Programmable Controllers PROGRAMMING MANUAL

Programmable Controllers PROGRAMMING MANUAL
Cat.No. W353-E1-3
SYSMAC
CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(–V2)
Programmable Controllers
PROGRAMMING MANUAL
CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2)
Programmable Controllers
Programming Manual
Revised February 2001
Notice:
OMRON products are manufactured for use according to proper procedures by a qualified operator
and only for the purposes described in this manual.
The following conventions are used to indicate and classify precautions in this manual. Always heed
the information provided with them. Failure to heed precautions can result in injury to people or damage to property.
DANGER
Indicates an imminently hazardous situation which, if not avoided, will result in death or
serious injury.
! WARNING
Indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in death or
serious injury.
! Caution
Indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided, may result in minor or
moderate injury, or property damage.
!
OMRON Product References
All OMRON products are capitalized in this manual. The word “Unit” is also capitalized when it refers
to an OMRON product, regardless of whether or not it appears in the proper name of the product.
The abbreviation “Ch,” which appears in some displays and on some OMRON products, often means
“word” and is abbreviated “Wd” in documentation in this sense.
The abbreviation “PC” means Programmable Controller and is not used as an abbreviation for anything else.
Visual Aids
The following headings appear in the left column of the manual to help you locate different types of
information.
Note Indicates information of particular interest for efficient and convenient operation
of the product.
1, 2, 3...
1. Indicates lists of one sort or another, such as procedures, checklists, etc.
 OMRON, 1999
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any
form, or by any means, mechanical, electronic, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of OMRON.
No patent liability is assumed with respect to the use of the information contained herein. Moreover, because OMRON is
constantly striving to improve its high-quality products, the information contained in this manual is subject to change
without notice. Every precaution has been taken in the preparation of this manual. Nevertheless, OMRON assumes no
responsibility for errors or omissions. Neither is any liability assumed for damages resulting from the use of the information contained in this publication.
v
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PRECAUTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 Intended Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2 General Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3 Safety Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4 Operating Environment Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5 Application Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SECTION 1
PC Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-1
1-2
1-3
PC Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Basic PC Operation and I/O Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPM2C Changes in SW2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SECTION 2
Special Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-6
2-7
2-8
2-9
2-10
2-11
2-12
2-13
2-14
2-15
2-16
2-17
2-18
2-19
CPM2A/CPM2C Interrupt Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SRM1(-V2) Interrupt Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPM1A Pulse Output Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronized Pulse Control (CPM2A/CPM2C Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Computation Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analog I/O Functions (CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A/CPM2C Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Temperature Sensor Input Functions (CPM1A/CPM2A/CPM2C Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CompoBus/S I/O Slave Functions (CPM1A/CPM2A/CPM2C Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CompoBus/S I/O Master Functions (SRM1(-V2) and CPM2C-S Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analog Controls (CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Quick-response Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Macro Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calculating with Signed Binary Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Differential Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Expansion Instructions (CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2) Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the CPM2A/CPM2C Clock Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SECTION 3
Using Expansion Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
Analog I/O Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Temperature Sensor Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CompoBus/S I/O Link Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DeviceNet I/O Link Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SECTION 4
Communications Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPM1/CPM1A Communications Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SRM1(-V2) Communications Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Host Link Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SECTION 5
Memory Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-1
5-2
5-3
Memory Area Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O Allocation for CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A PCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O Allocation for CPM2C PCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
xiii
xiv
xiv
xiv
xv
xvii
1
2
16
21
25
26
42
73
91
94
128
131
143
144
144
144
145
147
149
154
155
156
157
160
161
162
189
210
215
221
222
223
227
264
277
303
304
309
319
vii
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION 6
Ladder-diagram Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-1
6-2
6-3
6-4
6-5
6-6
6-7
Basic Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Instruction Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Basic Ladder Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controlling Bit Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Work Bits (Internal Relays) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programming Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program Execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SECTION 7
Instruction Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-1
7-2
7-3
7-4
7-5
7-6
7-7
7-8
7-9
7-10
7-11
7-12
7-13
7-14
7-15
7-16
7-17
7-18
7-19
7-20
7-21
7-22
7-23
7-24
7-25
7-26
7-27
7-28
7-29
7-30
Notation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Instruction Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Areas, Definer Values, and Flags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Differentiated Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Coding Right-hand Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Instruction Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ladder Diagram Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bit Control Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NO OPERATION – NOP(00) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
END – END(01) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
INTERLOCK and INTERLOCK CLEAR – IL(02) and ILC(03) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
JUMP and JUMP END – JMP(04) and JME(05) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User Error Instructions:
FAILURE ALARM AND RESET – FAL(06) and
SEVERE FAILURE ALARM – FALS(07) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step Instructions:
STEP DEFINE and STEP START–STEP(08)/SNXT(09) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Timer and Counter Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shift Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Movement Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Control Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Comparison Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Conversion Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BCD Calculation Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Binary Calculation Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Special Math Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Logic Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Increment/Decrement Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Subroutine Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pulse Output Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Special Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interrupt Control Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Communications Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SECTION 8
PC Operations and Processing Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-1
8-2
8-3
viii
CPM1/CPM1A Cycle Time and I/O Response Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPM2A/CPM2C Cycle Time and I/O Response Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SRM1(-V2) Cycle Time and I/O Response Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
329
330
330
331
350
352
354
356
357
360
360
360
362
363
366
372
373
377
377
377
379
381
381
384
400
407
417
428
435
453
463
467
475
479
480
483
493
497
501
507
508
519
533
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION 9
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-1
9-2
9-3
9-4
9-5
9-6
9-7
9-8
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programming Console Operation Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programming Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User-defined Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operating Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Host Link Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting Flowcharts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
545
546
546
547
548
549
551
553
553
Appendices
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
Programming Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error and Arithmetic Flag Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Memory Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O Assignment Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program Coding Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
List of FAL Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Extended ASCII . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Revision History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
555
561
565
583
585
589
591
593
599
ix
About this Manual:
This manual provides information on programming the CPM1, CPM1A, CPM2A, CPM2C (including the
CPM2C-S), and SRM1 (-V2) PCs. The following manuals describe the system configurations and installation of the PCs and provide a basic explanation of operating procedures for the Programming Consoles.
They also introduces the capabilities of the SYSMAC Support Software (SSS) and SYSMAC-CPT Support Software. Read the relevant manual first to acquaint yourself with the PC.
Manual
Note
Catalog No.
CPM1 Operation Manual
W262
CPM1A Operation Manual
W317
CPM2A Operation Manual
W352
CPM2C Operation Manual
W356
CPM2C-S Operation Manual
W377
SRM1(-V2) Operation Manual
W318
1. Version 2 (-V2) of the SRM1 is included beginning with following revision of the manual:
W318-E1-3.
2. Refer to sections on the CPM2C for information on CPM2C instructions and Expansion
Units.
The SYSMAC Support Software Operation Manuals: Basics and C-series PCs (W247 and W248) provide
descriptions of SSS operations for SYSMAC C-series PCs. The SYSMAC-CPT Support Software Quick
Start Guide (W332) and User Manual (W333), as well as the CX-Programmer User Manual (W361) and
CX-Server User Manual (362) provide descriptions of ladder diagram operations in the Windows environment.
Please read this manual carefully and be sure you understand the information provide before attempting
to program or operate the PC.
Section 1 explains the PC Setup. The PC Setup can be used to control the operating parameters.
Section 2 explains special features of the PC.
Section 3 describes how to use the CPM1A-MAD01 and CPM2C-MAD11 Analog I/O Units, the CPM1ATS and CPM2C-TS Temperature Sensor Units, and the CPM1A-SRT21 and CPM2C-SRT21
CompoBus/S I/O Link Units.
Section 4 describes how to use the communications functions provided in the PCs.
Section 5 describes the structure of the PC memory areas and explains how to use them. Details of some
areas are provided in Appendix C.
Section 6 explains the basic steps and concepts involved in writing a basic ladder diagram program. It
introduces the instructions that are used to build the basic structure of the ladder diagram and control its
execution.
Section 7 explains instructions individually and provides the ladder diagram symbol, data areas, and
flags used with each.
Section 8 explains the internal PC processing, as well as the time required for processing and execution.
Section 9 describes how to diagnose and correct hardware and software errors that can occur during
operation.
Various Appendices are also provided for easy reference. Refer to the table of contents for a list of appendices.
! WARNING Failure to read and understand the information provided in this manual may result in
personal injury or death, damage to the product, or product failure. Please read each
section in its entirety and be sure you understand the information provided in the section
and related sections before attempting any of the procedures or operations given.
xi
PRECAUTIONS
This section provides general precautions for using the Programmable Controller (PC) and related devices.
The information contained in this section is important for the safe and reliable application of the Programmable Controller. You must read this section and understand the information contained before attempting to set up or operate a
PC system.
1 Intended Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2 General Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3 Safety Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4 Operating Environment Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5 Application Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
xiv
xiv
xiv
xv
xvii
xiii
3
Safety Precautions
1
Intended Audience
This manual is intended for the following personnel, who must also have knowledge of electrical systems (an electrical engineer or the equivalent).
• Personnel in charge of installing FA systems.
• Personnel in charge of designing FA systems.
• Personnel in charge of managing FA systems and facilities.
2
General Precautions
The user must operate the product according to the performance specifications
described in the operation manuals.
Before using the product under conditions which are not described in the manual
or applying the product to nuclear control systems, railroad systems, aviation
systems, vehicles, combustion systems, medical equipment, amusement machines, safety equipment, and other systems, machines, and equipment that
may have a serious influence on lives and property if used improperly, consult
your OMRON representative.
Make sure that the ratings and performance characteristics of the product are
sufficient for the systems, machines, and equipment, and be sure to provide the
systems, machines, and equipment with double safety mechanisms.
This manual provides information for programming and operating the Unit. Be
sure to read this manual before attempting to use the Unit and keep this manual
close at hand for reference during operation.
! WARNING It is extremely important that a PC and all PC Units be used for the specified
purpose and under the specified conditions, especially in applications that can
directly or indirectly affect human life. You must consult with your OMRON
representative before applying a PC System to the above-mentioned
applications.
3
Safety Precautions
! WARNING Do not attempt to take any Unit apart while the power is being supplied. Doing so
may result in electric shock.
! WARNING Do not attempt to disassemble, repair, or modify any Units. Any attempt to do so
may result in malfunction, fire, or electric shock.
! WARNING Always turn OFF the power supply to the PC before attempting any of the
following. Not turning OFF the power supply may result in malfunction or electric
shock.
• Assembling the Units.
• Mounting or dismounting I/O Units, CPU Units, or any other Units.
• Connecting or wiring the cables.
• Connecting or disconnecting the connectors.
• Setting DIP switches.
• Replacing the battery
! WARNING Do not touch any of the terminals or terminal blocks while the power is being
supplied. Doing so may result in electric shock.
xiv
Operating Environment Precautions
4
! WARNING Always ground the system to 100 Ω or less when installing the Units. Not
connecting to a ground of 100 Ω or less may result in electric shock.
! WARNING Provide safety measures in external circuits (i.e., not in the Programmable
Controller), including the following items, to ensure safety in the system if an
abnormality occurs due to malfunction of the PC or another external factor
affecting the PC operation. Not doing so may result in serious accidents.
• Emergency stop circuits, interlock circuits, limit circuits, and similar safety
measures must be provided in external control circuits.
• The PC will turn OFF all outputs when its self-diagnosis function detects any
error or when a severe failure alarm (FALS) instruction is executed. As a countermeasure for such errors, external safety measures must be provided to ensure safety in the system.
• The PC outputs may remain ON or OFF due to deposition or burning of the
output relays or destruction of the output transistors. As a countermeasure for
such problems, external safety measures must be provided to ensure safety in
the system.
• When the 24-VDC output (service power supply to the PC) is overloaded or
short-circuited, the voltage may drop and result in the outputs being turned
OFF. As a countermeasure for such problems, external safety measures must
be provided to ensure safety in the system.
! WARNING When handling the Memory Backup Battery, never drop, disassemble, distort,
short-circuit, recharge, heat to a temperature exceeding 100°C, or throw into
fire. The Battery may explode, catch fire, or leak fluid if mishandled in any of
these ways.
4
! Caution
Execute online edit only after confirming that no adverse effects will be caused
by extending the cycle time. Otherwise, input signals may not be readable.
! Caution
When transferring programs to other nodes, or when making changes to I/O
memory, confirm the safety of the destination node before transfer. Not doing so
may result in injury.
! Caution
Tighten the screws on the terminal block of the AC Power Supply Unit to the
torque specified in the operation manual. The loose screws may result in fire or
malfunction.
Operating Environment Precautions
! Caution
Do not operate the control system in the following places:
• Locations subject to direct sunlight.
• Locations subject to temperatures or humidity outside the range specified in
the specifications.
• Locations subject to condensation as the result of severe changes in temperature.
• Locations subject to corrosive or flammable gases.
• Locations subject to dust (especially iron dust) or salts.
• Locations subject to exposure to water, oil, or chemicals.
xv
Operating Environment Precautions
4
• Locations subject to shock or vibration.
! Caution
Take appropriate and sufficient countermeasures when installing systems in the
following locations:
• Locations subject to static electricity or other forms of noise.
• Locations subject to strong electromagnetic fields.
• Locations subject to possible exposure to radioactivity.
• Locations close to power supplies.
! Caution
xvi
The operating environment of the PC System can have a large effect on the longevity and reliability of the system. Improper operating environments can lead to
malfunction, failure, and other unforeseeable problems with the PC System. Be
sure that the operating environment is within the specified conditions at installation and remains within the specified conditions during the life of the system.
5
Application Precautions
5
Application Precautions
Observe the following precautions when using the PC System.
! Caution
Failure to abide by the following precautions could lead to faulty operation of the
PC or the system, or could damage the PC or PC Units. Always heed these precautions.
Designing Circuits or Creating Ladder Programs
• Fail-safe measures must be taken by the customer to ensure safety in the
event of incorrect, missing, or abnormal signals caused by broken signal lines,
momentary power interruptions, or other causes.
• Construct a control circuit so that power supply for the I/O circuits does not
come ON before power supply for the Unit. If power supply for the I/O circuits
comes ON before power supply for the Unit, normal operation may be temporarily interrupted.
• If the operating mode is changed from RUN or MONITOR mode to PROGRAM
mode, with the IOM Hold Bit ON, the output will hold the most recent status. In
such a case, ensure that the external load does not exceed specifications. (If
operation is stopped because of an operating error, including errors generated
by FALS instructions, the values in the internal memory of the CPU Unit will be
saved, but the outputs will all turn OFF.)
• For models with only the super-capacitor installed, the contents of the READ/
WRITE enable area of the DM area, HR area, AR area, and CNT data area
may be damaged if the power is turned OFF for a long time. To prevent such
damage, provide ladder program that will check AR 1314 to ensure proper operation of the system.
• The life of relays largely varies depending on switching conditions. Be sure to
test operating conditions using actual Units and use the product within the specified number of switchings so as not to cause any performance problems. Using the product with performance problems may result in defective insulation
between circuits or burning of the relays.
Installation
Wiring and Connection
• Install the Units properly as specified in the relevant operation manual(s). Improper installation of the Units may result in malfunction.
• Do not install the PC or PC Units in places where the Units may be affected by
excessive noise. Doing so may result in malfunction.
• Install the Units properly so that they will not fall off.
• Be sure that all the mounting screws, terminal screws, and cable connector
screws are tightened to the torque specified in the relevant manuals. Incorrect
tightening torque may result in malfunction.
• Install the Expansion I/O Unit connector cover to the last Expansion I/O Unit to
prevent dust or foreign matter from entering inside the Unit. Not doing so may
result in malfunction.
• Be sure that the terminal blocks, expansion cables, and other items with locking devices are properly locked into place. Improper locking may result in malfunction.
• Be sure to use cables as specified in the relevant manual(s).
• Install external breakers and take other safety measures against short-circuiting in external wiring. Insufficient safety measures against short-circuiting may
result in burning.
• When wiring signal lines, do not place them in the same duct as high-voltage
lines or power lines. Doing so may result in malfunction.
xvii
5
Application Precautions
• Be sure that terminal blocks and connectors are connected in the specified
direction with the correct polarity. Not doing so may result in malfunction.
• Leave the labels attached CPM1 or CPM2A Units when wiring to prevent wiring cuttings from entering the Units.
• Attach the labels supplied with CPM1A or CPM2C Units or provide other protective covers when wiring to prevent dust or wiring cuttings from entering the
Units.
• Remove the labels after the completion of wiring to ensure proper heat dissipation. Leaving the labels attached may result in malfunction.
• Use the connectors and wiring materials specified in the relevant manual(s).
• Be sure to wire according to the relevant manual(s). Incorrect wiring may result
in burning.
I/O Connection and System Startup
• Disconnect the functional ground terminal when performing withstand voltage
tests.
• Always use the power supply voltages specified in the operation manual(s). An
incorrect voltage may result in malfunction or burning.
• Take appropriate measures to ensure that the specified power with the rated
voltage and frequency is supplied. Be particularly careful in places where the
power supply is unstable.
• Do not apply voltages to the input terminals in excess of the rated input voltage.
Excess voltages may result in burning.
• Do not apply voltages or connect loads to the output terminals in excess of the
maximum switching capacity. Excess voltage or loads may result in burning.
• Double-check all wiring and switch settings before turning ON the power supply. Incorrect wiring may result in burning.
• Check the user program for proper execution before actually running it on the
Unit. Not checking the program may result in an unexpected operation.
Handling Precautions
xviii
• When using, storing, or transporting the product, keep within the specifications
listed in the relevant manual(s).
• Confirm that no adverse effect will occur in the system before attempting any of
the following. Not doing so may result in an unexpected operation.
• Changing the operating mode of the PC.
• Force-setting/force-resetting any bit in memory.
• Changing the present value of any word or any set value in memory.
• Before touching a Unit, be sure to first touch a grounded metallic object to discharge any static built-up. Not doing so may result in malfunction or damage.
• Do not touch the Expansion I/O Unit Connecting Cable while the power is being supplied to prevent any malfunction due to static electricity.
• Do not pull on the cables or bend the cables beyond their natural limit. Doing
either of these may break the cables.
• Do not place objects on top of the cables. Doing so may break the cables.
• When disposing of Units or other products, be sure to do so according to local
laws and regulations.
• When using a Temperature Sensor Unit with a thermocouple input
(CPM1A-TS001/002, CPM2C-TS001), observe the following precautions:
• With the CPM1A-TS001/002, do not remove the cold junction compensator attached at the time of delivery. If the cold junction compensator is
removed the Unit will not be able to measure temperatures correctly.
5
Application Precautions
• With the CPM1A-TS001/002, each of the input circuits is calibrated with
the cold junction compensator attached to the Unit. If the Unit is used with
the cold junction compensator from other Units, the Unit will not be able to
measure temperatures correctly.
• With the CPM1A-TS001/002 or the CPM2C-TS001, do not touch the cold
junction compensator. Doing so may result in incorrect temperature measurement.
Maintenance
• When replacing a part, be sure to confirm that the rating of a new part is correct.
Not doing so may result in malfunction or burning.
• When the CPU Unit is replaced, resume operation only after transferring to the
new CPU Unit the contents of the DM and HR Areas required for operation. Not
doing so may result in an unexpected operation.
Transportation and Storage
• When transporting the Units, use special packing boxes. Do not subject the
Units or other products to excessive vibration or shock during transportation
and do not to drop them.
• Store the Units within the following temperature and humidity ranges:
Storage temperature: -25 to 65°C
Storage humidity:
25% to 85% (with no icing or condensation)
xix
SECTION 1
PC Setup
This section explains the PC Setup in the CPM1, CPM1A, CPM2A, CPM2C (including the CPM2C-S), and SRM1(-V2) PCs.
The PC Setup can be used to control the operating parameters. To change the PC Setup, refer to the Operation Manual of the
PC for Programming Console procedures.
Refer to the SSS Operation Manual: C-series PCs for SSS procedures. Refer to the SYSMAC-CPT Support Software Quick
Start Guide (W332) and User Manual (W333) for SYSMAC-CPT Support Software procedures. Refer to the CX-Programmer User Manual (W361) for CX-Programmer procedures.
If you are not familiar with OMRON PCs or ladder diagram program, you can read 1-1 PC Setup as an overview of the operating parameters available for the CPM1/CPM1A, CPM2A/CPM2C, and SRM1(-V2). You may then want to read Section 5
Memory Areas, Section 6 Ladder-diagram Programming, and related instructions in Section 7 Instruction Set before completing this section.
1-1
1-2
1-3
PC Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-1-1 Changing the PC Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-1-2 CPM1/CPM1A PC Setup Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-1-3 CPM2A/CPM2C PC Setup Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-1-4 SRM1(-V2) PC Setup Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Basic PC Operation and I/O Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-2-1 Startup Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-2-2 Hold Bit Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-2-3 Program Memory Write-protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-2-4 RS-232C Port Servicing Time (CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2) Only) . . . . . . . . .
1-2-5 Peripheral Port Servicing Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-2-6 Cycle Monitor Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-2-7 Minimum Cycle Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-2-8 Input Time Constants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-2-9 Error Log Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPM2C Changes in SW2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
2
3
7
13
16
16
17
17
18
18
18
19
19
21
21
1
Section
PC Setup
1-1
1-1
PC Setup
The PC Setup comprises various operating parameters that control PC operation. In order to make the maximum use of PC functionality when using interrupt
processing and communications functions, the PC Setup may be customized
according to operating conditions.
At the time of shipping, the defaults are set for general operating conditions, so
that the PC can be used without having to change the settings. You are, however, advised to check the default values before operation.
Default Values
The default values for the PC Setup are 0000 for all words (except for the low
battery error enable in DM 6655 bits 12 to 15 for CPM2A CPU Units). The default
values can be reset at any time by turning ON SR 25210 in PROGRAM mode.
! Caution
When data memory (DM) is cleared from a Programming Device, the PC Setup
settings will also be cleared to all zeros.
1-1-1 Changing the PC Setup
PC Setup settings are accessed at various times depending on the setting, as
described below.
• DM 6600 to DM 6614: Accessed only when PC’s power supply is turned
ON.
• DM 6615 to DM 6644: Accessed only when program execution begins.
• DM 6645 to DM 6655: Accessed regularly when the power is ON.
Since changes in the PC Setup become effective only at the times given above,
the PC will have to be restarted to make changes in DM 6600 to DM 6614 effective, and program execution will have to be restarted to make changes in
DM 6615 to DM 6644 effective.
When DM 6602 bits 00 to 03 are set to protect the program memory, DM 6602
cannot be changed using the PC Setup operation of the Support Software. To
change DM 6602, use the I/O Monitor or DM Edit operation.
Making Changes from a
Programming Device
The PC Setup can be read, but not overwritten, from the user program. Writing
can be done only by using a Programming Device.
Although the PC Setup is stored in DM 6600 to DM 6655, settings can be made
and changed only from a Programming Device (e.g., SSS, or Programming
Console). DM 6600 to DM 6644 can be set or changed only while in PROGRAM
mode. DM 6645 to DM 6655 can be set or changed while in either PROGRAM
mode or MONITOR mode. The cycle time will be rather long when the PC Setup
is changed in MONITOR mode.
The following settings can be made in PROGRAM mode from the SSS using
menu operations. All other settings must be made using the hexadecimal setting
operation.
• Startup Mode (DM 6600)
• I/O Hold Bit Status and Forced Status Hold Bit Status (DM 6601)
• Cycle Monitor Time (DM 6618)
• Cycle Time (DM 6619)
• RS-232C Port Settings (DM 6645 to DM 6649)
Note The RS-232C Port Settings (DM 6645 to DM 6649) are not used in
CPM1/CPM1A PCs because these PCs aren’t equipped with an RS-232C port.
Errors in the PC Setup
2
If an incorrect PC Setup setting is accessed, a non-fatal error (error code 9B) will
be generated, the corresponding error flag (AR 1300 to AR 1302) will be turned
ON, and the default setting will be used instead of the incorrect setting.
Section
PC Setup
1-1
1-1-2 CPM1/CPM1A PC Setup Settings
The PC Setup is broadly divided into four categories: 1) Settings related to basic
PC operation and I/O processes, 2) Settings related to the cycle time, 3) Settings
related to interrupts, and 4) Settings related to communications. This section will
explain the settings according to these classifications.
The following table shows the settings for CPM1/CPM1A PCs in order. Refer to
the page number in the last column for more details on that setting.
Word(s)
Bit(s)
Function
Page
Startup Processing (DM 6600 to DM 6614)
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC only after the PC is restarted.
DM 6600
00 to 07 Startup mode (effective when bits 08 to 15 are set to 02).
00: PROGRAM; 01: MONITOR 02: RUN
08 to 15 Startup mode designation
00: According to communications port setting switch and peripheral port connection
(See table at the bottom of this page.)
01: Continue operating mode last used before power was turned OFF.
02: Setting in 00 to 07
DM 6601
00 to 07 Not used.
08 to 11
12 to 15
DM 6602
00 to 03
04 to 07
DM 6603
DM 6604
08 to 15
00 to 15
00 to 07
IOM Hold Bit (SR 25212) Status at Startup
0: Reset; 1: Maintain (See note 3.)
Forced Status Hold Bit (SR 25211) Status at Startup
0: Reset; 1: Maintain (See note 3.)
Program memory write-protection
0: Program memory unprotected
1: Program memory write-protected (except DM 6602 itself)
16
17
17
Programming Console display language
0: English; 1: Japanese
Not used.
Not used.
00: If data could not be saved with the built-in capacitor (AR 1314 ON), a memory error will not
be generated.
01: If data could not be saved with the built-in capacitor (AR 1314 ON), a memory error will be
generated.
Not used.
Not used.
08 to 15
DM 6605 to 00 to 15
DM 6614
Cycle Time Settings (DM 6615 to DM 6619)
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC the next time operation is started.
DM 6615,
00 to 15 Not used.
DM 6616
DM 6617
00 to 07 Servicing time for peripheral port (effective when bits 08 to 15 are set to 01)
00 to 99 (BCD): Percentage of cycle time used to service peripheral.
08 to 15 Peripheral port servicing setting enable
00: 5% of the cycle time
01: Use time in 00 to 07.
DM 6618
00 to 07 Cycle monitor time (effective when bits 08 to 15 are set to 01, 02, or 03)
00 to 99 (BCD): Setting (see 08 to 15)
08 to 15 Cycle monitor enable (Setting in 00 to 07 x unit; 99 s max.)
00: 120 ms (setting in bits 00 to 07 disabled)
01: Setting unit: 10 ms
02: Setting unit: 100 ms
03: Setting unit: 1 s
DM 6619
00 to 15
Cycle time
0000: Variable (no minimum)
0001 to 9999 (BCD): Minimum time in ms
18
18
19
3
Section
PC Setup
Word(s)
Bit(s)
Function
1-1
Page
Interrupt Processing (DM 6620 to DM 6639)
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC the next time operation is started.
DM 6620
00 to 03 Input constant for IR 00000 to IR 00002
0: 8 ms; 1: 1 ms; 2: 2 ms; 3: 4 ms; 4: 8 ms; 5: 16 ms; 6: 32 ms; 7: 64 ms; 8: 128 ms
04 to 07 Input constant for IR 00003 and IR 00004 (Setting same as bits 00 to 03)
08 to 11 Input constant for IR 00005 and IR 00006 (Setting same as bits 00 to 03)
12 to 15 Input constant for IR 00007 to IR 00011 (Setting same as bits 00 to 03)
DM 6621
00 to 07 Input constant for IR 001
00: 8 ms; 01: 1 ms; 02: 2 ms; 03: 4 ms; 04: 8 ms; 05: 16 ms; 06: 32 ms; 07: 64 ms; 08:
128 ms
DM 6622
DM 6623
DM 6624
DM 6625
DM 6626 to
DM 6627
DM 6628
08 to 15
00 to 07
08 to 15
00 to 07
08 to 15
00 to 07
08 to 15
00 to 07
08 to 15
00 to 15
Input constant for IR 002 (Setting same as for IR 001.)
Input constant for IR 003 (Setting same as for IR 001.)
Input constant for IR 004 (Setting same as for IR 001.)
Input constant for IR 005 (Setting same as for IR 001.)
Input constant for IR 006 (Setting same as for IR 001.)
Input constant for IR 007 (Setting same as for IR 001.)
Input constant for IR 008 (Setting same as for IR 001.)
Input constant for IR 009 (Setting same as for IR 001.)
Not used.
Not used.
00 to 03
04 to 07
08 to 11
12 to 15
00 to 15
Interrupt enable for IR 00003 (0: Normal input; 1: Interrupt input; 2: Quick-response)
Interrupt enable for IR 00004 (0: Normal input; 1: Interrupt input; 2: Quick-response)
Interrupt enable for IR 00005 (0: Normal input; 1: Interrupt input; 2: Quick-response)
Interrupt enable for IR 00006 (0: Normal input; 1: Interrupt input; 2: Quick-response)
Not used.
19
74
DM 6629 to
DM 6641
High-speed Counter Settings (DM 6640 to DM 6644)
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC the next time operation is started.
DM 6640 to 00 to 15 Not used.
DM 6641
DM 6642
00 to 03 High-speed counter mode
0: Up/down counter mode; 4: Incrementing counter mode
04 to 07 High-speed counter reset mode
0: Z phase and software reset; 1: Software reset only
08 to 15 High-speed counter enable
00: Don’t use high-speed counter; 01: Use high-speed counter with settings in 00 to 07
DM 6643,
00 to 15 Not used.
DM 6644
4
82
Section
PC Setup
Word(s)
Bit(s)
Function
1-1
Page
Peripheral Port Settings
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC.
DM 6645 to 00 to 15 Not used.
DM 6649
DM 6650
00 to 07 Port settings
00: Standard (1 start bit, 7-bit data, even parity, 2 stop bits, 9,600 bps)
01: Settings in DM 6651
08 to 11
12 to 15
222
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
Link area for 1:1 PC Link via peripheral port:
0: LR 00 to LR 15
Communications mode
0: Host Link; 2: 1:1 PC Link Slave; 3: 1:1 PC Link Master; 4: 1:1 NT Link
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
DM 6651
00 to 07
08 to 15
Baud rate
00: 1.2K, 01: 2.4K, 02: 4.8K, 03: 9.6K, 04: 19.2K, 05 to 07: Cannot be used (see note
2)
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
Frame format
Start
Length
Stop
Parity
00:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
Even
01:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
Odd
02:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
None
03:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bits
Even
04:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bits
Odd
05:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bits
None
06:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
Even
07:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
Odd
08:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
None
09:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bits
Even
10:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bits
Odd
11:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bits
None
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
DM 6652
00 to 15
Transmission delay (Host Link) (See note 4.)
0000 to 9999: In ms.
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
DM 6653
00 to 07
Node number (Host Link)
00 to 31 (BCD)
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
08 to 15 Not used.
DM 6654
00 to 15 Not used.
Error Log Settings (DM 6655)
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC.
DM 6655
00 to 03 Style
0: Shift after 7 records have been stored
1: Store only first 7 records (no shifting)
2 to F: Do not store records
04 to 07 Not used.
08 to 11 Cycle time monitor enable
0: Detect long cycles as non-fatal errors
1: Do not detect long cycles
12 to 15
21
Not used.
Note
1. When the startup mode is set to continue the operating mode last used before the power was turned off, that operating mode will be retained by the
built-in capacitor. If the power remains off for longer than the backup time of
the capacitor, the data may be lost. (For details on the holding time, refer to
the CPM1A or CPM1 Operation Manual.)
5
Section
PC Setup
1-1
2. Do not set to “05” to “07.” If set to this value, the CPM1/CPM1A will not operate properly and the RUN PC Setup Error Flag (AR 1302 ON) will not turn
ON.
3. Retention of IOM Hold Bit (SR 25212) Status
If the “IOM Hold Bit Status at Startup” (DM 6601, bits 08 to 11) is set to “Maintain” with the IOM Hold Bit (SR 25212) turned ON, operation can be started
with the I/O memory (I/O, IR, LR) status just as it was before the power was
turned OFF. (The input area is refreshed at startup, however, so it is overwritten by the most recently updated input status.)
Retention of Forced Status Hold Bit (SR 25211) Status
If the “Forced Status Hold Bit Status at Startup” (DM 6601, bits 12 to 15) is
set to “Maintain” with the Forced Status Hold Bit (SR 25211) turned ON, operation can be started with the forced set/reset status just as it was before
the power was turned OFF. (When starting up in RUN Mode, however, the
forced set/reset status is cleared.)
Even if the “IOM Hold Bit Status at Startup” or “Forced Status Hold Bit Status
at Startup” is set to “Maintain,” the IOM Hold Bit (SR 25212) or Forced Status
Hold Bit (SR 25211) status may be cleared if the power remains OFF for
longer than the backup time of the built-in capacitor. (For details on the holding time, refer to the CPM1A or CPM1 Operation Manual.) At this time the
I/O memory will also be cleared, so set up the system so that clearing the I/O
memory will not cause problems.
4. The transmission delay is the delay between the previous transmission and
the next transmission.
Host computer
Command
Programmable Controller
Command
Response
Response
Transmission delay time
5. If an out-of-range value is set, the following communications conditions will
result. In that case, reset the value so that it is within the permissible range.
Communications mode:
Host Link
Communications format: Standard settings
(1 start bit, 7-bit data; even parity, 2 stop bits,
9,600 bps)
Transmission delay:
No
Node number:
00
6
Section
PC Setup
1-1
1-1-3 CPM2A/CPM2C PC Setup Settings
The PC Setup is broadly divided into four categories: 1) Settings related to basic
PC operation and I/O processes, 2) Settings related to pulse output functions, 3)
Settings related to interrupts, and 4) Settings related to communications. This
section will explain the settings according to these classifications.
The following table shows the setting in order in the DM area. For details, refer to
the page numbers shown.
Word(s)
Bit(s)
Function
Page
Startup Processing (DM 6600 to DM 6614)
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC only after the PC is restarted.
DM 6600
00 to 07 Startup mode (effective when bits 08 to 15 are set to 02).
00: PROGRAM; 01: MONITOR; 02: RUN
08 to 15 Startup mode designation
16
00: Mode set on Programming Console switch if Programming Console is connected.
RUN mode if Programming Console is not connected.
01: Continue operating mode last used before power was turned OFF.
02: Setting in 00 to 07
DM 6601
00 to 07
08 to 11
12 to 15
DM 6602
00 to 03
04 to 07
DM 6603
DM 6604
DM 6605 to
DM 6614
The setting of the switch SW2 will affect the operating mode for all CPM2C CPU Units
produced before 1 September 2000. Refer to 1-3 Changes in SW2 for details.
Not used.
IOM Hold Bit (SR 25212) Status at Startup
0: Reset to 0; 1: Maintain previous status
Forced Status Hold Bit (SR 25211) Status at Startup
0: Reset to 0; 1: Maintain previous status
Program memory write-protection
0: Program memory unprotected
1: Program memory write-protected (except DM 6602 itself)
08 to 11
Programming Console display language
0: English; 1: Japanese
Expansion instruction function code assignments
0: Default settings
1: User assignments
12 to 15
00 to 15
Not used.
Not used.
00 to 07
00: A memory error will not be generated if data could not be retained by the battery.
08 to 15
00 to 15
01: A memory error will be generated if data could not be retained by the battery.
Not used.
Not used.
17
17
157
Note For CPM2C PCs with lot number of 3180O or earlier, the startup operating mode
will be as shown in the following table if bits 08 to 15 of DM 6600 are set to 00.
Peripheral
p
p
port
connected
d to
Communications port setting switch
Nothing
SW2 OFF
PROGRAM
SW2 ON
Programming
Console
Mode set on Programming
Console mode switch
PROGRAM (The CPM2C will
not be able to communicate
with Programming Console.)
Other Programming
Device
PROGRAM (The CPM2C will
not be able to communicate
with Programming Device.)
PROGRAM
RUN
7
Section
PC Setup
Word(s)
Bit(s)
Function
1-1
Page
Cycle Time Settings (DM 6615 to DM 6619)
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC the next time operation is started.
DM 6615
00 to 15
Not used.
DM 6616
00 to 07
Servicing time for RS-232C port (Effective when bits 08 to 15 are set to 01.)
00 to 99 (BCD): Percentage of cycle time used to service RS-232C port.
RS-232C port servicing setting enable
00: 5% of the cycle time
01: Use time in bits 00 to 07.
18
Servicing time for peripheral port (Effective when bits 08 to 15 are set to 01.)
00 to 99 (BCD): Percentage of cycle time used to service peripheral.
Peripheral port servicing setting enable
00: 5% of the cycle time
01: Use time in bits 00 to 07.
18
Cycle monitor time (Effective when bits 08 to 15 are set to 01, 02, or 03.)
00 to 99 (BCD): Setting (See bits 08 to 15, below.)
18
08 to 15
DM 6617
00 to 07
08 to 15
DM 6618
00 to 07
08 to 15
DM 6619
00 to 15
A fatal error will be generated and PC operation will stop if the cycle time exceeds the
cycle monitor time set here.
Cycle monitor enable (Setting in 00 to 07 × units; 99 s max.)
00: 120 ms (setting in bits 00 to 07 disabled)
01: Setting units: 10 ms
02: Setting units: 100 ms
03: Setting units: 1 s
Minimum cycle time
0000: Variable (no minimum)
0001 to 9999 (BCD): Minimum time in ms
19
Interrupt Processing (DM 6620 to DM 6639)
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC the next time operation is started.
DM 6620
00 to 03
DM 6621
04 to 07
08 to 11
12 to 15
00 to 07
Input time constant for IR 00000 to IR 00002
0: 10 ms; 1: 1 ms; 2: 2 ms; 3: 3 ms; 4: 5 ms; 5: 10 ms; 6: 20 ms; 7: 40 ms; 8: 80 ms
Input time constant for IR 00003 and IR 00004 (Setting same as bits 00 to 03)
Input time constant for IR 00005 and IR 00006 (Setting same as bits 00 to 03)
Input time constant for IR 00007 to IR 00011 (Setting same as bits 00 to 03)
Input time constant for IR 001
00: 10 ms
01: 1 ms
02: 2 ms
03: 3 ms
04: 5 ms
05: 10 ms
06: 20 ms
07: 40 ms
08: 80 ms
08 to 15
00 to 07
08 to 15
00 to 07
08 to 15
00 to 07
08 to 15
00 to 07
08 to 15
Input constant for IR 002 (Setting same as for IR 001.)
Input constant for IR 003 (Setting same as for IR 001.)
Input constant for IR 004 (Setting same as for IR 001.)
Input constant for IR 005 (Setting same as for IR 001.)
Input constant for IR 006 (Setting same as for IR 001.)
Input constant for IR 007 (Setting same as for IR 001.)
Input constant for IR 008 (Setting same as for IR 001.)
Input constant for IR 009 (Setting same as for IR 001.)
Not used.
DM 6626 to
DM 6627
00 to 15
Not used.
DM6628
00 to 03
04 to 07
08 to 11
Interrupt enable for IR 00003 (0: Normal input; 1: Interrupt input; 2: Quick-response)
Interrupt enable for IR 00004 (0: Normal input; 1: Interrupt input; 2: Quick-response)
Interrupt enable for IR 00005 (0: Normal input; 1: Interrupt input; 2: Quick-response)
12 to 15
(Set to 0 in CPM2C CPU Units with 10 I/O points.)
Interrupt enable for IR 00006 (0: Normal input; 1: Interrupt input; 2: Quick-response)
DM 6622
DM 6623
DM 6624
DM 6625
(This input does not exist in CPM2C CPU Units with 10 I/O points.)
8
19
27
Section
PC Setup
Word(s)
DM 6629
Bit(s)
Function
00 to 03
PV coordinate system for pulse output 0
0: Relative coordinates; 1: Absolute coordinates
PV coordinate system for pulse output 1
0: Relative coordinates; 1: Absolute coordinates
Not used.
Not used.
04 to 07
08 to 15
00 to 15
1-1
Page
97
DM 6630 to
DM 6641
High-speed Counter Settings (DM 6640 to DM 6644)
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC the next time operation is started.
DM 6640 to 00 to 15 Not used.
DM 6641
DM 6642
00 to 03 High-speed counter mode
44, 52
0: Differential phase mode (5 kHz)
1: Pulse + direction input mode (20 kHz)
2: Up/down input mode (20 kHz)
4: Increment mode (20 kHz)
04 to 07
08 to 15
High-speed counter reset mode
0: Z phase and software reset; 1: Software reset only
High-speed counter/Synchronized pulse control for IR 00000 to IR 00002
00: Don’t use either function.
01: Use as high-speed counters.
02: Use for synchronized pulse control (10 to 500 Hz).
03: Use for synchronized pulse control (20 Hz to 1 kHz).
04: Use for synchronized pulse control (300 Hz to 20 kHz).
Not used.
DM 6643,
00 to 15
DM 6644
RS-232C Port Communications Settings
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC.
If the CPM2A CPU Unit’s Communications Switch is ON, communications through the CPM2A’s RS-232C port are governed by the default settings (all 0) regardless of the settings in DM 6645 through DM 6649.
If pin 2 of the CPM2C CPU Unit’s DIP switch is ON, communications through the CPM2C’s RS-232C port are governed
by the default settings (all 0) regardless of the settings in DM 6645 through DM 6649.
DM 6645
222
00 to 03 Port settings
0: Standard (1 start bit, 7 data bits, even parity, 2 stop bits, 9,600 bps), Host Link unit
number: 0
1: Settings in DM 6646
(Any other setting will cause a non-fatal error and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
04 to 07
CTS control setting
0: Disable CTS control; 1: Enable CTS control
(Any other setting will cause a non-fatal error and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
08 to 11
12 to 15
Link words for 1:1 data link
0: LR 00 to LR 15 (Any other settings are ineffective.)
Communications mode
0: Host Link; 1: No-protocol; 2: 1:1 PC Link Slave; 3: 1:1 PC Link Master; 4: NT Link
(Any other setting causes a non-fatal error and turns ON AR 1302.)
9
Section
PC Setup
Word(s)
DM 6646
Bit(s)
00 to 07
08 to 15
DM 6647
00 to 15
Function
Baud rate
00: 1,200 bps; 01: 2,400 bps; 02: 4,800 bps; 03: 9,600 bps; 04: 19,200 bps
Frame format
Start bits
Data bits
Stop bits
Parity
00:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
Even
01:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
Odd
02:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
None
03:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bits
Even
04:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bits
Odd
05:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bits
None
06:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
Even
07:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
Odd
08:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
None
09:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bits
Even
10:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bits
Odd
11:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bits
None
1-1
Page
222
(Any other setting specifies standard settings (1 start bit, 7 data bits; even parity, 2 stop
bits, 9,600 bps), causes a non-fatal error, and turns ON AR 1302.)
Transmission delay (0000 to 9999 BCD sets a delay of 0 to 99,990 ms.)
222
(Any other setting specifies a delay of 0 ms, causes a non-fatal error, and turns ON
AR 1302.)
DM 6648
00 to 07
08 to 11
12 to 15
DM 6649
00 to 07
08 to 15
Node number (Host Link)
00 to 31 (BCD)
(Any other setting specifies a node number of 00, causes a non-fatal error, and turns
ON AR 1302.)
Start code selection for no-protocol communications
0: Disables start code; 1: Enables start code in DM 6649
(Any other setting disables the start code, causes a non-fatal error, and turns ON
AR 1302.)
End code selection for no-protocol communications
0: Disables end code; 1: Enables end code in DM 6649; 2: Sets end code of CR, LF.
(Any other setting disables the end code, causes a non-fatal error, and turns ON
AR 1302.)
Start code (00 to FF)
(This setting is valid only when bits 8 to 11 of DM 6648 are set to 1.)
When bits 12 to 15 of DM 6648 set to 0:
Sets the number of bytes to receive. (00: 256 bytes; 01 to FF: 1 to 255 bytes)
When bits 12 to 15 of DM 6648 set to 1:
Sets the end code. (00 to FF)
10
222
222
Section
PC Setup
Word(s)
Bit(s)
Function
1-1
Page
Peripheral Port Communications Settings
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC.
If the CPM2A CPU Unit’s Communications Switch is ON, communications through the peripheral port are governed by
the default settings (all 0) regardless of the settings in DM 6650 through DM 6654.
The CPM2A’s Communications Switch setting has no effect on communications with a Programming Console connected
to the peripheral port or Support Software set for peripheral bus communications. The CPM2A CPU Unit will auto-detect
either Programming Device and automatically establish communications.
SW2 on the CPM2C CPU Unit must be OFF in order for communications through the CPM2C’s peripheral port to be governed by the settings in DM 6650 through DM 6654.
DM 6650
222
00 to 03 Port settings
00: Standard (1 start bit, 7 data bits, even parity, 2 stop bits, 9,600 bps), Host Link unit
number: 0
01: Settings in DM 6651
04 to 11
12 to 15
DM 6651
00 to 07
08 to 15
DM 6652
00 to 15
(Any other setting specifies standard settings, causes a non-fatal error, and turns ON
AR 1302.)
Not used.
Communications mode
0: Host Link or peripheral bus; 1: No-protocol
(Any other setting specifies Host Link, causes a non-fatal error, and turns ON
AR 1302.)
Baud rate
00: 1,200 bps; 01: 2,400 bps; 02: 4,800 bps; 03: 9,600 bps; 04: 19,200 bps
Frame format
Start bits
Data bits
Stop bits
Parity
00:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
Even
01:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
Odd
02:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
None
03:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bits
Even
04:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bits
Odd
05:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bits
None
06:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
Even
07:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
Odd
08:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
None
09:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bits
Even
10:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bits
Odd
11:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bits
None
(Any other setting specifies standard settings (1 start bit, 7 data bits; even parity, 2 stop
bits, 9,600 bps), causes a non-fatal error, and turns ON AR 1302.)
222
Transmission delay (0000 to 9999 BCD sets a delay of 0 to 99,990 ms.)
(Any other setting specifies a delay of 0 ms, causes a non-fatal error, and turns ON
AR 1302.)
DM 6653
00 to 07
08 to 11
12 to 15
Node number (Host Link)
00 to 31 (BCD)
(Any other setting specifies a node number of 00, causes a non-fatal error, and turns
ON AR 1302.)
Start code selection for no-protocol communications
0: Disables start code; 1: Enables start code in DM 6649
(Any other setting disables the start code, causes a non-fatal error, and turns ON
AR 1302.)
End code selection for no-protocol communications
0: Disables end code; 1: Enables end code in DM 6649; 2: Sets end code of CR, LF.
(Any other setting disables the end code, causes a non-fatal error, and turns ON
AR 1302.)
11
Section
PC Setup
Word(s)
DM 6654
Bit(s)
Function
00 to 07
Start code (00 to FF)
08 to 15
(This setting is valid only when bits 8 to 11 of DM 6648 are set to 1.)
When bits 12 to 15 of DM 6648 set to 0:
Sets the number of bytes to receive. (00: 256 bytes; 01 to FF: 1 to 255 bytes)
1-1
Page
222
When bits 12 to 15 of DM 6648 set to 1:
Sets the end code. (00 to FF)
Error Log Settings (DM 6655)
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC.
DM 6655
00 to 03 Style
0: Shift after 7 records have been stored
1: Store only first 7 records (no shifting)
2 to F: Do not store records
04 to 07 Not used.
08 to 11 Cycle time monitor enable
0: Generate a non-fatal error for a cycle time that is too long.
1: Do not generate a non-fatal error.
12 to 15
Low battery error enable
0: Generate a non-fatal error for low battery voltage.
1: Do not generate a non-fatal error.
Low battery error detection is disabled (i.e., set to 1) by default in CPU Units that do
not have a clock. If the PC Setup is cleared, the setting will changed to 0 and a low
battery error will occur.
Bits 12 to 15 should always be set to 0 when the optional CPM2C-BAT01 is mounted.
12
21
Section
PC Setup
1-1
1-1-4 SRM1(-V2) PC Setup Settings
The PC Setup is broadly divided into three categories: 1) Settings related to basic PC operation and I/O processes, 2) Settings related to the cycle time, and 3)
Settings related to communications. This section will explain the settings according to these classifications.
The following table shows the settings for SRM1(-V2) PCs in order. Refer to the
page number in the last column for more details on that setting.
Word(s)
Bit(s)
Function
Page
Startup Processing (DM 6600 to DM 6614)
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC only after the PC is restarted.
DM 6600
00 to 07 Startup mode (effective when bits 08 to 15 are set to 02).
00: PROGRAM; 01: MONITOR 02: RUN
08 to 15 Startup mode designation
00: Programming Console switch
01: Continue operating mode last used before power was turned off
02: Setting in 00 to 07
DM 6601
00 to 07 Not used.
08 to 11 IOM Hold Bit (SR 25212) Status
0: Reset; 1: Maintain (See caution on page 17.)
12 to 15 Forced Status Hold Bit (SR 25211) Status
0: Reset; 1: Maintain
DM 6602
00 to 03 Program memory write-protection
0: Program memory unprotected
1: Program memory write-protected (except DM 6602 itself)
04 to 07
08 to 11
DM 6603
DM 6604
12 to 15
00 to 03
16
17
17
Programming Console display language
0: English; 1: Japanese
Expansion Instructions
0: Default settings; 1: User settings
Not used.
Maximum number of CompoBus/S devices
0: Max. no. 32
1: Max. no. 16
04 to 07
CompoBus/S communications mode setting (V2 only)
0: High-speed communications
1: Long-distance communications
08 to 15
00 to 07
Not used.
00: If data could not be saved for a power interruption (AR 1314 ON), a memory error will not be
generated.
01: If data could not be saved for a power interruption (AR 1314 ON), a memory error will be
generated.
Not used.
Not used.
08 to 15
DM 6605 to 00 to 15
DM 6614
Cycle Time Settings (DM 6615 to DM 6619)
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC the next time operation is started.
DM 6615
00 to 15 Not used.
DM 6616
00 to 07 Servicing time for RS-232C port (effective when bits 08 to 15 are set)
00 to 99 (BCD): Percentage for cycle time used to service peripheral.
08 to 15 RS-232C port servicing enable
00: 5% of the cycle time
01: Use time in 00 to 07.
DM 6617
00 to 07 Servicing time for peripheral port (effective when bits 08 to 15 are set to 01)
00 to 99 (BCD): Percentage of cycle time used to service peripheral.
08 to 15 Peripheral port servicing setting enable
00: 5% of the cycle time
01: Use time in 00 to 07.
18
18
13
Section
PC Setup
Word(s)
DM 6618
Bit(s)
00 to 07
08 to 15
Function
Cycle monitor time (effective when bits 08 to 15 are set to 01, 02, or 03)
00 to 99 (BCD): Setting (see 08 to 15)
Cycle monitor enable (Setting in 00 to 07 x unit; 99 s max.)
00: 120 ms (setting in bits 00 to 07 disabled)
01: Setting unit: 10 ms
02: Setting unit: 100 ms
03: Setting unit: 1 s
DM 6619
00 to 15
Cycle time
0000: Variable (no minimum)
0001 to 9999 (BCD): Minimum time in ms
DM 6620 to
DM 6644
00 to 15
Not used.
1-1
Page
18
19
RS-232C Port Settings
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC.
DM 6645
00 to 03
Port settings
0: Standard (1 start bit, 7-bit data, even parity, 2 stop bits, 9,600 bps)
1: Settings in DM 6646
04 to 07
CTS control settings
0: Disable; 1: Set
When using a 1:1 data link: Sets the link area for 1:1 PC Link.
0: LR 00 to LR 15
Not 0: Disable
08 to 11
When using a 1:N NT Link: Sets the maximum PT node number.
1 to 7
12 to 15
Communications mode
0: Host Link; 1: No-protocol; 2: 1:1 PC Link Slave; 3: 1:1 PC Link Master; 4: 1:1 NT
Link; 5: 1:N NT Link
(Any other setting specifies Host Link mode, causes a non-fatal error, and turns ON
AR 1302.)
The 1:N NT Link is supported by SRM1-C02-V2 only.
DM 6646
00 to 07
08 to 15
DM 6647
00 to 15
DM 6648
00 to 07
08 to 11
12 to 15
14
Baud rate
00: 1.2K, 01: 2.4K, 02: 4.8K, 03: 9.6K, 04: 19.2K
Frame format
Start
Length
Stop
00:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
01:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
02:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
03:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bits
04:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bits
05:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bits
06:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
07:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
08:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
09:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bits
10:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bits
11:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bits
Other: 1 bit
7 bits
2 bits
Parity
Even
Odd
None
Even
Odd
None
Even
Odd
None
Even
Odd
None
Even
AR 1302 will turn ON to indicate a non-fatal system setting error if any value not between 00 and 11 is set.
Transmission delay (Host Link)
0000 to 9999 (BCD): Set in units of 10 ms, e.g., setting of 0001 equals 10 ms
Node number (Host Link, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM 6645 are set to 0.)
00 to 31 (BCD)
Start code enable (RS-232C, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM 6645 are set to 1.)
0: Disable; 1: Set
End code enable (RS-232C, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM 6645 are set to 1.)
0: Disable (number of bytes received)
1: Set (specified end code)
2: CR, LF
264
Section
PC Setup
Word(s)
DM 6649
Bit(s)
00 to 07
08 to 15
Function
1-1
Page
264
Start code (RS-232C)
00 to FF (binary)
When bits 12 to 15 of DM 6648 are set to 0:
Number of bytes received
00: Default setting (256 bytes)
01 to FF: 1 to 255 bytes
When bits 12 to 15 of DM 6648 are set to 1:
End code (RS-232C)
00 to FF (binary)
Peripheral Port Settings
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC.
DM 6650
00 to 03 Port settings
00: Standard (1 start bit, 7-bit data, even parity, 2 stop bits, 9,600 bps)
01: Settings in DM 6651
04 to 07
08 to 11
12 to 15
264
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
Not used.
Not used.
Communications mode
0: Host Link; 1: No-protocol
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
DM 6651
00 to 07
08 to 15
Baud rate
00: 1.2K, 01: 2.4K, 02: 4.8K, 03: 9.6K, 04: 19.2K
Frame format
Start
Length
Stop
00:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
01:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
02:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
03:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bits
04:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bits
05:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bits
06:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
07:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
08:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
09:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bits
10:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bits
11:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bits
Other: 1 bit
7 bits
2 bits
Parity
Even
Odd
None
Even
Odd
None
Even
Odd
None
Even
Odd
None
Even
AR 1302 will turn ON to indicate a non-fatal system setting error if any value not between 00 and 11 is set.
DM 6652
00 to 15
DM 6653
00 to 07
Transmission delay (Host Link)
0000 to 9999 (BCD): Set in units of 10 ms.
264
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
Node number (Host Link)
00 to 31 (BCD)
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
08 to 11
Start code enable (RS-232C, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM6650 are set to 1.)
0: Disable
1: Set
12 to 15
End code enable (RS-232C, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM6650 are set to 1.)
0: Disable (number of bytes received)
1: Set (specified end code)
2: CR, LF
15
Section
Basic PC Operation and I/O Processes
Word(s)
DM 6654
Bit(s)
Function
00 to 07
Start code (effective when bits 08 to 11 of DM6650 are set to 1.)
00: 256 bytes
01 to FF: 1 to 255 bytes
08 to 15
End code
1-2
Page
264
When bits 12 to 15 of DM6653 are set to 0:
00: 256 bytes
01 to FF: 1 to 255 bytes
When bits 12 to 15 of DM6653 are set to 1:
Setting: 00 to FF (binary)
Error Log Settings (DM 6655)
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC.
DM 6655
00 to 03 Style
0: Shift after 7 records have been stored
1: Store only first 7 records
04 to 07
08 to 11
12 to 15
21
Errors will not be stored if other values are set.
Not used.
Cycle time monitor enable
0: Detect long cycles as non-fatal errors
1: Do not detect long cycles
Low battery error enable
0: Generate a non-fatal error for low battery voltage.
1: Do not generate a non-fatal error.
Note If an out-of-range value is set, the following communications conditions will result. In that case, reset the value so that it is within the permissible range.
Communications mode:
Communications format:
Transmission delay:
Node number:
1-2
Host Link
Standard settings
(1 start bit, 7-bit data; even parity, 2 stop bits,
9,600 bps)
No
00
Basic PC Operation and I/O Processes
This section explains the PC Setup settings related to basic operation and I/O
processes.
1-2-1 Startup Mode
The operation mode the PC will start in when power is turned on can be set as
shown below.
Bit 15
0
DM6600
Startup Mode Designation
00: Programming Console Mode Selector (If not connected: RUN mode)
01: Operating mode last used before power was turned off
02: Mode set in bits 00 to 07
Startup Mode (Bits 08 to 15: Valid when bits 00 to 07 are set to 02)
00: PROGRAM mode
01: MONITOR mode
02: RUN mode
Default: Programming Console Mode Selector or RUN mode when Programming
Console is not connected.
Note When the “startup mode designation” is set to 00 and pin 2 of the CPM2C CPU
Unit’s DIP switch is ON, the CPM2C will enter RUN mode automatically, regardless of the Programming Console’s mode switch setting.
16
Section
Basic PC Operation and I/O Processes
1-2
1-2-2 Hold Bit Status
Make the settings shown below to determine whether, when the power supply is
turned on, the Forced Status Hold Bit (SR 25211) and/or IOM Hold Bit
(SR 25212) will retain the status that was in effect when the power was last
turned off, or whether the previous status will be cleared.
Bit 15
0
0
DM6601
0
Always 00
SR 25211 setting
0: Clear status
1: Retain status
SR 25212 setting
0: Clear status
1: Retain status
Default: Clear both.
The Forced Status Hold Bit (SR 25211) determines whether or not the forced
set/reset status is retained when changing from PROGRAM mode to MONITOR
mode.
The IOM Hold Bit (SR 25212) determines whether or not the status of IR bits and
LR bits is retained when PC operation is started and stopped.
! Caution
Note
In PCs with capacitor backup, do not use the I/O Hold Bit Status and Forced Status Hold Bit Status Bits (DM 6601) when the power to the PC is going to be
turned off longer than the memory backup time of the internal capacitor. If the
memory backup time is exceeded, memory status will be unstable even if the I/O
Hold Bit Status and Forced Status Hold Bit Status Bits are used. Unpredictable
results may occur if operation is attempted with unstable memory status.
1. The memory backup time of the internal capacitor varies with the ambient
temperature, but is 20 days at 25C. Refer to hardware specifications for
more details.
2. The memory backup time assumes that the internal capacitor is fully
charged before power is turned off. Fulling charging the capacitor requires
that power is supplied to the CPU Unit for at least 15 minutes.
1-2-3 Program Memory Write-protection
In CPM1, CPM1A, CPM2A, and CPM2C PCs, the program memory can be protected by setting bits 00 to 03 of DM 6602 to 1. Bits 04 to 07 determine whether
Programming Console messages are displayed in English or Japanese.
Bit 15
DM6602
0
0
0
Always 00
Programming Console messages
0: English
1: Japanese
Program memory
0: Not write-protected
1: Write-protected
Default: English displays, not write-protected
Note DM 6602 itself can still be changed after the program memory has been writeprotected by setting bits 04 to 07 of DM 6602 to 1.
17
Section
Basic PC Operation and I/O Processes
1-2
1-2-4 RS-232C Port Servicing Time (CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2) Only)
The following settings are used to determine the percentage of the cycle time
devoted to servicing the RS-232C port.
Bit 15
0
DM6616
Servicing time setting enable
00: Disabled (5% used)
01: Enabled (setting in bits 00 to 07 used)
Servicing time (%, valid with bits 08 to 15 are 01)
00 to 99 (BCD, two digits)
Default: 5% of cycle time
Example: If DM 6616 is set to 0110, the RS-232C port will be serviced for 10% of
the cycle time.
The servicing time will be 0.34 ms minimum.
The entire servicing time will not be used unless processing requests exist.
1-2-5 Peripheral Port Servicing Time
The following settings are used to determine the percentage of the cycle time
devoted to servicing the peripheral port.
Bit 15
0
DM6617
Servicing time setting enable
00: Disabled (5% used)
01: Enabled (setting in bits 00 to 07 used)
Servicing time (%, valid with bits 08 to 15 are 01)
00 to 99 (BCD, two digits)
Default: 5% of cycle time
Example: If DM 6617 is set to 0115, the peripheral port will be serviced for 15%
of the cycle time.
The servicing time will be 0.34 ms minimum.
The entire servicing time will not be used unless processing requests exist.
1-2-6 Cycle Monitor Time
Bit 15
0
DM6618
Cycle Monitor Time Enable and Units
00: Setting disabled (time fixed at 120 ms)
01: Setting in 00 to 07 enabled; units:10 ms
02: Setting in 00 to 07 enabled; units:100 ms
03: Setting in 00 to 07 enabled; units:1 s
Cycle monitor time setting (When bits 08 to 15 are not 00)
00 to 99 (2 digits BCD; units set in bits 08 to 15.)
Default: 120 ms.
The cycle monitor time is used for checking for extremely long cycle times, as
can happen when the program goes into an infinite loop. If the cycle time exceeds the cycle monitor setting, a fatal error (FALS 9F) will be generated.
18
Section
Basic PC Operation and I/O Processes
Note
1-2
1. The units used for the maximum and current cycle times recorded in the AR
area (AR 14 and AR 15) are determined by the setting for the cycle monitor
time in DM 6618, as shown below.
Bits 08 to 15 set to 01:
Bits 08 to 15 set to 02:
Bits 08 to 15 set to 03:
0.1 ms
1 ms
10 ms
2. If the cycle time is 1 s or longer, the cycle time read from Programming Devices will be 999.9 ms. The correct maximum and current cycle times will be
recorded in the AR area.
Example
If 0230 is set in DM 6618, an FALS 9F error will not occur until the cycle time
exceeds 3 s. If the actual cycle time is 2.59 s, the current cycle time stored in the
AR area will be 2590 (ms), but the cycle time read from a Programming Device
will be 999.9 ms.
A “cycle time over” error (non-fatal) will be generated when the cycle time exceeds 100 ms unless detection of long cycle times is disable using the setting in
DM 6655.
1-2-7 Minimum Cycle Time
Make the settings shown below to standardize the cycle time and to eliminate
variations in I/O response time by setting a minimum cycle time.
Bit 15
0
DM6619
Cycle time (4 digits BCD)
0000:Cycle time variable
0001 to 9999: Minimum cycle time (Unit: 1 ms)
Default: Cycle time variable
If the actual cycle time is shorter than the minimum cycle time, execution will wait
until the minimum time has expired. If the actual cycle time is longer than the
minimum cycle time, then operation will proceed according to the actual cycle
time. AR 2405 will turn ON if the minimum cycle time is exceeded.
1-2-8 Input Time Constants
Make the settings shown below to set the time from when the actual inputs from
the DC Input Unit are turned ON or OFF until the corresponding input bits are
updated (i.e., until their ON/OFF status is changed). Make these settings when
you want to adjust the time until inputs stabilize.
Increasing the input time constant can reduce the effects from chattering and
external noise.
Input from an input device
such as a limit switch
Input bit status
t
t Input time constant
The SRM1(-V2) does not have this setting.
19
Section
Basic PC Operation and I/O Processes
CPM1/CPM1A PCs
1-2
Set the input time constants for CPM1/CPM1A inputs from a Programming Device.
Input Time Constants for IR 000
Bit 15
0
DM 6620
Time constant for IR 00007 to IR 00011 (1 digit BCD; see below.)
Time constant for IR 00005 to IR 00006 (1 digit BCD; see below.)
Time constant for IR 00003 to IR 00004 (1 digit BCD; see below.)
Time constant for IR 00000 to IR 00002 (1 digit BCD; see below.)
Default: 0000 (8 ms for each)
Input Time Constants for IR 001 to IR 009
Bit 15
DM 6621: IR 001 and IR 002
DM 6622: IR 003 and IR 004
DM 6623: IR 005 and IR 006
DM 6624: IR 007 and IR 008
DM 6625: IR 009
0
DM 6621 to DM 6625
Time constant for IR 002, IR 004, IR 006, and IR 008
Time constant for IR 001, IR 003, IR 005, IR 007, and IR 009
Default: 0000 (8 ms for each)
The nine possible settings for the input time constant are shown below. (Set only
the rightmost digit for each setting for IR 000.)
00: 8 ms
05: 16 ms
01: 1 ms
06: 32 ms
02: 2 ms
07: 64 ms
03: 4 ms
08: 128 ms
04: 8 ms
The CPM1/CPM1A’s I/O response time is the input time constant (1 ms to
128 ms; default is 8 ms) + the cycle time.
Refer to 8-1 CPM1/CPM1A Cycle Time and I/O Response Time for more details.
CPM2A/CPM2C PCs
Set the input time constants for CPM2A/CPM2C inputs from a Programming Device.
Input Time Constants for IR 000
Bit 15
0
DM 6620
Time constant for IR 00007 to IR 00011 (1 digit BCD; see below.)
Time constant for IR 00005 to IR 00006 (1 digit BCD; see below.)
Time constant for IR 00003 to IR 00004 (1 digit BCD; see below.)
Time constant for IR 00000 to IR 00002 (1 digit BCD; see below.)
Default: 0000 (10 ms for each)
Input Time Constants for IR 001 to IR 009
DM 6621: IR 001 and IR 002
DM 6622: IR 003 and IR 004
DM 6623: IR 005 and IR 006
DM 6624: IR 007 and IR 008
DM 6625: IR 009
Bit 15
DM 6621 to DM 6625
Time constant for IR 002, IR 004, IR 006, and IR 008
Time constant for IR 001, IR 003, IR 005, IR 007, and IR 009
Default: 0000 (10 ms for each)
20
0
Section
CPM2C Changes in SW2
1-3
The nine possible settings for the input time constant are shown below. (Set only
the rightmost digit for IR 000.)
00: 10 ms
01: 1 ms
02: 2 ms
03: 3 ms
04: 5 ms
05: 10 ms
06: 20 ms
07: 40 ms
08: 80 ms
1-2-9 Error Log Settings
Error Detection and Error Log Operation (DM 6655)
Make the settings shown below to determine whether or not a non-fatal error is to
be generated when the cycle time exceeds 100 ms or when the voltage of the
built-in battery drops (CPM2A/CPM2C only), and to set the method for storing
records in the error log when errors occur.
Bit 15
DM6655
0
0
Always
0
Low battery voltage detection
0: Detect
1: Don’t detect
Cycle time over detection
0: Detect
1: Don’t detect
Error log storage method
0: Error records for the 7 most recent errors always stored (older errors deleted).
1: Only the first 7 error records stored (no errors stored beyond that point).
2 to F: Error records not stored.
Default: Low battery voltage and cycle time over errors detected, and error records
stored for the 7 most recent errors.
Battery errors and cycle time overrun errors are non-fatal errors.
For details on the error log, refer to Section 9 Troubleshooting.
Note The low battery error is applicable to CPM2A/CPM2C only. This digit isn’t used in
CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs and CPM2C PCs that aren’t equipped with a
battery.
1-3
CPM2C Changes in SW2
The connection of a Programming Console to the peripheral connector is automatically detected for CPM2C CPU Units with lot numbers of 0190O (1 September 2000) or later. This has resulted in a change to the operation of SW2 on the
front of the CPU Unit. Check the lot number to confirm the operation of SW2 for
any of the following model numbers before attempting operations.
CPU Units with Changed Specifications for SW2
I/O
Units with Relay
Outputs
and
O p
da
i
Terminal
Block
10 I/O points
CPM2C-10CDR-D
CPM2C-10C1DR-D
---
20 I/O points
Units with Transistor Outputs and a
Connector
Sinking outputs
CPM2C-10CDTC-D
CPM2C-10C1DTC-D
CPM2C-20CDTC-D
CPM2C-20C1DTC-D
Sourcing outputs
CPM2C-10CDT1C-D
CPM2C-10C1DT1C-D
CPM2C-20CDT1C-D
CPM2C-20C1DT1C-D
Interpreting Lot Numbers
Lot No.
01 9
0
O
Factory identification number
(indicated on the side of the product only)
Year:
Rightmost digit (2000 = 0)
Month: JAN to SEP = 1 to 9
OCT to NOV = X to Z
Day:
1 to 31
21
Section
CPM2C Changes in SW2
1-3
Operation Previous CPU Units
The following instructions apply to CPU Units with lot numbers of 3180O (August
2000) or earlier.
The previous CPU Units do not detect a Programming Console connected to the
peripheral port, and SW2 of the DIP switch was used to set either “Programming
Console” or “Other device.”
SW2 Setting
Communications
Switch
Setting
Meaning
OFF
Programming Console connected to peripheral port.
ON
Device other than Programming Console connected to peripheral port.
SW1 Setting
Setting
Meaning
OFF
Use PC Setup settings for RS-232C port (DM 6645 to DM 6649).
ON
Use default settings for RS-232C port.
The relationship between the PC Setup settings, the setting of SW2, and the
startup operating mode for previous CPU Units is shown in the following table.
PC Setup
Address
DM6600
Bits
08 to 15
CPM2C Operating
p
g Mode
Setting
00 Hex
According to communications switch SW2 and peripheral port device.
Peripheral
p
device
SW2 setting
Nothing connected
Programming
Console
Other
00 to 07
01 Hex
02 Hex
00 Hex
01 Hex
02 Hex
Note
OFF
PROGRAM mode
According to Programming
Console key switch.
PROGRAM mode
(See note.)
ON
RUN mode
PROGRAM mode
(See note.)
PROGRAM mode
Note: Communications will not be possible between the CPM2C and the peripheral
device for these combinations.
Mode used immediately before power interruption
Mode specified in bits 00 to 07.
PROGRAM mode
MONITOR mode
RUN mode
1. The default setting for DM 6600, bits 06 to 15 is 00 Hex, i.e., according to the
communications switch on the front panel. If SW2 is set for connecting a device other than a Programming Console to the peripheral connector, the
CPU Unit will start in RUN mode as soon as power is turned ON. Be sure that
adequate precautions are taken to ensure safety.
2. If SW2 is for connecting a device other than a Programming Console to the
peripheral connector, the CPU Unit will start in RUN mode as soon as power
is turned ON even it a device is connected to the RS-232C port. Be sure that
adequate precautions are taken to ensure safety.
22
Section
CPM2C Changes in SW2
1-3
Connections
IBM PC/AT
or compatible
CPM2C-CN111
XW2Z-200S-V
XW2Z-500S-V
CS1W-CN118
23
SECTION 2
Special Features
This section explains special features of the CPM1, CPM1A, CPM2A, CPM2C (including the CPM2C-S), and SRM1(-V2).
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-6
2-7
2-8
2-9
2-10
2-11
2-12
2-13
2-14
2-15
2-16
2-17
2-18
2-19
CPM2A/CPM2C Interrupt Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1-1 Interrupt Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1-2 Interval Timer Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1-3 Precautions on Programming Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-2-1 Using High-speed Counters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-2-2 Input Interrupts In Counter Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-3-1 Types of Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-3-2 Input Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-3-3 Masking All Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-3-4 Interval Timer Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-3-5 High-speed Counter Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-3-6 Precautions on Programming Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SRM1(-V2) Interrupt Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-4-1 Types of Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-4-2 Interval Timer Interrupts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-5-1 Using Single-phase Pulse Outputs Without Acceleration and
Deceleration (Fixed Duty Ratio) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-5-2 Using Pulse Outputs With Variable Duty Ratio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-5-3 Using Pulse Outputs With Trapezoidal Acceleration and Deceleration . . . . . . . .
CPM1A Pulse Output Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-6-1 Programming Example in Continuous Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-6-2 Programming Example in Independent Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-6-3 Using Pulse Output Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-6-4 Changing the Frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-6-5 Stopping Pulse Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronized Pulse Control (CPM2A/CPM2C Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Computation Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-8-1 Pulse Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-8-2 Synchronized Pulse Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analog I/O Functions (CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A/CPM2C Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Temperature Sensor Input Functions (CPM1A/CPM2A/CPM2C Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CompoBus/S I/O Slave Functions (CPM1A/CPM2A/CPM2C Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CompoBus/S I/O Master Functions (SRM1(-V2) and CPM2C-S Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analog Controls (CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Quick-response Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-14-1 CPM1/CPM1A Quick-response Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-14-2 CPM2A/CPM2C Quick-response Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Macro Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calculating with Signed Binary Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-16-1 Definition of Signed Binary Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-16-2 Arithmetic Flags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-16-3 Inputting Signed Binary Data Using Decimal Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Differential Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Expansion Instructions (CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2) Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-18-1 CPM2A/CPM2C/CPM2C-S Expansion Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-18-2 SRM1(-V2) Expansion Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the CPM2A/CPM2C Clock Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-19-1 Data Area Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-19-2 Setting the Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
26
27
34
39
42
44
65
73
74
75
80
81
83
91
91
91
91
94
98
108
114
128
129
129
129
130
130
131
143
143
143
144
144
144
145
147
149
149
151
154
155
156
156
156
156
157
158
159
160
160
160
25
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Interrupt Functions
2-1
2-1
CPM2A/CPM2C Interrupt Functions
The CPM2A and CPM2C (including the CPM2C-S) provide the following kinds
of interrupt processing. Interrupts may be disabled temporarily when online editing is performed during operation or STUP(––) is executed to change settings.
Types of Interrupts
Note *Input points 00005 and 00006 do not exist in CPM2C CPU Units with only 10 I/O
points or in CPM2C-S CPU Units. In these CPU Units, interrupt subroutine numbers 000 and 001 are allocated to input points 00003 and 00004.
Interrupt Inputs
Interrupt programs are executed when inputs to the CPU Unit’s built-in input
points (00003 to 00006*) are turned from OFF to ON. Interrupt subroutine numbers 000 to 003* are allocated to input points 00003 to 00006*.
Interval Timer Interrupts
Interval timer interrupt programs are executed with a precision of 0.1 ms. Interrupt subroutine numbers 000 to 049 are allocated by instructions.
Count-up Interrupts Using Interrupt Inputs (Counter Mode)
Input signals to the CPU Unit’s built-in input points (00003 to 00006*) are
counted at high speed (2 kHz), and the normal program is stopped and an interrupt program is executed. Interrupt subroutine numbers 000 to 003* are allocated to input points 00003 to 00006*.
Count-check Interrupts Using the High-speed Counter
Pulse inputs to the CPU Unit’s input points (00000 to 00002) are counted at high
speed (20 kHz/5 kHz), and an interrupt program is executed when the present
value matches the target value or falls within a given range. Interrupt subroutine
numbers 000 to 049 are allocated by instructions.
Note Interrupts will be temporarily disabled if online editing is performed during operation or if the PC Setup is changed during operation (including changes made
with STUP(––).
Interrupt programs are defined as interrupt subroutines within the user program.
Just like ordinary subroutines, an interrupt subroutine is defined by SBN(92) and
RET(93). It is written at the end of the normal program.
Writing Interrupt
Programs
Normal
program
Interrupt
program
1, 2, 3...
26
Subroutine
1. A new interrupt can be defined in an interrupt subroutine, and an existing
one can be cleared.
2. Within any given interrupt subroutine, it is not possible to write another subroutine for processing another interrupt. Do not nest another interrupt subroutine between the SBN(92) and RET(93) instructions.
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Interrupt Functions
2-1
3. It is not possible to write a subroutine program within an interrupt subroutine.
Do not nest an ordinary subroutine program between the SBN(92) and
RET(93) instructions.
4. It is not possible to write an interrupt subroutine within an ordinary subroutine program. Do not nest an interrupt subroutine between the SBN(92) and
RET(93) instructions.
When an interrupt subroutine is defined, an SBS UNDEFD error will be generated during the program check but execution will be normal.
! Caution
Order of Priority for
Interrupts
Interrupt inputs
Although IORF(97) can be used in interrupt subroutines, you must be careful of
the interval between IORF(97) executions. If IORF(97) is executed too frequently, a fatal system error may occur (FALS 9F), stopping operation. The interval
between executions of IORF(97) should be at least 1.3 ms + total execution time
of the interrupt subroutine.
The order of priority for interrupts is as follows:
Count-up interrupts
=
>
Interval timer
interrupts
=
High-speed counter
count check interrupts
If an interrupt with a higher priority is generated. during interrupt program execution, the interrupt that is currently being processed will be stopped and the new
interrupt will be processed first. Then the original interrupt will be resumed after
the higher-priority interrupt processing has been completed.
If interrupts of the same priority are generated simultaneously, they will be processed in the following order:
Interrupt input 0 → Interrupt input 1 → Interrupt input 2 → Interrupt input 3 (including count-up mode)
Interval timer interrupt → High-speed counter interrupt
2-1-1 Interrupt Inputs
By turning the CPU Unit’s built-in input points from OFF to ON, the normal program can be stopped and the interrupt program executed. The interrupt inputs
are allocated to four points (00003 to 00006, see note).
Interrupt input
(See note.)
(See note.)
Normal
program
Interrupt
program
Subroutine
Note Input points 00005 and 00006 do not exist in CPM2C CPU Units with only 10 I/O
points or in CPM2C-S CPU Units.
27
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Interrupt Functions
Input number
(Note 1)
00003
00004
00005
(See note 3.)
00006
(See note 3.)
Note
Interrupt
number
Subroutine
number
(Note 2)
0
1
2
000
001
002
3
003
28
Interrupt
response time
0.3 ms (from
(
when
h iinput turns
ON until
ntil program
progr m
execution)
1. Input numbers 00003 to 00006 can be used for any of the following functions: interrupt inputs, interrupt inputs (counter mode), or quick-response inputs. When not being used for any of these, they can be used as ordinary
inputs.
2. Subroutine numbers 000 to 003 are the subroutine numbers for interrupt
programs started up when interrupt inputs or count-up interrupts for interrupt inputs (counter mode) are generated. When not being used for this purpose, they can be used as ordinary inputs.
3. Input points 00005 and 00006 do not exist in CPM2C CPU Units with only 10
I/O points or in CPM2C-S CPU Units.
The following table shows the relationships between interrupt inputs and the
CPM2A/CPM2C PC’s other functions.
Function
Note
Minimum
input signal
width
50 µs
µ
2-1
Interrupt inputs (counter mode)
Synchronized pulse control
Can be used simultaneously.
Interrupt inputs
See note 1.
Interval timer interrupts
Can be used simultaneously.
High-speed counters
Can be used simultaneously.
Interrupt inputs (counter mode)
See note 1.
Pulse outputs
Can be used simultaneously.
Quick-response inputs
See note 1.
Input time constant
See note 2.
Clock
Can be used simultaneously.
1. The same input number (from 00003 to 00006) cannot be used for more
than one of the following functions: interrupt inputs, interrupt inputs (counter
mode), or quick-response inputs.
2. When inputs 00003 to 00006 are set for use as interrupt inputs (counter
mode), the input time constants for the relevant inputs are disabled. The input time constants remain in effect, however, for the values for refreshing
the relevant input relay area.
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Interrupt Functions
2-1
Procedure for Using Interrupt Inputs
Set the interrupt input number.
Wire the inputs.
Input numbers: 00003 to 00006 (See note.)
PC Setup (DM 6628)
Use as interrupt inputs (interrupt input mode or counter mode)
Create a ladder diagram program.
INT(89): For masking and unmasking interrupt inputs.
SBN(92) and RET(93): For creating interrupt subroutines.
Interrupt input
00003
Interrupt is
generated.
Interrupt input 0
00004
00005
(See note.)
00006
(See note.)
Ladder diagram programming
Specified subroutine executed.
INT(89) instruction
(92)
Permission to use
interrupt input
Interrupt input 1
(93)
Interrupt input 2
Interrupt input 3
PC Setup
DM 6628
Note Input points 00005 and 00006 do not exist in CPM2C CPU Units with only 10 I/O
points or in CPM2C-S CPU Units.
Setting the Interrupt
Input Number
With interrupt inputs (interrupt input mode), the subroutine numbers executed
for the input numbers are fixed.
Input number
Interrupt number
Subroutine number
00003
0
000
00004
1
001
00005 (See note.)
2
002
00006 (See note.)
3
003
The same input number (from 00003 to 00006) cannot be used for more than
one of the following functions: interrupt inputs, interrupt inputs (counter mode),
or quick-response inputs.
29
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Interrupt Functions
2-1
With a CPM2A, wire to the input terminals as shown in the following illustration.
Wiring the Inputs
Input number 00003: Interrupt input 0
Input number 00004: Interrupt input 1
Input number 00005: Interrupt input 2
Input number 00006: Interrupt input 3
With a CPM2C, wire to the input terminals as shown in the following illustration.
(See note 2.)
Input terminals
Input connector
(Example for
Fujitsu-compatible
connector.)
00004
00003
00006
00005
00004
00003
Note
1. Refer to the operation manual for your CPU Unit for information on wiring.
2. Input terminal and pin numbers depend on the model. Refer to the CPM2C
Operation Manual (W356) for details.
PC Setup
The following table shows the settings in the PC Setup area related to interrupt
input usage.
Word
DM 6628
Bits
00 to 03
04 to 07
08 to 11
12 to 15
Function
Interrupt setting for 0: Normal input
input 00003
Interr pt input
inp t
1: Interrupt
Interrupt setting for (interrupt input mode or
input 00004
counter mode)
Interrupt setting for 2: Quick-response input
input 00005*
Interrupt setting for
input 00006*
Setting
1
Note *Input points 00005 and 00006 do not exist in CPM2C CPU Units with only 10 I/O
points and in CPM2C-S CPU Units.
The settings will go into effect when the mode is changed (from PROGRAM to
MONITOR/RUN) or when the power supply is turned ON to the CPM2A/
CPM2C.
Ladder Diagram
Programming
30
The following table shows the instruction operations related to interrupt input
control.
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Interrupt Functions
Instruction
(@)INT(89)
Control
2-1
Operation
Mask/unmask interrupt
inputs
Clear interrupt inputs
Prohibits or permits specified interrupts.
Clears the cause of a prohibited interrupt
input.
Reads the permitted/prohibited status of
an interrupt input.
Prohibits all interrupts, including interrupt
inputs, interval timer interrupts, high-speed
counters, etc.
Read current mask
status
Mask all interrupts
Unmask all interrupts
Permits all interrupts, including interrupt
inputs, interval timer interrupts, high-speed
counters, etc.
Masking or Unmasking Interrupt Inputs
This function is used to mask or unmask input numbers 00003 to 00006 (interrupt inputs 0 to 3).
(@)INT(89)
000
Interrupt control designation (000: Mask/unmask interrupt inputs)
000
Fixed at 000.
C2
Control data word
Specifies/stores 0.
Specifies input 00006 (interrupt input 3).
Specifies input 00005 (interrupt input 2).
Specifies input 00004 (interrupt input 1).
Specifies input 00003 (interrupt input 0).
0: Clear mask (interrupt input permitted).
1: Set mask (interrupt input prohibited).
All interrupt inputs are prohibited at the beginning of operation (in either PROGRAM mode or in RUN/MONITOR mode). To use interrupt inputs, use INT(89)
to permit them.
Clearing Interrupt Inputs
This function is used to clear input numbers 00003 to 00006 (interrupt inputs 0 to
3). Since interrupt inputs are recorded, masked interrupts will be serviced after
the mask is removed unless they are cleared first. Use INT(89) to clear the cause
of the interrupt inputs so that they will not be executed when interrupt inputs are
permitted (i.e., when the mask is removed).
31
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Interrupt Functions
2-1
(@)INT(89)
001
000
C2
Interrupt control designation (001: Clear interrupt inputs)
Fixed at 000.
Control data word
Specifies/stores 0.
Specifies input 00006 (interrupt input 3).
Specifies input 00005 (interrupt input 2).
Specifies input 00004 (interrupt input 1).
Specifies input 00003 (interrupt input 0).
0: Retain cause of interrupt input.
1: Clear cause of interrupt input.
While interrupt inputs are masked, one cause is recorded for each interrupt input.
Reading Current Mask Status
This function is used to read the current mask status for input numbers 00003 to
00006 (interrupt inputs 0 to 3).
(@)INT(89)
002
Interrupt control designation (002: Read current mask status)
000
Fixed at 000.
Control data word
C2
Specifies/stores 0.
Specifies input 00006 (interrupt input 3).
Specifies input 00005 (interrupt input 2).
Specifies input 00004 (interrupt input 1).
Specifies input 00003 (interrupt input 0).
0: Mask is cleared (interrupt inputs permitted).
1: Mask is set (interrupt inputs prohibited).
Masking or Unmasking All Interrupts
This function is used to mask or unmask all interrupt processing, including interrupt inputs (interrupt input mode and counter mode), interval timer interrupts,
and high-speed counters. Masked inputs are recorded, but ignored.
Masking All Interrupts
(@)INT(89)
100
000
000
32
Interrupt control designation (100: Mask all interrupts)
Fixed at 000.
Fixed at 000.
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Interrupt Functions
2-1
Unmasking All Interrupts
(@)INT(89)
200
000
000
Interrupt control designation (200: Unmask all interrupts)
Fixed at 000.
Fixed at 000.
The masking or unmasking all interrupts cannot be executed within an interrupt
subroutine.
If causes for interrupts occur while all interrupts are masked, the causes will be
recorded for each interrupt but the interrupt processing will not be executed.
When “unmask all interrupts” is executed, the processing will then be carried out
according to the interrupt mask status at that point in time.
Interrupt masks cannot be cleared simply by executing “unmask all interrupts.”
Executing “unmask all interrupts” merely restores the status that was in effect
prior to the execution of “mask all interrupts.”
Note INT(89) must be executed in order, with “mask all interrupts” followed by “unmask all interrupts.”
Operation Example
Explanation
In this example, an interrupt subroutine is executed by turning input 00003 from
OFF to ON. The interrupt subroutine adds 1 to DM 0000.
Wiring
The following diagram shows input wiring in the CPM2A.
Input device
The following diagram shows input wiring in the CPM2C.
(See note 2.)
Input terminals
Input connector
(Example for
Fujitsu-compatible
connector.)
Input
device
Input
device
33
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Interrupt Functions
2-1
PC Setup
15
DM 6628
0
0
0
0
1
Input 00003 is used as an interrupt input.
(Inputs 00004 to 00006 are used as ordinary inputs.)
Programming
ON for 1 cycle at beginning
of operation
Clears Increment Area (DM 0000).
Permits interrupt for interrupt input 0 (input 00003).
(89)
E
Always ON
Executed when input 00003 turns from OFF to ON.
2-1-2 Interval Timer Interrupts
One interval timer (precision: 0.1 ms) is supported and it can be set from 0.5 ms
to 319,968 ms. There are two interrupt modes: the one-shot mode, in which a
single interrupt is executed when the time is up, and the scheduled-interrupt
mode, in which interrupts are executed at regular intervals.
Interval timer interrupt
Normal
program
Interrupt
program
One-shot mode
Operation
34
Subroutine
Scheduled-interrupt mode
Set time
Interrupt is executed once
Interrupts are executed at
when time has elapsed.
regular intervals.
0.5 to 316,968 ms (Unit: 0.1 ms)
Interrupt
response time
0.3 ms (from when time has elapsed until execution of interrupt
program)
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Interrupt Functions
2-1
The following table shows the relationships between interval timer interrupts
and the CPM2A/CPM2C’s other functions.
Interval timer interrupts
Synchronized pulse control
Can be used simultaneously.
Interrupt inputs
Can be used simultaneously.
Interval timer interrupts
---
High-speed counters
Can be used simultaneously.
Interrupt inputs (counter mode)
Can be used simultaneously.
Pulse outputs
Can be used simultaneously.
Quick-response inputs
Can be used simultaneously.
Input time constant
Can be used simultaneously.
Clock
Can be used simultaneously.
Procedure for Using Interval Timer Interrupts
Select the mode.
Ladder diagram programming
Either one-shot mode or schedule-interrupt mode
STIM(69)
Interrupt is
executed.
Interval timer
Ladder diagram programming
STIM(69)
INTERVAL TIMER
instruction
Specified subroutine is executed.
SBN(92)
Start timer
One-shot mode
Scheduled-interrupt mode
Read elapsed time
Selecting the Mode
RET(93)
Select either the one-shot mode or the scheduled-interrupt mode.
One-shot Mode
Normal program
Normal program
Interrupt program
Interval timer interrupt
Interval timer operation
Start timer
35
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Interrupt Functions
2-1
Scheduled-interrupt Mode
Normal program
Interrupt program
Interval timer interrupt
Interval timer operation
Start timer
In the scheduled-interrupt mode, the timer is reset each time the interrupt program is called when the set time elapses, and then the interval timer operates
again.
Be careful with regard to the interrupt program’s execution time and the interval
timer’s set time. If the interrupt program’s execution time exceeds the interval
timer’s set time, scheduled interrupts cannot be executed properly.
Ladder Diagram
Programming
The following table shows the instruction operations related to interrupt input
control.
Instruction
Control
((@)STIM(69)
)
( ) Start one-shot timer
Start scheduled-interrupt
timer
Read timer PV
Stop timer
(@)INT(89)
Mask all interrupts
Unmask all interrupts
Operation
Starts interval timer in one-shot mode.
Starts interval timer in
scheduled-interrupt mode.
Reads the timer PV.
Stops timer operations.
Prohibits all interrupts, including interrupt
inputs, interval timer interrupts,
high-speed counters, etc.
Permits all interrupts, including interrupt
inputs, interval timer interrupts,
high-speed counters, etc.
Starting Timers
This function sets the mode (one-shot or scheduled-interrupt) and the timer’s
SV, and starts the interval timer.
One-shot Mode
(@)STIM(69)
000
C2
C3
Control designation (000: Start one-shot timer)
First word of timer SV
Subroutine number (4 digits BCD: 0000 to 0049)
Scheduled-interrupt Mode
(@)STIM(69)
003
C2
C3
36
Control designation (003: Start scheduled-interrupt timer)
First word of timer SV
Subroutine number (4 digits BCD): 0000 to 0049
C2
Decrementing counter initial value (4 digits Hex): 0000 to 9999
C2+1
Decrementing time interval (4 digits BCD; unit: 0.1 ms):
0005 to 0320 (0.5 to 32 ms)
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Interrupt Functions
2-1
The interval from when STIM(69) is executed until the set time elapses is calculated as follows:
(Content of word C2) x (Content of words C2 + 1) x 0.1 ms
(0.5 to 319,968 ms)
When a constant is set for C2, that value will be taken as the decrementing
counter initial value, and the decrementing time interval will become 10 (1 ms).
(The SV is specified just as it is, in units of ms.)
Reading Timer PVs
This function reads interval timer PVs.
(@)STIM(69)
006
Control designation (006: Read timer PV)
C2
C3
C2
C2+1
C3
Number of times decrementing timer
is decremented (4 digits Hex)
Decrementing time interval
(4 digits BCD; unit: 0.1 ms)
Time elapsed since last decrement
(4 digits BCD; unit: 0.1 ms)
Stopping Timers
This function stops the interval timer.
(@)STIM(69)
010
Control designation (010: Stop timer)
000
Fixed: 000
Fixed: 000
000
Masking or Unmasking All Interrupts
For details on masking/unmasking all interrupts, refer to 2-1-1 Interrupt Inputs
and 7-29 Interrupt Control Instructions.
37
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Interrupt Functions
2-1
Operation Example
One-shot Mode
Explanation
In this example, the timer is started when the execution condition (00005) turns
from OFF to ON. When the time (approx. 1 s) has elapsed, the interrupt subroutine is executed one time. When the interrupt subroutine is executed, 1 is added
to DM 0000.
Elapsed time: 100 x 100 x 0.1 = 1,000 ms
Programming
ON for 1 cycle at beginning
of operation
Clears Increment Area (DM 0000).
Decrement counter setting
Count: 100 (0000 to 9999 BCD)
Count interval setting
Count interval setting: 10 ms
(0005 to 0320 BCD)
(69)
Starts interval timer in one-shot mode.
(Execution condition)
Always ON
Executes interrupt one time
only when time elapses.
38
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Interrupt Functions
2-1
Scheduled-interrupt Mode
Explanation
In this example, the timer is started when the execution condition (00005) turns
from OFF to ON. Then the interrupt subroutine is executed each time that the set
time (approx. 1 s) elapses. Each time the interrupt subroutine is executed, 1 is
added to DM 0000.
Elapsed time: 100 x 100 x 0.1 = 1,000 ms
Programming
ON for 1 cycle at beginning
of operation
Clears Increment Area (DM 0000).
Decrement counter setting
Count: 100 (0000 to 9999 BCD)
Count interval setting
Count interval setting: 10 ms (0005 to 0320 BCD)
(69)
Starts interval timer in scheduled-interrupt mode.
(Execution condition)
Always ON
Executes interrupt each time the set time elapses.
2-1-3 Precautions on Programming Interrupts
If words in memory are being manipulated both in the main program and in an
interrupt program, the interrupts must be masked when the words are being manipulated in the main program.
When an interrupt occurs, any instruction being executed in the main program
will be interrupted and processing data will be temporarily stored while the interrupt program is being executed. When execution of the interrupt program has
been completed, the original execution status of the main program will be restored and execution will be continued. Thus, if the manipulation of words in the
main program is interrupted and the same words are altered in the interrupt program, the words altered in the interrupt program will simply be restored to the
status that was in the process of being written in the main program, effectively
canceling the result of the interrupt program. If there are instructions that should
not be interrupted during processing in the main program, disable interrupts before and after executing them.
The are two cases in which the above problem can occur: When manipulating
the contents of one word and when manipulating the contents of multiple words.
39
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Interrupt Functions
Manipulating One Word
2-1
A problem can occur in the situation shown below because processing of the
ADD instruction could be interrupted between the 1st and 3rd operands and the
MOV instruction then executed in the interrupt program.
Interrupt Program
Main Program
MOV (21)
#0010
DM0000
ADD (30)
DM0000
#0001
DM0000
Flow of Processing
The processing that would occur when the ADD instruction above is interrupted
is illustrated below.
DM0000
Contents of DM 0000 read (1234)
1234
BCD add executed (1234 + 1 = 1235)
Interrupt generated
Processing interrupted
MOV executed
ADD
instruction
#0010 moved to DM 0000
Data temporarily buffered
0010
Add result (1235)
Interrupt program ended
Processing continued
Add result (1235) written
1235
Processing is interrupted before the result of the add operation can be written to
DM 0000 and the result is buffered. The interrupt program writes #0010 to
DM 0000, but this is immediately overwritten by the result of the add (1235) as
soon as execution of the interrupt program has been completed. In other words,
the result of the interrupt program have been consequently nullified.
Solution
The INT instruction can be used to enable and disable interrupts before and after
the add operation as shown below.
Main program
INT (89)
100
Interrupts disabled.
000
000
ADD (30)
DM0000
#0001
DM0000
INT (89)
200
000
000
40
Interrupts enabled.
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Interrupt Functions
Manipulating Multiple
Words
2-1
A problem can occur in the situation shown below because processing of the
BSET instruction could be interrupted before all of the data for BSET has been
written and the CMP instruction then executed in the interrupt program.
Interrupt Program
Main Program
CMP (20)
DM0000
DM0010
25506 (=)
A
BEST (71)
#1234
DM0000
DM0010
Flow of Processing
The processing that would occur when the BSET instruction above is interrupted
is illustrated below.
DM0000 DM0001
#1234 transferred to DM 0000
1234
#1234 transferred to DM 0001
003E
DM0002
DM0010
A
0502
ABCD
OFF
1234
Interrupt generated
Processing interrupted
DM 0000 read.
Processing
for CMP
1234
ABCD
DM 0010 read.
DM 0000 and DM 0010 compared
Comparison result output
BSET
instruction
OFF∗1
Interrupt program ended
Processing continued
0502
#1234 transferred to DM 0002
#1234 transferred to DM 0010
1234
1234
1234
ABCD
1234
1234∗2
OFF
Processing is interrupted before #1234 can be written to DM 0010. Bit A in the
interrupt program is thus turned OFF and will remain OFF when execution of the
main program is resumed even though the contents of DM 0000 and DM 0010
will be the same as soon as the main program is resumed, i.e., the result of the
comparison is not correct
Solution
The INT instruction can be used to enable and disable interrupts before and after
the BSET instruction as shown below.
Main program
INT (89)
100
000
000
Interrupts
disabled.
BEST (71)
#1234
DM0000
DM0010
INT (89)
200
000
000
Interrupts
enabled.
41
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
2-2
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
CPM2A CPU Units and most CPM2C CPU Units have five points for high-speed
counters: One point for a high-speed counter with a maximum response frequency of 20 kHz, and four points for interrupt inputs (counter mode).
CPM2C CPU Units with 10 I/O points have four points for high-speed counters:
One point for a high-speed counter with a maximum response frequency of 20
kHz, and three points for interrupt inputs (counter mode).
High-speed
counters
High-speed counter
No interrupts
Target value comparison interrupts
1 point
Count check
interrupts
Interrupt inputs
(counter mode)
4 points
(2 points in CPM2C CPU
Units with 10 I/O points
and CPM2C-S CPU Units)
Range comparison
interrupts
No interrupts
Count-up
interrupts
The CPM2A/CPM2C provides both a built-in high-speed counter and built-in interrupt inputs.
Types of High-speed
Counters
High-speed Counter
The built-in high-speed counter is a counter based on inputs to the CPU Unit’s
built-in points 00000 to 00002. The high-speed counter itself has one point, and
it can provide either an incrementing/decrementing or just an incrementing
count depending on the mode setting.
Input No.
(See note.)
00000
00001
0000
00002
Response
frequency
5 kHz
20 kHz
Input mode (count value)
Control method
Differential phase input mode
(-8388608 to 8388607)
Pulse + direction input
mode(-8388608 to 8388607)
Target value
comparison
co
so interrupts
e
s
Range comparison
interrupts
Up/down pulse input mode
(-8388608 to 8388607)
Increment mode
(0 to 16777215)
Note Input points not used for counter inputs can be used as ordinary inputs.
Interrupt Inputs (Counter Mode)
Interrupt inputs (counter mode) are counters based on inputs to the CPU Unit’s
built-in points 00003 to 00006 (00003 to 00004 in CPM2C CPU Units with 10 I/O
points and in CPM2C-S CPU Units). These counters have four points, and they
can provide either an incrementing or decrementing count depending on the
mode setting. Since this function utilizes interrupt inputs for counting, it is not
possible to use the same inputs for other interrupt inputs.
Input No.
(See note.)
00003
00004
00005
00006
Note
42
Response
frequency
2 kHz
Input mode (count value)
Incrementing
g counter
(0000 to FFFF)
Control method
Count-up interrupts
Decrementing counter
(0000 to FFFF)
1. Input points not used for counter inputs can be used as ordinary inputs.
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
2. Input points 00005 and 00006 do not exist in CPM2C CPU Units with 10 I/O
points and CPM2C-S CPU Units.
High-speed Counter Interrupts
Interrupts by High-speed Counter (Count-check Interrupts)
Target Value Comparison Interrupts
The current count is compared to each target value in the order that they are registered in the table. When the count is the same as the current target value, an
interrupt subroutine is executed. Up to 16 target values and interrupt subroutines can be registered in the table in either the incrementing or decrementing
direction.
Current count
Target values in incrementing
direction
Target values in decrementing
direction
Match with target value
during incrementing count
Match with target value
during decrementing count
Time
Interrupt processing can be executed when the current count matches a target value in
either the incrementing or decrementing direction.
Range Comparison Interrupts
A range comparison table contains up to eight ranges which are each defined by
a lower limit and an upper limit, as well as their corresponding subroutine numbers. The corresponding subroutine is called and executed when the current
count (the counter PV) falls within a given range.
Counter PV
Upper limit 1
Lower limit 1
Upper limit 2
Lower limit 2
Range comRange comparison condi- parison condition 2 satisfied. tion 1 satisfied.
Range comRange comparison condi- parison condition 1 satisfied. tion 2 satisfied.
Interrupt processing can be executed when a range comparison condition is satisfied.
Furthermore, when the counter PV is within a range between an upper limit and a lower
limit, the corresponding bits (from 0 to 7) in AR 11 will turn ON.
Count-up Interrupts by Interrupt Inputs (Counter Mode)
An interrupt subroutine is executed each time the condition is satisfied that the
counter PV equals the counter SV (in incrementing mode) or 0 (in decrementing
mode).
43
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
2-2-1 Using High-speed Counters
The CPM2A/CPM2C’s CPU Unit has one built-in channel for a high-speed
counter that can count inputs at a maximum of 20 kHz. Using this in conjunction
with the interrupt function enables target value comparison control or range
comparison control to be executed without deviating from the cycle time.
Counter inputs
Reset input
Sensor
Rotary encoder
Input mode
Item
Increment
Pulse inputs
See note 1.
Response frequency
Differential phase Pulse + direction
Up/down input
Phase-A inputs
Pulse inputs
CW inputs
Phase-B inputs
Direction inputs
CCW inputs
Phase-Z inputs (Reset inputs) (See note 1.)
Differential phase
Phase inputs
Phase inputs
inputs (4X)
5 kHz
20 kHz
20 kHz
Count value
–8388608 to 8388607
0 to 16777215
Counter PV storage destination
(See note 2.)
Interrupts
Target value
comparison
Range comparison
Words SR 248 (rightmost digit) and SR 249 (leftmost digit)
Input
number
b
00000
00001
00002
Input method
Counter reset method
Phase inputs
20 kHz
Up to 16 target values and interrupt subroutine numbers can be registered in either
the incrementing or decrementing direction.
Up to eight ranges (with upper and lower limits) and subroutine numbers can be
registered.
Phase-Z signal + software reset: Counter is reset when IR 00002 turns ON while
SR 25200 is ON.
Software reset: Counter is reset when SR 25200 turns ON.
Note
1. Input points not used for counter inputs can be used as ordinary inputs.
2. When not used for the counter PV storage destination, these words can be
used as ordinary IR words.
3. SR 25200 is read once each cycle. Up to one cycle may be required for a
reset to occur on the leading edge of phase Z.
The following table shows the relationships between the high-speed counter
and the CPM2A/CPM2C’s other functions.
44
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
Function
2-2
Interval timer interrupts
Synchronized pulse control
Cannot be used simultaneously.
Interrupt inputs
Can be used simultaneously.
Interval timer interrupts
Can be used simultaneously.
High-speed counters
---
Interrupt inputs (counter mode)
Can be used simultaneously.
Pulse outputs
Can be used simultaneously.
Quick-response inputs
Can be used simultaneously.
Input time constant
See note.
Clock
Can be used simultaneously.
Note When inputs 00000 to 00002 are set for use as a high-speed counter, the input
time constants for the relevant inputs are disabled. The input time constants remain in effect, however, for the values for refreshing the relevant input relay
area.
Operation Example
Select the input mode and reset
method.
Input mode: Differential phase input, pulse + direction input, up/down input,
or increment
Reset method: Phase-Z + software reset, or software reset
No interrupts (Read high-speed counter PV, or read range comparison results)
Select the interrupts to be used.
Target value comparison interrupts
Range comparison interrupts
Wire the inputs.
Input numbers: 00000, 00001, 00002
High-speed counter setting
PC Setup (DM 6642)
Input mode: Differential phase input, pulse + direction input, up/down input,
or increment
Reset method: Phase-Z + software reset, or software reset
CTBL(63): Register comparison table, start comparison
Create a ladder diagram program.
INI(61): Change PV, start comparison
PRV(62): Read high-speed counter PV, read high-speed counter comparison
status, read range comparison results
SBN(92) and RET(93): Create interrupt subroutine program
(when count-check interrupts are used)
45
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
PC Setup
High-speed
counter function
Encoder
inputs
Input mode
2-2
DM 6642, bits 08 to 15
Count-check interrupt
generated.
Count
Differential phase input
Ladder diagram program
Pulse + direction input
Up/down input
CTBL(63)
Increment input
REGISTER COMPARISON TABLE instruction
Specified subroutine executed
(when count-check interrupts are
used).
SBN(92)
Register comparison
table
Start comparison
PC Setup
DM 6642, bits
00 to 03
INI(61)
Every scan
Counter PV
MODE CONTROL
instruction
Change PV
Start/stop
comparison
RET(93)
Each time
PRV(62)
SR 249 SR 248
HIGH-SPEED COUNTER
PV READ instruction
Read PV
Read comparison status
Range comparison
results
AR 1100 to AR 1107
Read range comparison results
Selecting the Input Mode and Reset Method
Input Mode
Select the input mode for the high-speed counter according to the signal type.
Differential Phase Input Mode
In the differential phase input mode, the count is incremented or decremented
according to two differential phase signals with a multiplication of 4 (phase A and
phase B).
Maximum frequency: 5 kHz
ON
Phase A
OFF
ON
Phase B
OFF
Count
Nms → Frequency =
1,000
Nx4
46
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
Pulse + Direction Input Mode
In the pulse + direction input mode, pulse signals and direction signals are input,
and the count is incremented or decremented according to the direction signal
status.
Maximum frequency: 20 kHz
ON
Pulse inputs
OFF
ON
Direction
inputs
OFF
Count
1,000
Nms → Frequency =
N
Up/Down Pulse Input Mode
In the up/down pulse input mode, CW signals (up pulses) and CCW signals
(down pulses) are input, and the count is incremented or decremented accordingly.
Maximum frequency: 20 kHz
ON
CW inputs
OFF
ON
CCW inputs
OFF
Count
Incremented
Nms → Frequency =
Decremented
1,000
N
Increment Mode
In the increment mode, pulse signals are input and the count is incremented with
each pulse. IR 00001 can be used as an ordinary input.
Maximum frequency: 20 kHz
ON
Pulse inputs
OFF
Count
Nms → Frequency =
1,000
N
When the differential phase input mode is used, the inputs must be 4X differential phase inputs. When an encoder is connected in this mode, the number of
counts per revolution will be four times the encoder resolution. When selecting
an encoder take into account the relationship with the number of counts that are
possible.
47
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
Count Values
The range of numbers counted by the high-speed counter are in linear mode
only. If the count is outside of the permissible range, an overflow or underflow will
result. The PV will become 0FFFFFFF if an overflow occurs, or FFFFFFFF if an
underflow occurs, and the comparison will be stopped.
Differential phase input
mode
Pulse + direction input
mode
Overflow (0FFFFFFF)
Underflow (FFFFFFFF)
Up/down pulse input
mode
Increment mode
Overflow (0FFFFFFF)
To restart the count following an overflow or underflow, reset the PV. (The PV is
automatically reset whenever operation is started or stopped.)
Reset Method
Either of the following two methods can be selected for resetting the counter PV
to 0.
Phase-Z Signal (Reset Input) + Software Reset
The PV is reset when a phase-Z signal (i.e., a reset input) turns ON while the
High-speed Counter Reset Flag (25200) is ON.
1 scan
Phase Z
Reset
Reset
Not reset
Reset
Not reset
Software Reset
The PV is reset when the High-speed Counter Reset Flag (25200) turns ON.
1 scan
Reset
Not reset
Not reset
Not reset
The High-speed Counter Reset Flag (25200) is refreshed with every scan, so it
must remain ON for at least one cycle time to be certain it is read.
Even when the PV is reset, the comparison table registration status, the comparison execution status, and the range comparison results are all retained just as
they were before the PV reset. (If a comparison was underway prior to the PV
reset, that comparison will be continued with no change following the reset.)
Following the reset, the High-speed Counter Reset Flag (25200) must be turned
OFF in order to be able to execute the next reset. To be certain that it is turned
OFF, it must be remain OFF for at least one cycle time.
Selecting the Interrupts to be Used
High-speed Counter
Interrupts
48
High-speed counter interrupts use a comparison table and perform a count
check by either of the methods described below (i.e., target value comparison or
range comparison). If the conditions are satisfied, then an interrupt is generated.
For details regarding interrupt priorities, refer to Order of Priority for Interrupts
under 2-1 Interrupts.
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
If an interrupt is generated during execution of one of the high-speed counter
control instructions, i.e., CTBL(63), INI(61), or PRV(62), these instructions will
not be executed within the interrupt program.
Target Value Comparison Interrupts
Up to 16 combinations of comparison conditions (target value and count direction) and interrupt subroutine numbers can be registered in the comparison
table. The specified subroutine is executed when the counter PV matches a target value in the comparison table.
PV
Comparison table
Target value: 5,000
Count direction: Increment
Subroutine number: 10
Increment
direction
Decrement
direction
Target value: 1,000
Count direction: Increment
Subroutine number: 8
Increment
direction
Target value: 3,000
Count direction: Decrement
Subroutine number: 9
Time
Interrupt
Subroutine 8
executed
Interrupt
Subroutine 10
executed
Interrupt
Subroutine 9
executed
The relationship between the target value comparison count check and the comparison table is different for the CPM1/CPM1A. Refer to the individual manuals
for details.
It is not possible to specify more than one comparison direction condition for the
same target value in the comparison table.
Either target value comparison or range comparison can be used for high-speed
counter interrupts.
Range Comparison Interrupts
Up to eight combinations of comparison conditions (upper limit and lower limit)
and interrupt subroutine numbers can be registered in the comparison table.
The specified subroutine is executed once when the counter PV is greater than
or equal to the lower limit and less than or equal to the upper limit in the comparison table.
Comparison table
PV
Lower limit: 1,000
Upper limit: 4,000
Subroutine number: 10
Lower limit: 3,000
Upper limit: 5,000
Subroutine number: 9
Time
Interrupt
Subroutine 10
executed
Interrupt
Interrupt
Interrupt
Subroutine 9 Subroutine 9 Subroutine 10
executed
executed
executed
If two or more comparison conditions are satisfied simultaneously (in the same
cycle), the interrupt for the condition closest to the beginning of the comparison
table will be executed.
49
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
Either target value comparison or range comparison can be used for high-speed
counter interrupts.
If an interrupt is generated during execution of one of the high-speed counter
control instructions, i.e., CTBL(63), INI(61), or PRV(62), these instructions will
not be executed within the interrupt program.
If an interrupt is generated while an instruction controlling the high-speed counter is being executed in the normal program area, the CTBL(63), INI(61), and
PRV(62), instructions will not be executed within the interrupt program. This situation can be avoided by means of the following programming.
Method 1
Method 2
Prohibit interrupts in the
normal program area while
executing the instruction.
In the normal program area,
re-execute the instruction
that could not be executed.
Normal program area
Interrupt program area
Interrupt processing subroutines are defined by SBN(92) and RET(93), just like
ordinary subroutines.
An SBS UNDEFD error will be generated during the program check while an interrupt processing subroutine is being defined, but execution will be normal.
Wiring Inputs
Wire the inputs as shown in the following illustrations, according to the input
mode and the reset method.
CPM2A Inputs
Differential Phase Input Mode
Up/Down Pulse Input Mode
00000: CW input
00001: CCW input
00002: Reset input
00000: Phase-A input
00001: Phase-B input
00002: Phase-Z input
Pulse + Direction Input Mode
00000: Pulse input
00001: Direction input
00002: Reset input
50
Increment Mode
00000: Pulse input
00002: Reset input
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
CPM2C Inputs
Note The following examples are for Fujitsu-compatible connectors. Input bit addresses and connector pin numbers depend on the models. Refer to the CPM2C
Operation Manual (W356) or the CPM2C-S Operation Manual (W377) for details.
Differential Phase Input Mode
Input terminals
Input connector
(See above note.)
00002: Phase-Z input
00001: Phase-B input
00000: Phase-A input
00002: Phase-Z input
00001: Phase-B input
00000: Phase-A input
Up/Down Pulse Input Mode
Input terminals
Input connector
(See above note.)
00002: Reset input
00001: CCW input
00000: CW input
00002: Reset input
00001: CCW input
00000: CW input
51
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
Pulse + Direction Input Mode
Input terminals
Input connector
(See above note.)
00002: Reset input
00001: Direction input
00000: Pulse input
00002: Reset input
00001: Direction input
00000: Pulse input
Increment Mode
Input terminals
Input connector
(See above note.)
00002: Reset input
00000: Pulse input
00002: Reset input
00000: Pulse input
When phase-Z and reset inputs are not used, 00002 can be used as an ordinary
input.
PC Setup
52
Set the PC Setup areas related to the high-speed counter as follows:
High-speed counter usage
DM 6642, bits 08 to 15
Input mode
DM 6642, bits 00 to 03
Reset method
(Use/not use 00002 as ordinary input)
DM 6642, bits 04 to 07
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
Word
DM 6642
Bits
Function
2-2
Setting
00 to 03
High-speed counter input mode setting
0, 1, 2, or 4
04 to 07
0: Differential phase input 5 kHz
1: Pulse + direction input 20 kHz
2: Up/down input
20 kHz
4: Increment
20 kHz
High-speed counter reset method setting
0 or 1
08 to 15
0: Phase-Z signal + software reset
1: Software reset
High-speed counter usage setting
01
00: Do not use.
01: Use as high-speed counter
02: Use as pulse synchronization control
(10 Hz to 500 Hz)
03: Use as pulse synchronization control
(20 Hz to 1 kHz)
04: Use as pulse synchronization control
(300 Hz to 20 kHz)
The new settings for the System Setup go into effect when operation begins
(when PROGRAM mode is changed to MONITOR or RUN mode), or when the
CPM2A/CPM2C’s power is turned ON.
Ladder Diagram
Programming
The following table shows the instructions related to high-speed counter control.
Instruction
(@)CTBL(63)
(@)INI(61)
((@)PRV(62)
)
( )
(@)INT(89)
Control
Operation
Register target value
comparison table
Register range
comparison table
Register target value
comparison table and
start comparison
Registers target value comparison table.
Register range
comparison table and
start comparison
Registers range comparison table and
starts comparison.
Registers range comparison table.
Registers target value comparison table
and starts comparison.
Start comparison
Starts comparison with registered
comparison table.
Stop comparison
Stops comparison.
Change PV
Changes the high-speed counter PV.
Read PV
Reads the high-speed counter PV.
Read status
Reads the high-speed counter status.
Read range comparison Reads range comparison result.
result
Mask all interrupts
Prohibits all interrupts, including interrupt
inputs, interval timer interrupts,
high-speed counters, etc.
Unmask all interrupts
Permits all interrupts, including interrupt
inputs, interval timer interrupts,
high-speed counters, etc.
53
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
The following table shows the data areas related to high-speed counter control.
Word
248
249
Bits
252
00 to 15
00 to 15
00
AR11
00 to 07
08
09
Name
High-speed
counter PV
g
Contents
Reads high-speed
counter
g
PV
PV.
High-speed counter reset
When this bit turns ON, a
software reset is triggered
for the high-speed counter.
High-speed counter range
comparison results
High-speed counter
comparison
High-speed counter PV
overflow/underflow
ON: Condition satisfied
OFF: Condition not satisfied
ON: Comparison in progress
OFF: Comparison stopped
ON: Overflow/underflow
OFF: Normal
Register Target Value Comparison Table
Register Target Value Comparison Table and Start Comparison
These functions register a comparison table to the CPM2A/CPM2C for the purpose of count checking in target value comparison. It is also possible to start the
comparison along with the registration.
Register Target Value Comparison Table
(@)CTBL(63)
000
002
S
Port specifier (000: High-speed counter)
Mode designation (002: Register target value comparison table only)
Beginning word of comparison table
Register Target Value Comparison Table and Start Comparison
(@)CTBL(63)
000
000
S
Port specifier (000: High-speed counter)
Mode designation (000: Register target value comparison table
and start comparison)
Beginning word of comparison table
Target Value Comparison Table
Number of comparisons
Number of comparisons
0001 to 0016 BCD
Target value 1 (rightmost)
Target value (rightmost, leftmost)
Target value 1 (leftmost)
Comparison 1 setting
Subroutine number
Differential phase input mode
Pulse + direction input mode
Target value 2 (rightmost)
Target value 2 (leftmost)
Subroutine number
Register the counter value to be compared.
The leftmost digit shows the sign (+/–).
Comparison 2 setting
Up/down pulse input mode
When incrementing: F8388607 to 08388607
When decrementing: F8388608 to 08388606
Increment mode
00000001 to 16777215
The range that can be specified depends on the mode
when target comparison interrupts are specified.
Subroutine number
Register the direction of comparison and the subroutine
number to be executed when there is a match.
The leftmost digit shows the direction (increment/decrement).
Increment direction: 0000 to 0049
Decrement direction: F000 to F049
It is not possible to specify more than one comparison direction condition for the
same target value in the comparison table.
Once a comparison table has been registered, it will be saved in the CPM2A/
CPM2C as long as no other comparison table is registered and the mode is not
changed to PROGRAM mode (and as long as the power is not turned OFF).
54
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
Register Range Comparison Table
Register Range Comparison Table and Start Comparison
These functions register a comparison table to the CPM2A/CPM2C for the purpose of count checking in range comparison. It is also possible to start the comparison along with the registration.
Register Range Comparison Table
(@)CTBL(63)
000
003
S
Port specifier (000: High-speed counter)
Mode designation (003: Register range comparison table only)
Beginning word of comparison table
Register Range Comparison Table and Start Comparison
(@)CTBL(63)
000
001
S
Port specifier (000: High-speed counter)
Mode designation (001: Register range comparison table
and start comparison)
Beginning word of comparison table
Range Comparison Table
Eight range comparison conditions consisting of upper
and lower limits and subroutine numbers must be set.
Lower limit 1 (rightmost)
Lower limit 1 (leftmost)
Upper limit 1 (rightmost)
Range comparison
condition 1
Upper and lower limits (rightmost, leftmost)
Register the upper and lower limits.
The leftmost digit shows the sign (+/–).
Upper limit 1 (leftmost)
Differential phase input mode
Pulse + direction input mode
Subroutine number
Up/down pulse input mode
F8388608 to 08388607
Increment mode
00000000 to 16777215
Subroutine number
Register the subroutine number to be executed when
the range comparison condition is satisfied.
Lower limit 8 (rightmost)
Lower limit 8 (leftmost)
Upper limit 8 (rightmost)
0000 to 0049
Range comparison
condition 8
If the set values do not reach 8, set FFFF.
Upper limit 8 (leftmost)
Subroutine number
If two or more comparison conditions are satisfied simultaneously (in the same
cycle), the interrupt for the condition closest to the beginning of the comparison
table will be executed.
Once a comparison table has been registered, it will be saved in the CPM2A/
CPM2C as long as no other comparison table is registered and the mode is not
changed to PROGRAM mode (and as long as the power is not turned OFF).
Start/Stop Comparison
The comparison can be started or stopped according to the table that has already been registered to the CPM2A/CPM2C by CTBL(63).
Start Comparison
(@)INI(61)
000
Port specifier (000: High-speed counter)
000
Control designation (000: Start comparison)
Fixed: 000
000
55
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
Stop Comparison
(@)INI(61)
000
001
Port specifier (000: High-speed counter)
Control designation (001: Stop comparison)
000
Fixed: 000
Change PV
This function changes the high-speed counter PV.
(@)INI(61)
000
Port specifier (000: High-speed counter)
002
Control designation (002: Change PV)
Beginning word of PV data to change
C2
Rightmost 4 digits
C2
Leftmost 4 digits
C2+1
PV data to change (Rightmost and leftmost)
Register the PV data to be changed.
The leftmost digit shows the sign (+/–).
Differential phase input mode
Pulse + direction input mode
Up/down pulse input mode
F8388608 to 08388607
Increment mode
00000000 to 16777215
No interrupt will occur during a target value comparison even if the target value
registered in the comparison table is changed by INI(61).
Read PV
This function reads the high-speed counter PV.
Using an Instruction
(@)PRV(62)
000
Port specifier (000: High-speed counter)
002
Control designation (000: Read PV)
Beginning word for storing PV
C2
D
Rightmost 4 digits
D+1
Leftmost 4 digits
PV (Rightmost and leftmost)
The read PV will be stored here.
The leftmost digit shows the sign (+/–).
Differential phase input mode
Pulse + direction input mode
Up/down pulse input mode
F8388608 to 08388607
Increment mode
00000000 to 16777215
Using Data Areas
The high-speed counter PV is stored in words 248 and 249 as shown below.
SR 248
PV (Rightmost word)
SR 249
PV (Leftmost word)
Words 248 and 249 are refreshed with every scan, so there may be a discrepancy from the exact PV at any given time.
When the high-speed counter is not used, words 248 and 249 can be used as
work words.
When the PV is read by executing PRV(62), words 248 and 249 are refreshed
with the same timing.
56
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
Read Status
This function reads the high-speed counter status, such as whether a comparison operation is in progress or whether an overflow or underflow has occurred.
Using an Instruction
(@)PRV(62)
000
Port specifier (000: High-speed counter)
001
Control designation (001: Read status)
D
Word for storing status
Overflow/underflow
0: Normal
1: Overflow/underflow
Comparison
0: Stopped
1: In progress
Using Data Areas
The status is stored in AR 1108 and AR 1109 as shown below.
Overflow/underflow
0: Normal
1: Overflow/underflow
Comparison
0: Stopped
1: In progress
AR 1108 and AR 1109 are refreshed with every scan, so there may be a discrepancy from the exact status at any given time.
When the status is read by executing PRV(62), AR 1108 and AR 1109 are refreshed with the same timing.
Read Range Comparison Result
This function reads the result of a range comparison showing whether or not the
PV is within a range.
Using an Instruction
(@)PRV(62)
000
002
D
Port specifier (000: High-speed counter)
Control designation (002: Read range comparison result)
Beginning word for storing range comparison result
Match with 1st condition (0: No match; 1: Match)
Match with 2nd condition (0: No match; 1: Match)
Match with 3rd condition (0: No match; 1: Match)
Match with 4th condition (0: No match; 1: Match)
Match with 5th condition (0: No match; 1: Match)
Match with 6th condition (0: No match; 1: Match)
Match with 7th condition (0: No match; 1: Match)
Match with 8th condition (0: No match; 1: Match)
Using Data Areas
The range comparison result is stored in AR 1100 through AR 1107, as shown
below.
Match with 1st condition (0: No match; 1: Match)
Match with 2nd condition (0: No match; 1: Match)
Match with 3rd condition (0: No match; 1: Match)
Match with 4th condition (0: No match; 1: Match)
Match with 5th condition (0: No match; 1: Match)
Match with 6th condition (0: No match; 1: Match)
Match with 7th condition (0: No match; 1: Match)
Match with 8th condition (0: No match; 1: Match)
57
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
AR 1100 through AR 1107 are refreshed with every scan, so there may be a discrepancy from the exact PV range comparison result at any given time.
When the range comparison result is read by executing PRV(62), AR 1100
through AR 1107 are refreshed with the same timing.
Mask/Unmask All Interrupts
For details regarding masking and unmasking all interrupts, refer to 2-1-1 Interrupt Inputs.
Application Examples
Target Value Comparison
Explanation
In this example, specified interrupt subroutines are executed by matching the
high-speed counter’s PV with five values set as a target value comparison table.
With each interrupt, the data in DM 0000 to DM 0004 is incremented by one.
Wiring (CPM2A)
Orange
E6B2-CWZ6C
Rotary Encoder
White
Black
Blue
Brown
58
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
Wiring (CPM2C)
Note The following examples are for Fujitsu-compatible connectors. Input bit addresses and connector pin numbers depend on the models. Refer to the CPM2C
Operation Manual (W356) or the CPM2C-S Operation Manual (W377) for details.
Input terminals
Blue
Rotary encoder
Brown
Orange
White
Black
Input connector
(See above note.)
Blue
Rotary encoder
Brown
Orange
White
Black
PC Setup
15
DM 6642
0
0
1
0
0
0: Differential phase input
0: Reset by phase-Z signal + software reset
01: Use as high-speed counter
59
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
Programming
ON for 1 cycle at beginning
of operation
(71)
(63) Register target value comparison table and begin comparison
High-speed counter
Register target value comparison table and begin comparison
Beginning word of comparison table
Number of comparisons: 5
(92)
Target value:
00010000
Always ON
(38)
Comparison 2
Comparison 1
Increment, subroutine 049
Target value:
00003000
Comparison 2
Increment, subroutine 040
Target value:
00000000
(93)
Comparison 3
Decrement, subroutine 010
(92)
Target value:
00003000
Always ON
Comparison 4
Decrement, subroutine 041
(38)
Comparison 4
Target value:
00010000
Comparison 5
Decrement, subroutine 048
(93)
(92)
Always ON
(38)
Comparison 5
(93)
(92)
Always ON
(38)
Comparison 1
(93)
(92)
Always ON
(38)
(93)
(01)
60
Comparison 3
2-2
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
Range Comparison
Explanation
In this example, specified interrupt subroutines are executed by matching the
high-speed counter’s PV with five range set as a range comparison table. With
each interrupt, the data in DM 0000 to DM 0004 is incremented by one.
Wiring (CPM2A)
Orange
E6B2-CWZ6C
Rotary Encoder
White
Black
Blue
Brown
61
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
Wiring (CPM2C)
Note The following examples are for Fujitsu-compatible connectors. Input bit addresses and connector pin numbers depend on the models. Refer to the CPM2C
Operation Manual (W356) or the CPM2C-S Operation Manual (W377) for details.
Input terminals
Blue
Rotary encoder
Brown
Orange
White
Black
Input connector
(See above note.)
Blue
Rotary encoder
Brown
Orange
White
Black
PC Setup
15
DM 6642
0
0
1
0
0
0: Differential phase input
0: Reset by phase-Z signal + software reset
01: Use as high-speed counter
62
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
Programming
ON for 1 cycle at beginning
of operation
(71)
(63) Register range comparison table and begin comparison
High-speed counter
Register range comparison table and begin comparison
Beginning word of comparison table
Lower limit:
9,000
(92)
Comparison 1
Always ON
(38)
Comparison 1
Upper limit:
10,000
Subroutine 040
Lower limit:
7,000
(93)
Comparison 2
Upper limit:
8,000
(92)
Subroutine 041
Always ON
(38)
Comparison 2
Lower limit:
3,000
Comparison 3
Upper limit:
–3,000
(93)
Subroutine 010
Lower limit:
–8,000
(92)
Comparison 4
Always ON
Upper limit:
7,000
(38)
Comparison 3
Subroutine 042
Lower limit:
–10,000
(93)
Comparison 5
Upper limit:
9,000
(92)
Subroutine 043
Always ON
(38)
Comparison 4
Comparison 6
Not used.
Comparison 7
Not used.
Comparison 8
Not used.
(93)
(92)
Always ON
(38)
(93)
Comparison 5
(01)
63
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
2-2-2 Input Interrupts In Counter Mode
The four built-in interrupt inputs in the CPM2A/CPM2C’s CPU Unit can be used
in counter mode as inputs of up to 2 kHz. These inputs can be used as either
incrementing counters or decrementing counters, triggering an interrupt (i.e.,
executing an interrupt subroutine) when the count matches the set value.
Counter
input
Counter input
Normal
program
Interrupt
program
Input number
(Note 2)
00003
00004
00005
00006
Note
Count
Subroutine
Interrupt
number
0 to 65535
0
(0000 to FFFF) 1
2
3
Subroutine
Response
number (Note 3)
frequency
2 kHz
000
001
002
003
1. Input number 00005 and 00006 cannot be used in CPM2C CPU Units with
10 I/O points and CPM2C-S CPU Units.
2. Input numbers 00003 to 00006 can be used for any of the following functions: interrupt inputs, interrupt inputs (counter mode), or quick-response inputs. When not being used for any of these, they can be used as ordinary
inputs.
3. Subroutine numbers 000 to 003 are the subroutine numbers for interrupt
programs started up when interrupt inputs or count-up interrupts for interrupt inputs (counter mode) are generated. When not being used for this purpose, they can be used as ordinary inputs.
64
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
! Caution
2-2
Although IORF(97) can be used in interrupt subroutines, you must be careful of
the interval between IORF(97) executions. If IORF(97) is executed too frequently, a fatal system error may occur (FALS 9F), stopping operation. The interval
between executions of IORF(97) should be at least 1.3 ms + total execution time
of the interrupt subroutine.
The following table shows the relationships between interrupt inputs (counter
mode) and the CPM2A/CPM2C’s other functions.
Function
Interrupt inputs (counter mode)
Synchronized pulse control
Can be used simultaneously.
Interrupt inputs
See note 1.
Interval timer interrupts
Can be used simultaneously.
High-speed counters
Can be used simultaneously.
Interrupt inputs (counter mode)
See note 1.
Pulse outputs
Can be used simultaneously.
Quick-response inputs
See note 1.
Input time constant
See note 2.
Clock
Can be used simultaneously.
Note
1. The same input number (from 00003 to 00006) cannot be used for more
than one of the following functions: interrupt inputs, interrupt inputs (counter
mode), or quick-response inputs.
2. When inputs 00003 to 00006 are set for use as interrupt inputs (counter
mode), the input time constants for the relevant inputs are disabled. The input time constants remain in effect, however, for the values for refreshing
the relevant input relay area.
Procedure for Using Interrupt Inputs in Counter Mode
Set the interrupt input number.
Select either incrementing or
decrementing count.
Wire the inputs.
PC Setup (DM 6628)
Create a ladder diagram program.
Input numbers: 00003 to 00006 (00003 or 00004 for CPM2C CPU
Units with 10 I/O points and CPM2C-S CPU Units.)
1: Use as interrupt input (interrupt input mode or counter mode)
INI(61): Change counter PV
INT(89): Refresh counter SV*
PRV(62): Read counter PV
SBN(92) and RET(93): For creating interrupt subroutines.*
*Used only for count-up interrupts.
65
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
Interrupt
input
Counter (2 kHz) 0
Interrupt input (counter mode)
2-2
Interrupt generated
Specified subroutine executed.
(Used only for count-up interrupts.)
Ladder diagram program
SBN(92)
INTERRUPT
CONTROL
instruction
INT(89)
Counter (2 kHz) 1
RET(93)
Change SV (increment/
decrement)
Counter (2 kHz) 2
Counter (2 kHz) 3
Counter SV
Counter 0
Counter 1
Counter 2
Counter 3
PC Setup
MODE CONTROL
instruction
INI(61)
DM 6628
SR 240
SR 241
SR 242
SR 243
Change PV
Every scan
Counter SV
Counter 0
Counter 1
Counter 2
Counter 3
Setting the Interrupt
Input Number
Immediately
PRV(62)
HIGH-SPEED COUNTER
PV READ instruction
SR 244
SR 245
SR 246
SR 247
Read counter PV
With interrupt inputs in counter mode, the subroutine to be executed is determined by the interrupt corresponding to the input number.
Input number
Interrupt number
Subroutine number
00003
0
000
00004
1
001
00005*
2
002
00006*
3
003
Note *Input numbers 00005 and 00006 cannot be used for CPM2C CPU Units with 10
I/O points and for CPM2C-S CPU Units.
The same input number (from 00003 to 00006) cannot be used for more than
one of the following functions: interrupt inputs, interrupt inputs (counter mode),
or quick-response inputs.
66
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
Selecting Incrementing
or Decrementing Count
2-2
Either an incrementing or decrementing count can be used with interrupt inputs
in counter mode.
Incrementing Counter Mode
As the set value (SV) is refreshed, the count is incremented from 0, and the interrupt subroutine is executed when the present value (PV) matches the SV.
PV
The subroutine is executed when the count is up,
and the PV is reset to 0.
SV
Incrementing
Incrementing
Time
Interrupt
Return
Subroutine executed.
Interrupt
Subroutine executed.
Decrementing Counter Mode
As the set value (SV) is refreshed, the count is is decremented toward 0, and the
interrupt subroutine is executed when the present value (PV) reaches 0.
PV
The subroutine is executed when the count is up,
and the PV is reset to the SV.
SV
Decrementing
Decrementing
Time
Interrupt
Subroutine executed.
Wiring the Inputs
Return
Interrupt
Subroutine executed.
With the CPM2A, wire the input terminals as shown in the following illustration.
Input 00003: Input interrupt (counter mode) 0
Input 00004: Input interrupt (counter mode) 1
Input 00005: Input interrupt (counter mode) 2
Input 00006: Input interrupt (counter mode) 3
With the CPM2C, wire the input terminals as shown in the following illustration.
67
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
Note The following examples are for Fujitsu-compatible connectors. Input bit addresses and connector pin numbers depend on the models. Refer to the CPM2C
Operation Manual (W356) or the CPM2C-S Operation Manual (W377) for details.
Input terminals
00004: Input interrupt (counter mode) 1
00003: Input interrupt (counter mode) 0
Input connector
(See above note.)
00006: Input interrupt (counter mode) 3
00005: Input interrupt (counter mode) 2
00004: Input interrupt (counter mode) 1
00003: Input interrupt (counter mode) 0
Note Inputs 00006 and 00005 cannot
be used with CPU Units that
have only 10 I/O points.
PC Setup
The following table shows the settings in the PC Setup area related to interrupt
input usage.
Word
DM 6628
Bits
00 to 03
04 to 07
08 to 11
12 to 15
Interrupt setting for
input 00003
Interrupt setting for
input 00004
Interrupt setting for
input 00005*
Interrupt setting for
input 00006*
Function
0: Normal input
Setting
1
Interr pt input
inp t
1: Interrupt
(interrupt input mode or
counter mode)
2: Quick-response input
Note *Input number 00005 and 00006 cannot be used in CPM2C CPU Units with 10
I/O points and in CPM2C-S CPU Units.
The setting will go into effect when the mode is changed (from PROGRAM to
MONITOR/RUN) or when the power supply is turned ON to the CPM2A/
CPM2C.
68
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
Ladder Diagram
Programming
2-2
The following table shows the instruction operations related to interrupt input
(counter mode) control.
Instruction
(@)INT(89)
(@)INI(61)
Control
Operation
Refresh incrementing
counter SV
Refresh decrementing
counter SV
Mask all interrupts
Refreshes the counter’s SV and starts the
incrementing count.
Refreshes the counter’s SV and starts the
decrementing count.
Prohibits all interrupts, including interrupt
inputs, interval timer interrupts, high-speed
counters, etc.
Unmask all interrupts
Permits all interrupts, including interrupt
inputs, interval timer interrupts, high-speed
counters, etc.
Change PV
Changes the counter’s PV.
(@)PRV(62) Read PV
Reads the counter’s PV.
The functions related to input interrupts (counter mode) are executed according
to the data areas shown in the following table.
Word
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
Bits
00 to 15
00 to 15
00 to 15
00 to 15
00 to 15
00 to 15
00 to 15
00 to 15
Name
SV area for input interrupt (counter mode) 0
SV area for input interrupt (counter mode) 1
SV area for input interrupt (counter mode) 2
SV area for input interrupt (counter mode) 3
PV area for input interrupt (counter mode) 0
PV area for input interrupt (counter mode) 1
PV area for input interrupt (counter mode) 2
PV area for input interrupt (counter mode) 3
Contents
Stores the
counter’s
’ set
v l e (SV).
value
(SV)
Stores the
’
counter’s
present value
v l e
(PV).
Refresh Incrementing Counter SV / Refresh Decrementing Counter SV
These functions store the counter’s set values in data areas and refresh them by
means of INT(89). In this way, they start the count operation for interrupt inputs
(counter mode) and they permit interrupts.
Storing Set Values in Data Areas
The counter’s set values are stored in words 240, 241, 242, and 243.
SR 240
SV for interrupt input (count mode) 0: 0000 to FFFF
SR 241
SV for interrupt input (count mode) 1: 0000 to FFFF
SR 242
SV for interrupt input (count mode) 2: 0000 to FFFF
SR 243
SV for interrupt input (count mode) 3: 0000 to FFFF
69
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
Starting the Count Operation and Permitting Interrupts
Incrementing Counter
(@)INT(89)
004
Interrupt control designation (004: Refresh incrementing counter SV)
000
Fixed: 000
C2
Control data word
Decrementing Counter
(@)INT(89)
003
Interrupt control designation (003: Refresh decrementing counter SV)
000
Fixed: 000
C2
Control data word
Specify and store 0
Specify interrupt input (counter mode) 3
Specify interrupt input (counter mode) 2
Specify interrupt input (counter mode) 1
Specify interrupt input (counter mode) 0
0: Refresh SV
1: Do not refresh SV
Note When INT(89) is executed to mask interrupts during counter operation (interrupt
control designation 000), counter operation will be stopped and the counter PV
will be reset. To use the counter again, start the counter operation again as described above.
Change PV
This function refreshes the counter’s present value (PV).
(@)INT(89)
P
002
C2
Port specifier (100. 102, 102, 103: Interrupt inputs (counter mode) 0 to 3)
Control designation (002: Change PV)
Change PV data word
C2
Change PV data
Registers the PV data to be changed.
0000 to FFFF
Read PV
This function reads the counter’s present value (PV).
Using an Instruction
(@)PRV(62)
P
000
D
Port specifier (100. 102, 102, 103: Interrupt inputs (counter mode) 0 to 3)
Control designation (000: Read PV)
Word for storing PV
D
70
Read PV data
The PV that is read is stored here.
0000 to FFFF
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C High-speed Counters
2-2
Using Data Areas
The high-speed counter’s present value (PV) is stored in words SR 244 to
SR 247 as shown below.
SR 244
PV
Interrupt input (counter mode) 0
SR 245
PV
Interrupt input (counter mode) 1
SR 246
PV
Interrupt input (counter mode) 2
SR 247
PV
Interrupt input (counter mode) 3
Words SR 244 to SR 247 are refreshed with every scan, so there may be a discrepancy from the exact PV at any given time.
Words SR 244 to SR 247 cannot be used as work word even when the interrupt
inputs (counter mode) are not used.
When the PV is read by executing PRV(62), words 244 to 247 are refreshed with
the same timing.
Mask/Unmask All Interrupts
For details regarding masking and unmasking all interrupts, refer to 2-1-1 Interrupt Inputs.
Application Example
Explanation
In this example, the PV is decremented every time input 00003 is turned ON, and
DM 0000 is incremented by 1 by an interrupt subroutine every 100 times (64
Hex) that input 00003 is turned ON.
Wiring
The following diagram shows input wiring in the CPM2A.
Input device
71
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions
2-3
The following diagram shows input wiring in the CPM2C.
Note The following examples are for Fujitsu-compatible connectors. Input bit addresses and connector pin numbers depend on the models. Refer to the CPM2C
Operation Manual (W356) or the CPM2C-S Operation Manual (W377) for details.
Input terminals
Input connector
(See above note.)
Input device
Input device
PC Setup
15
DM 6628
0
0
0
0
1
Specifies bit 00003 as an interrupt input (counter mode). Inputs
00004 to 00006 are used as ordinary inputs.
Programming
ON for 1 cycle at beginning
of operation
Clears Increment Area (DM 0000).
Decrement counter setting
Counter SV: 64 Hex (100 times)
Stores SV in word 240.
(89)
Starts counter with bit 00003 as interrupt input
(counter mode).
Refreshes counter SV (decrement counter).
Always 000.
Specifies bit 00003. (Others are masked.)
Executed one time when count is up.
2-3
CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions
This section explains the settings and methods for using the CPM1/CPM1A interrupt functions.
72
CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions
Section
2-3
2-3-1 Types of Interrupts
The CPM1/CPM1A has three types of interrupt processing, as outlined below.
Input Interrupts
CPM1/CPM1A PCs have two or four interrupt inputs. Interrupt processing is
executed when one of these inputs is turned ON from an external source.
Interval Timer Interrupts
Interrupt processing is executed by an interval timer with a precision of 0.1 ms.
High-speed Counter Interrupts
The high-speed counter counts pulse inputs to one of CPU bits 00000 to 00002.
Interrupt processing is executed when the count reaches the set value of a builtin high-speed counter.
Interrupt Priority
When an interrupt is generated, the specified interrupt processing routine is
executed. Interrupts have the following priority ranking.
Input interrupts > Interval interrupts = High-speed counter interrupts
When an interrupt with a higher priority is received during interrupt processing,
the current processes will be stopped and the newly received interrupt will be
processed instead. After that routine has been completely executed, then processing of the previous interrupt will be resumed.
When an interrupt with a lower or equal priority is received during interrupt processing, then the newly received interrupt will be processed as soon as the routine currently being processed has been completely executed.
When two interrupts with equal priority are received at the same time, they are
executed in the following order:
Input interrupt 0 > Input interrupt 1 > Input interrupt 2 > Input interrupt 3
Interval interrupts > High-speed counter interrupts
Observe the following precautions when using interrupt programs:
Interrupt Program
Precautions
1, 2, 3...
1. A new interrupt can be defined within an interrupt program. Furthermore, an
interrupt can be cleared from within an interrupt program.
2. Another interrupt program cannot be written within an interrupt program.
3. A subroutine program cannot be written within an interrupt program. Do not
write a SUBROUTINE DEFINE instruction, SBN(92), within an interrupt program.
4. An interrupt program cannot be written within a subroutine program. Do not
write an interrupt program between a SUBROUTINE DEFINE instruction
(SBN(92)) and a RETURN instruction (RET(93)).
Inputs used as interrupts cannot be used as regular inputs.
High-speed Counter
Instructions and Interrupts
The following instructions cannot be executed in an interrupt subroutine when
an instruction that controls high-speed counters is being executed in the main
program:
INI(61), PRV(62), or CTBL(63)
The following methods can be used to circumvent this limitation:
73
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions
2-3
Method 1
All interrupt processing can be masked while the instruction is being executed.
@INT(89)
100
000
000
INI(61)
000
000
000
@INT(89)
200
000
000
Method 2
Execute the instruction again in the main program.
1, 2, 3...
1. This is the program section from the main program:
@PRV(62)
000
002
DM 0000
LR 0000
CTBL(63)
000
000
DM 0000
RSET LR 0000
2. This is the program section from the interrupt subroutine:
SBN(92) 000
25313
@CTBL(63)
000
000
DM 0000
25503
Note
LR
0000
1. Define interrupt routines at the end of the main program with SBN(92) and
RET(93) instructions, just like regular subroutines.
2. When defining an interrupt routine, a “SBS UNDEFD” error will occur during
the program check operation, but the program will be executed normally.
2-3-2 Input Interrupts
The 10-pt CPU Units (CPM1-10CDR- and CPM1A-10CDR-) have two interrupt inputs (00003 and 00004).
74
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions
2-3
The 20-, 30-, and 40-pt CPU Units (CPM1-20CDR-, CPM1A-20CDR-,
CPM1-30CDR-(-V1), CPM1A-30CDR- and CPM1A-40CDR-) have
four interrupt inputs (00003 to 00006).
There are two modes for input interrupts: input interrupt mode and counter
mode.
CPM1 PCs
00004
00003
00004
00005
00006
20- and 30-pt CPU Units
(CPM1-20CDR- and
CPM1-30CDR-(-V1))
00003
10-pt CPU Units
(CPM1-10CDR-)
NC
24VDC
CPM1A PCs
20-, 30-, and 40-pt CPU Units
(CPM1A-20CDR-,
CPM1A-30CDR-, and
CPM1A-40CDR-)
10-pt CPU Units
(CPM1A-10CDR-)
CPU Unit
CPM1-10CDR-
CPM1 10CD CPM1A-10CD-
Input
p
Interrupt
p
number
b
00003
00004
00003
00
01
00
00004
CPM1-30CDR-(-V1)
CPM1
30CDR ( V1)
00003
CPM1A-30CD-
CPM1
30CD 00004
CPM1A-40CD-
01
CPM1-20CDR-
CPM1A 20CD CPM1A-20CD-
Response time
Interrupt mode
Counter mode
0.3 ms max.
1 kHz
(Time until the
interrupt
program is
executed.))
02
03
Note If input interrupts are not used, use inputs 00003 to 00006 as regular inputs.
75
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions
Input Interrupt Settings
2-3
Inputs 00003 to 00006 must be set as interrupt inputs in DM 6628 if they are to
be used for input interrupts in the CPM1/CPM1A. Set the corresponding digit to 1
if the input is to be used as an interrupt input (input interrupt or counter mode);
set it to 0 if it is to be used as a regular input.
Word
DM 6628
Setting
0: Reg
Regular
lar input
inp t (defa
(defaultlt setting)
1: Interr
Interrupt
pt input
inp t
2: Quick-response
inputt
Q ick response inp
Bit 15
0
DM 6628
Setting for input 00006: Set to 1
Setting for input 00005: Set to 1
Setting for input 00004: Set to 1
Setting for input 00003: Set to 1
Interrupt Subroutines
Interrupts from inputs 00003 to 00006 are allocated interrupt numbers 00 to 03
and call subroutines 000 to 003. If the input interrupts aren’t being used, subroutines 000 to 003 can be used in regular subroutines.
Input number
Interrupt number
Subroutine number
00003
0
000
00004
1
001
00005
2
002
00006
3
003
Input Refreshing
If input refreshing is not used, input signal status within the interrupt routine will
not be reliable. Depending on the input time constant, the input signals might not
go ON even if input refreshing is used. This includes the status of the interrupt
input bit that activated the interrupt.
For example, IR 00000 would not be ON in interrupt routine for input interrupt 0
unless it was refreshed. In this case, use the Always ON Flag, SR 25313 in the
interrupt routine instead of IR 00000.
Input Interrupt Mode
When an input interrupt signal is received, the main program is interrupted and
the interrupt program is executed immediately, regardless of the point in the
cycle in which the interrupt is received. The signal must be ON for 200 µs or more
to be detected.
Main program
Main program
Interrupt program
Input interrupt
Use the following instructions to program input interrupts using the Input Interrupt Mode.
Masking/Unmasking of Interrupts
With the INT(89) instruction, set or clear input interrupt masks as required.
(@)INT(89)
000
000
D
76
Make the settings with word D bits 0 to 3, which correspond
to input interrupts 0 to 3.
0: Mask cleared. (Input interrupt enabled.)
1: Mask set. (Input interrupt disabled.)
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions
2-3
All of the input interrupts are masked when PC operation is started. If input interrupt mode is being used, be sure to enable the inputs by executing INT(89) as
shown above.
Clearing Masked Interrupts
If the bit corresponding to an input interrupt turns ON while masked, that input
interrupt will be saved in memory and will be executed as soon as the mask is
cleared. In order for that input interrupt not to be executed when the mask is
cleared, the interrupt must be cleared from memory.
Only one interrupt signal will be saved in memory for each interrupt number.
With the INT(89) instruction, clear the input interrupt from memory.
(@)INT(89)
001
000
If D bits 0 to 3, which correspond to input interrupts 0 to 3, are
set to “1,” then the input interrupts will be cleared from memory.
0: Input interrupt retained.
1: Input interrupt cleared.
D
Reading Mask Status
With the INT(89) instruction, read the input interrupt mask status.
(@)INT(89)
002
000
The status of the rightmost digit of the data stored in word D (bits
0 to 3) show the mask status.
0: Mask cleared. (Input interrupt enabled.)
1: Mask set. (Input interrupt disabled.)
D
Program Example
When input 00003 (interrupt no. 0) goes ON, operation moves immediately to
the interrupt program with subroutine number 000. Inputs for DM 6628 have
been set to 0001.
25315 First Cycle Flag
ON for 1 cycle
@INT(89)
000
Mask/unmask input interrupts.
000
#000E
SBN(92)
Unmasks 00003 (interrupt input 0), masks others.
000
Interrupt program
RET(93)
Counter Mode
External signal inputs are counted at high speed and an interrupt is generated
when the count reaches the set value. When an interrupt is generated, the main
program is interrupted and the interrupt program is executed. Signals up to
1 kHz can be counted.
Main program
Main program
Interrupt program
Input interrupt
Set value
77
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions
2-3
Use the following steps to program input interrupts using the Counter Mode.
1, 2, 3...
1. Write the set values for counter operation to the SR words shown in the following table. The set values are written between 0000 and FFFF (0 to
65,535). A value of 0000 will disable the count operation until a new value is
set and step 2, below, is repeated.
Interrupt
Word
Input interrupt 0
SR 240
Input interrupt 1
SR 241
Input interrupt 2
SR 242
Input interrupt 3
SR 243
The SR words used in the Counter Mode (SR 240 to SR 243) contain hexadecimal data, not BCD. If the Counter Mode is not used, these words can be
used as work bits.
Note These SR words are cleared at the beginning of operation, and must
be written from the program.
2. With the INT(89) instruction, refresh the Counter Mode set value and enable
interrupts.
(@)INT(89)
003
000
D
If D bits 0 to 3, which correspond to input interrupts 0 to 3,
are set to “0,” then the set value will be refreshed and interrupts will be permitted.
0: Counter mode set value refreshed and mask cleared.
1: Not refreshed.
Be sure to set the corresponding bit to 1 if an input interrupt isn’t being controlled.
The input interrupt for which the set value is refreshed will be enabled in Counter
Mode. When the counter reaches the set value, an interrupt will occur, the counter will be reset, and counting/interrupts will continue until the counter is stopped.
Note
1. If the INT(89) instruction is used during counting, the present value (PV) will
return to the set value (SV). You must, therefore, use the differentiated form
of the instruction or an interrupt may never occur.
2. The set value will be set when the INT(89) instruction is executed. If interrupts are already in operation, then the set value will not be changed just by
changing the content of SR 240 to SR 243, i.e., if the contents are changed,
the set value must be refreshed by executing the INT(89) instruction again.
Interrupts can be masked using the same process used with the Input Interrupt
Mode, but if the masked interrupts are cleared using the same process, the interrupts will operate in Input Interrupt Mode, not Counter Mode.
Interrupt signals received for masked interrupts can also be cleared using the
same process as for the Input Interrupt Mode.
Counter PV in Counter Mode
When input interrupts are used in Counter Mode, the counter PV will be stored in
the SR word corresponding to input interrupts 0 to 3. Values are 0000 to FFFE (0
to 65,534) and will equal the counter PV minus one.
Interrupt
Word
Input interrupt 0
SR 244
Input interrupt 1
SR 245
Input interrupt 2
SR 246
Input interrupt 3
SR 247
Example: The present value for an interrupt whose set value is 000A will be recorded as 0009 immediately after INT(89) is executed.
Note Even if input interrupts are not used in Counter Mode, these SR bits cannot be
used as work bits.
78
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions
2-3
Program Example
When input 00003 (interrupt no. 0) goes ON 10 times, operation moves immediately to the interrupt program with subroutine number 000. The following table
shows where the counters‘ set values and present values –1 are stored. Inputs
for DM 6628 have been set to 0001.
Interrupt
Input 00003 (input interrupt 0)
Word containing
SV
SR 240
Word containing
PV–1
SR 244
Input 00004 (input interrupt 1)
SR 241
SR 245
Input 00005 (input interrupt 2)
SR 242
SR 246
Input 00006 (input interrupt 3)
SR 243
SR 247
25315 First Cycle Flag
ON for 1 cycle
MOV(21)
#000A
Sets the SV to 10. (0000 to FFFF)
240
Word containing the SV (SR 240)
003
Refresh counter SVs.
@INT(89)
000
#000E
SBN(92)
Refreshes the SV of 00003 (interrupt input 0) only.
000
Interrupt program
RET(93)
2-3-3 Masking All Interrupts
All interrupts, including input interrupts, interval timer interrupts, and high-speed
counter interrupts, can be masked and unmasked as a group by means of the
INT(89) instruction. The mask is in addition to any masks on the individual types
of interrupts. Furthermore, clearing the masks for all interrupts does not clear the
masks on the individual types of interrupts, but restores them to the masked
conditions that existed before INT(89) was executed to mask them as a group.
Do not use INT(89) to mask interrupts unless it is necessary to temporarily mask
all interrupts and always use INT(89) instructions in pairs to do so, using the first
INT(89) instruction to mask and the second one to unmask interrupts.
INT(89) cannot be used to mask and unmask all interrupts from within interrupt
routines.
Masking Interrupts
Use the INT(89) instruction to disable all interrupts.
(@)INT(89)
100
000
000
If an interrupt is generated while interrupts are masked, interrupt processing will
not be executed but the interrupt will be recorded for the input, interval timer, and
high-speed counter interrupts. The interrupts will then be serviced as soon as
interrupts are unmasked.
79
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions
Unmasking Interrupts
2-3
Use the INT(89) instruction to unmask interrupts as follows:
(@)INT(89)
200
000
000
2-3-4 Interval Timer Interrupts
The CPM1/CPM1A is equipped with one interval timer. When the interval timer
times out, the main program is interrupted and the interrupt program is executed
immediately, regardless of the point in the cycle.
There are two modes for interval timer operation, the One-shot Mode, in which
only one interrupt will be executed when time expires, and the Scheduled Interrupt Mode in which the interrupt is repeated at a fixed interval.
The interval timer’s set value can be set anywhere from 0.5 to 319968 ms, in
units of 0.1 ms.
Operation
Use the following instruction to activate and control the interval timer.
Starting Up in One-Shot Mode
Use the STIM(69) instruction to start the interval timer in the one-shot mode.
(@)STIM(69)
C1
C2
C3
1, 2, 3...
C1
C2
C3
80
C2: Timer set value (first word address)
C3: Subroutine no. (4 digits BCD): 0000 to 0049
1. When C2 is entered as a word address:
C2: Decrementing counter set value (4 digits BCD): 0000 to 9999
C2 + 1: Decrementing time interval (4 digits BCD; unit: 0.1 ms): 0005 to 0320
(0.5 ms to 32 ms)
Each time that the interval specified in word C2 + 1 elapses, the decrementing counter will decrement the present value by one. When the PV reaches
0, the designated subroutine will be called just once and the timer will stop.
The time from when the STIM(69) instruction is executed until time elapses
is calculated as follows:
(Content of C2) × (Content of C2 + 1) × 0.1 ms = (0.5 to 319,968 ms)
2. When C2 is entered as a constant:
The set value of the decrementing counter will equal the specified constant
(in ms) and the decrementing time interval will be 10 (1 ms).
Starting Up in Scheduled Interrupt Mode
Use the STIM(69) instruction to start the interval timer in the scheduled interrupt
mode.
(@)STIM(69)
1, 2, 3...
C1: Interval timer, one-shot mode (000)
C1: Interval timer, scheduled interrupt mode (003)
C2: Timer set value (leading word no.)
C3: Subroutine no. (4 digits BCD): 0000 to 0049
1. When C2 is entered as a word address:
C2: Decrementing counter set value (4 digits BCD): 0000 to 9999
C2 + 1: Decrementing time interval (4 digits BCD; unit: 0.1 ms): 0005 to 0320
(0.5 ms to 32 ms)
The meanings of the settings are the same as for the one-shot mode, but in
the scheduled interrupt mode the timer PV will be reset to the set value and
decrementing will begin again after the subroutine has been called. In the
scheduled interrupt mode, interrupts will continue to be repeated at fixed intervals until the operation is stopped.
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions
2-3
2. When C2 is entered as a constant:
The settings are the same as for the one-shot mode, but interrupts will continue to be repeated at fixed intervals until the operation is stopped.
Reading the Timer’s Elapsed Time
Use the STIM(69) instruction to read the timer’s elapsed time.
(@)STIM(69)
C1: Read elapsed time (006)
C1
C2: Leading word of parameter 1
C2
C3: Parameter 2
C3
C2: Number of times the decrementing counter has ben decremented (4 digits
BCD)
C2 + 1: Decrementing counter time interval (4 digits BCD; unit: 0.1 ms)
C3: Elapsed time from previous decrement (4 digits BCD; unit: 0.1 ms)
The time from when the interval timer is started until the execution of this instruction is calculated as follows:
{(Content of C2) × (Content of C2+1) + (Content of C3)} × 0.1 ms
If the specified interval timer is stopped, then “0000” will be stored.
Stopping the Timer
Use the STIM(69) instruction to stop the interval timer. The interval timer will be
stopped.
(@)STIM(69)
C1
C1: Stop interval timer (010)
000
000
Application Example
(One-shot Mode)
In this example, an interrupt is generated 2.4 ms (0.6 ms × 4) after input 00005
goes ON; the interrupt executes interrupt subroutine number 23.
25315 First Cycle Flag
ON for 1 cycle
MOV(21)
#0004
DM 0010
Sets the decrementing counter‘s set value to 4.
(BCD: 0000 to 9999)
MOV(21)
#0006
DM 0011
Sets the decrementing time interval to 0.6 ms.
(BCD: 0005 to 0320)
00005
@STIM(69)
000
DM 0010
#0023
SBN(92)
Starts the interval timer in one-shot mode.
Specifies the first word containing the set value.
Specifies the subroutine number (23).
023
Interrupt program
RET(93)
81
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions
Application Example
(Scheduled Interrupt Mode)
2-3
In this example, an interrupt is generated every 4.0 ms (1.0 ms × 4) after input
00005 goes ON; the interrupts execute interrupt subroutine number 23.
25315 First Cycle Flag
ON for 1 cycle
MOV(21)
#0004
DM 0010
Sets the decrementing counter‘s set value to 4.
(BCD: 0000 to 9999)
MOV(21)
#0010
DM 0011
Sets the decrementing time interval to 1.0 ms.
(BCD: 0005 to 0320)
00005
@STIM(69)
003
DM 0010
#0023
SBN(92)
Starts the interval timer in scheduled interrupt mode.
Specifies the first word containing the set value.
Specifies the subroutine number (23).
023
Interrupt program
RET(93)
2-3-5 High-speed Counter Interrupts
CPM1/CPM1A PCs have a high-speed counter function that can be used in incrementing mode or up/down mode. The high-speed counter can be combined
with input interrupts to perform target value control or zone comparison control
that isn’t affected by the PC’s cycle time.
High-speed counter signals can be input to CPU bits 00000 through 00002.
NC
24VDC
82
00002
00001
00000
CPM1 PCs
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions
2-3
CPM1A PCs
Mode
Input functions
Input method
Up/Down
00000: Phase-A input
00001: Phase-B input
00002: Phase-Z input
Incrementing
00000: Count input
00001: See note.
00002: Reset input
Count
Count
frequency
range
Phase-difference, 2.5 kHz max. –32767
4× inputs
to
32767
Individual inputs
5.0 kHz max. 0
to
65535
Control methods
Target value control:
Up to 16 target values and
interrupt subroutine numbers can
be registered.
Zone comparison
Z
i
control:
t l
Up to 8 sets of upper limit values,
lower limit values, and interrupt
subroutine numbers can be
registered.
Note In incrementing mode, input 00001 can be used as a regular input. When the
reset method is used for the software reset, input 00002 can be used as a regular
input. Also, even when used for the phase-Z signal and software reset, the input
status is reflected inn 00002 of the I/O memory.
High-speed Counter Settings The following settings must be made in DM 6642 when using the
CPM1/CPM1A’s high-speed counter function.
DM 6642
Bit
Bits
Settings
Function
00 to 03
Sets the counter mode:
Incrementing Up/Down
4
0
Not used
0 or 4
04 to 07
0: Up/down
4: Incrementing
Sets the reset method:
0 or 1
0 or 1
0 or 1
08 to 15
0: Phase-Z + software reset
1: Software reset
Sets the counter:
01
01
00
00: Counter not being used.
01: Counter being used.
Count Range
The CPM1/CPM1A’s high-speed counter uses linear operation and the count
(present value) is stored in SR 248 and SR 249. (The upper four digits are stored
in SR 249 and the lower four digits are stored in SR 248.)
Mode
Count range
Up/Down
F003 2767 to 0003 2767 (–32,767 to 32,767)
The leftmost digit in SR 248 indicates the sign. F is negative, 0 is
positive.
Incrementing
0000 0000 to 0006 5535 (0 to 65,535)
83
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions
2-3
An overflow will occur if the count exceeds the upper limit in the count range and
an underflow will occur if the count goes below the lower limit in the count range.
Error
Overflow
Underflow
Processing
Incrementing
Up/Down
Occurs when the count is
incremented from 65,535.
---
Present
value
0FFF FFFF
Occurs when the count is
incremented from 32,767.
Occurs when the count is
FFFF FFFF
decremented from –32,767.
Two types of signals can be input from a pulse encoder. The count mode used for
the high-speed counter will depend on the signal type. The count mode and reset mode are set in DM 6642; these settings become effective when the power is
turned on or PC operation is started.
Up/Down Mode:
Phase-A difference 4× two-phase signal (phase-A and phase-B) and a
phase-Z signal are used for inputs. The count is incremented or decremented according to differences in the 2-phase signals.
Incrementing Mode:
One single-phase pulse signal and a count reset signal are used for inputs.
The count is incremented according to the single-phase signal.
Incrementing Mode
Up/Down Mode
ON
Pulse
input
Phase A
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
Phase B
OFF
Count
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 –1 –2
Incremented
Decremented
Count
1
2
3
4
Incremented only
Note One of the reset methods described below should always be used to reset the
counter when restarting it. The counter will be automatically reset when program
execution is started or stopped.
The following signal transitions are handled as forward (incrementing) pulses:
Phase-A leading edge to phase-B leading edge to phase-A trailing edge to
phase-B trailing edge. The following signal transitions are handled as reverse
(decrementing) pulses: Phase-B leading edge to phase-A leading edge to
phase-B trailing edge to phase-A trailing edge.
The Up/Down Mode always uses a 4× phase-difference input. The number of
counts for each encoder revolution would be 4 times the resolution of the counter. Select the encoder based on the countable ranges.
Reset Methods
Either of the two methods described below may be selected for resetting the PV
of the count (i.e., setting it to 0).
Phase-Z signal + software reset:
The PV is reset when the phase-Z signal (reset input) is turned ON while the
High-speed Counter Reset Bit (SR 25200) is ON.
Software reset:
The PV is reset when the High-speed Counter Reset Bit (SR 25200) is
turned ON.
84
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions
2-3
Phase-Z Signal + Software Reset
I/O refresh
Common processing,
communications servicing, etc.
1 cycle
Program
execution
CPU processing
Program
execution
Program
execution
Program
execution
Program
execution
Program
execution
25200
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
Reset
Reset
(5)
Phase-Z
Not reset
Not reset
No.
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
Not reset
Operation timing
Reset
Phase-Z signal turns ON when
Not reset.
SR 25200 turns OFF.
Phase-Z signal turns ON within one
Not reset.
cycle after SR 25200 turns ON.
Phase-Z signal turns ON after at least Reset with phase-Z leading edge.
one cycle elapses after SR 25200
turns ON.
Phase-Z signal turns ON within one
cycle after SR 25200 turns OFF.
SR 25200 turns ON when phase-Z
signal is ON.
Reset with phase-Z leading edge.
Not reset.
Note The High-speed Counter Reset Bit (SR 25200) is refreshed once every cycle, so
in order for it to be read reliably it must be ON for at least one cycle.
The “Z” in “phase-Z” is an abbreviation for “Zero.” It is a signal that shows that the
encoder has completed one cycle.
High-speed Counter Interrupt Count
For high-speed counter 0 interrupts, a comparison table is used instead of a
“count up.” The count check can be carried out by either of the two methods described below. In the comparison table, comparison conditions (for comparing to
the PV) and interrupt routine combinations are saved.
Target value:
A maximum of 16 comparison conditions (target values and count directions) and interrupt routine combinations are saved in the comparison table.
When the counter PV and the count direction match the comparison conditions, then the specified interrupt routine is executed.
Range (zone) comparison:
Eight comparison conditions (upper and lower limits) and interrupt routine
combinations are saved in the comparison table. When the PV is greater
than or equal to the lower limit and less than or equal to the upper limit, then
the specified interrupt routine is executed.
85
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions
Target Value
Comparisons
2-3
The current count is compared to the target values in the order that target values
are set in the comparison table and interrupts are generated as the count equals
each target value. Once the count has equaled all of the target values in the
table, the target value is set to the first target value in the table, which is again
compared to the current counted until the two values are equal.
Count
Interrupts
Comparison Table
Target value 1
Target value 2
Target value 3
Target value 4
Target value 5
Initial value
Target value
1
2
3
4
5
The current count is compared in cyclic fashion to all of the ranges at the same
time and interrupts are generated based on the results of the comparisons.
Range Comparisons
Comparison Table
0
Count
1
3
2
Rage setting 1
Rage setting 2
Rage setting 3
Rage setting 4
4
Note When performing target value comparisons, do not repeatedly use the INI instruction to change the current value of the count and start the comparison operation. The interrupt operation may not work correctly if the comparison operation is started immediately after changing the current value from the program.
(The comparison operation will automatically return to the first target value once
an interrupt has been generated for the last target value. Repetitious operation
is thus possible merely by changing the current value.)
Programming
Use the following steps to program the high-speed counter.
The high-speed counter begins the counting operation when the proper PC Setup settings are made, but comparisons will not be made with the comparison
table and interrupts will not be generated unless the CTBL(63) instruction is
executed.
The high-speed counter is reset to “0” when power is turned ON and when operation begins.
The present value of high-speed counter is maintained in SR 248 and SR 249.
Controlling High-speed Counter Interrupts
1, 2, 3...
1. Use the CTBL(63) instruction to save the comparison table in the
CPM1/CPM1A and begin comparisons.
(@)CTBL(63)
P
C
TB
C: (3 digits BCD)
000:
Target table set and comparison begun
001:
Range table set and comparison begun
002:
Target table set only
003:
Range table set only
TB: Beginning word of comparison table
86
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions
2-3
If C is set to 000, then comparisons will be made by the target matching
method; if 001, then they will be made by the range comparison method.
The comparison table will be saved, and, when the save operation is complete, then comparisons will begin. While comparisons are being executed,
high-speed interrupts will be executed according to the comparison table.
For details on the contents of the comparison tables that are saved, refer to
the explanation of the CTBL(63) instruction in Section 7 Instruction Set.
Note The comparison results are normally stored in AR 1100 through
AR 1107 while the range comparison is being executed.
If C is set to 002, then comparisons will be made by the target matching
method; if 003, then they will be made by the range comparison method. For
either of these settings, the comparison table will be saved, but comparisons will not begin, and the INI(61) instruction must be used to begin comparisons.
2. To stop comparisons, execute the INI(61) instruction as shown below.
(@)INI(61)
000
001
000
To start comparisons again, set the second operand to “000” (execute comparison), and execute the INI(61) instruction.
Once a table has been saved, it will be retained in the CPM1/CPM1A during
operation (i.e., during program execution) as long as no other table is saved.
Reading the PV
There are two ways to read the PV. The first is to read it from SR 248 and
SR 249, and the second to use the PRV(62) instruction.
Reading SR 248 and SR 249
The PV of high-speed counter is stored in SR 248 and SR 249 as shown below.
The leftmost bit will be F for negative values.
Leftmost 4 digits
SR 249
Note
Rightmost 4 digits
SR 248
Up/Down Mode
Incrementing Mode
F0032767 to 00032767
(–32767)
00000000 to 00065535
1. These words are refreshed only once every cycle, so there may be a difference from the actual PV.
2. When high-speed counter is not being used, the bits in these words can be
used as work bits.
Using the PRV(62) Instruction
Read the PV of the high-speed counter by using the PRV(62) instruction.
(@)PRV(62)
000
P1: Leading word of PV
000
P1
The PV of the high-speed counter is stored as shown below. The leftmost bit will
be F for negative values.
Leftmost 4 digits
P1+1
Rightmost 4 digits
P1
Up/Down Mode
F0032767 to 00032767
(–32767)
Incrementing Mode
00000000 to 00065535
87
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions
2-3
The PV is read when the PRV(62) instruction is actually executed.
Changing the PV
There are two ways to change the PV of high-speed counter. The first way is to
reset it by using the reset methods. (In this case the PV is reset to 0.) The second
way is to use the INI(61) instruction.
The method using the INI(61) instruction is explained here. For an explanation of
the reset method, refer to the beginning of this description of high-speed counter.
Change the timer PV by using the INI(61) instruction as shown below.
(@)INI(61)
D: Leading word for storing PV change data
000
002
D
Leftmost 4 digits Rightmost 4 digits
D+1
D
Up/Down Mode
F0032767 to 00032767
Incrementing Mode
00000000 to 00065535
To specify a negative number in up/down mode, set F in the leftmost digit.
Application Example
(Incrementing Mode)
This example shows a program that uses the high-speed counter with singlephase inputs in the Incrementing Mode, making comparisons by means of the
target matching method.
The comparison conditions (target values and count directions) are stored in the
comparison table with the subroutine numbers. Up to 16 target values can be
stored. The corresponding subroutine is executed when the counter’s PV
matches the target value.
The following data is stored for the comparison table:
DM 0000
0002 Number of comparison conditions: 2
DM 0001
1000 Target value 1: 1000
DM 0002
0000
DM 0003
0030 Comparison 1 interrupt subroutine no.: 30
DM 0004
2000 Target value 2: 2000
DM 0005
0000
DM 0006
0031 Comparison 2 interrupt subroutine no.: 31
The following diagram shows the example ladder program. DM 6642 must be
set to 014, where is the reset method which can be set to 0 or 1.
25315 (ON for first cycle)
CTBL(63)
000
000
DM 0000
SBN(92)
Registers comparison table, target value mode
First word of the comparison table
030
Interrupt program 30
RET(93)
SBN(92)
031
Interrupt program 31
RET(93)
88
CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions
Application Example
(Up/Down Mode)
Section
2-3
This example shows a program that uses the high-speed counter with phase-difference inputs in the Up/Down Mode, making comparisons by means of the
range comparison method.
The comparison conditions (upper/lower limits of the ranges) are stored in the
comparison table with the subroutine numbers. Up to 8 separate ranges can be
defined. The corresponding subroutine is executed when the counter’s PV is
within the range.
Note Always set 8 ranges. If fewer than 8 ranges are needed, set the remaining subroutine numbers to FFFF. A value of FFFF indicates that no subroutine is to be
executed.
The following data is stored for the comparison table:
DM 0000
1500
DM 0001
0000 Lower limit 1: 1,500 counts
DM 0002
3000
DM 0003
0000 Upper limit 1: 3,000 counts
DM 0004
0040 Range 1 interrupt subroutine no.: 40
DM 0005
7500
DM 0006
0000 Lower limit 2: 7,500 counts
DM 0007
0000
DM 0008
0001 Upper limit 2: 10,000 counts
DM 0009
0041 Range 2 interrupt subroutine no.: 41
DM 0010
0000
DM 0011
0000
DM 0012
0000
DM 0013
0000
DM 0014
FFFF Range 3 interrupt subroutine not executed
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
DM 0035
0000
DM 0036
0000
DM 0037
0000
DM 0038
0000
DM 0039
FFFF Range 8 interrupt subroutine not executed
89
Section
SRM1(-V2) Interrupt Functions
2-4
The following diagram shows the example ladder program. DM 6642 must be
set to 010, where is the reset method which can be set to 0 or 1.
25315 (ON for first cycle)
CTBL(63)
000
001
DM 0000
Registers comparison
range comparison mode
table,
First word of the comparison table
SBN(92)
040
Interrupt program 40
RET(93)
SBN(92)
041
Interrupt program 41
RET(93)
2-3-6 Precautions on Programming Interrupts
If words in memory are being manipulated both in the main program and in an
interrupt program, the interrupts must be masked when the words are being manipulated in the main program. Refer to 2-1-3 Precautions on Programming Interrupts for details.
2-4
SRM1(-V2) Interrupt Functions
This section explains the settings and methods for using the SRM1(-V2) interrupt functions.
2-4-1 Types of Interrupts
The SRM1(-V2) has only one type of interrupt processing, as outlined below.
Interval Timer Interrupts
Interrupt processing is executed by an interval timer with a precision of 0.1 ms.
2-4-2 Interval Timer Interrupts
The SRM1(-V2) is equipped with one interval timer. When the interval timer
times out, the main program is interrupted and the interrupt program is executed
immediately, regardless of the point in the cycle.
There are two modes for interval timer operation, the One-shot Mode, in which
only one interrupt will be executed when time expires, and the Scheduled Interrupt Mode in which the interrupt is repeated at a fixed interval.
The interval timer’s set value can be set anywhere from 0.5 to 319,968 ms, in
units of 0.1 ms.
Operation
Use the following instruction to activate and control the interval timer.
Starting Up in One-Shot Mode
Use the STIM(69) instruction to start the interval timer in the one-shot mode.
(@)STIM(69)
C1
C2
C3
90
C1: Interval timer, one-shot mode (000)
C2: Timer set value (first word address)
C3: Subroutine no. (4 digits BCD): 0000 to 0049
Section
SRM1(-V2) Interrupt Functions
1, 2, 3...
2-4
1. When C2 is entered as a word address:
C2: Decrementing counter set value (4 digits BCD): 0000 to 9999
C2 + 1: Decrementing time interval (4 digits BCD; unit: 0.1 ms): 0005 to 0320
(0.5 ms to 32 ms)
Each time that the interval specified in word C2 + 1 elapses, the decrementing counter will decrement the present value by one. When the PV reaches
0, the designated subroutine will be called just once and the timer will stop.
The time from when the STIM(69) instruction is executed until time elapses
is calculated as follows:
(Content of C2) × (Content of C2 + 1) × 0.1 ms = (0.5 to 319,968 ms)
2. When C2 is entered as a constant:
The set value of the decrementing counter will equal the specified constant
(in ms) and the decrementing time interval will be 10 (1 ms).
Starting Up in Scheduled Interrupt Mode
Use the STIM(69) instruction to start the interval timer in the scheduled interrupt
mode.
(@)STIM(69)
C1
C2
C3
1, 2, 3...
C1: Interval timer, scheduled interrupt mode (003)
C2: Timer set value (leading word no.)
C3: Subroutine no. (4 digits BCD): 0000 to 0049
1. When C2 is entered as a word address:
C2: Decrementing counter set value (4 digits BCD): 0000 to 9999
C2 + 1: Decrementing time interval (4 digits BCD; unit: 0.1 ms): 0005 to 0320
(0.5 ms to 32 ms)
The meanings of the settings are the same as for the one-shot mode, but in
the scheduled interrupt mode the timer PV will be reset to the set value and
decrementing will begin again after the subroutine has been called. In the
scheduled interrupt mode, interrupts will continue to be repeated at fixed intervals until the operation is stopped.
2. When C2 is entered as a constant:
The settings are the same as for the one-shot mode, but interrupts will continue to be repeated at fixed intervals until the operation is stopped.
Reading the Timer’s Elapsed Time
Use the STIM(69) instruction to read the timer’s elapsed time.
(@)STIM(69)
C1
C2
C3
C1: Read elapsed time (006)
C2: Leading word of parameter 1
C3: Parameter 2
C2: Number of times the decrementing counter has been decremented (4 digits
BCD)
C2 + 1: Decrementing counter time interval (4 digits BCD; unit: 0.1 ms)
C3: Elapsed time from previous decrement (4 digits BCD; unit: 0.1 ms)
The time from when the interval timer is started until the execution of this instruction is calculated as follows:
{(Content of C2) × (Content of C2+1) + (Content of C3)} × 0.1 ms
If the specified interval timer is stopped, then “0000” will be stored.
91
Section
SRM1(-V2) Interrupt Functions
2-4
Stopping the Timer
Use the STIM(69) instruction to stop the interval timer. The interval timer will be
stopped.
(@)STIM(69)
C1
C1: Stop interval timer (010)
000
000
Application Example
(One-shot Mode)
In this example, an interrupt is generated 2.4 ms (0.6 ms × 4) after input 00005
goes ON; the interrupt executes interrupt subroutine number 23.
25315 First Cycle Flag
ON for 1 cycle
MOV(21)
#0004
DM 0010
Sets the decrementing counter‘s set value to 4.
(BCD: 0000 to 9999)
MOV(21)
#0006
DM 0011
Sets the decrementing time interval to 0.6 ms.
(BCD: 0005 to 0320)
00005
@STIM(69)
000
SBN(92)
Starts the interval timer in one-shot mode.
DM 0010
Specifies the first word containing the set value.
#0023
Specifies the subroutine number (only lower bytes are effective).
023
Interrupt program
RET(93)
Application Example
(Scheduled Interrupt Mode)
In this example, an interrupt is generated every 4.0 ms (1.0 ms × 4) after input
00005 goes ON; the interrupts execute interrupt subroutine number 23.
25315 First Cycle Flag
ON for 1 cycle
MOV(21)
#0004
DM 0010
Sets the decrementing counter‘s set value to 4.
(BCD: 0000 to 9999)
MOV(21)
#0010
DM 0011
Sets the decrementing time interval to 1.0 ms.
(BCD: 0005 to 0320)
00005
@STIM(69)
003
DM 0010
#0023
SBN(92)
Starts the interval timer in scheduled interrupt mode.
Specifies the first word containing the set value.
Specifies the subroutine number (only the lower bytes are effective).
023
Interrupt program
RET(93)
92
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
2-5
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
The CPM2A/CPM2C has two pulse outputs. By means of a selection in the PC
Setup, these outputs can be used as two single-phase outputs without acceleration and deceleration, two variable duty ratio pulse outputs, or pulse outputs with
trapezoidal acceleration/deceleration (one pulse + direction output and one up/
down pulse output). The pulse output PV coordinate system can also be specified in the PC Setup as either relative or absolute.
There are two pulse output modes: Independent mode, in which outputs are
stopped at a preset amount of pulses, and continuous mode, in which outputs
are stopped by an instruction.
Note To use pulse outputs, it is necessary to use a CPU Unit with transistor outputs,
i.e., either a CPM2A-CDT-D or CPM2A-CDT1-D.
The following diagram shows the configuration for a CPM2A, but the configuration for a CPM2C is identical.
Stepping motor
Motor
controller
Pulse outputs
Item
Execution instructions
Output
number
be
01000
01001
Output frequency range
Pitch
Single-phase
pulse
outputs
p eo
p
i
without
accel/decel
Variable duty
ratio
o pulse
p e
outputs
Single-phase pulse outputs with trapezoidal
acceleration/deceleration
PULS(65) and
SPED(64)
Pulse output 0
(See note 1.)
Pulse output 1
(See note 1.)
10 Hz to 10 kHz
PWM(––)
Pulse + direction
outputs
PULS(65) and ACC(––)
Up/down pulse
outputs
Pulse output 0
(See note 1.)
Pulse output 1
(See note 1.)
0.1 to 999.9 Hz
Pulse
Pulse output
output 0
o
Direction
output
10 Hz to 10 kHz
Pulse
CW pulse
output 0 output
o
CCW pulse
output
10 Hz to 10 kHz
10 Hz
0.1 Hz
10 Hz
10 Hz
Up/down frequency pitch
---
---
10 Hz (See note 2.)
10 Hz (See note 2.)
Start speed pitch
---
---
10 Hz
10 Hz
Output mode
Continuous,
Independent
1 to 16777215
Continuous
---
Continuous,
Independent
±1 to 16777215
Continuous,
Independent
±1 to 16777215
50%
0 to 100%
50%
50%
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
No
Number of
pulses
Duty ratio (See note 3.)
Control
Movement
method
e od
specification
Accel/decel
specification
Start speed
specification
Duty
specification
93
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
Note
2-5
1. With single-phase pulse outputs, pulse outputs 0 and 1 can each be output
independently.
2. Pulse outputs can be accelerated or decelerated in units of 10 Hz every 10
ms.
3. Actual pulses are affected by the transistor output’s ON response time (20
µs max.) and OFF response time (40 µs max.).
The following table shows the relationships between the high-speed counter
and the CPM2A/CPM2C’s other functions.
Interval timer interrupts
Synchronized pulse control
Cannot be used simultaneously.
Interrupt inputs
Can be used simultaneously.
Interval timer interrupts
Can be used simultaneously.
High-speed counters
Can be used simultaneously.
Interrupt inputs (counter mode)
Can be used simultaneously.
Pulse outputs
See note.
Quick-response inputs
Can be used simultaneously.
Input time constant
Can be used simultaneously.
Clock
Can be used simultaneously.
Note The number of simultaneous outputs varies according to the type of pulse output, as shown in the following table.
Combination
Single-phase pulse output
Fixed duty ratio
Single-phase Fixed duty Can use two points
pulse output ratio
simultaneously
(independently).
Variable
duty ratio
Variable duty ratio
Can use one point at a
time (independently).
Pulse + direction
output
Up/down
p
p
pulse
output
Cannot be used.
Cannot be used.
Can use one point at a
time (independently).
Can use two points
simultaneously
(independently).
Cannot be used.
Cannot be used.
Pulse + direction output
Cannot be used.
Cannot be used.
Cannot be used.
Cannot be used.
Up/down pulse output
Cannot be used.
Cannot be used.
Cannot be used.
Cannot be used.
Up to two points can be output simultaneously with only single-phase pulse outputs, so two-point output is possible when fixed duty ratio and variable duty ratio
are used in combination.
Outputs are possible for only one point at a time with pulse + direction outputs
and up/down pulse outputs, so no other pulses can be output.
Types of Pulse Outputs
There are three types of pulse outputs: Single-phase pulse outputs without acceleration and deceleration, variable duty ratio pulse outputs, and single-phase
pulse outputs with trapezoidal acceleration and deceleration.
Single-phase Pulse Outputs Without Acceleration and Deceleration
94
• Frequency:
10 Hz to 10 kHz (Set in units of 10 Hz.)
• Output destination:
Output number 01000 (Word 010, bit 00)
Output number 01001 (Word 010, bit 01)
(Pulses can be output simultaneously and independently from two points.
• Output mode:
Continuous or Independent
• Number of pulses:
1 to 16,777,215
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
• Instructions:
2-5
PULS(65) and SPED(64)
• With PULS(65), the number of pulses is set for each point (in independent
mode only).
• With SPED(64), the output mode and target frequency are set for each
point, and pulses are output.
Instruction execution: PULS(65) + SPED(64) (Independent mode)
Independent mode
Number of set pulses
The output is stopped automatically when the set number of pulses has been output.
Instruction execution: SPED(64) (Continuous mode)
Continuous mode
Pulses continue to be output at the set frequency until stopped by the instruction.
Variable Duty Ratio Pulse Outputs
• Duty ratio:
0% to 100% (Set in units of 1%.)
• Frequency:
0.1 to 999.9 Hz (Set in units of 0.1 Hz.)
• Output destination:
Output number 01000 (Word 010, bit 00)
Output number 01001 (Word 010, bit 01)
(Pulses can be output simultaneously and independently from two points.)
• Output mode:
Continuous
• Instruction:
PWM(––)
With PWM(––), pulses are output with a variable duty ratio.
ton
Instruction execution: PWM(––)
Pulses are output at the set frequency until stopped.
Duty ratio (D) =
ton
T
Single-phase Pulse Outputs With Trapezoidal Acceleration/Deceleration
• Frequency:
10 Hz to 10 kHz (Set in units of 10 Hz.)
• Acceleration/deceleration rate: 10 Hz/10 ms to 10 kHz/10 ms (Set in units of
10 Hz.)
Pulse + Direction Outputs
• For CW Output:
Output number 01001 (Word 010, bit 01) turned OFF.
Pulses output from output number 01000 (Word 010, bit 00).
• For CCW Output:
Output number 01001 (Word 010, bit 01) turned ON.
Pulses output from output number 01000 (Word 010, bit 00).
01000
Pulse outputs
01001
Direction outputs (OFF: CW operation; ON: CCW operation)
95
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
Up/Down Pulse Outputs
• For CW output:
Pulses output from output number 01000 (Word 010, bit 00).
• For CCW output:
Pulses output from output number 01001 (Word 010, bit 01).
01000
CW operation
01001
CCW operation
• Output mode: Continuous and Independent
• Number of pulses: 1 to 16,777,215
• Instructions:
PULS(65) and ACC(––)
• With PULS(65), the number of pulses is set (in independent mode only).
• With ACC(––), the output mode, starting frequency, target frequency, and
acceleration/deceleration rate are set, and the pulse outputs are started.
From when the pulse outputs are started until they are stopped, they are
controlled at a constant-ratio frequency change.
Independent Mode
Pulse output frequency
Instruction execution: PULS(65) + ACC(––) (Independent mode)
In independent mode, deceleration is
carried out at the acceleration/
deceleration rate in effect at the start.
Target
frequency
Starting
frequency
Time
0 Hz
Acceleration
Start
Deceleration
ACC(––)
Continuous Mode
Pulse output frequency
Instruction execution: ACC(––) (Continuous mode)
Target
frequency 2
Target
frequency 3
Target
frequency 1
0 Hz
Time
Acceleration/
deceleration Acceleration/deceleration Acceleration/deceleration
Start
Acceleration or
Acceleration or
deceleration
deceleration
ACC(––)
ACC(––)
96
ACC(––)
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
2-5-1 Using Single-phase Pulse Outputs Without Acceleration and
Deceleration (Fixed Duty Ratio)
Select the pulse output number.
Pulse output number 0 or 1
Wire the outputs.
Output numbers: 01000 and 01001
PC Setup (DM 6629)
PV coordinate system for pulse output numbers 0 and 1
PULS(65): For setting the number of output pulses.
Create a ladder diagram program.
SPED(64): For pulse output control without acceleration and deceleration.
INI(61): For stopping pulse outputs and changing the pulse output PV.
PRV(62): For reading the pulse output PV and status.
Single-phase Pulse Outputs
PULS(65)
SET
PULSES
instruction
SPED(64)
Specify relative or
absolute pulses.
Pulse output 0
Pulse output 1
Output mode: Continuous or
Independent
Target frequency: 10 Hz to 10 kHz
Pulse output SV
(8 digits BCD)
INI(61)
SPEED
OUTPUT
instruction
Start pulse outputs.
MODE
CONTROL
instruction
Every scan
Pulse output status
Stop pulse outputs.
AR 11
Change pulse output PV.
AR 12
Every scan
Pulse output PV
SR 228
SR 229
SR 230
SR 231
Immediately
PRV(62)
HIGH-SPEED COUNTER
PV READ instruction
Read pulse output PV.
Read pulse output
status.
PC Setup
DM 6629,
bits 04 to 07
Selecting the Pulse
Output Number
Select either pulse number 0 or 1.
Output number
Pulse output number
01000
0
01001
1
97
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
Wiring the Outputs
2-5
Wire the CPM2A outputs as shown in the following illustration. (Pulses can be
output independently from pulse outputs 0 and 1.)
Output 01000: Pulse output 0 (single-phase output)
Output 01001: Pulse output 1 (single-phase output)
Wire the CPM2C outputs as shown in the following illustration. (Pulses can be
output independently from pulse outputs 0 and 1.)
Note The following examples are for Fujitsu-compatible connectors. Output bit addresses and connector pin numbers depend on the models. Refer to the CPM2C
Operation Manual (W356) or the CPM2C-S Operation Manual (W377) for details.
Output connector (See above note.)
01000: Pulse output 0 (single-phase output)
01001: Pulse output 1 (single-phase output)
98
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
Make the following settings in the PC Setup.
PC Setup
Word
DM 6629
DM 6642
Bits
00 to 03
Function
Pulse 0 PV coordinate 0: Relative coordinate
y
system
system
04 to 07
Pulse 1 PV coordinate
system
1: Absolute coordinate
system
08 to 15
High-speed counter
setting
00: Do not use.
Setting
Either 0 or
1
Either 00 or
01: Use as high-speed 01
counter
02: Use as
synchronized pulse
control (10 to 500 Hz).
03: Use as
synchronized pulse
control (20 Hz to 1
kHz).
04: Use as
synchronized pulse
control (300 Hz to 20
kHz).
If absolute pulses are specified with PULS(65), be sure to set the absolute coordinate system (1).
Synchronized pulse control cannot be used simultaneously.
The settings will go into effect when the mode is changed (from PROGRAM to
MONITOR/RUN) or when the power supply is turned ON to the PC.
The following table shows the instruction operations related to pulse outputs
without acceleration and deceleration (fixed duty ratio).
Ladder Diagram
Programming
Instruction
Control
(@)PULS(65)
Set number of pulses
(@)SPED(64)
Set frequency and start
pulse outputs
Change frequency
Operation
Sets the number of pulses to be output
in independent mode.
Sets the frequency for outputs in the
independent mode or continuous mode,
and starts the pulse outputs.
Changes the frequency for outputs in
the independent mode or continuous
mode.
Stop pulse outputs
((@)INI(61)
) ( )
((@)PRV(62)
)
( )
Stops the pulse outputs (by changing
the speed to a frequency of 0 Hz).
Stop pulse outputs
Stops the pulse outputs.
Change pulse output PV Changes the pulse output PV.
Read pulse output PV
Reads the pulse output PV.
Read pulse output status Reads the pulse output status.
The following table shows which instructions can be executed during pulse outputs without acceleration and deceleration.
PULS(65)
SPED(64)
INI(61)
PRV(62)
ACC(––)
PWM(––)
Continuous mode
No
Yes (See note 2.)
Yes (See note 1.)
Yes
No
No
Independent mode
No
Yes (See note 2.)
Yes (See note 1.)
Yes
No
No
Note
1. This instruction can be executed only while pulse outputs are stopped. The
PV cannot be changed while pulses are being output. If the PV needs to be
changed, be sure to stop the pulse output first.
2. This instruction can be used only for changing the frequency and stopping
the pulse output. It cannot be used for switching between independent
mode and continuous mode.
99
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
The following table shows the words and bits related to pulse outputs without
acceleration and deceleration (fixed duty ratio).
Word
228
229
230
231
252
AR 11
Bits
00 to 15
00 to 15
00 to 15
00 to 15
04
05
12
13
14
AR 12
Name
Pulse output PV 0, rightmost 4 digits
Pulse output PV 0, leftmost 4 digits
Pulse output PV 1, rightmost 4 digits
Pulse output PV 1, leftmost 4 digits
Pulse output 0 PV reset
Pulse output 1 PV reset
Pulse output 0 PV overflow/underflow
Clears PV 0 when ON.
Clears PV 1 when ON.
ON: Occurred
OFF: Normal
Number of pulses set for pulse output 0 ON: Set (by PULS(65))
OFF: Not set
Pulse output completed for pulse
ON: Completed (by
output 0
SPED(64))
OFF: Not completed
15
Pulse output in progress for pulse
output 0
12
Pulse output 1 PV overflow/underflow
13
14
15
Contents
Cannot be used as
work
k bi
bits even when
h
sed ass pulse
p lse
not used
out uts.
outputs.
ON: In progress (by
SPED(64))
OFF: Stopped
ON: Occurred
OFF: Normal
Number of pulses set for pulse output 1 ON: Set (by PULS(65))
OFF: Not set
Pulse output completed for pulse
ON: Completed (by
output 1
SPED(64))
OFF: Not completed
Pulse output in progress for pulse
output 0
ON: In progress (by
SPED(64))
OFF: Stopped
Set Number of Pulses
Specify the number of pulses to be output in independent mode.
(@)PULS(65)
P
Port specifier (000: Pulse output 0; 010: Pulse output 1)
D
Type of Pulse Output (000: Relative pulses; 001: Absolute pulses) (See note.)
Beginning word of setting for number of pulses
N
N
Rightmost 4 digits
N+1
Leftmost 4 digits
Number of pulses (Rightmost, leftmost digits)
Register the number of pulses to be set.
96,777,215 to 16,777,215
Negative numbers are expressed by turning ON
the leftmost bit.
Type of Pulse Output
000:
001:
Relative pulses (SV for number of pulses = Number of pulses moved)
Absolute pulses (SV for number of pulses = The next PV on the absolute coordinate system,
i.e., the pulse output PV + number of pulses moved)*
*Absolute pulses can only be specified by PULS(65) when the PV coordinate system
in the PC Setup is set for an absolute coordinate system.
Set Frequency and Start Pulse Outputs
Change Frequency
These functions set the pulse output number, the output mode, and the frequen-
100
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
cy, and begin pulse outputs. They can also be used to change the frequency if
pulse outputs are already in progress.
(@)SPED(64)
M
Port specifier (000: Pulse output 0; 010: Pulse output 1)
Mode designation (000: Independent; 001: Continuous)
F
Target frequency data word
P
Target frequency
F
Register the target frequency data to be set.
#0001 to #1000 (4 digits BCD): 10 Hz to 10 kHz
#0000: Pulse output stopped
Change Pulse Output PV
Resetting Pulse Output PV
This function changes the pulse output present value (PV). The PV can also be
cleared by using SR 25204 and SR 25205.
(@)INI(61)
P
004
C2
Port specifier (000: Pulse output 0; 010: Pulse output 1)
Control designation (004: Change pulse output PV)
Beginning word for PV change data
C2
Rightmost 4 digits
Change PV data (Rightmost, leftmost digits)
C2+1
Leftmost 4 digits
Register the PV data to be changed.
96,777,215 to 16,777,215
Negative numbers are expressed by turning
ON the leftmost bit.
The pulse output PV can only be changed or reset while pulse outputs are
stopped. Check to be sure that the Pulse Output In Progress Flags (AR 1115 and
AR 1215) have been turned OFF.
Stop Pulse Outputs
This function stops the pulse outputs.
Using SPED(64)
(@)SPED(64)
P
M
F
Port specifier (000: Pulse output 0; 010: Pulse output 1)
Mode designation (000: Independent; 001: Continuous)
Target frequency data word
F
#0000
Specifies a frequency of 0 Hz.
Using INI(61)
(@)INI(61)
P
003
000
Port specifier (000: Pulse output 0; 010: Pulse output 1)
Control designation (003: Stop pulse outputs)
Fixed: 000
Besides executing the instructions shown above, it is also possible to stop pulse
outputs by stopping operation (PROGRAM mode).
Read Pulse Output PV
This function reads the pulse output PV.
101
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
Using an Instruction
(@)PRV(62)
P
003
D
Port specifier (000: Pulse output 0; 010: Pulse output 1)
Control designation (003: Read pulse output PV)
Beginning word for storing pulse output PV
D
Rightmost 4 digits
D+1
Leftmost 4 digits
Pulse output PV (rightmost, leftmost digits)
The PV data that is read is stored here.
96,777,215 to 16,777,215
Negative numbers are expressed by turning
ON the leftmost bit.
Using Data Areas
As shown in the following illustration, the pulse output PV for pulse output 0 is
stored in words 228 and 229, and the pulse output PV for pulse output 1 is stored
in words 230 and 231.
Pulse Output 0
Pulse Output 1
Word 228
PV (Rightmost)
Word 230
PV (Rightmost)
Word 229
PV (Leftmost)
Word 231
PV (Leftmost)
Words 228 to 231 are refreshed with every scan, so there may be a discrepancy
from the exact PV at any given time.
Words 228 to 231 cannot be used as work words even when pulse outputs are
not being used.
When the PV is read by executing PRV(62), words 228 to 231 are refreshed with
the same timing.
Read Pulse Output Status
This function reads the pulse output status.
Using an Instruction
(@)PRV(62)
P
001
D
Port specifier (000: Pulse output 0; 010: Pulse output 1)
Control designation (001: Read pulse output status)
Word for storing pulse output status
Pulse output status
0: Constant speed; 1: Accelerating/decelerating
Pulse output PV overflow/underflow
0: Normal; 1: Overflow or underflow occurred
Pulse output in progress
0: Stopped
1: Output in progress
Number of pulses
0: Not set
1: Set
Pulse output completion
0: Not completed
1: Completed
Using Data Areas
As shown in the following illustration, the pulse output status for pulse output 0 is
stored in AR 11, and the pulse output status for pulse output 1 is stored in AR 12.
AR 11: Pulse output 0
AR 12: Pulse output 1
Pulse output in progress
0: Stopped
1: Output in progress
Pulse output completion
0: Not completed
1: Completed
102
Pulse output status:
0: Constant speed;
1: Accelerating/decelerating
Pulse output PV overflow/underflow
0: Normal
1: Overflow or underflow occurred
Number of pulses
0: Not set
1: Set
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
Note The flags in AR 11 and AR 12 are refreshed once each cycle, so the values in
these words may not reflect the actual status during each cycle, but the flags in
AR 11 and AR 12 are refreshed when the status is read with PRV(62).
Relationship Between Status and Operation
Independent Mode (Without Acceleration and Deceleration)
Frequency
Time
PULS(65) execution
SPED(64) execution
Output in progress
Output completed
Number of pulses set
Continuous Mode
Frequency
Time
SPED(64) execution
INI(61) execution
Output in progress
Output completed
Number of pulses set
Stopping Output in Independent Mode (Without Acceleration and Deceleration)
Frequency
Time
PULS(65) execution
SPED(64) execution
INI(61) execution
Output in progress
Output completed
Number of pulses set
103
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
Application Examples
Positioning
Explanation
In this example, when the execution condition (00005) turns ON, 100 pulses are
output from output 01000 (pulse output 0) at a frequency of 60 Hz.
Frequency
60 Hz
Number of pulses
Execution condition
(00005)
Wiring
Wire the CPM2A to the motor driver as shown in the following illustration.
Motor Driver
Wire the CPM2C to the motor driver as shown in the following illustration. In this
case, a CPU Unit with sinking transistor outputs is used.
Note The following examples are for Fujitsu-compatible connectors. Output bit addresses and connector pin numbers depend on the models. Refer to the CPM2C
Operation Manual (W356) or the CPM2C-S Operation Manual (W377) for details.
Output connector
Motor Driver
24 VDC
104
(See above note.)
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
PC Setup
15
0
DM 6629
DM 6642
0
0
Sets the coordinate system for pulse output 0 as relative.
Set for other than synchronized pulse control.
0
(Set to 01 when using the high-speed counter.)
Programming
00005 (Execution condition)
(13)
Detects turning ON of execution condition.
PLUS(65)
Sets number of pulses.
Pulse output 0
Relative pulses
Beginning word for pulse
SV data
DM 0000
DM 0001
Number of pulses:
100
SPED(64) Sets frequency and starts pulse output.
Pulse output 0
Independent mode
Frequency: 60 Hz
JOG Operation
Explanation
In this example, when the execution condition (00005) turns ON, JOG pulses are
output at a frequency of 100 Hz from either output 01000 (pulse output 0) or output 01001 (pulse output 1). When the execution condition (00005) turns OFF,
the output is stopped. Switching between output 01000 (pulse output 0) and output 01001 (pulse output 1) is performed by means of the direction designator
(00006).
Frequency
(direction)
Time
Execution condition
(00005)
Direction designator
(00006)
Wiring
Wire the CPM2A to the motor driver as shown in the following illustration.
Motor Driver
105
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
Wire the CPM2C to the motor driver as shown in the following illustration. In this
case, a CPU Unit with sinking transistor outputs is used.
Note The following examples are for Fujitsu-compatible connectors. Output bit addresses and connector pin numbers depend on the models. Refer to the CPM2C
Operation Manual (W356) or the CPM2C-S Operation Manual (W377) for details.
Output connector
(See above note.)
Motor
Driver
24 VDC
Note Refer to page operation manual for details on wiring outputs.
PC Setup
15
0
DM 6629
DM 6642
0
0
0
0
Sets the coordinate system for pulse outputs 0 and 1 as relative.
Set for other than synchronized pulse control.
(Set to 01 when using the high-speed counter.)
Programming
00005 (Execution condition)
(13)
Detects turning ON of execution condition.
(14)
Detects turning OFF of execution condition.
(Direction designator)
SPED(64)
SPED(64)
Output in CW direction
Pulse output 0
Continuous mode
Output frequency: 100 Hz
Output in CCW direction
Pulse output 1
Continuous mode
Output frequency: 100 Hz
INI(61)
Stops pulse outputs 0 and 1.
INI(61)
010
106
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
2-5-2 Using Pulse Outputs With Variable Duty Ratio
Select the pulse output number.
Wire the outputs.
Pulse output number 0 or 1
Output numbers: 01000 and 01001
PWM(––): For setting the frequency and duty ratio.
Create a ladder diagram program.
INI(61): For stopping pulse outputs.
PRV(62): For reading the pulse output status.
Pulse Outputs With Variable Duty Ratio
PWM(––)
PULSE WITH
VARIABLE DUTY
RATIO instruction
Pulse output 0
Pulse output 1
(Either 01000 or 01001
can be used.)
Target frequency: 0.1 to 999.9 Hz
Duty ratio: 0 to 100%
Start pulse outputs
INI(61)
(Note: The duty ratio is the ratio
of ON time to pulse frequency.)
Every scan
MODE CONTROL
instruction
Stop pulse outputs
Selecting the Pulse
Output Number
Wiring the Outputs
Every scan
Pulse output status
AR 11
Immediately
HIGH-SPEED
COUNTER PV
PRV(62) READ instruction
AR 12
Read pulse
output status.
Select either pulse output 0 or 1.
Output number
Pulse output number
01000
0
01001
1
Wire the CPM2A outputs as shown in the following illustration. (Pulses can be
output independently from pulse outputs 0 and 1.)
Output 01000: Pulse output 0 (single-phase output)
Output 01001: Pulse output 1 (single-phase output)
Wire the CPM2C outputs as shown in the following illustration. (Pulses can be
output independently from pulse outputs 0 and 1.)
107
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
Note The following examples are for Fujitsu-compatible connectors. Output bit addresses and connector pin numbers depend on the models. Refer to the CPM2C
Operation Manual (W356) or the CPM2C-S Operation Manual (W377) for details.
Output connector
(See above note.)
01000: Pulse output 0 (single-phase output)
01001: Pulse output 1 (single-phase output)
PC Setup
Make the following settings in the PC Setup.
Word
Bits
DM 6642
08 to 15
Function
High-speed
counter
setting
Setting
00: Do not use.
01: Use as high-speed counter
Either 00 or
01
02: Use as synchronized pulse
control (10 to 500 Hz).
03: Use as synchronized pulse
control (20 Hz to 1 kHz).
04: Use as synchronized pulse
control (300 Hz to 20 kHz).
Synchronized pulse control cannot be used simultaneously.
The settings will go into effect when the mode is changed (from PROGRAM to
MONITOR/RUN) or when the power supply is turned ON to the PC.
Ladder Diagram
Programming
The following table shows the instruction operations related to pulse outputs
with variable duty ratio.
Instruction
(@)PWM(––)
Control
Operation
Pulse output with
variable duty ratio
Change duty ratio
Sets the frequency and duty ratio and
starts the pulse outputs.
Changes the duty ratio during pulse
while pulse outputs with variable duty
ratio are already in progress.
(@)INI(61)
Stop pulse outputs
Stops the pulse outputs.
(@)PRV(62)
Read pulse output status Reads the pulse output status (during
pulse outputs).
The following table shows which instructions can be executed during pulse outputs without acceleration and deceleration.
PULS(65) SPED(64)
No
Note
108
No
INI(61)
PRV(62) ACC(––)
Yes (See note 1.) Yes
No
PWM(––)
Yes (See note 2.)
1. This instruction can be used only for stopping pulse outputs.
2. This instruction can be used only for changing the duty ratio. The frequency
cannot be changed while pulses are being output. If the frequency needs to
be changed, be sure to stop the pulse output first.
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
The following table shows the words and bits related to pulse outputs with variable duty ratio.
Word
Bit
Name
Contents
AR 11
15
Pulse output in progress
for pulse output 0
ON: In progress (by SPED(64),
ACC(––), or PWM(––))
OFF: Stopped
AR 12
15
Pulse output in progress
for pulse output 1
ON: In progress (by SPED(64),
ACC(––), or PWM(––))
OFF: Stopped
Pulse Output With Variable Duty Ratio
Change Duty Ratio
These functions set the position for outputting pulses (01000, 01001), the frequency, and the duty ratio, and start the pulse outputs. By changing the duty ratio
setting and executing PWM(––) again, it is also possible to change the duty ratio
while pulse outputs with variable duty ratio are already in progress.
(@PWM(––)
P
F
Port specifier (000: Pulse output 0; 010: Pulse output 1)
Target frequency data word
D
Duty ratio data word
F
Target frequency
Register the target frequency to be set.
#0001 to #9999 (4 digits BCD): 0.1 Hz to 999.9 Hz
D
Duty ratio
Register the duty ratio to be set.
#0000 to #0100 (4 digits BCD): 0% to 100%
The pulse frequency cannot be changed while pulses are being output.
Stop Pulse Outputs
This function stops pulse outputs.
(@)INI(61)
P
003
000
Port specifier (000: Pulse output 0; 010: Pulse output 1)
Control designation (003: Stop pulse outputs)
Fixed: 000
Note The pulse outputs can also be stopped by switching the PC to PROGRAM
mode.
Read Pulse Output Status
This function reads the pulse output status.
Using an Instruction
(@)PRV(62)
P
001
D
Port specifier (000: Pulse output 0; 010: Pulse output 1)
Control designation (001: Read pulse output status)
Beginning word for storing pulse output status
Pulse output in progress
0: Stopped
1: Output in progress
109
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
Using Data Areas
As shown in the following illustration, the pulse output status for pulse output 0 is
stored in AR 1115, and the pulse output status for pulse output 1 is stored in AR
1215.
AR 11: Pulse output 0
AR 12: Pulse output 1
Pulse output in progress
0: Stopped
1: Output in progress
Note AR 1115 and AR 1215 are refreshed once each cycle, so the values in these
words may not reflect the actual status during each cycle, but AR 1115 and
AR 1215 are refreshed when the status is read with PRV(62).
Relationship Between Status and Operation
Continuous Mode (Pulse Output With Variable Duty Ratio)
Frequency
Time
PWM(––) execution
INI(61) execution
Output in progress
Output completion
Set number of pulses
Application Example
Explanation
In this example, when the execution condition (00005) turns ON, variable duty
pulses are output from output 01000 (pulse output 0) at a frequency of 100 Hz.
The duty ratio at this time can be changed with the thumbwheel switch 0.
Wiring
Wire the CPM2A to the motor driver and thumbwheel switch as shown in the following illustration.
Motor Driver
Wire the CPM2C to the motor driver and thumbwheel switch as shown in the following illustration. In this case, a CPU Unit with sinking transistor outputs is
used.
110
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
Note The following examples are for Fujitsu-compatible connectors. I/O bit addresses
and connector pin numbers depend on the models. Refer to the CPM2C Operation Manual (W356) or the CPM2C-S Operation Manual (W377) for details.
Output connector
Input connector
(See above note.)
Motor Driver
Thumbwheel switch
24 VDC
Note Refer to the operation manual for details on wiring.
PC Setup
15
DM 6642
0
0
0
High-speed counter not used.
(Set for other than synchronized pulse control.)
Programming (CPM2A Example)
00005 (Execution condition)
(14)
Detects turning OFF of execution condition.
DIV(33) Changes analog control 0 value to a value from 0 to 100.
Value in SR 250 (Analog control 0 in CPM2A PCs) (see note)
Divide value by 2.
Duty ratio setting
PWM(––) Pulse outputs with variable duty
Pulse output 0
Output frequency: 100 Hz
Duty ratio setting
INI(61)
Stops pulse output 0.
Note The CPM2C is not provided with
an analog control. For external
settings, specify the input word
connected to the thumbwheel
switch.
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Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
Programming (CPM2C Example)
Execution condition
DIFD (14)
20000
Detects OFF to ON transition in execution condition.
Reads the value from the thumb rotary switch.
ANDW (34)
000
#000F
DM0100
Value from the thumb rotary switch
BCD (24)
DM0100
DM0101
MUL (32)
DM0101
#0010
DM0102
PWM (––)
000
#1000
DM0102
Duty ratio setting
Variable duty pulse output
Pulse output 0
Output frequency: 100 Hz
Duty ratio setting
20000
Stops pulse output 0
INI(61)
000
003
000
END (01)
112
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
2-5-3 Using Pulse Outputs With Trapezoidal Acceleration and
Deceleration
Select the direction control method.
Select the pulse output number.
Wire the outputs.
Pulse + direction output or up/down pulse output
Pulse output number 0
Output numbers: 01000 and 01001
PC Setup (DM 6629)
PV coordinate system for pulse output number 0
PULS(65): For setting the number of output pulses.
Create a ladder diagram program.
ACC(––): For controlling pulse outputs with trapezoidal acceleration and
deceleration
INI(61): For stopping pulse outputs and changing the pulse output PV.
PRV(62): For reading the pulse output PV and status.
Pulse Outputs With Trapezoidal Acceleration and Deceleration
PULS(65)
SET
PULSES
instruction
ACC(––)
Specify relative or absolute pulses.
Number of output pulses
set value (8 digits BCD)
ACCELERATION
CONTROL
instruction
Pulse, CW
Direction, CCW
Mode designation
Starting frequency: 0 Hz to 10 kHz
Target frequency: 10 Hz to 10 kHz
INI(61) MODE
CONTROL
instruction
Acceleration/deceleration rate:
10 ms increase/decrease
10 Hz to 10 kHz
Start pulse outputs.
Stop pulse outputs.
Every scan
Every scan
Pulse output status
Pulse output PV
Change pulse output PV.
PC Setup
DM 6629, bits
00 to 03
AR 11
SR 228
SR 229
Immediately
HIGH-SPEED
PRV(62) COUNTER PV
READ instruction
Read pulse output PV.
Read pulse output
status.
113
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
Selecting the Direction
Control Method
2-5
Select the pulse output direction control method according to the type of signal
used.
Pulse + Direction Outputs
Selecting the Pulse
Output Number
Up/down Pulse Outputs
Select pulse output 0.
Output number
01000
01001
Wiring the Outputs
Pulse output number
0
Wire the CPM2A outputs as shown in the following illustration.
Pulse + Direction Outputs
Up/down Pulse Outputs
Output 01000: Pulse output
Output 01000: CW output
Output 01001: Direction output
Output 01001: CCW output
Wire the CPM2C outputs as shown in the following illustration.
Note The following examples are for Fujitsu-compatible connectors. Output bit addresses and connector pin numbers depend on the models. Refer to the CPM2C
Operation Manual (W356) or the CPM2C-S Operation Manual (W377) for details.
Pulse + Direction Outputs
(See above note.)
Output connector
01000: Pulse output
01001: Direction output
114
Up/down Pulse Outputs
(See above note.)
Output connector
01000: CW output
01001: CCW output
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
Make the following settings in the PC Setup.
PC Setup
Word
Bits
DM 6629
00 to 03
DM 6642
08 to 15
Function
Setting
Pulse 0 PV
coordinate
system
0: Relative coordinate system
High-speed
counter
setting
00: Do not use.
Either 0 or 1
1: Absolute coordinate system
01: Use as high-speed counter
Either 00 or
01
02: Use as synchronized pulse
control (10 to 500 Hz).
03: Use as synchronized pulse
control (20 Hz to 1 kHz).
04: Use as synchronized pulse
control (300 Hz to 20 kHz).
If absolute pulses are specified with PULS(65), be sure to set the absolute coordinate system (1).
Synchronized pulse control cannot be used simultaneously.
The settings will go into effect when the mode is changed (from PROGRAM to
MONITOR/RUN) or when the power supply is turned ON to the PC.
The following table shows the instruction operations related to pulse outputs
with trapezoidal acceleration and deceleration (fixed duty ratio).
Ladder Diagram
Programming
Instruction
Control
Operation
(@)PULS(65)
Set number of pulses
(@)ACC(––)
Set frequency and start
pulse outputs
(@)INI(61)
((@)PRV(62)
)
( )
Sets the number of pulses to be output
in independent mode.
Sets the target frequency, starting
frequency, and acceleration/deceleration
rate for outputs in independent mode or
continuous mode, and starts the pulse
outputs.
Change frequency
Changes the frequency during pulse
output in continuous mode by
accelerating or decelerating according
to the specified
acceleration/deceleration rate.
Stop pulse outputs
Decelerates pulse outputs to a stop
according to the specified
acceleration/deceleration rate.
Stop (decelerate stop)
pulse outputs
Change pulse output PV
Read pulse output PV
Read pulse output status
Stops the pulse outputs.
Changes the pulse output PV.
Reads the pulse output PV.
Reads the pulse output status.
The following table shows which instructions can be executed during pulse outputs with trapezoidal acceleration and deceleration.
PULS(65)
SPED(64)
INI(61)
PRV(62)
ACC(––)
PWM(––)
Continuous mode
No
No
Yes (See note 1.)
Yes
No
No
Independent mode
No
No
Yes (See note 1.)
Yes
Yes (See note 2.)
No
Note
1. This instruction can be executed only while pulse outputs are stopped. The
PV cannot be changed while pulses are being output. If the PV needs to be
changed, be sure to stop the pulse output first.
2. This instruction can be used only for changing the frequency and stopping
the pulse output. It cannot be used for switching between independent
mode and continuous mode. Moreover, ACC(––) cannot be received during
acceleration or deceleration.
115
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CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
The following table shows the words and bits related to pulse outputs with trapezoidal acceleration and deceleration (fixed duty ratio).
Word
Bits
Name
Contents
Cannot be used as
work bits even when
not used as pulse
outputs.
228
00 to 15 Pulse output PV 0, rightmost 4 digits
229
00 to 15 Pulse output PV 0, leftmost 4 digits
252
AR 11
04
Pulse output 0 PV reset
Clears PV 0 when ON.
11
Pulse output status for pulse output 0
ON: Accelerating or
decelerating
OFF: Constant speed
12
Pulse output 0 PV overflow/underflow
13
14
15
ON: Occurred
OFF: Normal
Number of pulses set for pulse output 0 ON: Set
OFF: Not set
Pulse output completed for pulse
ON: Completed
output 0
OFF: Not completed
Pulse output in progress for pulse
ON: In progress (by
output 0
SPED(64), ACC(––),
or PWM(––))
OFF: Stopped
Set Number of Pulses
Specify the number of pulses to be output in independent mode.
(@)PULS(65)
000
D
N
Fixed at 000: Pulse output 0
Type of Pulse Output (000: Relative pulses; 001: Absolute pulses) (See note.)
Beginning word of setting for number of pulses
N
Rightmost 4 digits
N+1
Leftmost 4 digits
Number of pulses (Rightmost, leftmost digits)
Register the number of pulses to be set.
96,777,215 to 16,777,215
Negative numbers are expressed by turning
ON the leftmost bit.
Type of Pulse Output
000:
Relative pulses (SV for number of pulses = Number of pulses moved)
001:
Absolute pulses (SV for number of pulses = The next PV on the absolute coordinate system,
i.e., the pulse output PV + number of pulses moved)*
*Absolute pulses can only be specified by PULS(65) when the PV coordinate system
in the PC Setup is set for an absolute coordinate system.
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CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
Set Frequency and Start Pulse Outputs
Change Frequency
These functions set the output mode, the target frequency, the starting frequency, and the acceleration/deceleration rate, and they begin pulse outputs. They
can also be used to change the frequency, by accelerating or decelerating at the
specified acceleration/deceleration rate, if pulse outputs are already in progress
in continuous mode.
Setting the Frequencies, Acceleration/Deceleration, and Starting Pulse
Outputs in Independent Mode
(@)ACC(––)
000
M
T
M
Fixed at 000: Pulse output 0
Output mode designation
Beginning word of settings table
Output mode
Specify the output mode.
000: Up/down pulse outputs, independent mode
002: Pulse + direction outputs, independent mode
T
Acceleration/deceleration rate (#0001 to #1000 BCD: 10 Hz to 10 kHz)
T+1
Target frequency (#0001 to #1000 BCD: 10 Hz to 10 kHz)
T+2
Starting frequency (#0000 to #1000 BCD: 0 to 10 kHz)
Register the data for each frequency.
The acceleration/deceleration rate is the increase or decrease in the frequency every 10 ms.
Pulse output frequency
Target
frequency
Starting
frequency
0 Hz
Number of
pulses
Time
In independent mode, the acceleration and deceleration
points are determined from the number of pulses, the
acceleration/deceleration rate, the target frequency, and
the the starting frequency.
117
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CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
Setting the Frequency and Acceleration/Deceleration, Starting Pulse Outputs, and Changing the Frequency in Continuous Mode
(@)ACC(––)
M
Fixed at 000: Pulse output 0
Output mode designation
T
Beginning word of settings table
000
M
Output mode
Specify the output mode.
010: Up/down pulse output, CW, continuous mode
011: Up/down pulse output, CCW, continuous mode
012: Pulse + direction output, CW, continuous mode
013: Pulse + direction output, CCW, continuous mode
T
Acceleration/deceleration rate (#0001 to #1000 BCD: 10 Hz to 10 kHz)
T+1
Target frequency (#0001 to #1000 BCD: 10 Hz to 10 kHz)
T+2
Starting frequency (#0000 to #1000 BCD: 0 to 10 kHz)
Register the data for each frequency.
The acceleration/deceleration rate is the increase or decrease in the frequency every 10 ms.
Pulse output frequency
Target
frequency
Starting
frequency
0 Hz
Time
In continuous mode, pulses are output at the target frequency until
stopped. The next ACC(––) instruction cannot be received except during
acceleration or deceleration.
Change Pulse Output PV
This function changes the pulse output PV.
(@)INI(61)
000
004
C2
Fixed at 000: Pulse output 0
Control designation (004: Change pulse output PV)
Beginning word for PV change data
C2
Rightmost 4 digits
C2+1
Leftmost 4 digits
Change PV data (Rightmost, leftmost digits)
Register the PV data to be changed.
96,777,215 to 16,777,215
Negative numbers are expressed by turning
ON the leftmost bit.
Note The pulse output PV can be changed only while the pulse output is stopped.
118
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
Stop Pulse Outputs,
Decelerate and Stop Pulse Outputs
These functions stop the pulse outputs.
Stop Pulse Outputs
(@)INI(61)
000
Fixed at 000: Pulse output 0
003
Control designation (003: Stop pulse outputs)
000
Fixed at 000
Decelerate Stop Pulse Outputs
(@)ACC(––)
Fixed at 000: Port specifier
Mode designation
000
000
Beginning word of settings table
T
T
Acceleration/deceleration rate (#0001 to #1000 BCD: 10 Hz to 10 kHz)
T+1
Target frequency (#0000 to #1000 BCD: 0 Hz to 10 kHz)
T+2
Starting frequency (#0000 to #1000 BCD: 0 to 10 kHz)
Register the data for each frequency.
The acceleration/deceleration rate is the increase or decrease in the frequency every 10 ms.
Note The pulse outputs can also be stopped by switching the PC to PROGRAM
mode.
Read Pulse Output PV
This function reads the pulse output PV.
Using an Instruction
(@)PRV(62)
000
003
D
Fixed at 000: Pulse output 0
Control designation (003: Read pulse output PV)
Beginning word for storing pulse output PV
D
Rightmost 4 digits
D+1
Leftmost 4 digits
Pulse output PV (rightmost, leftmost digits)
The PV data that is read is stored here.
96,777,215 to 16,777,215
Negative numbers are expressed by turning
ON the leftmost bit.
Using Data Areas
As shown in the following illustration, the pulse output PV for pulse output 0 is
stored in words 228 and 229.
Pulse Output 0
Word 228
PV (Rightmost)
Word 229
PV (Leftmost)
SR 228 and SR 229 are refreshed once each cycle, so the values in these words
may not reflect the actual status during each cycle. SR 228 and SR 229 are refreshed immediately when their status is read with PRV(62).
SR 228 to SR 231 are refreshed with every scan, so there may be a discrepancy
from the exact PV at any given time.
119
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
SR 228 to SR 231 cannot be used as work words even when pulse outputs are
not being used.
When the PV is read by executing PRV(62), SR 228 to SR 231 are refreshed with
the same timing.
Read Pulse Output Status
This function reads the pulse output status.
Using an Instruction
(@)PRV(62)
000
Fixed at 000: Pulse output 0
001
Control designation (001: Read pulse output status)
Word for storing pulse output status
D
Pulse output status
0: Constant rate
1: Accelerating or decelerating
Pulse output PV overflow/underflow
0: Normal; 1: Overflow or underflow occurred
Number of pulses
0: Not set
1: Set
Pulse output completion
0: Not completed
1: Completed
Pulse output in progress
0: Stopped
1: Output in progress
Using Data Areas
As shown in the following illustration, the pulse output status for pulse output 0 is
stored in AR 1111 to AR 1115.
AR 11: Pulse output 0
Pulse output in progress
0: Stopped
1: Output in progress
Pulse output completion
0: Not completed
1: Completed
Pulse output status
0: Constant rate
1: Accelerating or decelerating
Pulse output PV overflow/underflow
0: Normal
1: Overflow or underflow occurred
Number of pulses
0: Not set
1: Set
Note AR 1111 through AR 1115 are refreshed once each cycle, so the values of these
flags may not reflect the actual status, but these flags are refreshed immediately
when their status is read with PRV(62).
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CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
Relationship Between Status and Operation
Independent Mode with Acceleration and Deceleration
Frequency
Time
PULS(65) execution
ACC(––) execution
Output 0 in progress
Output 1 in progress
Output completion
Output status
Set number of pulses
Continuous Mode with Acceleration and Deceleration 1
Frequency
Time
ACC(––) execution (1)
ACC(––) execution (2)
INI(61) execution
Output 0 in progress
Output 1 in progress
Output completion
Output status
Set number of pulses
Continuous Mode with Acceleration and Deceleration 2
Frequency
Time
ACC(––) execution (Stop)
Output 0 in progress
Output 1 in progress
Output completion
Output status
Set number of pulses
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CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
Stopping Outputs in Continuous Mode
with Acceleration and Deceleration 1
Frequency
Time
PULS(65) execution
ACC(––) execution
INI(61) execution
Output 0 in progress
Output 1 in progress
Output completion
Output status
Set number of pulses
Stopping Outputs in Continuous Mode
with Acceleration and Deceleration 2
Frequency
Time
PULS(65) execution
ACC(––) execution
ACC(––) execution
Output 0 in progress
Output 1 in progress
Output completion
Output status
Set number of pulses
Application Example
Positioning
Explanation
In this example, when the execution condition (00005) turns ON, 1000 pulses
are output from output 01000 (pulse output 0) in a trapezoidal acceleration/deceleration pattern as shown in the following diagram.
Frequency (Hz)
Acceleration/deceleration rate
500
200
10 Hz
10 ms
Number of pulses
Execution condition
(00005)
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Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
Wiring
Wire the CPM2A to the motor driver as shown in the following illustration.
Motor Driver
Wire the CPM2C to the motor driver as shown in the following illustration. In this
case, a CPU Unit with sinking transistor outputs is used.
Note The following examples are for Fujitsu-compatible connectors. Output bit addresses and connector pin numbers depend on the models. Refer to the CPM2C
Operation Manual (W356) or the CPM2C-S Operation Manual (W377) for details.
Output connector
(See above note.)
Motor Driver
24 VDC
Note Refer to the operation manual for details on wiring.
PC Setup
15
0
DM 6629
DM 6642
0
0
0
Sets the coordinate system for pulse output 0 as relative.
High-speed counter not used.
(Set for other than synchronized pulse control.)
123
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CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
Programming
00005 (Execution condition)
(13)
Detects turning ON of execution condition.
PULS(65) Sets number of pulses.
Pulse output 0
Relative pulses
Beginning word for pulse SV
data
ACC(––)
Number of pulses: 1,000
Sets frequency and starts pulse output.
Pulse output 0
Independent mode, up/down pulse output
Beginning word of
Acceleration/deceleration rate: 10 Hz/10 ms
settings table
Target frequency: 500 Hz
Starting frequency: 200 Hz
Jogging
Explanation
In this example, when the execution condition (00005) turns ON, JOG pulses are
output at a frequency of 100 Hz from either output 01000 (CW direction) or output 01001 (CCW direction). When the execution condition (00005) turns OFF,
the output is stopped. As shown in the following diagram, the JOG pulses are
accelerated and decelerated at the start and stop of the operation. Switching between output 01000 (CW direction) and output 01001 (CCW direction) is performed by means of the direction designator (00006).
Frequency (Hz)
Acceleration/deceleration rate
Time
10 Hz
10 ms
Execution condition
(00005)
Direction designator
(00006)
Wiring
Wire the CPM2A to the motor driver as shown in the following illustration.
Motor Driver
124
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
2-5
Wire the CPM2C to the motor driver as shown in the following illustration. In this
case, a CPU Unit with sinking transistor outputs is used.
Note The following examples are for Fujitsu-compatible connectors. Output bit addresses and connector pin numbers depend on the models. Refer to the CPM2C
Operation Manual (W356) or the CPM2C-S Operation Manual (W377) for details.
Output connector (See above note.)
Motor Driver
24 VDC
Note Refer to the operation manual for details on wiring.
PC Setup
15
0
DM 6629
DM 6642
0
0
0
Sets the coordinate system for pulse output 0 as relative.
High-speed counter not used.
(Set for other than synchronized pulse control.)
125
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Pulse Output Functions
Programming
00005 (Execution condition)
(Direction designator)
(13)
Detects turning ON of execution condition.
(14)
Detects turning OFF of execution condition.
AR1115
ACC(––)
Output in CW direction
Pulse output 0
Continuous mode, up/down pulses, CW direction
Beginning word of settings table
ACC(––)
Output in CCW direction
Pulse output 0
Continuous mode, up/down pulses, CCW direction
Beginning word of settings table
Acceleration/deceleration rate: 10 Hz/10 ms
Target frequency: 500 Hz
Starting frequency: 200 Hz
(Direction designator)
(14)
ACC(––)
Deceleration stop
Pulse output 0
Beginning word of settings table
Acceleration/deceleration rate: 10 Hz/10 ms
Target frequency: 0 Hz
126
2-5
Section
CPM1A Pulse Output Functions
2-6
2-6
CPM1A Pulse Output Functions
The CPM1A PCs with transistor outputs have a pulse output function capable of
outputting a pulse of 20 Hz to 2 kHz (single-phase). Either IR 01000 or IR 01001
can be selected for pulse output, and the pulse output can be set to either the
continuous mode, under which the output can be stopped by an instruction, or
the independent mode, under which the output is stopped after a preset number
of pulses (1 to 16,777,215).
Refer to the CPM1A Operation Manual for details on hardware connections to
output points and ports.
Pulses are output at the specified frequency until stopped.
Continuous mode
Pulse output is stopped automatically when the specified
number of pulses has been output.
Independent mode
Specified number of pulses
Stepping motor
Stepping motor
Control input
Motor
controller
CW/CCW control output
Pulse output
(single-phase output)
IR 01000 or IR 01001
Note
1. The CPM1A uses a single-phase pulse output. The control signal for the
direction of rotation (CW/CCW) for the motor driver must be written in the
program.
2. Be sure to use a CPU Unit with transistor outputs.
127
Section
CPM1A Pulse Output Functions
2-6
2-6-1 Programming Example in Continuous Mode
In this example program, pulse output begins from IR 01000 when input
IR 00004 turns ON, and is stopped when input IR 00005 turns ON.
SPED(64) can be used to stop pulse output. When using SPED(64) for that purpose, specify #0000 (constant or word contents) as the pulse frequency.
00004 (pulse output condition)
@SPED(64)
Begins pulse output.
000
Output from 01000
001
Continuous mode
#0100
Pulse frequency: 1 kHz
00005 (pulse output stop condition)
@INI(61)
Stops pulse output.
000
003
000
2-6-2 Programming Example in Independent Mode
In this example program, pulse output begins from IR 01000 when input
IR 00004 turns ON, and is stopped after the specified number of pulses have
been output. The pulse amount is set in DM 0100 and DM 0101.
00004 (pulse output condition)
@PULS(65)
Sets the number of pulses.
000
000
DM 0100
Pulse number setting
@SPED(64)
Begins pulse output.
00004 (pulse output condition)
000
000
#0100
Independent mode
Pulse frequency: 1 kHz
2-6-3 Using Pulse Output Instructions
Setting the Number of
Pulses
Before beginning pulse output using the independent mode use PULS(65) as
shown below to set the number of pulses to be output. This setting is not required
for the continuous mode.
@PULS(65)
000
000
N
In N, set the beginning word address of the words where the number of pulses is
set. Store the number of pulses in words N and N+1, in eight digits BCD, with the
leftmost four digits in N+1 and the rightmost four digits in N.
Make the setting within a range of 00000001 to 16777215 (BCD).
128
Section
CPM1A Pulse Output Functions
Beginning Pulse Output
2-6
With SPED(64), set the bit location for pulse outputs (IR 01000 or IR 01001), the
output mode (independent, continuous), and the pulse frequency to begin the
pulse output.
@SPED(64)
P
M
F
P (3 digits BCD)
M (3 digits BCD)
F (4 digits BCD)
Note
000: Outputs to IR 01000
010: Outputs to IR 01001
000: Independent mode
001 Continuous mode
For the beginning pulse output frequency, specify a
constant or word contents. The specified value and set
frequency are as follows:
Specified value:
0002 to 0200
Set frequency:
20 to 2,000 Hz
1. Pulses can be output from only one bit at a time.
2. When pulse output is begun in independent mode, the number of pulses is
read when SPED(64) is executed. PULS(65) cannot be used to change the
number of pulses while pulses are being output.
2-6-4 Changing the Frequency
To change the frequency during pulse output, change the frequency setting with
SPED(64). At that time, set the operands other than the frequency to the same
settings as at the beginning of pulse output.
@SPED(64)
P
M
F
P (3 digits BCD)
M (3 digits BCD)
F (4 digits BCD)
Same as at beginning of pulse output.
Same as at beginning of pulse output.
For the changed pulse output frequency, specify a
constant or word contents. The specified value and set
frequency are as follows:
Specified value:
0002 to 0200
Set frequency:
20 to 2,000 Hz
2-6-5 Stopping Pulse Output
When pulses are output in the independent mode, the pulse output will automatically stop after the number of pulses specified with PULS(65) has been output.
When pulses are output in the continuous mode, either of the following two
methods can be used to stop the pulse output.
1. Use SPED(64) to set the frequency to 0.
2. Use INI(61) to stop the pulse output.
Using SPED(64)
The first method is to use SPED(64) to stop the pulse output by setting the frequency to 0. For details, refer to 2-6-4 Changing the Frequency.
Using INI(61)
The second method is to use INI(61) to stop the pulse output, as follows:
@INI(61)
000
003
000
129
Section
Synchronized Pulse Control (CPM2A/CPM2C Only)
2-7
2-7
Synchronized Pulse Control (CPM2A/CPM2C Only)
By combining the CPM2A/CPM2C’s high-speed counter function with the pulse
output function, the output pulse frequency can be controlled as a specified multiple of the input pulse frequency.
Note A CPU Unit with transistor outputs is required in order to use synchronized pulse
control, i.e., either a CPM2A-CDT-D or CPM2A-CDT1-D.
The following diagram shows the configuration for a CPM2A, but the configuration for a CPM2C is identical.
Counter input
Pulse input 00000
or 00001
Main motor
Rotary encoder
Motor
driver
Pulse output 01000 or 01001
(single-phase output)
Input mode
Item
Input
number
b
Differential phase Pulse + direction
Up/down pulse
input mode
input mode
input mode
Phase-A input
Count input
CW input
Phase-B input
Direction input
CCW input
Differential phase
Single-phase input Single-phase input
input (4X)
10 to 500 Hz (accuracy ±1 Hz)
20 Hz to 1 kHz (accuracy ±1 Hz)
300 Hz to 20 kHz (accuracy ±25 Hz) (See note 2.)
00000
00001
Input method
Input frequency range
Output
n mber (See
number
note 3.)
01000
Pulse output 0
01001
Pulse output 1
Output method
Single-phase output
Output frequency range
10 Hz to 10 kHz (accuracy 10 Hz)
Frequency ratio
1% to 1,000% (Can be specified in units of 1%.)
Synchronized control cycle
10 ms
Note
130
Increment mode
Count input
(See note 1.)
Single-phase input
1. Can be used as an ordinary input.
2. When 10 kHz or less, then the accuracy is ±10 Hz.
3. Either can be selected as the output number, using SYNC(––).
Section
Synchronized Pulse Control (CPM2A/CPM2C Only)
2-7
The directions of pulse inputs are all ignored. The frequency of a pulse that has
been input is read, without regard to the direction.
The following table shows the relationships between synchronized pulse control
and the CPM2A’s other functions.
Function
Synchronized pulse control
Synchronized pulse control
---
Interrupt inputs
Can be used simultaneously.
Interval timer interrupts
Can be used simultaneously.
High-speed counters
Cannot be used simultaneously.
Interrupt inputs (counter mode)
Can be used simultaneously.
Pulse outputs
Cannot be used simultaneously.
Quick-response inputs
Can be used simultaneously.
Input time constant
See note.
Clock
Can be used simultaneously.
Note When inputs 00000 and 00001 are set for use as synchronized pulse control inputs, the input time constant settings for the affected inputs are disabled. The
input time constants remain in effect, however, for the values for refreshing the
relevant input data area.
The relationship between the pulse input frequency and the pulse output frequency is shown below.
Pulse input frequency
X
Frequency ratio
=
Rough pulse output frequency
Values are rounded off in units of 10 Hz.
10 to 500 Hz
A value less than 10 Hz is regarded as 0 Hz.
20 Hz to 1 kHz
A value greater than 10 kHz is regarded as 10 kHz.
300 Hz to 20 kHz
Pulse output frequency
(10 Hz to 10 kHz)
The scaling factor control cycle is 10 ms, and the pulse output frequency is
changed at intervals of 10 ms with respect to the pulse input frequency.
Frequency
Time
131
Section
Synchronized Pulse Control (CPM2A/CPM2C Only)
2-7
Using Synchronized Pulse Control
Differential phase pulse input mode, pulse + direction input
mode, up/down pulse input mode, increment mode
Select the input mode.
Select the pulse synchronization
input frequency.
Wire the inputs and outputs.
Input frequency: 10 Hz to 500 Hz; 20 Hz to 1 kHz; 300 Hz to 20 kHz
Input numbers: 00000, 00001, and 0002
Output numbers: 01000 and 01001
Settings for synchronized pulse control: Input mode, input frequency
PC Setup (DM 6642)
SYNC(––): For beginning synchronized pulse control and changing the scaling factor.
Create a ladder diagram program.
INI(61): For stopping synchronized pulse control.
PRV(62): For reading the high-speed counter frequency and the synchronized pulse
control status.
PC Setup
Synchronized
pulse control
DM 6642, bits 08 to 15
10 Hz to 500 Hz
20 Hz to 1 kHz
300 Hz to 20 kHz
Either
Encoder
inputs
Input mode
Count
Differential phase input
Pulse + direction input
Ladder diagram program
Up/down input
Increment input
SYNC(––)
PC Setup
DM 6642, bits
00 to 03
INI(61)
SYNCHRONIZED
PULSE CONTROL
instruction
Start synchronized
pulse control
Change scaling
factor
MODE CONTROL
instruction
Stop synchronized
pulse control
Every scan
Counter frequency PV
SR 249
SR 248
Immediately
Every scan
HIGH-SPEED
COUNTER PV
Synchronized pulse
PRV(62) READ instruction
control status
Read high-speed counter
frequency
Read synchronized pulse
control status
The pulse output frequency cannot be read.
132
AR 1100 to AR 1107
Pulse output 0
Pulse output 1
Section
Synchronized Pulse Control (CPM2A/CPM2C Only)
2-7
Selecting the Input Mode
Select the differential phase input mode, the pulse + direction input mode, the
up/down pulse input mode, or the increment mode. These modes are explained
below.
Selecting the Pulse
Synchronization Input
Frequency
Select one of the following as the input frequency range: 10 Hz to 500 Hz, 20 Hz
to 1 kHz, or 300 Hz to 20 kHz. For more information on input frequencies, refer to
the following diagrams.
Differential Phase Input Mode
In the differential phase input mode, the count is incremented or decremented
according to two differential phase signals (phase A and phase B) with a multiplication factor of 4.
ON
Phase A
OFF
ON
Phase B
OFF
Nms → Frequency =
1,000
N
Pulse + Direction Input Mode
In the pulse + direction input mode, pulse signals and direction signals are input,
and the count is incremented or decremented according to the direction signal
status.
Pulse inputs
ON
OFF
Direction
inputs
ON
OFF
Nms → Frequency =
1,000
N
Up/Down Pulse Input Mode
In the up/down pulse input mode, CW signals (up pulses) and CCW signals
(down pulses) are input, and the count is incremented or decremented accordingly.
ON
CW inputs
OFF
ON
CWW inputs
OFF
Incremented
Nms → Frequency =
Decremented
1,000
N
133
Section
Synchronized Pulse Control (CPM2A/CPM2C Only)
2-7
Increment Mode
In the increment mode, pulse signals are input and the count is incremented with
each pulse. Phase-B inputs can be used as ordinary inputs.
ON
Pulse inputs
OFF
Nms → Frequency =
1,000
N
Wiring the Inputs
Input Wiring
Wire the CPM2A inputs as shown in the following diagram.
Differential Phase Input Mode
Up/Down Pulse Input Mode
00000: Phase-A input
00001: Phase-B input
00002: Phase-Z input
Pulse + Direction Input Mode
00000: Pulse input
00001: Direction input
134
00000: CW input
00001: CCW input
Increment Mode
00000: Pulse input
Section
Synchronized Pulse Control (CPM2A/CPM2C Only)
2-7
Wire the CPM2C inputs as shown in the following diagram.
Note The following examples are for Fujitsu-compatible connectors. Input bit addresses and connector pin numbers depend on the models. Refer to the CPM2C
Operation Manual (W356) or the CPM2C-S Operation Manual (W377) for details.
Differential Phase Input Mode
Up/Down Pulse Input Mode
Input connector (See above note.)
Input connector
(See above note.)
00002: Phase-Z input
00001: Phase-B input
00001: CCW input
00000: Phase-A input
00000: CW input
Pulse + Direction Input Mode
Input connector
(See above note.)
Increment Mode
Input connector
(See above note.)
00001: Direction input
00000: Pulse input
00000: Pulse input
Output Wiring
Wire the CPM2A outputs as shown in the following diagram.
Output Wiring
01000: Pulse output 0
01001: Pulse output 1
135
Section
Synchronized Pulse Control (CPM2A/CPM2C Only)
2-7
Wire the CPM2C outputs as shown in the following diagram.
Output connector
(See above note.)
01000: Pulse output 0
01001: Pulse output 1
PC Setup
The settings in the PC Setup related to synchronized pulse control are listed in
the following table.
Word
DM 6642
Bits
Function
Setting
00 to 03
High-speed counter input mode setting
04 to 07
0: Differential phase input 5 kHz
1: Pulse + direction input 20 kHz
2: Up/down input
20 kHz
4: Increment
20 kHz
High-speed counter reset method setting
08 to 15
0: Phase-Z signal + software reset
1: Software reset
High-speed counter setting
0, 1, 2, or
4
0 or 1
02, 03, 04
00: Do not use.
01: Use as high-speed counter
02: Use as synchronized pulse control
(10 Hz to 500 Hz)
03: Use as synchronized pulse control
(20 Hz to 1 kHz)
04: Use as synchronized pulse control
(300 Hz to 20 kHz)
The settings will go into effect when the mode is changed (from PROGRAM to
MONITOR/RUN) or when the power supply is turned ON to the PC.
Ladder Diagram
Programming
The following table shows the instruction operations related to synchronized
pulse control.
Instruction
Control
(@)SYNC(––) Start synchronized
control
Change frequency
scaling factor
(@)INI(61)
Stop synchronized
control
((@)PRV(62)
)
( )
Read input frequency
Read synchronized
control status
136
Operation
Specifies the frequency scaling factor
and the output port, and outputs pulses.
Changes the frequency scaling factor
during pulse output.
Stops the pulse outputs.
Reads the input frequency.
Reads the synchronized control status.
Section
Synchronized Pulse Control (CPM2A/CPM2C Only)
2-7
The following table shows the words and bits related to synchronized pulse control.
Word
Bits
Name
248
249
AR 11
00 to 15
00 to 15
15
AR 12
15
Input frequency PV, rightmost digits
Input frequency PV, leftmost digits
Pulse output in progress for pulse
output 0
Pulse output in progress for pulse
output 1
Contents
Reads the input
f
frequency
PV
PV.
ON: Output in progress
OFF: Stopped
O
o ed
Start Frequency Control
This function specifies the bits for pulse outputs (01000, 01001) and the frequency scaling factor (1% to 1,000%), and starts the pulse output.
(@)SYNC(––)
000
P2
C
Pulse input port designation (000: High-speed counter)
Pulse output port designation (000: Pulse output 0; 010: Pulse output 1)
Frequency scaling factor setting
Frequency scaling factor
C
Register the frequency scaling factor to be set.
#0001 to #1000 (4 digits BCD): 1 to 1,000%
Note When using SYNC(––) to specify a frequency scaling factor, be careful to keep
the pulse output frequency below 10 kHz.
Change Frequency Scaling Factor
This function changes the frequency scaling factor during synchronized control
(during pulse output) by specifying the bits for pulse outputs (01000, 01001) and
the frequency scaling factor (1% to 1,000%) and executing SYNC(––).
Stop Synchronized Control
This function stops the pulse outputs.
(@)INI(61)
005
Port specifier (000: High-speed counter)
Control designation (005: Stop synchronized control)
000
Fixed: 000
000
Note The pulse output can also be stopped by switching the PC to PROGRAM mode.
Read Input Frequency
This function reads the input frequency PV.
Using an Instruction
(@)PRV(62)
000
000
D
Fixed: 000
Control designation (000: Read high-speed counter input frequency)
Beginning word for storing input frequency PV
D
Rightmost 4 digits
D+1
Leftmost 4 digits
00000000 to 00020000 (8 digits BCD)
Using Data Areas
As shown in the following illustration, the input frequency is stored in words 248
and 249.
Word 248
Input frequency PV (Rightmost)
Word 249
Input frequency PV (Leftmost)
137
Section
Synchronized Pulse Control (CPM2A/CPM2C Only)
2-7
Words 248 and 249 are refreshed with every scan, so there may be a discrepancy from the exact PV at any given time.
When the PV is read by executing PRV(62), words 248 and 249 are refreshed
with the same timing.
Read Synchronized Control Status
This function reads the synchronized control status.
Using an Instruction
(@)PRV(62)
000
Port specifier (000: Pulse output 0; 010: Pulse output 1)
001
Control designation (001: Read synchronized control status)
Beginning word for storing synchronized control status
D
• Port specifier: 000
Status of pulse output 0
0: Stopped
1: Pulse output in progress
• Port specifier: 010
Status of pulse output 1
0: Stopped
1: Pulse output in progress
Using Data Areas
As shown in the following illustration, the status of pulse output 0 is stored in
AR 1115, and the status of pulse output 1 is stored in AR 1215.
AR 11
Status of pulse output 0
0: Stopped
1: Output in progress
AR 12
Status of pulse output 1
0: Stopped
1: Output in progress
AR 1115 and AR 1215 are refreshed once each cycle, so there may be a discrepancy from the exact PV at any given time.
When the PV is read by executing PRV(62), AR 1112 and AR 1212 are refreshed
immediately.
138
Section
Synchronized Pulse Control (CPM2A/CPM2C Only)
2-7
Relationship Between Status and Operation
Frequency
Input pulses
Time
Frequency
Output pulses
Time
SYNC(––) execution
INI(61) execution
Output 0 in progress
Output 1 in progress
Application Example
Explanation
In this example, when the execution condition (00005) turns ON, synchronized
pulse control is started and pulses are output from output 01000 (pulse output 0)
according to the pulses input by the high-speed counter. At this time, the frequency scaling factor can be changed by means of analog control 0. When the
execution condition (00005) turns OFF, synchronized pulse control is stopped.
Wiring
Wire the CPM2A as shown in the following illustration.
Orange
White
Black
Rotary encoder
Blue
Brown
Motor driver
Wire the CPM2C as shown in the following illustration. In this case, a CPU Unit
with sinking transistor outputs is used.
139
Section
Synchronized Pulse Control (CPM2A/CPM2C Only)
2-7
Note The following examples are for Fujitsu-compatible connectors. I/O bit addresses
and connector pin numbers depend on the models. Refer to the CPM2C Operation Manual (W356) or the CPM2C-S Operation Manual (W377) for details.
Input connector
(See above note.)
Output connector
(See above note.)
Motor Driver
Blue
Rotary encoder
Brown
COM
Orange
24 VDC
White
Black
Note For details regarding motor driver wiring to outputs and rotary encoder wiring to
inputs, refer to the CPM2A Operation Manual (W352)/CPM2C (W356) Operation Manual CPM2C-S Operation Manual (W377).
PC Setup
15
DM 6642
0
0
2
0
0
0: Differential phase input
02: Use as pulse synchronization output.
Programming (Example for CPM2A)
00005 (Execution condition)
DIFD(14) 20000
Detects the turning OFF of the execution condition.
MOV(21)
250
DM0000
Moves the value of analog control 0 into DM 0000.
CMP(20)
Sets DM 0000 to “1” when analog control 0 is set
to “0.”
MOV(21)
140
(The analog controls are built into the CPM2A
PCs, but not CPM2C PCs.)
SYNC(––)
SYNCHRONIZED PULSE CONTROL execution
HIgh-speed counter
Pulse output port 0
Beginning word of frequency scaling factor
INI(61)
Stops synchronized pulse control.
Section
Synchronized Pulse Control (CPM2A/CPM2C Only)
2-7
Programming (Example for CPM2C)
Execution condition
00005
DIFD (14)
20000
SYNC
000
000
DM0000
Detects OFF to ON transition in execution condition.
Executes synchronized pulse control.
High-speed counter
Pulse output 0
First word containing frequency factor
20000
Stops synchronized pulse control.
INI
000
005
000
END (01)
141
Section
Data Computation Standards
2-8
2-8
Data Computation Standards
The degree of error and performance in pulse outputs and synchronized pulse
control are described in this section.
2-8-1 Pulse Outputs
Delays in Frequency
Changes
There will be a delay before a change in the frequency during pulse output is
actually applied to the output, as shown below.
Frequency
changed
Delay
Pulse output
Maximum delay (ms) = One period of the current pulse output 2 + 10 + instruction execution time
There will be an error between the frequency of the output pulse and the set frequency of less than ± 1% due to internal processing error.
Frequency Error
2-8-2 Synchronized Pulse Control
Delay in Start of Pulse
Output
The following diagram shows the delay that will occur between starting synchronized pulse control and the start of actual pulse output.
Pulse input
Pulse output
Delay
Maximum delay (ms) = One period of the pulse input x 2 + 16.25
Delays in Frequency
Changes
There will be a delay before a change in the frequency during pulse output is
actually applied to the output when performing synchronized pulse control, as
shown below.
Delay
Pulse input
Pulse output
Maximum delay (ms) = One period of the current pulse output 2 + 10
Delay in Stop of Pulse
Output
The following diagram shows the delay that will occur between stopping synchronized pulse control (0 Hz) and the end of actual pulse output during synchronized pulse control.
Delay
Pulse input
Pulse output
Maximum delay (ms) = Setting in DM 6642 (see below) + One period of the current pulse output B 2 + 10
142
Setting of
DM 6642 bits 08 to 15
02
Frequency range
Delay
10 to 500 Hz
262 ms
03
20 Hz to 1 kHz
66 ms
04
300 Hz to 20 kHz
4 ms
Section 2-11
CompoBus/S I/O Slave Functions (CPM1A/CPM2A/CPM2C Only)
Frequency Error
There will be an error between the frequencies of the input pulse and output
pulse, as described below. The error consists of error in the input pulse frequency measurement and error in the output pulse frequency.
Input Pulse Frequency Measurement Error
The error in measuring the frequency of the input pulse depends on the setting in
DM 6642, as shown below. If a multiplication factor is specified for synchronized
pulse control, the error given in the table must also be multiplied by the same
factor.
Setting of
DM 6642 bits 08 to 15
02
Frequency range
Error
10 to 500 Hz
±1 Hz
03
20 Hz to 1 kHz
±1 Hz
04
300 Hz to 20 kHz
±10 Hz
Output Pulse Frequency Error
There will be an error between the frequency of the output pulse and the set frequency of less than ± 1% due to internal processing error.
Example
DM 6642 bits 08 to 15: 4 (frequency range: 300 Hz to 20 kHz)
Multiplication factor:
300%
Input frequency:
1 kHz (error: 0%)
If synchronized pulse control is performed under the above conditions, there will
be an error of ±10 Hz in measuring the frequency range of the input pulse. The
input frequency will thus be 990 to 1010 Hz. The multiplication factor of 300%,
however, would make this 2970 to 3030 Hz. There would also be an error of ±1%
in the frequency of the output pulse, so the output would be in the range 2940 to
3060 Hz.
2-9
Analog I/O Functions (CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A/CPM2C Only)
One or more Analog I/O Units can be connected to the PC to provide analog I/O.
One Analog I/O Unit allows 2 analog inputs and 1 analog output. See 3-1 Analog
I/O Units for details.
2-10 Temperature Sensor Input Functions
(CPM1A/CPM2A/CPM2C Only)
Temperature Sensor Units can be added to directly input temperature sensor
inputs into the PC. Temperature Sensor Units are available for either thermocouple or platinum resistance thermometer inputs.
For the CPM1A or CPM2A, up to three CPM1A-TS001/101 Temperature Sensor
Units or one CPM1A-TS002/102 Temperature Sensor Unit can be connected.
Up to 6 temperature inputs are possible for one PC.
For the CPM2C, up to four CPM2C-TS001/101 Temperature Sensor Units can
be connected, enabling up to 8 temperature inputs for one PC.
Up to three Units can be connected for the CPM2C-S.
2-11 CompoBus/S I/O Slave Functions
(CPM1A/CPM2A/CPM2C Only)
The PC can function as a Slave to a CompoBus/S Master Unit (or SRM1 CompoBus/S Master Control Unit) when a CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit is connected. See
3-3 CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit for details.
143
Section 2-12
CompoBus/S I/O Master Functions (SRM1(-V2) and CPM2C-S Only)
2-12 CompoBus/S I/O Master Functions (SRM1(-V2) and
CPM2C-S Only)
Maximum Number of Nodes
A maximum of either 16 or 32 CompoBus/S nodes may be connected.
Communications mode No. of nodes set
High-speed
g
mode
16
32
Long-distance
g
mode
16
32
Communications response time
0.5 ms
0.8 ms
4.0 ms
6.0 ms
The communications mode and maximum number of nodes are set in the PC
Setup, as shown in the following table.
Word
Bit(s)
DM 6603 00 to 03
Function
Setting
Maximum number of CompoBus/S nodes
0 or 1
04 to 07
0: 32 nodes
1: 16 nodes
CompoBus/S communications mode
0 or 1
08 to 15
0: High-speed communications
1: Long-distance communications
Not used.
00
Note When changes are made to these settings, always turn the power off and on
again to make the new setting effective.
Slave Interrupts
Input bits in IR 000 to IR 007 and output bits in IR 010 to IR 017 are used as interrupts for CompoBus/S I/O Terminals. The CompoBus/S I/O Terminal interrupts
(IN 0 to 15 and OUT 0 to 15) are allocated as indicated in the following table.
IN0 to IN15 are the node addresses for the Input Terminals and OUT0 to OUT15
are the node addresses for the Output Terminals.
Bit
Word
Input
Output
Note
IR 000
IR 001
IR 002
IR 003
IR 004
IR 005
IR 006
IR 007
IR 010
IR 011
IR 012
IR 013
IR 014
IR 015
IR 016
IR 017
15 14 13 12 11 10 9
IN1
IN3
IN5
IN7
IN9
IN11
IN13
IN15
OUT1
OUT3
OUT5
OUT7
OUT9
OUT11
OUT13
OUT15
8
7
6
5
4 3 2
IN0
IN2
IN4
IN6
IN8
IN10
IN12
IN14
OUT0
OUT2
OUT4
OUT6
OUT8
OUT10
OUT12
OUT14
1
0
1. When the maximum number of CompoBus/S nodes is set to 16, IN8 to IN15
can be used as work bits.
2. CompoBus/S Terminals with less than 8 points are allocated bit addresses
from either 0 or 8.
144
Section 2-12
CompoBus/S I/O Master Functions (SRM1(-V2) and CPM2C-S Only)
3. CompoBus/S Terminals with 16 points can be set for only even number addresses.
4. Analog Terminals can be set for only even number addresses.
Status Flags
Word
AR04
The communications status between CompoBus/S terminals is output through
AR04 to AR07 Slave Add Flags and Slave Communications Error Flags.
Uppermost bits: Slave Communications Error Flags
Lower Bits: Slave Add Flags
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
OUT
7
OUT
6
OUT
5
OUT
4
OUT
3
OUT
2
OUT
1
OUT
0
OUT
7
OUT
6
OUT
5
OUT
4
OUT
3
OUT
2
OUT
1
OUT
0
AR05
IN7
IN6
IN5
IN4
IN3
IN2
IN1
IN0
IN7
IN6
IN5
IN4
IN3
IN2
IN1
IN0
AR06
OUT
15
OUT
14
OUT
13
OUT
12
OUT
11
OUT
10
OUT
9
OUT
8
OUT
15
OUT
14
OUT
13
OUT
12
OUT
11
OUT
10
OUT
9
OUT
8
AR07
IN15
IN14
IN13
IN12
IN11
IN10
IN9
IN8
IN15
IN14
IN13
IN12
IN11
IN10
IN9
IN8
Note
1. IN0 to IN15 are the input terminals and OUT0 to OUT15 are the output terminals.
2. When the maximum number of CompoBus/S units is set to 16, IN8 to IN15
and OUT8 to OUT15 cannot be used.
3. The Slave Add Flag turns ON when a slave joins the communications. When
the power to the CPU Unit is turned OFF and ON again all bits will turn OFF.
4. The Slave Communications Error Flag turns ON when a slave participating
in the network is separated from the network. The bit will turn OFF when the
slave re-enters the network.
5. For the SRM1, an error will not occur even if the same node address is allocated to more than one slave. Errors will also not occur when communications go down or communications errors, such as broken lines, occur. Set all
node addresses very carefully and confirm slave operation by including a
section of ladder program using the Status Flags. An example is shown below.
Example
SRM1 (-V2)
or CPM2C-S
CompoBus/S
communications path
Disconnection (2)
IR 000
Bits 00 to 07
Slave 1
Node 0 (IN0)
IR 001
Bits 00 to 07
IR 000
Bits 00 to 07
Slave 2
Node 2 (IN2)
Slave 3
Node 0 (IN0)
Node address
duplication (1)
145
Section 2-13
Analog Controls (CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A Only)
00000
(Slave 1 input)
20000
00100
(Slave 2 input)
20100
If the addresses for Slave 1 and Slave 3
are the same, the Master will not be able
to read input from Slave 3.
If a communications error is generated,
the status of IR 00100 will be the same
as before the error and so the change in
the status of the actual input will not be
detected.
• Example of Countermeasure in Ladder Program
AR0500
(IN0’s Active Flag)
AR0508
(IN0’s Error Flag)
02800
00000
(Slave 1 communications normal)
02800
20000
AR0502
(IN2’s Active Flag)
AR0510
(IN2’s Error Flag)
02900
00100
(Slave 2 communications normal)
02900
20100
2-13 Analog Controls (CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A Only)
The PCs are equipped with analog controls that automatically transfer the settings on the CPU Unit’s adjustment switches to words in the CPU Unit’s I/O memory. This function is very useful when there are set values that need to be precisely adjusted during operation. These set values can be changed just by turning the adjustment switches on the CPU Unit.
Settings
146
The PCs have two analog adjustment controls that can be used for a wide range
of timer and counter analog settings. The following diagrams show the adjustment controls. As these controls are turned, values from 0000 to 0200 (BCD) are
stored in the SR Area. Use a Phillips screwdriver to adjust the settings.
Analog Controls (CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A Only)
Section 2-13
The storage words are refreshed once with every CPU Unit cycle.
CPM1
The analog setting for control 0 is in SR 250.
The analog setting for control 1 is in SR 251.
CPM1A/CPM2A
The analog setting for control 0 is in SR 250.
The analog setting for control 1 is in SR 251.
Note The above diagram shows the CPM2A, but the settings are the same for the
CPM1A.
! Caution
The analog setting may change with changing temperatures. Do not use the
analog adjustment controls for applications that require a precise, fixed setting.
147
Section 2-14
Quick-response Inputs
Using Analog Controls
Make the analog settings.
Use a Phillips screwdriver to adjust the controls.
Connect a Programming Device such as a Programming Console, and
check the values stored in SR 250 and SR 251.
Create a ladder diagram program.
Analog control 0
Making the Analog
Settings
Read the values in SR 250 and SR 251 with the ladder diagram program.
Analog control 1
SR 251
Analog control 1 set value (SV)
SR 250
Analog control 0 set value (SV)
Use a Phillips screwdriver to adjust the analog controls. The set values can be
checked by connecting a Programming Device such as a Programming Console
and reading the values stored in SR 250 and SR 251.
Analog control 0
Ladder Diagram
Programming
Analog control 1
The following table shows the words and bits where the analog settings are
stored.
Word
SR 250
SR 251
Bit
00 to 15
00 to 15
Name
Analog control 0 SV storage area
Analog control 1 SV storage area
Value
0000 to 0200
(BCD)
In the following example program, the analog control SV (0000 to 0200 BCD)
stored in SR 250 is set as a timer SV. The timer’s set range is 0.0 s to 20.0 s.
Start bit
Specifies SR 250 for the timer SV.
2-14 Quick-response Inputs
2-14-1 CPM1/CPM1A Quick-response Inputs
The CPM1/CPM1A have quick response inputs that can be used to enable inputting shorter signals.
All 10-point CPU Units have 2 quick-response input terminals and the 20-, 30-,
and 40-point CPU Units have 4 quick-response input terminals. The same terminals are used for quick-response inputs and interrupt inputs.
148
Section 2-14
Quick-response Inputs
Quick-response Operation
Quick-response inputs have an internal buffer, so input signals shorter than one
cycle can be detected. Signals with a pulse width as short as 0.2 ms can be detected, regardless of their timing during the PC cycle.
Overseeing
processes
Program
execution
I/O
refreshing
Overseeing Program
processes
execution
I/O
refreshing
Input signal
(00003)
IR 00003
One cycle
CPU Unit
Input bits
10-point CPU Units
20-, 30-, 40-point CPU Units
Setting Quick-response
Inputs
IR 00003 to IR 00004
IR 00003 to IR 00006
Min. input pulse width
0.2 ms
The input bits in the above table can be set as quick-response inputs in
DM 6628, as shown in the following table.
Word
DM 6628
Settings
0: Normal
Norm l input
in ut
1: Interrupt input
Q ick response input
inp t
2: Quick-response
(D f lt setting:
(Default
tti
0)
Bit 15
0
DM 6628
Setting for input 00006: Set to 2
Setting for input 00005: Set to 2
Setting for input 00004: Set to 2
Setting for input 00003: Set to 2
Program Example
In this example, DM 6628 has been set to 0002.
25315 First Cycle Flag
ON for 1 cycle
@INT(89)
000
Mask/unmask input interrupts.
000
#000E
Unmasks 00003 (interrupt input 0), masks others.
149
Section 2-14
Quick-response Inputs
2-14-2 CPM2A/CPM2C Quick-response Inputs
The CPM2A and CPM2C have four inputs used for quick-response inputs
(shared with interrupt inputs and 2-kHz high-speed counter inputs). With quickresponse inputs, signals that are changed within a cycle can be received by
maintaining an internal buffer.
Shared
processing
Calculation
processing
I/O refresh
Shared
processing
Calculation
processing
I/O refresh
Input terminal
(00003)
00003
1 cycle
Input number (See note.)
00003
00004
00005
00006 (See note 2.)
Note
Minimum input signal width
50 µs
µ
1. Input numbers 00003 to 00006 can be used as interrupt inputs, 2-kHz highspeed counter inputs, or quick-response inputs. If they are not used for any
of these purposes, then they can be used as ordinary inputs.
2. Input number 00006 does not exist in CPM2C CPU Units with 10 I/O points.
The following table shows the relationships between quick-response inputs and
the CPM2A/CPM2C’s other functions.
Function
Note
Interval timer interrupts
Synchronized pulse control
Can be used simultaneously.
Interrupt inputs
See note 1.
Interval timer interrupts
Can be used simultaneously.
High-speed counters
Can be used simultaneously.
Interrupt inputs (counter mode)
See note 2.
Pulse outputs
Can be used simultaneously.
Quick-response inputs
See note 3.
Input time constant
See note 4.
Clock
Can be used simultaneously.
1. Quick-response inputs utilize the interrupt input function, so the same input
number from 00003 to 00006 cannot be assigned for both a quick-response
input and an interrupt input in the PC Setup.
2. A quick-response input and an interrupt in counter mode cannot be assigned the same input number in the PC Setup.
3. The input numbers allocated for quick-response inputs are 00003 to 00006.
These inputs can be set and operated as quick-response inputs.
4. Input time constants are disabled for all inputs that are set as quick-response inputs.
150
Section 2-14
Quick-response Inputs
Using Quick-response Inputs
Wire the inputs.
PC Setup (DM 6628)
Quick-response inputs
Input numbers 00003, 00004, 00005, and 00006
2: Use as quick-response inputs.
Quick-response input 0
Quick response
Quick-response input 1
Quick-response input 2
Quick-response input 3
PC Setup
DM 6628
Wiring the Inputs
Wire the CPM2A’s inputs as shown in the following diagram.
Input 00003: Quick-response input 0
Input 00004: Quick-response input 1
Input 00005: Quick-response input 2
Input 00006: Quick-response input 3
151
Section 2-14
Quick-response Inputs
Wire the CPM2C’s inputs as shown in the following diagram.
Note The following examples are for Fujitsu-compatible connectors. Input bit addresses and connector pin numbers depend on the models. Refer to the CPM2C
Operation Manual (W356) or the CPM2C-S Operation Manual (W377) for details.
CPU Units with 10 I/O Points
Input terminal
Input connector
(See above note.)
Input 00004: Quick-response input 1
Input 00003: Quick-response input 0
00004: Quick-response input 1
00003: Quick-response input 0
CPU Units with 20/32 I/O Points
Input connector
(See above note.)
00006: Quick-response input 3*
00005: Quick-response input 2*
00004: Quick-response input 1
00003: Quick-response input 0
PC Setup
To use quick-response inputs with the CPM2A or CPM2C, make the following
settings in the System Setup Area (DM 6628) from a Programming Device.
Word
DM 6628
Bits
00 to 03
04 to 07
08 to 11
12 to 15
152
Interrupt setting for
input number 3
Interrupt setting for
input number 4
Interrupt setting for
input number 5*
Interrupt setting for
input number 6*
Function
0: Ordinary input
1: Interr
Interrupt
pt inp
inputt
(interrupt input mode or
counter mode)
2: Quick-response input
Setting
2
Section 2-15
Macro Function
Note *Input numbers 00005 and 00006 does not exist in CPM2C CPU Units with 10
I/O points.
The settings will go into effect when the mode is changed (from PROGRAM to
MONITOR/RUN) or when the power supply is turned ON to the PC.
2-15 Macro Function
The macro function allows a single subroutine (programming pattern) to be used
by simply changing the I/O word. A number of similar program sections can be
managed with just one subroutine, thereby greatly reducing the number of steps
in the program and making the program easier to understand.
Using Macros
To use a macro, call a subroutine by means of the MACRO instruction,
MCRO(99), as shown below, in stead of SBS(91) (SUBROUTINE ENTRY).
MCRO(99)
Subroutine No
Fist input word
First output word
When MCRO(99) is executed, operation will proceed as follows:
1, 2, 3...
1. The contents of the four consecutive words beginning with the first input
word will be transferred to SR 232 through SR 235.
2. The specified subroutine will be executed until RET(93) (Subroutine Return)
is executed.
3. The contents of SR 236 through SR 239 (results of the subroutine execution) will be transferred to the four consecutive words beginning with the first
output word.
4. MCRO(99) will then be finished.
When MCRO(99) is executed, the same instruction pattern can be used as
needed simply by changing the first input word or the first output word.
The following restrictions apply when the macro function is used.
• The only words that can be used for each execution of the macro are the four
consecutive words beginning with the first input word number (for input) and
the four consecutive words beginning with the first output word (for output).
• The specified inputs and outputs must correctly correspond to the words used
in the subroutine.
• Even when the direct output method is used for outputs,subroutine results will
be actually reflected in the specified output words only when the subroutine
has been completed (step 3 above).
Note SR 232 through SR 239 can be used as work bits when MCRO(99) is not used.
The first input word and the first output word can be specified not with I/O bits, but
also with other bits (such as HR bits, work bits, etc.) or with DM words.
Subroutines called by MCRO(99) are defined by SBN(92) and RET(93), just as
are ordinary subroutines.
153
Section 2-16
Calculating with Signed Binary Data
Application Example
When a macro is used, the program can be simplified as shown below.
Macro not used
Macro used
25313 (Always ON)
00000
20001
MCRO(99)
20000
030
000
20000
200
00001
00002
MCRO(99)
20001
00200
030
002
20501
205
20500
MCRO(99)
20500
030
00201
005
00202
20501
00500
210
MCRO(99)
21001
21000
030
010
21000
220
00501
00502
SBN(92)
21001
01000
23200
22001
23601
23600
22000
23600
22000
00101
030
00102
22001
Subroutine used
to define macro
23201
23202
23201
RET(93)
2-16 Calculating with Signed Binary Data
The CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A/SRM1(-V2) allow calculations on signed binary
data. The following instructions manipulate signed binary data. Signed data is
handled using 2’s complements.
CPM2A/CPM2C and
SRM1(-V2) Instructions
The following signed-binary instructions are available in CPM2A, CPM2C, and
SRM1(-V2) PCs:
• BINARY ADD – ADB(50)
• BINARY SUBTRACT – SBB(51)
• 2’S COMPLEMENT – NEG(––)
CPM1/CPM1A Instructions
The following signed-binary instructions are available in CPM1/CPM1A PCs:
• BINARY ADD – ADB(50)
• BINARY SUBTRACT – SBB(51)
Signed Data Calculations
154
Addition
Subtraction
7 + 3 = 10
7–3=4
(–7) + 3 = –4
(–7) – 3 = –10
7 + (–3) = 4
7 – (–3) = 10
(–7) + (–3) = –10
(–7) – (–3) = –4
Section 2-17
Differential Monitor
2-16-1 Definition of Signed Binary Data
Signed binary data is manipulated using 2’s complements and bit 15 is used as
the sign bit. The range of data that can be expressed using one word is as follows:–32,768 to 32,767 (8000 to 7FFF hexadecimal).
The following table shows equivalents between decimal and hexadecimal data.
Decimal
32,767
32,766
.
.
.
2
1
0
–1
–2
.
.
.
–32,767
–32,768
4-digit Hexadecimal
7FFF
7FFE
.
.
.
0002
0001
0000
FFFF
FFFE
.
.
.
8001
8000
2-16-2 Arithmetic Flags
The results of executing signed binary instructions is reflected in the arithmetic
flags. The flags and the conditions under which it will turn ON are given in the
following table. The flags will be OFF when these conditions are not met.
Flag
Carry Flag (SR 25504)
ON conditions
Carry in an addition.
Negative results for subtraction.
Equals Flag (SR 25506)
The results of addition, subtraction,
multiplication, or division is 0.
Results of converting 2’s complement is 0.
2-16-3 Inputting Signed Binary Data Using Decimal Values
Although calculations for signed binary data use hexadecimal expressions, inputs from the Programming Console or SSS can be done using decimal inputs
and mnemonics for the instructions. The procedure to using the Programming
Console to input using decimal values is shown in the CPM1 Operation Manual,
CPM1A Operation Manual, CPM2A Operation Manual, CPM2C Operation
Manual, and SRM1 Master Control Unit Operation Manual. Refer to the SSS Operation Manual: C-series PCs for details on using the SSS.
Inputting Instructions
Refer to the CPM1 Operation Manual, CPM1A Operation Manual, CPM2C Operation Manual, CPM2A Operation Manual, and SRM1 Master Control Unit Operation Manual details on inputting instructions from the Programming Console.
2-17 Differential Monitor
The CPM1/CPM1A, CPM2A//CPM2C, and SRM1(-V2) support differential
monitoring from either the Programming Console or the SSS. The operator can
detect on OFF-to-ON or ON-to-OFF transition in a specified bit. When the specified transition takes place, the transition is indicated on the display and a buzzer
sounds to enable easy recognition of the transition.
Refer to the CPM1 Operation Manual, CPM1A Operation Manual, CPM2A Operation Manual, CPM2C Operation Manual, or SRM1 Master Control Units Operation Manual for details on the Programming Console Differential Monitor procedure and to the SSS Operation Manual: C-series PCs for the SYSMAC Support Software procedure.
155
Section 2-18
Expansion Instructions (CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2) Only)
2-18 Expansion Instructions (CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2) Only)
A set of expansion instructions is available for the CPM2A, CPM2C (including
the CPM2C-S), and SRM1(-V2) to aid in special programming needs. Function
codes can be assigned to up to 18 of the expansion instructions to enable using
them in programs. This allows the user to pick the instructions needed by each
CPM2A, CPM2C, or SRM1(-V2) program to more effectively use the function
codes required to input instructions.
The mnemonics of expansion instructions are followed by “(––)” as the function
code to indicate that they must be assigned function codes by the user in the
instructions table before they can be used in programming (unless they are used
under their default settings).
Any of the instructions not assigned function codes will need to be assigned
function codes in the instructions table used by the Programming Device and the
CPM2A/CPM2C or SRM1(-V2) before they can be used in programming. The
assignments of expansion instructions in the instructions table will change the
meaning of instructions and operands, so be sure to set the instructions table
before programming and transfer the proper instructions table to the CPM2A/
CPM2C or SRM1(-V2) before program execution.
Example: CPM2A/CPM2C PCs
The specific instructions used in the following example are for the CPM2A/
CPM2C. The concepts are the same for the SRM1(-V2).
Function code 61
INI
Function code 61
SPED
SPED
Function code 64
PULS
Function code 64
MIN
SUM
At the time of shipping, the function codes are
assigned as shown above. (In this example,
the instructions all relate to pulse outputs.)
Note
156
PULS
MAX
MAX
Function code 65
INI
Function code 65
MIN
SUM
If pulse outputs are not being used, and if
maximum values, minimum values, and
sums are required, then the Set Instructions
operation can be used as shown above to
reassign instructions in the instruction table.
1. Set the PC model to “CQM1” when setting the expansion instructions for the
SRM1(-V2) or CPM2A/CPM2C from the SSS.
2. The PC Setup must be set for user-defined expansion instruction function
codes in order for function codes to be assigned. Set bits 08 to 11 of
DM 6602 to 1.
Expansion Instructions (CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2) Only)
Section 2-18
2-18-1 CPM2A/CPM2C/CPM2C-S Expansion Instructions
The following 18 function codes can be used for expansion instructions: 17, 18,
19, 47, 48, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 87, 88, and 89. The function
code assignments can be changed with a Programming Console or the Support
Software.
Refer to 4-4-5 Assigning Expansion Instruction Function Codes in the CPM2A or
CPM2C Operation Manual for the Programming Console procedure.
Refer to the SSS Operation Manual: C-series PCs for the SSS procedure.
Refer to the SYSMAC-CPT Support Software Quick Start Guide (W332) and
User Manual (W333) for the SYSMAC-CPT Support Software procedure.
The expansion instructions that can be used are listed below, along with the default function codes that are assigned when the PC is shipped.
Mnemonic
ASFT
----RXD
TXD
CMPL
INI
PRV
CTBL
SPED
PULS
SCL
BCNT
BCMP
STIM
----INT
ACC
AVG
FCS
HEX
HMS
MAX
MIN
NEG
PID
PWM
SCL2
SCL3
SEC
SRCH
STUP
SUM
SYNC
TIML
TMHH
ZCP
ZCPL
Function code
17
18
19
47
48
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
87
88
89
-------------------------------------------
157
Expansion Instructions (CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2) Only)
Section 2-18
2-18-2 SRM1(-V2) Expansion Instructions
The following 18 function codes can be used for expansion instructions: 17, 18,
19, 47, 48, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 87, 88, and 89. The function
code assignments can be changed with a Programming Console or the Support
Software.
Refer to 4-2-6 Setting Expansion Instructions in the SRM1 Master Control Unit
Operation Manual for the Programming Console procedure. Refer to the SSS
Operation Manual: C-series PCs for the SSS procedure. Refer to the SYSMACCPT Support Software Quick Start Guide (W332) and User Manual (W333) for
the SYSMAC-CPT Support Software procedure.
The expansion instructions that can be used are listed below, along with the default function codes that are assigned when the SRM1(-V2) is shipped.
Mnemonic
Function code
ASFT
-----
17
18
19
RXD
47
TXD
48
CMPL
-----------
60
61
62
63
64
65
SCL*
66
BCNT
67
BCMP
68
STIM
-------
69
87
88
89
FCS
---
HEX
---
NEG*
---
PID*
---
STUP
---
ZCP*
---
Note *SCL(66), NEG(––), PID(––), and ZCP (––) are supported by the
SRM1-C0-V2 CPUs only.
158
Section 2-19
Using the CPM2A/CPM2C Clock Function
2-19 Using the CPM2A/CPM2C Clock Function
The CPM2A PCs and some CPM2C (including the CPM2C-S) PCs have a builtin clock function. This section explains how to use the clock.
2-19-1 Data Area Words
This following illustration shows the configuration of the words (AR 17 through
AR 21) that are used with the clock. These words can be read and used as required. (AR 17 is provided so that the hour and minute can be accessed quickly.)
15
AR 17
AR 18
AR 19
AR 20
AR 21
Hour
Minute
Date
Year
8 7
0
Minute
Second
Hour
Month
Day of week
2 digits BCD each.
(Only the last 2 digits of the
year are given.)
00 to 06: Sunday to Saturday
AR 2115 Clock Set Bit
AR 2114 Clock Stop Bit
AR 2113 30-Second Adjustment Bit
2-19-2 Setting the Time
To set the time, use a programming device as follows:
Setting Everything
1, 2, 3...
1. Turn ON AR 2114 (Clock Stop Bit) to stop the clock and allow AR 18 through
AR 21 to be overwritten.
2. Using a Programming Device, set AR 18 through AR 20 (minute/second,
date/hour, and year/month) and AR 2100 through AR 2107 (day of week).
3. Turn ON AR 2115 (Clock Set Bit) when the time set in step 2 is reached. The
clock will start operating from the time that is set, and the Clock Stop Bit and
Clock Set BIt will be turned OFF automatically.
Setting Only the Seconds
It is also possible, by using AR 2113, to simply set the seconds to “00” without
going through a complicated procedure. When AR 2113 is turned ON, the clock
time will change as follows:
If the seconds setting is from 00 to 29, the seconds will be reset to “00” and the
minute setting will remain the same.
If the seconds setting is from 30 to 59, the seconds will be reset to “00” and the
minute setting will advance by one.
When the time setting is complete, AR 2113 will turn OFF automatically.
Note The time can be set easily using menu operations from a Programming Console
or SSS. Refer to the CPM2A Operation Manual or the CPM2C Operation Manual for the Programming Console procedure or to the SSS Operation Manual: Cseries PCs for the SSS procedure.
159
SECTION 3
Using Expansion Units
This section describes how to use the CPM1A-MAD01, CPM1A-MAD11, and CPM2C-MAD11 Analog I/O Units; the
CPM1A-TS001/002/101/102 and CPM2C-TS001/101 Temperature Sensor Units; the CPM1A-SRT21 and CPM2C-SRT21
CompoBus/S I/O Link Units; and the CPM1A-DRT21 DeviceNet I/O Link Unit. The CPM1A-MAD11 and CPM2C-MAD11
Analog I/O Units provide the same functions, and are thus described in the same section even though they are supported by
different PCs.
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
Analog I/O Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1-1 CPM1A-MAD01 Analog I/O Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1-2 CPM1A-MAD11 and CPM2C-MAD11 Analog I/O Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Temperature Sensor Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2-1 CPM1A/CPM2A Temperature Sensor Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2-2 CPM2C Temperature Sensor Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2-3 Using Temperature Sensor Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2-4 Connecting Temperature Sensor Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2-5 Setting Temperature Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2-6 Connecting Temperature Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2-7 Ladder Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2-8 Two-decimal-place Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CompoBus/S I/O Link Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DeviceNet I/O Link Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
162
162
173
189
189
190
191
191
193
196
198
204
210
215
161
Section
Analog I/O Units
3-1
3-1
Analog I/O Units
3-1-1 CPM1A-MAD01 Analog I/O Unit
A maximum of 3 Expansion Units or Expansion I/O Units, including CPM1AMAD01 Analog I/O Units, can be connected to a CPM1, CPM1A (see note) or
CPM2A PC. One Analog I/O Unit allows 2 analog inputs and 1 analog output.
With the maximum of 3 Analog I/O Units connected, 6 analog inputs and 3 analog outputs are possible.
• The analog input range can be set to 0 to 10 VDC, 1 to 5 VDC, or 4 to 20 mA
with a resolution of 1/256.
• An open-circuit detection function can be used with the 1 to 5 VDC and 4 to
20 mA settings.
• The analog output range can be set to 0 to 10 VDC, 4 to 20 mA, or –10 to
10 VDC. The output has a resolution of 1/256 when the range is set to 0 to
10 VDC or 4 to 20 mA, or a resolution of 1/512 when set to –10 to 10 VDC.
A maximum of 3 Expansion Units or Expansion I/O Units can be connected.
CPM1A-8ED
CPM1A-MAD01
Expansion I/O Unit Analog I/O Unit
2 analog inputs
CPM1A-20EDR1
Expansion I/O Unit
1 analog output
CPM1(-V1)/CPM1A/CPM2A
CPU Unit
Note The CPM1-30CDR--V1 is the only CPM1 CPU Unit to which 3 Expansion
Units or Expansion I/O Units can be connected. Only one Expansion Unit or
Expansion I/O Unit can be connected to models without the “V1” suffix. Analog
Units cannot be connected to 10-point or 20-point CPM1A CPU Units. You must
use a 30-point or 40-point CPU Unit to connect to the CPM1A.
162
Section
Analog I/O Units
Item
Analog
g
I
Input
Section
Analog
g
O
Output
Section
(See
note 1.)
Voltage I/O
Number of inputs
Input signal range
Max. rated input
External input impedance
Resolution
Accuracy
A/D conversion data
Number of outputs
Output signal range
Max. external output current
Allowable external output load resistance
Resolution
Accuracy
Set data
Conversion time
Isolation method
3-1
Current I/O
2
0 to 10 V/1 to 5 V
4 to 20 mA
±15 V
±30 mA
1 MΩ min.
250 Ω rated current
1/256
1.0% full scale
8-bit binary
1
0 to 10 V or
4 to 20 mA
–10 to 10 V
5 mA
----350 Ω
1/256 (1/512 when the output signal range is –10 to 10 V)
1.0% of full scale
8-bit signed binary
10 ms max. per Unit (See note 2.)
Photocoupler isolation between I/O terminals and PC signals.
No isolation between analog I/O signals.
Note
1. With analog outputs it is possible to use both voltage outputs and current
outputs at the same time. In this case however, the total output current must
not exceed 21 mA.
2. The conversion time is the total time for 2 analog inputs and 1 analog output.
Part Names
Expansion connector
Expansion I/O connecting cable
Analog I/O terminals
Analog I/O Terminals
Connected to analog I/O devices.
Expansion I/O
Connecting Cable
Connected to the CPU Unit or previous Expansion Unit. The cable is provided
with the Unit and cannot be removed.
! Caution
Expansion Connector
Do not touch the cables during operation. Static electricity may cause operating
errors.
Connected to the next Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit.
163
Section
Analog I/O Units
Analog I/O Signal Ranges
Analog Input Signal Ranges
0 to 10 V inputs
Conversion value
1 to 5 V inputs
Conversion value
1V
Input signal
4 to 20 mA inputs
Conversion value
3V
Input signal
Input signal
Analog Output Signal Ranges
0 to 10 V outputs and
–10 to +10 V outputs
Set value
Set value
4 to 20 mA outputs
Set value
164
3-1
Section
Analog I/O Units
3-1
Using Analog I/O
Set the I/O range
Connect the Unit
Wire the analog I/O
Analog inputs:
0 to 10 V, 1 to 5 V, or 4 to 20 mA
Analog outputs:
0 to 10 V, –10 to +10 V, or 4 to 20 mA
Connect the Analog I/O Unit.
Connect an analog input device.
Write the range code.
Create a ladder program
Analog input:
Read converted data.
Analog output:
Write set value.
Analog Inputs
CPU Unit
Analog I/O Unit
Ladder program
(21) MOVE instruction
Writes the range code.
Reads the conversion
value.
Word (n + 1)
Range code
Word (m + 1)
Analog input 1
conversion value
Analog input 2
conversion value
Word (m + 2)
Analog devices
Temperature sensor
Where “m” is the last input word and “n” is the
last output word allocated to the CPU Unit, or
previous Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit.
Pressure sensor
Speed sensor
Flow sensor
Voltage/current meter
165
Section
Analog I/O Units
3-1
Analog Outputs
CPU Unit
Analog I/O Unit
Ladder program
(See note.)
Word (n + 1)
Range code
Analog output set value
(21) MOVE instruction
Writes the range code
Writes the set value
Analog devices
Where “n” is the last output word allocated to
the CPU Unit, or previous Expansion Unit or
Expansion I/O Unit.
Adjustment equipment
Servo Controller
Variable speed device
Recorder
Other
Note Word (n + 1) can be used for either the range code or the analog output set value.
Setting I/O Signal Range
The I/O signal range is set by wiring the I/O terminal and by writing the range
code to the Analog I/O Unit’s output word.
I/O Terminal Arrangement
Note When using current inputs, short terminal V IN1 with I IN1
and terminal V IN2 with I IN2.
V OUT
Voltage output
I OUT
Current output
COM
Output common
V IN1
Voltage input 1
I IN1
Current input 1
COM1
Input common 1
V IN2
Voltage input 2
I IN2
Current input 2
COM2
Input common 2
Range Code
The range code must be set for the Analog I/O Unit to convert data.
The 8 range code settings provide 8 combinations of signal ranges for the analog inputs and analog output, as shown in the following table.
166
Section
Analog I/O Units
3-1
Range
Analog input 1
code
signal range
FF00
0 to 10 V
Analog input 2
signal range
0 to 10 V
Analog output
signal range
0 to 10 V or 4 to 20 mA
FF01
0 to 10 V
0 to 10 V
–10 to 10 V or 4 to 20 mA
FF02
1 to 5 V or 4 to 20 mA
0 to 10 V
0 to 10 V or 4 to 20 mA
FF03
1 to 5 V or 4 to 20 mA
0 to 10 V
–10 to 10 V or 4 to 20 mA
FF04
0 to 10 V
1 to 5 V or 4 to 20 mA
0 to 10 V or 4 to 20 mA
FF05
0 to 10 V
1 to 5 V or 4 to 20 mA
–10 to 10 V or 4 to 20 mA
FF06
1 to 5 V or 4 to 20 mA
1 to 5 V or 4 to 20 mA
0 to 10 V or 4 to 20 mA
FF07
1 to 5 V or 4 to 20 mA
1 to 5 V or 4 to 20 mA
–10 to 10 V or 4 to 20 mA
Write the range code to the Analog I/O Unit’s output word (n + 1) in the first cycle
of program execution.
SR 25315 First Cycle Flag
ON for 1 cycle
(21)
Analog input 1:
1 to 5 V/4 to 20 mA
Analog input 2:
0 to 10 V
Analog output:
0 to 10 V/4 to 20 mA
(n + 1)
Range code (4-digit hexadecimal)
The Analog I/O Unit will not start converting analog I/O values until the range
code has been written.
Once the range code has been set, it is not possible to change the setting while
power is being supplied to the CPU Unit. To change the I/O range, turn the CPU
Unit OFF then ON again.
Note If a range code other than those specified in the above table is written to n+1, the
range code will not be received by the Analog I/O Unit and analog I/O conversion
will not start.
Analog I/O Unit
Connection
This section describes how to connect an Analog I/O Unit to the CPU Unit.
A maximum of 3 Expansion Units or Expansion I/O Units, including Analog I/O
Units, can be connected to one PC. When the Analog I/O Unit is used in combination with other Expansion Units or Expansion I/O Units, there are no restrictions on the connection order.
CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A
CPU Unit
Analog I/O Unit
I/O Allocation
I/O is allocated for the Analog I/O Unit in the same way as other Expansion Units
or Expansion I/O Units starting from the next word following the last allocated
word on the CPU Unit, or previous Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit. When
“m” is the last allocated input word and “n” the last allocated output word on the
167
Section
Analog I/O Units
3-1
CPU Unit, or previous Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit, the allocation will
be as follows:
Analog I/O Unit
(m + 1)
(m + 2)
2 analog inputs
1 analog output
(n + 1)
For example, in the following diagram an Analog I/O Unit is connected to a CPU
Unit with 30 I/O points.
Input address
IR 000
IR 001
IR 002
IR 003
30-point CPU
Unit
Output address
Analog I/O
Unit
IR 010
IR 011
IR 012
Wiring Analog I/O Devices
Analog Input Wiring
2-core shielded
twisted-pair cable
Analog
output
device
voltage
output
Analog
output
device
current
output
Analog I/O Unit
250 Ω
10 kΩ
250 Ω
10 kΩ
Analog Output Wiring
Voltage Outputs
Analog I/O Unit
2-core shielded
twisted-pair cable
Analog
input
device
voltage
input
Current Outputs
Analog I/O Unit
2-core shielded
twisted-pair cable
168
Analog
output
device
current
input
Section
Analog I/O Units
3-1
For analog outputs it is possible to use both voltage outputs and current outputs
at the same time, but the total current output must not exceed 21 mA.
Note
1. Use 2-core shielded twisted-pair cables.
2. Wire away from power lines (AC power supply wires, power lines, etc.)
3. When an input is not being used, short V IN and I IN to the COM terminal.
4. Use crimp terminals. (Tighten terminals to a torque of 0.5 N⋅m.)
5. When using current inputs, short V IN to I IN.
6. When there is noise in the power supply line, install a noise filter on the input
section and the Power Supply Unit.
Ladder Program
Specifying the Range Code
Specify the I/O signal range by writing the range code to the Analog I/O Unit’s
output word from the ladder program in the first cycle of program execution. The
Analog I/O Unit will start to convert analog I/O values once the range code has
been specified. (Refer to page 166.)
Write the range code to the Analog I/O Unit’s output word in the first cycle of operation; the Analog I/O Unit’s output word is “n+1” when “n” is the last word allocated to the CPU Unit, or previous Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit in the
configuration.
Reading Converted Analog Input Values
A ladder program can be used to read the memory area where the converted
values are stored. Values are output to the next two words (m + 1, m + 2) following the last input word (m) allocated to the CPU Unit, or previous Expansion Unit
or Expansion I/O Unit.
(m + 1)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Analog input 1
Open-circuit
Detection Flag
Analog input 1 conversion value (Hex: 00 to FF)
0: Normal
1: Open-circuit
(m + 2)
0
0
0
0
0
Analog input 2
Open-circuit
Detection Flag
0
0
Analog input 2 conversion value (Hex: 00 to FF)
0: Normal
1: Open-circuit
Note The Open-circuit Detection Flag is turned ON when the input signal range is set
to 1 to 5 V or 4 to 20 mA and the input signal falls below 1 V or 4 mA. (Open circuits are not detected when the input signal range is set to 0 to 10 V.)
169
Section
Analog I/O Units
3-1
Writing Analog Output Set Values
A ladder program can be used to write data to the output word where the set value is stored. The output word will be “n+1” when “n” is the last output word allocated to the CPU Unit, or previous Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit.
(n + 1)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Sign bit
(Used when the output signal range is –10 to 10 V.)
1, 2, 3...
Set value (Hex: 00 to FF)
1. The set value range is 0000 to 00FF when the output signal range is 0 to
10 V/4 to 20 mA.
2. The set value range is divided into two parts: 80FF to 8000 (–10 to 0 V) and
0000 to 00FF (0 to 10 V) when the output signal range is –10 to 10 V.
Startup Operation
After power is turned ON, it will require two cycle times plus approx. 100 ms before the first data is converted. The following instructions can be placed at the
beginning of the program to delay reading converted data from analog inputs
until conversion is actually possible.
Note Analog input data will be 0000 until initial processing has been completed. Analog output data will be 0 V or 0 mA until the range code has been written. After the
range code has been written, the analog output data will be 0 V or 4 mA if the
range is 0 to 10 V, –10 to 10 V, or 4 to 20 mA.
SR 25315
(Always ON Flag)
TIM 000
#0003
T005
MOV (21)
TIM 000 will start as soon as power turns ON.
After 0.2 to 0.3 s (200 to 300 ms), the Completion Flag for TIM 000 will turn ON, and the converted data from analog input will be read from
IR 001 and stored in DM 0000.
001
DM0000
Handling Unit Errors
If an error occurs in an Analog I/O Unit, the Error Flags in AR 0200 to AR 0204 will
be turned ON. The addresses of the Error Flags are in the order that the Expansion Units and Expansion I/O Units are connected in the PC, with AR 0200 used
for the Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit closest to the CPU Unit. Use these
flags in the program when it is necessary to detect errors.
When an error occurs in the Analog I/O Unit, analog input data will be 0000 and
0 V or 4 mA will be output as the analog output.
170
Section
Analog I/O Units
3-1
Programming Example
This programming example uses these ranges:
Analog input 0: 0 to 10 V
Analog input 1: 1 to 5 V or 4 to 20 mA
Analog output: 0 to 10 V or 4 to 20 mA
25135
(First Cycle ON Flag)
MOV (21)
#FF04
011
25313
(Always ON Flag)
Writes the range code (FF04) to the Unit.
TIM 000
TIM000
#0003
Execution
condition
MOV (21)
001
DM0000
TIM000
Execution
condition
00215
01000
TIM000
Reads analog input 0’s converted value.
Open-circuit alarm
Execution
condition
MOV (21)
002
TIM000
DM0001
Execution
condition
Reads analog input 1’s converted value.
MOV (21)
DM0010
011
The content of DM 0010 is written to the output
word as the analog output set value.
Example
Analog Input Program Example
Analog I/O Unit Connection
In this example, an Analog I/O Unit is connected to a CPU Unit with 30 I/O points.
I/O words are allocated to the Analog I/O Unit beginning with the next word address following the last words allocated to the CPU Unit.
Input words
Output words
IR 000
IR 001
IR 002
IR 003
CPU Unit with
30 I/O points
Analog I/O
Unit
IR 010
IR 011
IR 012
171
Section
Analog I/O Units
3-1
Analog I/O Wiring
Using analog input 1 as a voltage input
Using analog input 2 as a current input
Common (–)
Current input 2 (+)
Common (–)
Voltage input 1 (+)
Using analog output as a voltage output
Common (–)
Voltage output (+)
Analog I/O Settings
Input 1 signal range:
Input 2 signal range:
Output signal range:
Range Code Setting:
0 to 10 V
4 to 20 mA
0 to 10 V
FF04
IR 012
Range code: FF04
Program
25135
(First Cycle ON Flag)
MOV (21)
#FF04
012
25313
(Always ON Flag)
Writes the range code (FF04) to the Unit.
TIM 000
TIM000
#0003
Execution
condition
MOV (21)
002
DM0000
TIM000
Execution
condition
Reads analog input 1’s converted value.
MOV (21)
003
TIM000
DM0001
Execution
condition
Reads analog input 2’s converted value.
MOV (21)
DM0010
012
172
The content of DM0010 is written to the output
word as the analog output set value.
Section
Analog I/O Units
3-1
3-1-2 CPM1A-MAD11 and CPM2C-MAD11 Analog I/O Units
The following information applies to both the CPM1A-MAD11 and CPM2CMAD11 Analog I/O Units unless otherwise specified.
A maximum of 3 Expansion Units or Expansion I/O Units, including up to 3
CPM1A-MAD11 Analog I/O Units, can be connected to a CPM2A or CPM1A.
One Analog I/O Unit allows 2 analog inputs and 1 analog output. With the maximum of 3 Analog I/O Units connected, 6 analog inputs and 3 analog outputs are
possible.
Possible to connect to a maximum of
3 Units including Expansion I/O Units
CPM1A/CPM2A
CPU Unit
CPM1A-20EDR1
Expansion I/O Unit
CPM1A-8ED
Expansion I/O Unit
CPM1A-MAD11
Analog I/O Unit
1 analog output
2 analog inputs
A maximum of 5 Expansion Units or Expansion I/O Units, including up to 4
CPM2C-MAD11 Analog I/O Units, can be connected to a CPM2C (A maximum
of 3 Units can be connected to the CPM2C-S). One Analog I/O Unit allows 2 analog inputs and 1 analog output. With the maximum of 4 Analog I/O Units connected, 8 analog inputs and 4 analog outputs are possible.
CPM2C
CPU Unit
CPM2C-MAD11 Analog I/O Units
Expansion I/O Unit
Two analog inputs and one
analog output for each Unit
• The analog input range can be set to 0 to 5 VDC, 1 to 5 VDC, 0 to 10 VDC, –10
to 10 VDC, 0 to 20 mA, or 4 to 20 mA. The inputs have a resolution of 1/6000.
• An open-circuit detection function can be used with the 1 to 5 VDC and 4 to
20 mA settings.
• The analog output range can be set to 1 to 5 VDC, 0 to 10 VDC, –10 to 10 VDC,
0 to 20 mA, or 4 to 20 mA. The outputs have a resolution of 1/6000.
173
Section
Analog I/O Units
Item
Analog
g
I
Input
Section
Voltage I/O
Number of inputs
Input signal range
Max. rated input
External input impedance
Resolution
Overall accuracy
y
25°C
0 to 55°C
A/D conversion data
Analog
g
O
Output
Section
Averaging function
Open-circuit detection function
Number of outputs
Output signal range
Allowable external output load
resistance
External output impedance
Resolution
Overall accuracy
y
25°C
0 to 55°C
Set data (D/A conversion)
2 inputs (2 words allocated)
0 to 5 VDC, 1 to 5 VDC,
0 to 10 VDC, or –10 to 10 VDC
±15 V
1 MΩ min.
1/6000 (full scale)
0.3% full scale
0.6% full scale
16-bit binary (4-digit hexadecimal)
3-1
Current I/O
0 to 20 mA or 4 to 20 mA
±30 mA
250 Ω
0.4% full scale
0.8% full scale
Full scale for –10 to 10 V: F448 to 0BB8 Hex
Full scale for other ranges: 0000 to 1770 Hex
Supported (Settable for individual inputs via DIP switch)
Supported
1 output (1 word allocated)
1 to 5 VDC, 0 to 10 VDC, or
0 to 20 mA or 4 to 20 mA
–10 to 10 VDC,
1 kΩ min.
600 Ω max.
0.5 Ω max.
1/6000 (full scale)
0.4% full scale
0.8% full scale
16-bit binary (4-digit hexadecimal)
---
Full scale for –10 to 10 V: F448 to 0BB8 Hex
Full scale for other ranges: 0000 to 1770 Hex
2 ms/point (6 ms/all points)
Conversion time
Isolation method
Photocoupler isolation between analog I/O terminals and internal circuits.
No isolation between analog I/O signals.
CPM1A-MAD11 Part Names
DIP switch
Expansion connector
Expansion I/O connecting cable
Analog I/O terminals
Analog I/O Terminals
Connected to analog I/O devices.
Expansion I/O
Connecting Cable
Connected to the CPU Unit or previous Expansion Unit. The cable is provided
with the Unit and cannot be removed.
! Caution
Expansion Connector
174
Do not touch the cables during operation. Static electricity may cause operating
errors.
Connected to the next Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit.
Section
Analog I/O Units
3-1
Used to enable or disable averaging.
DIP Switch
Pin1: Average processing for analog input 0
(OFF: Average processing not performed; ON: Average processing performed)
Pin2: Average processing for analog input 1
(OFF: Average processing not performed; ON: Average processing performed)
CPM2C-MAD11 Part Names
Front
Side
Lock level
Expansion I/O
input connector
Expansion I/O
output connector
DIP switch
Lock level
Analog I/O terminals
Expansion I/O output connector
Expansion I/O input connector
DIP switch
Analog input terminals
Analog output terminals
Analog I/O Terminals
Connected to analog I/O devices.
DIP Switch
Used to specify current or voltage inputs and to enable or disable averaging.
ON 1
Average processing for analog input 0
(OFF: Average processing not performed; ON: Average processing performed)
2
Average processing for analog input 1
(OFF: Average processing not performed; ON: Average processing performed)
3
Input type for analog input 0
(OFF: Voltage input; ON: Current input)
4
Input type for analog input 1
(OFF: Voltage input; ON: Current input)
! Caution
Do not touch the DIP switch during operation. Static electricity may cause operating errors.
Expansion I/O Input
Connector
Connected to the expansion I/O output connector on the CPU Unit or previous
Expansion (I/O) Unit.
Expansion I/O Output
Connector
Connected to the expansion I/O input connector on the next Expansion (I/O)
Unit.
Note
1. A maximum of 5 Expansion (I/O) Units can be connected to the CPU Unit
and the total number of allocated words must be 10 maximum for inputs and
10 maximum for outputs.
175
Section
Analog I/O Units
3-1
2. Use the connector cover provided with the CPU Unit to protect the output
connector when it is not used.
! Caution
Lock Levers
Do not touch the cables during operation. Static electricity may cause operating
errors.
Used to secure the Expansion Unit.
Analog I/O Signal Ranges
Analog I/O signal ranges are digitally converted as described in this section.
Analog Input Signal
Ranges
The Analog I/O Unit converts analog input data to digital values. The digital values depend on the input signal ranges, as shown in the following diagrams.
When the input exceeds the specified range, the AD converted data will be fixed
at either the lower limit or upper limit.
–10 to 10 V
The –10- to 10-V range corresponds to the hexadecimal values F448 to 0BB8
(–3000 to 3000). The entire data range is F31C to 0CE4 (–3300 to 3300). A negative voltage is expressed as a two’s complement.
Converted Data
Hexadecimal (Decimal)
0CE4 (3300)
0BB8 (3000)
–11 V –10 V
0000 (0)
0V
10 V 11 V
F448 (–3000)
F31C (–3300)
0 to 10 V
The 0- to 10-V range corresponds to the hexadecimal values 0000 to 1770 (0 to
6000). The entire data range is FED4 to 189C (–300 to 6300). A negative voltage
is expressed as a two’s complement.
Converted Data
Hexadecimal (Decimal)
189C (6300)
1770 (6000)
0000 (0)
–0.5 V
FED4 (–300)
176
0V
10 V 10.5 V
Section
Analog I/O Units
3-1
0 to 5 V
The 0- to 5-V range corresponds to the hexadecimal values 0000 to 1770 (0 to
6000). The entire data range is FED4 to 189C (–300 to 6300). A negative voltage
is expressed as a two’s complement.
Converted Data
Hexadecimal (Decimal)
189C (6300)
1770 (6000)
0000 (0)
–0.25 V
FED4 (–300)
0V
5 V 5.25 V
1 to 5 V
The 1- to 5-V range corresponds to the hexadecimal values 0000 to 1770 (0 to
6000). The entire data range is FED4 to 189C (–300 to 6300). Inputs between
0.8 and 1 V are expressed as two’s complements. If the input falls below 0.8 V,
open-circuit detection will activate and converted data will be 8000.
Converted Data
Hexadecimal (Decimal)
189C (6300)
1770 (6000)
0000 (0) 0.8 V
FED4 (–300)
1V
5 V 5.2 V
0 to 20 mA
The 0- to 20-mA range corresponds to the hexadecimal values 0000 to 1770 (0
to 6000). The entire data range is FED4 to 189C (–300 to 6300). A negative voltage is expressed as a two’s complement.
Converted Data
Hexadecimal (Decimal)
189C (6300)
1770 (6000)
0000 (0)
–1 mA
FED4 (–300)
0 mA
20 mA 21 mA
177
Section
Analog I/O Units
3-1
4 to 20 mA
The 4- to 20-mA range corresponds to the hexadecimal values 0000 to 1770 (0
to 6000). The entire data range is FED4 to 189C (–300 to 6300). Inputs between
3.2 and 4 mA are expressed as two’s complements. If the input falls below
3.2 mA, open-circuit detection will activate and converted data will be 8000.
Converted Data
Hexadecimal (Decimal)
189C (6300)
1770 (6000)
3.2 mA
0000 (0)
4 mA
FED4 (–300)
20 mA 20.8 mA
0 mA
Analog Output Signal
Ranges
The Analog I/O Unit converts the digital output data to analog values. The analog
values depend on the output signal ranges, as shown in the following diagrams.
–10 to 10 V
The hexadecimal values F448 to 0BB8 (–3000 to 3000) correspond to an analog
voltage range of –10 to 10 V. The entire output range is –11 to 11 V. Specify a
negative voltage as a two’s complement.
11 V
10 V
F31C F448
8000 (–3300) (–3000)
0000 (0)
0V
0BB8 0CE4
(3000) (3300)
Conversion
Data
Hexadecimal
7FFF (Decimal)
–10 V
–11 V
0 to 10 V
The hexadecimal values 0000 to 1770 (0 to 6000) correspond to an analog voltage range of 0 to 10 V. The entire output range is –0.5 to 10.5 V. Specify a negative voltage as a two’s complement.
10.5 V
10 V
0V
(–300)
8000 FED4
–0.5 V
178
0000 (0)
Conversion
Data
Hexadecimal
1770 189C
(Decimal)
(6000) (6300) 7FFF
Section
Analog I/O Units
3-1
1 to 5 V
The hexadecimal values 0000 to 1770 (0 to 6000) correspond to an analog voltage range of 1 to 5 V. The entire output range is 0.8 to 5.2 V.
5.2 V
5V
1V
0.8 V
0V
8000 FED4
(–300)
0000 (0)
1770 189C
(6000) (6300)
Conversion
Data
Hexadecimal
7FFF (Decimal)
0 to 20 mA
The hexadecimal values 0000 to 1770 (0 to 6000) correspond to an analog current range of 0 to 20 mA. The entire output range is 0 to 21 mA.
21 mA
20 mA
0000
(0)
0 mA
8000
1770 189C
(6000) (6300)
Conversion
Data
Hexadecimal
7FFF
(Decimal)
4 to 20 mA
The hexadecimal values 0000 to 1770 (0 to 6000) correspond to an analog current range of 4 to 20 mA. The entire output range is 3.2 to 20.8 mA.
20.8 mA
20 mA
4 mA
3.2 mA
0 mA
8000
FED4 0000 (0)
(–300)
1770 189C
(6000) (6300)
Conversion
Data
Hexadecimal
7FFF (Decimal)
Averaging Function for
Analog Inputs
The averaging function can be enabled for inputs using the DIP switch. The
averaging function stores the average (a moving average) of the last eight input
values as the converted value. Use this function to smooth inputs that vary at a
short interval.
Open-circuit Detection
Function for Analog
Inputs
The open-circuit detection function is activated when the input range is set to 1 to
5 V and the voltage drops below 0.8 V, or when the input range is set to 4 to
20 mA and the current drops below 3.2 mA. When the open-circuit detection
function is activated, the converted data will be set to 8000.
179
Section
Analog I/O Units
3-1
The open-circuit detection function is enabled or cleared when data is converted. If the input returns to the convertible range, the open-circuit detection is
cleared automatically and the output returns to the normal range.
Using Analog I/O
Connect the Unit.
Set the I/O ranges.
Connect the Analog I/O Unit.
Analog inputs: 0 to 5 VDC, 1 to 5 VDC, 0 to 10 VDC,
–10 to 10 VDC, 0 to 20 mA, or 4 to 20 mA
Analog output: 1 to 5 VDC, 0 to 10 VDC, –10 to 10 VDC,
0 to 20 mA, or 4 to 20 mA
Set inputs as voltage or analog and set the averaging function.
Wire the analog I/O.
Program operation in the
ladder program.
Connect analog I/O devices.
Write the range code.
Analog inputs: Read converted data.
Analog output: Write set values.
Analog Inputs
CPU Unit
Analog I/O Unit
Ladder program
(21) MOVE instruction
Writes the range code.
Reads the converted
values.
Word (n + 1)
Range code
Word (m + 1)
Analog input 0
converted value
Analog input 1
converted value
Word (m + 2)
Analog devices
Where “m” is the last input word and “n” is the
last output word allocated to the CPU Unit, or
previous Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit.
180
Temperature sensor
Pressure sensor
Speed sensor
Flow sensor
Voltage/current meter
Other
Section
Analog I/O Units
3-1
Analog Outputs
CPU Unit
Analog I/O Unit
Ladder program
(See note.)
Word (n + 1)
Range code
Analog output set value
(21) MOVE instruction
Writes the range code.
Writes the set value.
Analog devices
Adjustment equipment
Where “n” is the last output word allocated to
the CPU Unit, or previous Expansion Unit or
Expansion I/O Unit.
Servo Controller
Variable speed device
Recorder
Other
Note Word (n + 1) can be used for either the range code or the analog output set value.
Connecting the
CPM1A-MAD11 Analog
I/O Unit
This section describes how to connect an Analog I/O Unit to the CPU Unit.
A maximum of 3 Expansion Units or Expansion I/O Units, including up to 3 Analog I/O Units, can be connected to one CPM2A or CPM1A PC. When the Analog
I/O Unit is used in combination with other Expansion Units or Expansion I/O
Units, there are no restrictions on the connection order.
CPM1A/CPM2A
CPU Unit
CPM1A-MAD11
Analog I/O Unit
I/O Allocation
I/O is allocated for the Analog I/O Unit in the same way as other Expansion Units
or Expansion I/O Units starting from the next word following the last allocated
word on the CPU Unit or previous Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit. When
“m” is the last allocated input word and “n” the last allocated output word on the
CPU Unit, or previous Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit, the allocation will
be as follows:
CPM1A-MAD11
Analog I/O Unit
Analog input 0: Word m+1
Analog input 1: Word m+2
32 inputs
16 outputs
Analog output: Word n+1
181
Section
Analog I/O Units
3-1
For example, in the following diagram an Analog I/O Unit is connected to a CPU
Unit with 30 I/O points.
Inputs
Outputs
Connecting the
CPM2C-MAD11 Analog
I/O Unit
IR 002
IR 003
IR 000
IR 001
30-point
CPU Unit
IR 010
IR 011
CPM1A-MAD11
Analog I/O Unit
IR 012
This section describes how to connect an Analog I/O Unit to the CPU Unit.
A maximum of 5 Expansion Units or Expansion I/O Units (a maximum of 3 Units
for the CPM2C-S), including up to 4 Analog I/O Units, can be connected to one
CPM2C PC. When the Analog I/O Unit is used in combination with other Expansion Units or Expansion I/O Units, there are no restrictions on the connection
order.
CPU Unit
CPM2C-MAD11 Analog I/O Units
Expansion I/O Unit
I/O Allocation
I/O is allocated for the Analog I/O Unit in the same way as other Expansion Units
or Expansion I/O Units starting from the next word following the last allocated
word on the CPU Unit or previous Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit. When
“m” is the last allocated input word and “n” the last allocated output word on the
CPU Unit, or previous Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit, the allocation will
be as follows:
CPM2C-MAD11 Analog I/O Unit
Analog input 0:
Analog input 1:
Word m+1
Word m+2
Analog output:
Word n+1
For example, in the following diagram an Analog I/O Unit is connected to a CPU
Unit with 20 I/O points.
CPU Unit CPM2C-MAD11 Analog I/O Unit
182
CPU Unit inputs:
Analog input 0:
Analog input 1:
IR 000
IR 001
IR 002
CPU Unit outputs:
Analog output:
IR 010
IR 011
Section
Analog I/O Units
Setting I/O Signal Range
3-1
I/O signal ranges are set by writing a range code to the output word of the Analog
I/O Unit. The range code must be set for the Analog I/O Unit to convert data.
The range code settings provide the combinations of signal ranges for the analog inputs and analog output, as shown in the following table.
Voltage/current selections for the CPM1A-MAD11 are made by connecting the
appropriate terminals. Refer to page 184 for details.
Voltage/current selections for the CPM2C-MAD11 are made using pins 3 and 4
on the DIP switch. refer to page 175 for details.
Range
Analog input 1
code
signal range
000
–10 to 10 V
Analog input 2
signal range
Analog output
signal range
–10 to 10 V
001
0 to 10 V
0 to 10 V
010
1 to 5 V or 4 to 20 mA
1 to 5 V
011
1 to 5 V or 0 to 20 mA
0 to 20 mA
100
---
4 to 20 mA
Note Be sure to write the correct terminals or set the DIP switch to specify either voltage or current inputs.
Write the range codes to the Analog I/O Unit’s output word (n + 1) in the first cycle
of program execution.
n+1
15
8 7
1 0 0 0 0 0 0
6 5 4 3 2 1 0
Analog
output
Analog
input 0
Analog
input 1
Example
The following instructions set analog input 0 to 4 to 20 mA, analog input 1 to 0 to
10 V, and the analog output to –10 to 10 V.
SR 25315
(First Cycle Flag)
MOV (21)
#800A
Analog input 0:
4 to 20 mA
011
Analog input 1:
0 to 10 V
Analog output:
–10 to 10 V
The Analog I/O Unit will not start converting analog I/O values until the range
code has been written. Until conversion starts, inputs will be 0000, and 0 V or
0 mA will be output.
After the range code has been set, 0 V or 0 mA will be output for the 0 to 10-V,
–10 to 10-V, or 0 to 20-mA ranges, and 1 V or 4 mA will be output for the 1 to 5-V
and 4 to 20-mA ranges until a convertible value has been written to the output
word.
Once the range code has been set, it is not possible to change the setting while
power is being supplied to the CPU Unit. To change the I/O range, turn the CPU
Unit OFF then ON again.
183
Section
Analog I/O Units
Wiring Analog I/O Devices
CPM1A-MAD11 Internal Circuits
Analog Inputs
Analog Outputs
510 kΩ
V OUT
I IN 0
COM 0 (–)
250 Ω
Internal circuits
Internal circuits
Output
Input 0
V IN –
510 kΩ
Input 1
V IN 1
510 kΩ
I IN 1
COM 1 (–)
250 Ω
510 kΩ
COM (–)
I OUT
NC
AG
NC
Analog ground
Analog ground
CPM1A-MAD11 Terminal Arrangements
I OUT
NC
V OUT COM
Label
NC
NC
V IN0
NC
COM0 I IN1
I IN0
AG
V IN0 COM1
Signal
V OUT
Voltage output
I OUT
Current output
COM
Output common
V IN0
Voltage input 0
I IN0
Current input 0
COM0
Input common 0
V IN1
Voltage input 1
I IN1
Current input 1
COM1
Input common 1
Note For current inputs, short V IN0 to I IN0 and V IN1 to I IN1
Wiring for Analog Inputs
+
Analog device
with voltage
output
184
V IN
I IN
–
COM
+
Analog
I/O
Unit
Analog device
with current
output
V IN
I IN
–
COM
Analog
I/O
Unit
3-1
Section
Analog I/O Units
3-1
Wiring for Analog Outputs
V OUT
Analog
I/O
Unit
+
I OUT
COM
–
Note
V OUT
Analog
I/O
Unit
Analog device
with voltage
input
+
I OUT
COM
–
Analog device
with current
input
1. Use shielded twisted-pair cables, but do not connect the shield.
2. When an input is not being used, short the + and – terminals.
3. Separate wiring from power lines (AC power supply lines, high-voltage
lines, etc.)
4. When there is noise in the power supply line, install a noise filter on the input
section and the Power Supply Unit.
CPM2C-MAD11 Internal Circuits
Analog Inputs
Analog Outputs
0+
510 kΩ
V+
250 Ω
Internal circuits
Internal circuits
Input 0
0–
510 kΩ
1+
510 kΩ
Input 1
250 Ω
510 kΩ
1+
–
Output
I+
NC
AG
NC
Analog ground
Analog ground
CPM2C-MAD11 Terminal Arrangements
Analog Input Terminals
IN
Analog input 0 +
Analog input 0 –
Analog input 1 +
Analog input 1 –
Analog ground
Analog Output Terminals
0+
0–
1+
1–
AG
OUT
Analog voltage output
Output common
Analog current output
Not used
Not used
V+
–
I+
NC
NC
Analog Input Wiring
Analog
output
device
+
+
–
–
Analog
I/O Unit
Analog Output Wiring
Analog
I/O Unit
V+
–
+ Analog
input device
with voltage
– input
Analog
I/O Unit
I+
–
+ Analog
input device
with current
– input
185
Section
Analog I/O Units
Note
3-1
1. Use shielded twisted-pair cables, but do not connect the shield.
2. When an input is not being used, short the + and – terminals.
3. Separate wiring from power lines (AC power supply lines, high-voltage
lines, etc.)
4. When there is noise in the power supply line, install a noise filter on the input
section and the Power Supply Unit.
Reference Information
Consider the following information on open input circuits when using voltage inputs.
If the same power supply is used as shown in the following diagram and an open
circuit occurs at point A or B, an unwanted current flow will occur as shown by the
dotted lines in the diagram, creating a voltage at the other input of about 1/3 to
1/2. If the 1 to 5-V range is being used, the open-circuit detection function will not
operate. Also, if there is an open circuit at C, the open-circuit detection function
will not operate because the negative sides are the same.
A
Analog
input
device 1
B
C
Analog
input
device 2
24 VDC
For example, if analog input device 2 is outputting 5 V and the same power supply is being used as shown above, about 1/3, or 1.6 V, will be applied at the input
for input device 1.
To eliminate the above problem, either use separate power supplies, or install an
isolator at each input. This problem will not occur for current inputs even if the
same power supply is used.
Note When power is supplied (when setting the range code), or when there is a power
interruption, pulse-form analog output of up to 1 ms may be generated.
If this causes problems with operation, take countermeasure such as those suggested below.
• Turn ON the power supply for the CPU Unit first, and then turn ON the power
supply for the load after confirming correct operation.
186
Section
Analog I/O Units
3-1
• Turn OFF the power supply for the load before turning OFF the power supply
for the CPU Unit.
Ladder Program
Specifying the Range Code
Specify the I/O signal range by writing the range code to the Analog I/O Unit’s
output word from the ladder program in the first cycle of program execution. The
Analog I/O Unit will start to convert analog I/O values once the range code has
been specified and convertible values are provided. (Refer to page NO TAG.)
Write the range code to the Analog I/O Unit’s output word in the first cycle of operation; the Analog I/O Unit’s output word is “n+1” when “n” is the last word allocated to the CPU Unit, or previous Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit in the
configuration.
Reading Converted Analog Input Values
The ladder program can be used to read the memory area where the converted
values are stored. Values are output to the next two words (m + 1, m + 2) following the last input word (m) allocated to the CPU Unit or previous Expansion Unit
or Expansion I/O Unit.
Writing Analog Output Set Values
The ladder program can be used to write data to the output word where the set
value is stored. The output word will be “n+1” when “n” is the last output word
allocated to the CPU Unit, or previous Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit.
Startup Operation
After power is turned ON, it will require two cycle times plus approx. 50 ms before
the first data is converted. The following instructions can be placed at the beginning of the program to delay reading converted data from analog inputs until conversion is actually possible.
Note Analog input data will be 0000 until initial processing has been completed. Analog output data will be 0 V or 0 mA until the range code has been written. After the
range code has been written, the analog output data will be 0 V or 0 mA if the
range is 0 to 10 V, –10 to 10 V, or 0 to 20 mA, or it will be 1 V or 4 mA if the range is
1 to 5 V or 4 to 20 mA.
SR 25315
(Always ON Flag)
TIM 005
#0002
T005
MOV (21)
TIM 005 will start as soon as power turns ON.
After 0.1 to 0.2 s (100 to 200 ms), the Completion Flag for TIM 005 will turn ON, and the converted data from analog input will be read from
IR 001 and stored in DM 0000.
001
DM0000
Handling Unit Errors
If an error occurs in an Analog I/O Unit, the Error Flags in AR 0200 to AR 0204 for
the CPM2C and AR 0200 to AR 0202 for the CPM1A/CPM2A will be turned ON.
The addresses of the Error Flags are in the order that the Expansion Units and
Expansion I/O Units are connected in the PC, with AR 0200 used for the Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit closest to the CPU Unit. Use these flags in the
program when it is necessary to detect errors.
When an error occurs in the Analog I/O Unit, analog input data will be 0000 and
0 V or 0 mA will be output as the analog output.
If a CPU error or an I/O bus error (fatal errors) occurs at the CPU Unit and the
analog output is set to 1 to 5 V or 4 to 20 mA, 0 V or 0 mA will be output. For any
other fatal errors at the CPU Unit, 1 V or 4 mA will be output.
187
Section
Analog I/O Units
3-1
Programming Example
This programming example uses these ranges:
Analog input 0: 0 to 10 V
Analog input 1: 4 to 20 mA
Analog output: 0 to 10 V
25135
(First Cycle ON Flag)
MOV (21)
8051
011
25313
(Always ON Flag)
Writes the range code (8051) to the Unit.
TIM 005
TIM005
#0002
Execution
condition
MOV (21)
001
TIM005
DM0000
Execution
condition
Reads analog input 0’s converted value.
CMP (20)
002
#8000
25506(=)
01000
TIM005
Open-circuit alarm
Execution
condition
MOV (21)
002
TIM005
DM0001
Execution
condition
Reads analog input 1’s converted value.
MOV (21)
DM0010
011
188
The content of DM 0010 is written to the output
word as the analog output set value.
Section
Temperature Sensor Units
3-2
3-2
Temperature Sensor Units
3-2-1 CPM1A/CPM2A Temperature Sensor Units
With the CPM1A or CPM2A, up to three Expansion Units or Expansion I/O Units
can be connected to the CPU Unit. One, two, or three of these Units can be
CPM1A-TS001 or CPM1A-TS101 Temperature Sensor Units. If a CPM1ATS002 or CPM1A-TS102 Temperature Sensor Unit is connected to the CPU
Unit, then only one other Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit can be connected. The other Unit can be a CPM1A-TS001/TS101 Temperature Sensor
Unit.
The CPM1A-TS001/TS101 Temperature Sensor Units each provide 2 input
points and the CPM1A-TS002/TS102 Temperature Sensor Units each provide 4
input points, meaning up to 6 temperature input points can be used on one
CPM1A or CPM2A PC. The inputs can be from thermocouples or platinum resistance thermometers.
Up to 3 Units, including Expansion I/O Units and other Expansion
Units. (Only 2 Units if CPM1A-TS002/TS102 is used.)
CPM1A or CPM2A CPU Unit
CPM1A-20EDR1
Expansion I/O Unit
CPM1A-8ED
CPM1A-TS
Expansion I/O Unit Temperature Sensor Unit
Thermocouples or
platinum resistance
thermometers
Temperature inputs
Specifications
Item
CPM1A-TS001
CPM1A-TS002
CPM1A-TS101
CPM1A-TS102
Temperature sensors
Thermocouples
Platinum resistance thermometer
Number of inputs
Switchable between K and J, but same
type must be used for all inputs.
2
4
Switchable between Pt100 and JPt100, but
same type must be used for all inputs.
2
4
Allocated input words
2
4
2
4
Max. number of Units
(See note 1.)
Accuracy
3
1
3
1
(The larger of ±0.5% of converted value or
±2C) ±1 digit max. (See note 2.)
(The larger of ±0.5% of converted value or
±1C) ±1 digit max.
Conversion time
250 ms for 2 or 4 input points
Converted temperature data
16-bit binary data (4-digit hexadecimal)
Isolation
Photocouplers between all temperature input signals
Note
1. If only the CPM1A-TS001 and CPM1A-TS101 are connected, then up to 3
Units including Expansion I/O Units and other Expansion Units can be connected. If the CPM1A-TS002 or CPM1A-TS102 is connected, then only one
other Expansion I/O Unit or Expansion Unit can be connected. The CPM1ATS001 or CPM1A-TS101 may be the other Unit, but another CPM1A-TS002
or CPM1A-TS102 cannot be connected.
189
Section
Temperature Sensor Units
3-2
2. Accuracy for a K-type sensor at –100°C or less is ±4C ±1 digit max.
3-2-2 CPM2C Temperature Sensor Units
With the CPM2C (including the CPM2C-S), up to four CPM2C-TS001/TS101
Temperature Sensor Units can be connected (up to three Units for the
CPM2C-S). Each Temperature Sensor Unit provides 2 input points meaning that
a total of 8 input points can be used. The inputs can be from thermocouples or
platinum resistance thermometers.
CPM2C-TS001/101
Temperature Sensor Units
CPM2C CPU Unit
Thermocouples or
platinum resistance
thermometers
Expansion I/O Unit
Temperature inputs
8 points max.
Specifications
Item
Temperature sensors
CPM2C-TS001
Thermocouples
Switchable between K
and J, but same type
must be used for all
inputs.
Note
CPM2C-TS101
Platinum resistance
thermometer
Switchable between
Pt100 and JPt100, but
same type must be used
for all inputs.
Number of inputs
2
Allocated input words
2
Max. number of Units
(See note 1.)
Accuracy
4
4
(The larger of ±0.5% of
converted value or
±1C) ±1 digit max.
Conversion time
(The larger of ±0.5% of
converted value or
±2C) ±1 digit max. (See
note.)
250 ms for 2 input points
Converted temperature data
16-bit binary data (4-digit hexadecimal)
Isolation
Photocouplers between all temperature input
signals
1. Accuracy for a K-type sensor at –100°C or less is ±4C ±1 digit max.
2. The error deviation for temperatures in °F is double that for °C.
190
Section
Temperature Sensor Units
3-2
3-2-3 Using Temperature Sensor Units
Connect the Temperature Sensor Unit.
Refer to 3-2-4 Connecting Temperature Sensor Units.
Connect the Unit.
Set the temperature unit, 2-decimal-place Mode if
required, and set the temperature input range.
Refer to 3-2-5 Setting Temperature Ranges.
Set the temperature ranges.
Connect the temperature sensors.
Connect temperature sensors.
Refer to 3-2-6 Connecting Temperature Sensors.
Program operation in the
ladder program.
Read temperature data stored in the input word.
Refer to 3-2-7 Ladder Programming.
3-2-4 Connecting Temperature Sensor Units
This section shows example configurations containing Temperature Sensor
Units.
CPM1A/CPM2A Temperature Sensor Unit Allocations
Words are allocated to Temperature Sensor Units just like other Expansion I/O
Units and Expansion Units: In the order in which the Units are connected. A Temperature Sensor Unit will thus be allocated the next input words after the Unit to
which it is connected (CPU Unit or other Unit).
Note Only one 4-input Temperature Sensor Unit (CPM1A-TS002 or CPM1A-TS102,
4 words allocated) can be mounted to the CPU Unit. There are, however, no
restrictions on the mounting order.
Temperature Sensor Units with 2 Inputs: CPM1A-TS001 and CPM1A-TS101 (2 Words Allocated)
CPM1A or CPM2A CPU Unit
(with 20, 30, 40, or 60 I/O points)
CPM1A-20EDR1
Expansion I/O Unit
Temperature 2 inputs
Sensor Units
Expansion I/O Units
Analog I/O Units
CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit
CPM1A-8ED
CPM1A-TS001/TS101
Expansion I/O Unit Temperature Sensor Unit
CPM1A-TS001
CPM1A-TS101
With 8 or 20 I/O points
CPM1A-MAD01
CPM1A-SRT21
Up to 3 Units can be
connected.
co
ec ed There
e e are
e no
o
restrictions on the order in
which Units are
re
connected.
191
Section
Temperature Sensor Units
3-2
Word Allocations
The CPM1A-TS001 and CPM1A-TS101 are allocated two words each (one for
each input point). No output words are allocated.
40-point CPU Unit
20-point Expansion
I/O Unit
8-point Expansion
Input Unit
CPM1A-TS001/101
Temperature Sensor Unit
Input word
addresses
IR 000
IR 001
IR 002
IR 003
IR 004
IR 005
Output word
addresses
IR 010
IR 011
IR 012
None
None
Temperature Sensor Units with 4 Inputs (4 Words Allocated): CPM1A-TS002 and CPM1A-TS102
CPM1A or CPM2A CPU Unit
(with 20, 30, 40, or 60 I/O points)
Temperature
Sensor
Units
e so U
s
CPM1A-20EDR1
CPM1A-TS002/TS102
Expansion I/O Unit Temperature Sensor Unit
4 inputs
2 inputs
Expansion I/O Units
Analog I/O Units
CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit
CPM1A-TS002 or
CPM1A-TS102
CPM1A-TS001 or
CPM1A-TS101
With 8 or 20 I/O
points
CPM1A-MAD01
CPM1A-SRT21
1 Unit only
1 Unit only
Up to 2 Units can be
connected.
co
ec ed There
e e are
e
no restrictions on the
order in which Units
are
connected.
re connected
Word Allocations
The CPM1A-TS002 and CPM1A-TS102 are allocated four words each (one for
each input point). No output words are allocated.
60-point CPU Unit
20-point Expansion
I/O Unit
Input word addresses
IR 000
IR 001
IR 002
IR 003
Output word addresses
IR 010
IR 011
IR 012
IR 013
CPM1A-TS002/102
Temperature Sensor Unit
IR 004
IR 005
IR 006
IR 007
None
CPM2C Temperature Sensor Unit Allocations
Up to four CPM2C-TS001/101 Temperature Sensor Units can be connected. Up
to a total of five Expansion I/O Units and Expansion Units can be connected (in-
192
Section
Temperature Sensor Units
3-2
cluding the Temperature Sensor Units.) Up to three Units can be connected to
the CPM2C-S. No matter how many Units are connected, however, no more
than 0 input words and 10 output words can be allocated in one PC. There are no
restrictions on the order in which Units can be connected.
Example
CPM2C-TS001/101
Temperature Sensor Units
CPM2C CPU Unit
Expansion I/O Unit
Four Temperature
Sensor Units max.
Word Allocation
Words are allocated to Temperature Sensor Units just like other Expansion I/O
Units and Expansion Units: In the order in which the Units are connected. A
CPM2C-TS001 or CPM2C-TS101 Temperature Sensor Unit will thus be allocated the next two input words after the Unit to which it is connected (CPU Unit or
other Unit). No output words are allocated.
20-point CPU Unit
CPM2C-TS001
Temperature
Sensor Unit
CPM2C-TS001
Temperature
Sensor Unit
CPM2C-TS101
Temperature
Sensor Unit
CPM2C-TS101
Temperature
Sensor Unit
CPM2C-24EDTC
Expansion I/O Unit
Inputs
IR 000
Inputs
IR 001
IR 002
Inputs
IR 003
IR 004
Inputs
IR 005
IR 006
Inputs
IR 007
IR 008
Inputs
IR 009
Outputs
IR 010
Outputs
None
Outputs
None
Outputs
None
Outputs
None
Outputs
IR 011
3-2-5 Setting Temperature Ranges
The temperature unit, the number of decimal places used, and the temperature
input range are set on the DIP switch and rotary switch on the Temperature Sensor Unit.
Note
1. Always turn OFF the power supply before setting the temperature range.
2. Never touch the DIP switch or rotary switch during Temperature Sensor Unit
operation. Static electricity may cause operating errors.
193
Section
Temperature Sensor Units
3-2
CPM1A/CPM2A Temperature Sensor Units
CPM1A-TS001/002/101/102
DIP Switch
Used to set the temperature
unit and the number of decimal
places used.
Rotary Switch
Used to set the temperature
input range.
Temperature input terminals
CPM2C Temperature Sensor Units
CPM2C-TS001/101
Expansion I/O connector (output)
Expansion I/O connector (input)
Cold junction compensator
(TS001 only)
Temperature input terminals
DIP Switch
Used to set the temperature
unit and the number of decimal
places used.
Rotary Switch
Used to set the temperature
input range.
DIP Switch Settings
The DIP switch is used to set the temperature unit (°C or °F) and the number of
decimal places used.
CPM1A-TS
CPM2C-TS
SW1
ON
F
ON
C
ON
2
1
1
2
0.01
SW1
1
2
1 or 0.1
Setting
Temperature unit
Number of decimal
places
ces used
sed
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
°C
°F
Normal (0 or 1 digit after the decimal
point, depending on the input range)
2-decimal-place Mode (e.g., 0.01)
Note For details on 2-decimal-place Mode, refer to 3-2-8 Two-decimal-place Mode.
194
Section
Temperature Sensor Units
Note
Rotary Switch Setting
3-2
1. Turn OFF the power supply before changing the temperature range setting.
2. Do not touch the DIP switch or rotary switches while power is turned ON.
Static electricity may cause malfunctions.
The rotary switch is used to set the temperature range.
! Caution
Set the temperature range according to the type of temperature sensor connected to the Unit. Temperature data will not be converted correctly if the temperature range does not match the sensor.
! Caution
Do not set the temperature range to any values other than those for which temperature ranges are given in the following table. An incorrect setting may cause
operating errors.
CPM1A-TS001/002
CPM2C-TS001
Setting
Input
type
0
K
1
2
J
3
4 to F
---
Range
Range
(°C)
(°F)
–200 to
–300 to
1,300
2,300
0.0 to
0.0 to
500.0
900.0
–100 to
–100 to
850
1,500
0.0 to
0.0 to
400.0
750.0
Setting not possible
CPM1A-TS101/102
CPM2C-TS101
Input
type
Pt100
JPt100
---
Range
Range
(°C)
(°F)
–200.0 to –300.0 to
650.0
1,200.0
–200.0 to –300.0 to
650.0
1,200.0
Setting not possible
-----
195
Section
Temperature Sensor Units
3-2
3-2-6 Connecting Temperature Sensors
CPM1A/CPM2A Temperature Sensor Units
Thermocouples
CPM1A-TS001
Either K or J thermocouples can be connected, but both of the thermocouples
must be of the same type and the same input range must be used for each.
Input 0
+
Input 0
–
Input 1
+
Input 1
–
NC
NC
NC
NC
NC
NC
NC
NC
Temperature input 0
Temperature input 1
Cold junction compensator
CPM1A-TS002
Either K or J thermocouples can be connected, but all four of the thermocouples
must be of the same type and the same input range must be used for each.
Input 0
+
Input 0
–
Input 1
+
Input 1
–
Input 2
+
NC
NC
Temperature
input 0
Temperature
input 1
NC
Input 3
+
Input 2
–
NC
Input 3
–
Temperature
input 2
Cold junction
compensator
Temperature
input 3
Note When using a Temperature Sensor Unit with a thermocouple input, observe the
following precautions:
• Do not remove the cold junction compensator attached at the time of delivery. If the cold junction compensator is removed, the Unit will not be able to
measure temperatures correctly.
• Each of the input circuits is calibrated with the cold junction compensator
attached to the Unit. If the Unit is used with the cold junction compensator
from other Units, the Unit will not be able to measure temperatures correctly.
• Do not touch the cold junction compensator. Doing so may result in incorrect temperature measurement.
196
Section
Temperature Sensor Units
3-2
Platinum Resistance
Thermometers
CPM1A-TS101
Either Pt100 or JPt100 platinum resistance thermometers can be connected,
but both of the thermometers must be of the same type and the same input range
must be used for each.
Input 0
A
Input 0
B
Input 1
A
Input 0
B
Pt
NC
Input 1
B
Input 1
B
NC
NC
NC
NC
NC
NC
NC
Pt
Temperature input 0
Temperature input 1
CPM1A-TS102
Either Pt100 or JPt100 platinum resistance thermometers can be connected,
but all four of the thermometers must be of the same type and the same input
range must be used for each.
Input 0
A
Input 0
B
Input 1
A
Input 0
B
Pt
Temperature
input 0
Input 1
B
Pt
Temperature
input 1
Input 2
A
NC
Input 1
B
NC
Input 2
B
Input 3
A
Input 2
B
Pt
Temperature
input 2
Input 3
B
Input 3
B
Pt
Temperature
input 3
Note Do not connect anything to terminals not used for inputs.
197
Section
Temperature Sensor Units
3-2
CPM2C Temperature Sensor Units
CPM2C-TS001 (Thermocouples)
Either K or J thermocouples can be connected, but both of the thermocouples
must be of the same type and the same input range must be used for each.
0+
0–
Temperature input 0
NC
1+
1–
Temperature input 1
NC
Cold junction
compensator
Note When using a Temperature Sensor Unit with a thermocouple input, observe the
following precautions:
• Do not touch the cold junction compensator. Doing so may result in incorrect temperature measurement.
CPM2C-TS101 (Platinum Resistance Thermometers)
Either Pt100 or JPt100 platinum resistance thermometers can be connected,
but both of the thermometers must be of the same type and the same input range
must be used for each.
0A
Pt
Temperature input 0
0B
0B
1A
Pt
Temperature input 1
1B
NC
3-2-7 Ladder Programming
Converted Temperature
Data
The temperature data will be stored in the input words allocated to the Temperature Sensor Unit in 4-digit hexadecimal.
CPM1A-TS001/TS101 and CPM2C-TS001/TS101
“m” is the last word allocated to the CPU Unit, Expansion I/O Unit, or Expansion
Unit connected immediately before the Temperature Sensor Unit.
Word
Contents
m+1
Converted temperature data from input 0
m+2
Converted temperature data from input 1
CPM1A-TS002/TS102
“m” is the last word allocated to the CPU Unit, Expansion I/O Unit, or Expansion
Unit connected immediately before the Temperature Sensor Unit.
Word
Contents
m+1
Converted temperature data from input 0
m+2
Converted temperature data from input 1
m+3
Converted temperature data from input 2
m+4
Converted temperature data from input 3
All Temperature Sensor Units
Negative values are stored as 2’s complements. Data for range codes that in-
198
Section
Temperature Sensor Units
3-2
clude one digit after the decimal point are stored without the decimal point, i.e.,
10 times the actual value is stored. Some examples are provided in the following
table.
Input
Data conversion examples
Unit: 1°
K or J
Unit: 0.1°
K, J, Pt100 or
JPt100
850° → 0352 Hex
–200° → FF38 Hex
×10
500.0° → 5000 → 1388 Hex
–20.0° → –200 → FF38 Hex
–200.0° → –2000 → F830 Hex
If the input temperature exceeds the range that can be converted, the converted
temperature data will be held at the maximum or minimum value in the range. If
the input temperature exceeds the range by more than a specified amount, the
open-circuit detection function will detect an open-circuit and the converted temperature data will be set to 7FFF. The open-circuit detection function will also
operate if the cold junction compensator is faulty. The open-circuit detection
function will be automatically cleared and normal input temperature conversion
will begin automatically when the input temperature returns to the convertible
range.
After power is turned ON, it will require approximately 1 s before the first data is
converted. The following instructions can be placed at the beginning of the program and then IR 02000 can be used to delay reading converted data until conversion is actually begun.
Startup Operation
25313
(Always ON Flag)
CMP (20)
001
#7FFE
User flag indicating that temperature data
conversion has begun.
25506 (=)
02000
User-defined flag indicating that initialization has been completed
Note Input data will be 7FFE until actual conversion starts.
Handling Unit Errors
If an error occurs in an Expansion Unit, the Error Flags in AR 0200 to AR 0204
will be turned ON ( AR 0200 to AR 0202 for the CPM1A/CPM2A). Refer to page
568 for details. The addresses of the Error Flags are in order that the Expansion
Units are connected in the PC, with AR 0200 used for the Expansion Unit closest
to the CPU Unit. Use these flags in the program when it is necessary to detect
errors.
When an error occurs in a Temperature Sensor Unit, converted temperature
data will be 7FFF.
Note The status of AR 0200 to AR 0204 will not change for the open-circuit detection
function.
Programming Example 1
The following programming example shows how to convert the input data from 2
temperature sensor inputs to BCD and store the result in DM 0000 and
DM 0001. The following system configuration is used.
199
Section
Temperature Sensor Units
20-point CPU Unit
Inputs
IR 000
Outputs
IR 010
200
Temperature Sensor Unit
Inputs
IR 001
IR 002
Outputs
None
Temperature unit setting:
Two-decimal-place Mode:
Input range setting:
Temperature input 0 storage word:
Temperature input 1 storage word:
OFF (°C)
OFF (normal)
1 (K2, 0.0 to 500.0°C)
IR 001
IR 002
3-2
Section
Temperature Sensor Units
3-2
25313
(Always ON Flag)
Detects completion of input 0 initialization.
CMP (20)
001
#7FFE
25506(=)
02000
ON when input 0 has been initialized
25313
(Always ON Flag)
Detects completion of input 1 initialization.
CMP (20)
002
#7FFE
25506
02001
02000
ON when input 1 has been initialized
Execution condition
CMP (20)
001
Detects an open-circuit alarm or Unit error by checking converted temperature data for the error code
7FFF.
#7FFF
25506(=)
01000
CMP (20)
001
ON when an open-circuit alarm or Unit error has been
detected for input 0.
Checks to see if the temperature data in IR 001 has
exceeded 500.0°C (1388 Hex without decimal point).
#1388
25505(>)
01001
ON for an input 0 temperature error
25507(<)
BCD (24)
001
Converts the contents of IR 001 (temperature data
for input 0) to BCD and stores the result in
DM 0000.
DM0000
02001
Execution condition
CMP (20)
002
#7FFF
25506(=)
01002
CMP (20)
002
Detects an open-circuit alarm or Unit error by checking converted temperature data for the error code
7FFF.
ON when an open-circuit alarm or Unit error has been
detected for input 1.
Checks to see if the temperature data in IR 002 has
exceeded 500.0°C (1388 Hex without decimal point).
#1388
25505(>)
01003
ON for an input 1 temperature error
25507(<)
BCD (24)
002
Converts the contents of IR 002 (temperature data
for input 1) to BCD and stores the result in
DM 0001.
DM0001
201
Section
Temperature Sensor Units
Programming Example 2
20-point CPU Unit
Inputs
IR 000
Outputs
IR 010
3-2
The following programming example shows how to convert the data for temperature input 0 to BCD and store the result in DM 0000 and DM 0001. “0001” is
stored in DM 0001 when the input data is a negative value. The following system
configuration is used.
Temperature Sensor Unit
Inputs
IR 001
IR 002
Outputs
None
Temperature unit setting:
Two-decimal-place Mode:
Input range setting:
Temperature input 0 storage word:
OFF (°C)
OFF (normal)
1 (Pt100, –200.0 to 650.0°C)
IR 001
Programming with BCD(24) Instruction
25313
(Always ON Flag)
CMP (20)
Detects completion of input 0 initialization.
001
#7FFE
02000
02000
ON when input 0 has been initialized
Execution condition
CMP (20)
002
Detects an open-circuit alarm or Unit error by checking converted temperature data for the error code
7FFF.
#7FFF
25506(=)
01000
25506(=)
ON when an open-circuit alarm or Unit error has been
detected for input 0.
00115
BDC (24)
001
DM0000
MOV (21)
When the input temperature data is non-negative,
converts the contents of IR 001 (temperature data
for input 0) to BCD and stores the result in
DM 0000.
Stores #0000 in DM 0001.
#0000
DM0001
00115
CLC (41)
SBB (51)
#0000
001
DM0010
BCD (24)
DM0010
When the input temperature data is negative, converts the contents of IR 001 to the absolute value of
the actual temperature and stores the result in
DM 0010.
Converts the contents of DM 0010 (absolute value
of negative temperature data for input 0) to BCD
and stores the result in DM 0000.
DM0010
MOV (21)
#0001
DM0001
202
Stores #0001 in DM 0001 to indicate a negative
number.
Section
Temperature Sensor Units
3-2
Programming with SCL2(––) Instruction (CPM2A/CPM2C Only)
25313
(Always ON Flag)
Detects completion of initialization.
CMP (20)
001
#7FFE
25506(=)
02000
ON when initialization complete.
02000 Execution condition
Detects an open-circuit alarm.
CMP (20)
001
#7FFF
25506(=)
01000
ON when an open-circuit alarm has been detected.
25506(=)
SCL2 (–)
001
Parameter settings for data conversion:
DM0010
DM0000
DM0010
#0000
Offset
DM0011
#0001
∆X (Hex)
DM0012
#0001
∆Y (BCD)
25504(CY)
When the converted value is non-negative,
stores #0000 in DM 0001.
MOV (21)
#0000
DM0001
25504(CY)
When the converted value is negative, stores
#0001 in DM 0001.
MOV (21)
#0001
DM0001
Operation
Binary to BCD conversion
IR 001 163 162 161 160
DM 0000
DM 0001
0
0
0
1/0
103 102 101 100
CY (when using SCL2 instruction)
1/0
1: Negative, 0: Non-negative
0: If data non-negative, “0000” stored in DM 0001
1: If data negative, “0001” stored in DM 0001
203
Section
Temperature Sensor Units
3-2
3-2-8 Two-decimal-place Mode
If pin 2 on the DIP switch is turned ON, values are stored to two decimal places.
In this case, temperature data is stored as 6-digit signed hexadecimal (binary)
data with 4 digits in the integer portion and 2 digits after the decimal point. The
actual data stored in memory is 100 times the actual value, i.e., the decimal point
is not indicated. Methods for handling this data are described in this section.
Note When set to store values to two decimal places, temperature data as far as two
digits after the decimal point is converted to 6-digit binary data, but the actual
resolution is not 0.01°C (°F). For this reason, there may be skipping and inaccuracies in the first digit after the decimal point (0.1). Treat any resolution above
that specified for the normal data format as reference data.
Data Structure
The structure of the data stored in memory is shown below. The value will be 100
times the actual temperature.
Leftmost 3 Digits and Flags
15
14
13
12
Leftmost/
Rightmost Flag
Temperature
Unit Flag
Open-circuit
Flag
Not used.
0: Leftmost
1: Rightmost
0: °C
1: °F
0: Normal
1: Error
Always 0
Rightmost 3 Digits and Flags
15
14
13
12
Leftmost/
Rightmost Flag
Temperature
Unit Flag
Open-circuit
Flag
Not used.
0: Leftmost
1: Rightmost
0: °C
1: °F
0: Normal
1: Error
Always 0
Temperature data
x165
x164
Temperature data
x162
x161
Leftmost/Rightmost Flag: Indicates whether the leftmost or rightmost 3 digits are provided.
204
x163
Temperature Unit Flag:
Indicates whether the temperature is in °C or °F.
Open-circuit Flag:
Turns ON (1) when an open-circuit is detected. The temperature
data will be 7FF FFF if this flag is ON.
x160
Section
Temperature Sensor Units
Data Conversion
Examples
3-2
Some examples of the data stored for various temperature inputs are provided
below.
Example 1
Temperature:
1,130.25°C
×100:
113025
Temperature Data: 01B981 (hexadecimal for 113025)
Leftmost 3 Digits and Flags
Bits
Data
Flags
x165
x164
x163
15 14 13 12
08 to 11
04 to 07
00 to 03
0
1
B
0
0
0
0
0
Normal
°C
Leftmost
0
1
B
Temperature
data
Flags
Rightmost 3 Digits and Flags
Bits
Data
Flags
x162
x161
x160
15 14 13 12
08 to 11
04 to 07
00 to 03
9
8
1
1
0
0
0
Normal
°C
Rightmost
8
9
8
1
Temperature
data
Flags
Example 2
Temperature:
–100.12°C
×100:
–10012
Temperature Data: FFD8E4 (hexadecimal for –10012)
Leftmost 3 Digits and Flags
Bits
Data
Flags
x165
x164
x163
15 14 13 12
08 to 11
04 to 07
00 to 03
F
F
D
0
0
0
0
Normal
°C
Leftmost
0
F F D
Temperature
data
Flags
Rightmost 3 Digits and Flags
Bits
Data
Flags
x162
x161
x160
15 14 13 12
08 to 11
04 to 07
00 to 03
8
E
4
1
0
0
0
Normal
°C
Rightmost
8
Flags
8
E 4
Temperature
data
205
Section
Temperature Sensor Units
3-2
Example 3
Temperature:
–200.12°F
×100:
–20012
Temperature Data: FFB1D4 (hexadecimal for –20012)
Leftmost 3 Digits and Flags
Bits
Flags
x165
x164
x163
15 14 13 12
08 to 11
04 to 07
00 to 03
F
F
B
Data
0
0
0
0
Normal
°F
Leftmost
4
F F B
Temperature
data
Flags
Rightmost 3 Digits and Flags
Bits
Flags
x162
x161
x160
15 14 13 12
08 to 11
04 to 07
00 to 03
1
D
4
Data
1
0
0
0
Normal
°F
Rightmost
C 1
D 4
Temperature
data
Flags
Example 4
Temperature:
Open circuit (°F)
Temperature Data: 7FFFFFFF
Leftmost 3 Digits and Flags
Bits
Flags
x165
x164
x163
15 14 13 12
08 to 11
04 to 07
00 to 03
7
F
F
Data
0
1
1
0
Error
°F
Leftmost
6
Flags
7
F F
Temperature
data
Rightmost 3 Digits and Flags
Bits
Data
Flags
x162
x161
x160
15 14 13 12
08 to 11
04 to 07
00 to 03
F
F
F
1
1
1
0
Error
°F
Rightmost
Note
E F F F
Flags
Temperature
data
1. Leftmost digits are stored in the lower memory addresses. Treat the data in
the lower memory address as the leftmost digits when programming.
2. Be sure that the data is read at least once every 125 ms to allow for the CPU
Unit’s cycle time and communications time. Correct data may not be obtained if the read cycle is greater than 125 ms.
206
Section
Temperature Sensor Units
Programming Example
20-point CPU Unit
3-2
The following programming example shows how to use 2-decimal-place Mode
for the following PC configuration.
20-point Expansion
I/O Unit
Temperature Sensor Unit
Temperature unit setting:
OFF (°C)
Inputs
IR 000
Inputs
IR 001
Inputs
IR 002
IR 003
Outputs
IR 010
Outputs
IR 011
Outputs
None
Two-decimal-place Mode:
ON (2 digits after decimal point stored)
In this example, 100 times the temperature data for temperature input 0 is stored
in binary form in DM 0100 to DM 0102.
Temperature input 0
IR 002
Bit
IR 200
Leftmost data
Rightmost data
15 14 13 12 11 10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
DM 0100
x163
x162
x161
x160
DM 0101
x167
x166
x165
x164
Always 0
Always 0
DM 0102
Always 0
0
0
0
Temperature Unit Flag (0: °C, 1: °F)
Open-circuit Flag (0: Normal, 1: Error)
The following program would be used.
207
Section
Temperature Sensor Units
25315
(First Scan Flag)
(1)
Sets DM 0103 and DM 0102 to
#0100 and #0000, respectively.
MOV (21)
#0000
DM0102
MOV (21)
#0100
25313
(Always ON Flag)
DM0103
CMP (20)
Detects completion of input 0 initialization.
002
#7FFE
25506(=)
02000
02000
ON when input 0 has been initialized.
01000
Open-circuit alarm output
00213 (open-circuit detected)
00215 (leftmost digits)
02001
SET 02001
Ready for data conversion.
MOV (21)
(2)
Leftmost digits moved to IR 200
00215 (leftmost digits)
002
200
00215 (rightmost digits)
(3)
MOVD (83)
Leftmost and rightmost digits
rearranged and moved to
IR 202 and IR 201.
002
#0020
201
(4)
MOVD (83)
200
#0300
201
(5)
MOVD (83)
200
#0011
202
RSET 02001
RSET 02002
(continued next page.)
208
Data rearrangement completed.
3-2
Section
Temperature Sensor Units
3-2
00207 (non-negative data)
02002
BCDL (59)
201
DM0100
00207 (negative data)
(6)
If the temperature data is non-negative, the
binary data in IR 202 and IR 201 is converted
to BCD and placed in DM 0101 and DM 0100.
CLC (41)
(7)
If the temperature data is negative, the 2’s
complement data in IR 202 and IR 201 is
converted to binary data representing the
absolute value of the temperature input
and placed in HR 01 and HR 00.
SBB (51)
DM0102
201
HR00
SBB (51)
DM0103
202
HR01
BCDL (59)
HR00
DM0100
MOVD (83)
#0008
(8)
The binary data in HR 01 and HR 00 is converted to BCD and placed in DM 0101 and
DM 0100.
(9)
“1” is written to the bit in DM 0101
indicating negative data.
#0300
DM0101
RSET 02002
Note The BCDL(59) instruction is only available with the CPM2A and CPM2C.
The data movements corresponding to the numbers in the above ladder programming example are illustrated in the following diagram.
IR 002: Leftmost 3 digits of temperature data
0
165
0
165
164
IR 002: Rightmost 3 digits of temperature data
163
162
1
161
(2)
IR 200
164
160
(3)
163
(4)
(5)
IR 202
0
DM0101 0/8
(1)
DM0103
–
IR 202
HR 01
0
106 105 104
1
0
0
2’s complement data
0
164
163
161 160
3
DM0100 10
102
101 100
IR 201
(9)
If temperature data is negative, “8” is written here
(i.e., “1” is written to the bit indicating negative data).
(1) #0000
#0100
0
165 164
0
165 164
DM0102
IR 201
0
0
0
(6)
If the temperature data is non-negative, the
binary data in IR 202 and IR 201 is converted
to BCD and placed in DM 0101 and DM 0100.
(8)
If the temperature data is negative, the binary
data in HR 01 and HR 00 is converted to BCD
and placed in DM 0101 and DM 0100.
0
2’s complement data
HR 00
163
162
161 160
(7)
The 2’s complement data in IR 202 and IR 201 is subtracted, as binary data,
from the data in DM 0103 and DM 0102 and placed in HR 01 and HR 00.
209
Section
CompoBus/S I/O Link Units
3-3
3-3
CompoBus/S I/O Link Units
The CPM1A, CPM2A, or CPM2C (including the CPM2C-S) PCs can function as
Slaves to a CompoBus/S Master Unit (or SRM1 CompoBus/S Master Control
Unit) when a CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit is connected. The CompoBus/S I/O Link
Unit establishes an I/O link of 8 inputs and 8 outputs between the Master Unit
and the PC.
Note For the CPM1A, a CPM1A CPU Unit with 30 or 40 I/O points must be used to
connected the CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit. It cannot be connected to a CPM1A
CPU Unit with 10 or 20 I/O points.
CompoBus/S Master Unit
(or SRM1 CompoBus/S
Master Control Unit)
CPM1A/CPM2A CPU Unit
CPM1A-SRT21
CompoBus/S
I/O Link Unit
CPM2C
CPM2C-SRT21
or CPM2C-S CompoBus/S
CPU Unit
I/O Link Unit
Special flat cable or VCTF cable
From the standpoint of the CPU Unit, the 8 input bits and 8 output bits allocated
to the CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit are identical to input and output bits allocated to
Expansion I/O Units even though the CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit does not control
actual inputs and outputs. The input and output bits allocated to the CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit are one side of an I/O link between the slave CPU Unit and
the CPU Unit to which the Master Unit is connected.
Master PC (CS1 Series)
CPU Unit
I/O memory
Output
2000
Input
2004
Specifications
CPM1A, CPM2A, or CPM2C
CompoBus/S
Master Unit
Unit No. 0
CPU Unit with 30 I/O points
I/O memory
8 bits
8 bits
8 bits
8 bits
Node
number:
0
Input
IR 002
Output
IR 012
Item
Model number
CompoBus/S
I/O Link Unit
Specification
CPM1A or CPM2A:
CPM1A-SRT21
CPM2C or CPM2C-S :
CPM2C-SRT21
Master/slave
CompoBus/S Slave
Number of I/O points
8 input points, 8 output points
Number of words allocated
in CPU Unit I/O memory
1 input word, 1 output word
Node number setting
(Allocated in the same way as Expansion I/O Units
and other Expansion Units)
Set using the DIP switch
(Set before turning on the CPU Unit’s power supply.)
210
Section
CompoBus/S I/O Link Units
LED Indicators
Indicator
COMM
( ll )
(yellow)
ERR
( d)
(red)
Status
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
3-3
Meaning
Communications in progress.
Communications stopped or error has occurred.
A communications error has occurred.
Indicates normal communications or stand-by.
Usage Procedure
Connect the Unit.
Connect the CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit.
Determine the node address of
the CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit and
set the DIP switch.
The node number should be a unique number between 0 and 15.
Wire the CompoBus/S transmission
path.
Connect the CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit to a CompoBus/S
transmission path.
Connecting the
CompoBus/S I/O Link
Unit
Use the DIP switch to set the CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit’s node
number, communications mode, and the status of output data
when a communications error occurs.
Connect the CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit to the CPU Unit. The number of CompoBus/S I/O Link Units that can be connected depends on the PC. Three Units can
be connected to the CPM1A/CPM2A, five Units can be connected to the
CPM2C, and three Units can be connected to the CPM2C-S. When Expansion
I/O Units or other Expansion Units are also connected, they can be connected in
any order from the CPU Unit.
CPM1A/CPM2A CPU Unit
CPM1A-SRT21
CompoBus/S
I/O Link Unit
CPM2C or
CPM2C-S CompoBus/S I/O
CPU Unit Link Unit
I/O Allocation
I/O words are allocated to the CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit in the same way as
Expansion I/O Units or other Expansion Units, the next available input and output words are allocated. When “m” is the last allocated input word and “n” is the
last allocated output word, the CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit is allocated “m+1” as
its input word and “n+1” as its output word.
CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit
Word m+1
bits 00 to 07
8 inputs
8 outputs
Word n+1
bits 00 to 07
211
Section
CompoBus/S I/O Link Units
3-3
In the following example, a CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit is connected to a CPU
Unit with 30 I/O points.
IR 000
IR 001
IR 002
CPU Unit with
30 I/O points
CompoBus/S
I/O LInk Unit
IR 010
IR 011
IR 012
Input words
Output words
The input word (m+1) contains the 8 bits of data from the Master Unit and two
CompoBus/S communications flags.
15
Word m+1
09 08 07
0
0
0
0
0
00
0
Data from the Master Unit
CompoBus/S Communications Error Flag
0: Normal; 1: Error
CompoBus/S Communication Status Flag
0: Stopped; 1: Communicating
Write the data to be transmitted to the Master Unit in the output word (n+1).
15
Word n+1
0
07
0
0
0
0
0
0
00
0
Data to be transferred to the Master Unit
The 8 bits of I/O data are not always transmitted simultaneously. In other words,
8 bits of data transmitted from the Master CPU Unit at the same time will not always reach the Slave CPU Unit simultaneously, and 8 bits of data transmitted
from the Slave CPU Unit at the same time will not always reach the Master CPU
Unit simultaneously.
When the 8 bits of input data must be read together, modify the ladder program in
the CPU Unit receiving the data. For example, read the input data twice in succession and accept the data only when the two values match.
Unused bits in the CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit’s output word can be used as work
bits, but unused bits in the output slaves cannot be used as work bits.
Unused bits in input word cannot be used as work bits.
Determining the Node Number and Making DIP Switch Settings
Node Number
The CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit is a Slave Unit with 8 input bits and 8 output bits.
The node number setting is made using the DIP switch; the inputs and outputs
share the same node number.
The range of possible node number settings is determined by the type of PC the
Master Unit is mounted to and the settings on the Master Unit. For details refer to
the CompoBus/S Operation Manual.
212
Section
CompoBus/S I/O Link Units
3-3
DIP Switch Settings
Use the DIP switch to set the CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit’s node number, communications mode, and the status of output data when a communications error occurs.
CPM1A-SRT21
DIP switch
CPM2C-SRT21
Pin
labels
1, 2, 4, Node Address Setting
and 8
Pins
Contents
Address
8421
Address
Pins
8421
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
0000
0001
0010
0011
0100
0101
0110
0111
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
1000
1001
1010
1011
1100
1101
1110
1111
1 = ON, 0 = OFF
DR
HOLD
Note
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
Long-distance communications mode (See note 2.)
High-speed communications mode
Retain inputs after a communications error.
Clear inputs after a communications error.
1. Always turn OFF the power supply before changing the DIP switch settings.
2. Never touch the DIP switch when the Unit is operating. Static electricity may
cause operating errors.
213
Section
CompoBus/S I/O Link Units
3-3
3. The long-distance communications mode can be used only when one of the
following
Master
Units
is
connected:
C200HW-SRM21-V1,
CQM1-SRM21-V1, or SRM1-C0-V2.
Wiring the CompoBus/S
Communications Path
Wire the CompoBus/S communications path as shown in the following diagrams.
CPM1A-SRT21
These terminals are not used. They can
however be used as communications
power supply relay terminals.
NC (BS+)
NC (BS–)
(BS +)
(BS –)
Connect the CompoBus/S Communications Cable.
CPM2C-SRT21
From the CompoBus/S
communications path
BD L
BD H
BD H
BD H
BD L
BD L
NC
To the CompoBus/S
communications path
214
Section
DeviceNet I/O Link Unit
3-4
3-4
DeviceNet I/O Link Unit
The CPM1A or CPM2A PCs can function as slaves to a DeviceNet master when
a DeviceNet I/O Link Unit is connected. The DeviceNet I/O Link Unit establishes
an I/O link of 32 inputs and 32 outputs between the master and the PC.
A maximum of 3 DeviceNet I/O Link Units, can be connected to a CPM2A or
CPM1A to create I/O Links for up to 192 points (96 inputs and 96 outputs).
PC supporting DeviceNet master,
e.g., CS1, C200HX/HG/HE (-Z),
CVM1, CV-series, etc.
DeviceNet Master Unit
or DeviceNet Unit
DeviceNet transmission path
DeviceNet slave
DeviceNet slave
Each Unit enables remote I/O
communications for 32 input
and 32 output points as a DeviceNet slave.
CPM1A or CPM2A
CPU Unit
CPM1A-DRT21
DeviceNet I/O Link Unit
From the standpoint of the CPU Unit, the 32 input bits and 32 output bits allocated to the DeviceNet I/O Link Unit are identical to input and output bits allocated to Expansion I/O Units even though the DeviceNet I/O Link Unit does not
control external inputs and outputs. The input and output bits allocated to the
DeviceNet I/O Link Unit are one side of an I/O link between the slave CPU Unit
and the CPU Unit to which the Master Unit is connected.
Master PC (CS1 Series with fixed allocations)
CPU Unit
I/O memory
Outputs
CIO 50
CIO 51
Inputs
CIO 350
CIO 351
32 bits
32 bits
DeviceNet
Master Unit
Unit No. 0
CPM1A or CPM2A
CPU Unit with 30 I/O points
DeviceNet
I/O Link Unit
I/O memory
32 bits Inputs
IR 002
IR 003
32 bits
Output
IR 012
IR 013
Node
number:
0
Note Refer to the DeviceNet Slaves Operation Manual (W347) for details on DeviceNet networks.
215
Section
DeviceNet I/O Link Unit
Specifications
Item
3-4
Specification
Model number
CPM1A-DRT21
Master/slave
DeviceNet Slave
Number of I/O points
32 input points, 32 output points
Number of words allocated
in CPU Unit I/O memory
2 input words, 2 output words
Node number setting
(Allocated in the same way as Expansion I/O Units
and other Expansion Units)
Set using the rotary switches
(Set before turning ON the CPU Unit’s power supply.)
LED Indicators
Indicator
MS
Color
Green
Red
---
Status
Lit
Flashing
Lit
Flashing
OFF
Meaning
Normal status
Switch settings being read
Fatal hardware error (watchdog timer)
Nonfatal error: Incorrect switch settings.
Power not supplied.
Waiting for initialization to start.
NS
Green
Lit
Flashing
Red
Lit
Reset in progress.
Network normal and communications
established.
Network normal and communications not
established.
Fatal communications error: Unit has detected
network status preventing normal
communications.
Node number duplications
Bus OFF detected.
---
Flashing
Nonfatal communications error: Communications
timeout or communications error for one or more
slaves.
OFF
Waiting for node number check by master.
Switch setting error.
Power not supplied.
Handling Unit Errors
If an error occurs in the DeviceNet I/O Link Unit, the Error Flags in AR 0200 to
AR 0202 will be turned ON. The addresses of the Error Flags are in the order that
the Expansion Units are connected in the PC, with AR 0200 used for the Expansion Unit closest to the CPU Unit. Use these flags in the program when it is necessary to detect errors.
Usage Procedure
Connect the Unit.
216
Connect the DeviceNet I/O Link Unit.
The node number should be a unique number between 0 and 63.
Determine the node number of the
DeviceNet I/O Link Unit and set
the rotary switches.
Use the DIP switch to set the DeviceNet I/O Link Unit’s baud rate
and the status of output data when a communications error occurs.
Wire the DeviceNet transmission
path.
Connect the DeviceNet I/O Link Unit to a DeviceNet transmission path.
Section
DeviceNet I/O Link Unit
Connecting the
DeviceNet I/O Link Unit
3-4
Connect the DeviceNet I/O Link Unit to the CPU Unit. Up to three Units can be
connected to the CPM1A/CPM2A. When Expansion I/O Units or other Expansion Units are also connected, they can be connected in any order from the CPU
Unit.
CPM1A/CPM2A CPU Unit
CPM1A-DRT21
DeviceNet
I/O Link Unit
I/O Allocation
I/O words are allocated to the DeviceNet I/O Link Unit in the same way as Expansion I/O Units or other Expansion Units, the next available input and output
words are allocated. When “m” is the last allocated input word and “n” is the last
allocated output word, the DeviceNet I/O Link Unit is allocated “m+1” as its input
word and “n+1” as its output word.
DeviceNet I/O Link Unit
Word m+1 bits 00 to 15
Word m+2 bits 00 to 15
32 inputs
32 outputs
Word n+1 bits 00 to 15
Word n+2 bits 00 to 15
In the following example, a DeviceNet I/O Link Unit is connected to a CPU Unit
with 30 I/O points.
IR 002
IR 003
IR 000
IR 001
Input words
CPU Unit with
30 I/O points
DeviceNet I/O
LInk Unit
IR 010
IR 011
Output words
IR 012
IR 013
All of the words allocated to the DeviceNet I/O Link Unit are used to read and
write data between the CPU Unit of the DeviceNet I/O Link Unit and the CPU Unit
of the DeviceNet master, as shown in the following illustration.
DeviceNet master
I/O memory
32 bits
IR 000
IR 001
(m)
IR 002
(m+1)
IR 003
(m+2)
15 14 13 12 11 10 9
32 bits
6
5 4
3 2
1 0
Do not use.
15 14 13 12 11 10 9
IR 010
IR 011
(n)
IR 012
(n+1)
IR 013
(n+2)
8 7
8 7
6
5 4
3 2
1 0
Input bits
IR 00000 to IR 00011: 12 bits
IR 00100 to IR 00105: 6 bits
CPU Unit
IR 00200 to IR 00215: 16 bits
IR 00300 to IR 00315: 16 bits
DeviceNet I/O Link
Unit
Output bits
IR 01000 to IR 01007: 8 bits
IR 01100 to IR 01103: 4 bits
CPU Unit
IR 01200 to IR 01215: 16 bits
IR 01300 to IR 01315: 16 bits
DeviceNet I/O Link
Unit
The 32 bits each of I/O data are not always transmitted simultaneously. In other
words, 32 bits of data transmitted from the Master CPU Unit at the same time will
not always reach the Slave CPU Unit simultaneously, and 32 bits of data transmitted from the Slave CPU Unit at the same time will not always reach the Master
CPU Unit simultaneously.
217
Section
DeviceNet I/O Link Unit
3-4
When the 32 bits of input data must be read together, modify the ladder program
in the CPU Unit receiving the data. For example, read the input data twice in succession and accept the data only when the two values match.
Unused bits in the DeviceNet I/O Link Unit’s output words can be used as work
bits if they are not used for output from the slave.
Unused bits in input word cannot be used as work bits.
Determining the Node Number and Making DIP Switch Settings
Use these switches to set the node address of the Unit.
Node Address Switches
Setting method: Two-digit decimal
Setting range: 0 to 63 (Do not set 64 to 99.)
Note
DIP Switch
1. Set the rotary switches before turning ON the power supply. The switch settings are read only at startup.
2. Any node address from 0 through 63 can be set as long as it hasn’t been set
on another slave node.
3. If the node address is the same as one set on another node, a node address
duplication error will occur and it won’t be possible to start up network communications. Refer to the DeviceNet Slaves Operation Manual (W347) for
details.
The DIP switch on the front of the DeviceNet I/O Link Unit is used to set the baud
rate and whether to hold or clear the remote outputs when a communications
error occurs in the slave.
Baud rate
Not used.
Hold/clear input for communications error (when used as a slave)
The settings of the DIP switch pins are shown in the following table. All pins are
set to OFF at the factory.
1
2
3
Pin
Baud rate
Function
Setting
See the next table.
Not used
OFF
4
Hold/clear remote outputs for
communications error
OFF:
Clear remote outputs
ON:
Hold remote outputs
Baud Rate
Pins 1 and 2 are used to set the baud rate as shown in the following table.
Note
218
Pin 1
Pin 2
Baud rate
OFF
OFF
125 kbps
Max. transmission path length
(reference)
500 m
ON
OFF
250 kbps
250 m
OFF
ON
500 kbps
100 m
ON
ON
Not allowed.
---
1. Always turn OFF the PC before changing the DIP switch settings.
2. Set the same baud rate on all of the nodes (Master and Slaves) in the Network. Any slaves with baud rates different from the master’s rate won’t be
able to participate in communications and may cause a communications error between nodes that have been set properly.
Section
DeviceNet I/O Link Unit
3-4
Hold/Clear Remote Outputs
When the DeviceNet Unit is used as a slave, pin 4 is used to set whether to hold
or clear remote outputs when a communications error occurs.
Note When using AR 02 (Expansion Unit Error Flags) in the program, turn ON pin 4 on
the DIP switch. If communications are set to be cleared, the timing for clearing
outputs and setting the Error Flags may not agree.
Wire the DeviceNet communications path as shown in the following diagram.
Wiring the DeviceNet
Communications Path
CPM1A-DRT21
DeviceNet I/O Link Unit
Connector provided with Unit
(XW4B-05C1-H1-D)
Multidrop Connector
(XW4B-05C4-TF-D)
Black (+V)
Blue (CAN high)
Shield
White (CAN low)
Red (–V)
DeviceNet Connectors
Use the following connectors.
Model
Form and specifications
XW4B-05C1-H1-D
OMRON connector with screws (included with DeviceNet I/O
Link Unit).
XW4B-05C4-TF-D
OMRON connector for multidrop connections (See note.)
Note Use the XW4B-05C4-TF-D when wiring multidrop connections using
Thick Cables.
Use the following screwdriver for the above connector.
XW4Z-00C
3.5 mm
0.6 mm
219
DeviceNet I/O Link Unit
Section
3-4
I/O Response Time
Refer to the DeviceNet Slaves Operation Manual (W347) for details on the response time. The data read/write time for one cycle for the CPM1A-DRT21 is
approximately 0.5 ms. Add a maximum of 1 ms to the I/O response time.
220
SECTION 4
Communications Functions
This section describes how to use the communications functions provided in the CPM1, CPM1A, CPM2A, CPM2C (including the CPM2C-S), and SRM1(-V2) PCs.
4-1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
222
4-1-1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
222
4-1-2 Wiring Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
222
4-2 CPM1/CPM1A Communications Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
223
4-2-1 Host Link Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
223
4-2-2 One-to-one NT Link Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
224
4-2-3 One-to-one PC Link Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
225
4-3 CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
227
4-3-1 Host Link Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
227
4-3-2 No-protocol Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
247
4-3-3 One-to-one NT Link Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
256
4-3-4 One-to-one PC Link Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
259
4-4 SRM1(-V2) Communications Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
264
4-4-1 Host Link Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
264
4-4-2 No-protocol Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
268
4-4-3 One-to-one NT Link Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
273
4-4-4 One-to-N NT Link Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
274
4-4-5 One-to-one PC Link Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
275
4-5 Host Link Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
277
4-5-1 IR/SR AREA READ – RR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
277
4-5-2 LR AREA READ – RL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
278
4-5-3 HR AREA READ – RH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
278
4-5-4 PV READ – RC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
278
4-5-5 TC STATUS READ – RG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
279
4-5-6 DM AREA READ – RD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
279
4-5-7 AR AREA READ – RJ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
280
4-5-8 IR/SR AREA WRITE – WR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
281
4-5-9 LR AREA WRITE – WL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
281
4-5-10 HR AREA WRITE – WH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
282
4-5-11 PV WRITE – WC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
282
4-5-12 TC STATUS WRITE – WG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
283
4-5-13 DM AREA WRITE – WD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
284
4-5-14 AR AREA WRITE – WJ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
284
4-5-15 SV READ 1 – R# . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
285
4-5-16 SV READ 2 – R$ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
286
4-5-17 SV CHANGE 1 – W# . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
287
4-5-18 SV CHANGE 2 – W$ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
288
4-5-19 STATUS READ – MS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
289
4-5-20 STATUS WRITE – SC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
290
4-5-21 ERROR READ – MF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
291
4-5-22 FORCED SET – KS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
292
4-5-23 FORCED RESET – KR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
293
4-5-24 MULTIPLE FORCED SET/RESET – FK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
294
4-5-25 FORCED SET/RESET CANCEL – KC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
295
4-5-26 PC MODEL READ – MM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
296
4-5-27 TEST – TS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
296
4-5-28 PROGRAM READ – RP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
297
4-5-29 PROGRAM WRITE – WP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
297
4-5-30 COMPOUND COMMAND – QQ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
298
4-5-31 ABORT – XZ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
300
4-5-32 INITIALIZE – :: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
300
4-5-33 TXD RESPONSE – EX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
300
4-5-34 Undefined Command – IC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
301
221
Section
Introduction
4-1
4-1
Introduction
4-1-1 Overview
CPM1/CPM1A
Communications
The CPM1/CPM1A can execute a variety of communications through its peripheral port via an RS-232C Adapter or an RS-422 Adapter.
Host Link Communications
The CPM1/CPM1A PCs are compatible with the Host Link System, which allows
up to 32 PCs to be controlled from a host computer. An RS-232C Adapter is used
for 1:1 communications and an RS-422 Adapter and B500-AL004 Link Adapter
are used for 1:N communications.
A CPM1/CPM1A equipped with an RS-232C Adapter can also communicate
with a OMRON Programmable Terminal using host link commands.
Refer to 4-2-1 CPM1/CPM1A Host Link Communications in this manual and
1-2-2 Host Link Communications in the CPM1 Operation Manual or 1-2-2 Host
Link Communications in the CPM1A Operation Manual for more details.
One-to-one PC Link
A data link can be created with a data area in another CPM1, CPM1A, CPM2A,
CPM2C, CQM1, C200HX/HG/HE, or C200HS PC. An RS-232C Adapter is used
to make the 1:1 connection.
Refer to 4-2-3 CPM1/CPM1A 1:1 PC Link Communications in this manual and
1-2-3 One-to-one PC Communications Links in the CPM1 Operation Manual or
1-2-3 One-to-one PC Communications Links in the CPM1A Operation Manual
for more details.
One-to-one NT Link
Using the 1:1 NT Link, the CPM1/CPM1A PC can connected to the OMRON
Programmable Terminal (NT Link Interface) through an RS-232C Adapter.
Refer to 4-2-2 CPM1/CPM1A 1:1 NT Link Communications in this manual and
1-2-4 One-to-one NT Link Communications in the CPM1 Operation Manual or
NT Link Communications in the CPM1A Operation Manual for more details.
CPM2A/CPM2C
Communications
The following types of communications can be executed through the ports of the
CPM2A/CPM2C.
• Host Link communications with a host computer
• RS-232C communications with a computer or other device
• One-to-one PC Link communications with another PC
• One-to-one NT Link communications with OMRON Programmable Terminals
This section explains the required PC Setup and methods for using these types
of communications.
SRM1(-V2) Communications
The following types of communications can be executed through the ports of the
SRM1(-V2).
• Host Link communications with a host computer
• RS-232C communications with a computer or other device
• One-to-one PC Link communications with another PC
• One-to-one NT Link communications with OMRON Programmable Terminals
Note One-to-one NT Link communications are not possible with the SRM1-C01,
which is equipped with only a peripheral port. The SRM1-C01 may be connected
to a PT through an RS-232C Adapter in Host Link mode.
4-1-2 Wiring Ports
Refer to the CPM1 Operation Manual, CPM1A Operation Manual, CPM2A Operation Manual, CPM2C Operation Manual, or SRM1 Master Control Units Operation Manual for information on wiring the communications ports.
222
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Communications Functions
4-2
4-2
CPM1/CPM1A Communications Functions
4-2-1 Host Link Communications
Host Link communications were developed by OMRON for the purpose of connecting PCs and one or more host computers by RS-232C cable, and controlling
PC communications from the host computer. Normally the host computer issues
a command to a PC, and the PC automatically sends back a response. Thus the
communications are carried out without the PCs being actively involved. The
PCs also have the ability to initiate data transmissions when direct involvement
is necessary.
In general, there are two means for implementing Host Link communications.
One is based on C-mode commands, and the other on FINS (CV-mode) commands. The CPM1/CPM1A supports C-mode commands only. For details on
Host Link communications, refer to 4-5 Host Link Commands.
PC Setup Settings
Word
Bit
DM 6650 00 to 07
The CPM1/CPM1A’s peripheral port settings must be set properly in order to use
the Host Link communications, as shown in the following table.
Function
Setting
Port settings1
00: Standard (1 start bit, 7-bit data, 2 stop bits, even parity, 9,600 bps)
01: Settings in DM 6651
00
08 to 11
Link area for 1:1 PC Link via peripheral port
0: LR 00 to LR 15
0
(Any value is OK)
12 to 15
Communications mode1
0: Host Link; 2: 1:1 PC Link Slave; 3: 1:1 PC Link Master; 4: 1:1 NT Link
Baud rate1
00: 1.2K, 01: 2.4K, 02: 4.8K, 03: 9.6K, 04: 19.2K
0
Frame format1
Start
Length
00:
1 bit
7 bits
01:
1 bit
7 bits
02:
1 bit
7 bits
03:
1 bit
7 bits
04:
1 bit
7 bits
05:
1 bit
7 bits
06:
1 bit
8 bits
07:
1 bit
8 bits
08:
1 bit
8 bits
09:
1 bit
8 bits
10:
1 bit
8 bits
11:
1 bit
8 bits
Transmission delay (Host Link)1
0000 to 9999: In ms.
Node number (Host Link)1
00 to 31 (BCD)
Not used.
00
(Any value is OK)
DM 6651 00 to 07
08 to 15
DM 6652 00 to 15
DM 6653 00 to 07
08 to 15
Note
Stop
1 bit
1 bit
1 bit
2 bit
2 bit
2 bit
1 bit
1 bit
1 bit
2 bit
2 bit
2 bit
Parity
Even
Odd
None
Even
Odd
None
Even
Odd
None
Even
Odd
None
00
(Any value is OK)
0000
00 to 31
00
(Any value is OK)
1. If an improper setting is used, a non-fatal error will occur, AR 1302 will be
turned ON, and the default setting (0, 00, or 0000) will be used.
2. For information on the Host Link settings for another OMRON PC, refer to
that PC’s Operation Manual.
223
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Communications Functions
4-2
3. If an out-of-range value is set, the following communications conditions will
result. In that case, reset the value so that it is within the permissible range.
Example Program
Communications mode:
Host Link
Communications format:
Standard settings
(1 start bit, 7-bit data; 2 stop bits, even parity,
9,600 bps)
Transmission delay:
No
Node number:
00
This example shows a BASIC program that reads the status of the CPM1’s inputs in IR 000. For more details, refer to 4-5 Host Link Commands.
An FCS (frame check sequence) check isn’t performed on the received response data in this program. Be sure that the host computer’s RS-232C port is
configured correctly before executing the program.
1010
1020
1030
1040
1050
1060
1070
1080
1090
1100
1110
1120
1130
1140
1150
1160
1170
1180
’CPM1 SAMPLE PROGRAM
’SET THE COMMAND DATA
S$=”@00RR00000001”
FCS=0
FOR I=1 TO LEN(S$)
FCS=FCS XOR ASC(MID$(S$,I,1))
NEXT I
FCS$=(FCS):IF LEN(FCS$)=1 THEN FCS$=”0”+FCS$
CLOSE 1
CLS
PRINT ”SENDING COMMAND”
OPEN ”COM:E73” AS #1
PRINT #1,S$ + FCS + CHR$(13);
CLS
PRINT ”RECEIVING RESPONSE DATA”
LINE INPUT #1,A$
PRINT A$
END
4-2-2 One-to-one NT Link Communications
Using the 1:1 NT Link, the CPM1/CPM1A PC can connected to the Programmable Terminal (NT Link Interface) through an RS-232C Adapter.
CPM1 PCs
RS-232C Adapter
OMRON Programmable Terminal
CPM1 CPU Unit
CPM1 CPU
RS-232C Cable
224
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Communications Functions
4-2
CPM1A PCs
RS-232C
Adapter
OMRON Programmable Terminal
CPM1A CPU Unit
RS-232C Cable
PC Setup Settings
Word
Bit
DM 6650 00 to 07
The settings relating to 1:1 NT Link PC communications must be set as shown in
the following table.
Function
settings1
Setting
Port
00: Standard (1 start bit, 7-bit data, 2 stop bits, even parity, 9,600 bps)
01: Settings in DM 6651
00
(Any value is OK)
08 to 11
Link area for 1:1 PC Link via peripheral port
0: LR 00 to LR 15
0
(Any value is OK)
12 to 15
Communications mode1
0: Host Link; 2: 1:1 PC Link Slave; 3: 1:1 PC Link Master; 4: 1:1 NT Link
4
Note
1. If an improper setting is used, a non-fatal error will occur, AR 1302 will be
turned ON, and the default setting (0 or 00) will be used.
2. For information on the NT Link settings for another OMRON PC, refer to that
PC’s Operation Manual.
3. If an out-of-range value is set, the following communications conditions will
result. In that case, reset the value so that it is within the permissible range.
Communications mode:
Host Link
Communications format: Standard settings
(1 start bit, 7-bit data; 2 stop bits, even parity,
9,600 bps)
Transmission delay:
No
Node number:
00
4-2-3 One-to-one PC Link Communications
In a 1:1 PC Link, a CPM1/CPM1A is linked to another CPM1/CPM1A, CPM2A/
CPM2C, CQM1, C200HX/HG/HE, or C200HS PC through an RS-232C Adapter
and standard RS-232C cable. One of the PCs will serve as the Master and the
other as the Slave. The 1:1 PC Link can connect up to 256 bits (LR 0000 to LR
1515) in the two PCs.
225
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Communications Functions
CPM1/CPM1A One-to-one
PC Links
4-2
The following diagram shows a 1:1 PC Link between two CPM1s PCs. Refer to
the CPM1A Operation Manual for the corresponding information on the CPM1A.
RS-232C Cable
RS-232C Adapter
RS-232C Adapter
CPM1 CPU Unit
CPM1 CPU Unit
The words used for the 1:1 PC Link are as shown below.
LR00
Write data
Read data
Master
Slave
Area for writing
LR07
LR08
LR00
Read data
Area for reading
Area for reading
Area for writing
LR15
LR07
LR08
Write data
LR15
Limitations of 1:1 PC Links
with a CPM1/CPM1A
Only the 16 LR words from LR 00 to LR 15 can be linked in the CPM1/CPM1A, so
use only those 16 words in the CQM1 or C200HS when making a 1:1 PC Link
with one of those PCs. A 1:1 PC Link cannot be made to a CPM1/CPM1A PC
using LR 16 through LR 63 in the CQM1, C200HX/HG/HE, or C200HS.
PC Setup Settings
The settings relating to 1:1 PC Link communications must be set as shown in the
following table.
Word
Bit
DM 6650 00 to 07
Function
Port settings1
00: Standard (1 start bit, 7-bit data, 2 stop bits, even parity, 9,600 bps)
01: Settings in DM 6651
Setting
(Slave)
00
(Any value is OK)
08 to 11
Link area for 1:1 PC Link via peripheral port
0: LR 00 to LR 15
0
0
(Any value is OK)
12 to 15
Communications mode1
0: Host Link; 2: 1:1 PC Link Slave; 3: 1:1 PC Link Master; 4: 1:1 NT Link
3
2
Note
226
Setting
(Master)
00
(Any value is OK)
1. If an improper setting is used, a non-fatal error will occur, AR 1302 will be
turned ON, and the default setting (0 or 00) will be used.
2. For information on the 1:1 PC Link settings for another OMRON PC, refer to
that PC’s Operation Manual.
3. For information on CPM1/CPM1A 1:1 PC Link connections and wiring diagrams refer to 3-4-7 Host Link Connections in the CPM1 Operation Manual
or CPM1A Operation Manual. For the SRM1(-V2) refer to 3-4-4 RS-232C
Port Wiring in the SRM1 Master Control Unit Operation Manual.
4. If an out-of-range value is set, the following communications conditions will
result. In that case, reset the value so that it is within the permissible range.
Communications mode:
Host Link
Communications format: Standard settings
(1 start bit, 7-bit data; 2 stop bits, even parity,
9,600 bps)
Transmission delay:
No
Node number:
00
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
Example Program
This example shows ladder programs that copy the status of IR 000 in each
CPM1/CPM1A to SR 200 in the other CPM1/CPM1A.
Program in the Master
Program in the Slave
25313 (Always ON)
25313 (Always ON)
MOV(21)
MOV(21)
000
000
LR00
LR08
MOV(21)
MOV(21)
LR08
LR00
200
200
LR00
IR 000
SR 200
Write
Read
LR00
Writing area
LR07
LR08
Reading area
Reading area
Writing area
LR15
4-3
4-3
Read
SR 200
Write
IR 000
LR07
LR08
LR15
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
This section describes how to use CPM2A/CPM2C (including the CPM2C-S)
communications functions. Read this section if you are using Host Link, no-protocol, 1:1 NT Link, or 1:1 PC Link communications.
4-3-1 Host Link Communications
Host Link communications are a conversational-type communications protocol,
in which the PC sends responses to commands issued from a host computer
and can be used to read or write data in the PC’s data areas and control some PC
operations. There is no need for a communications program in the PC. Host Link
communications can be used through the peripheral port or the CPM2A/
CPM2C’s RS-232C port.
CPM2A
Commands
Host computer
Responses
227
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
CPM2A One-to-one Communications
CPM2A RS-232C port connection
(See note.)
Commands
Responses
Responses
Commands
OMRON Programmable
Terminal
CPM2A RS-232C port connection
(See note.)
Note When connecting to the peripheral port, an RS-232C Adapter or computer
connection cable (CQM1-CIF01 or CQM1-CIF02) is necessary.
228
4-3
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
4-3
CPM2C One-to-one Communications
Connecting Cable
RS-232C port (D-sub 9-pin)
CPM2C CPU Unit
XW2Z-200S-V (2 m)
XW2Z-500S-V (5 m)
CPM2C-CN111 (0.15 m)
IBM PC/AT
or compatible
CS1W-CN118 (0.1 m)
CPM2C
CPU Unit
CPM2C-CIF01
CPM2C
CPU Unit
CPM2C-CIF11
CPM2C
CPU Unit
CPM2C-CIF21
Note The CSW1-CN226/626 can be connected directly to the CPU Unit. They cannot
be connected to the CPM2C-CIF01.
229
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
Responses
IBM PC/AT
or compatible
Commands
CPM2A 1:N Communications
CPM2A RS-232C
port connection
NT-AL001 RS-232C/RS-422
Conversion Adapter
230
B500-AL004
Link Adapter
CPM2A peripheral
port connection
CPM1-CIF01 RS-422 Adapter
4-3
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
4-3
CPM2C 1:N Communications
IBM PC/AT or
compatible
computer
Connecting Cable
XW2Z-200S-V (2 m)
XW2Z-500S-V (5 m)
B500-AL004 or NT-AL001 (requires +5 V)
(See notes 1 and 2.)
RS-422 (Total length: 500 m max.)
When using the port
as a peripheral port
CPM2C
CPU Unit
CPM2-CIF11
When using
the port as
an RS-232C
port
NT-AL001
(See note 1.)
RS-232C port
CPM2C
CPU Unit
CPM2C
CPU Unit
CPM2C
CPU Unit
CPM2-CIF11
NT-AL001
(See note 1.)
XW2Z-070T-1 (0.7 m)
XW2Z-200T-1 (2 m)
CPM2C
CPU Unit
CPM2C
CPU Unit
CPM2-CIF11
NT-AL001
(See note 1.)
NT-AL001
(See note 1.)
XW2Z-070T-1 (0.7 m)
XW2Z-200T-1 (2 m)
XW2Z-070T-1 (0.7 m)
XW2Z-200T-1 (2 m)
RS-232C port
CPM2C-CN111
Connecting Cable
(0.15 m)
XW2Z-070T-1 (0.7 m)
XW2Z-200T-1 (2 m)
CPM2C
CPU Unit
RS-232C port
CSW1-CN118 Connecting Cable (0.1 m)
CPM2C-CIF01
CPM2C-CIF21
Up to 32 PCs
231
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
4-3
Frame Transmission and Reception
In Host Link communications, the host computer ordinarily has the transmission
right first and initiates the communications. The CPM2A/CPM2C then automatically sends a response.
Commands and responses are exchanged in the order shown in the illustration
below. The block of data transferred in a single transmission is called a “frame.”
A single frame is configured of a maximum of 131 characters of data. The right to
send a frame is called the “transmission right.” The Unit that has the transmission right is the one that can send a frame at any given time. The transmission
right is traded back and forth between the host computer and the CPM2A/
CPM2C each time a frame is transmitted. The transmission right is passed from
the transmitting Unit to the receiving Unit when either a terminator (the code that
marks the end of a command or response) or a delimiter (the code that sets
frames apart) is received.
Frame (command)
Frame (command)
Host
computer
Unit no.
Header code
Unit no.
Header code
Text
Text
FCS
Terminator
FCS
Terminator
Next frame transmission
enabled (i.e., transmission
right transferred)
Unit no.
Header code
End code
Unit no.
Header code
End code
Text
Text
FCS
Terminator
FCS
Terminator
Frame (response)
Frame (response)
CPM2A/CPM2C
Slave-initiated
Communications
Data transmissions from the PC to the host computer can be initiated by the CPU
Unit using TXD(48).
Host
computer
There is no response
from the host computer
Unit no.
Header code
CPM2A/CPM2C
Text
FCS
Terminator
Frame (response)
232
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
4-3
Command and Response Formats
This section explains the formats for the commands and responses that are exchanged in Host Link communications.
When transmitting a command from the host computer, prepare the command
data in the format shown below.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node No.
*
Header
code
Text
FCS
↵
Terminator
@
An “@” symbol must be placed at the beginning.
Node No.
Identifies the CPM2A/CPM2C PC communicating with the host computer.
Specify the CPM2A/CPM2C’s node number in the PC Setup (DM 6648,
DM 6653).
Header Code
Set the 2-character command code.
Text
Set the command parameters.
FCS
Set a 2-character Frame Check Sequence code. See page 235.
Terminator
Set two characters, “*” and the carriage return (CHR$(13)) to indicate the end of
the command.
The response from the CPM2A/CPM2C is returned in the format shown below.
Prepare a program so that the response data can be interpreted and processed.
Response Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node No.
x 161 x 160
Header
code
End code
*
Text
FCS
↵
Terminator
@, Node No., Header Code
Contents identical to those of the command are returned.
End Code
The completion status of the command (e.g., whether or not an error has occurred) is returned.
Text
Text is returned only when there is data such as read data.
FCS
The set 2-character Frame Check Sequence is returned.
Terminator
Set two characters, “*” and the carriage return (CHR$(13)) to indicate the end of
the response.
Long Transmissions
The largest block of data that can be transmitted as a single frame is 131 characters. A command or response of 132 characters or more must therefore be divided into more than one frame before transmission. When a transmission is
split, the ends of the first and intermediate frames are marked by a delimiter
instead of a terminator.
233
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
Dividing Commands
4-3
As each frame is transmitted by the host computer, the computer waits for the
delimiter to be transmitted from the CPM2A/CPM2C. After the delimiter has
been transmitted, the next frame will then be sent. This procedure is repeated
until the entire command has been transmitted.
Frame 2 (command)
Frame 1 (command)
Frame 3 (command)
Unit no.
Header code
Host
computer
Text
Text
Text
FCS
Delimiter
FCS
Delimiter
FCS
Terminator
Delimiter
CPM2A/CPM2C
Delimiter
Unit no.
Header code
End code
Text
FCS
Terminator
Frame (response)
Dividing Responses
As each frame is received by the host computer, a delimiter is transmitted to the
CPM2A/CPM2C. After the delimiter has been transmitted, the CPM2A/CPM2C
will transmit the next frame. This procedure is repeated until the entire response
has been transmitted.
Frame (command)
Unit no.
Header code
Host
computer
Text
FCS
Terminator
Delimiter
Unit no.
Header code
End code
CPM2A/CPM2C
Text
FCS
Delimiter
Frame1 (response)
234
Delimiter
Text
Text
FCS
Delimiter
FCS
Terminator
Frame2 (response)
Frame3 (response)
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
Precautions for Long
Transmissions
Frame 1
@
4-3
When dividing commands such as WR, WL, WC, or WD that execute write operations, be careful not to divide into separate frames data that is to be written
into a single word. As shown in the illustration below, be sure to divide frames so
that they coincide with the divisions between words.
(131 characters maximum)
0
0
x101 x100
W
Node
No.
↵
Data
D
Header
code
FCS
One word of data
Delimiter
Data from the same word is not divided.
Frame 2 (128 characters maximum)
Data
↵
*
One word of data
Terminator
FCS
Data from the same word is not divided.
FCS (Frame Check Sequence)
When a frame is transmitted, an FCS is placed just before the delimiter or terminator in order to check whether any data error has been generated. The FCS is
8-bit data converted into two ASCII characters. The 8-bit data is the result of an
EXCLUSIVE OR performed on the data from the beginning of the frame until the
end of the text in that frame (i.e., just before the FCS). Calculating the FCS each
time a frame is received and checking the result against the FCS that is included
in the frame makes it possible to check for data errors in the frame.
@
1
0
R
R
0
0
0
Node No. Header code
Text
1
4
2
FCS
*
↵
Terminator
FCS calculation range
ASCII code
@
1
0
R
0
0
→
→
→
→
→
→
40
31
30
52
30
30
→
→
→
→
→
→
Leftmost
Rightmost
0100
0000
XOR
0011
0001
XOR
0011
0000
XOR
0101
0010
XOR
0011
0000
XOR
0011
0000
XOR
to
0
→
1
→
Calculation results
30
31
→
→
0011
0000
XOR
0011
0100
↓
↓
4
2
0001
0010
Converted to hexadecimal.
Handled as ASCII characters.
235
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
Section
4-3
This example shows a BASIC subroutine program for executing an FCS check
on a frame received by the host computer.
Normal reception data includes the FCS, delimiter or terminator, and so on.
When an error occurs in transmission, however the FCS or some other data may
not be included. Be sure to program the system to cover this possibility.
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
400 *FCSCHECK
410 L = LEN ( RESPONSE$ ) ’ . ........................ Data transmitted and received
420 Q = 0 : FCSCK$ = ” ”
430 A$ = RIGHT$ ( RESPONSE$ , 1)
440 PRINT RESPONSE$ , A$ , L
450 IF A$ = ”*” THEN LENGS = LEN ( RESPONSE$ ) – 3
ELSE LENGS = LEN ( RESPONSE$ ) – 2
460 FCSP$ = MID$ ( RESPONSE$ , LENGS + 1 , 2 ) ’ . ......... FCS data received
470 FOR I = 1 TO LENGS ’ . ........................ Number of characters in FCS
480
Q = ASC ( MID$ ( RESPONSE$ , I , 1 ) ) XOR Q
490 NEXT I
500 FCSD$ = HEX$ ( Q )
510 IF LEN ( FCS0$ ) = 1 THEN FCSD$ = ” 0 ” + FCSD$ ’ . ........ FCS result
520 IF FCSD$ < > FCSP$ THEN FCSCK$ = ” ERR ”
530 PRINT ” FCSD$ = ” ; FCSD$ , ” FCSP$ = ” ; FCSP$ , ” FCSCK$ = ” ; FCSCK$
540 RETURN
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Example Program for
FCS
236
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
4-3
Commands
Header
d
code
CPM2A/CPM2C Operating Mode
Name
Page
g
RR
RUN
Valid
MONITOR
Valid
PROGRAM
Valid
IR/WR/SR AREA READ
277
RL
Valid
Valid
Valid
LR AREA READ
278
RH
Valid
Valid
Valid
HR AREA READ
278
RC
Valid
Valid
Valid
TC PV READ
278
RG
Valid
Valid
Valid
TC STATUS READ
279
RD
Valid
Valid
Valid
DM AREA READ
279
RJ
Valid
Valid
Valid
AR AREA READ
280
WR
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
IR/WR/SR AREA WRITE
281
WL
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
LR AREA WRITE
281
WH
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
HR AREA WRITE
282
WC
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
TC PV WRITE
282
WG
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
TC STATUS WRITE
283
WD
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
DM AREA WRITE
284
WJ
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
AR AREA WRITE
284
R#
Valid
Valid
Valid
SV READ 1
285
R$
Valid
Valid
Valid
SV READ 2
286
W#
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
SV CHANGE 1
287
W$
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
SV CHANGE 2
288
MS
Valid
Valid
Valid
STATUS READ
289
SC
Valid
Valid
Valid
STATUS WRITE
290
MF
Valid
Valid
Valid
ERROR READ
291
KS
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
FORCED SET
292
KR
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
FORCED RESET
293
FK
Not Valid
Valid
Valid
MULTIPLE FORCED SET/RESET
294
KC
Valid
Valid
Valid
FORCED SET/RESET CANCEL
295
MM
Valid
Valid
Valid
PC MODEL READ
296
TS
Valid
Valid
Valid
TEST
296
RP
Valid
Valid
Valid
PROGRAM READ
297
WP
Not Valid
Not Valid
Valid
PROGRAM WRITE
297
QQ
Valid
Valid
Valid
COMPOUND COMMAND
298
XZ
Valid
Valid
Valid
ABORT (command only)
300
**
Valid
Valid
Valid
INITIALIZE (command only)
300
EX
Valid
Valid
Not Valid
TXD RESPONSE (response only)
300
IC
---
---
---
Undefined command (response only)
301
Note ---: Not affected by the mode.
237
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
4-3
Response Codes
End
code
00
Normal completion
---
01
Not executable in RUN mode
The command that was sent cannot be executed when the PC is in
RUN mode.
02
Not executable in MONITOR mode
The command that was sent cannot be executed when the PC is in
MONITOR mode.
04
Address over
Check the program.
0B
Not executable in PROGRAM
mode
The user program area’s highest
address was exceeded.
The command that was sent cannot be executed when the PC is in
PROGRAM mode.
13
FCS error
The FCS is wrong. Either the FCS
calculation is mistaken or there is
adverse influence from noise.
Check the FCS calculation method.
If there was influence from noise,
transfer the command again.
14
Format error
The command format is wrong.
15
Entry number data error
16
Command not supported
The read/write area specification is
wrong.
The specified command does not
exist in the specified address.
(Reading the SV, etc.)
Check the format and transfer the
command again.
Correct the areas and transfer the
command again.
Check the address and instruction.
18
Frame length error
19
Not executable
23
User memory write-protected
A3
Aborted due to FCS error in transmit data
Aborted due to format error in
transmit data
Aborted due to entry number data
error in transmit data
Aborted due to frame length error
in transmit data
---
A4
A5
A8
Other
Contents
Probable cause
The maximum frame length was
exceeded.
Items to read not registered for
composite command (QQ).
The memory is write-protected in
the PC Setup.
The error was generated while a
command
extending
over
co
de
e d go
e more
oe
than one fframe was being
executed.
Corrective measures
--Check the relation between the
command and the PC mode.
This code is not presently being
used.
Divide the command into multiple
frames.
Execute QQ to register items to
read before attempting batch read.
Change the setting in the PC Setup
(DM 6602).
Check for corrupted frames, correct
if necessary,
ecess y, and
d tryy the
e transfer
se
again.
Note: The data up to that point has
y been written to the apalready
propri te area
propriate
re of the CPU Unit.
U it
Influence from noise was received.
Transfer the command again.
Application Procedure
Setting the CPU Unit’s
communications switch
Connecting the cables
Commands issued from the host
computer.
238
Set the CPM2A CPU Unit’s communications switch
or the CPM2C CPU Unit’s DIP switch.
Make the 1:1 or 1:N connection.
Ladder program
(Communications initiated by
CPM2A/CPM2C)
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
Communications Switch
Setting
4-3
The CPM2A’s communications are controlled by the communications switch on
the front of the CPU Unit and the CPM2C’s communications are controlled by
the DIP switch on the front of the CPU Unit.
CPM2A Communications Switch Setting
When the communications switch is set to OFF, communications through the peripheral port and RS-232C port are governed by the settings in the PC Setup.
When the communications switch is set to ON, communications through the peripheral port and RS-232C port are governed by the standard Host Link settings
(1 start bit, 7 data bits, 2 stop bits, even parity, and 9,600 bps baud rate).
Note When a Programming Console is connected to the peripheral port, communications with the Programming Console are unaffected by either the communications switch or PC Setup.
Communications switch
Peripheral port
RS-232C port
An RS-232C Adapter is needed to perform Host Link communications from a
peripheral port.
239
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
4-3
CPM2C DIP Switch Settings
When SW2 is set to OFF, communications through the peripheral port are set to
Programming Console protocol, regardless of the setting of pin 1 or the settings
in the PC Setup.
Front View
CPU Unit with Relay Outputs via Terminal Block
CPU Unit with Transistor Outputs
via Fujitsu-compatible Connector
4. Status indicators
6. Output indicators
7. Communications port
5. Input indicators
DIP switch for Units
with 10/20 I/O points
8. Communications switch
9. Customize switch
2. Input terminals
3. Output terminals
2. Input connector
(8)
3. Output connector
(9)
CPU Unit with Transistor Outputs
via MIL Connector
4. Status indicators
7. Communications port
6. Output indicators
5. Input indicators
8. Communications switch
9. Customize switch
DIP switch for Units
with 32 I/O points
(8)
2. Input connector
3. Output connector
(9)
When SW 2 is set to ON, the status of SW 1 determines whether communications through the peripheral port and RS-232C port are governed by the settings
in the PC Setup or the standard settings (1 start bit, 7 data bits, 2 stop bits, even
parity, and 9,600 bps baud rate).
SW1
OFF
ON
Communications settings
The communications settings for the peripheral port and RS-232C
port will be determined by the settings in the PC Setup (DM 6645 to
DM 6649, DM 6650 to DM 6654). If a Programming Console is
connected to the peripheral port, however, operation for that port will
be in the Programming Console mode.
The communications settings for the peripheral port and RS-232C
port will be the standard settings. If a Programming Console is
connected to the peripheral port, however, operation for that port will
be in the Programming Console mode.
An RS-232C Adapter is needed to perform Host Link communications from a
peripheral port.
Note When performing host link communications via the peripheral port of a CPU Unit
with a manufacturing number of 3180O or earlier (i.e., manufactured on or
before April 31, 2000), set SW2 to ON. See above for details of the settings of
SW2. When using a CPU Unit with a manufacturing number of 3180O or earlier
(i.e., manufactured on or before April 31, 2000), do not change the setting of
SW2 with a Programming Console, the CPM2C-CIF01/11, or the
CQM1-CIF01/02 connected. If the setting of SW2 is changed in this state, communications will be interrupted, and a communications error will be generated or
the Programming Console will enter a “no-response” state (i.e., pressing the
keys of the Programming Console will have no effect and the display will stay the
same).
240
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
Connecting the Cables
4-3
This section describes RS-232C connections.
One-to-one Connections
The RS-232C port on the Host Link computer and the RS-232C port on the
CPM2A/CPM2C or CPM1-CIF01 RS-232C Adapter are connected as shown in
the following diagram when there is no CTS control on the RS-232C port. With
the CPM2C, the CPM2C-CN111 and CS1W-CN118 connecting cables can be
used in place of the RS-232C Adapter.
IBM PC/AT or compatible
Signal
Pin No.
RS-232C port
Signal
Pin No.
Hood
One-to-N Connections
Set the DIP switch on the NT-AL001 RS-232C/RS-422 Conversion Adapter.
Normally ON
ON when the Unit is at the end of the transmission path. OFF in all other cases.
Used as a 4-conductor method. (Both switches set to OFF)
According to RS-232C CTS control (5: OFF, 6: ON)
The RS-232C port with the NT-AL001 RS-232C/RS-422 Conversion Adapter
and the RS-232C port of the CPM2A/CPM2C or CPM1-CIF01 RS-232C Adapter
are connected as shown in the following diagram when there is no CTS control
on the RS-232C port. A power supply of 5 VDC is supplied to the
RS-232C/RS-422 Conversion Adapter. With the CPM2C, the CPM2C-CN111
and CS1W-CN118 connecting cables can be used in place of the RS-232C
Adapter.
NT-AL001 RS-232C/RS-422
Conversion Adapter
Signal
Pin No.
RS-232C port
Signal Pin No.
Hood
Note Do not connect external devices other than the NT-AL001 Conversion Adapter
to the 5 VDC power supply of pin number 6 on the CPM2A/CPM2C’s RS-232C
port. Doing so may result in damage to the CPM2A/CPM2C or to the external
device.
241
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
PC Setup
4-3
The PC Setup settings that are required depend on whether a peripheral port or
an RS-232C port is used.
Settings for RS-232C Port
Note If SW1 on the front panel of the CPU Unit is ON, the RS-232C port will operate
with the default settings regardless of the settings in DM 6645 to DM 6649.
Word
DM 6645
Bit
00 to 03
Function
Port settings
0: Standard (1 start bit, 7-bit data, 2 stop bits, even parity, 9,600 bps; Host
Link unit number: 0)
Setting
Match host
parameters
1: Settings in DM 6646
04 to 07
08 to 11
12 to 15
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting will be used,
and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
CTS control settings
0: Disable; 1: Set
Link words for 1:1 PC Link
0: LR 00 to LR 15; Other: Not effective
Communications mode
0: Host Link (default setting); 1: RS-232C (no-protocol); 2: 1:1 PC Link Slave;
3: 1:1 PC Link Master; 4: 1:1 NT Link
0 or 1
Any
0
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the Host Link setting will be used,
and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
DM 6646
00 to 07
08 to 15
DM 6647
00 to 15
Baud rate:
00: 1,200 bps 01: 2,400 bps 02: 4,800 bps 03: 9,600 bps 04: 19,200 bps
Frame format
Start Length Stop Parity
00:
1
7
1
Even
01:
1
7
1
Odd
02:
1
7
1
None
03:
1
7
2
Even
04:
1
7
2
Odd
05:
1
7
2
None
06:
1
8
1
Even
07:
1
8
1
Odd
08:
1
8
1
None
09:
1
8
2
Even
10:
1
8
2
Odd
11:
1
8
2
None
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default settings (03) will be
used, and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
Transmission delay (Host Link)
0000 to 9999 (BCD): Set in units of 10 ms, e.g., setting of 0001 equals 10 ms
Match host
parameters
0000 to 9999
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (0000) will be
used, and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
DM 6648
00 to 07
08 to 11
12 to 15
00 to 31 (BCD): Node number (Host Link)
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (00) will be
used, and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
Start code enable (RS-232C)
0: Disable; 1: Use start code in DM 6649.
End code enable (RS-232C)
0: Disable (number of bytes received)
1: Use end code in DM 6649.
2: CR, LF
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the disable setting will be used,
and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
242
00 to 31
Any
Any
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
Word
DM 6649
Bit
00 to 07
00 to 15
Function
Start code (01 to FF)
(No-protocol, effective when bits 8 to 11 of DM 6648 are set to 1.)
No. of bytes of data received
(No-protocol, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM 6648 are set to 0.)
00: 256 bytes
01 to FF: 1 to 255 bytes
End code (00 to FF)
(No-protocol, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM 6648 are set to 1.)
4-3
Setting
Any
Any
Settings for Peripheral Port
Word
DM 6650
Bit
00 to 03
Function
Port settings
0: Standard (1 start bit, 7-bit data, 2 stop bits, even parity, 9,600 bps; Host
Link unit number: 0)
Setting
Match host
parameters
1: Settings in DM 6651
04 to 11
12 to 15
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (0) will be
used, and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
Not used
Communications mode
0: Host Link or peripheral bus; 1: No-protocol
0
0
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the Host Link setting (0) will be
used, and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
DM 6651
00 to 07
Baud rate
00: 1,200 bps, 01: 2,400 bps, 02: 4,800 bps, 03: 9,600 bps, 04: 19,200 bps
08 to 15
Match host
parameters
Frame format
00:
01:
02:
03:
04:
05:
06:
07:
08:
09:
10:
11:
Start
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Length Stop
7
1
7
1
7
1
7
2
7
2
7
2
8
1
8
1
8
1
8
2
8
2
8
2
Parity
Even
Odd
None
Even
Odd
None
Even
Odd
None
Even
Odd
None
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default settings (03) will be
used, and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
DM 6652
00 to 15
Transmission delay (Host Link)
0000 to 9999 (BCD): Set in units of 10 ms.
0000 to 9999
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (0000) will be
used, and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
Note
1. If SW1 on the front panel of the CPU Unit is ON, the peripheral port will operate with the default settings regardless of the settings in DM 6645 to
DM 6649.
2. When connecting a computer running Support Software via the peripheral
bus, turn OFF SW1 on the front panel of the CPU Unit and set DM 6650 to
0001 (Host Link). The CPU Unit will automatically switch to peripheral bus
communications for the serial communications port.
243
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
Word
DM 6653
Bit
00 to 07
Function
Node number (Host Link)
00 to 31 (BCD)
Setting
00 to 31
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (03) will be
used, and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
08 to 11
Start code enable (Peripheral port)
0: Disable
1: Use start code in DM 6654.
Any
12 to 15
End code enable (Peripheral port)
0: Disable (number of bytes received)
1: Use end code in DM 6654.
2: CR, LF
Any
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the disable setting (0) will be
used, and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
DM 6654
244
00 to 07
Start code
(Peripheral port, effective when bits 08 to 11 of DM 6653 are set to 1.)
01 to FF (Hex)
Any
08 to 15
No. of bytes of data received
(Peripheral port, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM 6653 are set to 0.)
00: 256 bytes
01 to FF: 1 to 255 bytes
End code (00 to FF)
(Peripheral port, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM 6653 are set to 1.)
Any
4-3
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
Section
4-3
This example shows a BASIC program that reads the status of the CPM2A/
CPM2C’s inputs in IR 000. For more details see 4-5 Host Link Commands.
An FCS (frame check sequence) check isn’t performed on the received response data in this program.
Be sure that the host computer’s RS-232C port is configured correctly before
executing the program.
1000 ’ ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
1010 ’ CPM2A/CPM2C Sample Program for BASIC
1020 ’
1050 ’ ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
1060 ’ –––Set value RS–232C SPEED:9600BPS,PARITY:EVEN,DATA:7,STOP:2–––
1070 OPEN ”COM:E73” AS #1
1080 *REPEAT
1090 –––Transmission data input–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
1100 INPUT ” send data : ”,send$
1110 ’ –––FCS Calculation–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
1120 FCS=0
1130 FOR IFCS = 1 TO LEN ( send$ )
1140
FCS = FCS XOR ASC( MID$ ( SEND$ , IFCS , 1 ) )
1150 NEXT
1160 FCS$ = RIGHT$ ( ”0” + HEX$ ( FCS ) , 2 )
1170 ’ –––Communications execute–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
1180 ZZZ$ = SEND$ + SCS$ + ”*” + CHR$(13)
1190 PRINT #1 , ZZZ$ ;
1200 ’ –––Response check–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
1210 RECCNT = 0 : TMP$ – ””
1220 *DRECLOOP
1230 IF LOC ( 1 ) < > 0 THEN *DREC1
1240 RECCNT = RECCNT + 1
1250 IF RECCNT = 5000 THEN *DRECERR ELSE *DRECLOOP
1260 *DREC1
1270 TMP$ = TMP$ + INPUT$ ( LOC (1 ) , #1 )
1280 IF RIGHT$ ( TMP$ , 1 ) = CHR$ (13) THEN *DRECEND ELSE RECCNT = 0 : GOTO *
DRECLOOP
1290 *DRECERR
1300 TMP$ = ” No response !! ” + CHR$ ( 13 )
1310 *DRECEND
1320 PRINT ” receive data : ” ; RECV$
1340 ’ –––Go to transmission data input––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
1350 GOTO *REPEAT
1360 ’ –––Processing complete–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
1370 CLOSE #1
1380 END
Issuing Commands from
a Host Computer
245
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
Ladder Program
(Mnemonics)
4-3
The unsolicited Host Link communications are executed using TXD(48).
Mnemonic
Control
Contents
(@)TXD(48) Communications port
output
Reads data from I/O memory and transmits
it in the specified frame format.
Host Link communications are controlled with the following AR area flags.
Word
AR 08
Bit(s)
Contents
00 to 03
RS-232C Port Error Code
0: Normal completion
1: Parity error
2: Frame error
3: Overrun error
04
RS-232C Communications Error Flag
ON: RS-232C port communications error occurred
OFF: Normal
05
RS-232C Transmit Ready Flag
ON: The PC is ready to transmit data.
Peripheral Port Error Code
0: Normal completion
1: Parity error
2: Frame error
3: Overrun error
08 to 11
12
13
Peripheral Port Communications Error Flag
ON: Peripheral port communications error occurred.
Peripheral Port Transmit Ready Flag
ON: The PC is ready to transmit data.
Unsolicited Communications
A data transmission to the host computer is initiated by the PC.
(@)TXD(48)
S
S: Leading address of data to be transmitted
C
C: Control data
N
N: Number of bytes to be transmitted (BCD: 0001 to 0061)
Communications port
0: RS-232 port; 1: Peripheral port
When Host Link communications are being used, TXD(48) converts the N-bytes
of data starting at S to ASCII, adds the Host Link header, FCS, and terminator,
and transmits this data as a Host Link frame.
The transmitted Host Link frame will be as shown in the following diagram.
Converted to ASCII.
N bytes
Node No.
246
Data (ASCII)
↵
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
4-3
In the following program example TXD(48) is used to transmit data from an
RS-232C port to a host computer. If AR 0805 (the RS-232C Transmit Ready
Flag) is ON when IR 00100 turns ON, the ten bytes of data (DM 0100 to
DM 0104) will be transmitted to the host computer, leftmost bytes first.
(48)
Leading address of data to be transmitted
RS-232C port specification
10 bytes
4-3-2 No-protocol Communications
Overview
When no-protocol communications are used, data can be exchanged with serial
devices such as bar code readers and serial printers using TXD(48) and
RXD(47). No-protocol communications can be used with either an RS-232C
port or peripheral port.
CPM2A Connections
CPM2A CPU Unit
RS-232C devices
Bar code reader
Serial printer
Other
RS-232C port
CPM1-CIF01 RS-232C Adapter
(CTS control cannot be used.)
CPM2A CPU Unit
RS-232C devices
Bar code reader
Serial printer
Other
Peripheral port
CPM2A CPU Unit
RS-232C devices
CQM1-CIF01/02 RS-232C Adapter
(CTS control cannot be used.)
Bar code reader
Serial printer
Other
Peripheral port
247
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
4-3
CPM2C Connections
CPM2C CPU Unit
RS-232C devices
Bar code reader
Serial printer
Other
Note A CPM1-CIF01 RS-232C Adapter can also be used for no-protocol communications through the peripheral port, or for a CPM2C, a CPM2C-CIF01 Peripheral/
RS-232C Adapter Unit can be used to connect to external devices. Refer to the
CPM2C Operation Manual for details.
Transmission Data Configuration
When no-protocol communications are used, TXD(48) is used to send data and
RXD(47) to receive data. The maximum amount of data that can be either sent or
received is 259 bytes, including the start and end codes.
No Start or End Code:
Data (Specified No. of bytes)
Only a Start Code:
ST
Data (Specified No. of bytes)
Only an End Code:
Data (256 bytes max.)
ED
Both a Start and End Code:
ST
Data (256 bytes max.)
ED
End Code of CR, LF:
Data (256 bytes max.)
CR
LF
CR
LF
Start Code 00-FF/End Code CR,LF:
ST
Note
Data (256 bytes max.)
1. The start and end codes are set in DM 6648 to DM 6649 (RS-232C) or
DM 6653 to DM 6654 (peripheral port) in the PC Setup.
2. When there are several start or end codes in the transmission, the first of
each will be effective.
3. When the end code is accidentally duplicated in the transmission data and
the transmission is stopped part way through, use CR and LF as the end
code.
4. The start and end codes themselves are not transmitted and received.
Transmission Flags
When sending data from the CPM2A/CPM2C, check that the Transmission Enable Flag is ON for executing TXD(48). The Transmission Enable Flag will turn
248
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
4-3
OFF while the data is being transmitted and will turn ON again when transmission is complete.
After the CPM2A/CPM2C has received data, the Receive Enable Flag turns ON.
When RXD(47) is executed, the data received will be written to the specified
words and the Reception Complete Flag will turn OFF.
Flag
Peripheral port
RS-232C port
Transmit Ready Flag
AR 0813
AR 0805
Reception Completed Flag
AR 0814
AR 0806
Note The CPM2A/CPM2C starts and completes data reception at the following
points:
Reception Start:
Start code disabled:
Continually available for reception
Start code enabled:
After start code is received
Reception Complete:
When either the end code, the specified no. of bytes, or 256 bytes are received.
Application Procedure
Setting the Communications switch
Set the CPM2A CPU Unit’s communications switch or
the CPM2C CPU Unit’s DIP switch.
Connecting the cables
Make the RS-232C connection with the serial device.
Ladder program
Communications Switch
Setting
The CPM2A’s communications are controlled by the communications switch on
the front of the CPU Unit and the CPM2C’s communications are controlled by
the DIP switch on the front of the CPU Unit.
CPM2A Communications Switch Setting
Turn OFF the Communications switch when using no-protocol communications.
No-protocol communications will not be possible if the communications switch is
ON.
Communications switch
Peripheral port
RS-232C port
249
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
4-3
Note An RS-232C adapter is required for no-protocol communications on the peripheral port.
CPM2C DIP Switch Settings
Turn OFF pin 1 of the DIP switch when using no-protocol communications so
that communications through the RS-232C port are governed by the settings in
the PC Setup (DM 6645 to DM 6649).
Front View
CPU Unit with Relay Outputs via Terminal Block
CPU Unit with Transistor Outputs
via Fujitsu-compatible Connector
4. Status indicators
6. Output indicators
7. Communications port
5. Input indicators
DIP switch for Units
with 10/20 I/O points
8. Communications switch
9. Customize switch
2. Input terminals
3. Output terminals
2. Input connector
(8)
3. Output connector
(9)
CPU Unit with Transistor Outputs
via MIL Connector
4. Status indicators
7. Communications port
6. Output indicators
5. Input indicators
8. Communications switch
9. Customize switch
DIP switch for Units
with 32 I/O points
(8)
2. Input connector
3. Output connector
Pin settings
(9)
RS-232C port
p
communications
Pin 1
OFF
ON
Governed by the PC Setup
etu
(DM 6645 to DM 6649)
nd rd settings
Governed by st
standard
Note An RS-232C Adapter is needed to perform no-protocol communications through
the peripheral port.
Connecting the Cables
250
This section describes RS-232C connections.
The RS-232C port on the serial device and the RS-232C port of the CPM2A/
CPM2C or CPM1-CIF01 RS-232C Adapter are connected as shown in the fol-
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
4-3
lowing diagram. With the CPM2C, the CPM2C-CN111 and CS1W-CN118 connecting cables can be used in place of the RS-232C Adapter.
RS-232C port
Signal
Pin No.
Serial device RD (receive data)
Serial device SD (send data)
Serial device SG (signal ground)
Hood
PC Setup
The PC Setup settings that are required depend on whether a peripheral port or
an RS-232C port is used.
Settings for RS-232C Port
Word
DM 6645
Bit
00 to 03
Function
Port settings
0: Standard (1 start bit, 7-bit data, 2 stop bits, even parity, 9,600 bps; Host Link
unit number: 0)
Setting
As required
1: Settings in DM 6646
04 to07
08 to 11
12 to 15
DM 6646
00 to 07
08 to 15
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting will be used, and AR
1302 will turn ON.)
CTS control settings
0: Disable; 1: Set
Link words for 1:1 PC Link
0: LR 00 to LR 15; Other: Not effective
Communications mode
0: Host Link; 1: No-protocol; 2: 1:1 PC Link Slave; 3: 1:1 PC Link Master; 4: 1:1 NT
Link
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the Host Link setting will be used, and
AR 1302 will turn ON.)
Baud rate
Any
1
As required
00: 1,200 bps; 01: 2,400 bps; 02: 4,800 bps; 3: 9,600 bps; 04: 19,200 bps
Frame format
Start Length Stop Parity
00:
1
7
1
Even
01:
1
7
1
Odd
02:
1
7
1
None
03:
1
7
2
Even
04:
1
7
2
Odd
05:
1
7
2
None
06:
1
8
1
Even
07:
1
8
1
Odd
08:
1
8
1
None
09:
1
8
2
Even
10:
1
8
2
Odd
11:
1
8
2
None
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default settings (03) will be used,
and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
DM 6647
00 to 15
Transmission delay (Host Link)
0000 to 9999 (BCD): Set in units of 10 ms, e.g., setting of 0001 equals 10 ms
0000 to
9999
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (0000) will be used,
and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
251
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
Word
DM 6648
Bit
Function
4-3
Setting
00 to 07
00 to 31 (BCD): Node number (Host Link)
As required
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (00) will be used, and
AR 1302 will turn ON.)
08 to 11
Start code enable (RS-232C)
0: Disable; 1: Use start code in DM 6649.
End code enable (RS-232C)
0: Disable (number of bytes received)
1: Use end code in DM 6649.
2: CR, LF
12 to 15
0 or 1
0 to 2
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (0) will be used, and
AR 1302 will turn ON.)
DM 6649
00 to 07
08 to 15
Start code (00 to FF)
(No-protocol, effective when bits 8 to 11 of DM 6648 are set to 1.)
No. of bytes of data received
(No-protocol, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM 6648 are set to 0.)
00: 256 bytes
01 to FF: 1 to 255 bytes
End code (00 to FF)
(No-protocol, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM 6648 are set to 1.)
00 to FF
00 to FF
00 to FF
Note If SW1 on the front panel of the CPU Unit is ON, the RS-232C port will operate
with the default settings regardless of the settings in DM 6645 to DM 6649.
Settings for Peripheral Port
Word
DM 6650
Bit
00 to 03
Function
Port settings
0: Standard (1 start bit, 7-bit data, 2 stop bits, even parity, 9,600 bps; Host Link
unit number: 0)
Setting
As required
1: Settings in DM 6651
04 to 11
12 to 15
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (0) will be used, and
AR 1302 will turn ON.)
Not used
Communications mode
0: Host Link or peripheral bus; 1: No-protocol
0
1
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the Host Link setting will be used, and
AR 1302 will turn ON.)
DM 6651
00 to 07
08 to 15
DM 6652
00 to 15
Baud rate
00: 1,200 bps; 01: 2,400 bps; 02: 4,800 bps; 03: 9,600 bps; 04: 19,200 bps
Frame format
Start Length Stop Parity
00:
1
7
1
Even
01:
1
7
1
Odd
02:
1
7
1
None
03:
1
7
2
Even
04:
1
7
2
Odd
05:
1
7
2
None
06:
1
8
1
Even
07:
1
8
1
Odd
08:
1
8
1
None
09:
1
8
2
Even
10:
1
8
2
Odd
11:
1
8
2
None
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default settings (03) will be used,
and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
Transmission delay (Host Link)
0000 to 9999 (BCD): Set in units of 10 ms.
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (0000) will be used,
and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
252
As required
0000 to
9999
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
Word
DM 6653
Bit
Function
Setting
00 to 07
00 to 31 (BCD): Node number (Host Link)
08 to 11
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (00) will be used, and
AR 1302 will turn ON.)
Start code enable (Peripheral port)
0 or 1
0: Disable
1: Use start code in DM 6654.
12 to 15
4-3
As required
End code enable (Peripheral port)
0: Disable (number of bytes received)
1: Use end code in DM 6654.
2: CR. LF
0 to 2
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (0) will be used, and
AR 1302 will turn ON.)
DM 6654
00 to 07
08 to 15
Start code (00 to FF)
(Peripheral port, effective when bits 8 to 11 of DM 6653 are set to 1.)
No. of bytes of data received
(Peripheral port, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM 6653 are set to 0.)
00: 256 bytes
01 to FF: 1 to 255 bytes
End code (00 to FF)
(Peripheral port, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM 6653 are set to 1)
Note
Program
00 to FF
00 to FF
00 to FF
1. If SW1 on the front panel of the CPU Unit is ON, the peripheral port will operate with the default settings regardless of the settings in DM 6645 to
DM 6649.
2. When connecting a computer running Support Software via the peripheral
bus, turn OFF SW1 on the front panel of the CPU Unit and set DM 6650 to
0001 (Host Link). The CPU Unit will automatically switch to peripheral bus
communications for the serial communications port.
The following instructions are used in no-protocol communications.
Mnemonic
Control
Contents
(@)TXD(48)
Communications
port output
Reads data from I/O memory and transmits it in
the specified frame format (the start and end
codes can be enabled/disabled).
(@)RXD(47)
Communications
port input
Receives data in the specified frame format (the
start and end codes can be enabled/disabled)
and stores only the data in I/O memory.
253
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
4-3
No-protocol communications are controlled with the following AR area flags.
Word
AR 08
Bit(s)
Contents
00 to 03
RS-232C Port Error Code
0: Normal completion;
1: Parity error;
2: Frame error;
3: Overrun error
04
RS-232C Communications Error Flag
ON: RS-232C port communications error occurred.
OFF: Normal
05
RS-232C Transmit Ready Flag
ON: The PC is ready to transmit data.
RS-232C Reception Completed Flag
ON: The PC has completed reading data.
RS-232C Reception Overflow Flag
ON: A reception overflow has occurred.
Peripheral Port Error Code
0: Normal completion;
1: Parity error;
2: Frame error;
3: Overrun error
06
07
08 to 11
12
Peripheral Port Communications Error Flag
ON: A peripheral port communications error occurred.
OFF: Normal
13
AR 09
00 to 15
Peripheral Port Transmit Ready Flag
ON: The PC is ready to transmit data.
Peripheral Port Reception Completed Flag
ON: The PC has completed reading data.
Peripheral Port Reception Overflow Flag
ON: A reception overflow has occurred.
RS-232C Port Reception Counter (4 digits BCD)
AR 10
00 to 15
Peripheral Port Reception Counter (4 digits BCD)
14
15
No-protocol Data Transmission
TXD(48) is used to transmit data to RS-232C devices.
(@)TXD(48)
S
S: Leading address of data to be transmitted
C
C: Control data
N
N: Number of bytes to be transmitted (BCD: 0001 to 0256)
Storage order
0: Leftmost bytes first 1: Rightmost bytes first
Communications port
0: RS-232C port 1: Peripheral port
When no-protocol communications are being used, TXD(48) transmits N bytes
of data beginning at S.
254
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
4-3
No-protocol Data Reception
RXD(47) is used to receive data from RS-232C devices.
(@)RXD(47)
S
D: Leading address for storing reception data
C
C: Control data
N: Number of bytes to receive (BCD: 0001 to 0256)
N
Storage order
0: Leftmost bytes first 1: Rightmost bytes first
Communications port
0: RS-232C port 1: Peripheral port
The following program example is for no-protocol communications conducted
through a RS-232C port using TXD(48) and RXD(47) instructions.
If AR 0805 (the RS-232C Transmit Ready Flag) is ON when 00100 turns ON,
then data from DM 0100 to DM 0104 is transmitted from leftmost bytes to rightmost bytes. When AR 0806 (the Reception Completed Flag) turns ON, 256 bytes of received data are read and written to DM 0200 from leftmost bytes to rightmost bytes.
00100
DIFU(13)
No-protocol communications start
00101
00101
AR 0805
@TXD(48)
DM 0100
#0000
#0010
First word holding send data.
Use the RS-232C port; transmit
data from leftmost bytes to rightmost bytes.
Transmit 10 bytes.
AR 0806
RXD(47)
DM 0200
#0000
#0256
First word to store received data.
Use the RS-232C port; store transmitted data from leftmost bytes to
rightmost bytes.
Receive 256 bytes.
255
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
4-3
4-3-3 One-to-one NT Link Communications
The NT Link allows a CPM2A/CPM2C PC to be connected directly to an OMRON Programmable Terminal. There is no need for a communications program
on the PC. The NT Link can be used with an RS-232C port.
CPM2A Connection
CPM2A CPU Unit
RS-232C cable
OMRON Programmable
Terminal
RS-232C port
256
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
4-3
CPM2C/CPM2C-S 1:1 NT Link Connection
RS-232C port
(D-sub 9-pin)
Connecting Cable
CPM2C CPU Unit
RS-232C
port
XW2Z-200T (2 m)
XW2Z-500T (5 m)
RS-232C connection
OMRON
Programmable
Terminal
CPM2C-CN111 (0.15 m)
CS1W-CN118 (0.1 m)
RS-232C ← peripheral port
RS-422 connection
RS-232C port
CPM2C-CIF01
RS-422 ← peripheral port
NT-AL001
RS-232C Adapter
RS-232C port
XW2Z-070T-1 (0.7 m)
XW2Z-200T-1 (2 m)
CPM2C-CIF11
RS-232C port
CPM2C-CIF21
Note The Programmable Terminal cannot be connected using a peripheral port connection when communicating via a 1:1 NT Link.
Application Procedure
Setting communications.
Connecting the cables
Communications Switch
Setting
Use the settings in the PC Setup (DM6645 to DM 6649) for
RS-232C communications.
(Turn OFF the Communications switch on the CPM2A’s CPU
Unit or pin 1 of the DIP Switch on the CPM2C’s CPU Unit.)
Connect to a Programmable Terminal.
The CPM2A’s communications are controlled by the communications switch on
the front of the CPU Unit and the CPM2C’s communications are controlled by
the DIP switch on the front of the CPU Unit.
257
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
4-3
CPM2A Communications Switch Setting
Turn OFF the communications switch when using 1:1 NT Link communications.
One-to-one NT Link communications will not be possible if the communications
switch is ON.
Communications switch
ON
OFF
RS-232C port
CPM2C DIP Switch Settings
Turn OFF pin 1 of the DIP switch when using 1:1 NT Link communications so that
communications through the RS-232C port are governed by the settings in the
PC Setup (DM 6645 to DM 6649).
Front View
CPU Unit with Relay Outputs via Terminal Block
CPU Unit with Transistor Outputs
via Fujitsu-compatible Connector
4. Status indicators
6. Output indicators
7. Communications port
5. Input indicators
DIP switch for Units
with 10/20 I/O points
8. Communications switch
9. Customize switch
2. Input terminals
3. Output terminals
2. Input connector
(8)
3. Output connector
(9)
CPU Unit with Transistor Outputs
via MIL Connector
4. Status indicators
7. Communications port
6. Output indicators
5. Input indicators
8. Communications switch
9. Customize switch
DIP switch for Units
with 32 I/O points
(8)
2. Input connector
3. Output connector
Pin settings
RS-232C port
p
communications
Pin 1
OFF
ON
258
(9)
Governed by the PC Setup
etu
(DM 6645 to DM 6649)
nd rd settings
Governed by st
standard
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
When using an NT Link with a CPM2A/CPM2C PC, the following settings must
be made to the PC Setup (DM 6645) using a Programming Device.
PC Setup
Word
DM 6645
4-3
Bit
00 to 03
Function
Setting
Port settings
0: Standard (1 start bit, 7-bit data, 2 stop bits, even parity, 9,600 bps; Host Link
unit number: 0)
Any
1: Settings in DM 6646
04 to 07
08 to 11
12 to 15
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (00) will be used, and
AR 1302 will turn ON.)
CTS control settings
Any
0: Disable
1: Set
Link area for 1:1 PC Link
0: LR 00 to LR 15
Any
(Other settings: Disabled)
Communications mode
0: Host Link; 1: No-protocol; 2: 1:1 PC Link Slave; 3: 1:1 PC Link Master;
4: 1:1 NT Link
4
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the Host Link setting will be used, and
AR 1302 will turn ON.)
For information on the 1:1 NT Link settings of an OMRON Programmable Terminal, refer to that PT’s Operation Manual.
Connecting the Cables
This section describes RS-232C connections.
The RS-232C port on the Programmable Terminal and the RS-232C port on the
CPM2A/CPM2C or CPM1-CIF01 RS-232C Adapter are connected as shown in
the following diagram when there is no CTS control on the RS-232C port. With
the CPM2C, the CPM2C-CN111 and CS1W-CN118 connecting cables are
used.
OMRON PT
Signal
Pin No.
RS-232C port
Signal
Pin No.
Recommended cables:
XW2Z-200T:
2m
XW2Z-500T:
5m
Hood
Hood
4-3-4 One-to-one PC Link Communications
A 1:1 PC Link of up to 256 bits (LR0000 to LR1515) can be created with the data
area of another CPM2A/CPM2C, CQM1, CPM1, CPM1A, SRM1(-V2), or a
C200HX/HG/HE PC, where one serves as the Master, the other as a Slave.
There is no need for a communications program on the PC.
The 1:1 PC Link can be used with an RS-232C port.
One-to-one PC Link
259
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
CPM2A CPU Unit
RS-232C port
OMRON PC (CQM1, CPM1, CPM1A, CPM2C,
SRM1(-V2), C200HS, or C200HX/HG/HE)
260
CPM2A CPU Unit
RS-232C port
OMRON PC (CQM1, CPM1, CPM1A, CPM2C,
SRM1(-V2), C200HS, or C200HX/HG/HE)
4-3
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
RS-232C port (D-sub 9-pin)
1:1 Link Master
CPM2C CPU Unit
1:1 Link Slave
CPM2C CPU Unit
RS-232C port (D-sub 9-pin)
CPM2C-CN111
(0.1 m)
4-3
CPM2C-CN111 (0.1 m)
Connecting Cable
XW2Z-200T (2 m)
XW2Z-500T (5 m)
CS1W-CN118
(0.1 m)
CS1W-CN118 (0.1 m)
CPM2C-CIF01
CPM2C-CIF01
CPM2C-CIF11
CPM2C-CIF11
OMRON PC (CQM1, CPM1, CPM1A, CPM2A,
SRM1(-V2), C200HS, or C200HX/HG/HE)
Master
Link bits
OMRON PC (CQM1, CPM1, CPM1A, CPM2A,
SRM1(-V2), C200HS, or C200HX/HG/HE)
Slave
Link bits
LR00
LR00
Write
LR07
LR08
Read
LR15
Write
area
Read
area
Read
area
Write
area
Read
LR07
LR08
Write
LR15
Note Even though the peripheral port on the CPM2C-CIF01 can output RS-232C, this port cannot be used for
one-to-one link communications.
261
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
PC Links with Other PCs
4-3
The link relay area on CPM2A/CPM2C PCs is only 16 words, LR00 to LR15.
When performing a 1:1 PC Link with a CPM2A/CPM2C PC and a CQM1,
C200HS, or C200HX/HE/HG use the corresponding 16 words, LR00 to LR15 on
the CQM1, C200HS, or C200HX/HE/HG PC. A 1:1 PC Link with a CPM2A/
CPM2C PC cannot be formed using LR16 to LR 63.
Application Procedure
Setting communications.
Connecting the cables
Communications Switch
Setting
Use the settings in the PC Setup (DM6645 to DM 6649) for
RS-232C communications.
(Turn OFF the Communications switch on the CPM2A’s CPU
Unit or pin 1 of the DIP Switch on the CPM2C’s CPU Unit.)
Connect a 1:1 PC Link with another PC.
The CPM2A’s communications are controlled by the communications switch on
the front of the CPU Unit and the CPM2C’s communications are controlled by
the DIP switch on the front of the CPU Unit.
CPM2A Communications Switch Setting
Turn OFF the Communications switch when using 1:1 PC Link communications.
One-to-one PC Link communications will not be possible if the communications
switch is ON.
Communications switch
ON
OFF
RS-232C port
262
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Communications Functions
4-3
CPM2C DIP Switch Settings
Turn OFF pin 1 of the DIP switch when using 1:1 PC Link communications so
that communications through the RS-232C port are governed by the settings in
the PC Setup (DM 6645 to DM 6649).
Front View
CPU Unit with Relay Outputs via Terminal Block
CPU Unit with Transistor Outputs
via Fujitsu-compatible Connector
4. Status indicators
6. Output indicators
7. Communications port
5. Input indicators
DIP switch for Units
with 10/20 I/O points
8. Communications switch
9. Customize switch
2. Input terminals
3. Output terminals
2. Input connector
(8)
3. Output connector
(9)
CPU Unit with Transistor Outputs
via MIL Connector
4. Status indicators
7. Communications port
6. Output indicators
5. Input indicators
8. Communications switch
9. Customize switch
DIP switch for Units
with 32 I/O points
(8)
2. Input connector
3. Output connector
Pin settings
(9)
RS-232C port
communications
p
Pin 1
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
Governed by
y the PC Setup
(DM 6645 to DM 6649)
Governed byy standard settings
g
263
Section
SRM1(-V2) Communications Functions
When creating a 1:1 PC Link with a CPM2A/CPM2C PC, use a Programming
Device to make the following settings to the PC Setup (DM 6645) in the Master
and Slave.
PC Setup
Word
DM 6645
4-4
Bit
00 to 03
04 to07
08 to 11
12 to 15
Function
Port settings
00: Standard (1 start bit, 7-bit data, 2 stop bits, even parity, 9,600 bps)
01: Settings in DM 6646
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (00) will be
used, and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
CTS control settings
0: Disable
1: Set
Link area for 1:1 PC Link
0: LR 00 to LR 15
(Other settings: Disabled)
Communications mode
0: Host Link; 1: No-protocol; 2: 1:1 PC Link Slave;
3: 1:1 PC Link Master; 4: 1:1 NT Link
Master
Setting
Any
Slave
Setting
Any
0
0
0
0
3
2
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the Host Link setting will be
used, and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
For information on the 1:1 PC Link settings of another OMRON PC, refer to that
PC’s Operation Manual.
Connecting the Cables
This section describes the RS-232C connection.
The RS-232C cable used for 1:1 PC Links is a cross connection cable. When
there is no CTS control on the RS-232C port, the connection is made as shown
in the following diagram. With the CPM2C, the CPM2C-CN111 and CS1WCN118 connecting cables are used.
RS-232C port
RS-232C port
Signal Pin No.
Signal Pin No.
Recommended cables
XW2Z-200T:
2m
XW2Z-500T:
5m
Hood
4-4
SRM1(-V2) Communications Functions
4-4-1 Host Link Communications
Host Link communications were developed by OMRON for the purpose of connecting PCs and one or more host computers by RS-232C cable, and controlling
PC communications from a host computer. Normally the host computer issues a
command to a PC, and the PC automatically sends back a response. Thus the
communications are carried out without the PCs being actively involved. The
PCs also have the ability to initiate data transmissions when direct involvement
is necessary.
In general, there are two means for implementing Host Link communications.
One is based on C-mode commands, and the other on FINS (CV-mode) com-
264
Section
SRM1(-V2) Communications Functions
4-4
mands. The SRM1(-V2) supports C-mode commands only. For details on Host
Link communications, refer to 4-5 Host Link Commands.
PC Setup Settings
Word
The SRM1(-V2)’s peripheral port and RS-232C port settings must be set properly in order to use the Host Link communications, as shown in the following table.
Bit
Function
Setting
Peripheral Port Settings
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC.
DM 6650
00 to 03 Port settings
0: Standard (1 start bit, 7-bit data, 2 stop bits, even parity, 9,600 bps)
1: Settings in DM 6651
To match
host parameters
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (0) will be used, and
AR 1302 will turn ON.)
04 to 07
08 to 11
12 to 15
DM 6651
00 to 07
08 to 15
DM 6652
DM 6653
00 to 15
00 to 07
08 to 11
12 to 15
Not used.
Not used.
Communications mode
0: Host Link; 1: No-protocol
0
0
0: Host
Link
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (0) will be used, and
AR 1302 will turn ON.)
Baud rate
00: 1.2K, 01: 2.4K, 02: 4.8K, 03: 9.6K, 04: 19.2K
Frame format
Start
00:
1 bit
01:
1 bit
02:
1 bit
03:
1 bit
04:
1 bit
05:
1 bit
06:
1 bit
07:
1 bit
08:
1 bit
09:
1 bit
10:
1 bit
11:
1 bit
Length
7 bits
7 bits
7 bits
7 bits
7 bits
7 bits
8 bits
8 bits
8 bits
8 bits
8 bits
8 bits
Stop
1 bit
1 bit
1 bit
2 bit
2 bit
2 bit
1 bit
1 bit
1 bit
2 bit
2 bit
2 bit
Parity
Even
Odd
None
Even
Odd
None
Even
Odd
None
Even
Odd
None
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (00) will be used, and
AR 1302 will turn ON.)
Transmission delay (Host Link)
0000 to 9999 (BCD): Set in units of 10 ms.
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (0000) will be used,
and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
Node number (Host Link)
00 to 31 (BCD)
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (0000) will be used,
and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
Start code enable (RS-232C, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM 6650 are set to 1.)
0: Disable
1: Set
End code enable (RS-232C, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM 6650 are set to 1.)
0: Disable (number of bytes received)
1: Set (specified end code)
2: CR, LF
To match
host parameters
To match
host parameters
To match
host parameters
00 to 31
Any
Any
265
Section
SRM1(-V2) Communications Functions
Word
DM 6654
Bit
Function
4-4
Setting
00 to 07
Start code (effective when bits 08 to 11 of DM6650 are set to 1.)
00: 256 bytes
01 to FF: 1 to 255 bytes
Any
08 to 15
End code (no-protocol)
Any
When bits 12 to 15 of DM6653 are set to 0:
00: 256 bytes
01 to FF: 1 to 255 bytes
When bits 12 to 15 of DM6653 are set to 1:
Setting: 00 to FF (Hex)
Note If an out-of-range value is set, the following communications conditions will result. In that case, reset the value so that it is within the permissible range.
Word
Bit
Communications mode:
Host Link
Communications format:
Standard settings
(1 start bit, 7-bit data; 2 stop bits, even parity,
9,600 bps)
Transmission delay:
No
Node number:
00
Function
Setting
RS-232C Port Settings
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC.
DM 6645
00 to 03 Port settings
0: Standard (1 start bit, 7-bit data, 2 stop bits, even parity, 9,600 bps)
1: Settings in DM 6646
04 to 07
08 to 11
CTS control settings
0: Disable; 1: Set
When using a 1:1 PC Link: Sets the link words for 1:1 PC Link.
0: LR 00 to LR 15
Not 0: Disable
To match
host parameters
0
When using a 1:N NT Link: Sets the maximum PT node number.
1 to 7
12 to 15
Communications mode
0: Host Link; 1: No-protocol; 2: 1:1 PC Link Slave; 3: 1:1 PC Link Master; 4: 1:1 NT
Link; 5: 1:N NT Link
0
(Any other setting specifies Host Link mode, causes a non-fatal error, and turns ON
AR 1302.)
DM 6646
00 to 07
08 to 15
DM 6647
266
00 to 15
The 1:N NT Link is supported by SRM1-C02-V2 only.
Baud rate
00: 1.2K, 01: 2.4K, 02: 4.8K, 03: 9.6K, 04: 19.2K
Frame format
Start
Length
Stop
Parity
00:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
Even
01:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
Odd
02:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
None
03:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bit
Even
04:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bit
Odd
05:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bit
None
06:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
Even
07:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
Odd
08:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
None
09:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bit
Even
10:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bit
Odd
11:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bit
None
Transmission delay (Host Link)
0000 to 9999 (BCD): Set in units of 10 ms, e.g., setting of 0001 equals 10 ms
To match
host parameters
To match
host parameters
To match
host parameters
Section
SRM1(-V2) Communications Functions
Word
DM 6648
Bit
Function
00 to 07
Node number (Host Link, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM 6645 are set to 0.)
00 to 31 (BCD)
Start code enable (RS-232C, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM 6645 are set to 1.)
0: Disable; 1: Set
End code enable (RS-232C, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM 6645 are set to 1.)
0: Disable (number of bytes received)
1: Set (specified end code)
2: CR, LF
Start code (RS-232C)
00: 256 bytes
01 to FF: 1 to 255 bytes
00 to 31
End code enable (RS-232C)
Any
08 to 11
12 to 15
DM 6649
4-4
00 to 07
08 to 15
Setting
Any
Any
Any
00 to FF (BIN)
Note If an out-of-range value is set, the following communications conditions will result. In that case, reset the value so that it is within the permissible range.
Communications mode:
Communications format:
Transmission delay:
Node number:
Example Program
1000
1010
1020
1050
1060
1070
1080
1090
1100
1110
1120
1130
1140
1150
1160
1170
1180
1190
1200
1210
1220
1230
1240
1250
1260
1270
1280
1290
Host Link
Standard settings
(1 start bit, 7-bit data; 2 stop bits, even parity,
9,600 bps)
No
00
This example shows a BASIC program that reads the status of the SRM1(-V2)’s
inputs in IR 000. For more details, refer to 4-5 Host Link Commands.
An FCS (frame check sequence) check isn’t performed on the received response data in this program. Be sure that the host computer’s RS-232C port is
configured correctly before executing the program.
’
’SRM1 Sample Program for BASIC
’
’
’
Set value RS-232C SPEED:9600BPS,PARITY:EVEN,DATA:7,STOP:2
OPEN ”COM:E73” AS #1
*REPEAT
’
Transmission data input
INPUT ”send data:”,SEND$
’
FCS Calculation
FCS=0
FOR IFCS=1 TO LEN(SEND$)
FCS=FCS XOR ASC(MID$(SEND$;IFCS,1)
NEXT
FCS$=RIGHT$(”0”+HEX$(FCS),2)
’
Communications execute
ZZZ$=SEND$+FCS$+”*”+CHR$(13)
PRINT #1,ZZZ$;
’
Response check
RECCNT=0:TMP$=””
*DRECLOOP
IF LOC(1)<>0 THEN *DREC1
RECCNT=RECCNT+1
IF RECCNT=5000 THEN *DRECERR ELSE *DRECLOOP
*DREC1
TMP$=TMP$+INPUT$(LOC(1),#1)
IF RIGHT$(TMP$,1)=CHR$(13) THEN *DRECEND ELSE RECCNT=0:GOTO *DRECLOOP
*DRECERR
267
Section
SRM1(-V2) Communications Functions
1300
1310
1320
1330
1340
1350
1360
1370
1380
4-4
TMP$=”No response!!”+CHR$(13)
*DRECEND
RECV$=TMP$
PRINT ”receive data:”;RECV$
’
Go to transmission data input
GOTO *REPEAT
’
Processing complete
CLOSE #1
END
4-4-2 No-protocol Communications
This section explains no-protocol (RS-232C) communications. No-protocol
communications allow data to be exchanged with standard RS-232C devices
such as printers and bar code readers. Data can be printed out by a printer or
read by a bar code reader. Handshaking is not supported for no-protocol communications.
Communications Procedure
Transmissions
1, 2, 3...
1. Check to see that AR 0805 (the RS-232C Port Transmit Ready Flag) has
turned ON.
2. Use the TXD(48) instruction to transmit the data.
(@)TXD(48)
S: Leading word no. of data to be transmitted
S
C: Control data
C
N: Number of bytes to be transmitted (4 digits BCD), 0000 to 0256
N
From the time this instruction is executed until the data transmission is complete,
AR 0805 ( or AR0813 for the peripheral port) will remain OFF. (It will turn ON
again upon completion of the data transmission.)
Start and end codes are not included when the number of bytes to be transmitted
is specified. The largest transmission that can be sent with or without start and
end codes in 256 bytes, N will be between 254 and 256 depending on the designations for start and end codes. If the number of bytes to be sent is set to 0000,
only the start and end codes will be sent.
256 bytes max.
Start code
Data
End code
To reset the RS-232C port (i.e., to restore the initial status), turn on SR 25209. To
reset the peripheral port, turn on SR 25208. These bits will turn OFF automatically after the reset.
Receptions
1, 2, 3...
268
1. Confirm that AR 0806 (RS-232C Reception Complete Flag) or AR 0814 (Peripheral Reception Complete Flag) is ON.
Section
SRM1(-V2) Communications Functions
4-4
2. Use the RXD(47) instruction to receive the data.
(@)RXD(47)
D: Leading word no. for storing reception data
D
C: Control data
Bits 00 to 03
0: Leftmost bytes first
1: Rightmost bytes first
Bits 12 to 15
0: RS-232C port
1: Peripheral port
C
N
N: Number of bytes stored (4 digits BCD), 0000 to 0256
3. The results of reading the data received will be stored in the AR area. Check
to see that the operation was successfully completed. The contents of these
bits will be reset each time RXD(47) is executed.
RS-232C
port
AR 0800 to
AR 0803
Peripheral
port
AR 0808 to
AR 0811
Error
AR 0804
AR0812
Communications error
AR 0807
AR0815
Reception Overrun Flag (After reception was completed, the subsequent data was received before the
data was read by means of the RXD(47) instruction.)
AR 09
AR10
Number of bytes received
RS-232C port error code (1 digit BCD) 0: Normal
completion 1: Parity error 2: Framing error 3: Overrun error
To reset the RS-232C port (i.e., to restore the initial status), turn ON SR 25209.
To reset the peripheral port, turn ON SR 25208. These bits will turn OFF automatically after the reset.
The start code and end code are not included in AR 09 or AR 10 (number of bytes
received).
The data will be as follows: “31323132313231323132CR LF”
Peripheral Port Settings
Word
When the peripheral port is used to conduct no-protocol communications, the
following settings must be made from the Programming Device to DM 6650 to
DM 6653 in the SRM1(-V2).
Bit
Function
Setting
Peripheral Port Settings
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC.
DM 6650
00 to 03 Port settings
0: Standard (1 start bit, 7-bit data, 2 stop bits, even parity, 9,600 bps)
1: Settings in DM 6651
As required
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (0) will be used, and
AR 1302 will turn ON.)
04 to 07
08 to 11
12 to 15
Not used.
Not used.
Communications mode
0: Host Link; 1: No-protocol
0
0
1: No-protocol
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (0) will be used, and
AR 1302 will turn ON.)
269
Section
SRM1(-V2) Communications Functions
Word
DM 6651
Bit
00 to 07
08 to 15
DM 6652
DM 6653
00 to 15
00 to 07
08 to 11
12 to 15
DM 6654
00 to 07
08 to 15
Function
Baud rate
00: 1.2K, 01: 2.4K, 02: 4.8K, 03: 9.6K, 04: 19.2K
Frame format
Start
Length
Stop
00:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
01:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
02:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
03:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bit
04:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bit
05:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bit
06:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
07:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
08:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
09:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bit
10:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bit
11:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bit
4-4
Setting
Parity
Even
Odd
None
Even
Odd
None
Even
Odd
None
Even
Odd
None
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (00) will be used, and
AR 1302 will turn ON.)
Transmission delay (Host Link)
0000 to 9999 (BCD): Set in units of 10 ms.
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (0000) will be used,
and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
Node number (Host Link)
00 to 31 (BCD)
(Other settings will cause a non-fatal error, the default setting (0000) will be used,
and AR 1302 will turn ON.)
Start code enable (RS-232C, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM 6650 are set to 1.)
0: Disable
1: Set
As required
As required
To match
host parameters
00 to 31
As required
End code enable (RS-232C, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM 6650 are set to 1.)
0: Disable (number of bytes received)
1: Set (specified end code)
2: CR, LF
Start code (effective when bits 08 to 11 of DM6650 are set to 1.)
00: 256 bytes
01 to FF: 1 to 255 bytes
As required
End code (no-protocol)
As required
When bits 12 to 15 of DM6653 are set to 0:
00: 256 bytes
01 to FF: 1 to 255 bytes
As required
When bits 12 to 15 of DM6653 are set to 1:
Setting: 00 to FF (Hex)
Note If an out-of-range value is set, the following communications conditions will result. In that case, reset the value so that it is within the permissible range.
RS-232C Port Settings
270
Communications mode:
Host Link
Communications format:
Standard settings
(1 start bit, 7-bit data; 2 stop bits, even parity,
9,600 bps)
Transmission delay:
No
Node number:
00
When the RS-232C port is used to conduct no-protocol communications, the following settings must be made from the Programming Device to DM 6645 to
DM 6649 in the SRM1(-V2).
Section
SRM1(-V2) Communications Functions
Word
Bit
Function
4-4
Setting
RS-232C Port Settings
The following settings are effective after transfer to the PC.
DM 6645
00 to 03 Port settings
0: Standard (1 start bit, 7-bit data, 2 stop bits, even parity, 9,600 bps)
1: Settings in DM 6646
04 to 07
08 to 11
CTS control settings
0: Disable; 1: Set
When using a 1:1 PC link: Sets the link words for 1:1 PC Link.
0: LR 00 to LR 15
Not 0: Disable
As required
0
When using a 1:N NT Link: Sets the maximum PT node number.
1 to 7
12 to 15
The 1:N NT Link is supported by SRM1-C02-V2 only.
Communications mode
0: Host Link; 1: No-protocol; 2: 1:1 PC Link Slave; 3: 1:1 PC Link Master; 4: 1:1 NT
Link; 5: 1:N NT Link
1
(Any other setting specifies Host Link mode, causes a non-fatal error, and turns ON
AR 1302.)
DM 6646
00 to 07
08 to 15
DM 6647
00 to 15
DM 6648
00 to 07
08 to 11
12 to 15
DM 6649
00 to 07
08 to 15
The 1:N NT Link is supported by SRM1-C02-V2 only.
Baud rate
00: 1.2K, 01: 2.4K, 02: 4.8K, 03: 9.6K, 04: 19.2K
Frame format
Start
Length
Stop
Parity
00:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
Even
01:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
Odd
02:
1 bit
7 bits
1 bit
None
03:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bit
Even
04:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bit
Odd
05:
1 bit
7 bits
2 bit
None
06:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
Even
07:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
Odd
08:
1 bit
8 bits
1 bit
None
09:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bit
Even
10:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bit
Odd
11:
1 bit
8 bits
2 bit
None
Transmission delay (Host Link)
0000 to 9999 (BCD): Set in units of 10 ms, e.g., setting of 0001 equals 10 ms
Node number (Host Link, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM 6645 are set to 0.)
00 to 31 (BCD)
Start code enable (RS-232C, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM 6645 are set to 1.)
0: Disable; 1: Set
End code enable (RS-232C, effective when bits 12 to 15 of DM 6645 are set to 1.)
0: Disable (number of bytes received)
1: Set (specified end code)
2: CR, LF
Start code (RS-232C)
00: 256 bytes
01 to FF: 1 to 255 bytes
As required
As required
As required
As required
As required
q
ed
End code enable (RS-232C)
00 to FF (BIN)
Note If an out-of-range value is set, the following communications conditions will result. In that case, reset the value so that it is within the permissible range.
Communications mode:
Communications format:
Host Link
Standard settings
(1 start bit, 7-bit data; 2 stop bits, even parity,
9,600 bps)
Transmission delay:
No
271
Section
SRM1(-V2) Communications Functions
Node number:
4-4
00
When no-protocol communications are used, TXD(48) is used to send data and
RXD(47) to receive data. The maximum amount of data that can be either sent or
received is 259 bytes, including the start/end code.
• No Start or End Code:
Transmission Data
Configuration
Data (256 bytes max.)
• Only a Start Code:
ST
Data (256 bytes max.)
• Only an End Code:
Data (256 bytes max.)
ED
• Both an Start and End Code:
ST
Data (256 bytes max.)
ED
• End Code of CR, LF:
Data (256 bytes max.)
CR
LF
CR
LF
• Start Code 00-FF/End Code CR,LF:
ST
Note
Transmission Flags
Data (256 bytes max.)
1. The start and end codes are set in DM 6648 to DM 6649 and DM 6653 to
DM 6654 of the PC Setup.
2. When there are several start and end codes, the first part of each will be effective.
3. When the end code duplicates the transmission data and the transmission is
stopped part way through, use CR or LF as the end code.
4. The start and end codes are not stored.
When sending data from the SRM1(-V2), check that the Transmission Enable
Flag is ON for executing the TXD(48) instruction. The Transmission Enable Flag
will turn OFF while the data is being transmitted and will turn ON again when
transmission is complete.
After the SRM1(-V2) has received data, the Receive Enable Flag turns ON.
When the RXD instruction is executed, the data received will be written to the
specified words and the Reception Complete Flag will turn OFF.
Flag
Peripheral port
RS-232C port
Transmission Enable Flag
AR 0813
AR 0805
Reception Complete Flag
AR 0814
AR 0806
Note The timing from data reception starting to completion for the SRM1(-V2) is as
indicated below.
Reception Start:
Without start code:
With start code:
272
Normal reception status
After start code is received.
Section
SRM1(-V2) Communications Functions
4-4
Reception Complete:
When either the end code, the specified no. of bytes, or 256 bytes are received.
Program Example
The following program example is for no-protocol communication conducted
through a RS-232C port using TXD(48) and RXD(47) instructions.
If AR 0805 (Transmission Enable Flag) is ON when 00100 is ON, then data from
DM0100 to DM0104 is transmitted from higher to lower values. When AR 0806
(Reception Enable Flag) turns ON, 256 bytes of received data are read and written to DM 0200 from higher to lower values.
00100
DIFU(13)
No-protocol communications start
00101
00100
AR0805
@TXD
DM0100
#0000
#0010
First word holding send data.
Using the RS-232C port data is
stored from higher to lower values
10 bytes transmitted
AR0806
@RXD
DM0200
#0000
256
First word to store receive data.
Using the RS-232C port data is
stored from higher to lower values
256 bytes transmitted
4-4-3 One-to-one NT Link Communications
Using the 1:1 NT Link, the SRM1(-V2) PC can be connected to the Programmable Terminal (NT Link Interface.) The RS-232C port can be used for the 1:1
NT Link.
SRM1
OMRON Programmable Terminal
The 1:1 NT Link is possible only with the SRM1-C02-V1/-V2 PCs, which have an
RS-232C port.
PC Setup Settings
Word
Bit
DM 6645 00 to 03
04 to 07
The settings relating to 1:1 NT Link PC communications must be set as shown in
the following table.
Function
settings1
Setting
Port
00: Standard (1 start bit, 7-bit data, 2 stop bits, even parity, 9,600 bps)
01: Settings in DM 6646
00 or 01
CTS control settings
0: Disable
1: Set
0 or 1
273
Section
SRM1(-V2) Communications Functions
Word
Bit
08 to 11
Function
4-4
Setting
When using a 1:1 PC Link: Sets the link words for 1:1 PC Link.
0: LR 00 to LR 15
Not 0: Disable
Any
When using a 1:N NT Link: Sets the maximum PT node number.
1 to 7
12 to 15
The 1:N NT Link is supported by SRM1-C02-V2 only.
Communications mode1
0: Host Link; 1: No-protocol; 2: 1:1 PC Link Slave; 3: 1:1 PC Link Master; 4: 1:1 NT
Link; 5: 1:N NT Link
4
The 1:N NT Link is supported by SRM1-C02-V2 only.
Note
1. If an improper setting is used, a non-fatal error will occur, AR 1302 will be
turned ON, and the default setting (0 or 00) will be used.
2. For information on the NT Link settings for another OMRON PC, refer to that
PC’s Operation Manual.
3. If an out-of-range value is set, the following communications conditions will
result. In that case, reset the value so that it is within the permissible range.
Communications mode:
Host Link
Communications format: Standard settings
(1 start bit, 7-bit data; 2 stop bits, even parity,
9,600 bps)
Transmission delay:
No
Node number:
00
4-4-4 One-to-N NT Link Communications
The 1:N NT Link allows an SRM1(-V2) PC to be connected to as many as 8 OMRON Programmable Terminals (PTs) and direct access provides high-speed
communications. The 1:N NT Link can be used with the RS-232C port.
SRM1
OMRON Programmable Terminal
The 1:N NT Link is possible only with the SRM1-C02-V2 PCs, which have an
RS-232C port.
274
Section
SRM1(-V2) Communications Functions
4-4
Cable Connections
Refer to the SRM1 Master Control Units Operation Manual for information on
cable connections in a 1:N NT Link.
PC Setup Settings
When the RS-232C port is used for a 1:N NT Link, make the following PC Setup
settings from a Programming Device.
Word
Bit
DM 6645 00 to 03
Function
Setting
settings1
Port
00: Standard (1 start bit, 7-bit data, 2 stop bits, even parity, 9,600 bps)
01: Settings in DM 6646
00 or 01
04 to 07
CTS control settings
0: Disable
1: Set
0 or 1
08 to 11
When using a 1:1 PC link: Sets the link words for 1:1 PC Link.
0: LR 00 to LR 15
Not 0: Disable
1 to 7
When using a 1:N NT Link: Sets the maximum PT node number.
1 to 7
12 to 15
The 1:N NT Link is supported by SRM1-C02-V2 only.
Communications mode1
0: Host Link; 1: No-protocol; 2: 1:1 PC Link Slave; 3: 1:1 PC Link Master; 4: 1:1 NT
Link; 5: 1:N NT Link
5
The 1:N NT Link is supported by SRM1-C02-V2 only.
Note
1. If an improper setting is used, a non-fatal error will occur, AR 1302 will be
turned ON, and the default setting (0 or 00) will be used.
2. For information on 1:N NT Link settings for OMRON PTs, refer to the PT’s
Operation Manual.
3. If an out-of-range value is set, the following communications conditions will
result. In that case, reset the value so that it is within the permissible range.
Communications mode:
Host Link
Communications format:
Standard settings
(1 start bit, 7-bit data; 2 stop bits, even parity,
9,600 bps)
Transmission delay:
No
Node number:
00
4-4-5 One-to-one PC Link Communications
In a 1:1 PC Link, an SRM1 is linked to another SRM1, CPM1, CPM1A, CPM2A,
CPM2C, CQM1, C200HS, or C200HX/HG/HE PC through a standard RS-232C
cable. One of the PCs will serve as the master and the other as the slave. The 1:1
PC Link can connect up to 256 bits (LR 0000 to LR 1515) in the two PCs.
One-to-one SRM1(-V2)
PC Links
The following diagram shows a 1:1 PC Link between two SRM1(-V2)s.
SRM1
SRM1
RS-232C Port
RS-232C Port
275
Section
SRM1(-V2) Communications Functions
4-4
The words used for the 1:1 PC Link are as shown below.
LR00
Write data
Read data
Master
Slave
Area for writing
LR07
LR08
Area for reading
Area for writing
LR15
Limitations of 1:1 PC Links
with a SRM1(-V2)
LR00
Read data
Area for reading
LR07
LR08
Write data
LR15
A 1:1 PC Link is possible only with the SRM1-C02-V1/V2 PCs, which are
equipped with an RS-232C port.
Only the 16 LR words from LR 00 to LR 15 can be linked in the SRM1, so use only
those 16 words in the CQM1 or C200HS when making a 1:1 PC Link with one of
those PCs. A 1:1 PC Link cannot be made to an SRM1 PC using LR 16 through
LR 63 in the CQM1 or C200HS.
Cable Connections
Refer to the SRM1 Master Control Units Operation Manual for information on
cable connections in a 1:1 PC Link.
PC Setup Settings
When an SRM1(-V2) is used in a 1:1 PC Link, make the following PC Setup settings from a Programming Device.
Word
Bit
DM 6645 00 to 03
Function
Port settings1
00: Standard (1 start bit, 7-bit data, 2 stop bits, even parity, 9,600 bps)
01: Settings in DM 6651
Setting Setting
(Master) (Slave)
00 or 01 00 or 01
04 to 07
CTS Control settings
0: Disable
1: Set
0
0
08 to 11
When using a 1:1 PC Link: Sets the link words for 1:1 PC Link.
0: LR 00 to LR 15
Not 0: Disable
0
0
3
2
When using a 1:N NT Link: Sets the maximum PT node number.
1 to 7
12 to 15
Communications mode1
0: Host Link; 1: No-protocol; 2: 1:1 PC Link Slave; 3: 1:1 PC Link Master; 4:
1:1 NT Link; 5: 1:N NT Link
Note
1. If an improper setting is used, a non-fatal error will occur, AR 1302 will be
turned ON, and the default setting (0 or 00) will be used.
2. For information on the 1:1 PC Link settings for another OMRON PC, refer to
that PC’s Operation Manual.
3. If an out-of-range value is set, the following communications conditions will
result. In that case, reset the value so that it is within the permissible range.
276
Communications mode:
Host Link
Communications format:
Standard settings
(1 start bit, 7-bit data; 2 stop bits, even parity,
9,600 bps)
Transmission delay:
No
Node number:
00
Section
Host Link Commands
Example Program
This example shows ladder programs that copy the status of IR 000 in each
SRM1 to IR 200 in the other SRM1.
Program in the Master
Program in the Slave
25313 (Always ON)
25313 (Always ON)
MOV(21)
MOV(21)
000
000
LR00
LR08
MOV(21)
MOV(21)
LR08
LR00
200
200
LR00
IR 000
LR00
Write
IR 200
Read
Writing area
LR07
LR08
Reading area
Reading area
Writing area
LR15
4-5
4-5
LR07
LR08
Read
IR 200
Write
IR 000
LR15
Host Link Commands
This section explains the commands that can be issued from the host computer
to the PC.
4-5-1 IR/SR AREA READ – RR
Reads the contents of the specified number of IR and SR words, starting from
the specified word.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
R
R
Header
code
x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100 x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100
Beginning word*
No. of words
(0000 to 0256)
FCS
↵
Terminator
Note *Beginning word: 0000 to 0049 and 0200 to 0255 in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs, 0000
to 0019 and 0200 to 0255 in CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs.
(A response of “0000” will be returned for non-existent IR and SR words.)
Response Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
R
R
Header
code
x 161 x 160 x 163 x 162 x 161 x 160
End code
Read data (1 word)
FCS
↵
Terminator
Read data (for number of words read)
Note
Parameters
1. Words 0050 to 0199 cannot be specified in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs and words
0020 to 0199 cannot be specified in CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs. If an
attempt to read any of these words is made, a response of 0000 will be returned.
2. The response will be divided when reading more than 30 words of data.
Read Data (Response)
The contents of the number of words specified by the command are returned in
hexadecimal as a response. The words are returned in order, starting with the
specified beginning word.
277
Section
Host Link Commands
4-5
4-5-2 LR AREA READ – RL
Reads the contents of the specified number of LR words, starting from the specified word.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
R
Header
code
Note
Response Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
L
x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100 x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100
Beginning word1
No. of words2
FCS
↵
Terminator
1. Beginning word: 0000 to 0015
2. No. of words: 0001 to 0016
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
R
L
Header
code
x 161 x 160 x 163 x 162 x 161 x 160
End code
Read data (1 word)
FCS
↵
Terminator
Read data (for number of words read)
Parameters
Read Data (Response)
The contents of the number of words specified by the command are returned in
hexadecimal as a response. The words are returned in order, starting with the
specified beginning word.
4-5-3 HR AREA READ – RH
Reads the contents of the specified number of HR words, starting from the specified word.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
R
Header
code
Note
Response Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
H
x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100 x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100
Beginning word1
No. of words2
FCS
↵
Terminator
1. Beginning word: 0000 to 0019
2. No. of words: 0001 to 0020
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
R
H
Header
code
Parameters
x 161 x 160 x 163 x 162 x 161 x 160
End code
Read data (1 word)
FCS
↵
Terminator
Read data (for number of words read)
Read Data (Response)
The contents of the number of words specified by the command are returned in
hexadecimal as a response. The words are returned in order, starting with the
specified beginning word.
4-5-4 PV READ – RC
Reads the contents of the specified number of timer/counter PVs (present values), starting from the specified timer/counter.
278
Section
Host Link Commands
4-5
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
C
x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100 x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100
Header
code
Beginning timer/counter1 No. of timers/counters2
R
Note
Response Format
@
FCS
↵
Terminator
1. Beginning T/C: 0000 to 0255 in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs, 0000 to 0127 in
CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs
2. No. of T/Cs:
0001 to 0256 in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs, 0001 to 0128 in
CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
x 101 x 100
R
Node no.
C
x 161 x 160 x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100
Header
code
End code
Read data (1 word)
Read data (for number of words read)
FCS
↵
Terminator
The response will be divided when reading more than 30 words of data.
Parameters
Read Data (Response)
The number of present values specified by the command is returned in hexadecimal as a response. The PVs are returned in order, starting with the specified
beginning timer/counter.
4-5-5 TC STATUS READ – RG
Reads the status of the Completion Flags of the specified number of timers/
counters, starting from the specified timer/counter.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
G
x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100 x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100
Header
code
Beginning timer/counter1 No. of timers/counters2
R
Node no.
Note
Response Format
FCS
↵
Terminator
1. Beginning T/C: 0000 to 0255 in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs, 0000 to 0127 in
CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs
2. No. of T/Cs:
0001 to 0256 in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs, 0001 to 0128 in
CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
R
G
Header
code
x 161 x 160 ON/
OFF
End code
FCS
↵
Terminator
Read data
(1 timer/counter)
Read data
(for number of TC read)
The response will be divided when reading the status of more than 123 timer/
counters.
Parameters
Read Data (Response)
The status of the number of Completion Flags specified by the command is returned as a response. “1” indicates that the Completion Flag is ON.
4-5-6 DM AREA READ – RD
Reads the contents of the specified number of DM words, starting from the specified word.
279
Section
Host Link Commands
4-5
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
R
D
Header
code
x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100 x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100
Beginning word*
No. of words
(0001 to 6656)
FCS
↵
Terminator
Note Beginning word:
DM 0000 to DM 1023 and DM 6144 to DM 6655 in CPM1/CPM1A PCs
DM 0000 to DM 2047 and DM 6144 to DM 6655 in CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2)
PCs. (A response of “0000” will be returned for non-existent DM words.)
Response Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
R
D
Header
code
Note
x 161 x 160 x 163 x 162 x 161 x 160
End code
Read data (1 word)
FCS
↵
Terminator
Read data (for number of words read)
1. Words DM 1024 to DM 6143 in CPM1/CPM1A PCs and words DM 2048 to
DM 6143 in CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2) PCs cannot be specified. If an attempt to read any of these words is made, a response of 0000 will be returned.
2. The response will be divided when reading more than 30 words of data.
Parameters
Read Data (Response)
The contents of the number of words specified by the command are returned in
hexadecimal as a response. The words are returned in order, starting with the
specified beginning word.
Note Be careful about the configuration of the DM area, as it varies depending on the
CPU Unit model.
4-5-7 AR AREA READ – RJ
Reads the contents of the specified number of AR words, starting from the specified word.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
R
J
Header
code
Note
x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100 x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100
Beginning word1
No. of words2
FCS
↵
Terminator
1. Beginning word: 0000 to 0023 in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs, 0000 to 0015 in
CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs
2. No. of words: 0001 to 0024 in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs, 0001 to 0016 in
CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs
Response Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
280
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
R
J
Header
code
x 161 x 160 x 163 x 162 x 161 x 160
End code
Read data (1 word )
Read data
(for number of words read)
FCS
↵
Terminator
Section
Host Link Commands
Parameters
4-5
Read Data (Response)
The contents of the number of words specified by the command are returned in
hexadecimal as a response. The words are returned in order, starting with the
specified beginning word.
4-5-8 IR/SR AREA WRITE – WR
Writes data to the IR and SR areas, starting from the specified word. Writing is
done word by word.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
W
R
Header
code
Note
x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100 x 163 x 162 x 161 x 160
Beginning word*
Write data (1 word)
↵
Terminator
FCS
Write data
(for number of words to write)
1. Beginning word: 0000 to 0049 and 0200 to 0252 in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs,
0000 to 0019 and 0200 to 0252 in CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs.
2. Divide the command when writing more than 30 words of data.
Response Format
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
R
x 161 x 160
Header
code
End code
W
FCS
↵
Terminator
Note Words 0050 to 0199 cannot be specified in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs and words
0020 to 0199 cannot be specified in CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs. If an attempt is made to write to any of these words, the writing operation will not be
executed and normal completion occurs.
Parameters
Write Data (Command)
Specify in order the contents of the number of words to be written to the IR or SR
area in hexadecimal, starting with the specified beginning word.
Note If data is specified for writing which exceeds the allowable range, an error will be
generated and the writing operation will not be executed. If, for example, 252 is
specified as the beginning word for writing,and two words of data are specified,
then 253 will become the last word for writing data, and the command will not be
executed because SR 253 is beyond the writable range.
4-5-9 LR AREA WRITE – WL
Writes data to the LR area, starting from the specified word. Writing is done word
by word.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
W
L
Header
code
x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100 x 163 x 162 x 161 x 160
Beginning word*
Write data (1 word)
FCS
↵
Terminator
Write data
(for number of words to write )
Note Beginning word: 0000 to 0015
281
Section
Host Link Commands
Response Format
4-5
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
Parameters
L
x 161 x 160
Header
code
End code
W
FCS
↵
Terminator
Write Data (Command)
Specify in order the contents of the number of words to be written to the LR area
in hexadecimal, starting with the specified beginning word.
Note If data is specified for writing which exceeds the allowable range, an error will be
generated and the writing operation will not be executed. If, for example, 12 is
specified as the beginning word for writing and five words of data are specified,
then 16 will become the last word for writing data, and the command will not be
executed because LR 16 is beyond area boundary.
4-5-10 HR AREA WRITE – WH
Writes data to the HR area, starting from the specified word. Writing is done word
by word.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
W
H
x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100 x 163 x 162 x 161 x 160
Header
code
Beginning word*
↵
Write data (1 word)
FCS
Terminator
Write data
(for no. of words to write)
Note Beginning word:0000 to 0019
Response Format
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
Parameters
H
x 161 x 160
Header
code
End code
W
FCS
↵
Terminator
Write Data (Command)
Specify in order the contents of the number of words to be written to the HR area
in hexadecimal, starting with the specified beginning word.
Note If data is specified for writing which exceeds the allowable range, an error will be
generated and the writing operation will not be executed. If, for example, 18 is
specified as the beginning word for writing, and three words of data are specified, then 20 will become the last word for writing data, and the command will not
be executed because HR 20 is beyond area boundary.
4-5-11 PV WRITE – WC
Writes the PVs (present values) of timers/counters starting from the specified
timer/counter.
282
Section
Host Link Commands
4-5
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
W
x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100 x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100
C
Header
code
Beginning timer/counter*
↵
Write data (1 timer/counter)
Terminator
FCS
Write data
(for no. of PV to write)
Note
1. Beginning T/C: 0000 to 0255 in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs, 0000 to 0127 in
CPM1/ CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs
2. Divide the command when writing more than 29 words of data.
Response Format
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
W
Node no.
Parameters
C
Header
code
x 161 x 160
↵
End code
FCS
Terminator
Write Data (Command)
Specify in decimal numbers (BCD) the present values for the number of timers/
counters that are to be written, starting from the beginning timer/counter.
Note
1. When this command is used to write data to the PV area, the Completion
Flags for the timers/counters that are written will be turned OFF.
2. If data is specified for writing which exceeds the allowable range, an error
will be generated and the writing operation will not be executed. If, for example, 126 is specified as the beginning word for writing in a CPM1 PC, and
three words of data are specified, then 128 will become the last word for writing data, and the command will not be executed because TC 128 is beyond
area boundary.
4-5-12 TC STATUS WRITE – WG
Writes the status of the Completion Flags for timers and counters in the TC area,
starting from the specified timer/counter (number). Writing is done number by
number.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
W
Node no.
G
Header
code
x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100 ON/
OFF
↵
Beginning timer/counter*
Terminator
FCS
Write data
(1 timer/counter)
Write data
(for number of TC to write)
Note
Response Format
1. Beginning T/C: 0000 to 0255 in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs, 0000 to 0127 in
CPM1/ CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs
2. Divide the command when writing the status of more than 118 timer/counters.
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
W
G
Header
code
x 161 x 160
End code
FCS
↵
Terminator
283
Section
Host Link Commands
Parameters
4-5
Write Data (Command)
Specify the status of the Completion Flags, for the number of timers/counters to
be written, in order (from the beginning word) as ON (i.e., “1”) or OFF (i.e., “0”).
When a Completion Flag is ON, it indicates that the time or count is up.
Note If data is specified for writing which exceeds the allowable range, an error will be
generated and the writing operation will not be executed. If, for example, 126 is
specified as the beginning word for writing in a CPM1 PC, and three words of
data are specified, then 128 will become the last word for writing data, and the
command will not be executed because TC 128 is beyond area boundary.
4-5-13 DM AREA WRITE – WD
Writes data to the DM area, starting from the specified word. Writing is done
word by word.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
W
D
Header
code
Note
Response Format
x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100 x 163 x 162 x 161 x 160
Beginning word*
Write data (1 word)
↵
Terminator
FCS
Write data
(for number of words to write)
1. Beginning word:
DM 0000 to DM 1023 and DM 6144 to DM 6655 in CPM1/CPM1A PCs
DM 0000 to DM 2047 and DM 6144 to DM 6655 in CPM2A/CPM2C/
SRM1(-V2) PCs
2. Divide the command when writing more than 29 words of data.
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
D
x 161 x 160
Header
code
End code
W
FCS
↵
Terminator
Note Words DM 1024 to DM 6143 in CPM1/CPM1A PCs and words DM 2048 to
DM 6143 in CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2) PCs cannot be specified. If an attempt
is made to write to any of these words, the writing operation will not be executed
for these words and the command will end normally.
Parameters
Write Data (Command)
Specify in order the contents of the number of words to be written to the DM area
in hexadecimal, starting with the specified beginning word.
Note
1. If data is specified for writing which exceeds the allowable range, an error
will be generated and the writing operation will not be executed. If, for example, 1022 is specified as the beginning word for writing in a CPM1 PC, and
three words of data are specified, then 1024 will become the last word for
writing data, and the command will not be executed because DM 1024 is
beyond the writable range.
2. Be careful about the configuration of the DM area, as it varies depending on
the CPU Unit model.
4-5-14 AR AREA WRITE – WJ
Writes data to the AR area, starting from the specified word. Writing is done word
by word.
284
Section
Host Link Commands
4-5
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
W
J
x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100 x 163 x 162 x 161 x 160
Header
code
Beginning word*
Write data (1 word)
↵
Terminator
FCS
Write data
(for the number of words to write)
Note Beginning word: 0000 to 0023 in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs, 0000 to 0015 in
CPM1/CPM1A and SRM1(-V2) PCs
Response Format
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
Parameters
J
x 161 x 160
Header
code
End code
W
:
FCS
↵
Terminator
Write Data (Command)
Specify in order the contents of the number of words to be written to the AR area
in hexadecimal, starting with the specified beginning word.
Note If data is specified for writing which exceeds the allowable range, an error will be
generated and the writing operation will not be executed. If, for example, 12 is
specified as the beginning word for writing in a CPM1 PC, and five words of data
are specified, then 16 will become the last word for writing data, and the command will not be executed because AR 16 is beyond the writable range.
4-5-15 SV READ 1 – R#
Searches for the first instance of a timer or counter instruction (TIM, TIMH(15),
TIML(––), TMHH(––), CNT, or CNTR(12)) with the specified TC number in the
user’s program and reads the PV, which is assumed to be set as a constant. The
SV that is read is a 4-digit decimal number (BCD). The program is searched from
the beginning, which may take as much as 10 seconds to produce a response.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
R
#
OP1 OP2 OP3 OP4 x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100
Header
code
Name
TC number*
↵
Terminator
FCS
Note TC number: 0000 to 0255 in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs and 0000 to 0127 in
CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs
Response Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
R
#
Header
code
x 161 x 160 x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100
End code
SV
FCS
↵
Terminator
285
Section
Host Link Commands
Parameters
4-5
Name, TC Number (Command)
Specify the instruction for reading the SV in “Name.” Make this setting in 4 characters. In “TC number,” specify the timer/counter number used for the instruction.
Name
OP1
OP2
Instruction name
T
I
OP3
M
OP4
(Space) TIMER
T
I
M
H
HIGH-SPEED TIMER
T
I
M
L
LONG TIMER
T
M
H
H
VERY HIGH-SPEED TIMER
C
N
T
(Space) COUNTER
C
N
T
R
REVERSIBLE COUNTER
SV (Response)
The constant SV is returned.
Note
1. The instruction specified under “Name” must be in four characters.
2. If the same instruction is used more than once in a program, only the first one
will be read.
3. Use this command only when it is definite that a constant SV has been set.
4. The response end code will indicate an error (16) if the SV wasn’t entered as
a constant.
4-5-16 SV READ 2 – R$
Reads the constant SV or the word address where the SV is stored. The SV that
is read is a 4-digit decimal number (BCD) written as the second operand for the
TIM, TIMH(15), TIML(––), TMHH(––), CNT, or CNTR(12) instruction at the specified program address in the user’s program. This can only be done with a program of less than 10K.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
R
$
x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100 OP1 OP2 OP3 OP4 x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100
Header
code
Program
address
Name
TC number*
FCS
↵
Terminator
Note TC number: 0000 to 0255 in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs and 0000 to 0127 in
CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs
Response Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
286
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
R
$
Header
code
x 161 x 160 OP1 OP2 OP3 OP4 x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100
End code
Operand
SV
FCS
↵
Terminator
Section
Host Link Commands
Parameters
4-5
Name, TC Number (Command)
Specify the name of the instruction for reading the SV in “Name.” Make this setting in 4 characters. In “TC number,” specify the timer/counter number used by
the instruction.
Name
OP1
OP2
Instruction name
T
I
M
OP3
OP4
(Space)
TIMER
T
I
M
H
HIGH-SPEED TIMER
T
I
M
L
LONG TIMER
T
M
H
H
VERY HIGH-SPEED TIMER
C
N
T
(Space)
COUNTER
C
N
T
R
REVERSIBLE COUNTER
Operand, SV (Response)
The name that indicates the SV classification is returned to “Operand,” and either the word address where the SV is stored or the constant SV is returned to
“SV.”
Operand
OP1 OP2
OP3
Classification
OP4
Constant or word address
C
I
O
L
R
(Space) (Space) LR
CPM2A/
CPM2C PCs
0000 to 0049
0200 to 0255
0000 to 0015
H
R
(Space) (Space) HR
0000 to 0019
0000 to 0019
A
R
(Space) (Space) AR
0000 to 0023
0000 to 0015
D
M
(Space) (Space) DM
0000 to 6655
0000 to 6655
D
M
(Space) DM (indirect)
0000 to 6655
0000 to 6655
C
O
N
(Space) Constant
0000 to 9999
0000 to 9999
(Space) IR or SR
CPM1 PCs
0000 to 0019
0200 to 0255
0000 to 0015
Note The instruction name specified under “Name” must be in four characters. Fill any
gaps with spaces to make a total of four characters.
4-5-17 SV CHANGE 1 – W#
Searches for the first instance of the specified TIM, TIMH(15), TIML(––),
TMHH(––), CNT, or CNTR(12) instruction in the user’s program and changes
the SV to new constant SV specified in the second word of the instruction. The
program is searched from the beginning, and it may therefore take approximately 10 seconds to produce a response.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
W
#
Header
code
OP1 OP2 OP3 OP4 x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100 x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100
Name
TC number*
SV (0000 to 9999)
FCS
↵
Terminator
Note TC number: 0000 to 0255 in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs and 0000 to 0127 in
CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs
Response Format
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
W
#
Header
code
x 161 x 160
End code
FCS
↵
Terminator
287
Section
Host Link Commands
Parameters
4-5
Name, TC Number (Command)
In “Name,” specify the name of the instruction, in four characters, for changing
the SV. In “TC number,” specify the timer/counter number used for the instruction.
Instruction name
OP1
OP2
Classification
OP3
T
I
M
OP4
(Space)
T
I
M
H
HIGH-SPEED TIMER
T
I
M
L
LONG TIMER
T
M
H
H
VERY HIGH-SPEED TIMER
C
N
T
(Space)
COUNTER
C
N
T
R
REVERSIBLE COUNTER
TIMER
4-5-18 SV CHANGE 2 – W$
Changes the contents of the second word of the TIM, TIMH(15), TIML(––),
TMHH(––), CNT, or CNTR(12) at the specified program address in the user’s
program. This can only be done with a program of less than 10K.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
W
$
x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100 OP1 OP2 OP3 OP4
Header
code
Program
address
x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100
Name
TC number
OP1 OP2 OP3 OP4
x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100
Operand
SV
FCS
↵
Terminator
Note TC number: 0000 to 0255 in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs and 0000 to 0127 in
CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs
Response Format
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
Parameters
W
$
Header
code
x 161 x 160
End code
FCS
Terminator
Name, TC Number (Command)
In “Name,” specify the name of the instruction, in four characters, for changing
the SV. In “TC number,” specify the timer/counter number used for the instruction.
Instruction name
OP1
288
↵
OP2
OP3
Classification
T
I
M
OP4
(Space)
TIMER
T
I
M
H
HIGH-SPEED TIMER
T
I
M
L
LONG TIMER
T
M
H
H
VERY HIGH-SPEED TIMER
C
N
T
(Space)
COUNTER
C
N
T
R
REVERSIBLE COUNTER
Section
Host Link Commands
4-5
Operand, SV (Response)
In “Operand,” specify the name that indicates the SV classification. Specify the
name in four characters. In “SV,” specify either the word address where the SV is
stored or the constant SV.
Operand
OP1
OP2
OP3
C
I
O
L
R
H
A
Constant or word address
Classification
OP4
(Space) (Space) LR
CPM2A/
CPM2C PCs
0000 to 0049
0200 to 0252
0000 to 0015
CPM1/CPM1A/
SRM1(-V2) PCs
0000 to 0019
0200 to 0252
0000 to 0015
R
(Space) (Space) HR
0000 to 0019
0000 to 0019
R
(Space) (Space) AR
0000 to 0023
0000 to 0015
D
M
(Space) (Space) DM
D
M
(Space) DM (indirect)
C
O
N
(Space) Constant
0000 to 2047
6144 to 6655
0000 to 2047
6144 to 6655
0000 to 9999
0000 to 1023*
6144 to 6655
0000 to 1023*
6144 to 6655
0000 to 9999
(Space) IR or SR
Note *For SRM1(-V2) PCs, the DM range is from 0000 to 2047.
4-5-19 STATUS READ – MS
Reads the PC operating conditions.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
Response Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
M
S
Header
code
FCS
↵
Terminator
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
M
S
Header
code
x 161 x 160 x 163 x 162 x 161 x 160 16 characters
End code
Status data
Message
FCS
↵
Terminator
289
Section
Host Link Commands
Parameters
Status Data, Message (Response)
“Status data” consists of four digits (two bytes) hexadecimal. The leftmost byte
indicates CPU Unit operation mode, and the rightmost byte indicates the size of
the program area.
x 163
Bit 15
4-5
14
13
0
0
x 162
12
11
10
0
0
9
8
Bit
1: Fatal error generated
1: FALS generated
Operation mode
9
8
0
0
PROGRAM mode
1
0
RUN mode
1
1
MONITOR mode
x 161
Bit
7
6
This area is different
from that of STATUS
WRITE.
x 160
5
4
3
1
2
1
0
0
0
0
Program area
Bit
6
5
4
0
0
0
None
0
0
1
4 Kbytes
0
1
0
8 Kbytes
Program area write-protection
0: Write-protected
1: Not write-protected
The “Message” parameter is a 16-character message that exists when MSG(47)
has been executed. When there is no message, this parameter is omitted.
4-5-20 STATUS WRITE – SC
Changes the PC operating mode.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
Response Format
C
Header
code
x 161 x 160
Mode data
FCS
↵
Terminator
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
290
S
S
C
Header
code
x 161 x 160
End code
FCS
↵
Terminator
Section
Host Link Commands
Parameters
4-5
Mode Data (Command)
“Mode data” consists of two digits (one byte) hexadecimal. With the leftmost two
bits, specify the PC operating mode. Set all of the remaining bits to “0.”
x 161
x 160
Bit 7
6
5
4
3
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
Bit
Operation mode
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
PROGRAM mode
MONITOR mode
RUN mode
This area is different
from that of STATUS
READ.
4-5-21 ERROR READ – MF
Reads and clears errors in the PC. Also checks whether previous errors have
been cleared.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
Response Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
Parameters
M
F
Header
code
x 101 x 100
Error clear
FCS
↵
Terminator
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
M
F
Header
code
x 161 x 160 x 163 x 162 x 161 x 160 x 163 x 162 x 161 x 160
End code
Error information
(1st word)
Error information
(2nd word)
FCS
↵
Terminator
Error Clear (Command)
Specify 01 to clear errors and 00 to not clear errors (BCD). Fatal errors can be
cleared only when the PC is in PROGRAM mode.
Error Information (Response)
The error information comes in two words.
291
Section
Host Link Commands
4-5
CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A/CPM2C PCs
1st word
x 163
Bit 15
14
x 162
13
12
11
0
0
0
10
x 161
9
8
7
0
6
x 160
5
0
4
3
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
ON: Battery alarm (F7)
ON: System error (FAL)
ON: Memory error (Error code F1)
ON: I/O bus error (Error code C0)
ON: No end instruction error (FALS)
ON: System error (FAL)
2nd word
x 163
Bit 15
14
0
0
13
x 162
12
x 161
11
10
9
8
0
0
0
0
7
6
x 160
5
4
3
2
1
0
FAL, FALS No. (00 to FF)
ON: Cycle time overrun (Error code F8)
ON: I/O Unit overflow (Error code E1)
SRM1(-V2) PCs
1st word
x 163
Bit 15
14
x 162
13
12
11
10
9
0
0
0
0
0
x 161
8
7
x 160
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
ON: System error (FAL)
ON: Memory error (Error code F1)
ON: No end instruction error (FALS)
ON: System error (FAL)
2nd word
x 163
Bit 15
14
13
0
0
0
x 162
12
x 161
11
10
9
8
0
0
0
0
7
6
5
x 160
4
3
2
1
0
FAL, FALS No. (00 to 99)
ON: Cycle time overrun (Error code F8)
4-5-22 FORCED SET – KS
Force sets a bit in the IR, SR, LR, HR, AR, or TC area. Just one bit can be force
set at a time.
Once a bit has been forced set or reset, that status will be retained until a
FORCED SET/RESET CANCEL (KC) command or the next FORCED SET/RESET command is transmitted.
292
Section
Host Link Commands
4-5
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
K
S
Header
code
Response Format
OP1 OP2 OP3 OP4 x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100 x 101 x 100
Name
Word
address
Bit
FCS
↵
Terminator
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
Parameters
K
S
Header
code
x 161 x 160
End code
FCS
↵
Terminator
Name, Word address, Bit (Command)
In “Name,” specify the area (i.e., IR, SR, LR, HR, AR, or TC) that is to be forced
set. Specify the name in four characters. In “Word address,” specify the address
of the word, and in “Bit” the number of the bit that is to be forced set.
Name
OP3
Word address setting range
Classification
OP1
OP2
OP4
C
I
O
(Space) IR or SR
L
H
A
T
T
T
T
C
C
R
R
R
I
I
I
M
N
N
(Space)
(Space)
(Space)
M
M
M
H
T
T
(Space)
(Space)
(Space)
(Space)
H
L
H
(Space)
R
LR
HR
AR
Completion Flag (timer)
Completion Flag (high-speed timer)
Completion Flag (long timer)
Completion Flag (very high-speed timer)
Completion Flag (counter)
Completion Flag (reversible counter)
CPM2A/
CPM2C PCs
0000 to 0049
0200 to 0252
0000 to 0015
0000 to 0019
0000 to 0023
0000 to 0255
CPM1/ CPM1A/
SRM1(-V2) PCs
0000 to 0019
0200 to 0252
0000 to 0015
0000 to 0019
0000 to 0015
0000 to 0127
Bit
00 to 15
(decimal))
(dec
Always
y
00
Note The area specified under “Name” must be in four characters. Add spaces after
the data area name if it is shorter than four characters.
4-5-23 FORCED RESET – KR
Force resets a bit in the IR, SR, LR, HR, AR, or TC area. Just one bit can be force
reset at a time.
Once a bit has been forced set or reset, that status will be retained until a
FORCED SET/RESET CANCEL (KC) command or the next FORCED SET/RESET command is transmitted.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
Response Format
K
R
Header
code
OP1 OP2 OP3 OP4 x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100 x 101 x 100
Name
Word
address
Bit
FCS
↵
Terminator
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
K
R
Header
code
x 161 x 160
End code
FCS
↵
Terminator
293
Section
Host Link Commands
Parameters
4-5
Name, Word address, Bit (Command)
In “Name,” specify the area (i.e., IR, SR, LR, HR, AR, or TC) that is to be forced
reset. Specify the name in four characters. In “Word address,” specify the address of the word, and in “Bit” the number of the bit that is to be forced reset.
Name
Word address setting range
Classification
OP1
OP2
OP3
OP4
C
I
O
(Space) IR or SR
L
H
A
T
T
T
T
C
C
R
R
R
I
I
I
M
N
N
(Space)
(Space)
(Space)
M
M
M
H
T
T
(Space)
(Space)
(Space)
(Space)
H
L
H
(Space)
R
LR
HR
AR
Completion Flag (timer)
Completion Flag (high-speed timer)
Completion Flag (long timer)
Completion Flag (very high-speed timer)
Completion Flag (counter)
Completion Flag (reversible counter)
Bit
CPM2A/
CPM2C PCs
CPM1/CPM1A
/SRM1(-V2)
PCs
0000 to 0049
0200 to 0252
0000 to 0015
0000 to 0019
0000 to 0023
0000 to 0255
0000 to 0019
0200 to 0252
0000 to 0015
0000 to 0019
0000 to 0015
0000 to 0127
00 to 15
(decimal))
(dec
Always
y 00
Note The area specified under “Name” must be in four characters. Add spaces after
the data area name if it is shorter than four characters.
4-5-24 MULTIPLE FORCED SET/RESET – FK
Force sets, force resets, or cancels the status of the bits in one word in the IR,
SR, LR, HR, AR, or TC area.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
F
K
Header
code
OP1 OP2 OP3 OP4 x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100
Name
Word
address
Forced set/reset/cancel data
x 160 x 160 x 160 x 160 x 160 x 160
x 160 x 160
FCS
Bit
Response Format
15
14
13
11
10
1
Terminator
0
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
294
12
F
K
Header
code
x 161 x 160
End code
FCS
↵
↵
Terminator
Section
Host Link Commands
Parameters
4-5
Name, Word address (Command)
In “Name,” specify the area (i.e., IR, SR, LR, HR, AR, or TC) that is to be forced
set or reset. Specify the name in four characters. In “Word address,” specify the
address of the word that is to be forced set or reset.
Name
OP1
OP2
C
I
O
L
R
H
A
Word address setting range
Classification
OP3
OP4
(Space) (Space) LR
CPM2A/CPM2C
PCs
0000 to 0049
0200 to 0252
0000 to 0015
CPM1/CPM1A/
SRM1(-V2) PCs
0000 to 0019
0200 to 0252
0000 to 0015
R
(Space) (Space) HR
0000 to 0019
0000 to 0019
R
(Space) (Space) AR
0000 to 0023
0000 to 0015
T
I
M
(Space) Completion Flag (timer)
0000 to 0255
0000 to 0127
T
I
M
H
Completion Flag (high-speed timer)
0000 to 0255
0000 to 0127
T
I
M
L
Completion Flag (long timer)
T
C
C
M
N
N
H
T
T
0000 to 0255
H
Completion Flag (very high-speed timer) 0000 to 0255
(Space) Completion Flag (counter)
R
Completion Flag (reversible counter)
0000 to 0127
0000 to 0127
(Space) IR or SR
Forced set/Reset/Cancel data (Command)
If a timer or counter completion flag is specified, only bit 15 is effective and all
other bits will be ignored. Only force-setting and force-resetting are possible for
timers/counters.
If a word address is specified, the content of the word specifies the desired process for each bit in the specified word, as shown in the following table.
Hexadecimal setting
Process
0000
No action (bit status not changed)
0002
Reset
0003
Set
0004
Forced-reset
0005
Forced-set
0008
Forced set/reset status cancel
The bits that are merely set or reset may change status the next time the program is executed, but bits that are force-set or force-reset will maintain the
forced status until it is cleared.
Response Format
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
F
K
Header
code
x 161 x 160
End code
FCS
↵
Terminator
4-5-25 FORCED SET/RESET CANCEL – KC
Cancels all forced set and forced reset bits (including those set by FORCED
SET, FORCED RESET, and MULTIPLE FORCED SET/RESET). If multiple bits
are set, the forced status will be cancelled for all of them. It is not possible to cancel bits one by one using KC.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
K
C
Header
code
FCS
↵
Terminator
295
Section
Host Link Commands
Response Format
4-5
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
K
C
Header
code
End code
↵
x 161 x 160
FCS
Terminator
4-5-26 PC MODEL READ – MM
Reads the model type of the PC.
Command Format
x 101 x 100
@
Node no.
Response Format
M
Header
code
FCS
↵
Terminator
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
Parameters
M
M
M
Header
code
x 161 x 160 x 161 x 160
End code
Model
code
FCS
↵
Terminator
Model Code
“Model code” indicates the PC model in two digits hexadecimal.
Model code
Model
01
C250
02
C500
03
C120
0E
C2000
10
C1000H
11
C2000H/CQM1/CPM2A/CPM2C/CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2)
12
C20H/C28H/C40H/C200H/C200HS
20
CV500
21
CV1000
22
CV2000
40
CVM1-CPU01-E
41
CVM1-CPU11-E
42
CVM1-CPU21-E
4-5-27 TEST – TS
Returns, unaltered, one block of data transmitted from the host computer.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
296
T
S
Header
code
122 characters max.
Characters
FCS
↵
Terminator
Section
Host Link Commands
Response Format
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
Parameters
4-5
T
122 characters max.
S
Header
code
FCS
Characters
↵
Terminator
Characters (Command, Response)
For the command, this setting specifies any characters other than the carriage
return (CHR$(13)). For the response, the same characters as specified by the
command will be returned unaltered if the test is successful.
4-5-28 PROGRAM READ – RP
Reads the contents of the PC user’s program area in machine language (object
code). The contents are read as a block, from the beginning to the end.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
Response Format
P
Header
code
FCS
↵
Terminator
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
Parameters
R
R
P
Header
code
x 161 x 160 x 161 x 160
End code
1 byte
FCS
↵
Terminator
Program (for entire UM area)
Program (Response)
The program is read from the entire program area.
Note To stop this operation in progress, execute the ABORT (XZ) command.
4-5-29 PROGRAM WRITE – WP
Writes to the PC user’s program area the machine language (object code) program transmitted from the host computer. The contents are written as a block,
from the beginning.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
Response Format
W
Header
code
x 161 x 160
1 byte
FCS
↵
Terminator
Program (Up to maximum memory size)
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
Parameters
P
W
P
Header
code
x 161 x 160
End code
FCS
↵
Terminator
Program (Command)
Program data up to the maximum memory size.
297
Section
Host Link Commands
4-5
4-5-30 COMPOUND COMMAND – QQ
Registers at the PC all of the bits, words, and timers/counters that are to be read,
and reads the status of all of them as a batch.
Registering Read Information
Register the information on all of the bits, words, and timers/counters that are to
be read.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
Q
Q
Header
code
R
M
OP1 OP2 OP3 OP4 x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100 OP1 OP2
Sub-header
code
Read area
Read word address
Data
format
,
Data break
Single read information
Total read information (128 max.)
,
Data break
Read area
Read word address
Data
format
↵
OP1 OP2 OP3 OP4 x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100 OP1 OP2
FCS
Terminator
Single read information
Total read information (128 max.)
Response Format
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
Parameters
298
Q
Q
Header
code
M
R
x 161 x 160
Sub-header End code
code
FCS
↵
Terminator
Read Area (Command)
Specify in four-character code the area that is to be read. The codes that can be
specified are listed in the following table.
Section
Host Link Commands
4-5
Read Word address, Data Format (Command)
Depending on the area and type of data that are to be read, the information to be
read is as shown in the following table. The “read data” is specified in four digits
BCD, and the data format is specified in two digits BCD.
Area
classification
l
ifi i
IR or SR
LR
HR
AR
Timer
High-speed
g
timer
Long
g timer
Veryy high-speed
timer
g
Counter
Reversible counter
DM
Read data
Read word
Read area
CPM2A/
CPM2C PCs
Bit
Word
Bit
Word
Bit
Word
Bit
Bit
Completion Flag
PV
Completion Flag
PV
Completion Flag
PV
Completion Flag
PV
Completion Flag
PV
Completion Flag
PV
Word
C I O ((S))
0000 to 0049
0200 to 0255
L R ((S)) ((S))
0000 to 0015
H R (S)
( ) (S)
( )
0000 to 0019
A R ((S)) ((S))
0000 to 0023
T I M (S)
( )
0000 to 0255
TIMH
0000 to 0255
TIML
0000 to 0255
TMHH
0000 to 0255
C N T (S)
( )
0000 to 0255
CNTR
0000 to 0255
D M (S) (S)
0000 to 2047
6144 to 6655
Data format
CPM1/
CPM1A/
SRM1(-V2)
PCs
0000 to 0019
0200 to 0255
00 to 15 (decimal)
“CH”
0000 to 0015 00 to 15 (decimal)
“CH”
0000 to 0019 00 to 15 (decimal)
“CH”
0000 to 0015 00 to 15 (decimal)
“CH”
0000 to 0127 2 characters other than “CH”
“CH”
0000 to 0127 2 characters other than “CH”
“CH”
Not used.
2 characters other than “CH”
“CH”
Not used.
2 characters other than “CH”
“CH”
0000 to 0127 2 characters other than “CH”
“CH”
0000 to 0127 2 characters other than “CH”
“CH”
0000 to 1023* Any 2 characters
6144 to 6655
Note *For SRM1(-V2) PCs, the DM range is from 0000 to 2047.
(S): Space
Data Break (Command)
The read information is specified one item at a time separated by a break code
(,). The maximum number of items that can be specified is 128. (When the PV of
a timer/counter is specified, however, the status of the Completion Flag is also
returned, and must therefore be counted as two items.)
Batch Reading
The bit, word, and timer/counter status is read as a batch according to the read
information that was registered with QQ.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
Q
Q
Header
code
I
R
Sub-header
code
FCS
↵
Terminator
299
Section
Host Link Commands
Response Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
4-5
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
Q
Q
Header
code
I
R
x 161 x 160 ON/ x 103 x 102 x 101 x 100
OFF
Sub-header End code
code
,
ON/
OFF
,
Data break
Timer/counter
If PV is specified the status
of the Completion Flag is
also returned.
,
x 163 x 162 x 161 x 160
Word data
IR, SR, LR, HR,
AR, DM
Bit data
ON/OFF
Parameters
,
FCS
↵
Terminator
Read Data (Response)
Read data is returned according to the data format and the order in which read
information was registered using QQ. If “Completion Flag” has been specified,
then bit data (ON or OFF) is returned. If “Word” has been specified, then word
data is returned. If “PV” has been specified for timers/counters, however, then
the PV is returned following the Completion Flag.
Data Break (Response)
The break code (, ) is returned between sections that are read.
4-5-31 ABORT – XZ
Aborts the Host Link operation that is currently being processed, and then enables reception of the next command. The ABORT command does not receive a
response.
Command Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
X
Z
Header
code
FCS
↵
Terminator
4-5-32 INITIALIZE – Initializes the transmission control procedure of all the PCs connected to the
host computer. The INITIALIZE command does not use node numbers or FCS,
and does not receive a response.
Command Format
@
↵
4-5-33 TXD RESPONSE – EX
This command is supported by CPM2A/CPM2C PCs only.
This is the response format used when the PC’s TXD(48) instruction is executed
in Host Link communications mode. There is no command associated with EX.
TXD(48) converts the specified data into ASCII and transmits it to the host computer with this format. The response can contain up to 122 characters of ASCII
data. (TXD(48) does not support multiple frames.)
300
Section
Host Link Commands
Response Format
An end code of 00 indicates normal completion.
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
Parameters
4-5
T
S
Data specified in TXD(48)
Header
code
FCS
Characters
(122 max.)
↵
Terminator
Characters (Response)
This is the data specified in TXD(48) that has been converted to ASCII.
4-5-34 Undefined Command – IC
This response is returned if the header code of a command cannot be decoded.
Check the header code.
Response Format
@
x 101 x 100
Node no.
I
C
Header
code
FCS
↵
Terminator
301
SECTION 5
Memory Areas
This section describes the structure of the PC memory areas and explains how to use them.
5-1
5-2
5-3
Memory Area Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-1-1 Memory Area Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-1-2 Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-1-3 CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) Flash Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O Allocation for CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A PCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-2-1 CPU Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-2-2 Expansion I/O Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-2-3 Expansion Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-2-4 Examples of Expansion Unit and Expansion I/O Unit Allocation . . . . . . . . . . . .
I/O Allocation for CPM2C PCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-3-1 CPU Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-3-2 Expansion I/O Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-3-3 Expansion Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-3-4 Examples of Expansion Unit and Expansion I/O Unit Allocation . . . . . . . . . . . .
304
304
307
309
309
309
313
314
315
319
319
321
324
325
303
Section
Memory Area Functions
5-1
5-1
Memory Area Functions
5-1-1 Memory Area Structure
CPM1/CPM1A
Data area
IR area1 Input area
Output area
Work area
SR area
TR area
The following memory areas can be used with the CPM1/CPM1A.
Words
IR 000 to IR 009
(10 words)
IR 010 to IR 019
(10 words)
IR 200 to IR 231
(32 words)
SR 232 to SR 255
(24 words)
---
Bits
IR 00000 to IR 00915
(160 bits)
IR 01000 to IR 01915
(160 bits)
IR 20000 to IR 23115
(512 bits)
SR 23200 to SR 25515
(384 bits)
TR 0 to TR 7
(8 bits)
HR 0000 to HR 1915
(320 bits)
HR area2
HR 00 to HR 19
(20 words)
AR area2
AR 00 to AR 15
AR 0000 to AR 1515
(16 words)
(256 bits)
LR 00 to LR 15
LR 0000 to LR 1515
(16 words)
(256 bits)
TC 000 to TC 127 (timer/counter numbers)3
LR area1
Timer/Counter area2
DM area Read/write2
DM 0000 to DM 0999 --DM 1022 to DM 1023
(1,002 words)
Error log
DM 1000 to DM 1021 --(22 words)
Read-only4
DM 6144 to DM 6599 --(456 words)
DM 6600 to DM 6655 --(56 words)
PC Setup4
Note
Function
These bits are allocated to the external I/O
terminals.
e
s
Work bits can be freely used within the program.
These bits serve specific functions such as
flags and control bits.
These bits are used to temporarily store
ON/OFF status at program branches.
These bits store data and retain their ON/
OFF status when power is turned off, or operation starts or stops. They are used in the
same way as work bits.
These bits serve specific functions such as
flags and control bits.
Used for a 1:1 PC Link with another PC.
Timers and counters use the TIM,
TIMH(15), CNT and CNTR(12) instructions.
The same numbers are used for both timers
and counters.
DM area data can be accessed in word
units only. Word values are retained when
the power is turned off, or operation started
or stopped.
Read/write areas can be read and written
freely within the program.
Used to store the time of occurrence and
error code of errors that occur. These words
can be used as ordinary read/write DM
when the error log function is not being
used.
Cannot be overwritten from program.
Used to store various parameters that control PC operation.
1. IR and LR bits that are not used for their allocated functions can be used as
work bits.
2. The contents of the HR area, AR area, Counter area, and read/write DM
area are backed up by a capacitor. The backup time varies with the ambient
temperature, but at 25C, the capacitor will back up memory for 20 days. If
the power supply is off longer than the backup time, memory contents will be
cleared and AR1314 will turn ON. (This flag turns ON when data can no
longer be retained by the built-in capacitor.) Refer to 2-1-2 Characteristics in
the CPM1 and CPM1A Operation Manual for a graph showing the backup
time vs. temperature.
3. When accessing a PV, TC numbers are used as word data; when accessing
Completion Flags, they are used as bit data.
4. Data in DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be overwritten from the program, but
they can be changed from a Programming Device.
304
Section
Memory Area Functions
CPM2A/CPM2C
The following memory areas can be used with the CPM2A/CPM2C.
Data area
IR area1
Input area
5-1
Words
Bits
Function
These bits are allocated to the external I/O
e
s
terminals.
IR 000 to IR 009
(10 words)
IR 010 to IR 019
(10 words)
IR 020 to IR 049,
IR 200 to IR 227
(58 words)
IR 00000 to IR 00915
(160 bits)
IR 01000 to IR 01915
(160 bits)
IR 02000 to IR 04915,
IR 20000 to IR 22715
(928 bits)
SR area
SR 228 to SR 255
(28 words)
SR 22800 to SR 25515 These bits serve specific functions such as
(448 bits)
flags and control bits.
TR area
---
TR 0 to TR 7
(8 bits)
These bits are used to temporarily store
ON/OFF status at program branches.
HR area2
HR 00 to HR 19
(20 words)
HR 0000 to HR 1915
(320 bits)
These bits store data and retain their ON/
OFF status when power is turned OFF, or
operation starts or stops. They are used in
the same way as work bits.
AR area2
AR 00 to AR 23
(24 words)
AR 0000 to AR 2315
(384 bits)
These bits serve specific functions such as
flags and control bits.
LR area1
LR 00 to LR 15
(16 words)
LR 0000 to LR 1515
(256 bits)
Used for a 1:1 PC Link with another PC.
Timer/Counter area2
TC 000 to TC 255 (timer/counter numbers)3
Timers and counters use the TIM,
TIMH(15), CNT, CNTR(12), TMHH(––), and
TIML(––) instructions. The same numbers
are used for both timers and counters.
DM area Read/write2
DM 0000 to DM 1999 --DM 2022 to DM 2047
(2,026 words)
DM area data can be accessed in word
units only. Word values are retained when
the power is turned off, or operation started
or stopped.
Output area
Work area
Error log
DM 2000 to DM 2021 --(22 words)
Read-only4,5
DM 6144 to DM 6599 --(456 words)
DM 6600 to DM 6655 --(56 words)
PC Setup4,5
Note
Work bits can be freely used within the program.
Read/write areas can be read and written
freely within the program.
Used to store the time of occurrence and
error code of errors that occur. These words
can be used as ordinary read/write DM
when the error log function isn’t being used.
Cannot be overwritten from program.
Used to store various parameters that control PC operation.
1. IR and LR bits that are not used for their allocated functions can be used as
work bits.
2. The contents of the HR area, AR area, Counter area, and read/write DM
area are backed up by the CPU Unit’s battery. If the battery is removed or
fails, the contents of these areas will be lost and returned to default values.
(In CPM2C CPU Units without a battery, these areas are backed up by a capacitor.)
3. When a TC numbers is used as a word operand, the timer or counter PV is
accessed; when used as a bit operand, its Completion Flag is accessed.
4. Data in DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be overwritten from the program, but
they can be changed from a Programming Device.
5. The program and data in DM 6144 to DM 6655 are stored in flash memory.
305
Section
Memory Area Functions
SRM1(-V2)
The following memory areas can be used with the SRM1(-V2).
Data area
IR
area1
Words
Bits
Input area
IR 000 to IR 007
(8 words)
IR 00000 to IR 00715
(128 bits)
Output area
IR 010 to IR 017
(8 words)
IR 01000 to IR 01715
(128 bits)
Work area
IR 008 to IR 009
IR 018 to IR 019
IR 200 to IR 239
(44 words)
SR 240 to SR 255
(16 words)
SR area
5-1
Function
These bits are allocated to the external I/O
terminals. The ON/OFF status of the I/O
bits will be the same as the ON/OFF status
of the I/O terminals
(When the CompoBus/S is used in 128-bit
mode, IR 004 to IR 007 and IR 014 to
IR 017 can also be used as work bits.)
IR 00800 to IR 00915
Work bits can be freely used within the proIR 01800 to IR 01915
gram. IR 232 to IR 239 however, are used
IR 20000 to IR 23915
as the MACRO input area when MCRO(99)
(704 bits)
is being used.
SR 24000 to SR 25507 These bits serve specific functions such as
(248 bits)
flags and control bits.
TR area
---
TR 0 to TR 7
(8 bits)
These bits are used to temporarily store
ON/OFF status at program branches.
HR area2
HR 00 to HR 19
(20 words)
HR 0000 to HR 1915
(320 bits)
These bits store data and retain their ON/
OFF status when power is turned off, or operation starts or stops. They are used in the
same way as work bits.
AR area2
AR 00 to AR 15
(16 words)
AR 0000 to AR 1515
(256 bits)
These bits serve specific functions such as
flags and control bits. AR 04 to 07 are used
as slaves. Refer to AR Area.
LR area1
LR 00 to LR 15
(16 words)
LR 0000 to LR 1515
(256 bits)
Used for a 1:1 PC Link with another PC.
Timer/Counter area2
TC 000 to TC 127 (timer/counter numbers)3
Timers and counters use the TIM,
TIMH(15), CNT and CNTR(12) instructions.
The same numbers are used for both timers
and counters.
DM area Read/write2
DM 0000 to DM 1999 --(2,000 words)
DM area data can be accessed in word
units only. Word values are retained when
the power is turned off, or operation started
or stopped.
Error log
DM 2000 to DM 2021 --(22 words)
Read-only4
DM 6144 to DM 6599 --(456 words)
DM 6600 to DM 6655 --(56 words)
PC Setup4
Note
Read/write areas can be read and written
freely within the program.
Used to store the time of occurrence and
error code of errors that occur. These words
can be used as ordinary read/write DM
when the error log function is not being
used.
Cannot be overwritten from program.
Used to store various parameters that control PC operation.
1. IR and LR bits that are not used for their allocated functions can be used as
work bits.
2. The contents of the HR area, AR area, Counter area, and read/write DM
area are backed up by a capacitor or a battery. Refer to 2-1-2 Characteristics
in the SRM1 Master Control Unit Operation Manual for a graph showing the
backup time vs. temperature.
3. When accessing a PV, TC numbers are used as word data; when accessing
Completion Flags, they are used as bit data.
4. Data in DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be overwritten from the program, but
they can be changed from a Programming Device.
306
Section
Memory Area Functions
5-1
5-1-2 Functions
IR Area
The functions of the IR area are explained below.
With CPM1, CPM1A, CPM2A, and CPM2C PCs, IR area bits from IR 00000 to
IR 01915 are allocated to terminals on the CPU Unit and Expansion I/O Units.
With the SRM1(-V2), IR area bits from IR 00000 to IR 00715 and IR 01000 to IR
01715 are allocated to CompoBus/S Slaves. They reflect the ON/OFF status of
input and output signals. Input bits begin at IR 00000, and output bits begin at
IR 01000.
IR words that are not allocated to inputs or outputs can be used as work words. In
addition, unused bits in IR words allocated to outputs can be used as work bits.
Work Bits
The work bits can be used freely within the program. They can only be used within the program, however, and not for direct external I/O.
Note
1. The input bits shown in the following tables can operate as normal inputs or
they can be assigned special functions in the PC Setup.
Special functions for input bits IR 00000 through IR 00002 are set in
DM 6642:
Bit
dd
address
IR 00000
IR 00001
PC Setup setting (DM 6642 bits 08 to15)
00
Used as normal
inp ts
inputs.
01
Used as high-speed
co nter inputs.
counter
inp ts
IR 00002
02, 03, or 04
Used as inputs for
synchronized p
pulse
lse
control.
Used as a normal input.
Special functions for input bits IR 00003 through IR 00006 are set in
DM 6628:
Bit
address
dd
IR 00003
IR 00004
IR 00005*
IR 00006*
Bits in
DM 6628
00 to 03
04 to 07
08 to 11
12 to 15
PC Setup setting (in DM 6628)
0
Used as normal
i
inputs.
1
Used as
i
interrupt
inputs
i
(incl ding
(including
counter mode).
2
Used as
quick-response
i k
inp ts
inputs.
Note *Input 00006 does not exist and input 00005 must be used as a normal input in CPM2C CPU Units with 10 I/O points.
2. Output bits IR 01000 and IR 01001 can operate as normal inputs or they can
be used for pulse outputs with PULS(65), SYNC(––), or PWM(––). (Use a
CPU Unit with transistor outputs for the pulse output functions.)
Instruction
PULS(65)
Function
With SPED(64):
Single-phase pulse output without acceleration or deceleration
With ACC(––):
Single-phase pulse output with trapezoidal acceleration and
deceleration
SYNC(––)
Synchronized pulse control output
PWM(––)
Variable duty-ratio pulse output
SR Area
These bits mainly serve as flags to PC operation or contain present and set values for various functions. For details on the various bit functions, refer to relevant
sections in this manual or to Appendix C Memory Areas.
Some SR area words can be used as work words when they are not used for
their assigned purpose.
TR Area
When a complex ladder diagram cannot be programmed in mnemonic code just
as it is, these bits are used to temporarily store ON/OFF execution conditions at
307
Memory Area Functions
Section
5-1
program branches. They are used only for mnemonic code. When programming
directly with ladder diagrams using the SYSMAC Support Software (SSS) or the
SYSMAC-CPT Support Software, TR bits are automatically processed for you.
The same TR bits cannot be used more than once within the same instruction
block, but can be used again in different instruction blocks. The ON/OFF status
of TR bits cannot be monitored from a Programming Device.
Examples showing the use of TR bits in programming are provided on page 346.
HR Area
These bits retain their ON/OFF status even after the PC power supply has been
turned off or when operation begins or stops. They are used in the same way as
work bits.
AR Area
These bits mainly serve as flags related to PC operation. These bits retain their
status even after the PC power supply has been turned off or when operation
begins or stops. For details on the various bit functions, refer to relevant sections
in this manual or to Appendix C Memory Areas.
LR Area
When the CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2) is linked 1:1 with another CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2), a CQM1, an C200HS or
C200HX/HG/HE PC, these bits are used to share data. For details, refer to page
225.
LR bits can be used as work bits when not used for 1:1 PC Links.
Timer/Counter Area
This area is used to manage timers and counters created with TIM, TIMH(15),
TMHH(––)*, TIML(––)*, CNT, and CNTR(12). The same numbers are used for
both timers and counters and each number can be used only once in the user
program. Do not use the same TC number twice even for different instructions.
Use TC numbers 000 through 003 for TIMH(15) and TC numbers 004 to 007 for
TMHH(––)*. When these timer numbers are used, timing is performed as an interrupt process and the cycle timer does not affect timer operation.
TC numbers are used to create timers and counters, as well as to access
Completion Flags and present values (PVs). If a TC number is designated for
word data, it will access the present value (PV); if it is used for bit data, it will access the Completion Flag for the timer/counter.
Refer to instructions beginning on page 384 for details on timers and counters.
DM Area
DM area data is accessed in word units only. The contents of the DM area are
retained even after the PC power supply has been turned off or when operation
begins or stops.
CPM1/CPM1A
DM words DM 0000 through DM 0999, DM 1022, and DM 1023 can be used
freely in the program; other DM words are allocated specific functions, described below.
DM 1000 through DM 1021 contain the error log information. Refer to Section 9
Troubleshooting for details on the error log.
CPM2A/CPM2C
DM words DM 0000 through DM 1999 and DM 2022 through DM 2047 can be
used freely in the program; other DM words are allocated specific functions, described below.
DM 2000 through DM 2021 contain the error log information. Refer to Section 9
Troubleshooting for details on the error log.
SRM1(-V2)
DM words DM 0000 through DM 1999 can be used freely in the program; other
DM words are allocated specific functions, described below.
DM 2000 through DM 2021 contain the error log information. Refer to Section 9
Troubleshooting for details on the error log.
Note DM 6600 through DM 6655 contain the PC Setup. Refer to 1-1 PC Setup for details.
308
Section
I/O Allocation for CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A PCs
5-2
5-1-3 CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) Flash Memory
The following settings must be made to use the flash memory area for
CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs.
Writing Data
In order to write the contents of the UM area, the DM read-only area (DM 6144 to
DM 6599, and the PC Setup area (DM 6600 to DM 6655) to the flash memory,
either one of the following operations must be performed.
• Switch the PC to either the MONITOR or PROGRAM mode.
• Turn the power to the PC OFF and ON again.
Note SRM1-CO01/02 Capacitor Backup
If changes are made to the above memory areas, they are not written to the flash
memory, and the power is switched off for 20 days or more (at 25°C), the
changes (in RAM) will be lost. If this occurs, the unchanged contents will be read
from the flash memory when the PC is started again.
Changing Memory Areas
When operating the SRM1 for the first time after changes have been made to the
UM area, the DM read only area (DM 6144 to DM 6599, and the PC Setup area
(DM 6600 to DM 6655), beware of the effect resulting from the SRM1’s delay in
the operation on other devices.
The first operation for the SRM1 after the above memory areas have been
changed will be a maximum of 850 ms later than the normal first operation without changes.
SRM1 Cycle Times
A cycle time overflow warning will not be issued when any of the following operations are performed in either MONITOR or OPERATION modes. Be careful of
the effect of using online editing on SRM1 I/O response time.
• Changes to the program using online editing.
• Changes to the read-only DM area (DM 6144 to DM 6599.)
• Changes to the PC Setup area (DM 6600 to DM 6655.)
When any of the above operations are performed, the SRM1 cycle time will be
increased by a maximum of 850 ms. During this tiny interrupts will be disabled
while the program or memory contents is written.
5-2
I/O Allocation for CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A PCs
5-2-1 CPU Units
CPM1
No. of I/O
(on CPU Unit)
Model number
10
CPM1-10CDR-
20
CPM1-20CDR-
30
CPM1-30CDR-
30
CPM1-30CDR--V1
I/O
Allocated bits
Input
Output
Input
Output
Input
6 inputs: 00000 to 00005
4 outputs: 01000 to 01003
12 inputs: 00000 to 00011
8 outputs: 01000 to 01007
18 inputs:
00000 to 00011
00100 to 00105
Output
12 outputs:
01000 to 01007
01100 to 01103
Input
18 inputs:
00000 to 00011
00100 to 00105
Output
12 outputs:
01000 to 01007
01100 to 01103
Max. No. of
Expansion I/O
Units
1 (see
note 1))
(
Max. No. of I/O
(see note 1)
30
1 (see
(
note 1))
40
1 (see note 1)
50
3 (see note 2)
90
309
Section
I/O Allocation for CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A PCs
Note
5-2
1. The values for the maximum number of I/O in the above table include I/O on
Expansion I/O Units.
2. When using a CPM1 CPU Unit other than the CPM1-30CDR--V1, one of
the following 20-point Expansion I/O Units can be connected to the PC:
• CPM1-20EDR (relay outputs)
• CPM1A-20EDRT (sinking transistor outputs)
• CPM1A-20EDT1 (sourcing transistor outputs)
3. When using the CPM1-30CDR--V1, up to 3 CPM1/CPM1A Expansion I/O
Units or CPM1A-MAD01 Analog I/O Units can be connected to the PC.
CPM1A
No. of I/O
(on CPU Unit)
10
20
30
40
Model number
Allocated bits
CPM1A-10CDR-
CPM1A-10CDT-D
CPM1A-10CDT1-D
Input
6 inputs: 00000 to 00005
Output
4 outputs: 01000 to 01003
CPM1A-20CDR-
CPM1A-20CDT-D
CPM1A-20CDT1-D
Input
12 inputs: 0000 to 00011
Output
8 outputs: 01000 to 01007
CPM1A-30CDR-
CPM1A-30CDT-D
CPM1A-30CDT1-D
Inputs
18 inputs:
00000 to 00011
00100 to 00105
Output
12 outputs:
01000 to 01007
01100 to 01103
Inputs
24 inputs:
00000 to 00011
00100 to 00111
Output
16 outputs:
01000 to 01007
01100 to 01107
CPM1A-40CDR-
CPM1A-40CDT-D
CPM1A-40CDT1-D
Note
310
I/O
Max. No. of
Expansion I/O
Units
None
Max. No. of I/O
(see note 1)
10
None
20
3 (see note)
90
3 (see note)
100
1. The values for the maximum number of I/O in the above table include I/O on
Expansion I/O Units.
2. When using a CPM1A CPU Unit with 30 or 40 I/O points, up to 3 Expansion
Units or Expansion I/O Units can be connected to the PC.
Section
I/O Allocation for CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A PCs
5-2
CPM2A
No. of I/O
(on CPU Unit)
20
30
40
Model number
I/O
CPM2A-20CDR-
CPM2A-20CDT-D
CPM2A-20CDT1-D
Input
12 inputs: 0000 to 00011
Output
8 outputs: 01000 to 01007
CPM2A-30CDR-
CPM2A-30CDT-D
CPM2A-30CDT1-D
Input
18 inputs:
00000 to 00011
00100 to 00105
Output
12 outputs:
01000 to 01007
01100 to 01103
Input
24 inputs:
00000 to 00011
00100 to 00111
Output
16 outputs:
01000 to 01007
01100 to 01107
Input
36 inputs:
00000 to 00011
00100 to 00111
00200 to 00211
24 outputs:
01000 to 01007
01100 to 01107
01200 to 01207
CPM2A-40CDR-
CPM2A-40CDT-D
CPM2A-40CDT1-D
60
Allocated bits
CPM2A-60CDR-
CPM2A-60CDT-D
CPM2A-60CDT1-D
Output
Note
Max. No. of
Expansion I/O
Units
3
Max. No. of I/O
(see note 1)
80
3
90
3
100
3
120
1. The values for the maximum number of I/O in the above table include the I/O
on Expansion I/O Units.
2. When using a CPM2A CPU Unit, up to 3 Expansion Units or Expansion I/O
Units can be connected to the PC.
CPU Unit Allocation
• In the following diagrams, shaded areas indicate bits actually used for inputs or
outputs.
• Input bits are allocated starting from IR 00000.
• Output bits are allocated starting from IR 01000.
• Bits in the output words that are not used as output bits can be used as work
bits.
• Bits in the input words that are not used as input bits cannot be used as work
bits.
CPU Units with 10 I/O Points
6 inputs
IR 00000 to IR 00005
CPM1-10CDR-
CPM1A-10CD-
4 outputs
IR 01000 to IR 01003
15
Bits
Inputs
IR 000
14
13
12
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
Do not use
Outputs IR 010
311
Section
I/O Allocation for CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A PCs
5-2
CPU Units with 20 I/O Points
12 inputs
IR 00000 to IR 00011
CPM1-20CDR-
CPM1A-20CD-
CPM2A-20CD-
8 outputs
IR 01000 to IR 01007
15
Bits
Inputs
14
IR 000
13
12
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
Do not use
Outputs IR 010
CPU Units with 30 I/O Points
18 inputs
IR 00000 to IR 00011
IR 00100 to IR 00105
CPM1-30CDR-/CPM1-30CDR--V1
CPM1A-30CD-
CPM2A-30CD-
12 outputs
IR 01000 to IR 01007
IR 01100 to IR 01103
15
Bits
14
13
12
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
IR 000
Inputs
Do not use
IR 001
IR 010
Outputs
IR 011
CPU Units with 40 I/O Points
24 inputs
IR 00000 to IR 00011
IR 00100 to IR 00111
CPM1A-40CD-
CPM2A-40CD-
16 outputs
IR 01000 to IR 01007
IR 01100 to IR 01107
15
Bits
14
13
IR 000
Inputs
IR 001
IR 010
Outputs
IR 011
312
Do not use
12
11
10
Section
I/O Allocation for CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A PCs
5-2
CPU Units with 60 I/O Points
36 inputs
IR 00000 to IR 00011
IR 00100 to IR 00111
IR 00200 to IR 00211
CPM1A-60CD-
24 outputs
IR 01000 to IR 01007
IR 01100 to IR 01107
IR 01200 to IR 01207
Bits
15
14
13
12
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
IR 000
Inputs
IR 001
Do not use
IR 002
IR 010
Outputs IR 011
IR 012
5-2-2 Expansion I/O Units
No. of I/O
8
8
20
20
Model number
CPM1A-8ED
I/O
Allocated bits
Input
8 inputs: Word (m+1), bits 00 to 07
Output
---
CPM1A-8ER
CPM1A-8ET
CPM1A-8ET1
Input
---
Output
8 outputs: Word (n+1), bits 00 to 07
CPM1A-20EDR
CPM1A-20EDR1
CPM1
20EDR1
CPM1A-20EDT
CPM1A-20EDT1
Input
12 inputs: Word (m+1), bits 00 to 11
Output
8 outputs: Word (n+1), bits 00 to 07
CPM1A-20EDR
Input
12 inputs: Word (m+1), bits 00 to 11
Output
8 outputs: Word (n+1), bits 00 to 07
Compatible CPU Units
CPM1-30CDR--V1
CPM1A
CPM2A
CPM1-30CDR--V1
CPM1A
CPM2A
CPM1-30CDR--V1
CPM1A
CPM1
CPM2A
CPM1-10CDR-
CPM1-20CDR-
CPM1-30CDR-(-V1)
Note m: “m” denotes the last input word allocated to the CPU Unit, or to the previous
Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit if one is already connected.
n: “n” denotes the last output word allocated to the CPU Unit, or to the previous
Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit if one is already connected.
Expansion I/O Unit Allocation
• In the following diagrams, shaded areas indicate bits actually used for inputs or
outputs.
• Input bits are allocated to Expansion I/O Units from word (m+1), where “m” is
the last input word allocated to the CPU Unit, or to the previous Expansion Unit
or Expansion I/O Unit if one is already connected.
• Output bits are allocated to Expansion I/O Units from word (n+1), where “n” is
the last output word allocated to the CPU Unit, or to the previous Expansion
Unit or Expansion I/O Unit if one is already connected.
• Bits in the output words that are not used as output bits can be used as work
bits.
• Bits in the input words that are not used as input bits cannot be used as work
bits.
313
Section
I/O Allocation for CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A PCs
5-2
Expansion I/O Units with 8 Inputs
8 inputs
Word (m+1), bits 00 to 07
CPM1A-8ED
No outputs
15
Bits
Inputs
14
13
m+1
12
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
Do not use
Expansion I/O Units with 8 Outputs
No inputs
CPM1A-8ER
CPM1A-8ET
CPM1A-8ET1
8 outputs
Word (n+1), bits 00 to 07
15
Bits
Outputs
14
13
12
11
10
n+1
Expansion I/O Units with 20 I/O Points
12 inputs
Word (m+1), bits 00 to 11
CPM1-20EDR
CPM1A-20EDR
CPM1A-20EDR1
CPM1A-20EDT
CPM1A-20EDT1
8 outputs
Words (n+1), bits 00 to 07
15
Bits
Inputs
m+1
Outputs
n+1
14
13
12
11
10
Do not use
5-2-3 Expansion Units
Unit
Analog I/O Unit
Temperature
Sensor U
Units
i
Model number
Allocated words/bits
CPM1A-MAD01
CPM1A-MAD11
Input
2 words: m+1, m+2
Output
1 word: n+1
CPM1A-TS001
CPM1 T 101
CPM1A-TS101
Input
Output
Input
Output
Input
Output
Input
Output
2 words: m+1, m+2
--4 words: m+1 to m+4
--8 bits: m+1
8 bits: n+1
32 bits: m+1, m+2
32 bits: n+1, n+2
CPM1A-TS002
CPM1 T 102
CPM1A-TS102
CompoBus/S I/O
Li k Unit
Link
U i
CPM1A-SRT21
DeviceNet I/O
Li k Unit
Link
U i
CPM1A-DRT21
Note
314
I/O
Max. No. of
Units
3 (see note 2)
Compatible
CPU Units
CPM1
CPM1A
CPM2A
3
CPM1A
CPM2
CPM2A
1
CPM1A
CPM2
CPM2A
3
CPM1A
CPM2
CPM2A
3
CPM1A
CPM2
CPM2A
1. m: “m” denotes the last input word allocated to the CPU Unit, or to the previous Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit if one is already connected.
Section
I/O Allocation for CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A PCs
5-2
n: “n” denotes the last output word allocated to the CPU Unit, or to the previous Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit if one is already connected.
2. Only CPM1 CPU Units with the “-V1” suffix can have 3 Analog I/O Units connected. CPU Units without the “-V1” suffix can only have one Analog I/O Unit
connected.
3. Only one CPM1A-TS002/102 Temperature Sensor Unit can be connected
to the PC. If a CPM1A-TS002/102 Temperature Sensor Unit is connected to
the PC, one more Expansion Unit (other than another CPM1A-TS002/102
Temperature Sensor Unit) or Expansion I/O Unit can be connected.
Analog I/O Unit
CPM1A-MAD01/MAD11
2 analog inputs
Input 0: word (m+1)
Input 1: word (m+2)
1 analog output
Output 0: word (n+1)
Temperature Sensor Units
CPM1A-TS001/TS101
CPM1A-TS002/TS102
2 temperature inputs
Input 0: word (m+1)
Input 1: word (m+2)
4 temperature inputs
Input 0: word (m+1)
Input 1: word (m+2)
Input 2: word (m+3)
Input 3: word (m+4)
No outputs
No outputs
CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit and DeviceNet I/O Link Unit
CPM1A-SRT21
CPM1A-DRT21
8 bits
Input: word (m+1)
32 bits
Input: word (m+1, m+2)
8 bits
Output: word (n+1)
32 bits
Output: word (n+1, n+2)
Note Input bits 00 to 07 in word (m+1) are for outputs from the Master. Output bits 00 to
07 in word (n+1), are for inputs to the Master.
5-2-4 Examples of Expansion Unit and Expansion I/O Unit Allocation
• When using a CPM1 CPU Unit without “-V1” at the end of the model number,
only one Expansion I/O Unit can be connected.
• When using a CPM1 CPU Unit with “-V1” at the end of the model number, up to
3 CPM1A-series Expansion I/O Units can be connected.
• When using a CPM1A CPU Unit with 30 or 40 I/O points, or when using a
CPM2A CPU Unit, up to 3 Expansion Units or Expansion I/O Units, excluding
4-input Temperature Sensor Units, can be connected. Only one 4-input Temperature Sensor Unit can be connected. If a 4-input Temperature Sensor Unit
is connected to the PC, only one more Expansion Unit (except for another
4-input Temperature Sensor Unit) or Expansion I/O Unit can be connected.
315
Section
I/O Allocation for CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A PCs
5-2
Example: CPU Unit with 20 I/O Points + Expansion I/O Unit with 20 I/O Points
CPU Unit
(20 I/O points)
Expansion I/O Unit
(20 I/O points)
12 inputs
IR 00000 to IR 00011
12 inputs
IR 00100 to IR 00111
8 outputs
IR 01000 to IR 01007
8 outputs
IR 01100 to IR 01107
15
Bits
Inputs
14
13
12
IR 000
Do not use
IR 001
Do not use
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
IR 010
Outputs
IR 011
• IR 00000 to IR 00011 and IR 00100 to IR 00111 are allocated as input bits.
IR 00012 to 00015 cannot be used.
• IR 01000 to IR 01007 and IR 01100 to IR 01107 are allocated as output bits.
IR 01108 to IR 01115 can be used as work bits.
• IR 002 to IR 009 of the input words and IR 012 to IR 019 of the output words can
all be used as work words.
Example: CPU Unit with 30 I/O Points + 3 Expansion I/O Units with 20 I/O Points
CPU Unit
(30 I/O points)
Expansion I/O Unit
(20 I/O points)
Expansion I/O Unit
(20 I/O points)
18 inputs
IR 00000 to IR 00011
IR 00100 to IR 00105
12 inputs
IR 00200 to IR 00211
12 inputs
IR 00300 to IR 00311
12 inputs
IR 00400 to IR 00411
12 outputs
IR 01000 to IR 01007
IR 01100 to IR 01103
8 outputs
IR 01200 to IR 01207
8 outputs
IR 01300 to IR 01307
8 outputs
IR 01400 to IR 01407
15
Bits
Inputs
14
13
IR 000
Do not use
IR 001
Do not use
IR 002
Do not use
IR 003
Do not use
IR 004
Do not use
IR 010
IR 011
Outputs IR 012
IR 013
IR 014
316
Expansion I/O Unit
(20 I/O points)
12
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
Section
I/O Allocation for CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A PCs
5-2
Example: CPU Unit with 60 I/O Points + 3 Expansion I/O Units
CPU Unit
(60 I/O points)
Expansion I/O Unit
(20 I/O points)
Expansion I/O Unit
(16 outputs)
Expansion I/O Unit
(20 I/O points)
36 inputs
IR 00000 to IR 00011
IR 00100 to IR 00111
IR 00200 to IR 00211
12 inputs
IR 00300 to IR 00311
No inputs
12 inputs
IR 00400 to IR 00411
24 outputs
IR 01000 to IR 01007
IR 01100 to IR 01107
IR 01200 to IR 01207
8 outputs
IR 01300 to IR 01307
16 outputs
IR 01400 to IR 01415
8 outputs
IR 01500 to IR 01507
15
Bits
Inputs
14
13
IR 000
Do not use
IR 001
Do not use
IR 002
Do not use
IR 003
Do not use
IR 004
Do not use
12
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
IR 010
IR 011
Outputs IR 012
IR 013
IR 014
IR 015
317
Section
I/O Allocation for CPM1/CPM1A/CPM2A PCs
5-2
Example: Configuration Including Analog I/O Unit, Temperature Sensor Unit, and Expansion I/O Unit
CPU Unit
(60 I/O points)
Analog I/O Unit
CPM1A-MAD01/11
36 inputs
IR 00000 to IR 00011
IR 00100 to IR 00111
IR 00200 to IR 00211
2 analog inputs
Input 0: IR 003
Input 1: IR 004
24 outputs
IR 01000 to IR 01007
IR 01100 to IR 01107
IR 01200 to IR 01207
15
Bits
Inputs
Temperature Sensor Unit
CPM1A-TS001/101
Expansion I/O Unit
(20 I/O points)
2 temperature inputs
Input 0: IR 005
Input 1: IR 006
16 inputs
IR 00700 to IR 00711
1 analog output
Output 1: IR 013
14
13
IR 000
Do not use
IR 001
Do not use
IR 002
Do not use
IR 003
12
11
No outputs
10
09
08
07
06
8 outputs
IR 01400 to IR 01407
05
04
02
01
00
Used for input 0 of the Analog I/O Unit
IR 004
Used for input 1 of the Analog I/O Unit
IR 005
Used for input 0 of the Temperature Sensor Unit
IR 006
Used for input 1 of the Temperature Sensor Unit
IR 007
03
Do not use
IR 010
IR 011
Outputs IR 012
IR 013
Used for the output of the Analog I/O Unit
IR 014
With the exception of CPM1A-TS002/102 Temperature Sensor Units, up to 3
Expansion Units (Analog I/O Units, Temperature Sensor Units, or CompoBus/S
Units) can be connected to a CPM1A or CPM2A PC. Only one
CPM1A-TS002/102 Temperature Sensor Unit can be connected. (See page
319 for an example of CPM1A-TS002/102 allocations.)
318
Section
I/O Allocation for CPM2C PCs
5-3
Example: Configuration Including Temperature Sensor Unit with 4 Inputs and CompoBus/S Link Unit
CPU Unit
(60 I/O points)
Temperature Sensor Unit CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit
CPM1A-TS002/102
CPM1A-SRT21
36 inputs
IR 00000 to IR 00011
IR 00100 to IR 00111
IR 00200 to IR 00211
2 temperature inputs
Input 0: IR 003
Input 1: IR 004
Input 2: IR 005
Input 3: IR 006
24 outputs
IR 01000 to IR 01007
IR 01100 to IR 01107
IR 01200 to IR 01207
15
Bits
Inputs
8 inputs
IR 00700 to IR 00707
8 outputs
IR 01300 to IR 01307
No outputs
14
13
IR 000
Do not use
IR 001
Do not use
IR 002
Do not use
12
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
IR 003
Used for input 0 of the Temperature Sensor Unit
IR 004
Used for input 1 of the Temperature Sensor Unit
IR 005
Used for input 1 of the Temperature Sensor Unit
IR 006
Used for input 1 of the Temperature Sensor Unit
IR 007
04
03
02
01
00
Do not use
IR 010
Outputs
IR 011
IR 012
IR 013
Only one 4-input Temperature Sensor Unit (CPM1A-TS002/102) can be connected to the PC. The CPM1A-TS002/102 can, however, be connected together
with an Expansion I/O Unit or a different Expansion Unit.
5-3
I/O Allocation for CPM2C PCs
5-3-1 CPU Units
No. of I/O
(on CPU Unit)
Model number
10
CPM2C-10CD-D
20
CPM2C-20CD-D
32
CPM2C-32CDT-D
Note
I/O
Inputs
Outputs
Inputs
Outputs
Inputs
Allocated bits
6 inputs: 00000 to 00005
4 outputs: 01000 to 01003
12 inputs: 00000 to 00011
8 outputs: 01000 to 01007
16 inputs: 00000 to 00007
and 00100 to 00107
Outputs 16 outputs: 01000 to 01007
and 01100 to 01107
Max. No. of
Expansion I/O
Units
5
Max. No. of I/O
(see note 1)
170
5
180
5
192
1. The values for the maximum number of I/O in the above table include the I/O
on Expansion I/O Units.
2. Although only up to 5 Expansion Units or Expansion I/O Units can be connected to a CPM2C PC, no more than 10 input words and 10 output words
can be allocated.
319
Section
I/O Allocation for CPM2C PCs
CPU Unit Allocation
5-3
• In the following diagrams, shaded areas indicate bits actually used for inputs or
outputs.
• Input bits are allocated starting from IR 00000.
• Output bits are allocated starting from IR 01000.
• Bits in the output words that are not used as output bits can be used as work
bits.
• Bits in the input words that are not used as input bits cannot be used as work
bits.
CPU Units with 10 I/O Points
6 inputs
IR 00000
to
IR 00005
CPM2C-10CD-
4 outputs
IR 01000
to
IR 01003
Bits
Inputs
15
14
13
12
IR 000
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
Do not use
Outputs IR 010
CPU Units with 20 I/O Points
12 inputs
IR 00000
to
IR 00011
CPM2C-20CD-
8 outputs
IR 01000
to
IR 01007
15
Bits
Inputs
IR 000
Outputs IR 010
320
14
13
Do not use
12
11
10
Section
I/O Allocation for CPM2C PCs
5-3
CPU Units with 32 I/O Points
16 inputs
IR 00000 to IR 00007
and
IR 00100 to IR 00107
CPM2C-32CDT-D
16 outputs
IR 01000 to IR 01007
and
IR 01100 to IR 01107
15
Bits
Inputs
IR 000
14
13
12
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
12
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
Do not use
IR 001
15
Bits
14
13
Outputs IR 010
IR 011
5-3-2 Expansion I/O Units
No. of I/O
Model number
I/O
Max. No. of Units
Allocated bits
CPM2C
8
CPM2C-8ED
16
CPM2C-16ED
8
CPM2C-8ER
CPM2C-8ET
CPM2C-8ET1
16
CPM2C-16ET
CPM2C 16ET1
CPM2C-16ET1
10
CPM2C-10EDR
20
CPM2C-20EDR
24
CPM2C-24EDT
CPM C EDT CPM2C-24EDT1
32
CPM2C-32EDT
CPM C EDT CPM2C-32EDT1
Input
Output
Input
Output
Input
8 inputs: Word (m+1), bits 00 to 07
--16 inputs: Word (m+1), bits 00 to 15
-----
Output
8 outputs: Word (n+1), bits 00 to 07
Input
Output
Input
Output
Input
Output
Input
Output
Input
Output
--16 outputs: Word (n+1), bits 00 to 15
6 inputs: Word (m+1), bits 00 to 05
4 outputs: Word (n+1), bits 00 to 03
12 inputs: Word (m+1), bits 00 to 11
8 outputs: Word (n+1), bits 00 to 07
16 inputs: Word (m+1), bits 00 to 15
8 outputs: Word (n+1), bits 00 to 07
16 inputs: Word (m+1), bits 00 to 15
16 outputs: Word (n+1), bits 00 to 15
5
CPM2C-S
3
5
3
5
3
5
3
5
3
5
3
5
3
5
3
Note m: “m” denotes the last input word allocated to the CPU Unit, or to the previous
Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit if one is already connected.
n: “n” denotes the last output word allocated to the CPU Unit, or to the previous
Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit if one is already connected.
Expansion I/O Unit Allocation
• In the following diagrams, shaded areas indicate bits actually used for inputs or
outputs.
• Input bits are allocated to Expansion I/O Units starting from word (m+1), where
“m” is the last input word allocated to the CPU Unit, or to the previous Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit if one is already connected.
• Output bits are allocated to Expansion I/O Units starting from word (n+1),
where “n” is the last output word allocated to the CPU Unit, or to the previous
Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit if one is already connected.
321
Section
I/O Allocation for CPM2C PCs
5-3
• Bits in the output words that are not used as output bits can be used as work
bits.
• Bits in the input words that are not used as input bits can be used as work bits.
Expansion I/O Unit with 8 Inputs
8 inputs
Word (m+1), bit 00
to
Word (m+1), bit 07
CPM2C-8EDC
CPM2C-8EDM
No outputs
15
Bits
Inputs
14
13
m+1
12
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
Do not use
Expansion I/O Unit with 16 Inputs
16 inputs
Word (m+1), bit 00
to
Word (m+1), bit 15
CPM2C-16EDC
CPM2C-16EDM
No outputs
15
Bits
Inputs
14
13
12
m+1
Expansion I/O Units with 8 Outputs
CPM2C-8ER
CPM2C-8ETC
CPM2C-8ET1C
CPM2C-8ETM
CPM2C-8ET1M
No inputs
8 outputs
Word (n+1), bit 00
to
Word (n+1), bit 07
15
Bits
Outputs
14
13
12
n+1
Expansion I/O Units with 16 Outputs
CPM2C-16ETC
CPM2C-16ET1C
CPM2C-16ETM
CPM2C-16ET1M
No inputs
16 outputs
Word (n+1), bit 00
to
Word (n+1), bit 15
15
Bits
Outputs
322
n+1
14
13
12
Section
I/O Allocation for CPM2C PCs
5-3
Expansion I/O Unit with 10 I/O Points
6 inputs
Word (m+1), bit 00
to
Word (m+1), bit 05
CPM2C-10EDR
4 outputs
Word (n+1), bit 00
to
Word (n+1), bit 03
15
Bits
Inputs
m+1
Outputs
n+1
14
13
12
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
Do not use
Expansion I/O Unit with 20 I/O Points
12 inputs
Word (m+1), bit 00
to
Word (m+1), bit 11
CPM2C-20EDR
8 outputs
Word (n+1), bit 00
to
Word (n+1), bit 07
15
Bits
Inputs
m+1
Outputs
n+1
14
13
12
11
Do not use
Expansion I/O Units with 24 I/O Points
16 inputs
Word (m+1), bit 00
to
Word (m+1), bit 15
CPM2C-24EDTC
CPM2C-24EDT1C
CPM2C-24EDTM
CPM2C-24EDT1M
8 outputs
Word (n+1), bit 00
to
Word (n+1), bit 07
15
Bits
Inputs
m+1
Outputs
n+1
14
13
12
11
323
Section
I/O Allocation for CPM2C PCs
5-3
Expansion I/O Units with 32 I/O Points
16 inputs
Word (m+1), bit 00
to
Word (m+1), bit 15
CPM2C-32EDTC
CPM2C-32EDT1C
CPM2C-32EDTM
CPM2C-32EDT1M
16 outputs
Word (n+1), bit 00
to
Word (n+1), bit 15
15
Bits
Inputs
m+1
Outputs
n+1
14
13
12
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
5-3-3 Expansion Units
Unit
Model number
I/O
Max. No. of Units
Allocated words
CPM2C
Analog
g I/O Unit
CPM2C-MAD11
Temperature Sensor Unit
CPM2C-TS001
CPM2C T 101
CPM2C-TS101
CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit
CPM2C-SRT21
Note
Input
Output
Input
Output
Input
Output
2 inputs: m+1, m+2
1 output: n+1
2 inputs: m+1, m+2
--1 input: m+1
1 output: n+1
4
CPM2C-S
3
4
3
5
3
1. m: “m” denotes the last input word allocated to the CPU Unit, or to the previous Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit if one is already connected.
n: “n” denotes the last output word allocated to the CPU Unit, or to the previous Expansion Unit or Expansion I/O Unit if one is already connected.
2. Because the CPM2C-MAD11 Analog I/O Unit and the CPM2C-TS001/101
Temperature Sensor Units require 2 I/O words each, only 4 of these Units
can be connected to the PC. (The CPU Unit itself requires one input word
and one output word.) A different Unit, such as an Expansion I/O Unit or the
CPM2C-SRT21 CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit, can, however, be connected in
addition to 4 Analog I/O Units or Temperature Sensor Units.
Analog I/O Unit
CPM2C-MAD11
2 analog inputs
Input 0: word (m+1)
Input 1: word (m+2)
1 analog output
Output 0: word (n+1)
324
Section
I/O Allocation for CPM2C PCs
5-3
Temperature Sensor Units
CPM2C-TS001/TS101
2 temperature inputs
Input 0: word (m+1)
Input 1: word (m+2)
No outputs
CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit
CPM2C-SRT21
8 inputs
Input: word (m+1)
8 outputs
Output: word (n+1)
Note Input bits 00 to 07 in word (m+1) are for outputs from the Master. Output bits 00 to
07 in word (n+1), are for inputs to the Master.
5-3-4 Examples of Expansion Unit and Expansion I/O Unit Allocation
Up to 5 Expansion Units or Expansion I/O Units can be connected to a CPM2C
PC. Input bits and output bits are automatically allocated starting from the CPU
Unit and continuing through Expansion Units and Expansion I/O Units in the
order in which they are connected. The input area consists of the 10 words from
IR 000 to 009, and the output area consists of the 10 words from IR 010 to 019.
Although I/O bits are allocated automatically, it is necessary to ensure that both
the number of input words and the number of output words do not exceed 10. For
example, the Analog I/O Unit and Temperature Sensor Unit require 2 input
words and so it is not possible to connect 5 of these Units.
Example: CPU Unit with 20 I/O Points + Expansion I/O Unit with 24 I/O Points
CPU Unit
(20 I/O points)
Expansion I/O Unit
(24 I/O points)
12 inputs
IR 00000
to
IR 00011
16 inputs
IR 00100
to
IR 00115
8 outputs
IR 01000
to
IR 01007
8 outputs
IR 01100
to
IR 01107
15
Bits
IR 000
Inputs
14
13
12
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
Do not use
IR 001
IR 010
Outputs
IR 011
325
Section
I/O Allocation for CPM2C PCs
Example: CPU Unit with 32 I/O Points + 5 Expansion I/O Units with 32 I/O Points
CPU Unit
(32 I/O points)
16 inputs
IR 00000 to IR 00007
and
IR 00100 to IR 00107
16 outputs
IR 01000 to IR 01007
and
IR 01100 to IR 01107
Bits
Expansion I/O Unit
(32 I/O points)
Expansion I/O Unit
(32 I/O points)
16 inputs
IR 00200
to
IR 00215
16 inputs
IR 00300
to
IR 00315
16 outputs
IR 01200
to
IR 01215
16 outputs
IR 01300
to
IR 012315
15
IR 000
14
13
12
11
10
09
Expansion I/O Unit
(32 I/O points)
Expansion I/O Unit
(32 I/O points)
16 inputs
IR 00400
to
IR 00415
16 inputs
IR 00500
to
IR 00515
16 inputs
IR 00600
to
IR 00615
16 outputs
IR 01400
to
IR 01415
16 outputs
IR 01500
to
IR 01515
16 outputs
IR 01600
to
IR 01615
Expansion I/O Unit
(32 I/O points)
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
Do not use
IR 001
Inputs
IR 002
IR 003
IR 004
IR 005
IR 006
IR 010
Outputs IR 011
IR 012
IR 013
IR 014
IR 015
IR 016
Example: Configuration Including Expansion I/O Units and a CompoBus/S I/O Link Unit
CPU Unit
(20 I/O points)
12 inputs
IR 00000
to
IR 00011
Expansion I/O Unit
(16 input points)
Expansion I/O Unit
(16 input points)
16 inputs
IR 00100
to
IR 00115
16 inputs
IR 00200
to
IR 00215
8 outputs
IR 01000
to
IR 01007
No outputs
Bits
15
IR 000
Inputs
14
13
11
Do not use
IR 001
IR 002
IR 003
IR 010
IR 011
Outputs
IR 012
IR 013
326
Do not use
Expansion I/O Unit
(16 output points)
No inputs
10
09
08
07
16 outputs
IR 01200
to
IR 01215
06
05
04
CompoBus/S I/O
Link Unit
8 inputs
IR 00300
to
IR 00307
No inputs
16 outputs
IR 01100
to
IR 01115
No outputs
12
Expansion I/O Unit
(16 output points)
8 outputs
IR 01300
to
IR 01307
03
02
01
00
5-3
Section
I/O Allocation for CPM2C PCs
5-3
Example: Configuration Including Analog I/O Units, Temperature Sensor Units, and Expansion I/O Unit
CPU Unit
(20 I/O points)
Analog I/O Unit 1
CPM2C-MAD11
12 inputs
IR 00000
to
IR 00011
2 analog inputs
Input 0: IR 001
Input 1: IR 002
8 outputs
IR 01000
to
IR 01007
1 analog output
Output: IR 011
15
Bits
IR 000
Inputs
14
13
Temperature Sensor
Unit 1
CPM2C-TS001
2 temperature inputs
Input 0: IR 003
Input 1: IR 004
11
10
2 analog inputs
Input 0: IR 005
Input 1: IR 006
Temperature Sensor
Unit 2
CPM2C-TS101
2 temperature inputs
Input 0: IR 007
Input 1: IR 008
1 analog output
Output: word 012
No outputs
12
Analog I/O Unit 2
CPM2C-MAD11
09
08
07
No outputs
06
05
04
03
Expansion I/O Unit
(24 I/O points)
16 inputs
IR 00900
to
IR 00915
8 outputs
IR 01300
to
IR 01307
02
01
00
Do not use
IR 001
Used for input 0 of Analog I/O Unit 1
IR 002
Used for input 1 of Analog I/O Unit 1
IR 003
Used for input 0 of Temperature Sensor Unit 1
IR 004
Used for input 1 of Temperature Sensor Unit 1
IR 005
Used for input 0 of Analog I/O Unit 2
IR 006
Used for input 1 of Analog I/O Unit 2
IR 007
Used for input 0 of Temperature Sensor Unit 2
IR 008
Used for input 1 of Temperature Sensor Unit 2
IR 009
IR 010
Outputs
IR 011
Used for the output of Analog I/O Unit 1
IR 012
Used for the output of Analog I/O Unit 2
IR 013
327
SECTION 6
Ladder-diagram Programming
This section explains the basic steps and concepts involved in writing a basic ladder diagram program. It introduces the
instructions that are used to build the basic structure of the ladder diagram and control its execution. The entire set of instructions used in programming is described in Section 7 Instruction Set.
6-1
6-2
6-3
6-4
6-5
6-6
6-7
Basic Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Instruction Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Basic Ladder Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-3-1 Basic Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-3-2 Mnemonic Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-3-3 Ladder Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-3-4 OUTPUT and OUTPUT NOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-3-5 The END Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-3-6 Logic Block Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-3-7 Coding Multiple Right-hand Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-3-8 Branching Instruction Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-3-9 Jumps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controlling Bit Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-4-1 SET and RESET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-4-2 DIFFERENTIATE UP and DIFFERENTIATE DOWN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-4-3 KEEP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-4-4 Self-maintaining Bits (Seal) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Work Bits (Internal Relays) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programming Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program Execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
330
330
331
331
332
333
336
337
337
345
345
349
350
350
351
351
352
352
354
356
329
Section
Instruction Terminology
6-1
6-2
Basic Procedure
There are several basic steps involved in writing a program. Sheets that can be
copied to aid in programming are provided in Appendix D I/O Assignment Sheet
and Appendix E Program Coding Sheet.
1, 2, 3... 1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Obtain a list of all I/O devices and the I/O points that have been assigned to
them and prepare a table that shows the I/O bit allocated to each I/O device.
If you are using LR bits to link two PCs, prepare sheet showing the used of
these bits.
Determine what words are available for work bits and prepare a table in
which you can allocate these as you use them.
Also prepare tables of TC numbers and jump numbers so that you can allocate these as you use them. Remember, the function of a TC number can
be defined only once within the program; jump numbers 01 through 99 can
be used only once each. (TC number are described in 7-15 Timer and
Counter Instructions; jump numbers are described later in this section.)
Draw the ladder diagram.
Input the program into the CPU Unit. When using the Programming Console, this will involve converting the program to mnemonic form.
Check the program for syntax errors and correct these.
Execute the program to check for execution errors and correct these.
After the entire Control System has been installed and is ready for use,
execute the program and fine tune it if required.
The basics of ladder-diagram programming and conversion to mnemonic code
are described in 6-3 Basic Ladder Diagrams. Preparing for and inputting the program via the Programming Console are described in the CPM1 Operation
Manual, the CPM1A Operation Manual, the CPM2A Operation Manual, the
CPM2C Operation Manual, and the SRM1 Master Control Units Manual and via
the SSS in the SSS Operation Manual: C-series PCs.
The rest of Section 6 covers more advanced programming, programming precautions, and program execution. All special application instructions are covered in Section 7 Instruction Set. Debugging is described in the CPM1 Operation
Manual, the CPM1A Operation Manual, the CPM2A Operation Manual, the
CPM2C Operation Manual, the SRM1 Master Control Units Manual, and SSS
Operation Manual: C-series PCs. Section 9 Troubleshooting also provides information required for debugging.
6-2
Instruction Terminology
There are basically two types of instructions used in ladder-diagram programming: instructions that correspond to the conditions on the ladder diagram and
are used in instruction form only when converting a program to mnemonic code
and instructions that are used on the right side of the ladder diagram and are
executed according to the conditions on the instruction lines leading to them.
Most instructions have at least one or more operands associated with them. Operands indicate or provide the data on which an instruction is to be performed.
These are sometimes input as the actual numeric values, but are usually the addresses of data area words or bits that contain the data to be used. For instance,
a MOVE instruction that has IR 000 designated as the source operand will move
the contents of IR 000 to some other location. The other location is also designated as an operand. A bit whose address is designated as an operand is called
an operand bit; a word whose address is designated as an operand is called an
operand word. If the actual value is entered as a constant, it is preceded by # to
indicate that it is not an address.
330
Section
Basic Ladder Diagrams
6-3
Other terms used in describing instructions are introduced in Section 7 Instruction Set.
6-3
Basic Ladder Diagrams
A ladder diagram consists of one line running down the left side with lines
branching off to the right. The line on the left is called the bus bar; the branching
lines, instruction lines or rungs. Along the instruction lines are placed conditions
that lead to other instructions on the right side. The logical combinations of these
conditions determine when and how the instructions at the right are executed. A
ladder diagram is shown below.
00000 20000
25208
HR 0109
LR 0003
20001
20002
Instruction
00001
00100 00002
00501
00003 HR 0050
00502
00007 TIM 001 LR 0515
00503
00504
00403
00405
Instruction
00010
21001
21002
00011
21005
21007
As shown in the diagram above, instruction lines can branch apart and they can
join back together. The vertical pairs of lines are called conditions. Conditions
without diagonal lines through them are called normally open conditions and
correspond to a LOAD, AND, or OR instruction. The conditions with diagonal
lines through them are called normally closed conditions and correspond to a
LOAD NOT, AND NOT, or OR NOT instruction. The number above each condition indicates the operand bit for the instruction. It is the status of the bit
associated with each condition that determines the execution condition for following instructions. The way the operation of each of the instructions corresponds to a condition is described below. Before we consider these, however,
there are some basic terms that must be explained.
Note When displaying ladder diagrams with the SSS, a second bus bar will be shown
on the right side of the ladder diagram and will be connected to all instructions on
the right side. This does not change the ladder-diagram program in any functional sense. No conditions can be placed between the instructions on the right side
and the right bus bar, i.e., all instructions on the right must be connected directly
to the right bus bar. Refer to the SSS Operation Manual: C-series PCs for details.
6-3-1
Basic Terms
Normally Open and
Normally Closed
Conditions
Each condition in a ladder diagram is either ON or OFF depending on the status
of the operand bit that has been assigned to it. A normally open condition is ON if
the operand bit is ON; OFF if the operand bit is OFF. A normally closed condition
is ON if the operand bit is OFF; OFF if the operand bit is ON. Generally speaking,
you use a normally open condition when you want something to happen when a
331
Section
Basic Ladder Diagrams
6-3
bit is ON, and a normally closed condition when you want something to happen
when a bit is OFF.
00000
Instruction
Instruction is executed
when IR bit 00000 is ON.
Instruction
Instruction is executed
when IR bit 00000 is OFF.
Normally open
condition
00000
Normally closed
condition
Execution Conditions
In ladder diagram programming, the logical combination of ON and OFF conditions before an instruction determines the compound condition under which the
instruction is executed. This condition, which is either ON or OFF, is called the
execution condition for the instruction. All instructions other than LOAD instructions have execution conditions.
Operand Bits
The operands designated for any of the ladder instructions can be any bit in the
IR, SR, HR, AR, LR, or TC areas. This means that the conditions in a ladder diagram can be determined by I/O bits, flags, work bits, timers/counters, etc. LOAD
and OUTPUT instructions can also use TR area bits, but they do so only in special applications. Refer to 6-3-8 Branching Instruction Lines for details.
Logic Blocks
The way that conditions correspond to what instructions is determined by the
relationship between the conditions within the instruction lines that connect
them. Any group of conditions that go together to create a logic result is called a
logic block. Although ladder diagrams can be written without actually analyzing
individual logic blocks, understanding logic blocks is necessary for efficient programming and is essential when programs are to be input in mnemonic code.
Instruction Block
An instruction block consists of all the instructions that are interconnected
across the ladder diagram. One instruction block thus consists of all the instructions between where you can draw a horizontal line across the ladder diagram
without intersecting any vertical lines and the next place where you can draw the
same type of horizontal line.
6-3-2
Mnemonic Code
The ladder diagram cannot be directly input into the PC via a Programming Console; the SSS is required. To input from a Programming Console, it is necessary
to convert the ladder diagram to mnemonic code. The mnemonic code provides
exactly the same information as the ladder diagram, but in a form that can be
typed directly into the PC. Actually you can program directly in mnemonic code,
although it in not recommended for beginners or for complex programs. Also,
regardless of the Programming Device used, the program is stored in memory in
mnemonic form, making it important to understand mnemonic code.
Because of the importance of the Programming Console as a Programming Device and because of the importance of mnemonic code in complete understanding of a program, we will introduce and describe the mnemonic code along with
the ladder diagram. Remember, you will not need to use the mnemonic code if
you are inputting via the SSS (although you can use it with the SSS if you prefer).
Program Memory Structure
332
The program is input into addresses in Program Memory. Addresses in Program
Memory are slightly different to those in other memory areas because each address does not necessarily hold the same amount of data. Rather, each address
holds one instruction and all of the definers and operands (described in more
Section
Basic Ladder Diagrams
6-3
detail later) required for that instruction. Because some instructions require no
operands, while others require up to three operands, Program Memory addresses can be from one to four words long.
Program Memory addresses start at 00000 and run until the capacity of Program
Memory has been exhausted. The first word at each address defines the instruction. Any definers used by the instruction are also contained in the first word.
Also, if an instruction requires only a single bit operand (with no definer), the bit
operand is also programmed on the same line as the instruction. The rest of the
words required by an instruction contain the operands that specify what data is
to be used. When converting to mnemonic code, all but ladder diagram instructions are written in the same form, one word to a line, just as they appear in the
ladder diagram symbols. An example of mnemonic code is shown below. The
instructions used in it are described later in the manual.
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
LD
AND
OR
LD NOT
OR
AND LD
MOV(21)
Operands
HR
DM
00007
00008
00009
00010
00011
00012
00013
0001
00001
00002
00100
00101
000
0000
CMP(20)
DM
HR
0000
00
25505
20000
DM
DM
0000
0500
00502
00005
20001
AND
OUT
MOV(21)
LD
AND
OUT
The address and instruction columns of the mnemonic code table are filled in for
the instruction word only. For all other lines, the left two columns are left blank. If
the instruction requires no definer or bit operand, the operand column is left
blank for first line. It is a good idea to cross through any blank data column
spaces (for all instruction words that do not require data) so that the data column
can be quickly scanned to see if any addresses have been left out.
When programming, addresses are automatically displayed and do not have to
be input unless for some reason a different location is desired for the instruction.
When converting to mnemonic code, it is best to start at Program Memory address 00000 unless there is a specific reason for starting elsewhere.
6-3-3
Ladder Instructions
The ladder instructions are those instructions that correspond to the conditions
on the ladder diagram. Ladder instructions, either independently or in combination with the logic block instructions described next, form the execution conditions upon which the execution of all other instructions are based.
333
Section
Basic Ladder Diagrams
LOAD and LOAD NOT
6-3
The first condition that starts any logic block within a ladder diagram corresponds to a LOAD or LOAD NOT instruction. Each of these instruction requires
one line of mnemonic code. “Instruction” is used as a dummy instruction in the
following examples and could be any of the right-hand instructions described later in this manual.
00000
Address
A LOAD instruction.
00000
00001
00002
00003
00000
A LOAD NOT instruction.
Instruction
LD
Instruction
LD NOT
Instruction
Operands
00000
00000
When this is the only condition on the instruction line, the execution condition for
the instruction at the right is ON when the condition is ON. For the LOAD instruction (i.e., a normally open condition), the execution condition would be ON when
IR 00000 was ON; for the LOAD NOT instruction (i.e., a normally closed condition), it would be ON when 00000 was OFF.
AND and AND NOT
When two or more conditions lie in series on the same instruction line, the first
one corresponds to a LOAD or LOAD NOT instruction; and the rest of the conditions, to AND or AND NOT instructions. The following example shows three
conditions which correspond in order from the left to a LOAD, an AND NOT, and
an AND instruction. Again, each of these instructions requires one line of mnemonic code.
00000
00100
LR 0000
Instruction
Address
00000
00001
00002
00003
Instruction
LD
AND NOT
AND
Instruction
Operands
LR
00000
00100
0000
The instruction would have an ON execution condition only when all three conditions are ON, i.e., when IR 00000 was ON, IR 00100 was OFF, and LR 0000 was
ON.
AND instructions in series can be considered individually, with each taking the
logical AND of the execution condition (i.e., the total of all conditions up to that
point) and the status of the AND instruction’s operand bit. If both of these are ON,
an ON execution condition will be produced for the next instruction. If either is
OFF, the result will also be OFF. The execution condition for the first AND
instruction in a series is the first condition on the instruction line.
Each AND NOT instruction in a series would take the logical AND between its
execution condition and the inverse of its operand bit.
334
Section
Basic Ladder Diagrams
OR and OR NOT
6-3
When two or more conditions lie on separate instruction lines running in parallel
and then joining together, the first condition corresponds to a LOAD or LOAD
NOT instruction; the rest of the conditions correspond to OR or OR NOT instructions. The following example shows three conditions which correspond in order
from the top to a LOAD NOT, an OR NOT, and an OR instruction. Again, each of
these instructions requires one line of mnemonic code.
00000
Instruction
00100
LR 0000
Address
00000
00001
00002
00003
Instruction
Operands
LD NOT
OR NOT
OR
Instruction
00000
00100
0000
LR
The instruction would have an ON execution condition when any one of the three
conditions was ON, i.e., when IR 00000 was OFF, when IR 00100 was OFF, or
when LR 0000 was ON.
OR and OR NOT instructions can be considered individually, each taking the
logical OR between its execution condition and the status of the OR instruction’s
operand bit. If either one of these were ON, an ON execution condition would be
produced for the next instruction.
Combining AND and OR
Instructions
When AND and OR instructions are combined in more complicated diagrams,
they can sometimes be considered individually, with each instruction performing
a logic operation on the execution condition and the status of the operand bit.
The following is one example. Study this example until you are convinced that
the mnemonic code follows the same logic flow as the ladder diagram.
00000
00001
00002
00003
Instruction
00200
Address
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
Instruction
LD
AND
OR
AND
AND NOT
Instruction
Operands
00000
00001
00200
00002
00003
Here, an AND is taken between the status of IR 00000 and that of IR 00001 to
determine the execution condition for an OR with the status of IR 00200. The
result of this operation determines the execution condition for an AND with the
status of IR 00002, which in turn determines the execution condition for an AND
with the inverse (i.e., and AND NOT) of the status of IR 00003.
335
Section
Basic Ladder Diagrams
6-3
In more complicated diagrams, however, it is necessary to consider logic blocks
before an execution condition can be determined for the final instruction, and
that’s where AND LOAD and OR LOAD instructions are used. Before we consider more complicated diagrams, however, we’ll look at the instructions required to
complete a simple “input-output” program.
6-3-4
OUTPUT and OUTPUT NOT
The simplest way to output the results of combining execution conditions is to
output it directly with the OUTPUT and OUTPUT NOT. These instructions are
used to control the status of the designated operand bit according to the execution condition. With the OUTPUT instruction, the operand bit will be turned ON
as long as the execution condition is ON and will be turned OFF as long as the
execution condition is OFF. With the OUTPUT NOT instruction, the operand bit
will be turned ON as long as the execution condition is OFF and turned OFF as
long as the execution condition is ON. These appear as shown below. In mnemonic code, each of these instructions requires one line.
Address
00000
01000
00000
00001
Instruction
LD
OUT
Operands
00000
01000
00001
01001
Address
00000
00001
Instruction
LD
OUT NOT
Operands
00001
01001
In the above examples, IR 01000 will be ON as long as IR 00000 is ON and
IR 01001 will be OFF as long as IR 00001 is ON. Here, IR 00000 and IR 00001
would be input bits and IR 01000 and IR 01001 output bits assigned to the Units
controlled by the PC, i.e., the signals coming in through the input points assigned
IR 00000 and IR 00001 are controlling the output points assigned IR 01000 and
IR 01001, respectively.
The length of time that a bit is ON or OFF can be controlled by combining the
OUTPUT or OUTPUT NOT instruction with Timer instructions. Refer to Examples under 7-15-1 Timer – TIM for details.
336
Section
Basic Ladder Diagrams
6-3-5
6-3
The END Instruction
The last instruction required to complete a simple program is the END instruction. When the CPU Unit scans the program, it executes all instructions up to the
first END instruction before returning to the beginning of the program and beginning execution again. Although an END instruction can be placed at any point in
a program, which is sometimes done when debugging, no instructions past the
first END instruction will be executed until it is removed. The number following
the END instruction in the mnemonic code is its function code, which is used
when inputted most instruction into the PC. These are described later. The END
instruction requires no operands and no conditions can be placed on the same
instruction line with it.
00000
00001
Instruction
END(01)
Address
00500
00501
00502
00503
Instruction
Program execution
ends here.
Operands
LD
AND NOT
Instruction
END(01)
00000
00001
---
If there is no END instruction anywhere in the program, the program will not be
executed at all.
Now you have all of the instructions required to write simple input-output programs. Before we finish with ladder diagram basic and go onto inputting the program into the PC, let’s look at logic block instruction (AND LOAD and OR LOAD),
which are sometimes necessary even with simple diagrams.
6-3-6
Logic Block Instructions
Logic block instructions do not correspond to specific conditions on the ladder
diagram; rather, they describe relationships between logic blocks. The AND
LOAD instruction logically ANDs the execution conditions produced by two logic
blocks. The OR LOAD instruction logically ORs the execution conditions produced by two logic blocks.
AND LOAD
Although simple in appearance, the diagram below requires an AND LOAD
instruction.
00000
00002
00001
00003
Instruction
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
LD
OR
LD
OR NOT
AND LD
Operands
00000
00001
00002
00003
---
337
Section
Basic Ladder Diagrams
6-3
The two logic blocks are indicated by dotted lines. Studying this example shows
that an ON execution condition will be produced when: either of the conditions in
the left logic block is ON (i.e., when either IR 00000 or IR 00001 is ON), and
when either of the conditions in the right logic block is ON (i.e., when either IR
00002 is ON or IR 00003 is OFF).
The above ladder diagram cannot, however, be converted to mnemonic code
using AND and OR instructions alone. If an AND between IR 00002 and the results of an OR between IR 00000 and IR 00001 is attempted, the OR NOT between IR 00002 and IR 00003 is lost and the OR NOT ends up being an OR NOT
between just IR 00003 and the result of an AND between IR 00002 and the first
OR. What we need is a way to do the OR (NOT)’s independently and then combine the results.
To do this, we can use the LOAD or LOAD NOT instruction in the middle of an
instruction line. When LOAD or LOAD NOT is executed in this way, the current
execution condition is saved in special buffers and the logic process is begun
over. To combine the results of the current execution condition with that of a previous “unused” execution condition, an AND LOAD or an OR LOAD instruction is
used. Here “LOAD” refers to loading the last unused execution condition. An unused execution condition is produced by using the LOAD or LOAD NOT instruction for any but the first condition on an instruction line.
Analyzing the above ladder diagram in terms of mnemonic instructions, the
condition for IR 00000 is a LOAD instruction and the condition below it is an OR
instruction between the status of IR 00000 and that of IR 00001. The condition at
IR 00002 is another LOAD instruction and the condition below is an OR NOT
instruction, i.e., an OR between the status of IR 00002 and the inverse of the
status of IR 00003. To arrive at the execution condition for the instruction at the
right, the logical AND of the execution conditions resulting from these two blocks
would have to be taken. AND LOAD does this. The mnemonic code for the ladder diagram is shown below. The AND LOAD instruction requires no operands of
its own, because it operates on previously determined execution conditions.
Here too, dashes are used to indicate that no operands needs designated or input.
OR LOAD
The following diagram requires an OR LOAD instruction between the top logic
block and the bottom logic block. An ON execution condition would be produced
for the instruction at the right either when IR 00000 is ON and IR 00001 is OFF or
when IR 00002 and IR 00003 are both ON. The operation of and mnemonic code
for the OR LOAD instruction is exactly the same as those for a AND LOAD
instruction except that the current execution condition is ORed with the last unused execution condition.
00000
00001
Instruction
00002
Address
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00003
Instruction
LD
AND NOT
LD
AND
OR LD
Operands
00000
00001
00002
00003
---
Naturally, some diagrams will require both AND LOAD and OR LOAD instructions.
338
Section
Basic Ladder Diagrams
Logic Block Instructions in
Series
6-3
To code diagrams with logic block instructions in series, the diagram must be
divided into logic blocks. Each block is coded using a LOAD instruction to code
the first condition, and then AND LOAD or OR LOAD is used to logically combine
the blocks. With both AND LOAD and OR LOAD there are two ways to achieve
this. One is to code the logic block instruction after the first two blocks and then
after each additional block. The other is to code all of the blocks to be combined,
starting each block with LOAD or LOAD NOT, and then to code the logic block
instructions which combine them. In this case, the instructions for the last pair of
blocks should be combined first, and then each preceding block should be combined, working progressively back to the first block. Although either of these
methods will produce exactly the same result, the second method, that of coding
all logic block instructions together, can be used only if eight or fewer blocks are
being combined, i.e., if seven or fewer logic block instructions are required.
The following diagram requires AND LOAD to be converted to mnemonic code
because three pairs of parallel conditions lie in series. The two means of coding
the programs are also shown.
00000
00002
00004
20000
00001
Address
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
Instruction
LD
OR NOT
LD NOT
OR
AND LD
LD
OR
AND LD
OUT
00003
Operands
00000
00001
00002
00003
—
00004
00005
—
20000
00005
Address
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
Instruction
LD
OR NOT
LD NOT
OR
LD
OR
AND LD
AND LD
OUT
Operands
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
—
—
20000
Again, with the method on the right, a maximum of eight blocks can be combined. There is no limit to the number of blocks that can be combined with the
first method.
The following diagram requires OR LOAD instructions to be converted to mnemonic code because three pairs of conditions in series lie in parallel to each other.
00000 00001
20001
00002 00003
00004 00005
339
Section
Basic Ladder Diagrams
6-3
The first of each pair of conditions is converted to LOAD with the assigned bit
operand and then ANDed with the other condition. The first two blocks can be
coded first, followed by OR LOAD, the last block, and another OR LOAD, or the
three blocks can be coded first followed by two OR LOADs. The mnemonic code
for both methods is shown below.
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
LD
AND NOT
LD NOT
AND NOT
OR LD
LD
AND
OR LD
OUT
Operands
00000
00001
00002
00003
—
00004
00005
—
20001
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
LD
AND NOT
LD NOT
AND NOT
LD
AND
OR LD
OR LD
OUT
Operands
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
—
—
20001
Again, with the method on the right, a maximum of eight blocks can be combined. There is no limit to the number of blocks that can be combined with the
first method.
Combining AND LOAD and
OR LOAD
Both of the coding methods described above can also be used when using AND
LOAD and OR LOAD, as long as the number of blocks being combined does not
exceed eight.
The following diagram contains only two logic blocks as shown. It is not necessary to further separate block b components, because it can coded directly using
only AND and OR.
00000 00001
00002 00003
20001
00201
00004
Block
a
Block
b
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
LD
AND NOT
LD
AND
OR
OR
AND LD
OUT
Operands
00000
00001
00002
00003
00201
00004
—
20001
Although the following diagram is similar to the one above, block b in the diagram
below cannot be coded without separating it into two blocks combined with OR
LOAD. In this example, the three blocks have been coded first and then OR
LOAD has been used to combine the last two blocks followed by AND LOAD to
combine the execution condition produced by the OR LOAD with the execution
condition of block a.
340
Section
Basic Ladder Diagrams
6-3
When coding the logic block instructions together at the end of the logic blocks
they are combining, they must, as shown below, be coded in reverse order, i.e.,
the logic block instruction for the last two blocks is coded first, followed by the
one to combine the execution condition resulting from the first logic block
instruction and the execution condition of the logic block third from the end, and
on back to the first logic block that is being combined.
Block
b1
00000 00001
00002 00003
20002
00004 00202
Block
b2
Block
a
Complicated Diagrams
Block
b
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
LD NOT
AND
LD
AND NOT
LD NOT
AND
OR LD
AND LD
OUT
Operands
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00202
—
—
20002
When determining what logic block instructions will be required to code a diagram, it is sometimes necessary to break the diagram into large blocks and then
continue breaking the large blocks down until logic blocks that can be coded
without logic block instructions have been formed. These blocks are then coded,
combining the small blocks first, and then combining the larger blocks. Either
AND LOAD or OR LOAD is used to combine the blocks, i.e., AND LOAD or OR
LOAD always combines the last two execution conditions that existed, regardless of whether the execution conditions resulted from a single condition, from
logic blocks, or from previous logic block instructions.
When working with complicated diagrams, blocks will ultimately be coded starting at the top left and moving down before moving across. This will generally
mean that, when there might be a choice, OR LOAD will be coded before AND
LOAD.
341
Section
Basic Ladder Diagrams
6-3
The following diagram must be broken down into two blocks and each of these
then broken into two blocks before it can be coded. As shown below, blocks a
and b require an AND LOAD. Before AND LOAD can be used, however, OR
LOAD must be used to combine the top and bottom blocks on both sides, i.e., to
combine a1 and a2; b1 and b2.
Block
b1
Block
a1
00000 00001
00004 00005
20003
00002 00003
00006 00007
Block
a2
Block
b2
Block
a
Block
b
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
00009
00010
00011
LD
AND NOT
LD NOT
AND
OR LD
LD
AND
LD
AND
OR LD
AND LD
OUT
Operands
00000
00001
00002
00003
—
00004
00005
00006
00007
—
—
20003
Blocks a1 and a2
Blocks b1 and b2
Blocks a and b
The following type of diagram can be coded easily if each block is coded in order:
first top to bottom and then left to right. In the following diagram, blocks a and b
would be combined using AND LOAD as shown above, and then block c would
be coded and a second AND LOAD would be used to combined it with the execution condition from the first AND LOAD. Then block d would be coded, a third
AND LOAD would be used to combine the execution condition from block d with
the execution condition from the second AND LOAD, and so on through to block
n.
20000
Block
a
342
Block
b
Block
c
Block
n
Section
Basic Ladder Diagrams
6-3
The following diagram requires an OR LOAD followed by an AND LOAD to code
the top of the three blocks, and then two more OR LOADs to complete the mnemonic code.
00000
00001
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
00009
00010
00011
00012
LD
LD
LD
AND NOT
OR LD
AND LD
LD NOT
AND
OR LD
LD NOT
AND
OR LD
OUT
Operands
LR 0000
00002
00004
00005
00006
00007
00003
LR
00000
00001
00002
00003
--00004
00005
-00006
00007
-0000
Although the program will execute as written, this diagram could be drawn as
shown below to eliminate the need for the first OR LOAD and the AND LOAD,
simplifying the program and saving memory space.
00002
00003
00000
LR 0000
00001
00004
00005
00006
00007
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
00009
00010
LD
AND NOT
OR
AND
LD NOT
AND
OR LD
LD NOT
AND
OR LD
OUT
Operands
LR
00002
00003
00001
00000
00004
00005
-00006
00007
-0000
The following diagram requires five blocks, which here are coded in order before
using OR LOAD and AND LOAD to combine them starting from the last two
blocks and working backward. The OR LOAD at program address 00008 combines blocks d and e, the following AND LOAD combines the resulting execution
condition with that of block c, etc.
00000
00001
00002
LR 0000
Block b
Block a
Block c
00003
00004
Block d
00005
00006
00007
Blocks d and e
Block e
Block c with result of above
Block b with result of above
Block a with result of above
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
00009
00010
00011
00012
LD
LD
AND
LD
AND
LD
LD
AND
OR LD
AND LD
OR LD
AND LD
OUT
Operands
LR
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
----0000
343
Section
Basic Ladder Diagrams
6-3
Again, this diagram can be redrawn as follows to simplify program structure and
coding and to save memory space.
00006
00007
00003
00004
00000
Address
LR 0000
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
00009
00005
00001
00002
Instruction
Operands
LD
AND
OR
AND
AND
LD
AND
OR LD
AND
OUT
00006
00007
00005
00003
00004
00001
00002
-00000
0000
LR
The next and final example may at first appear very complicated but can be
coded using only two logic block instructions. The diagram appears as follows:
Block a
00000
00001
01000
01001
00002
00003
00004
00005
20000
00006
20000
Block b
Block c
The first logic block instruction is used to combine the execution conditions resulting from blocks a and b, and the second one is to combine the execution
condition of block c with the execution condition resulting from the normally
closed condition assigned IR 00003. The rest of the diagram can be coded with
OR, AND, and AND NOT instructions. The logical flow for this and the resulting
code are shown below.
Block a
Block b
00000
00001
01000
01001
LD
AND
00000
00001
LD
AND
01000
01001
OR LD
Block c
20000
00005
00004
00005
OR
20000
LD
AND
00002
00003
00006
AND
00002
AND NOT 00003
OR
AND LD
20000
344
00004
00006
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
00009
00010
00011
00012
LD
AND
LD
AND
OR LD
OR
AND
AND NOT
LD
AND
OR
AND LD
OUT
Operands
00000
00001
01000
01001
-20000
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
-20000
Section
Basic Ladder Diagrams
6-3-7
6-3
Coding Multiple Right-hand Instructions
If there is more than one right-hand instruction executed with the same execution condition, they are coded consecutively following the last condition on the
instruction line. In the following example, the last instruction line contains one
more condition that corresponds to an AND with IR 00004.
00000
00003
HR 0001
00001
20000
00002
00004
20001
HR 0000
6-3-8
Address
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
Instruction
LD
OR
OR
OR
AND
OUT
OUT
AND
OUT
Operands
HR
HR
00000
00001
00002
0000
00003
0001
20000
00004
20001
Branching Instruction Lines
When an instruction line branches into two or more lines, it is sometimes necessary to use either interlocks or TR bits to maintain the execution condition that
existed at a branching point. This is because instruction lines are executed
across to a right-hand instruction before returning to the branching point to
execute instructions one a branch line. If a condition exists on any of the instruction lines after the branching point, the execution condition could change during
this time making proper execution impossible. The following diagrams illustrate
this. In both diagrams, instruction 1 is executed before returning to the branching
point and moving on to the branch line leading to instruction 2.
00000
Branching
point
Address
Instruction
Instruction 2
00000
00001
00002
00003
LD
Instruction 1
AND
Instruction 2
Instruction 1
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
LD
AND
Instruction 1
AND
Instruction 2
Instruction 1
00002
Diagram A: Correct Operation
00000
Branching
point
Operands
00000
00002
00001
00002
Instruction 2
Diagram B: Incorrect Operation
Operands
00000
00001
00002
If, as shown in diagram A, the execution condition that existed at the branching
point cannot be changed before returning to the branch line (instructions at the
far right do not change the execution condition), then the branch line will be
executed correctly and no special programming measure is required.
If, as shown in diagram B, a condition exists between the branching point and the
last instruction on the top instruction line, the execution condition at the branching point and the execution condition after completing the top instruction line will
sometimes be different, making it impossible to ensure correct execution of the
branch line.
There are two means of programming branching programs to preserve the
execution condition. One is to use TR bits; the other, to use interlocks
(IL(02)/IL(03)).
345
Section
Basic Ladder Diagrams
6-3
The TR area provides eight bits, TR 0 through TR 7, that can be used to temporarily preserve execution conditions. If a TR bit is placed at a branching point, the
current execution condition will be stored at the designated TR bit. When returning to the branching point, the TR bit restores the execution status that was
saved when the branching point was first reached in program execution.
TR Bits
The previous diagram B can be written as shown below to ensure correct execution. In mnemonic code, the execution condition is stored at the branching point
using the TR bit as the operand of the OUTPUT instruction. This execution
condition is then restored after executing the right-hand instruction by using the
same TR bit as the operand of a LOAD instruction
TR 0
Address
00001
00000
Instruction 1
00002
Instruction 2
Diagram B: Corrected Using a TR bit
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
Instruction
Operands
LD
OUT
AND
Instruction 1
LD
AND
Instruction 2
00000
0
00001
TR
TR
0
00002
In terms of actual instructions the above diagram would be as follows: The status
of IR 00000 is loaded (a LOAD instruction) to establish the initial execution
condition. This execution condition is then output using an OUTPUT instruction
to TR 0 to store the execution condition at the branching point. The execution
condition is then ANDed with the status of IR 00001 and instruction 1 is executed
accordingly. The execution condition that was stored at the branching point is
then re-loaded (a LOAD instruction with TR 0 as the operand), this is ANDed with
the status of IR 00002, and instruction 2 is executed accordingly.
The following example shows an application using two TR bits.
TR 0
00000
Address
TR 1
00001
00002
Instruction 1
00003
Instruction 2
00004
Instruction 3
00005
Instruction 4
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
00009
00010
00011
00012
00013
00014
Instruction
LD
OUT
AND
OUT
AND
Instruction 1
LD
AND
Instruction 2
LD
AND
Instruction 3
LD
AND NOT
Instruction 4
Operands
TR
TR
00000
0
00001
1
00002
TR
1
00003
TR
0
00004
TR
0
00005
In this example, TR 0 and TR 1 are used to store the execution conditions at the
branching points. After executing instruction 1, the execution condition stored in
TR 1 is loaded for an AND with the status IR 00003. The execution condition
stored in TR 0 is loaded twice, the first time for an AND with the status of IR
00004 and the second time for an AND with the inverse of the status of IR 00005.
346
Section
Basic Ladder Diagrams
6-3
TR bits can be used as many times as required as long as the same TR bit is not
used more than once in the same instruction block. Here, a new instruction block
is begun each time execution returns to the bus bar. If, in a single instruction
block, it is necessary to have more than eight branching points that require the
execution condition be saved, interlocks (which are described next) must be
used.
When drawing a ladder diagram, be careful not to use TR bits unless necessary.
Often the number of instructions required for a program can be reduced and
ease of understanding a program increased by redrawing a diagram that would
otherwise required TR bits. In both of the following pairs of diagrams, the bottom
versions require fewer instructions and do not require TR bits. In the first example, this is achieved by reorganizing the parts of the instruction block: the bottom
one, by separating the second OUTPUT instruction and using another LOAD
instruction to create the proper execution condition for it.
Note Although simplifying programs is always a concern, the order of execution of
instructions is sometimes important. For example, a MOVE instruction may be
required before the execution of a BINARY ADD instruction to place the proper
data in the required operand word. Be sure that you have considered execution
order before reorganizing a program to simplify it.
TR 0
00000
00000
00001
00003
Instruction 1
Instruction 1
Instruction 2
TR 0
00001
00002
00004
Instruction 2
00000
Instruction 2
00001
Instruction 1
00001
00002
00003
Instruction 1
00000
00001
00004
Instruction 2
Note TR bits are must be input by the user only when programming using mnemonic
code. They are not necessary when inputting ladder diagrams directly because
they are processed for you automatically. The above limitations on the number
of branching points requiring TR bits, and considerations on methods to reduce
the number of programming instructions, still hold.
Interlocks
The problem of storing execution conditions at branching points can also be
handled by using the INTERLOCK (IL(02)) and INTERLOCK CLEAR (ILC(03))
instructions to eliminate the branching point completely while allowing a specific
execution condition to control a group of instructions. The INTERLOCK and INTERLOCK CLEAR instructions are always used together.
347
Section
Basic Ladder Diagrams
6-3
When an INTERLOCK instruction is placed before a section of a ladder program, the execution condition for the INTERLOCK instruction will control the
execution of all instruction up to the next INTERLOCK CLEAR instruction. If the
execution condition for the INTERLOCK instruction is OFF, all right-hand
instructions through the next INTERLOCK CLEAR instruction will be executed
with OFF execution conditions to reset the entire section of the ladder diagram.
The effect that this has on particular instructions is described in 7-11 INTERLOCK and INTERLOCK CLEAR – IL(02) and ILC(03).
Diagram B can also be corrected with an interlock. Here, the conditions leading
up to the branching point are placed on an instruction line for the INTERLOCK
instruction, all of lines leading from the branching point are written as separate
instruction lines, and another instruction line is added for the INTERLOCK
CLEAR instruction. No conditions are allowed on the instruction line for INTERLOCK CLEAR. Note that neither INTERLOCK nor INTERLOCK CLEAR requires an operand.
00000
IL(02)
Address
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00001
Instruction 1
00002
Instruction 2
ILC(03)
Instruction
Operands
LD
IL(02)
LD
Instruction 1
LD
Instruction 2
ILC(03)
00000
--00001
00002
---
If IR 00000 is ON in the revised version of diagram B, above, the status of IR
00001 and that of IR 00002 would determine the execution conditions for
instructions 1 and 2, respectively. Because IR 00000 is ON, this would produce
the same results as ANDing the status of each of these bits. If IR 00000 is OFF,
the INTERLOCK instruction would produce an OFF execution condition for
instructions 1 and 2 and then execution would continue with the instruction line
following the INTERLOCK CLEAR instruction.
As shown in the following diagram, more than one INTERLOCK instruction can
be used within one instruction block; each is effective through the next INTERLOCK CLEAR instruction.
00000
IL(02)
00001
Instruction 1
00002
IL(02)
00003
00004
Instruction 2
00005
Instruction 3
00006
Instruction 4
ILC(03)
348
Address
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
00009
00010
00011
00012
00013
Instruction
LD
IL(02)
LD
Instruction 1
LD
IL(02)
LD
AND NOT
Instruction 2
LD
Instruction 3
LD
Instruction 4
ILC(03)
Operands
00000
--00001
00002
--00003
00004
00005
00006
---
Section
Basic Ladder Diagrams
6-3
If IR 00000 in the above diagram is OFF (i.e., if the execution condition for the
first INTERLOCK instruction is OFF), instructions 1 through 4 would be
executed with OFF execution conditions and execution would move to the
instruction following the INTERLOCK CLEAR instruction. If IR 00000 is ON, the
status of IR 00001 would be loaded as the execution condition for instruction 1
and then the status of IR 00002 would be loaded to form the execution condition
for the second INTERLOCK instruction. If IR 00002 is OFF, instructions 2
through 4 will be executed with OFF execution conditions. If IR 00002 is ON, IR
00003, IR 00005, and IR 00006 will determine the first execution condition in
new instruction lines.
6-3-9
Jumps
A specific section of a program can be skipped according to a designated execution condition. Although this is similar to what happens when the execution
condition for an INTERLOCK instruction is OFF, with jumps, the operands for all
instructions maintain status. Jumps can therefore be used to control devices
that require a sustained output, e.g., pneumatics and hydraulics, whereas interlocks can be used to control devices that do not required a sustained output,
e.g., electronic instruments.
Jumps are created using the JUMP (JMP(04)) and JUMP END (JME(05))
instructions. If the execution condition for a JUMP instruction is ON, the program
is executed normally as if the jump did not exist. If the execution condition for the
JUMP instruction is OFF, program execution moves immediately to a JUMP
END instruction without changing the status of anything between the JUMP and
JUMP END instruction.
All JUMP and JUMP END instructions are assigned jump numbers ranging between 00 and 99. There are two types of jumps. The jump number used determines the type of jump.
A jump can be defined using jump numbers 01 through 99 only once, i.e., each of
these numbers can be used once in a JUMP instruction and once in a JUMP
END instruction. When a JUMP instruction assigned one of these numbers is
executed, execution moves immediately to the JUMP END instruction that has
the same number as if all of the instruction between them did not exist. Diagram
B from the TR bit and interlock example could be redrawn as shown below using
a jump. Although 01 has been used as the jump number, any number between
01 and 99 could be used as long as it has not already been used in a different part
of the program. JUMP and JUMP END require no other operand and JUMP END
never has conditions on the instruction line leading to it.
00000
JMP(04) 01
00001
Instruction 1
00002
Instruction 2
JME(05) 01
Diagram B: Corrected with a Jump
Address
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
Instruction
LD
JMP(04)
LD
Instruction 1
LD
Instruction 2
JME(05)
Operands
00000
01
00001
00002
01
This version of diagram B would have a shorter execution time when IR 00000
was OFF than any of the other versions.
349
Section
Controlling Bit Status
6-4
The other type of jump is created with a jump number of 00. As many jumps as
desired can be created using jump number 00 and JUMP instructions using 00
can be used consecutively without a JUMP END using 00 between them. It is
even possible for all JUMP 00 instructions to move program execution to the
same JUMP END 00, i.e., only one JUMP END 00 instruction is required for all
JUMP 00 instruction in the program. When 00 is used as the jump number for a
JUMP instruction, program execution moves to the instruction following the next
JUMP END instruction with a jump number of 00. Although, as in all jumps, no
status is changed and no instructions are executed between the JUMP 00 and
JUMP END 00 instructions, the program must search for the next JUMP END 00
instruction, producing a slightly longer execution time.
Execution of programs containing multiple JUMP 00 instructions for one JUMP
END 00 instruction is similar to that of interlocked sections. The following diagram is the same as that used for the interlock example above, except redrawn
with jumps. The execution of this diagram would differ from that of the diagram
described above (e.g., in the previous diagram interlocks would reset certain
parts of the interlocked section, however, jumps do not affect the status of any bit
between the JUMP and JUMP END instructions).
00000
JMP(04) 00
00001
Instruction 1
00002
JMP(04) 00
00003
00004
Instruction 2
00005
Instruction 3
00006
Instruction 4
JME(05) 00
6-4
Address
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
00009
00010
00011
00012
00013
Instruction
LD
JMP(04)
LD
Instruction 1
LD
JMP(04)
LD
AND NOT
Instruction 2
LD
Instruction 3
LD
Instruction 4
JME(05)
Operands
00000
00
00001
00002
00
00003
00004
00005
00006
00
Controlling Bit Status
There are seven basic instructions that can be used generally to control individual bit status. These are the OUTPUT, OUTPUT NOT, SET, RESET, DIFFERENTIATE UP, DIFFERENTIATE DOWN, and KEEP instructions. All of these
instructions appear as the last instruction in an instruction line and take a bit address for an operand. Although details are provided in 7-8 Bit Control Instructions, these instructions (except for OUTPUT and OUTPUT NOT, which have
already been introduced) are described here because of their importance in
most programs. Although these instructions are used to turn ON and OFF output
bits in the IR area (i.e., to send or stop output signals to external devices), they
are also used to control the status of other bits in the IR area or in other data
areas.
6-4-1
SET and RESET
The SET and RESET instructions are very similar to the OUTPUT and OUTPUT
NOT instructions except that they only change the status of their operand bits for
ON execution conditions. Neither instructions will affect the status of its operand
bit when the execution condition is OFF.
350
Section
Controlling Bit Status
6-4
SET will turn ON the operand bit when the execution condition goes ON, but unlike the OUTPUT instruction, SET will not turn OFF the operand bit when the
execution condition goes OFF. RESET will turn OFF the operand bit when the
execution condition goes OFF, but unlike OUTPUT NOT, RESET will not turn ON
the operand bit when the execution condition goes OFF.
In the following example, IR 20000 will be turned ON when IR 00100 goes ON
and will remain ON until IR 00101 goes ON, regardless of the status of IR 00100.
When IR 00101 goes ON, RESET will turn IR 20000 OFF.
Address
00100
SET
20000
00101
RSET 20000
00000
00001
00002
00003
Instruction
LD
SET
LD
RSET
Operands
00100
20000
00101
20000
Note SET and RSET do not have function codes. To input them from the Programming Console, press the FUN and SET Keys or FUN and RSET Keys followed
by the bit address.
6-4-2
DIFFERENTIATE UP and DIFFERENTIATE DOWN
DIFFERENTIATE UP and DIFFERENTIATE DOWN instructions are used to
turn the operand bit ON for one cycle at a time. The DIFFERENTIATE UP
instruction turns ON the operand bit for one cycle after the execution condition
for it goes from OFF to ON; the DIFFERENTIATE DOWN instruction turns ON
the operand bit for one cycle after the execution condition for it goes from ON to
OFF. Both of these instructions require only one line of mnemonic code.
00000
DIFU(13) 20001
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
DIFU(13)
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
DIFD(14)
Operands
00000
20001
00001
DIFD(14) 20002
Operands
00001
20002
Here, IR 20001 will be turned ON for one cycle after IR 00000 goes ON. The next
time DIFU(13) 20001 is executed, IR 20001 will be turned OFF, regardless of the
status of IR 00000. With the DIFFERENTIATE DOWN instruction, IR 20002 will
be turned ON for one cycle after IR 00001 goes OFF (IR 20002 will be kept OFF
until then), and will be turned OFF the next time DIFD(14) 20002 is executed.
6-4-3
KEEP
The KEEP instruction is used to maintain the status of the operand bit based on
two execution conditions. To do this, the KEEP instruction is connected to two
instruction lines. When the execution condition at the end of the first instruction
line is ON, the operand bit of the KEEP instruction is turned ON. When the
execution condition at the end of the second instruction line is ON, the operand
bit of the KEEP instruction is turned OFF. The operand bit for the KEEP instruction will maintain its ON or OFF status even if it is located in an interlocked section of the diagram.
351
Section
Work Bits (Internal Relays)
6-5
In the following example, HR 0000 will be turned ON when IR 00002 is ON and IR
00003 is OFF. HR 0000 will then remain ON until either IR 00004 or IR 00005
turns ON. With KEEP, as with all instructions requiring more than one instruction
line, the instruction lines are coded first before the instruction that they control.
00002
00003
S: set input
KEEP(11)
HR 0000
00004
R: reset input
00005
6-4-4
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
LD
AND NOT
LD
OR
KEEP(11)
Operands
HR
00002
00003
00004
00005
0000
Self-maintaining Bits (Seal)
Although the KEEP instruction can be used to create self-maintaining bits, it is
sometimes necessary to create self-maintaining bits in another way so that they
can be turned OFF when in an interlocked section of a program.
To create a self-maintaining bit, the operand bit of an OUTPUT instruction is
used as a condition for the same OUTPUT instruction in an OR setup so that the
operand bit of the OUTPUT instruction will remain ON or OFF until changes occur in other bits. At least one other condition is used just before the OUTPUT
instruction to function as a reset. Without this reset, there would be no way to
control the operand bit of the OUTPUT instruction.
The above diagram for the KEEP instruction can be rewritten as shown below.
The only difference in these diagrams would be their operation in an interlocked
program section when the execution condition for the INTERLOCK instruction
was ON. Here, just as in the same diagram using the KEEP instruction, two reset
bits are used, i.e., HR 0000 can be turned OFF by turning ON either IR 00004 or
IR 00005.
00002
00003
00004
HR 0000
00005
HR 0000
6-5
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
LD
AND NOT
OR
AND NOT
OR NOT
AND LD
OUT
Operands
HR
HR
00002
00003
0000
00004
00005
--0000
Work Bits (Internal Relays)
In programming, combining conditions to directly produce execution conditions
is often extremely difficult. These difficulties are easily overcome, however, by
using certain bits to trigger other instructions indirectly. Such programming is
achieved by using work bits. Sometimes entire words are required for these purposes. These words are referred to as work words.
Work bits are not transferred to or from the PC. They are bits selected by the
programmer to facilitate programming as described above. I/O bits and other
dedicated bits cannot be used as works bits. All bits in the IR area that are not
allocated as I/O bits, and certain unused bits in the AR area, are available for use
as work bits. Be careful to keep an accurate record of how and where you use
work bits. This helps in program planning and writing, and also aids in debugging
operations.
352
Section
Work Bits (Internal Relays)
Work Bit Applications
6-5
Examples given later in this subsection show two of the most common ways to
employ work bits. These should act as a guide to the almost limitless number of
ways in which the work bits can be used. Whenever difficulties arise in programming a control action, consideration should be given to work bits and how they
might be used to simplify programming.
Work bits are often used with the OUTPUT, OUTPUT NOT, DIFFERENTIATE
UP, DIFFERENTIATE DOWN, and KEEP instructions. The work bit is used first
as the operand for one of these instructions so that later it can be used as a
condition that will determine how other instructions will be executed. Work bits
can also be used with other instructions, e.g., with the SHIFT REGISTER
instruction (SFT(10)). An example of the use of work words and bits with the
SHIFT REGISTER instruction is provided in 7-16-1 SHIFT REGISTER –
SFT(10).
Although they are not always specifically referred to as work bits, many of the
bits used in the examples in Section 7 Instruction Set use work bits. Understanding the use of these bits is essential to effective programming.
Work bits can be used to simplify programming when a certain combination of
conditions is repeatedly used in combination with other conditions. In the following example, IR 00000, IR 00001, IR 00002, and IR 00003 are combined in a
logic block that stores the resulting execution condition as the status of
IR 21600. IR 21600 is then combined with various other conditions to determine
output conditions for IR 20000, IR 20001, and IR 20002, i.e., to turn the outputs
allocated to these bits ON or OFF.
Reducing Complex
Conditions
00000
00001
21600
00002
00003
21600
00004
00005
20000
21600
00005
20001
00004
21600
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
00009
00010
00011
00012
00013
00014
00015
00016
LD
AND NOT
OR
OR NOT
OUT
LD
AND
AND NOT
OUT
LD
OR NOT
AND
OUT
LD NOT
OR
OR
OUT
Operands
00000
00001
00002
00003
21600
21600
00004
00005
20000
21600
00004
00005
20001
21600
00006
00007
20002
20002
00006
00007
353
Section
Programming Precautions
Differentiated Conditions
6-6
Work bits can also be used if differential treatment is necessary for some, but not
all, of the conditions required for execution of an instruction. In this example,
IR 20000 must be left ON continuously as long as IR 001001 is ON and both
IR 00002 and IR 00003 are OFF, or as long as IR 00004 is ON and IR 00005 is
OFF. It must be turned ON for only one cycle each time IR 00000 turns ON (unless one of the preceding conditions is keeping it ON continuously).
This action is easily programmed by using IR 22500 as a work bit as the operand
of the DIFFERENTIATE UP instruction (DIFU(13)). When IR 00000 turns ON, IR
22500 will be turned ON for one cycle and then be turned OFF the next cycle by
DIFU(13). Assuming the other conditions controlling IR 20000 are not keeping it
ON, the work bit IR 22500 will turn IR 20000 ON for one cycle only.
00000
DIFU(13) 22500
22500
20000
00001
00002
00004
6-6
00003
00005
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
00009
00010
LD
DIFU(13)
LD
LD
AND NOT
AND NOT
OR LD
LD
AND NOT
OR LD
OUT
Operands
00000
22500
22500
00001
00002
00003
--00004
00005
--20000
Programming Precautions
The number of conditions that can be used in series or parallel is unlimited as
long as the memory capacity of the PC is not exceeded. Therefore, use as many
conditions as required to draw a clear diagram. Although very complicated diagrams can be drawn with instruction lines, there must not be any conditions on
lines running vertically between two other instruction lines. Diagram A shown
below, for example, is not possible, and should be drawn as diagram B. Mnemonic code is provided for diagram B only; coding diagram A would be impossible.
00000
00002
Instruction 1
00004
00001
00003
Instruction 2
Diagram A: Not Programmable
00001
00004
00002
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
00009
LD
AND
OR
AND
Instruction 1
LD
AND
OR
AND NOT
Instruction 2
Operands
Instruction 1
00000
00000
00004
00003
Instruction 2
00001
Diagram B: Correct Version
354
00001
00004
00000
00002
00000
00004
00001
00003
Section
Programming Precautions
6-6
The number of times any particular bit can be assigned to conditions is not limited, so use them as many times as required to simplify your program. Often,
complicated programs are the result of attempts to reduce the number of times a
bit is used.
Except for instructions for which conditions are not allowed (e.g., INTERLOCK
CLEAR and JUMP END, see below), every instruction line must also have at
least one condition on it to determine the execution condition for the instruction
at the right. Again, diagram A , below, must be drawn as diagram B. If an instruction must be continuously executed (e.g., if an output must always be kept ON
while the program is being executed), the Always ON Flag (SR 25313) in the SR
area can be used.
Instruction
Diagram A: Not Programmable for Most Instructions
25313
Instruction
Diagram B: Correct Version
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
Instruction
Operands
25313
There are a few exceptions to this rule, including the INTERLOCK CLEAR,
JUMP END, and step instructions. Each of these instructions is used as the second of a pair of instructions and is controlled by the execution condition of the
first of the pair. Conditions should not be placed on the instruction lines leading to
these instructions. Refer to Section 7 Instruction Set for details.
When drawing ladder diagrams, it is important to keep in mind the number of
instructions that will be required to input it. In diagram A, below, an OR LOAD
instruction will be required to combine the top and bottom instruction lines. This
can be avoided by redrawing as shown in diagram B so that no AND LOAD or OR
LOAD instructions are required. Refer to 7-7-2 AND LOAD and OR LOAD for
more details.
Address
00000
20007
00001 20007
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
Instruction
LD
LD
AND
OR LD
OUT
Operands
00000
00001
20007
--20007
Diagram A
Address
00001 20007
20007
00000
00000
00001
00002
00003
Instruction
LD
AND
OR
OUT
Operands
00001
20007
00000
20007
Diagram B
355
Section
Program Execution
6-7
6-7
Program Execution
When program execution is started, the CPU Unit scans the program from top to
bottom, checking all conditions and executing all instructions accordingly as it
moves down the bus bar. It is important that instructions be placed in the proper
order so that, for example, the desired data is moved to a word before that word
is used as the operand for an instruction. Remember that an instruction line is
completed to the terminal instruction at the right before executing an instruction
lines branching from the first instruction line to other terminal instructions at the
right.
Program execution is only one of the tasks carried out by the CPU Unit as part of
the cycle time. Refer to Section 8 PC Operations and Processing Time for details.
356
SECTION 7
Instruction Set
The CPM1, CPM1A, CPM2A, CPM2C (including the CPM2C-S), and SRM1(-V2) PCs have large programming instruction
sets that allow for easy programming of complicated control processes. This section explains instructions individually and
provides the ladder diagram symbol, data areas, and flags used with each.
The many instructions provided by these PCs are organized in the following subsections by instruction group. These groups
include Ladder Diagram Instructions, instructions with fixed function codes, and set instructions.
Some instructions, such as Timer and Counter instructions, are used to control execution of other instructions, e.g., a TIM
Completion Flag might be used to turn ON a bit when the time period set for the timer has expired. Although these other
instructions are often used to control output bits through the Output instruction, they can be used to control execution of other
instructions as well. The Output instructions used in examples in this manual can therefore generally be replaced by other
instructions to modify the program for specific applications other than controlling output bits directly.
7-1
7-2
7-3
7-4
7-5
7-6
7-7
7-8
7-9
7-10
7-11
7-12
7-13
7-14
7-15
Notation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Instruction Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Areas, Definer Values, and Flags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Differentiated Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Coding Right-hand Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Instruction Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-6-1 CPM1/CPM1A Function Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-6-2 CPM2A/CPM2C Function Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-6-3 SRM1(-V2) Function Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-6-4 Alphabetic List by Mnemonic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ladder Diagram Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-7-1 LOAD, LOAD NOT, AND, AND NOT, OR, and OR NOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-7-2 AND LOAD and OR LOAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bit Control Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-8-1 OUTPUT and OUTPUT NOT – OUT and OUT NOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-8-2 SET and RESET – SET and RSET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-8-3 KEEP – KEEP(11) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-8-4 DIFFERENTIATE UP and DOWN – DIFU(13) and DIFD(14) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NO OPERATION – NOP(00) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
END – END(01) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
INTERLOCK and INTERLOCK CLEAR – IL(02) and ILC(03) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
JUMP and JUMP END – JMP(04) and JME(05) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User Error Instructions:
FAILURE ALARM AND RESET – FAL(06) and
SEVERE FAILURE ALARM – FALS(07) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step Instructions:
STEP DEFINE and STEP START–STEP(08)/SNXT(09) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Timer and Counter Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-15-1 TIMER – TIM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-15-2 HIGH-SPEED TIMER – TIMH(15) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-15-3 VERY HIGH-SPEED TIMER: TMHH(––) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-15-4 LONG TIMER: TIML(––) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-15-5 COUNTER – CNT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-15-6 REVERSIBLE COUNTER – CNTR(12) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-15-7 REGISTER COMPARISON TABLE – CTBL(63) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-15-8 MODE CONTROL – INI(61) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-15-9 HIGH-SPEED COUNTER PV READ – PRV(62) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
360
360
360
362
363
366
366
367
368
369
372
372
373
373
373
374
375
376
377
377
377
379
381
381
384
385
386
387
388
390
391
392
395
397
357
7-16 Shift Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-16-1 SHIFT REGISTER – SFT(10) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-16-2 WORD SHIFT – WSFT(16) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-16-3 ARITHMETIC SHIFT LEFT – ASL(25) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-16-4 ARITHMETIC SHIFT RIGHT – ASR(26) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-16-5 ROTATE LEFT – ROL(27) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-16-6 ROTATE RIGHT – ROR(28) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-16-7 ONE DIGIT SHIFT LEFT – SLD(74) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-16-8 ONE DIGIT SHIFT RIGHT – SRD(75) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-16-9 REVERSIBLE SHIFT REGISTER – SFTR(84) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-16-10 ASYNCHRONOUS SHIFT REGISTER – ASFT(17) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-17 Data Movement Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-17-1 MOVE – MOV(21) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-17-2 MOVE NOT – MVN(22) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-17-3 BLOCK TRANSFER – XFER(70) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-17-4 BLOCK SET – BSET(71) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-17-5 DATA EXCHANGE – XCHG(73) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-17-6 SINGLE WORD DISTRIBUTE – DIST(80) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-17-7 DATA COLLECT – COLL(81) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-17-8 MOVE BIT – MOVB(82) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-17-9 MOVE DIGIT – MOVD(83) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-18 Data Control Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-18-1 SCALING – SCL(66) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-18-2 SIGNED BINARY TO BCD SCALING – SCL2(––) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-18-3 BCD TO SIGNED BINARY SCALING – SCL3(––) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-18-4 PID CONTROL – PID(––) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-19 Comparison Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-19-1 COMPARE – CMP(20) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-19-2 TABLE COMPARE – TCMP(85) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-19-3 BLOCK COMPARE – BCMP(68) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-19-4 DOUBLE COMPARE – CMPL(60) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-19-5 AREA RANGE COMPARE – ZCP(––) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-19-6 DOUBLE AREA RANGE COMPARE – ZCPL(––) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-20 Conversion Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-20-1 BCD-TO-BINARY – BIN(23) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-20-2 BINARY-TO-BCD – BCD(24) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-20-3 DOUBLE BCD-TO-DOUBLE BINARY – BINL(58) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-20-4 DOUBLE BINARY-TO-DOUBLE BCD – BCDL(59) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-20-5 4-TO-16 DECODER – MLPX(76) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-20-6 16-TO-4 ENCODER – DMPX(77) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-20-7 7-SEGMENT DECODER – SDEC(78) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-20-8 ASCII CONVERT – ASC(86) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-20-9 ASCII-TO-HEXADECIMAL – HEX(––) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-20-10 HOURS-TO-SECONDS – SEC(––) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-20-11 SECONDS-TO-HOURS – HMS(––) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-20-12 2’S COMPLEMENT – NEG(––) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-21 BCD Calculation Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-21-1 SET CARRY – STC(40) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-21-2 CLEAR CARRY – CLC(41) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-21-3 BCD ADD – ADD(30) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-21-4 BCD SUBTRACT – SUB(31) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-21-5 BCD MULTIPLY – MUL(32) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-21-6 BCD DIVIDE – DIV(33) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-21-7 DOUBLE BCD ADD – ADDL(54) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-21-8 DOUBLE BCD SUBTRACT – SUBL(55) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-21-9 DOUBLE BCD MULTIPLY – MULL(56) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-21-10 DOUBLE BCD DIVIDE – DIVL(57) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
358
400
400
401
401
402
402
403
404
404
405
406
407
407
408
409
410
411
411
413
415
416
417
417
418
420
422
428
428
429
430
432
433
434
435
435
436
436
437
438
440
442
445
447
449
450
451
453
453
453
453
454
456
457
458
460
462
462
7-22 Binary Calculation Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-22-1 BINARY ADD – ADB(50) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-22-2 BINARY SUBTRACT – SBB(51) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-22-3 BINARY MULTIPLY – MLB(52) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-22-4 BINARY DIVIDE – DVB(53) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-23 Special Math Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-23-1 DATA SEARCH – SRCH(––) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-23-2 FIND MAXIMUM – MAX(––) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-23-3 FIND MINIMUM – MIN(––) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-23-4 AVERAGE VALUE – AVG(––) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-23-5 SUM – SUM(––) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-24 Logic Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-24-1 COMPLEMENT – COM(29) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-24-2 LOGICAL AND – ANDW(34) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-24-3 LOGICAL OR – ORW(35) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-24-4 EXCLUSIVE OR – XORW(36) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-24-5 EXCLUSIVE NOR – XNRW(37) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-25 Increment/Decrement Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-25-1 BCD INCREMENT – INC(38) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-25-2 BCD DECREMENT – DEC(39) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-26 Subroutine Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-26-1 SUBROUTINE ENTER – SBS(91) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-26-2 SUBROUTINE DEFINE and RETURN – SBN(92)/RET(93) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-26-3 MACRO – MCRO(99) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-27 Pulse Output Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-27-1 SET PULSES – PULS(65) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-27-2 SPEED OUTPUT– SPED(64) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-27-3 ACCELERATION CONTROL – ACC(––) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-27-4 PULSE WITH VARIABLE DUTY RATIO – PWM(––) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-27-5 SYNCHRONIZED PULSE CONTROL – SYNC(––) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-28 Special Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-28-1 MESSAGE DISPLAY – MSG(46) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-28-2 I/O REFRESH – IORF(97) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-28-3 BIT COUNTER – BCNT(67) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-28-4 FRAME CHECKSUM – FCS(––) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-29 Interrupt Control Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-29-1 INTERRUPT CONTROL – INT(89) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-29-2 INTERVAL TIMER – STIM(69) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-30 Communications Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-30-1 RECEIVE – RXD(47) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-30-2 TRANSMIT – TXD(48) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-30-3 CHANGE RS-232C SETUP – STUP(––) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
463
463
464
466
466
467
467
468
470
472
474
475
475
476
477
477
478
479
479
479
480
480
482
482
483
483
485
487
490
492
493
493
494
495
496
497
497
500
501
501
503
505
359
Data Areas, Definer Values, and Flags
7-1
Section
7-3
Notation
In the remainder of this manual, all instructions will be referred to by their mnemonics. For example, the OUTPUT instruction will be called OUT; the AND
LOAD instruction, AND LD. If you’re not sure of the instruction a mnemonic is
used for, refer to Appendix A Programming Instructions.
If an instruction is assigned a function code, it will be given in parentheses after
the mnemonic. These function codes, which are 2-digit decimal numbers, are
used to input most instructions into the CPU Unit. A table of instructions listed in
order of function codes is also provided in Appendix A Programming Instructions. Lists of instructions are also provided in 7-6 Instruction Tables.
An @ before a mnemonic indicates the differentiated version of that instruction.
Differentiated instructions are explained in Section 7-4.
7-2
Instruction Format
Most instructions have at least one or more operands associated with them. Operands indicate or provide the data on which an instruction is to be performed.
These are sometimes input as the actual numeric values (i.e., as constants), but
are usually the addresses of data area words or bits that contain the data to be
used. A bit whose address is designated as an operand is called an operand bit;
a word whose address is designated as an operand is called an operand word. In
some instructions, the word address designated in an instruction indicates the
first of multiple words containing the desired data.
Each instruction requires one or more words in Program Memory. The first word
is the instruction word, which specifies the instruction and contains any definers
(described below) or operand bits required by the instruction. Other operands
required by the instruction are contained in following words, one operand per
word. Some instructions require up to four words.
A definer is an operand associated with an instruction and contained in the same
word as the instruction itself. These operands define the instruction rather than
telling what data it is to use. Examples of definers are TC numbers, which are
used in timer and counter instructions to create timers and counters, as well as
jump numbers (which define which Jump instruction is paired with which Jump
End instruction). Bit operands are also contained in the same word as the
instruction itself, although these are not considered definers.
7-3
Data Areas, Definer Values, and Flags
In this section, each instruction description includes its ladder diagram symbol,
the data areas that can be used by its operands, and the values that can be used
as definers. Details for the data areas are also specified by the operand names
and the type of data required for each operand (i.e., word or bit and, for words,
hexadecimal or BCD).
Not all addresses in the specified data areas are necessarily allowed for an operand, e.g., if an operand requires two words, the last word in a data area cannot
be designated as the first word of the operand because all words for a single operand must be within the same data area. Other specific limitations are given in a
Limitations subsection. Refer to Section 5 Memory Areas for addressing conventions and the addresses of flags and control bits.
! Caution
360
The IR and SR areas are considered as separate data areas. If an operand has
access to one area, it doesn’t necessarily mean that the same operand will have
access to the other area. The border between the IR and SR areas can, however, be crossed for a single operand, i.e., the last bit in the IR area may be specified for an operand that requires more than one word as long as the SR area is
also allowed for that operand.
Section
Data Areas, Definer Values, and Flags
7-3
The Flags subsection lists flags that are affected by execution of an instruction.
These flags include the following SR area flags.
Abbreviation
ER
CY
GR
EQ
LE
Name
Instruction Execution Error Flag
Carry Flag
Greater Than Flag
Equals Flag
Less Than Flag
Bit
25503
25504
25505
25506
25507
ER is the flag most commonly used for monitoring an instruction’s execution.
When ER goes ON, it indicates that an error has occurred in attempting to
execute the current instruction. The Flags subsection of each instruction lists
possible reasons for ER being ON. ER will turn ON if operands are not entered
correctly. Instructions are not executed when ER is ON. A table of instructions
and the flags they affect is provided in Appendix B Error and Arithmetic Flag Operation.
Indirect Addressing
When the DM area is specified for an operand, an indirect address can be used.
Indirect DM addressing is specified by placing an asterisk before the DM: *DM.
When an indirect DM address is specified, the designated DM word will contain
the address of the DM word that contains the data that will be used as the operand of the instruction. If, for example, *DM 0001 was designated as the first operand and LR 00 as the second operand of MOV(21), the contents of DM 0001
was 1111, and DM 1111 contained 5555, the value 5555 would be moved to
LR 00.
MOV(21)
*DM 0001
LR 00
Indirect
address
Word
DM 0000
DM 0001
DM 0002
Content
4C59
1111
F35A
DM 1111
DM 1113
DM 1114
5555
2506
D541
Indicates
DM 1111.
5555 moved
to LR 00.
When using indirect addressing, the address of the desired word must be in BCD
and it must specify a word within the DM area. In the above example, the content
of DM 0001 has to be in BCD and has to specify an address in the DM area of the
PC being used. (Refer to Section 5 Memory Areas for DM area details.)
Designating Constants
Although data area addresses are most often given as operands, many operands and all definers are input as constants. The available value range for a given definer or operand depends on the particular instruction that uses it.
Constants must also be entered in the form required by the instruction, i.e., in
BCD or in hexadecimal.
361
Section
Differentiated Instructions
7-4
7-4
Differentiated Instructions
Most instructions are provided in both differentiated and non-differentiated
forms. Differentiated instructions are distinguished by an @ in front of the
instruction mnemonic.
A non-differentiated instruction is executed each time it is scanned as long as its
execution condition is ON. A differentiated instruction is executed only once after its execution condition goes from OFF to ON. If the execution condition has
not changed or has changed from ON to OFF since the last time the instruction
was scanned, the instruction will not be executed. The following two examples
show how this works with MOV(21) and @MOV(21), which are used to move the
data in the address designated by the first operand to the address designated by
the second operand.
00000
MOV(21)
HR 10
Diagram A
DM 0000
Address
00000
00001
Instruction
Operands
LD
MOV(21)
00000
HR
DM
10
0000
00000
Diagram B
@MOV(21)
Address
Instruction
HR 10
00000
00001
LD
@MOV(21)
DM 0000
Operands
00000
HR
DM
10
0000
In diagram A, the non-differentiated MOV(21) will move the content of HR 10 to
DM 0000 whenever it is scanned with 00000. If the cycle time is 80 ms and 00000
remains ON for 2.0 seconds, this move operation will be performed 25 times and
only the last value moved to DM 0000 will be preserved there.
In diagram B, the differentiated @MOV(21) will move the content of HR 10 to DM
0000 only once after 00000 goes ON. Even if 00000 remains ON for 2.0 seconds
with the same 80 ms cycle time, the move operation will be executed only once
during the first cycle in which 00000 has changed from OFF to ON. Because the
content of HR 10 could very well change during the 2 seconds while 00000 is
ON, the final content of DM 0000 after the 2 seconds could be different depending on whether MOV(21) or @MOV(21) was used.
All operands, ladder diagram symbols, and other specifications for instructions
are the same regardless of whether the differentiated or non-differentiated form
of an instruction is used. When inputting, the same function codes are also used,
but NOT is input after the function code to designate the differentiated form of an
instruction. Most, but not all, instructions have differentiated forms.
Refer to 7-11 INTERLOCK and INTERLOCK CLEAR – IL(02) and IL(03) for the
effects of interlocks on differentiated instructions.
The CPM2A/CPM2C also provides differentiation instructions: DIFU(13) and
DIFD(14). DIFU(13) operates the same as a differentiated instruction, but is
used to turn ON a bit for one cycle. DIFD(14) also turns ON a bit for one cycle, but
does it when the execution condition has changed from ON to OFF. Refer to
7-8-4 DIFFERENTIATE UP and DOWN - DIFU(13) and DIFD(14) for details.
362
Coding Right-hand Instructions
7-5
Section
7-5
Coding Right-hand Instructions
Writing mnemonic code for ladder instructions is described in Section 6 Ladderdiagram Programming. Converting the information in the ladder diagram symbol
for all other instructions follows the same pattern, as described below, and is not
specified for each instruction individually.
The first word of any instruction defines the instruction and provides any definers. If the instruction requires only a signal bit operand with no definer, the bit
operand is also placed on the same line as the mnemonic. All other operands are
placed on lines after the instruction line, one operand per line and in the same
order as they appear in the ladder symbol for the instruction.
The address and instruction columns of the mnemonic code table are filled in for
the instruction word only. For all other lines, the left two columns are left blank. If
the instruction requires no definer or bit operand, the data column is left blank for
first line. It is a good idea to cross through any blank data column spaces (for all
instruction words that do not require data) so that the data column can be quickly
scanned to see if any addresses have been left out.
If an IR or SR address is used in the data column, the left side of the column is left
blank. If any other data area is used, the data area abbreviation is placed on the
left side and the address is placed on the right side. If a constant to be input, the
number symbol (#) is placed on the left side of the data column and the number
to be input is placed on the right side. Any numbers input as definers in the
instruction word do not require the number symbol on the right side. TC bits,
once defined as a timer or counter, take a TIM (timer) or CNT (counter) prefix.
When coding an instruction that has a function code, be sure to write in the function code, which will be necessary when inputting the instruction via the Programming Console. Also be sure to designate the differentiated instruction with
the @ symbol.
Note The mnemonics of expansion instructions are followed by “(––)” as the function
code to indicate that they must be assigned function codes by the user in the
instructions table before they can be used in programming. Refer to page 156 for
details.
363
Section
Coding Right-hand Instructions
7-5
The following diagram and corresponding mnemonic code illustrates the points
described previously.
00000
Address Instruction
00001
DIFU(13) 21600
00002
00100
00200
21600
BCNT(67)
01001 01002
LR 0000
Data
00000
LD
00000
00001
AND
00001
00002
OR
00002
00003
DIFU(13)
21600
00004
LD
00100
00005
AND NOT
00200
00006
LD
01001
00007
AND NOT
01002
00008
AND NOT
00009
OR LD
00010
AND
00011
BCNT(67)
#0001
004
HR 00
00005
TIM 000
LR
0000
––
21600
#0150
TIM 000
––
#
MOV(21)
0001
004
HR 00
HR
LR 00
HR 0015
00012
LD
00013
TIM
364
00005
000
#
01000
00014
LD
00015
MOV(21)
00016
LD
00017
OUT NOT
00
TIM
0150
000
––
HR
00
LR
00
HR
0015
01000
Section
Coding Right-hand Instructions
Multiple Instruction Lines
00000
If a right-hand instruction requires multiple instruction lines (such as KEEP(11)),
all of the lines for the instruction are entered before the right-hand instruction.
Each of the lines for the instruction is coded, starting with LD or LD NOT, to form
‘logic blocks’ that are combined by the right-hand instruction. An example of this
for SFT(10) is shown below.
Address Instruction
00001
I
SFT(10)
00002
P
HR 00
00100
00200
01001 01002
7-5
21600
R
HR 00
Data
00000
LD
00000
00001
AND
00001
00002
LD
00002
00003
LD
00100
00004
AND NOT
00200
00005
LD
01001
00006
AND NOT
00007
AND NOT
00008
OR LD
00009
AND
00010
SFT(10)
HR
HR
00
00011
LD
HR
0015
00012
OUT NOT
LR 0000
HR 0015
01001
01002
LR
0000
––
21600
00
01001
365
Section
Instruction Tables
7-6
7-6
Instruction Tables
This section provides tables of the instructions supported by the CPM1/CPM1A,
CPM2A/CPM2C, and SRM1(-V2) PCs. The first few tables can be used to find
instructions by function code. The last table can be used to find instructions by
mnemonic. In both tables, the @ symbol indicates instructions with differentiated forms.
7-6-1 CPM1/CPM1A Function Codes
The following table lists the CPM1/CPM1A instructions that have fixed function
codes. Each instruction is listed by mnemonic and by instruction name. Use the
numbers in the leftmost column as the left digit and the number in the column
heading as the right digit of the function code.
Right digit
Left
digit
di
it
2
3
0
NOP
NO
OPERATION
0
END
END
1
IL
INTERLOCK
ILC
INTERLOCK
CLEAR
JMP
JUMP
4
JME
JUMP END
5
(@) FAL
FAILURE
ALARM AND
RESET
6
FALS
SEVERE
FAILURE
ALARM
STEP
STEP
DEFINE
SNXT
STEP START
1
SFT
SHIFT
REGISTER
KEEP
KEEP
CNTR
REVERSIBLE
COUNTER
DIFU
DIFFERENTIATE UP
DIFD
DIFFERENTIATE
DOWN
TIMH
HIGHSPEED
TIMER
(@) WSFT
WORD
SHIFT
(@) ASFT
ASYNCHRONOUS SHIFT
REGISTER
---
---
2
CMP
COMPARE
(@) MOV
MOVE
(@) MVN
MOVE NOT
(@) BIN
BCD TO
BINARY
(@) BCD
BINARY TO
BCD
(@) ASL
SHIFT LEFT
(@) ASR
SHIFT
RIGHT
(@) ROL
ROTATE
LEFT
(@) ROR
ROTATE
RIGHT
(@) COM
COMPLEMENT
3
(@) ADD
BCD ADD
(@) SUB
BCD
SUBTRACT
(@) MUL
BCD
MULTIPLY
(@) DIV
BCD
DIVIDE
(@) ANDW
LOGICAL
AND
(@) ORW
LOGICAL OR
(@) XORW
EXCLUSIVE
OR
(@) XNRW
EXCLUSIVE
NOR
(@) INC
INCREMENT
(@) DEC
DECREMENT
4
(@) STC
SET CARRY
(@) CLC
CLEAR
CARRY
---
---
---
---
(@) MSG
MESSAGE
DISPLAY
---
---
---
5
(@) ADB
BINARY ADD
(@) SBB
BINARY
SUBTRACT
(@) MLB
BINARY
MULTIPLY
(@) DVB
BINARY
DIVIDE
(@) ADDL
DOUBLE
BCD ADD
(@) SUBL
DOUBLE
BCD
SUBTRACT
(@) MULL
DOUBLE
BCD
MULTIPLY
(@) DIVL
DOUBLE
BCD
DIVIDE
---
---
6
CMPL
DOUBLE
COMPARE
(@) INI
MODE CONTROL
(@) PRV
HIGHSPEED
COUNTER
PV READ
(@) CTBL
COMPARISON TABLE
LOAD
(@) SPED
SPEED OUTPUT (see
note)
(@) PULS
SET PULSES
(see note)
---
(@) BCNT
BIT COUNTER
(@) BCMP
BLOCK
COMPARE
(@) STIM
INTERVAL
TIMER
7
(@) XFER
BLOCK
TRANSFER
(@) BSET
BLOCK SET
---
(@) XCHG
DATA
EXCHANGE
(@) SLD
ONE DIGIT
SHIFT LEFT
(@) SRD
ONE DIGIT
SHIFT
RIGHT
(@) MLPX
4-TO-16
DECODER
(@) DMPX
16-TO-4
ENCODER
(@) SDEC
7-SEGMENT
DECODER
---
8
(@) DIST
SINGLE
WORD
DISTRIBUTE
(@) COLL
DATA
COLLECT
(@) MOVB
MOVE BIT
(@) MOVD
MOVE DIGIT
(@) SFTR
REVERSIBLE SHIFT
REGISTER
(@) TCMP
TABLE
COMPARE
(@) ASC
ASCII
CONVERT
---
---
(@) INT
INTERRUPT
CONTROL
9
---
(@) SBS
SUBROUTINE
ENTRY
SBN
SUBROUTINE
DEFINE
RET
SUBROUTINE
RETURN
---
---
---
(@) IORF
I/O
REFRESH
---
(@) MCRO
MACRO
Note Only for the CPM1A transistor output models.
366
7
8
9
Section
Instruction Tables
7-6
7-6-2 CPM2A/CPM2C Function Codes
The following table lists the CPM2A/CPM2C (including the CPM2C-S) instructions that have fixed function codes. Each instruction is listed by mnemonic and
by instruction name. Use the numbers in the leftmost column as the left digit and
the number in the column heading as the right digit of the function code.
Right digit
Left
digit
di
it
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
NOP
NO
OPERATION
END
END
IL
INTERLOCK
ILC
INTERLOCK
CLEAR
JMP
JUMP
JME
JUMP END
(@) FAL
FAILURE
ALARM AND
RESET
FALS
SEVERE
FAILURE
ALARM
STEP
STEP
DEFINE
SNXT
STEP START
1
SFT
SHIFT
REGISTER
KEEP
KEEP
CNTR
REVERSIBLE
COUNTER
DIFU
DIFFERENTIATE UP
DIFD
DIFFERENTIATE
DOWN
TIMH
HIGHSPEED
TIMER
(@) WSFT
WORD
SHIFT
(@) ASFT
ASYNCHRONOUS SHIFT
REGISTER
---
---
2
CMP
COMPARE
(@) MOV
MOVE
(@) MVN
MOVE NOT
(@) BIN
BCD TO
BINARY
(@) BCD
BINARY TO
BCD
(@) ASL
SHIFT LEFT
(@) ASR
SHIFT
RIGHT
(@) ROL
ROTATE
LEFT
(@) ROR
ROTATE
RIGHT
(@) COM
COMPLEMENT
3
(@) ADD
BCD ADD
(@) SUB
BCD
SUBTRACT
(@) MUL
BCD
MULTIPLY
(@) DIV
BCD
DIVIDE
(@) ANDW
LOGICAL
AND
(@) ORW
LOGICAL OR
(@) XORW
EXCLUSIVE
OR
(@) XNRW
EXCLUSIVE
NOR
(@) INC
INCREMENT
(@) DEC
DECREMENT
4
(@) STC
SET CARRY
(@) CLC
CLEAR
CARRY
---
---
---
---
(@) MSG
MESSAGE
DISPLAY
(@) RXD
RECEIVE
(@) TXD
TRANSMIT
---
5
(@) ADB
BINARY ADD
(@) SBB
BINARY
SUBTRACT
(@) MLB
BINARY
MULTIPLY
(@) DVB
BINARY
DIVIDE
(@) ADDL
DOUBLE
BCD ADD
(@) SUBL
DOUBLE
BCD
SUBTRACT
(@) MULL
DOUBLE
BCD
MULTIPLY
(@) DIVL
DOUBLE
BCD
DIVIDE
(@) BINL
DOUBLE
BCD-TODOUBLE
BINARY
(@) BCDL
DOUBLE
BINARY-TODOUBLE
BCD
6
CMPL
DOUBLE
COMPARE
(@) INI
MODE CONTROL
(@) PRV
HIGHSPEED
COUNTER
PV READ
(@) CTBL
COMPARISON TABLE
LOAD
(@) SPED
SPEED OUTPUT
(@) PULS
SET PULSES
(@) SCL
SCALING
(@) BCNT
BIT COUNTER
(@) BCMP
BLOCK
COMPARE
(@) STIM
INTERVAL
TIMER
7
(@) XFER
BLOCK
TRANSFER
(@) BSET
BLOCK SET
---
(@) XCHG
DATA
EXCHANGE
(@) SLD
ONE DIGIT
SHIFT LEFT
(@) SRD
ONE DIGIT
SHIFT
RIGHT
(@) MLPX
4-TO-16
DECODER
(@) DMPX
16-TO-4
ENCODER
(@) SDEC
7-SEGMENT
DECODER
---
8
(@) DIST
SINGLE
WORD
DISTRIBUTE
(@) COLL
DATA
COLLECT
(@) MOVB
MOVE BIT
(@) MOVD
MOVE DIGIT
(@) SFTR
REVERSIBLE SHIFT
REGISTER
(@) TCMP
TABLE
COMPARE
(@) ASC
ASCII
CONVERT
---
---
(@) INT
INTERRUPT
CONTROL
9
---
(@) SBS
SUBROUTINE
ENTRY
SBN
SUBROUTINE
DEFINE
RET
SUBROUTINE
RETURN
---
---
---
(@) IORF
I/O
REFRESH
---
(@) MCRO
MACRO
Note The shaded areas are function codes to which expansion instructions are allocated by default or to which the user can allocate expansion instructions. The
following expansion instructions are available in addition to the ones listed
above with default function codes.
Mnemonic
Name
Mnemonic
Name
(@)ACC
ACCELERATION CONTROL
(@)SCL3
AVG
AVERAGE VALUE
(@)SEC
BCD TO SIGNED BINARY
SCALING
HOURS TO SECONDS
(@)FCS
FCS CALCULATE
(@)SRCH
DATA SEARCH
(@)HEX
ASCII-TO-HEXADECIMAL
(@)STUP
CHANGE RS-232C SETUP
(@)HMS
SECONDS TO HOURS
(@)SUM
SUM CALCULATE
(@)MAX
FIND MAXIMUM
SYNC
(@)MIN
FIND MINIMUM
TIML
SYNCHRONIZED PULSE
CONTROL
LONG TIMER
(@)NEG
2’S COMPLEMENT
TMHH
VERY HIGH-SPEED TIMER
PID
PID CONTROL
(@)PWM
PULSE WITH VARIABLE DUTY
RATIO
SIGNED BINARY TO BCD
SCALING
ZCP
ZCPL
AREA RANGE COMPARE
DOUBLE AREA RANGE
COMPARE
CO
(@)SCL2
367
Section
Instruction Tables
7-6
7-6-3 SRM1(-V2) Function Codes
The following table lists the SRM1(-V2) instructions that have fixed function
codes. Each instruction is listed by mnemonic and by instruction name. Use the
numbers in the leftmost column as the left digit and the number in the column
heading as the right digit of the function code.
Right digit
Left
digit
di
it
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
0
NOP
NO
OPERATION
END
END
IL
INTERLOCK
ILC
INTERLOCK
CLEAR
JMP
JUMP
JME
JUMP END
(@) FAL
FAILURE
ALARM AND
RESET
FALS
SEVERE
FAILURE
ALARM
STEP
STEP
DEFINE
SNXT
STEP START
1
SFT
SHIFT
REGISTER
KEEP
KEEP
CNTR
REVERSIBLE
COUNTER
DIFU
DIFFERENTIATE UP
DIFD
DIFFERENTIATE
DOWN
TIMH
HIGHSPEED
TIMER
(@) WSFT
WORD
SHIFT
(@) ASFT
ASYNCHRONOUS SHIFT
REGISTER
---
---
2
CMP
COMPARE
(@) MOV
MOVE
(@) MVN
MOVE NOT
(@) BIN
BCD TO
BINARY
(@) BCD
BINARY TO
BCD
(@) ASL
SHIFT LEFT
(@) ASR
SHIFT
RIGHT
(@) ROL
ROTATE
LEFT
(@) ROR
ROTATE
RIGHT
(@) COM
COMPLEMENT
3
(@) ADD
BCD ADD
(@) SUB
BCD
SUBTRACT
(@) MUL
BCD
MULTIPLY
(@) DIV
BCD
DIVIDE
(@) ANDW
LOGICAL
AND
(@) ORW
LOGICAL OR
(@) XORW
EXCLUSIVE
OR
(@) XNRW
EXCLUSIVE
NOR
(@) INC
INCREMENT
(@) DEC
DECREMENT
4
(@) STC
SET CARRY
(@) CLC
CLEAR
CARRY
---
---
---
---
(@) MSG
MESSAGE
DISPLAY
(@) RXD
RECEIVE
(@) TXD
TRANSMIT
---
5
(@) ADB
BINARY ADD
(@) SBB
BINARY
SUBTRACT
(@) MLB
BINARY
MULTIPLY
(@) DVB
BINARY
DIVIDE
(@) ADDL
DOUBLE
BCD ADD
(@) SUBL
DOUBLE
BCD
SUBTRACT
(@) MULL
DOUBLE
BCD
MULTIPLY
(@) DIVL
DOUBLE
BCD
DIVIDE
---
---
6
CMPL
DOUBLE
COMPARE
---
---
---
---
---
(@) SCL
SCALING
(@) BCNT
BIT COUNTER
(@) BCMP
BLOCK
COMPARE
(@) STIM
INTERVAL
TIMER
7
(@) XFER
BLOCK
TRANSFER
(@) BSET
BLOCK SET
---
(@) XCHG
DATA
EXCHANGE
(@) SLD
ONE DIGIT
SHIFT LEFT
(@) SRD
ONE DIGIT
SHIFT
RIGHT
(@) MLPX
4-TO-16
DECODER
(@) DMPX
16-TO-4
ENCODER
(@) SDEC
7-SEGMENT
DECODER
---
8
(@) DIST
SINGLE
WORD
DISTRIBUTE
(@) COLL
DATA
COLLECT
(@) MOVB
MOVE BIT
(@) MOVD
MOVE DIGIT
(@) SFTR
REVERSIBLE SHIFT
REGISTER
(@) TCMP
TABLE
COMPARE
(@) ASC
ASCII
CONVERT
---
---
---
9
---
(@) SBS
SUBROUTINE
ENTRY
SBN
SUBROUTINE
DEFINE
RET
SUBROUTINE
RETURN
---
---
---
---
---
(@) MCRO
MACRO
Note The shaded areas are function codes to which expansion instructions are allocated by default or to which the user can allocate expansion instructions. The
following expansion instructions are available in addition to the ones listed
above with default function codes.
Mnemonic
Name
(@)FCS
FCS CALCULATE
(@)HEX
ASCII-TO-HEXADECIMAL
(@)NEG*
2’S COMPLEMENT
PID*
PID CONTROL
(@)STUP
CHANGE RS-232C SETUP
ZCP*
AREA RANGE COMPARE
Note *SCL(66), NEG(––), PID(––), and ZCP (––) are supported by the
SRM1-C0-V2 CPUs only.
368
Section
Instruction Tables
7-6
7-6-4 Alphabetic List by Mnemonic
Dashes (“––”) in the Code column indicate expansion instructions, which do not
have fixed function codes. “None” indicates instructions for which function
codes are not used.
In the CPU Units column, “SRM1” indicates all versions of the SRM1 CPU Units
and “SRM1(-V2)” indicates only version 2 of the SRM1 CPU Units.
Mnemonic
Code
Words
Name
CPU Units
Page
ACC (@)
––
4
ACCELERATION CONTROL
CPM2A/CPM2C
487
ADB (@)
50
4
BINARY ADD
All
463
ADD (@)
30
4
BCD ADD
All
453
ADDL (@)
54
4
DOUBLE BCD ADD
All
459
AND
None
1
AND
All
372
AND LD
None
1
AND LOAD
All
373
AND NOT
None
1
AND NOT
All
372
ANDW (@) 34
4
LOGICAL AND
All
476
ASC (@)
86
4
ASCII CONVERT
All
445
ASFT(@)
17
4
ASYNCHRONOUS SHIFT REGISTER
All
406
ASL (@)
25
2
ARITHMETIC SHIFT LEFT
All
401
ASR (@)
26
2
ARITHMETIC SHIFT RIGHT
All
402
AVG
––
4
AVERAGE VALUE
CPM2A/CPM2C
472
BCD (@)
24
3
BINARY TO BCD
All
436
BCDL (@)
59
3
DOUBLE BINARY-TO-DOUBLE BCD
CPM2A/CPM2C
437
BCMP (@)
68
4
BLOCK COMPARE
All
430
BCNT (@)
67
4
BIT COUNTER
All
495
BIN (@)
23
3
BCD-TO-BINARY
All
435
BINL (@)
58
3
DOUBLE BCD-TO-DOUBLE BINARY
CPM2A/CPM2C
436
BSET (@)
71
4
BLOCK SET
All
410
CLC (@)
41
1
CLEAR CARRY
All
453
CMP
20
3
COMPARE
All
428
CMPL
60
4
DOUBLE COMPARE
All
432
CNT
None
2
COUNTER
All
390
CNTR
12
3
REVERSIBLE COUNTER
All
391
COLL (@)
81
4
DATA COLLECT
All
413
COM (@)
29
2
COMPLEMENT
All
475
CTBL(@)
63
4
COMPARISON TABLE LOAD
All
392
DEC (@)
39
2
BCD DECREMENT
All
479
DIFD
14
2
DIFFERENTIATE DOWN
All
376
DIFU
13
2
DIFFERENTIATE UP
All
376
DIST (@)
80
4
SINGLE WORD DISTRIBUTE
All
411
DIV (@)
33
4
BCD DIVIDE
All
457
DIVL (@)
57
4
DOUBLE BCD DIVIDE
All
462
DMPX (@)
77
4
16-TO-4 ENCODER
All
440
DVB (@)
53
4
BINARY DIVIDE
All
466
END
01
1
END
All
377
FAL (@)
06
2
FAILURE ALARM AND RESET
All
381
FALS
07
2
SEVERE FAILURE ALARM
All
381
FCS (@)
––
4
FCS CALCULATE
CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2)
496
HEX (@)
––
4
ASCII-TO-HEXADECIMAL
CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2)
447
HMS
––
4
SECONDS TO HOURS
CPM2A/CPM2C
450
IL
02
1
INTERLOCK
All
377
369
Section
Instruction Tables
Mnemonic
Code
Words
Name
CPU Units
7-6
Page
ILC
03
1
INTERLOCK CLEAR
All
377
INC (@)
38
2
INCREMENT
All
479
INI (@)
61
4
MODE CONTROL
All
395
INT (@)
89
4
INTERRUPT CONTROL
All
497
IORF (@)
97
3
I/O REFRESH
All except SRM1
494
JME
05
2
JUMP END
All
379
JMP
04
2
JUMP
All
379
KEEP
11
2
KEEP
All
375
LD
None
1
LOAD
All
372
LD NOT
None
1
LOAD NOT
All
372
MAX (@)
––
4
FIND MAXIMUM
CPM2A/CPM2C
468
MCRO (@) 99
4
MACRO
All
482
MIN (@)
––
4
FIND MINIMUM
CPM2A/CPM2C
470
MLB (@)
52
4
BINARY MULTIPLY
All
466
MLPX (@)
76
4
4-TO-16 DECODER
All
438
MOV (@)
21
3
MOVE
All
407
MOVB (@)
82
4
MOVE BIT
All
415
MOVD (@)
83
4
MOVE DIGIT
All
416
MSG (@)
46
2
MESSAGE
All
493
MUL (@)
32
4
BCD MULTIPLY
All
456
MULL (@)
56
4
DOUBLE BCD MULTIPLY
All
462
MVN (@)
22
3
MOVE NOT
All
408
NEG (@)
––
4
2’S COMPLEMENT
CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2)
451
NOP
00
1
NO OPERATION
All
377
OR
None
1
OR
All
372
OR LD
None
1
OR LOAD
All
373
OR NOT
None
1
OR NOT
All
372
ORW (@)
35
4
LOGICAL OR
All
477
OUT
None
2
OUTPUT
All
373
OUT NOT
None
2
OUTPUT NOT
All
373
PID
––
4
PID CONTROL
CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2)
422
PRV (@)
62
4
HIGH-SPEED COUNTER PV READ
All except SRM1
397
PULS (@)
65
4
SET PULSES
483
PWM (@)
––
4
PULSE WITH VARIABLE DUTY RATIO
CPM1A/CPM2A/CPM2C
(Transistor outputs only)
CPM2A/CPM2C
RET
93
1
SUBROUTINE RETURN
All
482
ROL (@)
27
2
ROTATE LEFT
All
402
ROR (@)
28
2
ROTATE RIGHT
All
403
RSET
None
2
RESET
All
374
RXD (@)
47
4
RECEIVE
CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1
501
SBB (@)
51
4
BINARY SUBTRACT
All
464
SBN
92
2
SUBROUTINE DEFINE
All
482
SBS (@)
91
2
SUBROUTINE ENTRY
All
480
SCL (@)
66
4
SCALING
CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2)
417
SCL2 (@)
––
4
SIGNED BINARY TO BCD SCALING
CPM2A/CPM2C
418
SCL3 (@)
––
4
BCD TO SIGNED BINARY SCALING
CPM2A/CPM2C
420
SDEC (@)
78
4
7-SEGMENT DECODER
CPM2A/CPM2C
442
SEC
––
4
HOURS TO SECONDS
CPM2A/CPM2C
449
SET
None
2
SET
All
374
370
490
Section
Instruction Tables
Mnemonic
Code
Words
Name
CPU Units
7-6
Page
SFT
10
3
SHIFT REGISTER
All
400
SFTR (@)
84
4
REVERSIBLE SHIFT REGISTER
All
405
SLD (@)
74
3
ONE DIGIT SHIFT LEFT
All
404
SNXT
09
2
STEP START
All
381
SPED (@)
64
4
SPEED OUTPUT
485
SRCH (@)
––
4
DATA SEARCH
CPM1A/CPM2A/CPM2C
(Transistor outputs only)
CPM2A/CPM2C
SRD (@)
75
3
ONE DIGIT SHIFT RIGHT
All
404
STC (@)
40
1
SET CARRY
All
453
STEP
08
2
STEP DEFINE
All
381
STIM (@)
69
4
INTERVAL TIMER
All
500
STUP
––
3
CHANGE RS-232C SETUP
CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1
505
SUB (@)
31
4
BCD SUBTRACT
All
454
SUBL (@)
55
4
DOUBLE BCD SUBTRACT
All
460
SUM (@)
––
4
SUM
CPM2A/CPM2C
474
SYNC (@)
––
4
SYNCHRONIZED PULSE CONTROL
CPM2A/CPM2C
492
TCMP (@)
85
4
TABLE COMPARE
All
429
TIM
None
2
TIMER
All
385
TIMH
15
3
HIGH-SPEED TIMER
All
386
TIML
––
4
LONG TIMER
CPM2A/CPM2C
388
TMHH
––
4
VERY HIGH-SPEED TIMER
CPM2A/CPM2C
387
TXD (@)
48
4
TRANSMIT
CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1
503
WSFT (@)
16
3
WORD SHIFT
All
401
XCHG (@)
73
3
DATA EXCHANGE
All
411
XFER (@)
70
4
BLOCK TRANSFER
All
409
XNRW (@)
37
4
EXCLUSIVE NOR
All
478
XORW (@) 36
4
EXCLUSIVE OR
All
477
ZCP
––
4
AREA RANGE COMPARE
CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2)
433
ZCPL
––
4
DOUBLE AREA RANGE COMPARE
CPM2A/CPM2C
434
467
371
Section
Ladder Diagram Instructions
7-7
7-7
Ladder Diagram Instructions
Ladder diagram instructions include ladder instructions and logic block instructions and correspond to the conditions on the ladder diagram. Logic block
instructions are used to relate more complex parts.
7-7-1 LOAD, LOAD NOT, AND, AND NOT, OR, and OR NOT
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
B
B: Bit
LOAD – LD
IR, SR, AR, HR, TC, LR, TR
B: Bit
B
LOAD NOT – LD NOT
IR, SR, AR, HR, TC, LR
B: Bit
B
AND – AND
IR, SR, AR, HR, TC, LR
B: Bit
B
AND NOT – AND NOT
IR, SR, AR, HR, TC, LR
B: Bit
OR – OR
B
OR NOT – OR NOT
B
IR, SR, AR, HR, TC, LR
B: Bit
IR, SR, AR, HR, TC, LR
Limitations
There is no limit to the number of any of these instructions, or restrictions in the
order in which they must be used, as long as the memory capacity of the PC is
not exceeded.
Description
These six basic instructions correspond to the conditions on a ladder diagram.
As described in Section 6 Ladder-diagram Programming, the status of the bits
assigned to each instruction determines the execution conditions for all other
instructions. Each of these instructions and each bit address can be used as
many times as required. Each can be used in as many of these instructions as
required.
The status of the bit operand (B) assigned to LD or LD NOT determines the first
execution condition. AND takes the logical AND between the execution condition and the status of its bit operand; AND NOT, the logical AND between the
execution condition and the inverse of the status of its bit operand. OR takes the
logical OR between the execution condition and the status of its bit operand; OR
NOT, the logical OR between the execution condition and the inverse of the status of its bit operand.
Flags
372
There are no flags affected by these instructions.
Section
Bit Control Instructions
7-8
7-7-2 AND LOAD and OR LOAD
AND LOAD – AND LD
Ladder Symbol
00000
00002
00001
00003
OR LOAD – OR LD
00000
00001
00002
00003
Ladder Symbol
Description
When instructions are combined into blocks that cannot be logically combined
using only OR and AND operations, AND LD and OR LD are used. Whereas
AND and OR operations logically combine a bit status and an execution condition, AND LD and OR LD logically combine two execution conditions, the current
one and the last unused one.
In order to draw ladder diagrams, it is not necessary to use AND LD and OR LD
instructions, nor are they necessary when inputting ladder diagrams directly, as
is possible from the SSS. They are required, however, to convert the program to
and input it in mnemonic form.
In order to reduce the number of programming instructions required, a basic understanding of logic block instructions is required. For an introduction to logic
blocks, refer to 6-3-6 Logic Block Instructions.
Flags
There are no flags affected by these instructions.
7-8
Bit Control Instructions
There are seven instructions that can be used generally to control individual bit
status. These are OUT, OUT NOT, DIFU(13), DIFD(14), SET, RSET, and
KEEP(11). These instructions are used to turn bits ON and OFF in different
ways.
7-8-1 OUTPUT and OUTPUT NOT – OUT and OUT NOT
OUTPUT – OUT
Ladder Symbol
Operand Data Areas
B: Bit
B
OUTPUT NOT – OUT NOT
Ladder Symbol
IR, SR, AR, HR, LR, TR
Operand Data Areas
B: Bit
B
IR, SR, AR, HR, LR
Limitations
Any output bit can generally be used in only one instruction that controls its status.
Description
OUT and OUT NOT are used to control the status of the designated bit according
to the execution condition.
373
Section
Bit Control Instructions
7-8
OUT turns ON the designated bit for an ON execution condition, and turns OFF
the designated bit for an OFF execution condition. With a TR bit, OUT appears at
a branching point rather than at the end of an instruction line. Refer to 6-3-8
Branching Instruction Lines for details.
OUT NOT turns ON the designated bit for a OFF execution condition, and turns
OFF the designated bit for an ON execution condition.
OUT and OUT NOT can be used to control execution by turning ON and OFF bits
that are assigned to conditions on the ladder diagram, thus determining execution conditions for other instructions. This is particularly helpful and allows a
complex set of conditions to be used to control the status of a single work bit, and
then that work bit can be used to control other instructions.
The length of time that a bit is ON or OFF can be controlled by combining the
OUT or OUT NOT with TIM. Refer to Examples under 7-15-1 TIMER – TIM for
details.
Flags
There are no flags affected by these instructions.
7-8-2 SET and RESET – SET and RSET
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
SET B
B: Bit
IR, SR, AR, HR, LR
RSET B
B: Bit
IR, SR, AR, HR, LR
Description
SET turns the operand bit ON when the execution condition is ON, and does not
affect the status of the operand bit when the execution condition is OFF. RSET
turns the operand bit OFF when the execution condition is ON, and does not affect the status of the operand bit when the execution condition is OFF.
The operation of SET differs from that of OUT because the OUT instruction turns
the operand bit OFF when its execution condition is OFF. Likewise, RSET differs
from OUT NOT because OUT NOT turns the operand bit ON when its execution
condition is OFF.
Note On the Programming Console, input SET by pressing the FUN and SET Keys
and input RSET by pressing the FUN and RESET Keys.
Precautions
The status of operand bits for SET and RSET programmed between IL(02) and
ILC(03) or JMP(04) and JME(05) will not change when the interlock or jump
condition is met (i.e., when IL(02) or JMP(04) is executed with an OFF execution
condition).
Flags
There are no flags affected by these instructions.
Examples
The following examples demonstrate the difference between OUT and SET/
RSET. In the first example (Diagram A), IR 20000 will be turned ON or OFF
whenever IR 00000 goes ON or OFF.
374
Section
Bit Control Instructions
7-8
In the second example (Diagram B), IR 10000 will be turned ON when IR 00001
goes ON and will remain ON (even if IR 00001 goes OFF) until IR 00002 goes
ON.
00000
20000
Address
00000
00001
Diagram A
Instruction
Operands
LD
OUT
00000
20000
00001
SET 20000
00002
RSET 20000
Diagram B
Address
00000
00001
00002
00003
Instruction
Operands
LD
SET
LD
RSET
00001
20000
00002
20000
7-8-3 KEEP – KEEP(11)
Ladder Symbol
Operand Data Areas
S
B: Bit
KEEP(11)
B
R
IR, SR, AR, HR, LR
Limitations
Any output bit can generally be used in only one instruction that controls its status.
Description
KEEP(11) is used to maintain the status of the designated bit based on two
execution conditions. These execution conditions are labeled S and R. S is the
set input; R, the reset input. KEEP(11) operates like a latching relay that is set by
S and reset by R.
When S turns ON, the designated bit will go ON and stay ON until reset, regardless of whether S stays ON or goes OFF. When R turns ON, the designated bit
will go OFF and stay OFF until reset, regardless of whether R stays ON or goes
OFF. The relationship between execution conditions and KEEP(11) bit status is
shown below.
S execution condition
R execution condition
Status of B
Flags
There are no flags affected by this instruction.
375
Section
Bit Control Instructions
Precautions
7-8
Exercise caution when using a KEEP reset line that is controlled by an external
normally closed device. Never use an input bit in an inverse condition on the reset (R) for KEEP(11) when the input device uses an AC power supply. The delay
in shutting down the PC’s DC power supply (relative to the AC power supply to
the input device) can cause the designated bit of KEEP(11) to be reset. This situation is shown below.
Input Unit
A
S
KEEP(11)
NEVER
B
A
R
Bits used in KEEP are not reset in interlocks. Refer to the 7-11 INTERLOCK –
and INTERLOCK CLEAR IL(02) and ILC(03) for details.
7-8-4 DIFFERENTIATE UP and DOWN – DIFU(13) and DIFD(14)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
DIFU(13) B
B: Bit
IR, SR, AR, HR, LR
DIFD(14) B
B: Bit
IR, SR, AR, HR, LR
Limitations
Any output bit can generally be used in only one instruction that controls its status.
Description
DIFU(13) and DIFD(14) are used to turn the designated bit ON for one cycle
only.
Whenever executed, DIFU(13) compares its current execution with the previous
execution condition. If the previous execution condition was OFF and the current one is ON, DIFU(13) will turn ON the designated bit. If the previous execution condition was ON and the current execution condition is either ON or OFF,
DIFU(13) will either turn the designated bit OFF or leave it OFF (i.e., if the designated bit is already OFF). The designated bit will thus never be ON for longer
than one cycle, assuming it is executed each cycle (see Precautions, below).
Whenever executed, DIFD(14) compares its current execution with the previous
execution condition. If the previous execution condition was ON and the current
one is OFF, DIFD(14) will turn ON the designated bit. If the previous execution
condition was OFF and the current execution condition is either ON or OFF,
DIFD(14) will either turn the designated bit OFF or leave it OFF. The designated
bit will thus never be ON for longer than one cycle, assuming it is executed each
cycle (see Precautions, below).
These instructions are used when differentiated instructions (i.e., those prefixed
with an @) are not available and single-cycle execution of a particular instruction
is desired. They can also be used with non-differentiated forms of instructions
that have differentiated forms when their use will simplify programming. Examples of these are shown below.
Flags
376
There are no flags affected by these instructions.
Section 7-11
INTERLOCK and INTERLOCK CLEAR – IL(02) and ILC(03)
Precautions
DIFU(13) and DIFD(14) operation can be uncertain when the instructions are
programmed between IL and ILC, between JMP and JME, or in subroutines. Refer to 7-11 INTERLOCK and INTERLOCK CLEAR – IL(02) and ILC(03), 7-12
JUMP and JUMP END – JMP(04) and JME(05), 7-26 Subroutine Instructions,
and 7-29-1 INTERRUPT CONTROL – INT(89).
Example
In this example, IR 20014 will be turned ON for one cycle when IR 00000 goes
from OFF to ON. IR 20015 will be turned ON for one cycle when IR 00000 goes
from ON to OFF.
00000
DIFU(13) 20014
DIFD(14) 20015
7-9
Address
00000
00001
00002
Instruction
LD
DIFU(13)
DIFD(14)
Operands
00000
20014
20015
NO OPERATION – NOP(00)
Description
NOP(00) is not generally required in programming and there is no ladder symbol
for it. When NOP(00) is found in a program, nothing is executed and the program
execution moves to the next instruction. When memory is cleared prior to programming, NOP(00) is written at all addresses. NOP(00) can be input through
the 00 function code.
Flags
There are no flags affected by NOP(00).
7-10 END – END(01)
Ladder Symbol
END(01)
Description
END(01) is required as the last instruction in any program. If there are subroutines, END(01) is placed after the last subroutine. No instruction written after
END(01) will be executed. END(01) can be placed anywhere in the program to
execute all instructions up to that point, as is sometimes done to debug a program, but it must be removed to execute the remainder of the program.
If there is no END(01) in the program, no instructions will be executed and the
error message “NO END INST” will appear.
Flags
END(01) turns OFF the ER, CY, GR, EQ, and LE flags.
7-11 INTERLOCK and INTERLOCK CLEAR – IL(02) and ILC(03)
Description
Ladder Symbol
IL(02)
Ladder Symbol
ILC(03)
IL(02) is always used in conjunction with ILC(03) to create interlocks. Interlocks
are used to enable branching in the same way as can be achieved with TR bits,
but treatment of instructions between IL(02) and ILC(03) differs from that with
TR bits when the execution condition for IL(02) is OFF. If the execution condition
of IL(02) is ON, the program will be executed as written, with an ON execution
condition used to start each instruction line from the point where IL(02) is located
through the next ILC(03). Refer to 6-3-8 Branching Instruction Lines for basic
descriptions of both methods.
377
Section 7-11
INTERLOCK and INTERLOCK CLEAR – IL(02) and ILC(03)
If the execution condition for IL(02) is OFF, the interlocked section between
IL(02) and ILC(03) will be treated as shown in the following table:
Instruction
Treatment
OUT and OUT NOT
Designated bit turned OFF.
TIM and TIMH(15)
Reset.
CNT, CNTR(12)
PV maintained.
KEEP(11)
Bit status maintained.
DIFU(13) and DIFD(14)
Not executed (see below).
All other instructions
The instructions are not executed, and all IR, AR, LR,
HR, and SR bits and words written to as operands in the
instructions are turned OFF.
IL(02) and ILC(03) do not necessarily have to be used in pairs. IL(02) can be
used several times in a row, with each IL(02) creating an interlocked section
through the next ILC(03). ILC(03) cannot be used unless there is at least one
IL(02) between it and any previous ILC(03).
DIFU(13) and DIFD(14) in
Interlocks
Changes in the execution condition for a DIFU(13) or DIFD(14) are not recorded
if the DIFU(13) or DIFD(14) is in an interlocked section and the execution condition for the IL(02) is OFF. When DIFU(13) or DIFD(14) is execution in an interlocked section immediately after the execution condition for the IL(02) has gone
ON, the execution condition for the DIFU(13) or DIFD(14) will be compared to
the execution condition that existed before the interlock became effective (i.e.,
before the interlock condition for IL(02) went OFF). The ladder diagram and bit
status changes for this are shown below. The interlock is in effect while 00000 is
OFF. Notice that 20000 is not turned ON at the point labeled A even though
00001 has turned OFF and then back ON.
00000
IL(02)
00001
DIFU(13) 20000
ILC(03)
A
Address
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
Instruction
LD
IL(02)
LD
DIFU(13)
ILC(03)
Operands
00000
00001
20000
ON
00000
OFF
ON
00001
OFF
ON
20000
OFF
Precautions
There must be an ILC(03) following any one or more IL(02).
Although as many IL(02) instructions as are necessary can be used with one
ILC(03), ILC(03) instructions cannot be used consecutively without at least one
IL(02) in between, i.e., nesting is not possible. Whenever a ILC(03) is executed,
all interlocks between the active ILC(03) and the preceding ILC(03) are cleared.
When more than one IL(02) is used with a single ILC(03), an error message will
appear when the program check is performed, but execution will proceed normally.
Flags
378
There are no flags affected by these instructions.
Section 7-12
JUMP and JUMP END – JMP(04) and JME(05)
Example
The following diagram shows IL(02) being used twice with one ILC(03).
Address
00000
IL(02)
00001
TIM 000
#0015
1.5 s
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
LD
IL(02)
LD
TIM
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
00009
00010
LD
IL(02)
LD
AND NOT
LD
LD
CNT
00000
00011
00012
00013
LD
OUT
ILC(03)
#
00002
IL(02)
00003
00100
Operands
00004
CP
R
CNT
001
IR 010
00005
00003
00004
00100
00100
001
010
00005
01002
01002
ILC(03)
00001
000
0015
00002
When the execution condition for the first IL(02) is OFF, TIM 000 will be reset to
1.5 s, CNT 001 will not be changed, and 01002 will be turned OFF. When the
execution condition for the first IL(02) is ON and the execution condition for the
second IL(02) is OFF, TIM 000 will be executed according to the status of 00001,
CNT 001 will not be changed, and 01002 will be turned OFF. When the execution
conditions for both the IL(02) are ON, the program will execute as written.
7-12 JUMP and JUMP END – JMP(04) and JME(05)
Ladder Symbols
JMP(04) N
Definer Values
N: Jump number
#
JME(05) N
N: Jump number
#
Limitations
Jump numbers 01 through 49 may be used only once in JMP(04) and once in
JME(05), i.e., each can be used to define one jump only. Jump number 00 can be
used as many times as desired.
Description
JMP(04) is always used in conjunction with JME(05) to create jumps, i.e., to skip
from one point in a ladder diagram to another point. JMP(04) defines the point
from which the jump will be made; JME(05) defines the destination of the jump.
When the execution condition for JMP(04) in ON, no jump is made and the program is executed consecutively as written. When the execution condition for
JMP(04) is OFF, a jump is made to the JME(05) with the same jump number and
the instruction following JME(05) is executed next.
If the jump number for JMP(04) is between 01 and 49, jumps, when made, will go
immediately to JME(05) with the same jump number without executing any
instructions in between. The status of timers, counters, bits used in OUT, bits
used in OUT NOT, and all other status bits controlled by the instructions between
JMP(04) and JMP(05) will not be changed. Each of these jump numbers can be
used to define only one jump. Because all of instructions between JMP(04) and
JME(05) are skipped, jump numbers 01 through 49 can be used to reduce cycle
time.
379
JUMP and JUMP END – JMP(04) and JME(05)
Section 7-12
Jump Number 00
If the jump number for JMP(04) is 00, the CPU Unit will look for the next JME(05)
with a jump number of 00. To do so, it must search through the program, causing
a longer cycle time (when the execution condition is OFF) than for other jumps.
The status of timers, counters, bits used in OUT, bits used in OUT NOT, and all
other status controlled by the instructions between JMP(04) 00 and JME(05) 00
will not be changed. jump number 00 can be used as many times as desired. A
jump from JMP(04) 00 will always go to the next JME(05) 00 in the program. It is
thus possible to use JMP(04) 00 consecutively and match them all with the same
JME(05) 00. It makes no sense, however, to use JME(05) 00 consecutively, because all jumps made to them will end at the first JME(05) 00.
DIFU(13) and DIFD(14) in
Jumps
Although DIFU(13) and DIFD(14) are designed to turn ON the designated bit for
one cycle, they will not necessarily do so when written between JMP(04) and
JME(05). Once either DIFU(13) or DIFD(14) has turned ON a bit, it will remain
ON until the next time DIFU(13) or DIFD(14) is executed again. In normal programming, this means the next cycle. In a jump, this means the next time the
jump from JMP(04) to JME(05) is not made, i.e., if a bit is turned ON by DIFU(13)
or DIFD(14) and then a jump is made in the next cycle so that DIFU(13) or
DIFD(14) are skipped, the designated bit will remain ON until the next time the
execution condition for the JMP(04) controlling the jump is ON.
TIMH(15) and TMHH(––) in
Jumps
When TIMH(15) or TMHH(––) is programmed between JMP(04) and JME(05),
timing will be performed by interrupt if jump numbers 01 through 49 are used but
timing won’t be performed if jump number 00 is used.
Precautions
When JMP(04) and JME(05) are not used in pairs, an error message will appear
when the program check is performed. This message also appears if JMP(04)
00 and JME(05) 00 are not used in pairs, but the program will execute properly
as written.
Flags
There are no flags affected by these instructions.
Examples
Examples of jump programs are provided in 6-3-9 Jumps.
380
Section 7-14
Step Instructions
7-13 User Error Instructions:
FAILURE ALARM AND RESET – FAL(06) and
SEVERE FAILURE ALARM – FALS(07)
Ladder Symbols
FAL(06) N
Definer Data Areas
@FAL(06) N
N: FAL number
# (00 to 99)
N: FAL number
FALS(07) N
# (01 to 99)
Description
FAL(06) and FALS(07) are provided so that the programmer can output error
numbers for use in operation, maintenance, and debugging. When executed
with an ON execution condition, either of these instructions will output a FAL
number to bits 00 to 07 of SR 253. The FAL number that is output can be between 01 and 99 and is input as the definer for FAL(06) or FALS(07). FAL(06)
with a definer of 00 is used to reset this area (see below).
FAL Area
25307
25300
X101
X100
FAL(06) produces a non-fatal error and FALS(07) produces a fatal error. When
FAL(06) is executed with an ON execution condition, the ALARM/ERROR indicator on the front of the CPU Unit will flash, but PC operation will continue. When
FALS(07) is executed with an ON execution condition, the ALARM/ERROR indicator will light and PC operation will stop.
The system also generates error codes to the FAL area.
Resetting Errors
FAL error codes will be retained in memory, although only one of these is available in the FAL area. To access the other FAL codes, reset the FAL area by
executing FAL(06) 00. Each time FAL(06) 00 is executed, another FAL error will
be moved to the FAL area, clearing the one that is already there.
FAL(06) 00 is also used to clear message programmed with the instruction,
MSG(46).
If the FAL area cannot be cleared, as is generally the case when FALS(07) is
executed, first remove the cause of the error and then clear the FAL area through
the Programming Console or SSS.
7-14 Step Instructions:
STEP DEFINE and STEP START–STEP(08)/SNXT(09)
Ladder Symbols
Definer Data Areas
STEP(08)
STEP(08) B
B: Control bit
IR, AR, HR, LR
SNXT(09) B
B: Control bit
IR, AR, HR, LR
381
Step Instructions
Section 7-14
Limitations
All control bits must be in the same word and must be consecutive.
Description
The step instructions STEP(08) and SNXT(09) are used together to set up
breakpoints between sections in a large program so that the sections can be
executed as units and reset upon completion. A section of program will usually
be defined to correspond to an actual process in the application. (Refer to the
application examples later in this section.) A step is like a normal programming
code, except that certain instructions (i.e., END(01), IL(02)/ILC(03),
JMP(04)/JME(05), and SBN(92)) may not be included.
STEP(08) uses a control bit in the IR or HR areas to define the beginning of a
section of the program called a step. STEP(08) does not require an execution
condition, i.e., its execution is controlled through the control bit. To start execution of the step, SNXT(09) is used with the same control bit as used for
STEP(08). If SNXT(09) is executed with an ON execution condition, the step
with the same control bit is executed. If the execution condition is OFF, the step is
not executed. The SNXT(09) instruction must be written into the program so that
it is executed before the program reaches the step it starts. It can be used at different locations before the step to control the step according to two different
execution conditions (see example 2, below). Any step in the program that has
not been started with SNXT(09) will not be executed.
Once SNXT(09) is used in the program, step execution will continue until
STEP(08) is executed without a control bit. STEP(08) without a control bit must
be preceded by SNXT(09) with a dummy control bit. The dummy control bit may
be any unused IR or HR bit. It cannot be a control bit used in a STEP(08).
382
Section 7-14
Step Instructions
Execution of a step is completed either by execution of the next SNXT(09) or by
turning OFF the control bit for the step (see example 3 below). When the step is
completed, all of the IR and HR bits in the step are turned OFF and all timers in
the step are reset to their SVs. Counters, shift registers, and bits used in
KEEP(11) maintain status. Two simple steps are shown below.
00000
SNXT(09) LR 1005
Starts step execution
STEP(08) LR 1005
Step controlled by LR 1005
1st step
00001
SNXT(09) 20200
STEP(08) 20200
Step controlled by IR 20200
2nd step
00002
SNXT(09) 23000
STEP(08)
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
LD
SNXT(09)
STEP(08)
Operands
LR
LR
00000
1005
1005
Step controlled by LR 1005.
00100
00101
LD
SNXT(09)
00001
20200
Address
Instruction
00102
STEP(08)
Ends step execution
Operands
20200
Step controlled by IR 20200.
00200
00201
00202
LD
SNXT(09)
STEP(08)
00002
23000
---
Steps can be programmed in consecutively. Each step must start with STEP(08)
and generally ends with SNXT(09) (see example 3, below, for an exception).
When steps are programmed in series, three types of execution are possible:
sequential, branching, or parallel. The execution conditions for, and the positioning of, SNXT(09) determine how the steps are executed. The three examples
given below demonstrate these three types of step execution.
Precautions
Interlocks, jumps, SBN(92), and END(01) cannot be used within step programs.
Bits used as control bits must not be used anywhere else in the program unless
they are being used to control the operation of the step (see example 3, below).
All control bits must be in the same word and must be consecutive.
If IR or LR bits are used for control bits, their status will be lost during any power
interruption. If it is necessary to maintain status to resume execution at the same
step, HR bits must be used.
383
Section 7-15
Timer and Counter Instructions
Flags
25407: Step Start Flag; turns ON for one cycle when STEP(08) is executed and
can be used to reset counters in steps as shown below if necessary.
00000
Start
SNXT(09) 20000
20000
STEP(08) 20000
00100
CP
CNT 001
25407
25407
R
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
LD
SNXT(09)
STEP(08)
LD
Operands
00000
20000
20000
00100
#0003
Address
00004
00005
1 cycle
Instruction
Operands
LD
CNT
#
25407
01
0003
7-15 Timer and Counter Instructions
TIM and TIMH(15) are decrementing ON-delay timer instructions which require
a TC number and a set value (SV). STIM(69) is used to control the interval timers, which are used to activate interrupt routines.
CNT is a decrementing counter instruction and CNTR(12) is a reversible counter
instruction. Both require a TC number and a SV. Both are also connected to multiple instruction lines which serve as an input signal(s) and a reset. CTBL(63),
INT(89), and PRV(62) are used to manage the high-speed counter. INT(89) is
also used to stop pulse output.
Any one TC number cannot be defined twice, i.e., once it has been used as the
definer in any of the timer or counter instructions, it cannot be used again. Once
defined, TC numbers can be used as many times as required as operands in
instructions other than timer and counter instructions.
TC numbers run from 000 through 255 in the CPM2A/CPM2C PCs and from 000
through 127 in the CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs. No prefix is required when
using a TC number as a definer in a timer or counter instruction. Once defined as
a timer, a TC number can be prefixed with TIM for use as an operand in certain
instructions. The TIM prefix is used regardless of the timer instruction that was
used to define the timer. Once defined as a counter, a TC number can be prefixed with CNT for use as an operand in certain instructions. The CNT is also
used regardless of the counter instruction that was used to define the counter.
TC numbers can be designated as operands that require either bit or word data.
When designated as an operand that requires bit data, the TC number accesses
a bit that functions as a ‘Completion Flag’ that indicates when the time/count has
expired, i.e., the bit, which is normally OFF, will turn ON when the designated SV
has expired. When designated as an operand that requires word data, the TC
number accesses a memory location that holds the present value (PV) of the
timer or counter. The PV of a timer or counter can thus be used as an operand in
CMP(20), or any other instruction for which the TC area is allowed. This is done
by designating the TC number used to define that timer or counter to access the
memory location that holds the PV.
384
Section 7-15
Timer and Counter Instructions
Note that “TIM 000” is used to designate the TIMER instruction defined with TC
number 000, to designate the Completion Flag for this timer, and to designate
the PV of this timer. The meaning of the term in context should be clear, i.e., the
first is always an instruction, the second is always a bit operand, and the third is
always a word operand. The same is true of all other TC numbers prefixed with
TIM or CNT.
An SV can be input as a constant or as a word address in a data area. If an IR
area word assigned to an Input Unit is designated as the word address, the Input
Unit can be wired so that the SV can be set externally through thumbwheel
switches or similar devices. Timers and counters wired in this way can only be
set externally during RUN or MONITOR mode. All SVs, including those set externally, must be in BCD.
7-15-1 TIMER – TIM
Definer Values
N: TC number
Ladder Symbol
#
TIM
N
SV
Operand Data Areas
SV: Set value (word, BCD)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR, #
Limitations
SV is between 000.0 and 999.9. The decimal point is not entered.
Each TC number can be used as the definer in only one TIMER or COUNTER
instruction. TC numbers run from 000 through 255 in the CPM2A/CPM2C PCs
and from 000 through 127 in the CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs.
TC 000 through TC 003 (TC 000 through TC 015 in the CPM2A/CPM2C) should
not be used in TIM if they are required for TIMH(15). Refer to 7-15-2 HIGHSPEED TIMER – TIMH(15) for details.
In the CPM2A/CPM2C PCs, TC 004 through TC 007 should not be used in TIM if
they are required for TMHH(––). Refer to 7-15-3 VERY HIGH-SPEED TIMER –
TMHH(––) for details.
Description
A timer is activated when its execution condition goes ON and is reset (to SV)
when the execution condition goes OFF. Once activated, TIM measures in units
of 0.1 second from the SV.
If the execution condition remains ON long enough for TIM to time down to zero,
the Completion Flag for the TC number used will turn ON and will remain ON
until TIM is reset (i.e., until its execution condition is goes OFF).
The following figure illustrates the relationship between the execution condition
for TIM and the Completion Flag assigned to it.
ON
Execution condition
OFF
ON
Completion Flag
OFF
SV
Precautions
SV
Timers in interlocked program sections are reset when the execution condition
for IL(02) is OFF. Power interruptions also reset timers. If a timer that is not reset
under these conditions is desired, SR area clock pulse bits can be counted to
produce timers using CNT. Refer to 7-15-5 COUNTER – CNT for details.
385
Section 7-15
Timer and Counter Instructions
The Completion Flag may be turned ON one cycle late when reading its status
from the user program.
Always reset the timer after changing between TIM and TIMH(015) in online
editing. The timer will not work properly if it is not reset.
If the timer’s set value is set to 0000, the Completion Flag will turn ON as soon as
the timer’s execution condition turns ON. If the timer’s set value is set to 0001,
the Completion Flag will turn ON somewhere between 0 and 0.1 s after the timer’s execution condition turns ON (i.e., the timer accuracy will actually determine
the time), and may turn ON as soon as the timer’s execution condition turns ON.
Always consider the accuracy of the timer (0 to –0.1 s) in application programs.
Flags
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
7-15-2 HIGH-SPEED TIMER – TIMH(15)
Definer Values
N: TC number
Ladder Symbol
#
TIMH(15) N
SV
Operand Data Areas
SV: Set value (word, BCD)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR, #
Limitations
SV is between 00.00 and 99.99. (Although 00.00 and 00.01 may be set, 00.00
will disable the timer, i.e., turn ON the Completion Flag immediately, and 00.01 is
not reliably scanned.) The decimal point is not entered.
Each TC number can be used as the definer in only one TIMER or COUNTER
instruction. TC numbers run from 000 through 255 in the CPM2A/CPM2C PCs
and from 000 through 127 in the CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs.
Description
TIMH(15) operates in the same way as TIM except that TIMH measures in units
of 0.01 second. Refer to 7-15-1 TIMER – TIM for operational details.
Precautions
Timers in interlocked program sections are reset when the execution condition
for IL(02) is OFF. Power interruptions also reset timers. If a timer that is not reset
under these conditions is desired, SR area clock pulse bits can be counted to
produce timers using CNT. Refer to 7-15-5 COUNTER – CNT for details.
Timers in jumped program sections will not be reset when the execution condition for JMP(04) is OFF. The timer will stop timing if jump number 00 is used, but
will continue timing if other jump numbers are used.
Always reset the timer when changing between TIM and TIMH(15) in online editing. Also, when changing a TIMH(15) instruction with interrupt refreshing, do so
only in PROGRAM mode.
Use timer numbers 000 to 003 for TIMH(15). High-speed timers with timer numbers TC 004 through TC 127 (TC 016 through TC 255 in the CPM2A/CPM2C)
may not be accurate when the cycle time exceeds 10 ms.
PC
CPM2A/CPM2C
CPM1, CPM1A, and
SRM1(-V2)
386
Interrupt refreshing every
10 ms
TC 000 through TC 003
Refreshed when TIMH(015)
is executed
TC 004 through TC 255
TC 000 through TC 003
TC 004 through TC 127
Section 7-15
Timer and Counter Instructions
In the CPM2A/CPM2C PCs, TC 004 through TC 007 should not be used in
TIMH(15) if they are required for TMHH(––). Refer to 7-15-3 VERY HIGHSPEED TIMER – TMHH(––) for details.
If the timer’s set value is set to 0000, the Completion Flag will turn ON as soon as
the timer’s execution condition turns ON. If TIM000 to TIM003 are used, however, there may be a delay before the flag turns ON.
If the timer’s set value is set to 0001, the Completion Flag will turn ON somewhere between 0 and 0.01 s after the timer’s execution condition turns ON (i.e.,
the timer accuracy will actually determine the time), and may turn ON as soon as
the timer’s execution condition turns ON.
Always consider the accuracy of the timer (0 to –0.01 s) in application programs.
Flags
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
Example
The following example shows a timer set with a constant. CIO 01600 will be
turned ON after CIO 00000 goes ON and stays ON for at least 1.5 seconds.
When 00000 goes OFF, the timer will be reset and CIO 01600 will be turned OFF.
00000
TIMH(15)
000
Address
1.5 s
#0150
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
TIMH(15)
00002
00003
LD
OUT
TIM 000
01600
Operands
#
TIM
00000
000
0150
000
01600
7-15-3 VERY HIGH-SPEED TIMER: TMHH(––)
Ladder Symbol
Operand Data Areas
N: #
TMHH(––)
TIM000 to TIM255
N
SV: Set value
SV
000
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR, #
000
Set to 000.
This instruction is supported by the CPM2A/CPM2C only.
Limitations
Each TC number can be used as the definer in only one TIMER or COUNTER
instruction. TC numbers run from TIM000 through TIM255. (You must enter
“TIM” along with the actual timer number when using TIML(––). The instruction
will not work if only the number is entered.)
SV is BCD between 0000 and 9999 (0 to 9.999 s).
Set the third operand to 000. (This operand is ignored.)
Description
TMHH(––) is a decrementing ON-delay timer that times in 1-ms units. The timer
set value can be 0 to 9.999 s and the timer has a accuracy of 1 ms.
A very high-speed timer is activated when its execution condition goes ON and is
reset (to the SV) when the execution condition goes OFF. Once activated,
TMHH(––) times down from the SV in units of 1 ms.
The timer will time out when the PV reaches #0000 (0 ms). Once the timer has
timed out, the PV and Completion Flag status will be maintained. The timer can
be restarted by temporarily turning its execution condition from ON to OFF or
387
Section 7-15
Timer and Counter Instructions
changing its PV to a value other than #0000 with an instruction such as
MOV(21).
The operation of very high-speed timers in jumped program sections depends
upon the TC number used to define the timer, as shown in the following table.
TC number
Operation
000 to 003,
008 to 255
The timer will stop when the execution condition for JMP(04) is OFF.
This can greatly reduce the accuracy of timers in jumped program
sections.
004 to 007
If jump number 00 is used, the timer will stop timing when the
execution condition for JMP(04) is OFF. This can greatly reduce the
accuracy of timers in jumped program sections.
If any other jump number is used, the timer will continue timing
normally when the execution condition for JMP(04) is OFF.
Precautions
Very high-speed timers with timer numbers other than TC 004 through TC 007
may not be accurate when the cycle time exceeds 1 ms. (The cycle time will not
affect very high-speed timers defined with TC 004 through TC 007.)
Very high-speed timers in interlocked program sections are reset (to the SV)
when the execution condition for IL(02) is OFF.
If the timer’s set value is set to 0000, the Completion Flag will turn ON as soon as
the timer’s execution condition turns ON. If TIM004 to TIM007 are used, however, there may be a delay before the flag turns ON.
If the timer’s set value is set to 0001, the Completion Flag will turn ON somewhere between 0 and 1 ms after the timer’s execution condition turns ON (i.e.,
the timer accuracy will actually determine the time), and may turn ON as soon as
the timer’s execution condition turns ON.
Always consider the accuracy of the timer (0 to –1 ms) in application programs.
Flags
ER:
Example
In the following example, CIO 20000 will be turned ON after CIO 00000 goes ON
and stays ON for at least 1.5 seconds. When 00000 goes OFF, the timer will be
reset and CIO 20000 will be turned OFF.
N is not a valid TC number.
00000
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
TMHH(––)
Operands
TMHH(––)
TIM004
#1500
1.5 s
TIM
#
000
TIM004
20000
00000
00002
00003
LD
OUT
TIM
004
1500
000
004
20000
7-15-4 LONG TIMER: TIML(––)
Ladder Symbol
Operand Data Areas
N: Timer number (see Limitations)
TIML(––)
TIM000 to TIM255
N
SV: Set value
SV
C
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR, #
C: Control data
000 or 001
This instruction is supported by the CPM2A/CPM2C only.
388
Section 7-15
Timer and Counter Instructions
Limitations
Each timer number can be used as the definer in only one TIMER or COUNTER
instruction. Timer numbers run from TIM000 through TIM255. (You must enter
“TIM” along with the actual timer number when using TIML(––). The instruction
will not work if only the number is entered.)
SV is BCD between 0000 and 9999 (0 to 9,999 s when C=000 and 0 to 99,990 s
when C=001).
C must be 000 (1-s timing units) or 001 (10-s timing units).
Description
TIML(––) is a decrementing ON-delay timer that can time in 1-s units or 10-s
units. The timer set value can be 0 to 9,999 s (accuracy 0 to 1 s) when 1-s units
are used (C=000) or 0.10 to 99,990 s (accuracy 0 to 10 s) when 10-s units are
used (C=001).
A long timer is activated when its execution condition goes ON and is reset (to
the SV) when the execution condition goes OFF. Once activated, TIML(––)
times down from the SV in units of 1 s or 10 s (depending upon the value of C).
TIML(––) accuracy is 0 to 1 s with 1-s units or 0 to 10 s with 10-s units.
The timer will time out when the PV reaches #0000 (0 s). Once the timer has
timed out, the PV and Completion Flag status will be maintained. The timer can
be restarted by temporarily turning its execution condition from ON to OFF or
changing its PV to a value other than #0000 with an instruction such as
MOV(21).
Long timers in jumped program sections will not be reset when the execution
condition for JMP(04) is OFF, but the timer will stop timing and the PV will be
maintained. Timing will resume when the execution condition for JMP(04) goes
ON again. This can greatly reduce the accuracy of long timers in jumped program sections.
Precautions
TIML(––) may not be accurate when the cycle time exceeds 1 s (C=000) or 10 s
(C=001).
Long timers in interlocked program sections are reset (to the SV) when the
execution condition for IL(02) is OFF.
The timing units in C can be changed while the long timer is timing. Changing the
timing units during operation reduces the timer’s accuracy by up to 10 s.
You must enter “TIM” along with the actual timer number when using TIML(––).
The instruction will not work if only the number is entered.
If the timer’s set value is set to 0000, the Completion Flag will turn ON as soon as
the timer’s execution condition turns ON. If the timer’s set value is set to 0001,
the Completion Flag will turn ON somewhere between 0 and 1 s or between 0
and 10 s after the timer’s execution condition turns ON (i.e., the timer accuracy
will actually determine the time), and may turn ON as soon as the timer’s execution condition turns ON.
Always consider the accuracy of the timer (0 to –1 s or 0 to –10 s) in application
programs.
Flags
ER:
N is not a valid timer number.
C is not 000 or 001.
389
Section 7-15
Timer and Counter Instructions
Example
In the following example, CIO 20000 will be turned ON after CIO 00000 goes ON
and stays ON for at least 1,500 seconds. When 00000 goes OFF, the timer will
be reset and CIO 20000 will be turned OFF.
00000
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
TIML(––)
Operands
TIML(––)
TIM002
#0150
1500 s
00000
TIM
#
001
TIM002
00002
00003
20000
LD
OUT
002
0150
001
002
20000
TIM
7-15-5 COUNTER – CNT
Definer Values
N: TC number
Ladder Symbol
#
CP
R
CNT N
Operand Data Areas
SV
SV: Set value (word, BCD)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR, #
Limitations
Each TC number can be used as the definer in only one TIMER or COUNTER
instruction. TC numbers run from 000 through 255 in the CPM2A/CPM2C PCs
and from 000 through 127 in the CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs.
Description
CNT is used to count down from SV when the execution condition on the count
pulse, CP, goes from OFF to ON, i.e., the present value (PV) will be decremented by one whenever CNT is executed with an ON execution condition for CP
and the execution condition was OFF for the last execution. If the execution
condition has not changed or has changed from ON to OFF, the PV of CNT will
not be changed. The Completion Flag for a counter is turned ON when the PV
reaches zero and will remain ON until the counter is reset.
CNT is reset with a reset input, R. When R goes from OFF to ON, the PV is reset
to SV. The PV will not be decremented while R is ON. Counting down from SV will
begin again when R goes OFF. The PV for CNT will not be reset in interlocked
program sections or by power interruptions.
Changes in execution conditions, the Completion Flag, and the PV are illustrated below. PV line height is meant only to indicate changes in the PV.
Execution condition
on count pulse (CP)
ON
Execution condition
on reset (R)
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
Completion Flag
OFF
SV
SV
PV
0002
SV – 1
SV – 2
0001
0000
390
Section 7-15
Timer and Counter Instructions
Precautions
Program execution will continue even if a non-BCD SV is used, but the SV will
not be correct.
Flags
ER:
Example
In the following example, CNT is used to create extended timers by counting SR
area clock pulse bits.
CNT 001 counts the number of times the 1-second clock pulse bit (SR 25502)
goes from OFF to ON. Here again, IR 00000 is used to control the times when
CNT is operating.
Because in this example the SV for CNT 001 is 700, the Completion Flag for
CNT 002 turns ON when 1 second x 700 times, or 11 minutes and 40 seconds
have expired. This would result in IR 20002 being turned ON.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
00000 25502
Address
CP
CNT
001
00001
R
#0700
CNT 001
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
LD
AND
LD NOT
CNT
00004
00005
LD
OUT
20002
! Caution
Operands
#
CNT
00000
25502
00001
001
0700
001
20002
The shorter clock pulses will not necessarily produce accurate timers because
their short ON times might not be read accurately during longer cycles. In particular, the 0.02-second and 0.1-second clock pulses should not be used to create
timers with CNT instructions.
7-15-6 REVERSIBLE COUNTER – CNTR(12)
Definer Values
N: TC number
Ladder Symbol
#
II
DI
R
CNTR(12)
N
Operand Data Areas
SV
SV: Set value (word, BCD)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR, #
Limitations
Each TC number can be used as the definer in only one TIMER or COUNTER
instruction. TC numbers run from 000 through 255 in the CPM2A/CPM2C PCs
and from 000 through 127 in the CPM1/CPM1A/SRM1(-V2) PCs.
Description
The CNTR(12) is a reversible, up/down circular counter, i.e., it is used to count
between zero and SV according to changes in two execution conditions, those in
the increment input (II) and those in the decrement input (DI).
The present value (PV) will be incremented by one whenever CNTR(12) is
executed with an ON execution condition for II and the last execution condition
for II was OFF. The present value (PV) will be decremented by one whenever
CNTR(12) is executed with an ON execution condition for DI and the last execution condition for DI was OFF. If OFF to ON changes have occurred in both II and
DI since the last execution, the PV will not be changed.
391
Section 7-15
Timer and Counter Instructions
If the execution conditions have not changed or have changed from ON to OFF
for both II and DI, the PV of CNT will not be changed.
When decremented from 0000, the present value is set to SV and the Completion Flag is turned ON until the PV is decremented again. When incremented
past the SV, the PV is set to 0000 and the Completion Flag is turned ON until the
PV is incremented again.
CNTR(12) is reset with a reset input, R. When R goes from OFF to ON, the PV is
reset to zero. The PV will not be incremented or decremented while R is ON.
Counting will begin again when R goes OFF. The PV for CNTR(12) will not be
reset in interlocked program sections or by the effects of power interruptions.
Changes in II and DI execution conditions, the Completion Flag, and the PV are
illustrated below starting from part way through CNTR(12) operation (i.e., when
reset, counting begins from zero). PV line height is meant to indicate changes in
the PV only.
Execution condition
on increment (II)
ON
Execution condition
on decrement (DI)
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
Completion Flag
OFF
SV
PV
SV
SV – 1
SV – 1
0001
SV – 2
SV – 2
0000
0000
Precautions
Program execution will continue even if a non-BCD SV is used, but the SV will
not be correct.
Flags
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
7-15-7 REGISTER COMPARISON TABLE – CTBL(63)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
P: Port specifier
CTBL(63)
@CTBL(63)
P
P
C
C
TB
TB
000
C: Control data
000 to 003
TB: First comparison table word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
This instruction is not supported by SRM1(-V2) PCs.
Limitations
The first and last comparison table words must be in the same data area. (The
length of the comparison table varies according to the settings.)
P must be 000 and C must be between 000 and 003.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, CTBL(63) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, CTBL(63) registers a comparison table for use with
the high-speed counter PV. Depending on the value of C, comparison with the
high-speed counter PV can begin immediately or it can be started separately
with INI(61).
392
Section 7-15
Timer and Counter Instructions
The port specifier (P) specifies the high-speed counter that will be used in the
comparison. Always set P to 000.
The function of CTBL(63) is determined by the control data, C, as shown in the
following table. These functions are described after the table.
C
CTBL(63) function
000
Registers a target value comparison table and starts comparison.
001
Registers a range comparison table and starts comparison.
002
Registers a target value comparison table. Start comparison with INI(61).
003
Registers a range comparison table. Start comparison with INI(61).
When the PV agrees with a target value or falls within a specified range, the specified subroutine is called and executed. Refer to 2-3-5 High-speed Counter Interrupts for more details on table comparison.
If the high-speed counter is enabled in the PC Setup (DM 6642), it will begin
counting from zero when the CPM2A/CPM2C begins operation. The PV will not
be compared to the comparison table until the table is registered and comparison is initiated with INI(61) or CTBL(63). Comparison can be stopped and
started, or the PV can be reset with INI(61).
Common Characteristics
of Target Value and
Range Comparisons
1, 2, 3...
The operation of a target value comparison is different from a range comparison,
but the two functions share some common characteristics.
1. Subroutine numbers 000 to 049 can be used and the same subroutine number can be used more than once in the table.
2. An undefined subroutine number or FFFF can be set for the subroutine
number if interrupt processing is not required.
3. Comparison can be stopped with INI(61). A registered table is valid until PC
operation stops or a new comparison table is registered.
4. CTBL(62) cannot be executed if the high-speed counter is disabled in the
PC Setup (DM 6642). (An error will occur if CTBL(63) is executed when the
high-speed counter is disabled.)
Target Value Comparison
A target value comparison table contains up to sixteen target values. A subroutine number is also registered for each target value. The corresponding subroutine is called and executed when the PV matches a target value. (When interrupt
processing is not required, an undefined subroutine number may be entered.)
• In the CPM1/CPM1A, target value comparisons are performed one item at a
time in order of the comparison table. When the PV reaches the first target value in the table, the interrupt subroutine is executed and comparison continues
to the next value in the table. When processing has been completed for the last
target value in the table, comparison returns to the first value in the table and
the process is repeated.
• In the CPM2A/CPM2C, the PV is compared to all of the target values in the
table each time CTBL(63) is executed. When the PV matches a target value
the corresponding subroutine is called and executed.
The following diagram shows the structure of a target value comparison table.
Target values must be unique; an error will occur if a target value appears in the
table more than once.
TB
TB+1
TB+2
TB+3
Number of target values (0001 to 0016, BCD)
Target value #1, lower 4 digits (BCD)
Target value #1, upper 4 digits (BCD)
Subroutine number for #1 (See note.)
One target
value setting
393
Section 7-15
Timer and Counter Instructions
Note The subroutine number can be F000 to F049 to activate the subroutine when
decrementing and can be 0000 to 0049 to activate the subroutine when incrementing. An error will occur if the high-speed counter is set to increment mode
but a decrementing subroutine number (F000 to F049) is specified.
Range Comparison
A range comparison table contains 8 ranges which are defined by an 8-digit lower limit and an 8-digit upper limit, as well as their corresponding subroutine numbers. The comparison is performed once each cycle at the end of program execution and can be performed during program execution with INI(61).
When the PV falls within a given range the corresponding subroutine is called
and executed. (When interrupt processing is not required, an undefined subroutine number may be entered.) Ranges can overlap, so the PV can fall within
more than one range; in the PV is within two or more ranges, the subroutine for
the first of the ranges will be executed.
The following diagram shows the structure of a range comparison table. Always
set 8 ranges. If fewer than 8 ranges are needed, set the remaining subroutine
numbers to FFFF.
Note
Flags
TB
TB+1
TB+2
TB+3
TB+4
Lower limit #1, lower 4 digits (BCD)
Lower limit #1, upper 4 digits (BCD)
Upper limit #1, lower 4 digits (BCD)
Upper limit #1, upper 4 digits (BCD)
Subroutine number (See note 2.)
First range setting
TB+35
TB+36
TB+37
TB+38
TB+39
Lower limit #8, lower 4 digits (BCD)
Lower limit #8, upper 4 digits (BCD)
Upper limit #8, lower 4 digits (BCD)
Upper limit #8, upper 4 digits (BCD)
Subroutine number (See note 2.)
Eighth range setting
1. Each range’s lower limit must be less than its upper limit. An error will occur if
the lower limit is greater than the upper limit.
2. The subroutine number can be 0000 to 0049 and the subroutine will be executed as long as the counter’s PV is within the specified range. A value of
FFFF indicates that no subroutine is to be executed.
3. Since the comparison is usually performed just once each cycle, be sure to
take the cycle time into account when the upper and lower limits represent
time values.
4. A subroutine number can be used more than once in the table.
ER:
The comparison table exceeds the data area boundary, or there is an
error in the comparison table settings.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
P is not 000 or C is not between 000 and 003.
There is a CTBL(63) instruction using a different comparison format in
the subroutine called by another CTBL(63) instruction.
A CTBL(63) instruction using a different comparison format is executed
during comparison.
CTBL(63) is executed in an interrupt subroutine while a pulse I/O or
high-speed counter instruction (INI(61), PRV(62), CTBL(63),
SPED(64), PULS(65), ACC(––), PWM(––), or SYNC(––)) is being
executed in the main program.
394
Section 7-15
Timer and Counter Instructions
Target Value Comparison Errors:
The number of target values (in TB) is not between 0001 and 0016.
A target value is not between F838 8608 and 0838 8607 (differential
phase mode, pulse + direction input mode, and up/down input mode).
A target value is not between 0000 0001 and 1677 7215 or a subroutine
number is not between 0000 and 0049 (increment mode).
If 0000 0000 is set in increment mode, 25503 (ER) will turn ON and the
instruction will not be executed.
Range Comparison Errors:
A range’s upper limit value is less than its lower limit value.
A target value is not between F838 8608 and 0838 8607 (differential
phase mode, pulse + direction input mode, and up/down input mode).
A target value is not between 0000 0000 and 1677 7215 or a subroutine
number is not between 0000 and 0049 (increment mode).
7-15-8 MODE CONTROL – INI(61)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
P: Port specifier
INI(61)
@INI(61)
P
P
C
C
P1
P1
000, 010, 100, 101, 102, 103
C: Control data
000 to 005
P1: First PV word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR (or 000)
This instruction is not supported by SRM1(-V2) PCs.
Limitations
In the CPM1/CPM1A PCs, P must be 000 and C must be 000 to 003.
In CPM2A/CPM2C PCs, P must be 000, 010, 100, 101, 102, or 103 and C must
be 000 to 005.
P1 must be 000 unless C is 002 or 004.
P1 and P1+1 must be in the same data area.
If a DM address is used for P1, it must be read/write DM.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, INI(61) is not executed. When the execution condition is ON, INI(61) is used to control high-speed counter operation and
stop pulse output.
The port specifier (P) specifies the high-speed counter or pulse output that will
be controlled.
P
000
Function
100*
Specifies high-speed counter input (inputs 00000, 00001, and 00002),
single-phase pulse output 0 with no acceleration/deceleration (output
01000 or 01001), single-phase pulse output 0 with trapezoidal acceleration/deceleration (output 01000).
Specifies single-phase pulse output 1 with no acceleration/deceleration
(output 01001).
Specifies interrupt input 0 in counter mode (input 00003).
101*
Specifies interrupt input 1 in counter mode (input 00004).
102*
Specifies interrupt input 2 in counter mode (input 00005).
103*
Specifies interrupt input 3 in counter mode (input 00006).
010*
Note *These settings can be used in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs only.
395
Section 7-15
Timer and Counter Instructions
The function of INI(61) is determined by the control data, C.
C
P1
INI(61) function
000
000
Starts CTBL(63) table comparison.
001
000
Stops CTBL(63) table comparison.
002
New PV
003
000
Changes PV of the high-speed counter or an interrupt input in
counter mode.
Stops pulse output.
004*
New PV
Changes PV of the pulse output.
005*
000
Stops synchronized pulse control output.
Note *These settings can be used in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs only.
Start or Stop Comparison
(C=000 or C=001)
If C is 000 or 001, INI(61) starts or stops comparison of the high-speed counter’s
PV to the comparison table registered with CTBL(63). An error will occur if this
function is executed without first registering a comparison table with CTBL(63).
In general, @INI(61) should be used when C=000 because the instruction
needs to be executed only one time to start table comparison.
Change PV
(C=002)
If C is 002, INI(61) changes the PV of the specified high-speed counter or interrupt input (counter mode).
High-speed Counter PV (P=000)
INI(61) changes the PV of the specified high-speed counter to the 8-digit BCD
value in P1 and P1+1.
The new PV can be F838 8608 to 0838 8607 in differential phase mode, pulse +
direction input mode, or up/down input mode. (The hexadecimal “F” in the first
digit acts as a minus sign.)
The new PV can be 0000 0000 to 1677 7215 in increment mode.
Interrupt Input PV (P=100 to 103)
INI(61) changes the PV of the specified interrupt input (counter mode) to the
4-digit hexadecimal value (0000 to FFFF) in P1.
Stop Pulse Output
(C=003)
If C is 003, INI(61) stops the pulse output.
Change PV
(C=004)
INI(61) changes the PV of the pulse output to the 8-digit BCD value in P1 and
P1+1. The PV cannot be changed while the pulse output is in progress.
The new PV can be –16,777,215 to 16,777,215. Bit 15 of P1+1 acts as a sign bit;
the number is negative if bit 15 is ON, positive if it is OFF.
Stop Synchronized Pulse
Control Output (C=003)
If C is 003, INI(61) stops the synchronized pulse control output.
Flags
ER:
The port specifier and control data are incompatible.
(For example: P=010 and C=000)
There is an error in the operand settings or the specified PV is not within
the acceptable range.
The address specified for P1 or P1+1 exceeds the data area boundary.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
The specified function is incompatible with actual PC operation. For example, do not set C=005 if synchronized pulse control is not being used.
INI(61) is executed to change the PV of a pulse output (C=004) while the
pulse output is operating.
INI(61) is executed in an interrupt subroutine while a pulse I/O or highspeed counter instruction (INI(61), PRV(62), CTBL(63), SPED(64),
PULS(65), ACC(––), PWM(––), or SYNC(––)) is being executed in the
main program.
396
Section 7-15
Timer and Counter Instructions
INI(61) is executed in an interrupt subroutine while a pulse I/O or highspeed counter instruction is being executed in the main program.
7-15-9 HIGH-SPEED COUNTER PV READ – PRV(62)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
P: Port specifier
PRV(62)
@PRV(62)
P
P
C
C
D
D
000, 010, 100, 101, 102, 103
C: Control data
000, 001, 002, or 003
D: First destination word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
This instruction is not supported by SRM1(-V2) PCs.
Limitations
In the CPM1/CPM1A PCs, P must be 000 and C must be 000 to 002.
In CPM2A/CPM2C PCs, P must be 000, 010, 100, 101, 102, or 103 and C must
be 000 to 003.
D and D+1 must be in the same data area.
If a DM address is used for D, it must be read/write DM.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, PRV(62) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, PRV(62) controls the high-speed counter PV, pulse
output PV, interrupt input (counter mode) PV, or input frequency for synchronized control as specified by P and C.
The port specifier (P) specifies the high-speed counter or pulse output that will
be controlled.
P
Function
000
Specifies high-speed counter input (inputs 00000, 00001, and 00002), input frequency for synchronized pulse control (inputs 00000, 00001, and
00002), single-phase pulse output 0 with no acceleration/deceleration (outputs 01000 and 01001), single-phase pulse output 0 with trapezoidal acceleration/deceleration (output 01000), or synchronized pulse control output 0 (output 01000/01001).
010*
100*
Specifies single-phase pulse output 1 with no acceleration/deceleration
(output 01001) or synchronized pulse control output 1 (output 01001).
Specifies interrupt input 0 in counter mode (input 00003).
101*
Specifies interrupt input 1 in counter mode (input 00004).
102*
Specifies interrupt input 2 in counter mode (input 00005).
103*
Specifies interrupt input 3 in counter mode (input 00006).
Note *These settings can be used in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs only.
The control data, C, determines which type of data will be accessed.
C
Function
Destination word(s)
000
Reads the PV of the high-speed counter or interrupt
input (counter mode) or the input frequency of the
synchronized pulse control.
D and D+1
001
D
002
Reads the status of the high-speed counter or pulse
output.
Reads the results of range comparison.
003*
Reads the PV of the pulse output.
D and D+1
D
Note *This setting can be used in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs only.
397
Section 7-15
Timer and Counter Instructions
Read PV (C=000)
If C is 000, PRV(62) reads the PV of the specified high-speed counter or interrupt
input (counter mode).
High-speed Counter PV or Input Frequency (P=000)
When the output is used for a high-speed counter, PRV(62) reads the PV of the
specified high-speed counter and writes the 8-digit BCD value in D and D+1.
(The leftmost 4 digits are written to D+1.)
The PV can be F838 8608 to 0838 8607 in differential phase mode, pulse + direction input mode, or up/down input mode. (The hexadecimal “F” in the first digit
acts as a minus sign.)
The PV can be 0000 0000 to 1677 7215 in increment mode.
When the output is used for synchronized pulse control, PRV(62) reads the input
frequency and writes the 8-digit BCD value in D and D+1. The input frequency
can be 0000 0000 to 0002 0000.
Interrupt Input PV (P=100 to 103)
PRV(62) reads the PV of the specified interrupt input (counter mode) and writes
the 4-digit hexadecimal value (0000 to FFFF) in D.
Read Status (C=001)
If C is 001, PRV(62) reads the operating status of the specified high-speed
counter or pulse output and writes the data to D.
High-speed Counter or Pulse Output 0 Status (P=000)
The following table shows the function of the bits in D when P=000. Bits not listed
in the table are not used and will always be 0.
Usage
High-speed
co
e
counter
Bit
00
01
Pulse output
05
06
07
08
09
Function
High-speed counter comparison status.
(0: Stopped; 1: Comparing)
High-speed counter underflow/overflow.
(0: Normal; 1: Underflow/Overflow occurred.)
Total number of pulses specified for pulse output 0.
(0: Not specified; 1: Specified.)
Pulse output 0 completed. (0: Not completed; 1: Completed)
Pulse output 0 status (0: Stopped; 1: Outputting)
Pulse output 0 PV underflow/overflow.
(0: Normal; 1: Underflow/Overflow occurred.)
Pulse output 0 acceleration
0: Constant; 1: Accelerating or decelerating
Pulse Output 1 Status (P=010)
The following table shows the function of the bits in D when P=010. Bits not listed
in the table are not used and will always be 0.
Bit
05
Function
06
Total number of pulses specified for pulse output 1.
(0: Not specified; 1: Specified.)
Pulse output 1 completed. (0: Not completed; 1: Completed)
07
Pulse output 1 status (0: Stopped; 1: Outputting)
08
Pulse output 1 PV underflow/overflow.
(0: Normal; 1: Underflow/Overflow occurred.)
Pulse output 1 acceleration (0: Constant; 1: Accelerating or decelerating)
09
Read Range Comparison
Results (C=002)
If C is 002, PRV(62) reads the results of the comparison of the PV to the 8 ranges
defined by CTBL(63) and writes this data to D. Bits 00 through 07 of D contain
the Comparison Result Flags for ranges 1 to 8. (0: Not in range; 1: In range)
Read Pulse Output PV
(C=003)
If C is 003, PRV(62) reads the pulse output PV and writes the 8-digit BCD value
in D and D+1. (The leftmost 4 digits are written to D+1.)
The PV can be –16,777,215 to 16,777,215. Bit 15 of D+1 acts as a sign bit; the
number is negative if bit 15 is ON, positive if it is OFF.
398
Section 7-15
Timer and Counter Instructions
Flags
ER:
The port specifier and control data are incompatible.
(For example: P=010 and C=000)
The address specified for D or D+1 exceeds the data area boundary.
There is an error in the operand settings.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
PRV(62) is executed in an interrupt subroutine while a pulse I/O or highspeed counter instruction (INI(61), PRV(62), CTBL(63), SPED(64),
PULS(65), ACC(––), PWM(––), or SYNC(––)) is being executed in the
main program.
399
Section 7-16
Shift Instructions
7-16 Shift Instructions
7-16-1 SHIFT REGISTER – SFT(10)
Ladder Symbol
Operand Data Areas
St: Starting word
I
SFT(10)
IR, SR, AR, HR, LR
P
St
R
E
E: End word
IR, SR, AR, HR, LR
E must be greater than or equal to St, and St and E must be in the same data
area.
Limitations
If a bit address in one of the words used in a shift register is also used in an
instruction that controls individual bit status (e.g., OUT, KEEP(11)), an error
(“COIL/OUT DUPL”) will be generated when program syntax is checked on the
Programming Console or another Programming Device. The program, however, will be executed as written. See Example 2: Controlling Bits in Shift Registers
for a programming example that does this.
SFT(10) is controlled by three execution conditions, I, P, and R. If SFT(10) is
executed and 1) execution condition P is ON and was OFF the last execution,
and 2) R is OFF, then execution condition I is shifted into the rightmost bit of a
shift register defined between St and E, i.e., if I is ON, a 1 is shifted into the register; if I is OFF, a 0 is shifted in. When I is shifted into the register, all bits previously
in the register are shifted to the left and the leftmost bit of the register is lost.
Description
E
St+1, St+2, ...
Lost data
St
Execution condition I
The execution condition on P functions like a differentiated instruction, i.e., I will
be shifted into the register only when P is ON and was OFF the last time SFT(10)
was executed. If execution condition P has not changed or has gone from ON to
OFF, the shift register will remain unaffected.
St designates the rightmost word of the shift register; E designates the leftmost.
The shift register includes both of these words and all words between them. The
same word may be designated for St and E to create a 16-bit (i.e., 1-word) shift
register.
When execution condition R goes ON, all bits in the shift register will be turned
OFF (i.e., set to 0) and the shift register will not operate until R goes OFF again.
Flags
400
ER:
St and E are not in the same area or St is greater than E.
Section 7-16
Shift Instructions
Example
The following example uses the 1-second clock pulse bit (25502) so that the
execution condition produced by 00000 is shifted into HR 00 every second. Output 20000 is turned ON whenever a “1” is shifted into HR 0007.
00000
Address
I
SFT(10)
25502
P
HR 00
00001
R
HR 00
0007
20000
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
LD
LD
LD
SFT(10)
00004
00005
LD
OUT
Operands
HR
HR
HR
00000
25502
00001
00
00
0007
20000
7-16-2 WORD SHIFT – WSFT(16)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
St: Starting word
Limitations
WSFT(16)
@WSFT(16)
St
St
E
E
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
E: End word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
St and E must be in the same data area, and E must be greater than or equal to
St.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for St or E.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, WSFT(16) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, WSFT(16) shifts data between St and E in word units.
Zeros are written into St and the content of E is lost.
E
F
0
St + 1
C 2
3
4
5
St
2
1
0
2
9
Lost
0000
E
3
Flags
ER:
4
St + 1
5
2
1
0
2
St
9
0
0
0
0
The St and E words are in different areas, or St is greater than E.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
7-16-3 ARITHMETIC SHIFT LEFT – ASL(25)
Ladder Symbols
Limitations
Operand Data Areas
ASL(25)
@ASL(25)
Wd
Wd
Wd: Shift word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for Wd.
401
Section 7-16
Shift Instructions
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, ASL(25) is not executed. When the execution condition is ON, ASL(25) shifts a 0 into bit 00 of Wd, shifts the bits of Wd one
bit to the left, and shifts the status of bit 15 into CY.
CY
Bit
Bit
15
00
1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1
0
Precautions
A 0 will be shifted into bit 00 every cycle if the undifferentiated form of ASL(25) is
used. Use the differentiated form (@ASL(25)) or combine ASL(25) with
DIFU(13) or DIFD(14) to shift just one time.
Flags
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
CY:
Receives the status of bit 15.
EQ:
ON when the content of Wd is zero; otherwise OFF.
7-16-4 ARITHMETIC SHIFT RIGHT – ASR(26)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
ASR(26)
@ASR(26)
Wd
Wd
Wd: Shift word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for Wd.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, ASR(25) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, ASR(25) shifts a 0 into bit 15 of Wd, shifts the bits of
Wd one bit to the right, and shifts the status of bit 00 into CY.
Bit
Bit
15
00
1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0
CY
0
Precautions
A 0 will be shifted into bit 15 every cycle if the undifferentiated form of ASR(26) is
used. Use the differentiated form (@ASR(26)) or combine ASR(26) with
DIFU(13) or DIFD(14) to shift just one time.
Flags
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
CY:
Receives the data of bit 00.
EQ:
ON when the content of Wd is zero; otherwise OFF.
7-16-5 ROTATE LEFT – ROL(27)
Ladder Symbols
Limitations
402
Operand Data Areas
ROL(27)
@ROL(27)
Wd
Wd
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for Wd.
Wd: Rotate word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Section 7-16
Shift Instructions
Description
Precautions
When the execution condition is OFF, ROL(27) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, ROL(27) shifts all Wd bits one bit to the left, shifting
CY into bit 00 of Wd and shifting bit 15 of Wd into CY.
CY
Bit
15
Bit
00
0
1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1
Use STC(41) to set the status of CY or CLC(41) to clear the status of CY before
doing a rotate operation to ensure that CY contains the proper status before
executing ROL(27).
CY will be shifted into bit 00 every cycle if the undifferentiated form of ROL(27) is
used. Use the differentiated form (@ROL(27)) or combine ROL(27) with
DIFU(13) or DIFD(14) to shift just one time.
Flags
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
CY:
Receives the data of bit 15.
EQ:
ON when the content of Wd is zero; otherwise OFF.
7-16-6 ROTATE RIGHT – ROR(28)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
ROR(28)
@ROR(28)
Wd
Wd
Wd: Rotate word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for Wd.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, ROR(28) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, ROR(28) shifts all Wd bits one bit to the right, shifting
CY into bit 15 of Wd and shifting bit 00 of Wd into CY.
Precautions
CY
Bit
15
Bit
00
0
0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1
Use STC(41) to set the status of CY or CLC(41) to clear the status of CY before
doing a rotate operation to ensure that CY contains the proper status before
execution ROR(28).
CY will be shifted into bit 15 every cycle if the undifferentiated form of ROR(28) is
used. Use the differentiated form (@ROR(28)) or combine ROR(28) with
DIFU(13) or DIFD(14) to shift just one time.
Flags
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
CY:
Receives the data of bit 00.
EQ:
ON when the content of Wd is zero; otherwise OFF.
403
Section 7-16
Shift Instructions
7-16-7 ONE DIGIT SHIFT LEFT – SLD(74)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
St: Starting word
SLD(74)
@SLD(74)
St
St
E
E
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
E: End word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
St and E must be in the same data area, and E must be greater than or equal to
St.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for St or E.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, SLD(74) is not executed. When the execution condition is ON, SLD(74) shifts data between St and E (inclusive) by one
digit (four bits) to the left. 0 is written into the rightmost digit of the St, and the
content of the leftmost digit of E is lost.
E
...
St
8 F C 5
D 7 9 1
Lost data
0
Precautions
If a power failure occurs during a shift operation across more than 50 words, the
shift operation might not be completed.
A 0 will be shifted into the least significant digit of St every cycle if the undifferentiated form of SLD(74) is used. Use the differentiated form (@SLD(74)) or combine SLD(74) with DIFU(13) or DIFD(14) to shift just one time.
Flags
ER:
The St and E words are in different areas, or St is greater than E.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
7-16-8 ONE DIGIT SHIFT RIGHT – SRD(75)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
E: End word
SRD(75)
@SRD(75)
E
E
St
St
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
St: Starting word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
St and E must be in the same data area, and E must be less than or equal to St.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for St or E.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, SRD(75) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, SRD(75) shifts data between St and E (inclusive) by
one digit (four bits) to the right. 0 is written into the leftmost digit of St and the
rightmost digit of E is lost.
St
3 4 5 2
0
404
...
E
F 8 C 1
Lost data
Section 7-16
Shift Instructions
Precautions
If a power failure occurs during a shift operation across more than 50 words, the
shift operation might not be completed.
A 0 will be shifted into the most significant digit of St every cycle if the undifferentiated form of SRD(75) is used. Use the differentiated form (@SRD(75)) or combine SRD(75) with DIFU(13) or DIFD(14) to shift just one time.
Flags
ER:
The St and E words are in different areas, or St is less than E.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
7-16-9 REVERSIBLE SHIFT REGISTER – SFTR(84)
Operand Data Areas
C: Control word
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
SFTR(84)
@SFTR(84)
C
C
St
St
E
E
St: Starting word
Limitations
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
E: End word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
St and E must be in the same data area and St must be less than or equal
to E.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for C, St, or E.
Description
SFTR(84) is used to create a single- or multiple-word shift register that can shift
data to either the right or the left. To create a single-word register, designate the
same word for St and E. The control word provides the shift direction, the status
to be put into the register, the shift pulse, and the reset input. The control word is
allocated as follows:
15
14
13
12
Not used.
Shift direction
1 (ON): Left (LSB to MSB)
0 (OFF): Right (MSB to LSB)
Status to input into register
Shift pulse bit
Reset
The data in the shift register will be shifted one bit in the direction indicated by bit
12, shifting one bit out to CY and the status of bit 13 into the other end whenever
SFTR(84) is executed with an ON execution condition as long as the reset bit is
OFF and as long as bit 14 is ON. If SFTR(84) is executed with an OFF execution
condition or if SFTR(84) is executed with bit 14 OFF, the shift register will remain
unchanged. If SFTR(84) is executed with an ON execution condition and the reset bit (bit 15) is OFF, the entire shift register and CY will be set to zero.
Flags
ER:
St and E are not in the same data area or ST is greater than E.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
405
Section 7-16
Shift Instructions
CY:
Receives the status of bit 00 of St or bit 15 of E, depending on the shift
direction.
In the following example, IR 00000, IR 00001, IR 00002, and IR 00003 are used
to control the bits of C used in @SFTR(84). The shift register is in DM 0010, and
it is controlled through IR 00004.
Example
Address
00000
20012
Direction
20013
Status to input
20014
Shift pulse
20015
Reset
00001
00002
00003
00000
00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
00009
Instruction
Operands
LD
OUT
LD
OUT
LD
OUT
LD
OUT
LD
@SFTR(84)
00000
20012
00001
20013
00002
20014
00003
20015
00004
DM
DM
00004
200
0010
0011
@SFTR(84)
200
DM 0010
DM 0011
7-16-10 ASYNCHRONOUS SHIFT REGISTER – ASFT(17)
Operand Data Areas
C: Control word
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR, #
ASFT(17)
@ASFT(17)
St: Starting word
C
C
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
St
St
E
E
E: End word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Note ASFT(17) is an expansion instruction for the SRM1(-V2). The function code 17 is
the factory setting and can be changed for the SRM1(-V2) if desired.
Limitations
St and E must be in the same data area, and E must be greater than or equal to
St.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for St or E.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, ASFT(17) does nothing and the program
moves to the next instruction. When the execution condition is ON, ASFT(17) is
used to create and control a reversible asynchronous word shift register between St and E. This register only shifts words when the next word in the register
is zero, e.g., if no words in the register contain zero, nothing is shifted. Also, only
one word is shifted for each word in the register that contains zero. When the
contents of a word are shifted to the next word, the original word’s contents are
set to zero. In essence, when the register is shifted, each zero word in the register trades places with the next word. (See Example below.)
The shift direction (i.e. whether the “next word” is the next higher or the next lower word) is designated in C. C is also used to reset the register. All of any portion
of the register can be reset by designating the desired portion with St and E.
406
Section 7-17
Data Movement Instructions
Control Word
Bits 00 through 12 of C are not used. Bit 13 is the shift direction: turn bit 13 ON to
shift down (toward lower addressed words) and OFF to shift up (toward higher
addressed words). Bit 14 is the Shift Enable Bit: turn bit 14 ON to enable shift
register operation according to bit 13 and OFF to disable the register. Bit 15 is the
Reset bit: the register will be reset (set to zero) between St and E when
ASFT(17) is executed with bit 15 ON. Turn bit 15 OFF for normal operation.
Note If the non-differentiated form of ASFT(17) is used, data will be shifted every cycle
while the execution condition is ON. Use the differentiated form to prevent this.
Flags
ER:
The St and E words are in different areas, or St is greater than E.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
Example
The following example shows instruction ASFT(17) used to shift words in an
11-word shift register created between DM 0100 and DM 0110 with C=#6000.
Non-zero data is shifted towards St (DM 0110).
00000
ASFT(17)
#6000
DM 0100
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
Operands
LD
ASFT(17)
00000
#
DM
DM
DM 0110
Before
execution
After one
execution
DM 0100
1234
1234
1234
DM 0101
0000
0000
2345
DM 0102
0000
2345
3456
DM 0103
2345
0000
4567
DM 0104
3456
3456
5678
DM 0105
0000
4567
6789
DM 0106
4567
0000
789A
DM 0107
5678
5678
0000
DM 0108
6789
6789
0000
DM 0109
0000
789A
0000
DM 0110
789A
0000
0000
6000
0100
0110
After seven
executions
Note The zeroes are shifted “upward” if C=4000, and the entire shift register is set to
zero if C=8000.
7-17 Data Movement Instructions
7-17-1 MOVE – MOV(21)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
S: Source word
MOV(21)
@MOV(21)
S
S
D
D
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
D: Destination word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
407
Section 7-17
Data Movement Instructions
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for D.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, MOV(21) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, MOV(21) copies the content of S to D.
Source word
Destination word
Bit status
not changed.
Precautions
TC numbers cannot be designated as D to change the PV of the timer or counter.
You can, however, easily change the PV of a timer or a counter by using
BSET(71).
Flags
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
EQ:
ON when all zeros are transferred to D.
Example
The following example shows @MOV(21) being used to copy the content of
IR 001 to HR 05 when IR 00000 goes from OFF to ON.
00000
@MOV(21)
001
HR 05
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
@MOV(21)
Operands
00000
HR
IR 000
0 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
HR 05
0 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
001
05
7-17-2 MOVE NOT – MVN(22)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
S: Source word
MVN(22)
@MVN(22)
S
S
D
D
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
D: Destination word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for D.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, MVN(22) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, MVN(22) transfers the inverted content of S (specified word or four-digit hexadecimal constant) to D, i.e., for each ON bit in S, the
corresponding bit in D is turned OFF, and for each OFF bit in S, the corresponding bit in D is turned ON.
Source word
Destination word
Bit status
inverted.
Precautions
408
TC numbers cannot be designated as D to change the PV of the timer or counter.
However, these can be easily changed using BSET(71).
Section 7-17
Data Movement Instructions
Flags
Example
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
EQ:
ON when all zeros are transferred to D.
The following example shows @MVN(22) being used to copy the complement of
#F8C5 to DM 0010 when IR 00001 goes from OFF to ON.
00001
@MVN(22)
#F8C5
DM 0010
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
@MOV(21)
Operands
00001
#
DM
#F8C5
1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1
DM 0010
0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0
F8C5
0010
7-17-3 BLOCK TRANSFER – XFER(70)
Operand Data Areas
N: Number of words (BCD)
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
XFER(70)
@XFER(70)
N
N
S
S
D
D
S: Starting source word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
D: Starting destination word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
Limitations
S and S+N must be in the same data area, as must D and D+N.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for D.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, XFER(70) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, XFER(70) copies the contents of S, S+1, ..., S+N to
D, D+1, ..., D+N.
Flags
ER:
S
D
3 4 5 2
3 4 5 2
S+1
D+1
3 4 5 1
3 4 5 1
S+2
D+2
3 4 2 2
3 4 2 2
S+N
D+N
6 4 5 2
6 4 5 2
N is not BCD
S and S+N or D and D+N are not in the same data area.
409
Section 7-17
Data Movement Instructions
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
7-17-4 BLOCK SET – BSET(71)
Operand Data Areas
S: Source data
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
BSET(71)
@BSET(71)
S
S
St
St
E
E
St: Starting word
Limitations
IR, SR AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
E: End Word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
St must be less than or equal to E, and St and E must be in the same data area.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for St or E.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, BSET(71) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, BSET(71) copies the content of S to all words from St
through E.
S
St
3 4 5 2
3 4 5 2
St+1
3 4 5 2
St+2
3 4 5 2
E
3 4 5 2
BSET(71) can be used to change timer/counter PV. (This cannot be done with
MOV(21) or MVN(22).) BSET(71) can also be used to clear sections of a data
area, i.e., the DM area, to prepare for executing other instructions. It can also be
used to clear words by transferring all zeros.
Flags
ER:
St and E are not in the same data area or St is greater than E.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
Example
The following example shows how to use BSET(71) to copy a constant (#0000)
to a block of the DM area (DM 0000 to DM 0500) when IR 00000 is ON.
00000
@BSET(71)
#0000
DM 0000
DM 0500
410
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
@BSET(71)
Operands
00000
#
DM
DM
0000
0000
0500
Section 7-17
Data Movement Instructions
7-17-5 DATA EXCHANGE – XCHG(73)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
E1: Exchange word 1
XCHG(73)
@XCHG(73)
E1
E1
E2
E2
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
E2: Exchange word 2
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for E1 or E2.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, XCHG(73) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, XCHG(73) exchanges the content of E1 and E2.
E1
E2
If you want to exchange content of blocks whose size is greater than 1 word, use
work words as an intermediate buffer to hold one of the blocks using XFER(70)
three times.
Flags
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
7-17-6 SINGLE WORD DISTRIBUTE – DIST(80)
Operand Data Areas
S: Source data
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
DIST(80)
@DIST(80)
S
S
DBs
DBs
C
C
DBs: Destination base word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
C: Control word (BCD)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
C must be BCD.
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for DBs or C.
Description
DIST(80) can be used for single-word distribution or for a stack operation depending on the content of the control word, C.
Single-word Distribution
When bits 12 to 15 of C=0 to 8, DIST(80) can be used for a single word distribute
operation. The entire contents of C specifies an offset, Of (0000 to 2047 in BCD).
When the execution condition is OFF, DIST(80) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, DIST(80) copies the content of S to DBs+Of, i.e., Of is
added to DBs to determine the destination word.
Note DBs and DBs+Of must be in the same data area and cannot be between
DM 6144 and DM 6655.
Example
The following example shows how to use DIST(80) to copy #00FF to HR 10 + Of.
411
Section 7-17
Data Movement Instructions
The content of LR 10 is #3005, so #00FF is copied to HR 15 (HR 10 + 5) when
IR 00000 is ON.
00000
@DIST(80)
#00FF
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
@DIST(80)
HR 10
Operands
00000
#
HR
LR
LR 10
LR 10
#00FF
HR 10
3 0 0 5
0 0 F F
0 0 0 0
00FF
10
10
HR 15
0 0 F F
Stack Operation
When bits 12 to 15 of C=9, DIST(80) can be used for a stack operation. The other
3 digits of C specify the number of words in the stack (000 to 999 in BCD). The
content of DBs is the stack pointer.
When the execution condition is OFF, DIST(80) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, DIST(80) copies the content of S to DBs+1+the content of DBs. In other words, 1 and the content of DBs are added to DBs to determine the destination word. The content of DBs is then incremented by 1.
Note
1. DIST(80) will be executed every cycle unless the differentiated form
(@DIST(80)) is used or DIST(80) is used with DIFU(13) or DIFD(14).
2. Be sure to initialize the stack pointer before using DIST(80) as a stack operation.
Example
The following example shows how to use DIST(80) to create a stack between
DM 0001 and DM 0005. DM 0000 acts as the stack pointer.
00000
@DIST(80)
200
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
@DIST(80)
Operands
00000
DM 0000
216
Flags
IR 200
FFFF
IR 216
9005
DM 0000
DM 0001
DM 0002
DM 0003
DM 0004
DM 0005
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
First execution
Stack pointer
incremented
ER:
DM
DM 0000
DM 0001
DM 0002
DM 0003
DM 0004
DM 0005
0001
FFFF
0000
0000
0000
0000
Second
execution
Stack pointer
incremented
DM 0000
DM 0001
DM 0002
DM 0003
DM 0004
DM 0005
200
0000
216
0002
FFFF
FFFF
0000
0000
0000
The offset or stack length in the control word is not BCD.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
412
Section 7-17
Data Movement Instructions
During stack operation, the value of the stack pointer+1 exceeds the
length of the stack.
ON when the content of S is zero; otherwise OFF.
EQ:
7-17-7 DATA COLLECT – COLL(81)
Operand Data Areas
SBs: Source base word
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
COLL(81)
@COLL(81)
SBs
SBs
C
C
D
D
C: Control word (BCD)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
D: Destination word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
Limitations
C must be BCD.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for D.
Description
COLL(81) can be used for data collection, an FIFO stack operation, or an LIFO
stack operation depending on the content of the control word, C.
Data Collection
When bits 12 to 15 of C=0 to 7, COLL(81) is used for data collection. The entire
contents of C specifies an offset, Of (0000 to 2047 in BCD).
When the execution condition is OFF, COLL(81) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, COLL(81) copies the content of SBs + Of to D, i.e., Of
is added to SBs to determine the source word.
Note SBs and SBs+Of must be in the same data area.
Example
The following example shows how to use COLL(81) to copy the content of
DM 0000+Of to LR 00. The content of 200 is #0005, so the content of DM 0005
(DM 0000 + 5) is copied to LR 00 when IR 00001 is ON.
00001
@COLL(81)
DM 0000
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
@DIST(80)
200
Operands
00001
DM
LR 00
LR
200
DM 0000
LR 00
0 0 0 5
0 0 0 0
0 0 F F
0000
200
00
DM 0005
0 0 F F
FIFO Stack Operation
When bits 12 to 15 of C=9, COLL(81) can be used for an FIFO stack operation.
The other 3 digits of C specify the number of words in the stack (000 to 999, in
BCD). The content of SBs is the stack pointer.
When the execution condition is ON, COLL(81) shifts the contents of each word
within the stack down by one address, finally shifting the data from SBs+1 (the
first value written to the stack) to the destination word (D). The content of the
stack pointer (SBs) is then decremented by one.
413
Section 7-17
Data Movement Instructions
Note COLL(81) will be executed every cycle unless the differentiated form
(@COLL(81)) is used or COLL(81) is used with DIFU(13) or DIFD(14).
Example
The following example shows how to use COLL(81) to create a stack between
DM 0001 and DM 0005. DM 0000 acts as the stack pointer.
When IR 00000 goes from OFF to ON, COLL(81) shifts the contents of DM 0002
to DM 0005 down by one address, and shifts the data from DM 0001 to IR 001.
The content of the stack pointer (DM 0000) is then decremented by one.
00000
@COLL(81)
DM 0000
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
@COLL(81)
Operands
216
00000
DM
0000
216
001
001
LIFO Stack Operation
IR 216
9005
DM 0000
DM 0001
DM 0002
DM 0003
DM 0004
DM 0005
0005
AAAA
BBBB
CCCC
DDDD
EEEE
Stack pointer
decremented DM 0000
DM 0001
DM 0002
DM 0003
DM 0004
DM 0005
0004
BBBB
CCCC
DDDD
EEEE
EEEE
IR 001
AAAA
When bits 12 to 15 of C=8, COLL(81) can be used for an LIFO stack operation.
The other 3 digits of C specify the number of words in the stack (000 to 999). The
content of SBs is the stack pointer.
When the execution condition is ON, COLL(81) copies the data from the word
indicated by the stack pointer (SBs+the content of SBs) to the destination word
(D). The content of the stack pointer (SBs) is then decremented by one.
The stack pointer is the only word changed in the stack.
Note COLL(81) will be executed every cycle unless the differentiated form
(@DIST(80)) is used or DIST(80) is used with DIFU(13) or DIFD(14).
Example
The following example shows how to use COLL(81) to create a stack between
DM 0001 and DM 0005. DM 0000 acts as the stack pointer.
When IR 00000 goes from OFF to ON, COLL(81) copies the content of DM 0005
(DM 0000 + 5) to IR 001. The content of the stack pointer (DM 0000) is then decremented by one.
00000
@COLL(81)
DM 0000
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
@COLL(81)
216
Operands
00000
DM
0000
216
001
001
414
IR 216
8005
DM 0000
DM 0001
DM 0002
DM 0003
DM 0004
DM 0005
0005
AAAA
BBBB
CCCC
DDDD
EEEE
Stack pointer
decremented DM 0000
DM 0001
DM 0002
DM 0003
DM 0004
DM 0005
0004
AAAA
BBBB
CCCC
DDDD
EEEE
IR 001
EEEE
Section 7-17
Data Movement Instructions
Flags
ER:
The offset or stack length in the control word is not BCD.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
During stack operation, the value of the stack pointer exceeds the
length of the stack; an attempt was made to write to a word beyond the
end of the stack.
EQ:
ON when the content of S is zero; otherwise OFF.
7-17-8 MOVE BIT – MOVB(82)
Operand Data Areas
S: Source word
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR, #
MOVB(82)
@MOVB(82)
S
S
Bi
Bi
D
D
Bi: Bit designator (BCD)
Limitations
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
D: Destination word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
The rightmost two digits and the leftmost two digits of Bi must each be between
00 and 15.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for Bi or D.
When the execution condition is OFF, MOVB(82) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, MOVB(82) copies the specified bit of S to the specified bit in D. The bits in S and D are specified by Bi. The rightmost two digits of Bi
designate the source bit; the leftmost two bits designate the destination bit.
Description
Bit
15
Bi
Bi
MSB 1
2
0
1
0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Bit
15
LSB
S
Bit
00
1
2
0
1
Bit
00
0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1
Source bit (00 to 15)
Bit
15
Destination bit (00 to 15)
D
Flags
ER:
Bit
00
0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1
Bi is not BCD, or it is specifying a non-existent bit (i.e., bit specification
must be between 00 and 15).
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
415
Section 7-17
Data Movement Instructions
7-17-9 MOVE DIGIT – MOVD(83)
Operand Data Areas
S: Source word
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
MOVD(83)
@MOVD(83)
S
S
Di
Di
D
D
Di: Digit designator (BCD)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
D: Destination word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
Limitations
The rightmost three digits of Di must each be between 0 and 3.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for Di or D.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, MOVD(83) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, MOVD(83) copies the content of the specified digit(s)
in S to the specified digit(s) in D. Up to four digits can be transferred at one time.
The first digit to be copied, the number of digits to be copied, and the first digit to
receive the copy are designated in Di as shown below. Digits from S will be copied to consecutive digits in D starting from the designated first digit and continued for the designated number of digits. If the last digit is reached in either S or D,
further digits are used starting back at digit 0.
Digit number:
3 2 1 0
First digit in S (0 to 3)
Number of digits (0 to 3)
0: 1 digit
1: 2 digits
2: 3 digits
3: 4 digits
First digit in D (0 to 3)
Not used. (Set to 0.)
Digit Designator
The following show examples of the data movements for various values of Di.
Di: 0010
Di: 0030
S
D
S
D
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
S
D
S
D
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
Di: 0031
Flags
ER:
Di: 0023
At least one of the rightmost three digits of Di is not between 0 and 3.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
416
Section 7-18
Data Control Instructions
7-18 Data Control Instructions
7-18-1 SCALING – SCL(66)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
S: Source word
SCL(66)
@SCL(66)
S
S
P1
P1
R
R
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
P1: First parameter word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
R: Result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2) only.
S must be BCD.
P1 through P1+3 must be in the same data area.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for P1 through P1+3 or R.
Description
SCL(66) is used to linearly convert a 4-digit hexadecimal value to a 4-digit BCD
value. Unlike BCD(24), which converts a 4-digit hexadecimal value to its 4-digit
BCD equivalent (Shex → SBCD), SCL(66) can convert the hexadecimal value according to a specified linear relationship. The conversion line is defined by two
points specified in the parameter words P1 to P1+3.
When the execution condition is OFF, SCL(66) is not executed. When the execution condition is ON, SCL(66) converts the 4-digit hexadecimal value in S to the
4-digit BCD value on the line defined by points (P1, P1+1) and (P1+2, P1+3) and
places the results in R. The results is rounded off to the nearest integer. If the
results is less than 0000, then 0000 is written to R, and if the result is greater than
9999, then 9999 is written to R.
The following table shows the functions and ranges of the parameter words:
Parameter
Function
Range
Comments
P1
BCD point #1 (AY)
0000 to 9999
---
P1+1
Hex. point #1 (AX)
0000 to FFFF
Do not set P1+1=P1+3.
P1+2
BCD point #2 (BY)
0000 to 9999
---
P1+3
Hex. point #2 (BX)
0000 to FFFF
Do not set P1+3=P1+1.
The following diagram shows the source word, S, converted to D according to
the line defined by points (AY, AX) and (BY, BX).
Value after
(BCD)
conversion
BY
R
AY
AX
S
BX
Value before conversion
(Hexadecimal)
The results can be calculated by first converting all values to BCD and then using
the following formula.
417
Section 7-18
Data Control Instructions
Results = BY – [(BY – AY)/(BX – AX) × (BX – S)]
Flags
ER:
The value in P1+1 equals that in P1+3.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
P1 and P1+3 are not in the same data area, or other setting error.
EQ:
Example
ON when the result, R, is 0000.
When 00000 is turned ON in the following example, the BCD source data in
DM 0100 (#0100) is converted to hexadecimal according to the parameters in
DM 0150 to DM 0153. The result (#0512) is then written to DM 0200.
00000
@SCL(66)
DM 0100
DM 0150
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
@SCL(66)
00000
DM
DM
DM
DM 0200
DM 0150
DM 0151
DM 0152
DM 0153
Operands
0010
0005
0050
0019
0100
0150
0200
DM 0100
0100
DM 0200
0512
7-18-2 SIGNED BINARY TO BCD SCALING – SCL2(––)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
S: Source word
SCL2(––)
@SCL2(––)
S
S
P1
P1
R
R
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
P1: First parameter word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
R: Result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C only.
S must be BCD.
P1 through P1+2 must be in the same data area.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
Description
SCL2(––) is used to linearly convert a 4-digit signed hexadecimal value to a
4-digit BCD value. Unlike BCD(24), which converts a 4-digit hexadecimal value
to its 4-digit BCD equivalent (Shex → SBCD), SCL2(––) can convert the signed
hexadecimal value according to a specified linear relationship. The conversion
line is defined by the x-intercept and the slope of the line specified in the parameter words P1 to P1+2.
When the execution condition is OFF, SCL2(––) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, SCL2(––) converts the 4-digit signed hexadecimal
value in S to the 4-digit BCD value on the line defined by the x-intercept (P1, 0)
and the slope (P1+2 ÷ P1+1) and places the results in R. The result is rounded off
to the nearest integer.
418
Section 7-18
Data Control Instructions
If the result is negative, then CY is set to 1. If the result is less than –9999, then
–9999 is written to R. If the result is greater than 9999, then 9999 is written to R.
The following table shows the functions and ranges of the parameter words:
Parameter
Function
Range
P1
x-intercept (signed hex.)
8000 to 7FFF (–32,768 to 32,767)
P1+1
∆X (signed hex.)
8000 to 7FFF (–32,768 to 32,767)
P1+2
∆Y (BCD)
0000 to 9999
The following diagram shows the source word, S, converted to R according to
the line defined by the point (P1, 0) and slope ∆Y/∆X.
Value after conversion
(BCD)
∆Y
∆X
R
Value before conversion
(Signed hexadecimal)
S
X-intercept
The result can be calculated by first converting all signed hexadecimal values to
BCD and then using the following formula.
R + DY
DX
Flags
ER:
(S–P1)
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
P1 and P1+2 are not in the same data area, or other setting error.
Example
CY:
ON when the result, R, is negative.
EQ:
ON when the result, R, is 0000.
When 05000 is turned ON in the following example, the signed binary source
data in 200 (#FFE2) is converted to BCD according to the parameters in
419
Section 7-18
Data Control Instructions
DM 0000 to DM 0002. The result (#0018) is then written to LR 00 and CY is
turned ON because the result is negative.
05000
@SCL2(––)
200
DM 0000
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
@SCL2(––)
Operands
05000
LR 00
DM
LR
2
DM 0000
DM 0001
DM 0002
FFFD
FFFD
0003
0002
IR 200
FFE2
LR 00
0018
200
0000
00
3
FFE2
CY=1
–0018
R + 0002
0003
+2
3
(FFE2–FFFD)
CY flag is turned ON because
the conversion result is negative.
(–1B) + –18
7-18-3 BCD TO SIGNED BINARY SCALING – SCL3(––)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
S: Source word
SCL3(––)
@SCL3(––)
S
S
P1
P1
R
R
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
P1: First parameter word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
R: Result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C only.
P1+1 must be BCD.
P1 through P1+4 must be in the same data area.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
Description
SCL3(––) is used to linearly convert a 4-digit 4-digit BCD value to 4-digit signed
hexadecimal. SCL3(––) converts the BCD value according to a specified linear
relationship. The conversion line is defined by the y-intercept and the slope of
the line specified in the parameter words P1 to P1+2.
When the execution condition is OFF, SCL3(––) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, SCL3(––) converts the 4-digit BCD value in S to the
4-digit signed hexadecimal value on the line defined by the y-intercept (0, P1)
and the slope (P1+2 ÷ P1+1) and places the result in R. The result is rounded off
to the nearest integer.
The content of S can be 0000 to 9999, but S will be treated as a negative value if
CY=1, so the effective range of S is actually –9999 to 9999. Be sure to set the
desired sign in CY using STC(40) or CLC(41).
Parameter words P1+3 and P1+4 define upper and lower limits for the result. If
the result is greater than the upper limit in P1+3, then the upper limit is written to
420
Section 7-18
Data Control Instructions
R. If the result is less than the lower limit in P1+4, then the lower limit is written to
R.
Note The upper and lower limits for a 12-bit Analog Input Unit would be 07FF and
F800.
The following table shows the functions and ranges of the parameter words:
Parameter
Function
Range
P1
x-intercept (signed hex.)
8000 to 7FFF (–32,768 to 32,767)
P1+1
∆X (BCD)
0001 to 9999
P1+2
∆Y (signed hex.)
8000 to 7FFF (–32,768 to 32,767)
P1+3
Upper limit (signed hex.)
8000 to 7FFF (–32,768 to 32,767)
P1+4
Lower limit (signed hex.)
8000 to 7FFF (–32,768 to 32,767)
The following diagram shows the source word, S, converted to R according to
the line defined by the point (0, P1) and slope ∆Y/∆X.
Value after conversion
(Signed hexadecimal)
∆Y
Upper limit
∆X
R
Y-intercept
Value before conversion
(BCD)
S
Lower limit
The result can be calculated by first converting all BCD values to signed binary
and then using the following formula.
R+
Flags
ER:
ǒDY
DX
Ǔ
S ) P1
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
The content of S is not BCD.
CY:
CY is not changed by SCL3(––). (CY shows the sign of S before execution.)
EQ:
ON when the result, R, is 0000.
421
Section 7-18
Data Control Instructions
Example
The status of 00101 determines the sign of the BCD source word in the following
example. If 00101 is ON, then the source word is negative. When 00100 is
turned ON, the BCD source data in LR 02 is converted to signed binary according to the parameters in DM 0000 to DM 0004. The result is then written to
DM 0100. (In the second conversion, the signed binary equivalent of –1035 is
less than the lower limit specified in DM 0004, so the lower limit is written to
DM 0100.)
25313
(Always ON)
Address
CLC(41)
00000
00001
00002
00101
00004
00005
00101
STC(40)
00100
@SCL3(––)
Instruction
Operands
LD
CLC(41)
LD
STC(40)
LD
SCL3(––)
LR 02
25313
00101
00100
LR
DM
DM
DM 0000
DM 0100
02
0000
0100
Signed hex.
CY=1
CY=0
DM 0000
DM 0001
DM 0002
DM 0003
DM 0004
6
3
0005
BCD
0005
0003
0006
07FF
F800
LR 02
0100
LR 02
1035
DM 0100
00CD
DM 0100
F800
7-18-4 PID CONTROL – PID(––)
Ladder Symbol
Operand Data Areas
IW: Input data word
PID(––)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
IW
P1: First parameter word
P1
OW
IR, SR, DM, HR, LR
OW: Output data word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C and SRM1(-V2) only.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for P1 or OW.
P1 to P1+32 must be in the same data area.
! Caution
422
A total of 33 continuous words starting with P1 must be provided for PID(––) to
operate correctly. Also, PID(––) may not operate dependably in any of the following situations: In interrupt programs, in subroutines, between IL(02) and
ILC(03), between JMP(04) and JME(05), and in step programming
(STEP(08)/SNXT(09)). Do not program PID(––) in these situations.
Section 7-18
Data Control Instructions
Description
PID(––) performs PID control based on the parameters specified in P1 through
P1+6.
When the execution condition OFF, PID(––) is not executed. When the execution condition is ON, PID(––) carries out PID control according to the designated
parameters. It takes the specified input range of binary data from the contents of
IW and carries out the PID action according to the parameters that are set. The
result is then stored as the manipulated variable in OW.
The following table shows the function of the parameter words.
Word
Bits
Parameter name
P1
00 to 15
Set value (SV).
P1+1
00 to 15
P1+2
00 to 15
Proportional band
width.
Integral time (Tik)/
sampling period (τ)
P1+3
00 to 15
Derivative time
(Tdk)/sampling period (τ)
P1+4
00 to 15
Sampling period (τ)
P1+5
00 to 03
Operation specifier
04 to 15
Input filter coefficient
(α)
Function/Setting range
This is the target value for PID control. It can be set to any binary number
with the number of bits set by the input range parameter.
This parameter specifies the proportional band width/input range ratio from
0.1% to 999.9%. It must be BCD from 0001 to 9999.
Sets the strength of integral action. Increasing this value strengthens the
integral action. It must be BCD from 0001 to 8191, or 9999. A setting of
9999 disables integral control.
Set the integral time divided by the sampling time.
Sets the strength of derivative action. Increasing this value strengthens the
derivative action. It must be BCD from 0001 to 8191, or 0000.
(A setting of 0000 disables derivative control.)
Set the derivative time divided by the sampling time.
Sets the interval between samplings of the input data. It must be BCD from
0001 to 1023. The period will be from 0.1 to 102.3 s
Sets reverse or normal operation. Set to 0 to specify reverse operation or
1 to specify normal operation.
Determines the strength of the input filter. The lower the coefficient, the
weaker the filter.
This setting must be BCD from 100 to 199, or 000. A setting of 000 sets
the default value (0.65) and a setting of 100 to 199 sets the coefficient
from 0.00 to 0.99.
P1+6
P1+7 to
P1+32
00 to 03
Output range
08 to 15
Input range
00 to 15
Work area
! Caution
Determines the number of bits of output data. This setting must be between 0 and 8, which sets the output range between 8 and 16 bits.
Determines the number of bits of input data. This setting must be between
00 and 08, which sets the input range between 8 and 16 bits.
Do not use.
(Used by the system.)
Changes made to the parameters will not be effective until the execution condition for PID(––) goes from OFF to ON.
Note Do not use PID(––) in the following situations; it may not be executed properly.
In interrupt programs
In subroutine programs
In interlocked program sections (between IL and ILC)
In jump program sections (between JMP and JME)
In step ladder program section (created with STEP)
When the execution condition is ON, PID(––) performs the PID calculation on
the input data when the sampling period has elapsed. The sampling period is the
time that must pass before input data is read for processing.
423
Section 7-18
Data Control Instructions
The following diagram shows the relationship between the sampling period and
PID processing. PID processing is performed only when the sampling period
(100 ms in this case) has elapsed.
1 cycle
70 ms
60 ms
70 ms
70 ms
PID processing
No processing
(70+30=100 ms,
(70 ms)
no carryover)
PID
processing
PID processing
No processing
with initial values
(130 ms, 30 ms carryover)
(60 ms)
(0 ms)
PID CONTROL Action
Execution Condition OFF
All data that has been set is retained. When the execution condition is OFF, the
manipulated variable can be written to the output word (OW) to achieve manual
control.
Rising Edge of the Execution Condition
The work area is initialized based on the PID parameters that have been set and
the PID control action is begin. Sudden and radical changes in the manipulated
variable output are not made when starting action to avoid adverse affect on the
controlled system (bumpless operation).
When PID parameters are changed, they first become valid when the execution
condition changes from OFF to ON.
Execution Condition ON
The PID action is executed at the intervals based on the sampling period, according to the PID parameters that have been set.
Sampling Period and PID Execution Timing
The sampling period is the time interval to retrieve the measurement data for
carrying out a PID action. PID(––), however, is executed according to CPU
cycle, so there may be cases where the sampling period is exceeded. In such
cases, the time interval until the next sampling is reduced.
PID Control Method
PID control actions are executed by means of PID control with feed-forward control (two degrees of freedom).
When overshooting is prevented with simple PID control, stabilization of disturbances is slowed (1). If stabilization of disturbances is speeded up, on the other
hand, overshooting occurs and response toward the target value is slowed (2).
With feed-forward PID control, there is no overshooting, and response toward
the target value and stabilization of disturbances can both be speeded up (3).
Simple PID Control
Feed-forward PID control
(1)
As the target response is slowed,
the disturbance response worsens.
(2)
Overshoot
424
As the disturbance response is speeded
up, the target response worsens.
Target response
Disturbance response
Section 7-18
Data Control Instructions
Control Actions
Proportional Action (P)
Proportional action is an operation in which a proportional band is established
with respect to the set value (SV), and within that band the manipulated variable
(MV) is made proportional to the deviation. An example for reverse operation is
shown in the following illustration
If the proportional action is used and the present value (PV) becomes smaller
than the proportional band, the manipulated variable (MV) is 100% (i.e., the
maximum value). Within the proportional band, the MV is made proportional to
the deviation (the difference between from SV and PV) and gradually decreased
until the SV and PV match (i.e., until the deviation is 0), at which time the MV will
be 0% (i.e., the minimum value). The MV will also be 0% when the PV is larger
than the SV.
The proportional band is expressed as a percentage of the total input range. The
smaller the proportional band, the larger the proportional constant and the stronger the corrective action will be. With proportional action an offset (residual deviation) generally occurs, but the offset can be reduced by making the proportional
band smaller. If it is made too small, however, hunting will occur.
Proportional Action (Reverse Action)
Adjusting the Proportional Band
Proportional
band
Proportional band too narrow (hunting occurring)
100%
Offset
Manipulated
variable
SV
0%
SV
Proportional band just right
Proportional band too wide (large offset)
Integral Action (I)
Combining integral action with proportional action reduces the offset according
to the time that has passed. The strength of the integral action is indicated by the
integral time, which is the time required for the manipulated variable of the integral action to reach the same level as the manipulated variable of the proportional action with respect to the step deviation, as shown in the following illustration.
The shorter the integral time, the stronger the correction by the integral action
will be. If the integral time is too short, the correction will be too strong and will
cause hunting to occur.
Integral Action
Step response
Deviation
Manipulated
variable
Pi Action and Integral Time
Step response
Deviation
PI action
I action
P action
Manipulated
variable
Ti: Integral time
425
Section 7-18
Data Control Instructions
Derivative Action (D)
Proportional action and integral action both make corrections with respect to the
control results, so there is inevitably a response delay. Derivative action compensates for that drawback. In response to a sudden disturbance it delivers a
large manipulated variable and rapidly restores the original status. A correction
is executed with the manipulated variable made proportional to the incline (derivative coefficient) caused by the deviation.
The strength of the derivative action is indicated by the derivative time, which is
the time required for the manipulated variable of the derivative action to reach
the same level as the manipulated variable of the proportional action with respect to the step deviation, as shown in the following illustration. The longer the
derivative time, the stronger the correction by the derivative action will be.
Derivative Action
Step response
Deviation
Manipulated
variable
PD Action and Derivative Time
Ramp response
Deviation
PD action
P action
D action
Manipulated
variable
Td: Derivative time
PID Action
PID action combines proportional action (P), integral action (I), and derivative
action (D). It produces superior control results even for control objects with dead
time. It employs proportional action to provide smooth control without hunting,
integral action to automatically correct any offset, and derivative action to speed
up the response to disturbances.
Step Response of PID Control Action Output
Step response
Deviation
PID action
I action
P action
D action
Manipulated
variable
Ramp Response of PID Control Action Output
Ramp response
Deviation
PID action
I action
P action
Manipulated
variable
Direction of Action
426
D action
When using PID action, select either of the following two control directions. In
either direction, the MV increases as the difference between the SV and the PV
increases.
Section 7-18
Data Control Instructions
• Forward action: MV is increased when the PV is larger than the SV.
• Reverse action: MV is increased when the PV is smaller than the SV.
Forward Action
Reverse Action
Proportional
band
Proportional
band
100%
100%
Manipulated
variable
Manipulated
variable
0%
0%
Low
temperature
Adjusting PID Parameters
High
SV temperature
Low
temperature
High
temperature
SV
The general relationship between PID parameters and control status is shown
below.
• When it is not a problem if a certain amount of time is required for stabilization
(settlement time), but it is important not to cause overshooting, then enlarge
the proportional band.
Control by measured PID
SV
When P is enlarged
• When overshooting is not a problem but it is desirable to quickly stabilize control, then narrow the proportional band. If the proportional band is narrowed too
much, however, then hunting may occur.
When P is narrowed
SV
Control by measured PID
• When there is broad hunting, or when operation is tied up by overshooting and
undershooting, it is probably because integral action is too strong. The hunting
will be reduced if the integral time is increased or the proportional band is enlarged.
Control by measured PID
(when loose hunting occurs)
SV
Enlarge I or P.
• If the period is short and hunting occurs, it may be that the control system response is quick and the derivative action is too strong. In that case, set the derivative action lower.
Control by measured PID
(when hunting occurs in a short period)
SV
Lower D.
427
Section 7-19
Comparison Instructions
Flags
ER:
There is an error in the parameter settings.
The cycle time is more than twice as long as the sampling period, so
PID(––) cannot be executed accurately. PID(––) will be executed in this
case.
P1 and P1+32 are not in the same area or a parameter setting is not
within the specified range.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
CY:
ON when PID processing is being performed. (OFF when the sampling
period has not elapsed.)
7-19 Comparison Instructions
7-19-1 COMPARE – CMP(20)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
Cp1: First compare word
CMP(20)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
Cp1
Cp2: Second compare word
Cp2
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
Limitations
When comparing a value to the PV of a timer or counter, the value must be in
BCD.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, CMP(20) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, CMP(20) compares Cp1 and Cp2 and outputs the
result to the GR, EQ, and LE flags in the SR area.
Precautions
Placing other instructions between CMP(20) and the operation which accesses
the EQ, LE, and GR flags may change the status of these flags. Be sure to access them before the desired status is changed.
Flags
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
EQ:
ON if Cp1 equals Cp2.
LE:
ON if Cp1 is less than Cp2.
GR:
ON if Cp1 is greater than Cp2.
Flag
428
Address
C1 < C2
C1 = C2
C1 > C2
GR
25505
OFF
OFF
ON
EQ
25506
OFF
ON
OFF
LE
25507
ON
OFF
OFF
Section 7-19
Comparison Instructions
The following example shows how to save the comparison result immediately. If
the content of HR 09 is greater than that of DM 0000, 20000 is turned ON; if the
two contents are equal, 20001 is turned ON; if content of HR 09 is less than that
of DM 0000, 20002 is turned ON. In some applications, only one of the three
OUTs would be necessary, making the use of TR 0 unnecessary. With this type
of programming, 20000, 20001, and 20002 are changed only when CMP(20) is
executed.
Example:
Saving CMP(20) Results
00000
TR
0
CMP(20)
HR 09
DM 0000
25505
20000
Greater Than
25506
20001
Equal
20002
Less Than
25507
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
LD
OUT
CMP(20)
00000
0
TR
HR
DM
00003
00004
Address
Operands
AND
OUT
00005
00006
00007
00008
00009
00010
09
0000
25505
20000
Instruction
LD
AND
OUT
LD
AND
OUT
Operands
TR
TR
0
25506
20001
0
25507
20002
7-19-2 TABLE COMPARE – TCMP(85)
Operand Data Areas
CD: Compare data
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
TCMP(85)
@TCMP(85)
CD
CD
TB
TB
R
R
TB: First comparison table word
IR, SR, DM, HR, TC, LR
R: Result word
IR, SR, DM, HR, TC, LR
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, TCMP(85) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, TCMP(85) compares CD to the content of TB, TB+1,
TB+2, ..., and TB+15. If CD is equal to the content of any of these words, the
corresponding bit in R is set, e.g., if the CD equals the content of TB, bit 00 is
turned ON, if it equals that of TB+1, bit 01 is turned ON, etc. The rest of the bits in
R will be turned OFF.
Flags
ER:
The comparison table (i.e., TB through TB+15) exceeds the data area.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
429
Section 7-19
Comparison Instructions
The following example shows the comparisons made and the results provided
for TCMP(85). Here, the comparison is made during each cycle when IR 00000
is ON.
Example
00000
TCMP(85)
HR 00
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
TCMP(85)
DM 0000
HR
00
Upper limits
0210
DM 0000
DM 0001
DM 0002
DM 0003
DM 0004
DM 0005
DM 0006
DM 0007
DM 0008
DM 0009
DM 0010
DM 0011
DM 0012
DM 0013
DM 0014
DM 0015
Compare the data in IR 001
with the given ranges.
00000
HR
DM
216
CD: HR 00
Operands
00
0000
216
R: 216
0100
0200
0210
0400
0500
0600
0210
0800
0900
1000
0210
1200
1300
1400
0210
1600
IR 21000
IR 21001
IR 21002
IR 21003
IR 21004
IR 21005
IR 21006
IR 21007
IR 21008
IR 21009
IR 21010
IR 21011
IR 21012
IR 21013
IR 21014
IR 21015
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
7-19-3 BLOCK COMPARE – BCMP(68)
Operand Data Areas
CD: Compare data
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
BCMP(68)
@BCMP(68)
CD
CD
CB
CB
R
R
CB: First comparison block word
IR, SR, DM, HR, TC, LR
R: Result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
Note BCMP(68) is an expansion instruction for the SRM1(-V2). The function code 68
is the factory setting and can be changed for the SRM1(-V2) if desired.
Limitations
Each lower limit word in the comparison block must be less than or equal to the
upper limit.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
430
Section 7-19
Comparison Instructions
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, BCMP(68) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, BCMP(68) compares CD to the ranges defined by a
block consisting of CB, CB+1, CB+2, ..., CB+31. Each range is defined by two
words, the first one providing the lower limit and the second word providing the
upper limit. If CD is found to be within any of these ranges (inclusive of the upper
and lower limits), the corresponding bit in R is set. The comparisons that are
made and the corresponding bit in R that is set for each true comparison are
shown below. The rest of the bits in R will be turned OFF.
CB ≤ CD ≤ CB+1
Bit 00
CB+2 ≤ CD ≤ CB+3
Bit 01
CB+4 ≤ CD ≤ CB+5
Bit 02
CB+6 ≤ CD ≤ CB+7
Bit 03
CB+8 ≤ CD ≤ CB+9
Bit 04
CB+10 ≤ CD ≤ CB+11
Bit 05
CB+12 ≤ CD ≤ CB+13
Bit 06
CB+14 ≤ CD ≤ CB+15
Bit 07
CB+16 ≤ CD ≤ CB+17
Bit 08
CB+18 ≤ CD ≤ CB+19
Bit 09
CB+20 ≤ CD ≤ CB+21
Bit 10
CB+22 ≤ CD ≤ CB+23
Bit 11
CB+24 ≤ CD ≤ CB+25
Bit 12
CB+26 ≤ CD ≤ CB+27
Bit 13
CB+28 ≤ CD ≤ CB+29
Bit 14
CB+30 ≤ CD ≤ CB+31
Bit 15
Flags
ER:
The comparison block (i.e., CB through CB+31) exceeds the data area.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
431
Section 7-19
Comparison Instructions
Example
The following example shows the comparisons made and the results provided
for BCMP(68). Here, the comparison is made during each cycle when IR 00000
is ON.
00000
BCMP(68)
HR 00
DM 0010
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
BCMP(68)
HR 00
Lower limits
0210
Compare data in IR 001
(which contains 0210) with
the given ranges.
DM 0010
DM 0012
DM 0014
DM 0016
DM 0018
DM 0020
DM 0022
DM 0024
DM 0026
DM 0028
DM 0030
DM 0032
DM 0034
DM 0036
DM 0038
DM 0040
0000
0101
0201
0301
0401
0501
0601
0701
0801
0901
1001
1101
1201
1301
1401
1501
00000
HR
DM
LR
LR 05
HR 00
Operands
Upper limits
DM 0011
DM 0013
DM 0015
DM 0017
DM 0019
DM 0021
DM 0023
DM 0025
DM 0027
DM 0029
DM 0031
DM 0033
DM 0035
DM 0037
DM 0039
DM 0041
00
0010
05
R:LR 05
0100
0200
0300
0400
0500
0600
0700
0800
0900
1000
1100
1200
1300
1400
1500
1600
LR 0500
LR 0501
LR 0502
LR 0503
LR 0504
LR 0505
LR 0506
LR 0507
LR 0508
LR 0509
LR 0510
LR 0511
LR 0512
LR 0513
LR 0514
LR 0515
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7-19-4 DOUBLE COMPARE – CMPL(60)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
Cp1: First word of first compare word pair
CMPL(60)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
Cp1
Cp2: First word of second compare word pair
Cp2
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
––
Note CMPL(60) is an expansion instruction for the SRM1(-V2). The function code 60
is the factory setting and can be changed for the SRM1(-V2) if desired.
Limitations
Cp1 and Cp1+1 must be in the same data area.
Cp2 and Cp2+1 must be in the same data area.
Set the third operand to 000.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, CMPL(60) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, CMPL(60) joins the 4-digit hexadecimal content of
Cp1+1 with that of Cp1, and that of Cp2+1 with that of Cp2 to create two 8-digit
hexadecimal numbers, Cp+1,Cp1 and Cp2+1,Cp2. The two 8-digit numbers are
then compared and the result is output to the GR, EQ, and LE flags in the SR
area.
Precautions
Placing other instructions between CMPL(60) and the operation which accesses the EQ, LE, and GR flags may change the status of these flags. Be sure
to access them before the desired status is changed.
432
Section 7-19
Comparison Instructions
Flags
Example:
Saving CMPL(60) Results
00000
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
GR:
ON if Cp1+1,Cp1 is greater than Cp2+1,Cp2.
EQ:
ON if Cp1+1,Cp1 equals Cp2+1,Cp2.
LE:
ON if Cp1+1,Cp1 is less than Cp2+1,Cp2.
The following example shows how to save the comparison result immediately. If
the content of HR 10, HR 09 is greater than that of DM 0001, DM 0000, then
20000 is turned ON; if the two contents are equal, 20001 is turned ON; if content
of HR 10, HR 09 is less than that of DM 0001, DM 0000, then 20002 is turned ON.
In some applications, only one of the three OUTs would be necessary, making
the use of TR 0 unnecessary. With this type of programming, 20000, 20001, and
20002 are changed only when CMPL(60) is executed.
TR
0
CMPL(60)
HR 09
DM 0000
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
LD
OUT
CMPL(60)
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
00009
00010
25505
Greater Than
25506
20001
Equal
25507
20002
TR
HR
DM
---
20000
Operands
Less Than
AND
OUT
LD
AND
OUT
LD
AND
OUT
TR
TR
00000
0
09
0000
25505
20000
0
25506
20001
0
25507
20002
7-19-5 AREA RANGE COMPARE – ZCP(––)
Operand Data Areas
CD: Compare data
Ladder Symbol
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
ZCP(––)
LL: Lower limit of range
CD
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
LL
UL: Upper limit of range
UL
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
Limitations
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2) only.
LL must be less than or equal to UL.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, ZCP(––) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, ZCP(––) compares CD to the range defined by lower
limit LL and upper limit UL and outputs the result to the GR, EQ, and LE flags in
the SR area. The resulting flag status is shown in the following table.
Flag status
Comparison
p
result
CD < LL
GR (SR 25505) EQ (SR 25506)
0
0
LE (SR 25507)
1
LL ≤ CD ≤ UL
0
1
0
UL < CD
1
0
0
433
Section 7-19
Comparison Instructions
Precautions
Placing other instructions between ZCP(––) and the operation which accesses
the EQ, LE, and GR flags may change the status of these flags. Be sure to access them before the desired status is changed.
Flags
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
LL is greater than UL.
Example
EQ:
ON if LL ≤ CD ≤ UL
LE:
ON if CD < LL.
GR:
ON if CD > UL.
In the following example, the content of IR 200 (#6FA4) is compared to the range
#0010 to #AB1F. Since #0010 ≤ #6FA4 ≤ #AB1F, the EQ flag and IR 10101 are
turned ON.
00000
TR
0
ZCP(––)
200
#0010
#AB1F
25505
01000
Greater Than
(above range)
01001
Equal
(within range)
01002
Less Than
(below range)
25506
25507
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
LD
OUT
ZCP(––)
Operands
00000
0
TR
AND
LL: #0010
0
0
1
0
<
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
00009
00010
200
0010
AB1F
25505
#
#
00003
Address
6
CD: 200
F
A
4
<
Instruction
OUT
LD
AND
OUT
LD
AND
OUT
Operands
01000
0
25506
01001
0
25507
01002
TR
TR
20000: OFF
20001: ON
20002: OFF
UL: #AB1F
A
B
1
F
7-19-6 DOUBLE AREA RANGE COMPARE – ZCPL(––)
Operand Data Areas
Ladder Symbol
CD: Compare data
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
ZCPL(––)
LL: Lower limit of range
CD
LL
UL
434
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
UL: Upper limit of range
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Section 7-20
Conversion Instructions
Limitations
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C only.
The 8-digit value in LL+1,LL must be less than or equal to UL+1,UL.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, ZCPL(––) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, ZCPL(––) compares the 8-digit value in CD, CD+1 to
the range defined by lower limit LL+1,LL and upper limit UL+1,UL and outputs
the result to the GR, EQ, and LE flags in the SR area. The resulting flag status is
shown in the following table.
Flag status
Comparison
p
result
GR
(SR 25505)
EQ
(SR 25506)
LE
(SR 25507)
CD , CD+1< LL+1,LL
0
0
1
LL+1,LL ≤ CD, CD+1 ≤ UL+1,UL
0
1
0
UL+1,UL < CD, CD+1
1
0
0
Precautions
Placing other instructions between ZCPL(––) and the operation which accesses
the EQ, LE, and GR flags may change the status of these flags. Be sure to access them before the desired status is changed.
Flags
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
LL+1,LL is greater than UL+1,UL.
EQ:
LE:
GR:
ON if LL+1,LL ≤ CD, CD+1 ≤ UL+1,UL
ON if CD, CD+1 < LL+1,LL.
ON if CD, CD+1 > UL+1,UL.
7-20 Conversion Instructions
7-20-1 BCD-TO-BINARY – BIN(23)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
S: Source word (BCD)
BIN(23)
@BIN(23)
S
S
R
R
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
R: Result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, BIN(23) is not executed. When the execution condition is ON, BIN(23) converts the BCD content of S into the numerically
equivalent binary bits, and outputs the binary value to R. Only the content of R is
changed; the content of S is left unchanged.
BCD
S
Binary
R
BIN(23) can be used to convert BCD to binary so that displays on the Programming Console or any other programming device will appear in hexadecimal rather than decimal. It can also be used to convert to binary to perform binary arithmetic operations rather than BCD arithmetic operations, e.g., when BCD and
binary values must be added.
435
Section 7-20
Conversion Instructions
Flags
ER:
The content of S is not BCD.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
EQ:
ON when the result is zero.
7-20-2 BINARY-TO-BCD – BCD(24)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
S: Source word (binary)
BCD(24)
@BCD(24)
S
S
R
R
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
R: Result word
Limitations
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
If the content of S exceeds 270F, the converted result would exceed 9999 and
BCD(24) will not be executed. When the instruction is not executed, the content
of R remains unchanged.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
Description
BCD(24) converts the binary (hexadecimal) content of S into the numerically
equivalent BCD bits, and outputs the BCD bits to R. Only the content of R is
changed; the content of S is left unchanged.
Binary
S
BCD
R
BCD(24) can be used to convert binary to BCD so that displays on the Programming Console or any other programming device will appear in decimal rather
than hexadecimal. It can also be used to convert to BCD to perform BCD arithmetic operations rather than binary arithmetic operations, e.g., when BCD and
binary values must be added.
Flags
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
EQ:
ON when the result is zero.
7-20-3 DOUBLE BCD-TO-DOUBLE BINARY – BINL(58)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
S: First source word (BCD)
BINL(58)
@BINL(58)
S
S
R
R
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
R: First result word
Limitations
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C only.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
436
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Section 7-20
Conversion Instructions
Description
Flags
When the execution condition is OFF, BINL(58) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, BINL(58) converts an eight-digit number in S and S+1
into 32-bit binary data, and outputs the converted data to R and R+1.
ER:
BCD
S+1
S
Binary
R+1
R
The contents of S and/or S+1 words are not BCD.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
EQ:
ON when the result is zero.
7-20-4 DOUBLE BINARY-TO-DOUBLE BCD – BCDL(59)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
S: First source word (binary)
BCDL(59)
@BCDL(59)
S
S
R
R
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
R: First result word
Limitations
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C only.
If the content of S exceeds 05F5E0FF, the converted result would exceed
99999999 and BCDL(59) will not be executed. When the instruction is not
executed, the content of R and R+1 remain unchanged.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
Description
Flags
BCDL(59) converts the 32-bit binary content of S and S+1 into eight digits of
BCD data, and outputs the converted data to R and R+1.
ER:
Binary
S+1
S
BCD
R+1
R
Content of R and R+1 exceeds 99999999.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
EQ:
ON when the result is zero.
437
Section 7-20
Conversion Instructions
7-20-5 4-TO-16 DECODER – MLPX(76)
Operand Data Areas
S: Source word
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
MLPX(76)
@MLPX(76)
S
S
Di
Di
R
R
Di: Digit designator
Limitations
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
R: First result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
The rightmost two digits of Di must each be between 0 and 3.
All result words must be in the same data area.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, MLPX(76) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, MLPX(76) converts up to four, four-bit hexadecimal
digits from S into decimal values from 0 to 15, each of which is used to indicate a
bit position. The bit whose number corresponds to each converted value is then
turned ON in a result word. If more than one digit is specified, then one bit will be
turned ON in each of consecutive words beginning with R. (See examples, below.)
The following is an example of a one-digit decode operation from digit number 1
of S, i.e., here Di would be 0001.
Source word
C
Bit C (i.e., bit number 12) turned ON.
First result word
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
The first digit and the number of digits to be converted are designated in Di. If
more digits are designated than remain in S (counting from the designated first
digit), the remaining digits will be taken starting back at the beginning of S. The
final word required to store the converted result (R plus the number of digits to be
converted) must be in the same data area as R, e.g., if two digits are converted,
the last word address in a data area cannot be designated; if three digits are converted, the last two words in a data area cannot be designated.
Digit Designator
The digits of Di are set as shown below.
Digit number:
3 2 1 0
Specifies the first digit to be converted (0 to 3)
Number of digits to be converted (0 to 3)
0: 1 digit
1: 2 digits
2: 3 digits
3: 4 digits
Not used (Set to zero)
438
Section 7-20
Conversion Instructions
Some example Di values and the digit-to-word conversions that they produce
are shown below.
Di: 0010
Di: 0030
S
S
0
R
0
R
1
R+1
1
R+1
2
2
R+2
3
3
R+3
Di: 0031
Di: 0023
S
S
R
0
Flags
ER:
0
R
1
R+1
1
R+1
2
R+2
2
R+2
3
R+3
3
Undefined digit designator, or R plus number of digits exceeds a data
area.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
The following program converts digits 1 to 3 of data from DM 0020 to bit positions
and turns ON the corresponding bits in three consecutive words starting with HR
10. Digit 0 is not converted.
Example
00000
MLPX(76)
Address
Instruction
DM 0020
00000
00001
LD
MLPX(76)
#0021
DM 0020
DM 0020
DM 0020
DM 0020
DM 0020
DM 0020
DM 0020
DM 0020
DM 0020
DM 0020
DM 0020
DM 0020
DM 0020
DM 0020
DM 0020
DM 0020
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
R: HR 10
Not
Converted
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
15
6
0
HR 1000
HR 1001
HR 1002
HR 1003
HR 1004
HR 1005
HR 1006
HR 1007
HR 1008
HR 1009
HR 1010
HR 1011
HR 1012
HR 1013
HR 1014
HR 1015
R+1: HR 11
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
00000
DM
#
HR
HR 10
S: DM 0020
Operands
HR 1100
HR 1101
HR 1102
HR 1103
HR 1104
HR 1105
HR 1106
HR 1107
HR 1108
HR 1109
HR 1110
HR 1111
HR 1112
HR 1113
HR 1114
HR 1115
0020
0021
10
R+2: HR 12
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
HR 1200
HR 1201
HR 1202
HR 1203
HR 1204
HR 1205
HR 1206
HR 1207
HR 1208
HR 1209
HR 1210
HR 1211
HR 1212
HR 1213
HR 1214
HR 1215
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
439
Section 7-20
Conversion Instructions
7-20-6 16-TO-4 ENCODER – DMPX(77)
Operand Data Areas
SB: First source word
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
DMPX(77)
@DMPX(77)
SB
SB
R
R
Di
Di
R: Result word
Limitations
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Di: Digit designator
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
The rightmost two digits of Di must each be between 0 and 3.
All source words must be in the same data area.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for SB, R, or Di.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, DMPX(77) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, DMPX(77) determines the position of the highest ON
bit in S, encodes it into single-digit hexadecimal value corresponding to the bit
number of the highest ON bit number, then transfers the hexadecimal value to
the specified digit in R. The digits to receive the results are specified in Di, which
also specifies the number of digits to be encoded.
The following is an example of a one-digit encode operation to digit number 1 of
R, i.e., here Di would be 0001.
First source word
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
C transferred to indicate bit number 12 as
the highest ON bit.
Result word
C
Up to four digits from four consecutive source words starting with S may be encoded and the digits written to R in order from the designated first digit. If more
digits are designated than remain in R (counting from the designated first digit),
the remaining digits will be placed at digits starting back at the beginning of R.
The final word to be converted (S plus the number of digits to be converted) must
be in the same data area as SB.
Digit Designator
The digits of Di are set as shown below.
Digit numbers: 3 2 1 0
Specifies the first digit to receive converted data (0 to 3).
Number of words to be converted (0 to 3)
0: 1 word
1: 2 words
2: 3 words
3: 4 words
Not used.
440
Section 7-20
Conversion Instructions
Some example Di values and the word-to-digit conversions that they produce
are shown below.
Di: 0011
Di: 0030
R
R
S
0
S
0
S+1
1
S+1
1
2
S+2
2
3
S+3
3
Di: 0013
Di: 0032
R
Flags
ER:
S
0
S
R
0
S+1
1
S+1
1
2
S+2
2
3
S+3
3
Undefined digit designator, or S plus number of digits exceeds a data
area.
Content of a source word is zero.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
When 00000 is ON, the following diagram encodes IR words 200 and 201 to the
first two digits of HR 10 and then encodes LR 10 and 11 to the last two digits of
HR 10. Although the status of each source word bit is not shown, it is assumed
that the bit with status 1 (ON) shown is the highest bit that is ON in the word.
Example
00000
DMPX(77)
Address
Instruction
200
00000
00001
LD
DMPX(77)
HR 10
Operands
00000
HR
#
200
10
0010
LR
HR
#
10
10
0012
#0010
DMPX(77)
00002
LR 10
HR 10
#0012
IR 200
IR 201
01000
01100
:
01011
DMPX(77)
:
1
01109
1
01012
0
01110
0
: :
:
: :
:
01015
0
01115
0
HR 10
LR 11
LR 10
LR 1100
LR 1000
LR 1001 1
:
LR 1002 0
LR 1108 1
: :
:
LR 1109 0
: :
:
LR 1015 0
: :
Digit 0
B
Digit 1
9
Digit 2
1
Digit 3
8
:
LR 1115 0
441
Section 7-20
Conversion Instructions
7-20-7 7-SEGMENT DECODER – SDEC(78)
Operand Data Areas
S: Source word (binary)
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
SDEC(78)
@SDEC(78)
S
S
Di
Di
D
D
Di: Digit designator
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
D: First destination word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
Di must be within the values given below.
All destination words must be in the same data area.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for D.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, SDEC(78) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, SDEC(78) converts the designated digit(s) of S into
the equivalent 8-bit, 7-segment display code and places it into the destination
word(s) beginning with D.
Any or all of the digits in S may be converted in sequence from the designated
first digit. The first digit, the number of digits to be converted, and the half of D to
receive the first 7-segment display code (rightmost or leftmost 8 bits) are designated in Di. If multiple digits are designated, they will be placed in order starting
from the designated half of D, each requiring two digits. If more digits are designated than remain in S (counting from the designated first digit), further digits will
be used starting back at the beginning of S.
Digit Designator
The digits of Di are set as shown below.
Digit number:
3 2 1 0
Specifies the first digit of S to be converted (0 to 3).
Number of digits to be converted (0 to 3)
0: 1 digit
1: 2 digits
2: 3 digits
3: 4 digits
First half of D to be used.
0: Rightmost 8 bits (1st half)
1: Leftmost 8 bits (2nd half)
Not used; set to 0.
442
Section 7-20
Conversion Instructions
Some example Di values and the 4-bit binary to 7-segment display conversions
that they produce are shown below.
Di: 0011
S digits
0
1
Di: 0030
D
S digits
D
1st half
0
1st half
2nd half
1
2nd half
2
2
3
3
D+1
1st half
2nd half
Di: 0112
S digits
D
0
1st half
1
2nd half
2
3
D+1
Di: 0130
S digits
0
1
2
3
D
1st half
2nd half
D+1
1st half
1st half
2nd half
2nd half
D+2
1st half
2nd half
443
Section 7-20
Conversion Instructions
Example
The following example shows the data to produce an 8. The lower case letters
show which bits correspond to which segments of the 7-segment display. The
table underneath shows the original data and converted code for all hexadecimal digits.
00000
@ SDEC(78)
DM 0010
LR 07
200
LR 07
a
IR 200
DM 0010
f
1
a
1
1
b
22
0
1
c
0
23
0
1
d
0
20
0
1
e
21
0
1
f
0
22
0
1
g
0
23
1
0
20
0
21
1
22
1
0
23
1
0
20
1
0
21
0
0
22
1
0
23
1
0
20
0
1
21
0
x100
0
x101
0
x102
0
x103
1: Second digit
0
0: One digit
1
3
Not used.
Digit
444
2
0 or 1:
0 Bits 00 through 07
1 Bits 08 through 15.
Bit 00
8
Bit 07
Original data
Bits
–
b
g
e
c
d
0
Converted code (segments)
g
f
e
d
c
b
Display
a
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
3
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
4
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
5
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
6
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
7
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
1
1
8
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
9
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
A
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
B
1
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
C
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
D
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
E
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
F
1
1
1
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
Section 7-20
Conversion Instructions
Flags
ER:
Incorrect digit designator, or data area for destination exceeded.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
7-20-8 ASCII CONVERT – ASC(86)
Operand Data Areas
S: Source word
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
ASC(86)
@ASC(86)
S
S
Di
Di
D
D
Di: Digit designator
Limitations
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
D: First destination word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Di must be within the values given below.
All destination words must be in the same data area.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for D.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, ASC(86) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, ASC(86) converts the designated digit(s) of S into the
equivalent 8-bit ASCII code and places it into the destination word(s) beginning
with D.
Any or all of the digits in S may be converted in order from the designated first
digit. The first digit, the number of digits to be converted, and the half of D to receive the first ASCII code (rightmost or leftmost 8 bits) are designated in Di. If
multiple digits are designated, they will be placed in order starting from the designated half of D, each requiring two digits. If more digits are designated than
remain in S (counting from the designated first digit), further digits will be used
starting back at the beginning of S.
Note Refer to Appendix G for a table of ASCII characters.
Digit Designator
The digits of Di are set as shown below.
Digit number:
3 2 1 0
Specifies the first digit to be converted (0 to 3).
Number of digits to be converted (0 to 3)
0: 1 digit
1: 2 digits
2: 3 digits
3: 4 digits
First half of D to be used.
0: Rightmost 8 bits (1st half)
1: Leftmost 8 bits (2nd half)
Parity
0: none
1: even
2: odd
445
Section 7-20
Conversion Instructions
Some examples of Di values and the 4-bit binary to 8-bit ASCII conversions that
they produce are shown below.
Di: 0011
S
0
1
Di: 0030
D
S
D
1st half
0
1st half
2nd half
1
2nd half
2
2
3
3
D+1
1st half
2nd half
Di: 0112
S
Di: 0130
0
1st half
S
0
1
2nd half
1
D
1st half
2nd half
2
2
3
D
D+1
3
D+1
1st half
1st half
2nd half
2nd half
D+2
1st half
2nd half
Parity
The leftmost bit of each ASCII character (2 digits) can be automatically adjusted
for either even or odd parity. If no parity is designated, the leftmost bit will always
be zero.
When even parity is designated, the leftmost bit will be adjusted so that the total
number of ON bits is even, e.g., when adjusted for even parity, ASCII “31”
(00110001) will be “B1” (10110001: parity bit turned ON to create an even number of ON bits); ASCII “36” (00110110) will be “36” (00110110: parity bit turned
OFF because the number of ON bits is already even). The status of the parity bit
does not affect the meaning of the ASCII code.
When odd parity is designated, the leftmost bit of each ASCII character will be
adjusted so that there is an odd number of ON bits.
Flags
ER:
Incorrect digit designator, or data area for destination exceeded.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
446
Section 7-20
Conversion Instructions
7-20-9 ASCII-TO-HEXADECIMAL – HEX(––)
Operand Data Areas
S: First source word
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
HEX(––)
@HEX(––)
S
S
Di
Di
D
D
Di: Digit designator
Limitations
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
D: Destination word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2) only.
Di must be within the values given below.
All source words must be in the same data area.
Bytes in the source words must contain the ASCII code equivalent of hexadecimal values, i.e., 30 to 39 (0 to 9) or 41 to 46 (A to F).
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for D.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, HEX(––) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, HEX(––) converts the designated byte(s) of ASCII
code from the source word(s) into the hexadecimal equivalent and places it into
D.
Up to 4 ASCII codes may be converted beginning with the designated first byte
of S. The converted hexadecimal values are then placed in D in order from the
designated digit. The first byte (rightmost or leftmost 8 bits), the number of bytes
to be converted, and the digit of D to receive the first hexadecimal value are
designated in Di. If multiple bytes are designated, they will be converted in order
starting from the designated half of S and continuing to S+1 and S+2, if
necessary.
If more digits are designated than remain in D (counting from the designated first
digit), further digits will be used starting back at the beginning of D. Digits in D
that do not receive converted data will not be changed.
Digit Designator
The digits of Di are set as shown below.
Digit number:
3 2 1 0
Specifies the first digit of D to be used (0 to 3).
Number of bytes to be converted (0 to 3)
0: 1 byte (2-digit ASCII code)
1: 2 bytes
2: 3 bytes
3: 4 bytes
First byte of S to be used.
0: Rightmost 8 bits (1st byte)
1: Leftmost 8 bits (2nd byte)
Parity
0: none
1: even
2: odd
447
Section 7-20
Conversion Instructions
Some examples of Di values and the 8-bit ASCII to 4-bit hexadecimal conversions that they produce are shown below.
Di: 0011
Di: 0030
D
S
1st
2nd
S
D
byte
0
1st
byte
0
byte
1
2nd
byte
1
2
2
S+1
3
3
1st byte
2nd byte
Di: 0023
Di: 0133
S
D
1st byte
0
1st byte
D
2nd byte
1
2nd byte
0
S
2
S+1
1
S+1
3
2
1st byte
1st byte
2nd byte
2nd byte
3
S+2
1st byte
2nd byte
ASCII Code Table
The following table shows the ASCII codes before conversion and the hexadecimal values after conversion. Refer to Appendix G for a table of ASCII characters.
Original data
ASCII Code
Converted data
Bit status (See note.)
Digit
Bits
30
*
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
31
*
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
32
*
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
2
0
0
1
0
33
*
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
3
0
0
1
1
34
*
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
4
0
1
0
0
35
*
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
5
0
1
0
1
36
*
0
1
1
0
1
1
0
6
0
1
1
0
37
*
0
1
1
0
1
1
1
7
0
1
1
1
38
*
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
8
1
0
0
0
39
*
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
9
1
0
0
1
41
*
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
A
1
0
1
0
42
*
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
B
1
0
1
1
43
*
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
C
1
1
0
0
44
*
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
D
1
1
0
1
45
*
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
E
1
1
1
0
46
*
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
F
1
1
1
1
Note The leftmost bit of each ASCII code is adjusted for parity.
Parity
448
The leftmost bit of each ASCII character (2 digits) is automatically adjusted for
either even or odd parity.
With no parity, the leftmost bit should always be zero. With odd or even parity, the
leftmost bit of each ASCII character should be adjusted so that there is an odd or
even number of ON bits.
If the parity of the ASCII code in S does not agree with the parity specified in Di,
the ER Flag (SR 25503) will be turned ON and the instruction will not be
executed.
Section 7-20
Conversion Instructions
Flags
ER:
Incorrect digit designator, or data area for destination exceeded.
The source words do not contain ASCII data that can be converted to
hexadecimal, i.e., values ranging from 0 to 9 or A to F.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
In the following example, the 2nd byte of LR 10 and the 1st byte of LR 11 are converted to hexadecimal values and those values are written to the first and second bytes of IR 200.
Example
00000
@HEX(––)
LR 10
HR 10
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
@HEX(––)
Operands
00000
LR
HR
200
10
10
200
HR 10 0 1 1 0
LR 12
3 5 3 4
LR 11
4 2 3 2
LR 10
3 1 3 0
Conversion to
hexadecimal
200 0 0 2 1
7-20-10 HOURS-TO-SECONDS – SEC(––)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
SEC(––)
@SEC(––)
S
S
R
R
000
000
S: Beginning source word (BCD)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
R: Beginning result word (BCD)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
000: No function
000
Limitations
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C only.
S and S+1 must be within the same data area. R and R+1 must be within the
same data area. S and S+1 must be BCD and must be in the proper hours/minutes/seconds format.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
Description
SEC(––) is used to convert time notation in hours/minutes/seconds to an equivalent in just seconds.
For the source data, the seconds are designated in bits 00 through 07 and the
minutes are designated in bits 08 through 15 of S. The hours are designated in
S+1. The maximum is thus 9,999 hours, 59 minutes, and 59 seconds.
The result is output to R and R+1. The maximum obtainable value is 35,999,999
seconds.
Flags
ER:
S and S+1 or R and R+1 are not in the same data area.
S and/or S+1 do not contain BCD.
449
Section 7-20
Conversion Instructions
Number of seconds and/or minutes exceeds 59.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
EQ:
Example
ON when the result is zero.
When 00000 is OFF (i.e., when the execution condition is ON), the following
instruction would convert the hours, minutes, and seconds given in HR 12 and
HR 13 to seconds and store the results in DM 0100 and DM 0101 as shown.
00000
Address
SEC(––)
HR 12
DM 0100
00000
00001
Instruction
LD NOT
SEC(––)
3
2
2
8
0
1
7
5
2,815 hrs, 32 min,
07 s
DM 0100
DM 0101
5
1
9
0
2
1
7
3
10,135,927 s
00000
HR
DM
000
HR 12
HR 13
Operands
12
0100
000
7-20-11 SECONDS-TO-HOURS – HMS(––)
Operand Data Areas
Ladder Symbols
HMS(––)
@HMS(––)
S
S
R
R
000
000
S: Beginning source word (BCD)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
R: Beginning result word (BCD)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
000: No function
000
Limitations
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C only.
S and S+1 must be within the same data area. R and R+1 must be within the
same data area. S and S+1 must be BCD and must be between 0 and
35,999,999 seconds.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
Description
HMS(––) is used to convert time notation in seconds to an equivalent in hours/
minutes/seconds.
The number of seconds designated in S and S+1 is converted to hours/minutes/
seconds and placed in R and R+1.
For the results, the seconds are placed in bits 00 through 07 and the minutes are
placed in bits 08 through 15 of R. The hours are placed in R+1. The maximum is
9,999 hours, 59 minutes, and 59 seconds.
Flags
ER:
S and S+1 or R and R+1 are not in the same data area.
S and/or S+1 do not contain BCD or exceed 36,000,000 seconds.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
EQ:
450
ON when the result is zero.
Section 7-20
Conversion Instructions
Example
When 00000 is OFF (i.e., when the execution condition is ON), the following
instruction would convert the seconds given in HR 12 and HR 13 to hours, minutes, and seconds and store the results in DM 0100 and DM 0101 as shown.
00000
Address
HMS(––)
HR 12
DM 0100
00000
00001
Instruction
Operands
LD NOT
HMS(––)
00000
HR
DM
000
HR 12
HR 13
5
1
9
0
2
1
7
3
DM 0100
DM 0101
3
2
2
8
0
1
7
5
7-20-12
10,135,927 s
12
0100
000
2,815 hrs, 32 min, 07 s
2’S COMPLEMENT – NEG(––)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
NEG(––)
@NEG(––)
S
S
R
R
000
000
S: Source word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
R: Result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
000
Not used. Set to 000.
Limitations
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2) only.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
Description
Converts the four-digit hexadecimal content of the source word (S) to its 2’s
complement and outputs the result to the result word (R). This operation is effectively the same as subtracting S from 0000 and outputting the result to R; it will
calculate the absolute value of negative signed binary data.
If the content of S is 0000, the content of R will also be 0000 after execution and
EQ (SR 25506) will be turned on.
If the content of S is 8000, the content of R will also be 8000 after execution and
UF (SR 25405) will be turned on.
Note Refer to 2-16 Calculating with Signed Binary Data for more details.
Flags
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
EQ:
ON when the content of R is zero after execution; otherwise OFF.
UF:
ON when the content of S is 8000; otherwise OFF.
N:
ON when bit 15 of R is ON; otherwise OFF.
451
Section 7-20
Conversion Instructions
Example
The following example shows how to use NEG(––) to find the 2’s complement of
the content of DM 0005 and output the result to IR 105.
00100
NEG(––)
DM 0005
105
Address
00000
00001
Instruction
#0000
452
00100
DM
000
–
Operands
LD
NEG(––)
#001F
Content of DM 0005.
#FFE1
Output to IR 105.
0005
105
000
Section 7-21
BCD Calculation Instructions
7-21 BCD Calculation Instructions
7-21-1 SET CARRY – STC(40)
Ladder Symbols
STC(40)
@STC(40)
When the execution condition is OFF, STC(40) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, STC(40) turns ON CY (SR 25504).
Note Refer to Appendix B Error and Arithmetic Flag Operation for a table listing the
instructions that affect CY.
7-21-2 CLEAR CARRY – CLC(41)
Ladder Symbols
CLC(41)
@CLC(41)
When the execution condition is OFF, CLC(41) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, CLC(41) turns OFF CY (SR 25504).
CLEAR CARRY is used to reset (turn OFF) CY (SR 25504) to “0.”
Note Refer to Appendix B Error and Arithmetic Flag Operation for a table listing the
instructions that affect CY.
7-21-3 BCD ADD – ADD(30)
Operand Data Areas
Au: Augend word (BCD)
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
ADD(30)
@ADD(30)
Au
Au
Ad
Ad
R
R
Ad: Addend word (BCD)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
R: Result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, ADD(30) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, ADD(30) adds the contents of Au, Ad, and CY, and
places the result in R. CY will be set if the result is greater than 9999.
Au + Ad + CY
Flags
ER:
CY
R
Au and/or Ad is not BCD.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
CY:
ON when there is a carry in the result.
EQ:
ON when the result is 0.
453
Section 7-21
BCD Calculation Instructions
If 00002 is ON, the program represented by the following diagram clears CY with
CLC(41), adds the content of IR 200 to a constant (6103), places the result in DM
0100, and then moves either all zeros or 0001 into DM 0101 depending on the
status of CY (25504). This ensures that any carry from the last digit is preserved
in R+1 so that the entire result can be later handled as eight-digit data.
Example
Address
TR 0
00002
CLC(41)
ADD(30)
00000
00001
00002
00003
Instruction
LD
OUT
CLC(41)
ADD(30)
TR
200
#
DM
#6103
DM 0100
25504
MOV(21)
00004
00005
AND
MOV(21)
#0001
DM 0101
25504
MOV(21)
Operands
00006
00007
00008
LD
AND NOT
MOV(21)
#0000
DM 0101
00002
0
200
6103
0100
25504
#
DM
TR
0001
0101
0
25504
#
DM
0000
0101
Although two ADD(30) can be used together to perform eight-digit BCD addition,
ADDL(54) is designed specifically for this purpose.
7-21-4 BCD SUBTRACT – SUB(31)
Operand Data Areas
Mi: Minuend word (BCD)
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
SUB(31)
@SUB(31)
Mi
Mi
Su
Su
R
R
Su: Subtrahend word (BCD)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
R: Result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, SUB(31) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, SUB(31) subtracts the contents of Su and CY from
Mi, and places the result in R. If the result is negative, CY is set and the 10’s complement of the actual result is placed in R. To convert the 10’s complement to the
true result, subtract the content of R from zero (see example below).
Mi – Su – CY
Flags
ER:
CY
R
Mi and/or Su is not BCD.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
454
CY:
ON when the result is negative, i.e., when Mi is less than Su plus CY.
EQ:
ON when the result is 0.
Section 7-21
BCD Calculation Instructions
! Caution
Example
Be sure to clear the carry flag with CLC(41) before executing SUB(31) if its previous status is not required, and check the status of CY after doing a subtraction
with SUB(31). If CY is ON as a result of executing SUB(31) (i.e., if the result is
negative), the result is output as the 10’s complement of the true answer. To convert the output result to the true value, subtract the value in R from 0.
When 00002 is ON, the following ladder program clears CY, subtracts the contents of DM 0100 and CY from the content of 201 and places the result in HR 10.
If CY is set by executing SUB(31), the result in HR 10 is subtracted from zero
(note that CLC(41) is again required to obtain an accurate result), the result is
placed back in HR 10, and HR 1100 is turned ON to indicate a negative result.
If CY is not set by executing SUB(31), the result is positive, the second subtraction is not performed, and HR 1100 is not turned ON. HR 1100 is programmed as
a self-maintaining bit so that a change in the status of CY will not turn it OFF
when the program is rescanned.
In this example, differentiated forms of SUB(31) are used so that the subtraction
operation is performed only once each time 00002 is turned ON. When another
subtraction operation is to be performed, 00002 will need to be turned OFF for at
least one cycle (resetting HR 1100) and then turned back ON.
TR 0
00002
CLC(41)
@SUB(31)
201
First
subtraction
DM 0100
HR 10
25504
CLC(41)
@SUB(31)
#0000
Second
subtraction
HR 10
HR 10
25504
HR 1100
HR 1100
Turned ON to indicate
negative result.
455
Section 7-21
BCD Calculation Instructions
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
00003
LD
OUT
CLC(41)
@SUB(31)
Operands
00002
0
TR
DM
HR
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
00009
00010
00011
AND
CLC(41)
@SUB(31)
LD
LD
OR
AND LD
OUT
#
HR
HR
TR
HR
HR
201
0100
10
25504
0000
10
10
0
25504
1100
--1100
The first and second subtractions for this diagram are shown below using example data for 201 and DM 0100.
Note The actual SUB(31) operation involves subtracting Su and CY from 10,000 plus
Mi. For positive results the leftmost digit is truncated. For negative results the
10s complement is obtained. The procedure for establishing the correct answer
is given below.
First Subtraction
IR 201
1029
DM 0100 – 3452
CY
–0
HR 10
7577 (1029 + (10000 – 3452))
CY
1
(negative result)
Second Subtraction
0000
HR 10 –7577
CY
–0
HR 10 2423 (0000 + (10000 – 7577))
CY
1
(negative result)
In the above case, the program would turn ON HR 1100 to indicate that the value
held in HR 10 is negative.
7-21-5 BCD MULTIPLY – MUL(32)
Operand Data Areas
Md: Multiplicand (BCD)
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
MUL(32)
@MUL(32)
Md
Md
Mr
Mr
R
R
Mr: Multiplier (BCD)
Limitations
456
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
R: First result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR LR
Section 7-21
BCD Calculation Instructions
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, MUL(32) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, MUL(32) multiplies Md by the content of Mr, and
places the result In R and R+1.
Md
X
R +1
Example
Mr
R
When IR 00000 is ON with the following program, the contents of IR 013 and
DM 0005 are multiplied and the result is placed in HR 07 and HR 08. Example
data and calculations are shown below the program.
00000
Address
MUL(32)
00000
00001
013
DM 0005
0
Flags
ER:
00000
DM
HR
3
Md: IR 013
3
5
6
0
Mr: DM 0005
0
2
5
3
R: HR 07
9
0
R+1: HR 08
0
0
8
Operands
LD
MUL(32)
HR 07
X
Instruction
013
0005
07
0
Md and/or Mr is not BCD.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
CY:
ON when there is a carry in the result.
EQ:
ON when the result is 0.
7-21-6 BCD DIVIDE – DIV(33)
Operand Data Areas
Ladder Symbol
Dd: Dividend word (BCD)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
DIV(33)
Dr: Divisor word (BCD)
Dd
Dr
R
Limitations
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
R: First result word (BCD)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
R and R+1 must be in the same data area. DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used
for R.
457
Section 7-21
BCD Calculation Instructions
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, DIV(33) is not executed and the program
moves to the next instruction. When the execution condition is ON, Dd is divided
by Dr and the result is placed in R and R + 1: the quotient in R and the remainder
in R + 1.
Remainder
Quotient
R+1
R
Dr
Flags
ER:
Dd
Dd or Dr is not in BCD.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
EQ:
Example
ON when the result is 0.
When IR 00000 is ON with the following program, the content of IR 216 is divided
by the content of HR 09 and the result is placed in DM 0017 and DM 0018. Example data and calculations are shown below the program.
00000
Address
DIV(33)
216
00000
00001
Instruction
Operands
LD
DIV(33)
00000
HR 09
DM 0017
Quotient
1
0
R: DM 0017
1
5
0
Dd: HR 09
0
0
3
3
Remainder
HR
DM
216
09
0017
R + 1: DM 0018
0
0
0
2
Dd: IR 216
4
5
2
7-21-7 DOUBLE BCD ADD – ADDL(54)
Operand Data Areas
Au: First augend word (BCD)
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
ADDL(54)
@ADDL(54)
Au
Au
Ad
Ad
R
R
Ad: First addend word (BCD)
Limitations
458
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
R: First result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Section 7-21
BCD Calculation Instructions
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, ADDL(54) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, ADDL(54) adds the contents of CY to the 8-digit value in Au and Au+1 to the 8-digit value in Ad and Ad+1, and places the result in R
and R+1. CY will be set if the result is greater than 99999999.
Au + 1
Au
Ad + 1
Ad
+
CY
Flags
ER:
CY
R+1
R
Au and/or Ad is not BCD.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
Example
CY:
ON when there is a carry in the result.
EQ:
ON when the result is 0.
When 00000 is ON, the following program section adds two 12-digit numbers,
the first contained in LR 00 through LR 02 and the second in DM 0010 through
DM 0012. The result is placed in HR 10 through HR 13.
The rightmost 8 digits of the two numbers are added using ADDL(54), i.e., the
contents of LR 00 and LR 01 are added to DM 0010 and DM 0011 and the results
is placed in HR 10 and HR 11. The second addition adds the leftmost 4 digits of
each number using ADD(30), and includes any carry from the first addition. The
last instruction, ADB(50) (see 7-22-1 BINARY ADD – ADB(50)) adds two allzero constants to place any carry from the second addition into HR 13.
00000
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
00002
LD
CLC(41)
@ADDL(54)
Operands
CLC(41)
@ADDL(54)
LR 00
DM 0010
HR 10
@ADD(30)
00003
DM 0012
HR 12
#0000
#0000
HR 13
00004
LR
DM
HR
00
0010
10
LR
DM
HR
02
0012
12
#
#
HR
0000
0000
13
@ADD(30)
LR 02
@ADB(50)
00000
@ADB(50)
459
Section 7-21
BCD Calculation Instructions
7-21-8 DOUBLE BCD SUBTRACT – SUBL(55)
Operand Data Areas
Mi: First minuend word (BCD)
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
SUBL(55)
@SUBL(55)
Mi
Mi
Su
Su
R
R
Su: First subtrahend word (BCD)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
R: First result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, SUBL(55) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, SUBL(55) subtracts CY and the 8-digit contents of Su
and Su+1 from the 8-digit value in Mi and Mi+1, and places the result in R and
R+1. If the result is negative, CY is set and the 10’s complement of the actual
result is placed in R. To convert the 10’s complement to the true result, subtract
the content of R from zero. Since an 8-digit constant cannot be directly entered,
use the BSET(71) instruction (see 7-17-4 BLOCK SET – BSET(71)) to create an
8-digit constant.
Mi + 1
Mi
Su + 1
Su
–
CY
Flags
ER:
CY
R+1
R
Mi, M+1,Su, or Su+1 are not BCD.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
460
CY:
ON when the result is negative, i.e., when Mi is less than Su.
EQ:
ON when the result is 0.
Section 7-21
BCD Calculation Instructions
Example
The following example works much like that for single-word subtraction. In this
example, however, BSET(71) is required to clear the content of DM 0000 and
DM 0001 so that a negative result can be subtracted from 0 (inputting an 8-digit
constant is not possible).
TR 0
00003
CLC(41)
First
subtraction
@SUBL(55)
HR 00
220
DM 0100
25504
@BSET(71)
#0000
DM 0000
DM 0001
CLC(41)
Second
subtraction
@SUBL(55)
DM 0000
DM 0100
DM 0100
25504
HR 0100
HR 0100
Address
00000
00001
00002
00003
Turned ON to indicate
negative result.
Instruction
LD
OUT
CLC(41)
@SUBL(55)
Operands
TR
HR
DM
00004
00005
AND
@BSET(71)
#
DM
DM
00003
0
00
220
0100
25504
0000
0000
0001
Address
00006
00007
00008
00009
00010
00011
00012
Instruction
Operands
CLC(41)
@SUBL(55)
LD
LD
OR
AND LD
OUT
DM
DM
DM
TR
HR
0000
0100
0100
0
25504
0100
HR
0100
461
Section 7-21
BCD Calculation Instructions
7-21-9 DOUBLE BCD MULTIPLY – MULL(56)
Operand Data Areas
Md: First multiplicand word (BCD)
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
MULL(56)
@MULL(56)
Md
Md
Mr
Mr
R
R
Mr: First multiplier word (BCD)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
R: First result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR LR
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, MULL(56) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, MULL(56) multiplies the eight-digit content of Md and
Md+1 by the content of Mr and Mr+1, and places the result in R to R+3.
x
R+3
Flags
ER:
R+2
Md + 1
Md
Mr + 1
Mr
R+1
R
Md, Md+1,Mr, or Mr+1 is not BCD.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
ON when there is a carry in the result.
ON when the result is 0.
CY:
EQ:
7-21-10 DOUBLE BCD DIVIDE – DIVL(57)
Operand Data Areas
Dd: First dividend word (BCD)
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
DIVL(57)
@DIVL(57)
Dd
Dd
Dr
Dr
R
R
Dr: First divisor word (BCD)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
R: First result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR LR
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, DIVL(57) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, DIVL(57) the eight-digit content of Dd and D+1 is divided by the content of Dr and Dr+1 and the result is placed in R to R+3: the quotient in R and R+1, the remainder in R+2 and R+3.
Remainder
R+3
Dr+1
462
R+2
Dr
Quotient
R+1
R
Dd+1
Dd
Section 7-22
Binary Calculation Instructions
Flags
ER:
Dr and Dr+1 contain 0.
Dd, Dd+1, Dr, or Dr+1 is not BCD.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
EQ:
ON when the result is 0.
7-22 Binary Calculation Instructions
7-22-1 BINARY ADD – ADB(50)
Operand Data Areas
Au: Augend word (binary)
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
ADB(50)
@ADB(50)
Au
Au
Ad
Ad
R
R
Ad: Addend word (binary)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
R: Result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, ADB(50) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, ADB(50) adds the contents of Au, Ad, and CY, and
places the result in R. CY will be set if the result is greater than FFFF.
Au + Ad + CY
CY
R
ADB(50) can also be used to add signed binary data. With the CPM1A, CPM2A,
CPM2C, and SRM1(-V2), the underflow and overflow flags (SR 25404 and
SR 25405) indicate whether the result has exceeded the lower or upper limits of
the 16-bit signed binary data range.
Flags
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
CY:
ON when the result is greater than FFFF.
EQ:
ON when the result is 0.
OF:
ON when the result exceeds +32,767 (7FFF).
UF:
ON when the result is below –32,768 (8000).
463
Section 7-22
Binary Calculation Instructions
Example
The following example shows a four-digit addition with CY used to place either
#0000 or #0001 into R+1 to ensure that any carry is preserved.
Address
TR 0
00000
00000
00001
00002
00003
CLC(41)
ADB(50)
Instruction
LD
OUT
CLC(41)
ADB(50)
Operands
200
DM 0100
HR 10
DM
HR
=R
25504
00004
00005
MOV(21)
#0000
HR 11
AND NOT
MOV(21)
= R+1
25504
MOV(21)
#0001
HR 11
= R+1
00006
00007
00008
LD
AND
MOV(21)
00000
0
TR
200
0100
10
25504
#
HR
TR
0000
11
0
25504
#
HR
00001
11
In the case below, A6E2 + 80C5 = 127A7. The result is a 5-digit number, so CY
(SR 25504) = 1, and the content of R + 1 becomes #0001.
+
0
R+1: HR 11
0
0
1
A
Au: IR 200
6
E
2
8
Ad: DM 0100
0
C
5
2
R: HR 10
7
A
7
Note For signed binary calculations, the status of the UF and OF flags indicate whether the result has exceeded the signed binary data range (–32,768 (8000) to
+32,767 (7FFF)).
7-22-2 BINARY SUBTRACT – SBB(51)
Operand Data Areas
Mi: Minuend word (binary)
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
SBB(51)
@SBB(51)
Mi
Mi
Su
Su
R
R
Su: Subtrahend word (binary)
Limitations
464
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
R: Result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Section 7-22
Binary Calculation Instructions
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, SBB(51) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, SBB(51) subtracts the contents of Su and CY from Mi
and places the result in R. If the result is negative, CY is set and the 2’s complement of the actual result is placed in R.
Mi – Su – CY
CY
R
SBB(51) can also be used to subtract signed binary data. With the CPM1A,
CPM2A, CPM2C, and SRM1(-V2), the underflow and overflow flags (SR 25404
and SR 25405) indicate whether the result has exceeded the lower or upper limits of the 16-bit signed binary data range.
Flags
Example
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
CY:
ON when the result is negative, i.e., when Mi is less than Su plus CY.
EQ:
ON when the result is 0.
OF:
ON when the result exceeds +32,767 (7FFF).
UF:
ON when the result is below –32,768 (8000).
The following example shows a four-digit subtraction. When IR 00001 is ON, the
content of LR 00 and CY are subtracted from the content of IR 002 and the result
is written to HR 01.
CY is turned ON if the result is negative. If normal data is being used, a negative
result (signed binary) must be converted to normal data using NEG(––). Refer to
7-20-12 2’s COMPLEMENT – NEG(––) for details.
Address
00001
00000
00001
00002
00003
CLC(41)
SBB(51)
Instruction
LD
OUT
CLC(41)
SBB(51)
Operands
TR
00001
1
LR
HR
200
00
01
200
LR00
HR 01
In the case below, the content of LR 00 (#7A03) and CY are subtracted from
IR 002 (#F8C5). Since the result is positive, CY is 0.
If the result had been negative, CY would have been set to 1. For normal (unsigned) data, the result would have to be converted to its 2’s complement.
F
Mi: IR 002
8
C
5
–
7
Su: LR 00
A
0
3
–
0
7
0
0
R: HR 01
E
C
CY = 0
(from CLC(41))
0
2
Note For signed binary calculations, the status of the UF and OF flags indicate whether the result has exceeded the signed binary data range (–32,768 (8000) to
+32,767 (7FFF)).
465
Section 7-22
Binary Calculation Instructions
7-22-3 BINARY MULTIPLY – MLB(52)
Operand Data Areas
Md: Multiplicand word (binary)
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
MLB(52)
@MLB(52)
Md
Md
Mr
Mr
R
R
Mr: Multiplier word (binary)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
R: First result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR LR
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
MLB(52) cannot be used to multiply signed binary data.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, MLB(52) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, MLB(52) multiplies the content of Md by the contents
of Mr, places the rightmost four digits of the result in R, and places the leftmost
four digits in R+1.
Md
X
Mr
R +1
Flags
ER:
R
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
ON when the result is 0.
EQ:
7-22-4 BINARY DIVIDE – DVB(53)
Operand Data Areas
Dd: Dividend word (binary)
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
DVB(53)
@DVB(53)
Dd
Dd
Dr
Dr
R
R
Dr: Divisor word (binary)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
R: First result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR LR
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
DVB(53) cannot be used to divide signed binary data.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, DVB(53) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, DVB(53) divides the content of Dd by the content of
Dr and the result is placed in R and R+1: the quotient in R, the remainder in R+1.
Quotient
R
Dr
466
Dd
Remainder
R+1
Section 7-23
Special Math Instructions
Flags
ER:
Dr contains 0.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
EQ:
ON when the result is 0.
7-23 Special Math Instructions
7-23-1 DATA SEARCH – SRCH(––)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
N: Number of words
SRCH(––)
@SRCH(––)
N
N
R1
R1
C
C
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
R1: First word in range
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
C: Comparison data, result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C only.
N must be BCD between 0001 to 9999.
R1 and R1+N–1 must be in the same data area.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for C.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, SRCH(––) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, SRCH(––) searches the range of memory from R1 to
R1+N–1 for addresses that contain the comparison data in C. If one or more addresses contain the comparison data, the EQ Flag (SR 25506) is turned ON and
the lowest address containing the comparison data is identified in C+1. The address is identified differently for the DM area:
1, 2, 3...
1. For an address in the DM area, the word address is written to C+1. For example, if the lowest address containing the comparison data is DM 0114,
then #0114 is written in C+1.
2. For an address in another data area, the number of addresses from the beginning of the search is written to C+1. For example, if the lowest address
containing the comparison data is IR 114 and the first word in the search
range is IR 014, then #0100 is written in C+1.
If none of addresses in the range contain the comparison data, the EQ Flag
(SR 25506) is turned OFF and C+1 is left unchanged.
Flags
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
N is not BCD between 0001 and 9999.
R1 and R1+N–1 are not in the same data area.
EQ:
Example
ON when the comparison data has been matched in the search range.
In the following example, the 10 word range from IR 200 to IR 209 is searched
for addresses that contain the same data as DM 0100 (89AB). Since IR 204 con-
467
Section 7-23
Special Math Instructions
tains the same data, the EQ Flag (SR 25506) is turned ON and #0004 is written
to DM 0101.
00000
Address
@SRCH(––)
00000
00001
#0010
200
Instruction
Operands
LD
@SRCH(––)
00000
#
DM 0100
DM
DM 0100
89AB
IR 200
IR 201
IR 202
IR 203
IR 204
IR 205
IR 206
IR 207
IR 208
IR 209
1234
5678
ABCD
EF13
89AB
8860
90CD
00FF
89AB
810C
Offset: 0004
Offset of first word containing the search data
DM 0101
0010
0200
0100
0004
← Search data found
← Search data found
Note The matching search data in IR 208 is ignored because the search data was
found in an earlier word in the range.
7-23-2 FIND MAXIMUM – MAX(––)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
C: Control data
MAX(––)
@MAX(––)
C
C
R1
R1
D
D
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
R1: First word in range
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
D: Destination word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C only.
N must be BCD between 0001 to 9999.
R1 and R1+N–1 must be in the same data area.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for D.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, MAX(––) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, MAX(––) searches the range of memory from R1 to
R1+N–1 for the address that contains the maximum value and outputs the maximum value to the destination word (D).
The address is identified differently for the DM area:
1, 2, 3...
468
1. For an address in the DM area, the word address is written to C+1. For example, if the address containing the maximum value is DM 0114, then #0114
is written in D+1.
2. For an address in another data area, the number of addresses from the beginning of the search is written to D+1. For example, if the address containing the maximum value is IR 114 and the first word in the search range is
IR 014, then #0100 is written in D+1.
Section 7-23
Special Math Instructions
If bit 14 of C is ON and more than one address contains the same maximum value, the position of the lowest of the addresses will be output to D+1. The position
will be output as the DM address for the DM area, but as an absolute position
relative to the first word in the range for all other areas.
The number of words within the range (N) is contained in the 3 rightmost digits of
C, which must be BCD between 001 and 999.
When bit 15 of C is OFF, data within the range is treated as unsigned binary and
when it is ON the data is treated as signed binary.
15
14
13
12
11
00
C:
Number of words
in range (N: 001 to 999 BCD)
Not used – set to zero.
Not used – set to zero.
! Caution
Flags
Output address to D+1?
1 (ON): Yes.
0 (OFF): No.
If bit 14 of C is ON, values above #8000 are treated as negative numbers, so the
results will differ depending on the specified data type. Be sure that the correct
data type is specified.
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
R1 and R1+N–1 are not in the same data area.
EQ:
Example
ON when the maximum value is #0000.
When IR 00000 is ON, the control data in DM 0000 (4010) will cause a search for
the maximum value in the 10 words starting at IR 200. The largest unsigned val-
469
Section 7-23
Special Math Instructions
ue will be stored in DM 0500. The offset from the beginning of the search of the
word containing the maximum value will be stored in DM 0501.
00000
MAX(––)
DM 0000
200
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
Operands
LD
MAX(––)
00000
DM
DM 0500
DM
10 words
DM 0000
4010
IR 200
3F2A
IR 201
51C3
IR 202
E02A
IR 203
7C9F
IR 204
2A20
IR 205
A827
IR 206
2A20
IR 207
E02A
IR 208
C755
IR 209
94DC
DM 0500
E02A
DM 0501
0002
0000
200
0500
Offset of word containing maximum value: 2 words
Maximum value
Maximum value
If there are two words containing
the maximum value, the one found
first will be stored in DM 0501.
7-23-3 FIND MINIMUM – MIN(––)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
C: Control data
MIN(––)
@MIN(––)
C
C
R1
R1
D
D
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
R1: First word in range
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
D: Destination word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C only.
N must be BCD between 0001 to 9999.
R1 and R1+N–1 must be in the same data area.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for D.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, MIN(––) is not executed. When the execution condition is ON, MIN(––) searches the range of memory from R1 to R1+N–1
for the address that contains the minimum value and outputs the minimum value
to the destination word (D).
The address is identified differently for the DM area:
1, 2, 3...
470
1. For an address in the DM area, the word address is written to C+1. For example, if the address containing the minimum value is DM 0114, then #0114
is written in D+1.
Section 7-23
Special Math Instructions
2. For an address in another data area, the number of addresses from the beginning of the search is written to D+1. For example, if the address containing the minimum value is IR 114 and the first word in the search range is
IR 014, then #0100 is written in D+1.
If bit 14 of C is ON and more than one address contains the same minimum value, the position of the lowest of the addresses will be output to D+1. The position
will be output as the DM address for the DM area, but as an absolute position
relative to the first word in the range for all other areas.
The number of words within the range (N) is contained in the 3 rightmost digits of
C, which must be BCD between 001 and 999.
When bit 15 of C is OFF, data within the range is treated as unsigned binary and
when it is ON the data is treated as signed binary.
15
14
13
12
11
00
C:
Number of words
in range (N: 001 to 999 BCD)
Not used – set to zero.
Not used – set to zero.
! Caution
Flags
Output address to D+1?
1 (ON): Yes.
0 (OFF): No.
If bit 14 of C is ON, values above #8000 are treated as negative numbers, so the
results will differ depending on the specified data type. Be sure that the correct
data type is specified.
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
R1 and R1+N–1 are not in the same data area.
EQ:
Example
ON when the minimum value is #0000.
When IR 00000 is ON, the control data in DM 0300 (4010) will cause a search for
the maximum value in the 10 words starting at DM 0000. The smallest unsigned
471
Section 7-23
Special Math Instructions
value will be stored in DM 0500. The address of the word containing the minimum value (0014) will be stored in DM 0501.
00000
MIN(––)
DM 0300
DM 0000
Address
00000
00001
Instruction
LD
MIN(––)
00000
DM
DM
DM
DM 0500
DM 0300
10 words
Operands
0300
0000
0500
4010
DM0010
3F2A
DM0011
51C3
DM0012
E02A
DM0013
7C9F
DM0014
2A20
DM0015
A827
DM0016
33BF
DM0017
E02A
DM0018
2A20
DM0019
94DC
DM 0500
2A20
DM 0501
0014
Address of word containing maximum value: 0014
Minimum value
Minimum value
If there are two words containing
the minimum value, the one found
first will be stored in DM 0501.
7-23-4 AVERAGE VALUE – AVG(––)
Ladder Symbols
AVG(––)
Operand Data Areas
S: Source word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
S
N: Number of cycles
N
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
D
D: First destination word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C only.
S must be hexadecimal.
N must be BCD from #0001 to #0064.
D and D+N+1 must be in the same data area.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for S, N, or D to D+N+1.
Description
AVG(––) is used to calculate the average value of S over N cycles.
When the execution condition is OFF, AVG(––) is not executed.
Each time that AVG(––) is executed, the content of S is stored in words D+2 to
D+N+1. On the first execution, AVG(––) writes the content of S to D+2; on the
second execution it writes the content of S to D+3, etc. On the Nth execution,
AVG(––) writes the content of S is stored in D+N+1, AVG(––) calculates the average value of the values stored in D+2 to D+N+1, and writes the average to D.
472
Section 7-23
Special Math Instructions
The following diagram shows the function of words D to D+N+1.
D
D+1
D+2
D+3
Average value (after N or more executions)
Used by the system.
Content of S from the 1st execution of AVG(––)
Content of S from the 2nd execution of AVG(––)
D+N+1
Content of S from the Nth execution of AVG(––)
Precautions
The average value is calculated in binary. Be sure that the content of S is in
binary.
N must be BCD from #0001 to #0064. If the content of N ≥ #0065, AVG(––) will
operate with N=64.
The average value will be rounded off to the nearest integer value. (0.5 is
rounded up to 1.)
Set the contents of D+1 to #0000 to execute AVG(––) from the first scan.
Flags
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
One or more operands have been set incorrectly.
D and D+N+1 are not in the same data area.
Example
In the following example, the content of IR 200 is set to #0000 and then incremented by 1 each cycle. For the first two cycles, AVG(––) moves the content of
IR 200 to DM 1002 and DM 1003. On the third and later cycles AVG(––) calculates the average value of the contents of DM 1002 to DM 1004 and writes that
average value to DM 1000.
00001
@MOV(21)
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
@MOV(21)
Operands
#0000
200
00001
#
AVG(––)
200
00002
AVG(––)
#0003
#
DM
DM 1000
00003
00004
CLC(41)
0000
200
200
0003
1000
CLC(41)
ADB(50)
ADB(50)
#
200
200
0001
200
#0001
200
IR 200
DM 1000
DM 1001
DM 1002
DM 1003
DM 1004
1st cycle
0000
2nd cycle
0001
3rd cycle
0002
4th cycle
0003
1st cycle
0000
2nd cycle
0001
3rd cycle
0001
4th cycle
0002
0000
-----
0000
0001
---
0000
0001
0002
0003
0001
0002
Average
Used by the system.
Previous
values of
IR 200
473
Section 7-23
Special Math Instructions
7-23-5 SUM – SUM(––)
Operand Data Areas
Ladder Symbols
SUM(––)
@SUM(––)
C
C
R1
R1
D
D
C: Control data
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR, #
R1: First word in range
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
D: First destination word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C only.
The 3 rightmost digits of C must be BCD between 001 and 999.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for D.
If bit 14 of C is OFF (setting for BCD data), all data within the range R1 to R1+N–1
must be BCD.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, SUM(––) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, SUM(––) adds either the contents of words R1 to
R1+N–1 or the bytes in words R1 to R1+N/2–1 and outputs that value to the destination words (D and D+1). The data can be summed as binary or BCD and will
be output in the same form. Binary data can be either signed or unsigned.
The function of bits in C are shown in the following diagram and explained in
more detail below.
15
14
13
12
11
00
C:
Number of items in range (N, BCD)
Number of words or number of bytes
001 to 999
First byte (when bit 13 is ON)
1 (ON): Rightmost
0 (OFF): Leftmost
Data type
1 (ON): Binary
0 (OFF): BCD
Addition units
1 (ON): Bytes
0 (OFF): Words
Not used – set to zero.
Number of Items in Range
The number of items within the range (N) is contained in the 3 rightmost digits of
C, which must be BCD between 001 and 999. This number will indicate the number of words or the number of bytes depending the items being summed.
Addition Units
Words will be added if bit 13 is OFF and bytes will be added if bit 13 is ON.
If bytes are specified, the range can begin with the leftmost or rightmost byte of
R1. The leftmost byte of R1 will not be added if bit 12 is ON.
R1
R1+1
R1+2
R1+3
474
MSB
1
3
5
7
LSB
2
4
6
8
Section 7-24
Logic Instructions
The bytes will be added in this order when bit 12 is OFF: 1+2+3+4....
The bytes will be added in this order when bit 12 is ON: 2+3+4....
Data Type
Data within the range is treated as unsigned binary when bit 14 of C is ON and bit
15 is OFF, and it is treated as signed binary when both bits 14 and 15 are ON.
Data within the range is treated as BCD when bit 14 of C is OFF, regardless of the
status of bit 15.
Flags
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
R1 and R1+N–1 are not in the same data area.
The number of items in C is not BCD between 001 and 999.
The data being summed in not BCD when BCD was designated.
EQ:
Example
ON when the result is zero.
In the following example, the BCD contents of the 8 words from DM 0000 to
DM 0007 are added when IR 00001 is ON and the result is written to DM 0010
and DM 0011.
00001
@SUM(––)
#0008
DM 0000
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
@SUM(––)
Operands
00001
#
DM
DM
DM 0010
DM 0000
DM 0001
DM 0002
DM 0003
DM 0004
DM 0005
DM 0006
DM 0007
0001
0002
0003
0004
0005
0006
0007
0008
DM 0010
DM 0011
0008
0000
0010
0036
0000
7-24 Logic Instructions
7-24-1 COMPLEMENT – COM(29)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
COM(29)
@COM(29)
Wd
Wd
Wd: Complement word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for Wd.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, COM(29) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, COM(29) clears all ON bits and sets all OFF bits in
Wd.
475
Section 7-24
Logic Instructions
Precautions
The complement of Wd will be calculated every cycle if the undifferentiated form
of COM(29) is used. Use the differentiated form (@COM(29)) or combine
COM(29) with DIFU(13) or DIFD(14) to calculate the complement just once.
15
Example
Original
00
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
15
00
Complement 0
Flags
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
EQ:
ON when the result is 0.
7-24-2 LOGICAL AND – ANDW(34)
Operand Data Areas
Ladder Symbols
I1: Input 1
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
ANDW(34)
@ANDW(34)
I1
I1
I2
I2
R
R
I2: Input 2
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
R: Result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, ANDW(34) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, ANDW(34) logically AND’s the contents of I1 and I2
bit-by-bit and places the result in R.
15
Example
I1
1
00
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
15
I2
0
00
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
15
R
Flags
476
0
1
1
00
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
EQ:
ON when the result is 0.
Section 7-24
Logic Instructions
7-24-3 LOGICAL OR – ORW(35)
Operand Data Areas
I1: Input 1
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
ORW(35)
@ORW(35)
I1
I1
I2
I2
R
R
I2: Input 2
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
R: Result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, ORW(35) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, ORW(35) logically OR’s the contents of I1 and I2 bitby-bit and places the result in R.
15
Example
I1
1
00
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
15
I2
0
00
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
15
R
Flags
1
1
1
00
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
EQ:
ON when the result is 0.
7-24-4 EXCLUSIVE OR – XORW(36)
Operand Data Areas
I1: Input 1
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
Limitations
XORW(36)
@XORW(36)
I1
I1
I2
I2
R
R
I2: Input 2
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
R: Result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
477
Section 7-24
Logic Instructions
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, XORW(36) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, XORW(36) exclusively OR’s the contents of I1 and I2
bit-by-bit and places the result in R.
15
Example
I1
1
00
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
15
I2
0
00
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
15
R
Flags
1
1
1
00
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
EQ:
ON when the result is 0.
7-24-5 EXCLUSIVE NOR – XNRW(37)
Operand Data Areas
I1: Input 1
Ladder Symbols
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
XNRW(37)
@XNRW(37)
I1
I1
I2
I2
R
R
I2: Input 2
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
R: Result word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, XNRW(37) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, XNRW(37) exclusively NOR’s the contents of I1 and
I2 bit-by-bit and places the result in R.
15
I1
1
00
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
15
I2
0
00
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
15
R
Flags
478
0
1
1
00
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
EQ:
ON when the result is 0.
Section 7-25
Increment/Decrement Instructions
7-25 Increment/Decrement Instructions
7-25-1 BCD INCREMENT – INC(38)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
INC(38)
@INC(38)
Wd
Wd
Wd: Increment word (BCD)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for Wd.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, INC(38) is not executed. When the execution condition is ON, INC(38) increments Wd, without affecting Carry (CY).
Precautions
The content of Wd will be incremented every cycle if the undifferentiated form of
INC(38) is used. Use the differentiated form (@INC(38)) or combine INC(38)
with DIFU(13) or DIFD(14) to increment Wd just once.
Flags
ER:
Wd is not BCD
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
EQ:
ON when the incremented result is 0.
7-25-2 BCD DECREMENT – DEC(39)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
DEC(39)
@DEC(39)
Wd
Wd
Wd: Decrement word (BCD)
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for Wd.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, DEC(39) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, DEC(39) decrements Wd, without affecting CY.
DEC(39) works the same way as INC(38) except that it decrements the value
instead of incrementing it.
Precautions
The content of Wd will be decremented every cycle if the undifferentiated form of
DEC(39) is used. Use the differentiated form (@DEC(39)) or combine DEC(39)
with DIFU(13) or DIFD(14) to decrement Wd just once.
Flags
ER:
Wd is not BCD.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
EQ:
ON when the decremented result is 0.
479
Section 7-26
Subroutine Instructions
7-26 Subroutine Instructions
Subroutines break large control tasks into smaller ones and enable you to reuse
a given set of instructions. When the main program calls a subroutine, control is
transferred to the subroutine and the subroutine instructions are executed. The
instructions within a subroutine are written in the same way as main program
code. When all the subroutine instructions have been executed, control returns
to the main program to the point just after the point from which the subroutine
was entered (unless otherwise specified in the subroutine).
7-26-1 SUBROUTINE ENTER – SBS(91)
Ladder Symbol
Definer Data Areas
N: Subroutine number
SBS(91) N
000 to 049
Limitations
The subroutine number must be between 000 and 049.
Description
A subroutine can be executed by placing SBS(91) in the main program at the
point where the subroutine is desired. The subroutine number used in SBS(91)
indicates the desired subroutine. When SBS(91) is executed (i.e., when the
execution condition for it is ON), the instructions between the SBN(92) with the
same subroutine number and the first RET(93) after it are executed before
execution returns to the instruction following the SBS(91) that made the call.
Main program
SBS(91)
000
Main program
SBN(92)
000
Subroutine
RET(93)
END(01)
SBS(91) may be used as many times as desired in the program, i.e., the same
subroutine may be called from different places in the program).
480
Section 7-26
Subroutine Instructions
SBS(91) may also be placed into a subroutine to shift program execution from
one subroutine to another, i.e., subroutines may be nested. When the second
subroutine has been completed (i.e., RET(93) has been reached), program
execution returns to the original subroutine which is then completed before returning to the main program. Nesting is possible to up to sixteen levels. A subroutine cannot call itself (e.g., SBS(91) 000 cannot be programmed within the
subroutine defined with SBN(92) 000). The following diagram illustrates two levels of nesting.
SBS(91) 010
SBN(92) 010
SBN(92) 011
SBS(91) 011
SBS(91) 012
RET(93)
RET(93)
SBN(92) 012
RET(93)
The following diagram illustrates program execution flow for various execution
conditions for two SBS(91).
A
SBS(91)
000
A
B
Main
program
SBS(91)
OFF execution conditions for
subroutines 000 and 001
B
C
001
ON execution condition for
subroutine 000 only
A
C
SBN(92)
000
D
B
C
ON execution condition for
subroutine 001 only
A
B
E
C
D
Subroutines
RET(93)
SBN(92)
001
ON execution conditions for
subroutines 000 and 001
A
D
B
E
C
E
RET(93)
END(01)
Flags
ER:
A subroutine does not exist for the specified subroutine number.
A subroutine has called itself.
An active subroutine has been called.
! Caution
SBS(91) will not be executed and the subroutine will not be called when ER is
ON.
481
Section 7-26
Subroutine Instructions
7-26-2 SUBROUTINE DEFINE and RETURN – SBN(92)/RET(93)
Ladder Symbols
SBN(92) N
Definer Data Areas
N: Subroutine number
000 to 049
RET(93)
Limitations
The subroutine number must be between 000 and 049.
Each subroutine number can be used in SBN(92) once only.
Description
SBN(92) is used to mark the beginning of a subroutine program; RET(93) is
used to mark the end. Each subroutine is identified with a subroutine number, N,
that is programmed as a definer for SBN(92). This same subroutine number is
used in any SBS(91) that calls the subroutine (see 7-26-1 SUBROUTINE ENTER – SBS(91)). No subroutine number is required with RET(93).
All subroutines must be programmed at the end of the main program. When one
or more subroutines have been programmed, the main program will be
executed up to the first SBN(92) before returning to address 00000 for the next
cycle. Subroutines will not be executed unless called by SBS(91).
END(01) must be placed at the end of the last subroutine program, i.e., after the
last RET(93). It is not required at any other point in the program.
Precautions
If SBN(92) is mistakenly placed in the main program, it will inhibit program
execution past that point, i.e., program execution will return to the beginning
when SBN(92) is encountered.
If either DIFU(13) or DIFU(14) is placed within a subroutine, the operand bit will
not be turned OFF until the next time the subroutine is executed, i.e., the operand bit may stay ON longer than one cycle.
Flags
There are no flags directly affected by these instructions.
7-26-3 MACRO – MCRO(99)
Operand Data Areas
N: Subroutine number
Ladder Symbols
000 to 127
MCRO(99)
@MCRO(99)
N
N
I1
I1
O1
O1
I1: First input word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
O1: First output word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
The subroutine number must be between 000 and 049.
If a DM address is used for O1, O1 through O1+3 must be read/write DM.
Description
The MACRO instruction allows a single subroutine to replace several subroutines that have identical structure but different operands. There are 4 input
words (SR 232 to SR 235) and 4 output words (SR 236 to SR 239), allocated to
MCRO(99). These 8 words are used in the subroutine and take their contents
from I1 to I1+3 and O1 to O1+3 when the subroutine is executed.
When the execution condition is OFF, MCRO(99) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, MCRO(99) copies the contents of I1 to I1+3 to SR 232
to SR 235, and then calls and executes the subroutine specified in N. When the
subroutine is completed, the contents of SR 236 through SR 239 are then transferred back to O1 to O1+3 before MCRO(99) is completed.
482
Section 7-27
Pulse Output Instructions
Note Refer to page 153 for more details on MCRO(99).
Example
In this example, the contents of DM 0010 through DM 0013 are copied to SR 232
through SR 235, and then subroutine 10 is called and executed. When the subroutine is completed, the contents of SR 236 through SR 239 are copied to output words DM 0020 to DM 0023.
Main program
MCRO(99)
010
DM 0010
DM 0020
Main program
SBN(92)
010
Subroutine
RET(93)
END(01)
Flags
ER:
A subroutine does not exist for the specified subroutine number.
An operand has exceeded a data area boundary.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
A subroutine has called itself.
An active subroutine has been called.
7-27 Pulse Output Instructions
7-27-1 SET PULSES – PULS(65)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
P: Port specifier
PULS(65)
@PULS(65)
P
P
C
C
N
N
000 or 010
C: Control data
000 or 001
N: Number of pulses
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
This instruction is supported by the CPM1A and CPM2A/CPM2C PCs with
transistor outputs only.
N and N+1 must be in the same data area.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for N.
483
Section 7-27
Pulse Output Instructions
Description
PULS(65) is used to set the number of pulses for pulse outputs that are started
later in the program using SPED(64) or ACC(––). The number of pulses set with
PULS(65) are output in independent mode.
The number of pulses cannot be changed while pulses are being output. In general, PULS(65) should be executed just once each time that the number of
pulses needs to be set; use the differentiated variation (@PULS(65)) or an input
condition that is ON for just one cycle.
Note Refer to 2-5 Pulse Output Functions for more details.
Port Specifier (P)
The port specifier indicates the pulse output location. The parameters set by the
in C and N will apply to the next SPED(64) or ACC(––) instruction in which the
same port output location is specified.
P
Pulse output location(s)
000 Single-phase pulse output 0 without acceleration or deceleration (output
01000) or single-phase pulse output 0 with trapezoidal acceleration and deceleration (outputs 01000 and 01001)
010 Single-phase pulse output 1 without acceleration or deceleration (output
01001)
This setting is supported by CPM2A/CPM2C PCs only.
Control Data (C)
The control data determines the type of pulses (relative or absolute).
C
Pulse type
000 Relative pulse specification
001 Absolute pulse specification (Valid only when the absolute coordinate system
is being used.)
This setting is supported by CPM2A/CPM2C PCs only.
Number of Output Pulses (N+1 and N)
N+1 and N contain the 8-digit BCD number of output pulses setting for independent mode pulse outputs. The number of output pulses can be –16,777,215 to
16,777,215. Bit 15 of N+1 acts as a sign bit; the number is negative if bit 15 is ON,
positive if it is OFF.
Positive: 0 to +16,777,215 (0000 0000 to 1677 7215)
Negative: –16,777,215 to 0 (9677 7215 to 8000 0000)
N+1 contains the leftmost 4 digits and N contains the rightmost 4 digits.
Number of Movement
Pulses
The number of movement pulses depends upon the number of output pulses
(N+1 and N) and the pulse type (C).
Coordinate
system
Relative
Absolute
Movement pulses
Number of movement pulses = Number of output pulses
Pulse type: Relative (C=000)
Number of movement pulses = Number of output pulses
Pulse type: Absolute (C=001, CPM2A/CPM2C only)
Number of movement pulses = Number of output pulses – PV
After PULS(65) has been executed, the calculated number of movement pulses
will not be changed even if INI(61) is executed to change the pulse output PV.
A specification that causes movement outside of the allowed PV range
(–16,777,215 to 16,777,215) can be specified without problems.
PULS(65) will not be executed and an error will occur (SR 25503 ON) if the calculated number of movement pulses is 0.
When the pulse output is operating in independent mode without acceleration or
deceleration and the number of movement pulses is negative, the absolute val-
484
Section 7-27
Pulse Output Instructions
ue of the number of movement pulses will be used. (For example, if the number
of movement pulses is –500, a value of 500 will be used.)
Flags
ER:
A data area boundary is exceeded.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
P is not 000 or 010.
C is not 000 or 001. (C cannot be set to 001 when relative coordinates
are being used.)
The number of output pulses is not between –16,777,215 and
16,777,215.
PULS(65) is executed in an interrupt subroutine while a pulse I/O or
high-speed counter instruction (INI(61), PRV(62), CTBL(63),
SPED(64), PULS(65), ACC(––), PWM(––), or SYNC(––)) is being
executed in the main program.
After PULS(65) is executed, the absolute value of the number of movement pulses is not between 1 and 16,777,215.
7-27-2 SPEED OUTPUT– SPED(64)
Operand Data Areas
Ladder Symbols
P: Port specifier
SPED(64)
@SPED(64)
P
P
M
M
F
F
001 or 010
M: Output mode
000 or 001
F: Target frequency
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR, #
Limitations
This instruction is supported by the CPM1A and CPM2A/CPM2C PCs with
transistor outputs only.
In the CPM1A: F must be BCD, #0000 or #0002 to #0200.
In the CPM2A/CPM2C: F must be BCD, #0000 or #0001 to #1000.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for F.
Description
SPED(64) is used to set the output pulse frequency and start the pulse output
from the specified output bit. When the execution condition is OFF, SPED(64) is
not executed. When the execution condition is ON, SPED(64) sets the pulse frequency F for the output bit specified by P. M determines the output mode.
In general, SPED(64) should be executed just once each time that the frequency
needs to be set; use the differentiated variation (@SPED(64)) or an input condition that is ON for just one cycle.
Note Refer to 2-5 Pulse Output Functions for more details.
Port Specifier (P)
The port specifier indicates the output bit where the pulses will be output.
P
Pulse output location(s)
000 Single-phase pulse output 0 without acceleration or deceleration (output
01000)
010 Single-phase pulse output 1 without acceleration or deceleration (output
01001)
This setting is supported by CPM2A/CPM2C PCs only.
485
Section 7-27
Pulse Output Instructions
Output Mode (M)
The value of M determines the output mode.
M
Pulse type
000 Independent mode
001 Continuous mode
Operation in independent mode and continuous mode is described below.
Target Frequency (F)
The 4-digit BCD value of F sets the pulse frequency in units of 10 Hz, as shown
below. Setting F to 0000 will stop the pulse output from the specified output bit.
PC
General Operation
Possible values of F
CPM1A
0000 (stops pulse output) or 0002 to 0200 (20 Hz to 2 kHz)
CPM2A/CPM2C
0000 (stops pulse output) or 0001 to 1000 (10 Hz to 10 kHz)
The pulse output started by SPED(64) will continue until one of the following occurs:
1, 2, 3...
1. The INI(61) instruction is executed with C=003.
2. In independent mode, the number of output pulses specified by PULS(65) is
reached. (Execute PULS(65) before SPED(64).)
3. SPED(64) is executed again with the target frequency, F, set to #0000.
4. The PC is switched to PROGRAM mode.
Pulses can be output simultaneously and independently from two output bits.
When outputting pulses in independent mode, specify the number of pulses beforehand by executing PULS(65). The number of output pulses must be specified again with PULS(65) each time that the pulse output has been stopped.
The frequency cannot be changed with SPED(64) when pulses are already being output from the specified output bit by ACC(––) or PWM(––). An error will
occur and SR 25503 will be turned ON if SPED(64) is executed under these circumstances.
Operation in Independent
Mode
In independent mode, just the number of output pulses set by PULS(65) will be
output. The number of output pulses must be specified by executing PULS(65)
before executing SPED(64). (Pulses won’t be output if the number of output
pulses has not been specified in advance.)
When the calculated number of movement pulses is negative, the absolute value of the number of movement pulses will be used. (For example, if the number
of movement pulses is –500, a value of 500 will be used.)
Pulse frequency
Time
486
Section 7-27
Pulse Output Instructions
In continuous mode, pulses will be output indefinitely until stopped by executing
INI(61) with C=003, executing SPED(64) again with F=0000, or switching the
PC to PROGRAM mode.
Operation in Continuous
Mode
Pulse frequency
Time
Flags
ER:
A data area boundary is exceeded.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
P is not 000 or 010, M is not 000 or 001, or F is not 0000 to 1000.
SPED(64) is executed in an interrupt subroutine while a pulse I/O or
high-speed counter instruction (INI(61), PRV(62), CTBL(63),
SPED(64), PULS(65), ACC(––), PWM(––), or SYNC(––)) is being
executed in the main program.
7-27-3 ACCELERATION CONTROL – ACC(––)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
P: Port specifier
ACC(––)
@ACC(––)
P
P
M
M
C
C
000
M: Mode specifier
000, 002, or 010 to 013
C: First control word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C only.
P must be 001 or 002 and M must be 000 to 003.
C to C+3 must be in the same data area.
Description
ACC(––) is used to specify the acceleration/deceleration rate and start the pulse
output for a pulse output with trapezoidal acceleration and deceleration.
In general, ACC(––) should be executed just once each time that the acceleration/deceleration rate needs to be set; use the differentiated variation
(@ACC(––)) or an input condition that is ON for just one cycle.
Note Refer to 2-5 Pulse Output Functions for more details.
Port Specifier (P)
Always set the port specifier to 000. The 000 setting specifies single-phase
pulse output 0 with trapezoidal acceleration and deceleration.
487
Section 7-27
Pulse Output Instructions
Mode Specifier (M)
The value of M determines the output mode.
M
Mode
Note
000 Independent mode and up/down pulse output mode
---
002 Independent mode and pulse + direction output mode
--CW: Clockwise
010
011
012
013
CW (continuous mode and up/down pulse output mode)
CCW (continuous mode and up/down pulse output mode)
CW (continuous mode and pulse + direction output mode)
CCW (continuous mode and pulse + direction output mode)
CCW: CounterCounter
clockwise
In independent mode, the output direction is set when PULS(65) is executed.
Control Words (C, C+1, and C+2)
The 3 control words indicate the acceleration rate, target frequency, and deceleration rate. (Each frequency is set in multiples of 10 Hz.)
Word
Function
C
The content of C determines the acceleration rate.
During acceleration, the output frequency is increased by the amount set in
C every 10 ms. C must be BCD from 0001 to 1000 (10 Hz to 10 kHz).
C+1
The content of C+1 specifies the target frequency.
C+1 must be BCD from 0001 to 1000 (10 Hz to 10 kHz).
The content of C+2 determines the deceleration rate.
During deceleration, the output frequency is decreased by the amount set
in C+2 every 10 ms. C must be BCD from 0001 to 1000 (10 Hz to 10 kHz).
C+2
Two output bits are required for pulse outputs controlled by ACC(––).
General Operation
Up/down pulse output mode
IR 01000 (CW operation)
IR 01001 (CCW operation)
Pulse + direction output mode
IR 01000 (Pulse output)
IR 01001 (Direction specifier)
The pulse output will start when ACC(––) is executed and the output frequency
will be increased every 10 ms by amount specified in control word C. When the
target frequency (specified in C+1) is reached, acceleration is stopped and the
pulse output continues at a constant frequency.
When the pulse output is operating with trapezoidal acceleration and deceleration, the pulse output can be stopped by one of the following methods.
1, 2, 3...
1. Execute the INI(61) instruction with C=003. (Immediate stop)
2. In independent mode, the number of output pulses specified by PULS(65) is
reached. (Decelerates to a stop.)
3. ACC(––) is executed with the target frequency (in C+1) set to 0000.
a) When pulses are being output in independent mode, the output will decelerate to a stop at the deceleration rate set when the pulse output was
started.
b) When pulses are being output in continuous mode, the output will decelerate to a stop at the specified deceleration rate.
4. Switch the PC to PROGRAM mode. (Immediate stop)
488
Section 7-27
Pulse Output Instructions
Operation in Independent
Mode
In independent mode, just the number of output pulses set by PULS(65) will be
output. The number of output pulses must be specified by executing PULS(65)
before executing ACC(––). (Pulses won’t be output if the number of output
pulses has not been specified in advance.)
Pulse frequency
Time
The number of output pulses must be specified again with PULS(65) each time
that the pulse output has been stopped.
In independent mode, the pulse output will begin decelerating at the point determined by the preset number of output pulses and the acceleration/deceleration
rates. The pulse output will stop when the preset number of output pulses has
been output.
Pulse frequency
Time
(The number of output pulses is always accurately output.)
If the number of output pulses required for acceleration and deceleration (the
time to reach the target frequency × the target frequency) exceeds the preset
number of pulses, the acceleration and deceleration will be cut short and the
pulse output will be triangular rather than trapezoidal.
Pulse frequency
Time
(The number of output pulses is always accurately output.)
If a high acceleration/deceleration rate and a low number of output pulses are
set, there will be effectively no acceleration and deceleration. (The pulse output
will operate at a constant speed.)
If the (target frequency ÷ acceleration/deceleration rate) is not an integer value,
the specified acceleration/deceleration rates will be increased or decreased. In
the following example, the acceleration and deceleration are 10-ms long, (1) is
the acceleration/deceleration rate, and (2) is the target frequency.
Pulse frequency
Time
10 ms
10 ms
489
Section 7-27
Pulse Output Instructions
Operation in Continuous
Mode
In continuous mode, pulses will be output indefinitely until stopped by executing
INI(61) with C=003, executing ACC(––) again with the target frequency (in C+1)
set to 0000, or switching the PC to PROGRAM mode.
Pulse frequency
Time
The following conditions apply when ACC(––) is executed while pulses are already being output with trapezoidal acceleration/deceleration.
• ACC(––) will have no effect if it is executed when the pulse output is accelerating or decelerating.
• When ACC(––) is executed while pulses are being output in continuous mode,
the frequency can be changed to a new target frequency (0001 to 1000: 10 Hz
to 10 kHz) with the set acceleration/deceleration rates.
• If pulses are being output in independent mode, the pulse output can be decelerated to a stop while by executing ACC(––) with the target frequency (in C+1)
set to 0000. The acceleration/deceleration rates and number of output pulses
won’t be checked or changed.
• ACC(––) will have no effect if it is executed when pulses are being output by
one of the following instructions. (The pulse output will continue unchanged.)
Pulses being output from output 01000 by SPED(64).
Pulses being output from output 01001 by SPED(64).
Pulses being output from output 01000 by PWM(––).
Pulses being output from output 01001 by PWM(––).
Note Be sure to check the status of the pulse output before executing ACC(––).
Flags
ER:
A data area boundary is exceeded.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
P is not 000.
M is not 000, 002, or 010 to 013. (The mode specifier is read only when
starting the pulse output.)
ACC(––) is executed for a bit from which pulses are already being output by PWM(––) or SPED(64).
ACC(––) is executed in an interrupt subroutine while a pulse I/O or highspeed counter instruction (INI(61), PRV(62), CTBL(63), SPED(64),
PULS(65), ACC(––), PWM(––), or SYNC(––)) is being executed in the
main program.
7-27-4 PULSE WITH VARIABLE DUTY RATIO – PWM(––)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
P: Port specifier
PWM(––)
@PWM(––)
P
P
F
F
D
D
000 or 010
F: Frequency
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR, #
D: Duty ratio
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR, #
490
Section 7-27
Pulse Output Instructions
Limitations
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C only.
P must be 000 or 010, F must be BCD between 0001 and 9999, and D must be
BCD between 0001 and 0100.
Description
PWM(––) is used to output pulses with the specified duty ratio from the specified
output bit. The pulse output continues until PWM(––) is executed again with a
different duty ratio, INI(61) is executed with C=003, or the PC is switched to
PROGRAM mode.
In general, PWM(––) should be executed just once to start the pulse output; use
the differentiated variation (@PWM(––)) or an input condition that is ON for just
one cycle.
Variable duty-ratio pulses can be output simultaneously and independently from
two output bits.
When variable duty-ratio pulses are being output from an output bit and
PWM(––) is executed for that bit again with a different duty ratio, pulses will continue being output with the new duty ratio. The frequency cannot be changed.
PWM(––) cannot be executed for an output bit if pulses are already being output
from that bit by SPED(64) or ACC(––). An error will occur and SR 25503 will be
turned ON if PWM(––) is executed under these circumstances.
Note Refer to 2-5 Pulse Output Functions for more details.
Port Specifier (P)
The port specifier indicates the output bit where the pulses will be output.
P
Pulse output location(s)
000 Variable duty-ratio pulse output 0 (output 01000)
010 Variable duty-ratio pulse output 1 (output 01001)
Frequency (F)
The 4-digit BCD value of F sets the pulse frequency in units of 0.1 Hz. The frequency can be set between 0001 and 9999 (0.1 to 999.9 Hz).
Duty Ratio (D)
The 4-digit BCD value of D specifies the duty ratio of the pulse output, i.e., the
percentage of time that the output is ON. The duty ratio can be set between 0001
and 0100 (1% to 100%). The duty ratio is 75% in the following diagram.
ton
t on
+ D (1% to 100%)
T
T
Flags
ER:
A data area boundary is exceeded.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
P is not 000 or 010, F is not BCD between 0001 and 9999, or D is not
BCD between 0001 and 0100. (The frequency setting in F is read only
when starting the pulse output.)
ACC(––) is executed for a bit from which pulses are already being output by ACC(––) or SPED(64).
PWM(––) is executed in an interrupt subroutine while a pulse I/O or
high-speed counter instruction (INI(61), PRV(62), CTBL(63),
SPED(64), PULS(65), ACC(––), PWM(––), or SYNC(––)) is being
executed in the main program.
491
Section 7-27
Pulse Output Instructions
7-27-5 SYNCHRONIZED PULSE CONTROL – SYNC(––)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
P1: Input port specifier
SYNC(––)
@SYNC(––)
P1
P1
P2
P2
C
C
000
P2: Output port specifier
000 or 010
C: Scaling factor
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR, #
Limitations
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C only.
P1 must be 000 and P2 must be 000 or 010.
Description
SYNC(––) takes the frequency of the input pulse received through the highspeed counter inputs, multiplies it by a fixed scaling factor, and outputs pulses
from the specified output bit at the resulting frequency.
Output frequency = Input frequency × Scaling factor/100
In general, SYNC(––) should be executed just once each time that synchronized
pulse output control needs to be set; use the differentiated variation
(@SYNC(––)) or an input condition that is ON for just one cycle.
Note Refer to 2-5 Pulse Output Functions for more details.
Input Port Specifier (P1)
Always set P1 to 000.
Output Port Specifier (P2)
The value of P2 determines where the scaled pulse frequency is output.
P2
Pulse output location(s)
000 Synchronized pulse output 0 (output 01000)
010 Synchronized pulse output 1 (output 01001)
Scaling Factor (C)
The 4-digit BCD value of C sets the scaling factor by which the input frequency is
multiplied. The scaling factor can be set between 0001 and 1000 (1 to 1,000%).
PC Setup Settings and
General Operation
The counter input mode for inputs 00000 and 00001 is set in bits 00 to 03 of
DM 6642.
DM 6642 bits 00 to 03
High-speed counter setting
0
Differential phase mode (5 kHz)
1
Pulse + direction input mode (20 kHz)
2
Up/down input mode (20 kHz)
4
Increment mode (20 kHz)
Input Frequency Range
The input frequency range for the synchronized pulse control is set in bits 08 to
15 of DM 6642, as shown in the following table.
DM 6642 bits 08 to 15
Function of inputs 00000 and 00001
02
Use for synchronized pulse control (10 to 500 Hz)
03
Use for synchronized pulse control (20 Hz to 1 kHz).
04
Use for synchronized pulse control (300 Hz to 20 kHz).
Synchronized pulse control cannot be executed unless inputs 00000 to 00003
are set for synchronized pulse control in bits 08 to 15 (settings 02, 03, and 04).
An error will occur and SR 25503 will be turned ON if SYNC(––) is executed but
DM 6642 is not set for synchronized pulse control.
492
Section 7-28
Special Instructions
The high-speed counter function and pulse output functions cannot be used while synchronized pulse control is in operation. An error will occur and SR 25503
will be turned ON if a related pulse output instruction is executed to use one of
these functions while synchronized pulse control is being performed.
If the input frequency exceeds the maximum in the table above, the maximum
input frequency for that range will be used. If the input frequency falls below the
minimum, an input frequency of 0 Hz will be used.
Output Frequency Range
The output frequency range is 10 Hz to 10 kHz. If the calculated output frequency (input frequency × scaling factor/100) exceeds 10 kHz, pulses will be output at
10 kHz. If the calculated output frequency falls below 10 Hz, pulses will not be
output (0 Hz).
Changing the Scaling Factor or Output Port
The scaling factor can be changed while synchronized pulse control is in operation by executing SYNC(––) again with a different scaling factor, but the output
port specifier cannot be changed during operation.
Stopping the Synchronized Pulse Control Output
The synchronized pulse output can be stopped by executing INI(61) with C=005
or switching the PC to PROGRAM mode.
Flags
ER:
A data area boundary is exceeded.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
P1 is not 000, P2 is not 000 or 010, or C is not BCD between 0001 and
1000.
SYNC(––) is executed when bits 08 to 15 of DM 6642 are not set for
synchronized pulse control.
SYNC(––) is executed in an interrupt subroutine while a pulse I/O or
high-speed counter instruction (INI(61), PRV(62), CTBL(63),
SPED(64), PULS(65), ACC(––), PWM(––), or SYNC(––)) is being
executed in the main program.
7-28 Special Instructions
7-28-1 MESSAGE DISPLAY – MSG(46)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
MSG(46)
@MSG(46)
FM
FM
FM: First message word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
DM 6649 to DM 6655 cannot be used for FM.
Description
When executed with an ON execution condition, MSG(46) reads eight words of
extended ASCII code from FM to FM+7 and displays the message on the Programming Console. The displayed message can be up to 16 characters long,
i.e., each ASCII character code requires eight bits (two digits). Refer to Appendix G for the ASCII codes. Japanese katakana characters are included in this
code.
If not all eight words are required for the message, it can be stopped at any point
by inputting “OD.” When OD is encountered in a message, no more words will be
read and the words that normally would be used for the message can be used for
other purposes.
493
Section 7-28
Special Instructions
Message Buffering and
Priority
Up to three messages can be buffered in memory. Once stored in the buffer, they
are displayed on a first in, first out basis. Since it is possible that more than three
MSG(46)s may be executed within a single cycle, there is a priority scheme,
based on the area where the messages are stored, for the selection of those
messages to be buffered.
The priority of the data areas is as follows for message display:
LR > IR > HR > AR > TC > DM
In handling messages from the same area, those with the lowest address values have higher priority.
In handling indirectly addressed messages (i.e. *DM), those with the
lowest final DM addresses have higher priority.
Clearing Messages
To clear a message, execute FAL(06) 00 or clear it via a Programming Console
or the Support Software.
If the message data changes while the message is being displayed, the display
will also change.
Flags
ER:
Example
The following example shows the display that would be produced for the instruction and data given when 00000 was ON. If 00001 goes ON, a message will be
cleared.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
00000
Address
Instruction
Operands
MSG(46)
DM 0010
00001
00000
00001
LD
MSG(46)
00002
00003
LD
FAL(06)
DM
FAL(06) 00
DM contents
DM 0010
4
1
4
2
ASCII
equivalent
A
B
DM 0011
4
3
4
4
C
D
DM 0012
4
5
4
6
E
F
DM 0013
4
7
4
8
G
H
DM 0014
4
9
4
A
I
J
DM 0015
4
B
4
C
K
L
DM 0016
4
D
4
E
M
N
DM 0017
4
F
5
0
O
P
00000
MSG
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOP
7-28-2 I/O REFRESH – IORF(97)
Ladder Symbol
Operand Data Areas
St: Starting word
IORF(97)
IR 000 to IR 019
St
E: End word
E
IR 000 to IR 019
Note This instruction is not supported by SRM1(-V2) PCs.
Limitations
494
St must be less than or equal to E.
0010
00001
00
Section 7-28
Special Instructions
Description
To refresh I/O words, specify the first (St) and last (E) I/O words to be refreshed.
When the execution condition for IORF(97) is ON, all words between St and E
will be refreshed. This will be in addition to the normal I/O refresh performed during the CPU Unit’s cycle.
(If St>E, IORF(97) will be treated as NOP(00).)
Normally, I/O refreshing is performed just once each cycle at the end of program
execution, but IORF(97) can be used to refresh I/O words immediately during
program execution.
! Caution
Flags
Although IORF(97) can be used in interrupt subroutines, you must be careful of
the interval between IORF(97) executions. If IORF(97) is executed to frequently,
a fatal system error may occur (FALS 9F), stopping operation. The interval between executions of IORF(97) should be at least 1.3 ms + total execution time of
the interrupt subroutine.
ER:
St or E is not within the allowed range (IR 000 to IR 019).
St is greater than E. (If St>E, IORF(97) will be treated as NOP(00).)
Flags
There are no flags affected by this instruction.
7-28-3 BIT COUNTER – BCNT(67)
Operand Data Areas
Ladder Symbols
N: Number of words (BCD)
BCNT(67)
@BCNT(67)
N
N
SB
SB
R
R
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
SB: Source beginning word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
R: Destination word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
Note BCNT(67) is an expansion instruction in the CPM2A/CPM2C and SRM1(-V2).
The function code 67 is the factory setting and can be changed for if desired.
Limitations
N cannot be 0.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for R.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, BCNT(67) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, BCNT(67) counts the total number of bits that are ON
in all words between SB and SB+(N–1) and places the result in R.
Flags
ER:
N is not BCD, or N is 0; SB and SB+(N–1) are not in the same area.
A DM address is used for SB, but SB through SB+(N–1) are not all in
read/write DM.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
EQ:
ON when the result is 0.
495
Section 7-28
Special Instructions
7-28-4 FRAME CHECKSUM – FCS(––)
Operand Data Areas
Ladder Symbols
FCS(––)
@FCS(––)
C
C
R1
R1
D
D
C: Control data
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR, #
R1: First word in range
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
D: First destination word
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR
Limitations
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C/SRM1(-V2) only.
The 3 rightmost digits of C must be BCD between 001 and 999.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for D.
Description
FCS(––) can be used to check for errors when transferring data through communications ports.
When the execution condition is OFF, FCS(––) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, FCS(––) calculates the frame checksum of the specified range by exclusively ORing either the contents of words R1 to R1+N–1 or the
bytes in words R1 to R1+N–1. The frame checksum value (hexadecimal) is then
converted to ASCII and output to the destination words (D and D+1).
The function of bits in C are shown in the following diagram and explained in
more detail below.
15
14
13
12
11
00
C:
Number of items in range (N, BCD)
001 to 999 words or bytes
First byte (when bit 13 is ON)
1 (ON): Rightmost
0 (OFF): Leftmost
Not used. Set to zero.
Calculation units
1 (ON): Bytes
0 (OFF): Words
Number of Items in Range
The number of items within the range (N) is contained in the 3 rightmost digits of
C, which must be BCD between 001 and 999.
Calculation Units
The frame checksum of words will be calculated if bit 13 is OFF and the frame
checksum of bytes will be calculated if bit 13 is ON.
If bytes are specified, the range can begin with the leftmost or rightmost byte of
R1. The leftmost byte of R1 will not be included if bit 12 is ON.
R1
R1+1
R1+2
R1+3
MSB
1
3
5
7
LSB
2
4
6
8
When bit 12 is OFF the bytes will be ORed in this order: 1, 2, 3, 4, ....
When bit 12 is ON the bytes will be ORed in this order: 2, 3, 4, 5, ....
Conversion to ASCII
496
The byte frame checksum calculation yields a 2-digit hexadecimal value which is
converted to its 4-digit ASCII equivalent. The word frame checksum calculation
Section 7-29
Interrupt Control Instructions
yields a 4-digit hexadecimal value which is converted to its 8-digit ASCII equivalent, as shown below.
Byte frame checksum value
Word frame checksum value
4A
F10B
3 4 4 1
D
D
4 6 3 1
D+1
3 0 4 2
Flags
ER:
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
The number of items is not 001 to 999 BCD.
Example
When IR 00000 is ON in the following example, the frame checksum (0008) is
calculated for the 8 words from DM 0000 to DM 0007 and the ASCII equivalent
(30 30 30 38) is written to DM 0010 and DM 0011.
00000
@FCS(––)
#0008
DM 0000
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
@FCS(––)
Operands
00000
#
DM
DM
DM 0010
DM 0000
DM 0001
DM 0002
DM 0003
DM 0004
DM 0005
DM 0006
DM 0007
0008
0000
0010
FCS
calculation
0001
0002
0003
0004
0005
0006
0007
0008
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
0
0
0
8
ASCII code
conversion
DM 0010 3 0 3 0
DM 0011 3 0 3 8
7-29 Interrupt Control Instructions
This section describes the operation of INT(89) and STIM(69). For general information on interrupt processing in CPM1/CPM1A, CPM2A/CPM2C, or
SRM1(-V2) PCs refer to the section shown in the following table.
PC
Reference
CPM1/CPM1A
See 2-3 CPM1/CPM1A Interrupt Functions.
CPM2A/CPM2C
See 2-1 CPM2A/CPM2C Interrupt Functions.
SRM1(-V2)
See 2-4 SRM1 Interrupt Functions.
7-29-1 INTERRUPT CONTROL – INT(89)
Operand Data Areas
C1: Control code
Ladder Symbols
# (000 to 004, 100, or 200)
INT(89)
@INT(89)
C1
C1
000
000
C2
C2
000: No function
000
C2: Control data
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
497
Section 7-29
Interrupt Control Instructions
Note This instruction is not supported by SRM1(-V2) PCs.
Limitations
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for C2 when C1=002.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, INT(89) is not executed. When the execution condition is ON, INT(89) is used to control interrupts and performs one of the
seven functions shown in the following table depending on the value of C1.
C1
INT(89) function
000
Mask/unmask interrupt inputs
001
Clear interrupt inputs
002
Read current mask status of interrupt inputs
003
Restart decrementing counter and unmask interrupt
004*
Restart incrementing counter and unmask interrupt
100
Mask all interrupts
200
Unmask all interrupts
Note *This setting can be used in CPM2A/CPM2C PCs only.
Mask/Unmask Interrupt
Inputs (C1=000)
This function is used to mask and unmask interrupt inputs 00003 to 00006.
Masked inputs are recorded, but ignored. When an input is masked, the interrupt
program for it will be run as soon as the bit is unmasked (unless it is cleared beforehand by executing INT(89) with C1=001).
Set the corresponding bit in C2 to 0 or 1 to unmask or mask an interrupt input.
Bits 00 to 03 correspond to 00003 to 00006. Bits 04 to 15 should be set to 0.
Word C2 bits: 3 2 1 0
Interrupt input 00003 (0: unmask, 1: mask)
Interrupt input 00004 (0: unmask, 1: mask)
Interrupt input 00005 (0: unmask, 1: mask)
Interrupt input 00006 (0: unmask, 1: mask)
All of the interrupt inputs are masked at the start of PC operation, so the inputs
must be unmasked in order to be used.
Clear Interrupt Inputs
(C1=001)
This function is used to clear interrupt inputs 00003 to 00006. Since interrupt inputs are recorded, masked interrupts will be serviced as soon as the mask is removed unless they are cleared first.
Set the corresponding bit in C2 to 1 to clear an I/O interrupt input. Bits 00 to 03
correspond to 00003 to 00006. Bits 04 to 15 should be set to 0.
Word C2 bits: 3 2 1 0
Interrupt input 00003 (0: Do not clear, 1: clear)
Interrupt input 00004 (0: Do not clear, 1: clear)
Interrupt input 00005 (0: Do not clear, 1: clear)
Interrupt input 00006 (0: Do not clear, 1: clear)
Read Current Mask Status
(C1=002)
This function reads the current mask status for interrupt inputs 00003 to 00006
and writes that information to word C2. The corresponding bit will be ON if the
input is masked. (Bits 00 to 03 correspond to 00003 to 00006.)
Word C2 bits: 3 2 1 0
Interrupt input 00003 (0: not masked, 1: masked)
Interrupt input 00004 (0: not masked, 1: masked)
Interrupt input 00005 (0: not masked, 1: masked)
Interrupt input 00006 (0: not masked, 1: masked)
Restart Counter and
Unmask Interrupt
(C1=003 or C1=004)
498
These functions are used to restart interrupt inputs (counter mode) by refreshing
the counter SV (in SR 240 to SR 243) and unmasking the interrupt input (00003
to 00006).
Section 7-29
Interrupt Control Instructions
Set C1=3 to restart decrementing counters or C1=4 (CPM2A/CPM2C PCs only)
to restart incrementing counters.
Set the corresponding bit in C2 to 0 to refresh the input’s counter SV and unmask
the interrupt. (Bits 00 to 03 correspond to 00003 to 00006.)
Word C2 bits: 3 2 1 0
Interrupt input 00003 counter
Interrupt input 00004 counter
Interrupt input 00005 counter
Interrupt input 00006 counter
Use the differentiated variation (@INT(89)) or an input condition that is ON for
just one cycle when executing INT(89) with C1=003 or C1=004. The counter PV
will be reset to the SV if INT(89) is executed while the counter is operating, so the
interrupt will never be generated if INT(89) is executed every cycle.
When INT(89) is executed with C1=003 or C1=004 and the SV word contains a
non-zero SV (0001 to FFFF), the corresponding counter will begin operating
(decrementing or incrementing) and the corresponding interrupt will be enabled
in counter mode. When the count reaches the SV, an interrupt will be generated
and the PV will be returned to the SV, so interrupts will be generated repeatedly
until the counter is stopped.
Writing 0000 to a counter’s SV word (SR 240 to SR 243) and executing INT(89)
to refresh the SV will stop the counter and disable the corresponding interrupt.
To restart the counter, write the non-zero SV to its SV word and execute INT(89).
(The SV words are reset to 0000 at the start of operation, so the counter’s SV
must be written to its SV word from the ladder program.)
When an interrupt has already been enabled (unmasked), the SV cannot be refreshed just by writing a new value to the SV word. Refresh the SV by executing
INT(89) with C1=003 (C1=004 for an incrementing counter).
A counter mode interrupt can be masked by executing INT(89) with C1=000 and
the corresponding bit in C2 set to 1, but an input will operate in interrupt input
mode, not counter mode, when its corresponding bit in C2 is set to 0.
Masking or Unmasking All
Interrupts
(C1=100 or C1=200)
All interrupts, including input interrupts, interval timer interrupts, and high-speed
counter interrupts, can be masked or unmasked as a group by executing
INT(89) with C1=100 or C1=200. The masked inputs are recorded, but ignored.
The global mask is in addition to any masks on the individual types of interrupts.
Furthermore, clearing the masks for all interrupts does not clear the masks on
the individual types of interrupts, but restores them to the masked conditions that
existed before INT(89) was executed to mask them as a group.
Do not use INT(89) to mask interrupts unless it is necessary to temporarily mask
all interrupts. Always use INT(89) instructions in pairs to do so, using the first
INT(89) instruction to mask all interrupts and the second one to unmask all interrupts.
INT(89) cannot be used to mask and unmask all interrupts from within interrupt
routines.
Masking Interrupts (C1=100)
Use the INT(89) instruction with C1=100 to mask all interrupts.
(@)INT(89)
100
000
000
If an interrupt is generated while interrupts are masked, interrupt processing will
not be executed but the interrupt will be recorded for the input, interval timer, and
high-speed counter interrupts. The interrupts will then be serviced as soon as
interrupts are unmasked.
499
Section 7-29
Interrupt Control Instructions
Unmasking Interrupts (C1=200)
Use the INT(89) instruction with C1=200 to unmask interrupts as follows:
(@)INT(89)
200
000
000
Flags
ER:
A data area boundary is exceeded.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
C1 is not 000 to 004,100, or 200.
C2 is not 0000 to 000F.
INT(89) is executed with C1=100 or C1=200 while an interrupt program
was being executed.
INT(89) is executed with C1=100 when all inputs were already masked.
C1=200 when inputs were not all unmasked.
7-29-2 INTERVAL TIMER – STIM(69)
Ladder Symbols
Operand Data Areas
C1: Control data #1
STIM(69)
@STIM(69)
C1
C1
C2
C2
C3
C3
000 to 008, 010 to 012
C2: Control data #2
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
C3: Control data #3
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
Note STIM(69) is an expansion instruction in the CPM2A/CPM2C and SRM1(-V2).
The function code 69 is the default setting and can be changed if desired.
Limitations
C1 must be 000, 003, 006. or 010.
If C1 is 000 or 003, C3 represents a BCD subroutine number up to 0049.
If C1 is 006, constants cannot be used for C2 or C3.
If C1 is 010, both C2 and C3 must be set to 000.
Description
STIM(69) is used to control the interval timers by performing four basic functions: starting the timer for a one-shot interrupt, starting the timer for scheduled
interrupts, reading the timer’s PV, and stopping the timer. Set the value of C1 to
specify which of these functions will be performed, as shown in the following
table. Refer to Section 2 Special Features for more detailed descriptions of using
interval timer interrupts. STIM(69) is also described in more detail after the table.
C1 value
Starting Interrupt Timers
(C1= 000 or 003)
500
Function
000
Starts the one-shot interrupt timer.
003
Starts the scheduled interrupt timer.
006
Reads the timer PV.
010
Stops the timer.
Set C1=000 to activate the one-shot interrupt timer. Set C1=003 to start the
scheduled interrupt timer.
Section 7-30
Communications Instructions
C2, which specifies the timer’s SV, can be a constant or the first of two words
containing the SV. The settings are slightly different depending on the method
used.
C2 = Constant
If C2 is a constant, it specifies the SV of the decrementing counter in BCD. The
setting range is 0000 to 9999 (0 to 9.999 ms). (The timing units are fixed at 1 ms.)
C3 specifies subroutine number: 0000 to 0049.
C2 = Word Address
If C2 is a word address, the content of C2 contains the SV of the decrementing
counter (BCD, 0000 to 9999).
The content of C2+1 specifies the timing units (BCD, 0005 to 0320) in units of
0.1 ms. The decrementing time interval can thus be 0.5 to 32 ms.
The timer SV is: (the content of C2) × (the content of C2+1) × 0.1 ms.
C3 specifies subroutine number: 0000 to 0049.
Reading the Timer PV
(C1=006)
Set C1=006 to read the timer PV.
C2 specifies the first of two destination words that will receive the timer’s PV. C2
receives the number of times the decrementing counter has been decremented
(hexadecimal, 0000 to 9999) and C2+1 receives the timing units (BCD in 0.1 ms
units).
C3 specifies the destination word that receives the time which has elapsed since
the last time the timer was decremented (BCD in 0.1 ms units).
Note The time that has elapsed since the timer was started is computed as follows:
((Content of C2) × (Content of C2+1)) + ((Content of C3)) × 0.1 ms
Stopping the Timer
(C=010)
Set C1=010 to stop the timer. C2 and C3 have no function and should both be set
to 000.
Flags
ER:
C1 is not 000, 003, 006, or 010.
A specified subroutine number is not between 0000 and 0049.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
A data area boundary has been exceeded.
7-30 Communications Instructions
7-30-1 RECEIVE – RXD(47)
Operand Data Areas
Ladder Symbols
D: First destination word
RXD(47)
@RXD(47)
D
D
C
C
N
N
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
C: Control word
#
N: Number of bytes
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
Limitations
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C and SRM1(-V2) only.
D and D+(N÷2)–1 must be in the same data area.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for D or N.
501
Section 7-30
Communications Instructions
N must be BCD from #0000 to #0256. (#0000 to #0061 in Host Link mode)
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, RXD(47) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, RXD(47) reads N bytes of data received at the port
specified in the control word, and then writes that data in words D to D+(N÷2)–1.
Up to 256 bytes of data can be read at one time.
If fewer than N bytes are received, the amount received will be read.
Note Refer to 4-1Communications Functions for details on using the RXD(47) instruction, setting communications protocol in the PC Setup, etc.
! Caution
Control Word
The PC will be incapable of receiving more data once 256 bytes have been received if received data is not read using RXD(47). Read data as soon as possible after the Reception Completed Flag is turned ON (AR 0806 for the
RS-232C port, AR 0814 for the peripheral port.)
The value of the control word determines the port from which data will be read
and the order in which data will be written to memory.
Digit number:
3 2 1 0
Byte order
0: Most significant bytes first, same word
1: Least significant bytes first, same word
Not used. (Set to 00.)
Port
0: RS-232C port.
1: Peripheral port.
The order in which data is written to memory depends on the value of digit 0 of C.
Eight bytes of data 12345678... will be written in the following manner:
Digit 0 = 0
MSB
D
1
D+1
3
D+2
5
D+3
7
Flags
ER:
LSB
2
4
6
8
Digit 0 = 1
MSB
D
2
D+1
4
D+2
6
D+3
8
Digit 0 = 2
MSB LSB
D
1
D+1
2
3
D+2
4
5
D+3
6
7
Digit 0 = 3
MSB
D
1
D+1
2
D+2
4
D+3
6
LSB
1
3
5
7
LSB
3
5
7
The settings in C are not correct.
N is greater than 256.
The PC Setup is not set for no-protocol mode.
RXD(47) is already being executed.
AR 08: AR 0806 will be turned ON when data has been received normally at the
RS-232C port. Reset when RXD(47) is executed.
502
Section 7-30
Communications Instructions
AR 0814 will be turned ON when data has been received normally at the
peripheral port. Reset when RXD(47) is executed.
AR 09: Contains the number of bytes received at the RS-232C port. Reset to
0000 when RXD(47) is executed.
AR 10: Contains the number of bytes received at the peripheral port. Reset to
0000 when RXD(47) is executed.
Note Communications flags and counters can be cleared either by specifying 0000 for
N or using the Port Reset Bits (SR 25208 for peripheral port and SR 25209 for
RS-232C port.)
7-30-2 TRANSMIT – TXD(48)
Operand Data Areas
Ladder Symbols
S: First source word
TXD(48)
@TXD(48)
S
S
C
C
N
N
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR
C: Control word
#
N: Number of bytes
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, TC, LR, #
Limitations
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C and SRM1(-V2) only.
S and S+(N÷2)–1 must be in the same data area.
DM 6144 to DM 6655 cannot be used for S or N.
N must be BCD from #0000 to #0256. (#0000 to #0061 in Host Link mode)
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, TXD(48) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, TXD(48) reads N bytes of data from words S to
S+(N÷2)–1, converts it to ASCII, and outputs the data from the specified port.
TXD(48) operates differently in Host Link mode and RS-232C mode, so these
modes are described separately.
Note
1. Flag AR 0805 will be ON when the PC is capable of transmitting data
through the RS-232C port and AR 0813 will be ON when the PC is capable
of transmitting data through the peripheral port.
2. Refer to 4-1 Communications Functions for details on using the TXD(48)
instruction, setting communications protocol in the PC Setup, etc.
Host Link Mode
N must be BCD from #0000 to #0061 (i.e., up to 122 bytes of ASCII). The value of
the control word determines the port from which data will be output, as shown
below.
Digit number:
3 2 1 0
Not used. (Set to 000.)
Port
0: Specifies RS-232C port.
1: Specifies peripheral port.
503
Section 7-30
Communications Instructions
The specified number of bytes will be read from S through S+(N/2)–1, converted
to ASCII, and transmitted through the specified port. The bytes of source data
shown below will be transmitted in this order: 12345678...
MSB
1
3
5
7
S
S+1
S+2
S+3
LSB
2
4
6
8
The following diagram shows the format for Host Link command (TXD) sent from
the CPM2A/CPM2C. The CPM2A/CPM2C automatically attaches the prefixes
and suffixes, such as the node number, header, and FCS.
@
E
Node
number
X
Header
code
∗
.........
Data (122 ASCII characters max.)
FCS
CR
Terminator
RS-232C Mode
N must be BCD from #0000 to #00256. The value of the control word determines
the port from which data will be output and the order in which data will be written
to memory.
Control Word
The value of the control word determines the port from which data will be read
and the order in which data will be written to memory.
Digit number:
3 2 1 0
Byte order
0: Most significant bytes first
1: Least significant bytes first
Not used. (Set to 00.)
Port
0: Specifies RS-232C port.
1: Specifies peripheral port.
The specified number of bytes will be read from S through S+(N÷2)–1 and transmitted through the specified port.
S
S+1
S+2
S+3
MSB
1
3
5
7
LSB
2
4
6
8
When digit 0 of C is 0, the bytes of source data shown above will be transmitted in
this order: 12345678...
When digit 0 of C is 1, the bytes of source data shown above will be transmitted in
this order: 21436587...
Note When start and end codes are specified the total data length should be 256 bytes
max., including the start and end codes.
Flags
ER:
The settings in C are not correct.
N is greater than 256 for no-protocol mode or greater than 61 for Host
Link mode.
504
Section 7-30
Communications Instructions
The PC Setup is not set for the correct communications mode.
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of *DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
TXD(48) is already being executed.
AR 08: AR 0805 will be turned ON when it is possible to transmit through the
RS-232C port. AR 0813 will be turned ON when it is possible to transmit
through the peripheral port.
7-30-3 CHANGE RS-232C SETUP – STUP(––)
Operand Data Areas
Ladder Symbols
N: RS-232C port specifier
STUP(––)
@STUP(––)
N
N
S
S
–
–
000
S: First source word
Limitations
IR, SR, AR, DM, HR, LR, #
The third operand is ignored.
This instruction is available in the CPM2A/CPM2C and SRM1(-V2) only.
N must be 000.
S and S+4 must be in the same data area.
(S can be set to #0000 to change the RS-232C settings to their defaults.)
STUP(––) can’t be executed within an interrupt subroutine.
Description
When the execution condition is OFF, STUP(––) is not executed. When the
execution condition is ON, STUP(––) changes the PC Setup settings for the
built-in RS-232C port. The settings are changed in the PC Setup, but they are
not written to flash memory until the PC is switched to PROGRAM mode (from
RUN or MONITOR mode) or the PC is turned OFF and then ON again.
In CPM2A/CPM2C and SRM1(-V2) PCs, N must be 000 because STUP(––) can
change the RS-232C Setup for the built-in RS-232C port (DM 6645 to DM 6649)
only.
If S is a word address, the contents of S through S+4 are copied to DM 6645 to
DM 6649.
If S is input as the constant #0000, the settings for the built-in RS-232C port are
returned to their default values.
S
Word address
Constant (#0000)
Note
Function
The contents of S through S+4 are copied to DM 6645 through
DM 6649.
The settings in DM 6645 through DM 6649 are returned to their
default values.
1. The Changing RS-232C Setup Flag (SR 25312) will be ON while STUP(––)
is being executed; it is turned OFF when STUP(––) is completed.
2. In the CPM2A/CPM2C, an error will occur and STUP(––) will not be executed if the Communications Switch on the front of the CPU Unit is ON. When
this switch is ON, RS-232C communications are governed by the default
settings.
505
Section 7-30
Communications Instructions
Application Example
This example shows a program that transfers the contents of DM 0100 through
DM 0104 to the PC Setup area for the built-in RS-232C port (DM 6645 through
DM 6649).
00000
Address
Instruction
00000
00001
LD
@STUP(––)
Operands
@STUP(––)
000
DM 0100
000
00000
DM
000
0100
---
The settings are transferred as shown below. The Changing RS-232C Setup
Flag (SR 25312) will be turned OFF when the transfer has been completed.
The following table shows the function of the transferred setup data.
Flags
Source
word
DM 0100
Destination
word
DM 6645
1001
Enables the communications settings in DM
0101 and sets the communications mode to
no-protocol.
DM 0101
DM 6646
0803
Sets the following communications settings:
9,600 bps, 1 start bit, 8-bit data, 1 stop bit,
no parity
DM 0102
DM 6647
0000
No transmission delay (0 ms)
DM 0103
DM 6648
2000
Enables the end code CR, LF.
DM 0104
DM 6649
0000
(No function when DM 6648 is set to 2000.)
ER:
Content
Function
Indirectly addressed DM word is non-existent. (Content of DM word is
not BCD, or the DM area boundary has been exceeded.)
The port specifier (N) isn’t 000.
In the CPM2A/CPM2C, the Communications Switch on the front of the
CPU Unit is ON.
Another STUP(––) instruction is already being executed or event processing is being performed.
The specified source words exceed the data area.
The instruction was executed from an interrupt program.
The PC Setup is write-protected.
506
SECTION 8
PC Operations and Processing Time
This section explains the internal processing of the CPM1, CPM1A, CPM2A, CPM2C, and SRM1(-V2), as well as the time
required for processing and execution. Refer to this section to gain an understanding of the precise timing of PC operation.
8-1
8-2
8-3
CPM1/CPM1A Cycle Time and I/O Response Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-1-1 The CPM1/CPM1A Cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-1-2 CPM1/CPM1A Cycle Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-1-3 I/O Response Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-1-4 One-to-one PC Link I/O Response Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-1-5 Interrupt Processing Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-1-6 CPM1/CPM1A Instruction Execution Times . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPM2A/CPM2C Cycle Time and I/O Response Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-2-1 CPM2A/CPM2C Cycle Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-2-2 I/O Response Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-2-3 One-to-one PC Link I/O Response Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-2-4 Interrupt Processing Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-2-5 CPM2A/CPM2C Instruction Execution Times . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SRM1(-V2) Cycle Time and I/O Response Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-3-1 The SRM1(-V2) Cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-3-2 SRM1(-V2) Cycle Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-3-3 I/O Response Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-3-4 One-to-one PC Link I/O Response Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-3-5 Interrupt Processing Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-3-6 SRM1(-V2) Instruction Execution Times . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
508
508
509
510
511
513
514
519
519
520
521
523
524
533
533
534
536
537
538
539
507
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
8-1
8-1
CPM1/CPM1A Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
8-1-1 The CPM1/CPM1A Cycle
The overall flow of CPM1/CPM1A operation is as shown in the following flowchart.
Power application
Initialization processes
Initialization
Check hardware and
Program Memory.
No
Check OK?
Overseeing
processes
Yes
Set error flags and
activate indicators.
ERROR or ALARM?
ERROR
(lit)
Preset cycle time
monitoring time.
ALARM
(flashing)
Execute user program.
End of program?
No
Program
execution
Yes
Check cycle time setting.
Minimum
cycle time set?
Yes
Wait until minimum cycle
time expires.
Cycle
time
No
Cycle time
processing
Compute cycle time.
Refresh input bits and
output terminals.
Service peripheral port.
I/O refreshing
Service
peripheral
port.
Note Initialization processes include clearing the IR, SR, and AR areas, presetting
system timers, and checking I/O Units.
508
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
8-1
8-1-2 CPM1/CPM1A Cycle Time
The processes involved in a single CPM1/CPM1A cycle are shown in the following table, and their respective processing times are explained.
Process
Content
Time requirements
Overseeing
Setting cycle watchdog timer, I/O bus check, UM
check, clock refreshing, refreshing bits allocated to
new functions, etc.
0.6 ms
Program execution
User program is executed.
Total time for executing instructions.
(Varies according to content of user’s
program.)
Cycle time calculation
Standby until set time, when minimum cycle time is
set in DM 6619 of PC Setup.
Almost instantaneous, except for
standby processing.
I/O refresh
Calculation of cycle time.
Input information is read to input bits.
Output information (results of executing program) is
written to output bits.
Peripheral port servicing
Devices connected to peripheral port serviced.
10-point CPU :
0.06 ms
20-point CPU:
0.06 ms
30-point CPU:
0.3 ms
Expansion I/O Unit: 0.3 ms
0.26 ms min., 5% or less of cycle
time up to 66 ms (see note)
Note The percentage of the cycle allocated to peripheral port servicing can be
changed in the PC Setup (DM 6617).
Cycle Time and Operations
Cycle time
10 ms or longer
20 ms or longer
100 ms or longer
120 ms or longer
200 ms or longer
The effects of the cycle time on CPM1/CPM1A operations are as shown below.
When a long cycle time is affecting operation, either reduce the cycle time or improve responsiveness with interrupt programs.
Operation conditions
TIMH(15) may be inaccurate when TC 004 through TC 127 are used (operation will be normal for
TC 000 through TC 003).
Programming using the 0.02-second Clock Bit (SR 25401) may be inaccurate.
TIM may be inaccurate. Programming using the 0.1-second Clock Bit (SR 25500) may be inaccurate. A CYCLE TIME OVER error is generated (SR 25309 will turn ON). See note 1.
The FALS 9F monitoring time SV is exceeded. A system error (FALS 9F) is generated, and operation stops. See note 2.
Programming using the 0.2-second Clock Bit (SR 25501) may be inaccurate.
Note
1. The PC Setup (DM 6655) can be used to disable detection of CYCLE TIME
OVER error.
2. The cycle monitoring time can be changed in the PC Setup (DM 6618).
Cycle Time Example
In this example, the cycle time is calculated for a CPM1/CPM1A CPU Unit with
20 I/O points (12 input points and 8 output points). The I/O is configured as follows:
Inputs: 1 word (00000 to 00011)
Outputs: 1 word (01000 to 01007)
The rest of the operating conditions are assumed to be as follows:
User’s program:500 instructions (consists of only LD and OUT)
Cycle time:
Variable (no minimum set)
509
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
8-1
The average processing time for a single instruction in the user’s program is assumed to be 2.86 µs. The cycle times are as shown in the following table.
Process
Calculation method
1. Overseeing
Fixed
Time with Programming De- Time without Programming
vice
Device
0.6 ms
0.6 ms
2. Program execution
2.86 × 500 (µs)
1.43 ms
1.43 ms
3. Cycle time calculation
Negligible
0 ms
0 ms
4. I/O refresh
0.01 × 1 + 0.005 × 1 (µs)
0.06 ms
0.06 ms
5. Peripheral port servicing
Minimum time
0.26 ms
0 ms
Cycle time
(1) + (2) + (3) + (4) + (5)
2.35 ms
2.09 ms
Note
1. The cycle time can be read from the PC via a Programming Device.
2. The maximum and current cycle time are stored in AR 14 and AR 15.
3. The cycle time can vary with actual operating conditions and will not necessarily agree precisely with the calculated value.
8-1-3 I/O Response Time
The I/O response time is the time it takes after an input signal has been received
(i.e., after an input bit has turned ON) for the PC to check and process the information and to output a control signal (i.e., to output the result of the processing to an output bit). The I/O response time varies according to the timing and
processing conditions.
The minimum and maximum I/O response times are shown here, using the following program as an example.
Output
Input
The following conditions are taken as examples for calculating the I/O response
times.
Input ON delay:
Overseeing time:
Instruction execution time:
Output ON delay:
Peripheral port:
8 ms (input time constant: default setting)
1 ms (includes I/O refresh for CPM1A)
14 ms
10 ms
Not used.
Minimum I/O Response Time The CPM1/CPM1A responds most quickly when it receives an input signal just
prior to I/O refreshing, as shown in the illustration below.
Input
point
Input ON delay (8 ms)
Input
bit
I/O refreshing
Program execution and other processes
(15 ms)
I/O refreshing
Output ON delay (10 ms)
Output
point
Min. I/O response time = 8+15+10 = 33 ms
510
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
8-1
Maximum I/O Response Time The CPM1/CPM1A takes longest to respond when it receives the input signal
just after the input refresh phase of the cycle, as shown in the illustration below.
In that case, a delay of approximately one cycle will occur.
Input
point
Input ON delay (8 ms)
Input
bit
I/O refreshing
Program execution
and other processes
(15 ms)
I/O refreshing
Program execution
and other processes
(15 ms)
I/O refreshing
Output ON delay (10 ms)
Output
point
Max. I/O response time = 8+15 × 2+10 = 48 ms
8-1-4 One-to-one PC Link I/O Response Time
When two CPM1/CPM1As are linked 1:1, the I/O response time is the time required for an input executed at one of the CPM1/CPM1As to be output to the
other CPM1/CPM1A by means of 1:1 PC Link communications.
The minimum and maximum I/O response times are shown here, using as an
example the following instructions executed at the master and the slave. In this
example, communications proceed from the master to the slave.
Master
Slave
Output (LR)
Input
Input
(LR)
Output
The following conditions are taken as examples for calculating the I/O response
times. In CPM1/CPM1A PCs, LR area words LR 00 to LR 15 are used in 1:1 data
links and the transmission time is fixed at 12 ms.
Input ON delay:
Master cycle time:
Slave cycle time:
Output ON delay:
Peripheral port:
8 ms (input time constant: default setting)
10 ms
15 ms
10 ms
Not used.
Minimum I/O Response Time The CPM1/CPM1A responds most quickly under the following circumstances:
1, 2, 3...
1. The CPM1/CPM1A receives an input signal just prior to the input refresh
phase of the cycle.
2. The Master’s communications servicing occurs just as the Master-to-Slave
transmission begins.
511
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
8-1
3. The Slave’s communications servicing occurs just after the transmission is
completed.
Input
point
I/O refresh
Overseeing, communications, etc.
Input ON delay (8 ms)
Input
bit
Master
Program
execution
CPU
processing
Master’s cycle time (10 ms)
Master to
Slave
Transmission time (12 ms)
Program
execution
CPU
processing
Output ON
Slave’s cycle time (15 ms) delay (10 ms)
Slave
Output
point
Min. I/O response time = 8+10+12+15+10 = 55 ms
Calculation formula = Input ON response time + Master’s cycle time + Slave’s
cycle time + Output ON response time
Maximum I/O Response Time The CPM1/CPM1A takes the longest to respond under the following circumstances:
1, 2, 3...
1. The CPM1/CPM1A receives an input signal just after the input refresh
phase of the cycle.
2. The Master’s communications servicing just misses the Master-to-Slave
transmission.
3. The transmission is completed just after the Slave’s communications servicing ends.
I/O Maximum Response Time Input ON response time + Master’s cycle time x 2 + Transmission time x 3 + Output ON response time
Input
point
I/O refresh
Input ON response time
Peripheral port servicing
Master
Input
bit
CPU
processing
Program
execution
Program
execution
Program
execution
Master #1
(Data transmission according to input point)
Master to Slave
CPU
processing
Transmission
time
Program
execution
Slave #1
Slave
Program
execution
Slave to Master
Program
execution
Transmission
time
Master to Slave
Transmission time
Program
execution
Slave #2
Program
execution
Slave #3
Output
point
Maximum I/O response time = 8 + 10 x 2 + 12 x 3 + 15 x 3 + 10 = 119 (ms)
512
Output OFF
response time
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
8-1
8-1-5 Interrupt Processing Time
This section explains the processing times involved from the time an interrupt is
executed until the interrupt processing routine is called, and from the time an interrupt processing routine is completed until returning to the initial location. This
explanation applies to input interrupts, interval timer interrupts, and high-speed
counter interrupts.
1, 2, 3...
Item
Interrupt ON delay
Wait for completion of
interrupt-mask processing
Change to interrupt
processing
Return
1. Source of interrupt
2. Interrupt ON delay
3. Wait for completion of interrupt-mask processing
4. Change to interrupt processing
5. Interrupt routing (CPM1A only)
6. Return to initial location
The table below shows the times involved from the generation of an interrupt signal until the interrupt processing routine is called, and from when the interrupt
processing routine is completed until returning to the original position.
Contents
Time
This is the delay time from the time the interrupt input bit turns ON until the
time that the interrupt is executed. This is unrelated to other interrupts.
This is the time during which interrupts are waiting until processing has
been completed. This situation occurs when a mask processes is
executed. It is explained below in more detail.
100 µs
This is the time it takes to change processing to an interrupt.
30 µs
This is the time it takes, from execution of RET(93), to return to the processing that was interrupted.
30 µs
See below.
Mask Processing
Interrupts are masked during processing of the operations described below. Until the processing is completed, any interrupts will remain masked for the indicated times.
Generation and clearing of non-fatal errors:
When a non-fatal error is generated and the error contents are registered at
the CPM1, or when an error is being cleared, interrupts will be masked for a
maximum of 100 µs until the processing has been completed.
Online editing:
Interrupts will be masked for a maximum of 600 ms (i.e.: editing DM 6144 to
DM 6655) when online editing is executed during operation. In addition, the
system processing may have to wait for a maximum of 170 µs during this
processing.
Example Calculation
This example shows the interrupt response time (i.e., the time from when the
interrupt input turns ON until the start of the interrupt processing routine) when
input interrupts are used under the conditions shown below.
Minimum Response Time
Interrupt ON delay:
100 µs
Interrupt mask standby time:
0 µs
30 µs
+
Change-to-interrupt processing:
Minimum response time:
130 µs
Maximum Response Time
(Except for the Online Editing of DM 6144 to DM6655)
Interrupt ON delay:
100 µs
Interrupt mask standby time:
170 µs
30 µs
+
Change-to-interrupt processing:
Maximum response time:
300 µs
513
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
8-1
In addition to the response time shown above, the time required for executing
the interrupt processing routine itself and a return time of 30 µs must also be accounted for when returning to the process that was interrupted.
8-1-6 CPM1/CPM1A Instruction Execution Times
The following table lists the execution times for CPM1/CPM1A instructions.
Basic Instructions
Code
Mnemonic
ON execution
ti
((µs))
time
---------------------------
LD
LD NOT
AND
AND NOT
OR
OR NOT
AND LD
OR LD
OUT
OUT NOT
SET
RSET
TIM
1.72
---
CNT
Conditions (Top:
( p min.; bottom: max.))
OFF execution time (µs)
RSET
---
Any
IL
JMP
1.32
0.72
4.0
5.8
5.9
10.0
Constant for SV
12.5
DM for SV
Constant for SV
DM for SV
16.2
31.4
14.1
29.1
16.0
31
6.2
6.2
6.4
6.4
6.6
6.6
Special Instructions
Code
Mnemonic
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
NOP
END
IL
ILC
JMP
JME
FAL
FALS
STEP
SNXT
SFT
11
KEEP
12
CNTR
ON execution
time (µs)
0.36
10.8
4.6
3.6
4.3
4.7
38.5
5.0
14.9
14.2
With 1-word shift register
With 10-word shift register
With 100-word shift register
Any
Constant for SV
Any
y
13
DIFU
14
DIFD
11.0
OFF execution time (µs)
Any
y
21.9
34.1
93.6
6.2
25.8
41.2
11.8
514
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
DM for SV
Any
y
2.6
3.6
2.4
4.7
5.5
5.4
11.1
7.6
Reset
19.7
26.5
60.1
Reset
6.1
Reset
16.8
IL
2.6
2.6
2.6
IL
3.1
IL
12.2
JMP
2.6
2.6
2.6
JMP
3.1
JMP
12.2
Shift
10.1
Shift
10.0
IL
12.2
IL
9.9
JMP
12.2
JMP
2.3
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
Code
Mnemonic
15
TIMH
ON execution
time (µs)
19.0
20.2
19.0
20.2
16
WSFT
29.2
40.7
1.42 ms
17
ASFT
29.6
50.2
1.76 ms
20
CMP
15.8
17.2
46.3
21
MOV
16.3
17.7
45.5
22
MVN
16.4
17.5
45.7
23
BIN
31.6
45.7
24
BCD
29.5
57.3
25
ASL
17.3
31.3
26
ASR
16.9
31.1
27
ROL
14.5
28.5
28
ROR
14.5
28.5
29
COM
18.1
32.1
30
ADD
29.5
30.9
72.7
31
SUB
29.3
30.5
72.5
32
MUL
49.1
50.5
95.1
33
DIV
47.7
50.9
94.3
34
ANDW
27.1
28.7
70.7
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
Regular execution, constant for SV
Interrupt execution, constant for SV
Regular execution, DM for SV
Interrupt execution, DM for SV
With 1-word shift register
With 10-word shift register
8-1
OFF execution time (µs)
Reset
25.7
IL
28.4
JMP
15.8
41.2
43.6
15.8
5.6
With 1,024-word shift register using DM
Shifting a word
Shifting 10 words
5.6
Shifting 1,023 words via DM
When comparing a constant to a word
When comparing two words
5.6
When comparing two DM
When transferring a constant to a word
When transferring from one word to another
5.6
When transferring DM to DM
When transferring a constant to a word
When transferring from one word to another
5.6
When transferring DM to DM
When converting a word to a word
5.6
When converting DM to DM
When converting a word to a word
5.6
When converting DM to DM
When shifting a word
5.5
When shifting DM
When shifting a word
5.5
When shifting DM
When rotating a word
5.5
When rotating DM
When rotating a word
5.5
When rotating DM
When inverting a word
5.5
When inverting DM
Constant + word → word
Word + word → word
5.6
DM + DM → DM
Constant – word → word
Word – word → word
5.6
DM – DM → DM
Constant word → word
Word word → word
5.6
DM DM → DM
Word ÷ constant → word
word ÷ word → word
5.6
DM ÷ DM → DM
Constant Ɠ word → word
Word Ɠ word → word
5.6
DM Ɠ DM → DM
515
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
Code
Mnemonic
35
ORW
36
XORW
27.1
28.7
70.5
37
XNRW
27.0
28.6
70.5
38
INC
17.9
31.9
39
DEC
18.3
32.3
40
41
46
STC
CLC
MSG
6.3
6.3
50
ADB
51
SBB
ON execution
time (µs)
27.1
28.7
70.7
21.5
35.7
30.5
32.1
73.9
30.9
32.7
74.5
52
MLB
34.7
36.3
80.7
53
DVB
35.1
36.7
81.1
54
ADDL
48.9
94.7
55
SUBL
48.9
94.7
56
MULL
138.7
184.3
57
DIVL
136.7
181.3
60
CMPL
30.4
60.8
61
62
516
INI
PRV
112.0
126.0
48.0
48.0
120.0
128.0
46.0
60.0
62.2
78.0
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
Constant V word → word
Word V word → word
OFF execution time (µs)
5.6
DM V DM → DM
Constant V word → word
Word V word → word
5.6
DM V DM → DM
Constant V word → word
Word V word → word
5.6
DM V DM → DM
When incrementing a word
5.5
When incrementing DM
When decrementing a word
5.5
When decrementing DM
Any
y
With message in words
5.5
5.5
5.5
With message in DM
Constant + word → word
Word + word → word
5.6
DM + DM → DM
Constant – word → word
Word – word → word
5.6
DM – DM → DM
Constant word → word
Word word → word
5.6
DM DM → DM
Word ÷ constant → word
Word ÷ word → word
5.6
DM ÷ DM → DM
Word + word → word
5.6
DM + DM → DM
Word – word → word
5.6
DM – DM → DM
Word word → word
5.6
DM DM → DM
Word ÷ word → word
5.6
DM ÷ DM → DM
Comparing words
5.6
Comparing DM
Starting comparison via word
5.6
Starting comparison via DM
Stopping comparison via word
Stopping comparison via DM
Changing PV via word
Changing PV via DM
Stopping pulse output via word
Stopping pulse output via DM
Designating output via word
Designating output via DM
8-1
5.6
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
Code
Mnemonic
63
CTBL
ON execution
time (µs)
106.3
120.3
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
Target table with 1 target in words and start
OFF execution time (µs)
5.6
Target table with 1 target in DM and start
775.5
799.5
Target table with 16 targets in words and start
711.5
722.5
Range table in words and start
91.9
106.3
Target table with 1 target in words
693.5
709.5
Target table with 16 targets in words
607.5
621.5
Range table in words
Target table with 16 targets in DM and start
Range table in DM and start
Target table with 1 target in DM
Target table with 16 targets in DM
Range table in DM
64
SPED
73.6
75.0
88.8
Specifying a constant
Specifying a word
5.6
Specifying DM
5.6
65
PULS
62.0
78.0
Specifying a word
5.6
67
BCNT
52.6
4.08 ms
Counting a word
68
BCMP
79.6
80.8
123.2
Comparing constant, results to word
Comparing word, results to word
69
STIM
47.5
58.7
47.9
59.1
33.5
63.5
25.7
54.1
Word-set one-shot interrupt start
45.5
47.1
1.78 ms
When transferring a constant to a word
When transferring a word to a word
70
XFER
Specifying DM
DM-set scheduled interrupt start
Word-set timer read
DM-set timer read
Word-set timer stop
DM-set timer stop
5.6
When transferring 1,024 words using DM
When setting a constant to 1 word
When setting word constant to 10 words
73
XCHG
30.5
59.1
Word → word
74
SLD
25.9
51.7
3.02 ms
Shifting 1 word
Shifting 10 word
75
SRD
25.9
51.7
3.02 ms
Shifting 1 word
Shifting 10 word
47.7
92.7
When decoding word to word
59.5
95.5
When encoding word to word
DMPX
5.6
DM-set one-shot interrupt start
Word-set scheduled interrupt start
28.1
38.3
1.12 ms
77
5.6
Comparing DM, results to DM
BSET
MLPX
5.6
Counting 6,656 words via DM
71
76
8-1
5.6
When setting DM to 1,024 words
5.6
DM → DM
5.6
Shifting 1024 words using DM
5.6
Shifting 1,024 words using DM
5.6
When decoding DM to DM
5.6
When encoding DM to DM
517
Section
CPM1/CPM1A Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
Code
Mnemonic
78
SDEC
80
DIST
81
82
83
84
85
COLL
MOVB
MOVD
SFTR
TCMP
ON execution
time (µs)
51.1
96.3
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
When decoding word to word
When setting a constant to a word + a word
When setting a word to a word + a word
42.6
43.6
83.4
78.0
79.2
1.76 ms
When setting a constant + a word to a word
When setting a word + a word to a word
66.8
68.0
112.0
When setting a word + constant to LIFO stack
When setting a word + word to LIFO stack
32.5
37.5
79.1
When transferring a constant to a word
When transferring from one word to another
28.3
33.3
75.5
When transferring a constant to a word
When transferring from one word to another
39.3
52.9
1.42 ms
Shifting 1 word
Shifting 10 word
57.7
58.9
101.9
Comparing constant to word-set table
Comparing word to word-set table
5.6
When setting DM + DM to DM
When setting a word + constant to FIFO stack
When setting a word + word to FIFO stack
When setting a DM + DM to
FIFO stack via DM
When setting a DM + DM to
LIFO stack via DM
5.6
When transferring DM to DM
5.6
When transferring DM to DM
5.6
Shifting 1,024 words using DM
5.6
Comparing DM to DM-set table
56.7
103.9
Word → word
89
INT
32.3
46.3
29.1
43.1
27.3
41.5
29.7
43.7
15.3
15.3
15.9
15.9
Set masks via word
36.6
1.7
15.0
Any
y
518
5.6
When setting DM to a stack via DM
ASC
SBS
SBN
RET
5.6
When setting DM to DM +DM
When setting a constant to a stack
When setting a word to a stack
86
91
92
93
OFF execution time (µs)
When decoding DM to DM
39.1
40.9
84.7
63.4
65.0
109.6
8-1
5.6
DM → DM
5.6
Set masks via DM
Clear interrupts via word
Clear interrupts via DM
Read mask status via word
Read mask status via DM
Change counter SV via word
Change counter SV via DM
Mask all interrupts via word
Mask all interrupts via DM
Clear all interrupts via word
Clear all interrupts via DM
5.5
1.7
2.5
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
Code
Mnemonic
97
IORF
99
MCRO
8-2
ON execution
time (µs)
40.0
142.6
135.4
74.0
116.4
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
8-2
OFF execution time (µs)
6.0
Refreshing IR 000
Refreshing one input word
Refreshing one output word
With word-set I/O operands
5.6
With DM-set I/O operands
CPM2A/CPM2C Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
8-2-1 CPM2A/CPM2C Cycle Time
The processes involved in a single CPM2A/CPM2C cycle are shown in the following table, and their respective processing times are explained. Refer to the
CPM2C-S Operation Manual (W377) for information on the cyclic operation of
the CPM2C-S.
Process
Content
Time requirements
Overseeing
Setting cycle watchdog timer, I/O bus check, UM
check, clock refreshing, refreshing bits allocated to
new functions.
0.3 ms
Program
execution
Cycle time
calculation
User program is executed.
Total time for executing instructions. (Varies
according to content of user’s program.)
Negligible except for the delay itself when required.
I/O refreshing
Automatic delay until minimum cycle time when a
minimum cycle time is set in DM 6619 of PC Setup.
Calculation of cycle time.
Output information (results of executing program) is
written to output bits.
Input information is read to input bits.
RS-232C port
servicing
Peripheral port
servicing
CPM2C CPU Unit:
20-point CPM2A CPU Unit:
30-point CPM2A CPU Unit:
40-point CPM2A CPU Unit:
60-point CPM2A CPU Unit:
Expansion I/O Unit:
0.06 ms
0.06 ms
0.3 ms
0.3 ms
0.54 ms
0.3 ms
Communications processing when a Programming
Device or Communications Adapter is connected to
the RS-232C port.
0.55 ms min., 5% or less of cycle time up to
131 ms
Devices connected to peripheral port serviced.
0.55 ms min., 5% or less of cycle time up to
131 ms
(The percentage of cycle time allocated to
RS-232C servicing can be set in DM 6616.)
(The percentage of cycle time allocated to peripheral port servicing can be set in DM 6617.)
Cycle Time and Operations
Cycle time
1 ms or longer
10 ms or longer
20 ms or longer
100 ms or longer
120 ms or longer
200 ms or longer
The effects of the cycle time on CPM2A/CPM2C operations are as shown below.
When a long cycle time is affecting operation, either reduce the cycle time or improve responsiveness with interrupt programs.
Operation conditions
TMHH(––) may be inaccurate when TC 000 through TC 003 or TC 008 through TC 255 are used
(operation will be normal for TC 004 through TC 007).
TIMH(15) may be inaccurate when TC 004 through TC 255 are used (operation will be normal for
TC 000 through TC 003).
Programming using the 0.02-second Clock Bit (SR 25401) may be inaccurate.
TIM may be inaccurate. Programming using the 0.1-second Clock Bit (SR 25500) may be inaccurate. A CYCLE TIME OVER error is generated (SR 25309 will turn ON).
The FALS 9F monitoring time SV is exceeded. A system error (FALS 9F) is generated, and operation stops.
Programming using the 0.2-second Clock Bit (SR 25501) may be inaccurate.
519
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
Cycle Time Example
8-2
In this example, the cycle time is calculated for a CPM2A/CPM2C CPU Unit with
30 I/O points (18 input points and 12 output points). The I/O is configured as follows:
18 inputs: 2 words (00000 to 00011, 00100 to 00105)
12 outputs: 2 words (01000 to 01007, 01100 to 01103)
The rest of the operating conditions are assumed to be as follows:
User’s program:500 instructions (consists of only LD and OUT)
Cycle time:
Variable (no minimum set)
The average processing time for a single instruction in the user’s program is assumed to be 1.26 µs. The cycle times are as shown in the following table.
Process
Calculation method
1. Overseeing
Fixed
Time with
Programming Device
0.3 ms
2. Program execution
1.26 × 500 (µs)
0.6 ms
0.6 ms
3. Cycle time calculation
Negligible
0 ms
0 ms
4. I/O refreshing
Fixed
0.3 ms (CPM2C: 0.06 ms)
0.3 ms (CPM2C: 0.06 ms)
5. Peripheral port servicing
Minimum time
0.55 ms
0 ms
Cycle time
(1) + (2) + (3) + (4) + (5)
1.75 ms (CPM2C: 1.51 ms)
1.2 ms (CPM2C: 0.96 ms)
Note
Time without
Programming Device
0.3 ms
1. The cycle time can be read from the PC via a Programming Device.
2. The maximum and current cycle time are stored in AR 14 and AR 15.
3. The cycle time can vary with actual operating conditions and will not necessarily agree precisely with the calculated value.
8-2-2 I/O Response Time
The I/O response time is the time it takes after an input signal has been received
(i.e., after an input bit has turned ON) for the PC to check and process the information and to output a control signal (i.e., to output the result of the processing to an output bit). The I/O response time varies according to the timing and
processing conditions.
The minimum and maximum I/O response times are shown here, using the following program as an example.
Output
Input
The following conditions are taken as examples for calculating the I/O response
times.
Input ON delay:
Overseeing time:
Instruction execution time:
Output ON delay:
Communications ports:
520
10 ms (input time constant: default setting)
1 ms (includes I/O refreshing)
14 ms
15 ms
Not used.
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
8-2
Minimum I/O Response Time The CPM2A/CPM2C responds most quickly when it receives an input signal just
prior to I/O refreshing, as shown in the illustration below.
Input
point
Input ON delay (10 ms)
Input
bit
Program execution and other processes
(15 ms)
I/O refreshing
I/O refreshing
Output ON delay (10 ms)
Output
point
Min. I/O response time = 10+15+15 = 40 ms
Maximum I/O Response Time The CPM2A/CPM2C takes longest to respond when it receives the input signal
just after the input refresh phase of the cycle, as shown in the illustration below.
In that case, a delay of approximately one cycle will occur.
Input
point
Input ON delay (10 ms)
Input
bit
I/O refreshing
Program execution
and other processes
(15 ms)
I/O refreshing
Program execution
and other processes
(15 ms)
I/O refreshing
Output ON delay (10 ms)
Output
point
Max. I/O response time = 10+15 × 2+15 = 55 ms
8-2-3 One-to-one PC Link I/O Response Time
When two CPM2A/CPM2Cs are linked 1:1, the I/O response time is the time required for an input executed at one of the CPM2A/CPM2Cs to be output to the
other CPM2A/CPM2C by means of 1:1 PC Link communications.
The minimum and maximum I/O response times are shown here, using as an
example the following instructions executed at the master and the slave. In this
example, communications proceed from the master to the slave.
Master
Slave
Output (LR)
Input
Input
(LR)
Output
The following conditions are taken as examples for calculating the I/O response
times. In CPM2A/CPM2C PCs, LR area words LR 00 to LR 15 are used in 1:1
data links and the transmission time is fixed at 21 ms.
Input ON delay:
Master cycle time:
Slave cycle time:
Output ON delay:
10 ms (input time constant: default setting)
10 ms
15 ms
15 ms
Minimum I/O Response Time The CPM2A/CPM2C responds most quickly under the following circumstances:
521
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
1, 2, 3...
8-2
1. The CPM2A/CPM2C receives an input signal just prior to the input refresh
phase of the cycle.
2. The Master’s communications servicing occurs just as the Master-to-Slave
transmission begins.
3. The Slave’s communications servicing occurs just after the transmission is
completed.
Input
point
I/O refresh
Input ON delay (10 ms)
Overseeing, communications
servicing, etc.
Input
bit
Master
Program
execution
CPU
processing
Master’s cycle time (10 ms)
Master to
Slave
Transmission time (21 ms)
Program
execution
CPU
processing
Output ON
Slave’s cycle time (15 ms) delay (10 ms)
Slave
Output
point
Min. I/O response time = 10+10+12+15+15 = 62 ms
Maximum I/O Response Time The CPM2A/CPM2C takes the longest to respond under the following circumstances:
1, 2, 3...
1. The CPM2A/CPM2C receives an input signal just after the input refresh
phase of the cycle.
2. The Master’s communications servicing just misses the Master-to-Slave
transmission.
3. The transmission is completed just after the Slave’s communications servicing ends.
I/O Maximum Response Time Input ON response time + Master’s cycle time × 2 + Transmission time × 3 +
Slave’s cycle time × 2 + Output ON response time
Input
point
I/O refresh
Input ON response time
Peripheral port servicing
Master
Input
bit
CPU
processing
Program
execution
Program
execution
Program
execution
Master #1
(Data transmission according to input point)
Master to Slave
CPU
processing
Transmission
time
Program
execution
Slave #1
Slave
Program
execution
Slave to Master
Program
execution
Transmission
time
Master to Slave
Transmission time
Program
execution
Slave #2
Program
execution
Slave #3
Output
point
Maximum I/O response time = 10 + 10 × 2 + 12 × 3 + 15 × 2 + 15 = 111 (ms)
522
Output OFF
response time
CPM2A/CPM2C Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
Section
8-2
8-2-4 Interrupt Processing Time
This section explains the processing times involved from the time an interrupt is
executed until the interrupt processing routine is called, and from the time an interrupt processing routine is completed until returning to the initial location. This
explanation applies to input interrupts, interval timer interrupts, and high-speed
counter interrupts.
1, 2, 3...
Item
Interrupt ON delay
1. Source of interrupt
2. Interrupt ON delay
3. Wait for completion of interrupt-mask processing
4. Change to interrupt processing
5. Interrupt routing (CPM1A/CPM2A/CPM2C only)
6. Return to initial location
The table below shows the times involved from the generation of an interrupt signal until the interrupt processing routine is called, and from when the interrupt
processing routine is completed until returning to the original position.
Contents
This is the delay time from the time the interrupt input bit turns ON until the
time that the interrupt is executed. This delay does not affect other interrupts.
Wait for completion of
When a process that disables (masks) the interrupt is being executed, this is
interrupt-mask processing the time required for that process to be completed.
Change to interrupt
This is the time it takes to change processing to the interrupt process.
processing
Return
This is the time it takes, from execution of RET(93), to return to the processing
that was interrupted.
Time
100 µs
See below.
30 µs
30 µs
Mask Processing
Interrupts are masked during processing of the operations described below. Until the processing is completed, any interrupts will remain masked for the indicated times.
Generation and clearing of non-fatal errors:
Interrupts will be masked for up to 100 µs when a non-fatal error has been
generated and the error contents are being registered in the PC, or when an
error is being cleared.
Online editing:
Operation will stop and interrupts will be masked for up to 600 ms (for
DM 6144 to DM 6655) when online editing is executed or the settings are
changed with STUP(––) during operation. The program or PC Setup can be
overwritten during that delay.
In addition to the online editing delay, interrupts may be masked for up to
170 µs for system processing.
Example Calculation
This example shows the interrupt response time (i.e., the time from when the
interrupt input turns ON until the start of the interrupt processing routine) when
input interrupts are used under the conditions shown below.
Minimum Response Time
Interrupt ON delay:
100 µs
Interrupt mask standby time:
0 µs
30 µs
+
Change-to-interrupt processing:
Minimum response time:
130 µs
Maximum Response Time
(Except for the Online Editing of DM 6144 to DM 6655)
Interrupt ON delay:
100 µs
Interrupt mask standby time:
170 µs
30 µs
+
Change-to-interrupt processing:
Maximum response time:
300 µs
523
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
8-2
In addition to the response time shown above, the time required for executing
the interrupt processing routine itself and a return time of 30 µs must also be accounted for when returning to the process that was interrupted.
8-2-5 CPM2A/CPM2C Instruction Execution Times
The following table lists the execution times for CPM2A/CPM2C (including the
CPM2C-S) instructions.
Basic Instructions
Code
Mnemonic
ON execution
time
i
((µs))
---------------------------
LD
LD NOT
AND
AND NOT
OR
OR NOT
AND LD
OR LD
OUT
OUT NOT
SET
RSET
TIM
0.64
---
CNT
Conditions (Top:
( p min.; bottom: max.))
OFF execution time (µs)
RSET
---
Any
IL
JMP
0.52
0.26
1.88
2.58
4.76
Constant for SV
4.50
DM for SV
Constant for SV
DM for SV
7.8
15.6
6.8
14.5
7.6
15.4
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
3.1
3.1
Special Instructions
Code
Mnemonic
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
NOP
END
IL
ILC
JMP
JME
FAL
FALS
STEP
SNXT
SFT
11
KEEP
12
CNTR
ON execution
time (µs)
0.15
6.2
1.1
1.6
0.95
2.1
20.5
2.9
7.3
5.1
With 1-word shift register
With 10-word shift register
With 53-word shift register
Any
Constant for SV
Any
y
13
DIFU
14
DIFD
5.3
OFF execution time (µs)
Any
y
10.4
15.3
39.6
3.2
10.9
18.8
5.5
524
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
DM for SV
Any
y
2.1
1.6
1.8
2.1
2.5
2.5
6.0
3.6
Reset
9.2
11.9
26.2
Reset
3.1
Reset
7.9
IL
0.98
1.0
1.0
IL
1.2
IL
5.5
JMP
0.98
1.0
1.0
JMP
1.3
JMP
5.6
Shift
5.1
Shift
5.4
IL
4.8
IL
4.7
JMP
0.96
JMP
0.97
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
Code
Mnemonic
15
TIMH
ON execution
time (µs)
9.0
9.6
9.8
10.7
16
WSFT
14.0
18.6
1.15 ms
17
ASFT
13.0
22.9
1.51 ms
20
CMP
7.0
8.3
12.1
21
MOV
7.8
8.4
22.8
22
MVN
7.9
8.4
22.8
23
BIN
15.8
30.3
24
BCD
14.6
29.0
25
ASL
8.6
15.8
26
ASR
8.4
15.6
27
ROL
7.3
14.5
28
ROR
7.3
14.5
29
COM
8.9
16.1
30
ADD
14.7
16.0
37.6
31
SUB
14.6
15.8
37.5
32
MUL
26.8
28.3
51.0
33
DIV
25.9
27.5
50.1
34
ANDW
12.3
13.8
35.4
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
Regular execution, constant for SV
Interrupt execution, constant for SV
Regular execution, DM for SV
Interrupt execution, DM for SV
With 1-word shift register
With 10-word shift register
8-2
OFF execution time (µs)
Reset
13.0
14.4
20.8
22.2
2.6
With 2,048-word shift register using DM
Shifting 1 word
Shifting 10 words
2.6
Shifting 2,048 words via DM
When comparing a constant to a constant
When comparing two words
2.6
When comparing two DM
When transferring a constant to a word
When transferring from one word to another
2.6
When transferring DM to DM
When transferring a constant to a word
When transferring from one word to another
2.6
When transferring DM to DM
When converting a word to a word
2.6
When converting DM to DM
When converting a word to a word
2.6
When converting DM to DM
When shifting a word
2.5
When shifting DM
When shifting a word
2.5
When shifting DM
When rotating a word
2.5
When rotating DM
When rotating a word
2.5
When rotating DM
When inverting a word
2.5
When inverting DM
Constant + constant → word
Word + word → word
2.6
DM + DM → DM
Constant – constant → word
Word – word → word
2.6
DM – DM → DM
Constant constant → word
Word word → word
2.6
DM DM → DM
Constant ÷ constant → word
word ÷ word → word
2.6
DM ÷ DM → DM
Constant Ɠ constant → word
Word Ɠ word → word
2.6
IL
12.6
14.0
20.5
22.0
JMP
6.1
7.5
6.1
7.5
DM Ɠ DM → DM
525
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
Code
Mnemonic
ON execution
time (µs)
12.3
13.8
35.4
35
ORW
36
XORW
12.3
13.8
35.4
37
XNRW
12.3
13.8
35.5
38
INC
8.8
15.9
39
DEC
8.9
16.1
40
41
46
STC
CLC
MSG
3.0
3.0
47
RXD
71.9
314.5
48
TXD
32.4
264.5
27.7
42.2
9.9
17.8
50
ADB
14.1
15.6
37.4
51
SBB
14.4
15.9
37.7
52
MLB
16.8
18.5
41.2
53
DVB
16.9
18.6
41.3
54
ADDL
25.3
48.6
55
SUBL
25.3
48.6
56
MULL
79.1
102.1
57
DIVL
73.9
98.6
58
BINL
23.9
38.5
59
BCDL
19.1
33.7
60
526
CMPL
14.8
30.6
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
Constant V constant → word
Word V word → word
OFF execution time (µs)
2.6
DM V DM → DM
Constant V constant → word
Word V word → word
2.6
DM V DM → DM
Constant V constant → word
Word V word → word
2.6
DM V DM → DM
When incrementing a word
2.5
When incrementing DM
When decrementing a word
2.5
When decrementing DM
Any
y
With message in words
2.5
2.5
2.5
With message in DM
Word specification, 1 byte input
2.6
DM specification, 256 bytes input
Word specification, 1 byte input, RS-232C
2.6
DM specification, 256 bytes input, RS-232C
Word specification, 1 byte input, Host Link
DM specification, 256 bytes input, Host Link
Constant + constant → word
Word + word → word
2.6
DM + DM → DM
Constant – constant → word
Word – word → word
2.6
DM – DM → DM
Constant constant → word
Word word → word
2.6
DM DM → DM
Constant ÷ constant → word
Word ÷ word → word
2.6
DM ÷ DM → DM
Word + word → word
2.6
DM + DM → DM
Word – word → word
2.6
DM – DM → DM
Word word → word
2.6
DM DM → DM
Word ÷ word → word
2.6
DM ÷ DM → DM
When converting word data to a word
2.6
When converting DM to DM
When converting word data to a word
2.6
When converting DM to DM
Comparing words
2.6
Comparing DM
8-2
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
Code
Mnemonic
61
INI
ON execution
time (µs)
68.8
12.0
43.3
51.8
42.8
50.8
60.1
42.7
50.7
17.8
20.0
27.6
62
PRV
36.9
44.7
36.6
44.3
38.5
46.2
20.2
27.4
24.4
32.4
39.9
47.8
20.1
27.1
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
Starting high-speed counter comparison
Stopping high-speed counter comparison
Specifying a constant when changing highspeed counter PV
Specifying DM when changing high-speed
counter PV
8-2
OFF execution time (µs)
2.6
Specifying increment mode via constant
Specifying increment mode via DM
Stopping pulse output
Specifying a constant when changing pulse output PV
Specifying DM when changing pulse output
PV
Stopping synchronized control of high-speed
counter
Specifying a constant when changing interrupt
counter PV
Specifying DM when changing interrupt
counter PV
Reading high-speed counter PV via word
2.6
Reading high-speed counter PV DM
Specifying increment mode via word
Specifying increment mode via D
Specifying a word when using synchronized
control
Specifying DM when using synchronized control
Reading high-speed counter pulse output status
via word
Reading high-speed counter pulse output status
via DM
Reading high-speed counter read range comparison results via word
Reading high-speed counter read range comparison results via DM
Reading pulse output PV via word
Reading pulse output PV via DM
Reading interrupt counter PV via word
Reading interrupt counter PV via DM
527
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
Code
Mnemonic
63
CTBL
ON execution
time (µs)
186.0
807.5
185.8
781.9
410.0
418.9
380.6
399.7
Registering a range comparison table and starting comparison in incrementing/decrementing
pule input mode via DM
Registering a range comparison table and starting comparison in incrementing mode via word
Registering a range comparison table and starting comparison in incrementing mode via DM
Only registering a target value comparison table
in incrementing/decrementing pulse input mode
via DM
Only registering a target value comparison table
in incrementing mode via word
Only registering a target value comparison table
in incrementing mode via DM
351.0
Only registering a range comparison table in
incrementing/decrementing pule input mode via
word
359.1
Only registering a range comparison table in
incrementing/decrementing pule input mode via
DM
Only registering a range comparison table in
incrementing mode via word
Only registering a range comparison table in
incrementing mode via DM
335.9
44.6
53.8
42.9
52.0
34.1
39.8
528
Registering a target value comparison table and
starting comparison in incrementing mode via
DM
Registering a range comparison table and starting comparison in incrementing/decrementing
pule input mode via word
810.3
331.2
SPED
Registering a target value comparison table and
starting comparison in incrementing/decrementing pulse input mode via DM
Registering a target value comparison table and
starting comparison in incrementing mode via
word
Only registering a target value comparison table
in incrementing/decrementing pulse input mode
via word
776.3
OFF execution time (µs)
Registering a target value comparison table and 2.6
starting comparison in incrementing/decrementing pulse input mode via word
183.4
182.4
64
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
Specifying a constant in independent mode
Specifying DM in independent mode
Specifying a constant in continuous pulse output mode
Specifying DM in continuous pulse output
mode
Specifying a word when changing output frequency
Specifying DM when changing output frequency
8-2
2.6
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
Code
Mnemonic
65
PULS
ON execution
time (µs)
38.4
46.6
40.0
48.1
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
Specifying a relative pulse for the set pulse output via a word
Specifying a relative pulse for the set pulse output via DM
SCL
37.9
39.2
59.9
Specifying a parameter word; constant to word
Specifying a parameter word; word to word
67
BCNT
24.9
4.32 ms
When counting 1 word
68
BCMP
35.3
38.3
58.1
Comparing constant, results to word
Comparing word, results to word
25.7
47.8
25.9
47.8
34.0
46.4
10.6
Constant-set one-shot interrupt start
21.3
23.8
1.52 ms
When transferring a constant to a word
When transferring a word to a word
70
STIM
XFER
OFF execution time (µs)
2.6
Specifying an absolute pulse for the set pulse
output via a word
Specifying an absolute pulse for the set pulse
output via DM
66
69
8-2
2.6
Specifying a parameter DM ; DM to DM
2.6
When counting 2,048 words via DM
2.6
Comparing DM, results to DM
2.6
DM-set one-shot interrupt start
Constant-set scheduled interrupt start
DM-set scheduled interrupt start
Constant-set timer read
DM-set timer read
Stopping timer
2.6
When transferring 2,048 words using DM
71
BSET
13.8
14.3
971.1
When setting a constant to a word
When setting a word to a word
73
XCHG
14.5
29.3
Word → word
74
SLD
12.3
23.9
2.83 ms
Shifting 1 word
Shifting 10 words
2.6
When setting DM to 2,048 words
2.6
DM → DM
2.6
Shifting 2,048 words using DM
75
SRD
12.3
23.9
2.83 ms
Shifting 1 word
Shifting 10 words
76
MLPX
16.8
46.1
When decoding word to word
77
DMPX
19.7
52.1
When encoding word to word
78
SDEC
19.8
48.3
When decoding word to word
80
DIST
18.7
20.2
43.1
31.0
32.7
55.9
When setting a constant to a word + a word
When setting a word to a word + a word
2.6
Shifting 2,048 words using DM
2.6
When decoding DM to DM
2.6
When encoding DM to DM
2.6
When decoding DM to DM
2.6
When setting DM to DM +DM
When setting a constant to a stack
When setting a word to a stack
When setting DM to a stack via DM
529
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
Code
Mnemonic
81
COLL
82
MOVB
83
MOVD
84
SFTR
85
TCMP
86
ASC
89
INT
91
92
93
97
SBS
SBN
RET
IORF
99
MCRO
530
ON execution
time (µs)
21.5
21.9
42.5
31.5
32.0
784.7
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
When setting a constant + a word to a word
When setting a word + a word to a word
OFF execution time (µs)
2.6
When setting DM + DM to DM
When setting a word + constant to FIFO stack
When setting a word + word to FIFO stack
When setting a DM + DM to FIFO stack via
DM
33.6
34.0
57.1
When setting a word + constant to LIFO stack
When setting a word + word to LIFO stack
17.3
18.0
41.7
13.8
16.2
38.1
22.8
24.3
1.15 ms
27.5
28.0
48.3
19.1
52.2
22.1
30.1
18.4
26.4
17.2
24.1
23.1
31.1
10.7
10.7
11.0
11.0
10.8
--6.2
16.8
130.7
110.7
26.1
42.3
When transferring a constant to a word
When transferring from one word to another
When setting a DM + DM to LIFO stack via
DM
2.6
When transferring DM to DM
When transferring a constant to a word
When transferring from one word to another
2.6
When transferring DM to DM
Shifting 1 word
Shifting 10 words
2.6
Shifting 2,048 words using DM
Comparing constant to word-set table
Comparing word to word-set table
2.6
Comparing DM to DM-set table
Word → word
2.6
DM → DM
Set masks via word
2.6
Set masks via DM
Clear interrupts via word
Clear interrupts via DM
Read mask status via word
Read mask status via DM
Change counter SV via word
Change counter SV via DM
Mask all interrupts via word
Mask all interrupts via DM
Clear all interrupts via word
Clear all interrupts via DM
Any
y
Refreshing IR 000
Refreshing one input word
Refreshing one output word
With word-set I/O operands
With DM-set I/O operands
8-2
2.6
0.76
1.0
2.8
2.6
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
8-2
Expansion Instructions without Default Function Codes
Code
Mnemonic
---
ACC
ON execution
time (µs)
66.5
92.1
66.2
92.2
65.5
75.0
45.4
53.8
65.5
75.0
45.5
53.6
65.0
74.5
45.4
53.5
65.4
74.8
45.5
53.6
---
---
AVG
FCS
---
HEX
---
HMS
---
MAX
---
MIN
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
When specifying a word in independent mode
and CW/CCW mode
When specifying DM in independent mode
and CW/CCW mode
OFF execution time (µs)
2.6
When specifying a word in independent mode
and Feed/Dir mode
When specifying DM in independent mode
and Feed/Dir mode
When executing the word designation in CW
continuous mode and CW/CCW mode
When executing the DM designation in CW
continuous mode and CW/CCW mode
When changing the word designation in CW
continuous mode and CW/CCW mode
When changing the DM designation in CW
continuous mode and CW/CCW mode
When executing the word designation in CCW
continuous mode and CW/CCW mode
When executing the DM designation in CCW
continuous mode and CW/CCW mode
When changing the word designation in CCW
continuous mode and CW/CCW mode
When changing the DM designation in CCW
continuous mode and CW/CCW mode
When executing the word designation in CW
continuous mode and Feed/Dir mode
When executing the DM designation in CW
continuous mode and Feed/Dir mode
When changing the word designation in CW
continuous mode and Feed/Dir mode
When changing the DM designation in CW
continuous mode and Feed/Dir mode
When executing the word designation in CCW
continuous mode and Feed/Dir mode
When executing the DM designation in CCW
continuous mode and Feed/Dir mode
When changing the word designation in CCW
continuous mode and Feed/Dir mode
When changing the DM designation in CCW
continuous mode and Feed/Dir mode
3.2
23.2
23.9
84.2
27.6
Average for 1 cycle (constant designation)
Average for 1 cycle (word designation)
592.3
Adding 999 words and outputting to DM
25.8
Word → Word
72.2
DM → DM
30.7
45.0
21.9
713.9
21.9
713.9
When converting word to word
2.6
When converting DM to DM
Searching one word and outputting to word
2.6
Searching 999 words and outputting to DM
Searching one word and outputting to word
2.6
Average for 64 cycles (DM designation)
Adding one word and outputting to word
2.6
2.6
Searching 999 words and outputting to DM
531
Section
CPM2A/CPM2C Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
Code
Mnemonic
---
NEG
---
---
---------
---
PID
PWM
SCL2
SCL3
SEC
SRCH
STUP
ON execution
time (µs)
12.0
12.8
28.3
---
---
---
---
SUM
SYNC
Constant for pulse width ratio
Word for pulse width ratio
35.1
59.3
Parameter word designation, word to word
37.1
62.3
Parameter word designation, word to word
29.8
44.0
Converting from word to word
28.9
1.40 ms
Searching one word and outputting to a word
3.42 ms
34.1
Constant specification, executed first scan
Constant specification, executed second scan
or later
DM specification, executed first scan
DM specification, executed second scan or
later
2.6
22.8
1.44 ms
Word added and output to word
2.6
34.6
35.3
42.5
25.3
32.6
Constant ratio specification, when executed
Word ratio specification, when executed
12.8
13.5
Normal execution, constant specification
Interrupt execution, constant specification
12.3
12.7
12.7
13.6
Normal execution, constant specification
Interrupt execution, constant specification
9.4
Comparing a constant to a constant range and
output to word
Comparing a word to a word range and output
to word
Comparing DM to DM and output to DM
2.6
Comparing a word to a word range
2.6
Initializing DM to DM
Sampling word to word
Sampling DM to DM
19.5
45.2
2.6
DM for pulse width ratio
2.6
Parameter DM designation, DM to DM
2.6
Parameter DM designation, DM to DM
2.6
Converting from DM to DM
2.6
DM specification, searching 2,048 words and
outputting to DM
DM specification, 999 bytes added and output
to DM
2.6
DM ratio specification, when executed
Word ratio specification, when changed
DM ratio specification, when changed
TMHH
ZCPL
3.3
30.3
43.4
46.0
33.4
532
Converting DM to DM
TIML
ZCP
3.0
Initializing word to word
11.8
---
Converting constant to word
Converting word to word
OFF execution time (µs)
392.5
418.8
29.3
58.7
3.44 ms
39.8
---
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
Normal execution, DM specification
Interrupt execution, DM specification
Comparing DM to DM
8-2
Reset
17.9
25.7
IL
17.5
25.5
JMP
8.1
8.1
Reset
15.6
17.2
23.6
25.1
IL
15.1
16.9
23.3
24.7
JMP
7.4
9.1
7.7
9.1
Section
SRM1(-V2) Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
8-3
8-3
SRM1(-V2) Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
8-3-1 The SRM1(-V2) Cycle
The overall flow of SRM1(-V2) operation is as shown in the following flowchart.
Initialization
Overseeing
processes
CompoBus/S
end wait
Input
refreshing
Program
execution
Cycle
time
Cycle time
processing
Output refreshing
RS-232C
servicing
Peripheral
port servicing
Note
1. The cycle time can be read using Programming Devices.
2. Cycle time maximum and current cycle time are stored in AR 14 and AR 15.
3. Change to processing will cause cycle times to change therefore the calculated values and actual values (for cycle time) will no always match.
533
Section
SRM1(-V2) Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
8-3
8-3-2 SRM1(-V2) Cycle Time
The processes involved in a single SRM1(-V2) cycle are shown in the following
table, and their respective processing times are explained.
Process
Content
Time requirements
Overseeing
Setting cycle watchdog timer, UM check, etc.
0.18 ms
CompoBus/S end wait
Waiting for CompoBus/S processing to finish
Input refreshing
Input information is read to input bits.
CompoBus/S communications response time – Overseeing time –
RS-232C port servicing time – peripheral port servicing time
0.02 ms
Program execution
User program is executed.
Cycle time calculation
Output refreshing
Refer to 8-3-6 SRM1(-V2) Instruction Execution
Times.
Standby until set time, when minimum cycle time is
set in DM 6619 of PC Setup.
Calculation of cycle time.
Output information (results of executing program) is
written to output bits.
RS-232C port servicing
CompoBus/S communications are started.
Devices connected to RS-232C port serviced.
Peripheral port servicing
Devices connected to peripheral port serviced.
Minimum Cycle Time
Total time for executing instructions.
(Varies according to content of user’s
program.)
Almost instantaneous, except for
standby processing.
0.05 ms
5% or less of cycle time, but always
between 0.55 and 131 ms
(Set in DM 6616.)
5% or less of cycle time, but always
between 0.55 and 131 ms
(Set in DM 6617.)
In SRM1(-V2) PCs, CompoBus/S communications are started after the output
refresh is completed. As a result, when the overseeing time plus the RS-232C
port servicing time plus the peripheral port servicing time is shorter than the
CompoBus/S communications response time, processing is placed on stand-by
until CompoBus/S communications are completed.
The minimum cycle time therefore is the the CompoBus/S communications response time plus the program execution time plus the input refresh time plus the
output refresh time. The CompoBus/S communications response time depends
on the “maximum number of nodes” and “communications mode” settings, as
follows:
Max. number of nodes Communications mode
32
High-speed mode
Long-distance mode
16
High-speed mode
Long-distance mode
CompoBus/S response time
0.8 ms
6.0 ms
0.5 ms
4.0 ms
Note The maximum number of nodes and communications mode are set in the PC
Setup (DM 6603).
534
Section
SRM1(-V2) Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
Cycle Time and Operations
The effects of the cycle time on SRM1(-V2) operations are as shown below.
When a long cycle time is affecting operation, either reduce the cycle time or improve responsiveness with interrupt programs.
Cycle time
10 ms or longer
20 ms or longer
100 ms or longer
120 ms or longer
200 ms or longer
8-3
Operation conditions
TIMH(15) may be inaccurate when TC 004 through TC 127 are used (operation will be normal for
TC 000 through TC 003).
Programming using the 0.02-second Clock Bit (SR 25401) may be inaccurate.
TIM may be inaccurate. Programming using the 0.1-second Clock Bit (SR 25500) may be inaccurate. A CYCLE TIME OVER error is generated (SR 25309 will turn ON). See note 1.
The FALS 9F monitoring time SV is exceeded. A system error (FALS 9F) is generated, and operation stops. See note 2.
Programming using the 0.2-second Clock Bit (SR 25501) may be inaccurate.
Note
1. The PC Setup (DM 6655) can be used to disable detection of CYCLE TIME
OVER error.
2. The cycle monitoring time can be changed in the PC Setup (DM 6618).
Cycle Time Example
The following is an example of a cycle time calculation.
The operating conditions are assumed to be as follows:
User’s program:500 instructions (consists of only LD and OUT)
Cycle time:
Variable (no minimum set)
RS-232C port: Not used.
Max. nodes:
32 nodes and high-speed communications mode
(CompoBus/S communication response time = 0.8 ms)
Peripheral:
0.7 ms
The average processing time for a single instruction in the user’s program is assumed to be 1.16 µs. The cycle times are as shown in the following table.
Process
Calculation method
Peripheral port used
Peripheral port not used
1. Overseeing
Fixed
0.18 ms
0.18 ms
2. CompoBus/S end wait
See previous page.
0.00 ms
0.62 ms
3. Input refresh
Fixed
0.02 ms
0.02 ms
4. Program execution
1.16 × 500 (µs)
0.8 ms
0.8 ms
5. Cycle time calculation
Negligible
0.00 ms
0.00 ms
6. Output refresh
0.01 × 1 + 0.005 × 1 (µs)
0.05 ms
0.05 ms
7. RS-232C port servicing
Not required
0.00 ms
0.00 ms
8. Peripheral port servicing
5% of cycle time
0.7 ms
0.00 ms
Cycle time
(1) + (2) + (3) + ...+ (8)
1.75 ms
1.67 ms
Note
1. The cycle time can be read from the PC via a Programming Device.
2. The maximum and current cycle time are stored in AR 14 and AR 15.
3. The cycle time can vary with actual operating conditions and will not necessarily agree precisely with the calculated value.
4. When the peripheral port is used, there is no CompoBus/S end wait time as it
is always 0 or less.
5. CompoBus/S end wait time = 0.8 – 0.18 – 0 – 0 = 0.62 (CompoBus/S communication response time – Overseeing – RS-232C port servicing time –
peripheral port servicing time.
535
Section
SRM1(-V2) Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
8-3
8-3-3 I/O Response Time
The I/O response time is the time it takes after an input signal has been received
(i.e., after an input bit has turned ON) for the PC to check and process the information and to output a control signal (i.e., to output the result of the processing to an output bit).
CompoBus/S communications are started when the SRM1(-V2) input refresh finishes. The ON/OFF status is read from the Input Terminals during the input refresh and the ON/OFF status is output to the Output Terminal during the output
refresh. Accordingly, the SRM1(-V2) I/O response time varies according to the
cycle time and CompoBus/S communications cycle status or I/O timing.
Example calculations of the I/O response time are provided next.
Minimum I/O Response Time
Minimum I/O response time =
Input ON delay + Output ON delay + CompoBus/S communications cycle time +
SRM1(-V2) cycle time
Cycle time
SRM1(-V2) cycle
CompoBus/S
cycle time
Communications
response time
Input
delay
Input on Slave
Output
delay
Output on Slave
Maximum I/O Response Time
Maximum I/O response time =
Input ON delay + Output ON delay + CompoBus/S communications cycle time +
SRM1(-V2) cycle time x 2
Cycle time
SRM1(-V2) cycle
CompoBus/S
cycle time
Communications
response time
Input on Slave
Output on Slave
536
Input
delay
Output
delay
Section
SRM1(-V2) Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
8-3
8-3-4 One-to-one PC Link I/O Response Time
When two SRM1s are linked in a 1:1 PC Link, the I/O response time is the time
required for an input executed at one of the SRM1s to be output to the other
SRM1 by means of 1:1 PC Link communications.
Minimum I/O Response Time The SRM1(-V2) responds most quickly under the following circumstances:
1, 2, 3...
Input
point
1. The SRM1(-V2) receives an input signal just prior to the I/O refresh phase of
the cycle.
2. The Master’s communications servicing occurs just as the Master-to-Slave
transmission begins.
3. The Slave’s communications servicing occurs just after the transmission is
completed.
I/O refresh
Overseeing, communications, etc.
Input ON delay (8 ms)
Input
bit
Program
execution
Master’s cycle time (10 ms)
Master to
Slave
Transmission time (39 ms)
Program
execution
Output ON
Slave’s cycle time (15 ms) delay (10 ms)
Output
point
Min. I/O response time = 8+10+39+15+10 = 82 ms
Maximum I/O Response Time The SRM1(-V2) takes the longest to respond under the following circumstances:
1, 2, 3...
1. The SRM1(-V2) receives an input signal just after the I/O refresh phase of
the cycle.
2. The Master’s communications servicing just misses the Master-to-Slave
transmission.
537
Section
SRM1(-V2) Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
8-3
3. The transmission is completed just after the Slave’s communications servicing ends.
Input
point
I/O refresh
Input ON delay (8 ms)
Overseeing, communications, etc.
Input
bit
Program
execution
Program
execution
Master’s cycle time (10 ms)
Master to
Slave
Slave to
Master
Master to
Slave
Transmission time (39 ms × 3)
Program
execution
Program
execution
Slave’s cycle time (15 ms)
Output ON
delay (10 ms)
Output
point
Max. I/O response time = 8 + 10 × 2 + 39 × 3 + 15× 2 + 10 = 185 ms
8-3-5 Interrupt Processing Time
This section explains the processing times involved from the time an interrupt is
executed until the interrupt processing routine is called, and from the time an interrupt processing routine is completed until returning to the initial location. This
explanation applies to input, interval timer interrupts.
1, 2, 3...
Item
1. Source of interrupt
2. Wait for completion of interrupt-mask processing
3. Change to interrupt processing
4. Interrupt routing (CPM1A only)
5. Return to initial location
The table below shows the times involved from the generation of an interrupt signal until the interrupt processing routine is called, and from when the interrupt
processing routine is completed until returning to the original position.
Contents
Time
Wait for completion of
interrupt-mask processing
This is the time during which interrupts are waiting until processing has
been completed. This situation occurs when a mask processes is
executed. It is explained below in more detail.
See below.
Change to interrupt
processing
Return
This is the time it takes to change processing to an interrupt.
15 µs
This is the time it takes, from execution of RET(93), to return to the processing that was interrupted.
15 µs
Mask Processing
Interrupts are masked during processing of the operations described below. Until the processing is completed, any interrupts will remain masked for the indicated times.
Generation and clearing of non-fatal errors:
When a non-fatal error is generated and the error contents are registered at
the SRM1(-V2), or when an error is being cleared, interrupts will be masked
for a maximum of 100 µs until the processing has been completed.
538
Section
SRM1(-V2) Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
8-3
Online editing:
Interrupts will be masked for a maximum of 600 ms (i.e.: editing DM 6144 to
DM 6655) when online editing is executed during operation. In addition, the
system processing may have to wait for a maximum of 170 µs during this
processing.
8-3-6 SRM1(-V2) Instruction Execution Times
The following table lists the execution times for SRM1(-V2) instructions.
Basic Instructions
Code
Mnemonic
ON execution
time
i
((µs))
OFF execution time (µs)
Conditions (Top:
( p min.; bottom: max.))
---------------------------
LD
LD NOT
AND
AND NOT
OR
OR NOT
AND LD
OR LD
OUT
OUT NOT
SET
RSET
TIM
0.97
0.97
0.77
Any
y
RSET
---
0.78
Any
---
0.39
Any
---
2.7
2.8
5.7
Constant for SV
---
CNT
6.6
DM for SV
Constant for SV
9.3
17.4
8.0
16.3
IL
JMP
2.2
DM for SV
9.1
17.2
3.6
3.6
3.5
3.5
3.8
3.8
Special Instructions and Expansion Instructions
Code
Mnemonic
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
NOP
END
IL
ILC
JMP
JME
FAL
FALS
STEP
SNXT
SFT
ON execution
time (µs)
0.20
4.8
2.5
1.9
2.2
2.5
18.4
3.6
10.7
5.9
14.5
11
KEEP
21.0
49.1
3.0
12
CNTR
14.8
DIFU
23.2
6.7
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
Any
y
With 1-word shift register
With 10-word shift register
With 100-word shift register
Any
Constant for SV
13
OFF execution time (µs)
DM for SV
Any
y
1.4
1.9
1.3
2.5
2.9
2.9
9.0
4.1
Reset
11.0
14.9
30.8
Reset
3.4
Reset
9.1
IL
1.4
1.4
1.4
IL
1.6
IL
6.6
JMP
1.4
1.4
1.4
JMP
1.7
JMP
6.5
Shift
5.8
IL
5.2
JMP
1.3
539
Section
SRM1(-V2) Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
Code
Mnemonic
14
DIFD
ON execution
time (µs)
6.4
15
TIMH
10.3
10.9
10.3
10.9
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
Any
y
Regular execution, constant for SV
Interrupt execution, constant for SV
Regular execution, DM for SV
Interrupt execution, DM for SV
16
WSFT
16.2
23.0
712.3
With 1-word shift register
With 10-word shift register
17
ASFT*
18.6
25.9
865.7
Shifting a word
Shifting 10 words
9.1
9.9
25.6
When comparing a constant to a word
When comparing two words
21
MOV
9.1
9.5
24.9
When transferring a constant to a word
When transferring from one word to another
22
MVN
9.3
9.8
25.1
When transferring a constant to a word
When transferring from one word to another
17.2
32.0
When converting a word to a word
15.8
30.6
When converting a word to a word
9.9
17.3
When shifting a word
9.7
17.2
When shifting a word
8.5
16.1
When rotating a word
24
25
26
BIN
BCD
ASL
ASR
IL
5.7
JMP
1.3
Reset
14.1
15.6
22.8
23.9
IL
13.9
15.4
22.1
23.6
JMP
7.0
8.5
7.0
8.5
2.9
3.0
3.0
When comparing two DM
3.0
When transferring DM to DM
3.0
When transferring DM to DM
3.0
When converting DM to DM
3.0
When converting DM to DM
2.9
When shifting DM
3.0
When shifting DM
27
ROL
28
ROR
8.5
16.1
When rotating a word
29
COM
10.5
17.7
When inverting a word
30
ADD
15.9
16.4
39.5
Constant + word → word
Word + word → word
2.9
When rotating DM
2.9
When rotating DM
3.0
When inverting DM
3.1
DM + DM → DM
31
SUB
15.6
16.3
38.6
Constant – word → word
Word – word → word
32
MUL
29.7
28.5
51.6
Constant word → word
Word word → word
33
DIV
27.2
28.5
53.1
Word ÷ constant → word
word ÷ word → word
540
Shift
5.8
Shifting 1,023 words via DM
CMP
23
OFF execution time (µs)
With 1,024-word shift register using DM
20
3.0
DM – DM → DM
3.0
DM DM → DM
DM ÷ DM → DM
8-3
2.9
Section
SRM1(-V2) Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
Code
Mnemonic
34
ANDW
35
ORW
36
XORW
ON execution
time (µs)
14.3
15.2
37.3
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
Constant Ɠ word → word
Word Ɠ word → word
OFF execution time (µs)
2.9
DM Ɠ DM → DM
14.3
15.2
37.3
Constant V word → word
Word V word → word
14.3
15.2
37.3
Constant V word → word
Word V word → word
2.9
DM V DM → DM
2.9
DM V DM → DM
37
XNRW
14.3
15.2
37.3
Constant V word → word
Word V word → word
38
INC
9.9
17.3
When incrementing a word
39
DEC
10.2
17.4
When decrementing a word
40
41
STC
CLC
3.5
3.0
Any
y
2.9
2.9
46
MSG
11.3
19.4
With message in words
2.9
47
RXD*
39.1
116.8
Word specification, 1 byte input
48
TXD*
31.3
266.5
26.7
34.0
Word specification, 1 byte input (RS-232C)
With message in DM
DM specification, 256 bytes input (Host Link)
SBB
17.0
17.8
40.2
Constant – word → word
Word – word → word
52
MLB
19.1
20.1
43.5
Constant word → word
Word word → word
19.5
20.4
43.7
Word ÷ constant → word
Word ÷ word → word
26.7
49.9
Word + word → word
26.8
49.9
Word – word → word
81.4
106.2
Word word → word
76.9
101.8
Word ÷ word → word
16.9
32.9
Comparing words
56
57
60
SUBL
MULL
DIVL
CMPL
2.9
DM specification, 256 bytes input (RS-232C)
Word specification, 1 byte input (Host Link)
51
55
2.9
DM specification, 256 bytes input
Constant + word → word
Word + word → word
ADDL
2.9
When decrementing DM
16.8
17.6
39.9
54
2.9
When incrementing DM
ADB
DVB
2.9
DM V DM → DM
50
53
8-3
3.0
DM + DM → DM
3.0
DM – DM → DM
3.0
DM DM → DM
3.0
DM ÷ DM → DM
3.0
DM + DM → DM
3.0
DM – DM → DM
3.0
DM DM → DM
3.0
DM ÷ DM → DM
2.9
Comparing DM
541
Section
SRM1(-V2) Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
Code
Mnemonic
66
SCL*
67
BCNT*
68
69
BCMP*
STIM*
70
XFER
71
BSET
73
XCHG
74
SLD
75
SRD
76
MLPX
77
DMPX
78
80
542
SDEC
DIST
ON execution
time (µs)
69.5
91.5
26.9
2.29 ms
41.4
41.9
64.5
34.7
49.5
35.3
50.0
33.9
49.5
11.4
22.9
24.0
902.0
15.2
15.7
565.2
16.2
31.5
13.6
26.7
1.54 ms
13.6
26.6
1.54 ms
25.5
48.9
35.1
58.1
26.8
49.9
21.3
21.9
45.7
34.3
35.3
59.3
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
OFF execution time (µs)
Word specification
3.0
DM specification
Counting a word
3.0
Counting 6,656 words via DM
Comparing constant, results to word
Comparing word, results to word
Comparing DM, results to DM
Word specification, one-shot timer start
3.0
3.0
DM specification, one-shot timer start
Word specification, scheduled interrupt start
DM specification, scheduled interrupt start
Words specification, timer read
DM specification timer read
Word specification, timer stop
When transferring a constant to a word
When transferring a word to a word
When transferring 1,024 words using DM
When setting a constant to 1 word
When setting word constant to 10 words
When setting DM to 1,024 words
Word → word
3.0
3.0
3.1
DM → DM
Shifting 1 word
Shifting 10 word
3.0
Shifting 1024 words using DM
Shifting 1 word
Shifting 10 word
3.0
Shifting 1,024 words using DM
When decoding word to word
3.0
When decoding DM to DM
When encoding word to word
3.0
When encoding DM to DM
When decoding word to word
2.9
When decoding DM to DM
When setting a constant to a word + a word
When setting a word to a word + a word
When setting DM to DM +DM
When setting a constant to a stack
When setting a word to a stack
When setting DM to a stack via DM
8-3
3.0
Section
SRM1(-V2) Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
Code
Mnemonic
81
COLL
82
MOVB
83
MOVD
84
SFTR
85
TCMP
86
ASC
91
92
93
99
SBS
SBN
RET
MCRO
ON execution
time (µs)
21.4
21.8
44.9
34.0
33.9
892.0
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
When setting a constant + a word to a word
When setting a word + a word to a word
8-3
OFF execution time (µs)
3.0
When setting DM + DM to DM
When setting a word + constant to FIFO stack
When setting a word + word to FIFO stack
When setting a DM + DM to
FIFO stack via DM
35.4
36.1
60.5
When setting a word + constant to LIFO stack
When setting a word + word to LIFO stack
18.2
19.0
42.1
16.3
17.6
39.9
21.0
26.9
718.5
30.0
30.7
53.1
30.0
53.7
13.2
--7.8
26.8
43.5
When transferring a constant to a word
When transferring one word to another
When setting a DM + DM to
LIFO stack via DM
3.0
When transferring DM to DM
When transferring a constant to a word
When transferring one word to another
2.9
When transferring DM to DM
Shifting 1 word
Shifting 10 word
3.0
Shifting 1,024 words using DM
Comparing constant to word-set table
Comparing word to word-set table
3.0
Comparing DM to DM-set table
Word → word
DM → DM
Any
y
With word-set I/O operands
3.0
3.0
1.3
1.3
3.0
With DM-set I/O operands
Note Those instructions marked with an asterisk are expansion instructions.
Expansion Instructions without Default Function Codes
Code
Mnemonic
---
FCS
---
HEX
---
NEG
---
PID
---
STUP
ON execution
time (µs)
23.4
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
Adding one word and outputting to word
643.7
Adding 999 words and outputting to DM
43.6
DM → DM
73.5
DM → DM
46.0
48.0
65.5
420.0
452.0
63.0
84.5
51.2
Converting constant to word
Converting word to word
58.2
Transferring word to word
Converting DM to DM
Initializing word to word
OFF execution time (µs)
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Initializing DM to DM
Sampling word to word
Sampling DM to DM
Transferring constant to word
3.0
543
Section
SRM1(-V2) Cycle Time and I/O Response Time
Code
Mnemonic
---
ZCP
544
ON execution
time (µs)
45.0
46.5
69.0
Conditions (Top: min.; bottom: max.)
Comparing a word to a constant range
Comparing a word to a word range
Comparing DM to DM
8-3
OFF execution time (µs)
3.0
SECTION 9
Troubleshooting
This section describes how to diagnose and correct the hardware and software errors that can occur during PC operation.
9-1
9-2
9-3
9-4
9-5
9-6
9-7
9-8
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programming Console Operation Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Programming Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User-defined Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operating Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-5-1 Non-fatal Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-5-2 Fatal Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-5-3 Other Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Host Link Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting Flowcharts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
546
546
547
548
549
549
550
550
551
553
553
545
Section
Programming Console Operation Errors
9-1
9-2
Introduction
PC errors can be divided broadly into the following four categories:
1, 2, 3...
1. Program Input Errors
These errors occur when inputting a program or attempting an operation
used to prepare the PC for operation.
2. Programming Errors
These errors will occur when the program is checked using the Program
Check operation.
3. User-defined Errors
There are three instructions that the user can use to define his own errors or
messages. The instructions will be executed when a particular condition
(defined by the user) has occurred during operation.
4. Operating Errors
These errors occur after program execution has been started.
a) Non-fatal Operating Errors
PC operation and program execution will continue after one or more of
these errors have occurred.
b) Fatal Operating Errors
PC operation and program execution will stop and all outputs from the
PC will be turned OFF when any of these errors have occurred.
The PC’s indicators will indicate when a PC error has occurred and an error message or code will be displayed on the Programming Console or host computer if
one is connected. The error code is also contained in SR 25300 to SR 25307.
For the most recent errors, both the type of error and time of occurrence will be
recorded in the PC’s error log area. Details are provided starting on page 551.
There are flags and other information provided in the SR and AR areas that can
be used in troubleshooting. Refer to Section 3 Memory Areas for lists of these.
Note In addition to the errors described above, communications errors can occur
when the PC is part of a Host Link System. Refer to page 553 for details.
9-2
Programming Console Operation Errors
The following error messages may appear when performing operations on the
Programming Console. Correct the error as indicated and continue with the operation. The asterisks in the displays shown below will be replaced with numeric
data, normally an address, in the actual display. Refer to the Ladder Support
Software Operation Manual, SYSMAC Support Software Operation Manual: Cseries PCs, or Data Access Console Operation Manual for errors that may appear when operating the SSS or a Data Access Console.
Message
REPL ROM
Meaning and appropriate response
An attempt was made to write to write-protected memory. Set bits
00 to 03 of DM 6602 to “0.”
PROG OVER The instruction at the last address in memory is not NOP(00). Erase
all unnecessary instructions at the end of the program.
ADDR OVER An address was set that is larger than the highest memory address
in Program Memory. Input a smaller address.
SET DATA
FALS 00 has been input, and “00” cannot be input. Re-input the
ERR
data.
I/O NO. ERR A data area address has been designated that exceeds the limit of
the data area, e.g., an address is too large. Confirm the
requirements for the instruction and re-enter the address.
546
Section
Programming Errors
9-3
9-3
Programming Errors
These errors in program syntax will be detected when the program is checked
using the Program Check operation.
Three levels of program checking are available. The desired level must be
designated to indicate the type of errors that are to be detected. The following table provides the error types, displays, and explanations of all syntax
errors. Check level 0 checks for type A, B, and C errors; check level 1, for
type A and B errors; and check level 2, for type A errors only.
Level A Errors
Message
?????
CIRCUIT
ERR
OPERAND
ERR
NO END
INSTR
LOCN ERR
JME
UNDEFD
DUPL
Level B Errors
Meaning and appropriate response
The program has been damaged, creating a non-existent function
code. Re-enter the program.
The number of logic blocks and logic block instructions does not
agree, i.e., either LD or LD NOT has been used to start a logic
block whose execution condition has not been used by another
instruction, or a logic block instruction has been used that does not
have the required number of logic blocks. Check your program.
A constant entered for the instruction is not within defined values.
Change the constant so that it lies within the proper range.
There is no END(01) in the program. Write END(01) at the final
address in the program.
An instruction is in the wrong place in the program. Check
instruction requirements and correct the program.
A JME(05) instruction is missing for a JMP(04) instruction. Correct
the jump number or insert the proper JME(05) instruction.
The same jump number or subroutine number has been used twice.
Correct the program so that the same number is only used once for
each.
SBN
UNDEFD
The SBS(91) instruction has been programmed for a subroutine
number that does not exist. Correct the subroutine number or
program the required subroutine.
STEP ERR
STEP(08) with a section number and STEP(08) without a section
number have been used incorrectly. Check STEP(08) programming
requirements and correct the program.
Message
IL-ILC ERR
JMP-JME
ERR
SBN-RET
ERR
Meaning and appropriate response
IL(02) and ILC(03) are not used in pairs. Correct the program so
that each IL(02) has a unique ILC(03). Although this error message
will appear if more than one IL(02) is used with the same ILC(03),
the program will be executed as written. Make sure your program is
written as desired before proceeding.
JMP(04) and JME(05) are not used in pairs. Make sure your
program is written as desired before proceeding.
If the displayed address is that of SBN(92), two different
subroutines have been defined with the same subroutine number.
Change one of the subroutine numbers or delete one of the
subroutines. If the displayed address is that of RET(93), RET(93)
has not been used properly. Check requirements for RET(93) and
correct the program.
547
Section
User-defined Errors
Level C Errors
Message
! Caution
9-4
9-4
Meaning and appropriate response
COIL DUPL
The same bit is being controlled (i.e., turned ON and/or OFF) by
more than one instruction (e.g., OUT, OUT NOT, DIFU(13),
DIFD(14), KEEP(11), SFT(10)). Although this is allowed for certain
instructions, check instruction requirements to confirm that the
program is correct or rewrite the program so that each bit is
controlled by only one instruction.
JMP
UNDEFD
JME(05) has been used with no JMP(04) with the same jump
number. Add a JMP(04) with the same number or delete the
JME(05) that is not being used.
SBS
UNDEFD
A subroutine exists that is not called by SBS(91). Program a
subroutine call in the proper place, or delete the subroutine if it is
not required.
Expansion instructions (those assigned to function codes 17, 18, 19, 47, 48, 60
to 69, 87, 88, and 89) are not subject to program checks. Program checks also
do not cover DM 1024 to DM 6143 for PCs that do not support this part of the DM
area. Data will not be written even if these areas are specified and data read from
these areas will always be “0000.”
User-defined Errors
There are four instructions that the user can use to define his own errors or messages. These instructions are used to send messages to the Programming Console connected to the PC, cause a non-fatal or a fatal error.
MESSAGE – MSG(46)
MSG(46) is used to display a message on the Programming Console. The message, which can be up to 16 characters long, is displayed when the instruction’s
execution condition is ON. Refer to page 493 for details.
FAILURE ALARM – FAL(06)
FAL(06) is an instruction that causes a non-fatal error. Refer to page 381 for details. The following will occur when an FAL(06) instruction is executed:
1, 2, 3...
1. The ERR/ALM indicator on the CPU Unit will flash. PC operation will continue.
2. The instruction’s 2-digit BCD FAL number (01 to 99) will be written to
SR 25300 to SR 25307.
3. The FAL number will be recorded in the PC’s error log area. The time of occurrence will also be recorded in CPM2A PCs and CPM2C PCs that are
equipped with an internal clock.
The FAL numbers can be set arbitrarily to indicate particular conditions. The
same number cannot be used as both an FAL number and an FALS number.
To clear an FAL error, correct the cause of the error, execute FAL 00, and then
clear the error using the Programming Console.
SEVERE FAILURE ALARM –
FALS(07)
FALS(07) is an instruction that causes a fatal error. Refer to page 381 for details.
The following will occur when an FALS(07) instruction is executed:
1, 2, 3...
1. Program execution will be stopped and outputs will be turned OFF.
2. The ERR/ALM indicator on the CPU Unit will be lit.
3. The instruction’s 2-digit BCD FALS number (01 to 99) will be written to
SR 25300 to SR 25307.
4. The FALS number will be recorded in the PC’s error log area. The time of
occurrence will also be recorded in CPM2A PCs and CPM2C PCs that are
equipped with an internal clock.
The FALS numbers can be set arbitrarily to indicate particular conditions. The
same number cannot be used as both an FAL number and an FALS number.
To clear an FALS error, switch the PC to PROGRAM Mode, correct the cause of
the error, and then clear the error using the Programming Console.
548
Section
Operating Errors
9-5
9-5
Operating Errors
There are two kinds of operating errors, non-fatal and fatal. PC operation will
continue after a non-fatal error occurs, but operation will be stopped if a fatal
error occurs.
! Caution
Investigate all errors, whether fatal or not. Remove the cause of the error as
soon as possible and restart the PC. Refer to the CPM1 Operation Manual,
CPM2A Operation Manual, or CPM2C Operation Manual for hardware information and Programming Console operations related to errors. Refer to the SSS
Operation Manual for SSS operations related to errors.
9-5-1 Non-fatal Errors
PC operation and program execution will continue after one or more of these errors have occurred. Although PC operation will continue, the cause of the error
should be corrected and the error cleared as soon as possible.
When one of these errors occurs, the POWER and RUN indicators will remain lit
and the ERR/ALM indicator will flash.
Message
SYS FAIL FAL**
(See note.)
FAL No.
Meaning and appropriate response
01 to 99
An FAL(06) instruction has been executed in the program. Check the FAL number to
determine conditions that would cause execution, correct the cause, and clear the
error.
9B
An error has been detected in the PC Setup. Check flags AR 1300 to AR 1302, and
correct as directed.
AR 1300 ON: An incorrect setting was detected in the PC Setup (DM 6600 to DM
6614) when power was turned on. Correct the settings in PROGRAM Mode and turn
on the power again.
AR 1301 ON: An incorrect setting was detected in the PC Setup (DM 6615 to DM
6644) when