City of Lakeport Municipal Sewer District
FOG Program
BMPs
REASONING
Check grease interceptor
solids depth routinely. The
combined thickness of the
floating grease and the
bottom solids should not be
more than 25% of the total
interceptor depth.
Grease interceptors will not meet
performance standards when
solids and floating grease levels
exceed 25%.
Collect and recycle waste
cooking oil.
These actions reduce grease
loading on grease removal
devices and the sewer.
“Dry wipe” pots, pans, and
kitchen equipment before
cleaning.
“Dry wiping” will reduce the
grease loading on grease removal
devices and the sewer.
Maintain a routine grease
trap cleaning schedule.
If grease traps are not routinely
cleaned, they do not work
properly and do not prevent
grease from entering the sewer. If
the grease trap is not providing
adequate protection, a grease
interceptor may be required.
Use absorbent paper under
fryer baskets.
This reduces the amount of grease
during cleanup.
Use absorbents, such as
paper towels and cat litter, to
pick up oil and grease spills
before mopping.
Do not use emulsifiers or
solvents other than typical
dishwashing detergents.
No hot water over 140°F
Decreases the amount of grease
that will be put down the drain.
BENEFITS
This will keep grease interceptor
working at peak performance.
This will reduce cleaning
frequency and maintenance
costs for grease removal devices
and reduce the amount of
grease entering the system.
This will reduce cleaning
frequency and maintenance
costs for grease removal devices
and reduce the amount of
grease entering the drain.
This reduces the amount of
grease entering the drain and
protects sewers from grease
blockages and overflows.
The amount of grease entering
the drain is reduced, which
protects the sewer system from
grease blockages and overflows.
Reduces the amount of grease
entering the drain and protects
sewers from grease blockages
and overflows.
Emulsifiers and solvents will break
down grease causing a problem
downstream in the sewer.
Allows for proper removal of
grease.
Temperatures in excess of 140°F in
any sink will dissolve grease and
send it into the sewer.
By reducing water temperature,
you will save costs for heating
that water, reduce the risk of
clogging up your sewer lateral,
and will save the cost of hiring
someone to clean out your
pipes.
CITY OF LAKEPORT
MUNICIPAL SEWER DISTRICT
Over 100 years of community, pride, progress, and service.
FATS, OILS AND GREASE (FOG) PROGRAM
BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES (BMPs) FOR FOOD
SERVICE ESTABLISHMENTS
What is FOG and Why is it Important to
My Business?
INSIDE THIS GUIDE
1
2
Why is FOG Important?
3
Food Prep Spill Prevention
4
Maintenance
5
Simple Suggestions to
Reduce FOG
Oil and Grease Collection,
Recycling and Food
Donations
6
Grease Traps
7
Tips
8
BMP Summary
“The best way to
manage FOG is to
keep fats, oils, and
grease out of the
sewer system.”
Residual fats, oils, and grease (FOG) are by-products that food
service establishments must constantly manage. Typically, FOG enters
a facility’s plumbing system from ware washing, floor cleaning, and
equipment sanitation. FOG will clog pipes and cause unsanitary spills
or overflows to occur in food preparation areas, around a food
service facility (e.g., in a parking lot or alleyway), or out on the street
near a manhole or sewer access point. Spills and overflows are costly
to clean up for businesses and the City, which means less profit for
your restaurant, or other food service establishment, and possible
fines and other penalties from the City.
Sanitary sewer systems are neither designed nor equipped to handle
the FOG that accumulates on the interior of the municipal sewer
collection system pipes. The best way to manage FOG is to keep fats,
oils and grease out of the sanitary sewer systems.
Some Simple Suggestions to Reduce
FOG
Training
Train kitchen staff and other employees about how they can help
ensure BMPs are implemented. People are more willing to support an
effort if they understand the basis for it. Through understanding, all
subsequent BMPs will have a better chance of being implemented.
FOG Program: Best Management Practices
Page |2
Dry Clean-Up
Practice dry clean-up. Remove food waste with “dry” methods such
as scraping, wiping, or sweeping before using “wet” methods that
use water. Wet methods typically wash the water and waste
materials into the drains where it eventually collects on the interior
walls of the drainage pipes. Do not pour grease, fats or oils from
cooking down the drain and do not use the sink to dispose of food
scraps. Likewise it is important to educate kitchen staff not to remove
drain screens as this may allow paper or plastic cups, straws, and
other utensils to enter the plumbing system during clean up.
The success of dry clean-up is dependent upon the behavior of the
employee and availability of the tools for removal of food waste
before washing. To practice dry clean-up:
“Do not pour
grease, fats or oils
from cooking down
the drain and do not
use the sink to
dispose of food
scraps.”
•
Use rubber scrapers to remove fats, oils and grease
from cookware, utensils, chafing dishes, and serving
ware.
•
Use food grade paper to soak up oil and grease under
fryer baskets.
•
Use paper towels to wipe down work areas. Cloth
towels will accumulate grease that will eventually end
up in your drains from towel washing/rinsing.
Signs
Post “No Grease” signs above sinks and on the front of dishwashers.
Signs are a constant reminder to kitchen staff that something must be
observed, such as those for hand washing or fire danger. Signs will
help minimize the amount of material going into grease
traps/interceptors and will reduce the cost of cleaning and disposal.
Water Temperature
Keep water less than 140°F in all sinks, especially in any pre-rinse sink in
line before a mechanical dishwasher. Temperatures in excess of
140°F in any sink will dissolve grease and send it into the sewer.
However, that grease will cool and eventually solidify somewhere
down the line in your sewer lateral or the municipal collection system.
This will create sewer blockages elsewhere, leading to spills at your
facility or overflows nearby. By reducing water temperature, you will
save costs for heating that water, reduce the risk of clogging up your
sewer lateral, and will save the cost of hiring someone to clean out
your pipes.
FOG Program: Best Management Practices
Page |3
Food Prep Spill Prevention Preventing spills reduces the amount of waste on food preparation
and serving areas that will require clean up. A dry workplace is safer
for employees in avoiding slips, trips and falls. For spill prevention:
“A dry workplace is
safer for employees
in avoiding slips, trips
and falls.”
•
Empty containers before they are full.
•
Use a cover to transport grease interceptor contents
to a rendering barrel.
•
Provide employees with the proper tools (ladles,
ample containers, etc.) to transport materials without
spilling.
Maintenance Maintenance is key to avoiding FOG blockages. Grease traps,
interceptors or other FOG capturing equipment should be regularly
maintained. All staff should be aware of, and trained to perform,
correct cleaning procedures, particularly for under-sink interceptors
that are prone to malfunction due to improper maintenance. A
regular maintenance schedule is highly recommended.
More
beneficial maintenance suggestions include:
“Some facilities may
require monthly
cleaning of their
grease traps or
interceptors; others
may need it less
frequently.”
•
Contract with a management company to
professionally clean large hood filters. Small hoods can
be hand-cleaned with spray detergents and wiped
down with cloths for cleaning. Hood filters can be
effectively cleaned by routinely spraying with hot
water with little or no detergents over the mop sink,
which should be connected to a grease
trap/interceptor. After a hot water rinse (separately
trapped), filter panels can go into the dishwasher. For
hoods to operate properly in the removal of greaseladen vapors, the ventilation system will also need to
be balanced with sufficient make-up air.
•
Skim/Filter fryer grease daily and change oil when
necessary. Use a test kit provided by your grocery
distributor rather than simply a “guess” to determine
when to change oil. This extends the life of both the
fryer and the oil. Build-up of carbon deposits on the
bottom of the fryer act as an insulator that forces the
fryer to heat longer, causing the oil to break down
sooner.
FOG Program: Best Management Practices
Page |4
•
Collect fryer oil in an oil rendering tank for disposal or
transport it to a bulk oil rendering tank instead of
discharging it into a grease interceptor or waste drain.
•
Cleaning intervals depend upon the type of food
establishment involved. Some facilities may require
monthly cleaning of their grease traps or interceptors;
others may need it less frequently. Establishments that
operate a large number of fryers or handle a large
amount of fried foods (such as chicken), along with
ethnic food establishments, may need at least monthly
cleanings. Full-cleaning of grease traps (removing all
liquids and solids and scraping the walls) is a
worthwhile investment. Remember, sugars, starches
and other organics accumulate from the bottom up. If
sediment is allowed to accumulate in the trap, it will
need to be pumped more frequently.
•
Develop a rotation system if multiple fryers are in use.
Designate a single fryer for products that are
particularly high in deposits, and change that one
more often.
Oil and Grease Collection, Recycling
and Food Donation Get paid to recycle
your yellow grease.
FOG, especially yellow grease, is a commodity that, if handled
properly, should be treated as a valuable resource. Yellow grease, or
”tallow,” as it is sometimes referred to, is cooking grease. When
heated and purified, it can be sold to soap, cosmetic, and animal
feed companies. When handling your grease, consider the following:
•
Some rendering companies will offer services free-ofcharge and others will give a rebate on the materials
collected. A list of registered grease haulers can be
found in the Grease Rendering Guide or on the City’s
web site, www.cityoflakeport.com.
•
Use 25-gallon rendering barrels with covers for onsite
collection of oil and grease other than from fryers.
Educate kitchen staff on the importance of keeping
outside barrels covered at all times. During storms,
uncovered or partially covered barrels allow storm
water to enter the barrel resulting in oil running onto
the ground and possibly into storm drains, and can
contaminate an otherwise useful by-product.
FOG Program: Best Management Practices
“Edible food waste
may be
donated….It helps
reduce disposal
costs….”
Page |5
•
Use a 3-compartment sink for ware washing. Begin with
a hot pre-wash, followed by a scouring sink with
detergent, then a rinse sink.
•
Make sure all drain screens are installed.
•
Prior to washing and rinsing, use a hot water ONLY (no
detergent) pre-rinse that is separately trapped to
remove non-emulsified oils and greases from ware
washing. Wash and rinse steps should also be trapped.
•
Empty grill top scrap baskets or scrap boxes and hoods
into the rendering barrel.
•
Easy does it! Instruct staff to be conservative about
their use of fats, oils and grease in food preparation
and serving.
•
Ensure that edible food is not flushed down your drains.
Edible food waste may be donated to a local food
bank. Food donation is a win-win situation. It helps
restaurants reduce disposal costs and it puts the food
in the hands of those who can use it. Contact the
Lake County Department of Social Services at 9954200 to learn more.
Grease Traps/Interceptors The City’s new sewer use ordinance requires all businesses that
produce FOG to install, operate, and maintain a grease trap or
interceptor.
Installing or upgrading a grease trap or grease
interceptor is a beneficial investment for any food service
establishment, given the costly effects of FOG. But before doing so,
the following should be considered:
•
For grease traps to be effective, the unit(s) must be
properly sized, constructed, and installed in a location
to provide an adequate retention time for settling and
accumulation of the FOG. If the unit(s) is too close to
the FOG discharge and does not have enough
volume to allow amassing of the FOG, the emulsified
oils will pass through the unit without being captured.
For information on properly locating, constructing, and
sizing grease traps, contact the City’s Compliance
Officer
or
visit
the
City’s
web
site
at
www.cityoflakeport.com.
FOG Program: Best Management Practices
Contact the City’s
Compliance Officer
at 263-5615 for more
information.
Page |6
•
Ensure all grease-bearing drains discharge to the
grease trap. These include mop sinks, woks, wash
sinks, prep sinks, utility sinks, pulpers, dishwashers,
prerinse sinks, can washes, and floor drains in food
preparation areas such as those near a fryer or
tilt/steam kettle. No toilet wastes should be plumbed
to the grease trap.
•
If these suggested best management practices do
not adequately reduce FOG levels, the operator may
consider installing a second grease trap with flowthrough venting. This system should help reduce
grease effluent substantially.
Consumer Tip Buyer beware! When choosing a method of managing your fats, oil,
and grease, ensure that it does what the vendor says it will do.
Some technologies or “miracle cures” don’t eliminate the problem
but result in grease accumulations further down the sewer line. “Out
of sight” is not “out of mind.” Check the vendor’s references.
Contact Information Please contact the City’s Compliance Officer at 263-5615, or by Email at dbuffalo@cityoflakeport.com, for more information or to
discuss your particular FOG situation. We’re here to help you
succeed!
Mailing Address:
Lakeport City Hall
225 Park Street
Lakeport, CA 95453
FOG Program: Best Management Practices
Page |7
SUMMARY BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES (BMPs) FOR FOOD
RELATED FATS, OILS AND GREASE
BMPs
REASONING
BENEFITS
Train all staff on BMPs.
People are more willing to support
an effort if they understand the
reasons behind it.
Post “No Grease” signs
above sinks and on the front
of dishwashers.
Check grease interceptor
solids depth routinely. The
combined thickness of the
floating grease and the
bottom solids should not be
more than 25% of the total
interceptor depth.
Collect and recycle waste
cooking oil.
Signs serve as a constant reminder
for staff working in kitchens.
Trained staff will be more likely to
implement BMPs and work to
reduce grease discharges to the
sewer.
Reminders help minimize grease
discharge to the sewer or grease
removal device.
This will keep grease interceptor
working at peak performance.
“Dry wipe” pots, pans, and
kitchen equipment before
cleaning.
“Dry wiping” will reduce the
grease loading on grease removal
devices and the sewer.
Maintain a routine grease
trap cleaning schedule.
If grease traps are not routinely
cleaned, they do not work
properly and do not prevent
grease from entering the sewer. If
the grease trap is not providing
adequate protection, a grease
interceptor may be required.
This reduces the amount of grease
during cleanup.
Use absorbent paper under
fryer baskets.
Use absorbents, such as
paper towels and cat litter, to
pick up oil and grease spills
before mopping.
Do not use emulsifiers or
solvents other than typical
dishwashing detergents.
Grease interceptors will not meet
performance standards when
solids and floating grease levels
exceed 25%.
These actions reduce grease
loading on grease removal
devices and the sewer.
Decreases the amount of grease
that will be put down the drain.
Emulsifiers and solvents will break
down grease causing a problem
downstream in the sewer.
This will reduce cleaning
frequency and maintenance
costs for grease removal devices
and reduce the amount of
grease entering the system.
This will reduce cleaning
frequency and maintenance
costs for grease removal devices
and reduce the amount of
grease entering the drain.
This reduces the amount of
grease entering the drain and
protects sewers from grease
blockages and overflows.
The amount of grease entering
the drain is reduced, which
protects the sewer system from
grease blockages and overflows.
Reduces the amount of grease
entering the drain and protects
sewers from grease blockages
and overflows.
Allows for proper removal of
grease.
CITY OF LAKEPORT
MUNICIPAL SEWER DISTRICT
Over 100 years of community, pride, progress, and service.
FATS, OILS AND GREASE (FOG) PROGRAM
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQs)
INSIDE THIS FAQ
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Is grease a problem?
What is a grease trap and
how does it work?
What is a grease
interceptor?
How do I clean my grease
trap?
Can you recommend a
maintenance schedule?
Do I need a grease trap?
Is the grease trap I have
adequate?
Who inspects grease
traps/interceptors?
Who determines if I need a
grease trap or interceptor?
10 What if I don’t install a
grease trap?
11 How can I get in
compliance?
Is grease a problem?
In the sewage collection and treatment business, the answer is an
emphatic “YES!” Grease is singled out for special attention because
of its poor solubility in water and its tendency to separate from the
liquid solution.
Large amounts of oil and grease in the wastewater cause trouble in
collection system pipes. It decreases pipe capacity and, therefore,
requires frequent cleaning and results in a shorter lifespan. Oil and
grease also hamper effective treatment at the wastewater treatment
plant.
Problems caused by wastes from restaurants and other grease
producing establishments have served as the basis for the City’s new
sewer ordinance, which governs the discharge of materials into the
sewer system. It is also why the installation of grease traps or
interceptors has become mandatory.
What is a grease trap and how does it
work?
A grease trap is a small reservoir built into the wastewater piping, a
short distance from a grease producing area. Baffles in the reservoir
retain the wastewater long enough for the grease to congeal and
rise to the surface. The grease can then be removed and disposed
of properly. A diagram of a typical grease trap is presented in Figure
1 below.
FOG Program: FAQs
Page |2
Figure 1
Grease trap
maintenance is
typically performed
by maintenance
staff or other
employees. Grease
interceptors are
usually cleaned by
grease haulers or
recyclers.
What is a grease interceptor?
A grease interceptor is a vault with a minimum capacity of between
500 and 750 gallons, located on the exterior of the building. The
capacity of the interceptor provides adequate residence time so
that wastewater has time to cool, allowing the remaining grease not
collected by the traps time to congeal and rise to the surface, where
it accumulates until the interceptor is cleaned. Figure 2 illustrates a
typical grease interceptor.
Figure 2
FOG Program: FAQs
Page |3
How do I clean my grease
trap/interceptor?
Refer to the “Grease
Trap Maintenance
Guide” for useful
information about
how to clean your
grease trap.
Grease trap maintenance is typically performed by maintenance
staff or other employees of a restaurant or other food service
establishment/facility. Please refer to the Grease Trap Maintenance
Guide for more information on how to clean and maintain your
grease trap.
Grease interceptors are usually cleaned by grease haulers or
recyclers. Several vendors operate in the Lakeport area, providing
both cleaning (grease removal) and disposal services. Please refer to
the Restaurant Oil and Grease Rendering Guide for more information
or check the local phone book for grease removal services.
Can you recommend a maintenance
schedule?
All grease interceptors should be cleaned at least once every 60
days. Some establishments will find it necessary to clean their traps
more often than that. If you find that you have to clean it often
(every month), you may want to consider installing a larger trap or
interceptor.
Be sure to record all of your maintenance activity on the
Maintenance Log. A copy can be obtained from the City’s Utilities
Department or from the Lake County Department of Environmental
Health.
Do I need a grease interceptor?
The short answer is yes. Pursuant to City code, any establishment that
introduces grease or oil into the drainage and sewage system in
quantities large enough to cause line blockages or hinder sewage
treatment is required to install a grease interceptor. However, the size
and type of interceptor may vary.
You can make
money by recycling
your used yellow
(cooking) grease.
Interceptors and grease traps are usually required for high volume
restaurants (full menu establishments operating 16 hours/day and/or
serving 500+ meals/day) and large commercial establishments, such
as hotels, hospitals, factories, or school kitchens.
However, even small volume (fast food or take-out restaurants with
limited menus, minimum dishwashing, and/or minimal seating
capacity) and medium volume establishments (full menu
establishments operating 8-16 hours/day and/or serving 100-400
meals/day) can generate significant amounts of grease. In order to
ensure that the sewer remains free of grease and fully functional, the
City is requiring all establishments to install interceptors.
FOG Program: FAQs
Page |4
Is the grease trap/interceptor I have
adequate?
It depends. The number of drains or fixtures connected to the trap
and the maintenance schedule dictate whether a trap is effective at
preventing grease from entering the sanitary sewer system. The
bottom line: if grease is clogging your lateral or the City main near
your establishment, most likely your trap is inadequate. Please feel
free to contact the City’s Compliance Officer at 263-5615 if you have
concerns about your grease trap or would like to discuss your
particular grease issue.
The County’s
Environmental Health
Department will
conduct an
inspection of your
grease
trap/interceptor at
least once a year
during a regular
health inspection.
Who inspects grease
traps/interceptors and what are the
criteria for those inspections?
The County’s Environmental Health Department will identify your
grease trap/interceptor at least once a year during a regular health
inspection. The City’s Compliance Officer is trained to inspect the
unit(s), if needed. Inspections may be frequent depending on any
identified issues or concerns related to FOG in the sanitary sewer that
may be occurring in or around your facility.
For additional information about grease trap/interceptor inspections,
please call the City’s Compliance Officer at 263-5615, ext. 30 or by Email at compliance@cityoflakeport.com.
Who determines if I need a grease
trap or interceptor?
Generally speaking, City Code requires every restaurant or other food
service establishment that produces grease to install and maintain a
grease trap/interceptor, unless a variance is requested.
If a variance is requested, a variance study will be performed, which
will examine the feasibility of installing a grease trap at a subject
location. The Community Development/Utilities Director, otherwise
known as the CLMSD Director, will make the determination as to
whether a grease trap is required or if it is infeasible.
FOG Program: FAQs
Page |5
What if I don’t install a grease
interceptor?
City code requires any establishment that introduces grease or oil
into the drainage and sewage system in quantities large enough to
cause line blockages or hinder sewage treatment is required to install
a grease interceptor. Failure to do so may result in remuneration and
fines up to $25,000 or more. However, you may request a variance, if
you feel your circumstance warrants consideration. There are fees
associated with this request. Please contact the Compliance Officer
for more information.
How can I get in compliance?
Great question! I like how you’re thinking. If your business does not
have a grease interceptor, and you produce fats, oils and grease,
you will need to request a grease trap/interceptor installation permit.
Contact the City’s Community Development Department at 263-3056
for more information and to request an application.
Contact the City’s
Compliance Officer
at 263-5615 for more
information.
If you have a grease trap or interceptor and believe that it may be
ineffective at keeping FOG out of the sanitary sewer (i.e. needs
frequent cleaning, backups occurring in kitchen, etc.), you may need
to upgrade or replace your existing grease trap/interceptor. A
grease trap/interceptor installation permit will be required for this as
well.
To assess your grease discharge practices and determine if your
efforts to minimize FOG are adequate, complete a Food Service
Assessment Checklist. Contact the City’s Compliance Officer at 2635615 to receive a copy or to discuss your particular grease trap or
interceptor issue.
Contact Information
Please contact the City’s Compliance Officer at 263-5615, or by Email at compliance@cityoflakeport.com, for more information or to
discuss your particular FOG situation. We’re here to help you
succeed!
Mailing Address:
Lakeport City Hall
225 Park Street
Lakeport, CA 95453
(707) 263-5615
CITY OF LAKEPORT MUNICIPAL SEWER DISTRICT
Over 100 years of community, pride, progress, and service.
FATS, OILS AND GREASE (FOG) PROGRAM
FOOD SERVICE ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST
FOOD SERVICE ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST
This checklist will help you as a manager /owner of a food services establishment/facility (FSE) identify sources
of fats, oil and grease and how they are being managed. By completing this checklist, you will gain a better
understanding of your current practices and if they are adequate to minimize FOG discharges to the City of
Lakeport Municipal Sewer District (CLMSD). Improper FOG disposal can result in costly and unhealthy sewer
overflows and backups directly into your facility.
Please take a moment to review this checklist and discuss it with your Health Inspector during your next
scheduled inspection. Your inspector can answer many questions you may have about FOG and grease
disposal. For additional information, please contact the City’s Compliance Officer at 263-5615.
General Food Service Establishment Information
1. Facility Name:
2. Facility Address:
3. Facility Owner/Manager:
4. Type of food service operation:
5. Responsible person/organization:
6. Hours of operation:
7. Number of meals served/day:
8. Number of seats:
Fats, Oil and Grease Trap/Interceptor
1. Type (under the sink, in ground, mechanical):
2. Number of units:
3. Size (gallons):
4. Location:
Date (MM/DD/YYY):
FOG Program: Food Service Assessment Checklist
Grease Trap/Interceptor Maintenance
1. Pump-out schedule (monthly, weekly, etc.)
2. Pump service provider:
3. Maintenance log available on-site?
4. Is grease trap/interceptor cleaning observed by management?
5. Does service include complete pumping/cleaning of the trap and
sample box, not just removing the grease layer?
6. Is the vault refilled with clean water, not with water already filled
out?
7. Are enzymes/bacteria used?
If yes, vendor name?
____________________________________
Page |2
□ Yes
□ Yes
□ Yes
□
□
□
No
No
No
□ Yes
□
No
□ Yes
□
No
Kitchen Equipment/Devices
Are the following kitchen devices plumbed to discharge to the grease trap/interceptor?
1. Dishwashers:
□ Yes
2. Pot sinks, multi-compartment sinks, mop sinks, pre-rinse sinks:
□ Yes
3. Floor drains:
□ Yes
4. Food streamers:
□ Yes
5. Food grinders/pulpers:
□ Yes
6. Steam kettle(s):
□ Yes
7. Can washer(s):
□ Yes
Comments:
□
□
□
□
□
□
□
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Are the following cleaned or maintained periodically? Is the cleanup water discharged to the
grease trap? If not, where is it discharged?____________________________________________________
1. Exhaust hoods and filters:
□ Yes
□ No
2. Floor mats, floors and grill tops
□ Yes
□ No
3. Exterior of the grease traps/interceptors
□ Yes
□ No
4. Dumpsters/trash cans
□ Yes
□ No
5. Parking lots and sidewalks
□ Yes
□ No
Comments:
Dry Cleanup
1. Are serving wares, utensils or food preparation surfaces wiped
before washing?
2. Do employees know not to allow FOG or food wastes into the
drains?
3. Are employees provided the necessary training and tools (rubber
scrapers, brooms, absorbent materials for spills) for dry cleanup?
□ Yes
□ No
□ Yes
□ No
□ Yes
□ No
FOG Program: Food Service Assessment Checklist
Spill Cleanup and Prevention
1. Are cleanup kits in visible and accessible areas?
2. Are employees provided with adequate conveyance
methods/tools (ladles, containers with lids, etc.) to prevent oil and
grease spills while transferring from inside the restaurant to the
outside storage bin?
3. Is there a designated employee(s) to manage/monitor cleanup?
Employee Awareness Training
1. Have employees received training in the Best Management
Practices (BMPs) for handling oil and grease (i.e. spill prevention,
dry cleanup, etc.)?
2. Are employees involved in keeping FOG out of the drains?
3. Are signs posted in key areas that remind staff to keep oils and
grease out of the drains?
4. Are new employees trained on FOG BMPs and existing employees
trained on a routine basis (e.g. quarterly, semi-annually, etc.)?
Grease Disposal
1. Are the outside oil and grease storage bins kept covered?
2. Are the outside storage bins located away from storm drains and
catch basins?
3. Are dumpsters and grease recycling bins cleaned and checked
for leaks often?
4. Is there a spill prevention plan, and are materials available in the
event of a spill?
Grease Management Contractors
1. Does your hauler/renderer have the proper legal licenses and
permits to handle the oil and grease waste?
2. Who do you contact when there is a problem?
3. Do you know where the waste grease is sent for final disposal?
Page |3
□ Yes
□ Yes
□ No
□ No
□ Yes
□ No
□ Yes
□ No
□ Yes
□ Yes
□ No
□ No
□ Yes
□ No
□ Yes
□ Yes
□ No
□ No
□ Yes
□ No
□ Yes
□ No
□ Yes
□ No
□ Yes
□ Yes
□ No
□ No
For further information on proper management of oil and grease from your food service
operations, contact the City’s Compliance Officer at (707) 263-5615.
CITY OF LAKEPORT
MUNICIPAL SEWER DISTRICT
Over 100 years of community, pride, progress, and service.
FATS, OILS AND GREASE (FOG) PROGRAM
GREASE RENDERING GUIDE
Grease Recycling
INSIDE THIS GUIDE
1
Grease Recycling
2
Benefits of Rendering
3
4
Renderers and Other
Maintenance Vendors
Questions to Ask a
Renderer
While pre-treating wastewater through the use of grease traps,
skimmers, separators, and process flow treatment systems can greatly
reduce FOG buildup in the sanitary sewer, source reduction of oil and
grease must be the first course of action. Through dry cleanup, the
development of an efficient collection system, and a rendering
program, wastewater problems can be avoided.
Rendering companies or “grease recyclers” will accept oil, grease,
and other animal byproducts (known as “yellow” or “tallow” grease),
including deep fry fat and bones. In fact, they may even pay you to
take it.
Waste oil and grease is tested for pesticides and other contaminants.
Material is placed in a settling tank to remove solids, heated in a
vacuum to volatize impurities and is then sold to companies for use as
animal feed additives, in soap production, oils, cosmetic and skin
care products, and in composting.
Benefits of Rendering
There are many potential benefits of rendering or recycling your
grease, including:
1. Cost Avoidance: The charge for pumping out a grease trap is
considerably more than the service fee charged by a
Renderer. With dry cleanup and other source reduction
techniques, many restaurants are reducing their water
consumption, sewer usage, and are saving money.
Rendering also helps restaurants avoid discharge penalties
and fines for sewer system overflows resulting from FOG.
FOG Program: Grease Rendering Guide
Page |2
2. Economic Incentives: Renderers’ service fees are low and
often provided at no charge. In some cases, rendering
companies are willing to pay for restaurant oil and grease.
3. Environmental Savings: Natural resources and energy are
conserved through source reduction and recycling. FOG
recycling keeps these materials from clogging municipal
sewer lines, as well as using valuable landfill space, and
diverts it to a useful purpose.
4. Compliance: The sewer use ordinance for the City of Lakeport
“In some cases,
rendering
companies are
willing to pay for
restaurant oil and
grease.”
strictly limits the type and amount of waste discharge into the
system.
Penalties may be levied against food service
establishments (FSEs) when higher concentrations of fats, oils
and grease are determined to be originating from a particular
location. Rendering prevents grease from reaching the sewer
system and, in so doing, helps FSEs maintain compliance and
avoid costly penalties and fines, which range from $50 for a
minor violation to $25,000 or more.
Renderers and Other Maintenance
Vendors
A list of a few registered grease haulers based in Lake County is as
follows:
Action Sanitary, Inc.
P.O. Box 492
Lower Lake, CA 95457
(707) 994-5068
Roto-Rooter of Lake County
P.O. Box 1340
Kelseyville, CA 95451
(707) 279-9461
The Following Companies Also Service Lake County
Darling International Inc.
429 Amador St.
San Francisco, CA 94124
(800) 473-4890
North State Rendering Company Inc.
15 Shippee Rd.
Oroville, CA 95965
(530) 343-6076
Sacramento Rendering Co.
11350 Kiefer Blvd.
Sacramento, CA 95830
(800) 339-6493
Yokayo Biofuels
150 Perry Street
Ukiah, CA 95482
(707) 472-0900
FOG Program: Grease Rendering Guide
Page |3
Choosing a Grease Renderer or Hauler
When selecting a grease disposal vendor, be aware that services
and prices may vary. Minimum services should include:
Penalties and fines
resulting from
noncompliance of
the City’s sewer use
ordinance can
range from $50 to
$25,000 or more.
1. Complete pumping and cleaning of the interceptor and
sample box, rather than just skimming the grease layer.
2. Deodorizing and thoroughly cleaning affected areas, as
necessary.
3. Disposal/reclamation at an approved location. You and your
hauler should agree on an adequate cleaning frequency to
avoid blockage of the line.
Questions to Ask a Renderer
When looking for an oil and grease renderer, it is important to ask the
right questions, which may include:
1. Do you provide collection containers?
2. Do you provide transportation?
3. Can I expect revenue for my material? If not, what’s your
service fee?
4. What
are
your
contamination?
specifications?
What
constitutes
5. If there is a problem, who should I contact?
Remember that fats, oils, and grease are commodities and should be
treated as valuable resources that can and should be recycled
whenever possible. Contact Information Please contact the City’s Compliance Officer at 263-5615, or by Email at dbuffalo@cityoflakeport.com, for more information or to
discuss your particular FOG situation. We’re here to help you
succeed!
CITY OF LAKEPORT MUNICIPAL SEWER DISTRICT
Over 100 years of community, pride, progress, and service.
FATS, OILS AND GREASE (FOG) PROGRAM
GREAE TRAP AND INTERCEPTOR MAINTENANCE GUIDE
Introduction
INSIDE THIS GUIDE
1
Introduction
2
Grease Trap Maintenance
3
Grease Interceptor
Maintenance
Grease trap maintenance is usually performed by maintenance staff,
or other employees of a food service establishment. Grease
interceptor maintenance, which is usually performed by permitted
haulers or recyclers (see Grease Rendering Guide) consists of
removing the entire volume (liquids and solids) from the grease
interceptor and properly disposing of the material in accordance
with all federal, state, and/or local laws. When performed properly,
and at the appropriate frequency, grease interceptor and trap
maintenance can greatly reduce the discharge of fats, oil and
grease (FOG) into the wastewater collection system.
The required maintenance frequency for grease interceptors and
traps depends greatly on the amount of FOG a facility generates as
well as any best management practices (BMPs) that your
establishment implements to reduce the FOG discharged into the
sanitary sewer system. In many cases, an establishment that
implements BMPs will realize financial benefit through a reduction in
their required grease interceptor and trap maintenance frequency.
Refer to Best Management Practice for Food Service Establishments
for examples of BMPs that your establishment should follow.
WARNING! Do not use hot water, acids, caustics, solvents, or
emulsifying agents when cleaning grease traps and interceptors.
FOG Program: Grease Trap and Interceptor Maintenance
Page |2
Grease Trap Maintenance
Proper maintenance for any grease trap is essential to the trap
functioning correctly and efficiently. The following are simple steps to
cleaning your grease trap(s):
Grease trap
maintenance is
typically performed
by maintenance
staff or other
employees.
1. Bail out any water in the trap or interceptor to facilitate
cleaning. The water should be discharged to the sanitary sewer
system.
2. Remove baffles, if possible.
3. Dip the accumulated grease out of the interceptor and deposit
in a watertight container.
4. Scrape the sides, the lid, and the baffles with a putty knife to
remove as much of the grease as possible, and deposit the
grease into a watertight container.
5. Contact a hauler or recycler for grease pick-up.
6. Replace the baffle and the lid.
7. Record the volume of grease removed on your Maintenance
Log.
FOG Program: Grease Trap and Interceptor Maintenance
Page |3
Grease Interceptor Maintenance
Grease interceptors, due to their size, will usually be cleaned by
grease haulers or recyclers. Licensed septic haulers can also pump
out grease interceptors and haul the waste to the treatment plant.
The hauler must be registered with the State as a grease hauler.
A proper maintenance procedure for a grease interceptor is outlined
below:
Grease interceptors
are usually cleaned
by grease haulers or
recyclers.
NOTE: Since your establishment is liable for the condition of your
pretreatment devices, you or your representative (manager,
supervisor, etc.) should witness all cleaning/maintenance activities to
verify that the interceptor is being cleaned fully and properly
maintained.
1. Contact a grease hauler or recycler for cleaning. See the
Grease Rendering Guide for a list of qualified grease vendors.
2. Ensure that all flow is stopped to the interceptor by shutting
the isolation valve in the inlet piping to the interceptor.
3. Remove the lid and bail out any water in the trap or
interceptor to facilitate cleaning. The water should be
discharged to the sanitary sewer system.
4. Remove baffles, if possible.
5. Dip the accumulated grease out of the interceptor and
deposit in a watertight container.
6. Pump out the settled solids and then the remaining liquids.
7. Scrape the sides, the lid, and the baffles with a putty knife to
remove as much of the grease as possible, and deposit the
grease into a watertight container.
8. Replace the baffle and the lid.
9. Record the volume of grease removed on your Maintenance
Log.
City of Lakeport Municipal Sewer District Mark Brannigan, Director 225 Park Street Lakeport, CA 95453 (707) 263‐5615 Over 100 years of community, pride, progress and service. GREASE TRAP/INTERCEPTOR MAINTENANCE LOG
INSTRUCTIONS: PLEASE HAVE YOUR GREASE HAULER, RECYCLER, MAINTENANCE/CLEANING CONTRACTOR OR EMPLOYEE COMPLETE THIS LOG EACH TIME YOUR GREASE TRAP AND/OR INTERCEPTOR IS CLEANED. THIS FORM MUST BE SHOWN TO THE COUNTY HEALTH INSPECTOR, IF REQUESTED. FOR ADDITIONAL COPIES OF THIS FORM, PLEASE CONTACT THE CITY’S COMPLIANCE OFFICER AT 263‐5615 Facility Name
Address
Telephone
Service Company
Address
Telephone
Grease Trap/Interceptor Maintenance/Service Log
Type of Service:
Date
Recycling Hauling
Number
of Units
Serviced
Serviced By (Name of
Individual)
Gallons
Pumped
Grease Disposal Site
Name and Address
PLEASE RETAIN THIS COPY WITH YOUR RECORDS FOR NO FEWER THAN 3 YEARS Condition of Unit(s)
Remarks/Comments
How can we help?
I feel so proud knowing my restaurant is doing its part to Whether you have questions about grease render-
reduce FOG. ing or need help identifying the best place to install a grease trap, we’re here to offer assistance.
Call to schedule an appointment to meet with the
City’s Compliance Officer or call for a consultation
FATS, OILS AND
GREASE (FOG)
over the phone. Please visit the City’s web site for
more information.
www.cityoflakeport.com
PROGRAM
The Benefits of Proper FOG Disposal
Eliminating FOG discharge to the sanitary sewer
system is a win-win situation for the City, businesses, and the community as a whole. Just a few
of the benefits associated with this effort include:
•
Reduced operating costs
•
More sewer capacity so the City can grow to
meet the needs of your business
•
Potential reimbursement for grease recycling
•
Avoidance of penalties or fines imposed for
clogging municipal sewer lines
•
A cleaner environment for your patrons and
the community to enjoy
...and so much more.
CLMSD
CITY OF LAKEPORT MUNICIPAL SEWER
DISTRICT
For answers to your FOG questions or to discuss your
particular grease issue, please contact the City’s
Compliance Officer for a one-on-one consultation
over the phone, or contact the Community
Development/Utilities Department to schedule an
appointment.
Compliance Officer
(707) 263-5615, ext. 30
compliance@cityoflakeport.com
Community Development/Utilities Department
(707) 263-5615, ext. 25
CITY OF LAKEPORT
MUNICIPAL SEWER
DISTRICT
Over 100 years of community pride, progress,
and service.
City Hall
225 Park Street
Lakeport, CA 95453
(707) 263-5615
FOG AND YOUR BUSINESS
So, you’ve got a
grease problem…?
Best Management Practices (BMPs)
Looking for a grease hauler?
Below are a few tips to avoid putting fats, oil, and grease
into the sanitary sewer.
Here are few local vendors who may be able
to clean your grease interceptor and haul your
grease away….
BMPs
Check grease interceptor solids
depth routinely. The combined
thickness of the floating grease
and the bottom solids should
not be more than 25% of the
total interceptor depth.
Collect and recycle waste
cooking oil.
“Dry wipe” pots, pans, and
kitchen equipment before
cleaning.
Are you noticing frequent or regular sink or
toilet backups at your facility? Are you finding that you have to call the plumber more
Maintain a routine grease trap
cleaning schedule.
often than usual? Have you noticed sewer
backups near or around your facility during
rainy periods? You may have a FOG prob-
Use absorbent paper under
fryer baskets.
lem.
The discharge of fats, oil and grease (or FOG)
into the sanitary sewer is a concern for everyone in the community. FOG sticks to the inside of sewer pipes and, over time, that material can build up and create a blockage. A
Use absorbents, such as paper
towels and cat litter, to pick up
oil and grease spills before
mopping.
into our waterways. Nasty!
Reducing that discharge is one of our top
priorities. Together we can do it!
Action Sanitary, Inc.
P.O. Box 492
Lower Lake, CA 95457
(707) 994-5068
This will reduce cleaning
frequency and maintenance costs for grease removal devices and reduce
the amount of grease entering the system.
This will reduce cleaning
frequency and maintenance costs for grease removal devices and reduce
the amount of grease entering the drain.
This reduces the amount of
grease entering the drain
and protects sewers from
grease blockages and overflows.
The amount of grease entering the drain is reduced,
which protects the sewer
system from grease blockages and overflows.
Reduces the amount of
grease entering the drain
and protects sewers from
grease blockages and overflows.
Roto-Rooter of Lake County
P.O. Box 1340
Kelseyville, CA 95451
(707) 279-9461
Allows for proper removal of
grease.
No hot water over 140°F
By reducing water temperature, you will save costs for
heating that water, reduce
the risk of clogging up your
sewer lateral, and will save
the cost of hiring someone
to clean out your pipes.
system overflow (SSO), which will release un-
BUSINESS NAME
This will keep grease interceptor working at peak
performance.
Do not use emulsifiers or solvents other than typical dishwashing detergents.
blockage such as this can result in a sewer
treated wastewater onto our properties and
BENEFITS
Darling International Inc.
429 Amador St.
San Francisco, CA 94124
(800) 473-4890
North State Rendering Company Inc.
15 Shippee Rd.
Oroville, CA 95965
(530) 343-6076
Sacramento Rendering Co.
11350 Kiefer Blvd.
Sacramento, CA 95830
(800) 339-6493
Yokayo Biofuels
150 Perry Street
Ukiah, CA 95482
(707) 472-0900
City of Lakeport Municipal Sewer District
Fats, Oils and Grease (FOG) Program
INDOOR GREASE TRAP/
INTERCEPTOR SIZING
GUIDE
INDOOR GREASE TRAP/
INTERCEPTOR SIZING
GUIDE
INDOOR GREASE TRAP/
INTERCEPTOR SIZING
GUIDE
Depending on your specific grease capturing needs, an indoor
grease trap/interceptor may be an effective measure for preventing
the discharge of fats, oils or grease into the sanitary sewer system.
Manufactured interceptors come in varying sizes, usually based on
a flow rate of gallons per minute, or GPM. We recommend consulting with a licensed plumber when determining the size of your
interceptor. But for basic guidance, the following steps could be
useful in determining the appropriate size of your new indoor
grease trap/interceptor:
Depending on your specific grease capturing needs, an indoor
grease trap/interceptor may be an effective measure for preventing
the discharge of fats, oils or grease into the sanitary sewer system.
Manufactured interceptors come in varying sizes, usually based on
a flow rate of gallons per minute, or GPM. We recommend consulting with a licensed plumber when determining the size of your
interceptor. But for basic guidance, the following steps could be
useful in determining the appropriate size of your new indoor
grease trap/interceptor:
Depending on your specific grease capturing needs, an indoor
grease trap/interceptor may be an effective measure for preventing
the discharge of fats, oils or grease into the sanitary sewer system.
Manufactured interceptors come in varying sizes, usually based on
a flow rate of gallons per minute, or GPM. We recommend consulting with a licensed plumber when determining the size of your
interceptor. But for basic guidance, the following steps could be
useful in determining the appropriate size of your new indoor
grease trap/interceptor:
Step 1:
Step 1:
Step 1:
Determine the cubic size of your sink(s) by multiplying its length,
width, and depth together (L x W x D).
Determine the cubic size of your sink(s) by multiplying its length,
width, and depth together (L x W x D).
Determine the cubic size of your sink(s) by multiplying its length,
width, and depth together (L x W x D).
Step 2:
Step 2:
Step 2:
Convert that number into gallons using the following conversion:
1 gallon = 231 cubic feet.
Convert that number into gallons using the following conversion:
1 gallon = 231 cubic feet.
Convert that number into gallons using the following conversion:
1 gallon = 231 cubic feet.
Step 3:
Step 3:
Step 3:
Estimate the capacity of the sink(s) measured in Step 1. Usually,
75% of the sink(s) will be filled with water, the remaining 25%
will be dishes, utensils, etc. Multiply that factor as a percentage
(e.g. 75% = 0.75, 25% = 0.25, etc.) by the number you calculated
in Step 2. This will also serve as your flow rate.
Estimate the capacity of the sink(s) measured in Step 1. Usually,
75% of the sink(s) will be filled with water, the remaining 25%
will be dishes, utensils, etc. Multiply that factor as a percentage
(e.g. 75% = 0.75, 25% = 0.25, etc.) by the number you calculated
in Step 2. This will also serve as your flow rate.
Estimate the capacity of the sink(s) measured in Step 1. Usually,
75% of the sink(s) will be filled with water, the remaining 25%
will be dishes, utensils, etc. Multiply that factor as a percentage
(e.g. 75% = 0.75, 25% = 0.25, etc.) by the number you calculated
in Step 2. This will also serve as your flow rate.
Step 4:
Step 4:
Step 4:
Select a trap/interceptor that is the next size higher than your
Select a trap/interceptor that is the next size higher than your
Select a trap/interceptor that is the next size higher than your
calculated flow rate. Example: your calculated flow rate is 78
calculated flow rate. Example: your calculated flow rate is 78
calculated flow rate. Example: your calculated flow rate is 78
GPM. Available interceptors are sized for 70 and 80 GPM. The
GPM. Available interceptors are sized for 70 and 80 GPM. The
GPM. Available interceptors are sized for 70 and 80 GPM. The
most appropriate choice is the latter, an 80 GMP device.
most appropriate choice is the latter, an 80 GMP device.
most appropriate choice is the latter, an 80 GMP device.
Additional sizing guidelines can be found in the most recent
Additional sizing guidelines can be found in the most recent
Additional sizing guidelines can be found in the most recent
addition of the California Plumbing Code. A licensed plumber
addition of the California Plumbing Code. A licensed plumber
addition of the California Plumbing Code. A licensed plumber
will be familiar with its provisions and can offer solutions unique
will be familiar with its provisions and can offer solutions unique
will be familiar with its provisions and can offer solutions unique
to your needs.
to your needs.
to your needs.
This guide and other helpful information can be found on the
This guide and other helpful information can be found on the
This guide and other helpful information can be found on the
City’s website: www.cityoflakeport.com.
City’s website: www.cityoflakeport.com.
City’s website: www.cityoflakeport.com.
CITY OF LAKEPORT MUNICIPAL SEWER DISTRICT
CITY OF LAKEPORT MUNICIPAL SEWER DISTRICT
CITY OF LAKEPORT MUNICIPAL SEWER DISTRICT
Over 100 years of community pride, progress, and service.
Over 100 years of community pride, progress, and service.
Over 100 years of community pride, progress, and service.
City Hall
225 Park Street
Lakeport, CA 95453
City Hall
225 Park Street
Lakeport, CA 95453
City Hall
225 Park Street
Lakeport, CA 95453
Phone: 707-263-5615, ext. 30
E-mail: compliance@cityoflakeport.com
Phone: 707-263-5615, ext. 30
E-mail: compliance@cityoflakeport.com
Phone: 707-263-5615, ext. 30
E-mail: compliance@cityoflakeport.com
OUTDOOR GREASE
INTERCEPTOR SIZING
GUIDE
OUTDOOR GREASE
INTERCEPTOR SIZING
GUIDE
OUTDOOR GREASE
INTERCEPTOR SIZING
GUIDE
Outdoor, in-ground or above-ground grease interceptors are ideal for
restaurants and other food service facilities that produce large
amounts of fats, oil, and grease during food preparation. City Code
allows for the use of two methods when sizing an outdoor interceptor. The first is based on criteria defined in the California Plumbing
Code. A licensed plumber can provide excellent interceptor solutions to meet your needs based on this method. The second is the
application of the Manning Formula, which is described here in
greater detail:
Outdoor, in-ground or above-ground grease interceptors are ideal for
restaurants and other food service facilities that produce large
amounts of fats, oil, and grease during food preparation. City Code
allows for the use of two methods when sizing an outdoor interceptor. The first is based on criteria defined in the California Plumbing
Code. A licensed plumber can provide excellent interceptor solutions to meet your needs based on this method. The second is the
application of the Manning Formula, which is described here in
greater detail:
Outdoor, in-ground or above-ground grease interceptors are ideal for
restaurants and other food service facilities that produce large
amounts of fats, oil, and grease during food preparation. City Code
allows for the use of two methods when sizing an outdoor interceptor. The first is based on criteria defined in the California Plumbing
Code. A licensed plumber can provide excellent interceptor solutions to meet your needs based on this method. The second is the
application of the Manning Formula, which is described here in
greater detail:
The Manning Formula:
The Manning Formula:
The Manning Formula:
Interceptor Size (in gallons) = Flow rate (GPM)/sink or fixture x sum
of fixture Ratings + the Discharge rate from any mechanical washers
(i.e. dishwashers, glass washers, laundry machines, etc.) x a 24 minute
retention Time.
Interceptor Size (in gallons) = Flow rate (GPM)/sink or fixture x sum
of fixture Ratings + the Discharge rate from any mechanical washers
(i.e. dishwashers, glass washers, laundry machines, etc.) x a 24 minute
retention Time.
Interceptor Size (in gallons) = Flow rate (GPM)/sink or fixture x sum
of fixture Ratings + the Discharge rate from any mechanical washers
(i.e. dishwashers, glass washers, laundry machines, etc.) x a 24 minute
retention Time.
Flow Rates
0.5” pipe = 0.8
GPM/fixture
1.0 “ = 5.0 GPM/fixture
1.5 “ = 15 GPM/fixture
2.0” = 33 GPM/fixture
2.5” = 59 GPM/fixture
3.0” = 93 GPM/fixture
Fixture Ratings
2,3, or 4 compartment sink = 1.0
1 or 2 compartment meat prep sink = 0.75
Pre-rinse sink = 0.5
1 or 2 compartment vegetable prep sink = 0.25
Can wash = 0.25
Mop sink = 0.25
Floor drain = 0.00
Flow Rates
0.5” pipe = 0.8
GPM/fixture
1.0 “ = 5.0 GPM/fixture
1.5 “ = 15 GPM/fixture
2.0” = 33 GPM/fixture
2.5” = 59 GPM/fixture
3.0” = 93 GPM/fixture
Fixture Ratings
2,3, or 4 compartment sink = 1.0
1 or 2 compartment meat prep sink = 0.75
Pre-rinse sink = 0.5
1 or 2 compartment vegetable prep sink = 0.25
Can wash = 0.25
Mop sink = 0.25
Floor drain = 0.00
Flow Rates
0.5” pipe = 0.8
GPM/fixture
1.0 “ = 5.0 GPM/fixture
1.5 “ = 15 GPM/fixture
2.0” = 33 GPM/fixture
2.5” = 59 GPM/fixture
3.0” = 93 GPM/fixture
Fixture Ratings
2,3, or 4 compartment sink = 1.0
1 or 2 compartment meat prep sink = 0.75
Pre-rinse sink = 0.5
1 or 2 compartment vegetable prep sink = 0.25
Can wash = 0.25
Mop sink = 0.25
Floor drain = 0.00
Using the charts above, you can calculate the size of the interceptor
you need. Just plug them into the Manning Formula:
Using the charts above, you can calculate the size of the interceptor
you need. Just plug them into the Manning Formula:
Using the charts above, you can calculate the size of the interceptor
you need. Just plug them into the Manning Formula:
Interceptor Size
= [[(Flow Rate) x (Fixture Ratings)] + Discharge Rate] x 24 minute
retention time
Interceptor Size
= [[(Flow Rate) x (Fixture Ratings)] + Discharge Rate] x 24 minute
retention time
Interceptor Size
= [[(Flow Rate) x (Fixture Ratings)] + Discharge Rate] x 24 minute
retention time
Direct flow from dishwashers, laundry washers, glass washers, etc. is
the discharge rate as determined by the manufacturer. This information should be available in your user’s manual or by contacting the
manufacturer directly.
Direct flow from dishwashers, laundry washers, glass washers, etc. is
the discharge rate as determined by the manufacturer. This information should be available in your user’s manual or by contacting the
manufacturer directly.
Direct flow from dishwashers, laundry washers, glass washers, etc. is
the discharge rate as determined by the manufacturer. This information should be available in your user’s manual or by contacting the
manufacturer directly.
24 minute retention time is the minimum amount of time needed
for grease to cool, condense, and separate from liquid. It is a constant for the purposes of this calculation.
24 minute retention time is the minimum amount of time needed
for grease to cool, condense, and separate from liquid. It is a constant for the purposes of this calculation.
24 minute retention time is the minimum amount of time needed
for grease to cool, condense, and separate from liquid. It is a constant for the purposes of this calculation.
This guide and other helpful information (including calculation
examples) can be found on the City’s website:
www.cityoflakeport.com.
This guide and other helpful information (including calculation
examples) can be found on the City’s website:
www.cityoflakeport.com.
This guide and other helpful information (including calculation
examples) can be found on the City’s website:
www.cityoflakeport.com.
Download PDF