Allen-Bradley micrologix 1500 User manual

Allen-Bradley micrologix 1500 User manual

MicroLogix™ 1500

Programmable

Controllers

Bulletin 1764

User Manual

Important User Information

Because of the variety of uses for the products described in this publication, those responsible for the application and use of this control equipment must satisfy themselves that all necessary steps have been taken to assure that each application and use meets all performance and safety requirements, including any applicable laws, regulations, codes and standards.

The illustrations, charts, sample programs and layout examples shown in this guide are intended solely for purposes of example. Since there are many variables and requirements associated with any particular installation, Allen-Bradley does not assume responsibility or liability

(to include intellectual property liability) for actual use based upon the examples shown in this publication.

Allen-Bradley publication SGI-1.1, Safety Guidelines for the

Application, Installation and Maintenance of Solid-State Control

(available from your local Allen-Bradley office), describes some important differences between solid-state equipment and electromechanical devices that should be taken into consideration when applying products such as those described in this publication.

Reproduction of the contents of this copyrighted publication, in whole or part, without written permission of Rockwell Automation, is prohibited.

Throughout this publication, notes may be used to make you aware of safety considerations. The following annotations and their accompanying statements help you to identify a potential hazard, avoid a potential hazard, and recognize the consequences of a potential hazard:

WARNING

Identifies information about practices or circumstances that can cause an explosion in a hazardous environment, which may lead to personal injury or death, property damage, or economic loss.

!

ATTENTION

!

Identifies information about practices or circumstances that can lead to personal injury or death, property damage, or economic loss.

IMPORTANT

Identifies information that is critical for successful application and understanding of the product.

MicroLogix, Compact I/O, and RSLogix are trademarks of Rockwell Automation.

Summary of Changes

The information below summarizes the changes to this manual since the last printing.

To help you find new and updated information in this release of the manual, we have included change bars as shown to the right of this paragraph.

The table below lists the sections that document new features and additional or updated information on existing features.

For this information:

Series C support for up to 16 expansion I/O modules

List of controller series, OS FRN numbers, and RSLogix versions

Updated list of recommended surge suppressors

Ethernet Connectivity

Typical CPU hold-up time

Updated system loading and heat dissipation worksheets

System loading graphs for 1769 power supplies, including 1769-PA4 and 1769-PB4

See

Chapter 1

Page 1-5

Page 3-6

Page 4-23

Page A-1

Appendix F

pages F-5 through F-7

iii Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - March 2002

Summary of Changes iv

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - March 2002

v

Hardware Overview

Installing Your Controller

Table of Contents

Preface

Who Should Use this Manual. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P-1

Purpose of this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P-1

Related Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P-1

Common Techniques Used in this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . P-3

Rockwell Automation Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P-3

Local Product Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P-3

Technical Product Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P-3

Your Questions or Comments on this Manual . . . . . . . . P-4

Chapter 1

Hardware Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1

MicroLogix 1500 Component Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2

Base Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2

Processors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3

Data Access Tool (Catalog Number 1764-DAT) . . . . . . . 1-3

Memory Modules/Real-Time Clock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4

Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4

Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5

Communication Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6

Compact™ Expansion I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6

End Cap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6

Expansion Power Supply and Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7

System Requirements for Using Expansion Modules . . . 1-7

Adding an I/O Bank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-9

Addressing Expansion I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-11

Expansion I/O Power Failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-11

Chapter 2

Agency Certifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1

Compliance to European Union Directives . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1

EMC Directive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1

Low Voltage Directive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2

Installation Considerations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2

Safety Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3

Hazardous Location Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3

Disconnecting Main Power. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4

Safety Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4

Power Distribution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5

Periodic Tests of Master Control Relay Circuit . . . . . . . . 2-5

Power Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5

Isolation Transformers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5

Power Supply Inrush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6

Loss of Power Source. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Table of Contents vi

Wiring Your Controller

Communication Connections

Input States on Power Down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6

Other Types of Line Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7

Preventing Excessive Heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7

Master Control Relay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8

Using Emergency-Stop Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9

Schematic (Using IEC Symbols) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10

Schematic (Using ANSI/CSA Symbols). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11

Base Unit Mounting Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12

Controller Spacing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12

Mounting the Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-13

Using a DIN Rail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14

Base Unit Panel Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16

Installing Controller Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-17

Prevent Electrostatic Discharge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-17

Processor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-17

Data Access Tool (DAT). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-19

Memory Module/Real-Time Clock. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-20

Compact I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-22

Chapter 3

Wiring Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1

Wiring Recommendation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2

Using Surge Suppressors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4

Recommended Surge Suppressors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6

Grounding the Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6

Wiring Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8

Miswiring - 1764-28BXB Only. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8

Terminal Block Layouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9

Terminal Groupings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10

Sinking and Sourcing Input Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10

1764-24AWA Wiring Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11

1764-24BWA Wiring Diagram with Sinking Inputs . . . . . 3-12

1764-24BWA Wiring Diagram with Sourcing Inputs . . . . 3-13

1764-28BXB Wiring Diagram with Sinking Inputs . . . . . 3-14

1764-28BXB Wiring Diagram with Sourcing Outputs . . . 3-15

Controller I/O Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16

Minimizing Electrical Noise. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16

Transistor Output Transient Pulses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16

Chapter 4

Default Communication Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1

Communications Toggle Push Button. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2

Connecting to the RS-232 Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3

DF1 Full-Duplex Communication Parameters . . . . . . . . 4-3

Making a DF1 Full-Duplex Point-to-Point Connection . . 4-3

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Using Trim Pots and the Data

Access Tool (DAT)

Using Real-Time Clock and

Memory Modules

Table of Contents vii

Using a Modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5

Isolated Modem Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5

Connecting to a DF1 Half-Duplex Network . . . . . . . . . . 4-7

Connecting to a DH-485 Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-10

DH-485 Configuration Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12

Recommended Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12

DH-485 Communication Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12

Communication Cable Connection to the

DH-485 Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13

Connecting the AIC+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-15

Connecting to DeviceNet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-22

Cable Selection Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-22

Connecting to Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-23

Ethernet Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-23

RS-232 Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-24

Chapter 5

Trim Pot Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1

Trim Pot Information Function File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2

Error Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2

Data Access Tool (DAT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2

DAT Keypad and Indicator Light Functions . . . . . . . . . . 5-2

Power-Up Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3

DAT Function File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4

Power Save Timeout (PST) Parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4

Understanding the DAT Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5

Entering Bit Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6

Entering Integer Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6

Monitoring and Editing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6

F1 and F2 Functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7

Working Screen Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7

Non-Existent Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8

Controller Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8

Error Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9

Chapter 6

Real-Time Clock Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1

Removal/Insertion Under Power. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1

Real-Time Clock Function File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1

Accuracy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2

Writing Data to the Real-Time Clock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2

RTC Battery Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2

Memory Module Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3

User Program and Data Back-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3

Program Compare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Table of Contents viii

Specifications

Replacement Parts

Troubleshooting Your System

Data File Download Protection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4

Memory Module Write Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5

Removal/Insertion Under Power. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5

Memory Module Information File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5

Appendix A

Controller Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1

Choosing a Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2

Transistor Output Transient Pulses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8

Controller Dimensions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-9

Compact I/O Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-9

Panel Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-9

End Cap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-10

Appendix B

MicroLogix 1500 Replacement Kits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1

Lithium Battery (1747-BA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2

Installing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2

Battery Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-3

Storing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-3

Transporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-3

Disposing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-4

Replacement Terminal Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-5

Replacement Doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-6

Base Terminal Door (1764-RPL-TDR1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-6

Processor Access Door (1764-RPL-CDR1) . . . . . . . . . . . B-6

Base Comms Door

(included in 1764-RPL-DR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-6

Trim Pots/Mode Switch Cover Door

(included in 1764-RPL-DR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-6

Appendix C

Understanding Controller LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1

When Operating Normally . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2

When an Error Exists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2

Controller Error Recovery Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-3

Identifying Controller Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-4

Automatically Clearing Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-4

Manually Clearing Faults Using the Fault Routine . . . . . C-4

Fault Messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-5

Calling Rockwell Automation for Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . C-5

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Table of Contents ix

Appendix D

Upgrading Your Operating System

Preparing for Upgrade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1

Performing the Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-2

Missing/Corrupt OS LED Pattern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-2

Understanding Communication

Protocols

Appendix E

RS-232 Communication Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-1

DF1 Full-Duplex Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-1

DF1 Half-Duplex Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-2

DF1 Half-Duplex Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-2

Considerations When Communicating as a DF1 Slave on a Multi-drop Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-3

Using Modems with MicroLogix 1500

Programmable Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-3

Dial-Up Phone Modems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-4

Leased-Line Modems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-4

Radio Modems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-5

Line Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-5

DH-485 Communication Protocol. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-5

DH-485 Network Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-5

DH-485 Token Rotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-6

DH-485 Configuration Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-6

Devices that Use the DH-485 Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-7

Important DH-485 Network Planning Considerations . . . E-8

Modbus RTU Slave Communication Protocol

(MicroLogix 1764-LSP and 1764-LRP Series B and later processors only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-13

ASCII Protocol (MicroLogix 1500 1764-LSP and 1764-LRP Series B and later Processors only) . . . . . . . E-13

System Loading and Heat

Dissipation

Appendix F

System Loading Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-1

System Expansion Calculations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-1

Selecting System Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-2

Verifying the System Loading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-4

Calculating Heat Dissipation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-9

Glossary

Index

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Table of Contents x

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Who Should Use this

Manual

Purpose of this Manual

Preface

Read this preface to familiarize yourself with the rest of the manual. It provides information concerning:

• who should use this manual

• the purpose of this manual

• related documentation

• conventions used in this manual

Rockwell Automation support

Use this manual if you are responsible for designing, installing, programming, or troubleshooting control systems that use

MicroLogix 1500 controllers.

You should have a basic understanding of electrical circuitry and familiarity with relay logic. If you do not, obtain the proper training before using this product.

This manual is a reference guide for MicroLogix 1500 controllers. It describes the procedures you use to install, wire, and troubleshoot your controller. This manual:

• explains how to install and wire your controllers

• gives you an overview of the MicroLogix 1500 controller system

Refer to publication 1762-RM001, MicroLogix 1200 and MicroLogix

1500 Programmable Controllers Instruction Set Reference Manual for the MicroLogix 1200 and 1500 instruction set and for application examples to show the instruction set in use. Refer to your programming software user documentation for more information on programming your MicroLogix 1500 controller.

Related Documentation

P-1

The documents listed on page P-2 contain additional information

concerning Rockwell Automation products. If you would like a copy, you can:

• download a free electronic version from the internet: www.ab.com/micrologix or www.theautomationbookstore.com

• purchase a printed manual by:

contacting your local distributor or Rockwell Automation representative

visiting www.theautomationbookstore.com and placing your order

calling 1.800.963.9548 (USA/Canada) or 001.330.725.1574 (Outside USA/Canada)

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Preface P-2

For

A technical overview of the MicroLogix 1500 and related products

Information on the MicroLogix 1500 Controllers instruction set

Read this Document

MicroLogix 1500 Programmable Controllers

Technical Data

MicroLogix 1200 and 1500 Programmable

Controllers Instruction Set Reference Manual

Document Number

1764-TD001

1762-RM001

Information on mounting and wiring the MicroLogix 1500 Base

Units, including a mounting template for easy installation

MicroLogix 1500 Programmable Controllers

Base Unit Installation Instructions

Compact I/O System Overview An overview of Compact I/O

More information on Compact I/O Power Supplies and Cables 1769 Compact I/O Power Supplies and

Communication Bus Expansion Cables

Technical Data

More information on Compact Analog I/O and Temperature Input

Modules

Compact Analog I/O and Temperature Input

Modules Technical Data

Detailed information on using Compact I/O Analog Modules

Detailed information on installing, configuring, and using

1769-IT6 Thermocouple/mV Input Modules

Detailed information on installing, configuring, and using

1769-IR6 RTD/Resistance Input Modules

Detailed information on installing, configuring, and using

1769-HSC High Speed Counter Modules

1764-IN001

1769-SO001

1769-TD001

1769-TD004

Compact I/O Analog Modules User Manual 1769-UM002

Compact I/O 1769-IT6 Thermocouple/mV

Input Module User Manual

1769-UM004

1769-UM005 Compact I/O 1769-IR6 RTD/Resistance Input

Module User Manual

Compact 1769-HSC High Speed Counter

Module User Manual

1769-UM006

A description on how to install and connect an AIC+. This manual also contains information on network wiring.

Information on how to install, configure, and commission a DNI

Information on installing, connecting, and configuring an ENI

Information on installing, configuring, and using a DeviceNet

Scanner

Information on DF1 open protocol.

In-depth information on grounding and wiring Allen-Bradley programmable controllers

A description of important differences between solid-state programmable controller products and hard-wired electromechanical devices

Advanced Interface Converter (AIC+) User

Manual

DeviceNet™ Interface User Manual

Ethernet Interface User Manual

1761-6.4

1761-6.5

1761-UM001

Compact™ I/O 1769-SDN DeviceNet Scanner

User Manual

1761-UM009

1770-6.5.16

DF1 Protocol and Command Set Reference

Manual

Allen-Bradley Programmable Controller

Grounding and Wiring Guidelines

1770-4.1

Application Considerations for Solid-State

Controls

SGI-1.1

An article on wire sizes and types for grounding electrical equipment

National Electrical Code - Published by the National Fire Protection

Association of Boston, MA.

SD499 A complete listing of current documentation, including ordering instructions. Also indicates whether the documents are available on CD-ROM or in multi-languages.

Allen-Bradley Publication Index

A glossary of industrial automation terms and abbreviations Allen-Bradley Industrial Automation Glossary AG-7.1

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Preface P-3

Common Techniques Used in this Manual

The following conventions are used throughout this manual:

Bulleted lists such as this one provide information, not procedural steps.

Numbered lists provide sequential steps or hierarchical information.

Italic type is used for emphasis.

Rockwell Automation

Support

Rockwell Automation offers support services worldwide, with over 75

Sales/Support Offices, 512 authorized Distributors and 260 authorized

Systems Integrators located throughout the United States alone, plus

Rockwell Automation representatives in every major country in the world.

Local Product Support

Contact your local Rockwell Automation representative for:

• sales and order support

• product technical training

• warranty support

• support service agreements

Technical Product Assistance

Before you contact Rockwell Automation for technical assistance, we suggest you please review the troubleshooting information contained in this publication first.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Preface P-4

If the problem persists, call your local Rockwell Automation representative or contact Rockwell Automation in one of the following ways:

Phone

Internet

United

States/Canada

Outside United

States/Canada

1.440.646.5800

You can access the phone number for your country via the Internet:

1. Go to http://www.ab.com

2. Click on Product Support

(http://support.automation.rockwell.com)

3. Under Support Centers , click on Contact

Information

1. Go to http://www.ab.com

2. Click on Product Support

(http://support.automation.rockwell.com)

Your Questions or Comments on this Manual

If you find a problem with this manual, or you have any suggestions for how this manual could be made more useful to you, please contact us at the address below:

Rockwell Automation

Automation Control and Information Group

Technical Communication, Dept. A602V

P.O. Box 2086

Milwaukee, WI 53201-2086 or visit our internet page at: http://www.rockwellautomation.com

For the latest information on MicroLogix controllers, visit www.ab.com/micrologix

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

1

Chapter

1

Hardware Overview

Hardware Features

The MicroLogix 1500 programmable controller is composed of a base unit, which contains a power supply, input and output circuits, and a processor. The controller is available with 24 or 28 points of embedded I/O. Additional I/O may be added using Compact™ I/O.

The hardware features of the controller are:

1

RUN

REM

PROG

10

2

12

3

4

5

11

10 9

8

1

7

6

4

5

Feature Description

1

2

3

Removable Terminal Blocks

Interface to Expansion I/O,

Removable ESD Barrier

Input LEDs

Feature

7

8

9

Description

Memory Module/Real-Time Clock

Replacement Battery

(1)

Battery

(1)

6

Output LEDs

Communication Port

Status LEDs

10

11

12

Terminal Doors and Label

Data Access Tool

(1)

Mode Switch, Trim Pots

(1) Optional.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

1-2 Hardware Overview

MicroLogix 1500

Component Descriptions

A controller is composed of a processor (1764-LSP or enhanced

1764-LRP with RS-232 port) and one of the base units listed below.

The FET transistor outputs are available on the 1764-28BXB base only.

Base Units

Catalog

Number

Line Power Inputs

1764-24AWA 120/240V ac (12) 120V ac

Outputs High Speed I/O

1764-24BWA 120/240V ac (8) Standard 24V dc

(4) Fast 24V dc

1764-28BXB 24V dc (8) Standard 24V dc

(8) Fast 24V dc

(12) Relay, 2 isolated relays per unit

(12) Relay, 2 isolated relays per unit

(6) Relay, 2 isolated relays per unit

(4) Standard 24V dc FET

(2) Fast 24V dc FET n/a

(4) 20 kHz input

(8) 20 kHz input

(2) 20 kHz output

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Processors

Processor (Catalog Number 1764-LSP)

Hardware Overview 1-3

Processor (Catalog Number 1764-LRP)

Communications Port

DTE (male) 9-pin D-shell connector

30V dc isolation

Data Access Tool (Catalog Number 1764-DAT)

1764-DAT mounted on

1764-LSP processor.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

1-4 Hardware Overview

Memory Modules/Real-Time Clock

Memory module mounted on

1764-LSP processor.

The following memory modules and real-time clock modules are available:

Catalog Number

1764-RTC

1764-MM1

1764-MM1RTC

1764-MM2

(1)

1764-MM2RTC

(1)

Function

Real-Time Clock

Memory Module

Memory Module and Real-Time Clock

Memory Module

Memory Module and Real-Time Clock

(1) For 1764-LRP programs greater than 8k, use the 1764-MM2 or 1764-MM2RTC.

Memory Size

not applicable

8K

8K

16K

16K

Cables

Use only the following communication cables in Class I, Division 2 hazardous locations.

Table 1.1 Cables for Use in Class I, Division 2 Hazardous Environment

1761-CBL-PM02 Series C or later

1761-CBL-HM02 Series C or later

1761-CBL-AM00 Series C or later

1761-CBL-AP00 Series C or later

2707-NC8 Series B or later

2707-NC9 Series B or later

2707-NC10 Series B or later

2707-NC11 Series B or later

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Hardware Overview 1-5

Programming

Programming the MicroLogix 1500 programmable controller is done using RSLogix™ 500, Rev. 4.0 or later. Certain features are only available when using the most current version of the software, as

noted in System Requirements for Using Expansion Modules on page

1-7.

The following table lists the firmware release numbers, feature and functionality enhancements, and the required version of RSLogix 500 and RSLogix 500 Starter software.

Table 1.B Required Software Version by FRN Number

Controller Firmware

Release

Available for Sale

Date

Catalog

Number

Series

Catalog

Number

Revision

OS FRN

Number

A B 2

Feature and Functionality

Changes

Initial Release

Required

Version of

RSLogix

500/RSLogix

500 Starter

Software

3.01.00

Initial

Release

February

1999

Enhancement October

1999

Series B

Release

March

2000

A

B

C

A

3

4

1764-LSP

1764-LRP

Enhancement October

2000

Series C

Release

Initial

Release

March

2000

Enhancement October

2000

Series C

Release

September

2001

September

2001

B

C

B

B

C

B

A

A

B

A

5

6

4

5

6

Power Supply and Expansion Cable

Compatibility

String Data File Type,

ASCII Instruction Set,

Modbus RTU Slave Protocol,

Ramping (when using PWM outputs),

Static Data File Protection,

RTC Messaging

PTO Controlled Stop,

Memory Module Program Compare Bit

Enhancement

Floating Point Data File Support,

Programmable Limit Switch (PLS),

Real Time Clock Adjust (Copy Word),

Absolute Value,

Gray Code,

Recipe,

Message Instruction Support for

1769-SDN

3.01.00

4.00.00

4.50.00

5.10.00

Initial Release - Same Functionality as

1764-LSP

4.00.00

PTO Controlled Stop,

Memory Module Program Compare Bit

Enhancement

Floating Point Data File Support,

Programmable Limit Switch (PLS),

Real Time Clock Adjust (Copy Word),

Absolute Value,

Gray Code,

Recipe,

Message Instruction Support for

1769-SDN

4.50.00

5.10.00

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

1-6 Hardware Overview

Communication Options

The MicroLogix 1500 can be connected to a personal computer. It can also be connected to the DH-485 network using an Advanced

Interface Converter (1761-NET-AIC), to an Ethernet network using an

Ethernet Interface (1761-NET-ENI), or to a DeviceNet™ network using a DeviceNet Interface (1761-NET-DNI) or through the DeviceNet

Scanner module (1769-SDN). The controller can also be connected to

Modbus™ SCADA networks as an RTU slave. See Communication

Connections on page 4-1 for more information on connecting to the

available communication options.

The 1764-LRP processor provides an additional communication port.

Each of the communications ports can be independently configured for any supported communication protocol. (Channel 0 is on the base unit and Channel 1 is on the 1764-LRP processor.)

Compact™ Expansion I/O

Compact expansion I/O (Bulletin 1769) can be connected to the

MicroLogix 1500 Controller. A maximum of either 8 or 16 expansion

I/O modules can be used, depending upon your system. See System

Requirements for Using Expansion Modules on page 1-7.

See System Loading and Heat Dissipation on page F-1 for more

information on system configurations.

End Cap

An end cap terminator (catalog number 1769-ECR or 1769-ECL) must be used at the end of the group of I/O modules attached to the

MicroLogix 1500 Controller. The end cap terminator is not provided with the base or processor units. It is required when using expansion

I/O.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

This illustration shows the right end cap (1769-ECR ). The left end cap

(1769-ECL) is shown on page 1-10.

Hardware Overview 1-7

Expansion Power Supply and Cables

With Operating System Revision Number (FRN) 3 or higher, you can connect an additional bank of I/O to your controller. Using an expansion power supply increases the system’s capacity for adding expansion I/O modules. The additional I/O bank is connected to the controller via a specially designed cable. The additional I/O bank must include a power supply and an end cap.

TIP

Depending on the system configuration, each controller can support up to 16 expansion I/O

modules. See the System Requirements for Using

Expansion Modules below. Also see System

Guidelines on page 1-9 for system limitations and

illustrations of expansion I/O banks.

System Requirements for Using Expansion Modules

To support a maximum of 8 I/O modules in an additional I/O bank, you must have the following:

Table 1.3 Requirements to Support a Maximum of 8 I/O Modules

Product

MicroLogix 1500

Processor

MicroLogix 1500

Base Unit

Catalog Number

1764-LSP, Series A, Revision C or higher

1764-LSP, Series B or higher

1764-LRP, Series B or higher

1764-24AWA, Series A or higher

1764-24BWA, Series A or higher

1764-28BXB, Series A or higher

Firmware Revision Number (FRN) 3 or higher

(1) Operating System

Version

Programming

Software

1 Power Supply

(optional)

1 Cable (optional)

1764-LSP, Series A RSLogix 500, Version 3.01.09 or higher,

1764-LSP, Series B

1764-LRP, Series B

RSLogix 500, Version 4.00.00 or higher.

1764-LSP, Series C

1764-LRP, Series C

1769-PA2, 1769-PA4

1769-PB2, 1769-PB4

RSLogix 500, Version 5.00.00 or higher.

1769-CRL1, 1769-CRL3, 1769-CRR1, 1769-CRR3

1 End Cap (required) 1769-ECL, 1769-ECR

(1) You can check the FRN by looking at word S:59 (Operating System FRN) in the Status File.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

1-8 Hardware Overview

To support a maximum of 16 I/O modules in an additional I/O bank, you must have the following:

Table 1.4 Requirements to Support a Maximum of 16 I/O Modules

Product

MicroLogix 1500 Processor

MicroLogix 1500 Base Unit

Operating System Version

Programming Software

1 Power Supply (optional)

1 Cable (optional)

1 End Cap (required)

Catalog Number

1764-LSP, Series C or higher

1764-LRP, Series C or higher

1764-24AWA, Series B or higher

1764-24BWA, Series B or higher

1764-28BXB, Series B or higher

Firmware Revision Number (FRN) 6 or higher

(1)

RSLogix 500, Version 5.10.00 or higher.

1769-PA2, 1769-PA4, 1769-PB2, 1769-PB4

1769-CRL1, 1769-CRL3, 1769-CRR1, 1769-CRR3

1769-ECL, 1769-ECR

(1) You can check the FRN by looking at word S:59 (Operating System FRN) in the Status File.

IMPORTANT

If your processor is at an older revision, you must upgrade the operating system to FRN 3 or higher to use an expansion cable and power supply (or to

FRN 6 or higher to allow up to 16 expansion modules). On the Internet, go to

http://www.ab.com/micrologix to download the operating system upgrade. Navigate to MicroLogix

1500 for further instructions and downloads.

MicroLogix 1500 base units are not field upgradeable from Series A to Series B.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Hardware Overview 1-9

Adding an I/O Bank

System Guidelines

A maximum of one 1769 Expansion Cable can be used in a

MicroLogix 1500 system, allowing for two banks of I/O modules (one connected directly to the controller, and the other connected via the cable). Each I/O bank requires its own power supply (Bank 1 uses the controller’s embedded power supply).

ATTENTION

!

LIMIT OF ONE EXPANSION POWER SUPPLY

The expansion power supply cannot be connected directly to the controller. It must be connected using an expansion cable. Only one power supply

(embedded in the base unit or an expansion power supply) may be used on an I/O bank. Exceeding these limitations may damage the power supply and result in unexpected operation.

ATTENTION

!

REMOVE POWER

Remove system power before making or breaking cable connections. When you remove or insert a cable connector with power applied, an electrical arc may occur. An electrical arc can cause personal injury or property damage by:

• sending an erroneous signal to your system’s field devices, causing unintended machine operation

• causing an explosion in a hazardous environment

Electrical arcing causes excessive wear to contacts on both the module and its mating connector.

Refer to your power supply and I/O module’s documentation for instructions on how to set up your system.

IMPORTANT

See the System Requirements for Using Expansion

Modules on page 1-7 to determine the maximum

number of expansion I/O modules you can use in your MicroLogix system.

Also see System Loading and Heat Dissipation on page F-1 for more information on system

configurations.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

1-10 Hardware Overview

The following illustrations show a MicroLogix 1500 with an expansion

I/O bank.

Vertical Orientation

Expansion

I/O Bank 1

1769-CRRx

(1)

Expansion Cable

Expansion

I/O Bank 2

1769-ECL

End Cap

(1) The x in this catalog number can be either a 1 or a 3 representing the length of the cable:

1 = 1 foot (305 mm) and 3 = 3.28 feet (1 meter).

Horizontal Orientation

Expansion

I/O Bank 1

1769-CRLx

(1)

Expansion Cable

Expansion

I/O Bank 2

(1) The x in this catalog number can be either a 1 or a 3 representing the length of the cable:

1 = 1 foot (305 mm) and 3 = 3.28 feet (1 meter).

1769-ECR

End Cap

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Hardware Overview 1-11

Addressing Expansion I/O

The expansion I/O is addressed as slots 1 through 16 (the controller’s embedded I/O is addressed as slot 0). Power supplies and cables are not counted as slots. Modules are counted from left to right on each bank as shown in the illustrations below. For more information on addressing, refer to the MicroLogix 1200 and MicroLogix 1500

Programmable Controllers Instruction Set Reference Manual, publication 1762-RM001.

Vertical Orientation

Expansion

I/O Bank 1

Embedded

I/O = Slot 0

Expansion

I/O Bank 2

Horizontal Orientation

Embedded

I/O = Slot 0

Expansion I/O Bank 1 Expansion I/O Bank 2

Expansion I/O Power Failure

Expansion I/O errors represent failures of the I/O bus or the modules themselves. The error codes are listed in the MicroLogix 1200 and

MicroLogix 1500 Programmable Controllers Instruction Set Reference

Manual, publication 1762-RM001.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

1-12 Hardware Overview

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Chapter

2

Installing Your Controller

1

Agency Certifications

This chapter shows you how to install your controller system. The only tools you require are a Flat or Phillips head screwdriver and drill.

Topics include:

• agency certifications

• compliance to European Union Directives

• using in hazardous locations

• master control relay

• power considerations

• preventing excessive heat

• controller spacing

• mounting the controller

UL 508

C-UL under CSA C22.2 no. 142

Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B, C, D

(UL 1604, C-UL under CSA C22.2 no. 213)

CE compliant for all applicable directives

Compliance to European

Union Directives

This product has the CE mark and is approved for installation within the European Union and EEA regions. It has been designed and tested to meet the following directives.

EMC Directive

This product is tested to meet Council Directive 89/336/EEC

Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) and the following standards, in whole or in part, documented in a technical construction file:

EN 50081-2

EMC - Generic Emission Standard, Part 2 - Industrial

Environment

EN 50082-2

EMC - Generic Immunity Standard, Part 2 - Industrial

Environment

This product is intended for use in an industrial environment.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

2-2 Installing Your Controller

Low Voltage Directive

This product is tested to meet Council Directive 73/23/EEC Low

Voltage, by applying the safety requirements of EN 61131-2

Programmable Controllers, Part 2 - Equipment Requirements and

Tests.

For specific information required by EN 61131-2, see the appropriate sections in this publication, as well as the following Allen-Bradley publications:

Industrial Automation Wiring and Grounding Guidelines for

Noise Immunity, publication 1770-4.1

Guidelines for Handling Lithium Batteries, publication AG-5.4

Automation Systems Catalog, publication B111

Installation Considerations

Most applications require installation in an industrial enclosure

(Pollution Degree 2

(1)

) to reduce the effects of electrical interference

(Over Voltage Category II

(2)

) and environmental exposure. Locate your controller as far as possible from power lines, load lines, and other sources of electrical noise such as hard-contact switches, relays, and AC motor drives. For more information on proper grounding guidelines, see the Industrial Automation Wiring and Grounding

Guidelines publication 1770-4.1.

ATTENTION

!

Vertical mounting of the controller is not recommended due to heat build-up considerations.

ATTENTION

!

Be careful of metal chips when drilling mounting holes for your controller or other equipment within the enclosure or panel. Drilled fragments that fall into the base or processor unit could cause damage. Do not drill holes above a mounted controller if the protective debris strips are removed or the processor is installed.

(1) Pollution Degree 2 is an environment where normally only non-conductive pollution occurs except that occasionally temporary conductivity caused by condensation shall be expected.

(2) Overvoltage Category II is the load level section of the electrical distribution system. At this level transient voltages are controlled and do not exceed the impulse voltage capability of the products insulation.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Safety Considerations

Installing Your Controller 2-3

Safety considerations are an important element of proper system installation. Actively thinking about the safety of yourself and others, as well as the condition of your equipment, is of primary importance.

We recommend reviewing the following safety considerations.

Hazardous Location Considerations

This equipment is suitable for use in Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B,

C, D or non-hazardous locations only. The following WARNING statement applies to use in hazardous locations.

WARNING

!

EXPLOSION HAZARD

Substitution of components may impair suitability for Class I, Division 2.

Do not replace components or disconnect equipment unless power has been switched off.

Do not connect or disconnect components unless power has been switched off, or the area is known to be non-hazardous.

This product must be installed in an enclosure. All cables connected to the product must remain in the enclosure or be protected by conduit or other means.

All wiring must comply with N.E.C. article

501-4(b).

WARNING

!

When installing any peripheral device (for example, push buttons, lamps) into a hazardous environment, ensure that they are Class I, Division 2 certified, or determined to be safe for the environment.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

2-4 Installing Your Controller

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Use only the following communication cables in Class I, Division 2 hazardous locations.

Table 2.1 Cables for Use in Class I, Division 2 Hazardous Environment

1761-CBL-PM02 Series C or later

1761-CBL-HM02 Series C or later

1761-CBL-AM00 Series C or later

1761-CBL-AP00 Series C or later

2707-NC8 Series B or later

2707-NC9 Series B or later

2707-NC10 Series B or later

2707-NC11 Series B or later

Disconnecting Main Power

WARNING

!

EXPLOSION HAZARD

Do not replace components or disconnect equipment unless power has been switched off.

The main power disconnect switch should be located where operators and maintenance personnel have quick and easy access to it. In addition to disconnecting electrical power, all other sources of power

(pneumatic and hydraulic) should be de-energized before working on a machine or process controlled by a controller.

Safety Circuits

WARNING

!

EXPLOSION HAZARD

Do not connect or disconnect connectors while circuit is live.

Circuits installed on the machine for safety reasons, like overtravel limit switches, stop push buttons, and interlocks, should always be hard-wired directly to the master control relay. These devices must be wired in series so that when any one device opens, the master control relay is de-energized, thereby removing power to the machine. Never alter these circuits to defeat their function. Serious injury or machine damage could result.

Power Considerations

Installing Your Controller 2-5

Power Distribution

There are some points about power distribution that you should know:

The master control relay must be able to inhibit all machine motion by removing power to the machine I/O devices when the relay is de-energized. It is recommended that the controller remain powered even when the master control relay is de-energized.

If you are using a dc power supply, interrupt the load side rather than the ac line power. This avoids the additional delay of power supply turn-off. The dc power supply should be powered directly from the fused secondary of the transformer. Power to the dc input and output circuits should be connected through a set of master control relay contacts.

Periodic Tests of Master Control Relay Circuit

Any part can fail, including the switches in a master control relay circuit. The failure of one of these switches would most likely cause an open circuit, which would be a safe power-off failure. However, if one of these switches shorts out, it no longer provides any safety protection. These switches should be tested periodically to assure they will stop machine motion when needed.

The following explains power considerations for the micro controllers.

Isolation Transformers

You may want to use an isolation transformer in the ac line to the controller. This type of transformer provides isolation from your power distribution system to reduce the electrical noise that enters the controller and is often used as a step-down transformer to reduce line voltage. Any transformer used with the controller must have a sufficient power rating for its load. The power rating is expressed in volt-amperes (VA).

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

2-6 Installing Your Controller

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Power Supply Inrush

During power-up, the MicroLogix 1500 power supply allows a brief inrush current to charge internal capacitors. Many power lines and control transformers can supply inrush current for a brief time. If the power source cannot supply this inrush current, the source voltage may sag momentarily.

The only effect of limited inrush current and voltage sag on the

MicroLogix 1500 is that the power supply capacitors charge more slowly. However, the effect of a voltage sag on other equipment should be considered. For example, a deep voltage sag may reset a computer connected to the same power source. The following considerations determine whether the power source must be required to supply high inrush current:

The power-up sequence of devices in a system.

The amount of the power source voltage sag if the inrush current cannot be supplied.

The effect of voltage sag on other equipment in the system.

If the entire system is powered-up at the same time, a brief sag in the power source voltage typically will not affect any equipment.

Loss of Power Source

The power supply is designed to withstand brief power losses without affecting the operation of the system. The time the system is operational during power loss is called “program scan hold-up time after loss of power.” The duration of the power supply hold-up time depends on the type and state of the I/O, but is typically between 10 milliseconds and 3 seconds. When the duration of power loss reaches this limit, the power supply signals the processor that it can no longer provide adequate dc power to the system. This is referred to as a power supply shutdown. The processor then performs an orderly shutdown of the controller.

Input States on Power Down

The power supply hold-up time as described above is generally longer than the turn-on and turn-off times of the inputs. Because of this, the input state change from “On” to “Off” that occurs when power is removed may be recorded by the processor before the

Installing Your Controller 2-7 power supply shuts down the system. Understanding this concept is important. Write the user program, taking this effect into account.

Other Types of Line Conditions

Occasionally the power source to the system can be temporarily interrupted. It is also possible that the voltage level may drop substantially below the normal line voltage range for a period of time.

Both of these conditions are considered to be a loss of power for the system.

Preventing Excessive Heat

For most applications, normal convective cooling keeps the controller within the specified operating range. Ensure that the specified temperature range is maintained. Proper spacing of components within an enclosure is usually sufficient for heat dissipation.

In some applications, a substantial amount of heat is produced by other equipment inside or outside the enclosure. In this case, place blower fans inside the enclosure to assist in air circulation and to reduce “hot spots” near the controller.

Additional cooling provisions might be necessary when high ambient temperatures are encountered.

TIP

Do not bring in unfiltered outside air. Place the controller in an enclosure to protect it from a corrosive atmosphere. Harmful contaminants or dirt could cause improper operation or damage to components. In extreme cases, you may need to use air conditioning to protect against heat build-up within the enclosure.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

2-8 Installing Your Controller

Master Control Relay

A hard-wired master control relay (MCR) provides a reliable means for emergency machine shutdown. Since the master control relay allows the placement of several emergency-stop switches in different locations, its installation is important from a safety standpoint.

Overtravel limit switches or mushroom-head push buttons are wired in series so that when any of them opens, the master control relay is de-energized. This removes power to input and output device circuits.

Refer to the figures on pages 2-10 and 2-11.

ATTENTION

!

Never alter these circuits to defeat their function since serious injury and/or machine damage could result.

TIP

If you are using an external dc power supply, interrupt the dc output side rather than the ac line side of the supply to avoid the additional delay of power supply turn-off.

The ac line of the dc output power supply should be fused.

Connect a set of master control relays in series with the dc power supplying the input and output circuits.

Place the main power disconnect switch where operators and maintenance personnel have quick and easy access to it. If you mount a disconnect switch inside the controller enclosure, place the switch operating handle on the outside of the enclosure, so that you can disconnect power without opening the enclosure.

Whenever any of the emergency-stop switches are opened, power to input and output devices should be removed.

When you use the master control relay to remove power from the external I/O circuits, power continues to be provided to the controller’s power supply so that diagnostic indicators on the processor can still be observed.

The master control relay is not a substitute for a disconnect to the controller. It is intended for any situation where the operator must quickly de-energize I/O devices only. When inspecting or installing terminal connections, replacing output fuses, or working on

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Installing Your Controller 2-9 equipment within the enclosure, use the disconnect to shut off power to the rest of the system.

TIP

Do not control the master control relay with the controller. Provide the operator with the safety of a direct connection between an emergency-stop switch and the master control relay.

Using Emergency-Stop Switches

When using emergency-stop switches, adhere to the following points:

Do not program emergency-stop switches in the controller program. Any emergency-stop switch should turn off all machine power by turning off the master control relay.

Observe all applicable local codes concerning the placement and labeling of emergency-stop switches.

Install emergency-stop switches and the master control relay in your system. Make certain that relay contacts have a sufficient rating for your application. Emergency-stop switches must be easy to reach.

In the following illustration, input and output circuits are shown with MCR protection. However, in most applications, only output circuits require MCR protection.

The following illustrations show the Master Control Relay wired in a grounded system.

TIP

In most applications input circuits do not require

MCR protection; however, if you need to remove power from all field devices, you must include MCR contacts in series with input power wiring.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

2-10 Installing Your Controller

Schematic (Using IEC Symbols)

L1

230V ac

L2

Disconnect

X1

Isolation

Transformer

115V ac or 230V ac

X2

Fuse

Fuse

MCR

230V ac

I/O

Circuits

Operation of either ofthese contacts will remove power from the external I/O circuits, stopping machine motion.

Emergency-Stop

Push Button

Overtravel

Limit Switch

Stop

Start

MCR

Master Control Relay (MCR)

Cat. No. 700-PK400A1

MCR

Suppr.

Suppressor

Cat. No.

700-N24

(Lo) (Hi)

Line Terminals:

Connect to terminals of Power Supply

(1764-24AWA and 1764-24BWA).

MCR dc Power Supply.

Use IEC 950/EN 60950

_

+

MCR

Line Terminals: Connect to 24V dc terminals of Power Supply.

115V ac or

230V ac

I/O Circuits

24V dc

I/O

Circuits

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Installing Your Controller 2-11

Schematic (Using ANSI/CSA Symbols)

L1

230V ac

L2

Disconnect

X1

Isolation

Transformer

115V ac or

230V ac

X2

Fuse

Fuse

MCR

230V ac

Output

Circuits

Operation of either of these contacts will remove power from the external I/O

Emergency-Stop

Push Button

Overtravel

Limit Switch

Stop

(Lo)

Line Terminals:

(Hi)

Connect to 1764-24AWA or

1764-24BWA terminals.

Start

MCR

Master Control Relay (MCR)

Cat. No. 700-PK400A1

MCR

Suppr.

Suppressor

Cat. No.

700-N24

MCR dc Power Supply.

Use NEC Class 2

_

+

MCR

115V ac or

230V ac

I/O Circuits

24 V dc

I/O

Circuits

Line Terminals: Connect to 24V dc terminals of Power Supply.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

2-12 Installing Your Controller

Base Unit Mounting

Dimensions

Controller Spacing

A

B

C

Dimension

Height (A)

Width (B)

Depth (C)

(1) 1764-24AWA 1764-24BWA

DIN latch open: 138 mm (5.43 in.), DIN latch closed: 118 mm (4.65 in.)

168 mm (6.62 in.)

87 mm (3.43 in.)

(1) See Controller Dimensions on page A-9 for more dimensional information.

1764-28BXB

The base unit is designed to be mounted horizontally, with the

Compact™ expansion I/O extending to the right of the base unit.

Allow 50 mm (2 in.) minimum of space on all sides for adequate ventilation, as shown below.

Top

Side

Controller

Side

Bottom

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Installing Your Controller 2-13

Mounting the Controller

ATTENTION

!

Do not remove protective debris strips until after the base and all other equipment in the panel near the base is mounted and wiring is complete. The debris strips are there to prevent drill fragments, wire strands and other dirt from getting into the controller.

Once wiring is complete, remove protective debris strips and install processor unit. Failure to remove strips before operating can cause overheating.

Protective

Debris Strips

ESD Barrier

ATTENTION

!

Be careful of metal chips when drilling mounting holes for your controller or other equipment within the enclosure or panel. Drilled fragments that fall into the controller could cause damage. Do not drill holes above a mounted controller if the protective debris strips have been removed.

ATTENTION

!

Electrostatic discharge can damage semiconductor devices inside the base unit. Do not touch the connector pins or other sensitive areas.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

2-14 Installing Your Controller

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

TIP

If additional I/O modules are required for the application, remove the ESD barrier to install expansion I/O modules. A maximum of 16 I/O

modules may be connected to the base. (See page

1-7 for system requirements.) The I/O module’s

current requirements and power consumption may further limit the number of modules connected to

the base. See System Loading and Heat Dissipation on page F-1. An end cap terminator (catalog number

1769-ECR or 1769-ECL) is required at the end of the group of I/O modules attached to the base.

Using a DIN Rail

The base unit and expansion I/O DIN rail latches lock in the open position so that an entire system can be easily attached to or removed from the DIN rail. The maximum extension of the latch is 15 mm (0.67 in.) in the open position. A flat-blade screw driver is required for removal of the base unit. The base can be mounted to

EN50022-35x7.5 or EN50022-35x15 DIN rails. DIN rail mounting dimensions are shown below.

DIN Rail Latch

B

C

A

Dimension Height

A DIN latch open: 138 mm (5.43 in.), DIN latch closed: 118 mm (4.65 in.)

B

C

47.6 mm (1.875 in.)

47.6 mm (1.875 in) DIN latch closed

54.7 mm (2.16 in.) DIN latch open

Installing Your Controller 2-15

To install your base unit on the DIN rail:

1. Mount your DIN rail. (Make sure that the placement of the base unit on the DIN rail meets the recommended spacing

requirements, see Controller Spacing on page 2-12. Refer to the

mounting template from the inside back cover of the MicroLogix

1500 Programmable Controller Base Units Installation

Instructions, publication 1764-IN001.

2. Hook the top slot over the DIN rail.

3. While pressing the base unit down against the top of the rail, snap the bottom of the base unit into position. Ensure DIN latches are in the up (secured) position.

4. Leave the protective debris strip attached until you are finished wiring the base unit and any other devices.

To remove your base unit from the DIN rail:

1. Place a flat-blade screwdriver in the DIN rail latch at the bottom of the base unit.

2. Holding the base unit, pry downward on the latch until the latch locks in the open position. Repeat this procedure with the second latch. This releases the base unit from the DIN rail.

DIN Rail Latch

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

2-16 Installing Your Controller

Base Unit Panel Mounting

Mount to panel using #8 or M4 screws.

Mounting Template

To install your base unit using mounting screws:

1. Remove the mounting template from the inside back cover of the MicroLogix 1500 Programmable Controller Base Units

Installation Instruction, publication 1764-IN001.

2. Secure the template to the mounting surface. (Make sure your

base unit is spaced properly, see Controller Spacing on page

2-12).

3. Drill holes through the template.

4. Remove the mounting template.

5. Mount the base unit.

6. Leave the protective debris strips attached until you are finished wiring the base unit and any other devices.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Installing Controller

Components

Installing Your Controller 2-17

Prevent Electrostatic Discharge

ATTENTION

!

Electrostatic discharge can damage integrated circuits or semiconductors if you touch bus connector pins.

Follow these guidelines when you handle any module:

Touch a grounded object to discharge static potential.

Wear an approved wrist-strap grounding device.

Do not touch the bus connector or connector pins.

Do not touch circuit components inside the module.

If available, use a static-safe work station.

When not in use, keep the module in its static-shield bag.

ATTENTION

!

Be sure the base unit is free of all metal fragments before removing protective debris strips and installing the processor unit. Failure to remove strips before operating can cause overheating.

Processor

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

2-18 Installing Your Controller

1. Be sure base unit power is off.

2. Slide the processor into the base unit using the guide rails for alignment.

3. Push until a click is heard. Be careful not to push on the connector when installing the 1764-LRP processor.

IMPORTANT

It is critical that the processor is fully engaged and locked into place.

4. Make sure the actuator is pushed closed.

5. To remove the processor from the base unit, make sure base unit power is off. Push the actuator to the open position until the processor is ejected slightly. Once the processor has been ejected, it can be removed from the base unit.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Data Access Tool (DAT)

1. Remove cover from processor.

Installing Your Controller 2-19

2. Holding the DAT in the proper orientation (as shown), place the

DAT onto processor. Align DAT port on the processor with the plug on the DAT.

3. Firmly seat DAT on processor; make sure it seats into place.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

2-20 Installing Your Controller

4. To remove DAT, grasp using finger areas and pull upward.

Memory Module/Real-Time Clock

1. Remove the cover (or DAT if installed) from the processor as shown below.

ATTENTION

!

Electrostatic discharge can damage semiconductor devices inside the base and processor units. Do not touch the connector pins or other sensitive areas.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Installing Your Controller 2-21

2. Align connector on the memory module with the connector pins on the processor.

3. Firmly seat the memory module in the processor making sure the locking tabs click into place.

4. Replace the cover (or DAT if used).

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

2-22 Installing Your Controller

Compact I/O

Attach and Lock Module (Module-to-Controller or Module-to-Module)

A Compact I/O module can be attached to the controller or an adjacent I/O module before or after mounting to the panel or DIN rail.

The module can be detached and replaced while the system is mounted to a panel or DIN rail.

ATTENTION

!

Remove power before removing or inserting an I/O module. When you remove or insert a module with power applied, an electrical arc may occur. An electrical arc can cause personal injury or property damage by:

• sending an erroneous signal to your system’s field devices, causing the controller to fault

• causing an explosion in a hazardous environment

Electrical arcing causes excessive wear to contacts on both the module and its mating connector. Worn contacts may create electrical resistance, reducing product reliability.

ATTENTION

!

When attaching I/O modules, it is very important that they are securely locked together to ensure proper electrical connection.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Installing Your Controller 2-23

3

4

1

2

6

1

To attach and lock modules:

TIP

5

Remove ESD barrier when attaching I/O modules to a MicroLogix 1500 base unit.

1. Disconnect power.

2. Check that the bus lever of the module to be installed is in the unlocked (fully right) position.

3. Use the upper and lower tongue-and-groove slots (1) to secure the modules together (or to a controller).

4. Move the module back along the tongue-and-groove slots until the bus connectors (2) line up with each other.

5. Push the bus lever back slightly to clear the positioning tab (3).

Use your fingers or a small screw driver.

6. To allow communication between the controller and module, move the bus lever fully to the left (4) until it clicks. Ensure it is locked firmly in place.

ATTENTION

!

When attaching I/O modules, it is very important that the bus connectors are securely locked together to ensure proper electrical connection.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

2-24 Installing Your Controller

7. Attach an end cap terminator (5) to the last module in the system by using the tongue-and-groove slots as before.

8. Lock the end cap bus terminator (6).

IMPORTANT

A 1769-ECR right end cap (or a 1769-ECL left end cap if I/O bank is located below the controller) must be used to terminate the end of the serial communication bus.

See Controller Dimensions on page A-9 for mounting dimensions.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

1

Chapter

3

Wiring Your Controller

This chapter describes how to wire your controller. Topics include:

• wiring requirements

• using surge suppressors

• grounding guidelines

• sinking and sourcing circuits

• wiring diagrams, input voltage ranges, and output voltage ranges

• minimizing noise

Wiring Requirements

Wire Type

Solid Cu-90°C (194°F)

Stranded Cu-90°C (194°F)

(1) Two wires maximum per terminal screw.

Wire Size

(1)

#14 to #22 AWG

#14 to #22 AWG

Wiring Torque

1.13 Nm (10 in-lb) rated

1.3 Nm (12 in-lb) maximum

ATTENTION

!

Be careful when stripping wires. Wire fragments that fall into the controller could cause damage. Once wiring is complete, be sure the base unit is free of all metal fragments before removing protective debris strips and installing the processor unit. Failure to remove strips before operating can cause overheating.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

3-2 Wiring Your Controller

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Wiring Recommendation

ATTENTION

!

Before you install and wire any device, disconnect power to the controller system.

ATTENTION

!

Calculate the maximum possible current in each power and common wire. Observe all electrical codes dictating the maximum current allowable for each wire size. Current above the maximum ratings may cause wiring to overheat, which can cause damage.

United States Only: If the controller is installed within a potentially hazardous environment, all wiring must comply with the requirements stated in the National

Electrical Code 501-4 (b).

Allow for at least 50 mm. (2 in.) between I/O wiring ducts or terminal strips and the controller.

Route incoming power to the controller by a path separate from the device wiring. Where paths must cross, their intersection should be perpendicular.

TIP

Do not run signal or communications wiring and power wiring in the same conduit. Wires with different signal characteristics should be routed by separate paths.

Separate wiring by signal type. Bundle wiring with similar electrical characteristics together.

Separate input wiring from output wiring.

Label wiring to all devices in the system. Use tape, shrink-tubing, or other dependable means for labeling purposes.

In addition to labeling, use colored insulation to identify wiring based on signal characteristics. For example, you may use blue for dc wiring and red for ac wiring.

Wiring Your Controller 3-3

Wiring without Spade Lugs

When wiring without spade lugs, it is recommended to keep the finger-safe covers in place. Loosen the terminal screw and route the wires through the opening in the finger-safe cover. Tighten the terminal screw making sure the pressure plate secures the wire.

Finger-Safe Cover terminal screw torque:

1.13 Nm (10 in-lbs) rated

1.3 Nm (12 in-lbs) max.

Wiring with Spade Lugs

The diameter of the terminal screw head is 5.5 mm (0.220 in.). The input and output terminals of the MicroLogix 1500 base unit are designed for a 6.35mm (0.25 in.) wide spade (standard for #6 screw for up to 14 AWG) or a 4 mm (metric #4) fork terminal.

When using spade lugs, use a small, flat-blade screwdriver to pry the finger-safe cover from the terminal blocks as shown below. Then loosen the terminal screw.

Finger-Safe

Cover terminal screw torque:

1.13 Nm (10 in-lbs) rated

1.3 Nm (12 in-lbs) max.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

3-4 Wiring Your Controller

Using Surge Suppressors

Inductive load devices, such as motor starters and solenoids, require the use of some type of surge suppression to protect and extend the operating life of the controller’s output contacts. Switching inductive loads without surge suppression can significantly reduce the life expectancy of relay contacts. By adding a suppression device directly across the coil of an inductive device, you prolong the life of the output or relay contacts. You also reduce the effects of voltage transients and electrical noise from radiating into adjacent systems.

The following diagram shows an output with a suppression device.

We recommend that you locate the suppression device as close as possible to the load device.

+dc or L1

Suppression

Device ac or dc

Outputs

VAC/D

Out 0

Out 1

Out 2

Out 3

Out 4

Out 5

Out 6

Out 7

COM dc COM or L2

If the outputs are dc, we recommend that you use an 1N4004 diode for surge suppression, as shown below.

+24V dc

Relay or Solid

State dc Outputs

VAC/D

Out 0

Out 1

Out 2

Out 3

Out 4

Out 5

Out 6

Out 7

COM

24V dc common

IN4004 Diode

Suitable surge suppression methods for inductive ac load devices include a varistor, an RC network, or an Allen-Bradley surge suppressor, all shown below. These components must be appropriately rated to suppress the switching transient characteristic of

the particular inductive device. See the table on page 3-6 for

recommended suppressors.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Wiring Your Controller 3-5

Output Device

Surge Suppression for Inductive ac Load Devices

Output Device

Output Device

Varistor RC Network Surge

Suppressor

If you connect an expansion I/O triac output to control an inductive load, we recommend that you use varistors to suppress noise. Choose a varistor that is appropriate for the application. The suppressors we recommend for triac outputs when switching 120V ac inductive loads are a Harris MOV, part number V175 LA10A, or an Allen-Bradley MOV, catalog number 599-K04 or 599-KA04. Consult the varistor manufacturer’s data sheet when selecting a varistor for your application

For inductive dc load devices, a diode is suitable. A 1N4004 diode is acceptable for most applications. A surge suppressor can also be used.

See the table on page 3-6 for recommended suppressors.

As shown in the illustration below, these surge suppression circuits connect directly across the load device.

Surge Suppression for Inductive dc Load Devices

_

+

Output Device

Diode

(A surge suppressor can also be used.)

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

3-6 Wiring Your Controller

Recommended Surge Suppressors

Use the Allen-Bradley surge suppressors shown in the following table for use with relays, contactors, and starters.

Suppressor Device

Bulletin 509 Motor Starter

Bulletin 509 Motor Starter

Bulletin 100 Contactor

Bulletin 100 Contactor

Coil Voltage

120V ac

240V ac

120V ac

240V ac

Bulletin 709 Motor Starter

Bulletin 700 Type R, RM Relays

Bulletin 700 Type R Relay

Bulletin 700 Type RM Relay

Bulletin 700 Type R Relay

Bulletin 700 Type RM Relay

Bulletin 700 Type R Relay

Bulletin 700 Type RM Relay

Bulletin 700 Type R Relay

Bulletin 700 Type RM Relay

Bulletin 700 Type R Relay

Bulletin 700 Type RM Relay

Bulletin 700 Type N, P, or PK Relay

Miscellaneous electromagnetic devices limited to 35 sealed VA

(1) Varistor – Not recommended for use on relay outputs.

(2) RC Type – Do not use with triac outputs.

120V ac ac coil

12V dc

12V dc

24V dc

24V dc

48V dc

48V dc

115-125V dc

115-125V dc

230-250V dc

230-250V dc

150V max, ac or DC

150V max, ac or DC

Catalog Number

599-K04

(1)

599-KA04

(1)

199-FSMA1

(2)

199-FSMA2

(2)

1401-N10

None Required

199-FSMA9

199-FSMA9

199-FSMA9

199-FSMA10

199-FSMA11

700-N24

(2)

700-N24

(2)

Grounding the Controller

In solid-state control systems, grounding and wire routing helps limit the effects of noise due to electromagnetic interference (EMI). Run the ground connection from the ground screw of the base unit to the electrical panel’s ground bus prior to connecting any devices. Use

AWG #14 wire. This connection must be made for safety purposes.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Wiring Your Controller 3-7

This product is intended to be mounted to a well grounded mounting surface such as a metal panel. Refer to the Industrial Automation

Wiring and Grounding Guidelines, publication 1770-4.1, for additional information. Additional grounding connections from the mounting tabs or DIN rail, if used, are not required unless the mounting surface cannot be grounded. You must also provide an acceptable grounding path for each device in your application.

TIP

It is recommended to use all four mounting positions for panel mounting installation.

Grounding Stamping

Grounding Stamping

TIP

This symbol denotes a protective earth ground terminal which provides a low impedance path between electrical circuits and earth for safety purposes and provides noise immunity improvement. This connection must be made for safety purposes

ATTENTION

!

Remove the protective debris strips before applying power to the controller. Failure to remove the strips may cause the controller to overheat.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

3-8 Wiring Your Controller

Wiring Diagrams

This section shows the wiring diagrams for the MicroLogix 1500 controllers. Controllers with dc inputs can be wired as either sinking or sourcing configuration. (Sinking and sourcing does not apply to ac

inputs.) See pages 3-12 through 3-15 for sinking and sourcing wiring

diagrams.

TIP

This symbol denotes a protective earth ground terminal which provides a low impedance path between electrical circuits and earth for safety purposes and provides noise immunity improvement.

This connection must be made for safety purposes.

Miswiring - 1764-28BXB Only

The following table shows miswiring conditions and the consequences of improper wiring:

Condition

Operating with Voltage

Less than 20.4V dc

Reverse Wiring of the Line

Terminals (0 to 30V dc)

Applied Voltage Level

Exceeds the Published

Recommended Value

(i.e. applying 120V ac to

240V ac)

Result

This will not damage the base unit. The base unit may not power up.

IMPORTANT

This is not recommended. You must verify that the line voltage remains within specified limits.

Reverse wiring will not damage the base unit. The base unit will not power up.

Exceeding the published recommended voltage may result in permanent damage to the base unit.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Wiring Your Controller 3-9

Terminal Block Layouts

The base unit terminal block layouts are shown below. The shading on the labels indicates how the terminals are grouped. A detail of the groupings is shown in the table following the terminal block layouts.

Inputs

1764-24BWA

Outputs

85-265

VAC

L1

L2

Group 0 Group 1 Group 2

+24V

DC

POWER

OUT

DC

COM 0

COM

I / 0

I / 1

I / 2

I / 3 I

DC

COM 1

/ 4

I / 5

I / 6

I / 7

DC

COM 2

I / 8

I / 9

I

I

/ 10

/ 11

24BWA

VAC

VDC 0

VAC

VDC 1

VAC

VDC 2

VAC

VDC 3

VAC

VDC 4

O / 5

O / 0

G ro up

0

O / 1

G ro up

1

O / 2

G ro up

2

O / 3

G ro up

3

O / 7 O / 8

O / 10

24BWA

O / 4 O / 6

G ro up

4

VAC

VDC 5

O / 9 O / 11

G ro up

5

Inputs

1764-24AWA

Outputs

85-265

VAC

L1

L2

NOT

USED

NOT

USED

AC

COM 0

Group 0

I / 1

I / 0 I / 2

I / 3

AC

COM 1

Group 1

I / 4 I / 6

I / 5 I / 7

AC

COM 2

Group 2

I / 9

I / 8

I / 11

I / 10

24AWA

VAC

VDC 0

VAC

VDC 1

VAC

VDC 2

VAC

VDC 3

VAC

VDC 4

O / 5

O / 0

G ro up

0

O / 1

G ro up

1

O / 2

G ro up

2

O / 3

G ro up

3

O / 4 O / 6

G ro up

4

O / 7 O / 8 O / 10

24AWA

VAC

VDC 5

O / 9 O / 11

G ro up

5

Inputs

NOT

USED

NOT

USED

DC

COM 0

Group 0

I / 1

I / 0

I / 2

I / 3

DC

COM 1

Group 1

I / 4 I / 6

I / 5 I / 7

DC

COM 2

I / 9

I / 8 I / 10

Group 2

I / 11 I / 13 I / 15

I / 12 I / 14

28BXB

1764-28BXB

Outputs

24 VDC

COM

+24V

VAC

VDC 0

VAC

VDC 1

VDC 2

O / 0

G ro up

0

O / 1

G ro up

1

O / 3

O / 2

O / 5

O / 4 O / 6

G ro up

2

O / 7

VAC

VDC 3

VDC

COM 2

O / 9 O / 10

O / 8

G ro up

3

VAC

VDC 4

28BXB

O / 11

G ro up

4

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

3-10 Wiring Your Controller

Terminal Groupings

Controller Inputs

Input Group

1764-24BWA

Group 0

Group 1

Group 2

1764-24AWA

Group 0

Group 1

Group 2

1764-28BXB

Group 0

Group 1

Group 2

Controller Outputs

Output Group

1764-24BWA

Group 0

Group 1

Group 2

Group 3

Group 4

Group 5

1764-24AWA

Group 0

Group 1

Group 2

Group 3

Group 4

Group 5

1764-28BXB

Group 0

Group 1

Group 2

Group 3

Group 4

Common Terminal

DC COM 0

DC COM 1

DC COM 2

AC COM 0

AC COM 1

AC COM 2

DC COM 0

DC COM 1

DC COM 2

Voltage Terminal

VAC/VDC 0

VAC/VDC 1

VAC/VDC 2

VAC/VDC 3

VAC/VDC 4

VAC/VDC 5

VAC/VDC 0

VAC/VDC 1

VAC/VDC 2

VAC/VDC 3

VAC/VDC 4

VAC/VDC 5

VAC/VDC 0

VAC/VDC 1

VDC 2, VDC COM 2

VAC/VDC 3

VAC/VDC 4

Input Terminal

I/0 through I/3

I/4 through I/7

I/8 through I/11

I/0 through I/3

I/4 through I/7

I/8 through I/11

I/0 through I/3

I/4 through I/7

I/8 through I/15

Output Terminal

O/0

O/1

O/2

O/3

O/4 through O/7

O/8 through O/11

O/0

O/1

O/2

O/3

O/4 through O/7

O/8 through O/11

O/0

O/1

O/2 through O/7

O/8 and O/9

O/10 and O/11

Sinking and Sourcing Input

Circuits

Any of the MicroLogix 1500 DC embedded input groups can be configured as sinking or sourcing depending on how the DC COM is

wired on the group. See pages 3-12 through 3-15 for sinking and

sourcing wiring diagrams.

Type

Sinking Input connection of a PNP sourcing device

Sourcing Input connection of an NPN sinking device

Definition

The input energizes when high-level voltage is applied to the input terminal (active high). Connect the power supply VDC (-) to the DC COM terminal.

The input energizes when low-level voltage is applied to the input terminal (active low). Connect the power supply VDC (+) to the DC COM terminal.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Wiring Your Controller 3-11

1764-24AWA Wiring Diagram

Input Terminals

L2

NOT

USED

AC

COM 0

NOT

USED

IN 0

IN 1

IN 2

IN 3

AC

IN 4

COM 1 IN 5

IN 6

AC

COM 2

IN 9

IN 7 IN 8 IN 10

IN 11

L1

L2 L1

“NOT USED” terminals are not intended for use as connection points.

Output Terminals

L2

(Lo)

CR CR

VAC

NEUT

VAC/

VDC 0

VAC/

VDC 1

VAC/

VDC 2

VAC/

VDC 3

VAC/

VDC 4

OUT 5 OUT 7 OUT 8

120/240 EARTH

VAC GND

OUT 0 OUT 1 OUT 2 OUT 3 OUT 4 OUT 6

VAC/

VDC 5

OUT 10

OUT 9 OUT 11

L1

(Hi)

CR CR CR CR

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

3-12 Wiring Your Controller

1764-24BWA Wiring Diagram with Sinking Inputs

Input Terminals

+24V

POWER

OUT

DC

COM 0

IN 1

IN 3 IN 4 IN 6

COM

IN 0 IN 2

DC

COM 1

IN 5

DC

COM 2

IN 7 IN 8

IN 9

IN 11

IN 10

-DC

+DC

Output Terminals

L2

(Lo)

CR CR

VAC

NEUT

VAC/

VDC 0

VAC/

VDC 1

VAC/

VDC 2

VAC/

VDC 3

VAC/

VDC 4

OUT 5 OUT 7 OUT 8 OUT 10

120/240

VAC

EARTH

GND

OUT 0 OUT 1 OUT 2 OUT 3 OUT 4 OUT 6

VAC/

VDC 5

OUT 9 OUT 11

L1

(Hi)

CR CR CR CR

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Wiring Your Controller 3-13

1764-24BWA Wiring Diagram with Sourcing Inputs

Input Terminals

+24V

POWER

OUT

DC

COM 0

IN 1 IN 3 IN 4 IN 6

COM

IN 0 IN 2

DC

COM 2

IN 9

DC

COM 1

IN 5

IN 7 IN 8

IN 10

IN 11

+DC

-DC

Output Terminals

L2

(Lo)

L1

(Hi)

CR CR

CR CR

VAC

NEUT

VAC/

VDC 0

VAC/

VDC 1

VAC/

VDC 2

VAC/

VDC 3

VAC/

VDC 4

OUT 5 OUT 7

120/240

VAC

EARTH

GND

OUT 0 OUT 1

OUT 2

OUT 3

OUT 4

OUT 6

OUT 8 OUT 10

VAC/

VDC 5

OUT 9 OUT 11

CR CR

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

3-14 Wiring Your Controller

1764-28BXB Wiring Diagram with Sinking Inputs

Input Terminals

-DC

+DC

-DC

+DC

NOT

USED

DC

COM 0

NOT

USED

IN 0

IN 1

IN 2

IN 3 IN 4 IN 6

DC

COM 2

IN 9 IN 11

DC

COM 1

IN 5 IN 7 IN 8 IN 10

IN 13

IN 12

IN 15

IN 14

“NOT USED” terminals are not intended for use as connection points.

Output Terminals (FET Outputs Are Sourcing Only)

-DC

+DC

CR CR CR

+24v

COM

VAC/

VDC 0

VAC/

VDC 1

VDC 2 OUT 3 OUT 5 OUT 7

VAC/

VDC 3

OUT 9 OUT 10

EARTH

GND

OUT 0 OUT 1 OUT 2 OUT 4 OUT 6

VDC

COM 2

OUT 8

VAC/

VDC 4

OUT 11

CR CR CR

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

+DC

-DC

Wiring Your Controller 3-15

1764-28BXB Wiring Diagram with Sourcing Outputs

Input Terminals

+DC

-DC

NOT

USED

DC

COM 0

NOT

USED

IN 0

IN 1

IN 2

IN 3 IN 4 IN 6

DC

COM 2

IN 9 IN 11

DC

COM 1

IN 5 IN 7 IN 8 IN 10

IN 13

IN 12

IN 15

IN 14

“NOT USED” terminals are not intended for use as connection points.

Output Terminals (FET Outputs Are Sourcing Only)

-DC

+DC

CR CR CR

COM

VAC/

VDC 0

VAC/

VDC 1

VDC 2 OUT 3

OUT 5

OUT 7

VAC/

VDC 3

OUT 9 OUT 10

+24V

EARTH

GND

OUT 0 OUT 1

OUT 2

OUT 4

OUT 6

VDC

COM 2

OUT 8

VAC/

VDC 4

OUT 11

CR CR CR

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

3-16 Wiring Your Controller

Controller I/O Wiring

Minimizing Electrical Noise

Because of the variety of applications and environments where controllers are installed and operating, it is impossible to ensure that all environmental noise will be removed by input filters. To help reduce the effects of environmental noise, install the MicroLogix 1500 system in a properly rated (i.e. NEMA) enclosure. Make sure that the

MicroLogix 1500 system is properly grounded.

A system may malfunction may occur due to a change in the operating environment after a period of time. We recommend periodically checking system operation, particularly when new machinery or other noise sources are installed near the Micrologix

1500 system.

Transistor Output Transient Pulses

ATTENTION

!

A brief transient current pulse may flow through transistor outputs if the external supply voltage is suddenly applied at the V dc and V dc com terminals

(e.g. via the master control relay). It is a fast rate-of-change of voltage at the terminals that causes the pulse. This condition is inherent in transistor outputs and is common to solid state devices. The transient pulses may occur regardless of whether the controller is powered or running.

The transient energy is dissipated in the load, and the pulse duration is longer for loads with high impedance. The graph below illustrates the relation between pulse duration and load current. Power-up transients will not exceed the times shown in the graph. For most applications the pulse energy is not sufficient to energize the load.

To reduce the possibility of inadvertent operation of devices connected to transistor outputs, consider adding an external resistor in parallel to the load to increase the on-state load current. The duration of the transient pulse is reduced when the on-state load current is increased or the load impedance is decreased.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Wiring Your Controller 3-17

1.0

0.9

0.8

0.7

0.6

Transient Pulse Duration as a

Function of Load Current

0.5

0.4

0.3

0.2

0.1

0.0

1 100 200 300 400 500 600 700

On-State Load Current (mA)

800 900 1000

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

3-18 Wiring Your Controller

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Chapter

4

Communication Connections

This chapter describes how to set up communications for your control system. The method you use and cabling required depend on your application. This chapter also describes how the controller establishes communication with the appropriate network. Topics include:

Default Communication Configuration

Communications Toggle Push Button

Connecting to the RS-232 Port

Connecting to a DH-485 Network

Connecting to DeviceNet

Connecting to Ethernet

ATTENTION

!

All devices communicating within a network, must use the same protocol.

1

Default Communication

Configuration

The MicroLogix 1500 has the following default communication configuration.

Table 4.1 DF1 Full-Duplex Configuration Parameters

Parameter

Baud Rate

Parity

Source ID (Node Address)

Control Line

Error Detection

Embedded Responses

Duplicate Packet (Message) Detect

ACK Timeout

NAK retries

ENQ retries

Stop Bits

Default

19.2K

none

1 no handshaking

CRC auto detect enabled

50 counts

3 retries

3 retries

1

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

4-2 Communication Connections

TIP

The default configuration is present when:

The controller is powered-up for the first time.

The communications toggle push button specifies default communications (the DCOMM LED is on).

An OS upgrade is completed.

For more information about communications, see Understanding

Communication Protocols on page E-1.

Communications Toggle

Push Button

The Communications Toggle Push Button is located on the processor.

You must remove processor door or DAT to access the

Communications Toggle Push Button.

Use the Communications Toggle Push Button to change from the user-defined communication configuration to the default communications configuration and back. The Default

Communications (DCOMM) LED operates to show when the controller is in the default communications mode (settings shown on

page 4-1).

COMMS

DC INPUTS

24V SINK/SOURCE

DC/RELAY OUT

24V SOURCE

TIP

The Communication Toggle Push Button must be pressed and held for two seconds to activate.

The Communication Toggle Push Button only affects the communication configuration of Channel 0.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Communication Connections 4-3

Connecting to the RS-232

Port

DF1 Full-Duplex Communication Parameters

When a communication channel is configured for DF1 Full-Duplex, the following parameters can be changed.

Table 4.2 DF1 Full-Duplex Configuration Parameters

Parameter

Baud Rate

Options Default

300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19.2K, 38.4K 19.2K

Parity

Source ID (Node

Address)

Control Line none, even

0 to 254 decimal no handshaking, Full-Duplex modem handshaking none

1 no handshaking

Error Detection

Embedded Responses

Duplicate Packet

(Message) Detect

CRC, BCC auto-detect, enabled enabled, disabled

CRC auto detect enabled

ACK Timeout

NAK retries

ENQ retries

Stop Bits

1 to 65535 counts (20 ms increments)

0 to 255

0 to 255 not a setting, always 1

50 counts

3 retries

3 retries

1

Making a DF1 Full-Duplex Point-to-Point Connection

You can connect the MicroLogix 1500 programmable controller to your personal computer using a serial cable from your personal computer’s serial port to the controller, as shown in the illustrations below.

ATTENTION

!

Chassis ground, internal 24V ground, user 24V dc ground, and RS-232 ground are internally connected.

You must connect the chassis ground terminal screw to ground prior to connecting any devices. It is important that you understand your personal computer’s grounding system before connecting to the controller. An optical isolator, such as the

1761-NET-AIC, is recommended between the controller and your personal computer when using

Channel 0. An isolator is not required when using

Channel 1 (1764-LRP).

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

4-4 Communication Connections

Channel 0

We recommend using an Advanced Interface Converter (AIC+), catalog number 1761-NET-AIC, or similar optical isolator, as shown

below. See page 4-16 for specific AIC+ cabling information.

MicroLogix 1500 with 1764-LSP or 1764-LRP processor

Personal Computer

1761-CBL-AM00 or 1761-CBL-HM02

TERM

A

B

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX TX

TX PWR

DC SOURCE

CABLE

EXTERNAL

24V dc

MicroLogix 1500 provides power to the AIC+ or an external power supply may be used.

1747-CP3 or 1761-CBL-AC00

Channel 1

Personal Computer

1747-CP3

MicroLogix

1500 Controller with 1764-LRP processor

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Communication Connections 4-5

Using a Modem

You can use modems to connect a personal computer to one

MicroLogix 1500 controller (using DF1 Full-Duplex protocol), or to multiple controllers (using DF1 Half-Duplex protocol), or Modbus

Slave RTU protocol, as shown in the following illustration. Do not use

DH-485 protocol through modems under any circumstance. (See

Using Modems with MicroLogix 1500 Programmable Controllers on page E-3 for information on types of modems you can use with the

MicroLogix controllers.)

Personal

Computer

Modem Cable

(straight-through)

Modem

MicroLogix1500

Controller with

1764-LRP

Processor

Protocol

DF1 Full-Duplex protocol (to 1 controller)

DF1 Half-Duplex Slave protocol (to multiple controllers when a

DF1 Half-Duplex Master is present)

Modem

Isolated Modem Connection

We recommend using an AIC+, catalog number 1761-NET-AIC, as

your optical isolator for Channel 0. See page 4-16 for specific AIC+

cabling information. Using an AIC+ to isolate the modem is illustrated below:

MicroLogix 1500 with 1764-LSP or 1764-LRP processor

1761-CBL-AM00 or 1761-CBL-HM02

User supplied modem cable

24V dc

MicroLogix 1500 provides power to the AIC+ or an external power supply may be used.

Modem

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

4-6 Communication Connections

Constructing Your Own Modem Cable

If you construct your own modem cable, the maximum cable length is

15.24 m (50 ft) with a 25-pin or 9-pin connector. Refer to the following typical pinout for constructing a straight-through cable: pins 4 and 6 are internally connected for

1764-LRP only

8

7

4

6

2

5

1

AIC+ Optical Isolator or 1764-LRP Channel 1

9-Pin

3 TXD

RXD

GND

CD

DTR

DSR

CTS

RTS

Modem

25-Pin 9-Pin

TXD 2 3

RXD 3

GND 7

CD 8

2

5

1

DTR 20

DSR 6

CTS 5

RTS 4

8

7

4

6

Constructing Your Own Null Modem Cable

If you construct your own null modem cable, the maximum cable length is 15.24m (50 ft) with a 25-pin or 9-pin connector. Refer to the following typical pinout:

8

7

4

6

5

1

Optical Isolator

9-Pin

3

2

TXD

RXD

GND

CD

DTR

DSR

CTS

RTS

DTR

DSR

CTS

RTS

Modem

TXD

RXD

GND 7

CD 8

25-Pin 9-Pin

2 3

3 2

5

1

5

4

20

6

8

7

4

6

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Communication Connections 4-7

Connecting to a DF1 Half-Duplex Network

When a communication port is configured for DF1 Half-Duplex Slave, available parameters include:

Table 4.3 DF1 Half-Duplex Configuration Parameters

Parameter

Baud Rate

Parity

Source ID (Node Address)

Control Line

Error Detection

EOT Suppression

Duplicate Packet (Message)

Detect

Poll Timeout (x20 ms)

RTS Off Delay (x20 ms)

RTS Send Delay (x20 ms)

Message Retries

Pre Transmit Delay

(x1 ms)

Options

300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19.2K, 38.4K none, even

0 to 254 decimal no handshaking, handshaking

CRC, BCC enabled, disabled

When EOT Suppression is enabled, the slave does not respond when polled if no message is queued. This saves modem transmission power and time when there is no message to transmit.

enabled, disabled

Detects and eliminates duplicate responses to a message. Duplicate packets may be sent under noisy communication conditions if the sender’s Message Retries are not set to 0.

0 to 65535 (can be set in 20 ms increments)

Poll Timeout only applies when a slave device initiates a MSG instruction. It is the amount of time that the slave device waits for a poll from the master device. If the slave device does not receive a poll within the

Poll Timeout, a MSG instruction error is generated, and the ladder program needs to requeue the MSG instruction. If you are using a MSG instruction, it is recommended that a Poll Timeout value of zero not be used. Poll Timeout is disabled when set to zero.

0 to 65535 (can be set in 20 ms increments)

Specifies the delay time between when the last serial character is sent to the modem and when RTS is deactivated. Gives the modem extra time to transmit the last character of a packet.

0 to 65535 (can be set in 20 ms increments)

Specifies the time delay between setting RTS until checking for the CTS response. For use with modems that are not ready to respond with CTS immediately upon receipt of RTS.

0 to 255

Specifies the number of times a slave device attempts to resend a message packet when it does not receive an ACK from the master device. For use in noisy environments where message packets may become corrupted in transmission.

0 to 65535 (can be set in 1 ms increments)

When the Control Line is set to no handshaking , this is the delay time before transmission.

Required for 1761-NET-AIC physical Half-Duplex networks. The 1761-NET-AIC needs delay time to change from transmit to receive mode.

When the Control Line is set to DF1 Half-Duplex Modem , this is the minimum time delay between receiving the last character of a packet and the RTS assertion.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

4-8 Communication Connections

DF1 Half-Duplex Master-Slave Network

Use this diagram for DF1 Half-Duplex Master-Slave protocol without hardware handshaking.

MicroLogix 1500 (DF1 Slave)

SLC 5/03 (DF1 Master)

AIC+

CH0

1761-CBL-AP00 or

1761-CBL-PM02 straight 9-25 pin cable radio modem or lease line straight 9-25 pin cable

MicroLogix 1500 (DF1 Slave) radio modem or lease line

AIC+

CH0 to port 1 or port 2

1761-CBL-AM00 or

1761-CBL-HM02

1761-CBL-AP00 or

1761-CBL-PM02

AIC+

MicroLogix 1500 (DF1 Slave)

AIC+

CH0

1761-CBL-AM00 or

1761-CBL-HM02

CH0 to port 1 or port 2

1761-CBL-AM00 or

1761-CBL-HM02

1761-CBL-AP00 or

1761-CBL-PM02

REFERENCE: AIC+ Port Identification

Port 3: RS-485

Port 2: mini-DIN 8 RS-232

Port 1: DB-9 RS-232

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Rockwell Software RSLinx 2.0 (or higher), SLC 5/03, SLC 5/04, and

SLC 5/05, or PLC-5 processors configured for DF1 Half-Duplex

Master.

DF1 Half-Duplex Network (Using PC and Modems)

Communication Connections 4-9

DF1 Half-Duplex Protocol

Modem

TERM

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX TX

TX PWR

DC SOURCE

CABLE

EXTERNAL

MicroLogix

1000 (Slave)

TERM

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX TX

TX PWR

DC SOURCE

CABLE

EXTERNAL

TERM

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX TX

TX PWR

DC SOURCE

CABLE

EXTERNAL

MicroLogix

1200 (Slave)

MicroLogix 1500 with

1764-LSP or 1764-LRP

Processor (Slave)

SLC 5/03 (Slave)

MicroLogix 1500 with

1764-LRP Processor (Slave)

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

4-10 Communication Connections

Connecting to a DH-485

Network

The following network diagrams provide examples of how to connect

MicroLogix 1500 controllers to the DH-485 network using the

Advanced Interface Converter (AIC+, catalog number 1761-NET-AIC).

For more information on the AIC+, see the Advanced Interface

Converter and DeviceNet Interface Installation Instructions,

Publication 1761-5.11.

DH-485 Network with a MicroLogix 1500 Controller

connection from port 1 or port 2 to MicroLogix Channel 1

1761-CBL-AP00 or 1761-CBL-PM02

AIC+

TX

TERM

A

B

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX PWR

MicroLogix 1500

1747-CP3 or 1761-CBL-AC00 connection from port 1 or port 2 to MicroLogix Channel 0

EXTERNAL

1761-CBL-AM00 or 1761-CBL-HM02

24V dc

(user supply needed if not connected to a controller)

AIC+

TERM

A

B

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX

TX PWR

EXTERNAL

1761-CBL-AP00 or 1761-CBL-PM02

24V dc

(user supply needed if not connected to a controller)

REFERENCE: AIC+ Port Identification

Port 3: RS-485

TX

TERM

A

B

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX PWR

Port 2: mini-DIN 8 RS-232

Port 1: DB-9 RS-232

EXTERNAL

Personal Computer

PC to port 1 or port 2

AIC+

TERM

A

B

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX TX

TX PWR

DC SOURCE

CABLE

EXTERNAL

1761-CBL-AP00 or 1761-CBL-PM02

1747-CP3 or 1761-CBL-AC00

24V dc

(user supplied)

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Communication Connections 4-11

Typical 3-Node Network (Channel 0 Connection)

PanelView 550

A-B PanelView

RJ45 port 1761-CBL-AS09 or 1761-CBL-AS03

1747-CP3 or

1761-CBL-AC00

TERM

TX

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX

TX PWR

DC SOURCE

CABLE

EXTERNAL

1761-CBL-AM00 or 1761-CBL-HM02

MicroLogix 1500 with

1764-LSP or 1764-LRP

Processor

Typical 3-Node Network (Channel 1 Connection)

PanelView 550

DH-485 Network

TERM

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX TX

AIC+

TX PWR

DC SOURCE

CABLE

EXTERNAL

MicroLogix 1000

1761-CBL-AS09 or 1761-CBL-AS03

RJ45 port

MicroLogix 1500 with

1764-LRP Processor

1747-CP3 or

1761-CBL-AC00

TX TX

COM COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX TX TX TX

1747-CP3 or

1761-CBL-AC00

Networked Operator Interface Device and MicroLogix Controllers

AIC+

TERM

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX TX

TX PWR

DC SOURCE

CABLE

EXTERNAL

AIC+

TERM

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX TX

TX PWR

DC SOURCE

CABLE

EXTERNAL

A-B PanelView

SLC 5/04

TERM

TX

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX

AIC+

TX PWR

DC SOURCE

CABLE

EXTERNAL

MicroLogix 1200

TERM

TX

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX

AIC+

TX PWR

DC SOURCE

CABLE

EXTERNAL

MicroLogix 1500

TERM

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX TX

AIC+

TX PWR

DC SOURCE

CABLE

EXTERNAL

PanelView 550

Personal

Computer

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

4-12 Communication Connections

DH-485 Configuration Parameters

When MicroLogix communications are configured for DH-485, the following parameters can be changed:

Table 4.4 DF1 Full-Duplex Configuration Parameters

Parameter

Baud Rate

Node Address

Token Hold Factor

Options

9600, 19.2K

1 to 31 decimal

1 to 4

See Software Considerations on page E-10 for tips on setting the

parameters listed above.

Recommended Tools

To connect a DH-485 network, you need tools to strip and attach the shielded cable. We recommend the following equipment (or equivalent):

Table 4.5 Working with Cable for DH-485 Network

Description Part Number

Shielded Twisted Pair Cable #3106A or #9842

Stripping Tool 45-164

1/8” Slotted Screwdriver Not Applicable

Manufacturer

Belden

Ideal Industries

Not Applicable

DH-485 Communication Cable

The communication cable consists of a number of cable segments daisy-chained together. The total length of the cable segments cannot exceed 1219 m (4000 ft). However, two segments can be used to extend the DH-485 network to 2438m (8000 ft). For additional information on connections using the AIC+, refer to the Advanced

Interface Converter (AIC+) User Manual, publication 1761-6.4.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Communication Connections 4-13

Communication Cable Connection to the DH-485 Connector

TIP

A daisy-chained network is recommended.

We do not recommend the following:

Belden #3106A or #9842

Connector

Connector

Connector

Incorrect

Single Cable Connection

When connecting a single cable to the DH-485 connector, use the following diagram.

Orange with White Stripes

White with Orange Stripes

Shrink Tubing Recommended Blue (#3106A) or

Blue with White

Stripes (#9842)

Drain/Shield

6 Termination

5 A

4 B

3 Common

2 Shield

1 Chassis Ground

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

4-14 Communication Connections

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Multiple Cable Connection

When connecting multiple cables to the DH-485 connector, use the following diagram.

to Previous Device

to Next Device

Table 4.6 Connections using Belden #3106A Cable

For this Wire/Pair

Shield/Drain

Blue

White/Orange

Connect this Wire

Non-jacketed

Blue

White with Orange

Stripe

Orange with White

Stripe

To this Terminal

Terminal 2 - Shield

Terminal 3 - (Common)

Terminal 4 - (Data B)

Terminal 5 - (Data A)

Table 4.7 Connections using Belden #9842 Cable

For this Wire/Pair

Shield/Drain

Blue/White

Connect this Wire

Non-jacketed

White with Blue Stripe

Blue with White Stripe

To this Terminal

Terminal 2 - Shield

Cut back - no connection

(1)

Terminal 3 -

(Common)

Terminal 4 - (Data B) White/Orange White with Orange

Stripe

Orange with White

Stripe

Terminal 5 - (Data A)

(1) To prevent confusion when installing the communication cable, cut back the white with blue stripe wire immediately after the insulation jacket is removed. This wire is not used by DH-485.

Grounding and Terminating the DH-485 Network

Only one connector at the end of the link must have Terminals 1 and

2 jumpered together. This provides an earth ground connection for the shield of the communication cable. Both ends of the network must have Terminals 5 and 6 jumpered together, as shown below. This connects the termination impedance (of 120

) that is built into each

AIC+ as required by the DH-485 specification.

Communication Connections 4-15

End-of-Line Termination

Jumper

Jumper

Belden #3106A or #9842 Cable

1219 m (4000 ft) Maximum

Jumper

Connecting the AIC+

The AIC+, catalog number 1761-NET-AIC, enables MicroLogix controllers to connect to a DH-485 network when they are configured for DH-485 protocol. The AIC+ has two isolated RS-232 ports and one

RS-485 port. When two MicroLogix controllers are closely positioned, you can connect a controller to each of the RS-232 ports on the AIC+.

The AIC+ can also be used as an RS-232 isolator, providing an isolation barrier between the controllers communications port and any equipment connected to it (i.e. personal computer, modem, etc.)

The following figure shows the connections and specifications of the

AIC+.

2

3

Item Description

1 Port 1 - DB-9 RS-232, DTE

4

Port 2 - mini-DIN 8 RS-232 DTE

Port 3 - RS-485 Phoenix plug

5

DC Power Source selector switch

(cable = port 2 power source, external = external power source connected to item 5)

Terminals for external 24V dc power supply and chassis ground

3

1

5

For additional information on connecting the AIC+, refer to the

Advanced Interface Converter (AIC+) User Manual, publication

1761-6.4.

2

4

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

4-16 Communication Connections

Cable Selection Guide

1761-CBL-PM02

1761-CBL-AP00

Cable

1761-CBL-AP00

1761-CBL-PM02

Length

45cm (17.7 in)

2m (6.5 ft)

Connections from to AIC+ External Power

Supply

Required

(1)

1764-LRP processor, channel 1 port 2 yes

SLC 5/03 or SLC 5/04 processors, channel 0 port 2 yes

MicroLogix 1000 or 1500 port 1 yes

PanelView 550 through NULL modem adapter port 2 yes

DTAM Plus / DTAM Micro

PC COM port port 2 port 2 yes yes

(1) External power supply required unless the AIC+ is powered by the device connected to port 2, then the selection switch should be set to cable .

Power

Selection

Switch

Setting

(1)

external external external external external external

1761-CBL-HM02

1761-CBL-AM00

Cable

1761-CBL-AM00

1761-CBL-HM02

Length

45cm (17.7 in)

2m (6.5 ft)

Connections from

MicroLogix 1000 or 1500 to port 2 on another AIC+

to

AIC+

port 2 port 2

External Power

Supply Required

(1)

no yes

(1) External power supply required unless the AIC+ is powered by the device connected to port 2, then the selection switch should be set to cable .

Power Selection

Switch Setting

(1)

cable external

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Communication Connections 4-17

1747-CP3

1761-CBL-AC00

Cable

1747-CP3

1761-CBL-AC00

Length

3m (9.8 ft)

45cm (17.7 in)

Connections from

1764-LRP processor, channel 1

SLC 5/03 or SLC 5/04 processor, channel 0

to AIC+ External Power

Supply Required

(1)

port 1 port 1

PC COM port port 1

PanelView 550 through NULL modem adapter port 1 yes yes yes yes

DTAM Plus / DTAM Micro™

Port 1 on another AIC+ port 1 port 1 yes yes

Power Selection

Switch Setting

(1)

external external external external external external

(1) External power supply required unless the AIC+ is powered by the device connected to port 2, then the selection switch should be set to cable .

user supplied cable

Cable Length Connections from to

AIC+

External Power

Supply Required

(1)

port 1 yes

Power Selection

Switch Setting

(1)

external straight

9-25 pin

— modem or other communication device

(1) External power supply required unless the AIC+ is powered by the device connected to port 2, then the selection switch should be set to cable .

1761-CBL-AS09

1761-CBL-AS03

Cable Length Connections from to AIC+ External Power

Supply

Required

(1)

port 3 yes

Power

Selection

Switch

Setting

(1)

external 1761-CBL-AS03

1761-CBL-AS09

3m (9.8 ft)

9.5m (31.17 ft)

SLC 500 Fixed,

SLC 5/01, SLC 5/02, and SLC 5/03 processors

PanelView 550 RJ45 port port 3 yes

(1) External power supply required unless the AIC+ is powered by the device connected to port 2, then the selection switch should be set to cable

.

external

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

4-18 Communication Connections

1761-CBL-PM02 (or equivalent) Cable Wiring Diagram

9

8

7

6

3

2

5

4

1

5

4

3

2

1

8

7

6

Programming

Device

9-Pin D-Shell

9 RI

CTS

RTS

DSR

GND

DTR

TXD

RXD

DCD

Controller

DCD

CTS

TXD

GND

8-Pin Mini Din

24V 1

GND

RTS

RXD

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

3

4

1 2

5

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Communication Connections 4-19

Recommended User-Supplied Components

The components in Table 4.8 can be purchased from your local

electronics supplier.

Table 4.8 User Supplied Components

Component

external power supply and chassis ground

NULL modem adapter straight 9-25 pin RS-232 cable

Recommended Model

power supply rated for 20.4-28.8V dc standard AT see table below for port information if making own cables

8

9

7

6

Port 1

DB-9 RS-232

1

2

3

4

5

3

4

Port 2

8-pin mini-DIN

(2)

6 7 8

5

1 2

5

4

3

2

6

Port 3

RS-485 connector

Table 4.9 AIC+ Terminals

Pin Port 1: DB-9 RS-232

Port 2

(2)

Port 3: RS-485

Connector

chassis ground 1 received line signal detector (DCD)

2 received data (RxD)

24V dc ground (GND) cable shield

3 transmitted data (TxD) request to send (RTS)

4

DTE ready (DTR)

(1) received data (RxD)

5 signal common (GND)

6

DCE ready (DSR)

(2)

signal ground

DH-485 data B received line signal detector (DCD) DH-485 data A clear to send (CTS) termination

7 request to send (RTS)

8 clear to send (CTS)

9 not applicable transmitted data (TxD) ground (GND) not applicable not applicable not applicable not applicable

(1) On port 1, pin 4 is electronically jumpered to pin 6. Whenever the AIC+ is powered on, pin 4 will match the state of pin 6.

(2) An 8-pin mini DIN connector is used for making connections to port 2. This connector is not commercially available.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

4-20 Communication Connections

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Safety Considerations

.

This equipment is suitable for use in Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B,

C, D or non-hazardous locations only.

WARNING

!

EXPLOSION HAZARD

This product must be installed in an enclosure. All cables connected to the product must remain in the enclosure or be protected by conduit or other means.

See Safety Considerations on page 2-3 for additional information.

Installing and Attaching the AIC+

1. Take care when installing the AIC+ in an enclosure so that the cable connecting the MicroLogix 1500 controller to the AIC+ does not interfere with the enclosure door.

2. Carefully plug the terminal block into the RS-485 port on the

AIC+ you are putting on the network. Allow enough cable slack to prevent stress on the plug.

3. Provide strain relief for the Belden cable after it is wired to the terminal block. This guards against breakage of the Belden cable wires.

Powering the AIC+

In normal operation with a MicroLogix programmable controller connected to port 2 of the AIC+, the controller powers the AIC+. Any

AIC+ not connected to a MicroLogix controller requires a 24V dc power source. The AIC+ requires 120 mA at 24V dc.

If both the controller and external power are connected to the AIC+, the power selection switch determines what device powers the AIC+.

ATTENTION

!

If you use an external power supply, it must be 24V dc. Permanent damage results if higher voltage is used.

Communication Connections 4-21

Set the DC Power Source selector switch to EXTERNAL before connecting the power supply to the AIC+. The following illustration shows where to connect external power for the AIC+.

Bottom View

24VDC

DC

NEUT

CHS

GND

ATTENTION

!

Always connect the CHS GND (chassis ground) terminal to the nearest earth ground. This connection must be made whether or not an external 24V dc supply is used.

Power Options

Below are two options for powering the AIC+:

Use the 24V dc user power supply built into the MicroLogix

1500 controller. The AIC+ is powered through a hard-wired connection using a communication cable (1761-CBL-HM02, or equivalent) connected to port 2.

Use an external DC power supply with the following specifications:

operating voltage: 24V dc +20% or -15%

output current: 150 mA minimum

rated NEC Class 2

Make a hard-wired connection from the external supply to the screw terminals on the bottom of the AIC+.

ATTENTION

!

If you use an external power supply, it must be 24V dc. Permanent damage results if miswired with the wrong power source.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

4-22 Communication Connections

Connecting to DeviceNet

You can connect a MicroLogix 1500 using DF1 Full-Duplex protocol to a DeviceNet network using the DeviceNet Interface (DNI), catalog number 1761-NET-DNI. For additional information on using the DNI, refer to the DeviceNet Interface User Manual, publication 1761-6.5.

The following figure shows the external wiring connections of the

DNI.

DeviceNet Node (Port 1)

(Replacement connector part no. 1761-RPL-0000)

Use this write-on area to mark the

DeviceNet node address.

V–

CAN_L

NET

SHIELD

CAN_H

V+

MOD

NODE

DANGER

TX/RX

GND

RS-232 (Port 2)

Cable Selection Guide

1761-CBL-AM00

Cable

1761-CBL-AM00

1761-CBL-HM02

Length

45 cm (17.7 in)

2m (6.5 ft)

Connections from

MicroLogix 1000

MicroLogix 1500

1761-CBL-HM02

to DNI

port 2 port 2

1761-CBL-PM02

1761-CBL-AP00

Cable

1761-CBL-AP00

1761-CBL-PM02

Length

45 cm (17.7 in)

2m (6.5 ft)

Connections from

SLC 5/03 or SLC 5/04 processors, channel 0

PC COM port

1764-LRP processor, channel 1

to DNI

port 2 port 2 port 2

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Communication Connections 4-23

Connecting to Ethernet

You can connect a MicroLogix 1500 to an Ethernet network using the

Ethernet Interface (ENI), catalog number 1761-NET-ENI. For additional information on using the ENI, refer to the Ethernet Interface User

Manual, publication 1761-UM006. The following figure shows the external wiring connections of the ENI.

Ethernet Port (ENI Port 1)

IP

ETHERNET

RS232

FAULT

NET

TX/RX

TX/RX

PWR

CABLE

EXTERNAL

RS-232 Mini-DIN (ENI Port 2)

Ethernet Connections

The Ethernet connector, port 1, is an RJ45, 10Base-T connector. The pin-out for the connector is shown below:

5

6

3

4

7

8

Pin

1

2

Pin Name

Tx+

Tx-

Rx+ not used by 10Base-T not used by 10Base-T

Rxnot used by 10Base-T not used by 10Base-T

When to use straight-through and cross-over cable:

ENI Ethernet port to 10Base-T Ethernet switch cables utilize a straight-through pin-out (1-1, 2-2, 3-3, 6-6).

Direct point-to-point 10Base-T cables connecting the ENI

Ethernet port directly to another ENI Ethernet port (or a computer 10Base-T port) require a cross-over pin-out (1-3, 2-6,

3-1, 6-2).

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

4-24 Communication Connections

RS-232 Connections

Port 2 of the ENI is an 8-pin mini-DIN RS-232 port that provides connection to DF1 compatible RS-232 devices. The connector pin assignments are shown below.

8-pin mini-DIN

5

4

8

2

7

1

6

3

6

7

4

5

8

2

3

Pin

1

Port 2

24V dc ground (GND) no connection

ENI input data, RxD no connection no connection

ENI output data, TxD ground (GND)

The table below describes the RS-232 compatible cables.

ENI Connected to:

MicroLogix (all series)

SLC 5/03, SLC 5/04, or

SLC 5/05 Channel 0

PLC-5

Catalog Number

1761-CBL-AM00

1761-CBL-HM02

1761-CBL-AP00

1761-CBL-PM02

1761-CBL-AP00

1761-CBL-PM02

Use Cable

Mini DIN to Mini DIN

45 cm (17.7 in)

2m (6.5 ft.)

Mini DIN to D-Shell

45 cm (17.7 in)

2m (6.5 ft.)

Mini DIN to D-Shell

45 cm (17.7 in)

2m (6.5 ft.)

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

1

Trim Pot Operation

Chapter

5

Using Trim Pots and the Data Access Tool

(DAT)

The processor has two trimming potentiometers (trim pots) which allow modification of data within the controller. Adjustments to the trim pots change the value in the corresponding Trim Pot Information

(TPI) register. The data value of each trim pot can be used throughout the control program as timer, counter, or analog presets depending upon the requirements of the application.

The trim pots are located below the mode switch under the left access door of the processor.

Trim Pot 0

Trim Pot 1

RUN

REM

PROG

Use a small flathead screwdriver to turn the trim pots. Adjusting their value causes data to change within a range of 0 to 250 (fully clockwise). The maximum rotation of each trim pot is three-quarters, as shown below. Trim pot stability over time and temperature is typically ±2 counts.

Minimum

(fully counterclockwise)

Maximum

(fully clockwise)

Trim pot data is updated continuously whenever the controller is powered-up.

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5-2 Using Trim Pots and the Data Access Tool (DAT)

Trim Pot Information Function File

The composition of the Trim Pot Information (TPI) Function File is described in the MicroLogix 1200 and MicroLogix 1500 Instruction Set

Reference Manual, publication 1762-RM001.

Error Conditions

If the controller detects a problem/error with either trim pot, the last values read remain in the data location, and an error code is put in the error code byte of the TPI file for whichever trim pot had the problem. Once the problem/error is corrected, the error code is cleared. The error codes are described in the MicroLogix 1200 and

MicroLogix 1500 Instruction Set Reference Manual, publication

1762-RM001.

Data Access Tool (DAT)

The DAT is a convenient and simple tool that provides an interface for editing and monitoring data. The DAT has five primary features:

• provides direct access to 48 bit elements

• provides direct access to 48 integer elements

• provides two function keys

• displays controller faults

• allows removal/insertion under power

DAT Keypad and Indicator Light Functions

The DAT has a digital display, 6 keys, an up/down key, and 7

indicator lights. Their functions are described in the table on page 5-3.

PROTECTED

F1

BIT

F2

INT

ESC

ENTER

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Using Trim Pots and the Data Access Tool (DAT) 5-3

Feature

Digital Display

Up/Down Key

F1 Key and Indicator Light

F2 Key and Indicator Light

ESC Key

BIT Key and Indicator Light

INT Key and Indicator Light

ENTER Key

PROTECTED Indicator Light

Function

Displays address elements, data values, faults and errors.

Selects element numbers and change data values. The up/down key scrolls when held.

Controls the F1 status bit. When the F1 key is pressed or latched, the F1 indicator LED is lit.

Controls the F2 status bit. When the F2 key is pressed or latched, the F2 indicator LED is lit.

Cancels a current operation.

Pressing the BIT key puts the DAT in bit mode. The bit indicator light is on when the DAT is in bit mode.

Pressing the INT key puts the DAT in integer mode. The integer indicator light is on when the DAT is in integer mode.

Press to select the flashing element number or enter data value.

Indicates element data cannot be changed using the DAT (element is read-only).

TIP

The F1, F2, ESC, BIT, INT, and ENTER keys do not repeat when held. Holding down any one of these keys results in only one key press. The Up/Down arrow key is the only key that repeats when held.

Power-Up Operation

The DAT receives power when it is plugged into the controller. Upon power-up, the DAT performs a self-test.

If the test fails, the DAT displays an error code, all indicator lights are deactivated, and the DAT does not respond to any key presses. See

DAT Error Codes on page 5-10.

PROTECTED

F1

BIT

F2

INT

ESC

ENTER

After a successful self-test, the DAT reads the DAT function file to determine its configuration.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

5-4 Using Trim Pots and the Data Access Tool (DAT)

DAT Function File

DAT configuration is stored in the processor in a specialized configuration file called the DAT Function File. The DAT Function

File, which is part of the user’s control program, is described in the

MicroLogix 1200 and MicroLogix 1500 Instruction Set Reference

Manual, publication 1762-RM001.

Following a successful power-up sequence, the DAT enters the bit monitoring mode.

0 0

F1

BIT

PROTECTED

o f f

-

0

F2 ESC

INT ENTER

Power Save Timeout (PST) Parameter

The power save timeout turns off the DAT display after keypad activity has stopped for a user-defined period of time. The power-save

(DAT:0.PST) value is set in the DAT Function File. The valid range is 0 to 255 minutes. The power-save feature can be disabled by setting the

PST value to 0, which keeps the display on continuously. The default value is 0.

In power-save mode, a dash flashes in the left-most segment of the display. Press any key (except F1 or F2) to return the DAT to its previous mode. If F1 or F2 is pressed, the DAT will change the value of the F1 or F2 status bits, but the display remains in power-save mode.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Using Trim Pots and the Data Access Tool (DAT) 5-5

Understanding the DAT Display

When the DAT enters either the bit or integer mode, the element number and its data are displayed, as shown below. The element number is either the integer or bit location.

Bit Mode Display

0 0

F1

BIT

PROTECTED

o f f

-

0

F2 ESC

INT ENTER

Integer Mode Display

PROTECTED

1 2

-

3 2 7 6

8

F1 F2 ESC

BIT INT ENTER

bit element number

• 0 to 47 bit data

• OFF - 0

• ON - 1

• – – – (undefined) integer element number

• 0 to 47 integer data

• -32,768 to 32,767

• – – – (undefined)

If the displayed element is defined in the controller’s data file, and is not protected, the element number flashes, indicating that it can be modified. If the displayed element is protected, the PROTECTED indicator light illuminates, and the element number does not flash, indicating that the element cannot be modified.

If the element is undefined, the data field displays three dashes. The element number does not flash because the element does not exist.

0 5

F1

BIT INT

F2

PROTECTED

- -

ESC

ENTER

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

5-6 Using Trim Pots and the Data Access Tool (DAT)

Entering Bit Mode

Bit mode allows you to view and modify up to 48 contiguous bit locations in the controller. The DAT enters the bit mode automatically following a successful power-up. The bit mode can also be selected by pressing the BIT key. If the bit mode was previously active, the

DAT displays the last bit element monitored. If the integer mode was active, the DAT displays the first bit element in the data file. However, there may be a brief delay while the DAT requests information from the controller. During the delay, the working screen will display. See

Working Screen Operation on page 5-7.

Entering Integer Mode

Integer mode allows you to view and modify up to 48 contiguous

16-bit integer data locations in the controller. To initiate integer mode, press the INT key. If the integer mode was previously active, the DAT displays the last integer element monitored. If the bit mode was active, the DAT displays the first integer element in the data file.

However, there may be a brief delay while the DAT requests information from the controller. If there is a delay, the working screen

is displayed. See Working Screen Operation on page 5-7.

Monitoring and Editing

1. Press the INT or BIT key to enter the desired mode. The element number flashes (if not protected).

2. Use the up/down key to scroll and select an element (to scroll rapidly, hold the up/down key).

3. Press ENTER to edit the element. The element number becomes steady and the data flashes if it is not protected.

4. Use the up/down key to change the data. Bit values toggle between “ON” and “OFF”. Integer values increment or decrement. Holding down the up/down key causes the integer value to increment or decrement quickly.

TIP

If the data is protected or undefined, pressing the up/down key scrolls to the next element in the list.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Using Trim Pots and the Data Access Tool (DAT) 5-7

5. Press ENTER to load the new data. Press ESC or INT/BIT to discard the new data.

F1 and F2 Functions

The function keys, F1 and F2, correspond to bits and can be used throughout the control program as desired. They have no effect on bit or integer monitoring.

Each key has two corresponding bits in the DAT function file. The bits within the DAT function file are shown in the table below.

Key Bits Address

F1 Key Pressed DAT:0/F1P

Latched DAT:0/F1L

F2 Key Pressed DAT:0/F2P

Latched DAT:0/F2L

Data Format

Binary

Type User Program

Access

Status Read/Write

Binary

Binary

Binary

Status

Status

Status

Read/Write

Read/Write

Read/Write

F1 or F2 Key Pressed

The pressed bits (DAT:0/F1P and DAT:0/F2P) function as push-buttons and provide the current state of either the F1 or F2 key on the keypad. When the F1 or F2 key is pressed, the DAT sets (1) the corresponding pressed key bit. When the F1 or F2 key is not pressed, the DAT clears (0) the corresponding pressed key bit.

F1 or F2 Key Latched

The latched bits (DAT:0/F1L and DAT:0/F2L) function as latched push-buttons and provide latched/toggle key functionality. When the

F1 or F2 key is pressed, the DAT sets (1) the corresponding latched key bit within the DAT Function File. When the F1 or F2 key is pressed a second time, the DAT clears (0) the corresponding latched key bit.

Working Screen Operation

Because the DAT is a communications device, its performance is affected by the scan time of the controller. Depending on the user program, if a long scan time is encountered and the DAT waits for information from the controller, a working screen is displayed. The

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

5-8 Using Trim Pots and the Data Access Tool (DAT) working screen consists of three dashes that move across the display from left to right. While the working screen is displayed, key presses are not recognized. Once the DAT receives data from the controller, it returns to its normal mode of operation.

If you encounter excessive working screen conditions, you can minimize the effect by adding an SVC instruction to the control program. Refer to the MicroLogix 1200 and MicroLogix 1500

Programmable Controllers Instruction Set Reference Manual, publication 1762-RM001, for information on the SVC instruction.

Non-Existent Elements

When the DAT determines that an element number does not exist in the controller, the element value displays as three dashes.

If the protection bit for an element is undefined, the DAT will assume that the element is unprotected.

Controller Faults

The DAT checks for controller faults every 10 seconds. When the DAT detects a controller fault, the display shows “FL” in the element number field and the value of the controller’s major fault word (S2:6) is displayed in the value field, as shown below.

TIP

PROTECTED

f l

0 0 0

F1 F2 ESC

BIT INT ENTER

If an element value is being modified when the fault is detected, the fault is stored until the modification is accepted or discarded. Then, the fault will be displayed.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Using Trim Pots and the Data Access Tool (DAT) 5-9

Pressing ESC while the fault is being displayed returns the DAT to its previous mode. The fault is not removed from the controller, just from the DAT display screen. The fault that was on screen will not display again and cannot be “recalled”. If a new fault is detected, it will be displayed. If the initial fault is cleared and returns at a later time, the

DAT will display the fault at that time.

Error Conditions

When the DAT detects an error in its own operation, it displays the error screen. The error screen consists of “Err” and a two-digit error code, as shown below.

PROTECTED

F1

BIT

F2

INT

ESC

ENTER

The DAT can experience two different types of errors, internal errors and communication errors.

Internal DAT Errors

Internal DAT errors are non-recoverable. When the DAT experiences an internal error, it displays the error screen, and does not respond to any key presses. Remove and re-install the DAT. If this does not clear the error, the DAT must be replaced.

Communication Errors

The DAT continually monitors the interface between the DAT and the controller to ensure a good communication path. If the DAT loses communication with the controller for more than three seconds, it generates an interface time-out error. The DAT automatically attempts to re-establish communications. The error screen displays until the

DAT regains communications with the processor. All key presses are ignored until the display clears.

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5-10 Using Trim Pots and the Data Access Tool (DAT)

DAT Error Codes

Error Code Description

00 Interface time-out

01 to 02

03 to 07

08

09

31 to 34

Caused by

Communication traffic

Recommended Action

Add SVC instructions to ladder program

Power-up test failure internal error processor owned access denied

(1)

Internal failure

Internal failure

Remove and re-insert the DAT. If failure persists, replace the unit.

Remove and re-insert the DAT. If failure persists, replace the unit.

Another device has ownership of the controller Release ownership by the other device

Release file ownership by the other device internal error

Cannot access that file because another device has ownership

Internal failure Remove and re-insert the DAT. If failure persists, replace the unit.

(1) This error can occur after a download in which communications configurations are changed. This error can be cleared by removing and re-installing the DAT, or by cycling power to the controller.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

1

Chapter

6

Using Real-Time Clock and Memory Modules

Five modules with different levels of functionality are available for use with the MicroLogix 1500 controller.

Catalog Number

1764-RTC

1764-MM1

1764-MM1RTC

1764-MM2

(1)

1764-MM2RTC

(1)

Function

Real-Time Clock

Memory Module

Memory Module and Real-Time Clock

Memory Module

Memory Module and Real-Time Clock

(1) For 1764-LRP programs greater than 8k, use the 1764-MM2 or 1764-MM2RTC.

Memory Size

not applicable

8K

8K

16K

16K

Real-Time Clock Operation

Removal/Insertion Under Power

The real-time clock module can be installed or removed at any time without risk of damage to either the module or the controller. If a module is installed while the MicroLogix 1500 is in an executing mode

(Run or Remote Run), the module is not recognized until either a power cycle occurs, or until the controller is placed in a non-executing mode (program mode or fault condition).

Removal of the memory module is detected within one program scan.

Removal of the real-time clock under power causes the controller to write zeros to the (RTC) Function File.

Real-Time Clock Function File

The real-time clock provides year, month, day of month, day of week, hour, minute, and second information to the Real-Time Clock (RTC)

Function File in the controller. Refer to the MicroLogix 1200 and

MicroLogix 1500 Instruction Set Reference Manual, publication

1762-RM001 for information about the RTC function file.

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6-2 Using Real-Time Clock and Memory Modules

Accuracy

The following table indicates the expected accuracy of the real-time clock at various temperatures.

Ambient Temperature

0°C (+32°F)

+25°C (+77°F)

+40°C (+104°F)

+55°C (+131°F)

Accuracy

(1)

+34 to -70 seconds/month

+36 to -68 seconds/month

+29 to -75 seconds/month

-133 to -237 seconds/month

(1) These numbers are expected worst case values over a 31 day month.

Writing Data to the Real-Time Clock

When valid data is sent to the real-time clock from the programming device, the new values take effect immediately.

The real-time clock does not allow you to write invalid date or time data.

RTC Battery Operation

The real-time clock has an internal battery that is not replaceable. The

RTC Function File features a battery low indicator bit (RTC:0/BL), which shows the status of the RTC battery. When the battery is low, the indicator bit is set (1). This means that the battery may fail within

14 days and the real-time clock module needs to be replaced. When the battery low indicator bit is clear (0), the battery level is acceptable or a real-time clock is not attached.

If the RTC battery is low and the controller is powered, the RTC operates normally. If the controller power is removed and the RTC battery is low, RTC data may be lost.

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Using Real-Time Clock and Memory Modules 6-3

Use the Disable Clock button in your programming device to disable the real-time clock before storing a module. This decreases the drain on the battery during storage.

Table 6.1 RTC Battery Life Expectancy

Battery State

Operating

Storage

Temperature

0°C to +40°C (+32°F to +104°F)

-40°C to +25°C (-40°F to +77°F)

+26°C to +60°C (+79°F to +140°F)

Time Duration

5 years

(1)

5 years minimum

3 years minimum

(1) The operating life of the battery is based on 6 months of storage time before the real-time clock is used.

ATTENTION

!

Operating with a low battery indication for more than 14 days may result in invalid RTC data if controller power is lost.

Memory Module Operation

The memory module supports program back-up as well as the following features:

User Program and Data Back-Up

Program Compare

Data File Download Protection

Memory Module Write Protection

Removal/Insertion Under Power

User Program and Data Back-Up

The memory module provides a simple and flexible program/data transport mechanism, allowing the user to transfer the program and data to the controller without the use of a personal computer and programming software.

The memory module can store one user program at a time.

During transfers from a memory module, the controller’s RUN LED flashes.

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6-4 Using Real-Time Clock and Memory Modules

Program Compare

The memory module can also provide application security, allowing you to specify that if the program stored in the memory module does not match the program in the controller, the controller will not enter an executing (run or remote run) mode. To enable this feature, set the

S:2/9 bit in the system status file. Refer to the MicroLogix 1200 and

MicroLogix 1500 Instruction Set Reference Manual, publication

1762-RM001, for more information.

Data File Download Protection

The memory module allows the user to specify individual data files in the controller that are protected from the download procedure. This allows user data to be saved (not overwritten) during a download.

TIP

Data file download protection is only functional if the processor does not have a fault and if all protected data files in the memory module exactly match the protected data file structure within the controller. Refer to the MicroLogix 1200 and

MicroLogix 1500 Instruction Set Reference Manual,

publication 1762-RM001, for information on protecting data files during download.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Using Real-Time Clock and Memory Modules 6-5

Memory Module Write Protection

The memory module supports write-once, read-many behavior. Write protection is enabled using your programming software.

IMPORTANT

Once set, write protection cannot be removed. A change cannot be made to the control program or data stored in a write-protected memory module. If a change is required, you must use a different memory module.

Removal/Insertion Under Power

The memory module can be installed or removed at any time without risk of damage to either the memory module or the controller. If a memory module is installed while the MicroLogix 1500 is executing, the memory module will not be recognized until either a power cycle occurs, or until the controller is placed in a non-executing mode

(program mode or fault condition).

Memory Module Information File

The controller has a Memory Module Information (MMI) File which provides status from the attached memory module. At power-up or on detection of a memory module being inserted, the catalog number, series, revision, and type (memory module and/or real-time clock) are identified and written to the MMI file. If a memory module and/or real-time clock is not attached, zeros are written to the MMI file. Refer to the MicroLogix 1200 and MicroLogix 1500 Instruction Set Reference

Manual, publication 1762-RM001, for more information.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

6-6 Using Real-Time Clock and Memory Modules

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

1

Appendix

A

Specifications

Controller Specifications

Table A.1 General Specifications

Description

Number of I/O

Line Power

1764-24BWA

12 inputs

12 outputs

85 to 265V ac at 47 to 63 Hz

88 VA

1764-24AWA

12 inputs

12 outputs

85 to 265V ac at 47 to 63 Hz

70 VA Power Supply

Usage

Power Supply Inrush 120V ac = 25A for 8 ms

240V ac = 40A for 4 ms

User Power Output 24V dc at 400 mA,

400 µF max.

120V ac = 25A for 8 ms

240V ac = 40A for 4 ms none

Input Circuit Type 24V dc, sink/source 120V ac

Output Circuit Type relay relay

1764-28BXB

16 inputs

12 outputs

20.4 to 30V dc

30W

24V dc = 4A for 150 ms none

(2)

24V dc, sink/source

6 relay, 6 FET transistor

(24V dc source)

Typical CPU Hold-up

Time

Operating Temp.

10 to 3000 ms

+0°C to +55°C (+32°F to +131°F) ambient

Storage Temp.

-40°C to +85°C (-40°F to +185°F) ambient

(1)

Operating Humidity 5% to 95% relative humidity (non-condensing)

Vibration

Shock (without Data

Access Tool installed)

Operating: 10 to 500 Hz, 5G, 0.030 in. max. peak-to-peak

Relay Operation: 2G

Operating: 30G panel mounted (15G DIN Rail mounted)

Relay operation: 7.5G panel mounted (5G DIN Rail mounted)

Non-Operating: 40G panel mounted (30G DIN Rail mounted)

Shock (with Data

Access Tool installed)

Operating: 20G panel mounted (15G DIN Rail mounted)

Relay operation: 7.5G panel mounted (5G DIN Rail mounted)

Non-Operating: 30G panel mounted (20G DIN Rail mounted)

Agency Certification

UL 508

C-UL under CSA C22.2 no. 142

Class I, Div. 2, Groups A, B, C, D

(UL 1604, C-UL under CSA C22.2 no. 213)

CE compliant for all applicable directives

C-Tick marked for all applicable acts

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

A-2 Specifications

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Table A.1 General Specifications

Description

Electrical/EMC

1764-24BWA 1764-24AWA 1764-28BXB

The module has passed testing at the following levels:

EN61000-4-2: 4 kV contact, 8 kV air, 4 kV indirect

EN61000-4-3: 10 V/m

EN61000-4-4: 2 kV, 5 kHz; communications cable: 1 kV, 5 kHz

EN61000-4-5: communications cable1 kv galvanic gun

-I/O: 2 kV CM, 1 kV DM,

-Power Supply (1764-24AWA/1764-24BWA): 4 kV CM, 2 kV DM

-Power Supply (1764-28BXB): 0.5 kV CM, 0.5 kV DM

EN61000-4-6: 10V, communications cable 3V

1.13 Nm (10 in-lb) rated; 1.3 Nm (12 in-lb) maximum Terminal Screw

Torque

Programming

Software

For 1764-LSP Series A Processors: RSLogix 500,

Version 3.01.09 or higher

For 1764-LSP and 1764-LRP Series B Processors: RSLogix 500,

Version 4.00.00 or higher.

(1) Recommended storage temperature for maximum battery life (5 years typical with normal operating/storage conditions) of the 1764-RTC, 1764-MM1RTC, and 1764-MM2RTC is -40°C to +40°C (-40°F to +104°F). Battery life is significantly shorter at elevated temperatures.

(2) See Choosing a Power Supply on page A-2.

Choosing a Power Supply

This section contains information for selecting a power supply for applications using a 1764-28BXB base unit. Use the tables in

Appendix F to calculate the total power (Watts) consumed by the

system. With that information, use the graphs below to chose a power supply. You can use either current or power, depending on how the power supply is rated.

Figure 1.1 Input Current Required

1

0.8

0.6

1.4

1.2

0.4

0.2

0

0 2 4 6 8 10

Power Consumption (Watts)

12 14 16 18

Specifications A-3

Figure 1.2 Input Power Required

30

25

20

15

10

5

0

0 2 4 6 8 10

Power Consumption (Watts)

12 14 16 18

Table A.2 Input Specifications

Description

On-State Voltage

Range

1764-24AWA

79 to 132V ac

1764-24BWA and 1764-28BXB

Inputs 0 thru 7 Inputs 8 and

Higher

14 to 30.0V dc at

30°C (86°F)

14 to 26.4V dc at

55°C (131°F)

0 to 5V dc

10 to 30.0V dc at

30°C (86°F)

10 to 26.4V dc at

55°C (131°F)

Off-State Voltage

Range

Operating

Frequency

On-State Current:

• minimum

• nominal

• maximum

Off-State Leakage

Current

Nominal

Impedance

Inrush Current

(max.)

0 to 20V ac

Not Applicable

12k ohms at 50 Hz

10k ohms at 60 Hz

250 mA at 120V ac

1 kHz to 20 kHz

5.0 mA at 79V ac

12.0 mA at 120V ac

16.0 mA at 132V ac

2.5 mA minimum

2.5 mA at 14V dc

7.3 mA at 24V dc

12.0 mA at 30V dc

1.5 mA minimum

3.3k ohms

Not Applicable

1 kHz to 500 Hz

2.0 mA at 10V dc

8.9 mA at 24V dc

12.0 mA at 30V dc

2.7k ohms

Not Applicable

(1)

(1) Scan-time dependant.

TIP

The 1764-24AWA input circuits (inputs 0-11) do not support adjustable filter settings. They have maximum turn-on and maximum turn-off times of

20 milliseconds.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

A-4 Specifications

Table A.3 Response Times for High-Speed dc Inputs 0 Through 7

(applies to 1764-24BWA and 1764-28BXB)

Maximum

High-Speed Counter

Frequency at 50%

Duty Cycle (KHz)

20.000

Filter

Setting

(ms)

0.025

6.700

5.000

2.000

1.000

0.500

0.250

0.125

0.063

0.031

Minimum

ON Delay

(ms)

0.075

0.100

0.250

0.500

1.000

2.000

0.005

0.040

0.050

0.170

0.370

0.700

1.700

4.000

8.000

(1)

3.400

6.700

16.000

14.000

Maximum

ON Delay

(ms)

0.025

0.075

0.100

0.250

0.500

1.000

2.000

4.000

8.000

16.000

Minimum

OFF Delay

(ms)

0.005

0.045

0.060

0.210

0.330

0.800

1.600

3.600

7.300

14.000

Maximum

OFF Delay

(ms)

16.000

0.025

0.075

0.100

0.250

0.500

1.000

2.000

4.000

8.000

(1) This is the default setting.

Table A.4 Response Times for Normal dc Inputs 8 Through 11 (1764-24BWA) and 8 Through 15 (1764-28BXB)

Maximum

Frequency at 50%

Duty Cycle (kHz)

1.000

0.500

0.250

0.125

0.063

0.031

Filter

Setting

(ms)

0.500

1.000

2.000

4.000

8.000

16.000

11.000

(1) This is the default setting.

(1)

Minimum

ON Delay

(ms)

0.090

0.500

1.100

2.800

5.800

Maximum

ON Delay

(ms)

0.500

1.000

2.000

4.000

8.000

16.000

Minimum

OFF Delay

(ms)

0.020

0.400

1.300

2.700

5.300

10.000

Maximum

OFF Delay

(ms)

0.500

1.000

2.000

4.000

8.000

16.000

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Specifications A-5

IMPORTANT

The relay current must stay within the limits defined in Tables A.5 and A.6.

Table A.5 Relay Contact Rating Table 1764-24AWA, -24BWA, -28BXB

Maximum

Volts

240V ac

120V ac

125V dc

24V dc

Amperes

Make

7.5A

15A

0.22A

(1)

1.2A

(1)

Break

0.75A

1.5A

Amperes

Continuous

2.5A

1.0A

2.0A

Voltamperes

Make

1800VA

28VA

28VA

Break

180VA

(2)

(1) For dc voltage applications, the make/break ampere rating for relay contacts can be determined by dividing 28

VA by the applied dc voltage. For example, 28 VA/48V dc = 0.58A. For dc voltage applications less than 14V, the make/break ratings for relay contacts cannot exceed 2A.

(2) The total load controlled by the 1764-24AWA and 1764-24BWA is limited to 1440VA (break).

Table A.6 Output Specifications - Maximum Continuous Relay Current

Specification

Current per Common

Current per

Controller at 150V Maximum at 240V Maximum

1764-24AWA,

-24BWA

8A

24A

20A

1764-28BXB

8A

18A

18A

Table A.7 1764-28BXB FET Output Specifications

Specification

User Supply

Voltage

On-State

Voltage Drop

Current Rating per Point minimum maximum at maximum load current at maximum surge current maximum load minimum load maximum leakage

General

Operation

(Outputs 2 thru 7)

20.4V dc

26.4V dc

1V dc

2.5V dc

1A at 55°C (131°F)

1.5A at 30°C (86°F)

1.0 mA

1.0 mA

High Speed

Operation

(1)

(Outputs 2 and 3 Only)

20.4V dc

26.4V dc

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

100 mA

10 mA

1.0 mA

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

A-6 Specifications

Table A.7 1764-28BXB FET Output Specifications

Specification

Surge Current per Point

Current per

Common

On-State

Current

Off-State

Leakage

Current

Turn-On Time

Turn-Off Time

Repeatability

Drift peak current maximum surge duration maximum rate of repetition at 30°C

(86°F) maximum rate of repetition at 55°C

(131°F) maximum total minimum maximum maximum maximum maximum maximum

General

Operation

(Outputs 2 thru 7)

4.0A

10 msec once every second once every 2 seconds

6A

2.5 mA at 14V dc

1 mA

0.1 msec

1.0 msec n/a n/a

High Speed

Operation

(1)

(Outputs 2 and 3 Only)

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

2.0 mA at 10V dc

1 mA

6 µsec

18 µsec

2 µsec

1 µsec per 5°C

(1 µsec per 9°F)

(1) Outputs 2 and 3 are designed to provide increased functionality over the other FET outputs (4 through 7). They may be used like the other FET transistor outputs, but in addition, within a limited current range, they may be operated at a higher speed. Outputs 2 and 3 also provide a pulse train output (PTO) or pulse width modulation output (PWM) function.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Specifications A-7

Table A.8 Working Voltage (1764-24AWA)

Specification

Power Supply Input to Backplane

Isolation

Input Group to Backplane

Isolation and Input Group to

Input Group Isolation

Output Group to Backplane

Isolation

Output Group to Output Group

Isolation

1764-24AWA

Verified by one of the following dielectric tests: 1836V ac for 1 second or 2596V dc for 1 second

265V Working Voltage (IEC Class 2 reinforced insulation)

Verified by one of the following dielectric tests: 151V ac for 1 second or 2145V dc for 1 second

132V Working Voltage (IEC Class 2 reinforced insulation)

Verified by one of the following dielectric tests: 1836V ac for 1 second or 2596V dc for 1 second

265V Working Voltage (IEC Class 2 reinforced insulation)

Verified by one of the following dielectric tests: 1836V ac for 1 second or 2596V dc for 1 second

265V Working Voltage (basic insulation) 150V Working

Voltage (IEC Class 2 reinforced insulation).

Table A.9 Working Voltage (1764-24BWA)

Specification

Power Supply Input to Backplane

Isolation

1764-24BWA

Verified by one of the following dielectric tests: 1836V ac for 1 second or 2596V dc for 1 second

Power Supply User 24V Output to Backplane Isolation

Input Group to Backplane

Isolation and Input Group to

Input Group Isolation

Output Group to Backplane

Isolation

Output Group to Output Group

Isolation.

265V Working Voltage (IEC Class 2 reinforced insulation)

Verified by one of the following dielectric tests: 600V ac for 1 second or 848V dc for 1 second

50V Working Voltage (IEC Class 2 reinforced insulation)

Verified by one of the following dielectric tests: 1200V ac for 1 second or 1697V dc for 1 second

75V dc Working Voltage (IEC Class 2 reinforced insulation)

Verified by one of the following dielectric tests: 1836V ac for 1 second or 2596V dc for 1 second

265V Working Voltage (IEC Class 2 reinforced insulation).

Verified by one of the following dielectric tests: 1836V ac for 1 second or 2596V dc for 1 second

265V Working Voltage (basic insulation) 150V Working

Voltage (IEC Class 2 reinforced insulation)

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

A-8 Specifications

Table A.10 Working Voltage (1764-28BXB)

Specification

Input Group to Backplane

Isolation and Input Group to

Input Group Isolation

FET Output Group to Backplane

Isolation and FET Outputs Group to Group

Relay Output Group to

Backplane Isolation

Relay Output Group to Relay and

FET Output Group Isolation

1764-28BXB

Verified by one of the following dielectric tests: 1200V ac for 1 second or 1697V dc for 1 second

75V dc Working Voltage (IEC Class 2 reinforced insulation)

Verified by one of the following dielectric tests: 1200V ac for 1 second or 1697V dc for 1 second

75V dc Working Voltage (IEC Class 2 reinforced insulation)

Verified by one of the following dielectric tests: 1836V ac for 1 second or 2596V dc for 1 second

265V Working Voltage (IEC Class 2 reinforced insulation)

Verified by one of the following dielectric tests: 1836V ac for 1 second or 2596V dc for 1 second

265V Working Voltage (basic insulation) 150V Working

Voltage (IEC Class 2 reinforced insulation)

Transistor Output Transient Pulses

Refer to page 3-16 for “Transistor Output Transient Pulses”.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Controller Dimensions

See page 2-12 for Base Unit Mounting Dimensions.

168 mm

(6.62 in)

147 mm

(5.79 in)

35 mm

(1.38 in)

35 mm

(1.38 in)

Specifications A-9

13.5 mm

(0.53 in)

14.7 mm

(0.58 in)

Compact I/O Dimensions

Panel Mounting

For more than 2 modules: (number of modules - 1) X 35 mm (1.38 in.)

Refer to host controller for this dimension .

35

(1.38)

132

(5.197)

122.6±0.2

(4.826±0.008)

28.5

(1.12)

NOTE: All dimensions are in mm (inches).

Hole spacing tolerance: ±0.4 mm

(0.016 in.)

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

A-10 Specifications

End Cap

18 mm

(0.71 in.)

32 mm

(1.26 in.)

This illustration shows the

1769-ECR right end cap. For the 1769-ECL left end cap, the drawing would be reversed.

118 mm

(4.65 in.)

Dimensions are in mm (inches).

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

1

MicroLogix 1500

Replacement Kits

Appendix

B

Replacement Parts

This chapter contains the following information:

• a table of MicroLogix 1500 replacement parts

• procedure for replacing the lithium battery

• illustrations of the MicroLogix 1500 replacement doors and terminal blocks

The table below provides a list of replacement parts and their catalog number.

Description

Lithium Battery (See page B-2.)

ESD Barrier

Base Terminal Doors (See page B-6.)

Processor Access Door (See page B-6.)

Door Combination Kit, includes ESD Barrier, Terminal Door, Access

Door, Base Comms Door (See page B-6.), and Trim Pots/Mode Switch

Cover Door (See page B-6.)

17-Point Terminal Block (for inputs on 1764-24AWA and -24BWA

bases) (See page B-5.)

21-Point Terminal Block (for inputs of 1764-28BXB and outputs for all

base units)(See page B-5.)

Catalog

Number

1747-BA

1764-RPL-TRM1

1764-RPL-TDR1

1764-RPL-CDR1

1764-RPL-DR

1764-RPL-TB1

1764-RPL-TB2

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

B-2 Replacement Parts

Lithium Battery (1747-BA)

IMPORTANT

When the processor’s Battery Low indicator is lit, install a backup battery immediately. After the indicator turns on, the battery lasts for at least:

14 days for the 1764-LSP

7 days for the 1764-LRP

Installing

Follow the procedure below to ensure proper replacement battery installation.

IMPORTANT

Do not remove the permanent battery when installing replacement battery.

1. Insert battery into replacement battery pocket with wires facing up.

2. Insert replacement battery wire connector into connector port.

3. Secure battery wires under wire latch (as shown below).

Replacement Battery Pocket

Replacement Battery

Battery Connector Wires

DC INPUTS

24V SINK/SOURCE

DC/RELAY OUT

24V SOURCE

Permanent Battery

(DO NOT ATTEMPT

TO REMOVE)

Connector Port

Wire Connector

Wire Latch

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Replacement Parts B-3

Battery Handling

Follow the procedure below to ensure proper battery operation and reduce personnel hazards.

Use only for the intended operation.

Do not ship or dispose of cells except according to recommended procedures.

Do not ship on passenger aircraft.

ATTENTION

!

Do not charge the batteries. An explosion could result or the cells could overheat causing burns.

Do not open, puncture, crush, or otherwise mutilate the batteries. A possibility of an explosion exists and/or toxic, corrosive, and flammable liquids would be exposed.

Do not incinerate or expose the batteries to high temperatures. Do not attempt to solder batteries.

An explosion could result.

Do not short positive and negative terminals together. Excessive heat can build up and cause severe burns.

Storing

Store lithium batteries in a cool, dry environment, typically +20°C to

+25°C (+68°F to 77°F) and 40% to 60% humidity. Store the batteries and a copy of the battery instruction sheet in the original container, away from flammable materials.

Transporting

One or Two Batteries

Each battery contains 0.23 grams of lithium. Therefore, up to two batteries can be shipped together within the United States without restriction. Regulations governing shipment to or within other countries may differ.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

B-4 Replacement Parts

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Three or More Batteries

Procedures for the transportation of three or more batteries shipped together within the United States are specified by the Department of

Transportation (DOT) in the Code of Federal Regulations, CFR49,

“Transportation.” An exemption to these regulations, DOT - E7052, covers the transport of certain hazardous materials classified as flammable solids. This exemption authorizes transport of lithium batteries by motor vehicle, rail freight, cargo vessel, and cargo-only aircraft, providing certain conditions are met. Transport by passenger aircraft is not permitted.

A special provision of DOT-E7052 (11th Rev., October 21, 1982, par.

8-a) provides that:

“Persons that receive cell and batteries covered by this exemption may reship them pursuant to the provisions of 49

CFR 173.22a in any of these packages authorized in this exemption including those in which they were received.”

The Code of Federal Regulations, 49 CFR 173.22a, relates to the use of packaging authorized under exemptions. In part, it requires that you must maintain a copy of the exemption at each facility where the packaging is being used in connection with shipment under the exemption.

Shipment of depleted batteries for disposal may be subject to specific regulation of the countries involved or to regulations endorsed by those countries, such as the IATA Articles Regulations of the

International Air Transport Association, Geneva, Switzerland.

IMPORTANT

Regulations for transportation of lithium batteries are periodically revised.

Disposing

ATTENTION

!

Do not incinerate or dispose of lithium batteries in general trash collection. Explosion or violent rupture is possible. Batteries should be collected for disposal in a manner to prevent against short-circuiting, compacting, or destruction of case integrity and hermetic seal.

Replacement Parts B-5

For disposal, batteries must be packaged and shipped in accordance with transportation regulations, to a proper disposal site. The U.S.

Department of Transportation authorizes shipment of “Lithium batteries for disposal” by motor vehicle only in regulation 173.1015 of

CFR 49 (effective January 5, 1983). For additional information contact:

U.S. Department of Transportation

Research and Special Programs Administration

400 Seventh Street, S.W.

Washington, D.C. 20590

Although the Environmental Protection Agency at this time has no regulations specific to lithium batteries, the material contained may be considered toxic, reactive, or corrosive. The person disposing of the material is responsible for any hazard created in doing so. State and local regulations may exist regarding the disposal of these materials.

For a lithium battery product safety data sheet, contact the manufacturer:

Sanyo Energy Corporation

2001 Sanyo Avenue

San Diego, CA 92173

(619) 661-4801

Tadarand Electronic Industries

2 Seaview Blvd.

Port Washington, NY 11050

(516) 621-4980

Replacement Terminal

Blocks

This figure illustrates how to replace the MicroLogix 1500 terminal blocks.

Catalog Numbers:

1764-RPL-TB1: 17-point terminal block

1764-RPL-TB2: 21-point terminal block

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

B-6 Replacement Parts

Replacement Doors

The following figures illustrate the procedure for installing the

MicroLogix 1500 replacement doors.

Base Terminal Door

(1764-RPL-TDR1)

2

L2

65

85-2

VAC

L1

O / 7

VAC

VDC

0

VAC

VDC 1

VAC

VDC

2

O / 1

VAC

VDC

3

VAC

VDC

4

O / 5

O / 4

O / 3

O / 2

O / 0

O / 6

O / 8

O / 1

0 24BW

O / 1

1

A

VAC

VDC

5

O / 9

3

1

Processor Access Door

(1764-RPL-CDR1)

Base Comms Door

(included in 1764-RPL-DR)

2

1

Trim Pots/Mode Switch

Cover Door

(included in 1764-RPL-DR)

2

1

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Appendix

C

Troubleshooting Your System

This chab pter describes how to troubleshoot your controller. Topics include:

• understanding the controller LED status

• controller error recovery model

• identifying controller faults

• calling Rockwell Automation for assistance

1

Understanding Controller

LEDs

The controller status LEDs provide a mechanism to determine the current status of the controller if a programming device is not present or available.

D.C. INPUTS

POWER

RUN

FAULT

FORCE

BAT. LO

COMM 0

DCOMM

24V SINK / SOURCE

DC/RELAY OUT

24V SOURCE

LED

POWER

RUN

Color

off green off

Indicates

no input power power on controller is not in Run mode or REM Run

FAULT

FORCE

COMM 0

COMM 1

(1764-LRP only)

DCOMM

(1) green controller is in Run mode or REM Run green flashing system is not in Run mode; memory module transfer is in progress off no fault detected red flashing red off amber

BATTERY LOW off red off green off green off green faulted user program processor hardware fault or critical fault no forces installed forces installed battery OK

battery needs replacement (See page B-2.)

flashes when communications are active flashes when communications are active user configured communications mode is active default communications mode active

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

C-2 Troubleshooting Your System

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

LED

INPUTS

OUTPUTS

Color

off amber off amber

Indicates

input is not energized input is energized (logic status) output is not energized output is energized (logic status)

(1) When using a 1764-LRP processor, the DCOMM LED applies only to Channel 0.

When Operating Normally

The POWER and RUN LEDs are on. If a force condition is active, the

FORCE LED turns on and remains on until all forces are removed.

When an Error Exists

If an error exists within the controller, the controller LEDs operate as described in the following tables.

If the

LEDS indicate:

All LEDS off

Power and

FAULT LEDs on solid

Power LED on and

FAULT LED flashing

The Following

Error Exists

No input power or power supply error

Hardware faulted

Application fault

Probable Cause

No Line Power

Power Supply

Overloaded

Processor Hardware

Error

Recommended Action

Verify proper line voltage and connections to the controller.

This problem can occur intermittently if power supply is overloaded when output loading and temperature varies.

Cycle power. Contact your local

Rockwell Automation representative if the error persists.

Loose Wiring

Hardware/Software

Major Fault

Detected

Verify connections to the controller.

1. Monitor Status File Word

S:6 for major error code.

See page C-5 for more

information.

2. Remove hardware/software condition causing fault.

3. Clear Major Error Halted flag, bit S2:1/13.

4. Attempt a controller Run mode entry. If unsuccessful, repeat recommended action steps above or contact your local Rockwell Automation distributor.

Troubleshooting Your System C-3

Controller Error Recovery

Model

Use the following error recovery model to help you diagnose software and hardware problems in the micro controller. The model provides common questions you might ask to help troubleshoot your system.

Refer to the recommended pages within the model for further help.

Identify the error code and description.

No

Refer to page C-2 for

probable cause and recommended action.

Clear fault.

Correct the condition causing the fault.

Return controller to

RUN or any of the

REM test modes.

Is the error hardware related?

Yes

Are the wire connections tight?

Yes

No

Start

Tighten wire connections.

Is the Power

LED on?

Yes

No

Is the RUN

LED on?

No

Yes

Is the Fault LED on?

No

Yes

See page C-2 for

probable cause and recommended action.

Is power supplied to the controller?

No

Yes

Refer to page C-2 for

probable cause and recommended action.

Check power.

Is an input LED accurately showing status?

No

Yes

See page C-2 for

probable cause and recommended action.

Test and verify system operation.

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C-4 Troubleshooting Your System

Identifying Controller Faults

While a program is executing, a fault may occur within the operating system or your program. When a fault occurs, you have various options to determine what the fault is and how to correct it. This section describes how to clear faults and provides a list of possible advisory messages with recommended corrective actions.

Automatically Clearing Faults

You can automatically clear a fault by cycling power to the controller when the Fault Override at Power-up bit (S:1/8) is set in the status file.

You can also configure the controller to clear faults and go to RUN every time the controller is power cycled. This is a feature that OEMs can build into their equipment to allow end users to reset the controller. If the controller faults, it can be reset by simply cycling power to the machine. To accomplish this, set the following bits in the status file:

S2:1/8 - Fault Override at Power-up

S2:1/12 - Mode Behavior

If the fault condition still exists after cycling power, the controller re-enters the fault mode. For more information on status bits, refer to the MicroLogix 1200 and MicroLogix 1500 Instruction Set Reference

Manual, publication 1762-RM001.

TIP

You can declare your own application-specific major fault by writing your own unique value to S:6 and then setting bit S:1/13 to prevent reusing system defined codes. The recommended values for user defined faults are FF00 to FF0F.

Manually Clearing Faults Using the Fault Routine

The occurrence of recoverable or non-recoverable user faults can cause the user fault subroutine to be executed. If the fault is recoverable, the subroutine can be used to correct the problem and clear the fault bit S:1/13. The controller then continues in the Run or test mode.

The subroutine does not execute for non-user faults. Refer to the

MicroLogix 1200 and MicroLogix 1500 Instruction Set Reference

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Troubleshooting Your System C-5

Manual, publication 1762-RM001, for information on creating a user fault subroutine.

Fault Messages

Refer to the MicroLogix 1200 and 1500 Instruction Set Reference

Manual, publication 1762-RM001, for the controller fault messages that can occur during operation of the MicroLogix 1500 programmable controllers. Each fault message includes the error code description, the probable cause, and the recommended corrective action.

Calling Rockwell

Automation for Assistance

If you need to contact Rockwell Automation or local distributor for assistance, it is helpful to obtain the following (prior to calling):

• controller type, series letter, and revision letter of the base unit

• series letter, revision letter, and firmware (FRN) number of the processor (on bottom side of processor unit)

• controller LED status

• controller error codes (found in S2:6 of status file).

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C-6 Troubleshooting Your System

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1

Upgrading Your Operating System

Appendix

D

Preparing for Upgrade

The operating system (OS) can be upgraded through the communication port on the controller. In order to download a new operating system, you must have the following:

ControlFLASH™ Upgrade Kit containing the new OS

• a Windows

®

95, Windows

®

98, Windows NT™, or

Windows

®

2000 based computer to run the download software.

The ControlFLASH™ Upgrade Kit includes:

• the operating system upgrade to be downloaded

• the ControlFLASH programming tool, along with its support drivers and on-line help

• a readme first file explaining how to upgrade the operating system

Before upgrading the controller’s operating system, you must:

Obtain the operating system upgrade from

http://www.ab.com/micrologix

or from your local Allen-Bradley distributor

IMPORTANT

Installing a new operating system deletes the controller’s user program.

Install the ControlFlash Software. Double click the processor catalog number/firmware revision number to install the operating system upgrade.

The controller must be configured for default communications

(use communications toggle push button; DCOMM LED on) and be in the Program mode to allow the download of a new operating system.

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D-2 Upgrading Your Operating System

Performing the Upgrade

The following steps occur during the upgrade process.

1. Controller mode and communications parameters are checked.

2. Download begins.

3. During the download, the Force, Battery, and Comms LEDs perform a walking bit pattern.

4. When the download is complete, the integrity of the new OS is checked. If the new OS is corrupt, the controller sends an error message to the computer and flashes the Missing or Corrupt OS

LED pattern. See Missing/Corrupt OS LED Pattern below.

5. Following a successful transfer, the Power, Force, and Battery

LEDs flash on and remain on for five seconds. Then the controller resets.

Missing/Corrupt OS LED

Pattern

When an operating system download is not successful or if the controller does not contain a valid operating system, the controller flashes the Run, Force, and Fault LEDS on and off.

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Appendix

E

Understanding Communication Protocols

1

Use the information in this appendix to understand the differences in communication protocols. The following protocols are supported from the RS-232 communication channel:

DF1 Full-Duplex

DF1 Half-Duplex Slave

DH-485

Modbus RTU Slave (1764-LSP and 1764-LRP Series B Processors only)

ASCII (1764-LSP and 1764-LRP Series B Processors only)

See Chapter 4 for information about required network devices and

accessories.

RS-232 Communication

Interface

The communications port on the MicroLogix 1500 utilizes an RS-232 interface. RS-232 is an Electronics Industries Association (EIA) standard that specifies the electrical characteristics for serial binary communication. It provides you with a variety of system configuration possibilities. (RS-232 defines electrical characteristics; it is not a protocol.)

One of the biggest benefits of an RS-232 interface is that it lets you easily integrate telephone and radio modems into your control system.

DF1 Full-Duplex Protocol

DF1 Full-Duplex protocol is an open protocol developed by

Allen-Bradley. It provides a point-to-point connection between two devices. DF1 Full-Duplex protocol combines data transparency

(American National Standards Institute ANSI - X3.28-1976 specification subcategory D1) and 2-way simultaneous transmission with embedded responses (subcategory F1). Refer to DF1 Protocol and

Command Set Reference Manual, publication 1770-6.5.16, for more information.

DF1 Full-Duplex protocol (also referred to as DF1 point-to-point protocol) is useful where RS-232 point-to-point communication is required. DF1 protocol controls message flow, detects and signals errors, and retries if errors are detected.

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E-2 Understanding Communication Protocols

MicroLogix 1500 controllers support the DF1 Full-Duplex protocol via

RS-232 connection to external devices such as computers, controllers, and other interface devices that support DF1 Full-Duplex.

For information about required network connecting equipment and

examples of DF1 Full-Duplex connections, see Chapter 4.

DF1 Half-Duplex Protocol

DF1 Half-Duplex protocol is a multi-drop single master/multiple slave network. DF1 Half-Duplex protocol supports data transparency

(American National Standards Institute ANSI - X3.28-1976 specification subcategory D1). In contrast to DF1 Full-Duplex, communication takes place in one direction at a time. With an active Half-Duplex

Master, you can use the RS-232 port on the MicroLogix 1500 as a

Half-Duplex programming port and a Half-Duplex peer-to-peer messaging port.

DF1 Half-Duplex Operation

A DF1 Half-Duplex master device initiates all communication by

“polling” each slave device. The slave device may only transmit when it is polled by the master. It is the master’s responsibility to poll each slave on a regular and sequential basis to allow slave devices an opportunity to communicate.

An additional feature of the DF1 Half-Duplex protocol is that it is possible for a slave device to enable a MSG write or read to/from another slave. When the initiating slave is polled, the MSG is sent to the master. The master recognizes that the message is not intended for it, but for another slave, so the master immediately forwards the message to the intended slave. The master does this automatically; you do not need to program the master to move data between slave nodes. This slave-to-slave transfer can also be used by programming software to allow slave-to-slave upload and download of programs to processors (including the master) on the DF1 Half-Duplex link.

The MicroLogix 1500 can only act as a slave device. A device that can act as a master is required to “run” the network. Several Allen-Bradley products support DF1 Half-Duplex master protocol. They include the

SLC 5/03™ and higher processors, enhanced PLC-5® processors, and

Rockwell Software RSLinx (version 2.x and higher).

DF1 Half-Duplex supports up to 255 devices (address 0 to 254) with address 255 reserved for master broadcasts. The MicroLogix 1500 supports broadcast reception.

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Understanding Communication Protocols E-3

Considerations When Communicating as a DF1 Slave on a Multi-drop Link

When communication is between either your programming software and a MicroLogix Programmable Controller or between two

MicroLogix 1500 Programmable Controllers via slave-to-slave communication on a larger multi-drop link, the devices depend on a

DF1 Half-Duplex Master to give each of them access in a timely manner. As the number of slave devices increase, the time between when slave devices are polled also increases. This increase in time may also be large if you are using low baud rates. As these time periods grow, you may need to increase the poll timeout and reply timeout values for slave devices.

IMPORTANT

If a program download is started when using DF1

Half-Duplex, but then is interrupted due to electromagnetic interference or other events, discontinue communications to the controller for the

ownership timeout period and then restart the program download. The ownership timeout period is

60 seconds. After the timeout, you can re-establish communications with the processor and try the program download again. The only other way to remove program ownership is to cycle power on the processor.

Using Modems with

MicroLogix 1500

Programmable Controllers

The types of modems that you can use with MicroLogix 1500 controllers include dial-up phone modems, leased-line modems, radio modems and line drivers.

For point-to-point Full-Duplex modem connections that do not require any modem handshaking signals to operate, use DF1

Full-Duplex protocol with no handshaking. For point-to-point

Full-Duplex modem connections that require RTS/CTS handshaking, use DF1 Full-Duplex protocol with handshaking.

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E-4 Understanding Communication Protocols

For multi-drop modem connections, or for point-to-point modem connections that require RTS/CTS handshaking, use DF1 Half-Duplex slave protocol.

IMPORTANT

Never attempt to use DH-485 protocol through modems under any circumstance.

TIP

All MicroLogix controllers support RTS/CTS modem handshaking when configured for DF1 Full-Duplex protocol with the control line parameter set to

Full-Duplex Modem Handshaking or DF1

Half-Duplex slave protocol with the control line parameter set to “Half-Duplex Modem”. No other modem handshaking lines (i.e. Data Set Ready,

Carrier Detect and Data Terminal Ready) are supported by any MicroLogix 1500 controllers.

MicroLogix 1500 1764-LRP processors also support

DCD (Data Carrier Detect)

Dial-Up Phone Modems

Some dial-up phone line modems support point-to-point Full-Duplex communications. A MicroLogix 1500 controller, on the receiving end of the dial-up connection, can be configured for DF1 Full-Duplex protocol with or without handshaking. The modem connected to the

MicroLogix controller should support auto-answer. The MicroLogix

1500 Series B processors (1764-LSP and 1764-LRP) support ASCII out communications. There fore, they can cause the modem to initiate or disconnect a phone call.

Leased-Line Modems

Leased-line modems are used with dedicated phone lines that are typically leased from the local phone company. The dedicated lines may be in a point-to-point topology supporting Full-Duplex communications between two modems or in a multi-drop topology supporting Half-Duplex communications between three or more modems.

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Understanding Communication Protocols E-5

Radio Modems

Radio modems may be implemented in a point-to-point topology supporting either Half-Duplex or Full-Duplex communications, or in a multi-drop topology supporting Half-Duplex communications between three or more modems.

Line Drivers

Line drivers, also called short-haul “modems”, do not actually modulate the serial data, but rather condition the electrical signals to operate reliably over long transmission distances (up to several miles).

Line drivers are available in Full- and Half-Duplex models.

Allen-Bradley’s AIC+ Advanced Interface Converter is a Half-Duplex line driver that converts an RS-232 electrical signal into an RS-485 electrical signal, increasing the signal transmission distance from 50 to

4000 feet (8000 feet when bridged).

DH-485 Communication

Protocol

The information in this section describes DH-485 network functions, network architecture, and performance characteristics. It will also help you plan and operate the MicroLogix controllers on a DH-485 network.

DH-485 Network Description

The DH-485 protocol defines the communication between multiple devices that coexist on a single pair of wires. DH-485 protocol uses

RS-485 Half-Duplex as its physical interface. (RS-485 is a definition of electrical characteristics; it is not a protocol.) RS-485 uses devices that are capable of co-existing on a common data circuit, thus allowing data to be easily shared between devices.

The DH-485 network offers:

• interconnection of 32 devices

• multi-master (peer-to-peer) capability

• token passing access control

• the ability to add or remove nodes without disrupting the network

• maximum network segment of 1219 m (4000 ft)

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E-6 Understanding Communication Protocols

The DH-485 protocol supports two classes of devices: initiators and responders. All initiators on the network get a chance to initiate message transfers. To determine which initiator has the right to transmit, a token passing algorithm is used.

The following section describes the protocol used to control message transfers on the DH-485 network.

DH-485 Token Rotation

A node holding the token can send a message onto the network. Each node is allowed a fixed number of transmissions (based on the Token

Hold Factor) each time it receives the token. After a node sends a message, it passes the token to the next device.

The allowable range of node addresses is 1 to 31. There must be at least one initiator on the network (such as a MicroLogix controller, or an SLC 5/02™ or higher processor).

DH-485 Configuration Parameters

When MicroLogix communications are configured for DH-485, the following parameters can be changed:

Table E.1 DF1 Full-Duplex Configuration Parameters

Parameter

Baud Rate

Node Address

Token Hold Factor

Options

9600, 19.2K

1 to 31 decimal

1 to 4

See Software Considerations on page E-10 for tips on setting the

parameters listed above.

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Understanding Communication Protocols E-7

Devices that Use the DH-485 Network

In addition to the MicroLogix 1500 controllers, the devices shown in the following table also support the DH-485 network.

Table E.2 Allen-Bradley Devices that Support DH-485 Communication

Catalog

Number

Bulletin

1761

Controllers

Bulletin

1762

Bulletin

1747

Processors

1746-BAS

Description

MicroLogix

1000

MicroLogix

1200

SLC 500

Processors

Installation

Series C or higher

Series A or higher

Function

These controllers support DH-485 communications.

These controllers support DH-485 communications.

SLC Chassis These processors support a variety of I/O requirements and functionality.

1785-KA5

2760-RB

1784-KTX,

-KTXD

BASIC

Module

DH

+ TM

/

DH-485

Gateway

Flexible

Interface

Module

PC DH-485

IM

SLC Chassis Provides an interface for SLC 500 devices to foreign devices.

Program in BASIC to interface the 3 channels (2 RS232 and 1

DH-485) to printers, modems, or the DH-485 network for data collection.

(1771) PLC

Chassis

(1771) PLC

Chassis

Provides communication between stations on the PLC-5

®

(DH

+

) and SLC 500 (DH-485) networks. Enables communication and data transfer from PLC

®

to SLC 500 on DH-485 network. Also enables programming software programming or data acquisition across DH+ to DH-485.

Provides an interface for SLC 500 (using protocol cartridge

2760-SFC3) to other A-B PLCs and devices. Three configurable channels are available to interface with Bar Code, Vision, RF,

Dataliner™, and PLC systems.

Provides DH-485 using RSLinx.

IBM XT/AT

Computer

Bus

1784-PCMK PCMCIA IM PCMCIA slot in computer and

Interchange

Provides DH-485 using RSLinx.

Publication

1761-6.3

1762-UM001

1747-6.2

1746-6.1

1746-6.2

1746-6.3

1785-6.5.5

1785-1.21

1747-KE

2760-ND001

1784-6.5.22

1784-6.5.19

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E-8 Understanding Communication Protocols

Table E.2 Allen-Bradley Devices that Support DH-485 Communication

Catalog

Number

1747-PT1

1747-DTAM,

2707-L8P1,

-L8P2,

-L40P1,

-L40P2,

-V40P1,

-V40P2,

-V40P2N,

-M232P3, and

-M485P3

2711-K5A2,

-B5A2,

-K5A5,

-B5A5,

-K5A1,

-B5A1,

-K9A2,

-T9A2,

-K9A5,

-T9A5,

-K9A1, and

-T9A1

Description

Hand-Held

Terminal

DTAM,

DTAM Plus, and DTAM

Micro

Operator

Interfaces

Installation

NA

Function

Provides hand-held programming, monitoring, configuring, and troubleshooting capabilities for SLC 500 processors.

Publication

1747-NP002

Panel Mount Provides electronic operator interface for SLC 500 processors.

1747-ND013

2707-800,

2707-803

PanelView

550 and

PanelView

900 Operator

Terminals

Panel Mount Provides electronic operator interface for SLC 500 processors.

2711-802, 2711-816

NA = Not Applicable

Important DH-485 Network Planning Considerations

Carefully plan your network configuration before installing any hardware. Listed below are some of the factors that can affect system performance:

• amount of electrical noise, temperature, and humidity in the network environment

• number of devices on the network

• connection and grounding quality in installation

• amount of communication traffic on the network

• type of process being controlled

• network configuration

The major hardware and software issues you need to resolve before installing a network are discussed in the following sections.

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Understanding Communication Protocols E-9

Hardware Considerations

You need to decide the length of the communication cable, where you route it, and how to protect it from the environment where it will be installed.

When the communication cable is installed, you need to know how many devices are to be connected during installation and how many devices will be added in the future. The following sections will help you understand and plan the network.

Number of Devices and Length of Communication Cable

The maximum length of the communication cable is 1219m (4000 ft).

This is the total cable distance from the first node to the last node in a segment. However, two segments can be used to extend the DH-485 network to 2438m (8000 ft). for additional information on connections using the AIC+, refer to the Advanced Interface Converter (AIC+) User

Manual, publication 1761-6.4.

Planning Cable Routes

Follow these guidelines to help protect the communication cable from electrical interference:

Keep the communication cable at least 1.52m (5 ft) from any electric motors, transformers, rectifiers, generators, arc welders, induction furnaces, or sources of microwave radiation.

If you must run the cable across power feed lines, run the cable at right angles to the lines.

If you do not run the cable through a contiguous metallic wireway or conduit, keep the communication cable at least

0.15m (6 in.) from ac power lines of less than 20A, 0.30m (1 ft) from lines greater than 20A, but only up to 100 kVA, and 0.60m

(2 ft) from lines of 100 kVA or more.

If you run the cable through a contiguous metallic wireway or conduit, keep the communication cable at least 0.08m (3 in.) from ac power lines of less than 20A, 0.15m (6 in.) from lines greater than 20A, but only up to 100 kVA, and 0.30m (1 ft) from lines of 100 kVA or more.

Running the communication cable through conduit provides extra protection from physical damage and electrical

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E-10 Understanding Communication Protocols interference. If you route the cable through conduit, follow these additional recommendations:

Use ferromagnetic conduit near critical sources of electrical interference. You can use aluminum conduit in non-critical areas.

Use plastic connectors to couple between aluminum and ferromagnetic conduit. Make an electrical connection around the plastic connector (use pipe clamps and the heavy gauge wire or wire braid) to hold both sections at the same potential.

Ground the entire length of conduit by attaching it to the building earth ground.

Do not let the conduit touch the plug on the cable.

Arrange the cables loosely within the conduit. The conduit should contain only serial communication cables.

Install the conduit so that it meets all applicable codes and environmental specifications.

For more information on planning cable routes, see Industrial

Automation Wiring and Grounding Guidelines, publication 1770-4.1.

Software Considerations

Software considerations include the configuration of the network and the parameters that can be set to the specific requirements of the network. The following are major configuration factors that have a significant effect on network performance:

• number of nodes on the network

• addresses of those nodes

• baud rate

The following sections explain network considerations and describe ways to select parameters for optimum network performance (speed).

See your programming software’s user manual for more information.

Number of Nodes

The number of nodes on the network directly affects the data transfer time between nodes. Unnecessary nodes (such as a second programming terminal that is not being used) slow the data transfer rate. The maximum number of nodes on the network is 32.

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Understanding Communication Protocols E-11

Setting Node Addresses

The best network performance occurs when node addresses are assigned in sequential order. Initiators, such as personal computers, should be assigned the lowest numbered addresses to minimize the time required to initialize the network. The valid range for the

MicroLogix 1500 controllers is 1-31 (controllers cannot be node 0).

The default setting is 1. The node address is stored in the controller

Communications Status file (CS0:5/0 to CS0:5/7).

Setting Controller Baud Rate

The best network performance occurs at the highest baud rate, which is 19200. This is the default baud rate for a MicroLogix 1500 device on the DH-485 network. All devices must be at the same baud rate. This rate is stored in the controller Communications Status file (CS0:5/8 to

CS0:5/15).

Setting Maximum Node Address

Once you have an established network set up and are confident that you will not be adding more devices, you may enhance performance by adjusting the maximum node address of your controllers. It should be set to the highest node address being used.

IMPORTANT

All devices should be set to the same maximum node address.

MicroLogix Remote Packet Support

MicroLogix 1500 controllers can respond and initiate with device’s communications (or commands) that do not originate on the local

DH-485 network. This is useful in installations where communication is needed between the DH-485 and DH+ networks.

The example below shows how to send messages from a PLC device or a PC on the DH+ network to a MicroLogix controller on the

DH-485 network. This method uses an SLC 5/04 processor bridge connection.

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E-12 Understanding Communication Protocols

When using this method (as shown in the following illustration):

PLC-5 devices can send read and write commands to MicroLogix

1500 controllers.

MicroLogix 1500 controllers can respond to MSG instructions received.

The MicroLogix 1500 controllers can initiate MSG instructions to devices on the DH+ network.

PC can send read and write commands to MicroLogix 1500 controllers.

PC can do remote programming of MicroLogix 1500 controllers.

AIC+

TERM

TX

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX

TX PWR

DC SOURCE

CABLE

EXTERNAL

AIC+

TERM

TX

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX

TX PWR

DC SOURCE

CABLE

EXTERNAL

A-B PanelView

DH-485 Network

TERM

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX TX

TX PWR

DC SOURCE

CABLE

EXTERNAL

AIC+

MicroLogix 1000

DH+ Network

SLC 5/04

TERM

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX TX

TX PWR

DC SOURCE

CABLE

EXTERNAL

AIC+

MicroLogix 1200

TERM

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX TX

TX PWR

DC SOURCE

CABLE

EXTERNAL

AIC+

TERM

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX TX

TX PWR

DC SOURCE

CABLE

EXTERNAL

AIC+

MicroLogix 1500 with 1764-LSP or 1764-LRP Processor

MicroLogix 1500 with

1764-LRP Processor

TERM

COM

SHLD

CHS GND

TX TX

TX PWR

DC SOURCE

CABLE

EXTERNAL

PanelView 550

SLC 5/04

SLC 5/04 PLC-5

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Understanding Communication Protocols E-13

Modbus RTU Slave

Communication Protocol

(MicroLogix 1764-LSP and

1764-LRP Series B and later processors only)

Modbus RTU Slave is a Half-Duplex, master-slave communications protocol. The Modbus network master initiates and controls all communications on the network. Modbus protocol allows a single master to communicate with a maximum of 255 slave devices.

When a MicroLogix 1200 or 1500 Communications port is configured for Modbus RTU Slave operation, the user must define where Modbus data (coils, contacts, and registers) is mapped into the MicroLogix data space.

The Modbus address space is comprised of seven distinct memory ranges. Four of these ranges can be mapped into MicroLogix data files. Three Modbus ranges are fixed to MicroLogix file 2, the Status file. The table below illustrates Modbus to MicroLogix mappings.

Table E.3 Modbus to MicroLogix Memory Map

Modbus Addressing

0001 to 4096

10001 to 14096

30001 to 30256

30501 to 30532

Description Valid MicroLogix Addressing

File Type Data File Number Address

Bit (B) or Integer (N) 3 to 255 bits 0 to 4095 Read/Write Modbus Coil Data space

Read-Only Modbus Contact Data space Bit (B) or Integer (N) 3 to 255

Read-Only Modbus Input Register space Bit (B) or Integer (N) 3 to 255

Modbus Communication Parameters Communication

Status Files

2 bits 0 to 4095 words 0 to 255 words 0 to 31

31501 to 31566

40001 to 40256

41501 to 41566

Read-Only System Status File space

Read/Write Modbus Holding Register space

Read/Write System Status File space

Status (S) 2

Bit (B) or Integer (N) 3 to 255

Status (S) 2 words 32 to 65 words 0 to 255 words 0 to 65

For more information on the MicroLogix 1500 configuration parameters for Modbus Slave RTU (Remote Terminal Unit transmission mode) protocol, refer to the MicroLogix 1200 and 1500 Programmable

Controllers Instruction Set Reference Manual, publication 1762-RM001.

For more information about the Modbus Slave protocol, see the

Modbus Protocol Specifications (available from http://www.modicon.com/techpubs/).

ASCII Protocol (MicroLogix

1500 1764-LSP and 1764-LRP

Series B and later

Processors only)

ASCII protocol provides connection to other ASCII devices, such as bar code readers, weigh scales, serial printers, and other intelligent devices.

You can use ASCII protocol by configuring the RS-232 port, channel 0 for ASCII driver (For the 1764-LRP only, you can select either Channel

0 or Channel 1).

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E-14 Understanding Communication Protocols

Refer to the MicroLogix 1200 and MicroLogix 1500 Programmable

Controllers Instruction Set Reference Manual, publication 1762-RM001 for detailed configuration information.

When the driver is set to ASCII, the following parameters can be changed:

Table E.4 ASCII Channel Configuration Parameters

Parameter Description

Baud Rate Toggles between the communication rate of 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19.2K, and 38.4K.

Parity Toggles between None, Odd, and Even.

Termination 1 Specifies the first termination character. The termination character defines the one or two character sequence used to specify the end of an ASCII line received. Setting the first ASCII termination character to undefined (\ff) indicates no ASCII receiver line termination is used.

Termination 2 Specifies the second termination character. The termination character defines the one or two character sequence used to specify the end of an ASCII line received. Setting the second ASCII

Termination character to undefined (\ff) and the first ASCII Termination character to a defined value

(\d) indicates a single character termination sequence.

Programming

Software Default

1200

None

\d

\ff

Control Line Toggles between No Handshaking, Half-Duplex Modem, and Full-Duplex Modem

Delete Mode The Delete Mode allows you to select the mode of the “delete” character. Toggles between Ignore,

CRT, and Printer.

Delete Mode affects the characters echoed back to the remote device. When Delete Mode is enabled, the previous character is removed from the receive buffer.

In CRT mode, when a delete character is encountered, the controller echos three characters to the device: backspace, space, and backspace. This erases the previous character on the terminal.

In Printer Mode, when a delete character is encountered, the controller echos the slash character, then the deleted character.

Enable the Echo parameter to use Delete Mode.

Echo When Echo Mode is enabled, all of the characters received are echoed back to the remote device.

This allows you to view characters on a terminal connected to the controller. Toggles between

Enabled and Disabled.

XON/XOFF

No Handshaking

Ignore

Disabled

Allows you to Enable or Disable XON/ XOFF software handshaking. XON/XOFF software handshaking involves the XON and XOFF control characters in the ASCII character set.

When the receiver receives the XOFF character, the transmitter stops transmitting until the receiver receives the XON character. If the receiver does not receive an XON character after 60 seconds, the transmitter automatically resumes sending characters.

Also, when the receive buffer is more than 80% full, an XOFF character is sent to the remote device to pause the transmission. Then, when the receive buffer drops to less than 80% full, an XON character is sent to the remote device to resume the transmission.

Allows you to select the delay between when a transmission is ended and when RTS is dropped.

Specify the RTS Off Delay value in increments of 20 ms. Valid range is 0 to 65535.

Disabled

0 RTS Off

Delay (x20 ms)

RTS Send

Delay (x20 ms)

Allows you to select the delay between when RTS is raised and the transmission is initiated. Specify the RTS Send Delay value in increments of 20 ms. Valid range is 0 to 65535.

0

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Appendix

F

System Loading and Heat Dissipation

1

System Loading Limitations

When you connect MicroLogix accessories and expansion I/O, an electrical load is placed on the base unit power supply. This section shows how to calculate the load and validate that the system will not exceed the capacity of the base unit power supply or expansion power supply.

The following example is provided to illustrate system loading validation. The system validation procedure accounts for the amount of 5V dc and 24V dc current consumed by controller, expansion I/O, and user supplied equipment.

Current consumed by the Base Units, Memory Modules, Real Time

Clock Modules, and the End Cap Terminators (for systems utilizing

Compact I/O expansion) has already been factored into the calculations. A system is valid if the current and power requirements are satisfied.

TIP

An End Cap Terminator (catalog number 1769-ECR or -ECL) is needed for any system using Compact expansion I/O.

System Expansion

Calculations

IMPORTANT

In a MicroLogix 1500 system, a maximum of one 1769 expansion cable can be used, allowing for two banks of I/O modules. One bank is connected directly to the controller and the other is connected via the expansion cable. The bank connected to the controller uses the controller’s embedded power supply. The bank connected via the cable requires its own power supply.

A download is also available for system validation. On the Internet, go to http://www.ab.com/micrologix and navigate to MicroLogix 1500.

The procedure in this publication consists of:

Selecting System Devices

Verifying the System Loading

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

F-2 System Loading and Heat Dissipation

Selecting System Devices

1. Use Table F.1 to select the processor and optional

communications or display devices. Enter a 1 in the “Select

Devices” column.

2. Enter the current draw values in the “Calculated Current for

System” columns. If an external power supply will be used to power communication devices, do not include their current draw values in this calculation. Add up the current draw values to determine the “SUBTOTAL1” values.

Table F.1 Selecting Hardware: Base Unit and Communications/Display Devices

Catalog Number Select

Device(s)

Bus Current Draw Specification at 5V dc (mA) at 24V dc (mA)

Choose a Processor, LSP or LRP:

1764-LSP

1764-LRP

1764-DAT

(1)

optional

300

380

350

0

0

0

Communications/Display Devices, optional, one only maximum:

1761-NET-AIC

(1)

1761-NET-ENI

(1)

2707-MVH232 or

2707-MVP232

(1)

0

0

0

120

(2)

100

(2)

80

(2)

SUBTOTAL1

Calculated Current for System at 5V dc (mA) at 24V dc (mA)

(A1) (B1)

(1) These are optional accessories. Current is consumed only if the accessory is installed.

(2) Current for the AIC+ and ENI may be supplied by controller communications port or from an external 24V dc source. No current is consumed from the controller when a user-supplied, external source is used. If an external source is to be used, do not select the device here. The current for a 2707-MVH232 or 2707-MVP232 MicroView

Operator Interface is supplied from the controller communication port, when directly connected.

3. Use Table F.2 to select the I/O modules. Enter the number of

modules in either the “Base Unit Expansion” or the “Bank 1” column.

IMPORTANT

When planning the system layout, keep in mind that each module has a “Power Supply

Distance Rating”. This is the maximum distance an I/O module may be located from the power supply. For most modules, the rating is 8. For the 1769-HSC and 1769-SDN, the rating is 4.

Depending on its configuration, the 1769-SDN may transfer large amounts of data into and out of the controller I/O image tables.

Care should be taken when using more than three of these modules to verify that they are optimally configured. This will

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

System Loading and Heat Dissipation F-3 ensure that the maximum available 4K data table size will not be exceeded. Refer to the 1769-SDN User Manual for more details.

4. Enter the current draw values in the “Calculated Current” columns. Add up the current draw values to determine the

“SUBTOTAL2” values.

5. Verify that the total number of modules does not exceed the system limits using the maximum values for the base unit and

Table F.5 for the expansion power supply, if used.

1769-HSC

(5)

1769-IA16

1769-IA8I

1769-IF4 (Series A)

1769-IF4 (Series B)

1769-IF4XOF2

1769-IM12

1769-IQ16

1769-IQ6XOW4

1769-IR6

1769-IT6

1769-OA8

1769-OA16

1769-OB16

1769-OB16P

1769-OF2 (Series A)

1769-OF2 (Series B)

1769-OV16

1769-OW8

1769-OW8I

1769-OW16

1769-SDN

TOTAL MODULES:

Table F.2 Selecting Hardware: Expansion I/O

Select I/O Modules for Each Bank:

Expansion I/O

Modules

Base Unit

Expansion

(1)

Bank 1

(2)

Catalog Number n1 n2

Number of Modules

(4)

100

145

225

200

100

115

105

100

115

90

120

120

120

125

125

205

440

160

120

120

200

Bus Current Draw

Specification (mA)

X at 5V dc

Calculate Current Draw:

Calculated Current for

Base Unit Expansion (mA)

Y

2250 mA max 400 mA max n1 x X at 24V dc at 5V dc n1 x Y at 24V dc

425 0

0

0

40

0

0

0

50

45

0

0

150

60

160

100

100

180

0

0

200

120

0

SUBTOTAL2: (A2) (B2)

Calculated Current for

Bank 1 Power Supply

(mA)

(3) n2 x X at 5V dc n2 x Y at 24V dc

(C) (D)

(1) May not exceed 8 I/O modules.

(2) No more than 8 I/O modules on either sid e of the power supply.

(3) Maximum value depends on the power supply chosen.

(4) Up to 16 modules may be used in a MicroLogix 1500 system when using a Series B Base Unit and Series C processor (up to 8 for Series A Base Units).

A maximum of 8 modules can be connected directly to the Base Unit.

A maximum of 8 modules can be connected to each side of the Expansion Power Supply.

(5) No more than 4 I/O modules may be connected to the base unit or to either side of the expansion power supply when the 1769-HSC or 1769-SDN are used in the system.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

F-4 System Loading and Heat Dissipation

Verifying the System Loading

To have a valid system, both current and power requirements must be satisfied.

Verifying the Base Unit Loading

1. Enter the SUBTOTAL values from Tables F.1 and F.2. Add the

total current draw for the Base Unit. Verify the values are within the maximum limits.

Table F.3 Base Unit Power Supply Loading - Verify the Current Limits

Current from:

For 1764-24BWA only, enter sum of any User 24V dc Sensor Current

MAXIMUM LIMIT

Values from SUBTOTAL1 (Table F.1)

Values from SUBTOTAL2 (Table F.2)

TOTAL BASE UNIT CURRENT LOADING

MAXIMUM LIMIT

Calculated Current for System at 5V dc (mA) at 24V dc (mA) n/a

(A1)

(A2)

(F)

2250 mA at 5V dc

(E)

400 mA User 24V dc

(B1)

(B2)

(G)

400 mA at 24V dc

Add up Total Watts

MAXIMUM POWER

LIMIT

2. Using the table below, verify that the MAXIMUM POWER LIMIT is not exceeded.

Table F.4 Base Unit Power Supply Loading - Verify the Required Power

Catalog Number:

5V Power Calculation

24V Power Calculation

1764-24AWA, 1764-28BXB Base Units

(F)

(G) x 5V x 24V

= W

= W

W

16W

(F)

(G)

(E)

1764-24BWA Base Unit

x 5V = W x 24V x 24V

= W

= W

W

22W

Verifying the Expansion Power Supply Loading

Using the values from SUBTOTAL2, verify that the system loading and

I/O distribution are within the limits shown in Table F.5. Consider

future expansion when selecting a power supply.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

System Loading and Heat Dissipation F-5

Table F.5 Bank 1 Power Supply Loading - Verify the Current Limits

Specification Catalog Number Calculated Current for System at 5V dc (mA) at 24V dc (mA)

Values from SUBTOTAL2 (Table F.2):

MAXIMUM CURRENT LIMIT 1769-PA2

1769-PA4

1769-PB2

I/O Distribution - Distribute I/O modules such that the current consumed from either the left side or the right side of the power supply never exceeds the following values:

1769-PB4

1769-PA2

1769-PA4

1769-PB2

1769-PB4

(C)

2000

4000

2000

4000

2000

2000

2000

2000

(D)

800

2000

800

2000

800

1000

800

1000

24V dc User Output

Capacity

250 mA

n/a

250 mA

n/a

System Using a 1769-PA2

To validate your system, the total 5V dc current and 24V dc current consumed must be considered. The I/O modules must be distributed, such that the current consumed from the left or right side of the power supply never exceeds 2A at 5V dc and 1.0A at 24V dc. Use the current graphs below to determine if the power supply loading in your system is within the allowable range.

Figure F.1 1769-PA2 Current with +24V dc User Load = 0A

2.0

1.5

Valid Operating Range

1.0

0.5

0.0

0.0

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

0.5

0.6

0.7

0.8

0.9

1.0

+24V dc Load (Amps)

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

F-6 System Loading and Heat Dissipation

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Figure F.2 1769-PA2 Current with +24V dc User Load = 0.2A

2.0

1.5

Valid Operating Range

1.0

0.5

0.0

0.0

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

0.5

0.6

0.7

0.8

0.9

1.0

+24V dc Load (Amps)

Figure F.3 1769-PA2 Current with +24V dc User Load = 0.25A

2.0

1.5

1.0

Valid Operating Range

0.5

0.0

0.0

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

0.5

0.6

0.7

0.8

0.9

1.0

+24V dc Load (Amps)

System Using a 1769-PB2

To validate your system, the total 5V dc current and 24V dc current consumed must be considered. The I/O modules must be distributed, such that the current consumed from the left or right side of the power supply never exceeds 2A at 5V dc and 1.0A at 24V dc. Use the current graph below to determine if the power supply loading in your system is within the allowable range.

Figure F.4 1769-PB2 Current

2.0

1.5

1.0

0.5

Valid Operating Range

0.0

0.0

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

0.5

0.6

0.7

0.8

0.9

1.0

+24V dc Load (Amps)

System Loading and Heat Dissipation F-7

System Using a 1769-PA4

To validate your system, the total 5V dc current and 24V dc current consumed must be considered. The I/O modules connected to the

PB2 should be distributed, such that the current consumed from the left and right side of the power supply never exceeds 2A at 5V and

0.8A at 24V dc with an ambient temperature of 0 to 55

°

C. Use the current graph below to determine if the power supply loading in your system is:

• within the allowable range for special load conditions

• above 55 ° to 60 ° C.

Figure 7 1769-PA4 5V and 24V dc Current

Total Output: 68W at 55°C or below 61W at 60°C or below

0.0

0.2

0.4

0.6

0.8

1.0

1.2

+24V Bus Load (Amps)

1.4

1.6

1.8

2.0

System Using a 1769-PB4

To validate your system, the total 5V dc current and 24V dc current consumed must be considered. The I/O modules connected to the

PB2 should be distributed, such that the current consumed from the left and right side of the power supply never exceeds 2A at 5V and

0.8A at 24V dc with an ambient temperature of 0 to 55

°

C. Use the current graph below to determine if the power supply loading in your system is:

• within the allowable range for special load conditions

• above 55

°

to 60

°

C.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

F-8 System Loading and Heat Dissipation

Figure 8 1769-PB4 5V and 24V dc Current

Total Output: 68W at 55°C or below

61W at 60°C or below

0.0

0.2

0.4

0.6

0.8

1.0

1.2

+24V Bus Load (Amps)

1.4

1.6

1.8

2.0

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

System Loading and Heat Dissipation F-9

Calculating Heat

Dissipation

Catalog Number

1764-24AWA

1764-24BWA

1764-28BXB

1764-DAT

1769-HSC

1769-IA16

1769-IA8I

1769-IF4 (Series A)

1769-IF4 (Series B)

1769-IF4XOF2

1769-IM12

1769-IQ16

1769-IQ6XOW4

1769-IR6

1769-IT6

1764-LSP

1764-LRP

1764-MM1, -RTC, -MM1/RTC

1769-OA8

1769-OA16

1769-OB16

1769-OB16P

1769-OF2 (Series A)

1769-OF2 (Series B)

1769-OV16

1769-OW8

1769-OW8I

1769-OW16

1769-SDN

Use this procedure when you need to determine the heat dissipation for installation in an enclosure. Use the following table.

Heat Dissipation

Equation or Constant

18W + (0.3 x System Loading)

20W + (0.3 x System Loading)

20W + (0.3 x System Loading)

1.75W

6.21W x number of modules

3.30W x number of modules

1.81W x number of modules

3.99W x number of modules

2.63W x number of modules

3.03W x number of modules

3.65W x number of modules

3.55W x number of modules

2.75W x number of modules

1.50W x number of modules

1.50W x number of modules

Calculation

18W + (0.3 x ______ W)

20W + (0.3 x ______ W)

20W + (0.3 x ______ W)

6.21W x __________

3.30W x __________

1.81W x __________

3.99W x __________

2.63W x __________

3.03W x __________

3.65W x __________

3.55W x __________

2.75W x __________

1.50W x __________

1.50W x __________

1.5W

1.9W

0

2.12W x number of modules

4.9W x number of modules

2.11W x number of modules

2.69W x number of modules

4.77W x number of modules

2.52W x number of modules

2.06W x number of modules

2.83W x number of modules

2.83W x number of modules

2.12W x __________

4.9W x __________

2.11W x __________

2.69W x __________

4.77W x __________

2.52W x __________

2.06W x __________

2.83W x __________

2.83W x __________

4.75W x number of modules

3.8W x number of modules

4.75W x __________

3.8W x __________

Add Subtotals to determine Heat Dissipation

Subtotal

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

F-10 System Loading and Heat Dissipation

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

1

Glossary

The following terms are used throughout this manual. Refer to the

Allen-Bradley Industrial Automation Glossary, Publication Number

AG-7.1, for a complete guide to Allen-Bradley technical terms.

address

A character string that uniquely identifies a memory location. For example, I:1/0 is the memory address for data located in Input file word 1, bit 0.

AIC+ Advanced Interface Converter

A device that provides RS-232 isolation to an RS-485 Half-Duplex communication link. (Catalog Number 1761-NET-AIC.)

application

1) A machine or process monitored and controlled by a controller.

2) The use of computer- or processor-based routines for specific purposes.

baud rate

The speed of communication between devices. Baud rate is typically displayed in K baud. For example, 19.2K baud = 19,200 bits per second.

bit

The smallest unit of memory used in discrete or binary logic, where the value 1 represents ON and 0 represents OFF.

block diagrams

A method used to illustrate logic components or a sequence of events.

Boolean operators

Logical operators such as AND, OR, NAND, NOR, NOT, and

Exclusive-OR that can be used singularly or in combination to form logic statements or circuits. Can have an output response of T or F.

branch

A parallel logic path within a rung of a ladder program. Its primary use is to build OR logic.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Glossary 2

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

communication scan

A part of the controller’s operating cycle. Communication with devices

(such as other controllers and operator interface devices) takes place during this period.

control program

User logic (the application) that defines the controller’s operation.

controller

A device, such as a programmable controller, used to control output devices.

controller overhead

A portion of the operating cycle used for housekeeping purposes

(memory checks, tests, communications, etc.).

counter

A device that counts the occurrence of an event.

CPU (Central Processing Unit)

The decision-making and data storage section of a programmable controller.

data table

The part of processor memory that contains I/O status and files where user data (such as bit, integer, timers, and counters) is monitored, manipulated, and changed for control purposes.

DIN rail

Manufactured according to Deutsche Industrie Normenausshus (DIN) standards, a metal railing designed to ease installation and mounting of your devices.

download

The transfer of program or data files to a device.

DCD

Data Carrier Detect. A signal generated by a modem that represents traffic (activity) on a communications network.

Glossary 3

DTE

Data Terminal Equipment

EMI

Electromagnetic interference.

embedded I/O

Embedded I/O is the controller’s on-board I/O. For MicroLogix controllers, embedded I/O is all I/O residing at slot 0.

expansion I/O

Expansion I/O is I/O that is connected to the controller via a bus or cable. MicroLogix 1200 controllers use Bulletin 1762 expansion I/O.

MicroLogix 1500 controllers use Bulletin 1769 expansion I/O. For

MicroLogix controllers, expansion I/O is all I/O residing at slot 1 and higher.

encoder

A device that detects position, and transmits a signal representing that position.

executing mode

Any run, remote run, or test mode.

false

The status of an instruction that does not provide a continuous logical path on a ladder rung.

FIFO (First-In-First-Out)

The order that data is stored and retrieved from a file.

file

A collection of data or logic organized into groups.

full-duplex

A mode of communication where data may be transmitted and received simultaneously (contrast with half-duplex).

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Glossary 4

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

half-duplex

A mode of communication where data transmission is limited to one direction at a time.

hard disk

A storage device in a personal computer.

high byte

Bits 8 to 15 of a word.

housekeeping

The portion of the scan when the controller performs internal checks and services communications.

input device

A device, such as a push button or a switch, that supplies an electrical signal to the controller.

input scan

The controller reads all input devices connected to the input terminals.

inrush current

The temporary surge of current produced when a device or circuit is initially energized.

instruction

A mnemonic defining an operation to be performed by the processor.

A rung in a program consists of a set of input and output instructions.

The input instructions are evaluated by the controller as being true or false. In turn, the controller sets the output instructions to true or false.

instruction set

The set of instructions available within a controller.

I/O

Input and Output

Glossary 5

jump

Changes the normal sequence of program execution. In ladder programs a JUMP (JMP) instruction causes execution to jump to a specific rung in the user program.

ladder logic

A graphical programming format resembling a ladder-like diagram.

The ladder logic programing language is the most common programmable controller language.

least significant bit (LSB)

The element (or bit) in a binary word that carries the smallest value of weight.

LED (Light Emitting Diode)

Used as status indicator for processor functions and inputs and outputs.

LIFO (Last-In-First-Out)

The order that data is stored and retrieved from a file.

low byte

Bits 0 to 7 of a word.

logic

A general term for digital circuits or programmed instructions to perform required decision making and computational functions.

Master Control Relay (MCR)

A hard-wired relay that can be de-energized by any series-connected emergency stop switch.

mnemonic

A simple and easy to remember term that is used to represent a complex or lengthy set of information.

Modbus™ RTU Slave

A serial communication protocol.

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Glossary 6

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

modem

Modulator/demodulator. Equipment that connects data terminal equipment to a communication line.

modes

Selected methods of operation. Example: run, test, or program.

negative logic

The use of binary logic in such a way that “0” represents the desired voltage level.

network

A series of stations (nodes) connected by some type of communication medium. A network may be made up of a single link or multiple links.

nominal input current

The typical amount of current seen at nominal input voltage.

normally closed

Contacts on a relay or switch that are closed when the relay is de-energized or deactivated. They are open when the relay is energized or the switch is activated.

normally open

Contacts on a relay or switch that are open when the relay is de-energized or the switch is deactivated. They are closed when the relay is energized or the switch is activated.

off-delay time

The OFF delay time is a measure of the time required for the controller logic to recognize that a signal has been removed from the input terminal of the controller. The time is determined by circuit component delays and by any applied filter.

offline

When a device is not scanning/controlling or when a programming device is not communicating with the controller.

Glossary 7

offset

A continuous deviation of a controlled variable from a fixed point.

off-state leakage current

When a mechanical switch is opened (off-state), no current flows through the switch. Semiconductor switches and transient suppression components which are sometimes used to protect switches, have a small current flow when they are in the off state. This current is referred to as the off-state leakage current. To ensure reliable operation, the off-state leakage current rating must be less than the minimum operating current rating of the device that is connected.

on-delay time

The ON delay time is a measure of the time required for the controller logic to recognize that a signal has been presented at the input terminal of the controller.

one shot

A programming technique that sets a bit ON or OFF for one program scan.

online

When a device is scanning/controlling or when a programming device is communicating with the controller.

operating voltage

For inputs, the voltage range needed for the input to be in the On state. For outputs, the allowable range of user-supplied voltage.

output device

A device, such as a pilot light or a motor starter coil, that receives a signal or command from the controller.

output scan

The controller turns on, off, or modifies the devices connected to the output terminals.

PCCC

Programmable Controller Communications Commands

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Glossary 8

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processor

A Central Processing Unit. (See CPU.)

processor files

The set of program and data files resident in the controller.

program file

Areas within a processor that contain the logic programs. MicroLogix controllers support multiple program files.

program mode

When the controller is not scanning the control program.

program scan

A part of the controller’s operating cycle. During the program scan, the logic program is processed and the Output Image is updated.

programming device

Programming package used to develop ladder logic diagrams.

protocol

The rules of data exchange via communications.

read

To acquire data. For example, the processor reads information from other devices via a read message.

relay

An electrically operated device that mechanically switches electrical circuits.

relay logic

A representation of binary or discrete logic.

restore

To transfer a program from a device to a controller.

Glossary 9

reserved bit

A location reserved for internal use.

retentive data

Information (data) that is preserved through power cycles.

RS-232

An EIA standard that specifies electrical, mechanical, and functional characteristics for serial binary communication circuits.

run mode

An executing mode during which the controller scans or executes the logic program.

rung

A rung contains input and output instructions. During Run mode, the inputs on a rung are evaluated to be true or false. If a path of true logic exists, the outputs are made true (energized). If all paths are false, the outputs are made false (de-energized).

RTU

Remote Terminal Unit

save

To save a program to a computer hard disk.

scan

The scan is made up of four elements: input scan, program scan, output scan, and housekeeping.

scan time

The time required for the controller to complete one scan.

sinking

A term used to describe current flow between two devices. A sinking device provides a direct path to ground.

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Glossary 10

sourcing

A term used to describe current flow between two devices. A sourcing device or circuit provides a power.

status

The condition of a circuit or system.

terminal

A point on an I/O module that external devices, such as a push button or pilot light, are wired to.

throughput

The time between when an input turns on and a corresponding output turns on or off. Throughput consists of input delays, program scan, output delays, and overhead.

true

The status of an instruction that provides a continuous logical path on a ladder rung.

upload

Data is transferred from the controller to a programming or storage device.

watchdog timer

A timer that monitors a cyclical process and is cleared at the conclusion of each cycle. If the watchdog runs past its programmed time period, it causes a fault.

write

To send data to another device. For example, the processor writes data to another device with a message write instruction.

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Index

Numerics

1764-24AWA

features

1-1

1764-24AWA wiring diagram

3-11

1764-24BWA

features

1-1

1764-24BWA sinking wiring diagram

3-12

1764-24BWA sourcing wiring diagram

3-13

1764-28BXB

features

1-1

1764-28BXB sinking wiring diagram

3-14

1764-28BXB sourcing wiring diagram

3-15

1764-LRP processor

1-3

1764-LSP processor

1-3

A

address

G-1

AIC+

applying power to

4-20

attaching to the network

4-20

connecting

4-15

isolated modem 4-5

installing

4-20

recommended user supplied components

4-19

selecting cable

4-17

AIC+ Advanced Interface Converter

G-1

Allen-Bradley

contacting for assistance

C-5

support

P-3

application

G-1

ASCII protocol

E-13

attach and lock module

2-22

B

base comms door

B-6

base terminal door

B-6

base unit panel mounting

2-16

base units

hardware overview

1-2

battery

processor battery life expectancy

B-2 processor replacement battery

B-2

RTC battery life expectancy

6-3

baud rate

G-1

bit

G-1

bit key

5-3

Bit Mode

5-6

block diagrams

G-1

Boolean operators

G-1

branch

G-1

C

Cables

4-23

cables

hardware overview

1-4

planning routes for DH485 connections

E-9

selection guide for the AIC+

4-17

selection guide for the DeviceNet network

4-22

calling Allen-Bradley for assistance

C-5

CE mark

2-1

certification

2-1

channel configuration

DF1 full-duplex

E-1

clearing faults

C-4

common techniques used in this manual

P-3

communication

DeviceNet

4-22, 4-23

communication protocols

DF1 fullduplex

E-1

DF1 halfduplex

E-2

DH485

E-5

Modbus

E-13

communication scan

G-2

compact I/O

attach and lock module

2-22 installing

2-22

component descriptions

1-2

accessories

cables 1-4

programming 1-5

base units

1-2

data access tool

1-3

end cap

1-6 expansion I/O

1-6

memory modules/real-time clock

1-3

processor

1-3

components

installing

2-17

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

2 Index

connecting the system

AIC+

4-15

DeviceNet network

4-22, 4-23

DF1 fullduplex protocol

4-3

DH485 network

4-10

contactors (bulletin 100), surge suppressors for

3-6

control program

G-2

ControlFlash

missing/corrupt OS LED pattern

D-2 sequence of operation

D-2

using

D-1

controller

definition

G-2

determining faults

C-1

fault messages

C-5

features

1-1

grounding

3-6

installation

2-1

mounting

2-13

overhead

G-2

preventing excessive heat

2-7

troubleshooting

C-1

controller error recovery model

C-3

controller faults

C-1

controller LED status

C-1

controller operation

normal

C-2

counters

definition

G-2

CPU (central processing unit), definition

G-2

CSA certification

see C-UL

2-1

C-UL certification

2-1

data access tool

hardware overview

1-3

installing

2-19

data table

G-2

DCD, definition

G-2

DeviceNet Communications

4-22, 4-23

DeviceNet network

connecting

4-22, 4-23

selecting cable

4-22

DF1 fullduplex protocol configuration parameters

E-1

connecting

4-3

description

E-1

using a modem

4-5, E-3

DF1 halfduplex protocol description

E-2

DH485 communication protocol

configuration parameters

4-12, E-6

DH485 network configuration parameters

E-10

connecting

4-10

description

E-5

devices that use the network

E-7

installation

4-12

planning considerations

E-8

protocol

E-6

token rotation

E-6

DIN rail

G-2

mounting

2-14

removing your base unit

2-15

disconnecting main power

2-4

download

G-2

DTE, definition

G-3

D

DAT

Communication Errors

5-9

configuration

5-4

Controller Faults Displayed

5-8

display

5-5

Error Conditions

5-9

Internal Errors

5-9

keypad

5-3

power-up operation

5-3

DAT Function File

5-4

E

Electronics Industries Association (EIA)

E-1

electrostatic discharge

preventing

2-17

EMC

2-1

EMC Directive

2-1

emergency-stop switches

2-9

EMI

G-3

encoder

definition

G-3

end cap

hardware overview

1-6

ENTER key

5-3

error recovery model

C-3

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Index 3

errors

controller

C-2

hardware

C-2

identifying

C-4

ESC key

5-3

European Union Directive compliance

2-1

executing mode

G-3

expansion I/O

hardware overview

1-6

F

F1 Functions

5-7

F1 key

5-3

F2 Functions

5-7

F2 key

5-3

false

G-3

fault recovery procedure

C-4

fault routine

C-4

faults

automatically clearing

C-4

identifying

C-4 manually clearing using the fault routine

C-4

FET output specifications

1764-28BXB

A-5

FIFO (First-In-First-Out)

G-3

file

G-3

full-duplex

G-3

I

I/O

G-4

identifying controller faults

C-4

input device

G-4

input scan

G-4

input specifications

A-3

input states on power down

2-6

inrush current

G-4

installing

ControlFlash software

D-1

your controller

2-1

installing controller components

compact I/O

2-22

data access tool

2-19

memory module/real-time clock

2-20

processor

2-17

installing your base unit

on DIN rail

2-15

using mounting screws

2-16

installion

2-17

instruction

G-4

instruction set

definition

G-4

integer key

5-3

Integer Mode

5-6

isolated link coupler

installing

4-12

isolation transformers

power considerations

2-5

G

grounding the controller

3-6

jump

G-5

J

K

keypad

5-3

H

half-duplex

G-4

hard disk

G-4

hardware

features

1-1

hardware overview

1-1

hazardous location

2-3

heat protection

2-7

high byte

G-4

housekeeping

G-4

L

ladder logic

G-5

least significant bit (LSB)

G-5

LED (light emitting diode)

G-5

LEDs

error with controller

C-2

normal controller operation

C-1

status

C-1

LIFO (Last-In-First-Out)

G-5

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

4 Index

lithium battery (1747-BA)

disposing

B-4

handling

B-3

installing

B-2

manufacturer

B-4

storing

B-3

transporting

B-3

logic

G-5

low byte

G-5

M

manuals, related

P-2

master control relay

2-8

master control relay (MCR)

G-5

master control relay circuit

periodic tests

2-5

memory module

data file protection

6-4

program compare

6-4

program/data backup

6-3

removal/installation under power

6-1,

6-5

Memory Module Information File

6-5

memory module/real-time clock

installing

2-20

mnemonic

G-5

Modbus communication protocol

E-13

Modbus definition

G-5

modem

G-6

modem cable

constructing your own

4-6

modems

dialup phone

E-4

leasedline

E-4

line drivers

E-5

radio

E-5

using with MicroLogix controllers

E-3

modes

G-6

monitoring

controller operation

fault recovery procedure C-4

motor starters (bulletin 509)

surge suppressors

3-6

motor starters (bulletin 709)

surge suppressors

3-6

mounting

dimensions

2-12

the controller

2-13

using DIN rail

2-14

N

negative logic

G-6

network

G-6

nominal input current

G-6

normally closed

G-6

normally open

G-6

null modem cable

4-6

O

offline

G-6

offset

G-7

off-state leakage current

G-7

one shot

G-7

online

G-7

operating voltage

G-7

output device

G-7

output scan

G-7

output specifications

A-5

1764-28BXB FET

A-5

P

panel mounting

base unit

2-16

PCCC

G-7

planning considerations for a network

E-8

power considerations

input states on power down

2-6

isolation transformers

2-5

loss of power source

2-6

other line conditions

2-7

overview

2-5

power supply inrush

2-6

power distribution

2-5

Power Save Timeout

5-4

power source

loss of

2-6

power supply inrush

power considerations

2-6

preparing for upgrade

D-1

preventing excessive heat

2-7

proceessor

hardware overview

1-3

processor

G-8

installing

2-17

processor access door

B-6

processor files

G-8

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Index 5

program faults

determining

C-1

program file

definition

G-8

program mode

G-8

program scan

definition

G-8

programming device

G-8

programming the controller

required software

1-5

PROTECTED indicator light

5-3, 5-5

protocol

G-8

publications, related

P-2

Purpose of this Manual

P-1

R

read

G-8

real time clock

battery low indicator bit

6-2

disabling

6-3

Real Time Clock Function File

6-1

related publications

P-2

relay

G-8

relay contact rating table

A-5

relay logic

G-8

relays

surge suppressors for

3-6

remote packet support

E-11

replacement battery

B-2

disposing

B-4

handling

B-3

installing

B-2

storing

B-3

transporting

B-3

replacement doors

B-6 base comms door

B-6 base terminal door

B-6

processor access door

B-6 trim pots/mode switch cover door

B-6

replacement kits

B-1

replacement parts

B-1

base comms door

B-6 base terminal door

B-6

processor access door

B-6

terminal blocks

B-5

trim pots/mode switch cover door

B-6

replacement terminal blocks

B-5

reserved bit

G-9

response times for high-speed dc inputs

A-4

response times for normal dc inputs

A-4

restore

G-8

retentive data

G-9

RS-232 communication interface

E-1

RS-232, definition

G-9

RTU, definition

G-9

run mode

G-9

rung

G-9

S

safety circuits

2-4

safety considerations

disconnecting main power

2-4

periodic tests of master control relay circuit

2-5

power distribution

2-5

safety circuits

2-4

save

G-9

scan

G-9

scan time

G-9

sinking

G-9

sinking and sourcing circuits

3-10

sinking wiring diagram

1764-28BXB

3-14

sourcing

G-10

sourcing wiring diagram

1764-28BXB

3-15

spade lug wiring

3-3

specifications

input

A-3

output

A-5

relay contact rating table

A-5

response times for high-speed dc inputs

A-4

response times for normal dc inputs

A-4

working voltage (1764-24AWA)

A-7 working voltage (1764-24BWA)

A-7

working voltage (1764-28BXB)

A-8

status

G-10

surge suppressors

for contactor

3-6

for motor starters

3-6

for relays

3-6

recommended

3-6

using

3-4

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

6 Index

T

terminal

G-10

throughput

G-10

Trim Pot Information Function File

5-2

trim pots

adjustment

5-1

error conditions

5-2

location

5-1

trim pots/mode switch cover door

B-6

troubleshooting

automatically clearing faults

C-4

contacting Allen-Bradley for assistance

C-5

controller error recovery model

C-3

determining controller faults

C-1

identifying controller faults

C-4 manually clearing faults

C-4

understanding the controller LED status

C-1

using the fault routine

C-4

true

G-10

U

UL certification

2-1

upload

G-10

W

wire requirements

3-1

wiring

spade lug

3-3

wiring diagrams

3-8

wiring recommendation

3-2

wiring your controller

3-1

Working Screen Operation

5-7

working voltage (1764-24AWA)

specifications

A-7

working voltage (1764-24BWA)

specifications

A-7

working voltage (1764-28BXB)

specifications

A-8

write

G-10

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

Publication 1764-UM001B-EN-P - April 2002

9

Supersedes Publication 1764-UM001A-US-P - April 2000

PN 40072-091-01(2)

Copyright © 2002 Rockwell Automation. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

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