Operation & Installation Manual 09/01/2005

MODEL NDP1
NAFEM GATEWAY
MODEL
NDP1
701 S. RIDGE AVENUE
TROY, OHIO 45374-0001
937-332-3000
www.hobartcorp.com
FORM 35374 (Sept. 2005)
TABLE OF CONTENTS
GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Product Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Network Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
INSTALLATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Physical Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Optimum Physical Location Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Ethernet Gateway Architecture — Possible Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Ethernet Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Authentication and Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation & RS485 Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RS485 and MODBus Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gateway Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7
7
7
8
9
TROUBLESHOOTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
LED Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Problem / Suggested Corrective Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Ping Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Model NDP1
© HOBART, 2005
–2–
Installation, Operation and Care of
MODEL NDP1 NAFEM GATEWAY
SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS
GENERAL
This manual is intended for the user who is already familiar with the NAFEM protocol and Ethernet
connections. For more information see:
NAFEM DATA PROTOCOL USER MANUAL located at:
http://www.nafem.org/resources/tech/DataProtocol.cfm
The NDP1 is a gateway device that, when used with compatible Hobart equipment, can make the
system NAFEM Data Protocol compliant. The NDP1 performs protocol conversion from MODBus
over RS485 to TCP/IP over Ethernet. You do not have to be a computer expert to understand
what the gateway can do for you and how it is going to be applied.
The first thing you need to know is that a protocol is simply a set of rules that instructs or tells
the computer how it can communicate. It is like a language and the rules of grammar that we use
to talk with each other. Computers talk to each other over wires or through radio waves using
protocols. NAFEM has worked with its members to develop a 'common' protocol for use in
foodservice equipment. Using this protocol, information about the equipment can be shared with
a computer system. Information that may be shared could include HACCP data, asset information
about the equipment, maintenance information and so forth.
Networking is very common in most office environments. The NAFEM Protocol uses networking
concepts that are very typical. If you use the Internet on your computer at home, you are
networking with computers all over the world. You may also use computers in your workplace to
share POS or inventory data.
When your network administrator connects the gateway to the network and adds an application
software package on the computer, you will be able to hook up from one to eight pieces of Hobart
and Traulsen equipment that are NDP (NAFEM Data Protocol) compatible. These pieces of
equipment will send data to a specified computer on site or at a central location. The data
collected will be managed by an application software system installed on the target computer.
The kitchen equipment will run normally and have only a slight difference in the installation.
When adding the Gateway to your facility, a network connection will start at either the target
computer or the router to the Ethernet going to the Gateway. From this point an RS485 cable (like
a telephone cable) will extend from the Gateway to the first piece of equipment. If more than one
piece of equipment is to be connected, a "daisy chain" configuration will connect one unit to the
other. A diagram of this configuration is shown on page 6.
The remainder of this manual gives further details to installing the NAFEM Data Protocol system
in your facility. Your network administrator will be able to complete the installation hookup and
software set-up.
–3–
PRODUCT OVERVIEW
The model NDP1 has three physical connectivity points to the physical world:
• The device’s EIA-485 serial communication port,
• The RJ45 Ethernet network communication port (10BaseT), and
• The power supply jack.
The NAFEM Gateway is a protocol converter that connects Hobart / Traulsen equipment to the
NAFEM protocol using an Ethernet connection. The requirements are set forth by NDP using
digital signal connectivity.
This Gateway device performs these tasks and achieves NAFEM Data Protocol compliance with
the use of six firmware components: Poll Engine, Alarm Module, SNMP v1 Agent, Web Server,
TFTP Client, and a Device Protocol Driver. In addition, a database resides within the gateway that
contains the NAFEM Objects. This is where the information is exchanged between the NAFEM
and MODBus elements.
The function of the gateway is to receive requests for reads and writes of NAFEM Objects. These
objects are the registers within the target equipment. This request comes to the gateway in the
format of the NAFEM protocol. The gateway converts the request into the appropriate format and
communicates with the target equipment. If connected in a daisy chain configuration (page 6),
up to 8 pieces of equipment can be connected to one gateway. The gateway can access up to
80 registers (i.e. 80 different pieces of data) divided between these targets. The information
returned to the gateway from the target equipment is converted into the NAFEM protocol and sent
to the SNMP Manager, the Web browser or the application software.
Network Services
The NDP1 supports DHCP client, staticIP, and autoIP for address assignment. Normally you will
not need to make any changes. Intelligence is employed within the gateway to revert to backup
IP assignment methods if the primary method is unavailable.
–4–
INSTALLATION
PHYSICAL LOCATIONS
There must be no more than 160 feet of RS485 cable within a configuration having one Gateway.
This means that one Gateway with up to 8 machines must have a total of no more than 160 feet
of RS485 cable. A configuration with two Gateways and up to 16 machines total must have no
more than160 feet of RS485 cable in each Gateway cluster for a total of no more than 320 feet
of RS485 cable for the two-Gateway configuration. A power adapter cord with six feet of lead is
provided; 120 volts, 60 hertz, 1 phase grounded outlet is required. Power adapter cord must be
plugged in prior to installation. The Gateway and power cord must be located away from areas
that will be sprayed with water or any other liquids, and any devices that can emit electrical
dsiturbances, such as microwave ovens, radios or other Gateways. The Power Supply must be
installed such that condensate cannot drip down the cord into the 120 volt outlet. The Gateway
and power cord must be located in an area where the ambient temperature is less than 100°F and
where there is minimal risk of condensate. It is recommended that the Gateway be mounted
above the equipment on the upper portion of a wall or above a dropped ceiling. Installation must
be in accordance with all applicable local or national electrical codes.
OPTIMUM PHYSICAL LOCATION CONFIGURATION
If multiple machines will be networked through the same Gateway, a daisy chain connection must
be utilized. Refer to Installation on page 6 for details. One connection cable is provided. If more
than one machine is to be connected, additional cables can be purchased from Hobart (order kit
number 893512). Hobart suggests that the machines for any one Gateway be clustered within
15 feet of the Gateway regardless of the length of cable between the machines and the Gateway.
If the machines are more than 15 feet away from the Gateway, a second Gateway should be used.
NOTE: NAFEM Data Protocol Gateway can be implemented in an Ethernet wireless configuration
such as the 802.11b wireless protocol. Components to install in this manner are supplied by
others. Connections between the target equipment and the Gateway must be hard wired with an
RS485 connection cable.
–5–
NAFEM Gateway Architecture — Possible Configurations
–6–
Ethernet Wiring
Connect an RJ-45 Ethernet jack to a Hub or Switch with standard CAT5 cable. The gateway is
a 10BaseT device, so a switch is the best solution for a multi-speed network. The device can be
connected directly to a computer’s Ethernet jack with a crossover cable, provided by others.
Authentication and Registration
Authentication and registration of the Gateway happens automatically once connections are
made and may take up to 1 minute. Communication to the network is accomplished via the DHCP
Client to a system DHCP service, if available. The result of the DHCP method will define the
device’s Internet Protocol address, SubNet mask and Default gateway. The Microsoft AutoIP
scheme is employed to address possible networking environments where DHCP services are not
available.
The Ethernet interface is designed to work without user intervention on most networks.
Installation & RS485 Wiring
0.19 dia.
3.3
5.0
5.5
Pin
12345
•••••
••••
1.3
0.12
6789
Device
Activity
LED
Pin
1 Not Used
2 Not Used
3 Not Used
4 T+/R+
5 Com
6 T-/R7 Not Used
8 Not Used
9 Not Used
Ethernet
RJ45
Ethernet
Activity
LED
5 VDC Power
Pos Center
Ethernet
Link
LED
Dimensions are in inches.
Refer to Installation Instructions on Nafem Cable , FORM 35375, included, for instructions on how
to connect and route the NAFEM cables inside Hobart machines.
NOTE: If additional cables are needed for additional length or additional machines, purchase
Hobart Kit Number 893512.
NOTE: Use proper ESD handling procedures when making connections to unit. A UL Listed
Class 2 power supply is supplied.
If the Gateway is connected to a DHCP-enabled network, it can be browsed at the address listed
next to "Browse at" on the Gateway label.
–7–
Installation and RS485 Wiring (continued)
Connect one end of one RJ-12 Machine cable (Hobart part no. 893493-1 or 893493-2) to the
Gateway Adapter (Hobart part no. 893494). Connect the Gateway Adapter to the Gateway.
Connect the other end of the Machine Cable to one of the ports on the double port side of the
Y-Adapter Connector (Hobart part no. 893902). Connect one end of the second RJ-12 Machine
Cable (Hobart part no. 893493-1 or 893493-2) to the single port side of theY-Adapter Connector.
Connect the other end of the second Machine Cable to the machine. Refer to NAFEM Gateway
Architecture — Possible Configurations on page 6 for instructions on how to connect and route
the NAFEM cables between the Gateway and the machines.
RS485 and MODBus Settings
All Hobart machines have their bit rate set at 9600 bits per second. Refer to each machine's
Operators manual or Service Department for specific instructions on how to verify the bit rate
setting.
All machines must have unique MODBus IDs. Refer to each machine's Operators Manual or
Service Department for specific instructions on how to verify the MODBus ID.
–8–
GATEWAY CONFIGURATION
The Gateway may be configured via a web-based interface. To access this interface, open a web
browser on a PC connected to the same LAN as the Gateway. In the address bar of the browser,
type in either the IP address or the address printed on the Gateway label and press Enter. The
configuration options are on the left panel (Fig. 1). All options can be configured individually.
Three important options to note are:
•
IP Address under Administration → Network
•
Time and Date under Clock/Calendar → Clock
•
Data Points to access under Gateway → Serial Port Entry
The first option set with the submit button will open a password dialogue box. The default user
name is new and the password is user. For more information on how to change the user name
and password or other configuation options, refer to the Watlow Manual located at:
http://www.watlow.com/literature/prodtechinfo/files/controllers/nafem_b.pdf
Fig. 1
–9–
TROUBLESHOOTING
When the Poll Engine attempts to read from a remote device and an error occurs, the Poll Engine
will immediately retry to read from the remote device. If all retries have failed, then the Poll Engine
will increment the protocol read message failure count by one and attempt the next poll attribute.
If all active attributes for a single device fail, then the poll engine will disengage the device from
the poll cycle.
When the Poll Engine attempts to write to a remote device and an error occurs, the Poll Engine
will immediately retry to write to the remote device. If all retries have failed, then the Poll Engine
will increment the protocol write message failure count by one and reset the programmable
attribute for the write operation to the previous write value.
LED DESCRIPTIONS (Fig. 2)
The Ethernet Link LED is on continuously when there is an active Ethernet link between the
Gateway and the rest of the network. If the LED is off at any time, check all power and network
cables for proper connection.
The Ethernet Activity LED flashes intermittently as Ethernet traffic flows across the network to
and from the Gateway. Any time the Gateway sends or receives data, the LED will flash and then
turn off. If the LED remains off for an extended period, ensure that the Ethernet Link LED is on
and that all power and network cables are properly connected.
The Device Activity LED flashes intermittently as serial data flows between the Gateway and the
machines connected to it via the RS485 port. Any time the Gateway sends or receives data the
LED will flash briefly and then turn off. The configuration of the Gateway will determine the
interval between flashes. Typically, this interval is between 30 seconds and 5 minutes. If there
is no activity and the LED remains off for an extended period, ensure that the Gateway is properly
enabled, all cables are properly connected and all machines connected to the Gateway are
powered on.
Fig. 2
– 10 –
PROBLEM
SUGGESTED CORRECTIVE ACTION
The computer is not recording
data for any of the machines.
1. Ensure that all machines to be monitored are plugged
in and turned on.
2. Ensure the Gateway is plugged in and connected to the network
and the machines.
3. Ensure the data cables are properly connected to the monitored
machines.
4. Try to ping the Gateway (refer to instructions, page 13).
5. Restart the logging software (this may require rebooting
the computer).
6. Contact your IT professional for further assistance.
The computer logging program
does not launch.
1. Ensure other programs launch properly (i.e. notepad).
2. Reboot the computer.
3. Contact the software vendor for further assistance.
A machine stopped working
and none of the properly
functioning machines are
being logged.
1. Ensure that all machines that are not being logged are
plugged in and turned on.
2. Ensure that those machines still operate properly.
3. Ensure the data cables are properly connected to the
machines and Gateway in a daisy-chain fashion (refer to
page 6).
4. Contact your IT professional for further assistance.
A machine received service
from a service technician
and none of the machines
are being properly logged.
1. Ensure that all machines that are not being logged are
plugged in and turned on.
2. Ensure that those machines still operate properly.
3. Ensure the data cables are properly connected to the
machines and Gateway in a daisy-chain fashion (refer to
page 6).
4. Contact your IT professional for further assistance.
The logging program stopped
recording data for some, but
not all, of the machines.
1. Ensure that all machines that are not being logged are
plugged in and turned on.
2. Ensure that those machines still operate properly.
3. Ensure the data cables are properly connected to the
machines and Gateway in a daisy-chain fashion (refer to
page 6).
4. Contact your IT professional for further assistance.
The logging software records
unexpected values for several
minutes after a system restart.
1. This is by design of the Gateway, logging software,
and method of communication. The problem should
correct itself within several minutes of being restarted.
The logging software needs to
be restarted multiple times
a day.
1. Unplug the Gateway from its power source for at least
60 seconds.
2. Plug the Gateway back in and wait up to 5 minutes for
data transfer to resume.
3. Contact the software vendor for further assistance.
– 11 –
PROBLEM
SUGGESTED CORRECTIVE ACTION
The Gateway itself needs its
power cycled multiple times
a day.
1. Ensure that the Gateway is away from other devices that
could be sending out interfering signals, such as microwave
ovens, radios, networking equipment and other Gateways.
2. Contact your local Hobart Service team to replace
the potentially faulty Gateway.
Values recorded for one of the
machines never changes.
1. Ensure that all machines providing false readings are
plugged in and turned on.
2. Ensure that all machines are operating properly.
3. Ensure correct readings are displayed on the machines.
4. Ensure the data cables are properly connected to the
machines and Gateway in a daisy-chain fashion (refer to
page 6).
5. Unplug the Gateway from its power source for at least
60 seconds.
6. Plug the Gateway back in and wait up to 5 minutes for
data transfer to resume.
7. Contact your IT professional for further assistance.
Values recorded for one
machine are much higher or
lower than what is expected.
1. Ensure that all machines providing false readings are
plugged in and turned on.
3. Ensure correct readings are displayed on the machines.
4. Ensure the data cables are properly connected to the
machines and Gateway in a daisy-chain fashion (refer to
page 6).
5. Unplug the Gateway from its power source for at least
60 seconds.
6. Plug the Gateway back in and wait up to 5 minutes for
data transfer to resume.
7. Contact your IT professional for further assistance.
The computer program launches, but nothing else seems to
happen.
1. Ensure that all machines to be monitored are plugged
in and turned on.
2. Ensure the Gateway is plugged in and connected to the
network and the machines.
3. Ensure that the machines being monitored are
operating normally.
4. Attempt to ping the Gateway (refer to instructions, page 13).
5. Unplug the Gateway from its power source for at least
60 seconds.
6. Plug the Gateway back in and wait up to 5 minutes for
data transfer to resume.
7. Contact your IT professional for further assistance.
– 12 –
PING INSTRUCTIONS
Ping can be performed on most computer operating systems. To perform a 'ping' command from
a 32-bit Windows machine (i.e. Windows 95, 98, Me, NT, 2000 or XP), follow instructions below.
For operating systems other than Windows, contact your network administrator.
1) Click Start on the menu bar
2) Click Run
3) In the dialog that appears, type the word command and then click OK
4) A Command Prompt (or MS-DOS box) will appear
5) At the command line, type ping #.#.#.#, where the #.#.#.# is the IP address of the
Gateway that is having problems (as in the first line of Fig. 3). [You may have to get this
number from your network administrator, manager or Help Desk.]
6) Press Enter
If the command is successful, meaning there is not a network communications problem between
the Gateway and your PC, then you will receive text similar to that of the second box in Fig. 3.
If the command is unsuccessful, meaning there is a network communication or configuration
error, you will receive text similar to that of Fig. 4.
Successful ping
Fig. 3
Unsuccessful ping
Fig. 4
– 13 –
GLOSSARY
Address
An identifiable location. A location within memory. A location of a
node within a network. A way of identifying a network, sub
network, or node.
Alarm Module
A portion of the firmware code that monitors data from the poll
engine and alerts the user (for example via E-mail) about
conditions that fall outside of preset tolerances.
Auto IP
Microsoft's implementation of Automatic Private IP Addressing
(APIPA). An Auto IP-enabled device will automatically configure
itself to an IP address in the range of 169.254.0. through
169.254.255.254 with a subnet mask of 255.255.0.0 if it cannot
reach a DHCP server or if it does not have a fixed, hard-coded
IP address.
Baseband
A type of channel where data transmission is carried across only
one communication channel. Baseband supports one signal
transmission at a time. Ethernet is an example of baseband
technology.
Bit rate
The rate, usually expressed in seconds, that bits are transmitted.
Broadcast
Simultaneous transmission of the same data to all nodes
connected to a network.
Cat5 Cable
Stands for Category 5 cable which can be used for Ethernet
networks. Many 10BaseT networks use this standard, which
defines how the cable is manufactured and what the maximum
data throughput on the cable is. Hobart recommends the use of
Cat5, Cat5e, or better cable to communicate between the
NAFEM Gateway and the rest of the network.
Client
A program that can be invoked by a user; a user being a human
or a program.
Client/Server
Terms used to refer to a peer to peer method of operation of
applications within hosts.
Daisychain Topology
The configuration of network devices. Examples include: BUS,
Star, Ring, Dual Ring, etc.
Data Link Protocol
A prescribed way of handling the establishment, maintenance,
and termination of a logical link between two nodes.
Default Gateway
The network gateway that a computer will use to access another
network if another gateway is not specified for use.
Destination Address
In an Ethernet network, this refers to the target node address.
Device Protocol Driver
Software that links the operating system to a peripheral device
using a specific protocol. The driver contains the precise
machine language necessary to perform the functions requested
by the application.
DHCP (Dynamic Host
Configuration Protocol)
Software that automatically assigns IP addresses to client
stations logging onto a TCP/IP network. It eliminates having to
manually assign permanent IP addresses
– 14 –
Domain Name System
A service used with TCP/IP to replace the previous method of
keeping track with host names, aliases, and internet addresses.
The domain name service is a distributed database used to
convert node names to internet addresses.
ESD
Electrostatic discharge.
Ethernet
A data link level protocol. It comprises layers one and two when
compared to the OSI reference model. Ethernet is a broadcast
technology and can be implemented with different media types,
such as thick or thin coaxial cable or twisted pair cable. Ethernet
uses CSMA/CD mechanism to access the medium.
Ethernet Address
A 48 bit address, commonly referred to as a hard address. This
address identifies an Ethernet network interface card (NIC), thus
identifying a host hardware address.
Firmware
Computer programs contained permanently in a hardware device
(as a read-only memory)
Interface
A shared point between two entities, either software or hardware.
Internet Address
A 32-bit address used to identify hosts and networks.
Internet Protocol (IP)
The part of the TCP/IP protocol that handles routing of data.
Link
Used to refer to a connection between two end points.
Local Area Network (LAN)
A collection of computer related equipment connected in such a
way that communication can occur between all nodes connected
to the medium.
Management Information Base (MIB) A database containing configuration and statistical information
about nodes on a network.
MODBus
A high level protocol for industrial networks, it defines a request /
response message structure for a client / server environment.
NAFEM
North American Association of Food Equipment Manufacturers
NAFEM Gateway
A protocol converter that converts Hobart / Traulsen equipment
to the NAFEM protocol using an Ethernet connection.
NDP1
A Gateway device that, when used with compatible Hobart
Equipment, can make the system NAFEM Data Protocol
compliant.
Network
A collection of computers and related devices connected so that
communication can occur.
Network Address
In TCP/IP networks, this refers to the IP Address of a node.
Network Administrator
The person designated to maintain the network. This person
should have working knowledge of network wiring, requirements,
etc. See System Administrator.
Ping
A program used with TCP/IP networks. The Ping program
provides a way of testing access to a destination by sending an
ICMP echo request, then waiting for a response from the target
host.
– 15 –
Poll Engine
A portion of the firmware code that requests (polls) data from the
connected target equipment and stores that data for later use.
Protocol
A set of rules governing the method of operation.
Protocol Conversion
Changing one type of protocol to another type of protocol.
RS-485
A physical layer specification for connecting devices.
Server
An application that answers requests from clients.
SNMP (Simple Network
Management Protocol)
A widely used network monitoring and control protocol. Data are
passed from SNMP agents to SNMP managers used to oversee
the network.
SNMP Agents
Hardware and / or software processes reporting activity in each
network device (hub, router, bridge, etc.) using SNMP.
SNMP Manager
Hardware and / or software processes on a workstation console
used to oversee the network that use SNMP.
Subnet Mask
A mask used to determine to what subnet an IP address belongs.
Subnetting enables the network administrator to further divide
the host part of the address into two or more "sub-networks" (or
subnets).
TCP
Transmission Control Protocol. A transport layer protocol that is
part of the TCP/IP protocol suite. TCP provides a reliable stream
mechanism performing re-transmission when a positive
acknowledgment is not returned to the source from the
destination node.
TCP/IP
Transmission Control Protocol / Internet Protocol. TCP/IP is an
upper layer networking protocol. It is client/server based at the
application layer.
TFTP (Trivial File Transfer Protocol) A TCP/IP based application used for transferring files from one
system to another that has no directory or password capability.
Web Server
A computer that delivers Web pages to browsers and other files
to applications via the HTTP protocol. It includes the hardware,
operating system, Web server software, TCP/IP protocols and
site content (Web pages and other files).
10BaseT
A reference to the cabling used in an Ethernet network. Meaning
10Megabits per second, using baseband signaling, and twisted
pair cabling.
SERVICE
Contact your local Hobart service office for any repairs needed on this equipment. Long-term
service contracts are available on this and other Hobart products.
FORM 35374 (Sept. 2005)
– 16 –
PRINTED IN U. S. A.
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