DT9832 Series User`s Manual

UM-22058-B
DT9832 Series
User’s Manual
Second Edition
June, 2006
Copyright © 2006 by Data Translation, Inc.
All rights reserved.
Information furnished by Data Translation, Inc.
is believed to be accurate and reliable; however,
no responsibility is assumed by Data
Translation, Inc. for its use; nor for any
infringements of patents or other rights of third
parties which may result from its use. No license
is granted by implication or otherwise under any
patent rights of Data Translation, Inc.
Use, duplication, or disclosure by the United
States Government is subject to restrictions as set
forth in subparagraph (c)(1)(ii) of the Rights in
Technical Data and Computer software clause at
48 C.F.R, 252.227-7013, or in subparagraph (c)(2)
of the Commercial computer Software Registered Rights clause at 48 C.F.R., 52-227-19
as applicable. Data Translation, Inc., 100 Locke
Drive, Marlboro, MA 01752
Data Translation, Inc.
100 Locke Drive
Marlboro, MA 01752-1192
(508) 481-3700
www.datatranslation.com
Fax: (508) 481-8620
E-mail: info@datx.com
Data Translation® is a registered trademark of
Data Translation, Inc. DT-Open LayersTM, DTOpen Layers for .NET Class LibraryTM, DataAcq
SDKTM, Data Acquisition OMNI CDTM, DT-LV
LinkTM, and DTx-EZTM are trademarks of Data
Translation, Inc.
All other brand and product names are
trademarks or registered trademarks of their
respective companies.
Radio and Television Interference
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with CISPR
EN55022 Class A, and EN50082-1 (CE) requirements and also with
the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC
Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection
against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a
commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can
radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in
accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful
interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in
a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case
the user will be required to correct the interference at his own
expense.
Changes or modifications to this equipment not expressly approved
by Data Translation could void your authority to operate the
equipment under Part 15 of the FCC Rules.
Note: This product was verified to meet FCC requirements under
test conditions that included use of shielded cables and connectors
between system components. It is important that you use shielded
cables and connectors to reduce the possibility of causing
interference to radio, television, and other electronic devices.
Canadian Department of Communications Statement
This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class A limits for radio
noise emissions from digital apparatus set out in the Radio
Interference Regulations of the Canadian Department of
Communications.
Le présent appareil numérique n’émet pas de bruits radioélectriques
dépassant les limites applicables aux appareils numériques de la class
A prescrites dans le Règlement sur le brouillage radioélectrique
édicté par le Ministère des Communications du Canada.
Table of Contents
About this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Intended Audience. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
How this Manual is Organized . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Conventions Used in this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Related Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Where To Get Help. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Chapter 1: Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
DT9832 Series Hardware Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Supported Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Getting Started Procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Part 1: Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Chapter 2: Preparing to Use a Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Unpacking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Checking the System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Installing the Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Viewing the Documentation Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Chapter 3: Setting Up and Installing the Module . . . . . . . . 35
Applying Power to the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Attaching Modules to the Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Connecting Directly to the USB Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Connecting to an Expansion Hub . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Configuring the DT9832 Series Device Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
5
Contents
Chapter 4: Wiring Signals to the BNC Connection Box. . . 43
Preparing to Wire Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Wiring Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
High-Performance Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Wiring to the BNC Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Wiring Signals to the BNC Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Wiring Signals to the D-Sub Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Digital In/Out Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
CT/Enc In, Analog Out, Clk/Trig Connector . . . . 51
Connecting Analog Input Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Connecting Analog Output Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Connecting Digital I/O Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Connecting Counter/Timer Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Event Counting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Up/Down Counting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Frequency Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Period/Pulse Width Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Edge-to-Edge Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Pulse Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Connecting Quadrature Decoder Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Chapter 5: Verifying the Operation of a Module . . . . . . . . . 65
Installing the Quick DataAcq Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Running the Quick DataAcq Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Testing Single-Value Analog Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Testing Single-Value Analog Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Testing Continuous Analog Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Testing Single-Value Digital Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Testing Single-Value Digital Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
6
Contents
Testing Frequency Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Testing Pulse Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Part 2: Using Your Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Chapter 6: Principles of Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Analog Input Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Input Resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Analog Input Channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Specifying a Single Analog Input Channel . . . . . . . . . 80
Specifying One or More Analog Input Channels . . . . 80
Specifying the Digital Input Port in the Analog Input
Channel List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Specifying Counter/Timers in the Analog Input
Channel List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Specifying Quadrature Decoders in the Analog Input
Channel List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Input Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Input Sample Clock Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Analog Input Conversion Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Continuous Scan Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Input Triggers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Data Format and Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Error Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Analog Output Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Output Resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Analog Output Channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Specifying a Single Analog Output Channel . . . . . . . . 91
Specifying Multiple Analog Output Channels
and/or the Digital Output Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Output Ranges and Gains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Output Triggers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
7
Contents
Output Clocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Output Conversion Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Streaming Analog Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Waveform Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Data Format and Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Error Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Digital I/O Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Digital I/O Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Operation Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Counter/Timer Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
C/T Channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
C/T Clock Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Gate Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Pulse Output Types and Duty Cycles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Counter/Timer Operation Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Event Counting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Up/Down Counting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Frequency Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Edge-to-Edge Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Rate Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
One-Shot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Repetitive One-Shot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Quadrature Decoder Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Chapter 7: Supported Device Driver Capabilities. . . . . . . 115
Data Flow and Operation Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Buffering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Triggered Scan Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Data Encoding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
8
Contents
Gain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Triggers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Clocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Counter/Timers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Chapter 8: Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
General Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
If Your Module Needs Factory Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Chapter 9: Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Using the Calibration Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Calibrating the Analog Input Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Connecting a Precision Voltage Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Using the Auto-Calibration Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Using the Manual Calibration Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Calibrating the Analog Output Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Appendix A: Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Appendix B: Connector Pin Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
OEM Version Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
OEM J2 Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
OEM J3 Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
OEM Wiring Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
OEM TB1 Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
BNC Box Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Digital I/O Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
CT/Enc In, Analog Out, Clk/Trig Connector. . . . . . . . . . . 163
9
Contents
EP353 Accessory Panel Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Connector J1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Connector J2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
EP356 Accessory Panel Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Connector J1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Connector J2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
EP355 Screw Terminal Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Appendix C: Ground, Power, and Isolation . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Secondary Power Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Ground, Power, and Isolation Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
10
About this Manual
The first part of this manual describes how to install and set up your
DT9832 Series module and device driver, and verify that your
module is working properly.
The second part of this manual describes the features of the DT9832
Series modules, the capabilities of the DT9832 Series Device Driver,
and how to program the DT9832 Series board using DT-Open Layers
for .NET Class Library™ software. Troubleshooting information is
also provided.
Note: For more information on the class library, refer to the
DT-Open Layers for .NET Class Library User’s Manual. If you are using
the DataAcq SDK or a software application to program your device,
refer to the documentation for that software for more information.
Note: This manual refers to the DT9832 and DT9832A modules
collectively as the DT9832 Series, except where their features differ.
The DT9832 Series module is available either installed in a metal
BNC connection box, or as a board-level OEM version that you can
install in your own custom application. If the information in this
manual applies to both versions of the DT9832 Series module, the
manual uses the product name "DT9832 Series module." Otherwise,
the specific product name is used.
11
About this Manual
Intended Audience
This document is intended for engineers, scientists, technicians, or
others responsible for installing, setting up, using, and/or
programming DT9832 Series modules for data acquisition operations.
It is assumed that you are familiar with the requirements of your
application. It is also assumed that you have some familiarity with
data acquisition principles, that you understand your application,
and that you are familiar with the Microsoft® Windows® 2000 or
Windows XP operating system.
How this Manual is Organized
This manual is organized as follows:
• Chapter 1, “Overview,” describes the major features of the
DT9832 Series module, as well as the supported software and
accessories for the modules.
• Chapter 2, “Preparing to Use a Module,” describes how to
unpack the DT9832 Series package, check the system
requirements, install the DT9832 Series software under Windows
2000 or Windows XP, and view the DT9832 Series documentation
online.
• Chapter 3, “Setting Up and Installing the Module,” describes
how to install a module, how to apply power to the module, and
how to configure the device driver.
• Chapter 4, “Wiring Signals to the BNC Connection Box,”
describes how to wire signals to a DT9832 Series BNC connection
box.
• Chapter 5, “Verifying the Operation of a Module,” describes how
to verify the operation of the module with the Quick DataAcq
application.
12
About this Manual
• Chapter 6, “Principles of Operation,” describes all of the features
of the module and how to use them in your application.
• Chapter 7, “Supported Device Driver Capabilities,” lists the data
acquisition subsystems and the associated features accessible
using the DT9832 Series Device Driver.
• Chapter 8, “Troubleshooting,”provides information that you can
use to resolve problems with the module and device driver,
should they occur.
• Chapter 9, “Calibration,”describes how to calibrate the analog
I/O circuitry of the module.
• Appendix A, “Specifications,” lists the specifications of the
DT9832 Series modules.
• Appendix B, “Connector Pin Assignments,” shows the pin
assignments and describes how to wire signals to the OEM
version of the DT9832 Series modules, using backplanes,
accessory panels, and screw terminal panels.
• Appendix C, “Ground, Power, and Isolation,” describes the
electrical characteristics of the DT9832 Series modules.
• An index completes this manual.
Conventions Used in this Manual
The following conventions are used in this manual:
• Notes provide useful information that requires special emphasis,
cautions provide information to help you avoid losing data or
damaging your equipment, and warnings provide information to
help you avoid catastrophic damage to yourself or your
equipment.
• Items that you select or type are shown in bold.
• Courier font is used to represent source code.
13
About this Manual
Related Information
Refer to the following documents for more information on using the
DT9832 Series module:
• Benefits of the Universal Serial Bus for Data Acquisition. This white
paper describes why USB is an attractive alternative for data
acquisition. It is available on the Data Translation® web site
(www.datatranslation.com).
• Measure Foundry Getting Started Manual (UM-19298) and online
help. These documents describe how to use Measure Foundry™
to build drag-and-drop test and measurement applications for
Data Translation data acquisition devices without programming.
• DT-Open Layers for .NET User’s Manual (UM-22161). For
programmers who are developing their own application
programs using Visual C# or Visual Basic .NET, this manual
describes how to use the DT-Open Layers for .NET Class Library
to access the capabilities or Data Translation data acquisition
devices.
• DataAcq SDK User’s Manual (UM-18326). For programmers who
are developing their own application programs using the
Microsoft C compiler, this manual describes how to use the
DT-Open LayersTM DataAcq SDKTM to access the capabilities of
Data Translation data acquisition devices. This manual is
included on the Data Acquisition OMNI CD.
• DTx-EZ Getting Started Manual (UM-15428). This manual
describes how to use the ActiveX controls provided in DTx-EZTM
to access the capabilities of Data Translation data acquisition
devices in Microsoft Visual Basic® or Visual C++®.
• DT-LV Link Getting Started Manual (UM-15790). This manual
describes how to use DT-LV LinkTM with the LabVIEW®
graphical programming language to access the capabilities of
Data Translation data acquisition devices.
14
About this Manual
• DAQ Adaptor for MATLAB (UM-22024). This document describes
how to use Data Translation’s DAQ Adaptor to provide an
interface between the MATLAB Data Acquisition subsystem
from The MathWorks and Data Translation’s DT-Open Layers
architecture.
• Microsoft Windows 2000 or Windows XP documentation.
• USB web site (http://www.usb.org).
Where To Get Help
Should you run into problems installing or using a DT9832 Series
module, our Technical Support Department is available to provide
technical assistance. Refer to Chapter 9 for information on how to
contact the Technical Support Department. If you are outside the U.S.
or Canada, call your local distributor, whose number is listed on Data
Translation’s web site (www.datatranslation.com).
15
About this Manual
16
1
Overview
DT9832 Series Hardware Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Supported Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Getting Started Procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
17
Chapter 1
DT9832 Series Hardware Features
The DT9832 Series is a family of high-performance, multifunction
data acquisition modules for the USB (Ver. 2.0 or Ver. 1.1) bus. The
key hardware features of the DT9832 Series modules are as follows:
• Available either installed in a metal BNC connection box, or as a
board-level OEM version that you can install in your own custom
application.
• Simultaneous operation of analog input, analog output, digital
I/O, and counter/timer subsystems.
• Analog input subsystem:
− 16-bit A/D converters.
− Throughput rate up to 1250 kSamples/s (DT9832) or
2000 kSamples/s (DT9832A).
− Either 4 (DT9832) or 2 (DT9832A) single-ended separate,
simultaneous analog input channels.
− Input range of ±10 V.
− 13- or 15-location channel list. You can read the digital inputs,
the two 32-bit counters, and the three 32-bit quadrature
decoders using the A/D subsystem and the A/D clock. This
synchronizes digital, counter, and quadrature decoder inputs
with the analog measurements. The maximum sampling rate
when using the channel list is 1250 kSamples/s (DT9832) or
2000 kSamples/s (DT9832A).
• Analog output subsystem:
− Two 16-bit D/A converters (if your module supports analog
output channels).
− Output rate up to 500 kSamples/s per channel
(simultaneous).
− Output range of ±10 V.
18
Overview
− The DACs are deglitched to prevent noise from interfering
with the output signal.
− Output channel list. You can cycle through the output channel
list using continuous output mode or waveform generation
mode.
• Digital I/O subsystem:
1
1
− One digital input port, consisting of 16 digital input lines. You
can program any of the first eight digital input lines to
perform interrupt-on-change operations. You can read the
value of the digital input port using the analog input
channel-gain list.
1
− One digital output port, consisting of 16 digital output lines.
You can output the value of the digital output port using the
output channel list.
1
• Two 32-bit counter/timer (C/T) channels that perform event
counting, up/down counting, frequency measurement,
edge-to-edge measurement, continuous pulse output, one-shot,
and repetitive one-shot operations. You can read the value of one
or more of the C/T channels using the analog input channel list.
• Three 32-bit quadrature decoders that can provide relative or
absolute position of quadrature encoder input and calculate
rotational speed. You can read the value of one or more of the
quadrature decoder channels using the analog input channel list.
• External or internal clock source.
1
1
1
• Trigger operations using a software command, an analog
threshold value, or an external digital trigger.
• 500 V galvanic isolation barrier that prevents ground loops to
maximize analog signal integrity and protect your computer.
1
1
19
Chapter 1
The key differences among the DT9832 Series modules are
summarized in Table 1. Note that all modules provide 16 digital
input lines, 16 digital output lines, 16-bit resolution, two
counter/timers, three quadrature decoders, and a throughput rate of
up to 1250 kSamples/s (DT9832) or 2000 kSamples/s (DT9832A).
Table 1: Summary of DT9832 Series Modules
Module
Analog Inputs
Analog
Outputs
Packaging
DT9832-04-2-OEM
4 single-ended
2
OEM
DT9832-04-2-BNC
4 single-ended
2
BNC
DT9832-04-0-OEM
4 single-ended
0
OEM
DT9832-04-0-BNC
4 single-ended
0
BNC
DT9832A-02-2-OEM
2 single-ended
2
OEM
DT9832A-02-2-BNC
2 single-ended
2
BNC
DT9832A-02-0-OEM
2 single-ended
0
OEM
DT9832A-02-0-BNC
2 single-ended
0
BNC
Notes:
• OEM packaging refers to the board-level version; the power
supply is not included.
• BNC packaging refers to a connection box with BNCs for the
specified number of analog inputs, 2 BNCs for analog outputs (if
included), 1 BNC for an external A/D clock, 1 BNC for an
external DAC clock, 1 BNC for an external A/D trigger, and 1
BNC for an external DAC trigger.
20
Overview
Supported Software
The following software is available for use with the DT9832 Series
modules and is on the Data Acquisition OMNI CD:
1
• DT9832 Series Device Driver – The device driver allows you to
use a DT9832 Series module with any of the supported software
packages or utilities. Refer to Chapter 3 for more information on
loading and configuring the device driver.
1
• Quick DataAcq application – The Quick DataAcq application
provides a quick way to get up and running using a DT9832
Series module. Using this application, you can verify key features
of the modules, display data on the screen, and save data to disk.
Refer to Chapter 5 for more information on using the Quick
DataAcq application.
1
• Measure Foundry – An evaluation version of this software is
included or provided via a link on the Data Acquisition OMNI
CD. Measure Foundry is a drag-and-drop test and measurement
application builder designed to give you top performance with
ease-of-use development. Order the full development version of
this software package to develop your own application using real
hardware.
• DT-Open Layers for .NET Class Library – Use this class library
if you want to use Visual C# or Visual Basic for .NET to develop
your own application software for a DT9832 Series module using
Visual Studio 2003 or Visual Studio 2005; the class library
complies with the DT-Open Layers standard.
• DataAcq SDK – Use the Data Acq SDK if you want to use Visual
Studio 6.0 and Microsoft C or C++ to develop your own
application software for a DT9832 Series module using Windows
2000 or Windows XP; the DataAcq SDK complies with the
DT-Open Layers standard.
1
1
1
1
1
1
21
Chapter 1
• DTx-EZ – DTx-EZ provides ActiveX controls, which allow you to
access the capabilities of the DT9832 Series modules using
Microsoft Visual Basic or Visual C++; DTx-EZ complies with the
DT-Open Layers standard.
• DAQ Adaptor for MATLAB – Data Translation’s DAQ Adaptor
provides an interface between the MATLAB Data Acquisition
(DAQ) subsystem from The MathWorks and Data Translation’s
DT-Open Layers architecture.
• DT-LV Link – Use DT-LV Link if you want to use the LabVIEW
graphical programming language to access the capabilities of
Data Translation modules.
Refer to the Data Translation web site (www.datatranslation.com) for
information about selecting the right software package for your
needs.
22
Overview
Accessories
You can purchase the following optional items from Data Translation
for use with the OEM version of the DT9832 Series module:
• EP361 – +5V power supply and cable.
• EP353 – Accessory panel that provides one 37-pin, D-sub
connector for attaching analog input signals and one 26-pin
connector for attaching a 5B Series signal conditioning backplane.
• EP355 – Screw terminal panel that provides 14-position screw
terminal blocks for attaching counter/timer, digital I/O, trigger,
and clock signals. (Not for analog input use with this module.)
• EP356 – Accessory panel that provides two 37-pin, D-sub
connectors for attaching digital I/O, analog output,
counter/timer, trigger, and clock signals.
• EP333 – 2-meter shielded cable with two 37-pin connectors that
connect an EP356 accessory panel to an STP37 screw terminal
panel.
• EP360 – 2-meter shielded cable with two 37-pin connectors that
connect an EP353 accessory panel to an STP37 screw terminal
panel.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
23
Chapter 1
Getting Started Procedure
The flow diagram shown in Figure 1 illustrates the steps needed to
get started using the DT9832 Series module. This diagram is repeated
in each Getting Started chapter; the shaded area in the diagram
shows you where you are in the procedure.
Prepare to Use the Module
(see Chapter 2 starting on page 27)
Set Up and Install the Module
(see Chapter 3 starting on page 35)
Wire Signals to the BNC Connection Box
(see Chapter 4 starting on page 43)
Verify the Operation of the Module
(see Chapter 5 starting on page 65)
Figure 1: Getting Started Flow Diagram
24
Part 1:
Getting Started
2
Preparing to Use a Module
Unpacking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Checking the System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Installing the Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Viewing the Documentation Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
27
Chapter 2
Prepare to Use the Module
(this chapter)
Set Up and Install the Module
(see Chapter 3 starting on page 35)
Wire Signals to the BNC Connection Box
(see Chapter 4 starting on page 43)
Verify the Operation of the Module
(see Chapter 5 starting on page 65)
28
Preparing to Use a Module
Unpacking
Open the shipping box and verify that the following items are
present:
• BNC connection box or OEM version of the DT9832 Series
module
2
2
• Data Acquisition OMNI CD
Note that if you purchased a BNC connection box, a USB cable and an
EP361 power supply and power cable should also be included.
Additionally, the BNC box includes a 37-pin mating connector
(AMP #747917-2).
If an item is missing or damaged, contact Data Translation. If you are
in the United States, call the Customer Service Department at (508)
481-3700. An application engineer will guide you through the
appropriate steps for replacing missing or damaged items. If you are
located outside the United States, call your local distributor, listed on
Data Translation’s web site (www.datatranslation.com).
Once you have unpacked your module, check the system
requirements, as described in the next section.
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
29
Chapter 2
Checking the System Requirements
For reliable operation, your DT9832 Series module requires the
following:
• PC with Pentium 233 MHz (or higher) processor.
• Windows 2000 or Windows XP (Professional Edition) operating
system.
For USB Ver. 2.0 support, make sure that you install Service Pack
2 (for Windows XP) or Service Pack 4 (for Windows 2000). In
addition, for some systems, you may have to disable standby
mode. If you are not sure whether you are using USB Ver. 1.1 or
Ver. 2.0, run the Open Layers Control Panel applet, described on
page 42.
• One or more USB ports (Ver. 2.0 or Ver. 1.1). USB Ver. 2.0 is
strongly recommended; USB Ver. 1.1 will severely degrade
performance.
• 64 MB (or more) of RAM; 128 MB (or more) recommended.
• One or more CD-ROM drives.
• Super VGA (800 x 600 or higher resolution) display monitor.
Once you have verified that your system meets the system
requirements, install the software, as described in the next section.
30
Preparing to Use a Module
Installing the Software
To install the software, perform the following steps:
1.
2.
Insert the Data Acquisition OMNI CD into your CD-ROM or
DVD drive.
The installation program should automatically start, and the
InstallShield Wizard should appear.
If the installation program does not automatically start,
double-click Setup.exe from the CD.
The InstallShield Wizard appears.
3.
Click Install Drivers.
The installation screen appears.
4.
Click Install now!
The InstallShield Wizard appears.
5.
If your system does not have the Microsoft .NET Framework 1.1
software installed, the following prompt appears:
DT-Open Layers optionally uses the Microsoft .NET
1.1 Framework. Would you like to install it now?
a.
Click Yes; the Framework is required.
The Framework installation begins and the license agreement is
displayed.
b. Read the license agreement, click the radio button next to "I
agree," and then click Install.
c.
After the components have been installed, click OK to
configure them.
d. Without removing your Data Acquisition OMNI CD, click
Restart to restart your system.
When the system restarts, the Windows Installer dialog box
appears, followed by the DT-Open Layers InstallShield Wizard.
6.
Click Next.
The license agreement appears.
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
31
Chapter 2
7.
Read the license agreement, click the radio button next to "I
accept the terms in the license agreement," and then click Next.
The Destination Folder dialog box appears.
8.
Change the default destination folder path, if you wish, by
clicking Change, and then click Next.
9.
Click Install.
The files are copied to the specified destination folder.
10. Click Finish to complete the installation process.
32
Preparing to Use a Module
Viewing the Documentation Online
Note: To view the documentation, you must have Adobe Acrobat
Reader 5.0 or greater installed on your system. Acrobat Reader is
provided on the Data Acquisition OMNI CD. If you install Acrobat
Reader from this CD, make sure that you open Acrobat Reader and
accept the license agreement before viewing the documentation.
2
2
2
You can access the DT9832 Series documentation from the Hardware
Documentation program group. From the Windows Start menu, click
Programs|Data Translation, Inc|Hardware Documentation,
and then select the appropriate document to view.
2
The following may be helpful when using Adobe Acrobat Reader:
• To navigate to a specific section of the document, click a heading
from the table of contents on the left side of the document.
• Within the document, click the text shown in blue to jump to the
appropriate reference (the pointer changes from a hand to an
index finger).
• To go back to the page from which the jump was made, click the
right mouse button and Go Back, or from the main menu, click
Document, and then Go Back.
• To print the document, from the main menu, click File, and then
Print.
• To increase or decrease the size of the displayed document, from
the main menu, click View, and then Zoom.
• By default, Acrobat Reader smooths text and monochrome
images, sometimes resulting in blurry images. If you wish, you
can turn smoothing off by clicking File, and then
Preferences/General, and unchecking Smooth Text and Images.
2
2
2
2
2
33
Chapter 2
34
3
Setting Up and Installing the
Module
Applying Power to the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Attaching Modules to the Computer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Configuring the DT9832 Series Device Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
35
Chapter 3
Prepare to Use the Module
(see Chapter 2 starting on page 27)
Set Up and Install the Module
(this chapter)
Wire Signals to the BNC Connection Box
(see Chapter 4 starting on page 43)
Verify the Operation of the Module
(see Chapter 5 starting on page 65)
Note: The DT9832 Series module is factory-calibrated. If you decide
that you want to recalibrate the analog input or analog output
circuitry, refer to the instructions on page 133.
36
Setting Up and Installing the Module
Applying Power to the Module
The BNC connection box is shipped with an EP361 +5V power
supply and cable. For the OEM version of the DT9832 Series module,
you must provide your own +5 V power source or purchase the
EP361 power supply and cable from Data Translation.
3
3
To apply power to the module, do the following:
1.
Connect the +5 V power supply to the power connector on the
DT9832 Series module. Refer to Figure 2.
EP361 +5 V
Power Supply
Power Connector
3
LED
To wall outlet
DT9832 Series
Module
USB Port
Figure 2: Attaching a +5 V Power Supply to the DT9832 Series Module
2.
3
Plug the power supply into a wall outlet.
For more detailed information about ground, power, and isolation
connections on a DT9832 Series module, refer to Appendix C starting
on page 175.
3
3
3
3
3
37
Chapter 3
Attaching Modules to the Computer
This section describes how to attach DT9832 Series modules to the
host computer.
Notes: Most computers have several USB ports that allow direct
connection to USB devices. If your application requires more DT9832
Series modules than you have USB ports for, you can expand the
number of USB devices attached to a single USB port by using
expansion hubs. For more information, refer to page 40.
You can unplug a module, then plug it in again, if you wish, without
causing damage. This process is called hot-swapping. Your
application may take a few seconds to recognize a module once it is
plugged back in.
You must install the device driver before connecting your DT9832
Series module(s) to the host computer. See “Installing the Software”
on page 31.
38
Setting Up and Installing the Module
Connecting Directly to the USB Ports
To connect a DT9832 Series module directly to a USB port on your
computer, do the following:
3
1.
Make sure that you have attached a power supply to the module.
2.
Attach one end of the USB cable to the USB port on the module.
3
3.
Attach the other end of the USB cable to one of the USB ports on
the host computer, as shown in Figure 3.
The operating system automatically detects the USB module and starts
the Found New Hardware wizard.
3
Power Cable
DT9832 Series
Module
USB Ports
3
3
Host Computer
USB Cable
3
Figure 3: Attaching the Module to the Host Computer
3
4.
5.
Click Next and/or Finish as required in the wizard. Once the
firmware is loaded, the wizard restarts to initiate the firmware to
accept commands. Click Next and/or Finish again.
If the power supply and module are attached correctly, the LED turns
green.
3
Repeat the steps to attach another DT9832 Series module to the
host computer, if desired.
3
39
Chapter 3
Connecting to an Expansion Hub
Expansion hubs are powered by their own external power supply.
Theoretically, you can connect up to five expansion hubs to a USB
port on the host computer. However, the practical number of DT9832
Series modules that you can connect to a single USB port depends on
the throughput you want to achieve. Each of the hubs supports up to
four modules.
To connect multiple DT9832 Series modules to an expansion hub, do
the following:
40
1.
Make sure that you have attached a power supply to the module.
2.
Attach one end of the USB cable to the module and the other end
of the USB cable to an expansion hub.
3.
Connect the power supply for the expansion hub to an external
power supply.
4.
Connect the expansion hub to the USB port on the host computer
using another USB cable.
The operating system automatically detects the USB module and starts
the Found New Hardware wizard.
5.
Click Next and/or Finish as required in the wizard. Once the
firmware is loaded, the wizard restarts to initiate the firmware to
accept commands. Click Next and/or Finish again.
If the power supply and module are attached correctly, the LED turns
green.
6.
Repeat these steps until you have attached the number of
expansion hubs (up to five) and modules (up to four per hub)
that you require. Refer to Figure 4.
The operating system automatically detects the USB devices as they are
installed.
Setting Up and Installing the Module
3
Power Supply
for Module
DT9832 Series
Module
USB Cables
DT9832 Series
Module
3
Host Computer
USB Cable
USB Cable
Power Supply
for Hub
3
Expansion Hubs
Power Supply
for Hub
DT9832 Series
Module
3
DT9832 Series
Module
USB Cables
3
Figure 4: Attaching Multiple Modules Using Expansion Hubs
3
3
3
3
41
Chapter 3
Configuring the DT9832 Series Device
Driver
To configure the device driver for the DT9832 Series module, do the
following:
1.
If you have not already done so, power up the host computer and
all peripherals.
2.
From the Windows Start menu, select Settings|Control Panel.
3.
From the Control Panel, double-click Open Layers Control
Panel.
The Data Acquisition Control Panel dialog box appears.
4.
Click the DT9832 Series module that you want to configure, and
then click Advanced.
The Configurable Board Options dialog box appears.
5.
If required, select the digital input line(s) that you want to use for
interrupt-on-change operations. When any of the selected lines
changes state, the module reads the entire 16-bit digital input
value and generates an interrupt.
6.
Click OK.
7.
If you want to rename the module, click Edit Name, enter a new
name for the module, and then click OK. The name is used to
identify the module in all subsequent applications.
8.
Repeat steps 4 to 7 for the other modules that you want to
configure.
9.
When you are finished configuring the modules, click Close.
Continue with the instructions on wiring in Chapter 4 starting on
page 43.
42
4
Wiring Signals to the
BNC Connection Box
Preparing to Wire Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Connecting Analog Input Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Connecting Analog Output Signals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Connecting Digital I/O Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Connecting Counter/Timer Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Connecting Quadrature Decoder Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
43
Chapter 4
Prepare to Use a Module
(see Chapter 2 starting on page 27)
Set Up and Install the Module
(see Chapter 3 starting on page 35)
Wire Signals to the BNC Connection Box
(this chapter)
Verify the Operation of the Module
(see Chapter 5 starting on page 65)
44
Wiring Signals to the BNC Connection Box
Preparing to Wire Signals
4
CAUTION:
To avoid electrostatic sensitivity, unplug your BNC connection box
from the computer before wiring signals.
This section provides recommendations and information about
wiring signals to the BNC connection box.
Note: If you are using the D-sub connectors on the BNC box or the
OEM version of the DT9832 Series module, use this chapter for
conceptual information, and then refer to Appendix B starting on
page 153 for connector pin assignments and accessory panel
information.
Wiring Recommendations
Keep the following recommendations in mind when wiring signals to
a BNC connection box:
4
4
4
4
4
• Separate power and signal lines by using physically different
wiring paths or conduits.
4
• To avoid noise, do not locate the box and cabling next to sources
that produce high electromagnetic fields, such as large electric
motors, power lines, solenoids, and electric arcs, unless the
signals are enclosed in a mumetal shield.
4
• Prevent electrostatic discharge to the I/O while the box is
operational.
• Connect all unused analog input channels to analog ground.
4
45
Chapter 4
High-Performance Considerations
Cables have a characteristic impedance, which can add amplitude
and phase errors to signals (typically 1/2 LSB at 10 kHz for a 6-foot
cable) due to reflection, if the impedance is unmatched on both ends
of a connection. For meticulous applications where optimal
performance is required, do the following:
• Pay attention to cable matching from the source to the DT9832
module and between channels.
• Consider placing a resistor with the same impedance in series
with the cable at your source.
• Alternatively, add termination with matched impedance at the
module. Typically this is a 100 ohm resistor in series with a
1000 pF NPO capacitor to common. At higher frequencies the
cable will see the 100 ohms. Note the component tolerances and
the effect they will have on simultaneous sampling across all
eight channels.
Wiring to the BNC Box
The BNC connection box contains both BNC connectors and 37-pin,
D-sub connectors. An example of a BNC connection box is shown in
Figure 5.
46
Wiring Signals to the BNC Connection Box
DAC Clock
DAC Ch1
AD Clock
DAC Trig
CT/Enc In, AO, Clk/Trig
DAC Ch0
Digital In/Out
4
4
4
AD Trig
AD Ch0
AD Ch1
AD Ch2
AD Ch3
4
Figure 5: DT9832-04-2-BNC Version of the BNC Connection Box
You can wire signals to the BNC connection box as follows. Refer to
Appendix A starting on page 141 for information about the required
D-sub mating connectors if you choose to use the D-sub connectors.
• Analog input signals – You can wire analog input signals using
the BNC connectors labelled AD Ch0 to AD Ch3.
• Analog output signals – You can wire analog output signals (if
your DT9832 model supports them) in one of the following ways:
− Using the BNC connectors labelled DAC Ch0 and DAC Ch1.
4
4
4
− Using the appropriate pins on the CT/Enc In, Analog Out,
Clk/Trig connector. You can access the pins by building your
own cable/panel. Refer to page 51 for connector pin
assignments.
4
• Digital I/O signals – To wire digital I/O signals, you must use
the appropriate pins on the Digital I/O connector. You can access
the pins by building your own cable/panel. Refer to page 50 for
connector pin assignments.
4
47
Chapter 4
• Counter/timer signals – To wire counter/timer signals, you must
use the appropriate pins on the CT/Enc In, Analog Out, Clk/Trig
connector. You can access the pins by building your own
cable/panel. Refer to page 51 for connector pin assignments.
• External A/D clock or trigger signal – You can wire external
clock/trigger signals in one of the following ways:
− Using the BNC connectors labelled AD Clock for A/D clock
signals and AD Trig for A/D trigger signals.
− Using the appropriate pins on the CT/Enc In, Analog Out,
Clk/Trig connector. You can access the pins by building your
own cable/panel. Refer to page 51 for connector pin
assignments.
• External DAC clock or trigger signal – If your version of the
DT9832 module supports analog output operations, you can wire
external clock/trigger signals in one of the following ways:
− Using the BNC connectors labelled DAC Clock for D/A clock
signals and DAC Trig for D/A trigger signals.
− Using the appropriate pins on the CT/Enc In, Analog Out,
Clk/Trig connector. You can access the pins by building your
own cable/panel. Refer to page 51 for connector pin
assignments.
The following sections describe how to wire signals using the BNC or
D-sub connectors.
Wiring Signals to the BNC Connectors
To wire signals using the BNC connectors, connect the appropriate
BNC connector to the appropriate input/output using a BNC cable.
The number of BNC connectors available on the box varies,
depending on the version of the box that you are using. For example,
the DT9832-04-2-BNC version, shown in Figure 5 on page 47,
contains 10 BNC connectors (4 BNC connectors for single-ended
48
Wiring Signals to the BNC Connection Box
analog inputs, two BNC connectors for analog outputs, and four BNC
connectors for external clocks and triggers).
As another example, the DT9832A-02-2-BNC version, shown in
Figure 6, contains 8 BNC connectors (two BNC connectors for analog
inputs, two BNC connectors for analog outputs, and four BNC
connectors for external clocks and triggers).
4
4
DAC Clock
DAC Ch1
AD Clock
DAC Trig
AD Ch0
AD Ch1
CT/Enc In, AO, Clk/Trig
DAC Ch0
Digital I/O
4
4
4
AD Trig
Figure 6: DT9832A-02-2-BNC Version of the BNC Connection Box
Wiring Signals to the D-Sub Connectors
4
4
If want to connect digital I/O or counter/timer signals to the BNC
connection box, you can use the 37-pin, D-sub connectors. These
connectors are described in the following sections.
4
Note: D-sub connectors are not available on the BNC connection
box for analog input.
4
49
Chapter 4
Digital In/Out Connector
The Digital In/Out connector allows you to access the digital I/O
signals. Table 5 lists the pin assignments for the Digital In/Out
connector on the BNC connection box.
Table 5: Digital In/Out Connector Pin Assignments
Pin
50
Signal Description
Pin
Signal Description
1
Digital Input 0
20
Digital Output 0
2
Digital Input 1
21
Digital Output 1
3
Digital Input 2
22
Digital Output 2
4
Digital Input 3
23
Digital Output 3
5
Digital Input 4
24
Digital Output 4
6
Digital Input 5
25
Digital Output 5
7
Digital Input 6
26
Digital Output 6
8
Digital Input 7
27
Digital Output 7
9
Digital Input 8
28
Digital Output 8
10
Digital Input 9
29
Digital Output 9
11
Digital Input 10
30
Digital Output 10
12
Digital Input 11
31
Digital Output 11
13
Digital Input 12
32
Digital Output 12
14
Digital Input 13
33
Digital Output 13
15
Digital Input 14
34
Digital Output 14
16
Digital Input 15
35
Digital Output 15
17
Digital Ground
36
Reserved
18
Digital Ground
37
Digital Ground
19
No Connect
Wiring Signals to the BNC Connection Box
CT/Enc In, Analog Out, Clk/Trig Connector
The CT/Enc In, Analog Out, Clk/Trig connector lets you access the
counter/timer, quadrature decoder, analog output, external clock,
and external trigger signals. Table 6 lists the pin assignments for this
connector on the BNC connection box.
4
4
Table 6: CT/Enc In, Analog Out, Clk/Trig Connector
Pin
Signal Description
Pin
Signal Description
1
Analog Output 0
20
Analog Output 0 Return
2
Analog Output 1
21
Analog Output 1 Return
3
Reserved
22
Reserved
4
Reserved
23
Reserved
5
Digital Ground
24
Digital Ground
6
External DAC Clock
25
External DAC Trigger
7
External ADC Clock
26
External ADC Trigger
8
Counter 0 Clock
27
Digital Ground
9
Counter 0 Out
28
Counter 0 Gate
10
Counter 1 Clock
29
Digital Ground
11
Counter 1 Out
30
Counter 1 Gate
12
Quad Dec 0 A
31
Digital Ground
13
Quad 0 Index
32
Quad Dec 0 B
14
Quad Dec 1 A
33
Digital Ground
15
Quad 1 Index
34
Quad Dec 1 B
16
Quad Dec 2 A
35
Digital Ground
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
51
Chapter 4
Table 6: CT/Enc In, Analog Out, Clk/Trig Connector (cont.)
Pin
52
Signal Description
Pin
Signal Description
17
Quad 2 Index
36
Quad Dec 2 B
18
Digital Ground
37
Digital Ground
19
No Connect
Wiring Signals to the BNC Connection Box
Connecting Analog Input Signals
The BNC connection box supports voltage inputs. You can connect
analog input signals to a BNC connection box in single-ended mode.
In this mode the source of the input should be close to the module,
and all the input signals are referred to the same common ground.
Figure 7 shows how to connect single-ended voltage inputs (channels
0 and 1, in this case) to the BNC connectors on the BNC connection
box.
4
4
4
BNC Connection Box
Analog In 1
4
DAC0
DAC1
Note that the BNC box automatically
connects the Analog Ground signal
appropriately.
AD3
AD2
Signal
Source
AD1
Analog In 0
AD0
4
Figure 7: Connecting Single-Ended Inputs to the BNC Connection Box
4
4
4
4
53
Chapter 4
Connecting Analog Output Signals
Figure 8 shows how to connect an analog output voltage signal
(channel 0, in this case) to the BNC connectors on the BNC connection
box.
BNC Connection Box
Note that the BNC box automatically
connects the Analog Ground signal
appropriately.
DAC0
DACClock
DAC1
ADClock
DACTrig
CT/Enc In, AO, Clk/Trig
Analog Out 0
Digital In/Out
Load
ADTrig
Figure 8: Connecting Analog Outputs to the BNC Connector Box
54
Wiring Signals to the BNC Connection Box
Connecting Digital I/O Signals
Figure 9 shows how to connect digital input signals (lines 0 and 1, in
this case) to the Digital In/Out pins.
4
4
17
Digital Ground
Digital Input 1
2
Digital Input 0
TTL Inputs
1
D-sub pins
Figure 9: Connecting Digital Inputs to the D-sub Pins
-
4
20
4
0 Out = LED On
500
Ω
4
37
Digital Ground
+
4
4
Figure 10 shows how to connect a digital output (line 0, in this case)
to the Digital In/Out pins.
5V
4
Digital Out 0
D-sub pins
Figure 10: Connecting Digital Outputs to the D-sub Pins
4
55
Chapter 4
Connecting Counter/Timer Signals
The BNC connection box provides two counter/timer channels that
you can use for the following operations:
• Event counting
• Up/down counting
• Frequency measurement
• Pulse width/period measurement
• Edge-to-edge measurement
• Pulse output (continuous, one-shot, and repetitive one-shot)
This section describes how to connect counter/timer signals. Refer to
Chapter 6 for more information about using the counter/timers.
Event Counting
Figure 11 shows how to connect counter/timer signals to the CT/Enc
In, Analog Output, Clk/Trig D-sub pins to perform an event
counting operation on counter/timer 0 using an external gate.
The counter counts the number of rising edges that occur on the
Counter 0 Clock input when the Counter 0 Gate signal is in the active
state (as specified by software). Refer to “Counter/Timer Features,”
on page 100, for more information.
56
Wiring Signals to the BNC Connection Box
4
Digital Ground
External
Gating
Switch
24
Counter 0 Gate
Counter 0 Clock
28
8
5
Signal
Source
Digital Ground
4
4
D-sub Pins
Figure 11: Connecting Counter/Timer Signals to the D-sub Pins for an Event
Counting Operation Using an External Gate
Figure 12 shows how to connect counter/timer signals to the CT/Enc
In, Analog Output, Clk/Trig D-sub pins to perform an event
counting operation on counter/timer 0 without using a gate. The
counter counts the number of rising edges that occur on the Counter
0 Clock input.
4
4
4
4
Counter 0 Clock
8
5
Signal
Source
Digital Ground
D-sub Pins
Figure 12: Connecting Counter/Timer Signals to the D-sub Pins for an Event
Counting Operation Without Using a Gate
4
4
57
Chapter 4
Up/Down Counting
Note: To use up/down counting mode, you need the latest version
of DT-Open Layers.
Figure 13 shows how to connect counter/timer signals to the CT/Enc
In, Analog Output, Clk/Trig D-sub pins to perform an up/down
counting operation on counter/timer 0. The counter keeps track of
the number of rising edges that occur on the Counter 0 Clock input.
The counter increments when the Counter 0 Gate signal is high and
decrements when the Counter 0 Gate signal is low.
Counter 0 Gate
Up/Down
Signal
Source
Counter 0 Clock
28
8
5
Digital Ground
D-sub Pins
Figure 13: Connecting Counter/Timer Signals to the D-sub Pins
for an Up/Down Counting Operation
58
Wiring Signals to the BNC Connection Box
Frequency Measurement
One way to measure frequency is to connect a pulse of a known
duration (such as a one-shot output of counter/timer 1) to the
Counter 0 Gate input.
Figure 14 shows how to connect counter/timer signals to the CT/Enc
In, Analog Output, Clk/Trig D-sub pins. In this case, the frequency of
the Counter 0 clock input is the number of counts divided by the
period of the Counter 0 Gate input signal.
Counter 1 Out
Counter 0 Gate
Counter 0 Clock
11
4
4
4
4
28
8
5
4
D-sub Pins
4
Signal
Source
Digital Ground
Figure 14: Connecting Counter/Timer Signals to the D-sub Pins for a
Frequency Measurement Operation Using an External Pulse
Period/Pulse Width Measurement
Figure 15 shows how to connect counter/timer signals to the CT/Enc
In, Analog Output, Clk/Trig D-sub pins to perform a period/pulse
width measurement operation on counter/timer 0. You specify the
active pulse (high or low) in software. The pulse width is the
percentage of the total pulse period that is active. Refer to Chapter 6
for more information about pulse periods and pulse widths.
4
4
4
59
Chapter 4
Counter 0 Clock
8
5
Signal
Source
Digital Ground
D-sub Pins
Figure 15: Connecting Counter/Timer Signals to the D-sub Pins
for a Period/Pulse Width Measurement Operation
60
Wiring Signals to the BNC Connection Box
Edge-to-Edge Measurement
4
Note: To use edge-to-edge measurement mode, you need the latest
version of DT-Open Layers.
Figure 16 shows how to connect counter/timer signals to the CT/Enc
In, Analog Output, Clk/Trig D-sub pins to perform an edge-to-edge
measurement operation on two signal sources. The counter measures
the time interval between the start edge (in this case, a rising edge on
the Counter 0 Clock signal) and the stop edge (in this case, a falling
edge on the Counter 0 Gate signal).
You specify the start edge and the stop edge in software. Refer to
page 107 for more information.
4
4
4
4
Digital Ground
Signal
Source 1
Signal
Source 0
5
Counter 0 Gate
28
Counter 0 Clock
4
8
4
D-sub Pins
Figure 16: Connecting Counter/Timer Signals to the D-sub Pins
for an Edge-to-Edge Measurement Operation
4
4
61
Chapter 4
Pulse Output
Figure 17 shows how to connect counter/timer signals to the CT/Enc
In, Analog Output, Clk/Trig D-sub pins to perform a pulse output
operation on counter/timer 0; in this example, an external gate is
used.
Digital Ground
External
Gating
Switch
24
Counter 0 Gate
Counter 0 Out
28
9
5
Heater
Controller
Digital Ground
D-sub Pins
Figure 17: Connecting Counter/Timer Signals to the D-sub Pins
for a Pulse Output Operation Using an External Gate
62
Wiring Signals to the BNC Connection Box
Connecting Quadrature Decoder Signals
The BNC connection box provides three quadrature decoder
channels that allow simultaneous decoding of three quadrature
encoded inputs.
Each quadrature decoder supports "A," "B," and "Index" inputs and is
used to interface with a quadrature encoder sensor. The A and B
input relationships are used to increment or decrement the positional
count; the Index input can be used to zero-out the positional count.
Refer to Chapter 6 for more information about using the quadrature
decoders.
Figure 11 shows how to connect signals from a quadrature encoder to
quadrature decoder 0 using the CT/Enc In, Analog Output, Clk/Trig
D-sub pins.
4
4
4
4
4
Quad Dec 0 B
+5 V Power
Quadrature
Encoder
Quad Dec 0 Index
Quad Dec 0 A
Digital Ground
32
13
4
12
5
4
D-sub Pins
4
Figure 18: Connecting Quadrature Decoder Signals to the D-sub Pins
4
63
Chapter 4
64
5
Verifying the Operation
of a Module
Installing the Quick DataAcq Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Running the Quick DataAcq Application. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Testing Single-Value Analog Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Testing Single-Value Analog Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Testing Continuous Analog Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Testing Single-Value Digital Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Testing Single-Value Digital Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Testing Frequency Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Testing Pulse Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
65
Chapter 5
Prepare to Use a Module
(see Chapter 2 starting on page 27)
Set Up and Install the Module
(see Chapter 3 starting on page 35)
Wire Signals to the BNC Connection Box
(see Chapter 4 starting on page 43)
Verify the Operation of the Module
(this chapter)
You can verify the operation of a DT9832 Series module using the
Quick DataAcq application. Quick DataAcq lets you do the
following:
• Acquire data from a single analog input channel or digital input
port
• Acquire data continuously from one or more analog input
channels using an oscilloscope, strip chart, or Fast Fourier
Transform (FFT) view
• Measure the frequency of events
• Output data from a single analog output channel or digital
output port
• Output pulses either continuously or as a one-shot
• Save the input data to disk
66
Verifying the Operation of a Module
Installing the Quick DataAcq Application
The Quick DataAcq application is installed automatically when you
install the driver software. See “Installing the Software” on page 31.
Running the Quick DataAcq Application
To run the Quick DataAcq application, do the following:
1.
If you have not already done so, power up your computer and
any attached peripherals.
2.
Click Start from the Task Bar.
3.
Browse to Programs|Data Translation, Inc| DT-Open Layers
for Win32|QuickDataAcq.
The main menu appears.
5
5
5
5
5
Note: The Quick DataAcq application allows you to verify basic
operations on the board; however, it may not support all of the
board’s features.
For information on each of the features provided, use the online help
for the Quick DataAcq application by pressing F1 from any view or
selecting the Help menu. If the system has trouble finding the help
file, navigate to C:\Program Files\Data Translation\Win32\
dtdataacq.hlp, where C: is the letter of your hard disk drive.
5
5
5
5
67
Chapter 5
Testing Single-Value Analog Input
To verify that the module can read a single analog input value, do the
following:
68
1.
Connect a voltage source, such as a function generator, to analog
input channel 0 on the DT9832 Series module. Refer to page 53
for an example of how to connect an analog input.
2.
In the Quick DataAcq application, choose Single Analog Input
from the Acquisition menu.
3.
Select the appropriate DT9832 Series module from the Board list
box.
4.
In the Channel list box, select analog input channel 0.
5.
In the Range list box, select the range for the channel. The default
is ±10 V.
6.
Select Single Ended.
7.
Click Get to acquire a single value from analog input channel 0.
The application displays the value on the screen in both text and
graphical form.
Verifying the Operation of a Module
Testing Single-Value Analog Output
Note: DT9832-04-0-BNC, DT9832-04-0-OEM, DT9832A-02-0-BNC,
and DT9832A-02-0-OEM modules do not have analog outputs.
To verify that the module can output a single analog output value, do
the following:
1.
Connect an oscilloscope or voltmeter to analog output channel 0
on the module. Refer to page 54 for an example of how to connect
analog output signals.
2.
In the Quick DataAcq application, choose Single Analog Output
from the Control menu.
3.
Select the appropriate DT9832 Series module from the Board list
box.
4.
In the Channel list box, select analog output channel 0.
5.
In the Range list box, select the output range of DAC0. The
default is ±10 V.
6.
Enter an output value, or use the slider to select a value, to output
from DAC0.
7.
Click Send to output a single value from analog output
channel 0.
The application displays the output value both on the slider and in the
text box.
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
69
Chapter 5
Testing Continuous Analog Input
To verify that the module can perform a continuous analog input
operation, do the following:
1.
Connect known voltage sources, such as the outputs of a function
generator, to analog input channels 0 and 1 on the DT9832 Series
module.
2.
In the Quick DataAcq application, choose Scope from the
Acquisition menu.
3.
Select the DT9832 Series module from the Board list box.
4.
In the Sec/Div list box, select the number of seconds per division
(.1 to .00001) for the display.
5.
In the Channel list box, select analog input channel 1, and then
click Add to add the channel to the channel list. Note that, by
default, channel 0 is included in the channel list.
6.
Click Config from the Toolbar.
7.
In the Config dialog, select ChannelType, and then select Single
Ended.
8.
In the Config dialog, select Range, and then select Bipolar.
9.
Click OK to close the dialog box.
10. In the Trigger box, select Auto to acquire data continuously from
the specified channels or Manual to acquire a burst of data from
the specified channels.
11. Click Start from the Toolbar to start the continuous analog input
operation.
The application displays the values acquired from each channel in a
unique color on the oscilloscope view.
12. Click Stop from the Toolbar to stop the operation.
70
Verifying the Operation of a Module
Testing Single-Value Digital Input
To verify that the module can read a single digital input value, do the
following:
1.
Connect a digital input to digital input line 0 on the DT9832
Series module. Refer to page 55 for information about how to
connect a digital input.
2.
In the Quick DataAcq application, choose Digital Input from the
Acquisition menu.
3.
Select the appropriate DT9832 Series module from the Board list
box.
4.
Click Get.
The application displays the entire 16-bit digital input value (0 to
FFFF) in both the Data box and the Digital Input box.
In addition, application shows the state of the lower eight digital input
lines (lines 0 to 7) in the graphical display. If an indicator light is lit
(red), the line is high; if an indicator light is not lit (black), the line is
low.
Note: Although the DT9832 Series modules contain 16 digital
input lines, the Quick DataAcq application shows indicator lights
for the lower eight digital input lines only. The 16-bit value is the
correct value for all 16 lines.
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
71
Chapter 5
Testing Single-Value Digital Output
Note: Although the DT9832 Series modules contain 16 digital
output lines, the Quick DataAcq application allows you to perform a
digital output operation on the lower eight digital output lines (lines
0 to 7) only.
To verify that the module can output a single digital output value, do
the following:
72
1.
Connect a digital output to digital output line 0 on the DT9832
Series module. Refer to page 49 for information about how to
connect a digital output.
2.
In the Quick DataAcq application, choose Digital Output from
the Control menu.
3.
Select the appropriate DT9832 Series module from the Board list
box.
4.
Click the appropriate indicator lights to select the types of signals
to write from the digital output lines. If you select a light, the
module outputs a high-level signal; if you do not select a light,
the module outputs a low-level signal. You can also enter an
output value for the lower eight digital output lines (0 to FF) in
the Hex text box.
5.
Click Send.
The values of the lower eight digital output lines are output
appropriately.
Verifying the Operation of a Module
Testing Frequency Measurement
To verify that the module can perform a frequency measurement
operation, do the following:
1.
Wire an external clock source to counter/timer 0 on the DT9832
Series module. Refer to page 73 for an example of how to connect
an external clock.
Note: The Quick DataAcq application works only with
counter/timer 0.
2.
In the Quick DataAcq application, choose Measure Frequency
from the Acquisition menu.
3.
Select the appropriate DT9832 Series module from the Board list
box.
4.
In the Count Duration text box, enter the number of seconds
during which events will be counted.
5.
Click Start to start the frequency measurement operation.
The operation automatically stops after the number of seconds you
specified has elapsed, and the frequency is displayed on the screen.
6.
Click Stop to stop the frequency measurement operation.
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
73
Chapter 5
Testing Pulse Output
To verify that the module can perform a pulse output operation,
perform the following steps:
1.
Connect a scope to counter/timer 0 on the DT9832 Series module.
Refer to page 62 for an example of how to connect a scope (a
pulse output) to counter/timer 0.
Note: The Quick DataAcq application works only with
counter/timer 0.
74
2.
In the Quick DataAcq application, choose Pulse Generator from
the Control menu.
3.
Select the appropriate DT9832 Series module from the Board list
box.
4.
Select either Continuous to output a continuous pulse stream or
One Shot to output one pulse.
5.
Select either Low-to-high to output a rising-edge pulse (the high
portion of the total pulse output period is the active portion of
the signal) or High-to-low to output a falling-edge pulse (the low
portion of the total pulse output period is the active portion of
the signal).
6.
Under Pulse Width, enter a percentage or use the slider to select
a percentage for the pulse width. The percentage determines the
duty cycle of the pulse.
7.
Click Start to generate the pulse(s).
The application displays the results both in text and graphical form.
8.
Click Stop to stop a continuous pulse output operation. One-shot
pulse output operations stop automatically.
Part 2:
Using Your Module
6
Principles of Operation
Analog Input Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Analog Output Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Digital I/O Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Counter/Timer Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Quadrature Decoder Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
77
Chapter 6
Figure 19 shows a block diagram of the DT9832 Series modules.
Synchronous
Analog
In 0
Simultaneous A/Ds
Isolated
Power
16-Bit
ADC
USB 2.0 Interface
+5V, ±15V
Analog
In 3
Digital In
[15:0]
16-Bit
ADC
500 V Isolation
Barrier
Input
FIFO
Synchronous
16-Bit
Digital
In
16-Bit
D/A
Clock [1:0]
Gate [1:0]
Output
FIFO
2 32-Bit
Counter/
Timers
16-Bit
D/A
16-Bit
Digital
Out
Out [1:0]
Encoder 0
Encoder 1
3 Quadrature
Decoders
Encoder 2
InputClock
Ext. A/D Trig
Ext. A/D Clk
Ext. D/A Trig
Clock
and
Trigger
Logic
OutputClock
Ext. D/A Clk
Figure 19: Block Diagram of the DT9832 Series Modules
78
Analog
Out 0
Analog
Out 1
Digital
Out
[1:15]
Principles of Operation
Analog Input Features
This section describes the following features of analog input (A/D)
operations on the DT9832 Series module:
• Input resolution, described below
• Analog input channels, described below
6
6
• Input ranges, described on page 84
• Input sample clock sources, described on page 84
• Analog input conversion modes, described on page 85
6
• Input triggers, described on page 87
• Data format and transfer, described on page 88
• Error conditions, described on page 89
Input Resolution
6
6
Input resolution is fixed at 16 bits; you cannot specify the resolution
in software.
6
Analog Input Channels
The DT9832 supports four analog inputs. The DT9832A supports two
analog inputs. You can connect the analog input channels in
single-ended mode. In this mode the source of the input should be
close to the module, and all the input signals are referred to the same
common ground. The BNC connection box is shipped in a
single-ended channel configuration.
6
6
6
79
Chapter 6
Note: To maintain simultaneous operation, all analog input
connections must have the same lead lengths. Do not use the STP37
screw terminal panel with the analog input subsystem.
The DT9832 Series modules can acquire data from a single analog
input channel or from a group of analog input channels. Analog
input channels are numbered 0 to 3 (DT9832) or 0 and 1 (DT9832A).
The following subsections describe how to specify the channels.
Specifying a Single Analog Input Channel
The simplest way to acquire data from a single analog input channel
is to specify the channel for a single-value analog input operation
using software; refer to page 85 for more information about
single-value operations.
You can also specify a single channel using the analog input channel
list, described in the next section.
Specifying One or More Analog Input Channels
You can read data from one or more analog input channels using an
analog input channel list. Because these modules feature
simultaneous sampling, the order of the channels in the channel list
does not matter. You cannot specify the same channel more than once
in the list.
Using software, specify the channels that you want to sample. You
can enter up to 15 entries in the channel list (13 for the DT9832A
module), including digital input, two 32-bit counter/timers, and
three 32-bit quadrature decoders. Channels 0 to 3 on the DT9832 (0
and 1 on the DT9832A) are reserved for analog input. Refer to page 85
for more information about the supported conversion modes.
80
Principles of Operation
Specifying the Digital Input Port in the Analog Input
Channel List
6
The DT9832 Series modules allow you to read the digital input port
(all 16 digital input lines) using the analog input channel list. This
feature is particularly useful when you want to correlate the timing of
analog and digital events.
6
To read the digital input port, specify channel 2 (DT9832A) or
channel 4 (DT9832) in the analog input channel list. You can enter
channel 2 or 4 anywhere in the list.
6
The digital input port is treated like any other channel in the analog
input channel list; therefore, all the clocking, triggering, and
conversion modes supported for analog input channels are
supported for the digital input port, if you specify them this way.
Specifying Counter/Timers in the Analog Input
Channel List
6
6
The DT9832 Series modules allow you to read the value of the 32-bit
counter/timer channels using the analog input channel list. This
feature is particularly useful when you want to correlate the timing of
analog and counter/timer events.
6
To read a counter/timer channel, specify the appropriate channel
number in the analog input channel list (refer to Table 7 on page 82).
You can enter a channel number anywhere in the list.
6
You need two channel list entries to read one 32-bit counter value.
The first entry stores the lower 16-bit word, and the second entry
stores the upper 16-bit word. You must specify both channel list
entries if you include a counter/timer channel.
6
Table 7 lists the channel number(s) to use for each counter/timer.
6
81
Chapter 6
Table 7: Using Counter/Timers in Analog Input Channel List
Channel to Specify in the
Channel List for:
Counter/Timer
Channel
Description
DT9832
DT9832A
C/T_0_LOW
Lower 16 bits (0 to 15) of C/T 0
Channel 5
Channel 3
C/T_0_HI
Upper 16 bits (16 to 31) of C/T 0
Channel 6
Channel 4
C/T_1_LOW
Lower 16 bits of C/T 1
Channel 7
Channel 5
C/T_1_HI
Upper 16 bits of C/T 1
Channel 8
Channel 6
The counter/timer channel is treated like any other channel in the
analog input channel list; therefore, all the clocking, triggering, and
conversion modes supported for analog input channels are
supported for the counter/timers, if you specify them this way.
Specifying Quadrature Decoders in the Analog Input
Channel List
The DT9832 Series modules allow you to read the value of the 32-bit
quadrature decoder channels using the analog input channel list.
This feature is particularly useful when you want to correlate the
timing of analog and quadrature decoder values.
To read a quadrature decoder channel, specify the appropriate
channel number in the analog input channel list (refer to Table 8 on
page 83). You can enter a channel number anywhere in the list.
You need two channel list entries to read one 32-bit counter value.
The first entry stores the lower 16-bit word, and the second entry
stores the upper 16-bit word. You must specify both channel list
entries if you include a quadrature decoder channel.
82
Principles of Operation
Table 8 lists the channel number(s) to use for each quadrature
decoder.
6
Table 8: Using Quadrature Decoders in Analog Input Channel List
Quadrature
Decoder
Channel
Channel to Specify in the
Channel List for:
Description
DT9832
6
DT9832A
QUAD_0_LOW
Lower 16 bits of Q/D 0
Channel 9
Channel 7
QUAD_0_HI
Upper 16 bits of Q/D 0
Channel 10
Channel 8
QUAD_1_LOW
Lower 16 bits of Q/D 1
Channel 11
Channel 9
QUAD_1_HI
Upper 16 bits of Q/D 1
Channel 12
Channel 10
QUAD_2_LOW
Lower 16 bits of Q/D 2
Channel 13
Channel 11
QUAD_2_HI
Upper 16 bits of Q/D 2
Channel 14
Channel 12
Note: If you are using the DataAcq SDK, you access the quadrature
decoders through the C/T subsystem. C/T subsystem 2 corresponds
to quadrature decoder 0, C/T subsystem 3 corresponds to
quadrature decoder 1, and C/T subsystem 4 corresponds to
quadrature decoder 2.
The quadrature decoder channel is treated like any other channel in
the analog input channel list; therefore, all the clocking, triggering,
and conversion modes supported for analog input channels are
supported for the quadrature decoders, if you specify them this way.
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Input Ranges
The DT9832 Series modules provide an input range of ±10 V. Use
software to specify the range as ±10 V.
You do not need to (and cannot) set gain values for DT9832 Series
modules. The gain is preset at 1.
Input Sample Clock Sources
DT9832 Series modules allow you to use one of the following clock
sources to pace analog input operations:
• Internal A/D clock – Using software, specify the clock source as
internal and the clock frequency at which to pace the operation.
The minimum frequency supported is 0.01118 Samples/s; the
maximum frequency supported is 1250 kSamples/s (for the
DT9832 module) or 2000 kSamples/S (for the DT9832A module).
According to sampling theory (Nyquist Theorem), specify a
frequency that is at least twice as fast as the input’s highest
frequency component. For example, to accurately sample a
20 kHz signal, specify a sampling frequency of at least 40 kHz.
Doing so avoids an error condition called aliasing, in which high
frequency input components erroneously appear as lower
frequencies after sampling.
• External A/D clock – An external A/D clock is useful when you
want to pace acquisitions at rates not available with the internal
A/D clock or when you want to pace at uneven intervals.
Connect an external A/D clock to the AD Clock BNC connector
on the DT9832 Series module. Conversions start on the falling
edge of the external A/D clock input signal.
Using software, specify the clock source as external. The clock
frequency is always equal to the frequency of the external A/D
sample clock input signal that you connect to the module.
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Principles of Operation
Note: If you specify the digital input port and/or counter/timer or
quadrature decoder channels in the channel list, the input sample
clock (internal or external) also paces the acquisition of the digital
input port and/or counter/timer and quadrature decoder channels.
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Analog Input Conversion Modes
DT9832 Series modules support the following conversion modes:
• Single-value operations are the simplest to use. Using software,
you specify the analog input channel. The module acquires the
data from the specified channel and returns the data
immediately. For a single-value operation, you cannot specify a
clock source, trigger source, scan mode, or buffer.
Single-value operations stop automatically when finished; you
cannot stop a single-value operation.
• Continuous scan mode takes full advantage of the capabilities of
the DT9832 Series modules. For a scan, you can specify a channel
list, clock source, trigger source, scan mode, and buffer using
software. This mode is described in the following subsection.
Using software, you can stop a scan by performing either an
orderly stop or an abrupt stop. In an orderly stop, the module
finishes acquiring the current buffer, stops all subsequent
acquisition, and transfers the acquired data to host memory; any
subsequent triggers are ignored.
In an abrupt stop, the module stops acquiring samples
immediately; the current buffer is not completely filled, it is
returned to the application only partially filled, and any
subsequent triggers are ignored.
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Continuous Scan Mode
Use continuous scan mode if you want to accurately control the
period between successive simultaneous conversions of all channels
in a channel list.
When it detects an initial trigger, the module simultaneously samples
all of the input channels, including the digital inputs, counter/timers,
and quadrature decoders, and converts the analog inputs. If the
channel is included in the channel list, the sampled data is placed in
the allocated buffer(s) and the operation continues until the allocated
buffers are filled or until you stop the operation. Refer to page 88 for
more information about buffers.
The conversion rate is determined by the frequency of the input
sample clock; refer to page 84 for more information about the input
sample clock. The sample rate, which is the rate at which a single
entry in the channel list is sampled, is the same as the conversion rate
due to the simultaneous nature of the module.
To select continuous scan mode, use software to specify the data flow
as Continuous and to specify the initial trigger (the trigger source that
starts the operation). You can select a software trigger, an external,
positive digital (TTL) trigger, an external, negative digital (TTL)
trigger, or a positive analog threshold trigger as the initial trigger.
Refer to page 87 for more information about the supported trigger
sources.
Figure 20 illustrates continuous scan mode using a channel list with
three entries: channel 0, channel 1, and channel 2. In this example,
analog input data is acquired simultaneously on all channels on each
clock pulse of the input sample clock. Data is acquired continuously.
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Principles of Operation
Chan 2
Chan 2
Chan 2
Chan 2
Chan 1
Chan 1
Chan 1
Chan 1
Chan 0
Chan 0
Chan 0
Chan 0
Input
Sample
Clock
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Data is acquired continuously
Initial trigger event occurs
Figure 20: Continuous Scan Mode
Input Triggers
A trigger is an event that occurs based on a specified set of
conditions. Acquisition starts when the module detects the initial
trigger event and stops when all the allocated buffer have been filled
or when you stop the operation.
The DT9832 Series module supports the following trigger sources:
• Software trigger − A software trigger event occurs when you
start the analog input operation (the computer issues a write to
the module to begin conversions). Using software, specify the
trigger source as a software trigger.
• External digital (TTL) trigger − An external digital (TTL) trigger
event occurs when the DT9832 Series module detects either a
rising-edge (positive) or falling-edge (negative) transition on the
signal connected to the AD Trig BNC connector on the module.
Using software, specify the trigger source as an external, positive
digital (TTL) trigger or an external, negative digital (TTL) trigger.
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• Analog threshold trigger – An analog threshold trigger event
occurs when the signal on the first channel in the analog input
channel list rises above (low-to-high transition) a programmable
threshold level. Using software, specify the trigger source as a
positive threshold trigger.
You must use analog input channel 0 as the analog trigger. The
analog trigger channel must be the first entry in the analog input
channel list.
You specify the threshold level by setting the value of the D/A
subsystem that controls the threshold value. For modules that do
not have analog output channels, this is D/A subsystem 0. For
modules that do have analog outputs, this is D/A subsystem 1.
Specify a value between 0 and 255, where 0 equals 0 V and 255
equals +10 V.
Data Format and Transfer
DT9832 Series modules use offset binary data encoding, where 0000
represents negative full-scale, and FFFFh represents positive
full-scale. Use software to specify the data encoding as binary. The
ADC outputs FFFFh for above-range signals, and 0000 for
below-range signals.
Before you begin acquiring data, you must allocate buffers to hold
the data. An event is raised whenever a buffer is filled. This allows
you to move and/or process the data as needed.
Note: We recommend that you allocate a minimum of two buffers
that can contain even multiples of 256 samples.
Data is written to multiple allocated input buffers continuously;
when no more empty buffers are available, the operation stops. The
data is gap-free.
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Principles of Operation
Error Conditions
The DT9832 Series module reports any overrun errors by generating
an overrun event. This event indicates that data buffers are not being
sent from the host to the module fast enough, and so the A/D
converter ran out of buffers. To avoid this error, try one or more of
the following:
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• Reduce the clock rate of the A/D
• Increase the size of the buffers
• Increase the number of buffers
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• Close any other applications that are running
• Run the program on a faster computer
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If one of these error conditions occurs, the module stops acquiring
and transferring data to the host computer.
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Analog Output Features
This section describes the following features of analog output
operations:
• Output resolution, described below
• Analog output channels, described below
• Output ranges and gains, described on page 92
• Output triggers, described on page 92
• Output clocks, described on page 93
• Data format and transfer, described on page 96
• Error conditions, described on page 97
Output Resolution
Input resolution is fixed at 16 bits; you cannot specify the resolution
in software.
Analog Output Channels
DT9832-04-2 and DT9832A-02-2 modules support two DC-level
analog output channels (DAC0 and DAC1). Refer to Chapter 4 for
information about how to wire analog output signals to the module.
Note: An extra analog output (D/A) subsystem is provided on all
DT9832 Series modules for controlling the analog threshold trigger.
The threshold trigger DAC is the highest-numbered D/A subsystem
supported by your module. Refer to page 87 for more information
on analog threshold triggering.
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Principles of Operation
The DACs are deglitched to prevent noise from interfering with the
output signal. They power up to a value of 0 V ±10 mV. Unplugging
the module resets the DACs to 0 V.
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The DT9832 Series modules can output data to a single DAC or
sequentially to one or more DACs and/or the digital output port. The
following subsections describe how to specify the DACs/port.
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Specifying a Single Analog Output Channel
The simplest way to output data to a single DAC is to specify the
channel for a single-value analog output operation using software;
refer to page 93 for more information about single-value operations.
You can also specify a single DAC using the output channel list,
described in the next section.
Specifying Multiple Analog Output Channels
and/or the Digital Output Port
You can output data to one or more DACs and/or the digital output
port using the output channel list. This feature is particularly useful
when you want to correlate the timing of analog and digital output
events.
Using software, specify the data flow mode as Continuous for the
D/A subsystem (described on page 93) and specify the output
channels you want to update, where 0 is DAC0, 1 is DAC1, and 2 is
the digital output port. You can enter a maximum of 3 entries in the
output channel list and the channels must be in order.
Note that you can skip a channel in the list, however, if you do not
want to update it. For example, if you want to update only DAC1 and
the digital output port, specify channels 1 and 2 in the output channel
list. If you want to update all the DACs and the digital output ports,
specify channels 0, 1, and 2 in the output channel list. The channels
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are output in order from the first entry in the list to the last entry in
the list.
Note: The digital output port is treated like any other channel in
the output channel list; therefore, all the clocking, triggering, and
conversion modes supported for analog output channels are
supported for the digital output port, if you specify the digital
output port in the output channel list.
Output Ranges and Gains
Each DAC on the DT9832 Series module can output bipolar analog
output signals in the range of ±10 V.
Output Triggers
A trigger is an event that occurs based on a specified set of
conditions. The DT9832 Series modules support the following output
trigger sources:
• Software trigger – A software trigger event occurs when you
start the analog output operation. Using software, specify the
trigger source as a software trigger.
• External digital (TTL) trigger – An external digital (TTL) trigger
event occurs when the DT9832 Series module detects a
rising-edge or falling-edge transition on the signal connected to
the DAC Trig BNC connector on the module. Using software,
specify the trigger source as either external, positive digital (TTL)
trigger or external, negative digital (TTL) trigger.
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Principles of Operation
Output Clocks
DT9832 Series modules allow you to use one of the following clock
sources to pace analog output operations:
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• Internal DAC clock – Using software, specify the clock source as
internal and the clock frequency at which to pace the operation.
The minimum frequency supported is 0.01118 Samples/s; the
maximum frequency supported is 500 kSamples/s.
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• External DAC clock – An external DAC clock is useful when you
want to pace conversions at rates not available with the output
sample clock or when you want to pace at uneven intervals.
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Connect an external DAC clock to the DAC Clock BNC connector
on the DT9832 Series module. Analog output operations start on
the rising edge of the external DAC clock signal.
Using software, specify the clock source as external. The clock
frequency is always equal to the frequency of the external DAC
clock signal that you connect to the module.
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Output Conversion Modes
DT9832 Series modules support the following conversion modes:
• Single-value operations are the simplest to use but offer the least
flexibility and efficiency. Use software to specify the analog
output channel that you want to update, and the value to output
from that channel. For a single-value operation, you cannot
specify a clock source, trigger source, or buffer. Single-value
operations stop automatically when finished; you cannot stop a
single-value operation.
• Streaming analog output operations take full advantage of the
capabilities of the DT9832 Series modules. In this mode, you can
specify an output channel list, clock source, trigger source, buffer,
and buffer wrap mode. Two continuous analog output modes are
supported: streaming and waveform generation mode. These
modes are described in the following subsections.
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Chapter 6
Note that in waveform mode, each channel in the output channel
list must write the same number of values, use the same output
clock (refer to page 93), and use the same output trigger (refer to
page 92).
Streaming Analog Output
Use streaming analog output mode if you want to accurately control
the period between conversions of individual channels in the output
channel list (refer to page 91 for information on specifying the output
channel list).
Use software to fill the output buffer with the values that you want to
write to the DACs and to the digital output port, if applicable. For
example, if your output channel list contains only DAC0 and the
digital output port, specify the values in the output buffer as follows:
the first output value for DAC0, the first output value for the digital
output port, the second output value for DAC0, the second output
value for the digital output port, and so on.
When it detects a trigger, the module starts writing the values from
the output buffer to the channels specified in the output channel list.
The operation repeats continuously until all the data is output from
the buffers.
Make sure that the host computer transfers data to the output
channel list fast enough so that the list does not empty completely;
otherwise, an underrun error results.
To select streaming analog output mode, use software to specify the
following parameters:
• Set the data flow as Continuous.
• Set WrapSingleBuffer to False to use multiple buffers.
• Set the trigger source to any of the supported trigger sources.
Refer to page 92 for more information about the supported
trigger sources.
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Principles of Operation
To stop a streaming analog output operation, you can stop sending
data to the module, letting the module stop when it runs out of data,
or you can perform either an orderly stop or an abrupt stop using
software. In an orderly stop, the module finishes outputting the
current buffer, and then stops; all subsequent triggers are ignored. In
an abrupt stop, the module stops outputting samples immediately;
all subsequent triggers are ignored.
Waveform Generation
Use waveform generation mode if you want to output a waveform
repetitively.
Note: The waveform pattern size must be the same for all output
channels, and the total number of samples must be a multiple of the
total number of output channels.
Use software to fill the output buffer with the values that you want to
write to the channels in the output channel list. For example, if your
output channel list contains only DAC0 and the digital output port,
specify the values in the output buffer as follows: the first output
value for DAC0, the first output value for the digital output port, the
second output value for DAC0, the second output value for the
digital output port, and so on.
When it detects a trigger, the host computer transfers the entire
waveform pattern to the module, and the module starts writing
output values to the output channels, as determined by the output
channel list. A single buffer is output repeatedly. Use software to
allocate the memory and specify the waveform pattern.
To select waveform generation mode, use software to specify the
following parameters:
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• Set the data flow to Continuous.
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• Set WrapSingleBuffer to True to use a single buffer. Refer to the
following section for more information on this buffer wrap mode.
• Set the trigger source as any of the supported trigger sources
(refer to page 92).
Data Format and Transfer
Data from the host computer must use offset binary data encoding
for analog output signals, where 0000 represents −10 V, and FFFFh
represents +10 V. Using software, specify the data encoding as
binary.
Before you begin writing data to the output channels, you must
allocate and fill buffers with the appropriate data. An event is
returned whenever a buffer is transferred to the module. This allows
you to reuse that buffer, and refill it with additional output data.
Note: If WrapSingleBuffer is False, we recommend that you
allocate a minimum of two buffers that are even multiples of 256
samples. If WrapSingleBuffer is True, we recommend that you
allocate a minimum of one buffer that is an even multiple of 256
samples.
In streaming mode, data is written from multiple output buffers
continuously; when no more buffers of data are available, the
operation stops. The data is gap-free. If the size of your buffers is less
than 128K and you stop the analog output operation, the operation
stops after the current buffer and the next buffer have been output.
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Principles of Operation
If a single buffer is used (WrapSingleBuffer is True), data is written
from a single output buffer continuously; when all the data in the
buffer has been output, the module returns to the first location of the
buffer and continues outputting the data. This process continues
indefinitely until you stop it.
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Note: If a single buffer is used and the allocated output buffer is
equal to or less than the size of the FIFO on the module, the data is
written once to the module. The module recycles the data, allowing
you to output the same pattern continuously without any further
CPU or USB bus activity.
Error Conditions
The DT9832 Series module reports any underrun errors by sending
an underrun event to the application. This event indicates that data
buffers are not being sent from the host to the module fast enough,
and so the D/A converter ran out of data. To avoid this error, try one
or more of the following:
• Reduce the clock rate of the D/A
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• Increase the size of the buffers
• Increase the number of buffers
• Close any other applications that are running
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• Run the program on a faster computer
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Digital I/O Features
This section describes the following features of digital I/O
operations:
• Digital I/O lines, described below
• Operation modes, described on page 99
Digital I/O Lines
DT9832 Series modules support one digital input port, consisting of
16 digital input lines (lines 0 to 15) and one digital output port,
consisting of 16 digital output lines (lines 0 to 15). The resolution is
fixed at 16 bits; you cannot change the resolution in software.
You can read all 16 digital input lines or write all 16 digital output
lines with a single-value digital I/O operation.
In addition, you can specify the digital input port in an analog input
channel list to perform a continuous digital input operation, or you
can specify the digital output port in an output channel list to
perform a continuous digital output operation.
A digital line is high if its value is 1; a digital line is low if its value is
0. On power up or reset, a low value (0) is output from each of the
digital output lines.
The DT9832 Series modules allow you to program the first eight
digital input lines to perform interrupt-on-change operations. Refer
to the next section for more information.
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Principles of Operation
Operation Modes
The DT9832 Series modules support the following digital I/O
operation modes:
• Single-value operations are the simplest to use but offer the least
flexibility and efficiency. You use software to specify the digital
I/O port (the gain is ignored). Data is then read from or written
to all the digital I/O lines. For a single-value operation, you
cannot specify a clock or trigger source.
Single-value operations stop automatically when finished; you
cannot stop a single-value operation.
• Continuous digital I/O takes full advantage of the capabilities of
the DT9832 Series modules using the analog I/O clock source,
scan mode, trigger source, buffer, and buffer wrap mode.
− Digital input – For digital input operations, enter the digital
input port (all 16 digital input lines) as channel 2 (for the
DT9832A) or 4 (for the DT9832) in the analog input channel
list; refer to page 81 for more information. The analog input
sample clock (internal or external) paces the reading of the
digital input port (as well as the acquisition of the analog
input, counter/timer, and quadrature decoder channels);
refer to page 84 for more information.
− Digital output – For digital output operations, enter the
digital output port (all 16 digital output lines) as channel 2 in
the output channel list; refer to page 91 for more information.
The analog output clock (internal or external) paces the
update of the digital output port (as well as the update of the
analog output channels); refer to page 93 for more
information.
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Chapter 6
• Interrupt-on-change operations – You can use the Open Layers
Control Panel applet or the DT-Open Layers for .NET Class
Library to select any of the first eight digital input lines to
perform interrupt-on-change operations. Use software to set the
data flow mode of the digital I/O subsystem to Continuous.
When any one of the specified bits changes state, the module
reads the entire 16-bit digital input value and generates an
interrupt. The software returns the current value of the digital
input port as well as the digital input lines that changed state.
Counter/Timer Features
This section describes the following features of counter/timer (C/T)
operations:
• C/T channels, described below
• C/T clock sources, described on page 101
• Gate types, described on page 102
• Pulse types and duty cycles, described on page 103
• C/T operation modes, described on page 104
C/T Channels
The DT9832 Series modules provide two 32-bit counter/timers (C/T
subsystems 0 and 1) for general-purpose use.
Each general-purpose counter accepts a clock input signal and gate
input signal and outputs a pulse (pulse output signal), as shown in
Figure 21.
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Principles of Operation
Clock Input SIgnal
(internal or external)
Counter
Pulse Output Signal
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Gate Input Signal
(software or external
input)
Figure 21: Counter/Timer Channel
To specify the counter/timer to use in software, specify the
appropriate C/T subsystem.
Using software, you can also specify one or more of the
counter/timers in the analog input channel list. You need two
channel list entries to read a 32-bit counter value. The first entry
stores the lower 16-bit word, and the second entry stores the upper
16-bit word. Refer to page 81 for more information about using C/Ts
in the channel list.
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C/T Clock Sources
The following clock sources are available for the general-purpose
counter/timers:
• Internal C/T clock – Through software, specify the clock source
as internal, and specify the frequency at which to pace the
operation (this is the frequency of the Counter n Out signal). This
is typically used in rate generation mode.
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Chapter 6
• External C/T clock – An external C/T clock is useful when you
want to pace counter/timer operations at rates not available with
the internal C/T clock or if you want to pace at uneven intervals.
The frequency of the external C/T clock can range up to 20 MHz.
Connect the external clock to the Counter n Clock input signal on
the DT9832 Series module. Counter/timer operations start on the
rising edge of the clock input signal.
Note: You typically use the external C/T clock (the clock connected
to the Counter n Clock input signal) to measure frequency (event
counting), or to measure the time interval between edges (measure
mode). The external C/T clock is not generally used for rate
generation.
If you specify a counter/timer in the analog input channel list, the
A/D clock determines how often you want to read the counter
value. Refer to page 84 for more information about the A/D clock.
Gate Types
The edge or level of the Counter n Gate signal determines when a
counter/timer operation is enabled. DT9832 Series modules provide
the following gate types:
• None −A software command enables any counter/timer
operation immediately after execution.
• Logic-low level external gate input – Enables a counter/timer
operation when the Counter n Gate signal is low, and disables the
counter/timer operation when the Counter n Gate signal is high.
Note that this gate type is used for event counting and rate
generation modes; refer to page 104 for more information about
these modes.
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Principles of Operation
• Logic-high level external gate input – Enables a counter/timer
operation when the Counter n Gate signal is high, and disables a
counter/timer operation when the Counter n Gate signal is low.
Note that this gate type is used for event counting and rate
generation modes; refer to page 104 for more information about
these modes.
• Falling-edge external gate input – Enables a counter/timer
operation when a high-to-low transition is detected on the
Counter n Gate signal. In software, this is called a low-edge gate
type. Note that this gate type is used for edge-to-edge
measurement, one-shot, and repetitive one-shot mode; refer to
page 104 for more information about these modes.
• Rising-edge external gate input – Enables a counter/timer
operation when a low-to-high transition is detected on the
Counter n Gate signal. In software, this is called a high-edge gate
type. Note that this gate type is used for edge-to-edge
measurement, one-shot, and repetitive one-shot mode; refer to
page 104 for more information about these modes.
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Specify the gate type in software.
Pulse Output Types and Duty Cycles
The DT9832 Series modules can output the following types of pulses
from each counter/timer:
• High-to-low transitions – The low portion of the total pulse
output period is the active portion of the counter/timer clock
output signal.
• Low-to-high transitions – The high portion of the total pulse
output period is the active portion of the counter/timer pulse
output signal.
You specify the pulse output type in software.
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Chapter 6
The duty cycle (or pulse width) indicates the percentage of the total
pulse output period that is active. For example, a duty cycle of 50
indicates that half of the total pulse output is low and half of the total
pulse output is high. You specify the duty cycle in software.
Figure 22 illustrates a low-to-high pulse with a duty cycle of
approximately 30%.
Active Pulse Width
high pulse
low pulse
Total Pulse Period
Figure 22: Example of a Low-to-High Pulse Output Type
Counter/Timer Operation Modes
DT9832 Series modules support the following counter/timer
operation modes:
• Event counting
• Up/down counting
• Frequency measurement
• Edge-to-edge measurement
• Rate generation
• One-shot
• Repetitive one-shot
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Principles of Operation
Note: The active polarity for each counter/timer operation mode is
software-selectable.
The following subsections describe these modes in more detail.
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Event Counting
Use event counting mode if you want to count the number of rising
edges that occur on the Counter n Clock input when the Counter n
Gate signal is active (low-level or high-level). Refer to page 102 for
information about specifying the active gate type.
You can count a maximum of 4,294,967,296 events before the counter
rolls over to 0 and starts counting again.
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Using software, specify the counter/timer mode as event counting
(count), the C/T clock source as external, and the active gate type as
low-level or high-level.
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Make sure that the signals are wired appropriately. Refer to
Chapter 4 for an example of connecting an event counting
application.
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Up/Down Counting
Use up/down counting mode if you want to increment or decrement
the number of rising edges that occur on the Counter n Clock input,
depending on the level of the Counter n Gate signal.
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If the Counter n Gate signal is high, the C/T increments; if the
specified gate signal is low, the C/T decrements.
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Chapter 6
Using software, specify the counter/timer mode as up/down
counting (up/down), and the C/T clock source as external. Note that
you do not specify the gate type in software.
Make sure that the signals are wired appropriately. Refer to
Chapter 4 for an example of connecting an up/down counting
application.
Note: Initialize the counter/timer so that the C/T never increments
above FFFFFFFFh nor decrements below 0.
Frequency Measurement
Use frequency measurement mode if you want to measure the
number of rising edges that occur on the Counter n Clock input over
a specified duration.
Using software, specify the counter/timer mode as frequency
measurement (count) or event counting (count), the clock source as
external, and the time over which to measure the frequency.
You can use the Windows timer (which uses a resolution of 1 ms), or
if you need more accuracy than the Windows timer provides, you can
connect a pulse of a known duration (such as a one-shot output of
another user counter) to the Counter n Gate input signal.
If you use a known pulse, use software to set up the counter/timers
as follows:
1.
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Set up one of the counter/timers for one-shot mode, specifying
the clock source as internal, the clock frequency, the gate type
that enables the operation as rising edge or falling edge, and the
polarity of the output pulse as high-to-low transition or
low-to-high transition.
Principles of Operation
2.
Set up the counter/timer that will measure the frequency for
event counting mode, specifying the type of clock pulses to count
and the gate type (this should match the pulse output type of the
counter/timer set up for one-shot mode).
3.
Start both counters (pulses are not counted until the active period
of the one-shot pulse is generated).
4.
Read the number of pulses counted. (Allow enough time to
ensure that the active period of the one-shot occurred and that
events have been counted.)
5.
Determine the measurement period using the following
equation:
Measurement period =
6.
1
* Active Pulse Width
Clock Frequency
Determine the frequency of the clock input signal using the
following equation:
Frequency Measurement =
Number of Events
Measurement Period
Make sure that the signals are wired appropriately. One way to wire
a frequency measurement operation is to use the same wiring as an
event counting application, but not use an external gate signal. Refer
to Chapter 4 for an example of connecting a frequency measurement
application.
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
Edge-to-Edge Measurement
Use edge-to-edge measurement mode if you want to measure the
time interval between a specified start edge and a specified stop edge.
6
The start edge and the stop edge can occur on the rising edge of the
Counter n Gate input, the falling edge of the Counter n Gate input,
the rising edge of the Counter n Clock input, or the falling edge of the
Counter n Clock input. When the start edge is detected, the
6
107
Chapter 6
counter/timer starts incrementing, and continues incrementing until
the stop edge is detected. The C/T then stops incrementing until it is
enabled to start another measurement.
You can use edge-to-edge measurement to measure the following:
• Pulse width of a signal pulse (the amount of time that a signal
pulse is in a high or a low state, or the amount of time between a
rising edge and a falling edge or between a falling edge and a
rising edge). You can calculate the pulse width as follows:
− Pulse width = Number of counts/20 MHz
• Period of a signal pulse (the time between two occurrences of the
same edge - rising edge to rising edge or falling edge to falling
edge). You can calculate the period as follows:
− Period = 1/Frequency
− Period = Number of counts/20 MHz
• Frequency of a signal pulse (the number of periods per second).
You can calculate the frequency as follows:
− Frequency = 20 MHz/Number of Counts
When the operation is complete, you can read the value of the
counter.
Using software, specify the counter/timer mode as edge-to-edge
measurement mode (measure), the C/T clock source as internal, the
start edge type, and the stop edge type.
Make sure that the signals are wired appropriately. Refer to
Chapter 4 for an example of connecting an edge-to-edge
measurement application.
108
Principles of Operation
Rate Generation
Use rate generation mode to generate a continuous pulse output
signal from the Counter n Out line; this mode is sometimes referred
to as continuous pulse output or pulse train output. You can use this
pulse output signal as an external clock to pace other operations, such
as analog input, analog output, or other counter/timer operations.
The pulse output operation is enabled whenever the Counter n Gate
signal is at the specified level. While the pulse output operation is
enabled, the counter outputs a pulse of the specified type and
frequency continuously. As soon as the operation is disabled, rate
generation stops.
The period of the output pulse is determined by the C/T clock source
(either internal using a clock divider, or external). You can output
pulses using a maximum frequency of 20 MHz (this is the frequency
of the Counter n Out signal). Refer to page 101 for more information
about the C/T clock sources.
Using software, specify the counter/timer mode as rate generation
(rate), the C/T clock source as either internal or external, the clock
divider (for an internal clock), the polarity of the output pulses
(high-to-low transition or low-to-high transition), the duty cycle of
the output pulses, and the active gate type (low-level or high-level).
Refer to page 103 for more information about pulse output signals
and to page 102 for more information about gate types.
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
Make sure that the signals are wired appropriately. Refer to
Chapter 4 for an example of connecting a rate generation application.
6
6
109
Chapter 6
One-Shot
Use one-shot mode to generate a single pulse output signal from the
Counter n Out line when the specified edge is detected on the
Counter n Gate signal. You can use this pulse output signal as an
external digital (TTL) trigger to start other operations, such as analog
input or analog output operations.
After the single pulse is output, the one-shot operation stops. All
subsequent clock input signals and gate input signals are ignored.
The period of the output pulse is determined by the C/T clock source
(either internal using a clock divider, or external). Note that in
one-shot mode, the internal C/T clock is more useful than an external
C/T clock; refer to page 101 for more information about the C/T
clock sources.
Using software, specify the counter/timer mode as one-shot, the
clock source as internal (recommended), the clock divider, the
polarity of the output pulse (high-to-low transition or low-to-high
transition), and the active gate type (rising edge or falling edge).
Refer to page 103 for more information about pulse output types and
to page 102 for more information about gate types.
Note: In the case of a one-shot operation, a duty cycle of 100% is set
automatically.
Make sure that the signals are wired appropriately. Refer to
Chapter 4 for an example of connecting a one-shot application.
110
Principles of Operation
Repetitive One-Shot
Use repetitive one-shot mode to generate a pulse output signal from
the Counter n Out line whenever the specified edge is detected on the
Counter n Gate signal. You can use this mode to clean up a poor clock
input signal by changing its pulse width, and then outputting it.
The module continues to output pulses until you stop the operation.
Note that any Counter n Gate signals that occur while the pulse is
being output are not detected by the module.
The period of the output pulse is determined by the C/T clock source
(either internal using a clock divider, or external). Note that in
repetitive one-shot mode, the internal C/T clock is more useful than
an external clock; refer to page 101 for more information about the
C/T clock sources.
Using software, specify the counter/timer mode as repetitive
one-shot, the polarity of the output pulses (high-to-low transition or
low-to-high transition), the C/T clock source as internal
(recommended), and the active gate type (rising edge or falling edge).
Refer to page 103 for more information about pulse output types and
to page 102 for more information about gates.
Note: In the case of a one-shot operation, a duty cycle of 100% is set
automatically.
Make sure that the signals are wired appropriately. Refer to
Chapter 4 for an example of connecting a repetitive one-shot
application.
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
111
Chapter 6
Quadrature Decoder Features
The DT9832 Series modules provide three 32-bit quadrature decoders
that allow simultaneous decoding of three quadrature encoded
inputs. Quadrature decoders may be used to provide relative or
absolute position, or determine rotational speed by calculating the
difference between samples.
To specify the quadrature decoder to use in software, specify the
appropriate QUAD subsystem. For example, quadrature decoder 0
corresponds to QUAD subsystem element 0, and quadrature decoder
1 corresponds to QUAD subsystem element 1.
Note: If you are using the DataAcq SDK, you access the quadrature
decoders through the C/T subsystem. C/T subsystem 2 corresponds
to quadrature decoder 0, C/T subsystem 3 corresponds to
quadrature decoder 1, and C/T subsystem 4 corresponds to
quadrature decoder 2.
Using software, you can also specify one or more of the quadrature
decoders in the analog input channel list. You need two channel list
entries to read a 32-bit quadrature decoder value. The first entry
stores the lower 16-bit word, and the second entry stores the upper
16-bit word. Refer to page 82 for more information about using
quadrature decoders in the channel list.
Each quadrature decoder supports "A," "B," and "Index" inputs and is
used to interface with a quadrature encoder sensor. The A and B
input relationships are used to increment or decrement the positional
count; the Index input can be used to zero-out the positional count.
Figure 23 shows an example of a quadrature decoder mode. In this
case, the A input leads the B input, up counting with a 90 degree
Index.
112
Principles of Operation
6
Sample Clock
Encoder A Input
Encoder B Input
Encoder Index Input
Figure 23: Example Quadrature Decoder Mode
Using software, you can specify the following parameters for a
quadrature decoder operation:
• The pre-scale value that is used to filter the onboard clock. Using
a pre-scale value can remove ringing edges and unwanted noise
for more accurate data.
• The scaling mode (X1 or X4 mode) to match the quadrature
encoder mode.
• The index mode, which either enables the Index signal or
disables the Index signal.
Note: For quadrature decoder operations, set the clock source to
external.
You can read the value of the quadrature decoder subsystem to
determine relative or absolute position. To determine the rotation of a
quadrature encoder, use the following formula:
Rotation degrees = Count x 360 degrees
4*N
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
113
Chapter 6
where N is the number of pulses generated by the quadrature
encoder per rotation. For example, if every rotation of the quadrature
encoder generated 10 pulses, and the value read from the quadrature
decoder is 20, the rotation of the quadrature encoder is 180 degrees
(20/40 x 360 degrees).
114
7
Supported Device Driver
Capabilities
Data Flow and Operation Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Buffering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Triggered Scan Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Gain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Triggers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Clocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Counter/Timers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
115
Chapter 7
The DT9832 Series Device Driver provides support for the analog
input (A/D), analog output (D/A), digital input (DIN), digital output
(DOUT), counter/timer (C/T), and quadrature decoder (QUAD)
subsystems. For information on how to configure the device driver,
refer to Chapter 3.
Table 9: DT9832 Series Subsystems
DT9832 Series
Total Subsystems on Module
A/D
D/A
DIN
DOUT
C/T
QUAD
1
1 or 2a
1
1
2
3
a. If your module does not support D/A, there is still one subsystem (element 0) for the
analog threshold trigger. If your module does support D/A, subsystem element 0
contains the analog output channels, and element 1 is used for the analog threshold
trigger.
The tables in this chapter summarize the features available for use
with the DT-Open Layers for .NET Class Library and the DT9832
Series modules. The DT-Open Layers for .NET Class Library
provides properties that return support information for specified
subsystem capabilities.
The first row in each table lists the subsystem types. The first column
in each table lists all possible subsystem capabilities. A description of
each capability is followed by the property used to describe that
capability in the DT-Open Layers for .NET Class Library.
Note: Blank fields represent unsupported options.
For more information, refer to the description of these properties in
the DT-Open Layers for .NET Class Library online help or DT-Open
Layers for .NET Class Library User’s Manual.
116
Supported Device Driver Capabilities
Data Flow and Operation Options
7
Table 10: DT9832 Series Data Flow and Operation Options
DT9832 Series
A/D
D/A
DIN
DOUT
C/T
QUAD
Single-Value Operation Support
SupportsSingleValue
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yesa
Yesb
Yesc
Yesd
7
Continuous Operation Support
SupportsContinuous
Continuous Operation until Trigger
7
SupportsContinuousPreTrigger
Continuous Operation before & after Trigger
7
SupportsContinuousPrePostTrigger
Simultaneous Start List Support
SupportsSimultaneousStart
Yes
Yes
Interrupt Support
Yese
SupportsInterruptOnChange
Output FIFO Size
FifoSize
7
128K
a. The DIN subsystem supports continuous mode by allowing you to read the digital input port
(all 16 digital input lines) using the analog input channel list.
b. The DOUT subsystem supports continuous mode by allowing you to output data from the
digital output port (all 16 digital output lines) using the output channel list.
c. The C/T subsystem supports continuous mode by allowing you to read the value of one or more
of the 2 general-purpose counter/timer channels using the analog input channel list.
d. The QUAD subsystem supports continuous mode by allowing you to read the value of one or
more of the 3 quadrature decoders using the analog input channel list.
e. The first 8 digital input lines of the digital input port can generate an interrupt-on-change event.
7
7
7
7
117
Chapter 7
Buffering
Table 11: DT9832 Series Buffering Options
DT9832 Series
A/D
D/A
DIN
DOUT
C/T
QUAD
Buffer Support
SupportsBuffering
Yes
Yes
Single Buffer Wrap Mode Support
SupportsWrapSingle
Yes
Inprocess Buffer Flush Support
SupportsInProcessFlush
Yesa
a. Data from the DT9832 Series module is transferred to the host in 4,096-byte (2,048-sample)
segments. If the application moves data from the buffer before the module has transferred
2,048 samples to the host, the resulting buffer will contain 0 samples. Your application
program must deal with these situations when flushing an inprocess buffer.
Triggered Scan Mode
Table 12: DT9832 Series Triggered Scan Mode Options
DT9832 Series
A/D
D/A
DIN
DOUT
C/T
QUAD
Triggered Scan Support
SupportsTriggeredScan
Maximum Number of CGL Scans per Trigger
MaxMultiScanCount
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Maximum Retrigger Frequency
MaxRetriggerFreq
Minimum Retrigger Frequency
MinRetriggerFreq
118
Supported Device Driver Capabilities
Data Encoding
7
Table 13: DT9832 Series Data Encoding Options
DT9832 Series
A/D
D/A
DIN
DOUT
C/T
QUAD
Binary Encoding Support
SupportsBinaryEncoding
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
7
Yes
Twos Complement Support
7
SupportsTwosCompEncoding
Channels
7
Table 14: DT9832 Series Channel Options
DT9832 Series
A/D
Number of Channels
13 or
NumberOfChannels
a
15
D/A
2b
DIN
1
DOUT
1
C/T
1
QUAD
1
7
SE Support
SupportsSingleEnded
Yes
7
SE Channels
MaxSingleEndedChannels
2 or 4
a
0
0
0
0
0
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
2
1
1
1
1
3b
1
1
0
0
DI Support
SupportsDifferential
DI Channels
MaxDifferentialChannels
0
Maximum Channel-Gain List Depth
13 or
CGLDepth
15a
Simultaneous Sample-and-Hold Support
SupportsSimultaneousSampleHold
7
7
Yes
Channel-List Inhibit
SupportsChannelListInhibit
7
119
Chapter 7
a. For DT9832A modules (2 channels), channels 0 to 1 read the analog input channels; channel 2
reads all 16 bits from the DIN subsystem; channels 3 to 6 read the C/T channels; and channels
7 to 12 read the quadrature decoder channels. For DT9832 modules (4 channels), channels 0 to
3 read the analog input channels; channel 4 reads all 16 bits from the DIN subsystem; channels
5 to 8 read the C/T channels; and channels 9 to 15 read the quadrature decoder channels.
b. Analog output channels are numbered 0 and 1. You can update the digital output port by
specifying channel 2 in the analog output channel list.
Gain
Table 15: DT9832 Series Gain Options
DT9832 Series
A/D
D/A
DIN
DOUT
C/T
QUAD
Programmable Gain Support
SupportsProgrammableGain
Yes
Number of Gains
NumberOfSupportedGains
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
Gains Available
SupportedGains
Ranges
Table 16: DT9832 Series Range Options
DT9832 Series
A/D
D/A
DIN
DOUT
C/T
QUAD
Number of Voltage Ranges
NumberOfRanges
1
1
±10 V
±10 Va
0
0
0
0
Available Ranges
SupportedVoltageRanges
a. For the D/A subsystem that is used as the threshold trigger, the range is 0 to 10 V, where a raw
count of 0 represents 0 V and a raw count of 255 represents 10 V.
120
Supported Device Driver Capabilities
Resolution
7
Table 17: DT9832 Series Resolution Options
DT9832 Series
A/D
D/A
DIN
DOUT
C/T
QUAD
Software Programmable Resolution
7
SupportsSoftwareResolution
Number of Resolutions
NumberOfResolutions
1
1
1
1
1
1
16
16
32
32
Available Resolutions
SupportedResolutions
16
16
a
a. For the D/A subsystem that is used to set the analog threshold value, the resolution is 8-bits.
7
7
Triggers
7
Table 18: DT9832 Series Trigger Options
DT9832 Series
A/D
D/A
DIN
DOUT
C/T
QUAD
Software Trigger Support
SupportsSoftwareTrigger
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
7
External Positive TTL Trigger Support
SupportsPosExternalTTLTrigger
External Negative TTL Trigger Support
SupportsNegExternalTTLTrigger
7
Positive Threshold Trigger Support
SupportsPosThresholdTrigger
Negative Threshold Trigger Support
SupportsNegThresholdTrigger
Yes
7
Digital Event Trigger Support
SupportsDigitalEventTrigger
7
121
Chapter 7
Clocks
Table 19: DT9832 Series Clock Options
DT9832 Series
A/D
D/A
DIN
DOUT
C/T
QUAD
Internal Clock Support
SupportsInternalClock
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
0
0
Yes
Yes
External Clock Support
SupportsExternalClock
Yes
Yes
0
Simultaneous Input/Output on a Single
Clock Signal
SupportsSimultaneousClocking
Base Clock Frequency
BaseClockFrequency
0
0
0
48 MHz 48 MHz 0
0
48 MHz 48 MHz
0
Maximum Clock Divider
MaxExtClockDivider
Minimum Clock Divider
MinExtClockDivider
4,294,
4,294,
0
1
1
967,295 967,295
0
1
1
3
Minimum Frequency
1.25 or
MinFrequency
2.0 MHz 500 kHz 0
0
20 MHz 20 MHz
Maximum Frequency
MaxFrequency
0
3
a
a. The DT9832 supports a maximum throughput frequency of 1.25 MHz; the DT9832A supports
a maximum throughput frequency of 2.0 MHz.
122
Supported Device Driver Capabilities
Counter/Timers
7
Table 20: DT9832 Series Counter/Timer Options
DT9832 Series
A/D
D/A
DIN
DOUT
C/T
Cascading Support
QUAD
7
SupportsCascading
Event Count Mode Support
SupportsCount
Yes
Generate Rate Mode Support
SupportsRateGenerate
7
Yes
One-Shot Mode Support
SupportsOneShot
Yes
Repetitive One-Shot Mode Support
SupportsOneShotRepeat
Yes
Up/Down Counting Mode Support
SupportsUpDown
Yes
Edge-to-Edge Measurement Mode Support
SupportsMeasure
7
Yes
Continuous Edge-to-Edge Measurement
Mode Support
SupportsContinuousMeasure
7
Yes
7
High to Low Output Pulse Support
SupportsHighToLowPulse
Yes
Low to High Output Pulse Support
SupportsLowToHighPulse
Yes
7
Variable Pulse Width Support
SupportsVariablePulseWidth
Yesa
None (internal) Gate Type Support
SupportsGateNone
Yes
7
High Level Gate Type Support
SupportsGateHighLevel
Yesb
Low Level Gate Type Support
SupportsGateLowLevel
Yesb
7
123
Chapter 7
Table 20: DT9832 Series Counter/Timer Options (cont.)
DT9832 Series
A/D
D/A
DIN
DOUT
C/T
QUAD
High Edge Gate Type Support
SupportsGateHighEdge
Yesb
Low Edge Gate Type Support
SupportsGateLowEdge
Yesb
Level Change Gate Type Support
SupportsGateLevel
Clock-Falling Edge Type
SupportsClockFalling
Yes
Clock-Rising Edge Type
SupportsClockRising
Yes
Gate-Falling Edge Type
SupportsGateFalling
Yes
Gate-Rising Edge Type
SupportsGateRising
Yes
Interrupt-Driven Operations
SupportsInterrupt
a. In one-shot and repetitve one-shot mode, the pulse width is set to 100% automatically.
b. High-edge and low-edge are supported for one-shot and repetitive one-shot modes. High-level
and low-level are supported for event counting, up/down counting, frequency measurement,
edge-to-edge measurement, and rate generation modes.
124
8
Troubleshooting
General Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
If Your Module Needs Factory Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
125
Chapter 8
General Checklist
Should you experience problems using a DT9832 Series module, do
the following:
1.
Read all the documentation provided for your product. Make
sure that you have added any “Read This First” information to
your manual and that you have used this information.
2.
Check the Data Acquisition OMNI CD for any README files
and ensure that you have used the latest installation and
configuration information available.
3.
Check that your system meets the requirements stated in
Chapter 2.
4.
Check that you have installed your hardware properly using the
instructions in Chapter 3.
5.
Check that you have installed and configured the device driver
properly using the instructions in Chapter 3.
6.
Check that you have wired your signals properly using the
instructions in Chapter 4.
7.
Search the DT Knowledgebase in the Support section of the Data
Translation web site (at www.datatranslation.com) for an answer
to your problem.
8.
Visit the product’s page on the Data Translation web site for the
latest tips, white papers, product documentation, and software
fixes.
If you still experience problems, try using the information in Table 21
to isolate and solve the problem. If you cannot identify the problem,
refer to page 130.
126
Troubleshooting
Table 21: Troubleshooting Problems
Symptom
Possible Cause
Module is not
recognized
You plugged the
module into your
computer before
installing the device
driver.
Module does not
respond.
Intermittent
operation.
Possible Solution
From the Control Panel > System >
Hardware > Device Manager, uninstall
any unknown devices (showing a yellow
question mark). Then, run the setup
program on your OMNI CD to install the
USB device drivers, and reconnect your
USB module to the computer.
The module
configuration is
incorrect.
Check the configuration of your device
driver; see the instructions in Chapter 3.
The module is
damaged.
Contact Data Translation for technical
support; refer to page 130.
Loose connections or
vibrations exist.
Check your wiring and tighten any loose
connections or cushion vibration sources;
see the instructions in Chapter 4.
The module is
overheating.
Check environmental and ambient
temperature; consult the module’s
specifications on page 151 of this manual
and the documentation provided by your
computer manufacturer for more
information.
Electrical noise
exists.
Check your wiring and either provide
better shielding or reroute unshielded
wiring; see the instructions in Chapter 4.
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
127
Chapter 8
Table 21: Troubleshooting Problems (cont.)
Symptom
Device failure
error reported.
Data appears to
be invalid.
128
Possible Cause
Possible Solution
The DT9832 Series
module cannot
communicate with the
Microsoft bus driver
or a problem with the
bus driver exists.
Check your cabling and wiring and tighten
any loose connections; see the
instructions in Chapter 4.
The DT9832 Series
module was removed
while an operation
was being performed.
Ensure that your DT9832 Series module
is properly connected; see the instructions
in Chapter 3.
An open connection
exists.
Check your wiring and fix any open
connections; see the instructions in
Chapter 4.
A transducer is not
connected to the
channel being read.
Check the transducer connections; see
the instructions in Chapter 4.
The module is set up
for differential inputs
while the transducers
are wired as
single-ended inputs
or vice versa.
Check your wiring and ensure that what
you specify in software matches your
hardware configuration; see the
instructions in Chapter 4.
Troubleshooting
Table 21: Troubleshooting Problems (cont.)
Symptom
Possible Cause
Possible Solution
8
8
Data appears to
be invalid
(cont.).
The DT9832 Series
module is out of
calibration.
DT9832 Series modules are calibrated at
the factory. If you want to readjust the
calibration of the analog input or analog
output circuitry, refer to Chapter 9 starting
on page 133.
USB 2.0 is not
recognized.
Your operating
system does not have
the appropriate
Service Pack
installed.
Ensure that you load the appropriate
Windows Service Pack (version 2 for
Windows XP or version 4 for Windows
2000). If you are unsure of whether you
are using USB 2.0 or USB 1.1, run the
Open Layers Control Panel applet,
described in Chapter 3.
Standby mode is
enabled on your PC.
For some PCs, you may need to disable
standby mode on your system for proper
USB 2.0 operation. Consult Microsoft for
more information.
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
129
Chapter 8
Technical Support
If you have difficulty using a DT9832 Series module, Data
Translation’s Technical Support Department is available to provide
technical assistance.
To request technical support, go to our web site at
http://www.datatranslation.com and click on the Support link.
When requesting technical support, be prepared to provide the
following information:
• Your product serial number
• The hardware/software product you need help on
• The version of the OMNI CD you are using
• Your contract number, if applicable
If you are located outside the USA, contact your local distributor; see
our web site (www.datatranslation.com) for the name and telephone
number of your nearest distributor.
130
Troubleshooting
If Your Module Needs Factory Service
If your module must be returned to Data Translation, do the
following:
1.
2.
Record the module’s serial number, and then contact the
Customer Service Department at (508) 481-3700, ext. 1323 (if you
are in the USA) and obtain a Return Material Authorization
(RMA).
8
If you are located outside the USA, call your local distributor for
authorization and shipping instructions; see our web site
(www.datatranslation.com) for the name and telephone number
of your nearest distributor. All return shipments to Data
Translation must be marked with the correct RMA number to
ensure proper processing.
8
Using the original packing materials, if available, package the
module as follows:
− Wrap the module in an electrically conductive plastic
material. Handle with ground protection. A static discharge
can destroy components on the module.
− Place in a secure shipping container.
3.
8
Return the module to the following address, making sure the
RMA number is visible on the outside of the box.
Customer Service Dept.
Data Translation, Inc.
100 Locke Drive
Marlboro, MA 01752-1192
8
8
8
8
8
8
131
Chapter 8
132
9
Calibration
Using the Calibration Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Calibrating the Analog Input Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Calibrating the Analog Output Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
133
Chapter 9
DT9832 Series modules are calibrated at the factory and should not
require calibration for initial use. We recommend that you check and,
if necessary, readjust the calibration of the analog input and analog
output circuitry on the DT9832 Series modules every six months
using the DT9832 / DT9836 Calibration Utility.
Note: Ensure that you installed the DT9832 Series Device Driver
prior to using the DT9832 / DT9836 Calibration Utility. Refer to
Chapter 3 for more information on installing the device driver.
This chapter describes how to calibrate the analog input and output
subsystems of DT9832 Series modules using the DT9832 /DT9836
Calibration Utility.
134
Calibration
Using the Calibration Utility
Start the DT9832 / DT9836 Calibration Utility as follows:
1.
Ensure that you installed the software using the instructions in
Chapter 3.
2.
Click Start from the Task Bar.
3.
Select Programs | Data Translation, Inc | Calibration |DT9832
Calibration Utility.
The main menu of the DT9832 / DT9836 Calibration Utility appears.
4.
Select the module to calibrate, and then click OK.
Once the DT9832 / DT9836 Calibration Utility is running, you can
calibrate the analog input circuitry (either automatically or
manually), described on page 136, or the analog output circuitry of
the DT9832 Series module, described on page 139.
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
135
Chapter 9
Calibrating the Analog Input Subsystem
This section describes how to use the DT9832 / DT9836 Calibration
Utility to calibrate the analog input subsystem of a DT9832 Series
module.
The DT9832 Series module has separate calibration for each A/D
input channel. You can choose to calibrate either an individual
channel or all channels on the board.
Connecting a Precision Voltage Source
To calibrate the analog input circuitry, you need to connect an
external +9.3750 V precision voltage source to the DT9832 Series
module. Connect the precision voltage source to the first channel you
want to calibrate; for example, Analog In 0 (AD Ch0).
Using the Auto-Calibration Procedure
Auto-calibration is the easiest to use and is the recommended
calibration method. To auto-calibrate the analog input subsystem, do
the following:
136
1.
Select the A/D Calibration tab of the DT9832 / DT9836
Calibration Utility.
2.
Choose either a single channel or all channels from the Type of
Calibration drop-down list box in the Automatic Calibration
area.
3.
Set the voltage supply on your selected channel to 0.000V.
4.
Click the Auto Calibration Start button.
A message appears notifying you to verify that 0.000 V is applied to the
channel.
5.
Verify that the supplied voltage to your selected channel is
0.000 V, and then click OK.
The offset value is calibrated. When the offset calibration is complete, a
Calibration
message appears notifying you to set the input voltage of the channel to
+9.375 V.
6.
Check that the supplied voltage to your selected channel is
+9.375 V, and then click OK.
The gain value is calibrated and a completion message appears.
7.
If you chose to calibrate all channels, repeat the proceeding four
steps for all other A/D channels on the board (the calibration
utility prompts you to attach the precision voltage source to the
next channel). Follow the on-screen prompts to proceed through
the rest of the channels.
Note: At any time, you can click Restore Factory Settings to reset
the A/D calibration values to their original factory settings. This
process will undo any auto or manual calibration settings.
Using the Manual Calibration Procedure
If you want to manually calibrate the analog input circuitry instead of
auto-calibrating it, do the following for each channel (substitute the
appropriate channel number as you go):
1.
9
9
9
9
9
Adjust the offset as follows:
Verify that 0.000 V is applied to AD Ch0, and that A/D
Channel Select is set to Channel 0.
The current voltage reading for this channel is displayed in the A/D
Value window.
9
b. Adjust the offset by entering values between 0 and 255 in the
Offset edit box, or by clicking the up/down buttons until the
A/D Value is 0.000 V.
9
a.
2.
9
Adjust the gain as follows:
a.
Verify that +9.375 V is applied to AD Ch0, and that A/D
Channel Select is set to Channel 0.
9
137
Chapter 9
The current voltage reading for this channel is displayed in the A/D
Value window.
b. Adjust the gain by entering values between 0 and 255 in the
Gain edit box, or by clicking the up/down buttons until the
A/D Value is 9.3750 V.
Note: At any time, you can click Restore Factory Settings to reset
the A/D calibration values to their original factory settings. This
process will undo any auto or manual calibration settings.
Once you have finished this procedure, continue with “Calibrating
the Analog Output Subsystem.”
138
Calibration
Calibrating the Analog Output Subsystem
This section describes how to use the DT9832 / DT9836 Calibration
Utility to calibrate the analog output subsystem of a DT9832 Series
module.
9
To calibrate the analog output circuitry, you need to connect an
external precision voltmeter to analog output channels 0 and 1 of the
DT9832 Series module.
9
Do the following to calibrate the analog output circuitry:
9
1.
Select the D/A Calibration tab of the DT9832 / DT9836
Calibration Utility.
2.
Connect an external precision voltmeter to Analog Output 0
(DAC Ch0) of the DT9832 Series module.
3.
In the DAC Output Voltage box, select –9.375 V.
4.
Adjust the offset by entering values between 0 and 255 in the
DAC 0 Offset edit box or by clicking the up/down buttons until
the voltmeter reads –9.375 V.
5.
In the DAC Output Voltage box, select 9.375 V.
6.
Adjust the gain by entering values between 0 and 255 in the DAC
0 Gain edit box or by clicking the up/down buttons until the
voltmeter reads 9.375 V.
7.
Connect an external precision voltmeter to Analog Output 1
(DAC Ch1) of the DT9832 Series module.
8.
In the DAC Output Voltage box, select –9.375 V.
9.
Adjust the offset by entering values between 0 and 255 in the
DAC 1 Offset edit box or by clicking the up/down buttons until
the voltmeter reads –9.375 V.
9
9
9
9
9
10. In the DAC Output Voltage box, select 9.375 V.
11. Adjust the gain by entering values between 0 and 255 in the DAC
1 Gain edit box or by clicking the up/down buttons until the
voltmeter reads 9.375 V.
9
139
Chapter 9
Note: At any time, you can click Restore Factory Settings to reset
the D/A calibration values to their original factory settings. This
process will undo any D/A calibration settings.
Once you have finished this procedure, the analog output circuitry is
calibrated. To close the DT9832 / DT9836 Calibration Utility, click the
close box in the upper right corner of the window.
140
A
Specifications
141
Appendix A
Table 3 lists the specifications for the A/D subsystem on the DT9832
Series modules.
Table 3: A/D Subsystem Specifications
Feature
142
Specifications
Number of analog input channels
DT9832:
DT9832A:
4 single-ended, simultaneous
2 single-ended, simultaneous
Resolution
16 bits
Range
±10 V
Throughput per channel
See Table 4.
Signal bandwidth (to 3 dB point)
DT9832:
DT9832A:
>6.25 MHz
>10.0 MHz
Sample-and-hold
Aperture uncertainty:
Aperture delay:
Aperture match:
Gain match:
Zero match:
200 ps typical
25 ns typical
1 ns / 500 ps typical
± 0.015%
± 1.5 mV
System accuracy, to % of FSR
±0.01%
Bipolar input range
± 10 V
Data encoding
Offset binary
Maximum input voltage (without damage)
Power on:
Power off:
±35 V
±20 V
Input impedance
100 MΩ, 10 pF
Input bias current
±10 nA
Integral nonlinearity
< 2 LSB
Specifications
Table 3: A/D Subsystem Specifications (cont.)
Feature
Specifications
Differential nonlinearity
< 1 LSB
Inherent quantizing error
1/2 LSB
Drift
Zero:
Gain:
±20 μV/° C
±20 ppm of FSR/° C
ESD protection
Arc:
Contact:
8 kV
4 kV
Effective Number of Bits (ENOBs) @
10 kHz input
14-bits typical
A/D Subsystem Throughput
Due to limitations of the USB bus, the maximum achievable sample
rate (throughput) of the modules depends upon the number of
channels sampled. Table 4 lists the approximate throughput for each
module based on the number of channels in the channel list.
A
A
A
A
A
A
The maximum allowable sample rate for a given number of channels
is 5,450,000/(Number of Channels). The sample clock is generated by
dividing the 48 MHz internal clock by an even divisor. The sample
rate you set with DT-Open Layers will be set to the nearest even
divisor on the module.
A
If you set a rate that is too high, you will receive an overrun error
when you begin sampling.
A
A
143
Appendix A
Table 4: Maximum Achievable Throughput
Channels
DT9832a
DT9832Ab
1
1,250,000 Hz
2,000,000 Hz
2
1,250,000 Hz
2,000,000 Hz
3
1,250,000 Hz
1,816,666 Hz
4
1,250,000 Hz
1,362,500 Hz
5
1,090,000 Hz
6
908,333 Hz
7
778,571 Hz
8
681,250 Hz
9
605,555 Hz
10
545,000 Hz
11
495,454 Hz
12
454,166 Hz
13
419,230 Hz
14
389,286 Hz
--
15
363,333 Hz
--
a. If you use all 15 channels of the DT9832 (30 bytes/sample), 1.25 MHz is
transferred to the FIFO. The stated USB limitation applies.
b. If you use all 13 channels of the DT9832A (26 bytes/sample), 1.50 MHz is
transferred to the FIFO. The stated USB limitation applies.
144
Specifications
Table 5 lists the specifications for the D/A subsystem on the DT9832
Series modules.
A
Table 5: D/A Subsystem Specifications
Feature
Specifications
Number of analog output channels
2 Simultaneous
Resolution
16 bits
Settling time to 0.01% of FSR
2.0 μs / 1.0 μs, 100 mV steps
5.0 μs / 2.0 μs, 10 V steps
Throughput
500 kSamples/s per channel
Slew rate
10 V/μs
Glitch energy
12 nV-s, typical (essentially glitchless)
Output range
±10 V
Data encoding
Offset binary
Output current
±5 mA maximum load
Output impedance
0.1 Ω maximum
Capacitive driver capability
0.004 μF
Protection
Short circuit to analog ground
Integral nonlinearity
1.0 LSB / 1/2 LSB
Differential nonlinearity
1.0 LSB / 1/2 LSB
Inherent quantizing error
1.0 LSB / 1/2 LSB
Error
Zero:
Gain:
Adjustable to 0
Adjustable to 0
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
145
Appendix A
Table 5: D/A Subsystem Specifications (cont.)
Feature
146
Specifications
Drift
Zero (bipolar):
Gain:
±10 ppm of FSR/° C
±30 ppm of FSR/° C
FIFO
128 kSamples, total
ESD protection
Arc:
Contact:
8 kV
4 kV
Specifications
Table 6 lists the specifications for the DIN/DOUT subsystems on the
DT9832 Series modules.
A
Table 6: DIN/DOUT Subsystem Specifications
Feature
Specifications
Number of digital I/O lines
32 (16 in, 16 out)
Number of ports
2 (16 bits each)
Logic family
LVTTL (5 V tolerant)
Logic sense
Positive true
Inputs
Input type:
Input logic load:
High input voltage:
Low input voltage:
Low input current:
Level-sensitive
1 LVTTL
2.0 V minimum
0.8 V maximum
0.4 mA maximum
Input termination
A
A
A
A
Inputs tied to +3.3 V through 15 kΩ pull-up
resistors
Outputs
Fan out:
High output:
Low output:
High output current:
Low output current:
12 mA
2.0 V minimum
0.8 V maximum
–12 mA maximum
12 mA maximum
Interrupt on change
Yes (on first 8 bits)
Clocked with sample clock
Yes
Software I/O selectable
No
A
A
A
A
147
Appendix A
Table 7 lists the specifications for the C/T and quadrature decoder
subsystems on the DT9832 Series modules.
Table 7: C/T and Quadrature Decoder Subsystem Specifications
Feature
148
Specifications
Number of channels
C/T:
Quadrature decoder:
2
3
Resolution
32 bits per channel
Minimum pulse width (minimum
amount of time it takes a C/T to
recognize an input pulse)
55.5 ns
Logic family
LVTTL (5 V tolerant)
Inputs
Input logic load:
High input voltage:
Low input voltage:
Low input current:
1 LVTTL
2.0 V minimum
0.8 V maximum
–0.4 mA maximum
Outputs
Fan out:
High output:
Low output:
High output current:
Low output current:
12 mA
2.0 V minimum
0.8 V maximum
–12 mA maximum
12 mA maximum
Internal reference clock rate
48 MHz
External clock rate
20 MHz maximum
Specifications
Table 8 lists the specifications for the external A/D and D/A triggers
on the DT9832 Series modules.
A
Table 8: External A/D and D/A Trigger Specifications
Feature
Specifications
Trigger sources
Internal:
External:
Software-initiated
Software-selectable
Input type
Edge-sensitive
Logic family
LVTTL (5 V tolerant)
Inputs
Input logic load:
Input termination:
High input voltage:
Low input voltage:
Low input current:
1 LVTTL
2.2 kΩ pull-up to +3.3 V
2.0 V minimum
0.8 V maximum
–0.25 mA maximum
Minimum pulse width
High:
Low:
25 ns
25 ns
Triggering modes
Single scan:
Continuous scan:
Triggered scan:
Yes
Yes
No
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
149
Appendix A
Table 9 lists the specifications for the internal A/D and D/A clocks
on the DT9832 Series modules.
Table 9: Internal A/D and D/A Clock Specifications
Feature
Specifications
Reference frequency
48 MHz
Divisor range
3 to 4,294,967,295
Usable range
A/D clock:
D/A clock:
0.00838 Hz to 1.25 or 2.0 MHz
0.00838 Hz to 500 kHz
Table 10 lists the specifications for the external A/D and D/A clocks
on the DT9832 Series modules.
Table 10: External A/D and D/A Clock Specifications
Feature
150
Specifications
Input type
Edge-sensitive, rising or falling edge
programmable
Logic family
LVTTL (5 V tolerant)
Inputs
Input logic load:
Input termination:
High input voltage:
Low input voltage:
1 LVTTL
2.2 kΩ pull-up to +3.3 V
2.0 V
0.8 V
Frequency
DC to 1.25 MHz or 2.0 MHz (DT9832A)
Minimum pulse width
High:
Low:
25 ns
25 ns
Specifications
Table 11 lists the power, physical, and environmental specifications
for the DT9832 Series modules.
A
Table 11: Power, Physical, and Environmental Specifications
Feature
Power, +5 V
Specifications
A
±5% @ 2 A maximum plus load on +5 V
outputs
Physical
Dimensions (OEM):
Dimensions (BNC):
Weight (OEM):
190 mm x 100 mm
215.9 mm x 105.9 mm x 50 mm
4.6 ounces
Environmental
Operating temperature range:
Storage temperature range:
Relative humidity:
Altitude:
0° C to 55° C
−25° C to 85° C
to 95%, noncondensing
to 10,000 feet
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
151
Appendix A
Table 12 lists the mating cable connectors for the connectors on the
BNC connection box, the OEM version of the DT9832 Series module,
and the EP353 and EP356 accessory panels.
Table 12: Mating Cable Connectors
Mating Cable
Connector
Connector
BNC connection
box
Analog input
AMP/Tyco 747375-8
AMP/Tyco 747917-2
Digital I/O
AMP/Tyco 747301-8
AMP/Tyco 747916-2
C\T, DAC,
Clk, Trig
AMP/Tyco 747301-8
AMP/Tyco 747916-2
J2
AMP/Tyco 1-104068-8
AMP/Tyco 1-111196-7
J3
AMP/Tyco 1-104068-8
AMP/Tyco 1-111196-7
TB1a
PCD, Inc. ELVH03500
PCD, Inc. ELVP03100
EP353
accessory panel
J1
AMP/Tyco 102321-6
AMP/Tyco 746288-6
J2
AMP/Tyco 747375-8
AMP/Tyco 747917-2
EP356
accessory panel
J1
AMP/Tyco 747301-8
AMP/Tyco 747916-2
J2
AMP/Tyco 747301-8
AMP/Tyco 747916-2
OEM version
a. Secondary power connector.
152
Part Number on
Module (or Equivalent)
Module/Panel
B
Connector Pin Assignments
OEM Version Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
BNC Box Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
EP353 Accessory Panel Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
EP356 Accessory Panel Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
EP355 Screw Terminal Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
153
Appendix B
OEM Version Connectors
This section describes the pin assignments for the J2 and J3
connectors on the OEM version of the DT9832 Series modules, as well
as the secondary power connector, TB1. You can access these pins by
building your own cable and screw terminal panel; refer to
Appendix A for information about the required mating connectors.
Figure 24 shows the orientation of the pins on these connectors.
Connector J3
TB1 Secondary
Power Connector
Connector J2
Pin 35
Pin 68
Pin 35
Pin 68
Pin 1
Pin 34
Pin 1
Pin 34
OEM Version of
DT9832 Series
Module
Figure 24: Connectors on OEM Version of DT9832 Module
Note: If you are using the BNC connection box, refer to Chapter 4
and “BNC Box Connectors” on page 161 for wiring information.
154
Connector Pin Assignments
OEM J2 Connector
Table 13 lists the pin assignments for connector J2 on the OEM
version of the DT9832 Series module.
Table 13: Pin Assignments for Connector J2 on the
OEM Version of Module
J2 Pin
Assignment
Signal Description
J2 Pin
Assignment
Signal Description
1
+5 V Analog (0.5 amps)
35
Digital Ground
2
Reserved
36
Analog Ground
3
Analog Ground
37
Analog Ground
4
Reserved
38
Reserved
5
Analog Ground
39
Analog Ground
6
Reserved
40
Reserved
7
Analog Ground
41
Analog Ground
8
Reserved
42
Reserved
9
Analog Ground
43
Analog Ground
10
Reserved
44
Reserved
11
Analog Ground
45
Analog Ground
12
Reserved
46
Reserved
13
Analog Ground
47
Analog Ground
14
Reserved
48
Reserved
15
Analog Ground
49
Analog Ground
16
Reserved
50
Reserved
17
Analog Ground
51
Analog Ground
18
Reserved
52
Reserved
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
155
Appendix B
Table 13: Pin Assignments for Connector J2 on the
OEM Version of Module (cont.)
J2 Pin
Assignment
Signal Description
Signal Description
19
Analog Ground
53
Analog Ground
20
Reserved
54
Reserved
21
Analog Ground
55
Analog Ground
22
Reserved
56
Reserved
23
Analog Ground
57
Analog Ground
24
Reserved
58
Reserved
25
Analog Ground
59
Analog Ground
26
Reserved
60
Reserved
27
Analog Ground
61
Analog Ground
28
Analog In 3a
62
Reserved
29
Analog Ground
63
Analog Ground
30
Analog In 2a
64
Reserved
31
Analog Ground
65
Analog Ground
32
Analog In 1
66
Reserved
33
Analog Ground
67
Analog Ground
34
Analog In 0
68
Reserved
a. Reserved on DT9832A series modules.
156
J2 Pin
Assignment
Connector Pin Assignments
OEM J3 Connector
Table 14 lists the pin assignments for connector J3 on the OEM
version of the DT9832 Series module.
Table 14: Pin Assignments for Connector J3 on the
OEM Version of Module
J3 Pin
Assignment
Signal Description
J3 Pin
Assignment
Signal Description
1
Quad 2 Index
35
Quad Dec 2 B
2
Quad Dec 2 A
36
Digital Ground
3
Quad 1 Index
37
Quad Dec 1 B
4
Quad Dec 1 A
38
Digital Ground
5
Quad 0 Index
39
Quad Dec 0 B
6
Quad Dec 0 A
40
Digital Ground
7
Counter 1 Out
41
Counter 1 Gate
8
Counter 1 Clock
42
Digital Ground
9
Counter 0 Out
43
Counter 0 Gate
10
Counter 0 Clock
44
Digital Ground
11
Digital Ground
45
Reserved
12
Digital Input 15
46
Digital Output 15
13
Digital Input 14
47
Digital Output 14
14
Digital Input 13
48
Digital Output 13
15
Digital Input 12
49
Digital Output 12
16
Digital Input 11
50
Digital Output 11
17
Digital Input 10
51
Digital Output 10
18
Digital Input 9
52
Digital Output 9
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
157
Appendix B
Table 14: Pin Assignments for Connector J3 on the
OEM Version of Module (cont.)
J3 Pin
Assignment
Signal Description
J3 Pin
Assignment
Signal Description
19
Digital Input 8
53
Digital Output 8
20
Digital Input 7
54
Digital Output 7
21
Digital Input 6
55
Digital Output 6
22
Digital Input 5
56
Digital Output 5
23
Digital Input 4
57
Digital Output 4
24
Digital Input 3
58
Digital Output 3
25
Digital Input 2
59
Digital Output 2
26
Digital Input 1
60
Digital Output 1
27
Digital Input 0
61
Digital Output 0
28
External ADC Clock
62
External ADC Trigger
29
External DAC Clock
63
External DAC Trigger
30
Digital Ground
64
Digital Ground
31
+5 V
65
Digital Ground
32
Reserved
66
Reserved
33
Analog Out 1a
67
Analog Out 1 Returna
34
Analog Out 0a
68
Analog Out 0 Returna
a. Reserved on DT9832A-02-0-OEM, DT9832A-02-0-BNC, DT9832-04-0-OEM, and
DT9832-04-0-BNC modules
158
Connector Pin Assignments
OEM Wiring Methods
You can connect signals directly through the J2 and J3 connectors on
the OEM version of the DT9832 Series module, or you can connect
signals using the connectors and screw terminals on the following
accessories:
• EP353 −This accessory panel plugs into connector J2 of the OEM
version of the DT9832 Series module. It provides one 37-pin,
D-sub connector for attaching analog input signals and one
26-pin connector for attaching a AC1315 cable/5B Series signal
conditioning backplane.
Refer to page 165 for more information about attaching the EP353
to the OEM version of the DT9832 Series module and for
information about the connector pin assignments.
• EP356 −This accessory panel plugs into connector J3 of the OEM
version of the DT9832 Series module. It provides two 37-pin,
D-sub connectors. Use connector J1 of the EP356 to attach digital
I/O signals, and use connector J2 of the EP356 to attach analog
output, counter/timer, trigger, and clock signals.
Refer to page 169 for more information about attaching the EP356
to the OEM version of the DT9832 Series module and for
information about the connector pin assignments.
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
159
Appendix B
OEM TB1 Connector
Table 15 lists the pin assignments for connector TB1 on the OEM
version of the DT9832 Series modules.
Table 15: Pin Assignments for Connector TB1 on the
OEM Version of Module
TB1
Pin Assignment
160
Signal Description
1
+5 V
2
Ground
3
Shield (Chassis Ground)
Connector Pin Assignments
BNC Box Connectors
This section describes the pin assignments for the D-sub connectors
on the BNC connection box. Note that the BNC connectors are
labeled on the box.
B
B
Digital I/O Connector
Figure 25 shows the orientation of the pins on the Digital In/Out
connector on the BNC connection box.
Pin 1
Pin 20
B
B
B
B
Pin 19
Pin 37
Figure 25: Orientation of the Digital In/Out Connector on the
BNC Connection Box
B
B
Table 16 lists the pin assignments for the Digital In/Out connector on
the BNC connection box.
B
161
Appendix B
Table 16: BNC Connection Box
Digital In/Out Connector Pin Assignments
Pin
Assignment
162
Signal Description
Pin
Assignment
Signal Description
1
Digital Input 0
20
Digital Output 0
2
Digital Input 1
21
Digital Output 1
3
Digital Input 2
22
Digital Output 2
4
Digital Input 3
23
Digital Output 3
5
Digital Input 4
24
Digital Output 4
6
Digital Input 5
25
Digital Output 5
7
Digital Input 6
26
Digital Output 6
8
Digital Input 7
27
Digital Output 7
9
Digital Input 8
28
Digital Output 8
10
Digital Input 9
29
Digital Output 9
11
Digital Input 10
30
Digital Output 10
12
Digital Input 11
31
Digital Output 11
13
Digital Input 12
32
Digital Output 12
14
Digital Input 13
33
Digital Output 13
15
Digital Input 14
34
Digital Output 14
16
Digital Input 15
35
Digital Output 15
17
Digital Ground
36
Reserved
18
Digital Ground
37
Digital Ground
19
No Connect
Connector Pin Assignments
CT/Enc In, Analog Out, Clk/Trig Connector
Figure 25 shows the orientation of the pins on the CT/Enc In, Analog
Out, Clk/Trig connector on the BNC connection box.
B
B
Pin 1
Pin 20
B
B
Pin 19
Pin 37
Figure 26: Orientation of the CT/Enc In, Analog Out, Clk/Trig
Connector on the BNC Connection Box
Table 17 lists the pin assignments for the CT/Enc In, Analog Out,
Clk/Trig connector on the BNC connection box.
B
B
B
B
B
163
Appendix B
Table 17: BNC Connection Box CT/Enc In, Analog Out, Clk/Trig Connector
Pin Assignments
Pin
Assignment
Signal Description
Pin
Assignment
Signal Description
1
Analog Output 0a
20
Analog Output 0 Returna
2
Analog Output 1a
21
Analog Output 1 Returna
3
Reserved
22
Reserved
4
Reserved
23
Reserved
5
Digital Ground
24
Digital Ground
6
External DAC Clock
25
External DAC Trigger
7
External ADC Clock
26
External ADC Trigger
8
Counter 0 Clock
27
Digital Ground
9
Counter 0 Out
28
Counter 0 Gate
10
Counter 1 Clock
29
Digital Ground
11
Counter 1 Out
30
Counter 1 Gate
12
Quad Dec 0 A
31
Digital Ground
13
Quad 0 Index
32
Quad Dec 0 B
14
Quad Dec 1 A
33
Digital Ground
15
Quad 1 Index
34
Quad Dec 1 B
16
Quad Dec 2 A
35
Digital Ground
17
Quad 2 Index
36
Quad Dec 2 B
18
Digital Ground
37
Digital Ground
19
No Connect
a. Reserved on DT9832A-02-0-OEM, DT9832A-02-0-BNC, DT9832-04-0-OEM, and
DT9832-04-0-BNC modules.
164
Connector Pin Assignments
EP353 Accessory Panel Connectors
To attach an EP353 accessory panel to the OEM version of the DT9832
Series module, plug the EP353 panel into connector J2 on the module,
as shown in Figure 27.
B
B
EP353 Accessory Panel
B
26-Pin
Connector J1
OEM Version of
DT9832 Series
Module
37-Pin
Connector J2
B
Module Connector J2
Module Connector J3
Figure 27: Connecting the EP353 Accessory Panel to Connector J2
B
B
Connector J1
Figure 31 shows the orientation of the pins for connector J1 on the
EP353 panel.
B
Pin 2
Pin 26
B
Pin 1
Pin 25
Figure 28: Orientation of the Pins for Connectors J1 on the EP353 Panel
B
165
Appendix B
You can use connector J1 and an AC1315 cable to attach a 5B Series
signal conditioning backplane to the EP353 accessory panel.
Table 18 lists the pin assignments for connector J1 on the EP353
accessory panel.
Table 18: EP353 Connector J1 Pin Assignments
J1 Pin
Assignment
Signal Description
Signal Description
1
Analog Input 0
2
Reserved
3
Analog Ground
4
Reserved
5
Analog Input 1
6
Analog Ground
7
Analog Input 2a
8
Reserved
9
Analog Ground
10
Reserved
11
Analog Input 3a
12
Analog Ground
13
Reserved
14
Reserved
15
Analog Ground
16
Reserved
17
Reserved
18
Analog Ground
19
Reserved
20
Reserved
21
Analog Ground
22
Reserved
23
Reserved
24
Analog Ground
25
Reserved
26
Reserved
a. Reserved on DT9832A Series modules.
166
J1 Pin
Assignment
Connector Pin Assignments
Connector J2
Use EP353 connector J2 to attach analog input signals to the EP353
accessory panel. Figure 29 shows the orientation of the pins for
connector J2 on the EP353 panel.
B
B
Pin 1
Pin 19
B
Pin 20
Pin 37
B
Figure 29: Orientation of the Pins for Connectors J2 on the EP353 Panel
You can access the pins on connector J2 either by using the EP360
cable and STP37 screw terminal panel (available from Data
Translation) or by building your own cable/panel. Refer to
Appendix A for information about the required mating connectors.
B
B
Table 19 lists the pin assignments of connector J2 on the EP353
accessory panel.
B
B
B
167
Appendix B
Table 19: EP353 Connector J2 Pin Assignments
J2 Pin
Assignment
Signal Description
Signal Description
1
Analog Input 0
20
Reserved
2
Analog Input 1
21
Reserved
3
Analog Input 2a
22
Reserved
4
Analog Input 3a
23
Reserved
5
Reserved
24
Reserved
6
Reserved
25
Reserved
7
Reserved
26
Reserved
8
Reserved
27
Reserved
9
Reserved
28
Reserved
10
Reserved
29
Reserved
11
Reserved
30
Reserved
12
Reserved
31
Reserved
13
Reserved
32
Reserved
14
Reserved
33
Reserved
15
Reserved
34
Reserved
16
Reserved
35
Reserved
17
Reserved
36
Analog Ground
18
+5 V Analog
37
Digital Ground
19
Chassis Ground
a. Reserved on DT9832A Series modules.
168
J2 Pin
Assignment
Connector Pin Assignments
EP356 Accessory Panel Connectors
To attach an EP356 accessory panel to the OEM version of the DT9832
Series module, plug the EP356 panel into connector J3 on the module,
as shown in Figure 30.
EP356 Accessory Panel
37-Pin
Connector J1
OEM Version of
DT9832 Series
Module
B
B
B
37-Pin
Connector J2
B
Connector J2
Connector J3
Figure 30: Connecting the EP356 Panel to the OEM Module
Figure 31 shows the orientation of the pins for connectors J1 and J2 on
the EP356 panel.
Pin 20
Pin 37
B
B
B
B
Pin 1
Pin 19
Figure 31: Orientation of the Pins for Connectors J1 and J2
of the EP356 Panel
B
169
Appendix B
Connector J1
Use connector J1 on the EP356 accessory panel to attach digital I/O
signals. You can access the pins on the connector J1 either by using
the EP333 cable and STP37 screw terminal panel (available from Data
Translation) or by building your own cable/panel. To build your
own cable/panel, refer to Appendix A for information about the
required mating connectors.
Table 20 lists the pin assignments for connector J1 on the EP356 panel.
Table 20: EP356 Connector J1 Pin Assignments
J1 Pin
Assignment
170
Signal Description
J1 Pin
Assignment
Signal Description
1
Digital Input 0
20
Digital Output 0
2
Digital Input 1
21
Digital Output 1
3
Digital Input 2
22
Digital Output 2
4
Digital Input 3
23
Digital Output 3
5
Digital Input 4
24
Digital Output 4
6
Digital Input 5
25
Digital Output 5
7
Digital Input 6
26
Digital Output 6
8
Digital Input 7
27
Digital Output 7
9
Digital Input 8
28
Digital Output 8
10
Digital Input 9
29
Digital Output 9
11
Digital Input 10
30
Digital Output 10
12
Digital Input 11
31
Digital Output 11
13
Digital Input 12
32
Digital Output 12
14
Digital Input 13
33
Digital Output 13
Connector Pin Assignments
Table 20: EP356 Connector J1 Pin Assignments (cont.)
J1 Pin
Assignment
Signal Description
J1 Pin
Assignment
B
Signal Description
15
Digital Input 14
34
Digital Output 14
16
Digital Input 15
35
Digital Output 15
17
Digital Ground
36
Reserved
18
Digital Ground
37
Digital Ground
19
Chassis Ground
Connector J2
B
B
B
Use connector J2 on the EP356 accessory panel to attach analog
output, counter/timer, trigger, and clock signals. You can access the
pins on the connector J1 either by using the EP333 cable and STP37
screw terminal panel (available from Data Translation) or by building
your own cable/panel. To build your own cable/panel, refer to
Appendix A for information about the required mating connectors.
B
Table 21 lists pin assignments for connector J2 on the EP356 panel.
B
B
B
B
171
Appendix B
Table 21: EP356 Connector J2 Pin Assignments
J2 Pin
Assignment
Signal Description
J2 Pin
Assignment
Signal Description
1
Analog Output 0a
20
Analog Output 0 Returna
2
Analog Output 1a
21
Analog Output 1 Returna
3
Reserved
22
Reserved
4
+5 V
23
Digital Ground
5
Digital Ground
24
Digital Ground
6
External DAC Clock
25
External DAC Trigger
7
External ADC Clock
26
External ADC Trigger
8
Counter 0 Clock
27
Digital Ground
9
Counter 0 Out
28
Counter 0 Gate
10
Counter 1 Clock
29
Digital Ground
11
Counter 1 Out
30
Counter 1 Gate
12
Quad Dec 0 A
31
Digital Ground
13
Quad 0 Index
32
Quad Dec 0 B
14
Quad Dec 1 A
33
Digital Ground
15
Quad 1 Index
34
Quad Dec 1 B
16
Quad Dec 2 A
35
Digital Ground
17
Quad 2 Index
36
Quad Dec 2 B
18
Digital Ground
37
Digital Ground
19
Chassis Ground
a. Reserved on DT9832A-02-0-OEM, DT9832A-02-0-BNC, DT9832-04-0-OEM, and
DT9832-04-0-BNC modules
172
Connector Pin Assignments
EP355 Screw Terminal Assignments
The EP355 screw terminal panel is used with the OEM version of the
DT9832 Series module on connector J3 of the module.
The screw terminal assignments correspond to the pin assignments
on the J3 connector on the OEM version of the DT9832 Series module
itself. Refer to Table 14 on page 157, using the pin numbers to
reference the screw terminals on the EP355.
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
173
Appendix B
174
C
Ground, Power, and Isolation
Secondary Power Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Ground, Power, and Isolation Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
175
Appendix C
Secondary Power Connector
The OEM version of the DT9832 Series module provides a secondary
power connector, which is useful for embedded applications. The
location of the connector is shown in Figure 32.
Secondary Power
Connector (TB1)
Primary
Power
Connector
3 2 1
OEM Version of
DT9832 Series
Module
LED
USB
Connector
Figure 32: Secondary Power Connector
The pin assignments for the secondary power connector (TB1) are as
follows:
• Pin 1 = +5 V
• Pin 2 = Ground
• Pin 3 = Shield (chassis ground)
176
Ground, Power, and Isolation
Ground, Power, and Isolation
Connections
C
Figure 33 illustrates how ground, power, and isolation are connected
on a DT9832 Series module.
The TB1 +5 V connector
is available from the OEM
version of a DT9832
Series module only.
C
1
TB1
+5 V
2
C
3
+5 V
The +5 V connector is
available from the OEM
version and the BNC
connection box.
C
+5 V
DGND
C
Earth GND
+5 V USB; used for
initialization only, not
for power.
USB
Interface
USB Interface
Power
DC
DC
DC
DGND USB
Earth GND
C
DC
A/D and D/A
Power
-15 V AGND
+15 V
C
A/D and D/A
System
Figure 33: Ground, Power, and Isolation Connections
C
C
177
Appendix C
Keep the following in mind:
• Earth ground on the DT9832 Series module is not connected to
DGND or AGND.
• Earth ground is connected to the aluminum case of the BNC
connection box.
• You should connect earth ground to the power supply earth.
• You should isolate the +5V/DGND input. Note that the EP361
power supply (shipped with the BNC connection box and
available from Data Translation for the OEM version of the
module) has no connection between +5V/DGND and earth
ground.
• The USB connector case is connected to earth ground.
• The USB data lines and USB GND are not connected to earth
ground.
• The USB DGND is connected to the USB GND of the PC USB
port.
178
Index
A
A/D subsystem specifications 142
accessories 23
aliasing 84
analog input
adding a digital input port to the
channel list 81
adding counter/timers to the
channel list 81
adding quadrature decoders to the
channel list 82
calibrating 136
channel list 80
channels 79
continuous operations 85
conversion modes 85
data format and transfer 88
error conditions 89
ranges 84
resolution 79
sample clock sources 84
single-ended operations 85
testing continuous 70
testing single-value 68
triggers 87
wiring single-ended inputs 53
analog output
calibrating 139
channel list 91
channels 90
clock sources 93
conversion modes 93
data format and transfer 96
error conditions 97
gain 92
ranges 92
resolution 90
single-value operations 93
streaming operations 93
subsystem specifications 145
testing 69
wiring 54
analog threshold trigger 88
applet, Open Layers Control Panel 30,
100, 129
application wiring
analog inputs 53
analog outputs 54
digital inputs and outputs 55
edge-to-edge measurement 61
event counting 56
frequency measurement 59
period measurement 59
pulse output 62
pulse width measurement 59
up-down counting 58
applications
DT Measure Foundry 21
DT-LV Link 22
Quick DataAcq 21
B
base clock frequency 122
BaseClockFrequency 122
179
Index
binary data encoding 119
BNC connection box connector pin
assignments 161
buffers 88, 94, 96, 118
inprocess flush 118
single wrap mode 118
C
C/C++ programs 21
C/T, see counter/timer 148
cables, USB 39, 40
calibrating the module
analog input subsystem 136
analog output subsystem 139
running the calibration utility 135
CGLDepth 119
channel list
for analog input channels 80
for counter/timers 81
for digital input port 81
for quadrature decoders 82
channel type
differential 119
single-ended 119
channel-gain list depth 119
channels
analog input 79
analog output 90
counter/timer 100
digital I/O 98
number of 119
quadrature decoder 112
clock source
quadrature decoder 113
clock sources
analog input 84
180
analog output 93
counter/timer 101
clock-falling edge type 124
clock-rising edge type 124
clocks
base frequency 122
external 122
internal 122
maximum external clock divider 122
maximum throughput 122
minimum external clock divider 122
minimum throughput 122
simultaneous 122
specifications 150
connecting signals
analog inputs 53
analog outputs 54
digital inputs and outputs 55
edge-to-edge measurement 61
event counting 56
frequency measurement 59
period measurement 59
pulse output 62
pulse width measurement 59
up-down counting 58
connecting to the host computer 38
connector J1 pin assignments
EP353 166
EP356 170
connector J2 pin assignments
EP353 168
EP356 51, 172
OEM version 155
connector J3 pin assignments, OEM
version 157
connector pin assignments
BNC connection box 161
Index
connector TB1 pin assignments, OEM
version 160
continuous analog input
post-trigger 117
scan operations 86
continuous analog output 117
streaming 94
waveform generation mode 95
continuous counter/timer 117
continuous digital I/O 99, 117
continuous edge-to-edge
measurement mode 123
Control Panel applet 30, 100, 129
conventions used 13
conversion modes
continuous analog input (scan mode)
85, 86
digital I/O 99
single-value analog input 85
single-value analog output 93
streaming analog output 93
conversion rate 86
counter/timer
channels 100, 119
clock sources 101, 122
clock-falling edge type 124
clock-rising edge type 124
continuous edge-to-edge
measurement mode 123
edge-to-edge measurement mode
123
event counting 123
gate types 102
gate-falling edge type 124
gate-rising edge type 124
high-edge gate type 124
high-level gate type 123
high-to-low output pulse 123
in analog input channel list 81
internal gate type 123
interrupt-driven operations 124
low-edge gate type 124
low-level gate type 123
low-to-high output pulse 123
one-shot mode 123
rate generation mode 123
repetitive one-shot mode 123
subsystem specifications 148
up/down counting 123
variable pulse width 123
wiring edge-to-edge signals 61
wiring event counting signals 56
wiring frequency measurement
signals 59
wiring period signals 59
wiring pulse width signals 59
wiring up-down counting signals 58
counter/timers
connecting frequency measurement
signals 59
connecting pulse output signals 62
wiring pulse output signals 62
counting events 105
customer service 131
D
D/A, see analog output 145
data encoding 88, 96, 119
data flow modes
continuous C/T 117
continuous digital input 117
continuous post-trigger 117
single-value 117
181
Index
data format and transfer
analog input 88
analog output 96
DataAcq SDK 21
device driver 21, 42
differential channels 119
digital I/O 98
adding a digital input port to the
analog input channel list 81
adding a digital output port to the
analog output channel list 91
input operations 99
lines 98
operation modes 99
output operations 99
single-value operations 99
subsystem specifications 147
testing inputs 71
testing outputs 72
wiring 55
Digital In/Out connector pin
assignments 50
digital trigger 87, 92
DT Measure Foundry 21
DT-LV Link 22
DT-Open Layers for .NET Class
Library 21
DTx-EZ 22
duty cycle 103
E
edge type
clock falling 124
clock rising 124
gate falling 124
gate rising 124
182
edge-to-edge measurement mode 107,
123
wiring 61
encoding data 88, 96
environmental specifications 151
EP353 pin assignments 166, 168
EP355 screw terminal 173
EP356 pin assignments 51, 170, 172
errors
analog input 89
analog output 97
event counting 105, 123
wiring 56
expansion hub 40
external clock 102, 122
external clock divider
maximum 122
minimum 122
external negative digital trigger 87, 92,
121
external positive digital trigger 87, 92,
121
F
factory service 131
features 18
FifoSize 117
formatting data
analog input 88
analog output 96
frequency
base clock 122
external A/D clock 84
external C/T clock 102
external DAC clock 93
internal A/D clock 84, 122
Index
internal A/D sample clock 122
internal C/T clock 101, 122
internal DAC clock 93
internal retrigger clock 118
output pulse 108
frequency measurement 59, 73, 106
G
gain
actual available 120
analog output 92
number of 120
programmable 120
gate type 102
high-edge 124
high-level 123
internal 123
low-edge 124
low-level 123
gate-falling edge type 124
gate-rising edge type 124
generating pulses 109, 110, 111
ground 177
H
hardware features 18
help, online 67
high-edge gate type 124
high-level gate type 123
hot-swapping 38
I
input
channels 79
ranges 84
resolution 79
sample clock sources 84
installing the Quick DataAcq
application 67
installing the software 31
internal
clock 101, 122
gate type 123
interrupt-driven operations 124
interrupt-on-change 100, 117
interrupts 117
isolation 177
J
J1 connector pin assignments
EP353 166
EP356 170
J2 connector pin assignments
EP353 168
EP356 51, 172
OEM version 155
J3 connector pin assignments
OEM version 157
L
LabVIEW 22
LED 39, 40
lines, digital I/O 98
low-edge gate type 124
low-level gate type 123
index mode 113
inprocess buffers 118
183
Index
M
MaxDifferentialChannels 119
MaxExtClockDivider 122
MaxFrequency 122
MaxMultiScanCount 118
MaxRetriggerFreq 118
MaxSingleEndedChannels 119
measuring frequency 106
measuring pulses 107
MinExtClockDivider 122
MinFrequency 122
MinRetriggerFreq 118
multiple channels
analog input 80
analog output 91
N
number of
differential channels 119
gains 120
I/O channels 119
resolutions 121
scans per trigger 118
single-ended channels 119
voltage ranges 120
NumberOfChannels 119
NumberOfRanges 120
NumberOfResolutions 121
NumberOfSupportedGains 120
Nyquist Theorem 84
O
OEM version
connector J2 pin assignments 155
connector J3 pin assignments 157
184
connector TB1 pin assignments 160
one-shot pulse output 110, 123
online help 67
Open Layers Control Panel applet 30,
100, 129
operation modes
continuous analog input (scan mode)
86
continuous digital I/O 99
single-value analog input 85
single-value analog output 93
single-value digital I/O 99
waveform generation 95
output
channel list 91
clock sources 93
pulses 123
ranges 92
outputting pulses 62, 109, 110, 111
testing 74
P
period 108
period measurement, wiring 59
physical specifications 151
pin assignments
Digital In/Out connector 50
EP353 166, 168
EP356 51, 170, 172
OEM version connector J2 155
OEM version connector J3 157
OEM version connector TB1 160
ports, digital I/O 98
positive threshold trigger 121
post-trigger acquisition mode 117
power 37, 176, 177
Index
power specifications 151
power supply 37
preparing to wire signals 45
pre-scale value 113
pulse output
one-shot 110
rate generation 109
repetitive one-shot 111
testing 74
types 103
wiring 62
pulse width 104, 108
wiring 59
Q
quadrature decoder
adding to the analog input channel
list 82
features 112
specifications 148
wiring 63
Quick DataAcq application 21
installing 67
running 67
R
ranges
analog input 84
analog output 92
number of 120
rate generation 109, 123
recommendations for wiring 45
related documents 14
repetitive one-shot pulse output 111,
123
requirements 30
resolution
analog input 79
analog output 90
available 121
number of 121
retrigger clock frequency 118
returning boards to the factory 131
RMA 131
S
sample clock sources 84
sample rate 86
scaling mode 113
scan operations, analog input 85
screw terminal assignments, EP355 173
SDK 21
simultaneous clocking 122
simultaneous sample-and-hold
support 119
simultaneous start list 117
single buffer wrap mode 118
single channel
analog input 80
analog output 91
single-ended channels 119
number of 119
single-value operations 117
analog input 85
analog output 93
digital I/O 99
software trigger 87, 92, 121
specifications 141
analog input 142
analog output 145
clocks 150
185
Index
counter/timer 148
digital I/O 147
environmental 151
physical 151
power 151
quadrature decoder 148
triggers 149
stopping an operation 85, 95
SupportedGains 120
SupportedResolutions 121
SupportedVoltageRanges 120
SupportsBinaryEncoding 119
SupportsBuffering 118
SupportsClockFalling 124
SupportsClockRising 124
SupportsContinuous 117
SupportsContinuousMeasure 123
SupportsCount 123
SupportsDifferential 119
SupportsExternalClock 122
SupportsGateFalling 124
SupportsGateHighEdge 124
SupportsGateHighLevel 123
SupportsGateLowEdge 124
SupportsGateLowLevel 123
SupportsGateNone 123
SupportsGateRising 124
SupportsHighToLowPulse 123
SupportsInProcessFlush 118
SupportsInternalClock 122
SupportsInterrupt 124
SupportsInterruptOnChange 117
SupportsLowToHighPulse 123
SupportsMeasure 123
SupportsNegExternalTTLTrigger 121
SupportsOneShot 123
SupportsOneShotRepeat 123
186
SupportsPosExternalTTLTrigger 121
SupportsPosThresholdTrigger 121
SupportsProgrammableGain 120
SupportsRateGenerate 123
SupportsSimultaneousClocking 122
SupportsSimultaneousSampleHold
119
SupportsSimultaneousStart 117
SupportsSingleEnded 119
SupportsSingleValue 117
SupportsSoftwareTrigger 121
SupportsUpDown 123
SupportsVariablePulseWidth 123
SupportsWrapSingle 118
system requirements 30
T
TB1 connector pin assignments
OEM version 160
technical support 130
threshold trigger
positive 121
throughput
maximum 122
minimum 122
transferring data
analog input 88
analog output 96
triggered scan
number of scans per trigger 118
retrigger frequency 118
triggers
analog input 87
analog threshold 88
external 87, 92
external negative digital 121
Index
external positive digital 121
positive analog threshold 121
software 87, 92, 121
specifications 149
troubleshooting
procedure 126
technical support 130
troubleshooting table 127
TTL trigger 87, 92
U
units, counter/timer 100
unpacking 29
up/down counting 105, 123
up-down counting, wiring 58
USB cable 39, 40
USB expansion hub 40
frequency measurement 59
period measurement 59
preparing 45
pulse output 62
pulse width measurement 59
recommendations 45
single-ended analog inputs 53
to the BNC connection box 46
up-down counting 58
writing programs in
C/C++ 21
Visual Basic 22
Visual Basic .NET 21
Visual C# 21
Visual C++ 22
V
variable pulse width 123
Visual Basic for .NET programs 21
Visual Basic programs 22
Visual C# programs 21
Visual C++ programs 22
voltage ranges 84, 120
number of 120
W
waveform generation mode 95
wiring signals
analog outputs 54
digital inputs and outputs 55
edge-to-edge measurement 61
event counting 56
187
Index
188
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