Remote network management system

Remote network management system
US008176155B2
(12) Unlted States Patent
Yang et al.
(54)
(10) Patent N0.:
(45) Date of Patent:
REMOTE NETWORK MANAGEMENT
(75) Inventors: Allen Yang, Bridgewater, NJ (US); Yee
'
Ed1SOn’NJ(US)
.
.
(73) Ass1gnee: RIIP, Inc., W1lm1ngton, DE (US)
Notice:
12/1990 Ch?IIlZaS 6t 81
4,982,292 A
5,023,611 A
5,025,258 A
1/1991 ltOh et al.
6/1991 ChamZas et a1.
6/1991 D W 'l
5,099,440 A
3/1992 Pennebaker et al.
5,323,420 A
6/1994 Asprey
5,732,212 A
3/1998
5,721,842 A
.
5,740,246 A
Subject to any disclaimer, the term of this
)
2/1998 Beasley etal.
P
h It
3/1999 Beasley et al.
6/1999 Van Court
2
A 1 N _ 10/723 992
pp ' O"
’
t l.
4/1998 szirtoo Ze a
5,884,096 A
,
USC' 1540:’) by 1164 days‘
21
7/1991 c?amgsezt a1‘
5,917,552 A
patent is extended or adjusted under 35
(
May 8, 2012
4,979,049 A
5,031,053 A
LiaW, Warren, NJ (US); Dennis Ti,
(*)
US 8,176,155 B2
,
it
av
ael e
t l
a.
6,104,414 A
8/2000 Odryna etal.
6,112,264 A
8/2000 Beasley et al.
(Continued)
(22)
F1led:
Nov. 26, 2003
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
(65)
Prior Publication Data
Us Zoos/0125519 A1
Jun 9 2005
“Apex PC Solutions Launches EmergeiHighly Sought-After
Remote Server Management System,” Business Wire, Sep. 14, 1998.
(51)
Int. Cl.
(52)
G06F 15/1 73
(2006.01)
US. Cl. . 709/223; 709/220; 725/130; 707/E17.016;
(58)
Field of Classi?cation Search ................ .. 709/223,
(57)
709/220; 725/130; 707/E17-016; 375/240-01
See application ?le fOr complete Search history_
Disclosed is a remote network management system for cou
pling a series of remote domain servers, ?le/print servers,
headless servers, network appliances, serial IT equipment,
(Continued)
Primary Examiner * Yves Dalencourt
Assisllml Examine?’ * Michael C Lai
375/240.01
(56)
References Clted
switches, routers, ?rewalls, security interfaces, application
4,286,256
4,295,125
4,463,342
4,467,317
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ABSTRACT
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Power Supply
servers, load balancers, and environmental controls to one or
more user workstations allowing for selective access of the
remote devices. The remote devices are all connected to a
remote management unit which interfaces each user worksta
tion to the remote devices. The power supply of each remote
device is similarly connected to the remote management unit
through a controllable power supply. An option menu con
taining a list of all of the remote devices allows a user to select
and operate any of the remote devices from the workstation.
The option menu is also utiliZed to selectively control the
power to the remote devices, servers, and computers.
43 Claims, 13 Drawing Sheets
US 8,176,155 B2
Page 2
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US 8,176,155 B2
Page 3
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andValidity ofU.S. Patent Nos. 5,884,096, 5,937,176 and 6,112,264,
Jan. 3, 2001. Claim Charts.
* cited by examiner
US. Patent
May 8, 2012
Sheet 1 0f 13
101
Internet/LAN/WAN
108
Power Supply
L17
FIG.1
US 8,176,155 B2
US. Patent
M y 8, 2012
Sheet 2 0f 13
US 8,176,155 B2
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US. Patent
May 8,2012
Sheet 3 or 13
US 8,176,155 B2
FIG. 3A
129T
Reset
.
Local KVM
Clrcultry
.
227
225
\
Dual Redundant Power Supply
221
AC
In
223
Option
ngezgu
Serial Card
211
L
PCI
CPU
207
riser
‘
Video
Processor 2
'
2
card
Frame Grabber
209
215
1
—-—-~
212
LAN
205
COM1
206
__1
COMZ
208
g
Y
KV Port
Header
Modem
+
Module
l 204
_
#21)? F2621 Ag‘?
121i i122
<-
217
I T1
Power
2%‘
i1 8
T0117
219
219 219
‘
219 213
213
213
213
US. Patent
May 8, 2012
US 8,176,155 B2
Sheet 4 0f 13
213
213
213
213
A
M
i
M
Serial
Transceiver
303
Serial
Transceiver
303
Serial
Transceiver
303
‘7
Serial
Transceiver
303
EEPROM
305
UARTlSwilch
301
PCI riser card
209
US. Patent
May 8, 2012
Sheet 5 0f 13
US 8,176,155 B2
FIG. 3C
219
219
219
219
UART
UART
UART
UART
354
354
354
354
1
1
217\‘
1__.___ Li
Switch
Video Switch
350
352
Frame Grabber
215
‘
US. Patent
May 8, 2012
Sheet 6 0f 13
US 8,176,155 B2
FIG. 3D
Keyboard and Cursor
Control Device Signals
CPU
207
Video-In
/
375
376a
I
V
I
376D
376c
him: e-im B-out
Frame Buffers
sso
Pixel Pusher
\
37a
' 379
J33‘?
361
Flash
Memory
384
RAM
386
Switch -———-—* To 205
387 \
390
MicroProcessor
388
_——> To 206
US. Patent
May 8, 2012
US 8,176,155 B2
Sheet 7 0f 13
Store in
frame
buffer
iv
Noise
Reduction
and Filter
/\ 403
Test
FIG.4
41 9
_w1__~
Exiting
421
Caching
407
405
Send Cache
Cache Hit? ——Y—es_>‘ Hit Message
Server
Something to
Compute
Stack
411
update area
and create
hit plane
413
v
Com oression
V
Send
compressed
data
message
415
To Switch
390
417
US. Patent
May 8, 2012
Sheet 8 0f 13
US 8,176,155 B2
--—-—-—->
___H__> Data
Flowchart
Transfer
Steps
G
CPU
207
511
+
~505
CCT From
/
503
Client
Raw /
,_‘___,_i_u
1
Frame
Buffer 0
Raw
Compare
Frame
Buffer 1
Frame
Buffer
l
A
\- 521
V
509
‘l
1'
RGB Noise
Nearest Color
Match Function
: Color 09d‘;
Transiat'on
Filter &
Difference Test
523
515
519
Compute CRC
for Changed
Blocks of
Pixels
\—__._
‘V
Coior Code
Table
513
‘
Coded
Frame
Buffer
/- 517
‘
CRC Array
11
See FIG. 4B
525
US. Patent
May 8, 2012
US 8,176,155 B2
Sheet 9 0f 13
Compute CRC for
changed blocks of
—————-—-—-> Data Transfer
———-> Flowchart Steps
Coded
Frame
Buffer
pixels
523
+
Wait for Complete
CRC Array
517
Coded Frame
Buffer and CRC
Array
invalidate all data,
\
New Video
Mode '2
Send new video
mode msg to client
— 529
0
531/
For all changed blocks
of pixels, compare
new CRC to cache \
CRCs and update block
of pixels info State
Send cache hit
msg to client & Yes
Cache Hit?
mark the block of A
pixels as complete
No
Search block of
+
Block info
Array
pixels info array for
incomplete biocks of <——’ '\.__...._____________________J
pixels. Compute
next update
541~/
rectangle
5 there
something to
date’7
Yes
Bit slice the
No
543
update rectangle
Bit Plane
Frame
Buffer
547 ~—/ |——_———————————-f
from the coded
frame buffer to
the bit plane frame
buffer
Send bit plane to
compressor
Send compressed
data msg to client \
Has it been
300ms since last
capture?
Sewer
Stack
545
417
To Switch
390
US. Patent
May 8, 2012
Sheet 10 0f 13
US 8,176,155 B2
Raw
Frame
Buffer
1
505 \/
601
Raw
‘Grab one block
Frame
7
of
Buffer
0
\
Generate a \/
——-> by frequency
sort
\ 600
503
r\
7
List of High
603
List of Low
Frequency
Frequency
Colorsj
Colors \/
‘
V
607
Grab Next Low ‘/
Frequency Pixel
Grab Next Higm/
609
_> Frequency
1
V
611
Compute \
Distance
511
CCT From
Ctient
U date Color
D Map
"*
—-—-—-~—-> Data Transfer
“few-p Flowchart Steps
Color
Code
605
US. Patent
May 8, 2012
Sheet 11 0f 13
700
US 8,176,155 B2
1 701
Current
Pixel Block
Previous
Pixel Block
Get next Pixel\/ 703
FIG-.7
705
Compute D= \
distance new-old
707
pixel_threshold
Yes Accumulation
715
New Pixel Block
Pixel block has not
changed
---——--—> Data Transfer
p Flowchart Steps
US. Patent
May 8, 2012
Sheet 12 0f 13
US 8,176,155 B2
\'756
00
22
0,0,0
00
00
00
0,0,0
00
FIG.8
753
0,0,0
25 ,
0
0,0,0
0
0
0
O
0
754
755f
US. Patent
May 8, 2012
803
FIG.9
Server _’ Client //
Stack
US 8,176,155 B2
Sheet 13 0f13
Slack
I
417/
Waitfor /
message from
server stack
Notify application
1
L
"* — layer about new
video mode
]_.~
D compress data
and transfer to bit
For each cache
hit, copy from the
speci?ed cache to
the merge buffer
833
\
I
plane frame buffer
Bit plane
frame
809
831
buffer
Notify application
Free 0 d buffers
and allocate new
:__
layer of update
Cache
buffers
flame
Transfer/data in
""'""bit plane frame
~
‘
buffer to the
‘
merge buffer
1 buffer (3)
515/ Lib:
N°
on N w
Application Layer
Notify' application
V
layer of update
Copy merge frame
buffer to vupdate
frame buffer.
Convert pixels to
area
Merge
Frame
Buffer
the current screen
4......
83
pixel format
it
Moniter
Video 105
U pdate
4-
521/
Control Path
--__>
frame
buffer
817
Copy newly
deccmpressed
block of pixels to
cache frame
buffer
US 8,176,155 B2
1
2
REMOTE NETWORK MANAGEMENT
SYSTEM
blinking of a cursor. Even as a user types a document, a
majority of the screen does not change over a period of time.
Hence, the compression algorithm used by the present inven
tion takes advantage of these redundancies, both between
successive frames of video and within each individual frame,
FIELD OF THE INVENTION
to reduce the amount of digital video signal data that is trans
mitted to the remote computers and/or video display devices.
Reducing the amount of digital data transmitted over the
communication medium decreases communication time and
The present invention relates generally to a remote network
management system for remotely controlling network and
computer equipment from one or more local user worksta
tions through a remote control device. Speci?cally, a key
board, video monitor, and cursor control device attached to a
decreases the required bandwidth.
Most forms of video compression known in the art require
user workstation are utiliZed to remotely control domain serv
complicated calculations. For example, Moving Pictures
Experts Group (“MPEG”) video compression algorithms use
ers, ?le/print servers, headless servers, network appliances,
serial IT equipment, switches, routers, ?rewalls, security
the discrete cosine transform as part of its algorithm. Also, the
MPEG standard relies on the recognition of “motion”
between frames, which requires calculation of motion vectors
interfaces, application servers, load balancers, and environ
mental controls as their associated power supplies are con
nected to a remote control device.
that describe how portions of the video image have changed
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
over a period of time. Since these algorithms are calculation
intensive, they either require expensive hardware or extended
equipment, servers, and computers located at a location
remote from the system administrator. If the distance is great
transmission times that allow su?icient time for slower hard
ware to complete the calculations.
In addition to complexity, many existing video compres
enough, the Internet is commonly utiliZed to control comput
sion techniques are lossy (i.e., they do not transmit all of the
In many situations, it is desirable to manage networking
20
video signal information in order to reduce the required band
ers from a remote location. For example, a software program
such as pcAnywhere may be utiliZed to access a remote 25 width). Typically, such lossy techniques either reduce the
detail of a video image or reduce the number of colors uti
computer over the Internet or a LAN utiliZing the keyboard,
video monitor, and cursor control device attached to a local
liZed. Although reducing the number of colors could be part
user workstation. Remote computer access programs, such as
of an adequate compression solution for some computer man
pcAnywhere, typically require that host software is installed
on the remote computer and client software is installed on the
agement systems applications, in many other applications,
30
such a result defeats the intended purposes of the computer
user workstation. To access a remote computer, a user of the
management system.
user workstation selects the desired remote computer from a
list and enters the appropriate usemame and password. Once
access has been granted to the remote computer, the user
The following references, which are discussed below, were
found to relate to the ?eld of computer management systems:
PerholtZ et al. US. Pat. No. 5,732,212 (“PerholtZ”), Beasley
US. Pat. No. 6,112,264 (“Beasley”), Pinkston, II et al. US.
Pat. No. 6,378,009 (“Pinkston”), Thornton et al. US. Pat. No.
6,385,666 (“Thomton”), and Wilder et al. US. Pat. No. 6,557,
utiliZes the keyboard, video monitor, and cursor control
35
device attached to the local user workstation to access and
operate the remote computer.
Hardware solutions also exist for operating a remote com
170 (“Wilder”).
puter from a user workstation over the Internet or via a
modem. In contrast to software solutions, hardware solutions
40
PerholtZ discloses a method and apparatus for coupling a
local user workstation, including a keyboard, mouse, and/or
do not typically require host and/or client software. Instead,
hardware solutions typically utiliZe a keyboard, video moni
video monitor, to a remote computer. PerholtZ discloses a
system wherein the remote computer is selected from a menu
tor, and mouse (“KVM”) switch which is accessible over the
displayed on a standard siZe personal computer video moni
Internet or LAN via a common protocol, such as TCP/IP. The
tor. Upon selection of a remote computer by the system user,
hardware solutions may also utiliZe a modem to connect to the 45 the remote computer’s video signals are transmitted to the
Internet. Generally, a user or system administrator accesses
local user workstation’s video monitor. The system user may
the remote computers attached to the KVM switch utiliZing
also control the remote computer utiliZing the local user
an Internet web-browser or client software associated with
workstation’s keyboard and monitor. The PerholtZ system is
also capable of bi-directionally transmitting mouse and key
the KVM switch. Once the remote computer has been
selected, the remote computer’s video signal is routed to the
a keyboard and/ or mouse to control the remote computer. The
board signals between the local user workstation and the
remote computer. The remote computer and the local user
workstation may be connected either via the Public Switched
KVM switch may additionally include a connection to the
Telephone System (“PSTN”) and modems or via direct
50
user workstation’ s video monitor and a user may then utiliZe
cabling.
power source of the remote computer for a hard reboot in case
of system failure.
55
The aforementioned hardware and software solutions gen
erally utiliZe compression algorithms to reduce the necessary
bandwidth required to transmit the video signals. For
example, the remote network management system of the
present invention uses the compression algorithm disclosed
in application Ser. No. 10/233,299, which is incorporated
herein by reference, to reduce and compress the digital data
local keyboard, mouse and/or video monitor to one of a plu
rality of remote computers. In particular, a ?rst signal condi
60
tioning unit includes an on-screen programming circuit that
displays a list of connected remote computers on the local
video monitor. To activate the menu, a user depresses, for
65
user selects the desired computer from the list using the local
keyboard and/or mouse.
According to Beasley, the on-screen programming circuit
requires at least two sets of tri-state buffers, a single on-screen
processor, an internal synchronization generator, a synchro
example, the “print screen” key on the local keyboard. The
that must be transmitted to the remote computers and/or video
display devices. Generally, video signals generated by a per
sonal computer have both spatial and interframe redundan
cies. For example, in a near idle personal computer, the only
change between successive frames of video might be the
Similar to PerholtZ, Beasley discloses a speci?c implemen
tation of a computeriZed switching system for coupling a
US 8,176,155 B2
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3
Thornton discloses a computer system having remotely
nization switch, a synchronization polarizer, and overlay con
trol logic. The ?rst set of tri-state buffers couples the red,
green, and blue components of the video signals received
from the remote computer to the video monitor. That is, When
located I/O devices. The system of Thornton includes a com
puter, a ?rst interface device, and a remotely located second
interface device. The ?rst interface device is coupled to the
computer and the second interface device is coupled to a
video monitor and as many as three I/O devices (e.g., key
the ?rst set of tri-state buffers are energized, the red, green,
and blue video signals are passed from the remote computer
to the local video monitor through the tri-state buffers. When
the ?rst set of tri-state buffers are not active, the video signals
from the remote computer are blocked. Similarly, the second
set of tri-state buffers couples the outputs of the single on
board, mouse, printer, joystick, trackball, etc.) such that a
human interface is created. The ?rst and second interface
devices are coupled to each other via a four Wire cable. The
?rst interface device receives video signals from the con
nected computer and encodes the horizontal and vertical syn
chronization signals of the received video signals onto at least
one of the red, green, and blue components of the video
screen processor to the video monitor. When the second set of
tri-state buffers is energized, the video output of the on- screen
programming circuit is displayed on the local video monitor.
When the second set of tri-state buffers is not active, the video
output from the on-screen programming circuit is blocked.
Alternatively, if both sets of tri-state buffers are energized, the
remote computer video signals are combined With the video
signal. The ?rst interface device also encodes the I/O signals
received from the connected computer into a data packet for
transmission over the fourth Wire in the four Wire cable.
Thereafter, the encoded, red, green, and blue components of
signals generated by the on-screen processor prior to display
on the local video monitor.
20
The on-screen programming circuit disclosed in Beasley
also produces its oWn horizontal and vertical synchronization
signals. To dictate Which characters are displayed on the
the video signals and the data packet are transmitted to the
second interface device located at the human interface. The
second interface device decodes the encoded red, green, and
blue components of the video signal, separates the encoded
horizontal and vertical synchronization signals, and decodes
the I/O signal data packet. The video signal and the synchro
video monitor, the CPU sends instructional data to the on
screen processor. This causes the on-screen processor to 25 nization signals are then output to the video monitor attached
retrieve characters from an internal video RAM for display on
the local video monitor.
to the second interface and the decoded I/O signals are routed
to the proper I/O device, also attached to the second interface.
The overlaid video image produced by the on-screen pro
The second interface device may optionally include circuitry
cessor, namely a Motorola MCl4l543 on-screen processor,
Words, the Beasley system is designed to produce an overlaid
to encode I/O signals received from the I/O devices attached
to the second interface for transmission to the ?rst interface
device.
Wilder discloses a keyboard, video, mouse, and poWer
video that is sized for a standard size computer monitor (i.e.,
not a Wall-size or multiple monitor type video display) and is
computers to one or more user stations having an attached
is limited to the size and quantity of colors and characters that
30
are available With the single on-screen processor. In other
limited to the quantity of colors and characters provided by
sWitching (“KVMP”) apparatus for connecting a plurality of
35
keyboard, video monitor, and mouse. On screen display
the single on-screen processor.
During operation of the Beasley system, a remote com
apparatus alloWs a user located at a user station to select and
puter is chosen from the overlaid video display. Thereafter,
the ?rst signal conditioning unit receives keyboard and mouse
video monitor, and mouse attached to the user station. Sec
signals from the local keyboard and mouse and generates a
data packet for transmission to a central cross point sWitch.
The cross point sWitch routes the data packet to the second
signal conditioning unit, Which is coupled to the selected
remote computer. The second signal conditioning unit then
routes the keyboard and mouse command signals to the key
(“OSD”) circuitry embedded Within the KVMP sWitching
operate any one of the computers utilizing the keyboard,
40
ondary sWitching circuitry located Within the KVMP sWitch
ing apparatus alloWs a user located at a user station to addi
tionally control the electrical poWer supply supplying each
computer.
In vieW of the foregoing, a need clearly exists for a self
45
contained remote netWork management system capable of
board and mouse connectors of the remote computer. Simi
operating and controlling netWorking equipment, servers,
larly, video signals produced by the remote computer are
routed from the remote computer through the second signal
conditioning unit, the cross point sWitch, and the ?rst signal
and computers connected to a remote control sWitching unit.
Furthermore, such a system should alloW a user to control the
and vertical synchronization video signals received from the
poWer supply attached to the remote netWorking equipment,
servers, and computers. The system should aid in managing
remote netWork environments, thereby reducing the need to
remote computer are encoded on one of the red, green or blue
have an on-site system administrator.
conditioning unit to the local video monitor. The horizontal
50
video signals. This encoding reduces the quantity of cables
required to transmit the video signals from the remote com
puter to the local video monitor.
Pinkston discloses a keyboard, video, mouse (“KVM”)
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
55
The present invention provides a self-contained remote
netWork management system for administrating a remote
sWitching system capable of coupling to a standard netWork
(e. g., a Local Area Network) operating With a standard net
computer netWorking environment from one or more local
Work protocol (e.g., Ethernet, TCP/IP, etc.). The system of
user Workstations With attached peripheral devices (i.e., key
board, video monitor, cursor control device, etc.). The remote
netWork management system of the present invention alloWs
Pinkston couples a central sWitch to a plurality of computers
and at least one user station having a keyboard, video monitor,
60
and mouse. The central sWitch includes a netWork interface
a user located at a user Workstation to access, operate, and
card (“NIC”) for connecting the central sWitch to a netWork,
control netWorking equipment, servers, and computers
Which may include a number of additional computers or
remote terminals. Utilizing the Pinkston system, a user
located at a remote terminal attached to the netWork may
control any of the computers coupled to the central sWitch.
65
located at a remote location. The remote netWork manage
ment system also alloWs a user to control the poWer supply to
each piece of remote equipment. The netWorking equipment
(e.g., hubs, sWitches, routers, etc.) is typically controlled via
US 8,176,155 B2
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6
a serial interface. In contrast, servers and computers are con
pression device constructs the video frame based upon the
transmitted video signals and the blocks of pixels contained in
trolled and operated utilizing a keyboard, video monitor, and
its local cache. Also, the decompression device updates its
mouse.
The remote networking equipment, servers, and computers
local cache with the new blocks of pixels received from the
RMU. In this manner, the decompression device caches
are all connected to a central remote management unit
(“RMU”), and in turn, the RMU is connected to the Internet or
remain synchroniZed with the compression device cache.
Both the compression device and the decompression device
update their respective cache by replacing older video data
a LAN via an Ethernet or modem connection. The RMU has
serial ports for connection to the networking equipment as
well as keyboard, video, and cursor control device ports for
connection to the servers and computers. The RMU addition
ally contains a port for connection to a power supply capable
of controlling the power to the networking equipment, serv
ers, and computers. Standard cabling is utiliZed to connect the
with newer video data.
Furthermore, the video signals transmitted by the RMU
have been compressed using a lossless compression algo
rithm. Therefore, the decompression device (e. g., software on
networking equipment, servers, and computers to the appro
priate ports on the RMU.
The RMU also provides compatibility between various
the user workstation) must reverse this lossless compression.
operating systems and/or communication protocols, includ
?ag information, the decompression device is able to recon
ing but not limited to, those manufactured by Microsoft Cor
struct full frames of video.
poration (“Microsoft”) (Windows), Apple Computer, Inc.
(“Apple”) (Macintosh), Sun Microsystems, Inc. (“Sun”) (So
laris), Digital Equipment Corporation (“DEC”), Compaq
Computer Corporation (“Compaq”) (Alpha), International
This is done by identifying the changed portions of the video
image, based upon ?ags transmitted by the RMU. From this
20
table (“CCT”) conversion. The decompression device, like
Business Machines (“IBM”) (RS/ 6000), Hewlett-Packard
Company (“HP”) (HP9000) and SGI (formerly “Silicon
Graphics, Inc .”) (IRIX).
25
The decompression algorithm can be implemented in the
remote network management system of the present invention
in a variety of embodiments. For example, in one embodi
30
The RMU is capable of storing multiple pro?les and different
execute within a web browser such as Internet Explorer or
35
listing all the networking equipment, servers, and computers
at the remote location. The option menu additionally contains
a menu allowing a user to control the power to each piece of
40
equipment, server, or computer by utiliZing the keyboard
and/ or cursor control device attached to the user workstation.
Once a user makes a selection, the user is provided access to
the remote equipment as if the user is physically located at the
remote site.
The RMU and the user workstation communicate via TCP/
IP. Before transmission via TCP/IP, the unidirectional video
signals (i.e., from the RMU to the user workstation) are
digitiZed by a frame grabber. This circuit captures video out
put from the initiating computer at a speed of at least 20
45
the present invention is designed to easily integrate with
50
55
algorithm is actually a combination of four sub-algorithms
(i.e., the Noise Reduction and Difference Test (“NRDT”),
niques or security measures may be used.
Smoothing, Caching, and Bit Splicing/Compression sub-al
60
decompression occurs. The user workstation operates as a
decompression device by executing a decompression algo
regarding the portions of the video that yielded “cache” hits
(i.e., portions of unchanged video). In response, the decom
digital encryption techniques known in the art. In one
embodiment of the present invention, a 128-bit encryption
technique is used both to verify the identity of the RMU and
to encrypt and decrypt the transmitted video and data signals.
In this embodiment, a 128-bit public key RSA encryption
technique is used to verify the remote participant, and a 128
bit RC4 private key encryption is used to encrypt and decrypt
the transmitted signals. Of course, other encryption tech
data contained in the raw frame buffer. The compression
rithm. Along with any transmitted video or data signals, the
RMU transmits messages to the decompression devices
sion is secure. If the transmission is not secure, hackers,
competitors, or other unauthorized users could potentially
view con?dential information contained within the video sig
nals. Therefore, the remote network management system of
represented with 5 bits for red, 5 bits for green, and 5 bits for
blue. The digital representation is then stored in a raw frame
gorithms) as described in greater detail below.
After the video signals have arrived at the user workstation,
Internet capabilities, regardless of the distance at which the
computer is located from the initiating computer. This feature
reduces the cabling cost associated with the remote network
management system of the present invention.
Since the present invention can be used to display video
signals at locations that may be at a great distance from the
RMU, it is important to ensure that the video signal transmis
frames/ second and converts the captured analog video signals
to a digital representation of pixels. Each pixel is digitally
buffer. The compression algorithm then processes the digital
Netscape® Navigator®. Such an embodiment eliminates the
need for installation of application speci?c software on the
user workstation. Also, this embodiment allows the RMU to
easily transmit the video signals to any user workstation with
located in the RMU. The option menu consists of a menu
remote equipment. The user selects the desired networking
ment, it can be implemented as a software application that is
executed by the user workstation. In an alternate embodi
ment, the decompression algorithm can be implemented to
levels of access for each pro?le. Once a user has been authen
ticated, the user is provided an option menu on the user
workstation’s monitor produced by option menu circuitry
the RMU, locally stores a copy of the same CCT used to
compress the video data. The CCT is then used to convert the
video data received from the RMU to a standard RGB format
that may be displayed on the monitor attached to the user
workstation.
To utiliZe the remote network management system of the
present invention, a user ?rst initiates a management session
by utiliZing client software located on a user workstation to
connect to the RMU. Alternatively, the user may utiliZe an
Internet browser to connect to the RMU. The user is then
prompted by the RMU to provide a user name and a pas sword.
In addition, the decompression device converts the video
frame to its original color scheme by reversing a color code
Finally, since the remote network management system of
the present invention allows for platform independent com
munications, the compression algorithm utiliZed does not
employ operating system speci?c hooks, nor does it use plat
form speci?c GDI calls.
In the preferred embodiment, the compression algorithm
65
described herein and in co-pending application Ser. No.
10/ 233,299 is used to transmit the video signals. However, the
video transmission system is not limited to such an embodi
US 8,176,155 B2
8
7
Other objects, features, and characteristics of the present
ment. Rather, this system may be employed with any com
pression algorithm without departing from the spirit of the
invention, as well as the methods of operation and functions
of the related elements of the structure, and the combination
of parts and economies of manufacture, will become more
invention.
Therefore, it is an object of the present invention to provide
an improved, remote network management system that
enables a user to control a remote networking environment
apparent upon consideration of the following detailed
description with reference to the accompanying drawings, all
from one or more local user workstations. Such a remote
of which form a part of this speci?cation.
networking environment may include domain servers, ?le/
print servers, headless servers, network appliances, serial IT
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
equipment, switches, routers, ?rewalls, security interfaces,
A further understanding of the present invention can be
obtained by reference to a preferred embodiment set forth in
application servers, load balancers, and environmental con
trols.
Further, it is an object of the present invention to provide a
the illustrations of the accompanying drawings. Although the
illustrated embodiment is merely exemplary of systems for
carrying out the present invention, both the organiZation and
method of operation of the invention, in general, together
remote network management system that allows one or more
local user workstations to access and operate remote network
ing equipment, servers, and computers connected to a remote
management unit.
It is another object of the present invention to provide a
single, platform-independent remote network management
system offering centraliZed, integrated, and secure control.
20
with further objectives and advantages thereof, may be more
easily understood by reference to the drawings and the fol
lowing description. The drawings are not intended to limit the
scope of this invention, which is set forth with particularity in
It is an additional object of the present invention to provide
a network-independent remote network management system
the claims as appended or as subsequently amended, but
containing a modem for emergency access.
For a more complete understanding of the present inven
tion, reference is now made to the following drawings in
which:
merely to clarify and exemplify the invention.
It is a further object of the present invention to provide a
remote network management system capable of BIOS-level
control of KVM equipment and console-level control of serial
devices.
Additionally, it is an object of the present invention to
provide a remote network management system which pro
vides a single consolidated view of all servers and other
25
FIG. 1 is a schematic representation of a remote network
management system according to the preferred embodiment
of the invention illustrating the connection of a user worksta
tion that includes a keyboard, video monitor, and cursor con
30
connected devices from one screen via a web browser.
It is another object of the present invention to provide a
remote network management system which contains a single
sign-on and interface.
Additionally, it is an object of the present invention to
provide a remote network management system which is
35
upgradeable.
It is a further object of the present invention to provide a
remote network management system which provides high
performance over low bandwidth connections including
40
modem, wireless, cable, DSL, and fractional Tl.
It is another object of the present invention to provide a
remote network management system which utiliZes a video
compression algorithm and frame-grabber technology to
ensure the fastest possible transmission of high quality video.
Furthermore, it is an object of the present invention to
provide a remote network management system including
built-in serial port buffering to provide views of recent con
FIG. 3B is a detailedblock diagram of the serial card shown
in FIG. 3A.
FIG. 3C is a detailed block diagram of the KVM port
header shown in FIG. 3A.
FIG. 3D is a detailed block diagram of the video processor
shown in FIG. 3A.
45
FIG. 4 depicts a ?owchart of the compression algorithm
utiliZed by the preferred embodiment of the RMU in accor
dance with the present invention.
FIG. 5A depicts a ?owchart detailing the Noise Reduction
and Difference Test and smoothing sub-algorithms of the
50
compression algorithm utiliZed by the preferred embodiment
sole history.
It is still a further object of the present invention to provide
trol device to networking equipment, servers, and computers
through a remote management unit (“RMU”).
FIG. 2 is a screen-shot of an example option menu utilized
to control the networking equipment, servers and computers.
FIG. 3A is a block diagram of the preferred embodiment of
the RMU shown in FIG. 1 according to the preferred embodi
ment of the present invention illustrating the internal structure
of the RMU and connectors for serial devices, keyboards,
video monitors, cursor control devices, and a power supply.
and operate.
of the present invention.
FIG. 5B depicts a ?owchart that details the caching and bit
In addition, it is an object of the present invention to pro
vide a remote network management system that is compact
algorithm utiliZed by the preferred embodiment of the present
a remote network management system that is easy to install
and provides readily accessible communications ports.
splicing/ compression sub-algorithms of the compression
55
Further, it is an object of present invention to provide a
remote network management system, which allows error-free
invention.
FIG. 6 depicts a ?owchart that details the nearest match
function and its integration with the CCT of the compression
communications between peripheral devices of a local user
algorithm utiliZed by the preferred embodiment of the present
workstation and networking equipment, servers, and comput
invention.
FIG. 7 depicts a ?owchart that details the Noise Reduction
ers located at domain servers, ?le/print servers, headless serv
60
ers, ?rewalls, security interfaces, application servers, load
and Difference Test sub-algorithm of the compression algo
rithm utiliZed by the preferred embodiment of the present
balancers, and environmental controls.
invention.
ers, network appliances, serial IT equipment, switches, rout
It is also an object of the present invention to provide a
remote network management system capable of controlling
the power supply to remotely located networking equipment,
servers, and computers.
65
FIG. 8 depicts an example application of the Noise Reduc
tion and Difference Test sub-algorithm to a sample block of
pixels as performed by the compression algorithm utiliZed by
the preferred embodiment of the present invention.
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