ICT Project Manual 2012 - University of Tasmania

ICT Project A & B
Project Manual
Nicole Herbert
Kristy de Salas
Version 4
January 2012
The purpose of the ICT Project Manual is to provide guidance to the students enrolled
in KXX331 & KXX332 ICT Project A & B at the University of Tasmania during
2012.
Queries: Nicole.Herbert@utas.edu.au
Copyright © Nicole Herbert
Introduction................................................................................................................... 2 Learning Outcomes ....................................................................................................... 3 Generic Attributes ......................................................................................................... 3 Projects .......................................................................................................................... 5 Team Management ....................................................................................................... 6 Lecturer Interaction .................................................................................................... 10 Client Interaction ........................................................................................................ 11 Project Reports ............................................................................................................ 15 Documentation ............................................................................................................ 24 Web Page ..................................................................................................................... 26 Presentation................................................................................................................. 27 Demonstration Day ..................................................................................................... 28 Timesheets ................................................................................................................... 30 Task Schedule ............................................................................................................. 32 Assessment................................................................................................................... 33 Unit Schedule .............................................................................................................. 37 Resources..................................................................................................................... 39 Appendix A – Timesheet ............................................................................................. 40 Appendix B – Confidentiality agreement template .................................................... 41 Appendix C – Intellectual Property Agreement ......................................................... 43 1
Introduction
ICT Project provides students with the experience of developing a medium-scale
software project in a small team. All aspects of the development lifecycle will be
considered: problem specification, requirement extraction, system design,
implementation, testing, documentation and integration. The units provide students
with the experience of working in a team and dealing with the associated challenges
of communication and team management.
In the first two years of your degree practical experience is limited to artificial
assignments. ICT Project allows you to apply your theoretical knowledge on a realworld project so that you will be able to transfer to industry easily.
ICT project is broken into two units, KXX331 Project A and KXX332 Project B,
which must be completed over consecutive semesters. Students work on the same
project in both units, unless circumstances prevent this.
Each student is placed into a project team of approximately 7 students; you will be
involved in forming your own teams. Team size may vary due to class or project size.
Each team will be given a project from the list available, the allocation will be based
on student preferences. Each project has a real client. In most cases the client is not a
member of the University community. All clients need to be treated professionally.
In Project A you complete release 1 (or a third of the project), you complete the
remaining two thirds in Project B. Students are discouraged from working on the
project over the semester break as you should be doing exams in other units and you
need a rest.
In both units each student will get an individual grade. This grade will be made up of
a team component and an individual component. To pass each unit a student must get
at least 45% of the marks allocated for each component and greater than 50% overall.
Please see the assessment section for more information.
Each team member is responsible for:
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A professional approach to the project and to the other members of the team;
Doing the tasks allocated to them at the team meetings by the specified date;
Keeping all appointments with clients, lecturer and team members;
Contributing at team discussions and hence increasing team intellectual property.
Good communication between everyone leads to success!
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Learning Outcomes
On completion of this unit, you should be able to:
1. in development of a substantial ICT system, demonstrate foundational ICT
knowledge of:
• programming, algorithms & data structures
• systems and applications
• historical and current trends
2. apply knowledge of computing, business and project management principles and
technical skills to guide the development and implementation of a substantial ICT
system by:
• interpreting and critically analyzing an organizations needs
• using systems analysis techniques and tools to analyse and model business
processes & information requirements
• using abstraction and computational thinking
• evaluating strengths and weaknesses of potential solutions
• creating artifacts using a variety of templates, techniques and tools
• following a recognised software development methodology
• adapting existing and emerging computing technologies.
3. act professionally by:
• communicating in different modes to diverse audiences
• adhering to professional and ethical codes of conduct
• working independently and collaborating in diverse teams
• considering economic, social, legal, and ethical consequences
Generic Attributes
Knowledge
• Students will be able to apply previous project management, systems analysis, and
software development knowledge and independently learn new skills to build a
software system according to client requirements and deadlines;
• Students will be able to investigate and overcome issues and challenges associated
with constructing a substantial piece of software;
• Students will develop research skills to identify and use appropriate systems
design and development tools and other resources;
• Students will be able to apply technical and information skills appropriate to the
practice of project management in the ICT industry;
• Students will develop a broad knowledge base in the application of project
management principles;
Communication Skills
• Students will develop the ability communicate effectively with a real world client,
in particular to extract requirements from a client, analyse and organise the
information and formulate ideas to provide a software solution;
• Students will demonstrate strong oral and written skills through effective
teamwork situations, be able to organise and present information in well
structured user and technical documents and through effective verbal
communication using communication technologies as appropriate;
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Problem-solving
• Students will develop effective problem-solving skills, be able to conceptualize
problems and be able to find, acquire, evaluate and manage and use relevant
information in a range of media to formulate a range of solutions to a non-trivial
software project;
• Students will have ability to interact effectively with others in order to work
towards a common outcome;
Global Perspective
• Students will be able to demonstrate mastery of skills appropriate to professional
practice in preparation for the transition to an IT working environment;
• Students will be able to recognise the critical importance of the field of project
management in the development of software systems;
• Students will have ability to interact with members of the Tasmanian IT industry;
• Students will be able to function in a multicultural or global context as effective
project management skills are transferable;
Social Responsibility
• Students need to be able to acknowledge the social and ethical implications of
their actions and appreciate the impact of social change on organisations and
individuals where new technologies are implemented.
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Projects
Projects have different benefits to students. Students may want to take on a project
that is relevant to an area they would like to work in after leaving university, as these
projects should provide very relevant experience. Some projects are very client
interaction based, others are graphical, and others are rather technical, while others
involve displaying online content.
A complete description of available projects is in a separate document. Teams are
formed based on student’s preferences for a particular project or project type. Every
student will have to nominate more than one project that they would like to do.
Nomination forms will be handed out in the first lecture.
After you have had your initial meeting with your client you may be allowed to
change project to another untaken one if a major problem exists. This will not be
granted lightly. Change will only be allowed if the lecturer agrees there are
insurmountable problems.
The list of projects is at http://www.cis.utas.edu.au/units/kxx331/projects2012/.
Intellectual Property
It may be a condition of your project if it is sponsored by industry that you assign to
the client, any intellectual property rights in relation to the project results. If this is
the case and you wish to work on the project, you will need to sign an assignment
agreement to give effect to this requirement. The example agreement is attached in
Appendix C.
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Team Management
Lecturers will form the teams, but you can indicate some of your preferences for team
members. Teams will have approximately 7 members, though this may vary due to
the class size or project size. Teams will be formed so that there are people who have
strengths in one or more of the following areas: analysis, design, programming,
documentation and communication. The University of Tasmania encourages students
to work with students of different nationalities to promote intercultural experiences.
Team Roles
Each person in the team should be given a management and/or coordination role. You
should rotate roles each semester so that you each get different experiences or if you
find some team members are not performing well to the detriment of the team (you
can rotate roles during semester if you need to).
Management Roles
Client liaison: This person provides easy access to the team for the client. This
person does the bulk of the communication with the client, eg organising the
meetings, keeping them up to date on progress. This person should attend most client
meetings. Note: All team members can attend meetings with the client.
Project manager: A project manager manages the team, sets the agenda for and
controls the meetings, and liaises between all stakeholders. Their main role is
managing task allocation across all aspects of the project; they need to identify all the
tasks (with the help of technical manager and coordinators below) and allocate tasks
at the formal team meetings (task allocation should be as fair and democratic as
possible). The project manager ensures that the team submits any required forms. The
project manager acts as the repository for any client documentation. The project
manager maintains the task schedule and system component charts for the project.
The project manager needs to be a good communicator but also have good
management skills. This person should attend most meetings with the client.
Technical manager: The technical manager locates useful tools and software needed
for the project during the analysis phase and is responsible for the technical requests
document. This person coordinates the technical prototypes during the design phase.
They generally implement the starting codebase. They identify implementation
modules to be allocated at team meetings. They also maintain program directories,
source code, and handle the duties of configuration management during the
implementation phase. They are not solely responsible for developing the software,
just the coordination/integration. The technical manager is normally a student with a
strong Computing background (particularly in programming).
Coordination Roles
Report Coordinator(s) (only needed weeks 1-8 in semester 1, 14-17, 24-26 in
semester 2): This coordinator is in charge of collating all the documents for the
Analysis Report, the Design Report, the Review Report and the Final Project Report.
Teams can have a different report coordinator for each report. The coordinator
identifies sections/documents and ensures they are allocated at team meetings. They
are not solely responsible for developing the reports, just the coordinating/collating.
They need to have good written skills, and know how to produce professional
documentation using Word or HTML.
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Manual Coordinator(s) (only needed weeks 21-26 in semester 2): You should have
two Manual Coordinators during weeks 21-26 (one for each manual). They are in
charge of ensuring that manual production is kept on track. They identify sections/
documents and ensure they are allocated at team meetings. They are not solely
responsible for developing the manual, just the coordinating/collating. They need to
have good written skills, and know how to produce professional documentation.
Marketing Coordinator(s) (only needed weeks 10-13 in semester 1 and weeks 1724 in semester 2): You can have up to 3 different marketing coordinators – one for
presentation, one for demonstration and one for webpage. They are not solely
responsible for developing these elements, just coordination. The coordinator needs to
have good communication skills, both verbal and written; artistic talent is useful.
Team meetings
Each team is required to have one formal team meeting each week. At this meeting
you should discuss the project as a whole, check progress on individual tasks and
allocate out tasks for the coming week. The task schedule should be updated to reflect
work completed and work allocated. The project manager should organise times for
weekly meetings.
It is important that you have other regular team meetings to work together on assessed
items. You should take advantage of the tutorial slot to hold long meetings that
involve major team discussion. Changes to the task allocation can only be made if
everyone affected is present and the changes should be recorded in the schedule as
soon as possible (otherwise task allocation changes should be made at the next formal
team meeting).
Your conduct at team meetings forms part of your assessment for professionalism.
This is an individual mark. You should make sure every individual has an opportunity
to contribute and that the task schedule is accurate.
Workload
KXX331 and KXX332 are time demanding units. You should be prepared to work
steadily on your project throughout the semester. To achieve a passing grade each
person should be prepared to work for at least 8 hours per week for 26 weeks (208
hours). If you want to achieve a higher grade you should expect to put in more than 8
hours a week. University guidelines suggest you should spend 10 hours a week on a
unit. Previous students have spent 10-11 hours a week on average on project.
Students tend to overemphasize the importance of project, and spend too much time
on it, to the detriment of other units and outside commitments. People who put in
more than 20 hours a week have their priorities wrong.
The workload is spread out over the entire 26 weeks of the year, if you don’t put in
the hours one week, you will find you have to make it up in later weeks. Marks are
allocated steadily throughout the unit so leaving all the work to the end of semester
(or near a deadline) will not result in a high mark.
Your work habits form a proportion of your individual assessment for
professionalism. You should make sure your work habits are satisfactory. You all get
the same mark for the team component, but team members do peer assessment of each
other that influences the individual component.
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It is extremely important that teams try to balance the workload so that each student is
making an even contribution. It may turn out that some students in a team are simply
aiming to pass the unit, while others are aiming for a HD. This means the HD student
needs to be doing more work of a higher quality or work of a harder nature, but not
taking work off the other students. Other team members will influence your mark.
It is the team’s project manager’s responsibility to make sure all the tasks are
allocated. The decisions about who does what should be made in a collegial manner at
a team meeting. The project manager should discuss (not dictate) task allocation.
This unit provides the experience of working in a team environment. This means that
if one person has commitments elsewhere, or is ill, then the rest of the team needs to
cover for them. This is real world experience. It is essential that if you are going to be
absent for any part of the unit that you let the rest of your team (and unit coordinator)
know as soon as possible. This means you can do extra work early to make up for the
time and that they can adjust their loads to cover for you while you are away.
Team break up procedure
Once you are in a team you are there to stay for the year, though there is some
flexibility in week 1. Unfortunately some teams do experience insurmountable
problems (these are very rare) and in some cases it is necessary for an individual to
leave a team. An individual could leave the team for the following reasons:
1. Failure to complete work – the student is not contributing to a level expected
by the remaining members of the team.
2. Failure of team to complete work – the student feels that other members of the
team are not contributing to the level expected.
3. Extreme personality clashes – the student is unable to continue associating
with one or more members of the team.
An individual can not leave a team without either the student or team undertaking a
three week probationary period unless the individual has found another team that they
can join and all members of that team are willing to take on a new member, and
(unless it is week 1) all members of the current team are willing to let that member
leave. A student can, of course, choose to withdraw from the unit at anytime.
At the management meetings peer assessments and team management will be
discussed, and a team or individual could be placed on three weeks probation. At the
end of probation a student could be asked to leave the team. This student can then
withdraw, or join another team if they know of one willing to have them, or form/join
a team with other people removed from teams or if none of the previous are possible
work as an individual on an in-house project for the rest of semester.
If an individual or team is put on probation, some or all of the following will occur:
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The student or team will be advised to talk to the University Counsellor;
The team will undergo a mediation session;
The individual (or all individuals in the team) will write weekly individual
contribution reports and be required to show the work to the lecturer;
A lecturer will attend the weekly formal team meeting.
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Self and Peer Assessment
Each team member will be assessing themselves and each other throughout the year.
This assessment will take many forms:
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Peer Evaluation Surveys
Individual Contribution Report
Work Product Pay Packet
These assessments are due in weeks 5, 9, 13, 18, 21 and 27. Failure to submit an
assessment form by the deadline (without a reasonable explanation) will result in a 0.5 reduction in your final grade (max -5).
It is tempting to have a pact with your team members to always give high ratings. You
are advised not to do this. This encourages individuals not to do their share of the
work and you will end up carrying them or submitting sub-quality work. You should
respond based on your opinion of each person’s contribution. You should find that if
you are honest with each other you will all learn more and improve.
Peer Evaluation Surveys
These surveys ask a series of questions about a team member’s performance at team
meetings and about their work habits. These surveys will be used to evaluate each
individual’s teamwork mark for professionalism, worth 5%.
Individual Contribution Report
With each submission (reports, software, manuals), an individual will be required to
write a report stating what was their contribution to the submission. It is important to
provide as much detail as possible. This report must be read by all team members who
must indicate agreement/disagreement. You must also write a comment about the
performance of each team member.
Work Product Pay Packet
With each report, software and manual submission students will distribute $100
(virtual only, not real money) based on their opinion of the contribution by their team
members, consider both quantity and quality. You do not have to give out the entire
$100 (any remaining amount will be distributed by the lecturer). You can only use
whole dollars (no cents). You must write a comment explaining why you have
distributed the pay in the pattern you have.
For example, each student will have $100 to distribute between their team members
(including self). If a person believes everyone contributed equally then they should
give everyone the same amount, or if they believe that someone did more work than
others, they should give that person more, and others less.
If you believe an individual has done above what was required (or asked for) then you
can give them a bonus. You can only give one person a bonus, and you can’t give it to
yourself. You must provide an explanation of why you are giving a bonus. If you
strongly believe more than one person deserves a bonus then you must choose one,
but in your comment state why the other person also deserves a bonus.
The lecturer will use these dollar amounts in conjunction with the Individual
Contribution Reports and Timesheets to calculate an individual mark for that work
product for each student.
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Lecturer Interaction
The unit coordinator is responsible for:
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Overall design and administration of the units;
Development of assessment criteria;
Monitoring the progress of the team project;
Monitoring the contribution of each individual;
Assisting the team with relationships with the client;
The lecturers are responsible for:
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Providing sufficient unit material;
Providing support and guidance to the team;
Ensuring students receive feedback;
Assisting the team to develop project management strategies;
Assisting in resolving team conflicts, which appear to be affecting the project.
Management Meetings
Each team will have regular management meetings with the lecturer. Management
meetings are in weeks 3 (Hbt only), 6, 10, 15, 19, 22 and 26. There will be short
Management meetings in Launceston in weeks 2 and 4 (due to public holiday in week
3). The Launceston meetings are on Monday and the Hobart meetings are on
Wednesday. Times for the meetings will be organised early in semester. Teams or
individuals can meet with the lecturer at any time to discuss client/project/team issues
(this is strongly encouraged).
The purpose of the meetings is to provide high-level management and to receive
feedback on your submissions. The progress of a project will be discussed. The
lecturer is particularly interested in any issues that may exist in the team, and will
facilitate mediation if the team requires some attention. These meetings will also give
you a chance to notify the lecturer of other resources you require for completing your
project and getting specific assistance with the next submission.
At these meetings students can be put on probation or removed from the team. The
students need to take the meetings seriously and see them as part of the process. The
management meetings are very important and failure to attend a management meeting
(without a prior reasonable explanation) will result in a loss of one (1) mark.
Email is welcome at all times, and will be answered when possible. If you want
feedback on a document do NOT email documents, put them in your project folder
and send an email explaining where to find them and what you would like feedback
on. You are strongly encouraged to seek feedback on documents before submission.
No feedback is given on the day of submission.
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Client Interaction
The client is responsible for:
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Supplying the team details of the user requirements for the project;
Supplying data/content for the project;
Attending all required and arranged client meetings with the team members;
Providing assessment to the lecturer on the conduct of the project team and
performance of the delivered system;
Attending the presentation/demonstration at the end of semester;
Making available any hardware or software necessary for the development of the
project not freely available in the School of Computing and Information Systems.
For the project to succeed clients must be extensively involved and made aware of
how the system will work and how they will use it. It is important that they are aware
of progress and to give feedback during development. It is highly recommended that
you are in contact with the client each week. The client liaison is the conduit for
information to/from the client, other team members can contact the client but make
sure that you are not all asking the same questions.
Your client interaction is assessed by the client and forms part of your
professionalism team mark. Assessment sheets will be sent via email to the client
throughout the year.
Client meetings
Each team should have a face-to-face meeting with their client in weeks 1-6, 8, 10 and
12 in semester 1 and in at least weeks 14, 17, 20, 23 and 26 in semester 2. The
lecturer is not present at the client meetings. The client liaison will contact the client
to organise a date and time for each meeting – if possible you should arrange a regular
day/time at the start of the semester and meet at the same time throughout the
semester. The students need to create an agenda for each meeting. The agenda should
be sent to the client at least 24 hours prior to the commencement of the meeting.
You should only have meetings when you have something worthwhile to discuss or
progress to demonstrate or questions to ask. Clients have agreed to give you at least
20 hours of their time, you should make use of this time. It is not necessary (or
sensible) for the whole team to attend each meeting, though it is desirable that all
students meet the client at some time.
It is preferable if the teams make an attempt to meet the client on their premises rather
than expecting the client to come to the University of Tasmania. There are some
meetings where the client should expect to come to the University, particularly
meetings where the students are demonstrating incomplete software or prototypes.
Meetings during analysis phase
These meetings are held in the first 4 weeks of semester 1 as soon as you know what
project you are allocated. Often the client will give you a lot of information in the first
meeting and you then need time to really think about it and come up with questions to
ask in the follow up meetings.
You should be prepared to ask lots of questions, because questions can lead to further
requirements being extracted. You should listen to and clarify what the client is
describing. You should take notes and drawing diagrams may also be useful. If the
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client agrees, tape recording the meetings can prove useful later on. Do not dictate to
the client what they are going to get.
You should use the first meeting to introduce yourself to the client and make sure the
client is aware of the project schedule. Make sure they understand the concept of
release 1 and release 2. You should get the client to indicate mandatory features and
what features they would like developed in each release. You should discuss
Intellectual Property and Confidentiality. You should look at any existing software if
there is any.
You may want to ask your client the following questions in the first interview.
At the beginning
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Exchange names
Tell client who is the team client liaison
– Exchange contact information, eg phone and email
• Ask for information about the client
– Type of business in
– Goals of business
– Do they have a website?
• Explain the project process to the client
– First analyse projects (4 weeks)
– Then develop design docs (4 weeks)
– Then implement Release 1 (4 weeks, a third of the project)
– Release 2 next semester
Find out about project
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Get the client to describe what they want
– Ask them to explain anything you do not understand
– What they want (functionality)?
– Why they want each function?
– Is each function mandatory/optional?
• What do they want in release 1 or 2
• Who will use it?
– Type of user? Eg child/adult, student/lecturer
– Level of ICT experience?
– Number of users?
– How many users at one time?
• How does the project fulfil or contribute to the organisational goals?
– How ‘important’ is it to the organisation?
Data storage
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Does it involve storing data?
What data do they want to store?
– Get examples of type of data
What database system use?
Do they already know what DB table structure they want?
Is the data confidential?
– Do you need a confidentiality agreement?
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Software Structure
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How many components?
– Eg client/server/db
• Run within a browser?
– Webpage, program within browser (java applet, flash file)
• Work over the internet?
– Firewall?
Software/Hardware Requirements
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What type of computer should it run on?
– Mac/PC/Unix/Mobile phone/PDA
• Are there any limitations/restrictions?
– Speed, access, size, protocols must use
• What programming language/software tools should be used?
• Does it have to communicate with any other hardware?
– Eg printer, card reader?
Existing System
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Is there an existing system?
– Can you have/see/use a copy?
• Is there a paper based system?
– Can you get copies of forms?
• Are you just re-writing/developing existing system?
– Or are you expanding on that system as well?
• Do they intend to expand the system that you develop in the future?
• Do they intend to use the new system for any other purpose in the future?
At the end
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Decide if you have enough information, or want a meeting another meeting
– If you do, make an appointment
This is NOT a complete list of questions to ask the client, you should be able to think
of some more project specific questions to ask. Do not simply read through these
questions at the interview, some of them the client will answer during the discussion.
Do not over PLAN the first interview; let the client give you information in the order
they want to give it.
Once you have started documents such as the project brief, business case or software
requirement documents you should discuss them with the client. You must make sure
your client has time to read the document before the discussion.
The clients should ask for everything that they would like in the first few meetings.
Generally speaking it is simply not possible for you to complete everything within 26
weeks. You have to decide what can be developed; this is a valuable experience for
you. You also need to decide what will be developed in release 1 and what will be
developed in the release 2 – this is written up in the release schedule. These decisions
are made after consultation with the client.
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Meetings during design phase
In week 5 you should take time to give your client a copy of the submitted Analysis
Report and ask for feedback – you will write up the suggested changes as part of the
Design Report.
In weeks 5 to 8 you will be developing prototypes of the GUIs (Graphical User
Interfaces) for the software. You should have meetings with the client to discuss these
prototypes. The GUIs are what the client will use and are the most likely thing that
they will want changed. Any feedback they provide will help you fill out the GUI
prototype reports.
You also need to test out anything that you are not sure will work in the client’s
environment. You need to find out things about the client’s technological set up and
make sure what you are about to do will work in their environment. This information
should form part of your technical prototype report.
The client will need to hand over and explain any content required for the project –
particularly important for an online content project. The content could be data,
pictures, text or executable code. In the past clients have proved very unreliable
about providing content, most leave it until the last few weeks, in some cases the last
week. You must start applying pressure early to get content from your client.
Meetings during the implementation phase
You need to keep your client aware of progress, the more feedback you get early the
more time you have to implement any changes that your client may ask for. It is not
recommended that you do weeks of implementation without showing something to
the client, or you may have to do it all again.
Meetings at the start of semester 2
The purpose of these meetings is to extract any changed requirements from your
client and also receive feedback on release 1 and suggestions for the release 2
schedule.
Hand over meeting
This meeting is held in week 26 or the week after. The purpose of this meeting is to
install the final release. At the meeting students will give the client an install disk and
a copy of the manuals. It is important that the client knows how to install and run the
software on their machine. It is best if you install it for them. Marks are allocated for
installing and integrating the software.
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Project Reports
Each team must submit an Analysis Report, Design Report, Review Report and a
Final Project Report. All team members must contribute to each report. Each report is
made up of a number of different documents. Some examples of the different
documents are available on MyLO. All documents for all reports must be
electronically submitted. Each document is assessed on the basis of accuracy,
usefulness, and quality.
The Analysis Report consists of:
Document
Project Brief
Business Case
Software Requirement
Document
Risk Log
Technical Requests
Extent
Use template
Use template
Detailed description of the software
requirements of the project
Use template
Use template
Mark
4
4
6
4
2
The Design Report consists of:
Document
Short Description
Updated Analysis Report Update any documents where changes were
identified by client or lecturer or team
Release Schedule
Describes the 3 releases
Requirements Trace
A spreadsheet itemizing each software
Matrix (RTM)
requirement and use case
Software Design
Detailed descriptions of proposed software,
Document
include: storyboards, scenarios, UML,
interface prototypes, data management,
hardware/software platform, functional
prototypes.
One of the following:
Business Process
Detailed description of the business process,
Modelling
includes diagrams
Market Analysis
Detailed description of the market that your
product will compete in
Mark
change
AR mark
4
3
14
4
4
The Review Report consists of:
Document
Testing Summary
Exception report(s)
Short Description
Describe testing of release 1 undertaken and the
results of that testing
Update the project brief, business case, software
requirement document, risk log, release schedule,
RTM, and design document using Track Changes
with Exception Report template as the cover.
Mark
4
6
The Final Project Report consists of:
Document
End Of Project Report
Testing Summary
Short Description
Use template to reflect on achievements
Describe testing of release 1 & 2 undertaken and
the results of that testing
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Mark
4
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Assessment Templates for all these documents are available on MyLO. It is strongly
recommended that you read these to ensure you cover the correct material in each
document.
Project Brief
A template is available on MyLO along with a learning module that describes how to
complete this document. The project brief captures the key aspects of the project, sets
out the objectives and scope and outlines the deliverables and constraints.
Business Case
A template is available on MyLO along with a learning module that describes how to
complete this document. The business case describes the added value of the project to
the client’s business objectives. The business case should include attachments that
describe the organisational strategy (possibly include modelling diagrams here) and
the goals of the business (where the business is going and what they hope to achieve).
The business case sets out the reasons for the project and costs and benefits of the
project, details the quality expectations and acceptance criteria.
Software Requirement Document
There is a learning module available on MyLO that describes how to complete this
document. The Software Requirement Document should describe the software system
that is required to achieve the goals of the business. Include everything that the client
has asked for, even if you won’t finish it all. Your document should cover everything
that the client has asked for (the what) and also any discussion of each point that the
client may have given you (the why). The reason why the why is so important, is that
later on you will be implementing a feature, and you will be wondering if it is actually
serving the purpose that your client needed it for. If you have the why in your
requirement document you will be able to quickly check. You do not have to give a
why for every what, but you should be able to provide a substantial amount.
Ensure that all the requirements (functional, non-functional, and domain) for the
project are elicited, and that these requirements are described in a manner that they
are valid, consistent, complete, realistic and verifiable.
The software requirement document is typically 6-10 pages of formatted text
produced in Microsoft Word. Layout is important; it should look professional. You
should put the requirement document into meaningful sections. Generally speaking,
you can divide your system up into a number of components: eg Server, Client and
Database or Administrator, User and Database. You could have sections like this in
your document. It is suggested that you number each section. You should not have a
section such as 'Requirements' or 'System Requirements' as the whole document is
about requirements.
Do not write your document as a list of dot points. Do not number every paragraph.
Neither of these approaches is very professional. The document should be in
paragraph form. One line paragraphs should be minimised. You should indicate what
things are mandatory and optional. Remember you are only expressing what the client
has told you, you can not decide what is mandatory or optional. Some indication
should be given of the priority of features, if the client has given a priority.
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Do not include a section on Implementation Platform, Language or Tools, unless the
client has specifically told you to use those tools. You want to leave your options
open. You should put all technical information in the Technical Requests Document.
Risk Log
A template is available on MyLO along with a learning module that describes how to
complete this document. The risk log identifies the possible risks to the completion of
the project. It indicates the likelihood of the risk occurring and what impact it will
have if it occurs. It also indicates some strategies to either avoid the risk, minimize the
impact if it does arise or contingency plans if the risk arises.
Technical Requests
A template is available on MyLO along with a learning module that describes how to
complete this document. This document is meant to be a one page document. This
report is primarily the responsibility of the Technical Manager, though its contents
should be discussed with other team members – decisions are made as a team. It must
describe your development platform, the programming language(s) you want to use,
any development environments or tools you want to use. It must list any other items
you will need, such as APIs or DLLs.
Release Schedule
The requirement document is a description of everything the client wants. It will not
be possible to for you to provide everything. You need to decide how much you can
achieve over the year. You need to let the client know what you have decided, and
allow them to make changes. A release is a distribution of software functionality to
the customer. Release 1 should constitute approximately a third of your project.
Release 2 should be the remaining two thirds of what you will do. There may be some
things that you just won’t have time to do, these should go into Release 3.
In first semester you indicate what you will have completed for each release. It is very
rare that you complete everything you say you will by the end of release 1; students
tend to overestimate how much they can do. At the start of second semester you can
re-negotiate release 2 with your client based on your experience in first semester.
The information about each release is presented in a release schedule. All teams need
to do a release schedule. A release schedule is a Word document; it should be about 3
pages long. Each release description should be about a page long, though release 2
can be longer and release 3 shorter. Do not simply copy the requirement document.
You are now describing what the client will get combined with how you are going to
do it. It is very important that you identify what a user will be able to do with your
system at the end of each release. This information, apart from informing your client,
is used to do your assessment.
Think carefully about what goes into Release 1, it should be useful for something. In
particular, you should attempt to develop a number of interfaces in release 1, as these
are things that the client generally wants to change. Generally speaking you don't do
authentication of the user in release 1 as you get limited feedback from the client (it
either works or it doesn't). You should generally try to get database implementation
out of the way in release 1.
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The release schedule is given to the client, so they know what you intend to develop
this year, and what things won't be attempted. It must look professional. It should be
written in paragraph form, sections are optional. Do not present a list of dot points.
RTM
Typically an Excel document with the following columns: Number, Paragraph,
Requirement, Type, Release and Use cases. The RTM can only be done once the
software requirement document is completed. The RTM must be compatible with the
Release Schedule.
Business Process Modelling
There is a learning module available on MyLO that describes how to complete this
document. This report is a detailed description of the business processes that your
client uses, in particular in will focus on where your software will fit in the process
and how it will improve/change the process.
Market Analysis
There is a learning module available on MyLO that describes how to complete this
document. The market analysis should identify such things as the target audience,
competitors, a SWOT analysis, economic environment (eg final price, competitor
prices, current relevant economic situation of market), and a marketing/promotion
strategy.
Software Design Document
The design document is a Word document and the body text should be at least 20
pages long but no more than 30 pages with the font set at 12pt Times New Roman.
The document also has appendices that are NOT included in the page count above.
The design document is a living document that is maintained throughout the
development and changed frequently; you will submit the original in week 8 and a
revised version (with Track Changes on) in week 17.
Before implementation can begin, the team produces the first version of a design
document incorporating all or most of the material from the software requirement
document but including extensive detail and prototypes. The design document should
thoroughly document the following aspects: interfaces (including interface
prototypes), interactions (including scenarios), functional mechanics (including
functional prototypes), data management (including structure), models (including
storyboards) and hardware and software platforms (including justification).
The following sections describe some of these elements in more detail.
Scenarios and OO Models
The section consists of detailed scenarios and a set of OO models.
Scenarios provide the operational concept behind a Use Case. A Scenario is a
formatted description of the steps required for the completion of a Use Case. There is
one scenario per use case.
The most important section is "Scenario", the action column contains all the user
actions, no matter how trivial. The software reaction contains details of everything the
software should take care of: how the screen is updated; any changes to file structures
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such as databases; any flags that should be set; any error windows that may come up;
literally everything the software should do in response to the user action.
An object oriented design should be completed for any project that requires
substantial programming, particularly if the programming language is object-oriented.
You can use any UML modeling program you like for this, but it must be capable of
exporting the diagrams into a readable format that can be assessed, eg .pdf. You can
do things like package diagram, class diagrams, sequence diagrams, activity diagrams
or state diagrams.
If required, scenarios and UML diagrams should be included in an appendix. You
may include some of the important scenarios in the main body of the document (or
excerpts from one or two) to explain the interactions of main parts of your software.
You may want to include a package diagram or a major class diagram in the body of
your design document.
Online Content
The bulk of this content would be in the body of the design document. If you are
working on an online content project you should produce a detailed textual
description of the layout of your content. Online content could mean a web site, or a
CD or a training package. Often the client does not provide many details about the
structure or layout. These are generally provided by the team members, but need to be
confirmed by the client. What is the expected content (does not include the actual
textual content)? The first thing to consider is the hierarchy (layout or structure) of
your content. How does the user navigate around the content? Is there a menu? What
is the structure of this menu? If you are going to extract data from the user then you
need to work out what you will be asking for.
Game/Model Storyboards
If you are working on a game or modelling project you should produce a detailed
textual description of your game and model. Generally the client does not provide
many details about the model structure or the game structure. The team members
generally provide these but need to be confirmed by the client.
You should discuss things like the game genre and influences, the core mechanics and
control scheme, and artistic style. You should cover the goals of the game and any
sub-texts. You should also cover the storyline if there is one, you should develop and
discuss the characters, you should discuss the pacing of the game and also the
learning curve involved. The bulk of this discussion would be in the body of the
design document.
If you are producing a 2D/3D model, game, video or animation then you should do
storyboards. A storyboard consists of a series of diagrams and explanations of the
diagrams.
The design document should include some major storyboards in the body text. The
design document should also include an appendix that includes all the storyboards (by
week 8 there should be the storyboards for at least release 1 and by week 17 the
storyboards for release 2). This appendix is a living document and should be kept up
to date.
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Data Management
Typically data is stored in a database or is imported/exported using XML or data is
simply imported/exported from a data file.
If you are using a database the report should consist of a database diagram showing
tables, attributes and relationships. There is more information on MyLO on how to do
database diagrams. The report should also contain a detailed description justifying the
decisions about tables, attributes and types.
If you are going to use XML in your project, you need to describe your document
type definition or Schema, and show some example XML. There are some examples
available on MyLO.
If your software is going to read/write external text files (data files) you need to
provide a detailed description of the purpose and format of these files.
A general summary of your decisions should be included in the body of your design
document; the detailed descriptions should be included in an appendix (eg table
structure, schema, file hierarchy).
Interface Prototypes
Your software will consist of a number of GUIs (screens), for example, a main screen,
some different dialog boxes to get information, a screen to display the results of some
analysis. You have to prototype each distinct screen (initially as a sketch with major
release 1 screens prototyped by week 8, all screens should be prototyped by week 17).
Typically a team will prototype 5-8 screens.
It is important to prototype your interfaces, this will mean you have something
concrete to show your client to get feedback. Early feedback from your client on the
interfaces can lead to greater client satisfaction. The client hardly ever likes your first
design of the interface, and you need to find out the problems as soon as possible.
Prototyping is also a good opportunity to learn your development language and
experiment with your development environment.
Generally speaking you should do a prototype for each distinct GUI, you should
group similar GUIs, e.g. enter data and edit data GUIs are generally very similar, all
error GUIs have an extremely similar look and feel. The first screen you should
prototype (to completion) is the main screen or equivalent. For the main screen
layout, it is common to produce a number of prototypes (e.g. each team member do a
version) and allow the team members and/or client to provide feedback as to which
one is best (or which bits from each should be used).
If you have scenarios draw a draft of each GUI identified on paper. Every button,
menu option, text field, etc referred to in the scenarios should be on the GUI. If you
put a button on a GUI that is not mentioned in a scenario somewhere then there is a
problem with the scenarios and vice versa. You must sketch every menu, so that you
have some idea of the options, navigation and number of levels involved.
If you have storyboards have a team meeting to ensure a consistent look and feel has
been used throughout. It is most likely that you will have an intro screen and/or menu
page, these at least should be prototyped in the implementation language.
If you are doing online content then at least one section of your content needs to be
prototyped. It is probably best to do this using the particular development software
you have decided to use for implementation. Ideally you will use realistic content, but
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it depends on whether your client can supply it in time. You need to develop a
prototype of your home screen and menu system for your program. You are
prototyping the overall layout and showing how people navigate around your content,
using relatively blank pages to represent the rest of your content. You are not doing
any difficult programming at this stage, just attempting to get an understanding of
how your content will be displayed.
When prototyping a screen it is normal to design a number of versions on paper first,
have a team meeting to decide which ones (or bits of ones) are worth implementing
(you should show the client more than one version as this gets greater feedback). The
paper designs should then be implemented in the implementation language for the
next stage(s) of the prototype. Once completed, have another team meeting, provide
feedback and make changes, and then show them to the client to get feedback, and
then create the interfaces based on client feedback. Then possibly have another round
of team feedback and finally client feedback, creating new versions after each set of
feedback. Going through this process is how a screen prototype goes through a
number of stages.
Overall when you reach the final stages of each screen they should use the same
layout principle, they should all use similar names for links or buttons, and the
colours used in headings and borders should all be similar.
If you are adding to existing software, you should use this opportunity to link your
new GUIs in with their old ones. This is an opportunity to understand the program
you will be adding too, and an opportunity to learn the language.
In all the above you should aim for a consistent look, remember though that this is a
prototype. The client won’t like everything that you do; you will have to change it.
The idea is to get the overall look ready so that your client can say what they do and
don’t like. Get feedback from client often; remember to write up their feedback in the
prototype reports.
The design document should include some major interfaces (sketches or screen shots)
in the body text. The design document should also include an appendix that includes
all the interfaces (by week 8 there should be the prototypes for at least release 1 and
by week 17 the prototypes for release 2). Each interfaces needs a diagram and a full
description of what the impact of interacting with each component is. This appendix
is a living document and should be kept up to date.
Hardware/Software Decision
Typically each project requires you to make some technical decisions – eg what
programming language to use, what hardware to use, what library to use, etc. These
issues need to be researched and decisions made using a logical process. It is this
process that is written up in the design document.
A technical decision prototype has a definite single purpose – eg choose development
language, choose a particular piece of hardware. Generally speaking there are a
numbers of options available to you and you have to make some sort of choice.
To determine an outcome it is normal to have some criteria on which to make the
decision. For each criteria there should be a rating system so that each possible option
can be ranked against the criteria. A decision is made in stages. Each stage is
investigating a different option against the specified criteria and giving it a rating.
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Once each option has been investigated, a decision is made on the basis of how each
option rated against each criteria.
Each technical decision should be written up in the design document as an appendix
using the following sections:
1. An overall description of what decision you are trying to make.
2. A description of the criteria and rating system for each criterion
3. For each option include:
a. A description of the option.
b. An analysis of how this option rates for each criterion along with a
discussion as to why it was given that rating.
4. A conclusion describing which option has been chosen and why (include a
summary table. [This conclusion should also be summarised in the body text
of the design document].
Functional Prototypes
You must develop prototypes showcasing one or more crucial features (mechanics or
significant screens) that could be incorporated in the final product. Developing
prototypes of features allows you to experiment with different algorithms and
usability scenarios for your software. A lot of prototyping is expected to take place
during the design phase before the design report is complete. Prototypes act as a proof
of concept. Most prototypes will be ported to the software system.
Typically each project requires you to undertake something that you are going to have
to research how to do, it is not something that you have been taught in your other
units. These processes need to be researched and a number of different methods
investigated. It is this process that is written up in the design document.
A functional prototype has a definite single goal – eg how to create a graphical asset,
how a particular feature will work, how to interact with another software package.
Generally speaking there are a numbers of options available to you and you have to
make some sort of choice. There should be a number of methods you could use to
achieve each goal and you need to describe a number of them and then explain why
you have chosen the one that you have chosen.
Each functional prototype should be written up in the design document as an appendix
using the following sections:
1. An overall description of what you are working out how to do.
2. A brief description of each possible path that could be taken to achieve this
goal and an analysis of why you have chosen a particular approach. [This
conclusion should also be summarised in the body text of the design
document, possibly including screen dumps].
Exception Report
A template is available on MyLO along with a learning module that describes how to
complete this document. Any significant changes to the project brief, business case,
software requirement document, risk log, release schedule, RTM or design document
requires the team to fill in an exception report for each change and produce an
updated document as an attachment. You should use track changes on your
documents, so that the changes can be identified.
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Testing Summary
A template is available on MyLO along with a learning module that describes how to
complete this document. Use the RTM to itemize the requirements, extract the
verifiable/measurable criteria for each requirement from the requirement document
and test whether the requirement has been achieved. Also testing for overall usability
and appearance of the software.
End Of Project Report
A template is available on MyLO along with a learning module that describes how to
complete this document. This states whether the objectives have been met,
deliverables achieved and benefits realized.
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Documentation
Each team is required to produce a user manual and a reference manual in KXX332.
The manual coordinator is responsible for coordination and layout and formatting, in
particular the Table of Contents. Every team member should participate in the text
and diagram production. The manual coordinator does not have to write everything.
Some examples of previous manuals are available on MyLO.
Proof read the manuals!!! Every team member should do this!
User Manual
The user manual is written for the client. It is assessed on how well your client will
understand what you are talking about. If your system is used by different types of
people, eg an administrator and a user, you may consider producing two separate user
manuals. The user manual must have a very professional look and feel.
This document can be a paged document (.doc or .pdf) or online (.html). The length of
this document will vary considerably between teams, but as a guide a 40-50 page
document is typical.
You must describe the software only, not your team, not the course. You should have
descriptions on how to use every element of your program. The manual should be
about your program, not primarily about installing drivers, etc. Include the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Introduction
Explain what your program can do
Include screen dumps (but do not overly repeat the same diagram)
Explain every input field
Explain every menu option
Starting and quitting
Getting help
Installing – this chapter may be in the reference manual.
Where relevant:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Getting Started (a step-by-step through all initial common steps)
A Tour (of all main features)
Saving information
Any networking that needs to be set up
Printing
Customizable aspect of your program
Trouble shooting – (explain all error messages)
You should think carefully about the order in which you present the information. You
can put similar elements into the same chapter. Put the more advanced aspects
towards the end. Look at the layout of each page, where possible put text describing a
diagram with that diagram. Make sure the text matches the diagram, eg close v cancel
buttons. Do not make the document longer by having multiple copies of the same
screen dump. Include page numbers.
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Reference Manual
The reference manual is written for people with programmer or system administrator
ICT knowledge, it is very technical. The main purpose of the reference manual is to
aid people who want to change/update your software at a later stage.
The length of this document will vary considerably between teams, but less than 50
pages would be unusual. This manual should be in an interactive html format that can
be accessed via an index.html file or can be a paged document (.doc or .pdf)
The introduction should explain what your program is about from a technical point of
view. This should not be the same introduction that appears in your user manual but it
will be similar.
You should explain the general structure of your program, e.g. client/server, standalone application.
You need to explain each file, why it exists, and in general what is in it. You do not
have to explain every method, so long as there are comments in your code explaining
every method. You can use an electronic documentation creator, such as javadoc, to
extract your comments that explain each file and method; this information should be
put into an appendix.
If your program reads/generates external files or uses a database you need to explain
the format of every text file or database table that accompanies your program. This
will be very similar to what was in your data storage report.
You need a section that covers how to re-compile your program. In particular this
must include a list of the source files needed and what versions of software you used
to compile your program. You also need to describe the development tools used,
including version numbers.
You need to have a section giving an example of how to change the program.
Typically you won't have implemented everything the client has asked for, or you
know of areas where your client is going to expand your software. You need to give a
detailed description of steps a programmer should go through to change your software
(including things like tools needed, important files that will need to be changed).
If it doesn’t appear in your user manual then you should have a chapter than covers
installing your program. This may occur when the user of the program is not usually
the person who installs it (for example, something that works over the Internet). It is
very important that this chapter covers every step.
You may also want to include a trouble shooting section, if you have had problems
understanding how to get it to install or compile then so will your client.
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Web Page
Each project team is required to maintain a small web page describing their project.
This should be in your /public_html/web folder. Create a file called index.html, this is
the base for your web page. The web pages will be made available externally via the
school webpage, for this reason you can not include any executable features in your
webpage, no PHP.
Every website should have a title and menu, a corporate look and feel and be
professional looking. The menu must have the following options:
•
•
•
•
•
Home – (index.html) has a brief description of purpose of the project
Team – first page describes team with team photo, linking to individual pages
o Each member has page with short resume
Client – describes the client
Tools – describes the languages and development tools used, including links
to other relevant sites.
Software – a clear description of the software developed
o Include screen dumps if possible, but not executables
o Do not include copies or links to completed documentation
The web page will be assessed at the end of second semester, but an initial assessment
is undertaken on Monday of week 22 (the software page does not have to be complete
at this time). Teams are advised that all the publicity for demonstration day starts in
week 22 and many industry members look at the pages in week 22/23, you are
advised to make sure your web page is presentable and up-to-date at this time. You
can continue to change your webpage up to week 26. At the end of the year the web
pages are moved to the past projects website and are available for eternity.
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Presentation
You must formally present your first release. Clients, staff and class members will be
invited to listen and bring guests with them. Team members can invite other people
(students, family, and employers) to listen. You should treat this process seriously and
dress and act in a business-like manner. You should treat the presentation as though
you were tendering/competing to do this project in the real world. You are aiming to
convince your client that you are the right team to employ to develop release 2.
The presentation will occur in week 13. Launceston presentations will be held on
Monday, Hobart presentations will be held on Wednesday. You will be required to
attend the presentations by other teams.
The presentation should be no longer than 35 minutes (less than 20 minutes would be
too short); include a demonstration and a PowerPoint presentation. All team members
should participate in preparing the presentation and demonstration. You can have a
subset of your team do the presentation/demonstration or you can all participate. All
team members should be available to answer questions. Your presentation should
contain the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
An introduction of your team members
A description of the client and the client’s business
A description of the problem that the software is meant to solve
A demonstration of the solution and software developed so far
A description of the tools used
A description of the difficulties/challenges you have faced
A description of the work to be completed for release 2
You do not necessarily have to have a slide with the title difficulties. You can simply
discuss the difficulties throughout your presentation. The kind of things you should
talk about are:
•
•
•
•
•
programming languages - are they new to you
development tools used - is this the first time you have used them
number of components (client/server/database, etc)
anything that was hard or time-consuming to do
lack of information or resources, or late receiving information or resources
A panel consisting of the lecturers and client will assess the presentation. The panel
will assess how well you present and demonstrate, and they will also assess your
release 1 software.
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Demonstration Day
The demonstration will be a public demonstration of your final release. Clients, staff,
students and members of the Tasmanian IT community will be invited to come and
look at the final products.
Demonstration days are held in week 24. The Hobart version will run from 10am 2pm on Wednesday. The Launceston version will run from 10am - 1pm on Monday.
The different duration is due to the amount of time it takes to assess all the teams.
Setting up demonstration day takes a considerable amount of time: typically one hour
before it starts in the morning and one hour after it finishes. Students from each team
will be required to help with the setup and pack up.
Demo Day Assessment
The assessment will be based on how well you market your project and how well you
demonstrate the project.
Demonstration
You need to prepare a suitable demonstration of your product and be prepared to talk
to interested people. At least two people from each group should be available at all
times during demo day, and everyone should participate. You should organise a
roster.
Your demonstration should contain the following:
•
•
A description before starting to use the program of what the project was all about.
A complete demonstration of all the standard type features of the program.
The complete assessment criteria will be discussed in the lecture and are available on
the MyLO site. The demonstration is worth 6% of your final mark.
Marketing
You should decorate your display area (booth) using such things as project posters,
pamphlets, name tags, client merchandise/equipment. Warning: each team only has
limited space, around 0.5m x 1.5m (a computer bench).
The marketing coordinator should coordinate the marketing materials, but all team
members should contribute text and diagrams and provide feedback and suggestions.
Each item is assessed on the basis of appropriateness and quality. The money spent on
an item has NO impact on assessment – do NOT spend too much money. Demo Day
Marketing is worth 5% of the final assessment. There is an assessment of individual
contribution to marketing using peer assessment tools.
Poster
You should prepare a poster for display on demonstration day. The poster should
include the following: title, team members, client name, description of the purpose of
your final product, description of what you have achieved, information about tools
used, screen dumps that give a good impression of the interface.
Pamphlet
This is typically an A4 sheet of paper, possibly in 3-fold format that describes your
project and team. You hand out these pamphlets to visitors to your stall. Printing these
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pamphlets is the financial responsibility of the team – we suggest no more than 20
pamphlets unless you expect to be extremely popular. Black and white pamphlets get
the same marks as colour ones!
Name Badges
Each student should wear a name badge. Printing these is the financial responsibility
of the team. Black and white versions get the same marks as colour ones!
Client Materials or Project Related Materials
Some clients have materials, such as posters or artifacts that you can borrow to
decorate your area. Depending on the domain of your project you can use interesting
artifacts to decorate your area, e.g. sporting equipment for a sporting project.
Giveaways
In the past students have given away lollies or other things such as key rings. This is
proving too expensive and this practice is discouraged.
Attire
You should treat this process seriously and dress and act in a business-like manner. A
coordinated team approach is best, for example matching t-shirts or tops or similarly
coloured clothes. It is NOT necessary to buy a suit for the occasion.
Attractiveness
Displaying your materials is just as important as having them. Think about how to use
your display space, do not overcrowd, use items to emphasize displays such as boxes
to raise height or tablecloths. You will also be assessed on how you attract people to
your area and interact with the people around your booth. Do not have too many team
members in your area, so that visitors can not see your project.
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Timesheets
Timesheets need to be filled in when you work on project to keep a record of how
much each person is contributing to the project. These will show who is doing what,
and that you are meeting the time requirements for this unit. Include lectures, all
meetings, any reading you do, any programming, anything to do with the project.
You are required to spend at least 8 hours a week on Project on average. There will be
weeks when you won’t do 8 hours; this is not a problem as you should make up the
hours in other weeks. The lecturer will only be concerned if you consistently work
less than 8 hours. Any excessive contributions will be looked at seriously.
The timesheet system is available via the project website. There is a paper version in
appendix A. The timesheets should be kept daily as this is the best way to ensure
accuracy. The web server goes down frequently; if the web server goes down on
Monday night there will be no extensions granted, as all the times should not be
entered at the last minute.
Classify each of the tasks you do as one of the following job codes:
Job Code
Meeting1
Tasks
Formal Team, Client, or Management meeting
Preparing for any of these meetings eg arranging a time for
the meeting, phone calls, etc
Admin
Peer Assessment, Task Schedule, reading/writing email
relevant to project, writing up minutes of meeting
Study
Reading project manual or online materials, reading other
project management material
Attending lectures
Reviewing past material from previous years (eg design
docs, manuals, marketing materials)
Web browsing for similar software or software tools
Web browsing for project content, eg pictures, text
Experimenting with other similar software,
Learning programming languages
Doing online tutorials about the tools or languages
Report
Any work on a report (analysis, design, review, final
project), includes both development and proof reading
Meeting to work as a team (or partial team) on a report
Does not including prototyping, but does include time
writing prototype reports
Does not include testing, but does include time writing
testing reports
Implementation Creating software (programming, graphical modelling,
whatever is involved in developing system)
Meeting to work as team (or partial team) on implementation
Developing prototypes
Some teams meet to do work on a specific item, eg requirements document. This should be
classed as report not meeting. If the meeting was to work on software, then it should be
classed as implementation, not meeting. It should only be recorded as meeting if there was no
specific work product produced, just checked or allocated.
1
30
Meeting to work as a team (or partial team) on a prototype
Testing software
Meeting to work as team (or partial team) on testing
Manuals
User Manual, Reference Manual,
Includes both development and proof reading
Marketing
Presentation, Demo Day, marketing materials, Webpage
Includes both developing material and attending
In the comment field you must describe in detail what you did, e.g. What particular
document you worked on and what you did to it; what type of meeting it was and
what you discussed. A comment entry would generally be about 10-30 words. Failure
to enter proper descriptions will lose marks.
Sometimes it may be hard to know what to classify a task as. Try to be as accurate as
possible. For instance, if you have a team meeting to primarily work on a document
then classify it as report, but if you have a team meeting to distribute out report work,
then classify it as Meeting. Sometimes you may do multiple things in the one session,
e.g. you may do some study, and then implementation, and then some administration.
You should break the timesheet entry up into separate entries reflecting the amount of
time you spent on each job code.
A timesheet spans from Monday to Sunday. A timesheet for the previous week must
be completed by the following midnight Monday. A timesheet is assessed based on
your level of participation and the following rules:
•
Each weekly timesheet is worth 0.5%, to a maximum of 5%.
•
The quality of comments may mean you do not earn the full 0.5%.
•
If there are less than 5 entries in a week by Monday midnight you will get 0
for that week.
•
Any entries added after midnight Monday will be considered late, and will not
be counted in the above rule.
•
If you average less than 8 hours over a semester (including the late entries),
you will score 0 for each week you worked less than 8 hours.
•
There are 13 weeks a semester; the three weeks with the lowest score will not
be counted, allowing you to have some light work weeks with no penalty.
It is in everyone’s best interest if you each keep honest records. The data on your
timesheets (and the number of hours you spend on each work product) is used to
evaluate your individual mark for a work product. It is incredibly important that your
timesheets are accurate, and that you classify each job you do correctly. Team
members should look at each others timesheets and ensure that they are accurate. If
your team members are lying about the time they spend on project you should tell the
lecturer, as this can impact on your mark.
If it is not on your timesheet, you did not do it!
31
Task Schedule
At the weekly formal team meeting you should check the progress of each team
member on the previous tasks allocated, and provide feedback to that person on their
contribution. During the meeting new tasks should be allocated for the following
week(s).
As soon as possible after the conclusion of the meeting (within 24 hours), the project
manager should update the task schedule. This updated task schedule should reflect
the progress made on the tasks allocated at the previous meeting and should also show
the tasks allocated at this meeting.
The project schedule should be developed using Microsoft Project. There is a
template available on MyLO, you should add subtasks as you identify them. There
will be lots of subtasks to add.
The schedule must contain accurate records of who has completed which tasks, and a
plan showing who is responsible for completing tasks in the coming week or further
ahead if decided at the team meeting.
Only tasks relating to project development should be recorded in the schedule. These
things relate to anything to do with the production of the project reports,
implementing the software, preparing the manuals, or tasks related to marketing
materials. These tasks typically take longer than one hour; in fact most will take
weeks. Do not put meeting attendance, administrative tasks, or tasks that relate to
professionalism in the schedule.
After each team meeting the project manager should update the task schedule to
reflect the outcomes of the meeting. Once the task schedule is updated the rest of the
team should review it (within 24 hours). If changes are required the changes should be
made.
The schedule is a permanent document in your submission folder. It must always be
up-to-date, within 24 hours of a formal team meeting or any other meetings that
change the allocation (remember we know when the team meetings are because you
put them in your timesheets). It can be assessed at anytime, but typically just before a
management meeting, feedback will be provided at your management meetings.
System Component Charts
The technical manager and coordinators (in conjunction with the project manager)
should develop a system component chart for their key development item (eg
Analysis report, Design report, Software, Manual, webpage, demoday, etc). This chart
should break the item down into sub-tasks/components. You should use this
component chart to identify the critical path and critical sub-tasks. The project
manager should maintain the charts. You should use this chart to do task allocation.
The sub-tasks should be colour coded to indicate in-progress, completed, not-started.
32
Assessment
Project A Assessment
45% Reports
27% Software
10% Marketing
18% Professionalism
Project A is 100% internal. Each student will get an individual grade that is made up
of an individual component worth 40% and a team component worth 60%. To pass
Project A you have to get 45% of both components and more than 50% overall. So to
pass Project A you would have to get at least 18/40 for the individual component and
at least 27/60 for the team component and at least 50/100. The individual component
is made up of: 18% Reports, 9% Software, 3% Marketing, and 10% Professionalism.
The team component is made up of: 27% Reports, 18% Software, 7% Marketing and
8% Professionalism. Each person in the team will get the same mark for the team
component, so it is very important that you all work as a team and contribute to the
best of your ability.
Each report will be assessed on the basis of quality, accuracy and presentation by the
lecturer. There are two reports (Analysis Report (20%) and Design Report(25%)).
Your contribution to the reports is worth 18% of the individual mark and is assessed
by the lecturer using peer assessment tools.
A panel (17%) will assess the software. The assessment will be based on what you
undertook to produce for release 1. The software assessment will be performed at the
presentation. Your contribution to the software is worth 9% of the individual mark
and is evaluated by the lecturer using peer assessment tools.
The presentation will be assessed by a panel. All students are required to actively
participate in the presentation (or its preparation) which is worth 7% of your team
mark. Your contribution to the presentation (or preparation) is worth 3% of the
individual mark and is assessed by the lecturer during the presentation and by using
peer assessment tools.
Peers and the client and lecturer will assess professionalism. The client interaction
assessment will form part of the team component (5%). For each meeting such things
as sending agenda, punctuality, asking questions, clarifying points, listening, making
the meetings worthwhile will be considered. Keeping the client informed of progress
and problems via email will also be considered.
The student’s approach to working in a team will be assessed by their team members
and the lecturer and form part of the individual component of professionalism (5%). It
includes such things as your attendance at team meetings, contributing to the ideas
and discussion at the meetings, completing work by deadlines set at team meetings,
your ability to work with team members and perform your management/coordinator
role. Assessment will be completed using the peer assessment forms. Each student’s
level of professionalism can be discussed at management meetings with the lecturer.
The lecturer will assess timesheets and task schedule. The assessment for the
timesheets is on-going throughout the semester and they are assessed using the rules
under the section titled Timesheets, maximum 5% towards the individual mark. The
33
assessment of the task schedule is on-going throughout the semester, and the task
schedule is worth 3% of your team mark.
Various penalties will be applied throughout semester. Failure to submit a peer
assessment form by the deadline (without a reasonable explanation) will result in -0.5
penalty to your individual mark. Failure to attend a management meeting (or rude or
abusive behaviour) will mean a -1 penalty to your individual mark, lateness to a
management meeting is a -0.5 penalty. Failure to have a team representative at a
lecture (without a reasonable explanation) will mean a -0.5 penalty in the team mark.
Maximum penalties (-5).
Item
Total
Team
Ind
Components
Worth
Reports
45
27
18
max 24
Analysis
Design
20
25
Software
27
18
9
max 12
Software
27
Marketing
10
7
3
max 5
Presentation
10
Professionalism
18
8
10
Client Interact
Teamwork
Timesheets
Schedule
Penalties
5
5
5
3
max -5
Note: When peer assessment is used it is possible for a team member to get more than
the amount allocated for the individual mark. In this case the excess can still be
counted (up to maximum indicated) towards the student’s individual mark, so long as
the combined individual marks do not exceed 40 and the total mark for that item does
not exceed the number in the total column.
34
Project B Assessment
20% Reports
32% Software
15% Manuals
15% Marketing
18% Professionalism
Project B is 100% internal. Each student will get an individual grade that is made up
of an individual component worth 40% and a team component worth 60%. To pass
Project B you have to get 45% of both components and more than 50% overall. So to
pass Project B you would have to get at least 18/40 for the individual component and
at least 27/60 for the team component and at least 50/100. The individual component
is made up of: 8% Reports, 12% Software, 10% Professionalism, 5% Marketing and
5% Manuals. The team component is made up of: 12% Reports, 20% Software, 8%
Professionalism, 10% Manuals, and 10% Marketing. Each person in the team will get
the same mark for the team component, so it is important that you all work as a team
and contribute to the best of your ability.
Each report will be assessed on the basis of quality, accuracy and presentation by the
lecturer. There are two submissions: Review Report is worth 10% and the Final
Project Report is worth 10%. Your contribution to reports is worth 8% of the
individual mark and is assessed by the lecturer using peer assessment tools.
A panel of people will assess the software, worth 32%. The assessment will be based
on what you have produced. The software assessment will be performed during
demonstration day and at the management meeting in week 26 and at the client
handover meeting. Your contribution to the software is worth 12% of the individual
mark and is evaluated by the lecturer using peer assessment tools.
A panel will assess the demonstration (6%) on demonstration day. The demonstration
will be assessed based on how you demonstrate your software. The lecturer will
assess how you have marketed your project and how you attract people to your area
(5%). The web page will be assessed by the lecturer and is worth 4% of your team
mark. Layout, grammar, and having the required contents will be assessed. The
marketing assessment will include a 5% individual component and is assessed by the
lecturer using peer assessment tools.
Teams must produce a user manual (7.5%) and reference manual (7.5%) and is
assessed by the lecturer. All items will be assessed at the end of the semester. Layout,
grammar, and having the required contents will be assessed. Your contribution to the
manuals is worth 5% of the individual mark and is assessed by the lecturer using peer
assessment tools.
Peers and the client and lecturer will assess professionalism. The client interaction
assessment will form part of the team component (5%). For each meeting such things
as sending agenda, punctuality, asking questions, clarifying points, listening, making
the meetings worthwhile will be considered. Keeping the client informed of progress
and problems via email will also be considered.
The student’s approach to working in a team will be assessed by their team members
and the lecturer and form part of the individual component of professionalism (5%).
Such things as your attendance at team meetings, contributing to the ideas and
discussion at the meetings, completing work by deadlines set at team meetings, your
35
ability to work with team members and perform your management/coordinator role.
Assessment will be completed using the peer assessment forms. Each student’s level
of professionalism can be discussed at management meetings with the lecturer.
The lecturer will assess timesheets and task schedule. The assessment for the
timesheets is on-going throughout the semester and they are assessed using the rules
under the section titled Timesheets, maximum 5% towards the individual mark. The
assessment of the task schedule is on-going throughout the semester, and the task
schedule is worth 3% of your team mark.
Various penalties will be applied throughout semester. Failure to submit a peer
assessment form by the deadline (without a reasonable explanation) will result in -0.5
penalty to your individual mark. Failure to attend a management meeting (or rude or
abusive behaviour) will mean a -1 penalty to your individual mark; lateness to a
management meeting is a -0.5 penalty. Failure to have a team representative at a
lecture (without a reasonable explanation) will mean a -0.5 penalty to the team mark.
Maximum penalties (-5).
Item
Total
Team
Ind
Components
Worth
Reports
20
12
8
max 11
Review
Final Project
10
10
Software
32
20
12
max 16
Software
30
Manuals
15
10
5
max 7
User
Reference
7.5
7.5
Marketing
15
10
5
max 7
DemoMarket
Demonstration
Webpage
5
6
4
Professionalism
18
8
10
Client Interact
Teamwork
Timesheets
Schedule
Penalties
5
5
5
3
max -5
Note: When peer assessment is used it is possible for a team member to get more than
the amount allocated for the individual mark. In this case the excess can still be
counted (up to maximum indicated) towards the student’s mark, so long as the
combined individual marks do not exceed 40 and the total mark for that item does not
exceed the number in the total column.
36
Unit Schedule
The amount of work can seem a little overwhelming, but you do not have to do
everything at once, but you do have to work consistently.
Week Activities
1
Lecture 9- 3pm
2
Lecture 9-11am
3
4
Lecture 11-1pm
5
Lecture 9-11am Monday
(catch up lecture if
required)
Split Week for Easter
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
Meetings
Client
Client
Management (Ltn)
Client
Management(Hbt)
Client
Management (Ltn)
Client
Major Tasks
Analysis Report
Design Report
Prototype Software
Management
Client
Client
Lecture 9-11am
Implement Release 1
Management
Client
Client
Presentation
Lecture 9-11am(Ltn)
Lecture 2-4pm (Hbt)
Client
Management
Prepare Presentation
Presentation
Review Report
Testing Release 1
Implement Release 2
Client
Lecture 9-11am (Ltn)
Lecture 2-4pm (Hbt)
Double week
Management
Client
Management
Client
Demo Day 10am-2pm
Management
Client
Implement Release 2
Webpage
Prepare Demo Materials
Integrate & Test Software
Manuals
Update Webpage
Final Project Report
Install/Integrate Software
You must have one team meeting each week to do work allocation and other team meetings each week
to complete work products.
37
The proposed schedule for the lecture in week 1 is:
•
•
•
•
•
•
9am – Lecture – Introduction & Administration
10:30am – Workshop – Team Formation Exercises
11:30am – Workshop – Client Interviews
1pm – Lunch & Hand in Team nomination form
2pm – Workshop – Team Announcement & Meeting
3pm – Finish
Hobart
All the lectures, management meetings, presentations and Demonstration Day are on
Wednesday.
Launceston
All the lectures, management meetings, presentations and Demonstration Day are on
Monday.
Submission Schedule
Task
Date
Time
Timesheets
Weekly
Monday midnight
Schedule
Weekly
Monday midnight
Analysis Report
Week 5
Monday 3pm
Design Report
Week 9
Monday 3pm
Release 1
Week 13 At your presentation
Presentation
Week 13 Monday/Wednesday
Review Report
Week 18 Monday 3pm
Webpage v1
Week 22 Monday 3pm
Demonstration
Week 24 Monday/Wednesday
Release 2
Week 26 At your MM
User Manual
Week 26 Friday 3pm
Reference Manual
Week 26 Friday 3pm
Final Report
Week 26 Friday 3pm
Webpage v2
Week 26 Friday 3pm
Peer assessment forms are due Thursday 3pm in weeks 5, 9, 13, 18, 21 and 27. You
have an additional 72 hours to do the agree/disagree part of the ICR.
38
Resources
Storage space
There is storage space in \\alacritas\project_name (Hobart) or \\lawson\project_name
(Launceston). The space should be available on Friday in week 1. A team can ask the
lecturer for an increase to their quota, if and when needed. The technical manager
should organise the folders inside your project folder as follows:
Submissions
• Task Schedule
• Week 5
• Week 9
• Week 13
•
• Presentation
• Release 1
• Source
•
• Executable
•
• Week 18
•
• Week 24
• Marketing Materials
• Week 26
•
• Release 2
• Source
• Executable
•
• Manuals
• Final Project Report
If your project is a website then you will need the project folder in public_html.
Source, Submissions, public_html, Reports, Manuals, Marketing, Downloads and
Temp should be at the top level.
•
Reports
• Analysis Report
• Design Report
• Review Report
• Final Project Report
Manuals
• User Manual
• Reference Manual
Marketing
Downloads
public_html
• project (if necessary)
• web
Source
• Release 1
• Final Release
Temp
•
You can only place work relevant to the project inside your project folder.
E-mail
E-mail is a very powerful communication tool that will be used a great deal by the
lecturer. It is recommended that you check your e-mail every day.
LPS
Each team can have an LPS account that you can all contribute to. You must share the
cost of printing.
MyLO
There are extensive resources for project on the MyLO website, including examples
of all documentation.
39
Appendix A – Timesheet
Name:
Team:
Week number:
Date
Start
Stop
Interruption
Time
Delta
Time
TOTAL TIME
40
Job
Code
Comments
Appendix B – Confidentiality agreement template
Some clients may require you to fill out a confidentiality agreement. If this is the case
use the following template as a guide. The team and the client should change this to
meet the requirements of the client. Before the team signs anything, it must have been
shown to the lecturer.
This agreement dated the
name] and [client name].
day of
2012 between the ICT Project Group [team
[Client name] requires, and the confidants agree, that it is necessary to take the required steps to ensure
that the confidential information is kept confidential.
NOW THE PARTIES AGREE AS FOLLOWS:
1. [Client name] has agreed to provide the ICT Project Group [team name] with access to information
pertaining to [something].
2. That members of the project group do not hold any office, possess any property, or have an
obligation by virtue of any contract that are, or might be created, in conflict with the information given
under this agreement.
3. If during the duration of the agreement a risk of conflict of the nature referred to in Clause 2 arises
they shall forthwith inform [client name].
DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION/CONFIDENTIALITY
4.1 All information obtained from [client name] will be kept confidential until it is in the public domain
or is deemed by [client name] not to be confidential. The team will not discuss such information
outside the team without the proper written consent from [client name] with any person other than the
School of Computing and Information Systems staff at the University of Tasmania, and shall keep any
such information in their possession in a secure manner.
4.2 Before publishing material based on information gathered from [client name], the team agrees to
consult with [client name] concerning the confidentiality of the information provided.
4.3 Confidential information includes:
Notes from interviews with [client name].
Code samples provided by [client name].
This list may be amended by an exchange of letters between the parties to the agreement. Such
additions may not be made retrospectively. “Confidential Material” does not include information in the
public domain, other than information that entered the public domain through a breach of this
agreement and information that [client name] designates as no longer confidential.
COMMENCEMENT and CONCLUSION OF SERVICES
6.1 The parties agree that this agreement is to be taken as having commenced on the [date].
6.2 Any information provided under this agreement will be kept confidential for 3 years from the
commencement of the agreement.
SIGNATURES
………………………
Client
TEAM MEMBERS
………………………
Member 1
.……………………….
Member 2
……………………
Member 3
……………………
Member 4
………………………
Member 5
.……………………….
Member 6
……………………
Member 7
……………………
Member 8
41
42
Appendix C – Intellectual Property Agreement
The purpose of this agreement is to confirm the [specify the name & address
of company] (“the Sponsor”) commitment to sponsor the Project and to
outline the conditions upon which the Sponsor has agreed to provide this
support.
1. Definitions
“Intellectual Property” has the meaning given to it by the University’s
Intellectual Property Policy.
“Project” means the project outlined in the Project Brief.
“Project Results” means those results of the Project, which have or
will be created as a result of the Project.
“Student” means [specify name and student number of student]
2. Sponsor Obligations
2.1. The Sponsor will provide in kind support of not less than 20 hours of
technical supervision, guidance and support to assist the Student to
undertake the Project.
2.2. [Optional if the Sponsor has agreed to pay the Student] The Sponsor
will pay the Student $…. when the Sponsor is satisfied that the Project
has been successfully completed.
2.3. The Sponsor agrees to permit the University to access the Project
Results for the purposes of examining the Student.
3. Intellectual Property
3.1. The Student assigns to the Sponsor, absolutely, all of their Intellectual
Property rights, existing now and in the future, in the Project Results
(other than copyright in any thesis of the Student’s based on the
Project), throughout the world.
3.2. To the extent that the University contributes to the creation of the
Project Results, the University agrees to assign to the Sponsor all
Intellectual Property rights existing now or in the future in those
Project Results.
3.3. The Sponsor agrees to grant the University and the Student a single
non-distributable exclusive licence to use, modify or adapt the Project
Results for non- commercial purposes.
4. Publication
The Student agrees to withhold publication of any documents relating to
the Project (other than those for the purposes of examination specified in
the ICT Project Manual 2012), until the written permission of the Sponsor
is obtained, which shall not be unreasonably withheld.
5. Entire Agreement
This agreement and any documents referred to in this agreement or
executed in connection with this agreement constitutes the entire
43
agreement of the parties in relation to its subject matter and supersedes all
other representations, negotiations, arrangements, understandings or
agreements and all other communications.
6. Governing Law
This agreement shall be governed by and construed in accordance with
the laws of the State of Tasmania.
Signed on behalf of the University of Tasmania
……………………………………………....………………………………………………
Name
Signature
……………………………………………....………………………………………………
Title/Position
Date
Signed on behalf of [Client]
……………………………………………....………………………………………………
Name and Title/Position
Signature
……………………………………………....………………………………………………
Business Name & Business Address
……………………………………………....………………………………………………
Home Address (if not Pty Ltd)
Date
Signed by Student
……………………………………………....………………………………………………
Name and Student Number
Signature
……………………………………………....………………………………………………
Address
Date
In the presence of:
……………………………………………....………………………………………………
Name
Signature
44
Date
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