VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit, GFK

GE Fanuc Automation
Programmable Control Products
VersaMax System
Ethernet Network Interface Unit
User's Manual
GFK-1860A
June 2001
GFL-002
Warnings, Cautions, and Notes
as Used in this Publication
Warning
Warning notices are used in this publication to emphasize that hazardous
voltages, currents, temperatures, or other conditions that could cause
personal injury exist in this equipment or may be associated with its use.
In situations where inattention could cause either personal injury or
damage to equipment, a Warning notice is used.
Caution
Caution notices are used where equipment might be damaged if care is not
taken.
Note
Notes merely call attention to information that is especially significant to
understanding and operating the equipment.
This document is based on information available at the time of its publication. While efforts have
been made to be accurate, the information contained herein does not purport to cover all details or
variations in hardware or software, nor to provide for every possible contingency in connection
with installation, operation, or maintenance. Features may be described herein which are not
present in all hardware and software systems. GE Fanuc Automation assumes no obligation of
notice to holders of this document with respect to changes subsequently made.
GE Fanuc Automation makes no representation or warranty, expressed, implied, or statutory with
respect to, and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, sufficiency, or usefulness of
the information contained herein. No warranties of merchantability or fitness for purpose shall apply.
The following are trademarks of GE Fanuc Automation North America, Inc.
Alarm Master
CIMPLICITY
CIMPLICITY 90–ADS
CIMSTAR
Field Control
FrameworX
GEnet
Genius
Helpmate
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Series Five
Series 90
Series One
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VersaMax
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©Copyright 1989-2001 GE Fanuc Automation North America, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
Contents
Chapter 1
Introduction, Description, and Specifications ....................................... 1-1
Other VersaMax Manuals.................................................................................... 1-1
Ethernet NIU Specifications ................................................................................ 1-4
Network Interface Unit Operation........................................................................ 1-5
Chapter 2
Installation.............................................................................................. 2-1
Section 1 – Installation Instructions ..................................................................... 2-2
Section 2 – Setting the Network IP Address ....................................................... 2-14
Chapter 3
Configuring an Ethernet NIU and I/O Station...................................... 3-1
Using Autoconfiguration or Programmer Configuration ....................................... 3-2
Configuring “Racks” and “Slots”......................................................................... 3-4
Software Configuration of the Ethernet NIU and I/O Station ................................ 3-6
Autoconfiguration of the Ethernet NIU and I/O Station ...................................... 3-15
Configuring the ENIU Produced Exchange........................................................ 3-18
Configuring the ENIU Consumed Exchange ...................................................... 3-24
EGD Exchange Status and Control Bytes for Fault Handling.............................. 3-32
Chapter 4
Modbus ................................................................................................... 4-1
Modbus Protocol ................................................................................................. 4-2
Modbus Tables ..................................................................................................... 4-3
Supported Function Codes................................................................................... 4-5
Chapter 5
Ethernet Global Data ............................................................................. 5-1
EGD Overview.................................................................................................... 5-1
EGD Protocol...................................................................................................... 5-3
EGD Exchange Definition ................................................................................... 5-3
Chapter 6
Troubleshooting ..................................................................................... 6-1
Checking Status and Operation with the ENIU’s LEDs ........................................ 6-2
ENIU Fault Table................................................................................................ 6-7
Using FTP to Obtain Network Status and Version Information............................. 6-9
EGD Troubleshooting ....................................................................................... 6-10
Determining the MAC Address of the ENIU...................................................... 6-11
Reading the Stored IP Address of the ENIU....................................................... 6-13
Chapter 7
VersaMax Product Overview................................................................. 7-1
The VersaMax Family of Products ................................................................... 7-1
VersaMax Products for Ethernet Networks .......................................................... 7-2
Power Supplies ................................................................................................... 7-3
I/O Modules........................................................................................................ 7-4
GFK-1860A
iii
Contents
Carriers............................................................................................................... 7-7
Expansion Modules ............................................................................................. 7-9
VersaMax General Product Specifications ......................................................... 7-11
Appendix A
Glossary ..................................................................................................A-1
Appendix B
IP and MAC Addresses..........................................................................B-1
Appendix C
Number Conversion Table.....................................................................C-1
Appendix D
Compatibility Matrix .............................................................................D-1
iv
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual –June 2001
GFK-1860A
Chapter
Introduction, Description, and Specifications
1
This manual describes installation and operation of the VersaMax Ethernet
Network Interface Unit (ENIU). This manual has the following layout:
Chapter 1: Description and Specifications of the Ethernet Network Interface Unit.
Chapter 2: Installation procedures.
Chapter 3: Configuration procedures for the Ethernet NIU and I/O Station.
Chapter 4: Modbus/TCP Communications.
Chapter 5: Ethernet Global Data Communications.
Chapter 6: Troubleshooting.
Chapter 7: An overview of VersaMax products.
Other VersaMax Manuals

VersaMax Modules, Power Supplies,
and Carriers User’s Manual (catalog
number GFK-1504).
Describes the many VersaMax I/O and option
modules, power supplies, and carriers. This
manual also provides detailed system
installation instructions.
VersaMax PLC User’s Manual (catalog
number GFK-1503).
Describes the installation and operation of the
VersaMax CPU.
Remote I/O Manager User’s Guide
(catalog number GFK-1847).
Gives step-by-step instructions for using the
Remote I/O Manager configuration software.
VersaMax Profibus Communications
Modules User’s Manual (catalog
number GFK-1534)
Describes the installation and operation of the
Profibus Network Interface Unit module and the
Profibus Network Communications Module.
VersaMax DeviceNet Communications
Modules User’s Manual (catalog
number GFK-1533).
Describes the installation and operation of the
DeviceNet NIU.
VersaMax Genius NIU User’s Manual
(catalog number GFK-1535).
Describes the installation and operation of the
Genius NIU.
VersaMax is a trademark of GE Fanuc Automation
GFK-1860A
1-1
1
The Ethernet Network Interface Unit (IC200EBI001) operates as either a Modbus
TCP server or an Ethernet Global Data (EGD) station on an Ethernet network,
providing I/O data, status, and diagnostic data.
The ENIU interfaces VersaMax I/O modules to an Ethernet network. The ENIU
and its expansion racks form an I/O station capable of handling up to 64 I/O
modules. The memory space of the ENIU will support I/O data consisting of up to
256 bytes of discrete input, 256 bytes of discrete output, 256 bytes of analog input,
and 256 bytes of analog output data. The maximum I/O that can be supported by
an ENIU station is limited by the modules that are installed.
In Modbus mode, up to 10 Modbus TCP connections can be made to the ENIU at
one time.
In EGD mode, the ENIU has exactly one produced and one consumed EGD
exchange.
The ENIU may be configured to run either Modbus or EGD. It cannot run both
modes at the same time.
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1-2
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
Description and Specifications
1
The Network Interface Unit installs on a 35mm x 7.5mm conductive DIN-rail. A
VersaMax power supply module1 mounts directly on the right-hand side of the
ENIU’s front surface. LEDs on the left-hand side of the ENIU’s front surface
indicate the presence of power and show the operating mode and status of the
ENIU. Three rotary switches beneath a transparent protective door can be used to
configure the ENIU’s address on the Ethernet network. The unshielded RJ-45
connector is used to connect the Ethernet network.
1
Power supply must be an “Expanded 3.3V” model. See power supply specs. in Chapter 7.
GFK-1860A
Chapter 1 Introduction, Description, and Specifications
1-3
1
Ethernet NIU Specifications
Number of racks
8 per station.
Number of modules
8 per rack for a total of 64 per station.
I/O data
1024 bytes maximum.
%I:
2048 points
%Q:
2048 points
%AI:
128 channels
%AQ: 128 channels
Fault table data
32 Faults (128 bytes)
Ethernet network address
Any valid Class A, B or C address.
Ethernet network data rate
10/100Mbit auto-detect.
Ethernet Duplex
Full/Half auto-detect
Indicators (5)
PWR LED to indicate power
OK LED to indicate health of the ENIU
FAULTS LED to indicate presence of faults
LAN LED to indicate traffic on the Ethernet network
STAT LED to indicate presence of a Modbus connection
or EGD is consuming.
Power Consumption*
+5V at 175mA; +3.3V at 425mA
*
Requires “Expanded 3.3V” type power supply.
Configuration Software
There are two choices of configuration software for the Ethernet NIU:
1-4
•
VersaPro 2.0 (or later version). Allows you to (1) configure all
VersaMax products and (2) program PLC ladder logic.
•
Remote I/O Manager 2.0 (or later version). Allows you to configure all
VersaMax I/O products, but does not allow PLC ladder logic
programming. If you will be using GE Fanuc I/O products with a thirdparty CPU, you can use this software to configure the I/O products. This
software is a stand-alone version of the VersaPro 2.0 (or later version)
configuration tool.
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
Description and Specifications
1
Network Interface Unit Operation
Warning
Be sure you understand the operation of outputs at power up and
with communications upsets for the mode (Default, Hold Last State)
that you are using. Failure to heed this warning could result in
unexpected operation, possibly leading to injury to personnel and
damage to equipment.
NOTE: The following topics should be understood before starting an
ENIU setup:
Modbus Mode
•
Operation of discrete outputs and analog outputs upon first communication
•
How much data can be exchanged in a single message
•
Choosing between “Default” and “Hold Last State” configuration
•
Operation at power-up
•
Operation if the Ethernet Cable is disconnected, the Ethernet connection is
lost, or a communication error occurs
EGD Mode
•
The ordering of data in an EGD packet
•
Operation if the Ethernet Cable is disconnected, the Ethernet connection is
lost, or a communication error occurs
“Default” and “Hold Last State” Configuration Options
Each ENIU Output Module’s output mode must be configured individually using
the configuration software. The two output mode choices are “Default” or “Hold
Last State.” The following two tables show Output Table and Real Output
states/values for both of these configuration choices; one table is for power up and
the other for recovery from upsets. The Output Table is part of the ENIU’s internal
memory; Real Outputs are the values on the output modules’ output terminals. The
Output Table is segmented into two parts: Discrete Outputs and Analog Outputs.
GFK-1860A
Chapter 1 Introduction, Description, and Specifications
1-5
1
The Power up Sequence Table
The ENIU Output Table is stored in volatile memory; therefore, all Output Table
values are initially zero upon power up. Configuration settings, including the table
of default values for each output, are stored in non-volatile Flash memory.
Power up Sequence
Configured for “Default”
Configured for “Hold Last State”
ENIU Condition
Output Table
Real Outputs
Output Table
Real Outputs
Power up
Zeros
Default table
Zeros
Zeros
First Write to segment of
Output Table after Power
up (Modbus only)
Zeros plus
written values
Output table
Zeros plus written
values
Output table
Operational (Modbus
only)
Zeros plus sum
of all writes
Output table
Zeros plus sum of all
writes
Output table
After first communication
(EGD only)
Values from
EGD exchange
Output table
Values from EGD
exchange
Output table
The After Upset Sequence Table
This table shows the sequence if power remains on but the connection is upset (by
such things as disconnection or communication error) and then restored.
Sequence After Ethernet Connection Loss, Cable Removal, or Communication Error
Configured for “Default”
ENIU Condition
Output Table
Real Outputs
Configured for “Hold Last State”
Output Table
Real Outputs
After disconnect, cable
Last values in Output Default table
removal, or communication table
error
Last values in Output
table
Output table
First write to segment of
Last values in Output Output table
Output Table after recovery table plus written
(Modbus only)
value
Last values in Output
table plus written
values
Output table
Operational (Modbus only)
Last values in Output Output table
table plus sum of all
writes
Last values in Output
table plus sum of all
writes
Output table
After first communication
(EGD only)
Values from EGD
exchange
Values from EGD
exchange
Output table
Output table
Note: In Modbus mode, after disconnect, cable removal, or communication error, and before the first Write
message is implemented, reads of the ENIU, which return values from the Output Table, may not be the
same as the values of the Real Outputs for modules configured for “Default.”
1-6
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
Description and Specifications
1
Modbus Operation
Operation at Power up
Upon power up, the ENIU will send the values for discrete outputs and analog
outputs to the output modules based on the configuration choice of “Defaults” or
“Hold Last State” that is configured for each module. The output modules will
continue using these values until the first output message is sent to the appropriate
segment of the Output Table. Both segments must be written to drive both
segments. Upon receiving this output message, the ENIU will update its output
table, then write the entire output table to the output modules.
Operation if Ethernet Cable is Disconnected, Ethernet Connection is Lost, or
Communication Error Occurs
Upon upset, the discrete and analog output modules will go to either the default
state or hold last state, depending on which was configured, on a module-by-module
basis. The output modules will continue using these values until the first output
message is sent to the ENIU. Upon receiving this output message, the ENIU will
update its output table, then write the entire output table to the output modules.
Reading Values from the ENIU after Power up but Before a Write has occurred.
If after power up, an Output Table Read is performed before a Write is done in
Modbus mode, the values returned for modules configured for Default may not be
the same as the Real output values (which were set from the Default table values).
The Output Table and Real Outputs will remain at these initial values until changed
by the first Write.
Reading Values from the ENIU after an Upset, but Before a Write has occurred.
This applies to the situation where power continues to be applied to the ENIU, but a
communications upset occurs in Modbus mode. If, after the communications upset,
an Output Table Read is performed before a Write is done, the Output Table values
returned may not be the same as the Real Output values for any discrete modules
configured for “Default.”
Warning
For both discrete and analog Output or Mixed modules, if the ENIU
loses power but the Output or Mixed modules do not lose power, the
Hold Last State parameter does not work as might be expected.
Upon ENIU power loss, outputs configured for Hold Last State go to
the Last State value on modules that still have power. When power
is restored to the ENIU, outputs go to the Default value. When
communications are reestablished and the ENIU receives a Write
message, outputs go to the values in the ENIU’s Output Table.
GFK-1860A
Chapter 1 Introduction, Description, and Specifications
1-7
1
EGD Operation
Operation at Power up
Default is used until the first communication, then the exchange values are used.
Operation on Upset
Default or Hold Last State used. On first communication, exchange values are used.
Maximum Data Transfer per Message in Modbus Mode
Reading Inputs (Modbus Mode)
The ENIU only responds to direct requests from clients. All values, both input and
output, can be requested. Messages sent from the ENIU to the client are limited to
250 bytes of data per request as per the Modbus TCP specification. Read requests
are for contiguous values.
Writing Outputs (Modbus Mode)
The maximum overall length of output message data sent to the ENIU from the
client is 200 bytes per message as per the Modbus TCP specification. As noted in
the following caution message, the first message to the ENIU after power up or after
Ethernet connection loss, cable removal, or communication error should contain all
discrete and analog outputs used in the I/O map. This can be accomplished by using
a Write Multiple Registers command that writes to bytes that overlap both the
discrete and analog tables of the ENIU.
Caution
It is very important that the first output message contain all discrete
and analog outputs used in the I/O map; otherwise, spurious outputs
will be produced in the time between the first message releasing the
output tables to the modules and the arrival of the second message.
How to write to all Discrete and Analog Outputs in a Single Message
The segments for Discrete Outputs and Analog Outputs are contiguous in memory.
By using only the higher numbered Discrete Outputs and the lower numbered
Analog Output references, a contiguous block of memory that contains all the
outputs and will fit in a single write can be achieved. The example in the following
table shows how this can be done.
1-8
No. of
Discrete
No. of
Analog
256
32
%Q Range
%AI
Range
%Q1793-2048 AQ1-32
Write Start
Address
Length
(Bytes)
368
96
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
Description and Specifications
1
Maximum Data Transfer per Message in EGD Mode
Reading Inputs – (all input values contained in each message)
The ENIU has one produced exchange that contains all of the configured discrete
and analog input module data. The maximum configurable discrete input module
data is 2048 bits or 256 bytes and the maximum configurable analog input data is
128 words or 256 bytes for a combined total of 512 bytes. There is an additional 4
bytes of status information at the beginning of the data in the exchange for a total of
516 total bytes allowed in one produced exchange.
Writing Outputs – (all output values, %Q & %AQ, are contained in each message)
The ENIU has one consumed exchange that contains all of the configured discrete
and analog output module data. The maximum configurable discrete output module
data is 2048 bits or 256 bytes and the maximum configurable analog output data is
128 words or 256 bytes for a combined total of 512 bytes. There is an additional 4
bytes of control information at the beginning of the data in the exchange for a total
of 516 total bytes allowed in one consumed exchange.
Maximum Number of I/O for ENIU Release 1.1
Maximum No. of I/O Modules per Rack
8
Maximum No. of I/O Racks
8 (1 local + 7 expansion)
Maximum No. of Discrete I/O Points1
2048 (8 x 8 x 32)
Maximum No. of Analog I/O Channels2
256 (8 x 8 x 4) - this figure is
equal to 128 in and 128 out.
Notes:
1. Currently, the maximum discrete point count for a VersaMax module is 32
2. Starting with release 1.1, the ENIU supports high density analog modules.
NOTE: A full system of all %AI and all %AQ will not fit in the %AI or %AQ table, each of which is
limited to 128.
Caution
In Modbus mode, reading the output tables (%Q and %AQ) may not
return the actual state of the outputs if defaults are active.
GFK-1860A
Chapter 1 Introduction, Description, and Specifications
1-9
Chapter
Installation
2
This chapter gives basic installation instructions. For more information, please refer
to the VersaMax Modules, Power Supplies, and Carriers Manual, GFK-1504.
This chapter is divided into two sections:
Section 1 – Installation Instructions
Discusses mounting (and removing) the various components, wiring the
system, and powering up the system
Section 2 – Setting the IP Address
Discusses various methods of setting temporary and non-volatile working IP
addresses for the ENIU.
GFK-1860A
2-1
2
Section 1 – Installation Instructions
Mounting Instructions
All VersaMax modules and carriers in the same PLC “rack” must be installed on
the same section of 7.5mm x 35mm DIN-rail, which must be electrically grounded
to provide EMC protection. The rail must have a conductive (unpainted) corrosionresistant finish. DIN-rails compliant with DIN EN50032 are preferred.
For vibration resistance, the DIN-rail should be installed on a panel using screws
spaced approximately 5.24cm (6 inches) apart. DIN-rail clamps (available as part
number IC200ACC313) can also be installed at both ends of the station to lock the
modules in position.
Panel-Mounting
For maximum resistance to mechanical vibration and shock, the DIN-rail-mounted
module must also be installed on a panel. Using the module as a template, mark the
location of the module’s panel-mount hole on the panel. Drill and tap an M3.5 (632) hole in the panel at the marked location. Install the module using an M3.5 (#6)
screw in the panel-mount hole.
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Note 1. Tolerances on all dimensions are +/-0.13mm (0.005in) non-cumulative.
Note 2. 1.1-1.4Nm (10-12 in/lbs) of torque should be applied to M3.5 (#6-32) steel
screw threaded into material containing internal threads and having a
minimum thickness of 2.4mm (0.093in). See figure below.
SEE NOTE 2.
4.3mm
0.170in
M3.5 (#6) SCREW
SPLIT LOCK
WASHER
FLAT WASHER
4.3mm
0.170in
5.1mm
0.200in
2-2
15.9mm
0.62in REF
TAPPED
HOLE IN
PANEL
NIU
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
Installation
2
Installing an Ethernet Network Interface Unit
If the I/O Station will have more than one expansion rack or one expansion rack that
uses an Isolated Expansion Receiver Module (IC200ERM001) as its interface to the
expansion bus, an Expansion Transmitter Module must be installed to the left of the
NIU. The Expansion Transmitter Module must be installed on the same section of
DIN-rail as the rest of the modules in the main “rack” (rack 0). See the instructions
for installing expansion equipment at the end of this chapter.
Clearance Required for the ENIU
Maintain a clearance of 2 inches (5.1cm) above and below the equipment and 1 inch
(2.54cm) to the left. Additional clearance requirements are shown below.
1
133.4mm
(5.25in)
85.9mm
(3.38in)
2
3
(The numbered items below refer to the numbered areas in the figure above.)
GFK-1860A
1.
Allow sufficient finger clearance for opening ENIU rotary switch door.
2.
Allow adequate clearance for communications cable, which connects to the RJ45 jack in area 2.
3.
Allow adequate space for power supply wiring. The power supply mounts on
the front of the ENIU on the right-hand side. Also, allow sufficient space in
front of the ENIU for the depth of the power supply.
Chapter 2 Installation
2-3
2
Installing the ENIU on the DIN-rail
1.
Turn off power to the system
2.
Place the stationary top latch of the ENIU over the top
edge of the DIN-rail.
Front of Mounting
Panel
NIU
Top Latch
DIN-Rail
Bottom Latch
3.
Pivot the ENIU downward until the ENIU’s spring-loaded
bottom latch snaps around the bottom edge of the DIN-rail.
DIN-Rail
Removing the ENIU from the DIN-rail
2-4
1.
Turn off power to the power supply.
2.
If the ENIU is attached to the panel with a screw, remove the power supply
module and then remove the panel-mount screw.
3.
Slide the ENIU to the left along the DIN-rail away from the other modules until
its carrier connector disengages from the carrier on its right. (If the ENIU will
not slide freely along the DIN-rail, pull downward on the DIN-rail latch tab
with a small screwdriver while sliding the ENIU.)
4.
Use a small flathead screwdriver to pull the DIN-rail latch tab downward, then
pull the bottom of the ENIU forward until it clears the bottom edge of the DINrail. Finally, lift the ENIU off the top edge of the DIN-rail.
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
Installation
2
Installing the Power Supply on the ENIU
1.
The power supply module installs directly
on top of the ENIU. The latch on the power
supply must be in the unlocked position as
shown in the picture on the left.
2.
Align the connectors and the latch post and
press the power supply module down
firmly, until the two tabs on the bottom of
the power supply click into place. Be sure
the tabs are fully inserted in the holes in the
bottom edge of the ENIU.
3.
Turn the latch to the locked position to
secure the power supply to the top of the
ENIU module.
Removing the Power Supply from the ENIU
Exercise care when working around operating equipment. Devices may become
very hot and could cause injury.
1.
Remove power.
2.
Turn the latch to the unlocked position as
illustrated.
3.
Press the flexible panel on the lower edge of
the power supply to disengage the tabs on the
power supply from the holes in the carrier.
4.
Pull the power supply straight off.
GFK-1860A
Chapter 2 Installation
2-5
2
Installing Additional Modules
Before joining carriers to the ENIU, remove the connector cover on the right-hand
side of the ENIU. Do not discard this cover; you will need to install it on the last
carrier. It protects the connector pins from damage and ESD during handling and
use.
Do not remove the connector cover on the left-hand side.
Connector Cover
Connector Cover
Install additional modules by mounting modules on their carriers and sliding them
along the DIN-rail to fully engage the connectors in the sides of the carriers.
2-6
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
Installation
2
Installing the Ethernet Cable
The 10Base-T / 100Base-TX RJ-45 port on the Ethernet NIU connects directly to a
network without an external transceiver. Connect the port to an external 10Base-T /
100Base-TX hub or switch using a twisted pair cable. Category 5 cable is required
for 100Base-TX operation. 10Base-T / 100Base-TX cables are readily available
from commercial distributors. GE Fanuc recommends purchasing rather than
making cables. Cables must meet the applicable IEEE 802.3 or 802.3u standard,
noted in the table below.
The Ethernet NIU automatically senses whether it is connected to a 10BaseT or
100BaseTX network, and whether communications are half-duplex or full duplex.
NOTE: We recommend you use Category 5 cable even if using 10Base-T because
(1) it is a higher quality cable, (2) it will support a later system upgrade to 100BaseTX, and (3) cable cost is low compared to installation labor cost.
Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) Ethernet Cables
Cable Category
Rating
Max. Drop
Length
Standard
Suitable for:
Category 5
100 Mbits/sec.
100 Meters
IEEE 802.3u
100Base-TX
10Base-T
Category 4
20 Mbits/sec.
100 Meters
IEEE 802.3
10Base-T
Category 3
16 Mbits/sec.
100 Meters
IEEE 802.3
10Base-T
Network Connection
Connection of the Ethernet Interface to a 10Base-T or 100Base-TX network is
shown below (each cable drop can be up to 100 meters long):
10BaseT / 100 Base Tx Hub or Switch
10BaseT /
100 Base Tx
Ethernet Interface
Twisted Pair
Cable
To
Other Network
Devices
GFK-1860A
Chapter 2 Installation
2-7
2
Installing an Expansion Transmitter Module
If the I/O Station will have more than one expansion rack or one expansion rack that
uses an Isolated Expansion Receiver Module (IC200ERM001) as its interface to the
expansion bus, an Expansion Transmitter Module must be installed to the left of the
NIU. The Expansion Transmitter Module must be installed on the same section of
DIN-rail as the rest of the modules in the main “rack” (rack 0).
Expansion Transmitter Module
NIU and Power Supply
ETM
PS
NIU
VersaMax I/O Station Main Rack (0)
1.
Make sure rack power is off.
2.
Attach the Expansion Transmitter to DIN-rail to the left of the NIU position.
3.
Install the NIU as instructed. Connect the modules and press them together
until the connectors are mated.
4.
After completing any additional system installation steps, apply power and
observe the module LEDs.
On indicates presence of 5VDC power.
Off indicates no 5VDC power.
PWR
EXP TX
Blinking or On indicates active
communications on expansion bus.
Off indicates no communications.
Removing an Expansion Transmitter Module
2-8
1.
Make sure rack power is off.
2.
Slide module on DIN-rail away from the NIU in the main rack.
3.
Using a small screwdriver, pull down on the tab on the bottom of the module
and lift the module off the DIN-rail.
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
Installation
2
Installing an Expansion Receiver Module
An Expansion Receiver Module (IC200ERM001 or 002) must be installed in the
leftmost slot of each VersaMax expansion “rack”.
1.
Insert the label inside the access door at the upper left corner of the module.
2.
Attach the module to the DIN-rail at the left end of the expansion rack.
3.
Select the expansion rack ID (1 to 7) using the rotary switch under the access
door at upper left corner of the module.
1
7
2
3
6 5 4
4.
Install the Power Supply module on top of the Expansion Receiver.
5.
Attach the cables. If the system includes an Expansion Transmitter Module,
attach the terminator plug to the EXP2 port on the last Expansion Receiver
Module.
6.
After completing any additional system installation steps, apply power and
observe the module LEDs.
On indicates presence of 5VDC power.
PWR
SCAN
EXP RX
Green indicates CPU/NIU is scanning
I/O in expansion racks.
Amber indicates not scanning.
Blinking or On indicates module is
communicating on expansion bus
Off indicates module not communicating
Removing an Expansion Receiver Module
1.
Make sure rack power is off.
2.
Separate the Power Supply module from the Expansion Receiver Module.
3.
Slide the Expansion Receiver Module on DIN-rail away from the other
modules.
4.
Using a small screwdriver, pull down on the tab on the bottom of the module
and lift the module off the DIN-rail.
Expansion Rack Power Sources
Power for module operation comes from the Power Supply installed on the
Expansion Receiver Module. If the expansion rack includes any Power Supply
Booster Carrier and additional rack Power Supply, it must be tied to the same
source as the Power Supply on the Expansion Receiver Module.
GFK-1860A
Chapter 2 Installation
2-9
2
Connecting the Expansion Cable: RS-485 Differential
For a multiple-rack expansion system, connect the cable from the expansion port on
the Expansion Transmitter (ETM) to the Expansion Receivers (ERM) as shown
below. If all the Expansion Receivers are the Isolated type (IC200ERM001), the
maximum overall cable length is 750 meters. If the expansion bus includes any nonisolated Expansion Receivers (IC200ERM002), the maximum overall cable length
is 15 meters.
VersaMax PLC or I/O Station Main Rack (0)
ETM
PS
CPU/NIU
VersaMax ExpansionRack 1
PS
15M with any
IC200ERM002 ERMs
750M with all
IC200ERM001 ERMs
ERM
VersaMax ExpansionRack 7
PS
Terminator
Plug
ERM
Install the Terminator Plug (supplied with the Expansion Transmitter module) into
the lower port on the last Expansion Receiver. Spare Terminator Plugs can be
purchased separately as part number IC200ACC201 (Qty 2).
RS-485 Differential Inter-Rack Connection (IC200CBL601, 602, 615)
PIN
Expansion
Transmitter or
Expansion
Receiver
Module
Transmitting
Port
26-PIN
FEMALE
2
3
5
6
8
9
12
13
16
17
20
21
24
25
7
23
1
PIN
FRAME+
FRAMERIRQ/+
RIRQ/RUN+
RUNRERR+
RERRIODT+
IODTRSEL+
RSELIOCLK+
IOCLK0V
0V
SHIELD
26-PIN
MALE
2
3
5
6
8
9
12
13
16
17
20
21
24
25
7
23
1
VARIABLE (SEE
TEXT)
FRAME+
FRAMERIRQ/+
RIRQ/RUN+
RUNRERR+
RERRIODT+
IODTRSEL+
RSELIOCLK+
IOCLK0V
0V
SHIELD
26-PIN
MALE
Expansion
Transmitter
or
Expansion
Receiver
Module
Receiving
Port
26-PIN
FEMALE
Building a Custom Expansion Cable
Custom expansion cables can be built using Connector Kit IC200ACC202, Crimper
AMP 90800-1, and Belden 8138, Manhattan/CDT M2483, Alpha 3498C, or
equivalent AWG #24 (0.22mm2) cable.
2-10
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
Installation
2
Connecting the Expansion Cable: Single-ended
For a system with one non-isolated expansion rack (IC200ERM002) and no
Expansion Transmitter, connect the expansion cable from the serial port on the
VersaMax NIU to the Expansion Receiver (ERM) as shown below. The maximum
cable length is one meter. Cables cannot be fabricated for this type of installation;
cable IC200CBL600 must be ordered separately.
NOTE: No Terminator Plug is needed in a single-ended installation; however, it
will not impede system operation if installed.
VersaMax PLC or NIU I/O Station Main Rack
PS
CPU/NIU
1M
VersaMax Expansion Rack
PS
ERM
Single-Ended Inter-Rack Connection (IC200CBL600)
PIN
VersaMax
CPU or NIU
Serial Port
16 15
2
1
1
2
3
6
9
10
12
16
14
PIN
0V
T_IOCLK
T_RUN
T_IODT_
T_RERR
T_RIRQ_
T_FRAME
T_RSEL
0V
4
7
22
14
18
15
11
10
19
23
SINGLE_
0V
T_IOCLK
T_RUN
T_IODT_
T_RERR
T_RIRQ_
T_FRAME
T_RSEL
0V
1
SHIELD
Expansion
Receiver
IC200ERM002
Receiving
Port
1M
16-PIN
MALE
16-PIN
FEMALE
26-PIN
MALE
26-PIN
FEMALE
Power Sources for Single-Ended Expansion Rack Systems
When operating the system in single-ended mode, the power supplies for the main
rack and expansion rack must be fed from the same main power source. The main
rack and expansion racks cannot be switched ON and OFF separately; either both
must be ON or both must be OFF for proper operation.
Power for module operation comes from the Power Supply installed on the
Expansion Receiver Module. If the expansion rack includes any Power Supply
Booster Carrier and additional rack Power Supply, it must be tied to the same
source as the Power Supply on the Expansion Receiver Module.
GFK-1860A
Chapter 2 Installation
2-11
2
Powering up the ENIU
When power is applied to the ENIU, you should observe the following conditions if
there are no problems:
•
PWR LED should be ON steady
•
OK LED should be ON steady
•
FAULTS LED should be OFF
•
LAN LED should be flashing or ON steady if network communications are
occurring.
•
STAT LED should be ON if at least one Modbus TCP master is connected or if
EGD consumption is active; otherwise it should be OFF.
If there is an abnormal indication, please refer to Chapter 5 for troubleshooting
information.
2-12
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
Installation
2
CE Mark Installation Requirements
The following requirements for surge, electrostatic discharge (ESD), and fast
transient burst (FTB) protection must be met for applications that require CE Mark
listing:
GFK-1860A
„
The VersaMax I/O Station is considered to be open equipment and should
therefore be installed in an enclosure (IP54).
„
This equipment is intended for use in typical industrial environments that
utilize anti-static materials such as concrete or wood flooring. If the
equipment is used in an environment that contains static material, such as
carpets, personnel should discharge themselves by touching a safely
grounded surface before accessing the equipment.
„
If the AC mains are used to provide power for I/O, these lines should be
suppressed prior to distribution to the I/O so that immunity levels for the
I/O are not exceeded. Suppression for the AC I/O power can be made
using line-rated MOVs that are connected line-to-line, as well as
line-to-ground. A good high-frequency ground connection must be made
to the line-to-ground MOVs.
„
AC or DC power sources less than 50V are assumed to be derived locally
from the AC mains. The length of the wires between these power sources
and the PLC should be less than a maximum of approximately 10 meters.
„
Installation must be indoors with primary facility surge protection on the
incoming AC power lines.
Chapter 2 Installation
2-13
2
Section 2 – Setting the Network IP Address
The IP Address of the ENIU needs to be permanently set by “Storing” a
configuration to the ENIU from VersaPro or the Remote I/O config tool. The
configuration is “Stored” over Ethernet.
The ENIU needs to be given a temporary IP address to allow “Storing” of the
permanent IP Address.
There are two methods for setting a temporary IP Address
Â
Use the rotary switches on the ENIU (this only works if the ENIU does not
have a permanent IP address stored to it (ie a new ENIU).
Â
Create an entry in the ARP table of your PC that sets an IP address for the
MAC Address of the ENIU, then Telnet to Port 1 which causes the ENIU
to temporarily use the IP address. A utility to do this ia available on the GE
Fanuc WEB site at:
Note: If your network will be connected to another network, you must set an
address that will be compatible with the other network. In that case, you must
obtain a unique IP address for the Ethernet NIU from your system administrator.
Initially Setting the Network IP Address using the rotary switches (only
works if no IP address is set)
Open the clear protective hinged cover by pulling forward at the indentation in the
left side of the ENIU (see figure below). Use a 2.44mm (3/32in) flat screwdriver to
adjust the rotary switches. Always cycle power after changing the switch settings.
These switches, marked Node X100, X10 and X1 select the hundreds, tens, and
units digits of the last octet of the network IP address. Select any valid address in
the range 1-254. The full IP address will be 195.0.0.X, with the X being set by the
rotary switches.
9 0 1
8
7
2
3
6 5 4
9 0 1
2
3
6 5 4
9 0 1
8
2
3
7
6 5 4
8
7
Indentation used to
open switch cover
NODE
X100
X10
X1
Cover Hinge
2-14
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
Installation
2
At this point, the subnet mask defaults to 255.255.255.0 and there is no configured
gateway IP address. So, to communicate to the ENIU (which now has an IP address
of 195.0.0.x), an Ethernet device or the programmer must also have a unique IP
address in the range of 195.0.0.X , which places it in the same subnet as the ENIU.
See Chapter 3 for details on setting up communications parameters and storing the
configuration to the ENIU.
Once a software configuration that contains a valid IP address (0.0.0.0 should not be
used) is stored to the ENIU, the IP address setting on the rotary switches is ignored.
Forcing a Temporary Network IP Address
If there are no Modbus TCP connections, EGD consumption is not active and the
programmer is not connected, the IP address can be temporarily forced to any valid
IP address. Forcing the IP address will place the ENIU at the specified address with
a default subnet mask matching the class of the forced IP address and no configured
gateway IP address.
In the following procedure, an example is given to illustrate the commands used.
The example shows the use of the Windows Telnet and ARP (Address Resolution
Protocol) utility programs from a Windows£ 95/98/ME/NT command prompt to
assign an IP address of 3.16.27.5 to an ENIU that has a MAC address of 08-00-1901-48-64. (NOTE: MAC address is in hex characters.)
•
Note that if your computer is connected to the same network (subnet) as the ENIU,
they both must have the same network identification (net id) to be able to
communicate (see Appendix B for further information). The computer’s IP address
in this example is 3.16.88.139. To force a specific IP address, use the following
procedure:
1) Determine the Media Access Control (MAC) address of the ENIU. The ENIU’s
MAC Address is laser marked on the ENIU’s plastic case and is of the form
080019xxxxxx. If the MAC address can not be read from the ENIU’s case, see
the section “Determining the MAC Address of the ENIU” later in this chapter
for an alternate method.
2) On the programmer computer, we will use the Windows ARP utility program
(ARP.exe) to set the IP address.
3) Start the MS-DOS£ command prompt from the Windows Start/Programs menu.
4) Determine the IP address of your computer. You can use two possible
methods: (1) use the following commands at the command prompt:
WINIPCFG in Windows 95/98/ME or IPCONFIG in Windows NT/2000 or (2)
look it up in the Windows Start/Settings/Control Panel/Network dialog box

Modbus is a trademark of Gould, Inc. Windows and MS-DOS are registered trademarks and
NT is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation
GFK-1860A
Chapter 2 Installation
2-15
2
under Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties. The configuration of your computer
system will determine which of these methods will work successfully for you.
5) At the MS-DOS prompt, type in the following, then press the Enter key:
arp –s (IP address you want to assign to ENIU) (MAC address of the
ENIU) (IP address of your computer)
For this example we will use the following:
arp –s 3.16.27.5 08-00-19-01-48-64 3.16.88.139
NOTE: You will not see any reply on the screen (see next figure).
6) To verify that the ARP table entry was accepted, type the following, then press
the Enter key:
arp –a
An entry matching the desired ENIU IP address (“Internet Address”) and MAC
address (“Physical Address”) should be seen in the table, with the “Type” listed
as 'static'. This is shown in the following figure:
7) Next, create a Telnet connection to the ENIU (Port 1) by typing in the
following command at the computer’s MS-DOS prompt, then pressing the
Enter key:
telnet (IP Address) 1
For this example, the command is telnet 3.16.27.5 1
A Telnet window will appear. After several seconds, a “Connect Failed!”
dialog box will appear (see next figure); regardless, the ENIU will change its IP
address to the one designated in the Telnet command. (If it takes more than 15
seconds for the Connect Failed box to appear, the Telnet command probably
didn’t work.) Note: don’t wait too long to do the Telnet command because the
ARP table static entry will time out in two minutes and the Telnet command
will not work.
2-16
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
Installation
2
At this point, the forced IP address is temporary and will be lost if the ENIU is
power-cycled. The following steps show how to make this IP address
permanent.
8) Configure the network settings of the ENIU to the final desired values using the
VersaPro or Remote I/O Manager configuration software. See the
configuration software documentation or on-line help for detailed instructions.
9) Store the configuration to the ENIU, using the forced IP address in your
communications settings. The stored settings will be permanent. See Chapter
3 for details on communications settings and instructions on storing a
configuration.
Notes
GFK-1860A
1.
The forced IP address is lost after every power reset of the ENIU. Be
sure to store the ENIU configuration parameters using the
configuration software as detailed above to make the IP address
permanent.
2.
NOTE: Static ARP table entries are kept in your computer’s ARP table,
but dynamic entries are automatically cleared after about two minutes.
If you wish to remove the static listing once the ENIU has been
configured with the configuration program, type "arp -d
[IP_ADDRESS]" from the command prompt. Note that all ARP table
entries are removed automatically when your computer is shut down.
Chapter 2 Installation
2-17
Chapter
Configuring an Ethernet NIU and I/O Station
3
This chapter explains how an Ethernet NIU and the modules in an I/O Station can
be configured. Configuration determines certain characteristics of module operation
and also establishes the program references to be used by each module in the
system.
This chapter describes:
ƒ
Using autoconfiguration or programmer configuration
The Ethernet NIU and I/O Station can be either autoconfigured or
configured from a programmer using the Remote I/O Manager
configuration software.
ƒ
Configuring racks and slots
Even though a VersaMax I/O Station does not have a module rack, both
autoconfiguration and software configuration use the traditional
convention of “racks” and “slots” to identify module locations.
ƒ
Software configuration of the Ethernet NIU and I/O Station
Software configuration provides greater flexibility than autoconfiguration
in setting up an I/O Station. Software configuration is done using
VersaPro version 1.5 (or later) or the Remote I/O Manager configuration
software. (See Appendix D for a version vs. feature table.)
ƒ
Autoconfiguration of the Ethernet NIU and I/O Station
Autoconfiguration provides a default configuration for the ENIU in
Modbus mode and I/O Station and does not require the use of a
programmer. I/O modules that have software-configurable features
always use their default settings when autoconfigured.
Autoconfiguration using EGD mode is not supported.
ƒ
Configuring EGD Exchanges and Status/Control Bytes
Uses examples to show how to configure consumed and produced
exchange data including status and control data.
GFK-1860A
3-1
3
Using Autoconfiguration or Programmer Configuration
The Ethernet NIU and I/O Station can be either (1) autoconfigured in Modbus
mode, or (2) configured using the Remote I/O Manager or VersaPro 1.5 (or later)
programming software in either Modbus or EGD mode. (See Appendix D for a
version vs. feature table.) The choice of which configuration method to use
depends on the requirements of the application.
Autoconfiguration (Modbus Mode Only)
Autoconfiguration is done by the ENIU itself. It provides a default configuration for
the ENIU and I/O Station and does not require the use of a programmer. If there is
not a stored configuration already present at powerup, the ENIU sees which
modules are installed and automatically creates a configuration for the I/O Station.
I/O modules that have software-configurable features can only use their default
settings when the I/O Station is autoconfigured. Under autoconfiguration, discrete
output data defaults to 0 while analog output data holds its last state. Under
Autoconfiguration EGD functionality is disabled. Autoconfiguration is described
later in this chapter.
An autoconfiguration can be used as is for Modbus mode if the default settings for
software-configurable features are acceptable. For EGD mode and for Modbus
mode where default settings are not acceptable, auto configuration can be used as a
starting point, and the default configuration can be loaded to VersaPro or Remote
I/O Manager and modified.
Software Configuration
Using the configuration software makes it possible to reassign I/O table addresses
and to configure many I/O module features. The configuration software runs on a
computer that connects to the ENIU via Ethernet.
The configuration software can be used to:
ƒ
Create a customized configuration
ƒ
Store (write) a configuration to the ENIU
ƒ
Load (read) an existing configuration or autoconfiguration from an ENIU
ƒ
Compare the configuration in an ENIU with a configuration file stored in
the programmer
ƒ
Clear a configuration that was previously stored to the ENIU
ƒ
Enable EGD functionality
The ENIU retains a software configuration across power cycles. Storing a
configuration disables autoconfiguration, so the ENIU will not overwrite the
configuration during subsequent startups.
3-2
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
Configuration
3
However, clearing a configuration with the programmer does cause a new
autoconfiguration to be generated. In that case, autoconfiguration is enabled until a
configuration is stored from the programmer again.
Software configuration is summarized later in this chapter. Instructions for
installing and using the configuration software are found in the Remote I/O
Manager Software User’s Guide (GFK-1847) or the VersaPro Programming
Software User’s Guide (GFK-1670).
GFK-1860A
Chapter 3 Configuring an Ethernet NIU and I/O Station
3-3
3
Configuring “Racks” and “Slots”
Even though a VersaMax I/O Station does not have a rack, both autoconfiguration
and software configuration use the traditional convention of “racks” and “slots” to
identify module locations. Each logical rack consists of the ENIU or an Expansion
Receiver module plus up to 8 additional I/O and option modules mounted on the
same DIN-rail. Each I/O or option module occupies a “slot”. The module next to the
ENIU or Expansion Receiver module is in slot 1. Booster power supplies do not
count as occupying slots.
Booster Power
Supply
Main Rack (rack 0)
ENIU
1
2
3
4
5
The main rack (containing the ENIU) is always called rack 0.
In an I/O Station that has one expansion rack attached to the expansion bus by a
non-isolated Expansion Transmitter Module (IC200ERM002), the expansion rack
must be configured as rack 1.
VersaMax I/O Station Main Rack (0)
PS
1M
NIU
VersaMax Expansion Rack 1
PS
ERM
3-4
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
Configuration
3
In an I/O Station with an Expansion Transmitter Module (IC200BTM001) and up to
seven expansion “racks”, each with an Expansion Receiver Module (IC200ERM001
or IC200ERM002), the additional racks are configured as rack 1 through rack 7.
VersaMax I/O Station Main Rack (0)
ETM
PS
NIU
VersaMax Expansion Rack 1
PS
15M with any
IC200ERM002 ERMs
750M with all
IC200ERM001 ERMs
ERM
VersaMax Expansion Rack 7
PS
Terminator
Plug
ERM
Configuring I/O References
As I/O modules are added to the configuration, the configuration software keeps a
running total of input/output memory. If the modules added consume more than the
maximum memory available, the configuration software displays (1) the reference
address of the module that caused the error and (2) an error message.
The I/O Station, including all expansion racks, can include up to 1024 total bytes of
data.
You can change the I/O references assigned to a module when configuring that
module.
GFK-1860A
Chapter 3 Configuring an Ethernet NIU and I/O Station
3-5
3
Software Configuration of the Ethernet NIU and I/O Station
Software configuration provides greater flexibility than autoconfiguration in setting
up an I/O Station. Software configuration is performed using one of the following:
•
VersaPro 2.0 (or later version). This software allows you to (1) configure all
Series 90-30 and VersaMax products, including CPUs and NIUs, and (2)
program PLC ladder logic. For details of installing and using this software,
refer to the VersaPro Programming Software User’s Guide (GFk-1670).
•
Remote I/O Manager 2.0 (or later version). Allows you to configure all
Series 90-30 and VersaMax I/O products, including CPUs and NIUs. If you
will only be using GE Fanuc I/O products (no CPUs), you can use this software
for configuration purposes. Ladder logic programming is not supported. The
software is available as catalog number IC641CFG100. For details of installing
and using this software, refer to the Remote I/O Manager Software User’s
Guide (GFK-1847)
Note: The Remote I/O Manager comes bundled with a serial programmer cable if
ordered as catalog number IC641CFG110; however, the Ethernet NIU does not
support this serial cable. The IC641CFG110 package was created for the
convenience of Genius and Profibus NIU users, since those two products require the
serial cable for software configuration.
The Remote I/O Manager software runs on a computer equipped with Windows
95/98, Windows NT 4.0, or Windows 2000. Note that VersaPro 1.1 and the Remote
I/O Manager software cannot be installed on the same computer. If VersaPro 1.1 is
present, you will be prompted to un-install it during the Remote I/O Manager
installation. If both VersaPro and the Remote I/O Manager software are required,
you must upgrade to VersaPro version 1.5 (or later), which includes a built-in
version of the Remote I/O Manager. However, VersaPro 2.0 or later is required to
support high density analog modules. Please see Appendix D, which contains a
feature to software version compatibility matrix.
Notes on Using the Configuration Software
3-6
1.
The same Remote I/O Manager software can configure different types of
VersaMax NIUs and all supported IO modules.
2.
Empty slots are allowed in an ENIU software configuration (unlike an
autoconfiguration). Note: If empty slots are later filled when using EGD
mode, the EGD exchange on the controller will need to be updated.
3.
The I/O Station cannot include the following communication modules:
IC200BEM002 (Profibus Slave module) and IC200BEM103 (DeviceNet
Master module).
4.
The reference addresses assigned to modules in the I/O Station can be edited.
Addresses do not need to be consecutive.
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
Configuration
3
Basic Steps of Software Configuration
The Remote I/O Manager software provides a simple default configuration that you
edit to match the actual system modules. The default configuration consists of a
power supply (PWR001 – see Note below) and a CPU001. Carriers and modules
are then added in the same sequence as the hardware installation.
Note
The default PWR001 power supply is not powerful enough for as ENIU
system. Therefore, you must use one of the higher rated VersaMax
power supplies such as the IC200PWR002.
The basic configuration steps are listed below.
•
Configure the expansion rack system (local, local single rack, multiple remote
rack). This automatically adds the appropriate types of expansion modules to
the racks.
•
Configure the power supply type and any booster power supplies and carriers.
•
Configure the ENIU. This includes changing the NIU type, if necessary, and
assigning its parameters as described on the next page.
•
Configure the expansion modules if the system has expansion racks.
•
Add module carriers and define wiring assignments.
•
Place modules on carriers and select their parameters. Configurable parameters
of I/O modules are described in the VersaMax Modules, Power Supplies, and
Carriers User’s Manual (GFK-1504).
•
Save the configuration file so that it can be stored to the ENIU.
For step-by-step instructions, please refer to the Remote I/O Manager Software
User’s Guide (GFK-1847).
GFK-1860A
Chapter 3 Configuring an Ethernet NIU and I/O Station
3-7
3
Configuring ENIU Network Parameters
ENIU Network configuration establishes the basic operating characteristics of the
Network Interface Unit. When a programmer is first connected, either the rotary
switches or the forced IP address are used as the temporary IP address. The Subnet
Mask defaults to match the class of the IP address, and the Gateway IP address
defaults to Unused. Once a configuration is stored, the network settings of the ENIU
immediately change to those in the stored configuration, and any IP address set with
the rotary switches or by the forcing method is ignored.
If your ENIU will be communicating with devices on other networks, the
parameters in the following table must be set appropriately. These values should be
assigned by the person in charge of your network (the network administrator). See
Appendix B for more detailed information about IP Addressing and network setup.
Feature
Description
Config.
Default
Choices
IP Address
The IP Address is the unique address of the
Ethernet interface as a node on the network.
0.0.0.0
A valid Class A, B, or
C address
Subnet Mask
Subnet mask of the ENIU used to identify the
section of the overall network the ENIU is on.
IP address of the default gateway (router)
device to be used when the ENIU is unable to
locate the desired remote device on the local
sub-network.
0.0.0.0
A valid dotted-notation
mask.
A valid Class A, B, or
C address in the same
subnet as the ENIU.
Gateway IP
Address
0.0.0.0
Selecting EGD or Modbus
Configuring Modbus Parameters
There are no parameters that are specific to the Modbus protocol. There are,
however, three EGD parameters that must be set correctly to disable EGD and
enable Modbus. The following table shows how to enable Modbus:
Tab
Feature
Produced Exchange
Exchange Type
Produced Exchange
Consumer IP Address
Consumed Exchange
Producer ID
* These are the default settings for these parameters
Values*
IP Address
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
If any of these parameters are not set, the ENIU assumes EGD is trying to be
configured and will verify the remaining EGD parameters.
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Configuring EGD Parameters
To use EGD on the ENIU, the EGD configuration parameters must be set correctly.
The following tables show these parameters and their acceptable values.
Produced Exchange Parameters
Feature
Description
Config.
Default
Exchange ID
Uniquely identifies a particular exchange on a
specific producing node.
Exchange Type
Determines whether the exchange will be
IP Address
produced directly to an IP address or to a group
address (multicast).
The destination IP address of the exchange.
0.0.0.0
The Consumer IP Address field will only be
present if the Exchange Type is IP Address
Consumer IP
Address
Group ID
Producer Period
(in ms)
The destination group of the exchange. The
Group ID field will only be present if the
Exchange Type is Group ID
The period at which the exchange is produced
on the network
1
Choices
Cannot be changed
from default of 1
IP Address or
Group ID
1
0.0.0.0 to
255.255.255.255
0.0.0.0 Is only valid in
Modbus mode
1 To 32
200
5 To 3,600,000
Consumed Exchange Parameters
Feature
GFK-1860A
Description
Config.
Default
Exchange ID
Uniquely identifies a particular exchange on a
specific producing node
Producer ID
Uniquely identifies the producer of an exchange 0.0.0.0
on a give network
Group ID
The group IP address the exchange is to be
consumed from
Consumed
Period (in ms)
Update Timeout
(in ms)
The period at which the exchange is to be
200
consumed
The time allowed for the consumption of an
2000
exchange before it is deemed inactive. Upon
timeout, outputs go to their Default or Hold Last
State values.
Chapter 3 Configuring an Ethernet NIU and I/O Station
0
0
Choices
1 To 16383
0.0.0.0 to
255.255.255.254
0.0.0.0 Is only valid in
Modbus mode
0 to 32
0 Means no group
5 To 3,600,000
10 To 3,600,000
3-9
3
Software Configuration: Load, Store, Verify, Clear
To transfer and check the contents of a configuration, use the Load/Store/Verify
functions from the Tools menu. A configuration file must be saved in the
programmer (computer) before using the load/store/verify functions.
The computer connects to the Ethernet NIU via the Ethernet network.
Programmer
NIU
Hub or
Switch
Ethernet Port
To use the Load/Store/Verify functions, the programmer must be able to
communicate with the ENIU. The configuration software has a set of
communications parameters that need to be correctly set for communicating with
the Ethernet NIU. The following section discusses this:
Creating a New Communications Setup
In VersaPro or Remote I/O Manager, create a communications setup for the
Ethernet NIU using the ENIU’s IP address. Use these steps:
3-10
1.
First, choose Communications Setup from the Tools menu. The
Communication Configuration Utility dialog box will appear, shown
below.
2.
Second, click the New button and create your new setup. Configure the
following parameters:
•
Enter a Device Name. In the example shown below, the Device
Name of the newly-created setup is “EthernetNIU”:
•
Device Model as VersaMax (Optional)
•
Default Port as ENET
•
IP address as the address of your ENIU (3.16.27.5 in the example)
•
Leave the other parameters blank
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Modifying the ENIU Communications Settings
If your communications parameter settings are not correct, you can change them in
the Communications Configuration Utility dialog box, shown in the previous figure.
Click the Device Name of your ENIU communications setup to select it (it is called
EthernetNIU in the previous figure). Click the Edit button to make changes. Make
sure that:
•
The IP address is set to the ENIU’s current IP address
•
The Default Port is ENET
•
The Device Model is VersaMax (optional)
Note
The programmer must be able to communicate with the ENIU at the
current ENIU settings. This means that if the IP address is set to
195.0.0.X, the Subnet Mask is at 255.255.255.0, and there is no
Gateway IP address, the programmer must be at a different
195.0.0.X address in order to communicate with the ENIU.
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Storing a Configuration to the Ethernet NIU
After completing a configuration in the programmer (and saving it in the
programmer), the configuration must be Stored to the Ethernet NIU. In the Tools
menu, select Load/Store/Verify and click on Store. Since you cannot store a
configuration to the ENIU while it is communicating with a controller, you must
take the controller off-line to perform the store.
Storing a software configuration disables autoconfiguration, so the ENIU will not
overwrite a software configuration with an autoconfiguration during subsequent
startups.
If any mismatched, missing, or extra modules are detected, the ENIU turns on its
FAULTS LED.
The ENIU FAULTS LED will flash a repeating fatal error code (two blinks, pause,
five blinks, pause, repeat) and will autoconfigure on a power cycle for either of the
following conditions:
•
If the ENIU rejects the configuration due to corrupted or unacceptable data
•
If the Ethernet network is disconnected during the store operation
Please see Chapter 6 for information on troubleshooting these errors.
Loading a Configuration from the ENIU to the Programmer
The programming software can Load a previously stored configuration from the
Ethernet NIU back to the programmer. In the Tools menu, select Load/Store/Verify
and click Load.
Note that the following modules share hardware module IDs:
IC200MDL650 loads as IC200MDL636
IC200MDL750 loads as IC200MDL742
IC200MDL331 loads as IC200MDL329
IC200MDD844 loads as IC200MDD842
IC200MDL141 loads as IC200MDL140
If an Autoconfiguration containing any of the above modules is loaded, the software
may display an incorrect catalog number and description for them. Edit any
incorrect modules using the programmer before storing the configuration back to
the ENIU. Once this has been done, you will be able to load the configuration
properly.
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Comparing Configurations in the Programmer and ENIU
Use the Verify function to compare a configuration file in the programmer with a
configuration that was previously stored to the Ethernet NIU. In the Tools menu,
select Load/Store/Verify and click Verify.
Deleting a Software Configuration from the ENIU
Use the software’s Clear function to remove a previously stored configuration from
the ENIU. Clearing a software configuration causes a new autoconfiguration to be
generated. Autoconfiguration remains enabled until a software configuration is
stored from the programmer again. A clear function will not erase the network
settings of the ENIU. After a Clear function, the ENIU will remain at the same IP
address with the same subnet mask and gateway IP address. To invalidate the IP
address and revert back to using the ENIU’s rotary switches, store an IP address of
0.0.0.0 to the ENIU.
NOTE 1: If an IP address of 0.0.0.0 is stored to the ENIU and then the
configuration is cleared, the ENIU will cease referring to the rotary switches (unless
a new configuration is stored). The IP address of the ENIU will be that of the
switch settings at the time of the 0.0.0.0 store. For example if an IP address of
0.0.0.0 is stored to the ENIU and the switches are set so that the IP address is
195.0.0.128 and then a clear is performed, the ENIU will be 195.0.0.128 regardless
of the switch settings until a new configuration is stored.
NOTE 2: Clearing the configuration will erase EGD parameter information and
cause the ENIU to change to Modbus mode.
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Autoconfiguration of the Ethernet NIU and I/O Station
Autoconfiguration is done by the ENIU itself. It provides a default configuration for
the ENIU and I/O Station and does not require the use of a programmer. I/O
modules that have software-configurable features always use their default settings
when autoconfigured. Under autoconfiguration, discrete output data defaults to 0
while analog output data holds its last state.
When no previous autoconfiguration exists, the ENIU automatically reads, at
powerup, the default configuration of the modules installed in the system.
Once this autoconfiguration is complete as described below, the ENIU retains this
configuration until it is either (1) cleared or (2) powered up with a changed I/O
module configuration, in which case, a new autoconfiguration will be generated that
reflects the changes.
Autoconfiguration disables EGD functionality and sets the ENIU to Modbus mode.
Autoconfiguration Sequence
Each module is considered to occupy a “slot”. The position adjacent to the ENIU is
slot #1. Booster power supplies do not count as occupying slots.
Booster Power
Supply
NIU
1
2
3
4
5
Autoconfiguration starts at slot 1 of rack 0 (the main rack) and continues in the
same order the modules occupy in the I/O Station.
Autoconfiguration stops at the first empty slot or faulted module. For example, if
there are modules in slots 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6 but slot 4 is empty, the modules in slots 5
and 6 are not autoconfigured. The ENIU reports Extra I/O Module faults.
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Note
For the autoconfiguration process to work as expected, any
additional power supplies in the I/O Station must be powered up at
“exactly” the same time as or before the main power supply.
Autoconfiguration Assigns Reference Addresses
The ENIU stores data internally as discrete input bits, discrete output bits, analog
input words, and analog output words.
The NIU Data Memories
%I discrete input bits
%AI analog input words
%Q discrete output bits
%AQ analog output
During autoconfiguration, the ENIU automatically looks at the modules installed in
the I/O Station and assigns them to addresses in this internal I/O map. Reference
addresses are assigned in ascending order. For modules that have multiple data
types (for example, mixed I/O modules), each data type is assigned reference
addresses individually. Chapter 4 contains related information on memory mapping
and the Modbus Function Codes used to access ENIU memory.
Modules that have software-configurable features use their default settings when
autoconfigured. Under autoconfiguration, discrete output data defaults to 0 while
analog output data holds its last state. I/O module features are described in the
VersaMax Modules, Power Supplies, and Carriers Manual (GFK-1504).
Adding I/O modules to an Autoconfigured I/O Station
If additional I/O modules are added to an existing I/O Station, they do not become
part of the autoconfiguration until the ENIU is power-cycled.
Clearing an Autoconfiguration
To clear an existing autoconfiguration, power down the ENIU, disconnect the ENIU
from the first I/O module, and power up the ENIU. The autoconfiguration in the
ENIU is then cleared. (An existing software configuration can only be cleared using
the programmer, as described previously in this chapter.)
Hot Inserting I/O Modules
It is possible to hot insert I/O modules in an I/O Station. If the module being
replaced already exists in the configuration, no other action is necessary to make the
module operable.
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Autoconfiguring an I/O Station with Expansion Racks
3-16
•
The Expansion Receiver modules must have their rack ID selection dials set
correctly.
•
Any available rack number can be used for a new expansion rack but they
must all be unique (no duplicate rack numbers). It is best to assign expansion
rack numbers from lowest (1) to highest (7) as they are installed.
•
If a new expansion rack is added in the future, it should be assigned a rack
number that is higher than the racks that are already installed. If a new
expansion rack with a lower rack number is added and the system is then autoconfigured, the racks numbered higher than the new rack number have their
I/O reference addresses shifted in the reference tables. Any existing program
logic using those references would need to be adjusted to use the new
references.
•
When autoconfiguring an I/O Station with expansion racks, either all racks
must be powered from the same source or the expansion racks must be
powered up before the main rack.
•
To add another expansion rack to the I/O Station, the I/O Station must be
powered down. After adding the expansion rack, power up the I/O Station. It
will then autoconfigure.
•
To force autoconfiguration for expansion racks, first power down the ENIU.
Remove the transmitter module from the ENIU or remove the expansion cable
at the transmitter. Power up the ENIU and let it autoconfigure. Power the
ENIU down again, reattach the transmitter or cable, and power up the ENIU
again.
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
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3
Configuration
Configuring the ENIU Produced Exchange
The ENIU Produced Exchange contains input module and fault status data. Even if
your ENIU system does not use any input modules, you must configure a Produced
Exchange for the transmission of fault status data.
Phase 1 – Planning the Exchange
This phase should be done first. Planning the exchange will save time and mistakes
during the configuration phase. A worksheet should be filled out and kept as part of
your system documentation. Blank worksheets are provided at the end of this
section.
ENIU Rack Configuration Example
In this example, the ENIU rack is configured as illustrated below.
ENIU
Rack 0
Module 1
Rack 0
Module 2
Rack 0
Module 3
Rack 0
Module 4
Rack 0
Module 5
Rack 0
Module 6
%Q33-48
%I33-48
%Q17-32
%I17-32
%AQ5-8
%AI5-8
ENIU Produced Exchange Details
An ENIU can only have one Produced Exchange. It automatically configures its
own Produced Exchange, which contains only input (%I and %AI) data; the
produced exchange is automatically generated from the hardware configuration
stored in the ENIU. The ENIU’s Produced Exchange data will be sent in the same
order that the input modules are configured in the rack, from left to right. For this
example, 16 bytes of data will be sent in the following order:
•
The first four bytes contain Status data.
•
The next two bytes contains data from Module 2 (%I0033 - %I0048)
•
The next word contains data from Module 4 (%I0017 - %I0032)
•
The final eight bytes contain data from Module 6 (%AI0005 - %AI0008)
Note that each analog input produces two bytes of data.
CPU
ENIU
ENIU’s Produced Exchange
4 Bytes 2 Bytes 2 Bytes 8 Bytes
Status %I33-48 %I17-32 %AI5-8
Ethernet Cable
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ENIU Produced Exchange Memory Mapping Worksheet Example
This example worksheet shows the mapping of CPU memory to ENIU memory.
Note that the organization of memory addresses in the ENIU’s Produced Exchange
is based on the ENIU rack’s physical configuration. In automatically configuring
its Produced Exchange, the ENIU uses its stored configuration, starting with Slot 1
(from left to right). As it encounters input addresses, it adds them to the exchange
in the order in which it encounters them. Therefore, the ENIU’s Produced
Exchange is not configurable in any way by the user. For example, the first input
module the ENIU encounters when scanning its configuration from left to right is
the module in slot 2; therefore, the first byte of data the ENIU sends after the Status
data will be from the input module in slot 2.
Note that from the CPU’s standpoint this is a Consumed Exchange. Addresses in
CPU memory must be configured by the user. The first byte of an exchange is
called byte 0. All discrete addresses used in an exchange must be byte-aligned.
ENIU Produced Exchange Memory Mapping Worksheet
Produced by:
Exchange
Byte No.
CPU Memory
(assigned by user)
ENIU
Consumed by:
CPU
Data Type
ENIU Rack
Location
ENIU Memory
(assigned automatically by
ENIU)
Status
N/A
N/A
0-3
%R0050 - %R0051
4-5
6-7
%I0033 - %I0048
%I0017 - %I0032
Discrete
Discrete
Rack 0, Slot 2
Rack 0, Slot 4
%I0033 - %I0048
%I0017 - %I0032
8-15
%AI0005 - %AI0008
Analog
Slot 6, inputs 1-4
%AI0005 - %AI0008
Note
To avoid confusion, we recommend that ENIU memory addresses be
mapped to the same addresses in CPU memory; however, this is not a
requirement (any applicable CPU memory addresses can be used).
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Phase 2 – Configuring the PLC CPU to Receive the ENIU Produced
Exchange
This section uses the data from the planning phase in the example shown in the
previous section. This example uses an IC693CPU364 (which is a combination
CPU/Ethernet Interface module) as the master device in the system that will be
exchanging EGD data with the ENIU. The screens in the following figures were
copied from VersaPro Release 2.00.
GFK-1860A
•
To begin, open the Hardware Configuration File in VersaPro
•
Configure the CPU364 assigning all applicable CPU and Ethernet Interface
settings.
•
Next, right-click the CPU364 module. A short cut menu will appear as
shown in the next figure.
•
On the short cut menu, choose Ethernet Global Data. The Ethernet Global
Data configuration window will appear.
•
Select the Consumed Exchanges tab because the ENIU’s Produced
exchange becomes the CPU364’s Consumed exchange. See the next
figure.
Chapter 3 Configuring an Ethernet NIU and I/O Station
3-19
3
•
Note that the ENIU only supports one Produced exchange and one Consumed
exchange. Begin configuring the CPU’s Consumed exchange (to receive the ENIU’s
Produced exchange) by clicking the Add Exch. button.
•
In the Exchange field, you must enter 1 for the Exchange Number. See next figure.
Local
Producer’s
(CPU364)
IP Address
Exchange
Table
Range
Table
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Configuration
•
3
Configure the following parameters:
Exchange. Enter the exchange number. The ENIU only produces one
exchange, and it must be set to a value of 1.
Adapter Name. This is the configured Adapter Name of the CPU364. It
was configured previously in the CPU configuration window.
Producer ID. The IP address of the ENIU (3.16.32.2 for this example).
Group ID. Since the exchange is only being sent to the CPU364 and not
to a group, this is set to 0.
Consumed Period. This field sets how frequently this exchange is
produced. The default is 200 ms. This is probably too slow for many
applications. We will set it to 30 ms for this example. The lower the
value, the more frequently the exchanges will occur; however this also
increases network traffic. (Whether the network traffic increase is an issue
depends on whether other devices besides the CPU364 and ENIU are using
this network. If these are the only two devices on the network, then it’s not
an issue.)
Update Timout. Should be set to a value at least twice the value of the
ENIU producer exchange period value. If the CPU364’s Ethernet Interface
does not receive an exchange from the ENIU within the time set in this
parameter, it will declare the occurrence of a refresh error.
Once configured, the Exchange Table should look similar to the following figure.
•
Next, configure the Range Table for the CPU364’s consumer memory
addresses that will be used to store the ENIU’s produced data. The data you
entered in the ENIU Produced Exchange Memory Mapping Worksheet will be
used to configure the Range Table.
Set the Status reference address first (in the first row of the Range
Table). You can fill in the Reference field by clicking it and selecting
the memory type from the drop-down list.
Click the Low Point field and enter a starting address number for this
range. The Hi Point field will be filled in by the software based on the
Reference and Low Point values.
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Chapter 3 Configuring an Ethernet NIU and I/O Station
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Enter a Description to help you identify this data range.
Click the Add Range button. This will active a row in the Range
Table.
Click the Reference field and choose a memory type (such as %R,
%AI, %I, etc.) from the drop-down menu.
Click the Low Point field and enter a start address number for this
range. Then click the High Point field and enter an end address
number for this range.
Click the Description field and enter a description to help identify this
data range.
Continue to add ranges until the exchange is fully configured. For this
example the data from the example worksheet is used. When finished,
the Ethernet Global Data window looks like the figure below.
Note that the Status word in the first row of the Range Table is for PLC exchange
status use and is not part of the exchange.
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Configuring the ENIU Consumed Exchange
The ENIU Consumed Exchange contains output module and fault command data
from the CPU. Even if your ENIU system does not use any output modules, you
must configure a Consumed Exchange for the transmission of fault command data.
Phase 1 – Planning the Exchange
This phase should be done first. Planning the exchange will save time and mistakes
during the configuration phase. A worksheet should be filled out and kept as part of
your system documentation. Blank worksheets are provided at the end of this
section
ENIU Rack Configuration Example
In this example, the ENIU rack is configured as illustrated below
ENIU
Rack 0
Slot 1
Rack 0
Slot 2
Rack 0
Slot 3
Rack 0
Slot 4
Rack 0
Slot 5
Rack 0
Slot 6
%Q33-48
%I33-48
%Q17-32
%I17-32
%AQ5-8
%AI5-8
ENIU Consumed Exchange Example Overview
The ENIU Consumed Exchange contains only output (%Q and %AQ) data. The
exchange data will be automatically written to the output modules in the order in
which the output modules are configured in the ENIU rack, from left to right; no
user configuration is required at the ENIU end. For this example, the 16 bytes of
data consumed will be written in the following order:
•
•
•
•
The first four bytes contain Control data that instruct the ENIU how to act on
fault data (if faults are present).
The next two bytes will be written to %Q0033 - %Q0048 (from module in Slot
1)
The next two bytes will be written to %Q0017 - %Q0032 (from module is Slot
3)
The final eight bytes will be written to %AQ0005 - %AQ0008 (from module
in Slot 5). Note that each analog input requires two bytes in the exchange.
Master CPU
ENIU
ENIU Consumed Exchange
8 Bytes 2 Bytes 2 Bytes 4 Bytes
%AQ5-8 %Q17-32 %Q33-48 Status
Ethernet Cable
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ENIU Consumed Exchange Example Memory Mapping Worksheet
This example worksheet shows the mapping of CPU memory to ENIU memory.
Note that the memory addresses in the ENIU are based on the ENIU rack’s physical
configuration. In automatically writing consumed data to its output modules, the
ENIU scans its rack configuration starting with Slot 1, and writes the Consumed
Exchange data it received to the output modules in the order in which it encounters
them. Therefore, the ENIU exchange addresses are not selectable by the user. For
example, the first output module encountered when scanning from left to right is the
module in slot 1; therefore, the first byte of data received (other than Control data),
will be written to the module in slot 1.
Note that from the CPU’s standpoint this is a Produced Exchange. CPU addresses
must be configured by the user. The first byte of an exchange is called byte 0. All
discrete addresses used in an exchange must be byte-aligned.
ENIU Consumed Exchange Memory Mapping Worksheet
Produced by:
Exchange
Byte No.
CPU Memory
(assigned by user)
CPU
Consumed by:
ENIU
Data Type
ENIU Rack
Location
ENIU Memory
(assigned automatically
by ENIU)
N/A
N/A
0-3
%R0200 - %R0201
Status
4-5
%Q0033 - %Q0048
Discrete
Slot 1
%Q0033 - %Q0048
6-7
%Q0017 - %Q0032
Discrete
Slot 3
%Q0017 - %Q0032
8-15
%AQ0005 - %AQ0008
Analog
Slot 5, outputs 1-4
%AQ0005 - %AQ0008
Note
To avoid confusion, we recommend that ENIU memory addresses be
mapped to the same addresses in CPU memory; however, this is not a
requirement (any applicable CPU memory addresses can be used).
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Phase 2 - Configuring the CPU to Send to the ENIU’s Consumed Exchange
The CPU364’s Produced Exchange (which is the ENIU’s Consumed Exchange) is
configured in a similar manner as the CPU364’s Consumed Exchange, described in
the previous section, “Configuring the ENIU’s Produced Exchange.”
GFK-1860A
•
To begin, access the Ethernet Global Data configuration window, as in the
previous example. Select the Produced Exchanges tab. See next figure.
•
Note that the ENIU only supports one Produced Exchange and one Consumed
Exchange. Begin configuring the Produced Exchange by clicking the Add
Exch button.
•
In the Exchange field, you must enter 1 for the Exchange number. See the next
figure.
Chapter 3 Configuring an Ethernet NIU and I/O Station
3-25
3
Local
Producer’s
(CPU364)
IP Address
Exchange
Table
Range
Table
•
Configure the following Produced Exchange fields:
Adapter Name. This field is based on the Adapter Name you already
configured for the Ethernet Interface (in the CPU364 configuration
window).
Cons Type. This field specifies the consumer type. Three choices are
offered: Group ID, IP Address, or Name. For this example, the choice is IP
Address, since only the ENIU is to receive this exchange. We will use the
ENIU’s IP address in the Cons Addr field to identify it as the consumer of
the exchange.
Cons Addr. Here we will enter the ENIU’s IP address; this is based on our
choice for the Cons Type field.
Send Type. This field is not currently configurable. It is “permanently” set
to Always.
Prod Period. This field sets how frequently this exchange is produced.
The default is 200 ms. This is probably too slow for many applications. We
will set it to 30 ms for this example, which is the same value we set for the
Consumed Period in the Consumed Exchange in the previous section.
Setting these to the same value is recommended for best efficiency.
Note
The Prod. Period parameter sets the network production time and is
independent of I/O scan time. For example, if you process changes at a
20 ms rate and you produce at 10 ms, you may still not see every change
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if the I/O is scanning at a 25 ms. rate. I/O scan is affected by number and
type of I/O modules, TAN configuration, and network loading.
Reply Rate. This field is not currently used. It is “permanently” set to 0.
Once configured, the Exchange Table should look similar to the following
figure.
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3
•
Next, configure the Producer’s memory addresses that will be the source of
the data shared in the exchange.
Set the Status reference address first (in the first row of the Range
Table). You can fill in the Reference field by clicking it and selecting
the memory type from the drop-down list.
Click the Low Point field and enter a starting address number for this
range. The Hi Point field will be filled in by the software based on the
Reference and Low Point values.
Enter a Description to help you remember what the data range is used
for.
Click the Add Range button. This will active a row in the Range
Table.
Click the Reference field and choose a memory type (such as %R,
%AI, %I, etc.) from the drop-down menu.
Click the Low Point field and enter a start address number for this
range. Then click the High Point field and enter an end address
number for this range.
Click the Description field and enter a description to help identify this
data range.
Continue to add ranges until the exchange is fully configured. For this
example the data shown in the example worksheet is used. When
finished, the Ethernet Global Data window looks like the figure below.
Note that the Status word in the first row of the Range Table is for PLC internal
status use and is not part of the exchange.
3-28
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
Configuration
3
Blank Memory Mapping Worksheet
Make copies of this blank worksheet and use it to configure your ENIU exchanges. If not all
data will fit on this worksheet, continue it on the worksheet on the next page.
Exchange Memory Mapping Worksheet
Produced by:
Exchange
Byte No.
0
1
2
3
GFK-1860A
CPU Memory
Consumed by:
Data Type
ENIU Rack
Location
ENIU Memory
Status
Status
Status
Status
N/A
N/A
Chapter 3 Configuring an Ethernet NIU and I/O Station
3-29
3
Blank Memory Mapping Continuation Worksheet
If your exchange will not fit on the previous worksheet, copy this blank continuation worksheet
and use it to continue your exchange data.
Exchange Memory Mapping Continuation Worksheet
Produced by:
Exchange
Byte No.
3-30
CPU Memory
Consumed by:
Data Type
ENIU Rack
Location
ENIU Memory
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
Configuration
3
EGD Exchange Status and Control Bytes for Fault Handling
Both ENIU exchanges have four bytes dedicated to Status or Control data. These
four bytes are the first data sent in the exchanges. This section describes how to
configure this portion of the exchanges. In the exchanges produced by the ENIU,
the status bytes contain fault status information from the ENIU. In the exchanges
consumed by the ENIU, the status bytes contain Control commands from the master
device.
Control Bytes for Consumed Exchange
For the ENIU’s Consumed Exchange, only Control Byte 1 is active; the other three
bytes are always set to 0. Control Byte 1 is used to acknowledge and clear ENIU
faults.
Control Byte 1
7
CLR
Bit(s)
6
5
4
0 or 1
1-6
7
always 0
0 or 1
Control Byte 2
2
1
Reserved (always 0)
Value
0
3
0
ACK
Meaning
Fault acknowledged command. When this bit changes from 0
to 1, the ENIU updates the ENIU status data to contain the next
fault. If there is no next fault, the ENIU clears the ENIU status
data.
Reserved (always 0)
Clear all faults command. When this bit changes from 0 to 1,
the ENIU clears its internal fault table. It also turns off its
FAULT LED unless a new fault is immediately logged or an
existing fault condition continues to exist.
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
4
3
2
1
0
4
3
2
1
0
Reserved (always 0)
Control Byte 3
7
6
5
Reserved (always 0)
Control Byte 4
7
6
5
Reserved (always 0)
GFK-1860A
Chapter 3 Configuring an Ethernet NIU and I/O Station
3-31
3
Consumed Exchange Control Byte Examples
Value of
Control Byte 1
0
No faults acknowledged (NACK). The ENIU takes no resulting action.
Changes from 0 to
1
128
Changes from 1 to
0
3-32
Description
Indicates that the last fault sent by the ENIU is acknowledged (ACK) by the
master. As a result, the ENIU sends the next fault in its fault table. If no
additional faults exist, the ENIU sends the “NO FAULT” indication. Note
that the ENIU does not clear any faults due to an acknowledgement; use the
Clear Fault Table (128) command to clear the fault table.
Commands the ENIU to clear its fault table.
No fault is acknowledged by the master. If the ENIU sent a fault in its
previous exchange, it will send the same fault again. If the ENIU has sent all
of its faults and they have all been acknowledged, it will send a NO FAULT
status in its next exchange.
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
Configuration
3
Status Bytes for ENIU’s Produced Exchange
The first four bytes of the ENIU’s produced exchange are used to report fault status
information from the ENIU to the master device. The first three bytes refer to the
location of the fault. The fourth byte contains the status code. A table of fault
status codes can be found in Chapter 6. If a fault exists, bit 7 of Status Byte 0 will
be set to 1 (value = 128). If no fault exists, bit 7 of Status Byte 0 will be set to 0. If
the ENIU is consuming exchanges, bit 6 of Status Byte 0 will be set to 0; if not
consuming, bit 6 will be set to 1.
Status Byte 0
Bit(s)
7
6
FLT
NC
5
4
3
2
Reserved (all bits=0)
Value
1
0
Rack Number (0-7)
Meaning
0-2
0-7
The physical “rack” location of the faulted I/O module. The value
0 refers to the ENIU main rack.
3-5
0
Reserved
6
0 or 1
7
0 or 1
0 = Normal operation – consuming.
1 = Not consuming (NC)
0 = no fault data present. The remaining fields in bytes 0-3 may be
ignored.
1 = a fault is present. The remaining fields in bytes 0-3 provide the
rack, slot, point, and fault code of the fault.
Status Byte 1
7
6
5
4
3
Reserved (all bits=0)
2
1
0
Slot Number (0-8)
Bit(s)
Value
Meaning
0-3
0-8
The “slot” location of the faulted I/O module. The value 0 refers to
the ENIU itself.
4-7
0
Reserved
Status Byte 2
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Point Number(0-63)
GFK-1860A
Chapter 3 Configuring an Ethernet NIU and I/O Station
3-33
3
Bit(s)
Value
Meaning
0-7
0, 1-63
If no faults exist (Bytes 1 and 2 = 0), this byte will default to 0.
If faults exist (Bytes 1 and 2 indicate faulted rack and slot location)
and this byte = 0, it indicates a module-level fault on the module
indicated by Bytes 1 and 2. If this byte equals a value between 1
and 63 inclusive, it indicates the faulted point number on the module
indicated by Bytes 1 and 2.
Status Byte 3
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Fault code (0-63)
Bit(s)
Value
Meaning
0-7
0-63
See Chapter 6 for a list of the fault codes.
Examples
The following examples show the first four bytes (Status bytes) of the ENIU
produced exchange and the interpretation of the values.
Binary
Decimal
Meaning
1000000 00000100 00000001 00000101
128,4,1,5
Module in Rack 0, Slot 4 has a blown
fuse fault (fault code 5) on point 1
10000001 00000110 00000010 00001011 129,6,2,11 Module in Rack 1, Slot 6 has a high
alarm fault (fault code 11) on point 2
3-34
01000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 64,0,0,0
ENIU is not consuming
00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000 0,0,0,0
There are no faults
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
Configuration
3
Fault Handling Example (User Programming Required)
In the example below, the ENIU detects three faults after it sends its second produced exchange.
Master Exchanges 1, 2, and 3. Master’s Control Byte is 0 since it has not received any fault
data from the ENIU.
ENIU Exchanges 1 and 2. ENIU detects no faults, so sends a NO FAULT status.
ENIU Exchange 3. ENIU has detected three faults, so it sends the data for Fault #1.
Master Exchange 4. The Master changes its Control Byte status from 0 to 1, acknowledging
receipt of the ENIU’s Fault #1 data.
ENIU Exchange 4. In response, ENIU sends Fault #2 data in its Status bytes.
Master Exchange 5. In response, the Master resets its Control Byte to logic 0.
ENIU Exchange 5. The Master didn’t acknowledge, so ENIU sends Fault #2 data again.
Master Exchange 6. The Master acknowledges by setting its Control Byte to logic 1.
ENIU Exchange 6. In response to this acknowledgement, the ENIU sends Fault #3 data.
Master Exchange 7. In response, the Master resets its Control Byte to logic 0.
ENIU Exchange 7. The Master didn’t acknowledge, so ENIU sends Fault #3 data again.
Master Exchange 8. The Master acknowledges by setting its Control Byte to logic 1.
ENIU Exchange 8. ENIU recognizes acknowledgement, but has no more faults, so sends
the NO FAULT status, and continues to do so until another fault is detected.
Master Exchange 9. Master sends the Clear Fault Table command (128), which causes the
ENIU to clear its fault table and turn off its FAULT LED.
Master
ENIU
Produced
Control Data
Exchange No.
1
GFK-1860A
NACK (0) →
2
NACK (0) →
3
NACK (0) →
4
ACK (1) →
5
NACK (0) →
6
ACK (1) →
7
NACK (0) →
8
ACK (1) →
9
CLEAR (128) →
Status
Data
Produced
Exchange No.
← NO FAULT
1
← NO FAULT
2
← Fault #1 Data
3
← Fault #2 Data
4
← Fault #2 Data
5
← Fault #3 Data
6
← Fault #3 Data
7
← NO FAULT
8
Chapter 3 Configuring an Ethernet NIU and I/O Station
FAULT
LED
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
3-35
Modbus
Chapter
4
This section describes the implementation of Modbus/TCP communications on the
Ethernet NIU.
„
„
„
GFK-1860A
Modbus Protocol
ƒ
Modbus Connections
ƒ
Modbus Port
ƒ
Modbus Conformance Classes
ƒ
Modbus Message Format
Modbus Tables
ƒ
Register/Input Register Table
ƒ
Input Discrete Table
ƒ
Coil Table
Supported Function Codes
ƒ
Read Multiple Registers
ƒ
Write Multiple Registers
ƒ
Read Coils
ƒ
Read Input Discretes
ƒ
Read Input Registers
ƒ
Write Coil
ƒ
Write Single Register
ƒ
Read Exception Status
4-1
4
Modbus Protocol
The Ethernet NIU supports a Modbus/TCP server with the following features:
Modbus Connections
The Ethernet NIU supports up to 10 simultaneous connections. This allows for the fast
re-establishment of a connection. If a Modbus connection is lost, an immediate attempt
at reconnecting by the client will be successful.
Modbus Port
Modbus communication on the Ethernet NIU is supported on the Modbus industry
standard port 502.
Modbus Conformance Classes
The Ethernet NIU supports Modbus Conformance classes 0 and 1.
Modbus Message Format
The Modbus/TCP protocol has a specific message format as follows:
Table 4-1. Modbus Message Format
BYTE 0 – 1
BYTE 2 – 3
BYTE 4
BYTE 5
BYTE 6
BYTE 7
BYTE 8 on
Transaction Identifier – unique ID generated by the
client.
Protocol Identifier = 0
Length Field (upper byte) = 0 (all msgs < 256)
Length Field (lower byte) = number of bytes following
Unit Identifier
Modbus Function Code
Data as needed
NOTE: The ‘CRC-16’ or ‘LRC’ check fields normally associated with Modbus are not
needed in Modbus/TCP since the TCP/IP and link layer checksum mechanisms are used
to verify packet delivery.
Modbus Byte Order
MODBUS uses a ‘big-endian’ representation for addresses and data items. This means
that when a numerical quantity larger than a single byte is transmitted (as in a word or
double-word), the MOST significant byte is sent first. So, for example:
The quantity 0x1234 would be transmitted in the order 0x12 0x34
The quantity 0x12345678L would be transmitted in the order 0x12 0x34 0x56 0x78
Modbus Bit Order
If a series of bits is read as a register, such as %I1 to %I16, the highest numbered bit
(%I16 in this example) is the least significant, and the lowest numbered bit (%I1 in this
example) is the most significant.
4-2
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
4
Modbus
Modbus Tables
The Modbus protocol’s reference table definition is different from the internal structure
of the Ethernet NIU tables. Modbus refers to a Register, Input Register, Input Discrete
and Coil table; the Ethernet NIU refers to a Discrete Input (%I), Discrete Output (%Q),
Analog Input (%AI), Analog Output (%AQ) and Fault Table. The following table shows
how each Modbus table has been mapped to the ENIU tables. Note that everything in
this table refers to physical memory inside the ENIU. In effect, ENIU memory has been
given Modbus names. For example, if we issue a Read Inputs Discrete command to read
inputs in the Modbus Input Discrete table, we are actually reading from the ENIU’s %I
internal table, which is mapped to the Modbus Input Discrete table.
Table 4-2. Modbus Reference Tables
Modbus
Modbus Input Modbus Input
Register Table Register Table Discrete Table
0 – 127
(16-bit words)
128 – 255
(16-bit words)
256 – 383
(16-bit words)
384 – 511
(16-bit words)
1024 – 1087
(16-bit words)
0 – 127
(16-bit words)
128 – 255
(16-bit words)
256 – 383
(16-bit words)
384 – 511
(16-bit words)
1024 – 1087
(16-bit words)
Modbus Coil
Table
ENIU Internal
Tables
---
%I1 – 2048
(bits)
%AI1 – 128
(16-bit words)
%Q1 – 2048
(bits)
%AQ1 – 128
(16-bit words)
Fault Table
(32 Faults x two 16bit words per fault)
0 – 2047
(bits)
-----
---
---
0 – 2047
(bits)
---
---
---
Modbus Register/Input Register Table
The Ethernet NIU makes no distinction between the Modbus Register and Modbus Input
Register tables. The Modbus Register and Modbus Input Register tables are identically
mapped to all four NIU I/O tables as well as the Fault table.
Applicable Functions
„
Read Multiple Registers
All NIU tables can be read with this function.
„
Write Multiple Registers
Only the %Q and %AQ memory types may be written to with this function.
„
Read Input Registers
All NIU tables can be read with this function.
„
Write Single Register
Only the %Q, %AQ, and Fault tables may be written to with this function.
GFK-1860A
Chapter 4 Modbus
4-3
4
Modbus Input Discrete Table
The Modbus Input Discrete table is mapped exclusively to the NIU Discrete Input (%I)
table.
Applicable Functions
„
Read Input Discretes
Modbus Coil Table
The Modbus Coil table is mapped exclusively to the NIU Discrete Output (%Q) table.
Applicable Functions
4-4
„
Read Coils
„
Write Coil
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
4
Modbus
Supported Function Codes
The Function Codes are defined for the Modbus memory mapping, so to determine what
area of NIU memory is affected, refer back to Table 4-2, which maps the Modbus table
names to their corresponding NIU table names.
The Ethernet NIU supports the following Modbus function codes:
„
Read Multiple Registers (Function Code 3)
„
Write Multiple Registers (Function Code 16)
„
Read Coils (Function Code 1)
„
Read Input Discretes (Function Code 2)
„
Read Input Registers (Function Code 4)
„
Write Coil (Function Code 5)
„
Write Single Register (Function Code 6)
„
Read Exception Status (Function Code 7)
NOTE: The following function request and response message descriptions start with the
Modbus Function Code (byte 0 is actually byte 7 of the Modbus message format). See
Table 4-1, “Modbus Message Format.”
Read Multiple Registers
This command reads from 1 to 125 16-bit words from the Modbus Register table. Any
part of the Modbus Register table can be read from using this function. When reading
from the fault table, however, the entire fault table must be read.
The Read Multiple Registers request is in the following form:
BYTE 0
BYTE 1-2
BYTE 3-4
Function Code = 3
Register Table Offset
Word Count (1-125)
The Read Multiple Registers response is in the following form:
BYTE 0
BYTE 1
BYTE 2 – (B +
1)
GFK-1860A
Chapter 4 Modbus
Function Code = 3
Byte Count of response (B = 2 x word count of
request)
Register Values
4-5
4
If the request accesses an invalid offset or it contains an invalid length, the response is an
Exception Response in the following form:
BYTE 0
BYTE 1
Function Code = 0x83
Exception Code = 2
Read Multiple Registers Examples:
Register Table Offset = 0 and word count = 2 returns %I1-32.
Register Table Offset = 383 and word count = 2 returns %Q2033-2048 and %AQ1.
Register Table Offset = 1024 and word count = 64 returns the fault table.
Any combination of Register Table Offset and Word Count that accesses an offset > 511
and < 1024 produces an Exception Response.
Trying to read the fault table and giving a Register Table Offset > 1024 or a Word Count
<> 64 produces an Exception Response.
Write Multiple Registers
This command writes from 1 to 100 16-bit words to the Modbus Register table. Only the
part of the Modbus Register table mapped to the %Q and %AQ I/O tables may be written
to using this function.
The Write Multiple Registers request is in the following form:
BYTE 0
BYTE 1-2
BYTE 3-4
BYTE 5
BYTE 6 – (B + 5)
Function Code = 0x10
Register Table Offset
Word Count(1-100)
Byte Count (B = 2 x word count)
Register Values
The Write Multiple Registers response is in the following form:
BYTE 0
BYTE 1-2
BYTE 3-4
Function Code = 0x10
Register Table Offset (same as request)
Word Count (same as request)
If the request accesses an invalid offset or it contains an invalid length, the response is an
Exception Response in the following form:
BYTE 0
BYTE 1
Function Code = 0x90
Exception Code = 2
Write Multiple Registers Examples:
Register Table Offset = 256 and Word Count = 2 writes the Register Values into %Q132.
4-6
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
4
Modbus
Register Table Offset = 383 and Word Count = 2 writes the Register Values into
%Q2033-2048 and %AQ1.
Any combination of Register Table Offset and Word Count that accesses an offset < 256
or > 511 produces an Exception Response.
Read Coils
This command reads from 1 to 2000 bits from the Modbus Coil table.
The Read Coils request is in the following form:
BYTE 0
BYTE 1-2
BYTE 3-4
Function Code = 1
Coil Table Offset
Bit Count (1-2000)
The Read Coils response is in the following form:
BYTE 0
BYTE 1
BYTE 2 – (B + 1)
Function Code = 1
Byte count of response; B = (bit count of request + 7)/8
Bit Values (least significant bit is first coil)
If the request accesses an invalid offset or it contains an invalid length, the response is an
Exception Response in the following form:
BYTE 0
BYTE 1
Function Code = 0x81
Exception Code = 2
Read Coils Examples:
Coil Table Offset = 0 and Bit Count = 1 returns coil %Q1.
Coil Table Offset = 0 and Bit Count = 2000 returns coil values %Q1-2000.
Coil Table Offset = 4 and Bit Count = 13 returns coil values %Q5-17
Any combination of Coil Table Offset and Bit Count that accesses an offset > 2047
produces an Exception Response.
Read Input Discretes
This command reads from 1 to 2000 bits from the Modbus Input Discrete table.
The Read Input Discretes request is in the following form:
BYTE 0
BYTE 1-2
BYTE 3-4
Function Code = 2
Input Discrete Table Offset
Bit Count (1-2000)
The Read Coils response is in the following form:
GFK-1860A
Chapter 4 Modbus
4-7
4
BYTE 0
BYTE 1
Function Code = 2
Byte count of response (B = (bit count of request +
7)/8)
BYTE 2 – (B + 1) Bit Values (least significant bit is first coil)
If the request accesses an invalid offset or it contains an invalid length, the response is an
Exception Response in the following form:
BYTE 0
BYTE 1
Function Code = 0x82
Exception Code = 2
Read Input Discretes Examples:
Input Discrete Table Offset = 0 and Bit Count = 1 returns input discrete %I1.
Input Discrete Table Offset = 0 and Bit Count = 2000 returns input discrete values %I12000.
Input Discrete Table Offset = 4 and Bit Count = 13 returns input discrete values %Q5-17
Any combination of Input Discrete Table Offset and Bit Count that accesses an offset >
2047 produces an Exception Response.
Read Input Registers
This command reads from 1 to 125 16-bit words from the Modbus Register table. This
command is handled exactly as the Read Multiple Registers command.
The Read Input Registers request is in the following form:
BYTE 0
BYTE 1-2
BYTE 3-4
Function Code = 4
Register Table Offset
Word Count (1-125)
The Read Coils response is in the following form:
BYTE 0
BYTE 1
Function Code = 4
Byte Count of response (B = 2 x word count of
request)
BYTE 2 – (B Register Values
+ 1)
If the request accesses an invalid offset or it contains an invalid length, the response is an
Exception Response in the following form:
BYTE 0
BYTE 1
Function Code = 0x84
Exception Code = 2
Read Input Registers Examples:
See Read Multiple Registers section for examples.
4-8
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
4
Modbus
Write Coil
This command writes 1 bit to the Modbus Coil table.
The Write Coil request is in the following form:
BYTE 0
BYTE 1-2
BYTE 3
BYTE 4
Function Code = 5
Coil Table Offset
= 0xFF to turn coil ON, = 0 to turn coil OFF
=0
The Write Coil response is in the following form:
BYTE 0
BYTE 1-2
BYTE 3
BYTE 4
Function Code = 5
Coil Table Offset (same as request)
= 0xFF to turn coil ON, = 0 to turn coil OFF (same
as request)
=0
If the request accesses an invalid offset, the response is an Exception Response in the
following form:
BYTE 0
BYTE 1
Function Code = 0x85
Exception Code = 2
Write Coil Examples:
Coil Table Offset = 0 and value = 0xFF turns coil %Q1 ON.
Coil Table Offset = 0 and value = 0 turns coil %Q1 OFF.
Any Coil Table Offset > 2047 produces an Exception Response.
Write Single Register
This command writes one 16-bit word to the Modbus Register table. Only the part of the
Modbus Register table mapped to the %Q and %AQ I/O tables or the first word of the
Fault table may be written to using this function.
The Write Single Register request is in the following form:
BYTE 0
BYTE 1-2
BYTE 3-4
Function Code = 6
Register Table Offset
Register Value
The Write Single Register response is in the following form:
BYTE 0
BYTE 1-2
BYTE 3-4
GFK-1860A
Chapter 4 Modbus
Function Code = 6
Register Table Offset (same as request)
Register Value (same as request)
4-9
4
If the request accesses an invalid offset, the response is an Exception Response in the
following form:
BYTE 0
BYTE 1
Function Code = 0x86
Exception Code = 2
Write Single Register Examples:
Register Table Offset = 256 writes the register value into %Q1-32.
Register Table Offset = 384 writes the register value into %AQ1.
Register Table Offset = 1024 and register value = 0 clears the Fault table.
Any Register Table Offset < 256 or (> 511 and < 1024) or > 1024 produces an Exception
Response.
Read Exception Status
This command reads one 8-bit status of the Ethernet NIU.
The Read Exception Status request is in the following form:
BYTE 0 Function Code = 7
The Read Exception Status response is in the following form:
BYTE 0 Function Code = 7
BYTE 1 Exception Status
Exception Status Data Format
7
6
5
4
Unused
4-10
3
2
1
0
Fault
Present
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
Chapter
Ethernet Global Data
5
This section describes the implementation of Ethernet Global Data (EGD)
communications on the Ethernet NIU.
„
„
EGD Protocol
EGD Exchange Definition
EGD Overview
Ethernet Global Data is a protocol of GE that provides efficient connectionless
periodic data transfer over an Ethernet network. It operates over the industry
standard User Datagram Protocol (UDP). The UDP protocol works at the ISO
Transport layer. It supports fast, efficient communications because it is
connectionless and is not acknowledged.
Caution
Since Ethernet Global Data (EGD) communications is
connectionless and is not acknowledged, error-checking and
interlocking circuitry must be designed into the application to
ensure the safety of personnel and equipment in the event that
EGD data is lost. Failure to heed this warning could result in
injury to personnel and damage to equipment.
In EGD communications, a device (called a producer) shares a portion of its
memory contents periodically with one or more other devices (called consumers).
This sharing of memory between devices is called an exchange.
GFK-1860A
5-1
5
Exchange Parameters
When an exchange is configured, several key pieces of information must be
included:
• Exchange ID. The unique identification of the exchange configuration
• Producer ID. The unique identification of the producing (sending) device
• The area of memory in the producing device to be exchanged
• How frequently the exchange will be produced
• Consumer ID. The unique identification of the consuming (receiving) device
or devices
• The area of memory where the received data is to be stored for each
consuming device
Note that a device can be configured to be both a producer and a consumer of
exchanges.
5-2
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
5
Ethernet Global Data
EGD Protocol
The Ethernet NIU supports Ethernet Global Data communication with the following
features:
Number of EGD Exchanges
The Ethernet NIU supports one EGD consumed data exchange and one EGD produced
data exchange. The consumed data exchange is comprised of ENIU control data and the
discrete and analog module output data being sent to the ENIU. The produced data
exchanged is comprised of ENIU status data and the discrete and analog module input
data being sent from the ENIU.
EGD Port
EGD communication on the Ethernet NIU is supported on the EGD defined UDP Data
Port 18246 (4746H).
EGD Destination Addresses
The Ethernet NIU allows EGD exchanges to be sent to or received from a single
destination address (IP Unicast addressing), a group of addresses (IP Multicast
addressing), or all EGD nodes (IP Broadcast addressing). NOTE: Unicast addressing is
recommended unless there are special requirements. The following table shows the
defined Multicast addresses for transmission of data exchanges to a group of nodes:
Table 5-1. EGD Multicast Address Assignments
Parameter
Group 1
Group 2
:
:
Group 32
IP Address
224.0.7.1
224.0.7.2
:
:
224.0.7.32
EGD Exchange Definition
As stated earlier the Ethernet NIU supports two EGD exchanges; one consumed, and one
produced. The ENIU consumed exchange will be sent from a master to the ENIU, and the
ENIU produced exchange will be sent from the ENIU to a master.
Consumed Exchange
The ENIU consumes one exchange containing all of the output data for discrete output (Q)
and analog output (AQ) areas configured in the ENIU’s network I/O map. The data is
received in the same sequence the modules occupy in the I/O Station. If a single module
receives both discrete and analog output data, its discrete data is located before its analog
data. The maximum overall length of this output data is 512 bytes. An additional 4 bytes
at the start of the data are used by the master for control operations. The total maximum
length of the data portion of the exchange is 516 bytes.
GFK-1860A
Chapter 5 Ethernet Global Data
5-3
5
Consumed Exchange Data
First byte
Control
To
NIU
Last byte
Discrete and Analog Module Output Data
4 bytes
Maximum Output Data Length = 512 bytes
Maximum Total Data Length = 516 bytes
The following is an example of how the byte ordering is arranged in an EGD consumed
exchange. Please note that the order is based on module order not reference (memory
address) order.
Control Data
Discrete and Analog Module Data
Byte 1 Byte 2 Byte 3 Byte 4 Byte 1 Byte 2 Byte 3 Byte 4 Byte 5 Byte 6 Byte 7
ENIU
32-Bit Discrete
Output Module
%Q25
8-Bit Discrete
Output Module
%Q1
16-Bit Discrete
Output Module
%Q9
Slot 1
Slot 2
Slot 3
Note
If a discrete output does not use a multiple of bytes, extra bits in
the byte will be padded with zeros.
Produced Exchange
The ENIU produces one exchange containing all of the input data for the configured
discrete input (I) and analog input (AI) areas configured in the ENIU’s network I/O map.
The data is sent in the same sequence the modules occupy in the I/O Station. If a single
module provides both discrete and analog input data, its discrete data is placed before its
analog data. The maximum overall length of this input data is 512 bytes. An additional 4
bytes at the start of the data are used by the master for control operations. So the total
maximum length of the data portion of the exchange is 516 bytes.
5-4
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
5
Ethernet Global Data
Produced Exchange Data
First byte
To
Master
Status
Last byte
Discrete and Analog Module Input Data
4 bytes
Maximum Input Data Length = 512 bytes
Maximum Total Data Length = 516 bytes
The following is an example of how the byte ordering is arranged in an EGD produced
exchange. Please note that the order is based on module order and not on reference
(memory address) type or order. As implied in the following figure, each analog channel
required two bytes of memory.
Status Data
Discrete and Analog Module Exchange Data
Byte Byte Byte Byte Byte Byte Byte Byte Byte Byte Byte Byte Byte Byte Byte
3
3
10
1
2
4
1
2
4
5
6
7
8
9
11
ENIU
4-Channel Analog
Input Module
%AI5
16-Bit Discrete
Input Module
%I9
8-Bit Discrete
Input Module
%I1
Slot 1
Slot 2
Slot 3
Notes
If a discrete output does not use a multiple of bytes, extra bits in
the byte will be padded with zeros.
If an empty slot is left in the I/O (carrier present, but no I/O
module), it will not affect the EGD exchanges. If a module is
added later in the empty slot and configured, the ENIU
exchange(s) will change to add the new module in the appropriate
place in the data. The controller EGD exchange(s) will need to be
changed to match.
GFK-1860A
Chapter 5 Ethernet Global Data
5-5
Troubleshooting
Chapter
6
Overview
This chapter discusses the following topics:
•
Checking status and operation with the ENIU’s LEDs. The ENIU has
five LED indicator lights on its front panel that indicate both normal and fault
conditions. This section discusses how to interpret these LED indicators.
•
•
Reading the ENIU’s fault codes. The ENIU has a fault table that stores up to
32 fault codes. This section describes how to read and interpret the fault table codes.
Using FTP to obtain network status and version information. Using
the FTP utility to obtain status and version files from the ENIU.
•
EGD Troubleshooting. Checking common EGD communication problems.
•
Determining the ENIU’s MAC address. The ENIU’s MAC address is
printed on the front cover of the ENIU. However, if it becomes illegible or you
suspect it is incorrect, you can determine it using the method described.
•
Determining the ENIU’s IP address. If the ENIU’s stored IP address is not
known, you can determine it using the method described.
GFK-1860A
6-1
6
Checking Status and Operation with the ENIU’s LEDs
When power is applied to the ENIU, you can verify status and operation by checking the
module LEDs.
LED Power up Sequences
•
Normally, the PWR LED will light immediately when power is applied. After a selftest, which takes about 5 seconds, the OK LED should light and, if the ENIU has an
active network connection, the LAN LED should begin flashing (or could be ON
steady if communications traffic is heavy) at that time also.
•
If the ENIU’s rotary switches are set to either 900 (IP address check) or 901 (MAC
address check), upon power up, the PWR LED will light immediately, but the other
four LEDs will cycle through an address identification sequence before assuming
their normal roles as status indicators. An address identification sequence takes
about 45 seconds to complete. For normal operation, set the rotary switches to a
number in the range of 000 to 254 (000 would be a good choice).
NOTE: The rotary switches may also be set within the range of 1-254 to set an IP
address, as discussed earlier in Chapter 2 in the section “Setting the Network IP
Address.” Setting the switches in the range of 1-254 will not delay the normal LED
status operation at power up.
LED Descriptions
PWR
OK
FAULTS
LAN
STAT
PWR
Green when power is applied to the ENIU.
OK
FAULTS
Green when the ENIU is operational.
If no faults are detected, this LED is OFF
Amber if the ENIU has detected a fault with itself or an I/O module.
Blinks Amber pattern if the ENIU has encountered a fatal error.
Green, solid or blinking, when network packets are received or transmitted.
Indicates received data addressed to the ENIU as well as network broadcast data
(sent to all network devices).
OFF when the ENIU senses no communication on the network.
LAN
STAT (Modbus
Mode)
STAT (EGD
Mode)
6-2
Green indicates at least one Modbus TCP Master connected.
Amber blinking at 1/sec rate indicates an IP address problem (see the next section
“IP Address Problems”).
Green indicates exchanges are being received.
Amber blinking at 1/sec rate indicates an IP address problem (see the next section
“IP Address Problems”).
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
6
Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting Using LED Indicator Lights
PWR LED
ON
The ENIU’s power comes from the power supply that is mounted on the front of the
ENIU’s case. If power is applied to the power supply, the ENIU’s PWR LED should be
ON. (NOTE: A power supply with expanded 3.3V capability is required by the ENIU,
such as the IC200PWR002 model.)
OFF
If this LED is OFF, check the following
•
Check that the input power to the power supply is present.
•
If input power is present, try substituting a known good power supply.
•
If the power supply checks OK, the problem may be a defective ENIU, or a problem
with one of the modules connected to the ENIU. Turn of input power to the power
supply, and then separate the ENIU from all of the connected modules. Now try
powering up the ENIU again. If the PWR LED is still OFF, the problem is in the
ENIU. If the PWR LED is ON, the problem is in one of the other modules.
Reconnect them one-by-one to determine which one is “killing” the power supply.
OK LED
ON
Normally, upon power up, the ENIU will conduct a series of self-tests. If these tests are
passed, the ENIU turns on its OK LED. This LED should normally come on within a few
seconds after power is applied.
OFF
If this LED is OFF, it means the ENIU did not pass its power-up self-tests and has an
internal problem.
FAULTS LED
OFF
This LED should be OFF for normal operation.
ON Steady or Flashing
If this LED in not OFF, check the following
•
GFK-1860A
If ON steady, the ENIU has detected a non-fatal fault. The fault may be related to
the ENIU or to a connected module. Check the ENIU fault table to determine which
fault or faults are present. See the section “ENIU Fault Table” for details.
Chapter 6 Troubleshooting
6-3
6
•
If FLASHING with amber (yellow) color, a fatal fault is present. The ENIU
will be disabled by the presence of this fatal fault. The flashing will be a
repeating 2,5 pattern (flashes twice, pauses, flashes five times, pauses, repeats).
This can indicate either a software error (very unlikely) or, more commonly, a
configuration error. A configuration error occurs if a configuration being stored
from the programmer is rejected as unusable (see next topic “Causes for
Configuration Store Fault”), or if a network disconnect occurs during a
configuration store. There are a number of rules that are checked on a
configuration. It is suggest that if a user is having problems with a store being
rejected, autoconfigure the ENIU into a temporary folder and alter one setting at
a time until the problem is isolated.
NOTE: When a store is rejected or a disconnect occurs during a store, a power cycle is
required to restart the ENIU and it will autoconfigure after the power cycle.
Causes for Configuration Store Fault
The following rules are likely causes of a configuration being rejected:
General Configuration Problems
•
Subnet mask of 0.0.0.0 or 255.255.255.255
•
Gateway IP address of 0 in subnet or broadcast address (unless 0.0.0.0)
•
Gateway IP not in subnet (unless 0.0.0.0)
EGD Configuration Problems
If (1) the produced exchange type is changed from the default IP Address, or (2) the
produced IP is changed from the default of 0.0.0.0, or (3) the consumed IP is changed
from the default of 0.0.0.0, then it is assumed the device is to run EGD instead of Modbus
TCP, and the following rules are checked during configuration store:
•
If produced exchange type is IP, the produced IP address must not be 0.0.0.0
•
If produced exchange type is Group, group ID must be between 1 and 32
inclusive
•
Consumed exchange cannot be 0.0.0.0 or 255.255.255.255.
•
Consumed group ID cannot be above 32
NOTE: If EGD is configured, both consumption and production must be configured, even
if one side is not used. It is suggested that the time periods be adjusted for the unused side
to minimize network traffic. However, even if one side is “not used,” its exchange still
contains four bytes of Fault or Control Status data.
Example: If the EGD ENIU system is used only for outputs (Consumed exchanges), the
Produced exchange must be configured for the stored configuration to be accepted, but the
production period can be set at the default of 200 ms.
6-4
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
6
Troubleshooting
LAN LED
Flashing or ON Steady
This LED will be flashing or appear to be ON steady to indicate the ENIU is
communicating over the network.
OFF
If this LED is OFF, it indicates that the ENIU is not communicating over the network.
Check the following
•
Determine if there are any other operational devices connected to the network. Check
the STAT LED (see “STAT LED” below).
•
Ensure that the Ethernet cable is connected firmly in the ENIU’s RJ-45 connector.
Also, this cable may be defective; try substituting another cable. Also check the other
end of the cable to ensure that the device it connects to (hub, switch, etc.) is
connected and powered up.
•
There may be a problem with some other network device or in the network
configuration (ensure that the ENIU’s IP address and MAC address were configured
correctly in the applicable network devices).
•
The ENIU’s IP address may be invalid. Check to see if the STAT LED is flashing
(see the “STAT LED” section below).
•
Even if the ENIU has a valid IP address, it may not be compatible with the network.
Ensure that the ENIU’s netid matches the netid of the network/subnetwork it is
installed on. Netid information can be found in Appendix B.
STAT LED (Modbus Mode)
ON
This LED will be ON with a green color to indicate the presence of at least one Modbus
TCP Master on the network.
OFF
If OFF, it indicates that no Modbus TCP Master device has been detected on the network.
Flashing
If this LED is flashing an amber color at a one per second rate, it indicates an invalid
ENIU IP address. Check the following
GFK-1860A
•
If using the rotary switches, you may have the switches set outside the valid range of
1- 254.
•
You may have set the ENIU to an IP address that is the same as the base address of a
subnet (such as 3.16.32.0).
•
You may have set the ENIU to an IP address that is the same as the broadcast address
of a subnet (such as 3.16.32.255)
Chapter 6 Troubleshooting
6-5
6
STAT LED (EGD Mode)
ON
This LED will be ON with a green color to indicate that the ENIU is consuming the EGD
exchange and controlling its outputs.
OFF
If OFF, this LED indicates that the ENIU is not consuming EGD exchanges and that its
outputs have reverted to their configured states of Hold Last State or Default.
Flashing
If this LED is flashing an amber color at a one per second rate, it indicates an invalid
ENIU IP address. Check the following
6-6
•
If using the rotary switches, you may have the switches set outside the valid range of
1- 254. Note: 900 and 901 are also valid settings.
•
You may have set the ENIU to an IP address that is the same as the base address of a
subnet (such as 3.16.32.0).
•
You may have set the ENIU to an IP address that is the same as the broadcast address
of a subnet (such as 3.16.32.255)
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
6
Troubleshooting
ENIU Fault Table
Fault Table Data Format
The ENIU’s internal fault table, which can store up to 32 fault codes, can be accessed by a
client application using either Modbus or EGD. This internal fault table operates as a
First-In-First-Out (FIFO) stack. When fault 33 occurs, fault 1 is dropped from the table.
These faults can include both faults provided by the I/O modules and diagnostic
information provided by the ENIU itself. Faults may be read as an extension to the normal
register table. A client application may request all faults or clear all faults by sending the
applicable message to the ENIU.
Each fault is represented by 2 words, starting from reference 1024 in the register table.
Whenever a fault is present in the fault table, the FAULTS LED will be on (solid).
All fault table faults are informational only and do not halt operation of the ENIU. The
presence of one or more fault table faults will cause the ENIU’s Fault LED to turn ON
steady. If a fatal fault occurs, the Fault LED will blink ON and OFF.
Modbus Mode
Reading the ENIU Fault Table
The entire fault table can be read using a Read Multiple Registers command, starting at the
beginning of the fault table (1024), with a length 64 registers. No partial read access of
the fault table is permitted. Empty fault table entries are all zeros. Note that faults are
shifted so that the most recent fault is always located at offset 1024.
Clearing the ENIU Fault Table
When desired, the client application may clear all faults in the table by using a Write
Single Register command to write a zero to the first register (1024) of the fault table. No
other write to the fault table by a client is permitted.
Fault Table Entries
Each fault is two words in length and is formatted as follows:
Word No.
Word 0
Word 1
Fault Entry (2 Words)
Upper byte
Rack Number (0-7)
Module I/O Point Number (0-63)
Lower byte
Slot Number (0-15)
Fault Code (see table)
EGD Mode
The top fault in the FIFO fault stack is sent in the status message. The top fault or all
faults can be cleared by sending an ACK or clear in the control section of a consumed
exchange. See the “EGD Exchange Status and Control Bytes” section of Chapter 3 for
details and examples on configuring and handling fault codes in EGD mode.
GFK-1860A
Chapter 6 Troubleshooting
6-7
6
Fault Table Codes for Modbus and EGD Modes
Fault Table Codes
Fault Description
UNKNOWN_FAULT
CORRUPTED_CONFIGURATION_FAULT
UNSUPPORTED_FEATURE_FAULT
CONFIG_MISMATCH_FAULT
FUSE_BLOWN_FAULT
LOSS_OF_IO_MODULE_FAULT
ADDITION_OF_IO_MODULE_FAULT
EXTRA_IO_MODULE_FAULT
LOSS_OF_USER_POWER_FAULT
OPEN_WIRE_FAULT
HIGH_ALARM_FAULT
LOW_ALARM_FAULT
OVERRANGE_FAULT
UNDERRANGE_FAULT
SHORT_CIRCUIT_FAULT
NONVOLATILE_STORE_FAULT
LOSS_OF_NON_IO_MODULE_FAULT
ADDITION_OF_NON_IO_MODULE_FAULT
INSUFFICIENT_CONFIG_MEMORY_FAULT
MODULE_NOT_CONFIGURED_FAULT
INPUT_POINT_FAULT
WIRING_FAULT
THERMISTOR_FAULT
A_TO_D_CONVERTOR_FAULT
MAIL_QUEUE_FULL
MAIL_LOSS_FAULT
MODULE_IN_BOOT_MODE
LOSS_OF_RACK_FAULT
ADDITION_OF_RACK_FAULT
RACK_NOT_CONFIGURED_FAULT
LOSS_OF_TAN_XMIT_FAULT
ADDITION_OF_TAN_XMIT_FAULT
EXTRA_TAN_XMIT_FAULT
TAN_SPEED_CHANGE_FAULT
LOSS_OF_MOD_UNSUPP_FEATURE
6-8
Fault Number
0
1
2
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
6
Troubleshooting
Using FTP to Obtain Network Status and Version Information
Network Status
To obtain network status information such as number of packets transmitted and received,
number of collisions, etc.
1.
Start at an MS-DOS prompt.
2.
If using a networked computer, change to a directory where you have write
privileges.
3.
FTP to the ENIU.
4.
Log into the ENIU as programmer (all lower case)
5.
Enter the word password (all lower case) as the password
6.
Type get netstat.txt. This copies the text file netstat.txt into the current directory
of your personal computer. This file contains formatted Ethernet statistics.
7.
When the operation completes, enter the word bye to terminate the FTP session.
Version Information
Use the same procedure as above except substitute the file name version.txt for netstat.txt
in step 6.
GFK-1860A
Chapter 6 Troubleshooting
6-9
6
EGD Troubleshooting
The following are common EGD communications problems and solutions.
Wrong network setup. Check exchange configuration on both the ENIU and master
device. If using a GE Fanuc CPU, try pinging the ENIU from the Station Manager.
Obtain network status from the ENIU (see previous section “Using FTP to Obtain
Network Status and Version Information”) and see if UDP packets are being sent and
received by the ENIU at appropriate rate for the exchange speed.
Wrong exchange size. EGD exchange length must match expected length. Obtain
version information from ENIU (see previous section “Using FTP to Obtain Network
Status and Version Information”) to see length of produced and consumed exchange
ENIU is expecting. Make sure four bytes were added to the start of the exchanges for
Status and Control data.
Data Going to the wrong Place. If the exchanges are transferring data, but the data
seems to be going to the wrong places, verify the exchange definitions in configuration
and check the modules in the ENIU starting with Rack 0, Slot 1 onward until the
discrepancy is found.
6-10
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
6
Troubleshooting
Determining the MAC Address of the ENIU
A MAC address is a unique six-byte number (written as six 2-digit hex numbers separated
by dashes, such as 08-00-19-01-24-B6) that identifies each Ethernet hardware device.
These numbers are assigned by manufacturers and are often not configurable by users.
The ENIU’s MAC address is printed on the front of the ENIU. However, if it becomes
illegible or appears to be incorrect, you can check it using the following procedure:
To determine the MAC address of the ENIU before it is on the network, set the Node
Address switches to 901 and power cycle the ENIU. The OK, Fault, LAN, and Status
LED's will flash 12 patterns (two for each byte) spelling out the MAC address digit by
digit. This follows binary encoding with the exception of the use of the green Status LED
to represent zero. The following table contains the coding for these patterns.
Use the worksheet on the next page to record the 12 LED patterns, then return to the
following table to decode them. The numbers in parentheses represent the binary value of
the condition, and Logic 1 conditions are shown in bold type for improved readability.
LED Decoding Table
Hex
Value
OK LED
Fault LED
LAN LED
Status LED
0
Off (0)
Off (0)
Off (0)
Green (0)
1
Off (0)
Off (0)
Off (0)
Amber (1)
2
Off (0)
Off (0)
On (1)
Off (0)
3
Off (0)
Off (0)
On (1)
Amber (1)
4
Off (0)
On (1)
Off (0)
Off (0)
5
Off (0)
On (1)
Off (0)
Amber (1)
6
Off (0)
On (1)
On (1)
Off (0)
7
Off (0)
On (1)
On (1)
Amber (1)
8
On (1)
Off (0)
Off (0)
Off (0)
9
On (1)
Off (0)
Off (0)
Amber (1)
A
On (1)
Off (0)
On (1)
Off (0)
B
On (1)
Off (0)
On (1)
Amber (1)
C
On (1)
On (1)
Off (0)
Off (0)
D
On (1)
On (1)
Off (0)
Amber (1)
E
On (1)
On (1)
On (1)
Off (0)
F
On (1)
On (1)
On (1)
Amber (1)
Note
All GE Fanuc ENIU MAC addresses start with 08-00-19
GFK-1860A
Chapter 6 Troubleshooting
6-11
6
Worksheet for Determining the MAC Address
If the rotary switches are set to 901 when the Ethernet ENIU powers up, it displays its
MAC address in a series of 12 patterns on the OK, FAULT, LAN, and STATUS LED
lights. Each pattern will be separated by a brief “no-number” condition, in which all four
LEDs are off. As each of the 12 patterns is displayed, record them in the table below.
Then, decode the binary patterns into hexadecimal numbers using either (1) the “Weight”
column values in the table below, or (2) the “LED Decoding Table” from the previous
page. An additional “Value” row is provided below the table for you to write in the
decoded numbers. Use the following guidelines for recording the patterns:
1. For the OK, FAULT, and LAN LEDs, record one of these two states: 1 if On or leave
blank if Off (or, you may wish to record zeros if Off, instead of blanks).
2. For the STATUS LED, record one of these three states: 1 if On with an amber
(yellow) color, 0 if On with a green color, or leave blank if Off. The “On with a
green color” state of this LED is used to distinguish the number zero from a nonumber indication.
NOTE: Since GE Fanuc MAC addresses always begin with 08-00-19, these first six
numbers have been filled in already.
LED ↓
1
2
3
4
5
1
OK
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
Weight
8
FAULT
4
LAN
2
STATUS
Value
0
0
0
8
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
9
N/A
Example
LED ↓
1
2
3
4
5
1
OK
6
7
8
9
10
1
11
12
1
1
FAULT
1
LAN
STATUS
0
Value
0
8
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
1
9
0
1
1
8
1
4
1
2
1
2
4
B
Weight
1
6
N/A
So the MAC address in this example is 08-00-19-01-24-B6
6-12
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
6
Troubleshooting
Reading the Stored IP Address of the ENIU
If the stored IP address of an ENIU is lost or forgotten, you can cause it to be displayed on
the ENIU’s front panel LEDs by (1) setting the Node Address switches to 900 and (2)
power-cycling the ENIU. The OK, Fault, LAN, and Status LED's will flash 8 patterns
(two for each byte) spelling out the IP address digit by digit. As each of the 8 patterns is
displayed, record them in the table below. Then, decode the binary patterns into
hexadecimal (hex) numbers using the Weight column values or the “LED Decoding
Table.” Two additional (Value) rows are provided below the table for you to write in the
decoded hex numbers and equivalent decimal numbers. Use the following guidelines for
recording the patterns:
•
For the OK, FAULT, and LAN LEDs, record either 1 if On or blank if Off (or, if
preferred, write a zero if Off instead of a blank).
•
For the STATUS LED, record one of these three conditions: 1 if On with an amber
(yellow) color, 0 if On with a green color, or blank if Off.
If no IP address has been stored, the LEDs will indicate the default address of 195.0.0.0.
LED ↓
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Weight
OK
8
FAULT
4
LAN
2
STATUS
1
Hex.
Values
N/A
Decimal
Values
N/A
IP Address Example
In the following example, the bit patterns have been recorded and then converted to the
two-byte hex number, then to an equivalent decimal number:
GFK-1860A
Chapter 6 Troubleshooting
6-13
6
IP Address Example, Continued
LED ↓
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
OK
8
1
FAULT
1
LAN
Weight
1
4
2
STATUS
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
1
1
Hex.
Values
0
3
1
0
1
B
0
5
N/A
Decimal
Values
3
16
27
5
N/A
So the decoded IP address is 3.16.27.5
6-14
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
Chapter
VersaMax Product Overview
7
The VersaMax Family of Products
The VersaMax family of products provides distributed I/O that spans PLC and PC-based
architectures. Designed for industrial and commercial automation, VersaMax I/O provides
a common, flexible I/O structure for local and remote control applications. The VersaMax
PLC provides big-PLC power with a full range of I/O and option modules. VersaMax I/O
Stations with Network Interface Modules make it possible to add VersaMax I/O to other
types of networks. VersaMax meets UL, CUL, CE, Class1 Zone 2 and Class I Division 2
requirements.
The 70-mm depth and small footprint of VersaMax I/O enables easy, convenient mounting
as well as space-saving benefits. Modules can accommodate up to 32 points of I/O each.
VersaMax products feature DIN-rail mounting with up to eight I/O and option modules
per “rack” and up to 8 racks per VersaMax PLC or VersaMax I/O Station system.
Expansion racks can be located up to 750 meters from the main VersaMax PLC or
VersaMax I/O Station rack. Expansion racks can include any VersaMax I/O, option, or
communications module.
VersaMax provides automatic addressing that can eliminate traditional configuration and
the need for hand-held devices. Multiple field wiring termination options provide support
for two, three, and four-wire devices.
For faster equipment repair and shorter Mean-Time-To-Repair, the hot insertion feature
enables addition and replacement of I/O modules while a machine or process is running
and without affecting field wiring.
GFK-1860A
7-1
7
VersaMax Products for Ethernet Networks
There are two VersaMax products for Ethernet networks. One is the IC200CPUE05,
which is a CPU with an embedded Ethernet interface, and the other is the
IC200EBI001Ethernet NIU.
Ethernet Network Interface Unit
The Ethernet Network Interface Unit acts as controller for an I/O Station of VersaMax
modules. Many types of modules can be combined to suit the needs of the application. I/O
modules install on individual “carriers”. Power for module operation is provided by a
power supply that installs directly on the NIU. Additional “booster” power supplies can be
included in the system if needed for modules with high current requirements.
Ethernet NIU
power supply
Optional booster
power supply
For more information about modules and system installation instructions, please see the
VersaMax Modules, Power Supplies and Carriers User’s Manual (GFK-1504).
7-2
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
7
VersaMax Product Overview
Power Supplies
A VersaMax Power Supply provides +5V and +3.3V power to the modules in the station.
VersaMax power supplies are available for various AC or DC input voltages as shown in
the table below. Additional power supplies can be installed on special booster carriers if
needed for systems where the number of modules creates the need for a booster. No
booster supply is needed to power conventional I/O modules.
24 VDC
POWER SUPPLY
IC200PWR001
NOT
USED
+ INPUT
VDC
Available Power Supplies and Carrier
The following VersaMax power supplies and carrier are available:
24VDC Power Supply
IC200PWR001
24VDC Expanded 3.3V Power Supply
IC200PWR002
120/240VAC Power Supply
IC200PWR101
120/240VAC Expanded 3.3V Power Supply
IC200PWR102
12VDC Power Supply
IC200PWR201
12VDC Expanded 3.3V Power Supply
IC200PWR202
Power Supply Booster Carrier
IC200PWB001
Note
The IC200PWR001 power supply does not have sufficient power capacity to
support a typical ENIU system.
Power supplies are described in the VersaMax Modules, Power Supplies, and Carriers
User’s Manual (GFK-1504).
GFK-1860A
Chapter 7 VersaMax Product Overview
7-3
7
I/O Modules
VersaMax I/O and option modules are approximately 110mm (4.33in) by 66.8mm
(2.63in) in size. Modules can be mounted either horizontally or vertically on several types
of available I/O Carriers. Modules are 50mm (1.956 in) in depth, not including the height
of the carrier or the mating connectors. The following figure shows an example of a
discrete output module.
110mm
(4.33in)
FLD
PWR
A
1
66.8mm
(2.63in)
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
IND CONT EQ FOR HAZ LOC
CLASS I DIV 2 GROUPS ABCD
Temp Code TA4 Ambient 60C
CLASS I ZONE 2 GROUP IIC TA4
CLASS I ZONE 2 Ex nA IIC T4 OC≤Ta ≤60C
Ex nV T4 Demko No
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
IC200MDL750
OUTPUT
POS LOG GRP
24VDC
.5A
Color code:
Red: AC
Blue: DC
Gold: Mixed
Gray: Analog/
other
Module
Description
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
FLD
PWR
B
OK
OK
OK LED indicates
presence of power
from VersaMax
power supply
Individual Point
LEDS on Discrete
Modules
Latch
Field Power LED
indicates presence
of power from external supply
VersaMax I/O modules are described in the VersaMax Modules, Power Supplies, and
Carriers User’s Manual (GFK-1504).
7-4
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
VersaMax Product Overview
7
I/O Modules
The following types of VersaMax I/O Modules are available:
Discrete Input Modules
Input 120VAC 8 Point Grouped Module
IC200MDL140
Input 240VAC 8 Point Grouped Module
IC200MDL141
Input 120VAC 8 Point Isolated Module
IC200MDL143
Input 240VAC 4 Point Isolated Module
IC200MDL144
Input 120VAC (2 Groups of 8) 16 Point Module
IC200MDL240
Input 240VAC (2 Groups of 8) 16 Point Module
IC200MDL241
Input 120VAC 16 Point Isolated Module
IC200MDL243
Input 240VAC 8 Point Isolated Module
IC200MDL244
Input 125VDC Positive/Negative Logic Grouped 8 Point Module
IC200MDL631
Input 125VDC Positive/Negative Logic Grouped 16 Point Module
IC200MDL632
Input 48VDC Positive/Negative Logic Grouped 16 Point Module
IC200MDL635
Input 48VDC Positive/Negative Logic Grouped 32 Point Module
IC200MDL636
Input 24VDC Positive/Negative Logic (2 Groups of 8) 16 Point Module
IC200MDL640
Input 5/12VDC (TTL) Positive/Negative Logic 16 Point Module
IC200MDL643
Input 5/12VDC (TTL) Positive/Negative Logic Grouped 32 Point Module
IC200MDL644
Input 24VDC Positive/Negative Logic (4 Groups of 8) 32 Point Module
IC200MDL650
Discrete Output Modules
GFK-1860A
Output 120VAC 0.5A per Point Isolated 8 Point Module
IC200MDL329
Output 120VAC 0.5A per Point Isolated 16 Point Module
IC200MDL330
Output 120VAC 2.0A per Point Isolated 8 Point Module
IC200MDL331
Output 24VDC Positive Logic 2.0A per Point (1 Group of 8) w/ESCP 8 Point Module,
IC200MDL730
Output 12/24VDC Positive Logic 0.5A per Point (1 Group of 16) 16 Point Module
IC200MDL740
Output 24VDC Positive Logic 0.5A per Point (1 Group of 16) w/ESCP 16 Point Module
IC200MDL741
Output 24VDC Positive Logic 0.5A per Point (2 Groups of 16) w/ESCP 32 Point Module
IC200MDL742
Output 5/12/24VDC Negative Logic 0.5A per Point (1 Group of 16) 16 Point Module
IC200MDL743
Output 5/12/24VDC Negative Logic 0.5A per Point (2 Groups of 16) 32 Point Module
IC200MDL744
Output 12/24VDC Positive Logic 0.5A per Point (2 Groups of 16) 32 Point Module
IC200MDL750
Output Relay 2.0A per Point Isolated Form A 8 Point Module
IC200MDL930
Output Relay 2.0A per Point Isolated Form A 16 Point Module
IC200MDL940
Chapter 7 VersaMax Product Overview
7-5
7
Discrete Mixed I/O Modules
Mixed 24VDC Positive Logic Input 20 Points / Output Relay 2.0A 12 Point Module
IC200MDD840
Mixed 24VDC Positive Logic Input 20 Point / Output 12 Point / (4) High Speed Counter, PWM, or
Pulse Train Configurable Points
IC200MDD841
Mixed 16 Point Grouped Input 24VDC Pos/Neg Logic / 16 Pt Grouped Output 24VDC Pos. Logic
0.5A w/ESCP
IC200MDD842
Mixed 24VDC Positive Logic Input Grouped 10 Point / Output Relay 2.0A per Point 6 Point Module
IC200MDD843
Mixed 24 VDC Pos/Neg Logic Input Grouped 16 Point / Output 12/24VDC Pos. Logic 0.5A 16
Point Module
IC200MDD844
Mixed 16 Point Grouped Input 24VDC Pos/Neg Logic / 8 Pt Relay Output 2.0A per Pt Isolated
Form A
IC200MDD845
Mixed 120VAC Input 8 Point / Output Relay 2.0A per Point 8 Point Module
IC200MDD846
Mixed 240VAC Input 8 Point / Output Relay 2.0A per Point 8 Point Module
IC200MDD847
Mixed 120VAC Input 8 Point / Output 120VAC 0.5A per Point Isolated 8 Point Module
IC200MDD848
Mixed 120VAC In Isolated 8 Point / Output Relay 2.0A Isolated 8 Point Module
IC200MDD849
Mixed 240VAC In Isolated 4 Point / Output Relay 2.0A Isolated 8 Point Module
IC200MDD850
Analog Input Modules
Analog Input Module, 12 Bit Voltage/Current 4 Channels
IC200ALG230
Analog Input Module, 16 Bit Voltage/Current, 1500VAC Isolation, 8 Channels
IC200ALG240
Analog Input Module, 12 Bit Voltage/Current 8 Channels
IC200ALG260
Analog Input Module, 15 Bit Voltage Differential 8 Channels
IC200ALG261
Analog Input Module, 15 Bit Current Differential 8 Channels
IC200ALG262
Analog Input Module, 15 Bit Voltage 15 Channels
IC200ALG263
Analog Input Module, 15 Bit Current 15 Channels
IC200ALG264
Analog Input Module, 16 Bit RTD, 4 Channels
IC200ALG620
Analog Input Module, 16 Bit Thermocouple, 7 Channels
IC200ALG630
Analog Output Modules
Analog Output Module, 12 Bit Current, 4 Channels
IC200ALG320
Analog Output Module, 12 Bit Voltage 4 Channels. 0 to +10VDC Range
IC200ALG321
Analog Output Module, 12 Bit Voltage 4 Channels. -10 to +10VDC Range
IC200ALG322
Analog Output Module, 13 Bit Voltage 8 Channels
IC200ALG325
Analog Output Module, 13 Bit Voltage 12 Channels
IC200ALG327
Analog Output Module, 16 Bit Voltage/Current, 1500VAC Isolation, 4 Channels
IC200ALG331
Analog Mixed I/O Modules
Analog Mixed Module, Input Current 4 Channels, Output Current 2 Channels
7-6
IC200ALG430
Analog Mixed Module, 0 to +10VDC Input 4 Channels, Output 0 to +10VDC 2 Channels
IC200ALG431
Analog Mixed Module, 12 Bit ±10VDC, Input 4 Channels and Output 2 Channels
IC200ALG432
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
7
VersaMax Product Overview
Carriers
Carriers provide mounting, backplane communications, and field wiring connections for
all types of VersaMax modules. I/O modules can be installed on carriers or removed
without disturbing field wiring.
There are three basic I/O Carrier types:
ƒ
Terminal-style I/O carriers. Modules mount parallel to the DIN rail.
ƒ
Compact Terminal-style I/O Carriers. Modules mount perpendicular to the DIN rail.
ƒ
Connector-style I/O Carriers. Modules mount perpendicular to the DIN rail. These
carriers are normally used with Interposing I/O Terminals as illustrated below.
See the VersaMax Modules, Power Supplies, and Carriers User’s Manual (GFK-1504) for
information about VersaMax I/O Carriers.
Terminal-style I/O carriers have 36 individual terminals for direct connection of field
wiring. Auxiliary I/O Terminal Strips are available for applications requiring additional
wiring terminals. See GFK-1504 for information about the VersaMax Interposing
Terminals and Auxiliary I/O Terminal Strips.
Terminal-style I/O Carrier
Compact Terminal-style
I/O Carrier
Connector-style I/O
Carrier and
Interposing Terminals
Auxiliary I/O Terminal Strip
MADE IN USA
GFK-1860A
Chapter 7 VersaMax Product Overview
7-7
7
VersaMax Carriers and Terminal Strips
The following types of Carriers, terminals, and cables are available:
Terminal-Style I/O Carriers
Barrier-Style Terminal I/O Carrier
IC200CHS001
Box-Style Terminal I/O Carrier
IC200CHS002
Spring-Style Terminal I/O Carrier
IC200CHS005
Compact Terminal-Style I/O Carriers
Compact Box-Style I/O Carrier
IC200CHS022
Compact Spring-Style I/O Carrier
IC200CHS025
Connector-Style I/O Carrier
Connector-Style I/O Carrier
IC200CHS003
Interposing Terminals for use with Connector-Style Carrier
Barrier-Style Interposing I/O Terminals
IC200CHS011
Box-Style Interposing I/O Terminals
IC200CHS012
Thermocouple-Style Interposing I/O Terminals
IC200CHS014
Spring-Style Interposing I/O Terminals
IC200CHS015
Cables for use with Connector-Style I/O Carriers
2 connectors, 0.5m, no shield
IC200CBL105
2 connectors, 1.0m, no shield
IC200CBL110
2 connectors, 2.0m, no shield
IC200CBL120
1 connector, 3.0m, no shield
IC200CBL230
Auxiliary I/O Terminal Strips for use with Terminal-style I/O Carriers and Interposing
Terminals
Barrier-Style Auxiliary I/O Terminal Strip
IC200TBM001
Box-Style Auxiliary I/O Terminal Strip
IC200TBM002
Spring-Style Auxiliary I/O Terminal Strip
IC200TBM005
Other Carriers
7-8
Communications Carrier
IC200CHS006
Power Supply Booster Carrier
IC200PWB001
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
7
VersaMax Product Overview
Expansion Modules
Expansion modules can be used to extend the I/O Station and add more modules. There
are two basic types of VersaMax I/O expansion systems, Multi-Rack and Single-ended:
„
Multi-Rack: A VersaMax PLC or NIU I/O Station with an IC200ETM001
Expansion Transmitter Module (ETM) and one to seven expansion “racks”, each with
an Expansion Receiver Module (ERM), catalog number IC200ERM001 or
IC200ERM002. If all the Expansion Receivers are the Isolated type (IC200ERM001),
the maximum overall cable length is 750 meters. If the expansion bus includes any
non-isolated Expansion Receivers (IC200ERM002), the maximum overall cable
length is 15 meters.
VersaMax PLC or I/O Station Main Rack (0)
ETM
PS
CPU/NIU
VersaMax ExpansionRack 1
PS
15M with any
IC200ERM002 ERMs
750M with all
IC200ERM001 ERMs
ERM
IC200CBL601,
602, 615
VersaMax ExpansionRack 7
PS
Terminator
Plug
„
ERM
Single-ended: A PLC or NIU I/O Station connected directly to one expansion rack
with non-isolated Expansion Transmitter Module (IC200ERM002). Maximum cable
length is 1 meter. (No terminator is required.)
VersaMax PLC or NIU I/O Station Main Rack
PS
CPU/NIU
1M
VersaMax Expansion Rack
IC200CBL600
PS
ERM
GFK-1860A
Chapter 7 VersaMax Product Overview
7-9
7
VersaMax Modules for Expansion Racks
All types of VersaMax I/O and communications modules can be used in expansion racks.
Some VersaMax analog modules require specific module revisions as listed below:
Module
IC200ALG320
IC200ALG321
Module Revision
B or later
B or later
IC200ALG322
B or later
IC200ALG430
C or later
IC200ALG431
IC200ALG432
C or later
B or later
Available Expansion Modules, Cables, and Related Products
The following Expansion Modules and related products are available:
Expansion Modules
Expansion Transmitter Module
IC200ETM001
Expansion Receiver Module, Isolated
IC200ERM001
Expansion Receiver Module, Non-isolated
IC200ERM002
Cables
Expansion Cable, 1 meter
IC200CBL601
Expansion Cable, 2 meters
IC200CBL602
Expansion Cable, 15 meters
IC200CBL615
Terminator Plug (included with ETM)
IC200ACC201
Connector Kit
IC200ACC302
See the VersaMax Modules, Power Supplies, and Carriers User’s Manual (GFK-1504) for
information about VersaMax Expansion modules.
7-10
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
7
VersaMax Product Overview
VersaMax General Product Specifications
VersaMax products should be installed and used in conformance with product-specific
guidelines as well as the following specifications:
Environmental
Vibration
Shock
Operating Temp.
Storage Temp.
Humidity
Enclosure Protection
EMC Emission
Radiated, Conducted
IEC68-2-6
IEC68-2-27
IEC529
CISPR 11/EN 55011
CISPR 22/EN 55022
FCC 47 CFR 15
EMC Immunity
Electrostatic Discharge
RF Susceptibility
EN 61000-4-2
EN 61000-4-3
ENV 50140/ENV 50204
Fast Transient Burst
Surge Withstand
EN 61000-4-4
ANSI/IEEE C37.90a
IEC255-4
EN 61000-4-5
1G @57-150Hz, 0.012in p--p @10-57Hz
15G, 11ms
0 deg C to +60 deg C ambient
-40 deg C to +85 deg C
5% to 95%, noncondensing
Steel cabinet per IP54:
protection from dust & splashing water
Industrial Scientific & Medical Equipment
(Group 1, Class A)
Information Technology Equipment (Class A)
referred to as FCC part 15,
Radio Devices (Class A)
8KV Air, 4KV Contact
10Vrms /m, 80Mhz to 1000Mhz, 80% AM
10Vrms/m, 900MHz +/-5MHZ
100%AM with 200Hz square wave
2KV: power supplies, 1KV: I/O, communication
Damped Oscillatory Wave:
•
2.5KV power supplies, I/O [12V-240V]
•
1KV communication
Damped Oscillatory Wave: Class II,
power supplies, I/O [12V-240V]
2 kV cm(P/S); 1 kV cm (I/O and communication
modules)
10Vrms, 0.15 to 80Mhz, 80%AM
Conducted RF
EN 61000-4-6
Isolation
Dielectric Withstand
UL508, UL840, IEC664
1.5KV for modules rated from 51V to 250V
Power Supply
Input Dips, Variations
EN 61000-4-11
During Operation: Dips to 30% and 100%,
Variation for AC +/-10%, Variation for
DC +/-20%
GFK-1860A
Chapter 7 VersaMax Product Overview
7-11
Appendix
Glossary
A
ARP
Address Resolution Protocol. A system used to determine the MAC address of a
device whose IP address is known. In practice, an ARP request message is sent
to a particular IP address, requesting the device’s MAC address. The device’s
reply, containing its MAC address, is called an ARP response message.
It is also a computer utility program (such as ARP.EXE in Windows 95) that can
be used in conjunction with Telnet software to assign IP addresses to devices.
Byte
A group of eight bits. Also called by the data communications term, octet.
Carrier
A device that provides mounting, backplane communications, and field wiring
connections for VersaMax modules. Carriers, in turn, mount to DIN-rails.
DIN-rail
A metal rail measuring a standard 7.5mm x 35mm that serves as a mounting
device for various products, such as the VersaMax products, which usually snap
on or off the DIN-rail. DIN-rails should be compliant, preferably, with the DIN
EN50032 standard.
EGD
Ethernet Global Data. A proprietary GE Fanuc protocol that provides efficient
connectionless periodic data transfer over an Ethernet network. It operates over
the industry standard User Datagram Protocol (UDP).
ENIU
Ethernet Network Interface Unit
ERM
Expansion Receiver Module. A VersaMax module that mounts in an expansion
rack. It is used to interface the expansion rack to the expansion bus.
ETM
Expansion Transmitter Module. A VersaMax module that mounts in an I/O
station. It is used to interface the I/O station to the expansion bus.
Gateway
See Router
Host
See Node
Hostid
The portion of an IP Address that identifies the host. Each host on the same
network must have a unique hostid.
I/O
Input/Output
IP
Internet Protocol
IP Address
A unique address number assigned to a network device. It has a network portion,
GFK-1860A
A-1
A
called the netid, and a host portion called the hostid. According to the current
standard, it is a 32-bit value. To make it more readable to humans, the 32 binary
bits are often divided into four eight-bit segments (“octets”); then each segment is
converted to a decimal number (in the range of 0-255), and each decimal number
is separated by dots. For example, 192.2.1.123. This type of notation is called
“dotted decimal” notation. In practice, a block of IP address numbers is assigned
to an organization, which then assigns unique numbers from within its assigned
number block to devices that it manufacturers or implements.
LAN
Local Area Network
MAC
Media Access Control.
MAC Address
A unique address number assigned to a network device. According to the current
standard, it is a 48-bit value, divided into twelve four-bit segments, with each
segment converted to a hexadecimal number, and each pair of hexadecimal
number separated by a dash. For example, 08-00-19-01-24-B6. In practice, an
organization is assigned a unique 24-bit initial number sequence (GE Fanuc’s
sequence is 08-00-19). The organization uses its assigned sequence with 24
additional bits to assign a unique number to the network devices it produces.
MAC Addresses conform to the 802.3 MAC Layer Standard.
Modbus
A serial communications protocol, originally developed by Modicon, that has
come into widespread use worldwide. Often called “Modbus RTU”, or just
“RTU.” Modbus is now a trademark of Gould, Inc.
Netid
The portion of a host’s IP Address that identifies what network the host is located
on. Each host on a given network/subnet must have the same netid. A router,
which serves as a host on two or more networks, has a different IP address for
each network it is connected to, with each IP address being based upon the netid
for its network.
NIC
Network Interface Card
NIU
Network Interface Unit
Node
A device connected to a network. Also called a “host.” Examples of Ethernet
nodes are (1) a personal computer with an Ethernet NIC, (2) a PLC with an
Ethernet interface module, or (3) an Ethernet router. Each node must have its own
unique IP Address.
Octet
A group of eight bits. Octet is the data communications term for byte.
PLC
Programmable Logic Controller
Router
A device that routes messages between/among two or more networks. A router
uses a message’s destination IP Address to determine what network to route the
message to. A router has a different IP Address for each network it connects to
(see also, Netid). A router is also known by the term “gateway.”
A-2
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
A
Glossary
Subnet
Shortened version of the term subnetwork. It is the most basic or lowest level of
network. Subnets are formed by subdividing an organization’s assigned Network
ID using a subnet mask. This subdividing involves reassigning bits from the host
portion to the network portion of the address.
Subnet mask
A 32-bit binary number, assigned to each network or subnetwork, that is used in
conjunction with IP addresses. It allows an organization to use their assigned IP
addresses, which otherwise would be limited to one network, to form additional
internal subnetwork addresses.
TCP
Transmission Control Protocol
UDP
User Datagram Protocol. UDP is an ISO transport layer protocol that is very
efficient because it is connectionless and uses a minimum of error checking.
UTP
Unshielded Twisted Pair.
VersaMax
A GE Fanuc Automation product series, consisting of PLC and I/O devices.
VersaPro
A GE Fanuc Automation programming and configuration software product.
GFK-1860A
Appendix A Glossary
A-3
Appendix
IP and MAC Addresses
B
This appendix gives an overview of IP addresses, routers (gateways), subnet masks
and MAC addresses.
IP Addresses
Each TCP/IP node on a network must have a unique IP address. The Ethernet NIU
is such a node, as is a Personal Computer running TCP/IP. There may be other
nodes on the network that are not involved with communications to the PLCs, but no
matter what their function, each TCP/IP node must have its own IP address. It is the
unique IP address that identifies each node on the network (or system of connected
networks). (Note that Internet terminology often uses the term “host” to identify a
node on a network.)
The IP address is 32 bits long and has a netid part and a hostid part. Each network is
a Class A, Class B, or Class C network. The class of a network determines how the
IP Address bits are apportioned between the netid and hostid parts:
a45404
0 1
Class A
Class B
0
24
31
24
31
hostid
8
1 0
netid
1 1 0
16
netid
0 1
0 1 2
Class C
8
16
hostid
8
16
netid
24
31
hostid
Figure B-1. IP Address Format for Network Classes A, B, C
Each node on the same local network must have an IP address of the same class and
each must have the same netid. Each node on the same network must have a
different hostid thus giving it a unique IP address.
GFK-1860A
B-1
B
IP addresses are written as four decimal integers (0–255) separated by periods
(called “dotted–decimal”) where each integer gives the value of one byte of the IP
address. For example, the 32–bit IP address
00000011 00000000 00000000 00000001
is written in dotted-decimal format as:
3.0.0.1
Network Classes
As shown in the previous section, there are three major network classes, A, B, and C.
You can distinguish the class of an IP address from it’s first integer if it’s written in
dotted–decimal format, or from the leading bit or bits (called “Class ID Bits
Patterns” in the following table) if it’s written in binary format. Using the leading
bits method, we see that any IP address (in binary format) that starts with a zero is a
Class A address, any IP address starting with 10 is a Class B address, and any
starting with 110 is a Class C address. To illustrate this, the following example IP
address is shown in both formats:
Dotted-decimal format:
191.12.3.77
Binary format:
10111111 00001100 00000011 01001101
In the table below, we see from the “Range of First Integer” column, that the first of
the four integers, 191, indicates this to be a Class B address. Additionally, we see
from the “Class ID Bit Patterns” column that the leading bits 10 also indicate that
this is a Class B address.
Be aware that utilizing these leading bits (which are in the netid portion of the IP
address) for the Class ID leaves less bits for network identification. Compare the
“Size of Netid” column with the “Remaining Netid Bits” column in the table, which
reflects the netid size after the class ID bits are subtracted.
The following table reveals how many total network numbers are available. As
shown, the total number is 126+16,382+2,097,150 which equals 2,113,658 possible
networks for the entire world. That seemed like a large number 20 years ago, but
due to the enormous growth of the Internet, there is a danger of running out of
network addresses. This assessment is based upon the current 32-bit standard known
as IP Version 4. A new IP address standard, IP Version 6, will, when implemented,
address this problem by increasing IP address length to 128 bits.
Class
Size of Size of Range Class ID
Max.
Max. no. of
Remaining
Netid Hostid of First
Bit
Networks Hosts per
Netid Bits
Integer Patterns
per Class Network
A
B
8 bits
16 bits
24 bits
C
Other N/A
B-2
Default
Subnet
Mask
24 bits
16 bits
0 – 127
0
128 – 191 10
7
14
126
16,382
16,777,216
65,536
255.0.0.0
255.255.0.0
8 bits
N/A
192 – 223 110
224 – 255 N/A
21
N/A
2,097,150
N/A
254
N/A
255.255.255.0
N/A
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
B
IP and MAC Addresses
Routers and Gateways
Routers (also known as gateways) connect individual physical networks into a
system of networks. When a node needs to communicate with a node on another
network, a router transfers the data between the two networks. Each router port must
have an appropriate IP address for the network (or subnetwork) it connects to.
The following figure shows Router R1 connecting Network 1 with Network 2. Note
that each router port has its own IP address (the Network 1 port is 128.1.0.2, and the
Network 2 port is 128.2.0.3). A router port’s IP address must contain the netid of the
network it connects to in keeping with the rule that all nodes on a given network
must have the same netid.
a45405
A
128.1.0.1
Network 1
128.1.0.2
R1
128.2.0.3
C
B
128.2.0.1
128.2.0.2
Network 2
Figure B-2. Connecting Two Networks with a Router
When host B communicates with host C, it knows from C’s IP address that C is on
the same network. In an Ethernet environment, B can then resolve C’s IP address to
a MAC address (via ARP) and communicate with C directly.
When host B communicates with host A, it knows from A’s IP address that A is on
another network (the netids are different). In order to send data to A, B must have
the IP address of the router connecting the two networks. In this example, the
router’s IP address on Network 2 is 128.2.0.3.
GFK-1860A
Appendix B IP and MAC Addresses
B-3
B
Subnets
When an organization is assigned a block of IP addresses, it receives one network ID
(designated by the netid portion of the IP address) and a block of host IDs. The netid
portion of the assignment is fixed; it cannot be changed. All IP addresses that an
organization assigns from its block have the same netid, so they are all assigned to
one basic network. At the time this arrangement was conceived, it was not foreseen
that organizations might want or need to divide a single network into many
subnetworks, so no provision was originally made for this. Later, because the need
for more networks arose, the subnet arrangement was devised. Since the netid
portion of an IP address is fixed, it was necessary to use a portion of the hostid to
create subnetwork IDs.
So, subnet addressing is an extension of the IP address scheme that allows a site to
use a single netid for multiple networks (subnets). Routing outside the site continues
as usual by dividing the IP address into a netid and a hostid based on the Network
Class (A, B, or C) definition. However, inside a site, the IP address is rearranged
into custom netid and hostid portions by a subnet mask, discussed next.
Subnet Masks
A subnet mask is a 32-bit binary number that is assigned to a network to indicate
how many of the hostid bits will be reallocated for use as subnet ID bits. Each class
of network, A, B, or C, has a default subnet mask. A default subnet mask does not
create subnet ID capability. You must create a custom subnet mask to be able to
create subnets. Let’s use a Class B network address as an example. The normal bit
allocation of a class B IP address is that the first 16 bits are the netid and the last 16
bits are the hostid. .The following is the default subnet mask for a class B network:
Default Class B subnet mask:
11111111 11111111 00000000 00000000
In a subnet mask, the ones indicate how many bits are in the netid and the zeros
indicate how many bits are in the hostid. So the default Class B subnet mask shown
(16 one-bits and 16 zero-bits) does not change the allocation of the bits in a Class B
IP address, which means we cannot create any subnets if we have a default subnet
mask. We must create a “custom” subnet mask in order to create subnets. This
consists of taking the default subnet mask and replacing some zeros with ones,
starting with the left-most zero. For example, let’s change the default subnet mask
above by changing the first two zeros to ones. Here is the resulting subnet mask:
Custom Class B subnet mask:
B-4
11111111 11111111 11000000 00000000
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
B
IP and MAC Addresses
The two extra netid bits, taken from the hostid bits, can be used to designate subnets.
These two bits have four possible combinations:
00
01 10
11
Therefore, we might assume that we could designate four subnets with these two
bits. However, the current subnet standard states that the all-zeros and all-ones
combinations are not allowed to be used as subnet IDs. Therefore, our two bits only
allow us to name two subnets. (Note that the two bits are the two most significant
bits in their byte, so they have values of 128 and 64.) If we needed more than two
subnets, we would have to reallocate more hostid bits to the subnet ID by changing
more of the zeros to ones in the subnet mask. The possible number of subnets for a
given number of reallocated hostid bits is found by this formula:
Subnets = 2N –2
where N = the number of reallocated hostid bits
So, using this formula, we see that 2 bits gives 2 subnets, 3 bits gives 6 subnets, 4
bits gives 14 subnets, etc. Note that by reallocating hostid bits for use in the subnet
ID, there are fewer host bits left to use for assigning host IDs. Therefore, depending
on your application, you may need to carefully balance the number of subnets you
create against the number of hosts required to ensure that you have sufficient of each.
Subnet Example
Lets create a pair of subnets from Network 2 (a Class B network) in the previous
figure. As we discussed in the last section, using the following custom subnet mask
would add two additional netid bits, allowing us to create two subnetworks:
11111111 11111111 11000000 00000000
(In dotted-decimal format, our subnet mask looks like this: 255.255.192.0)
The new configuration for our network system would be as shown in the following
figure. Notice that Network 2 has been subdivided into subnetworks 2.1 and 2.2.
Hosts on these subnets still use the basic netid of 128.2.as the first numbers in their
IP addresses, but note the additional subnet numbers added to the addresses:
128.2.64.x and 128.2.128.x
GFK-1860A
Appendix B IP and MAC Addresses
B-5
B
a45406
A
128.1.0.1
Network 1
128.1.0.2
R1
B
C
128.2.64.3
128.2.64.1
128.2.64.2
Subnet 2.1
R2
D
E
128.2.128.3
128.2.128.1
128.2.128.2
Subnet 2.2
Figure B-3. Network Configuration Using a Subnet Mask
In our new arrangement, shown above, Network 2 has been subdivided into two
subnets and Hosts D and E have been added. Router R2 connects Subnet 2.1 with
Subnet 2.2. Hosts D and E will use Router R2 to communicate with hosts not on
Subnet 2.2. Hosts B and C will use Router R1 to communicate with hosts not on
Subnet 2.1. When B is communicating with D, R1 (the configured Router for B)
will route the data from B to D through Router R2.
In practice, a network’s routers (gateways) use the subnet masks (each subnetwork
has one) in conjunction with a message’s destination IP Address (which is located at
the beginning of each message) to determine which subnet to route the message to.
B-6
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual – June 2001
GFK-1860A
B
IP and MAC Addresses
MAC Addresses
Each byte of the MAC Address is an 8–bit binary number. Thus, the 12–digit hex
address is really a 48–bit binary number. A typical MAC Address, 08-00-19-00-5312, is represented as a binary number in the following example:
Byte
1
2
3
4
5
6
________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________
Hex
Binary
0
8
0
0
1
9
0
0
5
3
1
2
0000 1000 0000 0000 0001 1001 0000 0000 0101 0011 0001 0010
Another characteristic that is important, especially for multi–vendor networks, is the
order of address–bit transmission on the physical medium. MAC Addresses are
transmitted in ascending byte order, with the least significant bit of each byte
transmitted first.
The example above is shown including bit transmission order as follows:
Byte
1
2
3
4
5
6
________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________
Hex
0
8
0
0
1
9
0
0
5
3
1
2
Binary 0000 1000 0000 0000 0001 1001 0000 0000 0101 0011 0001 0010
Bit Order 8765 4321
...9
|
|
MSB of the MAC
LSB of the MAC Address–first bit transmitted
Address–last bit
transmitted
GFK-1860A
Appendix B IP and MAC Addresses
B-7
Appendix
C
Number Conversion Table
Hexadecimal digits have decimal values from 0..15, represented as 0...9, A (for 10),
B (for 11) ... F (for 15). Use the following table to convert binary-to-decimal-to-hex:
'HFLPDO
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
%LQDU\
0000
0001
0010
0011
0100
0101
0110
0111
1000
1001
1010
1011
1100
1101
1110
1111
+H[DGHFLPDO
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F
Figure C-1. Decimal, Binary, and Hexadecimal Conversion Table
To convert a binary value that has more than four bits into a hexadecimal value, first
separate it into groups of four bits. (If the number of binary bits is not an even
multiple of four, add leading zeroes to make it an even multiple.) Each group of
four binary bits represents a single hexadecimal number. For example, let’s convert
the binary number 1011110000 to the hexadecimal number 2F0. First separate the
binary number into groups of four bits (add two leading zeroes): 0010 1111 0000.
Then use the above conversion table to find the hexadecimal value for each group:
0010 = 2, 1111 = F, 0000 = 0.
GFK-1860A
C-1
Appendix
Compatibility Matrix
D
The following table identifies the major features of each VersaMax ENIU release, the
software required to fully use the features of each release, and the publications that
document each release. Note that later versions of the ENIU and software support the
features of the previous releases.
Features
ENIU
Software Versions that Support
Release
the Features1
Version
Initial ENIU release
Modbus RTU suppor
1.0
Ethernet Global Data
(EGD)
1.1
VersaPro 1.5 (or later)
ENIU User’s
Manual
Version
IPI Version
GFK-1860
GFK-1861
GFK-1860A
GFK-1861A
GFK-1860A
GFK-1861A
Remote I/O Manager 1.5 (or later)
VersaPro 1.5 (or later)
Remote I/O Manager 1.5 (or later)
Expansion Rack support
Logic Developer PLC 2.10 (or later)
Hot insertion of I/O
modules
Support for high density
analog I/O modules
1.1
VersaPro 2.0 (or later)
Remote I/O Manager 2.0 (or later)
Logic Developer PLC 2.10 (or later)
1
VersaPro and Logic Developer PLC 2.10 provide both configuration and PLC programming capability.
Remote I/O Manager only provides configuration capability; it is normally used to configure applications
where the GE Fanuc ENIU is controlled by a third-party CPU.
GFK-1860A
D-1
Index
A
Add modules to autoconfiguration, 3-16
Addresses, IP and MAC, B-1
ARP command, 2-16
Autoconfiguration, 3-1, 3-2, 3-15
B
Baud rates, 1-4
Binary
conversion, C-1
Bootloader mode, 2-14
network devices, 2-7
Consumed exchange
configuring, 3-24
Conversion
number table, C-1
D
Description, 1-3
DeviceNet NIU User's Manual, 1-1
DIN-rail, 2-2
mounting, 1-3, 2-2
type, 2-2
Documentation, 1-1
E
C
Cable
Ethernet types, 2-7
installing Ethernet, 2-7
Cables, VersaMax, 7-8
Carriers
figures, 7-7
table, 7-7
Catalog number, 1-2
CE Mark installation requirements, 2-13
Classes
network, B-2
Clear All Faults bit, 6-7
Clearance required, 2-3
Color code on modules, 7-4
Communications settings
creating, 3-11
editing, 3-12
Configuration
basic steps, 3-8
clearing, 3-16
comparing, 3-14
deleting, 3-14
EGD consumed exchange, 3-24
EGD produced exchange, 3-18, 3-24
loading, 3-13
software, 3-6, 3-11
storing, 3-13
Configuring
ENIU parameters, 3-9
I/O references, 3-5
Connecting
GFK-1860A
EGD
data size, 1-9
exchange config, 3-18, 3-24
fault example, 3-36
status and control, 3-32
worksheet, 3-30, 3-31
ESD protection
CE Mark requirements, 2-13
Extra I/O Module fault, 3-15
F
Fault table, 6-7
Faults
Extra I/O Module, 3-15
fatal, 3-13
format, 6-7
LED, 3-13
Field Power LED, 7-4
FTB protection
CE Mark requirements, 2-13
G
Gateways, B-3
General product specs., 7-11
Genius NIU User's Manual, 1-1
Glossary, A-1, D-1
Index-1
Index
H
Hexadecimal
conversion table, C-1
Hot inserting modules, 3-17
Hot insertion, 7-1
Hub connections, 2-7
Humidity, 7-11
I
I/O
max. number, 1-9
I/O carriers, 7-4
installation, 2-2
I/O data sizes, 1-4
I/O modules
autoconfiguration, 3-16
figure, 7-4
table, 7-5
I/O, configuring, 3-5
Input data, 1-8, 1-9
Inserting modules, 3-17
Installing
additional modules, 2-6
IP address
determining, 6-13
forcing, 2-15
setting local, 2-14
IP Addresses, B-1
K
Keying dials on carrier, 7-4
L
LEDs, 1-4
descriptions, 6-2
Load, Store, Verify, Clear, 3-11
M
MAC Address, B-7
determining, 6-11
Manuals, 1-1
Mapping
Index-2
modbus to ENIU memory, 4-3
Mask, subnet, B-4
Modbus
function codes, 4-5
Protocol, 4-2, 5-3
reference tables, 4-3
Module color code, 7-4
Module dimensions, 7-4
Module keying, 7-4
Module latch, 7-4
Module orientation on I/O carriers, 7-7
Modules per station, 1-4, 7-1
Mounting
DIN-rail, 1-3
instructions, 2-2
Mounting holes, 2-2
N
Network address, 1-4
Network address, setting, 2-14
Network classes, B-2
O
OK LED, 7-4
Output data, 1-8, 1-9
P
Panel mounting, 2-2
Power supplies, 7-3
Power supply installation, 2-5
Power-up sequence, 6-2
Produced exchange
configuring, 3-18, 3-24
Profibus NIU User's Manual, 1-1
Protocol
Modbus, 4-2, 5-3
R
Racks and slots, 3-4
Read_DP_Slave_Diagnostic_Information, 4-3, 4-5
Reference address assignment, 3-16
Remote I/O Manager
software, 1-4
Removing
VersaMax System Ethernet Network Interface Unit User's Manual –June 2001
GFK-1860A
Index
from DIN-rail, 2-4
Rotary switches, 2-14
Routers, B-3
S
Screws, 2-2
Shock, 7-11
Slots, 3-1, 3-2, 3-15
Software
configuration, 1-4
Software configuration, 3-2
Specifications, 1-4
System, 7-11
Status
checking with LEDs, 6-2
Subnet, B-4
Example, B-5
masks, B-4
Surge protection, 2-13
T
Telnet command, 2-16
Temperature, 7-11
Terminal strips, 7-7
V
VersaMax PLC User's Manual, 1-1
VersaPro
software, 1-4
Vibration, 7-11
Vibration resistance, 2-2
GFK-1860A
Index-3
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