LANPlanner User Manual

LANPlanner User Manual
2
Contents
Preface
Chapter 1
LANPlanner Solo
Introduction
7
WLAN Design Terminology
7
Naming Conventions
9
Related Documentation
9
Getting Support
9
Introduction to LANPlanner Solo
LANPlanner Solo Overview
11
Hardware Requirements
11
Installation Procedure
Preparation
Installation
License Activation
Installation on Multiple PCs
11
12
12
12
13
Understanding Wireless Network Design
Wireless Network Basics
13
13
Steps to Completing a Wireless Network Design
Before Getting Started
Site Modeling - Create Site-Specific Information
Design - Hardware Placement and Prediction
Deployment - Verifying Your Design
Maintenance - Document and Maintain Your Wireless Network
14
14
15
15
16
16
LANPlanner - Solo Edition
Using LANPlanner Solo
Determining Your Edition
16
16
17
3
Contents
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
4
Graphical User Interface
Introduction
19
LANPlanner Solo GUI Layout
Toolbar Icons
19
21
Menu Structure
File Menu
Edit Menu
View Menu
Format Building Menu
Advanced Sub-menu
Network Design Menu
Network Verification Menu
Utilities Menu
Preferences Dialog
Help Menu
22
22
23
24
28
30
36
38
39
40
49
Managing Software Licenses
Verify License Status
Registering LANPlanner Solo and Updating Licenses
50
50
51
Managing the Project Workspace
Introduction
53
Creating a New Project
Project Workspace Creation Wizard
53
54
Opening an Existing Workspace
57
Project Workspace vs. Open Drawing
57
Assembled Final Drawings
58
Workspace Directory Structure
58
Creating Site-Specific Information - Modeling Buildings and Facilities
Introduction
61
Creating Site-Specific Information Workflow
62
Importing Data
LANPlanner Solo Drawing Files
62
62
Modeling a Building
Converting Building Information Using Building Wizard
Formatting Floors Using the Floor Formatting Wizard
Editing Floors in an Existing Building Model
63
63
67
79
Editing Partitions and RF Obstructions
Format CAD Drawing
Drawing Partitions
82
82
86
LANPlanner Solo
Contents
Change Partition
Current Partition Categories
Editing the Partition Library
Scale Drawing
A Completed Site-Specific Model - Viewing Buildings in 2D and 3D
Toggling Between Floor Views
Viewing In 3D
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
97
97
100
Network Design
Introduction
103
Network Design Workflow
104
Managing Access Points
Access Point Placement
Quick Start Access Point Placement
Edit/Remove Access Point
Distribution System Editor
Access Point Colors
Move Access Point
Copy Access Point
105
105
108
121
132
143
144
145
Managing Sensors
Placing Sensors
Editing/Removing Sensors
Moving Sensors
Copying Sensors
146
146
148
149
150
Running Quick Prediction
Quick Prediction Settings - Access Points
Other Settings/Link to Predict
Quick Prediction Settings - Sensors
151
152
166
167
Displaying Grid Coverage Results
Displaying the Best Server by RSSI Coverage Grid
Received Signal Strength Coverage Grid
Displaying the Data Rate Grid
Displaying the Network Utilization View Grid
Histogram
CDF display
173
176
177
179
179
180
181
Generating a Bill of Materials
182
Setting Propagation Model Parameters
183
Setting Mobile Receiver Parameters
187
Network Verification
Introduction
LANPlanner Solo
89
90
92
96
191
5
Contents
Chapter 7
Verifying Wireless Network Coverage
Stand-alone Measurements
Server-coupled Measurements
Exporting Measurement Logfiles
Importing Measurement Logfiles
Deleting Measurement Data
Displaying Measurement Data
191
192
196
199
200
201
202
Optimizing Predictions
Choosing a Frequency Band to Update
Viewing Optimization Results
207
208
210
Report Generation
Introduction
213
Printing
213
Exporting Graphics
214
Screen Captures
215
Index
6
217
LANPlanner Solo
Preface
Introduction
Thank you for choosing LANPlanner Solo, the revolutionary software that saves you time creating a wireless
communication network. LANPlanner Solo is easy to use, and its features allow you to make critical wireless
network design and deployment decisions in a fraction of the time that other methods require. LANPlanner Solo
also incorporates powerful 3D display capabilities that make this software a leading product in its industry.
Combined with many other features, this state-of-the-art software package will help you see a quick return on your
investment.
This document serves as a guide to installing and using LANPlanner Solo. It is recommended that first time users
read this document in its entirety to become familiar with the software’s vast capabilities and our recommended
approach to using the software most efficiently.
Although we believe you will find this software easy to use, designing a wireless network is no simple matter.
LANPlanner Solo performs much of the guess work and all of the complicated mathematical engineering
calculations for you, but a basic understanding of wireless network fundamentals will help you better understand
the results this software produces. For those new to wireless network design (and as a refresher for the rest), see
“Understanding Wireless Network Design” on page 13 and the section below on common terminology.
WLAN Design Terminology
This section provides definitions for some common wireless network design terminology that are used throughout
this manual.
:
LANPlanner Solo
802.11a
802.11a is a Wi-Fi standard that provides eight channels in the 5GHz frequency band. The
theoretical speed of 802.11a data transmissions is 54Mbps.
802.11b
802.11b is a Wi-Fi standard in the 2.4GHz band that provides 14 channels (only 11 of which can
be used in the United States). The theoretical speed of 802.11b data transmissions is 11Mbps.
802.11g
802.11g is a Wi-Fi standard in the 2.4Ghz band that uses the same channels as 802.11b. The theoretical
speed of 802.11g data transmissions is 54Mbps.
access point
Access Point, also referred to as an AP, is a transmitting device that acts as a hub for
communications between a wireless client and a wired network.
AP
See access point
base station
See access point
7
Preface
attenuation
Attenuation refers to the amount that something is reduced. For instance, radio signal is attenuated
in amplitude when it travels through a building wall. Radio signal also attenuates as it travels
through free space.
CAD
CAD stands for Computer Aided Design, but most often refers to computer software that aids in
the drawing aspect of designing.
channel
Channel refers to a number that is assigned to a particular center frequency within a wireless
standard and a corresponding bandwidth. For instance, the 802.11b standard has 14 channels and
the name Channel 1 refers to a center frequency of 2412Mhz with a bandwidth of 22Mhz,
specifically.
floor attenuation factor See also attenuation. Floor attenuation factor, commonly referred to as FAF, is the amount of
attenuation incurred by radio signal propagating from one floor to another floor.
forward link
Forward link (sometimes called downlink) refers to RF transmissions traveling from the primary
transmitting source (or hub of communication, commonly an access point) to one or more
receivers.
frequency
See also channel. When people use the term frequency in regards to designing a wireless
communications system, they are most often referring to a transmitting channel as defined by a
wireless standard. From a physics perspective, frequency refers to the number of times a signal
oscillates in 1 second, expressed in base units of Hertz.
interference
Interference occurs when one radio wave causes distortion in another radio wave’s form. This most
often occurs when two transmitters transmit on the same or overlapping channels.
multipath
Multipath refers to the multiple paths any given signal makes towards a destination point in space.
In an indoor environment, a signal will diverge into more than one physical wave, each traveling in
different directions (due to reflection of obstructions). Receivers may receive one or more of these
multipath signals, and can often combine the individual waves to better understand the originally
transmitted signal.
noise
Noise refers to radio signal that is undesired or indistinguishable by the receiver.
reverse link
Sometimes called uplink. Refers to RF transmissions traveling from the primary receiver (a mobile
computer) back to the primary transmitter. Reverse link is the opposite of forward link.
RF
RF stands for radio frequency.
RSSI
RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indications) most often refers to the power level of a received
signal. RSSI is often used to simply mean signal strength.
signal strength
Signal Strength refers to the amount of power (usually measured in dBm, which is power relative
to one milliWatt) of a received signal.
SIR
SIR stands for the ratio of a desirable signal’s power to the signal power of the combined
interfering sources.
SNR
SNR stands for the ratio of signal to noise.
8
LANPlanner Solo
Naming Conventions
Naming Conventions
The table below lists conventions that are used throughout this User’s Guide:
Icon
Type
Alerts you to...
Note
Important features or instructions.
Caution Risk of system damage, or loss of data.
Related Documentation
LANPlanner Solo Quick Start Guide
The Quick Start Guide can be accessed from the LANPlanner Solo software by selecting Start > Programs >
LANPlanner Solo > Quick Start Guide.
Getting Support
If you have issues with the installation, configuration, or use of this software, please contact product support at
[email protected], or call (USA) (512) 821-1560.
LANPlanner Solo
9
Preface
10
LANPlanner Solo
1
Introduction to LANPlanner Solo
LANPlanner Solo Overview
LANPlanner Solo is a revolutionary software package that enables you to efficiently design, model, and measure
802.11a, 802.11b, and 802.11g networks. Building facilities and campus environments can be quickly modeled
using menus that guide you step-by-step. You can quickly place access points and predict signal coverage during
the WLAN design phase. Post-WLAN deployment, you can use LANPlanner Solo’s powerful features for
measuring network performance and validating network designs.
This User’s Guide is structured to help you get the information that you need to quickly start using even the most
advanced features of this product. The chapters present information in the same order as the recommended
workflow for completing a network design from start to finish. We recommend that you take time to review this
manual before you begin using the software. Although LANPlanner Solo has been designed to be easy to use
out-of-the-box, you will undoubtedly find time saving tips by referring to this manual frequently.
Hardware Requirements
To run LANPlanner Solo, the following computer platform is recommended:
•
Pentium III processor or later
•
500 MHz minimum processor speed (800 MHz or higher recommended)
•
At least 256 megabytes of RAM
•
100 megabytes of available hard drive space for installation, and at least 200 megabytes free after installation
•
Microsoft Windows 2000 or Windows XP (administrative rights are required for installation)
•
Internet Explorer 6.0 or higher
Installation Procedure
Installing LANPlanner Solo is much like installing any other Windows compatible software. However,
LANPlanner Solo uses electronic license control, so an extra activation step will be required. In order to install
LANPlanner Solo, you will need your installation CD, and some way to transfer files to your PC or receive email
directly on your PC.
If you have problems installing your software, please contact customer support at (512) 821–1560, or via email at
[email protected]
LANPlanner Solo
11
Introduction to LANPlanner Solo
Preparation
It is very important to perform some preparatory steps so that your installation goes smoothly. A Quick Start
Guide is included with your software package. Please read this now.
•
Windows Service Packs: If your operating system has not been updated with the latest Microsoft Windows
Service Packs, visit the Microsoft support web site, download the service packs and install them. Your
software will work best running under Windows 2000 or Windows XP with the most recent updates.
•
Internet Explorer Upgrades: To run functionality contained in Network Design and Network Verification,
the WININET libraries distributed with Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 or higher are required. If you do not
have access to these libraries or Internet Explorer, please contact customer support.
•
Backing Up Previous Work: If you are upgrading a previous installation of LANPlanner Solo, it is
recommended that you back up your Workspaces folder, Antennas folder, and BOM folder prior to
installation. These folders are located in the root installation directory for your installed software. The proper
procedure to back up your work is detailed in the Quick Start Guide accompanying the software.
•
Administrative Privileges Required for Install: LANPlanner Solo must be installed by a user with local
administrative privileges. Non-administrative users may use the software once it has been installed.
Installation
To install LANPlanner Solo, please follow these steps in the order presented:
1 Close any programs running within Windows before starting the installation process.
2 Log on as Administrator, or as a user with administrative or power user privileges. Some of the actions
required for software installation require extra privileges, though you can use the software without those
privileges.
3 Insert the CD into the drive.
4 If Autorun is activated on your computer, the setup program will start automatically. Otherwise, run
SETUP.EXE from the root folder on the product CD.
5 Read the warnings and the license agreement. You must accept the license agreement to continue.
6 Enter the user information, including your name, the name of your company and the company licensee. Enter
the serial number exactly as shown on the back of the CD case.
7 Choose the destination folder where the program files will be stored on the hard drive. We recommend you
accept the default folder name. If you choose a hard drive other than the default C: drive, be sure to also type
in a directory name; e.g. click on your D: drive and then type in \Program Files\LANPlanner Solo\.
8 Click Next to begin the installation process.
9 When setup is complete, you are ready to run the software by going to the Windows Start menu and selecting
Programs > LANPlanner Solo > LANPlanner Solo.
License Activation
•
When LANPlanner Solo starts running you will receive a message that “An activation code for your
software could not be obtained”. This software requires a valid activation code to run properly.
•
Activation codes enforce your software license agreement. Activation codes are only available via customer
support. Contact customer support at [email protected] to obtain an activation code. To do so,
you must provide your product name, version, serial number, and lock code. See “Managing Software
Licenses” on page 50 for further details.
•
When you click OK in the dialog box, you will reach the License Maintenance dialog box. See “Managing
Software Licenses” on page 50 or further details.
12
LANPlanner Solo
Understanding Wireless Network Design
•
Please keep in mind that the electronic license control mechanism is merely an enforcement method for the
terms of the end user license. Regardless of the functions of the electronic license control, you are bound by
the terms of the software end user license agreement.
Installation on Multiple PCs
According to the license agreement, your software can only be installed on one PC. License unlock codes will not
be provided for multiple PCs.
Understanding Wireless Network Design
Some general knowledge is important for designing a wireless communications network using 802.11a, b, or g
technologies. By no means is this section meant to be complete or comprehensive, but it should serve as a general
introduction for someone who has limited knowledge of designing and deploying wireless networks.
Wireless Network Basics
Designing a WLAN and deploying an access point can be a relatively easy task, but problems hindering the
quality of the network quickly multiply when multiple access points are involved. The proximity of access points
to users and to each other, access point channel settings, and access point power settings can all affect the
performance of the wireless network.
Most people consider application level throughput to be a good indicator of network performance. There are many
factors that contribute to the performance of a wireless network; however, two metrics are usually considered in
wireless designs to ensure that an acceptable level of throughput is obtained in desired coverage areas: signal
strength and interference.
Several important factors directly affect signal strength. Signal strength near an access point (same room to several
tens of feet away) is considered very strong and is directly related to the access point’s output power level. Signal
strength, however, decreases as you move farther away from the access point (referred to as attenuation). Another
key factor that contributes to diminished signal strength are obstructions, such as walls and wall-like metal
shelving. In general, it is safe to ignore obstructions such as people and furniture when modeling a facility for
signal coverage because their overall affect on signal strength is minimal. Keep in mind that different construction
materials attenuate RF signal in different ways.
RF interference can also affect application level throughput. RF interference occurs when radio signals transmitted
on overlapping frequency ranges (or channels) cause a distortion in the radio wave pattern. Two access points that
operate on the same channel and within close proximity of each other cause interference when transmitting at the
same time. Beware that 802.11b and 802.11g use the same frequency range and can be affected by common items
such as microwaves and cordless telephones.
LANPlanner Solo
13
Introduction to LANPlanner Solo
Steps to Completing a Wireless Network Design
This section provides you a brief overview of a common suggested workflow through LANPlanner Solo (see
Figure 1.1 below). This workflow describes how most people will work with LANPlanner Solo to complete a
wireless system design. This workflow is intended to give you a better understanding of how to get started using
this software. As your knowledge of this product matures, you may find more productive ways to use the software
as your needs require.
Site Modeling
Wireless Network Design and Deployment Using LANPlanner Solo
Site
Information
(CAD files,
images)
Create Site-Specific
Information
Drawing Files
Import Site Information
Create 3D Building Model
Assign RF Obstructions
Design
Hardware Place/Predict
Deployment
Select Access Points/Sensors
Place Access Points/Sensors
Predict and Visualize Coverage
Generate Bill of Materials
Verify Design
Maintainance
Deploy Wireless Network
Measure Coverage
Optimize Building Model
Fine-tune Wireless Network
Document and Maintain
Equipment Location
Wireless Network Configuration
Expansion “What-if” Scenerios
Figure 1.1: Wireless Network Design and Deployment Workflow
Before Getting Started
There are several things to consider before beginning your wireless network design:
•
What do the facility’s floor plans look like?
•
What common construction materials is the facility made of (brick, drywall, concrete, etc.)?
•
Where will the wireless network equipment be located?
•
What are the design requirements such as the number of users per access point, their applications, and the
wireless network bandwidth that needs to be met?
Answers to these questions vary from location to location; however, it is important to consider each of the above
questions throughout the design process.
14
LANPlanner Solo
Steps to Completing a Wireless Network Design
Site Modeling - Create Site-Specific Information
The first step in wireless network design is to model the facility or facilities that will be considered for wireless
coverage. LANPlanner Solo requires a specially formatted drawing file that properly represents the building
obstructions that may significantly affect RF signal coverage. The drawing file contains information about the
location of walls and other obstructions, and the type of construction material. The LANPlanner Solo Format
Building menu (See “Modeling a Building” on page 63) provides powerful functionality for modeling your
building or campus quickly and easily. The Format Building menu supports three basic “starting points” for
generating the three-dimensional drawing of a facility.
•
Start with a previously drawn CAD file.
•
Start with a scanned image
•
Start with a basic concept of the facility layout (requires free-hand sketch of the facility)
Most large building facilities are designed in a CAD (Computer Aided Design) software package. There are many
different CAD file formats, but one of the most common is the .dwg and the .dxf file formats. LANPlanner Solo
supports importing CAD files of this format directly. If you can obtain the CAD files for your facility, this makes a
great starting place for modeling the building.
Another convenient option is to simply obtain a sketch of the drawing facility from either a blueprint, fire escape
exit map, or an aerial photo (if modeling a campus environment). LANPlanner Solo supports importing many
common image formats such as bitmaps.
If you are unable to obtain a computer file containing information about your campus or building facility, then
LANPlanner Solo allows you to sketch a diagram of the building facility. This option will most likely require that
you have either visited the facility, been told its basic structure, or previously seen a diagram of the facility.
LANPlanner Solo does not require that every facility wall or obstruction be modeled to 100% accuracy, but the
accuracy of the software’s predictive engine depends on the modeled facility. It is important to model any major
obstructions and the general location and scale of building walls in order for the predictive engine to produce
useful results.
Once you have obtained information on your facility or campus environment, see Chapter 4 for detailed
instructions on modeling the facility in LANPlanner Solo.
Design - Hardware Placement and Prediction
After you have modeled your building or campus environment using LANPlanner Solo’s Building Wizard, you are
ready to begin designing the wireless network. Designing the wireless network involves using the functionality
provided by the Network Design menu. The design step includes:
•
Selecting wireless access points and sensors
•
Placing the access points and sensors
•
Predicting and visualizing wireless signal coverage
•
Generate a comprehensive Bill of Materials (BOM) of all wireless equipment in your design
LANPlanner Solo allows you to model every important aspect of your system design so that it can predict the
network’s performance as accurately as possible. Using the Network Design menu is described in Chapter 5.
LANPlanner Solo
15
Introduction to LANPlanner Solo
Deployment - Verifying Your Design
After deploying your wireless network, you can use Network Verification within LANPlanner Solo to help verify
signal coverage and optimize your building model. Post-deployment signal coverage verification is beneficial for one
or more of the following reasons:
•
Informs you of potential flaws in your original design by determining if the network performs as originally
predicted.
•
Provides LANPlanner Solo with building model RF characteristics that can be archived for modifying future
designs in the same building, or other buildings of similar construction.
•
Enables building model optimization and wireless network fine-tuning.
•
Documents the quality of the network as originally installed.
Wireless network verification and optimization is performed using the Network Verification menu, which is
described in Chapter 6.
Maintenance - Document and Maintain Your Wireless Network
After completing your wireless network design in LANPlanner Solo, physically deploying the network, and
verifying the network’s performance, you can continue to use LANPlanner Solo as a documentation system to
identify equipment locations, wireless coverage, and configuration (power levels, channels, etc). This information
can be vital to fixing future network problems or generating “what-if scenarios” for expanding the network.
LANPlanner Solo’s documentation and archiving capability frees up IT staff from depending on the knowledge of
those who originally created the wireless network.
Wireless network maintenance is an ongoing and iterative process. Maintenance tasks include expansion (see
Chapter 4, Chapter 5), verification (Chapter 6), and report generation (Chapter 7).
LANPlanner - Solo Edition
The Solo edition of LANPlanner gives you the full functionality of a cutting-edge wireless design tool, one
drawing at a time. By choosing to work with only one or more select drawing files, you can:
•
Try out the software for a pilot project without making a bigger investment in the full product suite.
•
Take advantage of all LANPlanner's features at a price point that is cost effective for single projects.
•
Include the cost of the software into the proposal process.
Using LANPlanner Solo
Because the Solo edition of LANPlanner is limited to working with specific drawing files, an extra step is required
in the design process. After completing your facility model using the Building Wizard, you will be prompted to
email the drawing to [email protected] Upon receipt, Motorola will attach a key to the drawing
file which unlocks the Network Design menu, enabling you to place hardware and run RF predictions. Once
unlocked, you will be unable to add floors to the drawing or make significant modifications to the building model.
16
LANPlanner Solo
LANPlanner - Solo Edition
Determining Your Edition
The section above applies only to users of the Solo edition of LANPlanner. The most notable difference in
LANPlanner Solo is that the Network Design menu is disabled until you begin working with a keyed drawing file:
Figure 1.2: Disabled Network Design Menu
LANPlanner Solo
17
Introduction to LANPlanner Solo
18
LANPlanner Solo
2
Graphical User Interface
Introduction
This chapter provides the information you need to become familiar with the LANPlanner Solo Graphical User
Interface (GUI) and extensive menu options.
LANPlanner Solo GUI Layout
Launch LANPlanner Solo from the Windows Start menu by selecting ProgramsPrograms > LANPLanner Solo
> LANPlanner Solo or by double-clicking the LANPlanner Solo icon from your Windows desktop:
Figure 2.1: LANPlanner Solo icon
LANPlanner Solo
19
Graphical User Interface
When the LANPlanner Solo GUI opens, note the major features:
Toolbar
Drawing Window
Legend Window
Floating mouse Pointer
Drag bars to resize
windows
Command Line Window
Mouse coordinates
(meters)
Figure 2.2: LANPlanner Solo Graphical User Interface (GUI)
Whenever you change LANPlanner Solo’s window size, user preferences, or the project workspace, all settings are
saved upon exiting the tool. These saved settings are restored the next time that you launch LANPlanner Solo.
20
LANPlanner Solo
LANPlanner Solo GUI Layout
Toolbar Icons
The toolbar icons below quick-link to LANPlanner Solo commands:
Clear Predictions
New
Quick Predict
Open
Save
Print
Edit/Remove
Access Point
Print Preview
Toggle Command
Window
Building Floor Place Access
Manager
Point
Toggle Dockable
Legend
Figure 2.3: Toolbar Icons - Actions
The toolbar icons below allow you to manipulate the drawing views:
Render
3D Orbit
Gouraud Shaded,
Edges On
Zoom Realtime
Flat Shaded,
Edges On
Pan Realtime Top View
Gouraud Shaded
SW Isometric View
2D Wireframe
Hidden
Flat Shaded
3D Wireframe
Figure 2.4: Toolbar Icons - Drawing Views
LANPlanner Solo
21
Graphical User Interface
Menu Structure
LANPlanner Solo has been designed with an organized menu structure designed to allow you to quickly access
similar features from within the same menu. The following sections provide a brief overview of each toolbar menu
and the functionality that is provided by the submenu commands.
File Menu
The File menu provides the ability to create and open project workspaces, create, open, and save drawings, and
export drawings into a wide range of file formats. The File menu is shown in Figure 2.5:
Figure 2.5: File menu
New/Open
Project
Allows you to open an existing project workspace or create a new project workspace.
New Drawing
Creates a new empty drawing that can be used to construct a floor plan.
Open Drawing
Opens an existing LANPlanner Solo compatible drawing file (*.dwg).
Save
Saves the current drawing at its existing location with its current name.
Save As
Saves the current drawing with a different name and/or file path.
Export
Saves the current drawing in a number of different formats (for example, Windows Metafile, Bitmap,
Encapsulated Postscript, and so on.). It is important to remember that LANPlanner Solo can only
function properly on *.dwg files, so files exported into another file format may not be recoverable as a
LANPlanner Solo drawing file.
Print Setup
Allows you to configure page layout settings for printing.
Print Preview
Preview a print job. To exit the print preview, press the ESC key, space bar, or click the right mouse
button.
Print
Opens the Print dialog box which allows you to print the drawing exactly as its currently displayed on
screen.
Exit
Exits the LANPlanner Solo program. If you have made changes to the current drawing, you will be
asked if you would like to save changes to the current drawing.
22
LANPlanner Solo
Menu Structure
Edit Menu
The Edit menu, shown in Figure 2.6, provides the standard Windows file editing capability. These commands are
for editing the partitions and other entities in your drawing file (*.dwg).
Figure 2.6: Edit menu
LANPlanner Solo
Cut Wall
Removes selected objects from the drawing and places them on the Windows Clipboard. To insure drawing
information stability, LANPlanner Solo does not allow certain entities (such as access points) to be cut
from the database. Instead, use the appropriate command within the Network Design menu.
Copy Wall
Copies selected wall objects to the clipboard.
Paste Wall
Inserts data from the clipboard.
Erase Wall
This command removes the selected objects from the drawing without placing them on the Windows
Clipboard.
23
Graphical User Interface
View Menu
The View menu offers powerful capabilities for displaying your drawing and predictions in a variety of ways. You
can alter the current view of the building environment, refresh, zoom, and pan the drawing. The View menu also
allows you to change the appearance and perspective of predictions and measurements.
Figure 2.7: View menu
Refresh Screen
Refreshes the display. Use this command when partitions, predictions, or other drawing data
disappear that should be visible. This is sometimes necessary if a command is cancelled by hitting
the ESC key when the command is partially completed. If a command is aborted prior to the
completion process, the display may be left in an interim state. The Refresh Screen command will
bring the display up to date.
Building Floor
Opens a fly-out menu that includes commands for selecting and viewing floors.
Zoom
Select Zoom to enable real-time zooming. Once real-time zooming is activated, click and hold the
left mouse button while moving the mouse up or down to zoom in or out, respectively. Press ESC to
cancel.
Zoom Extents
Zooms to display the entire drawing. Zooming to the drawing extents will effectively show all of
the visible objects in the drawing window.
Pan
Use Pan to move left, right, up or down in your view of the drawing. Pan is an alternative to using
the scrollbars. When this menu option is selected, the cursor changes to a hand, and allows the user
to drag the screen image around with the left mouse button. From this mode, the right mouse button
brings up the zoom menu.
Drawing Layers
These set of commands allows you to show/hide unformatted and formatted autocad layers.
3D Views
This command allows you to have menu access to the 3D Orbit, Top, and Southwest Isometric
Views
Shade
The commands under this fly-out menu quickly fill in the objects in the drawing.
24
LANPlanner Solo
Menu Structure
LANPlanner Solo
Show Unformatted
Walls
This command presents you with a list box of available layers in the drawing that are not
LANPlanner Solo formatted layers. You can then choose one or more layers from the list box to
make visible in the current viewport. This is useful when attempting to remove unused entities from
a drawing.
Hide Unformatted
Walls
This command makes all unformatted drawing layers invisible.
Display Order
This command allows you to change the display order of a image that has been imported into the
drawing. Changing the display order will change whether other entities in the drawing are displayed
in front of or behind the image. Entities that are displayed behind an image may not be visible.
When this command is selected, you are prompted in the text window at the bottom of the main
program window, to select items. These items are the images whose display order will be changed.
Left-click on the image that is obscuring your partitions, to select it, then right click. You will
receive a prompt in the text window asking how the display order is to be changed. Typing ‘B’ for
back, and hitting the return key will move the partitions to the back of all other visible entities.
Use of the other options, that is, moving images to the front, or putting them above or below
specific partitions, is not recommended.
Set Displayed
Drawing
Information
This command brings up a Display Options dialog described in “Set Displayed Drawing
Information Dialog” on page 26, below.
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Graphical User Interface
Set Displayed Drawing Information Dialog
The Set Displayed Drawing Information dialog helps you to reveal or hide the various entities such as access
points, ceiling and floor tiles, contours, and antenna patterns.
Figure 2.8: Set Displayed Drawing Information Dialog
Display Transmitters
on Other Floors
When this checkbox is activated, the complete antenna system of all access points on all floors
will be visible at all times. When not checked, only access points on the current floor will be
visible.
Display Legend
When this checkbox is activated, the legend in the drawing will be visible, displaying
information about the meaning of colors of partitions and of prediction results.
Display Received
Carrier Strength
Contours
Check this box to display RSSI contour coverage prediction results that have been generated by
the software’s prediction engine. This does not remove the results from the drawing, but merely
makes them invisible.
Display C/I Contours
Check this box to display SIR contour coverage prediction results that have been generated by
the software’s prediction engine. This does not remove the results from the drawing, but merely
makes them invisible.
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LANPlanner Solo
Menu Structure
Display C/N Contours
Check this box to display SNR contour coverage prediction results that have been generated by
the software’s prediction engine. This does not remove the results from the drawing, but merely
makes them invisible.
Display Throughput
Contours
Check this box to display peak data rate contour coverage prediction results that have been
generated by the software’s prediction engine. This does not remove the results from the
drawing, but merely makes them invisible.
Display Azimuth
Antenna Patterns
Check this box to display the azimuth antenna footprint of visible antennas.
Display Elevation
Antenna Patterns
Check this box to display the elevation antenna footprint of visible antennas.
NOTE
NOTE: If both the Display Azimuth Antenna Patterns and Display Elevation
Antenna Patterns are activated, LANPlanner Solo displays the full
three-dimensional antenna pattern.
Radius of Patterns (m)
If you have chosen to display antenna patterns, this number is the outer radius of the pattern.
Adjusting this setting controls the perceived size in meters of antenna patterns on the screen.
Display Ceiling Tiles
Check this box to display ceiling tiles placed in the drawing. Ceiling tiles are triangular surface
entities that define the boundaries of the ceiling separating each floor of the building. Using this
checkbox, you can select to either view or hide ceiling tiles. This functionality is useful to
visualize where elevator shafts, auditoriums, or other building features are positioned. Ceiling
tiles are used to explicitly specify ceilings if none exist in the drawing. Otherwise, ceilings are
assumed to be everywhere.
Display Floor Tiles
Check this box to display floor tiles placed into the drawing. Floor tiles are simply ceiling tiles
that have been placed on the floor below the current floor being displayed. For example, if
Floor1 has had ceiling tiles specified for it and you adjust your view using the View >
Building Floor commands to be Floor2, if the Display Floor Tiles checkbox is set the ceiling
tiles positioned for Floor1 will be visible while you are viewing Floor2. This is primarily useful
for report generation purposes.
Default Drawing Units
Display
This dropdown list controls the default drawing units that will be used throughout the software
modules to display lengths and distances. This only controls the settings for dialog boxes the
first time you open them. Afterwards, the settings of the individual units selection controls
within the dialog box are independently set. That is, the settings of each dialog box remain as
you last left them independent of this flag.
Reset Display of
Informational
Windows
Some commands in LANPlanner Solo will display a dialog box containing helpful hints on
using the command when it is accessed for the first time. These dialog windows, known as
information windows, provide detailed information about the command. It is highly
recommended that you carefully review each information window before continuing to use the
corresponding command.
Each information window contains a toggle that, when selected, will prevent the informational
window from being displayed the next time you use the command. Once the toggle for a given
dialog box has been set, it will not display again until you either reinstall the software program
or use the Reset Display of Informational Windows functionality described here.
The Reset Display of Informational Windows button, when selected, will reset all
information windows for all LANPlanner Solo commands such that they will appear the next
time a given command is activated. This command will also reset the displayed position and
size of all LANPlanner Solo dialog boxes and windows to their defaults.
LANPlanner Solo
27
Graphical User Interface
Format Building Menu
The Format Building menu contains commands for importing external drawing data and specifying the types of
materials in the drawing that can affect wireless signal propagation. For more information on the proper way to
format drawings, see Chapter 4.
This section of the manual provides a general description of each menu command on the Format Building menu.
The Format Building menu is shown in Figure 2.9. For examples of using individual commands, see “Editing
Partitions and RF Obstructions” on page 82.
Figure 2.9: Format Building menu
Building Floor
Manager
This command launches the Building Floor Manager, which is used to format, edit, and
assemble building floors. The Building Floor Manager operates within the current Project
Workspace and does not necessarily perform operations in the currently open drawing. In fact,
accessing this menu command can force you to save the file you currently have open before
proceeding. For details, see “Modeling a Building” on page 63.
NOTE
The Building Floor Manager may be renamed as the Building Wizard in some
versions.
Format CAD Drawing
The Format CAD Drawing command is used to quickly and easily convert layers and entities
in an AutoCAD drawing provided by a customer or end-user, into entities that are recognized
by LANPlanner Solo for the purpose of RF propagation simulation. This command will process
the layers of the currently open drawing. This same functionality is available through the
Building Floor Manager which operates on the current workspace as opposed to the currently
open drawing file. For details, see “Modeling a Building” on page 63. The process of
formatting a CAD drawing is described in detail in “Importing an Unformatted File” on
page 74.
Draw Partition
This command opens the Partition Draw dialog box that enables you to add new partitions to
the drawing. See “Sketch Floor Plan” on page 69 for details.
Change Partition Type
This command allows you to change the type of RF attenuating material that is associated with
a particular wall in the drawing. See “Convert Partition Type” on page 81 for details.
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LANPlanner Solo
Menu Structure
LANPlanner Solo
Change Partition
Height
This command allows you to modify the height of processed partition
Change Partition Floor
This command allows you to move entities on the current floor to another floor.
Current Partition
Categories
The Current Partition Categories command allows the user to define eight different types of
obstructions being used in the current drawing. It also allows the user to change the color of the
corresponding partition categories by selecting any color from the color drop down box next to
the partition category. Categories available for use in drawings are defined in the partition
library, which is editable using the Format Building > Edit Partition Library menu
command. The Partition Library serves as a reference of obstruction information. Entities from
the Partition Library are selected for use in LANPlanner Solo drawings using the Current
Partition Categories menu command.
Edit Partition Library
The Edit Partition Library allows the user to add, remove, and edit different partition
categories. Entries in the Partition Library do not affect partitions in the current drawing. To use
a new partition type in the current drawing, create the partition type with the Edit Partition
Library command, and then make it one of the current partition categories with the Format
Building > Current Partition Categories command.
Remove-Purge
Unnecessary Drawing
Information
This command removes unnecessary Autocad information that is not pertinent to the main
layers that will be processed into RF attenuating partitions.
Scale Drawing
The Scale Drawing command allows you to resize entities within the environment. You can
scale the entire drawing (both formatted and unformatted), or only the formatted entities of one
drawing or each entity-by-entity. You will be prompted to select two points in the drawing (by
clicking with the mouse) and you can then enter the actual physical distance between the two
locations you picked. The appropriate scaling will be applied so that the distance between the
points within the drawing matches the value you enter. If your drawing contains measurement
data, you should erase it before using the scale command.
Advanced
Described below, this command provides access to the Building Manager, Drawing Limits,
Layer, LineWeight, Prune Overlapping Partitions, Break/Ungroup Entities.
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Graphical User Interface
Advanced Sub-menu
The Advanced sub-menu provides functionality for modifying different aspects of a drawing, drawing entities,
and objects.
Figure 2.10: Advanced Sub-menu
30
LANPlanner Solo
Menu Structure
Building Manager
The Building Manager dialog provides advanced functionality for managing and navigating floors in the current drawing.
Most users will not require these features.
Figure 2.11: Building Manager dialog
LANPlanner Solo
Add Floor
Adds a new floor to the current drawing.
Remove Floor
Removes a selected floor from the current drawing.
Set as Current Floor
Sets a particular floor to the current floor and makes it visible.
Show Floor
Shows a selected floor.
Hide Floor
Hides a selected floor.
Align Floors
Aligns floors vertically if a building has multiple floors.
Specify Ceiling
Opens the Ceiling Editor dialog, which allows you to select the floor, and Add Section of
Ceiling, or Erase Section of Ceiling.
Set Reference Point
If you are combining drawings of the same floor or are of two separate buildings, use Set
Reference Point on each drawing separately to position the drawings properly relative to one
another before combining them.
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Graphical User Interface
Scale Drawing
The Scale Drawing command allows you to resize entities within the environment. You can scale
the entire drawing (both formatted and unformatted), or only the formatted entities of one
drawing or each entity-by-entity.
You will be prompted to select two points in the drawing (by clicking with the mouse) and you
can then enter the actual physical distance between the two locations you picked. The appropriate
scaling will be applied so that the distance between the points within the drawing matches the
value you enter. If your drawing contains measurement data, you should erase it before using the
Scale Drawing command.
Insert Drawing
Combines two separate drawings into one. The drawing you select will be inserted into the
currently open drawing. This command is most often used to combine multiple floors of a
building where each floor's information is contained in a separate drawing file into a single 3D
model of the building, or to combine drawings of separate buildings.
Update Drawing
Purges the drawing files LANPlanner Solo uses during RF predictions and updates the drawing
database after making modifications to the building model. Using this button is not necessary
unless the drawing file has become corrupted.
Drawing Limits
The Drawing Limits command allows you to specify the limits of the drawing. Drawing limits are used by the
software’s AutoCAD graphics engine. Generally, they only need to be set when a drawing is received from an
architect or customer that has extremely large limits far beyond the building(s) in the design. Grossly oversized
limits can make it hard to perform some LANPlanner Solo functions, such as scaling. The Drawing Limits
command allows you to set the drawing limits to be closer to the actual building or buildings in your design.
32
LANPlanner Solo
Menu Structure
Layer Properties Manager
The Layer Properties Manager (Figure 2.12 below) allows you to directly manipulate the drawing layers on
which walls and other entities are stored. It is almost never necessary to directly manipulate layers, but some
advanced users, especially those with CAD experience, may wish to do so. A layer is a grouping of one or more
drawing entities. Layers themselves have properties. For example, each layer has a unique name by which it is
referenced (e.g., ‘FLOOR1’). Layers may be invisible (in which case the drawing entities that are part of those
layers are hidden from view) or visible. Layers have a default color associated with them such that all new
graphical entities (e.g., lines) placed on a given layer assumes the default color of the layer.
LANPlanner Solo uses layers to organize and manage physical obstructions such as walls. Each LANPlanner Solo
partition type is stored on its own layer. Use the Format Building > Current Partition Categories command to
view the partition types, and the layers they are stored on. Note that the objects for each floor are stored on a
separate layer, so that the “windows” on the first three floors of a drawing might for example be stored on
MPART1, MPART2 and MPART3 respectively.
Figure 2.12: Layer Properties Manager
When layers are visible, you can make changes to entities on the layer. Hidden layers remain stored in the
drawing file, but the objects on hidden layers are not accessible for selection. Layers that are hidden are generally
unaffected by your actions. Certain commands in the software will access and alter entities that exist on hidden
layers. For example, if you remove an access point from a drawing using the Network Design > Edit/Remove
LANPlanner Solo
33
Graphical User Interface
access point command, the access point will be removed from the drawing regardless of which layer the access
point resides upon.
However, if you select entities using the Format Building > Change Partition Type command, entities on hidden
layers are not visible and therefore cannot be selected and converted into a different partition category. Objects
that exist on a layer can be moved to other layers and can have their properties controlled by the settings of the
layer. For example, an entity moved to layer “FLOOR1” assumes the default properties of layer “FLOOR1”, such
as color and visibility. If you move an entity to a layer that is hidden, the entity will become hidden.
LANPlanner Solo drawings use a structured layer scheme for organizing building floor plans in a database that
can be used for performing complex predictions, optimizations and measurements. Depending on the complexity
of the objects that you wish to incorporate, the software may have a different number of layers for each formatted
floor. You can manipulate the different properties of the layer by clicking the different symbols in the Layer
Properties Manager dialog box. See the figure below:
Figure 2.13: Layer Properties symbols
Manually creating new layers may be beneficial if you have additional information you would like to incorporate
into a drawing but which you do not want associated directly with the entities on any existing layer. The Layer
Properties Manager also allows you to create new layers by using the New button in the Layer Properties
Manager dialog box. You can also select a particular layer and make it the current layer by clicking the Current
button.
34
LANPlanner Solo
Menu Structure
Lineweight Settings
Lineweight Settings are useful for increasing the thickness with which lines are drawn in 2D Wireframe and other
wireframe views. It is not common to use the 2D Wireframe view; the Flat Shaded, Edges On view is more
commonly used, as it has filled in walls that provide a more realistic 3D appearance. However, when in 2D
Wireframe mode, thicker lines can help make the walls of a building stand out over a bitmap background.
To use typical settings for displaying lineweights, check the Display Lineweights checkbox in the Lineweight
Settings dialog box, and choose 0.30mm from the Default combo box. Make sure that your Lineweights list box
has ByLayer selected. Click OK in the Lineweight Settings dialog box to close it and display the increased
lineweights. Note that the lineweights will only be visible in wireframe modes. Lineweights do not affect RF
propagation simulation.
Figure 2.14: Lineweight Settings dialog
Prune Overlapping Partitions
This command process the design removing overlapping partitions to prevent double/triple attenuation of
partitions. Overlapping partitions are lines that get drawn directly on top of each other. Because LANPlanner
Solo’s prediction engine treats each line as a wall, the effect of overlapping lines is that two walls are recognized
where there should only be one. Prune overlapping partitions removes the duplicate lines so long as they are the
same partition type and drawn with the same start and end point.
Break/Ungroup Entities
This command ungroups individually selected grouped blocks in the current viewport. This means that any
grouped blocks that are currently being displayed will be separated (ungrouped) if you select them.
LANPlanner Solo
35
Graphical User Interface
Network Design Menu
The Network Design menu encapsulates the prediction capability of LANPlanner Solo. With LANPlanner Solo,
you have a comprehensive wireless communication system analysis package that helps you carry out frequency
planning, capacity planning, signal strength evaluation, signal-to-interference evaluation, and throughput
evaluation. After you use LANPlanner Solo to place access points and sensors, predictions may be displayed in a
variety of ways to inform you how such a system will perform. For more detailed information on the commands
in this menu and how to use them, see Chapter 5.
Figure 2.15: Network Design menu
Quick Start AP
Planning
This command opens a fly-out menu that allows you to have the software automatically place
access points, or throughput requirement regions used by the Quick Start AP Placement feature or
the network utilization feature. The access points that you choose from are automatically placed
in the regions that require connectivity. For details about the Quick Start AP Placement
command, see “Quick Start Access Point Placement” on page 108. For details about the Edit
Throughput Regions command, see “Specifying Requirement Regions” on page 111. The
Toggle Throughput Region Display command toggles throughput regions in the drawing on or
off.
Place Access Point
This command prompts you with a list of pre-configured access points that you may place in your
drawing. To place an access point, double click your left mouse button on an access point from
the list. Your mouse cursor will turn into an access point that will move as you move your
mouse. Left click in the drawing to position the access point at a fixed location. You may
continue to left click to place more access points. Press the ESC key to exit place access point
mode and return to the list of pre-configured access points. See “Access Point Placement” on
page 105 for details.
Edit/Remove Access
Point
This command allows you to edit, remove, move, or copy any access point in the drawing. See
“Edit/Remove Access Point” on page 121 for details.
Access Point Colors
This command allows you to override the default colors of access points. It will color code access
points based on floor number, air interface, channel set, active channel, power, antenna type,
cable type, or connector type. You may specify the colors by double clicking on the label in the
dialog box that you want to change. See “Access Point Colors” on page 143 for details.
36
LANPlanner Solo
Menu Structure
Move Access Point
This command allows you to change the location of an access point. Select the access point you
wish to move from the list and click the Move button. The mouse will then show the access point
you selected and will move as you move your mouse around the floor. Left click to place the
access point in the new location. See “Move Access Point” on page 144 for details.
Copy Access Point
This command allows you to place access points that have the same properties as another access
point in your drawing by selecting an access point and then selecting the location where you
would like the copy to be placed. You may also multi-select access points to copy more than one
at a time. The software will automatically give the new access points unique names. See “Copy
Access Point” on page 145 for details.
Sensor
This command opens a fly-out menu for placing, editing/removing, moving, and copying sensors.
See “Managing Sensors” on page 146 for details.
Quick Predict
This command opens up the Quick Predict dialog box. The Quick Predict dialog box is where you
may perform a variety of coverage predictions. From this dialog you can select from the
following types of predictions:
•
Channel Planning
•
Instant Point Mode
•
Coverage Predictions
•
Access Point Positioning
•
Antenna Reorientation
See “Running Quick Prediction” on page 151 for details.
LANPlanner Solo
Grid Coverage
Display
This command opens the Grid Coverage Display dialog box. From this dialog box, you can
select the composite coverage prediction results you wish to display. See “Displaying Grid
Coverage Results” on page 173 for details.
Clear Predictions
This command erases prediction results for all access points on all floors throughout the drawing.
Bill of Materials
This command provides you with a list of equipment and cost currently placed in the drawing.
See “Generating a Bill of Materials” on page 182 for details.
Set Propagation
Model Parameters
This command provides you with a dialog box that allows the modification of partition labels and
values, path loss parameters, and attenuation parameters. See “Setting Propagation Model
Parameters” on page 183 for details.
Mobile Receiver
Parameters
This command opens a dialog box allowing you to configure the receiver channel set, the mobile
transmitting power, the mobile antenna gain, body loss margin, mobile noise figure and the
receivers’ height above the floor. See “Setting Mobile Receiver Parameters” on page 187 for
details.
37
Graphical User Interface
Network Verification Menu
The Network Verification menu provides the ability to collect site-survey measurement data and to use that
measurement data to fine tune LANPlanner Solo’s prediction engine and environment parameters. Network
Verification is discussed in more detail in Chapter 6. The options under the Network Verification menu are briefly
described below.
Figure 2.16: Network Verification menu
Record
Measurements
This command will launch a client application that will allow you to collect measurement
information about your network from a WLAN (Wireless LAN) card. LANPlanner Solo may be
installed on any PC and the measurement client will be accessible as long as you have a valid
license. See “Stand-alone Measurements” on page 192 for details.
Run Server
This command will launch the Measurement Server. The Measurement Server allows connections
from measurement clients. See “Server-coupled Measurements” on page 196 for details.
Export
Measurement
Logfile
This command allows you to export measurement data embedded within the drawing to an ASCII
logfile. See “Exporting Measurement Logfiles” on page 199 for details.
Import
Measurement
Logfile
This command allows you to import an ASCII measurement logfile created by LANPlanner Solo.
See “Importing Measurement Logfiles” on page 200 for details.
Delete Measurement
Data
This command allows you to remove measurement data from the current drawing. Your
measurement data logfile, however, will still remain on your hard drive unless you select the
option to “Erase Logfile” on the Measurement Run Delete dialog box that prompts you for the
measurement run you would like to remove. See “Deleting Measurement Data” on page 201 for
details.
Access Point
Associations
Allows you to associate measurement points with the access point(s) that were associated with
while taking measurements.
Display
Measurement Data
This submenu includes commands to display or hide both graphical and text markers for
measurement data in the drawing. See “Displaying Measurement Data” on page 202 for details.
Optimize
Predictions
This is an ‘all-in-one’ optimization function that takes you through the steps required for
parameter tuning. See “Optimizing Predictions” on page 207 for details.
38
LANPlanner Solo
Menu Structure
Utilities Menu
The Utilities menu provides access to commands that are useful through the entire software package. The
commands allow you to do such things as:
•
Enter project information
•
Alter the drawing legend
•
Create text labels
•
Measure distances between drawing points mouse cursor
Figure 2.17: Utilities menu
LANPlanner Solo
Project
Information
This command opens a tabbed dialog that will allow you to view and edit information about the current
project workspace.
Legend
This command opens a dialog box that allows you to configure the drawing legend and title block. With
this dialog box, you can change the text in the title block, alter the size and position of the legend
relative to the drawing, and toggle what information is shown in the legend.
Labels
This command lets you add text labels with your choice of font, formatting, and color to the drawing.
When you place a label, you first use the mouse to identify where the label should go on the screen.
This involves identifying the rectangular region bounding the label; the label text will wrap within the
text box. The label editor will then appear enabling you to enter text of various fonts, styles, and colors.
Once a label has been placed, click on it and drag the mouse to move the label to a different location.
To edit a label, first click on the label and then type the command “mtedit” in the command window
and press enter. The label edit will reappear and allow you to change the label’s text.
Show Distance
Between Points
This command prompts the user to select points in a drawing; LANPlanner Solo draws temporary line
segments between consecutive points. While the mouse cursor is moved around, a tool tip displays the
sum of the lengths of the line segments. Pressing ESC once will cancel the current set of lines, and
pressing ESC again will terminate the command. The distance is based on the current scale of the
drawing. See “Rescale Floor” on page 80 for details.
Preferences
This command brings up an Options dialog box that allows you to configure various LANPlanner Solo
settings with respect to File, Display, Save, Plotting, User preferences, Drafting, and Selection.
39
Graphical User Interface
Preferences Dialog
LANPlanner Solo offers many different configuration preferences for your convenience. These preferences allow
you to configure the file paths, printers, autosave, pointer devices, fonts, colors, and many other settings. This
section describes each of the tabs in the Preferences dialog.
Preferences - Files
The Files tab in the Preferences dialog box presents the options shown below. Most of the settings are determined
during installation, or are derived from your computer’s Windows profile (under Windows 2000/XP), and do not
need to be changed under normal circumstances.
Figure 2.18: Preferences - Files dialog
40
LANPlanner Solo
Menu Structure
Preferences - Display
This tab, controls various options related to how the drawing is rendered to the screen. For example, the Colors
button allows you to customize the user interface colors to suit your personal preferences.
Figure 2.19: Preferences - Display dialog
LANPlanner Solo
•
Display scroll bars in drawing window - Enables horizontal and vertical scrollbars in drawing window.
•
Colors - Figure 2.20 below shows the Color Options dialog box which allows you to customize the colors
used in the drawing. For example, by selecting the “Model tab background” entry in the Window Element
pull down list, and then selecting a color in the Color pull down list, you may change the background color of
your drawing window. Typically either a black or white background gives the best results.
41
Graphical User Interface
Figure 2.20: Display - Color Options
•
Fonts - The dialog in Figure 2.21 below allows you to choose a font for the Command Line pane and the
Session History window. This only affects the appearance of text within the lower command prompt area.
Figure 2.21: Display - Fonts
42
LANPlanner Solo
Menu Structure
Preferences - Open and Save
Preferences related to how LANPlanner Solo opens and saves files are contained in the Open and Save tab under
the Options dialog box in Figure 2.22 below. Users will typically want to keep the “Save as:” preference set to
“LANPlanner Solo 2004 drawing”. This option is the default; however, users can override this in the “Save As…”
dialog box available from the File menu.
The “Maintain a log file” checkbox allows a user to capture the messages from the command line window. The
log file is written to the main program directory and the filename typically starts with the name of the drawing
and ends with a “.log” extension. It is important to note that each time you run the software it will append new
information onto the log file, meaning that it will grow larger over time.
External references, or Xrefs, are links within a CAD drawing file to a separate, external drawing file. Xrefs are
typically only a concern when importing CAD drawings. The default settings should be sufficient for most
applications.
Figure 2.22: Preferences - Open and Save dialog
LANPlanner Solo
43
Graphical User Interface
Preferences - Plotting
This tab controls the default settings for the printing and plotting subsystem. Use this functionality to control the
way in which your designs are printed.
Figure 2.23: Preferences - Plotting tab
44
LANPlanner Solo
Menu Structure
Preferences - System
This tab enables you to adjust such properties as whether or not the software will generate an audible alert on
errors, and to configure access to system pointing devices other than the Windows system mouse (example, a
CAD drawing tablet).
Figure 2.24: Preferences - System dialog
LANPlanner Solo
45
Graphical User Interface
Preferences - User Preferences
The User Preferences tab contains a number of settings that are primarily of interest to users familiar with
AutoCAD. The default settings for these values are generally the most beneficial.
Figure 2.25: Preferences - User Preferences dialog
•
Windows Standard Behavior - Enables you to select whether to use the standard Windows accelerator keys
(example, Control-C performs a copy operation, Control-V performs a paste operation) or the right-click popup
menu. Some users who are very familiar with CAD programs such as AutoCAD prefer to map the right mouse
button to perform a carriage return operation. In LANPlanner Solo, a carriage return will repeat the last
command performed, which is a standard CAD program behavior. By mapping the right mouse button to the
carriage return operation, you may activate the previous command by simply right-clicking with your mouse.
•
When prompted to select a point by LANPlanner Solo, you may type an exact coordinate in the command
prompt area (e.g., by typing “0.1,2.3,5.2” you are referring to the point within the drawing at x-coordinate 0.1,
y-coordinate 2.3, and z-coordinate 5.2). If Object Snap is active, however, coordinates you enter on the
keyboard may “snap” to a different location. For example, if Object Snap is set to snap to entity end points,
and you type a coordinate on the keyboard, if the coordinate is near the end point of a drawing entity, the
actual coordinate the software will use is that of the end point of the drawing entity since Object Snap is
active. To disable this, select the “Keyboard entry” option in the Priority for Coordinate Data Entry
window.
•
Object Sorting Methods - Enables you to customize the order in which operations are performed on drawing
entities. If any of the check boxes are set, the corresponding operation is performed on drawing entities by the
order in which they were created. If not set, the corresponding operation is performed on drawing entities
46
LANPlanner Solo
Menu Structure
randomly. For example, if the Redraw check box is set, and you select the View > Redraw command from
the main program menu, drawing entities are redrawn on the screen in the order in which they were created
(example, the first drawing entity is redrawn first). Otherwise, the entities will be redrawn randomly.
Generally, you should notice no change in operation by activating or deactivating Object Sorting. Except in
extremely specialized applications (example, you wish to have certain drawing entities plotted prior to others),
this functionality should not affect your work in LANPlanner Solo.
•
Lineweight Settings - Enables you to activate, deactivate, or adjust the settings for the display of lineweights
in the software. When in the 2D wireframe shade mode (accessed through the View > Shade menu),
lineweight settings effect the perceived thickness of line entities. For example, you may use the lineweight
settings to make all entities representing the outer wall of your building to appear thicker than the interior
walls. This only affects the way lines are displayed on the screen and has no impact on the way drawing
entities are managed.
•
Hyperlink - Enables you to adjust the way the mouse cursor responds when it encounters a hyperlink within
LANPlanner Solo. For example, when the mouse cursor passes over a hyperlink, the cursor transforms into a
small hand to visually identify the hyperlink
Preferences - Drafting
The options in the Drafting tab are useful if LANPlanner Solo is regularly used on a computer with a
non-standard display resolution. Related options are also under the Selection tab.
Figure 2.26: Preferences - Drafting dialog
LANPlanner Solo
47
Graphical User Interface
•
AutoSnap Marker - Indicator displayed at a snap point when the OSNAP option is turned on, but can be
difficult to see at high display resolutions.
•
Aperture Size - The region that the software will search for objects when you are making a selection. This
allows a certain amount of inaccuracy in positioning the mouse cursor for a selection, but can be
counterproductive on a low-resolution screen where the software might find another object in the aperture first.
Preferences - Selection
The Selection tab provides options related to selecting objects in a drawing. These options are quite useful when
using Format Building to reformat an existing CAD drawing.
Figure 2.27: Preferences - Selection dialog
•
Noun/Verb Selection - To specify objects for a command to operate upon, you can either make the selection
and invoke the command, or invoke the command and then make the selection. The former is considered a
noun/verb selection (the selection occurs before specifying the action) and is enabled by this checkbox.
•
Use Shift to add to selection - Checking this box forces LANPlanner Solo to use the typical Windows
selection semantics. The default is to add to the selection when you click on a different object, and to remove
the object from the selection set when shift is held down.
•
Press and Drag - LANPlanner Solo usually requires you to define a selection rectangle with two clicks, each
at diagonally opposite corners. Enabling this checkbox allows you to click and drag to sweep out rectangles.
•
Implied Windowing
48
- When a point is selected outside of an object, start a selection rectangle (or window).
LANPlanner Solo
Menu Structure
•
Object Grouping - Checking this box implies that if one object in a group is selected, the rest of the group
should also be selected.
•
Associative Hatch - This option is generally not used with LANPlanner Solo drawings, which usually do not
make use of associative hatches. This option determines which objects are selected when you select an
associative hatch. If this option is selected, boundary objects are also selected when you select an associative
hatch.
•
Grips - The boxes shown on objects once they are selected. They are so named because they permit you to
drag and reshape or resize the object once selected. The options are straightforward with the exception of the
“enable grips within blocks” checkbox, which specifies whether individual objects within a block have visible
grips, or whether a set of grips is shown for the block as a whole.
Help Menu
The Help menu provides valuable information about every aspect of LANPlanner Solo and is briefly discussed
below.
Figure 2.28: Help menu
LANPlanner Solo
User Manual F1
This command will launch the LANPlanner Solo User’s Guide.
Manage
Licenses
Allows the management of your LANPlanner Solo license. See “Managing Software Licenses” on
page 50, below.
About
This command opens the About LANPlanner Solo screen, which shows information about the software.
49
Graphical User Interface
Managing Software Licenses
You can use the Help > Manage License menu option to do many useful tasks related to managing your software
license. Use this menu command to: register LANPlanner Solo, verify license status, or add new licenses.
Verify License Status
If you wish to know if you have a valid license and if so, how much time is left on it, then you can use the
command Help > Manage Licenses.
Figure 2.29: License Maintenance
•
License Type - Reports if you have a Trial License or a Local License. Local and Trial licenses are stored on
the machine that the software is running on.
•
Days Left/Hours Left - The amount of days/hours remaining on the current license LANPlanner Solo license.
•
Register Product - See “Registering LANPlanner Solo and Updating Licenses” on page 51, below.
50
LANPlanner Solo
Managing Software Licenses
Registering LANPlanner Solo and Updating Licenses
To add a new license or to update an existing license, you should click on the Register Product button located on
the License Maintenance dialog box to open the Update License dialog:
Figure 2.30: Update License
To register a new license you need to contact [email protected] and include the following
information: client lock code, product name, product version, serial number, and the server lock code. You will
receive a file by E-mail. Save this file to your hard drive and use the Browse button to locate the file. You can
then click the OK button to add the licenses.
LANPlanner Solo
51
Graphical User Interface
52
LANPlanner Solo
3
Managing the Project Workspace
Introduction
When LANPlanner Solo is installed, a project workspace directory structure is automatically placed on your PC to
help organize and manage your work. You do not need to be aware of this directory during normal use, but it is
important to understand how LANPlanner Solo operates on files within a project workspace. This section provides
information regarding project workspaces and how and when workspace specific files are created automatically.
NOTE
LANPlanner Solo always works within the concept of a project workspace, regardless of what individual file is
currently open in the software.
Creating a New Project
Since LANPlanner Solo always works within the context of a project workspace, it is recommended that you create a
new project workspace for each building or campus environment for which you do a network design.
When you create a new project workspace in LANPlanner Solo, you will be asked for the following information:
LANPlanner Solo
•
Project specific information such as the designer’s name, the customer the design is for, and any optional
project notes.
•
A list of obstruction materials used for performance analysis. Eight common types are suggested for you, and
you may simply select the defaults.
•
The number of floors desired for the facility model. Floors may be added or removed later.
53
Managing the Project Workspace
To create a new project workspace, use the command File > New/Open Project to invoke the Building Wizard
Setup dialog box shown below:
Figure 3.1: Building Wizard Setup dialog
Select the radio button labeled I am starting a new project and enter the name of the project you wish to create
in the Project Name field. Pressing the Next button will launch the Project Workspace Creation Wizard which
will guide you through the process of creating a new project workspace.
Project Workspace Creation Wizard
The Project Workspace Creation Wizard guides you through the process of creating a new project workspace. The
individual steps of the wizard are detailed below.
Screen 1 below provides information about creating a new project workspace. Press Next to continue.
Figure 3.2: First screen of the Project Creation Wizard
54
LANPlanner Solo
Creating a New Project
Screen 2 below allows you to enter information about the project, customer, and any additional notes. You may
enter information here in any way that you wish and the information will be stored in the current project
workspace. The information you enter here is simply for your references and does not affect individual drawing
files. To access or edit this information at a later time, use the Utilities > Project Information menu command.
Figure 3.3: Second screen of the Project Creation Wizard
LANPlanner Solo
55
Managing the Project Workspace
Screen 3 below, allows you to choose up to eight types of obstructions to model your facility. To choose different
obstruction types, press the Edit Materials button. If none of the partitions listed are suitable, you may define
your own partitions prior to creating a new project workspace. For more information on how to create your own
partition types, see “Editing Partitions and RF Obstructions” on page 82.
Figure 3.4: Third screen of the Project Creation Wizard.
Screen 4 below, prompts you for the number of building floors that you wish to create for your building model.
Floors may be added and removed later using the Building Floor Manager.
Figure 3.5: Fourth screen of the Project Creation Wizard
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LANPlanner Solo
Opening an Existing Workspace
Screen 5 below, lets you know that you have successfully entered the information needed to create your new
project workspace. Press the Finish button to complete the creation of the new project workspace. LANPlanner
Solo then opens the Building Floor Manager so you can start modeling your building (see “Modeling a
Building” on page 63).
Figure 3.6: Final screen of the Project Creation Wizard
Opening an Existing Workspace
To open an existing project workspace, use the menu command File > New/Open Project to invoke the Building
Wizard Setup dialog box.
Select the radio button labeled “I would like to continue where I left off” and select the name of the project you
wish to open in the Project pull down box. Pressing the Next button will set the chosen workspace to be the
current project workspace. If an assembled <workspace name>_Final.dwg file exists in the newly opened
workspace, then LANPlanner Solo will automatically open the final drawing for you, otherwise you will
automatically be taken to the Building Floor Manager.
Project Workspace vs. Open Drawing
LANPlanner Solo uses the concept of a current project workspace to keep information about the building
environment separate from information for other buildings. Upon first launching LANPlanner Solo, a project
workspace is active. The name of the current project workspace is displayed in the bottom left corner of the
screen. Even though LANPlanner Solo always works within its current project workspace, you may use the File >
Open Drawing command to open a drawing file located outside of the current project workspace. Doing this will
open the project workspace for the open drawing. You will be prompted to switch to the workspace for the
drawing if it is in a different workspace.
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57
Managing the Project Workspace
Regardless of where the file you open exists on disk, you may use LANPlanner Solo to format the drawing and
place access points. During your system design, information such as wall material types, attenuation factors, and
already configured access points are pulled from information stored in the current project workspace. Therefore, it
is important to keep in mind your current project workspace at all times, regardless of where the currently open
file is stored on disk.
Assembled Final Drawings
As previously mentioned, LANPlanner Solo may perform work on the currently open file, regardless of where it
exists on your hard drive, but certain information defaults to information stored in the current project workspace
directory structure. Another important item to note about a project workspace is that there are certain file names
that are reserved for use by LANPlanner Solo. For this reason, it is recommended that you use the Building Floor
Manager to format and assemble floors of a multi-floor environment.
When the Building Floor Manager is invoked from the Format Building menu, your previously opened drawing
file will be closed. If an assembled Final drawing already exist in your project workspace, accessing the Building
Floor Manager will open that file after closing the currently open file. Building Floor Manager works on
temporary files (one per building floor) that are stored in the Formatted subdirectory under your project
workspace directory (the name you would like to call the new project workspace). Project Workspace directories
exist on your PC under the Workspaces subdirectory under your main LANPlanner Solo installation directory.
As you will read in “Modeling a Building” on page 63, you select the Assemble Building button in the Building
Floor Manager to create an assembled drawing file for a stacked multi- floor environment. This assembled
drawing is given the name <workspace name>_Final.dwg. To prevent confusion, it is therefore recommended
that you not create a file with a similar name.
Workspace Directory Structure
When LANPlanner Solo is installed, a directory structure is automatically created on your PC that helps organize
your work and frees you from worrying about file management. Figure 3.7 shows an expanded view of this
directory structure which, by default, exists under: C:\Program Files\LANPlanner Solo.
Each time you create a new project workspace in LANPlanner Solo, the necessary directory structure is
automatically created. For example, Default is the workspace created by the software. New project directories are
placed under the Workspaces directory. All directories above the Workspace directory are considered part of the
global workspace. Consequently, the files contained in the global directories are available to all projects at any
time. Changes to files in global workspace directories may directly impact all project workspaces.
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LANPlanner Solo
Workspace Directory Structure
Figure 3.7: LANPlanner Solo directory structure
LANPlanner Solo
59
Managing the Project Workspace
60
LANPlanner Solo
4
Creating Site-Specific Information Modeling Buildings and Facilities
Introduction
LANPlanner Solo uses a 3D virtual model to represent the environment in which your wireless network will be
deployed. This model is also called “site-specific information”. To create this virtual model, LANPlanner Solo
requires that you import site-specific information before it can accurately predict system performance. This
drawing file contains information about the location of walls and other obstructions as well as their type of
construction material. The type of material that walls are made of is important in determining how radio signals
propagate throughout a facility.
To create the 3D virtual model, you use the Building Wizard utility from within the Format Building menu.
Building Wizard provides powerful functionality for modeling a building quickly and easily. The process of
modeling a building includes specifying the location, height, and type of materials that make up the building floor
plan. Once the 3D virtual model is finished, it serves as the basis for planning, testing, and maintaining your
wireless network.
NOTE
The Building Floor Manager may be renamed as the Building Wizard in some versions.
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Creating Site-Specific Information - Modeling Buildings and Facilities
Creating Site-Specific Information Workflow
The workflow diagram below provides an overview of the primary steps for creating a site-specific model.
Site
Information
(CAD files,
images)
Import Site Information
Drawing Files
Import Building CAD Files
Import Building Images
Model Building
Import Data
Creating Site-Specific Information Using LANPlanner Solo
Create 3D Building Model
RF
Obstructions
Convert Building Information
Format Floors
Assemble Building
Assign RF Obstructions
Set Obstruction Types
Create Partitions
Figure 4.1: Creating Site-Specific Information Workflow
Importing Data
LANPlanner Solo provides a Format Building menu that leads you through the process of creating your 3D
virtual environment model. Format Building supports three basic starting points for generating the
three-dimensional drawing of a facility:
•
Starting with a previously drawn CAD floor plan. File formats include .dwg, .dxf, 3DS, ACIS Solid, Drawing
Exchange Binary, and others.
•
Starting with a blueprint and converted into a scanned image format such as .bmp, .jpg, .tif, .wmf, .tga, .gif,
etc.
•
Starting from scratch and drawing the building floor plan from within LANPlanner Solo.
LANPlanner Solo Drawing Files
LANPlanner Solo contains internal drawing files which can only be accessed through LANPlanner Solo software
products. Drawing files contain the following primary information:
•
Building databases as collections of buildings
•
Building file drawings as collections of floors
•
Each building floor includes obstructions (walls, elevators, windows, clutter, etc.), the ceiling, and the floor
•
All obstructions such as metal walls, windows, cubicle walls, elevators, etc. are modeled as partitions
•
All partitions are considered attenuating obstructions by LANPlanner Solo’s predictive engine and are assigned
a RF signal attenuation factor depending on the material
•
Obstructions with similar RF properties are grouped into partition categories
•
Libraries of obstructions are easily created and managed
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Modeling a Building
Modeling a Building
Converting Building Information Using Building Wizard
You use the Building Wizard to convert information about a building or campus floor plan layout into a 3D
drawing database suitable for use by LANPlanner Solo’s predictive engine. The Building Wizard provides an
interface for allowing you to quickly model the different floors of your building and to assemble those floors into
a final combined drawing. This assembled drawing is then used to perform cross floor system performance
analysis using the tools within Network Design (see Chapter 5).
The Building Wizard is automatically launched after you create a new project workspace. The Building Wizard is
also launched when you open an existing workspace that does not contain a final assembled drawing (see
“Creating a New Project” on page 53). To launch the Wizard manually, select Format Building > Building Floor
Manager from the LANPlanner Solo toolbar.
The Building Wizard operates on separate files (one per floor) during the floor formatting process. When working
with multiple floors, you can use the Assemble Building button on the dialog box to combine formatted floors
into a single combined drawing that will be stored in a single file named <workspace name>_Final.dwg. You
should also click the Assemble Building button even if you only have one floor and are using the building floor
manager. Otherwise, the software will report that you do not have an assembled drawing in the workspace as
noted the paragraph two, above.
The Building Wizard runs within the context of the current project workspace. This means that
information about floors created and formatted within the context of the Building Wizard will be saved in
a project workspace file. Any work you for a particular workspace will be remembered the next time you
launch LANPlanner Solo and reopen that same project workspace. For this reason you should create a new
project workspace for each new building you format.
The following list provides a brief overview of the tasks you can perform within Building Wizard:
•
Create a new floor that can be formatted and assembled
•
Remove a floor
•
Format a floor
•
Edit a floor
•
Rearrange the order of floors
•
Assemble formatted floors into a single drawing database file
For LANPlanner Solo users: After completing your facility model using the Building Wizard, you will be prompted
to email the drawing to [email protected] Upon receipt, Motorola will attach a key to the drawing
file which unlocks the Network Design menu, enabling you to place hardware and run RF predictions.
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Creating Site-Specific Information - Modeling Buildings and Facilities
The Building Wizard main dialog is shown below:
Figure 4.2: Building Floor Manager main dialog
The Building Wizard contains a list of floors ordered by floor number. A green circle next to a floor specifies that
the floor has been properly formatted using the Format Floor Wizard. Selecting the floor causes the Edit Floor
button to display. See “Editing Floors in an Existing Building Model” on page 79 for further details.
A yellow circle next to a floor specifies that the floor is empty and has not yet been formatted. Selecting the floor
causes the Format Floor button to display. See “Formatting Floors Using the Floor Formatting Wizard” on
page 67 for further details.
Add Floor
Use the Add Floor button on the Building Wizard main dialog to append a new unformatted floor to the end of
the list of floors for the current project workspace.
Remove Floor
Use the Remove Floor button on the Building Wizard main dialog to remove the currently selected building floor
from the list. Using this option will permanently delete the highlighted building floor and will reorder the
remaining floors. For example, if you select Floor 2 from a list of three floors and press the Remove Floor button,
Floor 2 will be completely removed (regardless of whether it has been formatted or not) and floor 3 will be
renamed to Floor 2 automatically.
Up/Down
Use the Up and Down buttons to move the currently selected floor up or down in the list of floors. The first floor
in the list will become the ground floor when the building is assembled, and the other floors in the list will be
assembled in the order they are listed (one on top of the other).
Edit Floor
See “Editing Floors in an Existing Building Model” on page 79 for details of each of the Edit Floor options.
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LANPlanner Solo
Modeling a Building
Help Button
Use the Help button on the Building Wizard main dialog box to launch the LANPlanner Solo User’s Guide.
Assemble Building
Use the Assemble Building button to combine your formatted floors into a single drawing that can be used by
LANPlanner Solo’s predictive engine to perform cross floor system performance analysis.
NOTE
The Building Wizard is intended to guide you through the process of formatting and assembling building floors
BEFORE you begin a network design using the Network Design menu. Pressing the Assemble Building button
will overwrite your <workspace name>_Final.dwg file and delete all placed access points. If you should need to
make changes to your final assembled drawing (add or delete walls, etc.), you may do so with the formatting
menu commands directly available from the Format Building menu instead of using the Building Floor Manager.
See “Editing Partitions and RF Obstructions” on page 82 for details.
You will be asked to perform two tasks when you press the Assemble Floors button: (1) Set the legend position
and (2) Verify the drawing. These two steps are described in more detail below.
Step 1: Drawing Legend
•
When you assemble the building floors, the Drawing Legend dialog box displays:
Figure 4.3: Drawing Legend dialog
LANPlanner Solo
•
The information you enter in the Drawing Legend dialog box are for your reference and may be filled out
with any text that you wish. The check boxes in the lower left corner of the Drawing Legend dialog allows
you to set what information the legend displays in the drawing window. Once you have configured the
legend, use the Set Position button to configure where the legend will be displayed in the drawing window.
When you press the Set Position button, you will then be prompted to click in the drawing to set the new
legend position. Choose the point in the drawing where you want the lower left corner of the legend to
appear.
•
Once you have finished configuring and placing the legend, press the OK button to dismiss the Drawing
Legend dialog and continue to the Verify Drawing step. You may edit the drawing legend at a later time by
accessing the menu command Utilities > Legend.
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Creating Site-Specific Information - Modeling Buildings and Facilities
Step 2: Verifying Drawing Assembly
•
Once you chosen to assemble building floors and then configured the drawing legend, you will be asked to
verify that the drawing appears as you intended it to. This is your opportunity to make sure that you
properly set the alignment points for a multi-floor building by making sure the floors stack up properly.
The Verify Drawing dialog allows you to view the assembled drawing from multiple perspectives and to
make sure floors are scaled relative to each other:
Figure 4.4: Verify Drawing dialog
•
Use the buttons to view the building from each of several different angles. Hovering your mouse over a
button will give you a tool tip that will tell you what action the button performs.
If you are not satisfied with how your drawing looks, press the No button to return to the Building Floor Manager
where you can correct any errors. Otherwise, press the Yes button finish the Assemble Floors process.Once the
drawing is fully Assembeld in LANPlanner Solo, the prompt below displays, prompting you to email the drawing
to [email protected] Upon receipt, Motorola will attach a key to the drawing file which unlocks
the Network Design menu, enabling you to place hardware and run RF predictions. Once unlocked, you will be
unable to add floors to the drawing or make significant modifications to the building model.
Figure 4.5: LANPlanner Solo prompts
After completing the Verify Drawing Assembly step,and receiving the keyed drawing file from Motorola, you now
have a final drawing that may be used with LANPlanner Solo’s predictive engine. See Chapter 5 for information
on designing your network which includes placing access points, sensors, and predicting and visualizing network
coverage.
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LANPlanner Solo
Modeling a Building
Formatting Floors Using the Floor Formatting Wizard
The purpose of the Floor Formatting Wizard is to guide you through the steps that are required to import and
format a floor for use by LANPlanner Solo’s predictive engine. To properly format a floor, you need to begin with
some basic information about the floor of the building, such as the location of where walls and obstructions are in
relation to each other.
To begin formatting an unformatted floor, select an unformatted floor from the list of floors on the Building Floor
Manager main dialog and then press the Format Floor button:
Figure 4.6: Building Floor Manager main dialog
Pressing the Format Floor button opens the Floor Formatting Wizard:
Figure 4.7: Initial screen of the Floor Formatting Wizard
LANPlanner Solo
67
Creating Site-Specific Information - Modeling Buildings and Facilities
The Floor Formatting Wizard supports the following methods as a starting point for entering information about a
floor:
•
Leave Floor Empty - This option allows you to defer formatting this floor until a later time.
•
Sketch Floor Plan — Use this option to freehand sketch the layout of a building floor plan. LANPlanner Solo
supports a variety of drawing tools that make this process easy. The drawing tools allow you to do such things
as make straight lines, make perpendicular lines, make exact end point connections of lines, and draw rooms.
The freehand sketch method is most often used when another form of an electronic blueprint is not available.
When drawing a line, you first specify its height and material type. LANPlanner Solo automatically takes care of
building the three dimensional building database model as you sketch.
•
Make Copy of Floor — Make a copy of a floor that you have previously formatted in the current project
workspace by using the Format Floor Wizard.
•
Import Non Formatted File — Allows you to import an unformatted file such as an AutoCAD architect file,
raster bitmap image, etc., that you can use to trace the walls of the floor plan. After importing an unformatted
raster image file, you use the same easy drawing tools of the Sketch Floor Plan mode to specify where walls
exist, their height, and what type of material they are made of. LANPlanner Solo automatically takes care of
building the three dimensional building database model as you sketch. If you import an unformatted AutoCAD
file, you will be given the opportunity to select the individual drawing entities (one by one, or by layer) and
process them all at once as a particular type of construction material.
•
Import Preformatted File — This option allows you to import a floor from a previously formatted
LANPlanner Solo file. This can be useful if you share the work of formatting floors with other team members.
Each team member can format a separate floor, then the floors may later be combined into a single drawing
using this option.
The Floor Formatting Wizard is a Windows style guide that includes several navigation buttons allowing you to
change from one dialog to the next. On each dialog you will be asked to review information or perform an action.
Once you have stepped through each dialog in the wizard, you will have the option to press the Finish button on
the wizard to save your work. If at any time you wish to abort the wizard, press the Cancel button (This will abort
any formatting you have done to the floor, and your work will be lost). Press the Next button on the wizard to
continue to the next step. Use the Back button to repeat previous steps.
Detailed instructions on formatting floors by various methods are described in the following sections.
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LANPlanner Solo
Modeling a Building
Leave Floor Empty
Selecting the Leave Floor Empty option on the first dialog of the Floor Formatting Wizard is the same as
pressing the Cancel button on the Floor Formatting Wizard dialog. Choose this option if you decide that you do
not wish to format this floor at this time. Pressing the Next button will present you with a screen stating that you
have chosen to leave the selected floor empty. Simply press the Finish button on the Floor Formatting Wizard
to return to the main dialog of the Building Floor Manager.
Sketch Floor Plan
Selecting the Sketch Floor Plan option on the first dialog of the Floor Formatting Wizard will allow you to
sketch the layout of a building floor plan. There are six steps to sketching a floor plan:
Step 1: Select Sketch Floor Plan
•
After selecting the Sketch Floor Plan option on the first dialog of the Floor Formatting Wizard, press the
Next button to continue to step two of the wizard.
Step 2: Set Slab-to-Slab Height
•
Step two of sketching a floor plan is shown below. Step two allows you to enter the desired height for the
floor. You may do so in either feet or meters.
Figure 4.8: Floor Formatting Wizard: Setting the slab-to-slab height
LANPlanner Solo
69
Creating Site-Specific Information - Modeling Buildings and Facilities
Step 3: Sketch Floor
•
Step three of sketching a floor plan is shown below:
Figure 4.9: Floor Formatting Wizard: Sketch floor
•
Press the Sketch Floor button to begin sketching the floor plan. Pressing the Sketch Floor button will
cause you to temporarily leave the Floor Formatting Wizard, but once you are finished sketching the floor
plan you will automatically be taken back to where you left off in the Floor Formatting Wizard.
•
Press Sketch Floor to display the Draw Partition dialog shown below:
Figure 4.10: Draw Partition Dialog
•
70
The Draw Partition dialog box enables you to add new partitions to the drawing. This is used most
frequently when tracing over an imported raster image of a blueprint, but may also be used to sketch a
LANPlanner Solo
Modeling a Building
floor plan from scratch. If you are using this manual as a step-by-step follow along guide, see “Drawing
Partitions” on page 86 now for additional information on drawing partitions, then return to this section to
continue with sketching a floor plan using the Floor Formatting Wizard.
Step 4: Scale Floor
•
Step four requires that you scale the floor you sketched in step three. It is important for LANPlanner Solo
to know the relational distance of one wall to another so that it can accurately predict system performance.
Press the Scale Floor button on the wizard dialog shown in Figure 4.11 to begin scaling the drawing.
Figure 4.11: Floor Formatting Wizard: Scale Drawing
LANPlanner Solo
•
You will be prompted to select two locations by left clicking your mouse at two different points in the
drawing. After selecting two points, you will then be prompted to enter the physical real world distance
between those two points.
•
The check box option to Lock cursor to line endpoints during scale enables you to accurately scale the
drawing based on the distance from the end point of one wall to the end point of another wall. Using this
option will cause your mouse cursor to exactly lock onto the end of wall, even if you do not click precisely
on an end point. “Editing Partitions and RF Obstructions” on page 82 provides information on scaling an
already assembled final drawing without using the Building Floor Manager.
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Creating Site-Specific Information - Modeling Buildings and Facilities
Step 5: Set Floor Alignment Point
•
Step five requires that you set an alignment point for the floor. The alignment point you choose will
become the origin for the x-y plane represented by a top-down view of the drawing. The Building Floor
Manager uses the origin of the x-y plane to align building floors vertically with the Assemble Floors
command. Therefore, it is important that you choose a floor alignment point that is common among all
floors that you wish to align. You can also choose a common point on an elevator shaft or stairwell. For
example, choosing the bottom left corner of every floor will often work well for rectangular shaped floors.
•
To set the floor alignment point, press the Set Alignment Point button shown below and then click the
point on the drawing that you wish to become the origin.
Figure 4.12: Floor Formatting Wizard: Set Floor Alignment Point
•
72
Similar to the Scale Floor command, you may check the option to Lock cursor to line endpoints during
align before setting the floor alignment point. This option will allow you to set the origin at the end point of
a line with exact mouse click precision.
LANPlanner Solo
Modeling a Building
Step 6: Verify Formatting Steps
•
This final step, shown below, highlights the formatting steps that you have performed. Should you wish to
redo any of the steps, use the Back button to go back to a previous step. Otherwise, press the Finish button
to complete the formatting of the current floor and return to the Building Floor Manager.
Figure 4.13: Floor Formatting Wizard: Verify Formatting Steps
Making a Copy of a Floor
Select the Make Copy of Floor option on the first dialog of the Floor Formatting Wizard to create an exact copy
of an already formatted floor. Select the floor you wish to copy from in the pull down box to the right of the
Make a Copy option. Click the Next button to perform the copy.
Figure 4.14: Making a copy of a floor
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Creating Site-Specific Information - Modeling Buildings and Facilities
Importing an Unformatted File
Select the Import a Non Formatted file option on the first dialog of the Floor Formatting Wizard to begin the
process of importing an unformatted drawing file.
Figure 4.15: Importing a Non-Formatted file
Follow the six steps below to properly format an unformatted drawing file:
Step 1: Choose File Import Location
•
As shown in Figure 4.15, choosing to import an unformatted floor will display an additional option where
you must select the location of the unformatted file you wish to import. Use the Browse button to locate
your unformatted file on disk, then press Next to proceed to step two. It is a good idea to store your
unformatted files in the unformatted folder of your project workspace. This is the default folder opened
when clicking the Browse button. Files will also be copied there when opened from another location.
Step 2: Set Slab-to-Slab Height
•
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This follows the same process as “Set Slab-to-Slab Height” on page 69.
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Modeling a Building
Step 3: Format the Floor
•
This step, shown below, is used to process the unformatted floor.
Figure 4.16: Floor Formatting Wizard: Format Floor
•
Press the Format Floor button to temporarily leave the Floor Formatting Wizard so that you may
process the unformatted file. Pressing the Format Floor button will give you different formatting options
based on the type of unformatted input file you chose in step one. If you chose to import a LANPlanner
Solo recognized CAD file format, you will be taken to the Process Unformatted Information dialog shown
in Figure 4.23. If you chose to import a raster file in step one (such as a bitmap or jpeg), you will be
taken to the Draw Partition dialog shown below:
Figure 4.17: Draw Partition Dialog
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•
For more information on processing a CAD drawing file with the Process Unformatted dialog, see “Format
CAD Drawing” on page 82.
•
For more information on processing a raster image with the Draw Partition dialog, see “Drawing
Partitions” on page 86.
•
Once you have completed formatting your drawing file, press the Next button to continue to step four.
Step 4: Scale the Drawing
•
Step four requires that you scale the floor you have sketched. It is important for LANPlanner Solo to know
the relational distance of one wall to another so that it can accurately predict system performance. Press the
Scale Floor button on the wizard dialog shown in Figure 4.18 to begin scaling the drawing. You will be
prompted to select two locations by left clicking your mouse at two different points in the drawing. After
selecting two points, you will then be prompted to enter a the physical real world distance between those
two points.
•
You may choose to check the option to Lock cursor to line end points during scale on Figure 4.18 to enable
you to accurately scale the drawing based on the distance from the end point of one wall to the end point
of another wall. “Scale Drawing” on page 96 provides additional information on scaling a final assembled
drawing without using the Building Floor Manager.
NOTE
You cannot lock you cursor to elements in an image, only objects in the drawing such as lines or partitions.
Figure 4.18: Floor Formatting Wizard: Scale Drawing
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Step 5: Set Floor Alignment Point
•
Step five requires that you set an alignment point for the floor. The alignment point you choose will
become the origin for the x-y plane represented by a top-down view of the drawing. The Building Floor
Manager uses the origin of the x-y plane to align building floors vertically with the Assemble Floors
command. Therefore, it is important that you choose a floor alignment point that is common among all
floors that you wish to align. For example, choosing the bottom left corner of every floor will often work
well for rectangular shaped floors.
•
To set the floor alignment point, press the Set Alignment Point button shown in Figure 4.19 and then click
the point on the drawing that you wish to become the origin.
•
Similar to the Scale Floor command, select Lock cursor to line endpoints during align before setting the
floor alignment point. This option will allow you to set the origin at the end point of a line with precision.
Figure 4.19: Floor Formatting Wizard: Set Floor Alignment Point
Step 6: Verify Formatting Steps
•
LANPlanner Solo
Step six shows you the formatting steps that you have performed (see Figure 4.13). Should you wish to
redo any of the steps, use the Back button to go back to a previous step. Otherwise, press the Finish button
to complete the formatting of the current floor and return to the Building Floor Manager.
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Import Preformatted File
Select the Import an Already Formatted file option on the first dialog of the Floor Formatting Wizard to import
a floor from a file that has already been formatted with LANPlanner Solo:
Figure 4.20: Importing an Already Formatted file
Choosing to import a preformatted floor will display an additional option where you must select the location of
the unformatted file you wish to import. Use the Browse button to locate your unformatted file on disk, then press
Next to proceed to step two.
If the file you choose to import has more than one floor, you will be prompted to select which floor number you
would like to import from the already formatted file.
Importing from an already formatted file gives you the ability to use a team of multiple people to format the floors
of a building, then quickly assemble the multiple floors into one single drawing.
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Editing Floors in an Existing Building Model
Editing a floor in the Building Floor Manager allows you to make modifications to a floor that you have already
formatted with the Format Floor Wizard. The Edit Floor option will only be available for floors that have already
been formatted. To begin editing a floor, choose an already formatted floor from the list of floors on the Building
Floor Manager’s main dialog and then press the Edit Floor button:
Figure 4.21: Building Floor Manager main dialog
Select the Edit Floor button to modify an already formatted floor using the Floor Formatting Wizard. Selecting an
empty floor causes the Format Floor button to display. See “Formatting Floors Using the Floor Formatting
Wizard” on page 67 for further details.
The following options are available from the Building Floor Manager dialog (see Figure 4.22):
LANPlanner Solo
•
Rescale Floor
•
Reset Floor Alignment Point
•
Draw New Partitions
•
Convert Partition Type
•
Process Unformatted Layers
•
Clear Floor
•
Edit Floor Name
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Figure 4.22: Edit Floor dialog
Rescale Floor
The Rescale Floor button allows you to set the scale for the floor you have chosen to edit from the Building Floor
Manager’s main dialog. The scaling command will resize all entities within the floor. You will be prompted to
select two points in the drawing (by clicking with the mouse) and then you will be prompted to enter the actual
physical real world distance between the two locations. The appropriate scaling will be applied so that the distance
between the points within the drawing matches the value you enter.
See “Snap to Endpoint” on page 81 for information on how to select your scaling points more accurately.
Reset Floor Alignment Point
The Reset Floor Alignment Point button allows you to choose the location that you wish to be the origin of the
x-y plane of the top down perspective of the floor. The point you choose to be the origin is also the point within
the drawing that will be used to align this floor with floors above and below.
See “Snap to Endpoint” on page 81 for information on making your origin point selection more accurately.
Draw New Partitions
The Draw New Partitions button allows you to draw new walls to the floor you have chosen to edit. Press the
Draw New Partitions button to be taken to the Draw Partition dialog detailed in section “Drawing Partitions” on
page 86. With the Draw Partition dialog, you draw individual partitions, a square room, and delete partitions.
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Convert Partition Type
The Convert Partition Type button lets you convert individual wall entities from one type of partition to another.
Select the type of partition you want to convert to using the pull down menu on the Change Partition Type
dialog box (shown in Figure 4.34), then press the Select button. Any entities you select with your left mouse
button at this point will be converted into the new partition type you selected when you right click your mouse.
Use the ESC key to return to the Convert Partition Type dialog.
See “Change Partition” on page 89 for more information on converting partition types.
Process Unformatted Layers
The Process Unformatted Layers button lets you return to the Format CAD Drawing dialog box that the Floor
Formatting Wizard uses to allow you to process the layers of a CAD file that contains unformatted entities.
It is unlikely that you will ever need to return to this dialog once a floor has already been formatted, but the
functionality is provided here just in case.
NOTE
Layers will not be available for formatting if you choose to delete the remaining unformatted entities after
formatting the CAD drawing
See “Format CAD Drawing” on page 82 for more information on formatting a CAD file using the Process
Unformatted Information dialog.
Clear Floor
The Clear Floor button allows you to empty the contents of a floor and return the floor to the unformatted state.
CAUTION
There is no way to undo the Clear Floor option, so only use it if you intend to reformat a floor using the Format
Floor Wizard.
Snap to Endpoint
The “Snap to endpoint when scaling floor or setting floor alignment point” option will allow you to more
precisely click exactly on the end point of a line in the drawing. Check this option to able the automatic snap of
the mouse cursor to the end points of lines.
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Editing Partitions and RF Obstructions
The Format Building menu, shown in Figure 2.9 and discussed in “Modeling a Building” on page 63, contains
menu commands for creating a drawing that LANPlanner Solo’s predictive engine can use for system performance
analysis. This section provides more details about the following commands on the Format Building menu that
affect Partitions and RF Obstructions:
•
Format CAD Drawing
•
Draw Partition
•
Change Partition
•
Current Partition Categories
•
Edit Partition Library
•
Scale Drawing
Format CAD Drawing
The Format Building > Format CAD Drawing dialog box can be used to process an AutoCAD file (single floor)
for use by LANPlanner Solo’s predictive engine without using the Building Floor Manager. If you wish to
assemble a floor with other floors (stack the floors), then it will be necessary to use the Building Floor Manager to
perform the assembly. The Format CAD Drawing dialog is shown below:
Figure 4.23: The Format CAD Drawing dialog box
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To format an AutoCAD file without using the Building Floor Manager:
Select File > Open Drawing to open the AutoCAD file.
Next, choose the Format Building > Format CAD Drawing menu command to launch the dialog box. This
dialog allows you to manually format the layers in an AutoCAD file.
When the Format CAD Drawing command is initiated, some preparatory work will be performed on the open
AutoCAD file. In the course of this operation, LANPlanner Solo will search through the entire drawing file and
attempt to separate all composite entities (for example, polylines, blocks, and so on) into individually selectable
graphical entities (such as lines). Any arcs in the drawing will be automatically converted into a series of straight
lines that LANPlanner Solo can use in predictions. It will also remove all references to unused blocks and empty
drawing layers.
During the course of this procedure, certain drawing entities may seem to disappear. They have not been deleted
from the drawing file, but may have moved to a hidden or invisible drawing layer as a result of having been
separated from the block or composite entity they were members of. Note also that door arcs present on any layer
with the word “door” in it will be automatically converted to doors. This process may require several minutes,
depending on the size of your drawing file.
The main list box in this dialog displays all the layers that are present in the AutoCAD file. Formatting an
AutoCAD file involves going through the list of layers and deciding which ones have significant RF obstructions
and need to be kept and which ones are not significant and can be safely removed. Double clicking on a layer
causes the other unformatted layers to be hidden so you can see what is on that layer.
By default, any layers that you have already formatted continue to be displayed so you can see how the selected
layer fits in with the rest of the drawing. After double-clicking a layer to hide everything else, it is important to
note that formatted layers will remain visible, but you can choose to hide them by clicking the icon in Figure 4.24.
Figure 4.24: Format CAD Drawing: Hide formatted partitions icon
If you decide that the layer does not contain any useful data (e.g. the layer has nothing on it but AutoCAD
dimensions, office furniture, or some other item that does not affect RF signals) you can click the button shown in
Figure 4.25 to remove all the entities on that layer.
Figure 4.25: Format CAD Drawing: Delete all entities on a particular layer
If the layer does contain significant RF attenuating structures such as walls, doors, glass, tall and heavy objects,
then you need to convert them to one of your current partition categories. There are two ways to do this. The
easiest is to right click on the layer you wish to convert. This displays the popup menu similar to the one seen in
Figure 4.26. Choose one of the Convert to menu options to convert the entities in that layer to the given partition
type.
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Figure 4.26: Format CAD Drawing: Right click popup menu for processing layer selections
The other method is to select the layer you wish to convert and then use the controls in the Automatic Layer
Processing group to convert the layer (Figure 4.27). You can specify the height of the partition when formatted
(to make cubicles, for example) and the partition type the layer will become. Pressing the Process Selection
button will covert the layer.
Figure 4.27: Format CAD Drawing: Automatic Layer Processing group
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As the layers are formatted, they will disappear from the main list box. If you format a layer and it does not
disappear from the list box then there are some entities left on that layer that are not lines and can not be
processed. You can use the icon shown in Figure 4.24 to hide and show the formatted building data. This is useful
when you cannot distinguish the difference between formatted information and some lines on an unformatted
layer.
Figure 4.28 below shows further useful icons on the Format CAD Drawing dialog:
Make multiple
layers visible
Set drawing
scale
Set origin
Figure 4.28: Format CAD Drawing: Scaling, Origin, and Layers Visible icons
The Add New Partitions button displays a dialog that allows you to draw completely new walls (see “Drawing
Partitions” on page 86). Convert Individual Entities displays a dialog that allows you to select individual lines in
the AutoCAD file and convert them to partitions that can be used by LANPlanner Solo’s predictive engine (see
“Change Partition” on page 89). This is useful when there is more than one wall type in a given layer.
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Drawing Partitions
The primary way of creating partitions is by using the Draw Partition dialog shown below. The Draw Partition
dialog may be activated by choosing the Format Building > Draw Partition menu command.
Figure 4.29: Draw Partition Dialog
•
View/Edit Partitions - Provides access to the Set Propagation Parameters dialog box (see “Setting
Propagation Model Parameters” on page 183). Use the View/Edit Partitions button to examine or change
partition attenuation factors.
•
Draw Partition - This button allows you to add partitions. To do this, select the desired partition type from
the pull-down list in the dialog box and then click the Draw Partition button. The pull-down list displays the
eight partition types you choose within Format Building > Current Partition Categories (see “Current
Partition Categories” on page 90).
LANPlanner Solo allows you to place partitions by clicking in the drawing with the mouse cursor. Left click to
start drawing a partition, and left click in another location to complete the partition. If you continue to left
click in successive locations, a continuous series of walls will be drawn. Right click (or press the ESC key) to
begin an unconnected string of partitions elsewhere in the building. Right click twice (or press ESC twice) to
return to the Draw Partition dialog box.
Figure 4.30: Drawing partitions
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•
Draw Room - Allows you to draw rectilinear rooms with square corners. To do this, select the Draw Room
button, then click in the drawing to indicate one corner of the room, then click again to indicate the opposite
corner.
•
Delete Partitions - This button provides a way to undo partitions you have drawn. Each time you click Delete
Partitions, a previously drawn partition is deleted, starting with the most recently drawn partitions.
•
Snap To Endpoints - This checkbox helps you to draw partitions that join properly with no gaps between
walls. When the Snap To Endpoints checkbox is selected, and you are drawing partitions, a colored box
highlights the end of previously drawn lines when your cursor is nearby (see Figure 4.31, below). If you click
your mouse while the end of a nearby line is highlighted, the software will behave as though you had in fact
clicked exactly on the end of the nearby line, thereby creating perfectly joined partitions with no gap.
Figure 4.31: Snap to endpoint
•
Raster Image Fading - When using imported raster images, you must use the partition drawing tool to ‘trace’
over the image where the partitions appear. You can make raster images dimmer, and therefore make it easier
to see what you have drawn, by using the Raster Image Fading slider bar.
You can change the viewing perspective, or zoom or pan to look at a different part of the drawing by using the
buttons on the bottom left of the Draw Partition dialog box (see Figure 4.32).
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Top
View
Pan
Zoom
SW Isometric View
Figure 4.32: Viewing perspective buttons
When finished drawing new partitions, click Done to exit the Draw Partition dialog.
Drawing Tips
The main LANPlanner Solo window has quick access buttons at the bottom of the screen that can aid the process
of drawing. The figure below shows the ORTHO and OSNAP buttons at the bottom right of the main program
screen.
Figure 4.33: GUI command line
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The quick access buttons, when left-clicked, toggle the Orthogonal cursor mode and Object Snap on and off. A
given mode is on if the command is displayed in bold text. Otherwise, it is off. Settings for each command may be
accessed by right clicking on the button.
Object snap is a useful tool for adding partitions. To accurately connect drawing objects such as walls, the cursor
movement may not be steady enough. To assist users, object snap provides several commands that can manually
or automatically connect drawing objects to other objects at end points, quadrants of circles, perpendicular
intersections, and many other points of interest. To configure automatic object snap, click on the OSNAP button
on the status bar and configure using the subsequent dialog box. Object Snap can be toggled on and off by
clicking the OSNAP button on the status bar.
Since most partitions are either vertical or horizontal on the screen, you need to be able to put the software in a
mode that forces the cursor to draw partitions vertically or horizontally. LANPlanner Solo provides a command
that handles this task. Clicking the word ORTHO on the status bar toggles ORTHO mode. ORTHO mode forces
the cursor to place objects in a drawing either horizontally or vertically.
Change Partition
The Format Building > Change Partition Type command is used to covert existing formatted partitions into a
new partition type. This command can also be used to change already formatted partitions into a different type of
partition.
Figure 4.34: Change Partition Type dialog
This dialog lets you pick a new partition type to assign to one or many partitions on the drawing.
After selecting this menu command, you will be prompted to select the new partition type and the floor upon
which the changed partitions should appear. Keep in mind that all of the selected objects will be formatted to one
of the choices available in this dialog box and all of the objects will be placed on the floor specified in the combo
box at the top of the dialog box. After clicking Select you have the option of selecting one or many objects by
clicking them with the cursor. Alternatively, you can use more drawing aids such as windows or fences to select
several objects. To exit the selection mode and return to the Change Partition Type dialog, press the ESC key.
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Current Partition Categories
LANPlanner Solo ships with default names for partitions and default colors for partition objects. Selecting Format
Building > Current Partition Categories allows you to select the eight partitions used for the current drawing.
NOTE
You were already given the opportunity to select your eight partitions when creating a the project workspace with
the Project Workspace Creation Wizard. Changing the partitions here may change the partitions assigned to
Category 1, for example, from drywall to something else. However, you can always change it back.
The Current Partition Categories dialog is shown below. This dialog lets you select the current eight partitions
used in the drawing.
Figure 4.35: Current Partition Categories dialog
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To change a partition category, select a new partition from the drop down list:
Figure 4.36: Changing a partition category
To change the default color for that category, click on the color square next to a partition category:
Figure 4.37: Selecting a partition color
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Editing the Partition Library
Although LANPlanner Solo comes with default names for partitions and default colors for partition objects, they
are configurable to fit your specific needs. Selecting Format Building > Edit Partition Library opens the dialog
box below, which lets you create and edit partition types.
Figure 4.38: Partition Library dialog
The Partition Library dialog assists you in customizing the color, attenuation values, and name of each type of
partition. This dialog also allows you to determine the location of your global partition library file. You can use
the text box at the top of the dialog or the Browse button to enter a directory where the software should store the
partition information. This can be used to share one copy of the partition library with several installations of
LANPlanner Solo.
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Selecting the “+” sign next to a partition expands its list of frequencies and attenuation values:
Figure 4.39: Partition Library details
The Partition Library panel includes the following options:
•
Global Library Directory - You can use the text box at the top of the dialog box or the Browse button to
enter a directory for storing the partition information. This can be used to share one copy of the partition
library with several installations of LANPlanner Solo, for example, on a centralized file server.
•
Add - Allows you to add a new partition category (see Figure 4.40, below):
NOTE
Changes made in the Partition Library only modifies the global library, not the partitions in the current
drawing. If you want to update partitions in the current drawing, you can change the global library but you
have to open Format Building > Current Partition Categories and select one from the global library (see
“Current Partition Categories” on page 90).
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Figure 4.40: Adding a new partition category
•
94
Remove - Allows you to delete the selected partition category. Selecting this option opens a prompt dialog
confirm the partition category delete.
LANPlanner Solo
Editing Partitions and RF Obstructions
•
Edit - You can change the value for a frequency, add a new frequency, rename the partition category, or
change the attenuation value for a frequency. The attenuation value is the reduction in signal strength (dB) for
the specified frequency due to the partition material.
Figure 4.41: Editing a Partition Category
•
LANPlanner Solo
Import - There may be instances when you need to import partition category information from another
partition library (.xml file) or a propagation parameter file (.xpt file). Selecting the import button from the
Partition Library dialog opens the Partition Import Filter (Figure 4.42), which provides you the option to
chose the source file by using the Browse button. You can import all the partition information, or import only
specific ones by selecting the Remove button to filter out unwanted partitions.
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Creating Site-Specific Information - Modeling Buildings and Facilities
Figure 4.42: Partition Import Filter
Scale Drawing
Scaling the drawing is very important because the drawing must represent the actual real life size of the partitions
to ensure that predictions accurately model the real world. Scaling the drawing normally occurs in the Building
Floor Manager via the Format Floor Wizard or Edit Floor dialog, but it may also be performed from the Format
Building > Scale Drawing command.
If you choose to scale the drawing from the Format Building menu, you have the additional functionality of
choosing whether to scale the entire drawing, the current floor, or individual drawing entities. Your choice is made
in the Scale Drawing dialog box below:
Figure 4.43: The Scale Drawing dialog box
After you click OK, the software will prompt you to select two points and then you will be prompted to enter the
physical real world distance between those points. Once the points have been selected and a distance has been
entered, the software will automatically scale the corresponding objects (Individual, Current Floor, Entire
Drawing) and refresh the drawing display.
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A Completed Site-Specific Model - Viewing Buildings in 2D and 3D
A Completed Site-Specific Model - Viewing Buildings in 2D
and 3D
This section presents examples of final building models processed through LANPlanner Solo’s Format Building
functions. In the examples below, you can match the partition colors in the building diagram to the Partition
Categories in the Legend Data window to determine the material type. The unique RF attenuation properties of
these materials will be used by the prediction engine to simulate wireless signal coverage during Network Design
(Chapter 5) and Network Verification (Chapter 6).
Toggling Between Floor Views
By default, the LANPlanner Solo displays the first floor of the building model in 2D.
Figure 4.44: Completed Site-Specific Model
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If your building or facility contains multiple floors, you can switch the view to a different floor by using several
different methods:
•
Hotkeys (F5 up one floor, F4 down one floor)
•
Through the View menu from the LANPlanner Solo toolbar:
Figure 4.45: Switching floors through the View menu
•
By explicitly using the Goto Floor hotkey (F9), which opens the Goto Floor dialog in Figure 4.46, below.
•
By selecting View > Goto Floor, which also opens the Goto Floor dialog in Figure 4.46, below:
Figure 4.46: Selecting which floor to view
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A Completed Site-Specific Model - Viewing Buildings in 2D and 3D
•
You can also toggle floor selection by using the Current Floor link in the Legend Data window:
Figure 4.47: Selecting floors from the Legend Data window
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Viewing In 3D
The best way to get a full perspective of RF obstructions is to view your building model in 3D.
LANPlanner Solo’s virtual environment models are inherently three dimensional. By default, the ceiling heights
you specify are used to determine the vertical height on a given floor. If a partition resides on floor two of a
building, the ceiling height of floor two is used to determine the height of the partition, unless otherwise specified
by you while drawing the partition. This is done automatically for you during the formatting process. Thus, when
you have finished formatting a drawing using Format Building, even though the formatting process was strictly
two dimensional, the final drawing is a true 3D site-specific model.
You can see the three-dimensional building structure by selecting View > 3D Views > SW Isometric. To return
to the 2D view, select View > 3D Views > Top. A building that has been fully formatted and displayed in SW
Isometric View with View > Shade > Flat Shaded, Edges On enabled is shown below:
Figure 4.48: 3D SW Isometric view
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You can also view your building model in 2D wireframe mode by selecting View > Shade > 2D Wireframe. 2D
wireframe makes walls transparent and only displays their outline. This feature is optimal if you want to see
through a wall. 2D wireframe mode also causes the drawing to renders faster, as opposed to using View > Shade
> Flat Shaded, Edges On. 2D wireframe mode is also the only view in which lineweight is displayed.
Figure 4.49: 2D Wireframe view
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Selecting View > Shade > Hidden makes “hidden lines” invisible while displaying a drawing in 3D. “Hidden
lines” refer to lines in a drawing that would not be visible if the objects in the 3D drawing were visualized in
real-life, true 3D.
Figure 4.50: Hidden lines invisible
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5
Network Design
Introduction
After modeling your building or campus environment using the tools under LANPlanner Solo’s Format Building
menu, you are ready to begin wireless network design. The Network Design menu provides the functionality for
placing equipment such as access points and sensors in your facility and predicting system performance.
NOTE
For LANPlanner Solo users: The Network Design menu remains locked until you open a drawing file received
from Motorola that contains the appropriate key. After completing your facility model using the Building Wizard,
you will be prompted to email the drawing to [email protected] Upon receipt, Motorola will
attach a key to the drawing file which unlocks the Network Design menu, enabling you to place hardware and run
RF predictions.
From within the Network Design menu, you can manually or automatically place access points and sensors, and
then predict wireless network coverage and capacity. You can also position the access point/sensor, choose the air
interface standard and assigned channels, and if you use the Quick Start AP Placement feature, specify the user
locations and data rate requirements. After hardware placement and prediction, you then graphically view the results
in LANPlanner Solo to visualize coverage and when satisfied with the results, generate a complete bill of
materials for costing your design
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Network Design Workflow
The workflow diagram in Figure 5.1 below provides an overview of the primary Network Design steps for
selecting, placing, and configuring access points/sensors.
Select Wireless Hardware
Select APs/Sensors
Select Building Floor
Quick Start Placement
Placement
Place APs/Sensors
View Placed APs/Sensors
Placement
Method
Select Placement Options and
Regions
Specify Data Rate, Capacity, and
Bandwidth Requirements
Run Placement
Coverage/Capacity
Prediction
Select Prediction Mode
Select Prediction Metric
Run Prediction
Visualize Prediction Results
Visualize
Results
Prediction
Placement
Select
Hardware
Wireless Network Design - Placement, Prediction and Visualization
View AP/ Sensor Coverage
Run “What-if” Coverage/Capacity
Scenerios
Generate Bill of Materials
Figure 5.1: Network Design Workflow
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Managing Access Points
Access Point Placement
Selecting Network Design > Place Access Point displays the Place Access Point dialog (shown in Figure 5.3).
This dialog allows you to directly place hardware equipment at a desired location in the drawing by clicking in the
drawing at the location you want to locate the hardware. Another option is to run automatic access point
placement (see “Quick Start Access Point Placement” on page 108).
Figure 5.2: Selecting Access Point placement
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To place hardware in the drawing, double left click the hardware description in the Place Access Point Dialog
and then left click at the location in the drawing where you would like the access point placed. If the access point
you are placing has antenna’s that are attached via cables, then click again in the drawing to specify the location
of the antenna relative to the access point. You may continue to place multiple access points by clicking in the
drawing again.
Figure 5.3: Place Access Point dialog
To place access points on a different floor, use the floor drop-down menu located on the lower-right side of the
Place Access Point dialog to change the floor currently displayed in the drawing.
Figure 5.4: Selecting a floor
To exit manual placement, press the ESC key, which will return you to the Place Access Point dialog.
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The example below shows the result of manual access point placement. Note that when you place the mouse
cursor over an access point or right-click, a tool tip window provides details about the access point hardware:
Figure 5.5: Placed Access Points
Once you are satisfied with access point placement, you are ready to configure the channel and power settings (see
“Running Quick Prediction” on page 151).
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Quick Start Access Point Placement
LANPlanner Solo includes the ability to automatically place and configure access points in the building model to
satisfy your unique coverage and capacity requirements.
Selecting Network Design > Quick Start AP Placement opens the Select Access Point Model dialog:
Figure 5.6: Selecting Quick Start AP Placement
The first step in automatic placement is to choose the access point type. The Place Access Point dialog (see
Figure 5.7) allows you to choose which type of hardware will be used to provide coverage. Select an access point
from the listbox then press Next to continue. Alternately, you can double-click the access point.
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NOTE
All access point air interface standards, configuration, parameters, and prediction results depend on the access
point that you select from this dialog.
Figure 5.7: Place Access Point dialog
Global Auto-Placement Options
After you choose an access point, LANPlanner Solo displays the global configuration options window shown
below. The parameters you select from this dialog apply to all access point requirement regions specified during
the auto-placement process.
Figure 5.8: Global Auto-Placement Options dialog
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Air Interface Standard - The air interface standard is the standard for which LANPlanner Solo will base
placement optimization on. It helps to determines the number of access points placed and the appropriate
configuration for each. If the chosen access point supports more than one standard, LANPlanner Solo uses this
setting to select appropriate power settings, throughput capabilities, and frequency-dependent propagation
parameters.
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•
Maximum Number of Access Points - Change the maximum number of access points in the design to
account for hardware limitations in the deployment. This setting limits the total number of access points placed
by the wizard. If access points already exist in the design, these are taken into account when calculating this
limit.
•
Plan for resiliency - Many deployments require the designer to plan for coverage resiliency by planning
access point power settings well below the maximum threshold. In the event an access point goes down or
becomes unavailable, coverage holes can be minimized by increasing the available power of other access
points.
LANPlanner Solo allows the user to plan access point placements based on 50% of the maximum available
power. The result is that the automatic placement wizard places more access points in the design and
configures power settings at or below 50% of the maximum power allowed.
•
Advanced Parameters - See “Advanced Global Auto-Placement Options” on page 110.
After completing the Global Auto-Placement Options dialog, select Next to open the Specify Client Location
and Requirement Regions dialog (see Figure 5.10).
Advanced Global Auto-Placement Options
You can use the Advanced Global Auto-Placement Options dialog to fine-tune the network performance
requirements that LANPlanner Solo will use during Quick Start AP Placement. The parameters you select from
this dialog apply to all access point requirement regions specified during the auto-placement process.
Figure 5.9: Advanced Global Auto-Placement Options
•
Max. # of clients per AP - This is the maximum number of clients that will connect to each access point.
•
Global maximum client peak data rate - Each client connecting through the access point will have a
upper-limit data rate. Use this setting to specify the peak data rate (applies globally to all clients).
•
Data rate reductions (compounded) - Use these settings to add data rate “padding” for anticipated network
overhead:
— Due to network overhead
— Due to AP loading
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Specifying Requirement Regions
Quick Start AP Placement determines access point locations based on requirement regions that you specify and
draw in the building model. From within the Specify Client Location and Requirement Regions dialog, you can
create multiple regions with each region specifying unique coverage, capacity (data rate), and the number of users.
The Quick Start algorithm satisfies two different metrics:
•
Coverage - Guaranteed data rate (peak data rate) across the requirement region, such that each user in that
region can connect at that data rate. Data rate is mapped directly from the RSSI (signal strength).
•
Capacity - Number of users multiplied by average usage per user (called avg. data rate) such that enough
access points are placed to satisfy the usage requirements.
If you are working with a drawing that has multiple floors, select the floor from the drop-down box. The Quick
Start placement wizard can optimize access point placements for requirement regions defined on multiple floors at
once. The requirement region list shows all regions in the drawing, not just for the current floor.
Figure 5.10: Floor drop-down menu
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New Region Characteristics
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Region Type - This setting determines the shape of new regions. Requirement regions can either be
rectangular or circular.
Figure 5.11: New Region Characteristics
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Peak Data Rate - This setting specifies the data rate required for all points in newly drawn regions. This
setting determines access point placements to ensure sufficient signal coverage.
Figure 5.12: Specifying peak data rate
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•
Specify capacity statistics- Check this box to enable the # of clients and Average Sustained Data Rate
fields, which direct LANPlanner Solo to consider capacity during access point placement. Leaving the box
unchecked directs LANPlanner Solo to place access points based on coverage only.
Figure 5.13: Specifying Capacity
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# of Clients - The number of clients (wireless network users) is also a factor in determining capacity. Enter the
number of users that you expect to be located in this region of your wireless network. LANPlanner Solo takes
the number of users into account when placing and predicting access point performance.
Figure 5.14: Selecting Number of Clients
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•
Average Sustained Data Rate: Defaults - Select user application bandwidth requirements from a drop-down
menu. Web surfing, email (64Kps) activities are considered a light load for the wireless network. If you have
high bandwidth requirements such as file transfers, video, etc., select the average data rate that your user
applications will require. LANPlanner Solo takes data rate into account when placing and predicting access
point performance.
Figure 5.15: Selecting Average Sustained Data Rate
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Average Sustained Data Rate: Other - Use this field to specify the data rate in Kbps, if you require a custom
Average Sustained Data Rate not available in the Defaults pull-down menu.
Figure 5.16: Entering “Other” Data Rate
After entering the New Region Characteristics, create the new region in the building drawing by selecting Create
New Region. Left-click once to begin the region and again to specify the end point. Overlapping regions can be
drawn to completely specify an area. It is best to draw regions slightly inside partitions that serve as a region’s
boundary. The example below shows the new region:
Figure 5.17: New Region (rectangular)
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Once you are finished drawing the new region, the Specify Client Location and Requirement Regions updates
with the new requirements region. Optionally, you can change the requirement region colors by selecting Color
Coding (see “Color Coding” on page 118). Otherwise, click Next.
Figure 5.18: New requirements region
To remove an existing requirements region, select the region in the list and click Remove Selected Region. The
list and drawing display updates to reflect the removed region.
Figure 5.19: Removing a requirements region
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General Options
In addition to configuring and placing new requirement regions, Quick Start AP Placement includes some tools to
view and change existing regions.
Select Color Coding to specify the color scheme used for regions drawn in the design. Region colors are assigned
according the data rate as defined in the color scheme editor. Changing these settings updates the drawing and the
region list in the requirement region window on the fly.
Figure 5.20: Color Coding
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Specifying Exclusion Regions
Sometimes the designer may need to identify areas in a building that equipment cannot be placed in. These areas,
know as exclusion regions, can be specified so that LANPlanner Solo will not place any access points within
them. Exclusion regions override requirement regions such that requirement regions may not be completely
satisfied if exclusion regions prevent access points from being placed to satisfy them. The equipment exclusion
region window is shown below:
Figure 5.21: Identify Equipment Exclusion Regions dialog
To specify an exclusion region, click New Region on the equipment exclusion regions window. Left-click once to
begin the region and again to specify the end point. Overlapping regions can be drawn to completely specify an
area. The example below shows the new exclusion region
Figure 5.22: Exclusion Region (gray) within AP placement region
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To execute Quick Start AP Placement with your settings, select the Done button from the Identify Equipment
Exclusion Regions dialog. LANPlanner Solo’s placement engine then:
•
Chooses optimal locations for the access points to satisfy coverage and capacity requirements
•
Determines optimal channel assignments to maximize SIR (Signal-to-Interference Ratio), and sets the channel
on each access point appropriately
•
Optimizes and configures power levels, effectively reducing the power of access points from the initial power
setting
•
Takes floor-to-floor signal into consideration and also takes into account access points which already exist in
the current drawing
After executing Quick Start AP Placement, LANPlanner Solo updates the drawing window with the placed access
points and signal coverage contour:
Figure 5.23: Quick Start placed AP with coverage contour
Once you are satisfied with access point placement, you are ready to evaluate the design in detail and reconfigure
hardware as needed.
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Edit/Remove Access Point
The Network Design > Edit/Remove Access Point command allows you to edit, remove, move, or copy any
access point in the drawing. Selecting Edit/Remove Access Point opens the dialog shown in Figure 5.25.
Figure 5.24: Edit/Remove Access Point selection
The Edit/Remove Access Point dialog shows a list of every access point in the drawing, a description of the
Access point, its floor location, air interface standard, channel number, and transmit power. You may click in the
Name or Description field to directly edit that field, or you may optionally double click on the access point icon
next to the access point name to bring up an edit window with more options.
Figure 5.25: Edit/Remove Access Point dialog
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The following options are available from the Edit/Remove Access Point dialog:
•
Edit — This button allows you to edit an individual access point’s name, power settings, style, and position.
See “Edit” on page 122.
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Copy — To copy an access point, select it from the list and press the Copy button. You may then click on the
drawing to place a copy of the access point the same way you use the Place Access Point command. Press the
ESC key to return to the Edit/Remove Access Point dialog. You may copy an access point to another floor in
the drawing by first switching to that floor.
•
Move — The Move Access Point button works the same way as the Copy Access Point button, except that the
access point will be moved from its previous location to the new point in the drawing where you click.
•
Remove — To remove an access point or access points, select them from the list and then press the Remove
button. Use caution when removing an access point, as removing an access point can not be undone
•
Change Floors — The Edit/Remove Access Point dialog box provides a floor pull down list that allows you
to change your view to a different floor of the drawing. Use this combo box to see the location of access
points on other floors.
Edit
Choosing the Edit button on the Edit/Remove Access Point dialog in Figure 5.25 opens the Edit Access Point
dialog below:
Figure 5.26: Edit Access Point dialog
Within a local project workspace, all access points must have a unique name. That is, the name entered in the
Name edit box cannot be used for any other access point within the drawing. If you accidentally enter a duplicate
name in the edit box, LANPlanner Solo will display a warning message. The access point name may be up to 20
characters long, but can only consist of alphanumeric characters. New access points are automatically given a
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name in the form of APXX, where XX is an auto-incremented number incremented each time a new access point
is added. Naming restarts at 01 for each new project workspace.
•
View settings for - This drop-down menu controls which air interface standard you are modifying settings for,
such as independently setting different power levels for 802.11a and 802.11g.
•
Configure - This dialog allows you to manually set Air Interface Standards beyond the default access point
settings. With this capability, you can remove intermediate channel frequencies as an added precaution to
minimize channel overlap interferrence.
Figure 5.27: Edit Access Point - Configure dialog
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Access Point Power Tab - The Power tab allows for the configuration of the transmit power and frequency of
an access point. Selecting the Standard pull-down list presents a list of wireless communication standards that
have been defined for the access point. You can configure the channel settings and power level on a per
standard basis. To do so, first select the standard you wish to edit from the Standard pull-down list. Next,
select the Air Interface Channel Set, Active Channel, and Power Level from the other pull-down lists on the
Power tab.
The Active Channel drop-down menu allows you to select the channel for the current air interface standard:
Figure 5.28: Edit Access Point - Active Channel Frequencies
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The Power Level drop-down menu allows you to select the transmit power for the current air interface
standard for the access point:
Figure 5.29: Edit Access Point - Power Levels
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•
Access Point Additional Tab - You can optionally assign the 32-character SSID (Service Set Identifier) and
the MAC (Media Access Control address) for the current access point. Each air interface standard can have its
own SSID and MAC address, which are set for the air interface standard currently selected in the View
settings for drop-down menu.
Figure 5.30: Edit Access Point - Additional settings
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Access Point Summary Tab - Provides a the configuration parameters for the selected access point:
Figure 5.31: Edit Access Point - Summary
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Access Point Hardware Tab - The Access Point Hardware tab enables you to specify a description of the
selected access point. This is only for your reference in distinguishing the transmitter from other transmitters.
The access point description may be up to 128 characters:
Figure 5.32: Edit Access Point - Hardware
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•
Access Point Style Tab - The Access Point Style tab enables you to specify the color, display settings, and
size of the marker used to identify the location of the access point on the drawing. The Display Antenna
System drop down list lets you turn on or off the display of the antenna system attached to the access point, or
show only the components of the antenna system placed on the current floor. By default, all components of the
antenna system are shown.
Figure 5.33: Edit Access Point - Style
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Access Point Position Tab - The Access Point Position section configures the location of the access point. This
enables you to enter the absolute position of the access point on the floor within the building. All coordinates are
given relative to the origin (also called the Floor Alignment Point) of the building coordinate system.
Figure 5.34: Edit Access Point - Position
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•
Access Point Cost Tab - Entering the Unit Cost and the Installation Cost for unique access point types allows
this information to be calculated when you generate the final Bill of Materials (see “Generating a Bill of
Materials” on page 182).
Figure 5.35: Edit Access Point - Cost
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Distribution System Editor
Selecting Distribution System Editor from the Edit Access Point dialog opens the Distributed Antenna System
dialog. A distribution system is the path through which the RF signal travels before being transmitted into the air,
and includes the connectivity medium of your network such as antennas, cables and their routes, and repeater
amplifiers. Use the features in the Distribution Antenna System dialog to manage the distribution system
components in your wireless network design. Most users will leverage this functionality to swap antennas of
access points.
Highlighted component
Description
Figure 5.36: Distributed Antenna System dialog
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Editing a RF Distribution System
There are several ways to define the RF distribution system or antenna system for a given transmitter. When you
create a new access point, you can click the Distribution System Editor button after placing the access point. To
modify existing antenna systems, edit the access point and then click the Distribution System Editor button.
Highlighting a component updates the Component Information box
Adding Distribution System Components
The process of adding a component to a distribution system varies depending on the component selected, but the
basic concept remains the same. In order to add a component into the distribution system, there must be a
component already in the system with an available connection, such as the access point itself, or a cable with
an available output connector. The open connection will be displayed in the distribution system tree as a connector
and will be labeled OPEN. Connections which have been used to connect to another component are replaced in
the display by the other component and thus only open connectors are displayed.
To add components to a distribution system, select an open connector in the transmitter system or on the access
point itself, then click the Add button. This displays the Component to Add dialog box. You may now select the
general type of component you want to add to the antenna system. You can also add components by right-clicking
on the access point or on an open connector and then selecting Add from the resulting pop-up menu.
•
Adding an Antenna - Access Points are pre-configured with a default antenna. To add a specific antenna to
an access point, you must either replace the existing antenna or remove it prior to placing a new one. To add
an antenna, select an open connector or the access point itself and click Add. From the Component to Add
dialog select Antenna, then click Next to open the Select Component from Database to Add dialog.
Alternatively, you can also right-click on an existing component and choose insert to put the component above
the selected component in the system.
Figure 5.37: Component to Add - Antennas
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Select the antenna model from the list and then click OK:
Figure 5.38: Antenna Browser
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The new antenna is added to the Distributed Antenna System list:
Figure 5.39: Antenna added to system list
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Manipulating Components in the Distributed Antenna System Dialog
The appearance and position of components in the antenna component system can be changed in a number of
ways. You can use the buttons along the right side of the antenna system editor dialog box to perform these
functions or you can right-click on components in the design.
•
Removing Components - To remove an antenna system component, simply highlight it in the dialog box and
select the Remove button. You can also right-click on the component to access a pop-up menu and choose
Remove. Removing a component involves removing all the parts connected to it in the direction away from the
access point. This is done automatically. For example, if you remove the cable connecting an antenna to the
access point, the cable and the antenna will be removed, but not the access point.
•
Replacing Component - To replace a component with a different part, select the component to replace in the
dialog box and click the Replace button. The resulting dialog box has a sortable list of components. Highlight
the desired part and click OK. You can also activate this command by right-clicking on a component and
choosing Replace from the resulting pop-up menu. The Replace command enables you to quickly analyze
trade-offs involving changes in system performance based on antenna selection, for example
Figure 5.40: Replacing components
•
Rerouting Cables - Cables can be re-routed via the Reroute button in the antenna system editor. Simply select
the cable, click the Reroute button and trace out the new route for the cable. Any components attached to the
end of the cable will be moved to reflect the new ending position.
•
Component Colors - The color of an individual component can be changed by using the color swatch
drop-down menu in the antenna system editor. Each component will be displayed with the same color as the
access point.
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Figure 5.41: Selecting a component color
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•
Antenna Orientation - To change the orientation of an antenna or to view a larger version of the pattern,
select the antenna and click the Edit button. This opens the Edit Antenna dialog, which contains slider
controls for rotating the antenna:
Figure 5.42: Edit Antenna dialog
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You can also see the actual RF radiation pattern by selecting the View Antenna Pattern button, which opens
the Antenna Pattern dialog. From this dialog you can also change the Frequency Range (IEEE 802.11a/IEEE
802.11.g) and change the number of grid steps in the displayed antenna pattern.
Figure 5.43: Antenna pattern dialog
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•
Inserting Components - To insert a component into the antenna system, such as a cable between the access
point and antenna, right-click on one of the existing components and select Insert. Choose a part to insert
much as you would choose a part to add. The part will be inserted above the part you originally clicked.
NOTE
Only parts with at least two connectors can be inserted (no point antennas).
Figure 5.44: Selecting Insert component
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Select the component you wish to insert from the Insert Antenna System Component list:
Figure 5.45: Selecting a component for insertion
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•
Creating Kits - To create a new component kit out of a portion of your antenna system, such as a cable and
amplifier combination, right click on the topmost component you want to be part of the kit (the part closest to
the access point). Select Export as Kit from the pop-up menu. The Define New Component Kit dialog opens
(see Figure 5.47).
NOTE
A Component Kit is a group of components that can be saved (as a kit) and added to a distribution system just
like you would add another component. Instead of adding one component, the component kit is added instead.
Figure 5.46: Selecting Exporting as Kit
Choose a name for the kit in the Define New Component Kit dialog box. The component you selected and all
those attached to it form a new kit. You can then add the kit to other portions of the designs. Click OK when
you are finished.
Figure 5.47: Defining a component kit for export
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Access Point Colors
Selecting Network Design > Access Point Colors displays the dialog box in Figure 5.49.
Figure 5.48: Selecting Access Point Colors
The Color Override dialog allows you to override the default colors of access points based on selection criteria.
Set your desired color selection criteria by choosing an option from the drop-down menu. The list of items for that
criteria will automatically update in the dialog window and will be displayed in the current color for access points
of that criteria. Double click on a colored item to change its color.
Figure 5.49: Color Override dialog
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Move Access Point
Selecting Network Design > Move Access Point is a quick way to change the location of an access point which
has already been configured. Move Access Point opens the dialog in Figure 5.51.
Figure 5.50: Selecting Move Access Point
From the Move Access Point dialog, select the access point that you wish to move and click Move. Only access
points on the current floor may be moved with this command. To move access points to a different floor, use the
Move command on the Edit/Remove Access Point dialog (see “Edit/Remove Access Point” on page 121).
Your pointer will take on the appearance of the access point that you selected from the list. Move the Access
Point to the desired location and click to place it. You may also move multiple access points simultaneously by
selecting more than one access point before clicking Move. Click Finished after moving access points.
Figure 5.51: Move Access Point dialog
Another way to move access points is through the Access Point Positioning prediction mode (see “Access Point
Positioning” on page 159). This function allows you to visualize the coverage footprint of your access point as you
move it to a new location. This is much faster than continued repositioning and repeated simulation of the new
location and can help you intelligently select a new location for your access point.
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Copy Access Point
The Copy Access Point menu command works very similar to the Move Access Point command. To copy one or
more access points on a floor, select Network Design > Copy Access Point. The Copy Access Point dialog box
opens (Figure 5.53).
Figure 5.52: Selecting Copy Access Point
Select the access point you want to copy from the Copy Access Point dialog and then press the Copy button.
Click in the drawing to specify the location where you want the access point copied to. Continue clicking to make
additional copies, or end the operation by right-clicking or by pressing the ESC key. This returns you to the Copy
Access Point dialog, then click Finished.
Figure 5.53: Copy Access Point dialog
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Managing Sensors
Placing Sensors
Sensors are RF detectors used in a wireless network designs to monitor RF activity in your network environment.
This feature is a key enabler for wireless asset tracking. LANPlanner Solo allows you to place sensors within your
building drawing. To do this, select Network Design > Sensor > Place Sensor:
Figure 5.54: Selecting Place Sensor
To place sensors in the drawing, double left click the hardware description in the Place Network Sensor dialog
and then left click at the location in the drawing where you would like the sensor placed. You may continue to
place multiple sensors by clicking in the drawing again.
Figure 5.55: Place Network Sensor dialog
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During sensor placement, your mouse cursor takes on the appearance of a sensor. Click on the areas in your
drawing where you want sensors placed. When finished, right-click or press the ESC button
Figure 5.56: Placed Sensors
NOTE
Sensors assume a uniform client transmit power across the drawing for sensor predictions. You can set this in the
Mobile Receiver Parameters dialog (see “Setting Mobile Receiver Parameters” on page 187).
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Editing/Removing Sensors
After manual sensor placement, you can edit and remove sensors from your building drawing by selecting
Network Design > Sensor > Edit/Remove Sensor. The Edit/Remove Sensor dialog box opens (Figure 5.58).
Figure 5.57: Selecting Edit/Remove Sensor
Choose the sensor you wish to remove, then select Remove Sensor. Double click on a sensor to edit its name,
location, or sensor height. You can also toggle the sensor display on or off by selecting the Show Network
Sensors on drawing checkbox. Click Done when you are finished.
Figure 5.58: Edit/Remove Sensor dialog
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Moving Sensors
The Move Sensor command is a quick way to change the location of a sensor which has already been placed. To
do this, select Network Design > Sensor > Move Sensor. The Move Sensor dialog box opens (Figure 5.60).
Figure 5.59: Selecting Move Sensor
From the Move Sensor dialog, select the sensor that you wish to move and click Move. Your pointer will take on
the appearance of the sensor that you selected from the list. Move the sensor to the desired location and left-click
to place it. You may also move multiple sensors simultaneously by selecting more than one sensor before clicking
Move. Click Finished after you are done moving sensors.
Figure 5.60: Move Sensor dialog
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Copying Sensors
The Copy Sensors menu command works very similar to the Move Sensor command. To copy one or more sensors
on a floor, select Network Design > Sensor > Copy Sensor. The Copy Sensor dialog box opens (Figure 5.62).
Figure 5.61: Selecting Copy Sensor
Select the sensor you want to copy from the Copy Sensor dialog and then press the Copy button. Click in the
drawing to specify the location you want the sensor copied to. You may also copy multiple sensors simultaneously
by selecting more than one sensor before clicking Copy. Press the ESC key to return to the Copy Sensor dialog,
then click Finished.
Figure 5.62: Copy Sensor dialog
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Running Quick Prediction
LANPlanner Solo employs powerful 3D prediction modes that use a RF Propagation model and site-specific
information to simulate wireless network performance. Each prediction mode is unique and powerful in its own
way. To make use of these predictive modes, you must have already positioned access points and/or sensors in the
drawing. All prediction modes share a common starting point. To Access the Quick Predict dialog, select Network
Performance > Quick Predict. Quick Predict dialog opens (Figure 5.64).
Figure 5.63: Selecting Quick Predict
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Quick Prediction Settings - Access Points
Figure 5.64: Quick Predict dialog (AP tab)
To run Quick Prediction for access points, first choose the floor for which you would like to run a prediction from
the pull down floor combo box. Next, select your desired prediction mode by clicking the button next to that mode
and configuring any additional options from the pull-down or button next to the mode you selected. See the
following sections for more detail:
•
“Channel Planning” on page 153
•
“Instant Point Mode” on page 154
•
“Contour Predictions” on page 156
•
“Access Point Positioning” on page 159
•
“Antenna Reorientation” on page 161
•
“Grid Predictions” on page 163
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•
Use the Other Settings options in section “Other Settings/Link to Predict” on page 166 to configure which air
interface standard will be used in predictions involving multi-standard access points.
Channel Planning
The Channel Planner is an automated system planning facility in Quick Predict that automatically assigns transmit
frequencies (channels) to your transmitters in a layout that minimizes interference between transmitters. Selecting
Next after selecting the Channel Planning mode in the Quick Predict Dialog initiates the Channel Planner dialog,
shown below:
Figure 5.65: Channel Planner dialog
For each access point, the name and active channel are displayed. There is padlock icon beside each access point
name. If the padlock icon is red and `locked' then the Channel Planner will not alter the channel for the relevant
access point during interference analysis. If the padlock icon is green and `unlocked' then the Channel Planner will
assign a channel to the access point that minimizes the total interference in the design.
To change whether an access point is a candidate for having its channel altered, either double-click on the padlock
icon, or single click on the access point in the list and then check the Lock current channel assignments...
checkbox in the Detailed Access Point Information panel. If you decide to lock an access point on a certain
channel, be sure to set that channel yourself using the Current Assigned Channel combo box drop-down menu.
When you are done selecting which access points will be excluded from the channel planning process, and
assigning their channels, press the Start button. The channel planner will automatically assign channels to the
candidate access points. Note that this process may take some time, and becomes more time-consuming as the
number of access points increases.
The result will be an updated list of access points, indicating the new active channel for each access point. Once
you have a satisfactory set of channels, you can use the Save and Exit button to store the channel set assignments
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into the access points in your drawing. If you would like to discard the proposed channel plan without updating
your drawing, click Cancel.
Instant Point Mode
Instant Point Mode allows you to convert your mouse cursor into the mobile user and display system performance
from the mobile user’s perspective.
The Instant Point Mode prediction will predict the mobile user’s RSSI (Received Signal Strength), SIR
(Signal-to-Interference Ratio), and throughput (data rate). Before you begin the Instant Point Mode prediction, you
may select the item you would like displayed as the mouse cursor tool tip from the pull-down menu next to the
Instant Point Mode radio selection.
Figure 5.66: Instant Point Mode tool tip options
Keep in mind that all items mentioned above will be predicted, not just what you set as the tool tip.
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Running Quick Prediction
A screen capture of a sample Instant Point Mode prediction is shown below. Forward Link Composite
Prediction is shown in table format, with each table data point also displayed in bar graph form (Peak Data Rate,
SINR, and RSSI):
Figure 5.67: Instant Point Mode prediction with RSSI selected
You can generate new Instant Point Mode data points interactively by moving your mouse pointer to different
locations in the drawing, simulating a mobile receiver’s location. The prediction values update dynamically, and a
tool tip box displays the RSSI value at the current mouse pointer. A green line connecting the mobile receiver to
an access point indicates that the this particular access point is providing the mobile receiver with the strongest
signal at that receiver’s current location.
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Contour Predictions
The Coverage Contours prediction mode allows you to view boundary regions where a certain level of RSSI
(Received Signal Strength), SIR (Signal-to-Interference Ratio), SNR (Signal-to-Noise Ratio), or throughput (data
rate) occurs. The boundaries are displayed as enclosed contours directly on the drawing.
To configure contours, first choose the Contour Predictions radio button on the Quick Predict dialog
(Figure 5.68). Next, click the Configure Predictions button. The dialog in Figure 5.69 will be displayed.
Figure 5.68: Selecting Contour Predictions
From the Contour Specification Dialog Box you can select an item to predict, such as signal strength (RSSI),
signal-to-interference (SIR), signal-to-noise ratio, or peak data rate. For the item you choose to predict, select the
Configure Contours button. The dialog in Figure 5.70 displays.
Figure 5.69: Contour Specification dialog
NOTE
If the maximum prediction distance is less than where a specified contour boundary actually occurs, it will be
drawn but end prematurely at the maximum prediction distance.
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Running Quick Prediction
Up to three contour boundaries may be predicted for each access point. Enter the value of the innermost contour
to predict, and then enter the spacing between each successive contour. With the selections shown, contours at -50
dBm, -60 dBm, and -70 dBm will be displayed. To choose a color for each contour, click the Configure Colors
button.
Figure 5.70: Contour Information dialog
NOTE
A forward link prediction indicates system performance from the view of the mobile receiver’s perspective,
specifically the signal transmitted from the access point to the mobile user. A reverse link prediction measures the
signal transmitted from the mobile user back to the access point. See “Setting Mobile Receiver Parameters” on
page 187 for further details.
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An example of a Contour Coverage prediction is shown below:
Figure 5.71: Access Point Coverage Contour example
To clear the results of a prediction from the screen, select Network Design > Clear Predictions from the
LANPlanner Solo toolbar
NOTE
Coverage contours are only displayed as shaded when in 2D wireframe shading mode (View > Shade > Flat
Shaded, Edges On).
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Running Quick Prediction
Access Point Positioning
Access Point Positioning Mode assists you in determining the ideal locations for your access points. In this mode,
you use your mouse cursor to move access points in real time and view system performance given the new access
point position.
To use this prediction mode, select Access Point Positioning from the Quick Predict dialog and choose a position
boundary from the drop-down list shown below in Figure 5.72. The position boundary selects the signal strength at
which the contour around the access point will be drawn. This contour will is recalculated as you change the position
of the access point. Click Next to begin positioning access points.
Figure 5.72: Access Point Positioning Mode
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To select an access point to position, left-click it in the drawing. The access point will move as you move the mouse
cursor. To place the access point in a new location, left-click again in the drawing. You can continue to click to
select and click to place, press ESC or right-click to finish. An example of an Access Point Positioning prediction
is shown below:
Figure 5.73: Access Point Positioning Mode prediction
To clear the results of a prediction from the screen, select Network Design > Clear Predictions from the
LANPlanner Solo toolbar.
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Running Quick Prediction
Antenna Reorientation
The Antenna Reorientation mode assists you in determining the ideal orientation for your access point antennas. In
this mode, you use a slider control change the orientation of the antenna while the signal coverage pattern is
updated in real time.
Figure 5.74: Selecting Antenna Reorientation prediction
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After selecting the Antenna Reorientation option in the Quick Predict dialog and clicking Next, left-click to
select an access point in the drawing. The dialog in Figure 5.75 opens. This figure shows the top down view of the
antenna pattern (Azimuth Pattern/XY-Plane) and the front view (Elevation Pattern/XZ-Plane).
Figure 5.75: Antenna Orientation dialog
Use the sliders at the bottom of this dialog to rotate the antenna specific degree amounts in the direction desired.
The signal strength coverage boundary will automatically update on the drawing in real time when you change the
orientation of the antenna. Once you are satisfied with the access point’s orientation, press the ESC key to exit
this prediction mode.
NOTE
Access Point Orientation mode is only beneficial for access points that do not have perfect spherical radiation
patterns such as directional antennas.
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Running Quick Prediction
Grid Predictions
Grid Prediction mode allows you to visualize the grid coverage for a selected set of access points. The result is a
fluctuating region of color and elevation that represents the combined effect of the selected access points within
the identified region. Grid coverage predictions are generally more computationally intensive than other predictive
modes, however, they may also provide significantly more information about the performance of your wireless
network.
After selecting the Grid Predictions option in the Quick Predict dialog, a drop-down menu opens, which allows
you to select the Grid Prediction mode you plan on simulating (Figure 5.76).
Figure 5.76: Grid Predictions options
The Grid Predictions drop-down menu options include:
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Best Server by RSSI - The best (strongest) serving access point judged by predicted received power is
calculated and displayed for each grid bin.
•
Best Server by SNR - The best (strongest) serving access point judged by predicted SNR is calculated and
displayed for each grid bin.
•
Received Signal Strength (RSSI) - Displays the RSSI for only the best server at each grid bin.
•
Signal to Interference Ratio (SIR) - Displays the SIR for only the best server at each grid bin.
•
Data Rate - Displays the data rate at each grid bin. The highest data rate from all transmitters is the displayed
value.
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•
Network Utilization - Displays the percentage of network utilization for the best serving access point at each
grid bin. These AP loads are determined by the throughput regions defined in the drawing (see “Specifying
Requirement Regions” on page 111).
Clicking Next from the Quick Predict dialog opens the Select Access Points dialog (Figure 5.77). Select an
individual access point, or multiple access points by holding down the left mouse button while highlighting the
desired access points. After selecting the access point(s) you wish to include in the prediction, click the OK button.
Figure 5.77: Selecting Access Points for Grid Prediction
A pop-up window displays showing the Grid Prediction progress. You can choose to Pause or Abort the process:
Figure 5.78: Grid Prediction progress
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Running Quick Prediction
The example below shows a completed Grid Prediction. Use the Network Design > Grid Coverage Display
command to configure and view Grid Coverage statistics (“Displaying Grid Coverage Results” on page 173).
Figure 5.79: Grid Prediction result
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Other Settings/Link to Predict
The Other Settings option on the Quick Predict dialog (Figure 5.80) allows you to select which Air Interface
Standard, Floor, Maximum Prediction Distance, and Link to Predict that will be used during prediction.
Figure 5.80: Quick Prediction - Other Settings
•
Air Interface Standard - Contains the air interface standards currently available in the drawing. Only access
points with the supported air interface standard will be available for a prediction. For example, if there are two
access points in drawing and ap1 supports 802.11a/g, while ap2 supports 802.11g, only ap1 will show up in
select access point list if 802.11a is selected.
•
Floor - The floor for which you would like to run a prediction.
•
Maximum Prediction Distance - Determines the maximum distance for which the prediction engine will
predict signal coverage for. For accurate results, this should typically be set beyond the maximum distance of
interest.
•
Link to Predict > Forward - Select to predict performance from the view of the mobile receiver’s
perspective, specifically the signal transmitted from the access point to the mobile user.
•
Link to Predict > Reverse - Select to predict the signal transmitted from the mobile user back to the access
point.
NOTE
See “Setting Mobile Receiver Parameters” on page 187 for further details about forward and reverse link
predictions.
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Running Quick Prediction
Quick Prediction Settings - Sensors
Figure 5.81: Quick Predict dialog (Sensor tab)
To run Quick Prediction for sensors, choose the floor for which you would like to run a prediction from the pull
down floor combo box. Next, select your desired prediction mode by clicking on the radio button next to that
mode and configuring any additional options from the pull down or button next to the mode you selected. See the
following sections for more detail:
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“Contour Predictions - Sensors” on page 168
•
“Instant Point Mode - Sensors” on page 171
•
Use the Other Settings options in section “Other Settings/Link to Predict” on page 166 to configure which air
interface standard will be used in predictions involving multi-standard access points and sensors.
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NOTE
Sensor predictions are directly dependent on the power of the mobile clients. You should set the transmit power of
mobile client devices before running sensor predictions. This is done by setting Portable Receiver TX Power from
within the Mobile Receiver Parameters dialog (see “Setting Mobile Receiver Parameters” on page 187).
Contour Predictions - Sensors
The Coverage Contours prediction mode allows you to view boundary regions where a certain level of RSSI
(Received Signal Strength), SIR (Signal-to-Interference Ratio), SNR (Signal-to-Noise Ratio), or throughput (data
rate) occurs. The boundaries are displayed as enclosed contours directly on the drawing.
To configure contours, first choose the Contour Predictions radio button on the Quick Predict dialog
(Figure 5.82). Next, click the Configure Predictions button. The dialog in Figure 5.83 displays.
Figure 5.82: Selecting Contour Predictions
From the Contour Specification Dialog Box you can select an item to predict, such as RSSI, SIR, SNR, or Peak
Data Rate. For the item you choose to predict, select the Configure Contours button. The dialog in Figure 5.84
opens.
Figure 5.83: Contour Specification dialog
NOTE
Sensor predictions are always reverse link - the power from the mobile client at the point of prediction as seen by
the sensor.
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Running Quick Prediction
Up to three contour boundaries may be predicted for each sensor. Enter the value of the innermost contour to
predict, and then enter the spacing between each successive contour. With the selections shown, contours at -50
dBm, -60 dBm, and -70 dBm will be displayed. To choose a color for each contour, click the Configure Colors
button.
Figure 5.84: Contour Information dialog
Select the sensor(s) from the Select Sensors dialog:
Figure 5.85: Select Sensors dialog
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An example of a Contour Coverage prediction is shown below:
Figure 5.86: Sensor Coverage Contour example
To clear the results of a prediction from the screen, select Network Design > Clear Predictions from the
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Running Quick Prediction
Instant Point Mode - Sensors
Instant Point Mode allows you to convert your mouse cursor into the mobile user and display system performance
from the mobile user’s perspective.
NOTE
A reverse link prediction measures the signal transmitted from the mobile user back to the sensor. Sensor
predictions are always reverse link.
The Instant Point Mode prediction will predict the mobile user’s RSSI (Received Signal Strength), SIR
(Signal-to-Interference Ratio), SNR (Signal-to-Noise Ratio), or throughput (data rate). Before you begin the
Instant Point Mode prediction, you may select the item you would like displayed as the mouse cursor tool tip from
the pull-down menu next to the Instant Point Mode selection.
Figure 5.87: Instant Point Mode tool tip options
Keep in mind that all items mentioned above will be predicted, not just what you set as the tool tip.
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A screen capture of a sample Instant Point Mode prediction is shown below:
Figure 5.88: Instant Point Mode prediction with RSSI selected
If the line connecting the mobile client to a sensor is green, this indicates that the particular sensor is receiving the
strongest signal from the client’s current location.
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Displaying Grid Coverage Results
Displaying Grid Coverage Results
After running a Grid Prediction (“Grid Predictions” on page 163), you can use the Network Design > Grid
Coverage Display command to configure and view Grid Coverage statistics. Selecting Grid Coverage Display
opens the Grid Prediction Data Display dialog (see Figure 5.90).
Figure 5.89: Selecting Grid Coverage Display
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The Grid Prediction Data Display dialog below enables you to control the format and appearance of the
displayed results. Grid coverage results are stored under the RF_Design subdirectory of your current workspace
directory. The results are written to binary data files with a .cpm extension. Each .cpm file fully describes the
results from a single grid coverage prediction and may be individually loaded, unloaded and displayed from any
LANPlanner Solo drawing.
Figure 5.90: Grid Prediction Data Display dialog
The Grid Prediction Data Display dialog contains several user-configurable parameters:
•
Grid Data Loaded in Current Drawing - Lists all grid coverage results that are currently loaded in the
drawing. The label appearing in the list corresponds to the descriptive name given to the prediction in the
dialog box and can be used to distinguish between predicted results.
•
Load Result - Selecting this button opens dialog box enabling you to select a .cpm files from a prior grid
prediction task.
•
Unload Result - Selecting this button removes the currently displayed predicted results from the drawing.
Note that the results can be viewed again by using Load Result.
Each loaded grid coverage result may be independently displayed or hidden. To display a grid coverage file, select
the Averaged radio button. To hide a grid coverage result that is loaded in the current file, choose Hide Grid
radio button. No grid coverage results are displayed unless otherwise specified.
NOTE
All configuration options (Hide Grid/Averaged/Non-Averaged, Additional Settings, etc) are particular to the
current grid data selected in the Grid Prediction Data Display dialog.
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Displaying Grid Coverage Results
The Select Base Station(s) list in the center of the dialog box enables you to individually select one or more
access points to be included in the prediction. If an access point is excluded from the selection set in this window,
its corresponding predicted results will not be incorporated into the Grid Prediction display.
The drop-down list under Grid Display Settings enables you to control how the predicted results are displayed:
Figure 5.91: Data Display Type drop-down list
The Grid Display Settings drop-down menu options include:
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Best Server by RSSI - The best (strongest) serving access point judged by predicted received power is
calculated and displayed for each grid bin.
•
Best Server by SNR - The best (strongest) serving access point judged by predicted SNR is calculated and
displayed for each grid bin.
•
Received Signal Strength (RSSI) - Displays the RSSI for only the best server at each grid bin.
•
Signal to Interference Ratio (SIR) - Displays the SIR for only the best server at each grid bin.
•
Data Rate - Displays the data rate at each grid bin. The highest data rate from all transmitters is the displayed
value.
•
Network Utilization - Displays the percentage of network utilization for the best serving access point at each
grid bin. These AP loads are determined by the throughput regions defined in the drawing (see “Specifying
Requirement Regions” on page 111).
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Displaying the Best Server by RSSI Coverage Grid
When Best Server by RSSI is selected from the Grid Display Settings drop-down list, the strongest serving
access point (on the basis of composite RSSI) displays.
To configure the Best Server by RSSI, select the Additional Settings button in the Grid Prediction Data
Display dialog box. The Configure Best Server Display dialog opens:
Figure 5.92: Configure Best Server Display
The Configure Best Server Display dialog contains the following options:
•
Maximum Peak Height - Range of elevations (from 0 to the value entered) to use for the display. A larger
predicted RSSI will result in displayed elevation at that point being higher. To flatten the 3D grid, set this
value to 0.
•
Offset From Ceiling - Specifies how far above the ceiling of the displayed floor the grid coverage results
should appear to float. By specifying a negative number, the displayed grid will begin to directly overlap the
building structure, which can be useful during report preparation.
•
You may assign unique colors to the access points in order to distinguish one from another. To do so, simply
click on the colored square to the right of the access point name and select a new color from the dialog box
that appears. These colors will then be used to color the displayed grid, identifying the selected access point
that has the strongest RSSI in a given area.
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Displaying Grid Coverage Results
Received Signal Strength Coverage Grid
When Received Signal Strength (RSSI) is selected from the Grid Display Settings drop-down list, the power
displayed is the RSSI from only the best server for each bin.
To configure this display, click the Additional Settings button in the Grid Prediction Data Display dialog box.
The Grid Style dialog opens:
Figure 5.93: Grid Style dialog
The Grid Style dialog contains the following options:
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Maximum Peak Height - Range of elevations (from 0 to the value entered) to use for the display. Larger
predicted RSSI values result in higher displayed elevation at that point. To flatten the 3D grid, set this value to
0.
•
The Offset From Ceiling - Specifies how far above the ceiling of the displayed floor the grid coverage results
should appear to float. By specifying a negative number, the displayed grid will begin to directly overlap the
building structure, which can be useful during report preparation.
•
Display Limits - Restricts the lower limit of the values displayed. For example, by entering –110 dBm into the
dialog box, only those regions with a predicted RSSI of –110 dBm or higher will be displayed. The number of
color categories (from two to twenty-one) and the color tint may be selected.
•
Colors - Opens the Color Scheme Editor dialog box. In this dialog box you can control the mapping of signal
values to a wider range of colors. The colors will be used to indicate the signal power predicted at each point
in the Received Signal Strength (RSSI) coverage grid. Each value range in the color scheme editor can be
independently edited or removed and new ranges can be added. The list of value ranges is automatically sorted
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after one of the value ranges is altered, added or removed. To add a value range, click the Add button. To
remove a value range, select a value range and click the Remove button.
Figure 5.94: Color Scheme Editor
The right hand side of the Color Scheme Editor dialog box contains information that defines the Signal
Value Properties range that has been selected in the list on the left hand side of the dialog box. The Color is
the color that will be used to indicate signals that fall into the selected signal value range. Start is the lowest
signal value that will be included in the selected signal value range. All signals greater than the Start value,
but less than the starting value of the next highest range, will be included in the selected signal value range. To
change the color for a value range, click on the color swatch and choose a new color. Note that changing the
starting value for a signal value range will change how it sorts in the list on the left hand side of the dialog
box.
There is always a default signal value range. The color white is assigned to any signal that falls below the
lowest user-defined signal value range. The default signal value range cannot be removed. You can alter the
default color by selecting the default value range and clicking the color swatch on the right hand side of the
dialog box.
Color schemes are persistent in a drawing, so that subsequent RSSI grid predictions will retain the color
scheme settings of the previous RSSI grid prediction. If no RSSI grid prediction has previously been displayed
in a drawing, the software uses the settings from the last drawing in which a RSSI grid prediction was
performed. If no RSSI grid prediction has been performed by a user in any other drawing, the default color
scheme provided by the software installation will be used.
The Color Scheme Editor presents a spectrum style color setup, progressing from red hot to orange, yellow,
green, blue, indigo and violet, different grades of a strong to weak signal. Another useful color scheme is a
simple ‘green is good, yellow is OK, red is bad’ color scheme. The ‘green is good…’ color scheme is easily
implemented by deleting all but two signal value ranges and the default, making the first value range green and
setting its start point to the lowest good signal value, changing the second value range to yellow and altering
its start point to indicate the lowest OK signal value and finally, changing the default signal value range to red.
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Displaying Grid Coverage Results
Displaying the Data Rate Grid
When Data Rate is selected the grid will display the predicted throughput at a given point. The predicted
throughput will be the highest throughput of all the transmitters that are included in the display of the grid. For
transmitters that are predicting throughput based on RSSI, the RSSI value is calculated as a composite RSSI. This
means that all the antennas attached to a given access point will contribute to the signal strength at any given
point.
To configure the Data Rate, select the Additional Settings button in the Grid Prediction Data Display dialog
box. The Configure Grid Display dialog opens:
Figure 5.95: Configure Grid Display
The Configure Grid Display dialog behaves the same as configuring an RSSI grid except there is no option to
omit bins of that do not have meet a throughput cutoff.
Displaying the Network Utilization View Grid
When Network Utilization is selected, the grid will display the utilization at the location of each grid tile. The
utilization is the percentage of the total aggregate throughput limitation of the access point serving the given
location that is actually being used by network clients.
For example, if APx01 is the access point that is providing the best service to a given location in the drawing, and
APx01 is an 802.11g access point with 54 Mbps total aggregate throughput available, and eleven clients are
connected to APx01 somewhere in the building each at 2 Mbps, then the actual aggregate throughput for APx01 is
22 Mbps or 50% of its rated maximum, so a value of 50% will be plotted at the grid bin in question.
Note that the value plotted at each grid bin of a utilization view depends on the overall status of the AP that
provides the best service to the location of the grid bin. The utilization view is not based on the presence or
absence of particular clients at the particular location of the grid bin. In this respect the Network Utilization plot is
similar to the Best Server by RSSI plot, except that the value plotted is the utilization of the best server, not the
signal power received from the best server.
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When you have selected the Network Utilization grid display option, the Additional Settings button allows you to
select the color values for each range, but the ranges will always be in 10% increments, starting at 100% e.g.
100%, 90%, 80%, etc.
To edit the grid prediction throughput regions, select Network Design > Quick Start AP Planning > Edit
Throughput Regions. This opens the Specifying Requirement Regions dialog (see “Specifying Requirement
Regions” on page 111). These throughput regions directly affect how the Network Utilization view calculates
network utilization.
NOTE
If no throughput regions are defined, the following error message displays: Could not compute AP loads
Histogram
The Histogram button provides a quick view of the distribution of the predicted results relative to the percentage
of floor area occupied by the grid. The percentage of the floor area covered is shown in terms of percentages
along the vertical axis. In addition, the total number of calculated points (or bins) is given in the lower left corner.
Figure 5.96: Histogram window
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Displaying Grid Coverage Results
CDF display
The CDF display button provides a quick view of the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the predicted
results relative to the percentage of floor area. For a given power value, the percentage on the vertical axis is the
percentage of the grid which sees a power greater than or equal to the selected power. In addition, the total
number of calculated points (or bins) is given in the lower left corner.
Figure 5.97: Cumulative Distribution Function window
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Generating a Bill of Materials
The Network Design > Bill of Materials command launches a dialog with a scrollable list box that contains
information about the materials that exist in the current drawing. This list shows the quantity, cost, and what
equipment is required to deploy the wireless network system.
Figure 5.98: Selecting Bill of Materials
An example bill of materials is shown below:
Figure 5.99: Bill of Materials dialog
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Setting Propagation Model Parameters
Setting Propagation Model Parameters
Selecting Network Design > Set Propagation Model Parameters menu command launches the Set Propagation
Parameters dialog shown in Figure 5.101.
Figure 5.100: Selecting Set Propagation Model Parameters dialog
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The Set Propagation Parameters Floors tab below allows you to set floor attenuation factors for use by
LANPlanner Solo’s predictive engine. To change an attenuation loss for the various floor separations, click on the
attenuation value you wish to change. The value will become editable, and you may simply type in a new value.
Each value determines the attenuation applied to a signal as it passes through the specified number of floors.
Figure 5.101: Set Propagation Parameters - Floors tab
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Setting Propagation Model Parameters
The Partitions tab below allows you to modify the attenuation values of the partitions in the drawing. This should
be used to edit the partitions in the current drawing. To modify the attenuation value of a partition, select it from
the list and then press the Edit button. To change the categories in the current drawing or edit the global library,
refer to the associated Format Building commands: Current Partition Categories/Edit Partition Library.
Figure 5.102: Set Propagation Parameters - Partitions tab
•
Load Parameter File - Select to import a pre-existing parameter file. Opens the dialog below:
Figure 5.103: Import Environmental Parameters File dialog
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•
Export Parameter File - Select to export a parameter file for future prediction tasks. Opens the dialog below:
Figure 5.104: Export Environmental Parameters File dialog
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Setting Mobile Receiver Parameters
Setting Mobile Receiver Parameters
Mobile receiver parameter settings directly impact both forward and reverse link predictions. The diagram below
shows a typical example of a forward link prediction. When LANPlanner Solo runs coverage predictions, the
resulting plot displays the power at each location (in the grid or contour) as if a mobile client were located there,
and the power was from the access point as seen by the mobile client at that location.
Figure 5.105: Forward Link Prediction
Below is an example of a reverse link prediction. When LANPlanner Solo runs coverage predictions, the resulting
plot displays the power at each location (in the grid or contour) as if a mobile client were located there, and the
power was seen by the access point from that location
Figure 5.106: Reverse Link Prediction
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Selecting Network Design > Mobile Receiver Parameters allows you to change settings that directly effect
forward and reverse link predictions as described above.
Figure 5.107: Selecting Mobile Receiver Parameters
Mobile Receiver Parameters are configured in the dialog below:
Figure 5.108: Mobile Receiver Parameters dialog
The Mobile Rx Parameters dialog includes the following options:
•
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Available Receiver Channel Sets - This drop down list allows you to select any of the Air Interface Standard,
which are available from access points in the drawing. A mobile receiver can support more than one,
depending on the access points placed in the current drawing.
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Setting Mobile Receiver Parameters
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•
Portable Receiver TX Power - Transmit power of the mobile client. This is similar to the transmit power of
an access point, but this value gets used in reverse link predictions. This is especially important for sensor
predictions, as the client transmit power directly affects the sensor coverage area.
•
Portable Receiver Antenna Gain - Amount of gain added by the antenna of the portable receiver.
•
Body Loss - User-configurable setting which adds loss (in dB) to a reverse link prediction.
•
Portable RX Height Above Floor - This is the simulated height of the mobile receiver. It is also the height
above the floor at which forward link predictions are performed.
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6
Network Verification
Introduction
This chapter describes the process of collecting measurement data with LANPlanner Solo for the purpose of
verifying system performance and optimizing your building model. This process occurs after wireless network
design deployment (access points/sensors placed, connectivity verified).
Verifying Wireless Network Coverage
LANPlanner Solo eliminates the hassles involved in measurement data acquisition for wireless networks design by
implementing a point-and-click method of acquiring measurement data from your PC’s wireless LAN (WLAN)
card.
LANPlanner Solo leverages its internal drawing files, which provides a site-specific means of recording
measurement information. The process of acquiring measurement data is reduced to simply setting your PC to
associate with an access point in the building, placing the same access point within the LANPlanner Solo drawing,
and then roaming throughout the LANPlanner Solo drawing environment. Each time you identify your location by
clicking on the associated position on the drawing, measurement data from the WLAN card is recorded, logged,
and embedded directly in the drawing. This track mode capability allows you to click a start and end point, then
records data as you walk, making it unnecessary to click for each measurement point.
LANPlanner Solo requires a working wireless LAN card for recording measurement data. Collecting measurement
data in LANPlanner Solo may be done in either of two configurations:
LANPlanner Solo
•
Stand-alone measurements (see “Stand-alone Measurements” on page 192)
•
Server-coupled measurements (see “Server-coupled Measurements” on page 196)
191
Network Verification
Stand-alone Measurements
You can use LANPlanner Solo to record measurement data and annotate the data directly to the building drawing
files. This process requires that LANPlanner Solo be installed on a mobile computer such as a laptop or
pen-tablet, and that the mobile computer be equipped with a compatible wireless LAN card. LANPlanner Solo’s
Network Verification menu contains the capabilities to measure RSSI, noise levels, and data rate from
compatible cards. To record measurement data in stand-alone mode, select Network Verification > Record
Measurements:
Figure 6.1: Selecting Record Measurements
The Record Measurements command launches the Select WLAN Adapter dialog below. Before you can record
measurements, you must provide LANPlanner Solo a valid WLAN adapter:
Figure 6.2: Selecting a WLAN adapter
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After you have chosen a WLAN adapter, the Measurement Collection Client dialog opens. This dialog allows
you to record and save measurements while your mobile computer is operating in stand-alone mode.
List of measured network statistics
Click to begin
saving data
points
Pan and
Zoom
Enter chat
message if
connected to
a server
Status and
chat window
Send chat
Client’s IP address
Server connection status
WLAN card status
Figure 6.3: Measurement Collection Client dialog
Saving a Data Point
LANPlanner Solo utilizes a site-specific model of the measurement environment to associate measurements with a
location based upon a 3D X, Y, Z-based coordinate system.
To associate a measurement with a location, you will simply need to click the location in the model where the
measurement is being made. The X, Y, Z coordinate is then identified from the mouse click and associated and
stored in the drawing database.
To record a measurement point, use the Save Data button (shown in Figure 6.3). When you click the save data
button, you can begin saving data points, but recording does not start until you actually start clicking in the
drawing. This stores the results that were displayed as well as the location of the measurement marker. You can
continue clicking and saving data points. When finished, right-click or press ESC to return to the Measurement
Collection Client. You can continue taking measurements by clicking Save Data again, or finish the current run by
pressing the “X” in the upper right corner or by using the menu command File > Exit.
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If your drawing contains access points, you will be prompted to Associate your measurement data with an access
point (see Figure 6.4). Associating with an access point is necessary if you choose to optimize your drawing.
LANPlanner Solo must know which access point you were connected to when taking measurements so that it can
accurately compare measured values to the prediction from the correct access point in the drawing. After taking
measurements and exiting the Associate dialog, your measurement run is automatically saved in the drawing file.
LANPlanner Solo records the IP address, SSID, and MAC address of the access point for each measurement. This
is useful if you happen to roam between access points when taking measurements since you can associate
measurement points within a single measurement run to multiple access points in the drawing.
Figure 6.4: Access Point Association
NOTE
When you exit the Associate dialog and the measurement run gets saved in the drawing, it is also saved as an
ASCII logfile in .wvc format in the measured folder of your current project workspace folder.
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Verifying Wireless Network Coverage
The example below shows a screenshot of a standalone measurement session:
Figure 6.5: Standalone measurement session
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Server-coupled Measurements
LANPlanner Solo may also be configured to connect to a measurement server to collect measurement data. This
configuration requires two copies of the software to be running on portable computers - one copy to run the server
functionality and one copy to use for measurements. The ‘server’ is functionality is built-in to LANPlanner Solo.
This functionality generates network traffic that allows the user to capture network-level data such as data rate,
packet latency, and retry rates in addition to RSSI and noise.
Starting a Server
To start a server, choose the menu command Network Verification > Run Server:
Figure 6.6: Selecting Run Server
A dialog box prompts for the server port number:
Figure 6.7: Entering a server port
196
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Verifying Wireless Network Coverage
After choosing a port, the Measurement Server window opens:
Figure 6.8: Measurement Server dialog
NOTE
Note that the server displays the computer’s IP address in the lower left corner of its screen. You will need this
address to connect your client to your server. Once the server is running, you can leave it unattended while you
begin your measurement survey.
If you are not running in standalone mode, there are two ways to connect to a server:
•
Using a client to connect to the server - From the client, select Server > Connect to Server, and enter the
IP address of the server to connect to. This opens the Connect To Server dialog box shown in Figure 6.9.
•
Using a server to connect to a client - From the server, choose the menu option End Point > Connect to
bring up the Connect To Endpoint dialog box shown in Figure 6.10.
NOTE
A server connection is not required to use the measurement client. The server connection generates network traffic
to enable the user to retrieve statistics such as application level throughput, packet latency, and retry rates.
Without a server connection, the user can still measure RSSI, noise, and data rate. Many users choose not to setup
a measurement server to simplify their measurement tasks.
NOTE
It is important that you do not have a software firewall on either computer blocking the client-server connection.
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Network Verification
Figure 6.9: Connect to Server dialog (from client)
Enter the IP address of the server you wish to connect to and the port that the server is running on, then click
Connect. Servers that you have recently connected to will be remembered. In future runs, you can reconnect to a
server, by choosing one from the history list on the Connect to Server dialog.
Figure 6.10: Connect to Endpoint dialog (from server)
After you are connected, click save data to record measurements. Now you have access to network data that the
server generates in addition to the RSSI, noise, and data rate measurement that are available in stand-alone mode.
198
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Verifying Wireless Network Coverage
Using the Chat Facility
LANPlanner Solo has a chat facility that allows you to send messages to the server and other LANPlanner Solo
clients. To use this facility yo must be connected to a server. Then, type your message into the Chat field
(Figure 6.3) and press the Send button. A copy of the message will be displayed in the status window of the
Measurement Server dialog along with the IP address of the sender.
Exporting Measurement Logfiles
After you have collected measurement data, you can export measurement data for a select measurement run into
an ASCII log file by using the Network Verification > Export Measurement Logfile command. After each
measurement run, the measurement data is automatically stored in the drawing file itself.
Figure 6.11: Selecting Export Measurement Logfile
Selecting Export Measurement Logfile opens the dialog below, which enables you to select the measurement
you wish to export and the location and name of the logfile:
Figure 6.12: Exporting measurement data to an ASCII logfile
Use the Browse button to choose the destination of the ASCII measurement file, and then select OK to export the
file.
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Network Verification
Importing Measurement Logfiles
If you have measurement data from prior sessions, use the Network Verification > Import Measurement
Logfile command to import a LANPlanner Solo ASCII measurement logfile, or other formats from specific
measurement receivers, and embed the data directly within the building drawing.
Figure 6.13: Selecting Import Measurement Logfile
Selecting Import Measurement Logfile opens the dialog below (Figure 6.14), which enables you to select the
type of measurement from the Select Type of Logfile to Import drop-down, and the location and name of the
logfile:
Figure 6.14: Measurement Data Logfile Import dialog
After selecting the type of logfile to import, use the Browse button to find the location of the ASCII measurement
file, and then select OK to import the file.
200
LANPlanner Solo
Verifying Wireless Network Coverage
Deleting Measurement Data
Use the Network Verification > Delete Measurement Data command to remove measurement data from the
current drawing database.
Figure 6.15: Selecting Delete Measurement Data
The Measurement Run Delete dialog opens:
Figure 6.16: Deleting measurement data from a drawing
Select the measurement run from the list that you want to remove from the drawing. Next, press OK to have the
measurement data erased from the drawing. If you previously stored an ASCII measurement logfile (this logfile is
written automatically when you collect the data), deleting it from the drawing will NOT erase the ASCII logfile.
If you wish to also have the ASCII logfile erased, check the Erase Logfile box before deleting the logfile data
from the drawing. Measurement data logfiles, by default, are stored in a subdirectory called Measured under the
active project workspace directory. See “Workspace Directory Structure” on page 58.
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201
Network Verification
Displaying Measurement Data
After recording measurements, you can display or hide both text and graphical markers on the building drawing
by using the Network Verification > Display Measurement Data command.
Figure 6.17: Display Measurement data submenu
Text Display
To display measurement data as text in the drawing, click Network Verification > Display Measurement Data >
Text Display. This option will display the dialog shown in Figure 6.18, below. Choose the measurement run you
wish to display form the drop-down box and click Next.
Figure 6.18: Text Display dialog box
202
LANPlanner Solo
Verifying Wireless Network Coverage
Set Text Height
To control the height of text markers, click Network Verification > Display Measurement Data > Set Text
Height. This will modify the size of the measurement data text in the drawing. This value can be set in feet or
meters.
Figure 6.19: Text Height dialog
Hide All Text Markers
To hide the display of all measurement text in the drawing, click Network Verification > Display Measurement
Data > Hide All Text Markers.
Graphical Display
LANPlanner Solo can also display measurement data as graphical markers in the drawing. These markers indicate
measured values using both color and height. To configure graphical markers, click Network Verification >
Display Measurement Data > Graphical Display.
Figure 6.20: Selecting Graphical Display
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203
Network Verification
The Graphical Measurement Display dialog opens:
Figure 6.21: Graphical Measurement Display dialog
From the Graphical Measurement Display dialog, you can select the measurement data you wish to display.
Select one or more measurement runs from the list and choose the data value you would like to display from the
pull down list. There are many options for the pull down data display, but not all of them will apply to your
measurement data. If you select measurement information that is not included in your measurement runs, nothing
will be displayed in the drawing.
The Marker Radius enables you to control the size of each marker point. The marker radius is specified in meters
(relative to scale of the drawing). The Upper and Lower bounds indicate the range of data you wish to display. This
range is used to determine the assigned marker colors. Selecting Configure Colors displays the Graphical Data
Color Setup dialog:.
Figure 6.22: Assigning colors for graphical display of measurement data
204
LANPlanner Solo
Verifying Wireless Network Coverage
The range of values between the upper and lower bounds is divided into eight intervals. You may specify a unique
color for each interval by clicking on the color next to a range. During display, the interval into which the value of
each measurement data point falls is identified, and the corresponding color is used for the marker placed at the
location.
The example below shows a screenshot of a measurement session with Graphical Markers enabled:
Figure 6.23: Graphical Markers
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205
Network Verification
The example below shows a screenshot of a measurement session with Text Markers enabled:
Figure 6.24: Text Markers
Show Markers/Hide Markers
To toggle graphical markers on, select Network Verification > Display Measurement Data > Show Markers
(left screen shot, below). Toggle graphical markers off by selecting Network Verification > Display
Measurement Data > Hide Markers (right screen shot, below).
Figure 6.25: Toggling markers on/off
206
LANPlanner Solo
Optimizing Predictions
Optimizing Predictions
LANPlanner Solo’s Optimize Predictions is the most efficient way to tune your wireless network simulation
parameters and building model. Optimize Predictions compares predicted results to measured values and adjusts
the building model and simulation parameters accordingly. You can use this capability to characterize unknown
building materials, fine-tune predicted performance, increase prediction accuracy, and eliminate the need for
lengthy site surveys.
Through a series of dialog boxes, Optimize Predictions leads you through the process of specifying measurement
runs to include in your analysis, configuring the optimization analysis, and examining the results. The parameters
obtained through tuning apply specifically to the transmit frequencies at which measurements were taken.
Parameter tuning requires, at minimum:
•
Virtual building model - A 3D virtual building model created in the software drawing that models the
building in which measurement data was gathered.
•
Virtual transmitter - The formatted building must include at least one access point that represents the actual
test transmitter(s) used during the on-site data collection process.
•
Measurement run - At least one measurement run must be provided. The measurement run should consist of
RSSI data for at least 20 positions scattered around the building, preferably more. The characteristics of the
text transmitter used to gather the measurement data, should match the characteristics of the virtual access
point in your drawing file.
•
Access point association - The virtual access point and the measurement run must be explicitly linked in your
drawing, via a formal access point association. The frequency at which measurements were taken, and the
transmit frequency of the corresponding virtual transmitter must be very similar.
To begin the Optimize predictions process, select Optimatic > Optimize Predictions from LANPlanner Solo’s
tool bar:
Figure 6.26: Selecting Optimize Predictions
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207
Network Verification
The Select Measurement Runs dialog opens:
Figure 6.27: Select Measurement Runs dialog
Each optimization that you perform creates an intermediate file, the optimization data file (*.dat). By default, all
optimization data files are placed in the Optimized subdirectory of the current project workspace and have the
same name as the current drawing with the extension *.dat.
Select the OK button to progress to the next stage of optimization (see “Choosing a Frequency Band to Update”),
or Cancel to exit the dialog.
Choosing a Frequency Band to Update
The next step in the process of tuning your simulation parameters is the choice of a frequency band to update with
the new parameters.
The simulation parameters tuned by LANPlanner Solo include:
•
Eight partition attenuation factors, which govern the losses incurred by radio signals when they penetrate
obstacles such as walls.
•
Five floor attenuation factors, which govern the losses incurred by radio signals when they travel from one
floor to another within your building.
The partition attenuation factors are frequency-dependent, while the other parameters are not. For a given partition
type, there may be multiple attenuation factors defined, one for each of several frequencies. This allows the
partitions to behave properly for a range of different frequencies.
208
LANPlanner Solo
Optimizing Predictions
When you select the OK button from within the Select Measurement Runs dialog, the Select a Frequency Band
dialog opens:
Figure 6.28: Selecting a frequency band
To progress to the next step of Optimize Predictions, select the proper frequency band from the list and click OK
to execute Optimize Predictions and view optimization results.
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209
Network Verification
Viewing Optimization Results
While running Optimize Prediction, LANPlanner Solo generates parameter values that provide the closest overall
(average) match between measured and simulated signal power. All simulation parameter values are potentially
adjusted, including the partition attenuation factors and floor attenuation factors.
After Optimize Prediction finishes, the Optimized Parameter Values dialog (Figure 6.29, below) displays. This
dialog lists all simulation parameters and indicates their post-optimization values. Values marked with an asterisk,
‘*’, indicates that the values did not change, and did not affect the simulation. For example, if you had a partition
type of ‘Solid steel’ defined for your drawing, but no walls of that type were actually between an access point and
a measured value, Optimize Prediction ignores that partition type, leaves its attenuation value unchanged, and
flags it with an asterisk.
Figure 6.29: Optimized Parameter Values dialog
The Optimized Parameter Values dialog contains the following options and displays:
•
Update Current Drawing - Updates the drawing file with optimized prediction results.
•
Mean Error/Standard Deviation - These fields report the success of the optimization by presenting the
average difference between measurement and prediction across all measurement points (average error) and the
standard deviation of the post-optimized parameters.
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LANPlanner Solo
Optimizing Predictions
•
Graph by Distance - Displays a graph that plots the measured and predicted data. This enables you to see the
differences between the original prediction, the measured data, and the prediction after optimization. The graph
is plotted as dBm signal power values vs. the distance to the nearest antenna of the associated access point.
The measured values are displayed for all measurement runs included in the optimization, as well as the
predicted values pre and post-optimization. If there are multiple measurement values for a given distance, they
are plotted at the same point on the horizontal axis. There is one prediction value for each measurement point.
Figure 6.30: Graph by Distance chart
LANPlanner Solo
211
Network Verification
•
Graph by RSSI - This option is designed to provide a different visualization of the difference between the
predictions and the measured values. The Graph by RSSI option is similar to Graph by Distance as
described above. However, the horizontal axis is now the dBm value of each measured data point.
Observe that in Graph by RSSI, there are three data series in the Graph by RSSI plot:
•
Measured signal power versus itself (always a straight line)
•
Pre-optimization predicted signal power versus the measured signal power
•
Post-optimization predicted signal power versus the measured signal power
Since the measured-vs.-measured line is always straight, variation from a straight line for the other (predicted)
data series is an indication of the error. Ideally, all three data series would be perfectly straight. For example, if
one measured point had a value of –73 dBm, and the predicted value for that point was –78 dBm before
optimization, and –71 dBm after optimization, there would be three points plotted at the –73 dBm position on
the horizontal axis: -71, -73, and –78 dBm.
Figure 6.31: Graph by RSSI chart
After you are finished with viewing the Optimize Predictions results, select Exit from the Optimized Parameter
Values dialog to return to the LANPlanner Solo drawing window.
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LANPlanner Solo
7
Report Generation
Introduction
There are many different methods for generating reports with the output from LANPlanner Solo. This chapter
discusses two general techniques for displaying data for use in presentations and reports. The following
generalized categories will be discussed:
•
Printing
•
Screen Captures
•
Exporting Graphics
Within these categories, there are many different ways to generate effective displays of your system designs.
Although several methods are provided in this section, there may be many other ways to accomplish a given task
when generating reports. The material in this section should only serve as a reference, without limiting your use of
alternative report generation schemes.
Printing
You can output your drawing to a Windows printer by Accessing the menu command File > Print. Select a
printer from the list of defined Windows printers, the number of copies you would like to print, and the paper
orientation. Press the OK button to send the drawing document to the printer.
Figure 7.1: Printing
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213
Report Generation
The drawing document will be printed exactly as it is currently displayed on the screen. Therefore, make sure to
adjust the drawing to appear exactly as you would like it to appear in the final print out. You can use the View
menu to change the way the drawing looks on the screen.
NOTE
Contour shading and wall partition shading will not be displayed on the printout of a drawing. Shading is an
effect that applies only to the on screen view of a drawing after the non-shaded entities are rendered to the
screen. If you wish to capture a view of the building in SW Isometric view with a shading mode of Flat Shaded,
Edges On, then you need to use the Windows Print Screen key to capture the desired output.
Exporting Graphics
LANPlanner Solo can export the contents of the drawing to several types of files. To this, select File > Export
and choose a file type:
Figure 7.2: Supported export formats
Draw a selection box around the contents of the screen you wish to export and press Enter. You will be prompted
to choose a file name. Enter a unique name and press Enter. Depending on the file type selected (access point
data, .bmp, .wmf, .eps) the selected entities will be stored in a file.
214
LANPlanner Solo
Screen Captures
Screen Captures
Screen shots, sometimes referred to as screen captures, are user-accessible graphics, stored on the clipboard or in
files, which contain a “picture” of the screen or some portion of the screen. All figures in this manual are examples
of screen shots. Once a screen has been captured, you can easily insert it into other programs such as word
processors, spreadsheets, publishing packages, etc. Usage of other software packages is left as a choice to you.
Third-party applications are available for capturing and editing screen shots. Without one of these applications,
you can still take screen captures using Windows. To do so, press the Print Screen key on your keyboard. After
pressing this key, the system will store the entire contents of the screen on the system clipboard. The screen can
then be pasted into most applications such as word processors, spreadsheet software, and drawing packages.
Since this technique grabs the entire contents of the screen, you will have an image of your drawing and the
surrounding windows on the clipboard. If you do not want to include the extra screen graphics, paste the clipboard
into a drawing package and crop the image to obtain the desired effects. To capture dialog boxes such as those
shown in this manual, you must hold down the Alt key while pressing the Print Screen key.
LANPlanner Solo
215
Report Generation
216
LANPlanner Solo
Index
Numerics
3D Orbit
802.11a
802.11b
802.11g
Cut Wall
24, 27
7
7
7
A
activation
Add Floor
Administrative Privileges
antenna
Assemble floors
assembled drawing
attenuation
attenuation factor
12
64
12
26, 27, 179, 211
65
58
8
86
B
background
base station
BDM
Bill of Materials
block
Building Floor
Building Floor Manager
41
7, 26, 163, 175, 176, 179, 207, 211
34
37
49
27
28, 31
C
CAD
CAD drawing
campus information
ceiling
Change Partition
Change Partition Type
channel
Chat Facility
Choose File Import Location
Clear Predictions
command line
Connecting to a Server
contour
Copy Wall
Copy Wireless Port
coverage
Coverage Contours
create project
Current Partition Categories
LANPlanner Solo
8
82
15
27, 176, 177
89
28, 31, 34
8
199
74
37
42, 43
197
26, 27
23
37, 145
26, 27, 174, 176, 177
37, 156, 168
53
29, 31, 90
23
D
database
Delete Measurement Data
design wireless network
directory structure
Display Order
Down One Floor
Draw
Partition
Draw Partition
Drawing
CAD
Legend
Scale
Tips
Verify Assembly
34
38
14
53
25, 27
26
86
28, 31, 86, 87, 88
82
65
76, 96
88
66
E
Edit
Edit Floor
Edit Materials
Edit menu
Edit Partition Library
Edit Wireless Port
Edit/Remove Base Station
Editing Floors
entity
Erase Wall
Exit
Export
Export Measurement Logfile
Export Measurement Logfiles
Extents
122
64
56
22
29, 31, 92
36, 121
34
79
27, 30, 33, 34, 46, 47
23
22
22
38
199
24, 27
F
File menu
final drawings
floor
add
alignment point
assemble
attenuation factor
copy
22, 43
58
26, 27, 31, 32, 34, 62, 176, 177, 180, 181
64
72
65
8
68
217
Index
edit
editing
formatting
make copy
manager
remove
rescale
reset alignment point
scale
Floor Formatting Wizard
Format Building menu
Format CAD Drawing
forward link
frequency
64
79
67
73
16, 53, 57, 61
64
80
80
71
67
24, 82
28, 31, 82
8
8
G
Goto Floor
grid
26
163, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181
H
hardware requirements
Help button
Help menu
About
User Manual F1
Hidden
Hide Unformatted Walls
11
65
39
49
49
33
25, 27
68
68, 78
74
74
38
199
43
11, 12, 40, 178
37, 153, 154, 171
8
12
218
Lineweight47
Change Partition Type
Draw Partition
File
Predictor
Edit/Remove Base Station
Utilities
Preferences
View
Building Floor
Shade
Hidden33
menu structure
model
building facilities
model building
Move Wireless Port
multipath
multiple PCs
68, 73
191
34
34
86, 87, 88
43
34
40, 43, 46
27
47
22
61
15
37, 144
8
13
network design
Network Verification and Optimization
Network Verification menu
New Drawing
noise
NONCOMPOSITE RSSI
15
191
36
22
8
177
O
obstuctions
choosing
Open Drawing
Optimized
overview
56
22
208
11
P
L
Labels
layer
layer scheme
Leave Floor Empty
Legend
License
add
local
network
register
trial
license
license activation
Lineweight
log file
Logfiles
Export
Import
Make Copy of Floor
Measurement Survey
measurements
menu
BDM
Advanced
N
I
Import
Non Formatted File
Preformatted File
Unformatted File
import
choose file location
Import Measurement Logfile
Import Measurement Logfiles
importing
installation
Instant Point Mode
interference
Internet Explorer
M
39
33, 34
34
69
39
51
50
50
51
50
11, 12, 13
12
47
43
199
199
Page Setup
Pan
pan
Partition
Change
Current Categories
Draw
Edit Library
partition
partitions
Paste Wall
Power Tab
prediction
Predictor
Preferences
preferences
Print
Print Preview
Printing
22
24
87
89
90
86
92
34, 86, 87
26, 86, 87, 88
23
124
26, 27, 174, 175, 178, 211
33
40, 43, 46
40
22
22
213
LANPlanner Solo
Index
printing
project
creation
Project Information
Project Workspace Creation Wizard
Propagation Parameters
44
53
39
54
86
37, 151
R
Record Measurements
38
Refresh Screen
24, 26
register
12
registration
12
Remove Floor
64
Remove Wireless Port
36, 121
Report Generation
213
Rescale Floor
80
Reset Floor Alignment Point
80
RF
8
RSSI
8, 26, 163, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 207, 212
Run Server
38
S
Save
Save Data Point
Scale Drawing
Scale Floor
Scale the Drawing
scaling
Screen Captures
session history
Set Ceiling Height
Set Floor Alignment Point
Set Propagation Model Parameters
setup
Shade
Show Distance Between Points
Show Unformatted Walls
signal power
signal strength
SIR
site survey
Sketch Floor Plan
snap
Snap to Endpoint
SNR
Starting a Server
Run Server
Support
system design
Verify Drawing
Verify Formatting Steps
Verifying Drawing Assembly
View Menu
66
73
66
23
W
Q
Quick Predict
V
22
199
29, 32, 96
71
76
32
214
42
69
72
37, 183
12, 178
24, 27, 47
39
25, 27
177
8
8, 163, 175
16
69
46, 48
81
8, 163, 175
Windows Service Packs
wireless design
Wireless Port
Colors
Copy
Edit
Move
orientation
Position
Positioning
Remove
Style
wireless port
workspace
directory structure
opening
Workspaces
12
13
36,
37,
121,
37,
143
145
122
144
161
130, 131
37
36, 121
129
7
58
57
12
Z
Zoom
zoom
24
87
196
9
14
T
transmitter
207
U
unlock code
Up One Floor
Utilities menu
Utilization View
LANPlanner Solo
13
24, 26
39
179
219
Index
220
LANPlanner Solo
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