UM1718 - STMicroelectronics

UM1718 - STMicroelectronics
UM1718
User manual
STM32CubeMX for STM32 configuration
and initialization C code generation
Introduction
STM32CubeMX is a graphical tool for 32-bit ARM® Cortex® STM32 microcontrollers. It is
part of STMCube™ initiative (see Section 1) and is available either as a standalone
application or as an Eclipse plug-in for integration in Integrated Development Environments
(IDEs).
STM32CubeMX has the following key features:
•
Easy microcontroller selection covering whole STM32 portfolio.
•
Board selection from a list of STMicroelectronics boards.
•
Easy microcontroller configuration (pins, clock tree, peripherals, middleware) and
generation of the corresponding initialization C code.
•
Easy switching to another microcontroller belonging to the same series by
importing a previously-saved configuration to a new MCU project.
•
Generation of configuration reports.
•
Generation of IDE ready projects for a selection of integrated development
environment tool chains. STM32CubeMX projects include the generated initialization C
code, STM32 HAL drivers, the middleware stacks required for the user configuration,
and all the relevant files needed to open and build the project in the selected IDE.
•
Power consumption calculation for a user-defined application sequence.
•
Self-updates allowing the user to keep the STM32CubeMX up-to-date.
•
Download and update of STM32Cube™ embedded software required for user
application development (see Appendix E: STM32Cube embedded software packages
for details on STM32Cube embedded software offer).
Although STM32CubeMX offers a user interface and generates a C code compliant with
STM32 MCU design and firmware solutions, it is recommended to refer to the product
technical documentation for details on actual implementation of microcontroller peripherals
and firmware.
Reference documents
The following documents are available from http://www.st.com:
•
STM32 microcontroller reference manuals
•
STM32 microcontroller datasheets
•
STM32Cube HAL driver user manuals for STM32F0 (UM1785), STM32F1 (UM1850),
STM32F2 (UM1940), STM32F3 (UM1786), STM32F4 (UM1725), STM32F7 (UM1905),
STM32L0 (UM1749), STM32L1 (UM1816) and STM32L4 (UM1884).
December 2015
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Contents
UM1718
Contents
1
STM32Cube overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2
Getting started with STM32CubeMX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
3
2.1
Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.2
Key features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2.3
Rules and limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Installing and running STM32CubeMX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
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System requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
3.1.1
Supported operating systems and architectures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
3.1.2
Memory prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
3.1.3
Software requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Installing/uninstalling STM32CubeMX standalone version . . . . . . . . . . . 17
3.2.1
Installing STM32CubeMX standalone version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
3.2.2
Installing STM32CubeMX from command line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
3.2.3
Uninstalling STM32CubeMX standalone version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Installing STM32CubeMX plug-in version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
3.3.1
Downloading STM32CubeMX plug-in installation package . . . . . . . . . . 20
3.3.2
Installing STM32CubeMX as an Eclipse IDE plug-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
3.3.3
Uninstalling STM32CubeMX as Eclipse IDE plug-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Launching STM32CubeMX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
3.4.1
Running STM32CubeMX as standalone application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
3.4.2
Running STM32CubeMX in command-line mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
3.4.3
Running STM32CubeMX plug-in from Eclipse IDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Getting STM32Cube updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
3.5.1
Updater configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
3.5.2
Downloading new libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3.5.3
Removing libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
3.5.4
Checking for updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
STM32CubeMX User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
4.1
Welcome page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
4.2
New project window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
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Main window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
4.4
Toolbar and menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
4.4.1
File menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
4.4.2
Project menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
4.4.3
Pinout menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
4.4.4
Window menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
4.4.5
Help menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
4.5
MCUs selection window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
4.6
Import Project window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
4.7
Set unused / Reset used GPIOs windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
4.8
Project Settings Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
4.9
Update Manager Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
4.10
About Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
4.11
Pinout view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
4.12
4.13
4.14
4.11.1
IP tree pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
4.11.2
Chip view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
4.11.3
Chip view advanced actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
4.11.4
Keep Current Signals Placement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
4.11.5
Pinning and labeling signals on pins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Configuration view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
4.12.1
IP and Middleware Configuration window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
4.12.2
User Constants configuration window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
4.12.3
GPIO Configuration window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
4.12.4
DMA Configuration window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
4.12.5
NVIC Configuration window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Clock tree configuration view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
4.13.1
Clock tree configuration functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
4.13.2
Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
4.13.3
STM32F43x/42x power-over drive feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
4.13.4
Clock tree glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Power Consumption Calculator (PCC) view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
4.14.1
Building a power consumption sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
4.14.2
Configuring a step in the power sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
4.14.3
Managing user-defined power sequence and reviewing results . . . . . 104
4.14.4
Power sequence step parameters glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
4.14.5
Battery glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
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STM32CubeMX C Code generation overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
5.1
Standard STM32Cube code generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
5.2
Custom code generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
Tutorial 1: From pinout to project C code generation
using an STM32F4 MCU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
6.1
Creating a new STM32CubeMX Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
6.2
Configuring the MCU pinout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
6.3
Saving the project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
6.4
Generating the report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
6.5
Configuring the MCU Clock tree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
6.6
Configuring the MCU initialization parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
6.7
6.6.1
Initial conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
6.6.2
Configuring the peripherals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
6.6.3
Configuring the GPIOs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
6.6.4
Configuring the DMAs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
6.6.5
Configuring the middleware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Generating a complete C project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
6.7.1
Setting project options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
6.7.2
Downloading firmware package and generating the C code . . . . . . . . 136
6.8
Building and updating the C code project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
6.9
Switching to another MCU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
7
Tutorial 2 - Example of FatFs on an SD card using
STM32429I-EVAL evaluation board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
8
Tutorial 3- Using PCC to optimize the embedded
application power consumption and more . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
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8.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
8.2
Application example description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
8.3
Using the Power Consumption Calculator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
8.3.1
Creating a PCC sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
8.3.2
Optimizing application power consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
FAQ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
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On the Pinout configuration pane, why does STM32CubeMX
move some functions when I add a new peripheral mode? . . . . . . . . . . 166
9.2
How can I manually force a function remapping? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
9.3
Why are some pins highlighted in yellow or in light green in
the Chip view? Why cannot I change the function of some
pins (when I click some pins, nothing happens)? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
9.4
Why do I get the error “Java 7 update 45’ when installing
‘Java 7 update 45’ or a more recent version of the JRE? . . . . . . . . . . . 166
9.5
Why does the RTC multiplexer remain inactive on the Clock tree view? 167
9.6
How can I select LSE and HSE as clock source and
change the frequency? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
9.7
Why STM32CubeMX does not allow me to configure PC13,
PC14, PC15 and PI8 as outputs when one of them
is already configured as an output? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Appendix A STM32CubeMX pin assignment rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
A.1
Block consistency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
A.2
Block inter-dependency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
A.3
One block = one peripheral mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
A.4
Block remapping (STM32F10x only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
A.5
Function remapping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
A.6
Block shifting (only for STM32F10x and when
“Keep Current Signals placement” is unchecked) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
A.7
Setting and clearing a peripheral mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
A.8
Mapping a function individually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
A.9
GPIO signals mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Appendix B STM32CubeMX C code generation design
choices and limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
B.1
STM32CubeMX generated C code and user sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
B.2
STM32CubeMX design choices for peripheral initialization . . . . . . . . . . 180
B.3
STM32CubeMX design choices and limitations for
middleware initialization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
B.3.1
Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
B.3.2
USB Host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
B.3.3
USB Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
B.3.4
FatFs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
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B.3.5
FreeRTOS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
B.3.6
LwIP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Appendix C STM32 microcontrollers naming conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Appendix D STM32 microcontrollers power consumption parameters . . . . . 188
D.1
D.2
Appendix E
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Power modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
D.1.1
STM32L1 series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
D.1.2
STM32F4 series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
D.1.3
STM32L0 series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Power consumption ranges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
D.2.1
STM32L1 series feature 3 VCORE ranges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
D.2.2
STM32F4 series feature several VCORE scales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
D.2.3
STM32L0 series feature 3 VCORE ranges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
STM32Cube embedded software packages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Revision history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
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List of tables
Table 1.
Table 2.
Table 3.
Table 4.
Table 5.
Table 6.
Table 7.
Table 8.
Table 9.
Table 10.
Table 11.
Table 12.
Table 13.
Table 14.
Table 15.
Table 16.
Command line summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Welcome page shortcuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
File menu functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Project menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Pinout menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Window menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Help menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
IP tree pane - icons and color scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
STM32CubeMX Chip view - Icons and color scheme. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
IP configuration buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
IP Configuration window buttons and tooltips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Clock tree view widget . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Voltage scaling versus power over-drive and HCLK frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Relations between power over-drive and HCLK frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Document revision history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
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List of figures
Figure 1.
Figure 2.
Figure 3.
Figure 4.
Figure 5.
Figure 6.
Figure 7.
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Figure 10.
Figure 11.
Figure 12.
Figure 13.
Figure 14.
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Figure 36.
Figure 37.
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Figure 39.
Figure 40.
Figure 41.
Figure 42.
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Figure 44.
Figure 45.
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Overview of STM32CubeMX C code generation flow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Example of STM32CubeMX installation in interactive mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
STM32Cube Installation Wizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Auto-install command line. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Adding STM32CubeMX plug-in archive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Installing STM32CubeMX plug-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Closing STM32CubeMX perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Uninstalling STM32CubeMX plug-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Opening Eclipse plug-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
STM32CubeMX perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Displaying Windows default proxy settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Updater Settings window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Connection Parameters tab - No proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Connection Parameters tab - Use System proxy parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Connection Parameters tab - Manual Configuration of Proxy Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
New library Manager window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Removing libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Removing library confirmation message. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Library deletion progress window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
STM32CubeMX Welcome page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
New Project window - MCU selector. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
New Project window - board selector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
STM32CubeMX Main window upon MCU selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
STM32CubeMX Main window upon board selection
(Peripheral default option unchecked) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
STM32CubeMX Main window upon board selection
(Peripheral default option checked) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Pinout menus (Pinout tab selected) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Pinout menus (Pinout tab not selected) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
MCU selection menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Error message obtained when importing from different series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
New board project ready to be imported. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Automatic project import . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Manual project import . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Import Project menu - Try import with errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Import Project menu - Successful import after adjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Set unused pins window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Reset used pins window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Set unused GPIO pins with Keep Current Signals Placement checked . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Set unused GPIO pins with Keep Current Signals Placement unchecked . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Project Settings window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Project folder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Project Settings Code Generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
About window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
STM32CubeMX Pinout view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Chip view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Red highlights and tooltip example: no mode configuration available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Orange highlight and tooltip example: some configurations unavailable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
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Figure 47.
Figure 48.
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Figure 90.
Figure 91.
List of figures
Tooltip example: all configurations unavailable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Modifying pin assignments from the Chip view. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Example of remapping in case of block of pins consistency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Pins/Signals Options window. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
STM32CubeMX Configuration view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Configuration window tabs for GPIO, DMA and NVIC settings
(STM32F4 series) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
IP Configuration window (STM32F4 series) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
User Constants window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Extract of the generated mxconstants.h file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Using constants for peripheral parameter settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Specifying user constant value and name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Deleting user constant not allowed when
constant already used for another constant definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Deleting a user constant used for parameter configurationConfirmation request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Deleting a user constant used for peripheral configuration Consequence on peripheral configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Searching user constants list for name. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Searching user constants list for value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
GPIO Configuration window - GPIO selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
GPIO Configuration window - displaying GPIO settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
GPIO configuration grouped by IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Multiple Pins Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Adding a new DMA request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
DMA Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
DMA MemToMem configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
NVIC Configuration window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
STM32F429xx Clock Tree configuration view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Clock Tree configuration view with errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Clock tree configuration: enabling RTC, RCC Clock source
and outputs from Pinout view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Clock tree configuration: RCC Peripheral Advanced parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Power Consumption Calculator default view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Battery selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Building a power consumption sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Step management functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Edit Step window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Enabling the transition checker option on an already configured sequence all transitions valid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Enabling the transition checker option on an already configured sequence at least one transition invalid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Transition checker option -show log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Power consumption sequence: new step default view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Interpolated Power Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
ADC selected in Pinout view. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
PCC Step configuration window: ADC enabled using import pinout. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Power Consumption Calculator view after sequence building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Sequence table management functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
PCC Edit Step window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Power Consumption: Peripherals Consumption Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Description of the Results area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
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List of figures
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Peripheral power consumption tooltip. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Labels for pins generating define statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
User constant generating define statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Duplicate labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
extra_templates folder – default content. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
extra_templates folder with user templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Project root folder with corresponding custom generated files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
User custom folder for templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Custom folder with corresponding custom generated files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
MCU selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Pinout view with MCUs selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Pinout view without MCUs selection window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
GPIO pin configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Timer configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Simple pinout configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Save Project As window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Generate Project Report - New project creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Generate Project Report - Project successfully created . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Clock tree view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
HSI clock enabled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
HSE clock source disabled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
HSE clock source enabled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
External PLL clock source enabled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Configuration view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Case of IP without configuration parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Timer 3 configuration window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Timer 3 configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Enabling Timer 3 interrupt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
GPIO configuration color scheme and tooltip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
GPIO mode configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
DMA Parameters configuration window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
FatFs disabled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
USB Host configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
FatFs over USB mode enabled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Configuration view with FatFs and USB enabled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
FatFs IP instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
FatFs define statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Project Settings and toolchain choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Project Settings menu - Code Generator tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Missing firmware package warning message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Error during download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Updater settings for download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Updater settings with connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Downloading the firmware package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Unzipping the firmware package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
C code generation completion message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
C code generation output folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
C code generation output: Projects folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
C code generation for EWARM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
STM32CubeMX generated project open in IAR IDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
IAR options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
SWD connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
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Figure 144.
Figure 145.
Figure 146.
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Figure 156.
Figure 157.
Figure 158.
Figure 159.
Figure 160.
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Figure 163.
Figure 164.
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Figure 167.
Figure 168.
Figure 169.
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Figure 171.
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Figure 173.
Figure 174.
Figure 175.
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Figure 178.
Figure 179.
Figure 180.
Figure 181.
Figure 182.
Figure 183.
Figure 184.
Figure 185.
Figure 186.
Figure 187.
List of figures
Project building log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
User Section 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
User Section 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Import Project menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Project Import status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Board selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
SDIO IP configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
FatFs mode configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
RCC peripheral configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Clock tree view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Project Settings menu - Code Generator tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
C code generation completion message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
IDE workspace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Power Consumption Calculation example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
PCC VDD and battery selection menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
PCC Sequence table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
PCC sequence results before optimization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Step 1 optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Step 5 optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Step 6 optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Step 7 optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Step 8 optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Step 10 optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
PCC Sequence results after optimizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Java Control Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Pinout view - Enabling the RTC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Pinout view - Enabling LSE and HSE clocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Pinout view - Setting LSE/HSE clock frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Block mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Block remapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Block remapping - example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Block remapping - example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Block inter-dependency - SPI signals assigned to PB3/4/5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Block inter-dependency - SPI1_MISO function assigned to PA6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
One block = one peripheral mode - I2C1_SMBA function assigned to PB5. . . . . . . . . . . 176
Block remapping - example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Function remapping example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Block shifting not applied . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Block shifting applied . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
FreeRTOS HOOK functions to be completed by user . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
FreeRTOS elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
LwIP configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
STM32 microcontroller part numbering scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
STM32Cube Embedded Software package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
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STM32Cube overview
STMCube™ is an STMicroelectronics original initiative to ease developers life by reducing
development efforts, time and cost. STM32Cube covers STM32 portfolio.
STM32Cube includes:
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•
The STM32CubeMX, a graphical software configuration tool that allows to generate C
initialization C code using graphical wizards.
•
A comprehensive embedded software platform, delivered per series (such as
STM32CubeF2 for STM32F2 series and STM32CubeF4 for STM32F4 series)
–
The STM32Cube HAL, an STM32 abstraction layer embedded software, ensuring
maximized portability across STM32 portfolio
–
A consistent set of middleware components such as RTOS, USB, TCP/IP,
Graphics
–
All embedded software utilities coming with a full set of examples.
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2
Getting started with STM32CubeMX
2.1
Principles
Customers need to quickly identify the MCU that best meets their requirements (core
architecture, features, memory size, performance…). While board designers main concerns
are to optimize the microcontroller pin configuration for their board layout and to fulfill the
application requirements (choice of peripherals operating modes), embedded system
developers are more interested in developing new applications for a specific target device,
and migrating existing designs to different microcontrollers.
The time taken to migrate to new platforms and update the C code to new firmware drivers
adds unnecessary delays to the project. STM32CubeMX was developed within STM32Cube
initiative which purpose is to meet customer key requirements to maximize software reuse
and minimize the time to create the target system:
•
Software reuse and application design portability are achieved through STM32Cube
firmware solution proposing a common Hardware Abstraction Layer API across STM32
portfolio.
•
Optimized migration time is achieved thanks to STM32CubeMX built-in knowledge of
STM32 microcontrollers, peripherals and middleware (LwIP and USB communication
protocol stacks, FatFs file system for small embedded systems, FreeRTOS).
STM32CubeMX graphical interface performs the following functions:
•
Fast and easy configuration of the MCU pins, clock tree and operating modes for the
selected peripherals and middleware
•
Generation of pin configuration report for board designers
•
Generation of a complete project with all the necessary libraries and initialization C
code to set up the device in the user defined operating mode. The project can be
directly imported in the selected application development environment (for a selection
of supported IDEs) to proceed with application development (see Figure 1).
During the configuration process, STM32CubeMX detects conflicts and invalid settings and
highlights them through meaningful icons and useful tool tips.
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Figure 1. Overview of STM32CubeMX C code generation flow
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2.2
Getting started with STM32CubeMX
Key features
STM32CubeMX comes with the following features:
•
Project management
STM32CubeMX allows creating, saving and loading previously saved projects:
–
When STM32CubeMX is launched, the user can choose to create a new project or
to load a previously saved project.
–
Saving the project saves user settings and configuration performed within the
project in an .ioc file that will be used the next time the project will be loaded in
STM32CubeMX.
STM32CubeMX projects come in two flavors:
•
–
MCU configuration only: .ioc file can be saved anywhere
–
MCU configuration with C code generation: in this case .ioc files are saved in a
project dedicated folder along with the generated source C code.
Easy MCU and STMicroelectronics board selection
When starting a new project, a dedicated window opens to select either a
microcontroller or an STMicroelectronics board from STM32 portfolio. Different filtering
options are available to ease the MCU and board selection.
•
•
Easy pinout configuration
–
From the Pinout view, the user can select the peripherals from a list and configure
the peripheral modes required for the application. STM32CubeMX assigns and
configures the pins accordingly.
–
For more advanced users, it is also possible to directly map a peripheral function
to a physical pin using the Chip view. The signals can be locked on pins to prevent
STM32CubeMX conflict solver from moving the signal to another pin.
–
Pinout configuration can be exported as a .csv file.
Complete project generation
The project generation includes pinout, firmware and middleware initialization C code
for a set of IDEs. It is based on STM32Cube embedded software libraries. The
following actions can be performed:
–
Starting from the previously defined pinout, the user can proceed with the
configuration of middleware, clock tree, services (RNG, CRC, etc...) and IP
peripheral parameters. STM32CubeMX generates the corresponding initialization
C code. The result is a project directory including generated main.c file and C
header files for configuration and initialization, plus a copy of the necessary HAL
and middleware libraries as well as specific files for the selected IDE.
–
The user can modify the generated source files by adding user-defined C code in
user dedicated sections. STM32CubeMX ensures that the user C code is
preserved upon next C code generation (the user C code is commented if it is no
longer relevant for the current configuration).
–
From the Project settings menu, the user can select the development tool chain
(IDE) for which the C code has to be generated. STM32CubeMX ensures that the
IDE relevant project files are added to the project folder so that the project can be
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directly imported as a new project within third party IDE (IAR™ EWARM, Keil™
MDK-ARM, Atollic® TrueStudio and AC6 System Workbench for STM32).
•
Power consumption calculation
Starting with the selection of a microcontroller part number and a battery type, the user
can define a sequence of steps representing the application life cycle and parameters
(choice of frequencies, enabled peripherals, step duration). STM32CubeMX Power
Consumption Calculator returns the corresponding power consumption and battery life
estimates.
•
Clock tree configuration
STM32CubeMX offers a graphical representation of the clock tree as it can be found in
the device reference manual. The user can change the default settings (clock sources,
prescaler and frequency values). The clock tree will be updated accordingly. Invalid
settings and limitations are highlighted and documented with tool tips.
•
Automatic updates of STM32CubeMX and STM32Cube firmware packages
STM32CubeMX comes with an updater mechanism that can be configured for
automatic or on-demand check for updates. It supports STM32CubeMX self-updates
as well as STM32Cube firmware library package updates.
•
Report generation
.pdf and .csv reports can be generated to document user configuration work.
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Rules and limitations
•
C code generation covers only peripheral and middleware initialization. It is based on
STM32Cube HAL firmware libraries.
•
STM32CubeMX configuration files (.ioc extension) can be saved in the same folder
when they target pin configuration only but require a dedicated folder when they cover
configuration for C code generation.
•
Refer to Appendix A for a description of pin assignment rules.
•
Refer to Appendix B for a description of STM32CubeMX C code generation design
choices and limitations.
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3
Installing and running STM32CubeMX
3.1
System requirements
3.1.1
Supported operating systems and architectures
•
•
•
3.1.2
Windows® 7: 32-bit (x86), 64-bit (x64)
Windows® 8: 32-bit (x86), 64-bit (x64)
Memory prerequisites
•
3.1.3
Windows® XP: 32-bit (x86)
Recommended minimum RAM: 2 Gbytes.
Software requirements
The following software must be installed:
•
Java Run Time Environment for 1.7.0_45 and 1.7.0_80
If Java is not installed on your computer or if you have an old version, STM32CubeMX
installer will open the Java download web page and stop.
•
For Eclipse plug-in installation only, install one of the following IDE:
–
Eclipse IDE Juno (4.2)
–
Eclipse Luna (4.4)
–
Eclipse Kepler (4.3)
–
Eclipse Mars (4.5)
3.2
Installing/uninstalling STM32CubeMX standalone version
3.2.1
Installing STM32CubeMX standalone version
To install STM32CubeMX, follow the steps below:
1.
Download the latest STM32CubeMX installation package from
http://www.st.com/stm32cube.
2.
Download STM32CubeMX-setup.zip to your local disk and extract the STM32CubeMXsetup.exe file.
3.
Double-click STM32CubeMX-setup.exe to launch the installation wizard.
4.
If the proper version of the Java Runtime Environment (version 1.7_45 or newer) is not
installed, the wizard will propose to download it and stop. Restart STM32CubeMX
installation once Java installation is complete. Refer to Section 9: FAQ for issues when
installing the JRE.
5.
If the installation was successful, the STM32CubeMX icon is displayed on the desktop
and STM32CubeMX application is available from the Program menu. STM32CubeMX
.ioc files are displayed with a cube icon and double-clicking them opens up them using
STM32CubeMX.
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Note:
Only the latest installation of STM32CubeMX will be enabled in the program menu. Previous
versions can be kept on your PC (not recommended) when different installation folders have
been selected. Otherwise, the new installation overwrites the previous ones.
3.2.2
Installing STM32CubeMX from command line
There are 2 ways to launch an installation from a console window: either in console
interactive mode or via a script.
Interactive mode
To perform interactive installation, type the following command:
java –jar SetupSTM32CubeMX-4.8.0.exe –console
At each installation step, an answer is requested (see Figure 2 below).
Figure 2. Example of STM32CubeMX installation in interactive mode
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Auto-install mode
At end of an installation, performed either using STM32CubeMX graphical wizard or console
mode, it is possible to generate an auto-installation script containing user installation
preferences (see Figure 3 below):
Figure 3. STM32Cube Installation Wizard
You can then launch the installation just by typing the following command:
java –jar SetupSTM32CubeMX-4.8.0.exe auto-install.xml
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Figure 4. Auto-install command line
3.2.3
Uninstalling STM32CubeMX standalone version
To uninstall STM32CubeMX, follow the steps below:
3.3
1.
Open the Windows Control panel.
2.
Select Programs and Features to display the list of programs installed on your
computer.
3.
Right click on STM32CubeMX and select the uninstall function.
Installing STM32CubeMX plug-in version
STM32CubeMX plug-in can be installed within Eclipse IDE development tool chain.
Installation related procedures are described in this section.
3.3.1
Downloading STM32CubeMX plug-in installation package
To download STM32CubeMX plug-in, follow the sequence below:
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1.
Go to http://www.st.com/stm32cube.
2.
Download STM32CubeMX- Eclipse-plug-in .zip file to your local disk.
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3.3.2
Installing and running STM32CubeMX
Installing STM32CubeMX as an Eclipse IDE plug-in
To install STM32CubeMX as an Eclipse IDE plug-in, follow the sequence below:
1.
Launch the Eclipse environment.
2.
Select Help > Install New Software from the main menu bar. The Available Software
window appears.
3.
Click Add. The Add Repository window opens.
4.
Click Archive. The Repository archive browser opens.
5.
Select the STM32CubeMX- Eclipse-plug-in .zip file that you downloaded and click
Open (see Figure 5).
6.
Click OK in the Add Repository dialog box,
7.
Check STM32CubeMX_Eclipse_plug-in and click Next (see Figure 6).
8.
Click Next in the Install Details dialog box.
9.
Click ”I accept the terms of the license agreement” in the Review Licenses dialog box
and then click Finish.
10. Click OK in the Security Warning menu.
11. Click OK when requested to restart Eclipse IDE (see Section 3.4.2: Running
STM32CubeMX in command-line mode).
Figure 5. Adding STM32CubeMX plug-in archive
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Figure 6. Installing STM32CubeMX plug-in
3.3.3
Uninstalling STM32CubeMX as Eclipse IDE plug-in
To uninstall STM32CubeMX plug-in in Eclipse IDE, follow sequence below:
1.
In Eclipse, right-click STM32CubeMX perspective Icon (see Figure 7) and select Close.
2.
From Eclipse Help menu, select Install New Software.
3.
Click Installed Software tab, then select STM32CubeMX and click Uninstall.
4.
Click Finish in Uninstall Details menu (see Figure 8).
Figure 7. Closing STM32CubeMX perspective
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Figure 8. Uninstalling STM32CubeMX plug-in
3.4
Launching STM32CubeMX
3.4.1
Running STM32CubeMX as standalone application
To run STM32CubeMX as a standalone application:
3.4.2
•
Select STM32CubeMX from Program Files > ST Microelectronics > STM32CubeMX.
•
Or double-click STM32CubeMX icon on your desktop.
Running STM32CubeMX in command-line mode
To facilitate its integration with other tools, STM32CubeMX provides a command-line mode.
Using a set of commands, you can:
•
Load an MCU
•
Load an existing configuration
•
Save a current configuration
•
Set project parameters and generate corresponding code.
Three command-line modes are available:
•
To run STM32CubeMX in interactive command-line mode, use the following command
line:
java -jar STM32CubeMX.exe –i
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The “MX>” prompt will be displayed, ready to accept commands.
To run STM32CubeMX in command-line mode getting commands from a script, use
the following command line:
java -jar "C:\Program Files
\STMicroelectronics\STM32Cube\STM32CubeMX\STM32cubeMX.exe” -i
All the commands to be executed must be listed in the script file.
An example of script file content is shown below:
load STM32F417VETx
project name MyFirstMXGeneratedProject
project toolchain "MDK-ARM v4"
project path C:\STM32CubeProjects\STM32F417VETx
project generate
exit
•
To run STM32CubeMX in command-line mode getting commands from a scripts and
without UI, use the following command line:
java –jar STM32CubeMX.exe –q <script filename>
Here again, the user can enter commands after the MX prompt.
See Table 1 for available commands.
Table 1. Command line summary
Command line
Example
Display the list of available
commands
help
load <mcu>
Load the selected MCU
load STM32F101RCTx
load STM32F101Z(F-G)Tx
config load <filename>
Load a previously saved
configuration
configuration load
C:\Cube\ccmram\ccmram.ioc
config save <filename>
Save the current configuration
configuration save
C:\Cube\ccmram\ccmram.ioc
config saveext <filename>
Save the current configuration
with all parameters, including
those for which values have
been kept to defaults
(unchanged by the user).
configuration saveext
C:\Cube\ccmram\ccmram.ioc
config saveas <filename>
Save the current project under
a new name
configuration saveas
C:\Cube\ccmram2\ccmram2.ioc
csv pinout <filename>
Export the current pin
configuration as a csv file. This
file could later be imported into
a board layout tool.
Csv pinout mypinout.csv
script <filename>
Run all commands in the script
file. There must be one
command per line.
script myscript.txt
help
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Purpose
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Table 1. Command line summary (continued)
Command line
project couplefilesbyip <0|1>
generate code <path>
This code generation option
allows choosing between 0 for
generating the peripheral
initializations in the main or 1
for generating each peripheral
initialization in dedicated .c/.h
files.
Example
project couplefilesbyip 1
Generate only “STM32CubeMX
generated” code and not a
complete project that would
include STM32Cube firmware
generate code C:\mypath
libraries and Toolchains project
files.
To generate a project, use
“project generate”.
Specify the tool chain to be
used for the project. Then, use
the “project generate”
command to generate the
project for that tool chain.
project toolchain EWARM
project toolchain “MDK-ARM
V4”
project toolchain “MDK-ARM
V5”
project toolchain TrueSTUDIO
project toolchain SW4STM32
project name <name>
Specify the project name
project name ccmram
project path <path>
Specify the path where to
generate the project
project path C:\Cube\ccmram
project generate
Generate the full project
project generate
End STM32CubeMX process
exit
project toolchain <toolchain>
exit
3.4.3
Purpose
Running STM32CubeMX plug-in from Eclipse IDE
To run STM32CubeMX plug-in from Eclipse:
1.
Launch Eclipse environment.
2.
Once Eclipse IDE is open, click open new perspective:
3.
Select STM32CubeMX to open STM32CubeMX as a perspective (see Figure 9).
4.
STM32CubeMX perspective opens (see Figure 10). Enter STM32CubeMX user
interface via the Welcome menus.
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Figure 9. Opening Eclipse plug-in
Figure 10. STM32CubeMX perspective
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3.5
Installing and running STM32CubeMX
Getting STM32Cube updates
STM32CubeMX implements a mechanism to access the internet and to:
•
Perform self-updates of STM32CubeMX and of the STM32Cube firmware packages
installed on the user computer
•
Download new firmware packages and patches
Installation and update related sub-menus are available under the Help menu.
Off-line updates can also be performed on computers without internet access (see
Figure 16). This is done by browsing the filesystem and selecting available STM32Cube
firmware zip packages.
If the PC on which STM32CubeMX runs is connected to a computer network using a proxy
server, STM32CubeMX needs to connect to that server to access the internet, get selfupdates and download firmware packages. Refer to Section 3.5.1: Updater configuration for
a description of this connection configuration.
To view Windows default proxy settings, select Internet options from the Control panel and
select LAN settings from the Connections tab (see Figure 11).
Figure 11. Displaying Windows default proxy settings
Several proxy types exist and different computer network configurations are possible:
•
Without proxy: the application directly accesses the web (Windows default
configuration).
•
Proxy without login/password
•
Proxy with login/password: when using an internet browser, a dialog box opens and
prompts the user to enter his login/password.
•
Web proxies with login/password: when using an internet browser, a web page opens
and prompts the user to enter his login/password.
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If necessary, contact your IT administrator for proxy information (proxy type, http address,
port).
STM32CubeMX does not support web proxies. In this case, the user will not be able to
benefit from the update mechanism and will need to manually copy the STM32 firmware
packages from http://www.st.com/stm32cube to the repository. To do it, follow the sequence
below:
3.5.1
1.
Go to http://www.st.com/stm32cube and download the relevant STM32Cube firmware
package from the Associated Software section.
2.
Unzip the zip package to your STM32Cube repository. Find out the default repository
folder location in the Updater settings tab as shown in Figure 12 (you might need to
update it to use a different location or name).
Updater configuration
To perform STM32Cube new library package installation or updates, the tool must be
configured as follows:
1.
2.
Select Help > Updater Settings to open the Updater Settings window.
From the Updater Settings tab (see Figure 12)
a)
Specify the repository destination folder where the downloaded packages will be
stored.
b)
Enable/Disable the automatic check for updates.
Figure 12. Updater Settings window
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3.
In the Connection Parameters tab, specify the proxy server settings appropriate for
your network configuration by selecting a proxy type among the following possibilities:
–
No Proxy (see Figure 13)
–
Use System Proxy Parameters (see Figure 14)
On Windows, proxy parameters will be retrieved from the PC system settings.
Uncheck “Require Authentication” if a proxy server without login/password
configuration is used.
–
Manual Configuration of Proxy Server (see Figure 15)
Enter the Proxy server http address and port number. Enter login/password
information or uncheck “Require Authentication” if a proxy server without
login/password configuration is used.
4.
Click the Check Connection button to verify if the connection works. A green check
mark appears to confirm that the connection operates
correctly
:
Figure 13. Connection Parameters tab - No proxy
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Figure 14. Connection Parameters tab - Use System proxy parameters
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Figure 15. Connection Parameters tab - Manual Configuration of Proxy Server
3.5.2
5.
Select Help > Install New Libraries sub-menu to select among a list of possible
packages to install.
6.
If the tool is configured for manual checks, select Help > Check for Updates to find out
about new tool versions or firmware library patches available to install.
Downloading new libraries
To download new libraries, follow the steps below:
1.
Select Help > Install New Libraries to open the New Libraries Manager window.
If the installation was performed using STM32CubeMX, all the packages available for
download are displayed along with their version including the version currently installed
on the user PC (if any), and the latest version available from http://www.st.com.
If no Internet access is available at that time, choose “Local File”. Then, browse to
select the zip file of the desired STM32Cube firmware package that has been
previously downloaded from st.com. An integrity check is performed on the file to
ensure that it is fully supported by STM32CubeMX.
The package is marked in green when the version installed matches the latest version
available from http://www.st.com.
2.
Click the checkbox to select a package then “Install Now” to start the download.
See Figure 16 for an example.
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Figure 16. New library Manager window
3.5.3
Removing libraries
Proceed as follows to clean up the repository from old library versions thus saving disk
space:
1.
Select Help > Install New Libraries to open the New Libraries Manager window.
2.
Click a green checkbox to select a package available in stm32cube repository.
3.
Click the Remove Now button and confirm. A progress window then opens to show the
deletion status.
Refer to Figure 17 to Figure 19 for an example
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Figure 17. Removing libraries
Figure 18. Removing library confirmation message
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Figure 19. Library deletion progress window
3.5.4
Checking for updates
When the updater is configured for automatic checks, it regularly verifies if updates are
available. In this case, a green arrow icon
appears on the tool bar.
When automatic checks have been disabled in the updater settings window, the user can
manually check if updates are available:
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1.
Click the icon to open the Update Manager window or Select Help > Check for
Updates. All the updates available for the user current installation are listed.
2.
Click the check box to select a package, and then Install Now to download the update.
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4
STM32CubeMX User Interface
STM32CubeMX User Interface
STM32CubeMX user interface consists of a main window, a menu bar, a toolbar, four views
(Pinout, Configuration, Clock Configuration, Power Consumption Calculator) and a set of
help windows (MCUs selection, Update manager, About). All these menus are described in
the following sections.
For C code generation, although the user can switch back and forth between the different
configuration views, it is recommended to follow the sequence below:
1.
Select the relevant IPs and their operating modes from the Pinout view.
2.
Configure the clock tree from the clock configuration view.
In the Pinout view, configure the RCC peripheral by enabling the external clocks,
master output clocks, audio input clocks (when relevant for your application). This
automatically displays more options on the Clock tree view (see Figure 23).
4.1
3.
Configure the parameters required to initialize the IP operating modes from the
configuration view.
4.
Generate the initialization C code.
Welcome page
The Welcome page is the first window that opens up when launching STM32CubeMX
program. It remains open as long as the application is running. Closing it closes down the
application. Refer to Figure 20 and to Table 2 for a description of the Welcome page.
Figure 20. STM32CubeMX Welcome page
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Table 2. Welcome page shortcuts
Name
New Project
Launches STM32CubeMX new project creation by opening the New
project window (select an MCU from the MCU selector tab or a board
configuration from the Board selector tab).
Load Project
Opens a browser window to select a previously saved configuration (.ioc
file) and loads it.
When upgrading to a new version of STM32CubeMX, make sure to
always backup your projects before loading the project (especially when
the project includes user code).
Help
4.2
Description
Opens the user manual.
New project window
This window shows two tabs to choose from:
•
The MCU selector tab offering a list of target processors
•
A Board selector tab showing a list of STMicroelectronics boards.
The MCU selector allows filtering on various criteria: series, lines, packages, peripherals
and additional MCU characteristics such as memory size or number of I/Os (see Figure 21).
The Board selector allows filtering on STM32 board types, series and peripherals (see
Figure 22). Only the default board configuration is proposed. Alternative board
configurations obtained by reconfiguring jumpers or by using solder bridges are not
supported.
When a board is selected, the Pinout view is initialized with the relevant MCU part number
along with the pin assignments for the LCD, buttons, communication interfaces, LEDs,
etc...(see Figure 24). Optionally, the user can choose to initialize it with the default
peripheral modes (see Figure 25).
When a board configuration is selected, the signals change to 'pinned', i.e. they cannot be
moved automatically by STM32CubeMX constraint solver (user action on the peripheral
tree, such as the selection of a peripheral mode, will not move the signals). This ensures
that the user configuration remains compatible with the board.
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Figure 21. New Project window - MCU selector
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Figure 22. New Project window - board selector
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4.3
STM32CubeMX User Interface
Main window
Once an STM32 part number or a board has been selected or a previously saved project
has been loaded, the main window displays all STM32CubeMX components and menus
(see Figure 23). Refer to Section 4.3 for a detailed description of the toolbar and menus.
Figure 23. STM32CubeMX Main window upon MCU selection
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Selecting a board while keeping the peripheral default modes option unchecked,
automatically sets the pinout for this board. However, no peripheral modes are set. The user
can then manually select from the peripheral tree the peripheral modes required for his
application (see Figure 24).
Figure 24. STM32CubeMX Main window upon board selection
(Peripheral default option unchecked)
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Selecting a board with the peripheral default modes option checked, automatically sets both
the pinout and the default modes for the peripherals available on the board. This means that
STM32CubeMX will generate the C initialization code for all the peripherals available on the
board and not only for those relevant to the user application (see Figure 25).
Figure 25. STM32CubeMX Main window upon board selection
(Peripheral default option checked)
4.4
Toolbar and menus
The following menus are available from STM32CubeMX menu bar:
•
File menu
•
Project menu
•
Pinout menu (displayed only when the Pinout view has been selected)
•
Window menu
•
Help menu
STM32CubeMX menus and toolbars are described in the sections below.
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File menu
Refer to Table 3 for a description of the File menu and icons.
Table 3. File menu functions
Icon
Name
Description
New Project
Opens a new project window showing all supported MCUs and
well as a set of STMicroelectronics boards to choose from
Load Project
…
Loads an existing STM32CubeMX project configuration by
selecting an STM32CubeMX configuration .ioc file.
Opens a new window to select the configuration file to be imported
as well as the import settings.
The import is possible only if the following conditions are met:
– Start from an empty MCU configuration. The menu is disabled
Import Project
otherwise.
…
– Select MCUs within the same series.
A status window displays the warnings or errors detected when
checking for import conflicts. The user can then decide to cancel
the import.
4.4.2
Save Project
as …
Saves current project configuration (pinout, clock tree, IP, PCC) as
a new project. This action creates an .ioc file with user defined
name and located in the destination folder
Save Project
Saves current project
No icon
Close Project
Closes current project and switch back to the welcome page
No icon
Recent
Projects >
No icon
Exit
Displays the list of five most recently saved projects
Proposes to save the project if needed then close the application
Project menu
Refer to Table 4 for a description of the Project menu and icons.
Table 4. Project menu
Icon
Name
Description
Generates C initialization C code for current configuration
Generate Code (pinout, clocks, peripherals and middleware). Opens a window
for project settings if they have not been defined previously.
Generate
Report(1)
Generates current project configuration as a pdf file and a text
file.
Settings
Opens the project settings window to configure project name,
folder, select a toolchain and C code generation options
1. If the project was previously saved, the reports are generated at the same location as the project
configuration .ioc file. Otherwise, the user can choose the destination folder, and whether to save the
project configuration as an .ioc file or not.
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STM32CubeMX User Interface
Pinout menu
The Pinout menu and sub-menus shortcuts are available only when the Pinout tab is
selected (see Figure 26). They are hidden otherwise (see Figure 27). Refer to Table 5 for a
description of the Pinout menu and icons.
Figure 26. Pinout menus (Pinout tab selected)
Figure 27. Pinout menus (Pinout tab not selected)
Table 5. Pinout menu
Icon
No icon
Name
Description
Undo
Undoes last configuration steps (one by one)
Redo
Redoes steps that have been undone (one by one)
Pins/Signals
Options
Opens a window showing the list of all the configured pins
together with the name of the signal on the pin and a Label field
allowing the user to specify a label name for each pin of the list.
For this menu to be active, at least one pin must have been
configured.
Click the pin icon to pin/unpin signals individually.
Select multiple rows then right click to open contextual menu
and select action to pin or unpin all selected signals at once.
Click column header names to sort alphabetically by name or
according to placement on MCU.
Pinout search
field
Allows the user to search for a pin name, signal name or signal
label in the Pinout view. When it is found, the pin or set of pins
that matches the search criteria blinks on the Chip view. Click
the Chip view to stop blinking.
Show user
labels
Allows showing on the Chip view, the user-defined labels
instead of the names of the signals assigned to the pins.
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Table 5. Pinout menu (continued)
Icon
Name
Description
No icon
Clear Pinouts
Clears user pinout configuration in the Pinout window. Note that
this action clears from the configuration window the IPs that
have an influence on the pinout.
Clear Single
Clears signal assignments to pins for signals that have no
Mapped Signals associated mode (highlighted in orange and not pinned).
No icon
No icon
Set unused
GPIOs
Opens a window to specify the number of GPIOs to be
configure among the total number of GPIO pins that are not
used yet. Specify their mode: Input, Output or Analog
(recommended configuration to optimize power consumption).
No icon
Reset used
GPIOs
Opens a window to specify the number of GPIOs to be freed
among the total number of GPIO pins that are configured.
Generate csv
text pinout file
Collapse All
Generates pin configuration as a .csv text file
Collapses the IP / Middleware tree view
Resets to “Disabled” all peripherals and middleware modes that
have been enabled. The pins configured in these modes (green
Disable Modes color) are consequently reset to “Unused” (gray color). IPs and
middleware labels change from green to black (when unused)
or gray (when not available).
Expand All
Expands the IP/Middleware tree view to display all functional
modes.
Zooming in
Zooms in the chip pinout diagram
Best Fit
4.4.4
Adjusts the chip pinout diagram to the best fit size
Zooming out
Zooms out the chip pinout diagram
Keep current
signals
Placement
Available from toolbar only.
Prevents moving pin assignments to match a new IP operating
mode. It is recommended to use the new pinning feature that
can block each pin assignment individually and leave this
checkbox unchecked.
Window menu
The Window menu allows to access the Outputs function (see Table 6).
Table 6. Window menu
Name
Outputs
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Description
Opens the MCUs selection window at the bottom of STM32CubeMX Main
window.
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STM32CubeMX User Interface
Help menu
Refer to Table 7 for a description of the Help menu and icons.
Table 7. Help menu
Icons
Name
Description
Help Content
Opens the STM32CubeMX user manual
About...
Shows version information
Check for Updates
Shows the software and firmware release updates available for
download.
Shows all STM32CubeMX and firmware releases available for
Install New Libraries installation. Green check box indicates which ones are already
installed on you PC and up-to-date.
Updater Settings...
4.5
Opens the updater settings window to configure manual
versus automatic updates, proxy settings for internet
connections, repository folder where the downloaded software
and firmware releases will be stored.
MCUs selection window
This window lists all the MCUs of a given family that match the user criteria (series,
peripherals, package..) when an MCU was selected last.
Note:
Selecting a different MCU from the list resets the current project configuration and switches
to the new MCU. The user will be prompted to confirm this action before proceeding.
Figure 28. MCU selection menu
This window can be shown/hidden by selecting/unselecting Outputs from the Window
menu.
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Import Project window
The Import Project menu eases the porting of a previously-saved configuration to another
MCU of the same series.
If the series do not match, an error message is displayed and prevents to proceed further:
Figure 29. Error message obtained when importing from different series
By default the following settings are imported:
•
Pinout tab: MCU pins and corresponding peripheral modes.The import fails if the same
peripheral instances are not available in the target MCU.
•
Clock configuration tab: clock tree parameters.
•
Configuration tab: peripherals and middleware libraries initialization parameters.
•
Project settings: choice of toolchain and code generation options.
To import a project, proceed as follows:
1.
Select the Import project icon
that appears under the File menu after starting a
New Project and once an MCU has been selected.
The menu remains active as long as no user configuration settings are defined for the
new project, that is just after the MCU selection. It is disabled as soon as a user action
is performed on the project configuration.
2.
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Select File > Import Project for the dedicated Import project window to open. This
window allows to specify the following options:
–
The STM32CubeMX configuration file (.ioc) pathname of the project to import on
top of current empty project.
–
Whether to import the PCC configuration defined in the Power Consumption
Calculator tab or not.
–
Whether to import the project settings defined through the Project > Settings
menu: IDE selection and code generation options.
–
Whether to attempt to import the whole configuration (Automatic import) or only a
subset (Manual Import).
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a)
Automatic project import (see Figure 30)
Figure 30. Automatic project import
b)
Manual project import
In this case, checkboxes allow to manually select the set of peripherals (see
Figure 31).
Select the Try Import option to attempt importing.
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Figure 31. Manual project import
The Peripheral List indicates:
–
The peripheral instances configured in the project to be imported
–
The peripheral instances, if any exists for the MCU currently selected, to which the
configuration has to be imported. If several peripheral instances are candidate for
the import, the user needs to choose one.
Conflicts might occur when importing a smaller package with less pins or a lower-end
MCU with less peripheral options. Click the Try Import button to check for such
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conflicts: the Import Status window and the Peripheral list get refreshed to indicate
errors, warnings and whether the import has been successful or not:
–
Warning icons indicate that the user has selected a peripheral instance more than
once and that one of the import requests will not be performed. Figure 32 shows
an example where the ADC1 instance has been selected twice.
–
A cross sign indicates that there is a pinout conflict and that the configuration can
not be imported as such. In Figure 32, the SPI6 instance configuration can not be
imported on SPI3 because it conflicts with the previously selected SPI1
configuration.
The manual import can be used to refine import choices and resolve the issues raised
by the import trial. Figure 33 shows how to complete the import successfully, that is, in
this case, by unselecting the request for ADC2 and SPI1 imports.
The Show View function allows switching between the different configuration tabs
(pinout, clock tree, peripheral configuration) for checking influence of the "Try Import"
action before actual deployment on current project (see Figure 33).
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Figure 32. Import Project menu - Try import with errors
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Figure 33. Import Project menu - Successful import after adjustments
3.
Choose OK to import with the current status or Cancel to go back to the empty project
without importing.
Upon import, the Import icon gets grayed since the MCU is now configured and it is no
more possible to import a non-empty configuration.
4.7
Set unused / Reset used GPIOs windows
These windows allow configuring several pins at a time in the same GPIO mode.
To open them:
•
Note:
Select Pinout > Set unused GPIOs from the STM32CubeMX menu bar.
The user selects the number of GPIOs and lets STM32CubeMX choose the actual pins to
be configured or reset, among the available ones.
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Figure 34. Set unused pins window
•
Select Pinout > Reset used GPIOs from the STM32CubeMX menu bar.
Depending whether the Keep Current Signals Placement option is checked or not on
the toolbar, STM32CubeMX conflict solver will be able to move or not the GPIO signals
to other unused GPIOs:
–
When Keep Current Signals Placement is off (unchecked), STM32CubeMX
conflict solver can move the GPIO signals to unused pins in order to fit in another
peripheral mode.
–
When Keep Current Signals Placement is on (checked), GPIO signals will not be
moved and the number of possible peripheral modes becomes limited.
Refer to Figure 36 and Figure 37 and check the limitation in available peripheral
modes.
Figure 35. Reset used pins window
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Figure 36. Set unused GPIO pins with Keep Current Signals Placement checked
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Figure 37. Set unused GPIO pins with Keep Current Signals Placement unchecked
4.8
Project Settings Window
This window allows configuring the project: project name, project location, choice of
Integrated Development Environment tools (Keil MDK-ARM, IAR EW-ARM, Attolic
TrueStudio, AC6 SW4STM32 …), and C code generation options.
There are several ways to enter project settings information:
1.
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By selecting Project > Settings from the STM32CubeMX menu bar (see Figure 38).
The code generation will then be generated in the project folder tree shown in
Figure 39.
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Figure 38. Project Settings window
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Figure 39. Project folder
2.
By clicking Project > Generate code for the first time (see Figure 40).
Figure 40. Project Settings Code Generator
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3.
By selecting Save As for a project that includes C code generation (and not only pin
configuration).
Select the Code Generator tab to specify the following code generation options.
–
Copy all necessary libraries into the project folder: STM32CubeMX will copy to the
user project folder, the drivers libraries (HAL, CMSIS) and the middleware libraries
relevant to the user configuration (e.g. FatFs, USB, ..).
–
Copy only the necessary library files: STM32CubeMX will copy to the user project
folder only the library files relevant to the user configuration (e.g., SDIO HAL
driver from the HAL library,…).
–
Add the required library as referenced in the toolchain project configuration file. By
default, the required library files are copied to the user project. Select this option
for the configuration file to point to files in STM32CubeMX repository instead: the
user project folder will not hold a copy of the library files but only a reference to the
files in STM32CubeMX repository.
HAL settings options are also offers:
–
For the generated initialization code to set all free pins as analog for power
consumption optimization
–
To use or not the "Full Assert" function: the Define statement in the
stm32xx_hal_conf.h configuration file will be commented or uncommented,
respectively.
Note:
Useful tooltips are also available by hovering the mouse over the different options.
4.9
Update Manager Windows
Three windows can be accessed through the Help menu available from STM32CubeMX
menu bar:
1.
Select Help > Check for updates to open the Check Update Manager window and
find out about the latest software versions available for download.
2.
Select Help > Install new libraries to open the New Libraries Manager window and
find out about the software packages available for download.
3.
Select Help > Update settings to open the Updater settings window and configure
update mechanism settings (proxy settings, manual versus automatic updates).
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About Window
This window displays STM32CubeMX version information.
To open it, select Help > About from the STM32CubeMX menu bar.
Figure 41. About window
4.11
Pinout view
The Pinout view helps the user configuring the MCU pins based on a selection of
peripherals/middleware and of their operating modes.
Note:
For some middleware (USB, FATS, LwIP), a peripheral mode must be enabled before
activating the middleware mode. Tooltips guide the user through the configuration.
For FatFs, a user-defined mode has been introduced. This allows STM32CubeMX to
generate FatFs code without a predefined peripheral mode. Then, it will be up to the user to
connect the middleware with a user-defined peripheral by updating the generated
user_diskio.c/.h driver files with the necessary code.
Since STM32 MCUs allow a same pin to be used by different peripherals and for several
functions (alternate functions), the tool searches for the pinout configuration that best fits the
set of peripherals selected by the user. STM32CubeMX highlights the conflicts that cannot
be solved automatically.
The Pinout view left panel shows the IP tree and the right pane, a graphical representation
of the pinout for the selected package (e.g. BGA, QFP...) where each pin is represented with
its name (e.g. PC4) and its current alternate function assignment if any.
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STM32CubeMX offers two ways to configure the microcontroller:
•
From the IP tree by clicking the peripheral names and selecting the operating modes
(see Section 4.11.1: IP tree pane).
•
For advanced users, by clicking a pin on the Chip view to manually map it to a
peripheral function (see Section 4.11.2: Chip view).
In addition, selecting Pinout > Set unused GPIOs allows configuring in one shot several
unused pins in a given GPIO mode.
Note:
The Pinout view is automatically refreshed to display the resulting pinout configuration.
Pinout relevant menus and shortcuts are available when the Pinout view is active (see the
menu dedicated sections for details on the Pinout menus).
Figure 42. STM32CubeMX Pinout view
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IP tree pane
In this pane, the user can select the peripherals, services (DMA, RCC,...), middleware in the
modes corresponding to the application.
Note:
The peripheral tree panel is also accessible from the Configuration view. However, only the
peripherals and middleware modes without influence on the pinout can be configured
through this menu.
Icons and color schemes
Table 8 shows the icons and color scheme used in the IP tree pane.
Table 8. IP tree pane - icons and color scheme
Display
Peripheral status
The peripheral is not configured (no mode is set) and all
modes are available.
The peripheral is configured (at least one mode is set) and all
other modes are available
The peripheral is configured (one mode is set) and at least
one of its other modes is unavailable.
The peripheral is not configured (no mode is set) and at least
one of its modes is unavailable.
The peripheral is not configured (no mode is set) and no
mode is available. Move the mouse over the IP name to
display the tooltip describing the conflict.
Available peripheral mode configurations are shown in plain
black.
The warning yellow icon indicates that at least one mode
configuration is no longer available.
When no more configurations are left for a given peripheral
mode, this peripheral is highlighted in red.
Some modes depends on the configuration of other
peripherals or middleware modes. A tooltip explains the
dependencies when the conditions are not fulfilled.
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4.11.2
STM32CubeMX User Interface
Chip view
The Chip view shows, for the selected part number:
•
The MCU in a specific package (BGA, LQFP…)
•
The graphical representation of its pinout, each pin being represented with its name
(e.g. PC4: pin 4 of GPIO port C) and its current function assignment (e.g.
ETH_MII_RXD0) (see Figure 43 for an example).
The Chip view is automatically refreshed to match the user configuration performed via the
peripheral tree. It shows the pins current configuration state.
Assigning pins through the Chip view instead of the peripheral pane requires a good
knowledge of the MCU since each individual pin can be assigned to a specific function.
Tips and tricks
•
Use the mouse wheel to zoom in and out.
•
Click and drag the chip diagram to move it. Click best fit to reset it to best suited
position and size (see Table 5).
•
Use Pinout > Generic CSV pinout text file to export the pinout configuration into text
format.
•
Some basic controls, such as insuring blocks of pins consistency, are built-in. See
Appendix A: STM32CubeMX pin assignment rules for details.
Figure 43. Chip view
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Icons and color schemes
Table 9 shows the icons and color scheme used in the Chip view.
Table 9. STM32CubeMX Chip view - Icons and color scheme
Display
Pin information
Tooltip indicates the selected pin current configuration: alternate function
name, Reset state or GPIO mode.
Move your mouse over the pin name to display it.
When a pin features alternate pins corresponding to the function currently
selected, a popup message prompts the user to perform a CTRL + click to
display them.
The alternate pins available are highlighted in blue.
List of alternate functions that can be selected for a given pin. By default,
no alternate function is configured (pin in reset state).
Click the pin name to display the list.
When a function has been mapped to the pin, it is highlighted in blue.
When it corresponds to a well configured peripheral mode, the list caption
is shown in green.
Boot and reset pins are highlighted in khaki. Their configuration cannot be
changed.
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Table 9. STM32CubeMX Chip view - Icons and color scheme (continued)
Display
Pin information
Power dedicated pins are highlighted in yellow. Their configuration cannot
be changed.
Non-configured pins are shown in gray (default state).
When a signal assignment corresponds to a peripheral mode without
ambiguity, the pin color switches to green.
When the signal assignment does not correspond to a valid peripheral
mode configuration, the pin is shown in orange. Additional pins need to be
configured to achieve a valid mode configuration.
When a signal assignment corresponds to a peripheral mode without
ambiguity, the pins are shown in green.
As an example, assigning the PF2 pin to the I2C2_SMBA signal matches
to I2C2 mode without ambiguity and STM32CubeMX configures
automatically the other pins (PF0 and PF1) to complete the pin mode
configuration.
Tooltips
Move the mouse over IPs and IP modes that are unavailable or partially available to display
the tooltips describing the source of the conflict that is which pins are being used by which
peripherals.
As an example (see Figure 44), the Ethernet (ETH) peripheral is no longer available
because there is no possible mode configuration left. A tooltip indicates to which signal are
assigned the pins required for this mode (ADC1-IN0 signal, USART3 synchronous signal,
etc...).
Figure 44. Red highlights and tooltip example: no mode configuration available
In the next example (see Figure 45), the SDIO peripheral is partially available because at
least one of its modes is unavailable: the necessary pins are already assigned to the I2C
mode of the I2C3 peripheral.
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Figure 45. Orange highlight and tooltip example: some configurations unavailable
In this last example (see Figure 46) I2C2 peripheral is unavailable because there is no
mode function available. A tooltip shows for each function where all the remapped pins have
been allocated (USART3 synchronous mode).
Figure 46. Tooltip example: all configurations unavailable
4.11.3
Chip view advanced actions
Manually modifying pin assignments
To manually modify a pin assignment, follow the sequence below:
1.
Click the pin in the Chip view to display the list of all other possible alternate functions
together with the current assignment highlighted in blue (see Figure 47).
2.
Click to select the new function to assign to the pin.
Figure 47. Modifying pin assignments from the Chip view
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Manually remapping a function to another pin
To manually remap a function to another pin, follow the sequence below:
Caution:
1.
Press the CTRL key and click the pin in the Chip view. Possible pins for relocation, if
any, are highlighted in blue.
2.
Drag the function to the target pin.
A pin assignment performed from the Chip view overwrites any previous assignment.
Manual remapping with destination pin ambiguity
For MCUs with block of pins consistency (STM32F100x/ F101x/ F102x/ F103x and
STM32F105x/F107x), the destination pin can be ambiguous,e.g. there can be more than
one destination block including the destination pin. To display all the possible alternative
remapping blocks, move the mouse over the target pin.
Note:
A "block of pins" is a group of pins that must be assigned together to achieve a given
peripheral mode. As shown in Figure 48, two blocks of pins are available on a
STM32F107xx MCU to configure the Ethernet Peripheral in RMII synchronous mode: {PC1,
PA1, PA2, PA7, PC4, PC5, PB11, PB12, PB13, PB5} and {PC1, PA1, PA2, PD10, PD9,
PD8, PB11, PB12, PB13, PB5}.
Figure 48. Example of remapping in case of block of pins consistency
Resolving pin conflicts
To resolve the pin conflicts that may occur when some peripheral modes use the same pins,
STM32CubeMX attempts to reassign the peripheral mode functions to other pins. The
peripherals for which pin conflicts could not be solved are highlighted in red or orange with a
tooltip describing the conflict.
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If the conflict cannot be solved by remapping the modes, the user can try the following:
4.11.4
•
If the
different sequence.
•
Uncheck the Keep Current Signals Placement box and let STM32CubeMX try all the
remap combinations to find a solution.
•
Manually remap a mode of a peripheral when you cannot use it because there is no
pin available for one of the signals of that mode.
box is checked, try to select the peripherals in a
Keep Current Signals Placement
This checkbox is available from the toolbar when the Pinout view is selected (see Figure 26
and Table 5). It can be selected or unselected at any time during the configuration. It is
unselected by default.
It is recommended to keep the checkbox unchecked for an optimized placement of the
peripherals (maximum number of peripherals concurrently used).
The Keep Current Signals Placement checkbox should be selected when the objective is
to match a board design.
Keep Current Signals Placement is unchecked
This allows STM32CubeMX to remap previously mapped blocks to other pins in order to
serve a new request (selection of a new IP mode or a new IP mode function) which conflicts
with the current pinout configuration.
Keep Current Signals Placement is checked
This ensures that all the functions corresponding to a given peripheral mode remain
allocated (mapped) to a given pin. Once the allocation is done, STM32CubeMX cannot
move a peripheral mode function from one pin to another. New configuration requests are
served if it is feasible within current pin configuration.
This functionality is useful to:
•
Lock all the pins corresponding to peripherals that have been configured using the
Peripherals panel.
•
Maintain a function mapped to a pin while doing manual remapping from the Chip view.
Tip
If a mode becomes unavailable (highlighted in red), try to find another pin remapping
configuration for this mode by following the steps below:
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1.
From the Chip view, unselect the assigned functions one by one until the mode
becomes available again.
2.
Then, select the mode again and continue the pinout configuration with the new
sequence (see Appendix A: STM32CubeMX pin assignment rules for a remapping
example). This operation being time consuming, it is recommended to unselect the
Keep Current Signals Placement checkbox.
Even if Keep Current Signals placement is unchecked, GPIO_ functions (excepted
GPIO_EXTI functions) are not moved by STM32CubeMX.
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4.11.5
STM32CubeMX User Interface
Pinning and labeling signals on pins
STM32CubeMX comes with a feature allowing the user to selectively lock (or pin) signals to
pins and label the signals. User labels are used for code generation (see Section 5.1 for
details). This will prevent STM32CubeMX from automatically moving the pinned signals to
other pins when resolving conflicts.
There are several ways to pin, unpin and label the signals:
1.
2.
From the Chip view, right-click a pin with a signal assignment. This opens a contextual
menu:
a)
For unpinned signals, select Signal Pinning to pin the signal. A pin icon is then
displayed on the relevant pin. The signal can no longer be moved automatically
(for example when resolving pin assignment conflicts).
b)
For pinned signals, select Signal Unpinning to unpin the signal. The pin icon is
removed. From now on, to resolve a conflict (such as peripheral mode conflict),
this signal can be moved to another pin, provided the Keep user placement option
is unchecked.
c)
Select Enter User Label to specify a user defined label for this signal. The new
label will replacing the default signal name in the Chip view.
From the pinout menu, select Pins/Signals Options
The Pins/Signals Options window (see Figure 49) lists all configured pins.
a)
Click the first column to individually pin/unpin signals.
b)
Select multiple rows and right-click to open the contextual menu and select
Signal(s) Pinning or Unpinning.
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Figure 49. Pins/Signals Options window
c)
Select the User Label field to edit the field and enter a user-defined label.
d)
Order list alphabetically by Pin or Signal name by clicking the column header.
Click once more to go back to default i.e. to list ordered according to pin
placement on MCU.
Note:
Even if a signal is pinned, it is still possible however to manually change the pin signal
assignment from the Chip view: click the pin to display other possible signals for this pin and
select the relevant one.
4.12
Configuration view
STM32CubeMX Configuration window (see Figure 50) gives an overview of all the
software configurable components: GPIOs, peripherals and middleware. Clickable buttons
allow selecting the configuration options of the component initialization parameters that will
be included in the generated code. The button icon color reflects the configuration status:
Note:
•
Green checkmark: correct configuration
•
Warning sign: incomplete but still functional configuration
•
Red cross: for invalid configuration.
GPIO and Peripheral modes that influence the pinout can be set only from the Pinout view.
They are read-only in the Configuration view.
In this view, the MCU is shown on the left pane by its IP tree and on the right pane, by the list
of IPs organized in Middleware, Multimedia, Connectivity, Analog, System and Control
categories. Each peripheral instance has a dedicated button to edit its configuration: as an
example, TIM1 and TIM3 TIM instances are shown as dedicated buttons in Figure 50.
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Figure 50. STM32CubeMX Configuration view
An IP configuration button is associated to each peripheral in the Configuration window
(see Table 10).
Table 10. IP configuration buttons
Format
Peripheral Instance configuration status
Available but not fully configured yet. Click to open the
configuration window.
Well configured with default or user-defined settings
that allows proceeding with the generation of
corresponding initialization C code. Click to open the
configuration window.
Badly configured with some wrong parameter values.
Click to display the errors highlighted in red.
Other example (UART):
Dialog box that explains source of error. It shall be
fixed in another view.
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GPIO, DMA and NVIC settings can be accessed either via a dedicated button like other IPs
or via a tab in the other configuration windows of the IPs which use them (see Figure 51).
Figure 51. Configuration window tabs for GPIO, DMA and NVIC settings
(STM32F4 series)
4.12.1
IP and Middleware Configuration window
This window is open by clicking the IP instance or Middleware name from the
Configuration pane. It allows to configure the functional parameters that are required for
initializing the IP or the middleware in the selected operating mode. This configuration is
used to generate the corresponding initialization C code. Refer to Figure 52 for an IP
Configuration windows example.
The configuration window includes several tabs:
•
Parameter settings to configure library dedicated parameters for the selected
peripheral or middleware,
•
NVIC, GPIO and DMA settings to set the parameters for the selected peripheral (see
Section 4.12.5: NVIC Configuration window, Section 4.12.3: GPIO Configuration
window and Section 4.12.4: DMA Configuration windowfor configuration details).
•
User constants to create one or several user defined constants, common to the whole
project (see Section 4.12.1: IP and Middleware Configuration window for user
constants details).
Invalid settings are detected and are either:
•
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Reset to minimum valid value if user’s choice was smaller than minimum threshold,
•
Reset to maximum valid value if user’s choice was greater than maximum threshold,
•
Reset to previous valid value if previous value was neither a maximum nor a minimum
threshold value,
•
Highlighted in red:
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Table 11 describes IP and middleware configuration buttons and messages.
Figure 52. IP Configuration window (STM32F4 series)
Table 11. IP Configuration window buttons and tooltips
Buttons and messages
Apply
OK
Cancel
Action
Saves the changes without closing the window
Saves and closes the window
Closes and resets previously saved parameter settings
Shows and Hides the description pane
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Table 11. IP Configuration window buttons and tooltips (continued)
Buttons and messages
Tooltip
Action
Guides the user through the settings of parameters with valid min-max
range.
To display it, moves the mouse over a parameter value from a list of
possible values.
Choose to display the field as an hexadecimal or a decimal value by
clicking the arrow on the right:
Hexadecimal vs decimal
values
4.12.2
User Constants configuration window
A User Constants window is available to define user constants (see Figure 53). Constants
are automatically generated in the STM32CubeMX user project within the mxconstants.h file
(see Figure 54). Once defined, they can be used to configure peripheral and middleware
parameters (see Figure 55).
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Figure 53. User Constants window
Figure 54. Extract of the generated mxconstants.h file
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Figure 55. Using constants for peripheral parameter settings
Creating/editing user constants
Click the Add button to open the User Constants window and create a new user-defined
constant (see Figure 56).
A constant consists of:
•
•
A name that must comply with the following rules:
–
It must be unique.
–
It shall not be a C/C++ keyword.
–
It shall not contain a space.
–
It shall not start with digits.
A value
The constant value can be: (see Figure 53 for examples):
–
a simple decimal or hexadecimal value
–
a previously defined constant
–
a formula using arithmetic operators (subtraction, addition, division, multiplication,
and remainder) and numeric value or user-defined numeric constants as
operands.
–
a character string: the string value must be between double quotes (example:
“constant_for_usart”).
Once a constant is defined, its name and/or its value can still be changed: double click the
row that specifies the user constant to be modified. This opens the User Constants window
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for edition. The change of constant name is applied wherever the constant is used. This
does not affect the peripheral or middleware configuration state. However changing the
constant value impacts the parameters that use it and might result in invalid settings (e.g.
exceeding a maximum threshold). Invalid parameter settings will be highlighted in red with a
red cross.
Figure 56. Specifying user constant value and name
Deleting user constants
Click the Remove button to delete an existing user-defined constant.
The user constant is then automatically removed except in the following cases:
•
When the constant is used for the definition of another constant. In this case, a popup
window displays an explanatory message (see Figure 57).
Figure 57. Deleting user constant not allowed when
constant already used for another constant definition
•
When the constant is used for the configuration of a peripheral or middleware library
parameter. In this case, the user is requested to confirm the deletion since the constant
removal will result in a invalid peripheral or middleware configuration (see Figure 58).
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Figure 58. Deleting a user constant used for parameter configurationConfirmation request
Clicking Yes leads to an invalid peripheral configuration (see Figure 59))
Figure 59. Deleting a user constant used for peripheral configuration Consequence on peripheral configuration
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Searching for user constants
The Search Constants field allows searching for a constant name or value in the complete
list of user constants (see Figure 60 and Figure 61).
Figure 60. Searching user constants list for name
Figure 61. Searching user constants list for value
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GPIO Configuration window
Click GPIO in the Configuration pane to open the GPIO configuration window that allows
configuring the GPIO pin settings (see Figure 62). The configuration is populated with
default values that might not be adequate for some peripheral configurations. In particular,
check if the GPIO speed is sufficient for the peripheral communication speed and select the
internal pull-up whenever needed.
Note:
It is also possible to access GPIO settings for a specific IP instance via the dedicated GPIO
window in the IP instance configuration window.
Figure 62. GPIO Configuration window - GPIO selection
Click a row or select a set of rows to display the corresponding GPIO parameters (see
Figure 63):
•
GPIO mode (analog, input, output, alternate function)
Selecting an IP mode in the Pinout view automatically configures the pins with the
relevant alternate function and GPIO mode.
•
GPIO pull-up/pull-down
It is set to a default value and can be configured when other choices are possible.
•
GPIO maximum output speed (for communication IPs only)
It is set to Low by default for power consumption optimization and can be changed to a
higher frequency to fit application requirements.
•
User Label
It changes the default name (e.g. GPIO_input) into a user defined name. The Chip
view is updated accordingly. The GPIO can be found under this new name via the Find
menu.
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Figure 63. GPIO Configuration window - displaying GPIO settings
A Group by IP checkbox allows to group all instances of a peripheral under a same window
(see Figure 64).
Figure 64. GPIO configuration grouped by IP
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As shown in Figure 65, row multi-selection can be performed to change a set of pins to a
given configuration at the same time.
Figure 65. Multiple Pins Configuration
4.12.4
DMA Configuration window
Click DMA in the Configuration pane to open the DMA configuration window.
This window allows to configure the generic DMA controllers available on the MCU. The
DMA interfaces allow to perform data transfers between memories and peripherals while the
CPU is running, and memory to memory transfers (if supported).
Note:
Some IPs such as USB or Ethernet, have their own DMA controller, which is enabled by
default or via the IP configuration window.
Clicking Add in the DMA configuration window adds a new line at the end of the DMA
configuration window with a combo box proposing to choose between possible DMA
requests to be mapped to peripherals signals (see Figure 66).
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Figure 66. Adding a new DMA request
Selecting a DMA request automatically assigns a stream among all the streams available, a
direction and a priority. When the DMA channel is configured, it is up to the application code
to fully describe the DMA transfer run-time parameters such as the start address, etc....
The DMA request (called channel for STM32F4 MCUs) is used to reserve a stream to
transfer data between peripherals and memories (see Figure 67). The stream priority will be
used to decide which stream to select for the next DMA transfer.
DMA controllers support a dual priority system using the software priority first, and in case of
equal software priorities, a hardware priority that is given by the stream number.
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Figure 67. DMA Configuration
Additional DMA configuration settings can be done through the DMA configuration
window:
•
Mode: regular mode, circular mode, or peripheral flow controller mode (only available
for the SDIO IP).
•
Increment Add: the type of peripheral address and memory address increment (fixed
or post-incremented in which case the address is incremented after each transfer).
Click the checkbox to enable the post-incremented mode.
•
Peripheral data width: 8, 16 or 32 bits
•
Switching from the default direct mode to the FIFO mode with programmable threshold:
a)
Click the Use FIFO checkbox.
b)
Then, configure the peripheral and memory data width (8, 16 or 32 bits).
c)
Select between single transfer and burst transfer. If you select burst transfer,
choose a burst size (1, 4, 8 or 16).
In case of memory-to-memory transfer (MemtoMem), the DMA configuration applies to a
source memory and a destination memory.
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Figure 68. DMA MemToMem configuration
4.12.5
NVIC Configuration window
Click NVIC in the Configuration pane to open the Nested Vector interrupt controller
configuration window (see Figure 69).
The NVIC window will not show all possible interrupts but only the ones available for the IPs
selected in the Pinout and Configuration panes.
Check/Uncheck the Show only enabled interrupts box to filter or not on enabled
interrupts.
Use the search field to filter out the interrupt vector table according to a string value. For
example, after enabling UART IPs from the Pinout pane, type UART in the NVIC search
field and click the green arrow next to it: all UART interrupts are displayed.
Note:
It is also possible to access IP dedicated interrupts using the NVIC window in the IP
configuration window.
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Figure 69. NVIC Configuration window
STM32CubeMX NVIC configuration consists in selecting a priority group, enabling/disabling
interrupts and configuring interrupts priority levels (pre-emption and sub-priority levels):
1.
Select a priority group
Several bits allow to define NVIC priority levels. These bits are divided in two priority
groups corresponding to two priority types: pre-emption priority and sub-priority. For
example, in the case of STM32F4 MCUs, the NVIC priority group 0 corresponds to 0bit pre-emption and 4-bit sub-priority.
2.
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In the interrupt table, click one or more rows to select one or more interrupt vectors.
Use the widgets below the interrupt table to configure the vectors one by one or several
at a time:
–
Enable checkbox: check/uncheck to enable/disable the interrupt.
–
Pre-emption priority: select a priority level. The pre-emption priority defines the
ability of one interrupt to interrupt another.
–
Sub-priority: select a priority level. The sub-priority defines the interrupt priority
level.
–
Click Apply to save changes, and OK to close the window.
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4.13
STM32CubeMX User Interface
Clock tree configuration view
STM32CubeMX Clock configuration window (see Figure 23) provides a schematic
overview of the clock paths, clock sources, dividers, and multipliers. Drop-down menus and
buttons allow modifying the actual clock tree configuration to meet user application
requirements.
Actual clock speeds are displayed and active. The clock signals that are used are
highlighted in blue.
Out-of-range configured values are highlighted in red to flag potential issues. A solver
feature is proposed to automatically resolve such configuration issues (see Figure 71).
Reverse path is supported: just enter the required clock speed in the blue filed and
STM32CubeMX will attempt to reconfigure multipliers and dividers to provide the requested
value. The resulting clock value can then be locked by right clicking the field to prevent
modifications.
STM32CubeMX generates the corresponding initialization code:
4.13.1
•
main.c with relevant HAL_RCC structure initializations and function calls
•
stm32xxxx_hal_conf.h for oscillator frequencies and VDD values.
Clock tree configuration functions
External clock sources
When external clock sources are used, the user must previously enable them from the
Pinout view available under the RCC peripheral.
Peripheral clock configuration options
Some other paths, corresponding to clock peripherals, are grayed out. To become active,
the peripheral must be properly configured in the Pinout view (e.g. USB). This view allows
to:
•
Enter a frequency value for the CPU Clock (HCLK), buses or peripheral clocks
STM32CubeMX tries to propose a clock tree configuration that reaches the desired
frequency while adjusting prescalers and dividers and taking into account other
peripheral constraints (such as USB clock minimum value). If no solution can be found,
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STM32CubeMX proposes to switch to a different clock source or can even conclude
that no solution matches the desired frequency.
•
Lock the frequency fields for which the current value should be preserved
Right click a frequency field and select Lock to preserve the value currently assigned
when STM32CubeMX will search for a new clock configuration solution.
The user can unlock the locked frequency fields when the preservation is no longer
necessary.
•
•
Select the clock source that will drive the system clock (SYSCLK)
–
External oscillator clock (HSE) for a user defined frequency.
–
Internal oscillator clock (HSI) for the defined fixed frequency.
–
Main PLL clock
Select secondary sources (as available for the product)
–
Low-speed internal (LSI) or external (LSE) clock
–
I2S input clock
–
…
•
Select prescalers, dividers and multipliers values.
•
Enable the Clock Security system (CSS) on HSE when it is supported by the MCU
This feature is available only when the HSE clock is used as the system clock source
directly or indirectly through the PLL. It allows detecting HSE failure and inform the
software about it, thus allowing the MCU to perform rescue operations.
•
Enable the CSS on LSE when it is supported by the MCU
This feature is available only when the LSE and LSI are enabled and after the RTC or
LCD clock sources have been selected to be either LSE or LSI.
•
Reset the Clock tree default settings by using the toolbar Reset button (
):
This feature reloads STM32CubeMX default clock tree configuration.
•
Undo/Redo user configuration steps by using the toolbar
Undo/Redo buttons (
)
•
Detect and resolve configuration issues
Erroneous clock tree configurations are detected prior to code generation. Errors are
highlighted in red and the Clock Configuration view is marked with a red cross (see
Figure 71).
Issues can be resolved manually or automatically by clicking the Resolve Clock Issue
button (
) which is enabled only if issues have been detected.
The underlying resolution process follows a specific sequence:
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a)
Setting HSE frequency to its maximum value (optional).
b)
Setting HCLK frequency then peripheral frequencies to a maximum or minimum
value (optional).
c)
Changing multiplexers inputs (optional).
d)
Finally, iterating through multiplier/dividers values to fix the issue. The clock tree is
cleared from red highlights if a solution is found. Otherwise an error message is
displayed.
To be available from the clock tree, external clocks, I2S input clock, and master clocks shall
be enabled in RCC configuration in the Pinout view. This information is also available as
tooltips.
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The tool will automatically perform the following operations:
•
Adjust bus frequencies, timers, peripherals and master output clocks according to user
selection of clock sources, clock frequencies and prescalers/multipliers/dividers values.
•
Check the validity of user settings.
•
Highlight invalid settings in red and provide tooltips to guide the user to achieve a valid
configuration.
The Clock tree view is adjusted according to the RCC settings (configured in RCC IP pinout
and configuration views) and vice versa:
•
If in RCC Pinout view, the external and output clocks are enabled, they become
configurable in the clock tree view.
•
If in RCC Configuration view, the Timer prescaler is enabled, the choice of Timer clocks
multipliers will be adjusted.
Conversely, the clock tree configuration may affect some RCC parameters in the
configuration view:
•
Flash latency: number of wait states automatically derived from VDD voltage, HCLK
frequency, and power over-drive state.
•
Power regulator voltage scale: automatically derived from HCLK frequency.
•
Power over-drive is enabled automatically according to HCLK frequency. When the
power drive is enabled, the maximum possible frequency values for AHB and APB
domains are increased. They are displayed in the Clock tree view.
The default optimal system settings that is used at startup are defined in the
system_stm32f4xx.c file. This file is copied by STM32CubeMX from the STM32CubeF4
firmware package. The switch to user defined clock settings is done afterwards in the main
function.
Figure 70 gives an example of Clock tree configuration view for an STM32F429x MCU and
Table 12 describes the widgets that can be used to configure each clock.
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Figure 70. STM32F429xx Clock Tree configuration view
Figure 71. Clock Tree configuration view with errors
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Table 12. Clock tree view widget
Configuration status of the Peripheral
Instance
Format
Active clock sources
Unavailable settings are blurred or grayed out
(clock sources, dividers,…)
Gray drop down lists for prescalers, dividers,
multipliers selection.
Multiplier selection
User defined frequency values
Automatically derived frequency values
User-modifiable frequency field
Right click blue border rectangles, to lock/unlock
a frequency field. Lock to preserve the frequency
value during clock tree configuration updates.
4.13.2
Recommendations
The Clock tree view is not the only entry for clock configuration.
1.
Go first through the RCC IP pinout configuration in the Pinout view to enable the
clocks as needed: external clocks, master output clocks and Audio I2S input clock
when available (see Figure 72).
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Figure 72. Clock tree configuration: enabling RTC, RCC Clock source
and outputs from Pinout view
2.
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Then go to the RCC IP configuration in the Configuration view. The settings defined
there for advanced configurations will be reflected in the clock tree view. The settings
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defined in the clock tree view may change the settings in the RCC configuration (see
Figure 73).
Figure 73. Clock tree configuration: RCC Peripheral Advanced parameters
4.13.3
STM32F43x/42x power-over drive feature
STM32F42x/43x MCUs implement a power over-drive feature allowing to work at the
maximum AHB/APB bus frequencies (e.g., 180 MHz for HCLK) when a sufficient VDD
supply voltage is applied (e.g VDD > 2.1 V).
Table 13 lists the different parameters linked to the power over-drive feature and their
availability in STM32CubeMX user interface.
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Table 13. Voltage scaling versus power over-drive and HCLK frequency
Parameter
STM32CubeMX panel
Value
VDD voltage
Configuration (RCC)
User-defined within a pre-defined range. Impacts
power over-drive.
Power Regulator
Voltage scaling
Configuration (RCC)
Automatically derived from HCLK frequency and
power over-drive (see Table 14).
Configuration (RCC)
This value is conditioned by HCLK and VDD value
(see Table 14). It can be enabled only if
VDD ≥ 2.2 V
When VDD ≥2.2 V, it is either automatically
derived from HCLK or it can be configured by the
user if multiple choices are possible (e.g., HCLK
= 130 MHz)
HCLK/AHB clock
maximum frequency
value
Clock Configuration
Displayed in blue to indicate the maximum
possible value. For example: maximum value is
168 MHz for HCLK when power over-drive
cannot be activated (when VDD ≤ 2.1 V),
otherwise it is 180 MHz.
APB1/APB2 clock
maximum frequency
value
Clock Configuration
Displayed in blue to indicate maximum possible
value
Power Over Drive
Table 14 gives the relations between power-over drive mode and HCLK frequency.
Table 14. Relations between power over-drive and HCLK frequency
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HCLK frequency range:
VDD > 2.1 V required to enable power overdrive (POD)
Corresponding voltage scaling and power
over-drive (POD)
≤120 MHz
Scale 3
POD is disabled
120 to 14 MHz
Scale 2
POD can be either disabled or enabled
144 to 168 MHz
Scale 1 when POD is disabled
Scale 2 when POD is enabled
168 to 180 MHz
POD must be enabled
Scale 1 (otherwise frequency range not
supported)
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4.13.4
STM32CubeMX User Interface
Clock tree glossary
Table 15. Glossary
Acronym
HSI
High Speed Internal oscillator: enabled after reset, lower accuracy than
HSE.
HSE
High Speed External oscillator: requires an external clock circuit.
PLL
Phase Locked Loop: used to multiply above clock sources.
LSI
Low Speed Internal clock: low power clocks usually used for watchdog
timers.
LSE
Low Speed External clock: powered by an external clock.
SYSCLK
4.14
Definition
System clock
HCLK
Internal AHB clock frequency
FCLK
Cortex free running clock
AHB
Advanced High Performance Bus
APB1
Low speed Advanced Peripheral Bus
APB2
High speed Advanced Peripheral Bus
Power Consumption Calculator (PCC) view
For an ever-growing number of embedded systems applications, power consumption is a
major concern. To help minimizing it, STM32CubeMX offers the Power Consumption
Calculator (PCC) tab (see Figure 74), which, given a microcontroller, a battery model and a
user-defined power sequence, provides the following results:
•
Average current consumption
Power consumption values can either be taken from the datasheet or interpolated from
a user specified bus or core frequency.
•
Battery life
•
Average DMIPs
DMIPs values are directly taken from the MCU datasheet and are neither interpolated
nor extrapolated.
•
Maximum ambient temperature (TAMAX)
According to the chip internal power consumption, the package type and a maximum
junction temperature of 105 °C, the tool computes the maximum ambient temperature
to ensure good operating conditions.
Current TAMAX implementation does not account for I/O consumption. For an accurate
TAMAX estimate, I/O consumption must be specified using the Additional Consumption
field. The formula for I/O dynamic current consumption is specified in the
microcontroller datasheet.
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The PCC view allows developers to visualize an estimate of the embedded application
consumption and lower it further at each PCC power sequence step:
•
Make use of low power modes when any available
•
Adjust clock sources and frequencies based on the step requirements.
•
Enable the peripherals necessary for each phase.
For each step, the user can choose VBUS as possible power source instead of the battery.
This will impact the battery life estimation. If power consumption measurements are
available at different voltage levels, STM32CubeMX will also propose a choice of voltage
values (see Figure 82).
An additional option, the transition checker, is available for STM32L0, STM32L1 and
STM32L4 series. When it is enabled, the transition checker detects invalid transitions within
the currently configured sequence. It ensures that only possible transitions are proposed to
the user when a new step is added.
4.14.1
Building a power consumption sequence
The default starting view is shown in Figure 74.
Figure 74. Power Consumption Calculator default view
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Selecting a VDD value
From this view and when multiple choices are available, the user must select a VDD value.
Selecting a battery model (optional)
Optionally, the user can select a battery model. This can also be done once the power
consumption sequence is configured.
The user can select a pre-defined battery or choose to specify a new battery that best
matches his application (see Figure 75).
Figure 75. Battery selection
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Power sequence default view
The user can now proceed and build a power sequence (see Figure 76).
Figure 76. Building a power consumption sequence
Managing sequence steps
Steps can be reorganized within a sequence (Add new, Delete a step, Duplicate a step,
move Up or Down in the sequence) using the set of Step buttons (see Figure 77).
The user can undo or redo the last configuration actions by clicking the Undo button in the
PCC view or the Undo icon from the main toolbar
Figure 77. Step management functions
Adding a step
There are two ways to add a new step:
•
Click Add in the Power Consumption panel. The New Step window opens with empty
step settings.
•
Or, select a step from the sequence table and click Duplicate. A New Step window
opens duplicating the step settings. (see Figure 82).
Once a step is configured, resulting current consumption and TAMAX values are provided in
the window.
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STM32CubeMX User Interface
Editing a step
To edit a step, double-click it in the sequence table. The Edit Step window opens (see
Figure 78).
Figure 78. Edit Step window
Moving a step
By default, a new step is added at the end of a sequence.
Click the step in the sequence table to select it and use the Up and Down buttons to move it
elsewhere in the sequence.
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Deleting a step
Select the step to be deleted and click the Delete button.
Using the transition checker
Not all transitions between power modes are possible. PCC proposes a transition checker
to detect invalid transitions or restrict the sequence configuration to only valid transitions.
Enabling the transition checker option prior to sequence configuration ensures the user will
be able to select only valid transition steps.
Enabling the transition checker option on an already configured sequence will highlight the
sequence in green (green frame) if all transitions are valid (see Figure 79), or in red if at
least one transition is invalid (red frame with description of invalid step highlighted in red)
(see Figure 80).
In this case, the user can click the Show log button to find out how to solve the transition
issue (see Figure 81).
Figure 79. Enabling the transition checker option on an already configured sequence all transitions valid
Figure 80. Enabling the transition checker option on an already configured sequence at least one transition invalid
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Figure 81. Transition checker option -show log
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Figure 82. Power consumption sequence: new step default view
4.14.2
Configuring a step in the power sequence
The step configuration is performed from the Edit Step and New Step windows. The
graphical interface guides the user by forcing a pre-defined order for setting parameters.
Their naming may differ according to the selected MCU series. For details on each
parameter, refer to Section 4.14.4: Power sequence step parameters glossary glossary and
to Appendix D: STM32 microcontrollers power consumption parameters or to the electrical
characteristics section of the MCU datasheet.
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The parameters are set automatically by the tool when there is only one possible value (in
this case, the parameter cannot be modified and is grayed out). The tool proposes only the
configuration choices relevant to the selected MCU.
Proceed as follow to configure a new step:
1.
Click Add or Duplicate to open the New step window or double-click a step from the
sequence table to open the Edit step window.
2.
Within the open step window, select in the following order:
–
The Power Mode
Changing the Power Mode resets the whole step configuration.
–
The Peripherals
Peripherals can be selected/unselected at any time after the Power Mode is
configured.
–
The Power scale
The power scale corresponds to the power consumption range (STM32L1) or the
power scale (STM32F4).
Changing the Power Mode or the Power Consumption Range discards all
subsequent configurations.
–
The Memory Fetch Type
–
The VDD value if multiple choices available
–
The voltage source (battery or VBUS)
–
A Clock Configuration
Changing the Clock Configuration resets the frequency choices further down.
–
3.
4.
When multiple choices are available, the CPU Frequency (STM32F4) and the
AHB Bus Frequency/CPU Frequency(STM32L1) or, for active modes, a user
specified frequency. In this case, the consumption value will be interpolated (see
Section : Using interpolation).
Optionally set
–
A step duration (1 ms is the default value)
–
An additional consumption value (expressed in mA) to reflect, for example,
external components used by the application (external regulator, external pull-up,
LEDs or other displays). This value added to the microcontroller power
consumption will impact the step overall power consumption.
Once the configuration is complete, the Add button becomes active. Click it to create
the step and add it to the sequence table.
Using interpolation
For steps configured for active modes (Run, Sleep), frequency interpolation is supported by
selecting CPU frequency as User Defined and entering a frequency in Hz (see Figure 83).
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Figure 83. Interpolated Power Consumption
Importing pinout
Figure 84 illustrates the example of the ADC configuration in the Pinout view: clicking
Import Pinout in the PCC view selects the ADC IP and GPIO A (Figure 85). The Import
pinout button allows to automatically select the IPs that have been configured in the Pinout
view.
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Figure 84. ADC selected in Pinout view
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Figure 85. PCC Step configuration window: ADC enabled using import pinout
4.14.3
Managing user-defined power sequence and reviewing results
The configuration of a power sequence leads to an update of the PCC view (see Figure 86):
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•
The sequence table shows all steps and step parameters values. A category column
indicates whether the consumption values are taken from the datasheet or are
interpolated.
•
The sequence chart area shows different views of the power sequence according to a
display type (e.g. plot all steps, plot low power versus run modes, ..)
•
The results summary provides the total sequence time, the maximum ambient
temperature (TAMAX), plus an estimate of the average power consumption, DMIPS, and
battery lifetime provided a valid battery configuration has been selected.
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Figure 86. Power Consumption Calculator view after sequence building
Managing the whole sequence (load, save and compare)
The current sequence can be saved or deleted. In addition, a previously saved sequence
can be either loaded in the current view or opened for comparison (see Figure 87).
Figure 87. Sequence table management functions
To load a previously saved sequence:
1.
Click the load button.
2.
Browse to select the sequence to load.
To open a previously saved sequence for comparison:
1.
Click the Compare button.
2.
Browse and select the .pcs sequence file to be compared with the current sequence. A
new window opens showing the selected sequence details.
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Figure 88. PCC Edit Step window
Managing the results charts and display options
In the Display area, select the type of chart to display (sequence steps, pie charts,
consumption per IPs, ...). You can also click External Display to open the charts in
dedicated windows (see Figure 89).
Right-click on the chart to access the contextual menus: Properties, Copy, Save as png
picture file, Print, Zoom menus, and Auto Range to reset to the original view before zoom
operations. Zooming can also be achieved by mouse selecting from left to right a zone in
the chart and Zoom reset by clicking the chart and dragging the mouse to the left.
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Figure 89. Power Consumption: Peripherals Consumption Chart
Overview of the Results summary area
This area provides the following information (see Figure 90):
•
Total sequence time as the sum of the sequence steps durations.
•
Average consumption as the sum of each step consumption weighed by the step
duration.
•
The average DMIPS (Dhrystone Million Instructions per Second) based on Dhrystone
benchmark, highlighting the CPU performance for the defined sequence.
•
Battery life estimation for the selected battery model, based on the average power
consumption and the battery self-discharge.
•
TAMAX: highest maximum ambient temperature value encountered during the
sequence.
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Figure 90. Description of the Results area
4.14.4
Power sequence step parameters glossary
The parameters that characterize power sequence steps are the following (refer to
Appendix D: STM32 microcontrollers power consumption parameters for more details):
•
Power modes
To save energy, it is recommended to switch the microcontroller operating mode from
running mode, where a maximum power is required, to a low-power mode requiring
limited resources.
•
VCORE range (STM32L1) or Power scale (STM32F4)
These parameters are set by software to control the power supply range for digital
peripherals.
•
Memory Fetch Type
This field proposes the possible memory locations for application C code execution. It
can be either RAM, FLASH or FLASH with ART ON or OFF (only for families that
feature a proprietary Adaptive real-time (ART) memory accelerator which increases the
program execution speed when executing from Flash memory).
The performance achieved thanks to the ART accelerator is equivalent to 0 wait state
program execution from Flash memory. In terms of power consumption, it is equivalent
to program execution from RAM. In addition, STM32CubeMX uses the same selection
choice to cover both settings, RAM and Flash with ART ON.
•
Clock Configuration
This operation sets the AHB bus frequency or the CPU frequency that will be used for
computing the microcontroller power consumption. When there is only one possible
choice, the frequencies are automatically configured.
The clock configuration drop-down list allows to configure the application clocks:
•
–
The internal or external oscillator sources: MSI, HSI, LSI, HSE or LSE),
–
The oscillator frequency,
–
Other determining parameters: PLL ON, LSE Bypass, AHB prescaler value, LCD
with duty...
Peripherals
The peripheral list shows the peripherals available for the selected power mode. The
power consumption is given assuming that peripherals are only clocked (e.g. not in use
by a running program). Each peripheral can be enabled or disabled. Peripherals
individual power consumptions are displayed in a tooltip. An overall consumption due
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to peripheral analog and digital parts is provided in the step Results area (see
Figure 91).
The user can select the peripherals relevant for the application:
–
None (Disable All),
–
Some (using IP individual checkbox),
–
All (Activate All),
–
Or all from the previously defined pinout configuration (Import Pinout).
Only the selected and enabled peripherals are taken into account when computing the
power consumption.
Figure 91. Peripheral power consumption tooltip
•
Step duration
The user can change the default step duration value. When building a sequence, the
user can either create steps according to the application actual power sequence or
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define them as a percentage spent in each mode. For example, if an application
spends 30% in Run mode, 20% in Sleep and 50% in Stop, the user must configure a 3step sequence consisting in 30 ms in Run, 20 ms in Sleep and 50 ms in Stop.
•
Additional Consumption
This field allows entering an additional consumption resulting from specific user
configuration (e.g. MCU providing power supply to other connected devices).
4.14.5
Battery glossary
•
Capacity (mAh)
Amount of energy that can be delivered in a single battery discharge.
•
Self-discharge (%/month)
This percentage, over a specified period, represents the loss of battery capacity when
the battery is not used (open-circuit conditions), as a result of internal leakage.
•
Nominal voltage (V)
Voltage supplied by a fully charged battery.
•
Max. Continuous Current (mA)
This current corresponds to the maximum current that can be delivered during the
battery lifetime period without damaging the battery.
•
Max. Pulse Current (mA)
This is the maximum pulse current that can be delivered exceptionally, for instance
when the application is switched on during the starting phase.
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5
STM32CubeMX C Code generation overview
STM32CubeMX C Code generation overview
Refer to Section 4.4.2: Project menu for code generation and C project settings related
topics.
5.1
Standard STM32Cube code generation
During the C code generation process, STM32CubeMX performs the following actions:
1.
If it is missing, it downloads the relevant STM32Cube firmware package from the user
repository. STM32CubeMX repository folder is specified in the Help > Updater
settings menu.
2.
It copies from the firmware package, the relevant files in Drivers/CMSIS and
Drivers/STM32F4_HAL_Driver folders and in the Middleware folder if a middleware
was selected.
3.
It generates the initialization C code ( .c/.h files) corresponding to the user MCU
configuration and stores it in the Inc and Src folders. By default, the following files are
included:
–
stm32f4xx_hal_conf.h file: this file defines the enabled HAL modules and sets
some parameters (e.g. External High Speed oscillator frequency) to pre-defined
default values or according to user configuration (clock tree).
–
stm32f4xx_hal_msp.c (MSP = MCU Support package): this file defines all
initialization functions to configure the IP instances according to the user
configuration (pin allocation, enabling of clock, use of DMA and Interrupts).
–
main.c is in charge of:
Resetting the MCU to a known state by calling the HAL_init() function that resets
all peripherals, initializes the Flash memory interface and the SysTick.
Configuring and initializing the system clock.
Configuring and initializing the GPIOs that are not used by IPs.
Defining and calling, for each configured IP, an IP initialization function that
defines a handle structure that will be passed to the corresponding IP HAL init
function which in turn will call the IP HAL MSP initialization function. Note that
when LwIP (respectively USB) middleware is used, the initialization C code for the
underlying Ethernet (respectively USB IP) is moved from main.c to LwIP
(respectively USB) initialization C code itself.
–
mxconstants.h file:
This file contains the define statements corresponding to the pin labels set from
the Pinout tab, as well as the user project constants added from the
Configuration tab (refer to Figure 92 and Figure 93 for examples):
#define MyTimeOut
10
#define LD4_Pin
GPIO_PIN_12
#define LD4_GPIO_Port
GPIOD
#define LD3_Pin
GPIO_PIN_13
#define LD3_GPIO_Port
GPIOD
#define LD5_Pin
GPIO_PIN_14
#define LD5_GPIO_Port
GPIOD
#define LD6_Pin
GPIO_PIN_15
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#define LD6_GPIO_Port
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GPIOD
Figure 92. Labels for pins generating define statements
Figure 93. User constant generating define statements
In case of duplicate labels, a unique suffix, consisting of the pin port letter and the
pin index number, is added and used for the generation of the associated define
statements.
In the example of a duplicate I2C1 labels shown in Figure 94, the code generation
produces the following code, keeping the I2C1 label on the original port B pin 6
define statements and adding B7 suffix on pin 7 define statements:
#define I2C1_Pin
GPIO_PIN_6
#define I2C1_GPIO_Port
GPIOB
#define I2C1B7_Pin
GPIO_PIN_7
#define I2C1B7_GPIO_Port
GPIOB
Figure 94. Duplicate labels
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In order for the generated project to compile, define statements shall follow strict
naming conventions. They shall start with a letter or an underscore as well as the
corresponding label. In addition, they shall not include any special character such
as minus sign, parenthesis or brackets. Any special character within the label will
be automatically replaced by an underscore in the define name.
If the label contains character strings between “[]” or “()”, only the first string listed
is used for the define name. As an example, the label “LD6 [Blue Led]”
corresponds the following define statements:
#define LD6_Pin
GPIO_PIN_15
#define LD6_GPIO_Port
GPIOD
The define statements are used to configure the GPIOs in the generated
initialization code. In the following example, the initialization of the pins labeled
Audio_RST_Pin and LD4_Pin is done using the corresponding define statements:
/*Configure GPIO pins : LD4_Pin Audio_RST_Pin */
GPIO_InitStruct.Pin = LD4_Pin | Audio_RST_Pin;
GPIO_InitStruct.Mode = GPIO_MODE_OUTPUT_PP;
GPIO_InitStruct.Pull = GPIO_NOPULL;
GPIO_InitStruct.Speed = GPIO_SPEED_LOW;
HAL_GPIO_Init(GPIOD, &GPIO_InitStruct);
4.
Finally it generates a Projects folder that contains the toolchain specific files that match
the user project settings. Double-clicking the IDE specific project file launches the IDE
and loads the project ready to be edited, built and debugged.
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Custom code generation
STM32CubeMX supports custom code generation by means of a FreeMarker template
engine (see http://www.freemarker.org): STM32CubeMX can generate a custom code
based on a Freemarker template file (.ftl extension) for any of the following MCU
configuration information:
•
List of MCU peripherals used by the user configuration
•
List of parameters values for those peripherals
•
List of resources used by these peripherals: GPIO, DMA requests and interrupts.
The user template file must be compatible with STM32CubeMX data model. This means
that the template must start with the following lines:
[#ftl]
[#list configs as dt]
[#assign data = dt]
[#assign peripheralParams =dt.peripheralParams]
[#assign peripheralGPIOParams =dt.peripheralGPIOParams]
[#assign usedIPs =dt.usedIPs]
and end with
[/#list]
A sample template file is provided for guidance (see Figure 95: extra_templates folder –
default content).
STM32CubeMX will also generate user-specific code if any is available within the template.
As shown in the below example, when the sample template is used, the ftl commands are
provided as comments next to the data they have generated:
Freemarker command in template:
${peripheralParams.get("RCC").get("LSI_VALUE")}
Resulting generated code:
LSI_VALUE :
32000
[peripheralParams.get("RCC").get("LSI_VALUE")]
To generate a custom code, the user must place the Freemarker template file under
STM32CubeMX installation path within the db/extra_templates folder (see Figure 96:
extra_templates folder with user templates).
The template filename must follow the naming convention <user filename>_<file
extension>.ftl in order to generate the corresponding custom file as <user filename>.<file
extension>.
By default, the custom file is generated in the user project root folder, next to the .ioc file
(see Figure 97: Project root folder with corresponding custom generated files).
To generate the custom code in a different folder, the user shall match the destination folder
tree structure in the extra_template folder (see Figure 98: User custom folder for templates).
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Figure 95. extra_templates folder – default content
Figure 96. extra_templates folder with user templates
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Figure 97. Project root folder with corresponding custom generated files
Figure 98. User custom folder for templates
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Figure 99. Custom folder with corresponding custom generated files
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6
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Tutorial 1: From pinout to project C code generation
using an STM32F4 MCU
This section describes the configuration and C code generation process. It takes as an
example a simple LED toggling application running on the STM32F4DISCOVERY board.
6.1
Creating a new STM32CubeMX Project
1.
Select File > New project from the main menu bar or New project from the Welcome
page.
2.
Select the MCU Selector tab and filter down the STM32 portfolio by selecting STM32F4
as 'Series', STM32F407 as 'Lines', and LQFP100 as 'Package’ (see Figure 100).
3.
Select the STM32F407VGTx from the MCU list and click OK.
Figure 100. MCU selection
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STM32CubeMX views are then populated with the selected MCU database (see
Figure 101).
Figure 101. Pinout view with MCUs selection
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Optionally, remove the MCUs Selection bottom window by unselecting Window> Outputs
sub-menu (see Figure 102).
Figure 102. Pinout view without MCUs selection window
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6.2
Tutorial 1: From pinout to project C code generation using an STM32F4 MCU
Configuring the MCU pinout
For a detailed description of menus, advanced actions and conflict resolutions, refer to
Section 4: STM32CubeMX User Interface and Appendix A: STM32CubeMX pin assignment
rules.
1.
By default, STM32CubeMX shows the Pinout view.
2.
By default,
is unchecked allowing STM32CubeMX to
move the peripheral functions around and to find the optimal pin allocation, that is the
one that accommodates the maximum number of peripheral modes.
Since the MCU pin configurations must match the STM32F4DISCOVERY board,
enable
for STM32CubeMX to maintain the peripheral function
allocation (mapping) to a given pin.
This setting is saved as a user preference in order to be restored when reopening the
tool or when loading another project.
3.
Select the required peripherals and peripheral modes:
a)
Configure the GPIO to output the signal on the STM32F4DISCOVERY green LED
by right-clicking PD12 from the Chip view, then select GPIO_output:
Figure 103. GPIO pin configuration
b)
Enable a timer to be used as timebase for toggling the LED. This is done by
selecting Internal Clock as TIM3 Clock source from the peripheral tree (see
Figure 104).
Figure 104. Timer configuration
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You can also configure the RCC in order to use an external oscillator as potential
clock source (see Figure 105).
This completes the pinout configuration for this example.
Figure 105. Simple pinout configuration
Note:
Starting with STM32CubeMX 4.2, the user can skip the pinout configuration by directly
loading ST Discovery board configuration from the Board selector tab.
6.3
Saving the project
1.
Click
to save the project.
When saving for the first time, select a destination folder and filename for the project.
The .ioc extension is added automatically to indicate this is an STM32CubeMX
configuration file.
Figure 106. Save Project As window
2.
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to save the project under a different name or location.
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6.4
Tutorial 1: From pinout to project C code generation using an STM32F4 MCU
Generating the report
Reports can be generated at any time during the configuration:
1.
Click
to generate .pdf and .txt reports.
If a project file has not been created yet, a warning prompts the user to save the project
first and requests a project name and a destination folder (see Figure 107). An .ioc file
is then generated for the project along with a .pdf and .txt reports with the same name.
Answering “No” will require to provide a name and location for the report only.
A confirmation message is displayed when the operation has been successful (see
Figure 108).
Figure 107. Generate Project Report - New project creation
Figure 108. Generate Project Report - Project successfully created
2.
6.5
Open the .pdf report using Adobe Reader or the .txt report using your favorite text
editor. The reports summarize all the settings and MCU configuration performed for the
project.
Configuring the MCU Clock tree
The following sequence describes how to configure the clocks required by the application
based on an STM32F4 MCU.
STM32CubeMX automatically generates the system, CPU and AHB/APB bus frequencies
from the clock sources and prescalers selected by the user. Wrong settings are detected
and highlighted in red through a dynamic validation of minimum and maximum conditions.
Useful tooltips provide a detailed description of the actions to undertake when the settings
are unavailable or wrong. User frequency selection can influence some peripheral
parameters (e.g. UART baudrate limitation).
STM32CubeMX uses the clock settings defined in the Clock tree view to generate the
initialization C code for each peripheral clock. Clock settings are performed in the generated
C code as part of RCC initialization within the project main.c and in stm32f4xx_hal_conf.h
(HSE, HSI and External clock values expressed in Hertz).
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Follow the sequence below to configure the MCU clock tree:
1.
Click the Clock Configuration tab to display the clock tree (see Figure 109).
The internal (HSI, LSI), system (SYSCLK) and peripheral clock frequency fields cannot
be edited. The system and peripheral clocks can be adjusted by selecting a clock
source, and optionally by using the PLL, prescalers and multipliers.
Figure 109. Clock tree view
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2.
First select the clock source (HSE, HSI or PLLCLK) that will drive the system clock of
the microcontroller.
In the example taken for the tutorial, select HSI to use the internal 16 MHz clock (see
Figure 110).
Figure 110. HSI clock enabled
To use an external clock source (HSE or LSE), the RCC peripheral shall be configured
in the Pinout view since pins will be used to connect the external clock crystals (see
Figure 111).
Figure 111. HSE clock source disabled
Other clock configuration options for the STM32F4DISCOVERY board would have
been:
–
To select the external HSE source and enter 8 in the HSE input frequency box
since an 8 MHz crystal is connected on the discovery board:
Figure 112. HSE clock source enabled
–
To select the external PLL clock source and the HSI or HSE as the PLL input clock
source.
Figure 113. External PLL clock source enabled
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3.
Note:
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Keep the core and peripheral clocks to 16 MHz using HSI, no PLL and no prescaling.
Optionally, further adjust the system and peripheral clocks using PLL, prescalers and
multipliers:
Other clock sources independent from the system clock can be configured as follows:
6.6
–
USB OTG FS, Random Number Generator and SDIO clocks are driven by an
independent output of the PLL.
–
I2S peripherals come with their own internal clock (PLLI2S), alternatively derived
by an independent external clock source.
–
USB OTG HS and Ethernet Clocks are derived from an external source.
4.
Optionally, configure the prescaler for the Microcontroller Clock Output (MCO) pins that
allow to output two clocks to the external circuit.
5.
Click
6.
Go to the Configuration tab to proceed with the project configuration.
to save the project.
Configuring the MCU initialization parameters
Reminder
The C code generated by STM32CubeMX covers the initialization of the MCU
peripherals and middlewares using the STM32Cube firmware libraries.
6.6.1
Initial conditions
Select the Configuration tab to display the configuration view (see Figure 114).
Peripherals and middleware modes without influence on the pinout can be disabled or
enabled in the IP Tree panel. The modes that impact the pin assignments can only be
selected through the Pinout tab.
In the main panel, tooltips and warning messages are displayed when peripherals are not
properly configured (see Section 4: STM32CubeMX User Interface for details).
Note:
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The RCC peripheral initialization will use the parameter configuration done in this view as
well as the configuration done in the Clock tree view (clock source, frequencies, prescaler
values, etc…).
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Figure 114. Configuration view
6.6.2
Configuring the peripherals
Each peripheral instance corresponds to a dedicated button in the main panel.
Some peripheral modes have no configurable parameters as illustrated below:
Figure 115. Case of IP without configuration parameters
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Follow the steps below to proceed with peripheral configuration:
1.
Click the peripheral button to open the corresponding configuration window.
In our example,
a)
Click TIM3 to open the timer configuration window.
Figure 116. Timer 3 configuration window
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b)
With a 16 MHz APB clock (Clock tree view), set the prescaler to 16000 and the
counter period to 1000 to make the LED blink every millisecond.
Figure 117. Timer 3 configuration
2.
Optionally and when available, select:
–
The NVIC Settings tab to display the NVIC configuration and enable interruptions
for this peripheral.
–
The DMA Settings tab to display the DMA configuration and to configure DMA
transfers for this peripheral.
In the tutorial example, the DMA is not used and the GPIO settings remain
unchanged. The interrupt is enabled as shown in Figure 118.
–
3.
The GPIO Settings tab to display the GPIO configuration and to configure the
GPIOs for this peripheral.
Modify and click Apply or OK to save your modifications.
Figure 118. Enabling Timer 3 interrupt
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6.6.3
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Configuring the GPIOs
The user can adjust all pin configurations from this window. A small icon along with a tooltip
indicates the configuration status.
Figure 119. GPIO configuration color scheme and tooltip
Follow the sequence below to configure the GPIOS:
1.
Click the GPIO button in the Configuration view to open the Pin Configuration
window below.
2.
The first tab shows the pins that have been assigned a GPIO mode but not for a
dedicated IP. Select a Pin Name to open the configuration for that pin.
In the tutorial example, select PD12 and configure it in output push-pull mode to drive
the STM32F4DISCOVERY LED (see Figure 120).
Figure 120. GPIO mode configuration
3.
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Click Apply then Ok to close the window.
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Tutorial 1: From pinout to project C code generation using an STM32F4 MCU
Configuring the DMAs
This is not required for the example taken for the tutorial.
It is recommended to use DMA transfers to offload the CPU. The DMA Configuration
window provides a fast and easy way to configure the DMAs (see Figure 121).
1.
Note:
Add a new DMA request and select among a list of possible configurations.
2.
Select among the available streams.
3.
Select the Direction: Memory to Peripheral or Peripheral to Memory.
4.
Select a Priority.
Configuring the DMA for a given IP can also be performed using the IP configuration
window.
Figure 121. DMA Parameters configuration window
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6.6.5
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Configuring the middleware
This is not required for the example taken for the tutorial.
If a peripheral is required for a middleware mode, the peripheral must be configured in the
Pinout view for the middleware mode to become available. A tooltip can guide the user as
illustrated in the FatFs example below:
Figure 122. FatFs disabled
1.
Configure the USB IP from the Pinout view.
Figure 123. USB Host configuration
2.
Select MSC_FS class from USB Host middleware.
3.
Select the checkbox to enable FatFs USB mode in the tree panel.
Figure 124. FatFs over USB mode enabled
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4.
Select the Configuration view. FatFs and USB buttons are then displayed.
Figure 125. Configuration view with FatFs and USB enabled
5.
FatFs and USB using default settings are already marked as configured
. Click
FatFs and USB buttons to display default configuration settings. You can also change
them by following the guidelines provided at the bottom of the window.
Figure 126. FatFs IP instances
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Figure 127. FatFs define statements
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6.7
Generating a complete C project
6.7.1
Setting project options
Default project settings can be adjusted prior to C code generation as described in
Figure 128.
1.
Select Settings from the Project menu to open the Project settings window.
2.
Select the Project Tab and choose a Project name, location and a toolchain to
generate the project (see Figure 128).
Figure 128. Project Settings and toolchain choice
3.
Select the Code Generator tab to choose various C code generation options:
–
The library files copied to Projects folder.
–
C code regeneration (e.g. what is kept or backed up during C code regeneration).
–
HAL specific action (e.g. set all free pins as analog I/Os to reduce MCU power
consumption).
In the tutorial example, select the settings as displayed in the figure below and click
OK.
Note:
A dialog window appears when the firmware package is missing. Go to next section for
explanation on how to download the firmware package.
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Figure 129. Project Settings menu - Code Generator tab
6.7.2
Downloading firmware package and generating the C code
1.
Click
to generate the C code.
During C code generation, STM32CubeMX copies files from the relevant STM32Cube
firmware package into the project folder so that the project can be compiled. When
generating a project for the first time, the firmware package is not available on the user
PC and a warning message is displayed:
Figure 130. Missing firmware package warning message
2.
STM32CubeMX offers to download the relevant firmware package or to go on. Click
Download to obtain a complete project, that is a project ready to be used in the
selected IDE.
By clicking Continue, only Inc and Src folders will be created, holding STM32CubeMX
generated initialization files. The necessary firmware and middleware libraries will have
to be copied manually to obtain a complete project.
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If the download fails, the below error message is displayed:
Figure 131. Error during download
To solve this issue, execute the next two steps. Skip them otherwise.
3.
Select Help > Updater settings menu and adjust the connection parameters to match
your network configuration.
Figure 132. Updater settings for download
4.
Click Check connection. The check mark turns green once the connection is
established.
Figure 133. Updater settings with connection
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Once the connection is functional, click
to generate the C code. The C code
generation process starts and progress is displayed as illustrated in the next figures.
Figure 134. Downloading the firmware package
Figure 135. Unzipping the firmware package
6.
Finally, a confirmation message is displayed to indicate that the C code generation has
been successful.
Figure 136. C code generation completion message
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7.
Click Open Folder to display the generated project contents or click Open Project to
open the project directly in your IDE. Then proceed with Section 6.8.
Figure 137. C code generation output folder
The generated project contains:
Caution:
•
The STM32CubeMX .ioc project file located in the root folder. It contains the project
user configuration and settings generated through STM32CubeMX user interface.
•
The Drivers and Middlewares folders hold copies of the firmware package files relevant
for the user configuration.
•
The Projects folder contains IDE specific folders with all the files required for the project
development and debug within the IDE.
•
The Inc and Src folders contain STM32CubeMX generated files for middleware,
peripheral and GPIO initialization, including the main.c file. The STM32CubeMX
generated files contain user-dedicated sections allowing to insert user-defined C code.
C code written within the user sections is preserved at next C code generation, while C code
written outside these sections is overwritten.
User C code will be lost if user sections are moved or if user sections delimiters are
renamed.
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6.8
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Building and updating the C code project
This example explains how to use the generated initialization C code and complete the
project, within IAR EWARM toolchain, to have the LED blink according to the TIM3
frequency.
A folder is available for the toolchains selected for C code generation: the project can be
generated for more than one toolchain by choosing a different toolchain from the Project
Settings menu and clicking Generate code once again.
1.
Open the project directly in the IDE toolchain by clicking Open Project from the dialog
window or by double-clicking the relevant IDE file available in the toolchain folder under
STM32CubeMX generated project directory (see Figure 136).
Figure 138. C code generation output: Projects folder
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2.
As an example, select .eww file to load the project in the IAR EWARM IDE.
Figure 139. C code generation for EWARM
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3.
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Select the main.c file to open in editor.
Figure 140. STM32CubeMX generated project open in IAR IDE
The htim3 structure handler, system clock, GPIO and TIM3 initialization functions are
defined. The initialization functions are called in the main.c. For now the user C code
sections are empty.
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4.
In the IAR IDE, right-click the project name and select Options.
Figure 141. IAR options
5.
Click the ST-LINK category and make sure SWD is selected to communicate with the
STM32F4DISCOVERY board. Click OK.
Figure 142. SWD connection
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6.
Select Project > Rebuild all. Check if the project building has succeeded.
Figure 143. Project building log
7.
Note:
Add user C code in the dedicated user sections only.
The main while(1) loop is placed in a user section.
For example:
a)
Edit the main.c file.
b)
To start timer 3, update User Section 2 with the following C code:
Figure 144. User Section 2
c)
Then, add the following C code in User Section 4:
Figure 145. User Section 4
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This C code implements the weak callback function defined in the HAL timer driver
(stm32f4xx_hal_tim.h) to toggle the GPIO pin driving the green LED when the
timer counter period has elapsed.
8.
Rebuild and program your board using
. Make sure the SWD ST-LINK option is
checked as a Project options otherwise board programming will fail.
9.
Launch the program using
will blink every second.
. The green LED on the STM32F4DISCOVERY board
10. To change the MCU configuration, go back to STM32CubeMX user interface,
implement the changes and regenerate the C code. The project will be updated,
preserving the C code in the user sections if
option in
Project Settings is enabled.
6.9
Switching to another MCU
STM32CubeMX allows loading a project configuration on an MCU of the same series.
Proceed as follows:
1.
Select File > New Project.
2.
Select an MCU belonging to the same series. As an example, you can select the
STM32F429ZITx that is the core MCU of the 32F429IDISCOVERY board.
3.
Select File > Import project. In the Import project window, browse to the .ioc file to
load. A message warns you that the currently selected MCU (STM32F429ZITx) differs
from the one specified in the .ioc file (STM32F407VGTx). Several import options are
proposed (see Figure 146).
4.
Click the Try Import button and check the import status to verify if the import
succeeded (see Figure 147).
5.
Click OK to really import the project. An output tab is then displayed to report the import
results.
6.
The green LED on 32F429IDISCOVERY board is connected to PG13: CTRL+ right
click PD12 and drag and drop it on PG13.
7.
Select Project > Settings to configure the new project name and folder location. Click
Generate icon to save the project and generate the code.
8.
Select Open the project from the dialog window, update the user sections with the
user code, making sure to update the GPIO settings for PG13. Build the project and
flash the board. Launch the program and check that LED blinks once per second.
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Figure 146. Import Project menu
Figure 147. Project Import status
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Tutorial 2 - Example of FatFs on an SD card using STM32429I-EVAL evaluation board
7
Tutorial 2 - Example of FatFs on an SD card using
STM32429I-EVAL evaluation board
The tutorial consists in creating and writing to a file on the STM32429I-EVAL1 SD card using
the FatFs file system middleware.
To generate a project and run tutorial 2, follow the sequence below:
1.
Launch STM32CubeMX.
2.
Select File > New Project. The Project window opens.
3.
Click the Board Selector Tab to display the list of ST boards.
4.
Select EvalBoard as type of Board and STM32F4 as series to filter down the list.
5.
Leave the option Initialize all IPs with their default mode unchecked so that the code
is generated only for the IPs used by the application.
6.
Select the STM32429I-EVAL board and click OK. The Pinout view is loaded, matching
the MCU pinout configuration on the evaluation board (see Figure 148).
Figure 148. Board selection
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7.
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From the Peripheral tree on the left, expand the SDIO IP and select the SD 4 bits wide
bus (see Figure 149).
Figure 149. SDIO IP configuration
8.
Under the Middlewares category, check “SD Card” as FatFs mode (see Figure 150).
Figure 150. FatFs mode configuration
9.
Configure the clocks as follows:
a)
Select the RCC peripheral from the Pinout view (see Figure 151).
Figure 151. RCC peripheral configuration
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b)
Configure the clock tree from the clock tab (see Figure 152).
Figure 152. Clock tree view
10. In the Project Settings menu, specify the project name and destination folder. Then,
select the EWARM IDE toolchain.
Figure 153. Project Settings menu - Code Generator tab
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11. Click Ok. Then, in the toolbar menu, click
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to generate the project.
12. Upon code generation completion, click Open Project in the Code Generation dialog
window (see Figure 154). This opens the project directly in the IDE.
Figure 154. C code generation completion message
13. In the IDE, check that heap and stack sizes are sufficient: right click the project name
and select Options, then select Linker. Check Override default to use the icf file from
STM32CubeMX generated project folder. Adjust the heap and stack sizes (see
Figure 155).
Figure 155. IDE workspace
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Note:
When using the MDK-ARM toolchain, go to the Application/MDK-ARM folder and double
click the startup_xx.s file to edit and adjust the heap and stack sizes there.
14. Go to the Application/User folder. Double click the main.c file and edit it.
15. The tutorial consists in creating and writing to a file on the evaluation board SD card
using the FatFs file system middleware:
a)
At startup all LEDs are OFF.
b)
The red LED is turned ON to indicate that an error occurred (FatFs initialization,
file read/write access errors..).
c)
The orange LED is turned ON to indicate that the FatFs link has been successfully
mounted on the SD driver.
d)
The blue LED is turned ON to indicate that the file has been successfully written to
the SD Card.
e)
The green LED is turned ON to indicate that the file has been successfully read
from file the SD Card.
16. For use case implementation, update main.c with the following code:
a)
Insert main.c private variables in a dedicated user code section:
/* USER CODE BEGIN PV */
/* Private variables ------------------------------------------*/
FATFS SDFatFs; /* File system object for SD card logical drive */
FIL MyFile;
/* File object */
const char wtext[] = "Hello World!";
const uint8_t image1_bmp[] = {
0x42,0x4d,0x36,0x84,0x03,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x36,0x00,0x00,0x00,
0x28,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x40,0x01,0x00,0x00,0xf0,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x01,0x00,
0x18,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x84,0x03,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,
0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x00,0x29,0x74,
0x51,0x0e,0x63,0x30,0x04,0x4c,0x1d,0x0f,0x56,0x25,0x11,0x79,0x41,0x1f,
0x85,0x6f,0x25,0x79,0x7e,0x27,0x72,0x72,0x0b,0x50,0x43,0x00,0x44,0x15,
0x00,0x4b,0x0f,0x00,0x4a,0x15,0x07,0x50,0x16,0x03,0x54,0x22,0x23,0x70,
0x65,0x30,0x82,0x6d,0x0f,0x6c,0x3e,0x22,0x80,0x5d,0x23,0x8b,0x5b,0x26};
/* USER CODE END PV */
b)
Insert main functional local variables:
int main(void)
{
/* USER CODE BEGIN 1 */
FRESULT res;
/* FatFs function common result code */
uint32_t byteswritten, bytesread; /* File write/read counts */
char rtext[256];
/* File read buffer */
/* USER CODE END 1 */
/* MCU Configuration----------------------------------------*/
/* Reset of all peripherals, Initializes the Flash interface and the
Systick. */
HAL_Init();
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c)
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Insert user code in the main function, after initialization calls and before the while
loop, to perform actual read/write from/to the SD card:
int main(void)
{
….
MX_FATFS_Init();
/* USER CODE BEGIN 2 */
/*##-0- Turn all LEDs off(red, green, orange and blue) */
HAL_GPIO_WritePin(GPIOG, (GPIO_PIN_10 | GPIO_PIN_6 | GPIO_PIN_7 |
GPIO_PIN_12), GPIO_PIN_SET);
/*##-1- FatFS: Link the SD disk I/O driver ##########*/
if(retSD == 0){
/* success: set the orange LED on */
HAL_GPIO_WritePin(GPIOG, GPIO_PIN_7, GPIO_PIN_RESET);
/*##-2- Register the file system object to the FatFs module ###*/
if(f_mount(&SDFatFs, (TCHAR const*)SD_Path, 0) != FR_OK){
/* FatFs Initialization Error : set the red LED on */
HAL_GPIO_WritePin(GPIOG, GPIO_PIN_10, GPIO_PIN_RESET);
while(1);
}
else
{
/*##-3- Create a FAT file system (format) on the logical drive#*/
/* WARNING: Formatting the uSD card will delete all content on the
device */
if(f_mkfs((TCHAR const*)SD_Path, 0, 0) != FR_OK){
/* FatFs Format Error : set the red LED on */
HAL_GPIO_WritePin(GPIOG, GPIO_PIN_10, GPIO_PIN_RESET);
while(1);
} else {
/*##-4- Create & Open a new text file object with write access#*/
if(f_open(&MyFile, "Hello.txt", FA_CREATE_ALWAYS | FA_WRITE) !=
FR_OK){
/* 'Hello.txt' file Open for write Error : set the red LED on */
HAL_GPIO_WritePin(GPIOG, GPIO_PIN_10, GPIO_PIN_RESET);
while(1);
} else {
/*##-5- Write data to the text file ####################*/
res = f_write(&MyFile, wtext, sizeof(wtext), (void
*)&byteswritten);
if((byteswritten == 0) || (res != FR_OK)){
/* 'Hello.txt' file Write or EOF Error : set the red LED on */
HAL_GPIO_WritePin(GPIOG, GPIO_PIN_10, GPIO_PIN_RESET);
while(1);
} else {
/*##-6- Successful open/write : set the blue LED on */
HAL_GPIO_WritePin(GPIOG, GPIO_PIN_12, GPIO_PIN_RESET);
f_close(&MyFile);
/*##-7- Open the text file object with read access #*/
if(f_open(&MyFile, "Hello.txt", FA_READ) != FR_OK){
/* 'Hello.txt' file Open for read Error : set the red LED on */
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HAL_GPIO_WritePin(GPIOG, GPIO_PIN_10, GPIO_PIN_RESET);
while(1);
} else {
/*##-8- Read data from the text file #########*/
res = f_read(&MyFile, rtext, sizeof(wtext), &bytesread);
if((strcmp(rtext,wtext)!=0)|| (res != FR_OK)){
/* 'Hello.txt' file Read or EOF Error : set the red LED on */
HAL_GPIO_WritePin(GPIOG, GPIO_PIN_10, GPIO_PIN_RESET);
while(1);
} else {
/* Successful read : set the green LED On */
HAL_GPIO_WritePin(GPIOG, GPIO_PIN_6, GPIO_PIN_RESET);
/*##-9- Close the open text file ################*/
f_close(&MyFile);
}}}}}}}
/*##-10- Unlink the micro SD disk I/O driver #########*/
FATFS_UnLinkDriver(SD_Path);
/* USER CODE END 2 */
/* Infinite loop */
/* USER CODE BEGIN WHILE */
while (1)
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Tutorial 3- Using PCC to optimize the embedded application power consumption and more
8
Tutorial 3- Using PCC to optimize the embedded
application power consumption and more
8.1
Overview
This tutorial focuses on STM32CubeMX Power Consumption Calculator (PCC) feature and
its benefits to evaluate the impacts of power-saving techniques on a given application
sequence.
The key considerations to reduce a given application power consumption are:
•
Reducing the operating voltage
•
Reducing the time spent in energy consuming modes
It is up to the developer to select a configuration that will give the best compromise
between low-power consumption and performance.
•
Maximizing the time spent in non-active and low-power modes
•
Using the optimal clock configuration
The core should always operate at relatively good speed, since reducing the operating
frequency can increase energy consumption if the microcontroller has to remain for a
long time in an active operating mode to perform a given operation.
•
Enabling only the peripherals relevant for the current application state and clock-gating
the others
•
When relevant, using the peripherals with low-power features (e.g. waking up the
microcontroller with the I2C)
•
Minimizing the number of state transitions
•
Optimizing memory accesses during code execution
–
Prefer code execution from RAM to Flash memory
–
When relevant, consider aligning CPU frequency with Flash memory operating
frequency for zero wait states.
The following tutorial will show how STM32CubeMX PCC feature can help to tune an
application to minimize its power consumption and extend the battery life.
Note:
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PCC does not account for I/O dynamic current consumption and external board components
that can also affect current consumption. For this purpose, an “additional consumption” field
is provided for the user to specify such consumption value.
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8.2
Application example description
The application is designed using the NUCLEO-L476RG board based on a
STM32L476RGTx device and supplied by a 2.4 V battery.
The main purpose of this application is to perform ADC measurements and transfer the
conversion results over UART. It uses:
•
Multiple low-power modes: Low-power run, Low-power sleep, Sleep, Stop and Standby
•
Multiple peripherals: USART, DMA, Timer, COMP, DAC and RTC
–
The RTC is used to run a calendar and to wake up the CPU from Standby when a
specified time has elapsed.
–
The DMA transfers ADC measurements from ADC to memory
–
The USART is used in conjunction with the DMA to send/receive data via the
virtual COM port and to wake up the CPU from Stop mode.
The process to optimize such complex application is to start describing first a functional only
sequence then to introduce, on a step by step basis, the low-power features provided by the
STM32L476RG microcontroller.
8.3
Using the Power Consumption Calculator
8.3.1
Creating a PCC sequence
Follow the steps below to open PCC and create the sequence (see Figure 156):
1.
Launch STM32CubeMX.
2.
Click new project and select the Nucleo-L476RG board from the Board tab.
3.
Click the Power Consumption Calculator tab to select the Power Consumption
Calculator view. A first sequence is then created as a reference.
4.
Adapt it to minimize the overall current consumption. To do this:
a)
Select 2.4 V VDD power supply. This value can be adjusted on a step by step basis
(see Figure 157).
b)
Select the Li-MnO2 (CR2032) battery. This step is optional. The battery type can
be changed later on (see Figure 157).
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Figure 156. Power Consumption Calculation example
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Figure 157. PCC VDD and battery selection menu
5.
Enable the Transition checker to ensure the sequence is valid (see Figure 157). This
option allows verifying that the sequence respects the allowed transitions implemented
within the STM32L476RG.
6.
Click the Add button to add steps that match the sequence described in Figure 157.
–
By default the steps last 1 ms each, except for the wakeup transitions that are
preset using the transition times specified in the product datasheet (see
Figure 158).
–
Some peripherals for which consumption is unavailable or negligible are
highlighted with ‘*’ (see Figure 158).
Figure 158. PCC Sequence table
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7.
Click the Save button to save the sequence as SequenceOne.
The application consumption profile is the generated. It shows that the overall sequence
consumes an average of 2.01 mA for 9 ms, and the battery lifetime is only 4 days (see
Figure 159).
Figure 159. PCC sequence results before optimization
8.3.2
Optimizing application power consumption
Let us now take several actions to optimize the overall consumption and the battery lifetime.
These actions are performed on step 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 10.
The next figures show on the left the original step and on the right the step updated with
several optimization actions.
Step 1 (Run)
•
Findings
All peripherals are enabled although the application requires only the RTC.
•
•
Actions
–
Lower the operating frequency.
–
Enable solely the RTC peripheral.
–
To reduce the average current consumption, reduce the time spent in this mode.
Results
The current is reduced from 9.05 mA to 2.16 mA (see Figure 160).
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Figure 160. Step 1 optimization
Step 4 (Run, RTC)
•
Action:
Reduce the time spent in this mode to 0.1 ms.
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Step 5 (Run, ADC, DMA, RTC)
•
•
Actions
–
Change to Low-power run mode.
–
Lower the operating frequency.
Results
The current consumption is reduced from 6.17 mA to 271 µA (see Figure 161).
Figure 161. Step 5 optimization
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Step 6 (Sleep, DMA, ADC,RTC)
•
•
Actions
–
Switch to Lower-power sleep mode (BAM mode)
–
Reduce the operating frequency to 2 MHz.
Results
The current consumption is reduced from 703 µA to 93 µA (see Figure 162).
Figure 162. Step 6 optimization
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Step 7 (Run, DMA, RTC, USART)
•
•
Actions
–
Switch to Lower-power run mode.
–
Use the power-efficient LPUART peripheral.
–
Reduce the operating frequency to 1 MHz using the PCC interpolation feature.
Results
The current consumption is reduced from 1.92 µA to 42 µA (see Figure 163).
Figure 163. Step 7 optimization
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Step 8 (Stop 0, USART)
•
•
Actions:
–
Switch to Stop1 low-power mode.
–
Use the power-efficient LPUART peripheral.
Results
The current consumption is reduced from 110 µA to 6.65 µA (see Figure 164).
Figure 164. Step 8 optimization
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Step 10 (RTC, USART)
•
•
Actions
–
Use the power-efficient LPUART peripheral.
–
Reduce the operating frequency to 1 MHz.
Results
The current consumption is reduced from 1.89 mA to 234 µA (see Figure 165).
The example given in Figure 166 shows an average current consumption reduction of
155 µA.
Figure 165. Step 10 optimization
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See Figure 166 for the sequence overall results: 7 ms duration, about 2 month battery life,
and an average current consumption of 165.25 µA.
Use the compare button to compare the current results to the original ones saved as
SequenceOne.pcs.
Figure 166. PCC Sequence results after optimizations
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FAQ
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9
FAQ
9.1
On the Pinout configuration pane, why does STM32CubeMX
move some functions when I add a new peripheral mode?
You may have unselected
automatic remapping to optimize your placement.
9.2
. In this case, the tool performs an
How can I manually force a function remapping?
You should use the Manual Remapping feature.
9.3
Why are some pins highlighted in yellow or in light green in
the Chip view? Why cannot I change the function of some
pins (when I click some pins, nothing happens)?
These pins are specific pins (such as power supply or BOOT) which are not available as
peripheral signals.
9.4
Why do I get the error “Java 7 update 45’ when installing
‘Java 7 update 45’ or a more recent version of the JRE?
The problem generally occurs on 64-bit Windows operating system, when several versions
of Java are installed on your computer and the 64-bit Java installation is too old.
During STM32CubeMX installation, the computer searches for a 64-bit installation of Java.
•
If one is found, the ‘Java 7 update 45’ minimum version prerequisite is checked. If the
installed version is older, an error is displayed to request the upgrade.
•
If no 64-bit installation is found, STM32CubeMX searches for a 32-bit installation. If one
is found and the version is too old, the ‘Java 7 update 45’ error is displayed. The user
must update the installation to solve the issue.
To avoid this issue from occurring, it is recommended to perform one of the following
actions:
Note:
1.
Remove all Java installations and reinstall only one version (32 or 64 bits) (Java 7
update 45 or more recent).
2.
Keep 32-bit and 64-bit installations but make sure that the 64-bit version is at least
Java 7 update 45.
Some users (Java developers for example) may need to check the PC environment
variables defining hard-coded Java paths (e.g. JAVA_HOME or PATH) and update them so
that they point to the latest Java installation.
On Windows 7 you can check your Java installation using the Control Panel. To do this,
double-click
icon from Control Panel\All Control Panel to open the Java settings
window (see Figure 167):
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Figure 167. Java Control Panel
You can also enter ‘java –version’ as an MS-DOS command to check the version of your
latest Java installation (the Java program called here is a copy of the program installed
under C:\Windows\System32):
java version “1.7.0_45“
Java (TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.7.0_45-b18)
Java HotSpot (TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 24.45-b08, mixed mode)
9.5
Why does the RTC multiplexer remain inactive on the Clock
tree view?
To enable the RTC multiplexer, the user shall enable the RTC IP in the Pinout view as
indicated in below:
Figure 168. Pinout view - Enabling the RTC
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How can I select LSE and HSE as clock source and
change the frequency?
The LSE and HSE clocks become active once the RCC is configured as such in the Pinout
view. See Figure 169 for an example.
Figure 169. Pinout view - Enabling LSE and HSE clocks
The clock source frequency can then be edited and the external source selected:
Figure 170. Pinout view - Setting LSE/HSE clock frequency
9.7
Why STM32CubeMX does not allow me to configure PC13,
PC14, PC15 and PI8 as outputs when one of them
is already configured as an output?
STM32CubeMX implements the restriction documented in the reference manuals as a
footnote in table Output Voltage characteristics:
“PC13, PC14, PC15 and PI8 are supplied through the power switch. Since the switch only
sinks a limited amount of current (3 mA), the use of GPIOs PC13 to PC15 and PI8 in output
mode is limited: the speed should not exceed 2 MHz with a maximum load of 30 pF and
these I/Os must not be used as a current source (e.g. to drive a LED).”
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Appendix A
STM32CubeMX pin assignment rules
The following pin assignment rules are implemented in STM32CubeMX:
A.1
•
Rule 1: Block consistency
•
Rule 2: Block inter-dependency
•
Rule 3: One block = one peripheral mode
•
Rule 4: Block remapping (only for STM32F10x)
•
Rule 5: Function remapping
•
Rule 6: Block shifting (only for STM32F10x)
•
Rule 7: Setting or clearing a peripheral mode
•
Rule 8: Mapping a function individually (if Keep Current Placement is unchecked)
•
Rule 9: GPIO signals mapping
Block consistency
When setting a pin signal (provided there is no ambiguity about the corresponding
peripheral mode), all the pins/signals required for this mode are mapped and pins are
shown in green (otherwise the configured pin is shown in orange).
When clearing a pin signal, all the pins/signals required for this mode are unmapped
simultaneously and the pins turn back to gray.
Example of block mapping with a STM32F107x MCU
If the user assigns I2C1_SMBA function to PB5, then STM32CubeMX configures pins and
modes as follows:
•
I2C1_SCL and I2C1_SDA signals are mapped to the PB6 and PB7 pins, respectively
(see Figure 171).
•
I2C1 peripheral mode is set to SMBus-Alert mode.
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Figure 171. Block mapping
Example of block remapping with a STM32F107x MCU
If the user assigns GPIO_Output to PB6, STM32CubeMX automatically disables I2C1
SMBus-Alert peripheral mode from the peripheral tree view and updates the other I2C1 pins
(PB5 and PB7) as follows:
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•
If they are unpinned, the pin configuration is reset (pin grayed out).
•
If they are pinned, the peripheral signal assigned to the pins is kept and the pins are
highlighted in orange since they no longer match a peripheral mode (see Figure 172).
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Figure 172. Block remapping
For STM32CubeMX to find an alternative solution for the I2C peripheral mode, the user will
need to unpin I2C1 pins and select the I2C1 mode from the peripheral tree view (see
Figure 173 and Figure 174).
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Figure 173. Block remapping - example 1
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Figure 174. Block remapping - example 2
A.2
Block inter-dependency
On the Chip view, the same signal can appear as an alternate function for multiple pins.
However it can be mapped only once.
As a consequence, for STM32F1 MCUs, two blocks of pins cannot be selected
simultaneously for the same peripheral mode: when a block/signal from a block is selected,
the alternate blocks are cleared.
Example of block remapping of SPI in full-duplex master mode with a
STM32F107x MCU
If SPI1 full-duplex master mode is selected from the tree view, by default the corresponding
SPI signals are assigned to PB3, PB4 and PB5 pins (see Figure 175).
If the user assigns to PA6 the SPI1_MISO function currently assigned to PB4,
STM32CubeMX clears the PB4 pin from the SPI1_MISO function, as well as all the other
pins configured for this block, and moves the corresponding SPI1 functions to the relevant
pins in the same block as the PB4 pin (see Figure 176).
(by pressing CTRL and clicking PB4 to show PA6 alternate function in blue, then drag and
drop the signal to pin PA6)
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Figure 175. Block inter-dependency - SPI signals assigned to PB3/4/5
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Figure 176. Block inter-dependency - SPI1_MISO function assigned to PA6
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One block = one peripheral mode
When a block of pins is fully configured in the Chip view (shown in green), the related
peripheral mode is automatically set in the Peripherals tree.
Example of STM32F107x MCU
Assigning the I2C1_SMBA function to PB5 automatically configures I2C1 peripheral in
SMBus-Alert mode (see Peripheral tree in Figure 177).
Figure 177. One block = one peripheral mode - I2C1_SMBA function assigned to PB5
A.4
Block remapping (STM32F10x only)
To configure a peripheral mode, STM32CubeMX selects a block of pins and assigns each
mode signal to a pin in this block. In doing so, it looks for the first free block to which the
mode can be mapped.
When setting a peripheral mode, if at least one pin in the default block is already used,
STM32CubeMX tries to find an alternate block. If none can be found, it either selects the
functions in a different sequence, or unchecks
, and remaps all
the blocks to find a solution.
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Example
STM32CubeMX remaps USART3 hardware-flow-control mode to the (PD8-PD9-PD11PD12) block, because PB14 of USART3 default block is already allocated to the
SPI2_MISO function (see Figure 178).
Figure 178. Block remapping - example 2
A.5
Function remapping
To configure a peripheral mode, STM32CubeMX assigns each signal of the mode to a pin.
In doing so, it will look for the first free pin the signal can be mapped to.
Example using STM32F415x
When configuring USART3 for the Synchronous mode, STM32CubeMX discovered that the
default PB10 pin for USART3_TX signal was already used by SPI. It thus remapped it to
PD8 (see Figure 179).
Figure 179. Function remapping example
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Block shifting (only for STM32F10x and when
“Keep Current Signals placement” is unchecked)
If a block cannot be mapped and there are no free alternate solutions, STM32CubeMX tries
to free the pins by remapping all the peripheral modes impacted by the shared pin.
Example
With the Keep current signal placement enabled, if USART3 synchronous mode is set first,
the Asynchronous default block (PB10-PB11) is mapped and Ethernet becomes unavailable
(shown in red) (see Figure 180).
Unchecking
allows STM32CubeMX shifting blocks around
and freeing a block for the Ethernet MII mode. (see Figure 181).
Figure 180. Block shifting not applied
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Figure 181. Block shifting applied
A.7
Setting and clearing a peripheral mode
The Peripherals panel and the Chip view are linked: when a peripheral mode is set or
cleared, the corresponding pin functions are set or cleared.
A.8
Mapping a function individually
When STM32CubeMX needs a pin that has already been assigned manually to a function
(no peripheral mode set), it can move this function to another pin, only if
is unchecked and the function is not pinned (no pin icon).
A.9
GPIO signals mapping
I/O signals (GPIO_Input, GPIO_Output, GPIO_Analog) can be assigned to pins either
manually through the Chip view or automatically through the Pinout menu. Such pins can
no longer be assigned automatically to another signal: STM32CubeMX signal automatic
placement does not take into account this pin anymore since it does not shift I/O signals to
other pins.
The pin can still be manually assigned to another signal or to a reset state.
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Appendix B
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STM32CubeMX C code generation design
choices and limitations
This section summarizes STM32CubeMX design choices and limitations.
B.1
STM32CubeMX generated C code and user sections
The C code generated by STM32CubeMX provides user sections as illustrated below. They
allow user C code to be inserted and preserved at next C code generation.
User sections shall neither be moved nor renamed. Only the user sections defined by
STM32CubeMX are preserved. User created sections will be ignored and lost at next C
code generation.
/* USER CODE BEGIN 0 */
(..)
/* USER CODE END 0 */
Note:
STM32CubeMX may generate C code in some user sections. It will be up to the user to
clean the parts that may become obsolete in this section. For example, the while(1) loop in
the main function is placed inside a user section as illustrated below:
/* Infinite loop */
/* USER CODE BEGIN WHILE */
while (1)
{
/* USER CODE END WHILE */
/* USER CODE BEGIN 3 */
}
/* USER CODE END 3 */
B.2
STM32CubeMX design choices for peripheral initialization
STM32CubeMX generates peripheral _Init functions that can be easily identified thanks to
the MX_ prefix:
static void MX_GPIO_Init(void);
static void MX_<Peripheral Instance Name>_Init(void);
static void MX_I2S2_Init(void);
An MX_<peripheral instance name>_Init function exists for each peripheral instance
selected by the user (e.g, MX_I2S2_Init). It performs the initialization of the relevant handle
structure (e.g, &hi2s2 for I2S second instance) that is required for HAL driver initialization
(e.g., HAL_I2S_Init) and the actual call to this function:
void MX_I2S2_Init(void)
{
hi2s2.Instance = SPI2;
hi2s2.Init.Mode = I2S_MODE_MASTER_TX;
hi2s2.Init.Standard = I2S_STANDARD_PHILLIPS;
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hi2s2.Init.DataFormat = I2S_DATAFORMAT_16B;
hi2s2.Init.MCLKOutput = I2S_MCLKOUTPUT_DISABLE;
hi2s2.Init.AudioFreq = I2S_AUDIOFREQ_192K;
hi2s2.Init.CPOL = I2S_CPOL_LOW;
hi2s2.Init.ClockSource = I2S_CLOCK_PLL;
hi2s2.Init.FullDuplexMode = I2S_FULLDUPLEXMODE_ENABLE;
HAL_I2S_Init(&hi2s2);
}
By default, the peripheral initialization is done in main.c. If the peripheral is used by a
middleware mode, the peripheral initialization can be done in the middleware corresponding
.c file.
Customized HAL_<IP Name>_MspInit() functions are created in the stm32f4xx_hal_msp.c
file to configure the low level hardware (GPIO, CLOCK) for the selected IPs.
B.3
STM32CubeMX design choices and limitations for
middleware initialization
B.3.1
Overview
STM32CubeMX does not support C user code insertion in Middleware stack native files
although stacks such as LwIP might require it in some use cases.
STM32CubeMX generates middleware Init functions that can be easily identified thanks to
the MX_ prefix:
MX_LWIP_Init(); // defined in lwip.h file
MX_USB_HOST_Init(); // defined in usb_host.h file
MX_FATFS_Init(); // defined in fatfs.h file
Note however the following exceptions:
•
No Init function is generated for FreeRTOS unless the user chooses, from the Project
settings window, to generate Init functions as pairs of .c/.h files. Instead, a
StartDefaultTask function is defined in the main.c file and CMSIS-RTOS native function
(osKernelStart) is called in the main function.
•
If FreeRTOS is enabled, the Init functions for the other middlewares in use are called
from the StartDefaultTask function in the main.c file.
Example:
void StartDefaultTask(void const * argument)
{
/* init code for FATFS */
MX_FATFS_Init();
/* init code for LWIP */
MX_LWIP_Init();
/* init code for USB_HOST */
MX_USB_HOST_Init();
/* USER CODE BEGIN 5 */
/* Infinite loop */
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for(;;)
{
osDelay(1);
}
/* USER CODE END 5 */
}
B.3.2
USB Host
USB peripheral initialization is performed within the middleware initialization C code in the
usbh_conf.c file, while USB stack initialization is done within the usb_host.c file.
When using the USB Host middleware, the user is responsible for implementing the
USBH_UserProcess callback function in the generated usb_host.c file.
From STM32CubeMX user interface, the user can select to register one class or all classes
if the application requires switching dynamically between classes.
B.3.3
USB Device
USB peripheral initialization is performed within the middleware initialization C code in the
usbd_conf.c file, while USB stack initialization is done within the usb_device.c file.
USB VID, PID and String standard descriptors are configured via STM32CubeMX user
interface and available in the usbd_desc.c generated file. Other standard descriptors
(configuration, interface) are hard-coded in the same file preventing support for USB
composite devices.
When using the USB Device middleware, the user is responsible for implementing the
functions in the usbd_<classname>_if.c class interface file for all device classes (e.g.,
usbd_storage_if.c).
USB MTP and CCID classes are not supported.
B.3.4
FatFs
FatFs configuration is available in the ffconf.h generated file.
The initialization of the SDIO peripheral for the FatFs SD Card mode and of the FMC
peripheral for the FatFs External SDRAM and External SRAM modes are kept in the main.c
file.
Some files need to be modified by the user to match user board specificities (BSP drivers in
STM32Cube embedded software package can be used as example):
•
bsp_driver_sd.c/.h generated files when using FatFs SD Card mode
•
bsp_driver_sram.c/.h generated files when using FatFs External SRAM mode
•
bsp_driver_sdram.c/.h generated files when using FatFs External SDRAM mode.
Multi-drive FatFs is supported, which means that multiple logical drives can be used by the
application (External SDRAM, External SRAM, SD Card, USB Disk, User defined). However
support for multiple instances of a given logical drive is not available (e.g. FatFs using two
instances of USB hosts or several RAM disks).
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NOR and NAND Flash memory are not supported. In this case, the user shall select the
FatFs user-defined mode and update the user_diskio.c driver file generated to implement
the interface between the middleware and the selected peripheral.
B.3.5
FreeRTOS
FreeRTOS configuration is available in FreeRTOSConfig.h generated file.
When FreeRTOS is enabled, all other selected middleware modes (e.g., LwIP, FatFs, USB)
will be initialized within the same FreeRTOS thread in the main.c file.
When GENERATE_RUN_TIME_STATS, CHECK_FOR_STACK_OVERFLOW,
USE_IDLE_HOOK, USE_TICK_HOOK and USE_MALLOC_FAILED_HOOK parameters
are activated, STM32CubeMX generates freertos.c file with empty functions that the user
shall implement. This is highlighted by the tooltip (see Figure 182).
Figure 182. FreeRTOS HOOK functions to be completed by user
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Through STM32CubeMX FreeRTOS configuration window, the user can configure all the
resources required for the real-time OS application: tasks, queues, semaphores and timers.
The corresponding freeRTOS elements will be defined and created in the generated code
(see Figure 183).
Figure 183. FreeRTOS elements
B.3.6
LwIP
LwIP initialization function is defined in lwip.c, while LwIP configuration is available in
lwipopts.h generated file.
STM32CubeMX supports LwIP over Ethernet only. The Ethernet peripheral initialization is
done within the middleware initialization C code.
STM32CubeMX does not support user C code insertion in stack native files. However, some
LwIP use cases require modifying stack native files (e.g., cc.h, mib2.c): user modifications
shall be backed up since they will be lost at next STM32CubeMX generation.
STM32CubeMX LwIP configuration does not support IPv6.
DHCP must be disabled, to configure a static IP address (see Figure 184).
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Figure 184. LwIP configuration
STM32CubeMX generated C code will report compilation errors when specific parameters
are enabled (disabled by default). The user must fix the issues with a stack patch
(downloaded from Internet) or user C code. The following parameters generate an error:
•
MEM_USE_POOLS: user C code to be added either in lwipopts.h or in cc.h (stack file).
•
PPP_SUPPORT, PPPOE_SUPPORT: user C code required
•
MEMP_SEPARATE_POOLS with MEMP_OVERFLOW_CHECK > 0: a stack patch
required
•
MEM_LIBC_MALLOC & RTOS enabled: stack patch required
•
LWIP_EVENT_API: stack patch required
In STM32CubeMX, the user must enable FreeRTOS in order to use LwIP with the netconn
and sockets APIs. These APIs require the use of threads and consequently of an operating
system. Without FreeRTOS, only the LwIP event-driven raw API can be used.
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Appendix C
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STM32 microcontrollers naming conventions
STM32 microcontroller part numbers are codified following the below naming conventions:
•
Device subfamilies
The higher the number, the more features available.
For example STM32L0 line includes STM32L051, L052, L053, L061, L062, L063
subfamilies where STM32L06x part numbers come with AES while STM32L05x do not.
The last digit indicates the level of features. In the above example:
•
•
•
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–
1 =Access line
–
2 = with USB
–
3 = with USB and LCD.
Pin counts
–
F = 20 pins
–
G = 28 pins
–
K = 32 pins
–
T = 36 pins
–
S = 44 pins
–
C = 48 pins
–
R = 64 pins (or 66 pins)
–
M = 80 pins
–
O = 90 pins
–
V = 100 pins
–
Q= 132 pins (e. g. STM32L162QDH6)
–
Z=144
–
I=176 (+25)
–
B = 208 pins (e. g.: STM32F429BIT6)
–
N = 216 pins
Flash memory sizes
–
4 = 16 Kbytes of Flash memory
–
6 = 32 Kbytes of Flash memory
–
8 = 64 Kbytes of Flash memory
–
B = 128 Kbytes of Flash memory
–
C = 256 Kbytes of Flash memory
–
D = 384 Kbytes of Flash memory
–
E = 512 Kbytes of Flash memory
–
F = 768 Kbytes of Flash memory
–
G = 1024 Kbytes of Flash memory
–
I = 2048 Kbytes of Flash memory
Packages
–
B = SDIP
–
H = BGA
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STM32 microcontrollers naming conventions
–
M = SO
–
P = TSSOP
–
T = LQFP
–
U = VFQFPN
–
Y = WLCSP
Figure 185 shows an example of STM32 microcontroller part numbering scheme.
Figure 185. STM32 microcontroller part numbering scheme
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STM32 microcontrollers power consumption parameters
Appendix D
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STM32 microcontrollers power consumption
parameters
This section provides an overview on how to use STM32CubeMX Power Consumption
Calculator (PCC).
Microcontroller power consumption depends on chip size, supply voltage, clock frequency
and operating mode. Embedded applications can optimize STM32 MCU power
consumption by reducing the clock frequency when fast processing is not required and
choosing the optimal operating mode and voltage range to run from. A description of STM32
power modes and voltage range is provided below.
D.1
Power modes
STM32 MCUs support different power modes (refer to STM32 MCU datasheets for full
details).
D.1.1
STM32L1 series
STM32L1 microcontrollers feature up to 6 power modes, including 5 low-power modes:
•
Run mode
This mode offers the highest performance using HSE/HSI clock sources. The CPU
runs up to 32 MHz and the voltage regulator is enabled.
•
Sleep mode
This mode uses HSE or HSI as system clock sources. The voltage regulator is enabled
and the CPU is stopped. All peripherals continue to operate and can wake up the CPU
when an interrupt/event occurs.
•
Low- power run mode
This mode uses the multispeed internal (MSI) RC oscillator set to the minimum clock
frequency (131 kHz) and the internal regulator in low-power mode. The clock frequency
and the number of enabled peripherals are limited.
•
Low-power sleep mode
This mode is achieved by entering Sleep mode. The internal voltage regulator is in lowpower mode. The clock frequency and the number of enabled peripherals are limited. A
typical example would be a timer running at 32 kHz.
When the wakeup is triggered by an event or an interrupt, the system returns to the
Run mode with the regulator ON.
•
Stop mode
This mode achieves the lowest power consumption while retaining RAM and register
contents. Clocks are stopped. The real-time clock (RTC) an be backed up by using
LSE/LSI at 32 kHz/37 kHz. The number of enabled peripherals is limited. The voltage
regulator is in low-power mode.
The device can be woken up from Stop mode by any of the EXTI lines.
•
Standby mode
This mode achieves the lowest power consumption. The internal voltage regulator is
switched off so that the entire VCORE domain is powered off. Clocks are stopped and
the real-time clock (RTC) can be preserved up by using LSE/LSI at 32 kHz/37 kHz.
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RAM and register contents are lost except for the registers in the Standby circuitry. The
number of enabled peripherals is even more limited than in Stop mode.
The device exits Standby mode upon reset, rising edge on one of the three WKUP pins,
or if an RTC event occurs (if the RTC is ON).
Note:
When exiting Stop or Standby modes to enter the Run mode, STM32L1 MCUs go through a
state where the MSI oscillator is used as clock source. This transition can have a significant
impact on the global power consumption. For this reason, STM32CubeMX PCC introduces
two transition steps: WU_FROM_STOP and WU_FROM_STANDBY. During these steps,
the clock is automatically configured to MSI.
D.1.2
STM32F4 series
STM32F4 microcontrollers feature a total of 5 power modes, including 4 low-power modes:
•
Run mode
This is the default mode at power-on or after a system reset. It offers the highest
performance using HSE/HSI clock sources. The CPU can run at the maximum
frequency depending on the selected power scale.
•
Sleep mode
Only the CPU is stopped. All peripherals continue to operate and can wake up the CPU
when an interrupt/even occurs. The clock source is the clock that was set before
entering Sleep mode.
•
Stop mode
This mode achieves a very low power consumption using the RC oscillator as clock
source. All clocks in the 1.2 V domain are stopped as well as CPU and peripherals.
PLL, HSI RC and HSE crystal oscillators are disabled. The content of registers and
internal SRAM are kept.
The voltage regulator can be put either in normal Main regulator mode (MR) or in Lowpower regulator mode (LPR). Selecting the regulator in low-power regulator mode
increases the wakeup time.
The Flash memory can be put either in Stop mode to achieve a fast wakeup time or in
Deep power-down to obtain a lower consumption with a slow wakeup time.
The Stop mode features two sub-modes:
–
Stop in Normal mode (default mode)
In this mode, the 1.2 V domain is preserved in nominal leakage mode and the
minimum V12 voltage is 1.08 V.
–
Stop in Under-drive mode
In this mode, the 1.2 V domain is preserved in reduced leakage mode and V12
voltage is less than 1.08 V. The regulator (in Main or Low-power mode) is in
under-drive or low-voltage mode. The Flash memory must be in Deep-powerdown mode. The wakeup time is about 100 µs higher than in normal mode.
•
Standby mode
This mode achieves very low power consumption with the RC oscillator as a clock
source. The internal voltage regulator is switched off so that the entire 1.2 V domain is
powered off: CPU and peripherals are stopped. The PLL, the HSI RC and the HSE
crystal oscillators are disabled. SRAM and register contents are lost except for
registers in the backup domain and the 4-byte backup SRAM when selected. Only RTC
and LSE oscillator blocks are powered. The device exits Standby mode when an
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external reset (NRST pin), an IWDG reset, a rising edge on the WKUP pin, or an RTC
alarm/ wakeup/ tamper/time stamp event occurs.
•
VBAT operation
It allows to significantly reduced power consumption compared to the Standby mode.
This mode is available when the VBAT pin powering the Backup domain is connected to
an optional standby voltage supplied by a battery or by another source. The VBAT
domain is preserved (RTC registers, RTC backup register and backup SRAM) and
RTC and LSE oscillator blocks powered. The main difference compared to the Standby
mode is external interrupts and RTC alarm/events do not exit the device from VBAT
operation. Increasing VDD to reach the minimum threshold does.
D.1.3
STM32L0 series
STM32L0 microcontrollers feature up to 8 power modes, including 7 low-power modes to
achieve the best compromise between low-power consumption, short startup time and
available wakeup sources:
•
Run mode
This mode offers the highest performance using HSE/HSI clock sources. The CPU can
run up to 32 MHz and the voltage regulator is enabled.
•
Sleep mode
This mode uses HSE or HSI as system clock sources. The voltage regulator is enabled
and only the CPU is stopped. All peripherals continue to operate and can wake up the
CPU when an interrupt/event occurs.
•
Low-power run mode
This mode uses the internal regulator in low-power mode and the multispeed internal
(MSI) RC oscillator set to the minimum clock frequency (131 kHz). In Low-power run
mode, the clock frequency and the number of enabled peripherals are both limited.
•
Low-power sleep mode
This mode is achieved by entering Sleep mode with the internal voltage regulator in
low-power mode. Both the clock frequency and the number of enabled peripherals are
limited. Event or interrupt can revert the system to Run mode with regulator on.
•
Stop mode with RTC
The Stop mode achieves the lowest power consumption with, while retaining the RAM,
register contents and real time clock. The voltage regulator is in low-power mode. LSE
or LSI is still running. All clocks in the VCORE domain are stopped, the PLL, MSI RC,
HSE crystal and HSI RC oscillators are disabled.
Some peripherals featuring wakeup capability can enable the HSI RC during Stop
mode to detect their wakeup condition. The device can be woken up from Stop mode
by any of the EXTI line, in 3.5 µs, and the processor can serve the interrupt or resume
the code.
•
Stop mode without RTC
This mode is identical to “Stop mode with RTC “, except for the RTC clock which is
stopped here.
•
Standby mode with RTC
The Standby mode achieves the lowest power consumption with the real time clock
running. The internal voltage regulator is switched off so that the entire VCORE domain
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is powered off. The PLL, MSI RC, HSE crystal and HSI RC oscillators are also switched
off. The LSE or LSI is still running.
After entering Standby mode, the RAM and register contents are lost except for
registers in the Standby circuitry (wakeup logic, IWDG, RTC, LSI, LSE Crystal 32 KHz
oscillator, RCC_CSR register).
The device exits Standby mode in 60 µs when an external reset (NRST pin), an IWDG
reset, a rising edge on one of the three WKUP pins, RTC alarm (Alarm A or Alarm B),
RTC tamper event, RTC timestamp event or RTC Wakeup event occurs.
•
Standby mode without RTC
This mode is identical to Standby mode with RTC, except that the RTC, LSE and LSI
clocks are stopped.
The device exits Standby mode in 60 µs when an external reset (NRST pin) or a rising
edge on one of the three WKUP pin occurs.
Note:
The RTC, the IWDG, and the corresponding clock sources are not stopped automatically by
entering Stop or Standby mode. The LCD is not stopped automatically by entering Stop
mode.
D.2
Power consumption ranges
STM32 MCUs power consumption can be further optimized thanks to the dynamic voltage
scaling feature: the main internal regulator output voltage V12 that supplies the logic (CPU,
digital peripherals, SRAM and Flash memory) can be adjusted by software by selecting a
power range (STM32L1 and STM32L0) or power scale (STM32 F4).
Power consumption range definitions are provided below (refer to STM32 MCU datasheets
for full details).
D.2.1
STM32L1 series feature 3 VCORE ranges
•
High Performance Range 1 (VDD range limited to 2.0-3.6 V), with the CPU running at
up to 32 MHz
The voltage regulator outputs a 1.8 V voltage (typical) as long as the VDD input voltage
is above 2.0 V. Flash program and erase operations can be performed.
•
Medium Performance Range 2 (full VDD range), with a maximum CPU frequency of
16 MHz
At 1.5 V, the Flash memory is still functional but with medium read access time. Flash
program and erase operations are still possible.
•
Low Performance Range 3 (full VDD range), with a maximum CPU frequency limited to
4 MHz (generated only with the multispeed internal RC oscillator clock source)
At 1.2 V, the Flash memory is still functional but with slow read access time. Flash
Program and erase operations are no longer available.
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STM32 microcontrollers power consumption parameters
D.2.2
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STM32F4 series feature several VCORE scales
The scale can be modified only when the PLL is OFF and when HSI or HSE is selected as
system clock source.
•
Scale 1 (V12 voltage range limited to 1.26-1.40 V), default mode at reset
HCLK frequency range = 144 MHz to 168 MHz (180 MHz with over-drive).
This is the default mode at reset.
•
Scale 2 (V12 voltage range limited to 1.20 to 1.32 V)
HCLK frequency range is up to 144 MHz (168 MHz with over-drive)
•
Scale 3 (V12 voltage range limited to 1.08 to 1.20 V), default mode when exiting Stop
mode
HCLK frequency ≤120 MHz.
The voltage scaling is adjusted to fHCLK frequency as follows:
•
•
STM32F429x/39x MCUs:
–
Scale 1: up to 168 MHz (up to 180 MHz with over-drive)
–
Scale 2: from 120 to 144 MHz (up to 168 MHz with over-drive)
–
Scale 3: up to 120 MHz.
STM32F401x MCUs:
No Scale 1
•
D.2.3
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–
Scale 2: from 60 to 84 MHz
–
Scale 3: up to 60 MHz.
STM32F40x/41x MCUs:
–
Scale 1: up to 168 MHz
–
Scale 2: up to 144 MHz
STM32L0 series feature 3 VCORE ranges
•
Range 1 (VDD range limited to 1.71 to 3.6 V), with CPU running at a frequency up to
32 MHz
•
Range 2 (full VDD range), with a maximum CPU frequency of 16 MHz
•
Range 3 (full VDD range), with a maximum CPU frequency limited to 4.2 MHz.
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STM32Cube embedded software packages
Appendix E
STM32Cube embedded software packages
Along with STM32CubeMX C code generator, embedded software packages are part of
STM32Cube initiative (refer to DB2164 databrief): these packages include a low level
hardware abstraction layer (HAL) that covers the microcontroller hardware, together with an
extensive set of examples running on STMicroelectronics boards (see Figure 186). This set
of components is highly portable across the STM32 series. The packages are fully
compatible with STM32CubeMX generated C code.
Figure 186. STM32Cube Embedded Software package
Note:
STM32CubeF0, STM32CubeF1, STM32CubeF2, STM32CubeF3, STM32CubeF4,
STM32CubeL0 and STM32CubeL1 embedded software packages are available on st.com.
They are based on STM32Cube release v1.1 (other series will be introduced progressively)
and include the embedded software libraries used by STM32CubeMX for initialization C
code generation.
The user should use STM32CubeMX to generate the initialization C code and the examples
provided in the package to get started with STM32 application development.
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Revision history
10
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Revision history
Table 16. Document revision history
Date
Revision
17-Feb-2014
1
Initial release.
2
Added support for STM32CubeF2 and STM32F2 series in cover page,
Section 2.2: Key features, Section 4.12.1: IP and Middleware
Configuration window, and Appendix E: STM32Cube embedded
software packages.
Updated Section 6.1: Creating a new STM32CubeMX Project,
Section 6.2: Configuring the MCU pinout, Section 6.6: Configuring the
MCU initialization parameters.
Section “Generating GPIO initialization C code move to Section 8:
Tutorial 3- Generating GPIO initialization C code (STM32F1 series
only) and content updated.
Added Section 9.4: Why do I get the error “Java 7 update 45’ when
installing ‘Java 7 update 45’ or a more recent version of the JRE?.
3
Added support for STM32CubeL0 and STM32L0 series in cover page,
Section 2.2: Key features, Section 2.3: Rules and limitations and
Section 4.12.1: IP and Middleware Configuration window
Added board selection in Table 3: File menu functions, Section 4.4.3:
Pinout menu and Section 4.2: New project window. Updated Table 5:
Pinout menu.
Updated Figure 74: Power Consumption Calculator default view and
added battery selection in Section 4.14.1: Building a power
consumption sequence.
Updated note in Section 4.14: Power Consumption Calculator (PCC)
view
Updated Section 6.1: Creating a new STM32CubeMX Project.
Added Section 9.5: Why does the RTC multiplexer remain inactive on
the Clock tree view?, Section 9.6: How can I select LSE and HSE as
clock source and change the frequency?, and Section 9.7: Why
STM32CubeMX does not allow me to configure PC13, PC14, PC15
and PI8 as outputs when one of them is already configured as an
output?.
04-Apr-2014
24-Apr-2014
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Changes
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Revision history
Table 16. Document revision history (continued)
Date
19-jun-2014
Revision
Changes
4
Added support for STM32CubeF0, STM32CubeF3, STM32F0 and
STM32F3 series in cover page, Section 2.2: Key features, Section 2.3:
Rules and limitations,
Added board selection capability and pin locking capability in
Section 2.2: Key features, Table 2: Welcome page shortcuts,
Section 4.2: New project window, Section 4.4: Toolbar and menus,
Section 4.7: Set unused / Reset used GPIOs windows, Section 4.8:
Project Settings Window, and Section 4.11: Pinout view. Added
Section 4.11.5: Pinning and labeling signals on pins.
Updated Section 4.12: Configuration view and Section 4.13: Clock tree
configuration view and Section 4.14: Power Consumption Calculator
(PCC) view.
Updated Figure 23: STM32CubeMX Main window upon MCU selection,
Figure 38: Project Settings window, Figure 41: About window,
Figure 42: STM32CubeMX Pinout view, Figure 43: Chip view,
Figure 74: Power Consumption Calculator default view, Figure 75:
Battery selection, Figure 76: Building a power consumption sequence,
Figure 82: Power consumption sequence: new step default view,
Figure 86: Power Consumption Calculator view after sequence
building, Figure 87: Sequence table management functions, Figure 88:
PCC Edit Step window, Figure 83: Power consumption sequence: new
step configured (STM32F4 example), Figure 84: ADC selected in
Pinout view, Figure 85: PCC Step configuration window: ADC enabled
using import pinout, Figure 90: Description of the Results area,
Figure 91: Peripheral power consumption tooltip, Figure 156: Power
Consumption Calculation example, Figure 155: Sequence table and
Figure 156: Power Consumption Calculation results.
Updated Figure 50: STM32CubeMX Configuration view and Figure 39:
STM32CubeMX Configuration view - STM32F1 series titles.
Added STM32L1 in Section 4.14: Power Consumption Calculator
(PCC) view.
Removed Figure Add a new step using the PCC panel from
Section 8.1.1: Adding a step. Removed Figure Add a new step to the
sequence from Section 4.14.2: Configuring a step in the power
sequence.
Updated Section 8.2: Reviewing results.
Updated appendix B.3.4: FatFs and Appendix D: STM32
microcontrollers power consumption parameters. Added Appendix
D.1.3: STM32L0 series and D.2.3: STM32L0 series feature 3 VCORE
ranges.
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Revision history
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Table 16. Document revision history (continued)
Date
19-Sep-2014
196/200
Revision
Changes
5
Added support for STM32CubeL1 series in cover page, Section 2.2:
Key features, Section 2.3: Rules and limitations,
Updated Section 3.2.3: Uninstalling STM32CubeMX standalone
version.
Added off-line updates in Section 3.5: Getting STM32Cube updates,
modified Figure 16: New library Manager window, and Section 3.5.2:
Downloading new libraries.
Updated Section 4: STM32CubeMX User Interface introduction,
Table 2: Welcome page shortcuts and Section 4.2: New project
window.
Added Figure 22: New Project window - board selector.
Updated Figure 40: Project Settings Code Generator.
Modified step 3 in Section 4.8: Project Settings Window.
Updated Figure 39: STM32CubeMX Configuration view - STM32F1
series.
Added STM32L1 in Section 4.12.1: IP and Middleware Configuration
window.
Updated Figure 62: GPIO Configuration window - GPIO selection;
Section 4.12.3: GPIO Configuration window and Figure 68: DMA
MemToMem configuration.
Updated introduction of Section 4.13: Clock tree configuration view.
Updated Section 4.13.1: Clock tree configuration functions and
Section 4.13.2: Recommendations, Section 4.14: Power Consumption
Calculator (PCC) view, Figure 82: Power consumption sequence: new
step default view, Figure 86: Power Consumption Calculator view after
sequence building, Figure 83: Power consumption sequence: new step
configured (STM32F4 example), and Figure 85: PCC Step
configuration window: ADC enabled using import pinout. Added
Figure 89: Power Consumption: Peripherals Consumption Chart and
updated Figure 91: Peripheral power consumption tooltip. Updated
Section 4.14.4: Power sequence step parameters glossary.
Updated Section 5: STM32CubeMX C Code generation overview.
Updated Section 6.1: Creating a new STM32CubeMX Project and
Section 6.2: Configuring the MCU pinout.
Added Section 7: Tutorial 2 - Example of FatFs on an SD card using
STM32429I-EVAL evaluation board and updated Section 8: Tutorial 3Generating GPIO initialization C code (STM32F1 series only).
Updated Section 4.14.2: Configuring a step in the power sequence.
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Revision history
Table 16. Document revision history (continued)
Date
Revision
Changes
Complete project generation, power consumption calculation and clock
tree configuration now available on all STM32 series.
Updated Section 2.2: Key features and Section 2.3: Rules and
limitations.
Updated Eclipse IDEs in Section 3.1.3: Software requirements.
Updated Figure 12: Updater Settings window, Figure 16: New library
Manager window and Figure 22: New Project window - board selector,
Updated Section 4.8: Project Settings Window and Section 4.9: Update
Manager Windows.
Updated Figure 41: About window.
Removed Figure STM32CubeMX Configuration view - STM32F1
series.
19-Jan-2015
6
Updated Table 9: STM32CubeMX Chip view - Icons and color scheme.
Updated Section 4.12.1: IP and Middleware Configuration window.
Updated Figure 66: Adding a new DMA request and Figure 68: DMA
MemToMem configuration.
Updated Section 4.13.1: Clock tree configuration functions.
Updated Figure 75: Battery selection, Figure 76: Building a power
consumption sequence, Figure 88: PCC Edit Step window.
Added Section 5.2: Custom code generation.
Updated Figure 109: Clock tree view and Figure 114: Configuration
view.
Updated peripheral configuration sequence and Figure 116: Timer
3 configuration window in Section 6.6.2: Configuring the peripherals .
Removed Tutorial 3: Generating GPIO initialization C code (STM32F1
series only).
Updated Figure 120: GPIO mode configuration.
Updated Figure 156: Power Consumption Calculation example and
Figure 155: Sequence table.
Updated Appendix A.1: Block consistency, A.2: Block inter-dependency
and A.3: One block = one peripheral mode.
Appendix A.4: Block remapping (STM32F10x only): updated Section :
Example .
Appendix A.6: Block shifting (only for STM32F10x and when “Keep
Current Signals placement” is unchecked): updated Section : Example
Updated Appendix A.8: Mapping a function individually .
Updated Appendix B.3.1: Overview.
Updated Appendix D.1.3: STM32L0 series.
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Table 16. Document revision history (continued)
Date
Revision
Changes
19-Mar-2015
7
Section 2.2: Key features: removed Pinout initialization C code
generation for STM32F1 series from; updated Complete project
generation.
Updated Figure 16: New library Manager window, Figure 22: New
Project window - board selector.
Updated IDE list in Section 4.8: Project Settings Window and modified
Figure 38: Project Settings window.
Updated Section 4.13.1: Clock tree configuration functions. Updated
Figure 70: STM32F429xx Clock Tree configuration view.
Section 4.14: Power Consumption Calculator (PCC) view: added
transition checker option. Updated Figure 74: Power Consumption
Calculator default view, Figure 75: Battery selection and Figure 76:
Building a power consumption sequence. Added Figure 79: Enabling
the transition checker option on an already configured sequence - all
transitions valid, Figure 80: Enabling the transition checker option on an
already configured sequence - at least one transition invalid and
Figure 81: Transition checker option -show log. Updated Figure 86:
Power Consumption Calculator view after sequence building. Updated
Section : Managing sequence steps, Section : Managing the whole
sequence (load, save and compare). Updated Figure 88: PCC Edit
Step window and Figure 90: Description of the Results area.
Updated Figure 156: Power Consumption Calculation example,
Figure 155: Sequence table, Figure 156: Power Consumption
Calculation results and Figure 158: Power consumption results - IP
consumption chart.
Updated Appendix B.3.1: Overview and B.3.5: FreeRTOS.
28-May-2015
8
Added Section 3.2.2: Installing STM32CubeMX from command line and
Section 3.4.2: Running STM32CubeMX in command-line mode.
9
Added STLM32F7 and STM32L4 microcontroller series.
Added Import project feature. Added Import function in Table 3: File
menu functions. Added Section 4.6: Import Project window. Updated
Figure 82: Power consumption sequence: new step default view,
Figure 88: PCC Edit Step window, Figure 83: Power consumption
sequence: new step configured (STM32F4 example), Figure 85: PCC
Step configuration window: ADC enabled using import pinout and
Figure 91: Peripheral power consumption tooltip.
Updated command line to run STM32CubeMX in Section 3.4.2:
Running STM32CubeMX in command-line mode.
Updated note in Section 4.12: Configuration view.
Added new clock tree configuration functions in Section 4.13.1.
Updated Figure 122: FatFs disabled.
Modified code example in Appendix B.1: STM32CubeMX generated C
code and user sections.
Updated Appendix B.3.1: Overview.
Updated generated .h files in Appendix B.3.4: FatFs.
09-Jul-2015
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Revision history
Table 16. Document revision history (continued)
Date
27-Aug-2015
16-Oct-2015
03-Dec-2015
Revision
Changes
10
Replace UM1742 by UM1940 in Section : Reference documents.
Updated command line to run STM32CubeMX in command-line mode
in Section 3.4.2: Running STM32CubeMX in command-line mode.
Modified Table 1: Command line summary.
Updated board selection in Section 4.2: New project window.
Updated Section 4.12: Configuration view overview. Updated
Section 4.12.1: IP and Middleware Configuration window,
Section 4.12.3: GPIO Configuration window and Section 4.12.4: DMA
Configuration window. Added Section 4.12.2: User Constants
configuration window.
Updated Section 4.13: Clock tree configuration view and added reserve
path.
Updated Section 6.1: Creating a new STM32CubeMX Project,
Section 6.5: Configuring the MCU Clock tree, Section 6.6: Configuring
the MCU initialization parameters, Section 6.7.2: Downloading firmware
package and generating the C code, Section 6.8: Building and updating
the C code project. Added Section 6.9: Switching to another MCU.
Updated Section 7: Tutorial 2 - Example of FatFs on an SD card using
STM32429I-EVAL evaluation board and replaced STM32F429I-EVAL
by STM32429I-EVAL.
11
Updated Figure 16: New library Manager window and Section 3.5.4:
Checking for updates.
Character string constant supported in Section 4.12.2: User Constants
configuration window.
Updated Section 4.13: Clock tree configuration view.
Updated Section 4.14: Power Consumption Calculator (PCC) view.
Modified Figure 156: Power Consumption Calculation example.
Updated Section 8: Tutorial 3- Using PCC to optimize the embedded
application power consumption and more.
Added Eclipse Mars in Section 3.1.3: Software requirements
12
Code generation options now supported by the Project settings menu.
Updated Section 3.1.3: Software requirements.
Added project settings in Section 4.6: Import Project window. Updated
Figure 30: Automatic project import; modified Manual project import
step and updated Figure 31: Manual project import and Figure 32:
Import Project menu - Try import with errors; modified third step of the
import sequence.
Updated Figure 71: Clock Tree configuration view with errors.
Added mxconstants.h in Section 5.1: Standard STM32Cube code
generation.
Updated Figure 156: Power Consumption Calculation example to
Figure 165: Step 10 optimization.
Updated Figure 166: PCC Sequence results after optimizations.
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