PJ,," - TPUG
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5SeJ:>
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alqWOU u3 ltlns
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r.-11111111;, _ _ With cIcmIns or
super
....ful COC'IIInands Ike MERGE. UNDO.
TEST and DISK • well
the old
snndbp suCh. RENUH anct~CH •
as.
REPLACE. JncIticIes """"'ower64
TOOLBOX ..
*"
Is the uIdrnate ~·s utility
paclcJa.e. InCludes PII 6411semb1er
1nd Power 64 BASIC soup-up kit. all
togemer 1ft one rUlly IlWtI"'ted and
economlcll package.
1121.95
~
elf In a wor.OC4ll1ior prq.....n.
NOW SHIPPINGIII
For Your Nearest Dealer
call
(416) 273·&350
sers.a new ntarl·sanGllrQ
Induaryto.mear.
MAlLPRO 64
A new pnemion of data
orpm.er and list !NftIPt'. MalIPro
64 Is the easim or all to learn and use.
Handles up t~ .. ,000 records on one disk.
printJ multiple labels KrOSS. does Il1InOI"
telCl edltln.:le· setting up Invakes.
Best of
all. MailPro 64 resides entirely within
tCommadore 64 Ind Commodore Ire tralemark. of
Commadore !kIII..- Machin.. Inc.
• Pr-esendy ~eted II)' f'tofeGiollll So_ware 10K
5pectfiauonl .ubfea to chlnae wrchout /IOUte
memory so you don'r havlI to connantly
jugle disks like you must with other data
base managers for the Commodore 64,
588.95
Your Commodore 64™
is only as good as
the software you feed it
Treat yourself, your family, your friends and your computer to a software feast of fun and learning. CBS Software offers a veritable
banquet of stimulating and fulfilling programs for every member of the family - for pre-schoolers learning numbers and letters from
their Sesame Street pals; for teenagers preparing for an important exam; for adults managing a home or career.
Carefully developed by leading experts in the fields of education, entertainment and personal enrichment, CBS Software knows
how to put the best into your Commodore 64 - and get the best out of you .
DINOSAUR DIGTM
ASTRO-GROVERTM
Pre-school children have fun and
develop early number skills as the)'
help their SESAME STREET pal.
GROVER, greet the friendly Zips from
the planet Zap! Filling over the
keyboard, the plastic EasyKey overlay
allows kids to choose and answer
using simple words and colourful
pictures. Both GROVER and the
Man-in-the-Moon gently point out
mistakes and encourage children to
try again as they progress through
nve levels of challenge.
/I
_~
DREAM HOUSpM
ADVENTIJRE MASTERTM
Here's a computerized design tool to
bring out your creative architectural
impulses. From a variet), of electronic
blueprints, users choose a different
building plan each time. Build an exterior and landscape )'our front yard
choosing from a wide array of materials
- from brick. stone and wood to
shrubbery and a picket fence l Inside.
paint and furnish to your hearl's
desire. Bring your home alive with a
famil)' and household pets. Animation
and sound effects let you pia)' the
piano or watch TV while waiting for
your bacon to sizzle. There 's even a
mouse that runs out to steal the cheese!
The only thing more challenging than
playing computer games is creating
them yourself l Fueled by the
imagination , this "adventure factory"
provides users with the capacity to
graphically design and create up to 60
locations within each adventure, to
plan events, create secret exits, and
hide objects. Build entire worlds into
which other adventurers may travel
to seek prizes or save a galaxy - the
plot possibilities are endless.
Other popular Pre-school and Fun and Learning
Commodore 64 products available from CBS Software:
• Ught-Waves
• Ducks Ahoy!
• Big Bird's Spedal Delivery • Webster: The Word Game
Making you the best.
Combining animated graphics with
interactive games and activities, this
new educational adventure helps
children discover dinosaurs for themselves and encourages them to learn
more about these prehistoric creatures
- where and when they lived. how
much they weighed, and why the),
died. The plastic Easy Key overlay acts
as the menu, converting the keyboard
into a series of simple function keys.
Dinosaur Dig is an electronic journey
back into geologic time for budding
archaeologists of all ages.
Holt, Rinehart & Winston of Canada, Ltd.,
A Unit of the CBS Canadian Publishing Group
(416) 255-4491
,
A LrmE SPIRIT
GIVE YOU
,
POWER.
SIX
MONtHS
COMPLEt~
WARRANtY.
Spirit's the microprinter that lets you do more things
yourself. And do each of them letter perfect.
It prints standard, bold, expanded and condensed type
faces. Even italics. And fmely etched graphics. All because
every impression has a crisp, square edge to it for unmistakable
clarity.
That's the power to look perfect in print.
And a power that operates almost without sound. The
Quietpak option smothers printer noise. So Spirit rushes through work with barely a whisper.
There's also the power to manage paper. Variable width tractors adjust for narrow jobs like
labels. Or wider jobs like correspondence. All of which are handed to you immediately thanks to
Spirit's Quick Tear edge.
When you can have your own personal microprinter
that does so much for so little, aren't you powerless not
to act?
For more information, and a dealer in your area
contact: Mannesman Tally Corporation, 703 Petrolia Rd.,
Downsview, Ontario M3) 2N6 416-661-9783
Telex: 06 522 873
-Manufanurer's suggested rctail price with parallel interface.
MAN ESMA N
TALLY
Contents
Do You Believe In The Disk Fairy?
Evolution Of A Computer System
5
7
Lynn Earley
Two Unique Computers
19
Jim Butterfield
20
Mike }Jartin
For C-64 or VIC 20 (+ 16K expansion)
S.A.M. voice synthesizer
23
William R. Frenchu
For the C-64
Delta Drawing
22
41
Marya Miller
Rich Westerman
For the C-64
Picture Blocks
Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
41
Product Parade. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
42
46
messy comment
TPUG BBS Password
The Oddsmaker
TPUG Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . ..
46
4
TPUG Library. . . . . . . . . . . . .. 58
47
Big Bird's Special Delivery
47
Rich Westerman
For the C-64
27
Vincent Sirugo
For VIC 20
PaperClip 64-D With Spell pack
48
Ian A. Wnght
For the C-64
Cockpit 64 27
William E. Wilbur
Cardco Car dram 16
For the C-64
49
Richard Best
For VIC 20
29
Dal'e Neale
For the C-64
Three Spreadsheets
5I
Dave Powell
For the C-64
Runway 64 29
William E. Wilbur
C-64 Thermostat Program
For the C-64
30
VM201-24K
Music Construction Set
William E. Wilbur
For the C-64
31
55
John David
For VIC 20
C-64 Bug
56
David Bradley
32
54
John Vanderkooy
For the C-64
Chn's Johnson
For the C-64
Master Composer
22
John David
For the C-64
26
Dave Neale
For the C-64
The Koala Pad
9
TPUG Calendar of Events. . . . .. 11
Michael W. Norman
Flight Simulator II
Tim Grantham
For the C-64
45
TPUG Associate Club Chapter
Meetings
CodePro-64
25
6
Don's Bradley
Janet Sherbanowski
For the C-64
William Wilbur
For Ihe C-64
Spitfire Ace
This And That . . . . . . . . . . . . ..
Buscard II - Better and Better
Malcolm O'Brien
For the C-64
5
Helpl .. . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 12
Rich Westerman
For the C-64
Alex Fletcher
For the C-64
23
25
Choplifter
Doctor Aron's Guide To The Care,
Feeding And Training of Your
Commodore 64
John Easton
For the C-64
23
Vincent Sintgo
For VIC 20
Soloflight
38
Two Bible Games
Tim Grantham
For the C·64
Zaxxon
- Mapping The Commodore 64
Mathe w Shulman
Home Accountant
Kidwriter
Cardco Printer Utility Program
62
Books
L.F. Jarrett
For the C-64
Gordon Campbell
Apple Panic
37
Patn"ck Grote
For the C-64
Elizabeth Deal
Freeware
Departments
34
Tim Gran tham
For C-64 or VIC 20
Summer Games
14
Software Theft - A Case History
VoiceboxlWhen I'm 64
Nvel Profile
John McEwen
For VIC 20
56
TPUG Magazine would like to thank
Electronics 2001 Ltd. for kindly providing the software and hardware
displayed in this month's cover
photograph.
TP UG magazillc page :1
TPue
magazme
TPUG CONTACTS
Publisher
Chris Bennett
TPUG OFFICE
Editor
David Williams
(416) 782-8900
Assistant Editor Production Manager
Sandra Waugh
(416) 782-9252
Director of Advertising Sales
Louise Redgers
4161782-1861
For Toronto meeting information
Production Team
Astrid Kumas
Marya Miller
(416) 782-9804
Board of Directors 1984-85
The election results were not available before press time,
so the list of the current members of the Board and the
Executive Committee will appear in the December issue.
Graphic Design
Leslie Smart and Associates , Toronto, Ont.
Pn'nting
Delta Web Graphics, Scarborough, Ont.
TPUG Inc.
COt'er Photo
Roberto Ponolese Studio, Toronto, Onto
TPUG Magazine is published 10 times a year by TPUe, Inc. All
rights reserved. No material may be re printed without written
pe rmission .
TPUG yearly membership fees:
Regular member (attends meetings)
-$30.00
Student member (full-time, attends meetings)-$20.00
Associate (Canada)
-$20.00
Associate (U.S.)
-$20.00
-$25.00
-$30.00
Associate (Overseas - sea mail)
Associate (Overseas - air mail)
-S40.00
Cdn.
Cdn.
Cdn.
U.S.
Cdn.
U.S.
U.S.
TPue Inc. ,
1912-A Avenue Rd. , Ste. #1
Toronto , Onl.
M5M 4AI
Telephone numbers:
Business Office (416) 782-8900
(416) 782-9252
Magazine Office (416) 782-1861
Advertising
(416) 782-9804
VIC 20, Commodore 64 and SuperPET are trademarks of Commodore Electronics Ltd. PET is a registered trademark of Commodore
Business Machines, Inc. CBM is a registered trademark of Commodore Electronics Ltd.
TPUG Magazine is printed in Canada. Mailed at Toronto , ON and
Buffalo, NY. Send change of address to: TPUe Inc., Address Changes,
1912-A Avenue Rd. , Toronto, ON, Canada M5M 4AI
Subscription : 15,500
Newsstand : 10,000
ISSN #0825-0367
Micron Distributing
409 Queen Street W.
Toronto, ON
M5V 2A5
(416 )593-9862
Toll Free Order Desk
1-800-268-9052
Subscription·related inquiries
are handled ONLY by TPUG.
page 4 TPUG magazine
Chris Bennett
Doris Bradley
4161782-8900
4161782-8900
TPUG Magazine
Publisher
Editor
Asst.Ed.Prod.Mgr.
Ad Director
Chris Bennett
David Williams
Sandra Waugh
Louise Redgers
4161782-1861
4161782-1861
4161782-1861
4161782-1861
Meeting Co-ordinators
Brampton Chapter Garry Ledez
c/ o
Central Chapter
Michael Bonnycastle
C-64 Chapter
Louise Redgers
Comal Chapter
Donald Dalley
Victor Gough
Communications
David Bradley
Richard Bradley
Kelly Grinton
Eastside Chapter
Joyce Topley
Forth Chapter
David Williams
Hardware Chapter David Williams
Machine Language
c/ o
Super PET Chapter Gerry Gold
VIC 20 Chapter
Rick Adlard
c/ o
Westside Chapter John Easton
Al Farquharson
Librarians
Commodore 64
Distributed by:
Compulit Distributors
PO Box 352
Port Coquitlam, BC
V3C 4K6
(604 )464-1221
Business Mgr.
Asst. Bus . Mgr.
4161782-8900
416/ 654-2381
416/ 447-4811
4161742-3790
416/677-8840
4161782-8900
416/488-4776
416/839-7284
416/683-4898
4161782-1861
4161782-1861
4161782-8900
416/ 225-8760
4161782-8900
416/ 251-1511
519/ 442-7000
French
PET
SuperPET
VIC 20
David Bradley
c/o 4161782-8900
Richard Bradley c/o 4161782-8900
Baudouin St-Cyr c/ o 4161782-8900
Mike Donegan
416/639-0329
Bill Dutfield
416/ 224-0642
Chris Covell
416/ 925-9296
Bulletin Board
Conference
Richard Bradley c/ o 4161782-8900
Doris Bradley
4161782-8900
editorial
This is a special issue of TPUG Magazine .
Compared with othe rs in recent months,
which have contained many technical articles and relative ly few reviews of commercial products, this issue leans heavily in the
reverse direction. We have suspended all
our regular series of technical articles - those
on disk handling, menu creation, SuperPET
programming, COMAL, use of the user
port , and forecasting with the 8032. They
will all be back next mo nth .
Some of you may well be wondering wh y
we could not publish both our techni cal
fare and all these product reviews in this
issue. The answer is the roo t of all evil
- money. For various reasons, some of which
(such as a recent pause in the growth of the
membership of TPUG) have little to do
with thi s magazine, we have found ourselves in a somewhat less affluent position
than we had hoped. The situation is not
serious; we are not having to contemplate
ceasing publication, or anything like that ,
but it has caused us to postpone our plans
to increase the number of pages in TPUG
Magazine . We are therefore still printing
54-page issues, just as we have done since
the magazine started (although, by using
slightly smaller type, we are now squ eezing more material into the magazine than
formerly), instead of the 80 or 95 pages
which we had planned to have by now.
This has led us into a difficult bind. Over
the past seve ral months, anticipating an
increase in the number of pages, we undertook to publish the various series of articl es
which we have recently been running, and
also accepted for publication a lo t of product reviews and other feature articles which
were submitted to us. Now, we find ourselves unable to publish them all , at least
not all in one issue!
Up to now, we have preferred not to interrupt the continuity of the regular series of
articles, and have therefore tended to publish them in preference to product reviews.
But, for this issue which is appearing at the
start of the traditional free-spending "season
of goodwill", it seems appropriate to reverse
this preference. Interrupting all the regular series at the same time should also, we
hope, minimize the confusion'
could be duplicated as can so ftware. Imagine that you could get a machine such th at
you could drive your neighbour's car into
it, shovel in some iron ore, wait five minutes,
then drive out two cars - your neighbour's
and a perfect copy of it for yourself. Imagine that this mechanical wonder could even
be lIsed to make duplicat es of itself' We
would all soon have copies of as many aut omobiles as we liked. We would also put the
auto-makers out of business, throwing vast
numbers of people out of work and e nsuring' that few , if any , new types of cars would
ever again be produced . The initial effects
of the duplicating machine would be beneficial to many of us, but ultimately it would
harm us all by slowing or halting new
d evelopments. Th e same is true of software piracy. By hurting the software develope rs, it is really harming us all.
Perha ps the real proble m is that it is so
difficult to catch pirates to bring th em to
justice. By the time the existence of a pirated
version of a program is known to its legitimate owners, there are usuall y so many
copies of it around that tracing them back
to their source, or pre venting-their further
spread, is impossible .
There seems to be something about hightech wrongdoing which makes people who
commit it difficult to catch . Those of us
Do You Believe In
The Disk Fairy?
who are involved in running Bulletin Board
Systems are aware that the phone lines are
infested with modem- and autodiall e requipped fool s, who recklessly autodial
phone numbers without checking their
authenticity as BBS numbers, or who rudely
hang up or switch on their modems if a
human voice answers. The realization that
it is virtually impossible to trace their antisocial behaviour back to them encourages
. them to continue it.
It also DIScourages others of us who might
otherwise help them. For example, a few
months ago, TPUG Magazin e published a
BBS pho ne number (on tbe other side of
the continent) which , it turned out , was
outdated . As a result, the new users of the
number were plagued by caBs from people
with autodiallers, who did not bother to
re main on the line for long e nough to discover that the number was wrong. In the
end, they changed their phone n umber and
we at TPUG Magazin e decided to stop publishing BBS numbers. BBS users were hurt
'by their own thoughtlessness .
The idea that evil returns to do harm to its
perpetrators is common to a lot of optimistic philosophies. It isn't always true, but it
isn't always false either! TPUC
David Williams
We hunted in all the appropriate places.
No sign of it. Then we hunted in all the
inappropriate places. Still no sign. Abjectly ,
we phoned him back to ask for another
copy of the disk.
"We just don 't understand it," we apologized.
"Yo u say you personally hand-delivered it ·
you rse If!'''
"That's right. Slipped it under the magazine office door".
It was at this point we all look ed at each
other, a strange wild light in our eyes. As
one, we con verged upon the magazine-laden
bookshelf and couch which blocks the second,
sealed-and-never-used Magazine Office door
and started heaving and haul ing the furniture. Our author, meanwhile, was left
dangling (literally) on the phone ...
One of our series authors telephoned recently to check up on a disk which he had
submitted.
Jim Butterfield's article, this month, is one
of several we have recently received on the
subject of software piracy. We do not have
room to publish them all , at least for the
time being, but perhaps this does not matter much since they all say the same thing :
Piracy is BAD.
"What do you mean , you don't have it i I
sent it to you a month ago! As a matter of
fact, I personally hand-de livered it!"
I sometimes imagine what would happen if
items of hardware, such as automobiles,
We were distressed. Not one of us remembered seeing the disk .
"We don 't have it", we said. H e was upset.
He heard our raucous laughter. Quickly,
we picked up the receiver again and explained that his envelope containing the
precious disk had been sitting for a month
under the couch .
Strang-est disk d e livery we'v e ever had ...
TP UC
Editor 's N ote: We have no idea who wrote the
above. We f ound it under the couch. . .
TPUG Magazin e page 5
THIS AND THAT
Doris Bradley
Asst. Business Manager
TPUG Bulletin Board
The TPUG Bulletin Board is enjoying its
new home, down the hall from the TPUG
office. I am also enjoying my easy access to
the board when it comes time to verify
members and read messages. Upon occasion I even write a few messages, though I
try not to get too involved. I must say, if I
don't sign on every day, I get way behind
and find that the NEW command often
leaves me with 30 or more messages to read!·
This is due in part to the modification that
was made by the current SYSOP, Richard
Bradley. Normally a Punter bulletin board
can have 399 users ; TPUG's can have almost
700! During the week of September 15th ,
the user's log got dangerously close to the
magic 700 mark. As a result , all those who
last signed on the BBS prior to June 1st were
wiped off the list. Anyone involved in this
"purge" will have to apply again for verification. The SYSOP is again looking at
the program and attempting to find places
where he can cut corners in order to allow
more than 700 members on the log. Quite
often some of the more know ledgeable and
well known members ofTPUGcan be found
on the board providing helpful information .
I am starting to copy some of, what seem to
me, the most generally informative messages, with the hopes that they may appear
in this maga zine.
It is a few months now since many details
have been provided about the BBS . One
important change that was made was the elimination of the download section. You can still
upload articles for the magazine, programs
for the library, etc. but you can't download.
Please remembe r to always sign on by typing
in your name in exactly the same way, and
don't forget your user code!
San Bernardino Commodore 64 Club meet on
the 1st Thursday of each month. The group
is growing rapidly. Members' interests range
from how to set up a system to telecommunications. Contact Carl Gardenas 714864-4498.
Main Line Commodore Users Group meets in
West Chester, Pennsylvania. Contact Emil
J. Volcheck, Jr. 215-388-1581.
Commodore 64 West users club of West Los
Angeles and Santa Monica, with over 250
members, has a new permanent address
- P.O. Box 406, Santa Monica , CA 904060406
Australian Computer Education Association
produces a newsletter six times per year.
Accordin g to their constitution, their focus
includes the VIC 20 and Commodore 64
computers with emphasis on program construction and telecommunication. For further information write P.O . Box 194, Corinda 4075 Queensland, Australia.
World of Commodore
The World of Commodore II will take place
at the International Centre, Toronto, Ont.,
near the airport, frum Thursday, November
29th to Sunday, December 2nd. TPUG plans
to have a booth , so come on over and see us.
On Thursda y and Friday the ho urs are 10
a.m . to 9 p .m., and on Saturday and Sunday
the hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. If there's
enough interest shown, we'll try to organize some kind of get-togeth e r on Saturday
evening, especially for those from out-oftown, so It>: us know if you plan to come!
Meeting in Downtown Toronto?
If you would be interested in a really
"cenu-al" meeting, probably at Cenu-al Technical School, please contact th e TP UG office
and leave your name, membership number and telephone number.
Home Study Farm Computer Course
TPUG Conference 1984
Have you sent in the Appraisal Sheet which
was on page 58 of the August/September
TPUG Magazine? No? - please take a few
minutes and do it today. We need your
input!
Would you like to find out more about this
course which acquaints you with computers and gives you a good introduction to
their application on th e farm> Contact Home
Study, J. G. O'Donoghue Building, 7000
-113th Street , Edmonton, Alberta T6H
5T6 Phone 403-427-2404
Farm Inventory and Filer
Other Computer Clubs
I try to include information submitted by
other computer clubs. These groups may
or may not have an associate membership
in TPUG.
page 6 TPUG Magazine
This program, which runs on the Commodore 64, includes a database and inventory
control program . For further information
contact Digipac, 907 River St. E., Prince
Albert, Sask ., S6V OB3.
C-64 Word Processor and Spreadsheet
Support Group
If you live in the Seattle, Washington area
you might be interested in contacting Clif
Gazaway 206-935-2697 regarding this group
which meets on Mondays at Automated
Training Systems.
Renewing with an Associate Club
The membership and/or renewal fee for
someone who belongs to one of our 5] associate clubs who have 15 or more members
as members of TPUG is $5 less than it
would otherwise be. In order to take advantage of this saving it is imperative that you
send your renewal and/ or membership in
through the TPUG contact person in your
local club. If you don't know who it is - find
out. We offer this saving on the condition
that we are able to cut down on the paper
work here in the office. This is why we
request our associate club contacts to send
in a minimum of 5 memberships and/ or
renewals at one time, covered by one cheque.
Please note - to establish associate club
status, the minimum number of applicants
is 15.
Tape Prices
In the last three issues of this magazine the
order fOlom has indicated that you can order
Commodore 64 or VIC 20 tapes for $6.00
each, and PET or Commodore Educational
Software tapes for $10.00 each. I felt it was
worth pulling this information and highlighting it here as there has been some
confusion of late.
As we deplete the stock of VIC 20 and Commodore 64 tapes which were mass produced
by one of our suppliers, we will revert to
also doing these "in -house". Once "in-house"
tapes become the prime source of VIC 20 and
C-64 tapes, the price of ALL tapes will become
$10.00 per tape. The moral of this story
is - if you want current VIC 20 or C-64
tapes, order them now!
Tape Alignment Kit!
It's here! The tape alignment kit includes
all the necessary equipment to align the
heads of your datasette - the cost is $5.00.
If you order 4 or more tapes you can get the
kit free - but only one per member please.
When purchased, most datasettes are out
of alignment - some only a little, but others a lot. This is TPUG's attempt to help
you with the problem since there is nothing that we like better than to supply tapes
to members and have them work properly.
Do You Remember When ...
.. . a commodore was a nice man who ran a
ship. A byte was what happened to you
when you teased the neighbors' dog. ROM
was a museum in Toronto (the Royal Ontario Museum for our American and International members). A pet was a warm animal that welcomed you home. The figure
4032 meant the number before 403 3. Syntax
was money you paid to the government for
booze and cigarettes. BASIC was something
that was so simple even you could understand it. Mode was something that went a la
pie. Dim was what you did with the lights
on a hot date, . . and graphics was how you
told your friends about it! Output was what
you used to do to the garbage . An error was
something the Detroit Tigers made a lot of
(but not in 1984!). Memory was something
you lost before a test. A chip was a greasy
snack . A ram was what chased the ewes
around ... and a COMPUTER was something you would never, ever learn how to
use. (Author-we don't know)
If
If Jim Butterfield does go to speak to our
associate club in Trinidad , and if we can
find an appropriate scheduled trip to Trinidad at that time leaving from places in
Canada and the United States - we'll attempt
to organize a TPUG get-together in the
Caribbean.
TPUG Information Package
If you would like to, and might be able to
Please give us feedback on the insert you
found in your August/September magazine.
Adding this to the magazine is costly
(especia II y as far as postage is concerned)
and cannot be done on a regular basis. Was
it worth it?
take a week's vacation in Trinidad this
winter, without having to plan a long way
ahead, then let me know and I'll keep you
informed as to what is happening. TPUG
THE EVOLUTION
OF A COMPUTER SYSTEM
the 1541 Drive is compatible with both the
C-64 and the VIC 20. The VIC-1525 printer
is also compatible with both computers.
But now we had a switching problem. Each
computer came with a switch which can be
used with a TV set to permit its use either
as a Computer Monitor OR as a conventional TV set. By hooking up these two
switches in a suitable configuration , I am
able to use the TV as a Color Monitor for
either the C-64 or the VIC 20 or to use the
set as a second household TV connected to
cable.
Lynn Earley
Willills, CA
OR: HOW MY VIC 20 BECAME
A COMMODORE 64
When 1 bought my VIC 20 computer, I also
bought the Commodore Datasette. This permitted SAVING programs onto ordinary
audio-type cassettes, from which they could
be recalled at any future time and LOADED
back into the computer's memory. Of course
the process was quite slow; taking quite a
few minutes to SAVE or LOAD long programs. Also, tape is a sequential medium.
ProgTams cannot be randomly selected from
a tape . So ... I then bought my VIC 20 a
1540 Disk Drive.
With a Disk Drive, programs may be randomly selected. It's like putting the arm
down on a phonograph record at any desired
place instead of having to go through the
entire record from the start. Now programs
could be loaded in seconds.
But I had no means of obtaining a printed
copy: so 1 bought my VIC 20 a VIC-1525
printer. Now I could print out copies of my
computer programs directly from the computer's memory.
The author is a 71-year-old retiree who, after
living i1l the Big Apple for 40 years moved
from New York City to Willits, CalIfornia;
pop. 4000. Here Mr. Earley pursues his hobbies of Video off-the air recording, Audio
recording and corresponding and Hom e
Computing. A nd, during the school year, he
serves as a crossing guard for school children.
Of course I didn't have the means of producing documents such as this. So ... I had
to get my computer a WORD PROCESSOR.
To use my Word Processor, (together with
other peripherals), I had to augment my
Cardboard-6 Expansion Interface board with
a Cardboard-3 Expansion Interface board.
And now we enter a new phase .... With all
of the above, there just wasn't enough memory to handle some material such as my
COUPON FILE program. My VIC had the
disconcerting habit of throwing lines at me
like "OUT OF MEMORY".
So . . . I had to get a Commodore-64. And
for the C-64, I had to get a VIC-1541 Disk·
Drive because the VIC-1540 Disk Drive is
not compatible with the C-64! Fortunately,
Switching the 1541 Disk Drive and the 1525
Printer to either the C-64 or the VIC 20
presented another problem . For most problems there is a solution if one is patient
enough. And the solution to the problem
appeared in the August 1984 issue of
COMPUTErs GAZETTE magazine. In this
issue, there was an ad and a review for
THEREUNION, asinglepush-switch which
connects the 1541 Disk Drive and the 1525
Printer to the VIC 20 when the push button
is "IN" or to the Commodore-64 when the
push button is in the "OUT" position.
In photo No.1 we see, from left to right, the
1525 Printer, the Commodore-64 and the
VIC 20. In back of the computers, we see a
bench which holds a 13" Color TV . On the
under surface of this bench, we see THE
REU NION, (the switch box described above).
To the left, rear of the C-64 will be seen
power strips which contain individual rocker
switches for each outlet. Into these outlets
the computers, disk drive and printer are
plugged. (The power switches on these
devices are left in the "ON" position and
the devices are then controlled by the individual rocker switch on the power strip.
The computer console was custom-designed
and built by the author. TPUG
TPUG Magazine page 7
Commodore 64™ Interface
Silicom Software is pleased to present, in conjunction with A.C . Concepts Inc. the following
professional quality computer products.
OCTOBUSlM
oerOBUS PLUSN
A PET IEEE GPIB interface for the Commodore 64*
with these features:
Has all of the capabilities of the OCTOBUS plus these
added featu res:
- plugs directly into the cartridge expansion port.
-operates transparently with all software.
-has a standard PET IEEE edge connector.
-operates in basic 4.0.
-comes with 2 full featured utilities:-a powerful
machine language monitor-a flexible modem
program
- equipped with a switch which allows the user to
transfer between the IEEE and Commodore* serial
bus without affecting the computer's operation.
-a Centronics parallel printer port.
- includes a parallel printer cable.
-an 8-bit DIP switch which allows the user to specify
independently which devices are Commodore* serial,
Commodore* IEEE, or Centronics parallel.
•
To order send cheque , money order or Visa to:
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded.
Both products come with a warranty against
manufacturers defect. Discounts available for
quantity orders.
(Ontario residents add 7% P.S.T.)
Silicom Software Inc. (416) 482-8136
Box 47 P.O. Box 2213 Postal Station "P"
Toronto, Ontario
M5S 2T2
®Commodore and Commodore 64 are registered trademarks of Commodore Business Machines, Inc.
ATIENTION PROGRAMMERS
A DIVISION OF PAHNKE & DUFFY INTERNATIONAL INC.
IS LOOKING FOR NEW AND INNOVATIVE
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IF YOU HAVE AN INTERESTING GAME OR
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FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL US AT:
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ASK FOR DEAN BROWN (CANADIAN MANAGER)
THE SOFTWARE LAB
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ISLINGTON, ONTARIO, M9A lC4
PROUDL Y CANADIAN!
THE SOFTWARE LAB
PRESENTS THE
DISK ASSISTANT
A POWERFUL AND EASY TO USE UTILITY
FOR INVESTIGATION AND MANIPULATION
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THE DISK ASSISTANT SUPPORTS THE
FOLLOWING FUNCTIONS:
DISPLAYING: BAM
DISK DIRECTORY
SECTOR LINK
SECTOR IN HEX OR ASCII FORM
READING FROM AND WRITING TO THE DISK
DISK FORMATIING
ALLOCATING AND DE-ALLOCATING
POWERFUL EDITING
BUILT-IN QUICK COMMAND REFERENCE
AND MANY MORE USEFUL COMMANDS!
JUST $24.95 CAN./$19.95 US.
VISA/MASTERCARD/MONEY ORDER
PLEASE ALLOW 6-8 WEEKS DELIVERY
ONT. RES. ADD 7% PST
THE SOFTWARE LAB *
5170 DUNDAS STREET WEST
ISLINGTON, ONTARIO, M9A 1C4
PHONE (416) 233-2259
PROUDL Y CANADIAN!
• A DIV. OF PAHNKE & DUFFY INT. INC.
page 8 TPUG Magazine
TPUG ASSOCIATE CLUB CHAPTER MEETINGS
CANADA ..
Commodore Owners of Muskoka
-meets at MacAulay Public School, Bracebridge, on the first
Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m.
Contact Mike Wilson 705-645-6300
Edmonton Commodore Users Group
-meets at Archbishop Jordan High School, Sherwood Park on the
last Friday of each month at 7 p.m.
Contact Bob Kadylo 403-465-3523
Guelph Computer Club
-meets at Co-operators Insurance Assoc. on the 2nd Wednesday
of each month at 7 :30 p .m.
Contact Brian Grime 519-822-4992
London Commodore Users Qub
- meets at Althouse College of Education, main auditorium on
the 3rd Monday of each month at 7 p.m .
Contact Dennis Trankner 519-681-5059
Sarnia C-64 UseR Group
-meets at Lambton College on the first Sunday of each month at
7:30 p.m.
ContactJ. C. Hollemans 519-542-4710
Commodore Users Club of Sudbury
-meets at Lasalle High School in the cafeteria on the last Thursday of each month at 7 p.m .
Contact Tim Miner 705-566-9632
PET Educators Group (Windsor)
-meets at Windsor Separate School Board Media Centre, 1485
Janette Ave. on the 3rd Wednesday of each month (not July &
August) at 7 p .m .
Contact John Moore 519-253-8658
UNITED STATES.
Boston Computer Society/ Commodore Users Group
- meets at Minute Man Tech High School. Rt 2A (just off Rt 128)
in Lexington, MA every 2nd Monday of the month at 7 p.m.
Genesee County Area Pet Users Group (Michigan)
-meets at Bentley High School on Belsay Rd. on the 3rd Thursday of each month at 7 p.m .
Comact Gordon Hale 313-239-1366
Greater Omaha Commodore 64 UseR Group
-meets at South Omaha campus of the Metropolitan Technical
Community College, 27th and Q Streets in Room 120 of the
Industrial Training Center on the first Thursday of the month
at 7 p.m.
Contact Bob Quisenberry 402-292-2753
Manasota Commodore Users Group (Florida)
-meets at Mr. G's Computer World, 2057 Whitfield Industrial
Way, Bradenton, FL on the 2nd and 4th Thursdays of the month
at 7 p.m.
Contact Robert O. Bronson 813-747-1785
Michigan's Commodore 64 Users Group
-meets at Warren Woods High School
Tuesday of each month at 7 p .m .
Warren on the 3rd
Contact Chuck Ciesliga 313-773-6302
Mohawk Valley Commodore User's Group
-meets at the Clara S. Bacon School in Amsterdam, NY at 7 p.m.
on the 2nd Tuesday of the month
Contact William A. Nowak 518-829-7576
Russellville CUG, Inc. (Arkansas)
- meets at Oakland Heights Elementary School on the 3rd Thursday
of each month at 7 p.m.
Contact Bob Brazeal 501-967-1868
Sacramento Commodore Computer Club (California)
- meets at Kit Carson High School on the 4th Monday of each
month at 7 p.m .
Contact Geoff W omeIl 916-961-8699
Southern Minnesota Commodore UseR Group
- meets at Mankato State University on the first Thursday of each
month at 7:30 p .m .
Comact Dean Otto 507-625-6942
Westmoreland Commodore User's Club
-meets at Westmoreland County Community College (Youngwood
PAl on the 3rd Friday evening of each month
Contact Bob McKinley 412-863-3930
Contact Harvey W. Gendreau 617-661-9227
Commodore Houston Users Group (Texas)
-Clear Lake Chapter - Nassau Bay City Hall, NASA Road # I, on
the first Wednesday of each month at 7 p .m.
-Central Chapter - Farrish Hall , University of Houston main
campus
-NW Chapter - Bleyl Jr. High School, 10,000 Mills Rd . (CypressFairbanks SD), on the 3rd Thursday of each month at 7 :30 p.m.
-Klein Chapter- Hildebrandt Middle School, 22,800 Hildebrandt
Rd. (Klein ISD), on the 3rd Tuesday of each month (except
July & August) at 6:30 p .m.
1I1
INTERNATIONAL
*
Baden Computer Cub (West Gennany)
-meets at CFB Baden-Soellingen on the 2nd Sunday of each
month at 7 p .m .
Contact Ben Brash
Trinidad Association of Commodore Owners - TACO
- meets at St. Mary's College, Frederick Street, Port of Spain every
2nd Saturday of the month at 2 p.m.
Contact Mary F. Howe 713-376-7000
TPUG MagUZ1·ne page 9
For the C o mmodore 64 with
super graphics and great
sound efl ect s
Master the skill and self-control needed to play winning
blackjack. Learn the most effective yet the simplest
"card counting" system, which is used by the world's
most successful international blackjack players. You can
simulate the rules of the best casinos around the world
where you ought to be playing and winning. Play one
hand against the dealer and learn the basic strategy
using the "card count" system, or play up to seven
hands and see how well you can play under real casino
conditions.
Included i s a separate 38K program that will l et you play
blackjack with up to seven different players .
While you are playing one hand, the co mputer works out
the card count , your % chance of going bust, each card 's
chance of being drawn, the basic strategy, keeps track of all
your bets and prints a running summary of y our game.
Comes complete with the book
Beat The Dealer
by Edward O. Thorpe.
Dealer Enquiries Welcome.
VIC-20 SOFTWARE
Exterminator
$14.95
Miner 204ger(K)
Sale $39.95
Lode Runner(K)
$49.95
IFR (Flight Simulator)(K)
$49.95
MDOOl Snakman
$19.95
CSO Astroblitz(K)
$49.95
CS016 Apple Panic
Sale $29.95
CS017 Choplifter(K)
$49.95
CS018 Black Hole(K)
$49.95
ORM004 Crossfire
$29.95
HESC307 Shamus(K)
$49.95
Introduction to Basic II
$29.95
Frantic
$19.95
Wacky Waiters
$19.95
Krazy Kong
$9.95
'Requires 3K expo (K) cartridge
BOOKS
Tricks & Tips For Commodore 64
Mapping the VIC
Anatomy of the 1541
Anatomy of the Commodore 64
Commodore 64 Exposed
Sprite Graphics for C-64
Machine Language for Beginners
64 Sound and Graphics
PET Basic
VIC 20 Prog Reference Guide
Elementary Commodore 64
C64 Prog . Reference Guide
VIC Revealed
VIC Graphics
VIC Games
Compute 's 2nd book of PET/CBM
Compute's 2nd book of C64
JOYSTICKS
$24.95
$19.95
$24.95
$24.95
$19.95
$20.95
$20.95
$18.95
$19.95
$19.95
$18.95
$27.95
$18.95
$18.95
$18.95
$19.95
$18.95
COMPUTER SUPPLIES
COMMODORE 64 SOFTWARE
Sargon III
$69.95
Zaxxon
Sale $39.95
Easyscript
Sale $49.95
Word Pro 64
$69.95
Enhanced Forth
$44.95
Simon's BASIC
$99.95
Impossible Mission
$49.95
1541 Disk Aligner
$29.95
International Soccer
$49.95
World's Greatest Baseball
$49.95
Musicalc I
$52:95
Sysres 64
$79.95
Superbase 64 (Database)
$129.95
Power 64
$69.95
Pal 64
$69.95
Blue Max (disk)
$42.95
Grand Master Chess (disk and tape) $39.95
Fort Apocalypse (disk)
$42.95
Jumpman (disk)
$49.95
Jumpman Junior (cart.)
$54.95
Shamus (disk)
$42.95
Lode Runner (disk)
$49.95
page 10 TPUG Magazine
Cl0 Cassette Tapes
C20 Cassette Tapes
Cassette Boxes
Verbatim Disks M0525'()1
Memorex Disks 013481
Nashua Disks SS/DD
Kl0 Storage Disk Storage Box
Flip N File 50
$l.00ea
$1.25ea
.25ea
$39.90/ 10
$33.90/ 10
$29.90/10
$5.95
$39.95
WICO Bathandle
WICO Power Grip
WICO Track Ball
WICO Red Ball
Commodore Joystick
$34.95
$34.95
$69.95
$37 .95
$9.95
-All Joyst icks will fil VIC 20 or Co mmodore 64 computers
RIBBONS
8023
1525
MX-80.4022
1526. 4023
Spirit 80
2022
Tally MT160
$14.95
$12.95
$12.95
$14 .95
$14 .95
$4.95
$19.95
Ribbons for other makes available
ORDERING INFORMATION
.Cheque, Money Order, VISA, Master Card acc epted .
Ontario residents add 7% sales tax . Add 5% for shipping
(min imum charge $2 .DO ).
NOTE: All Prlce8 In Canadian Funds.
PET/CBM SOFTWARE
POWER
8040-80 col .4.0 sys
4040-40 co1.4 .0 sys
$119.95
a.iCROniC) ~OOl LTD.
5529 Yonge Street, Willowdale, Ontario M2N 5S3
Tel: (416) 223-8400
TPUG CALENDAR OF EVENTS
For Toronto meeting information ...
(416) 782-9804
Please note: The exceptions to the "rule" for the designated date for a
meeting (e.g. 2nd Thursday) are shown in bold.
BRAMPTON CHAPTER - Central Peel Secondary School, 32 Ken nedy Rd. N. on the second Thursday of the month at 7 :30 in the
Theatre.
Thu. Nov. 8
Thu. Dec. 13
CENTRAL CHAPTER - Leaside High School, Bayview & Eglinton
Aves. on the second Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. in the
auditorium for PET/ CBM .
Wed. Nov. 14
Wed . Dec. 12
COMAL CHAPTER- York Public Library, 1745 Eglinton Ave.
W., (just east of Dufferin) on the last Thursday of the month at 7 :30
p.m. in the auditorium.
Thu. Nov. 29
Thu. Dec. 27
Commodore 64 CHAPTER - York Mills c.I., 490 York Mills Rd.,
(east of Bayview) on the last Monday of the month at 7 :30 p.m. in
the cafetorium.
Mon . Nov. 19
Mon. Dec. 17
COMMUNICATIONS CHAPTER- York Public Library, 1745
Eglinton Ave. W., (just east of Dufferin) on the first Wednesday of
the month at 7:30 p.m. in the Story Hour Room (adjacent to the
auditorium).
Wed . Nov. 7
Wed . Dec. 5
EASTSIDE CHAPTER - Dunbarton High School, (from the traffic lights at Highway 2 and Whites Rd. - go north on Whites Rd . to
next traffic lights - turn left to parking lots) on the second Monday
of the month at 7:30 p.m.
Mon. Nov. 12
Mon. Dec. 10
FORTH CHAPTER- York Public Library, 1745 Eglinton Ave .
W., (just east of Dufferin) on the second Tuesday of the month at
7:30 p.m. in the Story Hour Room (adjacent to the auditorium).
Tue. Nov . 13
Tue. Dec. 4
HARDWARE CHAPTER - York Public Library, 1745 Eglinton
Ave. W., (just east of Dufferin) on the first Friday of the month at
6:30 p.m. in the Story Hour Room (adjacent to the auditorium).
Fri. Nov. 2
Fri. Dec. 7
MACHINE LANGUAGE CHAPTER (6502)-Call theTPUG Office
4161782-8900 for additional information .
SuperPET CHAPTER - York University, Petrie Science Building
(check in Room 340). Use north door of Petrie to access building.
On the third Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m.
Wed. Nov. 21
Wed. Dec. 19
VIC 20 CHAPTER- York Public library, 1745 Eglinton Ave. W.,
(just east of Dufferin) on the first Tuesday of the month at 7:30 p.m .
in the auditorium.
Tue. Nov. 6
Tue. Dec. 4
WESTSIDE CHAPTER - Clarkson Secondary School, Bromsgrove
just east of Winston Churchill Blvd . (south of the QEW) on the
third Thursday of the month at 7 :30 p .m. in the Little Theatre for
PET/ CBM/ VIC 20/ Commodore 64.
Thu. Nov . 15
Thu. Dec. 20
Are you interested in organizing some other interest group in the
Greater Toronto area~ Please let the club office know, by mail,
phone , or TPUG bulletin board.
I LEFT M'1 HI C.RO
SOL.VINGt RU6\K'S CUBE
WHILE I'M HAVING- A COfFEE
•
TPUG Magazine page 11
Do you have anything for this column? The three headings are :
(1) Helpful Hints,
(2) Who's Got the Answer? and
(3) "PET" Pals Wanted.
Just send your contributions (including answers to any questions which have
appeared) to:
Toronto PET Users Group
Dept. Help
1912A Avenue Rd, Ste.l
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
M5M 4Al
QUESTIONS
A. Allison Lewis
Grand Falls, Newfoundland
I have a CBM 8032 and a Hayes Smartmodem - 300 which I would like to use to
access Compuserve. Could someone please
tell me where I might obtain the rest of the
hardware (and software) to go on line.
Hugh Kunner
Pellow's Con ages
P.O. Box 802
Chapleau, ON POM lKO
I would like to purchase a schematic for a
battery back-up suitable for use with a PET,
4040 disk drive and a printer. As an alternate,
I could use any information to wire the
PET and disk drive directly without going
through 110 V AC . I wish to protect against
local power outs for 2 seconds or so, but
would prefer a much longer time protection ata nominal cost.
J. Buckwalter
c/o Alpha Components, Inc.
1106 E. Simpson Rd.
Mechanicsburg, PA 17055
page 12 TPUG Magazine
I am a new owner of a Commodore 64
computer with disk drive and I would like
to have a pen pal with similar hardware. I
am interested in enhancing software and
information. I am a 22-year-old student
and another important hobby is science
fiction.
Timo Pietila
Pinninkatu 34 A 10
SF·33100 Tampere, Finland
Please let us know if you want your full address published.
Is there literature available that I could get
to theoretically and mathematically figure
out the elements to produce the sounds of
individual instruments rather than simply
use the trial and error method on the
computer? I would very much like to reproduce the sound of such instruments as
chimes, bells, drums, and bagpipes.
PET-PALS
Does anyone know whether the ink vials
for the ribbon cartridges used by the Commodore MPS-801 printers are sold - preferably in the Pacific Northwest ; but anywhere inside the U.S. or Canada would be
acceptable? After all, replacing ink vials
when the ribbons are in good condition is
much less expensive than replacing the
en tire ribbon canridges.
I need the procedure for preparing a text
file from the following: (1) Disk Directory,
(2) BASIC program listing made by the
computer. This file would then be merged
with other text files when word processing
articles or book manuscripts in which I
might use them .
Marge Paulie
1560 Lincoln St., #12
Eugene, OR 97401·3962
I am trying to interface a C-64 to a Smith
Corona TP-l serial printer. Smith Corona
customer service suggested several RS-232
interfaces, one of which was a Commodore
!OIl A RS-232·C Interface cartridge. I purchased the Commodore unit, and when it
was delivered, I was shocked to discover
the unit is supplied without software.
I have been unable to make the printer
respond to the computer in any manner.
Can someone help?
Quinton Cable
RT #1, Box 200·B
Arnoldsville, GA 30619
My wife and I have a VIC-20, 16K RAM
expansion, Programmers Aid Cartridge,
4-slot Motherboard, Tape Drive, a VC1515
printer as well as a assortment of commercial programs. We are trying to locate a few
pen pals around the world so that we not
only learn about computing but also more
about the world out there.
Leon & Annene van der Merwe
P.O. Box 348
Kleinzee 8282, South Africa
Onllof my computer students (see below)
at Participation House, (a positive alternative to hospital or institutional care for the
physically handicapped), loves working with
his PET computer, but he lacks a library of
~oftware. Would someone like to correspond
with Richard , and provide him with some
programs?
Richard Olthot
499 Norfolk Street
Simcoe, Ontario
HINTS
(?) Looking for a 1605 Modem adaptor for
my VICMODEM purchased in u.s. but for
use in Canada - C. A. Radley, Bn'tish Columbia
You can get the 1605 Modem adaptor by
requesting same and sending $17.12 to: Com·
modore Business Machines Ltd ., 7261 Victoria Park Avenue, Markham, Ontario, L3R
2M7. It should arrive within two weeks . It
plugs into the back of the VIC Modem .
You then plug a modular phone jack into
the adaptor and then wire the other end
direct to the phone junction box . If you
have jacks in the wall you will need a cord
with a male modular plug on both ends .
Herb Carruthers
Box 193
Vonda, Saskatchewan
L
CLEARANCE SALE C-64 4 SLO
JOINTPUG
The largest Commodor e UserB Group
CLEARANCE SALE OF 4 SLOT EXPANDER
BOARDS FOR COMMODORE 64 by XETEC
Benefit from:
DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED
REG . PRICE $119.00 SPECIAL CLEARANCE
Access tD 11 rary of public doma in software for C-B4,
VIC 20 and PET/CEM
PRICE $89.00 ••• Save $30.00
Magazine ( 10 per year) With adVice from
Jim Bmter field
DaVid Hook
Borge Christensen
PLUGS into your Commodore 64 memory expansion port.
Allows you to insert up to 4 CARTRIDGES at one time .
COMPLETE with Reset switch. Fused power, plus spare
fuse, GOLD PLATED CONTACTS. Three status indicators,
for each slot, premium grade components. One YEAR
WARRANTY COMPLETE DOCUMENTATION.
TPUG yearly memberships:
Regular member (attends meetings)
Student member (full-time, attends mee tings)
Associate (Canada)
Associate (U.S.A.)
MASTER CARD, VISA, MONEY ORDERS, PERSONAL
CHECKS TAKE THREE WEEKS TO CLEAR. PHONE ORDERS
ACCEPTED (we deduct $1.00 for the cost of your call).
Phone 705-437-3187 from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Mon . to Sat.
Associate (Overseas - sea mail)
Associate (Overseas- air mail)
MAIL ORDERS TO:
B & R ENTERPRISES INC.
PEFFERLAW, ONTARIO
LOE lNO
I
I
I
I
II
I
ONTARIO RESIDENTS ADD 7% PROVINCIAL SALES TAX
($6 .23). Shipping and Handling Insurance $6.00 per unit.
I
... DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED. ••
1_ _ _
-$30.00 Cdn.
-$20.00 Cdn.,
-$20.00 Cdn.
-$20.00 U.S.
-$2:'.00 Cdn.
-$30.00 U.S.
-$40.00 U.S.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION:
Send $1.00 for an information catalogue
(tell us which machine you use!)
To: TPUG INC.
DEPr.A,
1912AAVENUE RD., SUI'l'E 1,
I
Fre=-mone~aVing catalog with every~rde~ _ _ _ l
TORONTO,ONTARIO
CANADA M5M 4A1
PRO-TERM64
INTELLIGENT TERMINAL PACKAGE
(C) J91U E.. ANDERSON AND G. FAIIMANER
ABACUS BOOKS
40/80 column display
Informative status line
Extensive Auto-Dlal/Auto-Iogon commands
Upload/Download:
(Punter) (X/ON X/OFF) (.IMG FILES)
Ram Buffer options
Complete Disk support, DOS commands.
dual drive. or two single drives
Complete Printer support
Transparent stream to Printer
Programmable Function Keys
Remote-terminal modes. (Mini BBS).
(Visual phone answer)
THE ANATOMY OF THE 1541 DRIVE
THE ANATOMY OF THE 64
MACHINE LANGUAGE BOOK OF THE 64
TRICKS AND TIPS ON THE 64
$24.95 each
Write for our FREE catalog.
Supports VT/52 and Televldeo 910/920
terminal emulations
Oil
disk
ONLY $46.95
Suite 210.5950 Cl'Ite des Nelges. Montreal. Quebec H3S IZ6
Money Order. Check. Dealer and distributor inquiries invited.
TPUG Magazine page 13
TWO UNIQUE COMPUTERS
Elizabeth Deal
Malvern, PA
Commodore is coming out with two spectacular machines. One goes under the name
COMMODORE 16, the other- PLUS 4.
The PLUS 4 was called various names
before: TED, Commodore 264 etc. In the
PLUS 4 you have a choice of three levels of
extra built-in software: two in the empty
sockets, one on a cartridge. Commodore
has a substantial amount of software to support the computers, both on chips and tape
or disk . This, I believe, includes word processing, a spreadsheet program, LOGO,
extra graphics, and a whole range of educational programs.
These computers are so much fun to work
with that the C-64 seems like a thing from
th e stone age, by comparison. It isn't really,
it's just that to do the simplest thing on the
C-64 you have to find the reference book
and the Butterfield memory maps, and load
the monitor and Power or BASIC Aid . By
the time you do all this you forgot what it is
you set out to do. Enter the new machines:
flip the switch, code your thing, the job is
done.
When new machines enter the market, people always ask what will happen to the support for the old ones. As I see it, the C-64 is
not being made obsolete, not yet in any
case . The VIC 20 might suffer. The PET, of
course, can NEVER become obsolete. There
is a balance of its power and the language
that makes it one of the easiest machines to
cope with, but then it doesn 't have many
features that are fun, such as graphics and
sound.
SHORT DESCRIPTIONS
N ow, back to our story : In a way this article
is a review. But I cannot look at a machine,
so closely related to all other Commodore
machines, in abstract. You can skip the comparisons with other machines. If you do
not have those machines, the details will
mean little. But if you have worked other
CBM machines, this review might show
the new computers in their evolutionary
perspective.
The Plus 4 machine is enormous. It's a
POWERHOUSE : Bank switchable sixty
thousand bytes free for BASIC to use! No
jiggling of memory locations is needed, all
the necessary switching is done in firmware,
a welcome change from the C-64.
page 14 TPUG Magazine
In both computers, the BASIC language is
incredible (see separate section below). No
longer must you hunt for POKE addresses
to do trivial tasks . . . you just say it to the
computer in BASIC and the job is don e.
It's about time that to draw a line all we
have to do is say : GRAPHICI : DRAWl ,
xl,yl to x2 ,y2. There is some book-looking
needed, of course. Some graphic commands
have so many powerful variants , that you
have to know what values go where, how
many commas to put in and thin gs like
that. But, overall, it is reference-less work.
A pleasure.
MACHINE CODE is simple (6502 instructions). To have a monitor available, you
just say the magic word: M, shifted 0, and
you're in. No loading, no fuss, and it's a
good monitor, too. It includes Assemble ,
Disassemble, Hunt , Save, load, verify, (the
usual stuff), and various forms of memory
displays, from one line to paused, to continuous. The disassemblies are chopped
up into about 12-line hunks, I don't like
th at, but can live with it . The Assembler is
OK, but it immediately moves what you
typed rightwards, which may be nice for
some people . I normally like to see things
stay put where I type them, and I have
nev~r lik~d t~xt moving from under me
such as in word-wrap in word processors. I
know , I'm peculiar.
C-16 IS A REAL COMPUTER
COMMODORE 16 at first seemed to me to
be a blunder. Why would ANYBODY design
a computer, in 1984, with twelve thousand
bytes free for BASIC, I wondered. Well,
I've grown to like the machine. I rarely
need huge memory. It, too is a powerhouse!
It is identical in operation to its big relative,
with two important exceptions: less memory and no ACIA chip which is used for
external communications .
I see it as an ideal starter computer and an
ideal computer for schools. No kid could
or should, in a course of a lesson, write
more that IK of code . So its little size is of
no consequence. Yet its power is : schools
can use the new BASIC language, machine
code, mathematics of graphing, simple
sounds . .. and lots more. Debugging aids
and disk commands are valuable in any
learning environment, as it makes it possible for the kids to concentrate on programming rather than fighting the computer.
More and more people have two computers.
You could have one PLUS 4, and a little
C-16. Run big programs or games on PLUS
4, develop small subroutines on the C-16
without tying up a big machine for 256
bytes of test-code.
The famous "a chicken and two computers
in every home" saying could well become a
reality ...
ASSORTED FEATURES
Extemal differences: PLUS 4 looks beautiful,
tiny and slick. It has a diamond arrang'ement of the cursor keys (flat little arrows,
positioned too low, but fairly easy to use) .
The keyboard is softer than the upgrade
PET's, almost too easy to type on . It has
four differently shaped function keys which
have eight functions pre-programmed, and
you can change that.
C-16 is in a C-64 or a VIC 20 case, but dark
grey. The keyboard is the same as on the
C-64, but the cursor keys are a pain to use :
four separate keys up top replacing +pound and Home. HOME is where RESTORE is on the C-64. If you are used to
another computer you'll curse the cursor
keys, otherwise it makes no difference.
Both computers have a little button on the
side to get you out of any crash. The RESTORE key isn't needed. Very handy . Two
exits exist: cold start , (bytes free type), and
into the monitor.
Both can use the standard serial pel'ipherals such as the 1541, but a fa st disk is being
talked about. Some routines seem to be in
place for that. I haven't used a printer, but
have no reason to believe there'll be problems. Some sort of RS2 32 support is provided.
There seems to be a user port, I don't know
what the arrangement of the pins is. There
are two joystick ports with non-standard
connectors. There is no lightpen port, but
if you know chips and wires, you might be
able to hook one up to the TED chip itself
to trigger the IRQ.
Both computers can use tape or disk. The
tape connector is different. Users of other
CBM computers can't hook up their old
recorders any more. The tape writing for mat is different, so, for the first time in
Commodore's history, we have tape incom-
Roberto Porto/ese
THE C-16
H ex and num e ric conversion are included ,
POKE D EC( "7000"),DEC("C4") or PRINT
HEX$( 32769) arc valid , most IJseful , and
fast. Goodbye conve rsions .
Displaying information on th e scree n is
pure pl easure . No more messy, unalign ed
columns of numbers, PRINT USING is a
drea m come tru e. It works o n intege rs, real
numbers, characte rs and strings. It ro unds
numbers correctly , unlik e th e INT fun ction which man gles th e negative numbe rs.
PRINT USING can also insert doll ar signs
or an y ch aract e r of your choice.
patibility. Chances are, th ere will be conversion programs wrilten . A C-64 could
well write a tape using the necessary format.
The tape is slooooooooooow . About half
th e speed of th e other machines.
The scree n is separate, a TV set or the
Commodore 17xx monito rs can be used ,
hooked up to either the front or the back.
The picture area is much larger than on th e
C-64, the bord er is barely there. You have
15 colors with 7 luminances each, plus bl ack
color. You also have fla shing, done by
hardware, at the cursor rat e. So you can
flash "press any ke y to continue" o n and
off. I actually dOll't like the flashing part of
this co mputer. The cursor rate is faste r
than the C-fi4 or the PET and the fla shin g,
unless done subtfy in yo ur programs, can
be an irritant.
The whole video sys tem is super-stable - it
seems to run like on th e PET. The main
source of the interrupts is th e raster. Three
clocks on the chip seem to be used only for
external I/O. The display never flick ers;
split screens are clean. Printing on the screen
is faster than in my upgrad e PET but slower,
considerably slower, than in th e C-64. In
fa ct e verythin g is slower , th e fancy bank ing ro utin es a nd doubl e th e amount of
BASIC commands has to tak e its to ll. No thing annoying, I'm just reporting a visibl e
differe nce in speed , and th at includes the
screen editor which enters BASIC lines into
the program.
BASIC languag'c is th e ri chest, ever. All
conce ivable graphic commands are included . The commands are somewhat similar to, but NOT identical to th e C-64
Superexpander and some routines see m to
work faster (clearing the screen and line
plolting) .
The syste m permits easy working of the
graphi cs and sou nd for an other reaso n:
clean exits. In the event of errors, th e computer turns th e sound and graphics off.
You're rarel y left in a state of a sneen mess
as is often the case in debu ggin g programs
on the C-64 . Don 't wa nt a cl eanup;' TRAP
the errors.
TRAPing errors is a good thing. It should
be most useful in input a nd o utput. It is
particularly useful in situations such as character definitions - if th ere is an error in
th e program . th e screen ('an become a mess.
But if you TRAP th e errors yourself, you
can clean up the mess. print your own error
message and exit e legantly . Super stuff'
THE PLUS 4
BASIC has new loop-commands in addition for FOR J. . . NEXT .1 loops : DO . . .
LOOP is supported , as well as DO WII ILE
. .. LOOP or DO ... LOOP UN TIL so me
co ndition is true . They arc hand y, but no t
as easy to use as it seems at first, becaus e
there arc no loop markers. It 's a bit rou gh
to have to match your o\\ln LOOP with th e
appropriate DO earli er in th e <"oele. IF ...
THEN . . . ELSE are supported , so lon g as
th e ELSE-clause is on th e same lin e.
BASIC 4-like disk commands are built
in. Directory CAN be se lective. There
is no " I" command , a we ird omission .
SCRATCH re ports the DS$ e rrors - not
ver y conve ni e nt . as yo u hay to sit and
wait. This should be changed in producti on mod els, I'm told . I'm puzzled by th e
long \\lo rd s that arc used , th e disk onl y
und ersta nds sin gle leite rs (N D V IRS C
etc), I see it as a waste of space . I do not I ik t'
the reversed sy nta x in "COpy this TO th at",
all other BASIC commands have the ri~ht
to left logic: X=5 means 5 goes into X a nd
not X into 5. Picky point, but it has always
Roberto Porto/ese
GREAT BASIC LANGUAGE
Finally, Commodore reali zed that \\Ih en
they build super features into chips such as
th e VIC chip or the SID, the features should
be supported by a language, e lse eve rybody suffers from th e POKE and PEEK
disease. I'm sick and tired of POKEs.
continued on n ext page
TPUG Magazine page 15
puzzled me. In any case BASIC 4 people
will have no trouble using th is reversed
logic; others will have to adapt, of course.
There is a poor-man's BASIC Aid built in .
A UTO line numbering, DELETE, T RAC E
(line numbers only), REN UMBER (all or a
tail end section , no line-range permitted).
The great loss is the absence of FIN D,
MERGE or SEARCH and REPLACE. They
just aren't there. There is no scrolling listings with the cursor keys, a major pest, in
my opinion since the code todo that already
exists on other computers. CTRL and S
pause the listings, or any output, but they
clutter up the keyboard buffer! Pressing
the LOGO key alone slows down all output,
but pressing the LOGO and STOP keys
together has the effect of DLOADing a
program - not very nice when it DLOADs
on top of a program you're listing' Keep
the drive door open.
GENERAL MEMORY USE
A bit of perspective on the C-16: its small
size can be problem. You can't easily use
memory consuming programs such as wordprocessing or spreadsheets. Unless disk is
used cleverly, forget those applications. It
also causes problems ill one other situation
-graphics. When graphics are used , only
2K is left for a BASIC program. What can
you do in2Kj Surprisingly MUCH! Because
you do not need to load any graphic support programs, or DOS wedges - you really
have 2K. If schools use this computer, it ·
might teach kids to program in tight spaces
in an orderly way, instead of spewing bytes
all over the machine as some people are
now doing on the C-64 (twenty bytes at
$COOO, four bytes at $4100, one byte at
$CFOO-sounds familiar?).
The C-16 BASIC configuration is stabl e.
Nothing moves about the computer. On
the PLUS 4 invoking GRAPHIC shoves
the BASIC program and all variables
and strings to a larger area. This is totally
1)1\1),
\,M 'WORRIED
GI\R'OYTE.. I i"HlNK. \-\£'5
8REI\KJNfQ OOWN!
page 16 TPUG Magazine
transparent to I3ASIC users (NEW command now stuffs that initial zero!), but
machine code programmers will have to be
careful with the placement of machine code,
as well as with poking the top-of-mem ory
pointers to avoid turning the machine
upside-down. Key BASIC pointers are identical to the C-64.
Character strings are a whole new ball game.
There are NO GARBAGE COLLECTION
delays. But there is some overhead penalty:
extra bytes to serve as pointers. A totally
new feature is that all character strings
declared within a program (MS="HELLO
TPUG!") are copied to the RAM string
space. Their pointers are to there NOT to
the BASIC program - very handy for program overlays, and general moving of a
BASIC program and its variables. But it
costs some space unless YOll balance carefully what must be in an assignment statement with what could be placed in a PRINT
statement directly.
MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS
Sprites don't exist. You can move predefined
objects on the high-resolution screen, but
in BASIC it's rather slow , speed depends
on the size of the object. The SID chip isn't
there either. Instead, there is a two voice
PET-like sound, not very exciting, but terrific for beeping and primitive games.
Sound, too, is supported in BASIC. With
one exception, you don 't have to POKE,
ever. Exception: changing sound parameters while the sound is on.
Loss of sprites will affect the game market
more than home-programmers. I t took an
advanced degree in programming-planning
to get sprites going on the C-64, most people couldn't use it anyway , so it doesn't
seem to be such a big loss.
The computers have an ESC key, as in th e
80-column PETs for all sorts of functions
including windows, erasing parts of lines,
'WHf\T MNZE.~ YOO
SF\'<TH~T?
inserting lines, deleting and so on . ESC
can be used in direct mode as well as in
PRI T statements. Having never used an
80 column PET, I can't comment on differences, but there are some funny things
going on : for instance, when you set a window on top of an already existing screen,
all line links are reset to single lines. It's
probably a good thing, but don't push
RETURN over any such line, or you can
mangle your program .
This brings me to a related detail. The
screen editor line links, for the first time, I
think, are handled differently. Instead of
the usual byte per screen arrangement, they
arc now packed into four bytes, one bit per
line. ,\Iso, while it is possible and easy to
set up alternative screens, as is often done
on the C-64, you cannot print on the alternative screens. All output goes to the standard screen location. To summarise : there
are significant differences in the screen editor from the earlier machines.
Characters can be redefined. It's much easier than on the C-64. The only difficulty is
that the standard set is a bit rough to get at
from BASIC. However, the built-in Monitor is a dream to use , and has no problems
in looking at any RAM or ROM.
THE BOTTOM LINE
You gotta tosee it to believe it. There hasn't
been a computer like it. Simple to use and
hug;e (not C-16, of course). In a way it
reminds me of the PET more than the C-64
ever did. It's probably the absence of all
those nasty POKEs. Everything you do
seems natural and pleasant, from using the
keyboard to the memory management and
graphics. There will be superchallenges
ahead, of course. Because as soon as we
learn a little how to use a computer for
some things, somebody thinks up another
use which can't be done easily ... but then
isn't that part of the whole fun? TPUG
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page 18 TPUG Magl1.2ine
SOFTWARE THEFT
A Case History
Jim Buucrfield
Toronto, Onl.
eopyrighl © 1984]im Butte rfield. Pe rmission
to repn'nt is hereby granted, provided this
notice is included in the repn'nted material.
Maybe you're tired of reading about program piracy. There's been a lot said about
it lately. But I have one or two extra thoughts
on the subject.
Recently (September 1984) I was chatting
with the author of the program FBACKUP.
You probably know it: it's sometimes called
Fast Backup, sometimes the Four-Minute
Backup. Everybody must have a copy by
now. In contrast to the single disk backup
program that comes with the 1541 and which
takes a half hour or more to perform a disk
backup, the fast backup program will do
the job in four minutes, sometimes less.
It's quite cleverly written - to describe it
technically, it formats as it writes in order
to get this amazing speed. When it wants
you to change disks so as to continue the
backup process, it whoops at you. Perhaps
I dOJl't need to tell you all this ... it seems as
if most people I talk to have a copy.
This celebrated program was written for
commercial distribution by Thomas Tempelmann, a student who lives in Oldenburg,
West Germany. It has been for sale in Europe
for some time now. There were problems
lining up a U.S. distributor, and so the
program has never been offered for sale in
the U.S.A. or Canada.
Thomas told me his total sales on the program - world wide - amounts to seventy
copies. I suspect there are at least ten thou-
sand copies in North America alone. If all
Thomas' sales had been to North America
(and as far as is known, none of them were),
that would mean that over 99% of the copies in circulation were not purchased.
Seventy copies. If you have a copy of
FBACKUP, how do you feel about that~
Would it be better if you didn't know the
author's name; if the program were written
by somebody unknown rather than by
Thomas Tempelmann~ Would it be better
if you thought maybe he has sold a million
copies, so won't miss your royalty~
Seventy copies. Listen, you can't be blamed,
right? It wasn't even for sale in North
America. So how else could you get a copy
except from a friend~ And it's a really fantastic program that everyone needs, right'
We seem to be entering a new era where
pirates are proud of their work. Bootleg
copies are signed by the pirates who broke
the protection. There's now a regularly published newsletter which deals with how to
make "unprotected backup" disks. The newsletter names commercial software packages,
details the protection schemes they use,
and gives precise procedures to remove
the protection .
Thomas Tempelman's story might have a
happy ending. He told me he hopes to sell
FBACKUP rights to Commodore for general distribution. It's a first class utility and
would look great on a bonus disk. It's certainly well tested - thousands of people
have used it. So Thomas might - possibly
- eventually receive respectable compensation for his work. But it won 't be from the
sale of seventy copies.
~·r.;lf~~
NOW
ItLBE BROKE!
~~
How do you think such an experience would
affect Thomas Tempelmann's attitude towards developing new software' Well,
Thomas is not the type of person to let
small setbacks like this slow him down. Six
months ago, h e wrote a fast disk program
that will load software at remarkable speed.
About the time it was completed , he was
visited by a young person to whom he
showed the system. Duri ng the demonstration, Thomas was called away to the phone.
The kid stole a copy, and there are hundreds of copies around West Germany now.
Thomas doesn't think he'll ever put his fast
disk on the market now.
Thomas' current project has something to
do with reading sequential files from other
computer disks - perhaps Apple, Atari,
and / or IBM PC. But he doesn't talk about
it much, and he doesn 't show his new svstem to anyone. I get the impression that
he's learned not to trust people. 1 wonder
why~
'0
Maybe you hope
write software some
day soon. And maybe you plan to work
hard, learn efficient coding, get some good
insights into machines and people, and put
together a program that will be universally
admired. It will be useful; it wi II be elegant;
it will be efficient; it will be easy and
convenient; and it will do something that
hasn 't been done before .
And maybe you'll g'et it all tOf!;cther, and
your program will be a sensation. Everybody will admire it, everybody will want it
- more, everybody will need it.
And maybe you'll sell seventy copies. TPUG
DON'T SWEAT IT! IILL G\VE
I\CLES~ TO YOUR
Dt\1J'~ ACCOlJNT.'
'{OU
~
TPUG Magazine page 19
FREEWARE
Gordon Campbell
TPUG Vice-President
Effective immediately, TPUG will act as a distributor for free
comme rcial software.
But don 't those terms conflict? No, because only a special kind of
comm ercial software will be included : programs whose authors
give them away.
Freeware is okay to copy. But the author, through a message in the
program, request s a donation from users. If you try it and don 't
like it , you don't send any donation .
Freeware is commercial-quality software. Because the author expects
to be compensated, it is polished and complete. (At least, that's the
theory .)
One benefit of Freeware to users is that they can try the package
before they pay for it. In fact, they don't have any legal obligation
to ever pay for it. And the cost of Freeware should be much less
than for normal commercial packages.
.
Freeware in many ways is an extension of public-domain software.
But instead of submitting a program to the library which works to
the author's satisfaction, the author has reason to polish it - maybe
adding menus, tutorials, h elp screens, or more options.
For prog(ammers, there are also benefits. There is no cost for
promotion and advertising (which was well over SlO-million last
year for Lotus 1-2-3). There is no cost for packaging and distribution.
And they get to keep all the money, as opposed to th e five per cent
which is typical for commercial packages .
For TPUG, Freeware is an excellent wayof supporting its objectives.
The librarians will have to make a little effort, making sure that no
thieves "convert" standard commercial packages into "freeware".
We ask the help of all members in this endeavour.
Freeware is also known as "user supported programs". (In fact, the
actual term 'Freeware' may become a trademark.) The author
makes no commitment of support - as a user, you are expected to
make sure that the program is good enough to use as is before you
send away your donation. But registered users may find that their
requests for enhancements are acted upon .
TPUG will be establishing a category of library disk for Freeware.
The disks will be available to members at the usual fee. Any
donation goes directly to the author, not to TPUG . Documentation of the disk will be the responsibility of the author. Generally,
only one Freeware package will appear on a disk. Appearance in
the library does not constitute endorsment of a package by TPUG.
Hopefully, there will even be competing packages.
At present, there are no Freeware packages in the library. However,
it is hoped that several will appear before the end of the year.
How well will Freeware work? We don 't know, but it has worked
extremely well in the IBM PC world. Several authors have made
in excess of SI00,OOO for well thought-out products. In a recent
survey of InJoAge readers, the most used communications program was PC-Talk, which is Freeware. On the other hand, Jim
Butterfield's experiment of requesting 25 cents flopped by commercial or any other standards.
The program's author will suggest a set donation for Freeware,
which we expect will range between S20.00 and $99.00 However,
users can feel free to send what they belie ve the program is worth
to them .
At this point, what is needed are programs. Based on personal
experience, I am sure there are many programs which people have
written for their own use, but which need substantial work before
th ey can be used by others. So, authors, polish those up, and start
making some money! TPUG
Editor's Note: To submit Freeware programs to TPUG, send them on
disk to "The Freeware Library': c/o the dub oJJice. Make sure that
they are Jully documented, including inJonnation on what machines
are capable oj running them.
THOSE TWO NEW COMM~NDS
I ADDED TODAY WORK
V£R'1 WELL.
villan
page 20 TPUG Magaz1ne
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TPUG Magazine page 21
CARDeo PRINTER UTILITY PROGRAM
Mike Martin
Phoenix, AZ
REQUIRED HARDWARE:
Commodore 64 or VIC 20(+ 16k expatlsion)
Casselle or Disk Dn've
CARD PRINT (Card/?) Interface
Joystick (optional, but helpful)
PRINTERS SUPPORTED
Epson MX RX FX 80 & 100
Star Gemini 10 & lOX
Leading Edge Pro Writer
C-Itoh 8510 & 8023
The Cardco Printer Utility is actually an
in teresting collection of programs, all with
strong good and bad points. The collection
starts with a versatile SCREEN DUMP and
includes a very good BANNER program.
The Disk collection also includes a simple
joystick drawing program, and a Hi-res
loader, with demonstl-ation pictures. The
package includes both the VIC 20 and Commodore 64 programs on each tape or disk.
The tape programs cost S20.00, and the
disk version $25.00
The best program included is the BANNER.
Once booted up, it allows the user to print
banners lengthwise on the printer with a
choice of two type styles and two type sizes .
Each style can print in either 1" or 2"-high
letters with six lines per page in the 1", and
three lines per page in the 2". Sizes may be
mixed by physically moving the paper back
to the starting position on the printer. Line
length may be up to 255 characters. The
program will print the full letter set, numbers and punctuation, but no graphics. The
tape version can take up to 6 minutes to
load. The first style is called "Gothic" and
is a simple, heavy block style of type. Some
of the letters are rather interestingly shaped,
such as the lower case 'h ' with the header
bent over, resembling more of an inverted
'yO than anything else. The printing varies
by printer logic. On the Star lOX, the print
head works hard by typing in each individual block of the letter, rather than making
quick passes to lay each strip of the letter.
On the "Mag" style print, it does print by
strip, and the letters l-esemble the magnetic "coding" style used by your bank on
the bottom of a check_ Both fon ts are
~[
U
page 22 TPUG Magazine
interesting, but I would have preferred more
of a simple, plain type face . When printing
the "Gothic" style, I worry about my printer.
It runs hard and repeatedly goes over the
parts of the letters. It also gives an "overheated" smell to the area. The results look
nice, but I wouldn't use it frequently with
an Epson or Star type printer . The "Mag"
type prints faster, and with less wear and
tear on the printer.
The SCREEN DUMP has plenty of features,
but also some strong drawbacks. It works
well, and quickly draws a very dark, intense
version of your screen. However, the proportions are wrong_ When it prints, the
finished picture has lost part of its height,
in fact, about 20% of its height. If your
picture was perfectly proportioned on the
screen, it will be squashed on the print-out.
This can be easily compensated for while
doing the drawing, but it is inconvenient.
The screen lettering looks better on the
print-out than on the screen, and doesn't
have the "dot-matrix" look, but instead looks
more like traditional printing or press-type.
The joystick program included by Cardco
is very simple, and does not include provisions for saving or loading a drawing. The
Hi-res loader and demonstration pictures
are fun to play with, but were obviously
not drawn with the included joystick program, but digitized from some other source.
The joystick program might be interesting
for a small child to use like a white crayon
on black paper, but is not much use otherwise. And a caution: One demonstration
program is of a "nude". Not really graphic,
but if you don't want your children playing
with this one, you might want to erase it
from the disk.
In summary, the BANNER program is well
worth having although hard on your printer.
The SCREEN DUMP is useful, but in limited applications. The Joystick draw program is the most simple I've ever seen, and
the Hi-res loader and drawings are useful
only to demonstrate the screen dump _Resolution is excellent on both BANNER and
SCREEN DUMP, and the programs are not
easily backed up. TPUG
The program asks you where to locate it in
memory, and gives you four choices on the
Commodore 64 ($CCOO,$CBOO,S9COO,S7COO),
and three on the VIC 20. Then it prints out
for you a list of eight commands that will
cause it to print in different ways. By SYS
or POKE commands it will turn on or off a
keyed screen dump on Function key 1, a
graphics character print, a reverse screen,
force flag or key character print. While
you can use commands in your own pro~rams that will automatically cause a dump,
the program is rather heavily copy-guarded,
so you cannot include it in your program .
You must load it first every time you want
to use it. It is not easily backed up. And
even with the choice of locations, it is easily
overwritten by other programs that you
might want to use it with. For example,
using the COMPUTE FIRST BOOK OF 64
SOUND & GRAPHICS Joystick Drawing
program, it will give you one print-out,
then self-destruct.
CARDCO Pn'nter Utility Program
CARDCO, Inc.
300 S. Topeka, Wichita, KS 67202
(316)267-6525
Price: 119.95 u.s.
Important message to all
BBS users
The TPUG BBS has
moved again!
The new telephone number is ...
(416 )782-9534
Its operating hours are ...
24 hours per day.
7 days per week.
The password is ...
PROXY
S.A.M. voice synthesizer
William R. Frenchu
Hopewell, NJ
S.A.M. (the Software Automatic Mouth) is a
voice synthesizer from Tronix for the Commodore 64 computer. Unlike many other
voice synthesizers, S.A.M. requires no additional hardware; it makes use of the C-64's
own SID chips. This enables C-64 owners
to add speech capability to their computers
for under S70.oo U.S.
The S.A.M. package contains two speech
programs, (one to produce the actual sounds
and th e second to translate text to speech)
several demonstration programs and a
35-page manual. The manual is quite well
done and includes sections on how to use
the programs, how S.A.M. produces its
speech, using S.A.M. from machine language, important memory locations, and a
dictionary o( about 1500 words spelled in
the phonetic system S.A.M. uses.
S.A.M. is an unlimited vocabulary synthesizer, that is, the S.A.M. program contains a
collection of phonemes that can be strung
together to produce any word. (Phonemes
are to spoken words what letters are to
written words - the smallest parts (sounds)
into which the word can be broken. There
are about 0 phonemes required to speak
English.) Also under software control is
the amount of stress to be put on each phoneme as well as the overall speed and pitch .
Finally, there is some control over the type
of voice produced using the KNOBS function. According to the manual, KNOBS
varies the size of the "throat" and "mouth"
producing the voice. Through its use, voices
can be produced that sound somewhat like
men, women, robots or ETs.
The second program on the disk is RECITER. RECITER translates written English
directly into speech. It sacrifices some of
the flexiblilty ofS.A.M. for the ease of regular English input. KNOBS, speed and pitch
can still be varied, but inflection and stress
are now determined automatically by the
punctuation . The translation produced by
RECITER is quite accurate although some
longer words must be deliberately misspelled to come out right.
The quality of the speech produced by these
programs is very good and the demonstration programs are quite impressive. (In
one, the computer will actually "sing" Th e
Star Spangled Banner.0 The program does,
DELTA DRAWING
however, blank the screen and turn off the
sprites and system interrupts whenever it
speaks . It can be made to leave them on
(using the LIGHTS and INTERRUPTS
commands) but this causes the quality of
the voice to degrade and changes the timing sligh tly .
S.A.M. should be compatible with most other
programs. TheS.A.M. program itself resides
mostly under BASIC (only about 2.75K stays
in normal program space) and RECITER
is supplied in two versions that fit either in
the 6K directly below S.A.M. or 2K below
S.A.M. plus 4K from SCOOO to SCFFF. With
RECITER in the lower space it is compatible with DOS 5.1. A run time version is also
available under license from Tronix for
professional programmers who wish to distribute programs with speech.
S.A.M. seems a great way to get a C-64
talking. It's versatile, produces easily understood speech and is just plain fun . Its ease
of use and low cost should make it a popular program. TPU C
S.A.M. - Software Automatic Mouth
Tronix 8295 S. La Cienega Blvd., Inglewood,
CA 90301
APPLE PANIC
Tim Grantham
Vincent Sirugo
Toronto, ON
Scarborough, ON
Delta Drawing is an elegantly simple, yet
powerful, LOGO-like learning prognm for
young people. I say "LOGO-like", but it
really would be more accurate to say "LOGO
in reverse". Children move the delta around
the screen by pressing keys (D for Draw, L
for Left, etc.) They can then press T (for
"text") and see the record of the commands
they used . But the important thing is that,
with a minimum of assistance from an adult,
they can work intuitively and create quite
complex pictures .
Della Drawing utili zes all 16 colours and the
medium-res screen on the C-64. It is only
available on cartridge, presumably because
young children can handle them better than
disks. Similarly, once they have created
their programs, they can only use the tape
recorder to save them. Only ten procedures
can be saved into one program file and
there is no way to name the file. There is
provision made for printing the programs,
or "text histories".
The cartridge comes in a sturdy plastic
case, complete with attractive documen-
Walk back-and-forth and climb the letters,
to get to the different levels on the screen
while avoiding the apple monsters. That's
Apple Panic. The monsters move back and
forth with no idea of where you are, so
when they are moving away from you, press
your 'fire' button to dig a hole in the ground.
If the apple monster comes back, then he
will fall into the hole. Now, before he gets
out, press your ' fire' button again to bash
him on the head, pushing him though the
hole, thus collecting 100 points.
tation, and a quick-reference card with
nearly sixty commands listed. It is available,
for $49 .95 Cdn., at Electronics 2001 Ltd.,
5529 Yonge St., Willowdale, Ontario M2N
5S3, (416) 223-S400 . TPUC
DEL T A DRA WING Learning Program
Spinnaker SoJiware, 215 First Street, Cambridge, MA 02142
There's not much to this game. The graphics and sound effects are reasonable. The
response on the joystick is slow. The digging of a hole is very difficult for young
and old alike, and if you hold the 'fire'
button down too long, you'll end up filling
in the hole you just dug. If you have the
money to spend , bypass this one and get
something else.
Rating: 5 out of 10 TPUC
APPLE PANIC from Creative Software.
TPUG Magazine page 23
C64
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Now there's PASCAL
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plus, a comprehensive tutorial manual illustrating the
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Sorry, no C.OD. orders accepted.
Ikyan
page 24 TPUG Magazine
• HARDWARE
• SERVICE
• SOFTWARE
• BOOKS
• ACCESSORIES
( : commodore
Off the Shelf Del ivery
INCREDIBLE MUSIC KEYBOARD
FOR C-64
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BOX OF 10 DISKS WITH THIS AD
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10 % Discount to
TPUG Members
ON SOFTWARE, BOOKS AND ACCESSORIES.
(NOT INCLUDING SALE ITEMS)
Mail orders subject to shipping and handling fees.
TPUG Library
Avai lable For Copy
Ontario residents add 7% Retail Sales Tax.
Ci5
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ZAXXON
Malcolm O'Brien
Toronto, ON
With 3-D graphic; and a diagonally-scrolling
screen, ZAXXON was sure to be an instant
hit. It had a captivating display. This alone
would not be enough to make the game a
hit. A bad game that looks good would not
be successful.
The good people at Synapse Software
(especially Peter Adams, the programmer)
have done a gTeat job of transferring a
great game to the C-64. The colour, sound
and graphics are all excellent, and it's a
very good reproduction of the arcade
version.
When the game starts, your C-64 is transformed into the gateway to the treacherous
Asteroid City . Be warned - although the
radar towers, fuel tanks and enemy planes
will pose no threat to you here, the base
missiles and gun emplacements are out to
clip your wings! Also, there are various
obstacles that test your navigation skills.
The altimeter on the left side of the screen
will help you decide if you are flying too
low or too high. You must fly over brick
walls, over or under electronic barriers,
and avoid colliding with anything on the
ground.
Don't think that you can simply fly over
the Asteroid City and avoid any confrontation. Attempting this will result in
the release of seeker missiles. These are
easy enough to shoot down ir you're careful,
but the passive approach will mean no
points. Even worse, without destroying fuel
tanks you will soon find your fuel gauge on
empty, and you'll have one less fighter as a
result.
So swoop down low (joystick forward) and
do some major damage. Make sure to destroy
as many enemy planes as you can, in order
to reduce the fleet that attacks you in Deep
Space.
The Deep Space dogfight is more difficult
than the Asteroid City. It's difficult to gauge
how high or how low the enemy fighters
are flying. Sometimes you will see a sighting device in front of your ship which is
accompanied by a beep. Shoot! This means
that your laser cannons are on target. Don't
move up or down, though, because there
will be several ships on the same level.
Successful negotiation of Deep Space brings
you to the next Asteroid City. This one is
more difficult, and demands more of your
navigational skills. You'll have to fly through
small openings between the electronic barriers and the brick walls. If you succeed,
you will find yourself face-to-face with
Zaxxon himself. To destroy this nasty robot,
you must make three direct hits on his
missile launcher (otherwise known as his
left arm, to us biological units). This is
tough! I only managed to do it twice.
Destroying his missile causes him to back
off and you go back to the Asteroid City
again. But it's tougher now - more guns
are shooting at you.
The thing that I persona lly don't like about
ZAXXON is that you quickly learn to folIowa set pattern of moves to get you th rough
to Zaxxon himself. For this reason, the game
will appeal most to the disciplined, goaldirected player (the kind you see at the
arcade who gets furious with himself when
his game ends after three hours on one
quarter). This type of player is perfectly
content to follow the same pattern for a few
minutes to get those precious few moments
of head-to-head combat with Zaxxon.
Alternatively, you could try different patterns to attempt a higher point total or to
eliminate more enemy planes, but you'll
run the risk of getting shot down without
meeting Zaxxon. The choice is yours.
One more thing about Synapse. When you
buy the game, YOll get printed instructions
which are brief, but sufficientl y informative.
On the other side of the sheet is an illustrated,
full-colour software catalog. More importantly, there are demos of four other
games on the disk. After the distinctive
title screen YOll have the option of playing
ZAXXON or viewing the demos. You can
preview several action screens from Survivor,
Shamus Case II, Necromancer and Drelbs. A
nice idea for the software consumer, and a
smart marketing idea on the part of Synapse!
Synapse, by the way, is looking for good
fighter pilots. If you would like to volunteer,
march down to your local software dealer
on the double and tell them you want to
challenge Zaxxon. TPUG
ZAXXON from Synapse SoJiware, 5221 Central A venue, Richmond CA 94804. 528.00
u.s.
SOLOFLIGHT
William Wilbur
Killery, ME
Solo Flight is advertised as a "real" flight
simulator program for the Commodore 64.
Some of the feaiures include three-dimensional gTaphics, multiple airports and
runways, radio navigation instruments, VFR
(Visual Flight Rules) and IFR (Instrument
Flight Rules) flying.
Included in the software package is an Air
Mail Delivery game, for 1 to 4 players. The
object of this game is to deliver a selected
amount of mail to selected airports, re-fuel,
and head for the next city. Various hazards,
real or otherwise, conspire to make your
flight more difficult . Each player must select
how much mail, how many destinations,
load sufficient fuel and plan an air route.
Small items such as fog, turbulence and
engine or instrument failure add quite a
bit of spice to each flight.
Actual "flight" is not very difficult. The
joystick flight controls are very responsive,
other controls (via the keyboard) are clear
and concise. Visual references are more
than adequate as you view the aircraft from
about 400 meters aft of the actual cockpit.
Unfortunately, the instruction manual provides only the most elementary air navigation maps. Not only are these maps extremely small, but the compass rose (very
small) is only marked every S degrees. This
makes accurate navigation well nigh impossible!
The "actual configuration" instrument panel
is somewhat like that found in real aircraft.
Although this panel supplies you with most
of the necessary information, the method
of displaying this information isquite unlike
any aircraft I have ever seen. (Aviation
history is just one of my hobbies, so I've
seen a few aircraft instrument panels!)
All in all, Solo Flight is an excellent flight
game . I am having a great amount of difficulty accepting this program as a "real flight
simulator", as claimed by the advertising!
As a flying game, I'd rate it 8 out of 10. As a
"real " flight simulator, lout of 1O! TPUG
SOLOFLIGHT from Microprose Software,
10616 Beaver Dam Valley Rd., Hunt Valley
MD 21030 (301) 667-1151. Disk or cassel/e.
J34.95 U.S.
TPUG Magazine page 25
FLIGHT SIMULATOR II
Dave Neale
Meaford, ON
If you've ever wanted to take up flying as a
hobby, now's your chance. Flight Simulator
II by SubLOGIC Corporation can help you
learn to fly a modern aircraft without spending hundreds of your hard-€arned dollars.
Flight Simulator II was designed around a
single-engine, 148 MPH, fixed-gear Piper
Archer II (PA-28-181), because this aircraft
offers great performance and easy handling
without the bother of a constant speed prop
or retractable landing gear. In addition to
the flight simulator, a World War I Ace
game is included in which you (the pilot)
must destroy several enemy installations.
What makes this flight simulator stand out
is the incredible out-the-window view using
a 360 degree, 3-D dynamic shaded colour
graphics flight display, as well as flight and
navigational instruments that look like the
real thing. SubLOG IC's first simulator used
a flying environment (known as a "small
world") of several hundred square kilometers, whereas Flight Simulator II has a
world that is more than 16,000 by 16,000
kilometers, encompassing most of the western hemisphere. All this is done with an
incredible resolution finer than 6cm. Over
80 airports in four scenery areas - New York,
Chicago, Seattle and Los Angeles - are
included, with additional scenery areas
becoming available (SubLOGIC will respond to requests and suggestions).
When Flight Simulator II is loaded and ready
you can enter the " Edit" mode, enabling
you to program the type of flight you wish
to have. With 35 parameters controlling
the flight simulator, the editor can adjust
virtually any factor affecting the flight. The
parameters include:
(I) User Mode: This controls a 25-mode
library pointer that can call up information off a disk to allow you to fly customized flight parameters. There are 10 preset modes to choose from and 15 user modes
where you can store your current flight
parameters. This feature lets you complete
a long cross-country flight in more than
one sitting.
The simulator will default to mode 0, the
"easy" mode. Here the aircraft is very forgiving of flight control, engine handling
and navigational mistakes. However, there
is a "realistic" mode (mode I) which adds
the sophistication of a real flight. As all
pilots know, a number of problems can
arise during any flight , ranging from diffi-
page 26 TPUG Magazine
culty starting the engine to a light bulb
burning out at night on a vital flight instrument (or getting stuck in mud or a snow
bank if you leave the runway).
(2) Auto Coordination: During aircraft turns,
a little rudder is necessary for a properly
co-ordinated turn. This feature can be
selected "on" or "off'; if "off' is set then
you must apply the proper amount of rudder yourself. Lazy pilots may always want
this on, but there may come a time when
you will want to lose some altitude to get to
a better position for landing'. In these cases
you can cross-control the ailerons and rudders to side-slip to a lower altitude.
(3) Communication Rate: By selecting certain communication frequencies you can
receive ATIS (Automatic Terminal Information Service) messages that assist you in
determining weather and active runway at
your destination.
completely white, blocking any altitude
information, and while on top of the cloud
there is no terrain information to help you
locate an airport. This means you must fly
the aircraft to the appropriate MDA (minimum descent altitude) before breaking out
into the clear for landing.
Several other features are included to make
the simulated flight as realistic as possible.
The real advantage of this package is its
graphic capability. Having flown several
real flight simulators (DC-IO, B-737, B-747
and DC-8) with a major airline, I can appreciate the time and care that the SubLOGIC
team put into this flight simulator. Some of
the terrain features include buildings,
taxiways, snow-capped mountains, water,
and communication antennas. The instrument panel has every instrument or device
the aircraft has except cabin heat - that, of
course, is left for you to set before you start.
The radio stack includes a communication
radio, two navigational VOR receivers (Very
high frequency Omni-range Radio) with
one ILS (Instrument Landing System) head
and one localizer head. (A head is a display
presentation unit) A DME (Distance Measuring Equipment) and 4096 code transponder complete the radio package . Also provided are a full range of engine instruments,
including magneto selection and carburettor heat indicator.
(4) Aircraft Position: A series of parameters
can be set to start or change the aircraft's
position at any time. These include North
and East positioning, altitude, heading,
pitch , bank , airspeed, throttle, rudder,
ailerons, flaps and elevator. With all these
settings, you can start (or change) the aircraft in any position or attitude, which may
come in handy while you're just learning
to fly.
(5) Seasons: The four seasons will affect your
aircraft's performance if you ' re in the
"reality" mode, as well as determine the
proper time for transition from day to dusk
to night, etc.
(6) Cloud Layers: At any time you can program up to two cloud layers by setting the
altitude of both the "tops" and "bottoms" of
each layer. While in cloud, the view becomes
After becoming familiar with the simulator,
I started planning a short cross-country
flight from Chicago's Merrill C. Meigs (the
default airport) to Bloomington-Normal
airport. Almost all of the regular preparations can be carried out in detail prior to
takeoff and, while airborne, I was very
surprised by the accuracy and detail of the
navigational instruments. This is where
Flight Simulator II's training capability can
really be seen. If you want to get into IFR
(instrument flight rules) flying, then this
could actually be used as a training aid.
Considering that most simulators at local
airports cost between $35 and $65 per hour,
you could pay for the package in just a
short time.
The sound provided is very realistic for
most conditions, like the tire squeak on
landing. However, the sound for a crash
could be improved (although I have no
first-hand knowledge of what it should sound
like, touch wood).
The documentation includes two manuals:
The Pilot's Operating Handbook and Airplane
Flight Manual and The Flight Physics and
Aircraft Control manual (with an introduction to Aerobatics). It was easy to see that
the manuals were written by an experienced pilot; they provide a very detailed
description of the aircraft and the flight
simulator. The Flight Physics and Aircraft
Control manual was designed for the user
who has absolutely no previous flight
experience. Its explanation of the theory
of flight and the physics involved will guide
you through eight flight lessons covering
different aspects of aircraft control and
instrument handling.
\Vhen you feel you can handle the aircraft,
it may be time for the World War I Ace
game. You will be required to destroy the
enemy's fuel depots and factories while six
computer-controlled enemy fighters (each
with their own flight technique and characteristics) test your flying ability in a real-
life dogfight. Attack radar, a machine gun
and five bombs are available to complete
the mission. Refuelling and resupplying
can be carried out at your home base.
aerobatics. When higher clock or bit rates
are produced, this type of program could
be in the same league as the simulators
used by the airlines.
The only drawback I see with the simulator is that the graphic display is sometimes
too slow in responding to control inputs.
This can cause a lot of over-controlling.
There is an overloading control that is supposed to solve this problem, but after hours
of practice I've yet to see it work. Because I
have flown a real Piper Archer II, I know
that the handling could be improved in
certain situations , like steep turns, stall and
dive recovery. When doing some aerobatics,
an actual aircraft responds much fastel and
better than this computer counterpart. I
will admit, however, that more practice
could overcome this drawback . The stated
projection rate (between 2 to 6 frames / second)seems a bit high with the C-64; I counted
about 0.5 to 3 frames / second, and thi~ could
not keep up with the quick manoeuvres of
For anyone interested in the navigational
part of flying, Flight SimulalOr II would be
a real asset. I know that my C-64 will be
doing several cross-country flights in the
near future.
If a simple program is to attract the attention of many VIC 20 users, then it must
have ~omething g·oing for it. Choplifter by
Creative Software is such a program. Being
one of the top three selling programs for
the VIC 20 is no small feat: therefore, we
had better take a look at it.
Choplifter has a very simple plan behind it:
" fly your helicopter and free all the prisoners". You take off from your base and
you fly around until you see little men
running around the ground or until you
see a house with the chimney smoking. At
this point you land your helicopter either
on the ground or on top of the house , thus
freeing the trapped men. The men now
run towards you and into the helicopter.
The helicopter can only hold sixteen men
at one time, so when you have your fill you
take orr again back to the base . You repeat
this procedure until you have all fortyeight men safely back at the base.
No, it's not that simple. There is a little
more to it than that. Patrolling the ground
is a Tank. When you land your helicopter
the Tank will start to come after you, destroying you and / or the men that you are trying
to save. But feel relieved: only one Tank
will come after you at a time! The Tank is
also a great distance away from you, so it
can only hit you if you're on the gTound or
SubLOGIC C01porat!On
713 Edgebrook Dn·ve
Champaign, lL 61820
(217) 359-8482 Telex 206995 TPUG
COCKPIT 64
CHOPLIFTER
Vincent Sirugo
Scarborough, ON
Flight Simulator II is available on disk for
the Commodore 64, Apple II and Atari ,
with a limited feature cassette version available soon. You can contact your dealer or
order from SubLOGIC directly. Enclose
$49.95 plus $1.90 shipping and state the
type of delivery. Most credit cards are
accepted . Con tact:
very close to it. "Take otT and flyaway to
avoid the Tank!", you say. Not so fast! The
enemy has planes flying around to protect
the Tank and guard the prisoners. But do
not fear: your helicopter can fly very fast.
It is also equipped to fight. You can fire at
the enemy planes, outmanoeuvre them and
drop bombs on the Tank. But you can never
destroy them all, therefore you must fly
back to your base for absolute safety.
That's the basic plot. Now for the graphics.
Choplifter uses high-resolution gnphics only
(no multi-colour). The ground is always
RED and the men , Tank, helicopter etc.
are always WHITE. I find this takes a bit
away from the game. Colours aside, though,
the effects are excellent. The helicopter is a
marvel as it flies forwards , backwards or
sideways, with its two blades turning and
its engines roaring. The planes , the Tank
and the little men running around are also
wonders of animation - at least for the VIC
20.
The only problem I found with the game is
that after I got all forty-eight men back to
the base, that was it. The game was now
over. No second or third level to advance
to. It didn't take long to master the game
and save one and all. When this happens,
what do you do next?
Choplifter is available on cartridge only from
Creative Software. TPUG
William E. Wilbur
Kit/ery, ME
From: Susie Software, 709 Wilshire Drive, Mt.
Prospect, lL 60056 (312)394-5165
For Commodore 64
Disk or Tape
List price: 130.00 (US)
Cockpit 64 is a flight simulator game for the
Commodore 64. The program is written
entirely in machine language. Features
include a windshield view, keyboard or
joystick control, seven different airports,
multiple difficulty levels (from easy to
impossible), and a full-color display, with
sound.
Instrumentation includes an altimeter,
VOR, DME radar, air-speed indicator, fuel
gauge, artificial horizon and indicators for
flap and landing gear positions. Standard
flight controls are supported.
The object of the game is to fly to one of
seven airports and make a safe landing on
the runway. To accomplish this, you follow the suggested altitude and direction
shown on the control panel. Just be sure to
keep an eye on your air-speed and flap
indicators.
All in all, Cockpit 64 is an excercise in eyehand co-ordination! I'd rate this program
at 4 out of 10. Not recommended at the
normal selling price. TPUG
TPUG Magazine page 27
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page 28 TP UG Magazine
SPITFIRE ACE
be able to pick up the basic flight control
stick movements that will be required to
fly your aircraft.
The graphics are great , considering the
fact that anything better might slow down
the action. As the game starts, you will see
an enemy aircraft somewhere on the screen,
a targeting sight, and either the sun or
moon, depending on whether it's a day or
night fight. The one disadvantage is the
lack of ground terrain but, as I mentioned,
it would slow things down.
Dave Neale
Meaford, ON
Your task will be to place the sights over
the enemy and fire the machine guns,
destroying him. There are four levels of
play and in each successive level the enemy
will be a bit harder to shoot down . You will
have to remember, though, while you're in
a tum you must lead your firing. because
the enemy will turn away from the bullet's
path. This is what makes the game interesting and challenging.
Have you ever wondered what it would be
like to take part in the Battle of Britain, or
defend Pearl Harbour from attacking Japanese fighters? All it takes now is a C-64
and one of two programs by Microprose
Software.
When you have shot down five aircraft,
you are proclaimed to be an Ace. This may
sound easy, but you'll have to see for
yourself. Four levels of play allow beginners to challenge the most experienced Aces,
because the levels can be set within each
game to match a player's skilL
The last feature is the sound, which is very
good. The drone of the engines, machinegun fire and explosions seem very realistic.
Although Hell Cat Ace and Spitfire Ace are
not as sophisticated as the flight simulators
out today, I feel that in some respects they
can teach you the basics of flying as quickly
as anything else. They are definitely a must
for those of you interested in flyi'lg . TPUG
HELL CA T A CE and SPITFIRE A CE from
Microprose Software, 10616 Beaver Dam Dr.,
Hunt Valley, MD 21031 (301) 667-1151.
S29.95.US
Microprose has developed Hell Cat Ace
(Pacific battle) and Spitfire Ace (European
battle); both of these are similar in that
they pit you and your skill against an enemy
aircraft that either must be destroyed or
evaded. Each has up to fourteen different
battle areas, as well as several types and
skill levels of enemy aircraft for each area.
There are many great features included in
the games, but the most important one is
the very fast projection rate (the rate at
which a new horizon line is presented on
the screen) - about 4 to 6 frames per second.
One reason that the rate is so high, though,
is that the detail of the horizon is not as
accurate as some of the more sophisticated
programs. However, after using both types,
I feel much more comfortable with the
Microprose version. This speed of projection gives you great control over your aircraft with little or no chance of overcontrolling. When the projection rate is
slow, however, you sometimes miss a horizon projection and this could cause you to
miss a cue that is needed to properly handle the aircraft. As a result, you may miss a
heading on a turn, or be unable the maintain a certain altitude. With the Microprose
game, those of you who have had absolutely no flying experience before should
after losing power and control of the aircraft and going into a screaming dive of
over 380 mph). For the more brave among
you, there is the option of flying your crippled aircraft to the ground and carefully
landing, hoping that you will be rescued
and returned to fight again.
RUNWAY 64
William E. Wilbur
Kittery, ME
Below the cockpit window is a small control panel that provides the basics needed
for flight. Airspeed, altitude, course, ammunition level, power setting and a rear-view
mirror that will tell you if you've got the
enemy on your tail are all included. By
adjusting the power setting, you can perform a great variety of flight manoeuvres,
including mild stalls, spins, inside and outside loops. All of these manoeuvres can
help you get an enemy off your taiL Of
course, sometimes the enemy will get the
better of you and shoot your aircraft. The
more times he hits you, the more your
aircraft will be damaged. This damage can
range from losing a bit to all of your power,
or even control of your aircraft. When all
your fight has been knocked out and you're
going to crash, there's only one thing to
do - bailout! However, you can only do
this if the speed is slow enough (as I learned
Runway 64 is an instrument flying game for
the Com mod ore 64. The object of this game
is to make a safe landing on a runway in as
little time as possible, while losing as few
points as possible.
The instrument display, while not realistic,
is very well-laid-out, complete and easy to
use. The instruction sheet is also complete
and easy to understand.
Overall, this game is very easy to play and
is mostly an exercise in eye-hand coordination. I found it to be not very exciting,
thus a rating of 5 out of 10. TPUG
From: Susie Software, 709 Wilshire Drive, Mt.
lL 60056 (312)394-5165
For Commodore 64
Disk or Tape
List price: 125.00 (US)
Prospec~
TPUG Magazine page 29
THE KOALA PAD
Chris Johnson
Toronto, ON
One of my childhood fantasies was recently
shot down: My father's standard sill y answer
to any question about colour was: "It's
sky-blue-pink".
a colourful experience
An example of a picture created on the Koala
Pad wilh the Koala Painter program. "Mirror"
and "Copy" "Swap" were used 10 create and
merge symmetn'cal features such as the eyes
and glasses.
It didn't take me long, of course, to realize
that this colour was a pigment of his imagination. But that didn't stop me from
picturing, in my mind's eye, the colour
"sky-blue-pink". It was a beautiful colour:
combine the vibrance of sky blue and the
pastel softness of pink into a single hue
(not the visible colours, mind you, just the
essence of each) and the result is breathtaking.
So what did that have to do with ruining
my conception of "sky blue pink"- Let me
describe the Koala Painter program to you.
The Koala Pad is a small graphics tablet
which plugs into joystick port one, sending
signals to the paddle 'locations. The pressure-
Before and after
page 30 TPUG Magazine
The basic choice is "draw". The arrow
is then moved to choose one of several
"brushes," from a single pixel to a wide
vertical, horizontal or diagonal brush. Then
on to choose the colour! By moving the
cursor to one of the sixteen C-64 colours
displayed across the bottom of the menu
screen and pushing a button, the colour is
selected. Moving the stylus (and cursor) to
the very bottom and pressing a button
switches the screen to a blank drawing
surface.
Drawing with the stylus is hard to get used
to at fi,rst, since the movement of the hand
is magnified on the screen (assuming you're
using something larger than a four-inch
monitor). It is accomplished by holding
one of the buttons down as the stylus is
moved.
I adopted that same expression with my
children, but I am afraid I shall have to
stop. My nine-year old daughter has ruined
it for me.
We recently acquired a Koala Pad with the
Koala Painter program for the Commodore
64. Rosalyn (she's my nine-year-old daughter) took to it immediately. Until then she
hadn't been much interested in the computer. Her favourite program was a low resolution drawing program operated with a
joystick. Then came Koala Pad, and she
was fighting her brothers for computer time.
arrow) is moved to the appropriate choice
and one of the buttons pressed.
sensitive drawing surface is only four inches
square, and has two control buttons above
it. (Either button can be used - a boon for
lefties, let me assure you). The Koala Painter
program that accompanies it is a multicolour, high resolution drawing utility which
is used entirely from the Koala Pad. (There
is a small exce ption which I shall get to
later.)
When the program is booted - it takes a
while and there is a beautiful landscape
displayed on the scree n for most of the
time-a menu appears. Using a stylus
(supplied) the cursor (in the shape of an
Drawing freehand with the stylus is only
the beginning of the story. Moving the styIus back to the bottom of the pad and pressing a button returns you to the menu.
There are other drawing commands, each
of which can be used with any of the eight
brush strokes.
"Line", Hcircle", "disc", "frame" and "box"
share a transportable feature: once the size
has been decided upon, the shape may be
moved around the screen before fixing it
in place. "Line" is a straight line; "circle"
and "frame" are outlines, while "disc" and
"box" are filled in.
by Chris Johnson
"Lines" draws a series of straight lines, each
new one beginning where the previous one
ended ; "rays" draws lines emanating from
a single point.
There are also several utility functions:
"oops" erases whatever was done on the
last trip to the drawing screen; "fill" colours in an area with a chosen colour ;
"x-color" switches all pixels of one colour
to another colour ; "mirror" executes your
drawing in reflection in all four quadrants
of the screen ; "copy" lets you copy a portion of a drawing from one area of the
screen to another or to a second drawing
screen which is reached via the "swap"
command; "zoom" enlarges a small seg-
ment of a drawing for detailed work; "erase",
which must be selected twice, does just what
one would expect; and finally , "storage"
aliows saving and retrieving pictures from
disc.
This last command is the only one in which
the keyboard need be used: to name the
picture you are saving to disc.
The ability to operate the computer without recourse to the keyboard makes the
Koa la Pad a versatile tool. Koala Technologies has released other software for it
as well as a guide (with disc) on how to use
it in your own programs. The Music Construction Set from Electronic Arts is an excel-
lent music-writing and-playing program
that can be operated from the Koala Pad .
But what does all this have to do with skyblue-pink? On the Koala Pad, any two colours can be combined in a pixel-sized checkerboard pattern and used as a single colour
when drawing or filling. So when Rosalyn
asked what colour she should use to fill
part of a drawing I replied, "Sky-blue-pink."
And that is what she used: a sky-blue and
pink checkerboard mixture. It looked horrible. TPUG
MUSIC CONSTRUCTION SET
William Wilbur
Kittery, ME
Originally written for the Apple, Will
Harvey's Music Construction Set is now available for the Commodore 64 (disk drive
required). A list price of $39.95 (US) is quite
reasonable for a software package of this
quality . Included in this package are: a
copy-protected diskette containing the program and numerous music samples, a very
well-written instruction manual and a large
reference card .
This software is just (about) what the doctor ordered for persons such as myself. I
enjoy most types and styles of music, but
have had little success in learning to read
musical notation; nor have I succeeded in
learning to play any type of musical instrument.
Some of the major features of the Music
Construction Set include: an icon screen
menu, loading and saving music, music
playback, a very powerful Cut and Paste
editing feature, speed, volume and sound
controls, and the ability to transpose pieces
(within limits) to another key. Although
only three voices, eight musical instruments
and five special effects are supported , they
are well done and sound quite nice. The
musical voices supported are ; harpsichord,
damped harpsichord, oboe, smoother oboe,
accordion, regal organ, and flute. The special effects include; backwards, slap, drum,
synch and ring. Unfortunately, there is no
way to alter the voice, speed or volume
settings in mid-song. A very minor drawback in an otherwise well-executed package.
The video display appears to be unchanged
from the original Apple version. Mine shows
as white characters on a black background.
Due to the small size of the note icons, I
would strongly suggest that you use a monochrome monitor when composing music.
My nine-inch color TV is not quite sharp
enough, nor was the 1702 monitor I borrowed
Most of the options are selected using a
joystick or trackball to move a hand icon
around the screen. A press of the fire button picks up and releases (or otherwise
moves) the selected feature. One additonal
"pointing device" is supported , a Koala
Pad. This feature was not tested . There is a
keyboard "shortcut" method of selecting
notes and options which is handy once
you've gained some experience with the
program . I used a trackball and the keyboard. Very satisfactory!
One very interesting feature of the program is the ability to print sheet music. 1've
tried this feature using a VIC 1525 and an
MPS 801. The process is rather slow, but
printing high-res graphics on a slow printer
is never a speedy process. The printing is
don e vertically down the page, a bit unexpected but logical. I printed out a bit of
Yankee Doodle and took it to a local music
store, where the owner had very little trouble reading from the "sheet" music.
My daughter (age 14) and her friends found
a very practical use for this program. Within
two hours of receiving the software, they
were putting in some of their more difficult clarinet pieces. (Clarinet is not one of
the instruments supported!) After hearing
how each piece was supposed to sound,
they had little trouble mastering these practice pieces. Unfortunately, their tonal quality was totally unaffected!
My overall impression of the Music Construction Set is highly favorable. On a scale
of 1 to 10, I'd give it a rating of 8 or so. I
.don't care for protected software so I automatically deduct one rating point off the
top.
Some features I'd like to see included in
this program are: provisions to edit or alter
the existing preset sounds, a polyphonic
option, more use of the C-64's color. A
method of changing voice, speed and volume in mid-song would be handy . Since
the C-64 has only three musical voices, it
seems a waste to use one of them as a drum .
It would be nice to add rhythm or beats by
using the fourth voice (noise genera tor) .
Within the limits of this program, taking _
into account the price, Electronic Arts have
produced an outstanding piece of software
for the Commodore 64. I have seen no better value for the money. If you en joy playing
around (pun intended) with music, then
this is an excellent buy! TPUG
"The COMPUTER isn't the ONLY one
that needs a SURGE SUPPRESSOR!'
TPUG Magazine page 31
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VIC20
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Diode Protected Circuitry
To install, simply tufT) off computer, locate user port
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6811-11 AVENUE
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(403 )463-3534
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ASTRO POSITIONS
display and print the position of the
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In history
includes User s Guide. Introduction
to Positional Astronomy and IntroductIon to ClassIcal Astrology.
DIS K 39, 95
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WORDS & CALC
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TPUG Magazin e page 33
MASTER COMPOSER
Tim Grantham
Toronto, ON
It's always a pleasure to review well-crafted ,
carefully designed software. MASTER
COMPOSER, a music utility program for
the Commodore 64, could serve as an example to all programmers.
Mind you, there are no glamourous graphics or flashy packaging. The most you get is
a brief display of a hi-res portrait of Ludwig van, as the main program starts loading from the disk. If you blink, you might
miss it.
The first thing to appear on the screen is an
approximation of the musical staff, containing the first measure of Beethoven's Fur
Elise. This is the INPUT screen. Notes
are entered here, using the cursor keys to
position the numbers for each voice.
block which contains the list of sound setting, determined in the programming mode.
A block can control up to 127 consecutive
measures. By switchin); from one block of
settings to another, one can change tone
colours, tempo and volume at any point in
the piece. You arrange the blocks into
playing order by grouping· them into pages.
This may seem over-organized but it offers
maximum flexibility and ease of editing.
It's all explained much better than I can ,
with tutorials and demos, in the excellent
documentation. If you don 't have a revised
copy, though, hang on to the errata sheet
supplied. This corrected significant mistakes in the copy I had.
If you want to hear the current composition ,
you go to the PROGRAMMING mode.
This is where you design the sounds to be
played . Using single stroke commands, you
can adjust the waveform settings, tempo,
envelope parameters, filtration, etc. You
can even turn on the synchronization and
ring modulation effects from here. MASTER COMPOSER, like most music software currently available, does not enable
the use of the outputs of the oscillator and
envelope generator of voice 3 to modulate
the other two voices. This is one of the most
potentially powerful features of the SID
chip on the C-64, one that I'm sure future
products will exploit more fully.
MASTER COMPOSER is interrupt-driven.
These mysterious words mean that the part
of the program that does the actual playing
of the music is, in effect, inserted into the
operating system of the computer. Every
time the OS checks the keyboard to see if a
key is being pressed, it first goes through
the playing program. Consequently the SID
chip is being up-dated with new musical
information every sixtieth of a second, quite
independent of the main program. Whenever you save a song to disk, this interruptdriven program is saved with the music
data. This makes the songs easily transportable. They can be accessed from a BASIC
program, and yet run independently from
it, in the background, as it were. You can
add your compositions to games, educational programs, whatever your imagination desires
MASTER COMPOSER organizes music into
measures, blocks and pages. A measure consists of a sequence of notes to be played by
the SID. Each measure is assigned to a
The program does have some limitations.
It cannot play in real-time. The notes must
be entered first. A more serious limitation
is that there is no control over the articula-
I'VE NOT HAD A RESPONSE "I-;:----;::;::E~I
FROM THIS BL.\L.LETIN lie
BOAR\) ALL DA~
page 32 TPUG Magazine
tion of the notes: you can't slur from one
note to another, or accent them, or add
vibrato. They're the sort ofthings one only
notices when they're missing. They make
music more interesting.
My copy had a couple of bugs in it. The
"change all blocks" command (@) did not
work reliably. And, more interestingly,
when I replaced the first voice settings with
settings from a file on the disk and then
played the piece, it caused the second voice
to play at a drastically reduced volume,
something that is supposed to be impossible on the SID chip!
These are minor flaws, however, in what is
otherwise a very carefully thought out, and
useful, piece of programming. This kind
of work makes for durable software, if you'll
pardon the mixed metaphor.
If you want to hear an example of my handiwork with MASTER COMPOSER, you can
download MUSIC BOX from the new
BBBBS being run by Patrick Cole (416272-0709). You'll need to download MUSIC
BOOT also, to run it.
MASTER COMPOSER comes on a copyprotected disk for $59.95 Cdn. You can purchase back-up and replacement copies from
Access Software for nominal charges.
I'd give this program a 9 out of 10. TPUG
MASTER COMPOSER program
by Paul Kleimeyer
Access Software Inc., 925 East 900 South,
Salt Lake City, Utah 84105 u.s.A.
A vailable at:
Electronic 2001, 5529 Yonge St., Toronto,
ON M2N 5S3, (416)223-8400
MA'1& I ~OT THE
PAS5WORD WRDNG-,
VOICEBOX/WHEN I'M 64
Tim Grantham
Toronto, ON
The makers of this Votrax-based speech synthesizer for the VIC 20
and C-64 claim that it is "the world's ONLY singing speech
synthesizer". They further state that it has an unlimited vocabulary and that it speaks with a natural inflection controlled either
from the program or from the built-in Pitch control. "No other
speech synthesizer has this feature' "
Fortunately, the hype in the ad copy isn't carried over into the
design and documentation of the software accompanying the unit.
Both the VOICEBOX software and the WHEN I'M 64 music
synthesizer software (which is sold separately) are powerful and
easy-to-use. The accompanying manuals are admirably concise
and straightforward.
"But how does it sound?!" Generally speaking (pun intended), not
bad. The programs on the disk packaged with the unit produce
crisp, intelligible speech. If you don't want to break down what you
want it to say into phonemes (the sixty-four basic units of speech),
there is a simple English text-to-speech program included . But, as
the manuals point out , this is very limiting. They have charts of the
phonemes, and many examples of their use. It's worth the time
invested in learning them to get the best from the synthesizer.
The software with the unit includes the aforementioned English
text-to-speech converter, and four other programs: text-to-speech
with an animated "Alien" face added, a phoneme-only speech
driver, a demo program and a spelling quiz that will accept new
words. This latter program, intended to demonstrate the unit's
educational possibilities, proved to be a disappointment. I had
trouble understanding what some of the words were - "grammar"
sounded like "yer anger", "murmur" was made to sound like it
rhymed with "pure-pure", and "cuisine" and "scissors" were simply unintelligible. Some "fine-tuning" can be done by altering the
phonemes used in this program, but I think a speech synthesizer
would have to be more advanced than this one before a child could
feel comfortable with it.
The only serious criticism I have of the VOICEBOX is its control of
pitch. The software provides only four distinct pitches for inflection,
and the documentation offers no suggestions for its use. Apparently,
one has to buy their DICTIONARY EDITOR package in order to
obtain natural-sounding inflection. Another drawback is that changing the pitch changes the timbre of the voice. If the VOICEBOX is
singing or speaking on a high note, it sounds like one of The
Chipmunks. If it is pitched low, it sounds like slow-motion dialogue.
This quality of the voice can be quite grating, especially during
songs. Perhaps the Pitch control knob on the unit can be used to
remedy this, but nowhere are you told how to use it.
The VOICEBOX plugs directly into the user port and gets its
power from the computer. It has its own speaker, plus a jack for use
with headphones or an external amplifier.
The WHEN I'M 64 music synthesizer software is a menu-driven
program designed to control the powerful SID chip in the C-64. If
you've got the VOICEBOX, it will provide the vocals to its library
of songs as well.
page 34 TPUG Magazine
make your computer speak
I spent one pleasant Sunday afternoon recording my version of
"King of the Road". To save time, I used the default ADSR and
wave-form settings for all three voices, but you can create your own
quite easily.
I first "laid down" the bass line of the arrangement. The software
converts the top two rows of the C-64 keyboard into a synthesizer
keyboard. I entered all the notes for the bass on the first pass. On
the second pass, I started the click-track going, and set the note and
rest lengths. Another pass was made to add accents and vibrato.
I repeated this process with the other two voices of the accompaniment. Then I removed the click-track that had synchronized
them all.
Using the lyrics editor, I phonetically recorded the words to be
sung by th e VOICEBOX. Then, using the same synthesizer keyboard conversion of the top two rows, I recorded the pitches to be
sung on each syllable. One more pass was taken to time the sung
syllables to the accompaniment and voila! a 1980's version of "King
of the Road ", starring the VOICEBOX and its C-64 back-up band.
You can even order up an animated hi-res face that will mouth the
words along with voice.
All this took me only four hours, and that was the first time I had
recorded a song. Another menu selection allowed me to save my
efforts to disk.
WHEN I'M 64 makes effective use of the SID chip's filters , allowing
one to easily obtain a triggered sweep up or down on any note, with
any of the filt ers. This permits the use of subtractive synthesis,
which really broadens the range of tone colours. The program
does not allow for the modulation of one oscillator by another, thus
ruling out such tricks as ring modulation, frequency sweeps, harmonic envelopes, etc.
Like all menu-driven software, WHEN I'M 64 is eminently logical
in its use but does not encourage a more intuitive, experimental
approach . Almost all of the synthesizer settings are adjusted by
entering a number from 0 to 15. While this reflects the actual
values being poked into the SID's registers, a musician would
probably prefer to have representations of an analogue nature like the controls on a more conventional synthesizer. I think this
program would be most suitable for programmers and hobbyists
wishing to explore the SID chip's possibilities.
As it looks like Commodore's piano keyboard for the C-64 won't be
around for quite a while yet, WHEN I'M 64 and other synthesizer
software such as Electronic Arts' Music Conslruction Sel, and
Waveform 's Musicale, will have to front the band .
WHEN I'M 64 retails for $39.95. Considering its relatively low cost
and its relatively powerful features, I give it a 7.5 out of 10.
The VOICEBOX with software sells for $179.95. Commodore should
be coming out with its speech synthesizer quite soon. I heard it at
the World of Commodore show and was quite impressed. As it
should fall into the same price range, it's going to give the VOICEBOX
a real run for its money. I rate the VOICEBOX at 7 out of 10. Both
VOICEBOX and WHEN I'M 64 can be found at COMSPEC, 866
Wilson Ave., Downsview, Ontario, (416) 633-5605. TPUG
VOICEBOX Speech Synthesizer
WHEN I'M 64 Advanced Music Synthesizer System
both by The ALIEN Group, 27 W. 23rd St., N. Y., N. Y. 10010
Our R5-232 5eriallnterfaces allow you to
connect printers, modems, plotters, and other
input/output devices to your 64 or VIC-20.
Commodore produced good computers
that were economical for families .
Our president wanted to provide
Commodore owners with better
peripheral products.
A parallel interface allows direct access between a
centronics printer and your software program,
saving you loading and waiting time. Our CPI is
compatible with most software written for the 64
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In less than two years, MSD was
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For professional-quality video and audio output,
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Next, determined to BUILD IT BETTER,
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MSD's dual drive formats, copies, and
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The CEX-4 Expandoport gives you four additional
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Save time and hassle with the greater
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Dealer and distributor inquiries invited.
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Super Action Software!
(
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DENVER, COLORADO
CYBERWORLD
$39.95
This five-screen arcade adventure packs the computer with
intense graphics and sound' Ynu are a special Cyberleague
agent in a universe full of hOotile aliens and vicIous robots.
Joystick and keyboard transport you through 3-0 rooms,
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Animation, action, and strategy all
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Perplexian Challenger
$29.95
The IncredJbly r esponSive t hree-a xI s j0'l''5 t 1c k cantrOl of a
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a contlnUDLJ ~) dis-pl ay of yo ur s hip 's Ins t rument,at.lon as well
as a three -dlmen 51(jllal. an rm~t. e d 'W'lf!W o f space.
You. as a pilot. must u t lll7 e lightning fast r eflexe s to destroy
Invading ships. and aVOid the lf return fi re . SUTIultaneOlAsly. you
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Outstanding graphics features Inc lude smOO th 3-0
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Programmed entirely In machine language, this actlonstrategy game IS guaranteed to blow you away.
All the professional f ~a tures you expect are Included:
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Challenger IS a game that bnngs the arcade expene nr.e to your
home.
$39.95
Wfzor<d$39.95
Jump from ropes to ladd~s, dodge plummeting ooulders and
duck under deadly arrows in your quest for sparkling diamonds,
gleaming bars of gold, and glistenin£ pearis. With joystick in hand
you must explore forty danling screens, each a new and exciting
adventure. Take the key to unlock the doorv,:ay to your next spineti.nglinlo! level. Each k<"y rt.-stores your magical POWNS, allowing YOll
(9 cast over ten different spells. With these magic spells 'i0U have the
power to overcome vicious creatures, terrifying trapS, and perilous
plunges.
Your Wizard is realistically animated in evt'ry possible direction.
Dozens of movements are possible - jump over burning fires,
shimmy up o'r down ropes and ladders, even slip down treacherous
sliding staircases! Magic portals move your Wizard through midair
and protect you from a myriad of fully-animated fiendish monSters.
Catch an elevator ro [he top of the screen and dart through sliding
gates in your quest for maji(ic and treasure.
Wizard's fascinating variety of screens are sure to please and
entertain, and of course you can build an unlimited number of your
own levels us ng [he construction set provided with your game.
Real-time adventure excitement at Its best. Solve countless
puzzles and slay over a dozen monSlers by USing Ihe huge
vocabulary 01 over 200 words Two challenging ddhculty levels
await you With over 80 areas. each fully described In Old EngliSh
scnpt.
Menacing monsters. kniving Villains. taltered code b>ooks and
treacherous terrain are Just a few of the situations you must
overcome rn your quest for the thir1een priceless IreaSutes. More
than seventy oblects are Invaluable 10 you in your search lor glory
and wealthl
A full-Size. thoroughly Illustrated manual is included Featuring
color ironl and back. book quallly, and a loid-oul map. Ihls
'extra' further extends Ihe profeSSionalism of thiS game The
follOWing are quotes from unsolicited testimonials sent to us by
adventurers In GOlhmog s Lair
I have extremely ~nJoyed Gothmog's Lair. and plan to buy more
adventure games
Scott Tulman
MemphIS. TN
'- GOIhmog's Lair IS the bes.i adventure I ve ever played
DennIS ManochlO. Jr.
Saraloga. CA
~PROFESSOR
An in-depth self-tutorial for the Commodore 64 on a twosided disk. This menu-driven tutorial covers every aspect
of your C-54-BASIc' keyboard, sound. music, simple and
'advanced graphics. Quizzes lest your comprehension at
the end of many lessons! On-screen illustrations. sound
effects and full-color interactive graphics make learning
e<lsy and interesting. The PROFESSOR is your ONLY choice
for an all-in-one_ thorough tutorial about the Commodore 64!
Supershipper 64
Supershipper Accounting
A complete multi-printer shipping system which operates
on the inexpensive Commodore 64. Offers all the fe<:llures
The accuunting supplement to Ihe Supershipper 64. Prints
statements. b ... nk deposits. post due ... ccounts and daily or
of more expensive. more cumbersome business soft ware at a
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entry. Prints inl,'uices. C.O.D. tags, mailing and shipping
lel bels. Sort s you r eu stomer list aphabet ic ... lly. by cII y/st<:lte
Inon t hi y s... les reports. Breaks down sales commissions Clnd
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Also prOVides
inventory control for up 10 200differenl produCis. Theunly
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page 36 TPUG Magazine
Supershipper 64
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$79.95
Call for more information or a dealer near you.
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Summer Games
Patrick Grote
51. Louis, MO
The time is 3:00 PM on a hot,muggy afternoon in Tokyo, Japan.
You are participating in the 1992 olympics. As you begin your
flight down the runway towards the bar, you feel drops of sweat
rapidly racing down your forehead. You plant your pole, push up
and release! You did it! A new world record! A six meter pole
vault. The crowd roars with joy and you trot off to your next event,
always knowing that you defeated the pole vault!
The type of excitement described above is the feeling you will
receive when playing (participating in) SUMMER GAMES.
Let's first look at the events. There are eight events:
POLE VAULT
DIVING
4X400 METER RELA Y
400 METER FREESTYLE
100 METER DASH
100 METER FREESTYLE
GYMNASTICS
SKEET SHOOTING
The events are all in High-Resolution graphics with excellent
sprites!
Before you play you must enter your name then pick from one of
the 18 countries to represent. Each country is depicted by a flag
and when chosen, the computer then plays that country's full
national anthem. One to eight players may play. You may also
play with one or two joysticks.
The first event is the pole vault which is a very realistic simulation
of the real thing. You have to gain speed by running down a path
then pull down on your joystick to plant your pole. To push of the
joystick you push the joystick up. When you are ready to release
press the fire button. You receive three attempts at clearing a
certain height. If you fail to clear then the other players continue.
The next event is diving. This event requires planning and a
timed layout. You attempt four types of dives:
FORWARD
BACKWARD
INWARD
REVERSE
You are rated on how you enter the water and difficulty of the
move that you attempted. You can dive in four positions:
ROLL
HALF-PIKE
PIKE
FORWARD
At the end of your dive the judges, sitting at the edge of the pool,
hold up cards with your score on them. After you are finished you
are shown a total score and move on to our next event, the 4X400
METER RELAY.
You start when the gun goes off. To push ahead of your competitor,
push left to dash off. Watch your strength meter on the bottom of
the screen: it goes down as you push left. To gain that power back,
push your joystick to the right. This causes the meter to increase
because you are jogging. If you leave the stick in the middle you
coast. As you approach the next person, pour on the speed. You
want to hand the baton to him before he gets to the end of the box.
Watch the crowds as you race past them. They wave signs and yell.
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In all axil.
2.) Condnuoul or Ilandard
c:omprehenslve memory
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3.) CODIIDodoreTII SID c:hlp
lell for lound analYIII.
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5.) Complele read/write Dllk
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.8'1'
6.) DllkeHe formal analYlls 10
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8.) Complele keyboard lell.
9.) CaneHe read/wrlle lell.
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The next racing event is the 100 METER DASH. This race takes
about two seconds to load in because it was the same graphics from
the last event. To move your man it is suggested that you move
your joystick side-to-side or up-and-down. What I do is move the
joystick in a circular motion very quickly! This allows me to hit
every spot that the computer may be checking for.
The event that takes the most skill (luck???) in SUMMER GAMES is
GYMNASTICS. You have tolal control over your player, who is a
girl with long hair, dressed in brown leotards. She can do some
amazing things. She can perform a triple somersault with a 180
degree twist and land perfectly. You are scored on performance
and difficulty. The scoring is on a 1-10 basis, with a total score of two
attempts as your final.
The first swimming event makes you want to put your trunks on!'
The event is so realistic you feel as if you are there swimming with
them. The FREESTYLE RELAY team is composed of four swimmers
who cover 400 meters in a pool! The swimmers are so realistic that
when they enter the water to perform a stroke their swim suits go
half under water. To perform a power stroke, hit the fire button
every time the swimmer's hand enters the water. Pay close attention to the digital clock. You could set your watch by it.
COlllilll/cd
011
ncxl page
TPUG Magazine page 37
The next swimming event is the 100 METER FREESTYLE. Do
basically the same you would in the RELAY except hit the fire
button at all times.
The last event of this great game is SKEET SHOOTING. This
requires a lot of skill. You have a circular sight through which you
shoot your clay pigeons. You can not let your sig'ht hang in the air
too long because the force of gravity will slowly pull it down. You
first press the fire button to release the pigeons then aim your sight
and press the fire button to shoot. You have eight different shooting positions from which you move left to right.
The awards ceremony is an interlude in which the programmers
could have done a better job. The opening ceremonies, though,
couldn't have been done better.
The documentation is brief and to the point.
So, if you are willing to pay $35.00 U.S. for a game, and it's a toss-up
between an "arcade classic" and SUMMER GAMES . I would pick
SUMMER GAMES without a doubt. TPUG
SUMMER GAMES
EPYX SOFTWARE
Price: 135.00
u.s.
Home Accountant
L.F. Jarrett
Carp,Ont.
Attracted by the colourful advertisement in Compute I persuaded
my wife to give me for Christmas the C-64 version of Home Accoun·
tant, produced by Continental Software. I have been using Account
Pac, produced by Pacific Coast Software, for the past year or so and
(while quite satisfied with it) after making some personal adaptations,
I thought that Home Accountant would be an improvement and
give me printed output in greater detail.
In this respect, I have nothing to complain about. The Home
Accountant can produce a variety of statements, balance sheets and
budget comparisons, both in print and as graphs, and is all that is
claimed . It is a very good, useful program.
However, nowhere is mentioned the time necessary to input all the
information and - take it fmm me - this is considerable. Home
Accountant is, in fact , a collection of different pmgrams - the Main
Menu, plus different ones for transactions, graphs, printed reports,
activity reports, start new system, et cetera - a total of eight. Only
one is loaded at a time. This means quite a wait to go from, say,
entering payments to producing a print-out showing your current
situation . But even that would be acceptable, if it were not for the
time taken to enter transactions. The Account Pac program takes
your daily input, which could be, say, ten or twenty cheques, sorts
them and records them. Home Accountant, however, records each
transaction individually, and you cannot enter the next one until
this is complete.
not get a print-out of anything. So I wrote to Continental on
December 29th, returning the warranty card, together with a cheque
for $20.00 U.S. to cover updates to the program , and two or three
weeks later received another disk . This cleared up the chequeentering pmblem - but still no print-outs. This time I went into
the program and discovered that the lines covering both printing
options ended with the instruction "GOTO 400". Investigation
showed that this was equivalent to pressing an out-of-range key . By
deleting the phrase completely, I could now obtain printed reports,
etc.!
I wrote to Continental on February 6th, advising them of this
action but up to now they have not seen fit to reply. They have,
however, cashed my cheque!
My cond usion - the Home Accountant program is a good program - if
you have time and patience. Mine has, however, been relegated to
a back shelf, and I am continuing to use the Account Pac. TPUG
HOME ACCOUNTANT from Contilte1l1al Software, 11223 S.
HindT')' Ave., LA, CA90045
S99.95
(213) 417-8031
u.s.A.
u.s.
Here is a comparison showing the times taken by each program
just to record transactions:
HA
Loading main menu
Loading transactions menu
Changing disk & loading current data
Total before any entry can be made
Average to enter and record 10 entries
ACCTPAC
l' 22"
0' 50"
l' 22"
0' 25"
1'00"
0'45"
3' 44"
2'00"
4' 10"
14' 10"
Another complaint about the Home Accountant program - it can
handle five chequing accounts to the Account Pac's one. But in the
Home Accountant, every chequing account must have a related
cash account - which seems to me completely unnecessary.
When I first received the package, I could not get it to accept
cheque entries at all, although it would take deposits. (Must have
. been written by an Income Tax Inspector'). Furthermore, I could
page 38 TPUG Magazine
"I SAID 'C8/"'\'
NPr
'!Ce"-":!
II
ENHANCE VD 'U R
CDMMDDDRE-B4
RAMDISK·64
The RAMoISK-64 is a cartridge containing 64K
bytes of RAM used to emulete a disk drive. No
more long waits for program saves and loads.
Use Ramdisk-64 as a second disk drive. Or use
the 64K bytes as extra memory for large and
data intensive software.
FEATURES:
• 64 kbytes of dynamic RAM
• Includes sof'Cware to emulate a disk drive
• Loads an S kbyte program in less than
second.
• Does not use CoMMoooRE-64 RAM space
• System reset does not erase files in RAMoISK64.
• Small size only 3"x5.5·'xo.5"
• Useable with other cartridges
APPLICATIDNS:
•
Time saver where disk usage is high:
- Software development
- Large programs using overlays
• Software requiring large data storage. Use
with data bases or spreadsheets. Save
multiple graphic screens.
• USB as a second drive. Minimize diskette swapping.
MORE ABOUT DISK
EMULATION SOFTWARE
• Allows 16 directory entries or 63.5.kbytes of
storage.
• Compatible with SASIC commands OPEN.
CLOSE. GET#. INPUT#. PRINT#
• Support,.; PRG and SEQ files
• Treat RAMoISK-64 as device 1 5. user changeable.
• OTHER FEATURES TOO NUMEROUS TO
MENTION HERE.
FEATURES:
•
•
•
•
•
•
so columns x 25 lines display
256 character set with full Ascii and reverse
letters
Flicker-free crisp displey even during scrolling
Compatible with SASIC and the KERNAL
Includes customizing video routines like
scrolling. insert and delete line, address
cursor, and screen blank
DUAL SCREEN: Connect tha normal C-64
video output to a color monitor AND connect
the VIDEO-SO video output to a S/W or
green screen monitor. Text will appear on the
B/W or green screen monitor and the color
graphics on the color monitor. A NECESSITY
FOR GAME DEVELOPERS AND GRAPHICS
PROGRAMMERS.
• Compact size only 3"x5.5"xo.5".
APPLICATIONS:
•
•
•
•
VIDEO·BO
The VIDEO-SO
cartridge.
is
a
high-quality
SO-column
Word Processing
Spreadsheets
Terminal Emulation
Software Programming. Eliminate irritating
line wrap around.
• Graphics development. Use VIDEO-SO for text
and C-64 video output for color graphics
simultaneously.
The RAMoISK-64 and VIDEO-SO use tha CoMMoooRE-64 expansion slot. An optional extander board
($10) or motherboard is required .
PRICES
U.S.
Cdn.
RAMDISK-64 ..... . . . .. . , .. , ... . $349.00 $199.00
VIDEO-80 ............... . ..... . $259.00 $149.00
$10.00 $10.00
Extender Board .......... . . .
CalIf. residents add S% salee tax . Add 5% shippIng and
handling. VISA. MasterCherge, COO accepted. Personal
checks require two weeks to clear . Order by phone or
mail.
J)
TechnclcQies
1 555 Riverpark Drive, Suite 206
Sacramento. CA 9581 5
(91 6) 920-3226
8:00 am to 5:00 pm PST. Man-Fri.
PRICES QUOTED IN U.S. FUNDS
EXCLUSIVE CANADIAN DISTRIBUTORS-
=til..
ENTERPRISES & ASSOCIATES INC.
29 IRVING DR. - PEFFER LAW. ONT. - LOE 1 NO - CANADA - (705) 437-3187 EX. 21
CANADIAN DEALERS INQUIRIES INVITED.
TPUG
Magazine page 39
OLYMPIA PRINTERS
COMPACT 2
R.O.
LETTER QUALI TY
LETTER QUALITY
DAISY WHEEL
DAISY WHEEL
PRINTER/TYPEWRITER
PRINTER
A1TEN110N AIL COMMODORE 64,
VIC 20, AND PEr OWNERS
A complete self-tutoring BASIC programming course is now
available. This course starts with turning your computer on, to
programming just anything you want! This course is currently
used in both High School and Adult Evening Education
classes and has also formed the basis of teacher literacy
programs. Written by a teacher, who after having taught the
course several times, has put together one of the finest
programming courses available today. This complete 13 lesson
course of over 2.20 pages is now available for the COMMODORE
64, VIC 20, and PET computers and takes you step by step
through a discovery approach to programming and you can
do it all in your leisure time! The lessons are filled with
examples and easy to understand explanations as well as
many programs for you to make up. At the end of each lesson
is a test of the information presented. Furthermore, all answers
are supplied to all the questions and programs, including the
answers to the tests. Follow this course step by step, lesson by
lesson, and tum yourself into a real programmer! You won't
be disappointed!
INC L U DES
RS232C and
parallel interfac
Tractor feed
10,12,15 pitch
$549.00 $725.00
We will send this COMPLETE course to you at once for just
$19.95 plus $3,00 for shipping and handling (U.S. residents,
please pay in U.S. funds), If you do not live in the U.S. or
Canada, please add $5.00 for shipping and handling (and
pay in U.S. funds), If you are not COMPLETELY satisfied,
then simply return course withing 10 days of receipt for a
FULL refund.
EXCEL TYPEWRITERS LTD
86 Sheppard Ave. West
North York,Ontario
Canada (416) 225-4121
VISA
Brantford Educational Services
68 Winding Way,
Brantford, Ontario
Canada, N3R 3S3
The Commodore 64'" CO MAL 2.0 cartridge
is being produced for Nov 84 delivery.
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Fill in the coupon or send a facsimile.
Name: _____________________________________
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Complete course:
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Total:
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3.00
check desired course:
$22.95
o
COMMODORE 64
t Brantford Educational Services
t 68 Winding Way,
o
PET
t Canada, N3R 3S3
0
VIC 20
Brantford, Ontario
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page 40 TPUG Magazine
HASTER CARD
THE WAIT
IS OVER
Send cheque or Money Order to:
t
INCLUDES
Full featured
typewriter with
correction
Parallel centronics
interface
On line key
•
•
•
•
•
Full 64K ROM Cartridge-30K Free user Memory
Empty socket for user EPROM (8K, 16K or 32K)
'LOGO' compatible turtle graphics (with abbreviations)
Easy Sprite ANIMATION-Load, save, Link Shapes
Interrupt driven Music-Full control of SID
user definable fonts-LOad, save, Link Fonts
Three different screen dumps in:
Hi·Res Graphics, Multi·color Graphics, Text
Error Handler, External procedures, Trace Commands
Protected Input, Batch Command File capability
Easily definable Function Keys
(i.e., F7 will RUN any program from a directory)
Built in LINK command for Machine Code Routines
HEX and BINARY accepted-ASCII conversion built in
All prepaid advance orders receive FREE:
• COMAL HANDBOOK, Second Edition (includes Cartridge)
• Introduction to 2.0 Built in pacKages BooK
(GraphiCS, TUrtle, Sprites, Sound, Font, .. )
• TWO different demo disKs (1S41 format>
• White custom molded case for disks and booK
ALL FOR ONLY $99.95
(A $175 value-nearly half price)
Due to high demand orders will be filled on first come basis.
Send checK or Money Order in US Dollars plus S3 handling to:
COMAL USERS CROUP, U.S.A., LIMITED
5501 Groveland Ter., Madison, WI 53716
phone: (608) 222-4432
VISA and MC prepaid orders may call tOil free: 1-800-356-5324
extension 1307
Commodore 6a Is a trademark of Commodore Electronics ltd
KIDWRITER
Rich Westerman
51. Anne, IL
KiD WRiTER From Spinnaker. SM.95. Disk
jar Commodore 64. Recommended jar ages
6-10.
At various times I have approached my
kids with different versions of "childrens'
word processors". Their response, in the
main , has been a uniform one: they narrow
their eyes and look furtively at the room 's
exits, much the same as a prisoner planning an escape.
EnterKIDWRITER .
"Hey, guys - here's a new kids' word processor'"
"Oh;", they say, as they edge towards the
door.
"Yes, and this one is different - you ran
make illustrations for your stories with
spn'tes," says I, gaining confidence as they
come closer to peer over my shoulder.
"Look ," I say, "you can do your homework
on the C-64 now, and then print it out.
\"'on 't your teacher be impressed;"
To cut a short story even shorter, within
half an hour my 9-year-old had completed
a 3-page, illustrated story about a fisherman whose boat overturned and his subsequent l'escue by helicopter. All accomplished
without once looking at the manual , thanks
to lots of prompts, excellent error-trapping;
and the com prehensive self-runn ing demo
with the program.
Well, maybe their teacher would be impressed, but that's not incentive enough to
get them to engage the computer keyboard
in hunt-and-peck combat - not to mention
the dreary task of memorizing all the formatting; commands. Homework is something that kids just want to jlnish. Especially if you 're only 9 years old and you're
still working; on getting your hands to do
what your eyes/ mind tell them to.
By following the omnipresent and simple
prompts, the child is first shown how to
create an illustration describing his or her
story on the upper half of the screen. To
accomplish this, a simple graphics editor
allows choosing from a 99-item list of characters and objects, Up to eigh t of these are
arranged by the child on one of many different backgrounds. When the illustration
is finished, the child hits the (D)one key.
Now KIDWRITER's word processor is
engaged and the child is encouraged to
descn'be the illustration he has just made.
Eig;ht lines are available per 'page' for text.
When the text area is full , the child is asked
if he is finished with the story. If so, he is
asked if he wants to SA VE it to disk. If he's
not finished yet, another blank page is presented to him to again illustrate and descriue
with text. Until he declares his work ' finish d', all the 'pages' are considered to be
part of a 'book' and will be filed on disk
under the same name. When th e child wants
to show the book to Mom or Dad, he only
has to call up the book's title from the disk
and all the pages of hi s story will be displayed sequentially - complete with a cute
musical soundtrack supplied by KIDWRITER.
The perject educational software package
hasn't crossed my disk drive yet, but KIDWRITER is the current contender for first
place. I would like to see an enhanced version of KIDWRITER with a print-out option
and perhaps a more sophisticated high-res
drawing; routine (a machine-language,
joystick-driven one would be ideal). In the
end, thoug;h, I find myself in the nit-picking
mode. This is really a first-class piece of
software. TPUC
PICTURE BLOCKS
Rich Westerman
51. Anne, 1L
PiCTURE 8LOCKS From PDi S24.95. DIsk
jar Commodore 64. Recommended jar ages '
5- up.
PICTURE BLOCKS is a shape and pattern
recognition program which can be used in
either a free-form or in a structured lesson
mode.
I had assumed that most kids would choose
the FREE FORM mode over the structured
PA"n'ERNS mode but was proven wrong
immediately by my own 9-vear-old. After
having read the five pages uf instructions
and running PICTURE BLOCKS through
both its modes, he ended up spending nearly
an hour going through the library of shapes
in the matching; game part of the program
called PATTERNS.
In the FREE FORM mode, the child uses
shapes provided by the computer to create
his own picture. The program developers
suggest that the FREE FORM mode be
used as an introduction to the PATTERNS
portion of the software.
Choosing FREE FORM from the two-item
opening menu presents you with a black
screen displaying ten different geometric
shapes at the bottom, the shapes being
flanked by the letters 'E' and 'N '. Moving
the joystick right or left lights up each of
the shapes. By pressing the joystick button
while a shape is lit , you choose that shape.
The nine other shapes disappear and the
chosen shape can now be maneuvered
around the screen until it is where you
want it. Pressing the button again locks
that shape in place and brings back the ten
original shapes at the bottom. This selection and placement routine is repeated until
you're finished with yoU!' creation. By moving the cursor over the large ' E' (erase) at
the bottom, you can erase any shape which
you're dissatisfied with. A large'E block' is
to be moved over the offending sha-pe, where
a press of the button erases both the 'E' and
the shape. At any time, you can scrap the
creation on the screen by placing the cursor over the large 'N' (new) and pressing
the button. The screen blanks, and you
may start again.
The PATTERNS mode, which ended up
having the most attraction, is chosen from
the opening menu and you're presented
with another menu. Six categories of patterns are displayed , including such topics
as Living Thing5, People and Places and Up
and Away. In each category, there are two
levels: ('as), and hard. The procedure you
followed in FREE FORM mode is followed
here. That i~ , you use the joystick to light
up the desired shape and move it to the
conlinued
Oil
nexi page
TPUC Magazine page 41
correct position OIl the screen. Now, however, the screen is split in two and it is your
task to duplicate on the left side of the
screen, the picture or design that the computer has placed on the right side. In the
EASY level, the pieces of the pattern appear
one at a time. You must choose and 'set' the
proper piece on your side of the screen
before the computer will show the next
piece. When you complete the picture, the
name of the object appears at the bottom
and you are prompted to either 'Continue'
or 'End'.
In the HARD level of PATTERNS, the
elltire pattern appears on the right side of
the screen. You may choose and place your
shapes in any order you wish as long as you
place the right shape in the correct position.
Ag'ain, the 'E' and 'N' prompts are present,
should you wish to change your mind and
quit. In the PATTERNS mode, the 'N' selection will cause the computer to finish the
pattern for you and name it.
PICTURE BLOCKS rejects the use of fancy
high-res graphics in favor of highly COIltrasting, easily recognized basic shapes. I
applaud the programmer for this decision
because I believe it makes the program
more acces~ i ble to pre-schoolers just learning the basic shapes. Surprising to me, the
use of large basic shapes did not decrease
its attraction to older kids. Remembering
the attraction of ancient games such as
TANGRAMS (which PICTURE BLOCKS
is reminiscent of), I should not be surprised,
I guess.
Better use of sound would add gTeatly to
the attraction of PICTURE BLOCKS. It is
limited to simple beeps, which is probably
a result of the program being written originally for micros with less sophisticated sound
capabilities than the C-64. Still, this is wellwritten, enjoyable software at a good price.
TPUG
TWO BIBLE GAMES
John Easton
THE ISRAEL GEOGRAPHY GAME
Toronto, ON
533.50 Cdn. ($25.00 US.)
Wn'tten by The Micmworks
Reviewing two BIBLE games from Davka
Corporation produced for the Institute for
Computers in Jewish LIfe, 845 North Michigan Ave., Suite 843, Chicago, IL 60611.
(312)787-7858
Unprotected disk, 30 day medIa u'arrant)'.
C-64, CBM Disk, keyboard
Distributed in Canada by: Israel's, The Judaica Centre, 973 Eglinton Ave.
Toronto,
ON M6C 2C4. (416)789-2169)
w.,
Davka Corporation have until recently been
producing a rather extensive collection of
'educational' programs for use mainly in
Hebrew schools and running mainly on
Apple products (Atari and TRS seeming to
follow in lesser emphasis in that order).
Well now, Commodore fans, Davka executives must have attended some recent trade
shows of the CES variety, for they seem to
have discovered the potential of those millions of C-64's out there. Evidence would
lead one to believe that, to some extent
they have instructed their program developers to convert their favourite Apple progra ms to run on the C-64, and a few of these
are now available (perhaps suffering a bit
in translation) for your favourite computer.
SAMSON AND DELILAH
133.50 Cdn. (125.00 u.s.)
Written by The Software Group, Ine.
Burlington, Vermont
DOS protected - 30 day media wammty (J5.00
replacement charge after that)
C-64, CBM Disk, joystick.
Donkey Kong in reverse. You are Samson,
and it is your task to make it down from the
top floor of the temple past temple guards,
a lion, scissors (remember Samson's hair
and all that?) and the wily Delilah herself.
Occasionally you run across a 'jawbone of
an ass' which you may for a short time use
page 42 TPUG Magazine
to defend yourself. Other means of defence
consist of jumping or retreating (usually
into the path of another guard). If you do
make it to the pillars in the basement, wowee,
you get an extra turn to gain more points!
The 'educational' flavour of this arcade game
is a few screens of text describing in very
abridged fashion (albeit, with musical accompaniment) the exploits of our hero,
Samson. This text only appears at initialization, so as to not intrude on the seriousness of the 'game'.
The usual beeps and graphics. Skill required
- higher than this scribe's aging ability. A
mild 'nit-pick' - the sprites don't turn off
at the end of the game, but hang there
suspended on a title screen with the message "lor 2 players ?"
Educationally, forget it. Game value - perhaps a 3 out of 10.
Using historical and geographical clues,
one attempts to deduce the names of locations (73 in total) marked on the map of
Israel. The student may pick one of four
regions from an overall map of Israel, after
which, the chosen region is drawn to fiII
the screen. A marker is placed on the map
at an appropriate location, and the computer supplies the first of three clues as to
the identity of the 'mystery site'. Clues
theoretically grow progressively simpler
(and your answ er value lower), till after
three wrong answers, the correct answer is
displayed, and we move on to the next site.
Naturally, scores are kept, encouraging
perhaps a wee bit of classroom rivalry
- preferably by splitting the class into
teams.
Technically, this progTam is clean. Reasonable graphics and use of sound both for
prompts and as incidental 'backgTound
music'. Input is well-protected and prompts
are appropriate. A rather excellent touch
is the ability to pick up on semi-matches to
an answer (for instance, it will accept as
correct a Hebrew name, perhaps an 'English'
name, and/or an original Biblical name;
or partial mixes from any). One slight 'nitpick' might be the observation that the sites
are not really chosen in a random manner
- and once your students have memorized
the order of selection, there goes any further semblance of 'learning'.
If you have a school budget to draw upon,
and Geography of Israel forms part of the
curriculum for somewhere in the 7th to 9th
grade, buy it - you'll use itl TPUG
A Tl
J
AHOWTO .....
COMPENDIUM FOR THE COMMODORE 64
•
The author of this COMPENDIUM is a retired college Professor of Computer and Information Science. He feels certain that the reader will find this
booklet an unusually convenient reference guide in using the Commodore
64.
TAKES THE
FRUSTRATIONS
-:i'J . - " .
OUT OF USING YOUR COMPUTER
" .~' " A,'
BY PROVIDING YOU WITH QUALITY
'· .. --';--.,:._.
SOFTWARE AT AN AFFORDABLE PRICE.
•
I·
I
• Sector Copy a Disk. Back -Up Copy "Whole Bit" Disk Serift • Program or sequent ial
file copy to d isk & eonversion of program files to sequential fil es. Check track and
sector for erron • Examine contents of a file , block by block in HEX or ASCII
• Modify contants of a block. Check whole disk for errors. Save Disk Utilities onto
disk. SCREEN-DUMP Hi -Res GraphiC$ and Characters to printer using any $elected
memory lo cations. MULTI -COLOR SPRITE MAKER. Quick program (Machine
language or Basic) transfer to another diik • Provided on diskene in a plastic library
CII8 with instruction manual (for Commodore 64 TM)
"THE WHOLE BIT" ™ - Word Processing
$49 .95
• MENU ·DRIVEN • 80 column vi8'W screen. On -line HELP Seteens • Enhanced
cunor movement. Supports major printers by Menu Selection. Ability to custom
tailor print oommands • Tab·setting 240 columns to screen. File copies printed in
any sequence. Sequential page numbering from one file to another. Screen and
character color seleCUIble. Menu selection of disk files. Global March and lor replace
ju~!~~~:roonv:/~:Ys;~!~Tpet~~Bio~o;;:;!a~=~~i:o~~~~jl!~:n~~~:ii~:~ i~C:~
tation • Search/ replace defined ph rases. Text Centering. and more . .. • Provided
on di$kene with User's Manual in a 3 ring binder (for Commodore 64)
"FILE CONVERTER"
• FILE CONVERSION ; Allows any program sequent ial or relative file to beconverted
to a d iffering type including PET to ASCII or Screen poke . and vice vena. Any file
record type may be read with its contenU displayed to Screen. Field sizes, includ ing
tra iling or leading blanks 8re displayed. Number of fields per reco rd may be changed ;
files may be appended , Will convert fixed or variable fHes. Can be used with $uch
programs as Flex File TM , Silicon Office TM, Manager TM , and Superba5e 64 Tlw! •
FAST OAT A BASE ENTRY ; Creates a sequential data base file of up to 32 fields per
record; a very fast data base entry program useful for entering large mailing lists, atc .;
can be easily con ..... rted to your .pecific data bMe using " File conversio n" • READ
RELATIVE ; Allows viewing or printing of any selected relative file record (PET ,
ASCII , o r Screenpoke form) • Provided 0" d iskene in a planic library case with in ·
structiOn manual (for Commodore 64 and PET series computers)
.
Prices Quoted in U.S. Funds
MASTERCARD/VISA
FREE SHIPPING
(207) 439-5074
Applied Technologies, Inc.
Computer Products Div.
Lyndon Way
Kittery, Maine 03904
By Jack M. Wolfe, Ph.D.
He wishes that such a publication had been available to him when he was
first learning the Commodore 64 and even in his more recent use of the
.ystem.
The configuration assumed here is likely to be the one possessed by many
users of the C-64 system : that is, the C-64 with one 1541 disk drive and a
printer, and without a tape unit.
As the reader will readily recognize. in instances where the precise punctuation and inclusion of all the necessary details will be crucial to the
successful execution of the desired objective, a reference guide of this
type is virtually essential.
The author states that, to the best of his knowledge , this Compendium
contains information not available in anyone publication in so convenient a
form for ready use. Without this Compend ium the reader will have to refer
to various parts of various other publications and to his own. perhaps
somewhat scattered. notes.
This booklet also conta ins practical suggestions and warnings that will
prove very helpful to new users of the C-64 and will serve as timely
reminders for experienced users.
The booklet contains the following topics:
HOWTO FORMAT A DISK
HOW TO LOAD A PROGRAM FROM DISK
HOW TO SAVE A PROGRAM ONTO A DISK
HOW TO PRINT A PROGRAM ON THE PRINTER
HOW TO MODIFY A PROGRAM ALREADY ON DISK
HOW TO SCRATCH A PROGRAM FROM A DISK
HOW TO COPY PROGRAMS FROM ONE DISK
ONTO ANOTHER DISK
Copies of this booklet may be obtained by sending a cheque or money
order for $5 .00 per copy. Residents of Florida are required to send $5.25
per copy because of the 5% Florida Sales Tax.
Payment should be made out to Dr. Jack M. Wolfe and mailed to him at:
P.O. Box 25732, Tamarac, FL 33320.
Do not send cash.
Dealer & Distributor Inquires Invited
SUP
IT OWNERS RESERVE YOUR O§.9
TPUG will implement the popular 6809 operating system
"OS/9" on the SuperPET. OS/ 9 greatly expands software
availability and the hardware capabilities of this computer
while at the same time preserving access to the Waterloo
languages and programs.
The cost of OS/ 9 to club members will be around $1 50
(U.s.), which will include the cost of a hardware modification that will not affect the normal operation of the SuperPET. Two board SuperPETs require a simple hardware
modification - we provide instructions. To reserve your
copy please mail $68.09 to TPUG. (1912A Avenue Rd.,
Suite I, Toronto Ont., M5M 4A I, Canada). In the unlikely
event that TPUG does not proceed with OS/ 9, your deposit
will be refunded.
What does 05/ 9 offer?
* A true operating system with UNIX features and the
simplicity and command style of Commodore BASIC;
* Multi-tasking and multi-user environment;
* Multi-level directories similar to those available in
MS DOS 2.0.;
* Time and date stamp for all directory entries (files);
* File access privileges may be restricted by the owner of
a file.
Extensive software is available for OS/ 9 most of which will
run on the SuperPET.
The OS/ 9 package includes an assembler, editor, command (shell) library monitor, symbolic debugger
Available Langua~es (compilers) include BASIC-09, Pascal, CIS-COBOL, C Language. .. and others.
Available Application Programs: Word processors, business, inventory and accounting applications.
Public Domain: Software, relational database and spreadsheets, extensive public domain software and documentation
TPUG will acquire public domain software and assist users
in the conversion of commercial software to Commodore
format.
Portability and ExpandabUity
* SuperPET OS/ 9 programs will run on all OS/ 9-based
microcomputers.
* OS/ 9 will run hard disks and parallel drives.
* There will be source code compatibility to versions of
OS/ 9 that are planned for the Motorola 68000.
For Informadon call TPUG Inc. (416)782-8900
(416)782-9252
For Technlcallnformadon
Gerry Gold (416) 667-3159 / 225-8760
Avy Moise (416) 667-3954 / 667-9898
Umlted number of copies will be .tv....., e.
TPUG Magazine page 43
... experience the XETEC family of printer interfaces
Available in three models - the SPI, SPI/B, GPI - These models feature a five year
warranty, complete user's manual with software examples, comlT ·., d channels, an
internal micro processor for maximum speed and intelligence, allU ...Ill internal 2K
buffer to allow more computing time (not included in the SPI). These models interface Centronics parallel compatible printers with the VIC 20, C-64 and SX-64 serial
bus.
SPI·SPIIB features:
•
•
•
•
•
•
GPI features:
2K buffer (SPIIB only)
Centronics compatible
10 printing modes
10 additional commands
4 user-accessable switches
CORRESPONDENCE QUALITY on the Gemini,
Delta, Epson and Panasonic printers
SPI-$89.95 .. SPIIB-$99.95 .. SGI-$129.95
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Graphic printer interface
Centronics compatible
Standard 2K buffer
7 printing modes
22 additional commands
Supports more than 21 printers
6 user-accessable switches
54 SECOND hi-res screen dump
100% COMPATIBLE with software written
for the VIC 1525 printer
Take out line available at finer software stores everywhere.
Exclusively distributed in Canada by
B&R Enterprises IDC.
Pefferlaw Onto LOE 1NO
(705) 437-3187
Ontario Residents add 7t11. P .S.T.
order direct, immediate delivery
page 44 TPUG Magazine
DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED
Circle No. 32 on Reader Serrice Card.
Buscard II - Better and Better
Alex Fletcher
Toronto, ON
I have owned Commodore equ ipment since
1980. When the C-64 was introduced in the
fall of 19821 wanted to use this new machine
with my existing drive , so just prior to
Christmas of 1982 I bought a Commodore
64 and an interface unit with which to hook
it to my IEEE drive. The cost was about
S1 300 and within three days I had returned
the whole system and bought a new printer
instead . I was impressed with neither the
ea rl y C-64 nor the interface unit. The C-64
produced a great deal of sparkle, and the
interface interfered too much. I waited
another six months before trying to include
th e C-64 into my system again - this time
with a Bu sCard.
A comp lete review of the original BusCard
was in th e February issue of TPUG Magaz£ne and the author, Mr. Lever, concluded
that it was "highly recommended". Here is
a quick summary of the BusCard features.
Plug the BusCard II into the cartridge port
of th e C-64 and you have an IEEE interface,
a parallel printer port, and you still have a
cartridge port for games. You can type
SYS6JOOO and have full BASIC 4.0 disk
commands (it's lovely to load with a shifted
R UN), or type SYS6J006 to have a machine
language monitor with its many features.
Mr. Lever also comments on the ability of
the BusCard to mix serial and IEEE devices
together and to sw it ch between them with
ease. His only criticism is the location of
these mini-switches; this is one of the few
visible changes on th e new BusCard II.
The switches have been moved to the rear
of the box to be more visible, although
many users will not find it necessary to
reset them. If you have both IEEE and
serial devices you can easi ly set these m iniswitches to fit your current sys tem needs.
Another visible change is that th e cartridge
slot has been moved to the right side of the
board. Since you don't pull up or push
down on the BusCard II while changing
cartridges, there is less chance of bend in g
the C-64 circuit board. The IEEE slot and
printer connector are now at th e rear of th e
BusCa rd II so their wiring is a t th e back - a
much neater installat ion.
C-64 owners' di sc ussions about interface
units usually turn to the problems of loading programs that are ex tensive ly copyprotected . Althou~h some interface devices
suggest that they are totall y trans parent,
th ey too will have problems loading some
of the la test software that is protected by
readin g the ROM's of the 1541 drive. I
have loaded li teral ly hundreds of programs
- both public doma.in and commercial
- and I have found very few programs that
will not load using BusCard II- but you
should ask th e vendor to check before you
buy any of the most recent programs.
One of the primary purposes of buying a
BusCard II is to have the speed of the IEEE
devices. Compared to using a 1541 I can
backup a disk thirty tim es faster; load and
run a program five tim es faster; save and
verify a program four times faster. The
IEEE interface is a boon to anyone who
requil'es rapid disk access, whether for program development or for small business
use. If the C-64 CP/ M catches on, then we
will all need IEEE interfaces to cope with
that disk-intensive DOS.
Installing the BusCard II is slightly differen t because there is one clip that has to be
connected to the inside of the C-64 now,
rather than th e two on the previous model.
According to Batteries Included this is an
indication that the latest version of the
BusCard II is even more transparent than
formerly. I have found that programs that
would not load on the earlier version will
load on this one. This Ilew BusCard II also
lets you alter the switches without re-setting
the machine - no more pressing the RUN/
STOP and RESTORE keys. This is valuable for programmers because, if you should
decide to change input /o utput between
IEEE and se,ial devices, you do not lose
what evel' program you have in memory .
The same applies to printers, but with extra
features. You can select devi ce 4 to be IEEE
or serial printers from Commodore or parallel printers with or without conversion
from PETSCII to ASCII , such as Epson or
Centronics. To change from a 1:)26 to an
Epson means that you throw switches - you
don't disconnect and re-connect cords and
plu~s.
The BusCard II is the interface between
my C-64 and 4040, 1541 and MSD driv es.
Friends have their BusCard II's attached
to Commodore 2031-lp drives and Gemini,
Daisywriter and Epson printers, ami th ey
have had no difficulties. I have attached
TTX (parallel) and Commodore (IEEE)
printers to the C-64 simultaneously and
switched the output to either printer- again
without problems. Rough drafts are fast on
a dot-matrix printer, but the daisy-whee l
and bond paper are business pre-requisites.
This feature of "sw itchability " is of great
value to anyone who must review program s
designed for varied formats, or write prog rams that are to work on a variety of
machines.
The machine language monitor that is built
into the BusCard II is not a full-featu red
assembly-aid like PAL, but it still has man y
valuable features. Type SYS61006 and the
monitor is enabled. After this, SYS8 will
jump you into the monitor again unless
the monitor is disabled through a reset or a
cold start.
The BusCard II allows me to use fast drives,
to press one shifted key to load and run, to
make simple disk commands , to access a
machine language monito r and to switch
between various peripheral devices with
ease. It's GREA T' TPlJC
BUSCARD II from Balleries lncluded, 186
Queen St. w., Toronto, ON Canada M5V 121.
TPUG Magazine page 45
CodePro-64
Janet Sherbanowski
Toronto, ON
The most impre~sive aspect Systems Management Associates (SMA) has built into
CodePro-64 is their clear identification of
each step in learning to program in BASIC.
A disclaimer in the brief introduction to
the tutorial assume~ that you are interested
and dedicated enough to want to learn the
language. It tells you right up front that
this is not a quick way to BASIC, and the y
are right. You really do have to learn to
crawl before you can run. There is no way
to rush through the course, but if you prefer to use your machine, in the comfort of
your home, at your own pace, then CodePro-64 could be the tool you have been
looking for.
The course consists of a manual and two
diskettes that require initialization with serial
numbers before they can be used . Programs
loaded from within the main program allow
you to save the practice exercises for future
use in your own progTam~ .
messy comment
Editor's Note: I hat'e receit'ed set'eral commellts
about my article "Messy is BeautIful" (TPUG
Magazine, MarchIApn·11984). Some were favourable, others less so. Here is one ftOm someone with an opposing point of l,iew. Does allyolle else wish to say anvthing abo III this ?'
.
I would like to comment on the article
"Messy is Beautiful ", by David Williams in
the Marchi April '84 i~sue. I am sure that
Mr. Williams has the best interests of his
students in mind when he teaches his courses,
but I must "take up the glove", so-to-speak,
on the behalf of structured programming
that Mr. Williams bemoans in his article.
I believe that the concept of an "algorithm"
is not too hard to comprehend in Grade 11
(when I learned it, and not in the classroom,
by the way). I am still studying more things
about algorithms in third-year Computing
Science at the University of Waterloo, and
page 46 TPUG Magazine
The CodePro-64 manual starts with an introduction to binary, hexadecimal and the
mathematics involved in programming.
From there, you get step-by-step instructions on screen and in the manual concepts,
keywords and BASIC functions . Once you
have mastered these steps through on-screen
exercises and tutorials, you are ready to do
some simple programming' yourself. The
screen tells you at each step whether or not
you have been successful in your attempts
and allows you to correct the errors as many
times as necessary in order to gain the proper
~equence and syntax.
Menu-driven screens allow you to choose
new concepts, return to previous lessons,
or push forward beyond the level you have
reached in each area . Each "page" on screen
has clear reference back to the manual so
you do not become lost in the program.
This product is designed for the beg'inner,
the only drawback to that goal being' the
occasional lapse into the use of computerese in some parts of the tutorial. On one
pa~e I would be enlightened by their total
understanding of the beginner'S need to
have things explained clearly and completely, and then they would lose me two
I believe the effort to teach structured programming at the beginning will be a service
to any student that intends to continue in
computers. The structured approach is the
easiest way to realize simply and efficiently
an algorithm . I believe a simple exercise
involving the students going back to programs they wrote earlier in the year would
drive home the point that messy is a pain if
you have to do any major modification of a
program .
I must admit that I am biased in my approach, but this is tempered by some work
in the field as well (I haven't been hidden
in the halls of "academia"). The students
that bemoan a lower mark because their
program is messier than friends yet accomplishes the same purpose should be invited
to a marking session when you have to
mark 80 programs. Sure, 95% of them will
produce the required output, but it is a
moot point that a neater, well-commented
program is betler from the viewpoint of
understanding what the progTam is trying
10 do, and what modifications might be necessary to accomplish another related task
(this being one of the things that a programmer does most often on the job).
pages later by explaining other important
topics without the same flow ..For example,
the manual says at times "this screen is
self-explanatory". In some cases that's true,
in others, I had to go back over two or three
pages to get it to explain itself to me. Overall,
my reactions to this programming course
are favourable.
The sprite creation section and music generator are worth the money in themselves
without the extra bonus of learning BASIC.
What you actually get are lessons in BASIC,
a progTam to create sprites and a music
generator. A nice package.
If you don't have time to spend many evenings at a university or college learning
BASIC but do have time at home to learn
at your own speed CodePro-64 could be the
right course for you. It helps to have someone you can call on for help occasionally
but, all -in-all , it's a good program for
a beginner. TPUG
CodePro-64
System's Management Associates (SMA)
3700 Computer Dlive, Raleigh, NC 27609,
(919)787-7703
Pn·ce:SS9.S9
u.s.
The new language COMAL has structures
such as IF-THEN-ELSE, WHILE-DO, REPEAT-UNTIL, CASE, etc. , that are popular in languages such as Pascal, but COMAL
also has some of BASIC's "looseness" as
well. The added advantage of Logo-type
graphic commands means that students can
see a gTaphical realization of what their
programs do. This can be a nice teaching
tool, and fun as well!
Michael W. Norman
The Oddsmaker
John David
Etobicoke, ON
Ladies and gentlemen, place your bets! With
The Oddsmaker you could become rich - or
arrested! (Or both!?!) You could be the
neighbourhood "turf accountant" with this
program that turns your C-64 into a parimutuel betting system. However, the creators suggest that it is for entertainment
use only.
First, a word on parimutuel betting for the
uninitiated. It is a system of betting in which
all those who backed the winner, in proportion to the their wagers, divide the total
amount bet, minus certain fees and taxes.
If a parimutuel was held on a seven-horse
race, there would be seven betting pools.
Suppose you bet $30.00 on horse #4, and
when betting finished there were $300.00
dollars bet on #4. Your share of the total
amount bet would be 10%, since $30.00 is
10% of $300.00 If the total amount bet on all
seven horses in the race (each represented
by a different pool) was $1000.00, you would
win $100.00 or 10% of the total bet (a tidy
profit!)
The Oddsmaker will make the whole, complicated parimutuel procedure process
simple. The menu-driven program offers
twelve choices that fall into four broad
categories. You can establish the pools to
be bet on, then take in bets on those pools,
print tickets for the bettors and save all the
data on disk. The program will automatically calculate odds and payouts. As the
numbers change with each and every bet,
the excitement grows for both the operator
and the bettor.
Playoffs mean excitement for any sport.
Imagine using The Oddsmaker to increase
the tension! First you create the pools - one
name (that name can be up to nineteen
characters long) for each team. You can
create fourteen different pools. They can
be edited at any time. Once this task is
completed, you can enter a percentage for
the house cut of the total pool. With this
"fee", you can buy snacks or prizes for the
party you hold in conjunction with your
"major sporting event". Once the pools are
established, place your bets! If you want to
print tickets for all participants, you can.
On each ticket there is room for two lines
each, fifteen characters long. The program
prints two copies of each bet - one for the
bettor and one for the cashier. Each printout has the two-line title, the bettor's name,
the number of the pool and the amount he
bet. While you are taking the bets, you
have three options for the bettor. He can
see the current odds, based on all money
wagered to that point; he can see the payouts
owed for each $1.00 bet; or he can see a
screen message created by the operator.
This part of the process is very dynamic, as
odds and payouts change with each new
wager. All of this important information
- especially how much you're owed - can
be stored on disk until the event is completed and you collect your share of the
parimutuel pot.
If there is a competition of any kind, The
Oddsmaker is a program that will add to the
excitement, as the users follow the fluctuations of the purse created by their own
scientific knov.ledge - or hunches. TPUG
cz
THE ODDSMAKER from
Software, 358
Forest Road, South Yarmouth, MA 02664
(617) 771-4155.
Big Bird's Special Delivery
Rich Westerman
St. Anne, IL
BIG BIRD'S SPECIAL DELIVERY From CBS
Software. 129.95.
System Requirements: Commodore 64, Disk
Dn've
Any software package that has a Sesame
Street character on its cover has one-up on
its competition. Shown a stack of assorted
software packages, I'd bet that the average
6-year-old American will want to see one
with Big Bird on the cover first. My theory
was confirmed in my own household the
other day when just such a stack of educational software arrived for review.
BIG BIRO'S SPECIAL DELIVERY is an
object recognition game. When playing it,
kids help Big Bird and Little Bird deliver
packages to all the correct places on Sesame Street.
Loading the software was made more difficult than usual by requiring the user to
type SYS 8 * 4096 instead of RUN, once the
program is loaded. A simple BASIC loader
program would have avoided this problem
and made the program less intimidating to
new users. Quirks like this are sometimes a
sign of the software developer'S haste in
translating a piece of software from one
computer to another.
The opening menu lists two games to choose
from. In the SAME GAME, the child must
make exact picture matches. For instance, a
pear must be delivered to the address showing another pear above it. In the RIGHT
KIND game, the pear could be delivered to
an address displaying afood item. You could
deliver the pear to an address displaying a
pumpkin, an ice cream cone or a glass of
milk.
high-quality one. A monitor is almost a
necessity for BIG BIRO'S SPECIAL
DELIVERY.
A note on the documentation is in order: It
is well-written and intended to be read verbatim to the child. Several pages of the
brief manual are given over to encouraging non-computer related activities. These
games and activities follow the software's
intended purpose: to teach object recognition and add a touch of class to an already
fine educatonal package. TPUG
Game manipulation is made easy by limiting keyboard input to four keys. With these
keys, the child moves Little Bird back and
forth as he carries packages to their destinations. There are nine categories of objects
to deliver, each category having seven items.
The categories include such diverse and
contrasting topics as: Clothes, Ways To
Travel, Musical Instruments and Animals.
This large inventory of graphic items should
help maintain interest in the game.
Speaking of graphics, those in BIG BIRO'S
SPECIAL DELIVERY are all hi-res and
attractively drawn ... but unfortunately,
very difficult to see on a color TV, even a
"I GUARANTEE that we will NOT
PROGRAM any micro BEFORE
ITS TIME!"
TPUG Magazine page 47
Paperclip 64-D With Spell pack
Ian A. Wright
Toronto, ON
A new PaperClip-640 with Spellpack is available from Batteries Included at 186 Queen
Street West, Toronto M5V lZI (416-596-1405)
for S149.95 Cdn. The original wordprocessor program has been further enhanced
and now includes a spelling checker.
What do you do to improve the best wordprocessor available for the C-64? You make
it easier to use and expand its capabilities
even further and the latest version of
PaperClip, version 64-0, has been improved
both ways .
PaperClip version 64-0 comes with or without the spelling checker program called
"Spellpack". Let's first look at the changes
to Paper<:lip, then at the spelling checker
program . The two programs coexist (since
the spelling check takes place within Paper~ip and there's no need for loading and
re-Ioading) but PaperClip 64-0 and PaperClip
64-0 with Spell pack are really separate
products. The Spellpack program itself is
also available as a separate package.
DEFAULTS FILE
Is 64-0 easier to use? Yes. Is it expanded"
Yes.
The answer to both questions is 'yes' since,
for example, there is an additional file on
the main disk to let you build a version of
PaperClip 64-0 that's customized especially
for you. The addition of a file called
"defaults-<l" to this new PaperClip 64-0 means
you can also select the printer port, the
RS-232 parameters, the printer device
number, screen colours, and 80 or 4O-column
video output so all of these come up automatically when you load. In the earlier
versions you could use a program (merge
pnfil) to have your choice of printerfile
built in to your copy of PaperClip. That
feature is still there, but is now clearly
explained in the manual. By using these
two "defaults" programs you can by-pass
some of the selection process.
A USER'S MANUAL
The latest version of PaperClip has a new
manual and it's now called a User's Manual
rather than an Owner's Manual. This implies
(quite correctly) that the manual has been
revised to make it easier to use. Some sections of the manual have been totally
re-written -like the printerfile default system mentioned above. Some sections have
page 48 TPUG Magazine
been added -like CNTRL Functions.
Other sections have been deleted -like
Precaution for 4040 dn·ves. Many of the
sections have been re-organized for clarity,
and some of the jargon has been re-wri lien
into plain English. The summary pages
have been revised with headings and subheadings by function and a stiff divider
separates the appendices from the text. A
couple of major and much needed changes
are the use of a simple page-numbering
system and re-selling the whole manual
with a clear typeface. To use a computer
cliche - a great deal of effort has gone to
make this manual more "user-friendly".
OTHER ENHANCEMENTS
Within the Paper<:lip program there have
been a few enhancements. For example:
CONTROL-Y will set and delete a phrase
without using CONTROL-P then CONTROL-K. The search functions have been
expanded so you can match any character,
match an alphabetic character, match what
follows exactly, and match at the beginning or the end of a word. According to the
sales staff there have been a number of
improvements in the coding of this latest
version of PaperOip 64-0 which make its
operations smoother. I haven't noticed any
great change, but then it always seemed
like mag'ic to me anyway!
P APERCLIP UPDATES
The new version of PaperClip is available
from Batteries Included at the above address
- but not for free. As Alan Krofchick
explains it, the company business is not
updates, nor is it losing money: they are
simply trying to support their many established customers. Al told me of a customer
from Hong Kong who wrote requesting a
"free" update (based on an earlier review I
wrote). Add up the costs for a disk, mailing
and handling charges and that update would
have cost the store about $50.00 and the
store was receiving hundreds of requests
each month! Needless to say, Batteries
Included has had to institute specific policies to deal with PaperClip updates. If you
come into the store with an original PaperOipdisk there is no charge for an update to
64-0, but if you mail the disk it will cost
$5.00 for postage and handling. An update
through the mail without returning the
ORIGINAL disk will cost $10.00. A new
manual costs an additional $10.00 and is a
small investment compared to the cost of
publication.
On a recent trip to the store I boug'ht a copy
of 64-A and the sales staff seemed surprised
that someone would "downgrade". I had to
confirm I wanted version "A" at least three
times. Despite the raised eyebrows, my reasoning was sound because, as PaperClip gains
features , the available file space decreases.
Most users do not write word processor files
flowing over 400, 40-column lines very often
(babbling is an acquired skill) but if this
has ever occurred to you - look out! You
will not be able to manipulate a file larger
than 424 lines in PaperClip 64-0 and this is
less than half the number that could be
written with the original version (64-A). I
suggest that anyone wishing to update their
version of PaperClip either keep their original disk or at least back-up the old version
and store it safely.
A SPELLING CHECKER
What's this about a spelling checker? How
does it work? What makes it speciaP How
fast is it"
Spellpack is Batteries Included's name for
an enhanced version of PaperOip 64-0. All
previous versions of Paper<:lip have used a
"dongle" or key (a small gray plastic box
that 's fitted into port #1 of the C-64) and all
versions including 64-0 work wi th the same
dongle. PaperClip with Spell pack won ·t.
PaperClip-S (Spellpack version) has its own
don gle, its own package, its own disk - plus
a separate dictionary disk - and an additional appendix in the manual. It 's loaded
by CONTROL-Shifted Y. That 's it. The
command line reads: "Insert dictionary disk
and press return", when that's done you
are asked: "Check user dictionary:'''. The
basic dictionary has 15,000 words which
sounds like a lot until you pick up The
Concise Oxford Dictionary (the standard in
local schools) with 40,000 words. This is
why Spell pack has a "user" dictionary designed to let you custom-build an additional file of your special words .
If you are blessed with an IEEE drive like
the 4040 or MSD drives, Spellpack is about
three times faster than with a 1541 serial
drive, since the entire dictionary must be
read in from disk. The word checking
process, however, is very quick, since it's in
machine code - and it's just as fast on 10
pages as on one. When an error is found it
is highlighted and at this point you can
select from four choices : skip to next word,
skip and ignore future occurrences, correct the spelling, or add it to your user
dictionary. This last selection requires that
you have answered "yes" to the prompt
"Check user dictionary" at the start. The
first time I used this reature I ble w this and
had to re-start Spellcheck because I didn't
read over the instructions carefully enough .
The Spellpack disk also has six "maintenance"
programs to let you view, repair, and update
the dictionary, aiso add and delete words
to the user dictionary. The last program ?
Exit .
Keep in mind that a spelling checker cannot find errors in syntax (like "boat" for
"boot" or "baby") since theseare also legitimate words. The big advantage to Spellpack
is that it does not require you to shut off the
word processor, load the spelling checker,
and then re-load the wordprocessor to print
a corrected copy. I use Spellpack to proof-
Spell pack has many extended ca pabilities
that will mean you grow into the program
- not out of it.
read my written material before it goes to
my printer. I'm always amazed after four
or five edits to find there is still one typo
I've missed - every time.
I used PaperClip for a recent demonstration of word processing to a group of Outdoor Wri ters from all across Canada. Some
of these authors wrote their material with
mega buck dedicated word processors and
some wrote their material with a pencil.
All of them were professionals and all were
impressed with PaperClip. They liked the
simplicity of full-screen editing, two-key
commands, full printer access, 80-column
video output, 40-256 column files, the list
of features g'oes on and on. Now, adding a
built-in spelling checker, that's fantastic!
PaperClip 64-D with Spe\lpack definitely sets
the standard for Commodore wordprocessors. TPUC
A SEPARATE PROGRAM
PaperClip 64-D with Spellpack costs $149.00.
It is NOT available as an upgrade to earlier versions, since it includes a totally new
program, but the Spell pack can be bought
separately and costs $49.95. If you already
own PaperClip, the acquisition of Spell pack
will give you the latest update, a new dongle,
and the SpelJpack disk. If you don 't own it
and you are in the market for a word processor, then you should look over the latest
PaperClip version's many features. Along
with the all the standard editing, r evising,
and printing functions, PaperClip 64-D with
Cardco Cardram 16
Richard Best
Mississauga, Ont
CARDca CARDRAM 16
The Cardco Cardram /16 is a 16K RAM
expansion board which plugs into the VIC
20 expansion port and increases available
memory to just under 20K . The cartridge
sells for nearly $50.00 less th an the similar
board from Commodore, and offers some
features not found on the original.
The circuitry comes enclosed in a black
plastic case with a cut-out that exposes a set
of mini-DIP switches. These switches are
used to allocate the two 8K blocks of RAM
to one of four available areas inside the
VIC 20. (The cartridge is actually two 8K
cartridges in one housing.) Memorycan be
placed in blocks 1, 2, 3 or 5 of the VIC 20.
When switched to blocks 1 and 2, memory
is expanded by the full 16K. If you already
have an 8K expander in block I, the Cardram/16 can be switched to blocks 2 and 3
for a total of28K - the maximum for BASIC
in the VIC 20. For a more exotic approach,
RAM can be put into block 3 or block 5
where it can hold an MI L program while a
BASIC program is sitting in lower memOl-Y.
The Cardram!16 canridge comes packed
with a 20-page booklet that contains a lot of
information about both the expander and
the VIC 20. It is written in a friendly style
and addresses itself to the pro and beginner alike. It also includes a n umber of very
interesting programs to try with the expander, such as a screen relocater and a
program which will load two programs into
memory at once. The board is very ruggedly constructed and all contacts are goldplated for performance and long life.
CARDBOARD/ 3S ECONOMY EXPANSION INTERFACE
Cardco started a trend with their Cardboard /3 Economy Expansion Interface. The
updated Cardboard/3s is basically the same
unit, with the addition of a number of
switches and a master reset button. This
interface increases the number of expansion ports available on the VIC 20 from the
normal single slot to a total of three switchable slots. The switches allow cartridges to
be assigned to blocks I , 3 or 5. Each slot is
individually switch able to any block by
means of tin y rocker switches. The inclusion of the reset button rna kes it possible to
switch from cartridge to cartridge without
turning off the computer, although the
machine must still be shut off to insert or
remove a cartridge - very convenient and
easi er on the VIC 20, your monitor and
your nerves.
This unit is vCI'y basic, consisting of just a
PC board with a couple of bolts for supports and a minimum of circuitry on top. It
is well-built wilh the same gold plating on
the contacts, and it is fused, in case you pi ug
in one cartridge too many. The original
Cardboard is still available at a lower pI-ice,
but will probably lose out to the switched
version. I bought my interface from Canadian Software Source in Toronto, and must
mention that I am pleased not only with
the Cardco product , but also with the price
and prompt, courteous service. (Thanks,
Mike and Barbara.)
All Cardco products are guaranteed for
the life of the orig'inal owner, and are available al a wide variety of retail outlets and
mail order houses. There are no suggested
list prices in Canada, and prices vary according to store policy. The Cardram!16 ranged
from a high of $120.00 to a low of $99.95.
The Cardboard /3s ran from $i9.95 down
to $54.95. TP(JC
Cardeo products are Manufactured by Cardeo,
/ne. 313 Mathewson, Witehita, Kansas.
DISKALIGNER
FOR YOUR 1541 DISK DRIVEl
In less than an hour, with just a Phillips screwdriver and th e DISKALIGNER Disk, you can
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L3T 3N3
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may be purchased at Electronics 2001
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TPUG Magazine page 49
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Recordkeeping system for the Dog Breed er and
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page 50 TPUG Magazine
1046 PARKWOOD AVE
SARNIA, ONTARIO
N7V 3T9
THREE SPREADSHEETS
Dave Powell
Mississauga, ON
With th ese three packages, we have almost the entire range available for the C-64. It's possible to get some cheaper sheets in the
$20-$30 range, and there's a FREE one (COLUMN CALC, written
in BASIC) in the TPUG libral'Y. I don't think there's anything on
the C-64 muket right now that can challenge Mulliplan as 'top-ofthe-line'. However, as we'll see, there are other things in life
besides being top-of-the-line,
pound interest, present value, effective interest I'ates, and so on .
The addition of a SORT function is a great help for analysis,
SEARCH (only in PraCliCalc) helps in large spreadsheets to find a
particular row, by searching for a known piece of text. ('GOTO
name' is a substitute in Multiplan).
My feeling is that FSP>Calc doesn 't have enough functions for the
price (COLUMN CALC almost rivals it here), Muhiplan has too
much unless one has the occasional business application, and
PractiCalc has a well-chosen set.
FUNCTION
EASE OF USE
The easiest comparison to make is on the basis of raw FUNCTION.
Multiplan wins hands down. (The C-64 version has 99% of the
functions of Multiplan on an IBM PC) . PractiCa\c is not as versatile,
but is probably as powerful as the original VISICALC product on
much larger machines. FSP>Calc offers "just enough" function,
and must rely on better documentation , presentation and examples to make up its price disadvantage over the real cheapies which
come in with the same rating. Here's a table to give an idea of their
relative functionality :
Multiplan
FUNCTION
MATH FEATURFS
+- /.
%
Sum ,avg,min ,max
Exponentiation
%+ , %- , %diff.
Trig & log fn.
Boolean fns .
Logical expr.
Iteration
MultiPlan
Practi
calc
FSP>
calc
x
x
x
x
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
EXTENSIONS
IF .. THEN .. ELSE
Table lookup
SORT
Search
X
X
X
For the active user, one who has invested the necessary time to
learn the ins and outs, Multiplan is a dream to use. Advanced
functions such as external sheet consolidation; area naming, copying and moving; iteration ; logic; table look-up; string manipulation ... the list goes on and on . .. are all packaged in the one
standard format. Wherever possible, Multiplan will oHer a proposed response. 1£ one copied 12 cols last time, Multiplan will
pre-enter ' 12' as a pmposed response to: 'number of cols to copy'. 1£
one goes about setting up the sheet systematically, the proposed
response will usually be suitable - just hit RETURN.
The manual is excellent. Ii's looseleaf, with both tutorial and
reference sections. There is a good example to follow.
X
X
OUTPUT
Graphics
Variable col
width
Different col
widths
Formats
Automatic
wide print
Formats,
widths, saved
How can I put this? Multiplan is easy to use, considering the incredi,
ble amount of function available. At all times, every command
option is shown at the bottom of the screen and choices can be made
directly, or by moving a cursor to one's preference, Formulae can
be constructed by 'pointing' to cells with the cursor to get cell
references. The downside, if one can call it that, is that there's
almost too much choice, too many ways of doing something. However,
help is always at hand, Point to the puzzling option, and press'?' to
get a screenful of helpful information . If you are going to set up
spreadsheets only occasionally, Multiplan will probably take too
long to relearn, each time.
lo-res
yes
hi&lo
yes
no
no
yes
no
yes
yes
title
only
yes
no
fixed
yes
yes
no
no
Naturally, the functions available are only relevant if they are
going to be used, I would think that even the simplest home
application can benefit from a better presentation afforded by
superior output functions. Financial spreadsheets won't get far
without either exponentiation or logarithms for calculating com-
Between sessions, every piece of customization is kept (with one
exception - recalculation auto/ manual always resets to auto) which
makes it practical to set up very nice looking output, and get it
every time. Printing wide sheets is accomplished automatically so
that one can cut and paste pages to get a wide page. There's no need
to specify several partial prin ts.
Movement of rows or columns (by insert, copy, move, or sort) is
simple, as each cell reference is already coded to show that it's
either absolute or relative. In addition, a rectangle can be moved
or copied, one is not confined to referencing single rows or cols at a
time.
continued on next page
TPUG Magazine page 51
ESP > Calc
PractiCalc
Multiplan and PractiCalc are 'traditional' spreadsheets in the
VISICALC mold. ESP>Ca1c is not. I have a hard time evaluating
which is better, as I became familiar with VISICALC first. ESP>Calc
takes the approach that the first row and the first column are always
titles, and also names. All other cells are numbers. Calculations
and title changes are done on a separate screen. Calculation order
is determined by the order in which they are specified. I found this
more difficult, because I was in the habit of specifying a spreadsheet
in a non-procedural fashion, in the order that I thought of things.
This product is very well put together. Good use is made of the
primary function keys to help in developing and changing a
spreadsheet in minimum time. It doesn't have the extensive help
facility that Multiplan does, or the simple, one screen help of
ESP>Calc, but it needs less. The major functions are represented
by the initial letter of each command, and these initials are given
on the prompt line.
Although changes are possible, ESP>Calc makes it much easier to
specify all the calculations at first. For instance, there is no way of
later adding extra calculations at the end of the list, only inserting
extras in the middle. Moreover, having to specify calculations on a
separate screen makes it difficult to remember which row and
column numbers were required.
With fewer options and fixed formatting, there is less to worry
about. There is no confusion of relative or absolute references,
because there is no copying (replicating) of formulae. Printing is
automatic in that if the sheet is wider than 80 characters, extra
pages are printed until all the columns are output. Row titles are
repeated on subsequent pages. The design is intended to make
things as easy to use as possible. In general, it succeeds for simple
calculations, but there are major deficiencies that need correction .
Set-up is done by copying rows and columns, inserting and deleting,
and moving. To specify a formula, fl is pressed at any time during
its input. Rowand column references are entered using letters for
rows and numbers for columns. Formulae are reconfigured based
on the answers to questions regarding each reference - is it relative or fixed?
Practicalc doesn't have a facility for displaying the disk directory
before a save or load, which is unfortunate - especially if one's
memory for file names is as bad as mine. Printing of wide spreadsheets
is accomplished by printing in sections - one has to guess or calculate how much will fit on the paper. Between sessions, Practicalc
'forgets' formats and column widths, which have to be re-entered.
This is a pain, for models which get regular use.
Despite these faults, I give Practicalc high marks for fitting a pile of
function into a small package and, on the whole, making it easy to
use. The manual is not loose leaf, but does have a good command
summary at the end and is generally very readable. A very good,
step-by-step example is provided.
In my test exercise, I wanted to see if a proposed budget would stay
out of the red in each month. Income was constant each month, and
expenses varied . Would net savings in early months cover the
heavy expenses later on? (i.e. what was the cash flow?) ESP>CaIc
has no copy function, so I had to type the same number for income
twelve times across a row. In data entry mode, it did have a nice
feature that moved the cursor automatically (in the direction
specified) upon hitting RETURN. I failed to find a way to calculate "(Income - Expense) + previous surplus" except by repeating
it physically eleven times, because each calculation is restricted to
a single operation, and all references are absolute. (A relative
reference might be to the 'previous column'; an absolute reference
is to 'col 4', say).
A strange omission is that there is no way to specify a constant. For
instance, to add 10% to each cell in a column, one can't say
c3=c2%+1O; the '10' has to go in a cell.
Unique to ESP>CaIc is a listing of the calculations using the row
and column names rather than just the numbers (R3, C7 etc.)
Unfortunately, this is only available when it's printed, not on the
screen .
The manual is comprehensive, well-written and in a loose leaf
binder. Only the explanations of the various formats of the mathematical operations could have been simpler. Unfortunately, the
manual is printed predominantly in light blue. Maybe someone
thought that this looked nice, but more likely it's to stop photocopy
artists. In any case, I can hardly read it in a good light. There is the
usual step-by-step example, and a very welcome pair of practical
examples on the disk, with an explanation in the manual. These
examples are an invaluable aid in getting to know a package,
allowing one to browse through something that is known to work,
without having to type it in from the manual.
page 52 TPUG Magazine
_:11:.
CARDINAL SOFTWARE
1~ Jefferson Davia Hlgl1WIY
Woo4bfl4ge, Vp.. 22191
PERFORMANCE
BACKUPS
Load time (on a 1541) for each product was as follows :
ESP>Calc lets you copy the master and protects its investment
with a dongle in the joystick port (either one). The other two are
protected. Backups are available to the registered owners for a fee.
I'd worry about Multiplan more beca use the disk is in continual
use. With PraCliCalc, one can remove the disk as soon as it's loaded.
F5P>Calc. ............ 1 :47 (mins : secs)
PractiCalc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 0:25
Multiplan . .... . ................. 2:03
Setting up a simple problem, within the scope of all three, is
usually fastest in PraClicalc, then F5P>Calc then Multiplan. Of
course, once one is working on a model beyond the scope of the two
quicker products, the question is academic. In actual time, there's
not much difference, but what makes Multiplan seem so slow in
set-up is the fact that it goes to disk for each command beyond a
basic set in memory, unless it was most recently used. All the help
is also on disk. After a while, it becomes second nature to do all the
copies at one time, then all the blanking, and so on . For this reason,
two disk drives become invaluable if one wants to save frequently ,
to avoid swapping the system disk and data disk all the time .
Quite obviously, for a quick, off-the-cuff modelling session, where
I don't expect to have to use anything too fancy, I reach for
PractiCalc.
SUMMARY
If you have used VISICALC, or a clone, and were happy with the
result, th en forget F5P>Calc. If you gave up on spreadsheets in
disgust, maybe ESP> Calc is exactly what you want.
Choose between Multiplan and PractiCalc based on your budget
and your needs. For most modelling, PractiCalc will do the job. For
some business applications, you'll need Multiplan. If you use Mulriplan
at work, then at least you won't have to learn another spreadsheet.
You choose! TPUG
ESP>Calc by New Leaf Inc. 147.50 Us. (Disk)
Microsoft Multiplan from HesWare 175.00 Us. (Disk)
PractiCalc by Computer Software Associates 154.95 Us. (Disk)
(All pn'ces shown are recent Us. mail order pn'ces, for comparison
purposes only).
COMMODORE VIC 20 GAMES
Exciting new games ...
Clearance SALE up to 75% off LIST PRICE
NUFEKKOP GAMES, with GREAT SOUND, ACTION,
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even at list price, great for all ages, from 5 to 75. All
Cassettes ... FOR VIC 20 no extra memory needed.
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY.
List
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Price
Price
ALIEN PANIC
$24.95 ......... $6.95
ANTIMATIER SPLATIER $29.95 ....... .. $7.95
EXTERMINATOR
$39.95 . . . . . .... $9.95
KRAZY KONG
$24.95 .... . .... $6.95
RACEFUN
$24.95 ...... .. . $6.95
MUSIC WRITER III
$39.95 ......... $9.95
THE CATCH
$29.95 ......... $7 .95
KINGS RANSOM
$39.95 ......... $9.95
TOTAL LIST PRICE
$254.60 .. . SALE $66.60
TOTAL PRICE save nearly $200.00
PLEASE ADD $2.50 for shipping and handling for first
game and $1, for each game thereafter.
WANTTOSAVE EVEN MORE?ORDERTHEWHOLE
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EXTRA MEMORY VIC GAMES BY THE SAME
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Price
DEFENDER ON TRI
$29.95 .... . . . . . $7.95
3D MAN
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SPACE QUEST
$29.95 ......... $7.95
Total List Price $89.95 Discount Price ..... $23.85
FREESHIPPING IFYOUORDERALL THREE GAMES
OR add $2.50 for shipping and handling for first game
$1.00 thereafter.
8K MEMORY EXPANDER FOR VIC 20
VIC 20 8K MEMORY EXPANDER STANDARD PLUG
IN CARTRIDGE INCREASES MEMORY from 5,120
bytes to 13,312 bytes. GOLD PLATED CONTACTS.
ONE YEAR WARRANTY PREMIUM GRADE COMPONENTS. COMPLETE DOCUMENTATION .
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YOUR SAVINGS$14.00
ONTARIO RESIDENTS ADD 7% Provincial Sales Tax
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Handling and shipping charges Add $5.00
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CALL (705)437-3187 PHONE ORDERS ACCEPTED 9 AM TO 10 PM MON.-SAT. CALL
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TPUG Magazine page 53
=
--=--- -=-- ----=-=
=--W~~ -=- --=- =:=r =
.....=...
VM201-24K
HANDS-ON WORKSHOPS
John David
Etobicoke, ON
Does the message 3583 BYTES FREE look all too familiar to you?
If so, Personal Computer Specialties has just the treat for you.
Instead of 3583, the simple flip of a dip switch will bring 11775
BYTES FREE! Flip again! 19967 BYTES FREE! Flip again! 28159
BYTES FREE! It is, quite literally, just as simple as that. Personal
Computer Specialties has created a 24K expander for the VIC 20
that is easy to install and easy to operate.
The VM201 expander board can be used alone, or with other
products - the VM10l or VM1000. Alone the expander is supported
by four plastic legs that can be removed when used in conjunction
with the other boards. These legs hold the board level with the VIC
20's cartridge port. You add the board to your computer by pushing it gently, but firmly into, the slot.
The appearance of the board is familiar to those who have ever
peeked inside a computer. It consists of the circuit board, with
HM6116P-4 silicon memory chips arranged neatly in four rows of
three chips each. Aside from these dominant and magical devices
which give the VM201 its marvelous capability, there are two timer
chips, some capacitors, the 3-position DIP switch and the edge
connector. Instructions advise the user to turn the power off and to
exercise extra care during the initial insertions of the VM201. The
test board slid slowly, but easily, into place. After that, operation
was simple. Turn off the power (as a precaution). Add an extra 8K
of memory to the VIC 20 by simply flipping the first of the three
DIP switches on the board. For each extra block of memory you
want, you need only flip the next switch in sequence. Although the
DIP switch is tig'ht under the overhanging VIC 20 case at the back
of the machine and therefore somewhat awkward to reach, the
problem is really minor since you will probably set the switches
once before you power up for each keyboard session.
Aside from ease of operation, the VM201 offers the programmer
expanded memory to use with his VIC 20. Since the board uses the
edge connector in the back of the VIC 20, there is another mounted
on the board. It will work with RAM cartridges only - a feature
that limits the use of this board. In other words, there are no places
on this board to connect other peripheral devices of any kind. The
manufacturer seems to have kept those functions for other parts of
his VIC 20 expansion system. The VM201 is strictly for memory
expansion. Therefore, when you use the board, you need to know
the configuration of the current program. For example, some
programs specify an 'unexpandecl' VIC 20. In such a case, you must
turn off all the DIP switches, otherwise the computer cannot properly locate your program in its memory. Likewise, programs developed for other expansions will operate in different memory locations and should be loaded back into the computer when it is
configured in the same manner - i.e. 12K, 19K or 28K.
Despite its deceptively simple appearance, this board has the
power to increase your VIC 20's computing capacity by almost
800%! TPUG
VM201-24K Expander Board
Personal Computer Specialties
PO. Box 23, Fleming, PA 168:15
(814)355-0205
Pnce: 1115.00 U.S
Special Weekend Sessions
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Hardware Design and Interfacing
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Call Sharon Malleck at
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Send more information on the following
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TPUG Magazine page SS
C-64 BUG
David Bradley
C-64 Librarian
How To Avoid Losing Everything
To make a long story short, you can avoid this bug by using "safe"
Cursor colours. And to save you from ch ecking what colours are
"safe" and which colours are not, here is a chart of the "safe"
colours.
Turn on your Commodore 64. Move the Cursor to the bottom left
corner of the display. Type the following:
Safe Colours
(0) Black
All computers have bugs. But however harmful they may be, there is
usually a wat to work around them.
(l)
Now , without pressing RETURN , back up the Cursor to change
the "t" in "wat" to a "y" and watch what happens ...
You should find that the "t" has been changed to an "I " and that the
letters "oad" appear on the next line down . Also, a -SYNTAX
ERROR message should be displayed , followed by READY and
RUN.
Try typing something. It doesn 't matter what, because none of it
will work. What you see here is a "bug" in the Commodore 64 . But
as you may have guessed, it can be avoided .
Reset your C-64. Move the Cursor down to th e bottom left corner
of the display, change the cursor colour to BLACK (press CTRL
and "1" at the same time) and repeat the above experiment.
This time, it worked, right? You were able to correct the mistake .
(If it didn't work, try it again).
NVEL PROFILE
John McEwen
Mississauga, ON
SOFTWARE PROFILE
Name: Mass Obliteration, Deluxe 5-Pak, VIC-G eMS
Type: Three cassel/e tapes which contain a selection of games for the
unexpanded VIC 20.
Features: Mass Obliteration is a game similar to Centipede. The 5-PAK
contains five games. One of them, Garden Snake, crashes upon loading.
VIC-GEMS consists of fout·teen programs, mainly public domain and
modified by the compiler.
System : VIC 20, without expansion
Summary: Not a good value. The tapes come without instruction and are
dIfficult to load. Several of the "games " do not work.
Price: Mass Obliteration SIS (Can)
Deluxe 5-Pak S10 (Can)
VIC-GEMS S8 (Can)
Manufacturer: Nv el.
A vailable from :
Tony Romer.
10405 Jasper A venue,
Edmonton, Alberta
T5J 3S2
page 56 TPUG Magazine
White
(4) Purple
(5) Green
(8) Orange
(9) Brown
(12) Gray 2
(13) Light Green
You may have noticed that there is a pattern to the "safe" colours.
Note that Black and Orange are both on key "1 " (depending on
whether you use CTRL or the COMMODORE key) and are both
safe colours. Is it a coincidence that White and Brown are on key
"2" and they are both "safe" colours?
Also notice that th e colours are in pairs. 0 and 1 are "safe", but 2 and
3 are not. 4 and 5 are "safe", but 6 and 7 are not.
Good luck! TPUC
Vanderkooy THERMOSTAT Program
Printed in this issue is a short program (below) which
accompanies John Vanderkooy's article C-64 Thermostat
(TPUG Magazine, October 1984), which was not available for
publication at that time.
(:()t·Hr:;::OI_I_EP C'-';4 (C;EF J;,Et'1~:; Fnr;:: I,,.' I C-2(1'
BY JOHN VRNOEPVOOY SEPT~84
TH I'::; PPtJCWP1'1 IY;E:~:; THE U::;:;F:r:;:: PCIPT W3E: FOP CCI~-nF:OL .:: PIP I ')
REM
DIAGRAM TN ARTICLE SHOWS PB0 (PIN C'; SH0ULO USE: PR7 (PIN L)
PRHH":J"!H'T'=1,n~T(:=4.~::1; REt'1 H'Th:;:;TEPP:=:!:::; At·m TU1E (:r::n,t=;TAt'H
T~'~F'I " IT" ~:;ETPCl Tt'F " CEU:=; TI I~:; ".~ ::;P
PRINT
H,WUT"TH'1E(HI-;r'1t'1:::S:', 1I ,~TI$
PPItH
TL=TT/3600;PEM INITIALTZE: LAST TIME:
8ASE=56577:PEM USEP PORT 8AS~ MEMORY AOOPESS (371~6 FOR VIC-20'
POKE gASE+2Tt28~REM MSB OOR OUTPUT
POK1=: BW:;E.- 1 :::;o:? ~ PE~'l T! !Pt,l OFF FIJPtlAC:E I NIT I ALI_'T',~ U~;E tWPt'1ALL 'T' C:LCt:?ED
COtHA(:T
T:2=n
TJ=TI~ PFM CALCULATE
TTFFY TIME ONCE PER LOOP
FOR I=1TOl~0
T2=T2+PEEV(54?q7)~ REM (36872 FGP VIC-20)
HE>:T J
Tl=T2/100 ~PEM AV~R~GF THEPMISTOR VALUE (SHOULD BE ABOUT 200)
TP=20.0+(175.8-Tl'.2.6/12.7:REM THERMISTOR CALIBRATION (USE YOLJR OWN)
IF (TJ,,":;::6':1(n(TI_ THEt~ TL=TL-144('1 ;PEr'1 HA~'W!!_F:=; TI !"JRAFAROUt)O
0:: I 44(1 ,'1 I t,t,/OA'T' >
T:::;=TJ," :-::6~X1-TL ~PE!'1
TJro1E :::ntlCF: LA:::;T :::;j..HTC::H o::r'1n~UTE'::;)
REM TEMP CHECK ROUTINE
TT=HY.EXP(-TS~TC): REM
TOGGLE TEMP OIFFERENTIAL
TR=SP+FO.TT: REM TPIGGER TEMP
TF TP>Tp THF:N FO=-l!PEM TURN OFF FURNACE
IF TP<TP THEN FO=1 :PEM TURN ON FUPNACE
P=(1-FO)/2*128: REM POkE TO pnpT
I F p ,::~::: (!:::'EE~::O:: E~A::;E:O Atl[! 1. ;::':=: >THEt,~ TI_=T.J . .":~:600 :REr'1 PE:::;ET T'=' IF :::;tH TCHED
POVE 8ASE,P : REM CONTROL OF FURNACE
TA=INT(TS+.5): ~EM ROUPDING FOR PRINTING
T8=TNT f l00*TP+.5)/100: REM POUNDING
PRINT TI$~TA , T8,FO:REM PRINTS TIME,SINCE LAST SWITCH,TEMP,ON OR OFF
GOTO 230: REM LOOP BACK GET TP
1 ~:-i ri R17: r-1
110 PD'1
'::::"0 PJ=:}1
t3~
140
1"';()
16(t
170
l::::e
190
200
210
:220
;2:-::0
240
2"';0
260
.:::7':::1
280
29~
:3(10
310
320
330
340
350
360
~7~
::::::=:~
390
400
410
420
430
Our thanks to Mr. Vanderkooy for modifying the longer
version of his program in order to produce this version for
our readers. TPUG
FUP~'~ACE
page 54 TPUG MagaZine
7
w~r
REVIEWERS SAY:
"This is the best typing tutor
we have seen yet;* * * * +"
INFC>-64
"Computer aided instruction at
its best."
Commander
"This Is an excellent program
that makes typing practice an
enjoyable pastime instead of
boring drudgery."
DILITHIUM PRESS
Rated the BEST educational
program for the VIC 20
Creative Computing
CUSTOMERS SAY:
" ... delighted with my son's
progress ... he is the only one in his second grade class
who touch types at the computer. "
"Your Typing Tutor is an excellent program ... our 4
children literally wait in line to use it."
"Thoroughly satisfied, can't believe how fast I've learned to
type. I've never typed before."
In daily use by schools across the USA.
TYPING TUTOR
+
WORD INVADERS
Commodore 64'~ ......... Tape $21 .95
Commodore 64'~ ......... Disk $24.95
VIC 20'· (unexpanded) ..... Tape $21.95
REALISTIC AIRCRAFT RESPONSE
"Has a quality of realism which
sets it apart from others, even
those I've tested in flight school."
Compute's Gazette
"Great program!" INFC>-64
"It is tremendous fun ."
Compute's Gazette
"Flight tested by an air traffic
controller, two skilled pilots and
an elementary school class.
Highly recommended by all. "
Mldnite Gazette
"This is an unbelievably realistic
simulation of the difficulties
faCing a pilot in instrument flying. I'm a 747 pilot and I think that this simulation could do
a lot to improve the reactions and instrument scan habits
of even very experienced pilots."
747 pilot
IFR (FLIGHT SIMULATOR)
Commodore 64'~ . . ...... Tape or Disk $29.95
VIC 20'· (unexpanded) ... .... Cartridge $39.95
JOYSTICK REQUIRED
. ~ Shipping and handling $1.00 per ~
_
.order. CA re si dents add 6% tax . , . . ,
ACAi)clil't
SOFTWARE
-=--=-----
------- - ----- -------
Products for the Commodore 64
Waterloo Structured BASIC
Already widely used on the Commodore PET,
the package augments the standard BASIC with:
• Structured Programming Statements
programs can be written with proper style.
• Procedures : eliminate the use of GOSUB;
instead CALL named procedures
• Additional Commands : increased ease of use
with AUTO, DELETE and RENUMBER
commands
Each package contains:
• cartridge containing software
• comprehensive textbook containing both a
primer and a reference manual
Price: $99.00; $79.00 for additional packages in
same order
WA TCOM Pascal
This interpreter supports the full ANSI standard
Pascal (with one omission) and features:
• integrated full-screen editor
• interactive debugger
• support for printer, disk and cassette
• graphics library
• peek and poke functions
Each package contains
• cartridge and disk containing the software
• comprehensive textbook containing both a
primer and a reference manual
Price: $149.00; $99.00 for additional packages in
same order
Ordering Information
Order forms and/or additional information may
be obtained from:
W ATCOM Products,
415 Phillip Street,
Waterloo, Ontario
Canada, N2L 3X2
(519) 886-3700
Telex: 06-955458
Additional textbooks are also available. Seminars
on Pascal and BASIC are offered regularly.
P.O. Box 6277 San Rafael, CA 94903 (415) 499-0850
Programmers: Write to our New Program Manager concerning
any exceptional Commodore 64 program you have developed.
TPUG Magazine page 57
TPUG LIBRARY
Reorganized Libraries
*
(C)U2
The librarians for the PET, Commodore 64 and VIC 20 have been
working at taking apart all the monthly disks up to and including
June 1984, sorting the programs into categories, and rel easing new
category disks. The first two disks to be created this way are
(C)U2-Utilities 2, and (C)U3-Utilities 3 for th e Commodore 64.
Note: If you have all the (C)64 monthlies you already have all of these
programs!
UTILITIES 2
(disk only)
LIST -ME(C)U2.L
C64.MENU
AUTO BOOT.C
MENU.C
AUTOBOOT .C
DOS IN BASIC.C
DOS.C
4040 COMMANDS.C
USING 64 WEDGE.C
C-64 WEDGE.C
DOS 5.1
BOOT DOS 5.2.C
DOS5.2 .D
DOS COMMANDS.C
ROM EMULATOR.C
SX 1
SX 2
SX 3
SX 4
Rll
R12
R13
R14
R21
R22
R23
R24
R3 1
R3 2
R33
R34
page 58 TPUG Magazine
Contains information about the programs
and files on (C)U2.
See a list of what is on your diskette and
then LOAD what you want from a menu.
See a list of what is on your diskette and
then LOAD what you want from a menu.
See a list of what is on your diskette and
then LOAD what you want from a menu .
See a list of what is on your diskette and
then LOAD what you want from a menu.
Allows you to access your disk drive
more easily.
Allows you to access your disk drive more
easily.
Allows you to access your dual disk drive
more easily.
Contains instructions for "DOS 5.1" and
" DOS5 .2.D ". Be sure and read them so
you can make the most of th ese two good
little disk access utility programs.
Loads and executes "DOS 5.1".
Allows you to access your disk drive more
easily.
Loads and executes "DOS5 .2.D" .
Allows you to access your disk drive more
easily.
Allows you to access your disk drive
more easily.
Allows you to load any of the four versions of the Commodore 64 into your
C-64 .
Loaded
and
used
by
"ROM EMULATOR.C"
Loaded
and
used
by
"ROM EMULATOR.C".
Loaded
and
used
by
"ROM EMULATOR .C" .
*
Looks at a program on your disk and then
tells you a bit about it.
Allows you to change the name of any of
CHANGE TITLE.C
your diskettes.
Prints out the directory of any diskette.
DISK PRINTER .C
Displays the BAM of a diskette .
BAM.C
Displays the number of blocks free on a
BLOCK FREE.C
diskette .
Reads the directory of a disk into memDIR READ .C
ory.
Loaded and used by "DIR READ.C".
DIR READ ML.D
Displays the BAM of a diskette .
FAST BAM.C
Loaded and used by "FAST BAM.C".
BAMGET.D
TINY DIRECTORY.C Prints out the directory of a diskette.
Prints out the directory of a diskette.
DISKPRINT.C
Allows you to make your own character
GEMINI CHAR .C
set(s) for your Gemini printer.
COMPUTER FONT.D Can be used by "GEMINI CHAR .C" .
Can be used by "GEMINI CHAR .C".
NORMAL FONT .D
PROGRAM INFO.C
{C)U3 -
UTILITIES 3
(disk only)
LIST-ME(C)U 3. L
SD FILE COPIER.C
COpy SOME.C
COpy SOME ML.D
SIN DISK COPY.C
COpy FILE.C
COPY FILES .C
UNICOPY INST.Z
UNICOPY .C
COCKROACH !D.C
Contains information about the programs and files on (C)U 3.
Copy some or all of one 1541 formatted
diskette to another using one 1541 disk
drive.
Copy some or all of one 1541 formatted
diskette to another using one 1541 disk
drive.
Loaded and used by "COPY SOME.C"
Copy some or all of one 1541 formatted
diskette to another using one 1541 disk
drive.
Copy one program from a 1541 formatted
diskette to another using one 1541 disk
drive.
Copy some or all of o~e 1541 f6rmatt.e d
diskette to another USIng one 1541 disk
drive.
Contains instructions for "UNICOPY.C".
Copy some or all of one 1541 formatted
diskette to another using one 1541 disk
drive.
Copy all of one 1541 formatted diskette
to another using one 1541 disk drive.
COCKROACH I.C
Copy all of one 1541 formatted diskette
to another using one 1541 disk drive.
COCKROACH 2D.C
Copy all of one 1541 formatted diskette
to another using one 1541 disk drive.
COCKROACH E.C
Check your diskette for bad spots.
COPY-ALL V2.C
Copy some or all of one 1541 formatted
diskette to another using two 1541 disk
drives.
FAST BACKUP.C
Copy all of one 1541 formatted diskette
to another using one 1541 disk drive in
four only minutes.
FILE COPY.C
Copy one file from one 1541 formatted
diskette to another using one 1541 disk
drive.
SD COPY/ ALL.C
Copy some or all of one 1541 formatted
diskette to another using one 1541 disk
drive.
MUL TICOPY.C
Copy all of one 1541 formatted diskette
to one or several others using one 1541
disk drive.
BLOCK MODIFIER.C Allows you to look at and alter any track
and sector on a disk.
DISKETTE MOD.C
Allows you to look at and alter any track
and sector on a disk.
DISK DOCTOR.C
Allows you to look at and alter any track
and sector on a disk.
DISK FIDDLER.C
Allows you to look at and alter any track
and sector on a disk.
Allows you to look at and alter any track
BLOCK MOD.C
and sector on a disk.
Allows you to look at and alter any track
DISKVIEW 3.C
and sector on a disk and much more.
Sorts sequential files.
FILESORT.C
BIGFILE.D
Sample sequential file that you can sort
using "F1LESORT.C".
HUGEFILE.D
Sample sequential file that you can sort
using "FILESORT.C".
Sample report generator that is meant
REPORT GEN.C
to be used on a sorted sequential file.
Takes the directory of a disk sorts it, and
DIR SORT.C
then writes it back out to your diskette.
Will tell you what lines in a program
NON EXEC.2
will not be executed.
Converts sequential file listings of proTOKENIZER.C
grams back into program files.
Allows you to scratch many files at a time
DISK TIDIER.Z
so you can keep your diskettes from getting clogged up with junk.
To the best of my knowledge all of the above listed programs work.
If you find any that does not , please write to me at the TPUG Office
and tell me.
David Bradley
(C)TB (1
TERM.64.2.C
BAUD RATE
CHECKER
NUMBERS
TERM64 BOOT.C
TE.RM64
TERM64 DOC.D
PARAMETERS.D
VT5240/S0TERM.C
VT5240/S0DOC.D
MIDWEST TERM.C
3 MIN BACKUP.C
1650 DIALILOAD.C
STORY WRlTER.C
STORY INST.D
REINFORCER.C
CHESS.C
CHESS-64
CHESS/CLK
CHS/CHAR
SYNTH SAMPLE.C
RELFILE COPY.C
TUNNEL MAZE.C
TUNN.D
MUSIC SYS4SI52.C
SEPT 1984
Machine Language program that is
loaded, needed , and used by "AUTODIALl650V5.C".
Updated & referred to by "AUTODIALl650V5.C".
Updated & referred to by "AUTO DIAL1650V5.C'.
Contains some BBS numbers from the
Toronto Area - can be used with "AUTODIALl650V5.C".
Will load and execute "TERM64".
Terminal program which has a lot of desirable features - one of most useful is a
42K capture buffer.
Contains instructions for "TERM64". Can
be printed using "TERM64".
Can be used with "TERM64" as a sample
of what you might have on your function
keys.
Terminal program which allows you to
go on line in either 40 or SO column
mode.
Contains instructions for "VT52 40/80TERM.C'. Can be printed using"TERM64".
Terminal program which lets you transfer data between any two computers using
this program.
Will backup an entire diskette much faster than other copy programs. Will not
work on all 1541 'so
Will dial a BBS, & then load in any terminal program you tell it to.
This word processor will do a lot of
things very well, and the price is right!
Instructions for "STORY WRITER.Cmay be printed using "STORY WRITER.
C".
Will read every block of a diskette, one
at a time. After a block is read, it is written back to its original position on the
diskette. This is supposed to reinforce
the data on the disk.
Play chess against your C-64.
Loaded and used by "CHESS.C".
Loaded and used by "CHESS.C'.
Loaded and used by "CHESS.C".
Contains some very good music'
Will copy relative files from one 1541
diskette to another using one 1541 disk
drive.
Search the tunnels for treasures.
Loaded and used by "TUNNEL MAZE.
C".
Will play the theme from "Mission Impossible" over and over. LOAD it ,8,1
and enter SYS 4S152 to RUN it.
disk/tape)
LlST-ME(C)TB.L
AUTODIALl650V5.C
Contains information about the programs
and files on (C)TB .
Terminal progTam which will allow upload & download from Punter bulletin
boards. Dial a number or a list of numbers with your 1650 Automodem , &
much more
TPUG Magazine page 59
(P)TB -
NOS ARTICLEUV
SEPr 1984
(I disk/tape)
LlST-ME(P)TB.L
UNICOPY 4.P
Documentation for disk (P)TB.
Utility - Copier, single disk (or tape)
from Jim Butterfield, BASIC 4 commands
- very similar to Copy-All. See " UNICOpy INS T.Z". for more information .
FILESORT 4.P
Utility - Sequential file sort & other features, BASIC 4, from Jim Butterfield.
UNICOPY 2.P
Utility - Copier, · single disk (or tape)
from Jim Butterfield, BASIC 2 commands
- very similar to Copy-All. See "U NICOPY INST.Z". for more information.
UNICOPY INST.Z
Utility - Unicopy program instructions,
just LOAD and RUN.
FILESORT INST .Z
Utility - Filesort program instructions,
just LOAD and RUN.
BIGFILE.D
Data - Output data file from "FILESORT 4.P" program. Do not LOAD!
PROG LOAD .P
Utility - Loads disk directory (ML code),
27 per screen, press letter to LOAD and
RUN a program.
ALIGATOR MATH .P Educational- Math drill and practice, 8
levels, alligator tries to eat problem before it is solved. Speeds up with correct
answers.
ARTILLERY .8
Game - Fire cannon, trajectory of shot
shown.
COpy ALL+ .P
Utility - Copy utility, changes disk device number, alphabetizes files, and
copies between drives.
FRENCH VERBS.P
Educational- French practice on 'ir', 're'
and irregular verbs.
NIGHTWAR .8
Game- Turn to see target, estimate
angle and fire.
NIGHT WAR DATA Data - "NIGHT WAR.8" file, lowest and
highest scores.
ORBITSTREAK.8
GAME - Dodge objects or fire, but firing costs points.
PROG CHR PRTR.P Utility - Epson MX80 Printer, programmable characters.
ROAD RACE 500.P
Game - Road racing game.
SCREEN INVERT.8
Utility - Inverts lower case characters.
Instructions in code.
SEQ SORT EDIT.8
Utility - Sequential file editor, reads, alters and saves files.
6 SORT DEMO .P
Educational- 6 different sort methods
are demonstrated .
UL TRASORT ML.8
Utility - Machine code sort, used in "6
SORT DEMO.P" and "COPY ALL+.P".
CATALOG PRT.8
Utility - Prints the disk directory (4 columns). Can also load or scratch a file,
using the program number.
PAPER WRAPPERS.P Miscellaneous - Puts repeated messages
on printer like those on wrapping paper.
The "NOS TRANSLATOR" is a program to help transfer software
from one brand of machine to another. There are some demo
programs, but only in Dutch. If there is interest, I will put them on
a category disk.
M. Donegan.
page 60 TPUG Magazine
NOS ARTICLE2 .W
NOS CBM 348.P
NOS PET 2001.P
WP LIST/ SCREEN.4
Language- Word Pro File NOS Translator.
Language - Word Pro File NOS Translator.
Language-NOS Translator
machines.
Language - NOS Translator
2001 machines.
Utility - can be used to list
Article.w files.
(S)TH - SEPT
article on
article on
for CBM
for PET
the NOS
1984
TPUG Toronto - SuperPET Distribution Disk for September 1984
25
"describe.sep/84"
SEQ This describe file.
• The following material from Avygdor Moise comprises a set of
macros designed to facilitate the programming of 6809 assembler
programs using the Waterloo Development Facility.
• Also included is a machine language sort merge routine using
these macros.
2
"copy.sort.files"
27
"procedure. doc"
18
"sort.merge.doc"
29
"procedure.
maccom"
17
"procedure.mac"
7
"sort.merge.for"
"sort.merge.cmd"
"mem.allocate.asm"
16 "sort.prg.l.O.asm"
32 "merge.io.l.O.asm"
13 "shl.sort.l.O.asm"
19 "compare.l.O.asm"
1
9
6
2
2
24
"mem.allocate.b09"
"sort.prg.l.O.b09"
"merge.io.l.O.b09"
"shl.sort.l.O.b09"
"compare.l.O.b09"
"test.srt"
SEQ A command file to copy the sort
program material to its own disk.
SEQ Documents an extensive set of6809
macros to aid in writing assembly
code. These are used in the machine
language sort program found on
this disk.
SEQ Documentation for a machine language sort/merge program using
disk as input and output.
SEQ A set of macros designed to assist
in 6809 assembly programming.
This file is commented so takes
more space than 'procedure. mac'.
See 'procedure.doc' for more information.
SEQ An un-commented set of the macros. This set should be 'included'
in the assembly using them.
SEQ A fortran routine demonstrating
the calling of the sort/merge program from a higher level language.
SEQ The linker 'cmd' file for linking together the various assemblies comprising the sort/merge program.
SEQ One component assembly of sort/
merge.
SEQ Main assembly of sort/merge.
SEQ Another component of sort/ merge.
SEQ And another.
SEQ The last component of the sort/
merge.
SEQ Output files from
SEQ
the assembler
SEQ
and input
SEQ
to the
SEQ
linker
SEQ A test file for input to the sort/merge
program .
I
9
1
59
6
"example.cmd"
"example.asm"
"exampre.exp"
"example. lis"
"example.b09"
2
"recurse.asm"
7
"sorLmerge.1.0"
SEQ A 6809 assem bier program
to d emonstrate
SEQ
the calling of
SEQ
the sort/ merge
SEQ
SEQ
program from machine
language.
SEQ A sample assembler routine to
demonstrate the recursive call
capability of the macros described
above.
PRG The load module for sort/merge.
The origin of the provided version
is at $78f8.
PRG The load module for the machine
language example demonstrating
linking to the sort / merge routine.
3
"example.mod"
4
"VC404.S BOOT:B " PRG A CommodOl'e Basic 4 routine and
two 6502 machine language routines which provide an emulation
" +VC404BS'
PRG of the Volker Craig 404 terminaL
Only the Baud rate is variable and
must be set in the Basic program,
"+VC404M.S"
PRG This progTam is provided by Gord
CampbelL
8
7
60
"simplex_curfit:p"
26
"simplex_doc:e"
SEQ A curve-fitting program in MicroPascal using the Simplex method.
Provided by Peter Spencer.
SEQ Some notes on the Simplex curve
fitting program by the SuperPET
librarian.
• The following materia~ provided by Brad Bjo77tMhl, comprises the
program 'pits' referred to in his series of TPUG Magazine al,tides
starting in the June 84 issue. To review, 'pits' is a single player game
adapted for the SuperPETfrom a mini-computer game called 'zombies ~ The game is set on an island which is strewn with deadly pits. If,
as you move around the island, you fall into a pit you lose. If you do
not move around the island one of the zombies which also occupy the
island will get you. The object of the game is to move in such a way
that the zombies, which always chase you, will fall into the pits.
23
"pits.structure :e"
11
30
44
18
1
9
"pits.asm"
"pi tsjsland .asm"
"pi ts_move,asm"
"pits_utility.asm"
"pits.cmd"
"pits.mod"
15
" pitsjnstr:e"
34
"med_v1.3"
SEQ A pseudo code representation of
the structure of 'pits"
SEQ The assembly language
modules
SEQ
which comprise
SEQ
the game 'pits'
SEQ
SEQ The linker 'cmd' file for 'pits'
PRG The load module for 'pits'. Load
either through the menu or through
the machine language monitor
and g $1000.
SEQ Some notes on playing 'pits'
PRG Version 1.3 of the microEditor we
all know and use. This version,
provided by ISPUG, has no new
features but is very much faster than
than the Waterloo original version
(1.1)
• This September Describe file created September 2, 1984 By Bill
Dutji·eld.
Logiciel Francais A TPUG
o
Par Baudoin St-Cyr
Depuis quelques mois deja, je travaille a la
creation de logiciel en langue franr;:aise pour
la bibliotheque de TPUG. En effet , il semble qu'un bon pourcentage des membres
de ce club proviennen t d u Quebec ou alors
sont francophones vivant a I'exlc ri e ur du
Quebec. L'idee de base de la creation d 'une
bibliotheque franr;:aise est que Ie club pourrait peut-etre mieux servir ses membres
francophones en mettant a leur disposition
un certain nombre de programmes en
franr;:ais. Evidemment, en faisant ceci,
nous esperons encourager ces memes membres a en voyer leurs programmes franr;:ais
au club ou alors, si Ie but est de rejoindre
tout Ie monde , de faire une double soumission. (Copie franr;:aise et copie anglaise).
A date, nous avons complete un disque en
franr;:ais; il S'agit du (v)fl que I'on retrouve
dans la bibliotheque du VIC 20. Ce disque,
commes les disques mensuels du club n'a
pas de theme comme teL Plutot il s'agit ou
d'une collection de programmes que j'ai
choisi de par la bibliotheque du VIC 20 et
que j'ai traduit et adaptl'~ au franr;:ais moimeme ou alors de programmes envoyes
par la poste par les membres de TPUG
Le critere general que j'utilise en choisissant
les programmes pour un tel disque est Ie
fonctionnement du programme. En d'autres
mots, si Ie programme, pour une raison ou
une autre ne fonctionne pas bien. il est
douteux qu'il soit inclus dans un futur
disque.
Presentement, je travaille a un deuxieme
disque pour Ie VIC 20 (v)£2 de meme qu'a
un premier disque pour Ie Commodore 64
(c)f1. Plus tard, il y a aura peut-etre un
disque en franr;:ais pour Ie PET et Ie SuperPET.
Si vous etes interesses a aider a la croissance
d'une bibliotheque franr;:aise a TPUG, la
meilleure far;:on de Ie faire est de nous
envoyer vos programmes en franr;:ais. En
retour, nous vous enverrons Ie disque ou la
cassette de votre choix. Qui sait, un jour la
bibliotheque franr;:aise pourrait peut-etre
rivaliser avec la bibliotheque de langue
anglaise en terme de qualite et de diversite.
TPUG
A I'avenir, j'aimerais pouvoir faire des
disques de categories (i .e. services, jeux,
demos etc.) Malheureusement pour I'instant
je dois me contenter de regro~per tout Ie
logiciel en langue franr;:aise qui me tombe
sous Ie main.
TPUG Magazine page 61
books ... books ... books ... books ... books ... books ... books .. ~
Mapping The Commodore 64
By Sheldon Leemon
Compute! Publications, Inc., P. 0. Box 5406,
Greensboro, NC 27403 (919) 275-9809.
268 pages. 121.50 U.S.
This book is arranged by memory location,
and every location has an entry. This makes
the book excellent for reference. If you are
examining an unfamiliar progTam, often
the Programmer's Reference Guide is not
enough. For example, if you saw something like POKE 56590,127, you wouldn't
know what to look up. Since Mapping The
Commodore 64 is arranged by memory
location, you needn't know what a location
does before you look it up. In essence, this
book is set up much like a dictionary. Instead
of words as entries, there are memory
locations. Instead of the pronunciation, the
location is written in hexadecimal after the
decimal number . Just as there is a definition in a dictionary, there is a fairly comprehensible explanation.
However, this set-up has an obvious drawback. It means that the author cannot present the information in what you would consider a logical order. To get around this,
there is a fairly complete index and extensive cross-referencing - but it is rather
a.nnoying to keep reading: "see location
For this reason, I would not recommend
the book for the beginning programmer. If
you are just beginning, or if you want to
learn how to do sound or graphics, there
are many other books which will explain
what memory you have to POKE with what,
and the information will be in a more comprehensible order.
= ".
Moreover, if you don't use machine language, you really have no use for the detailed
maps of the ROM , which take up over half
the book. Don't be misled by the front cover,
which reads: ".. .for beginning and advanced
programmers. .. "While the beginning
programmer would certainly benefit, he
would have to sort through pages of complicated explanations for which he would
have no use, before he came to something
of value.
If you do program in machine language,
however, get this book! Your programming power will increase tremendously.
All the BASIC and KERNAL routines are
included (although they are not disassembled). This means you can JSR, instead of
having to program things for which the
computer already has routines. For example,
you need not write a routine to scroll the
screen: just JSR 59626. The explanations of
all the routines have the machine language
page 62 TPUG Magazine
programmer in mind . There are also quite
a number of suggestions that can only be
utilized by the machine language progTammer. The latter are usually little tricks
which are quite useful.
In addition, there are excellent descriptions of the use of interrupts . The numerous examples will answer any questions
you might have. Moreover, there are explanations of how to combine other features
with interrupts - such as CIA timers.
If you have a disassembler, you will have a
great time disassembling the BASIC and
KERNAL routines. The book does not
include a disassembly of each routine, but
these descriptions are good enough so that
when you disassemble the routines yourself,
you will be able to follow what the com-
Doctor Aron's Guide To The Care,
Feeding And Training Of Your
Commodore 64
By Arthur and Elaine Aron
Hayden Book Company, 10 Mulholland
Dr., Hasbrouck Heights, NJ 07604 (201)
393-6306. ISBN 0-8104-6450-0. 320 pages.
£14.95 U.s.
This is the sort of book you'd want to give
to your mother if she was just getting into
computers (and maybe even borrow back
again!) It really is the ultimate beginner's
handbook.
Doctor A ron 's Guide is a fine mixture of
principles and practicalities. It contains
everything from elementary hook-up instructions to ullderstandable Sprite graphics programming. It includes such items as
basic BASIC instruction, practice exercises
(with answers in the back of the book), basic
.BASIC cOllcepts (clearly explained), a character code table (simple but useful); excellent , if concise, glossaries and indexes, an
array of useful tips and shortcuts that not
only make sense but actually work ; and a
well-balanced variety of programs that are
short , but interesting. There is not a confusing or superfluous sentence in the book.
The authors have lovingly pruned , weeded
and trimmed their product so that the beginning computerist gets the maximum amount
of solid information in a minimum of
verbiage. Furthermore, the material is very
well-organized and by the time you have
worked your way through this book (it took
me about ten hours), you will be, too. Most
valuable of all , it gives the beginner a good,
solid foundation on which to build.
Perhaps the most stunning feature of the
book is its layout. It is a large, comfortably-
puter is doing. It's almost exciting to dissect the computer like this. And when you
do, you can modify the routines in any way
you like. The book even includes a complete tutorial on the various methods of
adding new commands.
I find that Mapping The Commodore 64 is
an excellent companion to the Programmer's
Reference Guide. The latter is tough reading if you are not an expert computerist,
and the memory maps are quite undetailed.
Mapping The Commodore 64 fills in these
gaps. The explanations are clear, and it is
the best memory map I have ever seen for
the Commodore 64. I highly recommend
this book for those of you who do program
in machine language. TPUG
- Mathew Shulman
handled book, with clear, easy-to-read type
and large, self-explanatory headings (e.g.
How To Use This Book). It seems to have
been designed specifically to sprawl open
at awkward angles on whatever desk surface the practicing beginner has available.
The diagrams are clear, the programs easily readable and there is a left-hand margin on each page almost one-third-of-apage in width, on which the reader can
make notes, if so inclined. Occasionally,
boxes appear in this left-hand margin, containing tips and error-correction suggestions for the material 011 the same page - no
hunting through an index-full of obscure
headings, guessing which one your problem mIght becovered under, before finall y
giving up in disgust. (It is uncanny how
often these "error-proofing" boxes anticipate the peculiar problems beginning computerists are likely to encounter). In summary, this is a book to use!
My only criticism : the section on commercial software is generalized to the point of
vagueness. I would have liked to have seen
actual software described e.g. specific wordprocessing programs, home accounting
programs, etc.. . but this is a minor point
against the overall excellence of the book.
Doctor Aron 's Guide To The Care, Feeding
Alld Training Of Your Commodore 64 is a
masterpiece of simplicity and clarity. I wish
it had been around back when I was struggling through all those "beginners' manuals"
which promised instant knowledge and
left me feeling like a kindergarten dropout. TPUG
Rating: 10 out of 10
- Marya Miller
PET/CBM MULTI USER DISK SYSTEM
• ALLOWS UP TO SIXTEEN USERS TO SHARE DISK DRIVES
AND I OR PRINTERS
• WORKS WITH ALL PET ICBM EQUIPMENT
·100% HARDWARE INTERFACED
• NOALTERATIONS TO SOFTWARE OR SPECIAL SOFTWARE REQUIRED
• SOFTWARE TRANSPARENT - WORKS WITH ALL PETI CBM
SOFTWARE
• LANGUAGE TRANSPARENT - WORKS IN ANY LANGUAGE
• NO SPECIAL COMMANDS USED
• PROTECTS AGAINST SYSTEM LOCKUP
COMMODORE 64 MULTI USER DISK SYSTEM
• ALLOWS UP TO EIGHT USERS TO SHARE DISK DRIVES
ANDIOR PRINTERS
• WORKS WITH ALL 64 / VIC EQUIPMENT
• BUILT IN IEEE AND 64/VIC SERIAL PORTS
(WORKS WITH ALL IEEE DEVICES)
• 100 % HARDWARE INTERFACED
• NO ALTERATIONS TO SOFTWARE OR SPECIAL
SOFTWARE REQUIRED - SOFTWARE TRANSPARENT
• NO SPECIAL COMMANDS USED
• BUILT IN 16K PRINT BUFFER
• DISK DRIVE PRIORITY
GREATER PRODUCTIVITY & LOWER COST
FOR BUSINESS AND EDUCATIONAL USE
4032
8032
40 TO 80 COLUMN CONVERSION
• EXTERNALLY SWITCHABLE FROM 40 TO 80 COLUMNS
• EXTERNALLY SWITCHABLE FROM 80 TO 40 COLUMNS
• CONVERSIONS FOR BOTH 4032 '5 AND 8032 '5
·100% SOFTWARE COMPATIBILITY IN EITHER MODE
• HARDWARE (NOT SOFTWARE) MODIFICATION
• ALL KEYS FROM 8032 EMULATED ON 4032
• SPECIAL FUNCTION KEYS
MICROSHARE 64K PRINT BUFFER
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
LOW COST
REDUCES LONG WAITS - SAVES TIME
ALLOWS YOU TO PRINT AND PROCESS SIMULTANEOUSLY
IEEE INPUT - IEEE OR CENTRONICS PARALLEL OUTPUT
WORKS WITH ALL PET ICBM SOFTWARE
NO INSTALLATION REQUIRED
ELIMINATES THE FRUSTRATION OF WATING FOR YOUR
PRINTER
COMMODO RE 6'. PET . AND C BM AR E ALL TRA DEM ARKS OF COMMODORE BUSIN ESS MAC HINES. INC .
MANUFACTURED BY:
COMSPEC COMMUNICATIONS INC.
153 BRIDGELAND AVE., UNIT 5,
TORONTO, ONTARIO M6A 2Y6
(416) 787·0617
TPUG Magazine page 63
de ... product parade ... prod uct parade ... prod uct parade.
When this issue reaches you, Christmas will be fust aJew weeks away . ..
Perhaps some oj you would like to treat y ourself to a new soJtware
package 01' get another pen'pheralJor yow' compute I'. Maybe you are
thillkingoJ ellcoumgingother members ojyour Jamily to get involved
in computillg, whether seriously or fust Jor JUIl. We hope that this
mOllth 's special issue will illspire you with some gJft ideas. As Jar
Product Parade, we tried to select Ilew products so that they include
some whlch should appeal to people oj all ages alld with a wide van'ety
oj illterests.
Imegrated Visible Memory Board
from Micro Technology Unlimited
The Integrated Visible Memory Board is the
. newest member of the MTU seriesofhighresolution products for the 9 and 12 inch ,
40 and 80 column PET / CBM computers.
The board offers the user full control over
a 320 by 200 dot matrix on the display.
Additionally, it can be used as an 8K RAM
board when the graphics are not in use.
Other valuable features are: 4 types of video'
image control and 5 bank-switchable ROM
sockets. The board is designed to fit inside
the PET cabinet for maximum protection
and portability.
Price: $495.00 U.S. For more information
write or call: Micro Technology Unlimited ,
2806 Hillsborough Street , Raleigh , NC
27605, (919)833-1458
PowerType from Star Micron ics Inc.
PowerType, an 18 CPS, bi-directional, daisy
wheel printer, is adaptable to almost all
personal and business computers, and provides letter quality printouts. Power Type
special features include : proportional spacing, dual interface, Mandard printer and
word processinJ.\" mode , :12 easy access format switches, reverse paper feed, 7 or 8 bit
selectable interface, self-test, vertical and
horizontal tabs, micro-space justification.
Suggested retail price: $499.00 U.S. For more
information contact Star Micronics Inc. 200
Park Ave New York , NY 10166
Alphacom 81 fmm Alphacom Inc.
Alphacom 81 is a new low-cost "'universal"
80-column thermal printer for home and .
personal computers . The printer can be
linked to most home and personal com putt'rs by pluJ.\"J.\"inJ.\" the appropriate interface
cable into the printer's cartridJ.\"e-like slot.
page 64 TPUG Magazine
The Alphacom 81 is priced at $169.95 U.S.
The interface cables have a sug'g'ested retail
price of $44.95 U.S. each . For further information, contact Alphacom, Inc., 2323
South Bascom Avenue, Campbell, CA %008,
(408) 559-8000.
between the printer and the GPIB (IEEE-488
bus) connection. The power supply means
that power in not needed from the printer
or computer .
Price: $179.00 U.S. For nearest dealer contact Connecticut microComputer Inc., 36
Del Mar Drive, Brookfield, CT 06804 ,
. (203)775-4595
OKIMATE 10 Printer from OKIDATA
OKIMATE 10 Printer has been designed
for Commodore and Atari computers and
supports almost all of the software packages written for these computers. The printer
comes with special PLUG'n PRINT packa)!;es (sold separately), one for the Commodore computer , and one for the Atari
computer. The package contains a Color
Screen .Print program that automatically
puts a complete screen image onto paper.
OKIMATE 10 allows the user to produce
all kinds of pictures and graphics in 40, 50
or more colours. It prints out text at 60
characters per second, and graphics at 18
characters per second.
Price: $2:18.00 U.S. For the nearest dealer
ca II 1-800-6:)6-3282
GPAD-C- Parallel Printer Adapter for the
IEEE-488 Bus from Connecticut microComputer Inc.
The GPAD-C allows any printer with a
Centronics printer interface to be connected
to any computer or controller with an
I EEE-488 interface. The computers/controllers include those made by HewlettPackard, Tektronix, Commodore, Osborne
and most others. Compatible printers range
from low cost dot matrix types to high speed
letter quality daisy wheel types.
The printer's device number can be selected
by operating DIP switches on the adapter.
The GPAD-C includes two cables and a
power supply. The cables allow six feet
EASY PRINT WITH GRAPH ICS from Progressive Peripherals & Software
EASY PRINT WITH GRAPHICS, an interface for high-quality graphics, has bep.n
specifically designed for use with the Commodore 64 and the VIC 20. It connects to
nearl y all Centronics parallel printers and
docs not require any software overhead.
EASY PRINT WITH GRAPHICS can print
the full Commodore character set, including all graphics characters. It is also capable of printing sprites, custom character
sets, and high-resolution or color bit maps
with shading.
Included with the interface is a FREE
GRAPHICS UTILITY DISK for the Commodore 64. An optional 4K Buffer is available for fast graphics printing. The hardware is switch-selectable to device 4 or 5.
Price: $II9.g e) U.S. For the nearest dealer
contact: Progressive Peripherals and Software, 2186South Holly , Ste. 2, Denver, CO
80222 , (303)759-5713
FLEXIDRAW from Inkwell Systems
FLEXIDRAW enables Commodore ti4users
to draw a whole variety of pictures: business graphs, portrait drawings, architectural designs, g;ames, electronic schematics,
music compositions and custom letterheads.
The package includes light pen, user's
manual , :) 1/ 4" floppy disk and key overlay.
Imag-cs drawn with FLEXIDRAW can be
roduct parade... product parade... product parade ... produc
easily moved, overlaid and replicated using
PUT/ GET commands. They can also be
saved , loaded or deleted. 284 pattern choices
are available, for shading and pattern fills .
FLEXIDRA Wallows the user to work on
two separate sCI'eens and print drawings in
two sizes. The disk which comes with the
package includes 5 enhancement programs
which enable the user to paint pictures,
transmit them via mod e m, create mathematical plots, construct and sequentially
display sprites, create music with light pen
input.
Price: $149.95 U.S. For more informatio n
contact Inkwell Systems, P.O. Box 85152
MB290, 7677 Ronson Road, #210, San Diego,
CA 92138, (619)268-8792
McTERM 64 from Madison Computer
McTERM 64 is a telecommunications package d esigned for th e Commodore 64 home
computer. WithMcTerm 64, information is
temporarily stored in the computer's memory known as a "buffer". As a result,McTerrn
64 can receive / store/ send / print over 10
pages of text at a time. McTerm 64 can be
used with a variety of standard modems,
but its unique buffer features are ideal for
automatic modems. First , with the built-in
te lephone directory, the user can store up
to ten frequently-called names and phone
numbers right in the computer.
McTerm 64's main menu allows the user to
control the communication settings and the
characters displ ayed on the screen . It is
equipped with a clock which lets the user
know how long the computer has bee n on.
McTenn 64 also give's the convenient word
wrap and auto line feed optio ns .
McTerm 64 is available on disk. It comes
with a step-by-step manual that provides
an explanation of telecommunication , and
complete directions for using McTerm 64.
Suggested retail price is: $49.95 U.S. For
more information contact Madison Computer, 1825 Monroe Street, Madison, WI
53711 , (608)255-5552
PLUS GRAPH . YOUR PERSONAL ACCOUNTANT. EASY TUTOR from International Tri Micro
All thre e software packages have been
designed for the new Commodore Plus 4
computer.
PLUS GRAPH is a complete graphics program which increases the graphics capabilities of the Plus 4. PLUS GRAPH expands
the graphing function to include pie charts
and multi-variable bar and line charts. Text
can be used to label graphs, and all graphs
can be printed on any standard Commodore printer.
YOUR PERSONAL ACCOUNTANT , a
home finance package, allows the user to
budge t cash and .~everal bank accounts. Up
to twenty-one categories for expenses are
available per disk. The program is menudriven, eliminating the frustration of learning bookkeeping in order to successfully
operate it.
EASY TUTOR is for those who are interested in learning more about the computer
and the BASIC programming language. It
provides separate lesson plans. Each lesson is followed by a homework assignment.
This assignment is then reviewed at the
beginning of the succeeding lesson .
Prices : PLUS (~RAPH - $:l9.9:> U.S.; YOUR
PERSONAL ACCOUNTANT - S29 .9:>
U.S .; EASY TUTOR-$29.9:> U.S. More
information is availabl e at (714)771-4038
from Tri Micro at 10IO N.Batavia . Unit G,
Orange . CA 92607
YOUR PERSONAL NET WORTH from
Scarborough Systems, Inc.
With PERSONAL NET WORTH, the home
com puterist can:
• set up a budget ;
• keep a record of every banking and credit
card transaction;
• maintain an up-to-date record of personal
"net worth";
• record every tax-deductible expenditure;
• analyze interest rates on saving plans and
loans ;
• document household valuables;
• display or print fin a ncial reports ;
• record investment transactions;
Documentation for YOUR PERSONAL NET
WORTH is written in clear, simple language, without technical accounting terms.
Special help functions are available onscreen at all times.
Price: Commodore 64 version- $79.95 U.S.
For the nearest dealer contact Scarborough
Systems, Inc., 25 North Broadway, Tarrytown, NY 10591
BRIDGE 64 from Handic Software Inc.
BRIDGE 64, on a plug-in cartridge, has
been designed for all levels of players. For
the novice, it provides a helpful partner ;
for the advanced partner - a skilled opponent.
BRIDGE 64 offers very good graphics, with
thousands of different bids. Basic rules of
the game are included in the instruction
manual, making it easy for the beginner to
learn the fundam entals.
This game is also available for VIC 20.
Suggested retail price: $39.95 U.S. For the
nearest dealer contact Handic Software Inc.,
520 Fellowship Road , Ste. B206, Mount
Laurel, NJ 08054, (609)866-1001
ANOTHER BOW from Imagic
ANOTHER BOW opens the series of Time
Travelers, graphic-intensive interactive
literature . Themes for this new computer
entertainment experience come from great
classics. ANOTHER BOW is dedicated to
Sherlock Holmes. The game takes the player
back in time to post-Victorian England to
work together with Holmesand Dr. Watson
in solving a series of intricate mysteries .
ANOTHER BOW combines text and photodigitized graphics, uses highly advanced
computer intelligence and an extensive
vocabulary . It includes a number of cases
which would require many hours to solve.
Price: $34.95 U.S. For more information
contact Imagic, 981 University Ave., Los
Gatos, CA 95030, (408)399-2200
TRIVIA MANIA from Professional Software Inc.
Computerized version of a popular gam e
to use with almost all personal computers.
The package includes game program on
disk, as well as question-answer book with
score sheets for non-computer usage.
TRIVIA MANIA can be played by up to
eight individuals or eight teams. A player
is chosen as the "Master of the Game", to
control the game's computer activities.
Pla yers can choose five out of seven categories of questions to answer. Within each
category, questions can be generated at one
of three levels of difficulty.
Price:$39.95 U.S. Available through computer software and game distributors and
mass merchandisers worldwide .
TPUG Magazine page 65
This space
could be
advertising
YOUR
product
ForC-M
Q Bopper
For VIC 20
250 Consumers Rd., Suite 101
Willowdale, ON M2J 4V6
Tel#:(416)495-0035
,
advertiser s index
Academv Software .
Appl i(,o" Techn o log- it·s. Inc.
BOiler;,', Includ ed.
5529 Yonge St., Willowdale, ON
M2N 5S3 (416) 223-8400
for
TORONTO
meeting information
call:
(416) 782-9804
VV ... tfom Products .
,7
Wolfe .r.M .
4:1
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Bradley Ilrolhers Ilullelin Iloard Sy,Wm
4()
C.R .Q M""kl'lin~ .
Co ld Disk
110 11. Rilll·harr &" \·Vin~loll
Hurlll'r" Nichol:-..
Killg- Micf""o ....' arl' Ltd ..
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Microcomputer Solutiolls.
M i(ro S~' ~tl'ms Dt'\'l'lopmel1t .
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M io nill' Soft ....·an· (;aZell(' .
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Progr ... mnwrs (;uilo Products Lid .
Progn'ssi\'l' Pl'riph t'rais uno Software.
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Only $10.00 per year.
(All cheques should be payable to David
Bradley)
Pr()~~:rams
Messa~cs
(41 ti )4H7 ·:lHTl
(4 Ifi)4H I-H(ifil
(41 1i)4HJ -9047
(41 fi )272-07()9
~~~~
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'11
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• classified •
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40
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This space is limited to TPUG member wanted or for sale
items only.
Space cost is 25 cents per word. NO DEALER ADS ACCEPTED
4~
(The)
()S i ~
c/o David and Richard Bradley,
147 Roe Avenue,
Toronto,Ont.,
M5M 2H8
\Valcom S('min ... r . ..
Page
BriJlllfoni Ecitlt:arionC:lI Services .
CiJroil1<.1! Soft\"'an' .
C hadwc':I1\ Soflwure .
Co mat (1".1'> C;roup. U.S.A .. Ltd ...
ComplI-Simplt· Simon.
COmplI l('r R e lll;'.ds .
Comspl'C Communications In c.
ExCt'1 Typ('\.,:rill'r:s Ltcl. .
EI('unH1k~ 2001 Lid.
Frif'lHtly Sohwun' .
(;efll·a loJ.! Y SOfl ....·,H('
{13radley {13rolhers
{13ullelin {13oard d yslem
II
n:l:l.HSI
hh
B &: R EIlIl'rprist·s Inc-
$9.95
$9.95
59.95
$9.95
Electronics 2001
We repair Commodore computers
COMPUTER RENTALS
115.00
*Krazy Kong
*Galactic Blitz
*Sidewinder
*S-D Man
*3 for $19.95
We buy, trade and sell
Commodore computers
Wanted 1541 and 4040 disk drives
For a good time .. .
call the
CLEAROUT SPECIALS
17
liS.ll3C
OIlC
1:1.:1:1
~4
li7
~4
:10
:17
IS
~I
I
4:1
:N
~I
:~I;
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28
II!
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1:1
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SELL: BUSCARD II by PAPERCLIP. BRAND NEW. $140.00 OR
BEST OFFER . A. Pridmore, ~r)1 Richelieu, Granby. Quebec J2(;
:~Cl. 1-(:) 14) :37:)-:)9 17
FOR SAIL 3 COMMODORE 80325, WITH 8050 DRIVES AND
8023P PRINTERS, including Gelleral Ledger Package and Visicalc.
Phone (416) 388-7229 betweell 9 and 5 p./ll.
SELL: C-64, 1~41, 1701, Datasette, MSD dua l drive, 1600 vicmodem.
lo~O automodem, Bl1~card-2, Cardco-G, Paperclip , Oracle, CalcRe~ult, Koala Pad Set, Mu~ica lc Set and LOTS or mi~c. softwa re.
cables and books . Call for prices, sell total or separately. John
COll>olati, Toronto, ON. (410) 929-04()~
FUR SALE: 80:J2, 4040,4022P, Wordpro, Walerloo Basic, 1I1Il1l/wls,
//lOllil or alld ulilll." ROMS. 51800.00 or besl oj/er. (51'!) 886-0155.
FOR SALE: :12K 200lN Pet :1.0, ROMS, Dat as(' tte. ~02:1 CBM
Printer - Grea t for bq~inller~. SIOOO.OO or offer~. Call Ken Love.
(:100) :)H4-274H after h:OO.
See what CBS Software
has in store for you
at these locations:
TORONTO & ENVIRONS
CENTRAl. ONTARIO
• VIDEO VARIABLES
1535 Bayview Ave.
Toronto, Ontario.
• FOCUS MARKETING
4800 Dufferin SI
Toronto, Ontario.
• BATTERIES INCLUDED
186 Queen Street West,
Toronto, Ontario.
• HOUSE OF COMPUTERS
368 Eglinton Ave. West,
Toronto, Ontario.
• MR. SOFTWARE
6677 Meadowvale,
(Town Centre)
Mississauga, Ontario.
and
Bramalea City Centre
Bramalea, Ontario.
• CON·PUTE
333 King SI. West ,
Oshawa, Ontario.
• FUTURE SENSE
754 Queenston Rd.,
Greenford Mall
Hamiltoll, Ontario.
• COMPUTER ODYSSEY INC.
40 Centennial Pkwy. North .
Hamilton , Ontario.
• CAPLANS TV
1227 Barton SI. East.
Centre Mall ,
Hamilton , Ontario.
• HI·TECH EXCHANGE/
OLYMPIC SOFTWARE
33 l.akeshore Rd ..
St. Catharines, Ontario.
• MICROMART SOfTWARE
136 Lakeport Rd .
St. Catharines. Ontario.
• SOFTWARE SOFTWARE
285 Dun lop SI. West,
Barrie, Ontario.
• BANKS BROTHERS
35 Manitoba SI ,
Bracebridge, Ontario.
and
42 Main Street
Huntsville, Ontario.
• N RFOLK COMP TER
25 Robson SI.,
Simcoe, Ontario.
• Vfl)W PLACE
189 Kent Street,
(Kent Place)
Lindsay. Ontario.
EASTERN ONTARIO
• COMP MARTIINTER·AUIlIO
143 Pembroke SI.
Pembroke. Ontario.
• HOUSE Of VIDEO
39 Beckwith SI. North ,
Smiths falls , Ontario.
• CHA INe; VIIJED
1054 Bank SI. ,
Ottawa. On tario.
• CIRCLE TV
390 North Front St..
Quinte ~Iall ,
Belleville, Ontario.
• ACCESS IT,
232 Front St. (lower level)
Maze Mall
Belleville, Ontario.
• HASTINGS DATA LTD .
33 South Pinnacle St. ,
Belleville, Ontario.
and
336 B Barrie St. ,
Kingston. Ontario.
• WORTHING TV LTD ,
214 Front SI,
Trenton , On tario.
• WOODSTOCK VIDEO
204 Huron SI,
Woodstock, Ontario.
• KAWARTHA TV
188 Park SI..
Peterborough , Ontario.
• DATALAND LTD.,
119 A Victoria SI West .
Alliston, Ontario.
WESTERN ONTA.RIO
• IT'S HEAR ELECTRONICS
92 Broadway SI.
Tillsonburg, Ontario.
• HANNA ELECTRONICS
326 Main SI.,
Port Dover, Ontario.
• ROSE CITY HOME COMPUTER
5876 Tecumseh Rd. East,
nit C.
Windsor, Ontario.
• PERSONAL COMPliTER
301 Oxford SI West.
London, Ontario.
• CLASSIC COMP TERS
1105 Wellington Rd. ,
London, Ontario.
• NE TRON HmlE COMP TER
485 Silvercreek Pkwy. North ,
nit No. 11 ,
Guelph. Ontario.
• VIOEO 'S
50 Westmount Rd. 1\orth.
Kitchener, Ontario.
• DESK rop COMPUTER
1440 King St. East ,
Kitchcner, Ontario.
• OLD PROJECTION ROOM
242 St. Andrews SI. West.
Fergus. Ontario.
• BROWN 'S TV
17 Broadway St..
Orangeville. OntariO.
• COMPUTER COlli TRY
148 Waterloo St. South.
Stratford , Ontario.
NOVA SCOTIA
• KELLY 'S STEREO MART
914 Prince Street.
Truro , N.S.
• MINICOMP SYSTDIS LIMITED .
6174 Quinpool Road,
Halifax. N.S.
• BRIGADOON ENTERPRISES
8 2 East River Road.
New Glasgow, N.S.
NEW BRUNSWICK
• COMP TER WORLD
343 51. George Street.
Moncton. N.B.
and
573 King Stree t,
Fredericton, N.B.
and
76 Germain Street.
SI. John . N.B.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
• OWEN & S01\S CASH
REGISTERED LTD.,
2101 Government Stwet.
Victoria, B.C.
• TECWORLD
1918 Sooke Road.
Victoria. B. C.
ALBERTA
• Al.BERTA SOfTWARE
140 Park Avenue
Sherwood Centre
Sherwood Park. Alberta.
Dealer Inquiries: ACCESS COMPUTER SERVICES~ (416) 736-4402 or 800-268-1238
Making you the best.
INTERNATIONAL
NOVEMBER
29
&
30 ,
eNTRE ,
T
DECEMBER
1
RONTO
&
2,
1984
.......
•••••••
•••••••
•••••••
••••••••
••••••••••• i i i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
HE WORLD 0
COMMODORE
T
he Company that had the
for esight and imagination
to design and build more
computers for home, business and edu cation than any other will be presenting
the most farsighted and imaginative show
to d ate with exhib' tors from around
the World.
The 1983 Canadian World of Commodore
Show was the largest and best attended
show in Commodore Internationars
history. Larger than any other
Commodore show in the World
and this year's show will be
even larger.
World of Commodore II is designed
specifically to appeal to the interests
and nee ds of p r esent and potential
Commodore owners.
Come and e xp l ore the World of
Commodore.
~wDrldDf
'WcDrnrnodore n
A HUNTER NIOIOLS PRESENTATION.
FOR MORE INFORMATION CAll (416) 439-4140
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