Method and apparatus for adjusting a speaker system

Method and apparatus for adjusting a speaker system
USOO8923997B2
(12) United States Patent
(10) Patent N0.:
Kallai et a].
(54)
(45) Date of Patent:
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR ADJUSTING
A SPEAKER SYSTEM
.
5,673,323 A
5,946,343 A
6,704,421 B1
.
6,778,869 B2
(75) Inventors: Christopher Kallal, Santa Barbara, CA
(Us); MichaelDarrellAIldreW Ericson,
Santa Barbara, CA (US)
(73) Assignee: Sonos, Inc, Santa Barbara, CA (US)
(*)
.
.
Notlce:
.
.
(22) Filed:
8 045 952 B2
’
’
10/2011
h
Qures ey e
t al.
FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS
W0
2013012582 A1
1/2013
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
Prior Publication Data
US 2012/0096125 A1
1/2010 Bralthwalte et al'
9/2010 Holmgren et a1.
(continued)
Oct. 13, 2011
(65)
Cham ion
8/2005 Waller, Jr. et a1.
1/2007 Martin et a1.
8/2009 Lambourne et a1.
U.S.C. 154(b) by 665 days.
APPl-NO-113/272’833
8/2004
6,931,134 B1
7,171,010 B2
7,571,014 B1
7,792,311 B1
.
9/1997 SchotZ et al.
8/1999 SchotZ et a1.
3/2004 Kitamura
700% Ishidapet al‘
7,643,894 B2
Subject to any d1scla1mer, the term of this
Dec. 30, 2014
6,916,980 B2
patent is extended or adjusted under 35
(21)
US 8,923,997 B2
Yamaha DME Desinger 3.5 User Manual; Copyright 2004*
Apr. 19, 2012
(Continued)
Related US. Application Data
(60)
Provisional application No. 61/392,918, ?led on Oct.
13’ 2010'
Int. Cl.
G06F 1 7/00
H03G 5/00
H03G 5/02
H03G 5/16
(52) U-s- Cl-
Primary Examiner i Paul McCord
(74) Attorney, Agent, or Firm * Hanley,
(51)
(2006.01)
(2006.01)
(57)
ABSTRACT
(2006.01)
(200601)
Certain embodiments provide methods and systems for man
aging a sound pro?le. An example method includes accessing
CPC ............. .. H03G 5/005 (2013.01); H03G 5/025
a playback device on a network The example method
(201301); H03G 5/165 (201301)
includes displaying a graphic interface to allow a user to
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
(58)
a
Field Of ClaSSi?cation seardl
plurality of parameters for user adjustment. The example
USPC .......................................................... .. 700/94
method includes saving the sound pro?le The example
see application ?le for complete searCh hiStOI'Y-
method includes processing an audio signal at the playback
_
(56)
Flight and
Zimmerman, LLC
References Clted
Us PATENT DOCUMENTS
5,218,710 A
5,553,147 A
6/1993 Yamakiet 31.
9/1996 Pineau
5,668,884 A
9/1997 Clair, Jr. et a1.
device according to the sound pro?le, Wherein user adjust
ments to the sound pro?le are used to con?gure the playback
device to process the audio signal upon saving the sound
pro?le.
20 Claims, 7 Drawing Sheets
US 8,923,997 B2
Page 2
(56)
References Cited
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Yeh
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Chung
.......................... .. 700/94
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Eng
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......................... .. 709/219
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“UPnP; “Universal Plug and Play Device Architecture”; Jun. 8, 2000;
version 1.0; Microsoft Corporation; pp. 1-54”.
“Yamaha DME 32 manual: copyright 2001”.
* cited by examiner
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1
2
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR ADJUSTING
A SPEAKER SYSTEM
representations are typically used by those skilled in the art to
mo st effectively convey the sub stance of their work to others
skilled in the art. Reference herein to “one embodiment” or
“an embodiment” means that a particular feature, structure, or
characteristic described in connection with the embodiment
can be included in at least one embodiment. The appearances
of the phrase “in one embodiment” or “in an embodiment” in
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED
APPLICATIONS
The present application claims the bene?t of priority to
United States Provisional Application No. 61/392,918 ?led
on Oct. 13, 2010,entitled “Method and Apparatus for Adjust
ing a Speaker System”, which is herein incorporated by ref
various places in the speci?cation are not necessarily all
referring to the same embodiment, nor are separate or alter
native embodiments mutually exclusive of other embodi
ments. Further, the order of blocks in process ?owcharts or
diagrams representing one or more embodiments do not
erence in its entirety.
inherently indicate any particular order or imply any limita
BACKGROUND
tions.
Certain embodiments provide techniques for adjusting
loudspeakers (referred to herein interchangeably as speakers)
1. Field of the Invention
The present invention is related to the area of audio devices,
and more speci?cally related to techniques for adjusting a
speaker system or loudspeaker via a network.
via the Internet. The adjustment includes at least tuning,
con?guration and creation of customized equalizers (EQs). In
2. Background
Designing and ?ne tuning of loudspeakers are often a labo
rious process. In a typical process, certain electrical compo
nents have to be repeatedly changed or adjusted to generate a
20
?nal “sound” of the loudspeaker. In another embodiment, a
set of settings can be remotely adjusted or shared with another
speaker system.
new equalization or new ?rmware has to be upgraded on some
In an example application, when loudspeakers are placed
modern products. Typically during development, a loud
speaker is placed inside a large anechoic chamber where
one embodiment, a graphic interface is provided to tune a
loudspeaker, and allows a user to do quick iteration on the
25
in a listening environment, a customer home or a remote
acoustic measurements are gradually taken. After each mea
location, the loudspeakers sound can be adjusted remotely by
surement, the product is removed from the chamber and
brought out to be adjusted and then setup again to be re
measured. The process often takes days or weeks until the
?nal sound of the loudspeaker is determined.
a professional or an experienced user through the Internet.
This allows a listener to be able to select his/her favorite
30
method to connect the speaker to the network via a connec
tion, such as Ethernet or wireless 802.11n. For example, the
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
Internet Protocol (IP) address of the loudspeaker is typed into
Certain embodiments of the present invention will be
readily understood by the following detailed description in
conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein like
35
reference numerals designate like structural elements, and in
values for one or more loudspeaker parameters including
tweeter, midrange, woofer, etc. A type, frequency, gain, qual
40
ity factor, etc., can be set for each parameter.
Once “logged in” to the loudspeaker, the current settings
are loaded into a webpage and/ or other presentation interface,
for example. A user can then adjust any/all of the items in each
45
updated in “real-time” (or substantially real-time accounting
FIG. 2A shows an example functional block diagram of a
player in accordance with certain embodiments;
FIG. 2B shows an example of controllers that may be used
to remotely control one of more players of FIG. 1;
FIG. 2C shows an example internal functional block dia
gram of a controller in accordance with certain embodiments;
a computer, and the computer screen displays a loudspeaker
parameter con?guration layout. In certain embodiments, a
con?guration pro?le can be created to specify con?guration
which:
FIG. 1 shows an example con?guration in which certain
embodiments may be practiced;
sound from a variety of options, and sometimes share his/her
sound with another listener remotely located.
In certain embodiments, the loudspeaker incorporates a
area. Once the values are entered into each area, the values are
for some system processing, storage, and/or transmission
delay, for example) on the loud speaker.
In certain embodiments, the con?guration webpage can be
FIG. 3 shows an example interface in an embodiment to
allow a user to graphically adjust various settings via a net
designed speci?cally for the loudspeaker under development.
work;
FIG. 4 shows a ?owchart or process of adjusting various
50
settings in a speaker system; and
current number of “tuneable” sections.
FIG. 5 shows a ?owchart or process of sharing a pro?le
Thus, certain embodiments provide for speaker con?gura
between two remotely separated sound systems.
tion, con?guration pro?le creation, and con?guration pro?le
Certain embodiments will be better understood when read
in conjunction with the provided drawings, which illustrate
examples. It should be understood, however, that the embodi
For example, if a loudspeaker includes ?ve transducers, ?ve
sections can be quickly created such that the webpage has the
55
storage. The con?guration pro?le can be referred from one
ments are not limited to the arrangements and instrumentality
user to another, from one speaker to another, and so on. A
referred pro?le can be accessed and implemented at one or
shown in the attached drawings.
more connected speakers to con?gure the speakers and/or
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF CERTAIN
EMBODIMENTS
60
other playback devices for playback output, for example.
Brief Description
Certain embodiments provide a method for managing a
sound pro?le. The example method includes accessing a
The detailed description of certain embodiments is pre
sented largely in terms of procedures, steps, logic blocks,
processing, and other symbolic representations that directly
or indirectly resemble the operations of data processing
devices coupled to networks. These process descriptions and
playback device on a network. The example method includes
displaying a graphic interface to allow a user to adjust the
65
sound pro?le, wherein the sound pro?le includes a plurality
of parameters for user adjustment. The example method
includes saving the sound pro?le. The example method
US 8,923,997 B2
3
4
includes processing an audio signal at the playback device
according to the sound pro?le, wherein user adjustments to
the sound pro?le are used to con?gure the playback device to
process the audio signal upon saving the sound pro?le.
Certain embodiments provide a computer readable
All devices on the network 108 may be con?gured to
download and store audio sources or receive streaming audio
sources. For example, the computing device 110 can down
load audio sources from the Internet and store the down
loaded sources locally for sharing with other devices on the
medium including a set of instructions for execution by a
Internet or the network 108. The zone player 106 can be
computer device, the set of instructions, when executed,
con?gured to receive streaming audio source and share the
source with other devices. Shown as a stereo system, the
implementing a method for managing a sound pro?le. The
example method includes accessing a playback device on a
network. The example method includes displaying a graphic
device 112 is con?gured to receive an analog source (e.g.,
from broadcasting) or retrieve a digital source (e.g., from a
compact disk). The analog sources can be converted to digital
sources. In certain embodiments, all audio sources, regardless
of where they are located or how they are received, may be
interface to allow a user to adjust the sound pro?le, wherein
the sound pro?le includes a plurality of parameters for user
adjustment. The example method includes saving the sound
pro?le. The example method includes processing an audio
signal at the playback device according to the sound pro?le,
shared among the devices on the network 108.
Any device on the network 108 may be con?gured to
control operations of playback devices, such as the zone
players 102, 104 and 106. In particular, one or more control
ling devices 140 and 142 are used to control zone players 102,
104 and 106 as shown in FIG. 1. The controlling devices 140
wherein user adjustments to the sound pro?le are used to
con?gure the playback device to process the audio signal
upon saving the sound pro?le.
Certain embodiments provide a speaker con?guration sys
tem. The example system includes a computing device. The
example computing device includes an application module to
facilitate control functions for a playback device including
access to a sound pro?le to con?gure the playback device.
The example computing device includes an interface to allow
a user to adjust the sound pro?le, wherein the sound pro?le
includes a plurality of playback device parameters for user
adjustment. The example computing device is to save the
sound pro?le and facilitate application of the sound pro?le to
the playback device to con?gure output of multimedia con
tent via the playback device.
20
and 142 may be portable, for example. The controlling
25
devices 140 and 142 may remotely control the zone players
via a wireless data communication interface (e.g., infrared,
radio, wireless standard IEEE 802.1 lb or 802.11g, etc.). In an
embodiment, besides controlling an individual zone player,
the controlling device 140 or 142 is con?gured to manage
audio sources and other characteristics of all the zone players
regardless where the controlling device 140 or 142 is located
in a house or a con?ned complex.
In certain embodiments, a playback device may commu
30
nicate with and/or control other playback devices. For
example, one zone player may provide data to one or more
other zone players. A zone player may serve as a master
device in one con?guration and a slave device in another
EXAMPLES
con?guration, for example.
Referring now to the drawings, in which like numerals
refer to like parts throughout the several views. FIG. 1 shows
an example con?guration 100 in which the present invention
may be practiced. The con?guration may represent, but not be
limited to, a part of a residential home, a business building or
a complex with multiple zones. There are a number of mul
35
Also shown is a computing device 144 provided to com
municate with one or all of the devices on the network 108.
The computing device 144 may be a desktop computer, a
laptop computer, a tablet, a smart phone or any computing
device with a display screen. According to an embodiment,
shown as audio devices. Each of the audio devices may be
each of the networked devices on the network 108 has an IP
address. The computing device 144 is used by a user to access
one or all of the zone players to adjust a sound pro?le.
installed or provided in one particular area or zone and hence
referred to as a zone player herein.
Depending on implementation, the sound pro?le includes
various ?lters, frequencies, equalizers, gains or other factors
40
timedia players of which three examples 102, 104 and 106 are
As used herein, unless explicitly stated otherwise, a track
45
and an audio source are used interchangeably, an audio source
or audio sources are in digital format and can be transported
or streamed across a data network. To facilitate the under
standing of the present invention, it is assumed that the con
?guration 100 represents a home. Thus, the zone players 102
and 104 may be located in two of the bedrooms respectively
50
while the zone player 106 may be installed in a living room.
All of the zone players 102, 104 and 106 are coupled directly
or indirectly to a data network 108 that is also referred to as ad
hoc network formed by a plurality of zone players and one or
more controllers. In addition, a computing device 110 is
shown to be coupled on the network 108. In reality, any other
devices such as a home gateway device, a storage device, or
an MP3 player may be coupled to the network 108 as well.
The network 108 may be a wired network, a wireless net
work or a combination of both. In one example, all devices
including the zone players 102, 104 and 106 are wirelessly
coupled to the network 108 (e.g., based on an industry stan
dard such as IEEE 802.11). In yet another example, all
devices including the zone players 102, 104 and 106 are part
55
that may affect a listening experience.
Referring now to FIG. 2A, there is shown an example
functional block diagram of a playback device, such as a zone
player 200. The zone player 200 includes a network interface
202, a processor 204, a memory 206, an audio processing
circuit 210, a setting module 212, an audio ampli?er 214 and
a set of speakers. The network interface 202 facilitates a data
?ow between a data network (e.g., the data network 108 of
FIG. 1) and the zone player 200 and typically executes a
special set of rules (e.g., a protocol) to send data back and
forth. One example protocol is TCP/IP (Transmission Con
trol Protocol/ Internet Protocol) commonly used in the Inter
net. In general, a network interface manages the assembling
of an audio source or ?le into smaller packets that are trans
60
mitted over the data network or reassembles received packets
into the original source or ?le. In addition, the network inter
face 202 handles the address part of each packet so that it gets
to the right destination or intercepts packets destined for the
zone player 200.
In the example of FIG. 2A, the network interface 202 may
65
include either one or both of a wireless interface 216 and a
of a local area network that communicates with a wide area
wired interface 217. The wireless interface 216, such as a
network (e.g., the Internet).
radiofrequency (RF) interface, provides network interface
US 8,923,997 B2
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6
functions wirelessly for the zone player 200 to communicate
interface is based on an industry standard (e.g., infrared,
radio, wireless standard IEEE 802.11a, 802.11b or 802.11g).
When a particular audio source is being played in the zone
player 200, a picture, if there is any, associated with the audio
with other devices in accordance with a communication pro
tocol (such as the wireless standard IEEE 802.1 1a, 802.1 lb or
802.1 1g). The wired interface 217 provides network interface
functions by a wired connection (e.g., an Ethernet cable). In
source may be transmitted from the zone player 200 to the
an embodiment, a zone player, referred to as an access zone
controller 240 for display. In an embodiment, the controller
player, includes both of the interfaces 216 and 217, and other
zone players include only the RF interface 216. Thus these
240 is used to select an audio source for playback. In another
embodiment, the controller 240 is used to manage (e. g., add,
other zone players communicate with other devices on a
network or retrieve audio sources via the access zone player.
delete, move, save, or modify) a playlist.
In the example of FIG. 2B, the user interface for the con
The processor 204 is con?gured to control the operation of
other parts in the zone player 200. The memory 206 may be
troller 240 includes a screen 242 (e.g., a LCD screen) and a set
of functional buttons as follows: a “zones” button 244, a
loaded with one or more software modules that can be
“back” button 246, a “music” button 248, a scroll wheel 250,
“ok” button 252, a set of transport control buttons 254, a mute
button 262, a volume up/ down button 264, a set of soft buttons
266 corresponding to the labels 268 displayed on the screen
242.
executed by the processor 204 to achieve desired tasks.
In the example of FIG. 2A, the audio processing circuit 210
resembles most of the circuitry in an audio playback device
and includes one or more digital-to-analog converters (DAC),
an audio preprocessing part, an audio enhancement part or a
In the example of FIG. 2B, the screen 242 displays various
digital signal processor and others. In operation, when an
audio source (e. g., audio source) is retrieved via the network
interface 202, the audio source is processed in the audio
20 screen menus in response to a selection by a user. In an
processing circuit 210 to produce analog audio signals. The
processed analog audio signals are then provided to the audio
ampli?er 214 for playback on speakers. In addition, the audio
players in a number of desired zones so that the players are
processing circuit 210 may include necessary circuitry to
embodiment, the “zones” button 244 activates a zone man
agement screen or “Zone Menu” to allow a user to group
25
process analog signals as inputs to produce digital signals for
sharing with other devices on a network.
Depending on an exact implementation, the setting module
212 may be implemented within the audio processing circuit
210 or as a combination of hardware and software. The setting
30
synchronized to play an identical playlist or tracks. The
“back” button 246 may lead to different actions depending on
the current screen. In an embodiment, the “back” button
triggers the current screen display to go back to a previous
one. In another embodiment, the ‘back” button negates the
user’s erroneous selection. The “music” button 248 activates
a music menu, which allows the selection of an audio source
module 212 is provided to access different sound pro?les
stored in the memory 206 of the zone player and work with
the audio processing circuit 210 to effectuate the sound qual
queue) for playback.
ity or sound experience.
In the example of FIG. 2A, the audio ampli?er 214 includes
an analog circuit that powers the provided analog audio sig
selecting an item within a list, whenever a list is presented on
the screen 242. When the items in the list are too many to be
accommodated in one screen display, a scroll indicator such
(e.g., a song track) to be added to a playlist (e.g., a music
In the example of FIG. 2B, the scroll wheel 250 is used for
35
nals to drive one or more speakers 216. In an embodiment, the
as a scroll bar or a scroll arrow is displayed beside the list.
ampli?er 214 is automatically powered off when there is no
When the scroll indicator is displayed, a user may rotate the
scroll wheel 250 to either choose a displayed item or display
a hidden item in the list. The “ok” button 252 is use to con?rm
incoming data packets representing an audio source or pow
ered on when the zone player is con?gured to detect the
40
presence of the data packets.
In the example of FIG. 2A, the speakers 216 may be in
different con?gurations. For example, the speakers may be a
the user selection on the screen 242 or activate a playback of
an item.
In the example of FIG. 2B, there are three transport buttons
254, which are used to control the effect of the currently
con?guration of:
1) 2-channel: the stereo audio player is connected to two
speakers: left and right speakers to form a stereo sound;
45
buttons may include play/pause and forward/rewind a track,
2) 3-channel (or 2.1 sound effects): the stereo audio player
is connected to three speakers: left and right speakers
move forward to the next track, or move backward to the
previous track. According to an embodiment, pressing one of
the volume control buttons such as the mute button 262 or the
and a subwoofer to form a stereo sound; and
3) 6-channel (or 5.1 sound effects): the stereo audio player
playing track. For example, the functions of the transport
50
is connected to ?ve speakers: front left, front right, cen
volume up/down button 264 activates a volume panel. In
addition, there are three soft buttons 266 that can be activated
in accordance with the labels 268 on the screen 242. It can be
understood that, in a multi-zone system, there may be mul
ter, rear left and rear right speakers and a subwoofer to
form a surrounding sound.
Unless speci?cally stated herein, a device being adjusted
tiple audio sources being played respectively in more than
a sound may be produced collectively from the speakers, from
one zone players. The music transport functions described
herein shall apply selectively to one of the sources when a
one of the speakers, and so on.
corresponding zone player is selected.
includes one or more speakers. When a pro?le is determined,
55
FIG. 2C illustrates an internal functional block diagram of
an example controller 270, which may correspond to the
Referring now to FIG. 2B, there is shown an example of a
controller 240, which may correspond to the controlling
device 140 or 142 of FIG. 1. The controller 240 may be used
to facilitate the control of multi-media applications, automa
tion and others in a living complex. In particular, the control
ler 240 is con?gured to facilitate a selection of a plurality of
audio sources available on the network, controlling opera
tions of one or more zone players (e.g., the zone player 200)
through a RF interface corresponding to the wireless interface
216 of FIG. 2A. According to one embodiment, the wireless
60
controller 240 of FIG. 2B. The screen 272 on the controller
270 may be a LCD screen. The screen 272 communicates
with and is commanded by a screen driver 274 that is con
trolled by a microcontroller (e.g., a processor) 276. The
memory 282 may be loaded with one or more application
65
modules 284 that can be executed by the microcontroller 276
with or without a user input via the user interface 278 to
achieve desired tasks.
US 8,923,997 B2
7
8
In an embodiment, an application module is con?gured to
facilitate other control functions for the zone players, for
example, to initiate a downloading command to receive a
sound pro?le from another user or a speaker system. For
ues to check for a playback device (e.g., zone player) to be
example, a ?rst user wants to share with a second user his
determined whether the setting(s) are to be saved at the
sound pro?le created speci?cally for a type ofjazz music. The
device. If not, the process 400 continues to adjust settings
until a desired con?guration of settings is reached. If so, at
block 430, the setting(s) are saved in a memory in the play
logged in to the con?guration system.
At block 420, one or more settings are adjusted (e.g., fre
quencies in different bands, and so on). At block 425, it is
second user can use the controller 270 to access the system
(e.g., the system in FIG. 1) of the ?rst user to receive the
pro?le, provided the ?rst user allows. The received pro?le can
be saved and put into effect in the system being used by the
back device. Settings may be associated with a name or other
identi?er (e.g., “Jazz”, “Rock”, “Radio”, and so on). Saved
settings may form a speaker pro?le, for example. Settings
may be shared with another, remotely located speaker system
via the pro?le, for example.
second user. As a result, both systems of the ?rst and second
users produce substantially similar sound effects when a jazz
music is played back.
In operation, when the microcontroller 276 executes one of
the application modules 284, the screen driver 274 generates
control signals to drive screen 272 to display an application
speci?c user interface accordingly, more of which will be
described below.
In the example of FIG. 2C, the controller 270 includes a
5
network interface 280 referred to as a RF interface 280 that 20
facilitates wireless communication with a zone player via a
At block 435, the playback device is con?gured based on
the setting(s). For example, a pro?le and/or other stored set
tings may be selected to con?gure the playback device
accordingly. At block 440, after the playback device is con
?gured, the process 400 ends. The playback device may then
be used to playback multimedia content, for example. In
certain embodiments, the playback device may be con?gured
corresponding wireless interface or RF interface thereof. The
or re-con?gured based on pro?le settings while multimedia
controller 270 may control one or more zone players, such as
content is being played back.
102, 104 and 106 of FIG. 1. Nevertheless, there may be more
than one controllers, each preferably in a zone (e.g., a room)
and con?gured to control any one and all of the zone players.
It should be pointed out that the controller 240 in FIG. 2B
FIG. 5 shows a ?owchart or process of sharing a pro?le
25
saved. For example, a Joe’s Jazz Pro?le” sound pro?le for a
playback device or other speaker is con?gured and saved by
is not the only controlling device that may practice certain
embodiments. Other devices that provide the equivalent con
trol functions (e.g., a computing device, a PDA, a hand-held
between two remotely separated sound systems. At block
505, the process 500 begins. At block 510, a speaker pro?le is
a user via an interface, such as the example pro?le interface
30
device, and a laptop computer, etc.) may also be con?gured to
practice certain embodiments. In the above description,
unless otherwise speci?cally described, keys or buttons are
300 of FIG. 3. At block 515, the pro?le is shared. The pro?le
may be shared with another user, another device, and so on.
For example, a copy of the pro?le may be sent to a user,
device, and so on. Alternatively, a link to the pro?le may be
generally referred to as either the physical buttons or soft
sent to a user, device, and so on.
35
At block 520, the pro?le is read. For example, the pro?le is
buttons, enabling a user to enter a command or data.
accessed by a playback device at a location remote from a
FIG. 3 shows an example interface 300 for a user to create,
adjust or update a sound pro?le. When the pro?le 300 is
saved, various parameters in the pro?le 301 are updated.
When the pro?le 300 is selected, the parameters are put into
use and cause an audio signal to be processed accordingly
location at which the pro?le was created. The playback
device, a controller associated with the playback device, or
both the controller and the playback device read the pro?le. At
40
(e.g., to band-pass certain frequencies). In certain embodi
ments, a pro?le 300 may be selected from a plurality of
pro?les via a controller. In certain embodiments, a pro?le 300
accordingly.
may be sent from one user or system to anotheruser or system
to con?gure one or more speakers at the receiving system. In
45
certain embodiments, a pro?le 300 may be requested by a
user or system.
As illustrated in the example of FIG. 3, the pro?le 300 may
include a preset name or reference 301, an overall gain 303
(e. g., in decibels (dB)), and one or more speaker component
50
settings 305, 307, 309 (e. g., tweeter, midrange, woofer, and so
on). For each component, one or more parameters (e. g., type,
frequency (e. g., Hertz), quality factor, channel gain (e.g., dB),
delay (e.g., samples), phase, limiter, (e.g., threshold, attack
(e.g., microseconds), release (e.g., milliseconds), etc.), soft
clip (e.g., threshold, attack (e.g., microseconds), release (e.g.,
55
At block 530, it is determined whether the pro?le is to be
saved at the playback device. If so, at block 535, the pro?le is
saved at the playback device. At block 540, after the playback
device is con?gured, the process 500 ends. The playback
device may then be used to playback multimedia content, for
example. In certain embodiments, the playback device may
be con?gured or re-con?gured based on pro?le settings while
multimedia content is being played back.
The processes, sequences or steps and features discussed
above and in the appendix are related to each other and each
is believed independently novel in the art. The disclosed
processes and sequences may be performed alone or in any
combination to provide a novel and unobvious system or a
portion of a system. It shouldbe understood that the processes
milliseconds), etc.), and so on, may be speci?ed. Thus, using
and sequences in combination yield an equally independently
the example interface of FIG. 3, one or more parameters for
one or more settings of a speaker pro?le 300 may be set. In
certain embodiments, the pro?le 300 may be initialized with
block 525, the playback device is con?gured based on setting
(s) in the pro?le. For example, a pro?le and/or other stored
settings may be selected to con?gure the playback device
60
factory or default values and modi?ed by a user, software
novel combination as well, even if combined in their broadest
sense (e. g., with less than the speci?c manner in which each
of the processes or sequences has been reduced to practice in
program, and so on via the interface.
FIG. 4 shows a ?owchart or process 400 of adjusting a
the disclosure herein).
pro?le to be used in a networked audio device. At block 405,
the process 400 begins.At block 410, it is determined whether
a playback device is to be logged in. If yes, at block 415, a
default page is displayed. If no, then the process 400 contin
aspects/embodiments of the present invention, the disclosure
of speci?c sequence/ steps and the inclusion of speci?cs with
The forgoing and attached are illustrative of various
65
regard to broader methods and systems are not intended to
limit the scope of the invention which ?nds itself in the
US 8,923,997 B2
10
various permutations of the features disclosed and described
9. The computer readable medium of claim 8, wherein the
sound pro?le is to be shared with another user remotely
located.
10. The computer readable medium of claim 8, further
herein as conveyed to one of skill in the art.
What is claimed is:
1. A method for managing a sound pro?le, the method
including:
comprising:
maintaining a plurality of sound pro?les, each pro?le
accessing, via a ?rst device, a playback device on a local
selectable by a user or a computer device.
network;
1 1. The computer readable medium of claim 8, wherein the
parameters include at least one of band, frequency, equalizer
receiving, at the ?rst device via the local network, an indi
cation that a sound pro?le is available at a location
and gain.
outside of the local network;
displaying, via the ?rst device based on the received indi
cation, a graphic interface to facilitate initiation of the
playback device to obtain the sound pro?le; and
12. The computer readable medium of claim 8, further
comprising facilitating review of the sound pro?le remotely
via a web-based interface.
13. The computer readable medium of claim 12, wherein
the sound pro?le is editable remotely via the web -based inter
causing the playback device to (i) obtain the sound pro?le
from the location outside of the local network and (ii)
face.
14. The computer readable medium of claim 8, wherein the
sound pro?le is created to include a number of tuneable
update one or more parameters at the playback device
based on the sound pro?le, wherein the playback device
is to process an audio signal according to the sound
sections corresponding to a number of transducers in a
pro?le.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein the sound pro?le is to be
shared with another user remotely located.
3. The method of claim 1, further including: maintaining a
plurality of sound pro?les, each pro?le selectable by a user or
20
a computing device including:
an application module to facilitate control functions for a
playback device on a local network including access, via
a computer device.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein the parameters include
at least one of band, frequency, equalizer and gain.
5. The method of claim 1, further comprising facilitating
review of the sound pro?le remotely via a web-based inter
face.
6. The method of claim 5, wherein the sound pro?le is
25
an interface to, based on receipt, at the ?rst device via the
local network, of an indication that a sound pro?le is
available at a location outside of the local network,
30
sound pro?le,
35
8. A non-transitory computer readable medium including a
set of instructions for execution by a computer device, the set
of instructions, when executed, implementing a method for
40
able by a user or a computing device.
cation that a sound pro?le is available at a location
45
the sound pro?le remotely.
20. The system of claim 15, wherein the sound pro?le is to
from the location outside of the local network and (ii)
pro?le.
18. The system of claim 15, wherein the parameters include
at least one of band, frequency, equalizer and gain.
19. The system of claim 15, wherein the interface com
prises a web-based interface to facilitate review and editing of
causing the playback device to (i) obtain the sound pro?le
based on the sound pro?le, wherein the playback device
is to process an audio signal according to the sound
remotely located.
17. The system of claim 15, wherein the computing device
is to maintain a plurality of sound pro?les, each pro?le select
network;
receiving, at the ?rst device via the local network, an indi
update one or more parameters at the playback device
outside of the local network and (ii) update one or more
parameters at the playback device based on the sound
pro?le, wherein the playback device is to process an
audio signal according to the sound pro?le.
16. The system of claim 15, wherein the computing device
is to facilitate sharing of the sound pro?le with another user
managing a sound pro?le, the method comprising:
outside of the local network;
displaying, via the ?rst device based on the received indi
cation, a graphic interface to facilitate initiation of the
playback device to obtain the sound pro?le; and
facilitate initiation of the playback device to obtain the
wherein the computing device is to cause the playback
device to (i) obtain the sound pro?le from the location
created to include a number of tuneable sections correspond
ing to a number of transducers in a speaker to be con?gured
accessing, via a ?rst device, a playback device on a local
a ?rst device, to a sound pro?le to con?gure the playback
device; and
editable remotely via the web-based interface.
7. The method of claim 1, wherein the sound pro?le is
using the sound pro?le.
speaker to be con?gured using the sound pro?le.
15. A speaker con?guration system comprising:
50
include a number of tuneable sections corresponding to a
number of transducers in a speaker to be con?gured using the
sound pro?le.
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