Mathville 1 School Edition User Manual

Mathville 1 School Edition User Manual
User Manual
SCHOOL EDITION
Mathville 1 Version 1.1
©2007 Courseware Solutions Inc.
www.mathville.com
Purchasers of the program Mathville 1 are hereby
granted permission to copy or distribute this manual in whole
or in part for non-commercial educational purposes
under the condition that the copyright by
Courseware Solutions be acknowledged.
Table of Contents
General Information
Overview.................................................................................. 1
New in this update..................................................................... 1
Suggested grade range.............................................................. 2
Curriculum content..................................................................... 2
Suggestions for use.................................................................... 3
Directions and help.................................................................... 3
Learning approach..................................................................... 4
Levels........................................................................................ 5
Tracking and recording............................................................... 5
Printing options and worksheets.................................................. 6
Technical Information
Requirements............................................................................. 7
Quick start................................................................................. 7
Installation................................................................................. 7
Troubleshooting......................................................................... 8
Network and Internet access....................................................... 8
Curriculum Connections
Number Sense & Measurement................................................... 9
Shapes.................................................................................... 10
Patterns & Data........................................................................ 10
Home Page
Home Page Options................................................................. 11
Activity Descriptions and Sample Worksheets
Count...................................................................................... 12
Numbers & Fractions................................................................ 14
Estimate.................................................................................. 16
Skip Count............................................................................... 18
Add & Subtract........................................................................ 20
Time........................................................................................ 22
Identify.................................................................................... 24
Sort......................................................................................... 26
Build........................................................................................ 28
Pattern..................................................................................... 30
Balance................................................................................... 32
Graph..................................................................................... 34
Student Record Sheet
Description............................................................................... 36
Suggestions for use.................................................................. 36
Appendix A - California Grade 1 Math Curriculum Correlation
Appendix B - Florida Grade 1 Math Curriculum Correlation
Appendix C - Ontario Grade 1 Math Curriculum Correlation
General Information
Overview
Mathville 1 is the first grade member of the Mathville series
of educational software, which is used in thousands of
schools and recommended by many departments and boards
of education. The Mathville series is based on the belief that
EVERY student can enjoy developing and demonstrating their
mathematical ability within a fun, supportive, mathematically
rich environment.
Mathville 1 has 12 multi-level learning activities grouped in
strands:
NUMBER SENSE & MEASUREMENT
SHAPES
PATTERNS & DATA
Count
Numbers & Fractions
Identify
Pattern
Estimate
Skip Count
Sort
Balance
Add & Subtract
Time
Build
Graph
Descriptions of the activities are included in this manual.
Mathville 1 is easy to use, requiring no special registration or
installation process. It is also very versatile and may be used
on single computers with a CD-ROM drive, classroom or
school networks, or internet servers.
Updates, supplementary materials, and technical support are
available from the website: www.mathville.com
New in this update
Mathville 1 is a major update of the program Mathville
Kidway. It incorporates content, structure, and usage
improvements suggested by the many teachers and students
who used Kidway from its release in 1997 to 2006. For
example:
• Curriculum coverage has been increased and updated to
reflect the revised curriculum standards of many
educational jurisdictions. The number of activities has
increased from 8 to 12.
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• Students are automatically advanced through each
activity's multiple levels and are not required to select
their own entry level to begin the activity.
• A worksheet generator is included on the CD. Teachers
can use this program to generate and print worksheets
that address the curriculum skills covered in the Mathville
1 activities.
• A new PRINT feature has been added allowing students to
print out a record of their progress during the session and
to generate and print worksheets addressing the skills of
each activity.
As a result of the extensive technical upgrade, Mathville 1:
• runs on virtually all computer systems commonly used by
schools. It is Macintosh OSX-native and compatible with
the most recent versions of Windows, but still runs on
much older Mac and Windows operating systems.
• has been reduced in size by over 75% from Kidway,
despite higher quality graphics and audio, significantly
increasing network performance
• is available by subscription through a school's high speed
Internet connection
Suggested grade range
Mathville 1 addresses mathematics topics commonly taught
in first grade North American classrooms. With its multi-level
approach, however, many parts of the program are also
suitable for both younger and older children.
The variety of activities and difficulty levels and the fact that
all games and problems are randomly generated allow
Mathville 1 to be used and re-used throughout the school
year.
Curriculum content
All of the Mathville series programs are specifically designed
to correlate closely with the recommended math curriculum
of many national and regional jurisdictions. Included in this
manual are annotated copies of the official recommended
curriculum guides for three representative areas: California,
Florida, and Ontario. As is evident from the annotations,
Mathville 1 covers a significant portion of the Grade 1 math
curriculum for all of these areas.
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For specific curriculum content please refer to the Curriculum
Connections table (pages 9 and 10) and the individual
activity descriptions that follow.
Suggestions for use
Before each session, the volume level of the computer should
be adjusted to a comfortable, audible level. Teachers may
wish to start the program, so that students see the Home
Page on the computer screen when they sit down, and
explain that students will use the mouse to click the picture
buttons for a game or activity (see page 11).
The Home Page is designed to allow students to easily and
freely explore the program, discovering activities which they
find fun and interesting. Teachers who prefer to direct
students to particular activities could copy or describe the
picture button for the activity and instruct students to look for
that button on the screen and click it. The Mathville 1
Student Record Sheet, on page 37 of this manual, could also
be used for this purpose, as well as to record student
achievement during each session.
Students should be encouraged to follow their natural
inclinations to play and explore and to answer their own
"What do I do next?" or "How do I..."-type questions by
looking at the screen and experimenting. Ask students to
think of what else they might do or to look again at what has
happened so far.
Students generally work independently with the program for
a complete period and often enjoy working in pairs. Having
small groups of children work together on the program
provides a good opportunity for cooperative play and
problem-solving and fosters communication as children share
knowledge and ideas and discuss strategies.
Directions and help
Both audio and written directions are given at the beginning
of each activity in Mathville 1. In addition, the contextsensitive HELP button, in the top right of every screen, may
be clicked at any time to repeat the directions or receive
additional text and audio messages.
Mathville 1 uses audio messages and sound effects for their
motivational value and because they are helpful to children
with particular learning styles or reading disabilities or
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levels. All information required to use the program is also
presented in text form, so that the program is suitable for use
with hearing-impaired students or in settings where sound is
not available or desirable.
In general, the directions provided by the HELP button are
brief and procedural, due to the fact that children are
unlikely to choose or respond to longer tutorial-style
directions, and in keeping with the general learning
approach of Mathville 1.
Learning approach
The primary goal of Mathville 1 is to make learning fun and
so many of the activities are game-like in appearance or
structure, drawing on the positive experiences and feelings
of competency that many children have developed through
game playing. At the same time, students must do a
significant amount of math in order to complete each activity.
The activities have been structured to reflect and emphasize
the particular math skill being addressed - to guide the child
through a problem-solving exercise that will help them to
extend their understanding and learn the skill. Mathville 1
relies on this structure and immediate feedback to foster
active student involvement in the learning process.
To promote the development of problem-solving skills,
Mathville 1 provides an environment that encourages
students to try a variety of solutions and to persevere until
the problem is solved. The feedback, prompts, and scoring
are designed to lead students to recognize that trying a
solution that doesn't work is the first step in finding one that
does.
The game-like nature of the activities allows students to
connect their natural problem-solving play experiences with
the math they learn in the classroom. Many children will be
more likely to apply the strategies of perseverance and
reasoning that they have used to master games and puzzles
outside of school, rather than attempting to recall a
memorized algorithm or number fact.
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Levels
The activities in Mathville 1 have between 3 and 6 levels of
difficulty. Students are automatically routed through these
levels by the program. Students always enter an activity at
level 1. This is done to:
• build confidence by creating a comfortable, positive,
predictable environment for the students, who enjoy
demonstrating their knowledge and skills
• provide an opportunity to review and consolidate skills
• create a natural progression of learning experiences that
is intended to lead students to extend their understanding
of basic concepts to more complex ones
• model a problem-solving strategy of beginning with a
simpler, more approachable, version of a problem and
working up to a more complex, previously difficult to
approach problem
At each level a student may do up to 4 randomly generated
challenges, depending upon the particular activity, before
being advanced by the program to the next level.
Tracking and recording
The levels are represented by rows of stars on the right side
of the screen, the first row being Level 1, the second Level 2,
etc. Each successfully completed challenge is recognized
and recorded with a star. By glancing at the stars a teacher
can tell how many problems a student has solved and at
what level they are operating.
When a student completes all of the levels in an activity, a
star appears on the activity's house button on the Home Page
(see page 11). Students can be directed to record this
progress by either using the Mathville 1 Student Record
Sheet on page 37 or one of the printing options described
below.
Also available for evaluation of progress are the worksheets
that can be created using the worksheet generator. These
worksheets (one for each of the 12 activities) can be printed
out and given to the students to measure their skill level both
before and after using the Mathville 1 program.
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Printing options and worksheets
After completing an activity and earning a star, the student
has an opportunity to choose “Print.” Three print options
are available:
• “Home Page“ is a print out of the Home Page showing all
the activity house buttons and earned stars (see page 11).
• “What I did” is a one-page list of all the activities for
which the student earned a star during the session.
Students could be directed to choose this option once, at
the end of the session.
• “Worksheet” is a print out of a dynamically created
problem set designed for off computer use. Each
worksheet addresses the skills covered in the most recent
activity accessed by the student.
These worksheets are designed to consolidate the learning
acquired during the computer activity. They can be used
to provide practice and reinforcement and to help
integrate Mathville 1 into the classroom curriculum.
Sample worksheets are included with each Activity
description.
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Technical Information
Requirements
Mathville 1 is a dual platform multimedia CD-ROM program
that is Win XP and Mac OSX-native, but also runs on most
older Windows PC or Macintosh computers with very
minimal requirements:
WINDOWS PC
MACINTOSH
Windows 95 or higher
System 8 or higher
CD-ROM drive
In addition, the program runs best if the display is set to at
least 1024 by 768 and the sound is adjusted to be easily
heard by the student.
Quick start
Insert the CD-ROM into the drive and:
• for Macintosh, double-click the Mathville 1 icon
• for Windows, choose Run from the Start menu and either
browse to find the file Mathville1.exe or alternatively
type: d:\Mathville1.exe
Installation
Mathville 1 may be run directly from the CD-ROM or from a
hard drive, in which case, the CD-ROM is not needed and
need not be in the drive.
To run from a hard drive without the CD, copy the following
file and folder into an MV1 folder (any folder name will do)
on the hard drive:
• Mathville1.exe (Windows) or Mathville 1 (Macintosh)
• the folder named "data" and all its contents
• WorksheetGenerator.exe (Windows) or Worksheet
Generator (Macintosh) (teacher worksheet generator
program)
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Troubleshooting
If some activities appear blank:
• Make sure that the “data” folder is at the same level and
in the same folder as Mathville 1 or Mathville1.exe.
• Check that all of the contents of the "data" folder have
been copied.
Network and Internet access
To purchase an annual school subscription to Mathville 1,
which allows all students and teachers to use the program
over the school's high-speed internet connection, contact
Courseware Solutions through www.mathville.com.
To run the program on an unlimited number of workstations
in a school, a network version is available. For even more
flexibility, an "internet-ready" version, which can be run on
the board or school's own secure server and accessed
through an Internet browser, is also available.
If users wish to upgrade from a School Edition to a Lab Pack
or Network or Internet-ready version, the full purchase price
of the School Edition will be credited.
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Curriculum Connections
ACTIVITIES
SKILLS
Number Sense & Measurement
• Count up to 30 objects.
Count, Numbers & Fractions
• Read number words to "ten" and numerals to 30.
Count, Numbers & Fractions
• Count forward by 2's, 5's, and 10's to 100 using
a number line, hundreds chart, and grouped
items.
Numbers & Fractions,
Skip Count
• Count backward from 20 by 2's, 5's, and 10's
using a number line.
Skip Count
• Apply the concept of conservation of number.
Count, Balance
• Compose and decompose numbers.
Balance
• Demonstrate an understanding of halves and
quarters as part of a shape or object.
Numbers & Fractions
• Estimate the number of objects in a set and
compare the estimate with the actual number.
Estimate
• Add and subtract numbers to 20.
Add & Subtract
• Read digital and traditional clocks to the half
hour and identify benchmark times e.g. lunch,
bedtime, etc.
Time
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SKILLS
ACTIVITIES
Shapes
• Identify 2- and 3-dimensional figures and
recognize the relationship between them.
Identify, Sort
• Recognize geometric shapes in everyday objects.
Identify
• Sort and classify common 2 and 3-dimensional
shapes by their attributes.
Sort
• Recognize that shapes can be combined to form
other shapes.
Build
Patterns & Data
• Extend simple geometric repeating patterns
involving one attribute.
Pattern
• Recognize and extend simple repeating numeric
patterns.
Pattern
• Demonstrate an understanding of equality.
Balance
• Record primary data using a concrete graph.
Graph
• Sort and organize categorical data and display
it using a concrete graph, a pictograph, or a bar
graph.
Graph
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Home Page
Home Page Options
Count
Numbers & Fractions
Identify
Pattern
Estimate
Skip Count
Sort
Balance
Add & Subtract
Time
Build
Graph
The Mathville 1 Home Page has 12 house buttons, one for each activity.
Normally, the red activity titles, which are for the benefit of teachers rather than
students, are not displayed.
• To display a red activity title, roll the mouse over a house button.
• To go to an activity, click its house button.
In addition, there are 3 buttons in the upper right corner:
• QUIT - immediately quit and exit the Mathville 1 program.
• HELP - see and hear a context-sensitive help message.
• CREDITS - see a list of the creators of Mathville 1.
This button changes to PRINT once student has earned a star.
• PRINT - print out a session progress record or a worksheet covering the same
skills of the last activity.
A star appears on a house button to indicate that the activity was completed
successfully during the current session. For example, the stars on the sample page
above show that during this session Count and Identify were completed.
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Activity Descriptions and Sample Worksheets
Count
SKILLS
• count up to 30 objects
• read number words to "ten"
• read numerals to 30
Picture button (may be copied and given to students to assign activity)
DESCRIPTION
At the Mathville bowling alley students see and count three sets of pins. They then
position and roll bowling balls to knock down a specified total number of pins.
Balls rolled at sets of pins that are the wrong quantity miss completely, becoming
gutter balls. Accurate counting and positioning result in strikes, knocking down all
of the pins.
By immediately giving positive feedback for correct counts, this activity guides
students to accurately count and read number words and numerals. The bowling
game setting and the sight and sound of knocking down a set of pins provides
extra motivation and a real-world application of counting.
Level 1 - Students try to knock down up to ten pins with a single ball. The number
of pins to be knocked down is given as a written number word only.
Level 2 - Students must knock down up to 20 pins with a single ball. The number
of pins to be knocked down is a numeral.
Level 3 - Students are to knock down up to 15 pins by rolling two balls. There are
3 groups of 1 to 10 pins each and the student must decide which two of the groups
can be combined to total the goal number of pins. The goal is written as a
numeral. This level can be used to provide an introduction to the strategy of
counting on to solve an addition problem.
Level 4 - The object is to knock down up to 30 pins by rolling two balls. There are
three groups of 5 to 15 pins each. The goal is written as a numeral.
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Numbers & Fractions
SKILLS
• count out the number of objects in a set
• read number words in a meaningful context
• count by 1's, 2's, 3's, 5's and10's
• demonstrate an understanding of halves and
quarters as part of a shape or object
Picture button (may be copied and given to students to assign activity)
DESCRIPTION
In this activity students use their counting skills and recognition of number words,
fraction words, and multiples to fill a food order at the Mathville Snack Shack.
Food items are selected from the moving counter by a single click of the mouse.
Players are immediately notified if an incorrect item has been selected. Correct
items drop to a tray and positive feedback is given. When an order is complete,
the next one is presented.
This Numbers & Fractions activity can be used to reinforce reading skills as well as
math skills and can easily be extended to many off-computer classroom activities.
Level 1 - Students fill an order by selecting the correct number of food items.
The number in the order is a numeral between 1 and 5.
Level 2 - Students select the correct number of food items in an order.
The number in the order is a number word between one and five.
Level 3 - Students must select the correct number of food items in the order.
The food items that move along the counter are in groups (for example, a bunch of
5 bananas) and the number ordered is a multiple.
Level 4 - Fraction pieces of food (for example, half of an apple) are presented and
students must select the correct half or quarter piece.
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Estimate
SKILLS
• estimate the number of objects in a set and
compare the estimate with the actual number
• locate a number on a number line
Picture button (may be copied and given to students to assign activity)
DESCRIPTION
In this activity students guess the number of bugs that appear on a branch. The
number varies randomly from 10 to 100. The type of bug also varies randomly to
add more interest and variety.
Students are given feedback after each guess. If the guess is not a reasonable
one they are told whether the guess is too high or too low.
Students should be encouraged to talk out their guessing strategies.
Level 1 - Students guess the number of bugs by choosing from 5 numbers: 10, 25,
50, 75, 100. There is no time limit for guessing.
Level 2 - same as Level 1, but a 20 second limit on guessing time is introduced.
Level 3 - Students guess the number of bugs by choosing from 6 numbers on a
number line: 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100
Level 4 - Students guess the number of bugs by choosing from 10 numbers on a
number line: 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100
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Skip Count
SKILLS
• count forward by 2's, 5's, and 10's to 100
using a number line, hundreds chart, and
grouped items
• count backward from 20 by 2's, 5's, and 10's
using a number line
Picture button (may be copied and given to students to assign activity)
DESCRIPTION
In this activity students skip count to make a frog jump from one lily pad to
another, to traverse a number line segment, or to count equal-sized groups of
frogs. The faster and more accurate the skip count, the faster the frog hops along
and reaches the end of the pond or line.
Level 1 - Make a frog hop from point to point on a hundreds chart by clicking the
next number in a skip count. If you click an incorrect number, the frog splashes
into the water and returns to its previous position. Each correct number in the
count is highlighted to draw attention to the pattern created on the hundreds chart.
Level 2 - Make a frog jump along a number line by clicking the next number in a
skip count. If you click an incorrect number, the frog splashes and fails to leap
forward.
Level 3 - Make the frog jump from 20 to 0 along a number line by counting
backward from 20 by 2's, 5's, and 10's.
Level 4 - Find the total number of frogs when presented with a random number of
groups of 2, 5, or 10 frogs each. As the culmination of levels 1, 2, and 3, this
level can be used to model the concept of multiplication as counting by multiples.
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Add & Subtract
SKILLS
• add and subtract numbers to 20
Picture button (may be copied and given to students to assign activity)
DESCRIPTION
At the Mathville duck pond, the ducks are numbered from 1 to 20 and remain in
order as they swim round and round. Above the pond, two ducks display an
addition or subtraction problem in vertical format. Students demonstrate their
addition and subtraction skills by clicking the duck in the pond with the correct
answer.
The ordered and numbered ducks provide a model for solving addition and
subtraction problems by counting on or counting back, allowing students to work
out a method for solving addition and subtraction problems.
Presenting subtraction immediately following addition and suggesting counting
back as a method of solution highlights the inverse relationship between addition
and subtraction.
Level 1 - Add 1 to a single-digit number. The feedback for this level encourages
the students to think of adding 1 as thinking of the number that is one more than a
given number or looking for the first number that comes after the given number.
Level 2 - Add single-digit numbers that total 10 or less. Students who answer the
problem (X + Y) incorrectly are directed to look for duck X and then count Y more
ducks.
Level 3 - Add single-digit numbers that total between 10 and 20 inclusive.
Level 4 - Subtract a single-digit number from a number up to 20. Students who
answer "X - Y" incorrectly are guided to find duck X and then look for the number
that is Y in front of it.
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Time
SKILLS
• read digital and traditional clocks
• tell time to the hour and half hour
• read a clock to identify benchmark times (for
example, times for breakfast, lunch, bedtime,
etc.)
Picture button (may be copied and given to students to assign activity)
DESCRIPTION
In this activity students read traditional and digital clocks, time words (for example,
"six o'clock" and "half past two") and relate benchmark times (breakfast, lunch,
bedtime etc.) to the time displayed on the clock.
Level 1 - Students click the number on the clock face where the hour hand should
point. The time is presented in the form "n o'clock" where n is between 1 and 12.
Level 2 - Students click the number on the clock face where the hour hand should
point. The time is presented in digital form (for example, 10:00).
Level 3 - Students click the number on the clock face where the shorter hour hand
should point and also where the longer minute hand should point. The time is
presented in either digital form (for example, 6:30) or word form (for example,
"half past 6").
Level 4 - The clock shows a time (hour or half hour) and the student must select the
event that would most likely occur at that time. A choice of three events is
presented, each one in both picture and word format.
Level 5 - The traditional clock shows a time (hour or half hour) and the student
must select the correct digital form of the time from a choice of four possibilities.
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Identify
SKILLS
• identify 2- and 3-dimensional figures
• recognize the relationship between 2- and 3dimensional figures
• recognize geometric shapes in everyday
objects
Picture button (may be copied and given to students to assign activity)
DESCRIPTION
In this Bingo game students exercise their skill in recognizing 2- and 3-dimensional
shapes and the relationship between those shapes and everyday objects.
The game begins with a ball that drops down the ramp. All the squares on the
bingo card that match the shape on the ball must be selected. BINGO is attained
when any row, column, or diagonal on the card is completely marked. There are
no penalties for incorrect guesses.
Level 1 - The shapes on the card and dropping balls are limited to squares,
rectangles, triangles and circles. The bingo card is 3 by 3.
Level 2 - The shapes on the bingo card are everyday 3-dimensional objects that
must be matched to a related 2-dimensional shape. The bingo card is 3 by 3.
Level 3 - The shape possibilities are expanded to include ellipses and trapezoids.
The bingo card is 3 by 3.
Level 4 - The shapes (squares, rectangles, triangles, circles, ellipses, and
trapezoids) are presented on a 5 by 5 bingo card.
Level 5 - As in Level 2, everyday objects are presented on a 5 by 5 bingo card.
Level 6 - Randomly rotated shapes (squares, rectangles, triangles, circles, ellipses
and trapezoids) are presented on a 5 by 5 bingo card.
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Sort
SKILLS
• identify, sort, and classify common 2dimensional shapes
• sort and classify common 2-dimensional
shapes by their attributes
• sort and classify common 3-dimensional
shapes by their attributes
Picture button (may be copied and given to students to assign activity)
DESCRIPTION
Students guide falling shapes to sort them into three fish tanks, each labeled with a
different shape name or attribute. Shapes that fall into the wrong tank splash and
destroy themselves and any other shapes already in the tank.
The game aspect of this activity and the direct connection between accurate
sorting skills and game success motivate students to demonstrate or improve their
geometric classification and sorting skills. By observing and experimenting to
achieve success in the game, students can also discover or consolidate sorting and
classification skills.
The speed of the falling objects is controlled by up and down arrows, allowing for
individual student preferences and learning styles. Those with well-developed
sorting skills who enjoy a fast-moving game can increase the speed. Students
whose skills are at a lower level or who are uncomfortable with the pressure of a
speed-dependent situation can slow or stop the falling, taking as much time as they
want to make their sorting decisions.
Level 1 - Common two-dimensional shapes such as circles, squares, rectangles, and
triangles drop towards tanks with the names of the shapes. Each shape must be
correctly guided to the tank with its name.
Level 2 - Common two-dimensional shapes such as circles, squares, rectangles, and
triangles drop towards tanks labeled with attributes. For example, the three tanks
might be labeled: 3 corners, 4 corners, no corners.
Level 3 - Common three-dimensional shapes such as spheres, cubes, and cylinders
must be sorted into tanks with labels such as: like a box, like a ball, like a can.
Level 4 - Common three-dimensional shapes must be sorted based on their faces.
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Build
SKILLS
• identify shapes in a geometric design
• combine shapes to form other shapes
• discover through experimentation how to
manipulate an object in a desired direction
Picture button (may be copied and given to students to assign activity)
DESCRIPTION
In this puzzle challenge, students are presented with an outline shape, a set of
shapes that can be combined to fill the outline, and a robot whose movements can
be controlled by clicking left, right, up, and down arrows. The object is to
assemble the shapes to fill the outline.
Part of the challenge is to figure out how the robot can be maneuvered to push the
shapes in different directions. Students must experiment and observe how the
robot interacts with the shapes to develop a successful moving strategy, which is
dependent upon their relative positions.
Level 1 - All of the puzzles are two simple two-dimensional shapes that fit together
to form another simple two-dimensional shape. For example, two triangles
combine to form a rectangle.
Level 2 - Three or four shapes must be combined to form a geometric shape. For
example, two triangles and a square combine to form a parallelogram.
Level 3 - Four or five shapes must be combined to form a geometric design such as
a house or a bird.
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Pattern
SKILLS
• extend simple repeating patterns
• extend simple geometric repeating patterns
involving one attribute
• extend simple numeric repeating patterns
Picture button (may be copied and given to students to assign activity)
DESCRIPTION
A magic wand waves at a set of frogs and one by one they turn into a shape,
object, or number. The wand stops over the last frog and five choices are
displayed. The object is to recognize the developing pattern and extend it to
guess the result when the wand waves over the final frog. If the guess is incorrect,
the frog remains a frog. The frog is transformed when the pattern is extended
correctly.
Level 1 - The frogs turn into simple everyday objects like apples or balls. The
pattern is a two-element repeating pattern. For example, the pattern might be:
apple, orange, apple, orange, apple, ?
Level 2 - The frogs turn into simple two-dimensional geometric shapes. The pattern
is a two-element repeating pattern involving one attribute. For example, the
pattern might be: small red square, small blue square, small red square, small
blue square, small red square, ?
Level 3 - Similar to Level 2 but the pattern is a three-element repeating pattern
involving one attribute. For example, the pattern might be: small red square,
medium red square, big red square, small red square, medium red square, big red
square, small red square, medium red square, ?
Level 4 - In this level, the frogs turn into single-digit numerals. The pattern is a two
or three-element repeating pattern. For example, the pattern might be: 5, 8, 1, 5,
8, 1, 5, 8, ?
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Balance
SKILLS
• demonstrate an understanding of equality
• apply the concept of conservation of number
• compose and decompose numbers (for
example, 5 connected cubes equals 3
connected cubes and 2 connected cubes)
Picture button (may be copied and given to students to assign activity)
DESCRIPTION
In this activity students use a pan balance model to explore the concept of
equality.
Level 1 - Students must balance 2, 4, or 6 cubes that are initially all on one pan.
Students can move the cubes from one side of the balance to the other and
immediately see the impact by the movement of the balance beam.
Level 2 - Students must balance an even number of cubes (up to 12) by
determining the number of cubes to add or subtract from each side to establish
equality.
Level 3 - Students must balance three stacks of attached cubes where stack1+
stack2 = stack3. The largest stack possible is 10 cubes tall. For example, students
must demonstrate that a stack of 6 attached cubes on one side balances a stack of
2 cubes and a stack of 4 cubes on the other side.
Level 4 - Same as Level 3 with four cube stacks where stack1 + stack2 + stack3 =
stack4.
Level 5 - Same as Level 4 with four cube stacks where stack1 + stack2 = stack3 +
stack4.
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Graph
SKILLS
• record primary data using a concrete graph
• sort and organize categorical data and
display it with a concrete graph or a
pictograph
• classify data and represent it with a bar
graph
Picture button (may be copied and given to students to assign activity)
DESCRIPTION
In this activity, students are given a graph template and unsorted data in the form
of the responses to a question. They must organize the data and display it in
graph form. Incorrectly placed items bounce out of the graph area, guiding the
student to create an accurate graph.
Level 1 - The answers to questions such as, "Which fruit did you like more?" are
displayed as random numbers of two choices, such as apples and oranges. These
objects must be correctly placed on a pre-labeled concrete graph.
Level 2 - The answers in this level must be categorized in order to be correctly
placed on a concrete graph. For example, the question might be, "Are you eating
a fruit or a vegetable?" and the answers are random numbers of apples, oranges,
bananas, carrots, corn, potatoes, etc.
Level 3 - The questions and answers are the same as those for Level 2, but the
answers must be categorized and displayed as a pictograph by placing
representative pictures, rather than the objects themselves, on the graph template.
Level 4 - Similar to Level 3, but the data must be displayed as a bar graph by
dragging bars to the graph template.
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Student Record Sheet
Description
Suggestions for use
The Mathville 1 Student Record Sheet on the next page is a
simple way to let students record the work that they did
during a Mathville 1 computer session. It may also be used
as an assignment sheet by marking or pointing out the
picture of the activity that the teacher would like the student
to do that day.
• Print or photocopy the next page and hand out to students
before or as they sit down to use the computer.
• To assign a specific activity, circle the appropriate picture
on the sheet and instruct students to click the same picture
in the program. Alternatively, copy or describe the
activity's picture button from the preceding pages and
hand it out first. Hand out the Record Sheet later in the
session.
• Near the end of the session, draw the students' attention
to the Record Sheet and ask them to circle the picture
button of the activity they did. If they did more than one
activity they should circle more than one button. On the
back of the page, they should draw a picture of one of
the things they did, or write some words to describe what
they did, or both.
• Share the Record Sheets with parents, post them on
bulletin boards or include them in a learning portfolio.
36
Mathville 1 v.1.1 ©2007 Courseware Solutions Inc. www.mathville.com
Name:
Circle what you did today.
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Appendix A
California Grade 1 Math Curriculum Correlation
Appendix B
Florida Grade 1 Math Curriculum Correlation
Appendix C
Ontario Grade 1 Math Curriculum Correlation
38
Mathville 1 v.1.1 ©2007 Courseware Solutions Inc. www.mathville.com
B
D
R
A
Mathematics
Content Standards
for California
Public Schools
O
O F
This extract of the Mathematics Content Standards for
California Public Schools has been annotated to show the
correlation between the Grade 1 Content Standards and the
activities in Mathville 1, the first grade component of the
Mathville Series of Educational Software.
Kindergarten Through
Grade Twelve
Courseware Solutions Inc.
www.mathville.com
Adopted by the
California State Board
of Education
December, 1997
ED
U
4
GRADE ONE
Grade One
By the end of grade one, students understand and use the concept of ones and
tens in the place value number system. Students add and subtract small numbers
with ease. They measure with simple units and locate objects in space. They
describe data and analyze and solve simple problems.
Number Sense
1.0
Numbers & Fractions
Count
Students understand and use numbers up to 100:
1.1 Count, read, and write whole numbers to 100.
1.2 Compare and order whole numbers to 100 by using the symbols for less than, equal
to, or greater than (<, =, >).
Count
1.3 Represent equivalent forms of the same number through the use of physical models, diagrams, and number expressions (to 20) (e.g., 8 may be represented as 4 + 4,
5 + 3, 2 + 2 + 2 + 2, 10 − 2, 11 − 3).
1.4 Count and group object in ones and tens (e.g., three groups of 10 and 4 equals 34,
or 30 + 4).
1.5 Identify and know the value of coins and show different combinations of coins that
equal the same value.
2.0
Students demonstrate the meaning of addition and subtraction and use these
operations to solve problems:
Add & Subtract
2.1 Know the addition facts (sums to 20) and the corresponding subtraction facts and
commit them to memory.
Add & Subtract
2.2 Use the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction to solve problems.
Add & Subtract
2.3 Identify one more than, one less than, 10 more than, and 10 less than a given
number.
Skip Count
Numbers & Fractions
2.4 Count by 2s, 5s, and 10s to 100.
2.5 Show the meaning of addition (putting together, increasing) and subtraction
(taking away, comparing, finding the difference).
4
GRADE ONE 5
2.6 Solve addition and subtraction problems with one- and two-digit numbers
(e.g., 5 + 58 = __).
2.7 Find the sum of three one-digit numbers.
3.0
Estimate
Students use estimation strategies in computation and problem solving that
involve numbers that use the ones, tens, and hundreds places:
3.1 Make reasonable estimates when comparing larger or smaller numbers.
Algebra and Functions
1.0
Students use number sentences with operational symbols and expressions to
solve problems:
1.1 Write and solve number sentences from problem situations that express relationships involving addition and subtraction.
Add & Subtract
1.2 Understand the meaning of the symbols +, −, =.
1.3 Create problem situations that might lead to given number sentences involving
addition and subtraction.
Measurement and Geometry
1.0
Students use direct comparison and nonstandard units to describe the measurements of objects:
1.1 Compare the length, weight, and volume of two or more objects by using direct
comparison or a nonstandard unit.
Time
1.2 Tell time to the nearest half hour and relate time to events (e.g., before/after,
shorter/longer).
2.0
Students identify common geometric figures, classify them by common
attributes, and describe their relative position or their location in space:
Sort
Identify
2.1 Identify, describe, and compare triangles, rectangles, squares, and circles, including
the faces of three-dimensional objects.
Sort
2.2 Classify familiar plane and solid objects by common attributes, such as color,
position, shape, size, roundness, or number of corners, and explain which attributes
are being used for classification.
2.3 Give and follow directions about location.
2.4 Arrange and describe objects in space by proximity, position, and direction
(e.g., near, far, below, above, up, down, behind, in front of, next to, left or right of).
6
GRADE ONE
Statistics, Data Analysis, and Probability
1.0
Sort
Graph
Graph
Students organize, represent, and compare data by category on simple graphs
and charts:
1.1 Sort objects and data by common attributes and describe the categories.
1.2 Represent and compare data (e.g., largest, smallest, most often, least often) by using
pictures, bar graphs, tally charts, and picture graphs.
2.0
Students sort objects and create and describe patterns by numbers, shapes,
sizes, rhythms, or colors:
Pattern
2.1 Describe, extend, and explain ways to get to a next element in simple repeating
patterns (e.g., rhythmic, numeric, color, and shape).
Mathematical Reasoning
1.0
Students make decisions about how to set up a problem:
Build
1.1 Determine the approach, materials, and strategies to be used.
Balance
2.0
1.2 Use tools, such as manipulatives or sketches, to model problems.
Students solve problems and justify their reasoning:
2.1 Explain the reasoning used and justify the procedures selected.
2.2 Make precise calculations and check the validity of the results from the context
of the problem.
3.0
Students note connections between one problem and another.
Throughout the program as they move from one level to the next.
Grade Level Expectations
for the Sunshine State
Standards
Mathematics
First Grade
This extract of the Grade Level Expectations for
the Sunshine State Standards - Mathematics First
Grade has been annotated to show the correlation
between the specific expectations for First Grade
and the activities in Mathville 1.
Courseware Solutions Inc.
www.mathville.com
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
www.myfloridaeducation.com
Sunshine State Standards
Grade Level Expectations
Mathematics
First Grade
The first grade student:
Number Sense, Concepts, and Operations
•
uses one-to one correspondence to count objects to 100 or more.
•
reads and writes numerals to 100 or more.
Count, Numbers & Fractions
Count, Numbers & Fractions
•
uses ordinal numbers 1 - 10 or higher.
•
compares and orders whole numbers to 100 or more using concrete materials, drawings,
number lines, symbols (<, =, >), and vocabulary such as equal to, more than, or less
than.
•
represents real-world applications of whole numbers, to 100 or more, using concrete
materials, drawings, and symbols.
•
represents, explains, and compares fractions (one half, one fourth, three fourths) as part
of a whole and part of a set using concrete materials, drawings, and real-life situations. Numbers & Fractions
•
knows that the total of equivalent fractional pparts makes a whole (for example, two
halves equal one whole). Numbers & Fractions
•
represents equivalent forms of the same number, up to 20 or more, through the use of
p
concrete materials (including coins), diagrams, and number expressions
(for example, 16
can be represented as 8+8, 10+6, 4+4+4+4, 20-4, 17-1). Count, Balance
•
counts orally to 100 or more by 2s, 5s, and 10s with or without a hundred chart.
•
uses concrete materials, pictures, and symbols to show the grouping and place value of
numbers to 100 or more.
•
counts forward and backward by one beginning with any number less than 100.
•
counts forward by tens from any number less than 10 using a hundred chart.
•
knows place value patterns and uses zero as a place holder (for example, trading 10 ones
for 1 ten).
•
knows the place value of a designated digit in whole numbers to 100.
•
demonstrates knowledge of the meaning of addition (putting together, increasing) and
subtraction (taking away, comparing, finding the difference) using manipulatives,
drawings, symbols, and story problems.
•
solves basic addition facts using concrete objects and thinking strategies, such as count
on, count back, doubles, doubles plus one, and make ten.
•
describes the related facts that represent
a given fact family up to 18 (for example,
p
9+3=12, 12-9=3, 12-3=9). Balance
•
knows how to use the commutative and associative properties of addition in solving
problems and basic facts.
st
th
Florida Department of Education
Skip Count
1
Add & Subtract
Add & Subtract
Sunshine State Standards
Grade Level Expectations
Mathematics
First Grade
•
adds and subtracts two-digit numbers without regrouping (sums to 100) using models,
concrete materials, or algorithms.
•
poses and solves simple number problems by selecting the proper operation (for
example, finding how many students are sitting at tables one and two).
•
uses concrete objects to solve number problems with one operation.
•
describes thinking when solving number problems.
•
writes number sentences associated with addition and subtraction situations.
•
knows appropriate methods (for example, concrete materials, mental mathematics, paper
and pencil) to solve real-world problems involving addition and subtraction.
•
uses a calculator to explore addition, subtraction, and skip counting.
•
uses the language of estimation and approximation to identify and describe numbers in
real-world situations (for example, about, near, closer to, between). Estimate
•
estimates the number of objects, explains the reasoning for the estimate, and checks the
reasonableness of the estimate by counting. Estimate
•
makes reasonable estimates when comparing larger or smaller quantities.
•
estimates reasonable answers to basic facts (e.g., Will 7+8 be more than 10?).
•
demonstrates and builds models to show the difference between odd and even numbers
using concrete objects or drawings.
Estimate
Measurement
•
knows how to communicate measurement concepts.
•
demonstrates an understanding of measurement of lengths by selecting appropriate units
of measurement (for example, inches or feet).
•
demonstrates an understanding of weight by selecting appropriate units of measurement
(for example, grams or kilograms).
•
demonstrates an understanding of time using digital and analog clocks (for example,
Time
hour and half-hour intervals).
•
demonstrates an understanding of temperature using thermometers.
•
demonstrates an understanding of capacity by selecting appropriate units of
measurement (for example, cups, pints, quarts, liters).
•
measures length, weight, or capacity of an object using standard and nonstandard units
(for example, pounds, grams, or wooden blocks).
•
uses nonstandard, customary, and metric units to measure, compare, and order objects
according to their lengths or weights.
Florida Department of Education
2
Sunshine State Standards
Grade Level Expectations
Mathematics
First Grade
•
knows that a uniform unit is needed to measure in real-world situations (for example,
length, weight, time, capacity).
•
estimates, measures, and compares dimensions of an object.
•
estimates and measures the passage of time using before or after; yesterday, today, or
tomorrow; day or night; morning, afternoon, or evening; hour or half-hour.
•
knows and compares money values, including the quarter (25 cents), half-dollar (50
cents), and dollar (100 cents).
•
selects and uses an appropriate nonstandard unit to measure length, weight, time, and
capacity.
•
knows appropriate standard tools for measuring linear dimensions, weight, capacity, and
temperature.
•
knows appropriate tools (clocks and calendar) for measuring time (including days,
weeks, months).
Geometry and Spatial Sense
•
knows attributes of two- and three-dimensional figures (for example, vertices, edges).
•
sorts two- and three-dimensional figures according to their attributes.
•
understands lines of symmetry in two-dimensional shapes (for example, paper folding,
ink blot pictures, mirrors).
•
knows shapes that can be combined to form other shapes (for example, using pattern
blocks, six triangles make a hexagon). Build
•
uses concrete materials to demonstrate slides, turns, and reflections.
•
follows directions to move or place an object and describes the relationship of objects
using positional language (for example, over, to the left of).
•
compares and sorts two-dimensional and three-dimensional real-life objects.
•
knows geometric shapes in real-life situations.
•
compares, describes, and sorts objects according to attributes (for example, corners,
curves, faces).
Sort
•
locates and explains known and unknown numbers on a number line from 0 to 100 or
more.
Estimate, Skip Count
Sort
Identify, Sort
Identify
Algebraic Thinking
•
identifies, describes, and compares patterns using a wide variety of materials and
attributes (for example, size, shape, color). Pattern
•
describes a pattern rule.
Florida Department of Education
Identify, Sort
3
Sunshine State Standards
Grade Level Expectations
Mathematics
First Grade
•
explores number patterns on a hundred chart and with a calculator.
•
predicts and extends existing patterns that are concrete or pictorial.
•
uses one attribute to create a pattern (for example, thick or thin, open or closed).
•
transfers patterns from one medium to another (for example, concrete objects to actions
or symbols).
•
predicts, extends, and creates patterns
•
identifies and generates patterns in a list of related number pairs based on real-life
situations (for example, T-chart with number of children to number of eyes).
•
Number of Children
Pattern
Pattern
Number of Eyes
1
2
2
4
•
solves addition and subtraction sentences where an unknown number is represented by a
geometric shape (for example, 2 += 9).
•
uses concrete objects to solve number sentences with equalities and inequalities (using
the symbols >, =, <).
•
uses concrete objects to solve real-world addition and subtraction problems using one
unknown (for example, There are 28 children in this class, and 25 are here today. How many
are absent?).
Data Analysis and Probability
•
surveys a small group to answer a simple question involving two categories or choices
(for example, students who bring lunches or students who buy lunches).
•
uses mathematical language to read and interpret data on a simple concrete graph,
pictorial graph, or chart.
•
uses concrete materials, pictures, or graphs to display data and identify range and mode.
•
discusses a reasonable prediction for a large group using data from a small group.
•
uses a calculator to compare data and explores computer graphing software.
•
knows the likelihood of a given situation (for example, snowing in South Florida).
•
explains if an event is certain, probable, or impossible.
•
discusses results of games and activities dependent upon chance.
•
knows if a given event is more likely, equally likely, or less likely to occur (for example,
six blue marbles and two green marbles in a bag).
•
constructs appropriate questions for a class survey, in a whole group setting.
•
analyzes results of a survey as part of a class discussion.
Florida Department of Education
4
Graph
Ministry of Education
REVISED
The Ontario Curriculum
Grades 1-8
Mathematics
This extract of the Revised Ontario Mathematics
Curriculum Guideline has been annotated to
show the correlation between Specific
Expectations for Grade 1 and the activities in
Mathville 1.
Courseware Solutions Inc.
www.mathville.com
2005
ISBN 0-7794-8121-6 (Print)
ISBN 0-7794-8122-4 (Internet)
33
GRADE 1
Grade 1: Number Sense and Numeration
Overall Expectations
By the end of Grade 1, students will:
• read, represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 50, and use concrete materials to
investigate fractions and money amounts;
• demonstrate an understanding of magnitude by counting forward to 100 and backwards
from 20;
• solve problems involving the addition and subtraction of single-digit whole numbers, using a
variety of strategies.
Specific Expectations
Quantity Relationships
By the end of Grade 1, students will:
– represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 50, using a variety of tools (e.g.,
connecting cubes, ten frames, base ten
materials, number lines, hundreds charts)
and contexts (e.g., real-life experiences,
number stories);
Count
Numbers & Fractions
Count
Numbers & Fractions
Count
– read and print in words whole numbers to
ten, using meaningful contexts (e.g., storybooks, posters);
– demonstrate, using concrete materials, the
concept of conservation of number (e.g.,
5 counters represent the number 5, regardless whether they are close together or far
apart);
– relate numbers to the anchors of 5 and 10
(e.g., 7 is 2 more than 5 and 3 less than 10);
– identify and describe various coins (i.e.,
penny, nickel, dime, quarter, $1 coin, $2
coin), using coin manipulatives or drawings, and state their value (e.g., the value
of a penny is one cent; the value of a
toonie is two dollars);
– represent money amounts to 20¢, through
investigation using coin manipulatives;
– estimate the number of objects in a set,
and check by counting (e.g.,“I guessed
that there were 20 cubes in the pile.
I counted them and there were only 17
cubes. 17 is close to 20.”); Estimate
– compose and decompose numbers up to
20 in a variety of ways, using concrete
materials (e.g., 7 can be decomposed using
nto 6 and 1, or 5 and 2,
connecting cubes into
or 4 and 3);
Count
– divide whole objects into parts and identify and describe, through investigation,
equal-sized parts of the whole, using
fractional names (e.g., halves; fourths or
quarters).
Numbers & Fracttions
Counting
By the end of Grade 1, students will:
– demonstrate, using concrete materials, the
concept of one-to-one correspondence
between number and objectss when
wCount
counting;
Numbers & Frractions
– count forward by 1’s, 2’s, 5’s, and 10’s to
100, using a variety of tools and strategies
(e.g., move with steps; skip count on a
number line; place counters on a hundreds chart; connect cubes to show equal
groups; count groups of pennies, nickels,
or dimes);
Numbers & Fra
actions
Skip Count
34
THE ONTARIO CURRICULUM, GRADES 1–8: MATHEMATICS
– count backwards by 1’s from 20 and any
number less than 20 (e.g., count backwards from 18 to 11), with and without
the use of concrete materials and number
lines;
– count backwards from 20 by 2’s and 5’s,
using a variety of tools (e.g., number lines,
hundreds charts);
Skkip Count
Sk
kip Count
– use ordinal numbers to thirty-first in
meaningful contexts (e.g., identify the days
of the month on a calendar).
Operational Sense
By the end of Grade 1, students will:
– solve a variety of problems involving the
addition and subtraction of whole numbers to 20, using concrete materials and
drawings (e.g., pictures, number lines)
(Sample problem: Miguel has 12 cookies.
Seven cookies are chocolate. Use counters
to determine how many cookies are not
chocolate.);
– solve problems involving the addition and
subtraction of single-digit whole numbers,
using a variety of mental strategies (e.g.,
one more than, one less than, counting on,
counting back, doubles);
– add and subtract money amounts to 10¢,
using coin manipulatives and drawings.
Co
ount
Ad
dd & Subtract
Ad
dd & Subtract
35
GRADE 1
Grade 1: Measurement
Overall Expectations
By the end of Grade 1, students will:
• estimate, measure, and describe length, area, mass, capacity, time, and temperature, using
non-standard units of the same size;
• compare, describe, and order objects, using attributes measured in non-standard units.
Specific Expectations
Attributes, Units, and Measurement Sense
By the end of Grade 1, students will:
– demonstrate an understanding of the use
of non-standard units of the same size
(e.g., straws, index cards) for measuring
(Sample problem: Measure the length of
your desk in different ways; for example,
by using several different non-standard
units or by starting measurements from
opposite ends of the desk. Discuss your
findings.);
– estimate, measure (i.e., by placing nonstandard units repeatedly, without overlaps
or gaps), and record lengths, heights, and
distances (e.g., a book is about 10 paper
clips wide; a pencil is about 3 toothpicks
long);
– construct, using a variety of strategies,
tools for measuring lengths, heights, and
distances in non-standard units (e.g., footprints on cash register tape or on connecting cubes);
– estimate, measure (i.e., by minimizing
overlaps and gaps), and describe area,
through investigation using non-standard
units (e.g.,“It took about 15 index cards
to cover my desk, with only a little bit of
space left over.”);
– estimate, measure, and describe the capacity and/or mass of an object, through
investigation using non-standard units
(e.g.,“My journal has the same mass as
13 pencils.” “The juice can has the same
capacity as 4 pop cans.”);
– estimate, measure, and describe the passage
of time, through investigation using nonstandard units (e.g., number of sleeps;
number of claps; number of flips of a sand
timer);
– read demonstration digital and analogue
clocks, and use them to identify benchTim
me
mark times (e.g., times for breakfast,
lunch, dinner; the start and end of school;
bedtime) and to tell and write time to the
hour and half-hour in everyday settings;
– name the months of the year in order, and
read the date on a calendar;
– relate temperature to experiences of the
seasons (e.g.,“In winter, we can skate
because it’s cold enough for there to
be ice.”).
Measurement Relationships
By the end of Grade 1, students will:
– compare two or three objects using measurable attributes (e.g., length, height,
width, area, temperature, mass, capacity),
and describe the objects using relative terms
(e.g., taller, heavier, faster, bigger, warmer; “If I
put an eraser, a pencil, and a metre stick
beside each other, I can see that the eraser
is shortest and the metre stick is longest.”);
– compare and order objects by their linear
measurements, using the same non-standard
unit (Sample problem: Using a length of
string equal to the length of your forearm,
work with a partner to find other objects
that are about the same length.);
37
GRADE 1
Grade 1: Geometry and Spatial Sense
Overall Expectations
By the end of Grade 1, students will:
• identify common two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional figures and sort and classify
them by their attributes;*
• compose and decompose common two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional figures;
• describe the relative locations of objects using positional language.
Specific Expectations
Geometric Properties
By the end of Grade 1, students will:
Identify
Pattern
Sort
Sort
Identify
Sort
Graph
Identify
– identify and describe common twodimensional shapes (e.g., circles, triangles,
rectangles, squares) and sort and classify
them by their attributes (e.g., colour; size;
texture; number of sides), using concrete
materials and pictorial representations
(e.g.,“I put all the triangles in one group.
Some are long and skinny, and some are
short and fat, but they all have three
sides.”);
– trace and identify the two-dimensional
faces of three-dimensional figures, using
concrete models (e.g.,“I can see squares
on the cube.”);
– identify and describe common threedimensional figures (e.g., cubes, cones,
cylinders, spheres, rectangular prisms) and
sort and classify them by their attributes
(e.g., colour; size; texture; number and
shape of faces), using concrete materials
and pictorial representations (e.g.,“I put
the cones and the cylinders in the same
group because they all have circles on
them.”);
– describe similarities and differences
between an everyday object and a threedimensional figure (e.g.,“A water bottle
looks like a cylinder, except the bottle gets
thinner at the top.”);
– locate shapes in the environment that have
symmetry, and describe the symmetry.
Geometric Relationships
By the end of Grade 1, students will:
– compose patterns, pictures, and designs,
using common two-dimensional shapes
(Sample problem: Create a picture of a Builld
flower using pattern blocks.);
– identify and describe shapes within other
shapes (e.g., shapes within a geometric Builld
design);
– build three-dimensional structures using
concrete materials, and describe the twodimensional shapes the structures contain;
sional
– cover outline puzzles with two-dimensional
shapes (e.g., pattern blocks, tangrams) Build
(Sample problem: Fill in the outline of a
boat with tangram pieces.).
Location and Movement
By the end of Grade 1, students will:
– describe the relative locations of objects or
people using positional language (e.g.,
over, under, above, below, in front of, behind,
inside, outside, beside, between, along);
* For the purposes of student learning in Grade 1, “attributes” refers to the various characteristics of twodimensional shapes and three-dimensional figures, including geometric properties. (See glossary entries for
“attribute” and “property (geometric)”.) Students learn to distinguish attributes that are geometric properties
from attributes that are not geometric properties in Grade 2.
39
GRADE 1
Grade 1: Patterning and Algebra
Overall Expectations
By the end of Grade 1, students will:
• identify, describe, extend, and create repeating patterns;
• demonstrate an understanding of the concept of equality, using concrete materials and
addition and subtraction to 10.
Specific Expectations
Pattern
Pattern
Skip Count
Patterns and Relationships
By the end of Grade 1, students will:
Expressions and Equality
By the end of Grade 1, students will:
– identify, describe, and extend, through
investigation, geometric repeating patterns
involving one attribute (e.g., colour, size,
shape, thickness, orientation);
– create a set in which the number of
objects is greater than, less than, or equal
to the number of objects in a given set;
– identify and extend, through investigation,
numeric repeating patterns (e.g., 1, 2, 3, 1,
2, 3, 1, 2, 3, …);
– describe numeric repeating patterns in a
hundreds chart;
– identify a rule for a repeating pattern (e.g.,
“We’re lining up boy, girl, boy, girl, boy,
girl.”);
– create a repeating pattern involving one
attribute (e.g., colour, size, shape, sound)
(Sample problem: Use beads to make a
string that shows a repeating pattern
involving one attribute.);
Pattern
– represent a given repeating pattern in a
variety of ways (e.g., pictures, actions,
colours, sounds, numbers, letters) (Sample
problem: Make an ABA, ABA, ABA
pattern using actions like clapping or
tapping.).
– demonstrate examples of equality, through
investigation, using a “balance” model
(Sample problem: Demonstrate, using
a pan balance, that a train of 7 attached
cubes on one side balances a train of
3 cubes and a train of 4 cubes on the
Balance
other side.);
– determine, through investigation using a
“balance” model and whole numbers to
10, the number of identical objects that
must be added or subtracted to establish
equality (Sample problem: On a pan balance, 5 cubes are placed on the left side
and 8 cubes are placed on the right side.
How many cubes should you take off the
right side so that both sides balance?).
Balance
40
THE ONTARIO CURRICULUM, GRADES 1–8: MATHEMATICS
Grade 1: Data Management and Probability
Overall Expectations
By the end of Grade 1, students will:
• collect and organize categorical primary data and display the data using concrete graphs and
pictographs, without regard to the order of labels on the horizontal axis;
• read and describe primary data presented in concrete graphs and pictographs;
• describe the likelihood that everyday events will happen.
Specific Expectations
Graph
Graph
Collection and Organization of Data
By the end of Grade 1, students will:
Data Relationships
By the end of Grade 1, students will:
– demonstrate an ability to organize objects
into categories by sorting and classifying
objects using one attribute (e.g., colour,
size), and by describing informal sorting
experiences (e.g., helping to put away groceries) (Sample problem: Sort a collection
of attribute blocks by colour. Re-sort the
same collection by shape.);
– read primary data presented in concrete
graphs and pictographs, and describe the
data using comparative language (e.g.,
more students chose summer than winter
as their single favourite season);
– collect and organize primary data (e.g., data
collected by the class) that is categorical
(i.e., that can be organized into categories
based on qualities such as colour or hobby),
and display the data using one-to-one
correspondence, prepared templates of
concrete graphs and pictographs (with
titles and labels), and a variety of recording
methods (e.g., arranging objects, placing
stickers, drawing pictures, making tally
marks) (Sample problem: Collect and
organize data about the favourite fruit that
students in your class like to eat.).
– pose and answer questions about collected
data (Sample problem: What was the most
popular fruit chosen by the students in
your class?).
Probability
By the end of Grade 1, students will:
– describe the likelihood that everyday
events will occur, using mathematical
language (i.e., impossible, unlikely, less likely,
more likely, certain) (e.g.,“It’s unlikely that
I will win the contest shown on the cereal
box.”).
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