WTS701EF - Digi-Key
WTS701EF
ENGLISH FEMALE VERSION TEXT-TO-SPEECH
USER’S MANUAL
-1-
Publication Release Date: June, 2003
Revision 1.00
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. Introduction ......................................................................................................................................... 4
2. Winbond Text-To-Speech Technology Overview .............................................................................. 5
2.1. Overview of Device Initialization Sequence ................................................................................ 5
2.2. Description of User Interface........................................................................................................ 5
2.3. Description of WTS701 State Machine........................................................................................ 6
2.3.1 Text-To-Speech Mechanism ................................................................................................... 6
2.3.2. Text Normalization ................................................................................................................ 7
2.3.3. Letter-to-Phoneme Conversion .............................................................................................. 7
2.3.4. Phoneme Mapping ................................................................................................................. 7
2.4. SPI Commands Overview............................................................................................................. 8
2.4.1. Command Classes .................................................................................................................. 8
2.5. Description of Phonetic Alphabet Feature.................................................................................... 9
2.6. Description of Abbreviations Feature......................................................................................... 12
3. Rules to be Applied ........................................................................................................................... 13
3.1. Text............................................................................................................................................. 13
3.2. Sentence...................................................................................................................................... 13
3.3. Word ........................................................................................................................................... 13
3.4. Character..................................................................................................................................... 14
3.5. Control Characters ...................................................................................................................... 14
3.6. Dash ............................................................................................................................................ 16
3.7. Slash ........................................................................................................................................... 16
3.8. Dot .............................................................................................................................................. 16
3.9. Internet/ E-mail Address............................................................................................................. 17
3.10. Punctuation ............................................................................................................................... 17
3.11. Abbreviations............................................................................................................................ 18
3.12. Numeration ............................................................................................................................... 18
3.12.1 Numbers .............................................................................................................................. 18
3.12.2. Time ................................................................................................................................... 18
3.12.3. Date .................................................................................................................................... 19
3.12.4. Dollar sign:......................................................................................................................... 19
3.12.5. Combination of digits and other characters: ...................................................................... 19
3.12.6. Percent Sign %:.................................................................................................................. 19
-2-
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
4 Appendices ......................................................................................................................................... 20
4.1. Input Character Table ................................................................................................................. 20
4.2. Default Abbreviation List ........................................................................................................... 21
5. Version History ................................................................................................................................. 27
-3-
Publication Release Date: June, 2003
Revision 1.00
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
1. INTRODUCTION
The WTS701 is a high quality, fully integrated, single-chip Text-to-Speech solution that is ideal for
use in applications such as automotive appliances, GPS/navigation systems, cellular phones and other
portable products or accessories. The WTS701 product accepts ASCII (Unicode and Big5 for
Mandarin) input via a SPI port and converts it to spoken audio via an analog output or digital CODEC
output.
The WTS701 integrates a text processor, smoothing filter and multi-level memory storage array on a
single-chip. Text-to-speech conversion is achieved by processing the incoming text into a phonetic
representation that is then mapped to a corpus of naturally spoken word parts. The synthesis algorithm
attempts to use the largest possible word unit in the appropriate context to maximize natural sounding
speech quality. The speech units are stored uncompressed in a multi-level, non-volatile analog storage
array to provide the highest sound quality to density trade-off. This unique, single-chip solution is
made possible through Winbond’s patented multilevel storage technology. Voice and audio signals are
stored directly into solid-state memory in their natural, uncompressed form, providing superior quality
voice reproduction.
The chip can be programmed through the SPI port, allowing downloading of different languages and
speaker databases when made available by Winbond.
-4-
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
2. WINBOND TEXT-TO-SPEECH TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW
2.1. OVERVIEW OF DEVICE INITIALIZATION SEQUENCE
Configuration
After power-on or a Reset command (RST) the WTS701 processor can be configured for operation.
This involves initializing the internal configuration registers for the users requirements.
Table 1. Initialization Command Sequence
State
POWER
DOWN
IDLE
Command
Description
--------
State after power-on or RST command.
SCLC
Set clock configuration.
PWUP
Power up device.
SCOM
Set up communication register to enable interrupts.
SCOD
Set up CODEC configuration (if used).
SAUD
Set up audio control register.
SVOL
Set the initial volume level.
SSPD
Set the initial speech output speed level.
SPTC
Set the initial speech pitch level.
2.2. DESCRIPTION OF USER INTERFACE
As a real System-On-Chip solution, the WTS701 performs the overall control functions for host
controller and text-to-speech processing.
The WTS701 system architecture consists of the following functions:
•
•
Serial interface to monitor the SPI port and interpret commands and data
•
Text normalization module to pre-process incoming text into pronounceable words
•
Words to phoneme translator, which converts incoming text to phoneme codes
•
Phoneme mapping module that maps incoming phonemes to words, sub-words, syllables or
phonemes present in the MLS memory
•
Volume and speed adjustments
Digital and analog output blocks for off-chip usage
-5-
Publication Release Date: June, 2003
Revision 1.00
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
The WTS701 system performs text-to-speech synthesis based on concatenative samples. The units for
concatenation can vary from whole words down to phoneme units. The convention is that the larger
the sub-word unit used for synthesis the higher the quality of the speech output. A corpus of prerecorded words is stored in Winbond’s patented multilevel storage (MLS) memory and a mapping of
the various sub-word parts is held in a lookup table. The speech creation is achieved by concatenation
of these speech elements to produce words. The system process flow is shown in Figure 1.
WTS701
Serial Text,
symbols &
Control
Text Normalization
Letter to Phoneme
Phoneme Mapper
Digital
output
MLS
Memory
Speech
Analog
output
Figure 1. WTS701 System Process Flow.
2.3. DESCRIPTION OF WTS701 STATE MACHINE
2.3.1 Text-To-Speech Mechanism
The text to speech component of the system consists of three principal blocks:
•
Text normalization
•
Letter-to-phoneme conversion
•
Phoneme mapping
-6-
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
2.3.2. Text Normalization
Text normalization involves the translation of incoming text into pronounceable words. It includes
such functions as expanding abbreviations and translating numeric strings to spoken words. It involves
a certain amount of context processing to determine correct spoken form.
In addition, the WTS701 looks into the abbreviation list stored in the device’s internal memory and
converts acronyms, abbreviations or special characters (such as Instant Messaging icons or emoticons)
into the appropriate text representation.
The default abbreviation list supported by the WTS701 is a general one that cannot be modified by the
user to match the domain that the text is being loaded from. But the default list can be overridden by
the user abbreviation list. This enables a flexibility of adding abbreviation specifically for the text
either by the developer or even the end user to best customize the product for its preferences. Instant
Messaging or Short Messages Service (SMS) unique characters are supported through this
functionality as well, defining the icon, ASCII/Unicode/Big5 text, and its replacement. The default
abbreviation list supported is described in the specific language release letter.
2.3.3. Letter-to-Phoneme Conversion
Once the data stream has been translated to pronounceable words, the system next determines how to
pronounce them. This function is obviously highly language dependent. For a language such as
English it is impossible to break this task down to a set of definitive rules. The task is achieved by a
combination of rule based processing together with exception processing.
2.3.4. Phoneme Mapping
This algorithm maps phoneme strings into the MLS phonetic inventory. This task falls into two
portions. First, the word must be split into sub-word portions. This splitting must be done at
appropriate phonetic boundaries to achieve high quality concatenation. Once a sub-word unit is
determined, the inventory is searched to determine if a match is present. A matching weight is
assigned to each match depending on how closely the phonetic context matches. Each sub-word has a
left and right side context to match as well as the phoneme string itself. If no suitable match is found
in the inventory, then the sub-word is further split in a tree like manner until a match is found. The
splitting tree is processed from left to right and each time a successful match occurs the address and
duration of the match in the corpus is placed in a queue of phonetic parts to be played out the audio
interface.
-7-
Publication Release Date: June, 2003
Revision 1.00
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
2.4. SPI COMMANDS OVERVIEW
The WTS701 is controlled by a series of SPI transactions to send commands to the device. The
general format of an SPI transaction is shown in Figure 2 A transaction is always started by sending
a command word. The command word consists of a command byte followed by a command data
byte. At the same time, the status register is shifted out on the MISO line. What follows depends
on what command is sent. The general case is that following the command word, up to n-bytes of
data can be sent to the device and n-bytes can be read from the device. An SPI transaction is finished
when SS\ is returned to the HIGH condition.
MSB
LSB
MOSI
CMD BYTE
CMD DATA
DATA0
DATA1
DATAn
MISO
STATUS BYTE 0
STATUS BYTE 1
DATA0
DATA1
DATAn
time
Figure 2. SPI Transaction Format.
2.4.1. Command Classes
The SPI transactions to the WTS701 fall into four classes. The four classes represent variations in
how the command, and any associated data, is handled. The class of a command is defined by the
two most significant bits of the command byte. A summary of the command classes is given below
CLASS 0 COMMANDS
These are commands that are executed irrespective of the state of the WTS701. That is, the
command will execute even if the device is busy or powered down. These commands are executed
internally by a hardware command interpreter. All commands not of class 0 require that the WTS701
be in a powered up state. Example of class 0 command is the Read Status (RDST) command.
CLASS 1 COMMANDS
Class 1 commands require interpretation by the internal firmware of the WTS701. Class 1
commands consist only of a command byte and command data byte. Any further data sent in a
transaction is ignored. Class 1 commands are most often used for setting a configuration register in
the device or sending commands that have no data such as the conversion pause (PAUS) command.
-8-
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
CLASS 2 COMMANDS
Class 2 commands have associated data. After the command word, any data bytes following are
loaded into an internal FIFO buffer for processing. If this FIFO becomes full, the R/ B signal is
asserted (LOW) indicating that the host must pause data transfer. An alternative to monitoring the
R/ B line, the R/ B bit of the status register can be monitored instead (see subsection 7.3.2) or via the
RDST command.
CLASS 3 COMMANDS
Class 3 commands have data to return to the host. The R/ B line will go to busy immediately
following the command word indicating that the WTS701 is fetching the requested data. Data is put
into the BCNT0 and BCNT1 (see subsection 7.3.4) registers and is read out in the two subsequent
bytes after R/ B is released. If more than two bytes are returned from the command, R/ B will again
be asserted until data is ready to read. The primary Class 3 commands are to read the contents of
internal configuration registers such as RREG command.
2.5. DESCRIPTION OF PHONETIC ALPHABET FEATURE
As indicated in 2.3.3, the WTS701 coverts spelled-out pronounceable words into phonetic
transcriptions, i.e. a string of phonemes providing an abstract representation of the target
pronunciation. This feature allows the input to contain phonetic transcriptions instead of ordinary
English text, explicitly indicating the desired pronunciation.
Phonetic transcriptions can be sent directly to the WTS701. This can be done by embedding phoneme
strings in the text stream for conversion. To embed a phoneme string, the string must be preceded by a
control-P (^P, ASCII 0x10) character and terminated by a space character. If there is following
punctuation or word, a space must still intervene.
For example:
“The quick brown ^Pf1Aks jumped over the lazy ^Pd1cg .”
The following table lists the phoneme symbols acceptable by the WTS701 (English Female software
version). As the acceptable phoneme symbols are language and version dependent, please refer to the
specific language User’s Guide for details regarding characters accepted and other development
considerations.
-9-
Publication Release Date: June, 2003
Revision 1.00
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
Table 2. Acceptable Phoneme Symbols.
Vowels
Consonants
Phoneme
i
Example
Phoneme
Example
beat
p
pet
I
bit
t
ten
e
bait
k
kit
E
bet
q
written
@
bat
b
bet
u
boot
d
debt
U
book
g
get
o
boat
f
fat
c
bought
T
thing
a
Bob
s
sat
A
but
S
shut
R
bird
h
hat
O
boy
v
vat
Y
buy
D
that
W
down
z
zoo
x
about
Z
azure
X
roses
y
you
w
wit
r
rent
P
eighty
l
let
m
met
n
net
G
sing
C
church
J
judge
Note that each phoneme is represented by exactly one character, and there must be an indication of
stress before each vowel. The digit ‘1’ is used to indicate primary stress, and each word has only
one primary stress. All other vowels are marked with the digit ‘0’.
- 10 -
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
Examples:
Input
hi
cute
backpack
encyclopedia
Phonetic transcription
h1Y (phoneme /h/, followed by a 1-stress vowel phoneme Y)
ky1ut
[email protected]@k
0Ins0Ykl0xp1id0i0x
Constraints on stress:
All vowels may bear 0 stress. However, neither x nor X can bear primary stress, marked with ‘1’. The
best primary stress alternative for these two is 1A, but 1I may be more appropriate for X in some
cases.
Dialect note:
The WTS701EF presents a dialect of Standard American English spoken in the San Francisco Bay
area, and the transcriptions generated are consistent with this dialect. Transcriptions can be modified
to emulate some properties of other dialects, including Standard British and Australian dialects, but a
complete transformation cannot be successful, as many other dialect-dependent features cannot be
modified with transcriptions.
Abstractness:
These phonetic transcriptions are abstract representations, and some transformations are performed on
these transcriptions on the way to creating audio output. Three of phonemes in the preceding table are
commonly products of these transformations.
-The vowel 0X is associated with both 0I and 0x. It can be used in input transcriptions, but the user
can use 0I and 0x instead, as selecting among the two as appropriate. For example, ‘roses’ may also be
transcribed as ^Pr1oz0Iz . The output will be identical.
-Both q and P are associated with t. ‘Written’ can be transcribed as ^Pr1It0xn as well as ^Pr1Iq0xn ,
and ‘eighty’ may be transcribed as ^P1et0i as well as ^P1eP0i . The output will be identical in both
pairs. The user may simply use t except to force output with q or P.
Uses:
-Greater control
The phonetic alphabet feature may be used to specify particular pronunciations.
Examples:
“Do you say ^Pt0xm1eP0o or ^Pt0xm1at0o ?”
“People from Missouri say they’re from ^Pm0Iz1ur0x .”
-Foreign and unusual words
The phonetic alphabet can also be used to specify the pronunciation of unusual words, outside the
central core of English words covered by the letter-to-phoneme module. For example, the following
transcriptions can be provided for French President Jacques Chirac’s name: ^PZ1ak ^PS0ir1ak .
-Tweaking pronunciations
- 11 -
Publication Release Date: June, 2003
Revision 1.00
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
The phonetic alphabet can also be used to ‘tweak’ pronunciations. Many English words, even common
words, have multiple valid transcriptions, but in some cases, the output for each is not equally as good.
For example, the default transcription for ‘current’ for the WTS701EF is ^Pk1Rr0Int . The
transcription ^Pk1R0Int is equally valid, but the output is much worse. Exploring variant phonetic
transcriptions can solve many output problems.
Developers of TTS applications are often tempted to fix pronunciation problems by using abberant
spellings, but they should use transcriptions instead, as phonetic transcriptions provide much greater
control. Indeed, many issues can only be addressed by providing transcriptions.
2.6. DESCRIPTION OF ABBREVIATIONS FEATURE
The WTS701 has support for entering and using custom abbreviations in addition to the general
abbreviation table supported internally by the WTS701. These supplement the default abbreviation
support. (See sections 3.8 and 4.2) There are 2K bytes of flash memory reserved for this purpose.
After the WTS701 internal software has been initially programmed, this entire area is free and
available for custom abbreviations.
The commands associated with custom abbreviations are:
Command
Command
Byte
Command
Data Byte
ABBR_ADD
0xaf
0x00
+
abbreviation
data.
Adds a new abbreviation to the abbreviation table
in the WTS701 See below for the format of the
abbreviation data.
ABBR_DEL
0x83
0x00+
abbreviation
data.
Deletes an existing abbreviation from the
abbreviation table in the WTS701. See below for
the format of the abbreviation data.
ABBR_NUM
0xc8
0x00 + 0x00 +
0x00.
Returns the number of abbreviation currently active
in the abbreviation table of the WTS701.
ABBR_MEM
0xc7
0x00 + 0x00 +
0x00.
Returns the number of free bytes in
abbreviation table of the WTS701.
ABBR_RD
0xc9
0x00 + 2048
0x00s.
Returns the abbreviation table contents from the
WTS701.
See below for the format of the
abbreviation table data.
ENTER_RRSM
0x0c
0x00
Causes the xdata and code store memory to swap
spaces. The WTS701 begins to execute code
previously stored into xdata after this command.
the
For both ABBR_ADD and ABBR_DEL, the abbreviation data should be formatted as follows:
input_abbreviation + comma + output_string + semicolon.
For example, the following associates the abbreviation “Fr” with “Father”: “Fr,Father;”. If this data
were entered with ABBR_ADD, “Fr. Miller” would be read “Father Miller”. (See section 3.8 for
- 12 -
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
constraints on abbreviation matching.) An abbreviation can also map onto multiple words, e.g.
“BC,before Christ;” or “BC,British Columbia;”. This feature can also be used to provide
transcriptions, according to the conventions in section 2.5. For example, “NASA,^[email protected];” would
provide the common pronunciation of ‘NASA’. This can also be done for ordinary spelled out words,
as a means for consistently providing user transcriptions. Thus, if “Chirac,^PS0ir1ak;” were added, the
pronunciation for the input text ‘Chirac’ would consistently be ^PS0ir1ak .
The abbreviation table is provided in the following format when an ADDR_RD command is issued:
“abbreviation_number. input_abbreviation
output_string”
Abbreviations are listed and numbered in the order in which they are added. If an abbreviation is
deleted, the text “(deleted)” appears after the input_abbreviation.
Example:
01. Fr
Father
02. BC (deleted)
before Christ
03. BC
British Columbia
04. NASA
^[email protected]
05. Chirac
^PS0ir1ak
3. RULES TO BE APPLIED
3.1. TEXT
There is no pre-set character length limit for an input text.
3.2. SENTENCE
There is no pre-set character length limit for an input sentence.
3.3. WORD
- 13 -
Publication Release Date: June, 2003
Revision 1.00
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
Any space-bounded string is treated as a word. The maximum character length of a word is 53. Words
54 or more characters in length will be truncated after the 53rd character.
3.4. CHARACTER
A character must be encoded in ASCII. The set of ASCII characters defined by the system ranges from
'0x00' to '0x7A' excluding '0x22', ‘0x3B’, '0x3C', '0x3E' and '0x60' (please refer to section 5.1 for
more details). All the undefined characters will be deleted prior to letter-to-phoneme conversion.
3.5. CONTROL CHARACTERS
To allow users to manipulate the system functions via the input text, certain control characters are
defined as command flags. Actual HEX values must be sent to the chip. These should not be confused
with the sequence of ‘^’ followed by a capital letter.
•
Control-P (‘0x10’): Phoneme control flag. This command flag indicates a phoneme string is to
follow. A space character is required after the end of the phoneme string.
Example:
‘^Ppr0Ez0Int1eS0In ’ will be pronounced as ‘presentation’.
•
Control-Q (‘0x11’): Pause control flag. Pauses with variant length can be added within a
sentence by using the ‘^QX’ flag. ‘X’ is an integer which indicates the pause duration in
tenths of a second. A space character is required after the pause-duration digit.
Example:
'^Q10 ' will add in a one-second pause.
•
Control-S (‘0x13’): Speed control flag. This command flag controls the speed change.
‘^S+’: Increase the playback speed by 1 level. A space character is required after ‘+’.
Example:
‘^S+ Hello, world’
‘^S-‘: Decrease the playback speed by 1 level. A space character is required after ‘-’.
Example:
‘^S- Hello, world’
‘^SX’: Set the playback speed to level X. X is an integer, and its valid range is from 0 to 4,
from fast to slow. The default speed level is 2. Any number that is greater than 4 will be set to 4.
A space character is required after the level number.
Example:
‘^S0 Hello, world’
- 14 -
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
•
Control-U (‘0x15’): All-capital word control flag. This command flag tells the system whether
a string comprised exclusively of capital letters should be spelled out or not.
‘^U0’: Force all short all-capital words (4 or less letters) to be spelled out, unless the word is
an abbreviation established in the system. Abbreviations will be treated as indicated in the built-in
abbreviation list (see 4.2) or by the user (see 2.6). Longer all-capital words (5 or more letters) will
be pronounced if deemed to be a word pronounceable in English. This is the default setting. A
space character is required after ‘0’.
Example:
‘^U0 USA’ will be pronounced as ‘u s a’.
‘^U0 CA’ will be pronounced as ‘California’. (A built-in abbreviation)
‘^U0 ZZZZZZZ’ will be spelled out because it is not pronounceable in English.
‘^U1’: Avoid spelling out words in all capitals. The system will pronounce every all-capital
word (as a normal word) as long as the word is pronounceable. In this mode, no abbreviations will
be detected. A space character is required after ‘1’.
Example:
‘^U1 ROM’ will be pronounced as ‘rom’ whereas ‘^U0 ROM’ will be pronounced as ‘r o m’.
‘^U2’: Force every word to be spelled out regardless of case or length. In this mode, no
abbreviations will be detected. A space character is required after ‘2’.
Example:
‘^U2 GOOD’ will be pronounced as ‘g o o d’.
‘^U2 good’ will be pronounced as ‘g o o d’.
‘^U3’: Force every all-capitol word to be spelled out regardless of its string length, unless the
word is an abbreviation established in the system. Abbreviations will be treated as indicated in the
built-in abbreviation list (see 04.2) or by the user (see 02.6). It simlar to ‘^U0’ except for the
insensitivity to string length. A space character is required after ‘3’.
Example:
'^U3 HELLO' will be pronounced as 'h e l l o'.
•
Control-V (‘0x16’): Volume control flag. This command flag changes the volume.
‘^V+’: Increase the playback volume by 1 level. A space character is required after ‘+’.
Example:
‘^V+ Hello, world’.
‘^V-‘: Decrease the playback volume by 1 level. A space character is required after ‘-’.
Example:
‘^V- Hello, world’.
‘^VX’: Set the playback volume to level X. X is an integer and its valid range is from 0 to 7
(0dB to –28dB). The default volume level is 3 (-12dB). Any number that is greater than 7 will be
set to 0. A space character is required after the level number.
- 15 -
Publication Release Date: June, 2003
Revision 1.00
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
The following example shows how these control characters can be used together, handling not only
capitalization and pronunciation issues, but also establishing emphasis and conveying some emotion.
^V3 Well, ^V- ^S4 to tell you the truth, ^V+ ^S2 it was ^Q2 ^V+ ^U1 JOHN ^U0 ^V- ^Q1 who
^V- ^S- wrote the report, ^S+ ^V+ not ^Q1 ^V+ ^Pg0iy1erm0o ^V-.
3.6. DASH
•
When a dash appears between words with no space preceding or following, it is recognized as
hyphen in a hyphenated word. There is no abbreviation support for the hyphenated words.
Example:
‘three-year-old’ will be pronounced as ‘three year old'.
•
When there is a space preceding or following the dash, it will be pronounced as ‘dash’.
Example:
‘three- year’ will be pronounced as ‘three dash year'.
‘three -year’ will be pronounced as ‘three dash year'.
•
When used in front for a digit, it will be pronounced as ‘minus’.
Example:
‘-5’ will be pronounced as ‘minus five'.
3.7. SLASH
When a slash appears between words with no space preceding or following, it is treated as a space.
Otherwise, it will be pronounced out as ‘slash’. There is no abbreviation support in this case.
Example:
'boy/girl' will be pronounced as 'boy girl'.
'boy/ girl' will be pronounced as 'boy slash girl'.
3.8. DOT
•
When ‘.’ is used within a decimal number, it will be pronounced as 'point'.
Example:
- 16 -
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
'2.6' will be pronounced as 'two point six'.
•
When ‘.’ is used at the end of a word or a sentence, it is treated as silence (please see section
3.7 for more details).
•
For all the other cases that are not described above, ‘.’ will be pronounced out as 'dot'.
3.9. INTERNET/ E-MAIL ADDRESS
Any string which contains ‘@’, ‘www’, ‘.com’ or ‘.gov’ as a substring will be treated as a web or
e-mail address.
Example:
‘winbond.com’ will be pronounced as ‘winbond dot com’.
‘www.irs.gov’ will be pronounced as ‘w w w dot i r s dot gov’.
3.10. PUNCTUATION
Punctuation
Pause Duration
,
0.2 sec
.
0.6 sec
!
0.5 sec
?
0.5 sec
...
0.5 sec
Note: A space character is required at the end of ellipse (...).
While pauses are insterted for punctuation, punctuation also influences the pronunciation of
neighboring words. Punctuation should not added in violation of standard English usage in order to
insert or extend pauses; this should be done instead with the pause control flag control-Q (‘0x11’) (see
section 3.5).
In accordance with standard English orthography, all of these punctuation markers should immediately
follow the preceding word with no internening space. Violating this norm can adversely affect output
quality. For example, there should be no space before the period in “Believe it or not.” If “Believe it or
not.” is entered instead, the output for “not” will not be as appropriate to the context. The only
- 17 -
Publication Release Date: June, 2003
Revision 1.00
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
exception is for command character sequences, e.g. “Good night ^V-, my sweet ^Ppr1Ins .” (see
section 3.5).
3.11. ABBREVIATIONS
The system recognizes a default set of frequently used abbreviations (see section 5.2) and also allows
users to add abbreviations of their own (see section 2.6). Matching is case sensitive, but both the
presence and the absence of final periods are ignored in matching. For example, the abbreviation
“Feb” is provided for “February”. Both “Feb” and “Feb.” would constitute matches, but both “feb”
and “feb.” would not. Note also that there is no abbreviation support in both ^U1 and ^U2 modes. (See
section 3.5.)
3.12. NUMERATION
3.12.1 Numbers
•
Integers:
Example:
‘10’ will be pronounced as ‘ten’.
’10,000’ will be pronounced as ‘ten thousand’.
‘94087’ will be pronounced as ‘nine four zero eight seven’
•
Decimal numbers:
Example:
‘1.23’ will be pronounced as ‘one point two three’.
•
Ordinal numbers: Any number terminated by 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4 (5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0) th, is recognized as
an ordinal number.
Example:
‘21st’ will be pronounced as ‘twenty first’.
3.12.2. Time
The time representation format is '00:00AM' or '00:00PM' (one semicolon between 2 integers). 'AM'
(am) or 'PM' (pm) is optional, but if needed it must be added right after the second integer.
Example:
‘9:30pm’ will be pronounced as ‘nine thirty p m’.
- 18 -
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
3.12.3. Date
The support for dates goes from year 2000 to 2099 and the format is 'MM/DD/YY'.
For the dates before year 2000, please use ‘MM/DD/YYYY’.
Example:
'1/15/03' will be pronounced as 'one fifteen two thousand three'.
3.12.4. Dollar sign:
The combination of a '$' and any integer or any decimal number is recognized as money. (No space is
allowed in between)
Example:
'$15.99' will be pronounced as 'fifteen dollars and ninety nine cents'.
'$500 million' -> 'five hundred million dollars'.
3.12.5. Combination of digits and other characters:
This occasion happens mostly in telephone numbers.
Example:
‘(408) 123-4567’ will be pronounced as ‘four zero eight one two three four five six seven’. A pause
will be placed after 8 and another pause will be placed after 3.
‘123-4567’ will be pronounced as ‘one two three four five six seven’.
3.12.6. Percent Sign %:
Example:
‘12%’ will be pronounced as ‘twelve percent’.
- 19 -
Publication Release Date: June, 2003
Revision 1.00
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
4 APPENDICES
4.1. INPUT CHARACTER TABLE
0x0
Reserved
0x20
Space
0x40
@
0x60
Undefined
0x1
Reserved
0x21
!
0x41
A
0x61
a
0x2
Reserved
0x22
Undefined
0x42
B
0x62
b
0x3
Reserved
0x23
#
0x43
C
0x63
c
0x4
Reserved
0x24
$
0x44
D
0x64
d
0x5
Reserved
0x25
%
0x45
E
0x65
e
0x6
Reserved
0x26
&
0x46
F
0x66
f
0x7
Reserved
0x27
‘ (apostrophe)
0x47
G
0x67
g
0x8
Reserved
0x28
(
0x48
H
0x68
h
0x9
Space
0x29
)
0x49
I
0x69
I
0xa
Space
0x2a
*
0x4a
J
0x6a
j
0xb
Space
0x2b
+
0x4b
K
0x6b
k
0xc
Space
0x2c
, (comma)
0x4c
L
0x6c
l
0xd
Space
0x2d
- (dash)
0x4d
M
0x6d
m
0xe
Reserved
0x2e
. (period)
0x4e
N
0x6e
n
0xf
Reserved
0x2f
/ (slash)
0x4f
O
0x6f
o
0x10
^P
0x30
0
0x50
P
0x70
p
0x11
^Q
0x31
1
0x51
Q
0x71
q
0x12
Reserved
0x32
2
0x52
R
0x72
r
0x13
^S
0x33
3
0x53
S
0x73
s
0x14
Reserved
0x34
4
0x54
T
0x74
t
0x15
^U
0x35
5
0x55
U
0x75
u
0x16
^V
0x36
6
0x56
V
0x76
v
0x17
Reserved
0x37
7
0x57
W
0x77
w
0x18
Reserved
0x38
8
0x58
X
0x78
x
0x19
Reserved
0x39
9
0x59
Y
0x79
y
0x1a
EOT
0x3a
: (colon)
0x5a
Z
0x7a
z
0x1b
Reserved
0x3b
Undefined
0x5b
] (open bracket)
0x7b
Undefined
0x1c
Reserved
0x3c
Undefined
0x5c
\ (back slash)
0x7c
Undefined
0x1d
Reserved
0x3d
=
0x5d
[ (close bracket)
0x7d
Undefined
0x1e
Reserved
0x3e
Undefined
0x5e
^
0x7e
Undefined
0x1f
Reserved
0x3f
?
0x5f
_ (under score)
0x7f
Undefined
- 20 -
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
Note 1: Characters ranges from ‘0x09’ to ‘0x0D’ (escape characters) will be treated as white space.
Note 2: The characters marked ‘Reserved’ above are the characters reserved for future system development.
Unpredicted behavior may occur if these characters are used.
4.2. DEFAULT ABBREVIATION LIST
The list below is stored in WTS701 and used for all incoming text.
Note also that there is no abbreviation support in both ^U1 and ^U2 modes.
"Sen","Senator",
"Rep","Representative",
"Jan","January",
"Feb","February",
"Mar","March",
"Apr","April",
"Jun","June",
"Jul","July",
"Aug","August",
"Sep","September",
"Sept","September",
"Oct","October",
"Nov","November",
"Dec","December",
"Mon","monday",
"Tue","tuesday",
"Wed","wednesday",
"Thu","thursday",
"Fri","friday",
"Sat","saturday",
"Sun","sunday",
"A.M","A M",
"P.M","P M",
"a.m","A M",
"p.m","P M",
- 21 -
Publication Release Date: June, 2003
Revision 1.00
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
"pm","P M",
"PM","P M",
"PhD","P H D",
"Mr","Mister",
"Mrs","Missus",
"Ms","Miz",
"Dr","Doctor",
"Jr","Junior",
"Esq","Esquire",
"Pres","President",
"Prof","Professor",
"Sgt","Sargeant",
"Lt","Lieutenant",
"Lieut","Lieutenant",
"Maj","Major",
"MPH","mile per hour",
"Col","Colonel",
"Gen","General",
"Sr","Senior",
"St","Street",
"Av","Avenue",
"Ave","Avenue",
"Rd","Road",
"Rt","Route",
"Rte","Route",
"Blvd","Boulevard",
"Terr","Terrace",
"Exwy","Expressway",
"Expwy","Expressway",
"Drwy","Driveway",
"Dept","Department",
"Ct","Court",
"AL","Alabama",
- 22 -
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
"AK","Alaska",
"AZ","Arizona",
"AR","Arkansas",
"CA","California",
"Cal","California",
"Calif","California",
"Cal","California",
"DE","Delaware",
"FL","Florida",
"Fla","Florida",
"GA","Georgia",
"IEEE","I triple E",
"ID","Idaho",
"IL","Illinois",
"IN","Indiana",
"IA","Iowa",
"KS","Kansas",
"KY","Kentucky",
"IL","Illinois",
"MA","Massachusetts",
"MI","Michigan",
"MS","Mississippi",
"MN","Minnesota",
"MO","Missouri",
"MT","Montana",
"NV","Nevada",
"NH","New Hampshire",
"NM","New Mexico",
"NY","New York",
"NJ","New Jersey",
"NC","North Carolina",
"ND","North Dakota",
"OH","Ohio",
- 23 -
Publication Release Date: June, 2003
Revision 1.00
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
"PA","Pennsylvania",
"RI","Rhode Island",
"SC","South Carolina",
"SD","South Dakota",
"TN","Tennessee",
"TX","Texas",
"Tex","Texas",
"UT","Utah",
"VT","Vermont",
"VA","Virginia",
"WA","Washington",
"WV","West Virginia",
"WI","Wisconsin",
"WY","Wyoming",
"N","North",
"S","South",
"E","East",
"W","West",
"LA","Los Angeles",
"SF","San Francisco",
"SJ","San Jose",
"Ans","Answer",
"Q","Question",
"Asst","Assistant",
"Atty","Attorney",
"Bldg","Building",
"asap","ASAP",
"cc","CC",
"cm","centimeters",
"mm","millimeters",
"ft","feet",
"yd","yards",
"yds","yards",
- 24 -
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
"pt","pints",
"pts","pints",
"qt","quarts",
"qts","quarts",
"km","kilometers",
"mi","miles",
"deg","degrees",
"cu","cubic",
"diam","diameter",
"FAX","fax",
"Geog","geography",
"govt","government",
"min","minute",
"mins","minutes",
"hr","hour",
"hrs","hours",
"yr","year",
"yrs","years",
"doz","dozen",
"Inc","incorporated",
"KW","kilowatt",
"lb","pounds",
"lbs","pounds",
"mngr","manager",
"Nat","National",
"NASDAQ","nasdaq",
"ok","OK",
"oz","ounces",
"Pl","place",
"rcvd","received",
"rpm","RPM",
"tel","telephone",
"tv","TV",
- 25 -
Publication Release Date: June, 2003
Revision 1.00
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
"vs","versus",
"U.S","yoo ess",
"U.S.A","yoo ess ay",
"VISA","veeza",
"w","with",
"wrt","with respect to",
"wk","week",
"Xmas","Christmas",
"etc","etcetra",
"c/o","care of",
"w/o","without",
"III","the third",
"WYSIWYG","whisywig",
"THE","the"
- 26 -
WTS701EF
USER’S MANUAL
5. VERSION HISTORY
VERSION
DATE
PAGE
1.00
June 2003
All
DESCRIPTION
Initial Version
The contents of this document are provided only as a guide for the applications of Winbond
products. Winbond makes no representation or warranties with respect to the accuracy or
completeness of the contents of this publication and reserves the right to discontinue or make
changes to specifications and product descriptions at any time without notice. No license, whether
express or implied, to any intellectual property or other right of Winbond or others is granted by this
publication. Except as set forth in Winbond's Standard Terms and Conditions of Sale, Winbond
assumes no liability whatsoever and disclaims any express or implied warranty of merchantability,
fitness for a particular purpose or infringement of any Intellectual property.
Winbond products are not designed, intended, authorized or warranted for use as components in
systems or equipments intended for surgical implantation, atomic energy control instruments,
airplane or spaceship instruments, transportation instruments, traffic signal instruments,
combustion control instruments, or for other applications intended to support or sustain life.
Further, Winbond products are not intended for applications wherein failure of Winbond products
could result or lead to a situation wherein personal injury, death or severe property or
environmental injury could occur.
Headquarters
Winbond Electronics Corporation America
Winbond Electronics (Shanghai) Ltd.
No. 4, Creation Rd. III
Science-Based Industrial Park,
Hsinchu, Taiwan
TEL: 886-3-5770066
FAX: 886-3-5665577
http://www.winbond.com.tw/
2727 North First Street, San Jose,
CA 95134, U.S.A.
TEL: 1-408-9436666
FAX: 1-408-5441797
http://www.winbond-usa.com/
27F, 299 Yan An W. Rd. Shanghai,
200336 China
TEL: 86-21-62365999
FAX: 86-21-62356998
Taipei Office
Winbond Electronics Corporation Japan
Winbond Electronics (H.K.) Ltd.
9F, No. 480, Pueiguang Rd.
Neihu District
Taipei, 114 Taiwan
TEL: 886-2-81777168
FAX: 886-2-87153579
7F Daini-ueno BLDG. 3-7-18
Shinyokohama Kohokuku,
Yokohama, 222-0033
TEL: 81-45-4781881
FAX: 81-45-4781800
Unit 9-15, 22F, Millennium City,
No. 378 Kwun Tong Rd.,
Kowloon, Hong Kong
TEL: 852-27513100
FAX: 852-27552064
Publication Release Date: June, 2003
Revision 1.00
Please note that all data and specifications are subject to change without notice.
All the trademarks of products and companies mentioned in this datasheet belong to their respective owners.
This product incorporates SuperFlash® technology licensed from SST.
- 27 -
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement