies the company,
Program Administrator, supervisor, or PLHCP that the fit of the respirator is unacceptable.
That employee will be retested with a different respirator face piece.
Employees must pass either the quantitative or qualitative fit test prior to wearing a respirator at the
jobsite.
Training
The most thorough respiratory protection program will not be effective if employees do not wear
respirators, or if wearing them, do not do so properly. The only way to ensure that our employees
are aware of the purpose of wearing respirators, and how they are to be worn is to train them.
Our training program provided by qualified vendors is two-fold; it covers both the:
 Respiratory hazards to which our employees are potentially exposed during routine and
emergency situations, and
 Proper use of respirators, including putting on and removing them, any limitations on their
use, and their maintenance.
Both training parts are provided prior to requiring an employee to use a respirator in our workplace.
Once the respirator has been properly selected and fitted, employees are required to be trained in the
use of the respirators they will be using.
Our company will train employees in the following checklist to ensure that proper use procedures
include coverage of OSHA requirements:
Face piece Seal Protection
We will train employees that tight-fitting face pieces are not to be worn by employees who have:
 Facial hair that comes between the sealing surface of the face piece and the face or that
interferes with valve function; or
 Any condition that interferes with the face-to-face piece seal or valve function.
 If an employee wears corrective glasses or goggles or other personal protective equipment,
ensure that such equipment is worn in a manner that does not interfere with the seal of the
face piece to the face of the user.
For all tight-fitting respirators, employees will be trained to perform a user seal check each time
they put on the respirator using the procedures in 29 CFR 1910.134 Appendix B-1 (User Seal Check
Procedures) or procedures recommended by the respirator manufacturer that you can demonstrate
are as effective as those in Appendix B-1.
Continuing Respirator Effectiveness
Appropriate surveillance must be maintained of work area conditions and degree of employee
exposure or stress. When there is a change in work area conditions or degree of employee exposure
or stress that may affect respirator effectiveness, reevaluate the continued effectiveness of the
respirator.
Ensure that employees are trained to leave the respirator use area:
 To wash their faces and respirator face pieces as necessary to prevent eye or skin irritation
associated with respirator use; or
 If they detect vapor or gas breakthrough, changes in breathing resistance, or leakage of the
face piece; or
 To replace the respirator or the filter, cartridge, or canister elements.
 If the employee detects vapor or gas breakthrough, changes in breathing resistance, or
leakage of the face piece, replace or repair the respirator before allowing the employee to
return to the work area.
Procedures for working in IDLH Atmospheres
Training concerning IDLH conditions covers the following areas;
 One employee or, when needed, more than one employee is located outside the IDLH
atmosphere;
 Visual, voice, or signal line communication is maintained between the employee(s) in the
IDLH atmosphere and the employee(s) located outside the IDLH atmosphere;
 The employee(s) located outside the IDLH atmosphere are trained and equipped to provide
effective emergency rescue;
 The employer or designee is notified before the employee(s) located outside the IDLH
atmosphere enter the IDLH atmosphere to provide emergency rescue;
 The employer or designee authorized to do so by the company, once notified, provides
necessary assistance appropriate to the situation;
 Employee(s) located outside the IDLH atmospheres are equipped with:
 Pressure demand or other positive pressure self-contained breathing apparatuses (SCBAs),
or a pressure demand or other positive pressure supplied-air respirator with auxiliary SCBA;
and either:
 Appropriate retrieval equipment for removing the employee(s) who enter(s) these hazardous
atmospheres where retrieval equipment would contribute to the rescue of the employee(s)
and would not increase the overall risk resulting from entry; or
 Equivalent means for rescue where retrieval equipment is not required under the bullet item
above this one.
Maintenance and Care Procedures
In order to ensure continuing protection from respiratory protective devices, it is necessary to
establish and implement proper maintenance and care procedures and schedules. A lax attitude
toward maintenance and care will negate successful selection and fit because the devices will not
deliver the assumed protection unless they are kept in good working order.
Cleaning & disinfecting
Our company provides each respirator user with a respirator that is clean, sanitary, and in good
working order. We ensure that respirators are cleaned and disinfected after each use.
Storage
Storage of respirators must be done properly to ensure that the equipment is protected and not
subject to environmental conditions that may cause deterioration. We ensure that respirators are
stored to protect them from damage, contamination, dust, sunlight, extreme temperatures, excessive
moisture, and damaging chemicals, and they are packed or stored to prevent deformation of the face
piece and exhalation valve. In addition, emergency respirators are kept accessible to the work area;
stored in designated areas that are clearly marked as containing emergency respirators; and stored in
accordance with any applicable manufacturer instructions.
Inspection
Any one of our respirator inspections includes a check:
 For respirator function, tightness of connections, and the condition of the various parts
including, but not limited to, the face piece, head straps, valves, connecting tube, and
cartridges, canisters or filters; and
 Of elastomeric parts for pliability and signs of deterioration.
 For self-contained breathing apparatus, in addition to the above, monthly, we maintain air
and oxygen cylinders in a fully charged state and recharge when the pressure falls to 90% of
the manufacturer's recommended pressure level and determine that the regulator and
warning devices function properly.
Repairs
Respirators that fail an inspection or are otherwise found to be defective are removed from service,
and are discarded or repaired or adjusted in accordance with the following procedures:
Repairs or adjustments to respirators are to be made only by persons appropriately trained to
perform such operations and only with the respirator manufacturer's NIOSH-approved parts
designed for the respirator;
Repairs must be made according to the manufacturer's recommendations and specifications for the
type and extent of repairs to be performed; and
Reducing and admission valves, regulators, and alarms must be adjusted or repaired only by the
manufacturer or a technician trained by the manufacturer.
Discarding of respirators
Respirators that fail an inspection or are otherwise not fit for use and cannot be repaired must be
discarded.
Filters, Cartridges, and Canisters:
Ensure that all filters, cartridges and canisters used in the workplace are labeled and color-coded
with the NIOSH approval label and that the label is not removed and remains legible.
Scaffolding Safety Program
Purpose
It is SDV Construction, Inc. purpose in issuing these procedures to further ensure a safe workplace
based on the following formal, written procedures for scaffold work. These procedures will be
reviewed and updated as needed to comply with new OSHA regulations, new best practices in
scaffolding, and as business practices demand. Our Safety Officer is the plan coordinator and is
responsible for its implementation.
This general scaffold plan applies to
 All employees who perform work while on a scaffold.
 All employees who are involved in erecting, disassembling, moving, operating, repairing,
maintaining, or inspecting scaffolds.
 All scaffolds on all sites where SDV Construction, Inc. is doing work.
General Requirements
Scaffold erection, site preparation, access to the working platform, fall protection, and employee
training are vital requirements for scaffold work. While this all takes concentration and safe work
practices, the most dangerous time can be when employees are concentrating on their work and not
particularly aware of the hazards of working from scaffolds. Our competent person will inspect all
scaffolds and scaffold components for visible defects before each work shift, and after any
occurrence that could affect a scaffold's structural integrity. However, in addition to that, all users of
scaffolds in this company will know and understand the following safety rules:
 Scaffolds and scaffold components will never be loaded in excess of their maximum
intended loads or rated capacities.
 Debris must not be allowed to accumulate on platforms.
 A competent person before each work shift, and after any occurrence, which could affect a
scaffold’s structural integrity, shall inspect scaffolds and scaffold components for visible
defects.
 Any part of a scaffold damaged or weakened such that its strength is less than that required
by paragraph (a) of this section shall be immediately repaired or replaced, braced to meet
those provisions, or removed from service, tagged “Damaged Do Not Use” until repaired.
 Scaffolds shall not be moved horizontally while employees are on them, unless a registered
professional engineer specifically for such movement or, for mobile scaffolds has designed
them, where the provisions of §1926.452(w) are followed.
 Scaffolds shall be erected, moved, dismantled, or altered only under the supervision and
direction of a competent person qualified in scaffold erection, moving, dismantling or
alteration.
 Makeshift devices, such as but not limited to boxes and barrels, shall not be used on top of
scaffold platforms to increase the working level height of employees.
Scaffold Erection
The following general requirements apply to all scaffolds in use by SDV Construction, Inc.
employees or subcontractor employees;
 Each scaffold and scaffold component we use will support, without failure, its own weight
and at least four times the maximum intended load applied or transmitted to it.
 Each platform on all working levels of scaffolds shall be fully planked or decked between
the front uprights and the guardrail supports
 Each scaffold plank will be installed so that the space between adjacent planks and the space
between the platform and uprights is no more than one inch wide.
 Except for outrigger scaffolds (3 inches) and plastering and lathing operations (18 inches),
the front edge of all platforms will not be more than 14 inches from the face of the work,
unless we have a guardrail or personal fall arrest system in place that meets regulations.
 Supported scaffolds with a height to base width (including outrigger supports, if used) ratio
of more than four to one (4:1) shall be restrained from tipping by guying, tying, bracing, or
equivalent means.
 Scaffold components manufactured by different manufacturers shall not be intermixed
unless the components fit together without force and the scaffold's structural integrity is
maintained by the user. Scaffold components manufactured by different manufacturers shall
not be modified in order to inter-mix them unless a competent person determines the
resulting scaffold is structurally sound.
Site Preparation
In order for a scaffold to be erected safety the site should be prepared properly for scaffold
placement. The following requirements assist in our scaffolds being erected safely for employees
and subcontractors;
 Supported scaffold poles, legs, posts, frames, and uprights shall bear on base plates and mud
sills or other adequate firm foundation. Base should be level and if necessary shovels or
heavy equipment will be used to level ground and create a firm foundation.
 Footings shall be level, sound, rigid, and capable of supporting the loaded scaffold without
settling or displacement.
 Supported scaffold poles, legs, posts, frames, and uprights shall be plumb and braced to
prevent swaying and displacement.
 Unstable objects shall not be used to support scaffolds or platform units or be used as a work
platform. (etc: Blocks and Bricks)
Gaining Access to Scaffolds
We know that getting to the working platform is critical to the safety of our employees. This section
outlines the mechanical requirements for gaining access to scaffold platforms. When scaffold
platforms are more than 2 feet (0.6 m) above or below a point of access we may use one of the
following;
 Portable ladders
 Hook-on ladders
 Attachable ladders
 Stair towers (scaffold stairways/towers)
 Stairway-type ladders (such as ladder stands)
 Integral prefabricated scaffold
 Direct access from another scaffold, structure, personnel hoist, or similar surface shall be
used.
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* Cross braces shall not be used as a means of access.
SDV Construction, Inc. shall provide safe means of access for each employee erecting or
dismantling a scaffold where the provision of safe access is feasible and does not create a greater
hazard. We shall have a competent person determine whether it is feasible or would pose a greater
hazard to provide, and have employees use a safe means of access. This determination shall be
based on site conditions and the type of scaffold being erected or dismantled. Stairways or ladders
shall be installed as soon as scaffold erection has progressed to a point that permits safe installation
and use
Fall Protection
Fall protection planning is critical to the safety and well being of our employees. Our scaffold fall
protection plan follows the OSHA requirements that are different depending on the type of scaffold
we are using. We know we must provide fall protection for any employee on a scaffold more than
10 feet above a lower level.
*Most scaffolds that we use are typical frame scaffolds. Each employee on a frame scaffold shall be
protected by a guardrail system with minimum 200 pound top rail capacity, 150 pound mid rail
capacity and a toe board with a 50 pound capacity.
The following requirements apply to suspended scaffolds;
 When vertical lifelines are used, they shall be fastened to a fixed safe point of anchorage,
shall be independent of the scaffold, and shall be protected from sharp edges and abrasion.
 Safe points of anchorage include structural members of buildings, but do not include
standpipes, vents, other piping systems, electrical conduit, outrigger beams, or
counterweights.
 When horizontal lifelines are used, they shall be secured to two or more structural members
of the scaffold, or they may be looped around both suspension and independent suspension
lines (on scaffolds so equipped) above the hoist and brake attached to the end of the
scaffold. Horizontal lifelines shall not be attached only to the suspension ropes.
 When lanyards are connected to horizontal lifelines or structural members on a single-point
or two-point adjustable suspension scaffold, the scaffold shall be equipped with additional
independent support lines and automatic locking devices capable of stopping the fall of the
scaffold in the event one or both of the suspension ropes fail. The independent support lines
shall be equal in number and strength to the suspension ropes.
 Vertical lifelines, independent support lines, and suspension ropes shall not be attached to
each other, nor shall they be attached to or use the same point of anchorage, nor shall they
be attached to the same point on the scaffold or personal fall arrest system.
Mobile Scaffolds
SDV Construction, Inc. does not allow the usage of mobile scaffolds on our jobsites. If there is not
another feasible solution to complete a task, permission from SDV Construction Safety officer or
designated person is required.
Training
It is critical that employees who use scaffolds be trained, among other things, in the recognition of
the hazards associated with the type of scaffold being used and to understand the procedures to
control or minimize those hazards. Recognizing the need for training for employees who: (1)
perform work while on scaffolds, (2) are involved in erecting, disassembling, moving, operating,
repairing, maintaining, or inspecting scaffolds, and (3) have lost the requisite proficiency, the
following training syllabus is a part of this written safety plan.
Employees Who Use Scaffolds:
Our employees who perform work on scaffolds will be trained by a competent person to recognize
the hazards associated with the type of scaffold being used and to understand the procedures to
control or minimize those hazards. The training will include the following areas as applicable:
 The nature of and the correct procedures for dealing with electrical hazards.
 The nature of and the correct procedures for erecting, maintaining, and disassembling the
fall protection and falling object protection systems used.
 The proper use of the scaffold, and the proper handling of materials on the scaffold.
 The maximum intended load and the load-carrying capacities of the scaffolds used.
 Any other pertinent requirements of the OSHA rules.
Employees who Erect, Disassemble, Move, Operate, Repair, Maintain, or Inspect Scaffolds:
Our employees who erect, disassemble, move, operate, repair, maintain, or inspect scaffolds will be
trained by a competent person to recognize the hazards associated with the work being done. The
training will include the following topics as applicable:
 The nature of scaffold hazards.
 The correct procedures for erecting, disassembling, moving, operating, repairing, inspecting,
and maintaining the type of scaffold in question.
 The design criteria, maximum intended load-carrying capacity, and intended use of the
scaffold.
 Any other pertinent requirements of this subpart.
Employees Who Need Retraining:
When we have reason to believe that one of our employees lacks the skill or understanding needed
for safe work involving the erection, use or dismantling of scaffolds, we will re-train the employee
so that the requisite proficiency is regained. Retraining will be done in at least the following
situations:
 Where changes at the worksite present a hazard about which the employee has not been
previously trained.
 Where changes in the types of scaffolds, fall protection, falling object protection, or other
equipment present a hazard about which an employee has not been previously trained.
Where inadequacies in an affected employee's work involving scaffolds indicate that the employee
has not retained the requisite proficiency.
Stairways and Ladder Safety Program
Purpose
This written Stairway and Ladder Safety Plan describes methods and practices for care and use of
stairways and ladders that can be read and understood by all supervisors and employees here at
SDV Construction. This written plan is intended to be used to:
 Create an awareness of the hazards among our workforce.
 Standardize procedures for use and care of the equipment.
 Provide a consistent format for training employees on the proper procedures to be used.
 Minimize the possibility of injury or harm to our employees.
 Demonstrate SDV Construction compliance with stairway and ladder requirements in
Subpart X of 29 CFR 1926.
The procedures establish guidelines to be followed whenever an employee works with stairways
and ladders at our company.
Stairways
Stairways may be provided at some of our jobsites in the following circumstances:
 For access from one structure level to another where operations necessitate regular travel
between levels,
 For access to operating platforms which requires attention routinely during construction
activities
 Where access to elevations is daily or at each shift for such purposes as gauging, inspection,
regular maintenance, etc., where such work may expose employees to acids, caustics, gases,
or other harmful substances, or for which purposes the carrying of tools or equipment by
hand is normally required.
All stairways are provided according to OSHA specifications for stair strength, stair width, angle of
stairway rise, stair treads, stairway platforms, railings and handrails, and vertical clearance.
Portable Ladders
All portable ladders provided by SDV Construction for use by employees are constructed according
to OSHA specifications in order to insure safety under normal conditions of usage.
Portable ladders chosen for use by SDV Construction are:
 Designed without structural defects or accident hazards such as sharp edges, burrs, etc!
 Designed of sufficient strength to meet the test requirements!
 Protected against corrosion unless inherently corrosion-resistant!
Safe Work Practices
 When ascending or descending, the climber must face the ladder.
 All Load Capacities must be followed per manufacturer recommendations.
 Portable ladders are designed as a one-man working ladder based on a manufacturer
requirements and will be used accordingly.
 Portable rung and cleat ladders will be used at such a pitch that the horizontal distance from
the top support to the foot of the ladder is one-quarter (4 to 1) of the working length of the
ladder (the length along the ladder between the foot and the top support).
 The ladder will be so placed as to prevent slipping, or it will be lashed, or held in position.
The ladder base section must be placed with a secure footing.
 Employees will equip all portable rung ladders with nonslip bases when there is a hazard of
slipping. However, nonslip bases are not intended as a substitute for care in safely placing,
lashing, or holding a ladder that is being used on oily, metal, concrete, or slippery surfaces.
 The top of the ladder must be placed with the two rails supported, unless equipped with a
single support attachment.
 On two-section extension ladders, the minimum overlap for the two sections in use will be
according to OSHA specifications.
 Portable rung ladders with reinforced rails will be used only with the metal reinforcement on
the underside.
 The bracing on the back legs of step ladders is designed solely for increasing stability and
not for climbing.
 Extension Ladders will be placed at least 36” above the landing area.
Ladders will not be:
 Used in a horizontal position as platforms, runways, or scaffolds.
 Placed in front of doors opening toward the ladder unless the door is blocked open, locked,
or guarded.
 Placed on boxes, barrels, or other unstable bases to obtain additional height.
 Tied or fastened together to provide longer sections. They must be equipped with the
hardware fittings necessary if the manufacturer endorses extended uses.
 Used to gain access to a roof unless the top of the ladder extends at least 3 feet above the
point of support, at eave, gutter, or roofline.
 Ladders for which dimensions are specified should not be used by more than one man at a
time or with ladder jacks and scaffold planks where use by more than one man is
anticipated.
 Ladders with broken or missing steps, rungs, or cleats, broken side rails, or other faulty
equipment must not be used. Employees finding ladders with any of these conditions must
report them to their superintendent. Improvised repairs may not be made.
 Ladders made by fastening cleats across a single rail will not be used.
 All ladders will be uniformly spaced per manufacturer.
 Tops of the ordinary types of stepladders will not be used as steps.
 Middle and top sections of sectional or window cleaner's ladders will not be used for bottom
section unless the user equips them with safety shoes.
Inspections and Maintenance
 All Stairways and Ladders will be inspected prior to each use by the employees to insure
safety and serviceability.
 Stairways and Ladders will be maintained in good usable condition at all times.
 The joint between the steps and side rails is kept tight, all hardware and fittings are securely
attached, and the movable parts operate freely without binding or undue play.
 Metal bearings of locks, wheels, pulleys, etc., will be frequently lubricated.
 Safety feet and other auxiliary equipment will be kept in good condition to insure proper
performance.
 Ladders which have developed defects will be withdrawn from service for repair or
destruction and tagged or marked as Dangerous, Do Not Use.
If ladders tip over the superintendent will:
 Inspect the ladder for side rails dents or bends, or excessively dented rungs!
 Check all rung-to-side-rail connections!
 Check hardware connections!
 Check rivets for damage!
If ladders are exposed to oil and grease, equipment will be cleaned and kept free of oil, grease, or
slippery materials.
Employee Training
For all employees who work on stairways and ladders, training is provided. Our Safety Officer is
responsible for coordinating ladder safety training. Training is conducted by our Safety Officer or
designated Safety Consultant/Company. Training is documented and records are available on
request.
Elements included in the training program include;
 OSHA Stairway and Ladder Standards
 Safe work practices
 Inspection and Maintenance
 Requirements of this written plan.
Disciplinary Procedures
Constant awareness of and respect for stairway and ladder safety procedures and compliance with
all safety rules are considered conditions of employment. SDV Construction reserve the right to
issue disciplinary warnings to employees, up to and including termination, for failure to follow the
guidelines of this stairway and ladder safety program.
Steel Erection Safety Program
Purpose
This section sets forth requirements to protect employees from the hazards associated with steel
erection activities involved in the construction, alteration, and/or repair of single and multi-story
buildings, bridges, and other structures where steel erection occurs. The requirements of this section
apply to employees engaged in steel erection unless otherwise specified. This section does not cover
electrical transmission towers, communication and broadcast towers, or tanks.
Steel erection activities include hoisting, laying out, placing, connecting, welding, burning, guying,
bracing, bolting, plumbing and rigging structural steel, steel joists and metal buildings; installing
metal decking, curtain walls, window walls, siding systems, miscellaneous metals, ornamental iron
and similar materials; and moving point-to-point while performing these activities.
Hoisting & Rigging
Material
Hoisting and Rigging shall be in accordance with the Hoisting & Rigging section of this plan. In
addition the following shall apply:
 Cranes being used in steel erection activities shall be visually inspected prior to each shift by
a competent person; the inspection shall include observation for deficiencies during
operation. At a minimum this inspection shall include the following:
 All control mechanisms for maladjustments; Control and drive mechanism for excessive
wear of components and contamination by lubricants, water or other foreign matter; Safety
devices, including but not limited to boom angle indicators, boom stops, boom kick out
devices, anti-two block devices, and load moment indicators where required;
 Air, hydraulic, and other pressurized lines for deterioration or leakage, particularly those
which flex in normal operation; Hooks and latches for deformation, chemical damage,
cracks, or wear; Wire rope revving for compliance with hoisting equipment manufacturer's
specifications; Electrical apparatus for malfunctioning, signs of excessive deterioration, dirt,
or moisture accumulation; Hydraulic system for proper fluid level; Tires for proper inflation
and condition;
 Ground conditions around the hoisting equipment for proper support, including ground
settling under and around outriggers, ground water accumulation, or similar conditions; The
hoisting equipment for level position; and
 The hoisting equipment shall be set in a level position after each move and setup.
Inspection
If during an inspection any deficiency is identified, an immediate determination shall be made by
the competent person as to whether the deficiency constitutes a hazard. If the deficiency is
determined to constitute a hazard, the hoisting equipment shall be removed from service until the
deficiency has been corrected.
The operator shall be responsible for those operations under the operator's direct control. Whenever
there is any doubt as to safety, the operator shall have the authority to stop and refuse to handle
loads until safety has been assured.
A qualified rigger (a rigger who is also a qualified person) shall inspect the rigging prior to each
shift in accordance with § 1926.251.
Hoisting Employees
The headache ball, hook or load shall not be used to transport personnel. Cranes or derricks may be
used to hoist employees on a personnel platform when work is being conducted, provided that all
provisions of § 1926.550 (except for § 1926.550(g) (2)) are met.
Working under loads
Routes for suspended loads shall be pre-planned to ensure that no employee is required to work
directly below a suspended load except for:
Employees engaged in the initial connection of the steel; or Employees necessary for the hooking or
unhooking of the load.
When working under suspended loads, the following criteria shall be met:
Materials being hoisted shall be rigged to prevent unintentional displacement; Hooks with selfclosing safety latches or their equivalent shall be used to prevent components from slipping out of
the hook; and all loads shall be rigged by a qualified rigger
Multiple lift rigging procedure
A multiple lift shall only be performed if the following criteria are met:
 A multiple lift rigging assembly is used; a maximum of five members are hoisted per lift;
 Only beams and similar structural members are lifted; and All employees engaged in the
multiple lift have been trained in these procedures in accordance with § 1926.761(c) (1).
 No crane is permitted to be used for a multiple lift where such use is contrary to the
manufacturer's specifications and limitations.
 Components of the multiple lift rigging assembly shall be specifically designed and
assembled with a maximum capacity for total assembly and for each individual attachment
point. This capacity, certified by the manufacturer or a qualified rigger, shall be based on the
manufacturer's specifications with a 5 to 1 safety factor for all components.
The total load shall not exceed:
 The rated capacity of the hoisting equipment specified in the hoisting equipment load charts;
the rigging capacity specified in the rigging rating chart. The multiple lift rigging assembly
shall be rigged with members: Attached at their center of gravity and maintained reasonably
level; Rigged from top down; and Rigged at least 7 feet (2.1 m) apart. The members on the
multiple lift rigging assembly shall be set from the bottom up. Controlled load lowering
shall be used whenever the load is over the connectors. Structural stability shall be
maintained at all times during the erection process.
The following additional requirements shall apply for multi-story structures:
 The permanent floors shall be installed as the erection of structural member’s progress, and
there shall be not more than eight stories between the erection floor and the upper-most
permanent floor, except where the structural integrity is maintained as a result of the design.
At no time shall there be more than four floors or 48 feet (14.6 m), whichever is less, of
unfinished bolting or welding above the foundation or uppermost permanently secured floor,
except where the structural integrity is maintained as a result of the design.
 A fully planked or decked floor or nets shall be maintained within two stories or 30 feet (9.1
m), whichever is less, directly under any erection work being performed.
Walking/working surfaces
Tripping hazards. Shear connectors (such as headed steel studs, steel bars or steel lugs), reinforcing
bars, deformed anchors or threaded studs shall not be attached to the top flanges of beams, joists or
beam attachments so that they project vertically from or horizontally across the top flange of the
member until after the metal decking, or other walking/working surface, has been installed.
Installation of shear connectors on composite floors, roofs and bridge decks.
When shear connectors are used in construction of composite floors, roofs and bridge decks,
employees shall lay out and install the shear connectors after the metal decking has been installed,
using the metal decking as a working platform. Shear connectors shall not be installed from within a
controlled decking zone (CDZ), as specified in § 1926.760(c) (8).
Slip resistance of metal decking
Slip resistance of skeletal structural steel. Workers shall not be permitted to walk the top surface of
any structural steel member installed that has been coated with paint or similar material unless
documentation or certification that the coating has achieved a minimum average slip resistance of
.50 when measured with an English XL tribometer or equivalent tester on a wetted surface at a
testing laboratory is provided. Such documentation or certification shall be based on the appropriate
ASTM standard test method conducted by a laboratory capable of performing the test. The results
shall be available at the site and to the steel erector.
Plumbing-up
When deemed necessary by a competent person, plumbing-up equipment shall be installed in
conjunction with the steel erection process to ensure the stability of the structure.
When used, plumbing-up equipment shall be in place and properly installed before the structure is
loaded with construction material such as loads of joists, bundles of decking or bundles of bridging.
Plumbing-up equipment shall be removed only with the approval of a competent person.
Metal decking
Hoisting, landing and placing of metal decking bundles.
Bundle packaging and strapping shall not be used for hoisting unless specifically designed for that
purpose.
If loose items such as dunnage, flashing, or other materials are placed on the top of metal decking
bundles to be hoisted, such items shall be secured to the bundles. Bundles of metal decking on joists
shall be landed in accordance with § 1926.757(e) (4). Metal decking bundles shall be landed on
framing members so that enough support is provided to allow the bundles to be un-banded without
dislodging the bundles from the supports. At the end of the shift or when environmental or jobsite
conditions require, metal decking shall be secured against displacement.
Roof and floor holes and openings
Metal decking at roof and floor holes and openings shall be installed as follows:
 Framed metal deck openings shall have structural members turned down to allow continuous
deck installation except where not allowed by structural design constraints or
constructability.
 Roof and floor holes and openings shall be decked over. Where large size, configuration or
other structural design does not allow openings to be decked over (such as elevator shafts,
stair wells, etc.) employees shall be protected in accordance with § 1926.760(a) (1).
 Metal decking holes and openings shall not be cut until immediately prior to being
permanently filled with the equipment or structure needed or intended to fulfill its specific
use.
 Covering roof and floor openings
 Covers for roof and floor openings shall be capable of supporting, without failure, twice the
weight of the employees, equipment and materials that may be imposed on the cover at any
one time.
 All covers shall be secured when installed to prevent accidental displacement by the wind,
equipment or employees.
 All covers shall be painted with high-visibility paint or shall be marked with the word
"HOLE" or "COVER" to provide warning of the hazard.
 Smoke dome or skylight fixtures that have been installed are not considered covers for the
purpose of this section unless they meet the strength requirements of this section.
 Decking gaps around columns. Wire mesh, exterior plywood, or equivalent, shall be
installed around columns where planks or metal decking do not fit tightly. The materials
used must be of sufficient strength to provide fall protection for personnel and prevent
objects from falling through.
Installation of metal decking
Except as provided in § 1926.760(c), metal decking shall be laid tightly and immediately secured
upon placement to prevent accidental movement or displacement.
During initial placement, metal decking panels shall be placed to ensure full support by structural
members.
Derrick floors
A derrick floor shall be fully decked and/or planked and the steel member connections completed to
support the intended floor loading. Temporary loads placed on a derrick floor shall be distributed
over the underlying support members so as to prevent local overloading of the deck material.
General requirements for erection stability
All columns shall be anchored by a minimum of 4 anchor rods (anchor bolts). Each column anchor
rod (anchor bolt) assembly, including the column-to-base plate weld and the column foundation,
shall be designed to resist a minimum eccentric gravity load of 300 pounds (136.2 kg) located 18
inches (.46m) from the extreme outer face of the column in each direction at the top of the column
shaft. Columns shall be set on level finished floors, pre-grouted leveling plates, leveling nuts, or
shim packs which are adequate to transfer the construction loads.
All columns shall be evaluated by a competent person to determine whether guying or bracing is
needed; if guying or bracing is needed, it shall be installed.
Repair, replacement or field modification of anchor rods (anchor bolts)
Anchor rods (anchor bolts) shall not be repaired, replaced or field-modified without the approval of
the project structural engineer of record. Prior to the erection of a column, the controlling contractor
shall provide written notification to the steel erector if there has been any repair, replacement or
modification of the anchor rods (anchor bolts) of that column.
Beams and Columns
During the final placing of solid web structural members, the load shall not be released from the
hoisting line until the members are secured with at least two bolts per connection, of the same size
and strength as shown in the erection drawings, drawn up wrench-tight or the equivalent as
specified by the project structural engineer of record.
A competent person shall determine if more than two bolts are necessary to ensure the stability of
cantilevered members; if additional bolts are needed, they shall be installed.
Diagonal bracing
Solid web structural members used as diagonal bracing shall be secured by at least one bolt per
connection drawn up wrench-tight or the equivalent as specified by the project structural engineer
of record.
Double connections at columns and/or at beam webs over a column. When two structural members
on opposite sides of a column web, or a beam web over a column, are connected sharing common
connection holes, at least one bolt with its wrench-tight nut shall remain connected to the first
member unless a shop-attached or field-attached seat or equivalent connection device is supplied
with the member to secure the first member and prevent the column from being displaced.
If a seat or equivalent device is used, the seat (or device) shall be designed to support the load
during the double connection process. It shall be adequately bolted or welded to both a supporting
member and the first member before the nuts on the shared bolts are removed to make the double
connection.
Column splices
Each column splice shall be designed to resist a minimum eccentric gravity load of 300 pounds
(136.2 kg) located 18 inches (.46 m) from the extreme outer face of the column in each direction at
the top of the column shaft.
Perimeter columns
Perimeter columns shall not be erected unless:
The perimeter columns extend a minimum of 48 inches (1.2 m) above the finished floor to permit
installation of perimeter safety cables prior to erection of the next tier, except where constructability
does not allow; The perimeter columns have holes or other devices in or attached to perimeter
columns at 42-45 inches (107-114 cm) above the finished floor and the midpoint between the
finished floor and the top cable to permit installation of perimeter safety cables required by §
1926.760(a)(2), except where constructability does not allow.
Steel Joists
Where steel joists are used and columns are not framed in at least two directions with solid web
structural steel members, a steel joist shall be field-bolted at the column to provide lateral stability
to the column during erection. For the installation of this joist:
A vertical stabilizer plate shall be provided on each column for steel joists. The plate shall be a
minimum of 6 inch by 6 inch (152 mm by 152 mm) and shall extend at least 3 inches (76 mm)
below the bottom chord of the joist with a 13/16 inch (21 mm) hole to provide an attachment point for
guying or plumbing cables. The bottom chords of steel joists at columns shall be stabilized to
prevent rotation during erection. Hoisting cables shall not be released until the seat at each end of
the steel joist is field-bolted, and each end of the bottom chord is restrained by the column stabilizer
plate.
Where constructability does not allow a steel joist to be installed at the column: an alternate means
of stabilizing joists shall be installed on both sides near the column and shall; provide equivalent
stability; be designed by a qualified person; be shop installed; and be included in the erection
drawings.
Hoisting cables shall not be released until the seat at each end of the steel joist is field-bolted and
the joist is stabilized. Where steel joists at or near columns span 60 feet (18.3 m) or less, the joist
shall be designed with sufficient strength to allow one employee to release the hoisting cable
without the need for erection bridging.
Where steel joists at or near columns span more than 60 feet (18.3 m), the joists shall be set in
tandem with all bridging installed unless an alternative method of erection, which provides
equivalent stability to the steel joist, is designed by a qualified person and is included in the sitespecific erection plan. A steel joist or steel joist girder shall not be placed on any support structure
unless such structure is stabilized.
When steel joist(s) are landed on a structure, they shall be secured to prevent unintentional
displacement prior to installation.
No modification that affects the strength of a steel joist or steel joist girder shall be made without
the approval of the project structural engineer of record.
Field-bolted joists
Except for steel joists that have been pre-assembled into panels, connections of individual steel
joists to steel structures in bays of 40 feet (12.2 m) or more shall be fabricated to allow for field
bolting during erection. These connections shall be field-bolted unless constructability does not
allow.
Steel joists and steel joist girders shall not be used as anchorage points for a fall arrest system unless
written approval to do so is obtained from a qualified person.
Attachment of steel joists and steel joist girders
Each end of "K" series steel joists shall be attached to the support structure with a minimum of two
1/8
-inch (3 mm) fillet welds 1 inch (25 mm) long or with two 1/2-inch (13 mm) bolts, or the
equivalent.
Each end of "LH" and "DLH" series steel joists and steel joist girders shall be attached to the
support structure with a minimum of two 1/4-inch (6 mm) fillet welds 2 inches (51 mm) long, or
with two 3/4-inch (19 mm) bolts, or the equivalent.
Each steel joist shall be attached to the support structure, at least at one end on both sides of the
seat, immediately upon placement in the final erection position and before additional joists are
placed.
Panels that have been pre-assembled from steel joists with bridging shall be attached to the structure
at each corner before the hoisting cables are released.
Landing and placing loads
During the construction period, the employer placing a load on steel joists shall ensure that the load
is distributed so as not to exceed the carrying capacity of any steel joist.
No construction loads are allowed on the steel joists until all bridging is installed and anchored and
all joist-bearing ends are attached.
The weight of a bundle of joist bridging shall not exceed a total of 1,000 pounds (454 kg). A bundle
of joist bridging shall be placed on a minimum of three steel joists that are secured at one end. The
edge of the bridging bundle shall be positioned within 1 foot (.30 m) of the secured end.
No bundle of decking may be placed on steel joists until all bridging has been installed and
anchored and all joist bearing ends attached, unless all of the following conditions are met:
The employer has first determined from a qualified person and documented in a site-specific
erection plan that the structure or portion of the structure is capable of supporting the load; The
bundle of decking is placed on a minimum of three steel joists; The joists supporting the bundle of
decking are attached at both ends;
At least one row of bridging is installed and anchored; the total weight of the bundle of decking
does not exceed 4,000 pounds (1816 kg); and Placement of the bundle of decking shall be in
accordance with paragraph (e) (5) of this section. 1926.757(e) (5)
Falling Object Protection
Securing loose items aloft: All materials, equipment, and tools, which are not in use while aloft,
shall be secured against accidental displacement. Protection from falling objects other than
materials being hoisted: The controlling contractor shall bar other construction processes below
steel erection unless overhead protection for the employees below is provided.
Fall Protection
Fall Protection shall be in accordance with the Fall Protection section of this plan. In addition the
following shall apply:
Each employee engaged in a steel erection activity that is on a walking/working surface with an
unprotected side or edge more than 15 feet (4.6 m) above a lower level shall be protected from fall
hazards by guardrail systems, safety net systems, personal fall arrest systems, positioning device
systems or fall restraint systems.
Perimeter safety cables. On multi-story structures, perimeter safety cables shall be installed at the
final interior and exterior perimeters of the floors as soon as the metal decking has been installed.
Connectors and employees working in controlled decking zones shall be protected from fall
hazards.
Connectors
Each connector shall be protected from fall hazards of more than two stories or 30 feet (9.1 m)
above a lower level, whichever is less; Have completed connector training in accordance with §
1926.761; and be provided, at heights over 15 and up to 30 feet above a lower level, with a personal
fall arrest system, positioning device system or fall restraint system and wear the equipment
necessary to be able to be tied off; or be provided with other means of protection from fall hazards
in accordance with paragraph (a)(1) of section. 1926.760(c)
Controlled Decking Zone (CDZ)
A controlled decking zone may be established in that area of the structure over 15 and up to 30 feet
above a lower level where metal decking is initially being installed and forms the leading edge of a
work area. In each CDZ, the following shall apply:
Each employee working at the leading edge in a CDZ shall be protected from fall hazards of more
than two stories or 30 feet (9.1 m), whichever is less.
Access to a CDZ shall be limited to only those employees engaged in leading edge work.
The boundaries of a CDZ shall be designated and clearly marked. The CDZ shall not be more than
90 feet (27.4 m) wide and 90 (27.4 m) feet deep from any leading edge. The CDZ shall be marked
by the use of control lines or the equivalent.
Each employee working in a CDZ shall have completed CDZ training in accordance with §
1926.761.
Unsecured decking in a CDZ shall not exceed 3,000 square feet (914.4 m 2).
Safety deck attachments shall be performed in the CDZ from the leading edge back to the control
line and shall have at least two attachments for each metal decking panel.
Final deck attachments and installation of shear connectors shall not be performed in the CDZ.
Criteria for fall protection equipment
Guardrail systems, safety net systems, personal fall arrest systems, positioning device systems and
their components shall conform to the criteria in § 1926.502
Fall arrest system components shall be used in fall restraint systems and shall conform to the criteria
in § 1926.502 (see Appendix G). Either body belts or body harnesses shall be used in fall restraint
systems. Perimeter safety cables shall meet the criteria for guardrail systems in § 1926.502 (see
Appendix G).
Custody of fall protection
Fall protection provided by the steel erector shall remain in the area where steel erection activity has
been completed, to be used by other trades, only if the controlling contractor or its authorized
representative:
Has directed the steel erector to leave the fall protection in place; and has inspected and accepted
control and responsibility of the fall protection prior to authorizing persons other than steel erectors
to work in the area.
Training
Training personnel - Training required by this section shall be provided by a qualified person(s).
Fall hazard training. The employer shall provide a training program for all employees exposed to
fall hazards. The program shall include training and instruction in the following areas:
The recognition and identification of fall hazards in the work area; The use and operation of
guardrail systems (including perimeter safety cable systems), personal fall arrest systems,
positioning device systems, fall restraint systems, safety net systems, and other protection to be
used; The correct procedures for erecting, maintaining, disassembling, and inspecting the fall
protection systems to be used; The procedures to be followed to prevent falls to lower levels and
through or into holes and openings in walking/working surfaces and walls; and The fall protection
requirements of this section.
Special training programs:
In addition to the training required in the previous paragraphs of this section, the employer shall
provide special training to employees engaged in the following activities:
Multiple lift rigging procedure. The employer shall ensure that each employee who performs
multiple lift rigging has been provided training in the following areas:
The nature of the hazards associated with multiple lifts; and the proper procedures and equipment to
perform multiple lifts required by § 1926.753(e).
Connector procedures. The employer shall ensure that each connector has been provided training in
the following areas:
The nature of the hazards associated with connecting; and the establishment, access, proper
connecting techniques and work practices required by § 1926.756(c) and § 1926.760(b).
Controlled Decking Zone Procedures. Where CDZs are being used, the employer shall assure that
each employee has been provided training in the following areas:
The nature of the hazards associated with work within a controlled decking zone; and The
establishment, access, proper installation techniques and work practices required by § 1926.760(c)
and § 1926.754(e).
Suspension of Work
A. All employees, contractors, and visitors have the responsibility and authority to suspend
inappropriate or unsafe work activities when those activities present clear and imminent
danger to employees, contractors, visitors, the public, or the environment. Personnel may
suspend activities they observe or in which they are a participant, if they believe the activity
presents an imminent danger.
B. Upon receiving suspension of work request (oral or written), immediately cease activity, and
notify the Onsite Superintendent or Project Manager. Obtain name and telephone number of
person requesting suspension, and reason for suspension of work. Work shall not continue
on that activity until the issue has been resolved.
C. Stop Work Order: A Stop Work Order that affects a crew for a period greater than one (1)
hour shall be followed by issuance of formal written Stop Work Order. Work may be
restarted only with a written work release from the Superintendent or Project Manager. Stop
Work Order shall include the following information:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Date and time when work was stopped.
Reason for work stoppage.
Requirements for Contractor to resume work.
Date and time of when to expect corrective actions to be completed, if required.
D. Work Release: Superintendent or Project Managers shall provide a written work release that
includes the following:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Reference Stop Work Order
Reason for work stoppage
Conditions for restart of activity.
Specified date and time when work may resume.
Vehicle Policy
Company owned vehicles are the property of SDV Construction Inc and are “loaned” to each
employee, and should be treated as such. The same respect that you give a vehicle “borrowed”
from a family member or a close friend should be given to your “loaned” vehicle. Any action or
attitude considered irresponsible can be grounds for losing your privileges to use the vehicle.
Only authorized individuals are allowed to drive SDV vehicles. All employees will have a valid
driver’s license and it will be verified by our insurance company prior to vehicle operation.
Each vehicle is “loaned” with certain responsibilities and accountability attached. The company
expects value from each of you for the benefit of driving a company vehicle. If the company feels
that it is not receiving value for this privilege then you could lose your vehicle privileges.
Management reserves the right to terminate employment based on adherence to the following rules
and policy.
The assigned vehicle is not a right, it is a privilege. The vehicle may be removed at any time should
the management feel necessary.
Remember a vehicle with SDV Construction printed on it is a “rolling billboard.” It should always
be used and presented in such a manner as to bring positive attention to SDV Construction. Failure
to do so may be cause for termination of your privileges.
Company owned vehicles and/or those used by company employees will be operated in a safe and
economical manner.
The rules and expectations are as follows:
Rules:
1. Driving while under the influence of alcohol or Illegal substances is not permitted.
2. Driving with open containers of alcoholic beverage (or like substance) in a company vehicle
is prohibited (even if the container is empty in the bed of the vehicle).
3. Using any type of tobacco products in company vehicles is prohibited.
4. Driving your company vehicle to or from any establishment which serves liquor as a major
source of its income is prohibited (bars, lounges, casinos, night clubs, bingo parlors etc.)
5. Carrying weapons in a company vehicle is strictly prohibited.
6. Having a person, other than the person to whom the truck is assigned, drive the vehicle
outside of working hours is prohibited, this includes family members.
7. Having an un-licensed or uninsured person drive the vehicle, during or after working hours,
is prohibited.
8. The use of the vehicle, outside of working hours for a task, which might or does cause it
damage or undue wear and tear, is prohibited.
9. Every vehicle “on the road” must be safe and functional. Knowingly operating an unsafe
vehicle is prohibited.
10. All persons issued a vehicle must maintain a clean driving record and be insurable. You
must also show proof of insurance on your personal vehicles.
11. Seat belts must be worn by all people in a vehicle during it’s’ operation.
12. All traffic violations received while operating the assigned vehicle will be paid by the
employee and must be reported immediately to your supervisor.
13. Cargo will be secured and all doors locked while en route and while the vehicle is parked.
14. Hitchhikers are not permitted.
15. All loads must be secured properly and not exceed manufactures load limits. All loads must
be placed on appropriately sized vehicles intended for that use.
16. Cell Phone use is prohibited while operating SDV Vehicle.
Policy:
1. The vehicle is not intended to be a primary source of transportation and will not be used as
such.
2. The vehicle will not be used for ordinary transportation needs on the weekends or nonworking hours.
3. Any use of the vehicle for things other than those specifically related to SDV Construction
Inc business must be approved by Kirk or Jerry.
4. Damage caused to a vehicle and/or anything it is towing or hauling while off of a job site,
or during travel that is not specifically job related may be charged to the individual driving
the vehicle (accidents driving to and from work, etc.). The time it takes the employee to get
the damage fixed, if required, shall not be at the company’s expense. (i.e., fixing a flat,
broken windshield, etc.)
5. It is the responsibility of the employee to whom the truck has been issued to regularly wash
the vehicle (inside and out) and to maintain the vehicle through the company maintenance
program. Maintenance should occur every 5,000 miles or as directed.
6. It may be necessary for the vehicle to be pulled in for maintenance or repairs. During that
time SDV Construction will try to provide an “adequate” replacement. However, an
“adequate” replacement is not always available. During those times, any replacement will
do – if it is not suited to be used for anything else other than on the job, then that is all that is
required.
7. If an employee knowingly operated a vehicle that is unsafe, or in need of repair, and delays
repairs, which in turn causes damages which cost more, than that cost will be borne by the
person to who the vehicle is assigned.
8. The vehicle may be used to run errands and stops, directly before and after working hours,
in transit to your residence.
9. Cost over and above those normally associated with the operation and use of a company
vehicle, which are deemed to be caused by the person assigned the vehicle, may be charged
to the person who is assigned the vehicle.
10. Drivers witnessed or reported as driving fast or recklessly may lose their privileges.
11. When a driver goes on vacation, the company vehicle will be parked in the yard at the main
office and the keys left in the office. This allows the company to make use of the vehicle
during a driver’s absence.
12. Foremen working on out of town jobs may need to deliver their vehicle to the main office
prior to their departure on vacation, time off, etc. This will be determined by whether or not
the company requires the use of that vehicle during a driver’s absence.
13. The use of radar detectors is prohibited in all vehicles owned or used by the company. Obey
all speed limits.
14. Report all accidents immediately and complete a Vehicle Accident form.
_____________________________________
Print Name
_____________________________________
Date
______________________________
Signature
Welding & Cutting Program
Purpose
These written Welding & Cutting Procedures establish guidelines to be followed whenever any of
our employees work with welding and cutting equipment at this company. The procedures here
establish uniform requirements designed to ensure that welding and cutting safety training,
operation, and maintenance practices are communicated to and understood by the affected
employees. These requirements also are designed to ensure that procedures are in place to safeguard
the health and safety of all employees.
It is our intent to comply with the requirements of 29 CFR 1926.350 through .354. These
regulations have requirements for welding and cutting operations.
General Safety Requirements
 Welding cannot be conducted safely the welding and cutting shall not be performed.
 When objects to be welded or cut cannot readily be moved, all moveable fire hazards should
be removed from the area.
 If all the fire hazards cannot be removed, then guards shall be used to confine the heat,
sparks and slag and to protect the immovable fire hazards.
 When hazardous fumes, gases, or dust are possible ventilation shall be made available or
respiratory protection may be needed.
 Wherever there are floor openings or cracks in the flooring that cannot be closed,
precautions shall be taken so that no readily combustible materials on the floor below will be
exposed to sparks that might drop through the floor. The same precautions shall be observed
with regard to cracks or holes in walls, open doorways and open or broken windows.
 Appropriate PPE will be used by all welders for cutting and welding operations.
 Bottles shall be kept in the upright position at all times.
Fire Watch for Welding Activities
 The Fire Watch may only be performed by an individual who is not performing any other
duties that would take attention away from the area where the hot work is performed;
 Be aware of the inherent hazards involved in hot work;
 Ensure that safe conditions are maintained during the hot work;
 Ensure that appropriate fire extinguishers are readily available at the job site;
 Know how to report a fire or other emergency situation;
 Using appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
 Be trained in campus fire safety procedures and the use of fire extinguishing equipment;
 Must remain in a location that allows immediate communication with the individual(s)
performing hot work;
 Watch for fires in all exposed areas for a minimum of thirty (30) minutes.
Fire Protection Equipment
ABC Fire extinguishers will be available at all times during welding operations. It is the
responsibility of the fire watch to inspect and make sure extinguishers are operable and ready for
use prior to welding activities. All employees who use fire extinguisher are trained in the usage
prior to conducting fire watch operations.
Training
Our policy is to permit only trained and authorized personnel to operate welding and cutting
equipment.
Initial Training
During training, our program covers the operational hazards of our welding and cutting operations,
including:
 Hazards associated with the particular make and model of the welding and cutting
equipment;
 Hazards of the workplace; and
 General hazards that apply to the operation of all or most welding and cutting equipment.
Each potential welder or cutter who has received training in any of the elements of our training
program for the types of equipment which that employee will be authorized to operate and for the
type of workplace in which the welding and cutting equipment will be operated need not be
retrained in those elements before initial assignment in our workplace if, Inc has written
documentation of the training and if the employee is evaluated to be competent.
Performance Evaluation
Each certified welder or cutter is evaluated to verify that the welder or cutter has retained and uses
the knowledge and skills needed to operate safely. If the evaluation shows that the welder or cutter
is lacking the appropriate skills and knowledge, the welder or cutter is retrained. When a welder or
cutter has an accident or near miss or some unsafe operating procedure is identified, they must be
retraining.
Current Welders and Cutters
Under no circumstances may an employee operate welding or cutting equipment until he/she has
successfully been evaluated by a competent person.
A list of certified employees and equipment is available upon request.
All employees have a general obligation to work safely with and around welding and cutting
operations.
Inspections
Any deficiencies found in our welding and cutting equipment are repaired, or defective parts
replaced, before continued use.
However, no modifications or additions that affect the capacity or safe operation of the equipment
may be made without the manufacturer’s written approval. If such modifications or changes are
made, the capacity, operation, and maintenance instruction plates, tags, or decals, must be changed
accordingly. In no case may the original safety factor of the equipment be reduced.
While defective parts may be found, we prefer to invest time and effort into the proper upkeep of
our equipment, which results in day-to-day reliability. Keeping up with the manufacturer’s
recommended maintenance schedules, and completing the proper records, will also increase our
welding and cutting equipment’s longevity.
Periodic maintenance (those completed monthly or less frequently) is done by a factory-trainedexpert, or a dealer.
Work Site Identification (ASM Bulletin Board)
A. Construction Safety Bulletin Board: Provide and maintain weather tight safety bulletin board in
a visible location, not less than 3 feet by 5 feet in size. Bulletin board shall be used only to post
official documents and announcements.
1. For projects under $50,000, provide and maintain legible, durable, and weatherproof 8-1/2
inch by 11 inch sign in visible location with the following information:
a. Company name
b. Superintendent name
c. After hours telephone number
d. Client contact name and telephone number
2. For all projects, a copy of Contractor’s safety plan and all safety documentation will be
readily available at Project site.
B. Hazard Identification Signage and Barricades: Provide appropriate hazard identification and
barricades in accordance with 29 CFR 1926 and 29 CFR 1910 for construction and service
work, respectively, to warn Contractor personnel and visitors of specific work hazards. Prior to
start of work, ensure personnel on site know and understand signage that may be present on site
during performance of work.
1. Use flagging and tape barricades only for temporary (less than 24 hour) protection, unless
otherwise accepted by Superintendent. Use orange safety fencing or snow fencing around
excavations and trenching. Fencing shall be minimum 4 feet (1.2 m-) high and secured
vertically every 10 feet (3 m).
2. Provide signage in compliance with 29 CFR 1926 and 29 CFR 1910 for construction and
service work, respectively. Protect unattended sites with applicable signs and barricades at
all times.
C. Documentation: The following documents shall be available for review at each Project site.
1. Project plans, specifications, and work authorizations
2. All required permits.
3. Company Safety Plan
4. Material Safety Data Sheets for on-site chemicals.
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