DRAFT - Kent County Delaware

DRAFT - Kent County Delaware
[DRAFT] Policy 8 [DRAFT]
HEALTH AND SAFETY
§ 8-1. Safety program.
[Adopted 5-13-2003 (P-74A)]
This Policy establishes a safety and health program for Kent County operations and assigns
responsibility for administering and encouraging support of the program to the Division of
Emergency Management.
A.
Goals and purpose.
(1)
(2)
B.
The goals of the safety program are to:
(a)
Create awareness that Kent County governmental activities are subject
to risks of loss and that these risks can be controlled with a successful
program;
(b)
Teach department heads the five steps of risk management:
1. Risk Identification
2. Risk Evaluation
3. Risk Treatment
4. Selection and Implementation
5. Monitoring;
(c)
Encourage and motivate department heads to identify and control risks
in their respective departments.
The safety program shall have three specific purposes:
(a)
Increase health and safety awareness among employees;
(b)
Minimize the County government’s exposure to liability and financial
losses; and
(c)
Develop accountability of all employees and departments for safety
and health issues.
Administration.
(1)
The Division of Emergency Management in the Department of Public Safety
shall be responsible for the administration of a County-wide health and safety
program and the County’s risk management effort. At least two employees
designated by the department head shall be the County’s Safety Officers. The
Safety Officer and the Assistant County Safety Officer are responsible for developing and directing a workplace health and safety program. They shall assist operating personnel in achieving compliance with or developing a more
comprehensive program than the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) based guidelines.
(2)
At a minimum, the duties of the Safety Officers shall include:
(a)
Investigating every workplace accident and documenting steps taken
to remove or reasonably reduce hazards;
8-1
KENT COUNTY
(3)
(b)
Writing and distributing risk management policies and rules;
(c)
Creating a risk management policy statement;
(d)
Establishing inspection procedures to identify, monitor, and reedy key
risks in each department;
(e)
Assign Health & Safety Coordinator(s) to each Department and Division as required;
(f)
Reviewing all major purchases, proposals of new services or designs
for new buildings to identify loss exposures;
(g)
Developing and conducting health and safety training, and health and
safety incentive programs for employees;
(h)
Establishing procedures for reporting and investigating all claims, incidents, and safety violations;
(i)
Preparing a financial impact analysis of potential risks;
(j)
Developing and updating a safety procedure manual; and
(k)
Monitoring and publicizing safety efforts.
The Health and Safety Officers shall each be vested with the authority to order
the work of any County employee or Department stopped if judged by either
of them to be unsafe or posing the risk of injury or significant financial loss.
Work may not resume until a Safety Officer has determined that it is safe to
do so. In addition, a Safety Officer may close, block off, or otherwise prevent
the entry or use of any County facility or equipment judged to be unsafe or
posing a risk of injury or significant financial loss.
C.
The Emergency Management Division Manager shall coordinate health, safety and
risk management program efforts with the Personnel Office as the office responsible
for County insurance administration; the Department of Finance as the office responsible for determining safety improvement costs; the Division of Facilities Management as the office charged with making building alterations; the Division of
Wastewater Facilities, which has the largest employee base in a high risk environment; the Division of Community Services, which has the largest daily interaction
with the general public in graphically remote and isolated work and play environments, and the Division of Emergency Medical Services, which is exposed to hazards
unique to the field of work; the County Administrator to provide direction and leadership in assessing risk; and other departments in identifying and managing specific
hazards.
D.
Employees violating this Policy or disregarding the safety manual shall be subject to
disciplinary action up to and including termination.
E.
An annual report shall be provided to the Levy Court detailing identified hazards, remediation efforts, compensable and non-compensable injuries, and related costs.
8-2
COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR
HEALTH & SAFETY OFFICER
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KENT COUNTY SAFETY PROGRAM
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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Administrative Procedures
Purpose & Mission
Accident, Near-Miss, and Injury Investigation
Driver Safety
Emergency Planning and Response
Injury Reporting and Medical Treatment
Job Safety Analysis
Medical Monitoring and Exposure Records
Modified Duty and Return to Work
New Employee Safety Orientation
Safety Committee Operation
Safety Inspection Program
Work Zone and Traffic Control
Risk Specific Procedures
Blood-borne Pathogens
Chemical Right-To-Know
Confined Space Entry
Cranes, Slings and Hoists
Ergonomics
Fall Protection
Forklift Operations
Hand and Portable Power Tools
Hearing Conservation
Heat Stress Prevention
Ladder Safety
Lockout/Tagout
Machine Guarding
Personal Protective Equipment
Respiratory Protection
Welding and Hot Work
Revision Number:
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PURPOSE & MISSION STATEMENT
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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PURPOSE
This
Mission
Statement
describes
Kent
County
Delaware
Governmental Body (referred to from this point forward as “Kent
County”) actions taken to develop and provide a Safety Manual to
educate, train, measure and improve the health and safety of Kent
County Employees and Contractors working for and under the
direction of Kent County.
MISSION STATEMENT
Continue to aggressively advance the goal of eliminating
employee injuries, illnesses, near-miss incidents and
property damage through an ever-improving Kent County
Health and Safety Program
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ACCIDENT, NEAR-MISS, AND INJURY
INVESTIGATION
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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PURPOSE
This procedure describes Kent County Delaware Governmental Body (referred to from this point forward
as “Kent County”) actions taken in response to employee injuries, illnesses, near-miss incidents and
property damage. The purpose of this procedure is to:
•
•
•
Identify causes of employee accidents so that the necessary corrective actions can be taken to prevent
re-occurrence.
Assure that employees receive the appropriate medical treatment for injuries or illnesses that occur
while at work.
Evaluate the feasibility of modifying injured employees’ job duties for employees released for work
with restrictions, and make sure that their job duties do not hinder the healing process.
RESPONSIBILITY
•
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•
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Employees are responsible for immediately reporting all incidents of injuries, illnesses and near-miss
incidents to their immediate supervisor.
Kent County Health & Safety Officer or His/Her Assistant are responsible for conducting a thorough
accident investigation and for completing the Accident Investigation Form for all reported injuries
and near-miss incidents.
Kent County Administrator and the Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager are responsible for
reviewing and approving all accident investigation reports to ensure that the causes and corrective
actions are identified and documented.
The Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager is responsible for coordinating all medical
appointments with the Kent County medical provider and for reporting work-related injuries to the
company workers’ compensation insurance provider.
The Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager is responsible for maintaining the Insurance
Claims Records.
The Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager is responsible for communicating to Department
Director(s)/Manager(s) the modified duty status of injured employees using the Modified Duty
Notification Form.
Personnel Director/Human Resources are responsible for determining if there are suitable jobs
available for injured employees to perform within the scope of their restrictions.
Department Director(s)/Manager(s) are responsible for making sure that the appropriate corrective
actions have been implemented to prevent the reoccurrence of accidents, injuries and near-miss
incidents.
The Kent County Health & Safety Officer or His/Her Assistant/Safety Committee Chairperson is
responsible for making sure that an Accident Investigation Follow-up Report is completed for all
accident investigations each month until identified corrective actions have been implemented.
The Safety Committee is responsible for completing an Accident Investigation Evaluation Report for
all accident investigations to evaluate the effectiveness of Department Director(s)/Manager(s) and/or
Division Supervisors’/Managers’ accident investigations and to provide management with useful
feedback regarding completed investigations.
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ACCIDENT, NEAR-MISS, AND INJURY
INVESTIGATION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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DEFINITIONS
•
•
Insurance Claims Record – The annual summary of all workplace injuries and illnesses that have
been claimed on the company’s insurance.
Near-miss Incidents or Close-call – An incident that did not cause a specific injury or property
damage, but could have under slightly different circumstances. (i.e., an employee slips on an oil spill
on the floor, but he/she does not fall and is not injured.)
PROCEDURE
Injury Reporting/Investigation
• All employees must report injuries, illness, or near injuries immediately to their supervisor. If the
supervisor is not available a nearby manager or supervisor must be contacted.
• The notified supervisor or manager determines the nature of the injury; coordinates the appropriate 1st
Aid and notifies Personnel Director/Human Resources of the injury.
• If emergency medical attention is needed, the supervisor or manager calls 911 to summons the
appropriate emergency response agency (ambulance).
• If an employee requires non-urgent medical attention, Personnel Director/Human Resources schedule
an appointment with the Kent County’s occupational medical provider.
• For all reported injuries, illnesses and near injuries, the department supervisor or manager completes
an Accident Investigation Report, as soon as possible after the incident has occurred. The report shall
be submitted to Personnel Director/Human Resources within 48 hours of the employee’s report of
injury.
• Personnel Director/Human Resources report all injuries that require outside medical attention to the
workers compensation insurance provider within 24 hours of receipt of the accident investigation
report.
• Personnel Director/Human Resources records the date in which Accident Investigation Reports are
received and forwards a copy to the Kent County Health & Safety Officer or His/Her Assistant/Safety
Committee Chairperson.
• The Personnel Director/HR Manager determines if the incident needs to be added to the Insurance
Claims Record and adds incidents to this log as necessary.
• If a work-related injury results in the hospitalization of three or more employees or a death of one or
more employee (s), the highest ranking Manager or Supervisor on duty will contact the following
individuals immediately:
- Kent County Administrator
- Personnel Director/Human Resources Manager
- Kent County Health & Safety Officer or His/Her Assistant/Safety Committee Chairperson.
Corrective Action to Prevent Accident Reoccurrence
• The necessary corrective actions that are identified as a result of accident investigations are
documented by the Department Director(s)/Manager(s) and/or Division Supervisors’/Managers (to be
know as the) Investigating Supervisor on the Accident Investigation Report.
• The Department Director(s)/Manager(s) make sure that the corrective actions indicated on the
Accident Investigation Report are implemented in a timely manner.
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ACCIDENT, NEAR-MISS, AND INJURY
INVESTIGATION
Original Issue Date:
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•
•
Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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The Safety Committee completes an Accident Investigation Evaluation Form to provide feedback to
the Department Director(s)/Manager(s) and/or Supervisor regarding the quality of the investigation.
The Safety Committee provides an annual summary of these reports to the Municipality Manager.
The Kent County Health & Safety Officer or His/Her Assistant/ and/or the Safety Committee
Chairperson coordinates an accident investigation follow-up to determine if identified corrective
actions have been implemented and are sufficient to prevent a reoccurrence. These follow-ups are
completed each month until all of the identified corrective actions have been implemented. These
reports are distributed to the Department Director(s)/Manager(s) and the Kent County Personnel
Director/HR Manager.
Medical Management
The Personnel Office/Human Resources maintains a summary of each medical visit and associated
correspondence/meetings with the employee in a file separate from the personnel files.
If an injured employee returns from the medical provider with work restrictions, Personnel Office/Human
Resources sends a completed Modified Duty Notification Form to the employee’s supervisor/manager and
helps to coordinate the appropriate modified duty with the employee and the supervisor and/or manager.
The Personnel Office/Human Resources maintain the necessary contact with the workers’ compensation
insurance provider to assure the proper medical treatment and management of these claims.
Training
All employees will be provided training in methods of reporting injuries and this procedure. This training
will be provided by The Personnel Office/Human Resources and/or by the employee’s supervisor or
designated lead Safety Coordinator within the first week of their employment.
Kent County Personnel Director/HR Manager provides training to all of Department
Director(s)/Manager(s) and/or Division Supervisors’/Managers’ regarding the contents of this procedure
and the means to conduct effective accident investigations, including identifying accident causes and
corrective actions.
RECORDS
Accident Investigation Forms and Modified Duty Notification Forms are filed in The Personnel
Office/Human Resources, separate form the employee personnel records. These records are maintained
for the duration of injured employees’ employment plus 30 years.
The Accident Investigation Follow-up Forms and the Accident Investigation Evaluation Forms are
contained with the safety committee records.
Near-Miss or Close-Call Reports are to stay within the employee’s area of work and are to be filed in the
employee’s supervisor’s office. The report is to be utilized for awareness and training of others that may
be exposed to a similar working situation or event. This report is a training-aid only.
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ACCIDENT, NEAR-MISS, AND INJURY
INVESTIGATION
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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Near-Miss (“Close-call”) Reporting
A near-miss can be defined as minor accidents or close calls that have the potential for property loss or
injury. A near miss will prevent a task from being completed as planned.
Encourage all employees to identify and report a "Near Miss" or “Close Call”. Most accidents can be
predicted by a "Near Miss" or “Close Call”. Hazards should be removed as soon as possible, but they still
should be reported to supervisors so they can make note of it, even after the hazard has been removed.
Discussing these near misses and hazards in a non-threatening atmosphere can raise awareness for
employees to look out for other hazards that should be reported to their supervisor(s).
Any employee that reports a "Near Miss" or “Close Call” should receive positive feedback for his or her
effort towards fostering a safer working environment. Negative feedback or reprisal for their efforts will
discourage other employees from reporting “Near Misses" or “Close Calls”. Every effort should be made
to encourage "Near Miss" or “Close Call” Reporting
"Near Misses" or “Close Calls” do not get reported because the employee often does not know they
happened, which makes it very difficult to fix them or prevent future ones. Similarly, one employee may
report a near miss to a supervisor, but other employees were not made aware of the "Near Miss" or “Close
Call”. All too often, these incidents are not reported at all. Many employees simply say, "Whew! That
was a close one!" and move on to their next task thinking “no-harm-no-fowl”. They go back to work
without mentioning the incident to their supervisor, as if the incident was a one-time occurrence and not
worth mentioning or reporting. Employees sometimes decide if nobody gets hurt and there is no damage,
then it’s not really an accident, but this is a part of the problem. All near misses need to be reported and
discussed with a supervisor.
Even before "Near Misses" or “Close Calls” occur, employers should discuss the importance of reporting
near misses to create the best—and safest—work environment. Open discussion between employees and
employers is an important aspect of near miss reporting. Encouraging employees to treat close calls
exactly the way they treat accidents, which includes reporting them right away. This is the crucial first
step to finding causes, taking corrective action and training employees to avoid the real accident waiting
to happen.
The near miss training session could begin with the supervisor sharing his or her own experiences with
close calls, which could prompt other employees to give close call examples of their own, as well as
examples on how to prevent near misses. This will heighten awareness of the safety hazards illustrated by
the near misses and will encourage employees to take action to correct those underlying problems. New
employees and older employees will begin to understand and learn that they will not be lucky enough to
avoid these accidents every time. It’s important for employees to discuss examples of near misses to
really grasp the importance of the issue. The discussion should then turn to the causes of near misses and
then end with corrective action. It’s important for these meetings to end with a discussion of proactive
measures that need to be taken against near misses.
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ACCIDENT, NEAR-MISS, AND INJURY
INVESTIGATION
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
KENT COUNTY DELAWARE ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION REPORT
Employee Information (This Section Is To Be Completed by Personnel Office/Human Resources Only)
Name: _________________________________________________________________ Shift: ___________
Department & Division: _________________________ Job title: ___________________________________
Street Address: ____________________________
Social Security Number: ___-__-____
Birth Date:___/____/____
City: ______________ State: _______ Zip: ______
Phone Number: ___-___-____ Age: ______
Hire Date: ___/____/____
(MM/DD/YYYY)
Marital Status: ___
Sex: ______
# of Dependents: ____
( MM/DD/YYYY)
Incident Description
Time of Incident: ___:___ a.m./p.m
Time Reported: ___:___ a.m./p.m
Date of Incident: __/___/_____
Date Reported: __/___/_____
(MM/DD/YYYY)
(MM/DD/YYYY)
Indicate When Incident Occurred: __1st Hour __Between 2nd & 8th Hour ___ Over the 8th Hour
Length of Time on Job: _____ In Training _____Less than 1 Year
What Happened?
___ Over 1 Year
(Explain all events that led up to and occurred during the incident. Include exact location, machine number, etc.)
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
(Use Back Side of this Form and/or Extra Sheets if Needed)
Were There Any Witnesses? ___ Yes ___ No - If So, Who? ___________________________________
Was a 3rd Party (i.e. sub-contractor) directly or indirectly involved with this incident? ___Yes
___No
Was Safety Equipment by-passed, not used or used improperly?
Was Medical Attention Offered?
_____ 1st Aid on Site
____ Yes
____No
_____ Occupational Health Clinic
If Yes, Check All That Apply
_____ Hospital Emergency Room
_____ Employee Does not wish to receive outside medical treatment at this time _____ Other (explain)
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
(Use Back Side of this Form and/or Extra Sheets if Needed
DRAFT
2 of 2 (Back)
ACCIDENT, NEAR-MISS, AND INJURY
INVESTIGATION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
KENT COUNTY DELAWARE ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION REPORT
Incident Type
_____ Fall From Elevation
_____ Fall, Same Level
_____Slip or Trip (No Fall)
_____ Struck Against Object
_____ Struck By Object _____ Caught In, Under or Between _____ Overexertion/Strain
_____ Motor Vehicle
_____ Equipment
_____ Other (Explain) ______________________________________________________________
(Use Back Side of this Form and/or Extra Sheets if Needed)
Body Part(s) Affected (Circle Left or Right Where Applicable)
_____ Head
_____ Neck
_____ Hip (Lt/Rt)
_____ Wrist (Lt/Rt)
_____ Shin/Calf (Lt/Rt)
_____ Face
_____ Trunk/Torso
_____ Shoulder (Lt/Rt) _____ Hand (Lt/Rt)
_____ Ankle (Lt/Rt)
_____ Lip/Mouth
_____ Abdomen
_____ Upper Arm (Lt/Rt) _____ Finger(Lt/Rt)
_____ Foot (Lt/Rt)
_____ Eye (Lt/Rt)
_____ Upper Back
_____ Elbow (Lt/Rt)
_____ Thigh (Lt/Rt)
_____ Toe (Lt/Rt)
_____ Ear (Lt/Rt)
_____ Lower Back
_____ Forearm (Lt/Rt)
_____ Knee (Lt/Rt)
_____ Respiratory
_____ Other (Explain) ___________________________________________________________________________________
(Use Back Side of this Form and/or Extra Sheets if Needed)
Nature of Injury/Illness (Check All that Apply - Circle Where Applicable)
_____ Sprain/Strain
_____ Fracture/Dislocate/Crush
_____ Foreign Object
_____ Concussion
_____ Repetitive Trauma (CTD’s) _____ Skin Irritation/Dermatitis
_____ Heat Stress
_____ Chemical Exposure
_____ Cut/Scrape/Puncture
_____ Burn-Thermal/Electrical
_____ Hernia/Rupture
_____ Amputation
_____ Bruise/Contusion
_____ Burn-Chemical
_____ Other (Explain __________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
(Use Back Side of this Form and/or Extra Sheets if Needed)
Basic Causes (Check All that Apply - Circle Where Applicable)
_____ Unsafe Method
_____ Housekeeping/Clutter
_____ Procedure Not Followed Properly
_____ Spills/Leaks
_____ Using Improper Tool(s)
_____ Lack of Available Protective Equipment
_____ Shortcuts/Save Time
_____ Unguarded/Faulty Equipment
_____ Lack of Personal Protective Equipment
_____ Other (Explain ____________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
(Use Back Side of this Form and/or Extra Sheets if Needed)
Root Causes (Check All that Apply - Circle Where Applicable)
_____ Lack of Procedure
_____ Lack of Enforcement/Motivation
_____ Inadequate Inspection/Maintenance
_____ Inadequate Procedure
_____ Lack of Knowledge/Training
_____ Other __________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
(Use Back Side of this Form and/or Extra Sheets if Needed)
Corrective Action
Action Needed
Person(s) Responsible
Expected Completion Date
1)
2)
3)
(Use Extra Sheets if Needed)
Employee Signature:
_________________________________________________ Date: _________________________
Supervisor Signature:
_________________________________________________ Date: _________________________
*Department Director/Manager Signature ______________________________________ Date __________________________
Personnel Director/HR Manager Signature ____________________________________ Date __________________________
*Department Director/Manager is to Return Completed Form to Personnel Director/HR Manager within 24 Hours of Report of Incident)
DRAFT
1 of 2 (Front)
ACCIDENT, NEAR-MISS, AND INJURY
INVESTIGATION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
KENT COUNTY DELAWARE “NEAR-MISS” OR “CLOSE-CALL” REPORT
Employee Information (This Section Is To Be Completed by Employee
Name: _________________________________________________________________ Shift: ___________
Department & Division: _________________________ Job title: ___________________________________
Street Address: ____________________________
Social Security Number: ___-__-____
Birth Date:___/____/____
City: ______________ State: _______ Zip: ______
Phone Number: ___-___-____ Age: ______
Hire Date: ___/____/____
(MM/DD/YYYY)
Marital Status: ___
Sex: ______
# of Dependents: ____
( MM/DD/YYYY)
Incident Description
Time of Near-miss: ___:___ a.m./p.m
Time Reported: ___:___ a.m./p.m
Date of Near-miss: __/___/_____
Date Reported: __/___/_____
(MM/DD/YYYY)
(MM/DD/YYYY)
When Near-miss Occurred: __1st Hour __Between 2nd & 8th Hour ___ Over the 8th Hour
Length of Time on Job: _____ In Training _____Less than 1 Year
What Happened?
___ Over 1 Year
(Explain all events that led up to and occurred during the near-miss. Include exact location, machine number, etc.)
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
(Use Back Side of this Form and/or Extra Sheets if Needed)
Were There Any Witnesses? ___ Yes ___ No - If So, Who? ___________________________________
Was a 3rd Party (i.e. sub-contractor) directly or indirectly involved with this near-miss? ___Yes
___No
Was Safety Equipment by-passed, not used or used improperly? ____ Yes ____No N/A _____
Was Medical Attention Offered?
_____ 1st Aid on Site
____ Yes
____No
_____ Occupational Health Clinic
If Yes, Check All That Apply
_____ Hospital Emergency Room
_____ Employee Declined medical treatment at this time _____ Other (explain)
(Use Back Side of this Form and/or Extra Sheets if Needed)
DRAFT
2 of 2 (Back)
ACCIDENT, NEAR-MISS, AND INJURY
INVESTIGATION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
KENT COUNTY DELAWARE “NEAR-MISS” OR “CLOSE-CALL” REPORT
Near-Miss Type
_____ Fall From Elevation
_____ Fall, Same Level
_____Slip or Trip (No Fall)
_____ Struck Against Object
_____ Struck By Object _____ Caught In, Under or Between _____ Overexertion/Strain
_____ Motor Vehicle
_____ Equipment
_____ Other (Explain) ______________________________________________________________
(Use Back Side of this Form and/or Extra Sheets if Needed)
Body Part(s) Potentially Affected (Circle Left or Right Where Applicable)
_____ Head
_____ Neck
_____ Hip (Lt/Rt)
_____ Wrist (Lt/Rt)
_____ Shin/Calf (Lt/Rt)
_____ Face
_____ Trunk/Torso
_____ Shoulder (Lt/Rt) _____ Hand (Lt/Rt)
_____ Ankle (Lt/Rt)
_____ Lip/Mouth
_____ Abdomen
_____ Upper Arm (Lt/Rt) _____ Finger(Lt/Rt)
_____ Foot (Lt/Rt)
_____ Eye (Lt/Rt)
_____ Upper Back
_____ Elbow (Lt/Rt)
_____ Thigh (Lt/Rt)
_____ Toe (Lt/Rt)
_____ Ear (Lt/Rt)
_____ Lower Back
_____ Forearm (Lt/Rt)
_____ Knee (Lt/Rt)
_____ Respiratory
_____ Other (Explain) ___________________________________________________________________________________
(Use Back Side of this Form and/or Extra Sheets if Needed)
Potential Nature of Injury/Illness (Check All that Apply - Circle Where Applicable)
_____ Sprain/Strain
_____ Fracture/Dislocate/Crush
_____ Foreign Object
_____ Concussion
_____ Repetitive Trauma (CTD’s) _____ Skin Irritation/Dermatitis
_____ Heat Stress
_____ Chemical Exposure
_____ Cut/Scrape/Puncture
_____ Burn-Thermal/Electrical
_____ Hernia/Rupture
_____ Amputation
_____ Bruise/Contusion
_____ Burn-Chemical
_____ Other (Explain __________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
(Use Back Side of this Form and/or Extra Sheets if Needed)
Basic Causes (Check All that Apply - Circle Where Applicable)
_____ Unsafe Method
_____ Housekeeping/Clutter
_____ Procedure Not Followed Properly
_____ Spills/Leaks
_____ Using Improper Tool(s)
_____ Lack of Available Protective Equipment
_____ Shortcuts/Save Time
_____ Unguarded/Faulty Equipment
_____ Lack of Personal Protective Equipment
_____ Lack of Concentration
_____ Instructions Form Others
_____ Distraction(s)
_____ Other (Explain) ___________________________________________________________________________________
(Use Back Side of this Form and/or Extra Sheets if Needed)
Root Causes (Check All that Apply - Circle Where Applicable)
_____ Lack of Procedure
_____ Lack of Enforcement/Motivation
_____ Inadequate Inspection/Maintenance
_____ Inadequate Procedure
_____ Lack of Knowledge/Training
_____ Distraction
_____ Other (Explain)___________________________________________________________________________________
(Use Extra Sheets if Needed)
Corrective Action
Action Needed
Person(s) Responsible
Expected Completion Date
1)
2)
3)
(Use Back Side of this Form and/or Extra Sheets if Needed)
Employee Signature:
_________________________________________________ Date: _________________________
Supervisor Signature:
_________________________________________________ Date: _________________________
*Safety Coordinator
__________________________________________________ Date __________________________
* Near-Miss or Close-Call Reports are to stay within the employee’s area of work and are to be filed in the Safety Coordinator's file. This form in only an
inter-work center training tool, to only be utilized to track trends or to train.
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DRIVER SAFETY
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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PURPOSE
This procedure is designed to ensure that all Kent County Delaware Governmental Body (referred to from
this point forward as “Kent County”) employees who drive a vehicle for work are properly identified,
trained, and evaluated. It is also designed to ensure that Kent County vehicles are properly inspected,
serviced and maintained.
DRIVER QUALIFICATION
A Kent County driver is any employee or agent who may operate any owned, borrowed, leased, rented, or
other vehicle for which the Kent County is legally liable.
Drivers are qualified to operate vehicles after annual submission and evaluation of:
- Annual Driving History Questionnaire
- Annual Vehicle Use Agreement
- A valid driver’s license
- Completion of any driver-training program required by Kent County Delaware Policy and/or
Regulations
Drivers having two or more violation/at fault accidents or any DUI violation within a prior 18 month
period may be denied driving privileges. In addition driving privileges will be denied if the driving record
exhibits:
-
Three (3) at fault accidents or combination of accidents and violations within a 3-year period
involving any vehicle.
-
Conviction of reckless driving, driving license suspension, conviction of driving with a
suspended license, hit and run, or leaving the accident scene involving any vehicle.
-
Conviction of any driving offense as a felony involving any vehicle.
The continuance of driving privileges is subject to the meeting of all drug-testing standards described in
the employee’s manual.
The Personnel Director may reinstate driving privileges after the completion of a remedial action plan in
its entirety. The reinstatement of driving privileges is discretionary. The Kent County Administrator
must approve of any remedial action and reinstatement of Kent County driving privileges.
Kent County considers a Motor Vehicle Driving Record as public information. Abstracts of any driver’s
history including a job applicant may be obtained and reviewed at any time by the Personnel
Director/Human Resource Manager.
Drivers who may operate single vehicles in excess of 26,000 Gross Vehicle Weight or vehicles carrying
hazardous materials requiring placarding must meet these additional qualifications to be eligible to drive
these vehicles:
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DRIVER SAFETY
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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-
Possession of a valid CDL license.
-
Employment application.
-
Evidence of employment inquiries.
-
Annual inquiry and review of driving record.
-
Annual inquiry of driving record including abstract.
-
Evidence of road test or equivalent.
-
Meeting of all drug-testing requirements (see Employee’s manual).
-
Possession of a current certificate of medical examination.
The Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager will be responsible for keeping abreast of the
requirements of DOT Federal Highway Administration’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations and
assuring that all driver qualifying standards specified therein are met.
The Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager will maintain a driver qualification file for each driver
consistent with the requirements above.
EMPLOYEE ACCIDENT REPORTING PROCEDURE
The Kent County goal is to eliminate all accidents. To help meet this objective, all accidents will be
reported, investigated, documented and subsequently, reviewed by the Health & Safety Officer and/or
Assistant Health & Safety Officer and the Safety Committee. The desired purpose of our accident
investigation includes the evaluation of the need for:
-
Additional driver training or remedial training.
-
Changes in driver selection/qualifying procedures.
-
Changes in vehicle inspection and maintenance procedures.
Every Over-the-road vehicle will be equipped with an accident report kit to record the facts surrounding
vehicle incidents and witness information. Our accident and record keeping procedures consist of the
following components:
-
Immediate reporting by the driver and Supervisor
-
Documentation of
Director/Manager.
causes
by
driver,
passenger(s),
Supervisor,
and
Department
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DRIVER SAFETY
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-
Review by the Safety Committee to expedite corrective action.
-
Periodic analysis of all accidents to assure recognition of recurring accident patterns and
causes and the need for additional prevention measures or changes needed in the Vehicle
Safety Program.
Drivers will report every vehicle incident involving any degree of damage to Kent County vehicles or
other vehicles, damage to property other than vehicles, or injury to persons. Employees will take the
following actions when incidents occur:
-
-
Take immediate action to prevent further damage or injury at the scene of the accident.
Pull onto shoulder or side of road.
Actuate four-way flashers and place warning signals promptly and properly.
Assist any injured person, but don't move them unless they are in danger of further injury.
Call the 911 Center/police.
If someone is injured, request medical assistance or provide assistance only if you are qualified to do
so (i.e. CPR/ADE).
If the driver cannot get to a nearby phone, he/she should write a note giving location and seriousness
of the accident, and give it to a reliable-appearing motorist and ask him/her to notify police.
The vehicle should not be left unattended except in extreme emergency.
Exchange "Traffic Accident Exchange Information" forms with other driver(s).
The driver should give identifying information to the other party involved, but should make no
comments about assuming responsibility.
Secure names and addresses from all witnesses. Witnesses should be asked to complete a Witness
Information Card. If there are no witnesses, the name and address of the first person to arrive at the
scene should be obtained.
If cameras have been provided with your vehicle, take appropriate pictures of the accident scene and
damage to any vehicles. DO NOT TAKE PHOTOGRAPHS OF ANY INJURED PERSON.
Do not discuss the accident with anyone, admit fault, or sign anything for anyone except a police
officer at the scene.
Immediately notify your Supervisor, or if not available, your Department Director, or the Personnel
Director/Human Resource Manager.
Report the Accident
ƒ
ƒ
The driver should call his/her supervisor immediately in the event of any accident.
The accident should be reported to the nearest insurance claims office after reporting it to
the Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager. .
In cases of theft or damage to a Kent County vehicle only:
- Notify the local police department.
Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager
- Immediately notify your Supervisor, or if not available, your Department Director, or the Personnel
Director/Human Resource Manager.
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DRIVER SAFETY
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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-
Send a copy of the Police Report to the Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager.
-
Department Directors, upon knowledge, are responsible for immediately reporting all vehicle
accidents involving employees to the Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager.
-
The driver involved in the accident must provide a written accident report noting the circumstances of
the accident. The Police Department and Incident Report Number should be identified in the
accident report if a police report is taken.
-
Any accident report, information/details should be forwarded to the Personnel Director/Human
Resource Manager and auto insurance carrier who will pursue independent investigation, if
appropriate, and make a preliminary determination of degree of driver negligence. The Personnel
Director/Human Resource Manager will annotate the initial investigation report with findings and
route a copy of the accident report, an estimate of property damages, any police report, any claims
adjustor report, and any witness reports to the Health & Safety Officer and/or Assistant Health &
Safety Officer and the Safety Committee.
ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION AND RECORDS
Every accident will be reported, investigated, and reviewed in accordance with Kent County Accident and
Injury Investigation Program.
FLEET SAFETY RULES
The following are the Kent County safe driving rules (may not apply to emergency personnel):
- Do not take chances. To arrive safely is more important than to arrive on time.
- Drivers should be mentally and physically rested and alert prior to each trip.
- Drinking of alcoholic beverages while driving, consumption of restricted drugs or driving while
under the influence of alcohol or restricted drugs is prohibited.
- No use of Cell Phones, PDA’s, Texting Devices, or Computers while operating a vehicle.
- Drivers must have a valid driver's license for the type of vehicle to be operated, and keep the
license(s) with them at all times while driving.
- Traffic laws must be obeyed.
- Speed shall never be faster than a rate consistent with existing speed laws and road, traffic, and
weather conditions. Posted speed limits must be obeyed.
- Never attempt to exercise the right-of-way; always let the other driver go first.
- Keep to the right except when overtaking slow moving vehicles, or when getting into a position
to make a left turn.
- Never follow another vehicle so closely that you will not be able to make a safe stop under any
conditions. Observe timed interval and following distance guidelines.
- Turn signals must be used to show where you are heading; when going into traffic and before
every turn or lane change. Remember, signaling intentions neither gives the driver the right of
way, nor guarantees a safe lane change.
- Slow down and watch for children in school zones.
- Vehicles are to be driven by authorized drivers only.
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DRIVER SAFETY
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
-
-
Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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Do not give rides to hitchhikers or strangers.
Seat belts shall be worn by drivers and all passengers.
Check your vehicle daily before each trip, and check the vehicle visually each time before
driving. Check lights, tires, brakes, and steering particularly. An unsafe vehicle should not be
operated until repairs are made.
Drivers must report all accidents immediately, as required by law and their company rules.
Drivers must report all arrests and traffic convictions to their company. Repeated traffic
convictions or failure to report traffic accidents or convictions may result in disciplinary action.
PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE
Vehicle and Equipment Specifications
The maintenance program begins when the vehicles are ordered. Management will consider use, route,
terrain, cargo size, and weight when setting specifications.
Specifications will call for as much standardization as possible. Vehicle standardization can be by
manufacturer and model type or by component within the vehicle. Advantages to standardization include
reduced parts inventory, enhanced ability of mechanics to make repairs more efficiently and dependably
due to their familiarity with the various components, reduction of inadvertent abuse of vehicles by drivers
and, if the fleet has many similar units, better appraisal of the suitability of equipment for the task.
Preventative Maintenance (PM) Schedule
All owned vehicles will be part of preventative maintenance schedule. Kent County will determine the
timeframe of the PM services and adhere to the schedule. The needed services and timeframe will be
based on manufacturer recommendations and/or harsh/adverse/high usage conditions.
The critical components should include: brakes, tires, safety equipment, suspension equipment, steering
components, lights, mirrors, windshield and windows, wipers, and horn.
Demand maintenance: To retain the safety and dependability of the vehicle, it is essential that periodic
inspections, maintenance, and service be performed (follow the manufacturer's schedule of maintenance),
including lubrication service, inspection/replacement of filters, engine drive belts, exhaust system, etc.
Driver responsibility for maintenance: Management must require driver inspections to report vehicle
safety defects. Pre-trip inspections by the authorized drivers shall be conducted whenever a Kent County
vehicle is being used.
Recordkeeping
Up-to-date vehicle records will be kept for each vehicle. These records will include:
@ Driver's Vehicle Condition Reports (pre-trip reports) turned in Monthly to Vehicle/Equipment Control
Supervisor.
@ Service and Inspection Reports
@ Vehicle history folder - Provides a complete history of the costs of maintenance, parts, and
labor associated with the vehicles.
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DRIVER SAFETY
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
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DRIVER TRAINING
Training of new and existing drivers is an important part of an effective vehicle accident and
equipment control program. The training methods may include formal meetings; time spent
driving with Supervisors or experienced drivers; and the use of outside defensive driving
courses.
It is expected that full or part time employees including temporaries expected to drive
vehicles/equipment in the course of their duties will have the basic skills and credentials
necessary to perform the required driving function as confirmed through the driver
selection/qualifying process. The driver training conducted or approved by the Kent County will
focus on assuring the understanding of regulations, assuring familiarity with new equipment,
improving basic skills, and remedial defensive driving training.
The Driver’s Supervisor or Department Director in Supervisor’s Absents will decide the training
required by each driver.
-
Regulations – all drivers subject to DOT regulations will be provided with the Federal
Motor Carrier Regulations Handbook and receive classroom instruction provided by
Kent County or certified outside entity/contractor.
-
Kent County Rules and Policies – all drivers will be trained in the basic rules
governing vehicle/equipment use at the time of hire or when assigned to a new
position as appropriate. The Supervisor will conduct this training.
-
Vehicle Inspections – it will be the Supervisor’s responsibilities to assure vehicle
inspection requirements especially those dictated by the DOT are fully understood by
the assigned driver.
-
Familiarity with Equipment – for other than passenger automobiles, it will be the
Supervisors responsibility to assure drivers assigned new equipment receive
instruction in the operation of this equipment including a thorough understanding of
its safe operation.
-
Defensive Driving – Under the direction of the Personnel Director/Human Resource
Manager, periodic formal instruction may be provided including classroom
instruction, the use of topical videos, vendor sponsored training, etc. Mandatory
attendance shall be required to maintain driving privileges.
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DRIVER SAFETY
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
OPERATOR’S INSPECTION AND PRE-TRIP REPORT
MONTH/YEAR
VEHICLE/EQUIPEMENT TYPE
REGISTRATION NO.
RESPONSIBLE DIVISION
VEHICLE/EQUIPMENT CONTROL SUPERVISOR
OPERATOR’S SIGNATURE SIGNIFIES ACCOMPLISHMENT OF PRE-TRIP CHECKS
(LAST NAME AND FIRST INITIAL ONLY REQUIRED)
DAY
SHIFT
DAY
SHIFT
DAY
SHIFT
1)
1)
1)
1
11
21
2)
2)
2)
3)
3)
3)
1)
1)
1)
2
12
22
2)
2)
2)
3)
3)
3)
1)
1)
1)
3
13
23
2)
2)
2)
3)
3)
3)
1)
1)
1)
4
14
24
2)
2)
2)
3)
3)
3)
1)
1)
1)
5
15
25
2)
2)
2)
3)
3)
3)
1)
1)
1)
6
16
26
2)
2)
2)
3)
3)
3)
1)
1)
1)
7
17
27
2)
2)
2)
3)
3)
3)
1)
1)
1)
8
18
28
2)
2)
2)
3)
3)
3)
1)
1)
1)
9
19
29
2)
2)
2)
3)
3)
3)
1)
1)
1)
10
20
30
2)
2)
2)
3)
3)
3)
1)
This Form Is To Be Turned Into The Division
Vehicle/Equipment Supervisor At The End Of Each 31 2)
3)
Month!
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DRIVER SAFETY
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
*PRE-TRIP ITEMS TO BE CHECKED BY OPERATOR
1
CLEAN (Exterior & Interior)
2
DAMAGE (Exterior & Interior, Missing Parts)
3
TIRES (Visually Check For Damage/Abnormalities)
4
LEAKS (Visually Check Fuel, Oil, Coolant)
5
ENGINE OIL AND COOLANT (Visually Check Fluid Levels)
6
BATTERY (Visually Check Fluid Levels, Hold-down Secure & Cleanliness)
7
DRIVE BELT(S) (Visually Check for Fraying Or
8
LIGHTS (Visually Check All Proper Operation)
9
SAFETY DIVICES (Seatbelts/Harness, Headrests, ROPS, Warning Lights, Guards, Etc.)
10
INSTRUMENTS / HORN / WINDSHIELD / WIPERS (Functionally Check For Operation)
11
BREAKS / STEERING (Functionally Check – Responsive / Effective / Smooth Operation)
12
HYDRAULIC HOSES / CYLINDERS (Visually Check For Damage)
13
TOWING CONNECTION & SAFETY CHAINS (Visually Check For Serviceability )
14
MARKINGS – CHECK LEGIBILITY (I.E. Watch Step, VIN No., ID No., Etc.)
15
HEATER / A/C / DEFROSTER (Serviceable)
15
EXHAUST SYSTEM (Visually Check for Damage & Leaks)
17
UNUSUAL OCCURRENCES (Noise, Vibration, Odor, Erratic Instruments, Etc.)
18
OTHER
19
OTHER
20
OTHER
Cracking)
*Print Operator’s Inspection and Pre-Trip Report (Page 1 of 2 & 2 of 2) On One Sheet – Head to Head
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EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND
PLANNING
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
PURPOSE AND SCOPE
This procedure will provide Kent County Delaware Governmental Body (referred to from this point
forward as “Kent County”), its employees, and other personnel at its facilities with a clear plan of action
in the event of an emergency. The plan will comply with applicable emergency action regulations. This
plan covers emergency actions for all work areas and facilities for the protection of employees, general
public, and others from emergencies.
RESPONSIBILTIES
Department Directors/Managers will:
- Coordinate an orderly evacuation of personnel.
- Perform an accurate head count of personnel reported to the designated area.
- Determine a rescue method to locate missing personnel.
- Provide the response personnel with the necessary information about the facility.
- Perform adverse weather assessments and coordinate office emergency closing procedures due to
adverse weather.
- Ensure that designated evacuation monitors and special needs assistants have received adequate
information and training for performing their tasks.
- Ensure that employees with special needs evacuate in an emergency
Emergency Services Personnel Contact Information (Contact, Address/Location, & Telephone
Numbers to be Inserted by Department Directors/Managers or Their Designee)
Service
Contact
Address/Location
Telephone
Ambulance/EMS
Police
Fire
Primary Medical Facility
Secondary Medical Facility
Poison Control Center
Emergency Response Team
National Response Center
Electric
Water
Gas
Phone Company
Chemical Spill Cleanup
Contractor
1-800-424-8802
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EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND
PLANNING
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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DEFINITIONS
Exit: The portion of an exit route that is generally separated from other areas to provide a protected way
of travel to the exit discharge. An example of an exit is a 2-hour fire resistance-rated enclosed stairway
that leads from the fifth floor of an office building to the outside of the building.
Exit Route: A continuous and unobstructed path of exit travel from any point within a workplace to a
place of safety (including refuge areas). An exit route consists of three parts: the exit access; the exit; and
the exit discharge. (An exit route includes all vertical and horizontal areas along the route.)
REPORTING
The types of emergencies to be reported to Department Directors/Managers by facility personnel are:
-
Medical
Fire
Severe weather
Bomb threat
Chemical spill
Extended power loss
Other, e.g., terrorist attack, hostage taking
PROCEDURE
Evacuation Routes
Evacuation route maps will be posted in each work area. The following information is marked on
evacuation maps:
-
“You Are Here” notation
Emergency exits
Primary and alternative evacuation routes
Locations of fire extinguishers
Employee assembly areas
All employees have been trained concerning the evacuation plan for their work areas.
Evacuation Procedures
Flashing strobe and piercing warning signal and/or other blaring attention getting devices are the
signal(s) that all facility personnel must evacuate the facility. Whenever the alarm sounds, all personnel
must evacuate according to the designated primary routes or alternative routes to the predetermined
assembly areas. All designated primary and alternative routes are illustrated in the evacuation maps. A
full evacuation drill for all personnel will be held semi-annually or more to test the effectiveness of this
program.
Department Managers will ensure a plan is in place for the safe evacuation of personnel with special
needs or disabilities.
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EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND
PLANNING
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
After personnel are evacuated and have reached the assembly areas, the Department Directors/Managers
or a designee will conduct a thorough head count of all personnel. The name(s) of any missing persons
and suspected locations for unaccounted or injured people will be immediately communicated to rescue
personnel.
Medical Emergency
Call [911; or the appropriate medical emergency phone number for facilities with in-house emergency
responders]
Provide the following information:
- Nature of the medical emergency
- Location of the emergency (e.g., address, building, and/or room number)
- Your name and phone number where you may be reached
Do not move the victim unless absolutely necessary.
The following personnel (and work center personnel) are trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)
and first aid and will provide assistance before the arrival of the professional medical help Information
(Names & Telephone Numbers to be Inserted by Department Directors/Managers or Their Designee):
Name:
Phone:
Name:
Phone:
Trained Work Center(s)
Phone:
Trained Work Center(s)
Phone
Each work center and over the road vehicle shall be provided with a First Aid Kit(s) that meets or exceeds
the ANSI Standard Z308 and OSHA Standard 1910.151 Standards for First Aid Kit(s). Each kit is to be
inventoried and stocked monthly with the required items listed on the work center First Aid Kit(s).
Each work center/facility, vehicle, and/or equipment shall be equipped with a portable cardiopulmonary
resuscitation (CPR) defibrillator if that work center/facility, vehicle, and/or equipment has been
determined a suitable location for such device by the Kent County Health & Safety Officer or His/Her
Assistant.
Fire Emergency
- Activate the nearest fire alarm.
- Notify the local Fire Department (see the Emergency Contacts list for more information.)
- Notify the site personnel about the fire emergency by voice communication, radio, phone paging,
or other means.
- Nonemergency personnel may fight the fire ONLY if both of the following conditions apply:
o The fire is small (e.g., trash can) and is not spreading to other areas; and
o The fire extinguisher is in working condition and personnel are trained to use it.
- Upon being notified about the fire emergency, occupants must:
o Leave the building using the designated escape routes.
o Assemble in the designated area
o Remain at the designated area until the Department Director/Manager has announced that
it is safe to reenter.
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EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND
PLANNING
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Power Outage
-
Check generators and backup power systems to ensure that electrical power is switched to support
critical systems.
Turn off all noncritical electrical systems and equipment.
Drain systems and equipment pressurized with water in areas exposed to prolonged freezing
temperatures, or move them to heated areas if feasible.
Check and ensure elevators are not occupied.
Upon restoration of power, the following measures will be taken:
-
Ensure that generators and other backup systems are switched so that power is not fed back into
the regular power system.
Examine insulation systems for piping, vessels, and tanks.
Examine electrical motors and drives.
Check valve positions for all pressurized systems and equipment.
Examine all electrical equipment and wiring systems.
Make sure all warning systems are operational.
Check the integrity of all fire detection and suppression systems.
Ensure that all alarm systems are operational.
Chemical Spill
[IF UNSURE IF A SPILL IS A HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL OR IF IT IS A LARGE OR SMALL
SPILL, TREAT IT AS IF IT IS A LARGE SPILL, AND IS A HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL]
The following are the locations of information and equipment for responding to a chemical spill by
trained professionals. (Locations to be Inserted by Department Directors/Managers or Their Designee):
-
Spill containment and security equipment: [location(s)]
Personal protective equipment (PPE): [location(s)]
Material safety data sheets (MSDSs): [physical location of file system or electronic access]
Large Spill
The following procedure must be followed by all employees when a large spill that involves of hazardous
chemicals has occurred:
- Immediately notify the Department Director/Manager
- Contain the spill with available equipment (e.g., pads, booms, and absorbent).
- Secure the area and alert other site personnel.
- Do not attempt to clean the spill unless trained to do so.
- Attend to injured personnel and call the medical emergency number, if required.
- Evacuate the building as necessary.
[IF UNSURE IF A SPILL IS A HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL OR IF IT IS A LARGE OR SMALL
SPILL, TREAT IT AS IF IT IS A LARGE SPILL, AND IS A HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL]
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EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND
PLANNING
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Small Spill
The following procedure will be followed by all employees when a small chemical has occurred:
-
Notify the Department Manager
If toxic fumes are present, secure the area (with caution tapes or cones) from an oxygen sufficient
location to prevent other personnel from entering.
Deal with the spill in accordance with the instructions described in the MSDS.
Small spills must be handled in a safe manner, while wearing the proper Personal Protective
Equipment (PPE).
Review the general spill cleanup procedures.
Bomb Threat
All employees will be evacuated from the facility in the event of a bomb threat. Follow the evacuation
procedures listed above.
Severe Weather and Natural Disasters
-
In the event of severe weather or other natural disaster, all employees will be instructed to follow
the specific procedures for each type of event.
The Kent County Administrator and/o the Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager will
determine future actions and will notify their Department Directors and employees as needed.
Shelter in Place
-
-
In the event of an off-site hazardous chemical release or other event that makes an evacuation of
the facility dangerous or impossible, employees will take shelter in place until it is safe to
evacuate.
Department Directors/Managers will perform the same duties for shelter-in-place procedures as
for other emergency action procedures.
Employees, visitors, and other personnel will be notified to take shelter in place by electronic
and/or physical means of notification (i.e. Public Address Systems, E-mail, Telephone, Runner,
etc.). Shelter-in-place areas are: (Location(s) and/or room numbers to be Inserted by
Department Directors/Managers or Their Designee)
Critical Operations
-
-
Department Directors/Managers will identify any critical operations or processes that must be
shut down or inactivated before an evacuation is completed, and will designate the operations and
the personnel who will implement the shutdown or inactivation. During some emergency
situations, it will be necessary for some specially assigned personnel to remain at the work areas
to perform critical operations.
The Critical Operations Assignments table below contains the list of work areas and personnel
that are considered critical operations.
Personnel involved in critical operations may remain on the site by permission of the Department
Director/Manager.
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EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND
PLANNING
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
-
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Critical Operations Assignments (Work Area, Name, Job Title, & Description of Assignment
to be Inserted by Department Directors/Managers or Their Designee)
Work Area
Name
Job Title
Description of Assignment
TRAINING
The Department Directors/Managers will designate and train a sufficient number of employees to assist in
the safe emergency evacuation of all personnel or perform emergency shutdowns, and will review the
Emergency Response and Planning Plan with all employees covered by this plan:
-
When the Emergency Response and Planning Plan is implemented
Whenever the designated actions or responsibilities of personnel covered under the Emergency
Response and Planning Plan change
Whenever the Emergency Response and Planning Plan is changed
Evacuation monitors must be trained to ensure a safe and orderly emergency evacuation of other
employees and ensure post-evacuation accountability of all personnel.
PROGRAM REVIEW AND UPDATE
The Emergency Response and Planning Program will be reviewed annually and updated whenever:
-
New hazards are identified or existing hazards change
There are changes to the facility layout or infrastructure
There are changes to emergency action and evacuation procedures
The Emergency Response and Planning Program shall be reviewed and evaluated by the Kent County
Health & Safety Officer or Their Assistant annually.
RECORDKEEPING
A record of Emergency Response and Planning Plan training for employees will be maintained with the
employee personnel files for a period of 5 years.
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Page 1 of 5
INJURY REPORTING AND MEDICAL
TREATMENT
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
PURPOSE
This procedure describes Kent County Delaware Governmental Body (referred to from this point forward
as “Kent County”) steps for injury reporting and provision of prompt medical treatment to those
employees injured.
RESPONSIBILITY
Employees are responsible for immediately reporting all incidents of injuries to their immediate
supervisor. They must also notify Personnel Director/Human Resources of any treatment they receive
after 90 days from a provider that is not part of the County Insurance Plan and/or Panel of Physicians.
Accident investigation steps and responsibilities are outlined in the Kent County Accident Investigation
Procedure.
The Personnel Director/Human Resources Manager is responsible for reporting the injury to the worker’s
compensation insurance carrier in a timely manner and maintaining all records related to the injury.
PROCEDURE
Injury Reporting
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
All employees must report injuries immediately to their supervisor. If the supervisor is not available
a nearby Director/Manager/Supervisor must be contacted.
The notified supervisor or manager determines the nature of the injury; coordinates the appropriate
first aid (with assistance from trained First Aid/CPR responders) and notifies Personnel
Director/Human Resources of the injury.
If emergency medical attention is needed, the supervisor, director/manager or responsive employee calls
911 to summons the appropriate emergency response agency/ambulance.
If an employee requires non-urgent medical attention, Personnel/Human Resources will schedule an
appointment with the approved occupational health medical provider (s).
For all reported injuries, the supervisor or director/manager completes an Accident Investigation
Report, as soon as possible after the incident has occurred. The report shall be submitted to Personnel
Director/Human Resources within 48 hours of the employee’s report of injury.
Personnel/Human Resources report all injuries that require outside medical attention to the workers’
compensation insurance provider within 24 hours of receipt of the accident investigation report.
Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager or Their Designee records the date that the Accident
Investigation Report is received and forwards a copy to the Kent County Health & Safety Officer or
Their Assistant who is the Safety Committee Chairperson.
Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager or Their Designee will determine if the incident needs to
be added to the Insurance Claims Record (or OSHA Log if applicable) and adds incidents to this log
as necessary.
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INJURY REPORTING AND MEDICAL
TREATMENT
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
•
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
If a work-related injury results in the hospitalization of three or more employees or a death of one or
more employee(s), the highest ranking Administrator, Director/Manager or Supervisor on duty will
contact the following individuals immediately (within eight (8) hours):
-
Occupational Safety & Health Administration, ;United States Department of Labor, Delaware Area
Director
o Monday – Friday (Non-Holidays)
302-573-6518
o After Hours & Weekends
800-321-6742
o TTY: 877-889-5627
Treatment
• Injured employees will be treated at medical provider list on the approved Panel of Physicians. This
treatment source will be used for at least 90 days from the time of the injury.
• The injured employee will be given instructions on where to receive treatment, their rights under the
state workers’ compensation laws, and a list of the panel of physicians.
• Injured employees will be given the acknowledgement form located at end of this plan to sign upon
hire.
Panel of Medical Providers
The Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager will obtain an approved Panel of Medical Providers
that includes at least six medical providers to treat employee injuries. This Panel will be conspicuously
posted on employee bulletin boards within departments and divisions.
Accident Investigation
All injuries or incidents that may have resulted in an injury will be investigated in accordance with the
Accident investigation steps and responsibilities outlined in the Accident Investigation Procedure. Any
pertinent information will be reported to the workers’ compensation insurance carrier as soon as it is
identified.
MEDICAL MANAGEMENT
Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager will maintain a summary of each medical visit and
associated correspondence/meetings with the employee in a file separate from the employee’s personnel
files.
If an injured employee returns from the medical provider with work restrictions Personnel
Director/Human Resource Manager will send a completed list of those restrictions to the employee’s
supervisor/manager and will coordinate the appropriate modified duty with the employee and the supervisor
and/or manager in accordance with the Modified Duty/Return to Work procedure.
Human Resources maintain the necessary contact with the workers’ compensation insurance provider to
assure the proper medical treatment and management of these claims.
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INJURY REPORTING AND MEDICAL
TREATMENT
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
TRAINING
All employees will be provided training in methods of reporting injuries and this procedure. This training
will be provided by Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager or Their Designee and/or by the
employee’s supervisor within the first week of their employment.
The Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager or Their Designee will provides training to all
department managers and/or supervisors regarding the contents of this procedure and the means to
conduct ensure injuries are promptly reported and treated to ensure a smooth transition back to work.
RECORDS
Accident Investigation Forms and Modified Duty Notification Forms are filed in Human Resources,
separate form the employee personnel records. These records are maintained for the duration of injured
employees’ employment plus 30 years.
Data gathered on employees as a result of health surveillance will be confidential and documented and
filed in individual employee medical records.
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INJURY REPORTING AND MEDICAL
TREATMENT
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
NOTICE: MEDICAL TREATMENT FOR YOUR WORK INJURY OR OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS
Your employer has selected a list of 6 or more physicians and other health care providers who are
available to treat your work-related injuries and illnesses during the first 90 days of treatment. This list is
posted at (list location here) for you to view. Also, you may get a copy of this list from the Personnel
Director/Human Resource Manager or Their Designee.
If you are injured at work or suffer an occupational illness, you have certain legal RIGHTS and DUTIES
under Section 306 (f. 1) (1) (i) of the Workers’ Compensation Act regarding your medical treatment.
These rights and duties are summarized below.
MEDICAL TREATMENT: DURING THE FIRST 90 DAYS
-
You have the RIGHT to receive reasonable and necessary medical treatment for your work injury or
occupational illness. Your employer must pay for the treatment, as long as the treatment is by one of
the listed providers.
-
You have the RIGHT to choose which of the listed providers will treat you for your work injury or
Illness.
-
You have the RIGHT to switch among any of the listed providers when you receive treatment; and if
a listed provider refers you to a provider not on your employer’s list, you have the RIGHT to receive
treatment from the referral provider.
-
You have the RIGHT to receive emergency medical treatment from any provider. However, nonemergency treatment must be given by a listed provider.
-
If a listed provider prescribes surgery for you, you have the RIGHT to receive a second opinion from
any provider your choice. If that opinion is different from the opinion of the listed provider, you have
the RIGHT to choose which course of treatment to follow. If you choose the treatment prescribed in
the second opinion, you must receive the treatment from a listed provider for a period of 90 days after
the date of your visit to the provider of the second opinion.
-
You have the DUTY to visit one or more of the listed providers for the first 90 days of treatment for
your work injury or illness if you expect your employer to pay for the medical treatment you receive.
-
If you seek treatment for your work injury or illness from a provider who is not on the list, your
employer may not have to pay for this medical treatment during this 90-day period. Therefore, you
should talk to your employer before seeking treatment from a provider who is not on the list.
IMPORTANT: The requirements your employer must meet to have a valid list of at least 6 providers are
shown on the reverse side of this form. If the list does not meet these requirements, it is not a valid list,
and you have the right to seek medical treatment for your work injury or occupational illness from any
health care provider of your choice.
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INJURY REPORTING AND MEDICAL
TREATMENT
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
MEDICAL TREATMENT AFTER THE FIRST 90 DAYS
•
You have the RIGHT to receive treatment from any physician or other health care provider of
your choice, whether or not they are listed by your employer. Your employer must pay for this
treatment, as long as it is reasonable and necessary for your work injury or occupational illness
and has been properly documented by the physician or other health care provider.
•
You have the DUTY to notify your employer if you receive treatment from a physician or other
health care provider who Is not listed by your employer. You must notify your employer within
five days of the first visit to any provider who is not on your employer’s list. The employer may
not be required to pay for treatment received until you have given this notice.
Your signature on this form indicates that you have been informed of and you understand these rights and
duties. If you have questions, be sure you have your rights and duties explained to you before signing this
form.
I, ____________________
HAVE BEEN INFORMED OF MY MEDICAL TREATMENT
RIGHTS AND DUTIES WITH REGARD TO WORK-RELATED INJURIES AND OCCUPATIONAL
ILLNESSES. THIS NOTICE WAS PRESENTED TO ME AT (check one):
Time of Hire
_____________________________________
Date of Injury _____________________________________
Other
_____________________________________
EMPLOYER REPRESENTAT1VE: _____________________________________________
DATE: ______________________
EMPLOYEE REFUSES TO SIGN BUT WAS PROVIDED A COPY OF THIS DOCUMENT ________
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JOB SAFETY ANALYSIS
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
PURPOSE AND SCOPE
This procedure describes the steps taken by Kent County Delaware Governmental Body (referred to from
this point forward as “Kent County”) to help in prevention of workplace accidents and injuries by
preparing a Job Safety Analysis (JSA). The information gathered from this JSA may also be used in
employee training, writing job descriptions and procedures, and modified duty/return-to-work programs.
JSAs are used to identify and communicate to employees the safest and most efficient methods to follow
during their job tasks.
RESPONSIBILITIES
Personnel Director (Risk Manager) has the overall responsibility for this JSA Program including the
following:
-
Selecting who will conduct job safety analyses
Selecting jobs for analysis
Documenting the steps of each selected job
Identifying hazards
Minimizing or eliminating the hazards
Documenting the JSA
Managing the JSA information
Recordkeeping
Kent County performs regular Job Safety Analyses. They are an effective way to identify the hazards
involved in each job, and protect employees from those identified hazards. Hazards can change with
every job process change. Therefore, we perform a JSA of a job every time when job processes change,
and before an employee initially performs the job.
PROCEDURE
Selecting Jobs
JSAs are applied first to high-risk jobs, such as those that have a history of accidents or those that expose
employees to excessive amounts of energy or hazardous material. Past accident records may be used to
indicate jobs that qualify for a JSA, along with new jobs for which the hazards are not yet identified, and
jobs that have changed.
Once the jobs have been chosen, Department Director(s)/Manager(s) and/or Division
Supervisors’/Managers’ (the person or persons most familiar with the job) will identify those employees
who will be involved in conducting the JSA.
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Page 2 of 4
JOB SAFETY ANALYSIS
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Separating Jobs into Basic Steps
During the development of a JSA, the chosen job will be broken into steps. Each step tells generally what
must be done. The job steps are natural parts of the operation and the work is clearly advanced upon
completion of each step. JSAs usually involve observing a worker while he or she is performing a task,
asking the worker questions pertaining to the task, and recording the steps, including movements taken to
complete the task.
To help identify potential JSAs at Kent County the job safety analysis may use questions such as these
(this is not a complete list):
-
Can any body part get caught in or between objects?
Do tools, machines, or equipment present any hazards?
Can the worker make harmful contact with objects?
Can the worker slip, trip, or fall?
Can the worker suffer strain from lifting or pulling?
Is the worker exposed to extreme heat or cold?
Is excessive noise or vibration a problem?
Is there a danger from falling objects?
Is lighting a problem?
Can weather conditions affect safety?
Is harmful radiation a possibility?
Can contact be made with hot, toxic, or caustic substances?
Are there dusts, fumes, mists, or vapors in the air?
After the task is done, the information is reviewed and revised if necessary. The steps are listed. A
common job safety analysis rule of thumb indicates that most jobs will separate into 8-13 basic steps. In
any case, the important thing is that the breakdowns have enough steps to accurately describe the work.
Identifying Hazards
After the basic steps of the job have been determined, each step is carefully examined to identify hazards
or potential hazards. When the hazards are identified they are ranked according to their severity. The most
severe hazards are given priority.
Hazard Control
Once hazards are identified for each job step, they are reviewed, and solutions are developed to minimize
or eliminate the hazards. Hazard elimination should be considered in this order:
1. Feasible Engineering Controls (Abating the hazard by hazard removal, limiting exposure through
job rotation or other means, or controlling it at its source)
2. Training Personnel (Assuring personnel are aware of the hazard and to follow safe work
procedures to avoid it)
3. Personnel Protective Equipment (Prescribing PPE for protecting employees against the hazard
and ensuring that they not only use it, but that they know how to use it correctly
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JOB SAFETY ANALYSIS
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
For every known hazard associated with a job step, there should be a solution that offsets that hazard. The
most serious hazards are the first ones to have solutions developed. Factors to be considered in assigning
a priority for analysis of jobs include:
- Accident frequency and severity: jobs where accidents occur frequently or where they occur
infrequently, but result in disabling injuries.
- Potential for severe injuries or illnesses: the consequences of an accident, hazardous condition, or
exposure to harmful substance are potentially severe.
- Newly established jobs: due to lack of experience in these jobs, hazards may not be evident or
anticipated.
- Modified jobs: new hazards may be associated with changes in job procedures.
- Infrequently performed jobs: workers may be at greater risk when undertaking non-routine jobs
and a JSA provides a means of reviewing hazards.
The solution that provides the highest level of protection is given priority. Every solution is recorded, and
this record is maintained. The choice is also based on effectiveness and employee acceptance.
A follow-up evaluation is conducted to ensure that the implemented solution successfully controlled the
hazard and did not create new hazards.
JSA Forms
A copy of the JSA form can be found at the end of this Procedure.
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JOB SAFETY ANALYSIS
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Appendix A: Sample Form for Job Safety Analysis
Job Safety Analysis
Job:
Analysis By:
Date:
Reviewed By:
Date:
Approved By:
Date:
Preventative Measures
Sequence of Steps
Potential Accidents or
Hazards
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MEDICAL MONITORING AND
EXPOSURE RECORDS
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
PURPOSE AND SCOPE
The purpose of this procedure is to ensure that Kent County Delaware Governmental Body (referred to
from this point forward as “Kent County”) properly maintains all medical monitoring and employee
exposure records while ensuring employee confidentiality.
RESPONSIBILITITES
Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager is responsible for maintaining the following:
- Employee medical records
- Company exposure records
PROCEDURE
Employee Medical Records
All employee medical records will be kept in a separate folder in the employee’s personnel file. Medical
records will be completely confidential and will not be released to anyone other than the employee
without written consent from the employee.
Medical records will be be kept for at least the duration of employment plus 30 years. These records
include but are not limited to:
-
Audiograms (Hearing Tests)
Respirator fit testing and medical clearance
Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens
Injury or illness related medical visits
Exposure Records
These records will be kept on file for 30 years. Exposure records may include but are not limited to:
-
Chemical exposure monitoring
Noise monitoring
Mold monitoring
Indoor Air Quality monitoring
Employee Access
All employees have access to the following:
-
Their own medical records
Company exposure records
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MEDICAL MONITORING AND
EXPOSURE RECORDS
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Kent County will make these records available upon request by the employee. Employees can request
access to these records through the Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager
TRAINING
Employees will be notified of their rights under this program upon hire and annually thereafter to ensure
complaince with the Workers Right to Know Act. This information will include:
-
Who is responsible for maintaining the records
What is covered by medical and exposure records
How long they are kept on file
Confidentiality of the records
Employee access to the records
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MODIFIED DUTY AND RETURN TO
WORK PROGRAM
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
PURPOSE
Kent County Delaware Governmental Body (referred to from this point forward as “Kent County”) has
established return-to-work controls and operational procedures through the use of this document. Poor
reintegration of employees after an extended illness or injury can result in further complications and delay
getting an employee back to full work capacity.
HEALTH SURVEILLANCE UPON RETURN-TO-WORK
Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager maintains a summary of each medical visit and associated
correspondence/meetings with the employee in a file separate from the personnel files.
If an injured employee returns from the medical provider with work restrictions, Human Resources sends
a completed Modified Duty Notification Form to the employee’s supervisor/manager and helps to
coordinate the appropriate modified duty with the employee and the supervisor and/or manager.
Supervisors will ensure that employees returning to work are given a break-in period to recondition their
muscle-tendon groups prior to working at full capacity. A follow-up assessment of these workers after
the break-in period will be conducted to determine the following:
-
-
If any duties are aggravating the previous illness or injury.
If reconditioning of weak muscle-tendon groups has been successful.
Whether any reported soreness, stiffness, or other problems is transient and consistent with
normal adaptation to the job or whether it indicates the onset of stressors associated with the
previous illness or injury.
If problems are identified, what further follow-up action is required.
Human Resources maintain the necessary contact with the workers’ compensation and health care
providers to assure the proper medical treatment and management of these claims.
PERIODIC HEALTH SURVEILLANCE
Periodic health surveillance (based on care giver recommendations) will be conducted on all employees
who are assigned to positions involving exposure to duties that are known or suspected to aggravate an
existing or preexisting condition. The content of this assessment will include the following:
-
A medical and occupational review.
A physical examination (if required).
A detailed update of the employee's medical and occupational status.
Data gathered on employees as a result of health surveillance will be confidential and documented and
filed in individual employee medical records.
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MODIFIED DUTY AND RETURN TO
WORK PROGRAM
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
PROGRAM REVIEW AND EVALUATION
Personnel Director (Risk Manager) will review and evaluate this written program as follows:
-
On an annual basis
When changes occur that prompt revision of this document
When facility operational changes occur that require a revision of this document
When an accident or close call occurs which relates to the topic
The purpose will be to evaluate the success of the program and to monitor the progress of affected
employees. The results of the evaluation will be shared with all responsible parties. New or revised goals
arising from the review will be provided to affected employee as needed. Any deficiencies identified will
have corrective actions initiated. Evaluation techniques will include the following:
- Analysis of trends in injury/illness rates.
- Employee surveys.
- Before and after surveys/evaluations of return-to-work cases.
- Up-to-date records or logs of job improvements tried or implemented.
MODIFIED DUTY JOB DESCRIPTIONS
Kent County has developed a list of potential modified activity jobs and has prepared a job description
that includes a general overview of the job and includes a list of the limited physical demands. Examples
of Modified Duty jobs include:
-
Equipment Cleaning
Filing and Clerical Work
General Housekeeping
Inventory
Painting
Repair Work
Security Patrol/Fire Watch
Tool Room Attendant
PPE/Safety Equipment Inspection
Data (Office/Computer) Input
Safety Instructor
Baseline screening surveys will be conducted to identify jobs that put our employees at additional risk
after return-to-work.
WORK PRACTICE CONTROLS
An effective program for return-to-work includes procedures for safe and proper work that are understood
and followed by managers, supervisors, and workers. Key elements of a good work practice program
include proper work techniques, employee reconditioning, regular monitoring, feedback, modifications,
and enforcement.
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MODIFIED DUTY AND RETURN TO
WORK PROGRAM
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Supervisor awareness and control of proper work techniques will improve safety. The following includes
ideas for appropriate training and work practice controls for our employees:
-
Proper work techniques, including work methods that improve posture and reduce stress and
strain on previously injured body parts.
Good tool care, including regular maintenance.
Correct lifting techniques and work (proper body mechanics).
Proper selection, use, of all tools associated with the job.
Correct installation and use of work stations and fixtures.
Supervisors will ensure that returning employees are allowed an appropriate reconditioning period.
Returning employees will be gradually integrated into a full workload as appropriate for specific jobs and
individuals. Important - Supervisors will closely monitor employees that fall into this category
throughout their reintegration period.
Regular monitoring at all levels of operation helps to ensure that employees continue to use proper work
practices. This monitoring will include a periodic review of the techniques in use and their effectiveness,
including a determination of whether the procedures in use are those specified; if not, then it should be
determined why changes have occurred and whether corrective action is necessary.
ADMINISTRATIVE CONTROLS
Company administrative controls may be used to reduce the duration, frequency, and severity of
exposures to work stressors that may aggravate previous illnesses or injuries. Examples of administrative
controls include the following:
-
-
Reducing the total number of repetitions for suspect muscle groups or other bodily parts by such
means as decreasing the work pace, limiting overtime work etc.
Providing rest pauses to relieve fatigued muscle-tendon groups. The length of time needed
depends on the task's overall effort and total cycle time.
Increasing the number of employees assigned to a task to alleviate severe conditions.
Using job rotation, used with caution and as a preventive measure. The principle of job rotation
is to alleviate physical fatigue and stress of a particular set of muscles and tendons or other body
parts by rotating employees among other jobs that use different muscle-tendon groups. If rotation
is utilized, the new job must be reviewed to ensure that the same muscle-tendon groups are not
used when they are rotated.
Job enlargement. Having employees perform broader functions which reduce the stress on
specific muscle groups while performing individual tasks.
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MODIFIED DUTY AND RETURN TO
WORK PROGRAM
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
TRAINING AND EDUCATION
The purpose of training and education is to ensure that Kent County employees are sufficiently informed
about the hazards to which they may be exposed and thus are able to participate actively in their own
protection.
Employees shall be adequately trained about changes to or additional job hazards before being allowed to
return-to-work. Proper training shall allow managers, supervisors, and employees to understand the
hazards associated with a job, their prevention and control, and their medical consequences.
Training for affected employees shall consist of both general and specific job training:
-
-
General Training. Employees shall be given formal instruction on the hazards associated with
their jobs and with their equipment. This will include information on the varieties of hazards
associated with the job, what risk factors cause or contribute to them, how to recognize hazards,
and how to prevent them. This instruction will be repeated for each employee as necessary
Job-Specific Training. Employees returning to work shall receive a reorientation meeting prior to
being placed in a light duty or full duty job. This shall include a review of the restriction with
both he employee and supervisor responsible for that employee.
If additional training is
required, the training shall be provided before the employee is allowed to return to work.
Supervisors shall receive training so that they know how to ensure that employees returning to work
follow safe work practices and do not perform tasks outside of the restrictions provided by the medical
provider.
Managers shall be made aware of their safety and health responsibilities and will receive sufficient
training pertaining to this program to effectively carry out their responsibilities.
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NEW EMPLOYEE SAEFTY
ORIENTATION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
PURPOSE AND SCOPE
To assure that all new and transferred employees at work site, at any Kent County Delaware
Governmental Body (referred to from this point forward as “Kent County”) receive the necessary training
and information to conduct their job tasks in a safe manner.
RESPONSIBILITIES
Personnel Director/Human Resources Manager will be responsible for assuring required new employee
safety orientation training is conducted.
Department Director(s)/Manager(s) and/or Division Supervisors’/Managers’ will be responsible for
developing a training checklist for each job title which will include:
- Training topics
- Frequency of training topics
- Employee sign-off and date section
- Trainer sign-off and date section
Personnel Director/Human Resources Manager will review the checklist with the employee, which
becomes a permanent personnel document.
TRAINING TOPICS
Employees will receive training on a variety of safety topics. The topics will be specific to the
employee’s job title and responsibilities. The training topics may include but are not limited to:
-
Specific Job Hazards
Accident Reporting and Prevention Programs
Emergency Action Plans
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
Medical Services and First Aid
Use of Hand Tools
Use of Lift Trucks
Use of Power Operated Tools and Equipment
Ergonomics and Safe Lifting Techniques
Respiratory Protection Program
Hearing Conservation
Hazard Communication
Emergency Response
-
Heat Stress
Machine Guarding
Vehicle Safety
Machine Guarding
Mobile Shop Equipment
Scaffolding Safety in Construction
Workplace Violence
Fall Protection
Excavation Safety
Construction Site Safety
Electrical Safety - Lockout/Tagout
Bloodborne Pathogens
Cold Weather Safety
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NEW EMPLOYEE SAEFTY
ORIENTATION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
RECORDKEEPING
For each training session, the following information will be recorded and maintained in the employee’s
personnel file:
-
Date of training.
A listing of topics reviewed or discussed.
The instructor (for each topic if more than one instructor was involved).
The name of each person attending, as well as those required to receive the training involved who
were not present shall be documented.
A list of all matters that were found to require some type of follow-up or further action (this includes
the training of those who were unable to attend).
The name of the source document or audio-visual presentation, if one was used, should be identified.
TRAINING CHECKLISTS
All completed training checklists will be kept on file with Department Director(s)/Manager(s) and/or
Division Supervisors’/Managers’.
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SAFETY COMMITTEE OPERATION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
PURPOSE AND SCOPE
The purpose of the Kent County Delaware Governmental Body (referred to from this point forward as
“Kent County”) safety committee is to promote workplace safety and injury prevention through the
interactive involvement of employee and management representatives. The committee will act as a
resource to help management with its on-going efforts to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all
employees.
RESPONSIBILITITES
Safety Committee Members
• Attend and participate in all committee meetings.
• Work in a cooperative manner with other members of the safety committee in an attempt to help the
committee achieve its goals.
• Perform committee functions as assigned by the Chairperson (Kent County Health & Safety Officer)
or Vice-Chairperson (Kent County Assistant Health & Safety Officer).
• Act as a liaison between the safety committee and the department and/or division which they
represent.
Safety Committee Chairperson
• Facilitate organized safety committee meetings
• Prepare and distribute a written agenda prior to every meeting
• Prepare and distribute written minutes for every meeting
• Coordinate all committee communications and correspondences
• Ensure adherence to committee by-laws
• Assign sub-committees as needed (safety inspections, accident investigation, training, etc.)
Safety Committee Vice-Chairperson
• Act on behalf of the Chairperson in his/her absence
• Assist the Chairperson with his/her responsibilities
PROCEDURE
Membership
• The committee will be comprised of both management and non-management personnel with at least
50% being employees who do not serve in a management capacity.
• Committee membership will be documented on the Committee Membership List which includes
membership initiation date, employee name, title, department, shift, safety training date and
management status.
• The committee will be comprised of members from the major operating departments/divisions and
will represent all operating shifts.
• All employees will be provided with training in the requirements of a safety committee, hazard
identification, and accident investigation root cause analysis.
• Every two years, approximately half of the members will rotate from the committee to allow other
employees to participate, but will be done in such a way that ensures a core group of experienced
members will serve on the committee at all times.
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SAFETY COMMITTEE OPERATION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Term of Membership
• Committee members will serve a 12-month term.
• Upon term completion the committee will elect officers for the next 12-month term.
• The committee will then decide which of the remaining members will rotate from the committee
(approximately ½).
• New members will be nominated and selected by the existing safety committee members.
• If during the 12-month term a committee member is not able to serve his or her full term, the
committee will replace this member as soon as possible.
Safety Committee Organization
The safety committee will be organized as follows:
• Chairperson
• Vice-Chairperson
• Active Members
• Sub-committees may be appointed by the Chairperson as necessary.
Procedural Rules
• All actions of the committee will be determined by consensus or (if necessary) a majority vote basis.
• Meetings will be held monthly on a day and time agreeable to the committee members.
• Meetings must include more than half of the membership to be held. Guests, consultants and
alternate committee members should not be counted for purpose of recording a quorum.
• Meetings will be conducted in a timely manner following an agenda prepared by the Chairperson or
Vice-Chairperson.
• Department managers and/or supervisors will allow safety committee members at least three (3) hours
per month to conduct their committee responsibilities and will allow committee officers four (4)
hours per month.
• A copy of each month’s meeting minutes will be forwarded in a timely manner to the following:
o Safety Committee Members
o Senior Management Team
o Kent County Administrator
o Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager
o Employee Bulletin Boards
• The format for safety committee meetings will include:
o Attendance
o Follow-up with outstanding issues from prior meeting
o Review of monthly safety inspections
o Review of incident investigations since prior meeting
o Review of employee concerns/suggestions
o Future activity/event planning
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SAFETY COMMITTEE OPERATION
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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Meeting Attendance
• All committee members are responsible for attending the monthly meetings.
•
The committee may choose to replace members who continuously are unable to attend the monthly
meetings.
Committee Training
• All Kent County committees will receive annual training from individuals who meet the Occupational
Safety and Health Administration, Department of Labor and/or Delaware Department of Labor
Division of Industrial Affairs Occupational Safety and Health requirements for accident and illness
prevention service providers.
•
Annual training will include the following topics:
o Safety Committee Operation
o Hazard Detection and Inspection
o Incident Investigation and Prevention
RECORDS
• The Safety Committee Chairperson maintains records of all committee meeting minutes, agendas,
meeting attendance, correspondence, etc.
•
Committee records will be maintained for a period of five years.
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SAFETY INSPECTION PROGRAM
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Revision Number:
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PURPOSE AND SCOPE
The purpose of the Safety Inspection Program is to ensure that Kent County Delaware Governmental
Body (referred to from this point forward as “Kent County”) has a proactive safety approach by
identifying safety hazards and correcting them in a timely manner. The inspections will be used to
determine unsafe trends and guide Kent County with developing future policies, procedures, and training
programs.
RESPONSIBILITITES
With input form the Safety Committee, Department Directors/Managers and/or Division
Supervisors/Managers; the Health and Safety Officer, Assistant Health and Safety Officer, and the
Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager are responsible for:
- Reviewing and updating this procedure
- Ensuring the elements of this plan are followed
- Training the employees responsible for conducting facility inspections
The Safety Committee is responsible for:
-
Determining the inspection timeline (which facilities and how often)
Determining who will be conducting the inspections
Developing a site specific facility inspection checklist
Reviewing the inspections and ensuring all corrective actions are completed in a timely manner
Determining trends based on the inspections and developing proper protocols to stop those negative
trends while encouraging positive trends.
PROCEDURE
Facility inspections will follow a specific timeline developed by the safety committee. The table below
indicates which facilities will be inspected, how often they will be inspected, and who is responsible for
the inspections.
TABLE 1 – Audit Schedule
Facility Name
Inspection Frequency
Inspector
Administrative Complex
Monthly
Safety Coordinator
Library
Monthly
Safety Coordinator
Emergency Services Building
Monthly
Safety Coordinator
Medic Station/South Harrington
Monthly
Safety Coordinator
Medic Station/North Smyrna
Monthly
Safety Coordinator
Wastewater Facilities
Monthly
Safety Coordinator
Brecknock Park Camden
Monthly
Safety Coordinator
Browns Brach Park Harrington
Monthly
Safety Coordinator
Big Oak Park Smyrna
Monthly
Safety Coordinator
Blessing Barn Harrington
Bi-Monthly
Safety Coordinator
Lebanon Landing Dover
Bi-Monthly
Safety Coordinator
Tidbury Creek Park
Bi-Monthly
Safety Coordinator
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Inspection Checklist
Inspection checklist will be developed and used during safety inspections. The checklists will:
- Be specific to the hazards associated with the location to be inspected, refer to the Job Safety
Analysis (JSA)
- Include physical hazards as well as those associated with employee behaviors (examples: forklift
operation, use of power tools, lifting techniques, first responder actions, etc.)
- Include a location for the inspector(s) to sign-off on the results upon completion
Inspection Checklist Sections
The checklists may include but are not limited to:
- Electrical hazards
- Fire protection and life safety codes
- Chemical labeling, handling, and storage
- Lockout/tagout
- Machine Guarding
- Power tool use
- Material handling and storage
- Emergency Equipment (first aid supplies, eyewashes, bloodborne pathogens supplies, etc.)
- Confined Spaces
- Personal Protective Equipment
- Forklifts and Heavy Equipment use
- Bloodborne Pathogens
- Safe lifting
- Office ergonomics
- Fall Protection/Ladder use
- Driver safety
- Hazard Response Vehicle Operation
- Overhead Lifting Devices
Inspection Checklist Completion
Completed inspections will be given to the safety committee to review and:
-
Determine most effective corrective actions
Assign responsible parties to the corrective actions
Assign a completion date for each corrective action
Follow-up on all corrective actions until completed
Determine trends from the inspections to determine possible corrective actions including new
policies, procedures, and/or training
Document all correspondences in the safety committee meeting minutes
The results of the inspections should be communicated to all affected employees (those that work in that
area)
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TRAINING
Health and Safety Officer or Assistant Health and Safety Officer is responsible for training facility
inspectors prior to conducting inspections on the following topics:
- What facilities are being inspected
- The frequency of inspections
- How to conduct the inspections (what to look for)
- What the process is for correcting the inspection items
- How to communicate with employees when unsafe acts are noted
RECORDS
The Safety Committee Chairperson (Health & Safety Officer) maintains records of all facility inspections
as well as all safety committee correspondences related to the corrective actions progress and completion.
Facility inspections as well as committee records will be maintained for a period of five years.
Electronic or hard copy records may be utilized for Facility Inspections Records.
Facility Inspection Records will be sent to the Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager for proper
disposal or retention after being maintained for a period of five years by the Health & Safety Officer.
WORKPLACE INSPECTION CHECKLIST & HEALTH AND SAFETY AUDIT CHECKLIST
A Workplace Inspection Checklist(s) and Health and Safety Audit Checklist shall be tailored to each
workplace, department, division, or shop as applicable. As note in Table 1 (Audit Schedule) above…”…
inspections will follow a specific timeline developed by the safety committee
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WORKPLACE INSPECTION CHECKLIST [Sample]
ENTRANCES AND EXITS
Are entrances and exits to and from work areas free from obstructions?
Are doors clearly marked?
WALKWAYS, FLOORS AND STAIRS
Are stairs and walkways kept clear of boxes, equipment, cables and other
obstacles?
Is the foot space on each stair adequate?
Are handrails adequate and in good state of repair?
Are stairs in a good state of repair?
Do stairs have anti-slip materials where warranted?
Are floors clear of slip and trip hazards, e.g., extension cords, torn carpet,
uneven surfaces, cracks, holes, etc?
Are walkways clear of trip hazards such as open drawers, boxes, etc.?
Are walkways free of oil and grease?
Are walkways adequately lit and clearly marked?
Do walkways have unobstructed vision at intersections?
STORAGE FACILITIES
Are materials stored in bins wherever possible?
Is sufficient storage provided?
Are heavy items stored between mid-thigh and shoulder height?
Is there a safe means of accessing high shelves?
Is storage equipment in good condition and not overloaded?
Is stored material secured to prevent shifting/falling?
Are stored areas free from rubbish?
Are shelf units properly attached to walls and are cabinets/cupboards stable?
Are racks and pallets in good condition?
LIGHTING, VENTILATION AND TEMPERATURE
Does the lighting in the work area allow staff to see their work easily?
Are all light fitting in good corking order? No flickering lights, etc.?
Are glare and excessive brightness minimized in the work area?
Is temperature maintained as a comfortable level?
Is there adequate ventilation throughout the work area?
Are all light bulbs, tubes and lighting covers adequately cleaned?
Are ventilation ducts kept clean and unobstructed?
Is general indoor air quality acceptable for the majority of occupants, i.e.,
temperature, humidity, air flow, etc?
YES NO N/A
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WORKPLACE INSPECTION CHECKLIST [Sample] (Con’t)
EQUIPMENT
Is equipment clean and working properly
Is noise and fume producing equipment located away from workstations?
Is all lifting or moving equipment in good condition?
Is office equipment in good condition i.e., fax machines, printers, laminators?
Are procedures for safely operating equipment accessible to staff?
Are lockout/tagout procedures used?
Are there clear indications when equipment is switch on?
Are there procedures to report faulty equipment?
Are equipment guards in place?
Are noise levels controlled and is hearing protection being used?
HAZARDOURS SUBSTANCES
Are hazardous substances properly labeled?
Are hazardous substances properly stored?
Do procedures exist for the safe use and disposal of hazardous substances?
Are material safety data sheets available for all chemicals?
Is there a register of hazardous substances?
Are all containers labeled?
Are eye wash stations readily available and easily accessible to employees?
ELECTRICAL
Are all cords, plugs and sockets in good condition, i.e., not frayed, exposed,
cracked, grounding plug etc.?
Has electrical equipment been inspected, tested and tagged in accordance
with County policies and Regulations?
Are portable power tools in good condition?
Are all electrical items in good condition?
Have switches and circuits/circuit breakers been identified and are they in
working condition? Do breaker boxes have three (3) feet of clearance?
Are battery charges marked and well ventilated?
SECURITY
Are premises secure while employees are at work, e.g., during minimum staff
shifts or low manning?
Are security doors operational?
Are there procedures for managing suspicious mail and threats?
Have employees been trained in workplace violence procedures?
YES NO N/A
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WORKPLACE INSPECTION CHECKLIST [Sample] (Con’t)
YES NO N/A
STAFF AMENITIES
Are staff toilets and bathrooms facilities in good condition?
Are toilets and bathroom facilities cleaned regularly?
Is kitchen and break room equipment in good working order?
Are hot water taps appropriately marked?
Are surfaces in bathrooms, break rooms, and kitchen areas slip free?
Are kitchen, break room, and bathroom rubbish removed regularly?
Do kitchens & break rooms, contain serviceable/accessible fire extinguishers?
Are microwaves, refrigerators, etc., cleaned regularly to reduce the risk of
infection and/or fire?
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
Can emergency signals and alarms be clearly heard?
Are emergency exits clearly marked, easy to open and functional?
Are alarms and signals tested on a regular basis?
Are emergency exit lights operational?
Has there been an evacuation drill in the last 12 months?
Are evacuation drills reviewed and documented
Have floor wardens been appointed? Are their names posted?
Are details of office/floor emergency procedures displayed?
Is an evacuation plan displayed?
Are fire extinguishers easily identified and located?
Have fire extinguishers been inspected and tagged within the last two months
Are fire hoses conveniently located in major corridors?
Are sprinkler systems and smoke detectors operational?
Have re-entry procedures been developed and displayed?
Has emergency evacuation training been provided to all employees?
FIRST AID
Have first aid responders’ names been communicated to all employees?
Are details of first aid responders and locations of the first aid kits displayed?
Are there adequate - currently-trained first responders in or near worksite
Are first aid kits clearly labeled?
Are first aid kits easily accessible?
Are first aid kits regularly maintained and stocked?
Are emergency telephone numbers clearly displayed?
Are storage areas for AED devices communicated to personnel?
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WORKPLACE INSPECTION CHECKLIST [Sample] (Con’t)
YES NO N/A
DESKS AND/OR WORKSTATIONS
If desks are adjustable, can adjustments be easily made?
Is there enough space on each desk for the work required?
Is the height of desks appropriate for main tasks performed, e.g., keyboard?
Are items in constant use within easy reach?
Are workstations and/or desks stable and undamaged?
Do workstations have adequate storage?
Are waste bins emptied regularly?
Is there sufficient space around workstations to provide safe access?
Has staff been provided with information on how to optimize their
workstation, where applicable? Provide comment:
Have aids been provided for computer workstations (for example, foot/back
rest and document holders)?
PERSONAL COMPUTERS
Are monitor screens located approximately an arm’s length away?
Are the tops of screens located just below eye level?
Can the height and angle of the monitor be adjusted?
Are character displayed on screen legible and stable?
Is screen glare minimized?
Is the mouse situated so that the user does not have to reach or stretch?
Is the mouse easy to move?
CHAIRS (Used for working at personal computers)
Can height of chairs be adjusted according to the tasks being undertaken?
Can height of back rests be adjusted to provide appropriate lumbar support?
Can back rest angle be adjusted so users are setting upright when using a PC?
Can chairs be moved to the workstation without obstruction of arm rests?
Are chairs stable and undamaged?
Does the base of chair have five (5) or more wheeled supports?
SAFE LIFTING
Have workers been trained on, and are they using, safe lifting techniques?
Are employees avoiding heavy loads (splitting loads - asking for help)?
When lifting, do employees bend their knees to take pressure off their backs?
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WORKPLACE INSPECTION CHECKLIST [Sample] (Con’t)
TRAINING
Are new employees provided safety training during employee orientation?
Is job-specific training held for employees on a regular basis?
Is training provided on the safe use of common equipment?
Are personnel familiar with applicable material safety data sheets?
Are all personnel familiar with the emergency evacuation plan?
Is all training documentation current and accessible?
Have all personnel been trained in work-alone procedures?
Is Personnel protective equipment (PPE) been provided where necessary?
Have personnel been trained in the use of PPE respirators?
Have personnel been trained in the use of PPE hearing protection?
Have personnel been trained in the use of PPE gloves?
Have personnel been trained in the use of PPE safety glasses?
Have personnel been trained in the use of PPE lab coats?
Have personnel been trained in the use of PPE protective garments?
Have personnel been trained in the use of PPE hard hats?
Have personnel been trained in the use of PPE fall protection equipment?
YES NO N/A
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HEALTH AND SAFETY AUDIT CHECKLIST [Sample] (Con’t)
YES NO N/A
EMPLOYER POSTING
Is the required OSHA workplace poster displayed in a prominent location
where all employees are likely to see it?
Are emergency telephone numbers posted where they can be readily found in
case of emergency?
Where employees may be exposed to any toxic substance or harmful physical
agent has appropriate information concerning employee access to medical and
exposure records, and Material Safety Data Sheets, been posted or otherwise
made readily available to affected employees?
Are signs concerning “exiting from building,” room capacities, floor loading,
exposures to x-ray, micro wave, or other harmful radiation or substance posted
where appropriate?
Are sign concerning danger the appropriate type and color?
Is the Summary of Occupation Illnesses and Injuries posted in the month of
February?
RECORDKEEPING
Is all occupational injury or illnesses, except minor injuries requiring only
first-aid, being recorded as required on the OHSH 200 log?
Are employee medical records and records of employee exposure to
hazardous substances or harmful physical agents up-to-date?
Have arrangements been made to maintain required records for the legal
period of time?
SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM
Do you have an active safety and health program in operation?
Is one person clearly responsible for the overall activities of the safety and
health program?
Do you have a safety committee or group made up of management and labor
representatives that meet regularly and report in writing on its activities?
Are you keeping employees advised of the successful effort and
accomplishments you and your safety committee have made in assuring they
will have a workplace that is safe and healthful?
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HEALTH AND SAFETY AUDIT CHECKLIST [Sample] (Con’t)
YES NO N/A
MEDICAL SERVICES AND FIRST AID
Do you require each employee to have a physical examination after the offer
of employment?
Is there a hospital, clinic, or infirmary for medical care in the proximity of
your workplace, is at least one employee on each shift currently qualified to
render first aid?
Are medical personnel readily available for advice and consultation on matters
of employees’ health?
Are emergency phone numbers posted?
Are first aid kits easily accessible to each work area, with necessary supplies
available, periodically inspected and replenished with non-expired items?
Does Kent County require individuals to respond to emergencies, if so are
they meeting the requirements of the Blood Born Pathogens standard?
Are means provided for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body in
areas where corrosive liquids or materials are handled?
FIRE PROTECTION
Is your local fire department well acquainted with your facilities, its location
and specific hazards?
If you have a fire alarm, is it certified periodically?
If you have outside private fire hydrants, are they flushed at least once a year
and on a routine preventive maintenance schedule?
Are fire doors and shutters in good operation condition?
Are fire doors and shutters unobstructed and protected against obstructions?
Are fire doors and shutters fusible links in place?
Is the maintenance of automatic sprinkler systems assigned to responsible
persons or to a sprinkler contractor?
Are sprinkler heads protected by metal guards, if exposed to physical damage?
Is proper clearance maintained below sprinkler heads?
Are portable fire extinguishers provided in adequate number and type?
Are fire extinguishers recharged regularly and noted on the inspection tag?
Are employees periodically instructed in the use of extinguishers and fire
protection procedures?
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YES NO N/A
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPEMNT AND CLOTHING
Are protective goggles or face shields provided and worn where there is any
danger of flying particles of corrosive materials?
Are protective gloves, aprons, shields or other means provided against
corrosive liquids and chemicals?
Are hard hats provided and worn where danger of head injury, falling objects,
or overhead work exists?
Is appropriate foot protection required where there is the risk of foot injuries
from hot, corrosive, falling objects, or penetrating action
Are approved respirators provided for general or emergency as needed?
Is all protective equipment maintained in sanitary condition and ready for use?
Does Kent County have eye wash facilities and quick drench shower within
the work area where employees are exposed to injurious liquid materials?
Where special electrical emergency equipment is needed, is it available?
Is protection against the effects of occupation noise exposure provided when
levels exceed those of the OSHA standard?
GENERAL WORK ENVIRONMENT
Are all work sites clean and orderly?
Are work surfaces kept dry or are appropriate means taken to ensure the
surfaces are slip resistant?
Are all spilled materials or liquids cleaned up immediately?
Is combustible scrap, debris and waste stored safely and removed from the
worksite properly?
Is accumulated combustible dust routinely removed from elevated surfaces?
Are covered metal waste cans used for oily and solvent soaked rags?
Are minimum number of toilets and washing facilities provided?
Are all toilets and washing facilities clean and sanitary?
Is all work areas adequately illuminated?
Are pits and floor opening covered or otherwise guarded?
FLOORS AND WALL OPENINGS
Are floor openings guarded by cover, a guardrail, or equivalent on all sides?
Are toe boards installed around the edges of permanent floor opening, where
persons may pass below the opening?
Are skylight screens of such construction and mounting that they will
withstand a load of at least 200 pounds
Are manhole covers, and similar covers, plus supports designed to carry a
truck real axle load of at least 20,000 pounds where subject to vehicle traffic?
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YES NO N/A
WALKWAYS
Are aisles and passageways kept clear?
Are aisles and walkways marked as appropriate?
Are wet surfaces covered with non-slip materials?
Is there safe clearance for walking in aisles where motorized or mechanical
handling equipment is operating?
Is adequate headroom provided for the entire length of any aisle or walkway?
Are standard guardrails provided wherever aisle or walkway surfaces are
elevated more than 30 inches above any adjacent floor or the ground?
STAIRS AND STAIRWAYS
Are standard stair rails or handrails on all stairways having for or more risers?
Are all stairways at least 22 inches wide?
Do stairs have at least six foot six inches (6’- 6”) overhead clearance?
Are steps risers on stairs uniform from top to bottom, with no riser spacing
greater than 7 ½ Inch?
Are steps on stairs provided with a surface that renders them slip resistant?
Are stairways handrails located between 30 and 34 inches above the leading
edge of stair treads?
Do stairway handrails have at least 1 ½ inch of clearance between the
handrails and the wall or surface on which they are mounted?
Are stairway handrails capable of withstanding a load of 200 pounds, applied
in any direction?
When stairs or stairways exit directly into areas where vehicles may be
operated, are adequate barriers and warning provided to prevent employees
stepping into the path of traffic?
EXITING OR EGRESS
Are exits marked with an exit sign and illuminated by a reliable light source?
Are the directions to exits, when not apparent, marked with visible signs?
Are doors, passageways or stairways, that are neither exits nor access to exits
which could be mistaken for exits, appropriated marked “Not An Exit”, etc.?
Are all exits kept free of obstructions?
Are there sufficient exits to permit prompt escape in case of emergency?
Are exit stairways which are required to be separated form other parts of a
building, enclosed by at least 2-hour fire-resistive construction in building
more than four stories in height, and not less than 1-hour fire-resistive
construction elsewhere?
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YES NO N/A
EXIT DOORS
Where panic hardware is installed on a required exit door, will it allow the
door to open by applying a force of 15 pounds or less in the direction of the
exit traffic?
Are door on cold storage rooms or and air-tight security room provided with
an inside release mechanism which will release the latch and open the door
even if it is padlocked or otherwise locked on the outside?
Where exit doors open directly into any street, or an area where vehicles may
be operated, are adequate barriers and warning provided to prevent employees
stepping into the path of traffic?
PORTABLE LADDERS
Are all ladders maintained in good condition?
Are non-slip safety feet provided on each ladder?
Are ladder runs and steps free of grease and oil?
Are employees prohibited from using ladders that are broken, missing steps,
rungs, cleats or other faulty equipment?
Are employees prohibited from using ladders as braces, skids or other than
their intended purpose?
HAND TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
Are all tools and equipment (both Kent County’s and employee owned) used
by employees in good condition?
Are broken or fractured handles on hammer, axes and similar equipment
replaced promptly
Are appropriate safety glasses, face shields, etc. used while using hand tools
or equipment which might produce flying materials or be subject to breakage?
Are tool handles wedged tightly in the head of all tools?
PORTABLE POWER OPERATED TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
Are grinders, saws and similar equipment provided with proper safety guards?
Are shields, guards, or attachments suggested by the manufacturer used?
Are circular saws equipped with guards above and below the base shoe?
Are corded operated tools effectively grounded or double insulated type?
Are effective guards in place over belts, pulleys, chains, sprockets, on
equipment such as concrete mixers, air compressors, and hose reels, etc.?
Are ground fault circuit interrupters provided on all temporary electrical
circuits, used during period of construction?
Are pneumatic/hydraulic hoses checked regularly for deterioration or damage
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HEALTH AND SAFETY AUDIT CHECKLIST [Sample] (Con’t)
ABRASIVE WHEEL EQUIPEMNT - GRINDERS
Is the work rest used and kept adjusted to within 1/8 inch of the wheel?
Is the tongue on the top side of the grinder kept to within 1/4 inch of wheel?
Are bench and pedestal grinders permanently mounted?
Are goggles or face shields always worn when grinding?
Are fixed permanently mounted grinders connected to their electrical
supply system with metallic conduit or other permanent wiring method?
Before wheels are mounted, are they visually inspected and ring tested?
Are coolant guards mounted on grinders to keep the coolant from employees?
MACHINE GUARDING
An employee safe method of machine operation training program is utilized?
Is there a regular program of safety inspection of machinery and equipment?
Is all machinery and equipment kept clean and properly maintained?
Is equipment securely placed and anchored?
Is there a power shut off switch within reach of the operator’s position?
Are all emergency stop buttons colored red?
Are pulleys and belts within 7 feet of floor or working level properly guarded?
Are methods provided to protect the operator and other employees in the
machine area from hazards created at the point of operation, ingoing nip pints,
rotating parts, flying chips, and sparks?
Are provisions made to prevent machines from automatically starting when
power is restored after a power failure?
If machinery is cleaned with compre3ssed air, I air pressure controlled and
personal protective equipment or other safeguards utilized to protect operator
and other workers from eye and body injury?
SPRAYING OPERATIONS
Is adequate ventilation assured before spray operations are started?
Is mechanical ventilation provided when spraying operations are done in
enclosed areas?
Is the spray area free of hot surfaces?
Is approved respiratory equipment provided and used when appropriate during
spraying operations?
Is the spray area kept clean of combustible?
YES NO N/A
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YES NO N/A
LOCKOUT / TAGOUT PROCEDURES
Is all machinery or equipment capable of movement, required to be deenergized or disengaged and locked out/tagged out during cleaning, servicing,
adjusting or setting up operations, whenever required?
Do the power disconnecting means for equipment also disconnect the
electrical control circuit?
Are the appropriate electrical enclosures identified?
Are means provided to assure the control circuit can be disconnected and
locked out?
Does the lock out procedure require that stored energy be released or blocked
before equipment is serviced?
Are appropriate employees provided with individually keyed personal safety
locks and/or devices?
Is it required that employees check the safety of the lock out by attempting a
start up after making sure no one is exposed?
Are employees instructed to always push the control circuit stop button prior
to reenergizing the main power switch?
Is there a means provided to identify any or all employees who are working on
locked out equipment by their locks or accompanying tags?
Are sufficient number of accident preventive signs or tags and safety padlocks
provided for any reasonable foreseeable repair?
In the event that equipment or lines cannot be shut down, locked out and
tagged, is a safe job procedure established and rigidly followed?
COMPRESSOR AND COMPRESSED AIR
Are compressors equipped with pressure relief valves, and pressure gauges?
Are compressor air intakes installed and equipped to ensure that only clean
uncontaminated air enters the compressor?
Are air filters installed on compressor intakes?
Are safety services on compressed air systems checked frequently?
Are signs posted to warn of the automatic starting feature of compressors?
Is the belt system totally enclosed to provide protection from all sides?
Is it strictly prohibited from pointing compressed air at other employees?
If compressed air is used for leaning off clothing is it regulated to a safe level?
Is it prohibited to use compressed air to clean up or move combustible dust if
such action could cause the dust to be suspended in the air causing a fire or
explosion?
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YES NO N/A
WELDING, CUTTING AND BRAZING
Are only authorized and trained personnel permitted to us welding, cutting or
brazing equipment?
Are compressed gas cylinders regularly examined for signs of defects?
Are precautions taken to prevent the mixture of air or oxygen with flammable
gases, except at a burner or torch?
Are empty cylinders appropriately marked (i.e.“MT”) and their valves closed?
Are liquefied gases stored & shipped valve end up with valve covers in place?
Is grounding of the machine frame and safety ground connections of portable
machines checked periodically?
Are electrodes removed from the holders when not in use?
Is it required that the electrical power to the welder be shut off where no one
is in attendance?
Is suitable fire extinguishing equipment available for immediate use?
When the object to be welded cannot be moved and fire hazard cannot be
removed, are shields used to confine heat, sparks and slag?
Are non-welding employees or general public exposed to the hazards crated
by welding, cutting, or brazing by shielding, personal protective equipment?
Are compressed gas/oxygen cylinders prevented from falling over?
HOIST AND AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT
Is each overhead electric hoist equipped with a limit device to stop the hook
travel at is highest point of safe travel?
Is the rated load of each hoist legibly marked and visible to the operator?
Are stops provided at the safe limits of travel for the trolley hoist?
Are hoist controls plainly marked indicating the direction of travel or motion?
Is it prohibited to use chains or rope slings that are kinked or twisted?
Is it prohibited to use slings that are frayed and saturated with oil?
IDENTIFICATION OF PIPING SYSTEMS
When non-potable water is piped through a facility, are outlets or taps posted
to alert employees that it is unsafe and not to be used for drinking, washing or
other personal use?
When hazardous substances are transported through above ground piping, is
each pipeline identified at points where confusion could introduce hazards to
employees
Is direction of flow, and contents of piping clearly marks and viewable?
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SAFETY INSPECTION PROGRAM
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
HEALTH AND SAFETY AUDIT CHECKLIST [Sample] (Con’t)
YES NO N/A
INDUSTRIAL TRUCKS - FORKLEFTS
Are only employees who have been trained in the proper use of industrial
trucks allowed to operate them?
Is substantial roll over protection system (ROPS), overhead provided for all
high lift trucks and all terrain vehicles?
Does each truck have a warning horn, whistle or other device which can be
clearly heard above the normal noise of the areas where operated?
Are the brakes on each industrial truck capable of bringing the vehicle to a
complete and safe stop with a full load?
Will the trucks’ parking brake effectively prevent the vehicle from moving
when unattended?
Are motorized hand and hand rider trucks so designed that the brakes are
applied, and power to the drive motor is shut off, when the operator releases
his grip on the device that controls travel?
ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROLS
Is all work areas properly illuminated?
Are hazardous substances identified which may cause harm if used normally?
Is employee exposure to chemicals in the workplace kept at acceptable levels?
If forklifts and other vehicles are used in building or other enclosed areas, are
the carbon monoxide levels kept below acceptable concentration?
Has there been a determination that noise levels in the building(s) and/or work
area(s) are within acceptable levels?
Are all outlets for water not suitable for drinking clearly identified?
Are all employees instructed in proper lifting techniques?
Are exhaust stacks and air intakes so located that contaminated air will not be
re-circulated within the building or other enclosed areas?
FLAMMABLE AND COMBUSTIBLE MATERIALS
Are combustible scrap, debris and waste materials stored in covered metal
receptacles and removed from the workplace promptly?
Are all lids kept on drums of flammable material when not in use?
Are drums of flammables grounded while in use?
Are drums of flammable liquid stored in facilities with ramped door way,
explosion proof wiring and non sparking tools etc?
Is smoking prohibited in areas where flammable materials are stored?
Are fire extinguishers selected and provided for the types of material in area
where they are to be used?
Are spills of combustible material cleaned up promptly?
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SAFETY INSPECTION PROGRAM
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
HEALTH AND SAFETY AUDIT CHECKLIST [Sample] (Con’t)
YES NO N/A
NOISE
Are workplace areas where continuous noise levels exceed 85 dBA?
Is there an ongoing preventive health program to educate employees in safe
levels of noise, exposures, and effects of noise and use of personal protection?
Have high noise level work areas been identified and warning posted?
Have engineering controls been used to reduce excessive noise levels?
Where engineering controls are not feasible, are administrative controls (i.e.,
workers rotation) being utilized to minimize employee noise exposure?
Are employees properly fitted for ear protectors when required or used?
Are employees in high noise areas given periodic audiometric testing to
ensure that Kent County has an effective hearing protection system?
Is the audiometric testing reviewed by authorized individuals and employee?
ENTERING CONFINED SPACES
Are confined spaces thoroughly emptied of any corrosive or hazardous
substances, such as acids or caustics, before entry?
Are all lines to a confined space, valve(d) off and blanked or disconnected and
separated before entry?
Is it required that all impellers, agitators, or other moving equipment inside
confined spaces be locked out if they present a hazard?
Is natural/mechanical ventilation provided prior to confined space entry?
Are appropriate atmospheric test performed to check for Oxygen deficiency,
toxic substances and explosive concentration prior to entry?
Is adequate illumination provided for the work to be performed?
Is the atmosphere inside the confined space frequently tested or continuously
monitored during the conduct of work?
Is there an assigned safety standby employee outside of the confined space,
when required, whose sole responsibility is to watch the work in progress,
sound an alarm if necessary, and render assistance?
Is standby employee appropriately trained/equipped to handle an emergency?
Is approved respiratory equipment required if the atmosphere inside the
confined space cannot be made acceptable?
Is all portable electrical equipment used inside confined spaces either
grounded and insulated or equipped with ground fault protection?
If employees will be using oxygen-consuming equipment in a confined space,
is sufficient air provided to assure combustion without reducing the level of
oxygen below 19.5%
Is each confined space checked for toxic materials or decaying biological
matter prior to entry?
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SAFETY INSPECTION PROGRAM
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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HEALTH AND SAFETY AUDIT CHECKLIST [Sample] (Con’t)
YES NO N/A
HAZARDOUS COMMUNICATION PROGRAM
Is there a list of hazardous substances used in Kent County work locations
(hazardous substance survey form)?
Is there a written hazard communication program dealing with Material Safety
Data Sheets (MSDS)?
Is there a written hazard communication program dealing with Kent County
Employee Training?
Is there a written hazard communication program dealing with labeling?
Is each container for a hazardous substance labeled with the product identity
and a hazard warning (communication of the specific health hazard and
physical hazards)
Is there a MSDS readily available for each hazardous substance used?
Is there an employee training program for hazardous substances?
Does the Kent County Hazardous Substances Training Program include an
explanation of what a MSDS is and how to use and obtain one?
Does the Kent County Hazardous Substances Training Program include an
explanation of “Right To Know”?
Does the Kent County Hazardous Substances Training Program include
identification of where an employee can see the Kent County’s written hazard
communication program?
Does the Kent County Hazardous Substances Training Program include where
hazardous substances are present in their work areas?
Does the Kent County Hazardous Substances Training Program include where
the physical and health hazards of substances in the work area, and specific
protective measures to be used?
Does the Kent County Hazardous Substances Training Program include
details of the hazard communication program, including how to use labeling
system?
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WORK ZONE AND TRAFFIC
CONTROL
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PURPOSE
The purpose of this section is to establish traffic control guidelines for the safe and efficient maintenance
of traffic within work areas under the jurisdiction of the Kent County Delaware Governmental Body
(referred to from this point forward as “Kent County”). In order to preserve safe and efficient operations
of the Kent County facilities, it is necessary to perform routine maintenance and, on occasion, emergency
repairs to the roads under the jurisdiction of the Kent County. This procedure has been developed to
provide guidelines for preparing and implementing maintenance and protection of traffic plans to assure
the safety of the Kent County employees and the traveling public.
RESPONSIBILITY
The Director of Departments and/or Divisions will ensure that all managers, supervisors, foreman,
and employees are aware of their duties and responsibilities regarding the maintenance and protection
of traffic and staff.
The Supervisor or Foremen in charge of an operation requiring maintenance and protection of traffic
will be responsible for preparing and implementing the traffic control plan (TCP).
The Kent County Traffic Engineer or an approved designee will be responsible for approving the
traffic control plan.
Traffic Control Plan shall comply with the current Delaware Manual on Uniform Traffic Control
Devices for Streets and Highways.
PROCEDURES
General
-
Proper traffic control through work areas is essential for ensuring the safety of the traveling
public and of employees. Public safety and that of our employees have the highest priority. The
proper application of the approved TCP will provide the desired level of safety.
-
All work zones must adhere to the minimum provisions of the documents. Throughout the
period(s) of work activity, traffic shall be maintained by implementing the approved TCP.
-
No work shall begin on any work activity or work phase until all required traffic control patterns
and devices indicated on the TCP for that activity or phase are completely and correctly in place
and have been checked for approved usage.
-
General and specific warning signs shall only be put into place when specific work tasks and
activities are actually underway, or when conditions exist that pose a potential hazard to the
public, and when additional signing has been approved by an appropriate Traffic Engineer.
-
All traffic control devices required by the TCP shall be kept in good condition.
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WORK ZONE AND TRAFFIC
CONTROL
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-
All traffic control devices not required for the safe conduct of traffic shall be promptly removed,
completely covered, turned away from traffic, or otherwise taken out of service and stored in a
safe location. No traffic control device should be in service when there is no clear cut reason for
the device. In situations where TCP's are jointly implemented, care shall be exercised to present
correct and non-conflicting guidance to the traveling public.
-
Throughout this section, speed of traffic means the posted speed or prevailing travel speed,
whichever is higher, unless otherwise noted.
-
Traffic shall be maintained at all times throughout the entire length of the project, unless
otherwise noted. No travel lane(s) other than those designated for possible closure in the TCP
shall be closed without obtaining prior approval from the Delaware Department of Transportation
Engineer or designee. All ingress and egress to the work area shall be performed with the flow of
traffic. It is the supervisor's responsibility to see that the approved TCP is properly implemented
to protect the work area and ensure public safety.
Pre-Planning Work
Prior to beginning the task, the person responsible for the work should carefully plan the work and
arrange for all tools, equipment, material and personnel required to properly and safely accomplish the
work. At a minimum, employees should proceed only after the following issues have been addressed:
-
Equipment, tools and materials needed to accomplish the task.
Personnel needed to accomplish the task.
Procedures to be followed.
If any unusual situations are anticipated, discussion and approval with supervisory personnel.
Notification and coordination with Public Relations, Delaware or local law enforcement
and/or other departments as may be appropriate.
Planning Work In Or Adjacent To Lanes Of Traffic
-
Identify the work to be performed.
-
Determine whether normal traffic patterns need to be altered or disrupted to accomplish the
work.
Determine if there is a need to establish a TCP to protect the traveling public and/or
personnel who will be performing the work.
-
Determine when the work will be performed and the duration of the work.
Developing A Traffic Control Plan
Inspect the work area and become familiar with all field conditions. As a minimum, determine the
following:
-
Sight distance approaching the work area.
-
Traffic speed: posted and actual.
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WORK ZONE AND TRAFFIC
CONTROL
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-
Geometry of the highway system in the work area and approaching and leaving the work
area.
-
Are there exit and entrance ramps nearby?
-
Are there conditions present that normally require, or encourage motorists to change lanes?
-
Are there conditions or activities competing for drivers’ attention?
-
What will be the ambient light condition when the work is to be performed?
-
What are likely to be the climate and roadway surface conditions when the work is
performed?
-
Are there any planned events or unusual situations not controlled by the municipality that
may affect traffic patterns during the period when the work is to be performed?
-
Is there any other work being performed in the municipality facilities, or surrounding
facilities that can affect traffic conditions?
-
Prepare or select a TCP that addresses all traffic, field, and climate conditions. Use the following
documents as a guideline:
-
-
Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD)
Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
These documents or online address will be available in the Personnel/Human Resource office
and provide guidelines and examples of traffic control schemes for situations that will be similar,
in many cases, to those encountered by maintenance personnel. In some instances, a
combination of TCP’s presented in these documents may be required, but in any event, the plan
that is developed should be specific to the work being performed and the conditions under which
it will be performed.
The plan needs to address the following items:
-
The number, type, placement and location of all traffic control and protection devices.
-
Distances from the work site to begin placement of warning and control devices to provide
adequate notification to traffic of the condition to be encountered.
-
Proper merge distances for lane drops.
-
A safe and efficient method of setting up and removing the devices.
-
The method for checking and maintaining the devices while they are in use.
-
The methods for covering signs that is left in place, but not applicable during certain periods or
operations.
-
Replacement of spare devices or parts for damaged or nonfunctioning devices.
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-
Procedures to assess the effectiveness of the maintenance and protection of traffic scheme and
devices.
-
Identification and availability of staff to perform required tasks.
-
Availability of required traffic control devices.
-
Need for and availability of State/Local Police involvement.
-
Coordination with other Departments who may be affected by or interested in the work to be
performed.
Maintenance and Protection of Traffic Plan Approval
The Supervisor prepares and presents the TCP to the Traffic Engineer or approved designee for
approval.
-
Revise the plan as required.
Implementation Of The TCP
-
Schedule the repair work.
-
Notify Delaware Department of Transportation (DelDOT) of any work that will disrupt
traffic (sufficiently in advance of work to allow for timely notification of media).
-
Schedule/reserve all equipment, labor and devices required to implement TCP.
-
Notify all other Departments who may be affected by or interested in the work or schedule.
-
Arrange for State/Local Police involvement as required.
-
Set up per the approved TCP. Devices should be installed in the direction traffic flows. The
first device placed is the first advance warning sign. The installation should then proceed in
sequence through the traffic control zone.
-
Observe the installation and determine if any additions or adjustments are required to
improve the safety or effectiveness of the plan. Discuss any proposed changes with the
Traffic Engineer or approved designee, before alterations are made. If alterations are required
immediately, effect them and notify the Traffic Engineer or approved designee.
-
Check and maintain all traffic control devices as per the TCP.
-
Remove the installation as soon as it is no longer required. Traffic control devices should be
removed in reverse sequence to that used for installation. This requires moving backwards
through the traffic control zone.
-
Notify the affected entity or approved designee, Public Relations and other Departments, as
required, when the maintenance and protection of traffic has been removed.
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WORK ZONE AND TRAFFIC
CONTROL
Original Issue Date:
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Work Zone Traffic Control Devices
All work zone traffic control devices shall be in accordance with current state adopted DelDOT
edition, of the Uniform Manual Traffic Control Devices.
Traffic control devices used in a work zone should be used uniformly. It is desirable for traffic
control device application to be uniform across all jurisdictions, but unique circumstances may create
the need for some variability.
Flagging
All flaggers working on state-maintained roadways, except for emergency personnel and law
enforcement officers, shall be certified by a DelDOT-recognized flagger certification program. All
flaggers, except for emergency personnel and law enforcement officers, shall be required to carry a
flagger certification card and photo identification on their person at all times.
Because flaggers are responsible for public safety and make the greatest number of contacts with the
public of all highway workers, they should be trained in safe traffic control practices and public
contact techniques. Flaggers should be able to satisfactorily demonstrate the following abilities:
-
-
Ability to receive and communicate specific instructions clearly, firmly, and courteously in
English and other languages as required environment dictates.
Ability to move and maneuver quickly in order to avoid danger from errant vehicles
Ability to control signaling devices (such as paddles and flags) in order to provide clear and
positive guidance to drivers approaching a Temporary Traffic Control (TTC) zone in
frequently changing situations
Ability to understand and apply safe traffic control practices, sometimes in stressful or
emergency situations
Ability to recognize dangerous traffic situations and warn workers in sufficient time to avoid
injury.
For daytime and nighttime activity, flaggers shall wear high-visibility safety apparel that meets or
exceeds the Performance Class 3 requirements of the ANSI/ISEA 107–2004 publication entitled
“American National Standard for High-Visibility Apparel and Headwear” (see Section 1A.11) and
labeled as meeting the ANSI 107-2004 standard performance for Class 3 risk exposure. The apparel
background (outer) material color shall be fluorescent orange-red, fluorescent yellow-green, or a
combination of the two as defined in the ANSI standard. The retroreflective material shall be orange,
yellow, white, silver, yellow-green, or a fluorescent version of these colors, and shall be visible at a
minimum distance of 1,000 feet. The retroreflective safety apparel shall be designed to clearly
identify the wearer as a person.
Flaggers are provided at worksites to stop traffic intermittently as necessitated by work progress or to
maintain continuous traffic past a worksite at reduced speeds to help protect the work crew. For both
of these functions the flagger must, at all times, be clearly visible to approaching traffic for a distance
sufficient to permit proper response by the motorist to the flagging instructions, and to permit traffic
to reduce speed before entering the worksite. In positioning flaggers consideration must be given to
maintaining color contrast between the work area background and the flagger's protective garments.
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WORK ZONE AND TRAFFIC
CONTROL
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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Hand Signaling Devices
A number of hand signaling devices, such as STOP/SLOW paddles, lights and red flags are used in
controlling traffic through work zones. The sign paddle bearing the clear messages STOP and SLOW
provide motorists with more positive guidance than flags and should be the primary hand signaling
device. Flag use should be limited to emergency situations and at spot locations which can best be
controlled by a single flagger.
Sign paddles should be at least 24 inches wide with letters at least 8 inches high on a 6 foot rigid staff.
This combination sign may be fabricated from sheet metal or other light semi-rigid material. The
background of the STOP face shall be red with white letters and border. The background of SLOW
shall be orange with black letters and border. When used at night the STOP face shall be
reflectorized red with white reflectorized letters and border, and the SLOW face shall be reflectorized
orange with black letters and border.
Flags used for signaling purposes shall be a minimum of 24" x 24" in size, made of good grade of red
material securely fastened to a staff approximately 3 feet in length. The free edge should be weighted
to ensure that the flag will hang vertically, even in heavy winds.
Hand Signaling Procedures
The following methods of signaling with sign paddles should be used:
-
To STOP traffic. The flagger shall face traffic and extend the STOP sign paddle in a
stationary position with the arm extended horizontally away from the body. The free arm is
raised with the palm toward approaching traffic.
-
When it is desired to alert or slow traffic. The flagger shall face traffic with the slow sign
paddle held in a stationary position with the arm extended horizontally away from the body.
-
When it is safe for traffic to proceed. The flagger shall face traffic with the SLOW sign
paddle held in a stationary position with the arm extended horizontally away from the body.
The flagger motions traffic ahead with the free hand.
The following methods of signaling with a flag should be used:
-
To STOP traffic. The flagger shall face traffic and extend the flag horizontally across the
traffic lane in a stationary position so that the full area of the flag is visible hanging below the
staff. For greater emphasis, the free arm may be raised with the palm toward approaching
traffic.
-
Where it is desired to alert or slow traffic. The flagger shall face traffic and slowly wave the
flag in a sweeping motion of the extended arm from the shoulder level to straight down
without raising the arm above a horizontal position.
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WORK ZONE AND TRAFFIC
CONTROL
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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-
When it is safe for traffic to proceed. The flagger shall face traffic with the flag held in a
stationary position with the arm extended horizontally away from the body. The flagger
motions traffic ahead with the free hand.
-
Lights approved by the appropriate highway authority or reflectorized sign paddles or
reflectorized flags shall be used to flag traffic at night. Daytime flagging procedures shall be
followed whenever such lights, paddles or flags are used at night.
-
Whenever practicable, the flagger should advise the motorist of the reason for the delay and
the approximate period that traffic will be halted. Flaggers and operators of construction
machinery or trucks should be made to understand that every reasonable effort must be made
to allow the driving public the right-of-way and prevent excessive delays.
Flagger Stations
-
Flagger stations shall be located far enough in advance of the worksite so that approaching
traffic will have sufficient distance to reduce speed before entering the work zone. A flagger
should be clearly visible to the traffic which is being controlled for a minimum distance equal
10 times the normal regulatory speed limit in MPH.
-
The flagger should stand either on the shoulder adjacent to the traffic being controlled or in
the barricaded lane. At a "spot" obstruction a position may have to be taken on the shoulder
opposite the barricaded section to operate effectively. Under no circumstances should a
flagger stand in the lane being used by moving traffic. The flagger should be clearly visible
to approaching traffic at all times. For this reason the flagger should stand alone, never
permitting a group of workers to congregate around the flagger station. The flagger should
be stationed sufficiently in advance of the work force to warn them of approaching danger,
such as out-of-control vehicles.
-
Flagger stations should be adequately protected and preceded by proper advance warning
signs. At night, flagger stations should be adequately illuminated.
-
At short construction and maintenance lane closures where adequate sight distance is
available for the safe handling of traffic, the use of one flagger may be sufficient.
One-Way Traffic Control
-
Where traffic in both directions must, for a limited distance, use a single lane, provision
should be made for alternate one-way movement to pass traffic through the constricted
section. At a "spot" obstruction, such as an isolated pavement patch, the movement may be
self-regulating. However, where the one-lane section is of any length, there should be some
means of coordinating movements at each end so that vehicles are not simultaneously moving
in opposite directions in the section and so that delays are not excessive at either end.
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WORK ZONE AND TRAFFIC
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-
Control points at each end of the route should be chosen so as to permit easy passing of
opposing lines of vehicles.
-
Where the one-lane section is short enough so that each end is visible from the other end,
traffic may be controlled by means of a flagger at each end of the section. One of the two
should be designated as the chief flagger for purposes of coordinating movement. They
should be able to communicate with each other verbally or by means of signals. These
signals should not be such as to be mistaken for flagging signals.
-
Where the end of a one-lane section is not visible from the other end, the flaggers may
maintain contact by means of radio or field telephones. So that a flagger may know when to
allow traffic to proceed into the section, the last vehicle from the opposite direction can be
identified by description or license.
High Visibility Vests
During daylight hours every employee shall wear a safety vest or equivalent orange shirt, jacket or
coverall when working on or within thirty feet of any ramp, bridge, tunnel or roadway open to traffic.
During hours of darkness every employee shall wear a retroreflective vest that meets ANSI/ISEA
107-1999, Conspicuity Class 3 standards. The retroreflective material shall be orange, yellow, white,
silver, strong yellow-green or a fluorescent version of one of these colors and shall be visible at a
minimum distance of 390 m (1280 feet). The retroreflective clothing shall be designed to identify
clearly the wearer as a person and be visible through the full range of body motions.
CONTRACTORS
Whenever contractors or service personnel are engaged in work which restricts traffic on behalf of
Kent County they must follow the procedures covered by this program.
At the conclusion of any work performed by a contractor, a post review will be performed and
documented to determine if new or previously unidentified hazards have been identified.
Department/Division Safety Coordinator of project(s) will certify that post work reviews have been
accomplished. The certification will contain each contractor company’s name and dates of the work.
Documentation will be filed with Kent County Health & Safety Officer and shall be maintained for
12 months from the date on which the elevated work occurred.
PROGRAM EVALUATION
This policy and affected procedures shall be reviewed by Kent County Health & Safety Officer and a
committee comprised of affected employees within 12 months of the last review dated and will note
changes made to this document by a modification to its Revision Number in page header.
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BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS EXPOSURE
CONTROL PROCEDURE
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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PURPOSE AND SCOPE
These procedures establish requirements for communicating information concerning bloodborne pathogen
exposures. This procedure applies to all Kent County Delaware Governmental Body (referred to from this
point forward as “Kent County”) employees who may incur occupational exposure to blood or other
potentially infectious materials. The employees that may be expected to incur occupational exposures are
listed below:
Job / Position
Tasks
Department of Public Safety, Public Works Department,
Department of Community Services, Department of Planning
Services, Sheriff’s Office, Firefighter, EMT, HAZMAT, or
other individuals exposed, assigned, and trained to provide
First Aid or CPR response as part of their role within the
organization
Contact with an injured persons
blood or bodily fluids while
providing emergency medical or
first aid services.
Individuals who perform janitorial services.
Clean up of surface areas exposed
to uncontained blood or body
fluids. (i.e.: Vomit or urine not
contained within a plastic bags
Decontamination and clean up of
equipment or other surfaces after
being contaminated with blood or
bodily fluids.
Employees who may be required to perform decontamination
and clean up of equipment or other surfaces after an
exposure event.
Decontamination and clean up of
equipment or other surfaces after
being contaminated with blood or
bodily fluids.
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BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS EXPOSURE
CONTROL PROCEDURE
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Revision Number:
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PROTECTIVE METHODS
All blood or other potentially infectious material will be considered infectious regardless of the perceived
status of the source of the individual. Employees will wash their hands immediately, or as soon as feasible,
with soap and water after the removal of gloves or other personal protective equipment. Employees must
wash their hands and any other skin with soap and water immediately, or as soon as feasible, following
contact of such body areas with blood or other potentially infectious materials.
Eating, drinking, smoking, applying cosmetics or lip balm, and handling contact lenses are prohibited in work
areas or positions where there is a reasonable likelihood of occupational exposure.
CONTAMINATED EQUIPMENT
Equipment that has become contaminated with blood or other potentially infectious materials will be
decontaminated as necessary unless the decontamination of the equipment is not feasible. A readily
observable label will be attached to the equipment stating which portions remain contaminated. This
information will be conveyed to all affected employees, the servicing representative, and/or the manufacturer,
as appropriate, and prior to handling, servicing, or shipping so that appropriate precautions will be taken.
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Appropriate personal protective equipment will be made available to all employees with potential bloodborne
pathogen exposure. This equipment is kept with the first aid supplies or specific location as designated by
the Kent County Health & Safety Officer.
All garments that are penetrated by blood or bodily fluids will be removed immediately or as soon as feasible.
All personal protective equipment will be removed prior to leaving the work area. When personal protective
equipment is removed it will be placed in an appropriately designated area or container for storage, washing,
decontamination or disposal.
Gloves will be worn where it is reasonably anticipated that employees will have hand contact with blood,
other potentially infectious materials, non-intact skin, mucous membranes, and when handling or touching
contaminated items or surfaces.
Disposable (single use) gloves will not be washed or decontaminated for re-use. They will be replaced as
soon as practical when they become contaminated or as soon as feasible if they are torn, punctured, or when
their ability to function as a barrier is compromised.
Masks in combination with eye protection devices, such as goggles or glasses with solid side shields, or chin
length face shields, will be worn whenever splashes, spray, splatter, or droplets of blood or other potentially
infectious materials may be generated and eye, nose or mouth contamination can reasonably be anticipated.
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BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS EXPOSURE
CONTROL PROCEDURE
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Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
HOUSEKEEPING
All equipment, tools and working surfaces will be cleaned and decontaminated immediately or as soon as
feasible after contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials. Decontamination will be performed
with a water and chlorine bleach solution mixed at 10 parts water to 1 part bleach.
WASTE DISPOSAL
The majority of the waste anticipated to be generated through first aid treatment will be decontaminated
and disposed of in the facility’s regular trash. If a situation arises where waste is generated that cannot be
decontaminated prior to disposal, then it will be placed in an appropriately labeled red bag located at the
specific location as designated by the Kent County Health & Safety Officer and the facility and/or vehicle
Manager and will be disposed of in accordance with applicable regulations.
HEPATITIS B VACCINATION & POST EXPOSURE EVALUATION AND FOLLOW UP
Kent County offers the Hepatitis B Vaccine to all potentially exposed employees within 10 working days
of their entering a position in which occupational exposure is present. Employees who decline to accept
the Hepatitis B Vaccination must sign the statement found in the back of this procedure.
If the employee initially declines the Hepatitis B Vaccination, but at a later date, decides to accept the
Vaccination, the Vaccination will be made available at that time.
All potentially exposed individuals will have a Hepatitis B vaccine made available to them as soon as
possible, but in no event later than 24 hours after the exposure incident. If an exposure incident occurs
other post-exposure follow-up procedures will be initiated immediately. Hepatitis B vaccinations and
post-exposure evaluations and follow-up will be:
•
•
•
•
Made available at no cost to the employee;
Made available to the employee at a reasonable time and place;
Performed by or under the supervision of a licensed physician or by or under the supervision of a
licensed healthcare professional; and
Provided according to recommendations of the U.S. Public Health Service current at the time the
evaluations and procedures take place.
When the employee incurs an exposure incident, it should be reported to the employee’s immediate
supervisor. An Incident Report Form (located in the back of this Program) will be completed. All
employees who incur an exposure incident will be offered a post-exposure confidential medical
evaluation and follow-up.
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BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS EXPOSURE
CONTROL PROCEDURE
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
If the exposed employee requests a post-exposure medical evaluation, the employee will give consent by
signing the Follow-up Report Form located in the back of this Program. This Report Form will be sent
along with the employee to his/her medical evaluation, completed by the healthcare provider. A copy of
the Incident Report Form will be sent along with the exposed employee to his/her medical evaluation.
Information regarding the source individual’s infectious status will be made available to the healthcare
provider and exposed employee, if known. By law, the source individual is not required to submit to
testing or to disclose information regarding their infectious status.
Healthcare Professional’s Written Opinion
Kent County will obtain and provide the employee with a copy of the evaluating healthcare professional’s
written opinion within 15 days of the completion of the evaluation. The healthcare professional’s written
opinion for Hepatitis B Vaccination will be limited to whether the hepatitis B vaccine is indicated for an
employee, and if the employee has received such vaccination.
The healthcare professional’s written opinion for post-exposure evaluation and follow-up will be limited
to the following:
•
•
That the employee has been informed of the results of the evaluation; and
That the employee has been told about any medical conditions resulting from the exposure to blood or
other potentially infectious materials which require further evaluation or treatment.
All other findings or diagnoses will remain confidential and will not be included in the written report.
TRAINING
Training will be provided to all potentially exposed employees and first-aid responders by a qualified
trainer to ensure that facility personnel understand the purpose and the function of the Bloodborne
Pathogens Program and that they have the skills and knowledge required to protect themselves from
bloodborne pathogens. Training will be provided at the time of initial assignment to a position with
occupational exposure and annually thereafter.
The Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager will maintain training records including each
employee’s name and dates of training.
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BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS EXPOSURE
CONTROL PROCEDURE
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
RECORDKEEPING
An accurate record for each employee with occupational exposure will be established and maintained.
This record will include the following:
•
•
•
•
•
The name and social security number of the employee;
A copy of the employee’s Hepatitis B Vaccination status including the dates of all the Hepatitis B
Vaccinations and any medical records relevant to the employee’s ability to receive the Vaccination;
A copy of all results of examinations, medical testing, and follow-up procedures;
The employer’s copy of the healthcare professional’s written opinion; and
A copy of the information provided to the healthcare professional.
Kent County will ensure that employee medical records are kept confidential and not disclosed or
reported without the employee’s express written consent to any person within or outside the workplace
except as required by law.
Medical records will be maintained for at least the duration of employment plus 30 years.
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BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS
EXPOSURE CONTROL PROCEDURE
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
EXPOSURE REPORT FORM - BLOOD OR BODILY FLUID
(To be completed by the first aid responder or supervisor following an exposure incident)
Exposed Employee Information:
Name:
Department:________________________
SSN:
Phone (H):
Address: ____________________________________________
City:
State:
Zip:_______
Exposure Description:
Date of Exposure:
Time of Exposure: __________________________
What bodily fluid(s) was the person in contact with?
Blood
Sweat
Feces
Tears
Saliva
Urine
Spit
Vomit
Other (describe):_______________________________________________________________________
What was the method of contact?
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BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS
EXPOSURE CONTROL PROCEDURE
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Blood or bodily fluids into natural body openings (e.g. nose, mouth, eyes)
Blood or bodily fluids into cut, wound, sores, or rashes less than 24 hours old
Please specify: ______________________________________________________________________________
Blood or bodily fluids on intact skin
Other (describe specifically): ___________________________________________________________________
How did the exposure occur? Be specific.
What action was taken in response to the exposure to remove the contamination (example: hand washing)?
What personal protective equipment was being used at the time of exposure?
Please describe any other information related to the incident (use a separate piece of paper if needed):
Employee’s Signature
Supervisor Signature
Date
Date
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BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS
EXPOSURE CONTROL PROCEDURE
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE FOLLOW-UP REPORT
(To be completed by the exposed employee and healthcare provider)
CONSENT FOR EXPOSURE INCIDENT FOLLOW-UP
_____________________________________
Employee Signature
______________
Date
HEALTHCARE PROVIDER - FOLLOW-UP ITEMS:
Discussed employee’s blood test results
Discussed source individual’s blood test results with employee (If known)
Discussed with employee recommendations for additional testing, evaluation, and treatment
_____________________________________
Healthcare Provider Signature
______________
Date
HEALTH CARE PROVIDER COMMENTS:
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
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Page 1 of 6
CHEMICAL RIGHT-TO-KNOW
PROCEDURE
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
PURPOSE AND SCOPE
These procedures establish requirements for communicating information about hazards to employees who
may work with or near hazardous chemicals. They were developed in accordance with the Delaware
Hazardous Chemical Information Act (Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act) which
requires Kent County to make employees aware of the hazards and provide them with the information and
training needed to work safely ("Hazardous Chemical Information Act." TITLE 16 CHAPTER 24 64
Del. Laws, c. 344, § 1). This Delaware Act complements or exceeds items that are not covered by the
Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Hazard Communication (HazCom) Standard (29
CFR 1910.1200). They address the implementation and administration of Kent County chemical
handling procedures.
RESPONSIBILITIES
All personnel working in Kent County Delaware Governmental Body (referred to from this point forward
as “Kent County”), including contractors and vendors, will be instructed in the requirements of this RightTo-Know Program and will be required to follow these procedures when working with or around
hazardous chemicals. The Kent County Health & Safety Officer or His/Her Assistant with the
coordination of the Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager is the Right-To-Know coordinator and
will implement the Program by ensuring that:

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
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

Hazardous chemical inventories are conducted and are documented in accordance with the Delaware
Hazardous Substance Workplace Chemical List (DHSWCL) Survey Form requirements (See
Appendix A).
Information describing the employee’s rights under the Act and the current (DHSWCL) are posted on
employee bulletin boards at each building containing hazardous chemicals.
All chemical containers and pipelines are properly labeled.
Employees are trained prior to working with hazardous chemicals.
Employees are provided with and use appropriate personal protective measures.
Contractors are notified of the chemicals used in areas they will work and that they have chemical
right-to-know or hazard communication programs in place.
Training records are maintained.
An annual program evaluation is conducted by the Safety Committee or other responsible party.
The Department Director(s)/Manager(s) and/or Division Supervisors’/Managers’ is the Material Safety
Data Sheet (MSDS) Coordinator who will:



Ensure that all chemicals purchased are accompanied with a MSDS and that all chemicals are shipped in
labeled containers.
Contact manufacturers to obtain MSDSs as needed to ensure a complete set are available to
employees at all times.
Maintain a supply of hazard warning labels to ensure containers and pipelines are properly labeled.
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Page 2 of 6
CHEMICAL RIGHT-TO-KNOW
PROCEDURE
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
HAZARD DETERMINATION
Kent County will rely on the hazard determinations provided by the product manufacturer in the MSDS.
If the MSDS does not provide sufficient hazard information, the manufacturer or distributor will be
contacted and additional information will be requested prior to use of the chemical.
EMPLOYEE NOTIFICATION
Information describing the employee’s rights under the Delaware Hazardous Chemical Information Act
(Worker Right-to-Know Law) will be posted in each building at locations where normal employee
notifications are posted.
CHEMICAL INVENTORY AND MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS
An inventory of hazardous chemicals used or stored at each facility was conducted and includes all
information required by Delaware Hazardous Substance Workplace Chemical List (DHSWCL) Survey
Form. These DHSWCL forms are posted on employee bulletin boards at each facility.
Any new products purchased will be added to the list, and products that have been discontinued will be
deleted from the list. The Right-to-Know Coordinator or authorized designee will review the chemical
inventory on an annual basis and make any necessary changes.
Chemical Inventories/ DHSWCL and MSDS Binders will be kept in the following locations:

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

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



Kent County Administrative Complex – Facility Management Office
Kent County Library – Director’s Office
Kent County Emergency Services Building – Reference Library Room
Kent County Medic Station South (Harrington) – Reference Library Room
Kent County Medic Station North (Smyrna) – Reference Library Room
Kent County Facility (Milford) – Reference Library Room
Kent County Brecknock Park (Camden) – Break Room/Area
Kent County Big Oak Park (Smyrna)– Break Room/Area
Kent County Browns Branch Park (Harrington) – Break Room/Area
To ensure that all new chemicals receive proper review before being brought on-site, the person
requesting a new chemical will provide the MSDS to the MSDS Coordinator for review prior to allowing
it to be used in the department. The MSDS Coordinator will review each MSDS and communicate
whether the chemical is approved for use.
If an MSDS is not provided with a hazardous chemical, the MSDS Coordinator will request a MSDS
from the manufacturer and will not allow the chemical to be used prior to receiving the MSDS.
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CHEMICAL RIGHT-TO-KNOW
PROCEDURE
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
LABELING
All containers of hazardous chemicals will be prominently labeled in English (other languages may be
used on labels, as long as it also appears in English) with the following information:



Name of the hazardous chemical or mixture
Appropriate hazard warnings
Name and address of the manufacturer.
If labels provided by the manufacturer do not contain this information, the chemical will be returned to
the manufacturer. Transfer of a hazardous chemical to another container for use will be conducted
according to one of the following procedures:



Material will be transferred to a pre-labeled container;
A label provided by the manufacturer will be placed on the container prior to transfer;
The transferred chemical will be handled only by the employee making the transfer and will be
used in its entirety during the same work shift that the chemical was transferred.
NON-ROUTINE TASKS
When employees are required to perform non-routine tasks that may involve the use of hazardous chemicals,
specific instruction will be provided by the employee’s supervisor or a properly trained and assigned
subordinate, to ensure the employee understands the potential hazards and can conduct the tasks safely.
CONTRACTORS
These procedures will be followed each time an outside contractor is hired:



An evaluation of the contractor’s Hazard Communication Program will be conducted by the hiring
party to ensure compliance with the OSHA HazCom Standard.
The contractor will be required to submit a list of hazardous chemicals that will be used while on the
premises and corresponding MSDSs to the responsible manager prior to the commencement of work.
Employees working in or near the contractor work area will be furnished with information regarding
the potential hazards associated with the contracted work.
Subcontractors of general contractors will be required to conform to the general contractor’s HazCom
Program and abide by the requirements of this procedure. The contractor will be advised of the Kent
County Policy and of:



Any hazardous material that might be encountered in the area where they will be working;
The appropriate actions required should contact be made with any such hazardous material; and
The location of the nearest MSDS Binder.
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CHEMICAL RIGHT-TO-KNOW
PROCEDURE
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
TRAINING
Initial training on “Chemical Right to Know” will be provided to new employees during their
orientation/training period and no later than 120 days from hire. Documentation of the training will be
registered on a Safety Meeting Sign-In Sheet by the attending employees. This training will consist of:




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


An overview of the requirements contained in the Delaware Right to Know Law including their
rights under the regulation.
Information regarding any operations in there work-areas where hazardous substances are
present.
Location and availability of the written Chemical Right-To-Know program.
Physical and health effects of the hazardous substances.
Methods and observation techniques used to determine the presence or release of hazardous
substances in the work area and to whom to report such problems.
How to lessen or prevent exposure to these hazardous substances through the use of engineered
controls, work practices and/or the use of personal protective equipment (PPE).
Emergency and first aid procedures such as evacuation, spill clean up and reporting, etc., if
employees are exposed to hazardous materials or substances.
Where to obtain MSDS and how to read labels to obtain appropriate hazard information.
PERIODIC TRAINING
Periodic training must be conducted by the Right-To-Know Coordinator or Supervisor when:


A new hazardous chemical enters into the employees work area; or when there is new
information received regarding a hazardous chemical already in the work area.
Employees are transferred from one work area to another and the work involves changes in the
hazardous chemicals with which they will be working.
ANNUAL TRAINING
Annual training will be provided to all employees who work with hazardous chemicals. Documentation of
the training will be registered on a dated Meeting Record signed by the attending employees, and/or signature
on training acknowledgment form.
HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL SPILLS
All spills of hazardous chemicals must be immediately reported to your supervisor or the Right-To-Know
Coordinator. A knowledgeable person will determine if the spill can be cleaned up safely. If there is any
delay in getting the spill properly cleaned up the following will be done:



Secure or identify the area to prevent any other individual from being exposed to the spill
hazard.
Contain the spill as much as possible using the materials in the spill kits.
Wait for further instructions from the Right-To-Know Coordinator.
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CHEMICAL RIGHT-TO-KNOW
PROCEDURE
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
ANNUAL PROCEDURE EVALUATION
This Program will be evaluated annually to ensure its effectiveness. The evaluation will be performed to
ensure that the procedures are current and practical, and that the requirements are being implemented.
The evaluation will be conducted to determine that:




A complete list of hazardous chemicals is maintained and a MSDS exists for each chemical;
Each container of hazardous chemical is labeled to identify the hazard and the appropriate warnings;
Employees have received the required training and can demonstrate knowledge; and
Contractors are provided information on the Program and its requirements and have provided Kent
County with the required information.
Modifications will be implemented and incorporated into the Program within one (1) month. When
revisions are made to the procedures, employees will be furnished with information regarding
modifications through one of the following means:



Written correspondence;
General staff meetings conducted by supervisors who will discuss procedure changes; or
Formalized training that will review each aspect of the procedures.
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CHEMICAL RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROCEDURE
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
APPENDIX A
HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE WORKPLACE CHEMICAL LIST SURVEY FORM
Name of Employer/Workplace Covered By This Form:
Street Address Of Workplace:
City:
Telephone Number:
County Name:
All Hazardous Substances Present At Workplace During Prior Year From:
State:
Zip Code:
Signature of Employer or Representative:
S E Chemical
Product
Abstract Service Name/Ingredients
Number (CAS)
(“E”) Environmental Hazards
(“S”) Special Hazardous Substance
Manufacturer Information Quantity
Fire
Explosive
Reactivity
Acute
Chronic
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CONFINED SPACE ENTRY
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
PURPOSE
The purpose of the confined space entry procedure is to ensure that proper precautions are taken before
any employee enters a confined space and that rescue plans are in place should an emergency occur.
These procedures apply to all Kent County Delaware Governmental Body (referred to from this point
forward as “Kent County”) employees and contractors who are working at sites and on projects that are
under the direction of Kent County.
RESPONSIBILITIES
All personnel working for and in Kent County, including contractors and vendors, will be instructed in
the requirements of this Confined Space Entry Procedure and will be required to follow these procedures
when working at and around confined spaces. The Kent County Health & Safety Officer or His/Her
Assistant with the coordination of the Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager, Department
Director(s)/Manager(s) and/or Division Supervisors’/Managers’ will implement the program by:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Providing all equipment necessary for compliance with this program, including danger signs for
confined spaces, an atmospheric monitor, and any other special equipment required for safe confined
space entry
Ensuring that personnel involved in the confined space entry program are trained regarding their
duties and responsibilities
Ensuring that confined space entry is performed in compliance with this program.
Monitoring compliance with the elements of this program
Ensuring that all personnel are trained
Performing a periodic review of this program
DEFINITIONS
Confined Space: A confined space is defined as a space that: (1) has limited or restricted means of entry
or exit; (2) is large enough for an employee to enter and perform assigned work; (3) and is not designed
for continuous occupancy by the employee. Confined spaces may include, but are not limited to
underground vaults, tanks, storage bins, pits and dike areas, man holes, vessels, and working silos.
Permit-Required Confined Space: A permit-required confined space is a confined space that has one or
more of the following characteristics:
• Contains or has the potential to contain a hazardous atmosphere
• Contains a material that has the potential for engulfing an entrant
• Has an internal configuration that might cause an entrant to be trapped or asphyxiated by inwardly
converging walls or by a floor that slopes downward and tapers to a smaller cross section
• Contains any other recognized serious safety or health hazards.
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Page 2 of 10
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
HAZARD SIGNS
Danger signs should be posted at permit-required confined spaces to inform employees of the existence,
location, and danger posed by the spaces. The following language satisfies the requirements for such a
sign:
DANGER-PERMIT-REQUIRED CONFINED SPACE-AUTHORIZED ENTRANTS ONLY
HAZARD ASSESSMENT AND JOB PLANNING
Prior to performing any work in a suspected confined space, an assessment should be performed to identify
the possible hazards that may be encountered during entry. Refer to Attachment A for a confined space
hazard assessment form. When planning the work to be performed in a given confined space, assess the
likelihood of incidents, given the hazards, and determine if the work can be done without entering the space.
If entry is necessary, the Confined Space Entry Permit System procedures specified below must be
followed.
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY PERMIT SYSTEM
The confined space entry permit system establishes procedures for the preparation, issue, use, and
cancellation of confined space entry permits which will be required for entry into confined spaces. No
person, whether a Kent County employee or a contractor may enter any confined space until an entry
permit has been completed and signed, and all of the required precautions have been satisfied.
1. Obtain Confined Space Entry Permit
The initiator of the work must obtain a copy of the confined space entry permit specified in Attachment
B. The permit initiator should then complete the "Purpose of Entry Work to be Performed" section of the
permit. The permit will be valid only for the location, task, date, and time period specified (time periods
shall not exceed 12 hours). If work must continue past the time listed on the permit, the permit initiator
must issue another permit for the extended period. A new permit must also be issued if work is
discontinued for a period exceeding two hours.
2. Ensure that Precautions are Satisfied
The permit initiator and Kent County Health & Safety Officer or His/Her Assistant must jointly review
the "Minimum Requirements” section of the permit, and verify that the precautions have been satisfied by
placing a check mark in the "Yes" column.
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CONFINED SPACE ENTRY
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
3. Obtain Approval Signatures
The Project Foreman acting as the entry supervisor, as well as the attendant(s) and entrant(s) must sign
the permit. By signing the permit, each person indicates that he/she has reviewed applicable permit
procedures and precautions, inspected the work area, and that he/she understands his/her duties and
emergency responsibilities.
4. Post the Permit
Post the confined space entry permit at worksite entrance at the time of entry so that the entrants can
confirm that pre-entry preparations have been completed.
5. Terminate Entry and Cancel Permit
The permit initiator will terminate entry and cancel the entry permit when the work assignment has been
completed or when a condition that is not allowed under the permit arises in or near the permit space.
Upon permit termination, the permit initiator shall record the time that entrants exited the confined space.
Any problems or new conditions must be noted on the canceled permit so that appropriate revisions to the
permit space program can be made.
6. Recordkeeping
Confined space entry permits must be kept for at least one year to facilitate the review of the permitrequired confined space program. The Department Director/Manager and/or Division Supervisor/Manager
should retain the original permit.
7. Contractors
Prior to work, contractors working under the direction of Kent County shall be informed of the existence
of permit-required confined spaces at the work site and that confined space entry is only allowed through
compliance with the Kent County confined space entry program. When contractors will be entering
confined spaces, they shall take part in the permit process so that they are informed of the hazards
associated with the confined space and the precautions and procedures for working in the confined space.
Entry shall be coordinated so that contractors and Kent County employees do not endanger one another.
Contractors shall be debriefed at the conclusion of entry operations regarding the permit space program
followed and any hazards confronted or created in permit spaces during entry operations.
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CONFINED SPACE ENTRY
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY PERMIT
The precautions listed on the confined space entry permit must be satisfied before a confined space permit
is issued.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The type of confined space entry must be indicated on the permit along with the potential hazards of
entry, the materials last known to be in the space, the names of the entrants, and their times of entry
and exit into and from the confined space.
A hazard communication review should be conducted so that all personnel involved understand the
hazards associated with the materials in or previously in the confined space. Precautions and
emergency procedures should also be reviewed.
A hot work permit is required for work involving burning, welding, and cutting. No gas cylinders will
be permitted in the confined space.
Personal protective equipment must be selected for the task and donned by employees entering the
confined space at all times. The personal protective equipment required may include eye protection,
hearing protection, respiratory protection, and protective clothing.
The persons(s) regularly in charge of the area should be notified of the plans for confined space entry.
The space should then be drained, purged, cleaned or decontaminated, or cooled as required.
Special tool or equipment requirements, such as the need for non-sparking tools or low voltage tools
or lighting must be evaluated.
The need for equipment required for safe ingress and egress, such as ladders or scaffolds, must be
evaluated.
For vertical entries, authorized entrants should wear a chest or full body harness with a retrieval line
attached to the center of their backs near shoulder level, or above their heads. Wristlets may be used if
it can be shown that the use of a chest or full body harness is infeasible or creates a greater hazard. In
addition, the other end of the retrieval line must be attached to a mechanical device or to a fixed point
outside the permit space. Use of a lifeline, harness/tripod, and approved winch type system is required
for all vertical entries greater than 5 feet.
The entrants should be protected from external hazards by placing caution signs and barricades
around or near the area as necessary.
Any work in the area of the confined space which could pose a hazard during confined space entry
should be stopped prior to entry.
All hazardous energy sources, such as electrical/mechanical equipment, valves, and vessels/piping,
should be isolated using lockout or tagout. The hazardous energy control procedure should be
consulted for lockout/tagout and the checklist on the confined space entry permit should be
completed.
One attendant shall be assigned to monitor the entry outside the confined space at all times. The
attendant must not enter the confined space at any time. If an emergency occurs, the attendant should
utilize the retrieval system to extricate the employee and summon emergency service.
The attendant shall be equipped with a radio. Communication between the entrants and attendant shall
be maintained at all times.
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CONFINED SPACE ENTRY
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
•
•
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Forced ventilation must be supplied where insufficient oxygen levels exist. Purging should begin at
least 30 minutes prior to entry and continue for the duration of the work. The ventilation system
should provide approximately 12 air changes per hour. The use of gasoline powered ventilators is
prohibited.
Atmospheric monitoring for oxygen, combustible gases or vapors and/or toxic vapors must be
performed prior to entry. Continuous monitoring during entry is required when isolation of the permit
space is infeasible (such as a sewer). Testing should be performed in the order given below. Test data
must meet acceptable entry conditions for confined space entry to proceed and continue. The
acceptable entry conditions are as follows:
Conditions
(1) Oxygen content
(2) Combustible gas or vapor content
(3) Toxic vapor (contaminant) content
•
•
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Acceptable Levels
19.5% to 23.5% oxygen
0% LEL (Lower Explosive Limit)
Less than TLV (Threshold Limit Value) (ppm).
For continuous monitoring of oxygen and combustible gases or vapors, a personal
oxygen/combustible meter should be assigned to at least one entrant. The monitor should be worn
throughout entry. The meter must be set to alarm at oxygen concentrations less than 19.5% oxygen
and combustible gas or vapor concentrations at 10% of the lower explosive limit (LEL). If the alarm
sounds, all entrants should immediately exit the confined space. All meters must be UL or FM
approved. Department Director/Manager and/or Division Supervisor/Manager is responsible for the
semi-annual calibration of equipment. Calibration records should be kept on file.
The permit initiator shall inspect the work area prior to entry to ensure that all precautions have been
satisfied. Approval signatures can then be obtained and entry can begin.
EMERGENCIES
If an emergency situation arises and rescue is necessary (the entrant needs assistance to escape), the
attendant shall perform non-entry rescue. After the entrant has been rescued from permit space hazards,
the attendant shall call security for emergency services.
TRAINING
Before the initial work assignment begins, all employees required to work in permit spaces must be
properly trained. Training will ensure that employees have acquired the understanding, knowledge, and
skills necessary for the safe performance of their duties. The specific duties of the authorized entrant,
attendant, and entry supervisor are provided below.
DRAFT
Page 6 of 10
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Authorized Entrants must:
•
•
•
•
•
Know space hazards, including information on the mode of exposure (inhalation or dermal exposure),
signs or symptoms, and consequences of the exposure
Use appropriate personal protective equipment properly (face, eye, respiratory protection, and other
forms of barrier protection such as gloves, aprons, and coveralls)
Maintain communication (through telephone, radio or visual observation) with attendants to enable
the attendant to monitor the entrant's status as well as to alert the entrant to evacuate
Alert the attendant when a prohibited condition exists or when warning signs or symptoms of
exposure exist
Exit from the permit space as soon as possible when ordered by an authorized person, when the
entrant recognizes the warning signs or symptoms of exposure, when a prohibited condition exists or
when an automatic alarm is activated.
Attendants must:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Know the existing and potential hazards faced during entry, including information on the mode of
exposure, signs or symptoms of exposure, consequences of the exposure, and the behavioral and
physiological effects of exposure in authorized entrants.
Maintain communication with and keep an accurate account of those workers entering the permitrequired space.
Remain outside the permit space during entry operations unless relieved by another authorized
attendant.
Communicate with the authorized entrants as necessary to monitor entrant status and to alert entrants
of the need to evacuate the space.
Monitor activities inside and outside of the permit space and order evacuation of the permit space
when a prohibited condition exists, when a worker shows signs of behavioral/physiological effects of
hazard exposure, when an emergency outside the confined space exists or when the entrant/employee
cannot effectively and safely perform the required duties.
Summon rescue and other emergency services as soon as attemdamt(s) determines that the entrants
may need assistance to escape from permit hazard.
Ensure that unauthorized persons stay away from permit spaces or exit immediately if they have
entered the permit space.
Inform authorized entrants and the entry supervisor of entry by unauthorized persons.
Perform non-entry rescues when specified by the rescue procedure.
Perform no other duties that interfere with the primary duty to monitor and protect the entrants.
DRAFT
Page 7 of 10
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Entry Supervisor (Permit Initiator) must:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Know the space hazards that may be faced during entry including information on the mode of
exposure, signs or symptoms of exposure, and consequences of exposure.
Verify that rescue service are available and that the means for summoning them are operable
Verify emergency plans and specified entry conditions such as tests, procedures, and equipment
before endorsing the permit and allowing entry to begin.
Take appropriate measures to remove unauthorized entrants who enter or attempt to enter the permit
space during entry operations.
Ensure that entry operations remain consistent with the entry permit and that acceptable entry
conditions are maintained at intervals dictated by the hazards and operations performed within the
space and whenever responsibility for a permit space entry operation is transferred.
Terminate entry and cancel permits when entry operations are completed or if a new condition exists
Additional training is required when (1) job duties change, (2) there is a change in the permit-required
space program or the permit space operation presents a new hazard, and (3) when job performance is
inadequate.
Rescue service personnel shall be provided with and trained in the proper use of personal protective and
rescue equipment, including respirators. Rescue personnel shall also be trained to perform assigned rescue
duties and shall have had authorized entrants training. In addition, all rescuers shall be trained in first aid
and CPR and, at a minimum, one rescue team member must be currently certified in first aid, Automated
External Defibrillator (AED), and CPR. Practice exercises must be performed yearly and shall include an
exercise where rescue personnel are given access to permit spaces so that they can practice rescue
operations. Rescuers shall also be informed of the hazards of the permit space.
Upon completion of training, a certificate of training will be given to an employee that includes the
employee's name, signature or initials of trainer(s), and dates of training. All training documentation will
be maintained by Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager.
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY PROGRAM REVIEW
To ensure that employees participating in entry operations are protected from permit space hazards, the
permit-required confined space program shall be reviewed by [Insert Responsible Position Title] using the
canceled permits within one year after each entry. If deficiencies are found, the program should be revised
accordingly. If no entry is performed during a 12 month period, no review is necessary.
DRAFT
Page 8 of 10
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY
ATTACHMENT A
Kent County
Confined Space Hazard Assessment Form
Original Issue Date:
Last Reviewed:
Date of Survey:
Name of Space:
Location of Space:
Description of Space:
Possible Atmospheric Hazards:
Oxygen Deficiency:
Oxygen Enrichment:
Comments:
Revision Number:
Permit Required? Yes:
Flammable (Specific):
No:
Toxic (Specific):
Possible Content Hazards:
Previous Contents:
Content Fill or Removal:
Shifting Contents:
Fluid Levels:
Dust:
Comments:
Potential Energy:
Electrical:
Hydraulic:
Pneumatic:
Mechanical:
Fire Control System:
Comments:
Environment in the Space:
Ambient Temperature (High or Low):
Surface Temperature (High or Low):
Slippery Surfaces:
Noise:
Comments:
Configuration of Space:
Interior Shape & Slope:
Low Overhead
Clearance:
Drop Offs:
Complex
Layout:
Stability:
Structural
Integrity:
Comments:
External Hazards:
Traffic:
Comments:
Machinery:
Equipment:
Other Hazards:
Animals:
Insects:
Biological Organisms:
Comments:
Confined Space
Can be bodily Entered?
Yes:
No:
Limited or Restricted Entry?
Yes:
No:
Not Designed for Continuous Human
No:
Yes:
Occupancy?
Notes: Atmosphere unknown
Reasons for Entering Space and Typical Activities:
Frequency of Entry:
Who usually enters the space?
External Connections to Space:
Eligible for Alternate Procedure?
Comments:
Maintenance:
Yes:
No:
Processes:
Terrain:
Non-ionizing Radiation:
Ionizing Radiation:
Permit Required Confined Space
Hazardous Atmosphere?
Yes:
Potential for Engulfment?
Yes:
Internal Configuration Hazard?
Yes:
Other Serious Safety Hazard?
Yes:
Number of Entry Points:
Production:
Contractors:
Eligible for Reclassification?
No:
No:
No:
No:
Other:
Yes:
No:
DRAFT
Page 9 of 10
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY
ATTACHMENT B (TWO PAGES)
Kent County
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY PERMIT
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Date of Issue: ________ Time Issued: _______ Authorized Duration of Permit: _________ Space to be Entered:_____________________________________
Purpose of Entry and Work to be Performed: ___________________________________________________________________________________________
Potential Permit Space Hazards: ( ) Oxygen Deficient/Enrichment ( ) Flammable Atmosphere ( ) Mechanical Hazards ( ) Toxic Materials ( ) Entrapment
( ) Electrical Shock ( ) Other:______________________________________________________________________________________________________
Hazard Isolation/Elimination Methods: ( ) Purge and Clean ( ) Pipes Blanked or Disconnected ( ) Lockout/Tagout ( ) Mechanical Ventilation ( ) Atmospheric
Testing ( ) Hot Work Permit ( ) Other ______________________________________________________________________________________________
Note: If hot work is performed a hot work permit is required. Prior approval is required if solvents are hazardous chemicals are introduced in to the
space. If work involves hazardous energy, lockout tagout procedures must be followed.
Minimum Requirements to Be Performed and Reviewed Prior To Entry
YES
NO
N/A
1. Have the contents of the confined space been removed and the space cleaned? ____
____
____
2. Is the oxygen level of the confined space between 19.5 % and 23.5 %?
____
____
____
3. Is the lower flammability level less than 10%?
____
____
____
4. Are toxic substances below the permissible exposure limit (OSHA PEL)?
____
____
____
Note: Be aware of stratified atmospheres in the confined space.
____
____
____
5. Is the area around the confined space secured with perimeter guarding?
____
____
____
6. Are all hazardous energy sources controlled and operating controls checked? ____ ____
____
7. List required safety equipment
____
____
____
8. Has a Hot Work Permit been issued if required?
____
____
____
9. Is the non-entry retrieval system in place?
____
____
____
10. Is two-way communication established between Entrant and Attendant?
____
____
____
(PAGE 1 OF 2 FRONT)
DRAFT
Page 10 of 10
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY
ATTACHMENT B (TWO PAGES)
Kent County
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY PERMIT
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
11. Is the portable ventilation fan in place and operating properly?
____
____
____
12. Has a pre-entry briefing been conducted with all attendants and entrants?
____
____
____
13. List required protective equipment__________________________________________________________________________________________________
Explain any NO responses from above: __________________________________________________________________________________________________
Authorized Personnel
Attendant(s):
Name:__________________ Signature:__________________
Entrant(s):
Name:__________________
Signature:___________________
Name:__________________ Signature:__________________
Entrant(s):
Name:__________________
Signature:___________________
MSDSs available for materials/chemicals contained in the space: (Y) (N)
Communication procedure to summon emergency personnel: (Y) (N)
Method of transportation to nearest hospital: (Y) (N)
Record Periodic/Continuous Air Monitoring Results At Least Every Hour
Value
Initials
Time
Value
Initials
Time
Value
Initials
Time
Oxygen Level 19.5-23.5%
________
________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Lower Flammable Level 0%
________
________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Carbon Monoxide <10PPM
________
________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Other :_________________
________
________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
Authorization
Entry Supervisors must review and inspect the area to ensure that all requirements of the entry permit are performed & authorize entry by signature below.
___________________________________________________________________
Entry Supervisor Name/Signature
____________________________________________
Time Work Completed/Permit Cancelled
NOTE: Permit must be completed before entry. Post entry permit near the opening of the confined space. If conditions exceed permit requirements terminate entry
immediately and report to Health & Safety Officer or His/Her Assistant. Return completed entry permit to Department Director/Manager and/or Division
Supervisor/Manager
(PAGE 2 OF 2 BACK)
DRAFT
Page 1 of 8
CRANES, SLINGS, AND HOISTS
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
PURPOSE
The purpose of the Cranes, Slings, and Hoists Safety Program is to define the work practices and the
inspection procedures to help ensure that the operators of the overhead cranes at Kent County Delaware
Governmental Body (referred to from this point forward as “Kent County”) are protected from potential
hazards associated with the movement of equipment and material. This program includes information on
the safe operation and inspection procedures of small portable overhead hoists, chains, slings and hoists.
The provisions of the Cranes, Slings, and Hoists Safety Program apply to all Kent County employees who
operate and use overhead cranes, portable hoists, chains and slings.
RESPONSIBILITIES
All personnel working for Kent County, including contractors and vendors, will be required to follow
these procedures when working with cranes, slings, and hoists. The Kent County Health & Safety Officer
or His/Her Assistant with the coordination of the Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager will
implement the program by:
•
•
•
•
•
Providing or arranging training for the safe operation of overhead cranes, and the inspection
procedure for chains, slings and hoists.
Facilitating training on the requirements of the Cranes, Slings, and Hoists Safety Program.
Assuring that the requirements of the program are observed, with respect to daily, monthly and annual
inspections.
Maintaining certification record for inspection, including the date of inspection, the signature of the
person who performed the inspection and an identifier for the rope.
Reviewing the Cranes, Slings, and Hoists Safety Program on a periodic basis and revise it as
necessary.
All crane and hoist operators will:
•
•
•
Follow all required safety practices related to the use of overhead cranes, portable hoists, chains and
slings.
Attend training on the requirements of the Cranes, Slings, and Hoists Safety Program and the
appropriate inspection procedures for chains, slings and hoists.
Conduct the appropriate inspections when they are required and complete the required documentation
and notify their supervisor of any deficiencies identified during inspections.
DEFINITIONS
Crane: A crane is a machine for lifting and lowering a load and moving it horizontally, with the hoisting
mechanism an integral part of the machine. Cranes whether fixed or mobile are driven manually or by
power.
Hoist: A hoist is an apparatus which may or may not be a part of a crane, exerting a force for lifting or
lowering.
DRAFT
Page 2 of 8
CRANES, SLINGS, AND HOISTS
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Overhead Crane: An overhead crane is a crane with a movable bridge carrying a movable or fixed
hoisting mechanism and traveling on an overhead fixed runway structure.
Rated Load: The rated load is the maximum load for which a crane or individual hoist is designed and
built by the manufacturer and shown on the equipment nameplate(s).
Sling: A sling is a loop of material that connects the load to the lifting device. Slings can be made of
chain, wire, metal mesh, natural, and synthetic materials.
Competent Person: One who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings
or working conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to employees, and who has
authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them. (1926.32 Definitions subpart (f)
OSHA)
CRANE OPERATION
Operators will not leave their position at the controls while the load is suspended or pass under a
suspended load on the hook. Other employees are not permitted to walk under a suspended load.
1. Attaching the Load
The operator must be familiar with the appropriate rigging and hoisting techniques to safely move the
load. Additionally, the following items should be used to attach the load:
•
•
The hoist chain or hoist rope should be free of kinks or twists and must not be wrapped around the
load.
The load should be attached to the load block hook by means of slings or other approved devices. The
sling should clear all obstacles.
2. Moving the Load
The load should be well secured and properly balanced in the sling or lifting device before it is lifted
more than a few inches. Before starting the hoist, the hoist rope should not be kinked and the multiple part
lines should not be twisted around each other. The hook should be brought over the load in such a manner
as to prevent swinging. There should be no sudden acceleration or deceleration of the moving load. The
load should not contact any obstructions.
•
•
•
•
•
While any employee is on the load or hook, there will be no hoisting, lowering or traveling.
The operator will avoid carrying loads over people.
The operator will test the brakes each time a load approaching the rated load is handled. The brakes
will be tested by raising the load a few inches and applying the brakes.
The load will not be lowered below the point where less than 3 full wraps remain on the hoisting
drum.
The operator will not leave his position while the load is suspended. The operator needs to be aware
of the appropriate chains, hoist, and sling requirements.
DRAFT
Page 3 of 8
CRANES, SLINGS, AND HOISTS
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
RATED LOAD MARKING
The rated load of the crane will be plainly marked on each side of the crane. If the crane has more than
one hoisting unit, each hoist and each hoist attachment should have the rated load clearly marked. The
marking will be clearly legible from the ground or the floor. The load will not exceed the rated load of the
crane or hoist (a load is defined as the total superimposed weight on the load block or hook and includes
any lifting devices such as magnets, spreader bars, chains and slings).
CHAINS, SLINGS AND HOISTS
The following safety practices must be observed:
•
•
•
•
•
Slings that are damaged or defective should be destroyed. Slings must not be shortened with knots,
belts or other makeshift devices, and sling legs must not be kinked.
Slings will not be loaded in excess of their rated capacities. They will be securely attached to their
loads.
Slings should be padded or protected from the sharp edges of their loads.
Hands or fingers will not be placed between the sling and its load while the sling is being tightened
around the load.
A sling should not be pulled from under a load when the load is resting on the sling.
Alloy Steel Chain Slings:
All steel chain slings should have a permanently affixed durable identification stating size, grade, rated
capacity and reach, and inspection date. Worn or damaged alloy steel chain slings or attachments should
not be used until it is repaired. All steel chain slings with cracked or deformed master links, coupling
links or other components should be removed from service.
Wire Rope Slings:
Wire rope slings should be removed from service if any of the following is present:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Six randomly distributed broken wires in one rope lay or three broken wires in one strand in one rope
lay.
Wear or scraping of one-third the original diameter of outside individual wires.
Kinking, crushing, bird caging, or any other damage is noted.
Corrosion of the rope or end attachments.
There is evidence of heat damage.
End attachments are cracked, deformed or worn.
It is determined that hooks have been opened more than 15 percent of the normal throat opening
measured at the narrowest point or twisted more than 10 degrees from the plane of the unbent hook.
DRAFT
Page 4 of 8
CRANES, SLINGS, AND HOISTS
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Metal Mesh Slings:
Each metal mesh sling must have permanently affixed to it a durable marking that states the rated
capacity for a vertical basket and choker hitch loadings. Metal mesh slings must be immediately removed
from service, if any of the following conditions are present:
•
•
•
•
•
•
A broken weld or brazed joint along the sling edge.
A reduction in wire diameter of 25 percent due to abrasion or 15 percent due to corrosion.
Lack of flexibility due to distortion of the fabric.
A 15 percent reduction of the original cross sectional area of metal at any point around the handle
eye.
Distortion of the female handle so that the depth of the slot is increased more than 10 percent.
Distortion of either handle so that the width of the eye is decreased more than 10 percent.
Natural and Synthetic Fiber Rope Slings:
Natural and synthetic fiber rope slings will be immediately removed from service if there is:
• Abnormal wear.
• Powdered fiber between strands.
• Variations in the size or roundness of strands.
• Discoloration or rotting.
• Distortion of hardware in the sling.
Synthetic web slings will be immediately removed and destroyed if there are:
• Acid or caustic burns.
• Melting or charring of any part of the sling surface.
• Snags, punctures, tears or cuts.
• Broken or worn stitches.
• Distortion of fittings.
MOBILE CRANES
All Kent County employees will adhere to manufacturer’s specifications and limitations applicable will
be to the operation of mobile cranes. The attachments that are used with a crane must not exceed the
capacity, rating or scope recommended by the manufacturer. The rated load capacities, recommended
operating speeds, and special hazard warnings or instruction will be conspicuously posted on all
equipment.
DRAFT
Page 5 of 8
CRANES, SLINGS, AND HOISTS
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
The requirements for the use of mobile cranes are:
• A designated competent person will inspect all machinery and equipment prior to each use and during
use, to make sure that it is in safe operating condition. If a defective part is found, all parts should be
repaired or replaced.
• A thorough annual inspection of the hoisting machinery will be made by a competent person. The
dates and the result of the inspections for each hoisting machine and piece of equipment will be
documented. The documentation will be maintained by the Department/Division Director or
Designated Supervisor.
• All accessible areas within the swing radius of the rear of the rotating superstructure of the crane will
be barricaded in such a manner as to prevent an employee from being struck or crushed by the crane.
• All exhaust pipes will be guarded or insulated in areas where contact by employees is possible in the
performance of normal duties.
• All windows in cabs will be safety glass, or equivalent. There should be no visible distortion that will
interfere with the safe operation of the machine.
• Guard rails, handholds, and steps will be provided on cranes for easy access to the car and the cab.
• Platforms and walkways will have anti-skid surfaces.
• An accessible fire extinguisher of 5BC rating or higher will be available at all operator stations or
cabs of equipment.
• If the equipment or machinery must be operated next to electrical lines, then the following procedures
must be followed:
- For electrical lines that are rated 50 KV or below, the minimum clearance between the lines and
any part of the crane or load will be 20 feet.
- For lines rated over 50 KV, the minimum clearance between the lines and any part of the crane or
load will be 10 feet plus 0.4 inch for each 1 KV over 50 KV, or twice the length of the line
insulator, but never less than 20 feet.
- If the equipment is in transit with no load and boom lowered, the equipment clearance will be a
minimum of 4 feet for voltages less than 50 KV and 10 feet for voltages over 50 KV, up to and
including 345KV, and 16 feet for voltages up to and including 750 KV.
- A safety observer will be designated to observe clearance of the equipment and give timely
warning for all operations where it is difficult for the operator to maintain the desired clearance
by visual means.
- Any overhead wire will be considered to be an energized line unless documentation is available
to determine that the electrical lines are de-energized.
DRAFT
Page 6 of 8
CRANES, SLINGS, AND HOISTS
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
INSPECTIONS
Overhead crane inspections are divided into two general classifications: Frequent Inspections and
Periodic Inspections.
Frequent Inspections:
•
•
•
Rope slings, hooks and other lifting equipment will be visually inspected prior to each day’s use. All
parts including chains, cables, ropes, hooks, etc., on overhead and gantry cranes must be visually
inspected daily for deformation, cracks, excessive wear, twists, stretch, or other signs of deterioration
that may pose a hazard during use.
Hooks and chains must be visually inspected daily and monthly. Hooks that have cracks or have more
than 15 percent in excess of normal throat opening or more than 10 percent twist from the plane of the
unbent hook must be replaced.
Running ropes must be inspected monthly. Any deterioration which results in appreciable loss of
strength must be inspected and a determination made as to whether further use of the rope constitutes
a safety hazard. The monthly inspection will consist of noting the following disqualifying conditions:
- Reduction of rope diameter below a nominal diameter due to loss of core support, internal or
external corrosion, or wear of outside wires.
- Three broken wires in one strand in one lay length or six broken wires in any one lay length.
- Worn outside wires.
- Corroded or broken wires at connections.
- Corroded, cracked, bent, worn or improperly applied end connections on the equipment name
plate.
- Severe kinking, crushing, cutting or un-stranding.
Refer to Appendix A for an inspection checklist to be used for Frequent Inspections.
Periodic Inspections:
Periodic inspections will be conducted by a factory trained employee or a contract certified inspection
service. A complete inspection of the crane should be performed at least every 12 months. The inspection
should include the following:
• Noting any cracked, corroded, worn or loose members or parts.
• Noting and replacing loose bolts and tightening those bolts.
• Testing the limit indicators (wind, load, etc), power plant and electrical apparatus.
• Load testing must be performed at no more than 125% of the rated load, unless it is otherwise
recommended by the equipment manufacturer.
• Examining the electrical apparatus for any signs of pitting, or any deterioration of controller
contractors, limit switches and push button stations.
• Travel distance steering.
• Testing the braking system for excessive wear on the lining, pawls and ratchets.
Written documentation of periodic inspections will be prepared by the inspector. The documentation will
be maintained by the Department/Division Director or Designated Supervisor.
DRAFT
Page 7 of 8
CRANES, SLINGS, AND HOISTS
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE
All cranes and accessories will be maintained in a condition that will not endanger an operator or other
employee. Before adjustments or repairs are made on a crane, all of the following precautions must be
taken:
•
•
•
•
The crane will be moved to a location where it will cause the least interference with other moving
equipment on the track or rails and operations in the area.
Controllers will be placed in the “off” position.
The main switch will be placed in the “off” position or “open” position and locked out, except where
power is necessary to adjust or service the crane.
Appropriate signs or warnings will be used to alert affected personnel that the equipment is being
repaired or maintained.
If any adjustments have to be made to the unit, the crane will not be operated until all the guards have
been installed, all safety devices reactivated, and all maintenance equipment moved. If any defect is
found, the crane will not be operated until the repair or the adjustment is made.
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
All employees who handle wire slings and the hoist cables will wear leather gloves to prevent any hand
injury.
TRAINING
Employees will be trained on the safe operation of cranes, slings, and hoists prior to the use of any such
equipment. The training will be performed by a qualified person and include:
• Maximum rated capacities of equipment and attachments
• Safe crane operations and work practices, including attaching and moving the load
• How to perform Periodic Inspections of cranes, slings, and hoists
• Observation of crane operations
Upon completion of training, a record of the training will be completed by documenting employee's
name, signature of trainer(s), and dates of training. All training documentation will be maintained by the
Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager.
CRANES, SLINGS, AND HOISTS SAFETY PROGRAM REVIEW
Periodic reviews of the Cranes, Slings, and Hoists Safety Program will be performed by the
Department/Division Director or Designated Safety Coordinator to ensure that the operating practices and
inspection procedures remain relevant and effective for the equipment in operation. If deficiencies are
identified, the program will be revised accordingly.
DRAFT
Page 8 of 8
CRANES, SLINGS, AND HOISTS
Attachment A
Periodic Crane Inspection Form
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
DATE
LOCATION
KEY: N/A – Not Applicable
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
INSPECTOR
SERIAL NUMBER
A – Acceptable D – Deficient
Crane Rail and Structural Supports:
N/A
A
D
†
†
† Intact.
†
†
† Load Rating posted.
†
†
† Secured to the floor.
Hoist body and rail rollers:
N/A
A
D
†
†
† No visible cracks.
†
†
† No leaking fluids.
†
†
† Load Rating posted.
†
†
† No excessive wear.
Control pendant and electrical cord:
N/A
A
D
†
†
† Control cord and power cord condition.
†
†
† Strain relief.
†
†
† Pendant Box Condition
†
†
† Push Box Condition.
Chain:
N/A
A
D
†
†
† No excessive wear.
†
†
† Not twisted.
†
†
† No distorted links interfering with proper function.
†
† No stretching.
†
Hook(s):
N/A
A
D
†
†
† Not deformed or cracked.
†
†
† Safety latch present and functioning properly.
Running Ropes:
N/A
A
D
†
†
† Reduction of rope diameter
†
†
† Broken wires in strand, worn outside wires, of severe kinking, crushing, or cutting
†
†
† No corroded or broken wires at connections.
†
†
† No corroded, cracked, bent, worn or improperly applied end connections on the equipment
name plate.
Functional Test:
N/A
A
D
†
†
† Vertical.
†
†
† Horizontal.
NOTE: Any parameter marked as (D)-Deficient must be accompanied by a detailed description of the deficiency.
The crane must be taken out of service and Department/Division Director/Manager must be informed immediately.
DRAFT
Page 6 of 6
CHEMICAL RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROCEDURE
Original Issue Date:
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APPENDIX A
HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE WORKPLACE CHEMICAL LIST SURVEY FORM
Name of Employer/Workplace Covered By This Form:
Street Address Of Workplace:
City:
Telephone Number:
County Name:
All Hazardous Substances Present At Workplace During Prior Year From:
Signature of Employer or Representative:
(“E”) Environmental Hazards
(“S”) Special Hazardous Substance
S E Chemical
Product
Manufacturer Information Quantity
Fire
Abstract Service Name/Ingredients
Number (CAS)
State:
Explosive
Zip Code:
Reactivity
Acute
Chronic
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ERGONOMIC SAFETY
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PURPOSE AND SCOPE
This program establishes the training, inspection and operating requirements concerning proper
ergonomics for personnel and work sites at Kent County Delaware Governmental Body (referred to from
this point forward as “Kent County”). This program applies to all employees and contractors working on
any site owned or operated by Kent County
OVERVIEW
Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are the most widespread occupational health hazard
facing our Nation today
Ergonomics is the science of fitting workplace conditions and job demands to the capabilities of the
working population. Effective and successful "fits" assure high productivity, avoidance of illness and
injury risks, and increased satisfaction among the workforce. Although the scope of ergonomics is much
broader, the term here refers to assessing those work-related factors that may pose a risk of
musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) and recommendations to alleviate them. Common examples of
ergonomic risk factors are found in jobs requiring repetitive, forceful, or prolonged exertions of the
hands; frequent or heavy lifting, pushing, pulling, or carrying of heavy objects; and prolonged awkward
postures. Vibration and cold may add risk to these work conditions. Jobs or working conditions
presenting multiple risk factors will have a higher probability of causing a musculoskeletal problem. The
level of risk depends on the intensity, frequency, and duration of the exposure to these conditions.
Environmental work conditions that affect risk include intensity, frequency and duration of activities.
RESPONSIBILITIES
Kent County Health & Safety Officer or His/Her Assistant with the coordination of the Personnel
Director/Human Resource Manager, Department Director(s)/Manager(s) and/or Division
Supervisors’/Managers’ will be responsible for the following:
- Developing specific policies and procedures pertaining to the reducing of ergonomics (MSD) risks
for personnel and work sites at Kent County
- Implementation of employee training based on the general principles of proper ergonomic safety
and standards.
Managers and supervisors are responsible for:
- Arraigning for ergonomic training of employees in their departments.
- Ensuring that work stations/sites are properly inspected and provide a proper ergonomic
environment for employees.
- Inspecting employee’s work site/areas and completing the inspection form in (Appendix # 1).
Employees are responsible for:
- Using proper ergonomics at their work station/site.
- Reporting ergonomic deficiencies, equipment defects and/or maintenance needs to their supervisors
immediately.
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ERGONOMIC SAFETY
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TRAINING REQUIREMENTS
Kent County will provide training to ensure that all managers, supervisors and employees understand the
purpose and function of this ergonomic program.
Training will be as follows:
• Initial Training: Training that is conducted by Department Director(s)/Manager(s) and/or Division
Supervisors’/Managers’ for all new employees. This training will be conducted within 5 days of
employment.
• General Refresher Training: General regulatory overview conducted every three years by Department
Director for all managers, supervisors and employees within their department.
• Training Records: Training records are filed with Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager and
will be maintained for 3 years from the date on which the training occurred.
• Training Requirements: Employees will be trained to recognize hazards related to poor or improper
ergonomic conditions within their work site/area
EQUIPMENT INSPECTIONS
New or Modified Equipment Safety Inspection: An inspection of new or modified work site
arrangements and furnishings is performed by Division Safety Coordinator and/or Supervisor.
Pre-Use Inspections: If items provided to the employee or items utilized by the employee do not meet
proper ergonomic standards, the employee will immediately notify his/her supervisor, or the supervisor
will notify the employee.
Periodic Inspection: Semiannual inspections are performed for each work station/site in accordance with
the recommendations by Division Safety Coordinator and/or Supervisor.
- The results of the new equipment and furnishings inspections will be documented and retained by
Division Supervisor for 12 months for recordkeeping purposes.
- Arrangements, furnishings, and equipment with ergonomic defects shall be modified, repaired, or
replaced.
PROGRAM REVIEW
This program will be reviewed by the safety committee within 12 months of the last review dated. Any
changes made to this document will be noted by a modification to the Revision Number.
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ERGONOMIC SAFETY
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APPENDIX # 1
WORK SITE/AREAS ERGONOMIC INSPECTION FORM
WORKING POSTURES
The workstation is designed or arranged for doing computer tasks so it allows
Head and neck to be upright, or in-line with the torso
Head, neck, and trunk to face forward (not twisted)
Trunk to be perpendicular to floor (may lean back into backrest but not forward).
Shoulders and upper arms to be in-line with the torso, generally about
perpendicular to the floor and relaxed (not elevated or stretched forward)
Arms and elbows to be close to the body (not extended outward
Forearms, wrists, and hands to be straight and in-line (forearm at about 90 degrees
to the upper arm).
Wrists and hands to be straight (not bent up/down or sideways toward the little
finger).
Thighs to be parallel to the floor and the lower legs to be perpendicular to floor
(thighs may be slightly elevated above knees).
Feet rest flat on the floor or are supported by a stable footrest
SEATING
Consider these points when evaluating the chair
Backrest provides support for your lower back (lumbar area)
Seat width and depth accommodate the specific user (seat pan not too big/small)
Seat front does not press against the back of your knees and lower legs (seat pan
not too long).
Seat has cushioning and is rounded with a "waterfall" front (no sharp edge).
Armrests, if used, support both forearms while you perform computer tasks and
they do not interfere with movement
Does chair have a sturdy five-legged base with good chair casters that roll easily
over the floor or carpet?
Does the chair swivel 360 degrees so it is easier to access items around
workstation without twisting?
Is the backrest at least 15 inches high and 12 inches wide and provide lumbar
support that matches the curve of the users lower back?
Most chairs are designed for weights under 275 pounds. Has the chair been
designed for extra weight above 275 pounds?
Are armrests large enough (in length and width) to support users forearm without
interfering with the work surface?
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APPENDIX # 1 - WORK SITE/AREAS ERGONOMIC INSPECTION FORM (Con’t)
KEYBOARD/INPUT DEVICE
Consider these points when evaluating the keyboard or pointing device
The keyboard/input device is designed or arranged for doing computer tasks
Keyboard/input device platform(s) is stable and large enough to hold a keyboard
and an input device
Input device (mouse or trackball) is located right next to keyboard so it can be
operated without reaching
Input device is easy to activate and the shape/size fits empolyee’s hand (not too
big/small).
Wrists and hands do not rest on sharp or hard edges
Does cord allow for a variety of positions/locations
Is employee utilizing a split keyboard which allows them to maintain neutral wrist
postures
Is the cord that plugs into the CPU at least six feet long? Should be long enough
to allow the user to place the keyboard and the CPU in a variety of positions. At
least six feet of cord length is desirable
Is the minimum keyboard tray vertical adjustment range (for a sitting position) 22
inches to 28 inches from the floor?
Does keyboard trays have adjustment mechanisms that lock into position without
being difficult to loosen?
MONITOR
Consider these points when evaluating the monitor
Is the monitor designed or arranged for computer tasks at least 20 inches away
from users eyes
Top of the screen is at or below eye level so you can read it without bending your
head or neck down/back.
User with bifocals/trifocals can read the screen without bending the head or neck
backward.
Monitor distance allows you to read the screen without leaning your head, neck or
trunk forward/backward.
Monitor position is directly in front of you so you don't have to twist your head or
neck.
Glare (from windows, lights) is not reflected on your screen which can cause you
to assume an awkward posture to clearly see information on your screen.
Screen is large enough for adequate visibility. A 15 - 20-inch monitor is sufficient
Angle and tilt is be easily adjustable
Y N N/A
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ERGONOMIC SAFETY
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APPENDIX # 1 - WORK SITE/AREAS ERGONOMIC INSPECTION FORM (Con’t)
WORK AREA
Y N N/A
Consider these points when evaluating the desk and workstation
Thighs have sufficient clearance space between the top of the thighs and your Y N
computer table/keyboard platform (thighs are not trapped).
Is the minimum under-desk clearance depth 15 inches for user’s knees and 24 Y N
inches for user’s feet?
Y N
ACCESSORIES
Y N
Document holder, if provided, is stable and large enough to hold documents
Y N
Document holder, if provided, is placed at about the same height and distance as Y N
the monitor screen so there is little head movement, or need to re-focus, when you
look from the document to the screen.
Wrist/palm rest, if provided, is padded and free of sharp or square edges that push Y N
on your wrists.
Wrist/palm rest, if provided, allows you to keep your forearms, wrists, and hands Y N
straight and in-line when using the keyboard/input device
Telephone can be used with your head upright (not bent) and your shoulders Y N
relaxed (not elevated) if you do computer tasks at the same time.
Y N
GENERAL
Y N
Workstation and equipment have sufficient adjustability so a safe working posture Y N
and can make occasional changes in posture while performing computer tasks.
Computer workstation, components and accessories are maintained in serviceable Y N
condition and function properly.
Computer tasks allows employee to vary tasks with other work activities, or to Y N
take micro-breaks or recovery pauses while at the computer workstation
Y N
TELEPHONES
Y N
Does working requirements require a “hands-free” headset?
Y N
Does working requirements require a speakererfeature?
Y N
Y N
DESK LIGHTING
Y N
Is adequate lighting provided for task and user?
Y N
Is the location and angle of the light sources, as well as their intensity levels, fully Y N
adjustable.
Y N
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ERGONOMIC SAFETY
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APPENDIX # 1 - WORK SITE/AREAS ERGONOMIC INSPECTION FORM (Con’t)
NON-OFFICE ENVIROMENTS
Is appropriate ergonomically designed delivery equipment such as hand trucks,
stair climbers, conveyors, being utilized?
Are delivery vehicle pull-out step-on platforms, exterior grab handles on all bays
and drop down bay shelves installed as needed?
Is light weight plastic pallets being utilized?
Does the work environment require employees to assume awkward or static body
postures for a prolonged period of time?
Have psychosocial factors such as job dissatisfaction, monotony, and limited job
control been observed or noted?
Are employees exposed to force - the amount of physical effort required to
perform a task (such as heavy lifting, pushing, pulling) or to maintain control of
the equipment or tools
Has “non-value steps” such as “wasted walking” or “wasted motion” to pick up
parts/items been eliminated?
Are employees exposed to repetition - performing the same motion or series of
motions frequently for an extended period of time. ?
Are employees exposed to awkward & prolonged static body posture - assuming
positions that place stress on the body, such as repeated or prolonged reaching
above the shoulder height, bending forward or to the side, twisting, kneeling, or
squatting.?
Are employees exposed to contact stress - pressing the body or part of the body
(such as the hand) against hard or sharp edges, or using the hand as a hammer?
Are employees exposed to vibration - using vibrating tools such as sanders,
chippers, drills, grinders, or reciprocating saws?
Are work assignments expose employees to cold or hot temperatures?
Are employees exposed to whole body vibration?
Are devices that position work between the knees and shoulders and within easy
reach utilized?
Are any of the types of employee behavior that may indicate the presence of
ergonomics-related problems such as shaking arms and hands or rolling shoulders
due to discomfort being observed?
Are tools being arranged so that the most frequently used tools are within easy
reach?
When possible, are employees working with hands between waist and shoulder
height?
Are motorized pallet jacks being utilized for frequent or distant movement of
materials?
Are cart handles located at the rear of the cart and at waist level?
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ERGONOMIC SAFETY
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APPENDIX # 1 - WORK SITE/AREAS ERGONOMIC INSPECTION FORM (Con’t)
NON-OFFICE ENVIROMENTS (Con’t)
Y N N/A
Are cart wheels and floors compatible (for example: wheels should be appropriate to the Y N N/A
floor conditions, swivel wheels on both the front and rear make maneuvering in small, cramped
areas easier)?
Are carts being pushed in-lieu-of being pulled?
Do cart load heights obstruct vision?
Are loads balanced and load weight kept under the manufacturer's recommended
weight limits?
Are overhead handling system that easily lifts and tilts heavy drums being
utilized?
Are overhead devices used to lift and transport heavy items?
Are portable devices used to lift and position heavy objects or tools?
Are machines or reels utilized to coil hoses and cords out of the way?
Are pulleys attached to tools or equipment that assists in manual handling and
positioning?
Are tabletops or work surfaces with manual or powered roller systems utilized
where needed?
Are stored items on racks which allow them to be easily lifted from mid-thigh
level (instead of the floor)?
Are long extension handles for hand tools being utilized to enable the operator to
work standing instead of using the tools in awkward postures (e.g., kneeling or
crouching).?
Are portable seats, adjustable stools, or creepers being provided and utilized
where needed?
Do portable seats, adjustable stools, or creepers have locking casters to prevent
them form moving unexpectedly?
Are pads to protect the elbow from contact stress while working in cramped
spaces and/or leaning on the elbows being utilized?
Are pads to protect shoulder when carrying objects on the shoulder being utilized?
Are knee support devices that distribute weight and reduce knee strains being
utilized?
Are knee pads that reduce pressure within the knee while kneeling and prevent the
knee from bending too far while protecting the knee on a hard surface utilized?
Are items lifted by employees within the lifting ability of those employees?
Does the job require standing for most of the shift without anti-fatigue mats?
In areas where filling and emptying liquids from containers guarded from “splashback”?
When filling and emptying buckets with floor drain arrangements is protection
form the risks of spills and slips reduced or eliminated?
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APPENDIX # 1 - WORK SITE/AREAS ERGONOMIC INSPECTION FORM (Con’t)
NON-OFFICE ENVIROMENTS (Con’t)
Y N
Do vacuum cleaners and buffers have lightweight construction, adjustable Y N
handles, triggers (buffer) long enough to accommodate at least the index and
middle fingers, and easy to reach controls?
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FALL PROTECTION
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PURPOSE
This purpose of the fall protection procedure is to provide guidelines for protecting employees and
contractors from being injured by falls from heights. Kent County Delaware Governmental Body
(referred to from this point forward as “Kent County”) will take all necessary steps to eliminate,
prevent, and control fall hazards.
This procedure applies to all employees and contractors engaged in work activities, which exposes
them to falls from heights of 6 feet and more. First consideration will be given to the elimination of
fall hazards. If a fall hazard cannot be eliminated, effective fall protection will be planned,
implemented, and monitored to control the risks of injury due to falling.
All personnel exposed to potential falls from heights will be trained to minimize their exposures. Fall
protection equipment will be provided and used by all employees. Department/Division
Supervisor/Foremen will be responsible for implementation of a fall protection plan for each job task.
RESPONSIBILITIES
The Department/Division Supervisor/Foremen in charge of each job that calls for work at heights will
be responsible for identifying fall hazards on the job site.
The Department/Division Supervisor/Foremen will evaluate each situation or work procedure where
employees may be exposed to a fall of 6 feet or more.
The Department/Division Supervisor/Foremen will be responsible for developing a plan to eliminate
the exposures, if possible, or to select the appropriate fall protection systems and/or equipment.
EXAMPLES OF SITUATIONS REQUIRING FALL PROTECTION
The following are examples of situations were fall protection will be required. This listing is by no
means complete, and there are many other situations where a fall of 6 feet or more is possible. It
should be noted that ladders and scaffolding are not included in this list. They are covered by other
standards and requirements of our safety program. All Kent County Employees shall be reminded
that the human body can rotate 180 degrees (head over heel) within 18 - 20 inches
Wall Openings
Any employee working near a wall opening where the outside bottom edge of the wall opening is 6
feet or more from a lower level, or the wall opening is less than 39 inches (1.0 meter) above the
walking/working surface below, will be protected from falling by the use of a guardrail system, a
safety net system, or a personal fall arrest system.
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FALL PROTECTION
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Holes
Personal fall arrest systems, covers, or guardrail systems shall be erected around holes (including
skylights) that are more than 6 feet above lower levels.
Leading Edges
Each employee who is constructing a leading edge 6 feet or more above lower levels shall be
protected by guardrail systems, safety net systems, or personal fall arrest systems.
Excavations
Each employee at the edge of an excavation 6 feet or more deep shall be protected from falling by
guardrail systems, fences, barricades, or covers. Where walkways are provided to permit employees
to cross over excavations, guardrails are required on the walkway if it is 6 feet or more above the
excavation.
Form-work and Reinforcing Steel
For employees, while moving vertically and/or horizontally on the vertical face of reinforcing bar
(rebar) assemblies built in place, fall protection is not required when employees are moving. OSHA
considers the multiple hand holds and foot holds on rebar assemblies as providing similar protection
as that provided by a fixed ladder. Consequently, no fall protection is necessary while moving point
to point for heights below 6 feet. An employee will be provided with fall protection when climbing or
otherwise moving at a height more than 6 feet, the same as for fixed ladders.
Hoist Areas
Each employee in a hoist area shall be protected from falling 6 feet or more by guardrail systems or
personal fall arrest systems. If guardrail systems (chain gate or guardrail) or portions thereof must be
removed to facilitate hoisting operations, as during the landing of materials, and a worker must lean
through the access opening or out over the edge of the access opening to receive or guide equipment
and materials, that employee must be protected by a personal fall arrest system.
Ramps, Runways, and Other Walkways
Each employee using ramps, runways, and other walkways shall be protected from falling 6 feet or
more by guardrail systems.
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FALL PROTECTION
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Low-slope Roofs (a roof having a slope less than or equal to 4V:12H)
Each employee engaged in roofing activities on low-slope roofs with unprotected sides and edges 6
feet or more above lower levels shall be protected from falling by guardrail systems, safety net
systems, personal fall arrest systems or a combination of a warning line system and guardrail system,
warning line system and safety net system, warning line system and personal fall arrest system, or
warning line system. A Safety Monitoring System may be utilized with the afore listed systems; but
will not be utilized exclusively as a fall protection system.
Steep Roofs
Each employee on a steep roof with unprotected sides and edges 6 feet or more above lower levels
shall be protected by guardrail systems with toeboards, safety net systems, or personal fall arrest
systems.
ROOF ACTIVITIES
Access Permits: Prior to gaining access to a roof, authorization shall be received from The Kent
County Health & Safety Officer or His/Her Assistant. At that time there will be a review of:
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The activities to be perform at the time of access.
The fall hazards to be encountered while performing work on the roof.
Fall protection requirements.
Prior to accessing the roof, entrants shall refer to 1 (Roof Access Permit) to ensure that all fall
protection hazards for a particular roof are identified and controlled.
All roof access permits shall be kept on file with Department/Division Supervisor/Foremen for a
period of one (1) year.
FALL PROTECTION SYSTEMS
When there is a potential fall of 6 feet or more, Kent County will utilize one or more of the following
means of providing protection:
Guardrail Systems
Guardrail systems must meet the following criteria:
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Top edge height of top rails, or equivalent guardrail system members, shall be 42 inches (1.1
m) plus or minus 3 inches (8 cm) above the walking/working level. If workers are using stilts,
the top edge height of the top rail, or equivalent member, must be increased an amount equal
to the height of the stilts.
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FALL PROTECTION
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Guardrail system must be capable of withstanding a force of at least 300 pounds applied
within 2 inches of the top edge in any outward or downward direction.
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Cable top rails and mid-rails of guardrail systems must be at least one-quarter inch nominal
diameter or thickness to prevent cuts and lacerations. If wire rope is used for toprails, it must
be flagged at not more 6 feet intervals with a high-visibility material. Steel and plastic
banding will not be used as toprails or midrails. Manila, plastic, or synthetic rope used for
toprails or midrails must be inspected as frequently as necessary to ensure strength and
stability.
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Screens, midrails, mesh, intermediate vertical members, or equivalent intermediate structural
members must be installed between the top edge of the guardrail system and the
walking/working surface when there are no walls or parapet walls at least 21 inches high.
When midrails are used, they must be installed at a height midway between the top edge of
the guardrail system and the walking/working level. When screens and mesh are used, they
must extend from the top rail to the walking/working level and along the entire opening
between top rail supports. Intermediate members, such as balusters, when used between
posts, shall not be more than 19 inches apart.
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Other structural members, such as additional midrails and architectural panels, shall be
installed so that there are no openings in the guardrail system more than 19 inches.
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The guardrail system must be capable of withstanding a force of at least 300 pounds applied
within 2 inches of the top edge in any outward or downward direction. When the 300 pound
test is applied in a downward direction, the top edge of the guardrail must not deflect to a
height less than 39 inches above the walking/working level.
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Midrails, screens, mesh, intermediate vertical members, solid panels, and equivalent
structural members shall be capable of withstanding a force of at least 200 pounds applied in
any downward or outward direction at any point along the midrail or other member.
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Guardrail systems shall be surfaced to protect workers from punctures or lacerations and to
prevent clothing from snagging.
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The ends of top rails and midrails must not overhang terminal posts, except where such
overhang does not constitute a projection hazard.
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When guardrail systems are used at hoisting areas, a chain, gate or removable guardrail
section must be placed across the access opening between guardrail sections when hoisting
operations are not taking place.
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FALL PROTECTION
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At holes, guardrail systems must be set up on all unprotected sides or edges. When holes are
used for the passage of materials, the hole shall have not more than two sides with removable
guardrail sections. When the hole is not in use, it must be covered or provided with guardrails
along all unprotected sides or edges.
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If guardrail systems are used around holes that are used as access points (such as ladder
ways), gates must be used or the point of access must be offset to prevent accidental walking
into the hole.
If guardrails are used at unprotected sides or edges of ramps and runways, they must be
erected on each unprotected side or edge.
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Personal Fall Arrest Systems
Personal Fall Arrest Systems consist of an anchorage, connectors, and a body harness and may
include a deceleration device, lifeline, or suitable combinations. The use of body belts for fall arrest
is prohibited and a full body harness is required. If a personal fall arrest system is used for fall
protection it must be capable of the following:
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Limit maximum arresting force on an employee to 1,800 pounds when used with a body
harness.
Be rigged so that an employee can neither free fall more than 6 feet nor contact any lower
level.
Bring an employee to a complete stop and limit maximum deceleration distance an
employee travels to 3.5 feet.
Have sufficient strength to withstand twice the potential impact energy of an employee
free falling a distance of 6 feet or the free fall distance permitted by the system,
whichever is less.
Personal fall arrest systems must be inspected (See Attachment 2) prior to each use for wear damage,
and other deterioration. Defective components must be removed from service.
Positioning Device Systems include body belt or body harness systems that are to be set up so that
workers can free fall no farther than 2 feet. They shall be secured to an anchorage capable of
supporting a least twice the potential impact load of an employee’s fall or 3,000 pounds, whichever is
greater.
Entry Control Point (ECP)
Every Kent County Project (in-house or contracted) that has safety issued discussed in this manual
shall have a clearly marked and recognizable entry control point were workers, visitors, inspectors,
general public, and unforeseen personnel know and realize they are entering a Controlled Access
Zone that has safety issues.
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FALL PROTECTION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Controlled Access Zones
A Controlled access zone is a work area designated and clearly marked in which certain types of work
(such as overhand bricklaying) may take place without the use of conventional fall protection systems
including guardrail, personal arrest or safety net, to protect the employees working in the zone.
Controlled access zones are used to keep out workers other than those authorized to enter work areas
from which guardrails have been removed. Where there are no guardrails, masons are the only
workers allowed in controlled access zones.
Controlled access zones, when created to limit entrance to areas where leading edge work and other
operations are taking place, must be defined by a control line or by any other means that restrict
access. Control lines shall consist of ropes, wires, tapes or equivalent materials, and supporting
stanchions, and each must be:
-
Flagged or otherwise clearly marked at not more than 6-foot intervals with a highvisibility material
Rigged and supported in such a way that the lowest point (including sag) is not less than
39 inches from the walking/working surface and the highest point is not more than 45
inches --nor more than 50 inches when overhand bricklaying operations are being
performed—from the walking/working surface
-
Strong enough to sustain stress of not less than 300 pounds. Control lines shall extend
along the entire length of the unprotected or leading edge and shall be approximately
parallel to the unprotected or leading edge.
-
Control lines will be connected on each side to a guardrail system or wall.
-
When control lines are used, they shall be erected not less than 6 feet nor more than 25
feet from the unprotected or leading edge, except when precast concrete members are
being erected. In the latter case, the control line is to be erected not less than 6 feet nor
more than 60 feet or half the length of the member being erected, whichever is less, from
the leading edge.
-
Controlled access zones when used to determine access to areas where overhand
bricklaying and related work are taking place are to be defined by a control line erected
not less than 10 feet or more than 15 feet from the working edge. Additional control lines
must be erected at each end to enclose the controlled access zone. Only employees
engaged in overhand bricklaying or related works are permitted in the controlled access
zones.
-
On floors and roofs where guardrail systems are not in place prior to the beginning of
overhand bricklaying operations, controlled access zones will be enlarged as necessary to
enclose all points of access, material handling areas, and storage areas.
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FALL PROTECTION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
-
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
On floors and roofs where guardrail systems are in place, but need to be removed to
allow overhand bricklaying work or leading edge work to take place, only that portion of
the guardrail necessary to accomplish that day’s work shall be removed.
Safety Net Systems
Safety nets must be installed as close as practicable under the walking/working surface on which
employees are working and never more than 30 feet (9.1 meters) below such levels. Safety nets shall
be installed with sufficient clearance underneath to prevent contact with the surface or structure
below.
Items that have fallen into safety nets including but not restricted to, materials, scrap, equipment, and
tools must be removed as soon as possible and at least before the next work shift.
Safety nets shall extend outward from the outermost projection of the work surface as follows:
Vertical Distance from Working Min. Required Horizontal Distance
Level to Plane of the Net
of Outer Edge of Net from the Edge
of the Working Surface
Up to 5 Feet
8 Feet
More than 5 Feet, Up to 10 Feet
10 Feet
More than 10 Feet
13 Feet
The maximum size of each safety net mesh opening shall not exceed 36 square inches nor be longer
than 6 inches on any side. All mesh crossings must be secured to prevent enlargements of mesh
openings.
Each safety net shall have a border rope for webbing with a minimum breaking strength of 5,000 lbs.
Connections between safety net panels shall be as strong as integral net components and shall be
spaced not more than 6 inches apart.
All nets must be drop tested with a 400 lb bag of sand with a diameter of 28-32 inches. This bag must
be dropped into the net from the highest walking/ working surface at which employees are exposed to
fall hazards.
Safety nets shall be inspected at least once a week for wear, damage, and other deterioration.
Defective components shall be removed from service. Safety nets shall also be inspected after any
occurrence which could affect the integrity of the safety net system.
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Page 8 of 15
FALL PROTECTION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Warning Line Systems
Warning line systems consist of ropes, wires, or chains, and supporting stanchions and are set up as
follows:
-
Flagged at not more than 6-foot intervals with a high-visibility material.
-
Rigged and supported so that the lowest point including sag) is no less than 34 inches
from the walking/working surface and its highest point is no more than 39 inches from
the walking/working surface.
-
Stanchions, after being rigged with warning lines, shall be capable of resisting, without
tipping over, a force of at least 16 pounds applied horizontally against the stanchion, 30
inches above the walking/working surface, perpendicular to the warning line and in the
direction of the floor, roof, or platform edge.
-
The rope, wire, or chain shall have a minimum tensile strength of 500 pounds and after
being attached to the stanchions, must support without breaking the load applied to the
stanchions as prescribed above.
-
Shall be attached to each stanchion in such a way that pulling on one section of the line
between stanchions will not result in slack being taken up in the adjacent section before
the stanchion tips over.
-
Warning lines shall be erected around all sides of roof work areas. When mechanical
equipment is being used, the warning line shall be erected not less than 6 feet from the
roof edge parallel to the direction of mechanical equipment operation, and not less than
10 feet from the roof edge perpendicular to the direction of mechanical equipment
operation.
-
When mechanical equipment is not being used, the warning line must be erected not less
than 6 feet from the roof edge.
Safety Monitoring Systems
When no other alternative fall protection has been implemented, Kent County will implement a safety
monitoring system. Kent County will appoint a competent person to monitor the safety of workers
and shall ensure that the safety monitor is:
-
Is competent in the recognition of fall hazards.
-
Is capable of warning workers of fall hazard dangers and in detecting unsafe work
practices.
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FALL PROTECTION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
-
Is operating on the same walking/working surfaces of the workers and can see them.
-
Is close enough to work operations to communicate orally with workers and has no other
duties to distract from the monitoring function.
Mechanical equipment shall not be used or stored in areas where safety monitoring systems are being
used to monitor employees engaged in roofing operations on low-sloped roofs.
No worker, other than one engaged in roofing work (on low-sloped roofs) or one covered by a fall
protection plan, shall be allowed in an area where an employee is being protected by a safety
monitoring system.
All workers in a controlled access zone shall be instructed to promptly comply with fall hazard
warnings issued by safety monitors.
Covers
Covers located in roadways and vehicular aisles must be able to support at least twice the maximum
axle load of the largest vehicle to which the cover might be subjected. All other covers must be able
to support at least twice the weight of employees, equipment, and materials that may be imposed on
the cover at any one time. To prevent accidental displacement resulting from wind, equipment, or
work activities, all covers must be secured. All covers shall be color coded or bear the markings
"HOLE" or "COVER."
Protection From Falling Objects
When guardrail systems are used to prevent materials from falling from one level to another, any
openings must be small enough to prevent passage of potential falling objects. No materials or
equipment except masonry and mortar shall be stored within 4 feet of working edges. Excess mortar,
broken or scattered masonry units, and all other materials and debris shall be kept clear of the
working area by removal at regular intervals.
During roofing work, materials and equipment shall not be stored within 6 feet of a roof edge unless
guardrails are erected at the edge, and materials piled, grouped, or stacked near a roof edge must be
stable and self-supporting.
TRAINING
Employees engaged in work that exposes them to falls from heights will receive training in the
recognition of applicable fall hazards and the methods and means necessary for the control of such
hazards. The training will be conducted within 10 days of job assignment. The training will include
the following information:
-
The nature of fall hazards in the work area.
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FALL PROTECTION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
-
The correct procedures for erecting, maintaining, disassembling, and inspecting fall
protection systems.
-
The use and operation of controlled access zones and guardrail, personal fall arrest, safety
net, warning line, and safety monitoring systems.
-
The role of each employee in the safety monitoring system when the system is in use.
-
The limitations on the use of mechanical equipment during the performance of roofing work
on low-sloped roofs.
-
The correct procedures for equipment and materials handling and storage and the erection of
overhead protection.
-
The Employees’ role in fall protection plans.
Department Director/Manager and/or Division Supervisor/Manager will perform a fall protection
training verification evaluation to verify the individual’s knowledge of the fall hazards and
precautions required to prevent an accident.
Specific Fall Protection Retraining: Retraining will be conducted whenever an inspection reveals
there are deviations from, or inadequacies in the employee’s knowledge on fall protection issues.
Retraining shall also be conducted whenever an employee is observed violating the procedure or
when an accident investigation identifies that the procedure has been or needs to be altered.
Training Documentation: Training records shall be filed and maintained for 5 years from the date
on which the training occurred.
CONTRACTORS
Whenever contractors or service personnel are engaged in elevated work activities at Kent County
they must follow the procedures covered by this program.
At the conclusion of any elevated work performed by a contractor, a post review will be performed
and documented to determine if new or previously unidentified hazards have been identified.
Department Director/Manager and/or Division Supervisor/Manager will certify that post work
reviews have been accomplished. The certification will contain each contractor company’s name and
dates of the work. Documentation will be filed with Department Director/Manager and/or Division
Supervisor/Manager in charge of the project and shall be maintained for 12 months from the date on
which the elevated work occurred.
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Page 11 of 15
FALL PROTECTION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
PROGRAM EVALUATION
This procedure will be reviewed by Kent County Health and Safety Officer or His/Her Assistant and
a committee comprised of affected employees within 12 months of the last review dated and will note
changes made to this document by a modification to its Revision Number.
The following criteria will be used to perform the annual evaluation of this procedure:
- Accident reports, number of accidents.
- Management/staff compliance with program components.
- Periodic on-site audits.
- Employee feedback.
DEFINITIONS
Authorized Person: A person approved or assigned by the employer to perform a specific type of duty
or duties or to be at a specific location or job site, i.e., building maintenance, roof repair, etc.
Competent Person: A person capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the
surroundings or working conditions which are hazardous or dangerous to employees and who has the
authorization to take prompt corrective action to eliminate them.
Qualified Person: An individual, who by possession of a recognized degree, certificate, or
professional standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training, and experience, has successfully
demonstrated his ability to solve or resolve problem relating to the subject matter, work, or project.
Anchor Point: A secure point of attachment for lifelines, lanyards, or deceleration devices. An anchor
point must be capable of supporting at least 5,000 pounds (3,600 pounds if engineered/certified by a
qualified person) per person and must be independent of any anchorage being used to support or
suspend platforms.
Full Body Harness: Webbing/straps which are secured about an employee’s body in a manner that
will distribute the fall arrest forces over at least the thighs, pelvis, waist, chest, and shoulders with
means for attaching it to other components of a personal fall arrest system, preferably at the shoulders
and/or middle of the back.
Connector: A device which is used to couple (connect) parts of the personal fall arrest system
together.
Deceleration Device: Any mechanism, such as a rope grab, rip-stitch lanyard, a specially woven
lanyard, tearing or deforming lanyards, automatic self-retracting lifelines/lanyards, etc., which serves
to dissipate a substantial amount of energy during a fall arrest.
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FALL PROTECTION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Fall Distance: The maximum vertical change in distance from the bottom of an individual’s feet at the
onset of a fall, to the position of the feet after the fall is arrested - including free fall distance and
deceleration distance.
Guardrail System: A barrier erected to prevent employees from falling to lower levels. This system
includes a midrail and toe board able to withstand 200 pounds applied to the top rail in any direction.
Lanyard: A flexible line of rope or strap that has self-locking snaphook connectors at each end for
connecting to body harnesses, deceleration devices, and anchor points.
Entry Control Point (ECP): A clearly marked and recognizable entry control point were workers,
visitors, inspectors, general public, and unforeseen personnel know and realize they are entering a
Controlled Access Zone that has safety issues.
Leading Edge: The edge of a floor, roof, or other walking/working surface, which changes location as
additional floor, roof, etc., is placed or constructed. A leading edge is considered an unprotected side
or edge when not under active construction.
Personal Fall Arrest System: A system used to arrest (catch) an employee in a fall from a working
level. It consists of an anchorage location, connectors, a body harness, and may include a lanyard,
deceleration device, lifeline, or any combination of the before-mentioned items.
Roof Work: The hoisting, storage, installation, repair, and removal of materials or equipment on a
roof.
Safety Monitoring System: A safety system in which a competent person is responsible for
recognizing and warning employees of fall hazards. All other fall protection systems must be deemed
“infeasible” (through infeasibility study/review) to select/use a safety monitoring system.
Snaphook: A connector comprised of a hook-shaped member with a closed keeper which may be
opened to permit the hook to receive an object and when released, automatically closes to retain the
object. Snaphooks must be self-closing with a self-locking keeper which remains closed and locked
until unlocked and pressed open for connection or disconnection, thus preventing the opportunity for
the object to “rollout” of the snaphook.
Toeboard: A low protective barrier that will prevent the fall of materials and equipment to lower
levels, usually 4” or greater in height.
Unprotected Sides and Edges: Any side or edge of a walking or working surface, e.g., floor, roof,
ramp, runway, etc., where there is no guardrail.
Warning line system: A barrier erected on a roof to warn employees that they are approaching an
unprotected roof side or edge, and which designates an area in which work can be conducted without
the use of guardrails, personal fall arrest systems, or safety nets to protect employees in the area.
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Page 13 of 15
FALL PROTECTION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Attachment #1
ROOF ACCESS PERMIT
COPIES OF PERMIT WILL REMAIN AT JOB SITE UNTIL JOB IS COMPLETED THEN
RETURNED TO ______________________ FOLLOWING COMPLETION OF JOB.
Date and Time Issued: _______________
Roof I.D.: _______________________
Work to be performed: ___________________________________________________
Topics Reviewed:
Y/N
The nature of fall hazards in the work area;
Y/N
The correct procedures for erecting, maintaining, disassembling, and inspecting the fall
protection systems to be used;
Y/N
Inspection of all Fall Restraint System Components
Y/N
The role of each employee in the safety monitoring system if this system is used;
Y/N
The correct methods for the handling and storage of equipment and materials
Y/N
Understanding and following all components of this fall protection program.
We have reviewed the work authorized by this permit and the information contained here-in. Written
instructions and safety procedures have been received and are understood. Access cannot be approved
if any squares are marked in the "No" column.
Permit Prepared By: ________________________________________
Permit Approved By: __________________________________________
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FALL PROTECTION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Attachment #2
FALL RESTRAINT INSPECTION CRITERIA
The following criteria will be utilized to maintain all equipment in good working condition.
[FRONT PAGE]
Full Body Harnesses - Inspect before each use and annually
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Closely examine all of the nylon webbing to ensure there are no burn marks; torn, frayed, broken
fibers; pulled stitches, or frayed edges.
Examine D-ring for excessive wear, pits, deterioration, or cracks.
Verify that buckles are not deformed, cracked, and will operate correctly.
Check that all grommets are secure and not deformed from abuse or a fall.
All rivets should be tight, not deformed.
Check tongue/straps for excessive wear from repeated buckling.
Storage will consist of hanging in an enclosed cabinet, to protect from damage.
All harnesses that are involved in a fall will be destroyed.
Lanyards/Shock Absorbing Lanyards - Inspect before each use and annually
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Check lanyard material for cuts, burns, abrasions, kinks, knots, broken stitches and excessive
wear.
Inspect the snaphooks for hook, locks, and eye distortion.
Check carabiner for excessive wear, distortion, and lock operation.
Ensure that all locking mechanisms seat and lock properly.
Once locked, locking mechanism should prevent hook from opening.
Visually inspect shock absorber for any signs of damage.
Verify that points where the lanyard attaches to the snaphooks are free of detects.
Storage will consist of hanging in an enclosed cabinet, to protect from damage.
All lanyards that are involved in a fall will be destroyed.
Snaphooks - Inspect before each use and annually
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Inspect snaphook for any hook and eye distortions.
Verify there are no cracks, pitted surfaces, and eye distortions.
The keeper latch should not be bent, distorted, or obstructed.
Verify that the keeper latch seats into the nose without binding.
Verify that the keeper spring securely closes the keeper latch.
Test the locking mechanism to verify that the keeper latch locks properly.
All snaphooks involved in a fall will be destroyed.
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FALL PROTECTION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Attachment #2
FALL RESTRAINT INSPECTION CRITERIA
The following criteria will be utilized to maintain all equipment in good working condition.
[BACK PAGE]
Self-Retracting Lanyards - Inspect before each use and monthly
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Visually inspect the body to ensure there is no physical damage to the body.
Make sure all back nuts or rivets are tight.
Make sure the entire length of the nylon strap is free of any cuts, burns, abrasions, kinks, knots,
broken stitches, and excessive wear and retracts freely.
Test the unit by pulling sharply on the lanyard to verify that the locking mechanism is operating
correctly.
If manufacturer requires, make certain the retractable lanyard is returned to the manufacturer for
scheduled annual inspections.
Service per manufacturer specifications
Return to vendor for inspection after every fall.
Tie-off Adaptors/Anchorages - Inspect before each use and monthly
• Inspect for integrity and attachment to solid surface.
• Visually inspect the body to ensure there is no physical damage to the body.
• Inspect for distortion.
• All tie-offs and anchorages will be destroyed and replaced after a fall.
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Page 1 of 8
FORKLIFT OPERATIONS
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
PURPOSE AND SCOPE
The purpose of this procedure is to protect all Kent County Delaware Governmental Body (referred to
from this point forward as “Kent County”) employees from hazards associated with forklift operations.
This will include any employee who operates a multi-fuel or electric forklift, all-terrain forklift, forklift
attachments, manual forklift or electric/manual pallet jack.
RESPONSIBILITIES
The plan administrator will develop and periodically review and revise the Forklift Safety procedure,
develop procedures for the operation and maintenance of forklifts, and ensure that operators are trained
and certified to safely operate the forklift that they are assigned. The administrator will review and update
this procedure as deemed necessary by the review.
The Department/Division Supervisor/Foremen will:
• Ensure that pedestrian walkways are clearly defined by painted lines throughout the facility and
marked as walkways.
• Ensure that regular maintenance of the forklift vehicles is conducted and that maintenance records are
maintained for each vehicle.
• Ensure that all trucks meet national standards and bear a label indicating approval by a testing
laboratory.
• Request manufacturer’s approval before any modification is made to the forklift.
• Ensure that battery charging is conducted safely and in locations designated for that purpose,
including wearing the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE).
• Make sure that smoking is prohibited in battery charging areas, and ensure that any spark-producing
activities are closely restricted.
Shift supervisors will:
• Strictly enforce all industrial truck and forklift operation procedures.
• Ensure that all authorized personnel receive training in forklift operation.
• Train all other employees on the applicable pedestrian safety rules.
• Ensure that overhead guards protect against falling objects.
• Remove any defective trucks from service.
Forklift Operator Trainer. The trainer will conduct training for forklift operators and ensure that they
meet all requirements for certification for the forklift they operate. The trainer will also evaluate the
effectiveness of the training program and revise the program as needed to ensure the safe operation of
forklifts.
Certified forklift operators. All forklift operators will:
• Hold and maintain active operator certificates and operate forklifts safely.
• Inspect and maintain forklifts according to the inspection and maintenance schedule.
• Report equipment problems and unsafe conditions to a supervisor.
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FORKLIFT OPERATIONS
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
DEFINITIONS
Backrest: Vertical support above the forks that, when a load is tipped back, prevents the load from falling
rearward toward the driver.
Carriage: The part of the mast where the forks and backrest are mounted.
Forklift: A powered industrial truck with a power-operated forked platform used to hoist and transport
materials by means of steel forks inserted under a load.
Mast: A support member providing guideways that permit vertical movement of the carriage.
Powered industrial truck: An industrial vehicle used to carry, push, pull, lift, or stack material powered by
an electric motor or an internal combustion engine, including vehicles commonly called forklift trucks,
rider trucks, motorized or powered hand trucks, pallet trucks and tugs. Not included are compressed air or
nonflammable compressed gas-operated industrial trucks, farm vehicles, or vehicles intended primarily
for earth moving or over-the-road hauling.
Overhead guard: Framework fitted to a truck over the head of a riding operator to guard against falling
debris.
Folding Rollover Protection (ROPS): A heavy duty engineered over-head device to protect the operator
in case of a vehicle/equipment rollover.
Seat belt: A required use restraint device that will secure the operator in case of a rollover or impact with
another object or vehicle/equipment.
Rated capacity: The maximum weight that the truck is designed to lift as determined by the manufacturer.
FORKLIFT OPERATOR SAFETY PROGRAM
The forklifts used at the facility meet the design and construction requirements for powered industrial
trucks established in the ANSI/ASME B56.1-[year], “Safety Standard for High Lift and Low Lift
Trucks.”
Safety Rules and Procedures
Kent County has adopted rules and procedures for operators to safely operate forklifts and for personnel
working or passing through areas where forklifts are present.
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FORKLIFT OPERATIONS
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Forklift Operation Rules
•
•
•
No one under the age of 18 may operate a forklift or any other powered industrial truck. Only
personnel certified by Kent County or its designee are authorized to operate a forklift.
All forklift operators must obey the following rules for safely operating a forklift:
- Wear a seat belt.
- Yield the right of way to pedestrians and emergency vehicles.
- Never engage in stunt driving or horseplay with a forklift.
- Never drive a forklift up to a person standing in front of a bench or fixed object.
- Never stand or pass, or allow someone else to stand or pass, under the elevated forks.
- Always keep arms, hands, or legs inside the truck.
- Lift only loads that are within the rated capacity of the truck.
- Never handle unstable loads.
- Maintain a safe distance from the edge of ramps or platforms.
- Slow down and sound the horn at intersections and where the operator’s vision
is obstructed.
- Insure back-up warning alarm is activated when driving in reverse.
- Ride in reverse if the load obstructs forward view.
- Prohibit unauthorized personnel to ride on the trucks.
- When leaving a truck unattended, lower the forks to ground level, neutralize controls, shut power
off, and set brakes.
- Place chocks on the down-slope side of tires if parked on an incline.
- Use a load backrest extension to prevent load from falling backward.
Any time the operator leaves the forklift and his or her view of the forklift is obstructed, or the
operator is 10 feet or more away from the forklift, the operator will follow this sequence of
precautions:
- Lower the load to the ground with the forks parallel to the ground surface.
- Neutralize the controls.
- Set the brakes.
- Chock the tires if parked on an incline.
Traveling
Forklift operators will obey the following rules when the forklift is traveling:
• Never exceed the speed limit of two to three (2-3) miles per hour.
• A clear view of the travel route will be maintained; travel with the load behind if it blocks the forward
view.
• Carry loads with the forks no more than a few inches above the ground or floor.
• Ensure there is a safe distance along the path of travel from the top of the forklift mast or load and
any overhead objects (e.g., lights, pipes, ventilation equipment).
• Loads will not be raised or lowered while traveling.
• Slow down on a wet or slippery floor.
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FORKLIFT OPERATIONS
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Stay at least three truck lengths behind another truck.
Slow down, stop, and sound the horn at cross aisles and other places where line-of-sight vision is
impaired.
Slow down before making a turn; sharp turns can tip the truck.
Do not pass at intersections or blind spots.
Stay a safe distance from the edge of a platform or elevated ramp.
Cross railroad tracks diagonally if possible.
Drive slowly and carefully over dockboards or bridgeplates and do not exceed their rated capacity.
Go up and down grades slowly, keeping the load upgrade and raised only enough to clear the surface
on grades of over 10 percent.
Loading and Unloading
Forklift operators will comply with the following rules when loading or unloading materials with a
forklift:
• Only handle stable and safely arranged loads; make arrangements to secure an unstable load.
• Never lift loads that exceed the rated capacity listed on the nameplate of the forklift.
• Before entering a trailer with a forklift, ensure that trailer brakes are locked, the rear wheels are
chocked, and the dock plate is secure.
• Check the rated capacity of a trailer or railcar before entering it to ensure that it can support the
combined weight of the forklift and load.
• Place the forks under the load as far as possible (the load will touch the forklift carriage) and tilt the
mast backward enough to stabilize the load.
• Never carry anything on the overhead guard.
• Check the maximum safe height of an area before stacking or tiering a load.
• Never tilt the load forward unless depositing it onto a rack or stack.
Refueling Operations
Operators and forklift maintenance personnel will comply with the following rules when recharging a
forklift battery:
• No smoking.
• Turn off the engine.
• Have a fire extinguisher and spill cleanup materials ready.
• Avoid fuel spills—if there is a spill, clean it up immediately.
• Do not operate a forklift with a leak in the fuel system until the leak is fixed.
• Always turn off the engine when filling fuel tanks.
• Perform all fueling operations in well-ventilated areas designated for that purpose.
• Replace the fuel cap before starting the forklift.
• Never use an open flame to check the fuel level.
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FORKLIFT OPERATIONS
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Propane-powered forklifts - Take empty propane tanks outside and open the valve to let any leftover
propane escape to the open air.
Recharging Operations
Forklift recharging operations may be performed only in assigned ventilated areas. Operators and forklift
maintenance personnel must obey the following rules when recharging a forklift:
• No smoking.
• Turn the power switch to the “Off” position and put the brake in the “Park” position.
• Have a fire extinguisher and spill cleanup materials ready.
• Open the vent caps to dissipate heat.
• Do not place metallic objects, including tools, near the top of uncovered batteries.
• Move batteries with [type of equipment], not by hand.
• Properly position and secure the battery in the truck.
• Use proper equipment such as a carboy tilter or siphon device to handle the electrolyte.
• Use the eyewash station and flush the eyes for 15 minutes whenever electrolyte or other chemicals
splash in the eyes, seek immediate medical attention.
Inspection and Maintenance
Forklifts are inspected daily before they are used, and after each shift for a forklift used for more than one
consecutive shift. Forklift operators and forklift maintenance personnel will implement the following
maintenance precautions:
• Keep forklifts clean and free of lint, excess oil, and grease.
• Clean forklifts with noncombustible agents.
• Have trained, authorized people handle repairs.
• Perform fuel or ignition system repairs that present fire hazards in assigned areas free of ignition
sources.
• Disconnect batteries before repairing a truck’s electrical system.
• Keep water mufflers at least 75 percent full.
• Report the following conditions to the supervisor and stop operating a forklift that:
- Is not in condition to operate safely.
- Has clogged muffler screens or parts.
- Sends out hazardous sparks or flames from the exhaust.
- Has any part that overheats beyond its normal operating temperature.
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FORKLIFT OPERATIONS
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Forklift Safety Checklists
Forklift operators will perform pre-start inspections and other safety checks of forklifts and other related
equipment using the safety checklists attached to this Plan. A checklist for each category of safety rules
and procedures is available to all operators and other personnel that work near forklifts.
Pedestrians
Pedestrians must comply with the following rules when walking in areas where forklifts operate:
• Never ride on trucks.
• Never stand or walk under elevated forks.
• Stay within pedestrian walkways.
• Be aware and listen for truck horns, especially at intersections.
• Cross intersections carefully.
TRAINING
Forklift Operator Training
Department/Division Supervisor/Foremen, who is trained and certified to operate forklifts, will provide
training for forklift operators and forklift maintenance personnel. After training is successfully completed,
the forklift operator will be issued a Forklift Operator Certification Card.
Previous Operator Training
Operators that have received forklift operator training at a previous job, or on a different type of forklift
than the type they are about to be assigned, must complete initial training on the new operating
environment and/or the characteristics of the new forklift.
If an operator has previously received training in a topic covered in the initial training, and such training
is appropriate to the forklift and working conditions encountered, additional training in that topic is not
required if the operator has been evaluated and found competent to operate the forklift safely by the .
Department/Division Supervisor/Foremen
Initial Operator Training
A prospective operator will be trained and certified before he or she is assigned to operate a forklift. A
trainee will operate a forklift only under the direct supervision of a trainer who has the knowledge,
training, and experience to train operators and evaluate their competence, and where the operation will
not endanger the trainee or other employees.
Training will consist of a combination of formal instruction and demonstrations performed by the trainer,
practical exercises performed by the operator, and an evaluation of the operator’s performance.
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FORKLIFT OPERATIONS
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The forklift operator initial training program must cover at least the following topics:
Characteristics of the forklift:
- Differences from the automobile
- Controls and instrumentation, such as location, what they do, and how they work
- Engine or motor operation
- Steering and maneuvering
- Visibility
- Fork and/or attachment adoption, operation, and limitations of their use
- Vehicle capacity
- Vehicle stability
- Vehicle inspection and maintenance the operator will be required to perform
- Refueling or charging and recharging batteries
- Operating limitations
- Any other operating instruction, warning, or precaution listed in the operator’s manual for the
type of vehicle the employee is being trained to operate
The operating environment:
- Floor surfaces and/or ground conditions where the vehicle will be operated
- Composition of probable loads and load stability
- Load manipulation, stacking, or unstacking
- Pedestrian traffic
- Narrow aisle and restricted place operation
- Operating in classified hazardous locations
- Operating the truck on ramps and other sloped surfaces that would affect the stability of the
vehicle
- Other unique or potentially hazardous environmental conditions that exist or may exist in the
workplace
- Operating the vehicle in closed environments and other areas where insufficient ventilation
and/or poor vehicle maintenance could cause a buildup of carbon monoxide or diesel exhaust
Operator Performance Evaluation
Each forklift operator’s performance will be evaluated every year.
Refresher Training
Refresher training will be provided when:
• The operator has been observed to operate the vehicle in an unsafe manner.
• The operator has been involved in an accident or near-miss incident.
• The operator has received an evaluation that reveals that the truck is not being operated safely.
• The operator is assigned to drive a different type of truck.
• A condition in the workplace changes in a manner that could affect safe operation of the truck.
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PROGRAM REVIEW AND UPDATE
This procedure will be reviewed and updated:
• Annually
• When the applicable federal or state regulations change
• When operations at the facility change that require a revision to this plan
• When an accident investigation or safety audit warrant a plan revision
RECORDKEEPING
Records of training (dates of training, attendee lists, and trainers) will be maintained at
Department/Division Supervisor/Foremen office and the Personnel/Human Resource Office for at least 5
years.
Operator Certification and Recordkeeping
Once training is completed, Department/Division Supervisor/Foremen will certify that the operator has
been successfully trained and evaluated for the specific make and model of forklift he or she will operate.
The certificate is not valid for other types of forklifts. The certificate will include:
• The name of the operator
• The date of the training
• The date of the evaluation
• The type of forklift
• The identity of the person(s) performing the training or evaluation
Copies of all operator certificates will be maintained at Personnel/Human Resource Office for at least 5
years.
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HAND AND PORTABLE POWER TOOLS
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PURPOSE AND SCOPE
This Program covers practices and requirements for hand and portable power tool operation and
maintenance. Kent County Delaware Governmental Body (referred to from this point forward as “Kent
County”) will protect its employees from hazards related to hand and portable power tools and equipment
through engineering controls, tool safeguards, communication of hazards and solutions, personal
protective equipment, and training.
RESPONSIBILITIES
The Department/Division Supervisor/Foremen Program Administrator will:
- Read and understand instructional documents provided by the manufacturer before use of any
tool
- Provide authorization for employees to use tools and maintain records of authorized employees.
- Provide additional on-the-job training if the employee is not thoroughly familiar with the
equipment and/or written procedures.
- Provide safe hand and power tool equipment to employees.
- Remove defective hand and power tools from service.
- Maintain inspection records of hand and power tools.
The Administrator may designate other employees, including managers and supervisors, to implement
and enforce the provisions of this Plan.
Employees who use hand and portable power tools will:
- Read and understand instructional documents provided by the manufacturer for the hand and
power tool prior to use.
- Recognize the conditions of work that require hand and power tool inspection.
- Understand and follow the hand and power tool safety procedures in this Plan.
- Not tamper with or remove a safety guard.
- Stop using damaged or defective hand and power tools and report such problems to a supervisor.
DEFINITIONS
•
Hand tool means a tool that is non-powered or operates only through physical exertion by hand and
includes anything from axes to wrenches and paper-cutting boards in offices.
•
Point of operation means the area around a tool where work is actually performed on the material
being processed, and the operation exposes an employee or employees to injury.
•
Portable power tool means a mounted or portable tool that requires a power source to operate, such as
electric, pneumatic, liquid fuel, hydraulic, explosive-actuated, and powder-actuated device or power
supply. Examples of regulated portable power tools are portable abrasive wheels and grinders, lawn
mowers, powered drills, portable circular saws, portable belt sanding machines, explosive-actuated
fastening tools, jacks, and abrasive blast cleaning nozzles.
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HAND AND PORTABLE POWER TOOLS
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HAZARD ASSESSMENT
The Administrator or designee will ensure that a hazard assessment is conducted in each work area where
hand and portable power tools are or may be used. The assessment will identify sources of hazards that
could expose employees to flying objects, shock or electrocution, sparks, punctures, cuts, and crushing
forces. For example, sparks produced by iron and steel hand tools can be a dangerous ignition source
around flammable substances.
Each hazard assessment will identify hazards, recommend controls, and provide guidance on appropriate
personal protective equipment (PPE) selections when a hazard control is not feasible or satisfactory.
The Administrator or designee will use the attached Job Hazard Analysis Worksheet and PPE Hazard
Assessment Certificate for guidance when conducting the assessment(s).
Hazard Assessment Procedure
The following process will be used for evaluating the operations and tasks that present potential hazards
to employees who work with hand and portable power tools:
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Conduct a survey of each work area to assess if hazards are present, or are likely to be present, for
which hazard controls or PPE is needed. The Administrator will also provide worksite evaluations
of any operation at the request of a supervisor or employee.
Review injury and illness records, the layout of the work areas, and the placement of workers in
the work areas.
Collect and organize the data if available for each work area, and estimate the potential for
injuries according to the basic hazard categories and potential sources of injury and illness.
Determine the type, level of risk, and seriousness of potential injury from each of the hazards
found in the work areas, and evaluates the possibility of exposure to several hazards.
Categorize and record the hazards.
Determine what type of engineering or administrative control and/or PPE will protect against the
hazards.
Incorporate the results of the assessment and recommendations for protection into this Plan and
supplementary documents.
Hearing Protection
If it is determined that any employees are exposed to noise from portable power tools at or in excess of an
action level of 85 decibels (dB) for an 8-hour day, then the Administrator or designee will implement a
hearing conservation program for exposed employees.
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GENERAL TOOL SAFETY PRACTICES
Condition of Tools
All hand tool and portable power tools and similar equipment, whether furnished by the employer or the
employee, will be maintained in a safe condition. Tools will be stored in appropriate storage areas when
not in use.
Electric-Powered Tools
Electric power tools will be either three-wire grounded or double-insulated and listed by Underwriters’
Laboratories or another recognized listing agency.
Hand Tool Safe Practices
- Floors will be kept as clean and dry as possible to prevent accidental slips with or around
dangerous hand tools.
- Saw blades, knives, and other sharp tools will be directed away from aisle areas and other
employees working in close proximity.
- Knives and scissors will be kept sharp; dull tools can be more hazardous than sharp ones.
- Spark-resistant tools made from brass, plastic, aluminum, or wood will be used around flammable
substances.
Power Tool Safe Practices
To prevent hazards associated with the use of power tools, employees will obey the following general
precautions:
- Never carry a tool by the cord or hose.
- Never yank the cord or the hose to disconnect it from the receptacle.
- Keep cords and hoses away from heat, oil, and sharp edges.
- Disconnect tools when not using them, before servicing and cleaning them, and when changing
accessories such as blades, bits, and cutters.
- Keep all people not involved with the work at a safe distance from the work area.
- Secure work with clamps or a vise where appropriate, freeing both hands to operate the tool.
- Avoid accidental starting; do not hold fingers on the switch button while carrying a plugged-in
tool.
- Maintain tools with care; keep them sharp and clean for best performance.
- Follow instructions in the user’s manual for the tool when lubricating and changing accessories.
- Be sure to keep good footing and maintain good balance when operating power tools.
- Do not wear loose clothing, ties, or jewelry when operating portable power tools; such items can
become caught in moving parts.
- Remove all damaged or defective portable electric tools from use and tag them: “Do Not Use.”
- Always plug cord-connected, hand-held electric tools into ground-fault circuit interrupter (GFCI)protected receptacles or in compliance with the facility’s assured electrical grounding conductor
program.
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HAND AND PORTABLE POWER TOOLS
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Guarding Portable Power Tools
All power tools designed with guards will be equipped with such guards when in use. All belts, gears,
shafts, sprockets, drums, spindles, fly wheels, chains, pulleys, or other reciprocating, rotating, or moving
parts of tools will be guarded if those parts may expose to contact by employees or otherwise create a
hazard. Methods of guarding will prevent injuries from points of rotating parts, ingoing nip points, and
flying chips and sparks.
Safety input and approval from the Administrator or designee will be obtained when manufacturer
recommendations for guarding a specific power tool are not available or cannot be implemented.
Safe Work Practices with Guards
General safe work practices when working with power tools with guards will include the following:
- Guards will not be removed unless the power tool is unplugged or locked out from the power
source.
- Notify a supervisor immediately when any unguarded moving parts or dangerous points of
operation are observed. Stop work and shut down the tool until the condition is corrected.
- Operate equipment only when the proper tool guards are in place.
- Do not use unauthorized or damaged guards.
- Never leave tools unattended with parts still moving; even after the machine is turned off, some
parts may still be moving.
- Never remove or bypass guards.
- Maintain good housekeeping practices by keeping the work area free of debris or other items that
can get caught in tools or power equipment.
- Operate power tools only when all guards are in place and properly attached according to the
manufacturer’s recommendations, and functioning properly.
- Wear proper eye and face protection while operating power tools.
- If a guard is damaged, bypassed, or missing, shut down the tool until the problem is corrected.
- Never wear loose clothing or jewelry while operating power tools.
Safety Switches
All hand-held power tools will be fitted with any one of the following safety switch methods as
appropriate for the particular tool:
- A momentary contact “on-off” control
- A lock-on control provided that turnoff can be accomplished by a single motion of the same
finger or fingers that turn it on
- A pressure switch that constant pressure is needed to run and will shut off when the pressure is
released, such as required for hand-held gasoline-powered chain saws
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)
Employees using hand and power tools exposed to the hazard of falling, flying, abrasive and splashing
objects, or exposed to flying dusts, fumes or mists, vapors or gases will be fitted with the particular PPE
necessary to protect them from the specific hazard. Safety eyewear, hard hats, gloves, and appropriate
safety shoes are required on all construction sites.
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HAND AND PORTABLE POWER TOOLS
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SPECIFIC HAND AND PORTABLE POWER TOOLS
The Administrator or designee will ensure that employees who perform work using hand and portable
power tools are provided with tools that are safe, and that employees will inspect the tool prior to use and
use it correctly.
Hand Tools
- Wrenches
Wrenches including adjustable, pipe, box-end, and socket-style wrenches will not be used when
the jaws or socket are stripped or sprung in such a way that slippage occurs.
- Impact Tools
Impact tools such as drill pins or punches, wedges, and chisels will be kept free of mushroomed
heads.
- Wooden, Metal, & Plastic Handles of Tools
Wooden-handled tools will be kept free of cracks and splinters and will be kept tightly attached to
the working end of the tool.
Portable Power Tools
- Portable Circular Saws
- All cracked saws will be removed from service.
- All portable, power-driven circular saws that have a blade diameter greater than 2 inches will be
equipped with guards above and below the base plate or shoe. The upper guard will cover the saw
to the depth of the teeth, except for the minimum arc required to permit the base to be tilted for
bevel cuts. The lower guard will cover the saw to the depth of the teeth, except for the minimum
arc required to allow proper retraction and contact with the work. When the tool is withdrawn
from the work, the lower guard will automatically and instantly return to covering position.
- Circular saws will be equipped with a constant pressure switch or control that will shut off the
power when the pressure is released.
- Portable Belt Sanding Machines
- Belt sanding machines will be provided with guards at each nip point where the sanding belt runs
onto a pulley. These guards will effectively prevent the hands or fingers of the operator from
coming in contact with the nip points. The unused run of the sanding belt will be guarded against
accidental contact.
- Portable Powered Abrasive Wheels
- Due to the possibility of a wheel disintegrating (exploding) during start-up, the employee must
never stand directly in front of the wheel as it accelerates to full operating speed.
- Before an abrasive wheel is mounted, it will be inspected closely and sound- or ring-tested to be
sure that it is free from cracks or defects. To test, wheels should be tapped gently with a light
non-metallic instrument. If they sound cracked or dead, they could fly apart in operation and, so,
must not be used. A sound and undamaged wheel will give a clear metallic tone or “ring.”
- Mounting. The wheel must fit freely on the spindle to prevent it from cracking. The spindle nut
must be tightened enough to hold the wheel in place without distorting the flange. The
manufacturer’s recommendations for mounting and use of the wheel must be followed. Care must
be taken to assure that the spindle wheel will not exceed the abrasive wheel specifications.
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Guards. Abrasive wheels will be used only on machine provided with safety guards. A safety
guard will cover the spindle end, nut, and flange projections. The safety guard will be mounted so
as to maintain proper alignment with the wheel, and the strength of the fastenings will exceed the
strength of the guard. Safety guards on all operations where the work provides a suitable measure
of protection to the operator may be so constructed that the spindle end, nut, and outer flange are
exposed. Where the nature of the work is such as to entirely cover the side of the wheel, the side
covers of the guard may be omitted.
Exceptions to abrasive wheel requirements. The requirements for abrasive wheels do not apply to
natural sandstone wheels, and metal, wooden, cloth, or paper discs having a layer of abrasive on
the surface.
Cup Wheels
Cup wheels (Types 6 and 11) will be protected by safety guards or special “revolving cup guards”
which mount behind the wheel and turn with it. They will be made of steel or other material with
adequate strength and will enclose the wheel sides upward from the back for one-third of the
wheel thickness.
Portable Power Grinders : When using a powered grinder, employees must:
Always use eye protection.
Turn off the power when not in use.
Never clamp a hand-held grinder in a vise.
Guards. Portable grinding tools will be equipped with safety guards to protect workers from the
moving wheel surface and from flying fragments in case of breakage. Safety guards used on right
angle head or vertical portable grinders will have a maximum exposure angle of 180 degrees (°)
and the guard will be so located so as to be between the operator and the wheel during use.
Adjustment of the guard will be such that pieces of an accidentally broken wheel will be deflected
away from the operator.
The maximum angular exposure of the grinding wheel periphery and sides for safety guards used
on other portable grinding machines will not exceed 180° and the top half of the wheel will be
enclosed at all times.
Electric Power-Operated Tools
Portable electric power-operated tools will be of the approved double-insulated type and used
with an approved grounding device such as a Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) to prevent
the unlikely event of an electrical shock. Such tools will meet the requirements of the federal
electrical safety rules.
Safe work practices. Employees will implement the following safe work practices when
handling and operating electric power-operated tools:
Never use electrical cords for hoisting or lowering tools.
Keep cords and hoses away from heat, oil, and sharp edges.
Operate electrical tools only within their design limitations.
Wear gloves and safety footwear as appropriate during use of electric tools.
When not in use, store electrical tools in a dry place.
Do not use electrical tools in damp or wet locations without authorization.
Ensure work areas are well-lighted.
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Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI). All 120-volt, single-phase 15- and 20-ampere
receptacle outlets on sites, which are not a part of the permanent wiring of the building or
structure and which are in use by employees, shall have approved ground-fault circuit interrupters
for personnel protection.
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Pneumatic-Powered Tools and Hoses
Pneumatic tools are powered by compressed air and include chippers, drills, hammers, and
sanders.
Retainer. Pneumatic power tools will be secured to the hose or whip by some positive means
such as a tool retainer to prevent the tool from becoming accidentally disconnected. Safety clips
or retainers will be securely installed and maintained on pneumatic impact (percussion) tools to
prevent attachments from being accidentally expelled.
PPE. Eye protection is required and face protection is recommended for employees working with
pneumatic tools on appropriate projcets. Use appropriate hearing protection when working with
noisy tools such as jackhammers.
Barrier protection. Screens must be set up to protect nearby workers from being struck by flying
fragments around chippers, grinders, welders, riveting guns, staplers, or air drills.
Air pressure. The safe operating pressure stated by the manufacturer will not be exceeded.
Supplied compressed air will not be used for cleaning purposes except when reduced to 30
pounds per square in. (psi) and then only with effective chip guarding and when proper PPE is
used.
Hoses. Pneumatic powered tools will be secured to the hose or connection by a positive means to
prevent them from being accidentally expelled. A short wire or positive locking device attaching
the air hose to the tool will serve as an added safeguard. Hoses will not be used for hoisting or
lowering. All hoses exceeding ½ in. inside diameter will have a safety device to reduce pressure
should the hose fail.
Nailers, staplers, and similar tools. All pneumatically driven nailers, staplers, and other similar
tools provided with automatic fastener feeds which operate at more than 100 psi pressure to the
tool will have a safety device on the muzzle end to prevent the tool from ejecting fasteners unless
the muzzle is in contact with the work surface. A safety clip or retainer must be installed to
prevent attachments, such as chisels on a chipping hammer, from being unintentionally shot from
the
barrel.
Compressed air guns. Compressed air guns must never be pointed toward anyone. Users must
never “dead-end” the gun against themselves or anyone else.
Spray guns. Airless spray guns which atomize paints and fluids and operate at pressure of 1,000
psi or more will be equipped with an automatic or visible manual safety device which prevents
the accidental pulling of the trigger to prevent the release of paint or fluid until the device is
manually released. [Instead] of the safety device, the gun may be equipped with a diffuser nut
which will prevent high pressure and high velocity release while the nozzle tip is removed, plus a
nozzle tip guard, or other equivalent protection, which will prevent the tip from coming into
contact with the operator.
Blasting nozzles. Abrasive blasting nozzles will be equipped with a valve which must be
activated manually for operation and a holding rack for nonoperation. The nozzle will be
mounted on a support when it is not in use.
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Hydraulic Power Tools
The fluid used in hydraulic powered tools will be fire-resistant fluids and must retain its operating
characteristics at the most extreme temperatures to which it will be exposed. The manufacturer’s
safe operating pressures for hoses, valves, pipes, filters, and other fittings will not be exceeded.
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Fuel-Powered Tools
- All fuel-powered tools will be stopped during refueling, servicing, or maintenance.
- Fuel will be transported, handled, and stored in accordance with USEPA and USDOT rules
and procedures.
- When fuel-powered tools are used in enclosed spaces, the applicable requirements for toxic
gas monitoring and use of PPE will be applied.
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Powder-Actuated Tools
- Powder-actuated tools are also known as “explosive-actuated.” Such tools are actuated by
explosives or any similar means, and propel a stud, pin, fastener, or other object for the
purpose of affixing it by penetration to any other object.
- Powder-actuated tools will be designed in accordance with federal regulatory requirements
and operated according to facility and manufacturer’s instructions.
- Employee training. Only employees who have been trained in the safe operation of the
particular powder-actuated tool in use will be allowed to operate a powder-actuated tool.
- Testing. The tool will be tested each day before loading to see that safety devices are in
proper working condition. The method of testing will be in accordance with manufacturer’s
recommended procedures.
- Inspection. Before using a tool, the operator will inspect it to determine to his or her
satisfaction that it is clean, that all moving parts operate freely, and that the barrel is free from
obstructions. The tool will be inspected at regular intervals and be repaired in accordance
with the manufacturer's specifications.
- Safe work practices. Employees will obey the following safe work practices when operating
powder-actuated tools:
- Any tool found not in proper working order, or which develops a defect during use, will be
immediately removed from service and not used until properly repaired by an authorized
provider.
- Tools will not be loaded until just prior to the intended firing time. At no time, loaded or
unloaded, are the tools to be pointed at any employees.
- Hands will be kept clear of the open barrel.
- Loaded tools will not be left unattended.
- Tools will not be used in an explosive or flammable environment.
- In case of a misfire, the operator will hold the tool in the operating position for at least 30
seconds and then try to operate the tool a second time. The operator will wait another 30
seconds, holding the tool in the operating position, then proceed to remove the explosive load
in strict accordance with the manufacturer's instructions.
- A tool will never be left unattended in a place where it would be available to unauthorized
persons.
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Fasteners will not be driven into very hard or brittle materials including, but not limited to,
cast iron, glazed tile, surface-hardened steel, glass block, live rock, face brick, or hollow tile.
Driving into materials easily penetrated will be avoided unless such materials are backed by a
substance that will prevent the pin or fastener from passing completely through and creating a
flying-missile hazard on the other side.
Fasteners will not be driven directly into materials such as brick or concrete closer than 3 in.
from the unsupported edge or corner or into steel surfaces closer than ½ in. from the
unsupported edge or corner, unless a special guard, fixture, or jig is used. (Exception: Lowvelocity tools may drive no closer than 2 in. from an edge in concrete or ¼ in. in steel).
When fastening other materials, such as a 2- by 4-in. wood section to a concrete surface, it is
permissible to drive a fastener of no greater than 7/32-in. shank diameter not closer than 2 in.
from the unsupported edge or corner of the work surface.
Fasteners will not be driven through existing holes unless a positive guide is used to secure
accurate alignment.
No fastener will be driven into a spalled area caused by an unsatisfactory fastening.
Driving into materials easily penetrated will be avoided unless such materials are backed by a
substance that will prevent the pin or fastener from passing completely through and creating a
flying missile hazard on the other side.
Protective systems and PPE. All tools will be used with the correct shield, guard, or
attachment recommended by the manufacturer. Appropriate PPE will be used when operating
powder-actuated tools. Eye protection will be required at all times. Head and face protection
will be used as required by working conditions.
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Power Lawnmowers
- Guards. Power lawnmowers of the walk-behind, riding-rotary, and reel power lawnmowers
will be guarded in accordance with machine guarding requirements.
- All power-driven chains, belts, and gears will be so positioned or otherwise guarded to
prevent the operator's accidental contact therewith, during normal starting, mounting, and
operation of the machine.
- Shutoff device. A shutoff device will be provided to stop operation of the motor or engine.
This device will require manual and intentional reactivation to restart the motor or engine.
- Operator information. All positions of the operating controls will be clearly identified. The
words, “Caution. Be sure the operating control(s) is in neutral before starting the engine,” or
similar wording will be clearly visible at an engine starting control point on self-propelled
mowers.
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Jacks
- A jack is an appliance for lifting and lowering or moving horizontally a load by application of
a pushing force. Jacks may be lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic.
- The manufacturer’s rated capacity for the jack will be legibly marked on all jacks and will not
be exceeded. All jacks will have a positive stop to prevent and stop over-travel.
- When providing a firm foundation, the jack base, as well as the cap, will be blocked or
cribbed to prevent slippage. Where there is a possibility of slippage of the metal cap of the
jack, a wood block shall be placed between the cap and the load.
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HAND AND PORTABLE POWER TOOLS
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Inspections. Jacks will be maintained according to the manufacturer’s recommendations and
inspected at least every 6 months and prior to use. For jacks subjected to abusive conditions
such as freezing, load shock, or extreme heat, the jack will be examined for possible defects.
Defective jack. Any jack found damaged or defective will be tagged accordingly and not be
used until repaired by a person qualified to perform such repairs.
ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION
All incidents that result in injury to workers, as well as near misses, regardless of their nature, will be
reported and investigated. Investigations will be conducted by Kent County Health & Safety Officer or
His/Her Assistant or other authorized person as soon after an incident as possible to identify the cause and
means of prevention to eliminate the risk of reoccurrence.
In the event of an incident that results in serious injury, this Plan will be reevaluated by the Administrator
or designee to determine if additional practices, procedures, or training is necessary to prevent similar
future incidents.
CONTRACTORS
Contractors must submit, as part of the contract-required Plan, a hand and power tool program that meets
the provisions of this Plan.
Onsite service contractors may train their own employees in specific company policies, procedures, and
equipment, as needed, to ensure the safety of their employees. They must maintain authorization records
that meet the requirements of this Plan.
PROGRAM REVIEW AND UPDATE
The hand and power tool procedures and employee authorizations will be reviewed annually, and are
reviewed and updated whenever:
- New types of electrical systems or equipment for powering portable power tools are introduced
into the workplace.
- Evaluations of workplace hazards, injuries, and near-misses demonstrate that the current Plan is
outdated or not effective.
- Regulatory or applicable national consensus standards change that require this Plan to be updated.
TRAINING
Only employees who are trained and authorized will perform work using hand and power tools.
Construction contractors are permitted to show written records of equivalent training. The Administrator
or designee will provide specific authorization after the employee satisfies the training requirements of
this Plan or attachments.
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HAND AND PORTABLE POWER TOOLS
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Training Program Requirements
Training of employees that use hand and power tools must include the safe operation, use, and care of the
tool(s) and implements. The employee must be trained to be thoroughly familiar with the equipment
(within the context of his/her job function) and with the tool manufacturer’s procedures.
Each employee will be provided additional on-the-job training if the employee is not thoroughly familiar
with the tools and/or written procedures.
Refresher Training
Hand and power tool refresher training is required when:
-
An authorized employee’s job changes or if he or she is reassigned.
A new hand or power tool is introduced to the work area for use.
New handling procedures are implemented.
An employee demonstrates inadequate knowledge of hand and power tool procedures or policy.
RECORDKEEPING
Copies of manufacturer specifications and manuals, ANSI consensus standards, and applicable
regulations will be kept by the Division Supervisor/Manager or his/her agent in the working area
accessible to all employees..
The Administrator or designee will maintain records of authorized employees and the type of on-the-job
training, if any, that was given.
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HEARING CONSERVATION
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PURPOSE AND SCOPE
It is the policy of Kent County Delaware Governmental Body (referred to from this point forward as
“Kent County”) to protect the hearing of all workers whose noise exposures equal or exceed an action
level of 85 decibels (dB) for an 8-hour day. This program applies to all persons working in areas or with
equipment that have average noise levels of 85 decibels, A weighting (dBA) or higher.
RESPONSIBILITIES
The Kent County Health & Safety Officer or His/Her Assistant (Program Administrator) with the
assistance of the Department/Division Supervisor/Foremen will:
• Administer the Hearing Conservation Program.
• Conduct and document noise surveys areas/activities where potential noise exposures may equal or
exceed an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) of 85 dBA.
• When notified by employee or employee supervisor, perform a sound-level survey in areas where a
change in activity, process, equipment, or controls may have resulted in either an increase or a
decrease in employee exposure.
• Identify noise hazard areas and post appropriate signs.
• Provide employees access to noise monitoring records.
• Notify supervisors and affected employees when monitoring indicates an exposure at or above action
level (85 dBA), and participate in the Hearing Conservation Program when it becomes mandatory.
• Recommend appropriate engineering and/or administrative noise controls.
• Develop a training program and ensure annual training of employees enrolled in the HCP in hearing
conservation issues and practices.
• Maintain access to sound-level meters, noise dosimeters, and field calibration equipment in
accordance with manufacturers’ instructions and perform or provide for required calibrations
• Maintain records of all noise monitoring and instrument calibration.
The Audiometric Testing Coordinator will:
• Ensure that baseline audiograms and annual audiometric testing is conduced for employees enrolled
in the hearing conservation program.
• Notify Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager of employee complaints of potential noise
hazard exposures.
• Ensure the proper selection and fit of hearing protection devices (HPDs.)
• Ensure appropriate certification of those responsible for audiometric testing, interpretation of
audiometric results, selection and fit of HPDs, and employee hearing conservation training.
• Identify employees with Standard Threshold Shift (STS), subsequent retesting, employee notification,
management of those employees with STS, and possible referrals.
• Assist as needed with the annual training of employees in the Hearing Conservation Program.
• Maintain audiometric testing equipment in accordance with manufacturers’ instructions and perform
or provide for required machine calibrations
• Maintain records of audiometric test results (audiograms), employee training, and noise monitoring
results for the duration of employment for each employee plus 30 years.
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HEARING CONSERVATION
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Supervisors will:
• Notify Department/Division Director/Manager of potential noise hazard areas.
• Evaluate the feasibility of engineering and/or administrative noise controls.
• Identify employees exposed to sound levels equaling or exceeding the action level, and report such
information to Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager.
Employees will:
• Wear HPDs when entering or working in identified noise hazard areas in accordance with the posted
warning.
• Report potential noise hazard exposures to the supervisor.
• Comply with Hearing Conservation Program requirements when identified as being exposed to sound
levels equaling or exceeding the action level.
Employees who do not comply with the provisions of this program will be disciplined in accordance with
Kent County policy of progressive discipline.
DEFINITIONS
Action Level: A sound level equaling an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) of 85 decibels on an Aweighted level (dBA), or equivalently a noise dose of 50 percent.
Audiogram: A chart, graph, or table that results from an audiometric test. An audiogram shows an
individual’s hearing threshold level as a function of frequency (hertz).
Audiologist: A professional specializing in the study and rehabilitation of hearing who is certified by the
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association or licensed by a state board of examiners.
Baseline Audiogram: Reference audiogram against which future audiograms are compared.
Decibel (dB): Unit of measurement of sound level.
dBA (decibels on an A-weighted level): A measurement of noise intensity obtained using a soundmeasuring instrument commonly used to define degrees of auditory risk. The A-weighting is a
measurement that closely parallels the auditory characteristics of normal human hearing.
Dosimetry: A technique of sound measurement that integrates cumulative noise exposure over time and
directly indicates a noise dose.
Hearing Conservation Program (HCP): An annual audiometric testing and hearing conservation training
program for employees exposed to sound levels equaling or exceeding the action level.
Hearing Protection Device (HPD): Personal protective equipment worn by an individual for the purpose
of reducing noise exposure, including reusable and disposable earplugs, ear muffs, and similar noise
attenuating devices.
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HEARING CONSERVATION
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Noise dose: A measure of the noise exposure to which a person is subjected in the workplace.
Standard Threshold Shift (STS): A change in hearing threshold, relative to the baseline audiogram, of an
average of 10 dB or more at 2000, 3000, and 4000 Hz in either ear, taking into account any changes due
to presbycusis (age-related hearing loss).
Time-Weighted Average (TWA): Noise exposure averaged over a designated period of time (example: 8hour TWA).
ENGINEERING AND ADMINISTRATIVE CONTROLS
When noise exposure levels exceed the permissible limits, Kent County will implement engineering
controls as the primary mechanism to reduce noise levels. The following engineering controls will be or
have been implemented:
•
•
•
Install controls on vibrating surfaces.
Enclose machinery.
Install barriers or insulation between noise sources and operators.
The following administrative controls will be implemented in conjunction with engineering controls to
limit the amount of time that an employee works in areas where the 8-hour TWA equals or exceeds 90
dBA:
•
•
Employee rotation
Scheduling equipment operation
Administrative controls will neither be used as a substitute for nor replace applicable requirements for a
Hearing Conservation Program.
HEARING CONSERVATION PROGRAM
Monitoring
•
•
A noise survey will be conducted to identify the areas where employee noise exposure may exceed an
85 dB 8-hour TWA.
Workers will be monitored in questionable areas with a calibrated noise dosimeters that will measure
all continuous, intermittent, and impulsive sound levels between 80–130 decibels on the “Aweighted” scale (slow response).
Each employee will be notified of the monitoring results if exposed at or above the 85 dB TWA
•
.
Additional monitoring will be conducted if changes in production, equipment, processes, or controls
suggest that noise exposures may have increased. Employees identified with exposure levels at or above
an 8-hour TWA of 85 dB will be notified with the results of the monitoring and will be required to enroll
in the Hearing Conservation Program.
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HEARING CONSERVATION
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Below is the table of permissible noise exposures.
Hours
Permissible sound level
per day
dBA
8
90
6
92
4
95
3
97
2
100
1½
102
1
105
½
110
1/4 or less
115
Audiometric Testing
Baseline audiogram: Audiometric tests will be preformed by a licensed or certified audiologist,
otolaryngologist, qualified physician, or qualified technician responsible to the audiologist or physician.
A baseline audiogram (i.e., hearing test) will be obtained for all employees with noise exposures equal to
or greater than an 85 dB TWA. The baseline audiogram will be obtained within 6 months of an
employee’s first exposure to noise above the action level. In the case that a mobile van is used for testing,
the audiogram will be obtained within 1 year. Employees will use hearing protection 6 months after their
first exposure until a baseline audiogram is obtained.
Both a preemployment and termination audiogram will be obtained for all employees. Workers will be
informed that baseline audiometric testing must be preceded by at least 14 hours without exposure to
noise levels above 80 dB. Workers may use hearing protection to meet this requirement.
All audiometric testing and evaluation will be provided free of charge to our employees.
Annual audiogram: Annual audiograms will be conducted for all employees with noise exposures equal
to or greater than an 85 dB TWA. An annual audiogram may be substituted for the baseline audiogram
when the audiologist or physician evaluating the program declares:
- An STS is persistent, or
- The hearing threshold in the annual audiogram indicates a significant improvement over the
baseline audiogram.
Standard Threshold Shift (STS): If a comparison of the annual audiogram with the baseline audiogram
indicates that an STS has occurred, a retest within 30 days will be conducted, and the second test may be
considered the annual audiogram. If an STS is confirmed, the employee will be:
- Informed in writing within 21 days of the determination
- Referred to an audiologist, otolaryngologist, or qualified physician for further evaluation
- Provided with both the baseline and the most recent audiogram of the employee and the required
records on the audiometer and the audiometric test room
- Fitted or refitted with adequate hearing protectors, shown how to use them, and required to wear
them
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HEARING CONSERVATION
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Unless the audiologist or physician determines that the STS is not work-related or aggravated by noise
exposures in the workplace, the worker will be required to use suitable hearing protection. For workers
exposed to noise levels below 90 dB TWA, the use of hearing protection will continue until subsequent
audiometric testing indicates that the STS is not permanent.
Hearing Protection
Hearing protectors will be provided at no cost to employees, and a variety of suitable types will be
available for their selection. Hearing protectors will be evaluated for their ability to adequately reduce the
noise exposures in the workplace to a 90 dB TWA or below (or an 85 dB TWA for those workers who
have experienced an STS).
Hearing protectors will be required and provided for all employees with noise exposure:
•
•
•
Greater than a 90 dB TWA; or
Equal to or greater than an 85 dB TWA and who have experienced an STS; or
Equal to or greater than an 85 dB TWA for 6 months or more and who have not obtained a baseline
audiogram.
Hearing protectors will be available to all employees for use with noise exposures between an 85 and 90
dB TWA who have not experienced an STS.
TRAINING
Workers included in the Hearing Conservation Program will receive noise protection training that covers
the following topics:
•
•
•
•
•
The effects of noise on hearing
The purpose of hearing protectors
The advantages, disadvantages, and noise reduction capabilities of the various types of hearing
protectors
Instructions on the selection, fitting, use, and care of hearing protectors
The purpose of audiometric testing and an explanation of the test procedures
Employees already using hearing protectors and who have experienced an STS must be refitted and
retrained in their use and be provided with hearing protectors offering greater attenuation if necessary.
Department/Division Supervisor/Foremen will post a copy of the noise exposure regulations and any
informational materials related to the regulations that are supplied to the employer.
Annual Refresher Training
The training program will be repeated annually for each employee included in the Hearing Conservation
Program. Information provided in the training program will be updated to be consistent with changes in
protective equipment and work processes.
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HEARING CONSERVATION
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Training Records
Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager will maintain all records of employee training for at least 5
years.
PROGRAM REVIEW AND UPDATE
This program will be reevaluated:
• Annually, when the annual audiogram testing is done.
• Whenever there is a change in production, process, equipment, or controls that might have
questionable noise levels.
RECORDKEEPING
Injury and Illness Log
An STS of 10 dB or greater will be recorded on the log if caused or aggravated by exposure to
occupational noise.
Records Maintenance
Hearing Conservation Program records will be maintained in the office and are available on request to our
employees. All audiometric test records will be retained for the duration of each worker’s employment.
Each record will include:
• Audiogram with the name and job classification of the worker, date of the audiogram, and the
examiner’s name
• Measurements of the noise levels in the audiometric test booth and the date of the last acoustic or
exhaustive calibration of the audiometer
• Employee’s most recent noise exposure measurement
Noise sampling/exposure records will be retained for at least 2 years.
Transfer of Records
If Kent County ceases to exist, all Hearing Conservation Program records will be transferred to its
successors or agents. The records of a new employee who formerly worked in a high noise exposure
location will be kept in his or her current file. A copy of a new employee’s audiometric records,
particularly if he or she is to work in a high noise area, will be transferred to the new record.
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HEAT STRESS PREVENTION
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PURPOSE AND SCOPE
This Heat Stress Prevention procedure applies to any work operations at Kent County Delaware
Governmental Body (referred to from this point forward as “Kent County”) involving high air
temperatures, radiant heat sources, high humidity, direct physical contact with hot objects, or strenuous
physical activities that have a high potential for inducing heat stress in employees engaged in such
operations.
This procedure applies to all employees who are exposed to heat or hot conditions at or above the
threshold levels for work areas and activities identified in the heat stress hazard assessment.
RESPONSIBILITIES
Program Administrator: The Program Administrator (Kent County Health & Safety Officer or His/Her
Assistant with the coordination of the Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager, Department
Director(s)/Manager(s) and/or Division Supervisors’/Managers’) is responsible for implementing the Heat
Stress Prevention Program, monitoring work area heat conditions and worker physiological parameters,
and for ensuring that employees are trained to recognize the signs and symptoms of heat stress illnesses or
injury and what to do if these occur.
Supervisors: Supervisors are responsible for encouraging employees to frequently consume water or
other acceptable beverages to ensure hydration.
Employees: Employees are responsible for monitoring their own personal factors for heat-related illness
including consumption of water or other acceptable beverages to ensure hydration.
HEAT-RELATED ILLNESSES
Heat Illness is generally not instantaneous and occurs some time (hours or days) after the initial exposure
to an occupational hazard. For example, an instantaneous reaction such as a burn after touching a hot
surface is considered an injury; whereas a delayed reaction to a hot environment such as heat exhaustion
that occurs hours after the initial exposure is considered an illness.
Heat collapse is a condition where the brain does not receive enough oxygen because blood pools in the
extremities, resulting in a loss of consciousness (fainting or syncope). This reaction is similar to that of
heat exhaustion and does not affect the body’s heat balance. However, the onset of heat collapse is rapid
and unpredictable. Heat syncope is a fainting episode or dizziness that usually occurs with prolonged
standing or sudden rising from a sitting or lying position. Factors that may contribute to heat syncope
include dehydration and lack of acclimatization.
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HEAT STRESS PREVENTION
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Heat cramps are usually caused by performing hard physical labor in a hot environment. These cramps
have been attributed to an electrolyte imbalance caused by sweating. Cramps can be caused by both too
much and too little salt. Cramps appear to be caused by the lack of water replenishment. Because sweat is
a hypotonic solution (±0.3% sodium chloride), excess salt can build up in the body if the water lost
through sweating is not replaced. Thirst cannot be relied on as a guide to the need for water; instead,
water must be taken every 15 to 20 minutes in hot environments. Under extreme conditions, such as
working for 6 to 8 hours in heavy protective gear, a loss of sodium may occur. Recent studies have shown
that drinking commercially available carbohydrate-electrolyte replacement liquids is effective in
minimizing physiological disturbances during recovery.
Heat exhaustion is a condition with symptoms of headache, nausea, vertigo, weakness, thirst, and
giddiness. Fainting associated with heat exhaustion can be dangerous because the victim may be
operating machinery or controlling an operation that should not be left unattended; moreover, the victim
may be injured when he or she faints. Also, the signs and symptoms seen in heat exhaustion are similar to
those of heat stroke, a medical emergency.
Heat fatigue is a temporary state of discomfort and mental or psychological strain arising from prolonged
heat exposure. It is generally caused by fluid loss. Workers unaccustomed to the heat are particularly
susceptible and can suffer, to varying degrees, a decline in task performance, coordination, alertness, and
vigilance. There is no treatment for heat fatigue except to remove the heat stress before a more serious
heat-related condition develops. The severity of transient heat fatigue will be lessened by a period of
gradual adjustment to the hot environment (heat acclimatization).
Heat rash is “prickly” heat manifested as red papules (i.e., small, inflammatory, irritated spots on skin)
and usually appears in areas where the clothing is restrictive. It is the most common problem in hot work
environments. As sweating increases, these papules give rise to a prickling sensation. Prickly heat occurs
on skin that is persistently wetted by unevaporated sweat, and heat rash papules may become infected if
they are not treated. In most cases, heat rashes will disappear when the affected individual returns to a
cool environment.
Heat stroke is a condition when the body’s system of temperature regulation fails and body temperature
rises to critical levels. This condition is caused by a combination of highly variable factors, and its
occurrence is difficult to predict. Heat stroke is a medical emergency. The primary signs and symptoms of
heat stroke are confusion, irrational behavior, loss of consciousness, convulsions, a lack of sweating
(usually), hot and dry skin, and an abnormally high body temperature (e.g., a rectal temperature of 41°C
(105.8°F)). If body temperature is too high, it causes death. The elevated metabolic temperatures caused
by a combination of work load and environmental heat load, both of which contribute to heat stroke, are
also highly variable and difficult to predict.
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HEAT STRESS PREVENTION
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HAZARD ASSESSMENT
The Administrator or designee will conduct an initial inspection and hazard assessment of all work areas
and environments where hot conditions are anticipated or may occur. He or she will periodically conduct
follow-up inspections to ensure compliance with this Plan and to evaluate the effectiveness of heat stress
control measures.
During the assessment the inspector will:
- Determine building and facility operating characteristics that may cause, contribute to, or alleviate
hot conditions.
- Determine whether engineering and administrative controls are functioning properly.
- Verify information obtained from employee interviews.
- Perform temperature measurements and make other determinations to identify potential sources of
heat stress.
Investigators will discuss any operations that have the potential to cause heat stress with engineers or
other knowledgeable personnel. A walk-around inspection will cover all affected areas. Heat sources such
as furnaces, ovens, and boilers, and relative heat load per employee will be noted.
Heat Stress Factors
The following workplace factors will be considered in the assessment for heat stress:
• Air temperature
• Radiant heat sources
• Conductive heat sources
• Humidity
• Direct physical contact with hot objects
• Workload activity and duration
• Semi-permeable or impermeable protective clothing
The following worker heat sensitivity factors will also be considered in evaluating the potential for heat
stress:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Age
Weight
Degree of physical fitness
Degree of acclimatization
Metabolism
Use of alcohol or drugs
Medical conditions such as hypertension
Prior heat injury (predisposes an individual to additional injury)
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HEAT STRESS PREVENTION
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HEAT STRESS MONITORING
Every worker who works in extraordinary conditions that increase the risk of heat stress will be
personally monitored. Extraordinary conditions include wearing semi-permeable or impermeable
clothing when the temperature exceeds 21°C (69.8°F), and working at extreme metabolic loads greater
than 500 kilocalories/hour. Personal heat stress monitoring techniques include physiological tests such
as:
•
•
•
•
Heart rate
Recovery heart rate
Oral temperature
Extent of body water loss
Monitoring Personal Heat Stress
Personal monitoring of physiological stress will be conducted to alert employees and their supervisors to
potential heat stress illness. The Administrator or designee will conduct initial monitoring at the
beginning of the work shift prior to entry into the work zone. Reentry and readjustment of the work/rest
cycle will be determined based on the guidelines listed in the Physiological Monitoring Table.
Personal Monitoring Table
Type of monitoring
Monitoring location
Action levels
(vital signs)
Work/Rest
Modification
Physical signs and symptoms of heat stress will be discussed with employees every two hour time interval
or sooner as needed and reviewed as necessary. Employees will be trained and directed to monitor each
other’s actions, speech, and appearance for signs and symptoms of heat-related illnesses.
Heart rate. To check the heart rate, count the radial pulse for 30 seconds at the beginning of the rest
period. If the heart rate exceeds 110 beats per minute, shorten the next work period by one third and
maintain the same rest period.
Recovery heart rate. The recovery heart rate can be checked by comparing the pulse rate (i.e., number of
beats in 30 seconds x 2) taken at the beginning of the rest period (P1) with the pulse rate taken 3 minutes
(P3) after the beginning of the rest period. The two pulse rates can be interpreted using the Heart Rate
Recovery Table in this section.
Oral temperature. Oral temperature can be checked with a clinical thermometer after work but before
the employee drinks water. If the oral temperature taken under the tongue exceeds 37.6°C (100°F),
shorten the next work cycle by one-third.
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HEAT STRESS PREVENTION
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Body water loss. Body water loss can be measured by weighing the worker on a scale at the beginning
and end of each work day. The worker's weight loss should not exceed 1.5% of total body weight in a
work day. If a weight loss exceeding this amount is observed, fluid intake should be increased.
Heart Rate Recovery Table
Heart rate recovery pattern
Satisfactory recovery
High recovery (Conditions may require further
study)
No recovery (May indicate too much stress)
P3
Greater than 90
90
Difference between P1 and P3
None
10
90
Greater than 10
Monitoring Hot Conditions
Portable heat stress meters will be used to measure heat conditions. These instruments will calculate both
the indoor and outdoor Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) index according to established American
Conference of Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) equations. The WBGT for
continuous all-day or several hour exposures will be averaged over a 60-minute period. Intermittent
exposures are averaged over a 120-minute period. With this information and information on the type of
work being performed, heat stress meters can determine how long a person can safely work or remain in a
particular hot environment.
HEAT STRESS PREVENTION PROGRAM
This Heat Stress Prevention Program describes controls and work practices to protect employees from
heat stress while working in hot conditions.
Program Implementation Criteria
The Administrator or designee will implement the Heat Stress Prevention Program when the action levels
for hot conditions in the Personal Monitoring Table and/or the WBGT are exceeded.
Heat Stress Engineering Controls
The following engineering controls will be implemented before and in combination with work practices.
General Ventilation
General ventilation will be used where feasible and practical to dilute hot air with cooler air. Portable or
local exhaust systems will be provided for small areas where general ventilation is not feasible or
practical. If the dry bulb temperature is higher than 35°C (95°F) and the air is dry, evaporative cooling
may be improved by air movement. When the dry bulb temperature exceeds 35°C and the relative
humidity is 100%, air movement will make the worker hotter and forced ventilation will not be used to
alleviate heat stress.
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HEAT STRESS PREVENTION
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Fans
Fans will be provided where general ventilation is insufficient or impractical and when evaporative
cooling will be improved by air movement.
Air Cooling or Conditioning
Air cooling or conditioning systems will be provided where feasible and practical.
Shields
Shields may be used to reduce radiant heat (i.e., heat coming from hot surfaces) for surfaces that exceed
35°C (95°F) within the worker's line of sight. Cooler surfaces surrounding the worker assist in cooling
because the worker's body radiates heat toward them. The reflective surface of the shield will be kept
clean to maintain its effectiveness.
Insulation
Heating pipes will be insulated or otherwise shielded to reduce radiant heat.
Cool Room
Cool rooms will be used as a recovery area near hot jobs.
Heat Stress Prevention Work Practices
Work practices will be implemented to reduce the risk of elevating an employee’s core body temperature.
Heat stress prevention practices that may be implemented individually or in combination include:
- Employee work and rest intervals.
- Continual personal monitoring of physiological signs of heat stress.
- Provide cool liquids.
- Establish and implement acclimatization schedules.
- Use warm-weather cooling garments.
- Reduce the physical demands of work, e.g., excessive lifting or digging with heavy objects.
- Provide recovery areas such as air-conditioned enclosures and rooms.
- Use shifts such as early morning, cool part of the day, or night work.
- Use intermittent rest periods with water breaks.
- Use relief workers.
- Use worker pacing.
- Assign extra workers and limit worker occupancy, or the number of workers present, especially in
confined or enclosed spaces.
- Schedule work in hot conditions for the cooler part of the day.
- Schedule routine maintenance and repair work in hot areas for the cooler seasons of the year.
EMERGENCY RESPONSE
The Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager will implement the following emergency response
procedures for the type of heat stress indicated.
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HEAT STRESS PREVENTION
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Heat Stroke
If a worker shows signs of possible heat stroke, professional medical treatment will be obtained
immediately. The supervisor or co-workers will take the following steps to treat a worker with heat
stroke:
• Call 911 and notify the supervisor.
• Move the sick worker to a cool, shaded area.
• Cool the worker using methods such as soaking his or her clothes with water, spraying, sponging,
or showering him or her with water, and fanning his or her body.
• The worker should be placed in a shady area and the outer clothing should be removed. The
worker’s skin should be wetted and air movement around the worker should be increased to
improve evaporative cooling until professional methods of cooling are initiated and the
seriousness of the condition can be assessed. Fluids should be replaced as soon as possible. The
medical outcome of an episode of heat stroke depends on the victim’s physical fitness and the
timing and effectiveness of first-aid treatment. Regardless of the worker’s protests, no employee
suspected of being ill from heat stroke should be sent home or left unattended unless a physician
has specifically approved such an order.
6
Heat Exhaustion
Heat exhaustion responds readily to prompt treatment. A worker suffering from heat exhaustion should:
• Rest in a cool, shaded, or air-conditioned area.
• Drink plenty of water or other cool, nonalcoholic beverages.
• Take a cool shower, bath, or sponge bath.
• Workers suffering from heat exhaustion will be removed from the hot environment and given fluid
replacement. They will also be encouraged to get adequate rest. Regardless of the worker’s
protests, employee suspected of heat exhaustion should stop all activity, and sit in a cool place,
seek medical attention as needed
6
Heat Syncope (Fainting)
Workers who exhibit signs of heat syncope will be instructed by a supervisor or co-workers to:
• Sit or lie down in a cool place when they begin to feel symptoms.
• Slowly drink water, clear juice, or a sports beverage.
• Workers suffering from heat syncope (fainting) will be removed from the hot environment and
given fluid replacement. They will also be encouraged to get adequate rest.
• Regardless of the worker’s protests, employee suspected of heat syncope (fainting) should stop all
activity, and sit in a cool place, seek medical attention as needed
6
Heat Cramps
Workers with heat cramps should:
• Stop all activity, and sit in a cool place.
• Drink clear juice or a sports beverage.
• Not return to strenuous work for a few hours after the cramps subside, because further exertion
may lead to heat exhaustion or heat stroke.
• Seek medical attention if the worker has heart problems, the worker is on a low-sodium diet, or the
cramps do not subside within one hour.
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Page 8 of 9
HEAT STRESS PREVENTION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Heat Rash
Workers experiencing heat rash will be treated according to the following procedures:
• Directed to work in a cooler, less humid environment when possible.
• Keep the affected area dry.
• Use dusting powder to help increase comfort.
TRAINING
All employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to heat stress will receive training regarding heat
stress-related injuries and illnesses and prevention measures at the time of assignment to work activities
that involve hot conditions. The following topics will be covered during safety training for heat stress:
- Knowledge of the hazards of heat stress, including environmental factors that might contribute to
the risk of heat-related illness (temperature, humidity, radiant heat, air movement, conductive heat
sources, workload activity and duration, and personal protective equipment).
- Recognition of predisposing factors, danger signs, and symptoms (e.g., age, degree
acclimatization, medical conditions, consuming alcohol, caffeine use, nicotine use, and use of
medications that affect the body’s response to heat).
- The importance of frequent drinking of small quantities of water.
- Awareness of first-aid procedures for heat stroke and other heat stress-related illnesses.
- The procedure for reporting signs and symptoms of heat-related illness in themselves and coworkers.
- Employee responsibilities in avoiding heat stress.
- The importance of acclimatization.
- Dangers of using drugs, including therapeutic ones, and alcohol in hot work environments.
- Use of protective clothing and equipment, including the importance of removing heat-retaining
PPE, such as non-breathable chemical resistant clothing, during breaks.
- First aid and other emergency response procedures
Refresher Training
Personnel covered by this Program will receive refresher heat stress training at least once per year, and
whenever there is a change in work assignment or hot conditions, or when a new heat source is introduced
to a work area.
RECORDKEEPING
Heat stress-related illnesses that are relieved by first aid and do not require additional medical treatment
will not be recorded in injury and illness records.
Heat stress-related illnesses that require medical treatment beyond first aid will be recorded as an illness
on injury and illness recordkeeping forms. For example, the administration of fluids by intravenous
injections is recordable as medical treatment, and more serious cases of heat disorders involving such
injections will be entered into the injury and illness records. In addition, any diagnosis by a physician or
other licensed healthcare professional of heat syncope (fainting due to heat) will be recorded.
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Page 9 of 9
HEAT STRESS PREVENTION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
DEFINITIONS
Acclimatization or acclimate is the physiological (i.e., physical, mechanical, and biochemical) change that
allows the human body to adapt or get used to the effects of a new physical environment or climate. After
a period of acclimatization, the same physical activity will produce fewer cardiovascular demands. The
worker will sweat more efficiently, causing better evaporative cooling, and thus will more easily be able
to maintain normal body temperatures.
Calorie is the amount of heat required to raise 1 gram of water 1°Celcius (C) (based on a standard
temperature of 16.5 to 17.5°C).
Conduction is the transfer of heat between materials that contact each other. Heat passes from the warmer
material to the cooler material. For example, a worker’s skin can transfer heat to a contacting surface if
that surface is cooler, and vice versa.
Convection is the transfer of heat in a moving fluid. Air flowing past the body can cool the body if the air
temperature is cool. On the other hand, air that exceeds 35°C (95° Fahrenheit (F)) can increase the heat
load on the body.
Dry bulb (DB) temperature is the measurement of the heat content of freely exposed air measured by a
thermal sensor that is shielded from direct radiant energy sources.
Evaporative cooling takes place when sweat evaporates from the skin. High humidity reduces the rate of
evaporation and thus reduces the effectiveness of the body’s primary cooling mechanism.
Globe temperature is the temperature inside a blackened, hollow, thin copper globe.
Heat is a measure of energy that is transferred by a difference in temperature.
Metabolic heat is a by-product of the body’s activity.
Natural wet bulb (NWB) temperature is measured by exposing a wet sensor, such as a wet cotton wick
fitted over the bulb of a thermometer, to the effects of evaporation and convection. The term “natural”
refers to the movement of air around the sensor.
Radiation is the transfer of heat energy through space. A worker whose body temperature is greater than
the temperature of the surrounding surfaces radiates heat to these surfaces. Hot surfaces and infrared light
sources radiate heat that can increase the body’s heat load.
PRGORAM REVIEW AND UPDATE
This Plan will be periodically reviewed and updated when:
- New activities or equipment that creates heat stress are introduced into the workplace.
- Evaluations of heat stress hazards, injuries, and illnesses demonstrate that the current Plan is
outdated or not effective.
- Regulatory or applicable national consensus standards change that require this Plan to be updated.
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Page 1 of 4
LADDER SAFETY
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
PURPOSE AND SCOPE
This program establishes the training, inspection and operating requirements concerning the use of
portable ladders used at Kent County Delaware Governmental Body (referred to from this point forward
as “Kent County”). This program applies to all employees and contractors working on any site owned or
operated by Kent County
RESPONSIBILITIES
Kent County Health & Safety Officer or His/Her Assistant with the coordination of the Personnel
Director/Human Resource Manager, Department Director(s)/Manager(s) and/or Division
Supervisors’/Managers’ will be responsible for the following:
- Developing specific policies and procedures pertaining to the operation and maintenance of
company ladders.
- Implementation of employee training based on the general principles of ladder safety and their
inspections.
Managers and supervisors are responsible for:
- Arraigning for training of employees who use portable ladders in their departments.
- Ensuring that the ladders under their responsibility are properly inspected and maintained in a safe
operating condition using the form below.
Employees are responsible for:
- Using portable ladders in a safe manner.
- Inspecting ladders in their areas and completing the inspection form in (Appendix # 2).
- Reporting equipment defects and/or maintenance needs to their supervisors immediately.
TRAINING REQUIREMENTS
Kent County will provide training to ensure that all managers, supervisors and employees understand the
purpose and function of this program and general Ladder Safety.
Training will be as follows:
• Initial Training: Training that is conducted by Department Director(s)/Manager(s) and/or Division
Supervisors’/Managers’ for all new employees. This training will be conducted within 5 days of
employment.
• General Refresher Training: General regulatory overview conducted every three years by Department
Director for all managers, supervisors and employees within their deparment.
• Training Records: Training records are filed with Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager and
will be maintained for 3 years from the date on which the training occurred.
• Training Requirements: Employees will be trained to recognize hazards related to ladders. In
addition, employees will be trained on the maximum intended load-carrying capacities of ladders; the
proper placement of ladders and inspection criteria.
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Page 2 of 4
LADDER SAFETY
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
EQUIPMENT INSPECTIONS
New or Modified Equipment Safety Inspection: An inspection of new or modified ladder is performed
by Division Safety Coordinator and/or Supervisor.
Pre-Use Inspections: Portable ladders will be inspected prior to use to verify the equipment is safe to
operate. If at any time the ladder is found to be in unsafe, the employee will immediately notify his/her
supervisor and remove the equipment from service.
Periodic Inspection: Annual inspections are performed for each ladder in accordance with the
manufacturer’s recommendations by Division Safety Coordinator and/or Supervisor.
- The results of the new equipment and periodic inspections will be documented and retained by
Division Supervisor for 12 months for recordkeeping purposes.
- Ladders identified with defects shall be withdrawn from service for manufactures authorized
repairs. If manufacture authorized repairs cannot be preformed the ladder shall be destroyed. Any
requirements for repair or replacement of the equipment or its components will need to be rectified
prior to that ladder being returned for use.
PROGRAM REVIEW
This program will be reviewed by the safety committee within 12 months of the last review dated. Any
changes made to this document will be noted by a modification to the Revision Number.
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Page 3 of 4
LADDER SAFETY
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
(Appendix # 1)
LADDER INVENTORY
LADDER TYPE
CLASS
LOCATION
DRAFT
Page 4 of 4
LADDER SAFETY
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
(Appendix # 2)
PORTABLE LADDER INSPECTION GUIDE
Date
Employee
Ladder#
Type
Department
Comments
Are all the rungs, cleats, or steps in good condition?
Are the side rails intact without any cracks, bends, or
breaks?
Do the rungs, cleats, or steps fit snuggly into the side
rails?
Is the ladder free of corrosion?
Are the side rails and steps free of oil or grease?
Are the ladder's hardware and fittings secure and
undamaged?
Do moveable parts operate freely without binding or
excessive play?
Are the ropes on extension ladders intact without fraying
or excessive wear?
Are damaged ladders removed from service that are
beyond manufactures authorized repairs and destroyed?
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Page 1 of 5
LOCKOUT / TAGOUT
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
PURPOSE AND SCOPE
This Program applies to the control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout) during the servicing and/or
maintenance of machines and equipment used at Kent County Delaware Governmental Body (referred to
from this point forward as “Kent County”). This program applies to all employees and contractors
working on any site owned or operated by Kent County. The purpose of this Program is to provide
procedures that will ensure employees are not injured due to the unexpected start-up of machinery and
equipment during servicing and/or maintenance. All authorized and affected employees, as defined
below, are covered by the scope of this procedure.
RESPONSIBILITIES
Authorized Employees are responsible for following the necessary Lockout/Tagout Procedures when
servicing or maintaining equipment.
Affected and Other Employees are responsible for observing all warning tags and for not attempting to
operate any machinery or equipment that is being serviced and is in a lockout condition.
Department/Division Supervisors are responsible for enforcing this procedure, making sure that
authorized and/or affected employees in their departments understand and follow this procedure.
DEFINITIONS
Hazardous Energy: Potentially harmful and/or dangerous sudden uncontrolled released or activated
stored energy from a number of power sources (i.e.: electrical, hydraulic, powder, pneumatic, gas, water,
steam, fuel, pressurized systems, compressed metal coil/spring, etc.).
Authorized Employee: A person who locks out or tags out machines or equipment in order to perform
servicing or maintenance.
Affected Employee: An employee whose job requires him/her to operate or use or work in an area where
a machine or equipment is serviced or maintained under lockout/tagout.
Energy Isolating Device: A device that physically prevents the transmission or release of energy.
Examples include electrical circuit breakers, disconnect switches, line valves, etc. Push buttons, selector
switches, etc. are not energy isolating devices.
Lockout Device: A device that uses a positive means, such as a lock, to hold an energy isolating device in
a safe position and prevent the energizing of a machine or equipment.
Lockout: The placement of a lockout device on an energy isolating device ensuring that the equipment
being controlled can not be operated until the lockout device is removed.
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Page 2 of 5
LOCKOUT / TAGOUT
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
GENERAL PROCEDURE
Equipment specific lockout/tagout procedures have been developed and will be used when working on or
servicing equipment. The equipment specific procedures follow the General Procedure defined below
and will have additional information relevant to that particular piece of equipment.
De-Energization
- Review Machine-Specific Lockout/Tagout Procedure for the machine to be serviced and locked
out.
- Notify the Machine/Equipment Operator and other Affected Employees that the machine is to be
locked out for service.
- Shut down the machine/equipment using the normal stopping methods (e.g. depress stop button,
etc.).
- De-activate the energy isolating device(s) so that the machine is isolated from its power source(s).
- Apply locks/lockout devices to each energy-isolating device(s). All authorized employees working
on the machine/equipment must apply their own lock, remove the key and keep the key in their
possession for the duration of the lockout.
- Dissipate, release, restrain, block, and bleed, etc. any residual or stored energy as indicated in the
Machine-Specific Energy Control Working Standard for the machine to be serviced.
- Sign and date a warning tag and place one at each point of energy isolation.
- Verify that the energy source is de-energized by attempting to operate the machine/equipment
using the normal operating controls (start button, etc.), by observing appropriate drops in pressure
gauges, or by using a voltage meter to measure the voltage present.
- After verifying that the machine/equipment does not operate, return the operating controls to the
“neutral” or “off” position and service the machine as required.
Re-Energization
-
Once servicing is complete, remove all tools, spare parts, etc. from the machine/equipment.
Re-install all machine/equipment guards.
Make sure all employees are clear of the machine/equipment.
Notify all affected employees that the lockout is about to be removed and the machine/equipment is
about to be re-energized.
- All authorized employees remove their own lock(s). No one may remove another employee’s lock
with the following exception. If the authorized employee who installed the lock is not available
when the work is completed, the Department/Division Supervisor may remove this lock only after
all of the following conditions have been met:
- It is verified that the employee is not on site
- All reasonable efforts are made to contact the employee and notify him/her that the lock is
being removed
- The employee is made aware of the removal of the lock before he/she resumes work on site
- The authorized employee(s) re-energize the machine at the main power source(s).
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Page 3 of 5
LOCKOUT / TAGOUT
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
SHIFT OR PERSONNEL CHANGES
Whenever one authorized employee takes over for another authorized employee during a lockout situation
(i.e. shift change), the person who is taking over the job shall apply his/her lock(s) before the employee
who is leaving the job removes his/her lock(s).
Exchanging keys and using the same locks is not an acceptable means to comply with this section.
LOCKOUT/TAGOUT EQUIPMENT
A number of Authorized Employees are assigned individually identifiable locks (see sample List of
Authorized Employees at end of document). These locks are for use only by the person to whom it has
been assigned and only for lockout purposes. It is each Authorized Employee’s responsibility to store and
use these locks properly. Additional locks can be obtained from the Lockout Stations.
CONTRACTORS
When an outside contractor needs to perform service or maintenance on equipment that needs to be
locked out, the manager authorizing the contract work must first review this Lockout/Tagout procedure,
with the contractor.
The manager is then responsible for making sure that the contractor complies with the minimal
requirements of this procedure. When appropriate, the manager will provide the equipment specific
procedures to the contractor.
OUT OF SERVICE EQUIPMENT
If a piece of equipment is not under repair, but is out of service, a lock and an “Out-of-Service” tag will
be applied. The out of service locks will not be the same locks used for lockout. Out of Service tags will
be black and yellow letters on yellow background and have the words “Out-of-Service” printed on both
sides.
TRAINING
Upon initial job assignment, Authorized Employees shall receive training on the proper use of energy
control procedures. Training will include;
- The recognition of applicable hazardous energy sources
- The type and magnitude of the energy available in the workplace
- The methods and means necessary for energy isolation and control
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Page 4 of 5
LOCKOUT / TAGOUT
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Affected Employees and other employees who may be in areas where energy control procedures are used
shall be instructed in;
- The purpose of this procedure
- The means to recognize lockout situations
- The prohibition relating to attempts to restart or reenergize machines or equipment which are
locked out or tagged out
When tagout systems are used, employees will be trained on the limitations of these systems. Training
will include;
- Tags are warning devices that may evoke a false sense of security and do not provide the physical
restraints of a lock
- Tags are not to be removed except by the authorized person responsible for attaching the tag
- Tags are not to be defeated, removed or bypassed
- Tags must be legible and understandable
- Tags and their means of attachment must be durable to withstand the environmental conditions
encountered in the workplace
- Tags must be securely attached to energy isolating devices
Training is conducted:
- At the time of initial job assignment
- When changes in job assignments present new hazards
- When there are changes in the energy control procedures
- When the Annual Audit reveals inadequacies in employees’ use or knowledge of the energy control
procedures
_____________________________________________________________________________________
SAMPLE (Page 3)
AUTHORIZED EMPLOYEES ARE ASSIGNED INDIVIDUALLY IDENTIFIABLE LOCKS
EMPLOYEE NAME
LOCK NO.
KEY NO.
LOCK/KEY COLOR
EMPLOYEE PHOTO
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Page 5 of 5
LOCKOUT / TAGOUT
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
MINIMUM LOCKOUT/TAGOUT PROCEDURES CHECKLIST
0
Is all machinery or equipment de-energized or disengaged and blocked or locked out during
cleaning, servicing, adjusting, or setting up operations?
0
Is equipment disconnected form the electrical control circuit?
0
Are all appropriate electrical enclosures identified?
0
Has all control circuits been disconnected and locked out?
0
Are all equipment control valve handles provided with a means of locking out?
0
Has all Hazardous Stored Energy been released or blocked before equipment is locked out?
0
Are all appropriate employees provided with individually keyed personal safety locks?
0
Does employee who installed the lock(s) have control of their key(s)?
0
Can quick identification of employees who are working on locked-out equipment be made?
0
Has safety of lockout procedure been checked (tested) by attempting a startup after making
sure no one is exposed?
0
0
Return operating control(s) to “neutral” or “off” position after the test
Has the “Control Circuit Stop Button” been pushed before re-energizing the main power
switch?
0
Are a sufficient number of accident prevention signs or tags and safety padlocks on had for
emergency repairs?
0
0
Do all tagout device attachment meet the following requirements:
0
Be able to be affixed by hand?
0
Be non-reusable?
0
Be self-locking?
0
Requires a minimum unlocking strength of 50 pounds?
Have guards have been reinstalled before the removal of all lockout or tagout devices?
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Page 1 of 2
MACHINE GUARDING
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
PURPOSE AND SCOPE
The purpose of this procedure is to protect all Kent County Delaware Governmental Body (referred to
from this point forward as “Kent County”).employees from injury caused by machinery by ensure that all
machines and machine guarding conforms to the standards set forth by Occupational Safety & Health
Administration (OSHA) and American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and industry groups. Any
machine part, function, or process that may cause injury will be safeguarded. Guarding should protect the
operator and other employees in the machine area from hazards such as those created by point of
operation, ingoing nip points, rotating parts, flying chips, and sparks.
RESPONSIBILITIES
New Equipment: Before purchase any new equipment the Kent County Department Director/Manager
with the coordination of the Health & Safety Officer or His/Her Assistant will review all specifications to
ensure that the guards are suitable and that there are no unguarded moving parts. They will also
determine whether the equipment meets all regulatory requirements. When they are satisfied, they will
sign off on the purchase of the equipment.
Existing Equipment: The Department Director/Manager or Division Supervisior will keep all
specifications and designs for each machine on file. If a machine needs to be modified or retrofitted with
new guards, the manufacturer will be contacted for guidance on correct procedures. If the changes are to
be made in-house, the & Safety Officer or His/Her Assistant will approve and sign in-house request for
changes.
Supervisors will ensure that:
- Employees do not remove or bypass any machine guards. If a machine guard is damaged,
bypassed, or missing, the supervisor will ensure that the machine is taken out of service until the
problem is corrected.
- Employees wear proper PPE while operating the machines.
- Employees receive initial training on the machine operations and additional training when there
are any changes or as needed.
Employees should never bypass or remove machine guards. Employees are not permitted to wear loose
clothing or jewelry while operating the machines.
Employees should immediately notify their supervisors if they notice any unguarded moving parts or
dangerous points of operation. Work must stop and the machine shut down until the condition is
corrected.
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Page 2 of 2
MACHINE GUARDING
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
PROCEDURES
Guards
- Machine guards must prevent any part of an operator’s body from coming in contact with moving
parts and must prevent chips or pieces of material from flying off of the machine.
- Guards should be affixed to the machine whenever possible.
- Guards should not be an impediment that would encourage employees to bypass the system.
- Employees should be able to perform minor maintenance tasks, such as lubricating, without
removing the guards.
- Overhead belts, pulleys, or fans 7 feet or less above ground must be guarded.
- Pressure sensing device initiation (PSDI) must be certified and validated.
Machines
- All electrical machinery must be properly grounded.
- Machinery should be bolted to the floor, if possible, to prevent movement.
- Power controls and operating controls should be located within easy reach of the operator.
- Foot pedals, levers, and other start-up controls must be protected to prevent unintentional start-up
of the machine.
INSPECTIONS
Machines and guards will be inspected by the operator prior to use. In addition, the Safety Coordinator
will conduct a monthly inspection of machine and safe guards to ensure that they are in place and
positioned properly to ensure protection of operators and those work in the surrounding area.
TRAINING
Employees who work on or around machines will be trained on the proper operation and inspection of the
equipment and guards. This training will include how to handle minor servicing tasks, such as oiling or
clearing a jam, without endangering themselves and others.
All training shall be documented and documentation shall be maintained by the supervisor for three years.
Documentation shall consist of the printed name of trainer, trainee, date of training, type of training and
signature of trainee and trainer.
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Page 1 of 4
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
PURPOSE AND SCOPE
The purpose of the Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) procedure is to protect Kent County Delaware
Governmental Body (referred to from this point forward as “Kent County”) employees from the risk of injury
by creating a barrier against workplace hazards. PPE is not a substitute for engineering or administrative
controls or work practices, but should be used in conjunction with these controls to ensure the safety and
health of employees. PPE will be provided and/or replaced by Kent County, utilized by employees, and
maintained and inspected by employees when it has been determined that its use is required to lessen the
likelihood of occupational injury and/or illness.
This program addresses body, eye, face, head, foot, and hand protection. It does not include hearing
protection or respiratory protection, since these items are covered under separate programs.
RESPONSIBILITIES
Department Director(s)/Manager(s) and/or Division Supervisors’/Managers’ are responsible for the
development and administration of the PPE program that includes the following:
- Ensuring that workplace hazard assessments are conducted to determine the presence of hazards
that necessitate the use of PPE.
- Ensuring the workplace hazard assessments are evaluated at least every two years.
- Ensuring that employee training is provided.
- Ensuring that an annual review, update, and evaluation on the overall effectiveness of the PPE
program is conducted.
Division Supervisor/Manager is responsible for the implementation of the program including the
following items:
- Obtaining the appropriate PPE and making it available to employees.
- Ensuring that employees are properly trained in the use and care of PPE.
- Ensuring that the PPE program elements are followed.
- Seeking assistance to evaluate workplace hazards, if needed.
- Ensuring that defective or damaged equipment is immediately replaced.
Employees are responsible for:
- Insuring PPE that has been issued to an individual employee and subsequently contacts with
bodily fluids (salvia, perspiration, urine, etc.) from that same employee is not utilized by other
employees; but is only utilized by the originally issued employee.
- Wearing PPE, as required;
- Attending required training sessions;
- Caring for, cleaning, and maintaining PPE; and
- Informing supervisors if repairs or replacement are necessary.
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Page 2 of 4
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT HAZARD ASSESSMENTS
A hazard assessment of each work area has been and shall be conducted to identify sources of hazards and
the required PPE. The assessment shall be documented (See Appendix A) and identifies the work area
evaluated, the person conducting the evaluation, the findings of potential hazards, the required PPE, and
date of the evaluation. The Hazard Assessment will be updated when new hazard are introduced or at
least every two years.
INSPECTION, STORAGE, AND MAINTENANCE
Before using protective clothing these procedures should be followed:
- Determine if the PPE is appropriate for the specified task at hand.
- Visually inspect the PPE for proper size, imperfect seams, tears or holes, signs of shelf
deterioration, or stiffness that may have resulted from exposure to chemicals.
- Protective clothing should also be periodically inspected during use for evidence of chemical
attack such as discoloration, swelling, stiffening and softening; tears; punctures; or torn seams.
Clothing and other PPE must be stored properly to prevent damage or malfunction due to dust,
moisture, sunlight, chemicals, extreme temperatures, and impact. Many equipment failures can
be directly attributed to improper storage. All PPE will be stored according to the manufacturer's
recommendation.
CLEANING
It is important that all PPE be kept clean and properly maintained. Cleaning is particularly
important for eye and face protection where dirty or fogged lenses could impair vision. PPE
should be inspected, cleaned, and maintained at regular intervals so that the PPE provides the
required level of protection. It is also important to ensure that contaminated PPE is disposed of
in a manner that protects employees from exposure to hazards.
REUSE OF PPE
If protective clothing is to be reused, it should be noted that chemicals that have begun to
permeate the material might not be removable during decontamination. As a result, the
chemicals may continue to diffuse through the clothing. This could present the hazard of direct
skin contact to the next person who uses the PPE.
To prevent the reuse of contaminated clothing, the material should be examined thoroughly for
discoloration or any other evidence of contamination. Samples of clothing intended for reuse
can also be submitted for laboratory testing to verify visual observations.
In some instances, contaminated protective clothing can be stored for reuse without cleaning.
This assumes that the contaminants pose no threat to the workers health or safety. Clothing
meeting these criteria should be stored in a separate area with adequate ventilation.
Generally, reuse decisions must be based on known permeation rates as well as the toxicity of
the contaminants(s). Extreme care must be taken to ensure that the contaminants are harmless or
that the clothing is properly decontaminated without being damaged.
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Page 3 of 4
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
TRAINING
Any worker required to wear PPE will receive training in the proper use and care of PPE. The
training will include, but not be limited to, the following subjects:
-
When PPE is necessary
What PPE is necessary
How to properly wear PPE
Limitations of PPE
Proper care, maintenance, useful life and disposal of PPE
When there is reason to believe that an employee who has already been trained, does not
demonstrate that they understand the components of the PPE program and how to use the PPE
properly, then that employee will be retrained. Circumstances where retraining is required
include, but are not limited to situations where:
-
Changes in the workplace render previous training obsolete
Changes in the types of PPE to be used render previous training obsolete
Inadequacies in an affected employee’s knowledge or use of assigned PPE indicate that the
employee did not retain the requisite understanding or skill.
A written certification that verifies that each affected employee has received and understood the
required training will be maintained for a period of 5 years. The records will include employee
name and date of training.
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Page 4 of 4
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
(Appendix A)
PPE HAZARD ASSESSMENT
Location:
Task
Date of Assessment:
Hazards Identified
Controls
Date Verified:
PPE
Eyes:
Hands:
Feet:
Head:
Hearing:
Resp:
Other:
Eyes:
Hands:
Feet:
Head:
Hearing:
Resp:
Other:
I certify that the above PPE Hazard Assessment was completed and is true and accurate to the best of my knowledge.
Name:
Title:
Signature:
Date:
Notes
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RESPIRATORY PROTECTION
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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PURPOSE AND SCOPE
This program is designed to ensure that Kent County Delaware Governmental Body (referred to
from this point forward as “Kent County”) employees are provided with a safe and healthy work
environment. This will be accomplished by ensuring that all equipment and processes have
feasible safeguards incorporated into their design. Respiratory protection will be used only when
effective engineering or administrative controls or work practices are not feasible. This program
has been developed to assure appropriate respiratory protection for Kent County employees.
Kent County’s Program follows or exceeds the Occupational Safety and Health Administration
(OSHA) Respiratory Protection Standards (29 CFR 1910.134 and 29 CFR 1926.103).
Kent County shall provide respirators when such equipment is necessary to protect the health of
Kent County employees. The respirator provided must be suitable for its intended purpose.
RESPONSIBILITIES
Program Administrator:
The program administrator (Department Director/Manager and/or Division Supervisor/Manager)
under the oversight of the Kent County Health & Safety Officer or His/Her Assistant is
responsible for establishing and maintaining a respiratory protection program within their field of
control. The program administrator will implement a Respiratory Protection Program that is
approved by the Kent County Health & Safety Officer or His/Her Assistant and designed and
organized to ensure respirators are properly selected, used, and maintained.
The program administrator is also responsible for evaluating those tasks for which respiratory
protection may be needed, determine whether engineering or administrative controls are feasible,
and will specify which respiratory protection device that is to be used for each task. In addition,
the program administrator will ensure that personnel receive training in the selection and use of
respiratory protective devices, ensure employees are physically capable of wearing a respirator,
will conduct fit testing, and will issue necessary protective devices as needed.
Respirator Users:
It is the responsibility of each respirator user to wear his/her respirator in the manner in which
they were trained. Respirator wearers must report any malfunctions of the respirator to his/her
supervisor immediately. The wearer must also guard against mechanical damage to the
respirator, clean the respirator as instructed, and store the respirator in a clean, sanitary location.
Respiratory Protection Equipment
Respirators are devices that protect employees form inhaling harmful substances, including
chemical, biological, and radiological agents. These substances can be in the form of airborne
vapors, gases, dust, fogs, fumes, mists, smokes, or sprays. Some respirators also ensure that
employees do not breath air that contains dangerously low levels of oxygen or that is otherwise
immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH), (e.g., life-threatening exposures during interior
structural firefighting.) Respirators may be used to provide protection during routine operations
where engineering controls and work practices are not able to provide sufficient protection form
these hazards, or in emergencies.
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RESPIRATORY PROTECTION
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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In situations in which employees are exposed to harmful airborne hazards, respirators must “seal
off” and isolate the user’s respiratory system from the contaminated environment. The risk that a
user will experience an adverse health outcome when relying on respiratory protection is a
function f the toxicity or hazardous nature of the air contaminants in the air, the duration of
exposure and the degree of isolation provided by the respirator. When respirators fail or do not
provide the degree of protection expected by the user, the user is placed at an increased risk of
nay adverse health effects that are associated with exposure to the respiratory hazards present.
Furthermore, the margin for error in immediately dangerous to life or health atmospheres is slight
or nonexistent because an equipment malfunction or employee mistake can, without warning,
expose the employee to an atmosphere incapable of supporting human life. Such exposure may
disable the employee and require an immediate rescue if the employee’s life is to be saved.
Therefore it is critical that respirators are properly selected and used in compliance with the
OSHA Respiratory Protection standard (29 CFR 1910.134).
Respirators provide protection from respiratory hazards only when they are properly selected and
used in compliance with the OSHA Respiratory Protection Standard (29 CFR 1910.134 and 29
CFR 1926.103)
Medical Evaluation
Kent County’s Administrator will provide a medical questionnaire to employees who are required
or request to wear an elastomeric type facepiece respirator (half or full face). An Occupational
Health Provider will make a determination, based on the questionnaire, as to whether that
employee is physically capable to wear a respirator. This may require a physical examination if
deemed appropriate by the Occupational Health Provider. Records of all medical evaluations will
be kept on file.
Kent County shall provide a medical evaluation before the employee is fit tested and uses a
respirator in any workplace for the first time. When an employee voluntarily wears a dust mask
(filtering facepiece respirator), no medical examination is required.
Accepted Fit Test Protocols
Kent County’s Personnel/Human Resource Director/Manager shall provide fit testing using the
following procedures.
The test subject shall be allowed to pick the most acceptable respirator from a sufficient number
of respirator models and sizes so that the respirator is acceptable to, and correctly fits, the user.
Prior to the selection process, the test subject shall be shown how to put on a respirator, how it
should be positioned on the face, how to set strap tension and how to determine an acceptable fit.
A mirror shall be available to assist the subject in evaluating the fit and positioning of the
respirator. This instruction may not constitute the subject's formal training on respirator use,
because it is only a review.
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RESPIRATORY PROTECTION
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
The test subject shall be informed that he/she is being asked to select the respirator that provides
the most acceptable fit. Each respirator represents a different size and shape, and if fitted and used
properly, will provide adequate protection.
The test subject shall be instructed to hold each chosen facepiece up to the face and eliminate
those that obviously do not give an acceptable fit.
The more acceptable facepieces are noted in case the one selected proves unacceptable; the most
comfortable mask is donned and worn at least five minutes to assess comfort. Assistance in
assessing comfort can be given. If the test subject is not familiar with using a particular
respirator, the test subject shall be directed to don the mask several times and to adjust the straps
each time to become adept at setting proper tension on the straps.
Assessment of comfort shall include a review of the following points with the test subject and
allowing the test subject adequate time to determine the comfort of the respirator:
Position of the mask on the nose
Room for eye protection
Room to talk
Position of mask on face and cheeks
The following criteria shall be used to help determine the adequacy of the respirator fit:
Chin properly placed
Adequate strap tension, not overly tightened
Fit across nose bridge
Respirator of proper size to span distance from nose to chin
Tendency of respirator to slip
Self-observation in mirror to evaluate fit and respirator position.
The test subject shall conduct a user seal check, either the negative and positive pressure seal
checks recommended by the respirator manufacturer which provide equivalent protection to the
procedures. Before conducting the negative and positive pressure checks, the subject shall be told
to seat the mask on the face by moving the head from side-to-side and up and down slowly while
taking in a few slow deep breaths. Another facepiece shall be selected and retested if the test
subject fails the user seal check tests.
The test shall not be conducted if there is any hair growth between the skin and the facepiece
sealing surface, such as stubble beard growth, beard, mustache or sideburns which cross the
respirator sealing surface. Any type of apparel which interferes with a satisfactory fit shall be
altered or removed.
If a test subject exhibits difficulty in breathing during the tests, she or he shall be referred to a
physician or other licensed health care professional, as appropriate, to determine whether the test
subject can wear a respirator while performing her or his duties.
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RESPIRATORY PROTECTION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
If the employee finds the fit of the respirator unacceptable, the test subject shall be given the
opportunity to select a different respirator and to be retested.
Exercise regimen. Prior to the commencement of the fit test, the test subject shall be given a
description of the fit test and the test subject's responsibilities during the test procedure. The
description of the process shall include a description of the test exercises that the subject will be
performing. The respirator to be tested shall be worn for at least 5 minutes before the start of the
fit test.
The fit test shall be performed while the test subject is wearing any applicable safety equipment
that may be worn during actual respirator use which could interfere with respirator fit.
Test Exercises. (The respirator shall not be adjusted once the fit test exercises begin. Any
adjustment voids the test, and the fit test must be repeated.)
(a) Employers must perform the following test exercises for all fit testing methods Kent County
must ensure that employees perform the test exercises in the appropriate test environment in the
following manner:
Normal breathing. in a normal standing position, without talking, the subject shall breathe
normally.
Deep breathing. In a normal standing position, the subject shall breathe slowly and deeply, taking
caution so as not to hyperventilate.
Turning head side to side. Standing in place, the subject shall slowly turn his/her head from side
to side between the extreme positions on each side. The head shall be held at each extreme
momentarily so the subject can inhale at each side.
Moving head up and down. Standing in place, the subject shall slowly move his/her head up and
down. The subject shall be instructed to inhale in the up position (i.e., when looking toward the
ceiling).
Talking. The subject shall talk out loud slowly and loud enough so as to be heard clearly by the
test conductor. The subject can read from a prepared text such as the Rainbow Passage, count
backward from 100, or recite a memorized poem or song.
Rainbow Passage: When the sunlight strikes raindrops in the air, they act like a prism and
form a rainbow. The rainbow is a division of white light into many beautiful colors. These
take the shape of a long round arch, with its path high above, and its two ends apparently
beyond the horizon. There is, according to legend, a boiling pot of gold at one end. People
look, but no one ever finds it. When a man looks for something beyond reach, his friends say
he is looking for the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.
Grimace. The test subject shall grimace by smiling or frowning
Bending over. The test subject shall bend at the waist as if he/she were to touch his/her toes.
Jogging in place shall be substituted for this exercise
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RESPIRATORY PROTECTION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
HAZARD ASSESSMENTS
Kent County Health & Safety Officer or His/Her Assistant will conduct annual industrial hygiene
studies to ensure that employee exposure levels remain below recommended Threshold Limit
Value established by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH).
Based upon previous industrial hygiene studies conducted at Kent County Employment Location,
it has been determined that exposure levels may or may not exceed threshold limit values
established by ACGIH. The program administrator will maintain a record of all air-monitoring
results.
The program administrator will ensure that additional air monitoring studies are conducted
whenever processes, equipment, or chemical or environmental applications change, or when there
is reason to believe exposure levels many be in excess of established safe levels.
VOLUNTARY RESPIRATOR PROGRAM
Based upon previous hazard assessments it has been determined that employee exposure levels
are (as of this publication date) well below those established by ACGIH. Although respiratory
protection is not required, Kent County recognizes that employees may request respiratory
protection on a voluntary basis to eliminate and control nuisance level odors. Employees shall be
provided with the information contained Appendix “D” of the Respiratory Protection Standard.
(See Tab in this Policy)
Although no chemical overexposure exists, Kent County will implement a voluntary respiratory
protection program to ensure the highest levels of safety and comfort for all employees. The
voluntary protection program will consist of the following:
Filtering Face Piece Respirators (i.e. Dust Masks)
Respirators are an effective method of protection against designated hazards when properly
selected and worn. Respirator use is encouraged, even when exposures are below the exposure
limit, to provide an additional level of comfort and protection for workers. However, if a
respirator is used improperly or not kept clean, the respirator itself can become a hazard to the
worker. Sometimes, workers may wear respirators to avoid exposures to hazards, even if the
amount of hazardous substance does not exceed the limits set by OSHA standards. If Kent
County provides respirators for voluntary use, or if the employee provides their own respirator,
the employee needs to take certain precautions to be sure that the respirator itself does not present
a hazard. The employee should do the following:
Read and heed all instructions provided by the manufacturer on use, maintenance, cleaning and
care, and warnings regarding the respirators limitations.
Choose respirators certified for use to protect against the contaminant of concern. NIOSH, the
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of the U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services, certifies respirators. A label or statement of certification should appear on the
respirator or respirator packaging. It will tell the employee what the respirator is designed for and
how much it will protect.
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RESPIRATORY PROTECTION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Employee shall not wear a respirator into atmospheres containing contaminants for which the
respirator is not designed to protect against. For example, a respirator designed to filter dust
particles will not protect you against gases, vapors, or very small solid particles of fumes or
smoke.
An employee is to keep track of their respirator so that they do not mistakenly use someone else's
respirator.
Elastomeric Facepiece Respirators (i.e. Full & Half Face Respirators with Straps)
Employees requesting full or half face respirator, or any type of respirator with an elastomeric
(rubber) facepiece will be provided with a medical evaluation, fit-testing and training consistent
with Accepted Fit Test Protocols
TRAINING
For the purposes of this voluntary protection program employees will be instructed / trained on
the following prior to being given a respirator:
- Provide the employee with the information contained in Appendix D (See Tab in this
policy)
- Respirator capabilities and limitations
- How to test for proper fit and seal each time the mask is worn. (Although the employee is
not being exposed to levels in excess of Permissible Exposure Levels a seal check is
recommended)
- How to properly clean, store, and maintain the respirator so the respirator itself does not
pose a hazard.
In addition, Kent County will provide training on respiratory protection during personal
protective equipment training on an annual basis.
PROGRAM EVALUATION
The overall respiratory protection program at Kent County will be reviewed annually. Any
program faults will be corrected immediately. The program administrator will ensure that the
program is updated to reflect any necessary changes.
The status of the voluntary protection program as defined in this policy will be reviewed each
year in accordance with Industrial Hygiene Survey results and recommendations.
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RESPIRATORY PROTECTION
Original Issue Date:
INSERT DATE
Last Reviewed:
INSERT DATE
Revision Number:
INSERT NUMBER
Appendix D to Sec. 1910.134 (Mandatory) Information for Employees Using Respirators
When Not Required Under the Standard
Respirators are an effective method of protection against designated hazards when properly
selected and worn. Respirator use is encouraged, even when exposures are below the exposure
limit, to provide an additional level of comfort and protection for workers. However, if a
respirator is used improperly or not kept clean, the respirator itself can become a hazard to the
worker. Sometimes, workers may wear respirators to avoid exposures to hazards, even if the
amount of hazardous substance does not exceed the limits set by OSHA standards. If your
employer provides respirators for your voluntary use, or if you provide your own respirator, you
need to take certain precautions to be sure that the respirator itself does not present a hazard.
You should do the following:
1. Read and heed all instructions provided by the manufacturer on use, maintenance, cleaning and
care, and warnings regarding the respirators limitations.
2. Choose respirators certified for use to protect against the contaminant of concern. NIOSH, the
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of the U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services, certifies respirators. A label or statement of certification should appear on the
respirator or respirator packaging. It will tell you what the respirator is designed for and how
much it will protect you.
3. Do not wear your respirator into atmospheres containing contaminants for which your
respirator is not designed to protect against. For example, a respirator designed to filter dust
particles will not protect you against gases, vapors, or very small solid particles of fumes or
smoke.
4. Keep track of your respirator so that you do not mistakenly use someone else's respirator.
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WELDING AND HOT WORK
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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PURPOSE AND SCOPE
This Welding and Hot Work Safety Plan addresses welding, cutting, brazing, and related hot work
operations capable of initiating fires or explosions, creating toxic fumes, or generating heat or
molten flying objects that could injure workers at Kent County Delaware Governmental Body
(referred to from this point forward as “Kent County”). This Plan does not cover additional
requirements for hot work operations in confined spaces or lockout/tagout procedures during hot
work. See the Confined Space Entry Plan and Lockout/Tagout Plan for more information about
such operations.
RESPONSIBILITIES
•
•
Plan Administrator. The Plan Administrator as assigned by Personnel Director/Human
Resource Manager or designee is responsible for the safe operation of welding and related hot
work activities, and developing and maintaining this written Plan. The Administrator or designee
will:
- Conduct hazard assessments for all work areas where hot work is performed and welding,
cutting, and brazing equipment is used and stored, and ensure that hazard assessments
conducted by contractors or consultants submit them to the Administrator or designee.
- Establish safe areas for cutting and welding, and establish procedures for cutting and welding
in other areas on the basis of fire potential and/or personnel harm within the facilities.
- Designate an individual responsible for authorizing cutting and welding operations in areas
not specifically designed for such processes.
- Ensure that cutters, welders, and their supervisors are suitably trained in the safe operation of
their equipment and the safe use of the process.
- Advise all contractors about flammable materials or hazardous conditions of which they may
not be aware.
Supervisor. The Supervisor will:
- Mark safe areas for cutting and welding, that were establish within the facilities and/or
operation area.
- Be responsible for the safe handling of the cutting or welding equipment and the safe use of
the cutting or welding process.
- Determine whether combustible materials are present or likely to be present in the work
location.
- Protect combustibles from ignition according to safe practices described in this Plan.
- Secure authorization for the cutting or welding operations from the Administrator or
designated representative.
- Ensure that the cutter, welder, or hot work operator secures the approval of the Supervisor
that conditions are safe before going ahead.
- Determine that fire protection and extinguishing equipment are properly located at the site.
- Ensure fire watch personnel are available at the site when required.
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WELDING AND HOT WORK
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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Operators of welding, cutting, or other hot work equipment. The cutter, welder, or hot work
operator will:
- Conduct hot work only after specific written approval from the Administrator or designee.
- Handle all hot work and related equipment safely and perform work so as not to endanger
lives and property.
- Cease hot work operations if unsafe conditions develop.
- Notify the Administrator or designee for reassessment of the situation in the event of
suspected unsafe conditions or concerns expressed by affected persons.
DEFINITIONS
•
•
•
Fire watch means an individual or individuals whose primary responsibility is the surveillance of
all exposed areas to ensure that safe conditions are maintained during hot work.
Hot work means any work involving burning, welding, cutting, brazing, or similar operations
capable of initiating fires, explosions, noxious fumes, or molten flying objects.
Hot work permit means written authorization to perform hot work operations (for example,
riveting, welding, cutting, burning, grinding, and heating) capable of providing a source of
ignition.
HAZARD ASSESSMENT
•
•
•
The Administrator or designee will ensure that a hazard assessment is conducted in each work
area where welding or other hot work operations are or may be performed. The assessment will
identify sources of hazards that could expose employees to high heat, light radiation, fumes,
molten flying objects, and combustion from sparks.
Each hazard assessment will identify hazards, recommend controls, and provide guidance on
appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) selections when a hazard control is not feasible
or satisfactory.
Hazard Assessment Procedure
Following is the process for evaluating the operations and tasks that present potential hazards to
employees conducting or working near welding or other hot work operations:
- Conduct a survey of each work area to assess if hazards are present, or are likely to be
present, for which hazard controls or PPE is needed. The Administrator will also provide
worksite evaluations of any operation at the request of a supervisor or employee.
- Review injury and illness records, the layout of the work areas, and the placement of workers
in the work areas.
- Collect and organize the data if available for each work area, and estimate the potential for
injuries according to the basic hazard categories and potential sources of injury and illness.
- Determine the type, level of risk, and seriousness of potential injury from each of the hazards
found in the work areas, and evaluate the possibility of exposure to several hazards.
- Categorize and record the hazards.
- Determine what type of engineering or administrative control and/or PPE will protect against
the hazards.
- Incorporate the results of the assessment and recommendations for protection into this Plan
and supplementary documents.
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WELDING AND HOT WORK
Original Issue Date:
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Last Reviewed:
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GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR HOT WORK PERSONNEL
•
•
Hot Work Operator
The hot work operator will:
- Be trained in the safe operation of his or her equipment and the safe use of the process.
- Have an awareness of the inherent risks involved and understand the emergency procedures
in the event of a fire.
- Handle the equipment safely and use it as described in this Plan and according to
manufacturer’s instructions so as not to endanger life or property.
- Get Administrator or designee approval before starting hot work operations and comply with
the requirements of this Plan or hot work permit.
- Cease hot work operations if unsafe conditions develop and notify the supervisor or the
Administrator for reassessment of the situation.
Fire Watch Personnel
Fire watch personnel will:
- Be present during hot work operations and remain for a minimum of 30 minutes after
completion of hot work in order to detect and extinguish smoldering fires.
- Be aware of the inherent hazards of the worksite and of the hot work.
- Ensure that safe conditions are maintained during hot work operations.
- Have the authority to stop the hot work operations if unsafe conditions develop.
- Have fire-extinguishing equipment readily available and be trained in its use.
- Be familiar with the facilities and procedures for sounding an alarm in the event of a fire.
- Watch for fires in all exposed areas surrounding the hot work operation and try to extinguish
them only when the fires are obviously within the capacity of the equipment and fire-fighting
skills available.
- Immediately contact professional fire fighting personnel (911), then contact Supervisor
and/or the Administrator if he or she determines that the fire may potentially become out of
control.
HOT WORK AREAS
•
•
Designated Safe Area
A designated safe area will be a specific area approved for indoor and/or outdoor welding or
other hot work, such as a maintenance shop or a detached outside location that is of
noncombustible or fire-resistive construction, essentially free of combustible and flammable
contents, and suitably segregated from adjacent areas. These designations are generally longterm for facilities in which specific hot work operations are repeatedly performed. A fire watch is
not normally required in a Designated and Marked Safe Area.
Marked Designated Safe Area
An active Welding and/or Hot Work Location or locations clearly visible to ground personnel
and/or equipment operators by signage, floor-markings, and shielding (if shielding is required).
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WELDING AND HOT WORK
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•
Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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Hot Work Permit-Required Area
A permit-required area will be a non-marked designated area that is made fire-safe by removing
or protecting combustibles from ignition sources and where protective controls and ventilation
are adequate to control worker exposure to heat, intense light, fumes, and flying objects.
HOT WORK PERMIT
•
•
•
Authorization. Only designees authorized by the Administrator may issue hot work permits.
- Before hot work operations begin in a non-marked designated area, a completed hot work
permit is required. Based on local conditions, the Administrator or designee must determine
the length of the period for which the hot work permit is valid.
Posting. A signed and dated copy of the hot work permit must be posted at the entrance to the
area where hot work operations are conducted under the permit.
General Hot Work Permit Requirements
The following standard safe work practices and site conditions must be confirmed by the
Administrator or designee before permitting hot work to begin:
- All hot work and related equipment (e.g., welding equipment, shields, PPE, fire
extinguishers) must be in satisfactory operating condition and in good repair.
- The floor and/or working area must be swept clean for a radius of 35 feet (ft) if combustible
materials such as paper or wood shavings are on the floor and/or working area.
- Combustible floors except wood on concrete must be kept wet or be covered with damp sand.
Where floors have been wet down, personnel operating arc welding or cutting equipment
must be protected from possible shock or be protected by noncombustible or fire and/or arc
flash-retardant shields.
- Combustible work areas outdoors must be protected from ground vegetation becoming the
source of an outdoor fire. A fire watch must remain vigilant and be aware of changing
weather conditions.
- All combustible materials must be moved at least 35 ft away from the hot work operation. If
relocation is impractical, combustibles must be protected with fire-retardant covers, shields,
or curtains. Edges of covers at the floor must be tight to prevent sparks from going under
them, including where several covers overlap when protecting a large pile.
- Openings or cracks in walls, floors, or ducts within 35 ft of the site must be tightly covered
with fire-retardant or noncombustible material to prevent the passage of sparks to adjacent
areas.
- If hot work is done near walls, partitions, ceilings, or roofs of combustible construction, fireretardant shields or guards must be provided to prevent ignition.
- If hot work is to be done on a wall, partition, ceiling, or roof, precautions must be taken to
prevent ignition of combustibles on the other side by relocating combustibles. If it is
impractical to relocate combustibles, a fire watch on the opposite side from the work must be
posted.
- Hot work must not be attempted on a partition, wall, ceiling, or roof that has a combustible
covering or insulation, or on walls or partitions of combustible sandwich-type panel
construction.
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WELDING AND HOT WORK
Original Issue Date:
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-
-
-
Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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Hot work that is performed on pipes or other metal that is in contact with combustible walls,
partitions, ceilings, roofs, or other combustibles must not be undertaken if the work is close
enough to cause ignition by conduction.
Fully charged and operable fire extinguishers that are appropriate for the type of possible fire
must be available immediately at the work area. These extinguishers should be supplied by
Kent County or the group/contractor performing the hot work. The fire extinguishers
normally located in a building are not considered to fulfill this requirement.
Special precautions must be taken to avoid accidental operation of automatic fire detection or
suppression systems (for example, special extinguishing systems or sprinklers).
Nearby personnel must be suitably protected and shielded against heat, sparks, and slag.
FIRE PREVENTION AND PROTECTION
•
•
•
•
All welding and other hot work operations will be conducted in compliance with the National
Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standard 51B, Standard for Fire Prevention During
Welding, Cutting, and Other Hot Work.
General Procedures
Following procedures must be completed before welding or other hot work operations begin:
- All movable fire hazards within 35 ft of a welding or other hot work operation must be
moved to a safe place if the object to be welded or cut cannot readily be moved.
- If the object to be welded or cut cannot be moved and if all the fire hazards cannot be
removed, then guards must be used to confine the heat, sparks, and slag, and to protect the
immovable fire hazards.
- Combustible material must be protected from exposure to sparks wherever there are floor
openings or cracks in the flooring, cracks or holes in walls, open doorways, and open or
broken windows that cannot be closed.
- Fire extinguishers or extinguishing equipment must be ready and available for instant use;
such equipment may consist of pails of water, buckets of sand, or hose or portable
extinguishers, depending on the nature and quantity of the combustible material exposed.
Prohibited Conditions for Hot Work
Hot work must not be permitted in the following areas until the conditions prohibiting hot work
have been modified:
- In the presence of explosive atmospheres, or in situations where explosive atmospheres may
develop inside contaminated or improperly prepared tanks or equipment which previously
contained flammable liquids
- In areas with an accumulation of combustible debris, dust, lint, and oily deposits
- In areas near the storage of exposed, readily ignitable materials such as combustibles
- On a container such as a barrel, drum, or tank that contained materials that will emit toxic
fumes when heated
- In a confined space, until the space has been inspected and determined to be safe
Administrative Precautions
Plant operations that might expose combustibles to ignition must not be scheduled to start during
welding and other hot work operations.
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WELDING AND HOT WORK
Original Issue Date:
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•
•
Last Reviewed:
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Revision Number:
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Conditions for Fire Watch
Fire watchers are required whenever welding or cutting is performed in locations where other
than a minor fire might develop, or any of the following conditions exist:
- Appreciable combustible material is closer than 35 feet to the point of operation.
- Appreciable combustibles are more than 35 ft away but can be easily ignited by sparks.
- Wall or floor openings within a 35-foot radius expose combustible material in adjacent areas
including concealed spaces in walls or floors.
- Combustible materials are adjacent to the opposite side of metal partitions, walls, ceilings, or
roofs and are likely to be ignited by conduction or radiation.
Housekeeping
Welders must place welding cable and other equipment so that it is clear of passageways,
ladders, and stairways.
INSPECTIONS
•
•
•
Before welding or other hot work operations are permitted, the work area must be inspected by
the Administrator or designee responsible for authorizing such operations. The inspector must
indicate in writing (e.g., checklist or hot work permit) that:
- Hot work equipment is in good condition.
- Compressed gas cylinders are stored and handled according to safety procedures outlined in
this Plan or supplemental documents.
- Electrical systems associated with hot work operations are in good condition and operated
according to safety procedures outlined in this Plan or supplemental documents.
- Flammable and combustible materials such as trash, rags, and open containers of solvents
have been removed from the area.
- Flammable, combustible, or toxic residues have been removed or are adequately covered.
- All movable fire hazards in the vicinity have been removed from the hot work area.
- Ventilation is adequate to maintain a safe atmosphere during hot work.
- Adjacent spaces have been inspected and meet requirements for hot work.
- Operators and other affected workers are wearing required their issued PPE
- Fire watch personnel are on duty when required
- Flammable, combustible, or toxic coatings (preservative coatings or insulation) have been
removed from hot work surfaces.
- Toxic preservatives on surfaces where hot work is performed are stripped back at least 4
inches (in.); otherwise airline respirators must be used.
Hot work permit inspection requirements. The inspector must following any additional
inspection requirements prescribed in a hot work permit.
Recordkeeping. Inspection records must be maintained according to the Recordkeeping
requirements of this Plan.
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PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)
•
•
•
•
Kent County issued PPE is required for all workers who use hot work equipment and/or perform hot
work operations.
All Kent County employees and contractors operating welding equipment must wear eye protection
and other appropriate PPE.
Eye and face protection devices must meet the specifications of the American National Standards
Institute (ANSI) Z87.1, Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection Devices, for all
filter lenses and plates. (See last page for 1910.133(a)(5) Filter Lenses for Protection Against
Radiant Energy)
General PPE Requirements
The degree of PPE will vary with size, nature, and location of work to be performed.
- Hot work permit areas. The operator of any hot work equipment and work areas covered under
a hot work permit must be equipped with Kent County issued protective devices and/or PPE as
indicated in the permit before any work begins.
- Designated areas (hot work permit not required). The operator of any hot work equipment in
work areas designated for hot work must be equipped with Kent County issued protective devices
and/or apparel as indicated below:
° Portable and/or mechanical ventilation capable of keeping the levels of fumes, dust, and gases
below the thresholds established in regulations for permissible exposure limits (PELs) for
hazardous and toxic substances. If local exhaust or general ventilation is not available and
fume, dust, and gas generation is high, respirators must be used.
° Respiratory protection where required. NOTE: No employee will be issued or required to use
a respirator until that employee has satisfied the criteria for medical evaluation, donning,
doffing, and fit testing in the Respiratory Protection Plan.
° Gloves, apron, and/or jacket that are made of a material that is an insulator from heat and
electricity.
° Welder’s helmets equipped and/or Cutting Goggles with proper filter plate and cover lenses.
See the Filter Lens Shade Number Table for more information.
° Screens to protect persons not properly protected from the visual effects of viewing arc (Arc
Flash) welding or cutting and during gas or oxygen cutting or welding.
° Lifelines and harnesses for work in confined spaces as prescribed in the Confined Space
Entry Plan.
-
-
Arc Welding or Cutting PPE
Kent County issued helmets or hand shields must be used during all arc welding or arc cutting
operations except submerged arc welding. Helpers or attendants must be provided with proper
eye and body protection.
Gas Welding or Oxygen Cutting PPE
Goggles or other suitable eye protection must be used during all gas welding or oxygen cutting
operations. Spectacles with side shields and suitable filter lenses are permitted for use during gas
welding operations on light work, for torch brazing, or for inspection.
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Resistance (Spot, Seam, Projection & Butt) Welding PPE
Operators and attendants of resistance welding or resistance brazing equipment must use
transparent face shields and properly shaded safety glasses or goggles, depending on the
particular job, to protect their faces and eyes from welding hazards to protect their faces or eyes.
HAZARD NOTIFICATION
•
Employers must include the following information on health hazard notices:
- All filler metals and fusible granular materials must carry the following notice, as a
minimum, on tags, boxes, or other containers:
“CAUTION—Welding may produce fumes and gases hazardous to health. Avoid
breathing these fumes and gases. Use adequate ventilation. See ANSI Z49.”
- Filler metals containing cadmium in significant amounts must carry the following notice on
tags, boxes, or other containers:
“WARNING—CONTAINS CADMIUM—POISONOUS FUMES MAY BE
FORMED ON HEATING—Do not breathe fumes. Use only with adequate
ventilation such as fume collectors, exhaust ventilators, or air-supplied respirators.
See ANSI Z49.1. If chest pain, cough, or fever develops after use call 911 and/or a
physician immediately.”
SPECIAL OPERATIONS
•
Confined Spaces
For the purposes of identifying a confined space in welding, cutting, and brazing operations, a
confined space is a relatively small or restricted space such as a tank, boiler, pressure vessel, or
compartment. See the Confined Space Entry Plan for detailed information about work in a
confined space.
- Fire prevention in confined spaces
° When arc welding is to be suspended for any substantial period, such as during lunch or
overnight, all electrodes must be removed from the holders and the holders carefully
located so that accidental contact cannot occur and the machine be disconnected from the
power source.
° Whenever the torch is not to be used for a substantial period such as during lunch hour or
overnight, the torch valves must be closed and the fuel-gas and oxygen supply to the torch
positively shut off at some point outside the confined area. Where practicable, the torch
and hose must also be removed from the confined space.
- Work in confined spaces
° Ventilation is a prerequisite to work in confined spaces. For ventilation requirements see
the General Provisions subsection in this analysis.
° Gas cylinders and welding machines must be left outside the confined space when
welding or cutting is performed.
° Before operations are started, heavy portable equipment mounted on wheels must be
securely blocked to prevent accidental movement.
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° Where a welder must enter a confined space through a manhole or other small opening,
means must be provided for quickly removing him in case of emergency.
° When safety harness and lifelines are used for this purpose, they must be attached to the
welder’s body so that his body cannot be jammed in a small exit opening.
° An attendant with a preplanned rescue procedure must be stationed outside to observe the
welder at all times and be capable of putting rescue operations into effect. However, a
tapping procedure on the walls of tanks as a means of communication in lieu of direct
observation of the welder by the attendant is an acceptable way to communicate if
absolutely necessary.
° After welding operations are completed, the welder must mark the hot metal or provide
some other means of warning other workers about the hot metal.
Ventilation in confined spaces
° All welding and cutting operations carried on in confined spaces must be adequately
ventilated to prevent the accumulation of toxic materials or possible oxygen deficiency.
This applies not only to the welder but also to helpers and other personnel in the
immediate vicinity. Air replacement must be clean and safe to breathe.
° Oxygen must never be used for ventilation.
-
•
Respirators in confined spaces
° In circumstances for which it is impossible to provide such ventilation, airline respirators
or hose masks approved for this purpose by NIOSH must be used.
° In areas immediately hazardous to life, a full-facepiece, pressure-demand, self-contained
breathing apparatus or a combination full-face piece, pressure-demand supplied-air
respirator with an auxiliary, self-contained air supply approved by NIOSH must be used.
° Where welding operations are carried on in confined spaces and where welders and
helpers are provided with hose masks, hose masks with blowers, or self-contained
breathing equipment, a worker must be stationed on the outside of such confined spaces to
insure the safety of those working within.
Fuel-Gas Welding
Employers must adopt procedures to prevent mixtures of fuel gases and air or oxygen that may
explode. Mixtures of air or oxygen with flammable gases prior to consumption except at the
burner or in a standard torch, are not allowed unless approved for the purpose.
- Portable cylinders. All portable cylinders used for the storage and shipment of compressed
gases must be constructed and maintained in accordance with the regulations of the U.S.
Department of Transportation, 49 CFR parts 171–179.
Compressed gas cylinders must be legibly marked with either the chemical or the trade name
of the gas. Markings must be a stencil, stamp, or label, and must not be readily removable.
Whenever practical, the marking must be located on the shoulder of the cylinder.
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Oxy-acetylene Welding
Oxy-acetylene welders must:
° Check to make sure the safety fuse plug or disk is functioning.
° Never use oxygen or fuel gas directly from the cylinder. There has to be a regulator
attached to the valve.
° Stand to one side of the regulator (in case it malfunctions), open the cylinder valve slowly,
and do no more than 1½ turns.
° Use 3 - 7 psi for oxygen and 1 - 12 psi for acetylene, but never over 15 psi.
° Purge oxygen and acetylene lines and light the acetylene using a striker, not a lighter.
° Store oxygen and acetylene separately, secured in an upright position, with valves closed,
and at least 20 ft or more from combustibles.
° Tape, Mark, and Cap all empty cylinders with the letters “MT” and store in empty
cylinder designated location. Do not mix empty and full cylinders together. Exchange
empty cylinders for full cylinders as quickly as possible.
Arc Welding
- Operators and supervisors of arc welding equipment and operations must strictly follow the
printed rules and instructions covering operation of equipment supplied by the
manufacturers.
- Supervisors must ensure that operators follow the procedures for fire prevention and
protection, protection of personnel, and health protection and ventilation.
- Arc welders must:
° Ensure welding machines are grounded.
° Avoid wet or damp areas to prevent electric shock.
° Check that connections are tight.
° Ensure cables are maintained and conductors are well insulated.
° Ensure cable splices are not within 10 ft of a holder.
° Use flash screens to protect others in the area from the arc flash and welding slag.
Resistance Welding
- Periodic inspection must be made by qualified maintenance personnel, and a certification
record maintained. The certification record must include the date of inspection, the signature
of the person who performed the inspection and the serial number, or other identifier, for the
equipment inspected. The operator must be instructed to report any equipment defects to his
supervisor and the use of the equipment must be discontinued until safety repairs have been
completed.
- Workers designated to operate resistance-welding equipment must have been properly
instructed and judged competent to operate such equipment.
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EMERGENCY RESPONSE
•
Injured Person
In case of an accident that results in a serious injury (i.e., requires medical attention):
- Attend the injured person(s), give standard first aid, make the situation safe, and comfort the
injured.
- Call 911 from a cell phone, phone in crane cab, or other nearest location.
- Send a person, if available, to the office to coordinate help.
- Set up rescue rigging if the situation requires (trained staff only).
- Wait for the emergency medical service to arrive.
- Notify the Personnel Director/Human Resource Manager or designated personnel by phone
or radio.
TRAINING
•
•
•
•
Fire Watchers
Fire watchers must have fire extinguishing equipment readily available and be trained in its use.
They must be familiar with the equipment and procedures for sounding an alarm in the event of a
fire. They must watch for fires in all exposed areas, try to extinguish them only when obviously
within the capacity of the equipment available, or otherwise sound the alarm. A fire watch must
be maintained for at least a half hour after completion of welding or cutting operations to detect
and extinguish possible smoldering fires.
Oxygen-Fuel Gas Welders and Cutters
Workers in charge of the oxygen or fuel-gas supply equipment, including generators, and oxygen
or fuel-gas distribution piping systems must be instructed and judged competent by their
employers for this important work before being left in charge. Skilled mechanics must be
properly instructed to repair regulators or parts of regulators, including gages.
Arc Welders and Cutters
Workers who operate arc-welding equipment must be instructed and qualified to operate and
maintain such equipment.
Resistance Welders
Workers designated to operate resistance-welding equipment must be properly instructed and
judged competent to operate such equipment.
PLAN REVIEW AND UPDATE
This Plan will be reviewed and updated:
- Annually
- Whenever there is a change in federal, state, or Kent County rules related to welding, cutting,
brazing, or other hot work operations
- Whenever there is a change in facility operations related to the use, handling, or storage of
welding equipment and supplies
- Whenever equipment operators demonstrate a lack of understanding or skill to perform
welding or other hot work operations safely
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RECORDKEEPING
•
•
•
The Administrator or designee will maintain all records related to this Plan. Unless otherwise
noted, the records will be kept in the Division Hot Work & Welding location and transferred to
the Office of the Personnel Director/Human Resource Manage upon request or every three (3)
years. All records will be available for regulatory agency review on request.
The Administrator or designee will maintain the following written records:
- Job hazard assessments
- An updated list of designated locations allowed to perform welding or other hot work
operations without requiring a permit
- Hot work permits
- Inspection reports and checklists
- Accident or incident reports and investigations
- Training records
Record retention time. All records, including employee training records (e.g., curricula, written
or electronic materials, sign-in sheets, individual employee records) will be retained for 30 years.
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1910.133(a)(5) - Kent County shall ensure that each affected employee uses equipment with filter lenses that have a
shade number appropriate for the work being performed for protection from injurious light radiation. The following is a
listing of appropriate shade numbers for various operations.
Filter Lenses for Protection Against Radiant Energy
Operations
Shielded metal arc welding
Electrode Size 1/32 in
Less than 3
3-5
5-8
More than 8
Gas metal arc welding and
flux cored arc welding
Gas Tungsten arc welding
(TIG)
Arc Carbon Arc Cutting
Light
Heavy
Plasma arc welding
Plasma arc cutting
Light (**)
Medium (**)
Heavy (**)
Arc Current
Less than 60
60-160
160-250
250-550
Less than 60
60-160
160-250
250-500
Less than 50
50-150
150-500
Less than 500
500-1000
Less than 20
20-100
100-400
400-800
Less than 300
300-400
400-800
Torch brazing
Torch soldering
Carbon arc welding
Min. (*) Protective Shade
7 (*)
8 (*)
10 (*)
11 (*)
7 (*)
10 (*)
10 (*)
10 (*)
8 (*)
8 (*)
10 (*)
10 (*)
11 (*)
6
8 (*)
10 (*)
11 (*)
8 (*)
9 (*)
10 (*)
3 (*)
2 (*)
14 (*)
Filter Lenses for Protection Against Radiant Energy
Operations
Gas Welding:
Light
Medium
Heavy
Gas Cutting:
Light
Medium
Heavy
Plate thickness - inches
Plate thickness - mm
Min. (*) Protective Shade
Under 1/8
1/8 to 1/2
Over 1/2
Under 3.2
36.2 to 12.7
Over 12.7
4 (*)
5 (*)
6 (*)
Under 1
1 to 6
Over 6
Under 25
25 to 150
Over 150
3 (*)
4 (*)
5 (*)
Footnote (*) As a rule of thumb, start with a shade that is too dark to see the weld zone. Then go to a lighter shade
which gives sufficient view of the weld zone without going below the minimum. In oxy-fuel gas welding or cutting
where the torch produces a high yellow light, it is desirable to use a filter lens that absorbs the yellow or sodium line in
the visible light of the (spectrum) operation.
Footnote (**) These values apply where the actual arc is clearly seen. Experience has shown that lighter filters may be
used when the arc is hidden by the work-piece.
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