Instek PST, PSS, PSH SERIES PROGRAMMABLE POWER SUPPLY

Instek PST, PSS, PSH SERIES PROGRAMMABLE POWER SUPPLY
PST & PSS & PSH SERIES PROGRAMMABLE POWER SUPPLY
PST & PSS & PSH SERIES PROGRAMMABLE POWER SUPPLY
PROGRAMMER MANUAL
PROGRAMMER MANUAL
CONTENTS
PAGE
1. INTRODUCTION............................................................................. 1
2. CONNECTING POWER SUPPLY VIA GPIB INTERFACE.. 1
3. CONNECTING POWER SUPPLY VIA RS232 INTERFACE 4
4. INPUT AND OUTPUT QUEUE……………………………….. 7
5. COMMANDS AND SYNTAX…………………………………. 7
6. DETAILS OF COMMAND REFERENCE…………………… 19
7. STATUS AND ERROR REPORTING……………………….... 38
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PROGRAMMER MANUAL
PROGRAMMER MANUAL
1. INTRODUCTION
L4 (Listener)
In the modern automatic measurement system, communication
between equipments and computers is essential. The measured
procedures can be varied with users’ testing programs, therefore, the
programmable power supply can be operated remotely from an
instrument controller or computer across the RS232 interface (optional)
or GPIB (optional).
SR1 (Service Request)
Interface selection and setup
The GPIB address can be changed in normal operation condition. Press
[SHIFT] key and [LOCAL] key on the front panel, in which the last
transmitting interface settings will be displayed. Select interface and
press [ENTER], then select the baud rate (or GPIB address) and press
[ENTER] to confirm the setting by using the knobs. Finally, select “save”
and press [ENTER] to store the setup.
2. CONNECTING THE PROGRAMMABLE POWER
SUPPLY VIA GPIB INTERFACE
The GPIB interface capabilities:
The GPIB interface of the programmable power supply corresponds to
the standard of IEEE488.1-1987, IEEE488.2-1992 and SCPI-1994. The
GPIB interface functions are listed as follows:
SH1(Source Handshake)
: The power supply can transmit multilane
messages across the GPIB.
AH1(Acceptor Handshake) : The power supply can receive multilane
messages across the GPIB.
T6(Talker)
: Talker interface function includes basic
talker, serial poll, and unaddress if MLA
capabilities, without talk only mode
function.
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RL1 (Remote/Local)
PP0 (Parallel Poll)
DC1 (Device Clear)
DT0 (Device Trigger)
C0 (Controller)
: The power supply becomes a listener
when the controller sends its listen
address with the ATN (attention) line
asserted. The power supply does not
have listen only capability.
: The power supply asserts the SRQ
(Service request) line to notify the
controller when it requires service.
: The power supply responds to both the
GTL(Go to Local) and LLO(Local Lock
Out) interface messages.
: The power supply has no Parallel Poll
interface function.
: The power supply has Device clear
capability to return the device to power
on status.
: The power supply has no Device Trigger
interface function.
: The power supply can not control other
devices.
Notes for GPIB installation
When the programmable power supply is set up with a GPIB system,
please check the following things:
z
Only a maximum of 15 devices can be connected to a single GPIB
bus.
z
Do not use more than 20m of cable to connect devices to a bus.
z
Connect one device for every 2m of cable used.
z
Each device on the bus needs a unique device address. No two
devices can share the same device address.
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z
Turn on at least two-thirds of the devices on the GPIB system while
using the system.
3. CONNECTING THE PROGRAMMABLE POWER
SUPPLY VIA RS232 INTERFACE
z
Do not use loop or parallel structure for the topology of GPIB
system.
The RS232 interface capabilities:
Computer’s Connection
A personal computer with a GPIB card is the essential facilities in order
to operate the programmable power supply via GPIB interface.
The connections between power supply and computer are following:
I.
Connect one end of a GPIB cable to the computer.
II.
Connect the other end of the GPIB cable to the GPIB port on
the programmable power supply.
III.
Turn on the programmable power supply.
IV.
Turn on the computer.
The RS232 interface provides a point-to-point connection between two
items of equipment such as a computer and the power supply. There are
some parameters you need to set on the both sides. Once you have set
these parameters, you can control the power supply through the RS232
interface.
z
Baud rate: You can set rates of 1200, 2400, 4800 or 9600 baud.
z
Parity bit: none.
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Data bit: 8 bits.
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Stop bit: 1 stop bit.
z
Data flow control: none.
Notes for RS232 installation
If you want to test whether the GPIB connection is working or not, you
can send a GPIB command from computer. For instance, the query
command
The power supply is a DTE device with a 9-pin D-type shell RS232
connector located on the rear panel. Figure 1 shows the equipment of 9pin connector (male) with its pin number assignments. Figure 2 shows
the wiring configuration for DB9 to DB9. When the programmable power
supply is set up with a RS232 interface, please check the following
points:
*idn?
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should return the Manufacturer, model number, serial number and
firmware version in the following format:
Do not connect the output line of one DTE device to the output line
of the other.
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Many devices require a constant high signal on one or more input
pins.
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Ensure that the signal ground of the equipment is connected to the
signal ground of the external device.
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Ensure that the chassis ground of the equipment is connected to the
chassis ground of the external device.
The GPIB connection testing
WK.TMPRO,PST-3202,A000000,FW1.00
If you do not receive a proper response from the power supply, please
check if the power is on, the GPIB address is correct, and all cable
connections are active.
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z
Do not use more than 15m of cable to connect devices to a PC.
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Ensure the same baud rate is used on the device as the one used on
PC terminal.
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Ensure the connector for the both side of cable and the internal
connected line are met the demand of the instrument.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
No connection
Receive Data (RxD) (input)
Transmit Data (TxD) (output)
No connection
Signal Ground (GND)
No connection
No connection
No connection
No connection
PROGRAMMER MANUAL
EQUIPMENT
COMPUTER
(DB9, DTE)
(DB9, DTE)
Pin2
Pin2
Pin3
Pin3
Pin5
Pin5
Figure 2 Wiring configuration for DB9 to DB9
Computer’s Connection
A personal computer with a COM port is the essential facilities in order
to operate the programmable power supply via RS232 interface.
Figure 1 Pin assignments of the RS232 connector on the rear panel for DB-9-D
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The connections between power supply and computer are as follows:
I.
Connect one end of a RS232 cable to the computer.
II.
Connect the other end of the cable to the RS232 port on the
programmable power supply.
III.
Turn on the programmable power supply.
IV.
Turn on the computer.
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The RS232 connection testing
SCPI
If you want to test whether the RS232 connection is working or not, you
can send a command from computer. For instance, using a terminal
program send the query command
Common Command & Queries
*idn?
Syntax & Status Data Structure
should return the Manufacturer, model number, serial number and
firmware version in the following format:
WK.TMPRO,PST-3202,A000000,FW1.00
Interface Function
D
C
B
A
A
B
C
D
If you do not receive a proper response from the power supply, please
check if the power is on, the RS232 baud rate are the same on both sides,
and all cable connections are active.
4. INPUT AND OUTPUT QUEUE
The design of 128 bytes input queue and 128 bytes output queue for
storing the pending commands or return messages is to prevent the
transmitted commands of remote control and return messages from
missing. As the maximum stored capacity for Error/Event Queue is 20
groups of messages, it should be noted that input data exceeding the
capacity by using these buffers will cause data missing.
5. COMMANDS AND SYNTAX
The GPIB commands of the programmable power supply are
compatible with IEEE-488.2 and SCPI standards
SCPI
SCPI (Standard Commands for Programmable Instruments) is a standard
that created by an international consortium of the major test and
measurement equipment manufacturers. The IEEE-488.2 syntax has been
adopted by SCPI to provide common commands for the identical
functions of different programmable instruments.
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SCPI
IEEE-488.2
IEEE-488.1
SCPI
IEEE-488.2
Figure 3 the relationship between IEEE-488.1, IEEE-488.2, and SCPI
As shown in the figure 3, the IEEE-488.1 standard locates at layer A, the
layer A belongs to the protocol of interface function on the GPIB bus.
The source handshake (SH), acceptor handshake (AH) and talker are
included to this layer (10 interface functions totally).
At layer B, the syntax and data structure could be the essence of entire
IEEE-488.2 standard. The syntax defines the function of message
communication, which contain the <PROGRAM MESSAGE> (or simply
“commands”) and <RESPONSE MESSAGE>. The two kinds of messages
represent the syntax formation of device command and return value. The
data structure is the constitution of status reporting, which IEEE-488.2
standard have been defined.
The common commands and queries are included to layer C. Commands
and queries can be divided into two parts: mandatory and optional.
Commands modify control settings or tell the instrument to perform a
specific action. Queries cause the instrument to send data or status
information back to the computer. A question mark at the end of a
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command identifies it as a query.
The command header is configured by header path and leaf node. Figure 5
shows the command header for the leaf node indicated in Figure 4.
Layer D is interrelated with device information. Different devices have
different functions. SCPI command sets belong to this layer.
Command Syntax
If you want to transfer any instructions to an instrument, and comply
with SCPI, there are three basic elements must be included.
z
z
z
Command header
Parameter (if required)
Message terminator or separator
Command Header
The command header has a hierarchical structure that can be represented
by a command tree (Figure 4).
The top level of the tree is the root level. A root node is located at the
root level. A root node and one or more lower-level nodes form a header
path to the last node called the leaf node.
:SYSTem
:ERRor
:STATe
Figure 5 Command Header
Parameter
If the commands have parameters, the values have to be included. In this
manual, when we expressed the syntax of the command, the < > symbols
are used for enclosing the parameter type. For instance, the syntax of the
command in Figure 6 includes the Boolean parameter type.
Root node
:AUTO
:STARt
NOTE: Do not include the <, >, or | symbols when entering the actual
value for a parameter.
Lower-level node
:CYCLe
Leaf Node
Leaf
Figure 4: Tree hierarchy
Figure 6 Command Header with Parameter
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Table 1 defines the Boolean and other parameter types for the
programmable power supply.
Parameter Type
Description
Example
0, 1
Boolean
Boolean numbers or
values
NR1
Integers
0, 1, 18
NR2
Decimal numbers
1.5, 3.141, 8.4
NR3
Floating point numbers
4.5E-1, 8.25E+1
String
Alphanumeric characters
“No error”
Table 1: Parameter Types for Syntax Descriptions
Message Terminator and Message Separator
In accordance with IEEE 488.2 standard, any of the following message
terminators are acceptable:
z
z
LF^END
LF
Line feed code (hexadecimal 0A) with END
message
Line feed code
^
<dab> END
As there is no signal of end message on RS232 bus, therefore, use LF
as message terminator. When a series of commands are sent to the
instrument, it must add a LF to be a judgment for message terminator.
As for query command, the return message of the instrument is also
added a LF for PC to judge message terminator.
Entering Commands
The standards that govern the command set for the programmable power
supply allow for a certain amount of flexibility when you enter
commands. For instance, you can abbreviate many commands or
combine commands into one message that you send to the programmable
power supply. This flexibility, called friendly listening, saves
programming time and makes the command set easier to remember and
use.
Command Characters
I. GPIB message terminators
z
II. RS232 message terminators
The programmable power supplies are not sensitive to the case of
command characters. You can enter commands in either uppercase or
lowercase.
You can execute any command with white space characters. You must,
however, use at least one space between the parameter and the command
header
Last data byte with END message
These terminators are compatible with most application programs. A
semicolon separates one command from another when the commands
appear on the same line.
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Abbreviating Commands
Most commands have a long form and a short form. The listing for
each command in this section shows the abbreviations in uppercase.
For instance, you can enter the query :CHANnel1:VOLTage 1.23
simply as :CHAN1:VOLT 1.23
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Because the programmable power supply hypothesis that a command
starts from the root, you have the option of beginning the initial
command header with a colon (:).
PROGRAMMER MANUAL
z General Setting Commands
Table 2 lists the general setting commands that control and query the
settings of the power supply.
Combining Commands
You can use a semicolon (;) to combine commands. But continuously
query command will cause message missing. For example:
CHAN1:VOLT ?;CURR ?
Table 2: General Setting Commands
If the command that follows the semicolon has a different header path
from the root level, you must use a colon to force a return to the root
level:
:CHANnel<x>:CURRent <NR2>
★1 Sets the value of current.
:CHANnel<x>:CURRent ?
★1 Return the value of current.
:CHANnel<x>:VOLTage <NR2>
★1 Sets the value of voltage.
:CHANnel<x>:VOLTage ?
★1 Return the value of voltage.
:CHANnel<x>:MEASure:CURRent ?
★1 Returns actual output current.
:CHANnel<x>:MEASure:VOLTage ?
★1 Returns actual output voltage.
:CHANnel<x>:PROTection:CURRent
<Boolean>
★1 Sets the overcurrent protection
(OCP) on or off.
:CHAN1:VOLT 1.23;:OUTP:COUP:TRAC 1
If the command that follows the semicolon has the same header path, you
may omit the colon and the path and state only the new leaf node. For
example:
:CHAN1:VOLT 12.34;CHAN1:CURR 1.55
is equal to
:CHAN1:VOLT 12.34;CURR 1.55
You can combine commands and queries into the same message. Note,
for example, the following combination:
Command
Explanation
:CHANnel<x>:PROTection:CURRent ? ★1 Returns the state of the overcurrent protection (OCP)
setting as either on or off.
★1 Sets the value of overvoltage
protection (OVP).
:CHAN1:VOLT 12.34;VOLT ?
:CHANnel<x>:PROTection:VOLTage
<NR2>
Synopsis of Commands
:CHANnel<x>:PROTection:VOLTage ? ★1 Returns the overvoltage
protection (OVP) setting.
The tables in this section summarize the command of the programmable
power supply. These tables divide the commands into three functional
classifications:
:OUTPut:COUPle:TRACking <NR1>
★2 Sets the output of the power
supply working on Seriestracking or Parallel-tracking or
independent mode.
:OUTPut:COUPle:TRACking ?
★2 Returns the output of the power
supply working mode.
z
General Setting Commands
Status Commands
z
Miscellaneous Commands
The tables also provide a brief explanation of each command.
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:OUTPut:PROTection:CLEar
Clears over-voltage and over-current and
over temperature protection error message.
:OUTPut:STATe <Boolean>
Sets the output state on or off.
:OUTPut:STATe ?
Returns the output state on or off.
PROGRAMMER MANUAL
*SRE?
Returns contents of Service Request
Enable Register (SRER).
*STB?
Reads Status Byte Register (SBR).
:STATus:OPERation:COND Returns the contents of the OPERation
condition register. Returns NR1.
ition ?
:STATus:OPERation:ENAB Sets the contents of the enable mask for the
OPERation event register.
le <NR1>
Remark:
The mark “★1” means the <X> for PSS and PSH series can only be 1.
:STATus:OPERation:ENAB Returns the contents of the enable mask for
the OPERation event register. Returns NR1.
le ?
The mark “★2” means the PSS and PSH series do not have the function.
:STATus:OPERation:EVEN Query the contents of the OPERation Event
register.
t?
:STATus:PRESet
z Status Commands
Table 3 lists the status commands that set and query the various
registers and queues that make up the status and event structure of the
programmable power supply.
Presets the OPERation and QUEStionable
status registers.
:STATus:QUEStionable:CO Returns the contents of the OPERation
condition register. Returns NR1.
NDition ?
:STATus:QUEStionable:EN Sets the contents of the enable mask for the
QUEStionable enable register.
ABle <NR1>
Table 3: Status Commands
*CLS
Clears the status data structures.
:STATus:QUEStionable:EN Query the contents of the Questionable
Enable register.
ABle ?
*ESE <NR1>
Sets the Event Status Enable Register
(ESER).
:STATus:QUEStionable:EV Query the contents of the QUEStionable
Event register.
ENt ?
*ESE?
Returns contents of Event Status Enable
Register (ESER).
*ESR?
Returns and clear the contents of Standard
Event Status Register (SESR).
*SRE <NR1>
Sets contents of Service Request Enable
Register(SRER).
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z Miscellaneous Commands
Table 4 lists the miscellaneous commands that control general
housekeeping functions of the programmable power supply.
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Table 4: Miscellaneous Commands
*IDN?
Returns instrument identification.
*OPC
Reports when operation is complete by setting
the Operation Complete bit in SESR.
*OPC?
Reports when operation is complete. Same as
*OPC except returns a 1 to the output queue
and dose not set the SESR bit.
*RCL
★Recall the setting data from the memory
which previous saved.
*RST
Resets the protection levels and states, resets
the current and voltage levels to zero, sets the
output off, and sets memory section to 00.
*SAV
★Saves the setting data to memory.
*TST?
Initiates internal self-test and reports results.
*WAI
Wait to continue. This command forces
sequential operation of commands. This
command is required by IEEE-488.1-1987.
The power supply, however, forces sequential
operation of commands by design.
:SYSTem:AUTO:CYCLe
<NR1>
PROGRAMMER MANUAL
:SYSTem:AUTO:DELay
<NR1>
★ Set the delay time under the current
responding memory status.
:SYSTem:AUTO:DELay ?
★Query the setting of the delay time under
the current responding memory status.
:SYSTem:AUTO:END
<NR1>
★ Set the end memory section for auto
execute continuously.
:SYSTem:AUTO:END ?
★Query the end memory section for auto
execute continuously.
:SYSTem:AUTO:STARt
<NR1>
★ Set the start memory section for auto
execute continuously.
:SYSTem:AUTO:STARt ?
★Query the start memory section for auto
execute continuously.
:SYSTem:AUTO:STATe
<Boolean>
★Sets Auto sequence on or off.
:SYSTem:AUTO:STATe ?
★Returns Auto Sequence mode on or off.
:SYSTem:ERRor ?
Read the next item from the error/event
queue.
:SYSTem:MEMory?
★Query the last memory location
:SYSTem:VERSion?
Returns the SCPI version level.
★Set number of times of execution.
:SYSTem:AUTO:CYCLe ? ★Query the setting of the number of times of
Remark: The mark “★” means the PSS and PSH do not have the
function.
execution.
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6. DETAILS OF COMMAND REFERENCE
Each command in this chapter will give a detailed description. The
examples of each command will be provided and what query form might
return.
PROGRAMMER MANUAL
Examples:
*ESE 65 sets the ESER to binary 0100 0001.
If the ESER contains the binary value 1000 0010, the *ESE? will
return the value of 130.
*CLS (no query form)
Function:
Clear all event status data register. This includes the Output Queue,
Operation Event Status Register, Questionable Event Status Register, and
Standard Event Status Register.
*ESR? (query only)
Function:
Return and clear the contents of the Standard Event Status Register
(SESR).
Syntax:
Syntax:
*CLS
*ESR?
Examples:
Returns:
*CLS clears all event registers.
<NR1> is a number from 0 to 255 that indicates the decimal value of the
binary bits of the ESER.
*ESE
Examples:
Function:
Set or return the bits in the Event Status Enable Register (ESER). The
ESER enables the Standard Event Status Register (SESR) to be
summarized on bit 5 (ESB) of the Status Byte Register (SBR).
If the ESER contains the binary value 1100 0110, the *ESR? will
return the value of 198.
Syntax:
*IDN? (query only)
Function:
Return the unique identification code of the power supply.
*ESE <NR1>
*ESE?
Syntax:
<NR1> is in the range from 0 through 255.
*IDN?
Returns:
Returns:
<NR1> is a number from 0 to 255 that indicates the decimal value of the
binary bits of the ESER.
<string> includes Manufacturer, model number, serial number and
firmware version.
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Examples:
*RST (no query form)
*IDN? Returns WK.TMPRO,PST-3202,A000000,FW1.00
Function:
Set all control settings of power supply to their default values but does
not purge stored setting. The equivalent panel control will be set as
below:
*OPC
Function:
The command form (*OPC) sets the operation complete bit (bit 0) in the
Standard Event Status Register (SESR) when all pending operations are
finished.
The query form (*OPC?) tells the programmable power supply to place
an ASCII 1 in the Output Queue when the power supply completes all
pending operations.
Front Panel Control
Default Setting
OUTPUT
OFF
CURRENT SET
0
VOLTS SET
0
Syntax:
OCP SET
OFF
*OPC
*OPC?
DELAY
1 sec
AUTO SET
OFF
Returns:
RECALL (memory location) 00
1
OVP SET
MAXimum (Please refer to
the user manual for the OVP
setting)
*RCL
Function:
Recall the setting data from the memory saved previously. (The PSS and
PSH series do not have this function)
OUTPUT MODE (INDEP/ INDEP
SERIES/PARALLEL)
STEP SET
MINIMUM (Please refer to
the user manual.)
RECALL RANGE
START 00 END 05
Syntax:
*RCL <NR1>
<NR1> is in the range from 0 through 99.
Examples:
CYCLE 1
Syntax:
*RCL 12 recalls the setting data stored in memory location 12.
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*RST
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PROGRAMMER MANUAL
*SAV
Function:
Save the setting data to a specific memory location (The PSS and PSH
series do not have this function).
Syntax:
PROGRAMMER MANUAL
decimal number representing the bits that are set (true) in the status
register.
Syntax:
*STB?
Returns:
*SAV <NR1>
<NR1> is in the range from 0 through 255.
<NR1> is in the range from 0 through 99.
Examples:
Examples:
*STB? returns 81, if SBR contains the binary value 0101 0001.
*SAV 01 saves the current setting data to memory location 1.
*TST? (query only)
*SRE
Function:
Set the contents of the Service Request Enable Register (SRER). The
query form returns the contents of the SRER. Bit 6 of the SRER is always
zero. The bits on the SRER correspond to the bits on the SBR.
Function:
Self-test and test the RAM, ROM.
Syntax:
*TST?
Syntax:
Returns:
*SRE <NR1>
*SRE?
0|-300
Returns:
*TST? returns 0, if the test is successful.
*TST? returns –300, if the test is unsuccessful.
Examples:
<NR1> is in the range from 0 through 255.
Examples
*SRE 7 sets bits of the SRER to 0000 0111.
If the *SRE? returns 3, the SRER is set to 0000 0011.
*STB? (query only)
*WAI (no query form)
Function:
WAI prevents the programming instrument from executing further
commands or queries until all pending operations are finished.
Syntax:
Function:
The query of the Status Byte register (SBR) with *STB? will return a
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*WAI
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:CHANnel<x>:CURRent
<NR2>
Function:
Set or query the output current value of the specific channel.
Examples:
Syntax:
:CHANnel<x>:CURRent <NR2>
:CHANnel<x>:CURRent?
<x> can be 1 or 2 or 3, <NR2> Please refer to the specification.
<x> for PSS & PSH can only be 1.
:CHANnel1:VOLTage 12.0 sets the channel 1 voltage limit to 12.0
volts.
:CHANnel1:VOLTage? returns 2.34 if the channel 1 voltage limit
setting is 2.34 volts.
:CHANnel<x>:MEASure:CURRent?(Query Only)
Returns:
Function:
Read the actual output current of the specific channel.
<NR2>
Syntax:
Examples:
:CHANnel<x>:MEASure:CURRent?
:CHANnel1:CURRent 2.0 sets the channel 1 current limit to 2.0
amps.
<x> can be 1 or 2 or 3.
:CHANnel1:CURRent? returns 0.012 if the channel 1 current limit
setting is 0.012 amps.
<x> for PSS & PSH can only be 1.
Returns:
<NR2>
:CHANnel<x>:VOLTage
Examples:
Function:
Set or query the output voltage value of the specific channel.
:CHANnel1:MEASure:CURRent? might return 1.234 to indicate that
the load is drawing 1.234 A.
Syntax:
:CHANnel<x>:VOLTage <NR2>
:CHANnel<x>:MEASure:VOLTage?(Query Only)
Function:
Read the actual output voltage of the specific channel.
:CHANnel<x>:VOLTage?
<x> can be 1 or 2 or 3, <NR2> Please refer to the specification.
<x> for PSS & PSH can only be 1.
Syntax:
:CHANnel<x>:MEASure:VOLTage?
Returns:
<x> can be 1 or 2 or 3.
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<x> for PSS & PSH can only be 1.
Syntax:
Returns:
:CHANnel<x>:PROTection:VOLTage <NR2>
<NR2>
:CHANnel<x>:PROTection:VOLTage?
Examples:
<x> can be 1 or 2 or 3, <NR2> Please refer to the specification.
:CHANnel1:MEASure:VOLTage? might return 11.55 to indicate the
voltage at the channel 1 output is 11.55 V.
<x> for PSS & PSH can only be 1.
:CHANnel<x>:PROTection:CURRent
<NR2>
Function:
Set or query the overcurrent protection status of the specific channel.
Examples:
Syntax:
:CHANnel<x>:PROTection:CURRent <Boolean>
Returns:
:CHANnel1:PROTection:VOLTage 12.0 sets the channel 1
overvoltage protection limit to 12.0 volts.
:CHANnel1:PROTection:VOLTage? returns 2.34 if the channel 1
overvoltage protection limit setting is 2.34 volts.
:CHANnel<x>:PROTection:CURRent?
<x> can be 1 or 2 or 3, <Boolean> can be 0 (OFF) or 1(ON).
:OUTPut:COUPle:TRACking
<x> for PSS & PSH can only be 1.
0|1
Function:
Change the output of the channel 1 and channel 2 to series-tracking or
parallel-tracking or independent output mode (The PSS and PSH series
do not have this function).
Examples:
Syntax:
:CHANne1:PROTection:CURRent 0 sets the over-current protection
off.
If the overcurrent protection setting is on, the command
of :CHANne1:PROTection:CURRent? will return the value of 1.
:OUTPut:COUPle:TRACking <NR1>
:CHANnel<x>:PROTection:VOLTage
Returns:
Function:
Set or query the overvoltage protection value of the specific channel.
0|1|2
Returns:
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27 ⎯
:OUTPut:COUPle:TRACking?
<NR1> can be 0 (INDEPENDENT) or 1 (PARALLEL -TRACKING) or
2 (SERIES -TRACKING).
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Examples:
:OUTPut:COUPle:TRACking 2 set the output of the channel 1 and
channel 2 to series-tracking mode.
If the output is in the parallel-tracking mode, the command of
OUTPut:COUPle:TRACking? will return the value of 1.
OUTPut:PROTection:CLEar (no query form)
Function:
Clear all the protective messages (OTP, OVP, OCP) from the panel of the
device.
PROGRAMMER MANUAL
Examples:
OUTPut:STATe 1 enables the power supply output.
If the power supply output is disabled, OUTPut:STATe? will return 0.
STATus:OPERation:CONDition? (query only)
Function:
Return the contents of the OPERation register. The programmable power
supplies, however, do not use the OPERation register to report any
conditions.
Syntax:
Syntax:
STATus:OPERation:CONDition?
OUTPot:PROTection:CLEar
Returns:
When the panel displays the protective message, no further setting can be
accepted by the device. Uses this command to clear the displayed
messages in order to execute further setting.
<NR1>
Examples:
STATus:OPERation:CONDition? returns 0.
Examples:
STATus:OPERation:ENABle
OUTPot:PROTection:CLEar
OUTPut:STATe
Function:
Set the output state on or off.
Syntax:
OUTPut:STATe <Boolean>
OUTPut:STATe?
<Boolean> can be 0(OFF) or 1(ON).
Function:
Set or query the enable mask that allows the masked conditions in the
event register to be reported in the summary bit. If a bit is 1 (true) in the
enable register and its associated event bit changes to 1 (true), the
associated summary bit will change to 1 (true). Even though this is a 16bit register, only 15 bits (bit 0 through bit 14) are used. Bit 15 always
reads 0.
Syntax
Returns:
STATus:OPERation:ENABle <NR1>
STATus:OPERation:ENABle?
0|1
<NR1> is an integer from 0 to 32767.
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Returns
register is non-destructive.
<NR1>
Syntax:
Examples
STATus:QUEStionable:CONDition?
STATus:OPERation:ENABle 32767 sets all 15 bits of the register
to 1.
If the STATus:OPERation:ENABle? returns 0, all 15 bits of the
register are 0.
Returns:
STATus:OPERation:EVENt(query only)
Function:
Returns and clears the contents of the OPERation register.
<NR1>
Examples:
STATus:QUEStionable:CONDition? returns 0.
STATus:QUEStionable:ENABle
<NR1>
Function:
Set or query the enable mask that allows the masked conditions in the
event register to be reported in the summary bit. If a bit is 1 (true) in the
enable register and its associated event bit changes to 1 (true), the
associated summary bit will change to 1 (true). Even though this is a 16bit register, only 15 bits (bit 0 through bit 14) are used. Bit 15 always
reads 0.
Examples:
Syntax:
STATus:OPERation:EVENt? returns 0.
STATus:QUEStionable:ENABle <NR1>
STATus:QUEStionable:ENABle?
Syntax:
STATus:OPERation:EVENt?
Returns:
STATus:PRESet
<NR1> is an integer from 0 to 32767.
Function:
Set the OPERation and QUESTionable enable registers to zeros.
Returns:
<NR1>
Syntax:
Examples:
STATus:PRESet
STATus:QUEStionable:CONDition? (query only)
Function:
Return the contents of the QUEStionable register. Reading the condition
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31 ⎯
STATus:QUEStionable:ENABle 32767 sets all 15 bits of the
register to 1.
If the STATus:QUEStionable:ENABle? returns 0, all 15 bits of the
register are 0.
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STATus:QUEStionable:EVENt(query only)
Function:
Return and clear the contents of the QUEStionable register. The response
is a decimal value that summarizes the binary values of the set bits.
SYSTem:AUTO:DELay
Function:
Set the delay time under the current responding memory status (The PSS
and PSH series do not have this function.)
Syntax:
STATus:QUEStionable:EVENt?
Syntax:
SYSTem:AUTO:DELay <NR1>
SYSTem:AUTO:DELay?
Returns:
<NR1>
<NR1> is in the range from 1 through 59999, its unit is 100ms.
Examples:
STATus:QUEStionable:EVENt? returns 0.
Returns:
<NR1>
SYSTem:AUTO:CYCLe
Examples:
Function:
SYSTem:AUTO:DELay 1 sets auto delay time at 100ms for the memory
of the specific section.
Set or query the number of times of execution (The PSS and PSH series do not
have this function.)
SYSTem:AUTO:DELay 1000 sets auto delay time at 100 seconds for
the memory of the specific section, no further setting of auto delay will
be done on next memory section until the previous auto delay is fulfilled.
If the command SYSTem:AUTO:DELay? Returns 5, means delay
500ms at the current memory section that displayed on the LCD panel.
Syntax:
SYSTem:AUTO:CYCLe <NR1>
SYSTem:AUTO:CYCLe?
<NR1> is in the range from 0 through 99999 or infinite.
SYSTem:AUTO:END
Returns:
<NR1>
Function:
Set the end memory section for auto execute continuously (The PSS and
Examples:
PSH series do not have this function.)
SYSTem:AUTO:CYCLe 8 sets auto cycle on to repeat the setting 8
times.
Syntax:
SYSTem:AUTO:CYCLe 0 sets auto cycle on to repeat the setting
infinite.
If the command SYSTem:AUTO:CYCLe? Returns 0, means infinite.
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33 ⎯
SYSTem:AUTO:END <NR1>
SYSTem:AUTO:END?
<NR1> is in the range from 0 through 99 and must be large or equal to
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the value of START.
SYSTem:AUTO:STATe
Returns:
Function:
Set or return automatic sequence setting (The PSS and PSH series do not
<NR1>
have this function.)
Examples:
Syntax:
SYSTem:AUTO:END 8 sets auto end on from the memory of location 8
of the current device.
If the command SYSTem:AUTO:END? Returns 99, means set the
section 99 as the end.
SYSTem:AUTO:STATe <Boolean>
SYSTem:AUTO:STATe?
<Boolean> can be 0(OFF) or 1(ON).
Returns:
SYSTem:AUTO:STARt
Function:
Set the start memory section for auto execute continuously (The PSS and
PSH series do not have this function.)
0|1
Examples:
SYSTem:AUTO:STATe 1 sets auto sequence on.
Syntax:
SYSTem:ERRor? (query only)
SYSTem:AUTO:STARt <NR1>
SYSTem:AUTO:STARt?
<NR1> is in the range from 0 through 99 and must be small or equal to
the value of END.
Function:
Query the next error message from the Error/Event queue. The result of
the query is the error number followed by the error text.
Returns:
Syntax:
<NR1>
SYSTem:ERRor?
Examples:
Returns:
SYSTem:AUTO:STARt 0 sets auto start on from the memory of
location 0 of the current device.
If the command SYSTem:ATUO:STARt? Returns 2, means set the
section 2 as the start.
<string>
⎯
35 ⎯
Examples:
SYSTem:ERRor? returns 0, “No error”
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SYSTem:MEMory? (query only)
Function:
Read the current memory section number displayed on the panel (The PSS
and PSH series do not have this function.)
Syntax:
PROGRAMMER MANUAL
7. STATUS AND ERROR REPORTING
A set of status registers allows the user to quickly determine the
power supply’s internal processing status. The status register, as well as
the status and event reporting system, adhere to SCPI recommendations.
Structure of System
SYSTem:MEMory?
The sketch of the status and event reporting system is showed as
figure 7. Each component of the sketch represents a set of registers and
queues that can read, report, or enable the occurrence of certain events
within the system.
Returns:
<NR1>
SYSTem:VERSion? (query only)
Function:
Return the SCPI version of the device.
Syntax:
SYSTem:VERSion?
If a specific event in the power supply sets a bit in a status register,
reading which can tell you what types of events have occurred.
Each bit in the status register corresponds to a bit in an enable register;
the enable bit must be high for the event to be reported to the Status Byte
Register.
A Service Request (SRQ) is the last event to occur. The SRQ requests an
interrupt on the GPIB to report events to the system controller.
Returns:
1994.0
Status Registers
There are two kinds of status registers are included to the programmable
power supplies.
z
OPERation Status Registers ( CONDition, EVENt, and ENABle)
z
QUEStionable Status Registers (CONDition, EVENt, and ENABle)
The lower level nodes: QUEStionable and OPERation each have three 16
bits registers: CONDition, EVENt, and ENABle. Figure 8 shows the
sequential relationship between these three types of registers and the
commands that relate to each register.
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QUEStionable
Status
Summary Voltage
Summary Current
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Summary OVP
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
To SBR
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Condition
Register
OPERation
Status
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Figure 8: Status registers and related commands
Output Queue
Standard Event Status Registers
0
Not Used
Query Error
1
Device Dependent Error
Execution Error
Command Error
User Request
Power On
3
Status Byte Register
Not Used
Not Used
E/E
QUES
MAV
ESB
RQS/MSS
OPER
2
4
5
6
7
Enable
Register
Error/Event Queue
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Operation Complete
Event
Register
0
1
The CONDition register is a read-only register which monitors the
present state of the instrument. The CONDition register updates in real
time and the inputs are not latched or buffered. When a condition
monitored by the CONDition register becomes true, the bit for that
condition also becomes true (1). When the condition is false, the bit is 0.
The read-only EVENt register latches any false-to-true change in
condition. Once the bit in the EVENt register is set, it is no longer
affected by changes in the corresponding bit of the CONDition register.
The bit remains set until the controller reads it. The command *CLS
(Clear Status) clears the EVENt register.
2
3
SRQ
4
QUEStionable Status Registers.
5
6
7
Table 4 shows the bit designations of the 16 bit QUEStionable Status
Register.
Summary of IEEE 488.2 Status Structure Registers
Figure 7. A graphic representation of the status registers and their connections.
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Status Registers
Table 4: QUEStionable Status Register
Bit 15
Bit 14
Bit 13
Bit 12
Bit 11
Bit 10
Bit 9
Bit 8
NU
NU
NU
NU
Summary
OVP
NU
Bit 1
Bit 0
∗
NU
Bit 7
Bit 6
NU
Bit 5
NU
Bit 4
NU
Bit 3
NU
NU
Bit 2
NU
The command STATus:QUEStionable:CONDtion? Reads the
QUEStionable CONDition register but dose not clear it.
Reads
the
Table 5 shows the bit designations of the 16 bit OPERation Status
Register.
Table 5: OPERation Status Register
∗
Bit 14
Bit 13 Bit 12 Bit 11 Bit 10
Status Byte Register (SBR)
Standard Event Status Register (SESR)
Status Byte Register (SBR): The SBR (Table 6) summarizes the status of
all other registers and queues.
Table 6: Status Byte Register (SBR)
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5 Bit 4
Bit 3
OPER RQS/MSS ESB MAV QUES
OPERation Status Registers
Bit 15
z
z
Summar Summary
y Current Voltage
The command STATus:QUEStionable:EVENt?
QUEStionable EVENt Status register and clears it.
There are two status registers are included to the power supply defined by
IEEE-488.1 and IEEE-488.2 standards.
Bit 9
Bit 8
NU
NU
NU
NU
NU
NU
NU
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
NU
NU
NU
NU
NU
NU
NU
NU
41 ⎯
Bit 1
Bit 0
E/E
NU
NU
The bit 0 and 1 are not used, so these bits are always zero. The bit 2
(Error and Event) indicates an error code is waiting to be read in the
Error Event Queue. The bit 3 (QUES, QUEStionable) is the summary bit
for the QESR (QUEStionable Event Status Register). When the bit is
high it indicates that status is enabled and present in the QUES. The bit 4
(MAV, Message Available) indicates that output is available in the
output queue. The bit 5 (ESB, Event Status Bit) is the summary bit for
the Standard Event Status Register (SESR). When the bit is high it
indicates that status is enabled and present in the SESR. The bit 6 (RQS,
Request Service) is obtained from a serial poll and shows that the power
supply requests service from the GPIB controller. The bit 7 (OPER,
OPERation) is the summary bit for the OESR (OPERation EVENt
STATus Register).
NU: not used
⎯
Bit 2
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Use the serial poll or the *STB? Query to read the contents of the SBR.
The bits in the SBR are set and cleared depending on the contents of the
Standard Event Status Register (SESR), the Standard Event Status
Register (SESR), and the Output Queue.
following enable registers.
z
z
z
z
Standard Event Status Register (SESR): Table 7 shows the SESR
Table 7: Standard Event Status Register (SESR)
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
PON
URQ
CME
EXE
DDE
QYE
NU
OPC
The bit 0 (OPC, Operation Complete) shows that the operation is
completed. This bit is active when all pending operations are completed
following an *OPC command. The bit 1 is always zero. The bit 2 (QYE,
Query Error) indicates a command or query protocol error. The bit 3
(DDE, Device Error) shows that a device error occurred. The bit 4 (EXE,
Execution Error) shows that an error occurred while the power supply
was executing a command or query. The bit 5 (CME, Command Error)
shows that an error occurred while the power supply was parsing a
command or query. The bit 6 (USR, User Request) indicates the LOCAL
button was pushed. The bit 7 (PON, Power On) shows that the power
supply was powered on.
Use the *ESR? Query to read the SESR. Read the SESR and clear the bits
of the registers so that the register can accumulate information about new
events.
Event Status Enable Register (ESER)
OPERation Enable Register
QUEStionable Enable Register
Service Request Enable Register (SRER)
When one of the bits of the enable registers is high and the corresponding
bit in the status register is high, the enable registers will perform a logical
OR function, the output that controls the set bit of the Status Byte
Register is high.
Various commands set the bits in the enable registers. The following
sections describe the enable registers and the commands that set them.
Event Status Enable Register (ESER): The ESER controls which types of
events are summarized by the Event Status Bit (ESB) in the SBR. The
bits of the ESER correspond to the bits of the SESR.
Use the *ESE command to set the bits in ESER. Use the *ESE? query to
read it.
OPERation Enable Register: Even though the OPERation Enable
Register is present in the programmable power supplies, the OPERation
registers do not report any conditions.
QUEStionable Enable Register: The QUEStionable Enable Register
controls which types of events are summarized by the QUES status bit in
the SBR. Use the STATus:QUEStionable:ENABle command to set
the bits in the QUEStionable Enable register. Use the
STATus:QUEStionable:ENABle? query to read it.
Enable Registers
Service Request Enable Register (SRER): The SRER controls which bits
in the SBR generate a service request.
The enable registers determine whether certain events are reported to the
Status Byte Register and SRQ. The programmable power supply has the
Use the *SRE command to set the SRER. Use the *SRE? query to read
it.
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Queues
The output queue is included to power supplies.
Output Queue: The programmable power supplies store query responses
in the output queue by succeeding the IEEE 488.2 protocol. If the power
supply receives a new command or query message after a message
terminator, the power supply will clear and reset this queue each time.
The computer must read a query response before it sends the next
command (or query) or it loses response to earlier queries.
Error/Event Queues
When an error or event occurs, the output queue stores the message. The
output queue stores and reports the messages on a FIFO (first in first out)
state. The SYSTem:ERRor? query reads the next item from the output
queue. If output queue overflows, the error message is –350, “Queue
overflow”; the queue can’t store or report succeeding messages till it
is read or cleared.
Error Message
Table 8 lists the SCPI error messages for the programmable power
supplies.
Table 8 The error messages for the power supplies
SCPI Error Code and Description
SESR Bit
0, “No error”
-100, “Command error”
5
-200, “Execution Error”
4
-221, “Settings conflict”
4
-221, “Settings conflict; Timer setting error”
4
-221, “Settings conflict; Overvoltage protection setting error”
4
-221, “Settings conflict; Voltage setting error”
4
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45 ⎯
PROGRAMMER MANUAL
-221, “Settings conflict; Current setting error”
-221, “Settings conflict; Recall setting error”
-221, “Settings conflict; Store setting error”
-222, “Data out of range”
-222, “Data out of range; Voltage too large”
-222, “Data out of range; Current too large”
-222, “Data out of range; Voltage too small”
-222, “Data out of range; Current too small”
-240, “Hardware Error”
-300, “Device-specific error”
-300, “Device-specific error; Overcurrent protection error”
-300, “Device-specific error; Overvoltage protection error”
-300, “Device-specific error; Overtemperature protection
error”
-300, “Device-specific error; Calibration current error”
-300, “Device-specific error; Calibration voltage error”
-300, “Device-specific error; Calibration overvoltage
protection error”
-310, “System error”
-313, “Calibration memory lost”
-330, “Self-test failed”
-330, “Self-test failed; CPU test error”
-330, “Self-test failed; RAM test error”
-330, “Self-test failed; ROM test error”
-330, “Self-test failed; DAC/ADC test error”
-350, “Queue overflow”
-410, “Query INTERRUPTED”
-420, “Query UNTERMINATED”
-430, “Query DEADLOCKED”
⎯
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