PLC Fault Table - Platforma Internetowa ASTOR.

PLC Fault Table - Platforma Internetowa ASTOR.
GE Fanuc Automation
Programmable Control Products
Series 90™-30 System Manual
for Windows® Users
GFK-1411C
May 2000
GFL-002
Warnings, Cautions, and Notes
as Used in this Publication
Warning
Warning notices are used in this publication to emphasize that hazardous voltages,
currents, temperatures, or other conditions that could cause personal injury exist in this
equipment or may be associated with its use.
In situations where inattention could cause either personal injury or damage to
equipment, a Warning notice is used.
Caution
Caution notices are used where equipment might be damaged if care is not taken.
Note
Notes merely call attention to information that is especially significant to understanding and
operating the equipment.
This document is based on information available at the time of its publication. While efforts
have been made to be accurate, the information contained herein does not purport to cover all
details or variations in hardware or software, nor to provide for every possible contingency in
connection with installation, operation, or maintenance. Features may be described herein which
are not present in all hardware and software systems. GE Fanuc Automation assumes no
obligation of notice to holders of this document with respect to changes subsequently made.
GE Fanuc Automation makes no representation or warranty, expressed, implied, or statutory
with respect to, and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, sufficiency, or
usefulness of the information contained herein. No warranties of merchantability or fitness for
purpose shall apply.
The following are trademarks of GE Fanuc Automation North America, Inc.
Alarm Master
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Series 90
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©Copyright 1997-2000 GE Fanuc Automation North America, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Preface
This manual accompanies Control software versions 2.4 and later, VersaPro software versions 1.0
and later, and is applicable to version 10.0 of the Series 90-30 PLC CPUs.
Revisions to This Manual
The following changes have been made to this manual (GFK-1411C) as compared to the previous
version (GFK-1411B).
•
Added an example in Chapter 2 (page 2-17) of the maximum number of nested calls for
subroutine blocks allowed and text immediately before and after the example.
•
I/O scan time contributions for the DSM314 motion control module have been added to Table
2-2 on page 2-5.
•
DSM314 communications with the PLC has been added in Chapter 2 (page 2-11).
•
A description of Local Logic Programs for the DSM314 motion control module has been
included in Chapter 2 (page 2-39).
•
Description of a new feature, Reboot After Fatal Failure, has been added in Section 1 of
Chapter 3 (page 3-4).
•
Other corrections and clarifications as needed.
Content of This Manual
GFK-1411C
Chapter 1.
Introduction: provides an overview of the Series 90-30 PLCs.
Chapter 2.
System Operation: describes PLC sweep, program organization and user
references, power-up and power-down sequences, clocks and timers, system
security, and other information about the Series 90-30 system.
Chapter 3.
Fault Explanation and Correction: describes fault handling and both PLC and
I/O fault table explanations.
Appendix A.
Instruction Timing: lists the memory size in bytes and execution time in
microseconds for each programming instruction.
Appendix B.
Interpreting Fault Tables: describes how to interpret the message structure
format when reading the fault tables.
Appendix C.
Using Floating-Point Numbers: describes special considerations when using
floating-point numbers.
iii
Preface
Appendix D.
Setting Up a Modem: describes how to set up 32-bit modem communications
with your PLC using the Windows programming software and the
Communications Configuration Utility (CCU)
Related Information
Manuals
VersaPro User's Guide
GFK-1670
TCP/IP Ethernet Communications for the Series 90™ PLC
GFK-1541
Using Control Software
GFK-1295
Host Drivers and Communications Configuration Software
for Windows® Environments
GFK-1026
C Programmer's Toolkit for Series 90 PLCs User's Manual
GFK-0646
Series 90™-30 PLC Installation and Hardware Manual
GFK-0356
Other
GE Fanuc General Automation Online Support
http://www.gefanuc.com/support/plc/default.htm
GE Fanuc PLC Hotline Fax on Demand System (FaxLink)
804-978-5824
GE Fanuc PLC Hotline Telephone Number
1-800-GE Fanuc (1-800-433-2682)
International Customers direct dial: 804-978-6036
At GE Fanuc Automation, we strive to produce quality technical documentation. Please contact us
with any comments you may have regarding this manual.
Henry Konat
Technical Writer
iv
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users –May 2000
GFK-1411C
Contents
Chapter 1
Introduction..................................................................................................... 1-1
Chapter 2
System Operation ............................................................................................ 2-1
Section 1: PLC Sweep Summary .................................................................. 2-2
Standard Program Sweep .............................................................................................. 2-2
Sweep Time Calculation......................................................................................... 2-7
Example of Sweep Time Calculation ..................................................................... 2-7
Housekeeping ....................................................................................................... 2-7
Input Scan............................................................................................................. 2-7
Application Program Logic Scan or Solution ......................................................... 2-8
Output Scan .......................................................................................................... 2-8
Logic Program Checksum Calculation................................................................... 2-8
Programmer Communications Window......................................................................... 2-9
System Communications Window .............................................................................. 2-10
PCM Communications with the PLC (Models 331 and Higher)................................... 2-11
DSM Communications with the PLC .......................................................................... 2-11
Standard Program Sweep Variations ........................................................................... 2-12
Constant Sweep Time Mode................................................................................. 2-12
PLC Sweep When in STOP Mode ........................................................................ 2-12
Communication Window Modes........................................................................... 2-13
Key Switch on 35x and 36x Series CPUs: Change Mode and Flash Protect ................. 2-13
Using the Release 7 and Later Key Switch............................................................ 2-13
Clearing the Fault Table with the Key Switch ....................................................... 2-14
Enhanced Memory Protect with Release 8 and Later CPUs................................... 2-14
Section 2: Program Organization and User References/Data ....................2-15
Subroutine Blocks....................................................................................................... 2-16
Examples of Using Subroutine Blocks .................................................................. 2-16
How Blocks Are Called ........................................................................................ 2-17
Periodic Subroutines............................................................................................. 2-18
User References.......................................................................................................... 2-19
Transitions and Overrides ..................................................................................... 2-20
Retentiveness of Data ........................................................................................... 2-20
Data Types ................................................................................................................. 2-21
System Status References ........................................................................................... 2-22
Function Block Structure ............................................................................................ 2-25
Format of Ladder Logic Relays ............................................................................ 2-25
Format of Program Function Blocks ..................................................................... 2-26
Function Block Parameters ......................................................................................... 2-27
Power Flow In and Out of a Function .................................................................. 2-28
Section 3: Power-Up and Power-Down Sequences......................................2-29
Power-Up ................................................................................................................... 2-29
Power-Down............................................................................................................... 2-31
GFK-1411C
v
Contents
Section 4: Clocks and Timers.......................................................................2-32
Elapsed Time Clock.................................................................................................... 2-32
Time-of-Day Clock..................................................................................................... 2-32
Watchdog Timer ......................................................................................................... 2-33
Constant Sweep Timer ................................................................................................ 2-33
Time-Tick Contacts .................................................................................................... 2-33
Section 5: System Security .............................................................................2-34
Passwords................................................................................................................... 2-34
Privilege Level Change Requests ................................................................................ 2-34
Locking/Unlocking Subroutines.................................................................................. 2-35
Permanently Locking a Subroutine.............................................................................. 2-35
Section 6: Series 90-30 I/O System...............................................................2-36
Series 90-30 I/O Modules ........................................................................................... 2-37
I/O Data Formats ........................................................................................................ 2-39
Default Conditions for Series 90-30 Output Modules .................................................. 2-39
Diagnostic Data .......................................................................................................... 2-40
Global Data ................................................................................................................ 2-40
Genius Global Data .............................................................................................. 2-40
Ethernet Global Data ............................................................................................ 2-40
Local Logic Programs .......................................................................................... 2-40
Chapter 3
Fault Explanation and Correction.................................................................. 3-1
Section 1: Fault Handling .............................................................................. 3-2
Alarm Processor ........................................................................................................... 3-2
Classes of Faults........................................................................................................... 3-2
System Reaction to Faults............................................................................................. 3-3
Fault Tables............................................................................................................ 3-3
Fault Action ........................................................................................................... 3-4
Reboot After Fatal Fault ......................................................................................... 3-4
Fault References ........................................................................................................... 3-5
Fault Reference Definitions .......................................................................................... 3-5
Additional Fault Effects ................................................................................................ 3-5
PLC Fault Table Display............................................................................................... 3-6
I/O Fault Table Display ................................................................................................ 3-6
Accessing Additional Fault Information........................................................................ 3-7
Section 2: PLC Fault Table Explanations ..................................................... 3-8
Fault Actions ................................................................................................................ 3-9
Loss of, or Missing, Option Module........................................................................ 3-9
Reset of, Addition of, or Extra, Option Module....................................................... 3-9
System Configuration Mismatch........................................................................... 3-10
Option Module Software Failure........................................................................... 3-11
vi
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users –May 2000
GFK-1411C
Contents
Program Block Checksum Failure......................................................................... 3-11
Low Battery Signal............................................................................................... 3-11
Constant Sweep Time Exceeded ........................................................................... 3-12
Application Fault.................................................................................................. 3-12
No User Program Present ..................................................................................... 3-12
Corrupted User Program on Power-Up ................................................................. 3-13
Password Access Failure ...................................................................................... 3-13
PLC CPU System Software Failure....................................................................... 3-14
Communications Failure During Store.................................................................. 3-16
Section 3: I/O Fault Table Explanations ......................................................3-17
Loss of I/O Module..................................................................................................... 3-17
Addition of I/O Module .............................................................................................. 3-18
Appendix A
Instruction Timing ..........................................................................................A-1
Instruction Timing Tables ............................................................................................ A-2
Instruction Sizes for High Performance CPUs ............................................................ A-12
Boolean Execution Times .......................................................................................... A-12
Appendix B
Interpreting Fault Tables................................................................................B-1
PLC Fault Table .......................................................................................................... B-2
I/O Fault Table ............................................................................................................ B-8
Appendix C
Using Floating-Point Numbers .......................................................................C-1
Floating-Point Numbers............................................................................................... C-1
Internal Format of Floating-Point Numbers.................................................................. C-3
Values of Floating-Point Numbers ............................................................................... C-4
Entering and Displaying Floating-Point Numbers......................................................... C-5
Errors in Floating-Point Numbers and Operations ........................................................ C-6
Appendix D
Setting Up a Modem........................................................................................D-1
Modem Configuration and Cabling .............................................................................. D-1
PLC CPU Configuration .............................................................................................. D-2
Installing the Modem into Windows............................................................................. D-3
Setting Up the Communications Configuration Utility (CCU) ...................................... D-4
Connecting to the PLC................................................................................................. D-6
Using the HyperTerminal Utility to Establish Connection ............................................ D-7
Other Issues................................................................................................................. D-8
GFK-1411C
Contents
vii
Contents
Figure 2-1. PLC Sweep ............................................................................................................................ 2-3
Figure 2-2. Programmer Communications Window Flow Chart................................................................ 2-9
Figure 2-3. System Communications Window Flow Chart...................................................................... 2-10
Figure 2-4. PCM Communications with the PLC.................................................................................... 2-11
Figure 2-5. Power-Up Sequence ............................................................................................................ 2-30
Figure 2-6. Time-Tick Contact Timing Diagram..................................................................................... 2-33
Figure 2-7. Series 90-30 I/O Structure ................................................................................................... 2-36
Figure 2-8. Series 90-30 I/O Modules..................................................................................................... 2-37
viii
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users –May 2000
GFK-1411C
Contents
Table 2-1. Sweep Time Contribution ........................................................................................................ 2-4
Table 2-2. I/O Scan Time Contributions for the Series 90-30 35x and 36x CPUs (in milliseconds)............ 2-5
Table 2-3. I/O Scan Time Contributions for the Series 90-30 CPUs up to 341 (in milliseconds) ................ 2-6
Table 2-4. Register References ............................................................................................................... 2-19
Table 2-5. Discrete References ............................................................................................................... 2-19
Table 2-5. Discrete References - Continued ............................................................................................ 2-20
Table 2-6. Data Types ............................................................................................................................ 2-21
Table 2-7. System Status References ...................................................................................................... 2-22
Table 2-7. System Status References - Continued ................................................................................... 2-24
Table 2-7. System Status References - Continued ................................................................................... 2-25
Table 2-8. Series 90-30 I/O Modules - Continued ................................................................................... 2-38
Table 2-8. Series 90-30 I/O Modules - Continued ................................................................................... 2-39
Table 3-1. Fault Summary ........................................................................................................................ 3-3
Table 3-2. Fault Actions .......................................................................................................................... 3-4
Table A-1. Instruction Timing, Standard Models ................................................................................... A-2
Table A-1. Instruction Timing, Standard Models-Continued ................................................................... A-3
Table A-1. Instruction Timing, Standard Models-Continued .................................................................. A-4
Table A-1. Instruction Timing, Standard Models-Continued ................................................................... A-5
Table A-2. Instruction Timing, High Performance Models...................................................................... A-6
Table A-2. Instruction Timing, High Performance Models-Continued..................................................... A-7
Table A-2. Instruction Timing, High Performance Models-Continued..................................................... A-8
Table A-2. Instruction Timing, High Performance Models-Continued..................................................... A-9
Table A-3. SER Function Block Timing ............................................................................................... A-10
Table A-4. SER Function Block Trigger Timestamp Formats ............................................................... A-11
Table A-5. Instruction Sizes for 350—352, 360, 363, and 364 CPUs .................................................... A-12
Table B-1. PLC Fault Groups ................................................................................................................. B-4
Table B-2. PLC Fault Actions ................................................................................................................ B-4
Table B-3. Alarm Error Codes for PLC CPU Software Faults ................................................................. B-5
Table B-4. Alarm Error Codes for PLC Faults ........................................................................................ B-6
Table B-5. PLC Fault Data - Illegal Boolean Opcode Detected ............................................................... B-7
Table B-6. PLC Fault Time Stamp.......................................................................................................... B-7
Table B-7. I/O Fault Table Format Indicator Byte................................................................................... B-9
Table B-8. I/O Reference Address .......................................................................................................... B-9
Table B-9. I/O Reference Address Memory Type ................................................................................... B-9
Table B-10. I/O Fault Groups ............................................................................................................... B-10
Table B-11. I/O Fault Actions .............................................................................................................. B-10
GFK-1411C
Contents
ix
Contents
Table B-12. I/O Fault Specific Data...................................................................................................... B-11
Table B-13. I/O Fault Time Stamp........................................................................................................ B-11
Table C-1. General Case of Power Flow for Floating-Point Operations................................................... C-7
x
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users –May 2000
GFK-1411C
Chapter
Introduction
1
The Series 90-30 PLCs are members of the GE Fanuc Series 90™ family of Programmable Logic
Controllers (PLCs). They are easy to install and configure, offer advanced programming features,
and are compatible with the Series 90-70 PLCs.
Two Windows-based configuration/programming packages are available for Series 90-30 PLCs.
VersaPro software supports all Series 90-30 CPUs. Control software supports the 35x and 36x
series CPUs.
The software structure for the 341 and lower Series 90-30 PLCs uses an architecture that
manages memory and execution priority in the 80188 microprocessor. The 35x and 36x series of
Series 90-30 PLCs use an 80386EX microprocessor. This operation supports both program
execution and basic housekeeping tasks such as diagnostic routines, input/output scanners, and
alarm processing. The system software also contains routines to communicate with the
programmer. These routines provide for the upload and download of application programs, return
of status information, and control of the PLC.
In the Series 90-30 PLC, a dedicated Instruction Sequencer Coprocessor (ISCP) controls the
application (user logic) program that controls the end process to which the PLC is applied. The
ISCP is implemented in hardware in the Model 313 and higher and in software in the Model 311
systems. The 80188 microprocessor and the ISCP can execute simultaneously, allowing the
microprocessor to service communications while the ISCP is executing the bulk of the application
program; however, the microprocessor must execute the non-Boolean function blocks. Faults
occur in the Series 90-30 PLC when certain failures or conditions happen that affect the operation
and performance of the system. These conditions may affect the ability of the PLC to control a
machine or process. Other conditions may only act as an alert, such as a low battery signal to
indicate that the voltage of the battery protecting the memory is low and should be replaced. The
condition or failure is called a fault.
Faults are handled by a software alarm processor function that records the faults in either the PLC
fault table or the I/O fault table. (Model 331 and higher CPUs also time-stamp the faults.) These
tables can be displayed through the programming software.
Note
Floating-point capabilities are only supported on the 35x and 36x series CPUs,
Release 9 or later, and on all releases of CPU352.
GFK-1411C
1-1
Note
For additional information, see the appendices in the back of this manual.
1-2
•
Appendix A lists the memory size in bytes and the execution time in
microseconds for each programming instruction.
•
Appendix B describes how to interpret the message structure format when
reading the PLC and I/O fault tables.
•
Appendix C describes special considerations for using floating point
functions.
•
Appendix D describes how to set up modem communications.
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
Chapter
System Operation
2
This chapter describes certain system operations of the Series 90-30 PLC systems. These system
operations include:
GFK-1411C
•
A summary of PLC sweep sequences (Section 1) ................................................. 2-2
•
Program organization and user references/data (Section 2) ................................ 2-15
•
Power-up and power-down sequences (Section 3) .............................................. 2-28
•
Clocks and timers (Section 4) ............................................................................ 2-31
•
System security through password assignment (Section 5) ................................. 2-33
•
Series 90-30 I/O system (Section 6) ................................................................... 2-35
2-1
2
Section 1: PLC Sweep Summary
The logic program in the Series 90-30 PLCs execute repeatedly until stopped by a command from
the programmer or a command from another device. The sequence of operations necessary to
execute a program one time is called a sweep. In addition to executing the logic program, the
sweep includes obtaining data from input devices, sending data to output devices, performing
internal housekeeping, servicing the programmer, and servicing other communications.
Series 90-30 PLCs normally operate in STANDARD PROGRAM SWEEP mode. Other operating
modes include STOP WITH I/O DISABLED mode, STOP WITH I/O ENABLED mode,
and CONSTANT SWEEP mode. Each of these modes, described in this chapter, is controlled by
external events and application configuration settings. The PLC makes the decision regarding its
operating mode at the start of every sweep.
Standard Program Sweep
STANDARD PROGRAM SWEEP mode normally runs under all conditions. The CPU operates by
executing an application program, updating I/O, and performing communications and other tasks.
This occurs in a repetitive cycle called the CPU sweep. There are seven parts to the execution
sequence of the Standard Program Sweep:
2-2
1.
Start-of-sweep housekeeping
2.
Input scan (read inputs)
3.
Application program logic solution
4.
Output scan (update outputs)
5.
Programmer service
6.
Non-programmer service
7.
Diagnostics
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
2
All of these steps execute every sweep. Although the Programmer Communications Window
opens each sweep, programmer services only occur if a board fault has been detected or if the
programming device issues a service request; that is, the Programmer Communications Window
first checks for work to do and exits if there is none. The sequence of the standard program sweep
is shown in the following figure.
a43064
START-OF-SWEEP
HOUSEKEEPING
I/O
ENABLED
?
HOUSEKEEPING
NO
YES
DATA
INPUT
INPUT SCAN
NO
RUN
MODE
?
YES
PROGRAM
EXECUTION
LOGIC SOLUTION
SCAN
TIME
OF
PLC
NO
I/O
ENABLED
?
YES
OUTPUT SCAN
DATA
OUTPUT
PROGRAMMER
COMMUNICATIONS
PROGRAMMER
SERVICE
SYSTEM
COMMUNICATIONS
SYSTEM
COMMUNICATIONS
USER PROGRAM
CHECKSUM
CALCULATION
DIAGNOSTICS
START NEXT SWEEP
Figure 2-1. PLC Sweep
GFK-1411C
Chapter 2 System Operation
2-3
2
As shown in the PLC sweep sequence, several items are included in the sweep. These items
contribute to the total sweep time as shown in the following table.
Table 2-1. Sweep Time Contribution
Sweep
Element
Time Contribution (ms) 4
Description
311/313
331
340/341
351/352
(35x and 36x)5
Housekeeping
2-4
•
Calculate sweep time.
•
Schedule start of next sweep.
•
Determine mode of next
sweep.
•
Update fault reference tables.
•
Reset watchdog timer.
0.714
0.705
0.424
0.279
Data Input
Input data is received from input
and option modules.
See tables 2-2 and 2-3 for scan time contributions.
Program
Execution
User logic is solved.
Execution time is dependent upon the length of the
program and the type of instructions used in the program.
Instruction execution times are listed in Appendix A.
Data Output
Output data is sent to output and
option modules.
See tables 2-2 and 2-3 for scan time contributions.
Service External
Devices
Service requests from
programming devices
and intelligent modules
are processed. 1
4.426
4.524
2.476
0.334
LM-90
2.383
2.454
1.248
0.517
PCM 2
N/A
3.337
1.943
0.482
HHP
Reconfiguration
Slots with faulted modules and
empty slots are monitored.
0.458
0.639
0.463
0.319
Diagnostics
Verify user program integrity (time
contribution is the time required per
word checksummed each sweep). 3
0.050
0.048
0.031
0.010
1.
The scan time contribution of external device service is dependent upon the mode of the communications window in which
the service is processed. If the window mode is LIMITED, a maximum of 8 milliseconds for the 311, 313, 323, and 331
CPUs and 6 milliseconds for the 340 and higher CPUs will be spent during that window. If the window mode is RUN-TOCOMPLETION, a maximum of 50 milliseconds can be spent in that window, depending upon the number of requests
which are presented simultaneously.
2.
These measurements were taken with the PCM physically present but not configured and with no application task running
on the PCM.
3.
The number of words checksummed each sweep can be changed with the SVCREQ function block.
4.
These measurements were taken with an empty program and the default configuration. The Series 90-30 PLCs were in an
empty 10-slot rack with no extension racks connected. Also, the times in this table assume that there is no periodic
subroutine active; the times will be larger if a periodic subroutine is active.
5.
The times for the 350 CPU and the 36x series are estimated to be the same.
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
2
Table 2-2. I/O Scan Time Contributions for the Series 90-30 35x and 36x CPUs (in milliseconds)
35x and 36x Series CPUs
Module Type
8-point discrete input
16-point discrete input
32-point discrete input
8-point discrete output
16-point discrete output
32-point discrete output
Combination discrete input/output
4-channel analog input
2-channel analog output
16-channel analog input
(current or voltage)
8-channel analog output
Combination analog input/output
High Speed Counter
I/O Processor
Ethernet Interface (no connection)
Power Mate APM (1-axis)
Power Mate APM (2-axis)
DSM 302
40 AI, 6 AQ
50 AI, 9 AQ
64 AI, 12 AQ
DSM 314
1 Axis
(not supported by 2 Axes
CPU351)
3 Axes
4 Axes
GCM
no devices
8 64-word devices
GCM+
no devices
32 64-word devices
GBC
no devices
32 64-word devices
PCM 311
not configured, or
no application task
read 128 %R as
fast as possible
ADC (no task)
I/O Link Master
no devices
16 64-point
devices
I/O Link Slave
32-point
64-point
GFK-1411C
Chapter 2 System Operation
Main
Rack
Expansion
Rack
Remote
Rack
.030
.030
.043
.030
.030
.042
.060
.075
.058
.978
.055
.055
.073
.053
.053
.070
.112
.105
.114
1.446
.206
.206
.269
.197
.197
.259
.405
.396
.402
3.999
1.274
1.220
1.381
1.574
.038
1.527
1.807
2.143
2.427
2.864
1.6
2.2
2.8
3.3
.911
8.826
.567
1.714
.798
18.382
.476
1.988
1.999
2.106
2.402
.041
2.581
2.864
3.315
3.732
4.317
2.6
3.8
4.3
5.2
1.637
16.932
.866
2.514
1.202
25.377
N/A
4.472
4.338
5.221
6.388
.053
6.388
7.805
9.527
11.092
13.138
6.9
9.9
13.0
15.9
5.020
21.179
1.830
5.783
2.540
70.777
N/A
.485
N/A
N/A
.476
.569
4.948
N/A
.865
7.003
N/A
1.932
19.908
.087
.154
.146
.213
.553
.789
2-5
2
Table 2-3. I/O Scan Time Contributions for the Series 90-30 CPUs up to 341 (in milliseconds)
CPU Model
Module Type
331
311/313
Expansion
Rack
Remote
Rack
Main
Rack
Expansion
Rack
Remote
Rack
8-point discrete input
.076
.054
.095
.255
.048
.089
.249
16-point discrete input
.075
.055
.097
.257
.048
.091
.250
32-point discrete input
.094
.094
.126
.335
.073
.115
.321
8-point discrete output
.084
.059
.097
.252
.053
.090
.246
16-point discrete output
.083
.061
.097
.253
.054
.090
.248
32-point discrete output
.109
.075
.129
.333
.079
.114
.320
8-point combination input/output
.165
.141
.218
.529
.098
.176
.489
4-channel analog input
.151
.132
.183
.490
.117
.160
.462
2-channel analog output
.161
.138
.182
.428
.099
.148
.392
High Speed Counter
2.070
2.190
2.868
5.587
1.580
2.175
4.897
Power Mate APM (1-axis)
2.330
2.460
3.175
6.647
1.750
2.506
5.899
Power Mate APM (2-axis)
3.181
3.647
4.497
9.303
2.154
3.097
7.729
DSM 302
40 AI, 6 AQ
3.613
4.081
5.239
11.430
2.552
3.648
9.697
50AI, 9 AQ
4.127
4.611
5.899
13.310
2.911
4.170
11.406
64 AI, 12 AQ
4.715
5.276
6.759
15.747
3.354
4.840
13.615
GCM
no devices
.041
.054
.063
.128
.038
.048
.085
8 64-point devices
11.420
11.570
13.247
21.288
9.536
10.648
19.485
no devices
.887
.967
1.164
1.920
.666
.901
1.626
32 64-point
devices
4.120
6.250
8.529
21.352
5.043
7.146
20.052
not configured, or N/A
no application task
3.350
N/A
N/A
1.684
N/A
N/A
read 128 %R as
fast as possible
N/A
4.900
N/A
N/A
2.052
N/A
N/A
ADC 311
N/A
3.340
N/A
N/A
1.678
N/A
N/A
16-channel analog input
(current or voltage)
1.370
1.450
1.937
4.186
1.092
1.570
3.796
I/O Link
Master
GCM+
PCM 311
I/O Link Slave
2-6
Main
Rack
340/341
no devices
1.910
2.030
1.169
1.925
.678
.904
1.628
sixteen 64-point
devices
6.020
6.170
8.399
21.291
4.992
6.985
20.010
32-point
.206
.222
.289
.689
.146
.226
.636
64-point
.331
.350
.409
1.009
.244
.321
.926
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
2
Sweep Time Calculation
Table 2-1 lists the seven items that contribute to the sweep time of the PLC. The sweep time
consists of fixed times (housekeeping and diagnostics) and variable times. Variable times vary
according to the I/O configuration, size of the user program, and the type of programming device
connected to the PLC.
Example of Sweep Time Calculation
An example of the calculations for determining the sweep time for a Series 90-30 model 331 PLC
are shown in the table shown below.
The modules and instructions used for these calculations are listed below:
•
Input modules: five 16-point Series 90-30 input modules.
•
Output modules: four 16-point Series 90-30 output modules.
•
Programming instructions: A 1200-step program consisting of 700 Boolean instructions (LD,
AND, OR, etc.), 300 output coils (OUT, OUTM, etc.), and 200 math functions (ADD, SUB,
etc.).
Housekeeping
The housekeeping portion of the sweep performs all of the tasks necessary to prepare for the start
of the sweep. If the PLC is in CONSTANT SWEEP mode, the sweep is delayed until the required
sweep time elapses. If the required time has already elapsed, the OV_SWP %SA0002 contact is
set, and the sweep continues without delay. Next, timer values (hundredths, tenths, and seconds)
are updated by calculating the difference from the start of the previous sweep and the new sweep
time. In order to maintain accuracy, the actual start of sweep is recorded in 100 microsecond
increments. Each timer has a remainder field which contains the number of 100 microsecond
increments that have occurred since the last time the timer value was incremented.
Input Scan
Scanning of inputs occurs during the input scan portion of the sweep, just prior to the logic
solution. During this part of the sweep, all Series 90-30 input modules are scanned and their data
stored in %I (discrete inputs) or %AI (analog inputs) memory, as appropriate. Any global data
input received by a Genius Communications Module, an Enhanced Genius Communications
Module, or a Genius Bus Controller is stored in %G memory.
Modules are scanned in ascending reference address order, starting with the Genius
Communications Module, then discrete input modules, and finally analog input modules.
If the CPU is in STOP mode and the CPU is configured to not scan I/O in STOP mode, the
input scan is skipped.
GFK-1411C
Chapter 2 System Operation
2-7
2
Application Program Logic Scan or Solution
The application program logic scan is when the application logic program actually executes. The
logic solution always begins with the first instruction in the user application program immediately
following the completion of the input scan. Solving the logic provides a new set of outputs. The
logic solution ends when the END instruction is executed (the END is invisible unless you are
using a Hand-Held Monitor).
The ISCP and the 80C188 microprocessor execute the application program. In the model 313 and
higher CPUs, the ISCP executes the Boolean instructions; and the 80C188 or 80386EX executes
the timer, counter, and function blocks. In the model 311 CPUs, the 80C188 executes all Boolean,
timer, counter, and function block instructions.
A list of execution times for each programming function can be found in Appendix A.
Output Scan
Outputs are scanned during the output scan portion of the sweep, immediately following the logic
solution. Outputs are updated using data from %Q (for discrete outputs) and %AQ (for analog
outputs) memory, as appropriate. If the Genius Communications Module is configured to transmit
global data, then data from %G memory is sent to the GCM, GCM+, or GBC.
During the output scan, all Series 90-30 output modules are scanned in ascending reference
address order.
If the CPU is in the STOP mode and the CPU is configured to not scan I/O during STOP mode,
the output scan is skipped. The output scan is completed when all output data has been sent to all
Series 90-30 output modules.
Logic Program Checksum Calculation
A checksum calculation is performed on the user program at the end of every sweep. Since it
would take too long to calculate the checksum of the entire program, you can specify the number
of words from 0 to 32 to be checked on the CPU detail screen.
If the calculated checksum does not match the reference checksum, the program checksum failure
exception flag is raised. This causes a fault entry to be inserted into the PLC fault table and the
PLC mode to be changed to STOP. If the checksum calculation fails, the programmer
communications window is not affected. The default number of words to be checksummed is 8.
2-8
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
2
Programmer Communications Window
This part of the sweep is dedicated to communicating with the programmer. If there is a
programmer attached, the CPU executes the programmer communications window. The
programmer communications window will not execute if there is no programmer attached and no
board to be configured in the system. Only one board is configured each sweep.
Support is provided for the Hand-Held Programmer and for other programmers that can connect
to the serial port and use the Series Ninety Protocol (SNP) protocol. Support is also provided for
programmer communications with intelligent option modules.
In the default limited window mode, the CPU performs one operation for the programmer each
sweep, that is, it honors one service request or response to one key press. If the programmer makes
a request that requires more than 6 (or 8 depending on the CPU - see Note) milliseconds to
process, the request processing is spread out over several sweeps so that no sweep is impacted by
more than 6 (or 8 depending on the CPU - see Note) milliseconds.
Note
The time limit for the communications window is 6 milliseconds for the model
340 and higher CPUs and 8 milliseconds for the 311, 313, 323, and 331 models.
The following figure is a flow chart for the programmer communications portion of the sweep.
a45659
START
PROGRAMMER
ATTACHED
ATTACHED
PREVIOUS
STATUS
?
NO
PROGRAMMER
REQUEST
?
PROGRAMMER
ATTACHED
STATUS
HAND-HELD
PROGRAMMER
ATTACHED
NOT
ATTACHED
NOT
ATTACHED
ABORT
OPERATION
IN PROGRESS
ATTACHED
NO
SETUP FOR
HAND-HELD
PROGRAMMER
YES
PROCESS REQUEST
PREVIOUS
STATUS
?
KEY
PRESSED
?
YES
PROCESS KEY
SETUP FOR
SERIES 90
PROTOCOL
SEND INITIAL
DISPLAY
SEND NEW DISPLAY
STOP
Figure 2-2. Programmer Communications Window Flow Chart
GFK-1411C
Chapter 2 System Operation
2-9
2
System Communications Window
This is the part of the sweep where communications requests from intelligent option modules,
such as the PCM or DSM, are processed (see flow chart). Requests are serviced on a first-comefirst-served basis. However, since intelligent option modules are polled in a round-robin fashion,
no intelligent option module has priority over any other intelligent option module.
In the default Run-to-Completion mode, the length of the system communications window is
limited to 50 milliseconds. If an intelligent option module makes a request that requires more than
50 milliseconds to process, the request is spread out over multiple sweeps so that no one sweep is
impacted by more than 50 milliseconds.
a43066
START
ANY
REQUESTS
IN QUEUE
?
NO
YES
DEQUEUE A REQUEST
PROCESS THE REQUEST
NO
WINDOW
TIMER
TIMEOUT
?
YES
POLLING
STOPPED
?
NO
YES
RESTART POLLING
STOP
Figure 2-3. System Communications Window Flow Chart
2-10
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
2
PCM Communications with the PLC (Models 331 and Higher)
There is no way for intelligent option modules (IOM), such as the PCM, to interrupt the CPU
when they need service. The CPU must poll each intelligent option module for service requests.
This polling occurs asynchronously in the background during the sweep (see flow chart below).
When an intelligent option module is polled and sends the CPU a service request, the request is
queued for processing during the system communications window.
a43067
START
ALL
IOMS
POLLED
?
YES
NO
POLL NEXT IOM
NO
STOP POLLING
REQUEST
RECEIVED
?
YES
QUEUE REQUEST
Figure 2-4. PCM Communications with the PLC
DSM Communications with the PLC
The DSM302 and DSM314 are intelligent motion control modules operating asynchronously with
the Series 90-30 CPU module. Data is exchanged between the CPU and the DSM modules
automatically.
The DSM302 can be configured for three different lengths of %AI and %AQ data. A PLC CPU
requires time to read and write the data across the backplane with the DSM302. Tables 2-2 and 23 list the sweep impact for the different configurations of %AI and %AQ data for the DSM302.
For additional timing considerations that apply to the DSM302 module, refer to the Motion Mate
DSM302 for Series 90-30 PLCs User’s Manual, GFK-1464.
The length of %AI and %AQ data in the DSM314 is automatically assigned according to the
number of axes selected (1 to 4). Table 2-2 lists the sweep impact for the different number of axes
for the DSM314. Note that only 35x (except CPU351) and 36X CPUs support the DSM 314. For
additional timing considerations that apply to the DSM314 module, refer to the Motion Mate
DSM314 for Series 90-30 PLCs User’s Manual, GFK-1741.
GFK-1411C
Chapter 2 System Operation
2-11
2
Standard Program Sweep Variations
In addition to the normal execution of the standard program sweep, certain variations can be
encountered or forced. These variations, described in the following paragraphs, can be displayed
and/or changed from the programming software.
Constant Sweep Time Mode
In the standard program sweep, each sweep executes as quickly as possible with a varying amount
of time consumed each sweep. An alternative to this is CONSTANT SWEEP TIME mode, where
each sweep consumes the same amount of time. You can achieve this by setting the Configured
Constant Sweep, which will then become the default sweep mode, thereby taking effect each time
the PLC goes from STOP to RUN mode. A value from 5 to 200 milliseconds (or up to 500
milliseconds for the 35x and 36x series PLC CPUs) for the constant sweep timer (default is 100
milliseconds) is supported.
Due to variations in the time required for various parts of the PLC sweep, the constant sweep time
should be set at least 10 milliseconds higher than the sweep time that is displayed on the status
line when the PLC is in NORMAL SWEEP mode. This prevents the occurrence of extraneous
oversweep faults.
Use a constant sweep when I/O points or register values must be polled at a constant frequency,
such as in control algorithms. One reason for using CONSTANT SWEEP TIME mode might be
to ensure that I/O are updated at constant intervals. Another reason might be to ensure that a
certain amount of time elapses between the output scan and the next sweep’s input scan,
permitting inputs to settle after receiving output data from the program.
If the constant sweep timer expires before the sweep completes, the entire sweep, including the
windows, is completed. However, an oversweep fault is logged at the beginning of the next sweep.
Note
Unlike the Active Constant Sweep which can be edited only in RUN mode, the
Configured Constant Sweep Mode can be edited only during STOP mode and
you must “Store the configuration from the Programmer to the PLC” before the
change will take effect. Once stored, this becomes the default sweep mode.
PLC Sweep When in STOP Mode
When the PLC is in STOP mode, the application program is not executed. Communications with
the programmer and intelligent option modules continue. In addition, faulted board polling and
board reconfiguration execution continue while in STOP mode. For efficiency, the operating
system uses larger time-slice values than those used in RUN mode (usually about 50 milliseconds
per window). You can choose whether or not the I/O is scanned. I/O scans may execute in STOP
mode if the IOScan-Stop parameter on the CPU detail screen is set to YES.
2-12
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
2
Communication Window Modes
The default window mode for the programmer communication window is “Limited” mode. That
means that if a request takes more than 6 milliseconds to process, it is processed over multiple
sweeps, so that no one sweep is impacted by more than 6 milliseconds. For the 313, 323, and 331
CPUs, the sweep impact may be as much as 12 milliseconds during a RUN-mode store. Refer to
the online help for instructions on changing the active mode within Control software.
Note
If the system window mode is changed to Limited, then option modules such as
the PCM or GBC that communicate with the PLC using the system window will
have less impact on sweep time, but response to their requests will be slower.
Key Switch on 35x and 36x Series CPUs: Change Mode and Flash
Protect
Each of the 35x and 36x series CPUs has a key switch on the front of the module that allows you
to protect Flash memory from being over-written. When you turn the key to the ON/RUN position,
no one can change the Flash memory without turning the key to the OFF position.
Beginning with Release 7 of the 351and 352 CPUs, the Key Switch has another function: it allows
you to switch the PLC into STOP mode, into RUN mode, and to clear non-fatal faults as discussed
in the next section.
Beginning with Release 8 of the 35x and the 36x series CPUs, the Key Switch has an enhanced
memory protection function: it can be used to provide two additional types of memory protection
(see the “Using the Release 8 and Later Memory Protection” section).
If the key switch is enabled and in the ON/RUN position, you can change the Time of Day clock
only through the programming software. The Hand Held Programmer does not allow you to
change the Time of Day clock while key switch protection is active.
Using the Release 7 and Later Key Switch
Unlike the Flash Protection capabilities in the earlier release, if you do not enable the Key Switch
through the RUN/STOP Key Switch parameter in the CPU’s configuration screen, the CPU does
not have the enhanced control discussed here.
The operation of the Key Switch has the same safeguards and checks before the PLC goes to RUN
mode just like the existing transition to RUN mode; that is, the PLC will not go to RUN mode via
Key Switch input when the PLC is in STOP/FAULT mode. However, in the STOP/FAULT mode,
you can clear non-fatal faults and put the PLC in RUN mode through the use of the Key Switch.
If there are faults in the fault tables that are not fatal (that is, they do not cause the CPU to be
placed in the STOP/FAULT mode), then the CPU will be placed in RUN mode the first time you
turn the key from Stop to Run, and the fault tables will NOT be cleared.
If there are faults in the fault table that are fatal (CPU in STOP/FAULT mode), then the first
transition of the Key Switch from the STOP position to the RUN position will cause the CPU RUN
light to begin to flash at 2 Hz rate and a 5 second timer will begin. The flashing RUN light is an
indication that there are fatal fault(s) in the fault tables. In which case, the CPU will NOT be
placed in the RUN state even though the Key Switch is in RUN position.
GFK-1411C
Chapter 2 System Operation
2-13
2
Clearing the Fault Table with the Key Switch
If you turn the key from the RUN to STOP and back to RUN position during the 5 seconds when
the RUN light is flashing this will cause the faults to be cleared and the CPU will be placed into
RUN mode. The light will stop flashing and will go solid ON at this point. The switch is required
to be kept in either RUN or STOP position for at least 1/2 second before switching back to the
other position.
Note
If you allow the 5 second timer to expire (RUN light stops flashing) the CPU will
remain in its original state, STOP/FAULT mode, with faults in the fault table. If
you turn the Key Switch from the STOP to RUN position again at this time, the
process will be repeated with this being the first transition.
The following table provides a summary of how the two CPU parameter settings affecting the Key
Switch (R/S Switch and IOScan-Stop) and the Key Switch’s physical position affect PLC.
R/S Key Switch
Parameter in CPU
Configuration
Key Switch
Position
IOScan-Stop
Parameter in CPU
Configuration
OFF
X
X
All PLC Programmer Modes are allowed.
ON
ON/RUN
X
All PLC Programmer Modes are allowed.
ON
OFF/STOP
X
PLC not allowed to go to RUN.
ON
Toggle Key
Switch from
OFF/STOP to
ON/RUN
X
PLC goes to RUN if no fatal faults are present;
otherwise, the RUN LED blinks for 5 seconds.
ON
Toggle Key
Switch from
ON/RUN to
OFF/STOP
NO
PLC goes to STOP–NO IO
ON
Toggle Key
Switch from
ON/RUN to
OFF/STOP
YES
PLC goes to STOP–IO
PLC Operation
X = Has no effect regardless of setting
Enhanced Memory Protect with Release 8 and Later CPUs
In the Release 8 and later CPUs, the Key Switch has all the functionality discussed above, plus, by
setting a parameter in the programming package, it can be used to protect RAM so that the RAM
cannot be changed from the programming software. Two types of operations are blocked when
this memory protection is enabled: the user program and configuration cannot be modified and the
force and override of point data is not allowed. This is activated through the Memory Protect field
in the Settings tab for the 35x or 36x series CPUs module in Hardware Configuration within
VersaPro or Control software. The default is Disabled.
2-14
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
2
Section 2: Program Organization and User References/Data
The total logic size for the Series 90-30 programmable controllers is listed in the following table.
Models
User Logic Memory
(Kbytes)
CPU311
6
CPU313, CPU323
12
CPU331
16
CPU340
32
CPU341
80
CPU350
80 (release 9 and later)
32 (prior to release 9)
CPU351, CPU352, CPU360, CPU363,
CPU364
240 (release 9 and later)
80 (prior to release 9)
Beginning with Release 9 CPUs, some memory sizes for the 351, 352 and 36x series are
configurable. (For detailed instructions and a discussion of memory sizes available, refer to the
online help within Control or VersaPro software. The user program contains logic that is used
when it is started up. The maximum number of rungs allowed per logic block (main or subroutine)
is 3000; the maximum block size is 80 kilobytes for C blocks and 16 kilobytes for LD and SFC
blocks, but in an SFC block some of the 16 KB is used for the internal data block. The logic is
executed repeatedly by the PLC.
a45660
read
inputs
PROGRAM
write
outputs
Refer to the Series 90-30 PLC Installation and Hardware Manual, GFK-0356, for a listing of
program sizes and reference limits for each model CPU.
All programs have a variable table that lists the variable and reference descriptions that have been
assigned in the user program.
The block declaration editor lists subroutine blocks declared in the main program.
GFK-1411C
Chapter 2 System Operation
2-15
2
Subroutine Blocks
A program can “call” subroutine blocks as it executes. A maximum of 64 subroutine block
declarations in the program and 64 CALL instructions are allowed for each logic block in the
program. The maximum size of a subroutine block is 16 KB or 3000 rungs, but the main program
and all subroutines must fit within the logic size constraints for that CPU model.
The use of subroutines is optional. Dividing a program into smaller subroutines can simplify
programming, enhance understanding of the control algorithm, and reduce the overall amount of
logic needed for the program.
Examples of Using Subroutine Blocks
As an example, the logic for a program could be divided into three subroutines, each of which
could be called as needed from the program. In this example, the program block might contain
little logic, serving primarily to sequence the subroutine blocks.
a45661
SUBROUTINE
2
PROGRAM
SUBROUTINE
3
SUBROUTINE
4
A subroutine block can be used many times as the program executes. Logic which needs to be
repeated several times in a program could be entered in a subroutine block. Calls would then be
made to that subroutine block to access the logic. In this way, total program size is reduced.
a45662
PROGRAM
2-16
SUBROUTINE
2
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
2
In addition to being called from the program, subroutine blocks can also be called by other
subroutine blocks. A subroutine block may even call itself.
a45663
SUBROUTINE
2
SUBROUTINE
4
PROGRAM
SUBROUTINE
3
The PLC will only allow eight nested calls before an “Application Stack Overflow” fault is logged
and the PLC transitions to STOP/FAULT mode. The call from the MAIN program to the first
subroutine block counts as the first call. Subsequent calls may go seven more blocks deeper
without an error. The following illustration shows the maximum call depth allowed at runtime.
S U B R O U T IN E
1
S U B R O U T IN E
2
S U B R O U T IN E
S U B R O U T IN E
3
4
P R O G R A M
S U B R O U T IN E
5
S U B R O U T IN E
6
S U B R O U T IN E
S U B R O U T IN E
7
8
If subroutine 8 were to execute another call, the PLC would immediately transition to
STOP/FAULT mode.
How Blocks Are Called
A subroutine block executes when called from the program logic in the program or from another
block.
|
|%I0004
%T0001
|——| |—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————( )—
|
______________
|%I0006
|
|
|——| |—————| CALL ASTRO |—
|
| (SUBROUTINE) |
|
|______________|
|
|%I0003 %I0010
%Q0010
|——| |—————| |—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————( )—
|
This example shows the subroutine CALL instruction as it will appear in the calling block.
GFK-1411C
Chapter 2 System Operation
2-17
2
Periodic Subroutines
Version 4.20 or later of the 340 and higher CPUs support periodic subroutines. Please note the
following restrictions:
2-18
1.
Timer (TMR, ONDTR, and OFDTR) function blocks will not execute properly within a
periodic subroutine. A DOIO function block within a periodic subroutine whose reference
range includes references assigned to a Smart I/O Module (HSC, Motion Mate APM, Motion
Mate DSM, Genius, and others) will cause the CPU to lose communication with the module.
The FST_SCN and LST_SCN contacts (%S1 and %S2) will have an indeterminate value
during execution of the periodic subroutine. A periodic subroutine cannot call or be called by
other subroutines.
2.
The latency for the periodic subroutine (that is, the maximum interval between the time the
periodic subroutine should have executed and the time it actually executes) can be around .35
milliseconds if there is no PCM, CMM, or ADC module in the main rack. If there is a PCM,
CMM or ADC module in the main rack - even if it is not configured or used, the latency can
be almost 2.25 milliseconds. For that reason, use of the periodic subroutine with PCM-based
products is not recommended.
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
2
User References
The data used in an application program is stored as either register or discrete references.
Table 2-4. Register References
Type
Description
%R
The prefix %R is used to assign system register references, which will store program
data such as the results of calculations.
%AI
The prefix %AI represents an analog input register. This prefix is followed by the
register address of the reference (for example, %AI0015). An analog input register holds the
value of one analog input or other value.
%AQ
The prefix %AQ represents an analog output register. This prefix is followed by the
register address of the reference (for example, %AQ0056). An analog output register holds the
value of one analog output or other value.
Note
All register references are retained across a power cycle to the CPU.
Table 2-5. Discrete References
Type
Description
%I
The %I prefix represents input references. This prefix is followed by the reference’s address in
the input table (for example, %I00121). %I references are located in the input status table,
which stores the state of all inputs received from input modules during the last input scan. A
reference address is assigned to discrete input modules using the configuration software or the
Hand-Held Programmer. Until a reference address is assigned, no data will be received from the
module. %I data can be retentive or non-retentive.
%Q
The %Q prefix represents physical output references. The %Q prefix is followed by the
reference’s address in the output table (for example, %Q00016). %Q references are located in
the output status table, which stores the state of the output references as last set by the
application program. This output status table’s values are sent to output modules during the
output scan.
A reference address is assigned to discrete output modules using the configuration software or
the Hand-Held Programmer. Until a reference address is assigned, no data is sent to the
module. A particular %Q reference may be either retentive or non-retentive. *
%M
The %M prefix represents internal references. The coil check function checks for multiple uses
of %M references with relay coils or outputs on functions. A particular %M reference may be
either retentive or non-retentive. *
%T
The %T prefix represents temporary references. These references are never checked for
multiple coil use and can, therefore, be used many times in the same program even when coil
use checking is enabled. %T may be used to prevent coil use conflicts while using the cut/paste
and file write/include functions.
Because this memory is intended for temporary use, it is never retained through power loss or
RUN-TO-STOP-TO-RUN transitions and cannot be used with retentive coils.
*
GFK-1411C
Retentiveness is based on the type of coil. For more information, refer to “Retentiveness of Data” on page 2-20.
Chapter 2 System Operation
2-19
2
Table 2-5. Discrete References - Continued
Type
Description
%S
The %S prefix represents system status references. These references are used to access special
PLC data, such as timers, scan information, and fault information. System references include
%S, %SA, %SB, and %SC references.
%S, %SA, %SB, and %SC can be used on any contacts.
%SA, %SB, and %SC can be used on retentive coils –(M)–.
%S can be used as word or bit-string input arguments to functions or function blocks.
%SA, %SB, and %SC can be used as word or bit-string input or output arguments to functions
and function blocks.
%G
The %G prefix represents global data references. These references are used to access
data shared among several PLCs. %G references can be used on contacts and retentive coils
because %G memory is always retentive. %G cannot be used on non-retentive coils.
Transitions and Overrides
The %I, %Q, %M, and %G user references have associated transition and override bits. %T, %S,
%SA, %SB, and %SC references have transition bits, but not override bits. The CPU uses
transition bits for counters and transitional coils. Note that counters do not use the same kind of
transition bits as coils. Transition bits for counters are stored within the locating reference.
In the Model 331 and higher CPUs, override bits can be set. When override bits are set, the
associated references cannot be changed from the program or the input device; they can only be
changed on command from the programmer. CPU Models 323, 321, 313, and 311 do not support
overriding discrete references.
Retentiveness of Data
Data is said to be retentive if it is saved by the PLC when the PLC is stopped. The Series 90 PLC
preserves program logic, fault tables and diagnostics, overrides and output forces, word data (%R,
%AI, %AQ), bit data (%I, %SC, %G, fault bits and reserved bits), %Q and %M data (unless used
with non-retentive coils), and word data stored in %Q and %M. %T data is not saved. Although,
as stated above, %SC bit data is retentive, the defaults for %S, %SA, and %SB are non-retentive.
%Q and %M references are non-retentive (that is, cleared at power-up when the PLC switches
from STOP to RUN) whenever they are used with non-retentive coils. Non-retentive coils include
coils —( )—, negated coils —(/)—, SET coils —(S)—, and RESET coils —(R)—.
When %Q or %M references are used with retentive coils, or are used as function block outputs,
the contents are retained through power loss and RUN-TO-STOP-TO-RUN transitions.
Retentive coils include retentive coils —(M)—, negated retentive coils —(/M)—, retentive SET
coils —(SM)—, and retentive RESET coils —(RM)—.
The last time a %Q or %M reference is programmed on a coil instruction determines whether the
%Q or %M reference is retentive or non-retentive based on the coil type. For example, if %Q0001
was last programmed as the reference of a retentive coil, the %Q0001 data will be retentive.
However, if %Q0001 was last programmed on a non-retentive coil, then the %Q0001 data will be
non-retentive.
2-20
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
2
Data Types
Table 2-6. Data Types
Type
INT
DINT
BIT
Name
Signed
Integer
Description
Signed integers use 16-bit memory
data locations, and are represented
in 2’s complement notation. The
valid range of an INT data type is –32,768
to +32,767.
Double
Precision
Signed
Integer
Double precision signed integers are
stored in 32-bit data memory
locations (actually two consecutive 16-bit
memory locations) and represented in 2’s
complement notation. (Bit 32 is the sign
bit.) The valid range of a DINT data type
is –2,147,483,648 to +2,147,483,647.
Bit
A Bit data type is the smallest unit of
memory. It has two states, 1 or 0. A BIT
string may have length N.
BYTE
Byte
A Byte data type has an 8-bit value.
The valid range is 0 to 255 (0 to FF in
hexadecimal).
WORD
Word
A Word data type uses 16 consecutive
bits of data memory; but, instead of the
bits in the data location
representing a number, the bits are
independent of each other. Each bit
represents its own binary state (1 or
0), and the bits are not looked at
together to represent an integer
number. The valid range of word
values is 0 to FFFF.
DWORD Double
Word
A Double Word data type has the same
characteristics as a single word data type,
except that it uses 32 consecutive bits in
data memory instead of 16 bits.
Data Format
Register 1
S|
16
1
Register 2
S|
32
17
(16 bit positions)
Register 1
16
1
(Two’s Complement Value)
Register 1
(16 bit positions)
16
1
Register 2
32
Register 1
17
16
1
(32 bit states)
BCD-4
REAL
Four-Digit
Binary
Coded
Decimal
Four-digit BCD numbers use 16-bit data
memory locations. Each BCD
digit uses four bits and can represent
numbers between 0 and 9. This BCD
coding of the 16 bits has a legal value
range of 0 to 9999.
Floating
Point
Real numbers use 32 consecutive bits
(actually two consecutive 16-bit memory
locations). The range of numbers that can
be stored in this format is from ±
1.401298E-45 to ± 3.402823E+38.
Register 1
4 |3 | 2 | 1
16 13
9
5
(4 BCD digits)
1
Register 2
S|
32
17
Register 1
16
1
(Two’s Complement Value)
S = Sign bit (0 = positive, 1 = negative).
GFK-1411C
Chapter 2 System Operation
2-21
2
System Status References
System status references in the Series 90 PLC are assigned to %S, %SA, %SB, and %SC memory.
They each have a nickname. Examples of time tick references include T_10MS, T_100MS,
T_SEC, and T_MIN. Examples of convenience references include FST_SCN, ALW_ON, and
ALW_OFF.
Note
%S bits are read-only bits; do not write to these bits. You may, however, write to
%SA, %SB, and %SC bits.
Listed below are available system status references, which may be used in an application program.
When entering logic, either the reference or the nickname can be used. Refer to chapter 3, “Fault
Explanations and Correction,” for more detailed fault descriptions and information on correcting
the fault.
You cannot use these special names in another context.
Table 2-7. System Status References
Reference
Nickname
%S0001
FST_SCN
%S0002
LST_SCN
Reset from 1 to 0 when the current sweep is the last sweep.
%S0003
T_10MS
0.01 second timer contact.
Set to 1 when the current sweep is the first sweep.
%S0004
T_100MS
0.1 second timer contact.
%S0005
T_SEC
1.0 second timer contact.
%S0006
T_MIN
1.0 minute timer contact.
%S0007
ALW_ON
Always ON.
%S0008
ALW_OFF
Always OFF.
%S0009
SY_FULL
Set when the PLC fault table fills up. Cleared when an entry is
removed from the PLC fault table and when the PLC fault table is cleared.
%S0010
IO_FULL
Set when the I/O fault table fills up. Cleared when an entry is
removed from the I/O fault table and when the I/O fault table is cleared.
%S0011
OVR_PRE
Set when an override exists in %I, %Q, %M, or %G memory.
%S0013
PRG_CHK
Set when background program check is active.
%S0014
PLC_BAT
Set to indicate a bad battery in a Release 4 or later CPU. The
contact reference is updated once per sweep.
%S0017
SNPXACT
SNP-X host is actively attached to the CPU.
%S0018
SNPX_RD
SNP-X host has read data from the CPU.
%S0019
SNPX_WT
SNP-X host has written data to the CPU.
%S0020
Set ON when a relational function using REAL data executes successfully.
It is cleared when either input is NaN (Not a Number).
%S0021
FF_OVR
Used with reboot after Fatal Fault feature. Set ON when a fatal fault
exists. Cleared when all fatal faults are cleared or the CPU mode is set to
STOP/FAULT.
%S0022
USR_SW
Set to reflect the state of the CPU mode switch:
1=Run/On; 0 = Stop/Off
%S0032
2-22
Definition
Reserved for use by the programming software.
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
2
Table 2-7. System Status References - Continued
Reference
GFK-1411C
Name
Definition
%SA0001
PB_SUM
Set when a checksum calculated on the application program does
not match the reference checksum. If the fault was due to a
temporary failure, the discrete bit can be cleared by again storing
the program to the CPU. If the fault was due to a hard RAM
failure, the CPU must be replaced.
%SA0002
OV_SWP
Set when the PLC detects that the previous sweep took longer than the
time specified by the user. Cleared when the PLC detects that
the previous sweep did not take longer than the specified time. It is also
cleared during the transition from STOP to RUN mode. Only valid if the
PLC is in CONSTANT SWEEP mode.
%SA0003
APL_FLT
Set when an application fault occurs. Cleared when the PLC
transitions from STOP to RUN mode.
%SA0009
CFG_MM
Set when a configuration mismatch is detected during system
power-up or during a store of the configuration. Cleared by
powering up the PLC when no mismatches are present or during a store of
configuration that matches hardware.
%SA0010
HRD_CPU
Set when the diagnostics detects a problem with the CPU hardware.
Cleared by replacing the CPU module.
%SA0011
LOW_BAT
Set when a low battery fault occurs. Cleared by replacing the battery and
ensuring that the PLC powers up without the low battery condition.
%SA0014
LOS_IOM
Set when an I/O module stops communicating with the PLC CPU. Cleared
by replacing the module and cycling power on the main rack.
%SA0015
LOS_SIO
Set when an option module stops communicating with the PLC CPU.
Cleared by replacing the module and cycling power on the main rack.
%SA0019
ADD_IOM
Set when an I/O module is added to a rack. Cleared by cycling power on
the main rack and when the configuration matches the hardware after a
store.
%SA0020
ADD_SIO
Set when an option module is added to a rack. Cleared by cycling power
on the main rack and when the configuration matches the hardware after a
store.
%SA0027
HRD_SIO
Set when a hardware failure is detected in an option module. Cleared by
replacing the module and cycling power on the main rack.
%SA0031
SFT_SIO
Set when an unrecoverable software fault is detected in an option module.
Cleared by cycling power on the main rack and when the configuration
matches the hardware.
%SB0010
BAD_RAM
Set when the CPU detects corrupted RAM memory at power-up. Cleared
when the CPU detects that RAM memory is valid at power-up.
%SB0011
BAD_PWD
Set when a password access violation occurs. Cleared when the PLC fault
table is cleared.
%SB0013
SFT_CPU
Set when the CPU detects an unrecoverable error in the software. Cleared
by clearing the PLC fault table.
%SB0014
STOR_ER
Set when an error occurs during a programmer store operation. Cleared
when a store operation is completed successfully.
Chapter 2 System Operation
2-23
2
Table 2-7. System Status References - Continued
Reference
Nickname
Definition
%SC0009
ANY_FLT
Set when any fault occurs. Cleared when both fault tables have no
entries.
%SC0010
SY_FLT
Set when any fault occurs that causes an entry to be placed in the PLC
fault table. Cleared when the PLC fault table has no entries.
%SC0011
IO_FLT
Set when any fault occurs that causes an entry to be placed in the I/O
fault table. Cleared when the I/O fault table has no entries.
%SC0012
SY_PRES
Set as long as there is at least one entry in the PLC fault table. Cleared
when the PLC fault table has no entries.
%SC0013
IO_PRES
Set as long as there is at least one entry in the I/O fault table. Cleared
when the I/O fault table has no entries.
%SC0014
HRD_FLT
Set when a hardware fault occurs. Cleared when both fault tables have
no entries.
%SC0015
SFT_FLT
Set when a software fault occurs. Cleared when both fault tables have
no entries.
Note: Any %S reference not listed here is reserved and not to be used in program logic.
Function Block Structure
Each rung of logic is composed of one or more programming instructions. These may be simple
relays or more complex functions.
Format of Ladder Logic Relays
The programming software includes several types of relay functions. These functions provide
basic flow and control of logic in the program. Examples include a normally open relay contact
and a negated coil. Each of these relay contacts and coils has one input and one output. Together,
they provide logic flow through the contact or coil.
Each relay contact or coil must be given a reference that is entered when selecting the relay. For a
contact, the reference represents a location in memory that determines the flow of power into the
contact. In the following example, if reference %I0122 is ON, power will flow through this relay
contact.
%I0122
–| |–
2-24
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
2
For a coil, the reference represents a location in memory that is controlled by the flow of power
into the coil. In this example, if power flows into the left side of the coil, reference %Q0004 is
turned ON.
%Q0004
–( )–
The programming software and the Hand-Held Programmer both have a coil check function that
checks for multiple uses of %Q or %M references with relay coils or outputs on functions.
Format of Program Function Blocks
Some functions are very simple, like the MCR function, which is shown with the abbreviated
name of the function within brackets:
–[ MCR ]–
Other functions are more complex. They may have several places where you will enter
information to be used by the function.
The generic function block illustrated below is multiplication (MUL); parameters vary with the
type of function block. Its parts are typical of many program functions. The upper part of the
function block shows the name of the function.
_________________
_____
|
|
|
|
| MUL |—
|
|
|
|
—————|—————|—————
???????—|I1 Q|—???????
|
|
|
|
???????—|I2
|
|_____|
|
|
|
|
GFK-1411C
Chapter 2 System Operation
This is the function block name (MUL).
2-25
2
Function Block Parameters
Each line entering the left side of a function block represents an input for that function. There are
two forms of input that can be passed into a function block: constants and references. A constant
is an explicit value. A reference is the address of a value.
In the following example, input parameter I1 comes into the ADD function block as a constant,
and input parameter I2 comes in as a reference.
|
_____
|%I0001 |
|
%Q0001
|——| |———| ADD_|——————————————————————————————————————————————————————————( )—
|
| INT |
|
|
|
| CONST —|I1 Q|—%R0002
| +00010 |
|
|
|
|
|%R0001 —|I2
|
|
|_____|
|
Each line exiting the right side of the function block represents an output. There is only one form
of output from a function block or reference. Outputs can never be written to constants.
Where the question marks appear on the left of a function block, you will enter either the data
itself, a reference location where the data is found, or a variable representing the reference
location where the data is found. Where question marks appear on the right of a function block,
you will usually enter a reference location for data to be output by the function block or a variable
that represents the reference location for data to be output by the function block.
_____
|
|
—| MUL |—
|
|
—————————|
|—————————
| ???????—|I1 Q|—??????? |
|
|
|—————————
|
|
|
|
| ???????—|I2
|
————— This is the output parameter (Q)
—————————|
|
for the function block.
|
|_____|
|
|_____ These are the input parameters (I1 and I2)
for the function block.
Most function blocks do not change input data; instead, they place the result of the operation in an
output reference.
2-26
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
2
For functions that operate on tables, a length can be selected for the function. In the following
function block, the LEN operand specifies the number of words to be moved.
______
|
|
(enable) —| MOVE_|— (ok)
| WORD|
|
|
???????—|I1
Q|—???????
|
|
| LEN |
| 00003|
|______|
Timer, counter, BITSEQ, and ID functions require an address for the location of three words
(registers) which store the current value, preset value, and a control word or “Instance” of the
function.
_____
|
|
(enable) —|ONDTR|— Q
|1.00s|
|
|
(reset) —|R
|
|
|
|
|
???????—|PV
|
|_____|
(address)
Power Flow In and Out of a Function
Power flows into a function block on the upper left. Often, enabling logic is used to control power
flow to a function block; otherwise, the function block executes unconditionally each CPU sweep.
Enabling logic
|
| Power flow into the function
|
|
|
|
Power flow out of the function
¯
| _____
|
%I0001 ¯ |
|
¯
%Q0001
———| |————| MUL_|————————————————————————( )—
| INT |
^
|
|
|
%R0123 —|I1 Q|—%R0124
Displays state
|
|
of reference
|
|
CONST —|I2
|
00002 |_____|
Note
Function blocks cannot be tied directly to the left power rail. You can use %S7,
the ALW_ON (always on) bit with a normally open contact tied to the power rail
to call a function every sweep.
Power flows out of the function block on the upper right. It may be passed to other program logic
or to a coil (optional). Function blocks pass power when they execute successfully.
GFK-1411C
Chapter 2 System Operation
2-27
2
Section 3: Power-Up and Power-Down Sequences
There are two possible power-up sequences in the Series 90-30 PLC; a cold power-up and a warm
power-up. The CPU normally uses the cold power-up sequence. However, in a Model 331 or
higher PLC system, if the time that elapses between a power-down and the next power-up is less
than five seconds, the warm power-up sequence is used.
Power-Up
A cold power-up consists of the following sequence of events. A warm power-up sequence skips
Step 1.
2-28
1.
The CPU will run diagnostics on itself. This includes checking a portion of battery-backed
RAM to determine whether or not the RAM contains valid data.
2.
If an EPROM, EEPROM, or flash is present and the PROM power-up option in the PROM
specifies that the PROM contents should be used, the contents of PROM are copied into RAM
memory. If an EPROM, EEPROM, or flash is not present, RAM memory remains the same
and is not overwritten with the contents of PROM.
3.
The CPU interrogates each slot in the system to determine which boards are present.
4.
The hardware configuration is compared with software configuration to ensure that they are
the same. Any mismatches detected are considered faults and are alarmed. Also, if a board is
specified in the software configuration but a different module is present in the actual
hardware configuration, this condition is a fault and is alarmed.
5.
If there is no software configuration, the CPU will use the default configuration.
6.
The CPU establishes the communications channel between itself and any intelligent modules.
7.
In the final step of the execution, the mode of the first sweep is determined based on CPU
configuration. If RUN mode, the sweep proceeds as described under “STOP-to-RUN Mode
Transition.” Figure 2-5 on the next page shows the decision sequence for the CPU when it
decides whether to copy from PROM or to power-up in STOP or RUN mode.
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
2
* Go to Clear All Process
a45680
START
1
HHP
CLR M
KEYS
T
TRUE
* CLEAR
ALL
FALSE
2
USD
PRESENT AND
VALID
TRUE
3
FALSE
4
USD
PRG SRC =
PROM
URAM
PRG SRC =
PROM
FALSE
TRUE
FALSE
11
TRUE
URAM
CORRUPT
5
USD
REG SRC =
PROM
URAM
PRG SRC =
PROM
6
8
TRUE
13
12
7
TRUE
* CLEAR
ALL
FALSE
FALSE
TRUE
HHP
LD NOT
KEYS
TRUE
STOP MODE
FALSE
COPY PRG ,CFG,
& REGS FROM
USD TO URAM
14
FALSE
9
USD
NOT PRESENT
FALSE
FALSE
HHP
LD NOT
KEYS
TRUE
TRUE
HHP
NOT RUN
KEYS
COPY
PRG & CFG FROM
USD TO URAM
TRUE
STOP MODE
FALSE
15
URAM
PU MODE =
RUN
10
PRG or CFG
CHECKSUM
BAD
TRUE
RUN MODE
FALSE
FALSE
16
TRUE
Clear All Process
* CLEAR
ALL
LOW BATT
CLEAR ALL
TRUE
STOP MODE
FALSE
17
19
URAM
PU MODE =
STOP
CLEAR PRG, CFG,
AND REGS
18
STOP MODE
TRUE
STOP MODE
FALSE
PU MODE IS SAME,
AS POWERDOWN
STOP MODE
END
RUN MODE
Figure 2-5. Power-Up Sequence
Prior to the START statement on the Power Up Flowchart, the CPU goes through power up
diagnostics which test various peripheral devices used by the CPU and tests RAM. After
completing diagnostics, internal data structures and peripheral devices used by the CPU get
initialized. The CPU then determines if User Ram has been corrupted. If User Ram is corrupted
the user program and configuration are cleared out and defaulted and all user registers are cleared.
GFK-1411C
Chapter 2 System Operation
2-29
2
FLOW CHART TERMS:
PRG = user program
CFG = user configuration
REGS = user registers (%I, %Q, %M, %G, %R, %AI, and %AQ references).
USD = user storage device, either an EEPROM or flash device.
URAM = non-volatile user ram which contains PRG, CFG, and REGS.
FLOW CHART EXPANDED TEXT:
(1)
Are the <CLR> and <M_T> keys being pressed on the HHP during power-up to clear all
URAM?
(2)
Is the USD present (could only be missing on models that use EEPROM device) and is the
information on the USD valid?
(3)
Is the PRG SRC parameter in the USD set to Prom meaning to load the PRG and CFG from
the USD device?
(4)
Is the PRG SRC parameter in the URAM set to Prom meaning to load the PRG and CFG
from the USD device?
(5)
Is the REG SRC parameter in the USD set to Prom meaning to load the REGS from the
USD device?
(6 & 7) Are the <LD> and <NOT> keys being pressed on the HHP during power-up to keep the
PRG, CFG, and REGS from being loaded from USD?
(8)
Copy PRG, CFG, and REGS from the USD to URAM.
(9)
COPY PRG, and CFG from the USD to URAM.
(10)
Is the PRG or CFG checksums just loaded from USD invalid?
(11)
Is the URAM corrupted? Could be due to being powered down with out a battery attached
or a low battery. Could also be due to updating firmware.
(12)
Is the PRG SRC parameter in the URAM set to Prom meaning to load the PRG and CFG
from the USD device?
(13)
Is the USD present? Only applicable to models that use EEPROM device.
(14)
Are the <NOT> and <RUN> keys being pressed on the HHP during power-up to
unconditionally power-up in Stop Mode?
(15)
Is the PWR UP parameter in URAM set to RUN?
(16)
Is the battery low?
(17)
Is the PWR UP parameter in URAM set to STOP?
(18)
Set the power up mode to what ever the power down mode was.
(19)
Clear PRG, CFG, and REGS.
Power-Down
System power-down occurs when the power supply detects that incoming AC power has dropped
for more than one power cycle or the output of the 5-volt power supply has fallen to less than 4.9
volts DC.
2-30
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
2
Section 4: Clocks and Timers
Clocks and timers provided by the Series 90-30 PLC include an elapsed time clock, a time-of-day
clock, a watchdog timer, and a constant sweep timer. Three types of timer function blocks include
an on-delay timer, an off-delay timer, and a retentive on-delay timer (also called a watch clock
timer). Four time-tick contacts cycle on and off for 0.01 second, 0.1 second, 1.0 second, and 1
minute intervals.
Elapsed Time Clock
The elapsed time clock uses 100 microsecond “ticks” to track the time elapsed since the CPU
powered on. The clock is not retentive across a power failure; it restarts on each power-up. Once
per second the hardware interrupts the CPU to enable a seconds count to be recorded. This
seconds count rolls over approximately 100 years after the clock begins timing.
Because the elapsed time clock provides the base for system software operations and timer
function blocks, it can not be reset from the user program or the programmer. However, the
application program can read the current value of the elapsed time clock by using Service Request
16.
Time-of-Day Clock
The time of day in Series 90-30 PLC Model 331 and higher is maintained by a hardware time-ofday clock. The time-of-day clock maintains seven time functions:
•
Year (two digits)
•
Month
•
Day of month
•
Hour
•
Minute
•
Second
•
Day of week
The time-of-day clock is battery-backed and maintains its present state across a power failure.
However, unless you initialize the clock, the values it contains are meaningless. The application
program can read and set the time-of-day clock using Service Request #7. The time-of-day clock
can also be read and set from the CPU configuration software. Note that the Hand Held
Programmer does not allow you to change the Time of Day clock while key switch protection is
active.
The time-of-day clock is designed to handle month-to-month and year-to-year transitions. It
automatically compensates for leap years until the year 2079.
GFK-1411C
Chapter 2 System Operation
2-31
2
Watchdog Timer
A watchdog timer in the Series 90-30 PLC is designed to catch catastrophic failure conditions that
result in an unusually long sweep. The timer value for the watchdog timer is 500 milliseconds in
the 35x and 36x series of PLC CPUs; this is a fixed value which cannot be changed. The
watchdog timer always starts from zero at the beginning of each sweep.
For 331 and lower model 90-30 CPUs, if the watchdog timeout value is exceeded, the OK LED
goes off; the CPU is placed in reset and completely shuts down; and outputs go to their default
state. No communication of any form is possible, and all microprocessors on all boards are halted.
To recover, power must be cycled on the rack containing the CPU. In the 340 and higher 90-30
CPUs, a watchdog timeout causes the CPU to reset, execute its powerup logic, generate a
watchdog failure fault, and change its mode to STOP.
Constant Sweep Timer
The constant sweep timer controls the length of a program sweep when the Series 90-30 PLC
operates in CONSTANT SWEEP TIME mode. In this mode of operation, each sweep consumes
the same amount of time. Typically, for most application programs, the input scan, application
program logic scan, and output scan do not require exactly the same amount of execution time in
each sweep. The value of the constant sweep timer is set by the programmer and can be any value
from 5 to the value of the watchdog timer (default is 100 milliseconds).
If the constant sweep timer expires before the completion of the sweep and the previous sweep was
not oversweep, the PLC places an oversweep alarm in the PLC fault table. At the beginning of the
next sweep, the PLC sets the OV_SWP fault contact. The OV_SWP contact is reset when the PLC
is not in CONSTANT SWEEP TIME mode or the time of the last sweep did not exceed the
constant sweep timer.
Time-Tick Contacts
The Series 90 PLC provides four time-tick contacts with time durations of 0.01 second, 0.1
second, 1.0 second, and 1 minute. The state of these contacts does not change during the
execution of the sweep. These contacts provide a pulse having an equal on and off time duration.
The contacts are referenced as T_10MS (0.01 second), T_100MS (0.1 second), T_SEC (1.0
second), and T_MIN (1 minute).
The following timing diagram represents the on/off time duration of these contacts.
a43071
X
SEC
T XXXXX
X/2
SEC
X/2
SEC
Figure 2-6. Time-Tick Contact Timing Diagram
2-32
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
2
Section 5: System Security
Security in Series 90-30 PLCs is designed to prevent unauthorized changes to the contents of a
PLC. There are four security levels available in the PLC. The first level, which is always
available, provides only the ability to read PLC data; no changes are permitted to the application.
The other three levels have access to each level protected by a password.
Each higher privilege level permits greater change capabilities than the lower level(s). Privilege
levels accumulate in that the privileges granted at one level are a combination of that level, plus
all lower levels. The levels and their privileges are:
Privilege
Level
Description
Level 1
Any data, except passwords may be read. This includes all data memories (%I, %Q, %AQ,
%R, etc.), fault tables, and all program block types (data, value, and constant).
No values may be changed in the PLC.
Level 2
This level allows write access to the data memories (%I, %R, etc.).
Level 3
This level allows write access to the application program in STOP mode only.
Level 4
This is the default level for systems which have no passwords set. The default level for a
system with passwords is to the highest unprotected level. This level, the
highest, allows read and write access to all memories as well as passwords in both RUN
and STOP mode. (Configuration data cannot be changed in RUN mode.)
Passwords
There is one password for each privilege level in the PLC. (No password can be set for level 1
access.) Each password may be unique; however, the same password can be used for more than
one level. Passwords are one to four ASCII characters in length; they can only be entered or
changed with the programming software or the Hand-Held Programmer.
A privilege level change is in effect only as long as communications between the PLC and the
programmer are intact. There does not need to be any activity, but the communications link must
not be broken. If there is no communication for 15 minutes, the privilege level returns to the
highest unprotected level.
Upon connection of the PLC, the programming software requests the protection status of each
privilege level from the PLC. The programming software then requests the PLC to move to the
highest unprotected level, thereby giving the programming software access to the highest
unprotected level without having to request any particular level. When the Hand-Held
Programmer is connected to the PLC, the PLC reverts to the highest unprotected level.
Privilege Level Change Requests
The privilege level can be set in Control software (not in VersaPro). A programmer requests a
privilege level change by supplying the new privilege level and the password for that level. A
GFK-1411C
Chapter 2 System Operation
2-33
2
privilege level change is denied if the password sent by the programmer does not agree with the
password stored in the PLC’s password access table for the requested level. The current privilege
level is maintained and no change will occur. If you attempt to access or modify information in
the PLC using the Hand-Held Programmer without the proper privilege level, the Hand-Held
Programmer will respond with an error message that the access is denied.
Locking/Unlocking Subroutines
Subroutine blocks can be locked and unlocked using the block locking feature of programming
software. Two types of locks are available:
Type of Lock
Description
View
Once locked, you cannot zoom into that subroutine.
Edit
Once locked, the information in the subroutine cannot be edited.
A previously view locked or edit locked subroutine may be unlocked in the block declaration
editor unless it is permanently view locked or permanently edit locked.
A search or search and replace function may be performed on a view locked subroutine. If the
target of the search is found in a view locked subroutine, one of the following messages is
displayed, instead of logic:
Found in locked block <block_name>
(Continue/Quit)
or
Cannot write to locked block <block_name>
(Continue/Quit)
You may continue or abort the search.
Folders that contain locked subroutines may be cleared or deleted. If a folder contains locked
subroutines, these blocks remain locked when the programming software Copy, Backup, and
Restore folder functions are used.
Permanently Locking a Subroutine
In addition to VIEW LOCK and EDIT LOCK, there are two types of permanent locks. If a
PERMANENT VIEW LOCK is set, all zooms into a subroutine are denied. If a PERMANENT
EDIT LOCK is set, all attempts to edit the block are denied.
Caution
The permanent locks differ from the regular VIEW LOCK and EDIT
LOCK in that once set, they cannot be removed.
Once a PERMANENT EDIT LOCK is set, it can only be changed to a PERMANENT VIEW
LOCK. A PERMANENT VIEW LOCK cannot be changed to any other type of lock.
2-34
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
2
Section 6: Series 90-30 I/O System
The PLC I/O system provides the interface between the Series 90-30 PLC and user-supplied
devices and equipment. The PLC system I/O is called Series 90-30 I/O. Series 90-30 I/O modules
plug directly into slots in the CPU baseplate or into slots in any of the expansion baseplates for the
Series 90-30 PLC Model 331 or higher. Model 331, 340, and 341 I/O systems support up to 49
Series 90-30 I/O modules (5 racks). Model 350 to 364 I/O systems support up to 79 Series 90-30
I/O modules (8 racks). The Series 90-30 PLC Model 311 or Model 313 5-slot baseplate supports
up to 5 Series 90-30 I/O modules; the Model 323 10-slot baseplate supports up to 10 Series 90-30
I/O modules.
The I/O structure for the Series 90-30 PLC is shown in the following figure.
PLC I/O System
APPLICATION
RAM
a43072
CACHE
MEMORY
% AI
%I
% AQ
%T
%R
%G
%S
%Q
I/O
SCANNER
I/O CONFIGURATION
DATA
%M
1 BIT
16 BITS
SERIES 90-30
BACKPLANE
MODEL 30
DISCRETE
INPUT
MODULE
MODEL 30
DISCRETE
OUTPUT
MODULE
MODEL 30
ANALOG
I/O
MODULE
SERIES
90-30
GENIUS
COMMUNICATIONS
MODULE
GENIUS
BUS
SERIES
FIVE
GBC
SERIES
SIX
GBC
SERIES
90-70
GBC
GLOBAL
GENIUS
SERIES
FIVE
CPU
SERIES
SIX
CPU
SERIES
90-70
CPU
SERIES
90-30
CPU
Figure 2-7. Series 90-30 I/O Structure
Note
The drawing shown above is specific to the 90-30 I/O structure. Intelligent and
option modules are not part of the I/O scan; they use the System Communication
Window.
GFK-1411C
Chapter 2 System Operation
2-35
2
Series 90-30 I/O Modules
Series 90-30 I/O modules are available as five types, discrete input, discrete output, analog input,
analog output, and option modules. The following table lists the Series 90-30 I/O modules by
catalog number, number of I/O points, and a brief description of each module.
Note
All of the I/O modules listed below may not be available at the time this manual
is printed. For current availability, consult your local GE Fanuc PLC distributor
or GE Fanuc sales representative. Refer to the Series 90-30 I/O Module
Specifications Manual, GFK-0898, for the specifications and wiring information
of each Series 90-30 I/O module.
Figure 2-8. Series 90-30 I/O Modules
Catalog
Number
Points
Description
Pub
Number
Discrete Modules - Input
2-36
IC693MDL230
IC693MDL231
8
8
120 VAC Isolated
240 VAC Isolated
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
IC693MDL240
IC693MDL241
IC693MDL630
16
16
8
120 VAC
24 VAC/DC Positive/Negative Logic
24 VDC Positive Logic
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
IC693MDL632
IC693MDL633
IC693MDL634
IC693MDL640
IC693MDL641
IC693MDL643
IC693MDL644
IC693MDL645
8
8
8
16
16
16
16
16
125 VDC Positive/Negative Logic
24 VDC Negative Logic
24 VDC Positive/Negative Logic
24 VDC Positive Logic
24 VDC Negative Logic
24 VDC Positive Logic, FAST
24 VDC Negative Logic, FAST
24 VDC Positive/Negative Logic
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
IC693MDL646
IC693MDL652
16
32
24 VDC Positive/Negative Logic, FAST
24 VDC Position/Negative Logic
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
IC693MDL653
IC693MDL654
32
32
24 VDC Positive/Negative Logic, FAST
5/12 VDC (TTL) Positive/Negative Logic
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
IC693MDL655
IC693ACC300
32
8/16
24 VDC Positive/Negative Logic
Input Simulator
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
2
Table 2-8. Series 90-30 I/O Modules - Continued
Catalog
Number
Points
Description
Pub
Number
Discrete Modules - Output
IC693MDL310
12
120 VAC, 0.5A
GFK-0898
IC693MDL330
IC693MDL340
IC693MDL390
8
16
5
120/240 VAC, 2A
120 VAC, 0.5A
120/240 VAC Isolated, 2A
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
IC693MDL730
IC693MDL731
8
8
12/24 VDC Positive Logic, 2A
12/24 VDC Negative Logic, 2A
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
IC693MDL732
8
12/24 VDC Positive Logic, 0.5A
GFK-0898
IC693MDL733
IC693MDL734
8
6
12/24 VDC Negative Logic, 0.5A
125 VDC Positive/Negative Logic, 2A
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
IC693MDL740
IC693MDL741
IC693MDL742
IC693MDL750
IC693MDL751
IC693MDL752
IC693MDL753
IC693MDL930
IC693MDL931
IC693MDL940
IC693DVM300
16
16
16
12/24 VDC Positive Logic, 0.5A
12/24 VDC Negative Logic, 0.5A
12/24 VDC Positive Logic, 1A
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
12/24 VDC Negative Logic
12/24 VDC Positive Logic, 0.3A
5/24 VDC (TTL) Negative Logic, 0.5A
12/24 VDC Positive/Negative Logic, 0.5A
Relay, N.O., 4A Isolated
Relay, BC, Isolated
Relay, N.O., 2A
Digital Valve Driver
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
32
32
32
32
8
8
16
4 ch
Input/Output Modules
IC693MDR390
IC693MAR590
8/8
8/8
24 VDC Input, Relay Output
120 VAC Input, Relay Output
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
IC693ALG220
IC693ALG221
IC693ALG222
IC693ALG223
IC693ALG390
IC693ALG391
4 ch
4 ch
16
16
2 ch
2 ch
Analog Input, Voltage
Analog Input, Current
Analog Input, Voltage
Analog Input, Current
Analog Output, Voltage
Analog Output, Current
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
IC693ALG392
IC693ALG442
8 ch
4/2
Analog Output, Current/Voltage
Analog, Current/Voltage Combination Input/Output
GFK-0898
GFK-0898
Analog Modules
GFK-1411C
Chapter 2 System Operation
2-37
2
Table 2-8. Series 90-30 I/O Modules - Continued
Catalog Number
Description
Pub
Number
IC693APU300
IC693APU301
IC693APU301
Option Modules
High Speed Counter
Motion Mate APM Module, 1-Axis–Follower Mode
Motion Mate APM Module, 1-Axis–Standard Mode
GFK-0293
GFK-0781
GFK-0840
IC693APU302
IC693APU302
Motion Mate APM Module, 2-Axis–Follower Mode
Motion Mate APM Module, 2-Axis–Standard Mode
GFK-0781
GFK-0840
IC693DSM302
IC693DSM314
Motion Mate Digital Servo Module (DSM302)
Motion Mate Digital Servo Module (DSM314)
GFK-1464
GFK-1742
IC693TCM302/303
IC693PTM100/101
Temperature Control Modules
Power Transducer Module
GFK-1466
GFK-1734
IC693APU305
IC693CMM321
I/O Processor Module
Ethernet Communications Module
GFK-0521
GFK-1084
IC693ADC311
IC693BEM331
IC693BEM320
IC693BEM321
IC693BEM330
IC693BEM340
IC693CMM302
Alphanumeric Display Coprocessor
Genius Bus Controller
I/O Link Interface Module (slave)
I/O Link Interface Module (master)
FIP Remote I/O Scanner
FIP Bus Controller
Enhanced Genius Communications Module
GFK-0521
GFK-1034
GFK-0631
GFK-0823
GFK-1038
GFK-1037
GFK-0695
IC693PCM300
IC693PCM301
IC693PCM311
PCM, 160K Bytes (35KBytes User MegaBasic Program)
PCM, 192K Bytes (47KBytes User MegaBasic Program)
PCM, 640K Bytes (190KBytes User MegaBasic Program)
GFK-0255
GFK-0255
GFK-0255
I/O Data Formats
Discrete inputs and discrete outputs are stored as bits in bit cache (status table) memory. Analog
input and analog output data are stored as words and are memory resident in a portion of
application RAM memory allocated for that purpose.
Default Conditions for Series 90-30 Output Modules
At power-up, Series 90-30 discrete output modules default to outputs off. They will retain this
default condition until the first output scan from the PLC. Analog output modules can be
configured with a jumper located on the module’s removable terminal block to either default to
zero or retain their last state. Also, analog output modules may be powered from an external
power source so that, even though the PLC has no power, the analog output module will continue
to operate in its selected default state.
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Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
2
Diagnostic Data
Diagnostic bits are available in %S memory that will indicate the loss of an I/O module or a
mismatch in I/O configuration. Diagnostic information is not available for individual I/O points.
More information on fault handling can be in Chapter 3, “Fault Explanations and Correction.”
Global Data
Genius Global Data
The Series 90-30 PLC supports very fast sharing of data between multiple CPUs using Genius
global data. The Genius Bus Controller, IC693BEM331 in CPU firmware release 5 and later, and
the Enhanced Genius Communications Module, IC693CMM302, can broadcast up to 128 bytes of
data to other PLCs or computers. They can receive up to 128 bytes from each of the up to 30 other
Genius controllers on the network. Data can be broadcast from or received into any memory type,
not just %G global bits.
The original Genius Communications Module, IC693CMM301, is limited to fixed %G addresses
and can only exchange 32 bits per serial bus address from SBA 16 to 23. This module should not
be used as the Enhanced Genius Communications Module has over 100 times the capability.
Global data can be shared between Series Five, Series Six, and Series 90 PLCs connected to the
same Genius I/O bus.
Ethernet Global Data
Similar to Genius Global Data, Ethernet Global Data (EGD) allows one device (the producer) to
transfer data to one or more other devices (the consumers) on the network. For details on
configuring EGD using the Windows-based programmers, refer to the programmer Online Help
and to the TCP/IP Ethernet Communications for the Series 90 PLC User's Manual, GFK-1541.
The Model 364 CPU (release 9.0 and later) supports connection to an Ethernet network through
either (but not both) of two built-in Ethernet ports. AAUI and 10BaseT ports are provided. The
Model 364 (release 9.10 or later) is the only Series 90-30 CPU that supports EGD.
Local Logic Programs
Local Logic programs can be created for the DSM314 motion control module using the VersaPro
Local Logic Editor. This feature requires VersaPro 1.1 or later software and is supported by CPUs
350, 352, 360, 363 and 364 with firmware release 10.0 or later. These programs are stored to the
CPU from the programmer. In turn, the CPU automatically stores them to the DSM314 along with
the module’s configuration settings. The limit on the size of all Local Logic programs is 65280
bytes.
A Local Logic program runs synchronously with the motion program, but is independent of the
PLC’s CPU scan. This allows the DSM314 to interact quickly with motion I/O signals on its
faceplate connectors. This internal response to motion I/O signals is much faster than would be
GFK-1411C
Chapter 2 System Operation
2-39
2
possible if the logic for these signals was handled in the main ladder program running in the PLC.
This would be due to (1) the delay in communicating the signals across the backplane and (2) the
longer PLC sweep time.
For detailed information on Local Logic Programs and the DSM314, see GFK-1742, the Motion
Mate DSM314 for Series 90-30 PLCs User’s Manual. For information on configuration and
writing Local Logic Programs, refer to the VersPro online Help feature for the DSM314.
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Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
Chapter
Fault Explanation and Correction
3
This chapter is an aid to troubleshooting the Series 90-30 PLC system. It explains the fault
descriptions, which appear in the PLC fault table, and the fault categories, which appear in the
I/O fault table.
Each fault explanation in this chapter lists the fault description for the PLC fault table or the fault
category for the I/O fault table. Find the fault description or fault category corresponding to the
entry on the applicable fault table displayed on your programmer screen. Beneath it is a
description of the cause of the fault along with instructions to correct the fault.
Chapter 3 contains the following sections:
GFK-1411C
Section
Title
1
Fault Handling
2
3
Description
Page
Describes the type of faults that may occur in the
Series 90-30 and how they are displayed in the fault
tables. Descriptions of the PLC and I/O fault table
displays are also included.
3-2
PLC Fault Table
Explanations
Provides a fault description of each PLC fault and
instructions to correct the fault.
3-8
I/O Fault Table
Explanations
Describes the Loss of I/O Module and Addition of I/O
Module fault categories.
3-17
3-1
3
Section 1: Fault Handling
Faults occur in the Series 90-30 PLC system when certain failures or conditions happen which
affect the operation and performance of the system. These conditions, such as the loss of an I/O
module or rack, may affect the ability of the PLC to control a machine or process. These
conditions may also have beneficial effects, such as when a new module comes online and is now
available for use. Or, these conditions may only act as an alert, such as a low battery signal which
indicates that the battery protecting the memory needs to be changed.
Alarm Processor
The condition or failure itself is called a fault. When a fault is received and processed by the CPU,
it is called an alarm. The software in the CPU which handles these conditions is called the Alarm
Processor. The interface to the user for the Alarm Processor is through the programming software.
Any detected fault is recorded in a fault table and displayed on either the PLC fault table screen or
the I/O fault table screen, as applicable.
Classes of Faults
The Series 90-30 PLCs detect several classes of faults. These include internal failures, external
failures, and operational failures.
Fault Class
Examples
Internal Failures
Non-responding modules.
Low battery condition.
Memory checksum errors.
External I/O Failures
Loss of rack or module.
Addition of rack or module.
Operational Failures
Communication failures.
Configuration failures.
Password access failures.
3-2
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
3
System Reaction to Faults
Hardware failures require that either the system be shut down or the failure is tolerated. I/O
failures may be tolerated by the PLC system, but they may be intolerable by the application or the
process being controlled. Operational failures are normally tolerated. Series 90-30 faults have two
attributes:
Attribute
Description
Fault Table Affected
Fault Action
I/O Fault Table
PLC Fault Table
Fatal
Diagnostic
Informational
Fault Tables
Two fault tables are maintained in the PLC for logging faults, the I/O fault table for logging faults
related to the I/O system and the PLC fault table for logging all other faults. The following table
lists the fault groups, their fault actions, the fault tables affected, and the “name” for system
discrete %S points that are affected.
Table 3-1. Fault Summary
Fault Group
Fault
Table
Special Discrete Fault References
Loss of or Missing I/O Module
Diagnostic
I/O
io_flt
any_flt
io_pres
los_iom
Loss of or Missing Option Module
Diagnostic
PLC
sy_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
los_sio
System Configuration Mismatch
Fatal
PLC
sy_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
cfg_mm
PLC CPU Hardware Failure
Fatal
PLC
sy_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
hrd_cpu
Program Checksum Failure
Fatal
PLC
sy_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
pb_sum
Low Battery
Diagnostic
PLC
sy_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
low_bat
PLC Fault Table Full
Diagnostic
—
sy_full
sy_pres
apl_flt
I/O Fault Table Full
Diagnostic
—
io_full
Application Fault
Diagnostic
PLC
sy_flt
any_flt
No User Program
Informational
PLC
sy_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
no_prog
Fatal
PLC
sy_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
bad_ram
Corrupted User RAM
Password Access Failure
PLC Software Failure
PLC Store Failure
Diagnostic
PLC
sy_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
bad_pwd
Fatal
PLC
sy_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
sft_cpu
Fatal
PLC
sy_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
stor_er
Diagnostic
PLC
sy_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
ov_swp
Unknown PLC Fault
Fatal
PLC
sy_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
Unknown I/O Fault
Fatal
I/O
io_flt
any_flt
io_pres
Constant Sweep Time Exceeded
GFK-1411C
Fault Action
Chapter 3 Fault Explanation and Correction
3-3
3
Fault Action
Faults can be fatal, diagnostic or informational.
Fatal faults cause the fault to be recorded in the appropriate table, any diagnostic variables to be
set, and the system to be halted. Diagnostic faults are recorded in the appropriate table, and any
diagnostic variables are set. Informational faults are only recorded in the appropriate table.
Possible fault actions are listed in the following table.
Table 3-2. Fault Actions
Fault Action
Fatal
Response by CPU
Log fault in fault table.
Set fault references.
Go to STOP mode.
Diagnostic
Log fault in fault table.
Set fault references.
Informational
Log fault in fault table.
When a fault is detected, the CPU uses the fault action for that fault. Fault actions are not
configurable in the Series 90-30 PLC, except for the following condition.
Reboot After Fatal Fault
This feature is applicable for CPU models 350, 352, 360, 363 and 364. PLC CPU Firmware
release 10.0, or later and VersaPro 1.10 PLC software are required to use this feature. Reboot
After Fatal Fault, if enabled, allows the Series 90-30 PLC system to automatically resume normal
operation after a fatal fault has occurred. This feature is useful in applications where the PLC
experiences a nuisance fault, such as due to noise from an electrical storm, and no support person
is on-site to restart the PLC. However, there may be applications where it is not safe to use this
feature, as noted in the warning below.
Warning
The Reboot After Fatal Fault feature should not be used (should be set to
Disabled) in applications where a restart under fault conditions could
produce an unsafe condition in the controlled equipment. It is the
responsibility of the system designers to determine whether this feature can
be used safely with their equipment. Failure to follow this warning could
result in injury or death to personnel and/or damage to equipment.
Following the fatal fault, the PLC will automatically reset and resume execution. If fatal faults are
present following the power up, the PLC will still be allowed to transition to Run mode. This
feature is enabled by the Ignore Fatal Faults (or Fatal Fault Override) parameter in the CPU’s
hardware configuration. The maximum number of retries and the time period in which these
retries can occur is set through Service Request #48: Auto Reset. Three parameters must be
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Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
3
configured to enable automatic reset; Unlimited Retries, Number of Retries Allowed and Retry
Period (in minutes).
Service Request #49: Auto Reset Statistics, can then be used to determine the number of fatal
faults and retries that have occurred. There are three parameters associated with this Service
Request: Command (set to 0 = Return total number of Fatal Faults and Number of Retries that
have occurred; set to 1 = Initialize the Total Number of Fatal Faults and Total Number of Retries
to 0), Returned Value = Total Number of Fatal Faults that have occurred, and Returned Value =
Total Number of Auto Reset Retries.
The configuration for this feature can be set to require the operator to cycle power rather than
providing for automatic recovery. In this mode, fatal faults will be ignored at power up. A system
status bit, %S21 indicates to the user’s application program that a fatal fault exists. This status bit
is set to 1 whenever retry is successful and remains set until all faults are cleared or the mode is
set to STOP/FAULT.
For information on configuration of this feature, refer to the VersaPro online Help.
Fault References
Fault references in the Series 90-30 are of one type, fault summary references. Fault summary
references are set to indicate what fault occurred. The fault reference remains on until the PLC is
cleared or until cleared by the application program.
An example of a fault bit being set and then clearing the bit is shown in the following example. In
this example, the coil light_01 is turned on when an oversweep condition occurs; the light and the
OV_SWP contact remain on until the %I0359 contact is closed.
| ov_swp
light_01
|——] [————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————( )—
|
|%I0359
ov_swp
|——] [————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————(R)—
|
Fault Reference Definitions
The alarm processor maintains the states of the 128 system discrete bits in %S memory. These
fault references can be used to indicate where a fault has occurred and what type of fault it is.
Fault references are assigned to %S, %SA, %SB, and %SC memory, and they each have a
nickname. These references are available for use in the application program as required. Refer to
Chapter 2, “System Operation,” for a list of the system status references.
GFK-1411C
Chapter 3 Fault Explanation and Correction
3-5
3
Additional Fault Effects
Two faults described previously have additional effects associated with them. These are described
in the following table.
Side Effect
Description
PLC CPU Software Failure
When a PLC CPU software failure is logged, the Series 90-30CPU
immediately transitions into a special ERROR SWEEP mode. No
activity is permitted in this mode. The only method of clearing this
condition is to reset the PLC by cycling power.
PLC Sequence Store Failure
During a sequence store (a store of program blocks and other data
preceded with the special Start-of-Sequence command and ending with
the End-of-Sequence command), if communications with the
programming device performing the store is interrupted or any other
failure occurs which terminates the download, the PLC Sequence Store
Failure fault is logged. As long as this fault is present in the system,
the PLC will not transition to RUN mode.
PLC Fault Table Display
The PLC Fault Table screen displays PLC faults such as password violations, PLC/configuration
mismatches, parity errors, and communications errors.
The programming software may be in any operating mode. If the programming software is in
OFFLINE mode, no faults are displayed. In ONLINE or MONITOR mode, PLC fault data is
displayed. In ONLINE mode, faults can be cleared (this may be password protected).
Once cleared, faults that are still present are not logged again in the table (except for the “Low
Battery” fault).
I/O Fault Table Display
The I/O Fault Table screen displays I/O faults such as circuit faults, address conflicts, forced
circuits, and I/O bus faults.
The programming software may be in any operating mode. If the programming software is in
OFFLINE mode, no faults are displayed. In ONLINE or MONITOR mode, I/O fault data is
displayed. In ONLINE mode, faults can be cleared (this feature may be password protected).
Once cleared, faults that are still present are not logged again in the table.
3-6
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
3
Accessing Additional Fault Information
The fault tables contain basic information regarding the fault. Additional information pertaining
to each fault can be displayed through the programming software. In addition, the programming
software can provide a hexadecimal dump of the fault.
The last entry, Correction, for each fault explanation in this chapter lists the action(s) to be taken
to correct the fault. Note that the corrective action for some of the faults includes the statement:
Display the PLC Fault Table on the Programmer. Contact GE Fanuc Field
Service, giving them all the information contained in the fault
entry.
This second statement means that you must tell Field Service both the information readable
directly from the fault table and the hexadecimal information. Field Service personnel will then
give you further instructions for the appropriate action to be taken.
GFK-1411C
Chapter 3 Fault Explanation and Correction
3-7
3
Section 2: PLC Fault Table Explanations
Each fault explanation contains a fault description and instructions to correct the fault. Many fault
descriptions have multiple causes. In these cases, the error code, displayed with the additional
fault information, is used to distinguish different fault conditions sharing the same fault
description. The error code is the first two hexadecimal digits in the fifth group of numbers, as
shown in the following example.
01
000000
01030100
0902
0200
000000000000
|
|_____ Error Code (first two hex
digits in fifth group)
Some faults can occur because random access memory on the PLC CPU board has failed. These
same faults may also occur because the system has been powered off and the battery voltage is (or
was) too low to maintain memory. To avoid excessive duplication of instructions when corrupted
memory may be a cause of the error, the correction simply states:
Perform the corrections for Corrupted Memory.
This means:
1.
If the system has been powered off, replace the battery. Battery voltage may be insufficient to
maintain memory contents.
2.
Replace the PLC CPU board. The integrated circuits on the PLC CPU board may be failing.
The following table enables you to quickly find a particular PLC fault explanation in this section.
Each entry is listed as it appears on the programmer screen.
Fault Description
3-8
Page
Loss of, or Missing, Option Module
Reset of, Addition of, or Extra, Option Module
3-9
3-9
System Configuration Mismatch
Option Module Software Failure
Program Block Checksum Failure
3-10
3-11
3-11
Low Battery Signal
Constant Sweep Time Exceeded
Application Fault
3-11
3-12
3-12
No User Program Present
Corrupted User Program on Power-Up
3-12
3-13
Password Access Failure
PLC CPU System Software Failure
3-13
3-14
Communications Failure During Store
3-16
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
3
Fault Actions
Fatal faults cause the PLC to enter a form of STOP mode at the end of the sweep in which the
error occurred. Diagnostic faults are logged and corresponding fault contacts are set.
Informational faults are simply logged in the PLC fault table.
Loss of, or Missing, Option Module
The Fault Group Loss of, or Missing Option Module occurs when a PCM, CMM, or ADC fails
to respond. The failure may occur at power-up if the module is missing or during operation if the
module fails to respond. The fault action for this group is Diagnostic.
Error Code:
1, 42
Name:
Option Module Soft Reset Failed
Description:
PLC CPU unable to re-establish communications with option module after soft
reset.
Correction:
(1)
Try soft reset a second time.
(2)
Replace the option module.
(3)
Power off the system. Verify that the PCM is seated properly in the
rack and that all cables are properly connected and seated.
(4)
Replace the cables.
Error Code:
All Others
Name:
Module Failure During Configuration
Description:
The PLC operating software generates this error when a module fails
during power-up or configuration store.
Correction:
(1)
Power off the system. Replace the module located in that rack and
slot.
Reset of, Addition of, or Extra, Option Module
The Fault Group Reset of, Addition of, or Extra Option Module occurs when an option module
(PCM, ADC, etc.) comes online, is reset, or a module is found in the rack, but none is specified in
the configuration. The fault action for this group is Diagnostic. Three bytes of fault specific data
provide additional information regarding the fault.
Correction:
GFK-1411C
(1)
Update the configuration file to include the module.
(2)
Remove the module from the system.
Chapter 3 Fault Explanation and Correction
3-9
3
System Configuration Mismatch
The Fault Group Configuration Mismatch occurs when the module occupying a slot is different
from that specified in the configuration file. The fault action is Fatal.
3-10
Error Code:
1
Name:
System Configuration Mismatch
Description:
The PLC operating software generates this fault when the module occupying a
slot is not of the same type that the configuration file indicates should be in that
slot, or when the configured rack type does not match the actual rack present.
Correction:
Identify the mismatch and reconfigure the module or rack.
Error Code:
6
Name:
System Configuration Mismatch
Description:
This is the same as error code 1 in that this fault occurs when the module
occupying a slot is not of the same type that the configuration file indicates
should be in that slot, or when the configured rack type does not match the
actual rack present.
Correction:
Identify the mismatch and reconfigure the module or rack.
Error Code:
18
Name:
Unsupported Hardware
Description:
A PCM or PCM-type module is present in a 311, 313, or 323, or in an
expansion rack.
Correction:
Physically correct the situation by removing the PCM or PCM-type module or
install a CPU that does support the PCM.
Error Code:
26
Name:
Module busy–config not yet accept by module
Description:
The module cannot accept new configuration at this time because it is
busy with a different process.
Correction:
Allow the module to complete the current operation and re-store the
configuration.
Error Code:
51
Name:
END Function Executed from SFC Action
Description:
The placement of an END function in SFC logic or in logic called by SFC will
produce this fault.
Correction:
Remove the END function from the SFC logic or logic being called by the SFC
logic.
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
3
Option Module Software Failure
The Fault Group Option Module Software Failure occurs when a non-recoverable software
failure occurs on a PCM or ADC module. The fault action for this group is Fatal.
Error Code:
All
Name:
CommReq Frequency Too High
Description:
CommReqs are being sent to a module faster than it can process them.
Correction:
Change the PLC program to send CommReqs to the affected module
at a slower rate.
Program Block Checksum Failure
The Fault Group Program Block Checksum Failure occurs when the PLC CPU detects error
conditions in program blocks received by the PLC. It also occurs when the PLC CPU detects
checksum errors during power-up verification of memory or during RUN mode background
checking. The fault action for this group is Fatal.
Error Code:
All
Name:
Program Block Checksum Failure
Description:
The PLC Operating Software generates this error when a program block is
corrupted.
Correction:
(1)
Clear PLC memory and retry the store.
(2)
Display the PLC fault table on the programmer. Contact GE Fanuc
PLC Field Service, giving them all the information contained in the
fault entry.
Low Battery Signal
The Fault Group Low Battery Signal occurs when the PLC CPU detects a low battery on the PLC
power supply or a module, such as the PCM, reports a low battery condition. The fault action for
this group is Diagnostic.
GFK-1411C
Error Code:
0
Name:
Failed Battery Signal
Description:
The CPU module (or other module having a battery) battery is dead.
Correction:
Replace the battery. Do not remove power from the rack.
Error Code:
1
Name:
Low Battery Signal
Description:
A battery on the CPU, or other module has a low signal.
Correction:
Replace the battery. Do not remove power from the rack.
Chapter 3 Fault Explanation and Correction
3-11
3
Constant Sweep Time Exceeded
The Fault Group Constant Sweep Time Exceeded occurs when the PLC CPU operates in
CONSTANT SWEEP mode, and it detects that the sweep has exceeded the constant sweep timer.
The fault extra data contains the actual time of the sweep in the first two bytes and the name of
the program in the next eight bytes. The fault action for this group is Diagnostic.
Correction:
(1)
Increase constant sweep time.
(2)
Remove logic from application program.
Application Fault
The Fault Group Application Fault occurs when the PLC CPU detects a fault in the user
program. The fault action for this group is Diagnostic, except when the error is a Subroutine Call
Stack Exceeded, in which case it is Fatal.
Error Code:
7
Name:
Subroutine Call Stack Exceeded
Description:
Subroutine calls are limited to a depth of 8. A subroutine can call another
subroutine which, in turn, can call another subroutine until 8 call levels
are attained.
Correction:
Modify program so that subroutine call depth does not exceed 8.
Error Code:
Name:
Description:
1B
CommReq Not Processed Due To PLC Memory Limitations
No-wait communication requests can be placed in the queue faster than they can
be processed (for example, one per sweep). In a situation like this, when the
communication requests build up to the point that the PLC has less than a
minimum amount of memory available, the communication request will be
faulted and not processed
Issue fewer communication requests or otherwise reduce the amount of mail
being exchanged within the system.
Correction:
Error Code:
Name:
Description:
Correction:
5A
User Shut Down Requested
The PLC operating software (function blocks) generates this informational alarm
when Service Request #13 (User Shut Down) executes in the application
program.
None required. Information-only alarm.
No User Program Present
The Fault Group No User Program Present occurs when the PLC CPU is instructed to transition
from STOP to RUN mode or a store to the PLC and no user program exists in the PLC. The
PLC CPU detects the absence of a user program on power-up. The fault action for this group is
Informational.
3-12
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
3
Correction:
Download an application program before attempting to go to RUN mode.
Corrupted User Program on Power-Up
The Fault Group Corrupted User Program on Power-Up occurs when the PLC CPU detects
corrupted user RAM. The PLC CPU will remain in STOP mode until a valid user program and
configuration file are downloaded. The fault action for this group is Fatal.
Error Code:
1
Name:
Corrupted User RAM on Power-Up
Description:
The PLC operating software (operating software) generates this error when it
detects corrupted user RAM on power-up.
Correction:
(1)
Reload the configuration file, user program, and references (if any).
(2)
Replace the battery on the PLC CPU.
(3)
Replace the expansion memory board on the PLC CPU.
(4)
Replace the PLC CPU.
Error Code:
2
Name:
Illegal Boolean OpCode Detected
Description:
The PLC operating software (operating software) generates this error when it
detects a bad instruction in the user program.
Correction:
(1)
Restore the user program and references (if any).
(2)
Replace the expansion memory board on the PLC CPU.
(3)
Replace the PLC CPU.
Password Access Failure
The Fault Group Password Access Failure occurs when the PLC CPU receives a request to
change to a new privilege level and the password included with the request is not valid for that
level. The fault action for this group is Informational.
Correction:
GFK-1411C
Retry the request with the correct password.
Chapter 3 Fault Explanation and Correction
3-13
3
PLC CPU System Software Failure
The operating software of the Series 90-30 CPU generates Faults in the Fault Group PLC CPU
System Software Failure. They occur at many different points of system operation. When a Fatal
fault occurs, the PLC CPU immediately transitions into a special ERROR SWEEP mode. No activity is
permitted when the PLC is in this mode. The only way to clear this condition is to cycle power on the
PLC. The fault action for this group is Fatal.
Error Code:
Name:
Description:
Correction:
Error Code:
Name:
Description:
Correction:
Error Code:
Name:
Description:
Correction:
Error Code:
Name:
Description:
Correction:
Error Code:
Name:
Description:
Correction:
3-14
1 through B
User Memory Could Not Be Allocated
The PLC operating software (memory manager) generates these errors when
software requests the memory manager to allocate or de-allocate a block or
blocks of memory from user RAM that are not legal. These errors should not
occur in a production system.
Display the PLC fault table on the programmer. Contact GE Fanuc PLC Field
Service, giving them all the information contained in the fault entry.
D
System Memory Unavailable
The PLC operating software (I/O Scanner) generates this error when its request
for a block of system memory is denied by the memory manager because no
memory is available from the system memory heap. It is Informational if the
error occurs during the execution of a DO I/O function block. It is Fatal if it
occurs during power-up initialization or autoconfiguration.
Display the PLC fault table on the programmer. Contact GE Fanuc PLC Field
Service, giving them all the information contained in the fault entry.
E
System Memory Could Not Be Freed
The PLC operating software (I/O Scanner) generates this error when it requests
the memory manager to de-allocate a block of system memory
and the de-allocation fails. This error can only occur during the execution
of a DO I/O function block.
(1) Display the PLC fault table on the programmer. Contact GE Fanuc
PLC Field Service, giving them all the information contained in the
fault entry.
(2) Perform the corrections for corrupted memory.
10
Invalid Scan Request of the I/O Scanner
The PLC operating software (I/O Scanner) generates this error when the
operating system or DO I/O function block scan requests neither a full nor a
partial scan of the I/O. This should not occur in a production system.
Display the PLC fault table on the programmer. Contact GE Fanuc PLC Field
Service, giving them all the information contained in the fault entry.
13
PLC Operating Software Error
The PLC operating software generates this error when certain PLC
operating software problems occur. This error should not occur in a
production system.
(1) Display the PLC fault table on the programmer. Contact GE Fanuc
PLC Field Service, giving them all the information contained in the
fault entry.
(2) Perform the corrections for corrupted memory.
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
3
Error Code:
Name:
Description:
Correction:
Error Code:
Name:
Description:
Correction:
Error Code:
Name:
Description:
Correction:
Error Code:
Name:
Description:
Correction:
Error Code:
Name:
Description:
Correction:
Error Code:
Name:
Description:
Correction:
GFK-1411C
14, 27
Corrupted PLC Program Memory
The PLC operating software generates these errors when certain PLC
operating software problems occur. These should not occur in a
production system.
(1) Display the PLC fault table on the programmer. Contact GE Fanuc
PLC Field Service, giving them all the information contained in the
fault entry.
(2) Perform the corrections for corrupted memory.
27 through 4E
PLC Operating Software Error
The PLC operating software generates these errors when certain PLC
operating software problems occur. These errors should not occur in a
production system.
Display the PLC fault table on the programmer. Contact GE Fanuc PLC Field
Service, giving them all the information contained in the fault entry.
4F
Communications Failed
The PLC operating software (service request processor) generates this
error when it attempts to comply with a request that requires backplane
communications and receives a rejected response.
(1) Check the bus for abnormal activity.
(2) Replace the intelligent option module to which the request was
directed.
50, 51, 53
System Memory Errors
The PLC operating software generates these errors when its request for a block
of system memory is denied by the memory manager because no memory is
available or contains errors.
(1) Display the PLC fault table on the programmer. Contact GE Fanuc
PLC Field Service, giving them all the information contained in the
fault entry.
(2) Perform the corrections for corrupted memory.
52
Backplane Communications Failed
The PLC operating software (service request processor) generates this
error when it attempts to comply with a request that requires backplane
communications and receives a rejected mail response.
(1) Check the bus for abnormal activity.
(2) Replace the intelligent option module to which the request was
directed.
(3) Check parallel programmer cable for proper attachment.
All Others
PLC CPU Internal System Error
An internal system error has occurred that should not occur in a
production system.
Display the PLC fault table on the programmer. Contact GE Fanuc PLC Field
Service, giving them all the information contained in the fault entry.
Chapter 3 Fault Explanation and Correction
3-15
3
Communications Failure During Store
The Fault Group Communications Failure During Store occurs during the store of program
blocks and other data to the PLC. The stream of commands and data for storing program blocks
and data starts with a special start-of-sequence command and terminates with an end-of-sequence
command. If communications with the programming device performing the store is interrupted or
any other failure occurs which terminates the load, this fault is logged. As long as this fault is
present in the system, the controller will not transition to RUN mode.
This fault is not automatically cleared on power-up; the user must specifically order the condition
to be cleared. The fault action for this group is Fatal.
Correction:
3-16
Clear the fault and retry the download of the program or configuration file.
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
3
Section 3: I/O Fault Table Explanations
The I/O fault table reports data about faults in three classifications:
•
Fault category.
•
Fault type.
•
Fault description.
The faults described on the following page have a fault category, but do not have a fault type or
fault group.
Each fault explanation contains a fault description and instructions to correct the fault. Many fault
descriptions have multiple causes. The Fault Category is the first two hexadecimal digits in the
fifth group of numbers, as shown in the following example.
02
1F0100
00030101FF7F
0302
0200
84000000000003
|
|_____ Fault Category (first two hex
digits in fifth group)
The following table enables you to quickly find a particular I/O fault explanation in this section.
Each entry is listed as it appears on the programmer screen.
Loss of I/O Module
The Fault Category Loss of I/O Module applies to Series 90-30 discrete and analog I/O modules.
There are no fault types or fault descriptions associated with this category. The fault action is
Diagnostic.
GFK-1411C
Description:
The PLC operating software generates this error when it detects that a Model 30
I/O module is no longer responding to commands from the
PLC CPU, or when the configuration file indicates an I/O module is to
occupy a slot and no module exists in the slot.
Correction:
(1)
Replace the module.
(2)
Correct the configuration file.
(3)
Display the PLC fault table on the programmer. Contact GE Fanuc
PLC Field Service, giving them all the information contained in the
fault entry.
Chapter 3 Fault Explanation and Correction
3-17
3
Addition of I/O Module
The Fault Category Addition of I/O Module applies to Series 90-30 discrete and analog I/O
modules. There are no fault types or fault descriptions associated with this category. The fault
action is Diagnostic.
3-18
Description:
The PLC operating software generates this error when an I/O module, which had
been, faulted returns to operation.
Correction:
(1)
No action necessary if the module was removed or replaced,
or the remote rack was power cycled.
(2)
Update the configuration file or remove the module.
Description:
The PLC operating software generates this error when it detects a Series 90-30
I/O module in a slot that the configuration file indicates should be empty.
Correction:
(1)
Remove the module. (It may be in the wrong slot.)
(2)
Update and restore the configuration file to include the extra
module.
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
Appendix Instruction Timing
A
The Series 90-30 PLCs support many different functions and function blocks. This appendix
contains tables showing the memory size in bytes and the execution time in microseconds for each
function. Memory size is the number of bytes required by the function in a ladder diagram
application program.
Two execution times are shown for each function:
Execution Time
Description
Enabled
Time required to execute the function or function block when power flows
into and out of the function. Typically, best-case times are when the data
used by the block is contained in user RAM (word-oriented memory) and not
in the ISCP cache memory (discrete memory).
Disabled
Time required to execute the function when power flows into the function or
function block; however, it is in an inactive state, as when a timer is held in
the reset state.
Note
Timers and counters are updated each time they are encountered in the logic,
timers by the amount of time consumed by the last sweep and counters by one
count.
Note
For the 350, 351, 352, and 36x PLC CPUs, times are identical except for the
MOVE instruction, which is different for the 350 CPU—refer to the note at the
bottom of the table on page A-6.
GFK-1411C
A-1
A
Instruction Timing Tables
Table A-1. Instruction Timing, Standard Models
Function
Group
Timers
Counters
Math
Enabled
Function
Disabled
Increment
313
331
340/41
311
313
331
340/41
311
313
331
340/41
Size
On-D elay Timer
146
81
80
42
105
39
38
21
–
–
–
–
15
Off-D elay Timer
Timer
Up Counter
Down Counter
98
122
137
136
47
76
70
70
44
75
69
69
23
40
36
37
116
103
130
127
63
54
63
61
58
53
62
61
32
30
33
31
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
9
15
11
11
Addition (INT)
76
47
46
24
41
0
1
0
–
–
–
–
13
Addition (DINT)
90
60
60
34
41
1
0
0
–
–
–
–
13
Subtraction (INT)
75
46
45
25
41
0
1
0
–
–
–
–
13
Subtraction (DINT)
92
62
62
34
41
1
0
0
–
–
–
–
13
Multiplication (INT)
79
49
50
28
41
0
1
0
–
–
–
–
13
108
80
101
43
41
1
0
0
–
–
–
–
13
Multiplication (DINT)
Division (INT)
79
51
50
27
41
0
1
0
–
–
–
–
13
Division (DINT)
375
346
348
175
41
1
0
0
–
–
–
–
13
Modulo Division (INT)
Relational
311
78
51
49
27
41
0
1
0
–
–
–
–
13
Modulo Div (DINT)
134
103
107
54
41
1
0
0
–
–
–
–
13
Square Root (INT)
153
124
123
65
42
0
1
0
–
–
–
–
9
Square Root (DINT)
268
239
241
120
42
0
0
1
–
–
–
–
9
Equal (INT)
66
35
36
19
41
1
1
0
–
–
–
–
9
Equal (DINT)
86
56
54
29
41
1
0
0
–
–
–
–
9
Not Equal (INT)
67
39
35
22
41
1
1
0
–
–
–
–
9
Not Equal (DINT)
81
51
51
28
41
1
0
0
–
–
–
–
9
Greater Than (INT)
64
33
35
20
41
1
1
0
–
–
–
–
9
Greater Than (DINT)
89
59
58
32
41
1
0
0
–
–
–
–
9
Greater Than/Eq (INT)
64
36
34
19
41
1
1
0
–
–
–
–
9
Greater Than/Eq (DINT)
87
58
57
30
41
1
0
0
–
–
–
–
9
Less Than (INT)
66
35
19
41
1
1
0
–
–
–
–
9
Less Than (DINT)
87
57
30
41
1
1
0
–
–
–
–
9
Less Than/Equal (INT)
66
36
34
21
41
1
1
0
–
–
–
–
9
Less Than/Equal (DINT)
Range (INT)
86
92
57
58
56
31
29
41
46
1
1
1
0
0
1
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
9
15
Range(DINT)
106
75
37
45
0
0
0
–
–
–
–
15
93
60
29
0
0
0
0
–
–
–
–
15
Range(WORD)
54
57
54
Notes: 1. Time (in microseconds) is based on Release 5.01 of Logicmaster 90-30/20 software for Models 31 1, 313, 340, and 341 CPUs (Release 7 for the 331).
2. For table functions, increment is in units of length specified.; for bit operation functions, microseconds/bit.; for data move functions, microseconds/number
of bits or words.
3. Enabled time for single length units of type %R, %AI, and %AQ.
4. COMMREQ time has been measured between CPU and HSC.
5. DOIO is the time to output values to discrete output module.
6. Where there is more than one possible case, the time indicated above represents the worst possible case.
A-2
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
A
Table A-1. Instruction Timing, Standard Models-Continued
Function
Enabled
Group
Function
Disabled
Increment
311
313
331
340/41
311
313
331
340/41
311
313
331
340/41
Size
13
Bit
Logical AND
67
37
37
22
42
0
0
1
–
–
–
–
Operation
Logical OR
68
38
38
21
42
0
0
1
–
–
–
–
13
Logical Exclusive OR
66
38
37
20
42
0
1
1
–
–
–
–
13
Logical Invert, NOT
Data Move
Table
62
32
31
17
42
0
1
1
–
–
–
–
9
Shift Bit Left
139
89
90
47
74
26
23
13
11.61
11.61
12.04
6.29
15
Shift Bit Right
135
87
85
45
75
26
24
13
11.63
11.62
12.02
6.33
15
Rotate Bit Left
156
127
126
65
42
1
1
0
11.70
11.78
12.17
6.33
15
Rotate Bit Right
146
116
116
62
42
1
1
0
11.74
11.74
12.13
6.27
15
Bit Position
102
72
49
38
42
1
0
0
–
–
–
–
13
Bit Clear
68
38
35
21
42
1
1
1
–
–
–
–
13
Bit Test
79
49
51
28
41
0
0
1
–
–
–
–
13
Bit Set
Masked Compare (WORD)
67
217
37
154
37
42
107
0
44
0
39
0
21
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
13
25
Masked Compare (DWORD)
232
169
141
156
20
74
83
108
44
39
22
–
–
–
–
25
Move (INT)
68
37
39
20
43
0
0
0
1.62
1.62
5.25
1.31
13
Move (BIT)
94
62
64
35
42
0
0
0
12.61
12.64
12.59
6.33
13
1.31
13
–
27
–
27
Move (WORD)
67
37
40
20
41
0
0
0
1.62
1.63
5.25
Block Move (INT)
76
48
50
28
59
30
30
16
–
–
–
Block Move (WORD)
76
48
49
29
59
29
28
15
–
–
–
Block Clear
56
28
27
14
43
0
0
0
1.35
1.29
1.40
0.78
9
Shift Register (BIT)
201
153
153
79
85
36
34
18
0.69
0.68
0.71
0.37
15
Shift Register (WORD)
103
53
52
29
73
25
23
12
1.62
1.62
2.03
1.31
15
Bit Sequencer
165
101
99
53
96
31
29
16
0.07
0.07
0.08
0.05
15
COMM_REQ
Array Move
1317
1272 1489
884
41
2
0
0
–
–
–
–
INT
230
201
177
104
72
41
40
20
1.29
1.15
10.56
2.06
21
DINT
231
202
181
105
74
44
42
23
3.24
3.24
10.53
2.61
21
BIT
290
261
229
135
74
43
42
23
-0.01
0.79
21
BYTE
228
198
176
104
74
42
42
23
0.81
0.82
8.51
1.25
21
WORD
230
201
177
104
72
41
40
20
1.29
1.15
10.56
2.06
21
INT
197
158
123
82
78
39
37
20
1.93
1.97
2.55
1.55
19
DINT
206
166
135
87
79
38
36
21
4.33
4.34
4.55
2.44
19
BYTE
179
141
117
74
78
38
36
21
1.53
1.49
1.83
1.03
19
WORD
197
158
123
82
78
39
37
20
1.93
1.97
2.55
1.55
19
–.03
–.03
13
Search Equal
Notes: 1. Time (in microseconds) is based on Release 5.01 of Logicmaster 90-30/20 software for Models 311, 313, 340, and 341 CPUs (Release 7 for the 331).
2. For table functions, increment is in units of length specified.; for bit operation functions, microseconds/bit.; for data move functions, microseconds/number
of bits or words.
3. Enabled time for single length units of type %R, %AI, and %AQ.
4. COMMREQ time has been measured between CPU and HSC.
5. DOIO is the time to output values to discrete output module.
6. Where there is more than one possible case, the time indicated above represents the worst possible case.
7. For instructions that have an increment value, multiply the increment by (Length –1) and add that value to the base time.
GFK-1411C
Appendix A Instruction Timing
A-3
A
Table A-1. Instruction Timing, Standard Models-Continued
Function
Enabled
Group
Function
Disabled
Increment
Size
311
313
331
340/41
311
313
331
340/41
311
313
331
340/41
INT
198
159
124
83
79
39
36
21
1.93
1.93
2.48
1.52
19
DINT
201
163
132
84
79
37
35
21
6.49
6.47
6.88
3.82
19
BYTE
179
141
117
73
79
38
36
19
1.54
1.51
1.85
1.05
19
WORD
198
159
124
83
79
39
36
21
1.93
1.93
2.48
1.52
19
INT
198
160
125
82
79
37
38
19
3.83
3.83
4.41
2.59
19
DINT
206
167
135
88
78
38
36
20
8.61
8.61
9.03
4.88
19
BYTE
181
143
118
73
79
37
36
19
3.44
3.44
3.75
2.03
WORD
198
160
125
82
79
37
38
19
3.83
3.83
4.41
2.59
19
INT
197
160
124
83
77
38
36
20
3.86
3.83
4.45
2.52
19
DINT
205
167
136
87
80
39
36
21
8.62
8.61
9.02
4.87
19
BYTE
180
142
118
75
79
37
37
20
3.47
3.44
3.73
2.00
19
WORD
197
160
124
83
77
38
36
20
3.86
3.83
4.45
2.52
19
INT
199
159
124
84
78
38
36
20
3.83
3.86
4.48
2.48
19
DINT
206
168
135
87
79
38
38
19
8.62
8.60
-1.36
4.88
19
BYTE
181
143
119
75
80
38
37
20
3.44
3.44
3.75
2.00
19
WORD
199
159
124
84
78
38
36
20
3.83
3.86
4.45
2.48
19
INT
200
158
124
82
79
38
37
21
3.79
3.90
4.45
2.55
19
DINT
207
167
137
88
78
39
37
19
8.60
8.61
9.01
4.86
19
BYTE
180
143
119
74
78
40
37
19
3.46
3.44
3.73
2.02
19
WORD
200
158
124
82
79
38
37
21
3.79
3.90
4.45
2.55
19
Search Not Equal
Search Greater Than
19
Search Greater Than/Eq
Search Less Than
Search Less Than/Equal
Conversion
Convert to INT
74
46
39
25
42
1
1
1
–
–
–
–
9
Convert to BCD–4
77
50
34
25
42
1
1
1
–
–
–
–
9
Notes: 1. Time (in microseconds) is based on Release 5.01 of Logicmaster 90-30/20 software for Models 311, 313, 340, and 341 CPUs (Release 7 for the 331).
2. For table functions, increment is in units of length specified.; for bit operation functions, microseconds/bit.; for data move functions, microseconds/number
of bits or words.
3. Enabled time for single length units of type %R, %AI, and %AQ.
4. COMMREQ time has been measured between CPU and HSC.
5. DOIO is the time to output values to discrete output module.
6. Where there is more than one possible case, the time indicated above represents the worst possible case.
7. For instructions that have an increment value, multiply the increment by (Length –1) and add that value to the base time.
A-4
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
A
Table A-1. Instruction Timing, Standard Models-Continued
Function
Enabled
Group
Control
Function
311
313
331
Disabled
340/41
311
313
331
Increment
340/41
311
313
331
340/41
Size
Call a Subroutine
155
93
192
85
41
0
0
0
–
–
–
–
7
Do I/O
309
278
323
177
38
1
0
0
–
–
–
–
12
PID – ISA Algorithm
1870
1827
1812
929
91
56
82
30
–
–
–
–
15
PID – IND Algorithm
2047
2007
2002
1017
91
56
82
30
–
–
–
–
15
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
#6
93
54
63
45
41
2
0
0
–
–
–
–
9
# 7 (Read)
–
37
309
161
–
2
0
0
–
–
–
–
9
End Instruction
Service Request
# 7 (Set)
–
37
309
161
–
2
0
0
–
–
–
–
9
#14
447
418
483
244
41
2
0
0
–
–
–
–
9
#15
281
243
165
139
41
2
0
0
–
–
–
–
9
#16
131
104
115
69
41
2
0
0
–
–
–
–
9
#18
–
56
300
180
–
2
0
0
–
–
–
–
9
#23
1689
1663
1591
939
43
1
0
0
–
–
–
–
9
#26//30*
1268
1354
6680
3538
42
0
0
0
–
–
–
–
9
–
–
55
41
–
–
1
0
–
–
–
–
9
135
73
68
39
75
25
21
12
–
–
–
–
8
#29
Nested
MCR/ENDMCR
Combined
*Service request #26/30 was measured using a high speed counter, 16-point output, in a 5-slot rack.
Notes: 1. Time (in microseconds) is based on Release 5.01 of Logicmaster 90-30/20 software for Models 311, 313, 340, and 341 CPUs (Release 7 for the 331).
2. For table functions, increment is in units of length specified.; for bit operation functions, microseconds/bit.; for data move functions, microseconds/number
of bits or words.
3. Enabled time for single length units of type %R, %AI, and %AQ.
4. COMMREQ time has been measured between CPU and HSC.
5. DOIO is the time to output values to discrete output module.
6. Where there is more than one possible case, the time indicated above represents the worst possible case.
7. For instructions that have an increment value, multiply the increment by (Length –1) and add that value to the base time.
GFK-1411C
Appendix A Instruction Timing
A-5
A
Table A-2. Instruction Timing, High Performance Models
Function
Group
Function
Timers
Counters
Trigonometric
Logarithmic
Exponential
Radian Conversion
Disabled
Increment
350/351/36x
350/351/36x
350/351/36x
352
–
–
–
3
On-Delay Timer
Timer
4
6
3
Off-Delay Timer
3
Down Counter
3
3
3
3
3
Up Counter
Math
Enabled
1
Enabled Disabled
352
352
Size
4
5
2
–
–
15
15
–
15
–
13
–
13
–
1
2
2
2
2
–
Increment
2
Addition (INT)
2
0
–
1
0
–
13
Addition (DINT)
2
0
–
2
0
–
19
Addition (REAL)
52
0
–
33
0
–
17
Subtraction (INT)
2
0
–
1
0
–
13
Subtraction (DINT)
2
0
–
2
0
–
19
Subtraction (REAL)
53
0
–
34
0
–
17
Multiplication (INT)
21
0
–
21
0
–
13
Multiplication (DINT)
24
0
–
24
0
–
19
Multiplication (REAL)
68
1
–
38
1
–
17
Division (INT)
22
0
–
22
0
–
13
Division (DINT),
25
0
–
25
0
–
19
Division (REAL)
82
2
–
36
2
–
17
Modulo Division (INT)
21
0
–
21
0
–
13
Modulo Div (DINT)
25
0
–
25
0
–
19
Square Root (INT)
42
1
–
41
1
–
10
Square Root (DINT)
70
0
–
70
0
–
13
Square Root (REAL)
137
0
–
35
0
–
11
SIN (REAL)
360
0
–
32
0
–
11
COS (REAL)
319
0
–
29
0
–
11
TAN (REAL)
510
1
–
32
1
–
11
ASIN (REAL)
440
0
–
45
0
–
11
ACOS (REAL)
683
0
–
63
0
–
11
ATAN (REAL)
264
1
–
33
1
–
11
LOG (REAL)
469
0
–
32
0
–
11
LN (REAL)
437
0
–
32
0
–
11
EXP
639
0
–
42
0
–
11
EXPT
89
1
–
54
1
–
17
–
32
1
–
32
0
Convert RAD to DEG
65
1
Convert DEG to RAD
59
0
11
11
Notes: 1. Time (in microseconds) is based on Release 7 of Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro software for Model 351 and 352 CPUs.
2. For table functions, increment is in units of length specified.; for bit operation functions, microseconds/bit.; for data move
functions, microseconds/number of bits or words.
3. Enabled time for single length units of type %R, %AI, and %AQ.
4. COMMREQ time has been measured between CPU and HSC.
5. DOIO is the time to output values to discrete output module.
6. Where there is more than one possible case, the time indicated above represents the worst possible case.
A-6
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
A
Table A-2. Instruction Timing, High Performance Models-Continued
Function
Group
Relational
Function
Enabled
Disabled
Increment
Enabled Disabled
Increment
Size
350/351/36x
350/351/36x
350/351/36x
352
352
352
Equal (INT)
1
0
–
1
0
–
10
Equal (DINT)
2
0
–
2
0
–
16
Equal (REAL)
57
0
–
28
0
–
14
Not Equal (INT)
1
0
–
1
0
–
10
Not Equal (DINT)
1
0
–
1
0
–
16
Not Equal (REAL)
62
0
–
31
0
–
14
Greater Than (INT)
1
0
–
1
0
–
10
Greater Than (DINT)
1
0
–
1
0
–
16
Greater Than (REAL)
57
0
–
32
0
–
14
Greater Than/Equal (INT)
1
0
–
1
0
–
10
Greater Than/Equal (DINT)
1
0
–
1
0
–
10
Greater Than/Equal (REAL)
57
1
–
31
1
–
14
Less Than (INT)
1
0
–
1
0
–
10
Less Than (DINT)
1
0
–
1
0
–
16
Less Than (REAL)
58
1
–
36
1
–
14
Less Than/Equal (INT)
1
0
–
1
0
–
10
Less Than/Equal (DINT)
3
0
–
3
0
–
16
Less Than/Equal (REAL)
Range (INT)
37
0
37
0
2
1
–
–
2
1
–
–
14
13
Range (DINT)
2
1
–
2
1
–
22
1
0
–
13
13
Range (WORD)
1
0
–
Bit
Logical AND
2
0
–
2
0
–
Operation
Logical OR
2
0
–
2
0
–
13
Logical Exclusive OR
1
0
–
1
0
–
13
Logical Invert, NOT
1
0
–
1
0
–
10
Shift Bit Left
31
1
1.37
31
1
1.37
16
Shift Bit Right
28
0
3.03
28
0
3.03
16
Rotate Bit Left
25
0
3.12
25
0
3.12
16
Rotate Bit Right
25
0
4.14
25
0
4.14
16
Bit Position
20
1
–
20
1
–
13
Bit Clear
20
0
–
20
0
–
13
Bit Test
20
0
–
20
0
–
13
Bit Set
Mask Compare (WORD)
19
1
19
1
52
0
–
–
52
0
–
–
13
25
Mask Compare (DWORD)
50
0
–
49
0
–
25
Notes: 1. Time (in microseconds) is based on Release 7 of Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro software for Model 351 and 352 CPUs.
2. For table functions, increment is in units of length specified.; for bit operation functions, microseconds/bit.; for data
move functions, microseconds/number of bits or words.
3. Enabled time for single length units of type %R, %AI, and %AQ.
4. COMMREQ time has been measured between CPU and HSC.
5. DOIO is the time to output values to discrete output module.
6. Where there is more than one possible case, the time indicated above represents the worst possible case.
7. For instructions that have an increment value, multiply the increment by (Length –1) and add that value to the base time.
GFK-1411C
Appendix A Instruction Timing
A-7
A
Table A-2. Instruction Timing, High Performance Models-Continued
Function
Enabled
Disabled
Increment
Enabled
Disabled
Increment
350/351/36X
350/351/36X
350/351/36X
352
352
352
Size
Move (INT)
2
0
0.41
2
0
0.41
Move (BIT)
28
0
4.98
28
0
4.98
10
13
Group
Function
Data Move
Table
Move (WORD)
2
0
0.41
2
0
0.41
10
Move (REAL)
24
1
0.82
24
1
0.82
13
Block Move (INT)
2
0
–
2
0
–
28
Block Move (WORD)
4
4
–
3
0
–
28
Block Move (REAL)
41
0
–
41
0
–
13
Block Clear
1
0
0.24
1
0
0.24
11
Shift Register (BIT)
49
0
0.23
46
0
0.23
16
Shift Register (WORD)
27
0
0.41
27
0
0.41
16
Bit Sequencer
38
22
0.02
38
22
0.02
16
COMM_REQ
765
0
–
765
0
–
13
INT
54
0
0.97
54
0
0.97
22
DINT
54
0
0.81
54
0
0.81
22
BIT
69
0
0.36
69
0
0.36
22
BYTE
54
1
0.64
54
1
0.64
22
WORD
54
0
0.97
54
0
0.97
22
INT
37
0
0.62
37
0
0.62
19
DINT
41
1
1.38
41
1
1.38
22
BYTE
35
0
0.46
35
0
0.46
19
WORD
37
0
0.62
37
0
0.62
19
INT
37
0
0.62
37
0
0.62
19
DINT
38
0
2.14
38
0
2.14
22
BYTE
37
0
0.47
37
0
0.47
19
WORD
37
0
0.62
37
0
0.62
19
INT
37
0
1.52
37
0
1.52
19
DINT
39
0
2.26
39
0
2.26
22
BYTE
36
1
1.24
36
1
1.24
19
WORD
37
0
1.52
37
0
1.52
19
INT
37
0
1.48
37
0
1.48
19
DINT
39
0
2.33
39
0
2.33
22
BYTE
37
1
1.34
37
1
1.34
19
WORD
37
0
1.48
37
0
1.48
19
Array Move
Search Equal
Search Not Equal
Search Greater Than
Search Greater Than/Equal
Notes: 1. Time (in microseconds) is based on Release 7 of Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro software for 350 and 360 Series CPUs.
2. For table functions, increment is in units of length specified.; for bit operation functions, microseconds/bit.; for data
move functions, microseconds/number of bits or words.
3. Enabled time for single length units of type %R, %AI, and %AQ.
4. COMMREQ time has been measured between CPU and HSC.
5. DOIO is the time to output values to discrete output module.
6. Where there is more than one possible case, the time indicated above represents the worst possible case.
7. For instructions that have an increment value, multiply the increment by (Length –1) and add that value to the base time.
A-8
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
A
Table A-2. Instruction Timing, High Performance Models-Continued
Function
Group
Function
Enabled
Disabled
Increment
Enabled
Disabled
Increment
350/351/36x
350/351/36x
350/351/36x
352
352
352
Size
Search Less Than
INT
37
0
1.52
37
0
1.52
19
DINT
41
1
2.27
41
1
2.27
22
BYTE
37
0
1.41
37
0
1.41
19
WORD
37
0
1.52
37
0
1.52
19
Search Less Than/Equal
Conversion
Control
INT
38
0
1.48
38
0
1.48
19
DINT
40
1
2.30
40
1
2.30
22
BYTE
37
0
1.24
37
0
1.24
19
WORD
38
0
1.48
38
0
1.48
19
Convert to INT
19
1
–
19
1
–
10
10
Convert to BCD-4
21
1
–
21
1
–
Convert to REAL
27
0
–
21
0
–
8
Convert to WORD
28
1
–
30
1
–
11
Truncate to INT
32
0
–
32
0
–
11
Truncate to DINT
63
0
–
31
0
–
11
Call a Subroutine
72
1
–
73
1
–
7
Do I/O
114
1
–
115
1
–
13
PID – ISA Algorithm*
162
34
–
162
34
–
16
PID – IND Algorithm*
146
34
–
146
34
–
16
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
#6
22
1
–
22
1
–
10
#7 (Read)
75
1
–
75
1
–
10
End Instruction
Service Request
#7 (Set)
75
1
–
75
1
–
10
#14
121
1
–
121
1
–
10
#15
46
1
–
46
1
–
10
#16
36
1
–
36
1
–
10
#18
261
1
–
261
1
–
10
#23
426
0
–
426
0
–
10
#26//30**
2260
1
–
2260
1
–
10
20
0
–
20
0
–
10
1
1
–
1
1
–
4
See Table
A-3
26.50
#29
#43
Nested MCR/ENDMCR
Combined
Sequential Event
Recorder (SER)
See Table A-3
*The PID times shown above are based on the 6.5 release of the 351 CPU.
**Service request #26/30 was measured using a high speed counter, 16-point output, in a 5-slot rack.
Notes: 1. Time (in microseconds) is based on Release 7 of Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro software for 350 and 360 Series CPUs.
2. For table functions, increment is in units of length specified.; for bit operation functions, microseconds/bit.; for data move
functions, microseconds/number of bits or words.
3. Enabled time for single length units of type %R, %AI, and %AQ.
4. COMMREQ time has been measured between CPU and HSC.
5. DOIO is the time to output values to discrete output module.
6. Where there is more than one possible case, the time indicated above represents the worst possible case.
7. For instructions that have an increment value, multiply the increment by (Length –1) and add that value to the base time.
GFK-1411C
Appendix A Instruction Timing
A-9
A
Table A-3. SER Function Block Timing
Configuration
Example
No power flow (disabled)
—
Time (µsec)
26.50
Contiguous
8 samples
%I1—8
79.94
16 samples
%I1—16
80.58
24 samples
%I1—24
81.56
32 samples
8 + 8 contiguous samples
%I1—32
%I1—8 and %Q1—8
81.73
111.03
8 + 8 + 8 contiguous
samples
8 + 8 + 8 + 8 contiguous
samples
%I1—8, %Q1—8 and
%M1—8
%I1—8, %Q1—8 and
%M1—8 and %T1—8
143.38
%I1, %M10, %Q3, etc.
299.64
552.83
806.35
1059.85
Noncontiguous
8 samples
16 samples
24 samples
32 samples
Reset
with 8 samples
with 16 samples
—
—
175.79
162.63
267.51
with 24 samples
—
372.73
with 32 samples
—
477.95
Notes: Increment for specifying an Input module: +46 µsec
Increment for each group of 8 contiguous samples: +32 µsec
Increment for each group of 8 noncontiguous samples: +254 µsec
Increment for trigger sample using BCD format: +29 µsec
Increment for trigger sample using Posix format: +148 µsec
Times shown for reset are for the maximum buffer size of 1024 samples. (Reset clears
all samples in the sample buffer.)
A-10
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
A
Table A-4. SER Function Block Trigger Timestamp Formats
Example trigger time of November 3, 1998 at 8:34:05:16 a.m.
BCD Format:
struct time_of_day_clk_rec {
unsigned char
seconds;
unsigned char
minutes;
unsigned char
hours;
unsigned char
day_of_month;
unsigned char
month;
unsigned char
year;
};
Parameter
Register
Value (dec)
Value (hex)
%R0203
%R204
Minutes/Seconds
Day of Month/Hours
13317
776
3405
0308
%R205
%R206
Year/Month
Unused
-26607
0
9811
0
POSIX Format:
struct timespec {
long
tv_sec; /* Number of seconds since January 1, 1970 */
long
tv_nsec;/* Number of nanoseconds into next seconds */
};
Register
GFK-1411C
Parameter
Value (dec)
Value (hex)
%R0203
Seconds Low Word
-7811
e17d
%R204
Seconds High Word
13845
3615
%R205
%R206
Nano-seconds Low Word
Nano-seconds High Word
26624
2441
6800
0989
Appendix A Instruction Timing
A-11
A
Instruction Sizes for High Performance CPUs
Memory size is the number of bytes required by the instruction in a ladder diagram application
program. Model 351 and 352 CPUs require three bytes for most standard Boolean functions—see
Table A-3.
Table A-5. Instruction Sizes for 350—352, 360, 363, and 364 CPUs
Size
Function
No operation
1
Pop stack and AND to top
1
Pop stack and OR to top
1
Duplicate top of stack
1
Pop stack
1
Initial stack
1
Label
5
Jump
5
All other instructions
3
Function blocks—see Table A-2
–
Boolean Execution Times
The table below lists execution times of coils and contacts for the Series 90-30 CPU modules.
Table A-5. Boolean Execution Times
CPU Model
A-12
Execution Time per
1,000 Boolean Contacts/Coils
Model 350 and 360 Series
0.22 milliseconds
Model 340/341
0.3 milliseconds
Model 331
0.4 milliseconds
Model 313/323
0.6 milliseconds
Model 311
18.0 milliseconds
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
Appendix Interpreting Fault Tables
B
The Series 90-30 PLCs maintain two fault tables, the I/O fault table for faults generated by I/O
devices (including I/O controllers) and the PLC fault table for internal PLC faults. The
information in this appendix will enable you to interpret the message structure format when
reading these fault tables. Both tables contain similar information.
•
The PLC fault table contains:
†
†
†
•
Fault description.
Date and time of fault.
The I/O fault table contains:
†
†
†
†
†
GFK-1411C
Fault location.
Fault location.
Reference address.
Fault category.
Fault type.
Date and time of fault.
B-1
B
PLC Fault Table
Access the PLC fault table through the programming software. For information about accessing
fault tables, refer to the online help, or to the user's manual for your software: VersaPro User's
Guide (GFK-1670) or Using Control (GFK-1295).
The following diagram identifies each field in the fault entry for the System Configuration
Mismatch fault displayed above:
00 000000
000373F2
0B03
0100
000000000000000000047E0C0B0301000000000000000000
Fault Extra Data
Error Code
Fault Action
Fault Group
Task
Slot
Rack
Spare
Long/ Short
The System Configuration Mismatch fault entry is explained below. (All data is in hexadecimal.)
Field
Value
Description
Long/Short
00
This fault contains 8 bytes of fault extra data.
Rack
00
Main rack (rack 0).
Slot 3.
Slot
03
Task
44
Fault Group
0B
System Configuration Mismatch fault.
Fault Action
03
FATAL fault.
Error Code
01
The following paragraphs describe each field in the fault entry. Included are tables describing the
range of values each field may have.
Long/Short Indicator
This byte indicates whether the fault contains 8 bytes or 24 bytes of fault extra data.
Type
B-2
Code
Fault Extra Data
Short
00
8 bytes
Long
01
24 bytes
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
B
Spare
These six bytes are pad bytes, used to make the PLC fault table entry exactly the same length as
the I/O fault table entry.
Rack
The rack number ranges from 0 to 7. Zero is the main rack, containing the PLC. Racks 1
through 7 are expansion racks, connected to the PLC through an expansion cable.
Slot
The slot number ranges from 0 to 9. The PLC CPU always occupies slot 1 in the main rack (rack
0).
Task
The task number ranges from 0 to +65,535. Sometimes the task number gives additional
information for PLC engineers; typically, the task can be ignored.
PLC Fault Group
Fault group is the highest classification of a fault. It identifies the general category of the fault.
Table B-1 lists the possible fault groups in the PLC fault table.
The last non-maskable fault group, Additional PLC Fault Codes, is declared for the handling of
new fault conditions in the system without the PLC having to specifically know the alarm codes.
All unrecognized PLC-type alarm codes belong to this group.
GFK-1411C
Appendix B Interpreting Fault Tables
B-3
B
Table B-1. PLC Fault Groups
Group Number
Decimal
Hexadecimal
Group Name
Fault Action
1
4
1
4
Loss of, or missing, rack.
Loss of, or missing, option module.
5
5
Addition of, or extra, rack.
Diagnostic
8
11
8
B
Addition of, or extra, option module.
System configuration mismatch.
Diagnostic
Fatal
12
13
14
C
D
E
System bus error.
PLC CPU hardware failure.
Non-fatal module hardware failure.
Diagnostic
Fatal
Diagnostic
16
10
Option module software failure.
Diagnostic
17
18
11
12
Program block checksum failure.
Low battery signal.
Fatal
Diagnostic
19
20
21
13
14
15
Constant sweep time exceeded.
PLC system fault table full.
I/O fault table full.
Diagnostic
Diagnostic
Diagnostic
22
–
16
–
User Application fault.
Additional PLC fault codes.
Diagnostic
As specified
128
129
80
81
System bus failure.
No user’s program on power-up.
Fatal
Informational
130
82
Corrupted user RAM detected.
132
135
137
84
87
89
Password access failure.
PLC CPU software failure.
PLC sequence-store failure.
Fatal
Diagnostic
Fatal
Informational
Fatal
Fatal
Fault Action
Each fault may have one of three actions associated with it. These fault actions are fixed on the
Series 90-30 PLC and cannot be changed by the user.
Table B-2. PLC Fault Actions
Fault Action
Informational
Diagnostic
Fatal
B-4
Action Taken by CPU
Log fault in fault table.
Log fault in fault table.
Set fault references.
Log fault in fault table.
Set fault references.
Go to STOP mode.
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
Code
1
2
3
GFK-1411C
B
Error Code
The error code further describes the fault. Each fault group has its own set of error codes. Table
B-3 shows error codes for the PLC Software Error Group (Group 87H).
Table B-3. Alarm Error Codes for PLC CPU Software Faults
Decimal
Hexadecimal
20
14
Corrupted PLC Program Memory.
39
27
Corrupted PLC Program Memory.
82
52
Backplane Communications Failed.
90
5A
User Shut Down Requested.
All others
Name
PLC CPU Internal System Error.
Table B-4 shows the error codes for all the other fault groups.
GFK-1411C
Appendix B Interpreting Fault Tables
B-5
B
Table B-4. Alarm Error Codes for PLC Faults
Decimal
Hexadecimal
Name
PLC Error Codes for Loss of Option Module Group (04)
44
45
79
255
2C
2D
4F
FF
Option Module Soft Reset Failed
Option Module Soft Reset Failed
Loss of Daughterboard
Option Module Communication Failed
Error Codes for Reset of, Addition of, or Extra Option Module Group (08)
2
4
5
8
10
23
58
2
Module Restart Complete
4
Addition of Daughterboard
5
Reset of Daughterboard
All others
Reset of, Addition of, or Extra Option Module
Error Codes for System Configuration Mismatch Group (11)
8
Analog Expansion Mismatch
A
Unsupported Feature
17
Program exceeds memory limits
3A
Mismatch of Daughterboard
Error Codes for System Bus Error Group (12)
All others
System Bus Error
Error Codes for PLC CPU Hardware Faults (13)
All codes
1
2
1
2
3
5
11
13
401
3
5
B
D
191
Unsupported Board Type
COMREQ – mailbox full on outgoing message that starts the
COMREQ
COMREQ – mailbox full on response
Backplane Communications with PLC; Lost Request
Resource (alloc, tbl ovrflw, etc.) error
User program error
Module Software Corrupted; Requesting Reload
3
Error Codes for Program Block Checksum Group (17)
3
Program or program block checksum failure
0
1
0
1
2
5
6
7
2
5
6
7
1
1
1
2
3
4
B-6
PLC CPU Hardware Failure
Error Codes for Option Module Software Failure Group (16)
Error Codes for Low Battery Signal (18)
Failed battery on PLC CPU or other module
Low battery on PLC CPU or other module
Error Codes for User Application Fault Group (22)
PLC Watchdog Timer Timed Out
COMREQ – WAIT mode not available for this command
COMREQ – Bad Task ID
Application Stack Overflow
Error Codes for System Bus Failure Group (128)
Operating system
Error Codes for Corrupted User RAM on Powerup Group (130)
1
Corrupted User RAM on Power-up
2
Illegal Boolean Opcode Detected
3
PLC_ISCP_PC_OVERFLOW
4
PRG_SYNTAX_ERR
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
B
Fault Extra Data
This field contains details of the fault entry. An example of what data may be present are:
Corrupted
User RAM
Group:
Four of the error codes in the System Configuration Mismatch group supply fault
extra data:
Table B-5. PLC Fault Data - Illegal Boolean Opcode Detected
Model Number Mismatch
Fault Extra Data
[0]
ISCP Fault Register Contents
[1]
Bad OPCODE
[2,3]
ISCP Program Counter
[4,5]
Function Number
For a RAM failure in the PLC CPU (one of the faults reported as a PLC CPU
hardware failure), the address of the failure is stored in the first four bytes of the
field.
PLC CPU
Hardware
Failure (RAM
Failure):
PLC Fault Time Stamp
The six-byte time stamp is the value of the system clock when the fault was
recorded by the PLC CPU. (Values are coded in BCD format.)
Table B-6. PLC Fault Time Stamp
Byte Number
1
2
3
4
5
6
GFK-1411C
Appendix B Interpreting Fault Tables
Description
Seconds
Minutes
Hours
Day of the month
Month
Year
B-7
B
I/O Fault Table
The following diagram identifies the hexadecimal information displayed in each field in the fault
entry.
00 FF0000 00037F7FFF7F 0702 0F 00 00 010000000000027EF00B0301000000000000000000
Fault Specific Data
Fault Description
Fault Type
Fault Category
Fault Action
Fault Group
Point
Block
I/O Bus
Slot
Rack
Reference Address
Long/Short
B-8
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
B
The following paragraphs describe each field in the I/O fault table. Included are tables describing
the range of values each field may have.
Long/Short Indicator
This byte indicates whether the fault contains 5 bytes or 21 bytes of fault specific data.
Table B-7. I/O Fault Table Format Indicator Byte
Type
Code
Fault Specific Data
Short
02
5 bytes
Long
03
21 bytes
Reference Address
Reference address is a three-byte address containing the I/O memory type and location (or offset)
in that memory which corresponds to the point experiencing the fault. Or, when a Genius block
fault or integral analog module fault occurs, the reference address refers to the first point on the
block where the fault occurred.
Table B-8. I/O Reference Address
Byte
Description
Range
0
Memory Type
0 – FF
1–2
Offset
0 – 7FF
The memory type byte is one of the following values.
Table B-9. I/O Reference Address Memory Type
Name
Value (Hexadecimal)
Analog input
0A
Analog output
0C
Analog grouped
0D
Discrete input
10 or 46
Discrete output
12 or 48
Discrete grouped
1F
I/O Fault Address
The I/O fault address is a six-byte address containing rack, slot, bus, block, and point address of
the I/O point which generated the fault. The point address is a word; all other addresses are one
byte each. All five values may not be present in a fault.
When an I/O fault address does not contain all five addresses, a 7F hex appears in the address to
indicate where the significance stops. For example, if 7F appears in the bus byte, then the fault is
a module fault. Only rack and slot values are significant.
GFK-1411C
Appendix B Interpreting Fault Tables
B-9
B
Rack
The rack number ranges from 0 to 7. Zero is the main rack, i.e., the one containing the PLC.
Racks 1 through 7 are expansion racks.
Slot
The slot number ranges from 0 to 9. The PLC CPU always occupies slot 1 in the main rack (rack
0).
Point
Point ranges from 1 to 1024 (decimal). It tells which point on the block has the fault when the
fault is a point-type fault.
I/O Fault Group
Fault group is the highest classification of a fault. It identifies the general category of the fault.
Table B-10 lists the possible fault groups in the I/O fault table. Group numbers less than 80 (Hex)
are maskable faults.
The last non-maskable fault group, Additional I/O Fault Codes, is declared for the handling of
new fault conditions in the system without the PLC having to specifically know the alarm codes.
All unrecognized I/O-type alarm codes belong to this group.
Table B-10. I/O Fault Groups
Group Number
3
Group Name
Fault Action
Loss of, or missing, I/O module.
Diagnostic
7
Addition of, or extra, I/O module.
Diagnostic
9
IOC or I/O bus fault.
Diagnostic
A
I/O module fault.
–
Additional I/O fault codes.
Diagnostic
As specified
I/O Fault Action
The fault action specifies what action the PLC CPU should take when a fault occurs. Table B-11
lists possible fault actions.
Table B-11. I/O Fault Actions
Fault Action
B-10
Action Taken by CPU
Code
Informational
Log fault in fault table.
1
Diagnostic
Log fault in fault table.
Set fault references.
2
Fatal
Log fault in fault table.
Set fault references.
Go to STOP mode.
3
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
B
I/O Fault Specific Data
An I/O fault table entry may contain up to 5 bytes of I/O fault specific data.
Symbolic Fault Specific Data
Table B-12 lists data that is required for block circuit configuration.
Table B-12. I/O Fault Specific Data
Decimal Number
Hex Code
Description
Circuit Configuration
1
2
3
Circuit is an input – tristate.
Circuit is an input.
Circuit is an output.
Fault Actions for Specific Faults
Forced/unforced circuit faults are reported as informational faults. All others are diagnostic or
fatal.
The model number mismatch, I/O type mismatch and non-existent I/O module faults are reported
in the PLC fault table under the System Configuration Mismatch group. They are not reported in
the I/O fault table.
I/O Fault Time Stamp
The six-byte time stamp is the value of the system clock when the fault was recorded by the PLC
CPU. Values are coded in BCD format.
Table B-13. I/O Fault Time Stamp
GFK-1411C
Byte Number
Description
1
2
3
4
5
6
Seconds
Minutes
Hours
Day of the month
Month
Year
Appendix B Interpreting Fault Tables
B-11
Appendix Using Floating-Point Numbers
C
There are a few considerations you need to understand when using floating-point numbers. The
first section discusses these general considerations. Refer to page C-5 and following for
instructions on entering and displaying floating-point numbers.
Note
Floating-point capabilities are only supported on the 35x and 36x series CPUs,
Release 9 or later, and on all releases of CPU352.
Floating-Point Numbers
The programming software provides the ability to edit, display, store, and retrieve numbers with
real values. Some functions operate on floating-point numbers. However, to use floating-point
numbers with the programming software, you must have a 35x or 36x series CPU (see Note
above). Floating-point numbers are represented in decimal scientific notation, with a display of
six significant digits.
Note
In this manual, the terms “floating-point” and “real” are used interchangeably to
describe the floating-point number display/entry feature of the programming
software.
The following format is used. For numbers in the range 9999999 to .0001, the display has no
exponent and up to six or seven significant digits. For example:
GFK-1411C
Entered
Displayed
Description
.000123456789
+.0001234567
–12.345e-2
–.1234500
Seven digits, six or seven significant.
1234
+1234.000
Seven digits, six or seven significant.
Ten digits, six or seven significant.
C-1
C
Outside the range listed above, only six significant digits are displayed and the display has the
form:
+1.23456E+12
||| | | |
||| | | +———
||| | |
||| | +—————
||| |
||| +————————
|||
||+———————————
||
|+————————————
|
+—————————————
C-2
Exponent (signed power of 10)
Exponent indicator and sign of exponent
Five less significant digits
Decimal point
Most significant digit
Sign of the entire number
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
C
Internal Format of Floating-Point Numbers
Floating-point numbers are stored in single precision IEEE-standard format. This format requires
32 bits, which translates to two adjacent 16-bit PLC registers. The encoding of the bits is
diagrammed below.
Bits 17-32
Bits 1-16
17 16
32
1
23-bit mantissa
8-bit exponent
1-bit sign (Bit 32)
Register use by a single floating-point number is diagrammed below. In this diagram, if the
floating-point number occupies registers R5 and R6, for example, R5 is the least significant
register and R6 is the most significant register.
Least Significant Register
Bits 1-16
1
16
Least Significant Bit: Bit 1
Most Significant Bit: Bit 16
Most Significant Register
Bits 17-32
32
17
Least Significant Bit: Bit 17
Most Significant Bit: Bit 32
GFK-1411C
Appendix C Using Floating-Point Numbers
C-3
C
Values of Floating-Point Numbers
Use the following table to calculate the value of a floating-point number from the binary number
stored in two registers.
Exponent (e)
Mantissa (f)
Value of Floating Point Number
255
Non-zero
255
0
0 < e < 255
Any value
–1s * 2e–127 * 1.f
0
Non-zero
–1s * 2–126 * 0.f
0
0
Not a valid number (NaN).
–1s * ∞
0
f = the mantissa. The mantissa is a binary fraction.
e = the exponent. The exponent is an integer E such that E+127 is the power of 2 by which the mantissa
must be multiplied to yield the floating-point value.
s = the sign bit.
* = the multiplication operator.
For example, consider the floating-point number 12.5. The IEEE floating-point binary
representation of the number is:
01000001 01001000 00000000 00000000
or 41480000 hex. The most significant bit (the sign bit) is zero (s=0). The next eight most
significant bits are 10000010, or 130 decimal (e=130).
The mantissa is stored as a decimal binary number with the decimal point preceding the most
significant of the 23 bits. Thus, the most significant bit in the mantissa is a multiple of 2–1, the
next most significant bit is a multiple of 2–2, and so on to the least significant bit, which is a
multiple of 2–23. The final 23 bits (the mantissa) are:
1001000 00000000 00000000
The value of the mantissa, then, is .5625 (that is, 2–1 + 2–4).
Since e > 0 and e < 255, we use the third formula in the table above:
number = –1s * 2e–127 * 1.f
= –10 * 2130–127 * 1.5625
= 1 * 23 * 1.5625
= 8 * 1.5625
= 12.5
Thus, you can see that the above binary representation is correct.
The range of numbers that can be stored in this format is from ± 1.401298E–45 to
± 3.402823E+38 and the number zero.
C-4
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
C
Entering and Displaying Floating-Point Numbers
In the mantissa, up to six or seven significant digits of precision may be entered and stored;
however, the programming software will display only the first six of these digits. The mantissa
may be preceded by a positive or negative sign. If no sign is entered, the floating-point number is
assumed to be positive.
If an exponent is entered, it must be preceded by the letter E or e, and the mantissa must
contain a decimal point to avoid mistaking it for a hexadecimal number. The exponent may be
preceded by a sign; but, if none is provided, it is assumed to be positive. If no exponent is entered,
it is assumed to be zero. No spaces are allowed in a floating-point number.
To provide ease-of-use, several formats are accepted in both command-line and field data entry.
These formats include an integer, a decimal number, or a decimal number followed by an
exponent. These numbers are converted to a standard form for display once the user has entered
the data and pressed the Enter key.
Examples of valid floating-point number entries and their normalized display are shown below.
Entered
Displayed
250
+250,0000
+4
+4.000000
–2383019
–2383019.
34.
+34.00000
–.0036209
–.003620900
12.E+9
+1.20000E+10
–.0004E–11
–4.00000E–15
731.0388
+731.0388
99.20003e–29
+9.92000E–28
Examples of invalid floating-point number entries are shown below.
Invalid Entry
GFK-1411C
Explanation
–433E23
Missing decimal point.
10e-19
Missing decimal point.
10.e19
The mantissa cannot contain spaces between digits or characters.
This is accepted as 10.e0, and an error message is displayed.
4.1e19
The exponent cannot contain spaces between digits or characters.
This is accepted as 4.1e0, and an error message is displayed.
Appendix C Using Floating-Point Numbers
C-5
C
Errors in Floating-Point Numbers and Operations
On a 352 CPU, overflow occurs when a number greater than 3.402823E+38 or less than
-3.402823E+38 is generated by a REAL function. On all other 90-30 models that support floating
point operations, the range is greater than 216 or less than –216. When your number exceeds the
range, the ok output of the function is set OFF; and the result is set to positive infinity (for a
number greater than 3.402823E+38 on a 352 CPU or 216 on all other models) or negative infinity
(for a number less than –3.402823E+38 or –216 on all other models). You can determine where
this occurs by testing the sense of the ok output.
POS_INF
NEG_INF
= 7F800000h
= FF800000h
– IEEE positive infinity representation in hex.
– IEEE negative infinity representation in hex.
Note
If you are using software floating point (all models capable of floating point
operations except the 352 CPU), numbers are rounded to zero (0) at
±1.175494E–38.
If the infinities produced by overflow are used as operands to other REAL functions, they may
cause an undefined result. This undefined result is referred to as an NaN (Not a Number). For
example, the result of adding positive infinity to negative infinity is undefined. When the
ADD_REAL function is invoked with positive infinity and negative infinity as its operands, it
produces an NaN for its result.
On a 352 CPU, each REAL function capable of producing an NaN produces a specialized NaN
which identifies the function:
C-6
NaN_SW
NaN_ADD
NaN_SUB
NaN_MUL
=
=
=
=
FFFFFFFFh
7F81FFFFh
7F81FFFFh
7F82FFFFh
NaN_DIV
NaN_SQRT
NaN_LOG
= 7F83FFFFh
= 7F84FFFFh
= 7F85FFFFh
–
–
–
–
Software floating point NaN.
Real addition error value in hex.
Real subtraction error value in hex.
Real multiplication error value in hex.
– Real division error value in hex.
– Real square root error value in hex.
– Real logarithm error value in hex.
NaN_POW0
= 7F86FFFFh
– Real exponent error value in hex.
NaN_SIN
NaN_COS
NaN_TAN
= 7F87FFFFh
= 7F88FFFFh
= 7F89FFFFh
– Real sine error value in hex.
– Real cosine error value in hex.
– Real tangent error value in hex.
NaN_ASIN
NaN_ACOS
NaN_BCD
= 7F8AFFFFh
= 7F8BFFFFh
= 7F8CFFFFh
– Real inverse sine error value in hex.
– Real inverse cosine error value in hex.
– BCD-4 to real error.
REAL_INDEF
= FFC00000h
– Real indefinite, divide 0 by 0 error.
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
C
All other CPUs that support floating point operations produce one NaN output: FFFF FFFF.
When an NaN result is fed into another function, it passes through to the result. For example, if
an NaN_ADD is the first operand to the SUB_REAL function, the result of the SUB_REAL is
NaN_ADD. If both operands to a function are NaNs, the first operand will pass through. Because
of this feature of propagating NaNs through functions, you can identify the function where the
NaN originated.
Note
For NaN, the ok output is OFF (not energized).
The following table explains when power is or is not passed when dealing with numbers viewed as
or equal to infinity for binary operations such as Add, Multiply, etc. As shown previously, outputs
that exceed the positive or negative limits are viewed as POS_INF or NEG_INF respectively.
Table C-1. General Case of Power Flow for Floating-Point Operations
Operation
GFK-1411C
Input 1
Input 2
Output
Power Flow
All
Number
Number
Positive or
Negative Infinity
No
All Except
Division
Infinity
Number
Infinity
Yes
All
Number
Infinity
Infinity
Yes
Division
Infinity
Number
Infinity
No
All
Number
Number
NaN
No
Appendix C Using Floating-Point Numbers
C-7
Appendix Setting Up a Modem
D
This appendix describes how to set up 32-bit modem communications with your PLC using the
Windows programming software and the Communications Configuration Utility (CCU). If you are
unable to use the built-in communications utility, HyperTerminal software can be used as an
alternate means of establishing modem communications.
Modem Configuration and Cabling
Refer to the setup documents (cabling, AT commands, general setup) for your modem at:
http://www.gefanuc.com/support/plc/modems.htm
or on our FaxLink system (804-978-5824):
FaxLink Document
GFK-1411C
Modem
2302
2303
Hayes Optima
Practical Peripherals
2304
2305
2307
2308
Motorola V3225 4-wire leased line
Data-Linc dialup/leased line
MultiTech 1932ZDX
Boca Modem V.34 28.8, V.32 14.4 Model M14EW
2310
USRobotics 56K
D-1
D
PLC CPU Configuration
D-2
1.
In VersaPro or Control open the Hardware Configuration (HWC) utility. If a CPU has not been
configured, choose the desired PLC CPU type.
2.
In the Parameters dialog box for the CPU, enter the desired baud rate (9600 typically), no
parity, 1 stop bit, and a modem turnaround of 1 (if necessary.)
3.
Save the configuration of the CPU and download it to the PLC.
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
D
Installing the Modem into Windows
GFK-1411C
1.
In the Start menu, choose Settings,
Control Panel, and Modems icon. In
the Modems Properties dialog box,
click the Add button and install a
standard modem (typically 9600).
2.
With the standard modem selected, click
the Properties button. Under the
maximum speed for that modem, choose
9600 (or other desired baud rate) if it is
not already selected.
3.
On the Connection tab, the Data bits
should be 8, Parity should be none, and
Stop bits should be 1.
Appendix D Setting Up a Modem
D-3
D
4.
Click the Advanced… button, and
deselect the Flow Control checkbox.
5.
Click OK until you have closed the Modem Properties dialog box.
Setting Up the Communications Configuration Utility (CCU)
1.
In VersaPro, in the Tools menu, and
Control, under the COMM menu selects
Communications Setup. Enter your
password (default is netutil). Once in the
CCU, select the Modems tab. Click New to
add a new modem to the list.
Give the modem a name and enter the area
code and phone number. Click OK to
accept the modem.
Note
Although the Configure Line button opens a modem properties dialog box,
changes to parameters in this box are not saved. Use the Windows Control Panel
to configure the modem.
D-4
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
D
2.
In the CCU, click on the Ports tab. Click New to add a new port to the list.
Enter the name of the port.
Next to Type, select SNP_SERIAL.
Next to Physical Port, select the desired COM port for the modem on your computer.
Set the Port Settings to be equal with those that were configured for the PLC CPU.
Select the Associated Modem that was created in step 1.
Click the Advanced button.
Next to Connect Timeout, enter a value (in milliseconds) of approximately 40000 (40
seconds). This time may be longer or shorter depending on how long it takes for the modem to
establish communications.
Click OK to accept the port.
GFK-1411C
Appendix D Setting Up a Modem
D-5
D
3.
In the CCU, click on the Devices tab. Click New to add a new device to the list.
Under Device Name, type in the desired name for the device.
Next to Device Model, select from the list the type of CPU to communicate with.
Next to Default Port, select from the list the port that was created in step 2.
Next to Associated Modem, select the modem that was created in step 1 from the list (If the
port and/or the modem do not appear in the list, they need to be created and saved).
Click OK to accept the device.
4.
Click OK in the CCU to accept the configuration changes.
Connecting to the PLC
D-6
1.
In Control software, under the COMM menu, select Connect. In VersaPro, go to the PLC
menu and select Connect.
2.
If not already selected, select the Device and Port that are configured for the modem. Click
Connect to initiate communications with the PLC. The modem will dial and communications
will be initialized.
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
D
Using the HyperTerminal Utility to Establish Connection
If the modem will not dial or connect using the built-in communications, HyperTerminal can be
used as a backup. When using HyperTerminal, the modem functions (dialing, hanging up) are
executed independently of the PLC programming software. Once the modems are connected to
each other, the PLC programming software will communicate as if it were connected directly to the
PLC.
Note
This approach may not work for PCMCIA modems.
Modem configuration can be accomplished with HyperTerminal by entering the “AT” commands
specified by the FaxLink documents listed on page D-1. Some typical settings necessary for SNP
to operate across a modem connection are:
Flow control – disabled
Error correction – disabled
Data compression – disabled
Baud rate – only at the desired baud rate
Break signal – sent intact (only for pre-Break-Free CPUs)
DTR signal – ignored
Autoanswer for remote modem – selected
1.
To start HyperTerminal, go to the Start menu and select Programs, Accessories, and
HyperTerminal. (In Windows 98, HyperTerminal is under Accessories, Communications…)
In HyperTerminal, enter a name for the connection. Naming and saving the connection makes
it easier to re-connect in the future.
2.
To open the Properties dialog box, go to File, Properties. Next to Connect Using, choose the
comm port that the modem is connected (or mapped) to.
3.
Click the Configure button to configure the communications parameters. Set the baud rate to
9600 (or other desired baud rate), data bits to 8, parity to none, stop bits to 1, and flow control
to none. Click OK to accept the parameters.
Modems autobaud to the settings of the DTE when in command mode. This means that any
port settings will work to configure the modem and dial it. However, when the modem is in
data mode (connected to another modem), the modem may not respond to the escape sequence
unless it is sent at the same baud rate at which the modem is communicating.
GFK-1411C
4.
In HyperTerminal, test the connection to the modem by typing AT and pressing ENTER. The
modem should respond with “OK”. To dial the modem, type ATDT# (where # is the phone
number of the remote modem) and wait for the connection response (ex. CONNECT 9600).
5.
Set up the PLC programmer to communicate at the desired port settings, but assume a standard
serial port connection, not a modem connection, using the desired port setup parameters. The
port setup in the CCU will not have an associated modem, but will have a modem turnaround
time.
Appendix D Setting Up a Modem
D-7
D
6.
To hang up, first disconnect the PLC programmer connection (this will free up the comm port
for use with HyperTerminal). Then connect to the modem with HyperTerminal. While
connected, wait at least 1 second, then type three plus signs (+++). One second later, the
modem should respond with an “OK”. Next, enter ATH, the hang-up command. The modem
should respond “OK” again.
Remember that the HyperTerminal connection must be set to the same baud rate that the modem is
currently communicating at. If not, the escape sequence may not be recognized.
Other Issues
Because of the dynamic nature of the computer/communications industry and limited resources for
testing modems, a situation may arise where a recommended modem can not be found. If this is
the situation, there are a few steps that can be taken to see if an alternate modem will work in your
system.
Chipset
The first thing to look at is the chipset that the modem uses. This can be obtained from the modem
manufacturer, their web site, or occasionally through the computer manufacturer. The chipset
dictates the AT commands used to configure the modem. The AT command reference will be
available from the chipset manufacturer (typically Rockwell, Lucent, USRobotics, Hayes -- R.I.P.)
Break
Applies to the following CPU models: 350 and higher, before revision 9.00
341, 331, 323, 313, and 311 before revision 8.20
For those CPUs that require the break to be passed, the modem needs to send the break intact
without affecting the data being sent. This mode is sometimes called non-destructive, expedited.
A destructive break will clear all data in the buffers of the modem. Typical parameters to look for
are the ‘S82’ register (for most chipsets) and the ‘&Y’ command (for USR).
Flow Control, Data Compression, and Error Correction
These should be disabled. Flow control must be disabled because SNP uses the CTS signal for
cable detection, not flow control. Data compression and error correction must be disabled because
they cannot be used without flow control. Error correction modifies the character timing, but with
a large enough modem buffer, may be able to be used without flow control.
Other Considerations
D-8
•
PCMCIA modems sometimes operate differently than external modems. One major difference
is that some PCMCIA drivers will remove power from the modem card when the port is
deactivated. This means that dialing with HyperTerminal will not work. You must use the
modem connect procedure within the programming software in order to keep the com port
handle active.
•
The baud rate is a critical setting for reliable communications. 19200 baud is the current
maximum rate for GE Fanuc PLCs , but the distance between modems and line quality will
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users – May 2000
GFK-1411C
D
dictate what baud rate is acceptable. SNP does not use hardware flow control and all data
quality features of the modems must be disabled. Therefore we are relying on an 8-bit
checksum to catch transmission errors, meaning 1 out of every 256 errors will be detected.
Running the modem over low-quality analog phone lines with high data rates will increase the
chances of transmission errors. It is a good idea to find the optimum baud rate by
experimenting with the actual line quality and connection rate before fully implementing a
system.
GFK-1411C
•
Forcing the modems to a single baud rate is desirable. Because the PLC serial port can only be
configured to one rate, forcing the PLC modem to its baud rate ensures that the modems will
not choose a different negotiating speed.
•
Most modems will not pass parity, and specifically state that they will not pass parity settings.
•
The modem turnaround time in the PLC and programmer delays the time from when the
device receives transmission to when it responds. You need to have a value of 1 (10ms) or
greater in the PLC and programmer.
Appendix D Setting Up a Modem
D-9
Index
3
35x and 36x series CPUs: key switch, 2-13
A
ADD_IOM, 2-24
ADD_SIO, 2-24
Addition of I/O module, 3-18
Alarm, 3-2
Alarm error codes, B-5
Alarm processor, 3-2
ANY_FLT, 2-25
APL_FLT, 2-24
Appendices
A - Instruction timing, A-1
B - Interpreting fault tables, B-1
C - Using floating-point numbers, C-1
D - Setting up a modem, D-1
Application fault, 3-12
Application program logic scan, 2-8
B
BAD_PWD, 2-24
BAD_RAM, 2-24
Battery signal, low, 3-11
BCD Format
for SER function block trigger timestamp, A-11
BCD-4, 2-21
BIT, 2-21
Block locking feature, 2-35
EDITLOCK, 2-35
permanently locking a subroutine, 2-35
VIEWLOCK, 2-35
Boolean execution times, A-12
BYTE, 2-21
C
CCU
setting up, D-4
CFG_MM, 2-24
Checksum calculation, 2-8
Checksum failure, program block, 3-11
Clocks, 2-32
elapsed time clock, 2-32
time-of-day clock, 2-32
COMMREQ
error code, description, and correction, 3-11
Communication request function
error code, description, and correction, 3-11
Communication window modes, 2-13
Communications failure during store, 3-16
GFK-1411C
Communications with the PLC, 2-11
Configuration mismatch, system, 3-10
Connecting to the PLC, D-6
Constant sweep time exceeded, 3-12
Constant sweep time mode, 2-12, 2-33
Constant sweep timer, 2-33
Corrupted memory, 3-8
Corrupted user program on power-up, 3-13
CPU sweep, 2-2
D
Data retentiveness, 2-20
Data types, 2-21
BCD-4, 2-21
BIT, 2-21
BYTE, 2-21
DINT, 2-21
INT, 2-21
REAL, 2-21
WORD, 2-21
Defaults conditions for Model 30 output
modules, 2-39
Diagnostic data, 2-40
Diagnostic faults, 3-4
addition of I/O module, 3-18
application fault, 3-12
constant sweep time exceeded, 3-12
loss of I/O module, 3-17
loss of, or missing, option module, 3-9
low battery signal, 3-11
reset of, addition of, or extra, option module, 3-9
DINT, 2-21
Discrete references, 2-19
discrete inputs, 2-19
discrete internal, 2-19
discrete outputs, 2-19
discrete temporary, 2-19
global data, 2-20
system references, 3-5
system status, 2-20, 2-22
Double precision signed integer, 2-21
DSM communications with the PLC, 2-11
DSM314
I/O scan time contributions, 2-5
local logic programs, 2-40
DSM314 and DSM302 communications with
PLC, 2-11
E
EDITLOCK, 2-35
Elapsed time clock, 2-32
Error codes, B-5
Ethernet Global Data, 2-40
External I/O failures, 3-2
Index-1
Index
F
Fatal faults, 3-4
communications failure during store, 3-16
corrupted user program on power-up, 3-13
option module software failure, 3-11
PLC CPU system software failure, 3-14
program block checksum failure, 3-11
system configuration mismatch, 3-10
Fault action, 3-4, 3-9
diagnostic faults, 3-4
fatal faults, 3-4
I/O fault action, B-10
informational faults, 3-4
PLC fault action, B-4
Fault category, 3-17
Fault description, 3-17
Fault effects, additional, 3-5
Fault explanation and correction
I/O fault group, B-10
interpreting a fault, B-1
PLC fault group, B-3
Fault explanations and correction, 3-1
accessing additional fault information, 3-7
addition of I/O module, 3-18
application fault, 3-12
communications failure during store, 3-16
constant sweep time exceeded, 3-12
corrupted user program on power-up, 3-13
fault category, 3-17
fault description, 3-17
fault handling, 3-2
fault type, 3-17
I/O fault table, 3-6
I/O fault table explanations, 3-17
loss of I/O module, 3-17
loss of, or missing, option module, 3-9
low battery signal, 3-11
no user program present, 3-12
non-configurable faults, 3-9
option module software failure, 3-11
password access failure, 3-13
PLC CPU system software failure, 3-14
PLC fault table, 3-6
PLC fault table explanations, 3-8
program block checksum failure, 3-11
reset of, addition of, or extra, option module, 3-9
system configuration mismatch, 3-10
Fault group, B-3, B-10
Fault handling, 3-2
addition of I/O module, 3-18
additional fault effects, 3-5
application fault, 3-12
classes of faults, 3-2
communications failure during store, 3-16
constant sweep time exceeded, 3-12
corrupted user program on power-up, 3-13
error codes, B-5
explanations and correction, 3-1
external I/O failures, 3-2
fault action, 3-4
I/O fault action, B-10
I/O fault group, B-10
I/O fault table, 3-3, 3-6
I/O fault table explanations, 3-17
internal failures, 3-2
interpreting a fault, B-1
loss of I/O module, 3-17
loss of, or missing, option module, 3-9
low battery signal, 3-11
no user program present, 3-12
operational failures, 3-2
option module software failure, 3-11
password access failure, 3-13
PLC CPU system software failure, 3-14
PLC fault action, B-4
PLC fault group, B-3
PLC fault table, 3-3, 3-6
PLC fault table explanations, 3-8
program block checksum failure, 3-11
references, 3-5
reset of, addition of, or extra, option module, 3-9
system configuration mismatch, 3-10
system reaction to faults, 3-3
Faults, interpreting, B-1
Flash protection on 35x and 36x series CPUs,
2-13
Floating-point numbers, C-1
entering and displaying floating-point numbers,
C-5
errors in floating-point numbers and operations,
C-6
internal format of floating-point numbers, C-3
values of floating-point numbers, C-4
Function block parameters, 2-27
Function block structure, 2-25
format of program function blocks, 2-26
format of relays, 2-25
function block parameters, 2-27
power flow, 2-28
alarm processor, 3-2
fault action, 3-4
Fault references, 3-5
definitions of, 3-5
Fault type, 3-17
Faults, 3-2
G
Genius Global Data, 2-40
Global data, 2-40
Global data references, 2-20
accessing additional fault information, 3-7
actions, 3-9
Index-2
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users –May 2000
GFK-1411C
Index
H
Housekeeping, 2-7
HRD_CPU, 2-24
HRD_FLT, 2-25
HRD_SIO, 2-24
HyperTerminal, D-7
I
I/O data formats, 2-39
I/O fault table, 3-3, 3-6, B-8
explanations, 3-17
fault action, B-10
fault actions for specific faults, B-11
fault address, B-9
fault group, B-10
fault specific data, B-11
fault time stamp, B-11
interpreting a fault, B-1
long/short indicator, B-9
point, B-10
rack, B-10
reference address, B-9
slot, B-10
symbolic fault specific data, B-11
I/O structure, Series 90-30 PLC, 2-36
I/O system , Series 90-30 PLC, 2-36
I/O system, Series 90-20 PLC, 2-36
I/O system, Series 90-30 PLC
default conditions for Model 30 output modules,
2-39
diagnostic data, 2-40
global data, 2-40
I/O data formats, 2-39
model 30 I/O modules, 2-37
Informational faults, 3-4
no user program present, 3-12
password access failure, 3-13
Input references, discrete, 2-19
Input register references, analog, 2-19
Input scan, 2-7
Instruction timing, A-1
high performance models, A-6
SER, A-10
standard models, A-2
INT, 2-21
Internal failures, 3-2
Internal references, discrete, 2-19
Interpreting fault tables, B-1
IO_FLT, 2-25
IO_PRES, 2-25
K
Key switch on 35x and 36x series CPUs, 2-13
GFK-1411C
Index
L
Levels, privilege, 2-34
change requests, 2-34
Local logic programs, 2-40
Locking/unlocking subroutines, 2-35
Logic program checksum calculation, 2-8
Logic solution, 2-8
LOS_IOM, 2-24
LOS_SIO, 2-24
Loss of I/O module, 3-17
Loss of, or missing, option module, 3-9
Low battery signal, 3-11
LOW_BAT, 2-24
M
Maintenance, 3-1
Manuals
for I/O modules, 2-37
Memory, corrupted, 3-8
Model 30 I/O modules, 2-37
Modems
configuration and cabling, D-1
connecting to the PLC, D-6
installing in Windows, D-3
PLC CPU configuration, D-2
using HyperTerminal to establish connection,
D-7
N
No user program present, 3-12
O
Operation of system, 2-1
Operational failures, 3-2
Option module software failure, 3-11
Output references, discrete, 2-19
Output register references, analog, 2-19
Output scan, 2-8
OV_SWP, 2-24
Overrides, 2-20
P
Password access failure, 3-13
Passwords, 2-34
PB_SUM, 2-24
PCM communications with the PLC, 2-11
Periodic subroutines, 2-18
PLC CPU configuration
for modem communications, D-2
Index-3
Index
PLC CPU system software failure, 3-14
PLC fault table, 3-3, 3-6, B-2
error codes, B-5
explanations, 3-8
fault action, B-4
fault group, B-3
fault time stamp, B-7
interpreting a fault, B-1
long/short indicator, B-2
rack, B-3
slot, B-3
spare, B-3
task, B-3
PLC sweep, 2-2
application program logic scan, 2-8
configured constant sweep time mode, 2-12
constant sweep time mode, 2-12, 2-33
DSM communications with the PLC, 2-11
housekeeping, 2-7
input scan, 2-7
logic program checksum calculation, 2-8
logic solution, 2-8
output scan, 2-8
PCM communications with the PLC, 2-11
programmer communications window, 2-9
scan time contributions for 35x and 36x series,
2-5, 2-6
standard program sweep mode, 2-2
standard program sweep variations, 2-12
STOP mode, 2-12
sweep time calculation, 2-7
sweep time contribution, 2-4
PLC system operation, 2-1
POSIX Format
for SER function block trigger timestamp, A-11
Power flow, 2-28
Power-down, 2-31
Power-up, 2-29
Power-up and power-down sequences, 2-29
power-down, 2-31
power-up, 2-29
Privilege level change requests, 2-34
Privilege levels, 2-34
change requests, 2-34
Program block
how blocks are called, 2-17
how C blocks are called, 2-17
how subroutines are called, 2-17
nested calls, 2-17
Program block checksum failure, 3-11
Program organization and user data
floating-point numbers, C-1
Program organization and user references/data,
2-15
data types, 2-21
function block structure, 2-25
retentiveness of data, 2-20
system status, 2-22
Index-4
transitions and overrides, 2-20
user references, 2-19
Program structure
how blocks are called, 2-17
how C blocks are called, 2-17
how subroutines are called, 2-17
Program sweep, standard, 2-2
Programmer communications window, 2-9
Programs, local logic, 2-40
R
REAL
Data type structure, 2-21
Using floating-point numbers, C-1
Using Real numbers, C-1
Reboot after fatal fault, 3-4
references, 2-19
Register Reference
system registers, 2-19
Register references, 2-19
analog inputs, 2-19
analog outputs, 2-19
Reset of, addition of, or extra, option module,
3-9
Retentiveness of data, 2-20
S
Scan time contributions for 35x and 36x series
CPUs, 2-5, 2-6
Scan, input, 2-7
Scan, output, 2-8
Security, system, 2-34
locking/unlocking subroutines, 2-35
passwords, 2-34
privilege level change requests, 2-34
privilege levels, 2-34
Series 90-20 PLC I/O system, 2-36
Series 90-30 PLC I/O system, 2-36
default conditions for Model 30 output modules,
2-39
diagnostic data, 2-40
global data, 2-40
I/O data formats, 2-39
I/O structure, 2-36
model 30 I/O modules, 2-37
Setting up a modem, D-1
SFT_CPU, 2-24
SFT_FLT, 2-25
SFT_SIO, 2-24
Signed integer, 2-21
SNPX_RD, 2-22
SNPX_WT, 2-22
SNPXACT, 2-22
Software failure, option module, 3-11
Standard program sweep mode, 2-2
Series 90™-30 System Manual for Windows® Users –May 2000
GFK-1411C
Index
Standard program sweep variations, 2-12
Status references, system, 2-20, 2-22
STOP mode, 2-12
STOR_ER, 2-24
Subroutine blocks
examples of, 2-16
nested calls, 2-17
Subroutines, locking/unlocking, 2-35
Sweep time calculation, 2-7
Sweep, PLC, 2-2
application program logic scan, 2-8
constant sweep time mode, 2-12, 2-33
DSM communications with the PLC, 2-11
housekeeping, 2-7
input scan, 2-7
logic program checksum calculation, 2-8
logic solution, 2-8
output scan, 2-8
PCM communications with the PLC, 2-11
programmer communications window, 2-9
scan time contributions for 35x and 36x series
CPUs, 2-5, 2-6
standard program sweep mode, 2-2
standard program sweep variations, 2-12
STOP mode, 2-12
sweep time calculation, 2-7
sweep time contribution, 2-4
SY_FLT, 2-25
SY_PRES, 2-25
System configuration mismatch, 3-10
System operation, 2-1
clocks and timers, 2-32
PLC sweep summary, 2-2
power-up and power-down sequences, 2-29
program organization and user references/data,
2-15
Series 90-20 PLC I/O system, 2-36
Series 90-30 PLC I/O system, 2-36
system security, 2-34
System references, 3-5
System register references, 2-19
System status references, 2-20, 2-22
ADD_IOM, 2-24
ADD_SIO, 2-24
ANY_FLT, 2-25
APL_FLT, 2-24
BAD_PWD, 2-24
BAD_RAM, 2-24
CFG_MM, 2-24
HRD_CPU, 2-24
HRD_FLT, 2-25
HRD_SIO, 2-24
IO_FLT, 2-25
IO_PRES, 2-25
LOS_IOM, 2-24
LOS_SIO, 2-24
LOW_BAT, 2-24
OV_SWP, 2-24
GFK-1411C
Index
PB_SUM, 2-24
SFT_CPU, 2-24
SFT_FLT, 2-25
SFT_SIO, 2-24
SNPX_RD, 2-22
SNPX_WT, 2-22
SNPXACT, 2-22
STOR_ER, 2-24
SY_FLT, 2-25
SY_PRES, 2-25
T
Temporary references, discrete, 2-19
Time-of-day clock, 2-32
Timers, 2-32
constant sweep timer, 2-33
time-tick contacts, 2-33
Watchdog timer, 2-33
Time-tick contacts, 2-33
Timing, instruction, A-1
high performance models, A-6
SER, A-10
standard models, A-2
Transitions, 2-20
Troubleshooting, 3-1
accessing additional fault information, 3-7
I/O fault table, 3-6
I/O fault table explanations, 3-17
interpreting a fault, B-1
non-configurable faults, 3-9
PLC fault table, 3-6
PLC fault table explanations, 3-8
U
User references, 2-19
analog inputs, 2-19
analog outputs, 2-19
discrete inputs, 2-19
discrete internal, 2-19
discrete outputs, 2-19
discrete references, 2-19
discrete temporary, 2-19
global data, 2-20
register references, 2-19
system references, 3-5
system registers, 2-19
system status, 2-20, 2-22
V
VIEWLOCK, 2-35
W
Watchdog timer, 2-33
Window
programmer communications window, 2-9
WORD, 2-21
Index-5
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