X/Open System Verification Suite VSX-PCTS User

X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
VSXgen1.4 May 1999
VSX-PCTS 4.4.4 November 1999
The Open Group
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
The Open Group
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
 1991, 1992, 1997, 1999 The Open Group
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval
system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical,
photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior permission of the copyright
owners.
Motif, OSF/1, and UNIX are registered trademarks and the IT DialToneTM, The
Open GroupTM, and the ‘‘X Device’’TM are trademarks of The Open Group.
Any comments relating to the material in this document may be sent by electronic mail
to the VSX-PCTS support team at:
fips151-2@opengroup.org
The Open Group
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
The Open Group
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
1. FOREWORD
1.1 VSX DOCUMENTATION
The X/Open Verification Suite, known as VSX, enables you to build and execute test
programs which assess operating systems for conformance to the standards established
in the Single UNIX Specification versions 1 and 2, the X/Open Portability Guide issues
3 and 4, POSIX.1-1990, POSIX.1-1996, FIPS 151-2, and the Common Application
Environment Specification — Protocols for X/Open Interworking: XNFS, Issue 1.
VSX consists of a number of separate packages. The VSXgen package is combined
with one or more add-on test packages to form a test suite which covers some or all of
the above specifications.
This guide describes the use of VSXgen together with the following test packages to
test POSIX.1 and FIPS-151:
VSX-PCTS 4.4.4 November 1999
Do NOT use this guide if you wish to test any specifications other than those listed
above.
VSX uses part of a set of libraries and programs called TETware. TETware has its own
documentation; this manual contains sufficient information on how to use TETware in
conjunction with VSX, but issues pertaining to TETware installation and use of the
more extended TETware functionality will require the user to refer to the toolkit
manuals. Some test packages can also be used with TET 1.10, a predecessor of
TETware. The instructions given in later parts of this document assume the use of
TETware. There may be some differences when predecessors of TETware are used.
The VSX User and Installation Guide is in four parts. Part 1 is the VSX User Guide,
which gives information about the terminology and structure used in VSX. In addition,
the User Guide tells you what resources and facilities you need to use VSX. Part 2 is the
VSX Installation Guide, which gives you all the information you need to install and run
VSX. It is a good idea to read both parts before you start installing and using VSX.
Part 3 gives additional reference information in a series of appendices. Part 4 contains
manual pages for various VSX utilities.
The VSX documentation also includes a separate Pseudo-language Specification, which
contains details of the test locales that VSX uses.
1.1.1 Part 1: VSX User Guide
Contents
The terms used in the VSX documentation and the structure of VSX are explained in
the User Guide, so that you are familiar with the VSX system before you start
installation. The last chapter tells you the hardware, utilities, time and skills which are
necessary to use VSX successfully.
Layout
The layout of the User Guide gives section and paragraph headings in the left margin.
Additional sub-headings are in the body of the text.
Pages are numbered in the bottom right-hand corner, although references within the
documentation are made by reference to chapter, not numbered pages. This system is
used because when you format and print the VSX documentation, the pagination will
vary between systems.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 1
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
1.1.2 Part 2: VSX Installation Guide
Users
The Installation Guide is written for people who are familiar with their system and who
have some knowledge of the utilities and options available on it. The installation of
VSX should be carried out by an experienced systems administrator, because of the
wide range of implementations which can be verified by VSX.
During the stages of installation, VSX needs detailed information about your system.
On a fully compliant system the configuration details can be found from the system
header files and the Conformance Document. On other systems you may need to obtain
the information from the personnel who implemented the system.
Contents
Each chapter in the Installation Guide corresponds with a stage of installation and use
of VSX. An overview of each chapter is provided in the User Guide. Some chapters
contain supplementary information for specific test packages in the sections at the end
of the chapter. You will need to refer to these sections when the generic part of the
chapter indicates that a particular requirement only applies to some test packages, in
order to determine if it applies to any of the test packages you are using. These sections
may also describe additional procedures or requirements for each test package.
You can simply read the Installation Guide for detailed information about VSX. When
you want to install VSX on your system, follow the instructions in the Action Points at
the end of each section. Start from the first chapter and continue until you are ready to
build the testsets and execute them. The final VSX stage enables you to report on the
results of the building and execution stages. The last chapter of the Installation Guide
gives information about interpreting the results of the VSX tests.
When you are familiar with VSX, you can use the appendix entitled ‘‘Action Point
Summary’’ as a checklist.
Layout
The layout of the Installation Guide corresponds to that of the User Guide, with the
addition of Action Points for you to effect after you have read each section.
1.1.3 Part 3: VSX Appendices
The first appendix is a summary of the Action Points from the Installation Guide, which
you can use when you are familiar with installing VSX. Other appendices contain the
reference information you may need when you are using VSX.
1.1.4 Part 4: Manual Pages
The commands used to install, build and execute the test suite and to produce reports
are covered at a basic level in the installation guide. However, many of these
commands have additional features which are described only in the manual pages.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 2
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
X/Open System Verification Suite
Part 1: User Guide
VSXgen1.4 May 1999
The Open Group
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
The Open Group
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
2. VSX TERMINOLOGY
2.1 INTRODUCTION
This chapter introduces the terms used in the VSX User and Installation Guides. The
chapter tells you about the seven stages of using VSX, the terms and naming
conventions used in describing the structure of VSX.
2.2 STAGES OF VSX
VSX is used in a series of independent stages. When you have run all of the stages, you
can read the VSX reports and interpret the results of the tests to assess the conformance
of your system. As each stage is independent, you can re-run the verification suite
starting at any of the stages without affecting any of the earlier stages in the suite.
2.2.1 Stage 1: Preparation
In this stage, you check your system has enough file space available, add entries to the
user and group databases and extract the VSX software from the distribution files for
VSXgen and one or more test packages.
2.2.2 Stage 2: Configuration
Next, the VSX configuration script interrogates your system for information and asks
you questions on the screen. From this information, VSX generates configuration
parameter files, which are used in the later stages of VSX to find out details about your
system. Additionally, for some test packages you must configure character encodings
for the VSX test locales, and install the test locales using the tools and file formats for
your system.
2.2.3 Stage 3: Installation
In this stage, VSX sets up the programs, libraries, include files and file systems which
are needed to build and execute the test suite.
2.2.4 Stage 4: Building
The building stage uses the VSX source files and the configuration parameter files to
build and install executable test programs. This stage places results in a journal file,
which is used by the reporting stage. You can choose to build the whole suite of test
programs to test your system for conformance, or selected parts. Building selected
parts is known as a partial build. In this stage you can also undo all or part of a previous
building stage, for example, when you want to rebuild using a different compiler.
2.2.5 Stage 5: Execution
When you have completed the preceding stages, you can run the tests to verify your
system. VSX executes the test programs and keeps the results in a journal file for use
by the reporting stage. You can choose to execute all of the installed tests at once, or
choose a partial execution.
2.2.6 Stage 6: Reporting
The reporting stage generates reports from the building and execution journal files.
You can also produce a summary report for management information and a report
comparing the results from several test executions.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 5
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
2.2.7 Stage 7: Interpreting VSX Results
Using the report generated by VSX, the test source code and the test strategy
documentation, you can interpret the results in order to identify the causes of test
failures.
2.3 STRUCTURE
VSX uses a common structure for each of the building, execution and reporting stages
to locate the different facilities that are to be verified. This is a four-level hierarchy
consisting of the following levels:
2.3.1 Section
A section corresponds with the primary source of the definition of an interface. For
example, the VSX4 section POSIX.hdr corresponds with the header file definitions
relating to POSIX.1. The VSX4 section ANSI.os corresponds with the interface
definitions contained in the ANSI C standard and referenced in POSIX.1.
2.3.2 Area
An area groups together test programs with a common theme, and is a sub-division of a
section. For example, in the VSX4 section POSIX.os (operating system interfaces
relating to POSIX), the area files holds all of the test programs for interfaces which
deal with files and directories.
2.3.3 Testset
A testset is the subdivision of an area. A testset usually relates directly to an interface
definition.
2.3.4 Test
A test tests a particular statement in a definition. A number of tests, which may depend
on each other, make up the testset to assess the conformance of a particular interface.
2.4 NAMING CONVENTIONS
The VSX naming convention numbers the tests within a testset executable sequentially,
and corresponds with the test descriptions in the VSX manual. The naming conventions
are as follows;
Section
major-section.sub-section
Area
area-name
Testset directory
testset-name
Where testset directory names start with an M, they contain tests for the macro version
of the interface.
Testset executable
T.testset-name
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 6
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
2.5 JOURNAL FILE
A journal file is generated after the building, execution and cleanup stages, with the
results of the stage. The journal file is a text file with control information on the front
of each line. It is not usually necessary to examine these files directly, but if you do
then details of the file format may be found in the TETware manuals. The reporting
stage uses the journal file as input when you are producing a formatted report.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 7
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
3. VSX DIRECTORY STRUCTURE
3.1 TOP LEVEL DIRECTORY STRUCTURE
3.1.1 Introduction
There are the following directories in the top level of the VSX directory structure. This
section gives a brief description of the top level, and is followed by sections with a
detailed explanation of each directory hierarchy. These are described thus, with the
VSX directory name following the descriptive directory name.
3.1.2 Binaries: BIN
A common location for all the VSX commands you execute, for example, vrpt. You
should include this directory in the search path for your shell.
3.1.3 Manual: MAN
Manual pages for the testsets and VSX programs, and test description and strategy files.
The manual pages use the man macros package associated with [nt]roff for
formatting.
3.1.4 Results: results
A directory under which the journal files for the installation, building, execution and
cleanup stages are written.
3.1.5 Source: SRC
The source files for libraries and utilities used to configure, install and build VSX.
3.1.6 Support: SUPPORT
A template for error reports and details of how to submit them. These files are not
relevant to POSIX or FIPS mode testing.
3.1.7 Testroot: TESTROOT
A directory containing the TESTROOT directory structure, used by default as the
directory to install the executable testsets. You can change the location when you are
configuring the parameter files.
3.1.8 Testset: tset
This directory hierarchy contains the source files which are used to build the VSX
testsets. The testset directory contains section directories.
Section
The section directories are named using the naming conventions explained in the
chapter entitled ‘‘VSX Terminology’’. Each section directory contains area directories,
below which are the testsets.
For header sections, each testset directory contains a compacted (L.) source file and a
makefile. For other sections, each testset directory holds the source programs and
makefile for the testset.
The Test Case Controller executes the makefile to install the relevant files in the testroot
directory.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 8
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
3.2 SOURCE DIRECTORY STRUCTURE
There are the following directories at the top of the source (or SRC) directory structure.
3.2.1 Common: common
The source files compiled during the installation stage, which are used to build the
executable program vrpt and others used by VSX. In addition, this directory includes
the source for the libraries used for building the testsets.
3.2.2 Install: install
The scripts and associated files used to configure and install VSX.
3.2.3 Subsets: subsets
This directory contains subdirectories relating to each available VSX subset. The files
for each subset contain information about the subset and the test package it belongs to,
used in the configuration and installation stages of VSX.
3.2.4 Library: LIB
An empty directory, named LIB, which is used for the libraries compiled from the
source in the directory common.
3.2.5 Include: INC
The unique VSX include files, used to build the common software and the testsets.
3.2.6 System Include: SYSINC
A copy of the include files for the system, which are modified during the installation
stage to correct any deficiencies. Note that it is important to ensure that this copy
reflects any changes made to the system include files.
3.3 MANUAL DIRECTORY STRUCTURE
The manual directory contains the following directories.
3.3.1 Common: common
The manual entries for the common software elements, which correspond with the
directories under the source directory structure.
3.3.2 Testset: tset
The manual entries, test descriptions and strategies for each VSX testset. The directory
structure follows the naming conventions explained in the chapter entitled ‘‘VSX
Terminology’’. The testset entries are T. files containing the manual pages (including
test descriptions) for formatting with [nt]roff -man, and L. files containing test
descriptions and strategies used by vrpt.
3.4 TESTROOT DIRECTORY STRUCTURE
This structure contains the executable programs for each of the testsets installed. The
structure under the tset subdirectory follows the naming conventions explained in
the chapter entitled ‘‘VSX Terminology’’. Each testset entry is an executable program
and creates a matching d. directory entry which is used to hold any temporary files
created while the testset is executing.
The header file and C language testsets contain compacted file entries copied from the
source directory structure, as well as the executable drivers. These do not use a d.
temporary directory.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 9
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
The BIN subdirectory is where utility programs and other binary files used by the
executable testsets are placed, and may also contain scripts which must be edited by the
user.
The INC subdirectory contains include files for use in header file tests.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 10
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
4. RESOURCES
4.1 INTRODUCTION
VSX requires the following major resources to run successfully:
g
an adequate computer hardware environment
g
the correct base utilities
g
enough time to complete the task
g
a system administrator with the necessary skill to run VSX.
4.2 COMPUTER HARDWARE
4.2.1 Disk Space
Installation
VSX uses a considerable amount of disk space. This is described in detail in the chapter
entitled ‘‘PREPARATION’’.
Building and Execution
To save disk space, you can build and execute selected sections of VSX. See the
chapter entitled ‘‘BUILDING VSX’’ for more information.
4.2.2 Exclusive Use
It is recommended that you have exclusive use of the machine when you execute the
tests. In particular, the operating system tests should only be executed when exclusive
use is available since these tests may affect other users of the system.
4.2.3 Devices
In order to execute all of the tests in VSX you will need the following devices to be
available on your machine. These are only required for some subsets.
1.
One or more mountable file systems. VSX uses these for three separate purposes,
and so three separate device names can be specified if desired. However, one file
system is normally used for all three. One of the file systems is used for testing
ENOSPC errors, and will be filled up as part the installation process (if needed by
a selected subset).
2.
A terminal at which a user is logged on while the tests are executing.
3.
Two spare ports to test the terminal interfaces.
4.3 UTILITIES
VSX assumes that the following utilities, which are defined in Volume 1 of XPG3, are
available on your system. VSX also assumes that the utilities work in the way described
in XPG3.
4.3.1 Bourne Shell
The configuration and installation stages use scripts which are written for the Bourne
shell, or a similar shell.
4.3.2 make
The installation and building stages use make files.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 11
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
4.3.3 Compiler
VSX requires a C compiler with the -E option, and a link editor. VSX assumes that
when these utilities execute successfully, they will return an exit value of 0 (zero).
4.3.4 Library Archiver
VSX requires a library archiver and other software to order the libraries. The ordering
software may be inherent in the library archiver, the ranlib utility or the utility pair
lorder and tsort.
4.3.5 awk
The reporting stage uses awk scripts.
4.3.6 Editors
VSX uses the basic editor ed and the stream editor sed. The implementation of
sed can be either in the style of System V or BSD. In addition, the configuration and
installation stages use the utility grep extensively.
4.3.7 File Utilities
To handle files, VSX uses the basic utilities cp, mv and rm. To handle file modes,
VSX uses the utilities chown, chgrp and chmod and, for this reason, you must
have access to these during the installation phase of VSX.
VSX also uses a variety of other commands and utilities (as described in Volume 1 of
XPG3) during execution and uses the text formatter nroff to format the
documentation.
4.3.8 Null Device
VSX assumes that the file /dev/null is readable and writable by all users and
behaves as described in XPG3.
4.4 TIME
For an experienced VSX user, the installation and execution of VSXgen and the full set
of test packages should take less than 24 hours. A longer period may be needed on
slower processors, as the building stage and the header tests make considerable use of
the compiler.
The design of VSX enables you to run the building and execution stages without
intervention and to review the results afterwards.
4.5 SKILLS
4.5.1 Using VSX
To install, build and execute the tests correctly, you must be able to give detailed
information about your system to VSX. VSX is not a product which can be loaded and
run without assistance. VSX is designed for use by an experienced systems
administrator who has considerable knowledge of the utilities available, the devices and
their associated device files on the system. For example, you may need to know whether
your system generates the EBUSY error if you attempt to remove a busy directory.
Without this level of information, you may find difficulty in using VSX.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 12
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
4.5.2 Interpreting Results
When VSX reports on the results of the tests, the report may show that a facility does
not work in the way that VSX expects. To investigate the cause of failed tests, you may
need more information than is available from the VSX report. Considerable skill and an
understanding of the operating system are necessary to gather this information and to
investigate the results thoroughly.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 13
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 14
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
X/Open System Verification Suite
Part 2: Installation Guide
VSXgen1.4 May 1999
VSX-PCTS 4.4.4 November 1999
The Open Group
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
The Open Group
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
5. PREPARATION
5.1 INTRODUCTION
Before you install VSX you must first check there is file space available and then create
the user accounts. When you are ready to load the VSX distribution, you must unpack
the distribution files and then check that the contents were extracted correctly. Finally,
you can optionally remove any unwanted parts of the distribution.
5.2 PREPARING YOUR SYSTEM
5.2.1 File Space Requirements
The target file system must have enough free space available to build and execute the
test suite. The amount of space required by each test package is given in the packagespecific sections at the end of this chapter. In addition VSXgen itself requires
approximately 5 to 8 Mb free space, of which less than 1 Mb is for the TESTROOT
directory.
Note the following points:
1.
The TESTROOT directory may be on a different file system, but it must be one
that allows privileged access (e.g., it cannot be on a remote file system where user
ID 0 will be mapped to an ‘anonymous’ user ID).
2.
The disk usage is much greater on RISC systems due to the larger size of object
and executable files. Where a range is given the higher figure is for a typical
RISC system, but some systems have been known to require up to three times this
amount.
3.
For POSIX or FIPS mode testing, some of the VSX distribution is redundant, and
may be removed after unpacking (as described in the section ‘‘Removing
Unwanted VSX Data’’). The figures given for POSIX and FIPS modes assume
that this is done.
4.
You will need space to hold the reports. Allow 2Mb minimum.
5.
The archiver and compiler may also use some temporary file space.
6.
Disk usage in TESTROOT will be less if the executables use shared libraries.
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
Check there is enough free space available to unpack and install the software.
5.2.2 VSX User Accounts
You must add one or more group names and one or more user names to the group and
user databases on your system. The precise requirements vary between test packages.
Refer to the package-specific sections at the end of this chapter for details.
The only requirements common to all packages are the user name vsx0 and the group
name vsxg0. The home directory for user vsx0 must be a subdirectory of your
TET_ROOT directory. (If you do not have TETware installed, you must first create a
directory to be designated as your TET_ROOT directory.)
The home directories of users vsx1 and vsx2 (if needed) must differ from that of
vsx0.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 17
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
The user vsx0 must have a login shell. The user ID and group ID values chosen must
not exceed the value of INT_MAX for the system.
If your system has extensions which are enabled by environment variables, and the
default settings of these variables would cause behaviour to differ from that required for
compliance, you must ensure that these variables are set so as to disable the extensions
in the login script for user vsx0. For example, if the setting of the LANG
environment variable is such that processes have a locale setting other than the C or
POSIX locale on entry to main() then this would typically be disabled by adding the
line
unset LANG
to the .profile for user vsx0.
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
Create a distinct group entry for vsxg0 and (if required by one of the test
packages) distinct group entries for vsxg1 and vsxg2; usually in the file
/etc/group.
2.
If you do not already have TETware installed, create a directory you wish to
designate as your TET_ROOT directory.
3.
Create a distinct user entry for vsx0 in group vsxg0, with home directory
located under your TET_ROOT, and with a login shell; usually in the file
/etc/passwd.
4.
Make sure that the user vsx0 has write permission in the TET_ROOT
directory.
5.
Add $HOME/BIN and $HOME/../bin to the command search path for user
vsx0, and include it in the PATH environment variable set in the login script for
user vsx0.
6.
Ensure that any extensions enabled by environment variables that would cause
non-compliant behaviour are disabled in the login script for user vsx0.
7.
For some test packages, if the implementation supports supplementary groups,
the user vsx0 should have the maximum number of supplementary groups
associated with it. These supplementary groups must exclude the groups vsxg1
and vsxg2. The group ID values chosen must not exceed the value of
INT_MAX for the system.
8.
If required by one of the test packages, create a distinct user entry for vsx1 in
group vsxg1, in the password file. The home directory must differ from that of
user vsx0.
9.
If required by one of the test packages, create a distinct user entry for vsx2 in
group vsxg2, in the password file. The home directory must differ from that of
user vsx0.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 18
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
5.3 LOADING THE VSX DISTRIBUTION
5.3.1 Unpacking the Distribution Files
The sources for VSXgen and each VSX test package are distributed separately as
compressed cpio or tar archives.
When you unpack the distribution files, the contents are installed in a hierarchy which
starts from the current working directory. Make sure you log in as the user vsx0 and
unpack the files in the vsx0 home directory, to ensure that the access permissions and
locations for the files are correct.
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
Log in to the test system as the user vsx0, who must be the owner of all the
loaded files.
2.
Ensure you are working in the vsx0 home directory and that you have write
permission in that directory.
3.
Unpack the distribution files for the VSX-vtools (namespace test tool), VSXgen
and the test packages you wish to use, using appropriate commands to
decompress each file and extract all files from the resulting POSIX cpio or
tar archive, e.g.:
zcat ../vsx-vtools-1.4.tar.Z| pax -v -r -p p
zcat ../vsxgen-os-1.4.tar.Z| pax -v -r -p p
zcat ../vsx-pcts-4.4.4.tar.Z| pax -v -r -p p
or
zcat ../vsx-vtools-1.4.tar.Z| tar xvf zcat ../vsxgen-os-1.4.tar.Z| tar xvf zcat ../vsx-pcts-4.4.4.tar.Z| tar xvf -
5.3.2 Checking the Contents
When you have finished unpacking the files, the following main directories should be in
the vsx0 home directory:
Directory Name
Summary of contents
BIN
MAN
results
SRC
SUPPORT
TESTROOT
tset
VSX user commands
VSX user manuals (on-line)
a directory tree for journal files
general source tree
Not relevant in POSIX or FIPS modes
executable testsets tree
testset source tree
In addition, a number of other files should be in the vsx0 home directory. The most
important ones to look for are the test package release identification files, called
pkgrelnum, where pkg is the package name (e.g. VSX4) and num is the release
number of the package. This is the last file written to each test package archive. Its
presence tells you that all the contents of the archive have been read.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 19
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
Change to the vsx0 home directory (using cd) and list the directory. Check
the expected subdirectories and the release identification files for each test
package are there.
If they are not, check that there were no read errors while the archives were being
read and that there is space available on the file system.
2.
Check that the release numbers given in the test-package specific Action Points
for this chapter correspond with the release identification files.
5.4 REMOVING UNWANTED VSX DATA (OPTIONAL)
When you want to save space on your system and you do not want to install the tests for
some sections, you can remove parts of the VSX distribution. Refer to the packagespecific sections at the end of this chapter to identify which parts of each test package
you might be able to remove.
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
Remove any unwanted sections from the directories tset and MAN/tset.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 20
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
5.5 VSX4 PREPARATION
5.5.1 File Space Requirements
The VSX4 test package requires in the region of 45 to 75 Mb of free space, of which 30
to 55 Mb is for the TESTROOT directory.
5.5.2 VSX User Accounts
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
The vsx0 home directory must be called vsx4.
2.
The user names vsx1 and vsx2, group names vsxg1 and vsxg2, and
supplementary groups are all required.
3.
If your system treats group ID values which do not exist in the group database as
invalid, then ensure that the six consecutive group ID values after vsxg0 also
exist in the group database.
5.5.3 Loading The VSX Distribution
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
The name of the VSX4 release identification file is VSX4rel4.4.2.
5.5.4 Removing Unwanted VSX Data (Optional)
VSX4 is divided into the sections listed below. Note that VSX4 has been designed to
follow the same structure as that adopted by the contents of the various standards and
guides which it tests.
Therefore, please note the following points regarding the contents of the sections within
the base subset:
1.
The POSIX and ANSI sections are both required for testing conformance to the
POSIX.1 and FIPS 151 standards. The reason for this is that the POSIX.1
standard makes reference to the requirements within the ANSI C standard and
VSX follows this structure. These sections are included in VSX-PCTS.
2.
The XOPEN, POSIX, ANSI and lang.C sections are all required for testing
compliance with the X/Open specifications. These sections are not included in
VSX-PCTS.
3.
The XPG4 sections are required in addition to the XOPEN, POSIX, ANSI and
lang.C sections for testing compliance with X/Open Portability Guide, issue 4,
and the Single UNIX Specification, version 2. These sections are not included in
VSX-PCTS.
Base Subset
Sections
Description
ANSI.os
ANSI.hdr
POSIX.os
POSIX.hdr
XOPEN.os
Tests for ANSI system interfaces
Tests for ANSI header files
Tests for POSIX system interfaces
Tests for POSIX header files
Tests for X/Open system interfaces
The Open Group
VSX-PCTS4.4.4
Page 21
X/Open System Verification Suite
XOPEN.hdr
XOPEN.cmd
XPG4.os
XPG4.hdr
lang.C
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
Tests for X/Open header files
Tests for X/Open commands
Tests for XPG issue 4 system interfaces
Tests for XPG issue 4 header files
Tests for the C language
Data Management Subset
Sections
Description
dm.hdr
dm.isam
Tests for ISAM header file
Tests for ISAM sub-routines
The Open Group
VSX-PCTS4.4.4
Page 22
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
6. CONFIGURING VSX
6.1 INTRODUCTION
When you receive VSX, the source code is written to run even when your system does
not yet conform fully to the specification. The construction of VSX enables it to run on
a wide range of implementations, by including a configuration stage.
During the configuration stage, VSX finds out the specific details about your system and
uses the information to generate parameter files for the system. VSX finds the
information both by interrogating your system and by asking you questions.
Before you start, you must establish an installation directory and find out the
information which is needed for configuration. Read this chapter and write the
information for your system next to each action point. When you have finished
configuring VSX, check the parameter files are correct for your system.
For some subsets you must also install several test locales, or ‘pseudo-languages’.
Further information is given in the section entitled ‘‘INSTALLING THE PSEUDOLANGUAGES’’ later in this chapter.
6.2 INSTALLATION DIRECTORY
The directory you use to install the testsets may be on a different file system from the
distribution directory. The file system must have enough space available for the
executable testsets. A default installation directory is provided, named TESTROOT in
the vsx0 home directory. If you choose a directory that does not already exist, it will
be created by the VSX installation procedure.
For some test packages (as indicated in the package-specific sections at the end of this
chapter), if you are testing for conformance to FIPS 151 the installation directory must
support the inheritance of parent directory group ID. The method of achieving this (if it
is not the default) is implementation dependent, but will typically be either an option
when the file system is created, or a mode setting on the individual directories which
support the feature. If the method used involves the setting being inherited by
subdirectories when they are created and there is an existing directory hierarchy under
the installation directory which is not set up to support the inheritance of parent
directory group ID, then you must remove the tset subdirectory and everything
below it.
It is recommended that you set the environment variable TET_EXECUTE to the
pathname of the installation directory in your login script. For example, if you are
using a Bourne-type shell and the default location for the installation directory, include
the lines
TET_EXECUTE=$HOME/TESTROOT
export TET_EXECUTE
in the .profile for the vsx0 login.
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
Choose a directory for the installation of testset executables. The default is
TESTROOT under the vsx0 home directory.
2.
If you are testing for conformance to FIPS 151 and one of the VSX test packages
you are using requires that the installation directory must support the inheritance
of parent directory group ID, and your system implements the inheritance of
parent directory group ID by means of a directory mode setting that is inherited
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 23
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
by subdirectories (for example by setting the S_ISGID bit on the directory),
and there is an existing directory hierarchy under the testroot which does not
support this feature, then you must remove it using
rm -rf TESTROOT/tset
3.
Set the environment variable TET_EXECUTE in the vsx0 login script to the
pathname of the testroot directory.
6.3 PARAMETERS
6.3.1 Introduction
The shell script included with VSX for configuration interrogates your system and asks
you questions on the screen. There are VSX default values which you can use, or you
can choose to start with the defaults in a parameter file which has already been set up. A
list of the parameter files available is given when the configuration script starts. See also
the section entitled ‘‘CREATING PARAMETER FILES’’ at the end of the chapter.
6.3.2 Libraries
When VSX interrogates your system, it searches libraries in an order which ensures that
the standard C library is checked last. Give the names of other libraries to search in the
order you want VSX to use them. Note that if loadable objects with the same name
appear in different libraries, problems may occur when you are compiling if the
libraries are searched in the wrong order.
6.4 VSX CONFIGURATION SCRIPT
6.4.1 Introduction
The configuration script finds or requests information about the following subjects.
When the configuration script asks a question on the screen, you can use the default
value, shown in brackets, or type the answer for your system. The sections on the
following pages tell you what information VSX is looking for. The package-specific
sections at the end of this chapter may indicate additional requirements or restrictions
on the answers you give to some of these questions.
Note that the defaults (shown in parentheses) in the text on the following pages are the
VSX defaults. When you use a parameter file which has already been set up, the
defaults on the screen will be taken from the parameter file you chose. When you rerun the configuration script later, the defaults are taken from the previous run unless
you use a parameter file.
6.4.2 General Information
Parameter File
Choose a parameter file from the list shown on the screen. Alternatively, press
RETURN to start with values from a previous run if any, otherwise the VSX defaults.
Mode
This determines which test mode you wish to run. Some or all of the following modes
will be offered, depending on which test packages are available:
g
POSIX96 — tests compliance to POSIX.1-1996
g
POSIX90 — tests compliance to POSIX.1-1990
g
FIPS — tests compliance to FIPS 151-2
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 24
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
Subset
A list of the subsets that support the chosen test mode from each available test package
is displayed. Enter a space-separated list of the subsets which contain tests you wish to
run (default: all subsets that support the chosen test mode).
If only one subset supports the chosen test mode, its name is displayed and the question
is not asked.
Name
Your name in the way you want it shown on reports.
Agency
Your agency name, to use on reports.
System
The operating system name and the release number, to use on reports.
Installation Directory
The name of the installation directory for the executable testsets (default:
$HOME/TESTROOT). You can choose any other directory you want to use, to make
the best use of the file space available. The installation directory is also known as the
testroot directory.
Machine Speed
The speed of your machine, in the range 1–10, where 1 is very fast and 10 is slow
(default: 5). For example, the speed of an average workstation is rated 5 on this scale.
It is better to underestimate the speed of your machine than to overestimate it.
The speed rating is used to determine how much time to allow a test before timing out,
usually in cases where a test has failed. The speed rating does not affect the execution
time for VSX significantly.
Include Files
The system’s include directories in order of searching (default:
C Compiler
The name of the C compiler (default:
/usr/include).
c89 or cc).
C Compiler Special Command Line Options
This question prompts for special command line options for your C compiler. If you
want to compile parts of the suite with special options, you can specify them when you
build the parts with the Test Case Controller. The code is not usually optimised.
If the list of system include directories specified earlier is not the default for the
C compiler, then add -I/directory options as necessary.
C Compiler Special Link Editor Options
The next question prompts for special link editor options for your compiler. The
default options are usually adequate. However, it should be noted that the C compiler
special command line options are not used on the link command line, and thus some of
these special options may need to be repeated here.
Libraries
The location of the library maintenance utilities ar, lorder, tsort and ranlib.
This is requested when they are not in the user’s PATH.
Files
The location of the commands to change file ownership, file group ownership and file
modes; namely chown, chgrp and chmod. This is requested when they are not in
the user’s PATH.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 25
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
Additional Libraries
Libraries, other than the C library and specific libraries asked for individually, used by
your system for some of the routines (for example -lmalloc). Give one library
name each time the question is asked.
Note that some questions about specific libraries may be asked after this question, if
they are only needed by certain subsets.
ANSI vprintf Function
Whether the ANSI functions vprintf() and vfprintf() are supported (y/n,
default: y).
6.4.3 Compiler Characteristics and Libraries
VSX uses a series of small C programs to test your compiler and libraries.
6.4.4 Subset-specific Information
Information needed by individual subsets is asked at this point. Refer to the packagespecific sections at the end of this chapter for details.
6.4.5 Optional Information
The following questions are only asked if the information is needed by one or more of
the subsets you have selected. The package-specific sections at the end of this chapter
indicate which questions apply to the subsets and test mode you have selected.
C Compiler Threads Command Line Options
This question prompts for compiler options to be used instead of the normal options,
when compiling thread-safe programs.
Maths Library
The location of the archive library which contains your maths library routines if there is
one (default: -lm).
File System for ENOSPC Tests
A mountable device to be used for ENOSPC tests. This will be initialised to a known
nearly-full condition during the installation stage. The filling procedure will take less
time if the device to be used has a small capacity. If only a large device is available it is
advisable to create a small file system on it if possible.
6.4.6 Running the Configuration Script
When you execute the configuration script and answer the questions, messages appear
on the screen which tell you when the script is updating the parameter files.
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
Read through the configuration script section and write down any information
you will need to use which is different from the defaults.
2.
Execute the shell script config.sh which is in the BIN directory. When you
have included this directory in your PATH, you can execute the command from
any location.
3.
Answer the questions which the configuration script asks.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 26
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
6.5 CHECKING THE PARAMETER FILES
When you have run the configuration script and answered the questions, VSX generates
two files in the SRC directory. One contains configuration parameters and the other is
a header file containing include file elements.
6.5.1 Configuration Parameters File
The parameters file, named vsxparams, contains the configuration constants for your
system which VSX uses during the installation and building stages. The installation
stage uses the parameters file to modify makefiles to suit your system and to generate
the files tetbuild.cfg, tetexec.cfg and tetclean.cfg which are used
by the Test Case Controller. The parameters file contains a set of parameters which are
defined in a format suitable for inclusion in a Bourne shell script:
parameter−name="parameter−value"
Note that you must include the quotation marks. A description of the use and possible
values for the parameter precedes each parameter setting. You can change the values of
parameters in the file without re-running the configuration script.
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
Check the values in the configuration parameters file SRC/vsxparams and
edit the parameter−name lines if necessary.
6.5.2 Configuration Header File
The source files used in the installation and building stages of VSX will not compile
unless your header files contain the definitions used by the source code for the subsets
you have selected. The configuration script checks your system header files for these
definitions and, when some are missing, creates a header file, named vsxconfig.h,
with a list of the definitions which are missing from your system.
Note that VSX uses NSIG in signal.h, which is not in POSIX.1. However, this is
required to find the highest signal number. This must be set to the highest number that
a signal can take plus one.
When the configuration script adds a definition to this file, a message appears on the
screen.
Definitions
The list may contain missing elements of the following types:
1.
Where the value of a defined constant is unlikely to vary between systems, the
configuration header file uses the most common value.
2.
Where the value of a defined constant is likely to vary between systems, the
configuration header file uses a value of −1. You can change the value to one
which is more suitable for your system, or leave it as −1. However, VSX only
functions correctly when all of these values have been changed to the correct
values for your system. Some tests will fail when values are left as −1. For
example if your signal.h file does not include the signal SIGABRT, you can
map it onto the signal SIGIOT in the configuration header file, by adding the
definition
#define SIGABRT SIGIOT
3.
Where defined constants are missing from the file limits.h, the configuration
header file uses the minimum acceptable value.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 27
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
4.
Where type definitions are missing the configuration header file will contain a
dummy typedef statement. You should replace the token <type> with the
correct type for your system. If a type definition appears in more than one header
file, it must be protected against redefinition in the same way in all the headers
that define it, otherwise it must be protected against multiple inclusions of the
header that defines it. You may also need to move the type definition so that it
appears before any declarations that use the type name.
5.
Where structure definitions are missing the configuration header file will contain
a dummy struct statement. You should replace the token <members> with
the correct structure members for your system.
6.
Where extern declarations are missing the configuration header file will
contain the correct declaration.
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
Check the SRC/vsxconfig.h file to ensure that the values are correct for
your system.
2.
Check that the values of all the varying defined constants have been changed
from −1 to the values for your system.
3.
Check that the values of the other defined constants are correct for your system.
4.
Check that all dummy statements have been changed to valid ones.
5.
If you re-run
config.sh at a later time,
SRC/vsxconfig.h, so make sure you copy it first.
it
will
overwrite
6.5.3 IMPORTANT
When VSX creates the configuration header file with a list of definitions, the indication
is that your system does not conform to POSIX.1. If you are unable to give the correct
values for the definitions in the file, you may find that some of the VSX sources do not
compile and that some of the tests fail.
You must check all the values for the definitions added to this file, to ensure that they
are suitable for your system. Incorrect values may cause particular tests to function
incorrectly. If this happens, it is much more difficult to ascertain the cause of the error.
As this information is not available to all users, you may need assistance from the
personnel who implemented your system.
6.6 CREATING PARAMETER FILES
You can create a new parameter file by copying the vsxparams file to the directory
install/params.data. If you re-run the configuration script, you can choose to
use any of the files in this directory to provide the default values for your system. The
default values are taken from the file SRC/vsxparams unless you choose a different
parameter file.
6.7 TOP LEVEL MAKEFILE
The VSX configuration script generates a Makefile in the vsx0 home directory.
This contains commands to be executed in the installation stage. Many of the
commands needed are implementation-specific and so must be configured by the user.
Only the commands needed for the subsets and test mode you have selected are placed
in the template Makefile.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 28
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
The operations that must be performed by the configured commands are described in
the following sections. You need only refer to the descriptions of the targets that appear
in the template that has been created by config.sh.
The Makefile is provided for convenience should the installation stage need to be
repeated. However, as the configured commands must be executed as a privileged user,
you may, if you prefer, choose not to use the Makefile and execute the necessary
commands by hand instead.
6.7.1 Privilege Check
The privchk target checks that make has been executed with the necessary
privileges. The default commands assume that these privileges are associated with user
ID 0 and use the commands id and grep to check the current user ID value.
6.7.2 Parent Directory Group ID
The dirgid target sets up the testroot directory to support the inheritance of parent
directory group ID. The default commands assume that this is done by setting the
S_ISGID bit on the directory.
6.7.3 Execute Install Script as User vsx0
The install target executes the VSX installation script install.sh with the
user ID of user vsx0. Since the script expects the environment variable HOME to
contain the vsx0 home directory, these commands must ensure that it is set
appropriately.
6.7.4 Assign Privileges to chmog Program
The chmogpriv target gives the program chmog the appropriate privilege to
change the mode, owner and group of any file and to assign privileges to executable
files. The default commands make the program setuid root.
6.7.5 Set Up File System for ENOSPC Tests
The filldisc target initialises the mountable device to be used for ENOSPC tests
to a known nearly-full condition. This is done by mounting the device, changing
directory to the mount point, and executing the filldisc.sh script. The default
commands also include a df to report the free space remaining after filldisc.sh
has completed.
6.7.6 Additional Subset-specific Targets
The Makefile may also contain additional targets that are specific to the subsets you
have selected. Refer to the package-specific sections at the end of this chapter for
details.
6.7.7 Non-configured Commands
The top level Makefile may also perform some of the following operations, using
commands that do not need to be configured by the user:
g
Creates the testroot directory if it does not already exist.
g
Additional subset-specific operations.
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
Edit the Makefile in the vsx0 home directory.
2.
Configure the implementation-specific installation commands correctly for your
system.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 29
X/Open System Verification Suite
3.
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
If you re-run config.sh at a later time, it will overwrite Makefile, so
make sure you copy it first.
6.8 USER-SUPPLIED INTERFACE ROUTINES
6.8.1 Introduction
Depending on the test mode selected, VSX needs to use a variety of functions which are
not in the corresponding specification in order to set up the conditions required to
execute tests of system interfaces which are. Since this functionality can be defined in
any way a system implementor requires, VSX has a file which needs to be edited to
define these functions prior to the compilation of the test suite.
For example, VSX needs to obtain appropriate privileges in many tests. Since the
means of obtaining these privileges is not specified in POSIX.1, it is configurable in the
file SRC/userintf.c.
As supplied with VSX, these routines make use of system interfaces commonly found
on many systems. The file contains sensible defaults and if, after reviewing these, you
decide that they are not appropriate for your system, you should modify the routines as
necessary before the VSX test suite is installed.
Only the routines needed for the subsets and test mode you have selected are placed in
the template userintf.c file. Descriptions of the individual interfaces may be
found below. You need only refer to the descriptions of the routines that appear in the
template that has been created by config.sh.
6.8.2 setprv()
setprv() provides the current process with appropriate privileges. The argument
specifies what privilege is being requested from the following set:
PRV_SETID
to perform privileged setuid() and setgid() calls
PRV_MOUNT
to mount and unmount file systems
PRV_LINKDIR
to create and remove links to directories
PRV_ACCESS
to gain unrestricted access to files
PRV_CHOWN
to perform privileged chown() and chmod() calls
PRV_SETGRPS
to set supplementary group IDs
PRV_NEWROOT
to set the root directory of the process
PRV_KILL
to perform privileged kill() calls
PRV_DEVICE
to access device files
PRV_ASSIGN
to assign privileges to an executable file
PRV_IPC
to allow unrestricted IPC access
PRV_NICE
to perform privileged nice() calls
PRV_ULIMIT
to perform privileged setlimit() or ulimit()
calls
PRV_LIMITS
to perform privileged setrlimit() calls
PRV_MEMLOCK
to obtain memory locking privileges
PRV_SETTIME
to set (real-time) clocks
PRV_SETRTSCHED
to set (real-time) process scheduling parameters
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 30
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
PRV_GETRTSCHED
to get privileged
parameters
(real-time)
process
PRV_SETTHRSCHED
to set threads scheduling parameters
PRV_GETTHRSCHED
to get privileged threads scheduling parameters
scheduling
The mapping of this privilege set to the set of privileges on the implementation may not
be one-to-one. If distinction between individual privileges is not considered important,
then the simplest mapping is to give the calling process all possible privileges on each
call to setprv().
setprv() returns 0 for success, −1 for failure.
6.8.3 unsetprv()
unsetprv() removes the specified privilege from the current process. The argument
specifies what privilege is to be removed; the values are the same as those used with
setprv().
unsetprv() returns 0 for success, −1 for failure. (If the process already does not
have the privilege, this is considered success).
6.8.4 prv_assign()
prv_assign() assigns appropriate privileges to an executable file. The arguments
are the file name and a zero-terminated array of the privileges to be assigned. Privilege
values are the same as those used with setprv(). If a process with effective user ID
of root automatically has the requested privilege, no action is necessary. When the
file is executed it will make calls to setprv() to activate the assigned privileges. If
privileges assigned with prv_assign() are automatically active when the file is
executed, then setprv() should just check that the requested privilege is in effect.
prv_assign() is only called after setprv(PRV_ASSIGN) since assigning
privilege is a privileged operation.
prv_assign() returns 0 for success, −1 for failure.
6.8.5 mnt_rw()
mnt_rw() mounts the file system specified by spec on to the directory dir for reading
and writing.
mnt_rw() returns 0 for success, −1 for failure.
6.8.6 mnt_ro()
mnt_ro() mounts the file system specified by spec on to the directory dir for reading
only.
mnt_ro() returns 0 for success, −1 for failure.
6.8.7 unmnt()
unmnt() unmounts the file system specified by spec from the directory dir where it
has previously been mounted.
unmnt() returns 0 for success, −1 for failure.
6.8.8 openctl()
openctl() opens the terminal device spec with the specified flags. This then
becomes the controlling terminal for the current process.
openctl() returns the open file descriptor for the terminal, or −1 on failure.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 31
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
6.8.9 openpty()
openpty() opens the master and slave sides of a pseudo-terminal. Both device
names are supplied, but if master pseudo-terminals are obtained from a clone device
such as /dev/ptmx then the slave name is a dummy which must be overwritten with
the real device name. An argument specifies whether the slave must be opened as a
controlling terminal by calling openctl() instead of plain open(). Both devices
must be opened for reading and writing. On many systems master devices can only be
opened once, giving EBUSY for example on subsequent opens. If openpty()
encounters a busy master device, it must simply open the slave. This routine is only
called if pseudo-terminals are being used for terminal testing.
openpty() returns 0 for success or −1 for failure.
6.8.10 ptygetattr()
ptygetattr() obtains terminal attributes for the slave pseudo-terminal
corresponding to the master device addressed by a specified file descriptor. This routine
is only called if pseudo-terminals are being used for terminal testing.
ptygetattr() returns 0 for success or −1 for failure.
6.8.11 newroot()
newroot() causes path to become the root directory for the current process.
newroot() is only called after setprv(PRV_NEWROOT) since setting the root
directory is usually a privileged operation.
newroot() returns 0 for success, −1 for failure.
6.8.12 setlimit()
setlimit() is used to reduce the output file size limit for the process. The argument
is the value to be set in units of 512 byte blocks, and will always be greater than or
equal to the value set for the VSX_ULIMIT_BLKS parameter.
setlimit() returns the new limit, or −1 for failure.
6.8.13 pathdepth()
pathdepth() is used to determine the depth of pathnames beginning with // below
the root directory of the process. The default code supplied is suitable for systems
which use // to refer to a directory level above the root; i.e., when the root directory is
referred to by //somename.
6.8.14 Additional Subset-specific Routines
The package-specific sections at the end of this chapter describe any additional routines
that may have been added to userintf.c for the subsets you have selected.
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
Review the file SRC/userintf.c and identify if it needs to be modified.
2.
Modify the file to meet your system’s requirements.
3.
If you re-run config.sh at a later time, it will overwrite SRC/userintf.c
with the default version, so make sure you copy it first.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 32
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
6.9 INSTALLING THE PSEUDO-LANGUAGES
6.9.1 Introduction
The internationalisation elements of VSX make use of a set of ‘pseudo-languages’
which must be installed, if they are needed by one or more test packages, using the
appropriate tools for your system. Refer to the package-specific sections at the end of
this chapter to determine whether the pseudo-languages are needed for the subsets and
test mode you have selected.
The character encodings for additional characters in these languages must be chosen so
as not to conflict with the encodings for the portable character set on your system.
Detailed information about the VSX pseudo-languages is contained in a separate
document, called the VSX Pseudo-language Specification.
6.9.2 Configuring the Character Encodings
Each pseudo-language contains both the portable character set and the control character
set with their normal encodings, plus a number of additional characters. The character
encodings for the additional characters are specified in the file
SRC/INC/pslcodes.h, which you must modify if the default encodings conflict
with the encodings for the portable character set or the control character set on your
system. The default encodings are shown in the section entitled ‘‘PSEUDOLANGUAGE DEFINITION’’ in the VSX Pseudo-language Specification. They are
suitable for systems where the characters of the portable character set and control
character set have values in the range 0x0 to 0x7f (as in the ASCII character set).
The character encodings for the control character set are specified in the file
SRC/INC/ctrlcodes.h. You must modify this file if the default encodings are not
correct for your system. The default encodings are those of the control characters in the
ASCII character set. The file contains two sets of definitions, one for the C locale and
one for the pseudo-languages, in case the C locale definitions are not appropriate for use
in the pseudo-languages. Any control characters that are not supported by your system
should be defined with the value zero. The C locale definitions for the characters DEL,
NAK, ETX, FS, DC1, DC3, EOT, VT and SUB must not be zero, as they are used by
the terminal interface tests.
The character encodings specified in these two files will be compiled into the VSX
libraries when the libraries are built. Therefore you must configure these files before
proceeding to the installation stage, even though the languages themselves will not be
used until the execution stage.
6.9.3 Installing the Languages
There are five separate pseudo-languages, with the locale names VSX4L1, VSX4L2,
VSX4L3, VSX4L3@dict and VSX4L0. The definitions of the language elements
(shift and classification tables, language information tables and collating sequences) are
contained in the section entitled ‘‘PSEUDO-LANGUAGE DEFINITION’’ in the VSX
Pseudo-language Specification. If you execute tests before installing the pseudolanguages, then tests which require a pseudo-language will give a result of
unresolved or uninitiated.
If your system supports the localedef utility, and has ASCII or EBCDIC character
encodings, you should be able to use the files supplied in SUPPORT/psldefs with
little or no modification to install the pseudo-languages. If your system does not
support localedef you may find that you can adapt these files to the file format
required by your system. Note that the character encodings given in the CHARMAP
entries must match the encodings you have configured in SRC/INC/ctrlcodes.h
and SRC/INC/pslcodes.h. Also, since EBCDIC character encodings vary, you
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 33
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
may need to alter some of the encodings for the portable character set. Comments in
the file suggest alternative encodings.
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
Check the package-specific action points for this chapter to see whether the
pseudo-languages are needed for the subsets and test mode you have selected. If
they are not needed, skip the following action points.
2.
If your system does not use the ASCII character set, modify the file
SRC/INC/ctrlcodes.h so that it contains the correct control character
encodings for your system. If your system uses an EBCDIC character set, copy
the file SRC/INC/ctrlebcdic.h to SRC/INC/ctrlcodes.h first.
3.
Check
that
the
character
encodings
specified
in
the
file
SRC/INC/pslcodes.h are suitable for your system, and modify the file if
they are not. If your system uses an EBCDIC character set, copy the file
SRC/INC/pslebcdic.h to SRC/INC/pslcodes.h first.
4.
Install the VSX pseudo-languages using the appropriate tools for your system.
You may be able to make use of the files in SUPPORT/psldefs to do this.
6.10 WIDE CHARACTER CONFIGURATION FILE
6.10.1 Introduction
Some test packages contain tests for wide character and multibyte character interfaces,
which obtain information about the wide characters and multibyte characters supported
on the system from a configuration file, SRC/wchars.cfg. Refer to the packagespecific sections at the end of this chapter to see if this file is needed for the subsets and
test mode you have selected. If it is needed, you must enter the required information in
this file before proceeding to the installation stage, as the install script compiles the
information into a binary file for use in the tests.
An example file suitable for use on systems which only support single-byte characters is
provided with VSX. To use it simply copy SRC/wc_nosup.cfg to
SRC/wchars.cfg.
The wide character configuration file contains information about two locales. One
locale is often required to exhibit the opposite behaviour of the other, so while one of
the locales can be selected from the locales already present on the system, it will usually
be necessary to install the other, as it will have strange properties not found in a normal
locale. The locales chosen must support non-state-dependent encodings. Also, VSX
tests only multibyte characters of 2, 3 and 4 bytes. The locales chosen must support at
least one of these encodings.
The first two parameters in the file contain the names of the two locales. The remaining
parameters contain lists of characters with specified attributes. These characters may be
entered either as wide character numeric values or as multibyte sequences in quotes.
Numeric values may only be used if conversion to a multibyte sequence using
wctomb() will not generate a shift sequence. The usual convention of a leading 0x
for hexadecimal and leading 0 for octal are used (otherwise decimal). In quoted
strings the usual C language string literal conventions are used, including "\x"
hexadecimal escapes. Where a multibyte character requires a lead sequence to
introduce the encoding used, it must be entered as two adjacent quoted strings so that
the byte count of the character itself will be correct.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 34
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
Comments preceding each parameter specify the required attributes of the characters
listed in the parameter. Where no character with those attributes exists, enter either 0
or "".
Note that the file does not contain parameters to specify printing and non-printing
characters. The tests assume that all graphic and space characters are printing
characters, and all control characters are non-printing characters.
6.10.2 Example Wide Character Configuration File
On the following pages is an example wide character configuration file based on a draft
of the ISO 10646 character set. This character set supports three and four byte
multibyte encodings introduced by one or two SGCI (single graphic character
introducer) control characters ("\x97").
Long lines in this example have been folded for formatting purposes, marked by a \
character on the end of the line. These lines must be entered as a single line in the
configuration file.
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
If the wide character locales are needed for the subsets and test mode you have
selected, update the file SRC/wchars.cfg with information about wide
characters and multibyte characters supported on your system. If your system
only supports single-byte characters, simply copy SRC/wc_nosup.cfg to
SRC/wchars.cfg.
2.
If you re-run
config.sh at a later time,
SRC/wchars.cfg, so make sure you copy it first.
3.
Install additional locales if necessary to reflect the information in the file.
4.
If you change SRC/wchars.cfg at a later stage there is no need to repeat the
installation stage or to rebuild any testsets. Simply change directory to
SRC/common/wchars and type make. This will update the binary file used
by the tests from the new information in wchars.cfg.
it
will
overwrite
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 35
X/Open System Verification Suite
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
This file is a pro forma wide character configuration parameter file.
Wide characters may be entered as a numeric value (with a leading 0
indicating octal or a leading 0x indicating hexadecimal, otherwise
decimal), or as the equivalent multibyte sequence in double quotes
(using ’C’ string literal conventions). If a character needs a lead
sequence to introduce it, it must be specified as two double quoted
strings ("lead_seq" "character") so that the byte count of the
character itself will be correct. Numeric values may only be used
if conversion by wctomb() will not generate a shift sequence.
Where no wide character with the specified attributes exists, enter 0
or "". White space in parameter values is ignored.
Wide character entries are separated by commas; groups of wide characters
are separated by semi-colons.
#Locale names to which the values in the following parameters apply.
LOCALE1=VSXWCLOC1
LOCALE2=VSXWCLOC2
#Characters for which iswcntrl(), etc. are true (ISWCNTRL, etc.) or
#false (NOTCNTRL, etc.) for LOCALE1, and vice versa for LOCALE2.
#It is assumed that all graphic and space characters are printing
#characters, and all control characters are non-printing characters.
#Each parameter must contain a comma separated list of three wide
#characters which correspond to 2,3 and 4 byte multibyte characters
#respectively.
ISWCNTRL=0, "\x97"" \x81", "\x97\x97""
\x81"
NOTCNTRL=0, "\x97"" \x94", "\x97\x97""
\x94"
ISWGRAPH=0, "\x97"" ˜", "\x97\x97""
˜"
NOTGRAPH=0, "\x97"" &", "\x97\x97""
&"
ISWLOWER=0, "\x97"" a", "\x97\x97""
a"
NOTLOWER=0, "\x97"" A", "\x97\x97""
A"
ISWPUNCT=0, "\x97"" !", "\x97\x97""
!"
NOTPUNCT=0, "\x97"" #", "\x97\x97""
#"
ISWSPACE=0, "\x97"" @", "\x97\x97""
@"
NOTSPACE=0, "\x97""
", "\x97\x97""
"
ISWUPPER=0, "\x97"" A", "\x97\x97""
A"
NOTUPPER=0, "\x97"" a", "\x97\x97""
a"
#Lowercase/uppercase character pairs. In LOCALE1 the first character
#in each pair is lowercase, the second is the corresponding uppercase
#character. In LOCALE2 the first is uppercase and the second is
#the corresponding lowercase character.
#This parameter must contain a semi-colon separated list of three pairs
#of comma separated wide characters with the first character in each pair
#corresponding to a 2, 3 and 4 byte multibyte character respectively.
TOWUPPER=0,0; "\x97"" a", "\x97"" A"; "\x97\x97""
a", "\x97\x97""
A"
#Uppercase/lowercase character pairs. In LOCALE1 the first character
#in each pair is uppercase, the second is the corresponding lowercase
#character. In LOCALE2 the first is lowercase and the second is
#the corresponding uppercase character.
#This parameter must contain a semi-colon separated list of three pairs
#of comma separated wide characters with the first character in each pair
#corresponding to a 2, 3 and 4 byte multibyte character respectively.
TOWLOWER=0,0; "\x97"" A", "\x97"" a"; "\x97\x97""
A", "\x97\x97""
a"
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 36
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
#Additional properties for use with wctype().
#This parameter must contain a comma separated list of all property
#names supported by wctype() other than the standard ones
#(alnum, etc.).
PROPERTIES=cyrillic, greek
#Characters for which the above properties are true (ISW<property>)
#or false (NOT<property>) for LOCALE1, and vice versa for LOCALE2.
#One ISW<property> and one NOT<property> parameter should be
#defined for each property name in PROPERTIES, with <property>
#in the parameter names replaced by the real property name.
#Each parameter must contain a comma separated list of three wide
#characters which correspond to 2,3 and 4 byte multibyte characters
#respectively.
ISWCYRILLIC=0, "\x97"" \x28\x60", "\x97\x97"" \x28\x60"
NOTCYRILLIC=0, "\x97"" \x2a\x22", "\x97\x97"" \x2a\x22"
ISWGREEK=0, "\x97"" \x2a\x22", "\x97\x97"" \x2a\x22"
NOTGREEK=0, "\x97"" \x28\x60", "\x97\x97"" \x28\x60"
#Characters with specified printing widths in LOCALE1. The wide
#characters in WIDTH<x> have a printing width of <x>.
#Each parameter must contain a comma separated list of three wide
#characters which correspond to 2,3 and 4 byte multibyte characters
#respectively. If the system does not support any printing
#characters of a particular width, enter 0 or "" for all three
#wide characters in the corresponding parameter.
WIDTH0=0, "\x97"" \x82", "\x97\x97""
\x82"
WIDTH1=0, "\x97"" \x83", "\x97\x97""
\x83"
WIDTH2=0, "\x97"" \x84", "\x97\x97""
\x84"
WIDTH3=0, "\x97"" \x85", "\x97\x97""
\x85"
#Decimal point character for LOCALE1.
#This parameter should contain a multibyte character of more than
#one byte, if supported.
DECPOINT1="\x97"" ."
#Decimal point character for LOCALE2.
#This parameter should contain a multibyte character of more than
#one byte, if supported, with a different value to DECPOINT1.
DECPOINT2="\x97"" , "
#A character in LOCALE1 which corresponds to a multibyte sequence
#of length MB_CUR_MAX.
MBCURMAX1="\x97\x97""
a"
#A character in LOCALE2 which corresponds to a multibyte sequence
#of length MB_CUR_MAX.
MBCURMAX2="\x97\x97""
a"
#An invalid multibyte sequence.
#This parameter must contain a string in double quotes.
INVALID_MB="\x97"
#A wide character value which does not correspond to a multibyte
#character.
#This parameter must contain an integer value.
INVALID_WC=999999
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 37
X/Open System Verification Suite
#
#
#
#
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
The following parameters are not used in any tests if wcscoll() and
wcsxfrm() are not supported. In this case "all zero" values should
be used to satisfy the config file compiler. (They can be copied
from wc_nosup.cfg).
#Characters which are ignored when collating strings.
#This parameter must contain a comma separated list of three wide
#characters which correspond to 2,3 and 4 byte multibyte characters
#respectively.
DONTCARE=0, "\x97"" \x86", "\x97\x97""
\x86"
#Character pairs which differ in primary collation order. In
#each pair the first character collates before the second in
#LOCALE1, and vice versa in LOCALE2.
#This parameter must contain a semi-colon separated list of ten
#pairs of comma separated wide characters which correspond to
#multibyte characters with the following numbers of bytes: 1, 1;
#1, 2; 1, 3; 1, 4; 2, 2; 2, 3; 2, 4; 3, 3; 3, 4; 4, 4.
PRIMARY="\x87", "\x88";0,0; "\x87", "\x97"" \x88"; "\x87", "\x97\x97"" \
\x88";0,0;0,0;0,0; "\x97"" \x87", "\x97"" \x88"; "\x97"" \x87", "\x97\x97"" \
\x88"; "\x97\x97""
\x87", "\x97\x97""
\x88"
#Character pairs which have the same primary collation order
#but differ in secondary collation order. In each pair the first
#character collates before the second in LOCALE1, and vice versa
#in LOCALE2.
#This parameter must contain a semi-colon separated list of ten
#pairs of comma separated wide characters which correspond to
#multibyte characters with the following numbers of bytes: 1, 1;
#1, 2; 1, 3; 1, 4; 2, 2; 2, 3; 2, 4; 3, 3; 3, 4; 4, 4.
SECONDARY="\x89", "\x8a";0,0; "\x89", "\x97"" \x8a"; "\x89", "\x97\x97"" \
\x8a";0,0;0,0;0,0; "\x97"" \x89", "\x97"" \x8a"; "\x97"" \x89", "\x97\x97"" \
\x8a"; "\x97\x97""
\x89", "\x97\x97""
\x8a"
#Characters which collate as 2-1 mappings, with different primary
#order. In each set of three characters the first two together
#form a collation element which collates before the third character
#in LOCALE1, and vice versa in LOCALE2.
#This parameter must contain a semi-colon separated list of six
#triplets of comma separated wide characters which correspond to
#multibyte characters with the following numbers of bytes: 1, 1, 2;
#2, 3, 1; 2, 1, 3; 4, 2, 3; 1, 3, 3; 3, 4, 4.
PRIMARY2_1=0,0,0;0,0,0;0,0,0;0,0,0; "\x8b", "\x97"" \x8c", "\x97""
"\x97"" \x8b", "\x97\x97""
\x8c", "\x97\x97""
\x8d"
\x8d"; \
#Characters which collate as 2-1 mappings, with the same primary
#collation order, but different secondary order. In each set of
#three characters the first two together form a collation element
#which collates before the third character in LOCALE1, and vice
#versa in LOCALE2.
#This parameter must contain a comma separated list of six
#triplets of wide characters which correspond to multibyte
#characters with the following numbers of bytes: 1, 1, 2;
#2, 3, 1; 2, 1, 3; 4, 2, 3; 1, 3, 3; 3, 4, 4.
SECONDARY2_1=0,0,0;0,0,0;0,0,0;0,0,0; "\x8e", "\x97"" \x8f", "\x97""
"\x97"" \x8e", "\x97\x97""
\x8f", "\x97\x97""
\x90"
\x90"; \
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 38
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
#Characters which collate equally as 1-2 mappings. In each set of
#three characters the first two are collation elements which
#collate as a pair equally with the third character.
#This parameter must contain a comma separated list of six
#triplets of wide characters which correspond to multibyte
#characters with the following numbers of bytes: 1, 1, 2;
#2, 3, 1; 2, 1, 3; 4, 2, 3; 1, 3, 3; 3, 4, 4.
EQUAL1_2=0,0,0;0,0,0;0,0,0;0,0,0; "\x91", "\x97"" \x92", "\x97"" \x93"; \
"\x97"" \x91", "\x97\x97""
\x92", "\x97\x97""
\x93"
#
#
#
The following parameters are not used in any tests if wcsftime() is not
supported. In this case dummy values should be entered to satisfy the
config file compiler. (They can be copied from wc_nosup.cfg).
#Time values returned by wcsftime() for LOCALE1.
#MONTH1_1 contains a comma separated list of the characters in
#the full name for January, MONTH2_1 for February, and so on.
#Likewise ABMON1_1, etc. contain the abbreviated month names,
#DAY1_1, etc. contain the seven full day names, starting with
#Sunday, and ABDAY1_1, etc. contain the abbreviated day names.
#AM_STR1 contains the AM string and PM_STR1 contains the PM string.
#These parameters must together contain 2, 3 and 4 byte multibyte
#characters (at least one of each size that is supported).
MONTH1_1="J", "a", "\x97\x97""
n", "\x97"" u", "a", "r", "y"
MONTH2_1="F", "e", "b", "r", "\x97"" u", "a", "r", "y"
MONTH3_1="M", "a", "r", "c", "h"
MONTH4_1="A", "p", "r", "i", "l"
MONTH5_1="M", "a", "y"
MONTH6_1="J", "\x97"" u", "\x97\x97""
n", "e"
MONTH7_1="J", "\x97"" u", "l", "y"
MONTH8_1="A", "\x97"" u", "g", "\x97"" u", "s", "t"
MONTH9_1="S", "e", "p", "t", "e", "m", "b", "e", "r"
MONTH10_1="O", "c", "t", "o", "b", "e", "r"
MONTH11_1="N", "o", "v", "e", "m", "b", "e", "r"
MONTH12_1="D", "e", "c", "e", "m", "b", "e", "r"
ABMON1_1="J", "a", "\x97\x97""
n"
ABMON2_1="F", "e", "b"
ABMON3_1="M", "a", "r"
ABMON4_1="A", "p", "r"
ABMON5_1="M", "a", "y"
ABMON6_1="J", "\x97"" u", "\x97\x97""
n"
ABMON7_1="J", "\x97"" u", "l"
ABMON8_1="A", "\x97"" u", "g"
ABMON9_1="S", "e", "p"
ABMON10_1="O", "c", "t"
ABMON11_1="N", "o", "v"
ABMON12_1="D", "e", "c"
DAY1_1="S", "\x97"" u", "\x97\x97""
n", "d", "a", "y"
DAY2_1="M", "o", "\x97\x97""
n", "d", "a", "y"
DAY3_1="T", "\x97"" u", "e", "s", "d", "a", "y"
DAY4_1="W", "e", "d", "\x97\x97""
n", "e", "s", "d", "a", "y"
DAY5_1="T", "h", "\x97"" u", "r", "s", "d", "a", "y"
DAY6_1="F", "r", "i", "d", "a", "y"
DAY7_1="S", "a", "t", "\x97"" u", "r", "d", "a", "y"
ABDAY1_1="S", "\x97"" u", "\x97\x97""
n"
ABDAY2_1="M", "o", "\x97\x97""
n"
ABDAY3_1="T", "\x97"" u", "e"
ABDAY4_1="W", "e", "d"
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 39
X/Open System Verification Suite
ABDAY5_1="T", "h", "\x97""
ABDAY6_1="F", "r", "i"
ABDAY7_1="S", "a", "t"
AM_STR1="A", "M"
PM_STR1="P", "M"
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
u"
#Time values returned by wcsftime() for LOCALE2, specified in the
#same manner as for LOCALE1. The values in these parameters must
#differ from the values in the corresponding LOCALE1 parameters.
MONTH1_2="j", "a", "\x97\x97""
n", "v", "i", "e", "r"
MONTH2_2="f", "E", "v", "r", "i", "e", "r"
MONTH3_2="m", "a", "r", "s"
MONTH4_2="a", "v", "r", "i", "l"
MONTH5_2="m", "a", "i"
MONTH6_2="j", "\x97"" u", "i", "\x97\x97""
n"
MONTH7_2="j", "\x97"" u", "i", "l", "l", "e", "t"
MONTH8_2="a", "o", "C", "t"
MONTH9_2="s", "e", "p", "t", "e", "m", "b", "r", "e"
MONTH10_2="o", "c", "t", "o", "b", "r", "e"
MONTH11_2="\x97\x97""
n", "o", "v", "e", "m", "b", "r", "e"
MONTH12_2="d", "E", "c", "e", "m", "b", "r", "e"
ABMON1_2="j", "a", "\x97\x97""
n", "v"
ABMON2_2="f", "E", "v", "r"
ABMON3_2="m", "a", "r", "s"
ABMON4_2="a", "v", "r"
ABMON5_2="m", "a", "i"
ABMON6_2="j", "\x97"" u", "i", "\x97\x97""
n"
ABMON7_2="j", "\x97"" u", "i", "l"
ABMON8_2="a", "o", "C", "t"
ABMON9_2="s", "e", "p", "t"
ABMON10_2="o", "c", "t"
ABMON11_2="\x97\x97""
n", "o", "v"
ABMON12_2="d", "E", "c"
DAY1_2="d", "i", "m", "a", "\x97\x97""
n", "c", "h", "e"
DAY2_2="l", "\x97"" u", "\x97\x97""
n", "d", "i"
DAY3_2="m", "a", "r", "d", "i"
DAY4_2="m", "e", "r", "c", "r", "e", "d", "i"
DAY5_2="j", "e", "\x97"" u", "d", "i"
DAY6_2="v", "e", "\x97\x97""
n", "d", "r", "e", "d", "i"
DAY7_2="s", "a", "m", "e", "d", "i"
ABDAY1_2="d", "i", "m"
ABDAY2_2="l", "\x97"" u", "\x97\x97""
n"
ABDAY3_2="m", "a", "r"
ABDAY4_2="m", "e", "r"
ABDAY5_2="j", "e", "\x97"" u"
ABDAY6_2="v", "e", "\x97\x97""
n"
ABDAY7_2="s", "a", "m"
AM_STR2="a", "m"
PM_STR2="p", "m"
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 40
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
6.11 CONFIGURING VSX4
6.11.1 Installation Directory
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
The requirement for the installation directory to support the inheritance of parent
directory group ID applies to VSX4 if the base subset is selected.
6.11.2 VSX Configuration Script
Note the following points regarding the configuration script questions described in the
generic part of this chapter:
Subset
Only one VSX4 subset (base) supports POSIX and FIPS modes.
The following additional question is asked by the configuration script if the base
subset has been selected:
ANSI signal Function
Whether the ANSI function signal() is supported (y/n, default:
y).
The optional configuration script questions described in the generic part of this chapter
apply to VSX4 as follows:
C Compiler Threads Command Line Options
This question does not apply.
Maths Library
This question is asked if the base subset has been selected.
File System for ENOSPC Tests
This question is asked if the base subset has been selected.
6.11.3 User-supplied Interface Routines
The additional routines in userintf.c needed by VSX4 are described below.
An example version of userintf.c suitable for systems based on UNIX System V
Release 4.1
Enhanced
Security
is
provided
in
the
file
SRC/common/vport/userintfES.c. Note that this file only contains the
routines needed by the VSX4 test package.
setgrps()
setgrps() sets the current supplementary groups list to the group IDs in grparray.
This array should contain ngrps entries.
setgrps() is only called after
setprv(PRV_SETGRPS) since setting groups is usually a privileged operation.
setgrps() returns 0 for success, −1 for failure.
If the implementation does not support setting the supplementary groups list, then
setgrps() must return −1 with errno set to ENOSYS.
sys_call()
sys_call() makes one or more calls to an interface which is known to be a system
call. When a test needs to accumulate system CPU time, this routine is called a large
number of times. One system call each time should be sufficient, but more may be
executed if required.
sys_call() returns 0 for success, −1 for failure.
The Open Group
VSX-PCTS4.4.4
Page 41
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
use_time()
use_time() performs processing which will accumulate user CPU time. When a test
needs to accumulate user CPU time, this routine is called a large number of times. The
amount of processing per call may be adjusted if necessary.
6.11.4 Installing The Pseudo-languages
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
The pseudo-languages are needed if the base subset has been selected.
6.11.5 Wide Character Configuration File
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
The SRC/wchars.cfg file is not needed by VSX4 in POSIX and FIPS modes.
The Open Group
VSX-PCTS4.4.4
Page 42
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
7. INSTALLING VSX
7.1 INTRODUCTION
When you have configured VSX for your system, you can proceed to the VSX
installation stage. This is where the installation commands configured in the top level
Makefile are executed and the VSX utilities and libraries are built.
The major part of the installation procedure is performed by a script which is executed
with the user ID of user vsx0 from the top level Makefile. The installation script
applies the parameters and definitions in the files vsxparams and vsxconfig.h
to the VSX source files. The script generates a report with details of the success of each
step in a journal file in the results directory. The journal files from successive runs
of the installation script are numbered sequentially.
The installation script includes the following steps:
7.1.1 VSX Header Files
The file SRC/INC/std.h is updated with values from vsxparams which are
needed in C compilations.
7.1.2 Include Files
The set of your system include files is copied into SRC/SYSINC and each file is
updated with any extra definitions required, from the file vsxconfig.h. The VSX
include files are used to install and build the VSX software, but not in the execution of
header file tests.
7.1.3 Directory Routines
The installation script checks the directory routines opendir() and readdir()
are working. When the directory routines are not functioning correctly, the script gives
a warning, both on the screen and in the install journal.
7.1.4 Variable Argument Routines
The installation script checks whether variable argument functions work correctly,
using either <varargs.h> or <stdarg.h> depending on the test mode selected
and whether the compiler defines the symbol __STDC__. Note that the contents of
these headers is not checked during the configuration stage, when the other system
headers are checked. If the header file contents are found to be incorrect, and you do
not wish to alter the file in the system include directory, you can copy it in to
SRC/SYSINC and correct the problem there.
7.1.5 Testroot Initialisation
The install script creates the testroot directory structure under the testroot directory.
7.1.6 Configuration Files
The building and cleaning configuration files,
tetbuild.cfg and
tetclean.cfg are created in the home directory, using the information from the
configuration stage. The execution configuration file, tetexec.cfg is created in the
testroot directory with some of the parameters set up with the information from the
configuration stage. However, you must add the values for most of the parameters in
the execution file manually. See the chapter entitled ‘‘EXECUTING VSX’’ for details.
These files contain the parameters which are used during the building, execution and
cleanup stages respectively.
If these configuration files already exist, they are first renamed to oldbuild.cfg,
oldclean.cfg and oldexec.cfg before being created. Parameter values from
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 43
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
the old tetexec.cfg are copied to the new file before it is updated with information
from the configuration stage.
7.1.7 Scenario Files
The install script creates the scenario files scen.bld and scen.exec in the home
directory. These are used by TETware to determine which tests are built and executed,
respectively.
7.1.8 Update Common Software Files
Firstly, userintf.c is copied into SRC/common/vport. Then the
Makefiles in the various sub-directories of SRC/common are updated with
information from the configuration stage.
7.1.9 Subset-specific Install Scripts
Any additional procedures needed for the subsets and test mode you have selected are
performed at this point. For example, additional subset-specific values may be added to
SRC/INC/std.h.
7.1.10 Build Common Software
The installation script builds the VSX libraries and utility programs. The install journal
gives a success/failure indication for each directory in which make is executed. You
must investigate and correct any failures which occur during building before continuing
any further.
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
Obtain the necessary privileges for execution of the installation commands you
have configured in the top level Makefile and execute make in the vsx0
home directory. E.g.
su root -c make
2.
When make has completed, check the installation log in the results
directory to ensure that no errors have occurred. If make encountered any
errors, or there are errors in the log, you must correct them and re-run make.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 44
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
8. BUILDING VSX
8.1 INTRODUCTION
When you have configured and installed VSX, the next stage builds a series of
executable programs in your TESTROOT directory. These programs make up the VSX
test suite, which you run in the execution stage to verify your system. The building
stage also copies the source files for any header file tests into the correct directories.
You can choose to build all the testsets you have configured. Alternately, you can
choose the section or area you want to build and, optionally, build single testsets. When
building the tests, you can specify options to use an alternative configuration file and to
modify parameters on the command line, among others. In addition, you can use the
output from the building stage in a VSX journal file for the VSX reporting stage.
You may also need to install a loopback lead for the terminal interface testing. See the
section entitled ‘‘TERMINAL INTERFACE TESTING’’ later in this chapter for
information.
8.2 BUILDING ALL REQUIRED TESTSETS
8.2.1 Introduction
Invoking the Test Case Controller with the command
tcc -b -s scen.bld
will cause all the testsets for the options selected during the configuration stage to be
built. If you have not set the environment variable TET_EXECUTE to the pathname
of your testroot directory, you must specify it on the tcc command line. For example,
to specify the default testroot location, append
-a TESTROOT
to the command given above. The remaining example commands in this chapter
assume that TET_EXECUTE is set in the environment.
The build parameters are found in the tetbuild.cfg file in the vsx0 home
directory. This file is created during the installation phase.
Journal File
The results from the building stage are placed in a journal file under the results
directory. The name of this file is output by the tcc on startup. VSX provides
utilities to produce reports from these files — see the chapter entitled ‘‘REPORTING’’
for further details.
8.3 BUILDING SELECTED TESTSETS (OPTIONAL)
8.3.1 Sections and Areas
The package-specific sections at the end of this chapter give details about the parts of
the test suite you can build. To build individual testsets and use other options for the
tcc command, see the sections marked ‘‘OPTIONAL’’ later in the chapter.
8.3.2 Building Selected Parts of a Scenario
To build selected parts of the test suite, you can use the -y and -n options of the
tcc to select which lines of the file scen.bld you wish to include (-y) or exclude
(-n). You can use as many of these options as you like in one command. If a scenario
line matches both a -y string and a -n string it will be excluded.
For example, to build just the POSIX.os section, use the command:
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 45
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
tcc -b -s scen.bld -y POSIX.os
or to build everything except the header tests, use the command:
tcc -b -s scen.bld -n .hdr
or to build the streamio areas in all the sections that have one, but excluding tests of
fprintf, printf, sprintf, vfprintf, vprintf and vsprintf, use the
command:
tcc -b -s scen.bld -y streamio -n printf
The journal file for a partial execution is handled correctly by the report writer.
8.3.3 Building Individual Testsets
If the list of testsets you wish to build is too varied to be specified easily using -y and
-n options, simply edit a copy of the scenario file scen.bld to reflect the testsets
you wish to build.
Examples
If the file myscen.bld contains an edited copy of scen.bld then use the
command
tcc -b -s myscen.bld
to build just the testsets contained in the file.
8.3.4 Additional Options
The tcc manual page gives full details of the additional options you can use with the
tcc command. The following options are some of the most useful.
1.
To see a running progress report, include the -p option. The tcc will then
output a line to the terminal as it starts building each testset.
2.
To use an alternative configuration file to tetbuild.cfg, include the
-g filename option. The file must be in the same format as tetbuild.cfg.
3.
To override a parameter in the build parameters file, include the -v option. For
example, to use the operator name ‘‘A N Other’’ rather than the value defined in
tetbuild.cfg, use the command
tcc -b -v VSX_OPER="A N Other" rest−of−command
4.
In order to build testsets which failed to build in a previous build, use
tcc -b -s scen.bld -r FAIL old−journal−file
where old−journal−file is the journal file from which the codes are extracted.
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
Log in as the user vsx0.
2.
Give the command
tcc -b -s scen.bld
with the other options you want to use. Use the command
../bin/tcc -b -s scen.bld
from the vsx0 home directory if $HOME/../bin is not in your PATH.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 46
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
8.4 REMOVING BUILT TESTSETS
When you want to remove all of the object files and executable programs for the whole
test suite or part of it, you can use the -c option of the tcc command. This option
works in exactly the same way as the -b option except that, instead of building the test
suite, this option returns the system to the state it was in before you started the building
stage.
Use this option when you want to re-build VSX using a different compiler.
8.5 REPORTING
You can produce reports from the journal files output by tcc by using the procedures
described in the chapter entitled ‘‘REPORTING’’. These reports show you where any
compilation failures have occurred.
8.6 TERMINAL INTERFACE TESTING
8.6.1 Introduction
For tests that need to use a terminal interface, two ports on the same machine are
connected with each other. Then one port simulates the presence of a terminal providing
for error-free and repeatable testing. Where implementations do not have at least two
terminal ports, the tests can instead be performed using pseudo-terminals. In this case a
user-supplied routine is called to open the pseudo-terminals. See the section entitled
‘‘USER-SUPPLIED INTERFACE ROUTINES’’ for a description of this routine.
The terminal loop-back is only needed by some test packages. Refer to the packagespecific sections at the end of this chapter for details.
If the system does not provide any devices which support the general terminal interface,
then tests which need to use a terminal interface will give unsupported results.
Certain tests require modem control and will be reported unsupported if this is not
available.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 47
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
8.6.2 Cable Wiring
If the system has at least two ports, preparation for the tests begins by connecting two
terminal or modem ports back-to-back (sometimes called loop-back or closed-loop)
using a cable which fits these sockets. For example, a null modem cable is suitable for
RS232-type DTE ports. A typical cable wiring would be:
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
c
c
Null Modem Cable (DTE-DTE)
c
c
Function
Pins Data Flow Pins
Function
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
c
c
1
⇐⇒
1
Protective Ground
c Protective Ground
c
c Transmit Data
c
2
⇒
3
Receive Data
c Receive Data
c
3
⇐
2
Transmit Data
c
Request to Send
4
⇒
8
Data Carrier Detect c
c
c
Clear to Send
5
⇐
8
Data Carrier Detect c
c
6
⇐
20
Data Terminal Ready c
c Data Set Ready
c Signal Ground
7
⇐⇒
7
Signal Ground
c
c Data Carrier Detect
c
8
⇐
4
Request to Send
c
c
Data Carrier Detect
8
⇒
5
Clear to Send
c
c
Data Terminal Ready
20
⇒
6
Data Set Ready
ciiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
c
An equivalent ‘‘null terminal’’ cable suitable for RS232-type DCE ports could be wired
as follows:
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
c
c
Null Terminal Cable (DCE-DCE)
c
c
Function
Pins
Data
Flow
Pins
Function
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
c
c
1
⇐⇒
1
Protective Ground
c Protective Ground
c
2
⇐
3
Receive Data
c Transmit Data
c
c Receive Data
c
3
⇒
2
Transmit Data
c
c
Request to Send
4
⇐
6
Data Set Ready
c
c
Data Set Ready
6
⇒
4
Request to Send
c
c
6
⇒
20
Data Terminal Ready c
c Data Set Ready
7
⇐⇒
7
Signal Ground
c Signal Ground
c
c Data Terminal Ready
c
20
⇐
6
Data
Set
Ready
ciiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiic
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
Check the package-specific action points for this chapter to see whether the
terminal loop-back is needed for the subsets and test mode you have selected. If
it is not needed, skip the following action points.
2.
If the system has at least two terminal ports, wire and connect two ports to
provide a loop-back.
3.
Make the two ports readable and writable by user vsx0.
4.
There must not be any processes attached to these ports. (For example, you may
have to change /etc/inittab or /etc/ttys to remove login processes at
this point.)
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 48
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
8.7 TROUBLESHOOTING
You may encounter some of the following problems when you build tests with tcc.
This section lists common problems and gives notes explaining how to overcome them.
1.
tcc cannot create lock files.
There may be lock files left over from a previous run. Whenever possible tcc
always removes its lock files, however if it is terminated by an uncatchable signal
or the system crashes then lock files may be left behind. Check for files named
tet_lock in both the source and testroot directory hierarchies at the testset
level. The tet_lock file may itself be the lock file, or it may be a directory
containing lock files.
2.
Some header tests fail to build, due to a program called hdrdefs trying to write
files larger than the file size limit, or running out of disk space.
Normally hdrdefs creates a copy of each header it processes, with all nested
#include lines expanded out. On some systems, if certain key headers are
included by many others, the nesting complexity can cause these headers to be
copied so many times into the expanded file that the file becomes huge.
The hdrdefs program can be prevented from creating the expanded-out files by
setting the environment variable HDRDEFS_NOEXPAND. However, this also
causes hdrdefs to treat ‘missing’ nested include files differently. Instead of
indicating that a nested header could not be opened by placing a special #define
in the expanded-out file, it will report an error immediately and exit. If you try to
build the header tests with HDRDEFS_NOEXPAND set, and the build fails due
to some missing nested includes, you should first check that the reason they are
not being found is because they do not exist on your system, rather than because
their location has been omitted from the INCDIRS parameter in
SRC/vsxparams. You can stop hdrdefs reporting missing nested include files
by creating dummy versions of the missing files. Each file must contain a line
which will cause an error to be reported should the file be compiled during one of
the header tests. For example:
#error Dummy version of sys/thisfile.h was used
The location of the dummy include files should be added to the INCDIRS
parameter in SRC/vsxparams so that hdrdefs will be able to find them.
3.
Some header tests fail to build, with syntax errors reported by a program called
hdranal.
If your system headers make use of type names that are built-in to the compiler,
they will not be recognised by hdranal unless they are defined in the file
SRC/INC/builtins.h. This file may be edited by the user. As distributed,
the file contains all the definitions needed for systems that VSX has been run on
to date. If you find you need to add new definitions to the file, please inform the
VSXgen support team (see the appendix entitled ‘‘SUPPORT SERVICES’’) so
that the additions can be included in the next VSXgen release.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 49
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
8.8 BUILDING VSX4
8.8.1 Sections and Areas
Base Subset
The sections in the base subset contain the following areas:
ANSI.hdr
Area: misc.
ANSI.os
Areas: charhandle, diagnostics, genuts, jump, locale, maths,
signal, streamio, string and time.
POSIX.hdr
Area: misc.
POSIX.os
Areas: Csupport, dataform, devclass, files, ioprim, procenv,
procprim and sysdb.
8.8.2 Terminal Interface Testing
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
The terminal loop-back is needed if the base subset has been selected.
8.8.3 Data Interchange Format Testing
A number of shell scripts are provided with VSX4 which execute the data interchange
format utilities installed on the test machine. These utilities are required to test the
archive/interchange file formats within the testsets POSIX.os/dataform/tar and
POSIX.os/dataform/cpio.
The contents of these shell scripts should be modified to call the format utilities with the
correct syntax and arguments on the test machine. This is necessary because the name
and syntax of the format utilities are not defined within POSIX.1.
However, suitable commands are defined in POSIX.2, and these are used by default in
the supplied scripts. If the system under test has a conforming pax utility, there is no
need to change these scripts. Note that the default scripts do not use full pathnames, so
if you do not change the scripts, you must ensure that your PATH includes the
directories where the commands used in these scripts are located.
The shell scripts will be called by the test sets with arguments which are defined within
the shell script — these arguments should be passed to the format utility in an
appropriate manner to create or read an archive file.
The names of the shell scripts provided are as follows. These should all be present in
the directory your−testroot−directory/BIN.
Shell script
Use of script
cpio_cr.sh
cpio_xt.sh
cpio_i_xt.sh
tar_cr.sh
tar_xt.sh
tar_i_xt.sh
create cpio format archive file
read cpio format archive file
read cpio format archive file restoring file ownership
create tar format archive file
read tar format archive file
read tar format archive file restoring file ownership
The Open Group
VSX-PCTS4.4.4
Page 50
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
Review the contents of the tar and cpio shell scripts in the directory
your−testroot−directory/BIN and, where required, modify the contents of the
scripts to call suitable utilities with the correct syntax and arguments for the test
system.
The Open Group
VSX-PCTS4.4.4
Page 51
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
9. EXECUTING VSX
9.1 INTRODUCTION
Before you run the testsets you have built, you must set up the file containing execution
parameters. When you are ready to execute the VSX testsets, you can choose to run the
entire selection of testsets you have configured or, optionally, execute sections, areas,
single testsets and individual invocable components. In addition, you can use options to
change parameters on the command line and to re-execute failed testsets from old
journal files, among others. You can use the output from the execution stage in a
journal file for the VSX reporting stage.
9.2 THE EXECUTION PARAMETERS FILE
9.2.1 Introduction
During the testset execution stage, the VSX testsets find information about your system
from the execution parameters file. This file contains lines which define the parameters
and give their values. If the testset cannot find the information, it either uses a default
value or reports that the parameter is not set in the test results for the tests that use that
parameter.
9.2.2 Setting the Execution Parameters
VSX looks for the execution parameters file, tetexec.cfg, in the testroot directory
when you execute the Test Case Controller. During the installation stage, VSX
generates an execution parameters file in the testroot directory, but some of the values
in the file are INCORRECT for your system.
Format
Each line in the execution parameters file is either a comment line, beginning with the
hash character (#), or a parameter line. Parameter lines use the following format:
parameter−name=parameter−value
The contents of the generated file vary according to the subsets you have selected. The
section below lists the parameter names that are always present. Additional parameters
required only for one subset are listed in the package-specific sections at the end of this
chapter.
The value given to each parameter may be any sequence of characters which is valid for
the associated parameter. When you leave the value blank after the equals sign (=), the
parameter is set to its default value, if it has one.
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
Check the execution parameters file tetexec.cfg before you start the VSX
execution stage and edit any values which are not correct for your system.
9.3 EXECUTION PARAMETER NAMES
Check or set the values for the following parameters, and any additional subset-specific
parameters, in the execution parameters file before you start the VSX execution stage.
Note that the order of these parameters is the same as they are in the file where you will
edit them.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 52
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
9.3.1 General Parameters
TEST_MODE
The testing mode selected when config.sh was run. The value is set
automatically by the installation procedure and should not be altered.
TEST_PACKAGES
A list of the test packages being used. The value is set automatically by the
installation procedure and should not be altered.
VSXDIR
The source directory for the VSX source software.
Where Used
vbuild (vprog)
Default Value
None
VSX_DBUG_FLAGS
The debugging flags used to determine the level of debugging information
generated upon execution of tests.
Where Used
All testsets
Default Value
If this parameter is not set, no debugging output is produced.
VSX_DBUG_FILE
The default destination for debug and path tracing output. This file is used if
none is specified in the debug flags in VSX_DBUG_FLAGS. Output is
appended to the file on each run, so an existing file should be saved or deleted
before running tcc with debugging enabled. Use of relative path names is
not recommended, as the directory in which test programs are executed
varies. This parameter is usually set to your−testroot−directory/dbug.out.
Where Used
All testsets
Default Value
If this parameter is not set, debug output is sent to the standard error stream.
Note that this often causes incorrect test results in cases where the interface
being tested uses stderr. For this reason, it is advisable to direct
debugging output to a file.
VSX_NAME
The test run name; that is, what this particular test run will be called in the
final vrpt and/or prpt output.
Where Used
vrpt (vprog)
prpt (vprog)
Default Value
No default value is assigned.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 53
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
VSX_OPER
The name of the operator for this test run.
Where Used
vrpt (vprog)
prpt (vprog)
Default Value
No default value is assigned.
VSX_ORG
Name of the agency running the tests/for whom the tests are being run.
Where Used
vrpt (vprog)
prpt (vprog)
Default Value
No default value is assigned.
VSX_PATH
Used to set the PATH environment variable during execution of testsets in
the header file sections. This will be used to locate the C compiler and the
executable object produced by it. This parameter should always include the
current directory.
Where Used
driver.hdr (drivers)
driver.C (drivers)
Default Value
:/bin:/usr/bin; that is: your current directory, then /bin, then
/usr/bin.
VSX_SYS
The test system name; that is, the name of the system being tested.
Where Used
vrpt (vprog)
prpt (vprog)
Default Value
No default value is assigned.
VSX_UID0, VSX_UID1, VSX_UID2
These are the user IDs associated with the users vsx0, vsx1 and vsx2
respectively.
These must not be privileged users.
Where Used
uids (genlib)
Default Value
If not defined, each of the tests that uses these parameters is reported as
unresolved or uninitiated.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 54
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
VSX_GID0, VSX_GID1, VSX_GID2
These are the group IDs associated with the groups vsxg0, vsxg1 and
vsxg2 respectively.
These must not be privileged groups.
Where Used
uids (genlib)
Default Value
If not defined, each of the tests that uses these parameters is reported as
unresolved or uninitiated.
TET_SIG_IGN
A list of the signal numbers that are to be ignored during testing. This should
be a comma-separated list of (non-POSIX) signal numbers. Many systems
will need to include the signal number for SIGSYS.
Where Used
TETware API
Default Value
No default value is assigned.
TET_SIG_LEAVE
A list of the signal numbers that are to be left alone during testing. These are
most often signals which cause problems both if they are set to be caught and
if they are ignored via TET_SIG_IGN. This should be a comma-separated
list of (non-POSIX) signal numbers.
Where Used
setsigs (vlib)
TETware API
Default Value
No default value is assigned.
9.3.2 Compiler Characteristics
These parameters are only required if one or more selected subsets contain C language
tests, or header tests which use the generic driver driver.hdr. Some test packages
may build alternative header test drivers, which use different parameters.
VSX_CC
The full path name of the C compiler to be used in header and C language
tests. This is normally set to the same value as CC in SRC/vsxparams.
The file named by VSX_CC may be a shell script or an executable file.
Where Used
driver.hdr (drivers)
driver.C (drivers)
Default Value
/bin/cc
VSX_CFLAGS
The flags to be passed to the C compiler (VSX_CC). This is normally set to
the same value as COPTS in SRC/vsxparams.
These flags must not define any of the feature test macros
_XOPEN_SOURCE, _XOPEN_SOURCE_EXTENDED, _POSIX_SOURCE
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 55
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
or _POSIX_C_SOURCE.
Where Used
driver.hdr (drivers)
driver.C (drivers)
Default Value
NULL; that is, no string.
VSX_LIBS
Libraries and linker flags to be passed to the C compiler (VSX_CC).
These will usually include any subset-specific libraries named individually in
parameters in SRC/vsxparams, any libraries specified in SYSLIBS in
SRC/vsxparams, and any link editor command line options specified in
LDFLAGS in SRC/vsxparams.
Where Used
driver.hdr (drivers)
driver.C (drivers)
Default Value
-lm
9.3.3 Operating System Characteristics Common To Multiple Subsets
The following parameters are in the generic part of tetexec.cfg because they may
be needed by more than one subset. This avoids the need to configure the same
information multiple times under different parameter names. However, if you have not
selected any of the subsets which use a particular parameter, you do not need to set a
value for that parameter. Refer to the package-specific sections at the end of this
chapter to see which of these parameters are needed, and where they are used.
VSX_BLKDEV_FILE
The full path name of a block special device which exists on your system. If
block special files are not supported, this parameter should be set to unsup.
Default Value
If not defined, each of the tests that uses VSX_BLKDEV_FILE is marked as
unresolved or uninitiated.
VSX_CHRDEV_FILE
The path name of a character special device which exists on your system. If
character special files are not supported, this parameter should be set to
unsup.
Default Value
If not defined, each of the tests that uses VSX_CHRDEV_FILE is reported
as unresolved or uninitiated.
VSX_FCNTL_EDEADLK
Does fcntl() detect EDEADLK? (Y–yes or N–no)
Default Value
None. In the case no value is specified, tests using this parameter will be
reported uninitiated or unresolved.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 56
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
VSX_FCNTL_MAXLOCK
The maximum number of locks that can be set using fcntl(). This
number does not have to be exact, just sufficiently large to obtain an
ENOLCK error. A value of −1 indicates there is no practical limit (e.g., if
limited only by available memory).
Default Value
None. In the case no value is specified, tests using this parameter will be
reported uninitiated or unresolved.
VSX_INVALID_FCNTL_CMD
An invalid cmd value for the argument to fcntl().
Default Value
−1
VSX_INVALID_GID
Out of range group ID. If all gid_t values are valid group IDs, this parameter
should be set to unsup, so tests using this parameter will be reported
unsupported.
Default Value
None. In the case no value is specified, tests using this parameter will be
reported uninitiated or unresolved.
VSX_INVALID_GNAME
Group name not in the group database.
Default Value
nogroup
VSX_INVALID_PNAME
User name not in the user database.
Default Value
nouser
VSX_INVALID_UID
Out of range user ID. If all uid_t values are valid user IDs, this parameter
should be set to unsup, so tests using this parameter will be reported
unsupported.
Default Value
None. In the case no value is specified, tests using this parameter will be
reported uninitiated or unresolved.
VSX_INVALID_WHENCE
An invalid whence value for the argument to lseek() and fseek(),
and for the l_whence structure member passed to fcntl().
Default Value
−1
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 57
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
VSX_INVAL_SIG
An illegal signal number.
Default Value
If not defined, the default is set to −1.
VSX_MOUNT_DEV
The full path name of a block special file which can be mounted. The value
may be the same as that given for the VSX_ROFS and/or
VSX_NOSPC_DEV parameters.
Default Value
If not defined, each of the tests that uses VSX_MOUNT_DEV will be
reported as uninitiated or unresolved.
VSX_NOSPC_DEV
The full path name of the block special file for the mountable device which
was filled during the installation stage. The value may be the same as that
given for the VSX_MOUNT_DEV and/or VSX_ROFS parameters.
Default Value
If not defined, each of the tests that uses VSX_NOSPC_DEV will be reported
as untested.
VSX_PURE_FILE
The full path name to an executable pure procedure (shared text) file, this is
normally set to your−testroot−directory/BIN/purefile. If shared
executables are not supported, this parameter should be set to unsup. If the
system supports shared executables but does not produce the ETXTBSY error
condition, this parameter should not be set to unsup.
Each test takes its own copy of the file before performing the test using it.
This is done so that if, for example, creat() on a busy pure procedure file
succeeds and truncates the file, other tests that depend on the existence of
purefile will not be affected.
Default Value
If not defined, each of the tests that uses this parameter will be reported as
unresolved or uninitiated.
VSX_READDIR_EBADF
Does readdir() detect EBADF? (Y–yes or N–no)
Default Value
None. In the case no value is specified, tests using this parameter will be
reported uninitiated or unresolved.
VSX_ROFS
The full path name of a block special file which can be mounted read-only. If
read-only file systems are not supported, this parameter should be set to
unsup. The value may be the same as that given for the
VSX_MOUNT_DEV and/or VSX_NOSPC_DEV parameters.
Default Value
If not defined, each of the tests that uses VSX_ROFS will be reported
unresolved.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 58
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
VSX_SIGSET_EINVAL
Can sigaddset() and sigdelset() give EINVAL? (Y–yes or
N–no)
Default Value
None. In the case no value is specified, tests using this parameter will be
reported uninitiated or unresolved.
VSX_SYS_OPEN_MAX
The maximum number of files that can be open on the system at any time.
This number does not have to be exact, just sufficiently large to obtain an
ENFILE error. A value of −1 indicates that there is no practical limit (e.g., if
limited only by available memory). In the latter case the tests using this
parameter will be reported as untested.
Default Value
None. In the case no value is specified, tests using this parameter will be
reported uninitiated or unresolved.
VSX_TTYNAME
Device name of the terminal on which the tcc is running.
Default Value
None.
VSX_TTYUSER
The login name of the user logged on at the terminal specified by
VSX_TTYNAME.
Default Value
None.
VSX_ULIMIT_BLKS
The minimum multiple of blocks for which a file size limit can be set (using
the setlimit() user-supplied function). Most implementations only
support settings which correspond to the underlying file system block size. If
the system does not support setting a file size limit this parameter should be
set to −1.
Default Value
None.
VSX_UNLOCKABLE_FILE
The name of a file which cannot be locked. The file must have read and write
permission for user vsx0 or group vsxg0. If no unlockable files exist or
can be created on the system, then this parameter should be set to unsup.
Default Value
None.
If
not
defined,
each
of
the
tests
that
uses
VSX_UNLOCKABLE_FILE will be reported as unresolved or
uninitiated.
VSX_UNUSED_GID
An unused (but valid) group ID. If all unused group IDs are invalid, this
parameter should be set to unsup.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 59
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
Default Value
None.
VSX_UNUSED_UID
An unused (but valid) user ID. If all unused user IDs are invalid, this
parameter should be set to unsup.
Default Value
None.
9.3.4 Terminal Interface Parameters Common To Multiple Subsets
The parameters in this part of tetexec.cfg are only needed by some test packages.
Refer to the package-specific sections at the end of this chapter to see whether they are
needed, and if so where they are used.
If the system does not provide any devices which support the general terminal interface,
the VSX_TERMIOS_TTY and VSX_TERMIOS_LOOP parameters should be set to
unsup. In this case the remaining parameters are not used.
If the system does provide devices which support the general terminal interface, but
does not have two ports which can be used to form a hardware loopback, then where
possible testing should be performed using pseudo-terminals and the software loopback
facility in VSX. If the pseudo-terminal devices do not support the general terminal
interface fully, they should still be used, and waivers requested for the tests which use
unsupported features (typically parity generation/detection and character size). If
testing with neither a hardware nor software loopback is possible, set the
VSX_TERMIOS_TTY and VSX_TERMIOS_LOOP parameters to unsup. In this
case it will be necessary to request a waiver for the terminal interface tests which give
UNSUPPORTED results as they will disagree with the conformance document.
VSX_TERMIOS_TTY
This is the terminal device to be used as controlling terminal for the tests.
This parameter should be set to unsup if the general terminal interface is
not supported. When using pseudo-terminals for terminal interface testing, if
pseudo-terminal master devices are obtained from a clone device such as
/dev/ptmx then VSX_TERMIOS_TTY must be set to a dummy slave
device name long enough to be overwritten with the real name when it is
obtained; for example /dev/pts/XXX.
Default Value
None.
VSX_TERMIOS_LOOP
This is the terminal device connected to VSX_TERMIOS_TTY by loopback.
This parameter should be set to unsup if the general terminal interface is
not supported. When using pseudo-terminals for terminal interface testing, if
pseudo-terminal master devices are obtained from a clone device such as
/dev/ptmx then VSX_TERMIOS_LOOP must be set to a dummy slave
device name long enough to be overwritten with the real name when it is
obtained.
Default Value
None.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 60
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
VSX_MASTER_TTY
When using pseudo-terminals for terminal interface testing, this identifies the
master side of the pseudo-terminal pair for which VSX_TERMIOS_TTY is
the slave. This parameter should be left unset if VSX_TERMIOS_TTY is
not a pseudo-terminal.
Default Value
If not defined, the tests which perform terminal testing do not provide a
software
loopback
between
VSX_TERMIOS_TTY
and
VSX_TERMIOS_LOOP.
VSX_MASTER_LOOP
When using pseudo-terminals for terminal interface testing, this identifies the
master side of the pseudo-terminal pair for which VSX_TERMIOS_LOOP
is the slave. This parameter should be left unset if VSX_TERMIOS_LOOP
is not a pseudo-terminal.
Default Value
If not defined, the tests which perform terminal testing do not provide a
software
loopback
between
VSX_TERMIOS_TTY
and
VSX_TERMIOS_LOOP.
VSX_TERMIOS_ASYNC
Are VSX_TERMIOS_TTY and VSX_TERMIOS_LOOP asynchronous
serial terminals? (Y–yes or N–no)
Default Value
If not defined, each of the tests in the above testsets that uses
VSX_TERMIOS_ASYNC will be reported as uninitiated or
unresolved.
VSX_TERMIOS_BUFFERED
Do VSX_TERMIOS_TTY and VSX_TERMIOS_LOOP have buffered
output queues? (Y–yes or N–no)
Default Value
If not defined, each of the tests in the above testsets that uses this parameter
will be reported as uninitiated or unresolved.
VSX_TERMIOS_SPEED
This is the normal speed setting for terminal tests (e.g., B9600). If split
baud rates are supported, this parameter should be set to an output baud rate
which may be used with a different input baud rate.
Default Value
None.
VSX_MODEM_CONTROL
Is modem control supported? (Y–yes or N–no)
Default Value
None. If not defined, each of the tests in the above testsets that uses
VSX_MODEM_CONTROL will be reported as uninitiated or
unresolved.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 61
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
VSX_START_STOP_CHNG
Can the START and STOP characters be changed? (Y–yes or N–no)
Default Value
None. If not defined, each of the tests in the above testsets that uses
VSX_START_STOP_CHNG will be reported as uninitiated or
unresolved.
VSX_TCGETPGRP_SUPPORTED
Is tcgetpgrp() supported? (Y–yes or N–no)
Default Value
None. If not defined, each of the tests in the above testsets that uses
VSX_TCGETPGRP_SUPPORTED will be reported as uninitiated or
unresolved.
VSX_TCSETPGRP_SUPPORTED
Is tcsetpgrp() supported? (Y–yes or N–no)
Default Value
None. If not defined, each of the tests in the above testsets that uses
VSX_TCSETPGRP_SUPPORTED will be reported as uninitiated or
unresolved.
VSX_UNSUPPORTED_CFLAG
An unsupported c_cflag value or speed. The value can be specified using
c_cflag symbols from <termios.h>, as a speed with leading B, or as a
numeric value (with leading 0 for octal, 0x for hexadecimal, otherwise
decimal). If a c_cflag symbol or numeric value is prefixed with ˜ the
relevant bits will be cleared instead of set in c_cflag. This parameter
should be set to none if all possible c_cflag values are supported.
Default Value
None. If not defined, each of the tests in the above testsets that uses this
parameter will be reported as uninitiated or unresolved.
VSX_SUPPORTED_CFLAG
A c_cflag value which is not the default value in effect when the terminal
is opened, or a speed other than that specified for VSX_TERMIOS_SPEED.
The value must be unrelated to VSX_UNSUPPORTED_CFLAG (e.g., they
cannot both be speeds or both be one of CS5, CS6, CS7 and CS8). The
value is specified in the same form as for VSX_UNSUPPORTED_CFLAG.
This parameter should be set to none if no settings other than the defaults
are supported.
Default Value
None. If not defined, each of the tests in the above testsets that uses this
parameter will be reported as uninitiated or unresolved.
PCTS_ECHOE
Erase sequence echoed when ECHOE and ECHO are set.
Default Value
None.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 62
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
PCTS_ECHOK
Kill sequence echoed when ECHOK and ECHO are set, and a ’\025’ kill
character is used to kill an input line containing seven characters.
Default Value
None.
9.4 EXECUTING THE VSX TEST SUITE
9.4.1 Introduction
The TETware test case controller, tcc, controls the execution of the test suite. The
driver executes all the testsets or those for the part you have requested. The results from
the execution stage are placed in a journal file under the results directory. The
name of this file is output by the tcc on startup.
The sections below give details about the parts of the test suite you can execute and how
to execute them. To execute individual testsets and use other options for the test suite
driver, see the sections marked ‘‘OPTIONAL’’ later in this chapter.
Note that tcc cannot be run using nohup as this would break the association with
the login terminal specified in the VSX_TTYNAME parameter. If you wish to leave
tcc to run unattended but do not want the terminal to be left logged in when it finishes
you can use the shell’s exec command to execute tcc in place of the login shell.
This will cause the terminal to be logged out when tcc exits.
9.4.2 Executing All Required Tests
To execute all the tests for the options selected during the configuration stage, invoke
the test case controller with the command:
tcc -e -s scen.exec
If you have not set the environment variable TET_EXECUTE to the pathname of your
testroot directory, you must specify it on the tcc command line. For example, to
specify the default testroot location, append
-a TESTROOT
to the command given above. The remaining example commands in this chapter
assume that TET_EXECUTE is set in the environment.
The following sections contain details on executing selected parts of the test suite. Note
that if you make changes to your system to correct the faults diagnosed by VSX, it is
not sufficient just to re-build and re-run the tests that failed and see that they now pass.
The whole of VSX must be re-built and re-run to ensure that the changes have not had
an adverse effect on any other tests.
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
Log in as the user vsx0.
2.
Give the command
tcc -e -s scen.exec
with the other options you want to use. Use the command
../bin/tcc -e -s scen.exec
from the home directory if $HOME/../bin is not in your PATH.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 63
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
9.4.3 Executing Selected Parts of a Scenario (OPTIONAL)
To execute selected parts of the test suite, you can use the -y and -n options of the
tcc to select which lines of the file scen.exec you wish to include (-y) or exclude
(-n). You can use as many of these options as you like in one command. If a scenario
line matches both a -y string and a -n string it will be excluded.
For example, to execute just the POSIX.os section, use the command:
tcc -e -s scen.exec -y POSIX.os
or to execute everything except the header tests, use the command:
tcc -e -s scen.exec -n .hdr
or to execute the streamio areas in all the sections that have one, but excluding the
macro versions of the interfaces, use the command:
tcc -e -s scen.exec -y streamio -n streamio/M
The journal file for a partial execution is handled correctly by the report writer.
9.4.4 Executing Individual Testsets (OPTIONAL)
If the list of testsets you wish to execute is too varied to be specified easily using -y
and -n options, simply edit a copy of the scenario file scen.exec to reflect the
testsets you wish to build.
Examples
If the file myscen.exec contains an edited copy of scen.exec then use the
command
tcc -e -s myscen.exec
to execute just the testsets contained in the file.
9.4.5 Executing Individual Tests (OPTIONAL)
The lowest level of granularity in VSX allows you to execute individual tests. Most
tests can be executed in this way, but some are dependent upon execution of earlier tests
in the testset, in which case only groups of dependent tests may be executed as a single
unit. Also, the header and C language tests can only be executed as whole testsets.
The mechanism for executing individual tests is the TET invocable component (IC)
facility. Where no dependencies between tests exist the IC numbers are the same as the
test numbers. Where dependencies exist, the IC number for a group of dependent tests
is the same as the test number of the first test in the group. For example if a testset
contains four tests and test 3 is dependent on test 2, the IC numbers will be as follows:
Test number
IC number
1
2
3
4
1
2
2
4
If IC number 2 is requested, then tests 2 and 3 will both be executed.
Note that even where no explicit dependency has been identified, some tests may
behave differently when executed individually than when executed in the normal testset
sequence. For this reason, it is always advisable to re-execute the whole testset once
individual testing has been completed.
To execute selected invocable components from one or more testsets add a commaseparated list of the IC numbers in curly braces on the end of the associated scenario
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 64
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
lines. For example, the scenario file
all
/tset/POSIX.os/ioprim/write/T.write{3,7,8}
will execute only IC numbers 3,7 and 8 in the write() testset.
Alternatively, a one-off execution of selected IC numbers from a single testset can be
performed using the -l option of tcc. For example, the above execution could also
be achieved by the command
tcc -e -l /tset/POSIX.os/ioprim/write/T.write{3,7,8}
Some shells may require the braces to be quoted.
Multiple -l options may be specified to execute more than one testset.
9.4.6 Additional Options (OPTIONAL)
The tcc manual page gives full details of the additional options you can use with the
tcc command. The following options are some of the most useful:
1.
To see a running progress report, include the -p option. The tcc will then
output a line to the terminal as it starts executing each testset.
2.
To use an alternative configuration file to tetexec.cfg, include the
-x filename option. The file must be in the same format as tetexec.cfg.
3.
To override a parameter in the execution parameters file, include the -v option.
For example, to use the run name XYZ123 rather than the value defined in
tetexec.cfg, use the command
tcc -e -v VSX_NAME=XYZ123 rest−of−command
4.
In order to execute testsets which failed during a previous run, use
tcc -e -r code−list other−options old−journal−file
where code−list is a comma-separated list of result codes to be re-executed,
other−options are the other tcc options (e.g., -y or -n) and old−journal−file
is the journal file from which the codes are extracted. For example, to re-execute
all the tests that failed with FAIL, UNRESOLVED and UNINITIATED codes
from journal file results/0002e/journal, use the following command:3
cd results
tcc -e -r FAIL,UNRESOLVED,UNINITIATED \
-s ../scen.exec 0002e/journal
9.4.7 Path Tracing (OPTIONAL)
Most tests within the VSX test suite are coded for path tracing. Path tracing
information may be generated when a test is run by enabling the debugging mechanism.
The following VSX parameters, described earlier in this chapter, control VSX
debugging and path tracing:
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
3. The long line in this example has been folded at the \ character for formatting purposes. The command can be typed all on one
line, in which case the \ character must be omitted.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 65
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
VSX_DBUG_FLAGS
This determines the level of debugging, and what useful information is
generated with the output; e.g., line numbers, function names, etc.
VSX_DBUG_FILE
This determines the output file for the debugging information.
These parameters can be set to generate debugging information either on the
command line of the tcc by specifying -v VSX_DBUG_FILE=filename
and -v VSX_DBUG_FLAGS=dbug−flags or by modifying the relevant
tetexec.cfg file lines.
9.4.8 Debugging Options (OPTIONAL)
This section summarises the currently available debugging options and the flag
characters which enable them. Argument lists enclosed in square brackets are optional.
Options are separated by colons.
d[,keywords]
Enable output from macros including the specified keywords. A null list of
keywords implies that all keywords are selected.
f[,functions]
Limit debugger actions to the specified list of functions and the functions
which they invoke. A null list of functions implies that all functions are
selected.
F
Mark each debugger output line with the name of the source file containing
the macro causing the output.
l[,n]
Specify level of debugging output required, defaults to 1. Use level 2 to get
debugging output from library routines.
L
Mark each debugger output line with the source file line number of the macro
causing the output.
n
Mark each debugger output line with the current function nesting depth.
o[,file]
Re-direct the debugger output stream to the specified file. The default output
file is specified by the configuration variable VSX_DBUG_FILE. If this is
not set or cannot be opened, stderr is used. A null argument list or the file
name - causes output to be sent to stderr.
p[,processes]
Limit debugger actions to the specified processes. A null list implies all
processes. This is useful for processes which run child processes.
P
Mark each debugger output line with the name and PID of the current
process. Most useful when used with a process which runs child processes
that are also being debugged.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 66
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
t[,n]
Enable function control flow tracing. The maximum nesting depth is
specified by n and defaults to 200.
Useful Debugging Setting
A useful setting for path tracing purposes is
VSX_DBUG_FLAGS=d,trace:F:L
which prints the file name and line number as well as the check point value, and
therefore can provide a useful aid to locating the source of a path tracing error.
9.4.9 Debugging Output and the Path Tracing Code
This section describes the correlation between the debugging output and the source
code functions.
PATH_TRACE
This is the basic macro to checkpoint program progress. Output associated
with a call to PATH_TRACE will be in the form:
trace: path counter 1
Where the test is running correctly, one would expect a single output line for
each occurrence of the PATH_TRACE macro within the code, and the path
counter to increment.
PATH_FUNC_TRACE
PATH_FUNC_TRACE calls generate identical style of debugging information
to PATH_TRACE when a function is diagnosed as having path traced
successfully; however, if a function failed its path trace, output of the form
trace: path check failed in function call
will be produced by the PATH_FUNC_TRACE call.
PATH_XS_RPT
This call is made when the test has completed, and wishes to signal a PASS
result, subject to the path check being a given number. If the path check was
successful, then the success will be reported. However, if the path check was
unsuccessful, an unresolved result will be reported, together with the
following diagnostic appearing in both the journal and the debugging output:
path trace error: path counter X, expected Y
9.4.10 Executing Tests Directly (OPTIONAL)
When debugging tests it is sometimes useful to execute them directly instead of under
the control of tcc. When tests are executed in this way the current directory must be
the location of the testset executable file. Also the variables TET_CONFIG and
TET_CODE must be set in the environment. Once the tests have been executed the
results are found in a file called tet_xres.
For example to execute the tests for write() directly you would use the commands:
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 67
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
TET_CONFIG=$TET_EXECUTE/tetexec.cfg
TET_CODE=$HOME/tet_code
export TET_CONFIG TET_CODE
cd $TET_EXECUTE/tset/POSIX.os/ioprim/write
./T.write
more tet_xres
This will execute all the tests in the testset. If you want to execute only specified ICs,
give the IC list as an argument:
./T.write 1-3,7
9.5 TROUBLESHOOTING
You may encounter some of the following problems when you execute tests with tcc.
This section lists common problems and gives notes explaining how to overcome them.
1.
tcc refuses to find testsets.
Ensure you have either set the environment variable TET_EXECUTE to the full
pathname of the testroot directory, or used the -a option of the tcc to specify
the testroot directory.
2.
Tests appear to hang for long periods.
Some tests do require a long time, as they must wait for timeouts. If the test is not
simply waiting but is using processor time, it may be receiving a signal
repeatedly. If you interrupt the tcc program with a SIGINT (e.g., by typing
DEL or CTRL-C on the terminal where tcc is running), it will terminate the
current testset and start the next one. You can also do this by sending a
SIGTERM signal to the stuck process.
3.
The message IC number not defined for this test case in journal files.
There may be a dependency. See journal from whole testset execution to identify
IC numbers.
4.
Most header tests give FIP results.
If your C compiler produces output on successful compilations (e.g. an
identification message) then these tests will give Further Information Provided
(FIP) results, meaning the output must be checked manually before it can be
considered a pass. It is impractical to check hundreds of FIP results, so to avoid
producing them you should set the VSX_CC parameter to the name of a shell
script which invokes the C compiler and discards the identification message. It
must discard only the exact message, not all output. A suitable script to discard a
one line message would be:
c89 "$@" 2> tmp.err
code=$?
grep -v ’ˆText of message$’ tmp.err >&2
rm -f tmp.err
exit $code
5.
Some header tests do not compile because the compiler cannot cope with a huge
header.h.D file.
You can prevent these huge files from being created by building the header tests
with the variable HDRDEFS_NOEXPAND set in the environment. However, this
will produce build failures as there will be some nested include files that the
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 68
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
hdrdefs program cannot open. Refer to the TROUBLESHOOTING section in
the chapter entitled ‘‘BUILDING VSX’’ for information on how to deal with
these build failures.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 69
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
9.6 EXECUTING VSX4
9.6.1 General Parameters
The VSX_PATH parameter is also used in POSIX.os/procprim/exec.
9.6.2 Compiler Characteristics
All of the parameters in this section of tetexec.cfg are needed.
9.6.3 Operating System Characteristics Common To Multiple Subsets
The following parameters are needed from this section of tetexec.cfg if the
base subset has been selected. The full descriptions of these parameters are in the
generic part of this chapter.
VSX_BLKDEV_FILE
Where Used
POSIX.hdr/misc/stat
POSIX.os/dataform/tar
VSX_CHRDEV_FILE
Where Used
POSIX.hdr/misc/stat
POSIX.os/dataform/tar
VSX_FCNTL_EDEADLK
Where Used
POSIX.os/ioprim/fcntl
VSX_FCNTL_MAXLOCK
Where Used
POSIX.os/ioprim/fcntl
VSX_INVALID_FCNTL_CMD
Where Used
POSIX.os/ioprim/fcntl_X
VSX_INVALID_GID
Note that the EINVAL test for chown() gives an unsupported result
only when both VSX_INVALID_GID and VSX_INVALID_UID are set to
unsup.
Where Used
POSIX.os/files/chown
POSIX.os/procenv/setgid
POSIX.os/sysdb/getgrgid
VSX_INVALID_GNAME
Where Used
POSIX.os/sysdb/getgrnam
The Open Group
VSX-PCTS4.4.4
Page 70
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
VSX_INVALID_PNAME
Where Used
POSIX.os/sysdb/getpwnam
VSX_INVALID_UID
Note that the EINVAL test for chown() gives an unsupported result
only when both VSX_INVALID_GID and VSX_INVALID_UID are set to
unsup.
Where Used
POSIX.os/files/chown
POSIX.os/procenv/setuid
POSIX.os/sysdb/getpwuid
VSX_INVALID_WHENCE
Where Used
ANSI.os/streamio/fseek
POSIX.os/ioprim/fcntl
POSIX.os/ioprim/lseek
VSX_INVAL_SIG
Where Used
vsx_sigs (tsetlib)
VSX_MOUNT_DEV
Where Used
mountfs (tsetlib)
VSX_NOSPC_DEV
Where Used
setupnospc (tsetlib)
VSX_PURE_FILE
Where Used
pure_run (tsetlib)
VSX_READDIR_EBADF
Where Used
POSIX.os/files/readdir
VSX_ROFS
Where Used
setuprofs (tsetlib)
VSX_SIGSET_EINVAL
Where Used
POSIX.os/procprim/sigaddset
POSIX.os/procprim/sigdelset
POSIX.os/procprim/sigismembe
The Open Group
VSX-PCTS4.4.4
Page 71
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
VSX_SYS_OPEN_MAX
Where Used
ANSI.os/streamio/fopen
ANSI.os/streamio/freopen
ANSI.os/streamio/tmpfile
POSIX.os/files/creat
POSIX.os/files/open
POSIX.os/files/opendir
POSIX.os/ioprim/pipe
VSX_TTYNAME
Where Used
POSIX.os/files/fpathconf
POSIX.os/files/pathconf
POSIX.os/procenv/isatty
POSIX.os/procenv/ttyname
VSX_TTYUSER
Where Used
POSIX.os/procenv/getlogin
VSX_ULIMIT_BLKS
Where Used
ANSI.os/streamio/fwrite
do_ferr (tsetlib)
VSX_UNLOCKABLE_FILE
Where Used
POSIX.os/ioprim/fcntl
VSX_UNUSED_GID
Where Used
POSIX.os/sysdb/getgrgid
VSX_UNUSED_UID
Where Used
POSIX.os/sysdb/getpwuid
9.6.4 Terminal Interface Parameters Common To Multiple Subsets
The following parameters are needed from this section of tetexec.cfg if the
base subset has been selected. The full descriptions of these parameters are in the
generic part of this chapter.
VSX_TERMIOS_TTY and VSX_TERMIOS_LOOP
Where Used
termios (tsetlib)
The Open Group
VSX-PCTS4.4.4
Page 72
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
VSX_MASTER_TTY and VSX_MASTER_LOOP
Where Used
termios (tsetlib)
VSX_TERMIOS_ASYNC
Where Used
POSIX.os/devclass/tcsendbrea
POSIX.os/devclass/c_iflag
VSX_TERMIOS_BUFFERED
Where Used
POSIX.os/devclass/c_iflag
POSIX.os/devclass/c_iflag_X
POSIX.os/devclass/i_close
POSIX.os/devclass/i_spchars
POSIX.os/devclass/tcflow
POSIX.os/devclass/tcflush
POSIX.os/devclass/tcsetattr
POSIX.os/procprim/sigconcept
VSX_TERMIOS_SPEED
Where Used
termios (tsetlib)
VSX_MODEM_CONTROL
Where Used
POSIX.os/devclass/cfsetospee
POSIX.os/devclass/i_close
POSIX.os/devclass/i_modem
VSX_START_STOP_CHNG
Where Used
POSIX.os/devclass/i_spchars
VSX_TCGETPGRP_SUPPORTED
Where Used
POSIX.os/devclass/i_ctty
POSIX.os/devclass/tcgetpgrp
POSIX.os/devclass/tcsetpgrp
VSX_TCSETPGRP_SUPPORTED
Where Used
POSIX.os/devclass/tcsetpgrp
VSX_UNSUPPORTED_CFLAG and VSX_SUPPORTED_CFLAG
Where Used
POSIX.os/devclass/tcsetattr
The Open Group
VSX-PCTS4.4.4
Page 73
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
PCTS_ECHOE and PCTS_ECHOK
Where Used
POSIX.os/devclass/c_lflag
9.6.5 Operating System Characteristics for Base Subset Only
The following additional parameters are required for the base subset in all test modes.
VSX_AL_ACCURACY
Allowable error, in seconds, for the alarm() system call in the alarm
testset. Useful for slow systems where the system scheduler cannot always
guarantee the alarm signal will take effect precisely at the specified interval.
Where Used
POSIX.os/procprim/sleep
POSIX.os/procprim/alarm
Default Value
If not defined, the alarm testset sets the default to SPEEDFACTOR.
VSX_CLOCK_ERR
The percentage accuracy to which the clock system interface is to be
measured.
Where Used
POSIX.os/procenv/times
Default Value
Five per cent inaccuracy is allowed.
VSX_CLOSEDIR_EBADF
Does closedir() detect EBADF? (Y–yes or N–no)
Where Used
POSIX.os/files/closedir
Default Value
None. In the case no value is specified, tests using this parameter will be
reported uninitiated or unresolved.
VSX_FP_SOFTWARE
The system provides support for floating point calculations by software
emulation. If software emulation is employed the time-outs on the
mathematics tests will be increased by a factor of 5. (Y–yes or N–no)
Where Used
FPCOMP.h
fpcomp(genlib)
Default Value
N
VSX_INVALID_AMODE
An invalid access mode value for the second argument to access(). If
access() does not detect EINVAL errors, this parameter should be set to
unsup, so tests using this parameter will be reported unsupported.
The Open Group
VSX-PCTS4.4.4
Page 74
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
Where Used
POSIX.os/files/access
Default Value
−1
VSX_INVALID_PC
An invalid _PC_. . . value for the second argument to pathconf() and
fpathconf().
Where Used
POSIX.os/files/pathconf
POSIX.os/files/fpathconf
Default Value
−1
VSX_INVALID_PGID
An invalid process group ID.
Where Used
POSIX.os/devclass/tcsetpgrp
Default Value
−1
VSX_INVALID_SC
An invalid _SC_. . . value for the argument to sysconf().
Where Used
POSIX.os/procenv/sysconf
Default Value
−1
VSX_JOB_CONTROL_SUPP
Is the behaviour associated with {_POSIX_JOB_CONTROL} supported?
(Y–yes, N–no.
Where Used
POSIX.os/procenv/sysconf
Default Value
None. In the case no value is specified, tests using this parameter will be
reported uninitiated or unresolved.
VSX_LINK_ACCESS_REQD
Does link() require access to the existing file? (Y–yes or N–no)
Where Used
POSIX.os/files/link
Default Value
N
The Open Group
VSX-PCTS4.4.4
Page 75
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
VSX_LINK_DIR_SUPP
Can link() and unlink() be used on directories? (Y–both, N–neither,
U–unlink only)
Where Used
POSIX.os/files/link
POSIX.os/files/unlink
Default Value
None. In the case no value is specified, tests using this parameter will be
reported uninitiated or unresolved.
VSX_LINK_FILESYS_SUPP
Can link() be used across file systems? (Y–yes or N–no)
Where Used
POSIX.os/files/link
POSIX.os/files/rename
Default Value
None. In the case no value is specified, tests using this parameter will be
reported uninitiated or unresolved.
VSX_NONEXEC_FILE
The name of a file of a non-executable type. This file must not be a regular
file and must have execute permission for user vsx0. If all file types are
executable, this parameter should be set to unsup.
Where Used
POSIX.os/procprim/exec
Default Value
None. If not defined, each of the tests in the above testsets that uses
VSX_NONEXEC_FILE will be reported as
unresolved or
uninitiated.
VSX_OPENDIR_EMNFILE
Does opendir() detect EMFILE and ENFILE? (Y–yes or N–no)
Where Used
POSIX.os/files/opendir
Default Value
None. In the case no value is specified, tests using this parameter will be
reported uninitiated or unresolved.
VSX_PRIV_ACCESS_SUPP
Is privileged access to files supported? (Y–yes or N–no)
Where Used
POSIX.os/files/access
POSIX.os/files/utime
Default Value
N
The Open Group
VSX-PCTS4.4.4
Page 76
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
VSX_PRIV_CHOWN_SUPP
Do chown() and chmod() support appropriate privileges? (Y–yes or
N–no)
Where Used
POSIX.os/files/chmod
POSIX.os/files/chown
Default Value
N
VSX_REMOVE_DIR_EBUSY
Does removing a busy directory give EBUSY?
Y = Yes, always
S = Yes, but only when in use by the system
P = Yes, but only when in use by another process
N = No
Where Used
ANSI.os/streamio/remove
POSIX.os/files/rename
POSIX.os/files/rmdir
POSIX.os/files/unlink
Default Value
None. In the case no value is specified, tests using this parameter will be
reported uninitiated or unresolved.
VSX_RENAME_DIR_EBUSY
Does renaming a busy directory give EBUSY?
Y = Yes, always
S = Yes, but only when in use by the system
P = Yes, but only when in use by another process
N = No
Note: in the rename() tests, VSX_RENAME_DIR_EBUSY is used
when the busy directory is the first argument to rename(), and
VSX_REMOVE_DIR_EBUSY is used when the busy directory is the
second argument (when rename() will attempt to remove it).
Where Used
POSIX.os/files/rename
Default Value
None. In the case no value is specified, tests using this parameter will be
reported uninitiated or unresolved.
VSX_RENAME_DIR_WPERM_REQD
Does rename() on directories require write access? (Y–yes or N–no)
Where Used
POSIX.os/files/rename
Default Value
None. In the case no value is specified, tests using this parameter will be
reported uninitiated or unresolved.
The Open Group
VSX-PCTS4.4.4
Page 77
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
VSX_SAVED_IDS_SUPP
Is the behaviour associated with {_POSIX_SAVED_IDS} supported? (Y–yes
or N–no)
Where Used
POSIX.os/procenv/sysconf
Default Value
None. In the case no value is specified, tests using this parameter will be
reported uninitiated or unresolved.
VSX_SET_ID_MODES_SUPP
Is setting S_ISUID and S_ISGID by chmod() supported? (Y–yes or
N–no)
Where Used
POSIX.os/files/chmod
POSIX.os/files/chown
Default Value
None. If no value is specified, tests using this parameter will be reported
uninitiated or unresolved.
VSX_SETPGID_SUPPORTED
Is the setpgid() interface supported? (Y–yes or N–no)
This parameter should be set to Y if POSIX_JOB_CONTROL is supported.
Where Used
POSIX.os/procenv/setpgid
Default Value
None. If no value is specified, tests using this parameter will be reported
uninitiated or unresolved.
VSX_UNSUPPORTED_PGID
An unsupported process group ID (this must be greater than zero). This may
be set to unsup if all positive pid_t values are supported process group
IDs.
Where Used
POSIX.os/procenv/setpgid
Default Value
None.
The Open Group
VSX-PCTS4.4.4
Page 78
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
10. REPORTING
10.1 INTRODUCTION
You can use the VSX reporting program to format reports from the results of the
building and execution stages. You can generate reports from a complete journal file or
from the results for the part you want to use. In addition, you can generate summary
reports which summarise the results for testsets in a given section, area or testset. When
you use the reporting program, you can use other options to control the length and
width of the text on the page.
There is a separate reporting program for producing POSIX conformance reports.
When you want to compare the results in several journal files, you can use the
comparative reporting program, explained at the end of this chapter.
10.2 THE REPORTING PROGRAMS
The VSX reporting program, vrpt, formats the results in the VSX journal files
generated by the building and execution stages. When you use vrpt, the environment
variable PATH must be correctly set so that commands can be executed. The reporting
program and its subsidiary programs are located in the directory BIN below the vsx0
home directory. Include this directory in your PATH.
The POSIX reporting program, prpt, produces the definitive POSIX conformance
report from journal files created by execution in POSIX modes. It should only be used
with test packages that provide POSIX assertion numbers in their test descriptions.
Usually this will be the case only for test packages containing tests that can be run in
POSIX90 mode.
NB. prpt does not provide the detailed diagnostic information that vrpt provides,
and it gives results against POSIX assertion numbers, not the VSX testset names and
test numbers that would be needed to re-run failed tests. For these reasons, it is
recommended that POSIX mode users run vrpt until they are happy with the results
of the tests; prpt may then be run to produce final documentation of the test results.
10.3 REPORTING PROGRAM USAGE SUMMARY
vrpt [-llevel] [-rcoverage] [-ffile] [-v] [-H] [-p] [-P] [-Llen]
[-Wwid] [file ...]
prpt [-H] [-Llen] [-Wwid] [file ...]
10.4 REPORTING PROGRAM OPTIONS
10.4.1 Reporting on the Entire Journal
To generate a report on an entire journal file, use the command:
vrpt journal−file
10.4.2 Reporting on a Section or Area (OPTIONAL)
The names of the sections and areas are the same as those listed in the building chapter.
By default, the reporting program generates a report from the complete journal file. To
produce a report from results for part of the test suite, use the -r option of vrpt,
followed by the name of the section or area you want to use. For example, to report on
the POSIX.os testset results in the latest journal file, use the command:
vrpt -r POSIX.os journal−file
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 79
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
To report on the streamio area within the ANSI.os section, use the command:
vrpt -r ANSI.os/streamio journal−file
Note that the Conformance Summary produced as part of the cover pages on validation
test reports always contains the complete results for the journal file(s) being processed.
Only the body of the report is affected by the -r option.
10.4.3 Reporting on Individual Testsets (OPTIONAL)
You can also use the -r option for vrpt to report on the results of individual
testsets, or a range of testsets. The -P option is useful here to stop the cover pages
being produced. For example, to report on the results of a single testset for the system
interface write(), use the command:
vrpt -r POSIX.os/ioprim/write -P journal−file
To report on the results from all the testsets between the system calls read() and
write(), use the following command:5
vrpt -r POSIX.os/ioprim/read:POSIX.os/ioprim/write \
-P journal−file
10.4.4 Summary Reports (OPTIONAL)
To generate a report which summarises the testset results by section or area, use the -l
option. The area summary report, which is useful as a management summary, is given
in tabular format. For example, to generate a summary report at section level, use the
command:
vrpt -l sect journal−file
For area level reports, use the command:
vrpt -l area journal−file
10.4.5 Varying the Text Format (OPTIONAL)
You can use the -L page length and -W page width options to format the text in
reports according to your paper size. When you reduce the page width, long output lines
are automatically wrapped onto the next line of the report. Note that the Conformance
Summary produced as part of the cover pages contains a wide table which does not get
wrapped, so if you are using a page width of less than the default 80 characters, you will
probably want to disable the cover pages by using the -P option. For example, to
format the text using a page length of 50 lines and width of 64 characters, use the
command:
vrpt -L50 -W64 -P journal−file
10.4.6 Additional Options (OPTIONAL)
The vrpt user manual, in part 4 of this guide, gives full details of the additional
options you can use with the vrpt reporting program.
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
5. The long line in this example has been folded at the \ character for formatting purposes. The command can be typed all on one
line, in which case the \ character must be omitted.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 80
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
Log in as the user vsx0.
2.
Check that the environment variable PATH is set correctly.
3.
Change to the directory results if required.
4.
Give the command vrpt with the options you want to use, on a journal file
generated from the results of running the tcc.
10.5 POSIX CONFORMANCE REPORTING
A separate reporting program prpt produces POSIX conformance reports from
execution journal files. These reports consist only of the result codes for each POSIX
assertion; failure information produced by the tests is not included. Use the standard
reporting program, vrpt, to generate reports with the details of test failures.
Options
You can use the -W and -L options, for page width and page length, with prpt.
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
Log in as the user vsx0.
2.
Check that the environment variable PATH is set correctly.
3.
Change to the directory results if required.
4.
Give the command prpt with the options you want to use, on journal files
generated from the results of running the tcc.
10.6 COMPARATIVE REPORTING
You can use an alternative reporting program to compare the results in a number of
different journal files. The reporting program vrptm enables you to compare the
results from tests on a range of machines, or from a series of execution runs on the
same machine with different software releases.
The comparative reporting program handles results from up to five journal files on the
default page width of 80 columns (more on wider pages). The successes and failures
are printed in tables, without any extra information about the reasons for tests failing.
Use the standard reporting program vrpt to generate reports with the details of test
failures.
Options
You can use the -W and -L options, for page width and page length, with vrptm.
hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
Action Points
1.
Log in as the user vsx0.
2.
Check that the environment variable PATH is set correctly.
3.
Change to the directory results if required.
4.
Give the command vrptm with the options you want to use, on journal files
generated from the results of running the tcc.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 81
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
10.7 SAMPLE REPORT OUTPUT
10.7.1 vrpt Sample Output
Conformance Summary Information
X/OPEN Verification Suite
Test-Set Summary
Test-Set Summary
CONFORMANCE Summary
This is to certify that this system when tested for conformance
to POSIX.1-1990 achieved the results below.
|
TOTALS
Succeeded
Warnings Unresolved Unsupported NotInUse|
Section
| Expect Actual
Failed
FIP
Uninitiated Untested
|
____________|_________________________________________________________________|
|
|
ANSI.hdr
|
586
586
260
18
0
0
0
0
307
0
1 |
ANSI.os
F | 1676
1676
1638
6
2
0
0
0
3
0
27 |
ANSI.os
M | 1676
1676
97
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 1579 |
POSIX.hdr
|
450
450
233
13
0
0
0
0
198
0
6 |
POSIX.os F | 1434
1434
1330
9
0
3
0
0
57
1
34 |
POSIX.os M | 1434
1434
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 1430 |
TOTAL
| 7256
7256
3562
46
2
3
0
0
565
1 3077 |
____________|_________________________________________________________________|
Number of amendments ____________
___________________
Signature/Date
Test Agency: UniSoft
Test Date:
Apr 11, 1997
System Tested: oursys
Page 4
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 82
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
Test Results
Test-Set Summary
Test-Set Summary
Test-Set Results:
---------------Test-Set Started: 19:55:04
Test-Set Ended:
19:55:06
Test-Set Results Summary:
-----------------------1
1
Tests Executed
Tests Succeeded
Test-Set Name: /tset/ANSI.os/charhandle/Miscntrl/T.iscntrl
---------------------------------------------------------Test-Set Results:
---------------Test-Set Started: 19:55:07
Test-Set Ended:
19:55:08
Test-Set Results Summary:
-----------------------2
2
Tests Executed
Tests Succeeded
Test-Set Name: /tset/ANSI.os/charhandle/Miscntrl_X/T.iscntrl_X
-------------------------------------------------------------Test-Set Results:
---------------Test-Set Started: 19:55:09
Test-Set Ended:
19:55:11
Test-Set Results Summary:
-----------------------1
1
Tests Executed
Tests Succeeded
Test-Set Name: /tset/ANSI.os/charhandle/Misdigit/T.isdigit
---------------------------------------------------------Test-Set Results:
---------------Test Agency: UniSoft
Test Date:
Apr 11, 1997
System Tested: oursys
Page 6
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 83
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
Summary Information
X/OPEN Verification Suite
Test-Set Summary
Test-Set Summary
Section Name: ANSI.os
--------------------Section Started: 19:54:56
Section Ended:
22:35:59
Section Results Summary:
----------------------10
3352
1735
6
2
3
1606
Areas Containing
Tests
Tests
Tests
Tests
Tests
Tests
296
Test-Sets Completed
Executed
Succeeded
Failed
Warning
Unsupported
Not In Use
Test Agency: UniSoft
Test Date:
Apr 11, 1997
System Tested: oursys
Page 119
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 84
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
X/OPEN Verification Suite
Test-Set Summary
Test-Set Summary
Test Parameters:
TET_OUTPUT_CAPTURE
=
False
TET_RESCODES_FILE
=
tet_code
TET_VERSION
=
1.10
TEST_MODE
=
POSIX90
TEST_PACKAGES
=
VSX4.4.1
VSXDIR
=
/user4/TET/vsx4/SRC
VSX_DBUG_FLAGS
=
VSX_DBUG_FILE
=
/user4/TET/vsx4/TESTROOT/dbug.out
VSX_NAME
=
VSX_OPER
=
Joe Programmer
VSX_ORG
=
UniSoft
VSX_PATH
=
VSX_SYS
=
oursys
VSX_UID0
=
146
VSX_UID1
=
147
VSX_UID2
=
149
VSX_GID0
=
200
VSX_GID1
=
201
VSX_GID2
=
202
TET_SIG_IGN
=
12
TET_SIG_LEAVE
=
VSX_AL_ACCURACY
=
VSX_BLKDEV_FILE
=
/dev/mt/1m
VSX_CHRDEV_FILE
=
/dev/rmt/1m
VSX_CLOCK_ERR
=
VSX_CLOSEDIR_EBADF
=
Y
VSX_FCNTL_MAXLOCK
=
400
VSX_FP_SOFTWARE
=
VSX_INVALID_GID
=
VSX_INVALID_GNAME
=
VSX_INVALID_PC
=
VSX_INVALID_PNAME
=
VSX_INVALID_SC
=
VSX_INVALID_UID
=
VSX_INVAL_SIG
=
VSX_LINK_DIR_SUPP
=
Y
VSX_LINK_FILESYS_SUPP =
N
VSX_MOUNT_DEV
=
/dev/dsk/c1d0s6
VSX_NONEXEC_FILE
=
.
VSX_NOSPC_DEV
=
/dev/dsk/c1d0s6
VSX_PRIV_ACCESS_SUPP =
Y
VSX_PRIV_CHOWN_SUPP =
Y
VSX_READDIR_EBADF
=
Y
VSX_REMOVE_DIR_EBUSY =
S
VSX_RENAME_DIR_EBUSY =
S
VSX_RENAME_DIR_WPERM_REQD =
N
VSX_ROFS
=
/dev/dsk/c1d0s6
VSX_SET_ID_MODES_SUPP =
Y
VSX_SETPGID_SUPPORTED =
Y
VSX_SIGSET_EINVAL
=
Y
VSX_SYS_OPEN_MAX
=
600
VSX_TTYNAME
=
/dev/tty0p3
VSX_TTYUSER
=
vsx0
Test Agency: UniSoft
Test Date:
Apr 11, 1997
System Tested: oursys
Page 120
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 85
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
Test Failure Information
X/OPEN Verification Suite
Test-Set Summary
Test-Set Summary
Test-Set Name: /tset/POSIX.os/procprim/sigaddset/T.sigaddset
-----------------------------------------------------------Test-Set Results:
---------------Test-Set Started: 02:18:15
Test-Set Ended:
02:18:16
Test-Set Results Summary:
-----------------------2
2
Tests Executed
Tests Succeeded
Test-Set Name: /tset/POSIX.os/procprim/sigconcept/T.sigconcept
-------------------------------------------------------------Test-Set Results:
---------------Test-Set Started: 02:18:16
Test Results:
************************************************************************
/tset/POSIX.os/procprim/sigconcept/T.sigconcept 22
Failed
Test Description:
If _POSIX_JOB_CONTROL is defined, setting a signal action to SIG_DFL
for a SIGCHLD signal that is pending shall cause the pending signal to
be discarded.
Posix Ref: Component Signal Concepts Assertion 3.3.1.3-29(C)
Test Strategy:
FORK a child process
CHILD process:
SET the SIGCHLD signal action to signal catching function
BLOCK the SIGCHLD signal and send to itself
VERIFY the SIGCHLD signal is not received
VERIFY the SIGCHLD signal is pending
SET the SIGCHLD signal action to SIG_DFL
VERIFY the SIGCHLD signal is not pending
UNBLOCK the SIGCHLD signal
EXIT with the exit code set to the number of any caught signal,
otherwise 0
PARENT process:
VERIFY the SIGCHLD signal was discarded
Test Information:
Test Agency: UniSoft
Test Date:
Apr 11, 1997
System Tested: oursys
Page 23
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 86
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
X/OPEN Verification Suite
Test-Set Summary
Test-Set Summary
signal 18 (SIGCHLD) still pending after sigaction()
deletion reason: waitsync() failed, errno 4
************************************************************************
Test-Set Ended:
03:16:35
Test-Set Results Summary:
-----------------------37
36
1
Tests Executed
Tests Succeeded
Tests Failed
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 87
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
10.7.2 prpt Sample Output
POSIX Summary
POSIX Summary
Journal File:
/user4/TET/vsx4/results/0002e/journal
Test Date:
Fri Apr 11 19:26:25 1997
Test Agency:
UniSoft
Test System:
oursys
Test Operator:
Joe Programmer
Test Parameters:
TET_OUTPUT_CAPTURE
=
False
TET_RESCODES_FILE
=
tet_code
TET_VERSION
=
1.10
TEST_MODE
=
POSIX90
TEST_PACKAGES
=
VSX4.4.1
VSXDIR
=
/user4/TET/vsx4/SRC
VSX_DBUG_FLAGS
=
VSX_DBUG_FILE
=
/user4/TET/vsx4/TESTROOT/dbug.out
VSX_NAME
=
VSX_OPER
=
Joe Programmer
VSX_ORG
=
UniSoft
VSX_PATH
=
VSX_SYS
=
oursys
VSX_UID0
=
146
VSX_UID1
=
147
VSX_UID2
=
149
VSX_GID0
=
200
VSX_GID1
=
201
VSX_GID2
=
202
TET_SIG_IGN
=
12
TET_SIG_LEAVE
=
VSX_AL_ACCURACY
=
VSX_BLKDEV_FILE
=
/dev/mt/1m
VSX_CHRDEV_FILE
=
/dev/rmt/1m
VSX_CLOCK_ERR
=
VSX_CLOSEDIR_EBADF
=
Y
VSX_FCNTL_MAXLOCK
=
400
X/OPEN Verification Suite
POSIX Summary
GETENV
GETENV
GETENV
GETENV
GETENV
GETENV
GETENV
GETENV
POSIX Summary
4.6.1.1-01(A)
4.6.1.1-02(C)
4.6.1.1-03(C)
4.6.1.2-04(A)
4.6.1.2-05(A)
4.6.1.2-06(A)
4.6.1.2-07(A)
4.6.1.3-08(D)
PASS
UNSUPPORTED
UNSUPPORTED
PASS
PASS
PASS
PASS
UNTESTED
Page 23
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 88
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
10.8 TROUBLESHOOTING
This section lists known problems, and gives notes on how to overcome them. You
may encounter the following problem when you run vrpt.
1.
vrpt gives the error message ‘‘received SIGPIPE’’.
If the vrpt output was not being piped to another process, e.g. a pager, which
exited before reading all the output, then this may be due to awk becoming
overwhelmed and dumping core. Try using the -t option to truncate test failure
information to a manageable number of lines. If awk still dumps core, replacing
awk with nawk or gawk may cure the problem.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 89
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
11. INTERPRETING VSX RESULTS
11.1 INTRODUCTION
To interpret the results of the VSX tests, you must review each test and the test results
from your system. To review the test results, you must generate a report from the VSX
journal file, as explained in the chapter entitled ‘‘REPORTING’’. Test descriptions and
strategy are include in reports generated with vrpt for failed tests. Test descriptions
are also provided as a VSX manual page, to be found under the MAN/tset directory,
which you can print out using the utility [nt]roff -man.
11.2 TEST RESULTS
11.2.1 Failed
The test source code for failed operating system tests is located in the appropriate testset
directory, in the directory hierarchy starting from tset. To analyse the results of
these tests fully, you must be able to examine the test source code to understand the test
strategy and identify the conditions which led to the test failure. This level of expertise
requires the skills of an operating system specialist; non-specialist staff should not
attempt to interpret these results.
11.2.2 Uninitiated or Unresolved
Uninitiated means that the particular test in question did not start to execute.
Unresolved means that the test started but did not reach the point where the test was
able to report success or failure.
When a test is reported as uninitiated or unresolved you must identify the
reason why the test was not completed. These may be because of incorrect parameters,
preceding failures or external events, which are described in the following paragraphs.
Incorrect Parameters
Most tests reported this way cannot be run because a parameter is not set correctly in
the execution parameters file tetexec.cfg. The test report always identifies the
tests which cannot run because of incorrect parameters. For some tests, you can correct
the parameter and re-run the tests. For others, you may not be able to correct the
parameter because the resources required are not available on your system.
Incorrect Entries in userintf.c (Implementation Specific Routines)
Tests may be reported as unresolved or uninitiated because of incorrect
entries in SRC/userintf.c. If failures of user-supplied functions are reported, you
will need to check this file. See ‘‘User-supplied Interface Routines’’ in the chapter
entitled ‘‘CONFIGURING VSX’’ for more details.
Preceding Failures
When earlier tests have failed, some tests cannot be performed. Before you can re-run
the tests, you must resolve the problem in the preceding failed tests.
External Events
When an external event occurs unexpectedly, tests may not be performed. Investigate
the reason the test has not been run as for a failed test.
11.2.3 Unreported
When a test is marked as unreported a major error has occurred during the testset
execution. VSX tries to avoid such errors as far as possible. However, if you terminate a
testset with the signal SIGTERM, tests will be unreported. Investigate the cause
of the major error as for a failed test.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 90
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
11.2.4 Warning
Whenever a warning is given, the functionality is acceptable, but you should be aware
that later revisions of the relevant standards or specifications may change the
requirements in this area. See the appendix entitled ‘‘TESTS GIVING WARNINGS’’
for a list of the tests which may give warnings and the reasons for them.
11.2.5 FIP (Further Information Provided)
When a test has succeeded, additional information may sometimes be given which
needs to be inspected. Where information cannot be checked automatically by a test it
is given for you to validate. For example, the system name and node name are given by
the VSX4 uname testset.
11.2.6 Unsupported
Unsupported means that an optional feature is not available or supported in the
implementation under test.
For example, in some modes the job control features are optional. VSX will recognise
that they are unsupported on a particular system and report this.
11.2.7 Not In Use
Where no macro version of an interface exists, or separate macro and function testing is
not required, the macro version of the testset will report all tests as not in use. Also,
some tests within a testset may not be required in a particular test mode. For example,
tests for POSIX.1-1996 functionality when running in POSIX90 mode. These are not
failures and require no further work.
11.2.8 Untested
This occurs because there is no test written to check a particular feature, or an optional
facility needed to perform a test is not available on the system.
For example, it is not possible to check that session IDs are inherited across a fork()
when job control is not available.
These are generally listed on the manual pages under ‘‘Untestable Aspects’’.
11.2.9 Succeeded
This means the test has been executed correctly and to completion without any kind of
problem.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 91
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 92
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
X/Open System Verification Suite
Part 3: Appendices
VSXgen1.4 May 1999
VSX-PCTS 4.4.4 November 1999
The Open Group
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
The Open Group
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
A. ACTION POINT SUMMARY
A.1 PREPARATION
A.1.1 PREPARING YOUR SYSTEM
File Space Requirements
1.
Check there is enough free space available to unpack and install the software.
VSX User Accounts
1.
Create a distinct group entry for vsxg0 and (if required by one of the test
packages) distinct group entries for vsxg1 and vsxg2; usually in the file
/etc/group.
2.
If you do not already have TETware installed, create a directory you wish to
designate as your TET_ROOT directory.
3.
Create a distinct user entry for vsx0 in group vsxg0, with home directory
located under your TET_ROOT, and with a login shell; usually in the file
/etc/passwd.
4.
Make sure that the user vsx0 has write permission in the TET_ROOT
directory.
5.
Add $HOME/BIN and $HOME/../bin to the command search path for user
vsx0, and include it in the PATH environment variable set in the login script for
user vsx0.
6.
Ensure that any extensions enabled by environment variables that would cause
non-compliant behaviour are disabled in the login script for user vsx0.
7.
For some test packages, if the implementation supports supplementary groups,
the user vsx0 should have the maximum number of supplementary groups
associated with it. These supplementary groups must exclude the groups vsxg1
and vsxg2. The group ID values chosen must not exceed the value of
INT_MAX for the system.
8.
If required by one of the test packages, create a distinct user entry for vsx1 in
group vsxg1, in the password file. The home directory must differ from that of
user vsx0.
9.
If required by one of the test packages, create a distinct user entry for vsx2 in
group vsxg2, in the password file. The home directory must differ from that of
user vsx0.
A.1.2 LOADING THE VSX DISTRIBUTION
Unpacking the Distribution Files
1.
Log in to the test system as the user vsx0, who must be the owner of all the
loaded files.
2.
Ensure you are working in the vsx0 home directory and that you have write
permission in that directory.
3.
Unpack the distribution files for the VSX-vtools (namespace test tool), VSXgen
and the test packages you wish to use, using appropriate commands to
decompress each file and extract all files from the resulting POSIX cpio or
tar archive, e.g.:
The Open Group
Page 95
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
zcat ../vsx-vtools-1.4.tar.Z| pax -v -r -p p
zcat ../vsxgen-os-1.4.tar.Z| pax -v -r -p p
zcat ../vsx-pcts-4.4.4.tar.Z| pax -v -r -p p
or
zcat ../vsx-vtools-1.4.tar.Z| tar xvf zcat ../vsxgen-os-1.4.tar.Z| tar xvf zcat ../vsx-pcts-4.4.4.tar.Z| tar xvf Checking the Contents
1.
Change to the vsx0 home directory (using cd) and list the directory. Check
the expected subdirectories and the release identification files for each test
package are there.
If they are not, check that there were no read errors while the archives were being
read and that there is space available on the file system.
2.
Check that the release numbers given in the test-package specific Action Points
for this chapter correspond with the release identification files.
A.1.3 REMOVING UNWANTED VSX DATA (OPTIONAL)
1.
Remove any unwanted sections from the directories tset and MAN/tset.
A.1.4 VSX4 PREPARATION
VSX User Accounts
1.
The vsx0 home directory must be called vsx4.
2.
The user names vsx1 and vsx2, group names vsxg1 and vsxg2, and
supplementary groups are all required.
3.
If your system treats group ID values which do not exist in the group database as
invalid, then ensure that the six consecutive group ID values after vsxg0 also
exist in the group database.
Loading The VSX Distribution
1.
The name of the VSX4 release identification file is VSX4rel4.4.2.
A.2 CONFIGURING VSX
A.2.1 INSTALLATION DIRECTORY
1.
Choose a directory for the installation of testset executables. The default is
TESTROOT under the vsx0 home directory.
2.
If you are testing for conformance to FIPS 151 and one of the VSX test packages
you are using requires that the installation directory must support the inheritance
of parent directory group ID, and your system implements the inheritance of
parent directory group ID by means of a directory mode setting that is inherited
by subdirectories (for example by setting the S_ISGID bit on the directory),
and there is an existing directory hierarchy under the testroot which does not
support this feature, then you must remove it using
The Open Group
Page 96
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
rm -rf TESTROOT/tset
3.
Set the environment variable TET_EXECUTE in the vsx0 login script to the
pathname of the testroot directory.
A.2.2 VSX CONFIGURATION SCRIPT
Running the Configuration Script
1.
Read through the configuration script section and write down any information
you will need to use which is different from the defaults.
2.
Execute the shell script config.sh which is in the BIN directory. When you
have included this directory in your PATH, you can execute the command from
any location.
3.
Answer the questions which the configuration script asks.
A.2.3 CHECKING THE PARAMETER FILES
Configuration Parameters File
1.
Check the values in the configuration parameters file SRC/vsxparams and
edit the parameter−name lines if necessary.
Configuration Header File
1.
Check the SRC/vsxconfig.h file to ensure that the values are correct for
your system.
2.
Check that the values of all the varying defined constants have been changed
from −1 to the values for your system.
3.
Check that the values of the other defined constants are correct for your system.
4.
Check that all dummy statements have been changed to valid ones.
5.
If you re-run
config.sh at a later time,
SRC/vsxconfig.h, so make sure you copy it first.
it
will
overwrite
A.2.4 TOP LEVEL MAKEFILE
1.
Edit the Makefile in the vsx0 home directory.
2.
Configure the implementation-specific installation commands correctly for your
system.
3.
If you re-run config.sh at a later time, it will overwrite Makefile, so
make sure you copy it first.
A.2.5 USER-SUPPLIED INTERFACE ROUTINES
1.
Review the file SRC/userintf.c and identify if it needs to be modified.
2.
Modify the file to meet your system’s requirements.
3.
If you re-run config.sh at a later time, it will overwrite SRC/userintf.c
with the default version, so make sure you copy it first.
A.2.6 INSTALLING THE PSEUDO-LANGUAGES
Installing the Languages
1.
Check the package-specific action points for this chapter to see whether the
pseudo-languages are needed for the subsets and test mode you have selected. If
they are not needed, skip the following action points.
The Open Group
Page 97
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
2.
If your system does not use the ASCII character set, modify the file
SRC/INC/ctrlcodes.h so that it contains the correct control character
encodings for your system. If your system uses an EBCDIC character set, copy
the file SRC/INC/ctrlebcdic.h to SRC/INC/ctrlcodes.h first.
3.
Check
that
the
character
encodings
specified
in
the
file
SRC/INC/pslcodes.h are suitable for your system, and modify the file if
they are not. If your system uses an EBCDIC character set, copy the file
SRC/INC/pslebcdic.h to SRC/INC/pslcodes.h first.
4.
Install the VSX pseudo-languages using the appropriate tools for your system.
You may be able to make use of the files in SUPPORT/psldefs to do this.
A.2.7 WIDE CHARACTER CONFIGURATION FILE
1.
If the wide character locales are needed for the subsets and test mode you have
selected, update the file SRC/wchars.cfg with information about wide
characters and multibyte characters supported on your system. If your system
only supports single-byte characters, simply copy SRC/wc_nosup.cfg to
SRC/wchars.cfg.
2.
If you re-run
config.sh at a later time,
SRC/wchars.cfg, so make sure you copy it first.
3.
Install additional locales if necessary to reflect the information in the file.
4.
If you change SRC/wchars.cfg at a later stage there is no need to repeat the
installation stage or to rebuild any testsets. Simply change directory to
SRC/common/wchars and type make. This will update the binary file used
by the tests from the new information in wchars.cfg.
it
will
overwrite
A.2.8 CONFIGURING VSX4
Installation Directory
1.
The requirement for the installation directory to support the inheritance of parent
directory group ID applies to VSX4 if the base subset is selected.
Installing The Pseudo-languages
1.
The pseudo-languages are needed if the base subset has been selected.
Wide Character Configuration File
1.
The SRC/wchars.cfg file is not needed by VSX4 in POSIX and FIPS modes.
A.3 INSTALLING VSX
A.3.1 INTRODUCTION
1.
Obtain the necessary privileges for execution of the installation commands you
have configured in the top level Makefile and execute make in the vsx0
home directory. E.g.
su root -c make
2.
When make has completed, check the installation log in the results
directory to ensure that no errors have occurred. If make encountered any
errors, or there are errors in the log, you must correct them and re-run make.
The Open Group
Page 98
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
A.4 BUILDING VSX
1.
Log in as the user vsx0.
2.
Give the command
tcc -b -s scen.bld
with the other options you want to use. Use the command
../bin/tcc -b -s scen.bld
from the vsx0 home directory if $HOME/../bin is not in your PATH.
A.4.1 TERMINAL INTERFACE TESTING
Cable Wiring
1.
Check the package-specific action points for this chapter to see whether the
terminal loop-back is needed for the subsets and test mode you have selected. If
it is not needed, skip the following action points.
2.
If the system has at least two terminal ports, wire and connect two ports to
provide a loop-back.
3.
Make the two ports readable and writable by user vsx0.
4.
There must not be any processes attached to these ports. (For example, you may
have to change /etc/inittab or /etc/ttys to remove login processes at
this point.)
A.4.2 BUILDING VSX4
Terminal Interface Testing
1.
The terminal loop-back is needed if the base subset has been selected.
Data Interchange Format Testing
1.
Review the contents of the tar and cpio shell scripts in the directory
your−testroot−directory/BIN and, where required, modify the contents of the
scripts to call suitable utilities with the correct syntax and arguments for the test
system.
A.5 EXECUTING VSX
A.5.1 THE EXECUTION PARAMETERS FILE
Setting the Execution Parameters
1.
Check the execution parameters file tetexec.cfg before you start the VSX
execution stage and edit any values which are not correct for your system.
A.5.2 EXECUTING THE VSX TEST SUITE
1.
Log in as the user vsx0.
2.
Give the command
tcc -e -s scen.exec
with the other options you want to use. Use the command
The Open Group
Page 99
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
../bin/tcc -e -s scen.exec
from the home directory if $HOME/../bin is not in your PATH.
A.6 REPORTING
A.6.1 REPORTING PROGRAM OPTIONS
1.
Log in as the user vsx0.
2.
Check that the environment variable PATH is set correctly.
3.
Change to the directory results if required.
4.
Give the command vrpt with the options you want to use, on a journal file
generated from the results of running the tcc.
A.6.2 POSIX CONFORMANCE REPORTING
1.
Log in as the user vsx0.
2.
Check that the environment variable PATH is set correctly.
3.
Change to the directory results if required.
4.
Give the command prpt with the options you want to use, on journal files
generated from the results of running the tcc.
A.6.3 COMPARATIVE REPORTING
1.
Log in as the user vsx0.
2.
Check that the environment variable PATH is set correctly.
3.
Change to the directory results if required.
4.
Give the command vrptm with the options you want to use, on journal files
generated from the results of running the tcc.
The Open Group
Page 100
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
B. TESTS GIVING WARNINGS
B.1 WARNING CLASSIFICATIONS
The package-specific tables in the following sections show which tests can produce
warnings and the classification of the warning. Unless stated otherwise, the
classifictions given in each table are as follows.
Warnings in classification A are cases where many implementations differ from the
functionality described in the relevant specification. In each of these cases, the
functionality tested is not considered important enough to merit a failure, but in future
releases of the verification suite these tests may be re-classified as failures.
Warnings in classification B are cases where different implementations produce
different error numbers from those expected by the test. The specifications are not
explicit about the precedence of errors and, therefore, these tests are only classified as
warnings.
Warnings in classification C are cases where many implementations differ from the
functionality described in the relevant specification but agree with a known future
direction in which the specification is likely to alter.
Warnings in classification D are cases where the relevant specification describes the
feature being tested as optional, and the implementation under test does not support it.
Warnings in classification E are cases where the behaviour expected by the test is not
actually required by the relevant specification, but most implementations behave that
way, and some applications may (incorrectly) rely on it. Such cases arise where a test
has been downgraded to a warning rather than being removed, as it can still provide
useful information to users.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 101
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
B.2 VSX4 TESTS GIVING WARNINGS
B.2.1 Header Tests and Interface Tests
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
c
c
c
c Test Numbers c Class c
Section
Area
Testset
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
c
c
c
c
c
c
ANSI.os c maths
fmod
1
A c
c
c
c
c
3
A c
c ANSI.os
c maths
c pow
c
c
c ANSI.os
c maths
c pow
c
4
c
C c
c ANSI.os
c streamio c fflush
c
c
5-11
E c
c
c
c
ANSI.os c streamio c fopen
28
E c
c
c
c
c
c
c
ANSI.os c streamio c fscanf
41
A c
c
c
c
41
A c
c ANSI.os
c streamio c scanf
c
c
c ANSI.os
c streamio c sscanf
c
41
c
A c
c ANSI.os
c streamio c ungetc
c
c
2
A c
c
c
POSIX.os c devclass c i_noncanon c
14,15
A c
c
c
c
c
c
c
POSIX.os c devclass c i_spchars c
1,3,5
C c
c
c
2
A c
c POSIX.os c devclass c tcsendbrea c
c
POSIX.os cc procenv cc isatty
2
D cc
cciiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
cc
cc
The Open Group
VSX-PCTS4.4.4
Page 102
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
C. PRIVILEGED PROGRAMS
The following pages list the programs in each test package that are assigned privileges other than
PRV_DEVICE when the corresponding testsets are built.
The Open Group
VSXgen 1.4
Page 103
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
C.1 LIST OF PRIVILEGED PROGRAMS IN VSX4
ANSI.os/streamio/fclose/fclose_t18
ANSI.os/streamio/fflush/fflush_t13
ANSI.os/streamio/fgets/fgets_su
ANSI.os/streamio/fopen/fopen_t23
ANSI.os/streamio/fopen/fopen_t30
ANSI.os/streamio/fputs/fputs_t11
ANSI.os/streamio/fread/fread_su
ANSI.os/streamio/freopen/freop_t25
ANSI.os/streamio/freopen/freop_t30
ANSI.os/streamio/fseek/fseek_t15
ANSI.os/streamio/fwrite/fwrite_t17
ANSI.os/streamio/getc/getc_su
ANSI.os/streamio/gets/gets_su
ANSI.os/streamio/printf/printf_t68
ANSI.os/streamio/putc/putc_t11
ANSI.os/streamio/puts/puts_t11
ANSI.os/streamio/remove/remove_su
ANSI.os/streamio/scanf/scanf_su
ANSI.os/streamio/vprintf/vprintf_t68
POSIX.os/dataform/cpio/cpio_su
POSIX.os/dataform/tar/tar_su
POSIX.os/dataform/tar/tar_uids
POSIX.os/devclass/tcgetpgrp/tcgetpg_su
POSIX.os/files/access/T.access
POSIX.os/files/chdir/chdir_t4
POSIX.os/files/chmod/T.chmod
POSIX.os/files/chown/T.chown
POSIX.os/files/creat/creat_su
POSIX.os/files/creat/creat_t30
POSIX.os/files/link/T.link
POSIX.os/files/mkdir/mkdir_su
POSIX.os/files/mkdir/mkdir_t19
POSIX.os/files/mkfifo/mkfifo_su
POSIX.os/files/mkfifo/mkfifo_t17
POSIX.os/files/open/open_t20_3
POSIX.os/files/open/open_t44
POSIX.os/files/open/open_t46
POSIX.os/files/opendir/opendir_t5
POSIX.os/files/pathconf/pathcf_t19
POSIX.os/files/rename/rename_su
POSIX.os/files/rename/rename_t17
POSIX.os/files/rmdir/rmdir_su
POSIX.os/files/rmdir/rmdir_t9
POSIX.os/files/unlink/T.unlink
POSIX.os/files/unlink/unlink_t9
POSIX.os/files/utime/T.utime
POSIX.os/ioprim/read/read_su
POSIX.os/ioprim/write/write_su
POSIX.os/procenv/getgid/T.getgid
POSIX.os/procenv/getgroups/T.getgroups
POSIX.os/procenv/getlogin/T.getlogin
POSIX.os/procenv/getuid/T.getuid
POSIX.os/procenv/setgid/setgid_t01
The Open Group
VSX-PCTS4.4.4
Page 104
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
POSIX.os/procenv/setgid/setgid_t03
POSIX.os/procenv/setuid/setuid_t01
POSIX.os/procenv/setuid/setuid_t03
POSIX.os/procprim/exec/exec_setid
POSIX.os/procprim/exec/exec_su
POSIX.os/procprim/exec/exec_tstop
POSIX.os/procprim/fork/fork_su
POSIX.os/procprim/fork/fork_t18
POSIX.os/procprim/fork/fork_t21
POSIX.os/procprim/kill/kill_su
POSIX.os/procprim/kill/kill_t12
The Open Group
VSX-PCTS4.4.4
Page 105
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
The Open Group
VSX-PCTS4.4.4
Page 106
X/Open System Verification Suite
VSX-PCTS User and Installation Guide
X/Open System Verification Suite
Part 4: Manual Pages
VSXgen1.4 May 1999
The Open Group
prpt(vprog)
VSX USER MANUAL
prpt(vprog)
NAME
prpt - POSIX summary report generator
USAGE
prpt [-H] [-Llen] [-Wwid] jnlfile ...
DESCRIPTION
Prpt produces a POSIX conformance report from one or more test journal files. If the test suite
was not installed and run in one of the POSIX modes, the extra test results in the journal file(s) are
ignored by prpt. Reports are produced on the standard output.
Each report is prefaced by several cover pages, one for each test journal file being processed,
listing information from the file as follows: file name, validation test name, test date, test agency
and system, test operator and all test parameters.
The cover pages are followed by tables of test results, sorted by POSIX chapter then interface
name. Each line contains the interface name, assertion number and result code (PASS, FAIL,
UNRESOLVED, UNSUPPORTED, UNTESTED or NOTINUSE).
PARAMETERS
Command Line
-H
Disable page headers and footers. Prpt will normally print page headers and footers
whose placement and size depend on the page size flags given below. They contain the
page number, report date and report type. The report date is determined from the host
system at the time of prpt invocation. Headers and footers include blank lines between
each header and footer and page text.
Prpt produces headers and footers by default if no -H flag is given.
-Llen
Page length is len lines - used to place headers and footers properly on the output pages.
Defaults to 66 lines if no -L flag given.
-Wwid
Page width is wid columns - used to generate headers and footers and to wrap long lines.
Defaults to 80 columns if no -W flag given.
Environment
VSXBIN
specifies the directory where prpt executables and scripts reside. If VSXBIN is not set
this directory is assumed to be $HOME/BIN.
RETURNS
0
Report terminated successfully
1
Unknown option argument or command line usage error
2
Unreadable file or other unrecoverable error during report generation
VSXgen release 1.4
UniSoft Ltd.
Page 108
prpt(vprog)
VSX USER MANUAL
prpt(vprog)
DIAGNOSTICS
"cannot read input file <filename>"
An input file given on the command line could not be opened.
EXAMPLES
prpt journal01
Generate a report from journal file "journal01, using the default page size with page
headers and footers, and put the report onto the standard output.
prpt -H -W132 journal*
Generate a report from all journal files in the current directory, using the default page
length, a page width of 132 columns, and with no page headers or footers.
SEE ALSO
vrpt(vprog)
vrptm(vprog)
AUTHORS
Geoff Clare, UniSoft Ltd.
Stuart Boutell, UniSoft Ltd.
J. A. Nave, UniSoft Ltd.
RELEASE
VSXgen 1.4
VSXgen release 1.4
UniSoft Ltd.
Page 109
tcc(1)
USER COMMANDS
tcc(1)
NAME
tcc − TETware test case controller
SYNOPSIS
tcc −{bec} [options] [test-suite [scenario]]
tcc −{bec} −m codelist [options] old-journal-file [test-suite [scenario]]
tcc −{bec} −r codelist [options] old-journal-file [test-suite [scenario]]
DESCRIPTION
tcc is the TETware test case controller. It provides support for the building, execution and cleanup of test scenarios.
When TETware-Lite is built, scenarios may only contain test cases which are to be executed on the
local system and tcc performs all the actions required to process such test cases itself. When
Distributed TETware is built, scenarios can contain local, remote and distributed test cases. The
distributed version of tcc does not perform the actions required to process test cases itself but
instead sends requests to the test case controller daemon tccd which runs on the local system and
also on each participating remote system (see the tccd(1) manual page for details).
Apart from the scenario directives which relate to the processing of remote and distributed test
cases, the user interface to tcc is the same irrespective of whether TETware-Lite or Distributed
TETware is being used.
tcc has three modes of operation, namely build, execute and clean, which may be invoked singly
or in any combination. These modes are specified by the −b, −e and −c command-line options, at
least one of which must appear. All of the other options modify the behaviour of tcc in one or
more of these operational modes. Each mode (with optionally modified behaviour) is applied to
the test cases and invocable components selected for processing.
By default, tcc builds, executes or cleans test cases in the named scenario contained in the scenario
file tet_scen, which is located in the test suite root directory for test-suite (see DIRECTORIES
below). If no scenario is specified, the default scenario named all is used. If no test-suite is
specified, tcc attempts to deduce a default test suite name using the following rules:
1. If the TET_SUITE_ROOT environment variable is set and the current directory lies
under the directory hierarchy specified by this variable, then the test suite is the
component of the current directory’s path name which lies immediately below
$TET_SUITE_ROOT. For example, if $TET_SUITE_ROOT is /usr/tet3 and the
current directory is /usr/tet3/suite1/results, then the name of the default test suite is
suite1.
2. If the TET_SUITE_ROOT environment variable is not set and the current directory
lies under the directory hierarchy specified by the TET_ROOT environment variable,
then the test suite is the component of the current directory’s path name which lies
immediately below $TET_ROOT.
3. If the current directory lies outside of the directory hierarchy specified by the
TET_SUITE_ROOT environment variable (if set) or the TET_ROOT environment
variable (if TET_SUITE_ROOT is not set), then no default test suite name can be
deduced.
The Open Group
Page 110
tcc(1)
USER COMMANDS
tcc(1)
DIRECTORIES
By default, tcc interprets test case names relative to the test suite root directory. The location of
this directory is determined as follows on the local system:
1. If the TET_SUITE_ROOT environment variable is set, the test suite root directory is
determined by the test suite name, relative to $TET_SUITE_ROOT.
2. If the TET_SUITE_ROOT environment variable is not set, the test suite root
directory is determined by the test suite name, relative to $TET_ROOT.
3. If the TET_RUN environment variable is set, then the directory subtree below the test
suite root (determined as described above) is copied to the location below $TET_RUN
and this location becomes the new test suite root directory.
However, an alternate execution directory on the master system may be specified by the
TET_EXECUTE environment variable or by a command-line option (see OPTIONS below). If an
alternate execution directory is specified, tcc interprets test case names relative to this directory
when operating in execute mode.
By default, tcc creates a directory called tet_tmp_dir below the test suite root directory.
However, a different temporary directory name on the local system may be specified by the
TET_TMP_DIR environment variable. Each invocation of tcc creates a unique subdirectory
below the temporary directory on startup and removes it and its contents on normal completion.
CONFIGURATION FILES
During execution, tcc reads configuration variables from certain configuration files on both the
local and the remote systems (if any). By default, the name of the build mode configuration file is
tetbuild.cfg, that of the execute mode configuration file is tetexec.cfg and that of the clean mode
configuration file is tetclean.cfg. The build and clean mode configuration files reside in the test
suite root directory on each system. The execute mode configuration file resides in the alternate
execution directory if one has been specified, otherwise in the test suite root directory.
The Distributed version of tcc reads distributed configuration variables are read from the file
named tetdist.cfg in the test suite root directory on the local system. This file must at least contain
definitions for the tet root and test suite root directories for any remote systems that are specified
in the scenario being processed.
JOURNAL FILE
By default, tcc creates a sequentially numbered directory below the results directory in the test
suite root directory for the named test-suite on the local system, and places the journal file and
saved intermediate result files there. On startup, tcc writes the name of the journal file being used
to the standard output.
RESULT CODES
tcc uses a table of result codes to interpret the results generated by API-conforming test cases. A
default table containing standard codes is built in to tcc. It is possible to specify additional codes
in user-supplied result codes files located below the tet root and test suite root directories on the
local system. These files are optional but, if they exist, the codes specified in them are added to the
table of standard codes. The default name for each of these files is tet_code but this name can be
changed by means of the TET_RESCODES_FILE configuration variable.
The Open Group
Page 111
tcc(1)
USER COMMANDS
tcc(1)
OPTIONS
The following options alter the default behaviour described above:
−I
Enable interactive journal trace. Journal lines which indicate the start and end of
processing of each test case in each of the chosen modes of operation are written to the
standard error as well as being written to the journal file.
−a directory
Use directory as the alternate execution directory instead of the one specified by the
TET_EXECUTE environment variable (if any).
−f file Use file as the clean mode configuration file instead of the default.
−g file
Use file as the build mode configuration file instead of the default.
−i directory
Place the default journal file and saved intermediate results files in directory instead of in
the default location.
−j file Use file as the journal file instead of the default.
−l scenario-line
Process scenario-line as if it appeared in a scenario file below a scenario named all. More
than one −l option may be specified; the scenario-lines are processed in the order in
which they appear on the command line. scenario-line must be presented as a single
argument so it must be quoted if it contains embedded spaces. If a scenario file is
specified by a −s option, any scenario-lines are processed before that scenario file is read.
If no −s option is specified, the default scenario file tet_scen is not read when −l is used.
−n string
Do not process test case names that contain string. More than one −n option may appear.
−p
Enable progress reporting. As each build, execute or clean operation is started, a line
indicating the time, mode and scenario line being processed is printed on the standard
output.
−s file
Use file as the scenario file instead of the default.
−t timeout
Terminate the build, execute or clean of an individual test case if processing would
continue for more than timeout seconds.
−v variable=value
The specified configuration variable is set to value, overriding any assignment in the
configuration file for the current mode. It is probably best to surround value with single
quotes if it contains characters which have special meaning to the Shell. More than one
−v option may appear.
−x file
Use file as the execute mode configuration file instead of the default.
The Open Group
Page 112
tcc(1)
USER COMMANDS
tcc(1)
−y string
Only process test case names that contain string. More than one −y option may appear.
The −n option has higher precedence than the −y option; thus, a test case is not processed
if its name is matched by strings specified with both the −n and the −y options.
RERUN AND RESUME OPTIONS
The following options are mutually exclusive:
−m code-list
Causes tcc to resume the previous run of the specified scenario in the named test-suite
whose results are in old-journal-file. code-list specifies the point in the previous run from
which processing is to be resumed and may consist of a comma-separated list of result
codes, or of one or more of the letters b, e and c to specify failures in particular
processing modes. If code-list consists of result codes, then processing resumes at the
first invocable component whose result in the previous run matched one of those in the
list. If code-list specifies processing modes, then processing resumes at the first test case
which failed to build or clean or the first invocable component which, when executed, did
not report PASS in the previous run.
For example:
tcc −b −m b
Resume building from the first test case that failed to build.
tcc −e −m FAIL,UNRESOLVED
Resume execution from the first invocable component that reported FAIL or
UNRESOLVED.
tcc −bec −m b,e
Resume building, execution and cleaning from the first test case which failed to build or
from the first invocable component that did not report PASS.
−r code-list
Causes tcc to re-run individual test cases and invocable components from the specified
scenario in the named test-suite whose results are in old-journal-file. code-list specifies
the elements that are to be re-run and may consist of a comma-separated list of result
codes, or of one or more of the letters b, e and c to specify failures in particular
processing modes. If code-list consists of result codes, then test cases and invocable
components are re-run if the corresponding result in the previous run matched one of the
result codes in the list. If code-list specifies processing modes, then a test case is re-run if
it failed to build or clean and an invocable component is re-run if it did not report PASS
when it was executed in the previous run.
For example:
tcc −b −r b
Re-build test cases that previously failed to build.
The Open Group
Page 113
tcc(1)
USER COMMANDS
tcc(1)
tcc −e −r FAIL,UNRESOLVED
Re-execute all invocable components that previously reported FAIL or UNRESOLVED.
tcc −bec −r b,e
Re-build, execute and clean all test cases that previously failed to build or execute, and all
invocable components that did not previously report PASS when executed.
FILES
test-suite-root/tet_scen
Default scenario file. In Distributed TETware, only required on the local system.
test-suite-root/tetbuild.cfg
Default build mode configuration file.
alt-exec-dir/tetexec.cfg
Optional default execute mode configuration file when an alternate execution directory
has been specified.
test-suite-root/tetexec.cfg
Default execute mode configuration file when alt-exec-dir/tetexec.cfg does not exist or an
alternate execution directory has not been specified.
test-suite-root/tetclean.cfg
Default clean mode configuration file.
test-suite-root/tetdist.cfg
The distributed configuration file. Not used by TETware-Lite. In Distributed TETware,
only required on the local system.
$TET_ROOT/tet_code
test-suite-root/tet_code
Default result code files. In Distributed TETware, only accessed on the local system.
test-suite-root/tet_tmp_dir
Default temporary directory hierarchy.
test-suite-root/results/nnnn{bec}
Default results and saved files directory.
results-dir/REMOTEnnn
In Distributed TETware on the local system, the saved files directory for system nnn.
results-dir/journal
Default journal file. In Distributed TETware, only created on the local system.
The Open Group
Page 114
vrpt(vprog)
VSX USER MANUAL
vrpt(vprog)
NAME
vrpt - validation test report generator
USAGE
vrpt [-llevel] [-rcoverage] [-ffile] [-v] [-H] [-P] [-p]
[-Llen] [-Wwid] [-tlines] [jnlfile...]
DESCRIPTION
Vrpt generates a report from journal files specified by the jnlfile argument. Reports are generated
on the standard output.
Reports can be generated at one of three levels - the section, area, and testset levels - and covering
a specified range of sections, areas or testsets within these levels.
At the section level, for each section specified by the coverage parameter, a section report is
produced listing section start and end times, and a section summary listing the number of areas and
testsets run and the number of test/make results in each category. Test result categories are:
Succeeded, Failed, Warning, FIP (Further Information Provided), Unresolved, Uninitiated,
Unsupported, Untested and Not In Use. Make result categories are: Succeeded, Failed and
Unsupported.
At the area level, for each area specified by the coverage parameter, an area report is produced
giving area start and end time, a table showing the number of results in each category (see list
above) for each testset run, a list of all unsuccessful tests under result category headings, and an
area summary listing the number of testsets run and the number of results in each category. A
section summary is produced after the area reports in each section.
At the testset level, for each testset specified by the coverage parameter, a report is produced
listing testset start and end time, detailed testset results, and a summary listing the number of
results in each category (see list above). The detailed results list each unsuccessful test/make with
its result category and any supplementary information produced by the test/make stage. In verbose
mode (-v flag given) all successful and "Not In Use" tests/makes are also listed. Area and section
summaries are produced after the testset reports in each area/section.
Each section, area, or testset level individual report starts with the section/area/testset identifier as
passed through from the test/make stage.
Each validation test report run is normally prefaced by cover pages giving a contents list, an
operational summary and a conformance summary. Details are described under the "-P" flag
description below.
Any input that vrpt does not understand will be ignored, with a warning being issued for the first of
a sequence of lines not understood. Processing will attempt to continue normally from the first
understandable line.
PARAMETERS
VSXgen release 1.4
UniSoft Ltd.
Page 115
vrpt(vprog)
VSX USER MANUAL
vrpt(vprog)
Command Line
-llevel
generate report at level. Level can be one of "sect", "area", or "tset", for section, area,
and testset levels respectively.
level defaults to tset if no -l parameter given.
-rcoverage
report only on the specified range of tcc output within the level specified above. Note that
the tables in the conformance summary cover page always give the complete results for
the journal files being processed - only the detailed reports are affected when a reduced
coverage is specified.
Coverage can be specified as follows:
1) as a list in the format "name1 name2 ... namen", where a report will be generated for each
section/area/testset (depending on report level) whose name appears in the list;
2) as a range, in the format "name1:name2", where reporting will start with the section/area/testset
(depending on report level) named name1 and will continue until the report for section/area/testset
name2 is completed; note that ordering of sections/areas/testsets within each journal file depends
on the scenario files, and may differ between runs; or,
3) a combination of the above, in the format "name1:name2 name3 name4 name5:name6", etc with the combination of the above meanings.
It is not an error if specified names do not actually appear in the journal files.
If range names are specified to a greater level than the level as given in the -l option, then the extra
levels are ignored. E.g. -l sect -r section1/area1 will be processed the same as -l sect -r section1.
Vrpt defaults to reporting on every section/area/testset in the journal files if no -r list is specified.
-ffile
take the coverage specifier list from file; this file should contain a list of
section/area/testset identifiers or names one per line.
The -f and the -r parameters can be used together - the two lists are merged, and the
resulting list used, ignoring repetitions.
-v
Verbose mode - list names of successful and "Not In Use" tests/makes in testset level
reports. Without the -v flag, detailed output at this level is produced only for unsuccessful
tests/makes.
-H
Disable page headers and footers. Vrpt will normally print page headers and footers
whose placement and size depend on the page size flags given below. They contain the
report level, system and agency names, test/make date, and page number.
Vrpt produces headers and footers by default if no -H flag is given.
-P
Do not print the cover pages normally produced with reports, or the parameter list at the
end of all reports. Test cover pages consist of a banner page; a contents page; an
operational summary listing test date, test agency and operator, report date, report level
and coverage, and the journal files reported on; and, a conformance summary showing
tables of the total number of tests in each result category for each section, over the whole
of the journal files being processed (not just the coverage specified with -r).
Report date is determined from the host system at the time of vrpt invocation. Report
level and coverage are as given on the vrpt command line. All other items are determined
from the journal files.
VSXgen release 1.4
UniSoft Ltd.
Page 116
vrpt(vprog)
VSX USER MANUAL
vrpt(vprog)
The -P parameter implies -p, so that progressive report output is generated.
Vrpt defaults to producing the cover pages and parameter list if the -P flag is not given.
-p
Disable "Page n of N" page numbering style. Vrpt will normally report the page numbers
in the style "Page 4 of 40". However, this means that no output is generated all the pages
have been prepared. -p allows the user to disable this feature, and thus allowing
progressive report output.
Vrpt will produce footers with the "Page n of N" page numbering, and generates a
progress message every 25 pages on stderr, if the -p flag is not given.
-Llen
Page length is len lines - used to place headers and footers properly on the output pages.
Defaults to 66 lines if no -L flag given.
-Wwid
Page width is wid columns - used to generate headers and footers and to wrap long lines
in the journal file. Defaults to 80 columns if no -W flag given.
-tlines
Truncate test failure information after the specified number of lines. Some tests can
produce hundreds of lines of failure information. This option may be used to reduce the
size of a full report, with the complete test information for tests of interest subsequently
being obtained by using the -r option. The default is no truncation.
Environment
VSXBIN
specifies the directory where vrpt executables and scripts reside. If VSXBIN is not set
this directory is assumed to be $HOME/BIN.
RETURNS
0
Report terminated successfully
1
Unknown option argument
2
Unrecoverable error during report generation
DIAGNOSTICS
"warning: input does not start with control sequence"
- input file was probably not a correctly formed test/make journal file (i.e. file did not start
with the special "start report" sequence); this is not fatal, but may produce some strange
output.
"warning - line XXX: line ignored"
vrpt ignores lines it does not expect to see at that point, or that appear to be malformed.
Not fatal, and only produced for the first such error in each sequence of malformed lines
in the input file.
VSXgen release 1.4
UniSoft Ltd.
Page 117
vrpt(vprog)
VSX USER MANUAL
vrpt(vprog)
EXAMPLES
vrpt foo
Generate a validation report from the journal file named foo, using default levels and
coverage (testset/all), producing page headers and footers and a parameter list, and put the
report onto standard output.
vrpt -H -P -larea -r’area1 area3:area7’ journal[12]
Generate a validation report from the vtest journal files "journal1" and "journal2", at the
area level, for the area "area1" and every area from "area3" to area7" inclusive; don’t
produce any page headers or footers or cover pages.
SEE ALSO
prpt(vprog)
vrptm(vprog)
AUTHORS
Hamish Reid, UniSoft Ltd.
Stuart Boutell, UniSoft Ltd.
J. A. Nave, UniSoft Ltd.
RELEASE
VSXgen 1.4
VSXgen release 1.4
UniSoft Ltd.
Page 118
vrptm(vprog)
VSX USER MANUAL
vrptm(vprog)
NAME
vrptm - multiple test run comparison report generator
USAGE
vrptm [-H] [-Llen] [-Wwid] file1 file2 ...
DESCRIPTION
Vrptm produces a report comparing the results of two or more VSX validation test runs. It takes
as input the test journal files from the runs to be compared. The file names given on the command
line are used in the report to identify the results from the corresponding runs. Reports are
produced on the standard output.
Each report is prefaced by several cover pages, one for each test journal file being processed,
listing information from the file as follows: file name, validation test name, test date, test agency
and system, test operator and all test parameters.
The cover pages are followed by tables of test results, one table per testset, showing the results for
each test across all the input files. The tables contain one word entries giving the test result
category (Succeeded, Failed, Warning, FIP (Further Information Provided), Unresolved,
Uninitiated, Unsupported, Untested or Not In Use). A ’-’ character in the table indicates that no
result was found for that test in the corresponding file. Any additional test information in the
journal file is not reproduced.
PARAMETERS
Command Line
-H
Disable page headers and footers. Vrptm will normally print page headers and footers
whose placement and size depend on the page size flags given below. They contain the
page number, report date and report type. The report date is determined from the host
system at the time of vrptm invocation. Headers and footers include blank lines between
each header and footer and page text.
Vrptm produces headers and footers by default if no -H flag is given.
-Llen
Page length is len lines - used to place headers and footers properly on the output pages.
Defaults to 66 lines if no -L flag given.
-Wwid
Page width is wid columns - used to generate headers and footers and to wrap long lines
in the journal file. Defaults to 80 columns if no -W flag given.
Environment
VSXBIN
specifies the directory where vrptm executables and scripts reside. If VSXBIN is not set
this directory is assumed to be $HOME/BIN.
VSXgen release 1.4
UniSoft Ltd.
Page 119
vrptm(vprog)
VSX USER MANUAL
vrptm(vprog)
RETURNS
0
Report terminated successfully
1
Unknown option argument or command line usage error
2
Unreadable file or other unrecoverable error during report generation
DIAGNOSTICS
"cannot read input file <filename>"
An input file given on the command line could not be opened.
"insufficient page width for number of files - using <wid>"
The page width specified with the -W option was less than the minimum required for the
number of input files being processed. The program will produce the report using <wid>
instead of the requested width.
EXAMPLES
vrptm journal1 journal[45]
Generate a report comparing test results from journal files journal1, journal4 and journal5,
using the default page size with page headers and footers, and put the report onto the
standard output.
vrptm -H -W132 jo*
Generate a report comparing test results from all "journal" files in the current directory,
using the default page length, a page width of 132 columns, and with no page headers or
footers.
SEE ALSO
vrpt(vprog)
prpt(vprog)
AUTHORS
Geoff Clare, UniSoft Ltd.
Stuart Boutell, UniSoft Ltd.
RELEASE
VSXgen 1.4
VSXgen release 1.4
UniSoft Ltd.
Page 120
CONTENTS
1. FOREWORD . . . . . . . . .
1.1 VSX DOCUMENTATION . . .
1.1.1 Part 1: VSX User Guide . .
1.1.2 Part 2: VSX Installation Guide
1.1.3 Part 3: VSX Appendices . .
1.1.4 Part 4: Manual Pages . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
1
1
1
2
2
2
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
7
3. VSX DIRECTORY STRUCTURE
. . . .
3.1 TOP LEVEL DIRECTORY STRUCTURE
3.1.1 Introduction . . . . . . .
3.1.2 Binaries: BIN
. . . . . .
3.1.3 Manual: MAN . . . . . . .
3.1.4 Results: results . . . . .
3.1.5 Source: SRC . . . . . . .
3.1.6 Support: SUPPORT . . . . .
3.1.7 Testroot: TESTROOT . . . .
3.1.8 Testset: tset
. . . . . .
3.2 SOURCE DIRECTORY STRUCTURE .
3.2.1 Common: common . . . . .
3.2.2 Install: install
. . . . .
3.2.3 Subsets: subsets . . . . .
3.2.4 Library: LIB . . . . . . .
3.2.5 Include: INC . . . . . . .
3.2.6 System Include: SYSINC . . .
3.3 MANUAL DIRECTORY STRUCTURE .
3.3.1 Common: common . . . . .
3.3.2 Testset: tset
. . . . . .
3.4 TESTROOT DIRECTORY STRUCTURE
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
4. RESOURCES . . . . . .
4.1 INTRODUCTION . . .
4.2 COMPUTER HARDWARE
4.2.1 Disk Space . . .
4.2.2 Exclusive Use . .
4.2.3 Devices . . . .
4.3 UTILITIES . . . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
2. VSX TERMINOLOGY . . . . . . .
2.1 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . .
2.2 STAGES OF VSX . . . . . . .
2.2.1 Stage 1: Preparation . . . .
2.2.2 Stage 2: Configuration . . .
2.2.3 Stage 3: Installation . . . .
2.2.4 Stage 4: Building . . . . .
2.2.5 Stage 5: Execution
. . . .
2.2.6 Stage 6: Reporting
. . . .
2.2.7 Stage 7: Interpreting VSX Results
2.3 STRUCTURE . . . . . . . .
2.3.1 Section . . . . . . . .
2.3.2 Area
. . . . . . . .
2.3.3 Testset . . . . . . . .
2.3.4 Test . . . . . . . . .
2.4 NAMING CONVENTIONS . . . .
2.5 JOURNAL FILE . . . . . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
-i-
4.3.1 Bourne Shell . .
4.3.2 make . . . .
4.3.3 Compiler . . .
4.3.4 Library Archiver .
4.3.5 awk . . . . .
4.3.6 Editors . . . .
4.3.7 File Utilities . .
4.3.8 Null Device
. .
4.4 TIME
. . . . . .
4.5 SKILLS . . . . . .
4.5.1 Using VSX
. .
4.5.2 Interpreting Results
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
11
11
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
13
5. PREPARATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2 PREPARING YOUR SYSTEM . . . . . . . .
5.2.1 File Space Requirements
. . . . . . .
5.2.2 VSX User Accounts . . . . . . . . .
5.3 LOADING THE VSX DISTRIBUTION . . . . .
5.3.1 Unpacking the Distribution Files . . . . .
5.3.2 Checking the Contents . . . . . . . .
5.4 REMOVING UNWANTED VSX DATA (OPTIONAL)
5.5 VSX4 PREPARATION . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.1 File Space Requirements
. . . . . . .
5.5.2 VSX User Accounts . . . . . . . . .
5.5.3 Loading The VSX Distribution . . . . . .
5.5.4 Removing Unwanted VSX Data (Optional) . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
17
17
17
17
17
19
19
19
20
21
21
21
21
21
6. CONFIGURING VSX . . . . . . . . .
6.1 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . .
6.2 INSTALLATION DIRECTORY
. . . .
6.3 PARAMETERS
. . . . . . . . .
6.3.1 Introduction . . . . . . . .
6.3.2 Libraries . . . . . . . . .
6.4 VSX CONFIGURATION SCRIPT . . . .
6.4.1 Introduction . . . . . . . .
6.4.2 General Information . . . . . .
6.4.3 Compiler Characteristics and Libraries
6.4.4 Subset-specific Information . . . .
6.4.5 Optional Information . . . . . .
6.4.6 Running the Configuration Script . .
6.5 CHECKING THE PARAMETER FILES . .
6.5.1 Configuration Parameters File . . .
6.5.2 Configuration Header File . . . .
6.5.3 IMPORTANT . . . . . . . .
6.6 CREATING PARAMETER FILES
. . .
6.7 TOP LEVEL MAKEFILE . . . . . .
6.7.1 Privilege Check . . . . . . .
6.7.2 Parent Directory Group ID . . . .
6.7.3 Execute Install Script as User vsx0 .
6.7.4 Assign Privileges to chmog Program
6.7.5 Set Up File System for ENOSPC Tests
6.7.6 Additional Subset-specific Targets . .
6.7.7 Non-configured Commands . . . .
6.8 USER-SUPPLIED INTERFACE ROUTINES
6.8.1 Introduction . . . . . . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
23
23
23
24
24
24
24
24
24
26
26
26
26
27
27
27
28
28
28
29
29
29
29
29
29
29
30
30
- ii -
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
6.8.2 setprv()
. . . . . . . . .
6.8.3 unsetprv()
. . . . . . . .
6.8.4 prv_assign() . . . . . . . .
6.8.5 mnt_rw()
. . . . . . . . .
6.8.6 mnt_ro()
. . . . . . . . .
6.8.7 unmnt() . . . . . . . . . .
6.8.8 openctl() . . . . . . . . .
6.8.9 openpty() . . . . . . . . .
6.8.10 ptygetattr() . . . . . . . .
6.8.11 newroot() . . . . . . . . .
6.8.12 setlimit()
. . . . . . . .
6.8.13 pathdepth() . . . . . . . .
6.8.14 Additional Subset-specific Routines . .
6.9 INSTALLING THE PSEUDO-LANGUAGES .
6.9.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . .
6.9.2 Configuring the Character Encodings . .
6.9.3 Installing the Languages . . . . . .
6.10 WIDE CHARACTER CONFIGURATION FILE
6.10.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . .
6.10.2 Example Wide Character Configuration File
6.11 CONFIGURING VSX4 . . . . . . . .
6.11.1 Installation Directory
. . . . . .
6.11.2 VSX Configuration Script . . . . .
6.11.3 User-supplied Interface Routines . . .
6.11.4 Installing The Pseudo-languages . . .
6.11.5 Wide Character Configuration File
. .
7. INSTALLING VSX . . . . . . . .
7.1 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . .
7.1.1 VSX Header Files
. . . .
7.1.2 Include Files . . . . . .
7.1.3 Directory Routines . . . .
7.1.4 Variable Argument Routines
.
7.1.5 Testroot Initialisation
. . .
7.1.6 Configuration Files . . . .
7.1.7 Scenario Files . . . . . .
7.1.8 Update Common Software Files
7.1.9 Subset-specific Install Scripts .
7.1.10 Build Common Software
. .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
8. BUILDING VSX . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.1 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . .
8.2 BUILDING ALL REQUIRED TESTSETS . .
8.2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . .
8.3 BUILDING SELECTED TESTSETS (OPTIONAL)
8.3.1 Sections and Areas . . . . . . .
8.3.2 Building Selected Parts of a Scenario . .
8.3.3 Building Individual Testsets
. . . .
8.3.4 Additional Options . . . . . . .
8.4 REMOVING BUILT TESTSETS . . . . .
8.5 REPORTING . . . . . . . . . . .
8.6 TERMINAL INTERFACE TESTING . . . .
8.6.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . .
8.6.2 Cable Wiring . . . . . . . . .
8.7 TROUBLESHOOTING . . . . . . . .
8.8 BUILDING VSX4 . . . . . . . . . .
- iii -
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
30
31
31
31
31
31
31
32
32
32
32
32
32
33
33
33
33
34
34
35
41
41
41
41
42
42
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
43
43
43
43
43
43
43
43
44
44
44
44
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
46
46
47
47
47
47
48
49
50
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
8.8.1 Sections and Areas . . . .
8.8.2 Terminal Interface Testing . .
8.8.3 Data Interchange Format Testing
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
9. EXECUTING VSX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.1 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2 THE EXECUTION PARAMETERS FILE
. . . . . . . .
9.2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.2.2 Setting the Execution Parameters . . . . . . . . .
9.3 EXECUTION PARAMETER NAMES
. . . . . . . . .
9.3.1 General Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.3.2 Compiler Characteristics
. . . . . . . . . . .
9.3.3 Operating System Characteristics Common To Multiple Subsets
9.3.4 Terminal Interface Parameters Common To Multiple Subsets .
9.4 EXECUTING THE VSX TEST SUITE
. . . . . . . . .
9.4.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.4.2 Executing All Required Tests . . . . . . . . . .
9.4.3 Executing Selected Parts of a Scenario (OPTIONAL) . . .
9.4.4 Executing Individual Testsets (OPTIONAL) . . . . . .
9.4.5 Executing Individual Tests (OPTIONAL)
. . . . . .
9.4.6 Additional Options (OPTIONAL) . . . . . . . . .
9.4.7 Path Tracing (OPTIONAL) . . . . . . . . . . .
9.4.8 Debugging Options (OPTIONAL) . . . . . . . . .
9.4.9 Debugging Output and the Path Tracing Code . . . . .
9.4.10 Executing Tests Directly (OPTIONAL) . . . . . . .
9.5 TROUBLESHOOTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.6 EXECUTING VSX4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.6.1 General Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9.6.2 Compiler Characteristics
. . . . . . . . . . .
9.6.3 Operating System Characteristics Common To Multiple Subsets
9.6.4 Terminal Interface Parameters Common To Multiple Subsets .
9.6.5 Operating System Characteristics for Base Subset Only
. .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
50
50
50
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
52
52
52
52
52
52
53
55
56
60
63
63
63
64
64
64
65
65
66
67
67
68
70
70
70
70
72
74
10. REPORTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10.1 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . .
10.2 THE REPORTING PROGRAMS . . . . . .
10.3 REPORTING PROGRAM USAGE SUMMARY
.
10.4 REPORTING PROGRAM OPTIONS . . . . .
10.4.1 Reporting on the Entire Journal
. . . .
10.4.2 Reporting on a Section or Area (OPTIONAL)
10.4.3 Reporting on Individual Testsets (OPTIONAL)
10.4.4 Summary Reports (OPTIONAL) . . . .
10.4.5 Varying the Text Format (OPTIONAL) . .
10.4.6 Additional Options (OPTIONAL) . . . .
10.5 POSIX CONFORMANCE REPORTING . . . .
10.6 COMPARATIVE REPORTING
. . . . . .
10.7 SAMPLE REPORT OUTPUT . . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
10.7.1 vrpt Sample Output
10.7.2 prpt Sample Output
. . . . . . .
10.8 TROUBLESHOOTING . . . . . . . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
80
80
80
80
81
81
82
82
88
89
11. INTERPRETING VSX RESULTS
.
11.1 INTRODUCTION . . . . .
11.2 TEST RESULTS . . . . .
11.2.1 Failed . . . . . .
11.2.2 Uninitiated or Unresolved
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
90
90
90
90
90
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
- iv -
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
11.2.3
11.2.4
11.2.5
11.2.6
11.2.7
11.2.8
11.2.9
Unreported . . . . . . . .
Warning
. . . . . . . .
FIP (Further Information Provided)
Unsupported . . . . . . .
Not In Use . . . . . . . .
Untested
. . . . . . . .
Succeeded . . . . . . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
90
91
91
91
91
91
91
A. ACTION POINT SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1 PREPARATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.1.1 PREPARING YOUR SYSTEM
. . . . . . .
A.1.2 LOADING THE VSX DISTRIBUTION . . . . .
A.1.3 REMOVING UNWANTED VSX DATA (OPTIONAL)
A.1.4 VSX4 PREPARATION . . . . . . . . . .
A.2 CONFIGURING VSX
. . . . . . . . . . . .
A.2.1 INSTALLATION DIRECTORY . . . . . . .
A.2.2 VSX CONFIGURATION SCRIPT
. . . . . .
A.2.3 CHECKING THE PARAMETER FILES
. . . .
A.2.4 TOP LEVEL MAKEFILE . . . . . . . . .
A.2.5 USER-SUPPLIED INTERFACE ROUTINES . . .
A.2.6 INSTALLING THE PSEUDO-LANGUAGES . . .
A.2.7 WIDE CHARACTER CONFIGURATION FILE . .
A.2.8 CONFIGURING VSX4 . . . . . . . . . .
A.3 INSTALLING VSX . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.3.1 INTRODUCTION
. . . . . . . . . . .
A.4 BUILDING VSX . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.4.1 TERMINAL INTERFACE TESTING
. . . . .
A.4.2 BUILDING VSX4
. . . . . . . . . . .
A.5 EXECUTING VSX . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.5.1 THE EXECUTION PARAMETERS FILE . . . .
A.5.2 EXECUTING THE VSX TEST SUITE . . . . .
A.6 REPORTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A.6.1 REPORTING PROGRAM OPTIONS . . . . . .
A.6.2 POSIX CONFORMANCE REPORTING
. . . .
A.6.3 COMPARATIVE REPORTING . . . . . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
95
95
95
95
96
96
96
96
97
97
97
97
97
98
98
98
98
99
99
99
99
99
99
100
100
100
100
B. TESTS GIVING WARNINGS . . . . .
B.1 WARNING CLASSIFICATIONS . .
B.2 VSX4 TESTS GIVING WARNINGS .
B.2.1 Header Tests and Interface Tests
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
101
101
102
102
C. PRIVILEGED PROGRAMS . . . . . . . .
C.1 LIST OF PRIVILEGED PROGRAMS IN VSX4 .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
103
104
-v-
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
- vi -
Download PDF