united states patent and trademark office

united states patent and trademark office
UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE
__________________________________________________
BEFORE THE PATENT TRIAL AND APPEAL BOARD
__________________________________________________
ORACLE CORPORATION;
ORACLE OTC SUBSIDIARY LLC;
INGENIO, LLC.; and
YELLOWPAGES. COM LLC;
Petitioner
v.
CLICK-TO-CALL TECHNOLOGIES LP
Patent Owner
Patent No. 5,818,836
Issued: October 6, 1998
Filed: August 9,1995
Inventor: Stephen C. DuVal
Title: Method and Apparatus for
Anonymous Voice Communication Using An Online Data Service
__________________________________________________
CASE IPR: IPR2013-00312
__________________________________________________
DECLARATION BY STEPHEN C. DUVAL OF PRIOR INVENTION IN
THE UNITED STATES UNDER 37 C.F.R. § 1.131
1
CTC Exhibit No. 2017
Oracle Corporation v. Click-to-Call
IPR2013-00312
I, Stephen C. DuVal, hereby declare and state:
INTRODUCTION
1.
This Declaration under 37 C.F.R. § 1.131 of prior invention in the
United States is submitted with Patent Owner’s Response to the October 30, 2013
institution of Inter Partes Review of US Patent No. 5,818,836 C1 (hereinafter, the
“’836 Patent”) by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) in IPR
No. 2013-00312.
2.
This Declaration is provided by Stephen C. DuVal. I am the true
inventor of the ‘836 Patent. I am over the age of twenty-one (21) years, am
competent to testify in the matters stated herein, have personal knowledge of the
facts and statements in this Declaration, and each of the facts and statements is true
and correct. I have an agreement with the Patent Owner under which I receive a
portion of any royalties generated from the ‘836 Patent and am compensated for
the time required on this matter at a rate of $300 per hour plus any reasonable
expenses.
3.
This Declaration and the Attachments hereto establishes my
conception of the invention claimed in the '836 Patent at least prior to April 21,
1995, which is the effective date of U.S. Patent No. 5,991,394 to Dezonno et al.,
and my subsequent diligence in reduction to practice of the inventions claimed in
the '836 Patent.
2
STATEMENT OF PRIOR CONCEPTION AND SUBSEQUENT
DILIGENCE IN REDUCTION TO PRACTICE OF MY INVENTION
4.
I have reviewed each of Claims 1, 2, 8, 12, 13, 15, 16, 19, 22, 23, 26,
29, and 30 as presented in the ‘836 Patent and Ex Parte Reexamination Certificate
6587 to the ‘836 Patent (Attachment A) (hereinafter, the “Invention(s)”).
5.
I conceived such Inventions at least on or before March 28, 1995 and
diligently worked to reduce the Inventions to practice from at least as early as prior
to April 21, 1995 until the actual reduction to practice of such Inventions and/or at
least until the constructive reduction to practice of such Inventions by my filing of
the ‘836 Patent on August 9, 1995.
DOCUMENTARY EVIDENCE
6.
The following is a list of documents attached as Attachments hereto
and offered as evidence in this Declaration.
All documentation provided in
Attachments to this Declaration were created in the United States and/or describe
events that took place in the United States. Based on the evidence presented in this
Declaration and my understanding, the integrity of the Attachments hereto and the
evidence provided therein has been maintained and the Attachments have not been
altered in any way following the date of creation of such evidence, except for the
addition of a document identifier added to the footer of each document for
purposes of this or another proceeding or as otherwise expressly noted herein.
3
Attachment A
US Patent No. 5,818,836 C1 and Reexamination Certificate
Attachment B
October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document
Attachment C
March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document
Attachment D
March 27, 1995 Letter from Frank J. Kozak
Attachment E
February 14, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan
Attachment F
July 1, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan
Attachment G
Articles of Incorporation for PrivTel
Attachment H
March 13, 1995 PrivTel letter to Mr. Dean Kerl
Attachment I
PRIVTEL Trademark Application filed April 17, 1995
Attachment J
HIWIRE Trademark Application filed September 5, 1995
Attachment K
PrivTel Financial Statements and Report of Certified Public
Accountants
Attachment L
PrivTel SBA Authorization and Loan Agreement
Attachment M
Evidentiary Support of Conception of the '836 Claims
Attachment N
HiWire Marketing Brochure
Attachment O
March 28, 1995 Letter from Privtel to Blakely Sokoloff
Attachment P
May 2, 1995 letter from Ben Yorks to Stephen DuVal
Attachment Q
May 9, 1995 Facsimile from Privtel to Ben Yorks
Attachment R
July 17, 1995 Facsimile from Privtel to Ben Yorks
4
Attachment S
August 4, 1995 Facsimile from Privtel to Ben Yorks
Attachment T
July 31, 1995 Draft Patent Application
Attachment U
April 11, 1995 Letter from Stephen DuVal to Roger Blakely
Attachment V
US Patent No. 5,818,836 executed declaration dated August 4,
1995
Attachment W
August 7, 1995 Draft Patent Application
Attachment X
US Patent Application No. 08/512,820 filed August 9
Attachment Y
ICS Software Development Agreement
Attachment Z
October 28, 1995 PrivTel letter to ICS
Attachment AA
Attachment BB
ProDesign Software Development Maintenance and Marketing
Agreement
May 1995 Disclosure Document
Attachment CC
Request for Acknowledgement of Disclosure Documents filed
October 17, 1996
Attachment DD
SofTel Software Development Agreement
Attachment EE
Amended ProDesign Software Development Maintenance and
Marketing Agreement
Attachment FF
Tom Lichty, The Official AOL for Windows Tour Guide, 230
(1993)
Exhibit 2019
Declaration of Brian Forrest (“Forrest Decl.”)
Exhibit 2020
Certified Copies of Disclosure Document No. 363539,
Disclosure Document No. 372307, and
Disclosure Document No. 376109
5
Exhibit 2021
Declaration of Ben Yorks (“Yorks Decl.”)
Exhibit 2022
Declaration of Bob Shinn (“Shinn Decl.”)
Exhibit 2023
Exhibit 2024
Declaration of Simon Clement (“Clement Decl.”)
Declaration of William W. Schaal, Esq. (“Schaal Decl.”)
Exhibit 2025
Exhibit 2026
Declaration of Doug Martin (“Martin Decl.”)
J. Thompson, “Galacticomm Unveils Worldgroup; AOL on a
PC,” Boardwatch, pp. 56-60 (March 1995)
EVIDENCE OF CONCEPTION OF THE INVENTIONS
7.
Evidence of my conception of the Invention(s) at least prior to April
21 1995 includes, inter alia:
A)
On or before October 16, 1994, I authored an invention
disclosure document titled “DISCLOSURE OF A SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR
A COMBINED ONLINE DATA AND ANONYMOUS VOICE SERVICE,” dated
October 16, 1994, providing a detailed description and specification of some or all
of my Inventions (the "October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document") (Attachment B).
I filed my October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document with the United States Patent
and Trademark Office (USPTO) on October 18, 1994, which was granted a
Disclosure Document No. 363539 under the USPTO's Disclosure Document
Program in place at the time of such filing. Attached hereto as Attachment B is a
true and correct copy of the October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document I authored and
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filed with the USPTO, two copies of my October 17, 1994 cover letter to the
USPTO submitting the October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, and the
"Disclosure Document Receipt Notice" I received from the USPTO indicating
receipt of my October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document with a USPTO mailroom
date stamp of October 18, 1994.
B)
On or before March 5, 1995, I authored an invention disclosure
document titled “SYSTEM DESIGN: ONLINE CHAT TO ANONYMOUS
VOICE CLASSIFIED AD RESPONSE SYSTEM, 900 BILLING FOR
TELEPHONE BASED VOICE SERVICE,” dated March 5, 1995, disclosing a
detailed description and specification of some or all of my Inventions (the "March
5, 1995 Disclosure Document") (Attachment C).
I filed my March 5, 1995
Disclosure Document with the United States Patent and Trademark Office
(USPTO) on March 8, 1995, which was granted a Disclosure Document No.
372307 under the USPTO's Disclosure Document Program in place at the time of
such filing. Attachment C hereto is a true and correct copy of the March 5, 1995
Disclosure Document I authored and filed with the USPTO along with the
Disclosure Document Receipt Notice received from the USPTO showing the
USPTO mailroom date stamp of March 8, 1995 and including my cover letter to
the Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks dated March 6, 1995 submitting my
March 5, 1995 Document Disclosure stamped by the USPTO with the assigned
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Disclosure Document Number 372307 and the USPTO mailroom date stamp of
March 8, 1995, and further which was stamped with a Express Mail mailing label
certifying that the March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document was express mailed to the
USPTO on March 8, 1995 under express mail mailing label number
TB745111411US by Kevin Moore with the law firm of Willian, Brinks, Hoffer,
Gilson & Lione. Attachment D hereto is a true and correct copy of a March 27,
1995 letter to me I received from my attorney, Frank J. Kozak of Willian, Brinks,
Hofer, Gilson & Lione, transmitting the original Disclosure Document Receipt
Notice received from the USPTO with respect to my March 5, 1995 Disclosure
Document filed with the USPTO on March 8, 1995 in the attached duplicate copy
of my March 6, 1995 Disclosure Document returned by the USPTO (Attachment C
hereto was the enclosure accompanying Attachment D hereto).
Exhibit 2020
contains certified copies of my 1994 Disclosure Document (Attachment B) and my
1995 Disclosure Document (Attachment C) received from the USPTO.
C)
On December 12, 1994, I formed a company named "PrivTel,
Inc." to demonstrate, productize, commercialize and sell my Inventions. PrivTel
developed the Invention(s) into working commercial products and services by
implementing processes and systems for converting online communications to
anonymous voice calls, and marketing those products and services for sale through
bulletin board operators, online data services companies and over Internet
8
websites. PrivTel further developed its business by filing for and obtaining patent
protection for my Invention(s) (See, generally, PrivTel’s February 14, 1995
Business Plan (Attachment E), and PrivTel’s July 1, 1995 Business Plan
(Attachment F)). Evidence of the establishment of PrivTel, its business plans and
goals, and its diligent efforts to build its business and commercialize my Inventions
includes, inter alia:
(1)
Attachment G is a true and correct copy of the Articles of
Incorporation for our company PrivTel, which was incorporated under the laws of
the state of Illinois on December 12, 1994. PrivTel had two employees: my wife,
Peg DuVal, as President, and myself as Vice President of Operations.
(2)
Attachment E is a true and correct copy of one of the
business plans I authored for PrivTel, titled "PRIVTEL™ BUSINESS PLAN,"
dated February 14, 1995 (the "February 14, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan"). I
authored the February 14, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan on or before February 14,
1995. I authored this Business Plan in an effort to raise money to bring my
Inventions to the marketplace. Prior to April 21, 1995, I sent Brian Forrest at
Brant Securities Ltd. in Canada a copy of the February 14, 1995 PrivTel Business
Plan as part of that effort.
(3)
Attachment F is a true and correct copy of one of the
business plans I authored for PrivTel, titled "PRIVTEL™ BUSINESS PLAN,"
9
dated July 1, 1995 (the "July 1, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan"). I authored the July
1, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan on or before July 1, 1995.
(4)
Attachment H is a true and correct copy of a letter I
authored under the PrivTel letterhead to Mr. Dean Kerl of Datasafe Publications,
Inc., dated March 13, 1995, describing the products and services PrivTel was
developing and making a proposal for promotion of PrivTel products and services
through Datasafe's BBS (the "Kerl Letter"). I authored the Kerl Letter on or before
March 13, 1995. In that letter, I suggest using “the Worldgroup Windows client,”
which was a new product from Galacticomm that featured a graphical user
interface. When this product was made public, I realized that this interface would
provide an “ideal situation” for the “on line chat to anonymous voice” service that
I envisioned. A copy of an article describing the Worldgroup product is found at
Exhibit 2026. As I explained to Mr. Kerl, “the Worldgroup client would have a
button labeled anonymous voice. Pushing that button would bring up a dialog box
which requests the telephone number to be used for the call.”
(5)
Attachment I is a true and correct copy of a trademark
application prepared by PrivTel's attorney and filed in the USPTO on behalf of
PrivTel on April 17, 1995 for the trademark "PrivTel," to be used in connection
with PrivTel's "private, anonymous, secure telecommunications services."
(6)
Attachment J is a true and correct copy of PrivTel's U.S.
10
Trademark No. 2,085,307 for "HIWIRE" filed in the USPTO on September 5,
1995 and registered on August 5, 1997, used in conjunction with the marketing and
sales of PrivTel's "anonymous voice communications services." As shown on that
registration, the HiWire service was first used in commerce on “8-15-1995.” As I
explain further below, this date corresponds to the opening of the ONE BBSCON
conference where I demonstrated a working prototype of my Inventions.
Attachment J also includes a true and correct copy of a USPTO registration history
report for HIWIRE, available at www.uspto.gov.
(7)
Attachment K is a true and correct copy of the “Financial
Statements and Report of Certified Public Accountants” for PrivTel, Inc. of
Inverness, Illinois for the year ending December 31, 1995. Attachment K was
prepared for PrivTel by its certified public accountants, Hansen, Plahm & Co. of
Oak Brook, Illinois, on or before February 28, 1996.
(8)
Attachment L is a true and correct copy of PrivTel's
Authorization and Loan Agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration
(SBA) dated October 23, 1995 granting funds to supplement its working capital
and pay for software and hardware development of the PrivTel product and
service, as well as to cover various operating expenses and professional services,
including paying patent attorney fees on the completed preparation and filing of
my patent application for the '836 Patent. The July 1, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan
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was submitted in conjunction with PrivTel's October 20, 1995 application for the
SBA loan.
(9)
Attachment O is a true and correct copy (with a Blakely
Sokoloff date stamp added) of a letter I sent on March 28, 1995 to my patent
attorney, Mr. Roger Blakely of Blakely, Sokoloff, Taylor, Zafman, providing
copies of certain documents relating to my Inventions and the preparation and
filing of my patent application (the "March 28 Letter"). Attachment O includes
true and correct copies of two of the enclosures of my March 28 Letter contained
in Blakely, Sokoloffs’ file. That letter describes some of the novel features of my
Inventions including “a button in the graphical user interface of the [online service
provider] OPS which can request a switch to anonymous voice.”
D)
At least my October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, my
February 14, 1995 Business Plan, my March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, and
my March 28 Letter to Blakely Sokoloff, taken in combination, fully describes the
conception of my inventions as of March 28, 1995. Attachment M is a claim chart
prepare by my attorneys that correlates quotes from these documents to the various
parts of each claim that shows that I conceived of each invention at least prior to
April 21, 1995. For example, the claim chart of Attachment M provides the
following evidence of my conception with respect to exemplary Claim 1 in the
‘836 Patent:
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 1 “A method for creating a voice connection over a circuit switched
network between a first party and a second party using an on-line data
service to initiate the connection, comprising the steps of:”
“In accordance with my invention, an Online Data and Anonymous
Voice System (ODAVS) is disclosed which provides both online data
and anonymous voice services. This system has several distinguishing
features: • it allows for the automatic conversion of an online chat
connection into an anonymous voice connection” (October 16, 1994
Disclosure Document, p. 11 (Attachment B)).
"Using the PCP, in conjunction with the ODSP, the subscriber has the
ability to switch from online data services to anonymous voice
services" (October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, p. 75 (Attachment
B)).
“The Online Chat to Anonymous Voice service will allow two people
who are chatting on an online service to convert their conversation to
anonymous voice.
The ANI (Automatic Number Identification)
version will require a modification to the software of the online
service to transmit the phone numbers of the two callers to the
Anonymous Voice System.” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p.
6 (Attachment C)).
“To implement the ANI service, the online service provider installs
software to assist callers in the transition from online chat to
anonymous voice.
Two anonymous voice subscribers access the
13
service by selecting a “Switch to Anonymous Voice” option
supported by the software installed by the online service provider.
They enter their phone number, logoff the online service provider, and
then dial the 800 number associated with the Anonymous Voice
System. The online service software transmits the two telephone
numbers
to
the
Anonymous
Voice
System
over
a
data
communications link. The subscribers have the option of waiting for
the Anonymous Voice System to dial them.” (March 5, 1995
Disclosure Document, p. 7 (Attachment C)).
 1A “establishing an electronic communication between the first party and
the second party through the on-line data service between the first party
and the second party”
“In accordance with my invention, an Online Data and Anonymous
Voice System (ODAVS) is disclosed which provides both online data
and anonymous voice services. This system has several distinguishing
features: • it allows for the automatic conversion of an online chat
connection into an anonymous voice connection” (October 16, 1994
Disclosure Document, p. 11 (Attachment B)(emphasis added)).
"The ODAVS provides subscribers with the ability to automatically
switch from online chat to anonymous voice communication. After
two subscribers logon to the ODS using the PDN (public data
network) and enter into online chat, either of them can request that
the connection between them be switched to anonymous voice. If the
other party agrees, the data processing capability of the User Stations
14
disconnects from the ODS and sets the data communication capability
to answer an incoming call.” (October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document,
p. 11 (Attachment B) (emphasis added)).
“A Personal computer is used to - access the online data services
provided by the ODAVS including email, bulletin boards' and chat
- initiate an anonymous voice connection with another subscriber
while in online chat with that user” (February 14, 1995, PrivTel
Business Plan, p. 40 (Attachment E)(emphasis added)).
“The Online Chat to Anonymous Voice service will allow two people
who are chatting on an online service to convert their conversation
to anonymous voice. The ANI (Automatic Number Identification)
version will require a modification to the software of the online
service to transmit the phone numbers of the two callers to the
Anonymous Voice System.” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p.
6 (Attachment C)(emphasis added)).
“To implement the ANI service, the online service provider installs
software to assist callers in the transition from online chat to
anonymous voice.
Two anonymous voice subscribers access the
service by selecting a 'Switch to Anonymous Voice' option supported
by the software installed by the online service provider. They enter
their phone number, logoff the online service provider, and then dial
the 800 number associated with the Anonymous Voice System. The
online service software transmits the two telephone numbers to the
Anonymous Voice System over a data communications link. The
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subscribers have the option of waiting for the Anonymous Voice
System to dial them.” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p. 7
(Attachment C)(emphasis added)).
“1. Subscribers enter online chat + Subscriber1 logs into ODS using
PCP - establishes a virtual circuit conection [sic] across the PDN
between the ODS and the PSTN circuit which connects the
subscriber's POTS line to the PDN – Subscriber2 logs into ODS using
PCP - Both subscribers enter into Teleconference service which
allows them to exchange messages with each other 2. Subscriber's
agree to switch to anonymous voice” (October 16, 1994 Disclosure
Document, p. 76 (Attachment B)(emphasis added)).
 1B “wherein the first party is anonymous to the second party prior to
establishing a first electronic communication between the first party and
the second party,”
“Many people prefer to strengthen a new relationship gradually,
especially when it involves a person who they have met anonymously
through newspaper ads (Lonely Hearts), telephone based chat lines, or
online data services such as bulletin boards, email, or chat. Under
these circumstances, it is highly desirable to have one or more voice
conversations with the other party, without revealing your identity,
prior to a face to face meeting.” (October 16, 1994 Disclosure
Document, p. 9 (Attachment B)(emphasis added)).
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“Online data services, such as America Online, use Public Data
Networks (PDN) for efficient data communication with their
subscribers. They allow subscribers to exchange data messages
without either party revealing their identity to the other party. Data
messages are exchanged on the basis of 'handles'. The identity of the
person who uses the handle is known only to the online data service
provider. Online data services have not recognized the need for
anonymous voice communication in combination with their online
data services.” (October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, p. 9
(Attachment B) (emphasis added)).
”An Online Data and Anonymous Voice System (ODAVS) is
disclosed which provides both online data and anonymous voice
services. This system has several distinguishing features: it allows for
the automatic conversion of an online chat connection into an
anonymous voice connection” (October 16, 1994 Disclosure
Document, p. 11 (Attachment B) (emphasis added)).
“PrivTel will provide anonymous voice communication services to the
consumer market. Subscribers to online computer services can
establish friendships without revealing their identity to each
other. Anonymous voice services will allow them to enhance their
relationship to voice communications without revealing their
identity.” (February 14, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan (Attachment E, p.
4) (emphasis added)).
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“This service will be useful to people who have established a
relationship using an online computer service and wish to enhance
that relationship with voice communication without revealing their
identity.
It will also be useful for those who wish to screen
responders to classified ads in the 'Personals' section of newspapers
and magazines.” (February 14, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan, p. 7
(Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
“The Online Chat to Anonymous Voice service will allow two people
who are chatting on an online service to convert their conversation
to anonymous voice. The ANI (Automatic Number Identification)
version will require a modification to the software of the online
service to transmit the phone numbers of the two callers to the
Anonymous Voice System.” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p.
6 (Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
“You may wish to talk anonymously to your new friend before
revealing your identity. The anonymous voice communication service
will set up a telephone call between you while keeping both your
identity and your new friends identity private.” (March 5, 1995
Disclosure Document, p. 97 (Attachment C)).
“The anonymous voice call service enables a telephone conversation
between two people who do not want to reveal their identity to each
other. This service is useful for two people who have met via an
online computer service (ie. email, newsgroups/forums, or chat).
They want to extend their friendship to include voice conversation but
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would prefer to keep their identity secret until they know each other
better. This service is also useful for people who place and respond to
personal ads. After a voice conversation, both parties will be more
confident deciding whether or not to meet the other party face to
face.” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p. 79 (Attachment C)
(emphasis added)).
“Online data services, such as America Online, use Public Data
Networks (PDN) for efficient data communication with their
subscribers. They allow subscribers to exchange data messages
without either party revealing their identity to the other party.
Data messages are exchanged on the basis of "handles". The identity
of the person who uses the handle is known only to the online data
service provider. Online data services have not recognized the need
for anonymous voice communication in combination with their
online data services.” (October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, p. 9
(Attachment B) (emphasis added)).
“Subscribers [to online services] generally use nicknames (handles,
screen names, usernames) rather than their real names when logged on
to these systems. Over time people get to know each other; however,
they remain unaware of the person’s true identity unless a person
voluntarily reveals it.” (February 14, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan, p.
10 (Attachment E)).
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 1C “wherein the establishing includes providing over the Internet, to a
data terminal of the first party coupled to the Internet, information
publicly accessible over the Internet,”
“A PrivTel online service (privtel.com) will be established to
provide an online meeting place for people specifically interested in
the anonymous voice service.
This service [privtel.com] will be
accessible nationally over the Internet using a graphical interface.”
(February 14, 1995, PrivTel Business Plan, p. 25 (Attachment E)
(emphasis added)).
“The ODAVS provides subscribers with the ability to automatically
switch from online chat to anonymous voice communication. After
two subscribers logon to the ODS using the PDN (public data
network) and enter into online chat, either of them can request that
the connection between them be switched to anonymous voice. If the
other party agrees, the data processing capability of the User Stations
disconnects from the ODS and sets the data communication capability
to answer an incoming call.” (October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document,
p. 11 (Attachment B)).
“There are three major sections to the online services industry: the
BBSs (Bulletin Board Systems), the Internet, and the major online
service providers (America Online, Compuserve, and Prodigy).”
(February 14, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan, p. 10 (Attachment E)).)
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“Online data services, such as America Online, use Public Data
Networks (PDN) for efficient data communication with their
subscribers. They allow subscribers to exchange data messages
without either party revealing their identity to the other party. Data
messages are exchanged on the basis of "handles". The identity of the
person who uses the handle is known only to the online data service
provider. Online data services have not recognized the need for
anonymous voice communication in combination with their online
data services.” (October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, p. 9
(Attachment B)).
“Public Data Network (PDN) - provides packet switched
connection between the data communication means of the user
station and the Online Data Subsystem (ODS) of the Online Data
and Anonymous Voice System (ODAVS) for example - Sprintnet
from Sprint which supports the X.25 protocol - the Internet could
also be used given the appropriate hardware and software
modifications for TCP/IP protocols rather than X.25 protocols.”
(October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, p.36 (Attachment B)
(emphasis added)).
“1. Subscribers enter online chat + Subscriber1 logs into ODS using
PCP - establishes a virtual circuit conection [sic] across the PDN
between the ODS and the PSTN circuit which connects the
subscriber's POTS line to the PDN – Subscriber2 logs into ODS using
PCP - Both subscribers enter into Teleconference service which
allows them to exchange messages with each other 2. Subscriber's
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agree to switch to anonymous voice” (October 16, 1994 Disclosure
Document, p. 76 (Attachment B) (emphasis added)).
“On a typical Friday night, 10,000 people are chatting on AOL; 6000
in the ‘Public’ rooms set up by AOL and 4000 in ‘Member’ rooms set
up by subscribers.” (February 14, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan, p. 13
(Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
"The online service industry serves 10 million subscribers and is
growing at 30% per year. On a typical Friday night 20,000 - 30,000
people are chatting online. PrivTel requires 200 couples chatting
for 30 minutes on a peak night to breakeven. Each party will pay
$9 by credit card for the call. Online service providers will be paid a
commission for every anonymous voice call which originates on their
system. PrivTel will also establish an Internet based meeting
place for people interested in anonymous voice communication."
(February 14, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan (Attachment E, p. 4)
(emphasis added))
“The Internet has a service called Internet Relay Chat (IRC). This
service allows users of the Internet to converse with each other via
typing on their keyboard no matter where they are in the world. On
a typical evening 5,000 to 10,000 people will be using IRC.
Newsgroups are very effective mechanism for publishing
information on the Internet. Anyone can post a message to any
newsgroup.” (February 14, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan, p. 16
(Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
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“C - The Anonymous Voice Connection: Internet Site or BBS,
Phase 1: Promotion, Take Subscriptions, Phase 2: Customer Billing
Inquiries, Online Service Provider Commission Inquiries, Phase 3:
Support creation and searching of ads, Support Chatting” (March 5,
1995 Disclosure Document, p. 15 (Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
“F - “Online Service Provider (BBS, AOL) 1. Phase 1 - Create
room for chatting and newsgroup dedicated to anonymous voice
communication - Includes promotion material for the Matchcode
online chat to anonymous voice service 2. Phase 2 - Modify online
service software to support Double ANI online chat to anonymous
voice service 3. Phase 3 - Modify online service software to interface
with client software which provides a GUI interface” (March 5, 1995
Disclosure Document, p. 15 (Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
“PrivTel Internet Site A. Purpose –Advertise anon voice service and
bulletin board as a place to meet, -obtain feedback on level of interest,
-obtain demographics, -place people on a mailing list; B. Service
Components +http://Privtel.com (Phase 2), -will allow ads to be
placed and searched, -Will allow chatting.” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure
Document, p. 113 (Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
“Anonymous Voice Connection BBS A. Focus –national, -place to
meet other people interested in anonymous voice chat, -matchmaking,
B. Sections –romance, -primarily interested in meeting people for
dating, -women only, -men only, C. Services Available, +Ads, -text
23
search, -GIFs, -Chat, +Interactive Games, -Far West Trivia, -MUD, Forums?, D. Policy -21 years+, -driver id validation, -no harassment,
E. CSF –graphical user interface, -female greeter/support/help, F.
Access –Internet, +Dial up?, -local/Autonet” (March 5, 1995
Disclosure Document, p. 115 (Attachment C)).
“A User Station with a voice communication capability and a data
processing and communication capability is used to access the
ODAVS. The voice communication capability is connected to the
AVS over the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) and the
data communication capability is connected to the ODS over a Public
Data Network (PDN).” (October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, p. 11
(Attachment B) (emphasis added)).
 1D “wherein the information publically accessible over the Internet is
suitable for presentation within a graphical user interface of the data
terminal of the first party,”
"In addition, the PrivTel online service will have a graphical pointand-click user interface, it will have an area reserved for women
only, and it will enforce a no harassment policy." (February 14, 1995,
PrivTel Business Plan, p. 24 (Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
“A PrivTel online service (privtel.com) will be established to provide
an online meeting place for people specifically interested in the
anonymous voice service.
This service [privtel.com] will be
accessible nationally over the Internet using a graphical
24
interface.” (February 14, 1995, PrivTel Business Plan, p. 25
(Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
“Client Software A -Client software will improve the user interface
but is not required for the system to operate B -Client software will
include a button to push to initiate the switch to anonymous voice this button brings up a dialog box which allows the user to enter the
information required to initiate the switch to anonymous voice -the
client software send this information to the asp host software; C Versions 1. BBS -Galacticom's client, Telegraphics TIPTErm,
Mustang QModem, Telix DeltaComm, 2. Communication Shrink
wrap software –Microsoft Client for Windows, 3. Major online –
They modify their client software; 4. Internet -Modify an IRC client
which facilitates switch to voice.” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure
Document, p. 103 (Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
“Online Service Provider (BSS, AOL) 1. Phase 1 - Create room for
chatting
and
newsgroup
dedicated
to
anonymous
voice
communication - Includes promotion material for the Matchcode
online chat to anonymous voice service 2. Phase 2 - Modify online
service software to support Double ANI online chat to anonymous
voice service 3. Phase 3 - Modify online service software to
interface with client software which provides a GUI interface G Client Software - Modify client software to provide a GUI
interface to the online service provider to initiate an anonymous voice
connection” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p. 15 (Attachment
C) (emphasis added)).
25
“Software….D – Windows based client E- Mac based client” (March
5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p. 116 (Attachment C)).
“Anonymous Voice Connection BBS A. Focus –national, -place to
meet other people interested in anonymous voice chat, -matchmaking,
B. Sections –romance, -primarily interested in meeting people for
dating, -women only, -men only, C. Services Available, +Ads, -text
search, -GIFs, -Chat, +Interactive Games, -Far West Trivia, -MUD, Forums?, D. Policy -21 years+, -driver id validation, -no harassment,
E. CSF –graphical user interface, -female greeter/support/help, F.
Access –Internet, +Dial up?, -local/Autonet” (March 5, 1995
Disclosure Document, p. 115 (Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
“F - “Online Service Provider (BBS, AOL) 1. Phase 1 - Create room
for chatting and newsgroup dedicated to anonymous voice
communication - Includes promotion material for the Matchcode
online chat to anonymous voice service 2. Phase 2 - Modify online
service software to support Double ANI online chat to anonymous
voice service 3. Phase 3 - Modify online service software to interface
with client software which provides a GUI interface” (March 5, 1995
Disclosure Document, p. 15 (Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
“A User Station with a voice communication capability and a data
processing and communication capability is used to access the
ODAVS. The voice communication capability is connected to the
AVS over the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) and the
26
data communication capability is connected to the ODS over a Public
Data Network (PDN).” (October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, p. 11
(Attachment B) (emphasis added)).
“The PrivTel online service will support online chat, games which
facilitate interaction between people, personal ads with pictures, and
relevant newsgroups.” (February 14, 1995, PrivTel Business Plan, p.
25 (Attachment E)).
“The PrivTel online service (The Anonymous Voice Connection) will
be accessed nationally via the Internet at privtel.com. This service
will probably use World Wide Web technology to provide searchable
personal ads with pictures, chatting, and games which promote
interaction. The Web site will be listed in various searchable data
bases so that it can be found by people searching on anonymous,
telephone, or other keywords.” (February 14, 1995, PrivTel Business
Plan, p. 27 (Attachment E)).
“1. User Station Description A Personal computer is used to - access
the online data services provided by the ODAVS including email,
bulletin boards, and chat - initiate an anonymous voice connection
with another subscriber while in online chat with that user - become a
subscriber to the online data service provided by the ODAVS”
(February 14, 1995, PrivTel Business Plan, p. 40 (Attachment E)).
“The development of World Wide Web protocols which allow a point
and click graphical user interface has changed the situation
27
dramatically.” (February 14, 1995, PrivTel Business Plan, p. 15
(Attachment E)).
“The typical user interface to a BBS is text commands, which limits
their appeal. Many are moving to graphic interfaces but text still
predominates.” (February 14, 1995, PrivTel Business Plan, p. 13
(Attachment E).
The client software for the "major online" providers in March 1995
were GUI interfaces. For example, as early as 1993, one of the top
three "major online" providers, America Online (AOL), provided a
GUI user interface to their service as is evidenced by the screenshot of
an AOL chat room circa 1993 below.
Tom Lichty, The Official AOL for Windows Tour Guide, 230 (1993)
(Exhibit 2027).
28
In March 1995, Galaticomm introduced the “Worldgroup” BBS
platform to compete with AOL’s GUI interface. A reviewer of this
product describing it as having “an intuitive graphical user interface”
with “the power of a client/server environment while still retaining
compatibility for ANSI and RIP users.” J. Thompson, “Galacticomm
Unveils Worldgroup; AOL on a PC,” Boardwatch, pp. 56-60 (March
1995) (Exhibit 2026).
Examples of that GUI from that article are shown below:
29
J. Thompson, “Galacticomm Unveils Worldgroup; AOL on a PC,”
Boardwatch, pp. 56-60 (March 1995) (Exhibit 2026).
 1E “wherein the information publicly accessible over the Internet includes:
(1) first information characterizing the second party,”
“Online data services, such as America Online, use Public Data
Networks (PDN) for efficient data communication with their
subscribers. They allow subscribers to exchange data messages
without either party revealing their identity to the other party. Data
messages are exchanged on the basis of "handles". The identity of
the person who uses the handle is known only to the online data
service provider. Online data services have not recognized the need
for anonymous voice communication in combination with their online
30
data services.” (October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, p. 9
(Attachment B) (emphasis added)).
“The PrivTel online service will support online chat, games which
facilitate interaction between people, personal ads with pictures, and
relevant newsgroups.” (February 14, 1995, PrivTel Business Plan, p.
25 (Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
“Subscribers [to online services] generally use nicknames
(handles, screen names, usernames) rather than their real names
when logged on to these systems. Over time people get to know each
other; however, they remain unaware of the person’s true identity
unless a person voluntarily reveals it.” (February 14, 1995 PrivTel
Business Plan, p. 10 (Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
As shown above in 1D, A users' handles, screen names or usernames
were commonly used to identify a user in an online chat. The AOL
image above shows user handles (e.g., "Major Tom", "Lady Rusty")
used to identify the user typing the associated text chat in an AOL
chat-room circa 1993-94.
Tom Lichty, The Official AOL for
Windows Tour Guide, 230 (1993) (Exhibit 2027).
The Galacticomm Worldgroup product also included both public and
private chat features, which also displayed the users’ handles, as
shown in the Boardwatch article above. J. Thompson, “Galacticomm
Unveils Worldgroup; AOL on a PC,” Boardwatch, pp. 56-60 (March
1995) (Exhibit 2026).
31
“Online Data to Anonymous Voice, 2. Subscribers agree to switch to
anonymous voice, A. Requesting subscriber types “REQUEST TO
SWITCH TO VOICE” on the keyboard along with the handle of
accepting subscriber and the % of the total cost the requesting
subscriber is willing to pay” (October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document,
p. 76 (Attachment B) (emphasis added)).
“PC-Req-Voice (Message 1) - this message is from the requesting
PCP to ODS requesting the initiation of an anonymous voice
connection with the specified subscriber - the format of this message
is specified by Galacticomm - the X.25 virtual circuit number is used
to identify the requesting user id - Text "REQUEST SWITCH TO
VOICE" - Accepting-Handle - Percent-Willing-to-Pay” (October 16,
1994 Disclosure Document, p. 52 (Attachment B) (emphasis added)).
“The PrivTel online service (The Anonymous Voice Connection) will
be accessed nationally via the Internet at privtel.com. This service
will probably use World Wide Web technology to provide searchable
personal ads with pictures, chatting, and games which promote
interaction. The Web site will be listed in various searchable data
bases so that it can be found by people searching on anonymous,
telephone, or other keywords.” (February 14, 1995, PrivTel Business
Plan, p. 27 (Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
 1F “second information representing a communication from the
second party, and”
32
“The ODAVS provides subscribers with the ability to automatically
switch from online chat to anonymous voice communication. After
two subscribers logon to the ODS using the PDN (public data
network) and enter into online chat, either of them can request that
the connection between them be switched to anonymous voice. If the
other party agrees, the data processing capability of the User Stations
disconnects from the ODS and sets the data communication capability
to answer an incoming call.” (October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document,
p. 11 (Attachment B) (emphasis added)).
"Under this invention, the parties are chatting using an online service
provider." (March 28 Letter, “Patent Issues,” p. 2 (Attachment O)
(emphasis added)).
“The PrivTel online service will support online chat, games which
facilitate interaction between people, personal ads with pictures, and
relevant newsgroups.” (February 14, 1995, PrivTel Business Plan, p.
25 (Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
“The PrivTel online service (The Anonymous Voice Connection) will
be accessed nationally via the Internet at privtel.com. This service
will probably use World Wide Web technology to provide searchable
personal ads with pictures, chatting, and games which promote
interaction. The Web site will be listed in various searchable data
bases so that it can be found by people searching on anonymous,
33
telephone, or other keywords.” (February 14, 1995, PrivTel Business
Plan, p. 27 (Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
“In accordance with my invention, an Online Data and Anonymous
Voice System (ODAVS) is disclosed which provides both online data
and anonymous voice services. This system has several distinguishing
features: • it allows for the automatic conversion of an online chat
connection into an anonymous voice connection” (October 16, 1994
Disclosure Document, p. 11 (Attachment B) (emphasis added)).
“1. Subscribers enter online chat + Subscriber1 logs into ODS using
PCP - establishes a virtual circuit conection [sic] across the PDN
between the ODS and the PSTN circuit which connects the
subscriber's POTS line to the PDN – Subscriber2 logs into ODS using
PCP - Both subscribers enter into Teleconference service which
allows them to exchange messages with each other 2. Subscriber's
agree to switch to anonymous voice” (October 16, 1994 Disclosure
Document, p. 76 (Attachment B)(emphasis added)).
“ODS Program (ODSP) I. Bulletin Board software + Provides online
data services to subscribers electronic mail, forums (bulletin
boards), file libraries for upload and download, online chat
(teleconference), and security and accounting + For example - The
Major BSS from Galactlcomm + The Major BBS has an X.25
Software Option - allows subscribers to connect to the ODS via an
X.25 packet switching network + The Major BSS has a Search and
Retrieve Option - includes a text file manager that allows users to
34
perform keyword searches using Boolean expressions - files such as
images can be attached to the text document - provides subscribers
with the ability to create, search, and retrieve text based ads with
attached graphics” (October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document
(Attachment B, p. 50) (emphasis added)).
“A Personal computer is used to - access the online data services
provided by the ODAVS including email, bulletin boards' and chat
- initiate an anonymous voice connection with another subscriber
while in online chat with that user” (February 14, 1995, PrivTel
Business Plan, p. 40 (Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
“The PrivTel online service will support online chat, games which
facilitate interaction between people, personal ads with pictures,
and relevant newsgroups.” (February 14, 1995, PrivTel Business
Plan, p. 25 (Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
“C - The Anonymous Voice Connection: Internet Site or BBS, Phase
1: Promotion, Take Subscriptions, Phase 2: Customer Billing
Inquiries, Online Service Provider Commission Inquiries, Phase 3:
Support creation and searching of ads, Support Chatting” (March
5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p. 15 (Attachment C) (emphasis
added)).
“F - “Online Service Provider (BBS, AOL) 1. Phase 1 - Create room
for chatting and newsgroup dedicated to anonymous voice
communication - Includes promotion material for the Matchcode
35
online chat to anonymous voice service 2. Phase 2 - Modify online
service software to support Double ANI online chat to anonymous
voice service 3. Phase 3 - Modify online service software to interface
with client software which provides a GUI interface” (March 5, 1995
Disclosure Document, p. 15 (Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
“This service is useful for two people who have met via an online
computer service (ie. email, newsgroups/forums, or chat). They
want to extend their friendship to include voice conversation but
would prefer to keep their identity secret until they know each other
better.” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p. 79 (Attachment C)
(emphasis added)).
“The Online Chat to Anonymous Voice service will allow two people
who are chatting on an online service to convert their conversation to
anonymous voice.” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p. 6
(Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
“PrivTel Internet Site A. Purpose –Advertise anon voice service and
bulletin board as a place to meet, -obtain feedback on level of interest,
-obtain demographics, -place people on a mailing list; B. Service
Components +http://Privtel.com (Phase 2), -will allow ads to be
placed and searched, -Will allow chatting.” (March 5, 1995
Disclosure Document, p. 113 (Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
“Anonymous Voice Connection BBS A. Focus –national, -place to
meet other people interested in anonymous voice chat, -matchmaking,
36
B. Sections –romance, -primarily interested in meeting people for
dating, -women only, -men only, C. Services Available, +Ads, -text
search, -GIFs, -Chat, +Interactive Games, -Far West Trivia, -MUD, Forums?, D. Policy -21 years+, -driver id validation, -no harassment,
E. CSF –graphical user interface, -female greeter/support/help, F.
Access –Internet, +Dial up?, -local/Autonet” (March 5, 1995
Disclosure Document, p. 115 (Attachment C)).
“A PrivTel online service (privtel.com) will be established to provide
an online meeting place for people specifically interested in the
anonymous voice service.
This service [privtel.com] will be
accessible nationally over the Internet using a graphical interface.”
(February 14, 1995, PrivTel Business Plan, p. 25 (Attachment E)).
 1G “third information specifying a user-selectable element for display
within the graphical user interface of the data terminal of the first party,”
"[A] button in the graphical user interface of the OSP which can
request a switch to anonymous voice." (March 28 Letter, “Patent
Issues,” p. 2(Attachment O) (emphasis added)).
“Client Software A -Client software will improve the user interface
but is not required for the system to operate B -Client software will
include a button to push to initiate the switch to anonymous voice this button brings up a dialog box which allows the user to enter the
information required to initiate the switch to anonymous voice -the
client software send this information to the OSP host software; C -
37
Versions 1. BBS -Galacticom's client, Telegraphics TIPTErm,
Mustang QModem, Telix DeltaComm, 2. Communication Shrink
wrap software –Microsoft Client for Windows, 3. Major online –They
modify their client software; 4. Internet -Modify an IRC client which
facilitates switch to voice.” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p.
103 (Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
"In the ideal situation, the Worldgroup Windows client would have a
button labeled anonymous voice. Pushing that button will bring up
a dialog box which requests the telephone number to be used for the
call. This information will be sent by modem to the PrivTel system."
(Kerl Letter dated March 13, 1995, p. 2 (Attachment H) (emphasis
added)).
"In addition, the PrivTel online service will have a graphical pointand-click user interface, it will have an area reserved for women
only, and it will enforce a no harassment policy." (February 14, 1995,
PrivTel Business Plan, p. 24 (Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
“A PrivTel online service (privtel.com) will be established to provide
an online meeting place for people specifically interested in the
anonymous voice service.
This service [privtel.com] will be
accessible nationally over the Internet using a graphical
interface.” (February 14, 1995, PrivTel Business Plan, p. 25
(Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
38
“Client Software A -Client software will improve the user interface
but is not required for the system to operate B -Client software will
include a button to push to initiate the switch to anonymous voice
-this button brings up a dialog box which allows the user to enter the
information required to initiate the switch to anonymous voice -the
client software send this information to the asp host software; C Versions 1. BBS -Galacticom's client, Telegraphics TIPTErm,
Mustang QModem, Telix DeltaComm, 2. Communication Shrink
wrap software –Microsoft Client for Windows, 3. Major online –They
modify their client software; 4. Internet -Modify an IRC client which
facilitates switch to voice.” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p.
103 (Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
“Online Service Provider (BSS, AOL) 1. Phase 1 - Create room for
chatting
and
newsgroup
dedicated
to
anonymous
voice
communication - Includes promotion material for the Matchcode
online chat to anonymous voice service 2. Phase 2 - Modify online
service software to support Double ANI online chat to anonymous
voice service 3. Phase 3 - Modify online service software to
interface with client software which provides a GUI interface G Client Software - Modify client software to provide a GUI
interface to the online service provider to initiate an anonymous
voice connection” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p. 15
(Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
“Software….D – Windows based client” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure
Document, p. 116 (Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
39
“The PrivTel online service (The Anonymous Voice Connection) will
be accessed nationally via the Internet at privtel.com. This service
will probably use World Wide Web technology to provide
searchable personal ads with pictures, chatting, and games which
promote interaction.
The Web site will be listed in various
searchable data bases so that it can be found by people searching on
anonymous, telephone, or other keywords.” (February 14, 1995,
PrivTel Business Plan, p. 27 (Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
“To implement the ANI service, the online service provider installs
software to assist callers in the transition from online chat to
anonymous voice.
Two anonymous voice subscribers access the
service by selecting a “Switch to Anonymous Voice” option
supported by the software installed by the online service
provider.” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p. 7 (Attachment
C) (emphasis added)).
“The development of World Wide Web protocols which allow a point
and click graphical user interface has changed the situation
dramatically.” (February 14, 1995, PrivTel Business Plan, p. 15
(Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
For example, as early as 1993, one of the top three "major online"
providers, America Online (AOL), provided a GUI user interface to
their service including GUI buttons visually associated with chat room
user handles and associated text, as is evidenced by the screenshot of
40
an AOL chat room circa 1993-94 shown above. Tom Lichty, The
Official AOL for Windows Tour Guide, 230 (1993) (Exhibit 2027).
Galacticomm’s Worldgroup product included a similar graphical user
interface, as shown above.
J. Thompson, “Galacticomm Unveils
Worldgroup; AOL on a PC,” Boardwatch, pp. 56-60 (March 1995)
(Exhibit 2026).
 1H“wherein the user-selectable element is visually associated, within the
graphical user interface of the data terminal of the first party, with the
first information and the second information, when the first information,
second information and user-selectable element are presented within the
graphical user interface of the data terminal of the first party; and”
"Switch to Anonymous Voice Button The OSP usually provide
customers with a graphical user interface (GUI). As part of this
interface, the chat window will contain a button labeled 'switch to
anonymous voice'. When a customer clicks on this button, the OSP
initiates a switch from online chat to anonymous voice. …If the
requester is not in private chat, and the system requests the first party
to provide the handle/screen name/user id of the second party."
(March 28 Letter, “Patent Issues,” p. 4 (Attachment O) (emphasis
added)).
"There are at least four features which should be protected by patent:
… • having a button in the graphical user interface of the OSP
41
which can request a switch to anonymous voice." (March 28 Letter,
“Patent Issues,” p. 2 (Attachment O) (emphasis added)).
“Client Software A -Client software will improve the user interface
but is not required for the system to operate B -Client software will
include a button to push to initiate the switch to anonymous voice
-this button brings up a dialog box which allows the user to enter the
information required to initiate the switch to anonymous voice -the
client software send this information to the asp host software; C Versions 1. BBS -Galacticom's client, Telegraphics TIPTErm,
Mustang QModem, Telix DeltaComm, 2. Communication Shrink
wrap software –Microsoft Client for Windows, 3. Major online –
They modify their client software; 4. Internet -Modify an IRC client
which facilitates switch to voice.” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure
Document, p. 103 (Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
"Worldgroup is impressive. It provides an intuitive graphical user
interface and the power of a client/server environment while still
retaining compatibility for ANSI and RIP users." J. Thompson,
“Galacticomm Unveils Worldgroup; AOL on a PC,” Boardwatch, pp.
56-60 (March 1995) (Exhibit 2026) (emphasis added). "A caller who
connects via the Worldgroup Manager is presented with a typical
Windows environment and a series of services represented by
icons." Id. at 57 (emphasis added). "MULTI-CHANNEL CHAT The
Teleconference provides multichannel chat facilities.
All the
standard features are here. A split-screen mode allows a caller to
type in responses to comments he/she received in the
42
corresponding window.
A floating window can also be opened
which displays a list of the callers on the channel." Id. at 57. "The
drawing board can be opened along with the conversation
window(s)."
Id. at 58 (emphasis added).
The following is a
screenshot of the "Teleconference" chat room window within
Worldgroup including the drawing board window.
J. Thompson,
“Galacticomm Unveils Worldgroup; AOL on a PC,” Boardwatch, pp.
56-60 (March 1995) (Exhibit 2026).
"In addition to an icon for the drawing board, there is an icon for a
scrollback buffer, another to get a list of the current users on the
system, one to switch channels, one that allows you to scan available
channels and one to move to a private one-on-one chat mode." Id.
at 58 (emphasis added). "Access to the Address Book is available
from the Forum area making it easy to find a user or to access notes
or information about a particular user." Id. (emphasis added). "All
the options and features detailed above were available in the prerelease version that I tested." Id. at 59. "However, Visual Basic was
used to create most of the user interface. This is where the real power
of Worldgroup lies. Using Visual Basic for Windows, third-party
developers can quickly and easily create new applications that work in
conjunction with the client program." Id. at 59.
“The ODAVS provides subscribers with the ability to automatically
switch from online chat to anonymous voice communication. After
two subscribers logon to the ODS using the PDN (public data
network) and enter into online chat, either of them can request
43
that the connection between them be switched to anonymous
voice. If the other party agrees, the data processing capability of the
User Stations disconnects from the ODS and sets the data
communication capability to answer an incoming call.” (October 16,
1994 Disclosure Document, p. 11 (Attachment B) (emphasis added)).
“1. User Station Description A Personal computer is used to - access
the online data services provided by the ODAVS including email,
bulletin boards, and chat - initiate an anonymous voice connection
with another subscriber while in online chat with that user become a subscriber to the online data service provided by the
ODAVS” (February 14, 1995, PrivTel Business Plan, p. 40
(Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
“F - “Online Service Provider (BBS, AOL) 1. Phase 1 - Create room
for chatting and newsgroup dedicated to anonymous voice
communication - Includes promotion material for the Matchcode
online chat to anonymous voice service 2. Phase 2 - Modify online
service software to support Double ANI online chat to anonymous
voice service
3. Phase 3 - Modify online service software to
interface with client software which provides a GUI interface G Client Software - Modify client software to provide a GUI interface
to the online service provider to initiate an anonymous voice
connection” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p. 15 (Attachment
C) (emphasis added)).
44
With regard to the previous paragraph referencing AOL, as early as
1993, America Online (AOL) provided a GUI user interface to their
service including GUI buttons visually associated with chat room user
handles and associated text, as is evidenced by the screenshot of an
AOL chat room circa 1993-94 shown above.
Tom Lichty, The
Official AOL for Windows Tour Guide, 230 (1993) (Exhibit 2027).
Galacticomm’s Worldgroup product included a similar graphical user
interface for both private as well as public chat.
J. Thompson,
“Galacticomm Unveils Worldgroup; AOL on a PC,” Boardwatch, pp.
56-60 (March 1995) (Exhibit 2026).
As of March 1995, it was my conception that the GUI client software for the
HiWire service would display a GUI for an online data service establishing
electronic communication between a user and other online users (for example, a
GUI window for personal advertisements, newsgroups or textual chat), and would
include a "button labeled anonymous voice" within that GUI. The online GUI
would present information characterizing the other online user such as the other
online user's associated username, handle or other identifier and also information
representing the other online user's online communications, all visually associated
with the button to initiate the switch from online communication to voice
communication.
45
My conception was that the user-selectable element (i.e., “button”) presented in
the Windows GUI would be visually associated with the information
characterizing the other user (i.e., “handle”) and the information representing a
communication from the other user (i.e., “chat”) to implement the HiWire service
within an online data service such as AOL or Worldgroup. For example, given
"the chat window will contain a button," the button would necessarily have to be
visually associated with the user name and chat message within the same window
to enable the user to "push" such button to switch the online chat to a voice
telephone call.
Moreover, the user-selectable element being in view of and
associated with the user-identifying information and electronic communications
was the most efficient and logical manner within a GUI environment for the button
functionality to be recognized and available to the user to initiate a switch to voice
communication with the other chat user.
 1I “following the establishment of an electronic communication between
the first party and the second party through the on-line data service
between the first party and the second party, and in response to receiving
an indication of selection of the user-selectable element displayed within
the graphical user interface of the” data terminal of the first party,
performing the steps of: (1) requesting a voice communication between the
first party and the second party through the on-line data service;”
"The ODAVS provides subscribers with the ability to automatically
switch from online chat to anonymous voice communication. After
46
two subscribers logon to the ODS using the PDN (public data
network) and enter into online chat, either of them can request
that the connection between them be switched to anonymous
voice. If the other party agrees, the data processing capability of the
User Stations disconnects from the ODS and sets the data
communication capability to answer an incoming call.
The ODS
sends billing information to the SBSS to record the use of online data
services by the subscribers; and then the ODS requests the AVS
[Anonymous Voice System] to set up an anonymous call between the
two subscribers.” (October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, p. 11
(Attachment B) (emphasis added)).
“Client Software, A-Client software will improve the user interface
but is not required for the system to operate, B-Client software will
include a button to push to initiate the switch to anonymous voice
- this button brings up a dialog box which allows the user to enter
the information required to initiate the switch to anonymous voice
- the client software send [sic] this information to the OSP host
software” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p. 103 (Attachment
C) (emphasis added)).
"Combination Online Data Service and Anonymous Voice Under this
invention, the parties are chatting using an online service provider.
One party issues a command requesting a switch to anonymous
voice. After the other party agrees, the online service provider (OSP)
collects the required information (telephone numbers, dial in/dial out
request, how payment will be shared between the parties, and possibly
47
credit card numbers" (March 28 Letter, “Patent Issues,” p. 2
(Attachment O) (emphasis added)).
"Switch to Voice" sequence diagram shows the "PC-REQ-VOICE"
message transmitted from "PC1" (Personal Computer 1) to the "ODS"
(Online Data System) requesting a voice connection with "PC2"
(Personal Computer 2). (October 16, 1995 Disclosure Document, p.
88 (Attachment B)).
 1J “transmitting a message from the on-line data service to a voice system
requesting the voice connection between said first party and said second
party;”
"Combination Online Data Service and Anonymous Voice Under this
invention, the parties are chatting using an online service provider.
One party issues a command requesting a switch to anonymous voice.
After the other party agrees, the online service provider (OSP) collects
the required information (telephone numbers, dial in/dial out request,
how payment will be shared between the parties, and possibly credit
card numbers). This information is sent to the anonymous voice
system (AVS) which connects the two parties. There are at least
four features which should be protected by patent: • sending a
message from the online service provider (OSP) to the anonymous
voice system (ABS)." (March 28 Letter, “Patent Issues,” p. 2
(Attachment O) (emphasis added)).
48
“The ODAVS provides subscribers with the ability to automatically
switch from online chat to anonymous voice communication. After
two subscribers logon to the ODS using the PDN (public data
network) and enter into online chat, either of them can request that the
connection between them be switched to anonymous voice. If the
other party agrees, the data processing capability of the User Stations
disconnects from the ODS and sets the data communication capability
to answer an incoming call. The ODS sends billing information to the
SBSS to record the use of online data services by the subscribers; and
then the ODS requests the AVS to set up an anonymous call
between the two subscribers.”(October 16, 1994 Disclosure
Document, p. 11 (Attachment B) (emphasis added)).
“A - OSP Double ANI Message 1. This message is sent from the
Online Service Provider to the Anonymous Voice System to
initiate an anonymous voice connection 2. this message will be
encrypted and authenticated 3. Message ID 4. ANI1 - telephone
number to use for the anonymous voice call 5. First Cust Phone
Number - spaces if the same as ANI1 6 . ANI2 - telephone number to
use for the anonymous voice call 7. Second Cust Phone Number spaces if the same as ANI2 8. 100% pay ANI - ANI of party which
will pay for both sides or spaces 9. ANI1 Call In/Call Out…” (March
5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p. 46 (Attachment C) (emphasis
added)).
“The online service software transmits the two telephone
numbers to the Anonymous Voice System over a data
49
communications link.” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p. 7
(Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
"Two PrivTel subscribers access the service by selecting a 'Switch to
Anonymous Voice' option supported by the software installed by the
online service provider. They enter their phone number and then dial
1-800-PRIVTEL. The online service software transmits the two
telephone numbers to the PrivTel system over a data
communications link. The PrivTel system identifies the callers using
ANI (i.e. the calling party's phone number); it matches the callers
based upon the phone numbers received from the online service; and
then it connects the two callers." (February 14, 1995, PrivTel Business
Plan, p. 18 (Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
"The anonymous voice service will be very easy for consumers to use.
After two PrivTel subscribers agree to switch from online chat to
anonymous voice, they enter their telephone number using their
computer keyboard and then dial 1-800-PRIVTEL.
The PrivTel
system connects the two parties using information it receives from
the online service provider." (February 14, 1995, PrivTel Business
Plan, p. 4 (Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
“ODS-Setup-Voice (Message6) - this message is from ODS to
AVSC requesting it to setup an anonymous voice call - Common
Header (CH) - Subscriber-ID1 (same as used id in the Major BBS) Subscriber-ID2 (same as used id in the Major BBS) - Handlel Handle2 - Percent-paid-by-Sub1 - Percent-paid-by-Sub2” (October
50
16, 1994 Disclosure Document, p. 53 (Attachment B) (emphasis
added)).
"Two PrivTel subscribers access the service by selecting a 'Switch to
Anonymous Voice' option supported by the software installed by the
online service provider. They enter their phone number and then dial
1-800-PRIVTEL.
The online service software transmits the two
telephone numbers to the PrivTel system over a data communications
link. The PrivTel system identifies the callers using ANI (i.e. the
calling party's phone number); it matches the callers based upon the
phone numbers received from the online service; and then it
connects the two callers." (February 14, 1995, PrivTel Business Plan,
p. 18 (Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
"The Anonymous Voice System identifies the callers using ANI (ie.
the calling party's phone number); it matches the callers based upon
the phone numbers received from the online service; and then it
connects the two callers." (March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p. 7
(Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
"Switch to Voice" sequence diagram shows the "ODS-SETUPVOICE" message transmitted from the "ODS" (Online Data System)
to the "AVSC" (Anonymous Voice Subsystem Controller) requesting
a voice connection be set up by the AVSC.” (October 16, 1994
Disclosure Document, p. 88 (Attachment B)).
51
Fig. 10 (October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, p. 27 (Attachment B)).
“AVSC Program (AVSCP) - controls initialization of the AVS controls the operation of the AVS to establish an anonymous voice
connection in response to an ODS-Setup-Voice message or in
response to a dial in request for an anonymous voice connection - the
program will use the TCP/IP protocol for exchanging messages with
other subsystems over the LAN”) (October 16, 1994 Disclosure
Document, p. 42 (Attachment B)).
"1. Switch to Voice Events + ODS-Setup-Voice - request from ODS
to establish an anonymous voice connection"
Disclosure Document, p. 66 (Attachment B)).
52
(October 16, 1994
“send OSP Double ANI Message to anonymous voice system with the
information collected” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p. 102
(Attachment C)).
"D-Messages 1. OSP Double ANI Message -This message is sent
from the Online Service Provider to the Anonymous Voice System to
initiate an anonymous voice connection" (March 5, 1995 Disclosure
Document, p. 25 (Attachment C)).
 1K “establishing a first telephone call for the first party;
“The AVS calls the first User Station using the PSTN and verifies
the connection by exchanging messages with the data processing
capability. The AVS calls the second User Station using the PSTN
and verifies the connection. Then the AVS connects the two user
stations.” (October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, p. 12 (Attachment
B) (emphasis added)).
“The online service software transmits the two telephone numbers to
the Anonymous Voice System over a data communications link. The
subscribers have the option of waiting for the Anonymous Voice
System to dial them.” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p. 7
(Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
“A - OSP Double ANI Message 1. This message is sent from the
Online Service Provider to the Anonymous Voice System to initiate
an anonymous voice connection 2. this message will be encrypted and
53
authenticated 3. Message ID 4. ANI1 - telephone number to use for
the anonymous voice call 5. First Cust Phone Number - spaces if the
same as ANI1 6. ANI2 - telephone number to use for the anonymous
voice call 7. Second Cust Phone Number - spaces if the same as ANI2
8. 100% pay ANI - ANI of party which will pay for both sides or
spaces 9. ANI1 Call In/Call Out…”
(March 5, 1995 Disclosure
Document, p. 46 (Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
Fig. 10 (October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, p. 27 (Attachment B)).
"The AVS can connect the two parties using several methods. The
easiest for the two parties is dial out, ie. The AVS uses the telephone
numbers in the message to dial both parties and connect them."
(March 28 Letter, “Patent Issues,” p. 2 (Attachment O) (emphasis
added)).
54
 1L “establishing a second telephone call for the second party; and,”
“The AVS calls the first User Station using the PSTN and verifies the
connection by exchanging messages with the data processing
capability. The AVS calls the second User Station using the PSTN
and verifies the connection. Then the AVS connects the two user
stations.” (October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, p. 12 (Attachment
B) (emphasis added)).
“The online service software transmits the two telephone numbers to
the Anonymous Voice System over a data communications link. The
subscribers have the option of waiting for the Anonymous Voice
System to dial them.” (March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p. 7
(Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
“A - OSP Double ANI Message 1. This message is sent from the
Online Service Provider to the Anonymous Voice System to initiate
an anonymous voice connection 2. this message will be encrypted and
authenticated 3. Message ID 4. ANI1 - telephone number to use for
the anonymous voice call 5. First Cust Phone Number - spaces if the
same as ANI1 6 . ANI2 - telephone number to use for the
anonymous voice call 7. Second Cust Phone Number - spaces if the
same as ANI2 8. 100% pay ANI - ANI of party which will pay for
both sides or spaces 9. ANI1 Call In/Call Out…” (March 5, 1995
Disclosure Document, p. 46 (Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
55
Fig. 10 (October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, p. 27 (Attachment B)).
"The AVS can connect the two parties using several methods. The
easiest for the two parties is dial out, ie. the AVS uses the telephone
numbers in the message to dial both parties and connect them."
(March 28 Letter, “Patent Issues,” p. 2 (Attachment O) (emphasis
added)).
 1M “connecting said first telephone call with said second telephone call.”
“The AVS calls the first User Station using the PSTN and verifies the
connection by exchanging messages with the data processing
capability. The AVS calls the second User Station using the PSTN
and verifies the connection. Then the AVS connects the two user
stations.” (October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, p. 12 (Attachment
B) (emphasis added)).
56
"The anonymous voice service will be very easy for consumers to use.
After two PrivTel subscribers agree to switch from online chat to
anonymous voice, they enter their telephone number using their
computer keyboard and then dial 1-800-PRIVTEL.
The PrivTel
system connects the two parties using information it receives from
the online service provider." (February 14, 1995, PrivTel Business
Plan, p. 4 (Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
"Two PrivTel subscribers access the service by selecting a 'Switch to
Anonymous Voice' option supported by the software installed by the
online service provider. They enter their phone number and then dial
1-800-PRIVTEL.
The online service software transmits the two
telephone numbers to the PrivTel system over a data communications
link. The PrivTel system identifies the callers using ANI (i.e. the
calling party's phone number); it matches the callers based upon the
phone numbers received from the online service; and then it connects
the two callers." (February 14, 1995, PrivTel Business Plan, p. 18
(Attachment E) (emphasis added)).
"The Anonymous Voice System identifies the callers using ANI (ie.
the calling party's phone number); it matches the callers based upon
the phone numbers received from the online service; and then it
connects the two callers." (March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, p. 7
(Attachment C) (emphasis added)).
“1. VCS Description - this subsystem provides a circuit switched
interface to the PSTN - it processes incoming call and caller
57
disconnect signaling from the PSTN - it processes AVSC
[Anonymous Voice Subsystem Controller] requests to establish a
PSTN call, to connect two PSTN incoming calls, and to connect a
PSTN incoming call to the VPS” (October 16, 1994 Disclosure
Document, p. 44 (Attachment B) (emphasis added)).
Fig. 4 (October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, p. 21 (Attachment B)).
"The AVS can connect the two parties using several methods. The
easiest for the two parties is dial out, ie. the AVS uses the telephone
numbers in the message to dial both parties and connect them."
(March 28 Letter, “Patent Issues,” p. 2 (Attachment O) (emphasis
added)).
58
Fig. 10 (October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, p. 27 (Attachment B)).
Attachment M hereto includes a similar recitation of evidence dated prior to April
21, 1995 that demonstrates my conception of each of the claims challenged in this
matter. (See, Attachment M).
EVIDENCE OF DILIGENCE IN REDUCTION TO PRACTICE
8.
The evidence also establishes that I diligently pursued reducing my
Invention(s) to practice, both actual and constructive reduction to practice, from at
least prior to April 21, 1995 until the actual reduction to practice of the
Invention(s) no later than August 20, 1995 and/or at least until the constructive
reduction to practice of the Invention(s) on August 9, 1995 when I filed the ‘836
Patent. Evidence of my diligence in reducing to practice my Inventions includes
59
the following:
A)
From at least prior to April 21, 1995 until at least August 9,
1995, I diligently worked together with my patent attorneys, Roger W. Blakely and
Ben J. Yorks with the law firm of Blakely, Sokoloff, Taylor and Zafman, to draft,
revise, complete and file a patent application on my Inventions. Further, from at
least prior to April 21, 1995 until at least August 15, 1995, I diligently worked on
developing my product design, system architecture and product features and
creating a working software and hardware system implementing the Inventions to
reduce my Inventions to practice in a fully functioning online chat and to
anonymous voice service to be sold by PrivTel under the trademark "HiWire."
B)
My activities during at least prior to April 21, 1995 until at least
August 15, 1995 were almost exclusively focused on reducing my Inventions to
practice, both actual and constructive, by developing a working prototype of my
Inventions in a demonstration of PrivTel's HiWire service–the PrivTel online chat
to anonymous voice service (the "HiWire Demo") and filing a patent application
on my Inventions prior to August 16-20, 1995 (the "Diligence Goals").
My
Diligence Goals were driven by my company's plans to demonstrate the HiWire
service– to bulletin board service (BBS) and online data service companies
attending the leading conference for BBSs in the early 1990s – the ONE BBSCON
(Online Networking Exposition and BBS Convention) being held August 16-20,
60
1995 in Tampa, Florida.
(“The anonymous voice service will be announced
August 16th, 1995 at the ONE BBSCON conference. This conference is attended
by 5000 people in the BBS, online services, and Internet industry. PrivTel will
have a booth in a choice location and PrivTel will have a speaker at the
conference.” February 14, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan, p. 28 (Attachment E);
"The software required to operate the anonymous voice service will be developed
by a system integration firm which specializes in voice response applications."
February 14, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan, p. 34 (Attachment E); "PrivTel's current
objectives are:… to demonstrate the service to 30 large bulletin board operators at
the ONE BBSCON tradeshow in August." July 1, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan, p.
34 (Attachment F); "A disclosure document has been filed with the patent office
for a combination online and anonymous voice system. Additional disclosure
documents for telecommunication carrier-based, signaling network connection, and
stand-alone systems are being filed. These documents provide evidentiary proof of
the invention." February 14, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan, p. 9 (Attachment E)).
Attachment J is a true and correct copy of the USPTO Service Mark, Reg. No.
2,085,307, for “HIWIRE,” listing the first use in commerce as “8-15-1995,” which
corresponds to the date of the ONE BBSCON. Attachment N is a true and correct
copy of a marketing brochure for PrivTel's "HiWire" service. This marketing
brochure was created by PrivTel in July 1995 and distributed to BBS owners and
61
operators demonstrating the HiWire service at ONE BBSCON.
C)
From at least prior to April 21, 1995 until at least August 20,
1995, I was working full-time, approximately twelve hours a day, seven days a
week, to execute on my company's business plans, and particularly to meet my
Diligence Goals. The February 14, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan laid out PrivTel's
overall business plans, including a schedule for its plans, which I endeavored to
meet through diligent efforts throughout at least prior to April 21, 1995 until at
least August 20, 1995. (See, February 14, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan, p. 38
(Attachment E)).
D)
From at least prior to April 21, 1995 until at least August 9,
1995, I worked with my patent attorneys, Roger Blakely and Ben Yorks with the
law firm of Blakely, Sokoloff, Taylor and Zafman, to create, develop, revise and
ultimately file a patent application on my Inventions, which was filed on August 9,
1995 and issued as the '836 Patent on October 6, 1998. On or around March 28,
1995, within a few months of incorporating my company PrivTel, I engaged the
law firm of Blakely, Sokoloff, Taylor, Zafman to assist me in preparing a patent
application for United States patent protection of my Inventions based on my
October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document and later my March 5, 1995 Disclosure
Document. On March 28, 1995, I sent a letter dated March 28, 1995 to Mr. Roger
Blakely of Blakely Sokoloff providing copies of certain documents relating to my
62
Inventions and the preparation and filing of my patent application. Attached hereto
as Attachment O is a true and correct copy of that letter (with a Blakely Sokoloff
date stamp added) and two of the enclosures from Blakely, Sokoloff’s file.
Starting as early as March 28, 1995 through August 9, 1995, but at least prior to
April 21, 1995 until at least August 9, 1995, Mr. Yorks and I developed, drafted,
revised and filed the patent application for my Inventions. Our activities included
holding a number of conference calls to discuss the Inventions, including
discussing my October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, my March 5, 1995
Disclosure Document and my May 5, 1995 Disclosure Document, drafting the
patent specification, claims and figures, holding conference calls to discuss
application drafts, reviewing and revising multiple drafts of the patent application
until the patent application accurately described my Inventions and was ready for
filing with the United States Patent and Trademark Office, and ultimately filing my
patent application for the Inventions in the USPTO on August 9, 1995. (See, Yorks
Decl., ¶¶ 5-6 (Exhibit 2021)). At the time I engaged Mr. Yorks, it was my
intention that he prepare and file the patent application prior to my public
demonstration of PrivTel's prototype HiWire service at ONE BBSCON on August
16-20, 1995 in order to preserve my international rights to the Inventions by filing
the patent application prior to any public demonstration of the HiWire service.
("Stand-alone and combination patent applications will be filed before business
63
startup in order to maintain a one-year window for foreign filing patents."
February 14, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan, p. 9).
(1)
At least prior to April 21, 1995 until at least May 2, 1995,
my patent attorney, Ben Yorks, prepared a first draft of my patent application.
(See, Yorks Decl., ¶ 6(H) (Exhibit 2021)). When I engaged Blakely Sokoloff to
prepare the application on my Inventions, Mr. Blakely told me “a draft can be
prepared by the end of the month,” as I state in my April 11, 1995 letter to Roger
Blakely attached hereto as Attachment U. True to their word, on May 2, 1995, Ben
Yorks express mailed to me, and I received, the first "rough" draft of the patent
application he had developed on my Inventions. (See, Ben Yorks' May 2, 1995
letter to Stephen DuVal transmitting a first draft of the patent application
(Attachment P); See, Yorks Decl., ¶ 6(H) (Exhibit 2021)).
(2)
From at least May 2, 1995 until May 9, 1995, I reviewed
and prepared significant re-writes of the first draft patent application of my
Inventions and discussed the revisions with my patent attorney, Ben Yorks. On
May 9, 1995, I faxed copies of informal drawings to Ben Yorks that I prepared to
help describe my Inventions. Attached hereto as Attachment Q is a true and
correct copy of the facsimile that I sent to Ben Yorks on May 9, 1995 with those
drawings. My changes revised and added significantly to the draft I received on
May 2.
64
(3)
From at least May 9, 1995 until July 17, 1995, Mr. Yorks
and I continued to make progress on the preparation of my patent application.
(4)
During that period, Ben Yorks completed the next draft
of the patent application on my Inventions, which he forwarded to me in the same
manner as the May 2, 1995 draft of the application and I received after the 4th of
July in 1995. Upon receipt of the draft through July 17, 1995, I reviewed that draft
and provided my comments and revisions to Mr. York on July 17, 1995.
Attachment R is a true and correct copy of the facsimile I sent to Ben Yorks on
July 17, 1995 transmitting my comments and revisions on the draft patent
application. (See also, Yorks Decl, Attachment G (Exhibit 2021)).
(5)
Between July 17, 1995 and sometime prior to July 31,
1995, Ben Yorks revised the application to incorporate my changes in the July 17th
draft of the application. On July 31, 1995, Ben Yorks completed the next draft of
the patent application on my Inventions, which he forwarded to me in the same
manner as the May 2, 1995 draft of the application. Attachment T is a true and
correct copy of the July 31, 1995 draft patent application my patent attorney had
prepared.
(6)
From July 31, 1995 until August 4, 1995, I reviewed and
prepared comments on the July 31 draft patent application. On August 4, 1995, I
provided Mr. Yorks my final comments and drawings on the draft patent
65
application and my executed declaration for the patent application. (See, executed
declaration for the '836 Patent dated "8/4/95" (Attachment V)). Attachment S is a
true and correct copy of the facsimile I sent to Ben Yorks on August 4, 1995 (with
a Blakely Sokoloff date stamp added) transmitting my comments and revisions on
the draft patent application, and showing a Blakely Sokoloff date stamp of receipt
of August 7, 1995 (the next business day) (see also Yorks Decl., Attachment H
(Exhibit 2021)).
(7)
On August 7, 1995, my patent attorney, Ben Yorks, made
the final modifications to the final draft of the patent application to place it in
proper condition for filing in the USPTO. Attachment W hereto is a true and
correct copy of my patent application electronically saved on August 7, 1995 and
filed in the USPTO on August 9, 1995 (See, Yorks Decl., Attachment J, (Exhibit
2021)).
(8)
On August 9, 1995, Ben Yorks, caused the patent
application for my Inventions to be filed in the USPTO. (See, Yorks Decl.,
Attachment J, (Exhibit 2021)). Attachment X hereto is a true and correct copy of
my patent application filed in the USPTO on August 9, 1995 as US Patent
Application Number 08/512,820, which issued as the '836 Patent on October 6,
1998.
(9)
When I engaged Blakely, Sokoloff, Taylor and Zafman
66
to prepare the application on my Inventions, I was quoted a budget of “roughly
$6000 in fees and $1000 for filing,” as I state in my April 11, 1995 letter to Roger
Blakely (Attachment U). I paid them a retainer of $3000 to get started on my
application. (See, Attachment U). Professional fees paid to my attorneys were
projected to be $3000 in August, 1995 and $2000 in September 1995 based on
billed legal services rendered in the months of July 1995 and August 1995,
respectively. These were the projected costs for PrivTel to prepare and file my
patent application for the Inventions prior to the August 16, 1995 start of ONE
BBSCON.
(See, July 1, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan, monthly cashflow
projections, "Professional," "Aug-95," "$3," "Sep-95," "$2," (Attachment F, p.
44)). PrivTel pursued the patent application development efforts as projected in
the July 1, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan, incurred the patent legal expenses
generally as projected, and completed filing for patent protection of the Inventions
with the assistance of my patent attorney on August 9, 1995. PrivTel incurred
patent attorney fees generally as projected, further evidencing the work done by
my patent attorney from May, 1995 through August 1995. (See, Attachment K, p.
6 (PrivTel paid professional fees in the amount of $8462 in 1995).
E)
During at least prior to April 21, 1995 until at least August 15,
1995, PrivTel and I together spent over $60,000 on the design and development of
PrivTel's HiWire service to reduce my Inventions to practice.
67
(1)
During at least prior to April 21, 1995 until at least
August 9, 1995, PrivTel and I together spent approximately $42,993 on software
development costs for design, development and implementation of the
demonstration HiWire service (HiWire Demo) at ONE BBSCON. "Attachment C
- AVS Components" to the ICS Software Development Agreement (ICS Software
Development Agreement, p. 16 (Attachment Y)) is a table in a first part, showing
payments made to the system and software development and integration
engineering consultants hired by PrivTel to design, develop and test PrivTel’s AVS
product. As shown on pages 1-2 of the table (Attachment Y, p. _), the first column
identifies the consultant being paid and the milestones for which they were to be
paid upon completion. The second column is blank. The third column, identified
by "Cost," indicates the payments to be made for each of the identified milestones.
The fourth column, identified by "PrivTel Paid," indicates the amounts actually
paid by PrivTel to each of the software consultants as of the date of negotiation for
the ICS agreement (approximately November, 1995; See, PrivTel letter to ICS,
Attachment Z).
The fifth column, indicated by "SCD Paid," lists payments
personally made by myself, Stephen C. DuVal (initials "SCD"), to each of the
engineering firms for the applicable milestones because on those occasions PrivTel
did not have sufficient funds to make the required milestone payments. In the sixth
column, identified by "ToGo," indicates the amounts not yet paid to the software
68
developers and integrators but that will come due under the respective agreements
with the engineering consultant firms upon their completion of the remaining
milestones that had not been completed as of the date of negotiation for the ICS
agreement (approximately November, 1995; See, PrivTel letter to ICS, Attachment
Z). And the last column indicates the dates upon which the payments made by
PrivTel listed in the fourth column or myself listed in the fifth column were made
to the applicable firm.
As shown by the table, PrivTel made payments to
ProDesign between June 15, 1995 and July 24, 1995 for their consulting work on
the HiWire Demo in the amount of $15,000. As shown by the table, PrivTel made
payments to SofTel between July 1, 1995 and August 4, 1995 for their consulting
work on the HiWire Demo in the amount of $10,800. As shown by the table,
PrivTel made payments to ICS between May 15, 1995 and August 4, 1995 for their
consulting work on the HiWire Demo in the amount of $14,800. (See Shinn Decl.,
p. 14 (Exhibit 2022)). According to this same document, PrivTel paid a company
named "Point and Click" $2,393 on June 15, 1995, the same date that ProDesign
was paid. (See, ICS Software Development Agreement, p. 33 (Attachment Y)
("Attachment C - AVS Components", "Software", "Point and Click", "Cost
$2,393", "PrivTel Paid $2,393", "ToGo $0" "6/15/95")). The payments made
during at least prior to April 21, 1995 until at least August 15, 1995 to ICS, SofTel,
ProDesign and Point and Click for software development, integration and
69
implementation of the HiWire Demo totaled $42,993. In addition, another $15,600
was paid before the end of August and after the successful ONEBBS CON
demonstration.
(2)
From at least prior to April 21, 1995 through June 30,
1995, PrivTel incurred software development expenses of approximately $19,735,
which were paid to our software development partners, ICS, ProDesign and
SofTel, as they developed the custom software for the online to anonymous voice
system (AVS) implementing the Inventions. (See, July 1, 1995 PrivTel Business
Plan,
p.
43
(Attachment
(6/30/95)…Development
F)
Expenses
(“Year
to
$19,735.”);
Date
see
Income
also
ICS
Statement
Software
Development Agreement, p. 33 (Attachment Y)).
(3)
In July 1995, PrivTel’s software development costs were
$16,400. In August 1995, PrivTel’s software development costs grew to $27,800
as its software developers scaled up their efforts to complete the HiWire Demo
prior to the demonstrations at ONE BBSCON on August 16-20, 1995. (See, ICS
Software Development Agreement, p. 33 (Attachment Y)). As projected in the July
1, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan, PrivTel completed a working prototype of the
HiWire demo no later than August 15, 1995. (See, Shinn Decl., p. 8, 11 (Exhibit
2022); see also, completed milestone payments made to PrivTel software
developers upon completion of the demonstration prototype, ICS Software
70
Development Agreement, p. 34-35 (Attachment Y)).
(4)
During at least prior to April 21, 1995 until at least
August 15, 1995, PrivTel and I together spent $21,187 purchasing hardware and
off-the-shelf software components comprising the demonstration HiWire service
completed and presented at ONE BBSCON. "Attachment C - AVS Components"
to the ICS Software Development Agreement (ICS Software Development
Agreement, p. 34-35 (Attachment Y)) is a table in a second part, showing the
necessary hardware components for the HiWire service, quantity needed for each
component, each component cost, actual amount paid for each component, and the
component
serial
number.
("Attachment
C
-
AVS
Components",
"Demonstration", "Control PC", "Total $10,010", "Telephony PC", "Total
$11,052" "Total Demo $21,187", ICS Software Development Agreement, p. 34
(Attachment Y)).
F)
During at least prior to April 21, 1995 until at least August 15,
1995, engineers/technologists at four technology companies were working to
produce a working demonstration prototype of the HiWire service, which
embodied my inventions. (See also Shinn Decl. at pp. 11-13 (Exhibit 2022)). I
worked on behalf of PrivTel very long hours including many weekends,
throughout at least prior to April 21, 1995 until at least August 15, 1995, to
complete my Diligence Goals. During at least prior to April 21, 1995 until at least
71
August 15, 1995, PrivTel's software development and engineering firms,
Interactive Communication Services, Inc. (ICS) of Colorado Springs, Colorado, a
systems integration firm that specialized in voice response applications; SofTel,
Inc. (SofTel) of Colorado Springs, Colorado, a software development and systems
integration firm specializing in data communications and control software; and
ProDesign, Inc. (ProDesign), a third-party developer for Galacticomm BBS
Software, each committed significant resources to reduce my Inventions to
practice. At a minimum, each of PrivTel's custom software development and
engineering firms, ICS, SofTel and ProDesign, committed at least one full-time
engineer to PrivTel's development efforts to complete a working prototype of the
HiWire service, and reduce the Inventions to practice, in time for ONE BBSCON
on August 16-20, 1995.
(See also Shinn Decl. at pp. 11-13 (Exhibit 2022);
Clement Decl. at p. 20 (Exhibit 2023) (“PRODESIGN shall commit at least one
full time engineer to the project until completion of the development phase”);
Martin Decl., p. 5 (Exhibit 2025)). From prior to April 21 to May 15, 1995, I had
to take my ideas, narrow the offered service, locate development firms with the
requisite skills and available time for a crash project, negotiate terms, change
hardware and software design to match available skills, produce disclosure
documents, all while working with Ben Yorks on the patent application. Over
ensuing three short months, May 15, 1995 to August 16, 1995, the software
72
developers and system integrator had to completely design and implement three
separate complicated subsystems of hardware and software and then integrate
those systems into a working prototype of the HiWire service.
Such an
engineering endeavor was not a simple task and required a significant commitment
of engineering resources from myself an all three companies. (See, Martin Decl.,
pp. 2-9 (Exhibit 2025)). From at least May 15 1995 until at least August 15, 1995,
ICS committed at least one engineer, including Doug Martin and/or David Brown,
to diligent efforts to complete the HiWire Demo. (See, e.g., Attachment C to the
ICS Software Development Agreement specifying payments made by PrivTel or
myself on at least May 15, 1995, July 1, 1995, August 4, 1995 and August 26,
1995 as compensation for engineering work completed by ICS on the HiWire
Demo (Attachment Y, p. 32); Martin Decl., p. 5 (Exhibit 2025); Shinn Decl., p.
11-12 (Exhibit 2022)).
ProDesign committed at least one full-time engineer to
diligent efforts to complete the HiWire Demo from at least June 15, 1995 until at
least August 15, 1995. (See, Clement Decl. at p. 20 (Exhibit 2023) (“ProDesign
shall provide a demonstration version of the software for the ONE BBSCON
Conference August 16, 1995 on a best effort basis. To satisfy this objective,
ProDesign shall commit at least one full time engineer to the project until
completion of the development phase.”); (See also, Shinn Decl., p. 12 (Exhibit
2022)). SoftTel committed at least one full-time engineer to diligent efforts on the
73
project to complete the HiWire Demo from at least July 1, 1995 until at least
August 15, 1995. (See, Shinn Decl., p. 11 (Exhibit 2022)).
G)
From at least prior to April 21, 1995, I hired and began working
diligently with three custom software development and engineering firms to assist
me with reducing my Inventions to practice. The three firms hired were ICS,
SofTel and ProDesign. These firms were initially tasked with completing the
system prototype of my Inventions – the HiWire Demo – for demonstration at
ONE BBSCON on August 16-20, 1995. (See, July 1, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan,
p. 39 (Attachment F)). During the month of March 1995, I contacted 10-20
software developers throughout United States to find a firm having relevant
expertise in voice and telecommunication applications, data communications and
control, BBS software interfaces, and graphical user interface computer systems
(for example, I contacted Datasafe in early March 1995 about assisting with the
HiWire development, but Datasafe did not have personnel available to help PrivTel
on the project. (See, Kerl Letter, Attachment H)). In March 1995, ICS agreed to
provide systems design and integration of the HiWire service, and also perform
custom software development work on the real-time voice switching and telephony
software for the HiWire service. ICS referred me to Bob Shinn, president and
owner of SofTel, and in April 1995, SofTel agreed to provide overall project
management of the HiWire service development by the three co-developers and
74
also provide project management and software development of the custom
command control and data communications software for a control subsystem of the
HiWire service. (See Shinn Decl., p. 4 (Exhibit 2022)). In March 1995, I also
contacted Simon Clement, president of ProDesign, and ProDesign agreed to
provide custom software development of the BBS software for the HiWire service.
(See Clement Decl., p. 2 (Exhibit 2023)). Between May 5 and July 1, PrivTel
entered into agreements with each of the three software developers to develop the
custom software and integrate the custom software into a demonstration prototype
and a production system for the HiWire service that would implement an actual
reduction to practice of my Inventions. ("Contracts have been signed with 3 firms,
Interactive Communication Services, Softel, and ProDesign to develop software...
Development of the software is on schedule," July 1, 1995 PrivTel Business
Plan, p. 6, (Attachment F emphasis added); "The software required to operate the
anonymous voice service will be developed by Interactive Communication
Services, a systems integration firm which specializes in voice response
applications, SofTel, a systems integration firm which specializes in data
communications
software,
and
ProDesign,
a
third-party
developer
for
Galacticomm BBS software." July 1, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan, p. 39 (Id.);
"History of Existing Business [-]Since January, the firm has been researching the
market, writing the business plan, and initiating the development of the system
75
required to provide service." PrivTel Business Plan, July 1, 1995, p. 6 (Id.);
“Target bulletin board operators have been selected and are being scheduled for a
demonstration of the service at the ONE BBSCON tradeshow.” July 1, 1995
PrivTel Business Plan, p. 6 (Id.)).
H)
From at least prior to April 21, 1995 until at least May 5, 1995,
I diligently worked on and completed development of a detailed product design,
system architecture, communications protocol, database structure to provide
specifications and requirements for the HiWire service. During this period, my
three custom software developers, Interactive Communication Services, SofTel,
Inc. and ProDesign, Inc., collaborated with me on the requirements to be
incorporated into this document based on their expertise in their respective areas of
specialization. (See (See, Shinn Decl. pp. 5-7 (Exhibit 2022)), Martin Decl., p. 6
(Exhibit 2025)), Clement Decl., p. 3 (Attachment 2023)). This document provided
guidance to my custom software developers and system integrator through their
design and development of the demonstration and production implementations of
PrivTel's HiWire service. During this period, I diligently worked to develop, and
on May 5, 1995 completed the document, “SYSTEM DESIGN: ONLINE CHAT
TO ANONYMOUS VOICE,” dated May 5, 1995 (the "May 5, 1995 Disclosure
Document" (Attachment BB). I filed my May 5, 1995 Disclosure Document with
the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) on May 10, 1995 and was
76
granted a Disclosure Document No. 376109 under the USPTO's Disclosure
Document Program in place at the time of such filing. A true and correct true and
correct copy of the May 5, 1995 Disclosure Document I authored and filed with the
USPTO is attached hereto as Attachment BB, along with a true and correct copy of
the Disclosure Document Receipt Notice received from the USPTO with respect to
my May 5, 1995 Disclosure Document showing the USPTO mailroom date stamp
of May 10, 1995 and the assigned Disclosure Document Number 376109.
Certified copies of each are included in Exhibit 2020.
I)
Attachment CC hereto is a true and correct copy of the Request
For Acknowledgement of Disclosure Documents I filed on October 17, 1996 in the
USPTO prosecution history of the ‘836 patent, thereby submitting in the USPTO
each of the October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, the March 5, 1995 Disclosure
Document, and the May 5, 1995 Disclosure Document to preserve each of those
disclosure documents in the file history of the '836 Patent.
J)
From at least prior to April 21, 1995 until at least August 15,
1995, ICS worked diligently to assist PrivTel on the design, development and
integration of the HiWire service, including assisting me in developing and
integrating a working prototype of my Inventions based on my March 5, 1995
Disclosure Document and my May 5, 1995 Disclosure Document. In April 1995, I
engaged ICS to perform work on the overall system design and integration, and the
77
real-time voice switching and telephony components of the HiWire service. ("The
systems integrator will start work on April 10, install the system by June 14."
February 14, 1995 PrivTel Business Plan, p. 38 (Attachment E).)
(1)
Prior to May 15, 1995, ICS collaborated with PrivTel on
the requirements and documentation ICS needed to define the scope of services,
schedule and costs in a services agreement with PrivTel for their consulting work
to develop and integrate the demonstration and production HiWire service
implementations. PrivTel provided ICS a true and correct copy of the May 5, 1995
Disclosure Document to generate a software development services agreement for
the HiWire project and to direct their development of the production and prototype
implementations of PrivTel's HiWire service. (See, Martin Decl., p. 7 (Exhibit
2025)).
(2)
From at least prior to April 21, 1995 until at least May
15, 1995, I worked with ICS to develop a software development services
agreement with ICS to build the HiWire service. (See, Martin Decl., p. 4 (Exhibit
2025)). After filing my May 5, 1995 Disclosure Document in the USPTO, the
design requirements of the HiWire service were incorporated into the software
development services agreement, at which point ICS and PrivTel were able to
agree on the scope of services and associated payments to ICS for building
HiWire, and then execute the software development services agreement on or
78
about May 15, 1995. I also provided my May 5, 1995 Disclosure Document to
SofTel and ProDesign so that they could formalize their proposals for proceeding
on the HiWire project based on the specified service requirements, but because ICS
was to provide the overall system architecture, communication protocols and
design for HiWire, it was imperative that PrivTel first contract with ICS and
complete the system design and architecture so that ProDesign and SofTel could
then scope the services based on the ICS design to enter into consulting agreements
with PrivTel. On or before May 15, 1995, ICS and PrivTel entered into a software
development services agreement, and, on May 15, 1995, PrivTel paid ICS $2000 to
begin design work on the HiWire service, including the telephony subsystem
components of the HiWire service. (See, ICS Software Development Agreement,
p. 32 (Attachment Y) (("Attachment C - AVS Components", "Software", "ICS
Design", "Cost $2000", "PrivTel Paid $2000", "ToGo $0" "5/15/95"); Marin Decl.,
p. 6 (Exhibit 2025)).
(3)
Working from at least May 15, 1995 until July 1, 1995,
ICS diligently worked on the external an internal design of the HiWire service,
including the system architecture, communication protocols and overall system
design work.
For completion of the HiWire design and beginning ICS's
development of the HiWire Demo based on the completed design, PrivTel made a
$6400 payment to ICS on July 1, 1995.
79
(See, ICS Software Development
Agreement, p. 33 (Attachment Y) (("Attachment C - AVS Components",
"Software", "ICS Demo Start", "Cost $6,400", "PrivTel Paid $6,400", "ToGo $0"
"7/1/95"); see also Shinn Decl., p. 14 (Exhibit 2022)). This payment coincided
with ProDesign’s milestone No. 2 on June 27, 1995 and SofTel’s design start on
July 1, 1995.
(4)
After receipt of its milestone payment on July 1, 1995
until August 4, 1995, ICS worked diligently to develop and complete a working
demonstration prototype of the real-time voice switching and telephony subsystem
of the HiWire Demo to be demonstrated at ONE BBSCON on August 16-20, 1995.
(“Time is of the essence to this agreement. A demonstration version of the
software and documentation shall be delivered by ICS to PRIVTEL on a best
efforts basis by August 18, 1995,” ICS Software Development Agreement, p. 2,
Attachment Y). (See, Martin Decl. p. 7 (Exhibit 2025)). On or before August 4,
1995, ICS successfully completed a working demonstration prototype of the realtime voice switching and telephony subsystem of the HiWire service. On August
4, 1995, I personally paid ICS $6,400 for ICS's completion of the working
demonstration prototype of the real-time voice switching and telephony subsystem
of the HiWire service. (See, ICS Software Development Agreement, p. 33
(Attachment Y) (("Attachment C - AVS Components", "Software", "ICS Demo
Complete", "Cost $6,400", "SCD Paid $6,400", "ToGo $0" "8/4/95"); see also
80
Shinn Decl., p. 14 (Exhibit 2022)).
(5)
From August 4, 1995 until at least August 15, 1995, ICS
worked diligently with PrivTel, SofTel and ProDesign to test the integration of the
ICS real-time voice switching and telephony subsystem, the SofTel control
subsystem and the ProDesign BBS software into the HiWire Demo to ensure it was
working for demonstration at ONE BBSCON by August 16, 1995. (See, Martin
Decl. p.7 (Exhibit 2025); Shinn Decl., pp. 11-12 (Exhibit 2022)).
(6)
Prior to ONE BBSCON, Simon Clement of ProDesign
and I were in Colorado Springs, Colorado, for the integration test. (Clement Decl.,
p. 7 (Attachment 2023)).
During the time I was in Colorado Springs,
engineers/technologists from each of the four companies developing the HiWire
Demo (Stephen DuVal of PrivTel, Doug Martin of ICS, Bob Shinn of SofTel and
Simon Clement of ProDesign) diligently worked together at ICS's offices (where
the Telephony PC mounted with the ICS software and the Control PC mounted
with the SofTel software were installed) to integrate, test and complete a working
HiWire Demo, which was completed and working to the requirements and
specifications of at least my March 5, 1995 and May 5, 1995 Disclosure
Documents in time for ONE BBSCON on August 16-20, 1995. (See, Shinn Decl.
p. 8 (Exhibit 2022); Clement Decl., pp. 7-8 (Attachment 2023); Martin Decl., pp.
7-8 (Exhibit 2025)).
81
(7)
After ONE BBSCON, ICS worked to incorporate service
changes and improvements into the HiWire Demo based on the demonstrations of
the HiWire service at ONE BBSCON.
On or before August 26, 1995, I
personally paid $6,400 to ICS for completing the final demonstration prototype of
the HiWire service.
(See, ICS Software Development Agreement, p. 32
(Attachment Y) (("Attachment C - AVS Components", "Software", "ICS Demo
Finished", "Cost $6,400", "SCD Paid $6,400", "ToGo $0" "8/26/95")).
K)
Attachment Y is a true and correct copy of a draft of a software
development agreement entered into by PrivTel and ICS in November 1995 (the
"ICS Software Development Agreement"). This draft was a revision to a previous
software development agreement entered into by PrivTel and ICS in May 1995,
and was executed in a final form by PrivTel and ICS in November 19951. (See,
1
A search of PrivTel's corporate files did not uncover the May 1995 software
development agreement between PrivTel and ICS or an executed true and correct
copy of the November 1995 software development agreement with ICS. Bob
Shinn, an owner of ICS, conducted a search of ICS files and could not find a true
and correct copy of the May 1995 software development agreement with PrivTel
or an executed true and correct copy of the November 1995 software development
agreement between PrivTel and ICS. (See, Shinn Decl., pp. 15-16,( Exhibit 2022));
(See, Martin Decl., p. 11,( Exhibit 2025)).
82
Martin Decl. p. 7 (Exhibit 2025)). Attachment Z is a true and correct copy of a
facsimile of a letter dated October 28, 1995 from Rick Sachs, President and coowner of ICS, discussing the proposed modifications I had made to the May 1995
software development agreement between PrivTel and ICS. The hand written
comments on the facsimile are my additions to the facsimile after I received it on
October 28, 1995. The ICS Software Development Agreement was negotiated
between PrivTel and ICS on or about October 28, 1995. (See, Sachs letter dated
October 28, 1995 negotiating terms of the draft. (Attachment Z)). The original
software development agreement between PrivTel and ICS was being renegotiated
in October 1995 to replace the original agreement entered into by the parties in
early May 1995. Evidence that this draft was a revision to the May 1995 software
development agreement between PrivTel and ICS is found by provisions left in the
draft agreement by me and unchanged by Rick Sachs, President and owner of ICS,
in his changes to the proposed revision to the software development agreement in
his October 28, 1995 letter. (See, Sachs letter dated October 28, 1995, p. 1
(Attachment Z) ("With the exception of the Right of First Refusal, the changes are
fairly minor." )). For example, some of the terms from the May 1995 software
development agreement between ICS and PrivTel that were unchanged in the ICS
Software Development Agreement include milestones that predated that agreement
and which had been completed by the time of the October 1995 negotiation of the
83
ICS Software Development Agreement (e.g. “time is of the essence to this
agreement. A demonstration version of the software and documentation shall
be delivered by ICS to PRIVTEL on a best efforts basis by August 18, 1995,”
ICS Software Development Agreement, p. 2, Attachment Y); (See also, Martin
Decl., p. 11(Exhibit 2025)). “Attachment C” to the ICS Software Development
Agreement specified payments made to ICS for development milestones met by
ICS under the original May 1995 software development agreement. (See, ICS
Software Development Agreement, p. 2, (Attachment Y)). "Attachment D" to the
ICS Software Development Agreement is a schedule of milestones for each release
of the software and specified project milestones, including on July 10, July 14, July
21, July 24, July 26, July 31, August 7 and August 15 (notwithstanding the typed
notation of “done” for only milestones 1 and 4, at least the first nine milestones
had been completed by the negotiation of the ICS Software Development
Agreement in October 1995 because ICS had delivered to PrivTel a working
prototype of the HiWire Demo demonstrated at ONE BBSCON on August 16-20,
1995 (See, Shinn Decl., pp. 12-14 (Exhibit 2022); see also, Martin Decl., p.7-8
(Exhibit 2025)) and further because PrivTel had made milestone payments to ICS
for completion of those milestones (see. ICS Software Development Agreement, p.
18, 32-33 (Attachment Y) ("Attachment C - AVS Components", "Software", ICS
Software … "Attachment D" to the ICS Software Development Agreement further
84
specified the requirements for the ONE BBSCON demonstration system to be
delivered by ICS, and indicated that those requirements were already
“Complete.”)).
L)
From at least prior to April 21, 1995 until at least August 15,
1995, PrivTel's software developer, SofTel, worked diligently on the design,
development and integration of the HiWire service, including assisting me in
developing and integrating a working prototype of my Inventions based on my
October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, my March 5, 1995 Disclosure Document,
and my May 5, 1995 Disclosure Document. SofTel implemented the software for
the HiWire controller system to provide a business logic layer that interfaced with
the BBS software to take user requests for telephone calls and interfaced with the
telephony software to communicate instructions to the real-time switching and
telephony system.
The controller system also kept track of minutes used,
purchased and sold on the bulletin boards offering the HiWire service.
(1)
I held discussions with Robert Shinn of SofTel in April
1995 about SofTel providing custom software development to PrivTel. From at
least prior to April 21, 1995 until at least May 5, 1995, SofTel collaborated with
PrivTel on the requirements and documentation needed to define the scope of
services, schedule and costs for their consulting work on the development and
integration of the demonstration and production HiWire service implementations.
85
(See, Shinn Decl., pp. 4, 7 (Exhibit 2022)). After May 5, 1995, PrivTel provided
SofTel with a true and correct copy of the May 5, 1995 Disclosure Document to
direct their development on the production and prototype implementations of
PrivTel's HiWire service. (See, Shinn Decl., p. 5 (Exhibit 2022)). From May 5,
1995 until July 1, 1995, SofTel awaited the overall system architecture,
communication protocols and design for the HiWire service produced by ICS as
the overall system designer. (See, Shinn Decl., pp. 7-8 (Exhibit 2022)).
(2)
From after May 5, 1995 until June 15, 1995, SofTel
consulted with ICS on design and architecture issues related to the controller
subsystem software and interface as they related to ICS's development of the
overall architecture and design of the HiWire service. (See, Martin Decl., p. 6
(Exhibit 2025)).
Prior to July 1, 1995, SofTel was sent the overall system
architecture, communication protocols and design documentation generated by
ICS. Based on that document, SofTel worked with PrivTel to define the scope of
services and associated payments for SofTel's engineering work on the HiWire
service project.
(3)
From at least June 1, 1995 until at least August 15, 1995,
SofTel worked diligently on designing, developing and integrating the
demonstration prototype software for the controller system for the HiWire service.
(See, Shinn Decl. pp. 6-8 (Exhibit 2022)). PrivTel paid SofTel $3,000.00 on July
86
1, 1995 for starting the design on the controller system of the demonstration
prototype of the HiWire service. (See, ICS Software Development Agreement, p.
32 (Attachment Y) ("Attachment C - AVS Components", "Software", "SofTel
Demo Start", "Cost $3000", "PrivTel Paid $3000", "ToGo $0" "7/1/95"); see also
Shinn Decl., p. 13 (Exhibit 2022)).
(4)
On July 8, 1995, PrivTel made a $2,000.00 payment to
SofTel for completion of the design for the controller system of the HiWire service
and beginning development of the demonstration prototype software of the
controller system for the HiWire service. (See, Shinn Decl. p. 14 (Exhibit 2022));
ICS Software Development Agreement, p. 32 (Attachment Y) ("Attachment C AVS Components", "Software", "SofTel Demo Complete", "Cost $2000",
"PrivTel Paid $2000", "ToGo $0" "7/8/95").
(5)
From July 1, 1995 until August 4, 1995, SofTel worked
diligently to develop the demonstration prototype controller subsystem that was to
be part of the HiWire Demo to be presented at ONE BBSCON on August 16-20,
1995. (See, Shinn Decl. p. 5-6, 7-8(Exhibit 2022)). Upon SofTel's completion of a
working version of the demonstration prototype for the controller subsystem of the
HiWire Demo, 1995, I personally paid SofTel $5,800.00 for completing that
milestone on or before August 4. ("Attachment C - AVS Components",
"Software", "SofTel Demo Finished", "Cost $5,800", "SCD Paid $5,800", "ToGo
87
$0" "8/4/95", ICS Software Development Agreement, p. 32 (Attachment Y)).
(6)
From August 7, 1995 until at least August 15, 1995,
SofTel worked diligently with PrivTel, ICS and ProDesign to integrate the SofTel
controller subsystem into the demonstration prototype HiWire service and to test
and troubleshoot the HiWire service to ensure it was working for demonstration at
ONE BBSCON. (See, Shinn Decl. pp. 7, 11 (Exhibit 2022); Martin Decl., pp. 6-7
(Exhibit 2025)).
(7)
Prior to ONE BBSCON, engineers/technologists from
each of the four companies developing the HiWire Demo (Stephen DuVal of
PrivTel, Doug Martin of ICS, Bob Shinn of SofTel and Simon Clement of
ProDesign) diligently worked together at ICS's offices in Colorado Springs (where
the Telephony PC mounted with the ICS software and the Control PC mounted
with the SofTel software were installed) to integrate, test and complete a working
HiWire Demo, which was completed and working to the requirements and
specifications of at least my March 5, 1995 and May 5, 1995 Disclosure
Documents in time for ONE BBSCON on August 16-20, 1995. (See, Shinn Decl.
p. 8 (Exhibit 2022); Clement Decl., pp. 7-8 (Attachment 2023); Martin Decl., pp.
6-7 (Exhibit 2025)).
(8)
After ONE BBSCON, SofTel worked to incorporate
service changes and improvements into the completed HiWire service based on the
88
demonstrations of the HiWire Demo at ONE BBSCON.
(Shinn Decl., p. 11
(Exhibit 2022)).
M)
From when SofTel was initially engaged in April, 1995 through
the completion of the HiWire Demo, SoftTel worked under a standard software
services agreement with PrivTel based on SofTel's invoices. At Stephen DuVal's
request, PrivTel and SoftTel entered into a written software development
agreement for SoftTel's software development services dated September 12, 1995
(the "SoftTel Software Development Agreement"). (See, Shinn Decl., pp. 12-13
(Exhibit 2022)).
Attachment DD is a true and correct copy of a software
development agreement executed by PrivTel and Softel, Inc., dated September 12,
1995. The SoftTel Software Development Agreement references milestones and
delivery dates that pre-date the effective date of that agreement because SofTel had
been working on the PrivTel project since April 1995 under SofTel invoice's
standard terms and conditions. For example, Section 3 of the SoftTel Software
Development Agreement specifies, “Delivery of software and documentation.
Time is of the essence to this agreement. A demonstration version of the software
and documentation shall be delivered by SOFTEL to PRIVTEL on a best efforts
basis by August 1, 1995,” where such deadline was selected to ensure that SofTel's
controller subsystem would be completed in time for integration into the HiWire
Demo prior to the ONE BBSCON on August 16-20, 1995, almost 6 weeks prior to
89
the effective date of the SoftTel Software Development Agreement. Section 4 of
the SoftTel Software Development Agreement specified compensation to SofTel in
amounts payable upon completion of development and delivery of certain
deliverables (e.g. “$3,000.00 upon SOFTEL’S commencement of work on the
demonstration version of the software and documentation.”). SofTel was paid
$3000 for commencement of work on the demonstration system software on July
1, 1995, three months prior to the effective date of the SoftTel Software
Development Agreement. (See, Shinn Decl. p. 13 (Exhibit 2022); ICS Software
Development Agreement, p. 32 (Attachment Y) ("Attachment C - AVS
Components", "Software", "SofTel Demo Start", "Cost $3000", "PrivTel Paid
$3000", "ToGo $0" "7/1/95")).
N)
From at least prior to April 21, 1995 until at least August 15,
1995, PrivTel's software developer, ProDesign, worked diligently on the design,
development and integration of the HiWire service, including collaborating with
me on the development and integration of a working prototype of my Inventions
based on my October 16, 1994 Disclosure Document, my March 5, 1995
Disclosure Document, and my May 5, 1995 Disclosure Document. (See Clement
Decl., pp. 5-8 (Attachment 2023)). ProDesign's primary responsibility was to
design and develop the BBS software to provide a user interface to the HiWire
service on bulletin board services, as well as to communicate with the control
90
subsystem of the HiWire service when a user selected the HiWire GUI button on
the BBS user interface and provide for bulletin board services to buy time on the
HiWire service wholesale and then sell minutes on the HiWire service to retail
customers. (See Clement Decl., pp. 4 (Attachment 2023)). I recruite ProDesign in
April 1995 to provide custom software development services for PrivTel. (See
Clement Decl., p. 5 (Attachment 2023))
(1)
From at least prior to April 21, 1995 until at least May
5, 1995, ProDesign collaborated with PrivTel on the requirements and
documentation ProDesign needed to define the scope of services, schedule and
costs for the consulting work to develop and integrate the demonstration and
production HiWire service implementations. (See Clement Decl., p. 5 (Attachment
2023)). After May 5, 1995, PrivTel provided ProDesign with a true and correct
copy of the May 5, 1995 Disclosure Document to direct its development of the
production and prototype implementations of the HiWire service. (Id.)
(2)
From approximately May 15, 1995 until June 15, 1995,
ProDesign consulted with ICS on design and architecture issues related to the BBS
software and interface as they related to ICS's development of the overall
architecture and design of the HiWire service. (See, Martin Decl., p. 5 (Exhibit
2025); Shinn Decl., p. 12 (Exhibit 2022)); see also Clement Decl., p. 5
(Attachment 2023)). ProDesign was sent a true and correct copy of a preliminary
91
draft of the system architecture, communication protocols and design
documentation for the HiWire service produced by ICS as the system integrator.
Based on that document, ProDesign worked with PrivTel to define the scope of
services and payments for ProDesign's engineering work on the HiWire service
project.
(3)
From at least as early as June 15, 1995 through at least
August 15, 1995, ProDesign worked diligently to implement software to provide a
BBS user interface of the HiWire service to allow BBS users to access the HiWire
service from bulletin board services. (See Clement Decl., pp. 2-8 (Attachment
2023)). Attachment AA is a true and correct copy of the Software Development
Maintenance and Marketing Agreement that was entered into by ProDesign and
PrivTel on June 26, 1995 (the "ProDesign Software Development Maintenance and
Marketing Agreement").
(See Clement Decl., p. 2 (Attachment 2023)).
ProDesign was to develop custom software for the HiWire Demo prototype of the
Invention(s) based on my March 5, 1995 and May 5, 1995 Disclosure Documents,
with the initial version of the HiWire Demo being targeted for the Worldgroup
software platform by Galacticomm – the most widely used BBS platform in 1995
that provided for a Windows client graphical user interface.
(See, ProDesign
Software Development Maintenance and Marketing Agreement, p.1 (Attachment
AA)). Because of the significant amount of software design and development
92
required to be performed in only two months before ONE BBSCON, ProDesign
agreed to begin development on the custom software for PrivTel upon PrivTel’s
first installment payment to ProDesign on or about June 15, 1995. Clement Decl.,
p. 5 (Attachment 2023)). After ProDesign began the development work, Simon
Clement, the President of ProDesign, finalized and executed the ProDesign
Software Development Maintenance and Marketing Agreement with PrivTel on
June 26, 1995. (Id. at p. 2). On July 21, 1995, ProDesign and PrivTel entered into
an amendment of the ProDesign Software Development Maintenance and
Marketing Agreement further specifying certain design testing terms and various
payment terms. (Id. at p. 2). Attachment EE is a true and correct copy of the
Amended ProDesign Software Development Maintenance and Marketing
Agreement, dated July 21, 1995. (Id.)
(4)
PrivTel paid ProDesign $5000 on June 15, 1995 for
commencement of the HiWire service design work.
(See, ICS Software
Development Agreement, p. 32 (Attachment Y) ("Attachment C - AVS
Components", "Software", "ProDesign Design 1", "Cost $5000", "PrivTel Paid
$5000", "ToGo $0" "6/15/95"); Clement Decl., p. 5 (Attachment 2023)). PrivTel
then paid ProDesign $5000 on June 27, 1995 for completion of the HiWire service
software design work and commencement of the development of the BBS software
for the HiWire Demo that was to be presented at ONE BBSCON on August 16-20,
93
1995.
(See, ICS Software Development Agreement, p. 32 (Attachment Y)
(("Attachment C - AVS Components", "Software", "ProDesign Design 2", "Cost
$5000", "PrivTel Paid $5000", "ToGo $0" "6/27/95"); Clement Decl., p. 5
(Attachment 2023)). The ProDesign agreement called for payment of $10,000 to
ProDesign at the "Start of Design Phase" and committed another payment of
$10,000 at the "Start of Development Phase," scheduled for completion by August
1, 1995. (See, ProDesign Software Development Maintenance and Marketing
Agreement, p. 9 (Attachment AA); Clement Decl., p. 5 (Attachment 2023)). The
$5000 payment on June 15, 1995 and the $5000 payment on June 27, 1995,
together constituted the $10,000 payment under the ProDesign agreement for the
start of the design phase on June 15, 1995. Further, ProDesign's design work had
already commenced and was almost complete by the time the ProDesign
agreement was signed, given the target completion date for the "Specification
Phase is June 30th," a mere four days after the effective date of the ProDesign .
(ProDesign Software Development Maintenance and Marketing Agreement, p. 9
(Attachment AA); Clement Decl., p. 5 (Attachment 2023)).
(5)
ProDesign met the first development milestone by
completing the HiWire Demo software, and on or before July 24, 1995, I
personally paid ProDesign $5,000.00 as a first installment of the $10,000 due for
the completion of the development phase (under the agreement, the development
94
phase "completion date" was August 1 and). (See, ProDesign Software
Development Maintenance and Marketing Agreement, p. 9; ICS Software
Development Agreement, p. 32 (Attachment Y) ("Attachment C - AVS
Components", "Software", "ProDesign Develop 1", "Cost $5000", "PrivTel Paid
$5000", "ToGo $0" "7/24/95"); Clement Decl., p. 5 (Attachment 2023)).
(6)
Following completion of the BBS software for the
HiWire Demo until at least August 15, 1995, ProDesign worked diligently with
PrivTel, ICS and SofTel to integrate the ProDesign BBS software into the
demonstration prototype HiWire service, and to test and troubleshoot the HiWire
service to ensure it was working for demonstration at ONE BBSCON. (See, Shinn
Decl. p. 12 (Exhibit 2022); Martin Decl., p. 7 (Exhibit 2025); Clement Decl., pp. 89 (Attachment 2023)).
(7)
Prior to ONE BBSCON, Simon Clement of ProDesign
and I traveled to Colorado Springs, Colorado. (Clement Decl., p. 6 (Attachment
2023)). During the time we were in Colorado Springs, engineers/technologists
from each of the four companies developing the HiWire Demo (Stephen DuVal of
PrivTel, Doug Martin of ICS, Bob Shinn of SofTel and Simon Clement of
ProDesign) diligently worked together at ICS's offices (where the Telephony PC
mounted with the ICS software and the Control PC mounted with the SofTel
software were installed) to integrate, test and complete a working HiWire Demo,
95
which was completed and working to the requirements and specifications of at
least my March 5, 1995 and May 5, 1995 Disclosure Documents in time for ONE
BBSCON on August 16-20, 1995. (See, Shinn Decl. p. 8 (Exhibit 2022); Martin
Decl., p. 7 (Exhibit 2025); Clement Decl., pp. 7-8 (Attachment 2023)).
(8)
After ProDesign's completion of the HiWire Demo for
demonstration at ONE BBSCON, I personally paid ProDesign $5,000 for
completing that milestone. (See, ICS Software Development Agreement, p. 32
(Attachment Y) ("Attachment C - AVS Components", "Software", "Develop2",
"Cost $5,000", "SCD Paid $5,000", "ToGo $0" "8/26/95")); Clement Decl., pp. 7-8
(Attachment 2023)).
O)
1995.
I attended ONE BBSCON in Tampa Florida on August 16-20,
Simon Clement, president and owner of ProDesign, was also at ONE
BBSCON to present his products. Simon Clement provided some assistance in
getting large BBS owners and representatives to attend my demos.
(See,
ProDesign Software Development Maintenance and Marketing Agreement, p. 9
(Attachment EE) (“At ONE BBSCON, PRODESIGN shall distribute PrivTel’s
literature to qualified BBS operators and refer them to PrivTel’s demonstration
room. Simon Clement shall participate in demonstrations to key BBS personnel.”).
ONE BBSCON was attended by approximately five thousand people in the BBS,
online services, and Internet industries. At ONE BBSCON, PrivTel had a suite in
96
an adjacent hotel to ONE BBSCON and gave a private demonstration of the
HiWire Demo to fourteen of the largest BBS operators in the United States.
During each day of demonstration, Robert Shinn attended to the Telephony PC and
Control PC at ICS's offices to ensure the smooth operation of the HiWire Demo.
(See, Shinn Decl. p. 11 (Exhibit 2022)). Thirteen out of fourteen BBS operators
that demonstrated the HiWire Demo at ONE BBSCON in 1995 purchased minutes
on the HiWire service to be offered on their BBS services.
P)
The HiWire Demo was a working prototype reducing to
practice at least the invention of independent Claim 1 in the '836 Patent2.
(1)
For the demonstration, the HiWire Demo was set up in a
hotel suite with 2 PC computers running Windows. Both computers would log on
to the Demo BBS in Albuquerque, New Mexico. For the demo, a user on the first
computer would click the anonymous voice button to initiate a voice call. There
were also two telephones having two separate telephone numbers. After the demo
BBS in Albuquerque received a request for a voice call from the PC in the hotel
suite, the demo BBS would send a request to the control PC installed at ICS offices
in Colorado Springs. Then the control PC sent a message to the telephony PC, also
at the ICS offices. The telephony PC also interacted with the public switched
2
The HiWire Demo also reduced to practice the invention of independent Claim
12 in the '836 Patent.
97
telephone network to make both phones in the hotel suite ring and establish a voice
circuit between both phones. (See, Shinn Decl. pp. 9-11 (Exhibit 2022); Martin
Decl. pp. 8-9 (Exhibit 2025); Clement Decl., pp. 8-9 (Attachment 2023)). (“1. A
method for creating a voice connection over a circuit switched network between a
first party and a second party using an on-line data service to initiate the
connection, comprising the steps of:” Claim 1 of the '836 Patent3).
(2)
A first user would use one of the personal computers to
log on to the HiWire Demo over a dial-up network to the demonstration bulletin
board service hosted by a ProDesign server in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The
demonstration BBS included a graphical user interface (“GUI”) with a text chat
window displaying a click-to-call button that the first or second user could push to
initiate a switch from electronic communication to voice connection with the other
user. (See, ICS Software Development Agreement, p. 21 (Attachment Y) (“ONE
BBSCON DEMO Complete … Client C/S Message Processor WG Client GUI”)).
The first user on the first PC would communicate via text chat on the demo BBS
3
Also demonstrating "A system for establishing a voice connection over a circuit
switched network between a first party and a second party that are both coupled to
said circuit switched network, and the first party is anonymous to the second party
prior to establishing a first voice connection between the parties, each party also
having a data terminal, comprising:" of Claim 12.
98
with a second user on the second personal computer in the hotel room, where the
first and second users were attendees at ONE BBSCON representing a large BBS.
While the two users were not anonymous in the demo, in actual practice on an
ODS, the users would not be in the same room and would be anonymous identified
just by their handles. (See also, Shinn Decl. p. 9 (Exhibit 2022); Martin Decl. pp.
8-9 (Exhibit 2025)). (“establishing an electronic communication between the first
party and the second party through the on-line data service between the first party
and the second party, wherein the first party is anonymous to the second party prior
to establishing a first electronic communication between the first party and the
second party, wherein the establishing includes providing over the Internet, to a
data terminal of the first party coupled to the Internet, information publicly
accessible over the Internet, wherein the information publically accessible over the
Internet is suitable for presentation within a graphical user interface of the data
terminal of the first party,” Claim 1 of the '836 Patent4).
4
Also demonstrating "an on-line data system that is coupled to the data terminal of
each party, wherein the on-line data system provides over the Internet, to the data
terminal of the first party, information publicly accessible over the Internet,
wherein the information publically accessible over the Internet is suitable for
presentation within a graphical user interface of the data terminal of the first party"
of Claim 12.
99
(3)
The text chat window within the GUI interface for the
first and second personal computers of the HiWire Demo showed each user's
handle and textual chat communications transmitted to each of the respective
personal computers through the HiWire demonstration BBS. The GUI interface
window of the first user also included the click-to-call button in view of the handle
and textual chat, which when selected by the first user in the GUI interface
initiated the process for switching from the chat communications online to a
telephone communication between the users on each of the first and second
telephones. (See, Shinn Decl. p. 9 (Exhibit 2022). (“wherein the information
publicly accessible over the Internet includes: (1) first information characterizing
the second party, second information representing a communication from the
second party, and third information specifying a user-selectable element for display
within the graphical user interface of the data terminal of the first party, wherein
the user-selectable element is visually associated, within the graphical user
interface of the data terminal of the first party, with the first information and the
second information, when the first information, second information and userselectable element are presented within the graphical user interface of the data
terminal of the first party; and” Claim 1 of the '836 Patent5).
5
Also demonstrating "wherein the information publicly accessible over the
Internet includes: (1) first information characterizing the second party, (2) second
100
(4)
Upon detection of the selection of the click-to-call button
indicating the first user wanted to make a telephone call to the second user whom
they were text chatting with on the BBS, the first user's personal computer
transmitted a request to the Demo BBS requesting that a telephone communication
be initiated between the first and second users. (See, Shinn Decl. p. 10 (Exhibit
2022); Martin Decl. pp. 8-9 (Exhibit 2025)). (“following the establishment of an
electronic communication between the first party and the second party through the
on-line data service between the first party and the second party, and in response to
receiving an indication of selection of the user-selectable element displayed within
the graphical user interface of the data terminal of the first party, performing the
steps of: (1) requesting a voice communication between the first party and the
information representing a communication from the second party received by the
on-line data system from the data terminal of the second party, and (3) third
information specifying a user-selectable element for display within the graphical
user interface of the data terminal of the first party,
wherein the user-selectable element is visually associated, within the graphical user
interface of the data terminal of the first party, with the first information and the
second information, when the first information, second information and userselectable element are presented within the graphical user interface of the data
terminal of the first party" of Claim 12.
101
second party through the on-line data service;” Claim 1 of the '836 Patent).
(5)
Upon receipt of the request from the first user's personal
computer initiated by the user selection of the click-to-call button, the Demo BBS
would transmit a connect command to the Control PC requesting a telephone
communication between the first and second user's telephones.
(See, Shinn Decl.
p. 10 (Exhibit 2022); Martin Decl. pp. 8-9 (Exhibit 2025)).
(“transmitting a
message from the on-line data service to a voice system requesting the voice
connection between said first party and said second party;” Claim 1 of the '836
Patent6).
(6)
In response to receiving the connect command, the
Control PC would send a message to the Telephony PC requesting a telephone
communication between the first and second user’s telephone. The Telephony PC
would first make a telephone call to the second user's telephone, it would ring, and
the second user would pick up the second user's telephone. The Telephony PC
6
Also demonstrating "wherein following the provision of the information publicly
accessible over the Internet to the data terminal of the first party, said on-line data
system generates a connect command in response to an input provided by the first
party through the data terminal of the first party indicative of selection of the user
selectable element within the graphical user interface of the data terminal of the
first party; and," of Claim 12.
102
would then dial a telephone call to the first user's telephone, it would ring, and the
first user would pick up the first user's telephone. The Telephony PC would then
connect the two telephone calls to each of the first and second telephones,
respectively, and then the two users would speak with each other over the
connected telephone calls. (See, Shinn Decl. p. 10 (Exhibit 2022); Martin Decl.
pp. 8-9 (Exhibit 2025)). (“establishing a first telephone call for the first party;
establishing a second telephone call for the second party; and, connecting said first
telephone call with said second telephone call." Claim 1 of the '836 Patent7).
(7)
The GUI presentation on each of the first and second
personal computers to the first and second users, respectively, was substantially
similar to the GUI interface I conceptualized for my Inventions and that I described
in the '836 Patent in the preferred embodiments depicted in FIG. 4 thereof. (See,
Shinn Decl. p. 10 (Exhibit 2022)).
7
Also demonstrating "a voice system connected to said circuit switched network
and said on-line data system, wherein said voice system receives said connect
command and connects a first telephone call of the first party with a second
telephone call of the second party in response to the connect command." of Claim
12.
103
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
I further declare that all statements made herein of my own knowledge are
true and that all statements made on information and belief are believed to be true,
and further that these statements were made with the knowledge that willful false
statements and the like so made are punishable by fine or imprisonment, or both,
under Section 1001 of Title 18 of the United States Code and that willful false
statements or the like may jeopardize the validity of the patent or any patent
issuing thereon.
FURTHER, DECLARANT SAYETH NOT,
Stephen C. DuVal
D
104
ATTACH M ENT A
A
ATTACHMENT
105
11111111111111111111111El111lUS0058l
11||11111|§1|8836C1
11111111111111111111111111111111
<12) EX PARTE REEXAMENATHON CERTKFECATE (65 87th)
United States Patent
(10) Number:
DuVa1
(45) Certificate Issued:
(54) METHODANDAPPARATUS FOR
.....
USING AN ONLINE DAT SER C
(76) inventor: Stephen C. DuVa1. 186 Plymouth Dr..
lVemSS‘IL(US)60o67
Int. Cl.
H04M 7/00
(2006.01)
H04M 1/66
(2006.01)
H04M 3/42
(2006.01)
1-104-M 15/00
(2006.01)
1-104M 7/12
(2006.01)
H0-’tM 3/56
(2006.01)
1-104M 3/38
(2006.01)
HO4M 3/432
(2006.01)
(52) U.S'.'C1'. ........................ 370/389: 370/352: 370/3921'
379/204.01; 379/213.01; 379/882
(58) Field of Classification Search ........................ None
See application tile for complete search history.
(56)
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
4/1988
1/1989
3/1992
* 11/1994
* 12/1994
7/1995
1/I996
* 1/1996
7/1996
8/1996
9/1996
9/1996
3/1997
*
:i"l°"
tometa.I
.
7/I997 Baugher
“/1997 Ah."-V’
§.;:t1):.;2g2 1* 1:11/1333
715/500.1
................
715,38
.
.................. 705/14
5.991.394 A
ll/1999 Dezonno
6.301.350 Bl "‘ 10/Z001 Henningson et :11.
379/£0.01
OTHER PUBL1CAT1ONS
Tanenbaum. Andrew S.. Computer Networks. 2nd Ed.. Prentice—l-lall. 1nc.. ISBN 0-13-l62959—X. 1988. pp. 35 and
36.*
* cited by examiner
Prirnary Examiner—--Roland G Foster
(57)
ABSTRACT
An anonymous telephone communication system. The system includes an anonymous voice system which can establish an anonymous telephone communication through a circuit switched network (CSN). In operation. two parties place
separate telephone calls to the anonymous voice system
through the CSN. The parties thenenter matchcodes through
their telephone keypads. The anonymous voice system compares the matchcodes entered by the parties and connects the
telephone calls if the matchcodes match The system may
include an on-line data service that establishes electronic
communication between the parties through corresponding
data terminals. The data terminals may have resident anonymous voice input commands that can be selected by the
parties. The or1—line data service transmits a connect command to the anonymous voice system which dials the two
parties, or waits for the parties to dial the system. and then
connects the parties. The anonymous voice system sends a
disconnect command to the on-line data service when the
References Cited
U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS
4.741.025
4,796,293
5.099.510
5.361.295
5.373.549
5.436.957
5.483.352
5.483.588
5.539.813
5.544.937
5555298
5.559.875
5.608.786
2 *
5.644.715 A
5.689553 A
Reexamination Request:
No. 90/007.012. Apr. 23, 2004
(51)
5
Dec. 30 2008
5.611.038 A * 3/1997 Show E1211.
ANONYMOUS VOICE COMMUNICATION
A
V] E
Reexamination Certificate for:
Patent No.:
5,818,836
lssued:
Oct. 6, 1998
Appl. No.2
08/512,820
Filed:
Aug. 9, 1995
Us 5,818,836 C1
Maniyamaetal.
Blinken et al. ......... 379/202.01
Blinlzendr.
Solomon et al, ........... 379/67.1
Bales et :11. .............. 379/93.21
McConnell
Fukuyama etal. .......... 358/402
Ealonet a1. ........... 379/202.01
Jonsson
Bales
Jonsson
Bieselin
Gordon
parties hang up.‘The disconnect command can be used by the
online service to bill the parties for using the anonymous
voice service. The system also stores a couple record during
the first anonymous call recording the matchcode and the
telephone numbers of both parties. Subsequently. either
party may initiate an anonymous call to the other party without prior coordination.
106
106
US 5,818,836 Cl
2
1
EX PARTE
[c)] (2) transmitting a message from the [online] on-line
data service to a voice system requesting the voice connection between said first party and said second party;
[c] (3) establishing a first telephone call for the first pany:
[d] (4) establishing a second telephone call for the second
party; and.
[e] (5) connecting said first telephone call with said second telephone call.
2. The method as recited in claim 1. wherein said tele-
REEXAMINATEON CERTIFICATE
ISSUED UNDER 35 U.S.C. 307
THE PATENT IS HEREBY AMENDED AS
INDICATED BELOW.
'
Matter enclosed in heavy brackets [ } appeared in the
patent, but has been deleted and is no longer a part of the
patent; matter printed in italics indicates additions made ;o_ phone [call’s] calls are established by dialing a telephone
to the patent.
/station of each party from [an anonymous] the voice system.
_.The method as recited in claim 1, wherein said telephone calls are established by each party dialing [an anonyAS A RESULT OF REEXAMINATION, IT HAS BEEN
DETERMINED THAT:
,—mous} the voice system.
15’ g5.;'I'he method as recited in claim 1, further comprising
Claims 4, 7, 11. 1'7. 20 and 21 are cancelled.
the «steps of providing the parties with a matchcode, [entering] receiving entered matchcodes, comparing said entered
Claims 1-3. 5, 6, 8, 12-16, 18 and 19 are determined to be
matchcodes. and connecting the parties if said matchcodes
patentable as amended.
,-match.
20:- _ 6. ,The method as recited in claim [1] 5, further comprising
Claims 9 and 10. dependent on an amended claim. are
the step of storing said matchcode, a first telephone number
determined to be patentable.
that corresponds to the first party and a second telephone
,i‘numb_er that corresponds to the second party.
New claims 22-30 are added and determined to be patent’ '8. The method as recited in claim 1, further comprising
able.
25 the’ step of sending a disconnect message to said [online]
on-line data service when said first telephone call is discon1. A method for creating a voice connection over a circuit
nected from said second telephone call.
switched networle between a first party and a second party
12. A system for establishing .a voice connection over a
using an on-line data service to initiate the connection, comcircuit switched network between a first party and a second
prising 'the steps of:
30 party that are both coupled to said circuit switched network,
a) establishing an electronic communication between the
and thefirst party is anonymous to the second party prior to
first party and the second party through the on-line data
establishing a first voice connection between the parties,
service between [a] the first party and [a] the second
each party also having a data terminal, comprising:
party, wherein the first party is anonymous to the secan on-line data [service] systentthat is coupled to the data
ond parry prior to establishing a first electronic com- 35
[terminals] terminal of each party, wherein the on-line
munication between the first party and the second
data sysrenz provides over the Internet, to the data terparty, wherein the establishing includes providing over
minal ofthe first party, infonnation publicly accessible
the Internet, to a data temtinal ofthefirst party coupled
over the Internet, wherein the information publically
to the Intemet, infomtation publicly accessible over the
accessible over the Internet is suitablefor presentation
Internet, wherein the infonnation publically accessible 40
within a graphical user interface ofthe data tenninal of
over the Internet is suitable for presentation within a
the first party, wherein the infonnation publicly accessible over the Internet includes:
graphical user interface oftire data terminal ofthefirst
party, wherein the infonnation publicly accessible over
(l)firstinfom1ation characterizing the second party,
the lntentet includes:
(2) second infomzation representing a communication
45
(])first information characterizing the second party,
from the second puny received by the on-line data
(2) second information representing a communication
system from the data tenninal of the second party,
and
from the secorzd party, and
(3) third information spectfvirzg a user—selectable element
(3) third infomtation specifying a user-selectable elefor display within the graphical user interface of the
ment for display within the graphical user interface
data tenninal of the first parry, wherein the user- 50
of the data terminal of the first party, wherein the
user-selectable elenzent is visually associated, within
selectable element is visually associated, witltin the
graphical user interface ofthe data terminal ofthefirst
the graphical user interface of the data tenninal of
thefirst party, with the first information and the secparty, with the first information and the second
ond infon-natiarz, when the first infonnation, second
irtfonnation, when the first infonnatiort, second information and user-selectable element are presented 55
information and user-selectable element are presented within the graphical user interface ofthe data
within the graphical user interface of the data tenninal
of thefirst party: and
terminal ofthefirst party,
h) following the establishment of an electronic communiwherein following the provision of the information publicly accessible over the Intemet to the data tenninal of
cation between the firsr party and the second party
through the on-line data service between thefirst party 60
the first party, said on-line data [service] system generates a connect command in response to an input proand the second party, and in response to receiving an
indication of selection of the user-selectable element
vided by [a] the first party through the data tenninal of
displayed witlzin the graphical user interface of the
the first parry indicative of selection of the userselectable element within the graphical user interface
data tenninal of thefirst party. performing the steps of:
65
of the data terminal ofthefirst party: and,
(I) requesting a voice communication between the first
a voice system connected to said circuit switched network
party and the second party through the on-line data
service;
and said on-line data [service] system. wherein said
107
107
US 5,818,836 Cl
4
3
voice system receives said connect command and conproviding a text presentation portion of the graphical
nects a first telephone call of the first party with a secuser interface in which tavtual information is presented: and
ond telephone call of the second party itt response to
the connect cotntnund.
providing the user-selectable element in association
13. The system as recited in claim 12. wherein said
with the text presentation portion of the graphical
[anonymous] voice system dials a telephone station of each
,
user
intetface.
party.
24.,-The method of claitn I. wherein the step of establish14. The system as recited in claim 12. wherein said conitt,§'electrottic cotntttunicatiott comprises establishing textual
nect command includes a matchcode and said [anonymous]
voice system connects said first and second telephone calls 10 data communication henveett the first party and the second
l7‘1'-'F."when the parties enter matching matchcodes.
" 25_.7"TlIL' method ofclaim 24, wherein the step ofestablish15. The system as recited in claim 12. wherein said
ittgfevtual data comnutnication comprises establishing chat
{anonymous} voice system generates a disconnect command
conttttttnicatiott benveen thefirst part)‘ and the second pony.
when said first telephone call is disconnected from said secI5 .5": 26,‘? The method ofclaim I, wherein:
ond telephone call.
16. The system as recited in claim 15. wherein said distlie step of establislzing the first telephone call utilizes a
first telephone ntttnber associated with the first party:
connect command is sent to said on-line data [service] sysl€I7l .
the step ofestablishing the second telephone call utilizes a
18. The system as recited in claim 12. wherein said
second telephone number associated with the second
on—line data [service] system is coupled to the data tenninals 20
party: and
through a packet switched network.
the metltodfurther contprises receiving from the data ter19. The system as recited in claim 12. wherein said
minal of the first party a request for voice communica[anonymous] voice system includes a switch that connects
tion incladittg, ofthe set consisting ofthefirst telephone
said first telephone call and said second telephone call.
number and the second telephone numbet; at most the
75
I 22."Tl1e method ofclaittt I , wherein:
first telephone nttntbet:
tlid user-selectable elemettt comprises an icon: and
2Z.’The method of claim I, wherein the second informathe step ofproviding over the Internet, to a data terminal
tion comprises an advertisement.
of the first patty coupled to the lntemet, infonttation
28. The system of claim I2, wherein the second infomtapublicly accessiblaover the Internet comprises provid‘ tiott comprises an advertisement.
_
30
- “ ing a graphical user interface including said icon.
29. The system of claim I2, wherein the user-selectable
element comprises an icon.
__2_3.-~;The method ofclaim 22, wherein:
the electronic communication includes electronic commu30. The S_VSl'L’m of claim I 2, wherein the on-line data systtication oftextual infonnation: and
tem provides the second ittfontzatiott in a text presentation
the step ofproviding over the Intentet, to a data tenninal
portion of the graphical user interface.
35
of the first party coupled to the Internet, infonnation
*
publicly accessible over the Internet comprises:
108
108
llllillllllilllliilllllllilliiiliil
mm:
US005818836A
United States Patent
[19]
lDuVal
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR
ANONYMOUS VOICE COMMUNICATION
USING AN ONLINE DATA SERVICE
[76]
Inventor:
[21]
Appl. No.: 512,820
[22]
Filed:
[51]
Int. CL6 ........................... H04L 12/28; H04L 12/56;
H04M 1/64; H04M 3/42
U.S. Cl. .......................... 370/389; 370/352; 370/392;
379/67; 379/204
[58]
Stephen C. ]Du‘Val, 186 Plymouth Dr.,
Iverness, Ill.
Aug. 9, 1995
References Cited
U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS
3,144,518
8/1964 Lummis ................................_. 379/204
4,475,189 10/1984
4,577,065 3/1986
4,771,425 9/1988
4,847,890 7/1989
4,878,B9 10/1989
4,908,850 3/1990
4,969,184 11/1990
5,058,152 10/1991
5,369,694 11/1994
5,608,786_ 3/1997
[45]
Date ct’ Patent:
5,818,836
Oct. 6, 1998
Primary Ex£zmirzer—Well_'ingt011 Chin
Assistant Examiner—Melissa Kay Carman
Attorney, Agent, or Firm——B1akely, Sokolofi, Taylor &
Zafman
Field of Search ..................................... 370/389, 392,
370/352, 485, 458; 379/100, 201, 90, 93,
94, 243, 229, 230, 100.13, 261, 204, 67,
88, 206, 90.01, 93.01
[56]
Patent Number:
Clark, D., et al. “Supporting Real—Time Applications in an
Integrated Services Packet Network—Architecture and
Mechanism.” ACM COMM’92—Aug. 1992.
Baran, P., “On Distributed Communications Networks.”
IEEE Transactions on Communications Systems, manuscript received Oct. 1963, Mar. 1964.
[54]
[52]
[11]
Herr et al. ..
370/261
Frey et a1. ..
379/204
Baran et al.
370/458
Solomon et al.
.. 379/67
Solomon etal. ..
.. 379/67
Masson et al.
379/88
Gordon et al. .
379/100.13
Solomon et al.
..... .. 379/67
Bales et al.
. 379/206
Gordon ................................... 370/352
. OTHER PUBLICATIONS
Yang, Q, “RFC-1789: INETPhone-—Telephone Services and
Sewers on Internet.” Apr. 1995. <http://ds.internic.net/rfc/
rfc1789.txt>(12 Feb. 1997).
Casner, S., et al. “RFC 14ZZ: Ingegrated Service in the
Internet Architecture”. Sep. 1993.
[57]
ABSTRACT
An anonymous telephone communication system. The system includes an anonymous voice system which can establish an anonymous telephone communication through a
circuit switched network (CSN). In operation, two parties
place separate telephone calls to the anonymous voice
system through the CSN. The parties then enter matchcodes
through their telephone keypads. The anonymous voice
system compares the matchcodes entered by the parties and
connects the telephone calls if the matchcodes match. The
system may include an on-line data service that establishes
electronic communication between the parties through corresponding data terminals. The data terminals may have
resident anonymous voice input commands that can be
selected by the parties. The on-line data service transmits :1
connect command to the anonymous voice system which
dials the two parties, or waits for the parties to dial the
system, and then connects the parties. The anonymous voice
system sends a disconnect command to the on-line data
service when the parties hang up. The disconnect command
can be used by the online service to bill the parties for using
the anonymous voice service. The system also stores a
couple record during the first anonymous call recording the
matchcode and the telephone numbers of both parties.
Subsequently, either party may initiate an anonymous call to
the other party without prior coordination.
21 Claims, 10 Drawing Sheets
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5,818,836
2
1
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR
ANONYMOUS VOICE COMMUNICATION
USING AN ONLINE DATA SERVICE
advertiser. In this situation, the calling party browses ads
(Lonely Hearts) published by other parties, selects an ad,
calls the system and enters the number associated with the
ad. The system calls the advertiser and asks them if they are
U:
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
willing to accept the call, and if they are willing to accept the
call, then the system connects the two parties anonymously.
1. Field of the Invention
U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,847,890, 5,058,152 and 5,361,295 issued
to Solomon disclose an anonymous telephone communicaThe present invention relates to a method and apparatus
tion system. In the Solomon system each subscriber is
for establishing anonymous telephone communication.
10 assigned a personal identification number (PIN) that is
2. Description of Related Art
stored in a database with the telephone number of the
Telephone calls are typically established by one party
subscriber. The subscriber places a personal advertisement
dialing the phone number of a second party. The call is
in a printed publication which lists the PIN and a phone
rou.ted by a public switched telephone network (PSTN) to
number of the system. A reader who wishes to contact the
the phone unit of the called party. Generally speaking, the
subscriber calls the published phone number of the system
calling party must know the phone number of the called
and enters the PIN through the telephone keypad. The
party to establish a call.
system correlates the PIN with the subscriber telephone
number and connects the caller to the subscriber. In this
To maintain confidentiality, it may desirable to establish a
two-party telephone communication without divulging the
manner the caller does not know the phone number of the
phone numbers of the parties. For example, two parties may 20 subscriber.
be communicating using an online service such as America
The Solomon system requires a printed publication to
Online or Prodigy. The two parties exchange electronic mail
advertise the PIN and corresponding phone number.
by entering messages into their data terminals. The messages
Additionally, instead of specifying in advance which callers
are transmitted over a public data network (PDN) to the
will be accepted, the Solomon system requires the advertiser
online service provider. At some point in the communication
to turn the system on and off. It would be desirable to
the parties may want to establish voice communication with
provide anonymous telephone communication which did not
the other party without revealing their phone number to the
limit the potential called parties to those who had placed an
other party. It would be desirable to have a system that can
advertisement, which allowed a better mechanism for selectprovide such an anonymous telephone communication.
ing the other party than browsing ads, which allowed both
“Chat lines” systems provide a form of anonymous voice 30 parties to initiate the communication, and which allowed
communication. One type of prior art chat line randomly
both parties to identify the parties from which they were
connects callers who call into the system. The callers can
willing to accept anonymous calls.
transfer to a dilferent caller by pressing a key on the
“Voice Personals with cut through” is an implementation
telephone handset. In this system the number of people a
of the Solomon patents. In this case the advertisement is a
caller can communicate with is limited to the people who are
voice recording. Callers to the system are allowed to browse
connected to the system. Further, the caller has no control
the voice greetings left by advertisers. When the caller finds
over who they will be connected to.
'
a greeting they like, the caller requests an anonymous
Another form of chat line allows a number of people to
telephone call with the other party using the cut through
call a conference bridge. The bridge allows the callers to talk
approach. This approach suffers from the same limitations as
to each other anonymously in a conference call. Two callers 40 indicated above. In addition, sequential browsing of voice
may interact with the system to move into a two party
recordings is a cumbersome method of selecting the other
communication. In this system the range of potential call
party and voice communication is expensive relative to data
communications.
mates is limited to callers already on the system. This system
does not allow two parties to reestablish anonymous comProdigy olfers a service which allows subscribers to
munication. Additionally, the voice communication required 45 search ads online. However, to contact the advertiser, the
to select the other party is expensive relative to data comsubscriber must follow the same procedure used for a
munication.
newspaper ad ie. dial the system and enter the PIN from the
ad. This system is limited to chat mates who place ads and
Another form of chat line allows people to call into a
the set up process for the voice call is not integrated with the
system, record a short greeting, browse the greetings of
50 online data service.
other callers currently on the system, and request an anonymous connection to the party associated with a greeting. In
There also exist a phone system to establish conference
calls referred to as “MEET ME”. The MEET ME service is
this case, the range of potential call mates is limited to
callers currently on the system and the selection process is
described in US. Pat. No. 4,577,065 issued to Frey, et al.,
eumbersome. Additionally, the system does not allow callers
and US. Pat. No. 5,369,694 issued to Bales et al. In the
to reestablish anonymous communication, and the voice UIUI MEET ME system, at about the same time, each party dials
communication required to select the other party is expena telephone number assigned to the service and then enters
sive relative to data communication. It would be desirable to
a code which has been assigned to the conference call. The
system connects each caller to a conference system which
provide an anonymous telephone communication system
without limiting the choice of call mates to people who are
utilizes a digital bridge to implement the conference call.
already on the system. It would also be desirable to have a 60
A conference bridge is a specialized piece of equipment
telephone system which allows callers to reestablish an
required for conferencing digital calls. For each caller, it
anonymous voice connection, which reduces the cost of
takes the input signal from multiple callers, sums these
selecting the other party to the call, which provides better
signals, removes the signal for one caller, and then outputs
mechanisms to search for and select the other party to the
the signal to that caller. It would be desirable to provide an
call.
anonymous two party telephone communication which used
Anonymous communication can also be established using
the MEET ME approach to set up a two party call and which
a published ad and the ability to “cut through” a call to the
did not require a conference bridge for communication.
120
120
5,818,836
4
3
Packet switched networks can transmit digitally encoded
through corresponding data terminals. The data terminals
voice as well as data. To communicate by voice over a
may have resident anonymous voice input commands that
can be selected by the parties. The on-line data service
package switched network, both parties must have a microphone and speakers attached to their computer, the computtransmits a connect command to the anonymous voice
ers must have sufficient processing power to decompress the
system which dials the parties, or waits for the parties to dial
digital signal in real time, and both computers must be
the system, and then connects the parties. The anonymous
voice system sends a disconnect command to the on-line running software which uses the same protocol to establish
communication and to decompress the voice signal. The lack
data service when the parties hang up. The disconnect
of widespread deployment of compatible hardware and
command can be used by the online service to bill the parties
10
for using the anonymous voice service.
software has limited the use of computer based voice
communication systems. In addition, a buifer is used in both
The system also stores a couple record during the first
computers to eliminate the jitter associated with random
anonymous call recording the nnatchcode and the telephone
delays in the packet switching network. This delay degrades
numbers of both parties. Subsequently, either party may
the quality of the communication link. The voice quality is
initiate an anonymous call to the other party without prior
also degraded by the use of compression techniques. It
coordination. Any method may be used to establish the first
would be desirable to provide an anonymous telephone
anonymous call, including the methods described in the
communication without requiring the use of special
Solomon patents, provided the method for the first call is
equipment, other than a telephone and possibly a computer,
modified to include the step of storing a couple record.
and which allowed high quality voice communication.
The anonymous voice system may be implemented as
20
“Teletalk” from Cinecom is a software package which
“customer premise equipment” attached to the Public
allows two users of Galacticom‘s Worldgroup bulletin board
Switched Telephone Network via an access line or it may be
system to communicate anonymously. Both parties must be
implemented as an “adjunct processof’ within the Public
able to record and playback speech on their computer. After
Switched Telephone Network.
one party makes a recording, the resulting file is transferred
The Anonymous Voice System may be distributed with
to the other party through the bulletin board system. The
nodes in the major cities so that at most one long distance
other party’s computer receives the file and plays it. This
call is required when one of the callers is resident in a city
with an AVS node.
approach provides a high quality voice signal; however, the
delay between speaking and hearing for the two parties is
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
very long. In addition the load on the bulletin board system 30
to transfer these large speech files is substantial. It would be
The objects and advantages of the present invention will
desirable to provide anonymous voice communication
which overcame these deficiencies.
'
become more readily apparent to those ordinarily slcilled in
the art after reviewing the following detailed description and
Cheersoft has advertised a product called “Autopatch”,
accompanying drawings, wherein:
which converts data communication into voice communicaFIG. 1 is a schematic of a system of the present invention;
tion. The Cheersoft device is a small 8 port circuit switch
FIG. 2 is a schematic of an alternate embodiment of the
into which analog telephone lines are connected on one side
and modems are connected on the other side. The modems
system;
are connected to a bulletin board system. Initially the device
FIG. 3 is a schematic of an anonymous voice system;
passes signals from the analog telephone line to the modem. 40
FIG. 4 is a schematic of a graphical user interface;
At the request of two users who are communicating via the
FIG. 5 is a schematic showing different anonymous voice
bulletin board, the bulletin board signals the switch which
fields;
then connects the two analog lines. This provides the parties
FIG. 6 is a schematic showing difierent fields of messages
with an anonymous voice connection. This approach is .
transferred between an anonymous voice system and an
inefficient because most of the time the switch just passes
on-line data service;
data packets from the analog line to the modem. The
FIG. 7a—d are flowcharts showing the operation of the
Cheersoft product will not work when either party is consystem;
nected to the bulletin board over a packet switching network
such as X25 or Internet. It would be desirable to provide an
FIG. 8 is a schematic showing an alternate embodiment of
anonymous telephone communication system which could 50 the system.
convert a data communication over a packet switched network to a voice communication over a circuit switched
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE
INVENTION
network.
Referring to the drawings more particularly by reference
numbers, FIG. 1 shows an anonymous voice communication
An anonymous telephone communication system. The
system 10 of the present invention. In one embodiment the
system includes an anonymous voice system which can
system 10 uses a circuit switched network (CSN) 12 and an
establish an anonymous telephone communication through a
Anonymous Voice System (AVS) 14 to establish anonymous
circuit switched network (CSN). In standalone operation,
voice communication between party A and party B. In
two parties place separate telephone calls to the anonymous 60 another embodiment the system 10 additionally uses a
voice system through the CSN. The parties then enter
packet switched network 16 and an on-line data system
matchcodes through their telephone keypads. The anony(ODS) 18 to initiate an anonymous voice communication
mous voice system compares the matchcodes entered by the
between party A and party B.
parties and connects the telephone calls if the matchcodes
Each party has a telephone station 20, 22 that is connected
match.
to the circuit switched network 12. The system 10 utilizes a
circuit switched network 12 to establish a voice connection
The system may include an on-line data service that
between the telephone stations 20 and 22, and the AVS 14.
establishes electronic communication between the parties
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
55
121
121
,D
5,818,836
6
or an ATM network using ATM Adaptation Layer type 1 to
In one embodiment the Anonymous Voice System 14
prompts both parties for an input and based upon that input
provide a constant bit rate service.
connects the two calls so that party A is communicating
The packet switched network 16 may be any network
anonymously with Party B.
um capable of switching packets such as public data networks
In another embodiment, each party may also have a data
including Sprintnet with X.25 or frame relay, the Internet
terminal 24, 26 which may be connected to the ODS 18
using TCP/IP, an SMDS based network, or an /3{l‘M network
using ATM Adaptation Layer type 2, 3, 4, or 5 to provide
through the circuit switched network 12 and the packet
switched network 16. The parties exchange messages
variable bit rate services. It may be as simple as a modem
through the on-line data system 18 to request an anonymous 10 bank connected to a statistical multiplexor which is convoice connection. The On-line data system 18 generates a
nected to the ODS via a dedicated circuit or even point to
command which prompts the Anonymous Voice System 14
point dedicated circuits with modems on each end.
to establish a telephone connection with party A and party B,
The Anonymous Voice System 14 is a processorand then connects the two parties. Although two parties are
controlled, software-driven interactive voice response sysshown and described, it is to be understood that numerous 15 tem with switching, aceess line termination, call supervision
parties may be connected to the system of the present
and progress analysis, audio playback and record, tone
invention. Additionally, although personal computers 24, 26,
detection and generation, storage devices, and optionally
a packet switched network 16, and an on-line data system 18
voice recognition. The operation of the anonymous Voice
are shown and described, it is to be understood that anonySystem 14 is controlled by system software capable of
mous voice communication can be established with the
20 executing transaction scripts which include commands
present invention without these components. Additionally,
to answer incoming calls and dial outgoing calls, ii) to
although one on-line data system 18 is shown and described,
prompt callers to enter touch—tone or spoken information, iii)
it is to be understood that numerous on-line data systems 18
to gather such information, iv) to connect calls to each other,
may be connected to the system of the present invention.
V) to monitor calls for disconnect, Vi) to do call progress
The telephone stations 20, 22 may be ordinary telephones,
analysis on outgoing calls.
ISDN telephones, or any device which can terminate an
FIG. 3 shows an embodiment of the Anonymous Voice
access line, play an audio signal and transmit a received
System 14. The AVS 14 has a line termination unit 46
audio signal.
connected to the CSN 12 by access line 48. The line
termination unit 46 terminates access line 48, detects netThe data terminals 24, 26 may be any personal computer
with the ability to process and store data, display 30 work signaling .for incoming calls and disconnects of estabinformation, accept input via keyboard, microphone, or
lished calls. The unit 46 may be a product sold by Dianatel
writing tablet, and communicate with other devices via a
under the designation EA 24 which terminates a DS1. The
serial port, modem, or Local Area Network.
AVS 14 includes a voice processing card 50 that can record
and playback speech, detect. and generate DTMF signals,
The parties can be coupled to the circuit switched network
12 by access lines 28 and 30. The access lines 28, 30 may 35 and perform call progress analysis. The card 50 may be a
product sold by Dialogic Corp. under the designation
be ordinary copper lines typically provided by the telephone
D/121B which supports 12 DSO voice channels. The AVS 14
companies, coaxial lines typically provided by the CATV
may further include a switch card 52 that connects two DSO
firms, a wireless connection typically provided by a cellular
channels on the line termination card 46, or connects a DSO
company, or hybrid fiber coax which is currently being
channel on the line termination card 46 to a voice channel on
deployed by telephone and CATV firms. When a personal 40
the voice processing card 50. The switch card 52 can also be
computer 24, 26 is implemented, a connector 32 may couple
used to monitor network signaling. The card may be a
both the telephone station and the personal computer to the
product sold by Dianatel under the product designation SS96
same access line. When the access line is ordinary copper
which provides a 96 by 96 non blocking switch that may be
lines, the connector can be a relay switch or an RJ-11 jack
with two receptacles. When the access line supports ISDN, 45 upgraded to a 192 by 192 non blocking switch. The line
the connector would be an NT1 interface with 21 TA for the
termination card 46, voice processing card 50 and switch
card 52 are connected by a voice bus 54. The voice bus 54
telephone. Both the B channel and the D channel of the
may be :1 PER (PCM expansion bus) cable sold by Dialogic
ISDN access line can be used to connect the personal
that provides 96 DSO channels.
computer to the packet switched network 16. For coaxial or
Each channel on the line termination card 46 and on the
hybrid fiber coax access lines, the connector 32 would have 50
to include a radio transmitter to place the signal on the
voice processing card 50 is connected to a channel on the
coaxial cable.
switch card 52 and can be addressed by reference to a switch
channel number.
FIG. 2 shows alternative ways to connect the telephone
stations and personal computers. The computer 26 and
The li.ne termination card 46, voice processing card 50,
and switch 52 are connected to a CPU and RAM 56 via a
telephone station 22 may be connected to the circuit
switched network by separate access lines 34 and 36. If two
computer bus 58. The cards exchange control messages with
access lines 34, 36 are used, then a connector 32 is not
the CPU over the bus 58. The voice processing card 50 also
required. Additionally, the computers may be connected to
retrieves voice prompts fiom the RAM 56 over the bus 58.
the ODS 18 by modems 38 and 40 through access lines 42
The protocol and content of the messages are described in
and 44 that are coupled to the CSN 12. If both personal 60 documentation provided by the Dianatel and Dialogic prodcomputers 24, 26 are connected to the On-line data system
uct specifications. The computer bus 58 can be implemented
18 via modems 38, 40 and access lines 42, 44 then the packet
using a conventional ISA bus. The CPU and RAM 56 can be
switched network 16 is not required even when the ODS is
provided by a PC motherboard with a microprocessor sold
used to initiate the anonymous voice call.
by Intel Corporation under the designation 80486. The AVS
65
The circuit switched network 12 may be any network
14 may include a disk controller 60 that couples a disk drive
62 to the bus 58. The AVS 14 may also include a LAN
capable of connection oriented isoehroneous communication such as the existing public switched telephone network,
adapter 64 which connects a router 66 to the computer bus
122l\)
5,818,836
7
58. The router 66 connects the Anonymous Voice System 1418 form a single integrated computer system. In this case
to a data communication link 68. The data link 68 is
software based interprocess communication is used to
exchange messages between the two systems.
preferably connected to the Internet.
The Anonymous Voice System 14 can be implemented by
The software which controls the operation of the Anony- U1
either an interexchange carrier or a local exchange carrier. If
mous Voice System 14 includes an operating system and a
a carrier implements the Anonymous Voice System, it is
voice application generator. The voice application generator
sometimes called by its functional name of “adjunct
interprets (or compiles) scripting commands and interacts
with the drivers used to control the line termination 46, voice
processor”, or “attached prompting mechanism”. In this case
processing 50, and switch 52. The drivers for these cards are 10 the Anonymous Voice System 14 would be located in a
central olfice connected to a tandem switch via access line
supplied by the card manufacturer. Voice application gen48, a short cable without a channel service unit.
erator software supports a set of commands which can be
used to dial or answer calls, connect two DSO channels to
The Anonymous Voice System 14 can be implemented by
each other, and record and playback speech. The voice
a firm which is not a carrier. In this case, the system is
sometimes called “Interactive Voice Response System” or
application generator also supports storage and retrieval of
digitally encoded speech from the disk drive 62. The oper“Customer Premise Equipment”. In this embodiment, a
ating system may be the Voice Operating System (VOS) sold
channel service unit would be required to connect the
by Parity Software, which provides a voice application
Anonymous Voice System 14 to the circuit switched network 12.
generator. VOS uses DOS as the operating system for low
level control of the computing hardware
The On-line data system 18 is a computing device with
20
The capacity of the exemplary embodiment, containing a
storage and communications capabihty which provides serDianatel SS96 switch card 52 and one Dianatel EA24 line
vices such as electronic mail, chat, newsgroups, and access
termination unit 46 supporting 24 DSO channels, can be
to information. Examples of the firms which provides these
services are AIVIERICA ONLINE and PRODIGY. The Interincreased by adding additional line termination units, by
increasing the capacity of the switch, or by implementing an l\‘)U\ net can also provide these services using a distributed
embodiment which utilizes a large programmable switch,
architecture for the computing device.
multiple PCs with voice processing cards, and another PC to
The software which controls the On-line data system 18
control the operation of the programmable switch and the
is modified so that it exchanges messages with the personal
PCs with voice processing cards.
computers 24, 26 related to the initiation of an anonymous
Voice bus 54 may be implemented using a Signal Com- 30 voice call. The On-line data system 18 ensures that both
puting System Architecture (SCSA) developed by Dialogic
parties want to establish an anonymous voice call, collects
Corporation. In this embodiment, the switch 52 is not
from both parties the information required to initiate an
required. Both the line termination unit 46 and the voice
anonymous voice call, and sends a connect message 110 to
processing unit 50 can issue commands to the SCSA bus 54
the Anonymous Voice System 14 over the data communiwhich allows any of 1,024 channels on the SCSA bus to be 35 cations link 68. When the call is complete, the Anonymous
connected together.
Voice System 14 sends the on-line data system 18 a disconnect message.
If switch 52 is replaced by a conference bridge, then this
system has the ability to connect more than 2 parties in an
The process of establishing an anonymous voioe commuanonymous conference call.
nication is initiated when one party inputs a command into
Access line 48 is an ordinary high capacity link capable 40 their personal computer. For text based interfaces to the
on-line data system 18, such as commonly provided by
of carrying multiple DSO circuits (or B channels) simultaBulletin Board Systems, a party uses a global command to
neously such as DS1, DS3, PR1 ISDN, or SONET OC3.
start the anonymous voice call routine on the On-line data
Access line 48 may include a channel service unit, a DS3
system 18. For on-line systems with graphical user
multiplexor or other equipment required to connect to the
interfaces, an icon or menu command is used to initiate the
line termination card 46.
request. This is implemented by modifying the client softReferring to FIG. 1, access line 69 connects the ODS 18
ware which executes on the personal computer. This client
to the packet switched network 16. It is typically implesoftware is distributed to subscribers by the firm ofiering the
mented as a high speed dedicated circuit i.e., DS1 or DS3.
service.
For smaller systems, multiple analog lines may be used.
FIG. 4 shows a full screen of a computer which contains
Data communication link 68 connects the Anonymous 50
graphical user interface which may be used to initiate an
Voice System 14 to the ODS 18. This link is used to pass
anonymous voice call.
messages between the two systems. This link can be impleMenu bar 70 allows the user to select commands for
mented as: a dedicated circuit such as a DSO, an analog dial
execution at any time by pointing and clicldng on the
up link using modems at each end, a packet switched
network, a local area network, a bus within a multiprocessor,
appropriate command. Clicking on the SERVICE menu
or via software used to implement interprocess communicommand 72 causes a pull down menu 74 to be displayed.
cation between processes running on the same computer. In
Pointing and clicking on the Anonymous Voice command 76
will initiate an anonymous voice call.
the preferred embodiment, data communication link 68 is a
Selecting Public Chat 78 will bring up the Public chat
packet switched network such as the Internet. Thus data
communication link 68 and packet switched network 16 may 60 Window 80. This window displays the messages typed by
be the same network.
other users in list box 82 and allows messages to be typed
in text box 84. Messages in box 84 are sent to other parties
If a dial up connection is used to implement data communication link 68, then router 66 would be replaced by a
who are also in public chat when button 78 is selected. The
icon 86 will initiate an anonymous voice call when selected.
modem and LAN adapter 64 would be replaced by a modem
adapter.
Selecting Private Chat 88 on pull down menu 74 will
It is also possible to implement the invention so that the
bring up dialog box 92 which requests the name 94 of the
other user, a message 96 to be sent to that user, and a button
Anonymous Voice System 14 and the On-line data system
123
123
5,818,836
10
9
parties in a connect message from the ODS 18. The anony98 causes the message to be sent to the other user. When the
mous voiee system 14 dials both parties and connects them
other user accepts the private chat, the On—line data system
without reference to a matchcode. Optionally, either party
18 sends a message to the personal computer which results
in the display of the window 100. This window 100 displays
may elect to call the system rather than have the system call
the messages 102 sent between the two users, provides for
them. The matchcode is optionally included in the connect
message so that the two parties can initiate subsequent
the sending of messages to the other user 104, 106 and
anonymous calls using the standalone method or the single
includes an icon 108 for initiating an anonymous voice call.
party initiation method.
The graphical interface features shown in FIG. 4 exist in
present on-line services except for the Anonymous Voice
The single party initiated method can be used after a first
command 76 which may be located in the menu bar 70 or a 10 anonymous call is made and a couple record 80 is created.
The party initiating the call, dials the system and enters the
pull down menu 72, and the Anonymous Voice icons 86 and
matchcode. The Anonymous Voice System 14 retrieves the
108 located in public and private chat windows.
telephone number of the second party from the couple
The anonymous voice icon 86, 108 can also be implerecord and dials the second party, if the second party has
mented as a “floating icon” within the client software. In this
embodiment, the icon will float to the top of the monitor 15 indicated that they will accept calls from the first party. If a
couple record with a matchcode is created during the first
screen of personal computer 24, 26 and be constantly visible
above all other windows on the screen.
call, any method can be used to establish the first anonymous
FIG. 5 shows information which can be stored in the AVS
call including the method described in U.S. Pat. Nos.
4,847,890, 5,058,152 and 5,361,295 issued to Solomon
14. The information corresponds to data for the anonymous
which are hereby incorporated by reference.
20
callers. Two types of records are stored: a couple record 80
The couple record 80 has a first call switch 88 (1 =first use
and a voice message record 82. A couple record 80 is set up
of couple record, 2=subsequent use of couple record) that is
for each pair of callers who are connected anonymously. The
used primarily for standalone anonymous calls to determine
couple record contains party information 84 about each
whether the Anonymous Voice System 14 should wait for a
party in the couple who has been connected together in an
anonymous call. The party information 84 may contain the toUI caller with a specific ANI (first call switch 88:2), or the
Anonymous Voice System 14 should connect the next caller
telephone number 86 of the corresponding party. The couple
who enters the same matchcode and does not have an
record 80 is created when two parties make their first
existing couple record which matches on the calling teleanonymous call. The couple record is deleted if either party
phone number.
requests its deletion, or if no anonymous calls have been
30
By having the Anonymous Voice System 14 delete the
made for a specified period, for example three months.
couple record on disconnect, all calls will be treated as first
When a person calls the system, automatic number identime calls. In this case, the Anonymous Voice System 14 will
tification (ANI) is used to obtain the callers telephone
have the caller wait until another caller enters the same
number. The system can identify the couple record to be
matchcode. In this embodiment, each caller will be conused by using the matchcode entered and the ANI.
nected to the next caller who enters the same matchcode.
35
When the matchcode is being selected, each party must
The couple record 80 has a online status 90 (1=not online,
ensure that they do not use the same matchcode for two
2=online) that is used by the Anonymous Voice System 14
dilferent parties. If the calling party uses the same matchto identify “online” anonymous calls.
code twice, the Anonymous Voice System 14 will attempt to
The couple record 80 has a date of last activity 92 that
connect the calling party to the other party associated with
the first couple record for the calling party which contains 40 indicates the last time the couple record was used. It is used
to delete the couple record 80 if there has not been any
the matchcode. The matchcode 87 is stored in the coupled
activity for a specified period of time.
record 80 and may be any alphanumeric code agreed to by
The couple record contains information on each party
the two parties. To simplify DTMF input, the matchcode can
be restricted to numeric characters.
which participates in the anonymous phone call. The party
45 information 84 on each party includes a telephone number
The present invention provides at least three diflferent
86, status 94 (0=inactive, 1=waiting, 2=cor1nected), a field '
methods of creating anonymous voice communication;
that indicates whether a party will accept anonymous calls
“standalone”, “on-line”, and “single party initiated". The
initiated by the other party 96 (O=don’t accept, 1=accept), a
standalone process starts when two parties agree on a
pointer to the first voice message which has been left for this
matchcode and a time without revealing their identity to
50
party 98. The information may also contain an AVS channel
each other. Standalone anonymous communication is estab100 which identifies the specific switch channel on which
lished when two parties call the system at about the same
the party is connected to the Anonymous Voice System 14
time and enter the same matchcode. The AVS 14 compares
and a VP channel 102 that identifies the switch channel on
the matchcodes and connects the parties if the codes match.
which
the voice processing card is connected to the caller.
The first time a party calls and enters a matchcode, the
The message record 82 is set up when one party records
couple record 80 does not match based upon the matchcode
entered and the ANI of the calling party. The next party who
a voice message for the other party. The next message field
calls and enters the same matchcode, and does not have an
104 points to the next message in the chain or is O for the last
existing couple record for that matchcode, will be connected
message. The message field 106 contains the audio message
which is stored in a digital PCM format.
to the first party. The phone numbers 86 and match code 87
60
are then stored in the couple record 80. If one party makes
FIG. 6 shows the information contained in the messages
a subsequent call and enters the same matchcode, the
exchanged between the Anonymous Voice System 14 and an
Anonymous Voice System 14 will identify the couple record
on-line data system 18. A Connect message 110 is sent from
and wait for a call which has an ANT equal to the telephone
the on-line data system 18 to the Anonymous Voice System
number of the other party, where the other calling party
14 to request an online anonymous voice call. A disconnect
enters the same matchcode.
message 112 is sent from the Anonymous Voice System 14
to the On-line data system 18 to indicate the end of an
For an on-line anonymous call request the Anonymous
anonymous call.
Voice System 14 receives the telephone numbers of both
124
5,818,836
12
11
could be used by the parties to agree upon a time and a
The message id 114, identifies the type of the message
connect 110 or disconnect 112. The first caller info 116 and
matchcode for the anonymous call.
second caller info 118 describe each party. Caller info 122
The first party dials the “standalone” telephone number of
contains the fields which describe each party. The message um the Anonymous Voice System 14 at approximately the
can contain an optional matchcode 120 which is not used to
agreed upon time. The number dialed could be a special
service number in the case of a carrier based service, or an
set up the “online” initiated call but can be used to set up
subsequent calls using the “standalone” or “single party
800, 900, or local number for a carrier or non carrier based
initiation” method.
service. The circuit switched network 12 signals (a “wink”
Caller information 122 provides detail on the fields used 10 is used for DS1 service) the Anonymous Voice System 14
to describe each caller. A caller identifier 124 is used to
that there is an incoming call on a particular AVS channel.
This signal triggers the Anonymous Voice System 14 to
identify a party requesting an anonymous voice call. In the
proceed from the event loop 200 to the receive call event in
preferred embodiment, this identifier would be the telephone
block 201.
number of the party. Alternatively, the identifier could be a
subscriber id which identifies the party as a subscriber to the
In processing block 202 the switch 52 is instructed to
anonymous voice service. In this case, the Anonymous Voice
connect the incoming AVS channel to an available voice
System 14 would maintain a file which provided the teleprocessing channel on the voice processing board 50. The
phone number associated with each subscriber id. The Dial
voice processing board 50 signals the circuit switched
in/Dial out field 126, indicates whether the Anonymous
network 12 that it is ready to accept the Automatic Number
Voice System 14 should dial the party or the party Will dial 20 Identification (ANI), i.e., the telephone number of the callthe system. The ODS ID field 128 identifies the On-line data
ing party and Dialed Number Identification Service (DNIS),
system 18 which is initiating the request.
i.e. the called telephone number. The circuit switched network 12 sends the ANI and DNIS to the voice processing
The disconnect message 112' is sent from the Anonymous
board 50. The voice processing board 50 uses DTMF or MF
Voice System 14 to the On-line data system 18 when the
anonymous voice call is complete, or when the Anonymous toun tone detection to receive the ANI and DNIS from the
network 12. The voice processing board 50 signals that it is
Voice System 14 is unable to set up the call. The message id
114 identifies the message as a disconnect message. The
ready to answer the call and the circuit switched network 12
connects the calling party to the voice processing board 50
message status field 132 indicates whether or not the call
over access line 48.
was successfully completed. First party completion infor30
In decision block 204, the AVS 14 determines whether the
mation and second party completion information 134, 136
describe call completion information for each party.
DNIS corresponds to the telephone number used for the
standalone matchcode service. If the first caller dials the
Completion info 138 provides detail on the information
standalone telephone number of the Anonymous Voice Systransmitted when a call is completed. The start and end time
tem 14, the program proceeds to block 206.
of the call, 140, 142 is included for billing the parties by the
on-line data system 18 or to allow the on-line data system 18 35
In block 206, the AVS 14 re ads digitized voice data from
to calculate commissions owing for initiating the call. The
the disk 62, transfers the digitized voice data to the voice
caller identifier 144 identifies the party making the call; this
processing board 50, and instructs the voice processing
field corresponds to 124 in the caller info 122. The ODS l'D
board 50 to play the prompt to the caller. The prompt greets
field 146 identifies the On-line data system 18 which initithe caller and asks the caller to input the matchcode. The
ated the call, this field corresponds to 128 in the caller info 40 voice processing board 50 is instructed to detect DTMF
122.
input from the caller and to send the captured digits back to
FIGS. 7a—d show the operation of the Anonymous Voice
the program executing in the CPU 56. The captured digits
are designated as a matchcode. If the ANI is not available
System 14. The system will initially be described without
from the network, then the Anonymous Voice System 14
use of the On—line data system 18, then described using the
45 would prompt the caller to enter his telephone number, as
On-line data system 18.
.
well as the matchcode.
'
When the Anonymous Voice System 14 is initialized, it
sets the line termination card 46 to monitor the access line
The caller can also input the matchcode using voice
recognition. A voice recognition board would have to be
48 for signals (incoming call, disconnect) from the circuit
installed in the Anonymous Voice System 14 and the CPU
switched network 12. After initialization, the Anonymous
50 56 would instruct the switch 52 to connect the caller to a
Voice System 14 proceeds to the event loop 200 where it
channel on the voice recognition board.
waits for signals from the CSN 12 or messages from the
ODS 18. When an event occurs, the Anonymous Voice
In decision block 208, the Anonymous Voice System 14
System 14 proceeds to receive call 201, disconnect 218, or
searches the couple records 80 stored on the disk 62 for the
connect message 205, depending upon the type of the event.
matchcode entered by the caller. The first time the caller
Before initiating a standalone anonymous voice call, both
calls, the matchcode may or may not be found depending
upon whether or not another couple has already used the
parties must agee, without revealing their identity to each
other, upon a time to call and a matchcode that both will
same matchcode. If the matchcode has never been used
before, then the process proceeds to block 214 from decision
input to the Anonymous Voice System 14. There are several
ways in which they can reach this agreement. For instance, 60 block 208. If another couple has used the same matchcode,
the program finds a couple record with the same matchcode
if they are both subscribers to an online data service, such as
PRODIGY, they could exchange electronic mail messages.
and proceeds to decision block 210. In block 210, the AVS
14 determines whether the calling party’s ANI matches the
Alternatively, one party may place a personal ad, wherein
the other party responds to the PO Box number with a
telephone number 86 in either the first party info 8412 or the
second party info 84b for any couple record that contains the
suggested time and matchcode. Alternatively, with Voice
matchcode entered by the calling party. If the determination
Mail personals, it would be possible for the two parties to
exchange voice mail messages until they agree upon a time
is NO (i.e., the first party is calling with a matchcode he has
and a matchcode. Any of these methods or other methods
never used before), the process proceeds to decision block
125U1
5,818,836
14
DTMF at the start of the call. The card number is sent to a
212 which determines whether any of the couple records
credit card processor to charge the call to the card. Asimilar
with the same matchcode is a first call (first call switch
process can be used to debit a checking account. Billing can
88:1). Since this is the first caller, the couple record will not
be handled on a subscription basis as well. The telephone
exist and the process will continue at block 214.
um
number would be used to identify a subscriber’s account.
In the unlikely event that two difierent couples are making
their first call at about the same time and both have selected
Billing records would be produced at the end of each
anonymous voice call and periodically the customer would
the same matchcode, then the first caller of the first couple
be billed by credit card for all calls made during the billing
may be connected to the first caller of the second couple.
In block 214 a new couple record 80 is created and stored 10 period. If a carrier implemented the AVS 14 as an adjunct
on the disk 62 in block 214. The matchcode 87 is set to the
processor, then block 222 would generate an Automatic
Message Accounting (AMA) record.
value entered by the calling party, the first call switch 88 is
After the initial call, the two parties can schedule addiset to 1 ( first call), the online status 90 is set to 1 (not online)
tional anonymous calls with the same matchcode. In this
and date of last activity 92 is set to the present date. The first
case when the first caller dials the Anonymous Voice System
party info 84a would store the telephone number 86 of the
14, the process starts executing at block 201 and proceeds to
calling party (ANI), the status field 94 is set to 1 (waiting),
the AVS channel 100 identifies the switch channel to which
block 208 as before. In the subsequent call, the matchcode
and ANI are found in a couple record 80 and the process
the incoming call is connected, the VP channel 102 identifies
continues to decision block 224. Since this is the first party,
the switch channel to which the voice processing channel for
this caller is connected, the accept calls field 96 is set to 1 20 the other party is not waiting and the process proceeds to
decision block 226. Assuming there are no messages, block
(accept calls), the first message field 98 is set to 0, and the
230 uses the voice processing board 50 to play a menu of
telephone number 86 of the second party info 84b would be
possible actions. The first caller selects wait and block 234
set to 0. The calling party is played a prompt which informs
updates the status 94 to indicate that the first party is waiting.
him that the other party has not called in and asks him to
wait. The CPU 56 instructs the voice processing card 50 to Ed J\ The Anonymous Voice System 14 puts the caller on hold and
play music retrieved from the disk 62 to the caller. The - proceeds to event loop 200 to wait for the next event.
When the second caller dials the AVS 14, the program
process then proceeds to block 200 to wait for the next event.
proceeds the same as for the first caller. However, at step
The second party then dials the Anonymous Voice System
224, the AVS determines that the first caller is waiting (status
14. The Anonymous Voice System 14 proceeds as above
except that in block 208 the matchcode is found, in block 30 94=1) and proceeds to step 216 which connects the callers.
At this point the two callers are connected in an anonymous
210 the telephone number of the second party is not within
phone call using the same matchcode for a subsequent call.
the couple record, and in block 212 the process determines
that the first call switch 88 has been set to 1. The process
If the first caller hangs up before the second party calls in,
the circuit switched network 12 sends a disconnect notifiproceeds to block 215, which updates the couple record 80
for the information relating to the second party 84b similarly 35 cation to the Anonymous Voice System 14 and the process
proceeds to block 220. The process of block 220 would
to the update of the first party info as described in block 214.
execute as described above except that information for the
In block 216, the CPU 56 instructs the switch 52 to
second party 84b would be zeroed out for the billing process
disconnect both callers from the voice processing board 50
222 and if the first call switch 88 was set to 1 (first call), the
and to connect the two channels identified by the AVS
channel 100. The status 94 field for both parties is set to 2 40 couple record 80 would be deleted.
If one of the parties is unable to participate in a scheduled
(connected) and the VP channel 102 to 0. The program goes
to 200 to wait for the next event.
anonymous voice call, the AVS 14 provides the functionality
required to leave a message for the other party. The first
The two parties are now connected anonymously and can
party dials the system prior to the agreed upon time and
communicate by voice without revealing their identity to the
other party. However nothing would stop either party from 45 enters the matchcode. AVS 14 proceeds through blocks 201,
202, 204, 206, 208, 210, 224, 226 as described above to the
revealing their identity during the conversation.
menu at 230. At this menu, the caller selects the leave
When they finish their conversation, the parties hang up.
message option and the program proceeds to block 228. In
The CSN 12 signals the Anonymous Voice System 14 that
block
228, the voice processing card 50 records a message
one of the parties has hung up. The line termination card 46
50 from the caller which is stored on the disk 62 in a message
detects the signal from the network and posts an event which
record 82. The first message field 98 is used to point to a
causes the Anonymous Voice System 14 to start executing at
linked list of message records 82. The AVS updates the
step 218. In block 220, the process identifies the couple
couple record, disconnects the caller and proceeds to the
record 80 associated with the disconnect by searching on the
event loop 200 to wait for the next event.
AVS channel 100 field in the first party info 84;: and second
55
When the other party calls at the scheduled time, the AVS
party info 84b. The line termination card 46 sends an on
14 proceeds from block 201 to block 226 as above. First
hook signal to the circuit switched network 12 for the AVS
message field 98 indicates that messages are available.
channel 100 associated with each party. The process also
In block 232 the message pointed to by the first message
updates the couple record 80 including setting the first call
98 is retrieved from the disk 62. The first message 98 is
switch 88 to 2 (not first call), the online status 90 to 1 (not
60
updated with the next message field 104. The voice proonline), the status 94 to 0 (inactive) and the AVS channel 100
to 0 for both parties.
cessing card 50 plays the message for the caller. The
message is deleted from the disk 62 and the process returns
The required billing functions are performed by the
to step 226 to determine if there any more messages.
process in block 222. If a carrier’s billing and collection
service is used (i.e. 900 or 976 numbers), then the call is
After the other party has listened to all the messages, the
recorded so that the statement from the carrier can be
voice processing board 50 plays a prompt which provides
the caller with a menu. The choices in the menu are: wait
audited. Credit cards can also be used to pay for the call. The
credit card number is entered using voice prompts and
234, leave a message 228, delete the couple record 236,
13
126
126
5,818,836
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16
accept calls initiated by the other party 238, don’t accept
calls initiated by the other party 240, initiate a call to the
other party without prior scheduling 242, or exit 244 (hang
up). The other party may select the leave message option and
proceed as above. In this manner the two parties are able to
exchange voice messages anonymously in preparation for
another anonymous phone call.
To permanently break olf contact with the other party, the
caller may select the delete block 236 from the menu 230.
The couple record 80, identified by the matchcode from step
208 and the ANI from step 210, is deleted in block 250.
The Anonymous Voice System 14 provides both parties
with the ability to control whether or not they will accept
calls initiated by the other party. To control this option, the
party calls the Anonymous Voice System 14. The process
executes blocks 202 and 204-, finds the matchcode at step
208, finds the calling party’s telephone number at 210,
determines that no one was waiting at 224, plays any
available messages at 226, and at the menu block 230 the
caller selects 238 to enable the other party to initiate calls or
selects 249 to disable “single party initiated” calls fiom this
party. In blofl 246, the accepts calls field 96 is set to 1
(accept) for the caller. In block 248, the field 96 is set to 0
(don’t accept calls). The process then disconnects the caller
and returns to the event loop 200.
’
Process blocks 246, 248, and 250 may be enhanced to
provide the caller with the option of updating/deleting all
couple records associated with their telephone number without regard to the matchcode.
The present invention allows a single party to initiate
anonymous voice communication with the consent of the
other party. After the first anonymous call, one of the parties
may wish to establish a second call without prearranging a
time for the call. “Single party initiated” anonymous calls
provides this capability provided that the other party has
consented to receiving the call. After a couple record 80 has
been established by a first call, the Anonymous Voice
System 14 can identify the telephone number 86 of the
second party 8417 based upon the matchcode 87 and ANI of
the first party 84a.
If the equivalent of a couple record (matchcode and two
telephone numbers) is stored during the first anonymous
call, then it is possible for either party to initiate an anonymous voice call. This modification to “chat” systems and
“ads plus cut through” systems would allow, after the first
anonymous call, either party to establish the connection.
To place a single party initiated call after a couple record
80 has been created, the caller dials the standalone telephone
number of the Anonymous Voice System 14. The process
proceeds to step 230 where the caller selects the single party
initiation step 242. In block 252, the process determines
whether the other party is willing to accept single party
initiated calls by checldng the accepts calls field 96 for the
other party in the couples record. If single party initiated
calls are not accepted the system plays a message to the
caller in bloclr 254 and returns to block 230 where the caller
can make another choice from the menu.
If the other party answers the phone, in block 262 the
process plays a greeting to the other party which includes the
greeting from the calling party. The receiving party has the
ability to accept or reject the call in decision block 264. If
the call is accepted, the parties are connected and the couples
record 80 is updated in block 266. The process then returns
to the event loop 200 to wait for the next event.
If the other party rejects the call, the program proceeds to
block 268 where the other party is disconnected, the couple
record is updated, a message is played for the calling party,
and the process continues to block 230 where the calling
party can select another option.
Periodically, the Anonymous Voice System 14 may scan
the couple records 80 and delete a record if the date of last
activity 92 is greater than a specified period.
Several enhancements can be made to this invention. For
‘Jr
10
15
'
instance, passwords can be associated with every telephone
number in the couples record. When a party dials in or the
20 system dials out, the party connected will be asked to
provide a password. This will ensure matthe right person
has been contacted when there is more than one person at the
telephone number. Another enhancement would allow one
party to pay the charges associated with the other party’s
portion of the anonymous voice call. The AVS 14 could
prompt each caller to indicate whether or not the party was
willing to pay for the other party. This information could be
recorded in the couple record 80 and used in step 222 when
the call is billed.
30
The Anonymous Voice System 14 may connect the wrong
parties in the unlikely situation where two couples have
selected the same matchcode and time for their first call.
This problem could be avoided by assigning a unique
identifier to every user of the Anonymous Voice System 14.
35 When two parties want to initiate an anonymous voice call,
they would reveal their identifier to the other party and both
parties would use their identifier and the other party’s
identifier as the matchcode. Since this matchcode would be
unique for every couple, there is no chance of connecting the
40 wrong parties. However, this approach has the disadvantage
of requiring the assignment of unique user ids to every user,
and it is not possible to completely break off contact since
the other party will still know the unique identifier assigned
to the party wishing to break ofi' contact.
Another approach to generating unique matchcodes is to
have an automated system assign them on request. For
instance if a couple uses a Voice Personals system to set up
an anonymous call, then the couple could request the system
to provide them with a unique matchcode. Each system
50 would have a unique identifier to which it would attach a
sequence number. In this manner, unique matchcodes could
be provided to couples using the Anonymous Voice System
14.
'
Two parties can also initiate an anonymous voice call
using an On-line data system 18. Both parties would use
personal computers 24, 26 to log onto the On-line data
system 18. The two parties may contact each other using
public chat, private chat, electronic mail, or newsgroups
If the other party is willing to accept single party initiated
calls, the process continues to block 256 which records a 60 through the ODS 18. The parties can communicate via the
On-line data system 18 without revealing their identity to
greeting from the calling party. In block 258, the process
each other because users are commonly identified on these
calls the other party using the telephone number 86 in the
systems by screen names, handles, or subscriber ids which
other party’s section of the couple record 80. If in decision
only the operator of the On-line data system 18 can translate
block 259, it is determined that the other party does not
into the subscriber‘s identity.
answer the phone, i.e.. busy, no answer, answering machine
or fax, then the program plays a message for the calling party
Either party can initiate an anonymous voice connection.
If they are using a text based service such as a bulletin board
in block 260, updates the couple record, and then returns to
the menu in block 230.
system, the first party sends a text string to the On-line data
127
127
5,818,836
17
18'
system 18 which invokes a global command. A global
ing machine) the process continues to block 278 where the
command is a command which can be executed at any point
AVS sends a disconnect message 112 to the On-line data
in the online session; it is not necessary to be at a menu
system 18. The message has a status of 1 indicating that an
which contains the command. Referring to FIG. 4, if the um error occurred and the call was not set up. The process
deletes the couple record 80 if the first call switch=1 and
parties are using an On-line data system 18 which supports
returns to the event loop 200.
a graphical user interface, then the parties may select a menu
command such as Anonymous Voice command 76 or click
If the first. party answers the phone, the process dials the
on an icon such as 86 or 108 which are accessible while in
second party in block 279. The process also updates the
public or private chat.
10 status 94 of the first party to 1 (waiting) and AVS channel
In response to these commands, the On-line data system
100 to the channel on which the call was placed. The process
18 or the client software running on the personal computer
determines whether the second party answered the phone in
decision block 280. If the second party does not answer, the
may request the screen name of the second party. The
first party is disconnected in block 282 and the connect
On-line data system 18 then sends a message to the personal
request is terminated in block 278. If the second party
computer of the second party to inquire whether the second
answers, the two parties are connected in an anonymous
party wishes to start an anonymous voice call. If the second
party declines, the anonymous voice call request is refused.
voice communication in block 284. The process updates the
couple record 80 and then awaits the next event.
If the second party accepts, then the On-line data system 18
requests information from both parties required to set up an
As an alternate method for establishing an anonymous
anonymous voice call. This information includes the tele- 20 voice communication, the parties may choose to dial in. In
phone number of the telephone stations 20, 22 which they
this case, the connect message 110 is processed at block 270
will use to make the anonymous voice call. The ODS 18 may
and then the decision block 272 proceeds to the event loop
also request whether the parties will call the Anonymous
200 to wait for the parties to call. Afirst party may call the
Voice System 14, or whether the system will call the parties.
AVS 14 using the system telephone number associated with
The ODS 18 may also collect a matchcode 87 that can be
an online service request. The circuit switched network 12
used to initiate subsequent anonymous calls.
signals the Anonymous Voice System 14 that there is an
After collecting this information, the On-line data system
incoming call and the process begins executing at block 201.
The process collects theANI and DNIS for the call in block
18 sends a connect message 110 to the Anonymous Voice
System 14 over data communication link 68. The On-line
202 and the call is identified as an online request in block
data system 18 may then display a message on the personal 30 204 using the DNIS i.e., the called number. The process then
computer which instructs the parties to either dial the
proceeds to block 286.
telephone number of the Anonymous Voice System 14, or
The process plays a greeting to the caller and then in block
wait for an incoming call on the telephone which they
288 checks to see if there is a couple record 80 with an
specified to receive the call. If necessary, the On-line data
online status 90=2 (online) and a telephone number 86 equal
system 18 may include a short delay to ensure that the 35 to the ANI. If these conditions are not met, the caller is
Anonymous Voice System 14 is ready to receive incoming
disconnected in block 290 and the program returns to the
calls.
event loop 200.
Referring to FIG. 7d, when the Anonymous Voice System
If a matching couple record is found, in block 292 the
14 receives a conncct message 110 in block 250, the system
couple record is updated i.e. status 94 equals 1 (waiting), and
would begin processing at block 270. The process would 40 AVS channel 100 is set to the channel on which the call was
search for a couple record 80 that contains telephone numreceived. In decision block 294 the process determines
bers 86 which match the telephone numbers 124 of the
whether the other party is waiting. If the other party is
parties provided in the connect message 110 by the ODS 18.
waiting, the program connects the two parties and updates
If a matching couple record is not found, this step would set
the couple record in block 296, and proceeds to the event
up a couple record 80 using the information from the 45 loop 200 to wait for the next event.
connect message 110. The first call switch 88 is set to 1 (first
If the other party is not waiting, then in decision block 298
call), the online status switch 90 is set to 2 ( online), the date
the process determines whether the other party has selected
of last activity 92 is set to today’s date, and the first 84a and
dial in. If the dial in/dial out field 126 is set so that the other
second 84b party information is entered. The telephone
party is dial in (1), the process proceeds to step 200 to wait
number 86 is set to the caller identifier 124, the status 94 is 50 for the next event. If the other party is set as “dial out”, the
set to 0 (inactive), the accept calls field 96 is set to 1 (accept
process dials the other party in block 300. Decision block
calls), the first message field 98 is set to 0 (no messages), the
302 monitors call progress. If the other party does not
AVS channel 100 is set to 0, the ODS id 128 is set to the
answer, the process proceeds to blocks 282 and 278 to
OSD id 128 from the connect message, and the dial in/dial
terminate the call. If the other party answers the call, then in
out field 126 is set to dial in/dial out 126 from the connect
block 304 the two parties are connected in an anonymous
message. If a matching couple record 80 is found, then only
voice call and the couples record is updated. The process
the online status 90, date of last activity 92, AVS channel
then proceeds to step 200 to wait for the next event.
100, ODS id 128, and Dial in/dial out 126 fields are updated.
When the two parties have finished talking, they hang up.
The circuit switched network 12 sends a disconnect notifiThe process proceeds to decision block 272 to determine
whether both parties are dial out (dial in/ dial out 126:2 in 60 cation to the Anonymous Voice System 14. The Anonymous
the couple record 80). If either party is dial in, the process
Voice System 14 jumps to block 220 of FIG. 7a. A disconreturns to the event loop 200 to wait for one or both parties
nect message is sent to the On-line data system 18 when the
to call.
online status 90=2 (online). The On-line data system 18 may
use the disconnect record when it periodically bills its
If both parties are dial out, the process dials the first party
using the first party telephone number in block 274 and starts
subscribers for their use of the anonymous voice service as
a call progress analysis routine in decision block 276. If the
well as other services. If the matchcode 87 in the couples
first party does not answer (busy/no answer, fax or answerrecord is blank, the couples record is deleted since the two
128
128
5,818,836
ZIP
19
parties indicated that they do not want to use theAnonymous
Voice System 14 for subsequent calls.
Several enhancements are possible for this invention. An
On-line data system 18 can maintain a record comparable to
the couple record 80. The On-line data system 18 could use
this record to support single party initiation of anonymous
voicecalls. The connect message 110 would have to indicate
that the connect request was for a single party initiated call
so that the Anonymous Voice System 14 could verify that the 10
second party wanted to accept the call.
It would also be possible to asynchronously schedule an
anonymous voice call. The first party would enter their
information associated with the anonymous voice call, a
proposed time for the call, and the user id of the second
party. When the second party logged on, the On-line data
system 18 would ask whether the party wanted to accept the
anonymous call at the suggested time from the requesting
party. If the party accepts, the party’s information is entered
and the On-line data system 18 sends the connect message '20
110 to the Anonymous Voice System 14 at the specified t1'_rn_e.
Another embodiment of the “online” system would allow
for multi-party anonymous calls. In this case the connect
message 110 would contain multiple caller info 122
sections, one for each participant in the multi-party anony- 25
mous call. The ODS 18 would request information from
each participant, and transmit the information for each
participant to the AVS 14. The AVS 14 would contain a
conference bridge card as well as the switch 52. The AVS
would dial each of the participants, or wait for their call, and 30
then connect them in a conference call using the conference
bridge. When the participants hang up, a disconnect message
would be sent to the ODS 18 with information on each
20, 22, the personal computers 24, 26, the circuit switched
network 12, the packet switched network 16 and the On-line
data system 18. In the preferred embodiment, the Internet
would be used to implement the paclcet switched network
16. As in the previous embodiments, the invention can
function without the personal computers and the On-line
data system The Anonymous Voice Systems »14A-, 14B are ’
modified so that the systems can exchange messages over a
packet switched network 16 with each other, and with an
Anonymous Voice System Controller (AVSC) 320. The
Anonymous Voice System Controller 320 is a computing
device such as a personal computer running the Windows
NT operating system.
The Anonymous Voice System Controller 32 stores the
couple records 80 for Anonymous Voice Systems 14A and
14B. An AVS Id field 722 identifies the AVS 14 that will
process the anonymous call for each party. To read from or
write to the couple record 80, an Anonymous Voice System
14 sends a message to the Anonymous Voice System Controller 32.0 which responds to the request by updating the
couple record in its database or by retrieving the requested
couple record from its database. The Anonymous Voice
System Controller 320 may ensure that the two Anonymous
Voice System 14 are operating in sync by forwarding
updates of the couple records 80 to the AVS systems 14. A
connect step such as 216 in FIG. '7A may require the first
AVS 14A to dial the second AVS 14B using the disuibuted
telephone number of the Anonymous Voice System 14B. In
this manner AVS 14B uses the DNIS in step 204 to distinguish customer calls from distributed AVS calls. The first
AVS 14Awould also send a message to the second AVS 14B
identifying the couple for which the dial in call was
intended. The disconnect procedure of block 220 would
participant.
include hanging up the call 903 between AVS 14A and MB.
If the On-line data system 18 bills its subscribers for
The AVSC 320 may also be the interface point for the
anonymous calls, then the ODS 18 may limit the duration of
On-line data system 18. When a connect message is received
a subscriber’s call. The On-line data system 18 may calcufrom the ODS 18, the AVSC 320 identifies the AVS nodes
late a limit for a subscriber and place the limit in the connect
14A, 14B which will be used to form the anonymous
message 110. The Anonymous VoicevSystem 14 may set a
timer to expire when the subscriber’s call reaches the time 40 connection. The couple record would be sent to both AVS
14A and AVS 14B. If both parties were dial out, each AVS
limit. If the timer expired before the caller hung up, the
would dial their party and then the first AVS would initiate
Anonymous Voice System 14 would disconnect the caller.
a connection with the second AVS. If one party was dial in,
For the sake of brevity many error conditions have not
then the dial in AVS would wait for the call and notify the
been described. For instance the connect and disconnect
second AVS when the call was received. The second AVS
messages could be acknowledged by the receiving system. 45
would dial the other party, and then establish a connection
Thus if the Anonymous Voice System 14 did not have
with the first AVS.
suflicient capacity to handle a connect message 110, it would
The distributed implementation can also be implemented
send an acknowledgment which rejected the request. The
by replicating the couple database across the AVS systems
On-line data system 18 would be able to inform the two
parties that their request was rejected and that they can try 50 14A, 14B. In this case allAVS 14A, 14B maintain the couple
database and forward updates to each other. The AVSC 320
again later.
continues to serve as the interface to the ODS 18, but it
FIG. 8 is a schematic of a distributed implementation of
would not be required for anonymous calls using the stanthe present invention. This embodiment is advantageous in
dalone matchcode approach.
that an anonymous voice connection requiring only one long
55
In another embodiment of the distributed architecture,
distance call can be established between two parties in
when the AVSC 320 receives a connect message 110 from
remote cities. This is accomplished by placing an Anonythe ODS 18, it would select an Anonymous Voice System,
mous Voice System 14A and 14B in each city. The parties
for example 14A, which is local to one of the callers. The
make a local call to the Anonymous Voice System 14 in their
AVSC 320 would send a message back to the ODS 18 which
city. The first Anonymous Voice System 14A dials the
second Anonymous Voice System 14B to establish a con- 60 included two phone numbers for AVS 14A. One phone
number would be a local number which the local caller
nection 903 so that the two parties can be connected anonywould use, the other phone number would be an 800 number
mously. Although two AVS 14A and 14B are shown and
for the remote caller to use. The ODS would cause these
described, it is to be understood that numerous Anonymous
phone
numbers to be displayed on the personal computers
Voice Systems may be connected to the system of the
24, 26 of the callers.
present invention.
In this embodiment, many components are the same as the
While certain exemplary embodiments have been
elements shown in FIG. 1 including the telephone stations
described and shown in the accompanying drawings, it is to
129
129
5,818,836
22
21
be understood that such embodiments are merely illustrative
of and not restrictive on the broad invention, and that this
invention not be limited to the specific constructions and
arrangements shown and described, since various other
modifications may occur to those ordinarily skilled in the art.
What is claimed is:
a voice system connected to said circuit switched
network, said voice system receives a first telephone
call from the first party and a second telephone call
from the second party, said voice system further
receives a matchcode from each party and connects
said first telephone call with said second telephone call
if said matchcodes match;
1. A method for creating a voice connection over a circuit
said
voice system includes an interface to an on-line data
switched network between a first party and a second party
service;
using an on-line data service to initiate the connection, 10
said voice system generates a disconnect message for the
comprising the steps of:
online data service when said first tclephone call is
a) establishing an electronic communication between the
disconnected from said second telephone call.
first party and the second party through the on-line data
12. A system for establishing a voice connection over a
service between a first party and a second party;
circuit switched network between a first party and a second
b) requesting a voice communication through the on-line
party that are both coupled to said circuit switched network,
service;
each party also having a data terminal, comprising:
c) transmitting a message from the online data service to
an on-line data service that is coupled to the data terminals
a voice system requesting the voice connection
of each party, said on-line data service generates a
between said first party and said second party;
connect command in response to an input provided by
20
c) establishing a first telephone call for the fi.I'Sl party;
a party through the data terminal; and,
d) establishing a second telephone call for the second
a voice system connected to said circuit switched network
party; and,
and said on-line data service, said voice system
receives said connect command and connects a first
e) connecting said first telephone call with said second
telephone call.
telephone call of the first party with a second telephone
IOU:
2. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein said telecall of the second party.
13. The system as recited in claim 12, wherein said
phone call’s are established by dialing a telephone station of
each party from an anonymous voice system.
anonymous voice system dials a telephone station of each
3. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein said tele—
party.
phone calls are established by each party dialing an anony- 30
14. The system as recited in claim 12, wherein said
connect command includes a matchcode and said anonymous voice system.
4. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein said anonymous voice system connects said first and second telephone
mous voice communication is requested by selecting a
calls when the parties enter matching matchcodes.
specific anonymous voice communication input provided by
15. The system as recited in claim 12, wherein said
anonymous voice system generates a disconnect command
a graphical user interface.
5. The method as recited in claim 1, further comprising
when said first telephone call is disconnected from said
second telephone call.
the steps of providing the parties with a matchcode, entering
matchcodes, comparing said entered matchcodes, and con16. The system as recited in claim 15, wherein said
disconnect command is sent to said on-line data service.
necting the parties if said matchcodes match.
17. The system as recited in claim 12, wherein said
6. The method as recited in claim 1, further comprising 40
the step of storing said matchcode, a first telephone number
anonymous voice input is provided by a graphical user
interface of the data terminal.
that corresponds to the first party and a second telephone
number that corresponds to the second party.
18. The system as recited in claim 12, wherein said
7. The method as recited in claim 6, further comprising
on-line data service is coupled to the data terminals through
the steps of establishing a third telephone call by the first 45 a packet switched network.
19. The system as recited in claim 12, wherein said
party, entering said matchcode, establishing a fourth teleanonymous voice system includes a switch that connects
phone call with the second party and connecting said third
telephone call with said fourth telephone call.
said first telephone call and said second telephone call.
8. The method as recited in claim 1, further comprising
20. The system as recited in claim 19, wherein said
the step of sending a disconnect message to said online data SO anonymous voice system includes a microprocessor and a
memory device which store said entered matchcodes, a first
service when said first telephone call is disconnected from
said second telephone call.
telephone number that corresponds to thc first party and a
second telephone number that corresponds to the second
9. The method as recited in claim 6, further comprising
party.
the steps of recording a message from the first party and
playing it to the second party on request.
21. The system as recited in claim 20, wherein said
55
anonymous voice system includes a voice processor which
10. The method as recited in claim 6, further comprising
the step of deleting said storage of said matchcode, said first
generates audio messages that are provided to the parties.
telephone number and said second telephone number.
system further receives a matchcode from each party and
11. A system that establishes a voice connection over a
connects said first telephone call with said second telephone
circuit switched network between a first party and a second 60 call if said matchcodes match.
party that are both coupled to said circuit switched network,
comprising:
130
130
ATTACH M ENT B
B
ATTACHMENT
131
US. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Patent and Trademark Office
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- Provide a. check or money order in the amount of $25.00 made payable to the Commissioner of .
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132
132
October, 17,1994
Honorable Commissioner of
Patents and Trademarks
Washington, D.C. 20231
ATTENTION: Box DD
Re: Title: S stem and Method for a Combined Online Data and
Anonggious Voice Service
Dear Sir:
. The undersigned, being the inventor of the disclosed invention, requests
that the enclosed papers be accepted under the Disclosure Document Program,
and that they be preserved for a period of two years.
- Respecduily submit-ted,
%
Stephen C. DuVa1
133
133
October, 17,1994
Honorable Commissioner of
Patents and Trademarks
Washington, D.C. 20231
ATTENTION: Box DD
Re: Titie: S stem and Method for a Combined Online Data and
Anon1_r_n_ous Voice Service
Dear Sir:
The undersigned, being the inventor of the disclosed invention, requests
that the enclosed papers be accepted under the Disclosure Document Program,
and that they be preserved for a period‘ of two years.
Respe ubmitted,
Stephen C. Duval
134
134
4 DESCLOSURE
% of a
SYSTEM AND METHOD
for 2
COMBENED
ONLJNE DATAAND ANONYMOUS VGECE
SERVICE
Stephen C. Duvai
October 16, 1934
135
135
-
TABLE or CONTENTS
' Abstract
5'
Background of the invention
Summary of the Invention
References
\\ H - \\B
Message Sequence
"e ~7
Ej~lv
Q-—\3
Figure 1- 6 Block Diagrams iii -\°l
Figure 7 - 17 Flow Charts
Lo -30
Section 1 : Drawings
Equipment Block Diagrams
Figure 1 Overview 3l—‘sS.
includes Shared Billing and Subscription Subsystem
(SBSS) description 33
Figure 2 User Station 31;
includes PC Program (PCP) description
Figure 3 Anonymous Voice System (A\.!S) '3‘? -3“!
includes AVS Controiler (AVSC) description
Figure 4 Voice Communication Sumystem (VCS) ‘lO~‘li
Figure 5 Voice Processing Subsystem (VPS) ¢[?.—\il-i
Figure 6 Online Data Subsystem (ODS) ‘Hg- xi 7
Messages
.
' ' ' "Switch to Voice Messages (1 --19) ‘£8 *5 1
Dial in Messages (20 - 27) S3- §"i
Caiier Hang Up Messages (28 - 29) 5'5’
Common Header
3 la
Tables and Records
AVSC Tables
Match ‘Tabie §'7
Call Table 37 8
VCS Tabie § 3
VPS Table S B
SBSS Subscriber Record §°i
ODS Record
(on
‘PCP Record
loo
'
SN:
136
136
Section 2: Software Components.
AVSC Program (AVSCP) ex 452
VPS Program (VPSP) (:3 ~ is S
ODS Program (ODSP) modifications Me
PC Program (PCP)
($7
SBSS Software
{DB
'
SBSS.AVS
SBSS.Bill
SB
137
137
Section 3: Operations
ODAVS initialization
Cf? - 7%
SBSS initialization
AVS initialization
Compietion of SBSS.AVS initialization
ODS initialization
Subscription
7]
Subscribe via online data
Subscribe via voice
online Data to Anonymous Voice 7 V7 3
Subscribers enter online chat
‘I 7.
Subscribers agree to switch to anonymous voice 7 Z
Subscriber accounts are updated to bill for online 7'3
services
_
Anonymous voice connection is set up 7*! - 77
Anonymous voice connection is used ‘78
Anonymous voice connection is terrninated 7 '5
Subscriber accounts are updated to bili for anonymous 78
voice services
Anonymous Voice via Diai in 7?" E §
.
s_ Rarties a_rrange_anonymous call without revealing their 7‘;
identity to each other
First subscriber calls ODAVS
Second caller calls ODAVS
.
'
Bo - 83
9,‘-l
The anonymous voice connection is established 39
The anonymous voice connection is used 8*-l
The anonymous voice connection is terminated 8'-i
Subscriber accounts are umated to biil for anonymous 8%‘
»
* voice services
when the first caller hangs up before the second caller 8%
calls in
Billing
is S
SE
138
138
Abstract:
A system and method to provide anonymous voice communication and
online data services in combination. The system comprises 3
subsystems and a data communications means which allows the
subsystems to exchange control messages. The subsystems are: the
Anonymous Voice Subsystem (AVS), the Oniine Data Subsystem
(ODS), and the Shared Billing and Subscription Subsystem (SBSS).
User Stations, with a data and voice communication means, connect
to the ODS via a Public Data Network (PDN) or to the AVS via the
Public Switched Teiephone Network (PSTN). when two User Stations
using online chat request to switch to anonymous voice, the ODS
sends a message to the AVS. The AVS will diai the User Stations
over the PSTN and establish a connection between them. Then each
User Station will display a message requesting its user to pick up
the telephone.
The AVS also supports a voice based, dial in mode. Two users agree
upon a matchcode and a time without reveaiing their identity to each other. Both users dial the AVS over the PSTN at about the same time
and both provide the AVS with the same matchcode. The AVS sets up
an anonymous voice connection between callers who provide the
same matchcode.
The SBSS is a shared resource used by the AVS and the ODS to obtain
" ‘subscriber information and to store subscriber billing information. .. . _
Periodically, the S1553 bills subscribers for their usage of oniine
data and anonymous voice services
139
139
Background of the Invention:
Many people prefer to strengthen a new relationship gradually,
especially when it involves a person who they have met anonymously
through" newspaper ads (Lonely Hearts), telephone based chat lines,
or online data services such as bulletin boards, email, or chat. Under
these circumstances, it is highly desirable to have one or more voice
conversations with the other party, without revealing your identity,
prior to a face to face meeting.
with respect to newspaper ads, PO Boxes were initially used to
establish communication. Now voice mailboxes are commonly used to
exchange voice messages; however, they do not provide real time
voice communication. Solomom discloses in patent 4,847,890 a
system to be used in conjunction with published ads to setup
anonymous voice calls. This approach is not convenient for
relationships being developed without newspaper ads.
online data services, such as America online, use Public Data
Networks (FUN) for efficient data communication with their
subscribers. They allow subscribers to exchange data messages
without either party revealing their identity to the other party. Data
messages are exchanged on the basis of "handles". The identity of the
person who uses the handle is known only to the online data service
provider. online data services have not recognized the need for
anonymous voice communication in combination with their online
"data services.
Most people will not use anonymous voice communication services
on a regular basis or for a large number of calls. Most people will
use these services only when they are actively searching for a new
. relationship or when they wish to convert an existing online
relationship to a personal relationship. in both cases, after a few
anonymous voice calls, either the relationship will bebroken off or
they will reveal their identity. At this point they will stop using
anonymous voice communication. This pattern of use poses problems
with regard to billing for these services.
Standalone anonymous voice services do not have a simple, low cost
approach to billing. 900 numbers could be used; however, they are
very expensive. Credit card numbers could be requested for every
call; however, this is inconvenient for the customer and costly for
the service provider because the charge for each call will frequently
140
140
be small. It is alsocostly for the service provider and inconvenient
for the caller to establish a subscription for a few calls.
The normal billing arrangement would have both subscribers pay for
a portion of the anonymous voice connection. Many online data
services aliow subscribers to communicate with other parties who
do not subscribe to the same service, for example via the Internet. In
this case it would be very convenient to allow the subscriber to pay
for the entire call.
The aforementioned problems are solved and a technical advance is
achieved in accordance with the principles of the invention in a
combination online data and anonymous voice system.
9)
141
141
Summary of Invention:
in accordance with my invention, an online Data and Anonymous
Voice System (ODAVS) is disclosed which provides both online data
and anonymous voice services. This system has several
distinguishing features:
.
0 it allows for the automatic conversion of an online chat
connection into an anonymous voice connection
0 it supports the use of a single subscription with a periodic
bill for the use of both online data and anonymous voice
services
0 it allows subscribers to dial in and establish an anonymous
voice connection without logging onto the online services
first
0 it allows a subscriber to establish an anonymous voice
connection with a non-subscriber if the subscriber is .
willing to pay for the entire cost of the caii.
The ODAVS consists of three subsystems connected by a local area
network (LAN). The subsystems are:
:0 Online Data Subsystem (ODS) which provides online data
services such as email, bulletin boards, online chat
0 Anonymous Voice Subsystem (AVS) which sets up
anonymous voice connections between two callers
6 Shared Subscription and Billing Subsystem (SBSS) which
maintains subscription and billing information and
periodically produces a single bill for each subscriber's
use of online data and anonymous voice services.
A User Station with a voice communication capability and a data
processing and communication capability is used to access the
ODAVS. The voice communication capability is connected to the AVS
over the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) and the data
communication capability is connected to the ODS over a Public Data
Network (PDN).
The ODAVS provides subscribers with the ability to automatically
switch from online chat to anonymous voice communication. After
142
two subscribers logon to the ODS using the PDN and enter into online
chat, either of them can request that the connection between them
be switched to anonymous voice. If the other party agrees, the data
processing capability of the User Stations disconnects from the ODS
and sets the data communication capability to answer an incomi-ng
call. The ODS sends billing information to the $855 to record the use
of online data services by the subscribers; and then the ODS requests
the AVS to set up an anonymous call between the two subscribers.
The AVS calls the first User Station using the PSTN and verifies the
connection by exchanging messages with the data processing
capability. The AVS calls the second User Station using the PSTN and
verifies the connection. Then the AVS connects the two user
stations. The data processing capability of the User Stations
exchange messages to verify the connection and then they display a
message on their monitor requesting the subscriber to pick up the
telephone.
After the subscribers have finished their anonyrnous conversation,
they hang up. The AVS recognizes the termination of the call and
sends billing information to the SBSS.
The ODAVS supports the use. of a single subscription with a periodic
bill for the use of both online data and anonymous voice services.
Consumers can enroll for both services using either the telephone or
“their personal‘ computergconsumers can logon to the ODS using their
personal computer and enroll. They can download software from the
ODS to their computer which will enable their personal computer to
support the automatic switch to anonymous voice. A consumer can
also enroll by dialing the AVS and using the Touch Tone keypad of the
telephone to respond to queries from the AVS.
Periodically the SBSS will read through all of the subscriber
records. if the subscriber owes the service operator for services
rendered, then the SBSS will bill the subscriber. The actual billing
technique will be dependent upon the option selected by the
subscriber. An invoice can be mailed, a charge can be applied to the
subscriber's credit card, or the funds can be electronically
transferred from the subscriber's bank account to the service
provider‘s bank account.
The ODAVS allows subscribers to dial in and establish an anonymous
voice connection without logging onto the online data services first.
143
143
To useythis feature, two subscribers would agree upon amatchcode
and atime without revealingtheir identity to each other. For
example, the subscribers could exchange this information using
voice mail, PO Boxes, email or online chat The first subscriber
would call the AVS over the PSTN and provide it with the rnatchcode
using Touch Tone input. The second subscriber would call the AVS
and provide it with the same matchcode. The AVS would connect the
two callers because the matchcodes they supplied were the same.
The subscribers would have an anonymous voice conversation and
then the call would be terminated in the same manner as described
above.
.
The ODAVS allows a subscriber to establish an anonymous voice
connection with a non-subscriber if the subscriber is willing to pay
for the entire cost of the call. Usually the cost of the coil is split
evenly between the two callers. However, the ODAVS provides the
two parties with the ability to split the cost of the call mtween
them as they choose. if the second party is not a subscriber then the
split must be 100% - 0
.
if a subscriber was in contact with a non-subscriber, i.e.. the Q08
might provide thesubscriber with access to the internet, then the
subscrimr and non subscriber could set up an anonymous voice
connection as follows. The two parties would select a matchcode
and then dial the AVS. Both parties would provide the AVS with the
same‘ matchcode and-the subscriber would agree -to pay for the entire
cost of the call. Alternatively, the non-subscriber could iogon auto
the ODS and download the software required to support automatic
switch to voice. The ODS would allow the non subscriber to use
online chat for a short period before switching to voice.
144
144
References
Linkon
— Teravox Programmer’s Guide published by Linkon Corporation,
1993, NY,NY
- Teravox Programmer's Reference Manual published by Linkon
-
Corporation, 1994, NY,NY
FC3000 Installation Guide and User’s Guide pubiished by Linkon
Corporation, 1994, NY,NY
'
Excel
-
LNXZOOO User’s Manual published by Excel , inc. Sagarnore Beach,
MA. 1994
-
EXCEL Developer's Toolkit User’s Manual published by Excel , Inc.
Sagamore Beach, MA. 1994
Galactioomm
-
.
System Operations Manual for The Major BBS Version 6.2, published
by Galaoticomrn, Florida, 1994
-
Developer's Guide for The Major BBS Version 6.2, published by
Galacticomm, Florida, 1994
D05
- ‘DOS 6.2 Instant Reference by Robert M Thomas, published by SYBEX
,
lnc., Alameda Ca, 1994
.- _DOS 6 Developer’s Guide by Jim Kyle, published by Sams Publishing,
_ Carmel Indiana, 1993
Novel!
-
NSEPro Network Support Encyclopedia Professional Volume
(CD-ROM) published by Novell, updated 12 times per year
-
Netware 4.0 NLM Programming by Michael Day, Michael Koontz,
Daniel Marshall, published by Novell Press, San Jose Ca 19.93
-
LAN Workshop Programming published by Novel!
-
Netware 4 for Professionals, Doug Bierer et ai, 1993, New Riders
Pubiishing, Indianapolis, Indiana
Btrieve
- The illustrated Guide to Netware Btrieve 6.x published by Golden
West Products international, Woodland i-iiils Ca
145
145
Sun Microsystems lnc
‘
- Soiaris Answersook (CD-ROM) published by Sun Microsystems
- Solaris Application Developer's Guide published by Sun
Microsystems 1993 Mountain Wew Ca
General
- Programmer’s Technical Reference: Data and FAX Communications,
Robert L. Hummel. Ziff-Davis Press, Emeryville, CA. 1993
- The Magic Garden Explained: The Internals of UNIX System V Release
4 by Berny Goodheart and James Cox, published by Prentice Hall,
Sydney Australia, ‘£994
- Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment, W Stevens,
Addison Wesley Publishing, 1992
- TCP/IP Illustrated, Vol 1 The Protocols. W Stevens,Addison Wesley
Publishing, NY, ‘E994
.
.
— PC Based Voice Processing, Bob Edgar, Parity Software
Development Corporation, 1 994
- The winn L. Rosch Hardware Bible, Third Edition, Brady Publishing,
lndiana,‘l 994
146
146
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SECTION 1 : DRAWINGS
EQUlPMENT BLOCK DlAGRAMS
Figure 1 Overview
1. User Station
- provides subscribers with voice and data communication
means so that they can access online data services from the
ODAVS and establish an anonymous voice connection with
another subscriber using the ODAVS
- refer to figure 2 for description
2. Communication link between the User Station and the
PSTN
.
- transports voice and data signais between the User Station
and the‘ PSTN
- for example LEC subscriber line (POTS)
3. Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN)
- circuit switched network (LEC and IXC) which connects the
user station to the Anonymous Voice Subsystem and to the
Public Data Network
_ - ‘ for connection to the PDN, the user station would dial the
telephone number associated with the closest PAD of the
PDN
- _for connection to the AVS, the user station would dial, for
example an 800 number, associated with the AVS
- alternatively, the AVS could dial the User Station using the
telephone number of the User Station
- for example — the operator of the ODAVS could purchase
Clarity Dedicated service from Sprint ie. an 800 number for
dial in and outwats for dial out
.
4. Communication link between the AVS and the PSTN
- transports voice and data signals between the AVS and the
PSTN
- for example - DS1 from LEC which connects to the POP of
an 'lXC
- one or more DS3s could be used to expand the capacity of the
system
3‘)
166
166
5. Communication links between the PSTN and the PDN
- these lines connect the PDN to the PSTN at a large number of
geographic points throughout the United States
- when the User Station dials the phone number of a PAD in the
PDN, the PSTN creates a circuit switched connection
between the PDN and the User Station using these
communication lines
6. Public Data Network (PDN)
- provides packet switched connection between the data
communication rneansof the user station and the Online Data
Subsystem (ODS) of the Online Data and Anonymous Voice
System (ODAVS)
- for example - Sprintnet from Sprint which supports the X25
protocol
_
- the Internet could also be used given the appropriate
hardware and software modifications for TCP/IF protocols
rather than X.25 protocols
7. Communication link between the PDN and the Online
Data Subsystem (ODS) of the ODAVS
- transports data signals between the PDN and the ODS
- X.2S can be used as the protocol to exchange data packets
.
..over this link
.
,
- for example - DSO leased line from LEC for connection to
PDN
- multiple DSOs or DS1s could be used to expand the capacity
of the system
8. Online Data and Anonymous Voice system (ODAVS)
A This system provides online data services and anonymous
voice communication services to subscribers
B Local Area Network (LAN) to connect the components
of the ODAVS
- transports data signals between the subsystems of the
ODAVS
—- for example = Ethernet LAN runing TCPIIP and SPX/IPX
protocols
-4- example components
- Ethernet Mu_ltiPort 10Base-T Hub from Addtron
167
167
- T Unshielded Twisted Pair cable connecting the hub to
the LAN adapters in the ODAVS subsystems
C Anonymous Voice Subsystem (AVS)
- this subsystem will provide anonymous voice services to
subscribers
—
refer to figure 3
D Oniine Data Subsystem (ODS)
- this subsystem will provide online data services to
subscribers
-
~
refer to figure 6
E Shared Billing. and Subscription Subsystem (SBSS)
I. This subsystem is a shared resource to process
subscription and billing information
- This subsystem will bill subscribers and process
subscription and billing requests from the AVS and
ODS
- it will set up new subscribers, respond to queries ‘
about existing ‘subscribers, record billing
information, and periodically bili subscribers
ll.
Hardware
-__ 486 based PC with disk storage such as Dell
Dimension 466V lntelDXZ 66 MHz System MA 5-0*-‘.
+ Local Area Network Adapter
- connects the LAN to the PC bus
.
O-
,.?/'U:.-.« Q1»
- for example - ‘IBM’ Ethernet LAN Adapter for UT?
- flaw; a modem which can be used to dial out to
credit card validation and billing services
Ill.
Software
a SBSSAVS
.
- _This program processes subscriber inquiry and
billing messages from other subsystems
- This is set up as a NLM under Netware
- Transport Layer interface (TLl) provides a
protocol independent Application Program
,
Interface (API) to local area network services
(supports both TCP/IP and SPX/IPX protocols)
S‘;
33
168
168
- includes Btrieve interface program which sends l0
req uests
to BROUTER.NLM
- Refer to Section 2: Software Components for a
mo re
detailed description
in SBSS.Bill
- Billing routine which periodically uses subscriber
billi ng
records to bill subscribers
- This is set up as a NLM under Netware
- Includes Btrieve interface program which
connects to BROUTER.NLM to process Btrieve
commands
- Refer to Section 2: Software Components for a
mo re
detailed description
c Operating system
- “for
example = Netware Server Edition 4.2:
from Novell‘
- refer to Network Support Encyclopedia
Professional Volume (CD-RUM) published by hove
+ includes support for Btrieve requests received
over the LAN
BSPXCONLNLM will pass the request to
Btrieve.NLM
Btrieve.NLM will process the :0 request and
-retum an error code
_
_
BROUTER.NLM interfaces other Netware
Loadable Modules (NLM) on the SBSS such as
SBSS.AVS and SBS$_.Biil to Btrieve
' refer to The illustrated Guide to Netware
Btrieve 6.): published by Golden West Products
International, Woodland Hills Ca ‘
d Development Tools
- used to develop SBSS.AVS and $BSS.Bill and to
provide ODS with TCP/IP and SPX/lPX
communication support
-I-LA N
Workshop from Novell
includes support for Transport independent
Remote Procedure Calls using TCP/lP as well
as SPX
includes support for TCP/IP protocols
‘3‘i
169
169
+ Software Development Kit CD from Novel!
— includes APl_ and libraries to support
development of NLMs for Netware 4.x
-
includes APl and libraries to support
development of DOS applications that utilize
SPX protocol for communication
-
- refer to Network Support Encyclopedia
Professional Volume (CD-ROM) published by Novel!
SE
170
170
Figure 2 User Station
1. User Station Description
A Personal computer is used to
- access the online data services provided by the ODAVS
including email, bulletin boards, and chat
— initiate an anonymous voice connection with another
subscriber while in online chat with that user
- become a subscriber to the online data service provided
by the ODAVS
B Telephone is used to
- anonymously converse with another subscriber over a
connection established by the ODAVS
- dial in to the ODAVS to establish an anonymous voice
connection
..
-. dial in to the ODAVS to enroll as a subscriber
2. User Station Hardware
— a telephone connected-to the POTS line via the connector
- Personal Computer (PC) such as an EBM compatible PC
+ Hayes AT compatible modem connected to the POTS line
- for example - the Hayes Accura 9600 Fax/Data PC
modern
- RS232 cable from modem to PC
- a connector to connect a POTS_line to two RJ-11 jacks
3. Software on the Personal Computer of the User Station
A PC Program (PCP)
- this program will provide the subcriber with an interface
to the ODS, process switch to voice messages, and start
an anonymous voice connection
- Commi.ib from Greenleaf Software Inc Dallas Tx
provides the basic functionality to control the operation
of the modem
B A common terminal emulation program
- for example ~ Smartcom from Hayes
- this program can be used to initially logon to the ODS,
enroll as a subscriber, and download the PCP program
C An operating system
' ’
'
- for example - DOS from Microsoft
go
3 lo
171
171
Figure 3 Anonymous Voice Subsystem (AVS)
1 . AVS Description
this subsystem provides a circuit switched interface to the
PSTN, voice processing functionality for interaction with
the user station, and modem functionality for interaction
with the user station
this subsystem exchanges messages with the SBSS to verify
and obtain subscriber information
this subsystem processes switch to voice requests from the
ODS
~
-
this subsystem processes dial in requests for anonymous
voice connections
~
.
this subsytem sends billing messages to the SBSS
this subsystem can enroll new subscribers
2. AVS Components
A Local Area Network {LAN}
- connects the AVCS, the V.CS, and the VPS to each other
and to the ODS and SBSS
- used to pass messages between these components
- same as the LAN in the ODAVS
8 Voice Bus connection between the VCS and VPS
- for exampe - a standard T1 cable with RJ45 jacks
- used to pass 24 digital 64 'kbs signals from the VCS to
the VPS
C Voice Communication Subsystem (VCS)
- this subsystem provides a circuit switched interface to
the PSTN
- refer to Figure 4
D Voice Processing Subsystem (VPS)- this subsystem provides voice processing and data
‘ . modem functionality for communication with the user
station
—
refer to figure 5
E Anonymous Voicesubsystem Controller (AVSC)
!. AVSC; Description
- the AVSC controls the operation of the AVS
- it processes switch to voice requests from ODS
37
172
4 it obtains subscriber information from and sends
billing information to the $858
- it responds to notification of incoming calls and caller disconnects from the VCS
- it requests the VCS to establish calls, to connect two
incoming PSTN channels, and to connect a PSTN
channel to a VPS channel
- it requests the VPS to collect subscriber information
concerning an anonymous voice connection or to
establish a data connection with a user station
ll.
AVSC Hardware
+ IBM Compatible PC and Peripherals
- 486 based PC with disk storage such as Dell
Dimension 466V lntelDX2 66 MHz System including
Hard Disk, Floppy, Keyboard, VGA with mouse
+ Local Area Network Adapter
-= connects the LAN to the PC bus
- for example - IBM Ethernet LAN Adapter for UTP
Ill.
AVSC Software
+ UNIX operating system
- for example - X86 Solaris from Sun
—
Microsystems
- refer to the AnswerBook CD—ROM from Solaris for
a desription of its operation
+ AVSC Program (AVSCP)
- controls initialization of the AVS
- controls the operation of the AVS to establish an
anonymous voice connection in response to an
ODS-Setup-Voice message or in response to a dial _
in request for an anonymous voice connection
- the program will use the TCP/lP protocol for
exchanging messages with other subsytems over
the LAN
+ this program uses the Excel Developer’s
Toolkit to provide the basic functionality
required to interface with the VCS
.
- this toolkit provides programs to initialize the
VCS (xldll and xlcfg) and to send messages to _
39
173
173
and receive messages from the VCS
(xlcom__rcv_msg and xlcorrL_3nd_msg)
- refer to EXCEL Developer’s Toolkit User's
Manual published by Excel , Inc. Sagamore
Beach, MA. 1994
this program is structured as a state machine
interpreter
.
refer to Section 2: Software Components ‘for a
more detailed description of this program
174
174
Figure
4 Voice Communication Subsystem (VCS)
1. VCS Description
‘ - this. subsystem provides a circuit switched interface to the
PSTN
- it processes incoming call and caller disconnect signalling
from the PSTN
- it processes AVSC requests to establish a PSTN call, to
connect two PSTN incoming calls, and to connect a PSTN
incoming call to the VPS
2. VCS Hardware
A Time Division Multiplex (TDM) bus
connects the controller/switch, line termination card,
tone generation and detection card, and the LAN adapter
card
supports the exchange of control messages and 64 kb
digital signals
B Controller/switch
this card includes a processor to run the VCS Program
(VCSP), and a circuit switch to form a connection
between any of the time slots in the TDM bus
C Line termination card
terminates T1 lines from the CSU and the VPS
D Tone generation andtdetection card
used to detect and generate tones used for PSTN
signalling
E LAN adapter card
interfaces the LAN to the TDM bus
F
For
example — LNXZOOO from Excel
LNX2000 base unit includes a chassis, a local bus (TDM
bus), and a MX/CPU 2000 (switch/controlier) which
includes a 2048 port non blocking circuit switch
ST 1 LC-1 92 (T1 line card, supports 8 T1 s i.e. 192 ports)
MFDSP card
Ethernet IO Adapter
refer to LNX2000 User's Manuai published by Excei , inc.
Sagarnore Beach, MA. 1994
.
G Channel Service Unit (CSU)
terminates the T1 cable from-the PSTN and the T1 cable
from the 51'‘! LC in the LNX2000'
HO
175
175
H T1 cable
- connects the CSU to the Line termination card
3. VCS Software - Voice Communication System Program
(VCS?)
- controls the operation of the VCS, configures the VCS in
resonse to messages from the AVCS, monitors the
operational readiness of the VCS, manages the assignment of
VCS resources, responds to messages sent by the AVSC, and
sends status messages to the AVSC
- ie. LNX System Software from Excel
Lu
176
176
Figures Voice Processing Subsystem (VPS)
1. VPS Description
_ - this subsystem provides voice processing and data modern
functionality for communication with the user station
- this subsystem responds to messages from the AVSC
- this subsystem obtains subscriber information concerning
anonymous voice connections using voice prompts and DTMF
responses from the user station
- this subsystem establishes a data connection with the
modem, of the user station and verifies the identity of the
user station
..
- this subsystem can enroll a new subscriber by sending a
message to the SBSS containing information collected from
from the caller
2. VPS Hardware
A IBM Compatible PC and Peripherals
- 486 based PC with disk storage such as Dell Dimension
466V» intelDX2 66 MHz System including Hard Disk,
Floppy, Keyboard, VGA with mouse
- includes an AT compatible bus which connects the 486
processor, RAM, device controllers, the LAN Adapter, the
Digital Signal Processor
B Local Area Network Adapter
-" connects the LAN to the PC bus
—- for example -. lBM Ethernet LAN Adapter for UTP
C Line Termination Card
- ie DianaTel EA24 operating as robbed bit Ti
D Digital Signal Processor (DSP) Card
' -, can be used to play voice prompts, collect DTMF input,
and emulate a Hayes AT compatible modem
- voiceprompts, DTMF input, modem commands and
messages are sent/received from the digital signal
processor overthe AT bus
*
+ for example - FC3000-=8 with 8 DSPs from Linkon
- with LEB-P (Linkon Expansion Bus - PEB Digital
Interface) for robbed bit T1 interface between the
FCBOOO and the PEB cable
‘ll
177
177
- refer to FC3 000 Installation Guide and User’s Guide
published by Linkon Corporation, 1994, NY,NY
E Cable from the Line Termination to the Digital
Signal Processor
- ie. PEB Cable (PCM Expansion Bus from Dialogic); similar
in character to a T1 link (24 digital channels)
l. Software running on the Digital Signal Processor
- software which supports voice playback and record, DTMF
input, and data modem functionality
- ie. DTMF-V. from Linkon which provides DTMF. voice
playback and record functionality
- ie. Modem-8 from Linkon which provides data modem
functionality (v.22 bis protocol - 2400 baud)
- refer to the Linkon manuals for a detailed description.
ll.
Device drivers for the DSP
- ie. FC3000 device drivers from Linkon for UNlX operating
system
III.
UNIX operating system
- for example - x86 Solaris from Sun Microsystems for
.
IBM compatible PCs
- refer to Solaris Answeraook (CD-ROM) published by Sun
Microsystems
Iv. VPS Program (VPSP) running on the PC
a VPSP Description
. _ - this program will initialize the VPS
- this program will collect subscriber inforrnation
‘_ related to an anonymous voice connection in response
to a AVSC-Call-info message
'
- this program can enroll a new subscriber in response
to input from a caller
- this program will establish a data connection with a
modem and verify its identity in response to a
AVSC-Data-Connect message
b VPSP Components
- VPS initialization routine
178.
178
- user process for each VPS channel
- AVSC Interface (AVSC!) process to pass messages
between the user processes and the LAN
- refer to main Section 2: Software Components for a
more detailed description
c Teravox, an application generator, from Linkon
generates the base software for the VPS?
+ VPS initialization routine
- modify the tvrb shell to run as a function
- add the VPSP initialization code to it
+ user process for each VPS channel
+ Teravox creates the basic user process to manage
the DSP
'
- file descriptor is associated with the port for
each DSP _
.
- read and write using the file descriptor as a
parameter to pass data to and receive data
from the DSP
- the device driver puts the data on the AT bus
- Modify the user process for interprocess
communication with the AVSCI
_- add the event loop to process AVSC messages
+ Modify the user processto send commands and
data to the FC3000 when it operates as a modem
- Hayes AT compatible
+ refer to
'
»
- Teravox Programmer's Guide published by Linkon
Corporation, 1993, NY,NY
'
- Teravox Programmer's Reference Manual
published by Linkon Corporation, 1994, NY,NY
‘H
179
179
Figure 6 Online Data Subsystem (ODS)
I. ODS Description
‘ — this subsystem will provide online data services to
subscribers including online chat (Teleconference),
electronic mail, bulletin boards, games, upload and download
of files, and other online data services
- this subsystem will allow two subscribers to agree to
switch to anonymous voice while they are in online chat
2. ODS Hardware
A iBM compatible PC with disk storage
. - for example - Dell Dimension 466V lntelDX2 66 MHz
System including Hard Disk, Floppy, Keyboard, VGA with
mouse
B Channel Service Unit/Data Service Unit (CSU/DSU)
- terminates the leased line from the PDN
- for example - Sprintnet bundles a CSU/DSU into their
packet switching service
C X.Z5 Adapter
- Adapter card for the PC which terminate an X.25
connection to a PDN
. .+ . for example - PC XNet from 0S'l'
- dual port (56 kbs) X.2S interface that connects to a
CSU/DSU
D Local Area Network Adapter
- connects the LAN to the PC bus
- for example - IBM Ethernet LAN Adapter for UTP
E Twisted pair cable
~
A
- connects the (_ZSU/DSU to the X.25 adapter
3. ODS Software
A An operating system
- for example - DOS from Microsoft
- DOS 6.2 instant Reference by Robert M Thomas, published
by SYBEX lnc., -Alameda Ca, 1994
'
3 Device Drivers for the X25 Adapter
- for example those which come with the PC XNet from DST
180
180
C Communication Software
I. to send ODSP requests for subscription and billing
information to the SBSS
II.
for example - BREQUESTEXE
- this routine captures Btrieve requests issued by The
Major BBS and forwards them over the LAN to the
SBSS
- BREQUEST.EXE is DOS TSR (Terminate and Stay
Resident) which will route Btrieve requests over an
SPX connection on the LAN to BSPXCONLNLM on the
SBSS
- BREQUEST.EXE is included with Netware Server
Edition 4.x from Noveli (a software component of the
SBSS)
= only requests for subscriber and billing information
, (BBSUSR.DAT) are sent over the LAN
for example - LAN workshop from Novell
- provides API and protocol stack for SPX/lPX to enable
BREQUEST.EXE to access SBSS over the LAN
- provides API and protocol stack for TCP/IP to support
the exchange of messages with the AVS
D DDS Program (ODSP)
’ 1.’ "Bulletin Board software
+ Provides online data services to subscribers
- electronic mail, forums (bulletin boards), file
libraries for upload and download, online chat
(teleconference), and security and accounting
+ For example - The Major BBS from Gaiacticomm
+ The Major BBS has an X.25 Software Option
‘- allows subscribers to connect to the ODS via
an X.25 packet switching network
+ The Major BBS has a Search and Retrieve Option
- includes a text file manager that allows users
to perform keyword searches using boolean
expressions
- files such as images can be attached to the
text document
- provides subscribers with the ability to
create, search, and retrieve text based ads
181
181
with attached graphics
- The Major BBS uses Btrieve from Btrieve
Technologies to manage its database
- Refer to System Operations‘ Manual for The Major
BBS Version 6.2, published by Galacticomm,
Florida, 1994
ll.
Modifications to the Bulletin Board software
- modify the Teleconference module of The Major BBS
to support switch-to-anonymous-voice requests
- The Developer's C Source Kit from Galacticomm
provides the source code for The Major BBS (including
Teleconference)
- refer to Developer's Guide for The Major BBS Version
6.2, published by Galacticomm, Florida, 1994 and
publications which describe each of their addon
options
.
- refer to Section 5: Software Components for more
details
5»
H7
182
/T’/iii .7~)é~E>
Switch to Voice Messages
+ PC-Req-Voice (Messagei)
this message‘ is from the requesting PCP to ODS requesting
the initiation of an anonymous voice connection with the
specified subscriber
‘
the format of this message is specified by Galacticomm
the X.25 virtual circuit number is used to identify the
requesting user id
Text “REQUEST SWITCH TO VOICE”
Accepting—Handle
Percent—Willing-to-Pay
+OD S-Req-Voice
(Messagez)
this message is from ODS to the accepting PCP requesting
the initiation of an anonymous voice connection with the
specified subscriber
the format of this message is specified by Galacticomm‘
the X25 virtual circuit number is used to identify the
requesting user id
Text “REQUEST SWITCH TO VOICE”
‘
Requesting-Handle
Percent-Willing-to—Pay
+ PC-Confirm-Voice (Message3)
this message is from the accepting PCP to ODS accepting or
rejecting the initiation of an anonymous voice connection
the format of this message is specified by Galacticomm .
the X.25 virtual circuit number is used to identify the
requesting user id
'
Text ‘CONFIRM SWiTCH TO VOICE”
Accept (Y/N)
-
+ ODS-Confirm-Voice messaged-)
.
this message is from from ODS to the requesting PCP
accepting of rejecting the request to initiate an anonymous
voice connection
the format of this message is specified by Gaiacticornm
the X25 virtual circuit number is used to identify the
requesting user id
Text “CONFIRM SWITCH TO VOICE’
Accept (Y/N) I
183
183
+ ODS-Bill (Messages)
— this message is from ODS to SBSS requesting SBSS to bill a
subscriber for an online session
- the format of this message is specified by Btrieve
Technologies inc
- this message starts as an i0 request from The Major BBS to
BREQUEST.EXE to update the user account record
,
- BREQUEST.EXE places the IO request on the LAN using SPX
protocols
- BSPXCOM.NLM reads the ID request from the LAN and passes
it to Btrieve.NLM for processing
+ ODS-Setup-Voice (Message6)
- this message is from ODS to AVSC requesting it to setup an
anonymous voice caii
-
Common Header (CH)
- Subscriber-ID‘! (same as" used id in the Major BBS)
- Subscriber-IDZ (same as used id in the Major BBS)
-
Handlel
-
Handlez
- Percent-paid-by-Subi
- Percent-paid-by-Sub2
+ AVSC-Inquiry (Message?)
-
Common Header (CH)
-
Subscriber-lD
+ SBSS-Inquiry (Messages)
- Commonl-ieader (CH)
-
Subscriber-ID
- Subscriber-Teiephone—Number
— Subscriber-Credit-Worthy (Y/N)
+ AVSC-Dial (Message9)
1. This message is from the AVCS to the VCS requesting the
VCS to dial a telephone number on the specified port
2. The format of this message is specified by the Excel
LNXZOOO system
3. Outseize Control message
4. Action lCBs
-
Seize
-
Scan for Wink
‘H
184
184
- Outpulse Stage N Address Data
‘S.
-
Scan for Wink
-
Do Call Progress Analysis
Data
-
VCS ID
-
Subscriber telephone number
+ VCS-Dial (iviessagei 0)
this message is from the VCS to the AVSC reporting on the
status of the request to dial a phone number
the format of this message is specified by the Excel
LNXZOOO system
Call Progress Analysis Result message
"VCS-ID
~
Status (Answer/No AnswerlBusy)
+ AVSC-VPS-Connect (Message! 1)
this message is from the AVSC to the VCS requesting the
VCS to connect the port of the called PC/caiiing subscriber
to the port of a VPS channel
the format of this message is specified by the Excel
LNXZOOO system
Connect message
VCS ID for the VPS
VCS ID for -the called PC
'
+ AVSC-Data-Connect (Message! 2)
this message is from the AVSC to the VPS requesting theVPS to establish a data connection with a User PC
Common Header (CH)
VPS-ID
Subscriber-lD
Handle
Other~Hand|e
+ VPS-PC-Verify (Message13)
this message is from the VPS to the User PC asking the User
PC to verify the connection
Common Header (CH)
Subscriber-ID
' ‘
Handle
Other-Handle
185
185
+ PC-VPS-Verify (Messagel 4)
- this message is from the User PC to
connection
on which the message appears
- Common Header (CH)
- Subscriber-lD
-
Handle
- Other-Handle
- Status (OK/Not OK)
gel 5)
e
he VPS to th
AVSC verifying the data
he VCS requesting the
from the User PC port and
-
Park message
- VCS ID for the VPS .
- VCS ID for the called PC
(Messagei 7)
- + AVSC-Call-Connect.
‘
tom the AVSC to the VCS
- this message IS f
requesting the
LNX2000 system
- Connect message
- VCS ID for PC}
- VCS ID for PCZ
+ PC-PC-Verify (Message! the
8) requesting PC to the accepting PC
- this message is from
to verify the connection
- Common Header (CH)
-
186
‘-186
-
Handle1
-
Handiez
+ PC-PC-Confirm (Message19)
‘ - this message is from the accepting PC to the requesting PC
verifying the connection
- Common Header (CH)
-
Handle‘!
-
Handlez
- Status (OK/Not OK)
187
187
Dial ln Messages
+ AVSC-In-Cal! (Messagezo)
1.
This messageis from the AVSC to the VCS requesting the
2.
VCS to scan for incoming calls
'
The format of this message is specified by the Excel
LNX2 000 system
3.
lnseize Control message
- upon seizure detection (an incoming call), the LNX wiil
begin execution of the channel’s call control instructions
4.
Action |CBs
+ Generate inseizure Ack
- instructs LNX to provide an inseizure Acknowledge to
the distant end (winkl)
+ Receive Stage N Address Date (AN!)
-
LNX attaches a DSP to the channel to collect an
incoming‘ digit stream
- Generate Call Processing Event (wink 2)
‘
+ Reportlncoming Call with Digit Data
- send host a Request for Service with Address Data _
message upon inseizure detection and receipt of a
single stage or multiple stage digit collection
5.
Data (VCS ID)
'+ VCS-In-Call (Message21)
this message is from the VCS to the AVSC letting the AVSC
know that a call has arrived
the format of this message isspecified by the Excel
LNX2 000 system
-
Request for Service with Address Data message
VCS ID (VCS channel identifier)
ANI (calling telephone number).
+ AVSC-Call-Info (Messagezz)
this message is from the AVSC to the VPS requesting the
VPS to collect information from the caller
Common Header (CH)
VPS-ID (Teravox channel number)
AN! (Calling telephone number)
188
188
+ VPS-Create-Sub (Message23)
- this message is from the VPS to SBSS requesting the SBSS
to create a new subscriber record
-
Common Header (CH)
- the other fields required in this message are similiar to
those in the Subscriber Record
+ VPS-Verify-Sub (Message24)
- this message is from the VPS to SBSS requesting the SBSS
to verify the subscriber ID
-
Common Header (CH)
-
Subscriber-lD
- VPS-iD (Teravox channel number)
+ SBSS=Verify=Sub (Messagezs)
- this message is from the SBSS to the VPS indicating
whether or not the subscriber ID is valid
-
Common Header (Ci-i‘)
.- VPS-lD (Teravox channel number)
-
Subscriber-ID
'
-
Subscriber-lD-Valid (Y/N)
-
S‘ubscrib'er-Credit-Worthy (Y/N)
+ VPS-Call-Info (Messagezfi)
'
‘ - "this message is from the VPS to the AVSC and it contains
the results of collecting information from the caller
-
Common Header (CH)
- VPS-iD (Teravox channel number)
-
Matchcode
-
Subscriber-ID
-
Subscriber=lD-Valid (Y/N)
-
Subscriber-Credit-Worthy (Y/N)
.
- willing-to-pay-100% (Y/N)
+ AVSC-Hang-Up (Message27)
- this message is from the AVSC to the VCS requesting the
VCS to disconnect a caller
- the format of this message is specified by the Excel
LNX2000.system
-
Release Channel message
-
VCS-ID
Sll
189
189
Caller Hang Up Messages
+ VCS-Hang-Up (Messageza)
-
' - this message is from the VCS to the AVSC letting the AVSC
know that a caller has hung up
- the format of this message is specified by the Excel
LNX2000 system
+ Channel Released
_
- this message informs the AVSC that a channel has been
released (caller has hung up)
-
VCS-ID
+ AVSC-Bill (Message29)
- ’ this message is from the AVSC to the SBSS requesting the
SBSS to create a billing record for a caller
- Common Header (CH)
-
Matchcode ID
-
Matchcode
‘
- Billing Rate
- Time of end of voiceconnection
-
Match State
- Payment-Status (Paid/Not Paid)
+ First Subscriber
-
First subscriber ID .
‘- " First telephone number
-
First handle
-
First Call ID
'
- Time of voice connection with first subscriber
‘- Percent of anonymous voice call paid by first subscriber
- First Subscriber Credit Worthy (Y/N)
as Second Subscriber
-
_
Second Subscriber ID
‘
—
-
~ Second telephone number
-
Second handle
-
Second Cali ID
- 'l’ime of voice connection with second subscriber
- Percent of anonymous voice call paid by second
subscriber
.
- Second Subscriber Credit Worthy (Y/N)
SS
190
190
Common Header (CH)
+ Message Number (CH01)
-
this field identifies the type of message
+ Sender(CHO2)
- AVSC
1'9“
- vps
-
ssss
=-
ODS
-
User PC
:
_
_\,b¢e
L R RG3 .1
2: Obsivg-V°““
fie
+ Destination (CH03)
—
AVSC
-
VPS
-
SSBS
- ODS
‘
_- User PC
Lise
191
191
r TABLES AND RECORDS
AVSC Tables
+ Match Table (Table 1)
each record in this table describes an anonymous voice
connection
_
Matchcode ID (identifier for table entry)
Matchcode (used for dial in calis to match callers)
up
Billing Rate
Time of end of voice connection
+ Match State
-
First caller waiting
-
Both callers waiting
-
Callers connected ‘
-
Callers disconnecting
Payment-Status (PaidlNot Paid)
+ First Subscriber
-
First subscriber ID
- First telephone number
-
First handle
-
First Call ID
- Time of voice connection with first subscriber
- Percent of anonymous voice call paid by first subscriber
- First Subscriber Credit Worthy (Y/N)
-4- Second Subscriber
-
Second Subscriber ID
- Second telephone number
-=
Second handle
'
- Second Call lD
‘
.
- Time of voice connection with second subscriber
- Percent of anonymous voice call paid by second
subscriber
- Second Subscriber Credit _Worthy (Y/N)
£7
192
+ Call Table (Table 2)
- each record in this table describes a call (dial in or dial out)
-
Call State
- Call ID (arbitrary number assigned to uniquely identify an
entry in the Call table)
+ VCS ID
-
logical span ID
-
channel offset
+ VPS ID (0 if DSP not assigned)
- Teravox voice channel
-
Matchcode ID
-
Subscriber ID .
+ VCS Table (Table 3)
- each record in this table describes a VCS channel
+ VCS ID (VCS channel identifier),
-
lcgical span ID
-
channel offset
+ VCS Channel State
- assigned to VPU channel
- awaiting dial-in calls
- assigned to dial-in caller
- assigned to dial-out caller
'
-
available
- Call ID (0 if channel is not assigned to a call)
+ VPS ID (0 if channel is not assigned to a VPS channel)
- Teravox channel number + VPS Table (‘Table 4)
- each record in this table describes a VPS channel
+ VPS ID
.
.
- Teravox channel number
+ VPS channel state -
available.
- assigned to a call
— Call ID (0 if channel is available)
- VCS ID of VCS channel connected to this VPS channel
193
193
SBSS Subscriber Record (Record 1)
- Subscriber-ID (User ID in The Major BBS)
- Password
‘
'
-
Subscriber-Name
-
Subscriber-Address
-
Subscriber-Telephone-Number
-
Handie
- Subscriber-Credits (creds in The Major BBS program)
+ Subscriber-Biliing-Method
-
Credit card
-
Bank account debit
-
Prepay
-
invoice
- Subscriber-Prepay-Balance
= Subscriber-Credit-Worthy (Y/N)
-
Subscriber-Credit-Limit
= refer to page 158 of Developer's Guide published by
Galacticomm for additional detail
S9
194
194
ODS Record (Record 2)
- This record is used by ODS during the setup of an anonymous
voice connection
+ This information is stored in the Volatile Data Area for the
Teleconference module
- refer to Developer's Guide published by Galacticomm
- identical copies are maintained in the VDA of the requesting
and the accepting subscribers
- the VDA will exist while the subscriber is using the
Teleconference moduie
+ Requesting State
-
request sent
- ‘ confirmation received - accepted
- confirmation received - rejected
+ Accepting State
-
request sent
- confirmation received - accepted
- confirmation received - rejected
- Subscriber-ID? (same as used id in the Major BBS)
- Subscriber-IDZ (same as used id in the Major BBS)
-
Handlel
v -
Handlez
~' Percent-paid-by-Subi
‘- "Percent-paid-by-Subz
PCP Record (Record 3)
+ State
- Switch to voice requested
- Switch to voice confirmed - accepted
- Switch to voice confirmed — rejected
- Handle of other subscriber
’
- Percent-paid—this-subscriber
- Percent-paid-other-subscriber
\‘\>
(oo
195
195
SECTION 2:. SOFTWARE COMPONENTS
AVSC Program (AVSCP)
A- This program is structured as a state machine interpreter
B-
initialization
initialize the AVSC tables
-
match table is empty
-
call table is empty
- VCS table has one entry per VCS channel and all channels are
available
- VPS table has one entry per VPS channel and all channels are.
available
. performs VCS initialization
'
- xldll toload software
_ + xlcfg to configure VCS using a configuration file
- Logical span IDs are assigned to physical spans (Ti)
- Logical span IDs for the PSTN connection and the VPS
connection are established
.
. send a connect request to the SBSS.AVS and the VPSPI to
establish a communication link
. sends messages to the VCS to establish voice connections with
the VPS and then park the channels
-
Outseize message
-
Park message
. update VCS and VPS tables for the VCS channels which -are
assigned to VPS channels
. issue the AVSC-ln-Call message to the VCS for the channels
which will handle dial in calls
. update the VCS table for the channels assigned to dial in calls
196
196
C-
Event loop
1.
Switch to Voice Events
+ ODS-Setup-Voice
- request from ODS to establish an anonymous voice
connection
+ SBSS-Inquiry
- response from SBSS to request for information about a
subscriber
+ VCS-Dial
- response from VCS to a request to dial a subscriber
+ VPS-Data-Connect
- VPS notifies AVSC: that it has established and verified a
PC connection
2. Caller Hang Up ‘Events
+ VCS.-Hang-Up
.
'
- VCS notifies AVSC of caller disconnect
3.
Dial in Events
+ VCS-In-Call message
. - VCS notifies AVSC of incoming call
+ VPS-Call-Info message
-
caller information collected by the VPS.
QD
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197
VPS Program (VPSP)
A-
VPS Initialization
1. tvrb function to initialize the VPS
-
- initialize the Teravox system: voice cache, system log,
speech file manager, speech support tasks
load the voice processing and modem software into the
DSPs, connect the DSPs to a channel on the FEB via the LEB-P
asigns the channels on -the first T1 to Teravox channels
0-23, the next T1 is assigned to 24-4-7, maximum 4 Tis per
VPS
the DSPs attached to the T1 channel via the PEB are
referenced by same Teravox channel number as the T1
channels connected to the DianaTel EA24
2. VPSP initialization '
- set up the VPSPI’ process
- set up a user process for each VPS channel to respond to
messages from the AVSC
B- User process for each VPS channel
1. Initialization
L
establish interprocess communication with VPSP! via named
stream pipe so that messages can be exchanged with the
AVSCP
establish Transport Layer Independent (TL!) communication
link with the SBSS.AVS
.
- call t-open to open a transport link specifying TCP/lP
protocol
. .
- call t-bind to establ' h a connection to the device driver
of. the LAN adapter
.
.
- call t-connect to establish a TLI communication link
with the SBSS.AVS over the LAN
- after the link is established, t-snd and t-rcv are used to
send and receive messages
tvappreg registers the application with Teravox
- ' specifies the channel number
- specifies the directory in which files are located
tvopnsf opens the speech file
33
L3
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198
V. tvsetcp sets the channel parameters
VI. tvnnxtcal will
- prepare the Dianatel EA24_ to receive incoming calls
- wait for the VCS to initiate a call
2. Event loop
+ Switch to Voice
+ AVSC-Data-Connect
- request from AVSC to establish a data connection to a
PC and to verify the identity of the PC
+ Dial In
+ AVSC-Ca|l—lnfo
- request from the AVSC to obtain information from the
caller required to set up the anonymous connection
' + SBSS-Verify-Sub
- response from SBSS to a request to verify a
subscriber
3. Teravox commands used to process messages
- tvmenu speaks a menu, collects digits, and branches to the
routine based upon the key pressed
- tvspeak speaks a singlephrase
+ tvtread is used to read Touch Tone input
- Touch ‘Tone input is stored in a queue allowing users to
type ahead
- tvtread takes input off the queue, one key at a time
p
- tvrecord records a single phrase
C- VPSP Interface (VPSPI) process
1. Description
— receives and sends messages over the ‘LAN from/to the AVSC
- uses named stream pipe to pass messages to the user
process for the specified Teravox channel
.
- uses Transport Layer Independent (TU) communication link
over the LAN to exchange messages with the AVSCP
2.
Initialization.
- set up the named stream pipe for interprocess
communication with the user process for each Teravox
channel
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199
- Set up a TLI endpoint and listen for a connection request
from the AVSCP
3. ‘Event loop
+ Receive message on a named stream pipe
- send message over the TL! connection to the AVSCP
+ Receive message from the LAN
- send message over the named stream pipe to the
specified user process
200
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