Justice Security Operations Center (JSOC) “News You Can Use”

Justice Security Operations Center (JSOC) “News You Can Use”
Description of document:
US Department of Justice (DOJ) Justice Security
Operations Center (JSOC) “News You Can Use”
Newsletters, 2008-2011
Requested date:
11-April-2011
Released date:
20-May-2011
Posted date:
11-July-2011
Date/date range of documents:
Included are: Dec 2008, Feb-Sep & Nov 2009, Jan-Dec
2010, Jan-Apr 2011
Source of document:
FOIA Contact
Justice Management Division
Department of Justice
Room 1111 RFK, 950 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20530-0001
Fax:
202-616-6695
Email: [email protected]
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U.S. Department of Justice
Justice Management Division
Ubshington, D.C. 20530
MAY 2 0 201 1
Re:
Freedom oflnformation Act Request No. 2352497
I am responding on behalf of the Justice Management Division (JMD) to your Freedom of Information
Act (FOIA) request dated April 11,2011 , for copies of each News You Can Use newsletter published on
DOJNet. Because I deem you to be a non-commercial requester, you are entitled to the first 100 pages
of documents and the first two hours of search time at no charge. 28 C.F .R. § 16.11 (d).
I am enclosing, at no cost to you, all the News You Can Use newsletters that have been published on
DOJNet, a total of26 documents. We are withholding portions of four newsletters- those from
September 2010, August 2010, January 2010, and April2010- under FOIA Exemption 7(E), which
protects disclosure of law enforcement techniques and procedures. 5 U.S.C. § 552(b)(7)(E).
If you are dissatisfied with my action, an appeal may be made pursuant to 28 C.F.R. § 16.9 by writing to
the Director, Office oflnformation and Policy, U.S. Department of Justice, 1425 New York Avenue,
Suite 11050, Washington, D.C. 20530-0001, within 60 days from the date ofthis letter. Both the letter
and the envelope should be clearly marked "Freedom oflnformation Act Appeal." In the event you are
dissatisfied with the results of any such appeal, judicial review will thereafter be available in the district
where the requester resides or has a principal place of business, or in the United States District Court for
the District of Columbia.
Sincerely,
Barbara Bush
Acting General Counsel
Enclosure
News You Con Use, Apri/2011
Visit Our Website
Security Awareness Tips
About the JSOC Newsletter
Your Golden Ticket. .. to Getting Scammed!
Beware of emails that promote investing in gold- scammers are exploiting the recent
increase in gold's value (a prevalent media topic). Recent concerns about inflation and
other economic issues have
caused some investors to
turn to gold as a safer investment. As a result, security
organizations have noticed
an influx of hoax emails that
request users' personal information . In one such scam,
the email's subject line
reads, "Is Gold Your Ticket To
A Golden Future?" and a
"FREE investor kit" is offered to users who provide their contact information.
"Certain personalities are used in the image for this spam campaign including Glenn
Beck. A Google search reveals an interesting angle about Glenn Beck promoting gold investments. It seems that the spammer did some research in order to know about the
association before propagating this spam campaign" (Harnett, www.symantec.com) .
Contributing sources: www.net-security.org; www.symontec.com; www.nytimes.com
User Awareness Tips
Thumb-thing's Fishy... Thumb Drive Safety 101
Removable devices such as thumb drives (also known as USB sticks) pose a unique challenge to Federal IT Security. While they are convenient, portable and great for storing
files, they are also easy to lose, and are often used to spread malware.
The US-CERT (Computer Emergency Response Team)
recommends the follow ing measures to protect
thumb drive data :
Warning!
_............. _......
Spyware detected on your computer'
....,._,,,, ......,
...........
~
'-·
The Justice Security Operations Center
(JSOC) News You Can Use Newsletter
strives to protect readers against Internet cyber threats by keeping them upto-date on the latest security issues,
vulnerabilities, and computer user tips.
The threats we address affect you daily- at work, at home, and virtually everywhere in between-and we provide the
information you need to know, in terms
you can understand . If there is a specific topic you would like to see discussed in a future newsletter, please
email us at [email protected]
Cyber Awareness Tip
Cybersecuritv Mvth :
"Once software is installed on your
home computer, you do not have to
worry about it anymore."
• Vendors may release updated versions of software to address problems or fix vulnerabilities . You should
install the updates (on your home
computer) as soon as possible; some
software even offers the option to
obtain updates automatically.
Source: US-Cert
VPR Alerts
~ __,..._......
~..:c:-;: •Do not plug an unknown USB drive into your com-
Security Advisories
~~ puter- If you find a USB drive, give it to the appro-
Monthly Wrap-Up
'*1 priate authorities (a location's security personnel,
'· your organization's IT department, etc.) . Do not plug
Green Tip of the Month
it into your computer to view the contents or to try to identify the owner.
•Take advantage of security features- Use passwords and encryption on your USB drive
to protect your data, and make sure that you have the information backed up in case
your drive is lost .
•Keep personal and business USB drives separate- Do not use personal USB drives on
computers owned by your organ ization, and do not plug USB drives containing corporate
information into your personal computer.
Contributing sources: www.us-cert.gov; news.cnet.com
Work from Home
Working from home when possible, as
well as utilizing an Alternative Work
Schedule (AWS) significantly reduces the
energy and t ime spent commuting. Video
and phone conferencing, and other workflow tools, make this an easy, effective
alternative to traditional commuting.
Source: www.green-unlimited.com
**This document is intended for Department af Justice internal use only and is nat ta be distributed outside the Department.....
Questions regarding this·newsletter or requests for permission to redistribute should be directed to: JSOC, 202-357-0266
News You Can Use
March 2011
Visit Our Website
Security Awareness Tips
Warning: Attackers May Attempt to Compromise Remote Access Tokens
A security breach at a vendor recently caused
weaknesses in RSA SecuriD tokens commonly used in
remote access to Department systems. As a result,
attackers may attempt to obtain users' PIN codes to
access Department systems using RSA SecuriD
tokens .
By remaining alert for attempts to reset or obtain RSA SecuriD token PIN codes, users can
assist in keep ing Department information secure.
All Department personnel are asked to:
•
Be cautious of messages, phone calls, or web pages requesting
that you reset the PIN code used with your token. ContaCt your.·'·
component IT helpdesk if you receive an unexpected request to
PIN code
·
·
•
Check the URL (address) of web pages asking for
to ensure they are legitimate government web·pa
imitations that look official.
··
•
Exercise caution when OJJ1er1ir1g'
contains links or ;on·;or·nnnP,,rc:
contains a sense of
U.S. government e-mail ;onnr••c:c:
Please report suspicious messages to the Justice Security Operations Center (JSOC) by email ([email protected] .gov) or phone (866-US-4-CERT) . Users may continue normal use of
systems, keeping in mind the above requests to remain vigilant for attempts to obtain PIN
codes. JSOC will distribute further information as it becomes available.
User Awareness Tip
Information Security 101: Avoid Password Reuse
In a recent study by the Security Group at the University of Cambridge Computer
Laboratory, a comparison was conducted on two websites whose password info~mation had
been stolen . The websites had overlapping customers (based on email addresses), and of
the customers who were registered at both sites,
76 percent used the same password on both
accounts.
Utilizing the same-or even very similar-passwords on multiple sites means that, if one
account
is
compromised,
they
all
are .
Unfortunately, due to this common, insecure
practice, "If a malicious hacker is able to get his
or her hands on a user's password credentials for
one domain, said hacker has a good starting
point for figuring out the user's password for
other sites" (Samson, infoworld.com) .
This issue is particularly relevant to Department of Justice users because, if an individual
uses the same password at DOJ and non-work-related sites, they are not only jeopardizing
their personal accounts, but also putting the Department's network at risk . At the very
least, users should commit to never reuse their work-related passwords for any of their
personal accounts .
Contributing Sources: Infoworld.com
The Justice Security Operations Center
(JSOC)
News
You
Can
Use
Newsletter strives to protect readers
against Internet cyber threats by
keeping them up-to-date on the latest
security issues, vulnerabilities, and
computer user tips. The threats we
address affect you daily-- at work, at
home, and virtually everywhere in
between-and
we
provide
the
information you need to know, in
terms you can understand . If there is
a specific topic you would like to see
discussed in a future newsletter,
please email Jennifer Jones at
[email protected]
Cyber Awareness Tip
Reasons to
be
particularly
careful when opening email
attachments:
Email is easily
circulated
Forward in g email is so simple
that viruses can quickly infect
many machines.
• Email programs try to address all
users' needs - Almost any type of
file can be attached to an email
message, so attackers have more
freedom with the types of viruses
they can send.
• Email programs offer many "userfriendly" features - Some email
programs have the option to
automatically
download
email
attachments, which im mediately
exposes your computer to any
viruses within the attachments.
Source : US-Cert
~ews Highlights . ·
,
VPR Alerts
Security Advisories
Monthly Wrap-Up
Green Tip of the Month
Waste Less Paper
Whenever appropriate, re-use one sided documents from a scrap paper
bin in the same area as your printer
or copier.
Source: Newdream.org
**This document is intended for Department of Justice internal use only and is not to be distributed outside the Department.**
Questions regarding this newsletter or requests for permission to redistribute should be directed to: JSOC 202-357-0266
News You Can Use
February 2011
.Visit Our Website
2011 DOl Cybersecurity Conference
"Leveraging a Collaborative Defense"
The third annual DOJ Cybersecurity Conference was held February 8-9, with the theme
" Leveraging a Collaborative Defense . " This year's conference examined the changing
threat picture and the new dynamics and challenges in defending DOJ networks. It also
emphasized the need to work together to strengthen the Department's networks and
applications security posture , while empowering its mission.
Thank you to all attendees-- particularly volunteers-- who helped to make this year's
conference a success. Please remember to fill out your attendee survey so that your
feedback can help shape next year's program . To request a specific topic be covered in a
future conferen ce, please email Jennifer Jones at [email protected] .
Security Awareness Tip
About the JSOC Newsletter
The Justice Security Operations Center
(JSOC)
News
You
Can
Use
Newsletter strives to protect readers
against I nternet cyber threats by
keeping them up-to-date on the latest
security issues, vulnerabilities, and
computer user tips. The threats we
address affect you daily-- at work, at
home, and virtually everywhere in
between-and
we
provide
the
information you need to know, in
terms you can understand . If there is
a specific topic you would like to see
discussed in a future newsletter,
please email Jennifer Jones at
jennifer. [email protected] gov
What You Should Know About
Advanced Persistent Threat (APT)
Cyber Awareness Tip
You may have heard the term " Advanced Persistent
Threat" or " APT" in the news, usually referring to a
determined group of hackers that continues to target
computer users in an attempt to steal information over
the long term.
Using methodical attack techniques
employing targeted, malicious ema il messages, the attackers trick
users into opening a malicious
attachment or clicking a link that
leads to a comprom ise of sensitive
information .
Once
inside
an
organization,
the
attackers
quietly move laterally among
network resources,
elevating
privileges
and
stealing
information,
persisting
potentially for years without
detection.
The Justice Security
Operations Center rem inds
users to remain vig ilant for
suspicious messages, keeping the
fol low ing in mind :
trea·sure,
they face. By~ contra
there to stay as long· as .
q~·n ~ The
attackers aren't trying· to steaniverY'thirig at
once. Instead, they exploit dozens to
hundreds of computers, logon accounts, and
email users, searching for new data and
ideas over an extended period of months
and years . "
Source : http:/ /infoworld.com/d/security-central
Attackers may send
convincing messages appearing to come from a coworker, employer, or other
reputable source to ga in you r trust .
•
Be wary of any unsolicited message that requests you open an attachment or
click a link, and attempt to confirm the authenticity of the message via phone .
At home, employ updated antivirus software and educate others who share your
computer that malicious e-mail messages can compromise your computer, and
remind them to view unfamiliar e-mail messages with caution.
Submit suspicious e-mail messages for analysis to JSOC via the e-mail address
[email protected]
Good Security Habit:
Lock Your Computer
Lock your computer when you are
away from it by pressing the
Windows Key and L. Even if you
only step away from your computer
for a few minutes, it's enough time
for someone else to destroy or
corrupt your information . Locking
your computer prevents another
person from being able to simply sit
down at your computer and access
all of your information
Source: US_ CERT.gov
VPR Alerts
Security Advisories
Monthly Wrap-Up
Green Tip of the Month
Green Lunch Ideas
Bringing lunch to work in reusable
containers is likely the greenest way
to eat at work, since ordering delivery
and takeout usually leaves leftover
packaging waste.' If you do order
delivery, join coworkers in placing a
large order (more efficient than many
separate ones). Also, bring in a
reusable plate, utensils, and napkins.
Source: treehugger.com
Source : Infoworld.com
**This document is intended for Department of Justice internal use only and is not to be distributed outside the Department.**
Questions regarding this newsletter or requests for permission to redistribute should be directed to: JSOC 202-357-0266
·You Can Use
.January 2011
.Visit Our Website
User Awareness Tip
About the JSOC Newsletter
Cyber Security Resolutions for 2011
"
7
!· '
1·
.
0
,,'
Cyber security experts predict a rise in economic and job marketrelated scams in 2011; resolve to be extra vigilant in protecting
yourself from cyber crime this year!
'
Lottery and Sweepstakes Scams
According to the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center
consumers have reported a recent sweepstakes scam that sends
and letters with fraudulent checks bearing the logos of financial services companies .
to see variations of these schemes in the coming year, using text messages and
calls.
(IC3),
emails
Expect
phone
Employment Schemes
Both "get rich quick" and "work from home" schemes have become
increasingly
common,
exploiting
those
facing
difficult
financial
circumstances. "Common warning flags in postings for possible scams
include: Inflated wages, vague wording or generic job openings, free
training, guaranteed placement, no special skills or experience required,
P.O. Box or out-of-state address, and job listings for government, civil
service and overseas positions".
Social Networking Dangers
Social networking sites are consistently risky, and threats are predicted to increase in 2011.
They "provide an avenue of easy attack to users who are will ing to click on every link they
receive". Be sure to contact friends before clicking links, videos, etc, to ensure they are
legitimate.
Sources: Dark Reading; Net-Security; PC Tools
Security Awareness Tips
Information Security during International Travel
All federal employees embarking on international travel-whether work-related or notshould keep the following tips in mind:
Assume You're a Target, Because You Probably Are
"Travelers need to know that in light of current worldwide political and economic instability,
the fact that they are American citizens and, in particular, U.S. government employees or
contractors, makes them a target for exploitation".
Avoid Processing and Transmitting Sensitive Information
Travelers should assume that their transmissions are being intercepted and read anywhere
networks are controlled by a foreign government . "Foreign network providers can disable
mobile device encryption and then turn it back on after information is intercepted".
Power Down When Possible
Travelers should turn their mobile devices off when not in use in order to
limit the potential for compromise. It is best to also remove the battery and
SIM card, and store them separately from the device .
Steer Clear of Cafes
Internet cafes are NOT a safe alternative to utilizing your own electronic
devices. The computers at many such establishments have malicious
software that can capture passwords, bank account or credit card
information, and the like . Never use cafes for official business.
Be Responsive
In the case of a security incident, know the proper method to report tampering,
unauthorized use, loss or theft of IT media to your Component 's IT Security Staff.
The Justice Security Operations Center
(JSOC)
News
You
Can
Use
Newsletter strives to protect readers
against Internet cyber threats by
keeping them up-to-date on the latest
security issues, vulnerabilities, and
computer user tips. The threats we
address affect you daily-- at work, at
home, and virtually everywhere in
between-and
we
provide
the
information you need to know, in
terms you can understand. If there is
a specific topic you would like to see
discussed in a future newsletter,
please
email Jennifer Jones
at
[email protected]
Cyber Awareness Tip
Cyber Security ·Myth: Attackers
only target people with money.
Truth : Anyone can become a victim of
identity theft. Attackers look for the
biggest reward for the least amount of
effort,
so
they typically target
databases that store information
about
many
people .
If
your
information happens to be in the
database, it could be collected and
used for malicious purposes. It is
important to pay attention to your
credit information in order to minimize
any potential damage .
Source : www.us-cert.gov
VPR Alerts
Security Advisories
Monthlv 'wrap-Up
Green Tip of the Month
Environmenta lly Conscious Travel
When feasible, make it a habit to take
the train, bus, or subway during
business travel, instead of a rental car.
If you must rent a car, opt for hybrids
and other high-mileage vehicles, which
some rental agencies now offer.
Better yet, utilize videoconferencing and
other technological solutions that can
reduce the amount of employee travel
when possible.
Source : Sierra Club
Contributing Sources: MacAfee; GCN
**This document is intended for Department of .Justice internal use only and is not to be distributed outside the Department.**
Questions regarding this newsletter or requests for permission to redistribute should be directed to :
JSOC 202-357-0266
December 2010
Visit Our Website
Security Awareness Tips
About the JSOC Newsletter
'Tis the Season ... to Get Scammed!
The Justice Security Operations Center
(JSOC)
News
You
Can
Use
Newsletter strives to protect readers
against Internet cyber threats by
keeping them up-to-date on the latest
security issues, vulnerabilities, and
computer user tips . The threats we
address affect you daily-- at work, at
home, and virtually everywhere in
between-a nd
we
provide
the
information you need to know, in
terms you can understand .If there is a
specific topic you would like to see
discussed in a future newsletter,
please email Jennifer Jones at
[email protected]
The hustle and bustle of the holidays-- with shoppers
looking for great deals in a hurry-- provides an excellent
opportunity for cyber criminals to strike. Don 't be fooled by
the common scams below :
Free iPad Offers
With Apple products bei ng in high demand this season, lots
of phony offers for free iPads and other merchandise are
circulating online. Some users receive spam email
messages that offer a free iPad with an online purchase. Those who attempt to make a credit
card purchase receive neither the product they supposedly paid for, nor the free iPad they
were promised, and their account information
is in the hands of cyber criminals . Others
have encountered quizzes on Facebook and
Twitter that promise a free iPad in exchange
for answering a few questions. To receive
their final results, individuals must enter their
cell phone number, which automatically
Free AP.ple iPad! See Details
subscribes them to a cell phone scam that
http://Dit.ly/
·
charges their account $10 a week . Malicious
#UKnowUBroke #mm #chile PS3
~
: ,-.r .~tes .l!OO::: ··aAP!
links and other counterfeit offers for iPads are
also common on social networking sites.
lrJ··-~~~~~9r
l
I
"Help! I've Been Robbed" Scam
This scam appears in the form of phony distress messages from someone you know, claiming
they are out of town and in need of money immediately. Do not fall prey to the message's
sense of urgency-- {irst, call or email the supposedly stranded friend in order to verify their
claims. Chances are, they're fine and you've encountered a scam .
Fake Gift Cards
Cyber criminals use phishing scams with offers of free
gift cards to steal users' personal information and
money. The offers can appear as pop-ups, emails,
banners on web pages, and more. " The ruse may say
something like 'The first 200 people to 'Like' [insert
well-known retailer] on Fa ce book will receive a $500 gift
card.' Then, to claim the prize, you have to enter
personal information or take a bunch of online quizzes.
The personal information is used for identity theft
purposes, and the quiz results are sold to marketers,
netting the crooks even more money" .
Charity Scams
With increased giving, comes increased swindling. When cons idering donating to a charity
online, remember to:
• Carefully check the name of any charity : Charity scams use names similar to the original
charity in order to cause confusion and obtain your donations, i.e., National Cancer
Society (scam ) instead of American Cancer Society (legitimate) .
• Check the email address of any message from a charity. Charities
sending out emails should have top level domains like .org, .com, or
.net and the email should come from this domain, not a free provider
like hotmail or gma il. However, as a general rule reputable charities
don't spam and you won't receive an email from them directly without
your prior inquiry.
Contributing Sources: ftc.gov; newsroom.mcafee.com; eldergadget.com
**This document is intended for Department of Justice internal use only and is not to be
distributed outside the Department.**
Questions regarding this newsletter or requests for permission to redistribute should be directed to :
lSOC 202-357-0266
'
Cyber Awareness Tip
Power Surge Protection
Inclement winter weather is headed
our way- keep your home PC safe
from power surges and outages by:
• Investing in a power strip that
protects against power surges;
many strips advertise compensation
if they do not effectively protect
your computer.
• During
a
lightning
storm
or
construction work that increases the
odds of power surges, consider
shutting your computer down and
unplugging it from all power
sources.
Source : US_CERT.gov
VPR Alerts
Securitv Advisories
Monthly Wrap-Up
Green Tip of the Month
Green Holiday Decorating
When decking your halls this season,
keep these green tips in mind :
• Reuse decorations from year to year
to
save
money and
prevent
unnecessary waste.
• Buy energy-efficient lights, such as
LEDs, and put them on a timer so
they aren't glowing hours longer
than necessary.
Source: earth911 .com
-News You Can Use
November 2010
Visit Our Website
Security Awareness Tips
Thanksgiving Threats
What is Fake Antivirus?
A fake antivirus is a warning
While planning parties, printing out invitations and
message that pops up from a Web
finding new recipes, many people forget to be
site and claims the user's computer
particularly careful browsing the Internet around the
is currently contaminated or not
holidays. Be aware that cybercriminals are utilizing
running properly. Also called "rogue
search results for common holiday terms to attack
antivirus" and "scareware," fake
unsuspecting users . Internet searches
antivirus is a dishonest attempt to
for
"Turkey. "
"Tha nksqivinq."
cause a user to purchase antivirus,
"Invitations" and "Printable (cards)"
registry cleaner or some other
often yield malicious search results that
software that repairs problems or
redirect users to fake antivirus sites .
enhances performance.
Source: pcmag.com
Once downloaded , the software will do
"a number of annoying things, such as
hijacking web browsing sessions, repeatedly playing messages over the speakers (E .g. 'Your
computer is infected'), and generating popups".
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Searches relaled 10: lradlllonal thanksgiving stutllng recipe
It is important to examine any link
before clicking it to make sure the URL is
related to the search you conducted.
While this does not guarantee the site is
safe, it is a good preventative measure
that can help you steer clear of malicious
links. The best solution, however, is to
type the specific URL of your intended
destination in the address bar rather
than conducting broad searches. "By
manually typing the URL in the address
bar, you can verify the information that
(your web browser] uses to access the
destination Web site. To do so, type the
URL in the Address bar, and then press
ENTER".
If you encounter an anti virus pop-up,
immediately close your browser to avoid unintentionally downloading the malware, and
contact your Component's IT security staff immediately.
Contributing Source : pandasecurity.com; microsoft. com
About the JSOC Newsletter:
The Justice Security Operations
Center (JSOC) News You Can Use
Newsletter
strives
to
protect
readers against Internet cyber
threats by keeping them up-to-date
on the latest security issues,
vulnerabilities, and computer user
tips. The threats we address affect
you daily-- at work, at home, and
virtually everywhere in betweenand we provide the information you
need to know, in terms you can
understand.If there is a specific
topic you would like to see
discussed in a future newsletter,
please email Jennifer Jones at
[email protected]
Cyber Awareness Tip
Safe Online Shopping
• Use
anti-virus
software,
a
firewall,
and
anti-spyware
software. These are your first
defense against viruses, etc.
• Do business with
reputable
vendors. Verify that the vendor is
reputable and established before
providing any personal or financial
information .
• Be wary of emails requesting
information. Legitimate businesses
will not solicit account or personal
information through email.
Source: US CERT
Fake USAA Phishing E-mails
A recent phishing scam has used the name of the
United States Automobile Association (USAA) to
lure victims into handing over their credit card
information . Recipients of the email are asked to
click a link to fill out a "new version of USAA
Confirmation Form." Once they click the link, they
are redirected to a phishing page with a fake form
(see image at right) requesting their online ID,
password, name, e-mail, USAA card number,
expiration date, security code and PIN.
What is the JSOC
Newsletter?
~.
VPR Alerts
CARDHOLDER tORM
There are severa l warning signs indicating this is
a scam, however : a small mistake in the wording
of the message, the use of shortened links (to
hide the actual destination URL). as well as a
browser warning that there might be a problem
with the destination URL.
Contributing Source : net-security.org
**This document is intended for Department of .Justice internal use only and is not to be
distributed outside the Department. * *
Questions regarding this newsletter or requests for permission to redistribute should be directed to:
JSOC 202-357-0266
Security Advisories
Monthly Wrap-Up
Green Tip of the Month
Smarter Recycling Dos and Don'ts
• .!2.2.!l.:t crush cans. This is no longer
necessary for processing.
• .!2.2.!l.:t thoroughly clean
every
empty jar.
Machinery at the
recycling center will clean jars .
• Q.Q
sort
recyclables.
Some
recycling
centers
throw
out
recyclables that are not sorted .
• Q.2 recycle
glossy paper. Most
centers now accept magazines.
Source : bestgreenhometips.com
Visit Our Website
Security Awareness Tip
What is the JSOC
Newsletter?
"MSIL/Zeven" Affects Internet Explorer, Chrome, and Firefox
About the JSOC Newsletter:
A new fake anti-virus scam in the form of a browser warning page has been spotted by the
Microsoft Malware Protection Center. The rogue, dubbed " MSIL/Zeven," has been spotted on
various compromised websites, and is able to detect whether Internet Explorer, Chrome , or
Firefox is being used, then generate a
malware warning page very similar to
•--...o.~~ ,.~* nt~f11!<1 ~
1•
those displayed by the respective
'
~
• "": "':.:; ;., ______.-,-.~"~·-r'.l
browsers
(See
phony
Internet 1~~- 0 .......,"-*lollt
Explorer page below).
The Justice Security Operations
Center (JSOC) News You Can Use
Newsletter
strives
to
protect
readers
against Internet cyber
threats by keeping them up-to-date
on the
latest security issues,
vulnerabilities, and computer user
tips . The threats we address affect
you daily-- at work, at home, and
virtually everywhere in betweenand we provide the information you
need to know, in terms you can
understand .
..
o'-·
It is im portant to note that all " the
{ ·!" ' "'"' ' "' '
J 'ff-tl'll.:'J
...
'upda tes' point to
a
copy
of
, ..., •M S... .., • •
'< <<• ,!' U ..,.,
,...,..,..,......,,.
MSIL/Zeven that promises to provide
'a
new
approach
to
windows
detection,' but Internet Explorer,
Firefox, and Chrome do not offer
such a solution when a website is
blocked "
(Microsoft
Malware
Protection
Center).
Additionally,
many of the pages have obvious
grammar and spelling mistakes, such
as " Get me our of here" (instead of
"out") in the Firefox warning page,
and "Proven antiv irus protection fin one click" (rather than "in"). If you encounter such a
warning page, hit Alt-F4 on your keyboard, which will immed iately kill the browser (Select
"Cancel" if a dialog box appears), to avoid unintentionally downloading the malware, and
contact your Component's IT security staff right away.
,.,.(""t~
'lf!f ......jl!( .;! • ..,,. .... , ·~
'!
· ~ - •ll "'> j:
t~ ' l"'"':i
r'e' \ :O'U
t;;Jtt- ... ~ ~ ·"1 "" f~ l1ft l ~!'io!>_, ~
,.- l,wo.- ~; ..-
If there is a specific topic you would
like to see discussed in a future
newsletter, please email Jennifer
Jones at [email protected]
Cyber Awareness Tip
"Free iPhone" Facebook Scam
Beware of iPhone-related status
updates from friends on Facebook,
with claims like : " Just testing
Face book for iPhone out : P Received
my free iPhone today, so happy
lol ... If anyone else wants one go
here: (link)". Users who click on the
link are asked if they want to
"Allow" the application to access
their basic information. Clicking
" Allow" enables the application to
access users' personal information.
as well as to post on their wall . Each
click earns commission for the
scammers . Impacted users should
immediately delete references to
the f ree iPhone from their wall, and
remove the offending application
from Account/ Application Settings .
If a user clicks the "Update Now" or " Upgrade" box on the page, their computer will be
infected and the phony "Wi n? AV" product will be installed . It starts by conducting a fake
scan, indicating that it has found malicious files, infections, and the like . While the scan
appears legitimate (see image at
·~
left), it does not actually inspect
ai:J)..
Threaddeledm
the user's computer, and the
- - IV1nTAV
report it generates is completely
false; "the features don't work ;
everything is there just to look
O!,IJI ,1 017i2-n
nice, not to offer any kind of
...;,,.- 00.00.:7
protection (just like in all other
rogue
antivirus
programs) "
(Microsoft
Malware
Protection
S,...flooMcll ......
Center) . After the initial scan, the
----~~
user is informed that the program
---------·-- --- .. ,,..
has detected various problems, but
cannot eradicate them unless they
upgrade to the full version of the
..
program (i.e. pay money) . Even if
....
IN-..~-....,_,....,_,""""-'-~-----·
,. _
the user chooses not to purchase
the
product,
the
MSIL/Zeven
malware is already on their PC and
will display reminders and warning messages stating that the computer is infected . If the
user does purchase the product, they will be paying for an ineffective scanner, and their
credit card information will be in the hands of cyber criminals .
.
,,
--·
--
-- .,.,.______
~
1
M!n~liortn
,.,
__ _
.....
_.,...~r4
......
Source : www. net-security. org/secworld
.,...
~CMI'IQtbJ •otU~»
Contributing Source : www. blogs. tech net. com/b/mmpc/
**This document is intended for Department of Justice internal use only and is not to be
distributed outside the Department. **
Questions regarding this newsletter or requests for permission to redistribute should be directed to :
JSOC 202-307-5332
VPR Alerts
Security Advisories
Monthly Wrap-Up
,
Green Tip of the Month
Switch out your disposable plastic
hand soap containers for refillable
hand soap pumps . Most brands offer
bulk soap refills, and you will be
saving both money and landfill space!
Source : www.bestgreenhometips.com
News You Can Use
September 2010
Visit Our Website
JSOC Issues Two Alerts to DOl Computer Users
What is the JSOC
Newsletter?
Computer "Worm" Attacks Federal Agencies
A new computer " worm" attacked several federal agencies and Fortune 500 companies
yesterday. The malicious email messages contain the subject line "Here You Have" or "Just
For You" and contain a link to a seemingly legitimate PDF file. If a user clicks on the link,
they will be redirected to a malicious
website that will prompt them to
Computer Worm:
down load and install a screensaver
A software program that is designed to copy itself
(.scr) file . If they agree to install this
from one computer to another, without human
file, they will become infected with an
interaction. Unlike a computer virus, a worm can
email worm that will continue to
copy itself automatically. Worms can replicate in
propagate through their email contacts
great volume. For example, a worm can send out
copies of itself to every contact in your e-mail
(see Computer Wo r m definition above).
address book, and then it can send itself to all of
The Department of Justice received
the contacts in your contact's e-mail address
over 200 of these emails but the
books (Microsoft.com).
Justice Security Operations Center
(JSOC) activated the OCIO Incident Response Action Team and blocks were instituted at the
TIC Internet gateways . Additionally, Components were required to update all antivirus
products in use, which minimized our exposure to only six infected machines. Even though
~ the Department is now protected, sometimes the adversaries change the
~ email to look slightly different so they can get past defenses .
.
The Department asks that all users carefully watch their emails, both at
work and on their home machines.
About the JSOC Newsletter:
The Justice Security Operations
Center (JSOC) News You Can Use
Newsletter
strives
to
protect
readers
against Internet cyber
threats by keeping them up-to-date
on the
latest security issues,
vulnerabilities, and computer user
tips . The threats we address affect
you daily-- at work, at home, and
virtually everywhere in betweenand we provide the information you
need to know, in terms you can
understand.
If there is a specific topic you would
like to see discussed in a future
newsletter, please email Jennifer
Jones at [email protected]
Cyber Awareness Tip
Safe Online Gaming at Home
Attackers Attempt to Access Department Systems Through
Malicious E-mail Messages
£)(-erY\p-h·on 1CE)
..........
The Justice Security Operations Center (JSOC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
designed to give attackers remote access to
Department systems . Due to the recent increase and nature of these targeted intrusion
attempts, we urge users to be extra cautious when opening e-mail messages at work and at
home .
~··•••••IIIIi
Typically, users will receive a malicious message disguised as a legitimate e-mail containing
links or attachments, often referring to U.S. government information, reports, conferences,
or meeting agendas . If a user clicks the link or opens the attachment, the attacker can gain
full control of their workstation and information.
To reduce the risk of compromising your DOJ workstation, be alert for unsolicited
e-mail messages and keep in mind the following traits common to malicious e-mail
messages:
• Be careful when downloading free to
play (F2P) clients on your home
computer. I f the client software is
malicious, you could be putting your
PC at risk .
Don't
give
out
your
login
information to strangers. In fact,
don't give out ANY kind of
information, personal or not, to
people you meet gaming .
• Avoid falling for the old "FarmVille
Secrets" scam. You will either
download a Trojan or expose your
Facebook login info to criminals.
Source: www .gizmodo.com
• Subject matter related to recipient's work, possibly containing actual U.S. Government
information
• A sense of urgency to convince the recipient to open an attachment or click a link within
the message
• Convincing content such as upcoming meeting agendas, reports, information on current
events or policy issues
• Seemingly-legitimate sender (government and commercial
@usdoj.gov) using legitimate signature and contact infor·mation
addresses,
including
• An attachment (typically a .pdf or .zip file) or link
The Justice Security Operations Center would like to examine suspected malicious e-mail
messages. To preserve the hidden message information typically invisible to average users,
suspicious e-mail messages must be sent to JSOC in a certain way. To forward a
message for analysis, please follow the instructions available on JSOC webs ite:
http: 1/dojnet.doj .qov /j md/irm/itsecurity/docu ments/malicious-email-submittal. pdf.
**This document is intended for Department of Justice internal use only and is not to be
distributed outside the Department.**
Questions regarding this newsletter or requests for permission to redistribute should be directed to :
JSOC 202-307-5332
Security Advisories
Monthly Wrap-Up
Green Tip of the Month
Think Before You Print
• Ask yourself: could this be read or
stored online instead' Make it a
policy to post employee manuals
and similar materials online, rather
than distribute print copies. They' re
easier to update that way too.
• Request to be removed from
mailing lists before you recycle
unwanted mail.
Source: www. sierraclub.typepad.com
News You Can Use
Visit Our Website
Security Awareness Tip
Increase in Social Networking Scams
What is the JSOC
Newsletter?
In its presentation to the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland
Security last month, the FBI reported a significant increase in
the use of social networking accounts in Internet scams.
Gordon Snow, Assistant Director of the FBI's Cyber Division,
stated, "The surge in the use of socia l networking sites over the
past two years has given cyber thieves and child predators
new,
highly
effective
avenues
to
take
advantage
of
unsuspecting
users"
(www.networkworld .com).
About the JSOC Newsletter:
facebook
The Justice Security Operations
Center (JSOC) News You Can Use
Newsletter strives
to
protect
readers against Internet cyber
threats by keeping them up-to-date
on the latest security issues,
vulnerabilities, and computer user
tips. The threats we address affect
you daily-- at work, at home, and
virtually everywhere in betweenand we provide the information you
need to know, in terms you can
understand.
A couple common tactics used on social networking sites include:
• Data Mining, in which cyber criminals extract bits of information about victims and then
use it to scam them. A common example is a "getting to know you quiz" on a social
networking site; "While the answers to these questions do not appear to be malicious on
the surface, they often mimic the same questions that are asked by financial institutions or
e-mail account providers when
an individual has forgotten their password"
(www.networkworld.com) . Scammers can thus gain information that will allow them to
access the victim's email, bank accounts, etc. Additionally, collecting personal information
is made even easier because many users "often accept into their private sites people that
they do not actually know, or sometimes fail altogether to properly set privacy settings on
their profile" (www . networkworld.com). Friends of friends should not be able to view your
birthday, cell phone number, or any other information that could be used to impersonate
you to credit card companies, credit unions, etc.
• Data mining can be applied in Phishing, in which cyber criminals attempt to acquire
passwords, account numbers and other sensitive information by pretending to be someone
else, often through personalized, legitimate-looking
messages. One example is a warning message that
appears to be from your bank, requesting you submit
your account information. for verificatipn purposes
(note that most banks will not contact you via email
to gather information) . A recent phishing scam that
has plagued Facebook and other social networking
sites is the "Help, I am stranded!" scam, in which
victims receive a message appearing to be from a
friend, claiming they have been robbed of their credit
cards, passport, money, and cell phone, and are in
immediate need of money. While the simple solution to this scam is to call the supposedly
stranded friend in order to verify their claims, many users fall prey to the message's sense
of urgency and send money. Phishing scams can be found in messages, links, or videos
(appearing to be from friends) within the site, ore-mails sent to users claiming to be from
the social networking site itself.
If there is a specific topic you would
like to see discussed in a future
newsletter, please email Jennifer
Jones at [email protected]
Cyber Awareness Tip
~
-
-
-
-
-
--------
"Keep Me Signed In" Box
• If you are not on your personal
laptop or home computer, DO NOT
select the "Keep me signed in" box
on websites .
• Although your work computer may
feel like it belongs to you, a
snooping co-worker could easily
open your browser and access your
accounts if you stay signed in.
• If you sign in to a particular site, do
not just navigate to another page or
close the browser-be sure to ~
out as well.
Source: www.gizmodo.com
With the growing number of social networking scams- annual crime complaints have
increased 667 .8% between 2001 and 2009- it is important to utilize social networking sites'
privacy settings, browse cautiously and contact the message sender before clicking anything.
Contributing Sources: www.networkworld.com Image: www.gizmodo.com
User Awareness Tip
Warning: DOJ Users Targeted in Parking Permit Phishing Scam
A number of Department of Justice users received an e-mail message disguised as a The attachment is ii'Ot"iJI
but instead redirects users to a site containing malicious software. If you encounter
a message of this nature, DO NOT open the attachment, and contact your Component's IT
security staff immediately.
~!!!!!!~·····~· with an attachment
• *This document is intended for Department of Justice internal use only and is not to be
distributed outside the Department.* •
Questions regarding this newsletter or requests for permission to redistribute should be directed to:
JSOC 202-307-5332
Security Advisories
Monthly Wrap-Up
Green Tip of the Month
Water Conservation
Be sure to turn off faucets completely,
ensuring that they don't drip . A faucet,
leaking at a rate of only one drop per
second, can waste more than 25 liters
of water a day - that's about 10 000
liters a year.
Source: www.about.com
Visit Our Website
Security Awareness Tip
Zeus Botnet Incarnated to Exploit Credit Card Verification Services
The Zeus botnet, a Trojan horse that steals banking information, social networking logins,
and email accounts, was first seen in July 2007, and has been widespread since June 2009.
Zeus is particularly difficult to identify, because it is
reconfigured more often than most malware, due to its
creators " .. .allowing other cybercriminals to license the rights
to use the malware . As a result, there are many different
gangs running their own licensed versions of Zeus and
distributing them independentl y" (SC Magazine) .
As you may recall, Zeus resurfaced early this year as a
series of emails targeting Federal employees . The messages
appeared to be from a reputable CIA figure and warned against a Russian phishing attack,
then encouraged recipients to install a "Windows update" to protect their computers.
The most recent incarnation of Zeus, however, poses as a
cred it card verification page. Once downloaded, the malware
waits for the user to v isit a bank webs ite, then emerges
(appearing to be associated with the bank) and asks the
victim to fill out an enrollment form for the Verified by Visa or
Mastercard SecureCode programs . The phish ing page states
that " Due to recent changes in FDIC Deposit Insurance Rules,
all ou r custom e rs mu st be enrolled in the Verified by Visa or
MasterCard SecureCode program depending on type of your
check card ." Once the customer submits thei r information,
the data is used to register accounts with the verification
services and perform fraudulent transactions.
__ _____
_... __
_p-_,_-·.....__.._______
.. __ . .. __. _
__
_,
--· r r r
r---- r r -
-···--·- '
_ ,...____
·----.
-~~ - -
_ __
-~ ----..-..
widespread prob lem . If you encounter an unexpected Visa or Mastercard verification page, it
is recommended you close your browser and contact your bank regarding the issue.
Contributing Sources : www. v3.co .u; www.scmagazineus.com
User Awareness Tip
Fake AV Vendors Offering "Live Support"
Fake Anti Virus software or "Fake AV " consists of phony alerts or warnings that typically
pretend to scan a victim 's computer, then claim to find some form of malware and seek
payment from the v ictim to remove the (non-existent) problem .
I
- ......... __. ...
Iii>\
... &..'"'£.,
mx·n ·• >
Si"i' RSWSZ
_ h_ __
---..
The Justice Security Operations
Center (JSOC) News You Can Use
Newsletter
strives
to
protect
readers
against Internet cyber
threats by keeping them up-to-date
on the latest security issues,
vulnerabilities, and computer user
tips . The threats we address affect
you daily- - at work, at home, and
virtually everywhere in betweenand we provide the information you
need to know, in terms you can
understand.
If there is a specific topic you would
like to see discussed in a future
newsletter, please email Jennifer
Jones at [email protected]
Cyber Awareness Tip
With 15 US financial institutions affected and an estimated
1 in every 100 computers infected, this has become a
.•
About the JSOC Newsletter:
~~
_. __ _ _ r __ _
l cs.uve~a..t
What is the JSOC
Newsletter?
As if this scam wasn 't deceptive enough, some fake AV
developers are now offering " live support" to users, in
order to convince potentia l victims of the legitimacy of
their products . Research found that there was in fact a
person - not a bot- responding to questions about the
product, and "They are offering support by email, chat,
and phone and are very well organized. You can get
uninstallers for older variants of their product, and also
trial versions for their newer products"
(www .securelist.com)
Safe Internet Publishing
Although people are typically wary of
sharing personal information with
strangers they meet on the street,
they may not hesitate to post that
same information online. Before
posting information online, remember
to:
View the internet as a novel, not
a diary: assume that people you
have never met will view the
information you are publishing .
Think ahead : once you publish
something online, it cannot be
taken back. It is available to
other people and to search
engines, arid may never be
completely removed .
Source : US_ CERT.gov
VPR Alerts
Security Advisories
Monthly Wrap-Up
--.-p-..·--·,.--...,._. ..-e_. ., ,...,.,._~,.
c==---..--..
:~--,, r :.
...:
Remember that scammers are constantly honing their
attacks to ensure they victimize increasing numbers of
computer users; phone or online "support" does not prove a particular antivirus software is
legitimate. If you encounter an anti virus pop-up, immediately close your browser to avoid
unintentionally downloading the malware, and contact your Component's IT security staff
immediately. Contributing Source : www.securelist.com
j [J,
**This document is intended for Department of Justice internal use only and is not to be
distributed outside the Department.**
Questions regarding th is newsletter or requests for permission to redistribute should be directed to:
JSOC 202-307-5332
Green Tip of the Month
Reduce E-Waste
The world generates 20 to 50 million
metric tons of e-waste, which makes up
2 percent of solid waste in the U.S. and
is the fastest-growing segment of U.S.
garbage . Be sure to take old electronics
and computers to your local facil ity
along with your usual recycling.
Source: www.pcmag.com
News You Can Use
June 2010
Visit Our Website
What is the JSOC
Newsletter?
Security Awareness Tip
AT&T Security Breach Impacts iPad Users
Early in June, just two months since the release of the Apple 3G iPad, AT&T was made aware
of a breach that exposed the email addresses and associated AT&T network authentication
IDs (known as ICC-IDs) of thousands of iPad owners --many of whom are Federal
employees. A group of security researchers called "Goatse Security"
(whose motives are currently in question) discovered the flaw and
extracted 114,000 email addresses before spreading word of the
problem. Goatse Security has been accused of informing outside parties
of the hole before AT&T had patched it, potentially allowing hackers to
access more iPad users' email addresses. In its defense, a Goatse
Security representative stated that "We did not contact AT&T directly,
but we made sure that someone else tipped them off" before spreading
word of the hole. They also stated that they were not paid for disclosing
information to third parties. AT&T closed the hole shortly after being
notified, but an FBI investigation is currently underway to determine whether illegal activity
was involved in the attainment of the email addresses.
~
\~
at&t
According to an article from arstechnica.com, " ... the worst consequences of this particular
leak are most likely increased spam sent to or spoofed as coming from a particular e-mail
address. However, it's not entirely
us.e.n~.y.mil
8901110121321~
unreasonable to suspect that hackers
d.a.rpa .mi.l
8901110121321~ :
@us . a.ray. m.il
8901110 i21~21~ :
might attempt to crack into some of
@us.a.rw.y.IILil
8901110-\21!:21 ~ :
the e-mail accounts revealed, which
lu:t. a.ray .&.11
89011101213219111111111111
lus . o.rmy .&il
8901<110121321---include officials from the FCC, FAA,
@us .arm.y.ail
8901110-421321 ~
NASA, and the Army ." If you own an
8901110 124321_.......
-8e:ucom .ai.l
8901110121322 ~
us.army .ai.l
iPad, there is a possibility that your
8901110121322~ : ............. 'll.S.&~y .m.il
email address has been made public
Ius . army . ail
890lil0 121322~
@us . ar11y. Jt.il
8901110121322~
through this breach, and it is
u:s.army . ail
8901 11 0121331 ~
recommended that you remain
particularly vigilant when checking
8901110424322~
na!la.qov
8901110121322 ~
email. If you encounter a message
@:!aa .gov
8901110121322 ~
that may be an intrusion attempt or
l:faa . gov
8901 11 0i21322 ~
8usdoj . ;ov
8901110 '121322~
pose a threat to DOJ computer
fcc.oov
8901110121331~
security, please follow the
@mail . bouse:. !JOV
8901 11 012i 331~
@:!jc.oov
8901 1101.2 1322 ~
instructions for reporting malicious
email at JSOC's DOJNet website:
http: //dojnet.doj .qov /jmd/i rm/itsecurity/documents/ma licious-email-submitta I. pdf
Contributing Sources: www.arstechnica.com ; www.gawker.com; http ://security.goatse.fr/
User Awareness Tip
Protecting Your PC from Spyware and Adware
Spyware and Adware are types of software that, when installed on your computer, may send
you pop-up ads, redirect your browser to certain web sites, or monitor the web sites that you
visit. The presence of spyware is typically hidden from the user, but some indications that it
is installed on your computer are:
•
•
•
•
Endless pop-up windows or Windows error messages
New, unexpected toolbars in your web browser
Your browser's home page changed
Your computer suddenly seems very slow when opening programs or processing tasks
Whether or not you suspect Spyware is installed on your computer, it is wise to run antivirus software and to adjust the settings so that you are periodically reminded to run a full
scan .
Contributing Sources : www. US-CERT.gov
**This document is intended for Department of Justice internal use only and is not to be
distributed outside the Department.
**Questions regarding this newsletter or requests for permission to redistribute should be directed to:
JSOC 202-307-5332
About the JSOC Newsletter:
The Justice Security Operations
Center (JSOC) News You Can Use
Newsletter
strives
to
protect
readers
against I nternet cyber
threats by keeping them up-to-date
on the
latest security issues,
vulnerabilities, and computer user
tips. The threats we address affect
you daily-- at work, at home, and
virtually everywhere in betweenand we provide the information you
need to know, in terms you can
understand .
If there is a specific topic you would
like to see discussed in a future
newsletter, please email Jennifer
Jones at [email protected]
Cyber Awareness Tip
Removing Personal Information
from Old Cell Phones
Before disposing of an old cell phone,
it is important to ensure your personal
information has been removed . A
recent study of 2,000 recycled cell
phones found that 99% of them had
personal data still stored in them,
including sensitive material like bank
account information . Before getting rid
of your phone, be sure to:
• Notify your cellular provider and
termina te service on your phone.
• Remove your SIM card-- the tiny
card inside your phone, which
contains data stored in your phone.
• Erase all the history from your
phone through a hard reset.
More information on performing each
of these steps can be found in your
phone's user manual.
Source: www. planetgreen . discovery. com
VPR Alerts
Security Advisories
Monthly Wrap-Up
Green Tip of the Month
Green Packaging
When shopping, choose products with
smarter packaging-i.e., less packaging
and use of eco-friendly materials-- and
write to let manufacturers know when
you don't like their packaging .
Source: the Daily Green
News You Can Use
May 2010
Visit Our Website
Security Awareness Tip
What is the JSOC
Newsletter?
DOJ SPAM Mailbox
The Justice Security Operations Center (JSOC) provides the DOJMAIL-SPAM
mailbox to allow reporting of e-mail messages that users suspect may be an
intrusion attempt or a threat to computer security. JSOC analyzes messages sent
to this mailbox and develops mitigation and detection methods to help protect
Department systems from intrusions.
There are specific instructions that need to be followed when forwarding suspected
malicious e-mail messages to JSOC for further analysis, which are online at JSOC's
DOJNet website: http://dojnet.doj.govlimd/irm/itsecurity/documents/maliciousemail-submittal . pdf.
Please note that JSOC does not analyze or block spam or other nuisance
messages, unless they pose a threat to computer security.
If you would like to block spam, nuisance, or other non-malicious e-mail
messages, several options exist:
1) Contact your component IT Helpdesk for information on the Proofpoint Mail
Digest and end-user mail filter settings. When enabled by your Helpdesk, this
service provides end-users with the ability to manage spam settings, including
blocking specific e-mail addresses, OR
2) Contact your component IT helpdesk for information on how to block specific
senders within your e-mail application using built- in tools (e.g., "J unk E-mail "
filtering in Microsoft Outlook)
User Awareness Tip
Cyber Attacks Center Around 2010 World Cup
The FIFA World Cup 2010, like most events that receive heavy media coverage ,
has provided cyber criminals the opportunity to attack unsuspecting computer
users in various ways. Using hacking techniques, attackers have managed to have
their malicious sites listed in the top Google search results. As seen in the image
below, the top four results --out of over 17,000-- for a World Cup-related query
led to malicious websites. Clicking on any of the top results causes a phony
"Windows Security Center" notification to pop-up, a common Fake AntiVirus
technique. Users need to be cautious when conductin g popular searches, and
immediately close their browsers if they
receive a supposed "antivirus alert." (For
"""'''" '·" '"'"'"'''m'" ,,.. ....,.
oul!co.net Wortd Cup .iltw ~ ·! Traduc11 !iii plqma I
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lrll alettn r.~ce;.ndbtthefirstl obuy ..,...._, C..pTicke• ...
nrlf1~. php?m=werlci%Dalp
11chts - fD...m.M
""' .. tsrC com: World Cup ~h.-<·;sta';lnalong ..,.
.,. .,.._~
,.. Tickttl -1 Traduur e~ta pi!l!l'liil I
[email protected]
~ Tickeb: tt~e-~AI Inghtsr~s~rved somu lo.~ oOfl
>1CC ~
,~
.. Board
Cup 2010
•..
lUtitbiS · ~
worhl'lf.XJcup....n-
velnetworks .com: World Cup ~-
...._ 'ofWorlcl
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~ Tid:ets
= Tickets ·I Traotuc~r esta p:igma I
t News All nghts
~ . Janu¥)7,2010
r~semd ~·muliiiHOn
Poat~don\tillrld
ffln~uom'~? .. worlcl%20 ..
..., constructJon.com: WOf1d Cup .tlt1•
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•••
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.;,. wes away fret Ucke• for C onffd~l1t1011S Cup semrfinal mate ~ beMfn Spi rn ano:I IJS
-
.a m es12ho i1C~rufor~
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:mstruchon co~mgh! php? -rtd~cup
.. •
tidcltl ·~
more information on Fake AV attacks, see
the February 2010 issue of News You Can
Use. )
Cyber criminals are also sending out
emails with mal icious PDFs, claiming the
attachments contain free World Cup tickets
or a World Cup Travel Guide. Users should
use their better judgment when faced with
offers that are unsolicited and/or sound too
good to be true , and refrain from opening
such attachments.
Contributing Sources: ESET Threat Blog; NetworkWorld.net
**This document is intended for Department of Justice internal use only and is not to be
distributed outside the Department.**
Questions regarding this newsletter or requests for permission to redistribute should be directed to :
JSOC 202-307-5332
About the JSOC Newsletter:
The Justice Security Operations
Center (JSOC) News You Can Use
Newsletter
strives
to
protect
readers
against Internet cyber
threats by keeping them up-to-date
on the
latest security issues,
vulnerabilities, and computer user
tips. The threats we address affect
you daily-- at work, at home, and
virtually everywhere in betweenand we provide the information you
need to know, in terms you can
understand .
If there is a specific topic you would
like to see discussed in a future
newsletter, please email Jennifer
Jones at [email protected] .gov
Cyber Awareness Tip
Protecting Personal Information
As long as you have a computer
and connect it to a network, you
are vulnerable to someone or
something
else
accessing
or
corrupting your information. To
minimize your risk, adhere to the
following rules:
- Lock your computer when you are
away from it.
- Disconnect from the Internet
when you are not using your
computer.
- Check your computer's security
settings to make sure they meet
your needs.
- Back up all of your data .
Source: www.US-CERT.gov
VPR Alerts
Security Advisories
Monthly Wrap-Up
Green Tip of the Month
Top Three Office Pet Peeves
Resulting in Increased Waste:
- Mindless, unnecessary printing
- Leaving lights on
- Lack of recycling bins
Source: the Daily Green
News You Can Use
Apri/2010
Visit Our Website
Security Awareness Tip
What is the JSOC
Newsletter?
DOJ Continuous Monitoring Initiative
About the JSOC Newsletter:
DOJ is in the process of moving to a model of continuous monitoring of assets,
vulnerabilities, configurati on changes, and threats in order to fulfill operating
requirements, minimize risk exposure, and improve computer incident response.
The Department's current risk management model focuses largely on "snapshots"
provided by periodic assessments and aud its . This model is not only reactive, but
the operating environment is also ever-changing, resulting in security assessments
that are qu ickly outdated and lack a real-time evaluation of risk .
The Justice Security Operations
Center (JSOC) News You Can Use
Newsletter
strives
to
protect
readers
against Internet cyber
threats by keeping them up-to-date
on the latest security issues ,
vulnerabilities, and computer user
tips . The t hreats we address affect
you daily-- at work, at home, and
virtually everywhere in betweenand we provide the information you
need to know, in terms you can
understand .
Due to this deficiency, DOJ made the decision to implement
Enterprise Lifecycle Management System (ELMS) BigFix. This
technology will provide situational awareness and greatly
improve our current risk management methods. Continuous
monitoring will provide real-time asset inventories and
endpoint visibility to the Department through a centrali zed
management console. DOJ Components, OBDs, and system
owners will also have their own console to monitor and evaluate system
vulnerabilities to determ ine applicabil ity within their environment. Having an
accurate understanding of DOJ's security posture will enable us to assume greater
risk levels when appropriate. Additionally, new FISMA reporting guidelines were
released last week, which require changing to automated data feeds, and ELMS
supports these new requirements.
If there is a specific topic you would
like to see discussed in a future
newsletter, please email Jennifer
Jones at [email protected]
Cyber Awareness Tip
Email Attachment Safety
An email attachment is a co mputer
file that is sent along with an email.
Attachments are convenient, but
they can also carry viruses . Follow
the tips below to protect yourself:
o Be wary of unsolicited
attachments, even from people
you know .
o Keep software up-to-date in order
to minimize your vulnerability.
o Turn off the option to
automatically download
attachments .
Continuous monitoring technology wi ll allow decision makers access to key
inform ation quickly and efficiently, and streamline Department compliance
reporting. DOJ wi ll now be able to fulfill data calls within hours --rather than weeks
or months-- while eliminating the uncertainties of self-reporting.
User Awareness Tip
Post-Tax Day Email Scams
April 15th has passed, and many taxpayers are anxiously awaiting their returns.
Not surprisingly, hackers are seizing the opportunity to scam as many users as
possible by sending out fraudulent emails marked as notifications from the Internal
Revenue Service (IRS). Many of these emails claim that taxpayers must submit
financial information such as bank account and credit card
numbers, passwords and ATM PINs in order to receive their
returns. Some are intended to frighten taxpayers by
claiming to come from th e IRS' " Fraud Department." Others
state that taxpayers will receive money for filling out a
customer satisfaction survey . It is important to note that
Oepartmentol1heTreasury
the IRS does not initiate taxpayer communications through
Internal R-ue Service
e-mail.
a IRS
Source : www.US-CERT.gov
VPR Alerts
Security Advisories
Monthly Wrao-Uo
If you encounter an unsolicited tax-related email from the IRS:
Green Tip of the Month
• Do not rep ly.
• Do not open any attachments.
• Do not click on any links.
Go as Paperless as Possible!
Keep copies of important emails ;
files, manuals and more on your
computer
• Review any documents online
instead of printing them out.
• Send company updates through
email instead of on paper.
o
Click here for a list of the top-12 IRS scams of 2010 .
Contributing Source: www.IRS.gov
** This document is intended for Department of Justice internal use only and is not to be
distributed outside the Department. **
Questions regarding this newsletter or requests for permission to redistribute should be directed to:
JSOC 202-307-5332
The Daily Green
March 2010
Visit Our Website
Security Awareness Tip
What is the
JSOC Newsletter?
Operation Aurora
About the JSOC Newsletter:
The Justice Security Operations
Center (JSOC) News You Can Use
Newsletter strives to protect
readers against Internet cyber
threats by keeping them up-to-date
on the latest security issues,
vulnerabilities, and computer user
tips. The threats we address affect
you daily-- at work, at home, and
virtually everywhere in between-and
we provide the information you need
to know, in terms you understand .
Mid-December 2009, hackers initiated a highly-sophisticated attack on
Google and more than twenty other companies, with the goal of accessing
source code and gathering information about dozens of U.S., Chinese and
European users who were advocates of human rights in China. A
combination of encryption, stealth programming, and exploitation of a
previously-unknown ("zero-day") vulnerability in Microsoft Internet Explorer
allowed hackers entry into two Gmail accounts, but Google claims the access
was limited to account information rather than actual email content. Upon
investigating further, however, Google discovered that hackers had
successfully gained entry into targeted Gmail accounts via phishing scams
and malware on the users' computers. The attack was tentatively linked to
China due to the presence of an obscure algorithm in the malware, which
had only been published in Chinese and was virtually unknown outside of
China.
If there is a specific topic you would
like to see discussed in a future
newsletter, please email Jennifer
Jones at [email protected]
References in the malware to a file folder named "Aurora," earned the attack
the name "Operation Aurora." The incident has resulted in considerable
contention between Google and China, with Google refusing to continue
censoring certain search results on its Chinese search engine, stating
" ...these attacks and the surveillance
they uncovered-combined with
.0. 0'.
G
~-
8. ~_
:'. e.
Cyber Awareness Tip
A password is often the only barrier
between other computer users and
your personal information, yet most
people create passwords based on
personal information that could be
guessed or easily cracked by a
hacker. Follow these tips to create
the most effective password:
attempts
over
thespeech
last year
further
limit
free
on to
the web
in China including the persistent
blocking of websites such as
Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Google Docs and Blogger-had led us to
conclude that we could no longer continue censoring our results on
Google.cn" (The Official Google Blog). On March 22nd, Google announced on
its blog that users visiting Google .cn are now being redirected to
Google.com.hk, where they will receive uncensored search results, and
which will "meaningfully increase access to information for people in China."
China maintains that its Internet safety policy is transparent and consistent,
and resents the U.S.'s accusation that it had any partici pation in the attack.
_
-¥
.
l.\1
Operation Aurora serves as a cogent reminder to the general public to
remain diligent on patching. Microsoft issued an out-of-band (outside the
normal schedule) patch for Aurora on January 21, 2010, but as word of the
Internet Explorer vulnerability spread, hackers scrambled to exploit it before
users were protected. It is therefore crucial to apply patches as soon as
possible; JSOC releases VPRs for software patches resolving vulnerabilities
with a CVSS base score of 7.0 or above (as determined by the National
Institute of Standards and Technology), and sets patch implementation
precedence based on public exploitation of vulnerabilities, if applicable.
Contributing Sources : The Official Google 8/og;Wired.com
**This document is intended for Department of Justice internal use only and is not to be
distributed outside the Department.**
Questions regarding this Bulletin or requests for permission to redistribute should be directed to:
JSOC/DOJCERT 202-307-5332
• Do not use a password based on
personal or easily-accessible
information.
• Do not use words that can be
found in a dictionary of any
language .
• Use a combination of letters,
numbers and special characters.
Source : www.US-CERT.gov
VPR Alerts
Security Advisories
Monthly Wrap-Uo
I
Green Tip of the Month
Energy-Efficient Lighting
Replace
compact
emitting
off less
incandescent light bulbs with
fluorescent light (CFL) or light
diode (LED) bulbs, which give
heat than incandescents and
last longer .
The Daily Green
News You Can Use
February 2010
Visit Our Website
DOl Cyber Security Conference Recap
The 2010 Department of Justice Cyber Security Conference was held February 2-3,
proving our largest turnout yet . This year's theme was "Keep Our Information
Secure" and discussed new Department security initiatives, emerging technologies
and security capabil ities piloted by DOJ Components, as well as future direction of
the Office of Management and Budget and the U.S. government. Thank you to all
attendees-- particularly volunteers-- who helped to make th is year's conference a
success. Please remember to fill out your attendee survey so that your feedback
can help shape next year's program. To request a specific topic be covered in a
future conference, please email Jennifer Jones at [email protected] .
Additionally, Components will have an opportunity to showcase their own security
advances, measures and programs at next year's conference; Information
Techn ology Security Staff (ITSS) will call for abstracts during the fourth quarter of
the year and notify Components of the ir selection shortly thereafter.
Google Image Search Targeted by Fake AV Attacks
Anti -Virus fakealerts-phony warnings that appear to indicate a virus scan is
runn ing on your computer and then insist you purchase a product to remove the
supposed "infection"-can now list Google image search as prey to their attacks .
Until recently, Fake AVs were primarily located on Trojan Horse applications;
however, due to the success of this particular attack, hackers have now migrated
fakealerts to browsers.
267 X 400 - 21 k - jpg
Image may be subject to copyright.
Below is the image at:
'11t t
)o•• ' 1- •
1 ~- ~-'-"'-'-"-'--""-~
l
o .. ufl Int e rnet Explore r
?
•
Warning!! I Your co~er contains v
malware programs presence . Your sy
viruses ched<l System Sect.rty wl
scarrinQ of your PC for viruses and m
As discussed in a Webroot.com blog, an
image search for a television actress
yielded phony image links leading to a
supposed Microsoft Internet Explorer
"warning" which stated that the user's
system had been compromised (the typical
Fake AV baiting tactic). Strangely, the
Google search pane remains at the top of
the page, while t he fakealert runs in the
lower section (see image at left).
Once the user clicks the fakealert, a rogue
antivirus (with a name such as "Total
Security" or "Security Tool") hides the
desktop with its personalized wallpaper, interferes with the user's ability to rightclick their mouse or use its scroll wheel, prohibits applications from running
(including Internet Explorer), and blames all of the problems on an infection within
the machine . The purpose of this elaborate Fake AV or "scareware attack" is to
convince users to spend $50 to $90 on bogus antivirus software, contributing to
the millions of dollars in profits generated by this scam to date .
01(
If you encoun ter a fakealert, h it Alt-F4 , which will immediately kill the browser
(Select " Cance l"· if a dialog box appears), to avoid
..------------,
unintentionally downloading the malware, and contact
.i··t~ .·.;
T.OOI
your Component's IT security staff right away .
II
Reference: Webroot Threat Blog
I
**This document is intended for Department of Justice internal use only and is not to be
distributed outside the Department. **
Questions regarding this Bulletin or requests for permission to redistribute should be directed to :
JSOC/DOJCERT 202-307-5332
The Justice Security Operations
Center (JSOC) News You Can Use
Newsletter strives to protect
readers against Internet cyber
threats by keeping them up-to-date
on the latest security issues,
vulnerabilities, and computer user
tips . The threats we address affect
you daily- - at work, at home, and
virtually everywhere in betweenand we provide the information you
need to know, in terms you can
understand .
If there is a specific topic you would
like to see discussed in a future
newsletter, please email Jennifer
Jones at [email protected] .gov
Security Awareness Tip
See full size image
What is the JSOC
Newsletter?
Cyber Awareness Tip
Losing a laptop or PDA means not
only losing the machine itself , but
sometimes the information on it .
Follow the tips below to minimize
damage :
o
Password - protect your computer
or PDA . Also, when entering your
password , ensure that others are
not able to view it by " shoulder
surfing ."
o
Do not leave you r device
unattended .
o
Downplay your laptop or PDAavoid using it in public if possible .
o
Back up your files.
Source: US_ CERT.gov
Secu rit:Advisories
Monthlv Wrap-Uo
Green Tip of the Month
Ditch Dixie Cups
Rather than using a Dixie cup each
time you make a trip to the office
water coole r, bring your own cup and
encourage colleagues to do the
same-it saves loads of paper!
The Daily Green
News You Can Use
Visit Our Website
January 2010
Security Awareness Tip
What is the JSOC
Newsletter?
JSRA
JSRA is a Virtual Private Network (VPN) which provides a secure and encrypted
connection to Department of Justice information resources via the Internet and is
part of the DOJ Disaster Contingency Plan .
The Justice Security Operations
Center
News
You
Can
Use
Newsletter keeps readers up to
date on the latest topics, security
vulnerabilities, and computer user
tips to help protect against cyber
threats on the Internet.
When utilizing the JSRA network, users should follow best practices,
DOJ Security Order 2640.2F, and DOJ General Rules of Behavior
FYlO.
http ://10.173 . 2.12/dojorders/doj2640-2f.pdf
These threats affect you everyday in
every way - at the office, at home,
and in between. This is information
you need to know, written in terms
you can understand .
http ://10.173.2.12/dojorders/doj2740-la.pdf
http:/110 . 173.2 . 12/jmd/irm/itsecurity/documents/general rob fy10 .odf
DOJ guidelines for JSRA users:
If you have any subjects, or ideas
you would like to see addressed in
future newsletters, please email
Curtis Johnson at
curtis.w [email protected] .gov .
Do not connect personal computers to the JSRA Network.
Ensure the computer's software is fully patched and the virus protection
definitions are up-to-date.
Do not use Peer-to-Peer (P2P) file sharing on the internet, such as instant
messaging, Skype, BitTorrent, or eDonkey, etc. P2P is expressly
forbidden throughout the Department unless a waiver is obtained from
the Department's CIO or his designee in each Component.
Cyber Awareness Tip
Malware Campaign Disguised as
Swine Flu Messages
Use only authorized thumb drives and diskettes, only download files from
known and reliable sources, and employ virus-checking tools prior to use.
This campaign sends e-mail messages
containing information regarding H1 N 1
vaccination programs, purporting to be
from the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention (CDC). The fake
messages attempt to entice recipients
to click a link to a malicious file.
Do not allow family members access to your government laptop.
Government laptops are only permitted to connect to the internet
through the JSRA network.
Users who click on this link may
become infected with malware. Public
reports indicate that the messages
contain
subjects
including
"Governmental registration program
on the H 1N 1 vaccination" and "Your
personal vaccination profile." Subject
lines related to this malware campaign
will likely change over time .
E )(-trY) p'1-,·o n
Click here for more information .
l- (E)
VPR Alerts
Security Advisories
Monthly Wrap-Uo
I
Green Tip of the Month
Don't Dump, Donate
**This docum~nt is intended for Department of Ju~;tice internal Use only and is not to he distributed outside the Department. ••
Quesrions regarding this Bulletin or requests for permission to redistribute should be directed to:
JSOC/DOJCERT 202-307-5332
The next time you upgrade something ,
can no longer stand the sight of
something hideous, or simply need to
downsize, think "donate" instead of
"dump."
The Daily Green
News You Can Use
Visit Our Website
November 2009
Security Awareness Tips
What is the JSOC
Newsletter?
Hidden Dangers of the Web
Social Networking
Pro
Con
• Enables quick, efficient
communication
• Wide userbase provides attractive
target for attackers
• Network with friends, coworkers,
friends of friends, classmates, the
world ...
• Can unintentionally leak sensitive
information
Facebook Targeting & Exploitation
Facebook has a "search by company" feature to allow networking with
coworkers. Over 500 profiles with DOJ listed as employer on Facebook.
5ean:h by Conlpany
Comp.;tny;
~tof.MKa
The Justice Security Operations
Center
News
You
Can
Use
Newsletter keeps read ers up to
date on the latest topics, security
vulnerabilities, and computer user
tips to help protect against cyber
threats on the Internet.
These threats affect you everyday in
every way - at the office, at home,
and in between . This is information
you need to know, written in terms
you can understand.
If you have any subjects, or ideas
you would like to see addressed in
future newsletters, please email
Curtis Johnson at
curtis . w [email protected] .qov .
Cyber Awareness Tip
DOl guidelines for JSRA users
~ ~~ ~ :
l ;.e ~,:.rt-s :
OQwtmMtoflustiot
Allows adversaries access to your private life and information that can be
used to target DOJ personnel.
Your full name can be used to craft targeted e-mail messages or for other
nefarious purposes.
Facebook disabled numerous fake profiles that included a link to a
purported video but which instead displayed a fake antivirus alert. Scam
designed to get credit card information from victims for identity fraud
purposes and install spyware.
• Do not connect personal computers
to the JSRA Network.
Ensure the computer's software is
fully patched and the virus
protection definitions are up-todate .
• Do not use Peer-to-Peer (P2P) file
sharing on the internet, such as
instant messaging, Skype,
BitTorrent, or eDonkey, etc. P2P is
expressly forbidden throughout the
Department unless a waiver is
obtained from the Department's CIO
or his designee in each Component.
• Use only authorized t humb drives
and diskettes, only download files
from known and reliable sources,
and use virus-checki ng procedures
prior to use .
Mitigation: Don't include place of employment on public profiles
Drive-by Downloads
Downloading malicious software without the user's knowledge by
exploiting a web-based vulnerability
Can occur while visiting legitimate websites (Facebook, personals, news,
search engines)
Poses security risk to Department by giving attackers remote access to
systems
Mitigation: Limit personal use of the Internet while connected to
a DOJ system to minimize exposure
Contributing Source : JSOC CyberFest 2009: Emerging Threats Presentation
**This document is intended for Department of Justice internal use only and is not to be distributed outside the Department.**
Questions regarding this Bulletin or requests for permission to redistribute should be directed to:
JSOC/DOJCERT 202-307-5332
Security Advisory- DOS Attack (JSOC)
Secu rity Advisory - RIM BlackBerry sw
~(JSOC )
October VPR Alerts (JSOC)
Green Tip of the Month
Turn your computer off at night
Shutting your computer off before
going to bed each night will save
an average of $90 worth of electricity
per year.
The Daily Green
News You Can Use
September 2009
Visit Our Website
Security Awareness Tips
Five Ways to Meet Compliance in a Virtual Environment
Five steps for securing and locking down virtual environments and meeting
compliance requirements :
1.
Platform-hardening - Configure the v irtualization platform, both the
hypervisor and administrative layer, with secure settings, eliminate unused
components, and keep up-to-date on patches
2.
Configuration and Change Management- Extend your current change
and configuration management processes and tools to the virtual
environment
3.
Administrative Access Control- Server administrators should have control
over virtual servers and network administrators, over virtual networks, and
these administrators need to be trained in virtualization software in order to
avoid misconfiguration of systems
4.
Network Security and Segmentation - Deploy virtual switches and virtual
firewalls to segment virtual networks, and use your physical network controls
in the virtual networks as well as change management systems. Be sure that
machines handling protected data are isolated, and deploy virtual IDS/IPSes
5.
Audit Logging - Monitor virtual infrastructure logs and correlate those logs
across the physical infrastructure, as well, to get a full picture of
vulnerabilities and risks. Adapt automated tools and SIEM systems to
integrate logs from both environments
Contributing Source: Dark Reading
Computer User Tips
Parental tips to keep children safe online
•
Keep your computer in an open area
•
Set rules and warn about dangers
•
Keep lines of communication open
•
Consider implementing parental controls
•
Consider partitioning your computer into separate accounts
What is the JSOC
Newsletter?
The Justice Security Operations
Center
News
You
Can
Use
Newsletter keeps readers up to
date on the latest topics, security
vulnerabilities, and computer user
tips to help protect against cyber
threats on the Internet.
These threats affect you everyday in
every way - at the office, at home,
and in between. This is information
you need to know, written in terms
you can understand .
If you have any subjects, or ideas
you would like to see addressed in
future newsletters, please email
Curtis Johnson at
[email protected] .
Cyber Awareness Tip
Protecting Your Data
• Use and maintain antivirus
software and a firewall
• Regularly scan for spyware
• Keep software up-to-date
• Evaluate your software settings
• Avoid unused software programs
• Create separate user accounts
• Establish computer use guidelines
• Use passwords and encrypt
sensitive files
• Properly dispose of sensitive info
Contributing Source: US-CERT.gov
Contributing Source : US-CERT Cyber Security Online
Keeping Laptops from Getting Lost or Stolen
Keep these tips in mind when you take your laptop out and about:
•
Treat your laptop like cash
•
Keep it locked
•
Keep it off the floor
VPR Alert - Adobe Acrobat (JSOC)
VPR Alert - MS Critical Patches August
lQQ.2__ (JSOC)
VPR Alert- Cisco Firewall Services
Module (JSOC)
Green Tip of the Month
Use a non-descript carrying case
Say No to Paper or Plastic
•
Keep your passwords elsewhere
•
Password protect your system
•
Backup important data before traveling
You don 't have to wait until grocery bags
are banned : Say no to plastic or paper
ones now . Instead, bring your own
reusable shopping bags . Consider an
entire set of reusable, double-handled
hemp bags that work great for a large
order, and reusable organic cotton mesh
bags for your fruit and vegetables .
Remember: BYOB (Bring Your Own
Bags).
Contributing Source: StaySafeOnline.info
To view the latest JSOC Monthly Wrap-Up, visit our website at:
http://dojnet.doj.gov/jmd/irm/itsecurity/monthly-report.php
**This document is intended for Department of Justice internal use only and is not to be di3·tributed outside the Department.**
Questions regarding this Bulletin or requests for permission to redistribute should be directed to:
JSOC/DOJCERT 202-307-5332
The Daily Green
News You ·can Use
August 2009
Visit Our Website
Security Awareness Tips
DOD Urges Less Network Anonymity, More PKI Use. Black Hat 2009
What is the JSOC
Newsletter?
lAS VEGAS -- The age of network anonymity may be coming to a close,
according to a top defense official charged with cyber security. The United States
needs to be more agile in defending against attacks from cybercriminals who are
constantly infiltrating domestic networks, said Robert Lentz, CISO at the U.S.
Department of Defense, during a keynote address to Black Hat USA 2009
attendees.
The Justice Security Operations
Center
News
You
Can Use
Newsletter keeps readers up to
date on the latest topics, security
vulnerabi lities, and computer user
tips to help protect aga inst cyber
threats on the Internet.
Lentz said the government continues its research into attack surfaces to produce
an agile, dynamic defense capable of not only detecting but being able to take a
proactive role to prevent future attacks against government infrastructure before
they happen." It's all threaded in this area of driving anonymity out of network,"
Lentz said.
These threats affect you everyday in
every way - at the office, at home,
and in between . This is information
you need to know, written in terms
you can understand.
Contributing Source: Information Security Magazine Online
To view the latest JSOC Monthly Wrap-Up, v isit our website at:
http: 1/dojnet. doj . ov /j md/i rm/itsecu rity/month ly-report. ph p
a
If you have any subjects, or ideas
you would like to see addressed in
futu re newsletters, please email
Curtis Johnson at
curtis . w [email protected] .qov.
Computer User Tips
Social Networking Site Twitter Offline, Millions Frustrated and Lost.
The popular social networking site Twitter came under attack Thursday August 6,
2009 and was out of service for the better half of the day. Service was eventually
restored by late that evening. The site was completely in accessible for all of its
users and analysts believe the denial - of-service attack may have originated in
Russia or Georgia.
Social networking site Facebook and search engine giant Goog/e fended off
similar attacks on Thursday as well.
At about 10 :30 a.m. E.S.T., millions of people worldwide received e-mail
messages containing links to Twitter and other sites . When recipients clicked on
the links, those sites were overwhelmed with requests to access their servers
causing massive network traffic that created the denial of service.
Cyber Awareness Tip
Using Caution with Email
Attachments
Take the following steps to protect
yourself and others in your address
book:
• Be wary of unsolicited attachments,
even from people you know
• Save and scan any attachments
before opening them
• Turn off the option to automatically
download attachments
• Consider
additional
security
practices (i .e., firewall)
Contributing Source : US-CERT.gov
Contributing Source: The New York Times Online
Spammers Exploiting Free File Storage on Websites
Automated account creation exploit lets spammers hide behind legitimate file
storage services. An unusual attack technique has enabled spammers to
distribute more than 1 mi ll ion messages an hour using legitimate, free file
storage services available on the Internet.
In a blog published earlier this week, AppRiver, a security services provider,
describes the unusual approach. In a nutshell, spammers have created an
automated method for creating accounts in popular free file storage services including groups. yahoo.com, groups.google.com, and livejoumal.com - and are
usin g those accounts to host their spam content. The use of these sites makes
the spam appear to be legitimate, thus enabling it to bypass commonly used
blacklists.
AppRiver has tweaked its own defenses to detect the new spam attack and block
it, but traditional spam tolls that blacklist IP addresses or domains will not block
the new attacks.
Contributing Source : Dark Reading Online
** This document is intended for Department of Justice internal use only and is not to be distributed outside the Department.**
Questions regarding this Bulletin or requests for permission to redis tribute should be directed to:
JSOC/DOJCERT 202-307-5332
Security Advisory - Mozill a (JSOC)
Security Advisory - Java (JSOC)
Security Advisory - OSX (JSOC)
Top Ten Scams (JSOC)
Green Tip of the Month
Greening the Commute
American workers spend an average of
47 hours per year commuting t hrough
rush hour traffic. This adds up to 3. 7
billion hours and 23 billion gallons of gas
wasted in traffic each year.
We can ease this strain by carpooling,
taking public transit, biking, walking, or
a creative combination thereof.
Consider car alternatives, such as a
hybrid or electric vehicle, motorcycle,
scooter, or using a car sharing service,
like Flexcar or Zipcar.
PlanetGreen
News You Can Use
July 2009
Visit Our Website
Security Awareness
Incident Dashboards are now available to Components through JSOC's
Remedy Web Portal
Component specific Incident Dashboards, available with a JSOC Remedy Web
Portal account, provide Components with an easy to understand graphical view
into their incident ticket status. The information displayed includes total
incidents open, incidents reported by category from the previous month, and
real-time open and closed incident ticket information by category for the current
month.
The Incident Dashboard is accessible by clicking the dashboard button at the top
of the JSOC's Remedy Web Portal's navigation bar.
For more information about your Component specific Incident Dashboard,
contact Curtis W. Johnson at [email protected], or visit our website .
Co!ll>OOent Name Listed Here
June
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _______ _
The Justice Security Operations
Center News
You
Can
Use
Newsletter keeps readers up to
date on the latest topics, security
vulnerabilities, and computer user
tips to help protect against cyber
threats on the Internet.
These threats affect you everyday in
every way - at the office, at home,
and in between. This is information
you need to know, written in terms
you can understand.
If you have any subjects, or ideas
you would like to see addressed in
future newsletters, please email
Curtis Johnson at
[email protected] .gov .
Cyber Awareness Tip
,July
640,000
()pen~93
Open Incidents: 3e
ResoiYe:f ln:ldents 93
Resolved Incidents: 33
IQI 'O
New
Fake
Antivirus
Variants
1C''IJ
__.,,
,_,
c.; n.t cmrll•~
;ce
• 01 -Un-.n-CAcc-
81114!u..- obrMAooa. ...
- (D.M•Ie i• ••C•n
'- 11"1-trr,..,_,u.,.
•ra,_,,.., ...
.tlll.ll ... l _
•~ o-~
•ocu~e-. li•
• 041,.,,...,•.Uut•
3(:1..,
What is the JSOC
Newsletter?
.1&-l'"'""' ~<U
Researchers are expecting 640,000
new variants of the Fake Antivirus
(Fake AV) malware in the third
quarter of 2009 . This increase is
due to the ease at which Fake AV
campaigns can be designed and
distributed
when
compared
to
banking
Trojan
attacks
which
require professional programmers.
Source: Dark Reading
Previous l'w\)nth's Data
current Month's Data
Computer User Tips
Guidelines to follow when publishing information on the internet
• Be careful what you post to the internet. Make sure you are comfortable
with anyone seeing the informati on you put online, because people you don't
know will find and share it with the people they know.
• Realize that you can't take it back. Once you post something online, it is
available to other people and search engines. You can change or remove
information after something has been posted, but it is possible that someone
has already seen the original version.
Source: USCERT
**This docum ent is intended for Department of Justice internal use only and is not to be distributed outside the Department. **
Questions regarding this Bulletin or requests fo r perm ission to redistribute should be directed to:
JSOC/DOJCERT 202-307-5332
Critical MS ATL MS09-03 Patch,
7/30/09
(JSOC)
MS Critical Patches. July 2009
(JSOC)
Adobe Flash Patch. 07/23/09
(JSOC)
Oracle CPU Patch. 07/17/09
(JSOC)
Green Tip of the Month
Select 2-Sided Printing
The U.S. alone uses 4 million tons of
copy paper annually, about 27 pounds
per person , which accounts for 25%
of all landfill waste .
Source : The Daily Green
News You Can Use
June 2009
Visit Our Website
Security Awareness Tips
JSOC's End of Month Report
The JSOC Monthly Wrap-Up provides an end of month summary of JSOC cyber
threat activity highlights, VPR alerts, CTAT briefings, user awareness
publications, and blocked domains, email address , and IP addresses . The report
also contains an incident dashboard that breaks down inci dents by category,
provides further analysis of Malicious Code incidents (the Department's most
identified threat category), and includes a list of the most popular internet hosts
visited by Department users.
To view the latest JSOC Monthly Wrap-Up, visit our website at:
http: //dojnet. doj. qovli md/i rm/itsecu rity/month ly-report. php
Computer User Tips
Cyber Criminals Roll Out Fake Microsoft Patch Malware Campaigns
Be on the look out for the following malware campaigns designed to emulate
legitimate Microsoft (MS) updates. If you encounter any of these updates at
work, record the URL and notify your IT Security staff as soon as possible.
Home users should only accept MS program updates through Microsoft's website
at www.microsoft.com.
•
Important Windows XP/Vista Security Update: This fake update is
often sent via email with a fake Conficker removal tool that can often be
identified by Conficker being misspelled as "Conflicker".
•
Outlook Re-Configuration Campaign: A fake Outlook Update executable
file (outlook_update .exe) is being posted to legitimate websites that have
been compromised. Outlook updates should only be performed through the
MS website .
Critical Outlook Update: This third malware attack should be familiar to
most users as it's delivered via an email attachment (officexp-KB910721Fu11File-ENU .exe) . Do not double click attachments, especially .exe files,
offering any type of software update.
What is the JSOC
Newsletter?
The Justice Security Operations
Center News
You
Can
Use
Newsletter keeps readers up to
date on the latest topics, security
vulnerabilities, and computer user
tips to help protect against cyber
threats on the Internet.
These threats affect you everyday in
every way - at the office, at home,
and in between. This is information
you need to know, written in terms
you can understand .
If you have any subjects, or ideas
you would like to see addressed in
future newsletters, please email
Curtis Johnson at
curtis. w [email protected] . gov .
Cyber Awareness Tip
Twitter Users Targeted with
First For-Profit Antivirus Scam
The first week of June introduced
Twitter users to their first antivirus
for-profit scam promising a "best
video" via a fake YouTube website.
This is the same antivirus scam that
has been circulating on other social
networking sites and through email.
The scam directs the user to a
malicious site that installs the virus.
Contributing Source: The Register
MS Critical Patches. June 2009
(JSOC)
Contributing Source: ZDNet
Adobe Implements Quarterly Security Patching Updates
Adobe released their first quarterly patch that addresses 13 critical PDF
vulnerabilities to Reader and Acrobat 9, and earlier versions of this software.
Adobe recommends users upgrade to the newly released 9 .1. 2 version as soon
as possible. If you are running an older version of Acrobat or Reader, and can't
upgrade, visit JSOC's Website for alternate version upgrades.
The Department's IT security staff performs software updates to your work
computer, but check to make sure your home computer is set to perform
automatic updates. If not, change this preference, or perform a manual update .
Software that cannot be set to automatically perform updates should be
updated manually on a monthly schedule.
**This document is intended for Department of Ju s tic:e internal Ul'e only and is not to be distributed outside the Department. **
Questions regarding this Bulletin or requests f or permission to redistribu te should be directed to:
JSOC/DOJCERT 202-307-5332
Choosing and Protecting Passwords
(US-CERT)
Green Tip of the Month
Phantom Load
The EPA estimates consumers spend
$100.00 a year on electricity used by
electronics that are turned off or in
stand by mode. EPA recommends :
• Unplug power adapters, battery
chargers and other similar items.
• Use power strips so you can turn off
electronics completely .
• Buy products that are highly rated
by the federal Energy Star program.
The Daily Green
News You Can Use
May2009
Visit Our Website
Security Awareness Tips
Internet Surfing Dangers
Cyber attacks originating from unsafe websites and email are
becoming increasingly sophisticated and focused on everyday
communication channels as more and more revenue is acquired .
Malicious coders are designing their websites to be exact replicas
of legitimate websites, and then advertising these sites via web ads and Internet
searches. Fake search engines and misspelled website domain traffic are big
business, especially in the financial and social networking market, because
visitors think they are on a real website and share their information without
suspicion.
Users are at serious risk of encounterin g one of these phony
websites if they spend time surfing and sharing information over the Internet.
The Department will begin implementing BlueCoaPM filters in accordance with
DOJ order 2740.1A to help protect its networks against existing threats and
non-work related Internet usage. Non-work related Internet usage continues to
be one of the largest threats to the Department's information security.
Remember, network security is everyone's responsibility .
New Information Phishing Schemes
Fake information gathering schemes based on popular topics, themes, and
games are being created by identity thieves to entice users into entering
personal information. These types of groups or discussions often require the
user to input their first pet's name, mother's maiden name, street address, first
school, etc. to join/register before the user can participate.
Disclosing of this kind of personal identifying information is very useful to
identity thieves as it's the same type of information required by web email
accounts, legitimate websites, and banking institutions. Be careful with any
personal information as it is very difficult and expensive to rebuild a "digital
identity" once it has been compromised.
If you encounter this kin d of request for personal information at work, do not fill
in the information; note the URL, and report it to your IT security staff as soon
Information solicitations received at home can be ignored by
as possible.
closing the browser window or navigating to a new website.
Computer User Tips
Update and Patch Your System Software Often
As soon as a security patch is announced, malicious coders are hard at work
writing code into their websites and email attacks to exploit information from
your computer, before they can be patched. Coders have reduced the time it
takes them to write code to exploit a new vulnerability from weeks or days to
hours! Microsoft automatic updates are performed every Tuesday in what is
referred to as "Patch Tuesday". The Department's IT security staff performs
these updates to your work computer, but check to make your home computer
is set to perform automatic Microsoft updates . If not, change this preference, or
perform a manual update. Software that cannot be set to automatically perform
updates should be updated manually on a monthly schedule .
**This do cument is intended for Department of Justice internal use only and is not to be distributed outside the Department.**
Questions regarding this Bulletin or requests for permission to redistribute should be directed to:
JSOC/DOJCERT 202-307-5332
What is the JSOC
Newsletter?
The Justice Security Operations
Center News
You
Can
Use
Newsletter keeps our readers up
to date on the latest topics, security
vulnerabilities, and computer user
tips to help protect against cyber
threats on the Internet.
These threats affect you everyday in
every way - at the office, at home,
and in between . This is information
you need to know, written in terms
you can understand .
If you have any issues, subjects, or
ideas you would
like to see
addressed in future newsletters ,
please email Curtis Johnson at
curtis . w [email protected] .gov .
Cyber Awareness Tip
Social
networking
sites
are
delivering malware 10 times
more effectively than email.
Kasperskey Lab 's Malware Evolution
2008 report indicates that 10% of
all malware delivered via social
networking sites are successfully
installed onto members' computers .
Kasperkey
Lab
collected
over
43,000 malware samples from social
networking sites . in 2008, while
McAfee reported 800 new variants
of the Koobface virus.
Contributing Source: eWeek
JSOC Fake Antivirus Information
(DOJ)
Why is Cyber Security a Problem?
(US-CERT)
Green Tip of the Month
Junk Mail
Each year m illions of trees and billions
of gallons of water are used to create
junk mail. To be removed from the
national mailing lists - send your
name, address, and signature to :
Mail Preference Service
c/o Direct Marketing Assoc iation
P.O. Box 643, Carmel, NY 10512
Source: nationalzoo. si. edu
News You Can Use
Apri/2009
Click Here To Visit Our Website
Security Awareness Tips
What is the JSOC
Newsletter?
Conficker Worm
The Justice Security Operations
Center News
You Can
Use
Newsletter keeps our readers up
to date on the latest topics, security
vulnerabilities, and computer user
tips to help protect against cyber
threats on the Internet .
The new version of Conficker, identified on April 9, 2009, attempts to
install new malicious code, scareware, and Waledac 1 Downadup onto
infected computers. Th is new version is especially dangerous as these
software additions are designed to scare and trick users into navigating
to malicious websites that capture personal and financial information.
These threats affect you everyday in
ev1=ry way - at the office, at home,
and in between . This is information
you need to know, written in terms
you can understand .
E)(-e Mt?+•' 0 Y1 -:t ( E)
I f you believe your home computer may be infected with Conficker, there's an
easy way to find out. Conficker blocks access to websites that contain software
that may interfere, block, or remove its installation . Open your internet browser
at home and try to visit the following websites: www.microsoft.com,
www.mcafee .com or www.symantec.com . If you are unable to reach these
websites, your computer may be infected. Please click here to read USCERT's
information on how to detect I remove Conficker from your home computer.
If you have any issues, subjects, or
ideas you would
like to see
addressed in future newsletters ,
please email Curtis Johnson at
curtis . w [email protected] .qov .
Contributing Sources: USCERT, CNet, Washington Post
Malicious Email (Spam)
'
Spam accounts for over 97% of all email, and is still a main delivery vehicle for
malicious coders who propagate their malware, botnets, and viruses over the
internet.
Wh ile there have been successful shutdowns of spam sending
companies (McCole 's closure in Nov. 2008 resulted in a 60-70% reduction in
malicious mail and botnet delivery in the US during Nov. and Dec. 2008), there
are others that have stepped in and already increased spam delivery rates
above pre-McColo levels .
• Fake Conficker Infection Alerts
Scareware ema il campaigns are circulating that try to scare the recipient
into accepting fake antivirus software by saying the recipient's computer is
infected with Conficker. If infected, the computer will attempt to download
the Waledac botnet and spread the virus to other computers.
• Stimulus Package Offers
Malicious email is circulating with the IRS logo and pictures of President
Obama that advertise available stimulus package money for cash strapped
individuals . These emails request personal, credit card, and other financial
information to verify that the recipient is qualified for stimulus funds .
Cyber Awareness Tip
JSOC'S NEW WEBPAGE ONLINE
JSOC's new webpage on DOJNet
contains all its cyber security alerts;
cyber briefings, user awareness
papers, and newsletters. Please
click here to visit JSOC's webpage .
• Incident Report Form
• Malicious Email Submittal
• Incident Response Plan IIRP)
Information
• Critical Vulnerability Alerts
• Vulnerability Alerts
• Cyber Threat Advisories
• White Papers
• News You Can Use Newsletter
• CTAT Cyber Daily Briefing
• Tax Return Solicitation
Fake tax return emails are being sent that offer "cash now" in exchange for
the recipient 's tax return, or charges for services to expedite a tax return.
These ema ils are designed to collect your Social Security number, date of
birth, mother's maiden name, credit card information and the PIN for your
ATM card. Tip: The IRS never initiates contact with taxpayers via email if it has to do with your account or private information.
Be very suspicious of any emails you receive from strangers, companies, or
government agencies that request personal, financial, or credit card information .
If you receive an email that directs you to a website requesting you to download
or update a program, do not accept the offer and close the web browser
window. Click here for instructions on how to report any malicious I spam email
you have received at work to your IT security staff or JSOC.
Contributing Sources: Security Focus, SecurityPark, CNet, ZDNet, MSN
This docum~nt is inund~d for DOJ employees and contractors, and is not to be distributed outside the Department
Questions regarding this Bulletin or requests for p ermission to redistribute should be directed to :
JSOC/DOJCERT 202-307-5332
Microsoft Releases 5 Critical Updates
on April 14. 2009
(Microsoft)
Green Tip of the Month
Turn Off Your Gaming Console.
A gaming console that is left on
twenty four hours a day, seven days a
week, will use as much electricity
annually as two new refrigerators .
(Green living Tips)
News You Can Use
March 2009
Click Here To Visit Our Website
Security Awareness Tips
Social Networking Websites and Job Boards
There continues to be a surge in malware, viruses, and botnets
directed towa rd and residing on social networking and job board
websites.
Malicious coders have turned their attention to these
websites ( See USAJobs Advisory) because of the wealth of
information available, and the relative ease at which members seem
willi ng to share it.
If you. are a member of a social networking or job board website, change your
password today, and change it often.
lrse a password that is at least · '8
characters long w ith a combination of upper and lower case letters, numbers,
.and special characters .
Malicious Web Sites Encrypt Local Files
A rush of new fake antivirus websites are being designed to emulate authentic
sites due to the success they have had at tricking visitors into downloading their
malicious content . Some of these websites contain "scareware" programs that
attempt to scare the visitor into install ing their malware or virus . These
websites are normally identified by warning messages or pop-ups that tell the
visitor a software upgrade is needed or something bad is happening to the
visitor's computer, and offers their software as the solution. Unfortunately this
action results in installing the malware or virus the visitor was trying to avoid .
A few scareware sites have introduced a new feature into their malware encryption. This new version attempts to encrypt and scramble files
inside the visitor's "my documents" folder when installed. Once the
encryption process is complete, the visitor must purchase an encryption key
from the malicious site to access their fi les.
If you visit a website you think is malicious, please report it to your IT security
staff as soon as possible.
Contributing Source: Washington Post
Computer User Tips
Website Passwords
Two-thirds of computer users use one or two passwords to access all their
websites. If you are one of these users, do not allow your web browser to
automatically save your passwords. This practice allows anyone with physical or
remote access to your computer, access to your web site accounts. If your
browser supports an encrypted master password, your saved passwords may be
more secure, but there are programs designed to break this encryption.
What is the JSOC
Newsletter?
The Justice Security Operations
Center News
You
Can
Use
Newsletter keeps our readers up
to date on the latest topics, security
vulnerabilities, and computer user
tips to help protect against cyber
threats on the Internet.
These threats affect you everyday in
every way - at the office, at home,
and in between . This is information
you need to know, written in terms
you can understand .
If you have any subjects, or ideas
you would like to see addressed in
future newsletters, please email
Curtis Johnson at
[email protected] .gov .
Cyber Awareness Tip
Fake Waledac Coupon Websites
Couponizer.com, a legitimate site
used
to
optimize
and
gather
coupons, is the latest target of the
Waledac virus.
Fake Couponizer
websites are now online that utilize
IP geolocation databases to locate
website visitors . This solution is new
for Waledac websites, and allows
coders to further trick the visitor by
offering national and local coupons
based on the visitor's location .
The Waledac virus, which infects
computer systems to collect email
addresses, is delivered as an email
or Ecard that directs the recipient to
a fake website that installs the virus
when clicked by the visitor.
Contributing Source: NY Times
Secure Your Wireless Router at Home
When installing a wireless network at home please take the proper steps to
ensure it is secure. Look in the manual for how to change the wireless ID (also
known as the SSID) to something unique. Turn on the Wi-Fi Protect Access
(WPA or WPA2) for authentication, enable Temporal Key Integrity Protocol
(TKIP) for encryption, and use Media Access Control (MAC) address filtering. An
unsecured wireless network allows other computer users to use your bandwidth
for free, and possibly use it for illegal activities. If the police come looking, a
person with an unsecured network would have a difficult time proving the
activity didn't come from one of their computers.
Contributing Source: SANS
This document is intended for DOJ employees and contractors, and is not to be distributed outside the Department.
Questions regarding this Bulletin or requests fo r permission to redistribwe should be directed to:
JSOC/DOJCERT 202-307-5332
USAJobs Cyber Threat Advisorv
(JSOC)
Adobe Acrobat and Reader
Vulnerability
(JSOC)
Green Tip of the Month
Public Transportation
A person riding public transportation
can ach ieve an average annual
savings of $8,481, based on today 's
gas prices and average parking costs.
(APTA)
News You Can Use
February 2009
Security Awareness Tips
Cyber Crime in 2009
Click Here To Visit Our Website
What is the JSOC
Newsletter?
Data capture, passwords, and account numbers will continue to be the target of
malicious coders in 2009 . While the Department of Justice is utilizing all
resources to protect its users against these risks, home users are expected to
encounter a dramatic inc rease in fake email and mal ici ous websites. Industry
also predicts mobile cell phone networks are the next target due to the
advances, popularity, and the variety of ways smart phones are being used.
The Justice Security Operations
Center News
You
Can
Use
Newsletter keeps our readers up
to date on the latest topics, security
vulnerabilities, and computer user
tips to help protect against cyber
threats on the Internet.
• Data Capture: Malicious coders are constantly modifying the schemes they
use to gather information from unsuspecting users. Be careful when opening
email attachments, accepting free offers, and surfing the internet. There is
someone out there trying to collect your information.
These threats affect you everyday in
every way - at the office, at home,
and in between. This is information
you need to know, written in terms
you can understand.
• Smart Phones: Voice and touchtone phishing (much like email and web
phishing), malware, and cellular botnets are predicted to become a serious
threat to the mobile network in 2009. Malicious code is being written to take
advantage of the growing trend in mobile interactivity with companies that
require social security numbers, account numbers, and passwords to verify
identity. High value targets will also include individuals that interact with
financial institutions to transfer funds and stocks through mobile devices.
If you have any issues, subjects, or
ideas you would
like to see
addressed in future newsletters,
please email Curtis Johnson at
[email protected]
Cyber Threat Tip
Contributing Source: Emerging Cyber Threats Report for 2009, Georgia Tech Information Security Center
Social Networking Risks
Social networking is often used to find old friends, create new friends, and
network with people of common interest. This free exchange of information
establishes a false sense of security as the user thinks only "friends" are viewing
their posted information. Malicious coders exploit this vulnerability by inviting
contacts within the network to click on their page. Once clicked, the embedded
code infects the visiting user's computer and directs it to collect personal
information from the user, the user's friends, and user's groups on the network.
Fake Antivirus Software Updates Wreak Havoc across the Internet
Malicious software disguised as a legitimate Antivirus Update is tricking users
into downloading and installing its Trojan virus. Recently, there has been a
significant increase in Fake Antivirus (AV) Trojan Horse software that is utilizing
social engineering principles to fool unsuspecting users into compromising their
own machines . Do not upgrade your antivirus software through hyperlinks
offered by unknown website or pop up windows. These software updates are
automatically provided by the DOJ IT service providers at work. If you believe
your antivirus software at home needs an update, open the program from your
desktop and select the button or link provided to perform a manual or live
update. (JSOC White Paper)
Fake Greeting Card emails are
distributed to capture data and
email addresses.
Internet scams, charity fraud, fake
websites, and unsolicited e-mail will
intensify
around
the
Valentine
hol iday . Exercise caution when
visiting new websites or opening
email offering free items, gifts, ecards .
Malware writers and spammers are
designing increasingly convincing
email and fake websites to fool
visitors into accepting their viruses.
Defending Cell Phones and PDAs
Against Attack
(US-CERT)
Green Tip of the Month
Computer User Tip
A Trick for Remembering Long Passwords
When creating a password, users should avoid common words, proper names,
and randomly generated passwords such as "GrTlkOPk6SI", which would be
impossi ble to remember. Try using a phrase that is familiar and easy to
remember (example: " IBowledA285!"). This password meets the Department's
12 character password requirements by using uppercase and lowercase letters,
numbers, and symbols.
Contributing Source: SANS
Donate or Recycle Old Cell Phones
Cell phone upgrades ca use consumers
to throw away over 130 million
working cell phones each year.
This document is intended for DOJ employees and
contracto rs, and is not to be distributed outside
the Department.
Questions regarding this Bulletin or requests for
permission to redistribute shou ld be directed to:
JSOC/DOJCERT 202-307-5332
News You Can Use
December 2008
Visit Our Website
Security Awareness Tips
What is the JSOC
Newsletter?
Malware Targets USB and Removable Media
In recent months, JSOC has identified a significant rise in the number of
dangerous malware downloads targeting removable media devices. This rise
has been attributed to malicious coders writing malware focused on infecting
USB and removable media storage devices to spread the virus quickly .
Thumb drives, external hard drives, CD/DVD-R/W, and flash media (digital
camera/phones) are targeted because they are portable, and easily exchange
information between computers. When infected devices are connected to a
computer they attempt to install Trojan software that runs in the background
unnoticed by the user.
Steps you can take to help protect your home pc:
• Disable Auto-Run. It's important to disable Auto-Run as this feature allows
removable media to automatically start or install any software programmed
to run when the device is inserted into a computer. This allows the Trojan
to spread throughout your computer and connected devices. Please see the
help instructions on your home computer to disable Auto-Run.
• Install Firewall and Antivirus Software. Windows XP and VISTA come
with a firewall that protects against most intrusions, please make sure it's
enabled and updated on a weekly basis. Norton and MacAfee, along with
many others, also offer "off the shelf" choices for both firewall and antivirus
protection solutions.
• Create a User Level Login (without administrative privileges), and use it
as your· main login account. This helps reduce your risk of infection, and
denies full administrative access to your computer in the event your login
credentials are compromised. An Administrative Login should never be
used when connecting to the internet.
Computer User Tips
Avoid Malicious Code and Software
Current web technology makes it possible to embed additional code inside a
primary webpage. Hackers are able to misuse this technology to carry out
mal icious activities, such as redirecting the user's web browser to websites that
secretly down load intrusive software. A number of popular websites have been
impacted by these attacks because the code is sophisticated and hidden from
plain view .
Steps you can take to help protect your home pc:
• Upgrade to Microsoft's Internet Explorer 7.0 (IE 7). IE7 includes many
user friendly enhancements and new security features that help protect
against malware intrusions.
• Regularly Update Computers and Applications.
Ensure Microsoft
Update is scheduled to check weekly for product updates. Applications that
do not automatically perform weekly updates should be updated manually.
• Improve Your Password Security. Increase your password length to a
minimum of 12 characters that include upper and lower case letters, and at
least one number and special character . A longer password provides
significantly higher protection from unauthorized access .
**Thi.~
document i.'i intended for DOJ employee.'> and t:ontrador.t, and i.'i not to be di.tttributed out.'~ide the Departm ent.**
Questions regarding this ne~~·slener, or reqw!st.\ ·for permission tn redf.,·trihute should he directed to:
JSOC/DOJCERT 202-307-5332
The Justice Security Operations
Center News
You
Can
Use
Newsletter keeps our readers up
to date on the latest topics, security
vulnerabilities, and computer user
tips to help protect them against
cyber threats on the Internet.
These threats can affect you
everyday in every way - at the
office, at home, and in between .
This is information you need to
know, in terms you can understand .
If you have any issues, subj ects, or
ideas you
would like to see
addressed in future newsletters,
please email Curtis Johnson at
curtis. w [email protected] .
Cyber Awareness Tip
--
--
-
-------------
Facebook's users are targeted
by a virus named "Koobface".
This virus spreads via a note from a
friend that might say, "You 're really
funny in this video." If clicked, the
link connects to a website which
asks you to download an update to
your Adobe Systems Flash player.
This link will attempt to insta ll the
Koobface on your computer.
Koobface modifies user profiles to
redirect their v isitors to malicious
websites .
DOJ Cyber Security Conference
(DOJ)
Deal ing with Cyberbull ies
(US-CERT)
Obama. McCain
Lesson in Cyber Security
(Security Focus)
Green Tip of the Month
Recycle Your Fluorescent Bulbs
The Mercury from one fluorescent
bulb can pollute 6,000 gallons of
water beyond safe drinking levels .
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