FOCUS on Energy Reduction
This household energy assessment booklet will help you to identify practical
ways to reduce energy consumption by making simple changes to how you
use electricity at home.
Australians are the biggest greenhouse gas emitters of the developed world.
Every year the average Australian household produces 14 tonnes of
greenhouse gases. 66% of household greenhouse gas emissions are a result
of electricity use within the home1.
You can save several tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions through simple
changes, reducing your impact on climate change and saving money.
Using the Power Meter to conduct your household
energy assessment
The Power Usage Meter, when plugged into each appliance, measures their
energy consumption. You can use this Energy Reduction Kit to;
•
Measure the amount of energy you currently use;
•
Compare the electricity ‘thirst’ of various appliances at home to help
you identify where you might be able to make the biggest savings;
•
Determine the cost of energy used to run each appliance over time;
and
•
Determine the greenhouse gas emissions of your appliances.
Sometimes it will be difficult to use the Power Usage Meter to measure your
consumption (e.g. water heating systems, stove tops and ovens), so standard
energy consumption information has been provided on page XX.
Once you know how much each appliance costs to run, you can change how
you use each appliance, potentially saving your household hundreds of
dollars per year.
Most household energy assessments take an hour to complete, however it
may take time for the Power Usage Meter to accumulate enough data to make a
calculation so don’t be surprised if the initial total cost displayed is 0.00.
The longer that an appliance is attached to the meter, the more accurate the
calculation becomes. This is especially true for appliances that cycle on and off such
as refrigerators and televisions.
For example if a television is used 4 hours a day, it is important to also measure the
20 hours a day that the television is not in use in order to get an accurate projection
of its running costs over a year.
Page 1 of 17
WARNING: IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
•
•
•
•
•
Take care near any electrical or gas appliance
Always turn off power points before plugging in or unplugging appliances.
Children under 16yrs must be supervised when using the Power Usage Meter
To reduce the risk of fire or electrical shock, do not expose this appliance to water
or moisture
Never insert foreign objects into to Power Usage Meter.
How to use the Power Usage Meter2
The following instructions are supplied by Solar Inverters and are a direct copy of the User Manual
supplied for the Power Usage Meter L7663
1. Connect the Power Usage Meter to a power outlet.
2. Connect the appliance to be measured/monitored to the Power Usage Meter
(just like using a double adapter).
3. Press and hold the RESET key on the unit until ‘rESt’ appears.
4. Press and hold the SET rate button unit ‘Rate’ is displayed. The kWh billing
rate flashes in the display. Press UP and DOWN buttons to change the rate.
For example; if the Electricity Company charges 27.5 cents per kWh then set
the ‘Rate’ at $0.275.
5. Press the SET key again and ‘SAVE’ will appear briefly in the display.
6. To display the actual or projected cost of power consumed; press the MENU
key until ‘Cost’ is displayed.
7. Pressing the UP and DOWN buttons will cycle through the cost projection
periods. For example; if the display indicates $37. and “Year”, then the unit is
projecting that the attached appliance will consume $37 worth of electricity in
one year.
8. To display power measurements press the MENU key until ‘VOLT’ is
displayed.
9. Pressing the UP and DOWN buttons will display the various measurements
made by the meter, choose ‘WATTS’.
10. To display the accumulated measurement totals, press the MENU key until
the desired unit to be viewed is displayed. The available units include the
accumulated running cost of the attached appliance, KWh rate, total KWh
consumed and the elapsed time that the Power Usage Meter has been
operating.
11. Once you have recorded your appliance press and hold the RESET button
until ‘rESt’ is momentarily displayed. This confirms that all previous
measurements including the total accumulated KWh elapsed time and cost
measurement have been reset to zero.
7 easy steps to assessing your electricity use at home
1. Carefully read the above instructions on how to use the Power Usage
Meter.
2. Choose the appliances you will measure (use the enclosed ‘Home
Energy Assessment’ as a guide pg XX).
3. Refer to your last energy bill to find out your cost of electricity or see
examples provided by Energy Australia on pg XX. Some electricity
providers charge two or more rates depending on consumption, time of day,
Page 2 of 17
or the season. The Power Usage Meter determines cost calculations using
just a single kWh rate.
4. Plug the Power Usage Meter into the wall socket, then plug the
appliance into the Power Usage Meter, see figure XX.
5. Record the ‘Watts’ and ‘Cost Per Year’ on the following table.
6. Estimate how often you use the appliance per week and for how long,
and then check to see how you compare to the typical use for that
appliance.
7. Read the supplementary information to see how you can improve your
energy use, save money and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
Home Energy Assessment
How to work out your Green House Gas Emissions
1000 watts = 1 Kilowatt Hour (kWh)
Eg 800 watts / 1000 = 0.8 kWh
1kWh of electricity = 1 kilogram of Greenhouse Gas Emissions
If you purchase GreenPower you can reduce this figure (eg if you purchase 10%
GreenPower reduce your total by 10% etc.)
Understanding your appliance running costs
Appliance Input wattage (kW) x Cost of 1 kW
If you have an electric heater that uses 800W of electricity and your energy retailer
tariff is 27.5c per kW, then the hourly running cost is;
Heater Wattage kW = 800W divided by 1000 = 0.8kW
= 0.8kW x 27.5c
= 22c per hour
The cost of electricity
It is best to contact your electricity supplier or refer to your last bill to establish
your electricity costs. Below are examples costs from Energy Australia
effective from 1 July 2008.
Domestic All Time
First 1,750 KWh per quarter *
Remaining usage per quarter
Cents per kWh
13.9700 cents
20.8450 cents
PowerSmart Home with a Time of
Cents per
Use Meter Installed
kWh
Peak: 2pm – 8pm on working
30.2500 cents
weekdays
Shoulder: 7am – 2pm and 8pm-10pm
working weekdays and 7am-10pm on 10.8900 cents
weekends and public holidays
Off peak: all other times
6.0500 cents
** All calculations based on using Energy Australia rates effective from 1 July 2008
Page 3 of 17
Refrigeration
Your Appliance
Appliance
Watts
Cost per
year
Small / Medium Fridge Freezer Frost Free
Large Fridge Freezer Frost Free
Large Fridge Freezer side by side
Small bar fridge
Chest Freezer
Medium Upright Freezer
Kitchen Appliances
Appliance
Your Appliance
Watts
Cost Per
Year
Electric Fry Pan
Juicer
Kettle
Microwave Oven
Rice Cooker
Toaster
Toasted Sandwich Maker
Cappuccino Maker
Coffee Percolator (10-12 cup)
Blender
Electric Wok
Typical Appliance
Annual
Emissions
Cost per
Energy Use
(kg /per
year
(kWh)
year)
508
$71.03
539
769
$107.39
815
942
$131.63
999
334
$46.66
354
535
$74.72
567
629
$87.85
667
Typical Appliances
Typical
Power
(watts)
Avg Hours
per week
Annual
Energy
Use (kWh)
Cost per
year
Emissions
(kg /per
year)
1700
300
2400
1000
700
1000
1100
1260
1000
600
2000
3
1
1.5
2.5
.75
1.3
.5
1.2
1.2
1
1
265
16
187
130
27
68
29
79
62
31
104
$37.05
$2.18
$26.15
18.16
$3.81
$9.44
$4.00
$10.98
$8.72
$4.32
$14.53
281
17
198
138
29
72
30
83
66
33
110
Electric Cooking
Appliance
Electric Cook top (all 4 burners
operating)
Electric Cook top (2 burners
operating)
Dishwasher (hot wash using
cold tap connection 3 star)
Electric Oven
Bathroom &
Laundry
Appliance
Clothes Dryer
Washing Machine Top Load
Washing Machine Front Load
Hairdryer
Heated Towel Rack
Iron
Vacuum Cleaner
Four bulb heat / light / fan
Two bulb heat/light/fan
Typical Power
(watts)
Avg Hours per
week
Annual
Energy Use
(kWh)
Cost per year
Emissions (kg
/per year)
6000
10
3120
$435.86
3307
3000
10
1560
$217.93
1654
2200
7
801
$111.87
849
2400
3.5
437
$61.02
463
Your Appliance
Watts
Cost per
year
Typical Appliance
Typical
Power
(watts)
Avg
Hours
per week
2400
1100
900
1000
100
1000
1200
1200
650
3.5
3.5
3.5
1.5
3.5
1.5
1
14
14
Page 4 of 17
Annual
Energy
Use
(kWh)
437
200
164
78
164
78
62
874
473
Cost per
year
Emissions
(kg /per
year)
$61.02
$27.97
$22.88
$10.90
$22.88
$10.90
$8.72
$122.04
$66.11
463
212
174
83
174
83
66
926
502
Living Room
Appliance
Your Appliance
Watts
Cost per
year
34cm Standard TV
Flat Screen 76cm
LCD 101cm
Plasma 107cm
Rear Projection TV
DVD Player
Games Console
Stereo System
Bedroom & Study
Appliance
70
250
225
310
190
50
200
70
Your appliance
Watts
Cost per
year
Desktop Computer
Laptop Computer
Printer
Clock Radio
Electric Blanket
Heating & Cooling
Typical
Power
(watts)
Typical
Power
(watts)
150
20
17
6
120
Typical Appliance
Annual
Avg
Cost per
Energy
Hours
year
Use
per week
(kWh)
38
138
$19.32
38
494
$69
38
445
$62.11
38
613
$85.57
38
375
$52.45
15
39
$5.45
10
104
$14.53
7
25
$3.56
Typical Appliance
Annual
Avg
Cost per
Energy
Hours
year
Use
per week
(kWh)
28
218
$30.51
28
29
$4.05
14
12
$1.73
168
52
$7.32
14
87
$12.20
Typical Appliance
Annual
Typical
Avg
Cost per
Energy Cost per
Appliance
Watts
Power
Hours
year
year
Use
(watts)
per week
(kWh)
Portable Evaporative Cooler
103
28
50
$6.98
Portable Oscillating Fan
50
14
12
$1.69
Reverse Cycle Air Conditioner
2800
56
2718
$379.69
Small Electric Bar Heater
750
42
546
$76.28
Large Electric Bar Heater
1000
42
728
$101.70
Electric Fan convection heater
2400
42
1747
$244.08
Large Oil Bar Heater
2400
42
1747
$244.08
As these appliances are seasonal these calculations are based on each appliance being in use for 4
months during the year
Outdoor and Garage
Appliance
Electric Drill
Chainsaw
Electric Saw
Swimming Pool Pump
Electric BBQ
Outdoor Spa
Emissions
(kg /per
year)
147
524
471
649
398
41
110
27
Emissions
(kg /per
year)
232
31
13
56
93
Your appliance
Your appliance
Watts
Cost per
year
Typical
Power
(watts)
700
1800
1000
1130
2400
6000
Page 5 of 17
Typical Appliance
Annual
Avg
Energy
Cost per
Hours
year
Use
per week
(kWh)
1
36
$5.09
1
94
$13.08
1
52
$7.26
42
2468
$344.77
7
874
$122.04
3
936
$130.76
Emissions
(kg /per
year)
53
13
2881
578
772
1852
1852
Emissions
(kg /per
year)
39
99
55
2616
929
992
How is energy consumed in the home?
Water and home heating or cooling account for about 60% of an average
household’s energy use3. Electric hot water systems are still the most
common type in Australian homes they account for around 37% of your power
bill.
Appliances
4%
Other
3%
Laundry
5%
Lights
6%
Hot Water
37%
Kitchen
10%
Fridge
12%
Heating & Cooling
23%
Source Energy Australia
3
Hot Water Systems
You won’t be able to measure your hot water system using your Power Usage
Meter but by reducing your usage you could save up to $400 and prevent 5
tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions per year. Alternatives to electric hot
water systems include natural gas hot water which consume less energy and
produce 1.5 tonnes costing over $100 per year 5. Solar hot water systems are
the most environmentally friendly, providing savings of $300-$700 per year.
The bathroom is where the majority of hot water is used in the home and is
where the biggest savings can be made.
Page 6 of 17
Hot Water in the Home
Kitchen,
10%
Laundry,
15%
Bathroom,
45%
Heat loss
from tank
and pipes,
30%
Based on 140litres usage per day)
Source Global Warming Cool It 1
Simple ways to save the power required for your hot water
• Turn your thermostat down to 60oC (no less). You can do this using
the temperature dial, or you may need a qualified installer.
• If you have ‘mixer taps’ make sure it is pushed to the cold side to
ensure hot water isn’t used unnecessarily.
• 45% of your hot water use is in the shower! 1 By installing AAA rated
showerhead and AAA rated tap aerators you minimise the volume of
water required but still maintain water pressure.
• Taking shorter showers costs you nothing and in fact will even save
you money. Reduce your time in the shower to a maximum of 4
minutes. Time your family members and see if they are up to the
challenge.
• Turn off your storage unit or gas pilot light if you are going away for an
extended period of time.
• Insulate your water heating tank and pipes to reduce heat loss.
• Investigate a solar water heater or 5 star gas or heat pump (check for
available rebates) if you are replacing your hot water system.
• If purchasing a gas system, check for the energy rating and choose
one with a high amount of stars.
Every 15 litres of hot water used
from an electric hot water system
generates about one kilogram of
greenhouse gas. 1
Take shorter showers, every
minute can save half a kilogram of
greenhouse gases. 5
Page 7 of 17
To measure your shower flow rates, turn the shower on full and let it flow
into a bucket for 10 seconds. Measure the amount of water in litres.
Multiply by six for the flow rate in litres per minute. Don’t forget to reuse
the water either on the garden or next time you wash up. AAA rated
showerheads have a flow rate of 9 litres per minute – how does yours
compare?
Home Heating and Cooling
The energy used for heating and cooling a typical home generates more than
one and a half tonnes of greenhouse gases and costs more than $200 per
year 5
• In summer
Keep the hot air out by closing up the house early in the
day.
Release hot air at night by opening your windows and
doors rather than forcing your air conditioner to work
over time.
Ensure air vents are clear from dust.
Shade your western windows and walls with plants,
awnings or shade cloth.
Use overhead ceiling fans to circulate cool air
Set your air conditions to between 25-27oC.
• In winter,
Keep your blinds, curtains or drapes closed on cold
winter days.
Capture the sun on warm days by opening your blinds or
windows that receive direct sunlight.
Use overhead ceiling fans on low to circulate heat.
Only heat the main living areas and secure other areas of
the house by closing doors.
Minimise draughts around window panes by filling in
gaps.
Increase your homes insulation in the ceiling space.
Set you air conditioning heating to a more efficient
temperature of 18-21oC.
An extra 1oC difference in
temperature between indoors and
outdoors can add around 10% to
heating or cooling costs and
greenhouse gas emissions.
You can check draughts by using
an incense stick (or similar).
Secure the incense stick, light it
and where there are no draughts
the smoke travel vertically.
Page 8 of 17
kg of GHG emissions per unit of heat
delivered
Approx Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Heaters
1.8
1.6
1.4
1.2
1
0.8
0.6
0.4
0.2
0
Natural Gas, LPG,
Electric reverse cycle
air conditioners
Electric fan heater,
Open fire (very variable
radiator oil filled heater
depending on type)
or off-peak electric
heating
Source - Your Home 4
Refrigerators and Freezers
An average Australian fridge produces nearly 1 tonne of emissions and
can cost up to $200 a year1.
• Switch off your 2nd fridge except when it is needed; for a single
door fridge save a tonne of Greenhouse gases a third of
Australian homes have at least two fridges, many of which are
old and inefficient.
• Move your fridge and freezer out of direct sunlight and make
sure it is well ventilated at the back, sides and top (remove any
dust build up from the coils).
• Check the quality of the seals, excessive ice build up can
indicate that moist air is getting in through a poor door seal. A
well sealing fridge door will hold a piece of paper in the seal.
• Try to keep the fridge well stocked but allow for good internal air
circulation, this will help maximise your fridge’s efficiency.
• Avoid opening the door for long periods, or frequently,
especially when the surrounding air temperature is warm.
• Place cold items back in the fridge immediately after use.
• The recommended temperature for a fridge is between 3oC to
5oC or a freezer is -15oC to -18oC. 5
If your fridge motor runs all the
time, you could be wasting over 20
kilograms of greenhouse gases
every week. Call a service provider
for advice.1.
Buying a family fridge with an extra
star on its label cuts greenhouse
gas emissions by more then 100
kilograms each year. Over its
lifetime it will save $200 in running
costs.1
Page 9 of 17
A typical new family fridge uses two
thirds less energy than a 20 year
old one. Hanging onto that old
clunker could be costing $130 and
generating an extra tonne of
greenhouse gases every year. 5
Dishwasher
Using your dishwasher efficiently could save you up to $100 per year.
• Avoid rinsing your dishes in hot water before placing them in the
dishwasher just rinse them with cold water.
• Only use your dishwasher once it is full and use energy/water
saving setting.
• If you have an electric hot water system – only connect cold
water to your dishwasher. Dishwashers can heat water very
effectively and do not need connection to the hot water supply
(avoid heating water twice). To do this you will need to contact
an accredited plumber.
Dishwashers may generate up to
500 kilograms of greenhouse gas
each year.
Rinsing dishes under running hot
water before putting them in the
machine could use more hot water
than the entire dishwasher cycle.
Clothes Washing and Drying
The laundry can account for around 5% of your household greenhouse gas
emissions 3.
• Wash in cold water and use a clothes line or drying rack – avoid using
a clothes dryer.
• If you have to use your dryer, minimise the time it is on by hanging
things out first (you will save energy by only drying things in the dryer
for 10 minutes rather then leaving it on for 30 minutes).
• Always use the spin cycle in your washing machine to remove as much
water as possible before you try to dry your clothes.
• Use your economy cycle and if you are washing heavily soiled items,
soak them overnight before putting them in the machine (avoid having
to rewash them).
Each year the energy used to run an average clothes
washer produces about 90 kilograms of greenhouse gas.
If you wash with hot water this adds another 475
kilograms!1
Page 10 of 17
Cooking
Kilograms of GHG released during
cooking
In general a gas cook top will produce less than half the greenhouse gases of
a standard electric unit.
Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Cooking a Serve of
Vegetables
0.3
0.25
0.2
0.15
0.1
0.05
0
Benchtop electic
steamer
appliance
Electric cooktop
Gas Cooktop
Microwave
Source: Your Home4
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Keep lids on your pots when boiling, steaming or cooking.
Using your microwave more often can save on energy used on the
stove or oven.
Always use the fan when cooking as this circulates the heat more
effectively, reducing cooking time and energy required.
Where possible fill your oven and try to cook a few dishes rather than
just one.
Avoid overfilling kettles and saucepans, only boil what you need and if
possible boil water in your kettle rather than stove top.
Check the seal on your oven door to ensure it is not losing heat this
could be a cheap repair that could improve your ovens performance.
Avoid opening the oven door unnecessarily, the temperature inside
can drop around 10oC each time the door is opened.
Using a microwave rather then an electric oven can save
you up to 70% in greenhouse gas emissions and running
costs, saving you time and money!
Page 11 of 17
Lights
Compact fluorescent globes (energy saving globes) can cut greenhouse gas
emissions and running costs by up to 75% compared to incandescent globes1
Over its life, a typical compact fluorescent lamp saves around a third of a tonne of greenhouse gas and $45
(compared to incandescent globes). Use of compact fluorescent globes also avoid the purchase cost of 6 or more
incandescent globes - you don’t have to change the bulbs as often!1
•
•
•
Change your light globes to Compact Fluorescents.
Turn off the lights when you leave a room.
Consider a smaller lamp (with a compact fluorescent globe of course!)
in areas where lighting is left on for long periods of time (e.g. hall way,
living room).
• Try to avoid halogen lighting systems (each globe has a transformer
which reduces the energy efficiency gains).
• Install daylight or movement sensors on your outdoor lights to avoid
them being left on unnecessarily.
• Over time dirt or dust build-up can reduce light output so clean your
lamps and light fittings regularly to reduce the
need for extra lighting.
Just a few outdoor lights
left on every evening can
Each year electricity used for lighting an average
Australian home generates around three quarters of a
double a households,
tonne of greenhouse gas and costs around $100.1
greenhouse gas
emissions and lighting
cost.
Swimming Pools and Spas
The average 40sq metre pool will cost around $600-$800 to heat per year
with a gas pool heater. Pool filter pumps can also be a big energy user with
up to 2500kWh or $350 every year5.
• Only use pool filters for 6 hours a day (depending on exposure to
sunlight, debris etc). Install a timer switch which can control this for
you.
• Avoid over heating the pool. Each degree increase in temperature
increases costs and power consumption by around 10%.
• Surround your pool with plants or a fence to act as a wind-break, this
will help reduce evaporation and heat loss.
• Using a pool cover will assist to maintain water temperature and
minimise evaporation.
Page 12 of 17
A pool filter pump generates 1-3 tonnes of
greenhouse gas each year (that is 1
kilogram every 1-3 hours!) 5.
Other low cost measures to reduce your household
greenhouse gas emissions.
Standby Power
Around 10% of your homes electricity consumption is wasted by standby
power, this could be costing your around $100 per year5.
• Switch off all appliances at the wall when they are not in use,
not just with a remote control.
• When purchasing TV’s, DVD’s and VCR’s look for the Energy
Star labels. This label means minimal power is used when in
standby mode.
• Remember a screen saver doesn’t save energy, it uses energy! By
enabling the Energy Star feature, your computer or monitor will go into
a low-energy sleep model when it is standing idle.
• For instructions on how to Energy Star enable your computer, go to
www.energystar.gov.au/consumers/stepbystep.html
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Energy Use
Standby Energy Consumption
6
Source - Sustainability Victoria
Page 13 of 17
Did you know – a lap top can
generate 40 kilograms of
greenhouse gases each year,
desktop computers used in the same
way can generate between 200-500
kilograms, more than half of this is
generated by the monitor! 1
An LCD panel monitor generates
around half as much greenhouse gas
as a conventional monitor, reducing its
brightness can cut emissions by 75%5.
Over the whole year, microwave ovens
generate more greenhouse gas running the
digital clock than cooking food 1
Star Energy Rating
If you are buying a new appliance such as a fridge, freezer or dishwasher, look at the
energy rating label (and water rating labels for dishwashers). Select an appliance
with a high star rating. The Energy Star Rating label will tell you how much energy an
appliance will consume over a year. For example if a fridge used 600kWh per year, it
will cost around $85 a year to run or $850 over 10 years.
GreenPower
GreenPower is the best way to cut your greenhouse emissions in the home.
GreenPower is a national accreditation program for renewable energy
products offered by electricity suppliers. When you purchase GreenPower
your energy supplier buys electricity from renewable sources which avoids
burning coal to produce electricity. Renewable energy is derived from
sources that can be replaced and not depleted over time and include;
•
•
•
•
•
•
Wind.
Solar Power
Hydro-electric power.
Geothermal energy.
Wave and tidal power.
Biomass (landfill gas, municipal solid waste, agricultural wastes,
energy crops, wood wastes).
You are able to nominate the percentage of GreenPower you would like,
from 10% through to 100% of your total power requirements.
Making the switch is easy, simply contact your choice of electricity supplier
or contact Green Power on 1300 852 688 or visit www.greenpower.gov.au
Page 14 of 17
Some energy providers show
household greenhouse gas
emissions on energy bills so you can
check that your emissions have
reduced after signing up to a green
power scheme
Switching to 100% GreenPower is
the equivalent to taking two cars off
the road each year (based on an
average household energy bill).
Your Household and Climate Change
Climate change is recognised as one of the greatest challenges facing our
future. Household energy is a significant contributor to Australia’s greenhouse
gas emissions, changing your consumption and energy use will reduce your
impact on climate change. Change today for a better future tomorrow.
Simple things you can start doing today
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Install a low flow showerhead
Limit your showers to 4 minutes
Conserve heat this winter by closing off doors and only heating living areas
Get rid of the second fridge or turn it off when not required
Wash clothes in cold water
Use the clothes line
Switch to energy efficient light bulbs (CFL’s)
Turn off any lights when not required
9. Turn off appliances on standby mode
10. Purchase a minimum of 10% GreenPower this year
But I am just one person, how can my decisions affect the environment?
Some decisions have long-lasting effects. When buying a home, car or major
appliance, that one decision will influence greenhouse gas emissions for
many years. For example a 1 or 2 star energy rated dishwasher could
generate 40% more greenhouse gas emissions than a dishwasher rated 4-5
stars, this could mean the difference of 5 tonnes of emissions during its
lifetime.
Page 15 of 17
More Information
To find out more visit;
Description
Website Address
Current Rebates
Aust Federal
Government Rebates
NSW Residential Rebate
program
Specific Appliances
Energy Rating
Information on energy star energy ratings
Choosing a Hot Water
System
Info on what to consider when buying a new hot
water system
Energy Australia
Appliance Calculator
A online calculator to measure your appliances
Information on current federal rebates
Information on state rebates available
Choosing a hot water
Info on what to consider when buying a new hot
system
water system
More Sustainability Information for your home
GreenPower
Global Warming Cool It
Your Home
NABERS
Want to know more?
Department of the
Environment, Water,
Heritage and the Arts
Resource Smart
Sustainability Victoria
Save Energy Resource
Smart Sustainability
Victoria
Australian Conservation
Foundation Online
World Wildlife
Foundation
Energy Smart Homes
Cool Communities Home
Greenhouse Audit
Manual
NSW Dept of
Environment and Climate
Change
Motivating Home Energy
Action
Information on how to switch to GreenPower
A home guide to reducing energy costs and
greenhouse gases
Information on making your home more
sustainable designing, updating or building.
A online tool to conduct a home energy audit
http://www.environment.gov.au/re
bates/index.html
http://www.environment.nsw.gov.
au/rebates/ccfhws.htm
www.energyrating.gov.au
http://www.sustainability.vic.gov.a
u/resources/documents/Choosing
ahotwatersystem.pdf
http://www.energy.com.au/energy
/ea.nsf/Content/Ways+Small+Ap
pliance+Calculator
http://www.environment.nsw.gov.
au/energy/hwschoose.htm
http://www.greenpower.gov.au/ho
me.aspx
http://www.environment.gov.au/s
ettlements/gwci/
www.yourhome.gov.au
http://www.nabers.com.au/
National policy, programs and legislation to protect
and conserve Australia's environment
http://www.environment.gov.au/
A wealth of information on a range of sustainability
issues
http://www.resourcesmart.vic.gov
.au/
A comprehensive source of information for
practical tips on saving energy in the home
http://www.saveenergy.vic.gov.au
A not-for-profit organisation with info on
sustainable living, climate change and many other
environmental topics
A not-for-profit organisation with information on
environmental action, sustainability and climate
change
Tools to conduct your own home energy audit
A comprehensive overview of conducting an
energy audit in your home.
www.acfonline.org.au
http://www.wwf.org.au/
http://www.energysmart.com.au
http://www.environment.gov.au/s
ettlements/local/publications/audit
.html
Sustainable household information water, energy
and waste.
http://www.environment.nsw.gov.
au/households/
A research paper on how to motivate home energy
action
http://www.environment.gov.au/s
ettlements/local/publications/moti
vating.html
Transport Information
Green Vehicle Guide
Check the fuel consumption of your car
Travel Smart
Information on alternatives to car transport
Page 16 of 17
www.greenvehicleguide.gov.au
www.travelsmart.gov.au
References
1
Department of the Environment and Water Resources. 2006. Global Warming Cool It: A
home guide to reducing energy costs and greenhouse gases. Department of the Environment
and Heritage’s Australian Greenhouse Office, Canberra.
2
Solar Inverters 2008, Power Usage Meter User Manual L7663, Solar Inverters Pty Ltd
URUNGA NSW
3
Energy Australia (2008) Where does your household energy go? Online accessed January
2009
http://www.energy.com.au/energy/ea.nsf/AttachmentsByTitle/Energy+Usage+Guide/$FILE/En
ergyUsageGuideDec08.pdf
4
Department of the Environment, Water Heritage and the Arts 2008, Your Home; Technical
Manual Online Accessed January 2009 http://www.yourhome.gov.au/technical/pubs/fs61.pdf
5
Moreland Energy Foundation 2001 Cool Communities Home Greenhouse Audit Manual,
Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts Australian Greenhouse Office.
6
Sustainability Victoria , 2008 Resource Smart, Operating Costs of Electrical Appliances
accessed January 2009
http://www.sustainability.vic.gov.au/resources/documents/Operating_costs_of_electrical_appli
ances.pdf
Page 17 of 17
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