Systems, methods, and devices for associating a contact identifier

USOO8452228B2
(12) United States Patent
(10) Patent N0.:
Haughay, Jr. et al.
(45) Date of Patent:
(54) SYSTEMS, METHODS, AND DEVICES FOR
(75)
US 8,452,228 B2
2
1
1
ASSOCIATING A CONTACT IDENTIFIER
WITHA BROADCAST SOURCE
6,192,340 B1
6,247,130 B1
6,255,961 B1
Inventors: Allen P. Haughay, Jr., San Jose, CA
.
'
Ryan perry’ san Franclsco’ CA
6,259,892 B1
6,314,094 B1
6,338,044 B1
May 28, 2013
gayle?s et al~ l
aug ton et a .
2/2001 Abecassis
6/2001 Fritsch
7/2001 Van RyZin et a1.
7/2001 Helferich
Boys
1/2002 Cook et a1.
11/2001
(Continued)
(73) Ass1gnee: Apple Inc., Cupertino, CA (US)
(*)
Notice:
FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS
Subject to any disclaimer, the term of this
patent is extended or adjusted under 35
EP
EP
0744839
0898378
U.S.C. 154(b) by 862 days.
11/1996
2/1999
(Continued)
(21) Appl. No.: 12/237,261
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
Orubeondo, “Trim AirCard 300 Eases Power Demands.” InfoWorld
(22)
Filed:
Sep. 24, 2008
(65)
Prior Publication Data
US 2010/0075616 A1
(51)
vol. 21, Issue 48, pp. 46 & 50, Nov. 29, 1999.
(continued)
Mar. 25, 2010
Primary Examiner * Keith Ferguson
(74) Attorney, Agent, 0rFirm * Blakely, Sokoloff, Taylor &
Zafman LLP
Int. Cl.
H04Q 7/20
(2006.01)
(52) US. Cl.
(57)
USPC
455(3‘04; 455/391; 4554303; 455/4141?
A media device including includes a broadcast receiver that
455/414'3’ 455/426'1’ 725/62’ 725/63’ 725/68’
receives broadcast media from a plurality of broadcast
_
(58)
ABSTRACT
_
_
725/70
sources where the broadcast receiver is tunable to a ?rst
Fleld 0f ClaSSI?catlon searCh
broadcast source. The media device also includes a data store
USPC ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~ 4556-0173061 4221’ 403: 550-1:
that stores a list of contact identi?ers Where each contact
455/4261: 4262’ 4187420, 73> 4121’ 412-2;
identi?er is associated with a broadcast source. The media
_
_
_ 725/62’72
see apphcanon ?le for complete searCh hlstOI'Y-
device includes a user interface that: i) provides a prompt to a
user to enable the user to initiate contact with the ?rst broad
_
(56)
cast source, and ii) receives a user indication to initiate con
References Clted
tact with the ?rst broadcast source. The media device further
includes a transceiver that initiates the contact with the ?rst
broadcast source by sending a communications session
U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS
2
,
,
5,557,541 A
5,616,876 A
5,963,916 A
5,983,073 A
lg;
Emmi“ tet lal~
ran
e
a
request via a communications network to the ?rst broadcast
.
-
9/1996 Schulhof et al‘
4/1997 Cluts
-
.
10/1999 Kaplan
11/1999 Ditzik
18 Claims, 10 Drawing Sheets
/ 200
//—”—/——————-—\.____.____\\
208 \1 J
(I
9:42AM
@
3:27
202 \
.
.
source that 1ncludes a contact 1dent1?er associated W1th the
?rst broadcast source.
-:‘
RED nor 01-11111 PEPPERS
DAN! CALIFORNIA
STADIUM ARCADIUM
1 of 14
1:15
. '204
RED HOT 01-11111 PEPPERS
'
'
US 8,452,228 B2
Page 2
US. PATENT DOCUMENTS
WO
00/70523
11/2000
0g
,Zogjgggggg A1
lgggg;
6,339,706 Bi
i/2002 irrigien e, i.
6,353,637 B1
3/2002 Mansour et al.
6,401,085 B1
6/2002 Gershman et al.
6,407,750 B1
6,408,332 B1
6/2002 Gioscia et al.
6/2002 MatsumOtO et al~
“Sierra Wireless Announces First Cellular Network Interface Card
k?zimha et al‘
1/2003 Baughan
for Notebook PCs; The AirCard 300 for Windows Changes the Way
Notebook PC Users Make Wireless Connections.” Business Wire,
2/2003 Jackson
2/2003 TreyZ er al
5:52;? et 31‘
8/2003 Van Zoest et al.
Jun. 21, 1999 (http://?ndaiticles.com/p/aiticles/miimOEIN/isi
1999iJunei2l/aii54937451/), retrieved Aug. 5, 2009.
“Cellular for Notebook PCs.” CIO vol. 13, No. 1, Section 1, p. 90,
0“; 1’ 1999
_
635103210 B1
6,516,466 Bl
6,526,335 B1
6,609,105 B2
6,658,247 B1
12/2003
6,728,531 B1
6,772,212 B1
6,823,225 B1
4/2004 Lee et al.
8/2004 Lau et al.
11/2004 Sass
6,845,398 B1
1/2005
Sal-to
Galensk
“Briefs: Sierra Wireless . . . ” NetworkWorld vol. 16, No. 34, p. 27,
Aug. 23, 1999.
“Speci?cation ofthe Bluetooth System, vol. 1.” pp. 1-1080, Nov. 29,
1999,
et al.
6,901,067 B1
5/2005 Kalavad:
6,907,112
B1
6/2005
Guedalia et al.
6,915,272
6,917,923
7,065,342
7,110,714
7,187,947
B1
B1
B1
B1
B1
700%
7/2005
6/2006
9/2006
30007
Zilliacus et al‘
Dimenstein
Rolf
Kay et 61,
White et 31'
\Bg??lgsefgil'
7,444,353 B1
7,486,926
7,634,228
2002/0010759
2002/0046084
2002/0049037
B2
B2
A1
A1
A1
2003/0013425 A1
2004/0198279 A1
2004/0198389 A1
-
>>
_
'
.
.
.
.
Pegoraro, “Music Factory; Retailers Struggle to Expand Listening
Options Online.” Contra Costa Times, Mar. 19, 2000 Sunday Final
Edition, Business Section, p. H01.
EMusic.com Inc. Prospectus, Sep. 24, 1999, 85 pages.
Pegoraro, “Logging on; Setting Sound Free From the CD.” The
Washington Post, Mar. 3, 2000, Final Edition, Fast Forward Section,
2/2009
12/2009
1/2002
4/2002
4/2002
“Digital Cellular Telecommunications System (Phase 2+); General
Packet Radio Service (GPRS); Overall Description of the GPRS
Radio Interface; Stage 2 (GSM 03.64 version 6.0.1 Release 1997)”
pp, 1.56, Aug, 1998,
“Digital Cellular Telecommunications System (Phase 2+); General
White et al‘
White et al,
Hitson et al.
Steele et al.
ChnStensen et 31'
12/2002 Noreen et 31‘
1/2003 Nee
10/2004 Anttila et al.
10/2004 AlCOCk et al.
700% KOPT? et 31; ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~ 705/1
2005/0208913 A1
9/2005 Raisinghani et al.
2006/0105781 A1
5/2006
2006/0184431 A1
-
lZlgngci?cation of the Bluetooth System, vol. 2. pp. 1 438, Nov. 29,
I" 1501'
2005/0154599 A1
2006/0184960 A1
2007/0208771 A1
2007/0232225 A1
“
10/2008 Chen et al.
JDafillitlgré’t‘Lri‘et al'
2002/0183059 A1
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
Ueda et al.
8/2006 Rosenberg et al‘ ““““““ H 705/26
8/2006 Honon et al‘
9/2007 Plan
10/2007 Kikuchi
_
_
Packet Radio Service (GPRS); Overall Description of the GPRS
Radio Interface; Stage 2 (GSM 03.64 version 6.1.0 Release 1997)77
PP~ 1-42, Oct 1998
“Digital Cellular Telecommunications System (Phase 2+); General
Packet Radio Service (GPRS); Overall Description of the GPRS
Radio Interface; Stage 2 (GSM 03.64 version 6.2.0 Release 1997)”
‘ 142 May 1999‘
BE. .
’
.
.
,
lgltal ceTlumr Télecommunlcatlons SyStem chase 2+), General
Packet Radio Serv1ce (GPRS); Overall Description of the GPRS
Radio Interface; Stage 2 (GSM 03.64 version 6.3.0 Release 1997)”
pp. 1-42, Jul. 1999.
Zoos/0039037 A1
2/2008 Kum
“Digital Cellular Telecommunications System (Phase 2+); General
Zoos/0133336 A1
6/2008 Altman et 31'
227223 ““““““““““““ H 370/390
Packet Radio Service (GPRS); Overall Description of the GPRS
Radio Interface; Stage 2 (GSM 03.64 version 7.0.0 Release 1997)”
Jendbro
PP~_ 1'41, Jul 1999
2008/0160940 A1
7/2008
_
_
_
_
zoos/0162358 A1
2008/0268772 A1
7/2008 patsiokas et al‘
10/2008 Linnamaki et al. ........ .. 455/304
Cai et al. “General Packet Radio Serv1ce in GSM.” IEEE Communi
cations Magazine, Oct. 1997, pp. 122-131.
Zoos/0288378
2009/0005071
2009/0063975
2009/0070370
2009/0100068
2009/0124226
11/2008
1/2009
3/2009
3/2009
4/2009
5/2009
“Part 11: Wireless LAN Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physi
cal Layer (PHY) Speci?cations.” IEEE Std 802.11-1997, pp. 1445.
Lind et al. “The Network Vehicle-A Glimpse into the Future of
Mobile Multi-Media.” IEEE, pp. 121-1-121-8, 1998.
Knudsen, “MP3 Linux Players.” Jul. 1, 1999, http://linqu ournal.
com/aiticle/3420, retrieved Jul. 16,2010.
A1
A1
A1
A1
A1
A1
2009/0125609 A1
2009/0158155
2009/0186629
2009/0326949
2010/0075593
A1
A1
A1
A1
BerStiS et 61,
Forstall er al.
Bun et al~
Cunningham er al
Gauba et 31~
Nakamum et al~
5/2009 WOPd et 31'
6/2009
7/2009
12/2009
30010
Quinn et al.
soelbefrg et al'
DOUthltt et 31'
Lee et 31'
Jeffrey, “Net Music Firms to Tap Public Market.” Billboard, Jul. 17,
1999, 2 pages‘
“Digital Download Provider Muscimaker.com Partners With Down
load Directory Listen.com; Offers Nearly 100,000 Downloadable
Tracks Via the Online Directory.” PR Newswire, Financial News
2010/0075616 A1
3/2010 Haughay, Jr. et al.
Section Se ‘ 15 1999 3 3 es‘
2010/0075695 A1
3/2010
“M
2011/0183603 A1
7/2011 Malik
Haughay, Jr. et al.
FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS
’
p
’
’
P g
.
.
.
,
.
.
yplay, Inc. Launches. Consumer Online Music Serv1ce, First in
Industry to Focus on Ability to Centrally Store Music and Access it
Via Multiple Devices; Company Secures Funding from Noted Ven
EP
0918408
5/1999
téircle Capital IFirms.” PR Newswire, Entertainment, Television, and
JP
8_006875
1/1996
“ u ture Section, Oct. 13, 1999, 3 pages. I
JP
11464058
6/1999
JP
Jp
KR
W0
WO
I
Myplay.com Launches Today; New Online Serv1ce Makes Down
11_242686
9/1999
loading Digital Music Easy for Everyone; Sign Up for Free Virtual
11317061
1999.0073234
00/ 19662
00/54462
11/1999
10/ 1999
4/2000
9/2000
Locker Get Bonus Tracks From Artists Including Kid Rock, Chris
Rock, Buckcherry. Easy Access to Your Music Collection for Down
load to Portable Music Players.” PR Newswire, Entertainment, Tele
vision, and Culture Section, Oct. 13, 1999, 2 pages.
US 8,452,228 B2
Page 3
Nokia 9110i User’s Manual, pp. 1-190, 1999.
SoundJamTM MP Digital Audio System User Guide, 1999, pp. 1-50.
StarTAC, Sprint PCS User Guide, pp. 1-1 18, Mar. 1999.
Qualcomm QCPil960TM, Sprint PCS User Guide, pp. 1-76, Apr.
Visteon: For Your Listening PleasureiAny Music, Any Time,
Nokia Quick Guide, Accessories Guide, pp. 1-31, 1999.
1999.
AnWhere
RealJukebox Plus Manual, 1999, pp. 1-83.
RealPlayerTM Plus User Manual, 2000, pp. 1-118.
RealPlayer PlusTM G2 Manual, 1998, pp. 1-81.
pl?ACCT:104&STORY:/WWW/story/01-05-2000/0001107812
(http ://WWWZ .prnewswire .com/c gi-bin/ stories.
&DATE ), originally retrieved Jan. 5, 2000.
Samsung Model SCH-3500, Sprint PCS User Guide, pp. 1-108,
1999.
* cited by examiner
US. Patent
May 28,2013
Sheet 1 0f 10
US 8,452,228 B2
100/
122
/108
FIG.
1
US. Patent
May 28, 2013
2
Hm
M 7,
“Uwow7! /3
meUw4MwOmI
v20?we?8N!\\//mF3\-O2en1Im0u
Sheet 2 0f 10
US 8,452,228 B2
US. Patent
May 28, 2013
wow
~ ~
Sheet 3 0f 10
~ » * u “ u * m n _ _ ~
~
* u
US 8,452,228 B2
US. Patent
May 28, 2013
Nmmr
nm> Stow
US 8,452,228 B2
Sheet 5 0f 10
?gum
mcosm
mam»
m.OE
@Q@p
Nmm@
US. Patent
May 28, 2013
US 8,452,228 B2
Sheet 6 0f 10
mm
MR8
0%kam
w.QE
OwEw
OwE
vow
wow
\
3
mew,
x0%sémz n5265sz
US. Patent
May 28, 2013
US 8,452,228 B2
Sheet 7 0f 10
mom
o._.
£I3L2NI
@\2wmm50
{E5%.
0%kan”
.QEN
(E
mew
650m
US. Patent
May 28, 2013
wow
Sheet 8 0f 10
US 8,452,228 B2
wow
£86E5qm:0uaw 6>mEo
.QEw
US. Patent
May 28, 2013
US 8,452,228 B2
Sheet 9 0f 10
\ Ij )
N;
P@5082a6n5 EH\QmEaO
8“ww3mo0wem N“O6ME0U
)NS
vow
z@Em0ow5bm EHumwvcao
wow
US. Patent
May 28, 2013
Sheet 10 0f 10
1002’\
US 8,452,228 B2
m
Receive Broadcast Media From
a Plurality Of Broadcast Sources
Using A Broadcast Receiver
That is Tunable To A First
Broadcast Source
1004/\
l
Store A List Of
Contact Identi?ers
Associated With
Broadcast Sources
1006/\
l
Produce A Prompt
To A User To Enable
Contact With The
First Broadcast
Source
1008/\
l
Receive A User
Indicator To Initiate
Contact With the
First Broadcast
Source
1010/\
l
Initiate Contact With the First
Broadcast Source By Sending
A Session Request to the First
Broadcast Source Including
the Contact Identi?er
FIG' 10
US 8,452,228 B2
1
2
SYSTEMS, METHODS, AND DEVICES FOR
One problem with participating in radio broadcast con
tests, talk shows, or listener-participant broadcasts, is that
listeners are typically given a relatively small amount of time
ASSOCIATING A CONTACT IDENTIFIER
WITH A BROADCAST SOURCE
to call into the show. Even when the radio station announces
REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
its telephone number, a listener must typically ?nd his tele
phone and then dial the number. This process can be incon
This application is related to the following: US. Patent
Application Publication No. 2010/0076576, ?lcd on pub
lished on Mar. 25, 2010, entitled “Systems, Methods, and
venient, time-consuming, and even dangerous, depending on
the current activity of the user. Accordingly, there is a need to
provide a listener of a broadcast media program with a con
Devices for Providing Broadcast Media From a Selected
venient mechanism to acquire the broadcast source contact
information and initiate a communication with the broadcast
Source”; US. Patent Application Publication No. 2010/
0075593, published on Mar. 25, 2010, and entitled “Media
Device with Enhanced Data Retrieval Feature”; and US.
Patent Application Publication No. 20 1 0/ 0075 695, published
on Mar. 25, 2010, and entitled “Systems, Methods, and
Devices for Retrieving Local Broadcast Source Presets.” The
source.
SUMMARY
The invention, in various embodiments, addresses de?
ciencies in the prior art by providing systems, methods and
entire contents of the above-referenced applications are
incorporated herein by reference.
BACKGROUND
devices that enable a media device to retrieve contact data
associated with a select broadcast source and provide a user
20
communication with the broadcast source.
In one aspect, a media device includes a broadcast receiver
This invention relates to media devices capable of retriev
ing contact information for a selected broadcast source and
providing a user with the ability to initiate a communication
with the broadcast source.
that receives broadcast media from a plurality of broadcast
25
Traditional media devices, e.g., an MP3 player, typically
connect with a headset to enable a user to listen to music.
Other media devices may include a display that displays
videos. Many types of media devices are portable and have
compact form factors to enable ef?cient handling and use by
30
a user. Certain media devices include a radio broadcast
receiver capable of receiving amplitude modulated (AM),
media can typically include a song, video, news program, or
35
source that includes a contact identi?er associated with the
?rst broadcast source.
In one con?guration, the transceiver can continuously ini
tiate the contact, e. g., continuously call a speci?ed telephone
a public land mobile network (PLMN) or wireless data net
work that may be linked with the Intemet or other data net
works. Other media devices are capable of interfacing with
personal area networks (PAN), wireless local area networks
sources where the broadcast receiver is tunable to a ?rst
broadcast source. The media device also includes a data store
that stores a list of contact identi?ers where each contact
identi?er is associated with a broadcast source. The media
device includes a user interface that: i) provides a prompt to a
user to enable the user to initiate contact with the ?rst broad
cast source, and ii) receives a user indication to initiate con
tact with the ?rst broadcast source. The media device further
includes a transceiver that initiates the contact with the ?rst
broadcast source by sending a communications session
request via a communications network to the ?rst broadcast
frequency modulated (PM), or satellite broadcast media. The
radio show. Certain media devices, e.g., cellular telephones,
include wireless transceivers capable of exchanging data with
with the capability to quickly and conveniently initiate a
number of a broadcast source, until the media device is con
works including, for example, Wi-? (802.X) networks.
nected at the desired and/ or requested time or calling event,
e.g., being the tenth caller to a radio station.
In one feature, at least one contact identi?er is provided by
In addition to providing broadcast media (e.g., songs,
video, television programs, and radio shows), certain broad
receiver may receive broadcast media data where the broad
40
(WLAN), satellite data networks (SAN), and other data net
cast media sources can supplement the broadcast media with
broadcast media data. The broadcast media data can include
the user to the data store via the user interface. The broadcast
45
media metadata (e.g., information about a particular song) or
data about the broadcast source (e.g., the name of the broad
casting radio station).
The Radio Data System (RDS) is a communications stan
50
dard developed by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU)
that enables the transmission of small amounts of broadcast
media data using FM radio broadcasts. RDS can send various
transceiver that: i) sends a query to a media data server for at
least one contact identi?er associated with the ?rst broadcast
source, ii) retrieves at least one contact identi?er via a data
network, and iii) provides at least one contact identi?er to the
data store. The media data server may be a clearinghouse
types of broadcast media data including: time, track title,
server, a web server, or a broadcast source server.
track artist, and station identi?cation. RDS has been used in
Europe and South America since the early 1990s.
The Radio Broadcast Data System (RBDS) is the name for
the North American version of RDS, and is also often referred
to simply as “RDS.” The North American and European ver
55
sions are nearly identical. Both RDS versions use a 57 kHZ
sub carrier to carry broadcast media data at 1187.5 bits per
60
second.
Radio stations often promote contests and other promo
tions where listeners are encouraged to call into the radio
station to win prizes. Many radio stations broadcast talk
shows where listeners are encouraged to call in to participate
in the talk show.
cast media data includes at least one contact identi?er, e.g.,
via RDS data. At least one contact identi?er may be provided
via the received media data to the data store.
In certain con?gurations, the media device includes a
The user interface may include a display, a keypad, a touch
screen, clickwheel, touch pad, speaker, and/or microphone.
The prompt to a user may include an icon, display button,
image, visual indicator, audio indicator, vibration, and the
like. The broadcast source may include a radio station, tele
65
vision station, satellite source, and the like.
The contact identi?er may include a telephone number, an
IP address, a domain name, and/or a URL. In one feature, the
broadcast media data may include an IP address, domain
name, and/ or URL which the media device uses to retrieve the
contact identi?er from a media server. The media device may
retrieve the contact identi?er from a clearinghouse server,
web server, and/or broadcast source server.
US 8,452,228 B2
3
4
The user indication may include clicking an icon, depress
ing a button, saying a phrase or word, and/or performing a
movement of the media device. In one feature, the media
device is tunable to a frequency setting. The media may
include a video, an image, audio, audio ?le, a song, music,
multimedia, movie, and/ or television data. The communica
tions network may include the PSTN, a wireless data net
work, a data network, and/or the Internet.
FIG. 10 is a ?ow diagram of a process for distributing
broadcast source preset data according to an illustrative
embodiment of the invention.
DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a media device 100 accord
ing to an illustrative embodiment of the invention. The device
100 includes a housing 102, a ?rst housing portion 104, a
In another feature, a media device includes a broadcast
receiver that receives media from a broadcast source. The
second housing portion 106, a display 108, a keypad 110, a
media device also includes a transceiver that: i) requests and
speaker housing aperture 112, a microphone housing aperture
receives a contact identi?er associated with the broadcast
114, a headphone jack 116, and frame sidewall 122. In certain
embodiments, the frame sidewall 122 is the exposed portion
of a frame residing within or adjacent to the housing 102 that
provides structural support for the media device 100 and
various internal components.
source via a communications network from a media server,
and ii) sends a connection request including the contact iden
ti?er associated with the broadcast source to establish a com
munications connection with the broadcast source via the
communications network. The communications connection
may include a circuit-switched and/or packet-switched con
nection.
In one embodiment, the housing 102 includes a ?rst hous
ing portion 104 and a second housing portion 106 that are
20
In a further aspect, a media device includes a broadcast
receiver for receiving media and media data from a broadcast
source where the media data includes a contact identi?er
associated with the broadcast source. The media device
includes a data store that stores the contact identi?er associ
25
ated with the broadcast source and a user interface that
receives a user indication to initiate contact with the broadcast
source. The media device also includes a transceiver that
sends a connection request, in response to the user indication,
which includes the contact identi?er associated with the
fastened together and/or to the frame sidewall 122 to encase
various components of the media device 100. The housing
102 and its housing portions 104 and 106 may include poly
mer-based materials that are formed by, for example, inj ec
tion molding to de?ne the form factor of the media device
100. In one embodiment, the housing 102 surrounds and/or
supports internal components such as, for example, a display
108, one or more circuit boards having integrated circuit
components, internal radio frequency (RF) circuitry, an inter
nal antenna, a speaker, a microphone, a hard drive, a proces
30
sor, and other components. Further details regarding certain
internal components are discussed herein with respect to FIG.
broadcast source to establish a communications connection
with the broadcast source via a communications network.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
35
4. The housing 102 provides for mounting of a display 108,
keypad 110, external jack 116, data connectors, or other
external interface elements. The housing 102 may include
invention will be apparent upon consideration of the follow
one or more housing apertures 112 to facilitate delivery of
sound, including voice and music, to a user from a speaker
within the housing 102. The housing 102 may include one or
ing detailed description, taken in conjunction with accompa
more housing apertures 114 to facilitate the reception of
The above and other objects and advantages of the present
nying drawings, in which like reference characters refer to
like parts throughout, and in which:
40
Personal computing devices and/or media devices of this
FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a media device according to
an illustrative embodiment of the invention;
type may include a touchscreen control, such as a Pronto
made available by Royal Philips Electronics of the Nether
FIG. 2 is a view of a media device according to an illustra
tive embodiment of the invention;
sounds, such as voice, for an internal microphone from a
device user.
45
lands or a GPS receiver made available by Garmin Intema
FIG. 3 is a communications topology including a media
device according to an illustrative embodiment of the inven
tional, Inc. of Olathe, Kans. In certain embodiments, the
tion;
enable a user to interact with the device 100. The personal
computing device 100 may also include an image sensor such
FIG. 4 shows a simpli?ed functional block diagram of a
media device according to an illustrative embodiment of the
display 108 includes a graphical user interface (GUI) to
50
invention;
FIG. 2 is a view of another personal media device 200
according to an illustrative embodiment of the invention. The
media device 200 includes a display 202 showing a status bar
FIG. 5 shows a diagram of a distribution system for media
and media data according to an illustrative embodiment of the
invention;
FIG. 6 shows a diagram of a public land mobile network
(PLMN) data distribution system according to an illustrative
55
embodiment of the invention;
FIG. 7 shows a diagram of a wireless access network
including an access point according to an illustrative embodi
60
ment of the invention;
FIG. 8 is a diagram of a computer processing environment
including various applications or routines running within a
media device according to an illustrative embodiment of the
invention;
FIG. 9 shows a database according to an illustrative
embodiment of the invention; and
as a camera capable of capturing photographic images and/or
video images.
208 and video image 204, which may include, for example, a
music video, a movie, video clip, or like video images. In one
embodiment, a GUI of the display 202 includes an interface
206 that enables the media device 200 user to play, pause, fast
forward, reverse, or monitor, via a slider 210, the progress of
the video displayed on the display 202 or audio being played
by the media device 200. The media device 200 includes a
housing base 212.
FIG. 3 shows a communications topology including a com
65
puter 308, media device 300, and a headset 302. Media device
300 may communicate with computer 308 via communica
tions channel 310. Media device 300 may communicate with
the headset 302 via communications channel 312. In one
US 8,452,228 B2
5
6
embodiment, communications channel 312 is a wired com
with a headset 302, other media device, or other system via a
communications network. Processor 402 may control the
munication channel. Alternatively, the communications
channel 312 may be wireless.
Media device 300 may take any form. For example, media
device 300 may be a portable media player such as a portable
operation of many functions and other circuitry included in
media device 400. Processor 402 may drive display 410 and
may receive user inputs from the user interface 406.
music player. Media device 300 may also include, for
example, a mobile telephone that may play downloaded
media. Media may be downloaded directly to the media
Storage device 404 may store media (e.g., music and video
?les), software (e.g., for implementing functions on device
400), preference information (e.g., media playback prefer
ences), lifestyle information (e.g., food preferences), per
device 300 or may be downloaded to computer 308 and trans
ferred to the media device 300 via communications channel
310.
The media device 300 may include a wireless communi
cations device such as a cellular telephone, satellite tele
sonal information (e.g., information obtained by exercise
monitoring equipment), transaction information (e.g., infor
mation such as credit card information), word processing
information, personal productivity information, wireless con
phone, cordless telephone, personal digital assistant (PDA),
nection information (e.g., information that may enable media
pager, portable computer, or any other device capable of
wireless communications. In fact, FIG. 2 shows an exemplary
cellular telephone version of a broad category of media
device 300. The media device 300 may be compact, portable,
device 400 to establish wireless communication with another
device), subscription information (e.g., information that
keeps tracks of podcasts or television shows or other media
that a user subscribes to), radio station broadcast source infor
mobile, personal, and/or transportable.
The media device 300 may also be integrated within the
20
packaging of other devices or structures such as a vehicle,
video game system, appliance, clothing, helmet, glasses,
wearable apparel, stereo system, computer system, entertain
ment system, or other portable devices. In certain embodi
ments, the media device 300 may be docked or connected to
a wireless (e. g., a wi-? docking system) and/ or radio enabling
nent memory such as RAM, or cache.
Memory 420 may include one or more different types of
25
accessory system (e.g., AM/FM or satellite radio receiver)
that provides the media device 300 with short-range commu
nicating functionality and/ or radio reception capability. Alter
native types of media devices 300 may include, for example,
30
Shuf?e, or Apple® iphone available by Apple Inc., of Cuper
412 may also convert audio inputs from the microphone 426
into digital audio signals. The CODEC 412 may include a
35
40
45
crete (e.g., ?les and packets) formats.
During synchronization, a host system, e.g., device 308,
may provide media to a client system or software application
embedded within the media device 300. In certain embodi
ments, media and/or data is “downloaded” to the media
device 300. In other embodiments, the media device 300 is
capable of uploading media to a remote host or other client
50
55
the invention. The block diagram provides a generalized
60
employed, without limitation, by the media devices 100, 200,
and 300. The media device 400 may include a processor 402,
storage device 404, user interface 406, display 410, CODEC
412, bus 418, memory 420, communications circuitry 422, a
speaker or transducer 424, a microphone 426, a location
sensor 430, a radio receiver 432, a radio receiver decoder 434,
and communications circuitry to facilitate communications
System for Mobile Communications (GSM), code division
multiple access (CDMA), and long-term evolution (LTE)
based wireless protocols. Communications circuitry 422 may
In one embodiment, the media device 400 may be a por
table computing device dedicated to processing media such as
audio and video. For example, the media device 400 may be
may include speakers 304 and 306 as well as a microphone.
FIG. 4 shows a simpli?ed functional block diagram of a
media device 400 according to an illustrative embodiment of
block diagram of a computer system such as may be
one of the 802.1x standards. Other wireless network protocol
standards could also be used, either in alternative to the iden
ti?ed protocols or in addition to the identi?ed protocols.
Other network standards may include Bluetooth, the Global
also include circuitry that enables the media device 400 to be
electrically coupled to another device (e.g., a computer or an
accessory device) and communicate with that other device.
system.
The headset 302 may be utilized to provide an audio func
tionality associated with media device 300. The headset 302
User interface 406 may allow a user to interact with the
media device 400. For example, the user interface 406 can
take a variety of forms, such as a button, keypad, dial, a click
wheel, or a touch screen. Communications circuitry 422 may
include circuitry for wireless communication (e.g., short
range and/or long range communication). For example, the
wireless communication circuitry may be Wi-Fi enabling
circuitry that permits wireless communication according to
may include, without limitation, sound or audio ?les, music,
video, multi-media, and digital data, in streaming and/or dis
video CODEC for processing digital and/or analog video
signals.
accessory system).
In certain embodiments, the media device 300 may syn
chronize with, for example, a remote computing system or
server, e.g., computer 308, to receive media (using either
wireless or wireline communications paths). Wireless sync
ing enables the media device 300 to transmit and receive
media and data without requiring a wired connection. Media
memory which may be used for performing device functions.
For example, memory 420 may include cache, ROM, and/or
RAM. Bus 418 may provide a data transfer path for transfer
ring data to, from, or between at least storage device 404,
memory 420, and processor 402. Coder/decoder (CODEC)
412 may be included to convert digital audio signals into
analog signals for driving the speaker 424 to produce sound
including voice, music, and other like audio. The CODEC
a media player such as an iPod®, iPod® Nano, iPod®
tino, Calif., pocket-sized personal computers such as an
iPAQ® Pocket PC available by Hewlett Packard Inc., of Palo
Alto, Calif. and any other device capable of communicating
wirelessly (with or without the aid of a wireless enabling
mation, and any other suitable data. Storage device 404 may
include one more storage mediums, including for example, a
hard-drive, permanent memory such as ROM, semi-perma
a media device such as a media player (e.g., MP3 player), a
game player, a remote controller, a portable communication
device, a remote ordering interface, an audio tour player, or
other suitable media device. The media device 400 may be
battery-operated and highly portable so as to allow a user to
listen to music, play games or video, record video or take
pictures, communicate with others, and/or control other
65
devices. In addition, the media device 400 may be sized such
that it ?ts relatively easily into a pocket or hand of the user. By
being handheld, the media device 400 (or media devices 100,
US 8,452,228 B2
7
8
200, and 300) is relatively small and easily handled and
which wireless access channels are grouped into geographi
utilized by its user and thus may be taken practically any
cally-located cells and sectors. The size of each cell depends
where the user travels.
The media device 400 may employ a location sensor 430 to
on the output power of the network base station (BS) trans
ceiver, e.g., BS 602, associated with each cellular tower 532
enable the media device to determine its geographic location
in support of location-based services and other services. The
location sensor 430 may include a global position system
and cell. Each access channel uses a certain frequency band in
one geographic cell that is re-used in another cell, geographi
cally separated from the ?rst cell, by another access channel
where the likelihood of interference is minimized.
(GPS) receiver. The location sensor 430 may include one or
more radio receivers that perform radio doppler and/ or trian
These networks also use a centralized switch or server such
gulation sensing to determine the media device 400 location.
as the mobile switching center (MSC) 604 to enable a wire
less device to move from cell to cell while maintaining a
In certain embodiments, the location sensor 430 may be inte
grated with the communications circuitry 422. In one
embodiment, the location sensor 430 may include a data
persistent data connection. In the United States, cellular and
Personal Communications Service (PCS) networks operate in
decoder such as decoder 434 that decodes a source identi?er
the licensed commercial 800-900 Mhz and 1900-2100 Mhz
broadcast by a radio source (e.g., radio station identi?er or
ranges. Access data channels, however, may be bandwidth
cellular network system identi?er (SID)).
limited to 30 khz, 200 khz, or 1.24 Mhz depending on the
wireless air interface standard used.
FIG. 5 shows a diagram of a media distribution system 500
according to an illustrative embodiment of the invention. The
media distribution system 500 includes a media device 502, a
broadcast radio station 504, a broadcast radio station 524, a
20
public land mobile network (PLMN) 530, a PLMN 542, an
access point (AP) 540, and AP 504, a data network 510, a
public switched telephone network (PSTN) 552, and a clear
inghouse server 516. The network 510 may include the Inter
net. The radio station 504 may include a radio station tower
PLMN networks primarily provide voice communications
while also providing relatively low rate data communications
(e.g., 9.6-140 kbps). PLMN networks such as the Global
System for Mobile Communications (GSM) and cdma 2000
provide a Short Message Service (SMS) that enables tele
phone users to send relatively short, e.g., about 160 bytes,
messages to other cellular telephones or to traditional elec
25
tronic mail (e-mail) accounts within land-based IP networks.
A Short Message Server Center (SMSC) 606 typically
520 that facilitates the broadcast of a broadcast radio signal
522 to a plurality of media devices including media device
502. Also, the radio station 524 may include a radio station
coordinates with the MSC 604 to distribute SMS messages to
tower 526 that facilitates the broadcast of a broadcast radio
may also interface with a wireless data server 608 to send
signal 528 to a plurality of media devices including media
cellular telephones and/or media devices 502. The SMSC
30
device 502.
The broadcast radio signal may be, without limitation,
frequency modulated (PM) or amplitude modulated (AM).
The interfaces 522 and 528 may operate in an AM frequency
band of about 500- l 500 kHz. The interfaces 522 and 528 may
operate in an FM and/ or television frequency band of about
54-1600 MHZ. The interfaces 522 and 528 may operate in any
number of frequency bands such as, for example, a satellite
frequency band. The radio station 504 may be associated with
SMS messages with destination addresses, e.g., e-mail
addresses, external to the PLMN 600. The SMSC may
include a mail server and/or other functionality to convert
SMS messages to the proper e-mail format if necessary. Alter
35
natively, the wireless data server may include a mail server
such as a POP and/or Exchange server to facilitate the deliv
a radio station server 506 that includes a database 508 for 40
ery of e-mail messages to and from the PLMN 600.
SMS messages may be transmitted over the air interface
536 via the traf?c and/or control channels of the PLMN 600
network. While SMS messages are typically limited to about
160 bytes in length, longer text messages may be sent to or
received by a media device 502. This may be performed by
breaking a larger message into multiple SMS messages for
storing media and/ or media data. The radio station 524 may
be associated with a radio station server 512 that includes a
delivery and then reassembling the multiple SMS messages
into the original message upon receipt. Multimedia message
services (MMS) may also be employed having messages that
include text, video, pictures, and audio.
database 514 for storing media and/or media data.
The PLMNs 530 and 542 may include a cellular telephone
network. The PLMNs 530 and 542 may utilize a plurality of
cellular radio towers 532, 538, 544, and 548 respectively. The
media device 502 may exchange data and other communica
Recently, PLMN providers have launched higher band
width data networks such as cdma2000 Evolution Data Only
tions with the PLMN 530 and/or 542 via a wireless commu
nications channel 536 and/ or 546 respectively. The media
device 502 may exchange data and other communications
with the AP 540 and/or AP 504 via a wireless communica
(EVDO) networks that provide up to 2 Mbps and Third Gen
50
300 kbps data rates. These higher rate data services may
employ point-to-point (PPP), simple IP and/or mobile IP
tions channel 534 and 550 respectively. The clearinghouse
media data server 516 may include a database 518 for storing
media and/or media data.
FIG. 6 shows a diagram of a public land mobile network
(PLMN) 600 according to an illustrative embodiment of the
(MIP) protocols to more ef?ciently interface with traditional
IP networks such as network 510 and/or the Internet. The
55
facilitate data communications with an external data network
such as the network 510.
60
wireless communications networks. These networks may
also provide data communications services such as Evolu
the Internet. Thus, media device 502 may employ any of the
applications and features of a standard workstation and/or
(GPRS), wireless application protocol (WAP), cellular digital
PLMN networks are generally referred to as cellular net
works because they employ a frequency re-use architecture in
Using circuit-switched and/or packet-switched data ser
vices, the PLMN 600, 530, and 542 enable a media device 502
to act like a network interface to another data network such as
tion-data only (EV-DO), General Packet Radio Service
packet data (CDPD), and like wireless data services.
wireless data server 608 may function as a cdma2000 and/or
GPRS Packet Data Server Node (PDSN), MIP Home Agent,
MIP Foreign agent, wireless data gateway, and like systems to
invention. A PLMN may include a wireless telecommunica
tions network and/or a cellular telephone network such as a
Global System for Mobile communications (GSM),
cdma2000 system, ANSI-136 TDMA system, LTE, and like
eration GSM (3GSM) networks that provide approximately
65
home personal computer, subject to the processing speed,
power, and memory constraints of a compact and mobile
device. For example, the media device 502 may utilize a
US 8,452,228 B2
9
10
WWW browser employing HTML, WML, XML, and like
media and/or media data. A clearinghouse server 516 may
markup languages to facilitate access to a remote web server,
include one or more data servers and systems that perform a
e.g., server 552, 506, 512, and/or 516, via the network 510.
The media device 502 may utilize certain applications that
network-based service via, for example, the Internet. One
enable the exchange of data with remote data servers con
nected to the network 510. Data may be transported to and
from the network 510 via the wireless data server 608. In
iTunes® music downloading service, made available by
example of a clearinghouse media data server 516 is the
Apple Inc. of Cupertino, Calif. Media data may include meta
data and/or data about or related to media. For example,
these instances, the wireless data server 608 exchanges data
with the BS 602. The BS 602, in turn, transmits data to and/or
media data may include an image such as album cover art
related to a song. Media data may also include information
related to a broadcast source of the media such as the name of
receives data from the media device 502 via one or more data
traf?c channels on the air interface 536 or 546.
FIG. 7 shows a diagram of a wireless access network 700
a radio station playing a song. In certain embodiments, the
media device 502 can retrieve media and/or media data from
a radio station server 506 and/or its associated database 508,
the clearinghouse server 516 and/or its associated database
518, a remote web server 552, and any other data source in
communication with the network 510. The broadcast sources
504 and 524 may utilize the RDS system to provide a limited
amount of information such as a song title, artist name,
64-character text, a station call sign, radio station music cat
including an access point (AP) 540 according to an illustra
tive embodiment of the invention. A wireless access network
may include any wireless network that facilitates communi
cations from one communications device to another or to
another network such as the Internet. Typical wireless access
networks include 802.11, WiFi, WiMAX, Bluetooth, propri
etary wireless LANs, wide area wireless networks, and like
wireless access networks.
20 egories (e.g.,
information.
The wireless access network 700 includes an AP 540, a
wireless LAN (WLAN) 702, router 704, and local area net
work (LAN) 706. The LAN may be connected to network 510
via one or more data networks. The WLAN 702 may be
connected to the PSTN 552 via one or more network inter 25
faces. The AP 540 may connect with one or more media
devices 502. WLAN networks, such as WLAN 702, employ
wireless APs 540 to communicate with multiple wireless
devices, e.g., media device 502, simultaneously via a set of
wireless access channels.
30
While the wireless access network 700 may not support
rock, country, classical, and so on), and other
Radio stations often promote contests or provide other
promotions where listeners are encouraged to call into the
radio station to win prizes. Many radio stations also broadcast
talk shows where listeners are encouraged to call in to the
radio station to participate in the talk show.
One problem with participating in radio broadcast con
tests, talk shows, or listener-participant broadcasts, is that
listeners are typically given a relatively small amount of time
to call into the show. Alternatively, the listener must call at a
particular time, in a particular sequence, and/or be at a par
SMS messaging as with the PLMN 600, the wireless access
ticular point in a queue of callers (e.g., the ?fth caller). Even
network 700 is capable of supporting relatively high data rate
when the radio station announces its telephone number, a
communications between a media device 502 and the net
work 510. Furthermore, the wireless access network 700 can
35
support higher layer protocols such as TCP/IP, HTTP, and
UDP, which enable the use of a web browser and other appli
cations at the media device 502.
Returning to FIG. 5, in operation, the media device 502
may move from one geographic location in the vicinity of
certain wireless communications infrastructure elements to
40
another geographic location in the vicinity of other wireless
communications infrastructure elements. For example, FIG.
gram to use a convenient mechanism to acquire the broadcast
source contact information and initiate a communication with
the broadcast source.
FIG. 8 is a diagram of a computer processing environment
including various functions running within a media device
800 according to an illustrative embodiment of the invention.
5 refers to media device 502 as media device 502a while the
device is in the vicinity of radio station 504, but then refers to
listener must typically ?nd his telephone and then dial the
number. This process can be inconvenient, time-consuming,
and even dangerous, depending on the current activity of the
user. Thus, the present invention addresses this problem by
advantageously enabling a listener of a broadcast media pro
media device 502 as media device 5021) when the device is in
The media device 800 may include a media source contact
data retriever application 802 and a media source contactor
the vicinity of radio station 524. In other embodiments, the
application 804.
terms 502a and 5021) can refer to different media devices.
As discussed previously, a media device 502 may include a
the media device 502 to receive media from a plurality of
In one embodiment, the media device 800 and/or 502
includes a broadcast receiver that receives broadcast media
from a plurality of broadcast sources 504 and 524 where the
broadcast receiver is tunable to a ?rst broadcast source, e.g.,
radio stations, e.g., radio station 504, within its vicinity. The
radio station 504. In certain embodiments, the media device
broadcast radio receiver, e.g., radio receiver 432, that enables
media device 502 may include the capability to enable a user
to con?gure a set of favorite radio stations and/or radio station
frequencies so that the user can conveniently tune the broad
cast radio receiver 432 to a favorite radio station.
45
50
800 includes a data retriever application 802 that controls a
transceiver such that the transceiver requests and retrieves
55 one or more contact identi?ers from a media server 516.
Alternatively, the media device 800 may receive one or more
In addition to the radio receiver 432, the media device 502
contact identi?ers from broadcast media data, e.g., RDS data,
associated with broadcast media. The media device 800 may
may include a data transceiver as part of its communications
circuitry 422 to facilitate the exchange of data with a PLMN,
e.g., PLMN 530, a wireless access network, e.g., via AP 540,
also receive one or more contact identi?ers from a user via the
60
or another like wireless data network. In certain embodi
ments, the media device 502 may utilize a data transceiver to
supplement broadcast media and/ or media data received from
identi?ers where each contact identi?er is associated with a
a radio station such as radio stations 504 and 524. In one
embodiment, the media device 502 is capable of querying a
clearinghouse media data server 516 via a wireless data net
work (e.g., PLMN or wireless access network) to obtain
user interface such as user interface 406. The media device
800 may include a data store 900 that stores a list of contact
65
broadcast source 902, 904, and 906.
FIG. 9 includes a database and/or list 900 of broadcast
source contact information 908, 910, and 912 that is associ
ated with broadcast sources 902, 904, and 906, respectively,
according to an illustrative embodiment of the invention. The
US 8,452,228 B2
11
12
contact information may include one or more contact identi
that: i) requests and receives a contact identi?er 908 associ
?ers such as, without limitation, a telephone number, an IP
ated with the broadcast source 504 via a communications
address, a domain name, a URL, and/ or electronic address of
an entity. In one embodiment, a portion of the database 900 is
network, e. g., network 510, from a media server 516, and ii)
sends a connection request including the contact identi?er
located remotely at, for example, media server 516. In
another embodiment, the database 900 is included within the
908 associated with the broadcast source 504 to establish a
communications connection with the broadcast source 504,
e.g., at server 506, via the communications network 510. The
communications connection may include a circuit-switched
media device 800, and is periodically updated with informa
tion from a remote server such as media server 516.
The media device 800 may include a user interface that
provides a prompt to a user to enable the user to initiate
and/or packet-switched connection.
contact with a ?rst broadcast source, e.g., radio station 504.
contact with a broadcast source 504 from a media device 502.
The user interface may provide the prompt when the media
device 800 is tuned to the broadcast source 504. The user
interface may then receive a user indication to initiate contact
with the ?rst broadcast source 504. The media device 800
may include a media source contactor application 804 that
First, the media device 502 receives broadcast media from a
plurality of broadcast sources, e.g., radio stations 504 and 524
using a broadcast receiver where the broadcast receiver is
tunable to a ?rst broadcast source 504 (Step 1002). Then, the
media device stores a list of contact identi?ers 908, 910, and
controls the operation of the transceiver. The transceiver may
initiate contact with the ?rst broadcast source 504 by sending
plurality of broadcast sources 902, 904, and 906 (Step 1004).
FIG. 10 is a ?ow diagram of a process 1000 for initiating
912 where each contact identi?er is associated with one of the
a communications session request via a communications net
work, e.g., PLMN 530, to the ?rst broadcast source 504 that
includes a contact identi?er 908 associated with the ?rst
20
source 504 (Step 1006). The media device 502 then receives
a user indication to initiate contact with the ?rst broadcast
broadcast source 902 or 504.
The transceiver, e.g., communications circuitry 422, can
continuously initiate the contact, e.g., continuously call a
speci?ed telephone number of the broadcast source 504, until
source 504 (Step 1008). Then, the media device 502 initiates
25
the media device 800 is connected at a desired and/or
requested time or calling event, e. g., when connecting as the
tenth caller to the radio station 504.
At least one contact identi?er 908 may be provided by the
user to the data store 900 via the user interface, e.g., user 30
interface 406. The broadcast receiver, e.g., radio receiver 432,
may receive broadcast media data where the broadcast media
contact with the ?rst broadcast source 504 by sending a com
munications session request to the ?rst broadcast source 504
including a contact identi?er 908 associated with the ?rst
broadcast source 504 and/or 902 (Step 1010).
Persons skilled in the art will appreciate that the various
con?gurations described herein may be combined without
departing from the present invention. It will also be recog
nized that the invention may take many forms other than those
disclosed in this speci?cation. Accordingly, it is emphasized
data includes at least one contact identi?er 908, e.g., via RDS
data, that is then provided to the data store 900.
In certain embodiments, the media device 800 includes a
The media device 502 or 800 provides a prompt to a user to
enable the user to initiate contact with the ?rst broadcast
35
that the invention is not limited to the disclosed methods,
systems and apparatuses, but is intended to include variations
to and modi?cations thereof which are within the spirit of the
following claims.
transceiver that: i) sends a query to a media data server 516 for
at least one contact identi?er 908 associated with the ?rst
broadcast source 504, ii) retrieves at least one contact identi
server 516, a web server 552, and/ or a broadcast source server
What is claimed is:
1. A media device comprising:
a broadcast receiver for receiving broadcast media and
associated broadcast media data from a plurality of
broadcast sources, the broadcast receiver being tunable
506.
The user interface 406 may include a display, a keypad, a
a data store for storing a list of contact identi?ers, each
?er 908 via a data network 530, 540, and/or 510, and iii)
provides at least one contact identi?er 908 to the data store
900. The media data server may include a clearinghouse
touch screen, clickwheel, touch pad, speaker, and/or micro
40
to a ?rst broadcast source,
45
phone. The prompt to a user may include an icon, display
button, image, visual indicator, audio indicator, vibration, and
a user interface for: i) providing a prompt to a user to enable
the user to initiate contact with the ?rst broadcast source,
the like. The broadcast source 504 may include a radio sta
tion, television station, satellite source, and the like.
In one embodiment, the broadcast media data may include
an IP address, domain name, and/or URL which the media
50
device 800 uses to retrieve the contact identi?er 908 from a
media server 516. The media device 800 may retrieve the
contact identi?er 908 from the clearinghouse server 516, web
server 552, and/ or broadcast source server 506.
with the ?rst broadcast source, wherein the media device
uses at least a portion of the received broadcast media
data associated with the received broadcast media from
the ?rst broadcast source to retrieve the ?rst contact
movement of the media device 800. In one embodiment, the
media device 800 is tunable to a frequency setting associated
identi?er from a media server.
with a broadcast source. The media may include a video, an 60
image, audio, audio ?le, a song, music, multimedia, movie,
source 504. The media device 800 also includes a transceiver
and ii) receiving a user indication to initiate contact with
the ?rst broadcast source, and
a transceiver for initiating the contact with the ?rst broad
cast source by sending a communications session
request via a communications network to the ?rst broad
cast source including a ?rst contact identi?er associated
55
The user indication may include clicking an icon, depress
ing a button, saying a phrase or word, and/or performing a
and/or television data. The communications network may
include the PSTN 552, a wireless data network 540, a data
network 530 and/ or 510, and/or the Internet.
In another embodiment, the media device 800 includes a
broadcast receiver 432 that receives media from a broadcast
contact identi?er being associated with one of the plu
rality of broadcast sources,
2. The device of claim 1, wherein at least one contact
identi?er is provided by the user to the data store via the user
interface.
3. The device of claim 1, wherein the broadcast media data
includes at least one contact identi?er.
65
4. The device of claim 3, wherein the at least one contact
identi?er is provided via the received media data to the data
store.
US 8,452,228 B2
14
13
initiating the contact with the ?rst broadcast source by
sending a communications session request from the
media device to the ?rst broadcast source including the
retrieved ?rst contact identi?er associated with the ?rst
5. The device of claim 1, wherein the transceiver is oper
able for: i) sending a query to the media data server via a data
network for the ?rst contact identi?er associated with the ?rst
broadcast source, ii) retrieving the ?rst contact identi?er via
the data network, and iii) providing the ?rst contact identi?er
m
broadcast source.
11. The method of claim 10, wherein at least one contact
identi?er is provided by the user to the data store via the user
interface.
to the data store.
6. The device of claim 1, wherein the user interface
includes at least one of a display, a keypad, a touch screen, a
12. The method of claim 10, wherein the broadcast media
clickwheel, a touch pad, a speaker, and a microphone.
7. The device of claim 1, wherein the ?rst broadcast source
data includes at least one contact identi?er.
13. The method of claim 12, wherein the at least one
contact identi?er is provided via the received broadcast media
includes a radio station.
data to the data store.
8. The device of claim 1, wherein the ?rst contact identi?er
includes at least one of a telephone number, an IP address, a
domain name, and a URL.
14. The method of claim 10 comprising:
i) sending a query from the media device to the media data
9. The device of claim 1, wherein the at least a portion of
the received broadcast media data comprises at least one of an
IP address, a domain name, and a URL.
10. A method for initiating contact with a broadcast source
from a media device comprising:
ii) retrieving at the media device the ?rst contact identi?er
server for the ?rst contact identi?er associated with the
?rst broadcast source,
via a data network, and
iii) providing the retrieved ?rst contact identi?er to the data
20
receiving broadcast media and associated broadcast media
data from a plurality of broadcast sources using a broad
and receiving a user indication are via a user interface of the
cast receiver of the media device, the broadcast receiver
being tunable to a ?rst broadcast source,
storing a list of contact identi?ers in a data store of the
media device, the user interface including at least one of a
display, a keypad, a touch screen, a clickwheel, a touch pad, a
25
media device, each contact identi?er being associated
with one of the plurality of broadcast sources,
providing a prompt with the media device to a user to
enable the user to initiate contact with the ?rst broadcast
source,
receiving a user indication with the media device to initiate
contact with the ?rst broadcast source,
using at least a portion of the broadcast media data received
from the ?rst broadcast source to retrieve with the media
device a ?rst contact identi?er from a media server, and
store.
15. The method of claim 10, wherein providing a prompt
speaker, and a microphone.
16. The method of claim 10, wherein the ?rst broadcast
source includes a radio station.
17. The method of claim 10, wherein the ?rst contact
30
identi?er includes at least one of a telephone number, an IP
address, a domain name, and a URL.
18. The method of claim 10, wherein the at least a portion
of broadcast media data comprises at least one of an IP
address, a domain name, and a URL.
*
*
*
*
*
Download PDF