US006333973B1
(12) United States Patent
Smith et al.
(54)
INTEGRATED MESSAGE CENTER
(75)
Inventors: Colin Donald Smith, Ottawa; Brian
Finlay Beaton, Orleans, both of (CA)
Notice:
*Dec. 25, 2001
5,742,905 *
4/1998 Pepe et al. ......................... .. 455/461
5,794,142 *
8/1998
5,815,506 *
9/1998 Gokhale --------- --
Vantilla et al. .................... .. 455/419
-- 370/524
5,842,141 * 11/1998 Vaihoja et al. ..................... .. 455/574
(73) Assignee: Nortel Networks Limited (CA)
(*)
US 6,333,973 B1
(10) Patent N0.:
(45) Date of Patent:
(Llst Con?rmed on next page‘)
FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS
This patent issued on a continued pros
ecution application ?led under 37 CFR
1.53(d), and is subject to the tWenty year
patent term provisions of 35 U.S.C.
0 630 141
0 691 777
W0 96 15490
154(a)(2)_
12/1994 (EP)
1/1996 (EP) 5/1996 (EP) '
10/1996 (JP) .
8268227
Subject to any disclaimer, the term of this
Pawnt is extended or adjusted under 35
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
Hattori et al., “A Multimedia Intelligent Message Commu
U-S-C- 154(k)) by 0 days-
nication System for Distributed Coordination Environ
ments,” Electronics & Communications in Japan, Part
(21) Appl. No.: 08/842,020
-
1—Communications, vol. 76, No. 1, Jan. 1, 1993, pp. 11—23.
_
“Nokia 9000 Communicator User’s Manual,” Nokia Cor
(22) Flled'
Apr‘ 23’ 1997
poration, 1996, pp. 1—1 through 16—1 (48 pages total).
(51)
Int. Cl.7 ......................... .. H04M 1/64; H04M 11/00;
(52)
US. Cl. ................ .. 379/8812; 379/67.1; 379/8811;
H04M 3/42; H04Q 7/20
Primary Examiner—Allan Hoosain
(74) Attorney, Agent, or Firm—Finnegan, Henderson,
379/8822; 379/9308; 455/412; 455/413;
_
(58)
FarabOW, Garrett & Dunner, L-L-P
455/466
(57)
ABSTRACT
Field of Search ............................ .. 379/8801, 88.11,
379/93.01, 93.08, 93.17, 100.01, 100.08,
88.22, 111, 112, 113, 211, 230, 246, 88.12,
An integrated message center operates on telecommunica
tions equipment, having a display and a processor, to con
114.06, 114.07, 88.23, 88.24; 455/445,
517, 417, 459, 419, 433, 466, 422, 38-1,
412, 413, 414; 370/347, 337, 349, 498,
524; 341/20—23
(56)
References Clted
associates a message type indicator With each of the received
U'S' PATENT DOCUMENTS
noti?cation messages based on the determined message type
and displays on the display a portion of the received noti
5,228,029 *
5,283,638 *
7/1993 KotZin ............................... .. 370/95.1
2/1994 Engberg et al- --------------------- -- 348/14
5,327,486 *
7/1994 Woltf et al. .......................... .. 379/96
*
,
solidate messages of different types for vieWing and manipu
lation by a user. The telecommunications equipment
receives noti?cation messages corresponding to pending
messages of different types and determines the message type
of the pending messages. The integrated message center
?cation messages and the associated message type indicators
as entries in a single selectable list. The user can select one
of the pending messages for retrieval based on the entries in
5103129; et al- -
,
y
e-
the single selectable list. In response to user selection, the
omson
.... ..
5,568,540 * 10/1996 Greco etal. ..... ..
~
~
.. 379/88
5,583,920 * 12/1996 Wheeler, Jr. ......................... .. 379/88
5,608,786
*
5,719,918 *
3/1997
-
czgéeingitini‘lftsioghi sitllicfirpendmg
g
g
p
y
Gordon .............................. .. 379/100
2/1998 Serbetciouglu et al. ............. .. 379/58
@
33 Claims, 16 Drawing Sheets
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US 6,333,973 B1
Page 2
US. PATENT DOCUMENTS
5870
549 *
,
,
2/1999 B 0 b 0, H
579037832 *
5/1999 Seppanen et a1‘
5,905,959
........................ ..
5,966,663 * 10/1999 Gleason ............................. .. 455/466
395/200 . 36
455/414
*
5/1999
Foladare et a1.
5,911,485 *
6/1999
Rossman ................................ .. 34/22
. 455/445
_
6,055,424 **
4/2000 Tornqvist
et a1.
.
6,205,139
3/2001 Volt .................................... .. 370/389
_
* cued by examlner
455/414
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1
2
INTEGRATED MESSAGE CENTER
If the user then Wanted to vieW a received SMS message,
hoWever, the user must return to the main menu to select
RELATED APPLICATIONS
“Received short messages.” In response, the internal pro
cessor launches the SMS application to display a list of
This application is related to US. patent application, Ser.
No. 08/842,015, entitled MULTITASKING GRAPHICAL
USER INTERFACE; US. patent application, Ser. No.
08/841,485, entitled ELECTRONIC BUSINESS CARDS;
US. patent application, Ser. No. 08/841,486, entitled
5
desired one.
Telephones of this type, hoWever, suffer from a number of
draWbacks. First, they store in their internal memory all
received messages, eXcept voice and e-mail messages Which
SCROLLING WITH AUTOMATIC COMPRESSION AND
EXPANSION; US. patent application, Ser. No. 08/842,019,
entitled CLID WITH LOCATION ICON; US. patent
application, Ser. No. 08/842,017, entitled CLID WITH
DRAG AND DROP CAPABILITY; and US. patent
application, Ser. No. 08/842,036, entitled ICONIZED
NAME LIST, all of Which Were ?led concurrently hereWith,
and all of Which are hereby incorporated by reference.
10
15
20
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
25
Systems and methods consistent With the present inven
tion address this need by providing an integrated message
center that graphically displays different types of received
messages together to facilitate user vieWing and manipula
by calling and interacting With a voice mail service using
dual tone multi-frequency (DTMF) commands. Such
With the office voice mail service, While pressing “6” With
the home voice mail service, meant “play the message.”
that cause speci?c applications to be eXecuted.
Therefore, a need eXists to integrate different types of
messages from different types of equipment into one graphi
cal location to notify the user of pending messages and their
type, and to alloW the user to vieW and respond to the
messages by simple operation.
forWarding, playback, and response by the user.
retrieval of messages, hoWever, required the user to dial the
voice mail service and listen to each message, or minimally
the header of each message, that is, the name of the person
and the time received. This type of voice mail retrieval
tended to be a sloW and tedious process.
Additionally, the user needed to memoriZe the DTMF
number commands to control the voice mail service. Some
times these commands Were different for the user’s home
voice mail service and the user’s of?ce voice mail service.
For eXample, the user needed to remember that pressing “1”
the telephones are menu driven and contain separate appli
cations for the different message types. To vieW different
types of messages, the user must folloW a series of menus
graphical scanning, prioritiZing, editing, selection, vieWing,
Traditionally, a user could retrieve only voice messages
are stored at an external server. This Wastes precious
memory space, and as a result, feWer messages can be
locally stored.
Additionally, message handling is cumbersome because
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
This invention relates to the ?eld of message handling,
and more speci?cally to the ?eld of message presentation to
a user by Which messages of all types are consolidated and
graphically displayed in a searchable list to alloW for easy
received SMS messages from Which the user selects the
30
35
tion of the messages Without having to folloW a series of
menus or launch separate applications.
In accordance With the purpose of the invention as
embodied and broadly described herein, an integrated mes
sage center consistent With the principles of the present
invention operates on telecommunications equipment, hav
ing a display and a processor, to consolidate messages of
different types for vieWing and manipulation by a user. The
telecommunications equipment receives noti?cation mes
40
sages corresponding to pending messages of different types
and determines the message type of the pending messages.
has a display, a keypad, and numerous hard keys, and uses 45
The integrated message center associates a message type
indicator With each of the received noti?cation messages
based on the determined message type and displays on the
display a portion of the received noti?cation messages and
the associated message type indicators as entries in a single
More recently, telephones have been designed With the
capability to directly receive, or doWnload, different types of
messages, such as faXes, e-mail, and Short Messaging Ser
vice (SMS) messages. One conventional mobile telephone
menus to enable a user to vieW different types of received
selectable list. The user can select one of the pending
messages.
When a message arrives, an internal processor detects the
message type and stores the message in a folder dedicated to
the message type. If the telephone receives a faX, for
messages for retrieval based on the entries in the single
selectable list. In response to user selection, the integrated
message center retrieves the selected pending message for
50
eXample, the internal processor stores the far in a faX folder.
When the user opens the cover to the display, the internal
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
processor displays a note indicating the quantity and type of
messages received. For eXample, if tWo faXes and tWo SMS
messages have been received, the note Will shoW “You have:
2 unread faXes and 2 unread short messages.”
The accompanying draWings, Which are incorporated in
55
principles of the invention. In the draWings,
goes to the main menu and selects the type of message to
FIG. 1 is a diagram of a communications netWork con
vieW. This causes the internal processor to launch a
60
from the message folder and display it for the user. For
eXample, if the user Wants to read a received faX, the user
selects “Received faxes” from the main menu. In response,
the internal processor launches the faX application to display
a list of received faXes. From the list, the user selects a 65
particular faX to read. The far application then displays the
selected faX.
and constitute a part of this speci?cation, illustrate systems
and methods consistent With this invention and, together
With the description, eXplain the objects, advantages and
If the user Wants to vieW a received message, the user ?rst
message-type speci?c application to retrieve the message
vieWing and manipulation by the user.
taining the integrated message center consistent With the
principles of the present invention;
FIG. 2 is a diagram of the user mobile telephone operating
in the netWork of FIG. 1;
FIG. 3 is a block diagram of the elements included in the
user mobile telephone of FIG. 2;
FIG. 4 is a block diagram of the softWare components
stored in the ?ash ROM of FIG. 3;
US 6,333,973 B1
4
3
FIG. 5 is a block diagram of the elements included in the
NetWork services provider 1200 stores many of the mes
sages aWaiting retrieval by the user and noti?es the user of
network services provider of FIG. 1;
the pending messages. Subscriber mobile telephone 1100
and caller equipment 1300 through 1700 communicate With
FIG. 6 is an example of an idle screen of the user mobile
telephone shoWn in FIG. 2;
netWork services provider 1200 over a communications
FIGS. 7A and 7B are eXample displays of received
messages;
FIG. 8A is an eXample display of a received SMS teXt
message;
FIG. 8B is an eXample display of a received electronic ink
message;
FIGS. 9A and 9B are eXample displays of SMS teXt
netWork, such as Global System for Mobile Communica
tions (GSM) sWitching fabric 1800.
While FIG. 1 shoWs caller equipment 1300 through 1700
directly connected to GSM sWitching fabric 1800, this is not
10
connect to GSM sWitching fabric 1800 via another type of
netWork, such as a Public SWitched Telephone NetWork
messages With hypertext markup language code;
FIG. 10 is an eXample display in Which the user selects to
listen to a voice mail message;
15
(PSTN).
When a caller uses telephone 1300 to communicate With
the user, the caller dials the telephone number corresponding
FIG. 11 is an eXample display in Which the user selects to
forWard a faX;
FIG. 12 is an eXample display of a received e-mail
message;
to mobile telephone 1100. If the user does not ansWer the call
for a predetermined number of rings, or upon direction of the
user (to be described), the call routes to netWork services
provider 1200 over GSM sWitching fabric 1800 by conven
tional mechanisms. NetWork services provider 1200 stores
the message left by the caller as voice mail and sends a short
message to mobile telephone 1100, notifying the user of the
FIGS. 13A through 13D are eXample displays in Which
the user responds to an ink message by sending an SMS
message;
FIGS. 14A and 14B are eXample displays in Which the
user responds to an ink message by establishing a voice call;
and
FIGS. 15A and 15B are eXample displays in Which the
typically the case. Telephone 1300, facsimile equipment
1500, computer 1600, and ADSI telephone 1700 normally
pending voice mail message.
25
user receives a voice call and an SMS message, respectively.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE
PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
When the caller uses caller mobile telephone 1400 to
communicate With the user, the caller may either call the
user, as described above With regard to telephone 1300, or
may send the user a Short Messaging Service (SMS) mes
sage. GSM netWorks typically include an SMS server that
provides the SMS service. The SMS service is an error-free,
guaranteed delivery transport mechanism by Which callers
The folloWing detailed description of the invention refers
can send short point-to-point messages, i.e., SMS messages,
to the accompanying draWings that illustrate preferred
through the GSM netWork, such as GSM sWitching fabric
1800, in a GSM signaling channel, simultaneously With, or
embodiments consistent With the principles of this inven
tion. Other embodiments are possible and changes may be
made to the embodiments Without departing from the spirit
and scope of the invention. The folloWing detailed descrip
tion does not limit the invention. Instead, the scope of the
35
GSM protocol limits the length of the standard SMS teXt
message to a maXimum of 140 bytes. HoWever, GSM
protocol permits longer messages to be formed by concat
enating several messages together, transparent to the caller.
Because GSM protocol transparently performs this concat
invention is de?ned only by the appended claims.
The integrated message center consistent With the prin
ciples of the present invention displays different types of
received messages in a single display and permits manipu
enating of messages, the caller sees no restriction on mes
sage length.
lation of the messages by a user, such that the user can vieW,
discard, forWard, and respond to any type of message
Without the need to launch different applications.
Without, a voice or data call.
If the caller chooses to send the user an SMS message, the
45
caller inputs the message data, and selects a destination
corresponding to the user. GSM sWitching fabric 1800
I. System Architecture
routes the message to an SMS server that services the area
FIG. 1 is a diagram of a communications netWork con
containing mobile telephone 1100, and the SMS server, in
turn, relays the message to the user.
When the caller uses facsimile equipment 1500 to send a
faX to the user, the caller dials the faX telephone number
taining the integrated message center consistent With the
principles of the present invention. The integrated message
center is a logical entity that resides in mobile telephone
1100 and operates in conjunction With netWork services
provider 1200 to inform a user of incoming and pending
messages, such as far mail, e-mail, voice mail, etc. The
corresponding to netWork services provider 1200. The caller
sends the faX to netWork services provider 1200. NetWork
services provider 1200 stores the faX and then sends a short
integrated message center also serves as a mechanism by 55 message to mobile telephone 1100, notifying the user of the
pending faX.
Which the user can retrieve, manipulate, and reply to all
types of messages. User manipulation of the pending mes
When the caller uses computer 1600 to send an e-mail
message to the user, the caller enters the message into the
sages might include the ability to vieW, prioritiZe, edit,
playback, discard, and/or forWard messages.
computer and af?Xes the user’s e-mail address. The user’s
e-mail address directs the e-mail message to netWork ser
The user uses mobile telephone 1100 to vieW messages
from callers having different types of caller equipment, such
as ordinary telephone 1300, caller mobile telephone 1400
vices provider 1200. NetWork services provider 1200 stores
Which is similar to user mobile telephone 1100, facsimile
mobile telephone 1100, notifying the user of the pending
the e-mail message, and then sends a short message to
equipment 1500, computer 1600, and Analog Display Ser
different types of messages for the user, depending upon the
e-mail message.
When the caller uses ADSI telephone 1700 to communi
cate With the user, the caller dials the telephone number
type of caller equipment.
corresponding to mobile telephone 1100, as described above
vices Interface (ADSI) telephone 1700. The callers leave
65
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