Series 90-70 Remote I/O Scanner User`s Manual, GFK

Series 90-70 Remote I/O Scanner User`s Manual, GFK
GE
Intelligent Platforms
ÎÎ
Programmable Control Products
Series 90*- 70
Remote I/O
Scanner
User’s Manual
GFK–0579B
March 2010
GFL-002
Warnings, Cautions, and Notes
as Used in this Publication
Warning
Warning notices are used in this publication to emphasize that hazardous voltages,
currents, temperatures, or other conditions that could cause personal injury exist in this
equipment or may be associated with its use.
In situations where inattention could cause either personal injury or damage to equipment,
a Warning notice is used.
Caution
Caution notices are used where equipment might be damaged if care is not taken.
Note:
Notes merely call attention to information that is especially significant to
understanding and operating the equipment.
This document is based on information available at the time of its publication. While efforts
have been made to be accurate, the information contained herein does not purport to cover all
details or variations in hardware or software, nor to provide for every possible contingency in
connection with installation, operation, or maintenance. Features may be described herein
which are not present in all hardware and software systems. GE Intelligent Platforms assumes
no obligation of notice to holders of this document with respect to changes subsequently made.
GE Intelligent Platforms makes no representation or warranty, expressed, implied, or statutory
with respect to, and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, sufficiency, or
usefulness of the information contained herein. No warranties of merchantability or fitness for
purpose shall apply.
* indicates a trademark of GE Intelligent Platforms, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All other
trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
©Copyright 2010 GE Intelligent Platforms, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
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Preface
Content of this Manual
This book is a reference to installing, configuring, and using a GE Intelligent Platforms
Series 90 –70 Remote I/O Scanner (IC697BEM733).
t
Chapter 1. Introduction: This chapter describes the Remote I/O Scanner and other
equipment that may be used with it. It discusses Genius bus operation as it relates to
the Remote I/O Scanner, and describes how the Remote I/O Scanner can be used in
redundancy systems. Chapter 1 also describes configurable features of a remote drop,
and explains configuration methods.
t
Chapter 2. Installation: Explains how to properly install the components of a remote
drop, including Series 90–70 racks, a Remote I/O Scanner, and other Series 90–70
modules. Chapter 2 also explains how to complete the Genius bus connections and how
to connect a programmer to the Remote I/O Scanner.
Chapter 3. Remote I/O Scanner Operation: Describes the memory and operating
modes of the Remote I/O Scanner, and explains its operation. This chapter also explains
how option modules such as the Programmable Coprocessor Module (PCM) could be
used in a remote drop.
t
Chapter 4. Configuration with Logicmaster 90–70: Explains configuration steps
using Release 4 of the Logicmaster 90–70 configuration software.
Chapter 5. Logicmaster 90 Operation with a Remote Drop: Explains how to set up a
Logicmaster 90 programmer to communicate with a remote drop. This chapter also
describes functional differences in LM90 when it communicates with a remote drop.
Chapter 6. Remote Drop Configuration with a Hand–held Monitor: Explains how to
configure a remote drop using a Genius Hand–held Monitor.
Chapter 7. Monitoring and Controlling Remote Drop Data: Explains how the I/O data
for a remote drop can be displayed on a Hand–held Monitor or programmer. Chapter 7
also describes how I/O circuits can be forced, toggled, or overwritten.
Chapter 8. Diagnostics and Fault Clearing: Explains how diagnostic information from a
remote drop can be displayed on a Hand–held Monitor or programmer, and how faults
can be cleared.
Chapter 9. Remote I/O Scanner Datagrams: Describes datagrams that can be sent to a
Remote I/O Scanner. Chapter 9 also shows the format of the Remote I/O Scanner’s
Report Fault datagrams.
Appendix A. Estimating the Maximum Number of Remote Drops for a Bus: Shows
how to roughly estimate how many remote drops can be on a bus with one Bus
Controller, one Hand–held Monitor, no Genius blocks, and no programmed
communications.
Appendix B. Finding the I/O Configuration Data Total of a Remote Drop: Gives
instructions for finding the amount of configuration data needed for the I/O modules in
a remote drop.
v
Preface
Appendix C. Logicmaster 90–70, Release 3, Series 90–70 PLC Configuration
Instructions: Explains how to complete the PLC portion of the configuration if you are
using Release 3 of the Logicmaster 90–70 software.
Appendix D. Logicmaster 90–70, Release 3, Remote Drop Configuration Instructions:
Explains how to configure a remote drop if you are using Release 3 of the Logicmaster
90–70 software.
Related Publications
For more information, refer to these publications:
Genius I/O System User’s Manual (GEK–90486–1). Reference manual for system
designers, programmers, and others involved in integrating Genius I/O products in a
PLC or host computer environment. This book provides a system overview, and
describes the types of systems that can be created using Genius products. Datagrams,
Global Data, and data formats are defined.
Series 90–70 PLC Installation and Operation Manual (GFK–0262). This book describes
the modules of a Series 90–70 PLC system, and explains system setup and operation.
Logicmaster 90–70 User’s Manual (GFK–0263). Reference manual for system operators
and others using the Logicmaster 90–70 software to program, configure, monitor, or
control a Series 90–70 PLC and/or a remote drop.
Logicmaster 90 Software Reference Manual (GFK–0265). Reference manual which
describes program structure and defines program instructions for the Series 90–70 PLC.
t
Series Six
Bus ControllerUser’s Manual (GFK–0171). Reference manual for the Bus
Controller, which interfaces a Genius bus to a Series Six PLC. This book describes the
installation and operation of the Bus Controller. It also contains the programming
information needed to interface Genius I/O devices to a Series Six PLC.
Series Five
Bus ControllerUser’s Manual (GFK–0248). Reference manual for the Bus
Controller, which interfaces a Genius bus to a Series Five PLC. This book describes the
installation and operation of the Bus Controller. It also contains the programming
information needed to interface Genius I/O devices to a Series Five PLC.
Genius I/O PCIM User’s Manual (GFK–0074). Reference manual for the PCIM, which
interfaces a Genius bus to a suitable host computer. This book describes the installation
and operation of the PCIM. It also contains the programming information needed to
interface Genius I/O devices to a host computer.
We Welcome Your Comments and Suggestions
At GE Intelligent Platforms , we strive to produce quality technical documentation. After
you have used this manual, please take a few moments to complete and return the
Reader ’s Comment Card located on the next page.
Jeanne Grimsby
Senior technical writer
vi
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – July 1992
Contents
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Required Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parts of a Remote Drop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Genius Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
2
4
5
11
12
14
18
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21
Hardware Packaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preinstallation Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Grounding Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rack Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Supply Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module Installation and Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Field Wiring to I/O Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Multiple Racks in a Remote Drop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Genius Bus Connections: Single Bus Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Genius Bus Connections: Dual Bus Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programmer Connection at the Remote I/O Scanner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Multidrop Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21
21
22
23
26
27
28
29
31
32
33
35
38
Remote I/O Scanner Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
43
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/OScan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O Scanner Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Transfer with the Host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Option Modules in a Remote Drop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
43
44
45
46
50
Configuration with Logicmaster 90–70 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
53
Configuration Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Filenames for Configuration Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Release 3 Configuration Files with Release 4 Software . . . . . . . . . . . .
“Attaching” Configuration Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring a Remote Drop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure the Modules in the Remote Drop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Completing the Remote Drop Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Displaying Configured References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Copying, Deleting, and Undeleting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting an Existing Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Storing the Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
53
53
54
54
55
65
68
71
73
74
75
GFK–0579B
Series 90–70 Remote I?O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
vii
Contents
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Logicmaster 90 Operation with a Remote Drop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
77
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
77
Setting Up Programmer Communications with a Remote Drop . . . . . . . . .
78
Status Display for a Remote Drop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
79
Logicmaster 90 Software,
Programmer Differences for a Remote Drop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
80
Remote Drop Configuration
with a Hand–held Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
83
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
84
Set Up the Hand–held Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
86
Display the Configuration Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
87
Select the Device Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
88
Select a Series Six or Series Five PLC Reference Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
89
Select the Baud Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
90
Select Series 90–70 Data Lengths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
91
Select the Remote Drop ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
93
Display I/O Modules in Remote Drop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
94
Select Genius Bus Redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
95
Select BSM Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
95
Select CPU Redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
96
Select Configuration Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
97
Monitoring and Controlling
Remote Drop Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
99
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
99
Monitoring/ControllingI/OData:
Genius Hand–held Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
102
Monitoring/ControllingI/OData:
Logicmaster 90–70 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
107
Monitoring/Controlling I/O Data:
Series Six PLC or Series Five PLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
109
Monitoring/ControllingI/OData:
Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
112
Diagnostics and Fault Clearing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
113
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
113
Display and Clear Faults from a Genius Hand–held Monitor . . . . . . . . . . .
114
Display and Clear Faults from Logicmaster 90–70 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
116
Display and Clear Faults from Logicmaster 5 or Logicmaster 6 . . . . . . . . . .
121
GFK–0579B
Series 90–70 Remote I?O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
viii
Contents
Chapter 9
Remote I/O Scanner Datagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
123
Datagram Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
124
Read Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
125
Read Map Reply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
125
Write Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
125
Report Fault Datagram Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
126
Appendix A
Estimating the Number of Remote Drops for a Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . .
129
Appendix B
Finding the I/O Configuration Data Total
for a Remote Drop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
131
Logicmaster 90–70, Release 3:
Series 90–70 PLC Configuration
for Remote Drops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
133
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
133
Step 1: Create or Select a PLC Program Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
134
Step 2: Add the Remote I/O Scanner to the Genius Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
134
Step 3: Configure the Remote I/O Scanner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
137
Step 4: Store the Configuration to the PLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
140
Logicmaster 90–70, Release 3:
Remote Drop Configuration Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
141
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
141
Remote Drop Configuration Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
142
Step 1: Create a Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
143
Step 2: Configure the Remote I/O Scanner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
144
Step 3: Configure the Modules in the Remote Drop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
148
Step 4: Store the Configuration to the Remote Drop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
150
Appendix C
Appendix D
GFK–0579B
Series 90–70 Remote I?O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
ix
restart lowapp ARestart oddapp: ARestarts for autonumbers that do not restart in
each chapter. figure bi level 1, reset table_big level 1, reset chap_big level 1, reset1
Lowapp Alwbox restart evenap:A1app_big level 1, resetA figure_ap level 1, reset
table_ap level 1, reset figure level 1, reset Figure 1. table level 1, reset Table 1.
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c:ebx, l 1 reset1 c:obx:l 1, reset1 c:bigbx level 1 reset1 c:ftr level 1 reset1
Reminders for autonumbers that need to be restarted manually (first instance will
always be 4) let_in level 1: A. B. C. letter level 1:A.B.C. num level 1: 1. 2. 3.
num_in level 1: 1. 2. 3. rom_in level 1: I. II. III. roman level 1: I. II. III. steps level 1:
1. 2. 3.
Chapter
1 Introduction
1
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter describes the Series 90t–70 Remote I/O Scanner (IC697BEM733) and
other equipment that may be used with it. It discusses Genius bus operation as it
relates to the Remote I/O Scanner, and describes how the Remote I/O Scanner can be
used in Genius redundancy systems.
Overview
The Remote I/O Scanner is an intelligent module which mounts in a remote Series
90–70 rack, and interfaces Series 90–70 modules to a Genius bus.
The Genius bus connects the Remote I/O Scanner to a Bus Controller in the host PLC
or computer. Additional remote drops, Genius blocks, Bus Controllers, and
Hand–held Monitors can be attached to the same bus.
a42453
CPU
BUS
CONTROLLER
HAND–HELD
MONITOR
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COMMUNICATIONS
BUS
REMOTE DROP
P
S
S
C
A
N
N
E
R
I/O BLOCKS
The Remote I/O Scanner can send up to 128 bytes of inputs from input boards in its
remote drop to the CPU, and can provide up to 128 bytes of outputs from the CPU to
output boards in the remote drop. The amount of data transferred is configurable.
Individual I/O circuits in the remote drop can be:
H
H
H
Forced and unforced from a Hand–held Monitor or the application program logic.
Overridden from a PLC application program.
Toggled from a Logicmaster 90–70 programmer.
The Remote I/O Scanner can be used in CPU redundancy (dual controller) and bus
redundancy (dual bus) systems.
The Host CPU
The Remote I/O Scanner is ideally suited for use in a Series 90–70 PLC system.
However, any type of PLC or computer capable of controlling a Genius bus can be
used as the host. Suitable hosts include Series Six PLCs, Series Five PLCs, and
computers equipped with a PCIM (Personal Computer Interface Module), QBIM
(Q–Bus Interface Module), or a third–party GENI–based interface.
1
1
Module Description
The Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner consists of a single circuit board, with a hinged
door which serves as a faceplate. It occupies one slot in a Series 90–70 I/O rack.
a44761
MODULE OK LED
I/O ENABLED LED
BUS B ACTIVE LED
GENIUS
HAND HELD
MONITOR
CONNECTOR
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MODEL 70
BEM 733
MODULE OK
I/O ENABLED
BUS B ACTIVE
ON = OK, ACTIVE
MODULEFUNCTION
SERIES 90–70
GENIUSBUS
REMOTEI/O
SCANNER
SERIAL
PORT
RS–422/485
COMPATIBLE
GENIUS
HAND HELD
MONITOR
SERIALPORT
RS–422/485
COMPATIBLE
SER1
GENIUS
BUS
TERMINALS
SHIELD
IN
SER2
SHIELD
OUT
SER1A
SHIELD
IN A
R
E
D
U SER2A
N
D
A SER1B
N
C
Y
SER2B
SHIELD
OUT A
SHIELD
IN B
SHIELD
OUT B
MODULE
IC697BEM733
LABEL
44A726758–110R02
BEM 733
The Remote I/O Scanner does not require batteries; the battery holder in the faceplate
is not used.
2
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
1
LEDs
The Remote I/O Scanner has three LEDs that show through the transparent portion at
the top of the door.
Module OK
lights to indicate that the module has passed its powerup diagnostic
tests. If this LED flashes, it indicates a problem, as shown in the table
below. If this LED is off, there is a fatal error, which causes the Remote
I/O Scanner to go to stop/faulted mode.
I/O Enabled
lights when the Remote I/O Scanner is receiving the expected output
data from the CPU. If this LED flashes, it indicates either I/O data is
forced, or a Device Number conflict.
Bus B Active
if the Remote I/O Scanner is installed on a dual (redundant) bus, this
LED lights if Bus B of the dual bus pair is the currently–active bus.
The following table summarizes the LED indications.
Module OK
I/O Enabled
Meaning
On
On
Normal operation
Blinking
On
Fault detected
On
Blinking
I/Odataforced
Alternate blinking
Alternate blinking
Synchronousblinking
Synchronousblinking
Fault detected, and I/O data forced
On
Off
Outputs not being updated from CPU
Off
Off
No power or fatal error
Device Number conflict
Connectors
The front of the module has three connectors:
H
9–pin male D Connector: the upper connector. Used for attaching a Genius
Hand–held Monitor.
H
15–pin female D Connector: the center connector. This connector is an RS–422
compatible RS–485 serial port. It can be used for communicating with a
programmer equipped with the serial version of Logicmaster 90–70, or for
connection to a multidrop communications network.
H
The connector at the bottom of the module attaches the Genius bus terminal strip.
Because the terminal strip is removable, it is possible to service or replace the
Remote I/O Scanner while the rest of the system is operating, without disrupting
bus communications.
Chapter 1 Introduction
3
1
Required Equipment
The following equipment is required to use a Remote I/O Scanner.
H
At least one Series 90–70 5–slot or 9–slot remote rack with Power Supply. A
remote drop may include multiple racks and power supplies.
H
If a Genius Hand–held Monitor will be used to configure or monitor a remote
drop, it must be version 4.0 (IC660HHM501G) or later.
H
If Logicmaster 90–70 configuration software will be used to configure the remote
drop, it must be release 3.0 or later:
A. IC641SWP701F (3.5”, 2DD, 5.25” 2S/HD)
B. IC641SWP704C (5.25” 2S/2D)
H
If the parallel version of Logicmaster 90–70 will be used with a remote drop, the
remote drop must include a Bus Transmitter Module (IC697BEM713) for
connection to the programmer.
H
If the remote drop will include more than one rack of modules, a Bus Transmitter
Module (IC697BEM713) one or more Bus Receiver Modules (IC697BEM711), and
appropriate cables are required.
H For a Series 90–70 PLC
h The Series 90–70 CPU firmware must be release 2.0 or later.
h The Logicmastert 90–70 programming and configuration software must be
release 3.0 or later. Catalog numbers are given above.
h
A Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller, release 3.0 or later. The Bus Controller
must be 4.0 or later for full diagnostics display from Logicmaster 90–70 (see
chapter 8), or for redundancy applications.
H For a Series Sixt PLC
h CPU: rev. 105 or later.
h Logicmaster 6 Programming Software: release 4.02 or later.
h Bus Controllers: IC660CBB902 or 903, version 1.7 or later.
H For a Series Fivet PLC
h CPU: rev. 3.2 (catalog number with E suffix) or later.
h Logicmaster 5 Programming Software: release 2.01 or later.
h Bus Controller: any version
H For a Host Computer
h PCIM: any version
h QBIM: any version
4
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
1
Parts of a Remote Drop
Together, a Remote I/O Scanner and the modules it serves make up a remote drop on
the Genius bus. The remote drop may consist of one to eight Series 90–70 racks.
REMOTE DROP
a44875
RACK 0
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P
S
RACK 1
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S B
C T
A M
N
N
E
R
P
S
B
R
M
RACK 6
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P
S
B
R
M
RACK 7
ÎÎ
P
S
B
R
M
Î
UP TO 50 FEET
GENIUS BUS
NOTE:
ALL RACKS MUST BE AT THE SAME GROUND POTENTIAL
Multiple Racks
When there are multiple racks, the Remote I/O Scanner must be located in the first
rack (rack 0). To link multiple racks in a remote drop, a Bus Transmitter (IC697BEM713)
Module in rack 0 is connected to a Bus Receiver Module (IC697BEM711) in the first
expansion rack. Additional racks are also linked via Bus Receiver Modules.
All racks in a remote drop must be at the same ground potential.
Distance Between Racks in a Remote Drop
The maximum total cable length from the first Bus Transmitter to the last Bus Receiver
in a remote drop is 50 feet (15 meters). Since none of the daisy–chained signals (all at
the same ground potential) are broken at a rack, any rack can be independently
powered–down without affecting the operation of the rest of the system.
Data Quantities
Regardless of the number of racks used for a remote drop, the maximum amount of
data for a remote drop is 128 bytes of inputs and 128 bytes of outputs (8 discrete points
represent one byte and 1 analog channel uses 2 bytes).
Chapter 1 Introduction
5
1
Series 90–70 Racks
Any of the following racks can be used in a remote drop:
H
H
H
5–slot, panel mount rack (IC697CHS750).
9–slot, panel mount rack (IC697CHS790).
9–slot, rack mount rack (IC697CHS791).
Each of these racks has an additional, wider slot for a Power Supply. Rack sizes may be
mixed in a system installation to suit the requirements of your application.
The rack–mount Series 90–70 rack has flanges on the front for mounting on 19–inch
standard instrument rack hardware. The panel–mount racks have rear flanges for
mounting on electrical panels.
WITH OPTIONAL VME J2
BACKPLANE KIT
1.00
(25.4)
a42984
19.00 12.60
(483) (320)
9.14
(232)
7.25
(184)
CONNECTOR
FOR
POWER
SUPPLY
SPACER
(QTY.4)
SIDE VIEW
I/O TERMINAL
RESTRAINING
STRAP
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18.11 11.71
(460) (297)
17.04 10.64
(433) (270)
REMOVABLE
I/O
TERMINAL
BLOCK
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ÑÑ
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ÑÑ
ÑÑ
ÎÎÎ
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ÑÑ
ÎÎ
ÑÑ
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ÑÑÎÎÎ
.75
(19)
6.75
(172)
11.50
(292)
CABLE
ENTRANCE
FROM
BOTTOM
HINGED
DOOR
GND
STUD
GND
STUD
3.00
(76)
1.50
(38)
2.24
(57)
.34
(8.64)
=
DIMENSIONS
FOR
5 SLOT RACK
FRONT VIEW
.25 DIA. (TYPICAL)
DIMENSIONS IN INCHES, MILLIMETERS ARE IN PARENTHESIS
Series 90–70 racks do not require a fan for cooling as long as sufficient space is left
around the rack when it is mounted.
6
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
1
Series 90–70 Power Supplies
These Series 90–70 Power Supplies can be used in a remote drop:
H
H
H
H
IC697PWR710, 120/240 VAC input, +5 VDC output, 55 Watts (shown below)
IC697PWR711, 120/240 VAC input, +5 VDC, +12 VDC, –12 VDC output, 100 Watts
IC697PWR721, 24VDC input, +5 VDC, +12 VDC, –12 VDC output, 90 Watts
IC697PWR731, 125VDC input, +5 VDC, +12 VDC, –12 VDC output, 60 Watts
a42818
LED
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MODEL 70
POWER SUPPLY MODULE
INPUT
120/240V AC
50/60HZ
1.5/0.8A
PWR 710
WARNING
EVEN IF THE POWER SUPPLY
IS SWITCHED OFF, HAZARDOUS
VOLTAGES FROM USER FIELD
OUTPUT
Î
5V
11A
WIRING MAY STILL BE PRESENT
ON THE I/O TERMINAL BOARDS
ON
AS WELL AS THE POWER
SUPPLY TERMINAL BOARD.
OFF
CARE SHOULD BE TAKEN WHEN
HANDLING THE POWER SUPPLY
AND I/O MODULES AS WELL AS
BRANCH CIRCUIT FUSING
MUST BE PROVIDED
EXTERNALLY
ANY WIRING CONNECTED TO
THEM IN ORDER TO PREVENT
PERSONAL INJURY.
INPUT
L1
L1
120
N
240
L2
WARNING
DO NOT REMOVE OR INSERT
SELECT
SHORT FOR 120
OPEN FOR 240
MODULES WITH POWER APPLIED.
PERSONAL INJURY, SYSTEM
MALFUNCTION AND/OR DAMAGE
RECOMMENDED TIGHTENING
TORQUE 1,5Nm (15kg cm)
TO THE EQUIPMENT MAY OCCUR.
MODULE IC697PWR710
LABEL 44A726758–501
Power supply selection will depend on the input power and load requirements of the
application. Load specifications for Series 90–70 modules are listed on page 9.
AC power supplies mount in the leftmost slot of a Series 90–70 rack. DC power
supplies can be mounted on the side of the rack or used as freestanding modules. The
DC power supplies require a power supply adapter, which installs in the power supply
slot and is connected to the power supply by a short cable.
Chapter 1 Introduction
7
1
Powering Two Racks from a Single Power Source
Except for the 125VDC supply, each of these power supplies can be used to power two
racks if the total current requirement for both racks does not exceed the power
supply’s load capacity. The rack that does not contain the Power Supply must not have
a load greater than 5.2 amps.
Connection from the rack with the power supply to the second rack is made through a
cable (catalog number IC697CBL700) three feet (one meter) in length, which is
terminated at both ends with 9–pin D–connectors. This cable carries both +5 volt
power and control signals (power sequencing signals only) to the second rack.
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1
INSTALL CABLE
SO THAT THE
INDICATED END
IS SUPPLYING
POWER
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
a42134
POWER
SUPPLY
FIRST
RACK
TWO
RACK
POWER
CABLE
FACE
PLATE
SECOND
RACK
8
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
1
Series 90–70 Modules for a Remote Drop
The table below lists modules that can be placed in a remote drop, and gives their
catalog numbers, I/O capacities, and loads.
Module
Catalog
Number
I/O Points
or
Channels
IC697BEM733
IC697BEM713
IC697BEM711
Module Description
Load in
Amps at
+5 VDC
RemoteI/O Scanner
Bus TransmitterModule
Bus Receiver Module
0.80
1.40
0.80
IC697MDL240
IC697MDL241
IC697MDL250
IC697MDL650
IC697MDL651
IC697MDL652
IC697MDL653
IC697MDL654
IC697MDL340
IC697MDL341
IC697MDL350
IC697MDL740
IC697MDL750
IC697MDL752
IC697MDL753
IC697MDL940
16
16
32
32
32
32
32
32
16
16
32
16
32
32
32
16
DiscreteModules
120 VAC Isolated, Input, 16 points
240 VAC Isolated, Input, 16 points
120 VAC Input, 32 point
24 VDC Input, 32 point
Input module, negative logic, TTL
12 VDC Pos/Neg Logic Input, 32 points
24 VDC Pos/Neg Logic Input, 32 points
48 VDC Pos/Neg Logic Input, 32 points
120 VAC Output, 16 point
120/240VAC Isolated 2A Output, 16 points
120 VAC Output, 32 point
24/48 VDC Output, 16 point
24/48 VDC Output, 32 point
12 VDC 0.5A Output, 32 points
5/48 VDC 0.5A Neg Logic Output, 32 points
Relay Output 16 points
0.25
0.25
0.35
0.30
0.525
0.30
0.30
0.30
0.25
0.25
0.50
0.25
0.15
0.50
0.50
0.75
IC697ALG230
IC697ALG440
IC697ALG441
IC697ALG320
8
16
16
4
AnalogModules
Analog Input Base Converter
Analog Input Current Expander
Analog Input VoltageExpander
High Level Analog Output, Voltage/Current
0.80
0.40
0.40
1.66
OptionModules
ProgrammableCoprocessorModule
Graphics Display Coprocessor Module
AlphanumericDisplayCoprocessorModule
1.00
1.20
1.00
IC697PCM711
IC697GDC701
IC697ADC701
Remote Drop Capacity
The maximum number of I/O and option modules that can be installed in a remote
drop is 63, which requires eight 9–slot racks. There are two limits that cannot be
exceeded when locating modules in a remote drop:
H
There must not be too many option modules in a remote drop. See “Option
Modules”, below.
H
The configuration data for all the I/O modules in a remote drop must not add up to
more than 4500 bytes. This amount of configuration data will not be reached in
any remote drop where all I/O modules are included in the Remote I/O Scanner’s
configured I/O map. However, it is possible to have I/O modules in a remote drop
configured to use references outside the I/O map, as explained in chapter 3. If the
drop will have some modules configured outside the Remote I/O Scanner’sI/O
map, refer to appendix B.
Chapter 1 Introduction
9
1
Analog Modules: The maximum number of analog input modules that can provide
input data to the host is 8; however, there may be additional modules in the remote
drop configured outside the Remote I/O Scanner’s I/O map. The maximum number of
analog input modules that can be configured for a remote drop is 29. Similarly, while
the maximum number of analog output modules that can receive output data from the
host is 16, as many as 54 can be configured for a remote drop.
Option Modules: A remote drop with seven or fewer racks can contain up to 18 GDS
(Graphics Display Coprocessor), or ADS (Alphanumeric Display Coprocessor) modules,
or up to 9 PCM (Programmable Coprocessor) modules with daughterboards. Each
PCM/daughterboard combination counts as two option modules against the total of 18.
The following table shows how many GDS and/or ADS modules can be used with 0 to
9 PCMs.
Total Option Modules in a Remote Drop
Number of PCMs and
Daughterboards
Number of GDS and/
or ADS Modules
0
18
1
16
2
14
3
12
4
10
5
8
6
6
7
4
8
2
9
0
If there are 8 racks in the remote drop, one less PCM with daughterboard, or two less GDS or
ADS modules are permitted.
Analog Expanders: A remote drop can accommodate up to one analog input module
with eight expander modules. However, the maximum number of expanders that can
pass inputs to the CPU is three, due to the Remote I/O Scanner’s 128–byte input data
limit. If an analog module and three expanders were used, no additional input
modules (either analog or discrete) could communicate with the host from the remote
drop.
Modules Not Supported: A remote drop cannot have any I/O module interrupts, or
bus controllers or other modules that depend on COMREQ instructions for their
operations.
Third–party VME modules cannot be used in a remote drop.
10
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
1
Genius Bus
The Genius bus is an industrially–hardened Local–Area–Network (LAN). It passes
I/O (control) data and background information (datagrams) between the Remote I/O
Scanner and a Genius bus controller. The communicated data is protected from
environmental interference and corruption in several ways. Each byte is
triply–encoded during transmission, and each message is checksummed with a cyclic
redundancy check (CRC). Embedded intelligence at either end also checks for correct
message length and type.
A Genius bus can support up to 32 devices. Each remote drop counts as one device on
the bus, regardless of the number or type of modules it includes. A bus can serve any
mix of remote drops, I/O blocks, Bus Controllers and Hand–held Monitors, provided
the bus scan time does not exceed 400mS. Typical busses reserve one location for a Bus
Controller and one for a Hand–held Monitor, leaving 30 for additional devices. The
illustration below shows a Bus Controller in a Series 90–70 PLC connected to a Genius
bus with I/O blocks and two single–rack remote drops.
Î
P
S
C
P
U
B
C
ÎÎ
MAXIMUM BUS LENGTH
7500 FEET WITH 16 DEVICES, AT 38.6K BAUD
3500 FEET WITH 32 DEVICES, AT 153.6K BAUD EXT.
90–70 REMOTE RACK
Î
a44669
Î
S I I I I I I I
C / / / / / / /
A O O O O O O O
N
N
E
R
90–70 REMOTE RACK
Î
Î
S I I I I I I I
C / / / / / / /
A O O O O O O O
N
N
E
R
Bus Type
Daisy–chained bus cable; single twisted pair plus shield or Twinax.
Fiber optics cable and modems can also be used.
Bus Termination
75, 100, 120, or 150 ohm resistor at both ends of electrical bus cable.
Baud Rate
Configurable. 153.6 Kbaud standard, 153.6 Kbaud extended,
76.8Kbaud, or 38.4 Kbaud.
Maximum Bus
Length
7500 feet at 38.4 Kbaud, 4500 feet at 76.8 Kbaud, 3500feet at 153.6
Kbaud extended, 2000 feet at 153.6 Kbaud, standard. Maximum
length at each baud rate also depends on cable type. The Genius I/O
System User’s Manual pro vides a complete list of cable types, showing corresponding bus lengths and baud rates. Greater bus lengths
are possible using sections of fiber optics cable with modems.
Maximum Number of 32 devices at 153.6 Kbaud standard, 153.6 Kbaud extended, or 76.8
Kbaud. 16 devices at 38.4 Kbaud. Includes Bus Controller and
Devices
Hand– held Monitor.
Chapter 1 Introduction
11
1
Timing
A fully–loaded (128 input bytes and 128 output bytes) remote drop adds at least 20mS
to the bus scan. The table below shows the bus scan time contribution, at each baud
rate, for remote drops with a total of 16, 32, 64, 128, and 256 bytes (fully–loaded),
when the Remote I/O Scanner receives outputs from only one bus controller at a time.
Total Amount of Input and
Output Data for
Remote Drop
Contribution time in mS at each baud rate *
153.6 Kb
std
153.6 Kb
ext
76.8 Kb
38.4 Kb
16 bytes
2.09
2.16
3.83
7.16
32 bytes
3.24
3.31
6.12
11.74
64 bytes
5.52
5.60
10.69
20.89
128 bytes
10.10
10.17
19.85
39.20
256 bytes (fully–loaded)
19.25
19.32
38.15
75.80
* See below to calculate the exact scan time contribution for the application.
Estimating Bus Scan Time for Remote I/O Drops
The scan time contribution for a remote drop depends on its I/O data usage. Follow
the procedure below to estimate the the scan time contribution of a remote drop.
(Each analog channels is 2 bytes. Eight discrete points are one byte).
1.
Find the total number of input bytes and output bytes.
number of input bytes
number of output bytes
total bytes
2.
= ________
= ________
= ________
With this total, calculate a scan time contribution using the formula below that
corresponds to the Genius bus baud rate.
Formula for 153.6 Kbaud Standard:
0.943mS + (0.0715 x total bytes) = ________ mS
Formula for 153.6 Kbaud Extended:
1.015mS + (0.0715 x total bytes) = ________ mS
Formula for 76.8 Kbaud:
1.538mS + (0.143 x total bytes) = ________ mS
Formula for 38.4 Kbaud:
2.583mS + (0.286 x total bytes) = ________ mS
Other devices on the bus, including the Bus Controller, Hand–held Monitor, and I/O
blocks also add to the bus scan time. The Genius I/O System Manual (Volume 1) shows
how to calculate bus scan time based on the devices actually present.
12
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
1
Number of Remote Drops on a Bus
The number of remote drops on a bus depends on the baud rate and the total number
of I/O points in the remote drops.
Since the maximum Genius bus scan time is 400mS, and the bus scan time contribution
of one fully–loaded remote drop is 20mS, only twenty fully–loaded remote drops are
supported on a single bus that operates at 153.6 Kbaud. If remote drops are not
fully–loaded, more may be used on a bus operating at these baud rates.
If some remote drops are not fully–loaded, more than the maximum number given
below can be used. The table in appendix A will help you estimate the total number of
remote drops and data bytes that can be accommodated on a bus that has one Bus
Controller, one Genius Hand–held Monitor, no datagrams or Global Data
communications, and no Genius I/O blocks. The Genius I/O System User’s Manual
explains how to calculate the bus scan time for a specific bus.
Maximum Number of Drops per Baud Rate
153.6K baud extended: Up to 20 fully–loaded drops, or up to 30 drops with the total
number of I/O bytes less than the limits listed in the table.
153.6K baud standard: Up to 20 fully–loaded drops, or up to 30 drops with the total
number of I/O bytes less than the limits listed in the table.
76.8K baud: Up to 10 fully–loaded drops, or up to 30 drops with the total number of
I/O bytes less than the limits listed in the table.
38.4K baud: Up to 5 fully–loaded drops, or up to 14 drops with the total number of
I/O bytes less than the limits listed in the table.
Chapter 1 Introduction
13
1
Redundancy
The Remote I/O Scanner can be used with CPU redundancy, bus redundancy, or both.
The suitability of redundancy features for any system depends on the requirements of
the application. For Series 90–70 PLC CPUs that are release 3 and earlier, some types
of redundancy are not supported.
CPU Redundancy
Genius devices are considered to be controlled by the Bus Controller that sends them
outputs. In CPU redundancy, two Bus Controllers on the same bus can send control
outputs at the same time. The Bus Controllers must use Device Numbers 30 and 31.
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
(DEVICE 30)
(DEVICE 31)
a44876
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Î
Î
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Î
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ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
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ÎÎÎ
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REMOTE DROP
P
S
S
C
A
N
N
E
R
Both Bus Controllers automatically receive inputs and fault reports from all devices on
the bus that have been configured as being in “CPU Redundancy“ mode.
How the two sets of outputs are handled by devices that receive them depends on
whether the devices are set up for Hot Standby or Duplex redundancy. Both are
explained below. If the remote drop contains any analog modules, the only form of CPU
redundancy permitted is Hot Standby.
Hot Standby CPU Redundancy
A device configured to be in Hot Standby redundancy mode is normally controlled by
the Bus Controller assigned to Device Number 31. If no outputs are available from that
Bus Controller for a period of three bus scans, the device accepts outputs from the Bus
Controller assigned to Device Number 30. If outputs are not available from either Bus
Controller, outputs go to their configured defaults or hold their last state. In Hot
Standby redundancy, Device Number 31 always has priority, so that when that Bus
Controller is on–line, it has control of the outputs.
Duplex CPU Redundancy
A device configured to be in Duplex redundancy mode compares the outputs it
receives from the two bus controllers, to determine whether they match. If
corresponding outputs are the same, the device sets the output to that state. If
corresponding outputs are not the same, the device sets the output to its configured
ON or OFF Duplex Default State. If either Bus Controller stops sending outputs to a
device, its outputs are directly controlled by the remaining device. Only discrete devices
can operate in Duplex redundancy mode; do not use Duplex mode if the analog drop contains
any analog modules.
14
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
1
Genius Bus Redundancy
In Genius bus redundancy, there are two bus cables each connected to a Bus Controller.
The device communicates on only one bus at a time. Before the alternate bus can be
use for communications, a bus switchover must occur and the device must “log in“
with the Bus Controller(s) on the alternate bus. Bus switching can be handled by a Bus
Switching Module attached to a Genius block, or by a Remote I/O Scanner
(IC697BEM733 rev. B or later) which contains a built–in bus switching relay. Bus
Switching Modules and Remote I/O Scanners are the only devices that can be directly
connected to redundant bus cables.
Bus Stubs Connect Other Devices to a Dual Bus
Other Genius devices, such as I/O blocks and additional Remote I/O Scanners, can be
interfaced to a dual bus by short lengths of unterminated cable called a bus stubs.
Typical arrangements are shown on the following pages. Up to seven devices can be
installed on a bus stub (plus the device that is connected to the dual bus). Each device
on a bus stub counts toward the total of 32 devices on the Genius bus.
The total length of all bus stubs on a bus should be 100 feet or less. Within each 20%
section of the actual bus length, the total maximum stub length is 20 feet. This can be
divided into shorter stubs, provided that the total length in each 20% of the bus is 20 ft.
or less.
a44976
20%
20%
10’
20’
20%
20%
20%
10’
20’
20’
COMBINED = 100 FEET MAXIMUM
= REMOTE I/O SCANNER OR
BUS SWITCHING MODULE
For example, for a trunk cable 3000 ft. long, 20% of the trunk cable length is 600 ft.
Therefore, 20 ft. of bus stub cable can be located within any 600 ft. section of the bus.
There might be two 10 ft. stubs with up to 8 devices each, or four 5 ft. stubs, with fewer
devices on each.
Chapter 1 Introduction
15
1
Redundant Bus Configuations
Many different redundant bus configurations are possible. Three basic ways of using a
Remote I/O Scanner with a redundant bus are described below.
H
A Remote I/O Scanner can be installed directly on both cables of the dual bus
pair. The Remote I/O Scanner is configured to operate as a bus switching device in
addition to performing its normal remote drop functions.
Here, two single–rack remote drops are installed on a dual bus. The Remote I/O
Scanner in each remote drop would be set up as a bus switching device.
RACK 0
P
S
S
C
A
N
N
E
R
RACK 0
P
S
a44974
S
C
A
N
N
E
R
BUS A
BUS B
A bus stub may be connected to a Remote I/O Scanner that is configured as a bus
switching device, allowing up to seven additional devices to utilize its bus
switching action. Devices on a bus stub are independent Genius devices. When
bus switching is controlled by a Remote I/O Scanner, as shown below, the devices
on the bus stub are not part of the remote drop. Their data does not count toward
the remote drop’s data total.
RACK 0
P
S
BUS A
BUS B
BUS
STUB
S
C
A
N
N
E
R
RACK 0
P
S
S
C
A
N
N
E
R
ÏÏ
ÏÏ
ÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
ÎÎÎ
ÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÏÏ ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
UP TO 7 ADDITIONAL DEVICES
16
a44878
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
1
H
A Remote I/O Scanner can be located on a bus stub. The bus switching device to
which the bus stub is connected can be another Remote I/O Scanner, as shown
below, or a Genius block with a Bus Switching Module attached.
In this example, there are two remote drops installed directly on a dual bus. A
third remote drop and some Genius blocks are installed on a bus stub connected to
one of the Remote I/O Scanners. That Remote I/O Scanner acts as the bus
switching device. A remote drop on a bus stub can accommodate up to 128 bytes
of inputs and 128 bytes of outputs, and may include expansion racks.
RACK 0
P
S
RACK 0
S
C
A
N
N
E
R
P
S
S
C
A
N
N
E
R
ÏÏÏÏÏÏ
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ÏÏÏÏÏÏ
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BUS A
BUS B
RACK 0
P
S
BUS
STUB
H
a44880
S
C
A
N
N
E
R
Finally, a remote drop can be located on just one bus of a redundant bus pair, if
bus redundancy is not needed for the modules in that remote drop.
In this example, the remote drop on the right is connected to both Bus A and Bus
B; the remote drop on the left, which contains non–critical I/O modules, is
connected to Bus A only.
RACK 0
P
S
S
C
A
N
N
E
R
RACK 0
P
S
a44877
S
C
A
N
N
E
R
BUS A
BUS B
Chapter 1 Introduction
17
1
Configuration
A remote drop can be fully configured using Logicmaster 90–70, or automatically
configured using a Genius Hand–held Monitor. Differences between the two
methods are explained below. Optionally, a previously–configured remote drop can
be reconfigured using datagrams.
Remote Drop Configuration with Logicmaster 90–70
Logicmaster 90–70, release 3.0 or later can be used to configure a remote drop for any
type of host. Either serial or parallel Logicmaster can be used. For serial Logicmaster,
the connection to the remote drop can be direct, or via a multidrop network. Direct
connection or a Hand–held Monitor is needed to configure the SNP ID of the remote drop, before
multidrop communications with it are possible.
Logicmaster 90–70 release 4.01 or later, which provides reference checking through
the use of a common folder, is preferred for configuring a Series 90–70 PLC with
remote drops. Chapter 4 explains how to configure a remote drop using Logicmaster
90–70 software which is Release 4 or later.
Appendixes C and D give instructions for configuration using Release 3 Logicmaster
90–70 software.
Remote Drop Configuration with a Genius Hand–held Monitor
A Genius Hand–held Monitor, version 4.0 (IC660HHM501G) or later, can be used to
configure a remote drop that does not include Analog Expander modules. If Analog
Expanders are present, Logicmaster 90 must be used for configuration.
The I/O modules in the remote drop cannot be individually configured with a
Hand–held Monitor; they will operate in default mode. HHM configuration
instructions are given in chapter 6.
Configuring a Remote Drop using Datagrams
The configuration of a remote drop can be completed or changed by sending it
datagrams, as shown in the table on the following page. The Write Map datagram will
supply Series 90–70 data types and lengths, and a Series 90–70 SNP ID for the remote
drop.
18
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
1
Configurable Features
The following table summarizes configuration options for a remote drop, and
compares them to the PLC configuration required with a remote drop. The remote
drop can be configured, or reconfigured, using Logicmaster 90–70 or a Genius
Hand–held Monitor, or datagrams. If the configuration is not protected, as explained
on the next page, a reconfiguration will replace part or all of an existing configuration,
regardless of the configuration method originally used.
Remote DropConfiguration
ConfigurationItem
Device Number (SBA)
Series 90–70 References
Data Lengths
SeriesSix/SeriesFive References
Baud Rate
Logicmaster
90–70
Hand–held
Monitor
n[
n[
n[
n
n
n
n
n
•
n[
Bus Controller Options:
Input Default
Outputs Enabled
n
n
I/OModuleOptions:
Input Filter Time
Outputs Default
Voltage/Current Range
Analog Expander Modules
PCM*, GDS*, ADS*
n
n
n
n
n
Genius Options:
BSM Controller *
BSM Present *
Timeout Select *
CPU Redundancy *
Duplex Default *
Configuration Protection
n
n
n
n
n
]
SNP Port Options:
SNP ID Write Map
Baud Rate
Stop Bits
Modem TT
Idle Time
n
n
n
n
n
Remote I/O Scanner Sweep Control:
Programmer Window
CommunicationsWindow
Datagrams
Write Map
Write Map
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
n
[ with release 3 software, PLC configuration must match the remote drop configuration.
• Only for a new Remote I/O Scanner, for which no Series Six/Series Five reference has been entered.
* Not approved for use with Remote I/O Scanner version IC697BEM733A;
upgrade to IC697BEM733B or later.
] Automaticallysupplied.
Chapter 1 Introduction
19
1
Configuration Protection
After configuring a Remote Drop, it is important to prevent inadvertent change while
the system is in operation. For this reason, Logicmaster 90–70 automatically protects
any configuration you download to a Remote I/O Scanner.
A configuration done with a Hand–held Monitor should be protected as described in
chapter 6.
Any Hand–held Monitor used with the system while it is operating should be set up
to prevent undesirable configuration changes:
Protect These Remote Drop Features
Device Number (SBA)
By Setting this HHM Option
Change Block ID Disabled
Reference Address
Data Lengths (%I, %Q, %AI, %AQ)
Remote Drop ID
Module Options: Output Defaults
Input Filter Time Voltage Range
Baud Rate
Change Block Baud Disabled
Configuration Protection
Change Block Config Disabled
Redundancy Options *
*
Not available with Remote I/O Scanner version IC697BEM733A.
To prevent access to restricted HHM configuration options, remove the HHM key.
Caution
If configuration protection is removed from the Remote I/O Scanner
and the Hand–held Monitor’s Change Block ID option is
ENABLED, the HHM’s automatic configuration capability can
overwrite any existing I/O configuration, including one created using
Logicmaster 90–70, or downloaded using a Write Map datagram.
This automatic reconfiguration will also set any module options (see
the table above) back to their defaults.
20
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
Chapter
2
2 Installation
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter describes procedures for installing the racks and modules in a remote
drop, grounding equipment, connecting the Genius bus, completing SNP connections,
and attaching a programmer.
Hardware Packaging
Each Series 90–70 rack is shipped in its own carton, without a power supply. The
power supply and all of the Series 90–70 modules are shipped in individual boxes.
When multiple modules are included in one shipment, individual module boxes are
packaged either two, five or ten boxes to a carton.
Verify that all components of the system have been received and that they agree with
your order. If the items received do not agree with your order, call Programmable
Control Customer Service, toll free, in Charlottesville, VA at 1–800–432–7521. A
Customer Service representative will assist you.
Preinstallation Check
Carefully inspect all shipping containers for damage during shipping. If any part of
the system is damaged, notify the carrier immediately. The damaged shipping
container should be saved as evidence for inspection by the carrier.
As the consignee, it is your responsibility to register a claim with the carrier for damage
incurred during shipment. However, GE Intelligent Platforms will fully cooperate with
you, should such action be necessary.
After unpacking the Series 90–70 PLC racks, modules, and other equipment, record all
serial numbers. Serial numbers are required if you should need to contact Product
Service during the warranty period of the equipment. Complete all software product
registration cards, and return them to to GE Intelligent Platforms.
All shipping containers and all packing material be saved should it be necessary to
transport or ship any part of the system.
21
2
System Grounding Procedures
All components of a control system and the devices it is controlling must be properly
grounded.
H
Ground conductors should be connected in a tree fashion with branches routed to
a central earth ground point. This ensures that no ground conductor carries
current from any other branch. This method is shown in the figure shown below.
H
Ground conductors should be as short and as large in size as possible. Braided
straps or ground cables (typically green insulation with a yellow tracer – AWG
#12 or larger) can be used to minimize resistance. Conductors must always be
large enough to carry the maximum short circuit current of the path being
considered.
a42942
SERIES 90–70
PLC CABINET
RACK
PROGRAMMING
DEVICE
RACK
EARTH
GROUND
22
MOTOR DRIVES
AND
OTHER
ELECTRICAL
CONTROL
EQUIPMENT
CENTRAL
GROUND POINT
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
MACHINERY
NOTE
SIGNAL AND POWER
CONNECTIONS
NOT SHOWN
2
Rack Installation
Install the rack(s) in the orientation shown below. The illustration shows a 9–slot rack,
but a 5–slot rack could be used.
Series 90–70 PLC racks may be rack or panel mounted, depending on version
ordered. Rack dimensions for installation purposes are shown below.
The Series 90–70 rack does not require a fan as long as sufficient space is left around
the rack for cooling airflow.
a42139
WITH OPTIONAL VME J2
BACKPLANE KIT
1.00
(25.4)
7.25
(184)
DIMENSIONS IN INCHES, MILLIMETERS ARE IN PARENTHESIS
(152.4) .45
(11)
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ÎÎ
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SIDE VIEW
I/O TERMINAL
RESTRAINING
STRAP
*
REMOVABLE
I/O
TERMINAL
BLOCK
CONNECTOR
FOR
POWER
SUPPLY
SPACER
(QTY.4)
19.00 12.60
(483) (320)
* * 6.00
9.14
(232)
.75
(19)
6.75
(172)
= DIMENSIONS FOR 5 SLOT RACK
Chapter 2 Installation
(152.4)
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GROUND
STUD
POWER
SUPPLY
1
2
3
4
5
17.04 10.64
(433) (264)
6
7
8
*
9
GROUND
STUD
11.50
(292)
10.47
(266)
.25 DIA.
(TYPICAL)
2.24
(57)
HINGED
DOOR
CABLE
ENTRANCE
FROM
BOTTOM
* * * 6.00
18.11 11.71
(460) (297)
FRONT VIEW
*
**
***
ALLOW SUFFICIENT HORIZONTAL CLEARANCE FOR ACCESS TO GROUND STUDS
AT EACH END OF THE RACK.
IF THE EXTENSION CABLE IS USED, ALLOW APPROXIMATELY 6 INCH HORIZONTAL
CLEARANCE ON THE LEFT SIDE OF THE RACK FOR ACCESS TO THE CONNECTOR.
* * * 6.00
(152.4)
ALLOWANCE FOR COOLING ( If REQUIRED FOR ADDITIONAL COOLING, RACK FAN
ASSEMBL Y (IC697ACC721 IS AVAILABLE. )
23
2
Rack Grounding
H
Complete safety and reference ground connections from the GND terminal on the
rack to earth ground using minimum AWG #12 wire and a ring terminal. Use of a
nut and star washer for each wire on the GND lug is recommended to ensure
adequate grounding.
Warning
If the ground lug on the rack is not connected, the rack is not
grounded. The rack must be grounded to minimize electrical shock
hazard which may result in severe personal injury or may be fatal.
H
All racks that are grouped together MUST have a common ground connection.
This is especially important for racks which are not mounted in the same cabinet.
H
Connect the rack frame directly to the control panel or rack on which it is
mounted. Attach a ground strap from one of the ground lugs on either side of the
rack to the control panel or cabinet following applicable electrical safety codes.
H
Use the bottom rail of the rack for module shield grounding. Some modules have
a ground clip that contacts the conductive bottom rail when the module is fully
inserted. Shield connections in the user connector are routed to this ground clip
through conductors on the module.
Rack Number Selection
Before installing the power supply or power supply adapter in the rack, set the
rack–number jumpers. Each rack in a remote drop must have a rack number
between 0 and 7. Rack number 0 must always be present; in the remote drop, it is the
rack that contains the Remote I/O Scanner.
To select a rack number, move jumpers X1, X2, and X4 so that the sum of the numbers
in the 1 (right) position equals the desired rack number. Jumper X8 must always be in the
0 (left) position. The jumper plug connects the middle post under the 1 or 0 column as
shown in the following example, which shows jumper positions for rack 2.
a42823
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
01
8
4
RACK NUMBER =2
2
1
24
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
2
Do not confuse this rack number with the Device Number used by a Remote I/O
Scanner. Rack number refers to a rack’s position within a remote drop. A Device
Number is a Remote I/O Scanner’s assigned ID on the Genius bus. These two
numbers are not related. The following example shows rack numbering for three
remote drops. The Remote I/O Scanners for those remote drops are configured to use
Device Numbers 7, 8, and 9.
Do not select duplicate rack numbers in the same remote drop. After selecting the rack
number, record it on the inside of the Power Supply hinged door.
RACK 0
Î
DEVICE
#7
P
S
RACK 1
Î
S B
C T
A M
N
N
E
R
P
S
RACK 2
ÎÎÎ
B
R
M
P
S
RACK 3
ÎÎ
B
R
M
P
S
B
R
M
a44879
Î
GENIUS
BUS
RACK CONNECTION CABLE
RACK 0
DEVICE
#8
Î
P
S
S
C
A
N
N
E
R
GENIUS
BUS
RACK 0
DEVICE
#9
GENIUS
BUS
Î
P
S
S B
C T
A M
N
N
E
R
RACK 1
Î
P
S
B
R
M
RACK 2
ÎÎÎ
P
S
B
R
M
Î
RACK CONNECTION CABLE
Chapter 2 Installation
25
2
Power Supply Installation
After setting the rack number selection jumpers, install the power supply as instructed
in its datasheet. An AC power supply installs directly in the leftmost slot of the rack.
For DC power supplies, a Power Supply Adapter installs in the leftmost slot. The DC
power supply itself can either be installed on the side of the rack or used as a
freestanding module up to 20 inches from the adapter module.
Power Supply Switch
On an AC power supply, the switch on the front of the power supply controls power to
the rack. With the switch in the up (ON) position, the power supply is on and power
flows to the rack. With the switch down (OFF), power is disconnected from the rack.
With a DC power supply, an external switch must be installed to control input power.
Caution
Power must be off when installing or removing modules.
Power Supplied to Two Racks
The120/240VAC 55–Watt, 24VDC 90–Watt, and 120/240VAC 100–Watt power
supplies can be used to supply power to two racks. The 125VDC, 60–Watt supply
cannot provide power for two racks.
Connect the rack with the power supply to the second rack using the two–rack power
extension cable (catalog number IC697CBL700). Plug the cable into the connectors on
the left side of each rack. When using a DC power supply mounted on the side of the
rack, the power extension cable must be installed first; the DC power supply will block
access to the connector on the side of the rack.
Maximum cable length between two racks that share a power supply is 3 feet (1 meter).
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1
INSTALL CABLE
SO THAT THE
INDICATED END
IS SUPPLYING
POWER
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
a42134
POWER
SUPPLY
FIRST
RACK
TWO
RACK
POWER
CABLE
FACE
PLATE
SECOND
RACK
26
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
2
Module Locations
Follow the guidelines below when planning module locations in a remote drop.
Remote I/O Scanner
Locate the Remote I/O Scanner in rack 0, slot 1, next to the power supply.
Bus Transmitter Module
A Bus Transmitter Module (BTM) can be located in any slot of rack 0; however, there
must be no empty slots between the Bus Transmitter and the Remote I/O Scanner. It is
recommended that the Bus Transmitter be located in slot 2, next to the Remote I/O
Scanner.
Bus Receiver Module
In a multiple–rack remote drop, locate a Bus Receiver Module (BRM) in slot 1 of each
expansion rack, next to the power supply slot.
I/O and Option Modules
Generally, I/O and option modules can be installed in any slot. Some exceptions are
noted below.
Analog Expanders
A high–level analog input module and its associated expander modules must be
installed in the same rack of a remote drop. Locate the high–level analog input
module in the lowest slot position of the group. Locate the expander modules to its
right. A second high–level analog input module cannot be located between a
high–level analog module and its expander modules. It must either be placed to the
left of the first analog module, or to the right of the last expander module.
Analog output modules, discrete I/O modules, and/or special–function modules may
be located between the analog input module and any of its expander modules.
Empty Slots in the Rack
Empty slots are permitted between modules, with two exceptions:
A. There can be no empty slots to the left of a Bus Transmitter, analog, PCM, GDS, or
ADS module.
B. If, in the future, modules will be placed in the empty slots and a Hand–held
Monitor will be used to automatically reconfigure the remote drop, locate empty
slots to the right in the rack. Otherwise, automatic reconfiguration will change the
I/O references assigned to the boards already there.
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ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
ÌÌ
Ì
ÌÌ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÌÌ
ÎÎ
Ì
ÌÌ
REMOTE DROP
P
S
S
C
A
N
N
E
R
I I
I
/ / /
O O O
I
/
O
a44753
I
/
O
EMPTY
Chapter 2 Installation
27
2
Module Installation and Removal
Warning
Always be careful working near the power supply and the wiring to
I/O boards in the rack. Be sure a protective faceplate cover is
installed on each board. Voltages present on I/O wiring and power
supply could cause severe or fatal injury to personnel.
Caution
Do not insert or remove a module when power is applied to the rack.
This could cause the system to stop. Use care when inserting or
removing a module so that the printed circuit board or its
components are not damaged.
Installing a Module
Install each module with its component side to the right. The LEDs will be at the top
front.
1.
Be sure the rack in which the module is to be inserted is powered–down.
2.
Grasp the module firmly with your hand and insert it into the card guide.
3.
Align the module’s printed circuit board with the connector on the rack backplane
and slide it towards the connector until it has started to seat.
4.
Place one thumb on the left side of the top plastic flange and the other thumb on
the left side of the bottom plastic flange. Push the board into the connector until
the top and bottom latches click onto the rack rails.
5.
Visually inspect the board to be sure it has seated properly.
6.
If the rack is in a high–vibration area, use screws to secure the module in the rack.
Removing a Module
28
1.
Be sure the rack is powered–down.
2.
Grasp the module firmly at the top and bottom of the board cover with your
thumbs on the front of the cover and your fingers on the plastic clips on the back
of the cover.
3.
Squeeze the rack clips on the back of the cover with your fingers to disengage the
clip from the rack rail and pull the board firmly to remove it from the backplane
connector.
4.
Slide the printed circuit board along the card guide and remove it from the rack.
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
2
Field Wiring to I/O Modules
Basic procedures for completing module wiring are given on the next page. For
additional information about installing a specific module, please read the module
datasheet.
a43855
JACKSCREW
HINGED
DOOR
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
Î
TERMINAL
BOARD
CORD
TIE
CORD
TIE
CLEAT
STRAP
Chapter 2 Installation
JACKSCREW
Î
CORD
TIE
CLEAT
STRAP
CLEAT
Î
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
CORD
TIE
STRAP
29
2
1.
Open the hinged door on the module to access the jackscrew which holds the
terminal board securely in place. Remove the terminal board by turning the
jackscrew counter–clockwise until it is fully disengaged.
2.
Remove the terminal board by grasping the top and swinging it outward.
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
JACKSCREW
a43747
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
DO NOT
PULL
ON DOOR
WIRE BUNDLE CABLE TIE CLEAT
Caution
Do not use the hinged door to remove the terminal board. The
hinged door could be damaged if this is done.
3.
Referring to the wiring information on the module door, complete the field wiring.
Use AWG #22 (0.324 mm) through AWG #14 (2.08 mm) wire. When using AWG
#14 wire and wiring all points, do not exceed a maximum insulation diameter of
.135 inch. To ensure proper connection, two wires may be terminated on any one
terminal only if both wires are the same size.
4.
After completing connections to all modules in a rack, secure the wire bundle.
Wrap a cable tie around the wire bundle and secure it tightly through the cable tie
cleat at the lower right corner of the terminal board. For large wire bundles, use
additional cable ties.
5.
Record circuit wiring identification on the door label. Insert the label in the door’s
slot (crease the scored edge of the label if necessary).
6.
Fasten the terminal board to the rack securely. Insert the terminal board strap into
the small rectangular slots in the bottom card guide grill on the rack.
7.
Leave a ventilation space of at least 6 inches above and below the rack grill. Do
not obstruct the grill with wire bundles.
Warning
Ensure that the protective cover is installed over all terminal boards.
The cover protects against accidental shock hazard which could
cause severe or fatal injury to the operator or maintenance personnel.
30
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
2
Multiple Racks in a Remote Drop
If the remote drop has more than one rack, rack 0 must contain a Bus Transmitter
Module. The Bus Transmitter should be installed in slot 2, next to the Remote I/O
Scanner. Using the appropriate cable (see the table below), attach the bottom connector
of the Bus Transmitter to the top connector of a Bus Receiver Module in the next rack.
Continue this process to connect all of the racks in the drop. The maximum total cable
length from the Bus Transmitter to the last Bus Receiver is 50 feet (15 meters).
Catalog Number
Length
IC600WD005
5 feet (1.5 meters)
IC600WD010
10 feet (3.0 meters)
IC600WD025
25 feet (7.5 meters)
IC600WD050
50 feet (15.0 meters)
Terminator Plug
Each Bus Receiver Module is shipped with a termination resistor pack installed in the
lower connector. Only the last Bus Receiver in a remote drop may have the terminator
plug installed. If the remote drop has three or more racks, remove the terminator
plugs from the intermediate Bus Receivers.
When power is applied, the middle LED on the last Bus Receiver should be on to
indicate that the termination resistor is installed. The middle LED on all other Bus
Receivers should be off.
RACK 0
Î
P
S
a44971
Î
S B
C T
A M
N
N
E
R
7 EXPANSION RACKS (MAXIMUM)
LAST RACK
Î
P
S
B
R
M
Î
I/O TERMINATOR PLUG
(IC697ACC702)
Chapter 2 Installation
31
2
Genius Bus Connections: Single Bus Cable
To install the Remote I/O Scanner on a single bus cable, use the upper four terminals as
described below. Do not use the lower eight terminals.
a44754
CONNECT
BUS TO
TOP FOUR
TERMINALS
NOT USED
FOR
SINGLE–CABLE
BUS
1.
2.
3.
SER1
1
2
SHIELD
IN
SER2
3
4
SHIELD
OUT
SER1A
R
E
D
U SER2A
N
D
A SER1B
N
C
Y
SER2B
5
6
SHIELD
IN A
7
8
SHIELD
OUT A
9
10
SHIELD
IN B
11
12
SHIELD
OUT B
ÎÎ
ÓÓ
ÓÓ
ÎÎ
ÓÓ
ÎÎ
ÑÑ
ÓÓ
ÎÎ
ÑÑ
ÎÎ
ÑÑ
ÎÎ
ÑÑ
ÎÎÎ
ÓÓÓ
ÓÓÓ
ÎÎÎ
ÓÓÓ
ÎÎÎ
ÓÓÓ
ÎÎÎ
ÑÑÑ
ÑÑÑ
ÎÎÎ
ÑÑÑ
ÎÎÎ
ÑÑÑ
ÎÎÎ
Connect Serial 1 to the Serial 1 terminals of the previous device and the next
device.
Connect Serial 2 to the Serial 2 terminals of the previous device and the next
device.
Connect the Remote I/O Scanner’s Shield In terminal to Shield Out of the preceding
device. Connect Shield Out to Shield In of the next device. If the Remote I/O Scanner
is the first device on the bus, Shield In can be left unconnected. If it is the last device
on the bus, Shield Out can be left unconnected. When making bus connections, the
maximum exposed length of bare wires should be two inches. For added protection,
each shield drain wire should be insulated with spaghetti tubing to prevent the Shield
In and Shield Out wires from touching each other, or the signal wires.
Note
The Genius bus connections for the Remote I/O Scanner are not the
same as for the Series 90–70 Bus Controller, even though the
terminals are physically identical.
a44755
SERIES 90–70
GENIUS
BUS
CONTROLLER
REMOTE
I/O
SCANNER
SER1
SER2
SHIELD
OUT
SER1
SHIELD IN
SER2
SHIELD
OUT
SHIELD
IN
Single Bus Termination
If the Scanner is at either end of the bus (electrically), connect a 75, 100, 120, or
150–ohm terminating resistor across the Serial 1 and Serial 2 terminals. Chapter 2 of
the Genius I/O System User’s Manual lists the correct impedance to use for each
approved type of bus cable.
Note
If the module will be powered up when not connected to a
properly–ter minated bus, connect a 75–ohm resistor across its Serial 1
and Serial 2 terminals to assure proper powerup.
32
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
2
Genius Bus Connections: Dual Bus Cables
To install a Remote I/O Scanner directly on both busses of a redundant bus, use the
lower eight terminals as described below. Do not attach an external Bus Switching Module
to a Remote I/O Scanner.
a44881
SER1
1
ÓÓÓ
ÎÎÎ
ÓÓÓ
ÓÓÓ
ÎÎÎ
ÑÑÑ
ÓÓÓ
ÎÎÎ
ÑÑÑ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÑÑÑ
ÑÑÑ
ÎÎÎ
2
SER2
3
4
SER1A
R
E
D
U SER2A
N
D
A SER1B
N
C
Y
SER2B
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
SHIELD
IN
ÓÓ
ÎÎ
ÓÓ
ÎÎ
ÓÓ
ÑÑ
ÎÎ
ÓÓ
ÑÑ
ÎÎ
ÑÑ
ÎÎ
ÑÑ
ÎÎ
SHIELD
OUT
SHIELD
IN A
SHIELD
OUT A
SHIELD
IN B
SHIELD
OUT B
TERMINALS
FOR
BUS A
TERMINALS
FOR
BUS B
1.
Connect bus A to terminals 5 – 8 on the Remote I/O Scanner, marked SER1A,
SER2A, SHIELD IN A and SHIELD OUT A.
2.
Connect bus B to terminals 9 – 12, marked SER2A, SER2B, SHIELD IN B, and
SHIELD OUT B.
3.
For each bus, connect Serial 1 to the Serial 1 terminals of the previous device and
the next device. Connect Serial 2 to the Serial 2 terminals of the previous device
and the next device.
4.
For each bus, connect the appropriate Shield In terminal to Shield Out of the
preceding device. Connect Shield Out to Shield In of the next device. If the
Remote I/O Scanner is the first device on a bus, its Shield In terminal for that bus
can be left unconnected. If it is the last device on the bus, its Shield Out terminal
for that bus can be left unconnected.
When making bus connections, the maximum exposed length of bare wires should be
two inches. For added protection, each shield drain wire should be insulated with
spaghetti tubing to prevent the Shield In and Shield Out wires from touching each
other or the signal wires.
Dual Bus Termination
If either trunk cable of the dual bus ends at the Remote I/O Scanner, install a
terminating resistor across the Serial 1 and Serial 2 terminals where that cable attaches
to the module. If both cables terminate at the Remote I/O Scanner, each must have its
own terminating resistor. Do not terminate dual bus stubs (see next page).
Chapter 2 Installation
33
2
Connecting a Bus Stub to a Remote I/O Scanner
A bus stub must always be Belden 9182 or equivalent cable, regardless of the cable type
used for the dual bus trunk.
ÓÓÓ
ÓÓÓ
ÓÓÓÓÓ
ÓÓÓ
ÓÓÓ
ÓÓÓÓÓ
ÓÓÓ
ÓÓÓ
ÓÓÓÓÓ
ÓÓÓ
ÓÓÓ
ÓÓÓ
ÓÓÓ
ÓÓÓ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÓÓÓ
BUS
STUB
BELDEN
9182
OR
EQUIVALENT
a44882
NO TERMINATING RESISTOR
BUS A
BUS B
TERMINATING RESISTOR NEEDED IF REMOTE
I/O SCANNER IS AT END OF A BUS.
The total length of all stubs on a bus should be 100 feet or less. Within each 20%
section of the actual bus length, the total maximum stub length is 20 feet. This can be
divided into shorter stubs, provided that the total length in each 20% of the bus is 20 ft.
or less.
Bus Stub Connections
1.
Bus stub cable attaches to the upper four terminals on a Remote I/O Scanner.
a44883
SER1
2.
34
1
ÓÓÓ
ÎÎÎ
ÓÓÓ
ÓÓÓ
ÎÎÎ
ÑÑÑ
ÓÓÓ
ÎÎÎ
ÑÑÑ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÑÑÑ
ÑÑÑ
ÎÎÎ
ÑÑÑ
2
SER2
3
4
SER1A
R
E
D
U SER2A
N
D
A SER1B
N
C
Y
SER2B
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
SHIELD
IN
ÓÓ
ÎÎ
ÓÓ
ÓÓ
ÎÎ
ÑÑ
ÓÓ
ÎÎ
ÑÑ
ÎÎ
ÑÑ
ÎÎ
ÑÑ
ÎÎ
ÑÑ
SHIELD
OUT
CONNECT
BUS
STUB CABLE
HERE
SHIELD
IN A
SHIELD
OUT A
SHIELD
IN B
SHIELD
OUT B
Connect Serial 1 to Serial 1 of the next device. Connect Serial 2 to Serial 2 of the
next device. Connect Shield Out to Shield In of the next device. Connect
additional devices in the same way. If the Remote I/O Scanner is the bus switching
device (directly connected to the dual bus), its Shield In terminal can be left
unconnected. If it is the last device on the bus stub, the Shield Out terminal can be
left unconnected. The bus stub does not require a terminating resistor.
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
2
Programmer Connection at the Remote I/O Scanner
A Logicmaster 90–70 programmer can be connected to rack 0 of a remote drop.
(Logicmaster 6 or Logicmaster 5 cannot be used with a remote drop).
Refer to the instructions that follow, for the type of equipment you are using.
H
H
H
Logicmaster 90 Parallel version and Workstation Interface Board
Logicmaster 90 Serial version and Workstation Interface Board
Logicmaster 90 Serial version, no Workstation Interface Board
The Workstation Interface Board can be used for either parallel or serial
communications with a remote drop. The board provides ground isolation allowing
the programmer ground to vary by up to 500V.
Logicmaster 90 Parallel Version and Workstation Interface Board
If the programmer is equipped with the parallel version of Logicmaster 90–70 and a
Workstation Interface Board (IC647WMI920 for Workmaster II or IBM PS/2 computer,
or IC640WMI910 for a Workmaster or IBM PC–XT/AT computer), connection is made
to a Bus Transmitter module located in the remote drop.
Grounding
For proper operation, the programmer must have a ground connection in common
with rack 0. Normally, the common ground connection is provided by connecting the
programmer ’s power cord to the same power source (with the same ground reference
point) as the rack. If a common ground cannot be established, use GE Intelligent Platforms
RS–422 Isolated Repeater/RS–232 Converter IC655CCM590, or an equivalent product.
Connection Instructions
For a Workmaster I or II computer, use cable IC647CBL703.
1.
Attach the 37–pin male connector to the computer’s Workstation Interface board.
2.
Attach the 37–pin female connector to the top connector on the Bus Transmitter
module.
a43562
Î
ÎÎ
Î
BTM
WSI
PARALLEL
PARALLEL
CABLE
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
WORKMASTER II
Chapter 2 Installation
35
2
Logicmaster 90 Serial Version and Workstation Interface Board
If the programmer is equipped with the serial version of Logicmaster 90–70 and a
Workstation Interface Board (IC647WMI920 for Workmaster II or IBM PS/2 computer,
or IC640WMI910 for a Workmaster or IBM PC–XT/AT computer), connection is made
to the Remote I/O Scanner’s RS–485 serial port. If the Remote I/O Scanner is not part
of a multidrop network, follow the instructions below. If the Remote I/O Scanner is
installed on a multidrop serial communications network, refer to the instructions on
page 39 instead.
The Workstation Interface Board can be used for either parallel or serial
communications with a remote drop. The board provides ground isolation allowing
the programmer ground to vary by up to 500V.
Grounding
For proper operation, the programmer must have a ground connection in common
with rack 0. Normally, the common ground connection is provided by connecting the
programmer ’s power cord to the same power source (with the same ground reference
point) as the rack. If a common ground cannot be established, use GE Intelligent Platforms
RS–422 Isolated Repeater/RS–232 Converter IC655CCM590, or an equivalent product.
Serial Port Termination
For direct programmer connection, the Remote I/O Scanner’s serial port must be
terminated. Connect a 220Ω resistor across pins 10 and 11 and another 220Ω resistor
across pins 8 and 15. These connections must be made inside the connector’s D–shell.
At the other end of the link, terminate the RD and CTS pins in the same way.
Connection Instructions
For a Workmaster I or II computer, use cable IC647CBL704.
1.
Attach the 37–pin male connector to the Workstation Interface Board.
2.
Attach the 15–pin male connector to the serial port connector on the Remote I/O
Scanner.
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
Î
a44884
SCANNER
WSI
SERIAL
SERIAL
CABLE
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
WORKMASTER II
WORKMASTER
36
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
2
Logicmaster 90 Serial Version, No Workstation Interface Board
If the programmer is equipped with the serial version of Logicmaster 90–70, and does
NOT have a Workstation Interface Board, connection must be made via an
intermediate RS422/RS485 to RS–232 Converter. If no isolation is required, use
GE Intelligent Platforms RS–232/RS–422 Converter IC690ACC900A. If isolation
is required, use GE Intelligent Platforms RS–422 Isolated Repeater/RS–232 Converter
IC655CCM590, or an equivalentproduct.
If the distance from the converter to the Remote I/O Scanner is more than 10 feet, +5
VDC must be provided using an external power supply. If the Remote I/O Scanner is
part of a multidrop network, follow the instructions on page 39. If the Remote I/O
Scanner is not part of a multidrop network, follow the instructions below.
Programmer to Converter Cable
For a Workmaster or IBM PC–XT or compatible computer, use cable IC690CBL701.
For an IBM PC–AT or compatible computer use cable IC690CBL702. For a Workmaster
II or IBM PS/2 or compatible computer, use cable IC690CBL705. These are all 10–foot
cables. For intormation about using longer cables, please refer to the Series 90–70
Installation and Operation Manual (GFK–0262, revision C or later).
Converter to Remote I/O Scanner Cable
Use standard 6–foot cable IC693CBL303.
1.
For direct programmer connection, the Remote I/O Scanner’s serial port must be
terminated. Connect a 220Ω resistor across pins 10 and 11 and another 220Ω
resistor across pins 8 and 15. These connections must be made inside the
connector ’s D–shell. At the other end of the link, terminate the RD and CTS pins
in the same way.
2.
Be sure the remote drop is powered–down.
3.
Connect the 25–pin male connector on the 10 foot cable to the 25–pin female
connector on the converter.
4.
Connect the female connector on this cable to the male RS–232 connector (serial
port) on the programmer.
5.
Connect the 6–foot cable to the converter and the Remote I/O Scanner. Both ends
of this cable are the same.
a44885
RACK 0
Î
P
S
S
C
A
N
N
E
R
ÎÎ ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
WORKMASTER II
RS–485
RS–232
CONVERTER
Chapter 2 Installation
37
2
Multidrop Connections
Multidrop connections are described in the Series 90–70 Installation and Operation
Manual (GFK–0262). Additional instructions are given below. Connection is made
between the CPU and the serial port on the Remote I/O Scanner.
Terminating the Remote I/O Scanner’s Serial Port
The serial port on the Remote I/O Scanner must be terminated if the Remote I/O
Scanner will be at the end of a multidrop network. To terminate the serial port, connect
a 220Ω resistor across pins 10 and 11 and another 220Ω resistor across pins 8 and 15.
These connections must be made inside the connector’s D–shell. At the other end of
the link, terminate the RD and CTS pins in the same way.
Note
SNP termination is the same for Series 90–70 CPUs IC697CPU731K or
later, and IC697CPU771H or later. For Series 90–70 CPUs
IC697CPU771J or earlier and IC697CPU771G or earlier, the jumper is
located between pins 9 and 10.
Isolation for the Serial Port
Like the Series 90–70 CPU, the Remote I/O Scanner contains NO isolation circuitry at
the SNP port. If isolation is required, use the GE Intelligent Platforms RS–232/RS–422
converter (catalog number IC655CCM590), or equivalent product.
Caution
If a multidrop network cannot be guaranteed to be on the same
electrical ground and served by the same phase on the mains,
isolation must be provided separately for each CPU and Remote I/O
Scanner.
38
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
2
Programmer Connections in a Multidrop Network
In a multidrop network, a programmer connected to the CPU can communicate with
the Remote I/O Scanner over the serial link, as shown below. A programmer can also
be connected directly at the remote drop. However, when the Remote I/O Scanner is
part of a multidrop network, its serial port, which is used for connection of the serial
link, is not available for direct connection of a programmer.
PLC
PROGRAMMER
CONNECTION
(SERIAL)
ON
MULTIDROP
NETWORK
P
S
C
P
U
REMOTE DROP
B
C
P
S
a44886
S
C
A
N
N
E
R
GENIUS BUS
SERIAL NETWORK CABLE
The illustrations that follow suggest how extra connectors may be installed to allow the
use of a programmer at various points in the system, without disturbing the serial link
between the PLC and the remote drop. When extra connectors are used, it is
important to be sure that the connections will be secure. For example, the connectors
can be permanently mounted on panels.
The illustrations show connections for a Workmaster
different type of programmer could be used.
t II programmer, although a
If the programmer does not have a Workstation Interface card, RS232–to–RS422
conversion must be provided at each location. A conversion box can be installed at
each drop, or one conversion box can be moved from location to location with the
programmer.
In locations where isolation is not a problem, the non–isolated RS232–to–RS422
Conversion Box (IC690ACC900) can be used.
In locations where ground potential differences may occur, it is important to provide
adequate ground isolation. Repeater/Converter Box (IC655CMM590) that provides
both RS232–to–RS422 conversion and isolation should be used.
Chapter 2 Installation
39
2
SNP Multidrop with WSI Board in Workmaster II
SHIELDED
TWISTED PAIRS
SERIES 90
PLC
J1
PIN
PIN
SHLD
0V
RD ( A’ )
RD ( B’ )
SD ( A )
SD ( B )
RTS ( A )
RTS ( B )
CTS ( A’ )
CTS ( B’ )
1
7
10
11
12
13
6
14
15
8
SHIELDED
TWISTED PAIRS
J2
PIN
7
16
17
15
14
11
10
13
12
7
16
17
15
14
11
10
13
12
23
22
18
19
9
8
15– PIN
MALE
UP TO A
MAXIMUM OF
4,000 FEET
(1,200 METERS)
a44855
RS–422 ISOLATED
REPEATER
(IC655CCM590)
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
PORT
PIN
1
7
15
14
16
17
13
12
11
10
PIN
SHLD
0V
RD ( A’ )
RD ( B’ )
SD ( A )
SD ( B )
RTS ( A )
RTS ( B )
CTS ( A’ )
CTS ( B’ )
SHLD
0V
RD ( A’ )
RD ( B’ )
SD ( A )
SD ( B )
RTS ( A )
RTS ( B )
CTS ( A’ )
CTS ( B’ )
25– PIN
FEMALE
**
1
7
15
14
16
17
13
12
11
10
25– PIN
MALE
**
PLC/CPU
PANEL
115
VAC
REMOTE
PANEL
SERIES 90
REMOTE I/O
SCANNER
SHLD
0V
RD ( A’ )
RD ( B’ )
SD ( A )
SD ( B )
RTS ( A )
RTS ( B )
CTS ( A’ )
CTS ( B’ )
Î
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
PORT
PIN
PIN
1
7
10
11
12
13
6
14
15
8
1
7
15
14
16
17
13
12
11
10
PIN
SHLD
0V
RD ( A’ )
RD ( B’ )
SD ( A )
SD ( B )
RTS ( A )
RTS ( B )
CTS ( A’ )
CTS ( B’ )
SHLD
0V
RD ( A’ )
RD ( B’ )
SD ( A )
SD ( B )
RTS ( A )
RTS ( B )
CTS ( A’ )
CTS ( B’ )
25– PIN
FEMALE
15– PIN
MALE
1
7
15
14
16
17
13
12
11
10
25– PIN
MALE
LAST
REMOTE
PANEL
SERIES 90
REMOTE I/O
SCANNER
SHLD
0V
RD ( A’ )
RD ( B’ )
SD ( A )
SD ( B )
RTS ( A )
RTS ( B )
CTS ( A’ )
CTS ( B’ )
RECOMMENDED CABLE
TYPES, BELDEN #9505 OR
#9832 (FIVE PAIR TWISTED)
WIRE PAIRS MUST BE
CONSISTENT THROUGHOUT
LENGTH OF NETWORK.
OEM MUST GUARANTEE
THERE IS NO MORE THAN A
" 7 VOLT COMMON MODE
VOLTAGE BETWEEN PANELS.
FOR INFORMATION ON MULTIDROP
CONFIGURATIONS, REFER TO THE
SERIES 90 PLC SNP
COMMUNICATIONS DRIVER
USER’S MANUAL (GFK–0585).
1.
2.
3.
4.
1
7
10
11
12
13
6
14
15
8
1
7
15
14
16
17
13
12
11
10
WSI
SERIAL/
PARALLEL
PORT
40
220 OHM–1/4 WATT–5%
RESISTORS.
37– PIN
FEMALE
PIN
SHLD
0V
RD ( A’ )
RD ( B’ )
SD ( A )
SD ( B )
RTS ( A )
RTS ( B )
CTS ( A’ )
CTS ( B’ )
SHLD
0V
RD ( A’ )
RD ( B’ )
SD ( A )
SD ( B )
RTS ( A )
RTS ( B )
CTS ( A’ )
CTS ( B’ )
25– PIN
FEMALE
15– PIN
MALE
WORKMASTER II
ÎÎ
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
PORT
PIN
* 120 OHM RESISTORS.
**
**
PIN
**
Î
Î
Î
Î
25– PIN
MALE
Typical Wiring Diagram
SHLD
0V
SD ( A )
SD ( B )
RD ( A’ )
RD ( B’ )
CTS ( A’ )
CTS ( B’ )
RTS ( A )
RTS ( B )
PIN
PIN
PIN
37
1
27
26
35
34
31
30
33
32
37
1
27
26
35
34
31
30
33
32
1
7
15
14
16
17
13
12
11
10
37– PIN
MALE
UP TO MAXIMUM OF 50 FEET (15.2 METERS)
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
1
7
15
14
16
17
13
12
11
10
2
SNP Multidrop without WSI Board in Workmaster II
SERIES 90
PLC
SHLD
0V
RD ( A’ )–
RD ( B’ )+
SD ( A )–
SD ( B )+
RTS ( A )–
RTS ( B )+
CTS ( A’ )–
CTS ( B’ )+
**
SHIELDED
TWISTED PAIRS
SHIELDED
TWISTED PAIRS
J1 J2
PIN PIN
PIN
1
7
10
11
12
13
6
14
15
8
15– PIN
MALE
a44973
RS–422 ISOLATED
REPEATER
(IC655CCM590)
**
7
16
17
15
14
11
10
13
12
7
16
17
15
14
11
10
13
12
23
22
18
19
9
8
1
5
7
15
14
16
17
13
12
11
10
SHLD
+5V
0V
RD ( A’ )–
RD ( B’ )+
SD ( A )–
SD ( B )+
RTS ( A )–
RTS ( B )+
CTS ( A’ )–
CTS ( B’ )+
25– PIN
FEMALE
***
***
SHLD
WIRE PAIRS MUST BE
CONSISTENT THROUGHOUT
LENGTH OF NETWORK.
3.
OEM MUST GUARANTEE
THERE IS NO MORE THAN A
+7 VOLT COMMON MODE
VOLTAGE BETWEEN PANELS
***
1
5
7
15
14
16
17
13
12
11
10
PIN
SHLD
+5V
0V
RD ( A’ )–
RD ( B’ )+
SD ( A )–
SD ( B )+
RTS ( A )–
RTS ( B )+
CTS ( A’ )–
CTS ( B’ )+
SHLD
1
5
+5V
0V
7
RD ( A’ )– 15
RD ( B’ )+ 14
SD ( A )– 16
SD ( B )+ 17
RTS ( A )– 13
RTS ( B )+ 12
CTS ( A’ )– 11
CTS ( B’ )+ 10
25– PIN
FEMALE
25– PIN
MALE
LAST
REMOTE
PANEL
SERIES 90
REMOTE I/O
SCANNER
***
PIN
PORT
PIN
1
5
7
15
14
16
17
13
12
11
10
SHLD
1
+5V
5
0V
7
RD ( A’ )– 10
RD ( B’ )+ 11
SD ( A )– 12
SD ( B )+ 13
RTS ( A )– 6
RTS ( B )+ 14
CTS ( A’ )– 15
CTS ( B’ )+ 8
POWER SOURCE FOR
IC690ACC900 CONVERTER
10 FEET (3 METERS) ONLY.
CONVERTER POWER SOURCE
BEYOND 10 FEET (3 METERS)
MUST BE FROM EXTERNAL
SOURCE.
**
PIN
1
15– PIN
MALE
4. FOR INFORMATION ON
MULTIDROP
CONFIGURATIONS, REFER
TO THE SERIES 90 PLC SNP
COMMUNICATIONS DRIVER
USER’S MANUAL (GFK–0585).
*
Î
Î
Î
Î
PORT
PIN
0V
7
RD ( A’ )– 10
RD ( B’ )+ 11
SD ( A )– 12
SD ( B )+ 13
RTS ( A )– 6
RTS ( B )+ 14
CTS ( A’ )– 15
CTS ( B’ )+ 8
2.
25– PIN
MALE
REMOTE
PANEL
SERIES 90
REMOTE I/O SCANNER
RECOMMENDED CABLE
TYPES, BELDEN #9505 OR
#9832 (FIVE PAIR TWISTED)
PIN
SHLD
1
+5V
5
0V
7
RD ( A’ )– 15
RD ( B’ )+ 14
SD ( A )– 16
SD ( B )+ 17
RTS ( A )– 13
RTS ( B )+ 12
CTS ( A’ )– 11
CTS ( B’ )+ 10
PLC/CPU
PANEL
115
UP TO A
MAXIMUM OF VAC
4,000 FEET
(1,200 METERS)
1.
Î
Î
Î
Î
PORT
PIN
120 OHM RESISTORS.
15– PIN
MALE
Î
Î
Î
Î
SHLD
+5V
0V
RD ( A’ )–
RD ( B’ )+
SD ( A )–
SD ( B )+
RTS ( A )–
RTS ( B )+
CTS ( A’ )–
CTS ( B’ )+
25– PIN
FEMALE
***
PIN
1
SHLD
5
+5V
0V
7
RD ( A’ )– 15
RD ( B’ )+ 14
SD ( A )– 16
SD ( B )+ 17
RTS ( A )– 13
RTS ( B )+ 12
CTS ( A’ )– 11
CTS ( B’ )+ 10
25– PIN
MALE
220 OHM–1/4 WATT–5%
RESISTORS.
WORKMASTER II
RS–232
PORT
25–PIN
MALE
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
IC690CBL705 OR EQUIVALENT
RS–232
SHIELDED PAIRS
PIN
TD
RD
RTS
CTS
DCD
DTR
GND
2
3
4
5
8
20
7
25–PIN
FEMALE
Chapter 2 Installation
RS–232/RS–485
CONVERTER
(IC690ACC900)
PIN
3
2
5
4
8
7
1
RD
TD
CTS
RTS
DCD
GND
SHLD
25–PIN
MALE
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
25–PIN
FEMALE
RS–232
PORT
15–PIN
FEMALE
RS–485
PORT
TYPICAL WIRING DIAGRAM
DCD ( A)–
DCD ( B )+
RD ( A’ )–
RD ( B’ )+
SD ( A )–
SD ( B )+
RT
CTS ( A’ )–
CTS ( B’ )+
RTS ( A– )–
RTS ( B )+
+5V
0V
SHLD
PIN
PIN
2
3
10
11
12
13
9
15
8
6
14
5
7
1
2
3
10
11
12
13
9
15
8
6
14
5
7
1
*
*
15– PIN
MALE
SHIELDED
TWISTED PAIRS
PIN
16
17
15
14
13
12
11
10
5
7
1
UP TO MAXIMUM OF 50 FEET (15.2 METERS)
*
41
Chapter
3
3 Remote I/O Scanner Operation
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter explains how a Remote I/O Scanner interacts with the modules in its
remote drop, how it stores data, and how it exchanges data with a PLC or other type of
system host.
Overview
The Remote I/O Scanner scans I/O modules in its remote drop in the same manner in
which a Series 90–70 PLC CPU scans I/O modules in the PLC. Its internal memories
store the remote drop’s I/O data.
A Remote I/O Scanner communicates with the host over the Genius bus, sending up to
128 bytes of input data and receiving up to 128 bytes of output data each Genius bus
scan.
HOST
REMOTE DROP
a44975
GENIUS
MESSAGE
INPUTS:
UP TO 128
BYTES
BUS
OUTPUTS:
CONTROLLER UP TO 128
BYTES
REMOTE
I/O SCANNER
% I % AI
% Q % AQ
SCAN
INPUT
MODULES
OUTPUT
MODULES
PCM, GDS, and ADS modules can be located in a remote drop. There, they have
direct access to the input and output data for the I/O modules in the remote drop.
They also have indirect access to the host, through the Remote I/O Scanner’s internal
I/Otables.
43
3
I/O Scan
Scanning begins immediately at powerup, unless a fatal diagnostic error occurs within
the module. At powerup, all I/O in the remote drop, except those that are presently
forced, default to Off. I/O that are forced at the time of powerup start operation in the
forced state or value.
Run Mode
Following a successful powerup, a Remote I/O Scanner goes into Run mode. It remains
in Run mode unless a fatal fault or other serious problem occurs. In Run mode, input
modules are scanned in rack and slot order. The Remote I/O Scanner stores the input
data in its own %I and %AI memories. These memories always contain the most
recent value for each input.
REMOTE DROP
REMOTE
I/O SCANNER
a44977
%I
% AI
INPUT
MODULES
%Q
% AQ
OUTPUT
MODULES
After the input scan, the Remote I/O Scanner scans the output modules in rack and slot
order, sending them the most recent output data from its internal %Q and %AQ
memories.
REMOTE DROP
REMOTE
I/O SCANNER
a44978
% AI
INPUT
MODULES
% Q % AQ
OUTPUT
MODULES
%I
Special–purpose modules, such as PCM, GDS, and ADS modules, are recognized by
the Remote I/O Scanner but are not scanned for I/O data. These modules may be
programmed to access the internal memories of the Remote I/O Scanner, where they
may deposit or acquire data.
Stop/Faulted Mode
If a fatal fault occurs, the Remote I/O Scanner goes to Stop/Faulted mode. The Module
OK LED is off. In Stop/Faulted mode, the Remote I/O Scanner can communicate with
Logicmaster 90–70; it may be possible to place the module back into Run mode by
clearing all faults from its CPU Fault Table and I/O Fault Table. This requires either a
direct programmer connection or communication with the remote drop on a multidrop
network. It is also possible to use a Hand–held Monitor to clear all faults to attempt a
return to Run mode. Stop/Faulted mode usually indicates a hardware fault. If the fault
condition is not corrected, the module will not be able to return to Run mode
successfully.
44
Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
3
I/O Scanner Memory
The Remote I/O Scanner has %I, %AI, %Q, %AQ, and %R internal memories. The
following table shows how much memory of each type the Remote I/O Scanner has,
and the maximum amount that may be transferred with the host.
Memory Type References Available in
Remote I/O Scanner
%I
%Q
%AI
%AQ
%R
12K
12K
8K
8K
16K
Transferred with Host
up to 1024 bits
up to 1024 bits
up to 64 words
up to 64 words
not transferrable
I/O Memory in the Remote I/O Scanner
The Remote I/O Scanner’s %I, %AI, %Q, and %AQ memories are used for the remote
drop’s I/O data. They can also be used for data being transferred between the host and
option modules in the remote drop.
Individual I/O modules may be configured anywhere within available memory. If data
are to be exchanged with the CPU, the modules must be placed inside the configured
I/O map. Any I/O modules configured outside the I/O map will be scanned by the
Remote I/O Scanner, but the data will not be derived from or supplied to the CPU.
Configuring I/O References in a Series 90–70 PLC Application
When configuring I/O references for a Series 90–70 PLC:
1.
A Logicmaster 90 program folder for the Series 90–70 contains the I/O map for
each remote drop.
2.
A Logicmaster 90 program folder for a Remote I/O Scanner also contains an I/O
map.
3.
For 90–70 applications, it recommended that both of these I/O maps agree.
4.
The configured data lengths must agree.
For most applications, matching PLC and Remote I/O Scanner references are
recommended to avoid confusion. However, it is not mandatory to assign the same
references in the Remote I/O Scanner configuration and in the PLC configuration.
%R Memory in the Remote I/O Scanner
The Remote I/O Scanner has 12K bytes of %R memory that is not used for data
transfer with the host. However, it is available for other uses such as transferring data
with Programmable Coprocessor Modules in the remote drop.
Chapter 3 Remote I/O Scanner Operation
45
3
Data Transfer with the Host
Each bus scan, a Remote I/O Scanner exchanges the following data with the host PLC
or computer:
H
H
It sends an input message with up to 128 bytes of %I and/or %AI inputs.
It receives an output message with up to 128 bytes of %Q and/or %AQ outputs.
The exact length and content of these messages is determined by the remote drop I/O
map configured for the Remote I/O Scanner. The data from each table (%I, %AI, %Q,
and %AQ) must be contiguous. Data formats are explained on the following pages.
Communications on the Genius Bus
After a Remote I/O Scanner completes a successful login with the controlling PLC or
computer, it begins sending the input data it has scanned from the input modules and
accepting output data for the output modules it controls.
The scanner’s communications with the host are performed asynchronously. When
the scanner receives the Genius bus communications token, it sends the most recent
data from the configured portion of its %I and %AI memories on the bus. As
described above, these memories are repeatedly updated whenever the Remote I/O
Scanner scans the input modules in the remote drop.
The scanner receives new outputs from the host when the host’s bus controller has the
communications token. It places these outputs into the configured portion of its %Q
and %AQ output tables. These outputs are then passed to the devices in the remote
drop on the next I/O scan.
The Genius bus scan time may vary from 3–400mS, but 20–30mS is typical.
Update Rate
Depending on the number and types of I/O modules in a remote drop, the update rate
is typically in the range of 4–7mS, if there is no programmer activity. If the Logicmaster
90–70 programmer is physically attached to the Remote I/O Scanner, and is in
On–line mode, it slows the update rate by about 10mS.
Throughput
If an output in the remote drop is tied to an input in the same remote drop, the output
changes state (or value, in the case of an analog output module) within a few
milliseconds of the new output being sent from the bus controller to the Remote I/O
Scanner. (To guarantee that an output changes state, it must be present for at least one
Genius bus scan time).
The input which is tied to the output responds as soon as any load–effects have
settled out and input filtering is completed. This may occur as soon as the Remote I/O
Scanner ’s next I/O scan.
An input must be present for at least one PLC sweep time plus one Genius bus scan
time to guarantee its detection by the host. If the input changes state only briefly, and
then changes again before the input data is sent on the bus, the change may be
overwritten by some new input state or value before it can be sent.
46
Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
3
Input Data Sent by the Remote I/O Scanner
When the Remote I/O Scanner has its turn on the bus, it sends one input data message
containing the latest values for all configured discrete inputs followed by all configured
analog inputs. Because they are broadcast (like all Genius inputs), they can be
obtained by any Bus Controller on the bus.
Input Data Message
(up to 128 bytes)
a
To CPU
discrete inputs
a Configured %I Length '
%I starting reference data
analog inputs
a Configured %AI Length '
%AI starting reference data
The lengths of each portion are equal to the lengths of %I and %AI data selected when
configuring the Remote I/O Scanner. Either may be zero.
The discrete inputs appear in the input message in the same sequence as their
assigned input references. Each discrete input module occupies one byte per eight
circuits.
The analog inputs are also in the same sequence as their assigned input references.
Each analog input module occupies two bytes (one word) for each analog channel.
The Remote I/O Scanner sends this data from its internal %I and %AI memories,
beginning at the start locations selected during remote drop configuration of the
Remote I/O Scanner.
How the host handles this data depends on the host type:
H
A Series 90–70 PLC places the data in the %I and %AI references selected during
PLC configuration. These must be the same references selected during Remote I/O
Scanner configuration.
H
A Series Six or Series Five PLC places the data into I/O table or register memory.
For a new Remote I/O Scanner, a beginning address in Series Six or Series FiveI/O
Table memory can be entered by Logicmaster 90 configuration of the Remote I/O
Scanner. To assign references in register memory instead, or to change a
previously–entered I/O table assignment, a Hand–held Monitor must be used.
H
A host computer places the data into the input table segment that corresponds to
the Device Number of the Remote I/O Scanner.
Chapter 9 explains how each of these host devices handles the data it exchanges with a
Remote I/O Scanner.
Chapter 3 Remote I/O Scanner Operation
47
3
Outputs from the Host to a Remote Drop
Each time the host’s Bus Controller has the bus communications token, it sends any
outputs it has received from the CPU to the devices on the bus. Outputs for the
Remote I/O Scanner are sent in one output data message, with all configured discrete
outputs followed by all configured analog outputs.
Output Data Message
(up to 128 bytes)
a
To
Remote
Drop
discrete outputs
analog outputs
a Configured %Q Length '
a Configured %AQ Length '
%Q starting reference data
%AQ starting reference data
The lengths of each portion are equal to the configured lengths of %Q and %AQ data
selected for the Remote I/O Scanner (regardless of the host CPU type or the actual
amount of output data needed for the modules physically present in the remote drop).
Either length may be zero.
The Series 90–70 Bus Controller automatically places the %Q data ahead of the %AQ
data, in accordance with the configuration supplied to the host PLC for the remote
drop. Other PLCs and computers need to prearrange the data in the order expected
by the remote drop. Each discrete output module will receive one byte of data for each
eight circuits. Each analog output module will receive two bytes (one word) for each
analog channel.
As soon as new output data is received, the Remote I/O Scanner checks it to be sure the
data is error–free and of the correct length. The length must match the combined
lengths of the discrete output data and analog output data that have been configured
for the Remote I/O Scanner. After verifying the accuracy of the data, the scanner puts
the data in the %Q and %AQ tables, and begins passing it to the output modules in the
remote drop.
Output Defaults
On powerup, all outputs are turned off (analogs go to zero), except those inputs and
outputs which had previously been forced––they go immediately to their forced state
or value.
If CPU communications are lost for 3 bus scans, all outputs that are not presently
forced will either default or hold their last state, as configured using the Logicmaster
90–70 software. If all configuration for a remote drop is done with a Genius
Hand–held Monitor, this selection cannot be made and all outputs will default to Off
(or 0 for analogs).
48
Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
3
Configuring Extra References
Normally, there are no extra references configured for the Remote I/O Scanner, since
that would consume extra references in the host CPU, making them unavailable for
other modules. In addition, extra references add to the Genius bus scan time, so they
should be avoided if they are not actually needed.
However, reserving extra references or leaving vacancies at configuration time is a
convenient way to prepare for future additions to a remote drop. (If Logicmaster
90–70 is used for configuration, unused references may be placed anywhere in the
input message).
Input Data Message with Some Inputs Not Used
a
discrete inputs
To CPU
unused
discrete
references
a Configured %I Length '
%I starting reference data
analog inputs
unused
analog
references
a Configured %AI Length '
%AI starting reference data
Example
An application has two remote drops, which have been configured as #016 and #017.
Drop 016
%I0001 – %I0064
%AI0001 – %AI0008
%Q0001 – %Q0032
%AQ0001 – %AQ0008
Drop 017
%I0065 – %I0128
%AI0009 – %AI0016
%Q0033 – %Q0064
%AQ0009 – %AQ0016
At a later time, it becomes necessary to add a 32–point input module to drop 016.
However, in drop 016, there are already enough input modules to use all of the
assigned input references (%I0001 – %I0064). Ideally, the extra modules would be
added to remote drop 016 at %I00065, but this is already used as a reference in drop
017. The alternatives at this stage are:
1.
Change the map of drop 017 to free up %I0065 – %I0096.
2.
Change the map of drop 016 to start at higher references, such as %I0097 –
%I0160.
It would have been easier to add the module to drop 016 if extra references had been
configured originally, or if some vacancies had been allowed.
Drop 016
%I0001 – %I0096
%AI0001 – %AI0008
%Q0001 – %Q0032
%AQ0001 – %AQ0008
Chapter 3 Remote I/O Scanner Operation
Drop 017
%I0097 – %I0160
%AI0009 – %AI0016
%Q0033 – %Q0064
%AQ0009 – %AQ0016
49
3
Using Option Modules in a Remote Drop
PCMs (Programmable Coprocessor Modules), GDS (Graphics Display Coprocessor
Modules), and ADS (Alphanumeric Display Coprocessor Modules) can be located in a
remote drop.
These option modules look at the Remote I/O Scanner as though it were a Series
90–70 PLC CPU. They can read and write to any locations in the Remote I/O Scanner’s
internal %I, %AI, %Q, %AQ, and %R memories, including those portions of memory
that are outside the range configured for data transfer with the system host.
The Remote I/O Scanner’s %R memory is NOT used for data transferred with the
CPU, but it can be freely accessed by a PCM, GDS, or ADS module in the remote drop.
Accessing the Host CPU from Option Modules in a Remote Drop
When used in a remote drop, a PCM, GDS, or ADS module does not have direct access
to host CPU memory; to read or write host memory, the data must be transferred
through the configured memory area of the Remote I/O Scanner. The area used
should not correspond to a physical I/O module; it should correspond to an unused
portion of the remote drop I/O map configured for the remote drop.
Extending the I/O map of a remote drop will cause the Genius message to increase in
size, and will therefore increase the Genius bus scan time. Gaps may be anywhere in
the I/O map, but if they are added to the end, the corresponding I/O references cannot
be used for any other purpose by either the host or the Remote I/O Scanner.
Reading Host Data from an Option Module
a44887
HOST
CPU
REMOTE I/O
SCANNER
GENIUS
MEMORIES MESSAGE
%Q
% AQ
MEMORIES
%Q
% AQ
OUTPUT
MODULES
50
Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
PCM, GDS
OR ADS
READ
3
Sending Data from an Option Module to the Host
To send data to the host CPU, the option module must place that data into the %I or
%AI memory area of the Remote I/O Scanner. The data must be located within the
range of %I or %AI memory configured for transfer to the host, and cannot correspond
to an input module. It must correspond to a gap in the input portion of the remote
drop I/O map.
a44888
HOST
CPU
REMOTE I/O
SCANNER
MEMORIES
MEMORIES
%I
%I
% AI
% AI
PCM, GDS
OR
ADS
WRITE
INPUT
MODULES
The transport delays between the CPU and the Remote I/O Scanner should be
considered when analyzing system timing.
Chapter 3 Remote I/O Scanner Operation
51
3
Direct Access to I/O by Option Modules
A PCM, GDS, or ADS module in the remote drop can read inputs from, and send
outputs to, any I/O module in the drop. This may include modules which do not
communicate with the system host at all.
It is possible to place I/O modules in a remote drop, and use Logicmaster 90 to assign
them references outside the range configured for the Remote I/O Scanner. Although
the host CPU would not be aware of such modules, the Remote I/O Scanner would
include them in its regular I/O scan. By reading or writing the assigned references in
the Remote I/O Scanner’s internal memory, an option module could independently
monitor or control I/O modules in the remote drop.
Example
A Remote I/O Scanner might be configured to receive from the CPU 256 outputs, from
%Q0001 to %Q0256, while output modules in the remote drop were configured using
Logicmaster 90 to use outputs %Q0001 to %Q0272. Although the module assigned to
references %Q00257 to %Q00272 would never receive outputs from the CPU, it could
be controlled by any PCM, GDS or ADS module in the remote drop. To control the
module, a PCM, GDS, or ADS module would send data to the corresponding %Q
outputs in the Remote I/O Scanner’s internal memory.
MEMORIES
%Q00001
%Q00256
SENDS
1–256
PCM
MEMORIES
%Q00001
%Q00256
%Q00257
%Q00272
%Q00001
%Q00272
OUTPUT
MODULES
52
a44889
REMOTE I/O
SCANNER
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Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
SENDS
257–272
Chapter
4 Configuration with Logicmaster 90–70
4
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter explains:
H
H
how to use Logicmaster 90–70 software to configure a Remote I/O Scanner and
the modules in a remote drop. See page 55.
how to convert Remote Drop configuration folders created with Release 3
Logicmaster software to Release 4 configuration folders. See page 54.
The instructions in this chapter are for rev. 4.01 or later of the Logicmaster 90–70
software. Either the serial or parallel version can be used. If you have an earlier
software version (3.0 or later is required for any Remote I/O Scanner configuration),
turn to appendix C for instructions.
Alternatively, a remote drop can be configured using a Hand–held Monitor (release
4.0 or later), provided there are no analog expanders in the remote drop. HHM
configuration does not provide all of the features that are available when configuring
with Logicmaster 90, such as I/O module options and support options. Differences
between the two configuration methods are listed in chapter 1. HHM configuration
instructions are given in chapter 6.
Configuration Limits
These configuration limits must not be exceeded:
1.
The maximum amount of data that may be exchanged with a Remote I/O Scanner
is 128 bytes of %I + %AI data and 128 bytes of %Q + %AQ data. For any particular
I/O type (I, Q, AI, AQ) of the I/O map, the length plus the offset cannot exceed the
current configured CPU limits.
2.
The reference addresses of the I/O modules in the Remote Drop cannot exceed the
Remote I/O Scanner limits.
3.
There must not be too many option modules in the remote drop. See chapter 1.
4.
The I/O configuration data must not be greater than 4500 bytes total. This amount
of configuration data will never be reached in a remote drop where all of the I/O
modules are included in the Remote I/O Scanner’s I/O map. Turn to appendix B if
the remote drop drop will have I/O modules configured outside the I/O map.
Filenames for Configuration Files
With Release 4 Logicmaster software, filenames for remote drop configuration files are
in the format dropXXX.cfg. For example, the configuration file for Drop033 is named
drop033.cfg. To view the list of configuration files in the currently–selected folder,
pressAlt/L.
53
4
Using Release 3 Configuration Files with Release 4 Software
With Release 3 of the Logicmaster software, multiple folders were needed for the
configuration: one for the PLC, and one for each remote drop. With Release 4 software,
all configuration files are contained within the same folder.
Instructions to convert existing, operational Release 3 remote drop folders to a Release
4 common folder are summarized below, and explained in detail on the following
pages.
1.
Load the configuration of each Remote I/O Scanner to the folder that has the
central PLC configuration. To do this:
A. Select the folder that contains the central PLC configuration.
B. Load the configuration from each Remote I/O Scanner in the system. The
configuration files created by the load will be in the form dropXXX.cfg, where
XXX is the Drop ID.
2.
If the conversion is being done on a system that is not operational, after you load a
configuration file to the folder, “attach” it to the PLC configuration as described
below.
“Attaching” Configuration Files
An unattached remote drop configuration file is one that exists in the same folder as
the PLC configuration, although it has not yet been included in the PLC configuration.
An example would be a Release 3 configuration file that has been loaded to the
common folder as described above. Although the file is present, the configuration data
it contains is still separate from the central PLC configuration. Follow these steps to
attach a remote drop configuration file to the PLC configuration.
54
1.
If the file has not already been loaded to the PLC configuration folder, load it as
described above.
2.
The Bus Controller must already be configured. If that has not been done,
configure it according to the instructions in the Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller
User’s Manual.
3.
Configure a new Remote I/O Scanner as a device on the bus.
4.
Zoom (F10) into the new Remote I/O Scanner’s configuration screen and change
its Drop ID to match the Drop ID of the remote drop configuration file being
attached.
5.
Press ESC to complete the attachment. The software saves the remote drop
configuration to disk and returns the display to the bus screen. At the next ESC
from the bus level, the software saves the entire configuration to disk, updating
both both the central PLC configuration and the remote drop configuration.
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
4
Configuring a Remote Drop
A Remote I/O Scanner must be configured as a device on a Genius bus. If the Bus
Controller has not been configured yet, refer to the configuration instructions in the
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual.
With the Bus Controller configured, select its slot on the rack configuration screen:
Adding a Remote I/O Scanner to the Bus
To add a Remote I/O Scanner to the bus, with the cursor on the Bus Controller’s slot,
press F10 (zoom) to go to the bus display:
Chapter 4 Configuration with Logicmaster 90–70
55
4
Selecting the Bus Address
Move the cursor to the Bus Address that will be used by the Remote I/O Scanner and
press F8 (Remote). (The Bus Address is the Remote I/O Scanner’s address on the
Genius bus; this number is not its DROP ID. See the explanations of Bus Address and
Drop ID on the next page if you would like more information.)
Next, this catalog list appears:
Press the Enter key. The Remote I/O Scanner is now entered at the selected Bus
Address. In the illustration, the Remote I/O Scanner is located at Bus Address 29.
The software assigns a DROP ID, as explained on the next page.
Press F10 (zoom) from this screen to configure the Remote I/O Scanner. The message
“Now saving Central PLC configuration to disk...” appears.
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Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
4
After the configuration is saved, the Remote Drop rack configuration screen appears.
The Remote I/O Scanner is located in slot 1.
The configuration screen shows the rack and slot location of the Bus Controller, and
the Bus Address, Remote Drop rack, and Drop ID of the Remote I/O Scanner.
Location of
Bus Controller
Remote Drop Rack
Drop ID
Genius Bus Address
of the Remote I/O Scanner
Drop IDs and Bus Addresses
As mentioned, a Remote I/O Scanner’s Drop ID is not the same as its Bus Address:
Bus Address
The Bus Address is the Remote I/O Scanner’s communications address
on the Genius bus. The Bus Address is selected when the Remote I/O
Scanner is configured as a Genius bus device. The range of Bus
Addresses is 0 to 31. Each Bus Address is unique only on that bus.
Drop ID
The Drop ID is a unique number from 16 to 254 by which the central
PLC can uniquely identify any device connected as a remote drop on
the Genius bus. There are two such devices, the Remote I/O Scanner
and the Series 90–30 Enhanced Genius Communications Module
(IC693CMM302).
The Remote I/O Scanner makes further use of the Drop ID by
incorporating it into its SNP ID as DropXXX where XXX is the 3–digit
Drop ID. The Logicmaster software assigns the letters “DROP ” by
default; these may be altered in the SNP ID screen, but the three last
digits may not.
As noted on the previous page, the software automatically assigns a
Drop ID to each Remote I/O Scanner. For the first Remote I/O Scanner
to be configured, the default Drop ID 33 should appear in the DROP
ID: field. Within a central PLC folder, Drop IDs are automatically
incremented from 033 – 254, and when those are used, 016 – 032. No
two remote drops can have the same Drop ID. If there is a “detached”
remote drop file in the current folder, its Drop ID is skipped in the
rotation.
If you prefer to use a Drop ID other than the one that has been
assigned, you can edit the Drop ID parameter on the Remote I/O
Scanner configuration screen.
Chapter 4 Configuration with Logicmaster 90–70
57
4
With the REMSCAN slot still selected, press F10 (zoom) to configure the Remote I/O
Scanner. The first configuration screen appears.
Auto I/O Map is ON
The next available Reference
Addresses within the PLC
configuration have been
automatically calculated
and assigned.
The information on this screen and entries you can make are described below.
Drop ID
The Remote I/O Scanner’s Drop ID also appears on this screen. It can be edited here, if
necessary.
Attaching a “Detached” File
To attach a configuration file that is present in the folder but not included in the PLC
configuration, change the Drop ID on this screen to match that used by the
configuration file. The file is read in and its configuration parameters are displayed.
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Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
4
I/O Map
The I/O map represents the boundaries of the I/O references assigned to the remote
drop which will be scanned by the central PLC. Before any modules are configured,
the I/O map begins at the next available reference in each data type, based on the PLC
configuration, and each reference type has a length of 0. You can change the reference
starting addresses and enter lengths manually, or you can use automatic I/O mapping.
The best method to use will depend on your application. If all I/O in the remote drop
will be scanned by the central PLC and no future additions to the remote drop are
planned, it is easiest to use automatic I/O mapping. However, if some I/O in the remote
drop will not be scanned by the central PLC, you may prefer not to have the software
automatically configure the I/O map. Details are on the following pages.
Ref Addr
The beginning configured reference for each data type. Initially, the
I/O map shows the next available reference in each data type, based on
the PLC configuration. If Auto I/O Map is ON, the software ensures
that all configured I/O will be scanned by the central PLC by adjusting
the I/O map. The first configured I/O module of a given data type will
have a starting reference offset that matches the offset of the I/O map.
Series Six or Series Five PLC: Reference Assignment You MUST
Length
use a Hand–held Monitor to change a Series Six or Series Five
reference previously configured using either Logicmaster 90–70 or a
Hand–held Monitor. You also must use an HHM to assign a reference
in register (rather than I/O) memory. For a Series Six or Series Five PLC
system that uses I/O table references, a previously–unconfigured
Remote I/O Scanner will accept a reference entered here. It will be the
reference for the first data type (in the sequence listed above) for
which you enter a non–zero length. For example, if the remote drop
has only analog input and output boards, the data lengths for %I and
%Q would be 0. You would enter a data length for %AI and %AQ.
The beginning reference entered for %AI would become the beginning
Series Six or Series Five reference for the remote drop.
The amount of data of each type to be exchanged with the PLC. For %I
and %Q memory, length is in bits (points). For %AI and %AQ
memory, length is in words (each word is two bytes). If Auto I/O Map
is ON, it is not necessary to enter lengths in the I/O map; within the
limits given below, the software will increment the lengths as you
configure I/O modules in the remote drop.
Data Length Limits Each remote drop transfers any mix of discrete
and analog inputs up to 128 bytes, and any mix of discrete and analog
outputs up to 128 bytes. These limits reflect the maximum amount of
data that can be sent on the Genius bus in a single transmission. Bit
memories (%I and %Q) are assigned on byte boundaries. Reference
limits for the Remote I/O Scanner are listed below. Reference limits for
the host may not necessarily be the same. Whichever is smaller
determines the practical limits of the configuration.
Memory Type
References
Available
Maximum
Quantity
%I
%Q
%AI
%AQ
12K
12K
8K
8K
up to 1024 bits
up to 1024 bits
up to 64 words
up to 64 words
Chapter 4 Configuration with Logicmaster 90–70
59
4
Using Auto I/O Map
Use Auto I/O Map if you want to use the software’s automatic I/O mapping feature.
With Auto I/O Map, the first I/O module of a given data type is assigned the same
offset as the offset of the I/O map. Auto I/O Map automatically supplies lengths for the
I/O map by incrementing the map as I/O modules are configured. In addition, if you
change the reference address of the first module configured for a data type, Auto I/O
Map changes the beginning address of the I/O map to match it.
If all I/O in the remote drop will be scanned by the central PLC:
For most applications, all I/O in the remote drop will be scanned by the central PLC:
I/O Map
Module Reference Addresses
If this is true for your application, begin with Auto I/O Map turned ON and use it to
configure the I/O map.
A. The software will use the beginning references in the I/O map for the first modules
of each type you configure. You can change the beginning reference for any
module.
B. As you configure additional modules, the software will update the I/O map.
C. After configuring modules, you can view the I/O map, and edit it if necessary.
If more I/O than is configured in the remote drop will be scanned by the PLC:
The extra references can be used for additional modules in the future, or for data
transfer between an intelligent module in the Remote Drop and the PLC CPU. The
extra references can be located before, between, or after the configured I/O module
references.
I/O Map
Assigned Module Reference Addresses
ÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉa
Extra
References
a Available
to assign
Auto I/O Map can be either ON or OFF. The best method to use depends on where the
extra references will be located.
A. To create extra references either before or after the I/O module references, turn
Auto I/O Map OFF and edit the offset and length of the I/O map directly.
B. To create extra references between I/O modules, turn Auto I/O Map On. When
configuring I/O modules, change the module starting references to skip the desired
references. Because these will be scanned, and will add to the Genius bus scan
time, be sure to only add reference that will be needed in the future.
One way to configure a system that will be expanded in the future is to configure the
complete future installation with Auto I/O Map ON, then delete the
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Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
4
presently–unavailable modules. Alternatively, you can could configure the existing
equipment with Auto I/O Map ON, then turn it OFF and edit the length fields to
provide space for the future modules, You need to plan this early; if you don’t leave
enough room for future modules, extensive reconfiguration may be required later on.
If some I/O will not be scanned by the central PLC:
I/Odata that is assigned to references outside the I/O map will not be exchanged with
the PLC during system operation. Such references would be controlled by an
intelligent module in the Remote Drop, as described in chapter 3. References outside
the I/O map can be located anywhere in the Remote I/O Scanner’s I/O memory.
I/O Map
Module Reference Addresses
Outside
I/O Map
b
ÉÉÉÉÉÉ
ÉÉÉÉÉÉ
For this type of application, Auto I/O Map can be turned OFF for part or all of the
Remote Drop configuration:
A. You can turn Auto I/O Map OFF before configuring any modules and enter in the
I/O Map lengths for each data type to be exchanged with the PLC. Then, configure
references for individual I/O modules that fall either inside or outside the I/O map,
as needed.
B. Or, you can begin with Auto I/O Map turned ON, and use it to configure all
modules that should be included in the I/O map. When you reach the point where
I/O references should be outside the I/O map, return to the Remote I/O Scanner’s
configuration screen, and turn Auto I/O Map OFF. The rest of the modules you
subsequently configure for this drop will be outside the I/O map.
Bus Scan Time Impact
As data lengths are incremented, either by entering them in the I/O map or with
automatic I/O mapping, the configuration software calculates the total number of
input and output bytes, and the amount of time the quantity of I/O specified will add
to the scan time of the Genius bus, based upon the configured baud rate. This
information is shown on the first Remote I/O Scanner configuration screen (this
information cannot be edited):
The Bus Scan Impact is the amount of time that will be added to the scan time of the
bus on which the Remote I/O Scanner is located by the quantity of data to be
exchanged with the host.
Chapter 4 Configuration with Logicmaster 90–70
61
4
Press the Page Down key to display the second configuration screen for the Remote
I/OScanner.
The selections you can make on this screen are explained below.
Genius Interface Entries
Several of the Genius entries relate to both redundancy and CPU redundancy. These
features are described in detail in the Bus Controller User’s Manual. Revision 3 of the
Bus Controller and Series 90–70 CPU are required to use redundancy; however,
Revision 4 products, which provide more complete support, are recommended for
redundancy applications.
Baud Rate
This field is automatically filled in with the baud rate configured for
the bus controller for the bus on which the Remote I/O Scanner
resides. If you want to change the baud rate, return to the Bus
Controller configuration screen. Note that all devices on the bus must
be configured for the same baud rate.
Input Def
Specifies the state presented to the PLC for all %I and %AI references
in the remote drop, in the event communications with the Remote I/O
Scanner are lost. The options are to default off or to hold last state.
Out Enabled
Specifies whether output data will be transmitted from this Bus
Controller to the remote drop at powerup. The options are enabled or
disabled. If outputs are enabled on this screen, the Bus Controller
sends outputs to the remote drop automatically after it logs in. If
outputs are disabled on this screen, the Bus Controller does not
automatically send outputs to the remote drop when it logs in. If
outputs are disabled, the application program must subsequently send
a COMREQ to the Bus Controller to enable outputs for the remote
drop.
BSM CTRLR In a dual bus system, if the Remote I/O Scanner will be used to switch
busses, select YES. If this entry is set to YES, the following entry will
also be set to YES automatically.
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Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
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BSM Present
In a dual bus system, if the Remote Drop will be located downsteam of
another device that controls bus switching (either a Bus Switching
Module or another Remote I/O Scanner), set this entry to YES.
Timeout Sec
If either of the previous two entries is YES, and the total bus scan time
is expected to exceed 100mS, set this entry to 10. This entry is
equivalent to the Switch Time entry made for the Bus Controller. It is
the amount of time that will be allowed for switching on a dual bus.
The choices are 2.5 seconds and 10 seconds. If the Remote I/O Scanner
stops receiving output data from the Bus Controller, it will wait for this
specified time period before defaulting outputs in the Remote Drop.
CFG Protect
After establishing the configuration for the Remote Drop, set this entry
to YES to prevent changes.
Redund
Mode
This entry determines the CPU redundancy mode of the system. For
most applications, it will be NONE, for no CPU redundancy. The other
choices are Hot Standby and Duplex. See the Bus Controller User’s
Manual for details. The Remote I/O Scanner can only be configured for
Duplex CPU redundancy if all of its modules are discrete.
Duplex Def
If the entry for Redund Mode above was Duplex, the Remote I/O
Scanner will operate in Duplex mode. It will accept output data from
two Bus Controllers, and compare the corresponding outputs. If the
two outputs match, the Remote I/O Scanner sets the output to the
commanded state. If they do not match, the Remote I/O Scanner sets
the output to this configured default state. All outputs in the Remote
Drop will use this same default state.
Redundancy?
Set this entry to YES if the Remote I/O Scanner will be a redundant
device on the bus of its bus controller. The bus controller must also be
set up for redundancy. Setting this to YES causes the configuration of
this Remote I/O Scanner to be automatically associated with any
“matching” internal bus controller.
SNP Port Entries
These are the SNP port communications parameters. If the Remote I/O Scanner will be
part of a Serial Network Protocol system, these parameters must be set to match the
SNP parameters of the PLC.
Baud Rate
Defaults to 19200 bps. The other choices are 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800,
and 9600 bits per second.
Parity
The number of parity bits added to each word. The default is ODD.
You can also choose EVEN and NONE.
Stop Bits
All communications use at least 1 stop bit, which is the default. For
slower communications, select 2.
Modem TT
The modem turnaround time delay. 1 count = 1/100 second. 0 to 255
counts can be specified. The default is 0.
Idle Time
The maximum communications idle time, which can be 1 to 60
seconds. The default is 10 seconds.
For multidrop communications, a unique SNP ID is required for each device in the
network. A Remote I/O Scanner automatically sets its SNP ID to the form DropXXX
Chapter 4 Configuration with Logicmaster 90–70
63
4
during the Store operation. XXX stands for a Drop ID of 016 to 254. This can be
changed on the SNP ID screen. The last three digits of the SNP ID refer to the Remote
I/OScanner’s Drop ID and cannot be changed directly.
Sweep Control Entries
Most applications will use the default programmer and communications windows
times.
Prog Window Programmer window time. The range is 0 to 255 milliseconds. 10mS is
the default.
Comm
Window
Communications window time. The range is 0 to 255 milliseconds.
255mS is the default.
When you complete the Remote I/O Scanner configuration, press the ESC key to
return to the Remote Drop rack display.
If Auto I/O Map is turned ON and no lengths have yet been assigned, no I/O map
entries appear on this screen, as illustrated below.
If you have assigned a length to any data type, the beginning address for that data
type appears in the I/O map:
In the above example, lengths have been assigned to %I, %Q and %AI, but not to
%AQ.
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Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
4
Configure the Modules in the Remote Drop
Configuring modules in a Remote Drop is the the same as configuring modules in the
central PLC. First, select a slot:
Use the function keys to select a module type. When the catalog number screen
appears, you can either enter a catalog number or use the function keys again to
display a list of appropriate modules with their catalog numbers.
A module configuration screen like the following example appears:
Module Reference Address
You can use the module reference address shown, or enter a different one.
Module Characteristics
Some module configuration screens, like the one shown in this example, also list
selectable characteristics for that type of module. For this module, they are Interrupt
Chapter 4 Configuration with Logicmaster 90–70
65
4
Enabled/Disabled,Transition Positive/Negative, and Input Filter Time. Configure such
selectable features as appropriate for your application.
Note
Such module features can only be selected using the Logicmaster
90–70 software. If a remote drop is configured (or reconfigured) using a
Genius Hand–held Monitor, the I/O boards in the remote drop will
operate in default mode only––optional features cannot be selected.
Return to the Rack Display
After configuring a module, press ESC to return to the Remote Drop rack display.
If Auto I/O Map is ON, the offset in the map determines the offset for the module. This
is the reference address displayed on the Remote Drop configuration screen, as shown
above. This beginning reference address can be changed on the I/O map (on the
Remote I/O Scanner configuration screen, or after module configuration, by
responding Y to the prompt).
If Auto I/O Map is OFF, entering a module or changing a reference address does not
change the I/O map.
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4
Entering Additional Modules
Configure the rest of the modules in the Remote Drop in the same way. You can also
copy, delete, and undelete module configurations.
Modules of the same type are automatically given the next Reference Address that is
available in the remote drop.
Reference Address
increments automatically,
based on limits for the
remote drop.
You can use this address, or change it. If you enter a higher address, the references you
skip will remain part of the I/O map (assuming that the module lies within the span of
the I/O map limits). If you skip references, remember that you will be consuming
references in both the remote drop and the PLC, and adding to the Genius bus scan
time.
Chapter 4 Configuration with Logicmaster 90–70
67
4
Completing the Remote Drop Configuration
For the example configuration, the Remote Drop rack display looks like this:
The I/O map and references for each module are displayed.
When you are finished configuring the modules in the Remote Drop, press ESC.
If Auto I/O Map is ON, when you press ESC from the Remote Drop rack configuration
screen as instructed on the previous page, the software prompts:
This Remote Drop’s I/O MAP has been automatically configured: view it? (Y/N)
If Auto I/O Map is OFF, no prompt appears.
If you want to save the configuration and return to the bus screen without viewing or
changing the I/O map, enter N. If you want to view or edit the I/O map, enter Y.
If Auto I/O Map is OFF, when you press ESC from the Remote Drop rack configuration
screen, the configuration is saved, and the display returns to the bus configuration
screen. If you want to view or edit the I/O map, zoom (F10) to the Remote Drop rack
configuration screen, then zoom (F10) to the Remote I/O Scanner configuration screen.
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Reference Overlaps
If you have entered a conflicting reference address, the following warning appears:
Overlapping addresses
Overlapping references are permitted in %Q and %AQ. Overlapping references in %I
and %AI are not permitted; such a configuration is not valid.
With the next press of any key after the message appears, the configuration is saved to
disk. Return to the Remote Drop configuration screens and remove the conflict.
In the example illustrated above, the duplicated references appear on the same screen,
so they are easy to locate and correct. If you are not sure where the conflicting
references are located, use the Reference View feature. See page 71 for more
information about Reference View.
Chapter 4 Configuration with Logicmaster 90–70
69
4
Changing Reference Addresses and Lengths
The I/O map shows the beginning Reference Address or Length assigned to the
Remote I/O Scanner for %I, %Q, %AI, and %AQ data.
You can change any reference address or length in the I/O map. If you change a
reference address after entering modules of that data type in the Remote Drop, you
can have the software automatically reassign their reference addresses to begin at the
new I/O map reference address by responding “Y” at the prompt.
I/O Map base address changed; adjust I/O presently inside map boundaries? (Y/N)
Viewing/Editing the I/O Map
If Auto I/O Map is ON, when you press ESC from the Remote Drop rack configuration
screen as instructed on the previous page, enter Y in response to the following prompt
if you want to view or edit the I/O map.
This Remote Drop’s I/O Map has been automatically configured, view it? (Y/N)
You can also view and edit the I/O map by returning to the Remote I/O Scanner
configuration screen at any time during Remote Drop configuration.
If Auto I/O Map is OFF, when you press ESC from the Remote Drop rack configuration
screen, the configuration is saved, and the display returns to the bus configuration
screen. If you want to view or edit the I/O map, zoom (F10) to the Remote Drop rack
configuration screen, then zoom (F10) to the Remote I/O Scanner configuration screen.
The Logicmaster software will not prevent you from configuring an I/O conflict. Be
careful not to enter an address that overlaps the references assigned to other modules.
If any module references are outside the I/O map, the screen displays:
***** NOTE: Configured modules(s) are outside the I/O MAP *****
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4
Displaying Configured References
If you want to display references configured for the PLC or a Remote Drop, use
Reference View. Reference View shows any reference conflicts that have been created.
Viewing PLC References
To see the references in the Remote I/O Scanner’s I/O Map together with the rest of the
PLC configuration, select Reference View (shift–F3) from the rack or bus screen. The
illustrations below show Reference Views for a system with three Remote I/O
Scanners.
%I
%Q
%AI
%AQ
Reference Conflicts in the PLC Configuration
The PLC Reference View screens show reference conflicts between modules in the PLC
rack(s). Conflicts in the output tables (%Q and %AQ), which are not considered “fatal”
conflicts, are indicated with one asterisk. Conflicts in the input tables (%I and %AI) are
considered fatal; they are indicated with two asterisks. The illustration above shows a
conflict in the Analog Output (%AQ) Table between the I/O maps of two Remote I/O
Scanners (Drop IDs 017 and 034).
The PLC Reference View screens do NOT show conflicts among the modules in a
Remote Drop. If you want to view the references for a Remote Drop, cursor to the
Remote I/O Scanner entry, and press F1 (expand). Or if you want to correct a conflict in
the Remote I/O Scanner configuration, cursor to the Remote I/O Scanner entry and
press shift–F1 (RACK) or F10 (zoom).
Chapter 4 Configuration with Logicmaster 90–70
71
4
Viewing Remote Drop References
The Remote Drop Reference View screens show references assigned to individual
modules in a Remote Drop, and indicates reference overlaps as well as modules that
are outside the Remote I/O Scanners’s I/O Map. You can reach the Remote Drop
Reference View Screens by selecting REF VU (shift–F3) while in a Remote Drop
configuration, or by selecting Expand (F1) from any PLC Reference View screen while
the Remote I/O Scanner entry is highlighted.
Each Remote Drop Reference View screen shows the references of that data type in the
I/O Map followed by the references assigned to the modules in the Remote Drop.
%I
Drop ID of the
Remote Drop
Reference overlap (fatal)
Remote Drop
rack and slot
%Q
Module outside
the I/O Map
%AI
%AQ
Reference Conflicts in the PLC Configuration
The Remote Drop Reference View screens show conflicts between modules in the
Remote Drop. These conflicts are not shown on the PLC configuration Reference View.
Modules with overlaps are indicated with asterisks. The illustration above shows an
overlap in the Remote I/O Scanner’s Discrete Input (%I) Table between the modules in
Remote Drop #34, rack 0, slots 2 and 3. If you want to go directly to a configuration
screen to correct an overlap, highlight the entry and press F10 (zoom).
Modules Outside the I/O Map
If a module is outside the I/O Map, an exclamation mark (!) appears to the left of its
description. In the example above, the output module in slot 7, rack 0 of remote drop
#34 has a beginning reference address of %Q00129, but the I/O Map only includes
%Q00097–%Q00128.
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Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
4
Copying, Deleting, and Undeleting
Individual modules in the Remote Drop configuration can be copied, deleted, and
undeleted in the same way as modules in the PLC configuration. You can also copy,
delete, and undelete Remote I/O Scanners and their remote drop configuration files
from the bus level. (A Remote I/O Scanner cannot be copied, deleted, or undeleted
from within the Remote Drop rack configuration.)
Copying a Remote Drop Configuration
Once a Remote I/O Scanner has been entered into the PLC configuration, it can be
copied to any other location on the Genius bus. The copy will include all modules that
are configured for the remote drop, in the same relative rack positions. To copy a
remote drop configuration, place the cursor on the Remote I/O Scanner in the bus
display and press the Copy key. In the bus display, move the cursor to the bus address
for the copy and press Enter. Press ESC to quit Copy mode.
In the copy, the Logicmaster 90–70 software automatically increments the Remote
Drop ID and Reference Addresses to the next ones available. The data lengths remain
the same. For instance, if the first Remote I/O Scanner has been assigned to use 32 bits
of %I memory, the duplicated configuration of the next Remote I/O Scanner would
also initially assign %I memory the length of 32 bits.
Fatal overlaps (%I or %AI) cannot be created by a copy.
Deleting a Remote Drop Configuration
To delete a Remote Drop configuration, go to the bus configuration screen and place
the cursor on the Remote I/O Scanner. Press DELETE (shift–F4). The screen prompts:
Delete Remote I/O Scanner from bus and corresponding configuration file? (Y/N)
To delete the Remote Drop, press Y.
The software retains the most recently–deleted module configuration. If you delete a
Remote Drop, the deleted configuration is saved until you: delete another module, exit
PLC configuration, zoom into another Remote Drop, or select another configuration
with the CFGSEL key. While it is saved, a deleted Remote Drop configuration can be
undeleted as described below.
Undeleting a Remote Drop Configuration
To get back the Remote Drop configuration you have deleted most recently, on the bus
configuration screen place the cursor on the intended slot. Press UNDEL (shift–F5).
The Remote I/O Scanner reappears in the slot.
A Remote I/O Scanner configuration can only be undeleted once.
Chapter 4 Configuration with Logicmaster 90–70
73
4
Selecting an Existing Configuration File
The Configuration Select feature can be used to display and select the available
configuration files. To use Configuration Select, use the CFGSEL (shift–F6) key from
any rack, bus, or Remote Drop rack screen.
You can enter the name of the file (for a Remote Drop, use the format dropXXX, as
discussed above), or select it from the list on the screen. When you select a
configuration file by pressing the Enter key, that configuration appears on your screen.
Rack 0 of the configuration is displayed.
74
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
4
Storing the Configuration
In addition to storing the central PLC configuration, a remote drop configuration
created with Logicmaster 90 software must be stored to each Remote I/O Scanner as
described below.
Storing the Configuration to the PLC
Use the Utility functions to store the program folder to the PLC as described in the
Logicmaster 90–70 User’s Manual.
Storing a Remote Drop Configuration
Follow the steps below to store a remote drop configuration to a Remote I/O Scanner.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Set up the programmer to communicate with the Remote I/O Scanner.
Go to the Program Utility Functions menu.
Select F2 ... Store from Programmer to PLC .
Press the Enter key. A list of the remote drop configurations in the folder appears:
S T O R E
F R O M
C O N F I G U R A T I O N
P R O G R A M M E R
T O
D A T A
P L C
SELECT CONFIGURATION FILE TO STORE:
CUR
PLC
DROP017
DROP 033
DROP034
<< TO SELECT A CONFIGURATION FILE, CURSOR TO OR TYPE ITS FILE NAME >>
<< AND PRESS ENTER; USE PGUP/PGDN TO PAGE THROUGH CONFIGURATION
>>
<< FILE NAMES; PRESS ESCAPE TO EXIT.
>>
5.
Select the configuration file to be stored by typing its filename or selecting it from
the list. If the list of filenames is long, you can use the Pg/Up, Pg/Dn, Home and
End keys to display other entries.
6.
With the filename selected, press Enter again. The screen prompts: I/O scanning
will be suspended during STORE; continue store? (Y/N).
7.
If you press Y, the configuration is stored.
8.
After a successful store, the SNP ID for the Remote I/O Scanner is displayed in the
status area at the bottom of the Logicmaster screen.
Chapter 4 Configuration with Logicmaster 90–70
75
Chapter
5
5 Logicmaster 90 Operation with a Remote
section level 1 1
Drop
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter explain how to set up a Logicmaster 90 programmer to communicate with
a remote drop. It also describes functional differences in Logicmaster 90 when it is
communicating with a remote drop.
Overview
A Logicmaster 90–70 programmer can be used to configure and monitor the operation
of a remote drop. Either serial or parallel Logicmaster can be used. With the serial
version, the connection to the remote drop can be direct or via a multidrop network.
With the parallel version, connection to the remote drop must be direct.
Chapter 2 explains how to complete the hardware connection between the
programmer and a Remote I/O Scanner. Be sure to follow the grounding instructions
for the programmer.
After starting up the programmer, use the Logicmaster 90 software to specify the type
of communications desired. This is explained on the next page. The same setup screen
is also used to communicate with remote drop when the programmer is connected at
another point on a multidrop network. The status line at the bottom of the
programmer screen will identify the device being communicated with.
Whether a direct or multidrop connection is made, the Logicmaster 90 software will
function slightly differently than it does with the programmer communicating with the
host. The specific differences are described in this chapter.
77
5
Setting Up Programmer Communications with a Remote Drop
To set up the programmer for remote drop communications, follow these steps:
1.
Go to the LM90–70 Programmer Setup Menu:
2.
In the Setup Menu, choose F3 ..... Select SNP/Parallel Connections
The following screen appears:
This screen lists the available devices in the network. Each PLC or remote drop on
the network should be included here once its SNP ID has been configured.
3.
If the remote drop will be part of a multidrop network, enter its SNP ID.
4.
Check the current Port Connection method. It should be:
A. Parallel: if you want to physically connect a programmer using parallel
Logicmaster 90–70 to a Remote I/O Scanner. A Bus Transmitter Module must
be installed in the remote drop to permit connection of the programmer with
the parallel version of Logicmaster 90–70.
B. Direct: if you want to physically connect a programmer using serial
Logicmaster 90–70 to a Remote I/O Scanner.
C. Multidrop: if you want to communicate with a remote drop over a multidrop
serial communications network.
78
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
5
Status Display for a Remote Drop
When the programmer is communicating with the PLC CPU, the status lines at the
bottom of the screen display information about the CPU. When communicating with a
remote drop, the status lines display information about the Remote I/O Scanner.
The first field identifies the SNP ID for the remote drop. The second shows whether
the Remote I/O Scanner is presently running, and scanning the I/O modules in the
remote drop.
ID:DROP033
ID:DROP016 RUN/IOSCAN
7ms FIXED ONLINE L4: ACC: WRITE CONFIG CONFIG EQUAL
PRG: LESSON
CONFIG VALID
REPLACE
The third field shows the current I/O scan time of the Remote I/O Scanner. This is the
time required for the Remote I/O Scanner to scan all the I/O modules in the remote
drop. The scan cannot be stopped from the programmer.
The fifth field shows the access level of the programmer. When communicating with a
remote drop, it is always level 4. It cannot be changed.
Chapter 5 Logicmaster 90 Operation with a Remote Drop
79
5
Logicmaster 90 Software,
Programmer Differences for a Remote Drop
When used with a remote drop, the features of the programmer are similar to the
features used with a Series 90–70 PLC.
Features Not Used for a Remote Drop
Certain programmer features are not used for a remote drop. If you try to select any of
those features while the programmer is communicating with the remote drop (either
by direct connection, or over a multidrop network), this message
Function not supported by Remote Drop
will appear at the top of the screen.
CPU Configuration Feature Differences
The following differences exist in the CPU Configuration portion of the programming
software.
Feature
80
From Remote Drop LM90–70 Folder
(Attached to Remote I/O Scanner)
Time–of–Day Clock
Time and date reflect the elapsed time since starting
up the remote drop. Date starts at 1–1–90. Time
and date cannot be reset with release 3 or earlier
versions of Logicmaster 90. The Equal function is
not supported by a remote drop, and new values
cannot be entered.
Assign SNP ID
SNP ID is unique identifier consisting of the drop’s
ID (a number from 016 to 254), following 0–4 alphanumeric characters. If online and communi–
cating, initially the Assign SNP ID screen shows
DROPxxx, where xxx is the Drop ID. A different
name can be substituted, if desired. In offline
mode, only asterisks appear.
Memory Allocation and Point
Fault Enable Screen
Function is not supported by remote drop.
FaultCategory Screen
Function is not supported by remote drop.
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
5
Programming Software: Differences for a Remote Drop
The features of the Logicmaster 90–70 software have the differences described below
when used with the remote drop (versus normal PLC operation).
Feature
From Remote Drop LM90–70 Folder (Attached to
Remote I/O Scanner)
ProgramDisplay/Edit
When communicating directly with a remote drop,
programmer is NOT EQUAL to PLC. Real–time updates do not occur for the display, and online editing
changes cannot occur. PLC programs should not be
edited while the remote drop folder is selected.
Reference Tables
When communicating directly with a remote drop,
%I,%AI, %Q, %AQ, %R, %S, %SA, %SB, and %SC
references can be viewed and reference states/values
can be toggled. The remote drop contains no information in %L, %M, %T, %P, and %G reference
tables.
PLC Control and Status
Fault Tables The only function supported is the fault
table displays for the Remote I/O Scanner and I/O
modules in the remote drop. Faults can be cleared
from the tables. If the Remote I/O Scanner is in Stop/
Faulted mode, clearing faults from these tables may
return the module to Run mode.
Programmer Mode and Setup
Normal operation.
Program Folder Functions
Normal operation.
Utilities
Load to Programmer: Only configurations can be
uploaded from a remote drop. The SNP ID of the
remote drop must be assigned already.
Store from Programmer: Only configurations can be
stored in the remote drop. The SNP ID of the remote
drop must be assigned already.
Verify with Programmer: Only remote drop configuration can be verified against folders in Logicmaster
90–70. The SNP ID of the remote drop must be assignedalready.
ClearMemory: Only remote drop configuration can
be cleared. The SNP ID of the remote drop must be
assignedalready.
ConfigurationPrint and
Reference View
Normal operation. Provides details of contents of
remote drop. See the Logicmaster 90–70 Software
User’s Manual for details.
Chapter 5 Logicmaster 90 Operation with a Remote Drop
81
Chapter
6
6 Remote Drop Configuration
with a Hand–held Monitor
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter explains how to configure a Remote I/O Scanner and the I/O modules in a
remote drop using a Genius Hand–held Monitor. HHM version 4.0 (IC660HHM501G)
or later is required. If the remote drop includes any Analog Expander Modules,
Logicmaster 90 must be used for configuration; do not use a Hand–held Monitor.
Note
Do not use a Hand–held Monitor to change a remote drop
configuration previously entered from another source, unless you
want to replace the entire configuration and reset all module options
to their defaults.
Remote drops configured with Logicmaster 90–70 are automatically
protected. Please check carefully before removing configuration
protection with a Hand–held Monitor.
For Additional Information, Also See:
Chapter 1 for a table comparing the features available with each configuration method.
Chapter 4 for Logicmaster 90–70 configuration instructions. Also see chapter 4 for
information about adding configurations created with Release 3 of the Logicmaster
software to programs created with Release 4 software.
Appendix C for configuration instructions using Release 3 of the Logicmaster software.
The Hand–held Monitor datasheet for basic operating instructions.
83
6
Overview
A Hand–held Monitor provides automatic configuration of I/O references for a remote
drop. The Hand–held Monitor automatically assigns references for the
presently–installed Series 90–70 I/O modules only. It does so in ascending order,
starting with the slot next to the Remote I/O Scanner. When a remote drop is
configured with a HHM, all I/O modules will operate in default mode; module options
can only be configured with the Logicmaster 90–70 software.
Configuration selections that are made with the Hand–held Monitor include:
H
H
H
H
The Device Number of the Remote I/O Scanner.
H
H
H
Remote Drop ID.
I/O or register addresses for a Series Six or Series Five PLC.
Baud rate for communicating on the Genius bus.
Series 90–70 data types (%I, %Q, %AI, and %AQ) and lengths for the Remote I/O
Scanner.
Redundancy features.
Configuration protection.
In addition, the Hand–held Monitor will display information about each of the
modules present in the remote drop:
H
H
H
H
A description of the module.
The module’s rack and slot location.
The module’s I/O type (%I, %Q, %AI, or %AQ).
The beginning reference assigned to the module by the Hand–held Monitor.
The module display screens are read–only. Module features and references cannot be
selected or changed.
Note
The Hand–held Monitor automatically creates a configuration for a
nine–slot rack, regardless of the actual rack size. If the remote drop
has a five–slot rack, the Hand–held Monitor will later assume that
there are unfilled slots. If this is a problem, Logicmaster 90–70 can be
used for configuration, or to edit an automatic configuration done with
a Hand–held Monitor. Then, the configuration can be stored to the
Remote I/O Scanner.
84
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
6
When configured with a Hand–held Monitor, the Remote I/O Scanner automatically
assigns I/O references to the modules in the remote drop starting with the reference(s)
assigned by the user via the Program Block ID screens. The left–most module of each
type (%I, %Q, %AI, or %AQ) in the rack receives the first available reference of the
appropriate type. The HHM then incrementally assigns references according to the
types and locations of modules in the rack, in left–to–right order.
Example
For this remote drop, %I, %Q, %AI, and %AQ references each begin at 0001. There is
no requirement that they all start at the same value.
Left ' reference values increase ' Right
Rack 0
IO 4AOUT
IO 8AIN
IO 8AIN
IO 16OUT
IO 32IN
IO 32OUT
IO 16IN
IO 32IN
Scanner
PS
32–ckt discrete input module: %I0001–%I0032
16–ckt discrete input module: %I0033–%I0048
32–ckt discrete output module: %Q0001–%Q0032
32–ckt discrete input module: %I0049–%I0080
16–ckt discrete output module: %Q0033–%Q0048
8–channel analog input module: %AI0001–%AI0008
8–channel analog input module: %AI0009–%AI0016
4–channel analog output module: %AQ0001–%AQ0004
Chapter 6 Remote Drop Configuration with a Hand–held Monitor
85
6
Set Up the Hand–held Monitor
1.
If the remote drop is connected to an operating bus, the Hand–held Monitor
must be the ONLY Hand–held Monitor plugged into any device on the bus.
If the remote drop that is NOT connected to a properly–terminated Genius bus,
install a 150Ω terminating resistor across the upper Serial 1 and Serial 2 terminals
on the Remote I/O Scanner. The resistor is needed only for off–line
communications between the HHM and the Remote I/O Scanner; it should be
removed prior to bus installation.
2.
Begin with the HHM turned off. Attach it to the upper port on the Remote I/O
Scanner.
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REMOTE DROP
HAND
HELD
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a44757
GENIUS
BUS
3.
Turn the Hand–held Monitor on. Adjust its baud rate if necessary.
Previously unconfigured Remote I/O Scanners will operate at 153.6 Kbaud
standard. You should be aware of the operating baud rate before trying to
communicate with the Remote I/O Scanner, and the Hand–held Monitor’s baud
rate should be set correspondingly.
After the Hand–held Monitor completes its powerup sequence, the Home menu
appears.
4.
Be sure the HHM is set up for the type of host that will be controlling the system.
If necessary, go to the HHM Utilities to select the CPU host type.
If the message FUNCTION DISABLED appears, the corresponding HHM option has
been disabled. To continue, it will be necessary to change HHM options in the HHM
Utilities menu. If the message CONFIG PROTECTED appears, the Remote I/O Scanner
configuration has been protected. To continue, it will be necessary to “unprotect” the
remote drop’s configuration.
86
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
6
Display the Configuration Main Menu
To begin remote drop configuration, select F3 (Configuration). The configuration Main
Menu appears.
F1:PROG BLOCK ID
F2:CONFIG BLOCK
F3:COPY CONFIG
F4:
From this menu, select Program Block ID (F1) to complete the basic remote drop
configuration screens.
After completing these screens, press F2 (Configure Block) to complete the Genius
configuration screens, or to display information about the I/O modules in the remote
drop.
Select Device Number
for Remote I/O Scanner
b
For Series Six or Series Five
PLC, select I/O or register
reference address.
b
Select baud rate
b
Select data types and lengths
b
Select a Remote Drop ID
Display modules in the remote
drop (READ ONLY)
b
Select bus redundancy *
b
Select BSM control *
b
Select bus redundancy *
b
Select configuration protection *
'
*
Remote I/O Scanner version IC697BEM733B (or later) is required for Genius bus redundancy,
bus switching operation, or CPU redundancy. Availability of redundancy features depends on
the Bus Controller and host type.
Chapter 6 Remote Drop Configuration with a Hand–held Monitor
87
6
Select the Device Number
The first step in configuring any device on a Genius bus is to assign its Device Number
(bus address). This is a number from 0 to 31 representing the serial bus address of the
device. There are 32 available addresses on a bus. One is needed for the Hand–held
Monitor; typically this is Device Number 0. Another is needed for the Bus Controller.
Typically, this is Device Number 31. A Remote I/O Scanner is usually assigned a Device
Number from 1 to 30. Duplicate Device Numbers disrupt communications and are not
permitted.
Note
If a Remote I/O Scanner has a Device Number conflict on an operating
bus, it will not scan the modules in the remote drop until the fault is
cleared.
The HHM configuration screen appearance depends on the host CPU type configured
for the Hand–held Monitor.
HHM Display (PLC Host Mode)
PROG BLOCK ID
I/O
?–
??
BLOCK NO. ?
ref blk
nxt
If the host is a Series 90–70 PLC, the F1 key function (ref) is not displayed.
HHM Display (PCIM Mode)
PROG BLOCK ID
__?__
#?
BLOCK NO. ?
ref
nxt
Configuration Steps
88
1.
Press F2 (Block). Then, enter the Device Number (1–30). If you make a mistake,
press F2 again, then enter the correct number.
2.
Press the F3 (Enter) key. If you are configuring the Remote I/O Scanner on an
operating bus, an error message appears if the number has been used for another
device. If the Remote I/O Scanner is not online, be sure to assign a unique Device
Number, or there will be a Device Number conflict when it is powered up on the
bus.
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
6
Select a Series Six or Series Five PLC Reference Address
If the host is a Series Six PLC or Series Five PLC, an I/O or register reference address
must be assigned to the Remote I/O Scanner. This is done on the Program Block ID
screen. It is also necessary to configure Series 90–70 data types and lengths, as
described later in this chapter.
HHM Display (Series Six/Series Five Host CPU Mode)
PROG BLOCK ID
I/O
?–
??
BLOCK NO. ?
ref blk
nxt
Configuration Steps
1.
The Reference Address is entered in the same PROG BLOCK ID display. Press F1
(Reference).
2.
To select register or I/O memory, press the F2 (Toggle) key to toggle the memory
type. With the correct memory type displayed, press F3 (Enter).
If I/O memory is used, the amount required is equal to the number of bits of
discrete data PLUS analog data. Each analog reference used consumes 16 points.
Data is stored beginning at the assigned I/O reference. In the Input Table, the
sequence is: discrete inputs then analog inputs. In the Output Table, the sequence
is discrete outputs then analog outputs. This is illustrated in chapter 3.
If register memory is used, an amount is required that is equal to the total number
of bytes of input data PLUS all of the output data. Data is stored beginning at the
assigned register reference. The sequence is: discrete inputs, then analog inputs,
then discrete outputs, and analog outputs last. See chapter 3 for more information.
3.
Key in the number of the block’s beginning I/O reference. The Hand–held
Monitor will accept any number up to 65,535; the number you enter must be
appropriate for the PLC.
4.
If you make a mistake entering the number, press F2 (Change), F1 (Reference),
then enter the correct number. Press the F3 (Enter) key. The HHM will
automatically supply the range of references correct for the block.
Chapter 6 Remote Drop Configuration with a Hand–held Monitor
89
6
Select the Baud Rate
Genius bus communications can occur at any of four baud rates: 153.6 Kbaud
standard, 153.6 Kbaud extended, 76.8 Kbaud, or 38.4 Kbaud. The default is 153.6 K
baud (standard). The Genius I/O System User’s Manual gives guidelines for baud rate
selection.
Each device’s communications baud rate must be the same as that used by all other devices on the
bus, or the bus will not operate.
HHM Display
SELECT BAUD RATE
ACTIVE=153.6K ST
PROG =153.6K ST
tgl entr nxt
Configuration Steps
90
1.
If the baud rate should be changed, press F2 (toggle). When the desired baud rate
appears beside P R O G = , press F3 (enter).
2.
If the baud rate is changed on any block that is currently installed on an operating
bus, it must be changed on all devices on that bus. After changing the baud rate,
you must cycle power at the same time to all devices on the bus to use the new
baud rate.
3.
Press F4 (nxt) to continue configuring the Remote I/O Scanner.
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
6
Select Series 90–70 Data Lengths
The Remote I/O Scanner must be assigned a starting address and length for one or
more of the following data types that will be used by I/O modules in its remote drop:
%I the discrete input table
%Q the discrete output table
%AI the analog input table
%AQ the analog output table
These entries are required whether or not the host CPU is a Series 90–70 PLC. They
determine the amount of discrete and analog input data the Remote I/O Scanner will
send, and the amount of discrete and analog output data it will accept. They also
determine the relative assignments of modules of the same type which are present in
the remote drop.
If the host is a Series 90–70 PLC, these selections will usually correspond to the
memory assignments made for the remote drop during PLC configuration.
If the host is a Series Six or Series Five PLC, these selections are used only to determine
the amounts of data sent and received by the Remote I/O Scanner. For the PLC to
handle the data correctly, a beginning address in I/O Table or Register Memory must
also be configured, as described previously.
The lengths selected should include all the I/O circuits or channels in the remote drop.
If a data length is too short, modules that overflow the configured limit will not be
serviced by the CPU. The Remote I/O Scanner will issue a diagnostic message. The
condition is not necessarily a fatal fault.
If the data length selected is longer than currently required, unassigned references will
remain at the end of the group. Although these references are not used by an actual
I/O board, they are considered to be part of the remote drop’s input or output data.
During system operation, the Remote I/O Scanner WILL transmit all %I and %AI
references assigned to it, including, under these circumstances, references that are not
used by input modules in the remote drop. Similarly, the host WILL send all the %Q
and %AQ references assigned to the Remote I/O Scanner, including references that are
not used by output modules in the remote drop. This transmission of unassigned
references lengthens the bus scan time, so it is not recommended unless the references
are needed for future expansion.
Chapter 6 Remote Drop Configuration with a Hand–held Monitor
91
6
The next screen that appears is used to assign the data types and lengths.
HHM Display
PROG REMOTE MAP
%I
____
LENGTH(PTS) ____
tgl ref send nxt
Configuration Steps
1.
To select a data type, press F1 (tgl). In sequence, line 2 will display: %I (discrete
input bits), %Q, (discrete output bits), %AI (analog input words), %AQ (analog
output words). Pressing F1 (tgl) a fourth time displays the Drop ID configuration
screen.
2.
With the desired data type displayed, press F2 (ref) to select the beginning Series
90–70 reference for that data type.
3.
Press F3 (entr) to enter the desired data length. For %I and %Q, this is a value in
discrete bits ( P T S). It must begin on a byte boundary (a number which is 1 more
than a multiple of 8, such as 9, 17, or 25). For %AI and %AQ, the length value is in
channels ( C H S ), each of which is a 2–byte word.
The lengths entered must not add up to more than 128 bytes of inputs and 128
bytes of outputs. The Hand–held Monitor will check these totals before sending
the configuration to the Remote I/O Scanner.
4.
Press the F1 (Tgl) key a fourth time to configure a Remote Drop ID as instructed
on the next page.
5.
After setting up the desired remote I/O map and Remote Drop ID, press the F3
(send) key to download these selections to the Remote I/O Scanner. This causes
the Remote I/O Scanner to automatically configure the I/O modules physically
present in the remote drop at that time, as shown in chapter 4.
Caution
Pressing the F3 (send) key from this screen causes the Remote I/O
Scanner to automatically configure the remote drop. If a
configuration was previous entered from any source, this new
configuration will REPLACE it if the original configuration is not
protected. This can result in changed data lengths and Remote Drop
ID. In addition, any module options (such as output defaults, voltage
range, and input filter time) previously selected using Logicmaster
90–70 will be replaced with their default settings.
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Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
6
Select the Remote Drop ID
The same configuration screen is used to assign a Remote Drop ID. A Remote Drop ID
is a number between 16 and 254 that allows the Remote I/O Scanner to communicate
with serial Logicmaster 90–70 for multidrop programming. The ID distinguishes one
remote drop from another. A valid entry must be made on this screen even if the host
type is not a Series 90–70 PLC.
When configured from a Hand–held Monitor, the Remote Drop ID is used as part of
the “folder” name, so a configuration stored in the Scanner can later be uploaded to
Logicmaster 90–70. The folder name will be DROPxxx, with xxx the Remote Drop ID
(016 – 254).
HHM display
PROG REMOTE MAP
DROP ID _____
tgl drp send nxt
Configuration Steps
1.
Press F2 (drp), then enter a Remote Drop ID between 16 and 254.
2.
After entering all the beginning addresses and lengths and a Remote Drop ID,
press F3 (send) to transmit this portion of the configuration to the Remote I/O
Scanner. When you press F3 (send), the Hand–held Monitor adds up the data
lengths to be sure they do not total more than 128 bytes of inputs and 128 bytes of
outputs. It also checks for the presence of a Remote Drop ID between 16 and 254.
If the entries are correct, the information is sent to the Remote I/O Scanner.
Other wise, an error message appears. After pressing the Clear key, the
configuration must be changed to correct the error.
3.
Press F4 (next) to return to the Program Block ID screen.
4.
To configure remote drop configuration, press the n MENU key to display the
configuration menu.
Return to the Configuration Menu
To complete the Genius configuration or display the modules in the remote drop, press
F2 (configure block).
F1:PROG BLOCK ID
F2:CONFIG BLOCK
F3:COPY CONFIG
F4:
Chapter 6 Remote Drop Configuration with a Hand–held Monitor
93
6
Display I/O Modules in Remote Drop
When you enter the Configure Block screens, the Hand held–Monitor displays the
configuration of the first I/O module in the remote drop. An example is shown below.
This is a read–only function; I/O module configuration cannot be changed with the Hand–held
Monitor. Note that these displays will indicate the presence of Analog Expander
(16–channel analog), PCM, GDS, ADS, Bus Receiver (BERA), Bus Transmitter (BETA),
jumper modules and empty slots, even though none of these can be configured by the
Hand–held Monitor.
ID#143 R:0
32PT 120VAC
S:2
%I
1
nxt
For each module, the display shows:
H
H
the Remote Drop ID (143 in this example)
H
H
H
S: the module’s slot number
R: the rack number. For Remote I/O Scanner version IC697BEM733A, this
must be rack 0.
% the module’s I/O type
the beginning I/O reference (in the example above, 1 in the third line
represents %I0001).
Pressing F4 (nxt) displays the next module. For example:
ID#143 R:0
32PT 120VAC
S:3
%Q
1
nxt
In this example, the module in rack 0, slot 3 is a 32–point output board. Its beginning
output reference is %Q0001.
If a slot is not occupied, the HHM displays:
ID#143 R:0
EMPTY SLOT
S:4
nxt
Press F4 (nxt) to continue going through the module screens.
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6
Select Genius Bus Redundancy
After the last module display screen, the Hand–held Monitor displays the redundancy
configuration screens for the Remote I/O Scanner.
The first of these indicates whether or not the Remote I/O Scanner will be located on a
dual bus or bus stub.
The default configuration for BSM Present is NO. It should be set to YES if the Remote
I/O Scanner will be used as a bus switching device itself, or located on a bus stub
downstream of another device (Remote I/O Scanner or Bus Switching Module
attached to a Genius block) that acts as a bus switching device.
HHM Display
BSM PRESENT ?
STATUS =NO
tgl entr
nxt
Configuration Steps
1.
If the selection should be changed, press F2 (tgl). Press F3 (entr).
2.
Press F4 (nxt) to display the next configuration screen.
Select BSM Control
The next HHM menu is used to specify whether or not the Remote I/O Scanner will act
as the bus switching device, capable of switching between Bus A and Bus B in a dual
Genius bus system. Remote I/O Scanner version IC697BEM733B or later is required to
use this feature. Select YES if this Remote I/O Scanner is to be the bus switching
device. Default is NO.
HHM Display
BSM CONTROLLER
STATUS =NO
tgl entr
nxt
Configuration Steps
1.
If the selection should be changed, press F2 (tgl). Press F3 (entr).
2.
Press F4 (nxt) to display the next configuration screen.
Chapter 6 Remote Drop Configuration with a Hand–held Monitor
95
6
Select CPU Redundancy
If the remote drop will be used on the same bus with two controllers (PLCs or host
computers), each of which will send it outputs, the Remote I/O Scanner must be set up
for CPU Redundancy. For a new Remote I/O Scanner as shipped from the factory, this
feature is not enabled. Remote I/O Scanner version IC697BEM733B or later is required
to use this feature.
The two types of CPU Redundancy, Hot Standby and Duplex, are described below. For
both types of CPU redundancy, inputs and diagnostics are automatically made
available to both CPUs.
If the remote drop contains any analog modules, the only form of CPU redundancy permitted is
Hot Standby. The Hand–held Monitor will permit selection of either type of CPU redundancy.
Do not select Duplex if there are any analog modules in the remote drop.
Hot Standby CPU Redundancy
A device configured for Hot Standby redundancy receives outputs from both CPUs. It
is normally controlled by Device Number 31. If no outputs are available from Device
Number 31 for a period of three bus scans, the outputs are immediately controlled by
Device Number 30. If outputs are not available from either Device Number 30 or 31,
outputs go to their configured default or hold their last state. In Hot Standby
redundancy, Device Number 31 always has priority, so that when Device Number 31 is
on–line, the device always gives it control of the outputs.
Duplex CPU Redundancy
In Duplex mode, a device receives outputs simultaneously from both Device Number
30 and 31. The device compares the outputs. If corresponding outputs are the same,
the device sets the output to that state. If corresponding outputs are not the same, the
device will set the output to its configured ON or OFF Duplex Default State, which
must be configured for all outputs in the remote drop. If either Device Number 30 or
31 stops sending outputs to a device, its outputs are directly controlled by the
remaining device. Only discrete devices can operate in Duplex redundancy mode. If both 30
and 31 stop sending outputs, the outputs in the remote drop either default to their
programmed default state (not the Duplex Default State), or hold their last state, as
configured.
HHM Display
CPU REDUNDANCY
NO CNTL REDUN
tgl entr nxt
Configuration Steps
96
1.
If the selection should be changed, press F2 (tgl). Press F3 (entr).
2.
Press F4 (nxt) to display the next configuration screen.
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
6
Select Configuration Protection
This feature can be used to protect the remote drop configuration, preventing changes
from the CPU or Hand–held Monitor. It can only be selected from a Hand–held
Monitor. To make subsequent changes, protection must be removed again using a
Hand–held Monitor. Before the remote drop is used, its configuration should be
protected.
After a Remote I/O Scanner has been configured from Logicmaster 90–70, its
configuration is automatically protected. If you want to use a Hand–held Monitor to
change a Logicmaster 90–70 configuration, you must first disable configuration
protection on this screen. Logicmaster 90–70 can always configure a remote drop,
regardless of of its configuration protect state.
HHM Display
CONFIG PROTECT
DISABLED
tgl entr
nxt
Configuration Steps
1.
If the selection shown on line 3 should be changed, press F2 (tgl). Press F3 (entr).
2.
This is the last configuration screen.
Finishing Configuration
That completes HHM configuration of the remote drop. The configuration is stored by
the Remote I/O Scanner, and will survive loss of power.
If the baud rate was changed, and the remote drop is on an operating bus, cycle power
to all devices on the bus at the same time to use the new baud rate.
Chapter 6 Remote Drop Configuration with a Hand–held Monitor
97
Chapter
7
7 Monitoring and Controlling
Remote Drop Data section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter explains how to monitor or control remote drop I/O data using Genius
Hand–held Monitor or a programmer.
Overview
There are three ways to manipulate I/O data in a remote drop:
A. by forcing an input or output to assume a desired state or value which will be
stored in the Remote I/O Scanner’s EEPROM memory. This is normally done with
a Hand–held Monitor, and does not require an active programmer connection. A
Hand–held Monitor is normally also used to unforce circuits.
B. for a host PLC, data can be manipulated by overriding an input or output state or
value in the PLC’s Override Tables. This is done with the programmer.
C. for all hosts, data can be manipulated by toggling an input or output state or value
in the Remote I/O Scanner’s internal I/O tables. This is also done with the
programmer.
These three methods described on the following pages. All are valuable tools for
verifying circuit wiring in a remote drop.
99
7
Forcing Circuits
Forcing an I/O circuit from a Hand–held Monitor causes the circuit to assume a
selected state (for discrete circuits) or value (for analog circuits). The forced state/value
is also stored in the Remote I/O Scanner’s EEPROM memory, and will survive power
failure. Because the forced state or value is stored in EEPROM, forcing is the only
method of manipulating I/O circuits that guarantees a fixed output/input state.
Forcing I/O works equally well for stand–alone (off–line) and on–line remote drops.
The Remote I/O Scanner’s I/O Enabled LED flashes while any circuit in the remote
drop is forced. Once forced, a circuit retains the selected state or value if power is
cycled. The forced circuit ignores data from an attached input device, or output data
from a CPU.
The force may be removed with the Hand–held Monitor. When unforced, a circuit
responds to real input or output data. Output circuits normally begin accepting CPU
outputs. If no CPU outputs are available, the output will either go to its programmed
default state, or hold its last state, according to the circuit’s preselected configuration.
The only other occurrence that removes forces is a configuration change, in which case
all forced data is assumed obsolete and discarded.
Note
If a discrete circuit which is configured to hold its last state is forced
while the Remote I/O Scanner online, the forced state is considered
the last state. Therefore, if the Remote I/O Scanner goes offline and
the force is removed while offline, the circuit remains in the forced
state, rather than assuming its actual last state.
When the Remote I/O Scanner goes back online, the circuit will again
accept outputs normally.
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7
Overriding I/O Circuits
Overriding an I/O circuit means changing its state or value in the PLC’s Override
Tables. Overrides must be done from the PLC, with the remote drop online. Results
can be viewed on the programmer screen. It cannot be done at the remote drop.
The override data is stored in the PLC, and survives loss of power in the PLC.
However, if power is lost at the PLC but not at the remote drop, the Remote I/O
Scanner operates as it normally does if CPU communications are lost. Outputs go to
their default state or hold their last state (as configured). Once power is restored at the
PLC and CPU communications resume, the output overrides again take effect.
Toggling I/O Circuits
If a Logicmaster 90–70 programmer is communicating with the remote drop, circuits
can be toggled to alter the contents of the Remote I/O Scanner’s internal I/O tables.
Toggling circuits is only effective if inputs are not being received from an input module,
or if the Bus Controller is not sending CPU outputs to an output module.
If the system is operational and the remote drop is on–line, circuits must be toggled
from the PLC. If the remote drop is off–line, it must be done locally. Results can be
viewed on the programmer screen.
Once an input module has been inserted into the remote drop, the inputs scanned
from that module supersede any input data entered into the tables using Logicmaster
90–70.
Similarly, once output data starts being accepted for a module in the remote drop, it
supersedes any output data entered via Logicmaster 90–70.
Therefore, toggling I/O data while Logicmaster 90–70 is communicating with the PLC
is only effective temporarily, as real inputs and outputs will overwrite toggled inputs or
outputs as soon as they are received.
Summary
In short, forcing is the only method of that guarantees consistent I/O behaviour
regardless of power failures throughout the system, or communications interruptions.
If you want to check out a circuit at the remote drop, the simplest way is with a
Hand–held Monitor, using force/unforce.
Chapter 7 Remote Drop I/O Data
101
7
Monitoring/Controlling I/O Data:
Genius Hand–held Monitor
A Genius Hand–held Monitor can be used to display current I/O states and
diagnostics, and to force and unforce individual I/O points.
From the HHM main menu, select either F1 (Monitor Block) or F2 (Monitor/Control
Reference). Both functions access the same set of display screens for the Remote I/O
Scanner. The first screen that appears is the Monitor screen for the module with the
first %I reference.
MNTR
1
143#0.2 %I
1
STS 0
FAULT
> ref force diag
Line 3 of the display shows the state or value of the circuit, and indicates whether it is
forced (by the letters FRC), or had a fault (the word FAULT appears).
Identifying the Circuit
The second line identifies the I/O module being monitored. It shows the Remote Drop
ID (143 in this example), the rack number (0), the slot number (2), and the memory
type (%I). The number on the right–hand side of the second line represents a data
word, or group of 16 discrete circuits. The first 16 are group 1, the second are group 17,
and so on. The top line identifies the circuit within that group which is being
monitored.
MNTR
1
143#0.2 %I
1
STS 0
FAULT
> ref force diag
Remote Drop ID
Rack number
Slot number
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Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
Circuit number
within group (1–16)
Starting reference
(groups of 16)
Reference type
7
Finding the Circuit’s Series 90 Reference
You can use the circuit number and starting reference for the module to find the exact
Series 90–70 I/O reference of the circuit. For example, suppose the first two HHM
lines show the following:
MNTR
3
143#0.3 %I
33
STS 0
FAULT
> ref force diag
The Series 90–70 I/O reference for the circuit is one less than the sum of the two
numbers on the right–hand side of the HHM screen. Here:
3 + 33 – 1 = 35
In this example, the circuit being monitored is %I0035.
Displaying Diagnostics for the Circuit Being Monitored
To display diagnostics for the selected circuit, press F4 (diag) from the Monitor screen.
If there is a fault, it appears on line 3 of the display. For example:
DIAG
143#0.3 %I
OVERCURRENT
mon
3
33
nxt
If there is no fault on the circuit you are monitoring, the Hand–held Monitor searches
the Remote I/O Scanner’s internal fault table to see whether there are any faults on the
remote drop. If there are any uncleared faults, the HHM then displays the fault that
occurred first (the oldest fault). For example:
DIAG
143#0.2 %AI
UNDERRANGE
mon
3
1
nxt
In addition to the fault description, the HHM identifies the location where the fault
occurred (on line 2). From this screen, you can display additional faults on the remote
drop by pressing F4 (nxt). Faults will appear in the same sequence in which they occurred.
This will probably not match the sequence of references in the remote drop.
Chapter 7 Remote Drop I/O Data
103
7
Multiple Faults for the Same Circuit
The Remote I/O Scanner stores faults (up to 64) in time sequence, not reference
sequence. To see whether there are additional faults on the same reference, use the F4
(nxt) key to go through the fault screens. Watch the reference identification on line 2
for the specific circuit you are interested in.
Returning to the Monitor Screen
Press F1 (mon) to return to the Monitor screen you started from.
For more information about diagnostics, see chapter 10.
Forcing/Unforcing I/O
Individual I/O points can be forced and unforced from the Hand–held Monitor (the
HHM’s circuit forcing capability must be enabled to use this function). Forcing an I/O
point changes its state in the Remote I/O Scanner’s EEPROM memory. If the circuit is
an output, the physical state of the output also changes. If the circuit is an input, the
forced input data is sent to the CPU. Once forced, a circuit retains the forced state or
value if power is removed. The forced circuit ignores data from an attached input
device, or output data from the CPU. The force can ONLY be removed from the
Hand–held Monitor.
Display the circuit you want to force on the Monitor screen, following the instructions
on the preceding page.
HHM Display
MNTR
3
143#0.3 %I
33
STS 0
> ref force diag
a
Circuit status
Forcing a Discrete Circuit
Press F3 (force) to force the circuit. For a discrete circuit, the HHM displays these key
functions:
mon on off reles
Press F2 (on) or F3 (off) to force the discrete circuit. The forced state will appear on line
3 of the display; the underline shows that the circuit is forced. To release the force,
press F4 (reles).
MNTR
3
143#0.3 %I
33
STS 1
mon on off reles
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Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
a
Circuit is forced
7
Forcing an Analog Circuit
If the circuit to be forced is an analog circuit, its current value appears on line 3 of the
Monitor screen.
MNTR
3
143#0.3 %AI
1
STS –22138
> ref force diag
a
Circuit value
MNTR
3
143#0.3 %AI
1
FRC –22138
> ref force diag
a
Circuit is
not forced
Pressing F3 (force) displays:
Press F2 (force) to enter a forced value for the circuit. The screen displays:
FORCE TO: ______
chng entr
Press F2 (chng). Enter the value, then press F3 (entr). The forced value appears on
line 3.
MNTR
3
143#0.3 %AI
1
STS –10000 FRC
force release
a
Circuit is forced
To release the force, press F4 (release) from the force/release screen.
Chapter 7 Remote Drop I/O Data
105
7
Displaying Other Circuits
In monitor mode, the HHM will step through I/O modules in the following sequence:
1.
%I, all references used
2.
%AI, all references used
3.
%Q, all references used
4.
%AQ, all references used
To display additional circuits within the currently–selected memory type, press the F1
(>) key. The HHM will step through each available circuit.
To jump directly to a particular device, memory type, or address, press F2 (ref). This
screen appears, to enter the desired information.
MNTR
_
chng entr
106
1.
Enter the reference number. Press F3 (entr).
2.
If you want to select a different reference type (for example, to display %AQ
instead of %I), press F2 (chng) to toggle the memory type.
3.
With the desired information displayed, press F3 (entr) to monitor the circuit.
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
7
Monitoring/Controlling I/O Data:
Logicmaster 90–70
Logicmaster 90–70 can be used to monitor I/O in the remote drop, either from the
PLC I/O Tables or from the Remote I/O Scanner’s internal I/O tables.
Reference Tables Display from the PLC
When the system is in operation and the remote drop is communicating with the PLC
via a Genius bus, the I/O in the remote drop can be monitored as part of the complete
system. The Logicmaster reference tables displays will include those portions of the
PLC’s %I, %Q, %AI, and %AQ memory being used by a Remote I/O Scanner. For
example, a remote drop uses discrete inputs %I00001 – %I00120. In the reference
tables for the PLC, these inputs are displayed along with other system inputs. When
attached to the PLC, Logicmaster 90–70 can override or toggle the I/O data and cause
a change.
%IReferencesusedby
RemoteI/OScanner
If the remote drop is on–line to the PLC, I/O cannot be toggled by a programmer
attached to the remote drop. This is because the altered data would be immediately
overwritten by the real input and output values being exchanged between the Remote
I/O Scanner and the PLC.
If the system is not yet in operation or the remote drop is not transferring I/O data
with the PLC over the Genius bus, monitoring must be done at the remote drop.
Either serial or parallel Logicmaster 90–70 can be used. In this situation, toggling
output data is possible and can be useful in checking out circuit connections.
Chapter 7 Remote Drop I/O Data
107
7
Reference Tables Display for the Remote I/O Scanner
When the programmer communicates directly with the remote drop, the Logicmaster
reference tables display the Remote I/O Scanner’s internal %I, %Q, %AI, %AQ, %R,
%S, %SA, %SB, and %SC memories.
I/O data in the Remote I/O Scanner’s %I, %AI. %Q, and %AQ tables corresponds to
discrete and analog I/O cards in the remote drop, and/or data being manipulated by
option modules. Any other memory locations in these tables are zero. Data from these
tables is exchanged with the host CPU according to the Remote I/O Scanner’s
configured I/O map. Viewing the equivalent table in the PLC shows the Remote I/O
Scanner ’s mapped data plus data for all other modules in the PLC system.
The Remote I/O Scanner’s %R reference table will not contain any data unless its %R
memory is being used by option modules in the remote drop. Such %R data is not
exchanged with the host.
PLC
references
not displayed at
RemoteI/OScanner
The %S, %SA, %SB, and %SC reference tables show the current states of the Remote
I/OScanner’s predefined status bits. These are the same as the status bits defined for
the Series 90–70 PLC. For more information about the status bits, see chapter 8.
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Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
7
Monitoring/Controlling I/O Data:
Series Six PLC or Series Five PLC
For a Series Six or Series Five PLC, I/O data for a remote drop may be configured to use
either I/O or register memory. To utilize the data correctly, it is necessary to know the
position of each module in the rack, and the amount of input and output data it has.
Data lengths are equal to the amounts configured for %I, %AI, %Q, and %AQ. For
discrete data, 16 points = 16 I/O references or 1 register. For analog data, 1 channel =
16 I/O references or 1 register.
Input Data Message
(up to 128 bytes)
a
discrete inputs
To CPU
a Configured %I Length '
analog inputs
a Configured %AI Length '
Remote Drop Data in I/O Table Memory
In I/O memory, data from a remote drop is stored beginning at the assigned I/O
reference. In the Input Table, the sequence is: discrete inputs then analog inputs. In
the Output Table, the sequence is discrete outputs then analog outputs.
For example, a remote drop has:
H
H
H
H
two 16–circuit discrete input boards (total of 32 input bits)
one 4–circuit analog input board (total of 64 input bits)
four 16–circuit discrete output boards (total of 64 output bits)
two 4–circuit analog output boards (total of 32 output bits)
The remote drop’s configured data lengths are: %I = 32, %AI = 4 (words), %Q = 48,
%AQ = 2 (words). In this example, there are 32 discrete input bits followed by 64 bits
from the analog input modules. If the beginning I/O Table Reference Address assigned
to the Remote I/O Scanner were 0001, the input data would occupy the references
shown below.
I0001 to I0016
I0017 to I0032
I0033 to I0048
I0049 to I0064
I0065 to I0080
I0081 to I0096
=
=
=
=
=
=
16 inputs from 1st discrete input module
16 inputs from 2nd discrete input module
1st input from analog input module
2nd input from analog input module
3rd input from analog input module
4th input from analog input module
POINT #
INPUT
(nickname)
0064
00000000 10111111 00011001 00101010 00011000 01010101 01001001 00101100
0128
0192
11001010 01110100 01010101 11010110 01010010 00010100 11010100 10001101
10100011 00101010 01001010 10101000 01100101 01010011 00101010 01101111
0256
0320
10101001 01010101 10101010 11111001 01111010 10111010 11111111 11111111
01100000 00000000 00000000 00000000 00011010 00011010 00000111 01000000
0384
11111111 11111111 11111110 11000111 11111110 01101010 01100000 00000000
Chapter 7 Remote Drop I/O Data
109
7
Analog values can be displayed in decimal, signed decimal, or hex using the
programmer function keys. For example, here the first analog input is shown in signed
decimal format:
POINT #
INPUT
(nickname)
0064
+0091
00011001 00101010
019210100011
00101010 01001010
025610101001
01010101 10101010
032001100000
00000000 00000000
038411111111
11111111 11111110
00011001
10101000
11111001
00000000
11000111
01010100
01100101
01111010
00011010
11111110
01001001
01010011
10111010
00011010
01101010
00101100
00101010
11111111
00000111
01100000
01101111
11111111
01000000
00000000
Similarly, in the Output Table, outputs for the remote drop will start at the reference
configured for the first discrete output module. The first 48 output bits the Remote I/O
Scanner receives from the PLC will be scanned into the discrete output modules. The
next 32 output bits received from the PLC will be scanned into the analog output
modules.
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Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
7
Remote Drop Data in Register Memory
If Series Six or Series Five register memory is used for remote drop data, an amount is
required that is equal to the total number of bytes of input data PLUS output data. The
data is stored beginning at the assigned register reference. The sequence is: discrete
inputs, then analog inputs, then discrete outputs, and analog outputs last. Data
lengths are equal to the amounts of %I, %AI, %Q, and %AQ configured for the Remote
I/OScanner. For example, a remote drop has:
H
H
H
H
two 16–circuit discrete input boards (total of 32 input bits)
one 4–circuit analog input board (total of 64 input bits)
four 16–circuit discrete output boards (total of 64 output bits)
two 4–circuit analog output boards (total of 32 output bits)
(This is the same set of boards used in the I/O Table example). If the beginning
Reference Address assigned to the Remote I/O Scanner were 0001, Register Table
contents would be:
R0001
=
R0002
=
R0003 – R0006 =
R0007
=
R0008
=
R0009
=
R0010
=
R0011 – R0014 =
R0015 – R0018 =
R
e00010
00020
00030
00040
00050
00060
REGISTER
16 inputs from 1st discrete input module
16 inputs from 2nd discrete input module
4 inputs from analog input module
16 outputs for 1st discrete output module
16 outputs for 2nd discrete output module
16 outputs for 3rd discrete output module
16 outputs for 4th discrete output module
4 outputs for 1st analog output module
4 outputs for 2nd analog output module
00029 (nickname)
EQUALS 0101101001011001
29811 29297 28783 28269 27755 23423 23434 34534 34535 2812
34534 23455 03466 21234 13565 17983 01344 23454 01245 2234
16344 23129 32365 35084 20346 17343 20485 16834 11465 0000
24411 26784 14573 08689 03463 14623 24574 02344 12456 2245
34254 23635 14573 08685 02675 11645 02341 23353 23435 1346
16147 23149 38409 38371 48299 47746 27740 40174 61624 0020
Individual discrete inputs and outputs can be read 16 bits at a time on the Register
Table display by placing the cursor at the register that contains them. The bit values
will appear at the top of the screen next to the word, EQUALS.
Mixed Reference Table Displays
Customized Logicmaster displays can be created to show both discrete and analog
values at the same time, in a format that is meaningful when monitoring system
operations. The Logicmaster Software User’s Manual explains how to do this. In a Mixed
Reference Table, each line of the display can show either 64 input bits or ten registers.
To display discrete or register data properly on a mixed screen, the Remote I/O Scanner
should be configured for data lengths that match up with the discrete and register line
boundaries imposed by Logicmaster.
Chapter 7 Remote Drop I/O Data
111
7
Monitoring/Controlling I/O Data:
Computer
To utilize the Remote I/O Scanner’s I/O data correctly, a computer must know the
sequence of modules in the rack, and the amount of input and output data each has.
For the PCIM, QBIM, and other GENI–based interfaces, the input and output data will
occupy the Device Input and Output Tables at the segments associated with the Device
Number of the Remote I/O Scanner.
I/O Tables
Input Table
32 segments, 128 bytes each
Output Table
32 segments, 128 bytes each
The Remote I/O Scanner automatically sends all discrete inputs followed by all analog
inputs from the remote drop, each bus scan. The PCIM or QBIM places this data into
its Input Segment. The application program must read the Input Segment to obtain
the input data from the PCIM or QBIM.
Input Table Segment for a
Remote Drop
Discrete Inputs Bits
(number of bytes = configured
%I length / 8)
Analog Input Words
(number of bytes = configured
%AI length X 2)
The Output Segment is used similarly. The application program must send to the
PCIM or QBIM’s Output Segment all the discrete outputs followed by all the analog
outputs for the remote drop. The PCIM or QBIM will automatically direct the outputs
to the Remote I/O Scanner each bus scan.
112
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
Chapter
8 Diagnostics and Fault Clearing
8
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter describes the diagnostics capabilities of the Remote I/O Scanner, and
explains how faults on a remote drop can be cleared from a Hand–held Monitor or
programmer.
Overview
The Remote I/O Scanner receives all standard Series 90–70 board–level diagnostics
from modules in the remote drop. These faults can be viewed and cleared from a
programmer fault table, or using a Genius Hand–held Monitor.
In addition, the Remote I/O Scanner itself provides the following diagnostics:
H
H
H
H
H
H
Device Number conflict
Loss of communications
Loss of controllers
EPROM fault
RAM fault
Processor fault
Maximum Number of Uncleared Faults
The Remote I/O Scanner can store up to 64 uncleared faults at a time. Faults are stored
in time sequence. If a 65th fault occurs, it will replace the oldest fault currently stored
in the table. The replaced fault is lost.
113
8
Display and Clear Faults from a Genius Hand–held Monitor
A Genius Hand–held Monitor can display faults from a remote drop while attached
anywhere on the Genius bus. Fault status is available from the HHM’s Block/Bus
Status screen, or the Monitor Block screen.
Fault Information on the Block/Bus Status Screen
The fault status of any remote drop on a Genius bus can be displayed from the
Hand–held Monitor’s Block/Bus Status screen.
1.
From the HHM Main Menu, select F2 (analyze). The Analyze Menu appears:
F1:MONITOR
F2:MON/CNTL REF
F3:BLOCK/BUS STS
F4:PULSE TEST
2.
Select F3 (Block/Bus Status). The HHM displays the status of the
currently–selected device. If this is the remote rack, the screen looks like this:
RIO
#
BLOCK
V.
ACT
NO FORCE,NO FAUL
nxt prv actv bus
If the Remote I/O Scanner is not the currently–selected device, press the F1 (nxt) or F2
(prev) key repeatedly until you reach the Device Number assigned to the Remote I/O
Scanner.
If faults are present, pressing Clear at this time will clear all faults in the remote drop.
This action has no effect, however, on the fault table in the central PLC, or on the
associated fault contacts in the PLC. To keep the entire system in step and
up–to–date, fault clearing should be performed from the central PLC.
114
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
8
Displaying Faults from the Monitor Block Screens
From the HHM main menu, select either F1 (Monitor Block) or F2 (Monitor/Control
Reference). Both functions access the same set of display screens for the Remote I/O
Scanner.
MNTR
1
143#0.2 %I
1
STS 0
> ref force diag
From any Monitor screen, press F4 (diag) to display diagnostics for the remote drop.
The Hand–held Monitor displays the first fault it encounters. For example:
DIAG
143#0.3 #I
OVERCURRENT
mon
3
33
nxt
The Remote I/O Scanner stores faults (up to 64) in time sequence, not reference
sequence. If the circuit that was shown on the Monitor screen when you pressed F4
(diag) has a fault, that fault appears. If there is no fault on that circuit, the Hand–held
Monitor displays the oldest fault stored by the Remote I/O Scanner instead.
Displaying Additional Faults
Pressing F4 (nxt) displays additional remote drop faults in the same sequence in which they
occurred. For example, if the fourth oldest fault is being shown, pressing F4 (nxt)
displays the fifth oldest, and so on.
Multiple Faults for the Same Circuit
If a circuit has multiple faults that occurred at different times, they will probably not be
displayed one after another. To see whether a reference has additional faults, use the
F4 (nxt) key to go through the fault screens. Watch the reference identification on line
2 for the specific circuit you are interested in.
Returning to the Monitor Screen
Pressing F1 (mon) returns you to the Monitor screen you started from.
Chapter 8 Diagnostics and Fault Clearing
115
8
Display and Clear Faults from Logicmaster 90–70
The content of the PLC and I/O Fault Table displays depends on whether the
programmer is communicating with the PLC or a remote drop.
I/O Fault Table at the PLC
The content of the fault display at the PLC depends on the revision level of the Bus
Controller. With a Bus Controller that is version 4.0 or later, when a fault occurs on a
remote drop, the I/O Fault Table shows the Drop ID and the rack and slot within the
remote drop where the fault has occurred:
33#0.4
Drop ID
Rack
Slot
|PROGRM |TABLES |STATUS |
|
|LIB
|SETUP |FOLDER |UTILTY |PRINT
1plcrun 2passwd 3plcflt 4io flt 5plcmem 6blkmem 7refsiz 8sweep 9clear 10zoom
>
I / O
F A U L T
TOP FAULT DISPLAYED: 0001
TOTAL FAULTS: 0007
FAULT DESCRIPTION: OPEN WIRE
Remote Drop Fault
Drop ID#, rack, slot
T A B L E
TABLE LAST CLEARED: 09–21 08:00:00
ENTRIES OVERFLOWED: 0000
PLC DATE/TIME: 10–14 10:05:13
FAULT
CIRC REFERENCE
FAULT
FAULT
DATE
TIME
LOCATION
NO.
ADDR.
CATEGORY
TYPE
M–D H: M: S
___________ _____ _________ ___________________ ________________ _____ ________
33#0.4
6
%AI0101
CIRCUIT FAULT
ANALOG FAULT
10–12 08:12:20
0.3.1.5
%Q01009
ADD’N OF DEVICE
10–12 08:12:22
Genius Bus Fault
rack, slot, bus,
bus address
MAINPLC
RUN/ENABLE
PLC C: LESSON
REPLACE
7MS SCAN ONLINE
PRG: LESSON
L4 ACC: WRITE CONFIG CONFIG EQUAL
I/O Fault Table Display with a Rev. 3 Bus Controller
If the Bus Controller is a rev. 3 version, it cannot transfer to the PLC the detailed fault
information provided by a Remote I/O Scanner. Instead, a rev. 3 Bus Controller reports
any fault from a remote drop as a GENA fault.
Fault Clearing
To clear the fault table, press the Clear key.
116
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
8
I/O Fault Table at the Remote I/O Scanner
If the programmer is communicating with a remote drop and in on–line mode, the I/O
Fault Table shows the remote drop rack and slot locations of the module where the
fault occurred, and a description of the fault.
|PROGRM |TABLES |STATUS |
|
|LIB
|SETUP |FOLDER |UTILTY |PRINT
1plcrun 2passwd 3plcflt 4io flt 5plcmem 6blkmem 7refsiz 8sweep 9clear 10zoom
>
I / O
F A U L T
TOP FAULT DISPLAYED: 0001
TOTAL FAULTS: 0007
FAULT DESCRIPTION: OPEN WIRE
T A B L E
TABLE LAST CLEARED: 09–21 08:00:00
ENTRIES OVERFLOWED: 0000
PLC DATE/TIME: 10–14 10:05:13
FAULT
CIRC REFERENCE
FAULT
FAULT
DATE
TIME
LOCATION
NO.
ADDR.
CATEGORY
TYPE
M–D H: M: S
___________ _____ _________ ___________________ ________________ _____ ________
0.4
%Q 00001 circuit fault
discrete fault
10–13 08:12:22
0.5
%I 00002 circuit fault
discrete fault
10–13 08:30:31
Slot Number
Remote Drop
Rack Number
MAINPLC
RUN/ENABLE
PLC C: LESSON
REPLACE
7MS SCAN ONLINE
PRG: LESSON
L4 ACC: WRITE CONFIG CONFIG EQUAL
Fault Clearing
From this display, all faults currently present in the remote drop can be cleared by
pressing the Clear key. However, this has no effect on the PLC’s fault table, or the fault
contacts associated with the remote drop, which are also located in the controlling
PLC. Clearing faults in this manner is therefore practical only when operating a
remote drop off–line. When on–line, all fault clearing should be performed from the
central PLC to keep the entire system in step, and up–to–date.
Chapter 8 Diagnostics and Fault Clearing
117
8
PLC Fault Table at the Series 90–70 PLC
If the programmer is communicating with a Series 90–70 PLC and a remote drop fault
occurs, the PLC Fault Table shows the Drop ID and the rack and slot within the remote
drop where the fault has occurred:
33#0.1
Drop ID
Rack
Slot
Slot 1 is occupied by the Remote I/O Scanner.
|PROGRM |TABLES |STATUS |
|
|LIB
|SETUP |FOLDER |UTILTY |PRINT
1plcrun 2passwd 3plcflt 4io flt 5plcmem 6blkmem 7refsiz 8sweep 9clear 10zoom
>
P L C
F A U L T
TOP FAULT DISPLAYED: 0001
TOTAL FAULTS: 0002
PLC Fault
rack, slot, bus,
bus address
FAULT
LOCATION
___________
0.1
0.2.1.14
0.3.1.3
33#0.1
T A B L E
TABLE LAST CLEARED: 09–21 08:00:00
ENTRIES OVERFLOWED: 0000
PLC DATE/TIME: 10–14 10:05:13
FAULT
DESCRIPTION
___________________________________________________
ADDITION OF DEVICE
LOSS OF, OR MISSING OPTION MODULE
GENIUS BLOCK MODEL NUMBER MISMATCH
I/O FAULT TABLE FULL
DATE
M–D
_____
10–13
10–13
10–13
10–14
TIME
H: M: S
________
08:12:22
09:50:14
11:04:15
16:27:54
Remote Drop Fault
Drop ID#, rack, slot
MAINPLC
RUN/ENABLE
PLC C: LESSON
REPLACE
7MS SCAN ONLINE
PRG: LESSON
L4 ACC: WRITE CONFIG CONFIG EQUAL
Fault Clearing
Pressing the Clear key from this display clears the entire PLC Fault Table. If there are no
faults in the I/O Fault Table, then pressing Clear will also clear Remote I/O Scanner
faults.
118
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
8
PLC Fault Table at the Remote I/O Scanner
If the programmer is communicating with a remote drop and in on–line mode, the
PLC Fault Table shows the remote drop rack and slot locations of the module where
the fault occurred, and a description of the fault.
Faults on option modules (such as the PCM) are listed in the Remote I/O Scanner’s
PLC Fault Table. Faults on I/O modules are listed in the I/O Fault Table.
|PROGRM |TABLES |STATUS |
|
|LIB
|SETUP |FOLDER |UTILTY |PRINT
1plcrun 2passwd 3plcflt 4io flt 5plcmem 6blkmem 7refsiz 8sweep 9clear 10zoom
>
P L C
F A U L T
TOP FAULT DISPLAYED: 0001
TOTAL FAULTS: 0001
T A B L E
TABLE LAST CLEARED: 09–21 08:00:00
ENTRIES OVERFLOWED: 0000
PLC DATE/TIME: 10–14 10:05:13
FAULT
FAULT
DATE
TIME
LOCATION
DESCRIPTION
M–D H: M: S
___________ ___________________________________________________ _____ ________
0.4
SYSTEM CONFIGURATION MISMATCH
10–14 16:27:54
0.2
LOSS OF, OR MISSING OPTION MODULE
10–13 09:50:14
MAINPLC
RUN/ENABLE
PLC C: LESSON
REPLACE
7MS SCAN ONLINE
PRG: LESSON
L4 ACC: WRITE CONFIG CONFIG EQUAL
In this example, the highlighted entry shows that an option module configured for slot
2 of remote drop rack 0 has been removed, or has not been installed yet.
Fault Clearing
From this display, all faults currently present in the remote drop can be cleared by
pressing the Clear key.
Chapter 8 Diagnostics and Fault Clearing
119
8
Status References
Status references in the Remote I/O Scanner are assigned to %S, %SA, %SB, and %SC
memory. These references have the same definitions as the status references for the
Series 90–70 PLC, although not all are meaningful for a Remote I/O Scanner. They can
be monitored using the reference tables function of Logicmaster 90 with the
programmer communicating with the remote drop.
120
Reference
Nickname
%S0001
%S0003
%S0004
%S0005
%S0006
%S0007
%S0008
%S0009
FST_SCN
T_10MS
T_100MS
T_SEC
T_MIN
ALW_ON
ALW_OFF
SY_FULL
%S0010
IO_FULL
%S0011
%SA0009
OVR_PRE
CFG_MM
%SA0010
HRD_CPU
%SA0012
LOS_RCK
%SA0014
LOS_IOM
%SA0015
LOS_SIO
%SA0017
ADD_RCK
%SA0019
ADD_IOM
%SA0020
ADD_SIO
%SA0023
IOM_FLT
%SA0027
HRD_SIO
%SA0032
%SB0010
SBUS_ER
BAD_RAM
%SB0013
SFT_CPU
%SB0014
STOR_ER
%SB0017
SBUS_FL
%SC0009
%SC0010
ANY_FLT
SY_FLT
%SC0011
IO_FLT
%SC0012
SY_PRES
%SC0013
IO_PRES
%SC0014
%SC0015
HRD_FLT
SFT_FLT
Definition
Current sweep is the first sweep.
0.01 second timer contact.
0.1 second timer contact.
1.0 second timer contact.
1.0 minute timer contact.
Always ON.
AlwaysOFF.
Set when the Remote I/O Scanner’s PLC Fault Table fills up. Cleared when an entry is removed from the PLC Fault Table and when the PLC Fault Table is cleared.
Set when the Remote I/O Scanner’s I/O Fault Table fills up. Cleared when an entry is removed from the I/O Fault Table and when the I/O Fault Table is cleared.
Set when an override exists in %I or memory.
Set when a configuration mismatch is detected during power–up or during a store of the
configuration. Cleared by powering up the Remote I/O Scanner when no mismatches are
present or during a store of configuration that matches hardware.
Set when the diagnostics detects a problem with the Remote I/O Scanner hardware. Cleared
by replacing the Remote I/O Scanner.
Set when an expansion rack in the remote drop stops communicating with the communicating with the Remote I/O Scanner. Cleared by fixing the problem and power cycling the rack.
Set when an I/O module stops Remote I/O Scanner. Cleared by replacing the module and
cycling power on the rack containing the module.
Set when an option module stops communicating with the Remote I/O Scanner. Cleared by
replacing the module and cycling power on the rack containing the module.
Set when an expansion rack is added to the remote drop. Cleared by cycling power on the
rack containing the module and when the con figuration matches the hardware after a store.
Set when an I/O module is added to a rack. Cleared by cycling power on the rack containing
the module and when the configuration matches the hardware after a store.
Set when an option module is added to a rack. Cleared by cycling power on the rack containing the module and when the configuration matches the hardware after a store.
Set when an I/O module reports a circuit or module fault. Cleared by cycling power on the
rack containing the module and when the config uration matches the hardware after a store.
Set when a hardware failure is detected in an option module. Cleared by replacing the module and cycling power on the rack containing the module.
Set when a bus error occurs on the VME bus backplane. Cleared by cycling power on rack 0.
Set when the Remote I/O Scanner detects corrupted RAM memory at power–up. Cleared
when the Remote I/O Scanner detects that RAM memory is valid at power–up.
Set when the Remote I/O Scanner detects an unrecoverable error in the software. Cleared by
cycling power to the Remote I/O Scanner.
Set when an error occurs during a programmer store operation. Cleared when a store operation is completed successfully.
Set when the Remote I/O Scanner fails to gain access to the bus. Cleared by cycling power on
the rack 0.
Set when any fault occurs. Cleared when both fault tables have no entries.
Set when any fault occurs that causes an entry to be placed in the Remote I/O Scanner’s PLC
Fault Table. Cleared when the PLC Fault Table has no entries.
Set when any fault occurs that causes an entry to be placed in the Remote I/O Scanner’sI/O
Fault Table. Cleared when the I/O Fault Table has no entries.
Set as long as there is at least one entry in the Remote I/O Scanner’s PLC fault table. Cleared
when the PLC fault table has no entries.
Set as long as there is at least one entry in the Remote I/O Scanner’s I/O fault table. Cleared
when the I/O fault table has no entries.
Set when a hardware fault occurs. Cleared when both fault tables have no entries.
Set when a software fault occurs. Cleared when both fault tables have no entries
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
8
Display and Clear Faults from Logicmaster 5 or Logicmaster 6
If the host CPU is a Series Five or Series Six PLC, faults from a remote drop are
displayed in the Genius Fault Table. A Logicmaster 6 fault table is illustrated below.
The Logicmaster 5 fault table is similar.
Faults from remote drops are identified as GENA faults. The GENA is the component
within the Remote I/O Scanner that handles the Genius bus interface.
TOTAL FAULTS: 0000
TOP FAULT DISPLAYED:0000
FAULT DISPLAYED:
B/C
ADDR.
–––––
0 0
0 64
1 32
NEXT
1 PAGE
L/M: OFFLINE
GENIUS I/O FAULT TABLE
date
time
0000:00:00:00:0
POINT CIRC
FAULT
FAULT
FAULT
ADDR. NO.
CATEGORY
TYPE
DESCRIPTION
DAY:HR:MN:SC:T
–––––– –––– –––––––––––––––– –––––––– ––––––––––––––– –––––––––––––––
I0001
1
CIRCUIT FAULT
DISCRETE
OPEN WIRE
147:12:03:12:44
O0053
6
CIRCUIT FAULT
DISCRETE
NO LOAD
147:13:56:31:04
IO001
GENA
148:03:12:48:55
PREV
2 PAGE
CLEAR
3FAULTS 4 TOP
5BOTTOM 6
7
XPNDED
8 FUNC
Fault Clearing
Pressing the Clear Faults key clears all faults currently in the fault table. This sets the
fault count to zero, and sends a Clear command to the Remote I/O Scanner.
Chapter 8 Diagnostics and Fault Clearing
121
Chapter
9
9 Remote I/O Scanner Datagrams
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter lists datagrams that can be sent to a Remote I/O Scanner module, and
shows the format of the Read Map, Write Map, and Read Map Reply Datagrams.
Datagrams cannot be sent to individual I/O modules in a remote drop.
It also shows the format of Report Fault datagrams that are sent by the Remote I/O
Scanner.
For Additional Information, Also See:
The bus controller User’s Manual for the PLC or computer, which explains
programming to send datagrams.
The Genius I/O System and Communications Manual, which describes additional
datagrams and data formats.
123
9
Datagram Types
The table below shows the types of device that can send each datagram, and the
resulting action taken by the Remote I/O Scanner.
Datagram Type
Subfunction
Code
Sent
From
Remote I/O Scanner
Action
ReadIdentification
00
BC, HHM
send Read ID Reply
ReadConfiguration
02
BC, HHM
send Read Configuration Reply
WriteConfiguration
04
BC, HHM
process (possibly send configuration changes)
AssignMonitor
05
BC
process
Begin Packet Sequence
06
BC, HHM
start sequence
End Packet Sequence
07
BC, HHM
end/checksequence
ReadDiagnostics
08
BC, HHM
send Read Diagnostics Reply
ReadBlockI/O
0C
BC, HHM
send Read Block I/O Reply
Pulse Test
10
HHM
send Pulse Test Complete
Clear All Faults
13
BC, HHM
process
Switch BSM
1C
BC. HHM
process
Read Device
1E
BC, HHM
send Read Device Reply
Write Device
20
BC HHM
process
Read Point Diagnostics
25
BC, HHM
send Read Point Diagnostics
Reply
Read Map
2A
BC, HHM
send Read Map Reply
Write Map
2C
BC, HHM
process–autoconfigure
A PLC or computer can send a datagram to the Remote I/O Scanner in the same
manner as sending a datagram to an I/O block or Bus Controller.
124
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – June 1992
9
Read Map
Subfunction Code: 2A hex
This datagram is used to read the Series 90–70 I/O references assigned to a Remote
I/OScanner, and its Remote Drop ID.
Data Field Format: none
Read Map Reply
Subfunction Code: 2B hex
A Remote I/O Scanner sends this reply datagram after receiving a Read Map
datagram. It contains the Series 90–70 I/O references assigned to the Remote I/O
Scanner, and its Remote Drop ID. It provides no information about the I/O
assignments of individual I/O modules in the remote drop. However, the checksum
supplied indicates that the overall configuration remains unchanged.
Byte No.
0
1
2
3
4, 5
6
7, 8
9
10,11
12
13
14, 15
Byte Description
Remote Drop ID
Starting reference %I (LSB)
Starting reference %I (MSB)
Length of %I data (in bytes)
Starting reference %AI
Length of %AI data (in bytes)
Starting reference %Q
Length of %Q data (in bytes)
Starting reference %AQ
Length of %AQ data (in bytes)
8–bit Additive Checksum READ ONLY
16–bit LRC Checksum (lsb in 14, msb in 15) READ ONLY
The Remote Drop ID is a unique number between 16 and 254 that identifies the remote
drop.
Starting references in %I, %AI, %Q, and %AQ memory may be returned. For each
memory type, a data length is also supplied. If zero, the associated starting reference
can be ignored; it is not meaningful.
Write Map
Subfunction Code: 2C hex
This datagram allows a CPU to send Series 90–70 I/O addresses and a Remote Drop ID
to a Remote I/O Scanner. If the Remote I/O Scanner receives this message, and its
configuration is not currently protected (by means of the Hand–held Monitor’s Configuration Protect feature), the I/O modules present in the remote drop are automatically configured. Data format for this datagram is the same as Read Map Reply.
The checksum must be included in the message, even though its values are ignored.
Chapter 9 Remote I/O Scanner Datagrams
125
9
Report Fault Datagram Format
The format of Report Fault datagrams sent by a Remote I/O Scanner is shown below.
The Series 90–70 Bus Controller interprets this information automatically; no
datagram programming is required.
If the host is a Series Six or Series Five PLC, this information is ignored. If the host is a
computer, this information can be retrieved from the unsolicited datagram queue, and
interpreted as needed for the application.
Subfunction Code: 0F hex
Byte #
Description
0
Fault Byte 1
1
Fault Byte 2
2
Fault byte 3
3
Fault byte 4
4
Fault byte 5
5
Fault byte 6
6
Fault byte 7
Fault Byte 1
byte 0
7 6
5 4
3 2
1 0
Fault type, always: 0 0 1 1
Type of module reporting fault:
00 = discrete output
01 = discrete input
10 = analog output
11 = analog input
Suppress alarm (short fault only)
Long=1, short=0 (always 0 for IC697BEM733A)
Fault Byte 2
byte 1
7 6
5 4
3 2
1 0
Diagnostic table byte number (0 – 63)
This value points to an internal table where the
Remote I/O Scanner stores the English ASCII
text used by the Hand–held Monitor to create
its fault message displays.
126
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – June 1992
9
Fault Byte 3
byte 2
7 6
5 4
3 2
1 0
Fault record number (always 0)
Number of fault records
Fault Bytes 4 and 5
Fault bytes 4 and 5 (bytes 3 and 4 of the datagram) identify the reference offset (within
the Remote I/O Scanner itself) assigned to the faulted module. This is an internal
reference, not a Series 90–70 reference.
byte 3
7 6
5 4
3 2
1 0
Diagnostic reference address, LSB
byte 4
7 6
5 4
3 2
1 0
Diagnostic reference address, MSB
Fault Bytes 6 and 7
Fault bytes 6 and 7 (datagram bytes 5 and 6) are interpreted by the Series 90–70 Bus
Controller automatically. They are not relevant to other types of host.
byte 5
7 6
5 4
3 2
1 0
Number of Series 90–70 fault entries to set (bit 7 = 1)
OR: Fault byte mask for S90–70 Bus Controller dual
port (bit 7 = 0).
Fault entire I/O module
byte 6
7 6
5 4
3 2
1 0
Entity offset into diagnostic table
Fault entire Remote I/O Scanner
Chapter 9 Remote I/O Scanner Datagrams
127
Appendix A Estimating the Number of Remote Drops for
a Bus
A
section level 1 1
figure_ap level 1
table_ap level 1
The number of remote drops that can be installed on a bus depends on the baud rate
and the total number of I/O points in the remote drops. Only twenty fully–loaded
remote drops are supported on a single bus that operates at 153.6 Kbaud (see chapter
1). If remote drops are not fully–loaded, more may be used. The table below will help
you roughly estimate how many remote drops (and data bytes) can be on a bus with
one Bus Controller, one Genius Hand–held Monitor, no datagrams or Global Data
communications, and no Genius I/O blocks. The Genius I/O System User’s Manual
explains how to calculate the bus scan time for a specific bus.
Maximum Capacity (in Bytes)
Number of
Remote
Drops
153.6KBaud
standard
153.6Kbaud
extended
76.8Kbaud
38.4Kbaud
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
loaded
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
5268
5255
5242
5230
5217
5207
5191
5178
5165
513
loaded
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
5242
5228
5215
5201
5118
5174
5161
5147
5134
5120
loaded
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
”
2617
2607
2597
2589
2581
2567
2557
2547
2537
2527
2515
2507
2497
2487
2477
2467
2457
2447
2437
2427
loaded
”
”
”
”
1279
1271
1262
1254
1246
1237
1229
1220
1212
129
Appendix B Finding the I/O Configuration Data Total
for a Remote Drop
section level 1 1
figure_ap level 1
table_ap level 1
B
The maximum amount of I/O configuration data for a remote drop is 4500 bytes. This
amount will accommodate the configuration of a remote drop with:
H
no more I/O modules than can be included in the Remote I/O Scanner’s I/O map;
or
H
any number of discrete modules plus up to 16 analog modules (input and/or
output), with at least one option module (PCM, GDS, or ADS) in the remote drop;
or
H
any number of discrete modules plus up to 41 analog output modules, with at least
one option module in the remote drop; or
H
up to 29 analog modules (combination of input and output modules) with no
discrete modules.
If a planned remote drop is not within these maximums, you will need to estimate its
configuration data total to be sure it does not exceed 4500 bytes. Attempting to store a
larger I/O configuration to a Remote I/O Scanner will cause Logicmaster 90–70 to
generate the message “Configuration File is Invalid”. The configuration will not be
accepted. The module will not operate properly until a valid configuration has been
stored to it.
If you need to find the I/O configuration data total, follow the steps below. You can use
this table as a guide. Two examples are shown on the next page.
Description
Numberof I/O Data Types
(%I, %AI, %Q, %AQ)
Discrete Input Modules, MDL2nn
Discrete Input Modules, MDL6nn
Discrete Output Modules
Analog Input Modules
Analog Expander Modules
Analog Output Modules
RemoteI/OScanner
Number
of Each
1
Multiplyby
Bytes Each
36
36
42
38
150
22
86
50
50
Total
1.
=
Contribution
be
a Must
4500 or less.
For each data type (%I, %AI, %Q, %AQ) configured for the Remote I/O Scanner,
add 36 bytes to the total. For example, if all four data types are configured, add
144.
131
B
2.
Add the contribution of each I/O module in the remote drop. For discrete input
modules, the contribution is either 36 bytes for modules with catalog numbers
IC697MDL2nn (for example, IC697MDL241) or 42 bytes for modules with catalog
numbers IC697MDL6nn.
3.
4.
Include 50 bytes as the contribution of the Remote I/O Scanner itself.
Option (PCM, GDS, ADS) modules do not have I/O configuration data, so they are
not included in the calculation. Chapter 1 explains how many option modules can
be in a remote drop.
Example 1
A remote drop has 10 discrete input modules with model numbers IC697MDL2nn and
14 with model numbers IC697MDL6nn, 15 discrete output modules, 3 analog input
modules, and 2 analog output modules, for a total of 44 I/O modules altogether. The
1974 bytes of configuration data is well within the configurable limit of 4500 bytes.
Description
Numberof I/O Data Types
(%I, %AI, %Q, %AQ)
Discrete Input Modules, MDL2nn
Discrete Input Modules, MDL6nn
Discrete Output Modules
Analog Input Modules
Analog Expander Modules
Analog Output Modules
RemoteI/OScanner
Number
of Each
4
10
14
15
3
0
2
1
Multiplyby
Bytes Each
36
36
42
38
150
22
86
50
=
Contribution
144
360
588
570
450
0
172
50
1974
Total
Example 2
A remote drop is planned with 16 analog input modules, 20 analog output modules, 4
discrete input modules with model numbers IC697MDL6nn, and 4 discrete output
modules, for a total of 44 I/O modules altogether. This is the same number of modules
used in example 1.
This would be an invalid configuration; it would not be accepted by a Remote I/O
Scanner. It would be necessary to remove some I/O modules from the remote drop to
bring its configuration data below the maximum limit.
Description
Numberof I/O Data Types
(%I, %AI, %Q, %AQ)
Discrete Input Modules, MDL2nn
Discrete Input Modules, MDL6nn
Discrete Output Modules
Analog Input Modules
Analog Expander Modules
Analog Output Modules
RemoteI/OScanner
Number
of Each
4
0
4
4
16
0
20
1
Multiplyby
Bytes Each
36
36
42
38
150
22
86
50
=
Contribution
144
0
168
152
2400
0
1720
50
4634
132
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner Use’s Manual – July 1992
Total
Appendix C Logicmaster 90–70, Release 3:
Series 90–70 PLC Configuration
for Remote Drops
section level 1 1
figure_ap level 1
table_ap level 1
C
This appendix explains how to include a Remote I/O Scanner in the configuration of a
Series 90–70 PLC using Release 3 of the Logicmaster 90–70 software.
t
Overview
If you are using Release 3 of the Logicmaster 90–70 software, any Series 90–70 PLC on
a Genius bus with a Remote I/O Scanner must be configured as described in this
appendix. Configuration must be done using the Logicmaster 90–70 software, version
3.0 or later. Either the serial or parallel version can be used.
It is highly advisable, especially in large systems, to configure the entire PLC first,
before configuring any of the remote drops involved. Doing things in this way will
automatically avoid reference conflicts, Device Number (serial bus address) conflicts,
and Remote Drop ID conflicts.
PLC Configuration Steps
To configure a remote drop as part of a Series 90–70 PLC system, add the Remote I/O
Scanner as a device on the Genius bus. The steps are:
1.
Select or create the folder of the PLC configuration.
2.
As part of the PLC configuration, configure the Genius Bus Controller and add the
Remote I/O Scanner as a device on the bus.
3.
Configure the Remote I/O Scanner. The same Device Numbers, Remote Drop IDs,
and assigned references entered during configuration will be used a second time
when later configuring the remote drops themselves.
4.
Connect the programmer to the PLC. Store the configuration to the PLC using the
Utility functions.
Steps 1 – 3 should always be done first, even in cases where the remote drops are set
up, installed, and checked out before the PLC is set up. These steps can all be done
off–line. Step 4 must be performed after the PLC is on–line.
When a Series 90–70 PLC system includes a remote drop, it is important to be sure
that the information supplied to the PLC during its own configuration matches the
configuration information later supplied to the remote drop.
133
C
Step 1: Create or Select a PLC Program Folder
To begin configuring a remote drop, go to the Program Folder screen and select or
create the PLC program folder. If the Bus Controller has not already been configured,
continue at step 2. If you are adding a Remote I/O Scanner to a bus that has already
been configured, go to step 3 now.
Step 2: Add the Remote I/O Scanner to the Genius Bus
Display the configuration screen for the rack where the Bus Controller is located. If the
Bus Controller has not already been configured, use the F2 (Genius) key to enter it in
the intended slot, like the example shown below.
Instructions for configuring a Bus Controller are given in the Logicmaster 90–70
Software User’s Manual.
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C
With the Bus Controller selected in the rack display, zoom into the Bus Controller to
display the bus configuration screen.
In this example, the bus configuration screen shows the bus controller being
configured at its default location––bus address 31. To select a bus address for the
Remote I/O Scanner, move the cursor to the desired number and press F8 (Remote).
Note
If a Remote I/O Scanner has a bus address conflict on an operating bus,
it will not scan the modules in the remote drop until the fault is
cleared.
Press the Enter key to accept the Remote I/O Scanner (IC697BEM733).
Appendix C Logicmaster 90–70, Rel. 3: Series 90–70 PLC Configuration for Remote Drops
135
C
The central CPU rack display returns.
Press F10 (zoom) to display the remote drop rack configuration screen.
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Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
C
Step 3: Configure the Remote I/O Scanner
On this screen, enter the Remote Drop ID and the I/O map to be used for the Remote
I/OScanner.
Bus Adr
29
Input Def :
Out Rnable:
OFF
YES
Entering the Scanner’s Remote Drop ID
The Scanner’s Remote Drop ID is its remote drop communications ID. The range of
possible IDs is 16–254. If this is the first remote drop to be configured, the number 16
should appear in the REMOTE DROP ID: field. If other remote drops have already
been configured, a higher number appears––the software automatically increments
the ID number to avoid conflicts. If the remote drop is part of a multidrop network, it
must be configured with a unique Remote Drop ID.
Appendix C Logicmaster 90–70, Rel. 3: Series 90–70 PLC Configuration for Remote Drops
137
C
Assigning I/O References for the Remote I/O Scanner
The discrete and analog I/O references that will be used by the Remote I/O Scanner
must be configured. A starting address and length must be specified for at least one of
the following:
H
H
H
H
%I the discrete input table
%Q the discrete output table
%AI the analog input table
%AQ the analog output table
For each table used, a contiguous block of references must be assigned. The reference
addresses and lengths entered here normally include all the references actually used
by the I/O modules located in the remote drop. If you need more information about
references and memory usage in the Remote I/O Scanner, please refer to chapter 3.
For each memory type, the configuration screen automatically displays the next
available beginning address, and a length. For %I and %Q memory, the LENGTH
shown is in bits (points). Bit memories must be assigned on byte boundaries. For %AI
and %AQ memory, the length shown is in words (each word is two bytes). The default
length for all four memory types is 0. Each remote drop can have any mix of discrete
and analog inputs up to 128 bytes, and any mix of discrete and analog outputs up to
128 bytes. The length limits reflect the maximum amount of data that can be sent on
the Genius bus in a single transmission.
The beginning address defaults to 00001 only for the first drop whose configuration is
entered. The Logicmaster 90–70 software will automatically increment the starting
reference for successive drops, and when other devices are assigned. If the system has
multiple remote drops, proper documentation of reference assignments will make
configuration easier.
It is not necessary to allocate all four classes of I/O. To move on without assigning a
class, leave the length set to 0. The starting references associated with that class will
become meaningless (the display stays the same however). The same starting
reference will be usable in the next remote drop (or any other device).
If you plan to expand a remote drop at a later date, the overall use of I/O references
should be planned at this point. Since remote drops must use contiguous sections in
each I/O table, add in the extra I/O space now, otherwise force Logicmaster 90 to leave
the required I/O space free.
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Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
C
Input Default/Out Enable
The two final fields specify how input and output conditions will be handled following
loss of communications, and whether outputs will be sent automatically after
powerup.
Input Default: Specifies the state presented to the PLC for all %I and %AI references
in the remote drop, in the event communications with the Remote I/O Scanner are lost.
The options are to default off or to hold last state.
Outputs Enabled: Specifies whether output data will be transmitted from this Bus
Controller to the remote drop at powerup. The options are enabled or disabled. If
outputs are enabled on this screen, the Bus Controller sends outputs to the remote
drop automatically after it logs in. If outputs are disabled on this screen, the Bus
Controller does not automatically send outputs to the remote drop when it logs in. If
outputs are disabled, the application program must send a COMREQ to the Bus
Controller to enable outputs for the remote drop.
Appendix C Logicmaster 90–70, Rel. 3: Series 90–70 PLC Configuration for Remote Drops
139
C
Using the Copy Configuration Feature
Once a Remote I/O Scanner has been entered into the PLC configuration, it can be
copied to any other location on the bus. With the cursor at the module to be copied,
press the Copy key. Move the cursor to the intended location for the copy and press
the Enter key.
When the configuration of a Remote I/O Scanner is copied, the Logicmaster 90–70
software automatically increments the Remote Drop ID and the Reference Addresses
for the copy to the next ones available. The configured lengths remain the same. For
instance, if the first Remote I/O Scanner has been assigned to use 32 bits of %I memory,
the duplicated configuration of the next Remote I/O Scanner would also initially
assign %I memory the length of 32 bits. Like any of the other configurable parameters,
this could be changed in the copied configuration.
When using the Copy feature, it is important to check reference limits. Once a
reference type limit is reached, the Logicmaster software stops incrementing the
reference address, and on successive copies the address ranges will overlap.
Using Reference View from the PLC Program Folder
In the PLC program folder, the Reference View function of Logicmaster 90–70 shows
the Remote I/O Scanner as a single module. Individual I/O modules in a remote drop
do not appear. In the example below, the two output modules listed are in rack 1, slots
3 and 4. They are NOT modules in the remote drop. Notice that their reference
addresses are not within the range assigned to the Remote I/O Scanner.
____________ D I S C R E T E
TOTAL I+Q
O U T P U T
( % Q )
V I E W ____________
HIGHEST REF CONFIGURED:
REFERENCE
START – END
___________
PHYSICAL
IO
MODULE
ADDRESS
TYPE
TYPE
___________ _____ _________
DESCRIPTION
______________________________
00001–00064
00065–00080
00081–00096
0.2.1.29
1.3
1.4
REMOTE I/O SCANNER
OUTPUT 120 VAC 2A 16PT
OUTPUT 120 VAC 2A 16PT
REMOTE REMSCAN
90–70 Q AQ 16
90–70 Q AC 16
The display shows the references assigned to the Remote I/O Scanner for the selected
memory type. In this example, the Remote I/O Scanner is assigned references
%Q00001 to %Q00064. It is within this range that the PLC will supply discrete outputs
to modules in the remote drop.
Step 4: Store the Configuration to the PLC
After creating or editing a program folder, it can be stored to the PLC at any time. Use
the Utility functions to store a program folder to the PLC, as described in the
Logicmaster 90–70 User’s Manual.
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Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
Appendix D Logicmaster 90–70, Release 3:
Remote Drop Configuration Instructions
D
section level 1 1
figure_ap level 1
table_ap level 1
This appendix explains how to configure a remote drop using Release 3 of the
Logicmaster 90–70 software.
Individual remote drop configuration files that have been created using Logicmaster
90–70 Release 3 software can be incorporated into a common folder using Release 4
software. Release 4 software provides more complete configuration support, and
makes remote drop configuration for the Series 90–70 PLC easier. See chapter 4 for
more information.
Overview
A remote drop can be configured using the Logicmaster 90–70 programming software
(version 3.0 or later), or a Hand–held Monitor (release 4.0 or later). A Hand–held
Monitor cannot be used for configuration if there are any analog expanders in the
remote drop. HHM configuration does not provide all of the features that are available
when configuring with Logicmaster 90, such as I/O module options and support
options. Differences between the two configuration methods are listed in chapter 1.
With Release 3 Logicmaster software, the Series 90–70 must also be configured
separately, as described in the preceding appendix. To ensure non–conflicting I/O
references, Device Numbers, and Remote Drop IDs, it is recommended that you
complete the PLC configuration before configuring its remote drops.
141
D
Remote Drop Configuration Summary
Configuring a remote drop with Logicmaster 90–70 is similar to configuring a rack
with a CPU and I/O modules. The configuration steps are:
1.
Select or create the folder for the remote drop configuration.
For a Series 90–70 PLC host, this should be located in the central PLC’s drawer,
with the name of the remote drop _DROPxxx, where xxx is the remote drop ID
(016–254).
2.
Configure the Remote I/O Scanner module in rack 0, slot 1. For a new folder, this
involves replacing the default CPU (which appears in rack 0, slot 1) with a Remote
I/OScanner.
Configuration includes selecting the Remote Drop ID (the remote drop’s SNP ID)
to be used for serial multidrop communications. Configuration also includes
selection of the remote I/O map outline (corresponding exactly to that defined in
the PLC folder).
3.
Configure the I/O modules into the rack (normally within the confines of the
remote I/O map). If it is possible that a remote drop may be added to in the future,
leave some vacant I/O references immediately above those used for the remote
drop. Otherwise, adding modules later may necessitate a shuffle or a complete
reassignment of I/O references.
4.
Store the completed configuration to the remote drop. This can be done at any
time.
A. Connect the programmer to the remote drop, or select the remote drop for
serial communications. Connection is made to the serial port on the Remote
I/O Scanner for the serial version of Logicmaster 90–70. Connection is made
to the communications port on the Bus Transmitter Module in the remote drop
for the parallel version of Logicmaster 90–70.
B. Store the configuration to the Remote I/O Scanner using the Utility functions.
If you need more information to complete the configuration steps, please refer to the
Logicmaster 90–70 Software User’s Manual.
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D
Step 1: Create a Folder
To begin configuring a remote drop, go to the Program Folder screen and create a new
folder for its configuration.
For a Series 90–70 PLC, you should create the central PLC’s program folder, even if the
remote I/O is to be installed first (just configure the folder off–line). By doing the
folders in this order (PLC folder first), all reference conflicts will be avoided.
Select the central PLC drawer. For example, assume the central PLC folder is contained
in the DOS directoryC:\LM90\central. To select the central PLC drawer, you would
type the following from the Select/Create Folder screen:
C:\LM90\central\
The folders in the Drawer: C:\LM90\central screen should appear.
Enter the name of the Program Folder for the remote drop. The folder name should be
DROPxxx, where xxx is the Remote Drop ID (016–254) to be assigned to the remote
drop. For this example, assume the Remote Drop ID for the configuration will be 016.
The folder should be DROP016.
Central PLC Folder (Remote I/O Drawer)
(DOS directory C:\LM90\central)
DROP016 folder
(DOS directory C:\LM90\central\drop016)
b
b
DROP254 folder
(DOS directory C:\LM90\central\drop254)
We are now operating at one of these levels
For a Series 90–70 PLC, you should create a separate program folder for each remote
drop. Organize the folders so that the remote drop folders are located in the central
PLC folder. This will allow the remote drop folders to automatically be converted to
files in the central PLC folder in the future.
Appendix D Logicmaster 90–70, Release 3: Remote Drop Configuration Instructions
143
D
Step 2: Configure the Remote I/O Scanner
Display the configuration screen for Rack 0, which is where the Remote I/O Scanner is
installed.
The Remote I/O Scanner is installed in slot 1 of the rack; however, as the configuration
screen shows, this is the slot normally assigned to a CPU. The CPU module must be
replaced in order to create a remote drop folder.
In the Rack 0 display, zoom (F10) into the CPU slot, and press the F2 (Remote) key. A
module description screen appears.
The screen prompts:
REPLACE displayed module? (Y/N)
Press Y to enter the Remote I/O Scanner in the CPU slot. You are on your way to
creating a remote drop folder.
Th I/O Map configuration screen appears. It should be filled in exactly as the
equivalent screen was filled in during Series 90–70 PLC configuration (as instructed in
appendix C).
Bus Adr
29
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D
Entering the Scanner’s Remote Drop ID
The Scanner’s Remote Drop ID is its remote drop communications ID. The range of
possible IDs is 16–254 The default is 16, which should initially appear in the REMOTE
DROP ID: field. Each remote drop in a serial communications network must have a
unique Remote Drop ID. When stored from Logicmaster 90–70, the default SNP ID
will be DROPxxx, where xxx is the Remote ID assigned from the screen illustrated
above. The Remote Drop ID should correspond to that entered during PLC
configuration. Consult the PLC printout.
If a Hand–held Monitor has previously been used to set up the remote drop, and an
SNP ID has been assigned, the default SNP ID will be DROPxxx, where xxx is the
remote ID assigned with the Hand–held Monitor. Unique ID numbers help avoid
confusion. See chapter 4 for more information.
Entering the Remote Drop’s I/O Configuration
The screen shows a beginning reference and length for:
H
H
H
H
%I discrete inputs
%Q discrete outputs
%AI analog inputs
%AQ analog outputs
For %I and %Q memory, the length shown is in bits (points). For %AI and %AQ
memory, the length shown is in words (each word is two bytes). The default length for
all four memory types is 0.
Specify a starting address and length for at least one memory type, as required for the
modules in the remote drop. Normally, these entries will match the starting address
and length entered when configuring the Series 90–70 PLC itself. Matching references
is highly recommended, since it will avoid confusion. As explained in chapter 3,
however, it is not absolutely necessary to match references. The appropriate
assignment of references will depend on the nature of the application.
Each remote drop can transfer up to 128 input bytes and 128 output bytes. These limits
reflect the maximum amount of data that can be sent on the Genius bus in a single
transmission. Each remote drop transfer any mix of discrete and analog inputs up to
128 bytes, and any mix of discrete and analog outputs up to 128 bytes. Bit memories
are assigned on byte boundaries. Reference limits for the Remote I/O Scanner are
listed below. Reference limits for the host may not be the same.
Memory Type
References
Available
Maximum
Quantity
%I
12K
up to 1024 bits
%Q
12K
up to 1024 bits
%AI
8K
up to 64 words
%AQ
8K
up to 64 words
It is not necessary to allocate all four classes of I/O. To move on without assigning a
class, leave the length set to 0. The starting references associated with this class will
become meaningless (the display stays the same however). The same starting
reference will be usable in the next remote drop (or any other device).
Appendix D Logicmaster 90–70, Release 3: Remote Drop Configuration Instructions
145
D
Series Six or Series Five PLC Reference
For a Series Six or Series Five PLC system that uses I/O table references, a
previously–unconfigured Remote I/O Scanner will accept a reference entered here. It
will be the reference for the first data type (in the sequence listed above) for which you
enter a non–zero length. For example, if the remote drop has only analog input and
output boards, the data lengths for %I and %Q would be 0. You would enter a data
length for %AI and %AQ. The beginning reference entered for %AI would become the
beginning Series Six or Series Five reference for the remote drop.
Note
You MUST use a Hand–held Monitor to change a Series Six or Series
Five reference previously configured using either Logicmaster 90–70
or a Hand–held Monitor. You also must use a Hand–held Monitor to
assign a reference in register memory (instead of I/O table memory).
Entering Communications and Operating Parameters
After describing the I/O configuration, press the Page Down key to display the Genius
interface, SNP interface, and sweep control selections.
–– Genius Interface –– –––– SNP Port ––––
Baud Rate
: 153STD
Baud Rate
: 19200
BUS ADR
: 29
Parity
: ODD
BSM CTRLR
: NO
Stop Bits
:1
BSM Present : NO
Modem TT
: 0
Timeout Sec : 2.5
Idle Time
: 10 Seconds
CFG Protect ; YES
Redundancy : NONE
Duplex Def : OFF
–––– Sweep Cntrl ––––
Prog WIndow : 10
Millisecs
Comm Window : 255 Millisecs
To complete these entries, refer to the table on the next page. For more information on
the Genius parameters, see the Genius I/O System User’s Manual.
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D
Definitions of Communications and Operating Parameters
The following table summarizes the Genius configuration parameters, communications
port configuration parameters, and sweep control parameters for a Remote I/O
Scanner.
Genius Parameters
SNP Communications Port
Parameters
Sweep Control Parameters
Parameter
Description
Default
Choices
Baud Rate ]
Genius bus baud rate
153.6 Kbaud
standard
153.6 Kbaud standard, 153.6
Kbaud extended, 78.8 Kbaud,
38.4 Kbaud
Bus Adr ]
Genius bus address (Device
Number) used by the Remote I/O Scanner
29
0 to 31
BSM Controller *
Remote I/O Scanner controls
switching between dual
busses.
No
Yes/No. If Yes, select Yes for
BSM Present (below).
BSM Present *
BSM Controller set to YES.
No
Yes/No. If yes, Timeout Sec. is
configurable.
Timeout Sec. *
Redundancy output timeout, seconds. (Ignored if
BSM Present is NO)
2.5 seconds
2.5 or 10 seconds, if BSM Present is YES.
CFG Protect
Configuration Protected
None
Yes/No
Redundancy *
CPU Redundancy
No redundancy
No redundancy, Hot Standby,
or Duplex redundancy. Duplex
Redundancy cannot be used if
there are any analog modules in
the remote drop. Use only in discrete–only remote drops.
Duplex Def *
If CPU Redundancy is configured for Duplex, this is
the default output state.
Off
On/off
Baud rate
Transmission rate in bits per
second.
19200 bps
300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600,
19200
Parity
Number of parity bits added
to each word
Odd
Odd, even, or none.
Stop bits
Communications use at least
one stop bit; slower communications use two.
1
1, 2
Modem TT
Modem turnaround delay
time counts. 1 count =
1/100sec.
0
0 to 255 counts
Idle Time
Maximumcommunications
idle time
10mS
1 to 60mS
Prog. Window
Programmer Window
10mS
0 to 255mS
Comm. Window
Communications Window
255mS
0 to 255mS
*
Not operational in Remote I/O Scanner IC697BEM733A; upgrade to IC697BEM733B or later.
]
Must correspond to PLC configuration of corresponding Genius bus.
Appendix D Logicmaster 90–70, Release 3: Remote Drop Configuration Instructions
147
D
Step 3: Configure the Modules in the Remote Drop
In addition to configuring the Remote I/O Scanner, the Logicmaster 90–70 software is
used to configure the modules in the remote drop, the rack type, and the Power
Supply type. Configuration steps are the same as described in the Logicmaster 90–70
Software User’s Manual.
When configuring modules in the remote drop, do not exceed the maximum
configuration limits listed on the next page.
Configuring I/O Module Options
The module configuration screen also lists the selectable characteristics for that type of
module. These include:
Input Filter: Allows selection of either 1mS or 10mS as the filter speed for all inputs on
the board.
Output Default: Determines what happens to outputs on the board if CPU outputs
are not received. Outputs may either be turned off, or hold their last state.
Voltage/Current Range: Selects the range over which the board operates (analog).
These selections can only be made using the Logicmaster 90–70 software. If a remote
drop is configured (or reconfigured) using a Genius Hand–held Monitor, the I/O boards
in the remote drop will operate in default mode only––optional features cannot be
selected.
The completed rack configuration will look like this example.
RACK 0
Configuring Reference Addresses
When you add a module to the remote drop by selecting it with Logicmaster 90–70,
you can specify its reference address, or let the Logicmaster software assign the next
available reference. Ordinarily, the module will be assigned to use references within
the range configured for the Remote I/O Scanner. However, it is possible to assign an
I/O module references outside that range. If that is done, the host CPU will not
exchange data with the module. The module will provide data to the Remote I/O
Scanner itself, or accept data from it, using the assigned references in Remote I/O
Scanner memory. These references can be accessed by other modules in the remote
drop, such as PCM, GDS, and ADS modules.
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D
Conversely, it is possible that a PCM, GDS, or ADS module contains data which it
wishes to pass to the host, or that it requires data to be supplied by the host. To pass
data to the host, some %I or %AI memory which is not used by I/O modules must be
included in the remote drop I/O map; the PCM, GDS or ADS will then be able to
deposit data there, and that data will automatically be transported to the host. To
receive data from the host, allocate some %Q or %AQ references within the remote
drop I/O map.
Configuration Limits
There are two configuration limits that must not be exceeded:
H
There must not be too many option modules in the remote drop. This is explained
in chapter 1.
H
The I/O configuration data must not be greater than 4500 bytes total. This amount
of configuration data will never be reached in a remote drop where all of the I/O
modules are included in the Remote I/O Scanner’s I/O map. Turn to appendix B if
the remote drop drop will have I/O modules configured outside the I/O map, and
controlled by option modules in the remote drop.
Note
If you store (as described in Step 4) a configuration which has too
many option modules, or which contains too much I/O configuration
data, the Remote I/O Scanner will generate an “Illegal Configuration”
error message. If there was an earlier configuration previously stored
to the Remote I/O Scanner, it will be DELETED, except for the Device
Number, baud rate, and the remote drop ID.
Reference View from a Remote Drop
From the remote drop, Reference View shows the references assigned to each module,
by memory type.
____ D I S C R E T E
TOTAL I+Q: 352
I N P U T
( % I )
V I E W ______
HIGHEST REF CONFIGURED:
160
REFERENCE
PHYSICAL
IO
MODULE
START – END
ADDRESS
TYPE
TYPE
DESCRIPTION
___________ _________ ______ ________ __________________________
00001–00016
00017–00032
00033–00064
00065–00096
# 00097–00128
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
90–70
90–70
90–70
90–70
90–70
I
I
I
I
I
AC
AC
DC
DC
DC
16
16
32
32
32
INPUT
INPUT
INPUT
INPUT
INPUT
120 VAC 16PT ISOLATED
120 VAC 16PT ISOLATED
24 VDC 32PT
TTL 32PT
12VDC 32PT POS/NEG LOGIC
In this example, the Remote I/O Scanner is assigned references %I00001 to %I00097. It
is within this range that the PLC will accept inputs from modules in the remote drop.
However, as the configuration display shows, one input module in the remote drop
has been assigned references above %I00097. Any # characters in the left of the screen
indicate I/O references which are outside the range configured for data transfer with
the PCU. This may be done deliberately in certain applications.
Appendix D Logicmaster 90–70, Release 3: Remote Drop Configuration Instructions
149
D
Step 4: Store the Configuration to the Remote Drop
After creating or editing the configuration of a remote drop, the configuration can
either be saved to disk, or stored to the remote drop.
Caution
Be sure the configuration does not contain too many option modules,
or too much I/O configuration data. Attempting to store an illegal
configuration will generate an “Illegal Configuration” error message,
and any earlier configuration will be DELETED, except for the
Device Number, baud rate, and the remote drop ID.
Follow these steps to store the configuration to a remote drop.
1.
Go to the Program Utility Functions menu. Select F2 ... Store from Programmer
to PLC .
The SNP ID of the remote drop should appear as part of the name of the Current
Folder, and as the ID in the screen’s status area. For example:
DROP016
150
2.
Press the Enter key. The Store screen appears.
3.
Press Enter again to store the configuration.
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual – July 1992
Index
A
Common folder, Logicmaster, 54
Communications Window, 64
Analog I/O inputs, 47 , 48
Analog Input Expander modules, 10
Auto I/O map, configuration, 60 , 66 , 68 ,
70
B
Baud rate
configuration, 90 , 146 , 147
of Genius bus, 11 , 62
SNP, 63
Block/Bus Status HHM screen, 114
BSM Controller, 62
BSM Present, 62
Compatibility among devices, 4
Configuration
copy, 73 , 140
for PLC using LM90 rel. 3, 134
for remote drop, 83
for remote drop using LM90, rel. 3, 141
for Series 90–70 PLC, 53 , 133
limits, 53
preventing/permitting changes, 63 , 97
selecting an existing Logicmaster file, 74
with Hand–held Monitor, 83
Configuration data, maximum amount, 53
Connectors, 3
Customer Service, 21
Cyclic redundancy check, 11
Bus Address, 56 , 57 , 88 , 135
Bus Controller configuration, 55 , 134
Bus Controller version required, 4
D
Bus Transmitter module, 4 , 78
Data lengths, 5 , 60
Bus, Genius
cable, 11
connection, 32
length, 11
number of devices, 11
redundancy, 95
scan time, 12 , 61
terminals on Remote I/O Scanner, 3 , 33
termination, 11 , 32 , 33
Datagrams, 123
C
Cable
expansion, 31
Genius bus, 11
ground, power, 22
two–rack power, 8 , 26
Capacities, Power Supply, 7
Device Number selection, 88
Diagnostics, 113
Discrete I/O inputs, 47 , 48
Display and clear faults from LM90–70,
116
Distance between racks in a remote drop,
5
Drop ID, 57
automatic assignment, 56
changing, 57
configuration, 93
notes for Release 3, 54
E
Circuit wiring identification, 30
Equipment required with Remote I/O
Scanner, 4
Clear Memory function, 81
Expander modules, analog I/O, 10
151
Index
F
Faults
clearing, 114 , 116 , 117
display on HHM, 115
display with Logicmaster 90–70,
116–120
LM fault table at remote drop, 81
maximum number of, uncleared, 113
I/O Map, 58 , 59 , 68 , 70
displayed on screen, 66
editing, 70
modules outside, 72
I/Omemory location, 137
I/O scan time, 79
I/Oservice, 43
I/OTable display, LM90–70, 107
Field wiring information, 29
I/OTable memory for S6 or S5 PLC, 89
Filenames, configuration, 53
Idle Time, SNP, 63
G
Genius bus, operation, 11
Inputs, 47
allocating, 91 , 138 , 145
default, 62
Installing the Remote I/O Scanner, 28
Genius bus redundancy, 95
J
Grounding, programming computer, 35 ,
36
Grounding procedures, system, 22
Jumpers, rack number, 25
L
H
Hand–held Monitor
attaching to Remote I/O Scanner, 86
configuring remote drop with, 83
connector, 3
used to clear faults, 114
used to display I/O modules, 94
used to monitor I/O data, 102
version required with Remote I/O Scanner, 4
LEDs, 3
Load/Store/V
erify functions, 81
Logic equality, 79
Logicmaster 90–70
converting release 3 configurations, 54
monitoring I/O data, 107
operation with a remote drop, 77
software version required, 4
Host computer, I/O service, 112
Host CPU, 1
I
I/Odata
force, 104
handling, 99
lengths, 59
maximum amount, 5
override, 101
toggle, 101
I/OFault Table at PLC, 116
I/OFault Table at Remote I/O Scanner, 117
M
Mixed Reference Table displays for S6 and
S5 PLC, 111
Modem TT, SNP, 63
Modes of operation, 44
Module configuration, 67
Module Reference Address, 67
Modules in remote drop, configuring with
LM90–70, 19 , 65 , 148
Modules in remote drop, types, 9
Modules outside I/O map, 60
Monitoring I/O data with an HHM, 102
152
Index
O
Operation, 43
Option modules, number in remote drop,
53
Outputs
allocating, 91 , 138 , 145
enabled, configuring, 62 , 138
send by host, 48
OverridingI/O, 101
Read Map datagram, 125
Redundancy, 14
Redundancy configuration, 62 , 63 , 96 ,
146 , 147
Reference address, 49 , 59 , 60
conflicts, 69 , 71 , 72
Reference Tables, 81
Reference View, 71 , 72 , 81 , 140 , 149
Register memory for S6 or S5 PLC, 89 ,
111
Release 3 configuration, add to folder, 58
P
Parity, SNP, 63
PCIM version required, 4
PLC Control and Status functions at remote drop, 81
PLC Fault Table, 118 , 119
Ports on the Remote I/O Scanner, 3
Power supplied to two racks, 8 , 26
Power Supply switch, 26
Release 3 files, convert to Release 4, 54
Remote drop capacity, 9
Remote drop, modules in, 9
Removing the Remote I/O Scanner, 28
Report Fault datagram, 126
Restarting faulted module, 44
Run mode, 44
S
Print function, 81
Scan time, actual, 79
Program Folder functions, 81
Serial port, 3
configuration, 146 , 147
termination, 37 , 38
Program Folder, release 3 software, 133 ,
143
Programmer communications configuration, 146 , 147
Programmer Mode and Setup, 81
Programmer Window, 64
Q
QBIM version required, 4
R
Rack
distance between racks in remote drop,
5
grounding, 24
installation, 23
mounting dimensions, 23
rack number selection, 25
Series 90–70 PLC
Bus Controller version, 4
configuration, 53 , 133
I/O racks, 6
power supplies, 7
reference, identify on HHM, 103
Series Five PLC
Bus Controller version, 4
fault clearing, 121
monitoring I/O data, 109
reference address, 59 , 89
register table, 111
version required, 4
Series Six PLC
Bus Controller version, 4
fault clearing, 121
monitoring I/O data, 109
reference address, 59 , 89
register table, 111
version required, 4
SNP ID, 78 , 80 , 145
153
Index
SNP Port configuration, 63
Timing, 12 , 61
Status display, 79
TogglingI/O, 101 , 107
Status references, 120
Two–rack power, 8 , 26
Stop bits, SNP, 63
Stop modes, 44
Storing the PLC configuration, 75 , 140
Storing the remote drop configuration, 75
, 150
U
Update rate, 46
Utility functions, 81
System overview, 1
W
T
Terminal board
strap, 30
wiring, 29 , 30
Terminator plug, 31
154
Window times, configuration, 146 , 147
Wire bundle, securing, 30
Wire size, terminal board, 30
Wiring, field, 29
Write Map datagram, 125
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