Body of Model Trailer User`s Manual

Cimarron Trailers, Inc.
MODEL: CIMARRON GOOSENECK AND BUMPER PULL
TRAILERS
^ WARNING
This User’s Manual contains safety information and instructions
for your trailer.
You must read this manual before loading or towing your trailer.
You must follow all safety precautions and instructions.
Cimarron Trailers, Inc.
1442 Hwy 62 East
PO Box B
Chickasha, OK 73023
405-222-4800 Phone
405-222-4844 Facsimile
Revised 2013
Table of Contents
CIMARRON GOOSENECK AND BUMPER PULL TRAILERS
1
INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................... 1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
2
WELCOME TO THE CIMARRON TRAILERS TEAM ................................... 1
MODELS OF CIMARRON TRAILERS ........................................................ 2
WARRANTY INFORMATION ................................................................... 2
DISCLAIMER.......................................................................................... 2
GENERAL SAFETY INFORMATION ................................................... 4
2.1
SAFETY ALERT SYMBOLS AND SIGNAL WORDS .................................... 4
2.2
MAJOR HAZARDS.................................................................................. 5
2.2.1 Improper Sizing of the Trailer to the Tow Vehicle .......................... 5
2.2.2 Driving Too Fast ............................................................................. 6
2.2.3 Adjust Driving Behavior When Towing a Trailer............................ 6
2.2.4 Improper Loading ........................................................................... 7
2.2.5 Unsafe Load Distribution ................................................................ 8
2.2.6 Trailer Not Properly Coupled to the Hitch ..................................... 9
2.2.7 Proper Use of Safety Chains ......................................................... 10
2.2.8 Proper Connection of Breakaway Brake ....................................... 10
2.2.9 Matching Trailer and Hitch .......................................................... 11
2.2.10
Worn Tires, Loose Wheels and Lug Nuts .................................. 11
2.2.11
Shifting Cargo ........................................................................... 13
2.2.12
Inappropriate Cargo ................................................................. 14
2.2.13
Inoperable Brakes, Lights or Mirrors ....................................... 15
2.2.14
Hazards From Modifying Your Trailer ..................................... 16
2.2.15
Hazards to Horses (Horse Trailer) ........................................... 16
2.2.16
Hazards to Livestock (Livestock Trailer) .................................. 17
2.2.17
Hazards from Accessories ......................................................... 18
2.2.18
Safety Warning Labels on Your Trailer .................................... 19
2.2.19
Trailer Towing Guide................................................................ 20
2.2.20
Reporting Safety Defects ........................................................... 22
3
TIRE SAFETY INFORMATION ........................................................... 23
3.1
TRAILER TIRE INFORMATION .............................................................. 24
3.2
STEPS FOR DETERMINING CORRECT LOAD LIMIT – TRAILER ............... 25
3.2.1 Trailers 10,000 Pounds GVWR or Less......................................... 27
3.2.2 Trailers Over 10,000 Pounds GVWR ............................................ 27
3.3
STEPS FOR DETERMINING CORRECT LOAD LIMIT – TOW VEHICLE ...... 28
3.4
GLOSSARY OF TIRE TERMINOLOGY .................................................... 28
3.5
TIRE SAFETY – EVERYTHING RIDES ON IT .......................................... 34
3.5.1 Safety First–Basic Tire Maintenance ............................................ 35
3.5.2 Finding Your Vehicle's Recommended Tire Pressure and Load
Limits ............................................................................................. 35
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CIMARRON GOOSENECK AND BUMPER PULL TRAILERS
3.5.3
3.5.4
3.5.5
3.5.6
3.5.7
3.5.8
3.5.9
3.5.10
Understanding Tire Pressure and Load Limits ............................. 35
Checking Tire Pressure ................................................................. 36
Steps for Maintaining Proper Tire Pressure ................................. 36
Tire Size......................................................................................... 37
Tire Tread...................................................................................... 37
Tire Balance and Wheel Alignment ............................................... 38
Tire Repair .................................................................................... 38
Tire Fundamentals .................................................................... 38
3.5.10.1
3.5.10.2
3.5.10.3
3.5.11
4
Information on Trailer (ST) Tires .................................................... 39
UTQGS Information ........................................................................ 40
Additional Information on Light Truck Tires .................................. 41
Tire Safety Tips ......................................................................... 42
COUPLING TO THE TOW VEHICLE ................................................ 43
4.1
USE AN ADEQUATE TOW VEHICLE AND HITCH ................................... 43
4.1.1 Trailer Information ....................................................................... 43
4.1.2 Tow Vehicle ................................................................................... 45
4.2
COUPLING AND UNCOUPLING THE TRAILER ........................................ 47
4.2.1 Trailer with Ball Hitch Coupler .................................................... 50
4.2.1.1
4.2.1.2
4.2.1.3
4.2.1.4
4.2.1.5
4.2.1.6
4.2.1.7
4.2.2
Trailer with Gooseneck Coupler ................................................... 59
4.2.2.1
4.2.2.2
4.2.2.3
4.2.2.4
4.2.2.5
4.2.2.6
4.2.2.7
4.2.3
5
Before coupling the trailer to the tow vehicle .................................. 51
Prepare the coupler and hitch .......................................................... 52
Couple the trailer to the tow vehicle ................................................ 52
Rig the safety chains ........................................................................ 54
Attach and test electric breakaway brake system ............................. 55
Connect the electrical connector ...................................................... 58
Uncoupling the ball hitch trailer ...................................................... 59
Before coupling the trailer to the tow vehicle .................................. 61
Prepare the ball receiver and gooseneck ball ................................... 62
Couple the trailer to the tow vehicle ................................................ 63
Rig the safety chains ........................................................................ 66
Attach and test the breakaway brake system .................................... 67
Connect the electrical connector ...................................................... 70
Uncoupling the gooseneck trailer .................................................... 71
Adjust Gooseneck Hitch Height .................................................... 73
LOADING THE TRAILER..................................................................... 75
5.1
CHECKING TONGUE WEIGHT .............................................................. 77
5.2
SECURING THE CARGO ........................................................................ 78
5.3
LOADING HORSES (HORSE TRAILER) .................................................. 78
5.3.1 Preparing the Horse Trailer for Loading ...................................... 79
5.3.2 Loading the Horse Trailer............................................................. 80
5.4
LOADING LIVESTOCK (LIVESTOCK TRAILER) ...................................... 83
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CIMARRON GOOSENECK AND BUMPER PULL TRAILERS
5.4.1 Preparing the Livestock Trailer for Loading ................................ 84
5.4.2 Loading the Livestock Trailer ....................................................... 84
5.5
LOADING CARGO (CARGO TRAILERS) ................................................. 85
5.5.1 Preparing the Cargo Trailer for Loading ..................................... 86
5.5.2 Loading the Enclosed Trailer ........................................................ 86
6
CHECKING THE TRAILER BEFORE AND DURING EACH TOW ..
.................................................................................................................... 88
6.1
6.2
7
BREAKING-IN A NEW TRAILER ....................................................... 89
7.1
7.2
7.3
8
PRE-TOW CHECKLIST .......................................................................... 88
MAKE REGULAR STOPS ...................................................................... 88
RETIGHTEN LUG NUTS AT FIRST 10, 25 & 50 MILES ........................... 89
ADJUST BRAKE SHOES AT FIRST 200 MILES ....................................... 89
SYNCHRONIZING THE BRAKE SYSTEMS ............................................... 90
ACCESSORIES ........................................................................................ 91
8.1
ELECTRIC/HYDRAULIC LANDING GEAR .............................................. 92
8.2
AIR RIDE SUSPENSION ........................................................................ 92
8.3
WINDOWS ........................................................................................... 93
8.4
RECESSED PADDLE LATCHES & STRIKER PLATE ................................. 93
8.5
BAR LOCK LATCH & CARGO VISE CATCH .......................................... 96
8.6
DROP-DOWN FEED DOORS ................................................................. 98
8.7
STALL DIVIDERS ............................................................................... 100
8.8
DOORS, GATES AND RAMPS .............................................................. 101
8.8.1 Livestock Center Gate ................................................................. 102
8.8.2 Rear Ramp Over Rear Doors ...................................................... 103
8.8.3 Full Height Side Ramp Door ....................................................... 104
8.8.4 Rear Ramp And Storm Doors ...................................................... 105
8.9
TACK ROOM ..................................................................................... 106
8.9.1 Front Walk-in Tack Room ........................................................... 106
8.9.2 Rear Fold-Away Tack Compartment ........................................... 106
8.9.3 Solid Rear Tack Compartment .................................................... 107
8.10
SADDLE TREE ................................................................................... 108
8.10.1
Removable Saddle Tree........................................................... 109
8.10.2
Saddle Tree Adjustments ......................................................... 110
8.11
REMOVABLE CENTER POST............................................................... 111
8.12
SLIDING GATE LATCH ....................................................................... 112
8.13
LIVESTOCK TRAVELING CENTER GATE ............................................. 112
8.14
SMALL ANIMAL PENS ....................................................................... 114
8.15
SLIDEOUT ......................................................................................... 115
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Table of Contents
CIMARRON GOOSENECK AND BUMPER PULL TRAILERS
9
INSPECTION, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE .................................. 117
9.1
INSPECTION, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE CHARTS ............................. 117
9.2
INSPECTION AND SERVICE INSTRUCTIONS ......................................... 120
9.2.1 Axle Bolts, Frame, Suspension, & Structure ............................... 120
9.2.2 Trailer Body ............................................................................... 121
9.2.2.1
9.2.2.2
9.2.2.3
9.2.2.4
9.2.3
9.2.4
Door Hinges ................................................................................ 125
Trailer Brakes ............................................................................. 125
9.2.4.1
9.2.4.2
9.2.4.3
9.2.4.4
9.2.5
Coupler and ball ............................................................................ 128
Gooseneck ..................................................................................... 129
Landing Leg or Jack.................................................................... 129
Lights and Signals ....................................................................... 130
Accessory Battery ........................................................................ 130
Tires ............................................................................................ 130
Wheel Rims ............................................................................. 132
Wheels, Bearings and Lug Nuts .............................................. 132
9.2.11.1
9.2.11.2
9.2.12
Brake shoes and drums .................................................................. 125
Manually adjusting brake shoes ..................................................... 126
Brakes, Electric .............................................................................. 126
Brakes, Hydraulic (air or electric operated) ................................... 127
Trailer Connection to Tow Vehicle ............................................. 128
9.2.5.1
9.2.5.2
9.2.6
9.2.7
9.2.8
9.2.9
9.2.10
9.2.11
Cleaning......................................................................................... 121
Fasteners and frame members ........................................................ 123
Welds ............................................................................................. 124
Roof Seal ....................................................................................... 124
Wheel bearings (Axles up to 7,000 lb) .......................................... 133
Wheel bearings (Axles over 7,000 lb) ........................................... 134
Lug Nuts (Bolts) ...................................................................... 134
10
ELECTRICAL DIAGRAMS................................................................. 136
11
WARRANTY INFORMATION ........................................................... 140
12
SERVICE RECORD .............................................................................. 148
iv
1 INTRODUCTION
1.1
WELCOME TO THE CIMARRON TRAILERS TEAM
Thank you for purchasing your new Cimarron trailer. You have now
joined an ever-growing team of quality conscience Cimarron trailer buyers.
Cimarron Trailers, Inc. established in 2000, is a family owned and
operated business. Products manufactured by Cimarron Trailers, Inc., are
designed and manufactured to give you many years of reliable service. The
combination of quality materials and top craftsmanship continues to put
Cimarron Trailers above the rest.
The safety and comfort of your cargo, whether animal, auto or freight, is
the highest priority in every Cimarron Trailer design and manufacturing
phase. We are proud to offer animal-safe engineering in every horse and
stock trailer model produced. However, as a responsible trailer owner, it is
your responsibility to be familiar with your new trailer, follow safety
guidelines and the recommended maintenance instructions to ensure you
have many years of safe hauling.
As you begin to use your new Cimarron trailer, this User's Manual will
allow you to become more familiar with the operation, maintenance and
care of your trailer. This manual will reference exerts from other
manufacturer's manuals which have components on Cimarron Trailers
products.
The material contained in this publication is both generalized and specific.
This manual is designed to give you general information about your trailer.
Page 1
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Introduction
1.2
MODELS OF CIMARRON TRAILERS
This publication pertains to all trailers produced within any of the
following models.
Norstar, Norstar LX–Deluxe horse trailer models
Winstar – Combination horse/stock trailer models
Lonestar – Stock trailer models
Showstar - Low profile small animal models
Stierwalt - Show cattle models
Transtar – Cargo/auto trailer models
1.3
WARRANTY INFORMATION
Upon receiving this manual, you should have also received a warranty
registration form, survey and a postage-paid envelope to return them in.
After your warranty registration is received by Cimarron Trailers Inc., it
will be on file should you require any type of warranty related repairs. IF
YOUR WARRANTY REGISTRATION FORM IS NOT ON FILE, THE
WARRANTY CANNOT BE HONORED. A copy of the warranty
registration form (after completion) should be retained for your files. The
survey will be forwarded to the marketing department for use in research
and product development.
When a trailer is sold, traded in or leaves the initial owner, it is the
responsibility of the owner to transfer this manual to the receiving party.
1.4
DISCLAIMER
All trailers manufactured by Cimarron Trailers, Inc. are designed to be
used within the specific engineering guidelines. These guidelines are
determined by the type of trailer, i.e. horse, stock, cargo, or auto. It is
suggested that all trailers are to be used as designated by the manufacturer.
At no time is it suggested or approved in any trailer manufactured by
Cimarron Trailers, Inc. for the use of any carbon monoxide producing
apparatus in an enclosed area. Some devices may release fumes, flames,
smoke or other hazardous emissions, which could result in serious injury
or possible death due to asphyxiation.
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Introduction
Cimarron Trailers Inc. assumes no responsibility for the misuse or
improper operation of towing trailers, nor the results from neglecting to
follow manufacturers' recommended instructions and maintenance
guidelines. Failure to comply with suggested guidelines could result in
nullification of warranty.
Cimarron Trailers custom designs and manufacturers trailers to fit the very
specific individual requirements of our customers. We pride ourselves in
our technical knowledge, experience, and sincere desire to fulfill our
customer’s needs and requests. However, in the pursuit of these goals,
there are countless changes and variations to designs, engineering,
specifications and materials, that from time to time create unforeseen or
unknown circumstances which compromise the information in this owners
manual.
Cimarron Trailers, Inc. reserves the right to make any change in design or
construction as necessary for engineering. All visual representation,
specification and guidelines are based on the latest product information
available at the time of this publication. All trailers manufactured by
Cimarron Trailers Inc., are covered in this publication, with minor
exceptions. For more information, call or write: 405/222-4800, toll free 1877-CTM-TRLR, Cimarron Trailers P.O. Box B, Chickasha, OK 73023,
e-mail: info@cimarrontrailers.com, web site: www.cimarrontrailers.com
Additional Contact Information
For your convenience, the following list of internet contacts of our primary
venders can be referred to if you require additional information about their
specific components.
Axles & running gear
Couplers & manual jacks
Electric/Hydraulics jacks
Glide room mechanism
Dexter Axles
Bulldog
Equalizer
HWH
www.dexteraxle.com
www.bulldogproducts.net
www.equalizersystems.com
www.hwhcorp.com
Portions of this user's manual were used with the expressed authority of
Dexter Axle, but Dexter Axle is not responsible for the accuracy of the
information contained herein.
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Revised 2013
2 GENERAL SAFETY INFORMATION
2.1
SAFETY ALERT SYMBOLS AND SIGNAL WORDS
An Owner’s Manual that provides general trailer information cannot cover
all of the specific details necessary for the proper combination of every
trailer, tow vehicle and hitch. Therefore, you must read, understand and
follow the instructions given by the tow vehicle and trailer hitch
manufacturers, as well as the instructions in this manual.
Our trailers are built with components produced by various
manufacturers. Some of these items have separate instruction manuals.
Where this manual indicates that you should read another manual, and you
do not have that manual, call Cimarron Trailers, Inc. at 405-222-4800 for a
free copy.
The safety information in this manual is denoted by the safety alert
symbol: ^
The level of risk is indicated by the following signal words.
^ DANGER
DANGER – Immediate hazards which WILL result in severe personal
injury or death if the warning is ignored.
^ WARNING
WARNING – Hazards or unsafe practices which COULD result in severe
personal injury or death if the warning is ignored.
^ CAUTION
CAUTION – Hazards or unsafe practices which could result in minor or
moderate injury if the warning is ignored.
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General Safety Information
NOTICE
NOTICE – Practices that could result in damage to the trailer or other
property.
2.2
MAJOR HAZARDS
Loss of control of the trailer or trailer/tow vehicle combination can result
in death or serious injury. The most common causes for loss of control of
the trailer are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Improper sizing the trailer for the tow vehicle, or vice versa.
Excessive Speed: Driving too fast for the conditions.
Failure to adjust driving behavior when towing a trailer.
Overloading and/or improper weight distribution.
Improper or mis-coupling of the trailer to the hitch.
Improper braking and steering under sway conditions.
Not maintaining proper tire pressure.
Not keeping lug nuts tight.
2.2.1
Improper Sizing of the Trailer to the Tow Vehicle
Trailers that weigh too much for the towing vehicle can cause stability
problems, which can lead to death or serious injury. Furthermore, the
additional strain put on the engine and drive-train may lead to serious tow
vehicle maintenance problems. For these reasons the maximum towing
capacity of your towing vehicle should not be exceeded. The towing
capacity of your tow vehicle, in terms of maximum Gross Trailer Weight
(GTW) and maximum Gross Combined Weight Rating (GCWR) can be
found in the tow vehicles Owner’s Manual.
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General Safety Information
^ DANGER
Use of a hitch with a load rating less than the load rating of the trailer can
result in loss of control and may lead to death or serious injury.
Use of a tow vehicle with a towing capacity less than the load rating of the
trailer can result in loss of control, and may lead to death or serious injury.
Be sure your hitch and tow vehicle are rated for the Gross Vehicle Weight
Rating (GVWR) of your trailer.
2.2.2
Driving Too Fast
If you drive too fast, the trailer is more likely to sway, thus increasing the
possibility for loss of control. Also your tires may overheat, thus increasing
the possibility of a blowout.
^ WARNING
Driving too fast for conditions can result in loss of control and cause death
or serious injury.
Decrease your speed as road, weather and lighting conditions deteriorate.
2.2.3
Adjust Driving Behavior When Towing a Trailer
When towing a trailer, you will have decreased acceleration, increased
stopping distance, and increased turning radius (which means you must
make wider turns to keep from hitting curbs, vehicles, and anything else
that is on the inside corner). Furthermore, the trailer will change the
handling characteristics of your towing vehicle, making it more sensitive
to steering inputs and more likely to be pushed around in windy conditions
or when being passed by large vehicles. In addition, you will need a
longer distance to pass, due to slower acceleration and increased length.
With these caveats in mind:
Page 6
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General Safety Information
•
•
•
•
•
•
Be alert for slippery conditions. You are more likely to be affected by
slippery road surfaces when driving a tow vehicle with a trailer, than
driving a tow vehicle without a trailer.
Anticipate the trailer “swaying.” Swaying can be caused by excessive
steering, wind gusts, roadway edges, or by the trailer reaction to the
pressure wave created by passing trucks and busses.
When encountering trailer sway, take your foot off the gas, and steer
as little as possible in order to stay on the road. Use small “trim-like”
steering adjustments. Do not attempt to steer out of the sway; you’ll
only make it worse. Also, do not apply the tow vehicle brakes to
correct trailer swaying. On the other hand, application of the trailer
brakes alone will tend to straighten out the combination, especially
when going downhill.
Check rearview mirrors frequently to observe the trailer and traffic.
Use lower gear when driving down steep or long grades. Use the
engine and transmission as a brake. Do not ride the brakes, as they
can overheat and become ineffective.
Be aware of your trailer height, especially when approaching bridges,
roofed areas and around trees.
2.2.4
Improper Loading
The total weight of the load you put in or on the trailer, plus the empty
weight of the trailer itself, must not exceed the trailer's Gross Vehicle
Weight Rating (GVWR). If you do not know the empty weight of the
trailer plus the cargo weight, you must weigh the loaded trailer at a
commercial scale. In addition, you must distribute the load in the trailer
such that the load on any axle does not exceed the Gross Axle Weight
Rating (GAWR). If your trailer is equipped with a Tire & Loading
Information Placard mounted next to the Certification / VIN label, the
cargo capacity weight stated on that placard is only a close estimate. The
GVWR and GAWR’s are listed on the Certification / VIN label mounted
on the front left side of the trailer.
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General Safety Information
^ WARNING
An overloaded trailer can result in loss of control of the trailer, leading to
death or serious injury.
Do not exceed the trailer Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) or an
axle Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR).
Do not load a trailer so that the weight on any tire exceeds its rating.
2.2.5
Unsafe Load Distribution
Improper front / rear load distribution can lead to poor trailer sway stability
or poor tow vehicle handling. Poor trailer sway stability results from
tongue weights that are too low, and poor tow vehicle stability results from
tongue weights that are too high.
In the following table, the second column shows the RULE OF THUMB
percentage of total weight of the trailer plus its cargo (Gross Trailer
Weight, or “GTW”) that should appear on the tongue of the trailer. For
example, a trailer with a gooseneck hitch, with a loaded weight of 12,000
pounds, should have 20-30% of 12,000 pounds (2400-3600 lbs.) on the
gooseneck. After loading, be sure to check that none of the axles are
overloaded.
NOTE: Due to custom manufacturing requirements and changes, the
above rule of thumb may vary greatly on highly customized models. Check
with Cimarron Trailers at 405/222-4800 for tongue weights on specific
trailers.
Tongue Weight as a Percentage of Loaded Trailer
Weight
Type of Hitch
Percentage
Ball Hitch (or Bumper Hitch)
10–20%
Gooseneck Hitch
20–30%
Uneven left / right load distribution can cause tire, wheel, axle or structural
failure. Be sure your trailer is evenly loaded left / right.
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General Safety Information
Towing stability also depends on keeping the center of gravity as low as
possible.
^ WARNING
Improper tongue weight (load distribution) can result in loss of control of
the trailer, leading to death or serious injury.
Make certain that tongue weight is within the allowable range.
Be sure to:
• Distribute the load front-to-rear to provide proper tongue weight (see
chart);
• Distribute the load evenly, right and left, to avoid tire overload; and
• Keep the center of gravity low.
2.2.6
Trailer Not Properly Coupled to the Hitch
It is critical that the trailer be securely coupled to the hitch ball, and that
the safety chains and emergency breakaway brake lanyard are correctly
attached. Uncoupling may result in death or serious injury to you and to
others.
^ WARNING
Proper selection and condition of the coupler and hitch are essential to
safely towing your trailer. A loss of coupling may result in death or
serious injury.
• Be sure the hitch load rating is equal to or greater than the load rating
of the coupler.
• Be sure the hitch size matches the coupler size.
• Observe the hitch for wear, corrosion and cracks before coupling.
Replace worn, corroded or cracked hitch components before coupling
the trailer to the tow vehicle.
• Be sure the hitch components are tight before coupling the trailer to the
tow vehicle.
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General Safety Information
^ WARNING
An improperly coupled trailer can result in death or serious injury.
Do not move the trailer until:
• The coupler is secured and locked to hitch;
• The safety chains are secured to the tow vehicle; and
• The trailer jack(s) are fully retracted.
Do not tow the trailer on the road until:
• Tires and wheels are checked;
• The trailer brakes are checked;
• The breakaway switch is connected to the tow vehicle;
• The load is secured to the trailer; and
• The trailer lights are connected and checked.
2.2.7
Proper Use of Safety Chains
If your trailer comes loose from the hitch for any reason, we have provided
safety chains so that control of the trailer can still be maintained.
^ WARNING
Improper rigging of the safety chains can result in loss of control of the
trailer and tow vehicle, leading to death or serious injury, if the trailer
uncouples from the tow vehicle.
• Fasten chains to frame of tow vehicle. Do not fasten chains to any part
of the hitch unless the hitch has holes or loops specifically for that
purpose.
• Cross chains underneath hitch and coupler with enough slack to permit
turning and to hold tongue up, if the trailer comes loose.
2.2.8
Proper Connection of Breakaway Brake
If equipped with brakes, your trailer will be equipped with a breakaway
brake system that can apply the brakes on your trailer if your trailer comes
loose from the hitch ball for any reason. You will have a separate set of
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General Safety Information
instructions for the breakaway brake if your trailer is so equipped. The
breakaway brake system, including battery, must be in good condition and
properly rigged to be effective.
^ WARNING
An ineffective or inoperative breakaway brake system can result in a
runaway trailer, leading to death or serious injury if the coupler or hitch
fails.
The breakaway lanyard must be connected to the tow vehicle, and NOT
to any part of the hitch.
Before towing the trailer, test the function of the breakaway brake system.
If the breakaway brake system is not working, do not tow the trailer. Have
it serviced or repaired.
2.2.9
Matching Trailer and Hitch
^ DANGER
Use of a hitch with a load rating less than the load rating of the trailer can
result in loss of control and may lead to death or serious injury.
Use of a tow vehicle with a towing capacity less than the load rating of the
trailer can result in loss of control, and may lead to death or serious injury.
Be sure your hitch and tow vehicle are rated for the Gross Vehicle Weight
Rating (GVWR) of your trailer.
2.2.10 Worn Tires, Loose Wheels and Lug Nuts
Just as with your tow vehicle the trailer tires and wheels are important
safety items. Therefore, it is essential to inspect the trailer tires before
each tow.
If a tire has a bald spot, bulge, cut, cracks, or is showing any cords, replace
the tire before towing. If a tire has uneven tread wear, take the trailer to a
dealer service center for diagnosis. Uneven tread wear can be caused by
tire imbalance, axle misalignment or incorrect inflation.
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General Safety Information
Tires with too little tread will not provide adequate frictional forces on wet
roadways and can result in loss of control, leading to death or serious
injury.
Improper tire pressure causes increased tire wear and may reduce trailer
stability, which can result in a tire blowout or possible loss of control.
Therefore, before each tow you must also check the tire pressure.
Remember, the proper tire pressure is listed on the Certification / VIN
label, and should be checked when tires are cold. Allow 3 hours cooldown after driving as much as 1 mile at 40 mph before checking tire
pressure.
The proper inflation pressure for tires is listed in Section 9.2.9 in the
"Inspection And Service Instructions" chapter of this manual. Use an air
gauge of proper capacity to check tire inflation pressure.
^ WARNING
Improper tire pressure can result in a blowout and loss of control, which
can lead to death or serious injury.
Be sure tires are inflated to pressure indicated Certification / VIN label
before towing trailer.
The tightness of the lug nuts is very important in keeping the wheels
properly seated to the hub. Before each tow, check to make sure the lug
nuts are tight.
^ WARNING
Metal creep between the wheel rim and lug nuts will cause rim to loosen
and could result in a wheel coming off, leading to death or serious injury.
Tighten lug nuts before each tow.
The proper tightness (torque) for lug nuts is listed in Section 9.2.12 in the
“Inspection and Service Instructions” chapter of this manual. Use a
calibrated torque wrench to tighten the lug nuts.
Lug nuts are also prone to loosen after first being assembled. When
driving a new trailer (or after wheels have been remounted), check to make
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sure they are tight after the first 10, 25 and 50 miles of driving and before
each tow thereafter.
Failure to perform this check can result in a wheel separating from the
trailer and a crash, leading to death or serious injury.
^ WARNING
Lug nuts are prone to loosen after initial installation, which can lead to
death or serious injury.
Check lug nuts for tightness on a new trailer or when wheel(s) have been
remounted after the first 10, 25 and 50 miles of driving.
^ WARNING
Improper lug nut torque can cause a wheel separating from the trailer,
leading to death or serious injury.
Be sure lug nuts are tight before each tow.
2.2.11 Shifting Cargo
Since the trailer “ride” can be bumpy and rough, you must secure your
cargo so that it does not shift while the trailer is being towed.
^ WARNING
Shifting cargo can result in loss of control of the trailer, and can lead to
death or serious injury.
Tie down all loads with proper sized fasteners, ropes, straps, etc.
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^ WARNING
If the door opens, your cargo may be ejected onto the road, resulting in
death or serious injury to other drivers.
Always secure the door latch after closing.
2.2.12 Inappropriate Cargo
Your trailer may be designed for specific cargo, for example, only for
horses. If your trailer is designed for specific cargo, only carry that cargo
in the trailer. Your trailer must not be used to carry certain items, such as
people, containers of hazardous substances or containers of flammable
substances. A trailer not designed with living quarters should only be used
for transportation of its intended cargo.
^ DANGER
You can die or be brain damaged by Carbon Monoxide.
• Do not operate a portable generator, portable grill, portable heater,
portable lantern or portable stove inside the trailer.
^ WARNING
Do not transport people inside the trailer, even if it has living quarters.
The transport of people puts their lives at risk and may be illegal.
^ WARNING
Do not sleep in a trailer not equipped with living quarters.
A trailer not designed with living quarters should only be used for
transportation of its intended cargo.
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^ WARNING
Do not transport flammable, explosive, poisonous or other dangerous
materials in your trailer.
Exceptions:
• Fuel in the tanks of vehicles that are being towed;
• Fuel stored in proper containers used in trailer living quarters for
cooking;
• Fuel stored in the tank of an on-board generator.
2.2.13 Inoperable Brakes, Lights or Mirrors
Be sure that the electric brakes and all of the lights on your trailer are
functioning properly before towing your trailer.
If your trailer has electric brakes, your tow vehicle will have an electric
brake controller that sends power to the trailer brakes. Before towing the
trailer on the road, you must operate the brake controller while trying to
pull the trailer in order to confirm that the electric brakes operate.
^ WARNING
Improper electrical connection between the tow vehicle and the trailer will
result in inoperable lights and electric brakes, and can lead to collision.
Before each tow:
• Check that the taillights, brake lights and turn signals work.
• Check that the electric brakes work by operating the brake controller
inside the tow vehicle.
Standard mirrors usually do not provide adequate visibility for viewing
traffic to the sides and rear a towed trailer. You must provide mirrors that
allow you to safely observe approaching traffic.
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2.2.14 Hazards From Modifying Your Trailer
Essential safety items can be damaged by altering your trailer. Even
simply driving a nail or screw to hang something can damage an electrical
circuit, LP gas line or other feature of the trailer.
Before making any alteration to your trailer, contact your dealer or
Cimarron Trailers, Inc. at 405-222-4800 and describe the alteration you
are contemplating. Alteration of the trailer structure or modification of
mechanical, electrical, plumbing, heating or other systems on your trailer
must be performed only by qualified technicians who are familiar with the
system as installed on your trailer.
2.2.15 Hazards to Horses (Horse Trailer)
Before hauling a horse, you must be aware of its temperament.
The layout of a horse trailer is designed to safely contain your horse. The
trailer is equipped with stall dividers and tie rings to secure the horse, and
has a rubber floor mat to keep shoed horses from slipping on the metal
underfloor. Restraining a horse without using a combination of a tie-strap
and stall dividers may result in serious injury or death to the horse.
Before loading your horse, inspect the interior of the horse trailer to insure
that no hazards are present. Read the “Loading the Horse Trailer” Section
5.3 of this manual for specific instructions regarding trailering of horses.
^ WARNING
When a horse is frightened, it is capable of inflicting serious injury or
death to a human handler.
Know your horse’s temperament before attempting to trailer it.
Handling a horse that is not trailer-acclimated may result in injury or
death, or damage to your trailer.
Do not haul an unbroken horse in this trailer.
Horses must have a halter.
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^ CAUTION
Failure to secure a horse using a tie strap may result in its serious
injury or death.
^ CAUTION
The trailer interior may contain hazards to a horse that can result in its
serious injury or death.
Before loading a horse, inspect the trailer interior and adjust or repair
all loose and protruding features such as handles, loose or broken
parts of the trailer, etc.
Before towing trailer:
• Lock all stall dividers.
• Be sure all saddles, tack and equipment, as well as horse(s), are
prevented from being thrown about.
^ CAUTION
Hauling a horse in a livestock trailer may result in its serious injury or
death.
Do not carry a horse in a livestock trailer. Use a trailer designed to
carry horses.
2.2.16 Hazards to Livestock (Livestock Trailer)
A livestock trailer is designed for the safe transport of livestock, other than
horses. It is not equipped for hauling horses.
Before loading your livestock, inspect the interior of the livestock trailer to
insure that no hazards are present. Read section 5.4, “Loading Livestock
(Livestock Trailer)” for specific instructions regarding trailering of
livestock other than horses.
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^ WARNING
Large animals are capable of inflicting serious injury or death to a human
handler.
Know your animals’ temperament before attempting to trailer them.
^ CAUTION
Hauling a horse in a livestock trailer may result in its serious injury or
death.
Do not carry a horse in a livestock trailer. Use a trailer designed to
carry horses.
2.2.17 Hazards from Accessories
The “Accessories” section of this manual contains some information about
certain optional accessories that may be on your trailer. Read and follow
all of these instructions before operating the accessories.
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2.2.18 Safety Warning Labels on Your Trailer
Figure 2-1 Safety Warning Labels
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^ WARNING
To protect you and others against death or serious injury, all of the
labels must be on the trailer and must be legible. See figure 2-1.
If any of these labels are missing or cannot be read, call Cimarron
Trailers, Inc. at 405-222-4800 for free replacement labels.
You will need to provide us with the number shown at the bottom of the
label(s) in order for us to send the correct one(s).
2.2.19 Trailer Towing Guide
Driving a vehicle with a trailer in tow is vastly different from driving the
same vehicle without a trailer in tow. Acceleration, maneuverability and
braking are all diminished with a trailer in tow. It takes longer to get up to
speed, you need more room to turn and pass, and more distance to stop
when towing a trailer. You will need to spend time adjusting to the
different feel and maneuverability of the tow vehicle with a loaded trailer.
Because of the significant differences in all aspects of maneuverability
when towing a trailer, the hazards and risks of injury are also much greater
than when driving without a trailer. You are responsible for keeping your
vehicle and trailer in control, and for all the damage that is caused if you
lose control of your vehicle and trailer.
As you did when learning to drive an automobile, find an open area with
little or no traffic for your first practice trailering. Of course, before you
start towing the trailer, you must follow all of the instructions for
inspection, testing, loading and coupling. Also, before you start towing,
adjust the mirrors so you can see the trailer as well as the area to the rear of
it.
Drive slowly at first, 5 mph or so, and turn the wheel to get the feel of how
the tow vehicle and trailer combination responds. Next, make some right
and left hand turns. Watch in your side mirrors to see how the trailer
follows the tow vehicle. Turning with a trailer attached requires more
room.
Stop the rig a few times from speeds no greater than 10 mph. If your
trailer is equipped with brakes, try using different combinations of
trailer/electric brake and tow vehicle brake. Note the effect that the trailer
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brakes have when they are the only brakes used. When properly adjusted,
the trailer brakes will come on just before the tow vehicle brakes.
It will take practice to learn how to back up a tow vehicle with a trailer
attached. Take it slow. Before backing up, get out of the tow vehicle and
look behind the trailer to make sure that there are no obstacles. Some
drivers place their hands at the bottom of the steering wheel, and while the
tow vehicle is in reverse, “think” of the hands as being on the top of the
wheel. When the hands move to the right (counter-clockwise, as you
would do to turn the tow vehicle to the left when moving forward), the rear
of the trailer moves to the right. Conversely, rotating the steering wheel
clockwise with your hands at the bottom of the wheel will move the rear of
the trailer to the left, while backing up. If you are towing a bumper hitch
rig, be careful not to allow the trailer to turn too much, because it will hit
the rear of the tow vehicle. To straighten the rig, either pull forward, or
turn the steering wheel in the opposite direction.
Safe Trailer Towing Guidelines
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Recheck the gates and dividers to make sure the horses or livestock
cannot shift or move during towing.
Before towing, check coupling, safety chain, safety brake, tires, wheels
and lights.
Check the lug nuts or bolts for tightness.
Check coupler tightness after towing 50 miles.
Adjust the brake controller to engage the trailer brakes before the tow
vehicle brakes.
Use your mirrors to verify that you have room to change lanes or pull
into traffic.
Use your turn signals well in advance.
Allow plenty of stopping space for your trailer and tow vehicle.
Do not drive so fast that the trailer begins to sway due to speed.
Generally, never drive faster than 60 m.p.h.
Allow plenty of room for passing. A rule of thumb is that the passing
distance with a trailer is 4 times the passing distance without a trailer.
Shift your automatic transmission into a lower gear for city driving.
Use lower gears for climbing and descending grades.
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•
•
•
•
•
•
Do not ride the brakes while descending grades, they may get so hot
that they stop working. Then you will potentially have a runaway tow
vehicle and trailer.
Slow down for bumps in the road. Take your foot off the brake when
crossing the bump.
Do not brake while in a curve unless absolutely necessary. Instead,
slow down before you enter the curve.
Do not apply the tow vehicle brakes to correct extreme trailer swaying.
Instead, lightly apply the trailer brakes with the hand controller.
Make regular stops, about once each hour.
Confirm that:
 The coupler is secure to the hitch and is locked,
 Electrical connectors are made,
 There is appropriate slack in the safety chains,
 There is appropriate slack in the breakaway switch pullpin
lanyard,
 The tires are not visibly low on pressure, and
 The cargo is secure and in good condition.
2.2.20 Reporting Safety Defects
If you believe that your vehicle has a defect that could cause a crash or
could cause injury or death, you should immediately inform the National
Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in addition to notifying
us.
If NHTSA receives similar complaints, it may open an investigation, and if
it finds that a safety defect exists in a group of vehicles, it may order a
recall and remedy campaign. However, NHTSA cannot become involved
in individual problems between you, your dealer, or us.
To contact NHTSA, you may either call the Vehicle Safety Hotline tollfree at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY: 1-800-424-9153), go to
http://www.nhtsa.gov; or write to: NHTSA Headquarters, 1200 New
Jersey Avenue, SE, West Building, Washington, DC 20590. You can
also obtain other information about motor vehicle safety from
http://www.nhtsa.gov.
Call 405-222-4800 to reach Cimarron Trailers, Inc.
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3 TIRE SAFETY INFORMATION
This portion of the User’s Manual contains tire safety information as
required by 49 CFR 575.6.
Section 3.1 contains “Trailer Tire Information”
Section 3.2 contains “Steps for Determining Correct Load Limit - Trailer”.
Section 3.3 contains “Steps for Determining Correct Load Limit – Tow
Vehicle”.
Section 3.4 contains a Glossary of Tire Terminology, including “cold
inflation pressure”, “maximum inflation pressure”, “recommended
inflation pressure”, and other non-technical terms.
Section 3.5 contains information from the NHTSA brochure entitled “Tire
Safety – Everything Rides On It”.
This brochure, as well as the preceding subsections, describe the
following items;
• Tire labeling, including a description and explanation of each marking
on the tires, and information about the DOT Tire Identification
Number (TIN).
• Recommended tire inflation pressure, including a description and
explanation of:
Cold inflation pressure.
Vehicle Placard and location on the vehicle.
Adverse safety consequences of under inflation (including tire failure).
Measuring and adjusting air pressure for proper inflation.
• Tire Care, including maintenance and safety practices.
• Vehicle load limits, including a description and explanation of the
following items:
Locating and understanding the load limit information, total load capacity,
and cargo capacity.
Calculating total and cargo capacities with varying seating configurations
including quantitative examples showing / illustrating how the vehicles
cargo and luggage capacity decreases as combined number and size of
occupants’ increases. This item is also discussed in Section 3.
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Determining compatibility of tire and vehicle load capabilities.
Adverse safety consequences of overloading on handling and stopping on
tires.
3.1
TRAILER TIRE INFORMATION
Trailer tires may be worn out even though they still have plenty of tread
left. This is because trailer tires have to carry a lot of weight all the time,
even when not in use. It is actually better for the tire to be rolling down
the road than to be idle. During use, the tire releases lubricants that are
beneficial to tire life. Using the trailer tires often also helps prevent flat
spots from developing.
The main cause of tire failure is improper inflation. Check the cold tire
inflation pressures at least once a week for proper inflation levels. “Cold”
means that the tires are at the same temperature as the surrounding air,
such as when the vehicle has been parked overnight. Wheel and tire
manufacturers recommend adjusting the air pressure to the trailer
manufacturers recommended cold inflation pressure, in pounds per square
inch (PSI) stated on the vehicle’s Federal Certification Label or Tire
Placard when the trailer is loaded to its gross vehicle weight rating
(GVWR). If the tires are inflated to less than the recommended inflation
level or the GVWR of the trailer is exceeded, the load carrying capacity of
the tire could be dramatically affected. If the tires are inflated more than
the recommended inflation level, handling characteristics of the tow
vehicle/trailer combination could be affected. Refer to the owner’s manual
or talk to your dealer or vehicle manufacturer if you have any questions
regarding proper inflation practices.
Tires can lose air over a period of time. In fact, tires can lose 1 to 3 PSI per
month. This is because molecules of air, under pressure, weave their way
from the inside of the tire, through the rubber, to the outside. A drop in
tire pressure could cause the tire to become overloaded, leading to
excessive heat build up. If a trailer tire is under-inflated, even for a short
period of time, the tire could suffer internal damage.
High speed towing in hot conditions degrades trailer tires significantly. As
heat builds up during driving, the tire’s internal structure starts to
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breakdown, compromising the strength of the tire. It is recommended to
drive at moderate speeds.
Statistics indicate the average life of a trailer tire is about five years under
normal use and maintenance conditions. After three years, replacing the
trailer tires with new ones should be considered, even if the tires have
adequate tread depth. Some experts claim that after five years, trailer tires
are considered worn out and should be replaced, even if they have had
minimal or no use. This is such a general statement that it may not apply
in all cases. It is best to have your tires inspected by a tire supplier to
determine if your tires need to be replaced.
If you are storing your trailer for an extended period, make sure the tires
are fully inflated to the maximum rated pressure and that you store them in
a cool, dry place, such as a garage. Use tire covers to protect the trailer
tires from the harsh effects of the sun.
3.2
STEPS FOR DETERMINING CORRECT LOAD LIMIT – TRAILER
Determining the load limits of a trailer includes more than understanding
the load limits of the tires alone. On all trailers there is a Federal
Certification / VIN label that is located on the forward half of the left
(road) side of the unit. This certification/VIN label will indicate the
trailer’s Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR). This is the most weight
the fully loaded trailer can weigh. It will also provide the Gross Axle
Weight Rating (GAWR). This is the most a particular axle can weigh. If
there are multiple axles, the GAWR of each axle will be provided.
If your trailer has a GVWR of 10,000 pounds or less, there is a vehicle
placard located in the same location as the certification label described
above. This placard provides tire and loading information. In addition, this
placard will show a statement regarding maximum cargo capacity. Cargo
can be added to the trailer, up to the maximum weight specified on the
placard. The combined weight of the cargo is provided as a single number.
In any case, remember: the total weight of a fully loaded trailer can not
exceed the stated GVWR.
For trailers with living quarters installed, the weight of water and propane
also need to be considered. The weight of fully filled propane containers is
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considered part of the weight of the trailer before it is loaded with cargo,
and is not considered part of the disposable cargo load. Water however, is
a disposable cargo weight and is treated as such. If there is a fresh water
storage tank of 100 gallons, this tank when filled would weigh about 800
pounds. If more cargo is being transported, water can be off-loaded to keep
the total amount of cargo added to the vehicle within the limits of the
GVWR so as not to overload the vehicle. Understanding this flexibility
will allow you, the owner, to make choices that fit your travel needs.
When loading your cargo, be sure it is distributed evenly to prevent
overloading front to back and side to side. Heavy items should be placed
low and as close to the axle positions as reasonable. Too many items on
one side may overload a tire. The best way to know the actual weight of
the vehicle is to weigh it at a public scale. Talk to your dealer to discuss
the weighing methods needed to capture the various weights related to the
trailer. This would include the weight empty or unloaded, weights per
axle, wheel, hitch or king-pin, and total weight.
Excessive loads and/or underinflation cause tire overloading and, as a
result, abnormal tire flexing occurs. This situation can generate an
excessive amount of heat within the tire. Excessive heat may lead to tire
failure. It is the air pressure that enables a tire to support the load, so
proper inflation is critical. The proper air pressure may be found on the
Certification / VIN label and/or on the Tire Placard. This value should
never exceed the maximum cold inflation pressure stamped on the tire.
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3.2.1
Trailers 10,000 Pounds GVWR or Less
Tire Information Placard – Figure 3-1
•
•
•
Locate the statement, “The weight of cargo should never exceed XXX
kg or XXX lbs.,” on your vehicle’s placard. See figure 3-1.
This figure equals the available amount of cargo and luggage load
capacity.
Determine the combined weight of luggage and cargo being loaded on
the vehicle. That weight may not safely exceed the available cargo
and luggage load capacity.
The trailer’s placard refers to the Tire Information Placard attached
adjacent to or near the trailer’s VIN (Certification) label at the left front of
the trailer.
3.2.2
Trailers Over 10,000 Pounds GVWR
Note: These trailers are not required to have a tire information
placard on the trailer and may not have one installed
1. Determine the empty weight of your trailer by weighing the trailer
using a public scale or other means. This step does not have to be
repeated.
2. Locate the GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating) of the trailer on
your trailer’s VIN (Certification) label.
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3. Subtract the empty weight of your trailer from the GVWR stated on
the VIN label. That weight is the maximum available cargo capacity
of the trailer and may not be safely exceeded.
3.3
STEPS FOR DETERMINING CORRECT LOAD LIMIT – TOW
VEHICLE
1. Locate the statement, “The combined weight of occupants and cargo
should never exceed XXX lbs.,” on your vehicle’s placard.
2. Determine the combined weight of the driver and passengers who will
be riding in your vehicle.
3. Subtract the combined weight of the driver and passengers from XXX
kilograms or XXX pounds.
4. The resulting figure equals the available amount of cargo and luggage
capacity. For example, if the “XXX” amount equals 1400 lbs. and
there will be five 150 lb. passengers in your vehicle, the amount of
available cargo and luggage capacity is 650 lbs. (1400-750 (5 x 150) =
650 lbs.).
5. Determine the combined weight of luggage and cargo being loaded on
the vehicle. That weight may not safely exceed the available cargo and
luggage capacity calculated in Step # 4.
6. If your vehicle will be towing a trailer, load from your trailer will be
transferred to your vehicle. Consult the tow vehicle’s manual to
determine how this weight transfer reduces the available cargo and
luggage capacity of your vehicle.
3.4
GLOSSARY OF TIRE TERMINOLOGY
Accessory weight The combined weight (in excess of those standard
items which may be replaced) of automatic transmission, power steering,
power brakes, power windows, power seats, radio and heater, to the extent
that these items are available as factory-installed equipment (whether
installed or not).
Bead The part of the tire that is made of steel wires, wrapped or
reinforced by ply cords and that is shaped to fit the rim.
Bead separation This is the breakdown of the bond between
components in the bead.
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Bias ply tire A pneumatic tire in which the ply cords that extend to the
beads are laid at alternate angles substantially less than 90 degrees to the
centerline of the tread.
Carcass The tire structure, except tread and sidewall rubber which,
when inflated, bears the load.
Chunking
The breaking away of pieces of the tread or sidewall.
Cold inflation pressure
Cord
The pressure in the tire before you drive.
The strands forming the plies in the tire.
Cord separation
compounds.
The parting of cords from adjacent rubber
Cracking Any parting within the tread, sidewall, or inner liner of the
tire extending to cord material.
CT A pneumatic tire with an inverted flange tire and rim system in
which the rim is designed with rim flanges pointed radially inward and the
tire is designed to fit on the underside of the rim in a manner that encloses
the rim flanges inside the air cavity of the tire.
Curb weight The weight of a motor vehicle with standard equipment
including the maximum capacity of fuel, oil, and coolant, and, if so
equipped, air conditioning and additional weight optional engine.
Extra load tire A tire designed to operate at higher loads and at higher
inflation pressures than the corresponding standard tire.
Groove
The space between two adjacent tread ribs.
Gross Axle Weight Rating The maximum weight that any axle can
support, as published on the Certification / VIN label on the front left side
of the trailer. Actual weight determined by weighing each axle on a public
scale, with the trailer attached to the towing vehicle.
Gross Vehicle Weight Rating The maximum weight of the fully
loaded trailer, as published on the Certification / VIN label. Actual weight
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determined by weighing trailer on a public scale, without being attached to
the towing vehicle.
Hitch Weight
trailer coupler.
The downward force exerted on the hitch ball by the
Innerliner The layer(s) forming the inside surface of a tubeless tire that
contains the inflating medium within the tire.
Innerliner separation
in the carcass.
The parting of the innerliner from cord material
Intended outboard sidewall The sidewall that contains a white-wall,
bears white lettering or bears manufacturer, brand, and/or model name
molding that is higher or deeper than the same molding on the other
sidewall of the tire or the outward facing sidewall of an asymmetrical tire
that has a particular side that must always face outward when mounted on
a vehicle.
Light truck (LT) tire A tire designated by its manufacturer as primarily
intended for use on lightweight trucks or multipurpose passenger vehicles.
Load rating The maximum load that a tire is rated to carry for a given
inflation pressure.
Maximum load rating The load rating for a tire at the maximum
permissible inflation pressure for that tire.
Maximum permissible inflation pressure The maximum cold
inflation pressure to which a tire may be inflated.
Maximum loaded vehicle weight The sum of curb weight, accessory
weight, vehicle capacity weight, and production options weight.
Measuring rim
requirements.
The rim on which a tire is fitted for physical dimension
Non-pneumatic rim A mechanical device which, when a nonpneumatic tire assembly incorporates a wheel, supports the tire, and
attaches, either integrally or separably, to the wheel center member and
upon which the tire is attached.
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Non-pneumatic spare tire assembly A non-pneumatic tire assembly
intended for temporary use in place of one of the pneumatic tires and rims
that are fitted to a passenger car in compliance with the requirements of
this standard.
Non-pneumatic tire A mechanical device which transmits, either
directly or through a wheel or wheel center member, the vertical load and
tractive forces from the roadway to the vehicle, generates the tractive
forces that provide the directional control of the vehicle and does not rely
on the containment of any gas or fluid for providing those functions.
Non-pneumatic tire assembly A non-pneumatic tire, alone or in
combination with a wheel or wheel center member, which can be mounted
on a vehicle.
Normal occupant weight This means 68 kilograms (150 lbs.) times the
number of occupants specified in the second column of Table I of 49 CFR
571.110.
Occupant distribution The distribution of occupants in a vehicle as
specified in the third column of Table I of 49 CFR 571.110.
Open splice Any parting at any junction of tread, sidewall, or innerliner
that extends to cord material.
Outer diameter
The overall diameter of an inflated new tire.
Overall width The linear distance between the exteriors of the
sidewalls of an inflated tire, including elevations due to labeling,
decorations, or protective bands or ribs.
Pin Weight The downward force applied to the 5th wheel or gooseneck
ball, by the trailer kingpin or gooseneck coupler.
Ply
A layer of rubber-coated parallel cords.
Ply separation
A parting of rubber compound between adjacent plies.
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Pneumatic tire A mechanical device made of rubber, chemicals, fabric
and steel or other materials, that, when mounted on an automotive wheel,
provides the traction and contains the gas or fluid that sustains the load.
Production options weight The combined weight of those installed
regular production options weighing over 2.3 kilograms (5 lbs.) in excess
of those standard items which they replace, not previously considered in
curb weight or accessory weight, including heavy duty brakes, ride
levelers, roof rack, heavy duty battery, and special trim.
Radial ply tire A pneumatic tire in which the ply cords that extend to
the beads are laid at substantially 90 degrees to the centerline of the tread.
Recommended inflation pressure This is the inflation pressure
provided by the vehicle manufacturer on the Tire Information label and on
the Certification / VIN tag.
Reinforced tire A tire designed to operate at higher loads and at higher
inflation pressures than the corresponding standard tire.
Rim A metal support for a tire or a tire and tube assembly upon which
the tire beads are seated.
Rim diameter
This means the nominal diameter of the bead seat.
Rim size designation
This means the rim diameter and width.
Rim type designation This means the industry of manufacturers
designation for a rim by style or code.
Rim width
This means the nominal distance between rim flanges.
Section width The linear distance between the exteriors of the sidewalls
of an inflated tire, excluding elevations due to labeling, decoration, or
protective bands.
Sidewall
That portion of a tire between the tread and bead.
Sidewall separation The parting of the rubber compound from the cord
material in the sidewall.
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Test rim The rim on which a tire is fitted for testing, and may be any
rim listed as appropriate for use with that tire.
Tread
That portion of a tire that comes into contact with the road.
Tread rib
A tread section running circumferentially around a tire.
Tread separation
Pulling away of the tread from the tire carcass.
Treadwear indicators (TWI)
The projections within the principal
grooves designed to give a visual indication of the degrees of wear of the
tread.
Vehicle capacity weight The rated cargo and luggage load plus 68
kilograms (150 lbs.) times the vehicle’s designated seating capacity.
Vehicle maximum load on the tire The load on an individual tire that
is determined by distributing to each axle its share of the maximum loaded
vehicle weight and dividing by two.
Vehicle normal load on the tire The load on an individual tire that is
determined by distributing to each axle its share of the curb weight,
accessory weight, and normal occupant weight (distributed in accordance
with Table I of CRF 49 571.110) and dividing by 2.
Weather side
tire.
The surface area of the rim not covered by the inflated
Wheel center member In the case of a non-pneumatic tire assembly
incorporating a wheel, a mechanical device which attaches, either
integrally or separably, to the non-pneumatic rim and provides the
connection between the non-pneumatic rim and the vehicle; or, in the case
of a non-pneumatic tire assembly not incorporating a wheel, a mechanical
device which attaches, either integrally or separably, to the non-pneumatic
tire and provides the connection between tire and the vehicle.
Wheel-holding fixture The fixture used to hold the wheel and tire
assembly securely during testing.
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3.5
TIRE SAFETY – EVERYTHING RIDES ON IT
The National Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has published a
brochure (DOT HS 809 361) that discusses all aspects of Tire Safety, as
required by CFR 575.6. This brochure is reproduced in part below. It can
be obtained and downloaded from NHTSA, free of charge, from the
following web site:
http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/rules/TireSafety/ridesonit/tires_index.html
Studies of tire safety show that maintaining proper tire pressure, observing
tire and vehicle load limits (not carrying more weight in your vehicle than
your tires or vehicle can safely handle), avoiding road hazards, and
inspecting tires for cuts, slashes, and other irregularities are the most
important things you can do to avoid tire failure, such as tread separation
or blowout and flat tires. These actions, along with other care and
maintenance activities, can also:
•
•
•
•
Improve vehicle handling
Help protect you and others from avoidable breakdowns and accidents
Improve fuel economy
Increase the life of your tires.
This booklet presents a comprehensive overview of tire safety, including
information on the following topics:
•
•
•
•
Basic tire maintenance
Uniform Tire Quality Grading System
Fundamental characteristics of tires
Tire safety tips.
Use this information to make tire safety a regular part of your vehicle
maintenance routine. Recognize that the time you spend is minimal
compared with the inconvenience and safety consequences of a flat tire or
other tire failure.
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3.5.1
Safety First–Basic Tire Maintenance
Properly maintained tires improve the steering, stopping, traction, and
load-carrying capability of your vehicle. Underinflated tires and
overloaded vehicles are a major cause of tire failure. Therefore, as
mentioned above, to avoid flat tires and other types of tire failure, you
should maintain proper tire pressure, observe tire and vehicle load limits,
avoid road hazards, and regularly inspect your tires.
3.5.2
Finding Your Vehicle's Recommended Tire Pressure
and Load Limits
Tire information placards and vehicle certification labels contain
information on tires and load limits. These labels indicate the vehicle
manufacturer's information including:
•
•
•
•
Recommended tire size
Recommended tire inflation pressure
Vehicle capacity weight (VCW–the maximum occupant and cargo
weight a vehicle is designed to carry)
Front and rear gross axle weight ratings (GAWR– the maximum
weight the axle systems are designed to carry).
Both placards and certification labels are permanently attached to the
trailer near the left front.
3.5.3
Understanding Tire Pressure and Load Limits
Tire inflation pressure is the level of air in the tire that provides it with
load-carrying capacity and affects the overall performance of the vehicle.
The tire inflation pressure is a number that indicates the amount of air
pressure– measured in pounds per square inch (psi)–a tire requires to be
properly inflated. (You will also find this number on the vehicle
information placard expressed in kilopascals (kPa), which is the metric
measure used internationally.)
Manufacturers of passenger vehicles and light trucks determine this
number based on the vehicle's design load limit, that is, the greatest
amount of weight a vehicle can safely carry and the vehicle's tire size. The
proper tire pressure for your vehicle is referred to as the "recommended
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cold inflation pressure." (As you will read below, it is difficult to obtain
the recommended tire pressure if your tires are not cold.)
Because tires are designed to be used on more than one type of vehicle,
tire manufacturer's list the "maximum permissible inflation pressure" on
the tire sidewall. This number is the greatest amount of air pressure that
should ever be put in the tire under normal driving conditions.
3.5.4
Checking Tire Pressure
It is important to check your vehicle's tire pressure at least once a month
for the following reasons:
•
•
•
Most tires may naturally lose air over time.
Tires can lose air suddenly if you drive over a pothole or other object
or if you strike the curb when parking.
With radial tires, it is usually not possible to determine underinflation
by visual inspection.
For convenience, purchase a tire pressure gauge to keep in your vehicle.
Gauges can be purchased at tire dealerships, auto supply stores, and other
retail outlets.
The recommended tire inflation pressure that vehicle manufacturers
provide reflects the proper psi when a tire is cold. The term cold does not
relate to the outside temperature. Rather, a cold tire is one that has not
been driven on for at least three hours. When you drive, your tires get
warmer, causing the air pressure within them to increase. Therefore, to get
an accurate tire pressure reading, you must measure tire pressure when the
tires are cold or compensate for the extra pressure in warm tires.
3.5.5
•
•
•
Steps for Maintaining Proper Tire Pressure
Step 1: Locate the recommended tire pressure on the vehicle's tire
information placard, certification label, or in the owner's manual.
Step 2: Record the tire pressure of all tires.
Step 3: If the tire pressure is too high in any of the tires, slowly release
air by gently pressing on the tire valve stem with the edge of your tire
gauge until you get to the correct pressure.
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•
•
•
Step 4: If the tire pressure is too low, note the difference between the
measured tire pressure and the correct tire pressure. These "missing"
pounds of pressure are what you will need to add.
Step 5: At a service station, add the missing pounds of air pressure to
each tire that is underinflated.
Step 6: Check all the tires to make sure they have the same air pressure
(except in cases in which the front and rear tires are supposed to have
different amounts of pressure).
If you have been driving your vehicle and think that a tire is underinflated,
fill it to the recommended cold inflation pressure indicated on your
vehicle's tire information placard or certification label. While your tire may
still be slightly underinflated due to the extra pounds of pressure in the
warm tire, it is safer to drive with air pressure that is slightly lower than the
vehicle manufacturers recommended cold inflation pressure than to drive
with a significantly underinflated tire. Since this is a temporary fix, don't
forget to recheck and adjust the tire's pressure when you can obtain a cold
reading.
3.5.6
Tire Size
To maintain tire safety, purchase new tires that are the same size as the
vehicle's original tires or another size recommended by the manufacturer.
Look at the tire information placard, the owner's manual, or the sidewall of
the tire you are replacing to find this information. If you have any doubt
about the correct size to choose, consult with the tire dealer.
3.5.7
Tire Tread
The tire tread provides the gripping action and traction that prevent your
vehicle from slipping or sliding, especially when the road is wet or icy. In
general, tires are not safe and should be replaced when the tread is worn
down to 1/16 of an inch. Tires have built-in treadwear indicators that let
you know when it is time to replace your tires. These indicators are raised
sections spaced intermittently in the bottom of the tread grooves. When
they appear "even" with the outside of the tread, it is time to replace your
tires. Another method for checking tread depth is to place a penny in the
tread with Lincoln's head upside down and facing you. If you can see the
top of Lincoln's head, you are ready for new tires.
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3.5.8
Tire Balance and Wheel Alignment
To avoid vibration or shaking of the vehicle when a tire rotates, the tire
must be properly balanced. This balance is achieved by positioning
weights on the wheel to counterbalance heavy spots on the wheel-and-tire
assembly. A wheel alignment adjusts the angles of the wheels so that they
are positioned correctly relative to the vehicle's frame. This adjustment
maximizes the life of your tires. These adjustments require special
equipment and should be performed by a qualified technician.
3.5.9
Tire Repair
The proper repair of a punctured tire requires a plug for the hole and a
patch for the area inside the tire that surrounds the puncture hole.
Punctures through the tread can be repaired if they are not too large, but
punctures to the sidewall should not be repaired. Tires must be removed
from the rim to be properly inspected before being plugged and patched.
3.5.10 Tire Fundamentals
Federal law requires tire manufacturers to place standardized information
on the sidewall of all tires. This information identifies and describes the
fundamental characteristics of the tire and also provides a tire
identification number for safety standard certification and in case of a
recall.
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3.5.10.1 Information on Trailer (ST) Tires
Please refer to the diagram below.
ST
The "ST" indicates the tire is for trailer use only. “ST” tires are design for
carrying heavy loads at lower speeds.
The Tire and Rim Association Standard indicates that for operation at
speeds up to 65 mph, no change in maximum cold tire inflation pressure or
load is required. For speeds between 66-75 mph, increase the maximum
cold tire inflation pressure 10 psi.
Next number
This three-digit number gives the width in millimeters of the tire from
sidewall edge to sidewall edge. In general, the larger the number, the wider
the tire.
Next number
This two-digit number, known as the aspect ratio, gives the tire's ratio of
height to width. Numbers of 70 or lower indicate a short sidewall for
improved steering response and better overall handling on dry pavement.
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R
The "R" stands for radial. Radial ply construction of tires has been the
industry standard for the past 20 years.
Next number
This two-digit number is the wheel or rim diameter in inches. If you
change your wheel size, you will have to purchase new tires to match the
new wheel diameter.
Max. Load Dual kg (lbs) at kPa (psi) Cold
This information indicates the maximum load and tire pressure when the
tire is used as a dual, that is, when four tires are put on each rear axle (a
total of six or more tires on the vehicle).
Max. Load Single kg (lbs) at kPa (psi) Cold
This information indicates the maximum load and tire pressure when the
tire is used as a single.
Load Range
This information identifies the tire's load-carrying capabilities and its
inflation limits.
Speed Rating
The speed rating denotes the speed at which a tire is designed to be driven
for extended periods of time. The ratings range from 99 miles per hour
(mph) to 186 mph. These ratings are listed below. Note: You may not find
this information on all tires because it is not required by law.
Maximum Load and Inflation Limits
These numbers indicate the maximum load in kilograms (pounds) that can
be carried by the tire and the greatest amount of air pressure in KPA (PSI)
that should ever be put in the tire under normal driving conditions.
3.5.10.2 UTQGS Information
Treadwear Number
This number indicates the tire's wear rate. The higher the treadwear
number is, the longer it should take for the tread to wear down. For
example, a tire graded 400 should last twice as long as a tire graded 200.
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Traction Letter
This letter indicates a tire's ability to stop on wet pavement. A higher
graded tire should allow you to stop your car on wet roads in a shorter
distance than a tire with a lower grade. Traction is graded from highest to
lowest as "AA","A", "B", and "C".
Temperature Letter
This letter indicates a tire's resistance to heat. The temperature grade is for
a tire that is inflated properly and not overloaded. Excessive speed,
underinflation or excessive loading, either separately or in combination,
can cause heat build-up and possible tire failure. From highest to lowest, a
tire's resistance to heat is graded as "A", "B", or "C".
3.5.10.3 Additional Information on Light Truck Tires
Please refer to the following diagram.
Tires for light trucks have other markings besides those found on the
sidewalls of passenger tires.
LT
The "LT" indicates the tire is for light trucks or trailers.
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ST
An "ST" is an indication the tire is for trailer use only.
Max. Load Dual kg (lbs) at kPa (psi) Cold
This information indicates the maximum load and tire pressure when the
tire is used as a dual, that is, when four tires are put on each rear axle (a
total of six or more tires on the vehicle).
Max. Load Single kg (lbs) at kPa (psi) Cold
This information indicates the maximum load and tire pressure when the
tire is used as a single.
Load Range
This information identifies the tire's load-carrying capabilities and its
inflation limits.
3.5.11 Tire Safety Tips
Preventing Tire Damage
•
•
Slow down if you have to go over a pothole or other object in the road.
Do not run over curbs or other foreign objects in the roadway, and try
not to strike the curb when parking.
Tire Safety Checklist
•
•
•
•
•
•
Check tire pressure regularly (at least once a month), including the
spare.
Inspect tires for uneven wear patterns on the tread, cracks, foreign
objects, or other signs of wear or trauma.
Remove bits of glass and foreign objects wedged in the tread.
Make sure your tire valves have valve caps.
Check tire pressure before going on a long trip.
Do not overload your vehicle. Check the Tire Information and
Loading Placard or Owner’s Manual for the maximum recommended
load for the vehicle.
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4 COUPLING TO THE TOW VEHICLE
Follow all of the safety precautions and instructions in this manual to
ensure safety of persons, cargo, and satisfactory life of the trailer.
4.1
USE AN ADEQUATE TOW VEHICLE AND HITCH
If the vehicle or hitch is not properly selected and matched to the Gross
Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) of your trailer, you can cause an accident
that could lead to death or serious injury. If you already have a tow
vehicle, know your vehicle tow rating and make certain the trailer’s rated
capacity is less than or equal to the tow vehicle’s rated towing capacity.
^ DANGER
Use of a hitch with a load rating less than the load rating of the trailer can
result in loss of control and may lead to death or serious injury.
Use of a tow vehicle with a towing capacity less than the load rating of the
trailer can result in loss of control, and may lead to death or serious injury.
Be sure your hitch and tow vehicle are rated for the Gross Vehicle Weight
Rating (GVWR) of your trailer.
4.1.1
Trailer Information
The “Certification / VIN Tag” location figure 4-1 and 4-2 shows the
location of the Certification / Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) tag on
your trailer.
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Figure 4-1 Gooseneck Certification / VIN Tag Location
Figure 4-2 Bumper Pull Certification / VIN Tag Location
The trailer Certification / VIN tag contains the following critical safety
information for the use of your trailer:
MANUFACTURER: Name of trailer manufacturer.
DATE OF MANUFACTURE: Month and year the trailer was
manufactured.
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GVWR: The Gross Vehicle Weight Rating is the maximum allowable
gross weight of the trailer and its contents. The gross weight of the trailer
includes the weight of the trailer and all of the items within it (such as
cargo, water, food and other supplies). GVWR is sometimes referred to as
GTW (Gross Trailer Weight), or MGTW (Maximum Gross Trailer
Weight). GVWR, GTW and MGTW are all the same rating.
GAWR: The Gross Axle Weight Rating is the maximum gross weight
that an axle can support. It is the lowest of axle, wheel, or tire rating.
Sometimes the tire or wheel rating is lower than the axle manufacturer's
rating, and will then determine GAWR.
The sum total of the GAWR for all trailer axles may be less than the
GVWR for the trailer, because some of the trailer load is carried by the
tow vehicle, rather than by the trailer axle(s). The total weight of the cargo
and trailer must not exceed the GVWR, and the load on an axle must not
exceed its GAWR.
PSIC: The “pounds per square inch-cold” is the tire pressure (Kilopascals
/ Pounds per Square Inch) measured when Cold.
VIN: The Vehicle Identification Number.
VEHICLE TYPE: The word Trailer followed by the model number.
CERTIFICATION STATEMENT: “This trailer meets all the Federal
Motor Vehicle Safety Standards in effect on the date of manufacture
shown above”.
4.1.2
Tow Vehicle
When equipping a new vehicle or an older vehicle to tow your trailer, ask
the vehicle dealer for advice on how to outfit the towing vehicle. Discuss
the following information and equipment with the vehicle dealer.
Overall Carrying and Towing Capacity of Vehicle
Vehicle manufacturers will provide you with the maximum towing
capacities of their various models, as well as the GCWR. No amount of
reinforcement will give a 100 horsepower, 2,500 pound truck the towing
capacity that a 300 horsepower, 5,000 pound truck has.
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Towing Hitch: The towing hitch attached to your tow vehicle must have
a capacity equal to or greater than the load rating of the trailer you intend
to tow. The hitch capacity must also be matched to the tow vehicle
capacity.
Suspension System: A tow vehicle equipped with a factory installed
“Towing Package” likely comes equipped with heavy duty springs, heavy
duty tires and other suspension components which are able to serve the
size and weight of the trailer that the vehicle is rated to tow. However, the
addition of additional equipment may further improve the tow vehicle
performance. These may include adjustable air shocks, helper springs, etc.
Brake Controller: The brake controller is part of the tow vehicle and is
essential in the operation of the electric brakes on the trailer. If your trailer
has electric brakes it requires a brake controller be installed at the driver’s
position. The brake controller is not the same as the safety breakaway
brake system that is installed on the trailer.
Side View Mirrors: The size of the trailer that is being towed and your
state law regulations determine the size of the mirrors. However, some
states prohibit extended mirrors on a tow vehicle, except while a trailer is
actually being towed. In this situation, detachable extended mirrors are
necessary. Check with your dealer or the appropriate state agency for
mirror requirements.
Heavy Duty Flasher: A Heavy Duty Flasher is an electrical component
that may be required when your trailer turn signal lights are attached to the
tow vehicle flasher circuit.
Electrical Connector: An Electrical Connector connects the light and
brake systems on the trailer to the light and brake controls on the towing
vehicle.
Heavy Duty Engine Oil Cooling System: The tow vehicle engine works
harder when a trailer is being towed. Depending on the size of the trailer,
you may need to install a separate engine oil cooler. Inadequate cooling
may result in sudden engine failure. Ask the tow vehicle dealer if it is
necessary to install a heavy duty cooling system.
Automatic Transmission Oil Cooler: The automatic transmission of a
towing vehicle handles more power when a trailer is being towed.
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Inadequate cooling will shorten transmission life, and may result in sudden
transmission failure. Ask the tow vehicle dealer if it is necessary to install
a separate oil cooler for the automatic transmission.
Fire Extinguisher: It is sensible to have a fire extinguisher in the tow
vehicle.
Emergency Flares and Emergency Triangle Reflectors: It is wise to
carry these warning devices even if you are not towing a trailer. It is
particularly important to have these when towing a trailer because the
hazard flashers of your towing vehicle will not operate for as long a period
of time when the battery is running both the trailer lights and tow vehicle
lights.
4.2
COUPLING AND UNCOUPLING THE TRAILER
A secure coupling (or fastening) of the trailer to the tow vehicle is
essential. A loss of coupling may result in death or serious injury.
Therefore, you must understand and follow all of the instructions for
coupling.
The following parts are involved in making a secure coupling between the
trailer and tow vehicle:
Coupling: That part of the trailer connecting mechanism by which the
connection is actually made to the trailer hitch. This does not include any
structural member, extension of the trailer frame, or brake controller. (per
SAE J684)
Hitch: That part of the connecting mechanism including the ball support
platform and ball and those components that extend and are attached to the
towing vehicle, including bumpers intended to serve as hitches. (per SAE
J684)
Safety chains: Chains are permanently attached to the trailer such that if
the coupler connection comes loose, the safety chains or cables can keep
the trailer attached to the tow vehicle. With properly rigged safety chains
or cables, it is possible to keep the tongue of the trailer from digging into
the road pavement, even if the coupler-to-hitch connection comes apart.
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Trailer lighting (and braking) connector: A device that connects
electrical power from the tow vehicle to the trailer. Electricity is used to
turn on brake lights, running lights, and turn signals as required. In
addition, if your trailer has a separate braking system, the electrical
connector will also supply power to the trailer brakes from the tow vehicle.
Breakaway switch: If the trailer becomes de-coupled from the towing
vehicle, the breakaway switch lanyard, attached independently to the tow
vehicle, will pull a pin in the emergency electrical breakaway switch on
the trailer.
The breakaway switch is activated by a separate battery supply in the
trailer such as to energize the trailer brakes independently of the towing
vehicle. It is important to check the state of charge of the emergency
breakaway battery before each trip. Simply pull the pin out of the switch
by hand and then try to pull the trailer.
If you feel a significant drag force the brakes are activated. Be sure to reinsert the pin in the breakaway switch. Also be sure to allow enough slack
in the breakaway brake lanyard such that the switch will only activate (pin
pulls out) if the coupler connection comes loose.
Jack: A device on the trailer that is used to raise and lower the trailer
tongue. The jack is sometimes called the “landing gear.”
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^ WARNING
An improperly coupled trailer can result in death or serious injury.
Do not move the trailer until:
• The coupler is secured and locked to hitch;
• The safety chains are secured to the tow vehicle; and
• The trailer jack(s) are fully retracted.
Do not tow the trailer on the road until:
• Tires and wheels are checked;
• The trailer brakes are checked;
• The breakaway switch is connected to the tow vehicle;
• The load is secured to the trailer; and
• The trailer lights are connected and checked.
COUPLER DESIGNS
Trailers are produced with one of three coupler devices. One of the
sections below will pertain to your trailer.
•
•
Bumper pull (Ball Hitch) Coupler
Gooseneck Hitch Coupler
If the coupler on your trailer does not resemble one of the couplers shown
in the figures, see the separate coupler instructions. If you do not have
separate coupler instructions, call Cimarron Trailers, Inc. at 405-222-4800
for a free copy.
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4.2.1
Trailer with Ball Hitch Coupler
A ball hitch coupler connects to a ball that is located on or under the rear
bumper of tow vehicle. The trailer jack or landing gear will raise and
lower the trailer coupler. See figure 4-3.
Figure 4-3 Trailer With Ball Hitch Coupler
Be sure the Ball Hitch coupler is suitable for the size and weight of the
trailer. The load rating of the coupler and the necessary ball size are listed
on the trailer tongue. You must provide a hitch and ball for your tow
vehicle, where the load rating of the hitch and ball is equal to or greater
than that of your trailer. Also, the ball size must be the same as the
coupler size. If the hitch ball is too small, too large, is underrated, is loose
or is worn, the trailer can come loose from the tow vehicle, and may cause
death or serious injury.
THE TOW VEHICLE, HITCH AND BALL MUST HAVE A RATED
TOWING CAPACITY EQUAL TO OR GREATER THAN THE
TRAILER Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR).
IT IS ESSENTIAL THAT THE HITCH BALL BE OF THE SAME SIZE
AS THE COUPLER. (Cimarron’s standard ball size is 2 5/16” for bumper
pull models.)
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The ball size and load rating (capacity) are marked on the ball; hitch
capacity is marked on the hitch.
4.2.1.1 Before coupling the trailer to the tow vehicle
•
Be sure the size and rating of hitch ball match the size and rating of
the coupler. Hitch balls and couplers are marked with their size and
rating.
^ WARNING
Coupler-to-hitch mismatch can result in uncoupling, leading to death or
serious injury.
Be sure the LOAD RATING of the hitch ball is equal or greater than the
load rating of the coupler.
Be sure the SIZE of the hitch ball matches the size of the coupler.
•
Wipe the hitch ball clean and inspect it visually and by feel for flat
spots, cracks and pits.
^ WARNING
A worn, cracked or corroded hitch ball can fail while towing, and may
result in death or serious injury.
Before coupling trailer, inspect the hitch ball for wear, corrosion and
cracks.
Replace worn or damaged hitch ball.
•
•
•
Rock the ball to make sure it is tight to the hitch, and visually check
that the hitch ball nut is solid against the lock washer and hitch frame.
Wipe the inside and outside of the coupler clean and inspect it visually
for cracks and deformations; feel the inside of the coupler for worn
spots and pits.
Be sure the coupler is tight to the tongue of the trailer. All coupler
fasteners must be visibly solid against the trailer frame.
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^ WARNING
A loose hitch ball nut can result in uncoupling, leading to death or serious
injury.
Be sure the hitch ball is tight to the hitch before coupling the trailer.
•
Using the jack, raise the bottom surface of the coupler to be above the
top of the hitch ball.
4.2.1.2 Prepare the coupler and hitch
•
•
•
Lubricate the hitch ball and the inside of the coupler with a thin layer
of automotive bearing grease.
Remove latch safety pin and open the coupler locking mechanism.
 In the open position, the coupler is able to drop fully onto the
hitch ball.
 See the coupler instructions for details of placing the coupler in
the “open” position.
Slowly back up the tow vehicle so that the hitch ball is near or aligned
under the coupler.
4.2.1.3 Couple the trailer to the tow vehicle
•
•
•
Using the jack, lower the trailer tongue until the coupler fully engages
the hitch ball. If the coupler does not line up with the hitch ball, adjust
the position of the tow vehicle.
Close the coupler and engage the coupler locking mechanism (A). See
figure 4-4. In the engaged position, the locking mechanism securely
holds the coupler to the hitch ball. Be sure the coupler is all the way
on the hitch ball and the locking mechanism is engaged.
Insert the lock pin (B) through the hole to lock the coupler and engage
the safety retainer. See figure 4-4.
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Figure 4-4 Locked Ball Hitch Coupler
•
A properly engaged locking mechanism will allow the coupler to raise
the rear of the tow vehicle. Using the trailer jack, test to see that you
can raise the rear of the tow vehicle by 1 inch, after the coupler is
locked to the hitch.
NOTICE
Overloading can damage the tongue jack. Do not use the tongue jack to
raise the tow vehicle more than 1 inch.
If the coupler cannot be secured to the hitch ball, do not tow the
trailer. Call Cimarron Trailers, Inc. at 405-222-4800 or your dealer for
assistance.
•
•
Lower the trailer so that its entire tongue weight is held by the hitch,
and continue retracting the jack to its fully retracted position.
It is recommended to remove the caster wheel from the bottom of the
parking jack for additional ground clearance while in transit. To
remove the caster wheel, retract the jack until the wheel clears the
ground. Then remove the bail pin attaching the wheel to the jack.
Store wheel & bail pin in secure location while in transit. Continue
retracting jack to its fully retracted position.
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4.2.1.4 Rig the safety chains
Figure 4-5 Proper Safety Chain Arrangement
•
•
Visually inspect the safety chains and hooks for wear or damage.
Replace worn or damaged safety chains and hooks before towing.
Rig the safety chains so that they:
 Cris-cross underneath the coupler so if the trailer uncouples, the
safety chains can hold the tongue up above the road. See figure 45.
 Loop around a frame member of the tow vehicle or to holes
provided in the hitch system (but, do not attach them to an
interchangeable part of the hitch assembly)
 Attach safety hooks up from underneath the hole (do not just drop
into hole); and
 Provide enough slack to permit tight turns, but not be close to the
road surface to drag.
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^ WARNING
Improper rigging of the safety chains can result in loss of control of the
trailer and tow vehicle, leading to death or serious injury, if the trailer
uncouples from the tow vehicle.
• Fasten chains to frame of tow vehicle. Do not fasten chains to any part
of the hitch unless the hitch has holes or loops specifically for that
purpose.
• Cross chains underneath hitch and coupler with enough slack to permit
turning and to hold tongue up, if the trailer comes loose.
4.2.1.5 Attach and test electric breakaway brake system
If the coupler or hitch fails, a properly connected and working breakaway
brake system will apply the brakes on the trailer. The safety chains will
keep the tow vehicle attached and as the trailer brakes are applied, the
trailer/tow vehicle combination will come to a controlled stop.
The breakaway brake system includes a brake controller, battery and a
switch with a pullpin, and lanyard. Read and follow the instructions here
as well as the instructions that have been prepared by the breakaway brake
manufacturer. If you do not have these instructions, call Cimarron
Trailers, Inc. at 405-222-4800 for a free copy.
The breakaway brake system is fitted with a “charging” capability that
draws power from the tow vehicle. If the electrical system on your tow
vehicle does not provide power to the breakaway brake battery, you must
periodically charge the battery to keep the breakaway brake system in
working order.
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Figure 4-6 Breakaway Brake Lanyard
•
•
•
Connect the pullpin lanyard to the tow vehicle so that the pullpin will
be pulled out before all of the slack in the safety chains is taken up.
See figure 4-6. Do not connect the pullpin lanyard to a safety chain,
hitch ball or hitch ball assembly. This would keep the breakaway
brake system from operating when it is needed.
To test the breakaway brake battery, remove the pullpin from the
switch and attempt to pull the trailer forward. You should feel the
trailer resisting being towed, but the wheels will not necessarily be
locked. If the brakes do not function, do not tow the trailer until
brakes, or battery are repaired.
Immediately replace the pullpin. The breakaway brake system battery
discharges rapidly when the pullpin is removed.
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^ WARNING
An ineffective or inoperative breakaway brake system can result in a
runaway trailer, leading to death or serious injury if the coupler or hitch
fails.
The breakaway lanyard must be connected to the tow vehicle, and NOT
to any part of the hitch.
Before towing the trailer, test the function of the breakaway brake system.
If the breakaway brake system is not working, do not tow the trailer. Have
it serviced or repaired.
Do not tow the trailer with the breakaway brake system ON because the
brakes will overheat which can result in permanent brake failure.
^ WARNING
Failure to replace the pullpin will prevent brakes from working, leading to
loss of control, serious injury or death.
If you do not use your trailer for three or more months, or during winter
months:
• Store the battery indoors; and
• Charge the battery every three months.
Replace the breakaway brake battery according to the intervals specified
by the brake manufacturer.
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4.2.1.6 Connect the electrical connector
Connect the trailer electrical connector (A) to the tow vehicle's electrical
system using the 7-pin electrical connector. See figure 4-7.
Figure 4-7, 7-Pin Electrical Connector
•
•
Check all lights for proper operation.
 Clearance and Running Lights (Turn on tow vehicle headlights).
 Brake Lights (Step on tow vehicle brake pedal).
 Turn Signals (Operate tow vehicle directional signal lever).
Check brakes for proper operation using brake controller mounted in
the cab.
If your trailer has brakes, your tow vehicle will have a brake controller that
applies the trailer brakes. Before towing the trailer on the road, you must
operate the brake controller while trying to pull the trailer in order to
confirm that the brakes operate. While towing the trailer at less than 5
m.p.h., manually operate the brake controller in the tow vehicle cab. You
should feel the operation of the trailer brakes.
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^ WARNING
Improper electrical connection between the tow vehicle and the trailer will
result in inoperable lights and electric brakes, and can lead to collision.
Before each tow:
• Check that the taillights, brake lights and turn signals work.
• Check that the electric brakes work by operating the brake controller
inside the tow vehicle.
4.2.1.7 Uncoupling the ball hitch trailer
Follow these steps to uncouple your ball hitch trailer from the tow vehicle:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Unload the trailer.
Block trailer tires to prevent the trailer from rolling.
Disconnect the electrical connector.
Disconnect the breakaway brake switch lanyard.
Disconnect the safety chains from the tow vehicle.
Unlock the coupler and open it.
Before extending jack, make certain the ground surface below the jack
pad will support the tongue load.
Extend the jack part way, replace the caster wheel & bail pin.
Extend the jack to transfer the weight of the trailer tongue to the jack.
Raise the trailer tongue until the coupler is above the hitch ball.
4.2.2
Trailer with Gooseneck Coupler
A gooseneck coupler on the trailer connects to a gooseneck ball that you
must have installed in the bed of the tow vehicle. See figure 4-8.
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Figure 4-8 Trailer With Gooseneck Coupler
The Gooseneck ball receiver is suited for the size and weight of the trailer.
The load rating of the coupler and the necessary ball size are listed on the
gooseneck.
You must provide a gooseneck ball and support structure that is marked
with a rating that meets or exceeds the GVW Rating of your trailer and
matches the size of the gooseneck ball receiver. If the gooseneck ball is
too small, is underrated, is loose or is worn, the trailer can come loose
from the tow vehicle, and may lead to death or serious injury.
THE TOW VEHICLE, SUPPORT STRUCTURE AND GOOSENECK
BALL MUST HAVE A RATED TOWING CAPACITY EQUAL TO OR
GREATER THAN THE TRAILER Gross Vehicle Weight Rating
(GVWR).
IT IS ESSENTIAL THAT THE GOOSENECK BALL BE OF THE
SAME SIZE AS THE GOOSENECK BALL RECEIVER. (Cimarron’s
standard ball size is 2 5/16” for gooseneck models.)
The ball size and load rating (capacity) are marked on the ball; hitch
capacity is marked on the hitch.
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^ WARNING
Coupler-to-hitch mismatch can result in uncoupling, leading to death or
serious injury.
Be sure the LOAD RATING of the hitch ball is equal or greater than the
load rating of the coupler.
Be sure the SIZE of the hitch ball matches the size of the coupler.
4.2.2.1 Before coupling the trailer to the tow vehicle
•
•
Be sure the size and rating of the gooseneck ball match the size and
rating of the receiver. Gooseneck balls and receivers are marked with
their size and ratings.
Wipe the gooseneck ball clean and inspect it visually and by feel for
flat spots, cracks and pits.
^ WARNING
A worn, cracked or corroded gooseneck ball can fail while towing, and
may result in death or serious injury.
Before coupling the trailer, inspect the gooseneck ball for wear, corrosion
and cracks; and replace worn or damaged gooseneck ball.
•
Rock the ball to make sure it is tight to the ball support, and visually
check that the gooseneck ball nut is solid against the lock washer and
ball support frame.
^ WARNING
A loose gooseneck ball can result in uncoupling, leading to death or
serious injury.
Be sure the gooseneck ball nut is tight before coupling the trailer.
•
Wipe the inside and outside of the receiver clean and inspect it
visually for cracks; and feel the inside of the receiver for worn spots
and pits. If any of these conditions exist, have the receiver replaced
before coupling the trailer.
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•
•
•
•
Lubricate the inside of the gooseneck ball receiver with automotive
bearing grease.
Be sure the receiver is tight to the trailer. All receiver fasteners must
be visibly solid against the trailer frame.
If the tow vehicle has a tailgate, lower it.
Remove the jack crank handle from its holder and place on the end of
the shaft. See figure 4-9.
Figure 4-9 Jack Crank Handle Installed
•
•
Rotate the handle/crank clockwise to raise the bottom surface of the
gooseneck to be above the top of the gooseneck ball.
Replace removable handle in holder.
4.2.2.2 Prepare the ball receiver and gooseneck ball
•
•
•
•
Block trailer wheels.
Set coupler into the open position by lifting up on the handle and slide
the locking plate into detent.
If the tow vehicle is equipped with a tailgate, lower it.
Slowly back up the tow vehicle so that the gooseneck ball is aligned
under the gooseneck ball receiver.
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^ WARNING
If the trailer drops during coupling, death or serious injury may result.
There must be no one under the trailer or coupler before or during the
coupling operation.
4.2.2.3 Couple the trailer to the tow vehicle
•
•
•
Retract the jack causing the gooseneck ball receiver to lower so it can
fully engage the gooseneck ball and transfer the weight of the trailer
tongue to the towing vehicle hitch. Visually check that the hitch ball
is fully seated in the coupler. If the receiver does not line up with the
ball, raise the receiver again and adjust the position of the tow vehicle.
Then lower the receiver over the ball.
Slide the locking plate over and place handle down into closed
position. When using a recessed ball, check to make sure handle and
locking plates are clear of any interference with safety chains and Drings.
For more information refer to "Bulldog® Bx1 Gooseneck Coupler"
instruction in your trailer packet. If you do not have these instructions,
call Cimarron Trailers, Inc. at 405-222-4800 for a free copy.
Figure 4-10 Gooseneck Coupler Locked
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•
A properly engaged locking mechanism will allow the coupler to raise
the rear of the tow vehicle. Using the trailer jack, test to see that you
can raise the rear of the tow vehicle by 1 inch.
Figure 4-11 Handle in Open and Closed Position
^ WARNING
Coupler must be FULLY seated onto the ball and CLOSED securely
before towing. Use 2 5/16" ball ONLY. Failure to do so may result in
serious injury or death.
To Couple:
1. Block trailer wheels.
2. Align hitch ball beneath coupler.
3. Set coupler into the open position by lifting up on the handle and slide
the locking plate into the detent.
4. Lower the trailer onto the hitch ball.
5. Visually check that the hitch ball is fully seated in the coupler.
6. Slide the locking plate over and place handle down into the closed
position. When using a recessed ball, check to make sure handle and
locking plate are clear of any interference with safety chains and Drings.
7. Insert (optional) theft deterrent lock through hole in fixed plate.
To Uncouple:
1. Block trailer wheels.
2. Remove lock (if equipped) and set the handle into the open position.
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3. Slide the locking plate into the open position and raise the trailer from
the hitch ball.
NOTICE
Overloading can damage the drop leg jack. Do not use the drop leg jack
to raise the tow vehicle more than 1 inch.
If the gooseneck ball cannot be secured to the receiver, do not tow the
trailer. Call Cimarron Trailers, Inc. at 405-222-4800 or your dealer for
assistance.
•
•
•
After testing to see that the receiver is properly secured and locked to
the ball, retract the jack to its fully retracted position, remove and stow
the crank handle.
Return the drop leg to the upper position. The drop leg is held in the
lowered position with a plunger pin. Rotating the plunger pin while
pulling it outward will cause it to come out of engagement with the
drop leg and the leg will rapidly rise. See figure 4-11.
Raise the tow vehicle tailgate.
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Figure 4-12 Spring Loaded Drop Leg Jack
^ CAUTION
The drop legs are heavily spring loaded in the lowered position. They
will rapidly return to the upper position when released and can inflict
serious bruises, scrapes or pinching.
Keep your feet, shins and hands well clear of the drop legs and drop
leg bases when releasing the drop legs.
Always wear shoes or boots while performing this operation
4.2.2.4 Rig the safety chains
Visually inspect the safety chains and hooks for wear or damage. Replace
worn or damaged safety chains and hooks before towing.
•
Rig the safety chains so that they attach to the “safety chain receivers”
on the tow vehicle. See figure 4-13. If you are not certain of the hitch
provisions for receiving safety chains, contact the hitch manufacturer
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•
or installer. Do NOT attach the safety chains to the gooseneck ball or
its support; and
Rig the safety chains so they have sufficient slack to permit turning,
but not too much slack – the safety chains must keep the gooseneck on
the tow vehicle bed if the trailer uncouples.
Figure 4-13 Proper Safety Chain Arrangement
^ WARNING
Improper rigging of the safety chains can result in loss of control of the
trailer and tow vehicle, leading to death or serious injury, if the trailer
uncouples from the tow vehicle.
• Fasten chains to safety chain receivers on the hitch, not to ball.
• Have sufficient slack to permit turning and to keep gooseneck on bed
of tow vehicle, if the trailer comes loose.
4.2.2.5 Attach and test the breakaway brake system
If the coupler or hitch fails, a properly connected and working breakaway
brake system will apply electric brakes on the trailer. The safety chains
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will keep the tow vehicle attached and as the brakes are applied at the
trailer’s axles, the trailer/tow vehicle combination will come to a
controlled stop.
The breakaway brake system includes a brake controller, battery and a
switch with a pullpin and lanyard. Read and follow the instructions here
as well as the instructions that have been prepared by the breakaway brake
controller manufacturer. If you do not have these instructions, call
Cimarron Trailers, Inc. at 405-222-4800 for a free copy.
Figure 4-14 Breakaway Brake Lanyard
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The breakaway brake system may be fitted with a charging facility that
draws power from the tow vehicle. If the electrical system on your tow
vehicle does not provide power to the breakaway brake battery you must
periodically charge the battery on the trailer to keep the breakaway brake
system in working order.
•
•
•
•
Visually inspect the breakaway brake system for broken parts.
Connect the pullpin lanyard (A) to the tow vehicle so that the pullpin
will be pulled out before all of the slack in the safety chains is taken
up. See figure 4-14. Do not connect the pullpin lanyard to a safety
chain, safety chain receiver or to the gooseneck ball or its support.
This would keep the breakaway brake system from operating when it
is needed. Contact the hitch manufacturer or installer if you are not
certain of the hitch provisions for breakaway brake connection
To test the breakaway brake battery, remove the pullpin from the
switch and attempt to pull the trailer forward. You should feel the
trailer resisting being towed, but the wheels will not necessarily lock
up.
Immediately replace the pullpin. The breakaway brake system battery
discharges rapidly when the pullpin is removed.
^ WARNING
An ineffective or inoperative breakaway brake system can result in a
runaway trailer leading to death or serious injury if the coupler or hitch
fails.
Connect the breakaway cable to the tow vehicle; and NOT to the safety
chain, safety chain receiver, gooseneck ball or gooseneck ball support.
Test the function of the breakaway brake system before towing the trailer.
Do not tow the trailer if the breakaway brake system is not working. Have
it serviced or repaired.
Do not tow the trailer with the breakaway brake system ON because the
brakes will overheat which can result in permanent brake failure.
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^ WARNING
Failure to replace the pullpin will prevent brakes from working, leading to
loss of control, serious injury or death.
If you do not use your trailer for three or more months, or during winter
months:
• Store the battery indoors; and
• Charge the battery every three months.
Replace the breakaway brake battery according to the intervals specified
by brake manufacturer.
4.2.2.6 Connect the electrical connector
Connect the trailer electrical connector (A) to the tow vehicle's electrical
system using the 7-pin electrical connector. See figure 4-15.
Figure 4-15, 7-Pin Electrical Connector
•
•
Check all lights for proper operation:
 Clearance and Running Lights (Turn on tow vehicle headlights).
 Brake Lights (Step on tow vehicle brake pedal).
 Turn Signals (Operate tow vehicle directional signal lever).
Check brakes for proper operation.
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If your trailer has brakes, your tow vehicle will have a brake controller that
applies the trailer brakes. Before towing the trailer on the road, you must
operate the brake controller while trying to pull the trailer in order to
confirm that the brakes operate. While towing the trailer at less than 5
m.p.h., manually operate the brake controller in the tow vehicle cab. You
should feel the operation of the trailer brakes.
^ WARNING
Improper electrical connection between the tow vehicle and the trailer will
result in inoperable lights and electric brakes, and can lead to collision.
Before each tow:
• Check that the taillights, brake lights and turn signals work.
• Check that the electric brakes work by operating the brake controller
inside the tow vehicle.
4.2.2.7 Uncoupling the gooseneck trailer
Follow these steps to uncouple your gooseneck hitch trailer from the tow
vehicle:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Unload the trailer.
Block trailer tires to prevent the trailer from rolling.
Disconnect the electrical connector.
Disconnect the breakaway brake switch lanyard.
Disconnect the safety chains from the tow vehicle.
Raise handle and rotate locking plate forward into OPEN position.
Rotate the lock plate to a position that permits the gooseneck ball to
exit the receiver.
Before releasing drop leg jack, make certain ground surface below
jack base will support the trailer tongue load.
Rotate the drop leg plunger pin handle so that the plunger pin is
released from the drop leg.
Push down on the drop leg base with your foot to place a drop leg to
the desired lowered position.
Rotate the plunger pin handle so that the plunger pin is attempting to
engage the drop leg.
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•
Slowly raise your foot, permitting the drop leg to raise. The plunger
pin will engage a hole in the drop leg.
^ CAUTION
The drop legs are heavily spring loaded in the lowered position.
They will rapidly return to the upper position when released and can
inflict serious bruises, scrapes or pinching.
Keep your feet, shins and hands well clear of the drop legs and drop
leg bases when releasing the drop legs.
Always wear shoes or boots while performing this operation
•
•
Be sure the plunger pin is fully engaged. Push it in by hand if
necessary. The bent part of the plunger pin handle must be touching
the plunger pin housing.
If your trailer has two drop leg jacks, lower them both to the same
level, following the above instructions.
NOTICE
If the drop legs are not set at the same level, one of the drop leg jacks
can be overloaded and can be damaged.
•
•
•
•
Remove the jack crank handle from its holder and place on the end of
the shaft.
On two speed jacks, move the handle in or out to engage high gear.
Rotate the crank handle clockwise to slowly extend the jack and
transfer the weight of the trailer tongue to the jack.
When the drop leg base contacts the ground, shift the gearbox into low
gear.
NOTICE
Do not use high speed to lift the trailer, the drop leg jack mechanism
can be damaged.
High speed is used only to rapidly move the drop leg base into contact
with the ground.
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Coupling To The Tow Vehicle
•
•
•
•
•
Continue to extend the jack, making sure that the ground is providing
stable and level support for the trailer.
Lower the tow vehicle tailgate
After the jack is extended and the gooseneck ball receiver is well clear
of the gooseneck ball, to permit driving the tow vehicle away, remove
and stow the crank handle.
Slowly drive the tow vehicle away from the trailer.
Raise the tow vehicle tailgate.
4.2.3
Adjust Gooseneck Hitch Height
The height of the ball receiver on the trailer must be adjusted so that the
trailer, when loaded to rated capacity, is level while connected to the tow
vehicle. There must also be adequate clearance between the bottom of the
trailer and the sides of the tow vehicle bed. A level trailer allows equal
weight distribution on the axles.
Connect trailer to tow vehicle (see Coupling To The Tow Vehicle) and
load the trailer to rated capacity (see Loading The Trailer).
Park the tow vehicle and trailer on a firm level surface.
Stand away from the trailer and visually verify if the trailer is level frontto-rear. If the front of the trailer is higher than the rear, the hitch must be
retracted. If the front of the trailer is lower than the rear, the hitch must be
extended.
Unload and uncouple trailer from tow vehicle (See Unloading The Trailer
and Uncoupling The Trailer).
^ WARNING
Improper gooseneck height adjustment can result in overloaded tires,
blowout and loss of control, leading to death or serious injury.
Adjust the gooseneck receiver so that the loaded trailer is level.
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Loosen jam nuts and set bolts (A). Remove retaining pin (B) then use
CAUTION removing load bearing pin (C) being careful not to drop the
inner tube coupler assembly (D) causing injury. There are four (4) height
adjustments holes for the load bearing pin allowing for a total of 8” of
height adjustment. Do NOT exceed 8” maximum extension from the fully
retracted position. Locate the proper hole location and replace the load
bearing pin. The load bearing pin must be fully inserted through both the
inner and outer tubes and the retaining pin installed in order for the
coupler to support its rated load. Tighten the set bolts and jam nuts to
minimize movement and vibration in the coupler during towing. Set bolts
and jam nuts MUST BE TIGHTENED TO A MINIMUM OF 125 lb/ft OF
TORQUE. See figures 4-16 and 4-17.
Figure 4-16 Maximum Gooseneck Adjustment
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5 LOADING THE TRAILER
Improper trailer loading causes many accidents and deaths. To safely load
a trailer, you must consider:




Overall load weight;
Load weight distribution;
Proper tongue weight; and
Securing the load properly.
To determine that you have loaded the trailer within its rating, you must
consider the distribution of weight, as well as the total weight of the trailer
and its contents. The trailer axles carry most of the total weight of the
trailer and its contents (Gross Vehicle Weight, or “GVW”). The
remainder of the total weight is carried by the tow vehicle hitch. It is
essential for safe towing that the trailer tongue and tow vehicle hitch carry
the proper amount of the loaded trailer weight, otherwise the trailer can
develop an undesirable sway at towing speeds, or the rear of the towing
vehicle can be overloaded. Read the “Tongue Weight” information that
follows.
The load distribution must be such that no component part of the trailer is
loaded beyond its rating. This means that you must consider the rating of
the tires, wheels and axles. For tandem and triple axle trailers, you must
make sure that the front-to-rear load distribution does not result in
overloading any axle.
Towing stability also depends on keeping the center of gravity as low as
possible. Load heavy items on the floor and over the axles. When loading
additional items, be sure to maintain even side-to-side weight distribution
and proper tongue weight. The total weight of the trailer and its contents
must never exceed the total weight rating of the trailer (Gross Vehicle
Weight Rating, or “GVWR”).
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^ WARNING
An overloaded trailer can result in loss of control of the trailer, leading to
death or serious injury.
Do not exceed the trailer Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) or an
axle Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR).
Do not load a trailer so that the weight on any tire exceeds its rating.
Tongue Weight
It is critical to have a portion of the trailer load carried by the tow vehicle.
That is, the trailer tongue must exert a downward force on the hitch. This
is necessary for two reasons. First, the proper amount of tongue weight is
necessary for the tow vehicle to be able to maintain control of the tow
vehicle/trailer system. If, for example, the tongue exerts an upward pull
on the hitch, instead of pushing down on it (because the trailer is
overloaded behind its axles), the rear wheel of the tow vehicle can lose
traction or grip and cause loss of control. Also, even if there is some, but
not enough weight on the tongue, the trailer can become unstable at high
speeds. Remember, the faster you go, the more likely the trailer is to sway.
If, on the other hand, there is too much tongue weight, the tow vehicle is
prone to jack-knife. Furthermore, the front wheels of the tow vehicle can
be too lightly loaded and cause loss of steering control and traction, if the
front wheels are driving.
In addition to tow vehicle control, tongue weight is necessary to insure that
the trailer axles do not exceed their Gross Axle Weight Rating (GAWR).
In the following table, the second column shows the RULE OF THUMB
percentage of total weight of the trailer plus its cargo (Gross Trailer
Weight, or “GTW”) that should appear on the tongue of the trailer. For
example, a trailer with a gooseneck hitch, with a loaded weight of 12,000
pounds, should have 20-30% of 12,000 pounds (2400-3600 lbs.) on the
gooseneck. After loading, be sure to check that none of the axles are
overloaded.
NOTE: Due to custom manufacturing requirements and changes, the
above rule of thumb may vary greatly on highly customized models. Check
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Loading The Trailer
with Cimarron Trailers at 405/222-4800 for tongue weights on specific
trailers.
Tongue Weight as a Percentage of Loaded Trailer
Weight
Type of Hitch
Percentage
Ball Hitch (or Bumper Hitch)
10–20%
Gooseneck Hitch
20–30%
^ WARNING
Improper tongue weight (load distribution) can result in loss of control of
the trailer, leading to death or serious injury.
Make certain that tongue weight is within the allowable range.
Be sure to:
• Distribute the load front-to-rear to provide proper tongue weight (see
chart);
• Distribute the load evenly, right and left, to avoid tire overload; and
• Keep the center of gravity low.
5.1
CHECKING TONGUE WEIGHT
To check the tongue weight, the tow vehicle and trailer must be on level
ground, as they will be when the trailer is being towed.
For lighter trailers the recommended method of checking tongue weight is
to use an accessory called a “tongue weight scale.” If a tongue weight
scale is not available from your dealer, call Cimarron Trailers, Inc. at 405222-4800 for assistance.
For most trailers, it is easier to go to a truck stop where there is a
“certified” scale. Pull the trailer onto the scale and decouple it from the
tow vehicle, leaving just the trailer on the scale. Get a “ticket”, which lists
the total trailer weight. Re-connect the trailer to your tow vehicle and the
drive the tow vehicle wheels off the scale, just leaving the trailer axles on
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the scale. Get a second “ticket”, which lists the trailer’s axle weight.
Simply subtract the axle weight from the total weight to determine the
hitch weight. While you are at the scale, to weigh the entire combination
vehicle. This result should be less than the Gross Combined Weight
Rating (GCWR) for your towing vehicle. Some scales allow you to get
individual axle weights also. If this is possible, get the tow vehicles front
and rear axle weights to make sure they are in the same proportion as the
tow vehicle alone, and that the rear axle is not overloaded.
5.2
SECURING THE CARGO
Since the trailer “ride” can be bumpy and rough, you must secure your
cargo so that it does not shift while the trailer is being towed.
^ WARNING
Shifting cargo can result in loss of control of the trailer, and can lead to
death or serious injury.
Tie down all loads with proper sized fasteners, ropes, straps, etc.
5.3
LOADING HORSES (HORSE TRAILER)
Couple the trailer to the tow vehicle before loading. This is essential for
the bumper pull trailer because the tongue of a bumper pull trailer can rise
during loading, before the cargo is properly distributed.
The cargo-carrying portion of a horse trailer is designed only for carrying
horses. Do not transport people, livestock, containers of hazardous
substances, or containers of flammable substances.
^ WARNING
Do not transport people inside the trailer, even if it has living quarters.
The transport of people puts their lives at risk and may be illegal.
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^ WARNING
Do not carry “loose” livestock in your horse trailer. They can cause the
trailer to become unstable and can result in loss of control.
You must use a trailer designed to carry “loose” livestock.
^ WARNING
Do not transport flammable, explosive, poisonous or other dangerous
materials in your trailer.
Exceptions:
• Fuel in the tanks of vehicles that are being towed.
• Fuel stored in proper containers used in trailer living quarters for
cooking.
• Fuel stored in the tank of an on-board generator.
Before loading a horse in your trailer, inspect the interior of the trailer.
The interior of the trailer must be smooth, and have no protruding objects.
There should be no loose objects that could move about and startle or
injure the horse. Check the walls, floor, dividers, etc., for loose and
broken parts, welds, hinges, etc.
5.3.1
Preparing the Horse Trailer for Loading
Open windows and vents to provide ventilation. Consider the weather and
transport conditions (i.e. on warm sunny days, maximum ventilation is
required). Do not carry a horse without providing ventilation, even in
coldest weather. Ventilation is critical for the well being of your horses.
Know your horses and adjust ventilation for your horses’ comfort.
Be sure window latches are in a flush position, so they do not present a
protrusion that can injure your horse.
Tighten any loose or protruding screws in the walls.
Remove or secure loose objects, (i.e. butt bars, saddles, tack and
equipment) so that items will not move during towing.
Inspect for cracks at the welds on the divider hinges, and the welds on the
tie rings. If you are able to open any cracks in or near these welds by
lifting the dividers or by twisting the tie rings, have the weld repaired
before loading your horses.
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^ CAUTION
The trailer interior may contain hazards to a horse that can result in its
serious injury or death.
Before loading a horse, inspect the trailer interior and adjust or repair
all loose and protruding features such as handles, loose or broken
parts of the trailer, etc.
Before towing trailer:
• Lock all stall dividers.
• Be sure all saddles, tack and equipment, as well as horse(s), are
prevented from being thrown about.
^ WARNING
Improper weld repair will lead to early failure of the trailer structure and
can cause serious injury or death.
Do not repair cracked or broken welds unless you have the skills and
equipment to make a proper repair. Have the welds repaired by your
dealer.
5.3.2
Loading the Horse Trailer
The trailering of horses introduces many variables that are not present in
the trailering of non-living cargo. Horses are prone to take flight when
they feel threatened or pain. In the confines of a trailer, the flight response
can cause serious injury or death to a human handler. Even experienced
and docile horses can be frightened.
Horses must be slowly acclimated to trailering. Be sure the horse’s first
trips are short trips, so you can gauge its reaction. Some will take to the
experience easily, but others will strongly protest. You must act according
to your horse’s demeanor.
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^ WARNING
When a horse is frightened, it is capable of inflicting serious injury or
death to a human handler.
Know your horse’s temperament before attempting to trailer it.
Handling a horse that is not trailer-acclimated may result in injury or
death, or damage to your trailer.
Do not haul an unbroken horse in this trailer.
Horses must have a halter.
1. If the trailer has living quarters, close and lock the door between the
living quarters and the horse area.
2. If your trailer is fitted with swinging loading doors, open them fully
and fasten them against the trailer using the door holdbacks.
3. If the trailer is fitted with a drop ramp, carefully lower it to the ground.
4. Open all stall dividers to their OPEN (against the wall) position.
5. Some trailers have a removable rear door center post and a fold away
rear tack room wall (see Accessories Section 8). Removing the door
post and moving the tack room wall creates a larger opening at the rear
of the trailer to assist the loading. After loading, return the wall and
door post to their normal positions for travel.
6. Lead the horse into the trailer by a halter or lead rope. If the horse
shows any signs of distress, stop loading, and calm the horse.
^ WARNING
Improper weight distribution of the horses in the trailer will result in an
unstable trailer.
Always load the first horse into the forward-most stall.
7. Tie the horse to the trailer interior by fastening the quick connect or
tying the lead rope to the tie ring, or other facility provided on the
trailer wall for attachment of the lead rope. A rule of thumb is to leave
about 18 inches of free rope between the attachment point on the
trailer and the horse. The layout of the horse trailer has been designed
to safely contain your horse. The trailer is equipped with stall dividers
and tie rings to secure the horse, and has a rubber floor mat to keep
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shoed horses from slipping on the metal underfloor. Restraining a
horse without using a combination of a tie-strap and stall divider may
result in serious injury or death to the horse.
^ CAUTION
Failure to secure a horse using a tie strap may result in its serious
injury or death.
8. Close and latch the stall divider.
9. If additional horses are to be loaded, repeat steps 6-8 for each horse –
lead the horse, secure the horse, close and lock latch the stall divider.
10. After the last horse has been loaded, close any unused dividers.
11. Double check that each horse is tied to the trailer and each stall divider
is LATCHED in the CLOSED position.
12. If your trailer is fitted with a butt bar or butt strap to keep the horse
away from the door, hook and lock the butt bar in place.
13. Release the door holdbacks and swing the hinged doors to a closed
position and raise the drop ramp if equipped.
14. Secure the trailer door/ramp so that the door/ramp cannot open while
the trailer is being towed.
15. If your trailer is fitted with feed doors, close and secure them.
^ WARNING
If the door opens, your cargo may be ejected onto the road, resulting in
death or serious injury to other drivers.
Always secure the door/ramp latch after closing.
16. Check the horses after 5 to 10 miles or 10 minutes of towing, and then
at least once per hour thereafter. Open a feed door or other access and
look for signs of stress, cuts, or injury. On long trips it is
recommended that horses be removed from the trailer every 6-10 hours
for exercise, food and watering.
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^ WARNING
Horses may kick when back door/ramp is opened.
Stay clear when opening back door.
5.4
LOADING LIVESTOCK (LIVESTOCK TRAILER)
Couple the trailer to the tow vehicle before loading. This is essential for
the bumper pull trailer because the tongue of a bumper pull trailer can rise
during loading, before the cargo is properly distributed.
The cargo-carrying portion of a livestock trailer is for carrying livestock
(other than horses) only. The livestock trailer does not have the equipment
required for the safe transport of horses, e.g. stall dividers, tie rings and a
rubber floor mat. Do not transport people, containers of hazardous
substances, or containers of flammable substances.
^ WARNING
Do not transport people inside the trailer, even if it has living quarters.
The transport of people puts their lives at risk and may be illegal.
^ WARNING
Do not transport flammable, explosive, poisonous or other dangerous
materials in your trailer.
Exceptions:
• Fuel in the tanks of vehicles that are being towed.
• Fuel stored in proper containers used in trailer living quarters for
cooking.
• Fuel stored in the tank of an on-board generator.
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^ CAUTION
Hauling a horse in a livestock trailer may result in its serious injury or
death.
Do not carry a horse in a livestock trailer. Use a trailer designed to
carry horses.
5.4.1
Preparing the Livestock Trailer for Loading
Before loading livestock in your livestock trailer, inspect the interior of the
trailer. The interior of the trailer must be smooth, and have no protruding
objects, such as bolts, broken parts of trailer interior, etc. A protruding
object can injure your livestock.
1. Tighten any loose or protruding bolts in the walls.
2. Remove or secure loose objects, so no items will move during towing.
^ CAUTION
The interior space of a trailer may contain hazards that result in
serious injury or death to trailered livestock.
Inspect the interior of the trailer before loading livestock.
• Adjust or repair all loose and protruding features.
• All cargo and equipment, besides the livestock, must be prevented
from being thrown about before towing trailer.
5.4.2
Loading the Livestock Trailer
The trailering of livestock introduces many variables that are not present in
the trailering of non-living cargo. Livestock may resist being loaded into a
trailer.
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^ WARNING
Large animals are capable of inflicting serious injury or death to a human
handler.
Know your animals’ temperament before attempting to trailer them.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Position the trailer as needed to load the livestock.
If the trailer is fitted with a drop ramp, carefully lower it to the ground.
Open and secure the loading door.
Open and secure the interior gates as necessary.
Load the livestock into the trailer.
Gate the livestock tightly to keep them from moving or falling during
transportation.
7. Close the loading doors and raise the drop ramp if equipped.
8. Secure the trailer door/ramp so that the catch and door cannot open
while the trailer is being towed.
^ WARNING
If the door opens, your cargo may be ejected onto the road, resulting in
death or serious injury to other drivers.
Always secure the door/ramp latch after closing.
5.5
LOADING CARGO (CARGO TRAILERS)
Couple the trailer to the tow vehicle before loading. The tongue of a
bumper pull trailer can rise during loading, before the cargo is properly
distributed. To measure the tongue weight, you will have to uncouple the
trailer after it is loaded.
Do not transport people, containers of hazardous substances, cans or
containers of flammable substances. However, fuel in the tank of an offroad vehicle, or a car or motorcycle, etc., may be carried inside of your
cargo trailer.
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^ WARNING
Do not transport people inside the trailer, even if it has living quarters.
The transport of people puts their lives at risk and may be illegal.
^ WARNING
Do not transport flammable, explosive, poisonous or other dangerous
materials in your trailer.
Exceptions:
• Fuel in the tanks of vehicles that are being towed.
• Fuel stored in proper containers used in trailer living quarters for
cooking.
• Fuel stored in the tank of an on-board generator.
5.5.1
Preparing the Cargo Trailer for Loading
1. Before loading cargo into your trailer, inspect the interior of the trailer.
2. Enclosed trailers may be fitted with “D”-ring hold-downs, and/or a
track system that can be used to secure the cargo. Inspect the “D”rings and track system for looseness or signs of bending before loading
the cargo onto the trailer.
^ WARNING
Damaged or loose “D”-rings can break, allowing cargo to become loose
inside the trailer. Loose cargo can shift the center of gravity, and result in
loss of control of the trailer.
Inspect “D”-rings, and test them for looseness before loading cargo.
Do not use a damaged or loose “D”-ring to secure cargo.
5.5.2
Loading the Enclosed Trailer
Enclosed trailers may be fitted with a drop ramp door. The weight of the
drop ramp door is partially held by a spring and cable counterbalance
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assembly. If this assembly is out of adjustment or worn out, it will not
provide the expected assistance for slow and careful lowering and raising
of ramp.
^ WARNING
A spring and cable counterbalance can inflict serious injury if it breaks, or
if incorrectly adjusted.
Inspect the cable and cable ends each time the door is operated.
Do not attempt to service the counterbalance. Take the trailer to your
dealer for service.
1. Carefully lower the drop ramp to the ground.
2. Load the cargo up the drop ramp and into the trailer, with
approximately 60% of the cargo in the front half of the trailer. If the
trailer has living quarters, the cargo area of your trailer may have
ventilation openings near the floor. Do not block these ventilation
openings. These openings are provided to exhaust potentially deadly
fumes.
^ WARNING
Accumulation of hazardous fumes can cause death or serious injury.
Do not block access to ventilation ports.
3. Secure the cargo to the trailer using appropriate straps, chains and
tensioning devices.
4. Close the drop ramp door and secure the trailer door catch so that the
catch and door cannot open while the trailer is being towed.
^ WARNING
If the door opens, your cargo may be ejected onto the road, resulting in
death or serious injury to other drivers.
Always secure the door latch after closing.
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6 CHECKING THE TRAILER BEFORE AND
DURING EACH TOW
6.1
PRE-TOW CHECKLIST
Before towing, double-check all of these items:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
6.2
Tires, wheels and lug nuts (see the “Major Hazards” section starting
on page 5 of this manual)
Tire Pressure. Inflate tires on trailer and tow vehicle to the pressure
stated on the Certification / VIN label.
Coupler secured and locked (see the “Coupling to the Tow Vehicle”
chapter starting at Page 43 of this manual).
Safety chains properly rigged to tow vehicle, not to hitch or ball (see
the “Coupling to the Tow Vehicle” chapter starting at Page 43 of this
manual)
Test Tail, Stop, and Turn Lights
Test trailer brakes.
Safety breakaway switch lanyard fastened to tow vehicle, not to safety
chains (see the “Coupling to the Tow Vehicle” chapter starting at Page
43 of this manual).
Cargo properly loaded, balanced and secured.
Tongue weight and weight distribution set-up.
Doors and gates latched and secured
Fire extinguisher
Flares and reflectors
MAKE REGULAR STOPS
After each 50 miles, or one hour of towing, stop and check the following
items:
•
•
•
•
Coupler secured
Safety chains are fastened and not dragging
Cargo secured
Cargo door latched and secured.
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7 BREAKING-IN A NEW TRAILER
7.1
RETIGHTEN LUG NUTS AT FIRST 10, 25 & 50 MILES
Wheel lugs can shift and settle quickly after being first assembled, and
must be checked after the first 10, 25 and 50 miles of driving. Failure to
perform this check may result in a wheel coming loose from the trailer,
causing a crash leading to death or serious injury. Refer to Section 9.2.12
for the proper lug nut tightening sequence and torque value.
^ WARNING
Lug nuts are prone to loosen after initial installation, which can lead to
death or serious injury.
Check lug nuts for tightness on a new trailer or when wheel(s) have been
remounted after the first 10, 25 and 50 miles of driving.
7.2
ADJUST BRAKE SHOES AT FIRST 200 MILES
Brake shoes and drums experience a rapid initial wear. The brakes must
be adjusted after the first 200 miles of use, and each 3,000 miles
thereafter. Some axles are fitted with a mechanism that will automatically
adjust the brake shoes when the trailer is “hard stopped” from a rearward
direction. Read your axle and brake manual to see if your brakes adjust
automatically. All 3500 - 7000 lb. axles use Dexter® "NEV-R-ADJUST"
self adjusting brakes as standard equipment. If you do not have the axle
and brake manual, call Cimarron Trailers, Inc. at 405-222-4800 for a free
copy.
A hard stop is used to:
 Confirm that the brakes work;
 Confirm that the trailer brakes are properly synchronized with the
tow vehicle brakes using the brake controller in the tow vehicle;
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 Adjust the brake shoes as necessary.
 For surge or hydraulic brakes, check the Master cylinder reservoir
for fluid.
If your trailer is not fitted with automatically adjusting brakes, the brakes
will need to be manually adjusted. See Section 9.2.4.2, “Manually
adjusting brake shoes,” for instructions.
7.3
SYNCHRONIZING THE BRAKE SYSTEMS
Trailer brakes are designed to work in synchronization with the brakes on
the tow vehicle. When the tow vehicle and trailer braking systems are
synchronized, both braking systems contribute to slowing, and the tongue
of the trailer will neither dive nor rise sharply.
^ WARNING
If trailer and tow vehicle brakes do not work properly together, death or
serious injury can occur.
Road test the brakes in a safe area at no more than 30 m.p.h. before
each tow
To insure safe brake performance and synchronization, read and follow the
axle/brake and the brake controller manufacturer's instructions. If you do
not have these instructions, call Cimarron Trailers, Inc. at 405-222-4800
for a free copy.
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8 ACCESSORIES
This chapter provides some basic information for the safe operation of
several accessories. For many accessories, such as generators and air
conditioners, the manufacturer of the accessory has provided instructions.
You must read and follow these instructions before using the accessory. If
you are uncertain whether you have all of the instructions, call Cimarron
Trailers, Inc. at 405-222-4800 before operating the accessory. The
following accessories are described in this section:
















Remove Center Post
Small Animal Gates
Traveling Center Gate
Hydraulic Landing Gear
Air Ride Suspension
Windows
Drop Down Feed Doors
Dividers
Doors, Gates and Ramps
Paddle Latch & Striker Plate
Bar Lock Latch & Cargo Vise Catch
Front Walk-In Tack Room
Rear Tack Compartment
Adjustable Saddle Racks
Drop Ramp Door
Slideout
Some accessories introduce the risk of fire and carbon monoxide
poisoning. Make sure you have a fire extinguisher charged and ready.
Check the fire extinguisher at least once a month. If the fire extinguisher
is discharged even partially, it must be recharged. Follow the fire
extinguisher manufacturer's instructions for recharging the extinguisher
after use.
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8.1
ELECTRIC/HYDRAULIC LANDING GEAR
The landing gear on your trailer may be powered with an electric motor
that runs a hydraulic pump. The landing gear is operated up or down
using controls located near the landing gear. See figures 8-1 and 8-2.
If the motor does not operate, such as when the battery is fully discharged,
the landing gear can be operated manually by operating the pump located
on the landing gear. Refer to the instructions provided by the landing gear
manufacturer that were included with your trailer.
Figure 8-1 Electric/Hydraulic Landing Gear
Figure 8-2 Electric/Hydraulic Landing Gear Control
8.2
AIR RIDE SUSPENSION
Your trailer may be equipped with air ride suspension. The compressed
air for the suspension can come from the tow vehicle or a compressor
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mounted to the trailer. Refer to the suspension manufacturer's
information for operating instructions.
8.3
WINDOWS
When operating sliding window, activate the pressure release in the center
of the window and slide the moveable section to the opposite side. To
close the window, reverse the above procedure, keeping hands and fingers
clear.
One or more windows installed in the living quarters area are egress style
windows that can be opened and used as an exit in an emergency. To
open, pull out on the red latches (A) and push out on the bottom of the
window. See figure 8-3.
Figure 8-3 Egress Window Latches
8.4
RECESSED PADDLE LATCHES & STRIKER PLATE
Recessed paddle latches & striker plates are used on; drop down feed
doors, manger doors, access doors, front tack room doors, etc. Open the
latch by lifting out on the recessed paddle and pull the door toward you.
See figure 8-4.
To close the door place your hand on the door next to the latch and firmly
push the door closed. The door will latch with a clicking sound. See figure
8-5.
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Figure 8-4 Open Paddle Latch Figure 8-5 Close Paddle Latch
Check to make sure the door has latched by inspecting the play in the latch
paddle. This can be done by gently feeling how much movement is
remaining in the paddle after it has latched. A properly latched paddle will
have no more movement than (about one sixteenth of an inch) what is felt
when the paddle latch is in a neutral position, such as when the door is in
an open position. Any excess movement means the spring loaded catch
bolt is not fully engaged in the striker plate, and the door should be re-shut
and or adjusted until proper latching is achieved.
PADDLE LOCKS - After latching paddle latch, it is recommended to
lock all doors when in transit for safety and security reasons. This can be
done by inserting your key into the tumbler on the paddle handle, and turn
the tumbler clockwise one quarter turn until it stops, then remove key, to
unlock reverse procedure. See figures 8-6 and 8-7.
Note: The lock on the paddle only locks the paddle handle itself to prevent
entrance from the outside. It does not lock the spring loaded catch bolt,
which actually holds the door closed. This latch will have a smooth
interior plate, without a release handle. All paddle latch locks will be
keyed the same throughout each trailer.
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Figure 8-6
Paddle Lock Tumbler
Figure 8-7
Paddle Smooth Interior Plate
DEAD BOLT LOCKS - Recessed paddle latches used in front tack
rooms and mid tack rooms have an additional lock made into the housing
of the latch. This is a dead bolt lock that has its own mechanically operated
catch bolt. This latch will have an interior release handle and a dead bolt
engagement knob. Dead bolt locks offer increased security while inside
and with the dead bolt locked from the outside the door cannot open. Dead
bolt locks are keyed separately from paddle latches for personal security
reasons. See figures 8-8 and 8-9.
Figure 8-8
Exterior Dead Bolt Lock
Figure 8-9
Interior Dead Bolt Handle & Knob
STRIKER PLATES - Both, paddle locks and dead bolts locks, latch into
the striker plate on the door-jamb. Striker plate adjustment determines the
amount of tension on the paddle latch. Striker plates may need to be
adjusted over time to keep doors latching properly. To adjust, loosen the
two screws holding the plate, move the plate inward or outward and
retighten the screws. Moving the plate inward will tighten the door seal
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and make the latch firmer to operate. Moving the plate outward will loosen
the door seal and make the latch softer to operate. See figure 8-10.
Figure 8-10 Adjustable Striker Plate
8.5
BAR LOCK LATCH & CARGO VISE CATCH
Bar lock latches are commonly used in a vertical position on rear stall
doors, full height side stall doors and in a horizontal position on some
ramp doors. Bar lock latches consist of a 1” pipe extending the height of a
door, held in place by top, center, and bottom rod guides, lug forks on each
end of pipe latch into keepers mounted onto the door jamb. The complete
assembly is controlled by a center mounted pivoting handle that latches
into a cargo vise catch. See figure 8-11.
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Figure 8-11 Typical Bar Lock Latch & Cargo Vise Catch
To open the bar lock latch, release the handle from the cargo vise by
tipping the center catch bar away from the handle, then raise the handle up
and free from the cargo vise catch. Once the handle clears the vise catch
pull the handle out from the door rotating the pipe and in turn rotating the
lug clear from the keepers. See figure 8-12, 8-13 and 8-14. Because a bar
lock latch spans the full height of the door and ties the top and bottom of
the door opening together, it is the strongest most secure type of door latch
available for stall doors. To close the bar latch reverse the above
procedure, being sure that both the top and bottom lug and keepers are
fully engaged.
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Figure 8-12
Trip Center Catch
Figure 8-13
Raise, Clear & Rotate
Handle
Figure 8-14
Clear Lug & Keeper
When replacing the handle into the cargo vise catch, be sure the handle
fully engages with the vise catch center bar until it snaps closed. See
figure 8-15 and 8-16. After latching cargo vise catch, it is recommended
to lock it when in transit, for safety and security reasons. This can be done
by inserting your key into the tumbler on the cargo vise catch, and turn the
tumbler clockwise one quarter turn until it stops, then remove key, to
unlock reverse procedure. Always check the bar lock handle is properly
locked into the cargo vise catch, before towing.
Figure 8-15
Lug & Keeper Fully Engaged
8.6
Figure 8-16
Handle Fully Engaged In Vise Catch
DROP-DOWN FEED DOORS
All factory installed drop-down feed doors on Cimarron trailers are made
in house of structural grade aluminum, with a sliding radius corner
window and a drop-down aluminum safety bar grill. These doors are
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designed to provide the utmost safety for your animals. The drop-down
aluminum safety bar grill makes traveling in high temperatures more
moderate, allowing ample air flow through the trailer. Do not attach or tie
animals, feed equipment or tack directly to the head grill.
Open the drop-down feed door by lifting out on the recessed paddle latch
located at the front center of the door. Pull door down exposing the
aluminum safety bar grill. See figure 8-17. The safety bar grill can also
be dropped down to allow feeding or total head exposure while parked.
Raise the feed door slightly until the safety bar grill tab (A) is aligned with
the opening in the guide and then pull safety bar grill outward. See figure
8-18. Never leave the safety bar grill down or open during transit. Return
the safety bar grill back to closed position by inserting the grill tab (A)
back into the opening in the guide. Close the drop-down feed door by
swinging the door back up into the opening. Check the paddle latch in the
drop-down feed door to be sure it is fully latched and engaged.
Figure 8-17 Drop Down Feed Door
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Figure 8-18 Open Safety Bar Grill
^ WARNING
Do not leave the safety bar grill open while in transit.
Death or serious injury to the horse may result.
8.7
STALL DIVIDERS
^ WARNING
Do not attempt to release or open a stall divider with an animals weight
applying pressure on the divider.
Serious injury may result from the divider swinging open with force.
Before unlatching a stall divider:
• Be certain the animal is not applying pressure on the divider;
• Stand in a safe position, while maintaining control of divider when
unlatching;
• Keep hands and fingers clear of pinch points during opening and
closing.
To open divider, (with no animal pressure on divider) place one hand on
the divider, take the free hand and pull outward on the latch (A), releasing
the latch and freeing the spring loaded divider to swing open. For divider
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latching or closing, simply push the divider closed, the latch will engage
when fully closed. See figure 8-19.
Figure 8-19 Stall Divider Latch
The latch striker bolt is adjustable to compensate for wear. Loosen nuts
(B) and adjust striker bolt in or out as necessary to keep divider securely
closed. Tighten nuts (B). See figure 8-20.
Figure 8-20 Adjust Stall Divider
8.8
DOORS, GATES AND RAMPS
Cimarron trailers can be equipped with various styles of doors, gates and
ramps. The following subsections describes the operation of each.
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8.8.1
Livestock Center Gate
Livestock center gates are normally equipped with a slam latch. The gate
is equipped with an inside and an outside release. Do not open center
gates from the inside of the trailer with live animal(s) loaded.
^ WARNING
Animals are capable of inflicting serious injury or death to a human
handler.
Do not open the center gate from inside the trailer with live animals
loaded.
To open, disengage the vertical locking pin (A) by pulling it in an upward
motion. Next, firmly grasp the vertical handle (B) from the interior of the
trailer and pull, or pull on the exterior handle (C). See figures 8-21 and 822. If opening from the inside, swing the gate open to curb side and latch
back against side wall.
Figure 8-21 Center Gate Lock Pin and Interior Handle
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Figure 8-22 Center Gate Exterior Latch Handle
To close, simply swing the gate back to the closed position, thus engaging
the slam latch. Engage locking pin (A) to secure gate. See figure 8-21.
8.8.2
Rear Ramp Over Rear Doors
Your trailer may be equipped with a rear ramp over rear doors. See figure
8-23. The ramp is spring loaded to assist in opening and closing.
Figure 8-23 Rear Ramp Over Rear Doors
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To open, pull up on latch (A) located on each side of the ramp and
carefully lower the ramp. See figure 8-24 and 8-25.
Figure 8-24 Rear Ramp Over Latch
Figure 8-25 Rear Ramp Over Rear Doors Lowered
8.8.3
Full Height Side Ramp Door
Your trailer may be equipped with a full height side ramp door. See figure
8-26. The ramp door is spring loaded to assist in opening and closing.
Open latches and pull door to open.
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Figure 8-26 Full Height Side Ramp Door
8.8.4
Rear Ramp And Storm Doors
Your trailer may be equipped with rear ramp and storm doors. See figure
8-27. Open the top doors first, then open latches and pull the ramp to
open. The ramp is spring loaded to assist in opening and closing.
Figure 8-27 Rear Ramp And Storm Door
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8.9
TACK ROOM
Your trailer may be equipped with a front walk-in tack room, rear
permanent tack compartment or a rear fold away tack compartment. Do
not store tack long term in the tack compartment due to condensation and
mildew factors in diverse climates.
8.9.1
Front Walk-in Tack Room
Located in front of the horse area with generally one access door on the
curb or street side (dependent upon model). Front walk-in tack rooms are
designed to store tack short term and must not be used for camping or
overnight stay.
Only trailers equipped with a finished living quarters are designed to
accommodate camping, sleeping and/or overnight stays, and are equipped
with safety features such as, a vent and/or egress window (escape hatch).
Walk-in tack rooms and unfinished living quarters are not equipped with
these features.
^ DANGER
You can die or be brain damaged by Carbon Monoxide.
• Do not operate a generator, portable grill, portable heater, portable
lantern or portable stove inside the trailer.
^ WARNING
Do not sleep in a trailer that is not equipped with a finished living quarters.
A trailer not designed with living quarters should only be used for
transportation of its intended cargo.
8.9.2
Rear Fold-Away Tack Compartment
Located in the rear, usually on the street side of the trailer, with the saddle
tree removed, the tack compartment wall can be folded up to the outside
wall. To begin this procedure, clear all remaining tack from the rear tack
compartment, then remove the saddle tree (To remove, refer to Removable
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Saddle Tree in this section). After removal, the saddle tree may be
relocated to the front tack room. To fold-away the rear tack compartment
wall, simply locate the securing pin(s) on the interior side of the center
post at the back doors. Location of the pin(s) is dependent upon model.
When pin(s) are located, free the wall by extracting spring loaded pin from
the closed position. As wall becomes free, begin to fold forward and
toward the outside wall. After partition is firmly against the outside
interior wall, lock down the folding wall with the locking pin, located at
the top of the partition. To restore the rear tack compartment to a usable
position, simply reverse the above procedure. Make sure all pins are
secured back in place and that everything is ready for travel. Moveable
partition can be removed if desired by extracting the pins from the hinges
on the wall.
8.9.3
Solid Rear Tack Compartment
Located in the rear, usually on the street side of the trailer, the solid tack
compartment cannot be removed. The saddle tree may or may not be
removable depending upon the model. If the saddle tree is removable refer
to removable saddle tree in this section, for instructions. If the saddle tree
is mounted permanent it cannot be removed. The radius wall separating
the rear tack compartment from the horse area is a solid wall to the floor
and roof.
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8.10 SADDLE TREE
Your trailer may be equipped with one or more saddle trees. Saddle trees
consist of a post (A), saddle rack (B) and blanket pole (C). See figure 828. The number of saddle racks and blanket poles on a saddle tree post
will vary depending on the model of your trailer. The post may be
attached solid to the trailer or may be removable. Each saddle rack and
blanket pole may be rearranged and height adjusted according to users
individual needs. Do not store tack long term in tack compartment due to
condensation and mildew factors in diverse climates.
Figure 8-28 Saddle Tree
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8.10.1 Removable Saddle Tree
To remove the saddle tree, first remove all saddles and tack from the
saddle tree. Next, remove the safety detent pin (A) located on the side of
the saddle tree post close to the top, by pulling the pin outward. This will
release the saddle tree’s spring loaded latch (B). See figure 8-29. Next,
lift the saddle tree up, about 1 inch, compressing the upper latch spring,
until the lower bracket will clear the floor receiver (C). See figure 8-30.
Then tilt the bottom of the tree outwards toward the rear door opening and
continue until removed. After removal, the saddle tree may be relocated to
the front tack room, depending upon model. To replace the saddle tree,
reverse the above procedure.
Figure 8-29
Top Saddle Post Pin & Latch
Figure 8-30
Bottom Saddle Post Floor Receiver
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8.10.2 Saddle Tree Adjustments
On most models, saddle racks and blanket poles are adjustable, height and
position. To adjust the height of any or all saddle racks or blanket poles,
simply loosen with a 5/8” wrench (do not remove) the acorn nuts that
attach the rack or pole to the saddle tree post, until the rack or pole slides
freely. See figure 8-31. Then, slide up or down to the new position and
retighten. To reposition the saddle racks or poles on the saddle tree post,
first remove the saddle tree from the trailer (refer to Removable Saddle
Tree in this section). Lay the saddle tree on the ground and loosen (do not
remove) the acorn nuts that attaches the rack or pole to the saddle tree
post, until the rack or pole slides freely. Then slide up the pole until it
slides free of the post. Rearrange racks and poles to fit your individual
needs and reassemble. Be sure all acorn nuts are tight enough to support
load while in transit. To avoid movement or slippage while in transit,
tighten all acorn nuts to 40 ft. lbs. of torque.
Figure 8-31 Adjusting Saddle Rack Height
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8.11 REMOVABLE CENTER POST
To remove the center post, first remove all attachments (dividers, head
grills, gates, pen panels, etc.) from the center post (A). See figures 8-32
and 8-33. Next, remove the safety bale pin (B) located on the side of the
post just below the upper spring loaded slide collar (C) by flexing the wire
bale off the end of the pin and pulling outward. Pull down on upper
spring loaded collar, aligning the hole (D) in the collar and post. With both
holes aligned insert the bale pin back into the hole, this will hold the collar
down for ease of removing. Now remove the post and stow appropriately.
To replace, reverse procedure, being sure post is fully engaged in
mounting slots top and bottom. Finally replace safety bale pin into center
post.
Figure 8-32
Center Post Installed
Figure 8-33
Center Post Removed
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8.12 SLIDING GATE LATCH
Sliding gate latches are used on Livestock trailers with sliding swing
tailgates and center gates with the sliding gate option. CAUTION never
stand directly in-line with the sliding gate opening during the animal
loading and unloading process. Always stand to the side of opening. To
open a sliding gate latch (A), remove the safety bail pin (B) from its closed
position. See figures 8-34 and 8-35. Then, swing handle (C) over to
vertical slot, lifting it up to top of slot and swing over into the retracted
position. Once the handle is in the retracted position slide the gate open,
take CAUTION to remaining out of the direct path of loading and
unloading animals. To close reverse the procedure, being sure to return
handle to latched position with safety bale pin in place.
Figure 8-34
Sliding Gate Latch Closed
Figure 8-35
Sliding Gate Latch Opened
8.13 LIVESTOCK TRAVELING CENTER GATE
Some Livestock trailers may be equipped with a traveling center gate(s).
A traveling type center gate is suspended from the ceiling of trailer in a
track system with rollers on each side, and can be moved from end to end
of track, latching around side wall upright posts and special pockets with
ease. Traveling gates should ONLY be repositioned when NO animal(s)
are present. DO NOT open or move center gate(s) from the inside of the
trailer with live animal(s) loaded.
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^ WARNING
Animals are capable of inflicting serious injury or death to a human
handler.
Do not open the center gate from inside the trailer with live animals
loaded.
This type of gate consists of an outer full perimeter frame with either a
sliding or a swinging inner gate assembly. The outer full perimeter frame
is latched and unlatched by four latches, one in each corner. To open latch
(A), rotate the safety catch (B) up and around toward the center of the
trailer. See figures 8-36 and 8-37. Next, move the handle (C) of the latch
inward and upward rotating it a quarter of turn and then downward into its
innermost holdback position. Repeat this procedure for each of the four
latches. Reverse procedure to latch traveling center gate, being sure to
check each latch is fully engaged around its accompanying side post. Be
sure all four safety catches are fully engaged.
Figure 8-36
Traveling Center Gate Closed
Figure 8-37
Traveling Center Gate Open
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8.14 SMALL ANIMAL PENS
To open small animal pen(s) spring loaded latch, pull back on handle then
rotate it 90 degrees down into the restrain groove. See figures 8-38 and 839. When latching reverse procedure being sure plunger is full engaged
into catch. Spring loaded hold back(s) to restrain pen(s) in the loading and
unload process are built into top section of center pen. To open, pull up
and rotate over to pen to be held back and lower into correspond receiver
hole in the top of pen. Reverse procedure to open. Be sure holdback is
lowered back into its hold back hole.
Figure 8-38
Small Animal Pen Closed
Figure 8-39
Small Animal Pen Opened
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8.15 SLIDEOUT
Your trailer may be equipped with a slideout room in the living quarters
area. See figures 8-40, 8-41, 8-42 and 8-43. Be sure there is adequate
clearance outside to extend the slideout room.
^ WARNING
Bystanders can be crushed by the slideout.
Keep people away from the slideout while extending and retracting.
Slideout room components have separate instruction/owners manuals.
Locate and read this manual before operating the slideout room. Slide
room operators manuals are available on line from HWH Corporation at
HWHCORP.com/Cimarron.html.
Figure 8-40
Slideout Retracted-Interior
Figure 8-41
Slideout Extended-Interior
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Figure 8-42
Figure 8-43
Slideout Retracted-Exterior Slideout Extended-Exterior
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9 INSPECTION, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE
9.1
INSPECTION, SERVICE & MAINTENANCE CHARTS
You must inspect, maintain and service your
trailer regularly to insure safe and reliable
operation. If you cannot or are unsure how to
perform the items listed here, have your dealer
do them. Note: In addition to this manual,
also check the relevant component
manufacturer's manual.
Inspection and Service Before Each Use
Item
Inspection / Service
Manual Section
Reference
> Electric
Check operation
> Hydraulic
Check fluid level
Sections 4.2.1.5 &
4.2.2.5
Breakaway Brakes
Section 9.2.4.4
Breakaway Battery
Fully charged,
connections clean
Sections 4.2.1.5 &
4.2.2.5
Brakes, all types
Check operation
Section 7.3
Shoes and Drums
Adjust
Section 7.2 & 9.2.4.2
Brakes, Hydraulic – Vacuum
Actuated
Check gauge for
proper vacuum of 18
In. Hg. (inches of
mercury)
Section 9.2.4.4
Coupler and Hitch Ball
Check for cracks,
pits, and flats.
Replace w/ball &
coupler having trailer
GVW Rating.
Section 4.2.1.1
Grease.
Check locking device
& replace.
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Section 4.2.1.1
Section 9.2.5.1
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Inspection, Service & Maintenance
Gooseneck Ball
Check for cracks,
pits, and flats.
Replace w/ball &
coupler having trailer
GVW Rating.
Grease.
Section 4.2.2.1
Section 4.2.2.1
Check locking device
& replace when worn.
Section 9.2.5.2
Safety Chains & Hooks
Check for wear and
damage
Sections 4.2.1.4 &
4.2.2.4
Tires
Check tire pressure
when cold. Inflate as
needed. Maintain
maximum air
pressure as stated
on tire sidewall.
Sections 6.1 & 9.2.9
Wheels - Lug Nuts (Bolts) &
Hub
Check for tightness
Section 6.1
Tighten. For new
and remounted
wheels, check torque
after first 10, 25 &
50 miles of driving
and after any impact
Sections 7.1 &
9.2.12
Inspection and Service each 3 Months or 3,000
Miles
Inspection / Service
Manual Section
Reference
> Rubber mats and
floor
Remove mats. Wash
both sides. Wash floor
Section 9.2.2
> Hinges, Doors and
Dividers
Inspect. Repair or
replace damaged, worn
or broken parts
Item
Body
> Cleaning
Wash complete exterior
and interior of stall area
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Sections 5.3.1, 5.4.1 &
9.2.2
Section 9.2.2.1
Revised 2013
Inspection, Service & Maintenance
Inspection and Service each 6 Months or
6,000 Miles
Item
Inspection / Service
Manual Section
Reference
Tires
Rotate @ 5,000 miles
Section 9.2.9
Check wear and
current draw
See Mfr’s Manual
Brakes, electric
> Magnets
> Controller (in
tow vehicle)
Check power output
(amperage) and
modulation
See Controller Mfr’s
Manual
Body
> Roof Vents
> Windows
Clean dirt buildup,
lubricate hinges,
slides and latches
Section 9.2.2
Section 9.2.3
> Door Hinges
> Paddle Latches
Tires
Inspect tread and
sidewalls thoroughly.
Replace tire when
treads are worn,
when sidewall has a
bulge, or sidewall is
worn
Section 9.2.9
Section 9.2.9
Wheel Bearings, all
axles
Check for free
running and wobble.
See axles mfr’s
manual
Axles up to 7,000 lb
Lube w/grease gun.
Section 9.2.11.1
Axles over 7,000 lb
Repack with grease.
Section 9.2.11.2
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Inspection and Service
Each Year or 12,000 Miles
Item
Inspection / Service
Manual Section
Reference
Brakes, all types
Check for scoring and
wear. Replace per
manufacturer’s
specifications
Section 9.2.4.1
Jack, Drop- leg
Grease gears
See Jack Mfr’s Manual
Body
Inspect all frame
members, bolts & rivets.
Repair or replace
damaged, worn or broken
parts.
Section 9.2.1
> Shoes and drums
> Frame members
> Welds
> Slide- out
Inspect all welds. Repair
as needed
See Brake Mfr’s Manual
Section 9.2.2.3
Clean dirt build- up.
Lubricate per slide out
mfg’s recommendations.
> Roof Seal
Wheel Rims
Inspect and repair as
needed
Section 9.2.2.4
Inspect for cracks & dents.
Replace as needed.
Section 9.2.10
Check BY DEALER
Section 9.2.1
Structure
> Axle Attachment
Bolts
9.2
9.2.1
INSPECTION AND SERVICE INSTRUCTIONS
Axle Bolts, Frame, Suspension, & Structure
^ WARNING
Worn or broken suspension parts can cause loss of control and injury
may result.
Have trailer professionally inspected annually and after any impact.
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To perform many of the inspection and maintenance activities, you must
jack up the trailer. Figure 9-1 indicates the general areas where jacks and
jack stands may be applied.
Figure 9-1 Jacking Points
When jacking and using jack stands, place them so as to clear wiring,
brake lines, and suspension parts (springs, torsion bars, etc.). Place jacks
and jack stands on the supporting structure to which the axles are attached,
as close to outside main frame as practical.
^ WARNING
Never crawl under your trailer unless it is on firm and level ground and
resting on properly placed and secured jack stands.
9.2.2
Trailer Body
9.2.2.1 Cleaning
Because the trailer floor receives the most abuse, it will most likely
corrode before any other part of the structure. This is particularly true for
horse and livestock trailers, having floors subjected to urine and manure.
The urine and manure are corrosive to the aluminum flooring and other
structural parts of the trailer.
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Remove the rubber mats from the floor of the trailer, and wash them, at
least every three months. Using a power washer and a neutral ph
automotive detergent solution, wash both sides of the rubber mat, as well
as the floor and interior walls of the trailer. Rinse the rubber mat and the
trailer floor and walls completely. Rinse, rinse, and rinse some more, it is
very important to expel all acid residues, in order to provide maximum
protection to the aluminum floor. Be sure the rubber mat and trailer floor
are completely dry before replacing the rubber floor mat.
HINT: Before replacing rubber mats sprinkle a box of baking soda over
the dry floor. The baking soda will help to neutralize the corrosive acids
in the urine and manure. It will also help control odors.
Washing the exterior of your trailer regularly is the easiest way to maintain
its new appearance. It is recommended to wash the exterior at least every
three months, with cool or lukewarm water and a neutral ph automotive
detergent solution. Numerous cleaning products are available from your
local automotive supply store.
Never use strong house hold detergents or soap, such as dish washing or
laundry liquid. These products can discolor and spot the painted and
natural aluminum surfaces of your trailer. Hint: DO NOT USE “Dawn®”
brand dish washing detergent, it can cause permanent tea colored stains on
natural aluminum surfaces.
Never wash a trailer that is “hot to the touch” or during exposure to strong,
direct sunlight. Always use a clean sponge, carwash mitt, or truck type
soft brush and pole with plenty of water for best results. Dry the trailer
with a chamois or soft terry cloth towel in order to eliminate water
spotting.
It is especially important to wash the trailer regularly when used during the
winter months, as dirt and road salt are difficult to remove and cause
damage to the trailer. Immediately remove items such as gasoline, diesel
fuel, bird droppings and insect deposits because they can cause permanent
damage to the finish over time. Flush the complete underside of your
trailer frequently. Keep body and door drain holes free from packed dirt.
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If your trailer is equipped with rubber floor or ramp mats, DO NOT USE
rubber, plastic and vinyl protective products on the mats, as they cause the
mat to become extremely slippery.
As with all metals, natural raw aluminum over time will oxidize and
tarnish, changing from an even silver white to a dark gray somewhat
streaked appearance. To remove this aluminum oxide from the surface
and bring back your trailer’s NEW appearance, periodically, your
aluminum trailer may need to be acid washed. Acid washing should be
done by experienced personnel at your local dealership or truck wash. The
time frame between acid washes varies greatly from location to location.
Environmental issues such as humidity, chemical exposures, road salts,
and temperature can vary the time between acid washes greatly, it all
depends on the general appearance of your specific trailer. But as a Rule
Of Thumb, most aluminum trailers need to be acid washed about every
two years.
9.2.2.2 Fasteners and frame members
Inspect all of the fasteners and structural frame members for bending and
other damage, cracks, or failure. Repair or replace any damaged fastener
and repair the frame member. If you have any questions about the
condition or method of repair of fasteners or frame members, get the
recommendation of, or have the repair done by, your dealer.
The various fastener types used on your trailer are:
Bolts, which are used mainly for attaching accessories and gate hinges to
the trailer body;
VHB Tape, which is used to attach the door and sidewall skins of the body
to each other, and to the frame of the trailer; and
Huck Bolts are used at various locations on the sub-frame. Huck bolts are
not user serviceable. If you detect a loose huck bolt fastener, do not tow
the trailer. Call your Cimarron trailer dealer for instructions.
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^ WARNING
Broken or damaged fasteners or welds can cause injury or damage to
trailer and contents.
Inspect for, and repair all damaged parts at least once a year.
9.2.2.3 Welds
All welds can crack or fail when subjected to heavy loads, extreme
vibration, or movement of cargo that was not properly tied to prevent
movement. Any time that you know or suspect that the trailer has been
subjected to heavy loads, extreme vibration or movement of cargo,
immediately inspect the welds and fasteners for damage. To prevent
severe damage to your trailer, inspect all of the welds for cracks or failure
at least once a year.
^ WARNING
Improper weld repair will lead to early failure of the trailer structure and
can cause serious injury or death.
Do not repair cracked or broken welds unless you have the skills and
equipment to make a proper repair. If not, have the welds repaired by
your dealer.
9.2.2.4 Roof Seal
All roof sealants can crack or fail when subjected to extreme vibration,
prolonged exposure to ultra violet radiation, extreme heat or extreme cold
for prolong periods. Any time that you know or suspect that the trailer has
subjected to these conditions, immediately inspect the roof seal for
damage. To prevent severe damage to your trailer and contents, inspect
the roof seal for cracks, adhesion or failure at least once a year.
To repair roof sealant, manufacturer insists you only use, Dow-Corning
791 neutral cure silicone sealant. The use of this specific sealant is
required to maintain your roof seal integrity for adhesion and elasticity
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reasons. If you cannot find this sealant locally, contact your dealer or
Cimarron Trailers, at 405-222-4800 for a supply of this specific sealant.
NOTICE
Although roof seams are sealed, trailer is not guaranteed waterproof.
Precautions should be made to protect valuable cargo. Failure to do so
may result in water damage to contents.
Inspect for and repair all damaged sealant at least once a year
9.2.3
Door Hinges
Lubricate all door hinges with grease every 6 months or 6,000 miles. See
figure 9-2.
Figure 9-2 Lubricate Door Hinges
9.2.4
Trailer Brakes
9.2.4.1 Brake shoes and drums
Properly functioning brake shoes and drums are essential to ensure safety.
You must have your dealer inspect these components at least once per
year, or each 12,000 miles.
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The brake shoes must be adjusted after the first 200 miles of use, and each
3,000 miles thereafter. Some axles are fitted with a brake mechanism that
will automatically adjust the brakes shoes when the trailer is “hard braked”
from a rearward direction. Read your axle and brake manual to see how to
adjust your brakes. If you do not have this manual, call Cimarron Trailers,
Inc. at 405-222-4800 for a free copy.
9.2.4.2 Manually adjusting brake shoes
Most braking systems are not automatically adjusted by hard stopping.
Refer to your axle and brake manual to see how to adjust your brakes. If
you do not have this manual, call Cimarron Trailers, Inc. at 405-222-4800
for a free copy.
9.2.4.3 Brakes, Electric
Two different types of electric brakes may be present on the trailer: an
emergency electric breakaway system, which acts only if the trailer comes
loose from the hitch and the breakaway pin is pulled. The other brake is
an electric braking system that acts whenever the brakes of the tow vehicle
are applied.
Breakaway Brake
• Breakaway Battery
This battery supplies the power to operate the trailer brakes if the trailer
uncouples from the tow vehicle. Be sure to check, maintain and replace
the battery according to the battery manufacturer’s instructions. The
breakaway battery is equipped with an inline battery charger, in order for
this charger to function, the trailer must receive 12 volt auxiliary power
from the tow vehicle.
• Breakaway Switch
This switch causes the breakaway battery to operate the electric brakes if
the trailer uncouples from the tow vehicle.
To check for proper functioning of the switch, battery and brakes, you
must pull the pin from the switch and confirm that the brakes apply to each
wheel. You can do this by trying to pull the trailer with the tow vehicle,
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after pulling the pin. The trailer brakes may not lock, but you will notice
that a greater force is needed to pull the trailer.
^ WARNING
If electric breakaway brakes do not operate when trailer is uncoupled
from the tow vehicle, death or serious injury can occur.
Check emergency breakaway brake system BEFORE each tow.
• Tow Vehicle Operated Electric Brakes
The electric brakes that operate in conjunction with the tow vehicle brakes
must be “synchronized” so that braking is properly distributed to the tow
vehicle brakes and the trailer brakes. For proper operation and
synchronization, read and follow the axle/brake and the brake controller
manufacturer's instructions. If you do not have these instructions, call
Cimarron Trailers, Inc. at 405-222-4800 for a free copy.
• Magnets for all Electric Brakes
To make certain an electrically-operated braking system will function
properly, you must have your dealer inspect the magnets at least once a
year, or each 12,000 miles. See the brake manual for wear and current
inspection instructions.
9.2.4.4 Brakes, Hydraulic (air or electric operated)
If your trailer has hydraulically-operated brakes, they function the same
way the hydraulic brakes do on your tow vehicle. The hydraulic braking
system must be inspected by a dealer, at least as often as the brakes on the
tow vehicle, but no less than once per year. This inspection includes an
assessment of the condition and proper operation of the wheel cylinders,
brake shoes, brake drums and hubs.
You must check the fluid level in the master cylinder reservoir at least
every three months. If you tow your trailer an average of 1,000 miles per
month in a hot and dry environment, you must check the brake fluid level
once a month. The brake fluid reservoir is located on the tongue of the
trailer or near the gooseneck. Fill with DOT 3 brake fluid.
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^ WARNING
If the vacuum gauge in tow vehicle is not at or above 18 In. Hg. (inches of
mercury), damage to the brake system will result and the brakes may
become inoperable.
• Air Pressure-Operated Hydraulic
Air/hydraulic braking systems are typically used when the tow vehicle has
a diesel engine. The tow vehicle has an air compressor that routes the air
to an air/hydraulic mechanism, which sends brake fluid to the wheel
cylinders.
The air pressure gauge in your tow vehicle indicates the current air
pressure. See your tow vehicle manual for the proper air pressure.
• Electrical-Operated Hydraulic
Electric/hydraulic braking systems, which are mounted on the trailer, use a
small electrically-driven pump to generate hydraulic pressure, which
operates the brake cylinders. Like electrical brakes, an electric/hydraulic
braking system is operated by an electrical signal from the tow vehicle.
9.2.5
Trailer Connection to Tow Vehicle
9.2.5.1 Coupler and ball
The coupler on the trailer connects to the ball attached to the hitch on the
tow vehicle. The coupler, ball and hitch transfer the towing forces
between the tow vehicle and the trailer. Before each tow, coat the ball
with a thin layer of automotive bearing grease to reduce wear and ensure
proper operation; and check the locking device that secures the coupler to
the ball for proper operation.
See the coupler manufacturer's manual for other inspection and
maintenance activities. If you do not have this manual, call Cimarron
Trailers, Inc. at 405-222-4800 for a free copy.
If you see or feel evidence of wear, such as flat spots, deformations, pitting
or corrosion, on the ball or coupler, immediately have your dealer inspect
them to determine the proper action to prevent possible failure of the ball
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and coupler system. All bent or broken coupler parts must be replaced
before towing the trailer.
The coupler handle lever must be able to rotate freely and automatically
snap into the latched position. Oil the pivot points, sliding surfaces, and
spring ends with SAE 30W motor oil. Keep the ball pocket and latch
mechanism clean. Dirt or contamination can prevent proper operation of
the latching mechanism.
When replacing a ball, the load rating must match or exceed the GVWR of
the trailer.
9.2.5.2 Gooseneck
The gooseneck receiver on the trailer connects to a hitch-mounted ball on
the towing vehicle. The receiver, ball and hitch transfer the towing forces
between the tow vehicle and the trailer. Before each tow, coat the ball
with a thin layer of automotive bearing grease to reduce wear and ensure
proper operation; and check the locking device that secures the receiver to
the ball for proper operation.
See the gooseneck ball receiver manufacturer's manual for other inspection
and maintenance activities. If you do not have a manual for the receiver,
call Cimarron Trailers, Inc. at 405-222-4800 for a free copy.
If you see or can feel evidence of wear, such as flat spots, pitting or
corrosion, on the ball or receiver, immediately have your dealer inspect
them to determine the proper action to prevent possible failure of the ball
and receiver system.
When replacing a ball, the load rating must match or exceed the GVWR of
the trailer.
9.2.6
Landing Leg or Jack
If a grease fitting is present, you must use a grease gun to lubricate the jack
mechanism. Grease the gears in the top of hand-cranked jacks once a year,
by removing the top of the jack and pumping or hand packing grease into
the gears.
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9.2.7
Lights and Signals
Before each tow, check the trailer taillights, stoplights, turn signals and
any clearance lights for proper operation.
^ WARNING
Improper operating taillights, stoplights and turn signals can cause
collisions.
Check all lights before each tow.
9.2.8
Accessory Battery
Your trailer may be outfitted with an accessory battery that operates
lighting, electric landing gear, slide-outs or other accessories. An
accessory battery may be kept charged either by the tow vehicle or by the
generator or shore power. See the manual for the accessory battery.
Trailers with accessory batteries are wired for a charge line from the tow
vehicle. Your tow vehicle must have 12 volt auxiliary power to the trailer
plug for the charge system to function. At the accessory battery the
auxiliary power charger line will have an in-line 30 amp breaker. Check
and replace as necessary.
A disconnect switch may be provided to disconnect the accessory battery
when you do not plan to be using the trailer for an extended period, such
as seasonal storage. If there is no disconnect switch, then remove the
cables from the battery terminals.
The accessory battery must be kept in a charged condition during storage.
The battery could freeze and break if it becomes discharged.
9.2.9
Tires
Before each tow, be sure the tire pressure is at the value indicated on the
Certification / VIN label. Tire pressure must be checked while the tire is
cold. Do not check the tire pressure immediately after towing the trailer.
Allow at least three hours for a tire to cool, if the trailer has been towed for
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Inspection, Service & Maintenance
as much as one mile. Replace the tire before towing the trailer if the tire
treads have less than 2/32 inch depth or the telltale bands are visible.
A bubble, cut or bulge in a side wall can result in a tire blowout. Inspect
both side walls of each tire for any bubble, cut or bulge; and replace a
damaged tire before towing the trailer.
^ WARNING
Worn, damaged or under-inflated tires can cause loss of control, resulting
in damage, serious injury and possibly death.
Inspect tires before each tow.
The tire air pressure for trailer tires MUST be kept at be the cold inflation
pressure indicated on the tire sidewall. The following chart lists the most
common tires used on Cimarron Trailers, and includes tire size, load
range, capacity each, cold inflation pressure and combined capacity for
four tires.
Cimarron Trailers Standard Tire, Capacity Chart
Tire Size
ST225/75R15” D
ST235/80R16”
LT235/85R16” 614
235/75 17.5” H-902
235/75 17.5” H-902 J
Load Range
D
E
G
H
J
Capacity Ea.
2540#
3420#
3750#
6005#
6005#
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Infl. Press.
@ 65 psi cold
@ 80 psi cold
@ 110 psi cold
@ 125 psi cold
@ 125 psi cold
Revised 2013
Inspection, Service & Maintenance
Figure 9-3 Tire Inspection and Wear Diagnostic Chart
9.2.10 Wheel Rims
If the trailer has been struck, or impacted, on or near the wheels, or if the
trailer has struck a curb, inspect the rims for damage (i.e. being out of
round); and replace any damaged wheel. Inspect the wheels for damage
every year, even if no obvious impact has occurred.
9.2.11 Wheels, Bearings and Lug Nuts
A loose, worn or damaged wheel bearing is the most common cause of
brakes that grab.
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Inspection, Service & Maintenance
To check your bearings, jack trailer and check wheels for side-to-side
looseness. If the wheels are loose, or spin with a wobble, the bearings
must be serviced or replaced.
9.2.11.1 Wheel bearings (Axles up to 7,000 lb)
The bearings must be lubricated every 6 months or 6,000 miles to insure
safe operation of your trailer. See figure 9-4.
Figure 9-4 E-Z Lube® Axle Wheel Bearing
• Remove the rubber plug from the grease cap.
• Place grease gun on grease zerk (A).
• Pump grease gun until new grease begins to appear.
Hint: Use a different color of grease each time so you will know when the
new grease begins to appear.
• Install rubber plug on grease cap.
Refer to the axle manufacturer's manual for additional service information.
If you do not have this manual, call Cimarron Trailers, Inc. at 405-2224800 for a free copy.
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Inspection, Service & Maintenance
9.2.11.2 Wheel bearings (Axles over 7,000 lb)
The bearings must be lubricated every 6 months or 6,000 miles to insure
safe operation of your trailer. Remove the hub and repack the wheel
bearings. Refer to the axle manufacturer's manual for additional service
information. If you do not have this manual, call Cimarron Trailers, Inc. at
405-222-4800 for a free copy.
9.2.12 Lug Nuts (Bolts)
Lug nuts are prone to loosen right after a wheel is mounted to a hub.
When driving on a remounted wheel, check to see if the lug nuts are tight
after the first 10, 25 and 50 miles of driving and before each tow
thereafter.
^ WARNING
Lug nuts are prone to loosen after initial installation, which can lead to
death or serious injury.
Check lug nuts for tightness on a new trailer or when wheel(s) have been
remounted after the first 10, 25 and 50 miles of driving.
^ WARNING
Metal creep between the wheel rim and lug nuts will cause rim to loosen
and could result in a wheel coming off, leading to death or serious injury.
Tighten lug nuts before each tow.
Tighten the lug nuts to the proper torque for the axle size on your trailer, to
prevent wheels from coming loose. Use a calibrated torque wrench to
tighten the fasteners. Over-tightening will result in breaking the studs or
permanently deforming the mounting stud holes in the wheels.
1. Remove all excess paint, oil and grease from mounting surfaces.
2. Start all lug nuts by hand to prevent cross threading.
3. Tighten lug nuts in the sequence shown in the “Lug Torque Sequence”
figure 9-5.
4. Tighten lug nuts in three stages as shown in figure 9-6.
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Inspection, Service & Maintenance
5. Check and retorque after the first 10, 25 and 50 miles of driving and
before each tow thereafter.
Figure 9-5 Lug Torque Sequence
Lug Nut Torque – Steel Wheels
Stud Size
1st Stage
2nd Stage
1/2 Inch
30 lb. ft.
60 lb. ft.
9/16 Inch
45 lb. ft.
90 lb. ft.
5/8 Inch
70 lb. ft.
140 lb. ft.
5/8 Inch
100 lb. ft.
200 lb. ft.
Flanged
5/8 Inch
50 lb. ft.
100 lb. ft.
Teflon Swivel
Flanged
3/4 Inch
135 lb. ft.
270 lb. ft.
Flanged
3rd Stage
90 lb. ft.
130 lb. ft.
200 lb. ft.
300 lb. ft.
150 lb. Ft.
400 lb. ft.
Figure 9-6 Steel Wheel Torque Values
NOTE: Due to custom manufacturing changes and requirements, torque
markings or labels on parts, wheels, lug nuts or wheel studs, take
precedence over the above chart for standard assemblies.
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10 ELECTRICAL DIAGRAMS
Figure 10-1 Electric / Hydraulic Brake Actuator Schematic
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Electrical Diagrams
Figure 10-2 Standard Wiring Schematic
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Electrical Diagrams
Figure 10-3 Standard Wiring Diagram
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Electrical Diagrams
Figure 10-4, 7 Pin Electrical Connector
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11 WARRANTY INFORMATION
8 Year Warranty effective starting with 2014 model year trailers.
8 YEAR LIMITED WARRANTY
Cimarron Trailers, Inc, (Manufacturer) warrants to the original purchaser
(the Purchaser) that the Cimarron Trailer (the Product) purchased shall
be free of defects in materials and workmanship attributable to
manufacturer, subject to the limitation and exclusions described below.
The warranties described below will hereafter be identified as “this
Warranty”. The term of this Warranty described below begins from the
date of the original purchase of product. Manufacturer warrants that the
particular components of its trailer product will be free from defects in
materials and workmanship for the warranty period specified below
corresponding to the particular component. Manufacturers determination
of whether the Product has been abused or misused by the Purchaser is
final and binding on Purchaser regarding Purchaser’s right under this
warranty.
TO ACTIVATE THIS WARRANTY, this warranty shall be signed
by Dealer and Original Purchaser and mailed to Cimarron Trailers,
Inc., Warranty Department, PO Box B, Chickasha, OK 73023 within
thirty (30) days of date of purchase. IF THIS SIGNED WARRANTY
IS NOT POST MARKED BY THE THIRTIETH DAY AFTER
PURCHASE, ALL WARRANTIES WHETHER EXPRESSED OR
IMPLIED SHALL BE NULL AND VOID.
Structural – 8 years recreational; 1 year commercial. Manufacturer
warrants that the structural components of the trailer main frame assembly,
consisting of the bottom rails, floor cross members, side posts, side and
roof rail extrusions, hitch and sub frame only, will be free of defects in
materials and workmanship attributable to manufacturer for eight (8) years
from the date of original purchase. If manufacturers trailer product is used
for a commercial purpose, manufacturer warrants that the structural
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Warranty Information
components of the trailer main frame assembly shall be free from defects
in materials and workmanship attributable to manufacturer for one (1) year
from the date of original purchase.
Body and Hardware – 3 years recreational; 1 year commercial
Manufacturer warrants that the non-structural trailer components,
including without limitation the manufactured doors, hinges, gates, divider
parts, attachments, and any options manufactured by manufacturer (all of
the foregoing being referred to as “Body and Hardware”) will be free of
defects in materials and workmanship attributable to manufacturer for
three (3) years from the date of original purchase if manufacturer’s trailer
product is used for ordinary, normal and proper recreational use. If
manufacturer’s trailer product is used for a commercial purpose,
manufacturer warrants that the Body and Hardware shall be free from
defects in materials and workmanship attributable to manufacturer for one
(1) year from the date of original purchase.
Sealants – 1 year. Manufacturer warrants that a trailer’s roof sealants and
caulking will be free of defects in material and workmanship attributable
to manufacturer one (1) year from the date of original purchase. After one
(1) year, sealants and caulking are a maintenance item.
Other Manufacturers’ Warranties. Manufacturer passes through to the
purchaser all warranties from all third party manufacturers for all products,
attachments, and parts manufactured by those third-parties and
incorporated into or attached to manufacturer’s trailer products. Purchaser
is directed to the warranty information supplied by the other manufacturer
that accompanies purchaser’s trailer for the description of their warranty,
the time period and any exclusions to their warranties. Items
manufactured by third parties that are sold as part of your trailer include
but are not limited to: Living Quarter packages and all related components,
roof material, axles, axle components, tow in and tow out on axles, camber
on axles, tires, rims, air conditioners, generators, awnings, electrical jacks,
landing gear, couplers, batteries, and ramp door springs.
Warranty Exclusions. This warranty excludes: (1) repair or replacement
of items subject to wear and tear or that must be maintained by purchaser
due to the stress of normal operations and wear and tear, including but not
limited to, bearings, brakes, brake linings, hoses, tires, bearing seals,
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Warranty Information
hinges; (2) defacing, scratching, dents, chips, tears not caused by
manufacturer or damage caused by abuse or misuse of the trailer by man or
animal, abuse or misuse of any component parts, by the environment or by
acts of God; (3) damage caused by loads in excess of Gross Vehicle
Weight Rating stated on the certification plate; (4) paint deterioration due
to wear and paint damage from decals, graphics, road elements, improper
wash solvents, salt, sand and weather; (5) damage to floor due to failure to
maintain properly; (6) damage due to use of aluminum brighteners, etching
acids, caustics cleaning agents, fertilizers, cement, etc.; (7) damage caused
by improper hitch ball, tow vehicle hook up, or towing with a truck or
other vehicle rated higher than two times the GVWR of the trailer (unless
the towing vehicle is “air ride” equipped); (8) damages to any tow vehicle
wiring; (9) damages caused by failure to check and torque lug nuts
properly resulting in any loose lug nuts; (10) damage to contents of any
trailer product, regardless of cause.
Warranty Void Due to Unauthorized Repairs and Accessories. THIS
WARRANTY WILL BE VOIDED BY ANY REPAIR OR
MODIFICATIONS TO THE PRODUCT, OR ADDITION OF
PRODUCT ACCESSORIES BY ANYONE OTHER THAN AN
APPROVED CIMARRON DEALER. Manufacturer will not be
responsible for work performed by anyone other than the manufacturer.
Limitations of Damages. Manufacturer specifically disclaims any and all
liability under this warranty for special, incidental, indirect or
consequential damages, which include but are not limited to loss of time,
inconvenience, lost profits and/or loss of income, freight costs, delivery
costs and postage costs. Manufacturer’s total liability under this warranty
shall not exceed the cost of the manufacturer’s trailer product.
LIMITATION OF LIABILITY
MANUFACTURER EXCLUDES ALL LIABILITY, WHETHER
BASED ON CONTRACT (EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED) TORT, OR
PRODUCT LIABILITY, FOR ANY DAMAGES TO PURCHASER OR
ANY OTHER PARTY OTHER THAN REPAIR OF ANY DEFECTIVE
ITEM AS SET FORTH IN THIS WARRANTY. NOR SHALL
MANUFACTURER BE LIABLE FOR ANY PUNITIVE, SPECIAL,
INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OF
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Warranty Information
ANY KIND OR FOR LOSS OF REVENUE, PROFITS, LOSS OF
BUSINESS, LOSS OF USE OF PRODUCT, OR OTHER FINANCIAL
LOSS ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SALE,
MAINTENANCE, USE OR FAILURE TO THE PRODUCT, EVEN IF
MANUFACTURER HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF
SUCH DAMAGES. MANUFACTURER’S LIABILITY UNDER THIS
WARRANTY THEREFORE DOES NOT INCLUDE, AND
SPECIFICALLY EXCLUDES, LIABILITY FOR PURCHASER’S
HOTEL OR OTHER LODGING, FOOD AND OTHER LIVING OR
TRAVEL EXPENSES, AND FUEL EXPENSES. THIS DISCLAIMER
OF LIABILITY SHALL NOT BE AFFECTED EVEN IF ANY
REMEDY PROVIDED IN WARRANTY FAILS OF ITS ESSENTIAL
PURPOSE.
DISCLAIMER OF IMPLIED WARRANTIES
MANUFACTURER MAKES NO EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OTHER THAN AS SPECIFICALLY SET FORTH IN
THIS WARRANTY. EXCEPT FOR THE EXPRESSED LIMITED
WARRANTY SET FORTH HEREIN, THE PRODUCT IS SOLD “AS
IS” AND THIS LIMITED WARRANTY IS GIVEN AS THE
EXCLUSIVE WARRANTY AND REMEDY AND SUPERCEDES ALL
OTHER WARRANTIES WHETHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AND
THE PURCHASER DOES HEREBY RELEASE CIMARRON
TRAILER, INC THEREFROM. THERE ARE NO IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE, COMPLIANCE WITH DESCRIPTION, OR
NON-INFRINGEMENT IN CONNECTION WITH ANY SALE. THIS
LIMITED WARRANTY DOES NOT COVER FAILURE OF THE
PRODUCT RESULTING FROM CAUSES OTHER THAN PRODUCT
DEFECTS, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO IMPROPER
MAINTENANCE, IMPROPER USE, OR ANY OTHER SUCH CAUSE.
NO ONE INCLUDING AN AUTHORIZED DEALER MAY MAKE
FURTHER OR ADDITIONAL WARRANTIES ON BEHALF OF
CIMARRON TRAILERS. THE PURCHASER’S EXCLUSIVE
REMEDY SHALL BE THAT SET FORTH ABOVE FOR ANY CLAIM
OF LIABILITY UNDER NEGLIGENCE, STRICT LIABLITY,
BREACH OF WARRANTY OR ANY OTHER LEGAL THEORY. If
any provision of this Warranty is held to be illegal or unenforceable by any
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Warranty Information
court of competent jurisdiction, the remaining provisions shall remain
effective. Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of implied
warranties or the limitation of incidental or consequential damages for
certain products supplied to consumers or the limitation of liability for
personal injury, so the limitations and exclusions above may be limited in
their application. When the implied warranties cannot be excluded in their
entirety, they will be limited to the duration of the Expressed written terms
of this warranty.
DESIGN CHANGES
Manufacturer reserves the right to change the design of its Products from
time to time without notice and with no obligation to make corresponding
changes in any Products previously manufactured.
LEGAL REMEDIES OF PURCHASER
THIS WARRANTY GIVES YOU SPECIFIC LEGAL RIGHTS, AND
YOU MAY HAVE OTHER RIGHTS WHICH MAY VARY FROM
STATE TO STATE. No action to enforce this Warranty shall be effective
if it is commenced later than 180 days after discovery of any defect nor
shall any action to enforce this Warranty be effective if after the expiration
of the Warranty Periods set forth above.
Exclusive Remedy. Purchaser’s exclusive remedy for breach of warranty
as a result of defects in material and workmanship shall be for
manufacturer to repair or replace, at manufacturer’s sole option, any part
or parts of manufacturer’s trailer product that are determined by
manufacturer to be defective in material or workmanship. The only
persons authorized to make repairs to manufacturer’s trailer products
covered under this warranty are manufacturer, manufacturer’s authorized
factory representative, or a service facility approved in writing by the
Manufacturer’s Warranty Department prior to any repairs being made. If
any other party makes repairs to manufacturer’s trailer products, this
warranty is void. Manufacturer’s authorized factory representatives (or
other service facility approved by manufacturer) may make repairs or
adjustments to a manufacturer’s trailer product only after the manufacturer
has approved in writing each specific repair and adjustment and has agreed
in writing to the cost of each specific repair or adjustment to
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Warranty Information
manufacturer’s trailer product. manufacturer is not responsible for
purchaser’s freight, transportation, delivery or postage cost incurred in the
repair or replacement process.
Procedures for Warranty Claims. Purchaser shall return the trailer to
Dealer for inspection within five (5) days after discovering a problem with
their trailer. If Dealer cannot repair the problem, a “warranty claim form”
should be submitted to Cimarron Trailers, by registered letter or fax within
ten (10) days. Cimarron Trailers, Inc will acknowledge receipt of the
claim within thirty (30) days of receipt. Defective part(s) must be sent by
prepaid freight to Cimarron Trailers, Inc to qualify for replacement.
DEFECTIVE PARTS MUST BE RETURNED TO CIMARRON
TRAILERS WITHIN THIRTY (30) DAYS FOR DATE OF APPROVAL
TO QUALIFY FOR REPLACEMENT. Cimarron Trailers will reimburse
claimant for adjustment or repair of a Cimarron trailer only if written
approval is made by Cimarron Trailers. If authorized repairs are made
other than at the factory, Cimarron Trailers, does not warrant that
repair/replacement.
Mediation/Arbitration Required. By signing below, Purchaser hereby
accepts and agrees that disputes under this Warranty will first be submitted
to a certified Mediator, mutually agreed upon by both parties, which
mediation shall take place in Grady County, Oklahoma. Each party to any
mediation will pay its own fees, costs and expenses, including attorney’s
fees, and will equally split the mediator’s fees and administrative fees of
mediation; and the parties further accept and understand that disputes not
resolved by mediation will be settled by neutral, binding arbitration in
Grady County, Oklahoma, in accordance with the rules of the American
Arbitration Association or other arbitrator agreed upon by the parties. Each
part to any arbitration (or litigation to enforce the arbitration provision of
this Warranty or an arbitration award) will pay its own fees, costs and
expenses, including attorney’s fees, and will equally split the arbitrator’s
fees and administrative fees of arbitration.
THIS WARRANTY SHALL BE GOVERNED BY THE LAWS OF THE
STATE OF OKLAHOMA. THE PURCHASER WAIVES ANY
OBJECTION TO AND FURTHER SUBMITS TO THE JURISDICTION
AND VENUE OF GRADY COUNTY, OKLAHOMA FOR ANY AND
ALL JUDICIAL ACTIONS OR PROCEEDINGS TO ENFORCE OR
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Warranty Information
DEFEND ANY MEDIATION AGREEMENT OR ARBITRATION
AGREEMENT REFERENCED ABOVE, OR TO ENFORCE THE
ARBITRATION PROVISION OF THIS WARRANTY.
The undersigned Dealer, hereby certifies that he/she has explained the
limited warranty and claims procedures to the Original Purchaser and will
perform all responsibilities of Dealer.
By signing this Manufacturer’s Limited Warranty, THE PURCHASER
ACKNOWLEDGES THAT HE OR SHE HAS READ THE ABOVE
LIMITED WARRANTY AND AGREES THAT, SHOULD ANY
WARRANTY CLAIMS BE MADE, PURCHASER WILL FOLLOW
THE PROCEDURES AS SET FORTH ABOVE.
__________________________________________________________________________
Dealer Signature
Dealership
__________________________________________________________
Product Purchased
VIN of Product
Purchase Date
__________________________________________________________
Purchaser Name (Printed)
Purchaser Signature
__________________________________________________________
Purchaser’s Address
City
State
Zip
__________________________________________________________
Telephone #
Email Address
REQUIRED WARRANTY CLAIM PROCEDURE
1. Within five (5) days after discovering a problem with the trailer, return
it for inspection by DEALER.
2. If DEALER cannot repair the problem a “limited warranty claim
form” should be submitted to Cimarron Trailers, Inc., by registered
letter or fax within ten (10) days.
3. Cimarron Trailers, Inc. will acknowledge receipt of the claim within
thirty (30) days of receipt.
4. Defective part(s) must be sent by prepaid freight to Cimarron Trailers,
Inc. to qualify for replacement. DEFECTIVE PARTS MUST BE
RETURNED TO CIMARRON TRAILERS, INC. WITHIN 30 DAYS
FROM DATE OF APPROVAL TO QUALIFY FOR
REPLACEMENT.
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Warranty Information
5. Cimarron Trailers, Inc. will reimburse claimant for adjustment or
repair of a Cimarron trailer only if written approval is made by
Cimarron Trailers, Inc.
6. If authorized repairs are made other than at the factory, Cimarron
Trailers, Inc. does not warrant that repair/replacement.
Cimarron Trailers, Inc., makes no other express or implied warranties and
there are no other warranties, which extend beyond the description on the
face of this limited warranty.
THIS WARRANTY SHALL BE GOVERNED BY THE LAWS OF THE
STATE OF OKLAHOMA. JURISDICTION AND VENUE FOR ALL
JUDICIAL ACTIONS OR PROCEEDINGS TO ENFORCE OR
DEFEND THIS WARRANT SHALL BE IN THE DISTRICT COURT
OF GRADY COUNTY, STATE OF OKLAHOMA.
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12 SERVICE RECORD
DATE
SERVICE
PREFORMED BY
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
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Service Record
OWNERS REFERENCE INFORMATION
Owner’s Name_____________________________________________
Address___________________________________________________
City____________________________State________Zip____________
Phone______________________E-Mail_________________________
Dealer’s Name__________________________Phone_______________
Salespersons Name________________________Phone_____________
Trailer Model_______________________________________________
Trailer Type (circle one) Horse
Stock
Combination
Cargo
Auto
Trailer: Length____________Width_______________Height________
Axles (circle one) Single
Tandem
Triple
Axle Size__________________________________________________
Tire Size_____________________________Tire Brand_____________
Vehicle Identification Number (VIN)
(VIN) 5 P A _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Key#_________________ Location_____________________________
__________________
____________________________
Purchase Date______________________________________________
Warranty Registration Date____________________________________
CIMARRON TRAILERS RECOMMENDS THAT ALL PURCHASERS
RECORD TRAILER INFORMATION FOR FUTURE REFERANCE.
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