"user manual"
Allen-Bradley
ControlLogix
Ethernet
Communication
Interface Module
User
Manual
(Cat. No. 1756-ENET)
File Name: AB_EtherNetControlLogix_1756_ENET_user_D897
Important User Information
Solid state equipment has operational characteristics differing from
those of electromechanical equipment. “Safety Guidelines for the
Application, Installation and Maintenance of Solid State Controls”
(Publication SGI-1.1) describes some important differences between
solid state equipment and hard–wired electromechanical devices.
Because of this difference, and also because of the wide variety of
uses for solid state equipment, all persons responsible for applying
this equipment must satisfy themselves that each intended
application of this equipment is acceptable.
In no event will the Allen-Bradley Company be responsible or liable
for indirect or consequential damages resulting from the use or
application of this equipment.
The examples and diagrams in this manual are included solely for
illustrative purposes. Because of the many variables and
requirements associated with any particular installation, the
Allen-Bradley Company cannot assume responsibility or liability for
actual use based on the examples and diagrams.
No patent liability is assumed by Allen-Bradley Company with
respect to use of information, circuits, equipment, or software
described in this manual.
Reproduction of the contents of this manual, in whole or in part,
without written permission of the Allen-Bradley Company is
prohibited.
Throughout this manual we use notes to make you aware of safety
considerations.
!
ATTENTION: Identifies information about practices
or circumstances that can lead to personal injury or
death, property damage, or economic loss.
Attentions help you:
• identify a hazard
• avoid the hazard
• recognize the consequences
Important: Identifies information that is especially important for
successful application and understanding of the product.
Ethernet is a registered trademark of Digital Equipment Corporation, Intel and Xerox Corporation.
Microsoft is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
Windows, Windows 95 and Windows NT are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
ControlLogix and Data Highway Plus are trademarks of the Allen-Bradley Company, Inc.
Table of Contents
About this User Manual
Preface
What this Preface Contains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Who Should Use this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Purpose of This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Conventions and Related Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Related Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Related Products and Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rockwell Automation Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Local Product Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Technical Product Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Your Questions or Comments on this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ControlLogix Ethernet
Communication Interface
Module
Chapter 1
Install the ControlLogix
Ethernet Communication
Interface Module
Chapter 2
What this Chapter Contains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What the Module Does . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removal and Insertion Under Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What this Chapter Contains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Compliance to
European Union Directives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EMC Directive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Low Voltage Directive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prevent Electrostatic Discharge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removal and Insertion Under Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prepare the Chassis for Module Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install or Remove the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Determine Module Slot Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remove or Replace the Module (when applicable) . . . . . . . . . . .
Wire the Ethernet Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connect the Module to the Ethernet Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Apply Chassis Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Check Power Supply and Module Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure the Ethernet Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Understand CSA Hazardous Location Approval . . . . . . . . . . . . .
P–1
P–1
P–1
P–2
P–3
P–4
P–4
P–4
P–4
P–4
1–1
1–2
1–3
1–4
2–1
2–1
2–1
2–1
2–3
2–3
2–3
2–4
2–4
2–5
2–6
2–7
2–8
2–9
2–9
2–10
2–11
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
ii
Before You Configure Your
Ethernet Module
Chapter 3
Configure Your Ethernet
Module
Chapter 4
Diagnostics and
Troubleshooting
Specifications
What this Chapter Contains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) . . . . . . . .
BOOTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IP Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gateways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Subnet Masks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What this Chapter Contains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use BOOTP to Configure the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enter IP Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enter Ethernet Hardware Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enter Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enter Gateway Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use the ControlLogix Gateway Configuration Software to Configure
the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set an IP Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Select a Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assign a Gateway Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disable BOOTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4–1
4–1
4–1
4–1
4–2
4–2
4–2
4–2
4–3
4–4
4–5
Appendix A
What this Appendix
Contains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A–1
Appendix B
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
3–1
3–1
3–1
3–2
3–2
3–3
3–4
3–5
B–1
Preface
P–1
What this Preface
Contains
This preface describes how to use this manual. The following table
describes what this preface contains and its location.
For information about
Who should use this manual
Purpose of this manual
Conventions and related terms
Related products and documentation
Rockwell Automation support
Who Should Use this
Manual
See page
P–1
P–1
P–2
P–4
P–4
We assume you have a good understanding of Ethernet and the
(TCP/IP) protocol.
For More Information...
Purpose of This Manual
Preface
This user manual contains a brief description of Ethernet and TCP/IP
in Chapter 2. For detailed information on TCP/IP protocol and
networking in general, see the following publications:
• Comer, Douglas E. Internetworking with TCP-IP, Volume 1:
Protocols and Architecture, 2nd ed. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.:
Prentice-Hall, 1995. ISBN 0-13-216987-8.
• Tanenbaum, Andrew S. Computer Networks, 2nd ed. Englewood
Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1989. ISBN 0-13-162959-X.
This manual describes how to understand, configure and
troubleshoot your ControlLogix Ethernet communication module.
Chapter 1
About this
User Manual
Chapter 2
Install the
Module
The ControlLogix Ethernet
Module
Appendix B
Appendix A
Chapter 4
Chapter 3
Specifications
Troubleshoot
the Module
Configure
the Module
Before You
Configure
Your Module
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
P–2
Preface
Conventions and Related
Terms
This manual uses the following conventions:
This icon:
Calls attention to:
helpful, time-saving information
Tip
an example
Example
For More Information...
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
additional information in the
publication referenced
Preface
P–3
Related Terms
This term:
Means:
BOOTP
low level protocol that provides communications to other nodes
on a TCP/IP network
an internetwork node between two similar communication
subnets where protocol translation is minimal
software that provides general module, diagnostic and
configuration information for the ControlLogix modules. It also
sets or changes the configuration of Ethernet or DHRIO
modules and saves and restores configuration data.
1756-ENET module
a logical communication path
Data Highway Plus – A-B’s proprietary token pass
communications protocol for peer to peer communications
a physical layer standard using Carrier Sense Multiple Access
with Collision Detection (CSMA/CD) methods
bridge
ControlLogix Gateway
Configuration Software
communication module
connection
DH+TM
Ethernet
Ethernet network
a local area network designed for the high-speed exchange of
information between computers and related devices
gateway
a module or set of modules that allows communications
between nodes on dissimilar networks
32-bit identification for each node on Internet Protocol network
LED indicator
1756-ENET module
a six-bit number used to uniquely identify any module on the
local and extended ControlLogix backplane
a physical and logical collection of application modules sharing
a common power supply and backplane for module to module
communication
IP address
indicator
module
module address
rack
RIUP
SNMP
subnet mask
TCP/IP
transaction
transfer
remove and insert under power
Simple Network Management Protocol – a standard for network
management within TCP/IP
an extension of the IP address that allows a site to use a single
net ID for multiple networks
Internet protocol suite (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet
Protocol)
an exchange of request and data and response and data
to send a message to the next destination
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
P–4
Preface
Related Products and
Documentation
The following table lists related ControlLogix products and
documentation:
Cat. number: Document title:
Pub. number:
1756-ENET
1756-5.3
1756-GTWY
1756-DHRIO
1756-DHRIO
1756-CNB/R
1756–CNB/R
Ethernet Communication Interface Module Installation
Instructions
ControlLogix Gateway Configuration Software Quick
Start
Data Highway Plus Communication Interface Module
Installation Instructions
Data Highway Plus Communication Interface Module
User Manual
ControlNet Bridge Module Installation Instructions
ControlNet Bridge Module User Manual
1756-10.2
1756-5.4
1756-6.5.2
1756-5.32
1756-6.5.3
If you need more information on these products, contact your local
Allen-Bradley integrator or sales office for assistance. For more
information on the documentation, refer to the Allen-Bradley
Publication Index, publication SD499.
Rockwell Automation Support
Rockwell Automation offers support services worldwide, with over
75 sales/support offices, 512 authorized distributors and 260
authorized systems integrators located throughout the United States
alone, plus Rockwell Automation representatives in every major
country in the world.
Local Product Support
Contact your local Rockwell Automation representative for:
• sales and order support
• product technical training
• warranty support
• support service agreements
Technical Product Assistance
If you need to contact Rockwell Automation for technical assistance,
please review the troubleshooting information in Appendix A first.
If the problem persists, then call your local Rockwell Automation
representative.
Your Questions or Comments on this Manual
If you find a problem with this manual, please notify us of it on the
enclosed Publication Problem Report.
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
Chapter
1
ControlLogix Ethernet
Communication Interface
Module
What this Chapter
Contains
This chapter describes the module and what you must know and do
before you begin to use it. The following table describes what this
chapter contains and its location.
For information about
What the module does
Module features
Removal and insertion under power
What the Module Does
See page
1–1
1–2
1–3
The Ethernet module supports gateway communication of control
and information data through Ethernet to other networks such as
ControlNet and Data Highway Plus.
Example
The following illustration shows an example of a typical system.
This system uses one ControlLogix Gateway linking existing Data
Highway Plus, Ethernet and ControlNet networks.
ControlLogix
Gateway
Data Highway Plus
ControlNet
Ethernet
PLC-5
Processor
Ethernet
PLC-5
Processor
ControlNet
PLC-5
Processor
PC with
RSLinx
Software
PC with
RSLinx
Software
PC with
RSLinx
Software
SLC
Processor
20901–M
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
1–2
ControlLogix Ethernet Communication Interface Module
Module Features
Backplane
Connector
Use the following illustration to identify the external features of the
Ethernet module.
Product
Label
Indicators
<•••> ETHERNET
Front
Panel
Front
Panel
RXD TXD
OK
Door and label
AUI Ethernet
Connector
Ethernet
Address
AUI
10BT Ethernet
Connector
10 BASET
1756-ENET
Side View
Front View
Other module features are:
• supports AUI and 10 Base-T media
• uses standard TCP/IP protocol
• supports gateway communication to and from other modules in
the same chassis
• no limit on number of modules per chassis
• remove and insert under power
• RSLinxTM Software Support
Important:
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
This module does not support Ethernet to Ethernet
bridging.
ControlLogix Ethernet Communication Interface Module
Removal and Insertion
Under Power
1–3
This module is designed to be installed or removed while chassis
power is applied.
!
ATTENTION: When you insert or remove a module
while backplane power is on, an electrical arc may
occur. An electrical arc can cause personal injury or
property damage by:
• sending an erroneous signal to your system’s actuators causing unintended machine motion or
loss of process control.
• causing an explosion in a hazardous environment.
Repeated electrical arcing causes excessive wear to
contacts on both the module and its mating connector.
Worn contacts may create electrical resistance that can
affect module operation.
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
1–4
ControlLogix Ethernet Communication Interface Module
Notes
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
Chapter
2
Install the ControlLogix
Ethernet Communication
Interface Module
What this Chapter
Contains
This chapter describes how to install the module. The following table
describes what this chapter contains and its location.
For information about
Compliance to European Union Directives
Electrostatic discharge
Removing and inserting the module under power
Preparing the Chassis for Module Installation
Installing, Removing or Replacing the Module
Wiring the Ethernet Connector
Applying Chassis Power
Checking Power Supply and Module Status
CSA Hazardous Location Approval
Compliance to
European Union Directives
See page
2–1
2–2
2–2
2–2
2–3
2–6
2–8
2–8
2–9
This product has the CE mark and is approved for installation within
the European Union and EEA regions. It has been designed and
tested to meet the following directives.
EMC Directive
This product is tested to meet Council Directive 89/336/EEC
Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) and the following standards,
in whole or in part, documented in a technical construction file:
• EN 50081-2EMC – Generic Emission Standard, Part 2 –
Industrial Environment
• EN 50082-2EMC – Generic Immunity Standard, Part 2 –
Industrial Environment
This product is intended for use in an industrial environment.
Low Voltage Directive
This product is tested to meet Council Directive 73/23/EEC
Low Voltage, by applying the safety requirements of EN 61131–2
Programmable Controllers, Part 2 – Equipment Requirements and
Tests.
For specific information required by EN 61131-2, see the appropriate
sections in this publication, as well as the following Allen-Bradley
publications:
• Industrial Automation Wiring and Grounding Guidelines For
Noise Immunity, publication 1770-4.1
• Automation Systems Catalog, publication B112
This equipment is classified as open equipment and must be installed
(mounted) in an enclosure during operation as a means of providing
safety protection.
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
2–2
ControlLogix Ethernet Communication Interface Module
Prevent Electrostatic
Discharge
The Ethernet module is sensitive to electrostatic discharge.
!
ATTENTION: Electrostatic discharge can damage
integrated circuits or semiconductors if you touch
backplane connector pins. Follow these guidelines
when you handle the module:
• Touch a grounded object to discharge static potential
• Wear an approved wrist-strap grounding device
• Do not touch the backplane connector or
connector pins
• Do not touch circuit components inside the module
• If available, use a static-safe work station
• When not in use, keep the module in its
static-shield bag
Removal and Insertion
Under Power
This module is designed to be installed or removed while chassis
power is applied.
!
ATTENTION: When you insert or remove a module
while backplane power is on, an electrical arc may
occur. An electrical arc can cause personal injury or
property damage by:
• sending an erroneous signal to your system’s actuators causing unintended machine motion or
loss of process control.
• causing an explosion in a hazardous environment.
Repeated electrical arcing causes excessive wear to
contacts on both the module and its mating connector.
Worn contacts may create electrical resistance that can
affect module operation.
Prepare the Chassis for
Module Installation
Before you install the Ethernet module, you must install and connect
a ControlLogix chassis and power supply. To install these products,
refer to the installation instructions you received with them.
Chassis
Power
supply
20805–M
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
ControlLogix Ethernet Communication Interface Module
Install or Remove the
Module
2–3
This module is designed to be installed or removed while chassis
power is applied.
!
ATTENTION: When you insert or remove a module
while backplane power is on, an electrical arc may
occur. An electrical arc can cause personal injury or
property damage by:
• sending an erroneous signal to your system’s
field devices causing unintended machine motion
or loss of process control.
• causing an explosion in a hazardous environment.
Repeated electrical arcing causes excessive wear to
contacts on both the module and its mating connector.
Worn contacts may create electrical resistance that can
affect module operation.
Determine Module Slot Location
This example shows chassis slot numbering in a 4-slot chassis. Slot 0
is the first slot and is always located to the right of the power supply.
You can use any size ControlLogix chassis and install the module in
any slot.
Slot 0
Slot 2
Slot 1
Slot 3
Power Supply
Chassis
You can use multiple Ethernet modules in the same chassis.
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
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ControlLogix Ethernet Communication Interface Module
Install the Module
1
Align the circuit board with top
and bottom guides in the chassis.
Circuit board
2
Slide the module into the chassis.
Make sure the module properly connects
to the chassis backplane.
3
The module is fully installed
when it is flush with the power
supply or other installed modules.
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
ControlLogix Ethernet Communication Interface Module
2–5
Remove or Replace the Module (when applicable)
1
Push on upper and lower module tabs
to disengage them.
2
Slide module out of chassis.
If you are replacing an existing Ethernet module with an another
Ethernet module, and you want to resume identical system operation,
you must install the new Ethernet module in the same slot.
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
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ControlLogix Ethernet Communication Interface Module
Wire the Ethernet
Connector
Use either an AUI or an RJ45 connector to connect to the Ethernet
network.
Wire the appropriate connector according to the following
illustrations:
Protective Ground
1–Ctrl IN Ckt Shield
2–Ctrl IN CKT A
3–Data OUT Ckt A
4–Data IN Ckt Shield
5–Data IN Ckt A
6–Voltage Comm
7–Ctrl OUT Ckt A
8–Ctrl OUT Ckt Shield
9–Ctrl IN Ckt B
10–Data OUT Ckt B
11–Data OUT Ckt B
12–Data OUT Ckt B
13–Voltage Plus
14–Voltage Shield
15–Ctrl OUT Ckt B
AUI
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
TD+
TD–
RD+
NC
NC
RD–
NC
NC
8
1
RJ 45
ControlLogix Ethernet Communication Interface Module
Connect the Module to the
Ethernet Network
2–7
Attach either the AUI or RJ45 connector to the matching Ethernet
port:
OR
Important:
The maximum number of ASA connections per TCP
connection is 32. If you exceed this limit, an error will
occur.
If your application requires the module door to be closed, use one of
the custom AUI connector cables available in two lengths: 2 meters
(cat. no. 1756-TC02) or 15 meters (cat. no. 1756-TC15).
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
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ControlLogix Ethernet Communication Interface Module
Apply Chassis Power
ON
POWER
OFF
Check Power Supply and
Module Status
Check the following indicators to determine if the power supply and
module are operating:
<•••> ETHERNET
RXD TXD
RXD
indicator
is OFF
Power supply indicator
is green
TXD
indicator
is OFF
OK
OK indicator is red
then flashing red
(or green
if module is
configured)
The following table describes the displays of the transmit (TX) and
receive (RX) indicators:
If this
indicator:
is:
the module is:
TXD
Green
Transmitting data
Off
Not active
Green
Receiving data
Off
Not active
RXD
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
ControlLogix Ethernet Communication Interface Module
2–9
Understand CSA Hazardous Location Approval
CSA Hazardous Location Approval
CSA certifies products for general use as well as for use in hazardous locations. Actual CSA
certification is indicated by the product label as shown below, and not by statements in any user
documentation.
Example of the CSA certification product label
To comply with CSA certification for use in hazardous locations, the following information becomes a part
of the product literature for CSA-certified Allen-Bradley industrial control products.
• This equipment is suitable for use in Class I, Division 2, Groups A, B, C, D, or non-hazardous
locations only.
• The products having the appropriate CSA markings (that is, Class I Division 2, Groups A, B, C, D), are
certified for use in other equipment where the suitability of combination (that is, application or use) is
determined by the CSA or the local inspection office having jurisdiction.
Important: Due to the modular nature of a PLC control system, the product with the highest
temperature rating determines the overall temperature code rating of a PLC control system in a Class I,
Division 2 location. The temperature code rating is marked on the product label as shown.
Temperature code rating
Look for temperature code
rating here
The following warnings apply to products having CSA certification for use in hazardous locations.
ATTENTION: Explosion hazard —
• Substitution of components may impair suitability for Class I, Division 2.
!
• Do not replace components unless power has been switched off or the
area is known to be non-hazardous.
• Do not disconnect equipment
e uipment unless power has been switched off or the area is
known to be non-hazardous.
• Do not disconnect connectors unless power has been switched off or the area is
known to be non-hazardous. Secure any user-supplied connectors that mate to
external circuits on an Allen-Bradley product using screws, sliding latches,
threaded connectors, or other means such that any connection can withstand a 15
Newton (3.4 lb.) separating force applied for a minimum of one minute.
PLC is a registered trademark of Allen-Bradley Company, Inc.
CSA logo is a registered trademark of the Canadian Standards Association.
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
2–10
ControlLogix Ethernet Communication Interface Module
Approbation d’utilisation dans des emplacements dangereux par la CSA
La CSA certifie les produits d’utilisation générale aussi bien que ceux qui s’utilisent dans des emplacement
dangereux. La certification CSA en vigueur est indiquée par l’étiquette du produit et non par des affirm
dans la documentation à l’usage des utilisateurs.
Exemple d’étiquette de certification d’un produit par la CSA
Pour satisfaire à la certification de la CSA dans des endroits dangereux, les informations suivantes font
partie intégrante de la documentation des produits industriels de contrôle Allen-Bradley certifiés par la
CSA.
• Cet équipement convient à l’utilisation dans des emplacements de Classe I, Division 2, Groupes A, B,
C, D, ou ne convient qu’à l’utilisation dans des endroits non dangereux.
• Les produits portant le marquage approprié de la CSA (c’est à dire, Classe I, Division 2, Groupes A,
B, C, D) sont certifiés à l’utilisation pour d’autres équipements où la convenance de combinaison
(application ou utilisation) est déterminée par la CSA ou le bureau local d’inspection qualifié.
Important: Par suite de la nature modulaire du système de contrôle PLC, le produit ayant le taux le
plus élevé de température détermine le taux d’ensemble du code de température du système de contrôle
d’un PLC dans un emplacement de Classe 1, Division 2. Le taux du code de température est indiqué sur
l’étiquette du produit.
Taux du code de température
Le taux du code de
température est indiqué ici
Les avertissements suivants s’appliquent aux produits ayant la certification CSA pour leur utilisation dans d
emplacements dangereux.
AVERTISSEMENT: Risque d’explosion —
• La substitution de composants peut rendre ce matériel inacceptable pour
lesemplacements de Classe I, Division 2.
!
• Couper le courant ou s’assurer quel’emplacement est désigné non dangereux avant
de remplacer lescomposants.
• Avant de débrancher l’équipement, couper le courant ou s’assurer que l’emplacemen
est désigné non dangereux.
• Avant de débrancher les connecteurs, couper le courant ou s’assurer que
l’emplacement est reconnu non dangereux. Attacher tous connecteurs fournis par
l’utilisateur et reliés aux circuits externes d’un appareil Allen-Bradley à l ’aide de vis,
loquets coulissants, connecteurs filetés ou autres moyens permettant aux connexions
de résister à une force de séparation de 15 newtons (3,4 lb. - 1,5 kg) appliquée
pendant au moins une minute.
Le sigle CSA est la marque déposée de l’Association des Standards pour le Canada.
PLC est une marque déposée de Allen-Bradley Company, Inc.
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
Chapter
3
Before You Configure Your
Ethernet Module
What this Chapter
Contains
This chapter describes what you must know before you configure
your Ethernet module. The following table describes what this
chapter contains and its location.
For information about
Ethernet
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol
(TCP/IP)
BOOTP
IP Address
Gateways
Subnet Masks
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)
See page
3–1
3–1
3–2
3–2
3–3
3–4
3–5
Ethernet
On the most basic level, Ethernet is a wire or cable that connects
computers and peripheral devices so that they can communicate.
The actual wire used for a network is called the network medium.
Transmission Control
Protocol/Internet Protocol
(TCP/IP)
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) is a
transport-layer protocol (TCP) and a network-layer protocol (IP)
commonly used for communication within networks and across
internetworks.
The Ethernet module uses TCP/IP for Ethernet communication.
For more information about TCP/IP and internetworking, refer to:
Internetworking with TCP/IP – Vol. 1,
2nd ed., by Douglas E. Comer
ISBN 0-13-216987-8
The Ethernet Management Guide
—Keeping The Link
ISBN 0-07-046320-4
An Introduction to TCP/IP
ISBN 3-540-96651-X
Computer Networks
by Andrew S. Tanenbaum
ISBN 0-13-162959-X
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
3–2
Before You Configure Your Ethernet Module
BOOTP
BOOTP (Bootstrap protocol) is a low-level protocol that provides
configurations to other nodes on a TCP/IP network with DOS,
Microsoft Windows, Windows NT, Windows 95, VMS and
HP-UNIX platforms. BOOTP configuration files let you
automatically assign IP addresses to the Ethernet module. You can
also obtain subnet masks and gateway addresses from BOOTP.
The Ethernet module factory default is BOOTP enabled. Upon
powerup, the module sends a message to the BOOTP server on the
network with its hardware address. The server is a computer (PC,
VAX, or UNIX system) that has BOOTP server software installed.
The server compares that hardware address to those in its look-up
table in the configuration file and sends a message back to the
module with the appropriate IP address.
With all hardware and IP addresses in one location, you can easily
change IP addresses in the BOOTP configuration file if your network
needs to be changed.
If BOOTP is disabled (or there is no BOOTP server on the network),
you can use the ControlLogix Gateway Configuration Software to
configure Ethernet from another module installed in the same
chassis.
IP Address
The IP address identifies each node on the IP network (or system of
connected networks). Each TCP/IP node on a network (including
the Ethernet module) must have a unique IP address.
The IP address is 32 bits long and has a net ID part and a host ID
part. Each network is a Class A, Class B, or Class C network. The
class of a network determines how an IP address is formatted.
0
Class A
Class B
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
16
net ID
0
0
Class C
8
1
24
host ID
8
16
24
net ID
31
host ID
8
0
31
16
net ID
24
31
host ID
Each node on the same physical network must have an IP address of
the same class and must have the same net ID. Each node on the
same network must have a different host ID thus giving it a unique
IP address.
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
Before You Configure Your Ethernet Module
Example
3–3
IP addresses are written as four decimal integers (0-255) separated
by periods where each integer gives the value of one byte of the IP
address. For example, the 32-bit IP address:
00000011 00000000 00000000 00000001
is written as
3.0.0.1.
You can distinguish the class of an IP address from the first integer
in its dotted-decimal IP address as follows:
Range of first integer
0 -127
128 -191
Tip
For More Information...
Gateways
Class
A
B
Range of first integer
192 - 223
224 - 255
Class
C
other
Contact your network administrator or the Network Information
Center for a unique IP address to assign to your module.
For more information on Internet addressing, see
Comer, Douglas E; Internetworking with TCP-IP, Volume 1:
Protocols and Architecture; Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall,
1990.
A gateway connects individual physical networks into a system of
networks. When a node needs to communicate with a node on
another network, a gateway transfers the data between the two
networks. The following figure shows gateway G connecting
Network 1 with Network 2.
A
128.1.0.1
Network 1
128.1.0.2
G
B
128.2.0.1
128.2.0.3
C
128.2.0.2
Network 2
When host B with IP address 128.2.0.1 communicates with host C, it
knows from C’s IP address that C is on the same network. In an
Ethernet environment, B can then resolve C’s IP address to a MAC
address (via ARP) and communicate with C directly.
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
3–4
Before You Configure Your Ethernet Module
When host B communicates with host A, it knows from A’s IP
address that A is on another network (the net IDs are different). In
order to send data to A, B must have the IP address of the gateway
connecting the two networks. In this example, the gateway’s IP
address on Network 2 is 128.2.0.3.
The gateway has two IP addresses (128.1.0.2 and 128.2.0.3). The
first must be used by hosts on Network 1 and the second must be
used by hosts on Network 2. To be usable, a host’s gateway must be
addressed using a net ID matching its own.
Subnet Masks
Subnet addressing is an extension of the IP address scheme that
allows a site to use a single net ID for multiple physical networks.
Routing outside of the site continues by dividing the IP address into
a net ID and a host ID via the class. Inside a site, the subnet mask is
used to redivide the IP address into a custom net ID portion and host
ID portion.
Take Network 2 (a Class B network) in the previous example and
add another physical network. Selecting the following subnet mask
would add two additional net ID bits allowing for four physical
networks:
Example
11111111 11111111 11000000 00000000 = 255.255.192.0
Two bits of the Class B host ID have been used to extend the net ID.
Each unique combination of bits in the part of the host ID where
subnet mask bits are 1 specifies a different physical network.
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
Before You Configure Your Ethernet Module
3–5
The new configuration is:
A
128.1.0.1
Network 1
128.1.0.2
G
B
128.2.64.3
C
128.2.64.1
128.2.64.2
Network 2.1
G2
D
128.2.128.1
128.2.128.3
E
128.2.128.2
Network 2.2
A second network with Hosts D and E has been added. Gateway G2
connects Network 2.1 with Network 2.2. Hosts D and E will use
Gateway G2 to communicate with hosts not on Network 2.2. Hosts B
and C will use Gateway G to communicate with hosts not on
Network 2.1. When B is communicating with D, G (the configured
Gateway for B) will route the data from B to D through G2.
Simple Network
Management Protocol
(SNMP)
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is a standard for
network management within TCP/IP environments. This lets client
applications monitor and manage network information on host
computers and gateways. Network administrators run programs that
use SNMP to manage their networks. The ethernet module supports
the SNMP protocol at the MIB II level.
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
3–6
Before You Configure Your Ethernet Module
Notes
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
Chapter
4
Configure the Ethernet Module
What this Chapter
Contains
This chapter describes how to configure the Ethernet module. The
following table describes what this chapter contains and its location.
For information about
Use BOOTP to configure the module
Use the ControlLogix Gateway Configuration
Software to configure the module
Use BOOTP to Configure
the Module
See page
4–1
4–4
The Ethernet module factory default is BOOTP enabled.
If BOOTP is disabled (or there is no BOOTP server on the network),
you must use the ControlLogix Gateway Configuration Software to
enter/change the IP address, subnet mask and gateway address for
your Ethernet module. Skip to the next section to use the software to
configure your module.
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
4–2
Configure the Ethernet Module
Example
The following text is an example BOOTP tab file:
# Example /etc/bootptab: database for bootp server (/etc/bootpd).
#
# Format:
#
nodename:tag=value:tag=value: . . . .:tag=value
#
#
first field – – nodename (hostname) of terminal followed by colon
#
(should be full domain name)
#
# Blank lines and lines beginning with ’#’ are ignored.
# Make sure you include a colon and a backslash to continue a line.
# Don’t put any spaces in the tag–value string.
# The ht tag MUST precede the ha tag.
#
# The options below are specified as tag=value and delimited by colons
# These are the options used by the 1756-ENET module:
#
#
gw – – gateway IP address
#
ha – – hardware address (link level address) (hex)
#
ht – – hardware type (either) (must precede the ha tag)
#
ip – – IP address
#
sm – – network subnet mask
#
tc – – template for common defaults (should be the first option listed)
#
#
vm – – vendor magic cookie selector (MUST be rfc1048 for 1756-ENET)
#
#-–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
# default values for 1756-ENET
icp.defaults:\
ht=ether:\
vm=rfc1048:\
sm=255.255.254.0:\
gw=130.151.132.1
#-–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
zappa0:\
tc=icp.defaults:\
ha=0000bc03404f:\
ip=130.151.132.121
zappa1:\
tc=icp.defaults:\
ha=0000bc034073:\
ip=130.151.132.122
zappa2:\
tc=icp.defaults:\
ha=0000bc034022:\
ip=130.151.132.123
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
Configure the Ethernet Module
4–3
To use BOOTP to configure the module:
1. Access and open the bootptab file.
Enter IP Address
2. Use a text editor to enter the IP address of your module.
If you need more information on setting IP addresses, refer to
page 3–2.
<•••> ETHERNET
Ethernet
Address
Enter Ethernet Hardware Address
OK
00:00:BC:03:41:63
Ethernet Address
RXD TXD
AUI
When using the BOOTP protocol, you must enter the Ethernet
hardware address of your module. Allen-Bradley assigns each
Ethernet module a unique hardware address at the factory. The
address is a 48-bit address that consists of six hexadecimal digits
separated by dots. The address is printed on a label on the front of
your Ethernet module as shown in the figure on the left. You cannot
change this address.
10 BASET
1756-ENET
Front View
00:00:BC:03:41:63
Ethernet Address
3. Use a text editor to enter the Ethernet hardware address of your
module. You must enter all digits, including zeroes.
If you ever change or replace this Ethernet module, you must
enter the new Ethernet hardware address of the new module.
Enter Subnet Mask
4. Continue using the text editor to enter the subnet mask:
If you need more information on selecting subnet masks,
refer to page 3–4.
Enter Gateway Address
5. Continue using the text editor to enter the gateway address:
If you need more information on assigning gateway
addresses, refer to page 3–3.
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
4–4
Configure the Ethernet Module
Use the ControlLogix
Gateway Configuration
Software to Configure the
Module
Use the ControlLogix Gateway Configuration Software to:
• set an IP address
• select a subnet mask
• assign a gateway address
• disable BOOTP
The procedures in this section assume you have the software
installed and open.
For More Information...
For more information on using the ControlLogix Gateway
Configuration Software, refer to the ControlLogix Gateway
Configuration Software Quick Start, publication 1756-10.2.
Set an IP Address
To set an IP address:
1. Select the Port Configuration tab.
2. Enter the appropriate IP address of the module in the IP Address
field.
Make sure your entry is in the form xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx where each
xxx is a number between 0–255.
If you need more information on setting IP addresses, refer
to page 3–2.
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
Configure the Ethernet Module
4–5
Select a Subnet Mask
To select a subnet mask:
Enter the appropriate subnet mask of the module in the Subnet Mask
field.
Make sure your entry is in the form xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx where each
xxx is a number between 0–255.
If you need more information on selecting subnet masks, refer to
page 3–4.
Assign a Gateway Address
To assign a gateway address:
Enter the appropriate gateway address of the module in the Gateway
Address field.
Make sure your entry is in the form xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx where each
xxx is a number between 0–255.
If you need more information on assigning gateway addresses, refer
to page 3–3.
Disable BOOTP
The Ethernet module factory default is BOOTP enabled. To
configure the module manually, you must disable BOOTP.
To disable BOOTP:
1. Click on the Bootp Enabled field to disable BOOTP. The X will
disappear.
2. Click on Apply.
If you need more information on BOOTP, refer to page 3–2.
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
4–6
Configure the Ethernet Module
Notes
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
Index
A
applying power, chassis, 2–8
ASA connections, maximum, 2–7
audience, user manual, P–1
AUI, connector pinouts, 2–6
AUI connector cables, sizes, 2–7
ControlLogix Configuration Software,
definition, P–3
ControlLogix Ethernet Module,
installation, 2–1
ControlLogix Gateway Configuration
Software
related publication, 4–2
using, 4–2
conventions, P–2
B
BOOTP
definition, P–3
description, 3–2
disabling, 4–3
for configuration, 4–1
bridge, definition, P–3
bridging, Ethernet to Ethernet, 1–2
C
cable sizes, AUI connector, 2–7
CE
compliance, 2–1
mark, 2–1
chassis
apply power, 2–8
Ethernet Module, 2–3
module location, 2–3
power supply, 2–2
prepare for installation, 2–2
slot numbering, 2–3
communication module, definition, P–3
compliance to European Union Directives,
2–1
CSA Hazardous Location Approval, 2–10
D
Data Highway Plus, definition, P–3
DH+, definition, P–3
diagnostics
chassis, 2–8
power supply, 2–8
diagnostics and troubleshooting, A–1
directives, European Union, 2–1
documentation, related, P–4
E
Electrostatic Discharge, preventing, 2–2
EMC directive, 2–1
ENET, definition, P–3
ESD, preventing, 2–2
Ethernet
definition, P–3
description, 3–1
network requirements, 4–1
connection, definition, P–3
Ethernet Connector
pinouts, 2–6
wiring, 2–6
connector, pinouts, 2–6
Ethernet hardware address, 4–1
Control Logix, Ethernet Module, 1–1
Ethernet Module
and ESD, 2–2
connecting to network, 2–7
description, 1–1
features, 1–2
preparing to install, 2–2
configuring the module, 4–1
ControlLogix, Gateway, system example,
1–1
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
I–2
Index
Ethernet module
configuration, 4–1
specifications, B–1
Ethernet network
definition, P–3
module connection, 2–7
Ethernet to Ethernet bridging, 1–2
European Union, directives, 2–1
European Union Directives, 2–1
example, system configuration, 1–1
G
gateway
definition, P–3
description, 3–3
examples, 3–3
gateway address
assigning, 4–3
in BOOTP, 4–2
H
hardware address, Ethernet, 4–1
I
M
manuals, related, P–4
maximum connections, ASA, 2–7
media, Ethernet, 4–1
module
configuration, 4–1
connect to network, 2–7
connector pinouts, 2–6
definition, P–3
description, 1–1
diagnostics and troubleshooting, A–1
Ethernet hardware address, 4–1
features, 1–2
handling and care, 2–2
indicator status, A–1
installation, 2–1, 2–3
preparation, 2–2
installation procedure, 2–4
preventing ESD, 2–2
purpose, 1–1
removal procedure, 2–5
removing, 2–3
safety, 2–2
slot location, 2–3
specifications, B–1
status upon powerup, 2–8
module address, definition, P–3
module connector, pinouts, 2–6
indicator, definition, P–3
installation
module, 2–1
power supply, 2–2
preparation, 2–2
installation procedure, module, 2–4
installing
Ethernet Module, 2–1
module, 2–4
Internet Protocol address, description,
3–2
IP address
definition, P–3
description, 3–2
example, 3–3
in BOOTP, 4–1
setting, 4–2
N
network connector, pinouts, 2–6
P
pinouts, Ethernet Connector, 2–6
power supply
applying power, 2–8
installation, 2–2
status upon powerup, 2–8
procedure
installation, 2–4
removing a module, 2–5
product support, P–4
products, related, P–4
Protocol, alternative, 3–1
L
low voltage directive, 2–1
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
publications, related, P–4
purpose, module, 1–1
Index
R
rack, definition, P–3
related products and documentation, P–4
related publications, P–1
TCP/IP, 3–1
related terms, P–3
Removal and Insertion Under Power
attention, 1–3
feature, 1–3
removal procedure, module, 2–5
removing, module, 2–5
RIUP
attention, 1–3
definition, P–3
feature, 1–3
RJ45, connector pinouts, 2–6
Rockwell Automation, support, P–4
S
Simple Network Management Protocol,
description, 3–5
slot location, module, 2–3
slot numbering, chassis, 2–3
SNMP
definition, P–3
description, 3–5
specifications, module, B–1
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
I–3
I–4
Index
Notes
subnet mask
definition, P–3
description, 3–4
in BOOTP, 4–2
selecting, 4–3
system configuration, example, 1–1
T
TCP/IP
definition, P–3
description, 3–1
related publications, P–1, 3–1
transaction, definition, P–3
transfer, definition, P–3
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet
Protocol, description, 3–1
troubleshooting, module, A–1
typical system configuration, 1–1
U
user manual
conventions, P–2
how to use, P–1
purpose, P–1
questions or comments, P–4
related terms, P–3
who should use, P–1
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
Appendix
A
Diagnostics and
Troubleshooting
What this Appendix
Contains
TXD
Indicator
RXD
Indicator
<•••> ETHERNET
RXD
TXD
The following table describes module health indicator displays,
module status and recommended action:
If the OK
indicator is:
then module
status is:
take this action:
Off
Not operating.
Apply chassis power.
Verify module is completely inserted into
chassis and backplane.
Red, then flashing red
or green
Performing powerup
diagnostics.
None, normal operation.
Green
Operating.
None.
Red flashing
Not configured.
Configure module (refer to Chapter 4)
Red
Unrecoverable fault.
Repair or replace module.
OK Indicator
OK
The following table describes the displays of the transmit (TX) and
receive (RX) indicators:
AUI
If this
indicator:
is:
the module is:
TXD
Green
Transmitting data
Off
Not active
Green
Receiving data
Off
Not active
10 BASET
RXD
1756-ENET
Front View
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
Variable Content TTL:Chap
A–2
Notes
Publication XXXX-XX.X – April 1996
Appendix
B
Specifications
Description
Value
Module Location
any slot in the ControlLogix chassis
Current Requirements
900mA @ +5V dc and 350mA @ 24 V dc
from I/O chassis backplane
Power Dissipation
13.13W maximum @ 5.0V dc
Thermal Dissipation
17.2 BTU/hr maximum @ 5.0V dc
Environmental Conditions:
Operational Temperature
Storage Temperature
Relative Humidity
Shock Unpackaged
Vibration Unpackaged
Conductors
Wiring
Category
0-60oC (32-140oF)
-40 to 85oC (–40 to 185oF)
5-95% without condensation
30g operational
50g non-operational
5g from 10-150Hz
802.3 compliant – twisted pair or AUI
2
Agency Certification
(when product or packaging is marked)
Class I Div 2 Hazardous
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Class I Div 2 Hazardous
marked for all applicable directives
Installation Instructions
Publication 1756-5.3
Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
Variable Content TTL:Chap
B–2
Notes
Publication XXXX-XX.X – April 1996
Allen-Bradley
Publication Problem Report
If you find a problem with our documentation, please complete and return this form.
Pub. Name ControlLogix Ethernet Communication Interface Module
Cat. No. 1756-ENET
Check Problem(s) Type:
Pub. No. 1756-6.5.1
Pub. Date
August 1997
Part No.
Describe Problem(s):
955126-69
Internal Use Only
Technical Accuracy
text
Completeness
procedure/step
illustration
definition
info in manual
example
guideline
feature
(accessibility)
explanation
other
What information is missing?
illustration
info not in
manual
Clarity
What is unclear?
Sequence
What is not in the right order?
Other Comments
Use back for more comments.
Your Name
Location/Phone
Return to: Technical Communication, Allen-Bradley Co., 1 Allen-Bradley Drive, Mayfield Hts., OH 44124
Publication ICCG-5.21-August 1995
Phone: (216)646-3166
FAX: (216)646-4320
PN 955107-82
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Other Comments
45
Allen-Bradley, a Rockwell Automation Business, has been helping its customers improve
productivity and quality for more than 90 years. We design, manufacture and support a broad
range of automation products worldwide. They include logic processors, power and motion
control devices, operator interfaces, sensors and a variety of software. Rockwell is one of the
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Publication 1756-6.5.1 – August 1997
PN 955126-69
Copyright 1997 Allen-Bradley Company, Inc. Printed in USA
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