Proof of Prototype

Phase IV
ILC Dover
Michelle DeBonis
Kirk Harbaugh
Bryan Hennigan
Melynda Schreiber
PROOF OF PROTOTYPE
Table of Contents
I.
Project Scope: ....................................................................................................................................... 3
I.
Present State: .................................................................................................................................... 3
II.
Problem Definition: ........................................................................................................................... 3
II.
Performance Validation Requirements: ............................................................................................... 4
I.
Needs: ............................................................................................................................................... 4
II.
Wants: ............................................................................................................................................... 4
III.
Constraints: ................................................................................................................................... 4
IV.
Metrics: ......................................................................................................................................... 5
V.
Relationship mapping: ...................................................................................................................... 5
III.
Prototype Development: .................................................................................................................. 6
I.
Project Design Path ........................................................................................................................... 6
II.
Prototype .......................................................................................................................................... 7
III. Actuation ........................................................................................................................................... 8
IV. Height Control ................................................................................................................................... 9
V. Angle Control ..................................................................................................................................... 9
VI. Trowel Attachment .......................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.0
VII. Velocity Control............................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.1
VII. Template Holding ............................................................................ Error! Bookmark not defined.1
IV.
Prototype Testing ............................................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined.3
V.
Risk Mitigation ................................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.
VI.
Safety .......................................................................................................................................... 17
VII.
Budget ......................................................................................................................................... 18
Appendix A: Fabrication Package ........................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.
Appendix B: Users Manual .................................................................................................................. 20
Appendix C: Calibration Plan............................................................................................................... 23
Appendix D: Bill of Materials .............................................................................................................. 26
Appendix E: Time Log .......................................................................................................................... 27
2
Introduction to Performance Validation:
Phase IV represents a validation of the developed prototype as a viable solution for ILC Dover.
The problem definition and design requirements have been refined and updated. This reiterated design
structure provides the framework for the validation process, ensuring that the prototype remains
aligned with ILC’s needs and wants. Through a series of strategic tests and analysis of results, the
achievement of target metrics will be determined. A final road map has been created to guide ILC from
the conclusion of the Senior Design Process to project completion, including further testing, operation,
and safety manuals.
Project Scope:
Present State:
Space suit gloves are manufactured by ILC Dover for their customers at NASA. Silicone
pads for the space suit gloves are made individually by troweling technicians using pre-existing plastic
templates. First, a template is placed over a board. A room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone
rubber material is applied in front of each pad template. The RTV silicone is troweled over the template
area manually.
The inability to control pad thickness through the present process results in failure of
the Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment (TMG) layer of the glove. Quality control testing of each pad’s
thickness is required to guard against such failure. At a production rate of 96 pairs annually with 26
pads per pair, extra testing is very time consuming and expensive. Developing a more reproducible
troweling process will save time and money.
Problem Definition:
Design an automated, reproducible, controlled troweling process for the manufacture of silicone
padding components of the Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment (TMG) section of a space suit glove for
the project sponsor, ILC Dover.
Enhance process
• Improve quality and
reliability
• Reduce operator
dependance
• Improve
reproducibility
Develop a
working
prototype
• Prototype
• Operation manual
• Testing manual
3
Verify Prototype
• Demonstrate
success against
chosen target
metrics
• Present tangible
benefits
Performance Validation Requirements:
Through communication with ILC Dover, a comprehensive outline of the solution requirements and
limitations has been developed. These design requirements provide the benchmarks for success of the
solution. The following summary is intended to illustrate those problem specifics.
Needs: A ranked list of the necessary requirements for a successful prototype
Table 1: Customer Needs
Rank
Needs
Descriptions
1
Reproducible Results
Process needs to deliver consistent pad quality
through variable settings
2
Steady Actuation
3
Control Pad Thickness
Trowel stroke needs to have constant velocity
and free of disturbances and vibrations
Adjustable settings need to be able to deliver
different thicknesses
The process must be automated
4
Automated
5
Easy Cleaning of Trowel
6
Maintain Ridge Profile
Process must allow for simple cleaning of the
trowel after each run
The process must employ the same ridge profile
of the present trowel
Wants: A ranked list of desired attributes to achieve customer needs
Table 2: Customer Wants
Rank
Wants
Descriptions
1
Cut Production Time
Streamline the pad troweling process to increase efficiency
2
Use Preexisting Trowel
ILC wants the same trowel profile utilized
3
Accessible Trowel
ILC wants trowel to be easily reached for cleaning
4
Speed Control
ILC wants variable speed settings
5
Height Control
ILC wants variable height settings
6
Angle Control
ILC wants variable angle settings
7
Simplicity of Assembly
8
Simplicity of Operation
ILC wants the prototype to be as simple as possible, limiting
special processes
ILC wants operation of the prototype to be uncomplicated
Constraints: A list of project constraints that must be met
Table 3: Project Constraints
Constraints
Notes
Resistant to Toluene and MEK
Chemicals used for cleaning
Compatible with Templates
The existing templates must be
used
Prototype needs to be tabletop
sized
No computer controls
Prototype Size
Controls independent of computers
4
Metrics: A tabulated summary of performance metrics with current and target values
Table 4: Performance Metrics
Rank
Metric
Current State
Target
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Pad Thickness Range
Height Range
Speed Range
Cost
Angle Range
Number of custom parts required
Prototype Volume
Prototype Weight
0.06-0.14”
No Control
No Control
N/A
90 ° (fixed)
N/A
N/A
N/A
.027-.035”
0-.5”
0.25-12 in/s
$5,000
±45 °
≤ 15
≤ 3 ft3
≤ 40 lbs
Relationship mapping: A hierarchical mapping, illustrating the relationships between project goals,
customer needs/wants, project constraints and performance metrics.
Fig.1: Project Hierarchical Attribute Mapping
5
Prototype Development:
Using the solution requirements and performance metrics, the team was able to develop an
appropriate design path for the project (Fig. 2). That design path, feedback from ILC, along with referring
to the developed validation criteria led to a series of design iterations and eventually a final prototype.
This prototype captured all the necessary requirements. Further testing would validate the prototype
after meeting the target metrics.
Project Design Path
Figure 2 presents the possible options for each identified decision level, moving from the highest
overreaching level of general project path down to specific control subsystems. Each decision was
discussed and after weighing the pros and cons, with careful consideration of our sponsor-defined
project scope and deliverables, a decision was made and the next decision was approached.




At the time of the project, no “market-ready product was available and ILC decided to
abandon their existing prototype. Pursuing a new concept was ideal in order to maximize
the time available to fine-tune the prototype. A new concept would allow complete control
in accommodating ILC’s design requirements
Actuating the board rather than the trowel was decided in order to maximize simplicity and
ensure steady actuation. This method effectively holds the angle/height controls stationary
in order to increase reproducibility.
Pneumatic actuation was selected in the interest of simplicity, low price and minimal
weight.
For both height and angle control, a unique subsystem was pursued in order to maximize
simplicity and to ensure reproducibility and integration into the entire system
Fig. 2: Proposed Project Decision Path
6
Prototype
Moving along the derived project design path, the group was able to iterate to the final
prototype. Figure 3, below, presents the prototype with callouts to provide detail as well as
appropriate parts labeled with common vocabulary used for clarity.
Trowel
Shaft
Shaft
Collar
Toggle Clamps
Angle Control
Knob
Trowel Board
Figure 3: Prototype Detail
7
Cam Levers
Prototype Design Aspects
1) Actuation
• Pnuematic Bimba cylinder actuates the Trowel Board
• Linear guide rails at the edges of the Trowel Board provide support
• All components directly mounted to the Base Plate.
2) Height Control
• The Shaft Assembly bridges the two Support Towers
• The assembly is set to the proper height using Plastic Shims
underneath the Trowel
• 4 adjustable Cam Levers lock the assembly at the proper height.
3) Angle Control
• The Trowel is attached to the Shaft, which can freely rotate ±45°
• An Angle Indicator connected to the Shaft is held at the appropriate
angle by tightening the Angle Control Knob
4) Trowel Attachment
• The Trowel is connected to the Shaft Collars by a dowel pin which
allows it to rotate 180° freely
• The Trowel is locked in the down position for troweling by Spring
Loaded Pins
• For cleaning, the Trowel swivels upward to rest on a flat in the Shaft
5) Velocity Control
• The control method uses adjustable Needle Valves which control the
flowrates into and out of the cylinder
• Adjustable Cushions in the cylinder provide a safe effective
decelleration
6) Template Holding
• The Trowel Board uses Toggle Clamps to secure the template during
actuation.
1. Actuation
Below the actuation (Fig 5) aspect of the prototype and its
components (Fig 4) is detailed and tied back to performance validation.
Bimba Cylinder

Needle Valves



For Speed Control
Rated for 1.44 Million
Cycles
30-110 operating PSI
15-30 breakaway PSI
20-80 C operating
temperature
Guide Rails
To ensure steady
actuation &
reproducibility
Rubber Feet
For Leveling
Base Plate
Figure 4: Actuation Components
8
Figure 5: Actuation Method
The automatic actuation of the trowel board past the stationary trowel is generated by engaging
airflow into the Bimba cylinder, by activating a 2-way control lever in the appropriate direction. The
design favors simplicity of operation as desired. The guide rails ensure a smooth motion and stability
across the board as the trowel engages the RTV.
2. Height Control
The method and components of the height control are highlighted in Figure 6 below. As stated
before the shaft assembly is set at the appropriate height using plastic shims placed between the
bottom of the trowel and the top surface of the trowel board. The easy-to-use cam levers lock the
trowel at the appropriate height to ensure reproducibility and provide control of pad thickness.
Cam Levers
Height Setting
Cam Levers
Figure 6: Height Control
3. Angle Control
Figure 7 outlines the angle control mechanism. The shaft sits snuggly in precision-reamed plastic
adapters at either end, which allows for easy rotation. At the front end an angle indicator shows how
much the trowel is angled, and the control knob is tightened to hold the angle tight.
9
Angle Control
Knob
Angle Indicator
Figure 7: Angle Control
4. Trowel Attachment
In order to allow for easy cleaning of the trowel while retaining the rigidity required for controlling
the pad thickness and maintaining the ridge profile, the trowel was designed to be able to swivel
between a troweling position (down) and cleaning position (up). (Figure 8) The trowel assembly is locked
in place by L-shaped spring loaded pins which mate to holes in the shaft collars.
Clean Position
Shaft Collar Hole
Trowel Position
Spring-Loaded Pins
Figure 8: Trowel Attachment
10
5. Velocity Control
The velocity of the cylinder (and the trowel board) is controlled by adjusting how much air enters
and exits the cylinder on either side of the slide. This is controlled by opening or closing the needle
valves which could the air inlet and outlet hoses to the cylinder. By opening the valves and allowing
more air to flow in/out the speed will increase. A separate double-acting lever valve allows air to pass
between the needle valves and the in-house air supply. The concept is displayed in Figure 9 below.
DoubleActing Lever
Pressure
Regulator
Bimba Slide
Figure 9: Velocity Control
6. Template Holding
The template must be securing held so the troweled pads remain consistent. The design (Fig. 10)
uses four easy-to-operate toggle clamps to firmly hold the template it place while the machine
actuates. The design is easy to use and contributes to reproducibility and simplicity of operation.
Care must be taken when releasing the clamps post-troweling; the rubber ends can sometimes
stick to the template and pull it, thereby disrupting the troweled pads. Perhaps a lubricant can be
applied to limit this issue.
11
Toggle Clamp
Template Position
Figure 10: Template Holding
Those 6 detail areas demonstrate the key features of the prototype design in line with the validation
deliverables. The finished prototype is operational and testing is needed to verify its success, which will
be discussed in the next section. The only discrepancy between the delivered prototype and an ultimate
solution is complete performance validation and proper calibration to ideal settings. A guide for
completing those final tasks will be presented. The performance validation of the design is presented in
table 5 below.
Table 5: Prototype Values
12
A complete design package has been provided for ILC in Appendix A. This includes machinist
drawings for each of the 13 custom-machined parts as well as sub-assembly and assembly drawings.
There is also a fabrication plan, along with appropriate suggestions/lessons learned for a future
iteration.
A full operator’s manual has been included in Appendix B which details the procedures required
for effectively operating the machine.
Prototype Testing
The prototype developed in the first three phases of the senior design project process must be
tested and proven to achieve the predefined performance metric goals. Preliminary testing in Phase III
demonstrated that the cylinder could produce acceptably linear velocities while troweling RTV. This
testing plan will have four major goals:
Testing Goals
1. Calibrate the Machine
2. Prove Ability to Control Pad
Thickness
3. Prove Steady Actuation
4. Characterize the Machine
The bottom three testing goals validate our proof-of-concept prototype derived from the early
phases of the design process. The top goal represents the road-map to the completion of the final
project solution. Goal 4 has been completed, but ILC will have to re characterize on site and will
complete the rest of the validation goals.
1. Calibrate the Machine:
13
The final goal will be to calibrate the prototype to the exact settings which will
repeatedly produce the exact desired pad thickness and profile. The methods and strategic plan
for ILC to determine the optimal operating settings for the prototype is attached in Appendix C.
2. Prove Ability to Control Pad Thickness
To ensure that the prototype delivers an acceptable product, the cured samples will be
tested. First the relationship between the prototype height setting and the final pad thickness
will be examined. The pad will be measured from bottom to trough using a snap gauge. A
correlation between setting and thickness will be determined. The consistency of the samples
will be reported. The variation of thickness along the length of the sample will also be examined,
measuring at .25” intervals.
Future Strategy: Ensure the thickness accuracy of troweled samples
a. Report accuracy of +- 0.01” with 95% confidence
b. Report level thickness with a deviation of less than +-0.01” with 95% confidence
3. Prove Steady Actuation
Once the optimal pressure setting and actuation direction were completed in goal 4, the
angle will be locked at 90 degrees and the height will be set at 0.03” using plastic shims. Using
(the most irregular template OR the template with the most RTV), each velocity setting at the
determined pressure setting will be tested once to examine its linearity. Next the highest and
lowest settings will be tested 5 times each. The coefficient of linear regression for each will be
determined. Statistical analysis will be conducted to report the confidence interval for linearity.
Future Strategy: Adjust height and angle controls to standard settings and prove acceptable
velocity linearity (RTV)
a. Each setting will be tested once to ensure linear trend
b. Upper and lower limits will be tested at least 5 times
4. Characterizing the machine:
To determine the best settings all of the 4 possible settings at each of 6 pressure
settings between 30-80 PSI, at 10 PSI increments, were examined (No RTV). The velocity of the
full trowel-board assembly was measured by evaluating videos of the actuation using lab view.
Each trial analysis produced a text file which was processed by a custom Matlab code (uploaded
to sakai). The code produced a plot, velocity value, and correlation value. The results are
presented in Figure 10 below. If the standard deviation of the trials is more than 0.3 inches/
second, the pressure and setting will be counted as unreliable.
Strategy: Determine all viable velocity ranges for all operating settings (No RTV)
a. Prove repeatability
b. Report best direction of actuation for consistent velocity.
c. Report the best pressure setting which allows the optimal velocity range
14
The characterization revealed a potential velocity range of 7-24 inches (Fig 11) per second for
using Spencer lab air.
Figure 11: Velocity Range At Each Pressure Setting
*Note: Noticeably slower velocities were produced on location at ILC. Slower velocities are more beneficial to smoothly troweling RTV.
Table 5: Velocity Setting Reliability
Pressure
30 PSI
40 PSI
50 PSI
60 PSI
70 PSI
80 PSI
Setting 1
0.026485
0.85119
0.64796
0.45199
0.27968
0.30631
Setting 2
0.15342
0.29124
0.53464
1.09
2.3475
0.2434
Setting 3
0.23725
0.16338
0.18164
0.035
0.99671
1.0281
Table 5 above shows the reliability of all the settings. We defined reliability as less than 0.3
standard deviations and highlighted the acceptable settings in green and the unacceptable in red. The trend
shows that the lower the setting (slower speed) the more reliable the actuation. ILC’s air supply produced
noticeably slower speeds, and correspondingly more reliability. Slower speeds should be pursued first in
calibration.
15
Risk Mitigation
Failure modes
To effectively plan for prototype shortcomings, a summary of possible concern areas with
associated contingency plans has been developed.
A. The Height Control Subsystem is Insufficient or Inaccurate
Risk: The height control subsystem, comprised of locking cam levers moved along vertical slots,
could be determined to not meet the needs of the sponsor during phase 4 testing of the
prototype.
Plan: If this is the case, the issue would be discussed with the advisor and sponsor. Then the
system design would be reevaluated using the 80/20 structural beams. The 80/20 beams could
be used in conjunction with screws and washers (which slide along the shaft due to the beam
cross section) to adjust the height control.
B. The Trowel Cleaning Procedure does not work well
Risk: The trowel is rotated for cleaning. If the RTV silicone material is too hard to clean from this
position, more time to the cleaning process.
Plan: If this is the case, after discussion with the sponsor and our advisor, a new plan of action
would be developed. In this plan of action, the shaft would be re-machined to allow for the
trowel to be directly screwed onto a flat surface to allow for removal without interference.
C. The Trowel Attachment System Has Too Much Slop
Risk: The trowel attached by spring loaded pins could have too much slop vertically. After
height calibration, the plastic shims are removed from beneath the trowel. The trowel could
further displace downward if there is too much slop in the system.
Plan: If this is the case, after discussion with the sponsor and our advisor, a new plan of action
would be initiated. In this plan of action, the shaft would be re-machined to allow for the trowel
to be directly screwed onto a flat surface. This alternative design has already been modeled if
this risk becomes a problem. Additional lead time for machining and testing would be required.
D. The ends of the Bimba Actuator are Unstable
Risk: The current design does not support the actuator at the extreme ends. There could be an
issue with vibrations or support which would be identified during testing.
Plan: If this is the case, after discussion with the sponsor and our advisor, additional aluminum
supports at each end of the actuator would be added to the design. Testing and report
schedules would be adjusted to reflect additional lead times from machining and assembly.
16
Safety
The safety of the proposed concept was considered during the design process. While making
the machine, attention must be paid to legal regulations. The Occupational Safety & Health
Administration (OSHA) in the United States Department of Labor outlines standards for machines in
regulations for standard industry: section 1910 subpart O and P. These sections deal with machinery
and machine guarding, and hand and portable powered tools and other hand held equipment
respectively. The proposed concept does not legally require any sort of safety guard or machine stop.
Operator safety guidelines will be outlined in the final machine manual developed in phase 4 of the
project. Some areas to consider include keeping hands clear of moving parts in addition safe operation
with pressurized air.
Safety Officers from ILC inspected the prototype and determined that it met safety
requirements, so long as warning stickers were added along the pinch hazard between the trowel board
and towers. Also the control lever must not be mounted so that it takes two hands to operate.
Budget Report
The project was under budget. Appendix D shows a complete bill of materials with prices and
miscellaneous expenses accounting for the total expended budget. Appendix E shows the groups time
sheet.
Table 6: Budget Report
Actual vs. Budget
Actual
Budget
Variance
Expenses
Actuation
Height Control
Angle Control
Total
$1,144.62
-
-
$ 395.54
-
-
$23.75
-
-
$1,563.91
-
-
110
-
-
$1,100.00
-
-
$0.00
-
-
$2,663.91
$5,000.00
$2,436.09
Hours
Total (Hours)
Cost ($10/hour)
Actual Cost
Totals:
17
Appendix A: Design & Fabrication Package
Uploaded to the Executive Level of Sakai
18
Appendix B: RTV Troweling Device User Manual
As with any machine, it is imperative to take proper precautions for your own safety. Before
operation, allow some time to become familiar with the device.
Resting Position
Ending Position
Connecting/Disconnecting Air
1. The controller has two inputs on one side, and one
input on the other side. Insert a ¼” parflex tube by
holding down the green “o-ring” on the controller
and slipping the tubing in all of the controller
inputs. To take out the tubing, hold the “o-ring”
down in the direction of the controller and pull the
tubing out.
2. Take the two parflex tubes on one side of the controller
and insert the free ends into the slide. To insert the tube
into the slide hold, the black “o-ring” down and insert the
tube.
3. Take the last parflex tube and insert the free end into the
house pressure.
Height Control
1. To place the trowel in its proper
position, unlock the cam levers.
19
2. When these levers are unlocked, and the shaft with the trowel securely
attached, the shaft will be able to be moved vertically. Use shims to
accurately set the height to a particular position.
3. Place shims beneath to trowel to obtain an accurate height.
4. Lock all the cam levers (4) into place. When the cam levers are in place,
they should be in a vertical position.
Angle Control
1. To change the angle, use a digital level and lock the level using the knob (as
shown above). To assure that the trowel is vertical, the digital level should
read out 90 degrees. This does not ensure that the level is perpendicular to
the trowel board.
2. To ensure that the trowel is perpendicular, make sure the entire system is
level as well as the trowel board itself.
Actuation
1. Start with the machine in a resting position. In this position,
the toggle clamps should be adjusted where the rubber
mount is toward the trowel board. If the toggle clamps are
not in the proper position, lower the toggle clamps(4) by
pressing the larger lever down until the clamp is locked into
position. If the clamps are not in their proper position before the
actuation, the clamps could eventually break off due to wear and the
actuation would be stopped abruptly.
2. The entire trowel board should be positioned so that it is a couple of inches
from the trowel which is at the farthest position on the slide.
3. To operate the machine, move the controller out of the way so that the
trowel board will not hit the operator’s hand. Press the controller in the
appropriate direction.
20
4. If the template is raised up on the edge, use the controller to slowly move
the trowel board under the trowel.
Safety Concerns
 Avoid getting hands and other clothing caught in between the slide and the
trowel board.
 Avoid operating the trowel board with the controller in the way of the
board.
 Avoid operating the trowel board when the toggle clamps are not in their
resting position.
Care of the System
 Avoid operating the trowel board when the tubing rises above the board.
Running the slide will cause the trowel board to scrape against the tubing
which will eventually cause a leak in the tubing.
 To assure slide longevity, do not get RTV on the slide. Repeated use of
strong chemicals may damage the metallic band on the slide.
 Grease the guide rails every 2 to 3 years to keep them in the optimal
condition.
 Be careful not to get dirt and other grime on the guide rails. Any dirt or
grime can cause the rails to slow down and change the speed of the
cylinder.
 If there is significant noise coming from the guide rails, disassemble the
guide blocks and clean the system or send it back to the company for
cleaning.
21
22
Appendix C: Calibration Procedures
In order to calibrate the machine to the optimal settings a strategic series of trial and error
testing must be employed. The machine has been characterized (Testing Goal 4) at Spencer lab, but will
need to be characterized at ILC using the air supply system on site. Once characterized to ILC’s air, the
lowest range should be explored. Using the lowest speed, the trowel would be set to 0.03” off the
template and RTV would be troweled. The cured sample would be observed, and if too thick the trowel
would be used incrementally higher. If irregularities due to too slow a speed are observed the speed
would be increased. Higher speeds should be explored; at least briefly, to observe which end the
velocity spectrum produces a smooth profile in the silicon. Through multiple trials the optimal settings
would be honed in on and locked.
Height Control Procedure:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Calipers will be used to verify individual shim height.
Shims will be placed to set the height of the trowel.
The board and ground will be checked to see if they are level.
T-squares will be used to ensure that the trowel is perpendicular to the board.
A digital level will be used to ensure that the angle is zero degrees.
Check the height of both ends to the trowel and the shaft.
Lock all cam levers. Remove shims by releasing the spring loaded pins and
flipping up trowel.
8. Set up a camera and record the motion.
9. Plot a graph of height versus time to ensure that there is no unintentional
binding created in the manufacturing of the Delrin.
Angle Control Procedure:
1. The board and ground will be checked to see if they are level.
2. T-squares will be used to ensure that the trowel is perpendicular to the board.
3. The trowel will be checked to see if the angle displayed on the protractor is
actually zero.
4. Tighten the lobe knob. Apply force to the trowel and check if the angle has
changed.
5. Untighten the lobe knob to move the trowel to some other appropriate angle.
6. Tighten the lobe knob. Check if the trowel starts to have a change in angle.
Speed Control Procedure:
1. Set up the system so that all components are level.
2. Set up the tripod so that it is level and the camera is facing down directly over
the top of the plate.
3. Ensure that all Parflex tubing and pipe fittings have been appropriately sealed so
that there is no air leakage.
23
4. Turn on air to appropriate pressure. The pressure range must be between 3580 psi.
5. Set the first pressure with one washer inserted between the needle valve and
the nut. Turn the needle valve until it cannot be turned anymore.
6. Start the video on the camera.
7. Use the controller to actuate the board with the RTV and template.
8. Stop the video and download the video.
9. Repeat steps for 2, 3, 4, and 5 washers and other pressure settings.
Computer Procedure for Speed Control:
1. Open video file in NI Vision Assistance.
2. Set coordinate system and select points with known distances to calibrate the
system.
3. Select a region of interest to find edges.
4. Output an excel file. Plot position versus time on a graph to assure constant
velocity.
5. Check for zero slope which would indicate stiction.
Pad Thickness Consistency Procedure:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Repeat Procedure for speed control testing.
Remove the template from the board after troweling.
Remove the board and allow the pads to cure for 8 hours.
Measure the thickness of each trough of each pad with a micrometer.
Compare to target thicknesses of .027 to .035 inches.
Observe whether the RTV form is acceptable. Note for any bubbles, noticeable
discontinuities and uneven RTV profile.
24
Appendix D: Bill of Materials
Part
Shaft Collars
Release Cams
L-Spring Pins
Toggle Clamps
80-20 Framing
80-20 Framing
3-corner
connecter
Stock Delrin
Stainless Steel
Stock Aluminum
Bimba Flow
Control
Center Supports
Bimba Cylinder
Knob
Rail System
Number
Company
Price
Amount
9946K24
5720K12
3403A81
4961A66
47065T146
47065T209
47065T244
McMaster
McMaster
McMaster
McMaster
McMaster
McMaster
McMaster
$3.53
$11.51
$14.00
$24.56
$25.15
$8.35
$9.86
8739K94
8513T31
8741K39
88915K753
8975K411
8975K114
FQPS2K
McMaster
McMaster
McMaster
McMaster
McMaster
McMaster
Bimba
Bimba
Bimba
UBCS-18
UB-18221XCM
JCL-116
Shipping
4
4
2
4
1
1
8
Total
Price
$14.12
$46.04
$28.00
$98.24
$25.15
$8.35
$78.88
$31.95
$85.26
$6.50
$81.39
$16.81
$51.79
$15.05
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
$31.95
$170.52
$6.50
$81.39
$33.62
$51.79
$15.05
?
$20.60
$294.00
2
1
$41.20
$294.00
?
$
13.84
$
8.39
$
50.00
$
50.00
$
122.23
$1.24
1
$1.24
R165181420
Reid
Select
Rexroth
$99.53
2
$199.06
R160580431
Rexroth
$158.39
2
$316.78
$1,541.88
25
-
Appendix E: Time Log
Time Report
Name
Bryan
Date
11/15/2010
Time In
8:30
Time Out
12:00
Total Time
3.5
Task
Cut & Assembled 80-20
Bryan
11/15/2010
2:30
5:00
2.5
Cut Stock
Bryan
11/17/2010
8:30
12:00
3.5
Cut Stock/Assembly
Bryan
11/17/2010
3:30
5:00
1.5
Shaft Collars
Bryan
11/22/2010
8:00
12:00
4
Bryan
11/30/2010
1:00
3:30
2.5
Testing Goal 1
Bryan
12/1/2010
10:00
12:00
2
Testing Goal 1
Bryan
11/22/2010
2:30
4:00
1.5
assembly
Bryan
11/23/2010
8:30
12:00
3.5
Bryan
11/23/2010
1:00
2:00
1
Protractor, trowel blocks,
assembly
Protractor
Bryan
11/29/2010
8:30
11:00
2.5
Final Assembly
Kirk
11/15/2010
8:00
5:00
8
Plastic Adapters
Kirk
11/30/2010
1:00
3:30
2.5
Testing Goal 1
Kirk
12/1/2010
10:00
12:00
2
Testing Goal 1
Kirk
11/17/2010
8:00
12:00
4
Trowel, L-Risers
Kirk
11/18/2010
8:00
9:00
1
L - Risers
Kirk
11/19/2010
8:00
5:00
8
Del. face plate, trowel board
Kirk
11/22/2010
8:00
10:00
2
End caps, angle indicator
Melynda
11/15/2010
8:30
12:00
3.5
Melynda
2.5
Testing Goal 1
Testing Goal 1
Risers, assembly
11/30/2010
1:00
3:30
Melynda
12/1/2010
10:00
12:00
2
Melynda
11/15/2010
2:30
5:00
2.5
Melynda
11/16/2010
8:00
9:00
1
Michelle
11/12/2010
1:00
3:30
2.5
Michelle
11/15/2010
8:00
12:00
4
Michelle
11/15/2010
2:30
5:00
2.5
Michelle
11/16/2010
8:00
12:00
4
Michelle
11/30/2010
1:00
3:30
2.5
Testing Goal 1
Michelle
12/1/2010
10:00
12:00
2
Testing Goal 1
Michelle
11/17/2010
8:00
12:00
4
Rail Risers
Michelle
11/17/2010
2:30
5:00
2.5
Assembly
Michelle
11/19/2010
8:00
11:00
3
Trowel Board Assistance
Michelle
11/19/2010
2:30
5:00
2.5
Trowel Board Assistance
Michelle
11/22/2010
2:30
5:00
2.5
Aluminum Endcaps
Michelle
12/6/2010
9:30
12:00
2.5
assembly, orginization
26
Cut 80/20 to the wrong length
tapped holes for 80/20
Rail Risers
27
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