Personal Jukebox - Gene & Amelia Bland

Personal Jukebox
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
Personal Jukebox
The perfect player for music lovers.
by D. Gene Bland, Sr.
Personal Jukebox is an application used to select and play
music files. These are commonly referred to as .mp3 files.
If you love music and like to have it playing in the
background most of the time, this is for you.
Personal Jukebox
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
All rights reserved. No parts of this work may be reproduced in any form or by any means - graphic, electronic, or
mechanical, including photocopying, recording, taping, or information storage and retrieval systems - without the
written permission of the publisher.
Products that are referred to in this document may be either trademarks and/or registered trademarks of the
respective owners. The publisher and the author make no claim to these trademarks.
While every precaution has been taken in the preparation of this document, the publisher and the author assume no
responsibility for errors or omissions, or for damages resulting from the use of information contained in this document
or from the use of programs and source code that may accompany it. In no event shall the publisher and the author be
liable for any loss of profit or any other commercial damage caused or alleged to have been caused directly or
indirectly by this document.
Printed: May 2015 in (whereever you are located)
Publisher
D. Gene Bland, Sr.
Managing Editor
D. Gene Bland, Sr.
Technical Editors
D. Gene Bland, Sr.
Cover Designer
D. Gene Bland, Sr.
Production
D. Gene Bland, Sr.
Special thanks to:
My wife, Amelia. Without her willingness to grant me the time
needed to produce the programs and this manual, none of it would
be available.
Personal Jukebox (PJB) has been a labor of love. I would like to
thank the numerous individuals that produced the freeware code
snippets that I used to produce the application. Offering PJB as
freeware is my way of giving back.
Contents
5
Table of Contents
Foreword
Part I Introduction to Personal Jukebox Server
7
10
1 Installing PJB
................................................................................................................................... 11
2 Quick Start................................................................................................................................... 11
3 Uses for Personal
...................................................................................................................................
Jukebox
15
Part II Managing Personal Jukebox Server
18
1 Setting Program
...................................................................................................................................
Options
18
Allow Users to Skip
..........................................................................................................................................................
the Current Song
19
Playcue Duplicates
.......................................................................................................................................................... 19
Playcue Alterations
.......................................................................................................................................................... 19
Start the Server with
..........................................................................................................................................................
PJB
19
Daily Log File .......................................................................................................................................................... 19
Replay Limit
.......................................................................................................................................................... 20
Jukebox Load Change
.......................................................................................................................................................... 20
Random Number..........................................................................................................................................................
of Songs Added to Playcue
21
Save a Daily Log..........................................................................................................................................................
of Songs Played
21
Show Cell Hints .......................................................................................................................................................... 21
2 Activating ...................................................................................................................................
the Server
21
3 Managing the
...................................................................................................................................
Library
22
Creating a New Library
.......................................................................................................................................................... 25
The Abort Button.......................................................................................................................................................... 26
Check Buttons .......................................................................................................................................................... 27
Adding Songs to..........................................................................................................................................................
or Updating an Existing Library
27
Removing Songs..........................................................................................................................................................
From the Library
28
Clean The Library
.......................................................................................................................................................... 28
Modifying Tags .......................................................................................................................................................... 28
Refreshing Tag Data
.......................................................................................................................................................... 31
Sorting the Library
..........................................................................................................................................................
(Sort)
31
Searching the Library
..........................................................................................................................................................
(Find)
33
Filtering the Library
.......................................................................................................................................................... 34
Playing a Song Using
..........................................................................................................................................................
Window's Default MP3 Player
34
4 Managing the
...................................................................................................................................
Jukebox Load
34
Using a Library Filter
..........................................................................................................................................................
to Create a Jukebox Load
35
Manual Jukebox ..........................................................................................................................................................
Load Creation
36
Modifying a Jukebox
..........................................................................................................................................................
Load
37
Adding Checked ..........................................................................................................................................................
Songs to the Current Jukebox Load
39
Selecting or Deleting
..........................................................................................................................................................
an Existing Jukebox Load
39
Validating Paths .......................................................................................................................................................... 40
Update Jukebox ..........................................................................................................................................................
Load Tags
41
Searching, Sorting
..........................................................................................................................................................
and Filtering the Jukebox Load
41
5 The Audio ...................................................................................................................................
Control Panel
43
The Player Tab .......................................................................................................................................................... 43
The AGC Tab
.......................................................................................................................................................... 44
The Amplifier Tab.......................................................................................................................................................... 45
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
5
6
Personal Jukebox
The Equalizer Tab
.......................................................................................................................................................... 46
Part III Using Personal Jukebox
48
1 Playing Songs
................................................................................................................................... 48
2 Adding Songs
...................................................................................................................................
To the Play Cue
49
3 Delete Corrupt
...................................................................................................................................
Songs
49
4 The Tools ...................................................................................................................................
Menu
50
Part IV Using PJB with FM Transmitters
62
1 The Basic Block
...................................................................................................................................
Diagram
62
Part V Definitions
Index
66
69
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
Foreword
Foreword
There are a great many ways to make a computer play music. This is just one of them.
When I decided to design an application to play music files, I knew that I wanted some
particular features.
The first was the ability to select the songs I wanted to hear. But, if I did not select a
song, I wanted the application to randomly select one for me. However, I wanted the
random selection to be made from a specific group of songs.
Another feature that I wanted would allow me to select songs to play from a computer
other than the one on which PJB was running. I wanted this feature so that PJB could
drive an FM transmitter, while I selected the songs to play from a laptop computer
located in the vicinity of the FM receiver that I was I listening to.
So, I decided to emulate the classic jukeboxes of the 1940s through the 1950s and
beyond. Thus, was born Personal Jukebox.
Many people that have computers also have Hi-Fi sound systems that include an FM
Stereo Receiver. I have been asked often how you could play all those songs on your
computer through a great sound system. PJB lets you do that. And, you'll learn all
about how to do it inside.
So, dive in and have fun!
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
7
gbland@nc.rr.com
http://www.dgb.us
Part
I
10
1
Personal Jukebox
Introduction to Personal Jukebox Server
Personal Jukebox has been created as a server-client system. The server establishes the
Personal Jukebox and creates the list of songs currently on the jukebox. Personal Jukebox (PJB)
is NOT play list oriented. It is jukebox oriented. If you are old enough or lucky enough to have
seen the classic Wurlitzer or Seeburg jukeboxes of the 1950s and 1960s, you will understand.
The jukebox is a machine loaded with records (what disks with songs recorded on them were
called before there were CDs). Each record contained two songs--one on the "A" side and one on
the "B" side. The jukebox had a list of the names of the songs on the records that were loaded on
it. For each song there was a button that when pressed would select that song to be played.
Originally, it cost a nickel to play one song or you could put a quarter in the coin slot and play six
songs.
When a song was selected, the jukebox would pull the record from a stack and place it on the
turntable. It would then lower the tone arm onto the record and the song would begin to play. If a
song was playing when you made your selection, the jukebox would remember your selection and
play it when possible. The jukebox kept a list of selections in the order they were made and
played them in that order. However, if you selected a song that had already been selected, the
song would only play once in the order that it was first selected.
To put different songs on the jukebox required that you had a key that would open the jukebox
giving you access to the inside. Then you could remove some records and replace them with
different ones. Of course you then had to update the selection list by the buttons on the front of
the machine.
Personal Jukebox was designed around this model. The server is similar to having access to the
inside of the jukebox and allows you to establish the songs that are loaded on the jukebox and
available to be played by the client. The server also contains the entire Library of songs that you
can make selections from to create a jukebox load. Typically, the library is your entire collection of
mp3 music.
The Personal Jukebox Client connects to the server and acts as the front of the jukebox from
which you can select a song on the jukebox to be played. In general use, only the manager of the
jukebox should use the server. The client should be used those simply wanting to select a song
to play. The Personal Jukebox does not collect nickels to play a song. Therefore, when no songs
have been selected, Personal Jukebox will select one randomly from the current songs loaded on
the jukebox and play it.
The closest thing to a play list that PJB offers is the jukebox load. The jukebox load is a subset of
the entire library. The jukebox load represents the songs you have selected from the library and
placed on the jukebox ready to be played. PJB does not play the songs in the jukebox load in any
particular order. PJB makes the songs available to be selected to play. Songs can be selected in
any order and will be played in that order. In the original jukeboxes, if no songs were selected to
play, the jukebox just sat silent, playing nothing. It wanted money to play anything. PJB, as a
convenience when no one has selected a song, will select one randomly from the current jukebox
load and play it. It will continue to play randomly selected songs until someone makes a selection
to be played.
Note: As of the last production compile of PJB (Build 7.1.0.4), PJB contains new features. A new
menu is available named "Tools ". This menu contains three sub-menus that allow you to copy
mp3 (song) files to a folder you choose and two sub-menus that allow you to establish your
favorite songs. As of Build 8.1.0.15, PJB has an updated menu under "Library Management".
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
Introduction to Personal Jukebox Server
11
See Figure 6.
1.1
Installing PJB
PJB is delivered with a setup program for the server and the client. Hopefully, when you
downloaded PJB, you made a note of where you saved it. Locate it and run the setup by double
clicking on it. Select the appropriate installation for the computer (either a client or a server) that
you will be using. Of course, you can install both the server and the client on the same computer.
The computer chosen as the server should be one that has a hard drive containing your library of
music in "mp3" format.
Song files in mp3 format are available from many locations on the Internet. Personal Jukebox will
also read standard audio CDs, extract the audio and store them to your hard drive in mp3 format.
PJB provides conversion tools that will enable you to convert audio files in other formats (Flac,
wma, and OGG) to mp3. One tool converts mp3 format to "wave" files. This is provided so that
you can produce a standard CD containing songs from your library (because some CD players will
not play songs in mp3 format).
1.2
Quick Start
The following will get you started quickly. It will not cover all the features of Personal Jukebox (PJB).
To be able to use all the features of PJB, you will have to review the detailed help chapters. NOTE:
As of Build 17.0.0.18 PJB contains new features. A new menu is available named "Tools". This menu
contains three sub-menus that allow you to copy mp3 (song) files to a folder you choose.
Start PJB (Server). Most likely your Library will be empty. If such is the case, You will see a
message to that effect. Click OK to close the message. You will then be presented with a dialog
window (A system window that presents and allows you to select a drive and/or a folder on
your computer.) in which you can select the disk drive and folder that contains your collection of
mp3 songs. If your songs are in multiple folders that are not sub-folders or are on different hard
drives, pick one of them. You can add the rest of them later. See "Adding Songs to an Existing
Library". If you do not pick a folder that contains mp3 songs or, if you Cancel the dialog, the
application will be unable to continue and will close.
If you select a folder that has a large number of .mp3 files, it can take a long time (minutes to hours)
to build your library. If you do not want to wait for it to finish, you can use the Abort button.
After your library is established, notice the following in PJB's Main Window: (Refer to Figure 1)
1. The Current Jukebox Load. It will be "Library" if you just loaded the library. When no other
jukebox load is available, PJB defaults to the entire library. This is indicated by the text in the
drop down combo box at the top. If other jukebox loads are available, one can be chosen using
the drop down arrow (The small triangular shaped arrow usually to the right of the text in
a combo box.). The grid below the current jukebox load is a list of songs in this load.
2. Status Bar (bottom of the window) shows the time remaining in the song that is playing.
3. The "Audio Control" tabbed panel in the lower right quarter of the window.
4. The Menu bar (The menu is typically the second horizontal line of text in a window
counting from the top.) at the top of the window just below the Title bar (The title bar is
usually the topmost line of text in a window. It typically shows the title of the
application. PJB will replace it with the currently playing song title if one is playing.).
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
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Personal Jukebox
5. The "Songs Selected for Playing" panel in the upper right quarter of the main window. This is
the play cue.
6. The "All Available Songs in The Library" grid (Grids usually are shown as vertical
columns and horizontal rows. The top row is typically the title of the information in the
column below it.) below the jukebox load grid. This is the library grid which lists all the MP3
songs that you have put in your library unless it is filtered. If filtered, it lists only the songs that
meet your filter criteria.
7. Notice the blue lines separating the four areas (Jukebox Load, Play Cue, Library and Audio
Control). If you place the mouse cursor over the blue lines, it will change to a splitter cursor.
You can click on the splitter and drag and drop to change the sizes of the four areas relative to
each other. In Figure 1, the top of the vertical blue line has the splitter cursor on it. Look
closely and you can see the splitter cursor which is a line with arrows pointing in opposite
directions from the middle of it.
Figure 1. PJB Main Window
If you have just created your Library, the jukebox load defaults to the entire library. In other words,
the jukebox load grid and the library grid show the same songs. There are a number of ways to create
a jukebox load that is a subset of your library. We will discuss only one now. Other methods are
covered later. Click the "Filter by" button below the library grid. A window (Figure 2) will open.
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
Introduction to Personal Jukebox Server
13
Figure 2. Setting Filter Criteria
This is used to filter the library and create a subset of it. Click the drop down arrow at the right of the
top most "Field Name". You will see a list that is the same as or similar to the names of the columns
shown in the library grid. In Figure 2 above, the library will be filtered to contain only those songs
having no entry for Genre (IS NULL) or (rather than And) having an entry for Genre equal to "Soul".
As you can see, you can filter your library in a great many ways. Click OK to filter the library
according to your criteria.
After filtering your library, you will see a notice above the library grid blinking to remind you that the
library grid is filtered and only shows the songs that meet the filter's criteria. Notice also that the
large "Save Jukebox Load" button is available. Click it and give your new jukebox load a name.
Click "OK" and the following happens. Your new load is created and then loaded. This can be
verified by checking the currently loaded combo box. Also the "Save Jukebox Load" button
disappears and the library grid is no longer filtered. Notice also that the jukebox load grid contains
only the songs in your new jukebox load while the library grid still contains all the songs in your
library. You have just created a jukebox load. You can add individual songs from your library to the
current jukebox load by double clicking on the song in the library grid. If you try to add a song that is
already in the load, you will get an error message.
If you plan to use the PJB Client, you need to set up your Server parameters. Do this by clicking on
"Server" in the menu bar at the top of the main window. If you get an error message to the effect that
your server directory is not shared you will need to right click on the directory containing your library
database named "Archive.mdb" and select properties. Then select the Sharing tab to complete the
task. The particulars about sharing directories are beyond the scope of this document. If you have
set up your own LAN, you probably already know about sharing directories. If someone else set up
your LAN, you may be able to get help from them. If you don't have a LAN, you will still have to share
your database file's directory (folder) if you plan to use PJB Client on the same computer as the
Server. If your database is in a shared directory, the window in Figure 3 will open.
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
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Personal Jukebox
Figure 3.
This is the Server Control panel. You must set the "Port" and "Password" parameters before you can
check the "Activate Server?" check box. Set the port to a valid port number (ports between 9000
and 9999 usually work). Choose and enter a password. Then, check "Activate Server?". A message
indicating server startup will appear in the "Server Activity Log" window. The "Connected",
"Received", "Sent", "Errors", "Name" and "Last Received" boxes will be filled in when a client
connects to the server. They are for information purposes only. Click "Done" to close the window.
Now clients can connect to the server if they provide the correct port number and password.
One more thing has to be discussed before you can start playing your songs. Look at the "Audio
Control" panel shown in Figure 4..
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
Introduction to Personal Jukebox Server
15
Figure 4.
Only the "Player" tab will be discussed here. The other tabs will be discussed in detail later. The
items of interest here are the "Level Control" and the "Sound Card" selection. The level control is
essentially your volume control. The minimum level is far left and the maximum level is far right. It
can be adjusted at any time. Most PCs have only one sound card and only that sound card will
appear in the drop down list. However, your PC may have more than one sound card. PJB allows
you to pick the sound card you want your songs to use. You may want to use one sound card
exclusively for PJB and another for Windows sounds. Of course, to do this, you must have more than
one sound card installed in your computer. PJB will default to the default sound card if you do not
pick one.
Finally, you get to pick and play songs. Select songs you want to play as follows. Go to the current
jukebox load grid (see Figure 1) and double click on several songs that you want to play. When you
double click on a song, it will be added to the "Songs Selected for Playing" window. This window is
the Play Cue. If you don't want to select songs, just click the "Start Play" button (upper right of
Figure 1) and PJB will select songs for you and start them playing. If you have selected songs,
clicking Start Play will start playing the songs you picked. If all the songs you picked have been
played, PJB will randomly pick songs to play from the current jukebox load. PJB will not pick songs to
play from the library. The Stop Play button will do just that. The Clear List button will clear the play
cue (the Songs Selected for Playing) window. The Skip button, if enabled via the Program/Options
menu, will skip the song currently being played and start the next song in the cue.
Well, you are on your way to listening to your music your way. This may seem difficult at first. But, it
becomes second nature quickly. Read Using Personal Jukebox to get you started.
1.3
Uses for Personal Jukebox
This will discuss some of the ways Personal Jukebox (PJB) can be used.
If you are running PJB on a computer, it will play the selected songs through your computer's
sound facility. Desktop PCs typically have a sound capability built in but, to use it you must
connect speakers to them. Speakers to be used with desktop computers are usually equipped
with a built in amplifier and come with a power supply to power it. The sound is output from the
computer via an 1/8" stereo jack located on the rear of the computer. Computer speakers typically
have a 1/8" stereo plug that plugs into the jack on the rear of the computer. Laptop computers
usually have built-in speakers but, they also have a sound output jack that will feed external
speakers or sound systems.
PJB was actually designed to be used on a Local Area Network (LAN) to drive a low power FM
stereo transmitter. The server is installed on one PC. The output of the sound card on that PC is
connected to the input of the FM transmitter. Then whatever selection is played by the server is
transmitted by the FM transmitter. You can then tune your Hi Fi Tuner (or any FM radio) to the FM
transmitter's frequency and hear the song being played. The client is then installed on a second
computer that is connected to your wired or wireless Local Area Network (LAN). The client PC
can then be used it to make selections to be played. Consider this scenario. You have PJB
running. You are hosting a small party and you have an FM tuner connected to good quality
audio equipment. You have a laptop computer setting near your audio equipment running PJB
client. Then you tell your guests that they can select their favorite songs to be played simply by
double clicking on the song's name. You have, of course, prior to your party, created a jukebox
load on the server that suits your party and your guests.
PJB can also be used to play songs directly into any sound system. The output of the sound card
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
16
Personal Jukebox
on the PC running PJB is connected to the input of the sound system using a standard cable.
This cable has a 1/8" stereo plug to plug into the PC sound card output on one end and two
"RCA" type plugs on the other end to plug into the sound system amplifier left and right audio
inputs on the other end. This same cable can also be used to connect to almost any high quality,
Hi-Fi amplifier/receiver.
Please read the topic Using PJB with FM Transmitters for more information and a pictorial
diagram.
If you are interested in low power FM transmitters, visit North Country Radio, https://
wholehousefmtransmitter.com, or http://www.ramseyelectronics.com.
The developer's email is gbland@nc.rr.com and the web site is http://www.dgb.us.
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
gbland@nc.rr.com
http://www.dgb.us
Part
II
18
2
Personal Jukebox
Managing Personal Jukebox Server
This chapter will cover the basic things you can do with PJB. Things such as adding music to
your library, creating jukebox loads, setting options, etc.
2.1
Setting Program Options
PJB provides "Hints" that popup on many controls and forms. While very helpful to a new user,
they can become annoying to an experienced user. The hints can be turned off by selecting
Program/Show Hints? in the menu bar. When there is a check mark by "Show Hints?" the hints
will be shown. Click it to remove the check mark and the hints will no longer be shown. Another
click will turn the hints back on. Hints can also be turn on or off by pressing Ctrl+H on the
keyboard. Your choice of showing hints or not will be remembered from the last session when you
start PJB.
PJB offers a number of operational options. In the menu bar select Program/Options. The window
in Figure 5 will appear.
Figure 5.
Each of the options will be discussed in detail in its own subchapter. Please refer to Figure 5 while
reading those details. PJB saves your option choices between sessions. So you can set them
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
Managing Personal Jukebox Server
19
once and they will be the same each time you start PJB.
2.1.1
Allow Users to Skip the Current Song
The old jukeboxes often had a concealed "Skip" or "Cancel" button. Pressing the button would
stop the current song from playing and go to the next song in the play cue. This button was not
available to paying customers and was used when maintenance was being performed on the
jukebox. PJB offers a similar option. Placing a check in the Allow Skip in Play Cue box will make
a Skip button available. It makes the Skip button available in both the server and the clients. If
you do not want your guests to be able to skip songs that someone else might have selected,
uncheck the box.
2.1.2
Playcue Duplicates
The original jukeboxes would only keep one instance of a song in the play cue. In other words, no
matter how many times a song was selected before it played, it would only play once. If you do
not allow duplicates in your play cue by leaving the Allow Duplicates In Play Cue box
unchecked, then PJB operates the same way. However, PJB offers the option to allow duplicates
by placing a check mark in the box. Doing so will allow a song to be played as often as it is
selected.
2.1.3
Playcue Alterations
If you leave the "Allow Play Cue Alteration" option unchecked, neither the server nor the client
PJB will allow any changes in the order of the play cue. Songs will play in the same order in which
they were selected. This is the way the original jukeboxes operated. Placing a check mark in the
box will allow PJB's server and client to change the order in which the selected songs will play.
To change the play order, click and drag a title in the Songs Selected for Playing window to the
position where you would like it to play. Obviously, you cannot change the play order of the song
already playing. (Note: The window is the play cue.)
2.1.4
Start the Server with PJB
If you place a check in the Start the Server when PJB Starts option box, PJB will attempt to start
the server when it starts. If the folder where PJB is located is not shared, you will get a message
to that effect and the server will not start. If there is no check in the box, the server will not start
until you start it manually.
2.1.5
Daily Log File
PJB can save a log file at midnight each day if a check mark is placed in the Save a Daily Log
File option box. The log file will contain errors that occurred such as corrupted files, files that
could not be found, songs that did not start playing in a timely fashion and others. The file will be
saved in the same folder where PJB is located. It will be named by the year, month, day and time.
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
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Personal Jukebox
(yyyy-mm-day hh-mm-ss.log). If you do not want to save a log file, leave the box unchecked.
A log file can be manually saved anytime by clicking the Save Log Now button at the bottom of
the main window.
There are other log files saved for trouble shooting purposes. They are also located in the same
folder where PJB is located. One is named "NoPlay yyyy-mm-dd.log". This log file simply list files
that were selected but failed to play. Another filed saved is named "Played On yyyy-mm-dd.csv".
This file is in comma separated values (CSV) format and can be loaded into or opened by Excel.
It list each song that was played on that day.
2.1.6
Replay Limit
A replay limit is defined as follows: When PJB is playing songs randomly for a long period of
time, it is theoretically possible for PJB to "randomly" select the same song many times. This
could result in hearing the same song over and over. PJB will can limit how often a song is
randomly placed in the play cue. This is established by setting the Replay Limit option. The
replay limit can only be set when there is a check in the Use a Replay Limit box. The replay limit
minimum is 1. The limit maximum is set to 2/3 of the number of songs in the current jukebox load.
This is necessary to ensure that PJB has at least 1/3 of the songs in the jukebox load to add to
the play cue. The list of played songs used to prevent a song from being placed in the play cue is
internally maintained. The maximum number of songs in the list is equal to the replay limit. If a
selected song is not in the list it is added to the play cue and to the bottom of the list of played
songs. If the list has exceeded the replay limit, the topmost song is removed from the list. The
result is that a song will reside in the list and be unable to be randomly added to the play cue for
the number of selection cycles that equals the replay limit.
If you do not want to use a replay limit, leave the box unchecked.
2.1.7
Jukebox Load Change
PJB provides a unique option--the Jukebox Load Change. If you place a check in the Use a
Scheduled Jukebox Load Change, the Change to, At, and Change Back At edit boxes will
become available. This will allow you select a jukebox load from the drop down box and a time for
PJB to change to that jukebox load. You can also enter a Change Back at time for PJB to return
to the original jukebox load. In both cases the time is based on a 24 hour clock. For example
20:00 would be 8:00 PM in the evening while 8:00 would be 8:00 AM in the morning.
PJB continues playing songs from the current jukebox load until the Change to time is reached.
At that time PJB will change the jukebox load to the load you have selected. At the Change Back
time PJB will change the jukebox load to the load being used before it automatically changed.
PJB will continue making the changes at the proper times until you make changes or uncheck Use
a Scheduled Jukebox Load Change.
Of course, it makes no sense to do this if you only have one jukebox load nor does it make sense
to change to the same load you are changing from. In fact, PJB will not allow you to do that.
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
Managing Personal Jukebox Server
2.1.8
21
Random Number of Songs Added to Playcue
When PJB plays all the songs that have been selected, it will default to randomly selecting songs
from the current jukebox load. You can set the number of songs that PJB adds by adjusting the
spin edit option control following the "When PJB randomly adds songs to the Playcue". The
minimum number is of course 1. The maximum number is 10 unless the jukebox load only
contains a small number of songs. If such is the case, the maximum number may be less than 10.
2.1.9
Save a Daily Log of Songs Played
Checking this option will cause PJB to save a log of songs played each day. The log is saved as a
Comma Separated Values (CSV). The file name, on your hard drive, will be "Played On yyyymm-dd.csv" where yyyy-mm-dd is the year, month and day. The suffix ".csv" identifies the file as
a CSV file and can be opened with Microsoft Excel and other spreadsheet programs. Removing
the check from this option will prevent the daily log file from being saved. Each night at midnight
the file for the previous day is saved and a new file for the current day is created. If PJB is closed
and reopened the file for the current day is continued.
2.1.10 Show Cell Hints
When "Show Cell Hints" is checked and the data to be displayed in a column is wider than the
column, a hint will display the entire contents of the data. If it is not checked, the column displays as
much of the data as possible with an ellipsis (...) at the end of it to indicate that the entire amount of
data cannot be displayed. Some users find the hint annoying while others find it helpful. This option
provides you with a choice.
2.2
Activating the Server
If you plan to use the PJB Client, you need to set up your Server parameters and activate it. Do
this by clicking on "Server" in the menu bar at the top of the main window. If you get an error
message to the effect that your server directory is not shared you will need to navigate to the
directory containing your library database named "Archive.mdb", right click on the folder icon in
the upper left corner and select "Sharing and Security..." to complete the task. The particulars
about sharing directories is beyond the scope of this document. If you have set up your own LAN
(Local Area Network), you probably already know about sharing. If someone else set up your
LAN, you may be able to get help from them. If your database is in a shared directory, the window
in Figure 3 will open.
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Personal Jukebox
Figure 3.
You must set the "Port" and "Password" parameters before you can check "Activate Server?"
Set the port to a valid port number (ports between 9000 and 9999 usually work). Choose and
enter a password. Then, check "Activate Server?". A message indicating server startup will
appear in the "Server Activity Log" window. The other boxes will be filled in when a client
connects to the server. They are for information purposes only. Click "" to close the window.
Now clients can connect to the server if they provide the correct port number and password. See
PJB Client help for information on using it.
2.3
Managing the Library
The entire contents of your library of music is shown in the grid (the Library Grid) below "All
Available Songs In The Library" unless the library is filtered. Management of your library is
explained in the following subjects.
The Library Grid has as many rows as you have songs in your library or, if it is filtered, the number
of rows equal the number of songs that meet the criteria of your filter. The Library grid columns
represent the fields in your database of songs. There is more about database fields below. The
library grid is shown in the example below.
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The Library Grid
The Library is displayed in a conventional grid. Each row in the grid is applicable to one song
(file). Along the left side are check boxes used to select songs for various processing. There is a
Horizontal Scroll button and a Vertical Scroll button. Place the mouse cursor on the Horizontal
button and hold down the left mouse button and drag left or right to see all the columns in the grid.
Place the mouse cursor on the Vertical button, hold down the left mouse button and drag up or
down to see all the rows (songs) in the grid. The The Column Header buttons offer a convenient
and quick way to sort the rows in the grid. Click on any Column Header to sort the grid based on
that column. Notice the "Next sort" arrow to the right and above the Column Headers. If it points
down, the next sort will be descending (highest to lowest). If it points upward, the next sort will be
ascending (lowest to highest).
A more detailed discussion of database fields. A database field is a piece of information about
an entry (song) in your database. Your music database includes the following fields:
Field Name
Field Description
Title
The title of the song.
Artist
The artist performing the song.
Bitrate
The bitrate used to compress the song. Higher bitrates yeild higher quality but,
larger file sizes.
Time
The length of time it takes to play the song.
Genre
A category for the song. i.e. Jazz, Rock, Soul, etc.
Year
The year the song was published.
Album
The name of the album containing the song.
Track
The track number on the album.
Preference
Your preference for the song. i.e. Poor, Fair, Good, Very Good, Excellent.
Situation
The situation in which you would usually play this song. i.e. Holiday, Party, etc.
Tempo
i.e. fast, slow, moderate, etc.
Mood
i.e. Romantic, Happy, etc.
Comment
Notes and opinions.
Path
The location of the song file on your computer. See the discussion of paths
below.
Album Artist
The dominate artist on the album.
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Composer
The song's composer.
Disk
The disk number in a multi-disk album.
Conductor
Orchestra or Symphony conductor.
Publisher
The album's publisher
Selected
This is the number of times the song has been manually selected to play from a
jukebox load.
Rating
A calculated preference rating of the song based on a number of factors.
Do not confuse database fields with "tags". Tags are actually a part of the song file. They are
appended to the music part of the file. The tags are included as fields within the database.
However, the database has fields that are not tags from a song file. The "Filter" facility in PJB
allows you to filter your database on the fields listed above.
Paths:
The path field in the database is not a tag. It contains the location of the song file PJB found when
you created your library. A typical path is: Q:\Music\Jimmy Smith And Wes Montgomery\The
Jimmy & Wes The Dynamic Duo\Baby, It's Cold Outside - 05.mp3. To understand what this
means, you need to understand how Windows stores data on disk drives. This includes hard
drives, external drives, network drives, thumb or flash drives, CDs, DVDs and floppy drives. The
letter preceding the colon (:) is used to identify the drive. "A" and "B" have been designated as
floppy drives since the MSDOS days when any other type of drive was rare. When hard drives
became widely available, the operating system was usually installed on the hard drive which was
assigned the next letter "C". DOS and subsequently Windows provide the 26 letters of the
alphabet to assign to drives. If you have a CD/DVD drive or a second hard drive, it is likely the "D"
drive. In other words, if you have a second hard drive in your computer and it contains all your
songs, the first letter in the path for each song could be D followed by the colon (:) i.e. D:. You
may ask, "What is all the rest of that stuff in the path above?". Disk drives are essentially very
large file cabinets. I use the following analogy to visualize this.
Consider the drive to be a building that houses nothing but files. In our example above the
building is "Q:". Buildings have rooms and the rooms in building Q: all contain files. Our building
(drive) Q: has a file room (in computer speak - a file "folder") named "Music". In our example
above Q: is the drive (file building) and the "\" indicates that we are going into a room (folder)
within Q: Here we see a larger number of file cabinets (in computer speak - "sub-folders"). We
notice one labeled "Jimmy Smith And Wes Montgomery". Since we are in the file room (folder)
that contains music, we can guess that this file cabinet (sub-folder) contains music by Jimmy
Smith and Wes Montgomery. Notice also that when go into the file cabinet, we signify this with
another "\". Next , within the file cabinet (sub-folder) named "Jimmy Smith And Wes Montgomery",
we see a file drawer (a sub-sub-folder) labeled "The Jimmy & Wes The Dynamic Duo". Within the
file drawer we find a file labeled "Baby, It's Cold Outside - 05.mp3". Ah! Ha!, this is the file we
were looking for. When this music collection was organized, a folder named "Music" was created
on drive Q: to hold the entire collection of music. Within "Music" a sub-folder was created to hold
only music by the artists "Jimmy Smith and Wes Montgomery". Within that folder a sub-folder was
created to hold only music on the album "The Jimmy & Wes The Dynamic Duo". In that folder we
store the song (file) "Baby, It's Cold Outside - 05.mp3". Now we can always find that song with the
path; Q:\Music\Jimmy Smith And Wes Montgomery\The Jimmy & Wes The Dynamic Duo\Baby,
It's Cold Outside - 05.mp3. Paths are a method for computers to know where a file is located. PJB
uses the Path database field to hold that information for each song. When you select a song to
play, PJB uses the information in the path field to locate the song on your hard drive and load it to
be played.
Creating a scheme for storing thousands of songs will greatly ease the chore of remembering
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where your songs are on the hard drive. One such scheme is illustrated below as a suggestion.
Musi
Artist
Album Title
Song Title
D c
:
H Any The name of the artist(s)
If the song is on an album, This is the name of the file
ar name performing the music. This it will be in this folder
that is actually the song.
d for
folder is inside the folder
named the same as the title This will be inside the folder
D the
that holds all of your music. of the album. This folder is named as the album title if
ri folder Having a folder for all
inside the folder named for it is on an album. If not, it
v holdi artists enables you search the artist.
will be inside the folder
e ng
your music folder for a
named for the artist.
L your specific artist.
et music
te files
r
Hopefully, this will help you organize your music. Organizing your music becomes more and more
important as your collection grows to be thousands of songs.
As of version 7.4 build 0.23, There is a new feature to assist in the management of your music
library. When you are working in the Library grid or the Jukebox Load grid and have highlighted a
cell in the grid, pressing the F11 key will open the Windows Explorer folder that contains the song
for the highlighted cell. This additional feature was prompted by the need to access the song
(mp3 file) in Windows Explorer to manage songs at the Windows file level. It is just a quick way to
find the song location in Windows.
2.3.1
Creating a New Library
Please realize that creating a new library (database) erases the old one. The "Favorite
Index" (listed as "Rating in the Library grid) will be lost as well as the number of times the
song has been "Selected". However, any jukebox loads that you had previously created
will still be available and the songs in them will play unless the path is no longer valid.
Figure 6.
To create a new library click Library Management/New Library on the menu bar as shown in
Figure 6. The following warning will appear. You can also right click on the library grid to get a
pop up menu where you can select New Library.
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Figure 7.
If you are sure that you want to create a new library, click Yes. The following Load Music dialog
box will open.
Figure 8.
Select the folder that contains your Mp3 files by clicking on it and, then, click OK to load the songs
to your library. In Figure 8 above notice that the folder named Test Music is highlighted. If OK is
clicked, all of the mp3 files in Test Music and any sub-folders within Test Music will be loaded. In
Figure 8, the songs in Barry White, cd1, and DL-Music will be loaded along with any mp3 files in
Test Music. If the folder contains thousands of Mp3 files, loading them can take a long time. The
"Abort" button will allow you to stop the process. The "Abort" button is covered in the next topic.
2.3.2
The Abort Button
For processes that can take a long time, Personal Jukebox provides an Abort button. Click on it to
stop most long processes. The process will stop cleanly allowing any changes completed to
remain. For instance, suppose you are loading a new library that contains 35,000 songs. You
decide after 10,000 songs have been loaded that you want to stop the process. Clicking the Abort
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button will stop the process leaving the 10,000 songs already loaded in the library.
The Abort Button
2.3.3
Check Buttons
At the bottom left of the library grid is a group of buttons. They are shown here:
Check Buttons
These buttons deal with the check boxes in the library grid. The "Check All" button will place a check
in all the library songs (files) listed. It is only visible when the library is filtered. Only those songs that
meet the filter criteria and are displayed will be checked. Otherwise, every song in your library would
be checked and actions against checked files such as "Modifying Tags" would be applied to all your
songs.
The "Clear Checks" button will remove the check from any song that is checked. The "Invert Checks"
button will remove any existing checks and place a check in the box by any song not previously
checked.
To check only one song, simply hold down the "Ctrl" key on the keyboard and select that song by
clicking on it. To uncheck a single song, hold down the "Ctrl" key and click on the song. To check
multiple songs in any location in the grid, hold down the "Ctrl" key on the keyboard while you make
your selections. For convenience, you can select a group of songs by selecting one song using the
"Ctrl" key and then holding down the "Shift" key on the keyboard, moving to another song several
songs away and clicking on it. Doing this will place check marks in the check boxes for all songs
between the first one selected and the last one selected.
2.3.4
Adding Songs to or Updating an Existing Library
On the menu bar click Library Management/Add to Or Update Library. (Please refer to Figure 6.)
You can also right click on the Library Grid and select Add to Or Update Library. This will open a
folder dialog box like Figure 8. It will have Add Music in its title bar. Select a folder by clicking on
it. Then click OK and the mp3 files in that folder will be added to the Library. If you choose
"Library" as your current jukebox load and scan through the songs, you will find the added music.
However, the added songs will NOT appear in any other jukebox loads unless you add them to
that load first.
As of Version 8.1 of Personal Jukebox, this menu selection actually became a Library update
function. It begins scanning at the folder that you selected and will scan all its contents including
sub-folders. If an MP3 file (song) has changed or is not in the Library database, it is updated or
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added to it. The Library database can also contain songs that are no longer on your hard drive.
This can happen if you delete it from the drive or move it to another location. To correct this, use
"Clean The Library".
2.3.5
Removing Songs From the Library
As of Version 8.1.0.15 Personal Jukebox has a facility for removing songs from your library.
Reviewing Figure 6, note the menu selection "Remove Checked Files from the Library". Songs can
be removed from the library by selecting them with check marks as discussed in Check Buttons.
Once you have completed your selections, the "Remove Checked Files from the Library" will be
available. Click it and the songs you have selected will be removed from your library. This action
does not remove the songs from its source (hard drive, etc.). The songs can added back to the
library using "Add to or Update Library".
2.3.6
Clean The Library
This menu selection was added to PJB as of Version 8.1. Sometimes you may delete songs from
your collection (hard drive, external drive, etc.). This will not remove the song from your Personal
Jukebox Library database. If you attempt to play the deleted song, you will get an error message
because PJB cannot find the song. "Clean The Library" (see Figure 6) provides a means of reading
your entire database and attempting to find every song in it. If a song is not located, it is removed
from the database. Songs that are removed are listed in the log files. This is equivalent to "Validating
Paths".
2.3.7
Modifying Tags
Tags are data entries attached to mp3 files. They contain information such as Title, Artist and
Album. The tags that PJB can manage are:
Tags
Description
Title
The song title.
Artist
The name of the performing artist.
Album
The name of the album, if any.
Year
The year of release (usually the year in which the song was popular).
Track
The track number of the song on the album.
Genre
The general category into which the song falls. Ex. Pop, Folk, Rock,
etc.
Pref(erence)
Your personal preference for the song. Ex. Excellent, Very Good,
Good, Fair, Poor
Situ(ation)
The situation in which you would hear this song. Ex. Party, Evening,
Cocktails, Holiday, etc.
T(e)mpo
The beat speed of the song. Ex. Very Fast, Fast, Moderate, Slow, Very
Slow
Mood
The mood set by the music. Ex. Upbeat, Quiet, Background, Dance
Comment
Your personal comments about the song.
Alb(um)Artist
The artist for the album or Various if there are multiple artists on the
album.
Composer
The composer of the song.
DiskNum(ber)
Used to identify the disk number in a multi-disk album set.
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Managing Personal Jukebox Server
Conductor
The conductor.
Publisher
The record label.
Table 1. PJB Tags
29
Most of the tags in Table 1 are conventional and are usually part of an mp3 file. PJB handles
some tags that may not be included in ome mp3 files. They are provided as an aid to sorting and
filtering your collection. Some of them were handled by mp3 players similar to MusicMatch. In
particular they are Preference, Tempo, and Mood. PJB adds another, Situation, to assist you in
identifying the situations in which you might like to play a song. These additional tags are not
supported by ID3v1, the first version of adding tags to song files.
There have been a number of versions of tags. The most prevalent are ID3v1 and ID3v2. PJB
supports both but, is biased toward ID3v2. Basically, PJB will attempt to read ID3v2 tags and, if
present, ignores IDv1. However, if there is no ID3v2 tag, PJB will attempt to read an ID3v1 tag.
When PJB writes tags, it always writes both.
PJB can modify tags in two ways. The first is to modify individual tags. Click on a cell in the
Library grid then click the same cell again. (Note: This is two single clicks. If you click twice too
quickly, it will be interpreted by Windows as a double click.) The first click will just select the grid
row and column. The second click will highlight the contents of the selected cell for editing. All the
tags can be edited in this way. The "Path" column cannot be edited because path is not a tag.
The path is the location of the song's file on your disk. A discussion of paths is here.
Figure 9. Modifying Individual Tags
This technique is most useful when you simply want to correct or update a tag on a single song. If
you would, for example, like to change the Preference tag on a large group of songs, PJB
provides another way. Notice that there are check boxes on the left side of the Library grid. Place
a check in the box next to each song that you want to change tags on. Too place a check mark in
the box, Hold down the "Ctrl" key and click on the row you want to select. To select a number of
songs, hold down the "Ctrl" key and click on the song's name. As long as you hold the "Ctrl" key
down, any song that you click on will be added to those which have checks in the check boxes to
the left of the song's title. These are called "Selected Songs". You can also select a song, then
hold down the "Shift" key and select a different song several songs above or below the song first
selected. When you do this, all the songs between the first selection and the last selection will
have check marks in the checked boxes. If you hold down the "Ctrl" key and click on a selected
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song, the check mark will disappear and the song will no longer be selected.
Just a word of caution about checking songs. Make sure that you are careful
not to click in the grid after you have checked a number of songs. Clicking
inside the grid will remove ALL your check marks except the one you
selected by clicking in the grid. It is upsetting to have checked a large
number of songs for tag modification and, inadvertently, click in the grid and
then have to check them all over again. UPDATE: As of version 7.4.0.20,
PJB no longer selects a song simply by clicking on it. You must hold the
Ctrl keyboard key down to select a song. You can also unselect (remove
the check mark) for a single song by holding down the Ctrl key and clicking
on it. Furthermore, selecting a single song NO LONGER REMOVES THE
CHECK MARKS FROM OTHER SONGS!
After you have checked all the songs for which you want to modify tags, go to the menu bar and
click Library Management/Modify Tags. (Please refer to Figure 6.) Or, you could right click on the
Library Grid and select Modify Tags. (Please refer to Figure 6.). If you have checked less than two
songs you will get an error message. Otherwise, you will see a message indicating how many
rows you have selected. Click OK and you will see the following window.
Figure 10. Tag Modification
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The "Modify Multiple Tags" window provides a method to modify any of the tags, except the
Title, on multiple mp3 files (songs) at one time. Title is not modified because Title is usually
specific to a single particular file. Consequently, Title must be modified one file at a time. The
Modify Multiple Tags window is used as follows: Select the tag or tags that you want to modify by
placing a check in the box next to them. When there is a check by the tag, the edit window to its
right is enabled allowing you to type in the value you want the tag to have. Clicking the Retrieve
From File button will load the information from one of the files to be modified. The song title is
included just for convenience. Also for convenience, there is a Select All button. Clicking it will
place check marks in all the tag check boxes. It then becomes an Unselect All button. Some of
the tag edit boxes are drop down boxes. If there are no selections to be dropped down, you can
add one. Simply type it in the edit area of the drop down box.The next time you come back to it
the values you have entered will be available in the drop down.
After you have entered all your changes click the Save Changes button. If you are changing the
tags on a large number of files, an Abort button will appear. Clicking it will abort the operation.
However, the changes made before the abort will be permanent. When storing your changes, PJB
will only store changes to tags that have checks by them. It will not alter the tags that have no
checks.
Once the changes have been saved the Done button can be clicked to close the window. If you
have made changes and have not saved them before you click the Done button, you will get a
warning and be offered the choice to close the window without saving changes or the choice to
avoid closing the window giving you the opportunity save your changes.
When the window closes you will be returned to PJB's main window. After you return to the main
window, the songs you have checked will still be checked. This will allow you to perform another
operation on them without having to select them all over. If you are finished, you can clear the
checks by clicking "Clear Checks".
2.3.8
Refreshing Tag Data
There are many tag modifier applications available. If you use an application other than PJB to
modify the tags on your mp3 files after you have created your library, PJB will not contain those
changes. If you modify tags outside of PJB and want to include those changes in your PJB library,
you can use Refresh Tag Data to do so. On the menu bar click Library Management/Refresh Tag
Data. Or use the pop up menu by right clicking in the Library grid. (Please refer to Figure 6.).
Refresh Tag Data offers two options. The first (All Files) is to refresh all files in the selected
folder whether they have been changed or not. The second (Changed Files) will refresh only
those files in the selected folder that have been changed outside of PJB. Either selection will open
a folder dialog box like Figure 8. Select the folder that contains the mp3 files that that you want to
refresh. Depending on your menu selection, All or only Changed mp3 files in that folder and its
sub-folders will be read and updated in PJB's library.
While this will update the tags on songs in the library, it will not update the tags associated with
songs listed in any Jukebox Loads that you have created. Please see Update Load Tags.
2.3.9
Sorting the Library (Sort)
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PJB allows you to quickly sort any column in the Library by simply clicking on a column heading.
There is a blue arrowhead to the right of the Library grid header that points either up or down.
This is shown below:
Column Sort Arrow
The direction of the arrowhead indicates the direction of the next sort. The direction of the arrow
can be changed by pressing the "F12" key on the keyboard or by clicking "Next Sort". When the
arrowhead points down, clicking on a column heading will sort that column descending. In other
words, from highest value to lowest. If the arrowhead points up, the column will be sorted from
lowest value to highest. Clicking on any column heading except "Title" will also sort the "Title"
column within the column heading on which you clicked.
To understand this, study the example shown below.
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Sort Example
In this example, the column heading "Year" was clicked. Notice that the values in the year column
go down in value from top to bottom (1997 to 1996) because the sort arrowhead pointed down.
Also notice the "Title" column. In it the song titles are sorted ascending (from low to high). When
the year changes from 1997 to 1996, the "Title" sort starts over. In other words, the song titles are
sorted ascending within the year. When clicking on a column heading other than "Title", the song
titles are always sorted ascending within the values of the column heading which you clicked.
You can also view your library any way you like by using the "Sort By" facility. There is a Sort
By\UnSort button at the bottom of the Library Grid. When it is titled Sort by and clicked, it will
open the Sort By Editor window shown in Figure 11.
Figure 11. Sort By Editor
Available fields on which you can sort are shown in the Available Fields box on the right. Fields
already used are shown in Sort order box on the left. To move a field, highlight it and click Add or
Remove, which ever is appropriate. To change the order of fields in the Sort order box, highlight
the field and click Up or Down to move it. The Sort Direction (Ascending or Descending) can be
set for each field in the Sort order box by selecting the field and choosing the direction from the
drop down choices. In the example above, your library will first be sorted by Genre, then Artist
within Genre, then Album within Artist and, finally, Title within Album. If the library is filtered and
sorted as above, the sort pattern will be applied to the filtered records. Sorting and Filtering can
be a great tool to build custom jukebox loads.
When the Library is sorted, the button will be labeled UnSort. This is an indication that the
Library is sorted and can be unsorted by clicking the button. Doing so will remove all sorting
parameters from the library.
2.3.10 Searching the Library (Find)
There are always numerous reasons to want to locate a song in your library. You may want to add
it to your current jukebox load by double clicking on it or you may just want to check its tag values.
PJB provides a way to find the song you want to locate. You can Find a song if you know at least
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the first part of the value of one of the fields such as Title, Artist, etc. To Find a song click on the
Find button below the Library grid. The window in Figure 11A will open.
Figure 11A. Find a Record
PJB searches beginning with the currently selected record. In the example above PJB will locate
the first record after the currently selected record, beginning with the letters "mock". Do Search
finds the first matching record and, if clicked again, will find the next matching record. Do Search
treats the library as circular. If you keep clicking Do Search, the record found will eventually be
the first one you found. OK, when clicked, will find the first matching record and close the window.
Capitalization of letters does not matter. If OK is clicked after Do Search is clicked, the library
selection will remain on the record found by the previous Do Search click.
Other search fields can be made visible by using the scroll bar on the right of the window.
Basically, to find a song, select a field, enter search data, click Do Search until you see the song
you want and, then, click OK.
2.3.11 Filtering the Library
The library is filtered by clicking the "Filter by" button below it. Please read the topic Using a Library
Filter to Create a Jukebox Load for details on using the filter window.
2.3.12 Playing a Song Using Window's Default MP3 Player
Sometimes you may want to hear what a song sounds like without playing it through PJB. In other
words, you just want to monitor a song before you put it in a jukebox load. You can do this by
selecting the song in the Library and clicking the left mouse button while holding down the ALT key.
The song the cursor is currently on will play using Window's default MP3 player. The sound device
used will be Window's default sound device. If PJB is playing and is using the Window's default
sound device, this feature will not work. This will always be the case if your PC has only one sound
device (card). If you stop PJB from playing by clicking the Stop Play button, you can then use this
feature to play a song from the Library. If PJB is using a sound device other than Window's default
sound device, then you can use this feature even when PJB is playing songs. This is another good
reason to equip your PC with two sound devices (cards).
2.4
Managing the Jukebox Load
The Jukebox Load represents the collection of songs that are taken from your Library and loaded
onto your jukebox making them available to be played. If you have created a library, there will be
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at least one jukebox load created. This is because the act of creating a library will, by default,
create a jukebox load named Library. Also, when a new library is created, PJB loads the Library
jukebox load automatically. The Library jukebox load contains ALL the songs in your library. The
Jukebox Load is presented much like the Library. It is shown as a grid similar to the grid
displaying the Library.
PJB's greatest usefulness, however, is in creating smaller jukebox loads consisting of songs
selected from the Library that fit a particular situation. Perhaps you are hosting a cocktail party
and want the background music to be nothing but smooth jazz. Or maybe you are having a
swimming pool party and would like the music to be mostly rock & roll with a few ballads included.
You can even create a jukebox load that contains only songs that were popular when you and
your significant other met. That's the beauty of PJB. Create a jukebox load to match any scenario.
Then, you can select a song from that load or let PJB do the selecting for you. In either case you
will hear only those songs you picked for the special occasion. If you are using PJB's companion
client on the same or another computer*, only the songs in the jukebox load will be visible. Now
lets find out how to do it.
* If you have a Local Area Network, PJB can serve Jukebox information over it. For example,
suppose you have created a Jukebox Load for a cocktail to be held on your patio. Load PJB
Client on a laptop computer and place the laptop in a conspicous location on your patio. Then
start PJB Client on the laptop and it will display the Jukebox Load. Your guest can then double
click on any song that they would like to hear and it will be placed in the playcue and played. This
assumes that your PJB server is playing the music into the audio system that can be heard on
your patio. If PJB server is playing the music into a low power FM transmitter, then any audio
system equiped with an FM receiver can be used to hear the music. See "Using PJB with FM
Transmitters ".
2.4.1
Using a Library Filter to Create a Jukebox Load
Filter By capability. In Quick Start the use of the filter capability was covered. It is repeated here
for convenience.
Figure 12. The Filter By Window
This is used to filter the library and create a subset of it. Click the drop down arrow at the right of
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the top most "Field Name". You will see a list that is the same as or similar to the names of the
columns shown in the library grid. In Figure 12 above, the library will be filtered to contain only
those songs having no entry for Genre (IS NULL) or having an entry for Genre equal to "Soul".
As you can see, you can filter your library in a great many ways. Click OK to filter the library
according to your criteria. More about "LIKE" and "NULL" (The Condition for a filter can be "=
(Equal to), > (Greater Than), < (Less Than), >= (Greater Than or Equal To), <= (Less Than or
Equal To), <> (Not Equal To), Like (Similar To), IS NULL (No entry), or IS NOT NULL (any entry).
Most of these are reasonably clear. However, "Like" and "NULL" need a little more explanation. If
the the Condition is LIKE, you can use "*" and "?" in Field Value. The "*" will represent any
quantity of any character while the "?" will represent any single character. For example selecting
"Artist" in Field Name, "LIKE" in Condition and "*jones" in Field Value will display any song having
any characters up to "jones" and "jones" as the last characters. Therefore, your filter would display
Quincy Jones, Jack Jones and any other artist with the last name Jones. The result is not case
sensitive. Using "?a*" would display any artist with "a" as the second letter of their name. Using "*"
and "?" can create almost any filter condition. NULL simply means that nothing (no character at
all) has been entered entered into the selected Field Name. In other words, If you select "Genre"
in Field Name and "IS NULL" in Condition (Field Value will be unavailable), the filter will display
all songs for which no entry has been made in the "Genre" field. Please realize that "space" is a
character and constitutes an entry in a field. Songs having only spaces entered will not match "IS
NULL". "IS NOT NULL" will display the song if the selected Field Name has any entry -- including
spaces.) Using "Or" and "And".
After filtering your library, you will see a notice above the library grid blinking to remind you that
the library grid is filtered and only shows the songs that meet the filter's criteria. Notice also that
the large "Save Jukebox Load" button is available. Click it and give your new jukebox load a
name. Click "OK" and the following happens. Your new load is created and then loaded. This
can be verified by checking the "Current Jukebox Load:" combo box. Also the "Save Jukebox
Load" button disappears and the library grid is no longer filtered. Notice also that the jukebox load
grid contains only the songs in your new jukebox load while the library grid still contains all the
songs in your library. You have just created a new jukebox load. You can add individual songs
from your library to the current jukebox load by double clicking on the song in the library grid. If
you try to add a song that is already in the load, you will get an error message.
You do not have to create a new jukebox load to use the filter. Just ignore the Save Jukebox
Load button and work with the library grid, which now shows only the files that meet your filter
parameters. Using this technique, you could display only the songs performed by a single artist or
display only the songs on a single album. In fact, you can display the songs in your library based
on any combination of filter parameters that you can come up with. If you want to remove all the
filter criteria, click on the Clear All button. The filter criteria will be removed. Then, click OK. The
window will close, the entire library will be visible in the library grid and the Save Jukebox Load
button will disappear.
The filter facility can also be used to modify a jukebox load. This is covered in the Modifying a
Jukebox Load topic.
2.4.2
Manual Jukebox Load Creation
A Custom Jukebox Load can be manually created by going to the menu bar and clicking on
Jukebox Management/Custom Jukebox Load. Custom Jukebox Load is also available in the pop-
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up menu you get when you right click in the Library Grid. The window in Figure 13 will open.
Figure 13. Naming A Custom Jukebox Load
Type in a unique name for your new load and click OK. Your new custom jukebox load will
become the current jukebox load. However, it will have no songs in it. In other words, the jukebox
grid will be empty. Add songs to the new jukebox load by double clicking on songs in the library
grid. You can use all the sorting, searching (Find) and filtering methods in the library grid to locate
songs that you want to double click on to add them to your custom jukebox load. You can also use
the check boxes to select multiple songs. Then use the Add Checked Songs to Current Load
feature from the pop-up menu to add your selections to the new jukebox load.
For your new load to be valid, you must add at least 5 songs to it. With less than 5 songs, you will
get an error message when you try to Start Play.
2.4.3
Modifying a Jukebox Load
The extended menu for the Jukebox Load (the double headed red arrow in the upper left is
covered in detail in the Searching, Sorting and Filtering the Jukebox Load topic.
There are a couple of ways to modify an existing jukebox load. First make sure that the load you
want to modify is the current jukebox load. Do this by using the Current Jukebox Load drop down
box shown in Figure 14.
Figure 14. Current Jukebox Load Drop Down Box
When the load is selected, the jukebox grid will display the songs in that load. Now you are ready
to make changes to it. The easiest way to add a single song to a load is to find it in the library and
double click on it. The song you double clicked in the library grid will become a member of the
current jukebox load.
To remove a song from a jukebox load, select it by holding down the "Ctrl" key and clicking on it in
the current jukebox load and then right click on it. Figure 15 below shows the result of selecting
"Basin Street Blue" and right clicking.
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Figure 15. Removing a Song from a Jukebox Load
Your choices at this point are explained in the Remove or Delete Selection window. Remove
from the Current Jukebox Load will remove the song from the load but it will still be in the
Library and on your hard drive. Remove and Delete the File will, not only remove the file from the
current load, it will also delete the file from your hard drive where ever it is stored. A warning
message will appear like figure 16 giving you a second chance to actually do it or not.
Figure 16.
Clicking Yes will do it, clicking No will cancel the operation and close the windows. Be careful. If
you delete the song from its storage location (hard drive), it cannot be recovered. In Figure 15
above clicking Cancel will close the window and leave the song unchanged. You may ask why
there is a facility to completely delete a file. Perhaps the song is incomplete and stops playing
before its end. So, you want to delete it and maybe replace it with a complete version.
You can also use this feature to remove or delete several songs at once. You can select multiple
songs by holding down the Ctrl key and clicking on the songs you want to remove or delete. A
black dot will appear to the left of the songs you have selected. Right click in the grid and you will
see the choices in Figure 15. You can clear your selections by clicking on the vertical red arrow in
the upper left corner of the jukebox grid (see Figure 18) and selecting Deselect All. You can
also Select All songs in the same manner. Be careful with this. You could select a large number
of your songs and DELETE them permanantly from your hard drive. If you are wise. you will have
backed up all your songs to a safe location anyway.
If you delete a song from your hard drive, it will be removed from the current jukebox load and
from the library. It may not, however, be removed from other jukebox loads. You can correct this
by validating the other loads (see Validating Paths).
You can use a filter to modify a jukebox load. Click on "Filter By" and select the parameters of
your filter. Click Ok to close the filter window. The library is filtered and the Save Jukebox Load
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Managing Personal Jukebox Server
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button appears. Click the Save Jukebox Load button and, when asked to name your load, type in
the name of the existing jukebox load that you want to modify. The window in Figure 16A will
open.
Figure 16A
Here you have the opportunity to Replace the load, Append to the load or Abort the operation. If
you select Append, all the songs shown in your filtered library will be added (appended) to the
jukebox load you named. If you want to add only selected songs to the current jukebox load, don't
use this method. Use the Add Checked Songs to Current Load feature instead. Selecting Replace
will delete the previous jukebox load and replace it with the songs in your filtered library. Either
way you have modified an existing jukebox load. Abort cancels the operation without making any
changes.
2.4.4
Adding Checked Songs to the Current Jukebox Load
This feature is only available in the pop-up menu that you see when you right click in the Library
Grid. You can check as many songs as you like using the check boxes on the left of the Library
Grid. Then, select "Add Checked Songs to the Current Load" from the pop-up menu to add the
songs you checked to the jukebox load currently shown in "The Current Jukebox Load is:" grid
above the library.
You can filter the library before you select songs to make it easier to locate the songs you want. If
the library is filtered, there will be additional buttons available below the library grid. The Save
Jukebox Load button is discussed in the "Using a Filter to Create a Jukebox Load" topic. The
"Check All", "Clear Checks" and "Invert Checks" buttons alter the check marks in the check boxes
on the left of the Library Grid. "Clear Checks" removes all checks from all the check boxes leaving
no songs selected. "Check All" places a check mark in every check box which results in having all
songs visible in the Library Grid being selected. "Invert Checks" removes a check mark where one
existed and places a check mark where there was none. These buttons are not available unless
the Library is filtered for the following reasons. All (Check All) the songs in the entire unfiltered
Library already exists as a Jukebox Load named "Library". Also, some libraries could be very
large and checking all songs and then adding them to an existing Jukebox Load would create a
process that on slower computers could take a long time (hours to days) to complete. In fact, if
you check more than 10,000 songs, you will get a message box that will give you the option to
cancel or continue the process.
2.4.5
Selecting or Deleting an Existing Jukebox Load
The Current Jukebox Load drop down box shown in Figure 14. is used to select a jukebox load.
All jukebox loads that have been created will be listed in the drop down list. Just click on the one
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you want to select. The songs in the selected jukebox load will be shown in the jukebox grid.
If you right click with the mouse on the text in the drop down box, you will be given the
opportunity to delete the Current Jukebox Load. This is a non-recoverable delete, so, BE
CAREFUL
2.4.6
Validating Paths
What is a path? Glad you ask. A path is the address to an mp3 file on your PC. Without the path,
PJB would not know where to find the song you want. When you are loading a library, you have to
select a folder on your PC where the music is located.That folder is part of the path. Go to the
scroll bar at the bottom of the library grid and move it to the right until you can see the "Path"
column as shown in Figure 17. You may have to expand the size of the "Path" column to see the
entire path unless you have chosen to Show Cell Hints .
Figure 17. The Path To A File
When PJB loads a new library or adds to a library, it stores the path to the file in a field in a
database. When PJB needs to retrieve the file (song), for example to play it, it goes to the location
identified by the path to get the file. If for some reason the file no longer exist at that location, PJB
stores a message in the log file and goes on to the next song to play. So, if you know that you
picked a song to play, but you never heard it play, you probably need to Validate Paths. Validating
paths takes place in the current jukebox load. When you go to the menu bar and click on
Jukebox Management/Validate Paths, the path for every song in the current load will be
checked. If PJB cannot find the file, it is removed from the current jukebox load and from the
library. If you want to validate paths for the entire library, select Library as the current jukebox
load and then validate paths. There is another discussion of "paths" here. Of course, any path
not found and removed from the library is no longer available. To add that song back to the
library, you will have to select the folder in which the song is currently located by using the Library
Management/Add To Library menu. The Add To Library is also available by right clicking in the
Library grid.
If you are familiar with Local Area Networks (LAN) you will likely understand "Mapping Network
Drives". PJB can load songs from a mapped network drive (i.e. a hard drive on a PC other than
the PC with PJB on it). If you do this and the network drive is unavailable when PJB looks for a file
on it, PJB will treat that file as a non-existent file. If you Validate Paths under this condition, PJB
will remove all the songs located on the currently unavailable drive from your library. The easiest
way to always avoid this is to put a large hard drive in the PC with PJB server on it and always
load your library from that drive. In other words, though you can use mapped networked drives, it
may not be wise. This can also apply to removable (external) drives such as USB connected hard
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Managing Personal Jukebox Server
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drives and thumb (flash) drives. Notice the paths in Figure 17. The very first character in the path
is the drive letter. In most of the paths above it is C. However, notice that M is the first letter in
the path of the very first one at the top of Figure 17. Whenever a drive is added to a PC, either by
mapping it or connecting it by USB, eSATA or otherwise, the operating system assigns that drive
a "drive letter". Mapped drives usually have the same letter assigned to them unless the mapping
is changed. External drives, however, may not be assigned the same letter when they are
attached. For example, suppose that you attach an external drive on which you have songs
stored. When you added songs from that drive to your library, the drive had the letter E assigned
to it. Now, PJB cannot find any of the songs that are on the external drive. Why, because before
you connected the external drive you had stuck a thumb (flash) drive into your computer and the
operating system assigned the first available letter E to it. Now, when you connected your external
hard drive, it will be assigned the next available letter F. The song files being looked for by PJB
have a path that begins with E. So PJB looks on E (your thumb drive) for the song file and it is not
there. This may be more technical information than you like. It is presented here in the hope that it
will help understanding.
2.4.7
Update Jukebox Load Tags
When you refresh the tag data in your Library, any jukebox load created prior to the refresh may
have tags that differ from the tags in your Library. This can be corrected by updating the current
Jukebox Load tags. To do this select Jukebox Management/Update Load Tags on the menu.
2.4.8
Searching, Sorting and Filtering the Jukebox Load
You can quickly sort on any column shown in the Jukebox Load by simply clicking on the column
heading at the top of each column. For example, to sort on genre, click on the Genre column
heading. See Sorting the Library (Sort) for a more detailed explanation of using column headings
to sort your Jukebox Load. The blue "Sort Arrowhead" and the "F12" key discussed there apply to
the jukebox grid as well. A more complex sorting method is explained below.
Searching for a song in the current jukebox load is much like searching for a song in the library.
The difference is in getting to the Sort/Find facility for the jukebox load. In Figure 18, notice the
vertical double headed red arrow in the upper left corner of the jukebox grid. Click on the red
arrow and the Jukebox Auxiliary Menu shown in Figure 18 will drop down.
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Figure 18. Jukebox Sort, Find & Filter Menu
The menu includes Sort, Filter, Find and Quick Find which can be used to locate songs in the
current jukebox load. Sort works just like the one in Figure 11. If you sort the Jukebox Load, an
UnSort button will appear above the Jukebox Load grid. This is an indication that the Jukebox
Load is sorted. Click the UnSort button to remove all sort parameters. Find works just like the
one in Figure 11A. . Filter works just like the one in Figure 12. When you filter the Jukebox Load,
the grid will turn Fuchsia and an Unfilter button will appear to the right of the number of songs in
the Jukebox Load. Please realize that, if there are no songs in the jukebox load that match your
filter settings, the Jukebox Load grid will be empty. Click the Unfilter button to see all the songs in
the jukebox load. Quick Find allows you search based on one database field. Clicking Quick
Find opens the window shown in Figure 19.
Figure 19. The Quick Find Window
In the example shown, Quick Find will look only at the Pref (preference) field for the data you
type in the Field Data to Search For box. The buttons Do Search, Cancel and Ok have their
usual functions.
The Choose Visible Columns menu selection provides a way to display only those columns of
data that you want to see. Figure 20 shows the window that will open when you click on Choose
Visible Columns.
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Managing Personal Jukebox Server
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Figure 20. Choosing Columns to Display
Using the window you can Add a column or Remove a column. Place a check in the Live view
check box to see the changes immediately. When unchecked, the changes take effect when the
window closes. Cancel and OK have their usual functions. You can also change the order (let to
right) of the columns. To do so, place the mouse cursor on the column title button (at the top of
the column); press the right mouse button and hold it down while you drag the column to the
position where you would like it to be. When you release the right mouse button, the column will
be there. Personal Jukebox will save your settings when you close the application.
The Select All and Deselect All menu items allow you to select or unselect all the songs in the
Jukebox Load.
2.5
The Audio Control Panel
The Audio Control Panel is the central control for the sound that comes from your selected sound
card. If you don't hear anything, make sure that the Level is moved to the right. Also, if you have
more than one sound card, make sure that you are listening to the selected sound card.
2.5.1
The Player Tab
The Player Tab was discussed briefly in Quick Start. Here are more details. The Player Tab
contains a Level Control, A Position In Program track bar and a Sound Card Selection drop
down box. These all control the mp3 player within PJB.
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Personal Jukebox
Figure 21. The Player Tab
The Level Control is the master volume control. Left is less volume and right is more volume.
Monitor the volume by listening to the output of the selected sound card with headphones or
speakers and adjust it to a suitable level. The Position In Program track bar will move left to right
as the selected song plays. If you have clicked the Start Play button you can drag and drop the
pointer to play different parts of a song. The song will begin playing from the pointer's position
when you lift the mouse button (drop). When the Start Play button is clicked the song always
starts playing from the beginning.
Some PCs are equipped with more than one sound card. To cover this possibility, PJB allows you
to select the sound card you want it to play through. This is accomplished by clicking on the
Sound Card Selection drop down box and clicking on the sound card of your choice. Make sure
that the target of your music be it headphones, speakers, FM Transmitter or other is connected to
the selected sound card.
2.5.2
The AGC Tab
AGC stands for Automatic Gain Control. PJB uses digital signal processing to even out the played
volume of mp3 files. Sadly there is no standard used to establish the volume of audio files converted
to mp3 files. Consequently, one mp3 file may play quit loud and the next one may play very softly
even though the player level control is not changed. It is desirable when listening to music not to
have to constantly adjust the level control to amplify low volume songs and attenuate high volume
songs. Take a look at Figure 22.
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
Managing Personal Jukebox Server
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Figure 22. The AGC Tab
The Max Amplification slider sets the maximum amount that the volume will be increased by AGC. It
can be set between 1 and 10. The Attack slider can be set between 0 and 1.0 ms. Setting the Attack
slider lower will cause the amplification action to take place for a shorter time. Set higher,
amplification will take place for a longer time and may have a greater effect. The Release slider is
set to the length of time the action will remain in effect. It can be set between 0 and 1 second. Finding
the optimum setting is, for the most part, a trial and error effort. Once you have determined the
settings you like, you will likely not change them anymore. The Enable Automatic Gain Control
check box at the bottom of the window enables the AGC when checked and disables it when
unchecked. Please note that the AGC works by lowering the volume of all songs and then controlling
the increase in amplification. So when you disable the AGC, you will likely have to go back to the
Player tab and lower the Level Control. Likewise, if you make changes and re-enable the AGC, you
will have to adjust the Level control on the Player tab.
2.5.3
The Amplifier Tab
The provides the ability to apply an overall amplification factor to the player. Take a look at
Figure 23.
Figure 23. Audio Control Amplifier Tab
The Amplification (%) can be set to 100 - 1000 per cent in increments of 100. A setting of 100
allows an amplification factor of 1 (100%). A setting of 1000 allows an amplification factor of 10
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Personal Jukebox
(1000%). The vertical slider allows an adjustment between 0% and the setting of Amplification
(%). In Figure 23 the slider allows an adjustment between 0% and 200% and is set to 145%.
The Channel drop down box refers to the number of the channel (All or Ch0Ch9) you want to
adjust. Since most music is stereo, only the All (channels at once), should be used. If you have a
very low output sound card and need additional amplification, you can adjust it here. Also, if there
is a significant imbalance between the left and right channel amplification on your sound card, the
channels can be independently adjusted to balance. In most cases you will not need to use this
feature. But, it's here if you do. The feature is enabled by placing a check in the Enabled box.
Without a check, it is disabled.
2.5.4
The Equalizer Tab
The Equalizer Tab displays a conventional audio equalizer. Refer to Figure 24 The equalizer
provides boost or cut adjustment to
.
Figure 24. The Audio Equalizer
ten frequency bands. The bands are centered at 60, 170, 310, 600, 1k, 3k, 6k, 12k, 14, and 16k
hertz (cycles per seconds). 60 through 310 hertz are the lower, bass frequencies, 600 - 3k hertz
are the mid range frequencies and 6k - 16k hertz are the higher treble frequencies. The channels
are the same as discussed on the Amplifier Tab. The Preset drop down box offers a number of
preset equalizations such as Dance, Loudness, Rock, Party, etc. You can set your own levels
and they will be remembered across sessions of PJB. However, if you select a Preset, your
custom preset will be lost.
If you are feeding the output of PJB into an audio system such as your Hi-Fi or an FM Transmitter,
it is usually best to leave the equalizer set to (Default), in other words, all sliders at 0 as shown in
Figure 24. If you are using your PC's sound system, then you can adjust the equalizer to get the
sound you want.
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
gbland@nc.rr.com
http://www.dgb.us
Part
III
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3
Personal Jukebox
Using Personal Jukebox
Assuming that you have installed Personal Jukebox, read its introduction and Quick Start and
loaded its library with Mp3 files, you are ready to use it to fill your life with music. This section of
help will cover only the routine operation of Personal Jukebox. Take a look at the figure below.
Figure 26
Here you see the play control buttons above the Play Cue. Their function is self-explanatory.
When they are grayed out (like Stop Play), they are inactive and cannot be clicked. In Figure 26,
Clear List and Start Play are active. Skip and Stop Play are not. The following topics go into more
detail.
3.1
Playing Songs
The simplest way to play songs is to click Start Play (see Figure 26). Once you click it, it will
become inactive and Stop Play will become active. Skip will also become active if it is visible . If
there are songs in the play cue, Clear List will become active.
When you click Start Play and there are no songs in the play cue, Personal Jukebox will
randomly add songs to the play cue from the current Jukebox Load and start playing them. The
number of songs added is determined by the setting in Options . If you have already added songs
to the play cue, clicking Start Play will start playing the song at the top of the play cue. When the
song is finished, it is removed from the play cue and the next song moves to the top and starts
playing. Adding songs to the play cue always adds them to the bottom of the play cue list.
To stop a song from playing click Stop Play. The currently playing song will stop. Click Start Play
to continue playing the song from the point where you stopped it. If you want to stop the song
currently playing and start playing the next song in the play cue, click Skip if it is available
(visible). Skip is not available unless it is allowed in the options .
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If you want to remove all the songs in the play cue, click Clear List. Note that Clear List is
inactive while songs are playing. You must click Stop Play to make Clear List active.
As mentioned, Personal Jukebox plays the songs in the play cue in order from top to bottom. It is
possible to change the order of songs in the play cue if the Allow Play Cue Alteration is set in
Options .
3.2
Adding Songs To the Play Cue
Songs are added to the play cue by placing the cursor (which becomes a pointing finger) on the
song in the jukebox load grid (see Figure 29) and double click it. The selected song will appear at
the bottom of the play cue list.
Figure 29
Above, a double click at that point will add "You're Still The One" to the play cue. Notice the two
boxes just above the play cue. The left box indicates the number of songs in the play cue and the
right box indicates the time it will take to play all the songs in the play cue in minutes and seconds
(mm:ss).
Duplicate songs are not allowed in the play cue unless that option is set.
3.3
Delete Corrupt Songs
Sometimes a song will begin to play and will not play properly. It is likely that the MP3 file has been
corrupted. To delete the corrupt file, double click on it in the play cue. However, it must be in the top
most position of the play cue to be deleted. Since this delete is designed to remove corrupted song
files from the hard drive as well as the library, a warning message will be shown that will ask you if
you really want to do it.
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Deleting Corrupt Songs
Illustrated above you can see that the file located at C:\Test Music\50's-Test - Copy\Al Hibbler - 11th
Hour Melody 1956.mp3 has been removed from the play cue and will be be deleted from the hard
drive if the "Yes" button is clicked. If you want to save the file for some reason, click the "No" button.
3.4
The Tools Menu
As of Build 8.0.0.0 PJB contains the "Tools" menu shown below
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The Tools Menu
The first three sub-menus allow you to copy songs (.mp3 files) from PJB to a drive and folder
selected by you. The first two, Copy Filtered Jukebox Songs and Copy Filtered Library Songs,
require you to create a filter for either the current Jukebox Load or the Library respectively. If the
Jukebox or Library is filtered, the appropriate menu will be enabled. The third menu, "Copy Selected
Library Songs", allows you to select any number of songs from your library using the check boxes
next to each song and then copy them to the selected folder.
The next two sub-menus are used to create "Favorites" in the Library. "Genre Rating Mgmt" will open
a window that will allow you to establish your preference ratings for the genres assigned to the songs
in your library.
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Genre Mgmt
Some of the more common genres are included, however, you can add new ones with the "New
Genre" button. You can also delete the currently selected genre with the "Delete Genre" button. You
can set the "Pref" (preference) value to a number between 0 and 10 inclusive. 10 is the most
preferred and 0 is the least preferred. When creating a "Favorites Index" (FavNdx) for a song, any
genre not listed in "Genre Mgmt" is considered to have a genre preference of 0.
There is also a "Bit Rate Influence" spin edit option. It can be set from 0 to 10. When set to 0, the bit
rate at which the MP3 song file was compressed provides no increase in the "Favorite Index" for
songs. When set to 10, the bit rate has maximum influence. (Note: Songs having a higher bitrate will
have higher quality at playback and songs having a lower bitrate will have lower quality but produce
smaller files.) Click the "Close" button to close the Genre Mgmt window.
The "Generate Favorite Index Values" menu will create a "Favorite" value between 0 and 10
inclusive. If the library is filtered when this menu is chosen, only the songs in the filtered list will have
their favorite value calculated. There will be a message to remind you that the library is filtered. The
"Favorite Index Value" is calculated using a complex algorithm based on the Genre, Bit Rate,
Preference and number of times the song has been manually selected to play (maintained in the
"SelCnt" field of the database). Note: If genre or preference for a song does not have an entry, they
are considered to have a value of zero (0) when a favorite index value is calculated. The "Favorite
Index Value" is maintained in the "FavNdx" field of the database. Both the "SelCnt" and the "FavNdx"
fields can be used in filters.
As of version 8.0 PJB includes "Conversions" tools. The possible conversions are listed in the submenu shown in "The Tools Menu" above. They are "CD to MP3", "MP3 to Wave", "Flac to MP3",
"WMA to MP3" and "OGG to MP3". The following is a description of each.
CD to MP3: This feature provides a method to "RIP" songs from an audio CD. Ripping refers to the
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
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53
extraction of the digital data that is used to store music on an audio CD. CD to MP3 does this and
converts the digital audio data to a file formatted as an MP3 file. The MP3 format is the audio
compression format that PJB plays. The files on a standard audio CD rarely have "Tags (Tags refer
to data that are added to the main file. They are also referred to as "metadata". In the case of
music, tags are not part of the music. When the music is played, the tags are not involved.
The tags are there and can be read and displayed when handled by software. Tags for music
files typically contain information such as the song title, the artist, the genre and so forth.) "
stored with them. CD to MP3 will check with "FreeDB" (a web based album database) and attempt to
download tags for each track on the CD. To rip songs from a CD and format them as MP3 files, click
on CD To MP3. If there is no CD in the selected drive, the resulting form will be empty. "Eject" the
CD tray. Insert an audio CD and "Close CD". It will take a little time for the CD drive to become
ready. After it does, the form will resemble this.
Converting CD Tracks to MP3
Notice that PJB has already read the CD and listed each track and its play time. The block below
labeled "Select an album to see the Track Info." will display a list of the albums from the internet CD
database that may be this album. If more than one album is displayed, select the proper one and its
track information will be shown. Here only one album is displayed and its title is the same as the
album on the CD placed in the CD drive tray. Click on that album to update the track information with
the proper tags. This is shown in the following.
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Data for Tracks After Album Selection
If the track information is correct, we are ready to select the tracks to rip. To rip all the tracks, click
on the "Check All" button at the top. This will place a check mark in the block to the left of each track.
At least one track must be checked before the "Rip" button will be active. Of course, we can check
or uncheck each track individually. Only the tracks that are checked will be ripped. "Clear Checks"
will remove all the check marks and "Invert Checks" will remove the checks from currently checked
tracks and place a check by currently unchecked tracks. When the desired tracks are checked, the
"Rip" button can be clicked. That will start the ripping process. A dialog form similar to the one below
will appear so that a folder in which to store the ripped tracks can be selected.
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
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Selecting a Folder In Which to Save Ripped Songs
Select a folder and click "OK". Be sure to remember where you saved the tracks so you can find
them later. After clicking OK the ripping process will begin. The window will be closed and the
ripping process will continue in the "background". On PJB's main form there will be a blinking label
("Conversion In Process") in the lower left corner. The label will continue to blink as long as the
conversion process continues. At the same time, below the label, a text box will indicate the track
currently being ripped and the progress bar will indicate the percentage of completion. When all the
tracks have been ripped, the label and progress bar will disappear. If "Cancel" is clicked, the folder
selection dialog form is closed and ripping will not start. This will allow you to either alter the checks
and click "Rip" again or to simply click "Done" and return to PJB's main form without ripping or
converting anything.
CDDB Options: The initials CDDB stand for Compact Disk DataBase. This used to be an Internet
database from which anyone could freely acquire track information for music albums on CDs. It was
updated by its users. However, it was purchased and became fee based. It was replaced by FreeDB
which can be used by anyone for free. So many music lovers became familiar with CDDB, it is still
common practice to use the initials to mean access to album track information from the Internet. If
you click on CDDB Options the following form will be displayed.
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CDDB (FreeDB) Option Form
You do not need to make any changes here. You can, if you choose to, enter your email address.
When the form is first displayed, the drop down combo box will be blank. Clicking on the drop down
arrow will display the default "freedb" web address. Don't change this unless FreeDB stops
responding. If you change it, you will need to know the web address of a suitable source of music
album track data.
MP3 To Wave: Some CD players will not play CDs with MP3 formatted tracks. They will only play
standard, wave formatted, CDs. This is quite often true of older CD players and some CD players in
automobiles. If you want to prepare a folder of wave formatted tracks selected from your library, you
must first select them in the Library on PJB's main form. After choosing the menu item "Conversions"
/ "MP3 To Wave", the "Convert MP3 Songs to Wave Format" form is displayed. When first displayed,
the tracks you selected from your library will be displayed but, there will be no tracks checked. In the
illustration below 26 have been checked for conversion. Wave formatted tracks take more storage
space than MP3 formatted tracks. Typically, the standard blank CD can store 650 megabytes of data.
This translates to about 15 to 30 wave formatted tracks depending on the length of each track. It is
recommended that you select at least 30 to 40 songs from your library. This will insure that "MP3 to
Wave" will allow you to pick from those songs, enough to fill a CD. This is illustrated below. Note that
on the main form (in the background) that you can see the last tracks checked in the library.
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
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Enough Tracks Selected to Fill A 650 MB CD.
The above illustrates the message box you will see when you have selected enough tracks to fill a
650 MB CD. Click OK to continue selecting tracks. When you exceed the number of tracks that will
fit on a 700 MB CD, the progress bar will disappear and the information bar will display the message
"700 MB CD Capacity Exceeded!! Uncheck Tracks to Correct!!". The reason for this is that most CD
Burning applications are easier to work with if there is one folder that holds the data that you want to
put on the CD. If you just want a folder full of wave formatted files, check as many as your hard drive
can hold. The point at which a 700 MB CD will be filled is illustrated below.
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Converting MP3 Tracks to Wave Format
You can check or uncheck any tracks. When you are satisfied that you have checked the tracks you
want to convert, you are ready for the conversion. Clicking "Convert" will start the conversion
process.
"MP3 to Wave" conversion is similar to "CD to MP3" in that it is a "background" operation. Once the
conversion begins the form will close and display the main form. After clicking "Convert", a "Browse
for Folder" dialog window will open just as it did for "CD to MP3" (refer to the illustration above). You
may want to use the "Make New Folder" button to create a new folder that will contain only the tracks
that you are converting to wave format. Be careful to make a note of your created folder's location.
Make sure that you know the name of the folder in which your new folder resides. After creating your
folder of wave formatted songs, you can use a CD/DVD burning application to create a CD that will
play on most CD players as well as your computer. Maybe in a later version, PJB will include the CD
burning feature! As with "CD to MP3", the "Conversion In Process" label will blink until the
conversion is finished. The track being converted will be displayed and the progress bar will display
the percentage of completion.
Flac to MP3, WMA to MP3 and OGG to MP3. These conversions work much the same as the two
above except that when you select one of them, you will be presented a form in which you will have to
locate the source files (songs). This means that you must know where your music is stored (i.e. their
path). See "Paths" in "Managing The Library".
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Selecting Source Files
You will only be able to see files that match the file extension (*.wma, *.flac. or *.ogg) of the format
you choose to convert. In the example above, we have chosen to convert *.wma files to *.mp3. (The
"*" is a place holder for any file name.) The folder we have selected contains songs that have a *.wma
file extension. The example below illustrates all but one of the source files have been selected.
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Selected Source Files
Click on "Open" and the familiar window with the check boxes will be displayed. (See "Converting
MP3 Tracks to Wave Format" above.) After this, you only have to check the songs that you want to
convert, select a folder in which your converted songs will be stored, click "OK" and the conversion
will start (in the background). The main form will be display and the blinking "Conversion In Process"
will be shown along with the song currently being converted and the progress bar percentage.
Here's to happy converting! Now, you can prepare almost any song for use in Personal Jukebox.
The "Tools" are just nice utilities that enhance the value and usefulness of Personal Jukebox.
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
gbland@nc.rr.com
http://www.dgb.us
Part
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Using PJB with FM Transmitters
Personal Jukebox (PJB) really shines when it is used with a FM transmitter. This topic will be a bit
more technical since it will discuss the details you need to know to set up your own FM radio
station. The following topic will provide a brief explanation of the way to do it.
4.1
The Basic Block Diagram
To establish your PJB driven FM radio station, you will need the following:
PJB Server software
A PC (preferably with two sound cards)
An FM Transmitter
At least one FM receiver
A second PC running PJB Client to select songs remotely
Figure 1. Basic Block Diagram
Refer to Figure 1. The PC running PJB will be referred to as the Server. The PC
running PJB Client, a laptop or tablet, will be referred to as the Client. Following is a
brief description of each of the items in Figure 1.
1. The Server PC. The PC serving PJB is typically a desktop but could also be a
laptop. The PC must be running Microsoft Windows XP SP3 or higher (PJB runs
under Vista, Windows 7 and Windows 8). PJB does not support Apple OSs or
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63
Linux. As mentioned before, it is recommended that two sound devices be
installed in this machine. One could be on the motherboard (this is the main
printed circuit board in the computer) and the other an add in board plugged into
the motherboard. The reason for recommending two sound devices is so that you
can dedicate one to PJB. This allows you to direct normal Windows' sounds to
one and PJB's sound to the other. If you do this, then you will not be transmitting
the normal Windows' sounds to the FM radio band. Connect one sound device
output to the PC speakers and the sound device being used for PJB output to the
FM transmitter.
2. The Low Power FM Transmitter. There are numerous sources of these. Check
out North Country Radio.They have two models that work well. First, there is the
MPX96 PLL Stereo Transmitter. If you are good at kit building, you can save
some money by building their kit. I highly recommend this unit. It can also be
purchased completely assembled. Their web site is http://
www.northcountryradio.com. Second there is Ramsey. They have kits as well.
One is the FM25B. I strongly recommend that you purchase a frequency
synthesized transmitter because they are more stable and are easily received by
digitally tuned FM receivers. Ramsey also provides a finished model, the
FM35BWT.
These transmitters will provide ample signal strength throughout the average
house and yard (my experience is an acre or more). Pay attention to the antenna.
Three to four feet is ample. Telescoping ones work quite well.
3. The FM Receiver or Radio. The radio can be a portable one, FM stereo capable
headphones, an ordinary table radio, a high power Hi-Fi Stereo Receiver or any
device capable of receiving FM stereo signals; even the car radio. One example
is a Hi-Fi receiver driving high quality speakers by the swimming pool. A Wi-Fi
connected laptop or tablet computer running PJB Client by the pool allows your
guests to select the songs they want to hear. How cool is that?
4. The Local Area Network (LAN). This is a standard setup found in many multiple
computer homes these days. Some of them are "wired" and some are "wireless"
while many are both. Figure 1 above shows a wired hub and a wireless access
point. However, if the hub is wireless, the access point is not needed. Also the
laptop computer in the diagram needs only the wireless connection or the wired
connection, not both. Both are shown just as an example.
5. The PJB Client. This is a PC connected to your LAN either by wire or wireless. It
is shown as a laptop but can be a desktop or tablet as well. Like the Server PC
the Client PC must be running Windows XP SP3 or higher (Windows 8 on a
touch screen tablet is nice). Typically, the client PC will have only PJB Client
installed on it. By not having PJB Server available on the client machine, guests
will not have access to PJB Server and, thus, cannot alter your jukebox setup.
The purpose of PJB Client is to provide you and your guests the ability to simply
select songs to be played on the jukebox.
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I hope this brief explanation helps you set your personal jukebox just the way you
want it.
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
gbland@nc.rr.com
http://www.dgb.us
Part
V
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Definitions
The purpose of this section is to provide you with the definition of some of the terms used in these
help documents. Some of the terms you may be familiar with but, may be used in a context with
which you are not familiar.
Jukebox Load - Typically, a sub-set of the songs in your library that have been placed on the
jukebox to make them available to be played. Some users have tens of thousands of songs. Quite
often they do not want all their songs to be available to be played. Only the songs in a jukebox load
will be visible in the display window of PJB's companion client program. If, for example, you are
hosting a dinner party, you can create a jukebox load containing only specific songs in the Easy
Listening and Smooth Jazz genres that will create the mood you desire for your gathering. PJB will
then randomly select songs from that jukebox load and play them. If you have a computer running
PJB Client available to your guests, they will be able to select songs to be played but, only from the
jukebox load you have established on PJB. In many ways a Jukebox Load is similar to a Playlist.
MP3 Format - Songs on a conventional compact disk (CD) are in a digital format called a "wave"
file (WAV). Wave files are large and consume a lot of storage space. They also, because of their
size, take longer to transmit over networks and take more bandwidth. Some very clever software
engineers took a mathematical approach to the analysis of wave files and found that there was a
great deal of redundancy in them. With this knowledge, they devised a way to remove the
redundancy to compress the file size. When the file is played, using appropriate mp3 software, the
redundant part is restored. Mp3 was the first compression technique and created the ability to
store and transmit large audio files. It is likely the most used of the many similar compression
methods now available.
Grids - Grids are tables made up of rows and columns. The row is horizontal and the column is
vertical. The rectangle created where the row and column intersect is called a cell. PJB uses grids
to display information about your music. The information for a single song is contained on one row.
Each column in that row is a specific bit of data about that song. For example, the column on the
left is "Title". The cell at the intersection of the the first row and the left hand column will contain
the title of the song for that row. In "techspeak", each row represents one record (a song) in a
database and each column represents a database field.
Bitrate - The songs stored on your hard drive will be in a format named MP3. This format
represents a method or compressing digital audio data to create a file that is smaller in size
(number of bytes of data). In order to do this, the original song in digital format (usually from a CD)
is sampled at a specified number of data bits per second. That is referred to as the bitrate. This
explanation is greatly simplified but, hopefully, you get the idea. In general, the greater the bitrate,
the better the quality of sound. However, the greater the bitrate, the larger the resulting MP3 file
will be. With the size of modern hard drives in mind, music should be compressed using bitrates of
128 or greater.
Server - As used here server refers to a computer used to serve applications or files. PJB's main
application can be used as a server. What this means is that PJB will respond to a client located
on a computer on the same Local Area Network (LAN). The PJB client can be installed on a
computer other than the one where PJB is installed and used to control (to limited extent) what PJB
does. To use PJB's server, you must start the server when you start PJB. See Activating the
Server.
Client - A client is usually an application that relies on a server to do most of the work. As
mentioned above, PJB Client relies on PJB's server function. Read the help file for it for more
details.
Port - A seaport is a port where ships can unload cargo or load cargo destined to be transported
somewhere else. A data port is a computer connection to an application for the purpose of loading
or unloading data. Data is transported over wires or wireless connections using TCP/IP (Transport
Control Protocol/Internet Protocol). When a client wants to transfer data to or from a specific
application on a server, it must send the port number assigned to the client app and the server app
so that the data can be directed to the proper port. You will notice that when you start the server on
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
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PJB, you are required to enter a port number. When you connect the PJB Client to the server, you
will need to enter the same port. Port numbers can be 1 to 50,000+. However, some of the lower
port numbers are de-facto standards, such as 80 for web pages. We recommend using 9000 to
9999 to avoid conflicts. (Note: These ports are software ports established by TCP/IP. See USB
and RJ-45 for hardware ports.)
Local Area Network (LAN) - A computer network is simply a number of interconnected computers.
The largest network is probably the World Wide Web (WWW). Believe it or not, when you
connect to the WWW, your computer is connected to every other computer that is connected to the
WWW. And, conversely, every other connected computer is connected to your computer.
Consider this. When you get on the WWW (commonly call the Internet), many millions of
computers around the world connect to your computer. This is something you should always be
thinking of when you are connected to the WWW. You do not have to connect to the internet to
establish and connect to a LAN. As its name implies, a LAN is local. The simplest LAN is two
computers and a hub which can be wired or wireless. This allows the two computers to be
connected and to transfer data to each other. The computers do not have to be connected to the
internet. See "The Basic Block Diagram".
Tags - Tags as used here are like the tags attached to some products. They have information on
them about the product and can be removed without damage to the product. MP3 tags are typically
appended to the beginning or the end of song files. For more information see "Modifying Tags".
Path - Basically what you follow to get somewhere. All the files you use on your computer are
stored somewhere. Files can be stored on hard drives within the computer case or in portable
cases attached to the computer via USB, Firewire, or eSATA connections. Files can also be stored
on "Thumb" drives or USB sticks, or on memory cards like those used in digital cameras.
Regardless of where they are stored, a computer must be able to find them before it can use them.
A Path is the way a computer finds files. Paths involve identifying the storage device and its
organization. With the Windows operating system storage devices are each given a letter as a an
identifier. Before hard drives and the other storage devices mentioned above, the primary storage
device was a floppy disk. Early computers had one or two floppy disk drives into which a floppy
disk could be inserted. As a result, the letters "A" and "B" were assigned to the two floppy drives.
Then came hard drives. They were call "hard" drives because the magnetic platters on which the
data was stored were rigid rather than flexible like floppies. The first hard drive in the system is
usually assigned the letter "C". Files can be stored directly on a drive (referred to as the drive's
root). For example, you can name a file 'happy" and store it on drive "C". Its path would be "C:
happy". Obviously, different files cannot have the same name because the computer could not tell
which is which. To make it easier to differentiate between files, the "file folder" scheme was
developed. Folders are also called directories. If you have two files named "happy", one of which
is a game and the other being a song, you can create a folder named "songs" and a folder named
"games" on your "C" drive. Now you can store "happy", the song, in folder "songs" and "happy",
the game, in folder "games". When you want to use "happy", the game, you will have to tell the
computer to retrieve "C:\games\happy". You have told the computer to go to drive "C" and find
folder "games". Then look in "games" and find file "happy". The ":" indicates that the previous
letter was the drive. the "\" indicates that the following is a folder unless it is the last "\" which will
be followed by a file name. By doing all this, you have created a Path (C:\games\happy).
Hopefully, you now know that the path to "happy", the song is "C:\songs\happy. There is another
discussion of paths here.
File Extensions - Every file has a two part name. (Note: Here we are discussing the part of the file
path that follows the last \. This is considered to be the "file name".) The two parts are the "friendly
name" (before the ".") and the extension (following the "."), i.e. "readme.txt". Quite often the
extension is hidden. Options within Windows, specifically "Folder Options" provide a way to show
file extensions when listing files. But, that is beyond the scope of this writing. Extensions are used
to allow the Windows operating system to associate a file with an application that can open and
display it. Some examples are *.doc, *.txt, *.xls, *.mp3, *.jpg, etc. "*.doc" files are usually
associated with Microsoft (MS) Word. When you open a *.doc file, Windows will first start MS
Word (or WordPad if Word is not installed) and use it to open the *.doc file. Likewise, *.mp3 files
will be associated with a media player so that it can be opened and played. Being able to see and
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recognize a file extension is useful because it enables you to know what type of application will be
needed to work with the file.
USB - USB are initials and stand for Universal Serial Bus. Early in the development of computers
two major hardware ports were used for peripheral equipment such as printers and monitors. A
parallel port was used, most often, for printers. A serial port was used for telephone line modems
and sometimes video monitors. An explanation of the differences between these types of ports is
beyond the scope here. Today, the prevalent port for hardware peripherals is USB. In tech speak,
a bus is an electrical path along which compatible devices can be attached. A reasonable analogy
is the 110 volt power outlets in the typical home. Appliances, lights, TVs and other devices can be
plugged into them and operated. The USB is similar. USB was developed to be extensible and
standard. Today, printers, external hard drives, mice, keyboards, and many other peripherals can
be plugged into a USB connector on a computer. Furthermore, a USB hub can be plugged into a
USB port and provide 2 to 8 or more USB ports (extensibility). The current USB version is 3.0 and
is about 10 times faster than USB 2.0. Most USB 3.0 devices will work with 2.0, but at 2.0 speed.
RJ-45 Port - RJ-45 ports are hardware ports related to LANs. Internet modems are used to
provide access to the Internet. Your Internet Service Provider (ISP) may be a cable company such
as Comcast or Time Warner or a telephone company such as Verizon or ATT. The ISP will provide
you with a modem that connects you to the internet service. The modem will have a number of RJ45 connectors. One will be labeled WAN (Wide Area Network, i.e. the Internet). The others will be
labeled 1, 2, 3, 4 and so on. These are your LAN connections. You can connect a computer to
each of the RJ-45 connectors and access the Internet. This, of course, assumes that each of the
computers has a RJ-45 connector.
Using the terms "Or" and "And" in the Filter facility. Admittedly, this can be one of the most
confusing activities. Consider the criteria to be "genre" and your goal is to select all songs where
the genre is "Jazz" as well as all songs where the genre is "Big Band". So, you go into the filter
window and select "Genre" in "Field Name", then "=" in "Operation" then type in Jazz in
"Condition" and select "And" in "Operand". Then, on the next line, you select "Genre", "=", "Big
Band", "And". When you click on "OK", you notice that nothing is showing in your filtered library.
What happened? Well, the criteria you have selected will be applied to each song in your library.
That means you have ask for all the songs that have for genre the value "Jazz AND Big Band".
Since genre can be "Jazz OR Big Band" but not both, no songs meet the criteria you have set.
Now, do the same thing except use "Or" as the operand. This time, assuming you have songs in
your library with the genre tags "Jazz" and "Big Band", you will get that list in your filtered library
grid. Now let's consider selecting songs that are tagged for artist as "Chet Baker" and tagged for
genre as "Big Band". Since the criteria "Artist" and the criteria "Genre" are two different fields, it is
possible that some songs by Chet Baker have the genre Big Band. Here you would use the
operand "And". Otherwise, if you used "Or", the result would include all the artists with genre equal
"Big Band" as well as all songs by Chet Baker--"Big Band" or not. While this may be confusing at
first, after some thought and use, you can become proficient at some pretty complex filters.
eSATA - This acronym stands for "external Serial Advanced Technology Attachment". This is a
very fast serial connection method used for external hard drive connections. Most hard drives
today are serial ATA drives as opposed to parallel ATA drives. This approach for external
connection was once the fastest connection for external drives. However, today's USB 3.0 rivals its
speed and is rapidly becoming a defacto standard.
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
Index
Available Fields
Index
-B-
-((All 45
(Transport Control Protocol/Internet Protocol
-AAbort 26, 28
activate 21
Activate Server 21
Activity 21
Activity Log 21
Add a column 41
Add Music 27
Add songs to the new jukebox 36
Add to Library 27
Adding Songs 39
additional amplification 45
address to an mp3 40
AGC 44
album track data 55
album track info 53, 55
Album Tracks 53
allow duplicates 19
Allow Duplicates In Play Cue 19
Allow Play Cue Alteration 19
Allow Skip in Play Cue 19
amplification 45
Amplification (%) 45
amplification factor 45
Amplifier Tab 45
Antenna 62
append 37
Append to the load 37
Archive 21
Arrow 31, 41
arrowhead 31, 41
Ascending 31
Attack 44
Audio CD 52
audio equalizer 46
audio format 66
Automatic Gain Control 44
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
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66
background music 34
bass 46
Bitrate 50, 66
bits per second 66
Burn 56
Bus 68
-CCancel 37
can't find song files 40
Capitalization 33
CD 52, 56
CD to MP3 52
CDDB 52, 55
CDDB Options 55
cell 66
Cell Hints 21
Ch0 45
Ch0 through Ch9 45
Ch1 45
Change Back 20
Change Back At 20
Change to 20
Change to, At 20
check 39
Check All 27, 54
Check boxes 28, 39
Check Marks 27
checkboxes 39
checks 39
Clean 28
Clear All 35
Clear Checks 27, 54
Clear List 11
client 15, 21, 66
collection of songs 34
column 66
column title 41
compression 66
connect 21
connects 21
conversion 56
69
70
Personal Jukebox
Conversion Check Boxes 58
Conversions 52
Convert 58
Copy Filtered Jukebox Songs 50
Copy Filtered Library Songs 50
Copy Selected Library Songs 50
Copy Songs 50
corrupt 49
corrupt files 49
corrupt songs 49
create a new 25
creating filters 68
Current Jukebox Load drop down box
currently loaded combo box 35
Custom Jukebox Load 36
custom preset 46
cycles per seconds 46
-DDaily Songs Played
CSV 19
Dance 46
data bits per second 66
data port 66
database 21, 66
database field 66
Database Fields 22
delete the Current Jukebox Load 39
delete the file 37
delete the file from your hard drive 37
deleting corrupt songs 49
Descending 31
Do Search 33
Done 28
-EEnable Automatic Gain Control
Equalizer 46
Equalizer Tab 46
eSATA 68
extended menu 37, 41
Extensions 67
external Hard Drive 68
44
-F-
37
F12 31, 41
FavNdx 50
Favorites 52
field 66
Field Description 22
Field Name 22, 35
File Extension 50, 67
File Extensions 66
file location 24
file server 66
Filter 35, 41
filter the library 35
filter your library 35
filtered 35
filtered library 37
Filtering 68
filtering the library 34
filtering your library 35
filters 68
Find 33, 34, 41
Find a song 33
Flac to MP3 58
floppy disk 67
FM 62
FM radio 15
FM stereo transmitter 15
FM Transmitter 15, 62
FreeDB 52, 55
frequency bands 46
-GGenerate Favorite Index Values
Genre Rating 50
Grid 66
Grid Sorting 22
50
-Hhertz 46
Hi Fi Tuner
Hints 18
hub 62
15
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
Index
Log File 19
long process 26
Loudness 46
-IID3v1 28
ID3v2 28
imbalance 45
improper tags 41
Installing 10
Internet Protocol 66
Internet Service Provider
Introduction 10
Invert Checks 27, 54
ISP 66, 68
-M68
-JJukebox Columns 21
jukebox grid 36, 37, 39
Jukebox Load 20, 34, 35, 38, 66
Jukebox Load Change 20
jukebox load grid 35
-LLAN 15, 21, 40, 66, 67
left and right channel 45
Level Control 43
Library 28
Library Columns 21
library database 21
Library editing 28
library filters 34
library grid 22, 25, 27, 28, 35, 36
library grid is filtered 35
library is filtered 31
Library management 25, 28
library of music 22
limit maximum 20
list of played songs 20
Live view 41
load modification 37, 39
Load Music 25
Load Music dialog box 25
Local Area Network 21, 66, 67
Local Area Networks 40
Locate 33
locate songs 41
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
main window 21
Management of your library 22
Manual Jukebox Load Creation 36
mapped network drive 40
Mapping Network Drives 40
master volume control 43
matching record 33
Max Amplification 44
meet the filter's criteria 35
menu bar 25
mid range 46
missing songs 40
modify a jukebox load 38
modify an existing jukebox load 37, 39
modify individual tags 28
Modify Multiple Tags 28
Modify Tags 28
Mood 28
move a field 31
mp3 66
mp3 player 43
MP3 To Wave: 56
-Nnetwork drive 40
New Library 25
new load 35
non-existent&nbsp;file
number of songs 21
40
-OOGG to MP3 58
option 18
options 18
order of fields 31
order of play 19
Organizing your music 22
original jukebox load 20
overall amplification 45
71
72
Personal Jukebox
overall amplification factor
45
replace 37
Replace the load 37
replay limit 20
replay limit minimum 20
Retrieve From File 28
Rip 50, 52, 54
Ripping 52
RJ-45 66, 68
RJ-45 connectors 66
RJ-45 Port 66
Rock 46
Router 62
row 66
-PParty 46
Password 21
path 22, 24, 25, 28, 40, 66, 67
Peripheral 66, 68
Personal Jukebox 15
PJB 15
PJB Client 21
Play Control Buttons 11
Play Cue 19, 20
play order 19
Played Songs 19
Player Tab 43
Playlist 66
pop up menu 25
port 21, 66
Position In Program 43
Preference 28
Preset 46
preset equalizations 46
Program/Options 18
Program/Show Hints? 18
-S-
-QQuick Find
Quick Start
41
10
-Rrandomly selecting songs 21
Receiver 62
record 66
Refresh Tag Data 31
refresh the tag data 41
Release 44
Remove a column 41
remove a song 37
Remove and Delete 37
Remove and Delete the File 37
Remove from the Current Jukebox Load
Remove or Delete Selection 37
remove or delete several songs at once
Removing Songs 28
37
37
Save a Daily Log File 19
Save Changes 28
Save Jukebox Load 35
Save Log Now 19
SelCnt 50
select a jukebox load 39
Select All 28
Select songs to convert 58
select the sound card 43
selected cell 28
selected songs 39
selected sound card 43
Selecting an Existing Jukebox Load
Selecting Songs 27
server 15, 19, 21, 66
Server Activity Log 21
server directory 21
Server parameters 21
server startup 21
shared 19, 21
sharing 21
Sharing and Security 21
sharing directories 21
Show Hints 18
Situation 28
Skip 19
software port 66
song file format 66
song server 66
Songs Selected for Playing 19
sort 22, 31, 41, 42
Sort by 31
39
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
Index
Sort By Editor 31
Sort by/Unsort 31
Sort Direction 31
sort library 33
Sort Order 31
sort pattern 31
sorted 31
sorting 31, 41
Sorting and Filtering 31
Sorting the Library 31
sound card 43
Sound Device 34
Sound Card Selection 43
spin edit 21
Start Play 11, 36, 43, 48
Start the Server when PJB Starts
Status Bar 10
Stop Play 11
stop process 26
sub-folders 25
upper left corner 41
USB 66, 68
Use a Replay Limit 20
Use a Scheduled Jukebox Load Change
Uses 10
using "Or" and "And" 68
-Vvalid 25
Validate Paths
volume 43
volume control
WAN 68
wave 56
wave file 56
wired 15
Wired Router 62
wireless 15
Wireless Router 62
WMA to MP3 58
World Wide Web 67
WWW 67
-T-
-Uunavailable files 40
Universal Serial Bus 66, 68
Unselect All 28
unsort 31, 41, 42
unsort library 33
Update Load Tags 41
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
43
-W-
19
tag 22, 28, 41
tag field 22, 41
tags 22, 28, 41, 50, 66
TCP/IP 66
Tempo 28
thumb drive 67
Tools 50
track 52, 56
track data 55
track info 55
track information 55
Transfer Control Protocol 66
Transfer Control Protocol/Internet Protocol
Transmitter 62
treble 46
40
66
73
20
74
Personal Jukebox
Endnotes 2... (after index)
© 2015 D. Gene Bland, Sr.
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