Series 90-30 Genius Bus Controller User`s Manual, GFK

Series 90-30 Genius Bus Controller User`s Manual, GFK
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GE Intelligent Platforms
Programmable Control Products
Series 90*-30
Genius* Bus Controller
User’s Manual
GFK-1034B
January 2010
GFL-002
Warnings, Cautions, and Notes
as Used in this Publication
Warning
Warning notices are used in this publication to emphasize that hazardous voltages,
currents, temperatures, or other conditions that could cause personal injury exist in this
equipment or may be associated with its use.
In situations where inattention could cause either personal injury or damage to equipment,
a Warning notice is used.
Caution
Caution notices are used where equipment might be damaged if care is not taken.
Note:
Notes merely call attention to information that is especially significant to
understanding and operating the equipment.
This document is based on information available at the time of its publication. While efforts
have been made to be accurate, the information contained herein does not purport to cover all
details or variations in hardware or software, nor to provide for every possible contingency in
connection with installation, operation, or maintenance. Features may be described herein
which are not present in all hardware and software systems. GE Intelligent Platforms assumes
no obligation of notice to holders of this document with respect to changes subsequently made.
GE Intelligent Platforms makes no representation or warranty, expressed, implied, or statutory
with respect to, and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, sufficiency, or
usefulness of the information contained herein. No warranties of merchantability or fitness for
purpose shall apply.
* indicates a trademark of GE Intelligent Platforms, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All other
trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
©Copyright 2009 GE Intelligent Platforms, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
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Preface
This manual describes the features and operation of the Series 90t-30 Geniusr Bus Controller (GBC). It also provides the configuration and programming information needed
to complete the interface between a Series 90-30 PLC and a Genius I/O bus.
Revisions to this Manual
Changes made to this manual, as compared to the previous version (GFK-1034A) consist
of the following:
D
Updated compatibility information, which includes new releases of Series 90-30
hardware and Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro software (see page 1-7).
D
A reference to the run-disable mode, which does not apply to the GBC, was deleted
from page 6-14.
D
Other corrections and clarifications have been made as necessary.
Content of this Manual
Chapter 1. Introduction: describes the Series 90-30 Genius Bus Controller and explains
how it operates. Topics include: System Overview, I/O Devices on the Bus, Genius Bus
Controller Description, Compatibility, The Genius Bus, Genius Bus Controller Operation,
Datagrams, and Sending and Receiving Global Data.
Chapter 2. Operation and Timing: explains the relationship between the operation of
the bus controller and global data transmission on the Genius bus. Also describes timing,
and how other devices on the bus handle global data.
Chapter 3. Installation: explains how to install and remove a GBC module, connect and
terminate the communications bus, remove and install the module’s Terminal Assembly,
and install an extra connector on the Genius bus for a Hand-held Monitor.
Chapter 4. Bus Controller Configuration: explains how to complete the Logicmaster
configuration steps for a Bus Controller and its bus.
Chapter 5. Diagnostics: describes diagnostic capabilities in Series 90-30 PLC systems that
use Genius I/O and communications. Topics include: Displaying and Clearing Genius
Faults From The Programmer I/O Fault Table, Status Bits, and Diagnostic Messages.
Chapter 6. Communication Requests: describes the use of the COMMREQ (Communication Request) program instruction for fault handling and communications functions.
GFK-1034B
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
v
Preface
Related Publications
For more information, refer to these publications:
Geniusr I/O System and Communications User’s Manual (GEK-90486-1)
Geniusr I/O Discrete and Analog Blocks User’s Manual (GEK-90486-2)
Geniusr Hand-held Monitor User’s Guide (GFK-0121)
Bus ControllerUser’s Manual (GFK-0171)
Series Five Bus ControllerUser’s Manual (GFK-0248)
Series 90-30 ProgrammableController Installation Manual (GFK-0356)
Series 90-70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual (GFK-0579).
Series 90-70 Genius Bus ControllerUser’s Manual (GFK-0398).
Logicmaster 90 Series 90-30/20/Micro Programming Software User’s Manual
Series Six
(GFK-0466).
Series 90 -30/20/Micro ProgrammableControllersReference Manual (GFK-0467).
Logicmaster 90-70 Software User’s Manual (GFK-0579)
Hand-Held Programmer, Series 90 -30 and 90-20 User’s Manual (GFK-0402)
Field Control I/O Module User’s Manual (GFK-0826)
Genius Bus Interface Unit User’s Manual (GFK-0825
Series 90 -30, 70, PLC Products, Genius I/O Products, Field Control Distributed I/O &
Control Products, GE Product Approvals, Standards, General Specifications
(GFK-0867B or later)
We Welcome Your Comments and Suggestions
At GE Intelligent Platforms, we strive to produce quality technical documentation. After
you have used this manual, please take a few moments to complete and return the
Reader ’s Comment Card located on the next page.
Libby Allen
Senior Technical Writer
Genius is a registered trademark of GE Intelligent Platforms North America, Inc.
vi
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
Contents
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-1
I/O Devices on the Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Memory Required for Genius Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Memory Required for a Remote Drop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Field Control Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-3
1-3
1-4
1-4
Genius Bus Controller Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Status LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-5
1-5
1-6
Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-7
The Genius Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Genius Bus Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting a Cable Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-8
1-8
1-8
Genius Bus Controller Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Genius Bus Scan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Input Data from Devices on the Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Output Data from the CPU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-11
1-11
1-12
1-12
Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-13
Datagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-14
Global Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-15
Operation and Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1
How the Genius Bus Controller Handles Global and Input Data . . . . . . . . .
Genius Bus Controller Receives Global or Input Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Genius Bus Controller Sends Output Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Genius Bus Controller Sends Global Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Global Data Without an Application Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1
2-2
2-4
2-5
2-5
Data Transmission on the Genius Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-6
Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPU Sweep Time for the Genius Bus Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bus Scan Time for Global Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Device-to-Device Response Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-7
2-7
2-11
2-11
How Other Devices Handle Global Data Sent by the Genius Bus Controller
2-12
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1
Choosing a Rack Location for the GBC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2
Module Installation and Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-4
3-4
3-5
Bus Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-6
Terminal Assembly Removal and Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-9
Installing a Hand-held Monitor Connector
GFK-1034B
1-1
..........................
Series 90-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
3-11
vii
Contents
Chapter 4
Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-1
Device Types and Assigned Configuration Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-2
Sending and Receiving Global Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-2
Configuration Using Logicmaster 90 Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module-specific Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 6
viii
4-3
4-5
Device-specific Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-6
Entries in REF VU (Reference View Option) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-8
Configuration Using the Hand-held Programmer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hand-held Programmer Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 5
4-1
4-9
4-9
Select the GBC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-10
Configure GBC-specific Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-11
Configure Device-specific Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-13
Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-1
Status Bits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-1
Fault Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-2
Fault Table Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-4
Technical Help
5-6
.................................................
Communication Requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-1
COMMREQs and Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-1
Programming for a Communication Request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-2
COMMREQ Command Block Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-3
Command Block Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-3
Command Block Quick Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-5
The COMMREQ Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-6
COMMREQ Inputs and Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-6
COMMREQ Status Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-8
Programming Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-10
Using COMMREQs to Send Datagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-12
COMMREQ Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-14
COMMREQ #8: Enable/Disable Outputs Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-14
COMMREQ #13: Dequeue Datagram Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-15
COMMREQ #14: Send Datagram Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-18
COMMREQ #15: Request Datagram Reply Command . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-22
Series 90-30 GeniusrBus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
Restarts for autonumbers that do not restart in each
chapter.
figure bi level 1, reset
table_big level 1, reset
chap_big level 1, reset1
app_big level 1, resetA
figure_ap level 1, reset
table_ap level 1, reset
figure level 1, reset
table level 1, reset Table 1.
Chapter
these restarts must be in the header frame of chapter 1.
a:ebx, l 1 resetA
a:obx:l 1, resetA
a:bigbx level 1 resetA
a:ftr level 1 resetA
c:ebx, l 1 reset1
c:obx:l 1, reset1
c:bigbx level 1 reset1
c:ftr level 1 reset1
Reminders for autonumbers that need to be restarted
manually (first instance will always be 4)
let_in level 1: A. B. C.
letter level 1:A.B.C.
num level 1: 1. 2. 3.
num_in level 1: 1. 2. 3.
rom_in level 1: I. II. III.
roman level 1: I. II. III.
steps level 1: 1. 2. 3.
1 Introduction
section level 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
1
This chapter provides an overview of the Series 90-30 Genius Bus Controller (GBC) and
its operation. The following topics are presented:
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
System overview
I/O Devices on the Bus
Genius Bus Controller description
Compatibility with specific equipment or software versions
The Genius Bus
Genius Bus Controller operation
Datagrams
Sending and receiving global data
System Overview
The Series 90-30 Genius Bus Controller (catalog number IC693BEM331) is used to
interface a Genius I/O serial bus to a Series 90-30 PLC. The GBC receives and transmits
control data of up to 128 bytes for up to 31 devices on the Genius bus.
a42453
CPU
BUS
CONTROLLER
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HAND-HELD
MONITOR
COMMUNICATIONS
BUS
REMOTE DROP
P
S
GFK-1034B
S
C
A
N
N
E
R
I/O BLOCKS
1-1
1
A Genius bus may serve:
H Genius blocks, which provide interface to a broad range of discrete, analog, and
special-purpose field devices. Genius blocks are self-contained modules with
advanced diagnostics capabilities and many software-configurable features.
H Remote Drops, Series 90-70 I/O racks that are interfaced to the bus via Remote I/O
Scanner Modules. Each remote drop can include any mix of discrete and analog I/O
modules, providing up to 128 bytes of input data and 128 bytes of output data.
H
Field Control I/O Station, consisting a Bus Interface Unit (BIU) and up to eight
additional Field Control modules. The BIU provides intelligent processing, I/O scanning,
and feature configuration for the I/O Station.
H
Hand-held Monitor, which can be used as a portable device or
permanently-mounted. A HHM provides a convenient operator interface for block
setup, data monitoring, and diagnostics.
H
Multiple hosts, for communications using datagrams and Global Data.
A bus may feature I/O control enhanced by communications commands in the program.
Or a bus may be used entirely for I/O control, with many I/O devices and no additional
communications. Or, a bus may be dedicated to CPU communications, with multiple
CPUs and no I/O devices. More complex systems can also be developed, with dual CPUs
and one or more additional CPUs for data monitoring.
Number of Genius Bus Controllers
Up to eight GBCs or Enhanced Genius Control Modules (GCM+) can be installed in a
Series 90-30 PLC system that has release 5.0 or later Logicmaster 90 software and release
5.0 or later CPU firmware. The GBC can not be installed in a system with a GCM.
1-2
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
1
I/O Devices on the Bus
The I/O devices on a bus may be Genius I/O blocks, or standard Series 90-70 I/O modules
in one or more remote drops. The total number of I/O circuits that can be served by one
Genius bus depends on the types of I/O devices that are used and the memory available
in the CPU.
Memor y Required for Genius Blocks
Memory requirements for Genius I/O blocks are shown below. For %I and %Q memory,
the sizes shown are in bits. For %AI and %AQ memory, the sizes shown are in words.
Maximum Memory Requirements
Block Type
%I(bits)
%Q(bits)
%AI(words)
%AQ (words)
115 VAC Grouped I/O blocks
115 VAC Isolated I/O blocks
16 Ckt AC Input Block
16 Ckt DC Sink/source blocks
32 Ckt DC Sink/source blocks
Relay Output blocks
4 Input/2 Output Analog Blocks
Current-sourceAnalogI/OBlocks
Current-source Analog Output Blocks
RTD Input blocks
Thermocoupleblocks
High-speedCounter
PowerTRAC Module A
8
8
16
16
32
8
8
4
4
2
2
6
16
16
16
16
6
6
15
18
PowerTRAC Module B
16
16
16
16
32
16
30
Many Genius I/O blocks have a configurable number of inputs or outputs, for example,
the 16-circuit DC Sink/Source Block can be configured for either 16 outputs, 16 inputs, or
16 outputs with input feedback. When configuring the GBC using either Logicmaster 90
or the HHP, the number of inputs and outputs configured for the device must match
what is configured in the block.
GFK-1034B
Chapter 1 Introduction
1-3
1
Memor y Required for a Remote Drop
Together, one 90-70 Remote I/O Scanner (IC697BEM733) and the modules it serves make
up a remote drop on the Genius bus.
REMOTE DROP
RACK 0
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P
S
RACK 1
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S B
C T
A M
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R
P
S
RACK 6
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M
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S
B
R
M
RACK 7
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R
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UP TO 50 FEET
GENIUS BUS
NOTE:
ALL RACKS MUST BE AT THE SAME GROUND POTENTIAL
The remote drop can include any mix of Series 90-70 discrete and analog input and
output modules, up to a total of 128 bytes of inputs and 128 bytes of outputs (8 discrete
points represent one byte and 1 analog channel uses 2 bytes).
Field Control Station
A Field Control station, consisting of a Genius Bus Interface Unit (IC670GBI001) and the
I/O modules it serves can make up a remote drop on the Genius bus.
The remote drop can include any mix of Field Control discrete and analog input and
output modules, up to a total of 128 bytes of inputs and 128 bytes of outputs (8 discrete
points represent one byte and 1 analog channel uses 2 bytes).
For more information, see the Field Controlt I/O Module User’s Manual (GFK-0826) and
the Geniusr Bus Interface Unit User’s Manual (GFK-0825).
1-4
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
1
Genius Bus Controller Description
The GBC is a standard, rack-mounted Series 90-30 PLC module. It plugs easily into the
PLC’s backplane or into a remote baseplate. The latch on the bottom of the module
secures it in position. The module’s Terminal Assembly, with its protective hinged cover,
is removable.
a43394
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OK
(LED)
COMM OK
(LED)
REMOVABLE
TERMINAL
ASSEMBLY
HINGED
COVER
LATCH
There are no DIP switches or jumpers to set on the module. Its configuration is
completed using the Hand-held Programmer or the Logicmaster 90-30 software.
Configuration steps are in Chapter 3.
Status LEDs
The LEDs on the front of the GBC indicate its operating status and should be on during
normal operation.
GFK-1034B
Module OK
Shows the status of the GBC. This LED turns on after power up
diagnostics are completed.
Comm OK
Shows the status of the bus. This LED is on steadily when the bus is
operating properly. It blinks for intermittent bus errors and is off for a
failed bus. It is also off when no configuration has been received from
the PLC CPU.
Chapter 1 Introduction
1-5
1
Module Specifications
Orderinginformation
IC693BEM331
Moduletype[
Currentconsumption
Series 90-30 PLC module, providing Genius
Global Data communications, Genius background
communications and I/O control with up to 31 other
devices.
Up to 8 GBCs in a PLC system with release 5.0 or later
firmware and Logicmaster 90 software.
<300mA at +5VDC
Global data length per GBC
Transmitted:
Received:
Up to 128 bytes.
Up to 128 bytes each from up to 31 other devices.
Quantity per PLC
Output data length per GBC
Up to 128 bytes transmitted to each of up to 31 other devices.
Input data length per GBC
Up to 128 bytes received from each of up to 31 other devices
Series 90-30 PLC, memory types for
globaldata
LEDs
Software diagnostics
%G, %I, %Q, %AI, %AQ, %R,
OK, COMM OK
Status bits, Fault Reporting to Series 90-30 PLC
[ Refer to GFK-0867B, or later for product standards and general specifications.
1-6
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
1
Compatibility
Specific equipment or software versions required for compatibility with the GBC module
are listed below.
Series 90-30
PLC
The GBC can be used with the following CPU models and versions of Logicmaster 90-30
software. In each case, later models or versions can be used.
CPU Models
IC693CPU___
CPU Firmware
Logicmaster 90 Software
IC641SWP___
311S
331T
313H
323H
340B
341K
release 5.0 or later
(release 5.0 or later)
301R
306K
311A
351AA
release 6.0 or later
(release 6.0 or later)
301S
306L
311A
351AB
release 6.02 or later
(release 6.0 or later)
Series Six PLC To exchange global data with a Genius Bus Controller, the Series Six Bus Controller must
be catalog number IC660CBB902F/903F (firmware version 1.5), or later.
Genius Handheld Monitor
A Genius Hand-held Monitor can be used to display the GBC bus address, its software
version, and the Series Six register address configured for global data. HHM version
IC660HHM501K (rev. 4.7) or later is required. There is no Hand-held Monitor connector
on the GBC module, but a Hand-held Monitor can communicate with the GBC while
connected to any other device on the bus. Optionally, an additional HHM mating
connector (catalog number 44A736310-001-R001) can be installed on the bus near the
GBC.
Series 90-30
Hand-held
Programmer
The GBC can be configured using a Series 90-30 Hand-held Programmer (IC693PRG300),
any version. Version 1.1 (IC693PRG300D) or later of the Hand-held Programmer allows
the use of %M (discrete internal) references.
Genius I/O
Blocks
Genius I/O blocks can be present on the same bus as the GBC. However, because the Bus
Controller is not compatible with older phase A blocks, they should not be installed on
the same bus.
GFK-1034B
Chapter 1 Introduction
1-7
1
The Genius Bus
Genius Bus Specifications
Bus Type
Daisy-chained bus cable; single twisted pair plus shield or Twinax.
Fiber optics cable and modems can also be used.
Bus Termination
75, 100, 120, or 150 ohm resistor at both ends of electrical bus cable.
Baud Rate
Configurable. 153.6 Kbaud standard, 153.6 Kbaud extended, 76.8
Kbaud, or 38.4 Kbaud.
Maximum Bus Length
7500 feet at 38.4 Kbaud, 4500 feet at 76.8 Kbaud, 3500 feet at 153.6
Kbaud extended, 2000 feet at 153.6 Kbaud, standard. Maximum
length at each baud rate also depends on cable type. The Geniusr
I/O System User’s Manual provides a complete list of cable types,
showing corresponding bus lengths and baud rates.
Greater bus lengths are possible using sections of fiber optics cable
with modems. (See Chapter 2 of the Genius I/O System User’s
Manual–GEK -90486-1.)
Maximum Number of
Devices
32 devices at 153.6 Kbaud standard, 153.6 Kbaud extended, or 76.8
Kbaud. 16 devices at 38.4 Kbaud. Includes GBC and typically a
Hand-heldMonitor.
DataEncoding
Each bit is encoded into three dipulses, majority voted at the receiver
to correct any single dipulse errors. A dipulse is an AC code consisting of a positive then negative excursion of voltage. Dipulses are individually sampled to reject low and high frequency interference.
ModulationTechnique
Frequency Shift Keying (FSK) 0 to 460.8 KHz max. (153.6 Kilobaud)
Isolationfrom
Backplane
2000 volts Hi-Pot, 1500 volts transient common mode rejection.
Signal/noiseRatio
60 dB
Selecting a Cable Type
The Genius bus is a shielded twisted-pair wire that is daisy-chained from block to block and
terminated at both ends. Proper cable selection is critical to successful operation of the
system.
Each bus in the system can be of any cable type listed in the table below. Do not mix cables of
different impedances, regardless of cable run length. The maximum run for mixed cable type
equals the shortest length recommended for any of the types used. Other, small-size twisted
pair shielded wire of unspecified impedance can be used for short runs of 50 feet or less,
using 75 ohm terminations.
The excellent noise reduction of these cable types, and of the Genius communications system,
allow the communications bus to be mixed with other signalling systems and 120 volt AC control circuits without added shielding or conduits. Conservative wiring practices, and national
and local codes, require physical separation between control circuits and power distribution
or motor power. Refer to sections 430 and 725 of the National Electric Code.
1-8
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
1
Cable Types
Cable #
& Make
Outer
Diameter
Terminating
Resistor*
–10%to+20%
1/2 Watt
Numberof Dielectric Ambient
Conductors/ Voltage
Temp
AWG (mm2)
Rating
Rating
Maximum Length Cable Run,
feet/meters at baud rate
153.6s
153.6e
76.8
38.4 D
(A)9823
(B)9182
(C)4596
(M)M39240
.350in
8.89mm
150 ohms
2 / #22 (0.36)
30V
60C
2000ft
606m
3500ft
1061m
4500ft
1364m
7500ft
2283m
(B)89182
.322in
8.18mm
150 ohms
2 / #22 (0.36)
150V
200C
2000ft
606m
3500ft
1061m
4500ft
1364m
7500ft
2283m
(B)9841
(M)M3993
.270in
6.86mm
*120 ohms
2 / #24 (0.22)
30V
80C
1000ft
303m
1500ft
455m
2500ft
758m
3500ft
1061m
(A)9818C
(B)9207
(M)M4270
.330in
8.38mm
100 ohms
2 / #20 (0.54)
300V
80C
1500ft
455m
2500ft
758m
3500ft
1061m
6000ft
1818m
(A)9109
(B)89207
(C)4798
(M)M44270
.282in
7.16mm
100 ohms
2 / #20 (0.54)
150V
200C
1500ft
455m
2500ft
758m
3500ft
1061m
6000ft
1818m
(A)9818D
(B)9815
.330in
8.38mm
100 ohms
2 / #20 (0.54)
1500ft
455m
2500ft
758m
3500ft
1061m
6000ft
1818m
(A)9818
(B)9855
(M)M4230
.315in
8.00mm
100 ohms
4 (two pair)
#22 (0.36)
150V
60C
1200ft
364m
1700ft
516m
3000ft
909m
4500ft
1364m
(A)9110
(B)89696
(B)89855
(M)M64230
.274in
6.96mm
100 ohms
4 (two pair)
#22 (0.36)
150V
200C
1200ft
364m
1700ft
516m
3000ft
909m
4500ft
1364m
(A)9814C)
(B)9463
(M)M4154
.243in
6.17mm
75 ohms
2 / #20 (0.54)
150V
60C
800ft
242m
1500ft
455m
2500ft
758m
3500ft
1061m
(A)5902C
(B)9302
(M)M17002
.244in
6.20mm
75 ohms
4 (two pair)
#22 (0.36)
300V
80C
200ft
60m
500ft
152m
1200ft
333m
2500ft
758m
Notes:
A = Alpha, B = Belden, C = Consolidated, M = Manhattan
D = Limited to 16 taps at 38.4 Kbaud
Notes
The 89182, 89207, 4794, 89696, and 89855 types are high temperature
cables for use in severe environments, and are qualified for use in air
plenums.
The 9815 type is water resistant, and can be used where direct burial is
required.
Similar cables of equivalent terminating resistance such as 9207, 89207,
and 9815 can be mixed.
GFK-1034B
Chapter 1 Introduction
1-9
1
Using Other Cable Types
The cable types listed in the preceding table are recommended for use. If the cable types
listed above are not available, the cable selected must meet the following guidelines.
1.
High quality construction. Most important is uniformity of cross section along the
length of the cable. Poor quality cable may cause signal distortion, and increase the
possibility of damage during installation.
2.
Precision-twisted shielded wire of EIA RS-422 standard type, having a uniform
number of twists per unit of length. In a catalog, this type of cable may also be listed
as twinaxial cable, data cable, or computer cable.
3.
Relatively high characteristic impedance; 100 to 150 ohms is best; 75 ohms is the
minimum recommended.
4.
Low capacitance between wires, typically less than 20pF/foot (60pF/meter). This
may be accomplished by inner dielectrics of foamed type, usually polypropylene or
polyethylene, having a low dielectric constant. Alternatively, the conductors may be
spaced relatively far apart. Lower impedance types have smaller cross–sections, and
provide easier wiring for shorter total transmission distances.
5.
Shield coverage of 95% or more. Solid foil with an overlapped folded seam and drain
wire is best. Braided copper is less desirable; spiral wound foil is least desirable.
6.
An outer jacket that provides appropriate protection, such as water, oil, or chemical
resistance. While PVC materials can be used in many installations, Teflon,
polyethelene, or polypropylene are usually more durable.
7.
Electrical characteristics: cable manufacturers’ information about pulse rise time and
NRZ data rate is useful for comparing cable types. The Genius bit consists of three
AC pulses; the equivalent NRZ bit rate is about three times as great.
For assistance in selecting a specific cable type, please consult your local GE application
engineer.
Prefabricated Cables
For applications using 150 ohm cables such as Belden 9182, prefabricated cables in 15”
(IC660BLC001) and 36” (IC660BLC003) lengths are available. These cables terminate in
mating connectors that simplify wiring between I/O blocks.
1-10
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
1
Genius Bus Controller Operation
The GBC handles all data transfer between the PLC and the devices on its bus. In order
to do this, the GBC must interface two completely separate and asynchronous activities:
A. The Genius bus scan, a cycle of communications among the devices on a bus
(including the GBC itself). The cycle follows the order of bus addresses (0-31).
B. The CPU sweep, the cycle of actions that includes communications between the
CPU and the GBC.
The GBC manages data transfer between the bus and the CPU by maintaining an
on-board RAM and a serial backplane interface. The GBC places inputs in the on-board
RAM when they are received from the Genius bus. When the input sweep of the PLC
CPU occurs, inputs from the on-board RAM are transferred via the serial backplane to
the CPU. When the output sweep of the PLC CPU occurs, outputs are received from the
CPU via the serial backplane and placed in the on-board RAM. When the GBC receives
the token on the Genius bus, outputs from the on-board RAM are transmitted onto the
Genius bus.
The Genius Bus Scan
A bus scan consists of one complete rotation of a “token” among the devices on the bus.
a43528
GBC
Î
Î
ÎÎ
TOKEN PATH
(DEVICE 31)
1
2
3
30
As mentioned earlier, these devices may include other GBCs, or Remote I/O Scanners, in
addition to (or instead of) the Genius blocks illustrated above.
During a bus scan, the GBC automatically:
H
H
H
receives all input data that has been sent by devices on the bus.
H
receives any fault messages issued by devices on the bus and issues fault reports to
the CPU that can be displayed using the Logicmaster software.
H
sends a single command received from the CPU (for example, a Clear Circuit Fault
datagram) to the appropriate devices.
broadcasts global data.
updates outputs, as permitted, to the devices on the bus. Transmission of outputs
from the GBC can be disabled for one or more devices on the bus.
The amount of time it takes for the communications token to pass to all devices depends
on the baud rate, the number and types of devices on the bus, and the use of global data
and datagram communications.
GFK-1034B
Chapter 1 Introduction
1-11
1
Input Data from Devices on the Bus
The GBC receives input data or global data from each input block, I/O block, remote
drop, or bus controller each time the block or Remote I/O Scanner has the
communications token. (Because this data is broadcast, it may be received by any other
bus interface module operating on the bus).
INPUTS
FROM BLOCK 4
a43559
GBC
1
2
4
3
= TOKEN
The GBC stores all the input data it receives. Once per CPU sweep, the CPU reads all
discrete and analog inputs from the GBC. (Analog data is not multiplexed).
Output Data from the CPU
As the application program executes, the CPU sends outputs and any commands to the
GBC. The GBC stores this data, transmitting it on the bus each time it has the
communications token. Unlike inputs, which are broadcast, outputs are directed to the
specific device that should receive them.
a43557
PLC CPU
READS STORED INPUTS
OUTPUTS
GBC
STORES NEW OUTPUTS
GBC
HAS
TOKEN
1
2
3
4
TOKEN
1-12
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
1
Diagnostics
Genius blocks and other devices on the bus automatically report faults, alarms and
certain other predefined conditions to the PLC.
INPUTS AND FAULT MESSAGE
FROM BLOCK 3
a43556
GBC
1
TOKEN
F
FAULT
2
3
4
F
F
Only one diagnostic message can be sent during any bus scan. If a fault message has
already been sent (by another device) during that scan, a device saves its own diagnostic
message until the next available bus scan. For example, if the communications token is
currently at device 3, and faults occur at devices 3 and 4 at the same time, device 3 can
send its diagnostic message if another message has not already been sent. Device 4 must
wait at least one more bus scan to send its diagnostic message.
The GBC stores any diagnostic messages it receives. They are read automatically by the
Series 90-30 CPU. Faults can then be displayed in the fault table using the Logicmaster
90-30 software. Faults on the Genius device can be cleared using the Genius HHM.
Faults in the PLC’s I/O fault table and on the Genius device can be cleared from
Logicmaster 90-30.
For more details about these diagnostics features, see Chapter 5.
Additional datagrams, not listed in the table on page 1-14, are sent as system messages;
they do not involve any application programming. The Geniusr I/O System User’s Manual
explains datagrams in detail. It also shows the formats of the data that is transferred by
datagrams.
In an application program, communication request (COMMREQ) instructions are used
to send datagrams and to read any unsolicited datagrams that have been received. See
Chapter 6 for instructions.
GFK-1034B
Chapter 1 Introduction
1-13
1
Datagrams
The Series 90-30 GBC supports all Genius datagrams. Refer to Chapter 3 of the Geniusr
I/O System and Communications User’s Manual (GEK-90486E-1) for further details on the
use of datagrams.
Datagram Type
1-14
Description
Read ID
Requests identifying information from a device on the bus.
Read ID Reply
The automatic response to a Read ID datagram.
ReadConfiguration
Requests configuration data from a device on the bus.
Read Configuration Reply
The automatic response to a Read Configuration datagram.
WriteConfiguration
Sends configuration data to a device on the bus.
AssignMonitor
Commands a device on the bus to direct an extra copy of each Fault
Report to another device on the bus.
ReadDiagnostics
Requests diagnostics data from a device on the bus.
Read Diagnostics Reply
The automatic response to a Read Diagnostics datagram.
Write Point
Sends up to 1 word of bit data to a Series Six or Series Five PLC, or
to a host computer.
ReadBlockI/O
Requests I/O data from some types of Genius blocks.
Read Block I/O Reply
The automatic response to a Read Block I/O datagram.
Report Fault
An automatic diagnostic message received from a device on the
bus.
Pulse Test
Commands a discrete block to pulse its outputs.
Pulse Test Complete
Automatic indication that outputs have been pulsed.
Clear Circuit Fault
Clears one specific circuit fault.
Clear All Circuit Faults
Clears all circuit faults on bus devices.
Switch BSM
Causes a Bus Switching Module to switch to alternate bus, if operational.
Read Device
Reads up to 128 bytes of CPU data via another GBC.
Read Device Reply
The response to a Read Device datagram.
Write Device
Sends up to 128 bytes of data to a CPU, via its GBC.
Read Data
Requeststemporary data from a High-speed Counter block.
Read Data Reply
The automatic reply to a Read Data datagram.
Write Data
Sends temporary data to a High-speed Counter block.
Read Map
Requests the I/O map configuration of a Remote I/O Scanner or
Field Control
Read Map Reply
Automatic response to a Read Map datagram.
Write Map
Sends I/O map configuration to a Remote I/O Scanner or Field Control.
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
1
Global Data
Global Data is data that is automatically and repeatedly broadcast by a bus controller.
The Series 90-30 GBC can send up to 128 bytes of Global Data and receive up to 128
bytes of Global Data each bus scan from each GCM+ or other GBC on its bus.
Sending Global Data
Once set up by configuration (see Chapter 4), Global Data is broadcast automatically.
Other devices that receive the Global Data place it in these memory locations:
Series 90-30 Sends
Global Data To:
Other CPU Places Global Data in this Memory Location:
Series 90-30 PLC
%I, %Q, %G, %R, %AI, %AQ, and %M (HHP configuration only).
Memory type and beginning address are chosen during configuration of
the receiving GBC.
Series 90-70 PLC
%I, %Q, %G, %R, %AI, %AQ. Memory type and beginning address are
chosen during configuration of the receiving GBC.
Series 90-30 GCM+
%I, %Q, %G, %R, %AI, %AQ. Memory type and beginning address are
chosen during configuration of the receiving GCM+.
Series90-30PLC/
GCM
%G memory location corresponding to Device Number (16-23) of the
Series 90-30 GBC that sent the data.
Series Six PLC
Register memory. Beginning S6 address selected during configuration of
the Series 90-30 GBC that sent the data.
Series Five PLC
Registermemory. Beginning S6 address selected during configuration of
the Series 90-30 GBC that sent the data.
Computer
PCIM or QBIM Input Table Segment corresponding to Device Number
of the Series 90-30 GBC that sent the data.
Receiving Global Data
The GBC can be configured to receive or ignore Global Data from any other GBC. The
memory type and length for incoming Global Data are also selected during
configuration, as described in Chapter 4.
The Series 90-30 CPU can place incoming Global Data in %I, %Q, %G, %R, %AI, %AQ,
or %M (HHP configuration only) memory.
Example
In the following example, a Series 90-30 PLC (PLC 1) sends 64 bits of Global Data
beginning at %I0105 to another Series 90-30 PLC (PLC 2). PLC 2 places this data into its
own memory beginning at %I0017. PLC 2 sends 8 words of %AQ data beginning at
%AQ0001 to PLC 1. PLC 1 places this data into its own memory beginning at %AI0032.
Series 90-30
PLC 1
%I0105 – %I0169
%AI0032 – %AI0039
GFK-1034B
Chapter 1 Introduction
Series 90-30
PLC 2
a
'
%I0017 – %I0081
%AQ00001
– %AQ00008
1-15
Chapter
2 Operation and Timing
section level 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
2
This chapter explains:
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
How the GBC sends and receives global and input data
What happens to global, input, and output data if certain communications stop
Application programming needed for global data
The relationship between the bus scan and the CPU sweep
How other devices handle global data received from the GBC
How to estimate bus scan time
How to estimate data response time
How to avoid unnecessarily slowing down either the CPU sweep time or the scan
time of the Genius bus
How the Genius Bus Controller Handles Global and Input Data
The GBC can send global data to all other global Genius devices on the bus. It can also
receive and pass to the CPU global data that has been sent by other devices on the bus.
Global data can be sent from and received into %G, %Q, %AQ, %R, %I, %AI, and %M
(HHP configuration only) memories in the Series 90-30 PLC. Status data uses %I
memory.
GFK-1034B
2-1
2
Genius Bus Controller Receives Global or Input Data
The GBC passes global data and input data, from all devices for which a length has been
configured, to the CPU.
In the following example, two devices, at serial bus addresses (SBAs) 18 and 22,
send global data on the bus. Each module broadcasts its global data while it has
the bus token. The global data is received by a GBC module (#20 in the
diagram) in a Series 90-30 PLC system.
Series 90-30
Memory
GBC
%G, %I,
%Q, %AI,
%AQ, %R
SBA #20
a
SBA #18
Global data
from SBA #22
a
SBA #22
Global data
from SBA #22
The GBC module stores the global data it receives. When the Series 90-30 CPU executes
the input update portion of its sweep, it reads global data, input data, and status bits (see
below) from the GBC.
In this example, the PLC CPU copies global data from the GBC into the memory
locations configured for the devices at bus addresses 18 and 22.
Series 90-30
Memory
%G, %I,
%Q, %AI,
%AQ, %R,
%M
2-2
Series 90
GBC
a
a
SBA #20
SBA #18
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
SBA #22
GFK-1034B
2
What Happens If Incoming Global or Input Data Stops
As part of the GBC configuration a data default (OFF or HOLD Last State) must be
selected. If the GBC stops receiving data from any device(s) for which a global or input
data length has been configured, the GBC sets the corresponding memory locations to
the selected default. If the default is OFF, the GBC supplies 0s for the missing data. If the
default is HOLD, the GBC continues to supply the last set of valid data it received from
the device.
Status Bits
The GBC maintains a status bit for every potential bus device. Bit 0 of the 32 bits of
status corresponds to SBA0. Bit 31 corresponds to SBA31. These bits are set to a value of
1 for every correctly configured device that is present on the bus. The bit corresponding
to the module itself is always 1 if the module is working.
If the GBC does not receive, or stops receiving, communications from a device (or if the
device is not configured or incorrectly configured), its bit is set to 0. In addition, the GBC
defaults the data as described above. The configuration supplied to the GBC must
provide a location in %I in which to place the 32 status bits. The status bits are updated
every PLC sweep.
Note: The GBC can been configured to receive global data from a Series 90-30 or 90-70
PLC on the Genius bus. If this external 90-30 or 90-70 is put in STOP mode, global data is
no longer sent. The GBC configured to receive this global data will default the device’s
data to OFF or to HOLD LAST STATE (as configured), but will not set the device’s status
bit to 0.
GFK-1034B
Chapter 2 Operation and Timing
2-3
2
Genius Bus Controller Sends Output Data
If there is an application program running in the 90-30, it executes before the PLC CPU
updates outputs. During the output portion of the sweep, if the GBC is configured to
send output data to devices on the Genius bus, the PLC CPU also writes the contents of
the selected memory locations to the GBC.
Example:
Series 90-30
Memory
%G, %I,
%Q, %AI,
%AQ, %R
GBC
'
SBA #31
SBA #18
SBA #19
The CPU sends new output data to its GBC from the memory locations configured as
outputs for devices 18 and 19. The GBC module stores the data until it receives the bus
token. At that time, it directs the output data for device 18 to device 18, and then directs
the output data for device 19 to device 19.
Series 90-30
Memory
%G, %I,
%Q, %AI,
%AQ, %R
2-4
Series 90
GBC
'
Outputs
for 18
SBA #31
'
Outputs
for 19
SBA #18
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
'
SBA #19
GFK-1034B
2
Genius Bus Controller Sends Global Data
If there is an application program running in the 90-30, it executes before the PLC CPU
updates outputs. During the output portion of the sweep, if the GBC is configured to
send global data to the Genius bus, the PLC CPU also writes the contents of the selected
memory locations to the GBC.
In the following example, the CPU sends new global data to its GBC from the
memory location configured for bus address 20.
Series 90-30
Memory
%G, %I,
%Q, %AI,
%AQ, %R,
%M
GBC
'
SBA #20
SBA #18
SBA #22
The GBC module stores this data until it receives the bus token. At that time, it
broadcasts the global data to all the other devices on the bus.
In the example system, both bus addresses 18 and 22 receive the global data sent
from bus address 20:
Series 90-30
Memory
%G, %I,
%Q, %AI,
%AQ, %R,
%M
GBC
'
SBA #20
SBA #18
Global data
from SBA #20
SBA #22
'
What Happens If the CPU Stops Supplying Global Data or Output Data
When the CPU stops, the GBC stops sending global data and output data.
Global Data Without an Application Program
The Series 90-30 can transmit and receive global data with or without running an
application program. Configuring I/O modules in the Series 90-30 to have the same
reference addresses used for global or input data allows the I/O modules to effectively
exchange I/O data with another device on the bus. Thus, where it is desired to set up the
Series 90-30 PLC without a program, data coming into the GBC will be mapped to %Q
and %AQ (where output modules are also mapped) and outgoing global data and
output data will be mapped to %I or %AI (where input modules are also mapped).
GFK-1034B
Chapter 2 Operation and Timing
2-5
2
Data Transmission on the Genius Bus
Communications on the Genius bus occur by a method called “token passing”. The
devices on the bus pass an implicit token, which rotates among the devices in sequence
from address 0 to address 31. Unused addresses are passed with very slight delays. This
sequence is called a bus scan. After device 31 has had its turn, the scan restarts at
device 0.
a43393
TOKEN PATH
DEVICES
ON THE
BUS
0
16
23
31
Each device on the bus can receive messages at all times (not just when it has the token).
A GBC module receives all broadcast messages. These are messages that are sent to all
devices on the bus. Global data and input data are types of broadcast messages.
When a device holds the token, it can send messages. To end its turn, the transmitting
device sends one specific broadcast message which acts as a sign-off message, and the
token passes to the next device.
If CPU sweep time is slower than bus scan time, it is possible that some incoming global
data might change before it is picked up by the CPU. It is important to be sure that the
data will not be sent so briefly that it will be missed.
If program execution time is faster than bus scan time, the CPU may process the same
data repeatedly. Also, if output data changes too quickly, some outputs may change
before they are sent out on the Genius bus. The ”Timing” section in this chapter explains
how to estimate bus scan time and CPU sweep time.
2-6
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
2
Timing
Global, input, and output data adds to both the CPU sweep time in the Series 90-30 and
to the scan time of the Genius bus. You can estimate the CPU sweep time and bus scan
time added by data transmissions, and the time it can take for a Series 90-30 PLC to send
data and then receive a response based on that data.
CPU Sweep Time for the Genius Bus Controller
The impact of global, input, and output data on CPU sweep time depends on the type of
PLC, the GBC rack location, and the types and amounts of data transferred. Refer to the
following table.
CPU Model
311/313
331
340/341
1.
Rack Location
Base Contribution
(milliseconds)
Per Byte Contribution
(microseconds/byte)
N/A
main
expansion
remote
main
expansion
remote
0.887
0.967
1.164
1.920
0.666
0.901
1.626
13
21
29
76
17
24
72
Once configured, the GBC always provides 32 status bits to the CPU, adding to the
CPU sweep time. The time required for this is listed in the table above as the “base
time” under “Status Bits + Incoming Global/Input Data”.
For example, if a GBC is installed in a local or expansion rack of a model 331
PLC, the base time for status bits and incoming global data is 1.2ms.
1.20
incoming
base time
Because the GBC always supplies its status bits to the CPU, the incoming data base
time must be included in the sweep time calculation, regardless of whether or not
the GBC passes incoming global/input data to the CPU. A sweep time example
illustrating this is on the next page.
GFK-1034B
Chapter 2 Operation and Timing
2-7
2
2.
If the GBC passes incoming global/input data from one or more bus devices to the
CPU, multiply the total of: the number of global data bytes passed to the CPU by the
corresponding “per byte” time in microseconds as listed in the table. For the model
331 PLC CPU only, incoming bit data has a slightly greater per byte rate than word
data. For destination tables %G, %I, and %Q, use the bit per-byte time. For %R, %AI,
or %AQ, use the word per-byte rate.
In the same example, if the GBC passes 16 bytes of global/input data each from 6
other devices to the model 331 CPU’s %R, %AI, or %AQ memory, the base time
plus the time required to transfer the data is:
1.20 + (96 * 0.017) =2.83ms
incoming
base time
per-byte rate for %R, %AI or %AQ
for model 331 CPU
incoming global data
16 bytes x 6 devices = 96
3.
If the GBC will also send global/output data, find the additional base time for
outgoing global data. Add bytes of output data for each output device. To this base
time, add: the number of bytes sent multiplied by a per-byte time in microseconds as
shown in the table. Again, for the model 331, use the “bit” per-byte time for
destination tables %G, %I, and %Q or the “word” per-byte rate for %R, %AI, or
%AQ.
If the same GBC sends 64 bytes of global data, the CPU sweep time impact of
sending the data is:
1.30 + (64 * 0.021) =2.64ms
per-byte rate for %R, %AI or %AQ
for model 331 CPU
outgoing
base time
outgoing global data
64 bytes
If the GBC does not send global data or output data, no base time or per-byte time is
included in the CPU sweep. This is different from the incoming global data
calculation, where incoming base time is always included.
4.
The total sweep time impact for a GBC is the sum of its read and write times.
For the same example:
2.83 + 2.64 = 5.47ms
2-8
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
2
Example with Genius Bus Controller in a Remote Rack
If the same GBC was installed in a remote rack, exchanging the same amounts of data
with the CPU would take considerably longer. The complete calculation is:
(2.0 + (96 *0.070)) + (2.5 + (64 * 0.069)) = 8.72 + 6.92 = 15.64ms
incoming
base time
outgoing global data
64 bytes
outgoing
base time
incoming global data
96 bytes
per-byte rate for %R, %AI or %AQ
for model 331 CPU
Example with No Incoming Global Data or Input Data
If a GBC sends global data but does not pass any incoming global data to the CPU, the
time required to transfer its status bits still impacts the CPU sweep. The base time for
incoming data described in step 1 must always be included in the sweep time calculation.
For example, a GBC in an expansion rack passes no incoming global data to the
CPU, but sends 48 bytes each bus scan. The sweep time impact is:
1.2 + 1.3 + (48 * 0.021) = 3.51 ms
incoming
base time
outgoing
base time
GFK-1034B
Chapter 2 Operation and Timing
per-byte rate for %R, %AI or %AQ
for model 331 CPU
outgoing global data
48 bytes
2-9
2
Example with No Outgoing Global/Output Data, Genius Bus Controller Receives
both Bit and Word Data
If the GBC passes incoming global data to the CPU but does not send any, the sweep
time calculation includes only the incoming data base time and per-byte time. Again, if
the PLC CPU is a model 331, incoming data sent to %G, %I, or %Q has a slightly greater
per-byte rate than data sent to %R, %AI, or %AQ, so the two data types are separated in
the calculation.
In this example, a GBC in a local rack of a model 331 passes 32 words and 256
bits of incoming global data to its CPU. It does not send any global data. The
sweep time impact is:
1.2 + (64 * 0.017) + (32 * 0.019) = 2.90 ms
incoming
base time
incoming word data
32 words = 64 bytes
per-byte rate for %G, %I or
%Q for model 331 CPU
incoming discrete data
256 bits = 32 bytes
per-byte rate for %R, %AI or %AQ
for model 331 CPU
Reducing the Sweep Time Impact
To minimize the impact of global data transfer on the CPU sweep time, you can:
H
H
Install GBC modules in the main rack or an expansion rack, not in a remote rack.
Eliminate unwanted incoming global data. If there is global data being transferred
on the bus that the Series 90-30 does not need, do not configure to receive it.
Timing is not affected by the number or type of memory assignments made for
incoming global data.
2-10
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
2
Bus Scan Time for Global Data
The minimum amount of time required for the token to make a complete bus rotation is
3mS. This minimum time limit is imposed by the GBC and other types of bus interface
modules. The maximum bus scan time is 400mS, but this will not be reached under
normal circumstances.
The presence of other PLCs, a host computer, I/O blocks, or datagrams on the bus adds
to the bus scan time (although the time required for each individual message
transmission remains the same). Using one of the slower baud rates also increases bus
scan time. The scan time increase from 153.6 Kbaud standard to 153.6 Kbaud extended is
slight. But scan time is about twice as long at 76.8 Kbaud and four times as long at 38.4
Kbaud.
Estimating Bus Scan Time
Refer to “Timing Considerations” in the Geniusr I/O System and Communications User’s
Manual (GEK-90486-1) for instructions on how to estimate bus scan time.
You will need to add up the time needed to service all devices on the bus, including the
GBC, at the bus baud rate. All 32 possible bus addresses (including unused bus
addresses) must be accounted for. See the table below.
Contribution time in mS at each baud rate
Device Type
153.6 Kb std
153.6 Kb ext
76.8 Kb
38.4 Kb
GBC
0.586
0.658
1.324
2.655
Unused Bus Address
0.026
0.052
0.104
0.208
Reducing Bus Scan Time
Bus scan time can be shortened by reducing the number of devices on the bus, reducing
the amount of global data transmitted, or both.
Device-to-Device Response Time
If you want to find out approximately how long it will take for one module to send
global data to another and to receive a response based upon that data, add together the
maximum times that may be required for each portion of the input to output cycle. Refer
to “Timing Considerations” in the Geniusr I/O System and Communications User’s Manual
(GEK-90486-1) for more information.
GFK-1034B
Chapter 2 Operation and Timing
2-11
2
How Other Devices Handle Global Data Sent by the Genius Bus
Controller
Global data sent by a GBC can be received by any other Bus Controller, Genius
Communications Module (GCM), Personal Computer Interface Module (PCIM), or
Q -Bus Interface Module (QBIM on the bus. All devices receive the same global data
message from the GBC. How each type of device handles the message is summarized
below. (See the table on page 1-15 for a list of memory locations for each module type.)
2-12
Series 90-30
PLC GBC
Module
A GBC in another Series 90-30 PLC places the data in the memory
location specified when that GBC is configured.
Series 90-30
PLC GCM+
Module
A GCM+ on another Series 90-30 PLC places the data in the memory
location specified when that GCM+ is configured. If the GCM+ does
not need all the data, a message offset and length can be specified.
Series 90-30
PLC GCM
Module
The Series 90-30 Genius Communications Module uses specific %G
memory locations for global data. It places incoming global data in the
%G memory location corresponding to the Device Number (16–23) of
the Series 90-30 GBC that sent the data. The GCM will not receive global
data sent from SBAs 0–15 or 24–31.
Series 90-30
PLC
The Series 90-30 PLC places incoming global data into the memory
location selected during configuration of its GBC.
Series 90-70
PLC
The Series 90-70 PLC places incoming global data into the memory
location selected during configuration of its GBC.
Series Six
PLC
If a Series Six Reference is specified during GBC configuration, any
Series Six and/or Series Five PLC on the bus will automatically receive all
global data from the GBC and place it in that register location.
Series Five
PLC
See Series Six PLC.
Computer
Data from the GBC is placed into the PCIM or QBIM Input Table
Segment corresponding to the bus address of the GBC. The computer’s
application program is responsible for transferring global data between
the CPU and the PCIM or QBIM.
I/O Blocks
I/O blocks (controlled by another host) can be present on the bus, but
cannot receive global data.
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
Chapter
3 Installation
section level 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
3
This chapter explains how to:
H
determine the maximum number of GBCs and Genius blocks that can be configured
for your system
H
H
H
H
install and remove a GBC module
connect and terminate the communications bus
remove and install the module’s Terminal Assembly
install an extra connector on the Genius bus for a Hand-held Monitor
Note
If the Genius bus is operating at 76.8Kbaud, the bus must be properly
terminated before powering-up the GBC module.
The module will not power up on an unterminated bus at 76.8Kbaud.
The GBC operates only on a correctly terminated Genius bus. If you want to test it
without any bus connections, place a 75-ohm resistor across the Serial 1 and Serial 2
terminals to ensure that the module will power-up.
GFK-1034B
3-1
3
Choosing a Rack Location for the GBC
The GBC module can be located in any I/O slot in Series 90-30 CPU expansion and
remote baseplates, or I/O racks, including remote racks. For the most efficient system
operation, the main baseplate is preferred. See the “Timing” section of Chapter 2 for
details.
A maximum of eight GBC modules can be used in the same Series 90-30 PLC. However,
depending on the number of I/O devices configured on the GBCs and the number of
other I/O modules in your system, your system may not be able to handle all eight
GBCs.
Note: Up to four references can be configured for each SBA on a GBC bus.
To estimate whether the system you want to design is possible, follow steps 1–3, below.
1.
The I/O configuration block uses a base of 90 bytes of user memory. Each smart
module uses 257 bytes of user memory for parameter data. Finally, everyI/O
segment uses an additional 40 bytes of user memory.
Example of segments:
A GBC with SBA 0 I1 and SBA 2 Q2 configured has three I/O segments: the status in
%I, and the two configured under the SBAs).
A discrete input module has one segment (%I).
2.
The total user memory required by a configuration is the sum of all these parts:
base configuration size (90)
number of smart modules *257
+number of segments *40
total user memory required for the configuration
3.
The total user memory available for configuration varies with CPU model. If the
number derived from the formula above is greater than the number next to the CPU
that you are using, the system will not work due to memory limitations.
CPU
3-2
Series 90
Available Memory
(bytes)
311
4,720
313
4,720
323
4,720
331
4,656
340/341
8,176
351
16,368
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
3
Example:
A user wants to configure three GBCs (the first with 53 segments, the second with 26
segments, and the third with 11 segments), 1 discrete input module, 1 analog input
module, 1 discrete output module, and 1 discrete combo input/output module.
First, add up the number of segments:
First GBC: 1 for status + 53 configured segments
Second GBC: 1 for status + 26 configured segments
Third GBC: 1 for status + 11 configured segments
Discrete input module: 1 (%I)
Analog input module 1 (%AI)
Discrete output module: 1 (%Q)
Discrete I/O module: 1 for input (%I) + 1 for output (%Q)
for a total of 98 segments.
Now, add them all up:
90=
90
3 x 257= 771
98 x 40=3,920
4,781
This will fit in a 341 CPU, but not in a 331 CPU.
GFK-1034B
Chapter 3 Installation
3-3
3
Module Installation and Removal
Module Installation
The GBC module is installed and removed in the same manner as all other Series 90-30
modules. Power must be OFF when installing or removing the module.
To install the GBC in the Series 90-30 PLC baseplate:
1.
Grasp the module with the terminal board toward you and the rear hook facing
away from you.
2.
Align the module with the desired base slot and connector. Tilt the module upward
so that the top rear hook on the module engages the slot on the baseplate.
3.
Swing the module downward until the connectors mate and the locking lever on the
bottom of the module snaps into place, engaging the baseplate notch.
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3-4
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
3
Module Removal
The module can be removed without powering down the communications bus,
provided the incoming and outgoing Serial 1 wires have been connected to one terminal
and the Serial 2 wires have been connected to one terminal or jumpered as described on
the next page. If this has been done, do not disconnect the bus cable or any terminating
resistor. Before removing the GBC, carefully remove the Terminal Assembly from the
front of the GBC (see page 3-9). Avoid contact with exposed cable wiring. Place the
Terminal Assembly, with the bus wiring still attached, in a protected location.
Caution
If exposed wiring comes in contact with conductive material, data on
the bus may be corrupted, possibly causing the system to shut down.
If the rest of the bus is powered down, the bus wiring can be removed from the module.
To remove the module:
1.
Locate the release lever on the bottom of the module. Firmly press it up toward the
module.
2.
While holding the module firmly at the top, continue fully depressing the release
lever and swing the module upward.
3.
Disengage the hook at the top of the module by raising the module up and moving
it away from the baseplate.
a43056
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PRESS
RELEASE LEVER
GFK-1034B
Chapter 3 Installation
3-5
3
Bus Installation
The Genius bus is connected to the terminal assembly on the front of the GBC module.
For the GBC module, these terminals have the following assignments:
a47051
GENIUS
BUS
CONTROL
OK
COM
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ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
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GENIUS
BUS
CONTROLLER
1
2
SER
1
3
4
5
6
7
8
SER
2
9
10
11
12
SHD
IN
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
SHD
OUT
20
44A729182–068R01
FOR USE WITH
IC693BEM331
Connection can be made to any of the terminals in a group. The cable is routed to and
from the terminals via the bottom of the Terminal Assembly cavity.
3-6
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
3
Using the cable type selected for the application, connect the devices as shown in the
following figure. Each terminal accepts up to one AWG #14 (2.10mm2) wire or two AWG
#16 (1.32mm2) wires using ring or lug-type connectors.
Caution
The bus shield wires are not insulated; do not permit them to touch
other wires or terminals. Spaghetti tubing should be used to cover
these wires.
4.
Connect Serial 1 terminals of adjacent devices and the Serial 2 terminals of
adjacent devices.
5.
Connect Shield In to the Shield Out terminal of the previous device. (For the first
device on the bus, Shield In is not connected.)
6.
Connect Shield Out to the Shield In terminal of the next device. (For the last
device on the bus, Shield Out is not connected.)
First
Device
R
GFK-1034B
Chapter 3 Installation
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
a43391
Last
Device
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
SERIAL
1
SERIAL
1
SERIAL
2
SERIAL
2
SHIELD
IN
SHIELD
IN
SHIELD
OUT
SHIELD
OUT
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ÎÎ
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SERIAL
1
SERIAL
2
SHIELD
IN
SHIELD
OUT
ÎÎ
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SERIAL
1
SERIAL
2
R
SHIELD
IN
SHIELD
OUT
3-7
3
Serial Wire Connections
The Serial 1 and Serial 2 terminals are interconnected on the circuit board, not on the
terminal strip. Incoming and outgoing signal wire pairs can be connected to either one
or two Serial 1 or Serial 2 terminals:
Signal Wires Connected
to One Terminal
Signal Wires Connected
to Two Terminals
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
5
Serial 1
signal wires
4
jumper
5
Serial 1
signal wires
Serial 1
terminals
Serial 1
terminals
If you are connecting two signal wires to the same terminal, use spade or lug-type
connectors, or twist the exposed ends of the wires together before inserting them. This
will allow future removal of the Terminal Assembly without disrupting other devices on
the bus (see ”Module Removal”, in this chapter).
If you are connecting two signal wires to separate terminals, install a jumper between
the two terminals as shown on the right above. Failure to install the jumper will cause
the entire bus to be disrupted whenever the faceplate is removed.
Terminating the Bus
The bus must be terminated at both ends by its characteristic impedance. The list of
suitable cable types in the Genius I/O System and Communications User’s Manual includes
the termination requirements for each cable type. If the GBC is at the end of the bus,
install a resistor of the appropriate impedance across its Serial 1 and Serial 2 terminals as
shown below.
If you need to install the terminating resistor across terminals different than those used
for the signal wires, attach jumper wires between the signal wire terminals and the
resistor terminals to prevent the bus from becoming unterminated if the Terminal
Assembly is removed. Failure to do so will cause the entire bus to be disrupted whenever
the faceplate is removed.
Signal Wires and
Resistor Connected
to Same Terminals
(preferred)
Signal Wires and
Resistor Connected
to Different
Terminals
1
jumpers
1
2
3
3
Serial 1
signal wire
4
5
resistor
Serial 1
signal wire
5
6
6
7
7
8
resistor
9
9
Serial 2
signal wire
Serial 1 and 2
terminals
3-8
Series 90
10
10
Serial 2
signal wire
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
Serial 1 and 2
terminals
GFK-1034B
3
Terminal Assembly Removal and Installation
The Terminal Assembly of all Series 90-30 modules can be removed or installed from the
module as described below.
Terminal Assembly Removal
1.
Open the hinged cover on the front of the module.
2.
There is a jacking lever above the wiring terminals, on the left. Push this lever
upward to release the terminal block.
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LEVER
3.
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ÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎ
Grasp the narrower pull-tab located at the right of the retaining tab. Pull the tab
toward you until the contacts have separated from the module housing and the
hook has disengaged.
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ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
PULL
TAB
GFK-1034B
a43061
Chapter 3 Installation
a43715
3-9
3
Terminal Assembly Installation
To replace the Terminal Assembly, follow the steps below. If wiring is already in place, be
sure that the Terminal Assembly is being connected to the proper type of module.
Caution
Check the label on the hinged door and the label on the module to be
sure they match. If a wired Terminal Assembly is installed on the
wrong module type, damage to the module may result.
1.
If the pull tab at the top of the Terminal Assembly is extended, push it back. Close
the Terminal Assembly door.
2.
Place the hook at the bottom of the Terminal Assembly into the corresponding slot at
the bottom of the module.
3.
Pivot the Terminal Assembly upward and firmly press it into position.
4.
Open the door and check to be sure that the latch is securely holding the Terminal
Assembly in place.
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2
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3
1
REFER TO TEXT FOR
INSTALLATION PROCEDURE
3-10
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
3
Installing a Hand-held Monitor Connector
The GBC does not have a built-in connector for a Genius Hand-held Monitor. However,
a Hand-held Monitor connector can be added directly to the serial bus at any location.
The unit shown below (catalog number 44A736310-001-R001) provides a Hand-held
Monitor connector and serial bus terminals in a single convenient package.
.5 in
1.27 cm
1.673 in
4.249cm
46357
Hand-held Monitor
Connector
Panel Mounting Ear
2.834 in
7.198 cm
X1 X2
X1
SA SB
X2
SA SB
shown at 100% of actual size
Serial Bus Terminals
X1
Serial 1
X2
Serial 2
SA Shield In
SB Shield Out
Mounting the HHM Connector
This unit can be easily mounted on a rail such as a standard 35mm or 15mm DIN rail.
The panel-mounting ears are not used if the unit is installed on a DIN rail.
46358
35mm DIN rail
(Removable) DIN rail
Mounting Feet
side view: shown at 50% of actual size
Alternatively, it can be installed directly on a panel using screws through its mounting
ears. The DIN rail feet on the back of the unit are removed when the unit is
panel-mounted.
GFK-1034B
Chapter 3 Installation
3-11
3
Making the Bus Connections
The Hand-held Monitor connector has two sets of terminals; one for incoming cable and
the other for outgoing cable.
Connect the Serial 1, Serial 2, and Shield In terminal of either connector to the previous
device. Connect the Serial 1, Serial 2, and Shield In terminal of the other connector to the
next device.
The following illustration shows connections for incoming and outgoing serial bus cable.
As with other devices, the HHM connector can be at either end of its bus. If it is, there
will only be one bus cable attached.
Bus In
Bus Out
X1
X2
X1
SA
X2
SB
SA
SB
X1
X2
SA
SB
Serial 1
Serial 2
Shield In
Shield Out
As with other devices, if the Hand-held Monitor Connector is at either end of its bus,
install an appropriate terminating resistor across the Serial 1 and Serial 2 terminals. The
Genius I/O System and Communications User’s Manual (GEK-90486-1) lists appropriate
terminating resistors for each recommended bus cable type.
3-12
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
3
Installing the Hand-held Monitor D-Shell Connector on the Bus
You have the option of installing the D-shell connector that is supplied with the
Hand-held Monitor, if you do not wish to use the connector described on page 3-11. You
will need a mounting plate (IC660MPH509) for this type of installation.
1.
Using the mounting plate as a template, cut an opening in the panel for the mating
connector. Also drill two holes for the mounting hardware.
2.
Attach the mounting plate and mating connector to the panel using the mounting
hardware supplied.
3.
Secure the two ends* of the serial bus cable to the back of the panel using strain
relief brackets.
4.
Strip the ends of the wires. Twist the two Serial 1 wires together and attach them to
pin 5 of the connector. Twist the Serial 2 wires together and attach them to pin 9.
Similarly, attach the Shield wire(s)* to pin 4.
The following illustration shows connections for incoming and outgoing serial bus
cable. As with other devices, the HHM connector may be at either end of its bus. If it
is, there will only be one bus cable attached.
Bus
Cable
Strain
Reliefs
Bus
Cable
Î
Mounting
Hardware
Mating
Connector
Mounting
Plate
Shield
(Pin 4)
SER 2
(Pin 9)
SER 1
(Pin 5)
Crimp
(Qty. 3)
a42240c
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Mounting Surface
(rear view)
Hand-held
Monitor
Connector
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
When making bus connections, the maximum exposed length of bare wires should
be two inches. For added protection, each shield drain wire should be insulated with
spaghetti tubing to prevent the Shield In and Shield Out wires from touching each
other.
If the Hand-held Monitor connector is at either end of its bus, it is necessary to install an
appropriate terminating resistor across the Serial 1 and Serial 2 wires. The Genius I/O
System and Communications User’s Manual lists appropriate terminating resistors for each
recommended bus cable type.
GFK-1034B
Chapter 3 Installation
3-13
Chapter
4 Configuration
section level 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
4
This chapter describes configuration procedures for the GBC. Topics include:
H
H
H
Configuration overview
Configuration using the Logicmaster 90 software
Configuration using the Hand-held Programmer
Configuration Overview
A GBC module can support up to 31 devices on its bus. Each device has an SBA and a
device type associated with it. The GBC and the devices on its bus must be configured in
two basic, different procedures.
1.
The GBC must be configured as part of the Series 90-30 PLC system using the
Logicmaster 90-30 software (release 5 or later) or a Hand-held Programmer (HHP).
This includes:
A. parameters for the GBC module itself, and
B. parameters specific to the devices on the GBC’s bus.
2.
The devices on the bus must be configured separately. This includes:
A. I/O blocks with an HHM and/or Write Configuration COMMREQs, and
B. remote drops using Logicmaster 90-70.
Eight-point devices can not be configured in word memories.
For additional information on the configuration of devices and remote drops, see:
Geniusr I/O System and Communications User’s Manual (GEK-90486-1) – Explains
how Global Data works. Details the data that can be transferred using Read
Configuration and Write Configuration COMMREQs.
Geniusr Discrete and Analog Blocks User’s Manual (GEK-90486-2) – includes
instructions for configuring most I/O blocks.
Logicmaster 90-70 Software User’s Manual (GFK-0579) – covers configuration of the
entire PLC.
GFK-0402: Hand-Held Programmer, Series 90t-30 and 90-20 Programmable Controllers
User’s Manual – Describes the Hand-held Programmer displays, and explains
operator procedures for module configuration, programming, and data
monitoring.
GFK-1034B
4-1
4
Device Types and Assigned Configuration Parameters
Device Type
Input1 Ref/Length
Input2 Ref/Length
Output1 Ref/Length Output2 Ref/Length
GENERIC*
User Input
(up to 128 bytes)
User Input
(up to 128 bytes)
User Input
(up to 128 bytes)
User Input
(up to 128 bytes)
8%I
8%I
0
0
0
16%I
16%I
0
0
0
32%I
32%I
0
0
0
8%Q
0
0
8%Q
0
16%Q
0
0
16%Q
0
32%Q
0
0
32%Q
0
8%IQ
8%IQ
0
8%IQ
0
16%IQ
16%IQ
0
16%IQ
0
32%IQ
32%IQ
0
32%IQ
0
6%AI
6%AI
0
0
0
6%AQ
0
0
6%AQ
0
4%A/I2%A
Q
4%AI
0
2%AQ
0
HSC
15%AI
16%I
16%Q
0
PWRTRACA
16%I
18%AI
16%Q
0
PWRTRACB
16% I
30%AI
16%Q
0
CONTROL
(this GBC)
0
0
User Input
(up to 128 bytes)
User Input
(up to 128 bytes)
* Note: When configuring GENERIC devices with mixed data types, discrete data must be assigned to Input1 and
Output1 locations. Analog data must be assigned to Input2 and Output2 locations.
Sending and Receiving Global Data
To transmit global data, a device must be configured as CONTROL. (Only the SBA of the
GBC module itself can be configured as CONTROL.) Set up the output lengths to
transmit global data. Up to 128 bytes can be configured for the total of Output1 and
Output2 Lengths. Discrete(%Q) data will automatically be adjusted to multiples of 8 for
byte alignment.
For a device to receive global data, configure it as GENERIC and specify memory types
and lengths for the incoming data. Up to 128 bytes can be configured for the total of
Input1 and Input2 Lengths. Discrete (%I) data will automatically be adjusted to
multiples of 8 for byte alignment.
For a complete description of Global Data and how it works, refer to Chapter 7 of
Geniusr I/O System and Communications User’s Manual (GEK-90486-1).
4-2
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
4
Configuration Using Logicmaster 90 Software
With the GBC installed in its proper rack/slot location, the Logicmaster 90-30
configurator software program (release 5 or later) can be used to configure the module
in the offline mode. Once the complete set of configuration data has been entered, it
must then be downloaded to the PLC (in the online mode) to become effective in the
GBC Module.
The GBC is configured by completing setup screens in the configurator software. The
setup screens that are used for this module are shown and described below.
In the I/O configuration screen, place the cursor at the slot representation corresponding
to the GBC’s installed location in the PLC rack.
Select F2 (genius). The following screen will appear.
GFK-1034B
Chapter 4 Configuration
4-3
4
Press F1 (gbc) and then the Enter key to select the GBC. The following screen will
appear. (Note that the defalt softkey, F9, is inactive for the GBC module.)
Press the Enter key to select the GBC. Complete the GBC configuration entries in the
following screen.
Note that the configuration screen consists of two parts: module-specific data (BUS
CONTROLLER MODULE DATA) and device-specific data (DEVICE DATA).
The default entries can be used as is, or changed. Until a valid configuration is stored to the
PLC CPU, the GBC will not operate on the bus, and its Channel OK LED will not light.
4-4
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
4
Module-specific Data
GFK-1034B
Module SBA
(serial bus
address)
Ordinarily, the Device Number (bus address) assigned to a bus
controller is 31. Any number from 0 to 31 can be used; however, each
must be unique on that Genius bus (no configured device already
present at that address). Whenever a Module SBA value is changed to a
new value, the DEVICE DATA for the GBC associated with the old
address is automatically copied to the new address value and cleared
from the old address. Default: 31
Baud Rate
All devices on a bus must use the same baud rate: 153.6 Kbaud standard,
153.6 Kbaud extended, 76.8 Kbaud, or 38.4 Kbaud. Selection of a baud
rate depends on the application, as explained in the Geniusr I/O System
User’s Manual. Usually, the bus length determines the baud rate. The
entry made here establishes the baud rate for the GBC only. If the
default baud rate (153.6 Kbaud extended) will not be used, the baud rate
of other devices on the bus must also be changed. Typically, this is done
using a Hand-held Programmer. Default: 153K STD
Series Six
(S6)
Reference
The S6 reference specifies the register location in a Series Six or a Series
Five CPU that should be reserved for the global data that will be
transmitted to it by the GBC. A value of zero indicates that no register
location should be reserved. The allowed range for Module Series Six
Reference is 0 to 16383 inclusive. Default: 0
Status
This field contains the starting reference for the 32-bit status area
maintained by the GBC. Each bit of this area represents the
online/offline status of a device on the bus. Default: Next available %I0001
address
Input Def
The input default state can be either set to HOLD or OFF. Default: OFF
Out at strt
Device outputs can be initially ENABLED or DISABLED when the GBC
is powered up. Default: ENABLED
Chapter 4 Configuration
4-5
4
Device-specific Data
A GBC module can support up to 31 devices on its bus. Each device will have the
following parameters associated with it.
Device SBA
A Device SBA can be between 0 and 31. Select by tabbing through the
parameter, or by setting to the desired value. Pressing the PgDn key
increments this parameter; pressing the PgUp key decrements this
parameter. If you enter a Device SBA that is the same as the Module
SBA, the input area parameters cannot be filled in and the Device Type
will be fixed to CONTROL. Default: 0
Device Type
Each device is associated with a device type. The device type selection
can be tabbed through. The allowed device types and their associated
input/output lengths are shown in the table on page 4-2. Default:
GENERIC
If you select a Device Type other than GENERIC, the input and output starting
references and lengths are automatically filled in. Fields that contain N/A represent 0.
The length parameter can not be edited. In the following example screen, an %8I device
type is configured at SBA 21.
4-6
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
4
GENERIC Devices
Note
For a device to be configured correctly using the generic device type, the
number of input points (channels), and the number of output points
configured must match exactly the amount of I/O the device is
transmitting or expecting to receive. Otherwise, the device will be
considered mismatched and the device’s status bit will be set to off (0).
When using a GE Genius I/O block, the Input 1 Ref and Output1
Ref must be set to the same starting address. Failure to set these
addresses correctly can lead to Bus Controller errors and incorrectI/O
mapping.
Note: For Input and Output Ref, the allowed memory types are %I, %AI, %Q, %AQ,
%G, and %R.
Input1 Ref/
Input2 Ref
A GENERIC device can be configured with two independent starting
locations for input data with associated lengths for each location. The
input data received from the device by the GBC is extracted and
deposited into the PLC memory areas starting at these specified
locations. Default: next available %I reference
Input1 Len/
Input2 Len
Associated lengths for input starting locations, above. Default: 0
Output1 Ref/
Output2 Ref
A device can be configured with two independent starting locations for
output data with associated lengths for each location. The output data
transmitted to the device by the GBC is extracted from the PLC memory
areas starting at these specified locations. Default: next available %I
reference
Output1 Len/
Output2 Len
Associated lengths for input starting locations, above. Default: 0
Data from Output1 Ref will be sent to a device first, then data from Output2 Ref will be
sent. Example:
Output1 Ref/Len = %Q1–16
Output2 Ref/Len = %R1–1
If the configured device is a 32-point output block, points 1–16 on the block are
controlled by %Q1–16 and points 17–32 are controlled by %R1.
Data received as inputs from a device are placed first into Input Ref1, then into Input
Ref2. Example:
Input1 Ref/Len = %I1–8
Input2 Ref/Len = %I33–41
If the configured device is a 16-point input block, points 1–8 on the block are put into
%I1–8 and points 9–16 on the block are put into %I33–41.
GFK-1034B
Chapter 4 Configuration
4-7
4
After configuring all desired devices, press the Esc key to exit the detail configuration
screens. The following screen will appear.
Entries in REF VU (Reference View Option)
The reference view screen can be entered by pressing the REF VU softkey (shift F3) in
the rack menu. As shown in the example %I reference view screen below, every
configured device that has %I memory configured has an entry. Here, the first entry
corresponds to the Status Area of the GBC module with SBA 31. The second entry
corresponds to the configured device 8%I with SBA 21. The third entry corresponds to a
GCM+ module in slot 4 of the rack with SBA 16. Press the appropriate function key to
see the other reference views: %Q (F4), %AI (F5), %AQ (F6), %R (F7), and %G (F8).
4-8
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
4
Configuration Using the Hand-held Programmer
With the GBC installed in its proper rack/slot location, a Hand-held Programmer can be
used to configure the module in the offline mode. The Hand-held Programmer must be
attached to and interfacing with the PLC. The PLC must be in Stop mode.
Hand-held Programmer Error Messages
The Hand-held Programmer will display a message if you make an error during
configuration, or if the GBC is not present or not communicating with the host PLC.
REF ER
May indicate either of the following:
A. The reference address assigned to that SBA exceeds the
reference limit for the PLC model.
B. The SBA message offset plus the length of the reference
assigned to the SBA exceeds 128 bytes.
REF ADJ
May indicate either of the following:
A. References have been adjusted (rounded) down to a byte
boundary.
B. For discrete references, the reference length for the SBA has
been rounded up to a byte boundary.
GFK-1034B
IOM ERR
The GBC module has stopped responding.
I/O ERR
You have assigned reference addresses that overlap references
already assigned.
DAT ERR
A parameter (such as the Series Six reference address) is out of
bounds.
GCM ERR
A GCM has already been configured. A GBC can not be configured in this system.
Chapter 4 Configuration
4-9
4
Select the GBC
From the Program/Data screen, select module configuration by pressing the 4 key, then
the ENTer
key.
Press the Down Arrow key to reach the configuration screen for the rack and slot
location of the GBC.
'
Use the HHP keypad to select the slot in which the GBC is installed. For example, if
the GBC is to be configured in rack 0, slot 4, press the following keys in sequence:
# , 0, ENTer
, 4, ENTer
. The following display will appear:
If the GBC is already configured, it appears in the slot location. For example:
R0:04 GBC 1.0 <S
I032:I0001–0032
The top line indicates the baseplate (R0) and slot (:04) selected. GBC stands for Genius
Bus Controller. The number 1.0 identifies the firmware revision. The bottom line shows
the addresses in %I memory that are assigned to the status bits.
'
If you press the
key, the following screen appears:
R0:04 GBC 1.0
SBA: 31
<S
Line 2 of the screen shows the module’s Serial Bus Address (SBA).
If the GBC was not previously configured, but is present in the rack and slot, it does not
appear at first. The HHP indicates that the slot is “empty”.
R0:04 EMPTY
'
To add the GBC to the configuration, press the READ/VRFY and ENTer
keys.
The following screen, the first in a series of parameter configuration screens, appears:
R0:04 GBC 1.0
I32:I_
4-10
<S
Series 90
<S
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
4
Configure GBC-specific Parameters
Using the HHP, configure the following, pressing the
key to go through the module
parameters in sequence. Pressing the –/+ key toggles through the values for the
parameter being configured. Or, you can use the HHP keypad to enter a value. Press the
ENTer
key to actually make each selection. If you want to go back to an earlier
parameter, use the
key.
GBC Status Reference
This field contains the starting reference for the 32-bit status area maintained by the
GBC. Each bit of this area represents the online/offline status of a device on the bus.
Default: %I0001
'
Enter the beginning reference in %I memory for the GBC module’s 32 status bits. It
is not necessary to enter leading zeros. After entering the number, press the ENTer
key. The HHP displays the range of selected status bit addresses. For example:
R0:04 GBC 1.0 <S
I032:I0001–0032
Press the
key to go to the next configuration screen.
GBCBus Address
The following screen is used to configure the Bus Address (SBA) of the GBC.
'
If the Bus Address shown is not correct, type in the new number from the keypad
then press the ENTer
key. Press the
key to continue. Default: 31
R0:04 GBC 1.0
SBA: 31
<S
Baud Rate
The following screen can be used to change the baud rate for the GBC.
All devices on a bus must use the same baud rate: 153.6 Kbaud standard, 153.6 Kbaud
extended, 76.8 Kbaud, or 38.4 Kbaud. Selection of a baud rate depends on the
application, as explained in the Genius I/O System User’s Manual. Usually, the bus length
determines the baud rate. The entry made here establishes the baud rate for the GBC
only. If the default baud rate (153.6 Kbaud extended) will not be used, the baud rate of
other devices on the bus must also be changed. Default: 153K STD
R0:04 GBC 1.0 <S
BAUD: 153.6 EXT
'
If the baud rate shown is not correct, press the +/– key to change it. When the
correct baud rate appears, press the ENTer
next configurable feature of the module.
GFK-1034B
Chapter 4 Configuration
key. Press the
key to display the
4-11
4
Series Six Reference
If there is a Series Six or Series Five PLC on the bus that should listen to the global data
sent by the GBC, a beginning register address for the data must be supplied. The range
of registers available for global data use is 1 to 16,383. The Series Five or Series Six PLC
will figure out the length automatically. Default: 0
R0:04 GBC 1.0
S6 REF: 0
'
'
<S
If there is a Series Five or Series Six PLC on the bus that should receive global data
from the GBC, enter a register number here. Then press the
key to continue.
If a previously-configured Series Five or Series Six PLC should no longer receive
global data from the GBC, enter 0.
Press the
key to continue.
Input Default
The next selection determines how the GBC will respond if it loses communications with
a device or devices. Data will either HOLD its last state, or be set to 0 (OFF). If the GBC
stops receiving data from one or more devices on the bus, it applies the data default to
the corresponding data being passed back to the CPU. Default: OFF
R0:04 GBC 1.0 <S
INPUT DEF: OFF
'
If data should hold its last state when communications are lost, select HOLD. If
data should be set to 0, select OFF. Press the –/+ key to make the selection, then
press the ENTer
key.
Outputs Powerup Enable/Disable
R0:04 GBC 1.0 <S
OUTPUTS:ENABLE
Device outputs can be initially ENABLED or DISABLED when the GBC is powered up.
To change the outputs powerup parameter to DISABLE, press the –/+ key, followed by
the ENTer
key. Default: ENABLE
This completes the GBC module-specific portion of GBC configuration. The following
screens are used to complete the device-specific portion of GBC configuration. Press the
key to continue.
4-12
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
4
Configure Device-specific Parameters
A GBC module can support up to 31 devices on its bus. (One of the 32 bus addresses is
used by the GBC module.) Enter the appropriate parameters for each serial bus address
(SBA) that has a device assigned to it. (If there is no device configured at an SBA, the
second line will read UNASSIGNED.)
Pressing the
key will cause the next parameter for the SBA to be displayed. If you
want to go back to an earlier address, use the key.
R0:04 GBC 00I1<S
UNASSIGNED
GENERIC Devices
All devices entered using the HHP are of the Generic type.
Input1 Ref Type
A GENERIC device can be configured with two independent starting locations for input
data with associated lengths for each location. The input data received from the device
by the GBC is extracted and deposited into the PLC memory areas starting at these
specified locations. You can change the reference type, by pressing the I/AI, Q/AQ, R, or
G keys. When the desired reference type is displayed, press the ENTer
key.
R0:04 GBC 00I1<S
%I_
Input1 Len
Length associated with Input1 Ref type, above. You can change the length, using the
key. Lengths
HHP keypad. When the desired length is displayed, press the ENTer
should be entered as the number of bits for %I, %Q, %G and as the number of words for
%AI, %AQ, and %R.
R0:04 GBC 00I1<S
%I8:_
Input1 Start Ref
Starting reference associated with Input1 Ref Type and Input1 Len, above. You can
change the start reference using the HHP keypad. When the desired address is
displayed, press the ENTer
key.
R0:04 GBC 00I1<S
%I8: I001–008
GFK-1034B
Chapter 4 Configuration
4-13
4
lnput2 Ref Type
See Input1 Ref Type.
Input2 Len
Length associated with Input2 Ref starting location, below.
Input2 Start Ref
Starting reference associated with Input2 Ref Type and Input2 Len, above.
Output1 Ref Type
A GENERIC device can be configured with two independent starting locations for
output data with associated lengths for each location. The output data transmitted to the
device by the GBC is extracted from the PLC memory areas starting at these specified
locations. You can change the reference type by pressing the I/AI, Q/AQ, R, or G keys on
the HHP keypad. When the desired reference is displayed, press the ENTer
key.
R0:04 GBC 00I1<S
%Q
Output1 Len
Length associated with Output1 Ref starting location. You can change the length, using
the HHP keypad. When the desired length is displayed, press the ENTer
key.
Lengths should be entered as the number of bits for %I, %Q, %G and as the number of
words for %AI, %AQ, and %R.
R0:04 GBC 00I1<S
%Q8:_
Output 1 Start Ref
Starting location for output data. You can change the address, using the HHP keypad.
When the desired address is displayed, press the ENTer
key.
R0:04 GBC 00I1<S
%Q8: Q001–Q008
4-14
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
4
Output2 Ref Type
See Output1 Ref Type.
Output2 Len
Length associated with Output2 starting reference.
Output 2 Start Ref
See Output1 Start Ref.
Note
For a device to be configured correctly using the generic device type, the
number of input points (channels), and the number of output points
configured must match exactly the amount of I/O the device is
transmitting or expecting to receive. Otherwise, the device will be
considered mismatched and the device’s status bit will be set to off (0).
GFK-1034B
Chapter 4 Configuration
4-15
Chapter
5 Diagnostics
5
section level 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter describes the following diagnostics capabilities in Series 90-30 PLC systems
that use Genius I/O and communications:
H
Display of Genius faults in the programmer I/O Fault table (I/O Table faults related
to the GBC and Genius devices are listed at the end of this chapter.)
H
Status bits that reflect the presence or absence of other devices on the bus, and
confirm the operating status of the GBC itself
Status Bits
The GBC uses 32 reference address bits in %I memory to supply status information for
the PLC. A default beginning reference (the next available %I) for the status bits is
automatically supplied by Logicmaster 90-30 or by a Hand-held Monitor, but a different
%I reference can be selected. Status bits are assigned in ascending order of the devices’
Bus Addresses (SBAs), beginning at the first %I status reference.
Low reference
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Status Bits
•••••••••••••••••••••
First %I status reference,
for example: %I0001
High reference
29 30 31
Last %I status reference,
for example: %I0032
Monitoring GBC and Bus Device Status
Once per bus scan, the Series 90-30 PLC reads the status bits from the GBC. An
application program logic can monitor the selected %I memory area regularly to check
on the operating status of the GBC and the devices on its bus. This is especially
recommended it the data default parameter has been set to HOLD (hold last state).
If the GBC status bit = 1, the GBC is on the bus and configured. If the GBC status bit =
0, the GBC is either not present or not configured.
For devices:
H
H
GFK-1034B
If the status bit =1, the device is configured and present on the bus
If the status bit = 0, at least one of the following conditions exists:
the device is not present on the bus,
the device is not configured,
the device is configured but I/O lengths are mismatched.
5-1
5
Fault Table
Faults and alarms from I/O devices, Bus Controller faults, and bus faults are
automatically logged into the Series 90-30 PLC’s I/O Fault Table. Faults can be displayed
in On-Line or in Monitor mode. GBC faults can not be cleared using the HHP.
Note that the 90-30 GBC does not provide addn of device or loss of device
faults as the 90-70 PLC does. This information is contained in the status bits, which are
also set to off (0) if there is a configuration or device mismatch. See page 2-3 for a
discussion of status bits.
|PROGRM |TABLES |STATUS |
|
|LIB
|SETUP |FOLDER |UTILTY |PRINT
1plcrun 2passwd 3plcflt 4io flt 5plcmem 6blkmem 7refsiz 8sweep 9clear 10zoom
>
I / O
F A U L T
TOP FAULT DISPLAYED: 0001
TOTAL FAULTS: 0007
FAULT DESCRIPTION: OPEN WIRE
Remote Drop Fault
Drop ID#, rack, slot
T A B L E
TABLE LAST CLEARED: 09–21 08:00:00
ENTRIES OVERFLOWED: 0000
PLC DATE/TIME: 10–14 10:05:13
FAULT
CIRC REFERENCE
FAULT
FAULT
DATE
TIME
LOCATION
NO.
ADDR.
CATEGORY
TYPE
M–D H: M: S
___________ _____ _________ ___________________ ________________ _____ ________
33#0.4
6
%AI010124 CIRCUIT FAULT
ANALOG FAULT
10–12 08:12:20
MAINPLC
RUN/ENABLE
PLC C: LESSON
REPLACE
7MS SCAN ONLINE
PRG: LESSON
L4 ACC: WRITE CONFIG CONFIG EQUAL
For a Genius bus fault, the display shows the date and time the fault occurred, and the
following information:
5-2
Fault
Location:
For a Genius bus fault, the formatis:rack/slot/bus/busaddress.
For a Remote Drop fault, the format is: Drop ID#/rack/slot.
Circ No:
The relative position of a point within its module.
Reference
Addr:
The I/O reference address where the fault was detected. It consists of
the memory type (%I, %Q, %IQ, %AI, %AQ) and a five-digit offset.
Fault
Category:
The general type of fault that has occurred. For diagnostic faults, the
CPU sets fault references. For fatal faults, the CPU sets fault references
and places itself in STOP mode.
Fault Type:
Further explains fault categories: Circuit Fault, Module Fault, I/O Bus
Fault, Loss of Block, and GBC Software Exception. These categories are
defined in the table on page 5-4.
Fault
Description:
Provides additional information if the highlighted fault is one of the
Circuit Faults or a Module Fault.
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
5
Number of Faults in the I/O Fault Table
The I/O Fault Table can contain up to 32 faults. Additional faults cause the table to
overflow, and faults are lost. The system reference IO_FULL (%S00010) is set to indicate
that the fault table is full.
As faults occur, the first 16 are logged into the table and remain there until the table is
cleared again; none of these 16 faults will be dropped if the table overflows. For faults 17
through 32, the Fault Table operates as a First-In-First-Out stack. When fault 33 occurs,
fault 17 is dropped from the table. Clearing the Fault Table removes all the fault listings.
Fault 1
.
.
Fault 16
Fault 17
'
Faults overflow here
Fault 33
a
New faults are added here
y
y
Clearing Faults
Faults can be cleared from the fault table using Logicmaster 90-30 (in the online mode),
using a Hand-held Monitor on the Genius bus, or by sending a Clear All Faults datagram
(see example on page 6-11). Clearing the fault table removes all fault entries.
Also, clearing faults only removes them from the table; it does not clear fault conditions
in the system. If the condition that caused a fault still exists and is detected, the fault will
be reported again.
Note
If you have a GCM+ and a 90-30 GBC in the same CPU system and on
the same Genius bus, you must turn the report faults configuration
parameter on the GCM+ to no. If you enable report faults on the
GCM+ in such a system, a single fault that occurs on the Genius bus or
inside the 90-30 system will be reported endlessly, causing the fault table
to be filled with multiple reports of the same fault.
GFK-1034B
Chapter 5 Diagnostics
5-3
5
Fault Table Definitions
Fault
Category
CIRCUIT
FAULT
Diag.
or
Fatal
D
Indicates
Fault
Type
Indicates
Short circuit, open
wire, etc.
DISCRETE
FAULT
Circuit fault
on discrete
I/Opoint
ANALOG
FAULT
Series 90
LOSS POWER
Indicates
Loss of user side power
SHORT CIRCUIT
Short in user wiring
OVERLOAD
Sustainedovercurrent
NO LOAD
Very low or no current flow
OVER TEMP
Switch temperature too high
SWITCH FAIL
Genius “smart switch” failure
POINT FAULT
Integral individual point fault
FUSE BLOWN
Integral output fuse blown.
AI LOW ALARM
Input channel low alarm
AI HI ALARM
Input channel high alarm
AI UNDER RANGE
Input channel under range
AI OVERRANGE
Input channel over range
OPEN WIRE
Open wire detected on input
channel
AQ UNDER RANGE
Output channel under range
AQ OVERRANGE
Output channel over range
CS FEEDBACK ERR
Feedback error from Currentsource Analog block
GENA
FAULT
Fault on a
GENA
GENA CKT FLT
Fault on a GENA analog or discrete point
LL
ANALOG
FAULT
Fault on a
low-level
analog channel
AI LOW ALARM
Input channel low alarm
AI HI ALARM
Input channel high alarm
AI UNDER RANGE
Input channel under range
AI OVERRANGE
Input channel over range
OPEN WIRE
Open wire detected on input
channel
WIRING ERROR
improper RTD connection or
thermocouple reverse junction
fault
INTERNALFAULT
Cold junction sensor fault on
thermocouple block, or internal error in RTD block.
INPUT SHORT
Input channel shorted
n/a
Any fault detected by a Remote
I/O Scanner and sent to the
PLC.
REMOTE
FAULT
5-4
Fault on analog I/O channel
Fault
Description
Fault on a
Remote I/O
Scanner
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
5
Fault Table Definitions (continued)
Fault
Category
I/OBUS
FAULT
I/O
MODULE
FAULT
Diag
or
Fatal
D
D
Indicates
Genius bus
fault
EEPROM fault,
watch
dog timeout
Fault
Type
Indicates
BUS FAULT
Genius bus fault
BUS OUT
DISABLE
Bus Controller disabled
all outputs on the bus
becausecommunications
timed out between the
PLC CPU and the Bus
Controller.
HEADEND
FAULT
Block Fault (EEPROM,
Watchdog, etc..)
A TO D
COMM
FAULT
Analog to digital communications fault or calibration error
USER
SCALING
ERROR
Scaling error cause out
of range values
Fault
Description
Indicates
CONFIG MEM
FAIL
Genius EEPROM or
NVRAMfailure
CAL MEM
FAIL
Geniuscalibration
memory failure
SHARERAM
FAIL
Genius Shared RAM
fault
INTRNAL
CKT FLT
Genius internal circuit
fault
WD TIMEOUT
Watchdog Timeout (discrete I/O modules only)
POINT FAULT
Point fault (also indicated for CIRCUIT
FAULT category)
FUSE BLOWN
Integral output fuse
blown (also indicated for
CIRCUIT FAULT category)
Additional Fault Information
If you need more information about a listing in the Fault Table, move the cursor to that
fault and press the CTRL and F keys. A number string will appear above the command
line. The Series 90-30 PLC Installation and Operation Manual (GFK-0356) explains how to
interpret this additional fault information.
If you find it necessary to contact Field Service concerning a fault, you should be
prepared to tell them the information that is provided in the Fault Table and the
hexadecimal information you see when you press the Ctrl/F keys. Field Service personnel will
give you further instructions.
GFK-1034B
Chapter 5 Diagnostics
5-5
5
Technical Help
PLCHotline
Phone numbers
1-800-828-5747(or804-978-5747)
Internet address
[email protected]
Fax number
804-978-5099
GE Bulletin Board
Fax Link
5-6
Series 90
Files on this bulletin board are provided by GE
“as-is” and no warranties apply. The
phone number is 804-978-5458 (up to 19200
baud, 8 bits, no parity).
804-978-5824
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
Chapter
6 Communication Requests
section level 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
6
This chapter explains how to use Communication Requests (COMMREQs) to:
H
H
H
H
Enable/disable all outputs from the GBC to devices on the bus
Send a datagram to a device on the bus.
Send a datagram containing a Reply Datagram Request to a device on the bus
Transfer an unsolicited incoming datagram from the GBC to the CPU.
For additional information, see the Geniusr I/O System and Communications Manual
(GEK-90486-1), which describes Genius Datagrams in detail.
COMMREQs and Passwords
Level 1 and 2 Logicmaster passwords, which prevent write access, cannot be used in
applications that include COMMREQs. COMMREQs require write access to return their
completion status.
GFK-1034B
6-1
6
Programming for a Communication Request
In order to communicate with an intelligent module (such as a GBC), the application
program should perform the following actions.
1.
Supply the content of the communication. Block Moves or similar program
instructions can be used to place the information into CPU memory. This content is
called the Command Block.
CPU Memory
Command Block
2.
Application
Program
a
Clear status block. The program should set the status block to all zeroes (see page
6-9). Establishing this initial condition allows the program to differentiate between
the result of an earlier command and the currently-executing command.
Application
Program
CPU Memory
Status Block
3.
Edit content of
communication
a
Set status block to
unassigned value
Use a COMMREQ instruction to perform the intended function.
Application
Program
Sends COMMREQ
to Device
4.
'
Check the status of the requested task. COMMREQs should be executed
sequentially. The application program should check that the status of the previous
COMMREQ to a GBC is complete, before sending it another one. Failure to do this
may result in improper operation of the GBC.
CPU Memory
Status Block
6-2
Genius Bus
Controller
Series 90
Application
Program
a'
Check completion
of communication
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
6
COMMREQ Command Block Format
The first step in programming communications requests is to set up the contents of the
communication. This can be done using Block Moves or similar program instructions, as
shown later in this chapter.
Application
Program
CPU Memory
Command Block
a
Edit content of
communication
Data is placed together in adjacent locations in CPU memory to form a Command Block.
Data
Location
address
“Data Block” Length
address + 1
Wait/NoWait Flag
address + 2
Status Pointer Memory Type
address + 3
Status Pointer Offset
address + 4
Idle Timeout Value
address + 5
Max. Communication Time
address + 6 to
address + 70
Data Block
The length of the Command Block depends on the type of COMMREQ being sent.
Although 70 words is the maximum, for a COMMREQ that transfers a 128-byte
datagram; most Command Blocks are much shorter. The table on page 6-5 gives an
overview of the contents of each type of COMMREQ that may be sent to a Series 90-30
GBC.
Command Block Contents
Command Block contents are described below. Further details are given in the table on
page 6-5.
GFK-1034B
Length:
The first word of the Command Block indicates the “data block” length.
This is the amount of data from [address + 6] to the end of the
Command Block Each type of COMMREQ command has a unique Data
Block.
Wait/No Wait
Flag:
This must be set to 0 for No Wait.
Chapter 6 Communication Requests
6-3
6
Status Pointer Memory
Type:
The Status Pointer Memory Type and Offset (see below) identify the
location of the function’s associated Status Block. The Status Block is
where the COMMREQ will return its status. If one of the bit-oriented
memories (%I or %Q) is used as the status location, its bits can be
monitored (see page 6-9).
Data
Location
address + 1
Status Pointer Memory
address + 2
Status Pointer offset
The high byte of address + 2 of the pointer is not used; it must be zero.
The low byte of address + 2 specifies the type of memory where the
Status Pointer will be located.
Status Pointer Offset:
For This Memory Type:
Enter This Number:
%I
discrete input table
70
%Q
discrete output table
72
%R
register memory
8
%AI
analog input table
10
%AQ
analog output table
12
Address + 3 of the Command Block contains the address within the
memory type selected. The offset of the status location is 0-based. For
example, if the Status Block was located at %R099, memory type would
be specified as 08 (for %R memory) and the offset would be 98.
Note that if a bit-oriented memory is specified, a byte boundary must be
used for the offset.
Idle Timeout
Value:
This field is not used for the No Wait mode of communication.
Maximum
Communication Time:
This field is not used for the No Wait mode of communication.
Data Block:
The Data Block contains the parameters of the command. Complete
descriptions of all commands appear later in this chapter (see pages 6-14
through 6-22). The Data Block begins with a Command Number in
Address +6. The Command Number identifies the type of
communications function to be performed. The following Command
Numbers are used for the Genius GBC:
Command
8
13
14
15
6-4
Series 90
Function
Enable/disable outputs command
Dequeue datagram
Send datagram
Request datagram reply
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
6
Command Block Quick Reference
The following table summarizes the content of the COMMREQ commands for a GBC.
Command Block Content
Add.
Add.
+1
Length
Wait/
No
Wait
Outputs
Enable, Disable
(#8)
3
0
Dequeue
Datagram
(#13)
7
Send
Datagram
(#14)
Request
Datagram
Reply (#15)
COMMREQ
Description
GFK-1034B
Add.+
2
Add.
+3
Add.+
4
Add.+
5
Add.
+6
Status
Pointer
Memory
Type
Status
Pointer
Offset
Idle
Timeout
Value
Max.
Comms.
Time
COM
MREQ
#
see page 6-14
0
0
8
0
see page 6-15
0
0
13
Add.+7 to Add.+12
see page 6-15
6 to 70
words
0
see page 6-19
0
0
14
Add.+7 to Add.+n
see page 6-19
10 to 78
words
0
see page 6-22
0
0
15
Add.+7 to Add.+n
see page 6-22
Chapter 6 Communication Requests
Add.
+7
Add.+8
to
Add.
+n
Additional Content
see
page
6-14
1 (enable)
or
0 (disable)
see
page
6-14
6-5
6
The COMMREQ Instruction
After supplying the content of the communication in the Command Block, the application
program uses a COMMREQ instruction to request communications with the GBC.
Application
Program
Sends COMMREQ
to Device
'
Genius Bus
Controller
COMMREQ Inputs and Outputs
The COMMREQ instruction has four inputs and two outputs:
(enable) – COMM
REQ
– function OK (logic)
Pointer to the Command Block – IN FT – function faulted (logic)
Location of the GBC – SYSID
Must be 1 for the GBC – TASK
6-6
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
6
COMMREQ Inputs
(enable)
Permissive logic that controls power flow to the COMMREQ function
block.
IN:
The memory location of the Command Block, which contains the
specific command information. The Command Block may be located in
any word-oriented area of memory (%P, %L, %R, %AI, or %AQ).
SYSID:
A hex value that gives the rack and slot location of the GBC. Use this
format:
R S
1 2
rack
slot
rack 1
slot 2
Examples
TASK:
Rack
Slot
Hex word value
0
7
4
2
0004h
0702h
The task is always “1”.
COMMREQ Outputs
The function’s OK and FT outputs can provide power flow to optional logic which can
verify successful completion of the COMMREQ. The OK and FT outputs may have these
states:
ENable
Error?
OK output
FT output
active
active
not active
no
yes
no execution
true
false
false
false
true
false
The OK and FT outputs are never both true at the same time; OK indicates correct
execution while FT indicates a fault condition. The COMMREQ passes power flow to OK
unless:
H
H
The specified module (in rack/slot) is not present.
H
The data length is zero.
The specified task is not valid for the device. This is not checked if the specified
device is a GBC.
If any fault above occurs, the function passes power flow to FT instead.
If there are errors in the portion of the Command Block used specifically by the GBC (for
example, the Device Number entered is incorrect), these errors are reflected in the value
returned in the status location, not in the FT output.
GFK-1034B
Chapter 6 Communication Requests
6-7
6
COMMREQ Status Block
When the GBC receives the communication from the CPU, it returns its current status to
the CPU, at the two-word memory location reserved for the Status Block. Possible status
values that can be returned are listed on the next page.
When a command is complete, the GBC writes any resulting data into the area
designated in the command, and sets the status to Complete (4).
Note
Because COMMREQs require write access to return their status, level 1
and 2 Logicmaster software passwords, which prevent write access,
cannot be used with COMMREQs. If an illegal memory type is specified,
a fault will be generated.
If one of the bit-oriented memories (%I or %Q) is used as the status location, its bits can
be monitored. These bits correspond to the binary values listed below. For example, if
%I048 were selected as the beginning location, reference %I050 would be set to 1 each
time the COMMREQ completed successfully.
Clearing the Status Block
COMMREQs to the GBC should be executed sequentially. Before sending a COMMREQ
to the GBC, the application program should check the status of any previous
COMMREQ to that GBC.
CPU Memory
Status Block
Application
Program
a'
Check completion
of communication
When the previous COMMREQ has completed, the program should set the Status Block
to a value not in the list on the next page. Establishing this initial condition allows the
program to differentiate between the result of an earlier command and the
currently-executing command.
6-8
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
6
Contents of the Status Block
The Status Block is two words of memory to which the GBC returns the status of the
COMMREQ.
The lower word is used for general information about the execution of the COMMREQ:
VALUE
decimal
(word)
0
1
4
8
16
32
64
128
256
512
1024
2048
DESCRIPTION
binary (bit)
MSB
000000000000
000000000001
000000000100
000000001000
000000010000
000000100000
000001000000
000010000000
000100000000
001000000000
010000000000
100000000000
GBC has not yet processed COMMREQ
Command not accepted, GBC busy with previous request
Commandcompletedsuccessfully
Command terminated due to syntax error
Command terminated due to data error
Command terminated due to suspended activity on bus
No data to transfer
Command not supported by target device
Only No Wait commands may be sent to the target device
Maximum Comms. Time must be greater than or equal to 5mS
Text buffer invalid in wait mode
Device did not accept the message, or timed out.
The upper word of the status location provides additional status information.
GFK-1034B
VALUE
decimal
(word)
DESCRIPTION
11
21
51
71
101
102
121
141
142
143
144
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
Non-discrete block specified for Pulse Test
Non-I/O device specified for Read Configuration
Invalid circuit number
Non-controller device specified for Assign Monitor
Switch BSM - device not BSM
Switch BSM - bus position greater than 1
P and L access not available
Function code greater than 111
Sub function code greater than 255
Priority greater than 1
Datagram length greater than 134
Invalid Device Number (greater than 31, but not 255)
Incorrect length for the command type
Device Number not configured or not active
Previous No Wait command in progress; current No Wait command not accepted
Invalid status pointer location specified
Command number is out of range
Subcommand code is out of range
Only partial data transferred
Device Number 255 not allowed for this command
Command specified is not valid for GBC
Command specified is only valid for controller devices
Command specified is not supported by the device to which it was sent
InvalidAlarmEnable/Disablemask
Chapter 6 Communication Requests
6-9
6
Programming Examples
Example 1–Using a COMMREQ to Clear a Circuit Fault
The following example shows how a COMMREQ can be used to clear a circuit fault on
point 4 of a Genius I/O block whose Device Number is 20.
This rung sets up an Enable Outputs COMMREQ to a GBC in rack 0 slot 3.
| << RUNG 5 STEP #0002 >>
|
|%M0001 +—————+
+—————+
+—————+
%M0001+——]
+——] [———+BLKMV+————————————————+BLKMV+————————————————+MOVE_+————————— —(RM)—
|
| INT |
| INT |
| INT |
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
| CONST —+IN1 Q+—%R0001 CONST —+IN1 Q+—%R0008 CONST —+IN Q+—%R0021
| +00003 |
|
+00255 |
|
+00000 | LEN |
|
|
|
|
|
|00002|
| CONST —+IN2 |
CONST —+IN2 |
+—————+
| +00000 |
|
+00000 |
|
|
|
|
|
|
| CONST —+IN3 |
CONST —+IN3 |
| +00008 |
|
+00000 |
|
|
|
|
|
|
| CONST —+IN4 |
CONST —+IN4 |
| +00020 |
|
+00000 |
|
|
|
|
|
|
| CONST —+IN5 |
CONST —+IN5 |
| +00000 |
|
+00000 |
|
|
|
|
|
|
| CONST —+IN6 |
CONST —+IN6 |
| +00000 |
|
+00000 |
|
|
|
|
|
|
| CONST —+IN7 |
CONST —+IN7 |
| +00008 +—————+
+00000 +—————+
|
This COMMREQ disables outputs (%R9 = 0) to all devices (%R8 = FFh). The status
pointer for this COMMREQ is %R21 (%R3 = 8,%R4 = 20). Note that the status registers
are cleared before the COMMREQ function block is called.
| << RUNG 6 STEP #0007 >>
|
|%Q0001
+—————+
%Q0002+——]
+——][———————————+COMM_|+—————————————————————————————————————————(SM)—
|
| REQ ||
|
|
||
|
%R0001 —+IN FT++
|
|
|
|
CONST —+SYSID|
|
0003 |
|
|
|
|
|
CONST —+TASK |
|
00000001 +—————+
|
|[
END OF PROGRAM LOGIC
]
|
6-10
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
6
Example 2–Using a COMMREQ to Clear All Circuit Faults
The following example shows how a COMMREQ can be used to clear all circuit faults on
the Genius I/O bus.
|
|(****************************************************************************)
| (* This rung sets up a send datagram COMMREQ to a GBC30 in rack 0 slot 3.
*)
| (* This COMMREQ will broadcast a clear all faults message to all devices on *)
| (* the GENIUS bus.
*)
| (*
*)
| (* %R7 = 14 – send datagram command
*)
| (* %R8 = 255 – broadcast message
*)
| (* %R9 = 32 – GENIUS function code
*)
| (* %R10 = 19 – (13Hex) GENIUS subfunction code for CLEAR ALL FAULTS
*)
| (* %R11 = 0 – normal priority
*)
| (* %R12 = 0 – CLEAR ALL FAULTS message contains no data
*)
| (*
*)
| (* The status pointer for this COMMREQ is %R21(%R3 = 8,%R4 = 20)
*)
| (* Note that the status registers are cleared before the COMMREQ function
*)
| (* block is called.
*)
|(****************************************************************************)
|
| << RUNG 5 STEP #0002 >>
|
|%M0001 +—————+
+—————+
%M0001
+——][———+BLKMV+—————————————————+BLKMV+———————————————————————————————————(RM)—
|
| INT |
| INT |
|
|
|
|
|
| CONST —+IN1 Q+—%R0001
CONST —+IN1 Q+—%R0008
| +00006 |
|
+00255 |
|
|
|
|
|
|
| CONST —+IN2 |
CONST —+IN2 |
| +00000 |
|
+00032 |
|
|
|
|
|
|
| CONST —+IN3 |
CONST —+IN3 |
| +00008 |
|
+00019 |
|
|
|
|
|
|
| CONST —+IN4 |
CONST —+IN4 |
| +00020 |
|
+00000 |
|
|
|
|
|
|
| CONST —+IN5 |
CONST —+IN5 |
| +00000 |
|
+00000 |
|
|
|
|
|
|
| CONST —+IN6 |
CONST —+IN6 |
| +00000 |
|
+00000 |
|
|
|
|
|
|
| CONST —+IN7 |
CONST —+IN7 |
| +00014 +—————+
+00000 +—————+
|
| << RUNG 6 STEP #0006 >>
|
|%Q0001 +—————+
+—————+
%Q0002
+——][———+MOVE_+—————————————————+COMM_|+——————————————————————————————————(SM)—
|
| INT |
| REQ ||
|
|
|
|
||
| CONST —+IN Q+—%R0021 %R0001 —+IN FT++
| +00000 | LEN |
|
|
|
|00002|
|
|
|
+—————+
CONST —+SYSID|
|
0003 |
|
|
|
|
|
CONST —+TASK |
|
00000001 +—————+
|
|
|[
END OF PROGRAM LOGIC
]
|
GFK-1034B
Chapter 6 Communication Requests
6-11
6
Using COMMREQs to Send Datagrams
The table on page 6-13 lists datagrams with their Subfunction Codes, lists possible ways
to send datagrams, and explains what happens to datagrams received from other
devices.
COMMREQ 14 (Send Datagram) and COMMREQ 15 (Request Datagram Reply) are the
only way to send messages to or from the GBC. Also, COMMREQ 13 (Dequeue
Datagram) must be used to handle datagrams that are not handled automatically.
All datagrams can be sent using COMMREQ 14 (Send Datagram). If COMMREQ 14 is
used to send a datagram that has a reply, COMMREQ 13 (Dequeue Datagram) must also
be used to obtain the reply from the GBC’s queue of unsolicited incoming datagrams.
6-12
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
6
Using COMMREQs to Send Datagrams
Datagram (hex code)
Ways to Send It
How Incoming Datagram is Handled
Read ID (00)
COMMREQ 15 (Request Datagram Reply)
*
GBC replies automatically to Read ID datagram received from bus device.
Read ID Reply (01)
(Sent automatically)
Handled automatically if COMMREQ 15 was used to
send Read ID datagram. *
Read Configuration (02)
COMMREQ 15 (Request Datagram Reply)
*
GBC queues it up. Use COMMREQ 13 (Dequeue Datagram) to read it.
Read Configuration Reply
(03)
(Sent automatically)
Handled automatically if COMMREQ 15 was used to
send Read Configuration datagram. *
Write Configuration (04)
Assign Monitor (05)
COMMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
COMMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
Begin Packet Sequence(06)
COMMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
End Packet Sequence (07)
COMMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
Read Diagnostics (08)
COMMREQ 15 (Request Datagram Reply)
*
GBC replies automatically.
Read Diagnostics Reply
(09)
(Sent automatically)
Handled automatically if COMMREQ 15 was used to
send Read Diagnostics datagram. *
Write Point (0B)
COMMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
GBC queues it up. Use COMMREQ 13 (Dequeue Datagram) to read it.
GBC queues it up. Use COMMREQ 13 (Dequeue Datagram) to read it.
*
Read Block I/O (0C)
COMMREQ 15 (Request Datagram Reply)
*
Read Block I/O Reply (0D)
(Sent automatically)
Handled automatically if COMMREQ 15 was used to
send Read Block I/O datagram. *
Report Fault (0F)
(Sent automatically)
Received from bus devices; GBC automatically places
the fault in the Fault Table.
Pulse Test (10)
COMMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
GBC queues it up. Use COMMREQ 13 (Dequeue Datagram) to read it
Pulse Test Complete (11)
(Sent automatically)
Handled automatically if COMMREQ 14 was used to
send Pulse Test datagram. *
Clear Circuit Faults (12)
COMMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
Clear All Circuit Faults
(13)
COMMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
Switch BSM (1C)
COMMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
Read Device (1E)
COMMREQ 15 (Request Datagram Reply)
GBC automatically sends reply.
Read Device Reply (1F)
(Sent automatically)
Handled automatically if COMMREQ 15 was used to
send Read Device datagram. *
Write Device (20)
COMMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
GBC processes automatically.
Read Data (27)
COMMREQ 15 (Request Datagram Reply)
GBC queues it up. Use COMMREQ 13 (Dequeue Datagram) to read it.
Read Data Reply (28)
(Sent automatically)
Handled automatically if COMMREQ 15 was used to
send Read Data datagram. *
Write Data (29)
COMMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
GBC queues it up. Use COMMREQ 13 (Dequeue Datagram) to read it.
Read Map (2A)
COMMREQ 15 (Request Datagram Reply)
Read Map Reply (2B)
(Sent automatically)
Handled automatically if COMMREQ 15 was used to
send Read Map datagram.
Write Map (2C)
COMMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
GBC queues it up. Use COMMREQ 13 (Dequeue Datagram) to read it.
GBC queues it up. Use COMMREQ 13 (Dequeue Datagram) to read it.
All datagrams can be sent using COMMREQ 14 (Send Datagram). If COMMREQ 14 is used to send a datagram that has a reply,
COMMREQ 13 (Dequeue Datagram) must also be used to obtain the reply from the GBC’s queue of unsolicited incoming datagrams.
GFK-1034B
Chapter 6 Communication Requests
6-13
6
COMMREQ Descriptions
COMMREQ #8: Enable/Disable Outputs Command
The Enable/Disable Outputs command can be sent to the GBC to disable sending
outputs to any block.
Command Block for the Enable/Disable Outputs Command
Address:
Command Length
3
Address +1:
No Wait
0
Address +2:
Status Block memory
type
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ)
Address +3:
Status Block offset
Beginning address for the COMMREQ status.
Address +4:
Idle timeout value
0
Address +5:
Max.communications
time
0
Address +6:
Command number
8
Address +7:
Device Number
Enter 0–31 to enable or disable outputs to one block.
To enable or disable outputs to ALL devices on the
bus, enter the number 255.
Address +8:
Enable/Disablecommand
To disable outputs to the device(s) specified in address
+7, enter 0. To enable outputs, enter 1.
Note that this COMMREQ overrides the configuration parameter outputs
enable/disable at start. For example, if outputs were initially disabled to all blocks during
configuration, this COMMREQ could be used to enable outputs to specific devices or to
all devices.
6-14
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
6
COMMREQ #13: Dequeue Datagram Command
The GBC handles most incoming datagrams automatically, with no additional
programming required. Under certain circumstances, however, the Dequeue Datagram
command must be used to transfer incoming datagrams to the CPU. Program the
Dequeue Datagram command for the following:
H
Replies that are received after sending Reply-type datagrams with the Send
Datagram command. (If Send Datagram with Reply is used instead, it automatically
handles replies).
H
Unsolicited datagrams that are not recognized by the GBC (Function Code not 20).
Command Block for the Dequeue Datagram Command
Location
Parameter
Contents
Address
Command Length
7
Address +1:
No Wait
0
Address +2:
Status Block memory type
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12
(%AQ)
Address +3:
Status Block offset
Beginning address for the COMMREQ status.
Address +4:
Idle timeout value
0
Address +5:
Max. communications time
0
Address +6:
Command number
13
Address +7:
Maximum data memory
length
Enter bit or word value (depends on the
memory type selected below). This entry tells
the CPU how much memory will be needed
to store all the data.
If the length of data returned by the device
exceeds this length, the GBC writes as much
data as possible to the PLC CPU and returns a
data error to the COMMREQ status location.
Address +8:
Memory type
Enter the number that represents the location
where the GBC will place the data in the
CPU: 70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12
(%AQ)
Addresses
9–12
Not used
Not used
Number of Dequeue Datagram Commands Needed
One Dequeue Datagram command is needed for each incoming datagram. If multiple
incoming Datagrams are expected during one CPU sweep, it will be necessary to place
multiple Dequeue Datagram commands in the program to assure their efficient transfer
to the CPU.
The number of Dequeue Datagram commands needed depends on whether the
Datagrams have been sent using Normal or High Priority, and the relative lengths of the
CPU sweep time and the scan time of the bus, as explained below.
GFK-1034B
Chapter 6 Communication Requests
6-15
6
If the Bus Scan Time is Greater than the CPU Sweep Time
If all Datagrams on the bus are sent with Normal Priority, there is a limit of one incoming
Datagram per CPU sweep. Therefore, only one Dequeue Datagram command per sweep
will be needed to handle incoming Datagrams.
If all Datagrams on the bus are sent with High Priority, the GBC can potentially receive
one Datagram from each transmitting device during a scan. The program should include
the same number of Dequeue Datagram commands as incoming Datagrams. (See page
6-19 for a description of datagram priority.)
If the Bus Scan Time is Less than the CPU Sweep Time
If the bus scan time is significantly shorter than the CPU sweep time, you can estimate
the number of Dequeue Datagram commands that must be sent to the GBC to
accommodate incoming Datagrams on that bus.
First, determine how many scans can occur in one CPU sweep. For example, if the bus
scan were 20mS and the CPU sweep were 90mS, the ratio between them would be 4.5 to
1. This should be rounded upward to 5.
This is the maximum number of Normal Priority Datagrams that might be received in a
single CPU sweep. Plan to have the same number of Dequeue Datagram commands to
that GBC in the program to handle the incoming Datagrams.
For High Priority Datagrams, multiply the number found above by the total number of
devices on the bus that might send a High Priority Datagram to the GBC in one bus scan.
This is the total number of incoming Datagrams from that bus the program might have
to handle in a single CPU sweep. Plan on this number of Dequeue Datagram commands
to the GBC.
Additional Logic for Incoming Datagrams
The GBC can place up to 16 datagrams into an internal queue. These include any
unsolicited reply-type datagrams. This permits the program to, for example, send a Read
ID Send Datagram and dequeue the Read ID Reply with the Dequeue Datagram
COMMREQ.
If the 16-item queue becomes filled, an informational fault GBC_SOFTWR_EXCPTN is
logged (Fault Type is DQ_QUEUE_FULL) in the I/O Fault Table. If the Dequeue
Datagram is issued and there are no datagrams in the queue, the Status Pointer is set to
NO DATA TO TRANSFER.
Program logic should be used to assure that no datagrams are accidentally written over.
This might be done by copying each datagram to another memory location, or by
changing the data memory location specified in the Command Block after each
incoming datagram is received.
Note that the Dequeue Datagram queue is operated as a first-in-first-out (FIFO) queue.
Specific datagrams within the queue can not be dequeued without first dequeueing
datagrams received earlier. This feature is different from the Series 90-70 GBC operation.
6-16
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
6
Format of Returned Data
The Dequeue Datagram returns data in the following format.
Location
High Byte
Low Byte
Data Length
Status byte
Memory address +1
Subfunction code
Function code
Memory address +2
Data byte 2
Data byte 1
Memory address +69
Data byte 134
Data byte 133
Memory Address
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
Returned Data items are explained below.
Status Byte:
The status byte reports the Device Number of the device that sent the
datagram. It also indicates whether the message was broadcast or
directed by the other device.
bit 7 6
5
4
3
2
1
0
B/D
x
n
n
n
n
n
x
DeviceNumber
(5bits:0–31decimal)
Unused
Broadcast
(1)
Directed
(0)
GFK-1034B
Data Length:
The number (0 to 134) of data bytes after the subfunction code.
Function
Code:
The function code of the received message: 0 to 111 decimal or 0 to 6F
hex.
Subfunction
Code:
The subfunction code of the received message: 0 to 255 decimal or 0 to
FF hex.
Chapter 6 Communication Requests
6-17
6
COMMREQ #14: Send Datagram Command
Most datagrams are normally programmed using their assigned COMMREQ command
numbers. However, datagrams can also be sent using the Send Datagram command and
the Request Datagram Reply command. The Send Datagram command might be used to
send:
H
Datagrams for which no COMMREQ command number is defined, such as Begin
Packet Sequence, End Packet Sequence, and Write Point.
H
Read Device and Write Device datagrams that are broadcast, but which should be
ignored by another Series 90-30 GBC.
H
Datagrams that must be guaranteed transmission during the next bus scan. This
should be done with restraint, for the reasons explained on the following pages.
H
Datagrams which do not cause another device to send back a reply, such as Pulse
Test, or Write Configuration.
H
Messages that the 90-70 GBC has COMMREQs for, but the 90-30 GBC does not
Datagrams which DO cause another device to send back a reply, such as Read
Diagnostics or Read Configuration, are usually programmed using their assigned
COMMREQ numbers or the Request Datagram Reply command (COMMREQ #15).
However, if Send Datagram is used to send datagrams that cause replies, the
Dequeue Datagram command must be used to transfer the replies back to the CPU.
Before using Send Datagram, refer to the table on page 6-12 for more information about
COMMREQs and datagrams.
6-18
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
6
Command Block for the Send Datagram Command
Address:
Command Length
6 – 70. Enter the number of words from Address +6 to Address +n.
No Wait
Status Block memory type
Status Block offset
Idle timeout value
0
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ)
Beginning address for the COMMREQ status.
0
Address +5:
Max. communications time
0
Address +6:
Command number
14
Address +7:
Device Number of the device to receive the message.
0–31, or 255 to broadcast the message.
Address +8:
Function code
For any datagram listed below, 32 decimal (20 hex).
Address +9
Subfunction code (hex)
See the list on page 6-12.
Address +10
Priority
Enter 0 for normalpriority, or 1 for high priority.
Address +11:
Datagram length (in bytes)
Enter the actual length of the Datagram, beginning
at [address +12].
Address +12:
to Address+n:
Datagram content
Enter the entire datagram as part of the Command
Block. The Genius I/O System User’s Manual shows
datagramstructures.
Address
Address
Address
Address
+1:
+2:
+3:
+4:
If the Send Datagram command is used to broadcast a
Write Device datagram, and that datagram should be
IGNORED by another Series 90-30 GBC, set the first
byte of the datagram as shown in the System User’s
Manual (this byte is normally 0), to FE hex.
Datagram Priority
A GBC can send one datagram per bus scan. That datagram may be assigned either
normal priority or high priority. Therefore, during one bus scan, there may be one
normal priority datagram followed by up to 31 high priority datagrams, or up to 32 high
priority datagrams sent by the devices on the bus.
In one bus scan (one complete rotation of the bus token among all devices on the bus),
there can be only one normal priority datagram sent by any device. If a normal priority
datagram or similar system message (such as a fault report) has already been sent by any
device (including itself), a device must wait until its next turn on the bus before it can
send a normal priority datagram.
GFK-1034B
Chapter 6 Communication Requests
6-19
6
Datagrams and I/O Blocks
If the bus will also be used for I/O block control, normal priority datagrams are
recommended to allow other messages such as fault reports (which the system handles
as normal priority datagrams) to get through. In addition, normal priority datagrams
ensure that bus scan time is only modestly delayed for communications. Bus scan time
affects the response time of any I/O data on the bus. If there are I/O blocks on the bus,
use high priority only if the datagram transmission cannot be delayed. Normal priority
will work satisfactorily except when there are many devices attempting to send
datagrams simultaneously.
Number of Datagrams per CPU Sweep
The application program should include logic that verifies successful completion of
earlier datagrams before requesting new ones. Because a GBC can only send one
datagram per bus scan, the number of datagrams that can be executed during the same
CPU sweep of program logic depends on the relative lengths of the CPU sweep and the
bus scan.
If the Bus Scan Time is Greater than the CPU Sweep Time: If the bus scan time is
greater than the CPU sweep time, the GBC will be able to send no more than one
datagram during one execution of the application program. Successful transmission of a
normal priority datagram will depend on the absence of datagram and system message
traffic on the bus.
If the Bus Scan Time is Less than the CPU Sweep Time: If the bus scan time is
significantly shorter than the CPU sweep time, the bus may be able to transmit multiple
datagrams during one execution of the application program.
Effect of Datagrams on the Genius I/O Bus Timing: Normal Priority Datagrams allow
fault reports and Hand-held Monitor communications on a bus to continue undisturbed.
Only one Normal Priority Datagram is allowed each bus scan, so the scan time stays
relatively constant, and I/O update timing varies only by small increments.
If High Priority Datagrams are being transmitted constantly, the Hand-held Monitor will
not function properly; fault reports from blocks will be prevented from being
transmitted on the bus, and regular COMMREQ commands (such as Write
Configuration commands) to that GBC will fail with a transmission error. For these
reasons, use of High Priority Datagrams on a bus with I/O blocks should be avoided if
possible.
If High Priority Datagrams are transmitted infrequently, they will cause some delay in
the Hand-held Monitor communications and other normal system messages, but the
delay should not be noticeable.
High Priority Datagrams will typically put more pressure on the GBC to transfer
multiple Datagrams per CPU sweep. However, this can also occur with Normal Priority
Datagrams if the bus scan time is much shorter than the CPU sweep time.
6-20
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
6
Maximum CPU Sweep Time Increase for Datagrams: To estimate the impact of
Datagrams on CPU sweep time, add together the times required for all Datagrams that
might be sent between the GBC and the CPU during one sweep if No Wait mode is
selected. Repeat this for each GBC in the PLC that sends or receives Datagrams.
Total Datagram Bytes Sent
(may be none)
+
x
.031mS
=
LARGEST incoming Normal Priority
Datagram Received, bytes
x
.031mS
=
Total incoming High Priority
Datagrams Bytes Received
x
.031mS
=
1.200mS
=
OR
+
+
______mS
Additional Information about Timing
If you need more information about timing for datagrams, Global Data, I/O devices, and
remote drops, refer to the Geniusr I/O System User’s Manual (GEK-90486-1).
GFK-1034B
Chapter 6 Communication Requests
6-21
6
COMMREQ #15: Request Datagram Reply Command
The Request Datagram Reply command can be used to send any datagram that causes
the target device to return a reply, such as: Read Configuration or Read Diagnostics.
With this command, the GBC automatically transfers replies to the CPU; no separate
Dequeue Datagram command is needed to handle them.
These datagrams are normally programmed using their assigned COMMREQ command
numbers. The primary reason for sending any of these datagrams using COMMREQ
#15 would be to assign it high priority, guaranteeing that it would be sent on the next
bus scan. Before doing this, see page 6-19 for important information about datagram
priority.
Command Block for the Request Datagram Reply Command
Address:
Command Length
10 – 78. Enter the number of words from Address +6 to
Address +n.
Address +1:
No Wait
0
Address +2:
Status Block memory type
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ)
Address +3:
Status Block offset
Beginning address for the COMMREQ status.
Address +4:
Idle timeout value
0
Address +5:
Max. communications time
0
Address +6:
Command number
15
Address +7:
Device Number of the device to receive the message.
0 – 31
Address +8:
Function code
For any datagram listed below, 32 decimal (20 hex).
Address +9
Subfunction code (hex) of
the datagram to be sent.
00 Read ID
02 Read Configuration
08 Read Diagnostics
0C Read Block I/O
1E Read Device
27 Read Data
Address +10
Priority
Enter 0 for normal priority, or 1 for high priority.
Address +11:
Datagram length (in bytes)
Enter the actual length of the Datagram, beginning at [address +16].
Address +12:
Subfunction code (hex) of
the reply
01 Read ID Reply
03 Read Configuration Reply
09 Read Diagnostics Reply
0D Read Block I/O Reply
1F Read Device Reply
28 Read Data Reply
Address +13:
Memory type for the reply
Enter a number: 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ)
Address +14:
Memory offset
Starting address within this memory type.
Address +15:
Maximum data memory
length needed
If the length of the memory
is smaller than the amount
of reply data received, the
extra portion of the data
will be lost, and a data error
(16) will be returned to the
status location.
Enter a value in bits or words, depending on the memory
type selected. This entry tells the CPU how much memory
will be needed to store all the reply data. The length depends on the message and device type.
– for Read Configuration Reply, see COMMREQ #2.
– for Read Diagnostics Reply, see COMMREQ #4.
– for Read Device Reply, message length depends on
device type. May be up to 64 words.
– for Read Data Reply, message length is 5 words.
– for Read ID Reply, message length depends on device
type. See the Genius I/O System User’s Manual.
Address +16 to
Address +n:
Datagram Content
Enter the entire datagram as shown in the Genius I/O System User’s Manual.
Format of Returned Data
Returned data format is the same as for the Dequeue Datagram. See page 6-17.
6-22
Series 90
-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
Index
A
A to D Comm fault, 5-5
AIHi/LowAlarm fault, 5-4
AIUnder/Overrange fault, 5-4
Analog faults, 5-4
AQ Under/Overrange fault, 5-4
B
Baud rate, 1-8, 4-5
configuration, 4-11
Circuit faults, 5-4
Bulletin board, 5-6
Clearing faults, 5-3, 6-10
Bus
cable characteristics, 1-10
cable types, 1-8–1-10
how to disconnect, 3-5
installation, 3-6
length, 1-8
noise, 3-5
removal, 3-5
termination, 1-8, 3-8
using other cable types, 1-10
Comm OK, LED, 1-5
Bus address, 4-5
Bus controller, operation, 1-11
Bus error rate, 5-3
Bus fault, 5-5
Bus Out Disable fault, 5-5
Bus scan, 6-16
description, 1-11, 2-6
reducing time of, 2-11
Bus scan time, 6-20
C
Cable types
characteristics, 1-10
high temperature, 1-9
prefabricated, 1-10
recommended, 1-9
Cal Mem fault, 5-5
Catalog numbers
cables
IC660BLC001, 1-10
IC660BLC003, 1-10
GFK-1034B
CPU, 1-7
GBC, IC693BEM331, 1-1, 1-6
Genius Bus Interface Unit,
IC760GBI001, 1-4
Hand-Held Programmer, IC693PRG300,
1-7
HHM, IC660HHM501, 1-7
inline HHM port, 44A736310-001-R001,
1-7, 3-11
mounting plate, IC660MPH509, 3-13
Series Six Bus Controller,
IC660CBB902F/903F, 1-7
software, 1-7
Circuit number, 5-2
Command block, COMMREQ, 6-3
Command numbers, 6-4
COMMREQ
command block, 6-3
command numbers, 6-4
commands
Dequeue Datagram, 6-5, 6-13, 6-15
Outputs Enable/Disable, 6-5, 6-13
Outputs Enabled, 6-14
Request Datagram Reply, 6-5, 6-13,
6-22
Send Datagram, 6-5, 6-13, 6-18
examples, 6-10–6-12
inputs, 6-7
instruction, 6-6
outputs, 6-7
quick reference, 6-5
Status Block, 6-8–6-11
status pointer, 6-4
COMMREQs and Passwords, allowable
password levels, 6-1
Communication Request. See COMMREQ
Communications, stopped, 2-3, 2-5
Compatibility, 1-2, 1-7
Computer, receives global data from GBC,
2-12
Config Mem fault, 5-5
Configuration
devices, 4-11
generic devices, 4-7, 4-13
I/O blocks, 4-1
remote drops, 4-1
Series 90-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
Index-1
Index
using Hand-held Programmer, 4-9–4-15
using Logicmaster 90 software, 4-3–4-15
Connector, Hand-held Monitor, 3-11
CPU sweep, 2-2, 6-16, 6-20
CS Feedback Error fault, 5-4
D
clearing, 5-3, 6-10
descriptions, 5-2
finding additional information about,
5-5
identification, 5-4
illegal memory type, 6-8
location, 5-2
number of, 5-3
types, 5-2
Field control I/O, 1-2
Data block, 6-4
Field Control station, 1-4
Data default, 2-3
Fuse Blown fault, 5-4, 5-5
Data quantities, 1-4
Datagrams, 1-14
incoming, 6-12, 6-16
number per CPU sweep, 6-20–6-21
priority, 6-16, 6-18, 6-19
ways to send, 6-12, 6-18
Default, input state, 4-5
Definitions, faults, 5-4
Dequeue Datagram COMMREQ, 6-5, 6-15
Device number, 4-5
Device outputs, enabled/disabled at startup, 4-5, 4-12
Device type, 4-6
Diagnostics, 1-13, 5-1–5-7
Discrete faults, 5-4
D-shell connector, installing, 3-13
E
G
GBC. See Genius Bus Controller
GCM. See Genius Communications Module
GE bulletin board, 5-6
GENA faults, 5-4
Generic devices, configuring, 4-7, 4-13
Genius blocks, 1-2, 1-3
Genius Bus Controller
description, 1-5
number in system, 1-2
operation, 1-11
specifications, 1-6
Genius bus scan, description, 1-11
Genius Communications Module, 1-2,
2-12
receives global data from GBC, 2-12
E–mail address, 5-6
Genius Hand-held Monitor, compatibility,
1-7
Enable/Disable Outputs COMMREQ, 6-14
Genius I/O blocks, compatibility, 1-7
End of bus, terminating, 3-12, 3-13
Error messages, Hand-held Programmer,
4-9
Global data, 1-15
memory types, 2-1
operation, 2-2, 2-5
sending and receiving, 4-2
Errors, number on bus, 4-4
F
Fault table, 5-2
Faults
categories, 5-2
Index-2
H
Hand-held Monitor, 1-2
connector, 3-11
Hand-held Programmer, compatibility, 1-7
Headend fault, 5-5
Series 90t-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
Index
I
I/O blocks, 1-2, 1-3
compatibility, 1-7
configuration, 4-1
on bus, 2-12
I/O bus fault, 5-5
N
No Load fault, 5-4
No Wait mode, 6-4
O
I/O data, 1-4
Open Wire fault, 5-4
I/OFault Table capacity, 5-3
Operation, Genius Bus Controller, 1-11
Illegal memory type fault, 6-8
Output data, operation, 2-4
Input default state, 4-5
Outputs Enable; Disable COMMREQ, 6-5,
6-14
Input Short fault, 5-4
Inputs and outputs, 1-11, 1-12
Outputs enable/disable at start, override,
6-14
Installation, Genius Bus Controller,
3-4–3-5
Over Temp fault, 5-4
Overload fault, 5-4
Internal fault, 5-4
Intrnal Ckt fault, 5-5
Isolation, 1-8
P
Passwords, Levels suitable for COMMREQs, 6-1
L
LEDs
Channel OK, 4-4
Comm OK, 1-5
Module OK, 1-5
LL Analog faults, 5-4
Phone numbers, 5-6
PLC Hotline, 5-6
PLC sweep, scan time contributions, 2-7
Point fault, 5-4, 5-5
Priority, datagram, 6-16, 6-19
Programming for a COMMREQ, 6-2
Location, Genius Bus Controller, 3-2, 3-4
Logicmaster 90 software, configuration
with, 4-3
R
Logicmaster 90-30 software, compatibility,
1-7
Racks, installing GBC in, 3-4–3-7
Loss Power fault, 5-4
Read Data datagram, 6-22
Read Configuration datagram, 6-22
Read Device datagram, 6-22
M
Reference address, 5-2
Memory, for I/O blocks, 1-3
Reference view, 4-8
Memory types, for global data, 1-6, 2-1
in other hosts, 2-12
Remote drop, memory required for, 1-4
Modulation technique, 1-8
Remote drops, 1-2
configuration, 4-1
Module, Genius Bus Controller, description, 1-5
Removing the module, 3-5
Module OK, LED, 1-5
GFK-1034B
Read Diagnostics datagram, 6-22
Request Datagram Reply COMMREQ,
6-5, 6-22
Series 90-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
Index-3
Index
S
S6. See Series 6; Series Six
SBA, 4-6, 4-11
See also Bus address
configuring devices for, 4-13
Scan time contributions, 2-7
Selecting a cable type, 1-8–1-10
Status LEDs, 1-5
Subfunction code, 6-12, 6-22
Sweep time, 2-6
minimizing, 2-10
Sweep, PLC, scan time contributions, 2-7
Switch Fail fault, 5-4
System design, 3-2–3-4
Send Datagram COMMREQ, 6-5, 6-18
T
Serial Bus Address. See SBA
Series 90-30 PLC, receives global data
from GBC, 2-12
Series 90-30 PLC, compatibility, 1-7
Series Five PLC
See also Series Six PLC
reference address, 4-12
Technical help, 5-6
Terminal assembly
installation, 3-10
removal, 3-9
Terminating the bus, 1-8, 3-8
Series Six Reference, 4-5
Timing
additional information, 6-21
bus scan and CPU sweep, 6-16, 6-20
bus scan time, 2-11
CPU sweep time, 2-7
device to device response time, 2-11
Share RAM fault, 5-5
Token passing, 1-11, 2-6
Series Six PLC
compatibility, 1-7
receives global data from GBC, 2-12
reference address, 4-12
Short Circuit fault, 5-4
Signal/noise ratio, 1-8
U
Slot number, 3-4
Specifications
Genius bus, 1-8
Genius Bus Controller, 1-6
Status
of COMMREQ, 6-8–6-11
starting reference, 4-5, 4-11
Status bits, 5-1
meaning, 2-3
memory for, 2-1
transferring to CPU, 2-7
Status block
clearing, 6-8
COMMREQ, 6-9
Index-4
User Scaling Error fault, 5-5
V
Versions
CPU, 1-7
software, 1-7
W
WD (watchdog) Timeout fault, 5-5
Wiring Error fault, 5-4
Series 90t-30 Geniusr Bus Controller User’s Manual – April 1996
GFK-1034B
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