LUFP9
Telemecanique
User’s Manual
Gateway
DeviceNet / Modbus RTU
1
2
Table of Contents
Safety Information .....................................................4
Disclaimer ..................................................................4
About the Book..........................................................5
1. Introduction............................................................6
1.1. Introduction to the User’s Manual .......................................... 6
1.2. Introduction to the LUFP9 Gateway ....................................... 8
1.3. Terminology............................................................................ 8
1.4. Introduction to the Communication “System” Architecture..... 9
1.5. Principle of Gateway Configuration and Operation .............. 10
2. Hardware Implementation of the LUFP9
Gateway ........................................................... 12
2.1. On Receipt ........................................................................... 12
2.2. Introduction to the LUFP9 Gateway ..................................... 12
2.3. Mounting the Gateway on a DIN Rail ................................... 13
2.4. Powering the Gateway ......................................................... 14
2.5. Connecting the Gateway to the Modbus Network ................ 14
2.5.1. Examples of Modbus Connection Topologies................ 14
2.5.2. Pin outs .......................................................................... 17
2.5.3. Wiring Recommendations for the Modbus Network....... 18
2.6. Connecting the LUFP9 Gateway to the DeviceNet Network 20
2.7. Configuring DeviceNet Communication Features ................ 21
2.7.1. Encoding DeviceNet Speed ........................................... 21
2.7.2. Encoding the Gateway Address..................................... 22
2.7.3. Sample Gateway Configurations.................................... 23
3. Signaling ............................................................. 24
4. Software Implementation of the Gateway........ 26
4.1. Introduction........................................................................... 26
4.1.1. System Architecture ....................................................... 26
4.1.2. Configuring the Motor Starters ....................................... 27
4.1.3. Modbus Cycle Time ....................................................... 27
4.1.4. Managing Degraded Modes With the Gateway Default
Configuration .................................................................. 27
4.2. Configuring the Gateway in RSNetWorx .............................. 32
4.2.1. Selecting and Adding the Master PLC’s DeviceNet
Scanner .......................................................................... 32
4.2.2. Installing the Gateway Description File.......................... 32
4.2.3. Selecting and Adding a Gateway to the DeviceNet
Network .......................................................................... 33
4.2.4. Editing Gateway Parameters ......................................... 33
4.2.5. Configuring the DeviceNet Scanner............................... 35
4.2.6. Configuring Inputs from the Gateway............................. 36
4.2.7. Configuring Outputs Intended for the Gateway.............. 37
4.2.8. Transferring the DeviceNet Scanner Configuration ....... 38
4.2.9. Developing a DeviceNet Application.............................. 38
4.3. Description of Services Assigned to Gateway I/O................ 38
5. Gateway Initialization and Diagnostics ............ 40
5.1. Full Management ..................................................................40
5.1.1. DeviceNet Master Command Word................................40
5.1.2. Gateway Status Word.....................................................41
5.2. Diagnostic Only.....................................................................41
5.2.1. DeviceNet Master Command Word................................41
5.2.2. Gateway Status Word.....................................................42
5.3. Simplified Operation .............................................................42
5.4. Description of the DeviceNet Master Command Word .........43
5.5. Description of the Gateway Status Word..............................45
6. Configuring the Gateway ................................... 47
6.1. Connecting the Gateway to the Configuration PC ................47
6.1.1. Pin Outs ..........................................................................48
6.1.2. RS-232 link protocol .......................................................48
6.2. Installing ABC-LUFP Config Tool .........................................49
6.3. Importing the Gateway Configuration ...................................49
6.4. Transferring a Configuration to the Gateway........................50
6.5. Monitoring the Content of the Gateway’s Memory................50
6.6. Deleting a Modbus Slave......................................................52
6.7. Adding a Modbus Slave........................................................53
6.8. Changing Periodic Data Exchanged With a Modbus Slave..55
6.8.1. Replacing a Periodic Input Data Element.......................55
6.8.2. Replacing a Periodic Output Data Element ....................56
6.8.3. Increasing the Amount of Periodic Input Data ................57
6.8.4. Increasing the amount of periodic output data ...............61
6.9. Deleting Aperiodic Parameter Data ......................................66
6.10. Changing a Modbus slave Configuration............................68
6.10.1. Changing the Name of a Modbus Slave.......................69
6.10.2. Changing the Address of a Modbus Slave ...................69
6.11. Adding and Setting Up a Modbus Command .....................70
6.11.1. With TeSys U Motor Starters........................................70
6.11.2. With a Generic Modbus Slave ......................................72
6.11.3. Adding a Special Modbus Command ...........................86
6.12. Configuring the General Characteristics of the Gateway....88
6.12.1. “Fieldbus” Element .......................................................88
6.12.2. “ABC” Element..............................................................89
6.12.3. “Sub-Network” Element ................................................90
6.13. Adding a Broadcaster Node................................................92
Appendix A: Technical Characteristics................ 93
Appendix B: Default Configuration....................... 96
Appendix C: Practical Example (RSLogix 500) ... 99
Appendix D: DeviceNet Objects.......................... 108
Appendix E: Modbus Commands ....................... 127
Index ...................................................................... 131
Glossary ................................................................ 132
3
Safety Information
NOTICE:
Read these instructions carefully, and look at the equipment to become familiar with the
device before trying to install, operate, or maintain it. The following special messages may
appear throughout this documentation or on the equipment to warn of potential hazards or
call attention to information that clarifies or simplifies a procedure.
These are the safety alert symbols. They are used to alert you to potential
personal injury hazards. Obey all safety messages following these symbols to
avoid death, injury, or equipment damage.
DANGER
DANGER indicates an imminently hazardous situation, which, if not avoided, will result
in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
WARNING
WARNING indicates a potentially hazardous situation, which, if not avoided, can result
in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
CAUTION
CAUTION indicates a potentially hazardous situation, which, if not avoided, can result in
injury or equipment damage.
Disclaimer
PLEASE NOTE:
Only qualified personnel should service electrical equipment. No responsibility is
assumed by Schneider Electric for any consequences arising out of the use of this
material or the associated User Manual. This document is not intended as an instruction
manual for untrained persons.
© 2005 Schneider Electric. All Rights Reserved.
4
About the Book
Validity Note
The data and illustrations in this manual are not contractual. We reserve the right to modify
our products in line with our policy of continuous development. The information given in this
document may be modified without notice and must not be interpreted as binding in the part
of Schneider Electric.
_________________________________________________________________________
Related
Documents
Title of Documentation
Reference Number
AnyBus Communicator – User Manual
ABC_User_Manual.pdf
Safety Guidelines for the Application,
Maintenance of Solid State Control
Installation,
and NEMA ICS 1.1
(latest edition)
Safety Standards for Construction and Guide for Selection, NEMA ICS 7.1
Installation and Operation of Adjustable-Speed Drive Systems
(latest edition)
Modbus User Guide
TSX DG MDB E
Modicon Modbus Protocol Reference Guide
PI-MBUS-300 Rev. J
Product Related
Information
Schneider Electric is in no way responsible for any errors in this document. Please contact
us if you have any suggestions for improvements or modifications, or if you find any errors
in this publication.
No parts of this document may be reproduced in any form or by any means whatsoever
(electronic, mechanical or photocopying) without the prior authorization of Schneider
Electric.
All pertinent state, regional, and local safety regulations must be observed when installing
and using this product. For safety reasons and to ensure compliance with the documented
system data, only the manufacturer should perform repairs to components.
_________________________________________________________________________
User Comment
This is a “living” document. As such, it will be revised from time to time to add new content
or to revise existing content as considered necessary. This manual has been written for
you. We welcome your questions and comments about this document. Please send your
comments by e-mail to techpub@schneider-electric.com
5
1. Introduction
1.1. Introduction to the User’s Manual
Chapter 1
Introduction describes the gateway, the user guide that comes with it and the terms used in it.
Chapter 2
Hardware Implementation of the LUFP9 Gateway gives an introduction to the gateway and
describes all the items used when setting it up, both inside (thumb wheels) and outside (cables
and connectors) the gateway.
Chapter 3
Signaling describes the six LEDs on the front of the gateway.
Chapter 4
Software Implementation of the Gateway describes the successive steps for setting the
gateway up with its default configuration, with a PLC using DeviceNet. LUFP9 gateways are
shipped pre-configured to allow you to interface a DeviceNet master with 8 predefined Modbus slaves
(TeSys U motor starters).
Chapter 5
Gateway Initialization and Diagnostics describes two registers in the gateway’s memory
reserved for initializing and carrying out diagnostics on the gateway. They are only exchanged
between the DeviceNet master and the gateway.
Chapter 6
Configuring the Gateway describes how to use the “ABC-LUFP Config Tool” software
application, which allows you to modify or create a new configuration for the gateway and shows
the various features of this software (add or remove a Modbus slave, add or change a Modbus
command, etc.).
This chapter also shows the changes to be made to software implementation operations in
RSNetWorx.
Appendix A Technical Characteristics describes the technical aspects of both the gateway and the
DeviceNet and Modbus RTU networks it is interfaced with.
Appendix B Default Configuration describes the main features of the default configuration of the LUFP9
gateway. However, it does not go into ABC-LUFP Config Tool in detail.
Appendix C Practical Example (RSLogix 500) gives a simple example using the LUFP9 gateway’s default
configuration. This example exploits the command and monitoring registers for 8 TeSys U motor
starters and uses the aperiodic read and write services to access the value of any motor starter
parameter.
Appendix D DeviceNet Objects describes both the generic DeviceNet objects and the DeviceNet objects
specific to the LUFP9 gateway. The values of the attributes of these objects are also given.
Appendix E Modbus Commands describes the content of the Modbus command frames supported by the
LUFP9 gateway.
6
1. Introduction
Quick Access to Critical Information
using…
(2) TeSys U Products
(1)
User of …
Presentation
of
Hardware
and
Connections
the predefined
(2b) configuration, the nb of
modifying …
slaves (< 8)
using…
(3)
User of …
other Products
the predefined
(2a) configuration
(with 8 slaves)
(2c) new variables
using…
via ABC-LUFP
Config Tool
(4)
Managing Loss of Communication
in case of a predefined configuration
(5) Signaling and Diagnostics
(1) Presentation of Hardware and Connections
See Chapter 2
- powering,
- mounting,
- Modbus connecting,
- DeviceNet connecting,
- Transmission speed and address selecting
(3) User of other Generic Modbus Products
See Chapter 6
(6.7 to 6.11, 6.11.2)
- building up your own configuration
from scratch (see ABC User Manual)
(2) User of TeSys U Products
(2a) with 8 slaves
(4) Loss of Communication
See Chapter 4
(2b) reducing the number of slaves
See Chapter 6
See Chapter 4.1.4.1
and Chapter 6.11.2.2
Using ABC-LUFP Config Tool:
- install (6.2),
- connect (6.1),
- remove slaves (6.6)
(2c) access to new variables
See Chapter 6
Select between:
- adapting the predefined configuration
provided with the gateway, if close
enough to that you wish (1 register to
read and 1 to write, 1 register address
to change), or
Using ABC-LUFP Config Tool to access
other registers than standard 704
(Command) and 455 (Status)
with the same request:
- replace a register with another (for
instance 455 with 458)
- expand the size (the number of
registers)
The variables described are:
- Reconnect time
(unit = 10ms, default value = 10s)
- Retries (default value = 3)
- Timeout time
(unit = 10ms, default value = 1s)
(5) Signaling of faults and status, Diagnostics
See Chapter 3
See Chapter 5
Signaling defaults and gateway status
by LEDs on the front
Gateway initializing mode and
description of diagnostics information
with a supplementary request:
- add-up extra commands
- other operations (6.7 to 6.11)
7
1. Introduction
1.2. Introduction to the LUFP9 Gateway
The LUFP9 gateway allows a master located on a DeviceNet network to enter into a dialogue with slaves on a
Modbus RTU network. This is a generic protocol converter operating in a way which is transparent to the user.
This gateway allows you to interface many products marketed by Schneider Electric with a DeviceNet network.
These include TeSys U motor starters, Altivar drives and Altistart soft start- soft stop units.
1.3. Terminology
Throughout this document, the term “user” refers to any person or persons who may need to handle or use the
gateway.
The term “RTU”, which refers to the Modbus RTU communication protocol, will be omitted most of the time. As a
result, the simple term “Modbus” will be used to refer to the Modbus RTU communication protocol.
As is still the case with all communication systems, the terms “input” and “output” are somewhat ambiguous. To
avoid any confusion, we use a single convention throughout this document. So the notions of “input” and “output”
are always as seen from the PLC, or the DeviceNet master / scanner.
Hence, an “output” is a command signal sent to a Modbus slave, whereas an “input” is a monitoring signal
generated by this same Modbus slave.
The diagram below shows the flows of “inputs” and “outputs” exchanged between a DeviceNet master and
Modbus RTU slaves via the LUFP9 gateway:
DeviceNet Master
OUTPUTS
LUFP9
Gateway
INPUTS
Altistart 48
Modbus RTU Slaves
NOTE: For more explanation about specific terms, refer to the Glossary at the end of this guide.
8
1. Introduction
1.4. Introduction to the Communication “System” Architecture
Each LUFP9 DeviceNet / Modbus RTU gateway allows a PLC on the DeviceNet network to command, control
and configure up to 8 Modbus slaves. 25 commands can be distributed over a maximum of 8 slaves, without any
time constraint. If there are more than 8 Modbus slaves, you will need to use an appropriate number of LUFP9
gateways.
DeviceNet
Master
Upstream network (DeviceNet)
Total of 16
motor starters
(TeSys U model)
Downstream
network no.1
(Modbus)
Downstream
network no.2
(Modbus)
ATS48
VW33-A48
ATS46
VW3-G46301
Downstream network no.3 (Modbus)
9
1. Introduction
The LUFP9 gateway behaves both as a DeviceNet slave on the upstream network and as a Modbus RTU
master on the downstream network.
See Appendix A: Technical Characteristics, if you would like to read about the technical communication
characteristics of the LUFP9 gateway.
The gateway can carry out its data exchanges (inputs and outputs of all types) with the Modbus slaves cyclically,
aperiodically or in an event-driven way. All of these Modbus exchanges make up the gateway’s “Modbus
scanner” and we use the “ABC-LUFP Config Tool” software application to configure this scanner’s exchanges.
Each item of data exchanged in this way is made available to the DeviceNet master, which can gain access to it
in a number of ways (cyclical, aperiodic or event-driven exchanges).
NOTE: If, for example, a communication is periodic on the Modbus network, the corresponding data does not
have to be exchanged periodically on the DeviceNet network and vice versa.
The diagram on the preceding page illustrates the distribution of several slaves over three downstream Modbus RTU
networks, each of these networks being interfaced with the DeviceNet master PLC using an LUFP9 gateway.
1.5. Principle of Gateway Configuration and Operation
The LUFP9 gateway is part of a family of products (referred to as LUFPz) designed to meet generic needs for
connection between two networks using different communication protocols.
The software elements common to all these gateways (a configuration tool known as “ABC-LUFP Config Tool” and
the on-board Modbus software) cohabit with the specific features of the network upstream of each of them
(DeviceNet in the case of the LUFP9 gateway) generically. This is one of the reasons why the interfacing between
the upstream network and the Modbus network is carried out entirely via the gateway’s physical memory.
Ö The exchanges between the gateway (which operates as a Modbus master) and the Modbus slaves are
wholly configured using ABC-LUFP Config Tool. This configuration tool goes into great detail (setting timers
for exchanges, communication modes, frame content, etc.), which makes it all the more delicate to use. So a
whole chapter in this guide (chapter 6 Configuring the Gateway) has been devoted to this tool.
10
1. Introduction
Ö Each LUFP9 gateway is shipped pre-configured so as to make it easier to operate and the factory settings
can be used as a basis for a configuration which will best meet the user’s expectations. The typical
operations applicable to this default configuration are described in chapter 6 Configuring the Gateway.
The DeviceNet network is totally separate from the Modbus network. The frames on a network are not directly
“translated” by the gateway to generate frames on the other network. Instead, the exchanges between the content
of the gateway’s memory and the Modbus slaves make up a system which is independent of the one which is
entrusted with managing the exchanges between this same memory and the DeviceNet master. The system
guarantees the coherence of data exchanged within the shared memory.
You must check that the size of the DeviceNet data corresponds to the size of the memory used for the Modbus
exchanges, because the gateway configures its DeviceNet exchanges on the basis of the memory used by the
Modbus frames. If the sizes do not match, the fieldbus Diag LED n°4 blinks at a 1 Hertz frequency, cyclic
Modbus exchanges are enabled and write-access Modbus registers are set to 0.
The example which follows illustrates the independent management of each of the two networks:
— Managing Gateway ↔ Modbus slaves exchanges —
11
2. Hardware Implementation of the LUFP9 Gateway
2.1. On Receipt
After opening the packaging, check that you have an LUFP9 DeviceNet / Modbus RTU Gateway equipped with
connectors.
2.2. Introduction to the LUFP9 Gateway
The cables and other accessories for connecting to DeviceNet and Modbus networks need to be ordered
separately.
Legend:
c
Detachable power connector for the
24V).
gateway (
d
Female RJ45 connector to a PC
running ABC-LUFP Config Tool
configuration software.
e
Female RJ45 connector for the
downstream Modbus RTU network.
f
Six diagnostic LEDs.
g
Removable cover for the selector
switches used to configure the
gateway, shown and described in
chapter 2.7 Configuring DeviceNet
Communication Features. The label
describing the LEDs is stuck onto this
cover.
h
Detachable
connector.
female
DeviceNet
12
2. Hardware Implementation of the LUFP9 Gateway
The LUFP9 enables communications between a DeviceNet network and Modbus devices for the purpose of
industrial automation and control. As with any component used in an industrial control system, the designer
must evaluate the potential hazards arising from use of the LUFP9 in the application.
WARNING
LOSS OF CONTROL
•
The designer of any control scheme must consider the potential failure modes of control paths and, for
certain critical control functions, provide a means to achieve a safe state during and after a path failure.
Examples of critical control functions are emergency stop and overtravel stop.
•
Separate or redundant control paths must be provided for critical control functions.
•
System control paths may include communication links. Consideration must be given to the implications of
unanticipated transmission delays or failures of the link. a
•
Each implementation of an LUFP• Gateway must be individually and thoroughly tested for proper
operation before being placed into service.
Failure to follow this instruction may result in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
a
For additional information, refer to NEMA ICS 1.1 (latest edition), “Safety Guidelines for the Application, Installation, and Maintenance of Solid
State Control” and to NEMA ICS 7.1 (latest edition), “Safety Standards for Construction and Guide for Selection, Installation and Operation of
Adjustable-Speed Drive Systems”.
2.3. Mounting the Gateway on a DIN Rail
Dismounting the gateway
Mounting the gateway
1
1
2
Start by fitting the rear base of the gateway to the
upper part of the rail, pushing downwards (1) to
compress the gateway’s spring. Then push the
gateway against the DIN rail (2) until the base of the
gateway box fits onto the rail.
2
Start by pushing the gateway downwards (1) to
compress the gateway’s spring. Then pull the
bottom of the gateway box forwards (2) until the box
comes away from the rail.
NOTE: The spring is also used to ground the gateway (Protective Earth).
13
2. Hardware Implementation of the LUFP9 Gateway
2.4. Powering the Gateway
DeviceNet / Modbus RTU gateway – View from underneath
–
+
Power supply
24V isolated
95 mA max.
WARNING
RISK OF UNINTENDED EQUIPMENT OPERATION
Do not use the 24 VDC power available from the DeviceNet network cabling to operate the LUFP• Gateways,
as the negative terminal (⎯) of this power is not necessarily at the installation earth ground potential. Use of
an ungrounded power supply may cause the LUFP• devices to operate in an unexpected manner.
To ensure reliable operation, the LUFP• Gateways require a separate power supply where the negative
terminal (⎯) is connected to the installation earth ground.
Failure to follow this instruction may result in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
2.5. Connecting the Gateway to the Modbus Network
Three typical examples of a Modbus connection for the gateway and its slaves are shown below. There are many
other possible Modbus connections, but they are not covered in this document.
2.5.1. Examples of Modbus Connection Topologies
• “Star” topology: This topology uses LU9GC03 Modbus hubs, which have 8 female RJ45 connectors.
These hubs should be placed close to the Modbus slaves to which they are connected using
VW3 A8 306 R•• cables. On the other hand, the nature of the cable connecting the LUFP9 gateway to one
of these hubs will depend on the network architecture, so long as there is a male RJ45 connector at each
end. If necessary, one or two line terminations may be directly connected to the hubs.
14
2. Hardware Implementation of the LUFP9 Gateway
The connections are shown below:
LUFP9 gateway
Modbus
VW3 A8 306 R••
Modbus hubs
LU9GC03
Line
termination
Line
termination
Towards 8 Modbus slaves
15
2. Hardware Implementation of the LUFP9 Gateway
“Bus” topology with VW3 A8 306 TF3 drop boxes: This topology uses VW3 A8 306 TF3 drop boxes to
connect each of the Modbus slaves to the main section of the Modbus network. Each box should be placed in the
immediate vicinity of the Modbus slave it is associated with. The cable for the main section of the Modbus
network must have male RJ45 connectors (like the VW3 A8 306 R•• cable used for the “star” topology). The lead
between the drop box and the slave or the Modbus gateway is an integral part of this box. The connections are
shown below:
LUFP9 gateway
Modbus
VW3 A8 306 TF3
Line
termination
Towards 2 Modbus slaves
Towards 3 Modbus slaves
Line
termination
Towards 3 Modbus slaves
16
2. Hardware Implementation of the LUFP9 Gateway
• “Bus” topology with tap boxes: This topology is similar to the previous one, except that it uses
TSXSCA62 subscriber connectors and/or TSXCA50 subscriber connectors. We recommend using a
VW3 A68 306 connection cable and the TSXCSA•00 Modbus cables. Connect the RJ45 connector on the
VW3 A68 306 cable to the Modbus connector on the LUFP9 gateway.
The connections are shown below:
VW3 A68 306
TSXSCA62
Modbus
LUFP9 gateway
TSXCSA•00
2.5.2. Pin outs
In addition to the pin out for the connector on the gateway, the one on the VW3 A68 306 cable is also shown
below, as it is the only Modbus cable which does not exclusively use RJ45 connections.
— LUFP9 connector —
Female RJ45
———— VW3 A68 306 cable for TSXSCA62 box ————
Male RJ45
Male 15-point SUB-D
1
2
1
2
3
3
D(B)
4
D(B)
4
14 D(B)
D(A)
5
D(A)
5
7
0V
6
6
7
7
8
0V
8
D(A)
15 0V
17
2. Hardware Implementation of the LUFP9 Gateway
2.5.3. Wiring Recommendations for the Modbus Network
• Use a shielded cable with 2 pairs of twisted conductors,
• connect the reference potentials to one another,
• maximum length of line: 1,000 meters (3,281 ft)
• maximum length of drop line / tap-off: 20 meters (66 ft)
• do not connect more than 9 stations to a bus (slaves and one LUFP9 gateway),
WARNING
RISK OF UNINTENDED EQUIPMENT OPERATION
Do not connect more than 9 stations to the Modbus fieldbus (gateway and 8 slaves). While the gateway
may appear to operate correctly with more than 9 devices, it is likely one or more devices will only
communicate intermittently, leading to unpredictable system behavior.
Failure to follow this instruction may result in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
• cable routing: keep the bus away from power cables (at least 30 cm – 11.8 in.), make crossings at right
angles if necessary, and connect the cable shielding to the earth ground on each unit,
• adapt the line at both ends using an RC-type line terminator (see diagram and VW3 A8 306 RC termination
below).
D(B)
4
120 Ω
D(A)
5
1 nF
— Line termination recommended at both ends of the line —
— VW3 A8 306 RC line termination —
WARNING
MODBUS TERMINATION USING THE RESISTANCE-ONLY METHOD
Use only RC (Resistance-Capacitance) Modbus cable terminations with the LUFP9 Gateway. The LUFP•
gateways are designed to support client equipment that will not function correctly without using RC-type
Modbus cable termination.
Failure to follow this instruction may result in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
To make it easier to connect the units using the topologies described in chapter 2.5.1 Examples of Modbus
Connection Topologies, various accessories are available in the Schneider Electric catalogue:
18
2. Hardware Implementation of the LUFP9 Gateway
1) Hubs, drops, taps, and line terminations:
… LU9GC03 hub ..................... This passive box has 8 female RJ45 connectors. Each of these connectors can
(“star” topology)
be connected to a Modbus slave, to a Modbus master, to another Modbus hub,
or to a line termination.
… VW3 A8 306 TF3 drop box...................... This passive box includes a short lead with a male RJ45 connector
(“bus” topology with VW3 A8 306 TF3
allowing it to be connected directly to a Modbus slave, without
drop boxes)
having to use a different cable. It is fitted with 2 female RJ45
connectors for the connection of two Modbus cables of the
VW3 A8 306 R•• type.
… 2-way TSXSCA62 subscriber connector. This passive box has a printed circuit fitted with screw terminals
and allows the connection of 2 subscribers to the bus (2 female
(“bus” topology with branch boxes)
15 point SUB-D connectors). It includes the line termination when
the connector is located at the end. It is fitted with 2 screw terminals
for the connection of two double twisted pair Modbus cables.
… TSXCA50 tap box.................................... This passive box allows a Modbus unit to be connected to a screw
(“bus” topology with tap boxes)
terminal. It includes the line termination when the connector is
located at the end. It is fitted with 2 screw terminals for the
connection of two double twisted pair Modbus cables.
… VW3 A8 306 RC double termination ....... Each of these two red passive boxes is a male RJ45 connector
(all topologies)
3 cm (1.2 in.) long containing an RC line termination (see diagram
and illustration above). Only the abbreviation “RC” is shown on
these boxes.
2) Cables:
ƒ VW3 A8 306 R•• Modbus cable.................................... Shielded cable with a male RJ45 connector at each
(“star” topology / “bus” topology with tap boxes)
end.
ƒ VW3 A68 306 Modbus cable........................................ Shielded cable with a male RJ45 connector and a
(“bus” topology with tap boxes)
male 15-point SUB-D connector. It is used to connect
a Modbus subscriber (slave or master) to a
TSXSCA62 or TSXCA50 box.
ƒ Shielded double twisted pair Modbus cable................. Bare cable (without connectors) used to make up the
(“bus” topology with branch boxes)
main section of the Modbus network. There are three
items available: TSXCSA100 (100 m – 328 ft),
TSXCSA200 (200 m – 656 ft), and TSXCSA500
(500 m – 1,640 ft).
19
2. Hardware Implementation of the LUFP9 Gateway
2.6. Connecting the LUFP9 Gateway to the DeviceNet Network
If the LUFP9 gateway is
physically located at either end
of the DeviceNet network, you
will need to connect a line
termination to the terminals on
its DeviceNet connector.
LUFP9
Gateway
Detachable female
connector
The resistance of this line
termination should be equal to
121 Ω and it should be
connected between pins 2 and 4
on the gateway connector, that
is to say between the CAN_L
and CAN_H signals.
DeviceNet cable
Pinouts
Modbus
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
Name
GND
CAN_L
SHIELD
CAN_H
V+
Wire colour
Black
Blue
None (bare wire)
White
Red
20
2. Hardware Implementation of the LUFP9 Gateway
2.7. Configuring DeviceNet Communication Features
This configuration should be carried out when the gateway is powered off.
CAUTION
OPENING LUFP• COVER WITH POWER ON
The power supply of the gateway must be turned off before opening the cover. Once the cover has been
removed, make sure you touch neither the electrical circuits nor the electronic components, as this may
damage the device.
Failure to follow this instruction may result in injury or equipment damage.
The block of selector switches allowing you to configure the DeviceNet communication functions is hidden
behind the gateway cover g (see illustration in chapter 2.2 Introduction to the LUFP9 Gateway). To remove this
cover, all you have to do is slide the end of a small screwdriver between the top of the cover and the gateway
box, then carefully remove it.
The block of selector switches is shown in the diagram below, each switch being shown in its factory set
position:
Speed
ON
1
2
Address (MAC ID)
3
4
5
6
7
A selector switch is in the 0 state when it is in the OFF
position and in the 1 state when it is in the ON position.
Note: Any change to the gateway’s communication
functions will not be effective until the next time that the
gateway is powered on.
8
2.7.1. Encoding DeviceNet Speed
The gateway’s communication speed on the DeviceNet network must be identical to that of the DeviceNet
master. If not, a configuration error will result.
The factory setting is 500 kbits/s.
This speed value depends on the position of selector switches 1 and 2.
Speed
ON
1
2
Address (MAC ID)
3
4
5
6
7
8
Selector
switches
12345678
DeviceNet speed
00xxxxxx
125 kbits/s
01xxxxxx
250 kbits/s
10xxxxxx
500 kbits/s
11xxxxxx
Invalid configuration
21
2. Hardware Implementation of the LUFP9 Gateway
2.7.2. Encoding the Gateway Address
The LUFP9 gateway is identified on the DeviceNet bus by its address (or “MAC ID”), which is between 0 and 63.
Speed
ON
1
2
Selector
switches
12345678
xx000000
xx000001
xx000010
xx000011
xx000100
xx000101
xx000110
xx000111
xx001000
xx001001
xx001010
xx001011
xx001100
xx001101
xx001110
xx001111
xx010000
xx010001
xx010010
xx010011
xx010100
xx010101
Address (MAC ID)
3
4
5
DeviceNet
address
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
6
7
8
Selector
switches
12345678
xx010110
xx010111
xx011000
xx011001
xx011010
xx011011
xx011100
xx011101
xx011110
xx011111
xx100000
xx100001
xx100010
xx100011
xx100100
xx100101
xx100110
xx100111
xx101000
xx101001
xx101010
xx101011
The gateway’s DeviceNet address depends on the
position of selector switches 3 to 8. It corresponds to
the binary number given by the ON (1) or OFF (0)
position of these 6 selector switches.
DeviceNet
address
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
Selector
switches
12345678
xx101100
xx101101
xx101110
xx101111
xx110000
xx110001
xx110010
xx110011
xx110100
xx110101
xx110110
xx110111
xx111000
xx111001
xx111010
xx111011
xx111100
xx111101
xx111110
xx111111
DeviceNet
address
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
22
2. Hardware Implementation of the LUFP9 Gateway
2.7.3. Sample Gateway Configurations
Speed = 250 kbits/s
Address = 12
Speed
ON
1
2
Speed = 500 kbits/s
Address = 5
Address (MAC ID)
3
4
5
6
7
8
Speed
ON
1
2
Address (MAC ID)
3
4
5
6
7
8
23
3. Signaling
The gateway’s 6 LEDs and the descriptive label on the removable cover allow you to diagnose the status of the
gateway:
d
c
LUFP9
n o
p q
r s
f
e
1 NETWORK STATUS
2 MODULE STATUS
3 NOT USED
4 NOT USED
5 MODBUS
6 GATEWAY
h
g
DeviceNet™
LED
n
p
NETWORK
STATUS
NOT USED
LED Æ Gateway state
Off: Gateway not connected to
the DeviceNet bus
Green: Gateway connected to
the DeviceNet bus:
Connection established
Red: Fatal error on connection
to the DeviceNet bus
Flashing (green): Gateway
connected to the DeviceNet bus:
Connection not established
Flashing (red):Timeout in
connection to the DeviceNet bus
The length of this timeout is
defined by the DeviceNet master
Off: —
LED
Off: No power
Red: Unrecoverable failure
o
MODULE
STATUS
Green: Gateway is operational
Flashing (red): Fault
q
NOT USED
Off: —
GATEWAY
Off: No power
Flashing (red/green):
Configuration absent / not valid
Use ABC-LUFP Config Tool to
load a valid configuration
Green: Gateway currently being
initialized and configured
Flashing (green):
Gateway is in running order:
Configuration OK
Off: No power
Flashing (green): No Modbus
communications
Green: Modbus
communications OK
r
MODBUS
Red:
- Loss of communication with at
least one Modbus slave (no
answer from the slave) (1)
LED Æ Gateway state
s
- Exception code coming from a
command or a transaction
24
3. Signaling
(1) The MODBUS LED r becomes red when one or more Modbus slaves fail to respond to the gateway in the
expected fashion. This can be caused by:
ƒ Loss of communications (e.g. a broken or disconnected cable)
ƒ Writing incorrect values to the outputs corresponding to the two aperiodic read/write services
(see chapter 4.3, Description of Services Assigned to Gateway I/O).
Note: When MODBUS LED r is flashing red due to a simple loss of communications, the LED will revert to a
green state when communications are restored. When LED (5) is flashing red due to the use of incorrect values
with the aperiodic read/write services, then the only way to clear the error is to reuse these aperiodic services
with correct values.
Note: If the DEVICENET STATUS LED s is flashing following a sequence beginning with one or more red
flashes, we advise that you note down the order of this sequence and give this information to the Schneider
Electric support service. In some cases, all you need to do is power the gateway off then back on again to solve
the problem.
25
4. Software Implementation of the Gateway
4.1. Introduction
This chapter gives an introduction to a quick implementation of the LUFP9 gateway, using its default
configuration. All LUFP9 gateways ship pre-configured.
NOTE: The configuration has been defined for 8 motor starters. If you use less than 8, refer to chapter 6
Configuring the Gateway.
The default configuration provided by Schneider Electric is intended to provide a good starting point for
customers using TeSys U motor starters and to minimize the configuration changes required for most
installations. The default configuration allows the gateway to be used with a configuration tool for DeviceNet
Master PLCs. However, it is the sole responsibility of the user to ensure the default configuration, or any other
configuration, is safe and appropriate for their facility and intended use;
4.1.1. System Architecture
The default configuration for an LUFP9 gateway allows it to control, monitor and configure 8 TeSys U motor
starters:
DeviceNet
Master PLC
(SLC500)
DeviceNet (upstream network)
LUFP9
Gateway
Modbus
addresses
c
d
e
f
Total of 8
motor starters
(TeSys U model)
g
h
i
j
Modbus (downstream network)
Line
termination
Connection
boxes
Please see chapter 2 Hardware Implementation of the LUFP9 Gateway, for the hardware implementation of the
default configuration.
26
4. Software Implementation of the Gateway
4.1.2. Configuring the Motor Starters
Each motor starter should be configured as follows:
Protocol:
Modbus address
Bitrate
Data bits
Modbus RTU slave
1 to 8
19,200 bits/s
8
Start bits
Parity
Parity bit
Stop bits
1
None
0
1
When using a TeSys U motor starter with a Modbus communication module (LULC03•), the configuration
parameters for the RS485 connection are automatically detected, only the Modbus address needs to be
configured.
4.1.3. Modbus Cycle Time
The LUFP9 gateway’s default configuration sets a cycle time of 300 ms on Modbus commands. This cycle time
corresponds to the polling time necessary to cover all of the 8 motor starters.
4.1.4. Managing Degraded Modes With the Gateway Default Configuration
The degraded modes with the gateway default configuration is described below, but it takes no account of the
PLC used or of the DeviceNet scanner. Please see chapter 6.11.2.1 Managing Degraded Modes, if you would
like to manage the degraded modes for any other configuration.
4.1.4.1. Description of the Gateway Degraded Mode Options
Offline options for fieldbus
This option affects the data sent to a Modbus slave if there is no communication coming from the DeviceNet
master.
It is defined at the Query level of each command or transaction sent to the different slaves.
This option can take 3 values:
Clear :
All data sent to the concerned Modbus slave is set to 0.
Freeze :
All data sent retains its current value.
No scanning : The query is no more transmitted.
With the gateway's default configuration:
"Clear" option is selected for periodic exchanges
"No scanning" is selected for aperiodic exchanges
Which means that Tesys Command and Status registers continue to be refreshed :
but output memory associated (Tesys U command registers) is forced to 0,
and input memory (Tesys U status registers) works normally,
Aperiodic Modbus exchanges are stopped.
Timeout time
This option defines the time the gateway will wait for a response before it either retries to send the same request,
or it disconnects the slave and declares it missing.
It is defined at the Query level of each command or transaction sent to the different slaves.
With the gateway’s default configuration, this time is equal to 300 ms.
27
4. Software Implementation of the Gateway
Retries
This option determines the number of re-transmissions carried out by the gateway if there is no response from
the slave.
It is defined at the Query level of each command or transaction sent to the different slaves.
With the gateway’s default configuration, this option is set to 3.
Reconnect time
This option defines the time the gateway will wait for a response before it reconnects a slave that was missing.
It is defined at the Query level of each command or transaction sent to the different slaves.
With the gateway’s default configuration, this time is equal to 10 sec.
WARNING
RISK OF UNINTENDED EQUIPMENT OPERATION
During the reconnect time, you cannot control a slave (read/write) via the bus. Depending on the slave
characteristics and the watchdog configuration, the slave can keep the same status or take a fallback
position.
To avoid an unintended equipment operation, you must know the possible status of a slave and adapt the
timeout and reconnect time values according to the request sending rate.
Failure to follow this instruction may result in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
Offline options for sub-network
This option affects the data sent to the DeviceNet scanner if there is no response coming from a slave.
It is defined at the Response level of each command or transaction sent from the different slaves.
This option can take 2 values:
Clear :
All data sent to the DeviceNet scanner is set to 0.
Freeze : All data sent to the DeviceNet scanner retains its current value.
With the gateway’s default configuration, "Clear" option is selected and Tesys U status registers and aperiodic
input data are forced to 0.
4.1.4.2. Degraded Mode Description
This description takes into account the following elements:
The PLC processor
The DeviceNet scanner
The LUFP9 gateway
The Tesys U starters-controllers.
28
4. Software Implementation of the Gateway
PLC processor stopped or on failure
PLC processor response
Outputs:
Software error, outputs reset to default state or hold their present state depending on
configuration.
Hardware error (EEPROM or hardware failure), output state will be indeterminate.
Inputs:
PLC stops responding to inputs in any error state.
DeviceNet scanner response
Depending on scanner configuration:
the scanner stops communicating with the LUFP9 gateway,
or forces DeviceNet outputs to 0, and refreshes the inputs,
or holds DeviceNet outputs in their last position, and refreshes inputs.
LUFP9 gateway response
If the scanner stops to communicate with the gateway:
periodic Modbus exchanges continue to run
with output memory associated forced to 0,
input memory continues to be refreshed,
aperiodic Modbus exchanges are stopped.
If the scanner forces DeviceNet outputs to 0, and refreshes the inputs:
periodic Modbus exchanges continue to run
with outputs set to 0,
input memory continues to be refreshed,
aperiodic Modbus exchanges are stopped.
If the scanner holds DeviceNet outputs, and refreshes the inputs:
periodic Modbus exchanges continue to run,
with output memory associated held in their last position,
input memory continues to be refreshed,
aperiodic Modbus exchanges are stopped.
Tesys U response
If the scanner stops to communicate or forces the outputs to 0:
periodic Modbus exchanges continue to run,
Command registers are set to 0 and motors are stopped,
Status register are transmitted to the gateway,
aperiodic Modbus exchanges are stopped.
If the scanner holds DeviceNet output words, and refreshes the inputs words:
periodic Modbus exchanges continues to run,
Command registers hold their last values and motors stays in the same state,
Status register data is transmitted to the gateway,
aperiodic Modbus exchanges are stopped.
29
4. Software Implementation of the Gateway
DeviceNet scanner stopped or on failure
PLC processor response
The PLC processor provides some error and/or diagnostic objects to the application in case of
DeviceNet scanner stop or failure (input/output not valid).
Refer to the PLC user manual to have their description.
This information must be managed in the PLC application.
DeviceNet scanner response
If the DeviceNet scanner is stopped (command coming from the application):
the scanner stops to communicate with the LUFP9 gateway.
If the DeviceNet scanner is on failure,
the scanner stops to communicate with the processor and the LUFP9 gateway.
LUFP9 gateway response
With the gateway default configuration (Offline option for fieldbus):
Periodic Modbus exchanges continue to run,
with the output memory associated forced to 0,
input memory continues to be refreshed,
aperiodic Modbus exchanges are stopped.
Tesys U response
Periodic Modbus exchanges continue to run:
Command registers are set to 0 and motors are stopped,
Status register data is transmitted to the gateway,
aperiodic Modbus exchanges are stopped.
LUFP9 gateways disconnected on DeviceNet side
PLC response
The PLC processor provides some error and diagnostic objects coming from the DeviceNet scanner in
case of slave disconnection from the application:
Refer to the PLC user manual to have their description.
This information must be managed in the PLC application.
DeviceNet scanner response
The DeviceNet scanner provides the processor with some error and diagnostic objects in case of
DeviceNet slave disconnection.
LUFP9 gateway response
With the gateway default configuration (Offline option for fieldbus):
Periodic Modbus exchanges continue to run,
with output memory associated forced to 0,
input memory continues to be refreshed,
aperiodic Modbus exchanges are stopped.
Tesys U response
Periodic Modbus exchanges continue to run:
Command registers are set to 0 and motors are stopped,
Status register data is transmitted to the gateway,
aperiodic Modbus exchanges are stopped.
30
4. Software Implementation of the Gateway
LUFP9 gateways failure
PLC response
The PLC processor provides some error and diagnostic objects coming from the DeviceNet scanner in
case of slave failure to the application.
Refer to the PLC user manual to have their description.
This information must be managed in the PLC application
DeviceNet scanner response
The DeviceNet scanner provides the processor with some error and diagnostic objects in case of
DeviceNet slave failure.
LUFP9 gateway response
In case of a failure, the gateway stops to communicate with the DeviceNet scanner and the Modbus
slaves.
Tesys U response
Depending on the Tesys U configuration:
If the starters-controllers do not receive any requests, they will:
stop the motor,
keep the same state,
or run the motor.
Refer to the Tesys U user manuals to adjust these fallback positions.
LUFP9 gateways disconnected on Modbus side or Tesys U failure
PLC response
The processor gives access to the gateway status word coming from the DeviceNet scanner input
table and to the gateway command word coming from the output table.
These 2 words must be managed in the PLC application in order to detect if a Modbus slave is
missing.
DeviceNet scanner response
The DeviceNet scanner must be configured to access the gateway status and command words in
order to provide Modbus diagnostic information.
LUFP9 gateway response
With the gateway’s default configuration: Timeout time = 300 ms, Retries = 3,
Reconnect time = 10 sec, and Offline option for sub-network = Clear.
After sending a request to a slave, if there is no response after 300 ms, the gateway will send it again
twice before giving the information about the slave missing in the gateway status word.
Data sent to the DeviceNet scanner (Read requests) is set to 0.
The gateway will try to reconnect the slave missing with the same sequence every 10 seconds.
Tesys U response
If the LUFP9 gateway is disconnected on Modbus side:
The starters-controllers do not receive any requests, depending on their configuration.they will:
stop the motor,
keep the same state,
or run the motor.
Refer to the Tesys U user manuals to adjust the fallback position.
In case of a Tesys U failure:
No response is sent to the gateway, the motor state will be undetermined. This case must be
managed in the PLC applcation.
31
4. Software Implementation of the Gateway
4.2. Configuring the Gateway in RSNetWorx
The DeviceNet master PLC must be configured so that it has access to all of the data described in Appendix B:
Default Configuration, Input and Output data Memory.
The following chapters describe the steps in RSNetWorx which you will need to go through so that the gateway
is correctly recognised by the DeviceNet master PLC.
NOTE: The DeviceNet network which is described in the following chapters only includes one master and one
slave (LUFP9 gateway). So you will need to adapt the addressing of the inputs and outputs shown below (%IW
and %QW) according to any other slaves on the DeviceNet network which you need to configure.
4.2.1. Selecting and Adding the Master PLC’s DeviceNet Scanner
In RSNetWorx, select the type of scanner you have and add it to the DeviceNet network topology.
In our example, this scanner is a “1747-SDN Scanner Module (4)” and its MAC ID address is set to 00.
4.2.2. Installing the Gateway Description File
The EDS file describing the gateway must be placed on the PC’s hard disk so that RSNetWorx has access to it
at all times.
This file can be found on the CD LU9CD1: “LUFP9_100.eds”.
Î Once you are inside RSNetWorx, see the documentation to read how to import an EDS file. This procedure
should then be applied to the file “LUFP9_100.eds”. It uses the “EDS wizard”, which is accessible from the
“Tools” menu.
The following two entries are then added to the tree structure for recognised DeviceNet products:
•
DeviceNet / Category / Communication Adapter / LUFP9
•
DeviceNet / Vendor / Schneider Automation / LUFP9
32
4. Software Implementation of the Gateway
4.2.3. Selecting and Adding a Gateway to the DeviceNet Network
Select “LUFP9” from the list on the left, then add it to the DeviceNet network topology.
In our example, we have assigned the MAC ID address 04 to the gateway (the configuration of the address for a
gateway is described in chapter 2.7.2 Encoding the Gateway Address).
4.2.4. Editing Gateway Parameters
Double-click on the icon which corresponds to the gateway, in the frame on the right.
In the window which then appears, select the “Device Parameters” tab and check that the values for the
parameters correspond to those for the parameters shown below. If necessary, change them (only parameters 1
to 5 are accessible to the user in write mode), then click on the “Download To Device” button to send these
changes to the gateway.
33
4. Software Implementation of the Gateway
If you are in any doubt over what is displayed, click on the “Upload From Device” button, then on “Start Monitor”. The
RSNetWorx application then starts to read from the gateway the values of the parameters currently displayed.
Click on the “Stop Monitor” button to stop this reading process.
The most important parameters, in the case of the default gateway configuration, are parameters 1 and 2
(periodic transfers between the PLC and the gateway via a periodic connection known as “polled”), 6 and 7
(offset and size of the input data area in the gateway’s input memory), and 18 and 19 (offset and size of the
output data area in the gateway‘s output memory). The value of each “offset” type parameter refers to an offset
from the start of the gateway’s input data memory area.
NOTE: Only monitoring of the “Input1” and “Output1” areas is discussed in this manual. The monitoring of Input2
to Input6, and Output2 to Output6 is an advanced application and is outside the scope of this manual. Contact
Schneider Electric support for assistance in monitoring the parameters.
NOTE: If you create or change a configuration using the ABC-LUFP Config Tool (see chapter 6), confirm that the
I/O data areas defined in the gateway’s memory are appropriate for the new configuration, and for
communications with the DeviceNet master. These I/O data areas define all of the bytes exchanged with the
Modbus slaves via the “Data” or “Preset Data” fields in the Modbus frames. If you do not take these steps, a
configuration error may result.
34
4. Software Implementation of the Gateway
4.2.5. Configuring the DeviceNet Scanner
Double-click on the icon which corresponds to the DeviceNet scanner.
A window then appears allowing you to configure the exchanges carried out by the scanner. Select the “Scanlist”
tab and add the “LUFP9” gateway to the “Scanlist” ( > or >> buttons). After selecting the gateway from this
list, the “Edit I/O Parameters…” button becomes accessible.
Click on the “Edit I/O Parameters…” button.
In the window that appears, check the “Polled:”
box, then configure the size of the data
received (Rx = 32 bytes) and the size of the
data transmitted (Tx = 32 bytes) by the
scanner.
With
the
LUFP9
gateway’s
default
configuration, these values allow you to
exchange all of the data shown in Appendix B:
Default Configuration.
NOTE: If you create or change a configuration using ABC-LUFP Config Tool, see chapter 6 Configuring the
Gateway.
35
4. Software Implementation of the Gateway
4.2.6. Configuring Inputs from the Gateway
On the “Input” tab, select the “LUFP9” gateway, then click on the “AutoMap” button. RSNetWorx then
automatically establishes the correspondence between the 32 data bytes (8-bit format) from the gateway and the
corresponding 16 PLC inputs “I:1.1” to “I:1.16” (16-bit format).
Please check that a correspondence between all of the data from the gateway and the PLC inputs “I:1.1” to
“I:1.16” has been established.
The correspondence between the contents of the gateway’s input memory (see Appendix B: Default Configuration)
and PLC inputs “I:1.1” to “I:1.16” is given in the following table:
Service
PLC input
Managing the downstream
Modbus network
(Status Word)
I:1.1
Periodic communications
—
Monitoring of
TeSys U motor starters
Aperiodic communications
—
Reading the value of a
motor starter parameter (RESPONSE)
Aperiodic communications
—
Writing the value of a
motor starter parameter (RESPONSE)
Aperiodic communications
(“Trigger bytes” for the responses)
Description
Bit 0......................Bit 7
Bit 8 ...................Bit 15
LUFP9 gateway status word
(MSB Æ 0xxx••)
Value of the motor starter c status register
Value of the motor starter d status register
Value of the motor starter e status register
Value of the motor starter f status register
Value of the motor starter g status register
Value of the motor starter h status register
Value of the motor starter i status register
Value of the motor starter j status register
I:1.2
I:1.3
I:1.4
I:1.5
I:1.6
I:1.7
I:1.8
I:1.9
I:1.10
Memory location free
I:1.11
Function number (0x03)
I:1.12
I:1.13
I:1.14
I:1.15
I:1.16
(LSB Æ 0x••xx)
Slave no. (0x01-0x08)
Number of bytes
read (0x02)
Value of the parameter read
(MSB Æ 0xxx••)
(LSB Æ 0x••xx)
Slave no. (0x01-0x08)
Function no. (0x06)
Address of the parameter written
(MSB Æ 0xxx••)
(LSB Æ 0x••xx)
Value of the parameter written
(MSB Æ 0xxx••)
(LSB Æ 0x••xx)
Read parameter
Write parameter
response counter
response counter
36
4. Software Implementation of the Gateway
4.2.7. Configuring Outputs Intended for the Gateway
On the “Output” tab, select the “LUFP9” gateway, then click on the “AutoMap” button. RSNetWorx then automatically
establishes the correspondence between the 32 data bytes (8-bit format) to be sent to the gateway and the
corresponding 16 PLC outputs “O:1.1” to “O:1.16” (16-bit format).
Please check that a correspondence between all of the data sent to the gateway and the PLC outputs “O:1.1” to
“O:1.16” has been established.
The correspondence between the contents of the gateway’s output memory (see Appendix B: Default
Configuration, Output Data Memory Area and PLC outputs “O:1.1” to “O:1.16” is given in the following table:
Service
PLC output
Managing the downstream
Modbus network
(Command Word)
O:1.1
Periodic communications
—
Controlling
TeSys U motor starters
Aperiodic communications
—
Reading the value of a
motor starter parameter (QUERY)
Aperiodic communications
—
Writing the value of a
motor starter parameter (QUERY)
Aperiodic communications
(“Trigger bytes” for the queries)
O:1.2
O:1.3
O:1.4
O:1.5
O:1.6
O:1.7
O:1.8
O:1.9
O:1.10
O:1.11
O:1.12
O:1.13
O:1.14
O:1.15
O:1.16
Description
Bit 0......................Bit 7
Bit 8 ...................Bit 15
DeviceNet master command word
(MSB Æ 0xxx••)
(LSB Æ 0x••xx)
Value of the motor starter c command register
Value of the motor starter d command register
Value of the motor starter e command register
Value of the motor starter f command register
Value of the motor starter g command register
Value of the motor starter h command register
Value of the motor starter i command register
Value of the motor starter j command register
Slave no. (0x01-0x08)
Function no. (0x03)
Address of the parameter to be read
(MSB Æ 0xxx••)
(LSB Æ 0x••xx)
Number of parameters to be read
(MSB Æ 0x00••)
(LSB Æ 0x••01)
Slave no. (0x01-0x08)
Function no. (0x06)
Address of the parameter to be written
(MSB Æ 0xxx••)
(LSB Æ 0x••xx)
Value of the parameter to be written
(MSB Æ 0xxx••)
(LSB Æ 0x••xx)
Read parameter
Write parameter
query counter
query counter
37
4. Software Implementation of the Gateway
4.2.8. Transferring the DeviceNet Scanner Configuration
Once you have finished the operations described above, make sure that the changes made have been
transmitted to the DeviceNet scanner. To do this, click on the “Download to Scanner…” button on each of the
“Module” and “Scanlist” tabs in the DeviceNet scanner properties window.
If necessary, please see the RSNetWorx documentation for further details on this subject.
4.2.9. Developing a DeviceNet Application
The DeviceNet master PLC used as an example is an SLC500, marketed by Allen Bradley. An example of a
PLC application, developed in RSLogix 500, is shown in Appendix C: Practical Example (RSLogix 500)
This example uses the PLC, the gateway and the 8 TeSys U motor starters shown in the Software
Implementation of the Gateway.
4.3. Description of Services Assigned to Gateway I/O
Managing the downstream Modbus network: Please see chapter 5.25, Diagnostic Only, for a detailed
description of this service. The example described in Appendix C: Main Program, only automatically
acknowledges gateway diagnostics, that is to say it does not exploit the data from these diagnostics. In the case
of the gateway’s default configuration, under ABC-LUFP Config Tool, the “Control/Status Byte” field of the “ABC”
element is equal to “Enabled but no startup lock.”
Periodic communications (inputs): The value of each of the 8 words for this service corresponds to the value
of the status register of a TeSys U motor starter (register located at address 455).
Periodic communications (outputs): The value of each of the 8 words for this service corresponds to the value
to be sent to the command register for a TeSys U motor starter (register located at address 704).
Please see Appendix C: Controlling/Monitoring Sub-Program, for an example of the simplified use of these
“periodic communications” services.
Aperiodic communications: Please see Appendix C: Sub-Program for Reading a Parameter… and SubProgram for Writing a Parameter…, for an example of how to use the “aperiodic communications” services.
These aperiodic communications services offer functions similar to those of “parameter area PKW”, which can
be found on certain Schneider Electric products, such as some ATV drives.
When using 16-bit inputs and outputs for which the order of the LSB and MSB is specified, the DeviceNet master
uses Big Endian byte ordering (LSB MSB), while the Modbus slaves use Little Endian (MSB LSB). In many
situations, the DeviceNet master will handle this conversion internally, but this may not be the case with certain
configurations, aperiodic services, or with custom applications. It is necessary this behaviour be properly
characterized before placing the system into service.
WARNING
RISK OF UNINTENDED EQUIPMENT OPERATION
The user must ensure the conversion of Endian (byte order within a 16-bit word) is correct between the
DeviceNet and Modbus fieldbuses. During configuration of the DeviceNet master, or when utilizing custom
applications or programming to communicate between the DeviceNet master and the Modbus slaves via the
gateway, the handling of Endian (byte order within a 16-bit word) must be correct for each fieldbus. If the
order of bytes transmitted to 16-bit inputs and outputs is handled incorrectly, incorrect data may be written to
the Modbus device configuration or command registers, leading to unintended equipment operation.
Failure to follow this instruction may result in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
38
4. Software Implementation of the Gateway
• Sample reading of a motor starter parameter:
Reading of the 1st fault register (address = 452 = 0x01C4) on “TeSys U n°5” motor starter. The initial values
of O:1.16 and I:1.16 are equal to 0x1306. The result of the reading is 0x0002 (magnetic fault).
Output
O:1.10
Value
0x0305
Meaning (MSB + LSB)
Function no. + Slave no.
Input
I:1.10
Value
0x0500
Meaning (MSB + LSB)
Slave no. + (not used)
O:1.11
0xC401
I:1.11
0x0203
Number of bytes + Function no.
O:1.12
0x0100
0x1307
Parameter address (MSB↔LSB)
Number of parameters (MSB↔LSB)
I:1.12
“Trigger byte” for the query (Pf)
I:1.16
0x0200
0x1307
“Trigger byte” for the response (Pf)
O:1.16
Value read (MSB↔LSB)
• Sample writing of a motor starter parameter:
Writing of the 2nd command register (address = 705 = 0x02C1) on “TeSys U n°7” motor starter at the value
0x0006 (clear statistics + reset thermal memory). The initial values of O:1.16 and I:1.16 are equal to
0x1307. The result of the writing is a command echo, that is to say that the values of the “address
parameter” and “value to be written” fields are identical in both the query and the response.
Output
O:1.13
Value
0x0607
Meaning (MSB + LSB)
Function no. + Slave no.
Input
I:1.13
Value
0x0607
O:1.14
0xC102
0xC102
0x0600
0x1407
Parameter address (MSB↔LSB)
Value to be written (MSB↔LSB)
I:1.14
O:1.15
I:1.15
“Trigger byte” for the query (PF)
I:1.16
0x0600
0x1407
O:1.16
Meaning (MSB + LSB)
Function no. + Slave no.
Parameter address (MSB↔LSB)
Value to be written (MSB↔LSB)
“Trigger byte” for the response (PF)
There is no error check performed on data transmitted using the aperiodic services described above. Incorrect
values written to the outputs that correspond to the aperiodic communication services will lead to the
transmission of an incoherent Modbus frame. This incoherent Modbus frame may return an error, or lead to
unexpected behavior of the slave devices.
WARNING
RISK OF UNINTENDED EQUIPMENT OPERATION
The user must perform error checking and appropriate error handling for values written to the outputs
corresponding to the aperiodic communications services. Incorrect values sent to the aperiodic services
outputs can lead to unexpected system behavior.
Failure to follow this instruction may result in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
39
5. Gateway Initialization and Diagnostics
The chapter describes the principle used to initialize and carry out diagnostics on the gateway using each of the
three options offered by the gateway. These options can be configured via ABC-LUFP Config Tool, by changing
the assignment of the “Control/Status Byte” field for the “ABC” element (see chapter 6.12.2). These options are:
“Control/Status Byte” field:
Meaning:
Enabled ..............................................................Full Management
Enabled but no startup lock ..............................Diagnostic Only
Disabled .............................................................Simplified Operation
The option chosen in the default configuration is “Enabled but no startup lock.”
Full Management
Diagnostic Only
Simplified Operation
Management in the PLC application of :
Æ Start-up of Modbus cyclic exchanges
Æ Modbus network diagnostic.
Management in the PLC application of :
Æ Modbus network diagnostic.
Æ Automatic start-up of Modbus cyclic exchanges
Æ No Modbus network diagnostic
5.1. Full Management
The DeviceNet master manages the start-up of Modbus cyclic exchanges and Modbus network diagnostic by
means of 2 words:
ƒ
A DeviceNet Command Word
which is transmitted by the PLC application,
and is associated to addresses 0x0200 and 0x0201 of the gateway output memory
ƒ
A Gateway Status Word
which is transmitted by the gateway
and is associated to addresses 0x0000 and 0x0001 of the gateway input memory
The Gateway Status Word is not refreshed cyclically. The updating of this word is based on a toggle-bit
system which must be managed in the PLC application:
Diagnostic is refreshed by the gateway using toggle bit B15
New command from the DeviceNet master is sent using toggle bit B14
5.1.1. DeviceNet Master Command Word
B15 B14 B13 B12 B11 B10 B9 B8
B7 B6
B5 B4 B3
B2
B1 B0
Reserved
FB_DU: Modbus cyclic exchanges start-up
FB_HS_SEND: Toggle bit - New command from DeviceNet master
FB_HS_CONFIRM: Toggle bit – Diagnostic acknowledgement
See the detailed description of each bit in chapter 5.4.
40
5. Gateway Initialization and Diagnostics
5.1.2. Gateway Status Word
B15 B14 B13 B12 B11 B10 B9 B8
B7 B6
EC = Error Code
B5 B4 B3
B2
B1 B0
ED = Error Detail
ABC_PER: Modbus cyclic exchanges will all slaves indication
ABC_DU: Modbus cyclic exchanges activated
ABC_HS_CONFIRM: Toggle bit – Command acknowledgement
FB_HS_SEND: Toggle bit – New gateway diagnostic
See the detailed description of each bit in chapter 5.5.
5.2. Diagnostic Only
The DeviceNet master manages only the Modbus network diagnostic using the same 2 words as those of Full
Management.
Bits concerning Modbus cyclic exchanges management are inactive.
5.2.1. DeviceNet Master Command Word
B15 B14 B13 B12 B11 B10 B9 B8
B7 B6
B5 B4 B3
B2
B1 B0
Reserved
FB_HS_CONFIRM: Toggle bit – Diagnostic acknowledgement
See the detailed description of each bit in chapter 5.4.
41
5. Gateway Initialization and Diagnostics
5.2.2. Gateway Status Word
B15 B14 B13 B12 B11 B10 B9 B8
B7 B6
EC = Error Code
B5 B4 B3
B2
B1 B0
ED = Error Detail
ABC_PER: Modbus cyclic exchanges will all slaves indocation
ABC_DU: Modbus cyclic exchanges activated
Reserved
FB_HS_SEND: Toggle bit – New gateway diagnostic
See the detailed description of each bit in chapter 5.5.
In the "Full management" and "Diagnostic only" modes, it is important that you configure your DeviceNet master
so that it has access to the first two bytes of the gateway’s output data area, as well as to the first two bytes of
the gateway’s input data area.
WARNING
MISCONFIGURATION OF LUFP• GATEWAY’S DATA AREAS
Configure your DeviceNet master so that it has access to the first two bytes of the gateway’s output data
area, as well as to the first two bytes of the gateway’s input data area. Failure to configure access to these
bytes can result in an inability to stop Modbus communications, and prevent logging of error conditions for
later evaluation. Either consequence may cause unintended equipment operation.
Failure to follow this instruction may result in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
See chapter 4.2 Configuring the Gateway in RSNetWorx, for more information.
5.3. Simplified Operation
The two 16-bit registers located at addresses 0x0000-0x0001 (inputs) and 0x0200-0x0201 (outputs) are no
longer used. Thus, these two addresses can be used to exchange data with the Modbus slave.
No diagnostic is sent back to the PLC. The DeviceNet master’s command word and the gateway’s status word
do not exist during simplified operations.
42
5. Gateway Initialization and Diagnostics
5.4. Description of the DeviceNet Master Command Word
The output word located at addresses 0x0200 (MSB) and 0x0201 (LSB) in the gateway’s output memory
constitutes the DeviceNet master command word. Its structure is described below:
Bits
15
Description
FB_HS_CONFIRM: Acknowledgement bit of a gateway diagnostic
The DeviceNet master must compare the value of the FB_HS_CONFIRM bit to the value of the
ABC_HS_SEND bit (bit 15 in the gateway’s status word). If these two values are different, this means
that the gateway has transmitted a new diagnostic to the DeviceNet master.
To tell the gateway that it has read a diagnostic, the DeviceNet master must copy the value of the
ABC_HS_SEND bit to the FB_HS_CONFIRM bit. This allows the gateway to issue a new diagnostic.
14
Summary:
• If ( FB_HS_CONFIRM = ABC_HS_SEND ) Æ The gateway’s status word contains a diagnostic
which has already been acknowledged by the DeviceNet master. So the gateway is free to use
this status word to place another diagnostic there.
• Else Æ A new diagnostic is available in the gateway’s status word. The DeviceNet master can
read this diagnostic, but must also copy the value of ABC_HS_SEND to FB_HS_CONFIRM in
order to allow the gateway to generate new diagnostics.
FB_HS_SEND: Toggle bit - New command from the DeviceNet master
(Reserved if "Diagnostic Only")
13
Before changing the value of FB_DU, the DeviceNet master must compare the values of
FB_HS_SEND and ABC_HS_CONFIRM (bit 14 of the gateway’s status word). If these two values are
different, this means that the gateway has not yet acknowledged the previous DeviceNet master
command. Else, the DeviceNet master can issue a new command, updating the FB_DU bit according
to the nature of its command (shutdown or activation of Modbus exchanges), then toggling the value
of the FB_HS_SEND bit to inform the gateway that it has sent it a new command.
Summary:
• If ( FB_HS_SEND ≠ ABC_HS_CONFIRM ) Æ The DeviceNet master command word still
contains a command which has not yet been acknowledged by the gateway. So the DeviceNet
master cannot use this word to place a new command in it.
• Else Æ The previous command of the DeviceNet master has been acknowledged by the
gateway, which allows it to transmit a new command. In this case, it changes the value of the
FB_DU bit, then toggles the value of the FB_HS_SEND bit.
FB_DU: Modbus exchange startup
(Reserved if "Diagnostic Only")
The setting of this bit to one by the DeviceNet master allows communications between the gateway
and the Modbus slaves. Resetting it to zero is used to inhibit them.
0-12
When the DeviceNet master sets this bit to one, it is preferable for all of the output data it has placed
in the gateway’s output memory to be up-to-date (“FB_DU” means “FieldBus – Data Updated”). If
they are not, this data will be transmitted to the Modbus slaves “as is”.
Reserved.
43
5. Gateway Initialization and Diagnostics
Due to the inversion of the LSB and the MSB for this register between the gateway and the DeviceNet master,
the structure of the corresponding output word (“O:1.1” in the case of the default configuration) is as follows:
Bits
8-15
7
6
5
0-4
Description
Reserved.
FB_HS_CONFIRM: Acknowledgement bit of a gateway diagnostic
FB_HS_SEND: New DeviceNet master command word (Reserved if "Diagnostic Only" mode)
FB_DU: Modbus exchange startup (Reserved if "Diagnostic Only" mode)
Reserved.
e.g. If the O:1.1 output word is set to 0x00A0, the DeviceNet master command word will be set to 0xA000.
The correct use of this command word by the DeviceNet master, to transmit a new command to the gateway,
goes through the following steps:
• Checking of (FB_HS_SEND = ABC_HS_CONFIRM).
• The command, that is to say the value of the FB_DU bit, is updated.
• The value of the FB_HS_SEND bit is inverted.
NOTE: It is possible to simplify this use as follows:
• The FB_DU and FB_HS_SEND bits are set to one to activate the Modbus communications.
• The FB_DU and FB_HS_SEND bits are reset to halt Modbus communications.
Though both 8-bit and 16-bit writes to the DeviceNet Master Command Word are permissible in theory, writing
directly to the DeviceNet master command word in 16-bit format can cause errors. Such 16-bit writes can disrupt
the operation of the transfer of the gateway diagnostics (undesired change to FB_HS_CONFIRM).
WARNING
RISK OF UNINTENDED EQUIPMENT OPERATION
Do not write 16-bit data directly to the DeviceNet master command word. Writing to this word using a 16-bit
format can disrupt the transfer of Gateway diagnostics information to the master. Depending on the user’s
configuration, unintended equipment operation may result.
Failure to follow this instruction may result in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
44
5. Gateway Initialization and Diagnostics
5.5. Description of the Gateway Status Word
The input word located at addresses 0x0000 (MSB) and 0x0001 (LSB) in the gateway’s input memory
constitutes the gateway’s status word. Its structure is described below:
Bits
15
14
13
Description
ABC_HS_SEND: New gateway diagnostic
(See description of bit 15 of the DeviceNet master command word, FB_HS_CONFIRM.)
ABC_HS_CONFIRM: Acknowledgement bit of a DeviceNet master command
(Reserved if "Diagnostic Only")
(See description of bit 14 of the DeviceNet master command word, FB_HS_SEND.)
ABC_DU: Modbus exchanges activated
The gateway activates this bit to tell the DeviceNet master that all Modbus data located in its input
memory area has been updated at least once since the last activation of FB_DU (“ABC_DU” means
“ABC – Data Updated”). This Modbus input data includes every data in responses from all Modbus
slaves, for both periodic commands and aperiodic commands.
This bit is deactivated by the gateway when the FB_DU bit is deactivated, that is to say when the
DeviceNet master demands a shutdown of Modbus exchanges.
12
NOTE: Once it is active, this bit is not deactivated if there are any communication errors with the
Modbus slaves. To signal this type of error, the gateway uses bit 12 of its status word.
Periodicity of Modbus exchanges
The gateway activates this bit provided that it is periodically communicating with all of the Modbus
slaves. It deactivates it as soon as it loses communication with one of them.
The “Reconnect time (10ms)”, “Retries” and “Timeout time (10ms)” elements of each of the Modbus
queries (see chapter 6.11.2.2) are used to determine whether communication is lost, then restored.
8-11
0-07
NOTE: If a number of periodic exchanges are configured for the same Modbus slave, only one of
them needs to remain active for the periodic communications with this slave to be declared active.
EC: Error code associated with the Modbus network
Code for the error detected on the Modbus network by the gateway and transmitted to the DeviceNet
master (see EC-ED table).
ED: Error data item associated with the Modbus network
Data item associated with the EC error code (see EC-ED table).
Due to the inversion of the LSB and the MSB for this register between the gateway and the DeviceNet master,
the structure of the corresponding input word (“I:1.1” in the case of the default configuration) is as follows:
Bits
8-15
7
6
5
4
0-3
Description
ED: Error data item associated with the Modbus network
ABC_HS_SEND: New gateway diagnostic
ABC_HS_CONFIRM: Acknowledgement bit of a DeviceNet master command
(Reserved if "Diagnostic Only" mode)
ABC_DU: Modbus exchanges activated
Periodicity of Modbus exchanges
EC: Error code associated with the Modbus network
E.g. If the gateway’s status word is set to 0xF031, the input word I:1.1 will be set to 0x31F0.
45
5. Gateway Initialization and Diagnostics
The correct use of this status word by the DeviceNet master, to read a diagnostic generated by the gateway,
goes through the following steps:
• Checking of (ABC_HS_SEND ≠ FB_HS_CONFIRM).
• Reading of the value of ABC_DU to determine whether all of the Modbus input data are up-to-date.
• Reading of the value of the “Periodicity of Modbus exchanges” bit to determine whether the periodicity of
the Modbus communications has been maintained.
• Reading of the values of EC and ED to check for any error detected by the gateway on the Modbus
network (see table below).
• Copying of the value of the ABC_HS_SEND bit to the FB_HS_CONFIRM bit.
This last step is very important if the system is designed to read the gateway diagnostics and perform some
action depending on the result. Copying of the value of the ABC_HS_SEND bit to the FB_HS_CONFIRM bit
allows the gateway to transmit a future diagnostic, preventing the loss of subsequent error information.
WARNING
RISK OF UNINTENDED EQUIPMENT OPERATION
The user must ensure the DeviceNet master programming concludes read operations by copying the value of
the ABC_HS_SEND bit to the FB_HS_CONFIRM bit. If this step is omitted in applications where gateway
diagnostics will be read and acted upon, future diagnostics information will be blocked. Depending on the
user’s configuration, unintended equipment operation may result.
Failure to follow this instruction may result in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
The values of the EC and ED fields are described in the table below:
EC
2#0000
2#0001
2#0010
2#0011
2#0100
Description of the error
Re-transmissions on the
Modbus network
A Modbus slave is missing
Several Modbus slaves
are missing
Excessive data in a
Modbus response
Unknown Modbus error
ED
Number of
re-transmissions
Address of the missing
Modbus slave
—
Notes
Total number of re-transmissions carried out
on the sub-network, for all slaves.
—
—
Address of the Modbus This error occurs when the gateway receives too
slave involved
much data in the response sent by one of its
Modbus slaves.
Address of the Modbus —
slave involved
The re-transmission counter used to signal this error is not reset when the gateway generates this error code. If
there are recurrent communication problems on the Modbus network, the gateway will generate this same
diagnostic repeatedly, so as to tell the DeviceNet master the total number of re-transmissions carried out as
often as possible. This counter is reset when its value exceeds its maximum value (counter modulo 256: 0xFF Æ
0x00).
In the case of de-connection of one or several devices on the Modbus sub-network, the LUFP9 gateway will first
report re-transmission errors several times and then the error “A Modbus slave is missing” or “Several Modbus
slaves are missing”. Later on when the LUFP9 makes a reconnection attempt, only the re-transmission error will
be reported. Due to this, the indication of the errors “A Modbus slave is missing” or “Several Modbus slaves are
missing” may be perceived as very brief.
46
6. Configuring the Gateway
Each part of this chapter describes a separate step allowing the user to personalize the gateway configuration,
according to his own particular needs. Each part gives an introduction to a basic operation isolating it from the
rest of the configuration and describing the operations to be carried out using ABC-LUFP Config Tool (mainly)
and RSNetWorx (where necessary), and their implications for the gateway’s general behaviour.
In each case, the first two steps are required, as they allow you to establish the dialogue between the gateway
and the PC software allowing you to configure it, that is to say ABC-LUFP Config Tool.
We strongly recommend that you read chapter 4 Software Implementation of the Gateway, because all of the
operations carried out in ABC-LUFP Config Tool or RSNetWorx are based on the principle that we are using the
default configuration of the LUFP9 gateway.
6.1. Connecting the Gateway to the Configuration PC
This step is required when setting up the gateway configuration application, ABC-LUFP Config Tool.
Connecting the gateway to one of the serial (COM) ports on a PC requires a straight PowerSuite cable and a
RS232/RS485 converter. These two items are the same as those allowing dialogue with drives and soft startsoft stop units using the PowerSuite application and are both available from the catalogue (ref.: VW3 A8 106).
Ensure that you use the “POWERSUITE” cable and the “RS232 / RS485 PC” converter. An “ATV28 before 09 /
2001” cable and an “ATV 58” converter are also supplied with these items, but they should not be used with the
LUFP9 gateway.
LUFP9 gateway (Seen from underneath)
Configuration
PC
RS485
RJ45
VW3 A8 106
Male
SubD 9
RS232
(COM)
RJ45
Straight POWERSUITE cable
Female
SubD 9
RS232 / RS485
converter
Once the gateway has been connected to a PC with the PowerSuite cable and the RS232/RS485 converter, you
can change its configuration using “ABC-LUFP Config Tool”. This configurator also allows you to carry out a few
diagnostics on the gateway.
47
6. Configuring the Gateway
6.1.1. Pin Outs
— LUFP9 (Configuration) —
Female RJ45
Male RJ45
RS-485 D(B)
RS-485 D(A)
+10 V
GND
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
8
D(B)
D(A)
+10 V
0V
Straight POWERSUITE cable
——— RS485 / RS232 converter ———
Male RJ45
Female RJ45
1
1
2
2
3
3
D(B)
4
4
D(B)
D(A)
5
5
D(A)
6
6
+10 V
7
7
0V
8
8
–—— PC (COM) ——–
Female 9 point SUB-D
Male 9 point SUB-D
1
1
Tx
2
2
RS-232 Rx
Rx
3
3
RS-232 Tx
4
4
5
5
6
6
+10 V
7
7
0V
8
8
9
9
GND
GND
NOTE: The inversion of the Rx and Tx signals between the gateway and the PC is shown on the 9-point SUB-D
connectors, because beyond this junction, the RS-232 signals are replaced by the D(A) and D(B) polarisations of
the RS-485 signals.
6.1.2. RS-232 link protocol
There is no need to configure the PC’s COM port, as ABC-LUFP Config Tool uses a specific setup which
replaces the one for the port being used. This replacement is temporary and is cancelled as ABC-LUFP Config
Tool is closed.
48
6. Configuring the Gateway
6.2. Installing ABC-LUFP Config Tool
The minimum system requirements for ABC-LUFP Config Tool are as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
Processor .......................................Pentium 133 MHz
Free hard disk space......................10 Mb
RAM................................................08 Mb
Operating system ...........................MS Windows 95 / 98 / ME / NT / 2000 / XP
Browser ..........................................MS Internet Explorer 4.01 SP1
The ABC-LUFP Config Tool installation program can be found on the PowerSuite CD (ref. VW3 A8 104). To
install it, run “ABC-LUFP_Setup.exe”, then follow the on-screen instructions
You can read about how to use ABC-LUFP Config Tool in a user manual entitled AnyBus Communicator –
User Manual which is also on the PowerSuite CD: “ABC_User_Manual.pdf”. We strongly recommend that
you read this manual when using ABC-LUFP Config Tool, because this guide will only describe the various
features it provides in relation to using the LUFP9 gateway.
6.3. Importing the Gateway Configuration
Before you can make any changes to the gateway configuration, you will first need to import its current
configuration. If you already have this configuration on your hard disk, all you will need to do is open the file
corresponding to this configuration.
Check that the gateway has a valid configuration and that it is working properly, that is to say that LED s
DEVICE STATUS is flashing green.
In ABC-LUFP Config Tool, choose “Upload configuration from
button, in
ABC-LUFP” from the “File” menu or click on the
the toolbar. A window called “Upload” will then open and a
progress bar shows you the state of progress of the gateway
configuration uploading process. This window disappears as
soon as the whole configuration has been uploaded
successfully.
This step is particularly important if you wish to read details about the content of the gateway’s default
configuration, after unpacking it. You can then use this configuration as a template for any changes you wish to
make subsequently, thus avoiding having to create all of the items and reducing the potential risk of error.
NOTE:
ƒ Save this configuration to your hard disk so that it is always available. This will allow you to reconfigure
the gateway “cleanly”, should the configuration become invalid.
ƒ The LUFP9 gateway’s default configuration can be found on the CD LU9CD1 : “LUFP9.cfg”.
49
6. Configuring the Gateway
6.4. Transferring a Configuration to the Gateway
When using ABC-LUFP Config Tool, you can transfer the configuration you are editing to the gateway at any
time.
Choose “Download configuration to ABC-LUFP” from the “File”
menu or click on the
button, in the toolbar.
ABC-LUFP Config Tool initializes a check test of the gateway
type.
NOTE: During this test, the PC should not carry out any other
operations, as this could lead to ABC-LUFP Config Tool
apparently freezing up and slow down the PC’s general operation
for several minutes. After the test is complete, the PC will return
to full speed, and may be used normally.
Once this test has finished, a window called “Download” opens
and a progress bar shows the state of progress for the transfer of
the configuration to the gateway.
NOTE: Do not interrupt this operation, otherwise you will have to
start it again from the beginning.
Check that the transfer has been correctly carried out: LED s DEVICE STATUS should be flashing green.
If this LED is flashing red/green, save the configuration you were editing, open the file containing the default
configuration for LUFP9 gateways, then transfer it to the gateway. This will restore it to a known initial state. You
can then continue with the configuration you were transferring, and make any corrections which may be
necessary.
6.5. Monitoring the Content of the Gateway’s Memory
One of the main commands that you will need to use when setting up the gateway is the command allowing you
to read the contents of the gateway’s memory and to display it in a window used for this purpose. This will be
particularly useful when you are working on your PLC configurations and applications. However, it only shows
data from the “Data” and “Preset Data” fields configured in the “Query” and “Response” elements of just one of
the Modbus slaves, plus the content of the gateway’s two reserved registers, located at memory addresses
0x0000-0x0001 (gateway status word) and 0x0200-0x0201 (DeviceNet master command word).
To monitor the content of the gateway’s memory, start by selecting the node corresponding to the Modbus slave
whose data you wish to view, then choose “Monitor” from the menu whose name corresponds to the name of the
previously selected node. A monitoring window then appears. The sample window shown at the top of the next
page corresponds to a view of the contents of the memory exchanged, using the gateway’s default configuration,
with the “TeSys U n°1” motor starter.
50
6. Configuring the Gateway
The upper part of this window allows you to choose a Modbus command, to edit its contents, then to send it to
the Modbus network (“Command” menu). The response will then be displayed in this same part. Please see
chapter 2.10 Node monitor in the ABC-LUFP Config Tool user manual, entitled AnyBus Communicator – User
Manual, for further information about how to use this window. This manual can be found on the CD LU9CD1:
“ABC_User_Manual.pdf”.
The lower part of this window allows you to view the content of the gateway’s memory, but only the bytes used in
queries and responses frames for commands and transactions configured for the selected node. The values of
the gateway’s two reserved words (addresses 0x0000-0x0001 and 0x0200-0x0201) are also shown, whichever
node is selected.
In the window shown above, the data displayed correspond to the values at the memory locations designated by the
“Data” fields in the commands and transactions configured for the “TeSys U no. 1” node, that is to say the following
commands: “Read Holding Registers”, “Preset Multiple Registers”, “Transactions 1”, and “Transactions 2”.
NOTE: The data exchanged with the Modbus slave previously selected are displayed LSB-first, that is in the
LSB / MSB order (as read from left to right, with growing memory addresses), provided that the “Byte Swap”
option from the “Data” or “Preset Data” element of the corresponding Modbus command was set to “Swap
2 bytes” (see chapter 6.11.2.5 Configuring the Content of the Response Frame). For the two reserved words
dedicated to the management of the downstream Modbus network, it is the contrary: MSB-first.
However, but only as far as the “TeSys U n°1” node is concerned, the data beginning at addresses 0x0013,
0x0018, 0x0212, and 0x0218 (see Appendix B:, Content of the Gateways’s DPRAM Memory) follow the same
byte order as the content of the frames they are related to (see Appendix E: Modbus Commands), from first to
last byte (checksum excluded), and following growing adresses in the memory of the gateway. Finally, bytes
0x001E, 0x001F, 0x021E, and 0x021F correspond to the reception and emission counters for these frames
(“Trigger bytes” from Transactions 1 and 2). But all these bytes are swapped two by two between the gateway
and the DeviceNet master.
A brief description of the toolbar buttons of this window is given below:
Stop / Start communications with the selected node.
Select / Send the Modbus command shown in the upper part of the window
Stop / Resume refreshing the data displayed in the lower part of the window
51
6. Configuring the Gateway
6.6. Deleting a Modbus Slave
This step allows you, for instance, to free up a location on the downstream Modbus network, known as the “SubNetwork” in ABC-LUFP Config Tool, in order to replace one Modbus slave with another.
In fact the gateway’s default configuration allows it to communicate with eight TeSys U motor starters, which is
the maximum number of Modbus slaves.
If the gateway is used to manage exchanges on a Modbus network with fewer than eight TeSys U motor
starters, it is preferable to delete the redundant TeSys U motor starters from the gateway. You should carry out
this operation using ABC-LUFP Config Tool.
If you are using the aperiodic read/write services, keep in mind that these services are configured using the
memory space of the first configured TeSys U Motor starter. Therefore, deleting the first configured TeSys U
Motor starter can also result in the deletion of the aperiodic read/write services
WARNING
LOSS OF APERIODIC COMMUNICATIONS
Do not delete the first configured TeSys U motor starter if you are using the aperiodic read/write services.
Deleting this first device will also delete the aperiodic services. Because these services allow communication
with all of the configured Modbus devices, and not just the first device, you may lose communications with all
devices, leading to unintended equipment operation.
Failure to follow this instruction can result in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
Procedure for deleting a Modbus slave
1) Select the node corresponding to the Modbus slave you wish to delete from the configuration. If this is the
only node remaining in the configuration, you will not be able to delete it, as the downstream Modbus network
must include at least one slave.
2) Right click on the icon or the name of this Modbus slave. A menu pops up underneath the mouse cursor.
or
In the ABC-LUFP Config Tool main menu, pull down the menu whose name corresponds to the name of the
previously selected node.
3) On this menu, click on “Delete”. The confirmation window shown below then appears, asking you to either
confirm that you want to delete the selected node (“TeSys U no. 2” in the example shown here) or cancel the
operation.
4) If you confirm that you want to delete the node,
the menu disappears, along with the previously
selected node. Otherwise, the node will still be
there once the window disappears.
Keyboard shortcut: “Del” key.
Adjusting the gateway’s memory (optional step):
The data previously exchanged between the gateway and the Modbus slave which has just been deleted will
free up locations in the gateway’s memory. If you want to optimize the exchanges between the gateway’s
memory and the master PLC DeviceNet scanner inputs/outputs, you will need to change the configuration of all
the other Modbus slaves in order to adjust the content of the gateway’s memory.
52
6. Configuring the Gateway
However, these operations are not necessary when deleting a single slave. Conversely, they become almost
essential when most of the Modbus slaves are deleted, because these deletions divide up the gateway’s
memory.
Please see chapter 6.11 Adding and Setting Up a Modbus Command, which describes all of the changes you
can make to the configuration of each of the Modbus commands.
6.7. Adding a Modbus Slave
This operation allows you to add a Modbus slave whose type is different from those of the other Modbus slaves in the
configuration. On the other hand, if the slave type is the same as one of the previously configured slaves, it is
preferable to copy this slave rather than to create a new one.
An additional import/export feature also allows you to individually save the complete configuration of a Modbus
slave, in order to have access to it in ABC-LUFP Config Tool, from any configuration and at any time.
These two features are only available provided that there are less than 8 Modbus slaves declared, which is not
the case in the default configuration, as it comprises 8 TeSys U motor starters.
Adding a new type of Modbus slave:
Use one of the two methods shown below:
a) Select “Sub-Network”, then choose “Add Node” from the “Sub-Network” menu. A new node is added after all
the other configured nodes. By default, its name is “New Node”.
b) Select one of the nodes located under the “Sub-network” element, then choose “Insert New Node” from the
menu whose name corresponds to the name of the selected node. A new node is added just before the
selected node. By default, its name is “New Node”.
All of the steps in configuring the new node are described in chapter 6.10 Changing a Modbus
slave Configuration.
Copying a previously configured Modbus slave:
Select the node corresponding to the slave whose configuration you want to copy, then choose “Copy” from the
menu whose name corresponds to the name of the selected node. Keyboard shortcut: “Ctrl C”.
Then use one of the two methods shown below:
a) Select “Sub-Network”, then choose “Paste” from the “Sub-Network” menu. A new node is added after all the
other configured nodes. Its name and its whole configuration are identical to that of the node you copied.
Keyboard shortcut: “Ctrl V”.
b) Select one of the “Sub-Network” nodes, then choose “Insert” from the menu whose name corresponds to the
selected node. A new node is added just before the one which is selected. Its name and the whole of its
configuration are identical to that of the node you copied.
53
6. Configuring the Gateway
As the new node and the original node are identical in every way, you will need to change (1) the name of the
node, (2) the address of the corresponding Modbus slave and (3) the location of the data exchanged between
the gateway’s memory and this Modbus slave. See chapter 6.10 Changing a Modbus slave Configuration, and
chapter 6.11 Adding and Setting Up a Modbus Command.
WARNING
DUPLICATE MODBUS ADDRESSES OR GATEWAY MEMORY RANGES
If the user chooses to add a Modbus slave by copying the configuration of an existing Modbus slave, the user
must change the added device’s Modbus address and the memory locations it uses to exchange data with
the gateway. Duplicated Modbus addresses or gateway memory locations may result in communications
errors, incorrect information being written to a slave’s registers, or in writing the registers of an unintended
device. Any of these errors may result in unintended equipment operation.
Failure to follow this instruction may result in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
Importing/exporting a Modbus slave configuration:
ABC-LUFP Config Tool offers the possibility of independently saving and loading the configuration of a node on
the downstream “Sub-Network”. For instance, this will allow you to build a library of Modbus slave templates, so
that you can use them in any configuration.
To save the configuration of a Modbus slave, select the node it corresponds to, then choose “Save Node” from
the menu whose name corresponds to the name of the selected node. A dialog box will then appear asking you
to save the configuration (export in XML format).
To insert a node using the XML file containing a Modbus slave configuration as a template, use one of the two
methods shown below:
a) Select “Sub-Network”, then choose “Load Node” from the “Sub-Network” menu. A dialog box asks you to
choose a file containing a Modbus slave configuration (import in XML format). A new node is added after all
the other configured nodes. Its name and its whole configuration are identical to those of the Modbus slave,
as it was configured when it was saved.
b) Select one of the “Sub-Network” nodes, then choose “Insert from File” from the menu whose name
corresponds to the name of the selected node. A new node is added just before the selected node. Its name
and its whole configuration are identical to those of the Modbus slave, as it was configured when it was
saved.
You will then change (1) the name of the node, (2) the address of the corresponding Modbus slave and (3) the
location of the data exchanged between the gateway’s memory and this Modbus slave. See chapter 6.10
Changing a Modbus slave Configuration, and chapter 6.11 Adding and Setting Up a Modbus Command.
WARNING
DUPLICATE MODBUS ADDRESSES OR GATEWAY MEMORY RANGES
If the user chooses to add a Modbus slave by copying the configuration of an existing Modbus slave, the user
must change the added device’s Modbus address and the memory locations it uses to exchange data with
the gateway. Duplicated Modbus addresses or gateway memory locations may result in communications
errors, incorrect information being written to a slave’s registers, or in writing the registers of an unintended
device. Any of these errors may result in unintended equipment operation.
Failure to follow this instruction may result in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
54
6. Configuring the Gateway
6.8. Changing Periodic Data Exchanged With a Modbus Slave
This operation consists of replacing, adding or deleting periodic data exchanged with one of the Modbus slaves.
With each of these operations, we shall take the default configuration of the LUFP9 gateway as an example, that
is to say that any changes previously made will have been cancelled at the start of each operation. In addition,
the operations to be carried out are shown as part of a targeted example.
Do not forget to save the changes you have made, or to transfer the whole configuration to the gateway. This will
allow you to check that the configuration is valid, as the gateway automatically verifies the configuration when it
is downloaded.
6.8.1. Replacing a Periodic Input Data Element
We will use the node corresponding to. “TeSys U n°3” motor starter for our example. We are trying to replace the
monitoring of the “TeSys U Status Register” (address 455 = 0x01C7) with the monitoring of the “1st Fault
Register” (address 452 = 0x01C4).
The operation is a very simple one and consists purely of changing the value of the “Starting Address (Hi, Lo)”
element of the “Query” from the “Read Holding Registers” command (Modbus command for reading the values
of a number of registers).
Select this element, then change its value as shown below. You can enter the address of the parameter in
decimal format. ABC-LUFP Config Tool will automatically convert it to hexadecimal.
This operation in no way changes the configuration of the gateway’s memory, because we do not need to
change the values of the “Data length” and “Data location” fields of the “Data” element of the “Response” to the
aforementioned command. So no additional operations will be necessary, either in ABC-LUFP Config Tool, or in
RSNetWorx.
On the other hand, the DeviceNet master PLC software will have to take account of the change in the nature of the
corresponding input. In the Appendix B:, Input Data Memory Area, the description of the word located at address
0x0006 becomes “value of the motor starter e 1st default register.” This word corresponds to the PLC input word I:1.4
(see chapter 4.2.6 Configuring Inputs from the Gateway).
55
6. Configuring the Gateway
6.8.2. Replacing a Periodic Output Data Element
We will use the node corresponding to “TeSys U n°6” motor starter for our example. We are trying to replace the
control of the “Command Register” (address 704 = 0x02C0) with the control of the “2nd Command Register”
(address 705 = 0x02C1).
The operation consists of changing the value of the “Starting Address” in the “Query” and in the “Response” for
the “Preset Multiple Registers” command (Modbus command for writing values from a number of registers).
Select “Starting Address” from the “Query”, then change its value as shown below. You can enter the address of
the parameter in decimal format. ABC-LUFP Config Tool will automatically convert it to hexadecimal. Do the
same for the “Starting Address” element of the “Response” because the gateway checks the value of this
field when it receives each Modbus response. If the value does not correspond to that of the query, the gateway
will ignore the response.
This operation in no way changes the content of the gateway’s memory, because we do not need to change the
values of the “Data length” and “Data location” fields of the “Data” element of the “Query”. So no additional
operations will be necessary, either in ABC-LUFP Config Tool, or in RSNetWorx.
On the other hand, the DeviceNet master PLC software will have to take account of the change in the nature of
the corresponding output. In Appendix B: Output Data Memory Area, the description of the word located at
address 0x020C becomes “value of the motor starter h 2nd command register.” This word corresponds to PLC
output word O:1.7 (see chapter 4.2.7 Configuring Outputs Intended for the Gateway).
56
6. Configuring the Gateway
6.8.3. Increasing the Amount of Periodic Input Data
We will use the node corresponding to “TeSys U no. 2” motor starter for our example. We are trying to complete
the monitoring of this motor starter starting from the currently monitored register, that is to say “TeSys U Status
Register” (address 455 = 0x01C7), and going as far as the “Reserved: 2nd Warning Register” (address 462 =
0x01CE). The number of registers monitored is therefore increased from 1 to 8.
In this case, there are quite a lot of operations to be carried out. They are described in order below:
1) Changing the number of registers monitored: This step consists of changing the value of “Number of points
(Hi, Lo)” element of the “Query” from the “Read Holding Registers” command (Modbus command for reading
the values of a number of registers). Select this element, then change its value as shown below. ABC-LUFP
Config Tool will automatically convert any value entered in decimal to hexadecimal.
2) Changing the number of data bytes in the Modbus response: The number of bytes read from the “TeSys U
n°2” motor starter memory increases from 2 to 16, as the number of registers monitored has increased from 1
to 8. Select the “Byte count” element from the “Response” and change its value as shown below. ABC-LUFP
Config Tool will automatically convert any value entered in decimal to hexadecimal.
57
6. Configuring the Gateway
3) Changing the location of the Modbus data received in the gateway’s memory: As the number of bytes read
(see previous step) has increased from 2 to 16, the Modbus data received must be placed at a different
location in the gateway’s memory, and the size of the memory occupied must also be adjusted appropriately.
If you are not certain how much of the gateway’s memory is currently occupied, select “Sub-Network” and
choose “Monitor” from the “Sub-Network” menu. The following window appears, allowing you to see how
much of the gateway’s memory is occupied.
To see which memory locations are occupied by data from the command you are interested in, all you have
to do is uncheck the box corresponding to the “Read Holding Registers” command from the “TeSys U n°2”
node, as shown above. We can see that the Modbus data received in response to this command occupy
2 bytes located from address 0x0004.
NOTE: The memory locations 0x0000 and 0x0001 are reserved (see chapter 5 Gateway Initialization and
Diagnostics). So you will not be able to place any Modbus data in these locations.
The sizes displayed above the graphics areas of this window (“In Area 32 bytes” and “Out Area 32 bytes”)
correspond to the total input and ouput sizes you must check under RSNetWorx (see point 6 on next page)
and configure for the DeviceNet scanner (see point 7).
If you wish to place the 16 bytes of Modbus data which will be received by the gateway for this command into
memory, once the changes have been made, we will have to move all the other input data by 14 bytes, which
may be tedious, or change the memory location of the block of data received. In the example described here,
we will be using the second solution, although the first solution is actually preferable, in principle, as it avoids
leaving any “holes” in the gateway’s memory, thus optimising the transfer of all of the data to the DeviceNet
master PLC. Furthermore, the 1747-SDN scanner can only exchange 32 input words with the master PLC.
Leaving “holes” of this sort in the gateway’s memory is therefore not recommended in cases of large
configurations.
So we will be placing the 16 bytes of data from address 0x0020 (32 in decimal), that is to say directly after the
input data for the gateway’s default configuration.
58
6. Configuring the Gateway
Close the “Sub-network Monitor” window, then once you are back in the main ABC-LUFP Config Tool
window, select the “Data length” and “Data location” fields of the “Data” element from the “Response” one
after another and change their values as shown at the top of the next page. ABC-LUFP Config Tool will
automatically convert any value entered in decimal to hexadecimal.
To check that these changes have been entered into the configuration, choose “Monitor” from the “SubNetwork” menu again:
4) Transferring this configuration to the gateway Please see chapter 6.4 Transferring a Configuration to the
Gateway. Check that the configuration is valid (LED s DEVICE STATUS flashing green).
5) Saving this configuration to your PC’s hard disk.
6) Checking the gateway setup: In RSNetWorx, check the values of the gateway parameters (see chapter 4.2.4
Editing Gateway Parameters). Only the value of parameter no. 7, “Input1 length”, should have changed, from
“32 bytes” to “48 bytes”.
NOTE: You shall make sure the values of the displayed parameters are the same as the exchange sizes
displayed in the “Sub-network Monitor.” In the current example, “In Area 48 bytes” implies that the “Input1”
area begins at offset 0 (physical address 0x0000) and that its length is equal to 48 bytes. Also, “Out Area
32 bytes” implies that the “Output1” area begins at offset 0 (physical address 0x0200) and that its length is
equal to 32 bytes.
59
6. Configuring the Gateway
7) Changing the amount of data received by the DeviceNet scanner: Still in RSNetWorx, change the value for
the amount of periodic data received by the DeviceNet scanner (see chapter 4.2.5 Configuring the DeviceNet
Scanner). Change the value of the “Rx Size:” field from 32 to 48, in the “Polled:” section.
8) Configuring the DeviceNet master PLC inputs: In RSNetWorx, establish a new correspondence between the
data from the gateway and the PLC inputs, according to the requirements of your application (see
chapter 4.2.6 Configuring Inputs from the Gateway). The various possibilities offered by RSNetWorx for
establishing a correspondence between the data from a DeviceNet subscriber and the PLC inputs will not be
covered here. Please see the documentation for this software application to find out more about this step in
setting up a DeviceNet master PLC.
In this guide, we will be using the “AutoMap” command to establish a “raw” correspondence with all of the
data from the LUFP9 gateway. We then get the correspondence shown below, derived from the one used
with the gateway’s default configuration. The changes in relation to the default configuration are shown by a
greyed-out background, like the “free memory locations”.
Service
PLC input
Managing the downstream Modbus
network
I:1.1
Periodic communications
—
Monitoring of
TeSys U motor starters
Aperiodic communications
—
Reading the value of a motor
starter parameter (RESPONSE)
Aperiodic communications
—
Writing the value of a motor
starter parameter (RESPONSE)
I:1.2
I:1.3
I:1.4
I:1.5
I:1.6
I:1.7
I:1.8
I:1.9
I:1.10
I:1.11
I:1.12
I:1.13
I:1.14
I:1.15
Aperiodic communications
(“Trigger bytes” for the responses)
I:1.16
Periodic communications
—
Monitoring of
TeSys U motor starter d
I:1.17
I:1.18
I:1.19
I:1.20
I:1.21
I:1.22
I:1.23
I:1.24
Description
Bit 8 ................... Bit 15
Bit 0 ......................Bit 7
LUFP9 gateway status word
(MSB Æ 0xxx••)
(LSB Æ 0x••xx)
Value of the motor starter c status register
Free memory location
Value of the motor starter e status register
Value of the motor starter f status register
Value of the motor starter g status register
Value of the motor starter h status register
Value of the motor starter i status register
Value of the motor starter j status register
Free memory location
Slave no. (0x01-0x08)
Function number (0x03)
Number of bytes read (0x02)
Value of the parameter read
(MSB Æ 0xxx••)
(LSB Æ 0x••xx)
Slave no. (0x01-0x08)
Function no. (0x06)
Address of the parameter written
(MSB Æ 0xxx••)
(LSB Æ 0x••xx)
Value of the parameter written
(MSB Æ 0xxx••)
(LSB Æ 0x••xx)
Read parameter
Write parameter
response counter
response counter
Value of the “TeSys U Status Register”
Value of the “Complementary Status Register”
Value of the “K7 Status Register”
Value of the “K7 Status Register 2 (free format)”
Value of the “K7 Status Register 3 (free format)”
Value of the “Warning Number” register
Value of the “Warning Register”
Value of “Reserved : 2nd Warning Register”
60
6. Configuring the Gateway
9) Transferring the DeviceNet scanner configuration: Following the changes made to the list of DeviceNet
scanner exchanges, it needs to be transferred to the DeviceNet scanner. Please see chapter 4.2.8
Transferring the DeviceNet Scanner Configuration.
6.8.4. Increasing the amount of periodic output data
We will use the node corresponding to “TeSys U no. 4” motor starter for our example. By default, we are
controlling Command Register 704. To add control of Command Register 705, we will carry out the following
operations.
1) Changing the number of registers controlled: This step consists of changing the value of the “No. of
Registers” in the “Query” and in the “Response” for the “Preset Multiple Registers” command (Modbus
command for writing values of a number of registers). Start by selecting “N° of Registers” from the “Query”,
then change its value as shown below. ABC-LUFP Config Tool will automatically convert any value entered in
decimal to hexadecimal. Do the same for the “N° of Registers” element of the “Response” because the
gateway checks the value of this field when it receives each Modbus response. If the value does not
correspond to that of the query, the gateway will ignore the response.
61
6. Configuring the Gateway
2) Changing the number of data bytes in the Modbus query: The number of bytes written into the memory of the
“TeSys U n°4” motor starter memory increases from 2 to 4, as the number of registers controlled has
increased from 1 to 2. Select the “Byte count” element from the “Query” and change its value as shown
below. ABC-LUFP Config Tool will automatically convert any value entered in decimal to hexadecimal.
3) Changing the location of the Modbus data transmitted into the gateway’s memory: As the number of bytes
written (see previous step) has increased from 2 to 4, the Modbus data to be transmitted to the “TeSys U n°4”
motor starter must be placed at a different location in the gateway’s memory, and the size of the memory
occupied must also be adjusted appropriately.
If you are not certain how much of the gateway’s memory is currently occupied, select “Sub-Network” and
choose “Monitor” from the “Sub-Network” menu. The window shown below appears, allowing you to see how
much of the gateway’s memory is occupied.
62
6. Configuring the Gateway
To see which memory locations are occupied by data from the command you are interested in, all you have
to do is uncheck the box corresponding to the “Preset Multiple Registers” command from the “TeSys U n°4”
node, as shown above. We can see that the Modbus data transmitted with the query corresponding to this
command occupy 2 bytes located from address 0x0208.
NOTE: Memory locations 0x0200 and 0x0201 are reserved (see chapter 5 Gateway Initialization and
Diagnostics). So you will not be able to place any Modbus data in these locations.
The sizes displayed above the graphics areas of this window (“In Area 32 bytes” and “Out Area 32 bytes”)
correspond to the total input and ouput sizes you must check under RSNetWorx (see point 6 on next page) and
configure for the DeviceNet scanner (see point 7).
If you wish to place the 4 bytes of Modbus data which will be transmitted by the gateway for this command
into memory, once the changes have been made, we will have to move all the other output data by 2 bytes,
which may be tedious, or change the memory location of the block of data transmitted. In the example
described here, we will be using the second solution, although the first solution is actually preferable, in
principle, as it avoids leaving any “holes” in the gateway’s memory, thus optimising the transfer of all of the
data from the DeviceNet master PLC. Furthermore, the 1747-SDN scanner can only exchange 32 output
words with the master PLC. Leaving “holes” of this sort in the gateway’s memory is therefore not
recommended in cases of large configurations.
When selecting a value for the “Data Location” field, data must be located at even addresses in order to align
the Modbus data (in 16-bit format) on the O:1.x outputs of the DeviceNet scanner. If data is not located at
even addresses, the values intended for the Modbus registers may be spread over two DeviceNet PLC
words. This greatly complicates programming of the application, as the application may need to parse one
PLC word for the Modbus LSB byte, and another for the Modbus MSB byte. If this complication is not handled
properly, it is possible to read and write the wrong data values to the Modbus slaves
WARNING
RISK OF UNINTENDED EQUIPMENT OPERATION
The user must use even values for the “Data Location” field. The selection of odd data values complicates
application programming and increases the likelihood of improper Modbus values being written to or read
from the slave devices. Depending on the user’s configuration, unintended equipment operation may result.
Failure to follow this instruction may result in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
Returning to our previous example, the value to be assigned to the ATS48’s CMD register should be placed
in the gateway’s output data memory area. We will be using the first free location starting at an even address,
that is to say the one located at 16#0220, with the gateway’s default configuration.
We will place the 4 bytes of data from address 0x0220 (544 in decimal).
63
6. Configuring the Gateway
Close the “Sub-network Monitor” window, then once you are back in the main ABC-LUFP Config Tool
window, select the “Data length” and “Data location” fields of the “Data” element from the “Query” one after
another and change their values as shown at the top of the next page. ABC-LUFP Config Tool will
automatically convert any value entered in decimal to hexadecimal.
To check that these changes have been entered into the configuration, choose “Monitor” from the “SubNetwork” menu again:
4) Transferring this configuration to the gateway Please see chapter 6.4 Transferring a Configuration to the
Gateway. Check that the configuration is valid (LED s DEVICE STATUS flashing green).
5) Saving this configuration to your PC’s hard disk.
6) Checking the gateway setup: In RSNetWorx, check the values of the gateway parameters (see chapter 4.2.4
Editing Gateway Parameters). Only the value of parameter no. 19, “Output1 length”, should have changed,
from “32 bytes” to “36 bytes”.
NOTE: You shall make sure the values of the displayed parameters are the same as the exchange sizes
displayed in the “Sub-network Monitor.” In the current example, “In Area 32 bytes” imply that the “Input1” area
begins at offset 0 (physical address 0x0000) and that its length is equal to 32 bytes. Also, “Out Area 36 bytes”
imply that the “Output1” area begins at offset 0 (physical address 0x0200) and that its length is equal to
36 bytes.
64
6. Configuring the Gateway
7) Changing the amount of data transmitted by the DeviceNet scanner: Still in RSNetWorx, change the value for
the amount of periodic data transmitted by the DeviceNet scanner (see chapter 4.2.5 Configuring the
DeviceNet Scanner). Change the value of the “Tx Size:” field from 32 to 36, in the “Polled:” section.
8) Configuring the DeviceNet master PLC outputs: In RSNetWorx, establish a new correspondence between the
data transmitted to the gateway and the PLC outputs, according to the requirements of your application (see
chapter 4.2.7 Configuring Outputs Intended for the Gateway). The various possibilities offered by RSNetWorx
for establishing a correspondence between the data transmitted to a DeviceNet subscriber and the PLC
outputs will not be covered here. Please see the documentation for this software application to find out more
about this step in setting up a DeviceNet master PLC.
In this guide, we will be using the “AutoMap” command to establish a “raw” correspondence with all of the
data transmitted to the LUFP9 gateway. We then get the correspondence shown below, derived from the one
used with the gateway’s default configuration. The changes in relation to the default configuration are shown
by a greyed-out background, like the “free memory locations”.
Service
PLC output
Managing the downstream Modbus
network
O:1.1
Periodic communications
—
Controlling
TeSys U motor starters
Aperiodic communications
—
Reading the value of a
motor starter parameter (QUERY)
Aperiodic communications
—
Writing the value of a
motor starter parameter (QUERY)
Aperiodic communications
(“Trigger bytes” for the queries)
Periodic communications
Monitoring of TeSys U motor starter f
O:1.2
O:1.3
O:1.4
O:1.5
O:1.6
O:1.7
O:1.8
O:1.9
O:1.10
O:1.11
O:1.12
O:1.13
O:1.14
O:1.15
O:1.16
O:1.17
O:1.18
Description
Bit 8 ................... Bit 15
Bit 0 ......................Bit 7
DeviceNet master command word
(MSB Æ 0xxx••)
(LSB Æ 0x••xx)
Value of the motor starter c command register
Value of the motor starter d command register
Value of the motor starter e command register
Free memory location
Value of the motor starter g command register
Value of the motor starter h command register
Value of the motor starter i command register
Value of the motor starter j command register
Slave no. (0x01-0x08)
Function no. (0x03)
Address of the parameter to be read
(MSB Æ 0xxx••)
(LSB Æ 0x••xx)
Number of parameters to be read
(MSB Æ 0x00••)
(LSB Æ 0x••01)
Slave no. (0x01-0x08)
Function no. (0x06)
Address of the parameter to be written
(MSB Æ 0xxx••)
(LSB Æ 0x••xx)
Value of the parameter to be written
(MSB Æ 0xxx••)
(LSB Æ 0x••xx)
Read parameter
Write parameter
query counter
query counter
Value of the “Command Register”
Value of the “2nd Command Register”
9) Transferring the DeviceNet scanner configuration: Following the changes made to the list of DeviceNet
scanner exchanges, it needs to be transferred to the DeviceNet scanner. Please see chapter 4.2.8
Transferring the DeviceNet Scanner Configuration.
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6. Configuring the Gateway
6.9. Deleting Aperiodic Parameter Data
If your PLC application does not need the aperiodic service for reading/writing parameter data on Modbus
slaves, you can delete the associated commands. If you also intend to add Modbus data, and therefore use new
locations in the gateway’s memory, it is preferable to delete the aperiodic commands from the start, so that you
can reuse the memory locations.
On the other hand, if the only configuration operation you wish to carry out on the LUFP9 gateway consists of
not using the aperiodic service for parameter data, you can simply not use this service in RSNetWorx. Go
straight on to step 8.
If you decide to delete the aperiodic commands, you will need to carry out the following operations:
1) Displaying parameter data commands: Select the very first node of the downstream Modbus network,
“TeSys U n°1”, and expand the tree structure showing its commands and transactions. The screen should
look like the one below:
2) Deleting the read command for a parameter: Select the personalized “Transactions 1” command and delete it
with the “Del” key (or “Delete” from the menu whose name corresponds to the name of the selected node).
A request for confirmation appears, asking you whether or not to proceed deleting the “Transactions 1”
command. In this case confirm with the “Yes” button.
3) Deleting the write command for a parameter: Back in the main ABC-LUFP Config Tool window, the
“Transactions 1” command has been deleted. The second personalised command, “Transactions 2” is
automatically renamed “Transactions 1”, but retains all of its setup. Now delete this one in the same way as
you did with the previous command. When this is done, there is no consequence for the other nodes.
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6. Configuring the Gateway
4) Checking the new memory occupation: If you wish to check how much of the gateway’s memory is now
occupied, select “Sub-Network” and choose “Monitor” from the “Sub-Network” menu. The following window
appears, allowing you to see how much of the gateway’s memory is occupied by Modbus data. The part
framed in red represents the memory occupation before the deletion of the two setup commands. It has been
inlaid in the illustration below so that you can see the effects of the deletion operations we have just carried
out.
You will Note: that the “TeSys U n°1” section now only has the two Modbus commands common to the eight
TeSys U motor starters, and that the memory locations which corresponded to the two personalised
commands are now free.
NOTE: The free memory location at address 0x0012 in the gateway’s memory is no longer part of the
gateway’s inputs, because there is no input data used beyond this address.
5) Transferring this configuration to the gateway Please see chapter 6.4 Transferring a Configuration to the
Gateway. Check that the configuration is valid (LED s DEVICE STATUS flashing green).
6) Saving this configuration to your PC’s hard disk.
7) Checking the gateway setup: In RSNetWorx, check the values of the gateway parameters (see chapter 4.2.4
Editing Gateway Parameters). The value of parameter no. 7, “Input1 length”, should have changed, from
“32 bytes” to “18 bytes”. The value of parameter no. 19, “Output1 length”, should have changed, from
“32 bytes” to “18 bytes”.
8) Changing the amount of data received and the amount of data transmitted by the DeviceNet scanner: Still in
RSNetWorx, change the value for the amount of periodic data received and the amount of periodic data
transmitted by the DeviceNet scanner (see chapter 4.2.5 Configuring the DeviceNet Scanner). In the “Polled:”
section, change the value of the “Rx Size:” field from 32 to 18 and the value of the “Tx Size:” field from 32
to 18.
9) Configuring the DeviceNet master PLC inputs and outputs: In RSNetWorx, establish a new correspondence
between the data from the gateway and the PLC inputs (see chapter 4.2.6 Configuring Inputs from the
Gateway). Do the same for the correspondence between the data transmitted to the gateway and the PLC
outputs (see chapter 4.2.7 Configuring Outputs Intended for the Gateway).
We then get the two correspondences shown on the next page, derived from those used with the gateway’s
default configuration.
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6. Configuring the Gateway
Service
PLC input
Managing the downstream Modbus
network
I:1.1
Periodic communications
—
Monitoring of
TeSys U motor starters
I:1.2
I:1.3
I:1.4
I:1.5
I:1.6
I:1.7
I:1.8
I:1.9
Service
PLC output
Managing the downstream Modbus
network
O:1.1
Periodic communications
—
Controlling
TeSys U motor starters
O:1.2
O:1.3
O:1.4
O:1.5
O:1.6
O:1.7
O:1.8
O:1.9
Description
Bit 8 ................... Bit 15
Bit 0 ......................Bit 7
LUFP9 gateway status word
(MSB Æ 0xxx••)
(LSB Æ 0x••xx)
Value of the motor starter c status register
Value of the motor starter d status register
Value of the motor starter e status register
Value of the motor starter f status register
Value of the motor starter g status register
Value of the motor starter h status register
Value of the motor starter i status register
Value of the motor starter j status register
Description
Bit 8 ................... Bit 15
Bit 0 ......................Bit 7
DeviceNet master command word
(MSB Æ 0xxx••)
(LSB Æ 0x••xx)
Value of the motor starter c command register
Value of the motor starter d command register
Value of the motor starter e command register
Value of the motor starter f command register
Value of the motor starter g command register
Value of the motor starter h command register
Value of the motor starter i command register
Value of the motor starter j command register
10) Transferring the DeviceNet scanner configuration: Following the changes made to the list of DeviceNet
scanner exchanges, it needs to be transferred to the DeviceNet scanner. Please see chapter 4.2.8
Transferring the DeviceNet Scanner Configuration.
6.10. Changing a Modbus slave Configuration
Configuring a Modbus slave itself remains very simple because it only involves the name and the Modbus
address of the node to which it corresponds. On the contrary, configuring Modbus commands is much more
complicated and is the subject of a separate section (see chapter 6.11 Adding and Setting Up a Modbus
Command).
You will need to change the configuration of a Modbus slave when you add a new Modbus unit (see chapter 6.7
Adding a Modbus Slave).
Changing the name of the node which corresponds to a Modbus slave is used to distinguish it from the other
nodes when the configuration of its Modbus commands has been changed.
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6. Configuring the Gateway
6.10.1. Changing the Name of a Modbus Slave
To carry out this operation, all you have to do is select the node which corresponds to the Modbus slave involved
(“Devices:” section), click on the current name (value of the “(Name)” field, in the “Configuration:” section), then
change it. After confirming the new name (“Enter” key or click outside the name’s data entry field), this will
become effective in ABC-LUFP Config Tool, and the name of the node will be automatically updated in the
“Devices:” section. An example is given at the top of the next page. The three red frames shown in this example
show the sequence of the changes made.
6.10.2. Changing the Address of a Modbus Slave
To carry out this operation, all you have to do is select the node which corresponds to the Modbus slave involved
(“Devices:” section), click on the value of the current address (value of the “Slave address” field, in the
“Configuration:” section), then change it.
Reminder: The address of a Modbus slave must be between 1 and 247. The system will not let you add a
value > 247.
WARNING
USE OF RESERVED MODBUS ADDRESSES
Do not use Modbus addresses 65, 126, or 127 if a gateway’s Modbus slaves will include a Schneider Electric
Speed Variation device such as an Altistart soft-starter or an Altivar motor drive. The Altistart and Altivar
devices reserve these addresses for other communications, and the use of these addresses in such a system
can have unintended consequences.
Failure to follow this instruction may result in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
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6. Configuring the Gateway
After confirming the new address (“Enter” key or click outside the data entry field of the address of the
Modbus slave), this will become effective in ABC-LUFP Config Tool, and the values of the “Slave Address”
elements of the queries and responses in the Modbus commands for the selected node will be automatically
updated. An example is given below, with the update of a single “Slave Address” element:
6.11. Adding and Setting Up a Modbus Command
6.11.1. With TeSys U Motor Starters
With TeSys U motor starters, adding a Modbus command allows you to control or monitor additional registers,
without having to change the default configuration. So, the operation of the periodic and aperiodic
communication services remains the same as for the default configuration, unlike the operations described in
chapter 6.8 Changing Periodic Data Exchanged With a Modbus Slave.
Instead of adding a command and fully configuring it, it is a better idea to copy one of the two default commands
“Read Holding Registers” or “Preset Multiple Registers” from an existing node, and to paste it into the list of
Modbus commands for the appropriate node.
To copy an already configured Modbus command from an existing node, select it, then choose “Copy” from the
menu whose name corresponds to the name of the selected node. Keyboard shortcut: “Ctrl C”. Then
continue using one of the two methods shown below:
a) Select the node corresponding to the Modbus slave for which you wish to add this command (e.g. “TeSys U
n°4”), then choose “Paste” from the menu whose name corresponds to the selected node. A new command is
added after all the other configured commands for this node. The whole of its configuration is identical to that
for the previously copied command. Keyboard shortcut: “Ctrl V”.
b) Select one of the commands for the node involved, then choose “Insert” from the menu whose name
corresponds to the selected command. A new command is added just before the one which is selected. The
whole of its configuration is identical to that for the previously copied command.
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6. Configuring the Gateway
As the new Modbus command and the original Modbus command are identical, you will need to make changes
to the fields highlighted in blue in one of the two following diagrams, depending on whether this is the “Preset
Multiple Registers” command or a “Read Holding Registers” command (see chapter 6.8 Changing Periodic Data
Exchanged With a Modbus Slave). The correspondence between the various elements which appear in these
tree structures and the standard Modbus terminology is located to their right:
NOTE: In all cases, the “Query / Slave Address” and “Response / Slave Address” elements are automatically
updated by ABC-LUFP Config Tool according to the node in which the command is located. Their values cannot
be changed by the user. In the same way, the “Query / Function” and “Response / Function” fields depend on
the nature of the Modbus command and cannot be changed by the user.
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6. Configuring the Gateway
The operations to be carried out are more or less the same as those consisting of changing the default
commands. For the “Read Holding Registers” command, please see chapter 6.8.1 Replacing a Periodic Input
Data Element, and chapter 6.8.3 Increasing the Amount of Periodic Input Data. For the “Preset Multiple
Registers” command, please see chapter 6.8.2 Replacing a Periodic Output Data Element, and chapter 6.8.4
Increasing the amount of periodic output data.
6.11.2. With a Generic Modbus Slave
In this chapter, we will add and configure Modbus commands differing from the LUFP9 defaults.
Please see Appendix E: Modbus Commands, for a list of the Modbus functions supported by the LUFP9
gateway. If you need to use a command which is not supported by the gateway, you can configure one. A
command of this sort is included in a specific element called “Transactions” or becomes a new Modbus
command in its own right. Please see the next paragraph for further details on this subject.
For our example, we will use an Altistart starter, the ATS48, and a Modbus command recognized both by the
gateway and the ATS48. This is the “Preset Single Register” command, whose function code is 6 and which
allows you to write the value of a unique output word. This function will be used to periodically write the value of
the ATS48’s CMD command register, located at address W400 (address 400 = 0x0190).
Since the gateway’s default configuration already has 8 Modbus slaves, you will need to delete one of them,
such as the “TeSys U n°2” node, for example, and to add a new node in its place (see chapter 6.6 Deleting a
Modbus Slave, and chapter 6.7 Adding a Modbus Slave).
Reminder: We strongly advise you not to delete the “TeSys U n°1” node, as it contains the commands
corresponding to the read and write services for a parameter in a Modbus slave.
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6. Configuring the Gateway
After creating the new node, we
rename it and assign it Modbus
address 10, as shown at right:
We then add the “Preset Single
Register”
command
by
choosing “Add Command” from
the “ATS48” menu.
In the window which appears (shown opposite), select the “0x06 Preset
Single Register” command and choose “Select” from the “File” menu.
Back in the main ABC-LUFP Config Tool window, the “Preset Single
Register” command now appears in the list of Modbus commands for the
“ATS48” node.
Expand the full tree structure for this command, as shown below. The correspondence between the various
elements which appear in this tree structure and the standard Modbus terminology is located to its right.
These elements can be configured using ABC-LUFP Config Tool, as described in the following chapters.
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6. Configuring the Gateway
6.11.2.1. Managing Degraded Modes
PLC processor stopped or on failure
PLC processor response
Outputs:
Software error, outputs reset to default state or hold their present state depending on configuration.
Hardware error (EEPROM or hardware failure), output state will be indetermined
Inputs: PLC stops responding to inputs in any error state.
DeviceNet scanner response
Depending on scanner configuration:
the scanner stops to communicate with the LUFP9 gateway,
or forces DeviceNet outputs to 0 and refreshes the inputs,
or holds DeviceNet outputs in their last position, and refreshes the inputs.
LUFP9 gateway response
If the scanner stops to communicate with the gateway, the behavior depends on the fieldbus "Offline
options:
Clear:
All data sent to the concerned Modbus slave is set to 0.
Freeze:
All data sent retains its current value.
No scanning: The query is no longer transmitted.
If the scanner forces DeviceNet outputs to 0 and refreshes the inputs:
all data sent (Write requests) is set to 0,
reading from slaves continues to run normally.
If the scanner holds DeviceNet outputs and refreshes the inputs:
all data sent (Write requests) retains its current value,
reading from slaves continues to run normally.
Slave response
Depending of the slave.
DeviceNet scanner stopped or on failure
PLC processor response
The PLC processor provides some error and/or diagnostic objects to the application in case of DeviceNet
scanner stop or failure (input/output not valid).
Refer to the PLC user manual to have their description.
This information must be managed in the PLC application.
DeviceNet scanner response
If the DeviceNet scanner is stopped (command coming from the application):
the scanner stops to communicate with the LUFP9 gateway.
If the DeviceNet scanner is on failure:
the scanner stops to communicate with the processor and the LUFP9 gateway.
LUFP9 gateway response
If the scanner stops to communicate with the gateway, the behavior depends on the fieldbus "Offline
options:
Clear:
All data sent to the concerned Modbus slave is set to 0.
Freeze:
All data sent retains its current value.
No scanning: The query is no longer transmitted.
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6. Configuring the Gateway
Slave response
Depending on the slave.
LUFP9 gateways disconnected on DeviceNet side
PLC response
The PLC processor provides some error and diagnostic objects coming from the DeviceNet scanner in case
of a slave disconnection from the application.
Refer to the PLC user manual to have their description.
This information must be managed in the PLC application.
DeviceNet scanner response
The DeviceNet scanner provides the processor with some error and diagnostic objects in case of DeviceNet
slave disconnection.
LUFP9 gateway response
The behavior depends on the fieldbus Offline options:
Clear :
All data sent to the concerned Modbus slave is set to 0.
Freeze :
All data sent retains its current value.
No scanning : The query is no longer transmitted.
Slave response
Depending of the slave
LUFP9 gateways failure
PLC response
The PLC processor provides some error and diagnostic objects coming from the DeviceNet scanner in case
of slave failure to the application.
Refer to the PLC user manual to have their description.
This information must be managed in the PLC application.
DeviceNet scanner response
The DeviceNet scanner provides the processor with some error and diagnostic objects in case of DeviceNet
slave failure.
LUFP9 gateway response
In case of a failure, the gateway stops to communicate with the DeviceNet scanner and the Modbus slaves.
Slave response
Depending on the slave.
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6. Configuring the Gateway
LUFP9 gateways disconnected on Modbus side or slave failure
PLC response
The processor gives access to the gateway status word coming from the DeviceNet scanner input table and
to the gateway command word coming from the output table.
These 2 words must be managed in the PLC application in order to detect if a Modbus slave is missing.
DeviceNet scanner response
The DeviceNet scanner must be configured to access the gateway status and command words in order to
provide Modbus diagnostic information.
LUFP9 gateway response
The behavior depends on the different options:
Timeout time, number of Retries, Reconnect time and Offline option for sub-network.
Slave response
In case of a Modbus disconnection, the behavior depends on the slave.
In case of a slave failure, undetermined state which must be managed in the PLC application.
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6. Configuring the Gateway
6.11.2.2. Configuring the Query
Select the “Query” element from the Modbus command. The
various elements of the configuration of the query for this command
are shown opposite. The values displayed correspond to the
default values for any new command.
These elements allow you to configure how the whole command is
managed, including how degraded modes are managed (number of
re-transmissions, for example).
Each of these elements is described, in order, in the table below. When a unit is assigned to an element, it is
shown in brackets after the name of the element:
Configuration
element
Offline options
for fieldbus
Reconnect time
(10ms)
Default value:
10ms x 1000 =
10s
Retries
Default value: 3
Timeout time
(10ms)
Default value:
10ms x 100 = 1s
Description
This element affects the data sent to the Modbus slave, but only in the query to which this
element belongs to, whenever the gateway is disconnected from the DeviceNet network. This
element takes one of the following three values:
- Clear ..............From now on all data sent to the Modbus slave using this query is set to
0x0000 (resetting of the output data in the gateway’s memory).
- Freeze ...........All data sent to the Modbus slave using this query retains its current values
(the output data in the gateway’s memory is frozen).
- NoScanning ...The query is no longer transmitted to the Modbus slave by the gateway.
If there is no response from the Modbus slave to a query, or following the receipt of an
incorrect response, the gateway uses the “Retries” and “Timeout time (10ms)” elements to
carry out re-transmissions. If the Modbus slave has still not responded correctly following
these re-transmissions, the gateway stops sending it the corresponding query for a period
of time which can be adjusted using “Reconnect time (10ms)”.
When this “Reconnect time” has elapsed, the gateway attempts to restore communication
with the Modbus slave.
This element indicates the number of re-transmissions carried out by the gateway if there is
no response from the Modbus slave to a query, or if the response is incorrect. This retransmission process ceases as soon as the gateway gets a correct response within a given
time. If none of the re-transmissions has allowed the gateway to obtain a correct response,
the Modbus slave is deemed to be off-line, but only in relation to the command in question.
The gateway then uses the “Offline options for sub-network” and “Reconnect time (10ms)”
elements and the LED r Modbus becomes red. This LED will only revert to a green state if
the Modbus command is answered with a correct response, once the reconnection has
started (see element “Reconnect time (10ms)”).
If the number of re-transmissions is set to 0, the process described above will not be run.
This element represents the time that the gateway will wait for a response. If a response
has not reached the gateway within the given time, configured using the “timeout time
(10ms)” element, the gateway proceeds to a re-transmission. This process continues until it
reaches the last re-transmission allowed (see “Retries”), then the gateway declares the
Modbus slave off-line, but only for the command to which the “timeout time (10ms)”
belongs.
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6. Configuring the Gateway
Configuration
element
Trigger byte
address
Update mode
Description
This element is only used by the gateway if “Update mode” is set to “Change of state on
trigger”. In this case, it specifies the address, in the gateway’s output memory (0x0202 to
0x03FF), of an 8-bit counter managed by the DeviceNet master.
When the DeviceNet master updates the value at the Trigger Byte Address to any value
other than zero, the query configured with an Update Mode of a “Change of state on trigger”
is transmitted to the Modbus slave. So the DeviceNet master must have access to this
counter in the same way as for the periodic output registers sent to TeSys U motor starters.
In comparison to the “On data change” Update Mode, this mode allows you to send a
command on a specific order from the DeviceNet master if, for example, the latter is unable
to update all data of any given query at the same time.
NOTE: In the specific case of the gateway’s default configuration, the “Transactions 1” and
“Transactions 2” personalized command modes for the “TeSys U n°1” node are set to
“Change of state on trigger”. These aperiodic commands are respectively used to read and
write the value of a parameter for one of the Modbus slaves.
The “Trigger byte address” elements of the “Query” elements for these two commands are
configured at addresses 0x021E and 0x021F. These are the “parameter read/write request
counters”. Considered under DeviceNet and RSNetWorx, these two data are configured the
same way as the other outputs (see chapter 4.2.4 Editing Gateway Parameters) and both
correspond to the O:1.16 output.
To transmit one of these two commands, the DeviceNet master PLC must first update all of
the data to be transmitted on the Modbus network for this command (addresses 0x0212 to
0x0217 or addresses 0x0218 to 0x021D), then change the value of the associated counter
(address 0x021E or 0x021F). The gateway will then transmit the query corresponding to the
command.
NOTE: The “trigger byte” does not have to be an item of output data updated by the
DeviceNet master. In fact it is quite possible that it may be an input between 0x0002 and
0x01FF. In this case, the Modbus slave which updates this byte will condition the
exchanges of the command you’re currently configuring.
This element is used to specify the transmission mode for the query on the Modbus
network. It takes one of the following four values:
- Cyclically................................. Default communication mode. The query is transmitted
periodically on the Modbus network (see “Update time”).
- On data change ...................... The gateway transmits the query on the Modbus network
when at least one item of data from this query is changed by the DeviceNet master.
So this is an aperiodic communication mode.
- Single Shot ............................. This transmission mode only allows a single Modbus
exchange for the whole of the time that the gateway is operating. This exchange
takes place just after the initialization of the gateway.
- Change of state on trigger...... With this aperiodic communication mode, the Modbus
query is sent every time that the DeviceNet master changes the value of an 8-bit
counter designated by the “Trigger byte address” element. For instance, this is the
case with the queries associated with “Transactions 1” and “Transactions 2”
personalized commands for the “TeSys U n°1” node of the gateway’s default
configuration. These queries are transmitted when the values of the related “trigger
bytes” (addresses 0x021E and 0x021F) are changed by the DeviceNet master.
Please see the description of this element for further information about how to use
this communication mode.
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6. Configuring the Gateway
Configuration
element
Update time
(10ms)
Description
This element is only used by the gateway if “Update mode” is set to “Cyclically”. In this case, it
specifies the query’s transmission period on the Modbus network.
Default value:
10ms x 100 = 1s
Returning to our example employing the ATS48 at address 10, we
will use the configuration shown opposite. The most notable points
of this configuration are:
• On disconnection the data is reset on both networks.
• 3 re-transmissions with a 100 ms timeout.
• Periodic communications with a cyclical Update time set to
300 ms.
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6. Configuring the Gateway
6.11.2.3. Configuring the Response
Next select the “Response” element from the Modbus command.
The various elements of the configuration of the response for this
command are shown opposite. The values displayed correspond to
the default values for any new command.
These elements allow you to configure a single aspect of managing the command, described at the top of the
page on the right. Each of these elements is described, in order, in the table below.
Configuration
element
Trigger byte
Trigger byte
address
Description
This element is used by the gateway to activate the unitary incrementation of an 8-bit
counter in order to notify the DeviceNet master of the receipt of a new response to the
associated Modbus command. It takes one of the following two values:
- Disabled.................................. Default configuration. The gateway does not increment any
counter on receipt of the Modbus response.
- Enabled .................................. Each time that the gateway receives a new response to the
associated Modbus command, it increments the value of an 8-bit counter designated
by the “Trigger byte address” element (see below). This change in the value of the
Trigger Byte Address can be used to notify the DeviceNet master that Modbus
Response data is ready to be polled.
This element is only used by the gateway if the element “Trigger byte” is set to “Enabled”. In
this case, it specifies the address, in the gateway’s input memory (0x0002 to 0x01FF), of an
8-bit counter managed by the gateway.
When the gateway receives a response to the associated Modbus command, it increments
the value of this counter in a unitary manner (value = value+1). So the DeviceNet master
must have access to this counter in the same way as for the periodic input registers from
the TeSys U motor starters.
This mode allows the DeviceNet master to be informed that a new response is available.
This can be useful, for example, if it is possible that the data from two consecutive
responses may be identical.
NOTE: In the specific case of the gateway’s default configuration, the “Trigger byte”
element for responses to the “Transactions 1” and “Transactions 2” personalized
commands of the “TeSys U n°1” node is set to “Enabled”. Hence, the management of
responses to read and write commands for parameters is event driven.
The “Trigger byte address” elements of the “Response” elements for these two commands
are configured at addresses 0x001E and 0x001F. These are the “parameter read/write
response counters”. Considered under DeviceNet and RSNetWorx, these two data are
configured the same way as the other inputs (see chapter 4.2.6 Configuring Inputs from the
Gateway) and both correspond to the I:1.16 input.
The DeviceNet master PLC will be able to detect the receipt of a response from a Modbus
slave by comparing the previous value and the current value of the associated counter
(address 0x001E or 0x001F). If there is a unitary incrementation of this counter, the PLC
may, for example, read all of the data from the response (addresses 0x0013 to 0x0017 or
addresses 0x0018 to 0x001D) and allow the transmission of a new query for reading or
writing the value of a parameter (using a “Trigger byte” for the queries). In contrast to other
“Query” counters, the value stored at the “Response” Trigger byte Address is a true
modulo 256 counter, i.e. zero must be managed (… 254, 255, 0, 1, 2 …).
In this example using the ATS48, we do not want the response to be event driven. So we will be retaining the
default configuration.
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6. Configuring the Gateway
6.11.2.4. Configuring the Content of the Query Frame
The window shown below is obtained using “Edit Frame” from the “Query” menu. Unlike the tree structure in the
main ABC-LUFP Config Tool window, this display has the advantage of showing all of the frame’s fields at the
same time as well as their values. The values displayed below correspond to the values assigned by default to the
Modbus command query we have created. The correspondence with the content of the corresponding Modbus
frame has been added underneath this window.
Slave no.
Word
Function no. number (MSB / Value of the word (MSB / LSB)
LSB)
CRC16 (LSB / MSB)
Edit the values which are not greyed out, one after another. There is a description of them below.
The nature of a frame’s fields depends on the Modbus command to which it corresponds. However, a certain
number of these fields are common to all frames, whereas others are common to a number of them. Here is a
description of those shown above, for the example described at the beginning of the chapter 6.11.2:
Field in the
frame
Slave
Address
Function
Register
Size in the
frame
1 byte
1 byte
2 bytes
Description
This field cannot be changed by the user and its value is greyed out to inform
him of the fact. ABC-LUFP Config Tool updates the value of this field
automatically using the address of the Modbus slave corresponding to the
current node.
NOTE: This field is common to queries for all Modbus commands.
E.g. the value of this field is set to the address of the Modbus slave which
corresponds to the “ATS48” nodes, that is to say 0x0A.
This field cannot be changed by the user and its value is greyed out to inform
him of the fact. ABC-LUFP Config Tool updates the value of this field
automatically using the function code for the corresponding Modbus command.
NOTE: This field is common to queries for all Modbus commands.
E.g. the value of this field is set to the code for the “Preset Single Register”
command (writing the value of an output word), that is to say 0x06.
Address of an output word, or of a register, in the Modbus slave’s memory. So
this field designates the memory object to which the command relates.
NOTE: This field is common to queries for all Modbus commands whose
purpose is to access one or more locations in the memory of a Modbus slave.
When accessing several memory locations, the “Register” field designates the
address of the first word affected by the command.
E.g. the value of this field should be changed by entering the address of the
CMD command register, that is to say 400 (0x0190). This value will be
automatically converted to hexadecimal if the user enters it in decimal.
81
6. Configuring the Gateway
Field in the
frame
Preset Data
Size in the
frame
2 bytes
or more for a
block of data
Description
Data Location: Address, in the gateway’s output data memory (0x0202 to
0x03FF), of the item of data to be transmitted in the “Preset Data” field for the
query’s frame.
NOTE: The “Data location” field is used for each frame that allows you to
exchange some data between the Modbus slaves and the DeviceNet master.
In this case it designates the starting address of the block of data to be
transmitted.
When selecting a value for the “Data Location” field, data must be located at
even addresses in order to align the Modbus data (in 16-bit format) on the
O:1.x outputs of the DeviceNet scanner. If data is not located at even
addresses, the values intended for the Modbus registers may be spread over
two DeviceNet PLC words. This greatly complicates programming of the
application, as the application may need to parse one PLC word for the
Modbus LSB byte, and another for the Modbus MSB byte. If this complication
is not handled properly, it is possible to read and write the wrong data values to
the Modbus slaves.
WARNING
RISK OF UNINTENDED EQUIPMENT OPERATION
The user must use even values for the “Data Location” field. The selection of odd data values complicates
application programming and increases the likelihood of improper Modbus values being written to or read from
the slave devices. Depending on the user’s configuration, unintended equipment operation may result.
Failure to follow this instruction may result in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
Returning to our previous example, the value to be assigned to the ATS48’s
CMD register should be placed in the gateway’s output data memory area. We
will be using the first free location starting at an even address, that is to say the
one located at 0x0220, with the gateway’s default configuration.
Data length: Length of the block of output data, in the gateway’s memory,
whose values must be transmitted in the “Preset Data” field of the query’s
frame. It is expressed in number of bytes.
NOTE: The “Data length” field is always used together with the “Data location”
field, described above.
E.g. since the “Preset Single Register” command is used to write the value of a
single register (16-bit), the value of the “Data length” field must be set to 2.
See the documentation for each Modbus slave to find out the maximum
amount of 8-bit data which can be placed in “Data” type fields in queries and
responses for this slave. With the ATS48, for instance, it is limited to 30 16-bit
words (Data length field limited to ≤ 60).
82
6. Configuring the Gateway
Field in the
frame
Size in the
frame
Description
Byte swap: Specifies whether the output data bytes to be transmitted to the
Modbus slave must be swapped before being placed in the Modbus frame or
not. The three possible values are as follows:
- No swapping ....... Default configuration. The data is sent in the same order as
they appear in the gateway’s memory.
- Swap 2 bytes ...... The bytes to be transmitted are swapped two by two. For
an item of 16-bit data, the most significant byte is placed first in the Modbus
frame, whereas it is always written into the gateway’s memory by a
DeviceNet master with the least significant byte first.
- Swap 4 bytes ...... The bytes to be transmitted are swapped four by four. This
is rarely used, as it only relates to 32-bit data. The principle is similar to that
of the previous case, “Swap 2 bytes”.
NOTE: With DeviceNet, use “Swap 2 bytes”.
Checksum
2 bytes
For example, we will be using the “Swap 2 bytes” value because the two bytes
of the value to be written into the ATS48’s CMD register, as transmitted by the
SLC500 PLC, are placed into the gateway’s memory in least significant / most
significant order.
Error check type: Type of error check for the frame.
- CRC .................... Default method.
This is the method adopted for the Modbus RTU protocol. It cannot be changed.
Error check start byte: Indicates the number of the byte, in the frame, from
which the calculation of the “checksum” should begin. The first byte in each
frame carries the number 0.
NOTE: The calculation of a frame’s checksum should always begin with the
first byte. Do not change the error check start byte from its default of zero. A
non-zero value will result in an incorrect CRC, and all Modbus communications
wil return an error.
83
6. Configuring the Gateway
6.11.2.5. Configuring the Content of the Response Frame
The window shown below is obtained using “Edit Frame” from the “Response” menu. The values shown in it
correspond to the values assigned by default to the Modbus command response we have created. The
correspondence with the content of the resulting Modbus frame has been added underneath this window.
Slave no.
Function no.
Word
number (MSB / Value of the word (MSB / LSB)
LSB)
CRC16 (LSB / MSB)
Edit the values which are not greyed out, one after another.
There is a description of them on the next page, but also see the previous chapter, as the nature of the content
of response frames is very similar to that of the fields in Modbus query frames.
NOTE: If the value of a field from the response of a Modbus slave is different from that configured via ABC-LUFP
Config Tool, the response will be rejected by the gateway. It will then proceed to a re-transmission of the query,
provided that at least one re-transmission has been configured for this command (see chapter 6.11.2.2
Configuring the Query).
84
6. Configuring the Gateway
Field in the
frame
Slave Address
Function
Register
Preset Data
Size in the
frame
1 byte
1 byte
2 bytes
2 bytes
or more for a
block of data
Description
Identical to that of the query’s “Slave Address” field.
Identical to that of the query’s “Function” field.
Identical to that of the query’s “Register” field, since the Modbus response of
any “Preset Single Register” command is an echo to the corresponding query.
Here you should also enter the address of the memory object to which the
command relates.
If receiving an exception code, see (*).
Data Location: Address, in the gateway’s input data memory (0x0002 to
0x01FF), of the item of data received in the “Preset Data” field for the
response’s frame.
NOTE: Check that the data is located at even addresses in order to align the
Modbus data (in 16-bit format) on the I:1.x inputs of the DeviceNet scanner.
E.g. The value sent back as an echo to the command must be placed in the
gateway’s input data memory area. We will be using the first free location, that
is to say the one located at 0x0020, with the gateway’s default configuration.
If receiving an exception code, see (*).
WARNING
RISK OF UNINTENDED EQUIPMENT OPERATION
The user must use even values for the “Data Location” field. The selection of odd data values complicates
application programming and increases the likelihood of improper Modbus values being written to or read from
the slave devices. Depending on the user’s configuration, unintended equipment operation may result.
Failure to follow this instruction may result in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
Data length: Length of the block of input data received in the “Preset Data”
field of the response frame. It is expressed in number of bytes.
E.g. The value of the “Data length” field must be set to 2.
Byte swap: Identical to that of the query’s “Byte swap” field (see query’s table
for details)
E.g. We will also be using the “Swap 2 bytes” value, for the same reasons as
with the query.
Checksum
2 bytes
Error check type: Identical to that of the query’s “Error check type” field.
Error check start byte: Identical to that of the query’s “Error check start bype”
field.
NOTE: These two fields cannot be changed by the user and their values are
greyed out to reflect this. ABC-LUFP Config Tool updates the values of these
fields automatically using those of the query’s “Error check type” and “Error
check start byte” fields.
(*) If receiving an exception code, the gateway re-transmits the request according to the number of retries that has
been defined. Then, it will disconnect the slave.
85
6. Configuring the Gateway
6.11.3. Adding a Special Modbus Command
Apart from the standard Modbus commands covered in the previous chapter, it is possible to create two types of
special Modbus commands: Modbus commands using the same template as standard commands and Modbus
commands whose nature and frame content can be completely changed by the user.
6.11.3.1. Modbus Commands Based on Standard Commands
You create a command of this type from the “Select Command” window (see chapter 6.11.2 With a Generic
Modbus Slave), by choosing “Add Command” from the “Command” menu. The window shown at the top of the
next page appears. It shows the structure of the future command’s query and response frames, which will then
be added to the list of available Modbus commands. This structure includes the standard elements, that is to say
the “Slave Address”, “Function” and “Checksum” fields, described in previous chapters.
Please see chapter 2.12 Command editor in the ABC-LUFP Config Tool user manual, entitled AnyBus
Communicator – User Manual, for further information about creating standard Modbus commands. This
manual can be found on the CD LU9CD1 : “ABC_User_Manual.pdf”.
86
6. Configuring the Gateway
6.11.3.2. User-Customizable Modbus Commands
In ABC-LUFP Config Tool, these commands are known as “Transactions”. Unlike in the previous examples
where many of the variables were fixed by the Modbus command selected, the whole structure of the query and
response frames associated with these transactions is dictated by data in the gateway’s memory. These data
fields in the gateway’s memory may contain values in Byte, Word or DWord format and a final “Checksum” field.
(See Query’s table for details)
All of the data contained in the query and response “Data” fields of a “Transactions” command are managed by
the DeviceNet master, including the “Slave address” and “Function” fields if these are placed in a “Data” field.
For instance, this allows you to manage all of the Modbus frame fields from the DeviceNet master if all of the
query and response fields of a “Transactions” element (excluding “Checksum”) are “Data” type fields.
WARNING
MORE THAN ONE “DATA” FIELD IN A MODBUS FRAME
Do not use more than one “Data” field per Modbus frame. Multiple “Data” fields in a single Modbus frame
may not be executed in the proper order by the gateway, leading to unintended consequences.
Failure to follow this instruction may result in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
Constants in Byte, Word or DWord format place the values of these constants in Modbus query frames
(constants in “Query” elements) or compare them to the values located in the Modbus responses (constants in
“Response” elements). These comparisons are used to accept (identical values) or reject (different values) the
Modbus responses in the same way as for standard Modbus commands. The DeviceNet master does not have
access to these constants. They are mainly used to replace fields such as “Slave address”, “Function”, “Starting
Address,” etc.
Please see the section on “Actions on query/response” in chapter 2.6.4 Transaction and in chapter 2.6.6 Frame
objects in the ABC-LUFP Config Tool user manual, entitled AnyBus Communicator – User Manual, for further
information about how to handle “Transaction” commands. This manual can be found on the CD LU9CD1:
“ABC_User_Manual.pdf”.
The LUFP9 gateway’s default configuration includes two “Transaction” commands. These are aperiodic
commands used for reading and writing the value of a Modbus slave parameter (necessarily a TeSys U motor
starter with the default configuration). They are configured solely for the “TeSys U n°1” node, as the address of
the slave is controlled by the DeviceNet master via the first byte of the “Data” field, which corresponds to the
“Slave Address” field in standard Modbus commands. This allows the DeviceNet master to send this command
to all of the Modbus slaves, slave by slave, through the first byte of the “Data” field. The remaining fields of the
frames used by these two commands are also placed in the same “Data” field. So the DeviceNet master has
access to all of the content of the frames in these two commands.
87
6. Configuring the Gateway
6.12. Configuring the General Characteristics of the Gateway
This operation relates to the gateway’s general characteristics (“Fieldbus”
to “Sub-Network” elements), whereas the previous chapters described the
configuration of the Modbus slaves (elements located under the “SubNetwork” element).
The “Fieldbus” element describes the upstream network, that is to say the
DeviceNet network in the case of the LUFP9 gateway.
The “ABC” and “Sub-Network” elements describe the downstream
network, that is to say the Modbus RTU network in the case of the LUFP9
gateway, and allow you to identify the software version in the gateway.
The configuration of these three elements, plus the commands they give
access to, are described in the next three chapters.
6.12.1. “Fieldbus” Element
Below this element there is a list of the mailboxes configured by default. These elements are not described here,
as they are only designed for the internal management of the gateway. These mailboxes can neither be changed
nor deleted. Both their number and their nature depend on the type of upstream network.
When the “Fieldbus” element is selected, you can choose the
type of upstream network: “DeviceNet” with the LUFP9
gateway.
If the network selected does not match the gateway, an error
message will pop-up at loading and the configuration will not
be loaded.
If your PC is connected to the gateway using the PowerSuite cable and you are using ABC-LUFP Config Tool in
“on-line” mode when ABC-LUFP Config Tool starts up, the type of upstream network will be automatically
detected.
The only command accessible from the “Fieldbus”
menu is “About Fieldbus…”.
In “on-line” mode, the window shown opposite will be
displayed. In “off-line” mode the word “Unknown” will
replace “DeviceNet” to show that the type of upstream
network cannot be identified.
88
6. Configuring the Gateway
6.12.2. “ABC” Element
The two commands accessible from the “ABC” menu are “About ABC…” and
“Disconnect” (or “Connect” if you are in “off-line” mode).
- Running “About ABC…”
allows ABC-LUFP Config Tool
to
upload
and
display
information
showing
the
software version on the PC
and the software version in
the gateway.
An
example
opposite.
is
shown
When you run “About ABC…” in “off-line” mode, the last three fields are replaced by “Unknown” to show that the
gateway software version cannot be identified.
NOTE: Only the software version in the gateway’s Modbus card is displayed. This software is common to
several types of gateway marketed by Schneider Electric. The gateway’s DeviceNet card software version is
only accessible using the appropriate DeviceNet object (see Appendix D:, Identity Object).
- The “Disconnect” command allows you to go from “on-line” to “off-line” mode. It is only available in “on-line”
mode. It is replaced by “Connect” once you are in “off-line” mode.
Apart from these two exclusive commands, the transition to “on-line” mode is requested by ABC-LUFP Config
Tool when certain events do occur (ABC-LUFP Config Tool is launched, use of “Upload” and “Download”
commands, etc.).
ABC-LUFP Config Tool’s connection mode is displayed to the right of its status bar:
“On-line” mode (the LED on the left is green)
“Off-line” mode (the LED on the right is red)
89
6. Configuring the Gateway
Four options allow you to configure certain of the gateway’s system aspects:
- Control/Status Byte: The three possibilities available for this option are described in chapter 5 Gateway
Initialization and Diagnostics.
- Module Reset: By default, this option prevents the gateway from reinitializing itself when there is an internal
operation problem. Changing this option is mainly intended for “laboratory” type use.
- Physical Interface: The only possibility offered by this option shows that the physical interface of the network
downstream of the gateway is a serial link.
- Protocol: This option should not be changed, because it indicates the type of protocol used on the downstream
network of the gateway. With the LUFP9 gateway, “Master Mode” must be selected. The other possibilities available
are reserved for other products from the same family as this gateway.
6.12.3. “Sub-Network” Element
The five commands accessible from the “Sub-Network” menu are:
- “Monitor”: Allows you to view the correspondence between the data
from Modbus commands and the content of the gateway’s memory.
Examples of how to use this command are shown in chapters 6.8.3,
6.8.4 and 6.9.
- “Add Node”: Allows you to add a new node on the downstream Modbus
network. Each node corresponds to a different Modbus slave. This
command is not available if there are already 8 Modbus slaves, which is
the case with the gateway’s default configuration.
- “Add Broadcaster”: Allows you to add a broadcaster node (see chapter 6.13 Adding a Broadcaster Node).
- “Load Node”: Allows you to add a pre-configured node on the downstream Modbus network. The configuration
for this node is contained in an XML file (see the section on “Importing/Exporting a Modbus slave configuration”
in chapter 6.7 Adding a Modbus Slave). This command is not available if there are already 8 Modbus slaves,
which is the case with the gateway’s default configuration.
90
6. Configuring the Gateway
- “Sub-Network Status…”: In “on-line” mode (see
chapter 6.12.2 “ABC” Element), this command displays a
window summarizing the values of the gateway’s error
counters. These counters are also used by the gateway to
update the value of its status word (see chapter 5.5
Description of the Gateway Status Word). The “Update”
button allows you to refresh the values of these counters.
When you run this command in “off-line” mode, all of the
values displayed are replaced by the word “Unknown” to
show that they cannot be read on the gateway. The
“Update” button then becomes inaccessible.
When the “Sub-Network” element is selected, you have access to all of the options allowing you to configure the
gateway’s communication protocol format on the Modbus network. The various settings you can make are
described below. All of the Modbus slaves present must support this configuration and be configured
appropriately.
- Bitrate (bits/s): The gateway
supports a limited number of
communication speeds.
Select the speed that
accomodates the slowest
slave.
- Data bits: 8 bits (required).
- Message delimiter (10ms):
Period of silence added to
the normal period of silence
between the end of one
message and the start of the
next message. The normal
period
of
silence
corresponds to the time
taken
to
transmit
3.5 characters.
- Parity: Choose the parity
according to the format
chosen for communications
on your Modbus network.
- Physical standard:
(required).
RS485
- Start bits: 1 bit (required).
- Stop bits: 1 bit (even or odd
parity) or 2 bits.(no parity).
91
6. Configuring the Gateway
6.13. Adding a Broadcaster Node
A broadcaster node does not correspond to any Modbus slave in particular, as it applies to all Modbus slaves.
All the commands which will be configured for this node will be transmitted with the “Slave Address” field set to
0x00. This means that all of the slaves will run the command, but that none of them will respond to it.
To add a broadcaster node, select “Sub-Network”, then choose “Add
Broadcaster” from the “Sub-Network” menu. The broadcaster node created in
this way does not count in the limit on the number of configurable nodes. A
simple example is shown opposite:
The addition and configuration of a Modbus command in the list of broadcaster
node commands is done in the same way as for other nodes, but with the
following differences:
- The list of standard Modbus commands which can be used in broadcast is
considerably smaller. Only functions 0x06 and 0x10 can be used (see list in
chapter 6.11.2).
- The command is made up of a query, but does not include any response. The query bears the name of the
command itself, instead of the name “Query”. Also, each broadcast command only consumes one of the
50 queries and responses allowed by the gateway, as there is no possible response for such a command.
- The value of the query frame’s “Slave Address” field is set to 0x00.
Please see chapter 6.11.2.2 Configuring the Query, for further details on how to configure a Modbus query.
92
Appendix A: Technical Characteristics
Environment
Dimensions (excluding
connectors)
External appearance
Torque
Power supply
Maximum relative humidity
Ambient air temperature
around the device, in a dry
environment
UL
CE
Electromagnetic compatibility
(EMC): Transmission
Electromagnetic compatibility
(EMC): Immunity
Height: 120 mm
Width: 27 mm
Depth: 75 mm
(4.7 in.)
(1.1 in.)
(3.0 in.)
Plastic case with device for fixing to a DIN rail.
PSU connector: between 5 and 7 lbs.-in (0.56 and 0.79 N-m).
24V regulated ±10%
Maximum consumption: around 95 mA
95% without condensation or seepage, according to IEC 68-2-30
According to IEC 68-2-1 Ab, IEC 68-2-2 Bb and IEC 68-2-14 Nb:
• Storage:
–25°C (±3)
to
+85°C (±2)
(-18.4°F to -7.6°F) …
(+181 F to 189 F)
• Operation:
–5°C (±3)
to
+70°C (±2)
(+17.6°F to 28.4°F) …
(+154 F to 162°F)
E 214107 certificate
“open type” category
The product should be installed in an electrical cabinet or in an equivalent location.
Certified as complying with European standards, unless otherwise stated.
Complies with the EN 50 081-2:1993 (industrial environment) standard
Tested according to class A radiation under the EN 55011:1990 standard
Complies with the EN 50 082-2:1995 and EN 61 000-6-2:1999 (industrial
environment) standard
Tested according to the EN 50 204:1995, EN 61000-4-2:1995, EN 61000-43:1996, EN 61000-4-4:1995, EN 61000-4-5:1995 and EN 61000-4-6:1996
standards.
Communication Characteristics
“Upstream” network
“Downstream” network
DeviceNet characteristics
DeviceNet
Modbus RTU
• Network topology: Multipoint linear topology (bus) with suitable line terminations
(impedance of 121 Ω ±1% ¼W).
• Physical media: Four types of specific DeviceNet cables, with built-in 24V
PSU:
c Thick double twisted pair cylindrical cable
e Flat cable
d Thin double twisted pair cylindrical cable
f “KwikLink” cable
• Communication speed: 125, 250, or 500 kbits/s
• Total maximum length of the network: 500 m (1,640 ft) at 125 kbits/s
250 m (820 ft) at 250 kbits/s
100 m (328 ft) at 500 kbits/s
• Maximum number of subscribers: 64
• Transactions: Up to 8 bytes of data per frame.
• Possibility of connecting or disconnecting a subscriber without affecting
communications between other subscribers.
93
Appendix A: Technical Characteristics
Specific DeviceNet
features of the LUFP9
gateway
Modbus RTU
characteristics
• The LUFP9 gateway is a “group two only server” DeviceNet subscriber (please
refer to DeviceNet Specifications).
• Fragmentation support for transactions requiring more than 8 bytes of data.
• Connections supported: 1 “Explicit Connection”
1 “Polled Command/Response” connection
1 “Bit Strobed Command/Response” connection
1 “Change-of-State / Cyclic” connection
• Communication speed configured using 2 selector switches.
• Gateway’s DeviceNet address (MAC ID) configured using 6 selector switches
(address between 0 and 63).
• Configuration facilitated by the use of a specific EDS file.
• Physical media: RS485 serial link
• Network topology: Multipoint linear topology with adapted line terminations
(impedance of 120 Ω in parallel with a capacitance of 1 nF)
• Communication speed: 1,200 to 57,600 bits/s
• Data bits: 8
• Subscriber addresses: 1 to 247. Address 0 reserved for broadcasting.
Addresses 65, 126 and 127 reserved if drives and/or starters from Schneider
Electric are used on the same Modbus network.
• Period of silence: Equivalent to the transmission of 3.5 characters.
WARNING
USE OF RESERVED MODBUS ADDRESSES
Do not use Modbus addresses 65, 126, or 127 if a gateway’s Modbus slaves will include a Schneider Electric
Speed Variation device such as an Altistart soft-starter or an Altivar motor drive. The Altistart and Altivar
devices reserve these addresses for other communications, and the use of these addresses in such a system
can have unintended consequences.
Failure to follow this instruction may result in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
• Maximum number of subscribers (excluding gateway): 8 Modbus slaves.
• Maximum number of commands configured: Up to 50 Modbus queries and
responses configured for the same gateway using ABC-LUFP Config Tool.
• Communication speed: 1,200, 2,400, 4,800, 9,600, or 19,200 bits/s, configured
using ABC-LUFP Config Tool.
• Period of silence: Possibility of increasing the gateway’s period of silence, in
10 ms steps, using ABC-LUFP Config Tool.
• Parity: None, even or odd, configured using ABC-LUFP Config Tool.
• Start bits: 1 bit, configuration using ABC-LUFP Config Tool.
• Stop bits: 1 or 2 bits, configuration using ABC-LUFP Config Tool.
• 2 bytes for the diagnostics of errors on the downstream network by the gateway
Structure of the
LUFP9 gateway’s memory: (see chapter 5 Gateway Initialization and Diagnostics).
• 510 bytes accessible by the DeviceNet master in the form of input data (see
Appendix B: Default Configuration, Input Data Memory Area, for the default use
Inputs
of this input data).
Specific Modbus RTU
features of the LUFP9
gateway
Addresses
0x0000
0x0001
0x0002
:
0x01FF
Input data area
Gateway status word
(unless “Control/Status Byte” = “Disabled”)
Inputs accessible through the DeviceNet master
510 bytes
1 input data area
94
Appendix A: Technical Characteristics
• 2 bytes for the activation or inhibition of the downstream network by the gateway
Structure of the
LUFP9 gateway’s memory: (see chapter 5 Gateway Initialization and Diagnostics).
• 510 bytes accessible by the DeviceNet master in the form of output data (see
Appendix B: Default Configuration, Output Data Memory Area, for the default
Outputs
use of this output data).
Addresses
0x0200
0x0201
0x0202
:
0x03FF
Output data area
DeviceNet master command word
(unless “Control/Status Byte” = “Disabled”)
Outputs accessible through the DeviceNet master
510 bytes
1 output data area
• 960 bytes inaccessible through the DeviceNet master.
Structure of the
LUFP9 gateway’s memory:
Addresses
General data area
0x0400
Input area reserved for the Mailboxes
General data
(288 bytes)
0x051F
0x0520
Output area reserved for the Mailboxes
(288 bytes)
0x063F
0x0640
Internal area reserved for the management
of the upstream network (384 bytes)
.......
(input area / output area / bi-directional area)
0x07BF
Data transfer order
(swapping)
NOTE: You can use the general data area for Modbus input data (from Modbus
responses) if you do not want the DeviceNet master to have access to them. In
this case, always use 0x0400 as the starting address. If you reuse the addresses
in this area multiple times, the corresponding memory locations will be displayed
in red in the “General Area” section of the “Sub-network Monitor” window (see
page 58 for an example). However, this will have no consequences on the
gateway during run-time.
• DeviceNet network: LSB first and MSB last.
• Modbus RTU network: MSB first and LSB last.
• LUFP9 gateway: MSB stored in the lowest memory address.
→ In most cases, the option which should be chosen for Modbus data stored in
the gateway’s memory is “Swap 2 bytes”. This option relates to all “Data” fields
for Modbus queries and responses frames.
95
Appendix B: Default Configuration
The configuration described below corresponds to the LUFP9 gateway’s default configuration.
NOTE: This chapter mainly gives the user information about the performance obtained on the downstream
Modbus network. It allows the user to decide whether, for example, he should change the period for cyclical
exchanges with one or more of the TeSys U motor starters (see chapter 6 Configuring the Gateway).
Configuring Modbus exchanges
The LUFP9 gateway carries out four types of exchanges with each of the 8 TeSys U motor starters. The first two
exchanges are cyclical and allow you to control and monitor the motor starter. The last two exchanges are
aperiodic (only when there is a change in the values of the data to be transmitted to the motor starter) and allow
you to read and change the value of any motor starter parameter.
Function
0x03
0x10
Modbus function
Read Holding
Registers
Preset Multiple
Registers
Number of
bytes (1)
11.5 + 10.5
14.5 + 11.5
(0x03)
(Read Holding
Register)
011.5 + 10.5
(0x06)
(Preset Single
Register)
11.5 + 11.5
Exchange between the LUFP9 gateway
and the TeSys U motor starter
Periodic reading (300 ms period) of the TeSys U motor
starter’s status register (address 455 = 0x01C7) only
Periodic writing (300 ms period) of the TeSys U motor
starter’s status register (address 704 = 0x02C0) only
Aperiodic reading of the value of a single parameter, for a
single TeSys U motor starter at a time (function and
address supplied by the user)
Aperiodic writing of the value of a single parameter, for a
single TeSys U motor starter at a time (function and
address and value supplied by the user)
(1) Number of bytes in the Query + number of bytes in the Response, plus a period of silence of 3.5 characters
for each of these two frames (see description of the “Message delimiter (10ms)” parameter in
chapter 6.12.3 “Sub-Network” Element). Each byte will be transmitted in the form of a group of 10 bits
(8 data bits, 1 start bit and 1 stop bit). These values allow you to calculate the approximate amount of traffic
on the downstream Modbus network as follows:
Volume of periodic traffic (300 ms period)..................... [ (11.5 + 10.5) + (14.5 + 11.5) ] × (8 + 1 + 1) = 480 bits
For 1 TeSys U motor starter ............................................................... 1 × 480 × (1,000 ÷ 300) = 01,600 bits/s
For 8 TeSys U motor starters ........................................................... 8 × 480 × (1,000 ÷ 300) = 012,800 bits/s
As a result, on a network operating at 9,600 bits/s, you will need to considerably increase the cycle time for
all or part of the periodic Modbus commands. On the other hand, at a speed of 19,200 bits/s (default
speed), the available bandwidth is sufficient to allow proper communications, even in occasional degraded
mode (frames re-transmission), and to allow the use of aperiodic setup exchanges.
96
Appendix B: Default Configuration
Content of the Gateway DPRAM Memory
The LUFP9 gateway’s DPRAM memory contains all of the data exchanged between the gateway and the
8 TeSys U motor starters, as well as two special registers only exchanged between the gateway and the
DeviceNet master (words used for managing the downstream Modbus network).
The flow of data exchanged between the TeSys U motor starters, the gateway and the DeviceNet master is
shown below, in order to highlight the role of the gateway’s memory in these exchanges:
TeSys U motor starters
LUFP9 Gateway
Outputs
INPUT data
memory zone
Modbus
c d
e
j
Inputs
DeviceNet (SLC500) Master
Outputs
DeviceNet
OUTPUT data
memory zone
Inputs
Input Data Memory Area
The gateway has 512 input bytes. Only the first 32 bytes are used. All of these 32 bytes make up the gateway’s
input area, referenced as “Input 1” in the RSNetWorx configurator.
Service
Address
Size
Managing the downstream
Modbus network
0x0000
1 word
Gateway status word
0x0002
1 word
Value of the motor starter c status register
0x0004
1 word
Value of the motor starter d status register
0x0006
1 word
Value of the motor starter e status register
0x0008
1 word
Value of the motor starter f status register
0x000A
1 word
Value of the motor starter g status register
0x000C
1 word
Value of the motor starter h status register
0x000E
1 word
Value of the motor starter i status register
0x0010
1 word
Value of the motor starter j status register
——
0x0012
1 byte
Memory location free
Aperiodic communications
—
Reading the value of a
motor starter parameter
(RESPONSE)
0x0013
1 byte
Slave no. (0x01 to 0x08)
0x0014
1 byte
Function number (0x03)
0x0015
1 byte
Number of bytes read (0x02)
0x0016
1 word
Value of the parameter read (0xxxxx)
Aperiodic communications
—
Writing the value of a
motor starter parameter
(RESPONSE)
0x0018
1 byte
Slave no. (0x01 to 0x08)
0x0019
1 byte
Function number (0x06)
0x001A
1 word
Address of the parameter written (0xxxxx)
0x001C
1 word
Value of the parameter written (0xxxxx)
Aperiodic communications
(“Trigger bytes” for the responses)
0x001E
1 byte
Read parameter response counter
0x001F
1 byte
Write parameter response counter
0x0020
…
0x01FF
1 byte
…
1 byte
Free input area
(480 bytes)
Periodic communications
—
Monitoring of
TeSys U motor starters
——
Description
97
Appendix B: Default Configuration
Output Data Memory Area
The gateway has 512 output bytes. Only the first 32 bytes are used. All of these 32 bytes make up the gateway’s
output area, referenced as “Output 1” in the RSNetWorx configurator.
Service
Address
Size
Managing the downstream
Modbus network
0x0200
1 word
DeviceNet master command word
0x0202
1 word
Value of the motor starter c command register
0x0204
1 word
Value of the motor starter d command register
0x0206
1 word
Value of the motor starter e command register
0x0208
1 word
Value of the motor starter f command register
0x020A
1 word
Value of the motor starter g command register
0x020C
1 word
Value of the motor starter h command register
0x020E
1 word
Value of the motor starter i command register
0x0210
1 word
Value of the motor starter j command register
0x0212
1 byte
Slave no. (0x01 to 0x08)
0x0213
1 byte
Function number (0x03)
0x0214
1 word
Address of the parameter to be read (0xxxxx)
0x0216
1 word
Number of parameters to be read (0x0001)
0x0218
1 byte
Slave no. (0x01 to 0x08)
0x0219
1 byte
Function number (0x06)
0x021A
1 word
Address of the parameter to be written
(0xxxxx)
0x021C
1 word
Value of the parameter to be written (0xxxxx)
0x021E
1 byte
Read parameter query counter
0x021F
1 byte
Write parameter query counter
0x0220
…
0x03FF
1 byte
…
1 byte
Free output area
(480 bytes)
Periodic communications
—
Controlling
TeSys U motor starters
Aperiodic communications
—
Reading the value of a
motor starter parameter (QUERY)
Aperiodic communications
—
Writing the value of a
motor starter parameter (QUERY)
Aperiodic communications
(“Trigger bytes” for the queries)
——
Description
Total Number of Modbus Queries and Responses
The total number of Modbus queries and responses is equal to 36 (2 periodic queries and 2 periodic
responses for each of the 8 TeSys U motor starters, plus 2 aperiodic queries and 2 aperiodic responses for all of
these motor starters). Since the total number of the Modbus queries and responses one can configure for a
single gateway is limited to 50, there are only 14 spare Modbus queries and responses (that is to say the
equivalent of 7 Modbus commands).
So this reserve does not allow the addition of any single Modbus command for each of the TeSys U motor
starters, as this would require the use of 16 Modbus queries and responses (1 query and 1 response for each of
the 8 motor starters).
98
Appendix C: Practical Example (RSLogix 500)
NOTE: This Appendix is reserved for users having a good knowledge of Rockwell Automation RSNetWorx and
RSLogix 500 products.
A practical example can be found on the CD LU9CD1. It is made up of two files. The first of these,
“SLC_Guide_LUFP9.dnt”, shows the configuration of the DeviceNet scanner in RSNetWorx, described in the
previous chapters. The second, “SLC_Guide_LUFP9_EN.rss”, is an RSLogix 500 file and so this is the
example itself.
As the configuration of the RSNetWorx file corresponds exactly to that shown in the previous chapters, we will
not be repeating its content here. On the other hand, the RSLogix 500 file is described below, based on the
structure of the sub-programs used.
Main Program: “LAD 2 - MAIN_LUFP9”
The role of the main program is to activate the DeviceNet and Modbus communications, and to call the other
sub-programs, described in later chapters. The processes carried out in the main program are described below,
in the order in which they are run:
• Validation of the scanner’s DeviceNet exchanges by activation of bit O:1.0/0.
• Activation of the gateway’s Modbus communications using bits 13 (FB_DU) and 14 (FB_HS_SEND) of the
DeviceNet master’s command word. These two bits correspond to DeviceNet scanner bits O:1.1/5 and
O:1.1/6.
NOTE: This process is only relevant provided that the “Control/Status Byte” option is set to “Enabled”. With
the LUFP9 gateway’s default configuration (“Control/Status Byte” = “Enabled but no startup lock”), this
process is irrelevant but may still be kept. Finally, this example should not be used when this option is set to
“Disabled”, because words I:1.1 and O:1.1 are no longer reserved for “managing the downstream Modbus
network”. Please see chapter 5Gateway Initialization and Diagnostics, for further information on this subject.
• Automatic acknowledgement of the gateway diagnostics by the DeviceNet master. All you have to do is
copy the value of bit 15 (ABC_HS_SEND) of the gateway’s status word to bit 15 (FB_HS_CONFIRM) of the
DeviceNet master’s command word (see chapter 5Gateway Initialization and Diagnostics). This automatic
acknowledgement is mainly designed not to halt the mechanism for feeding diagnostics back from the
gateway to the DeviceNet master.
• Controlling/monitoring the “TeSys U n°1” motor starter by using sub-program U:3, that is to say the “LAD 3 CMD_SURV” sub-program. This sub-program uses local variables as parameters. The word N7:0 is used to
index both the output register and the input register used to control and monitor the “TeSys U n°1” motor
starter. So before calling the sub-program, the value of this word is set to 2 in order to access the words
O:1.2 and I:1.2. N7:0 is also used to index one of the bits of each of the registers N7:32, 33, 34 and 35
(registers handled by the user).
• Controlling/monitoring motor starter “TeSys U n°2”: Ditto, but setting the value of N7:0 to 3 (O:1.3 and I:1.3).
• Controlling/monitoring motor starter “TeSys U n°3”: Ditto, but setting the value of N7:0 to 4 (O:1.4 and I:1.4).
• Controlling/monitoring motor starter “TeSys U n°4”: Ditto, but setting the value of N7:0 to 5 (O:1.5 and I:1.5).
• Controlling/monitoring motor starter “TeSys U n°5”: Ditto, but setting the value of N7:0 to 6 (O:1.6 and I:1.6).
• Controlling/monitoring motor starter “TeSys U n°6”: Ditto, but setting the value of N7:0 to 7 (O:1.7 and I:1.7).
99
Appendix C: Practical Example (RSLogix 500)
• Controlling/monitoring motor starter “TeSys U n°7”: Ditto, but setting the value of N7:0 to 8 (O:1.8 and I:1.8).
• Controlling/monitoring motor starter “TeSys U n°8”: Ditto, but setting the value of N7:0 to 9 (O:1.9 and I:1.9).
• Reading the value of a single parameter out of all of the TeSys U motor starters, by using the U:4 subprogram, that is to say the “LAD 4 - LECT_PAR” sub-program.
• Writing the value of a parameter in a single TeSys U motor starter at a time, by using the U:5 sub-program,
that is to say the “LAD 5 - LECT_PAR” sub-program.
• Updating output 0:1.16 using the two counters N7:36 and N7:37. This output corresponds to the two
“Trigger bytes” that trigger the emission of both the parameter reading request (LSB) and the parameter
writing request (MSB). These two counters are independantly updated in the following sub-programs: “LAD
4 – RD_PAR”, for N7:36, and “LAD 5 – WR_PAR”, for N7:37.
NOTE: You can read a parameter on all the motor starters and write a parameter on one of them at the same
time as these services use different Modbus commands.
The various data used by the main program are shown in the following table:
Address
Symbol
I:1.1/07 → I:1/23
O:1.0/00 → O:1/00
O:1.1/05 → O:1/21
O:1.1/06 → O:1/22
O:1.1/07 → O:1/23
N7:0
ABC_HS_SEND
SCAN_VALIDATION
FB_DU
FB_HS_SEND
FB_HS_CONFIRM
MODULE
O:1.16
N7:36
N7:37
Description
Flip flop indicating that there is a new gateway diagnostic
Enable DeviceNet communications: this bit must be set to 1 to validate the exchanges
Activation of Modbus communications by the gateway
Flip flop telling the gateway that there is a new command
Bit used by the DeviceNet master to acknowledge diagnostics of the gateway
Parameter giving access (index) to the motor starter (called “module” to simplify things)
"Trigger bytes" used to trigger the emission of the read parameter request
TRIGGER_OUT_RD_WR
(LSB) or of the write parameter request (MSB)
————
Local counter related to the “trigger byte” of the read parameter request
————
Local counter related to the “trigger byte” of the write parameter request
Controlling/Monitoring Sub-Program for a TeSys U Motor Starter: “LAD 3 - CMD_MON”
The role of this sub-program consists of exercising very simple control over one of the TeSys U motor starters,
depending on its current status and the user’s commands. The processes carried out in this sub-program are
described below, in the order in which they are run:
• Control of the motor to run forward / in reverse / to stop. Register N7:0 is used as a parameter. It contains
the number of both the input word and the output word used to control and monitor the TeSys U motor
starter. This same number is used to index one of the bits of each register for registers N7:32 to N7:35. The
input word used is located between I:1.2 and I:1.9 (motor starters nos. 1 to 8), and the output word used is
located between O:1.2 and O:1.9 (ditto). So the value of N7:0 must be between 2 and 9, according to the
number of the motor starter currently controlled.
The user controls the motor starter’s running mode using bits 2 to 9 (motor starters nos. 1 to 8) of registers
N7:32 ( Run (1) / Stop (0) ) and N7:33 (Run Forwards (0) / Reverse (1) ).
100
Appendix C: Practical Example (RSLogix 500)
The forward, reverse and stop commands for the TeSys U motor starter are carried out under the following
conditions:
ƒ Bit 14 of a TeSys U status word = 0......... The motor starter is not in local mode.
ƒ Bit 02 of a TeSys U status word = 0......... There is no fault on the motor starter.
ƒ Bit 00 of a TeSys U status word = 1......... The motor starter is in the “Ready” or “Switched on” state.
When all of these conditions are met, registers N7:32 and N7:33 (bit 2 to 9, depending on the value of N7:0) are
used to control either the motor starter running forwards / in reverse, or to stop it by means of braking. The user
updates these two registers bit by bit, according to the commands he wishes to undertake.
• The faults on the TeSys U motor starter are reset. Register N7:0 is used in the same way as above and the
input and output words are the same as for controlling the motor starter.
When there is a fault on the motor starter (bit 2 of the monitoring register equal to 1), this fault is copied to
one of the bits 2 to 9 (one bit per motor starter) in register N7:34 (Faulty device (1) / Motor starter OK (0) ),
simply to show this state together with the user command which allows you to reset motor starter faults.
This user command corresponds to one of the bits 2 to 9 of register N7:35 (fault reset (1) ) and is used to
activate bit 3 of the command register of the corresponding TeSys U motor starter (“Reset” bit), that is to
say bit O:1.[N7:0]/3.
This fault reset user command is then cancelled by the program when the TeSys U motor starter no longer
shows that there is a fault.
101
Appendix C: Practical Example (RSLogix 500)
The various data used by this sub-program are shown in the following table:
Address
I:1.[N7:0]/00
I:1.[N7:0]/01
I:1.[N7:0]/02
Symbol
—
—
—
I:1.[N7:0]/14
—
N7:32/[N7:0]
CMD_RUN [ MODULE ]
N7:33/[N7:0]
CMD_REVERSE [ MODULE ]
N7:34/[N7:0]
MON_FAULTY_DEV [ MODULE ]
N7:35/[N7:0]
CMD_RESET [ MODULE ]
O:1.[N7:0]/00
—
O:1.[N7:0]/01
—
O:1.[N7:0]/02
—
O:1.[N7:0]/03
—
N7:0
MODULE
Description
Bit 00 “Ready” of the TeSys U status register
Bit 01 “On” of the TeSys U status register
Bit 02 “Fault” of the TeSys U status register
Bit 14 “Reserved: Local control” of the TeSys U
motor starter status register
User command: Start (1) / Stop (0) on the motor
starter whose number is N7:0
User command: Run forwards (0) / Reverse (1) on
the motor starter whose number is N7:0
User monitoring: Fault (1) / No fault (0) on the
motor starter whose number is N7:0
User command: Fault reset (1) on the motor starter
whose number is N7:0
Bit 0 “Reserved: Run Forward” of the TeSys U
command register addressed with N7:0
Bit 1 “Reserved: Run Reverse” of the TeSys U
command register addressed with N7:0
Bit 2 “Reserved (brake)” of the TeSys U command
register addressed with N7:0
Bit 3 “Reset” of the TeSys U command register
addressed with N7:0
Parameter for accessing the motor starter (index
between 2 and 9, for TeSys U motor starters nos. 1
to 8)
The example includes a personalized data monitoring screen, known as “CDM 0 - CMD_MON”, in order to
simplify the use of this example. The content of this screen is shown below:
Address
O:1/00
O:1/21
O:1/22
N7:0
N7:32
N7:33
N7:34
N7:35
I:1.2
O:1.2
I:1.3
O:1.3
Symbol
SCAN_VALIDATION
FB_DU
FB_HS_SEND
MODULE
CMD_RUN
CMD_REVERSE
MON_FAULTY_DEV
CMD_RESET
MON_TESYS_U_1
CMD_TESYS_U_1
MON_TESYS_U_2
CMD_TESYS_U_2
Display
Binary
Binary
Binary
Decimal
Binary
Binary
Binary
Binary
Binary
Binary
Binary
Binary
Address
I:1.4
O:1.4
I:1.5
O:1.5
I:1.6
O:1.6
I:1.7
O:1.7
I:1.8
O:1.8
I:1.9
O:1.9
Symbol
MON_TESYS_U_3
CMD_TESYS_U_3
MON_TESYS_U_4
CMD_TESYS_U_4
MON_TESYS_U_5
CMD_TESYS_U_5
MON_TESYS_U_6
CMD_TESYS_U_6
MON_TESYS_U_7
CMD_TESYS_U_7
MON_TESYS_U_8
CMD_TESYS_U_8
Display
Binary
Binary
Binary
Binary
Binary
Binary
Binary
Binary
Binary
Binary
Binary
Binary
102
Appendix C: Practical Example (RSLogix 500)
Sub-Program for Reading a Parameter in all TeSys U Motor Starters: “LAD 4 - RD_PAR
The role of this sub-program is to read the value of a single parameter on all TeSys U motor starters. As they are
read, the results are placed into an array starting at N7:4 (motor starter no. 1) and ending at N7:11 (motor starter
no. 8). Index N7:2 is used to access these various addresses. The processes carried out on this sub-program
are described below, in the order in which they are run:
•
If the user changes the number (or address) of the parameter to be read (N7:1) this causes the data used by the
sub-program to be reinitialized, but only if the previous reading process is finished (B3:0/0 = 0). The comparison
between N7:1 (new address) and O:1.11 (address in the last command used) is made through a scratch variable,
N9:0, in which the LSB and the MSB of the new address are swapped. The initializations are summarised below:
ƒ B3:0/0 = 1 .................... A parameter is read on all TeSys U motor starters: In progress.
ƒ Reset (C5:0) ................ The number of motor starters polled counter is reinitialized.
ƒ Reset (T4:0)................. The timer associated with the timeout for a parameter’s read response is
reinitialized.
ƒ N7:2 = 4....................... Index in the array of results → No. of the 1st element in the array = N7:4.
ƒ N7:3 = 1....................... Address of the Modbus slave polled → Address of the first TeSys U motor starter,
that is to say 1.
ƒ N7:[4..11] = 0............... The contents of the array of results is reset.
ƒ B3:0/5 = 0 .................... Enables the update of the “trigger byte” that will trigger the emission of the query.
•
The output data corresponding to the read query is updated (O:1.10 to O:1.12) and the N7:36 counter (“trigger
byte”) is increased by one. This update is only done once (bit B3:0/5 used for this pupose). Reminder: In the
LUFP9 gateway’s default configuration, this output data corresponds to the personalized Modbus command
“Transactions 1” of the “TeSys U n°1” node. The query frame for this personalized command is sent when the
“trigger byte” located in bits 0-7 of O:1.16 is changed (“Update mode” = “Change of state on trigger”). As a result,
increasing the N7:36 counter, then updating O:1.16 using N7:36 (in “LAD 2 – MAIN_LUFP9”), causes this query
to be sent. On the other hand, the output data O:1.10 to O:1.12 must be valid so that the content of the Modbus
query remains coherent!
•
The data from the Modbus response which corresponds to this read command is checked. The values of inputs
I:1.10 and I:1.11 are compared to those of output O:1.10 and the value 0x02xx (AND mask set to 0xFF00) in
order to determine whether the response to the command has arrived or not. If the slave number and the function
number correspond to those of the query (see above) and the number of bytes of data received is correct, bit
B3:0/1 is activated in order to tell the rest of the sub-program that the response has arrived and that it is correct.
The N9:0 scratch variable is used to compare the inputs and the outputs in the same format.
•
The value of the read parameter is copied into the array of results. So the value of I:1.12 is transferred to the
location reserved for the result of the motor starter currently being polled (use of index N7:2). This transfer only
takes place if the response has arrived and its content is correct (bit B3:0/1 is active). The LSB and the MSB for
this value are then swapped in this array so as to restore the value of the read parameter. The timer for the
response timeout (T4:0) is reinitialized to allow the process of reading the same parameter on the next motor
starter.
•
Management of the response timeout (TON block on variable T4:0). Until the response arrives or if its content is
incorrect (bit B3:0/1 = 0), a 3-second timer is set. When this timeout (T4:0/DN = 1) is triggered, the related timer is
reinitialized and a result set to –1 is placed in the array of results, at the location normally reserved for the motor
starter being polled.
•
On receipt of the response, or after the timeout has been triggered, the internal data used by this sub-program is
updated to allow the same parameter to be read on the next motor starter, up to the last of the 8 motor starters
(addresses 1 to 8). Counter C5:0 is used to count the number of motor starters which have been polled so far.
•
When the reading of the 8th motor starter is finished (counter C5:0 reaching its preset value), the reading process
is halted (bit B3:0/0 is reset). However, until the reading of the parameter for the 8th motor starter has finished,
the sub-program restarts the next PLC cycle from the beginning (moving onto the next motor starter or continuing
to wait for a response for the motor starter currently being polled).
103
Appendix C: Practical Example (RSLogix 500)
The various data used by this sub-program are shown in the following table:
Address
Symbol
B3.0/0
RD_RUNNING
Description
B3.0/1
RD_OK_KO
B3:0/5
————
C5:0
CPT_RD_TESYS_U
I:1.10
CR_RDPAR_XXX_SLAVE
I:1.11
CR_RDPAR_FCT_BYTES
I:1.12
CR_RDPAR_VALUE
N7:1
NUMPARAM
N7:2
RD_INDEX
N7:3
ADDRESS
N7:[N7:2]
— [ RD_INDEX ]
N7:36
N9:0
————
VAR_TEMP_1
O:1.10
RDPAR_SLAVE_FCT
O:1.11
RDPAR_ADRPAR
O:1.12
RDPAR_NBPARS
T4:0
TIMEOUT_RD_PARAM
Reading a parameter on all TeSys U motor starters: In progress
Reading a parameter on all TeSys U motor starters: Reading is correct (OK) or
incorrect (KO) for a motor starter (if the response has arrived or when timeout
T4:0 is triggered)
The “trigger byte” of the query has been updated: Yes (1) / No (0)
Reading a parameter on the TeSys U motor starters: Counter. When the value
of this counter reaches 9, the process of reading a parameter on all of the
TeSys U motor starters is halted.
Result of reading a parameter: Slave (0x01 to 0x08) as MSB. The value of this
field is compared to that of the corresponding field in the query frame. The
LSB of this input word is not used.
Result of reading a parameter: Function (always 0x03) as LSB (the value of this
field is compared to that of the corresponding field in the query frame) +
number of bytes read (0x02) as MSB (value masked and checked).
Result of reading a parameter: Value of the parameter read (MSB and LSB
are swapped). This value is placed in array N7:[N7:2], then its MSB and its
LSB are swapped there in order to restore the correct value of the read
parameter.
User command: Number of the read parameter.
Index in the array of results for the reading of a TeSys U parameter. Value = 4
to 11 (motor starters nos. 1 to 8).
Address of the Modbus slave for which one of the parameters is currently
being read. Value = 1 to 8.
Array of results used for the reading of a TeSys U parameter (motor starters
nos. 1 to 8). Elements N7:4 to N7:11 (see N7:2). Value = –1 in case of error
(response timeout triggered).
Local counter that corresponds to the “trigger byte” of the read request.
Temporary scratch variable used to carry out intermediate evaluations.
Request for the reading of a parameter: Slave (from 0x01 to 0x08) as LSB +
function (always 0x03) as MSB.
Request for the reading of a parameter: Address of the parameter (copied
from N7:1, but with MSB and LSB swapped).
Request for the reading of a parameter: Number of parameters to be read
(always 0x0001, but with the MSB and LSB swapped, that is to say 0x0100).
Timer for the timeout of the parameter reading command (3 seconds)
The example includes a personalized screen for monitoring the data, called “CDM 1 - RD_PAR”, in order to
simplify the use of this example. The content of this screen is shown below:
Address
N7:1
Symbol
NUMPARAM
Display
Decimal
B3:0/0
B3:0/1
N7:2
N7:3
N7:4
N7:5
N7:6
N7:7
N7:8
N7:9
RD_RUNNING
RD_OK_KO
RD_INDEX
ADDRESS
RDPAR1
RDPAR2
RDPAR3
RDPAR4
RDPAR5
RDPAR6
Binary
Binary
Decimal
Decimal
Decimal
Decimal
Decimal
Decimal
Decimal
Decimal
Address
N7:10
N7:11
O:1.10
O:1.11
O:1.12
I:1.10
I:1.11
I:1.12
I:1.16
O:1.16
N7:36
B3:0/5
Symbol
RDPAR7
RDPAR8
RDPAR_SLAVE_FCT
RDPAR_ADRPAR
RDPAR_NBPARS
CR_RDPAR_XXX_SLAVE
CR_RDPAR_FCT_BYTES
CR_RDPAR_VALUE
TRIGGER_IN_RD_WR
TRIGGER_OUT_RD_WR
————
————
Display
Decimal
Decimal
Hexadecimal
Decimal
Hexadecimal
Hexadecimal
Hexadecimal
Hexadecimal
Hexadecimal
Hexadecimal
Hexadecimal
Binary
104
Appendix C: Practical Example (RSLogix 500)
Sub-Program for Writing a Parameter on a Single TeSys U Motor Starter: “LAD 5 WR_PAR
The role of this sub-program consists of writing the value of a parameter on a single TeSys U motor starter. The
user should enter the address of the TeSys U motor starter (N7:12), the address of the parameter (N7:13) and
the value to be assigned to the parameter (N7:14). Finally, he should activate bit B3:0/2 to activate the writing
process. This bit is automatically reset by the LAD 5 sub-program. When the writing process is finished, the
result of the writing (address of the parameter and value of the parameter) is copied in an array starting at N7:16
(for motor starter no. 1) and ending at N7:31 (for motor starter no. 8), using variable N7:15 as an index. Two
successive cells of this array are used for each motor starter: The first receives the parameter’s address and the
second its value. The processes carried out by this sub-program are described below, in the order in which they
are run:
• The sub-program goes into standby mode. The rest of the sub-program is not run until the user has
activated bit B3:0/2. This allows the user to enter the values of data N7:12, 13 and 14 one after another
beforehand.
• The data the sub-program uses subsequently is initialized, but only if the writing process is finished
(B3:0/3 = 0). These initializations are summarised below:
ƒ
B3:0/2 = 0............................. User command: The command for writing a parameter on a TeSys U
motor starter is reset.
ƒ
B3:0/3 = 1.............................A parameter is written on a TeSys U motor starter: In progress.
ƒ
Reset (T4:1) .........................The timer related to the timeout of the parameter write response is reset.
ƒ
N7:15 = (N7:12 × 2) + 14 .....Index in the array of results.
ƒ
N7:[N7:15] = { 0 ; 0 } ............The content of the array of results is reset, but only for the motor starter
affected by the write query (two successive bytes).
ƒ
B3:0/6 = 0.............................Enables the update of the “trigger byte” that will trigger the emission of the query.
• The output data corresponding to the write query is updated (O:1.13 to O:1.15) and the N7:37 counter
(“trigger byte”) is increased by one. This update is only done once (bit B3:0/6 used for this pupose).
Reminder: In the LUFP9 gateway’s default configuration, this output data corresponds to the personalized
Modbus command “Transactions 2” of the “TeSys U n°1” node. The query frame for this personalized
command is sent when the “trigger byte” located in bits 8-15 of O:1.16 is changed (“Update mode” =
“Change of state on trigger”). As a result, increasing the N7:37 counter, then updating O:1.16 using N7:37
(in “LAD 2 – MAIN_LUFP9”), causes this query to be sent. On the other hand, the output data O:1.13 to
O:1.15 must be valid so that the content of the Modbus query remains coherent! The LSB and the MSB of
outputs O:1.14 and O:1.15 must be swapped. The scratch variable N9:0 is used to carry out this swap
between variables N7:13 and N7:14 and outputs O:1.14 and O:1.15.
• The data from the Modbus response which corresponds to this write command is checked. The values of
inputs I:1.13 to I:1.15 are compared to those of outputs O:1.13 to O:1.15 to determine whether the response
to the command has arrived or not. If the slave number, the function number, the address of the parameter
and its value correspond to those of the query (see above) and the number of bytes of data received is
correct, bit B3:0/4 is activated in order to tell the rest of the sub-program that the response has arrived and
that it is correct.
• The address and the value of the parameter are copied into two successive locations in the array of results
(indexing carried out using N7:15), reserved for the motor starter currently being polled and only takes place
if the response has arrived and its content is correct (bit B3:0/4 active). The LSB and the MSB for each of
these two items of data are then swapped to restore its correct value. The timer for the response timeout
(T4:1) is reinitialized to ready the program for a future write command. Bit B3:0/3 is reset to show that the
command is finished, thus avoiding having to run the rest of the sub-program.
105
Appendix C: Practical Example (RSLogix 500)
• Management of the response timeout (T4:1). Until the response arrives or if its content is incorrect (bit
B3:0/4 = 0), a 3-second timer is set. When this timeout (T4:1/DN = 1) is triggered, the timer is reinitialized,
the parameter’s address (O:1.14, after LSB / MSB have been swapped using scratch variable N9:0) and an
erroneous value (N9:1 = –1) are placed in the array of results, into two successive locations, reserved for
the motor starter currently being polled. Finally, the write process is halted (bit B3:0/3 is reset).
The various data used by this sub-program are shown in the following table:
Address
Symbol
B3:0/2
WR_COMMAND
B3.0/3
WR_RUNNING
B3.0/4
WR_OK
B3.0/6
————
I:1.13
CR_WRPAR_SLAVE_FCT
I:1.14
CR_WRPAR_ADRPAR
I:1.15
CR_WRPAR_VALUE
N7:12
WR_SLAVE
N7:13
WR_ADDRESS
N7:14
WR_VALUE
N7:15
WR_INDEX
N7:[N7:15]
— [ WR_INDEX ]
N7:37
————
N9:0
N9:1
VAR_TEMP_1
VAR_TEMP_2
O:1.13
WRPAR_SLAVE_FCT
O:1.14
WRPAR_ADRPAR
O:1.15
WRPAR_VALUE
Description
User command: Writing a parameter on a TeSys U motor starter.
This bit is activated by the user and reset by the program.
Writing a parameter on a TeSys U motor starter: In progress
Writing a parameter on a TeSys U motor starter: Writing OK (if the
response has arrived and is correct)
The “trigger byte” of the query has been updated: Yes (1) / No (0)
Result of writing the value of a parameter: Slave (0x01 to 0x08) as
LSB + function (always 0x06) as MSB. The values of these fields
are compared to those of the query
Result of writing the value of a parameter: Address of the
parameter. The value of this field is compared to that of the query
(swapping of the MSB and the LSB with each of these two fields)
Result of writing the value of a parameter: Value of the written
parameter. The value of this field is compared to that of the query
(swapping of the MSB and the LSB with each of these two fields)
User command: Modbus address of the motor starter to which the
write request should be sent.
User command: Address of the parameter
NOTE: Do not attempt to change the value of register 704
(command register), because it is already controlled by the
DeviceNet master (see sub-program “LAD 3 - CMD_MON”)!
User command: New value of the parameter
Index in the array of results for writing TeSys U parameters (motor
starters nos. 1 to 8).
Value = 16 + 2 × (motor starter no. – 1) = 16 to 30
Array of results for writing TeSys U parameters (motor starters nos.
1 to 8). Elements N7:16 to N7:31 organized by “parameter address”
/ “parameter value” pairs, each pair occupying two successive
addresses.
“Parameter value” = –1 if there is an error (response timeout
triggered).
Local counter that corresponds to the “trigger byte” of the read
request.
Temporary variables used to carry out the intermediate evaluations
(primarily LSB / MSB swappings).
Request for writing the value of a parameter: Slave (copied from
N7:12) as LSB + function (always 0x06) as MSB.
Request for writing the value of a parameter: Address of the
parameter (copied from N7:13, but with MSB and LSB swapped).
Request for writing the value of a parameter: Value of the parameter
(copied from N7:14, but with MSB and LSB swapped).
106
Appendix C: Practical Example (RSLogix 500)
Address
S:24
Symbol
INDEX_SYS
T4:1
TIMEOUT_WR_PARAM
Description
Index register used in indexed addressing (prefix: ‘#’)
Timer for the timeout of the parameter writing command
(3 seconds)
The example includes a personalized screen for monitoring the data, called “CDM 2 - WR_PAR”, in order to
simplify the use of this example. The content of this screen is shown below:
Address
N7:12
N7:13
N7:14
B3:0/2
Symbol
WR_SLAVE
WR_ADDRESS
WR_VALUE
WR_COMMAND
Display
Decimal
Decimal
Decimal
Binary
B3:0/3
B3:0/4
N7:15
N7:16
N7:17
N7:18
N7:19
N7:20
N7:21
N7:22
N7:23
N7:24
WR_RUNNING
WR_OK
WR_INDEX
WRPAR_1_ADDRESS
WRPAR_1_VALUE
WRPAR_2_ADDRESS
WRPAR_2_VALUE
WRPAR_3_ADDRESS
WRPAR_3_VALUE
WRPAR_4_ADDRESS
WRPAR_4_VALUE
WRPAR_5_ADDRESS
Binary
Binary
Decimal
Decimal
Decimal
Decimal
Decimal
Decimal
Decimal
Decimal
Decimal
Decimal
Address
N7:25
N7:26
N7:27
N7:28
N7:29
N7:30
N7:31
O:1.13
O:1.14
O:1.15
I:1.13
I:1.14
I:1.15
I:1.16
O:1.16
N7:37
B3:0/6
Symbol
WRPAR_5_VALUE
WRPAR_6_ADDRESS
WRPAR_6_VALUE
WRPAR_7_ADDRESS
WRPAR_7_VALUE
WRPAR_8_ADDRESS
WRPAR_8_VALUE
WRPAR_SLAVE_FCT
WRPAR_ADRPAR
WRPAR_VALUE
CR_WRPAR_SLAVE_FCT
CR_WRPAR_ADRPAR
CR_WRPAR_VALUE
TRIGGER_IN_RD_WR
TRIGGER_OUT_RD_WR
————
————
Display
Decimal
Decimal
Decimal
Decimal
Decimal
Decimal
Decimal
Hexadecimal
Hexadecimal
Hexadecimal
Hexadecimal
Hexadecimal
Hexadecimal
Hexadecimal
Hexadecimal
Hexadecimal
Binary
Restrictions relating to the RSLogix 500 example
This example is not perfect. For instance, with an incorrect response (wrong slave number, function number,
etc.), the program performs no particular processing and continues to wait for a response until it times out, even
though the gateway has not re-transmitted anything because, from its point of view, the response is correct. In
fact, as the whole content of the Modbus response is placed in a “Data” field, it will not be checked before being
copied into the gateway’s memory. Only the frame’s Checksum is checked by the gateway.
The two “trigger bytes” located in the input word I:1.16 are not used. You should use them if it is relevant for your
application to be notified each time a response related to the two personalized commands “Transactions 1” and
“Transactions 2” is received by the gateway.
Compatibility with the various options offered for the “Control/Status Byte” field in “ABC” (see chapter 5 Gateway
Initialization and Diagnostics) is only partially dealt with in this example. The improvements required relate
mainly to managing bits 14 and 15 of the DeviceNet master’s command word and the gateway’s status word
(bits 6 and 7 of the corresponding input I:1.1 and output O:1.1). Also, the use of gateway diagnostics (EC and
ED fields) still needs to be defined by the user.
107
Appendix D: DeviceNet Objects
Introduction to the Gateway’s DeviceNet Objects
The LUFP9 gateway’s software has been developed in accordance with the Object Modelling from the
DeviceNet protocol. This model leads to a method used for addressing the gateway’s data, known as Attributes,
made up of four separate values: c the node address (MAC ID), d the Object’s class identifier (Class ID), e the
Instance Number (Instance ID) and f the Attribute Number (Attribute ID). An address made up in this way is
known as a “Path”. The Connection by Explicit Messaging, for example, uses paths of this sort to exchange data
from one point to another on a DeviceNet network.
Address
Min. – max.
Node
0 – 00 063
Class
1 – 65 535
Instance
0 – 65 535
Attribute
1 – 00 255
Description
This field allows you to address one subscriber out of the series of subscribers on a
DeviceNet network using its MAC ID.
All objects sharing the same characteristics belong to the same class, characterized by its
Class ID.
The instances represent the various objects from one class. All instances from one class
share the same behaviours (1) and the same attributes, but each of them has its own set of
values for these attributes. When a subscriber creates an instance (instantiation), he assigns
a unique Instance ID, which allows the other DeviceNet subscribers to have individual
access to it.
Each attribute represents one of the characteristics of the Instances belonging to the same
class. It is assigned some sort of value (byte, unsigned integer, character string, etc.) in
order to supply information about the subscriber’s status or to make settings on the
subscriber’s behaviours (1).
NOTE: To access the attributes of an object’s base class, you need to use Instance 0x00
when entering the full path. e.g. to access the “Revision” attribute from the “Identity Object”
class for DeviceNet subscriber no. 4, you will need to use the following path:
“0x04 • 0x01 • 0x00 • 0x01”.
(1) The behaviors designate actions taken by a DeviceNet object in response to particular events.
List of the Gateway’s DeviceNet Objects
Class
Identity object
Message router
DeviceNet object
Assembly object
Connection object
Acknowledge handler object
I/O data input mapping object
I/O data output mapping object
Diagnostic object
ID
0x01
0x02
0x03
0x04
0x05
0x2B
0xA0
0xA1
0xAA
Required
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
No
No
No
Instances
1
1
1
2 (1)
4 (2)
1
1
1
1
Interfaces
Message router
Explicit message connection
Message router
I/O connections or Message router
I/O connections or Explicit messages
I/O connections or Message router
Message router
Message router
Message router
(1) One input area and one output area are created in the gateway’s memory.
(2) The four instantiated connections are as follows: c Explicit Connection, d Polled Command/Response, e Bit Strobed
Command/Response and f Change-of-State / Cyclic. The last three connections are of the “I/O Connection” type.
108
Appendix D: DeviceNet Objects
Graphical Representation of the Gateway’s DeviceNet Objects
LUFP9 Gateway Memory
0x0000
0x01FF 0x0200
0x03FF 0x0400
Input data (1)
Output data (1)
0x07FF
General data area
Applicative
Objects
Diagnostic
Object
I/O Data Output
Mapping Object
I/O Data Input
Mapping Object
Identity
Object
Acknowledge
Handler Object
Message
Router
Assembly
Objects
I/O
Connections
Objects Reserved
for Communications
Explicit
Messages
DeviceNet
Object
Connection Object
The classes which
correspond to the
grey objects are
required
DeviceNet network
(1) The input and output data areas can be read or written either using “I/O connections” or using “explicit
messages”.
Identity Object (class 0x01)
The “Identity” object only has a single instance (Instance ID = 0x01). This object contains general information
allowing you to identify the gateway and diagnose its status. This object is described in chapter 6-2. of volume II
of the DeviceNet specifications on the ODVA website.
Attributes of class 0x01
ID
0x01
Access Name
Get
Revision
Need
Type
Value
Required
UINT
1
Description
Major and minor indices for the revision of the “Identity
Object”.
Services in class 0x01
Service code
Name of the service
0x0E
Get_Attribute_Single
Need
Description
Required This service allows the value of one of the attributes of the class to be
read.
109
Appendix D: DeviceNet Objects
Attributes of instance 0x01 of class 0x01
ID
Access Name
Need
Type
Value
0x01
Vendor ID
Get
Required
UINT
90
All vendor IDs for DeviceNet products are managed by the ODVA. With the LUFP9 gateway, this ID is set to 90
(gateways from HMS Fieldbus Systems AB (Hassbjer Micro Sys) ).
0x02
Device type
Get
Required
UINT
12
The list of the various types of DeviceNet products is managed by the ODVA. This attribute allows a DeviceNet
subscriber’s profile to be identified, and the minimum requirements and options commonly used by the
subscribers in this profile to be deduced. The LUFP9 gateway is a “Communication Adapter” product (see
chapter 3-7. of volume II of the DeviceNet specifications).
0x03
Product code
Get
Required
UINT
60
This attribute is managed by the manufacturer of the product, thus allowing him to characterize his own products.
He uses it to identify each of his products within the same product family (“device type” attribute). This allows
products with differences in terms of their configurations and/or their options to be characterized.
0x04
Revision
Get
Required
USINT, USINT
3,1
Major and minor indices allowing the “Identity Object” to be identified. The value of each of the two members of
this attribute may not be null. The conventional representation of the revision indices is “major.minor”, with
3 digits for the minor index, completed to the left by zeros if necessary. The major index is limited to 7 data bits.
Its 8th bit is reserved and should be set to zero.
0x05
Status
Get
Required
WORD
(16-bit register)
This attribute is a summary of the product’s general status. This is a 16-bit register:
Bit 0 ........... Allocated to a master
Bit 8...............Minor recoverable fault.
(predefined master/slave connection set).
Bit 9...............Minor unrecoverable fault.
Bit 1 ........... Reserved (value = 2#0).
Bit 10.............Major recoverable fault.
Bit 2 ........... Configured product.
Bit 11.............Major unrecoverable fault.
Bits 3-7 ...... Reserved (value = 2#00000).
Bits 12-15......Reserved (value = 2#0000).
0x06
Serial number
Get
Required
UDINT
(variable)
The product’s serial number is combined with the “vendor ID” attribute to produce a unique identifier for each
DeviceNet product. Each manufacturer must take responsibility for guaranteeing that all the DeviceNet products
he manufactures have a unique serial number.
Sample “serial number:” 0x 23 00 DD 20.
0x07
Product name
Get
Required
SHORT_STRING
“Anybus-C DeviceNet”
This attribute gives visual identification method and takes the form of an ASCII string. This text gives a short
description of the product, or the product family, equivalent to the “product code” attribute (0x03).
The byte preceding this ASCII string shows the total length of this string, from first to the last character. With the
LUFP9 gateway, the total number of bytes included in the “product name” attribute is set to 24. The “AnybusC DeviceNet” string has 18 characters (including spaces). The whole content of the “product name” attribute, with
the LUFP9 gateway, is therefore equal to: 0x 12 41 6E 79 62 75 73 2D 43 20 44 65 76 69 63 65 4E 65 74 00 00
00 00 00. The bytes which are not shown in bold are the content of the ASCII string (length = 0x12).
0x09
Configuration consistency value
Get
Optional
UINT
(variable)
The value of this attribute allows the validity of the product’s configuration to be checked. The product automatically
updates this attribute when the value of any non-volatile attribute is changed. The product’s behaviour when an
error in the integrity of the configuration is detected is specific to each type of product. In the same way, the method
used to calculate the value of this attribute depends entirely on the product: CRC, unit counter, etc.
So this attribute allows a DeviceNet master, for instance, to check that the configuration of the DeviceNet product
has not been changed.
NOTE: In addition to calculating the value of this attribute, the LUFP9 gateway uses its LED s DEVICE STATUS to
warn the user when its configuration is not valid (the LED flashes red/green).
Services of instance 0x01 of class 0x01
Service code Name of the service
0x05
0x0E
Reset
Get_Attribute_Single
Requirement Description
Required
Required
This service allows to restart the gateway (power cycle).
This service allows to read the value of one of the instance attributes.
110
Appendix D: DeviceNet Objects
Message Router Object (class 0x02)
The “Message Router” object is the element through which all objects of the “Explicit messages” type go so that
they can be routed to the objects they are intended for. It has only one instance (Instance ID = 0x01). This object
is described in chapter 6-3. of volume II of the DeviceNet specifications.
Attributes of class 0x02
ID
Access Name
0x01
Get
Revision
Need
Type
Value
Optional
UINT
1
Description
Revision index of the “Message Router Object” class.
Services in class 0x02
Service code Name of the service
0x0E
Get_Attribute_Single
Need
Required
Description
This service allows to read the value of one of the class attributes.
Attributes of instance 0x01 of class 0x02
This instance has no attributes.
DeviceNet Object (class 0x03)
The “DeviceNet” object has only one instance (Instance ID = 0x01). This object contains the status of the
general configuration of the gateway’s node on the DeviceNet network. It is described in chapter 5-5. of volume
II of the DeviceNet specifications. The LUFP9 gateway is a “Group 2 only server” type subscriber (see chapter 79.of volume I of the DeviceNet specifications).
Attributes of class 0x03
ID
Access Name
0x01
Get
Revision
Need
Type
Value
Required
UINT
2
Description
Revision index of the definition of the class of the “DeviceNet
Object” currently used for the implementation of the
gateway’s DeviceNet communications functions. (1)
(1) This index must be between 1 and 65,535 and will be incremented if the definition of the class is replaced
by a more recent definition.
Services in class 0x03
Service code Name of the service
0x0E
Get_Attribute_Single
Need
Optional
Description
This service allows to read the value of one of the class attributes.
Attributes of instance 0x01 of class 0x03
ID
Access Name
Need
Type
Value
0x01
MAC ID
Get
Required
USINT
0 to 63
The value of this attribute corresponds to the gateway’s address on the DeviceNet network (MAC ID), that is to
say to the address configured using the selector switches described in chapter 2.7.2 Encoding the Gateway
Address.
0x02
Baud rate
Get
Optional
USINT
0 to 2
The value of this attribute corresponds to the baud rate of the DeviceNet network, as configured on the gateway
using the selector switches described in chapter 2.7.1 Encoding DeviceNet Speed. This speed must be the same
for all subscribers on the DeviceNet network. The few possible values for this attribute are as follows:
0 (125 kbits/s), 1 (250 kbits/s) and 2 (500 kbits/s).
111
Appendix D: DeviceNet Objects
ID
Access Name
0x05
Need
Type
Value
Allocation information
Get
Required
BYTE , USINT
(variable)
This attribute supplies general information about the DeviceNet allocation method currently being used. It is made
up of the “allocation choice”, in BYTE format and the “master’s MAC ID”, in USINT format and whose value is
between 0 and 63. If the “master’s MAC ID” is set to 255 (which is the case when the gateway is initialized), this
means that there is no allocation when using the “Predefined Master/Slave Connections Set.” Please see
chapters 3-4., 5-5.4.2., and 7. of volume I of the DeviceNet specifications for further details on this subject.
Example : 0x03, 0x00.
Services of instance 0x01 of class 0x03
Service code Name of the service
0x0E
0x4B
Get_Attribute_Single
Allocate Master/Slave
Connection Set
Release Master/Slave
Connection Set
0x4C
Need
Optional
Optional
Optional
Description
This service allows to read the value of one of the instance attributes.
This service allows the master/slave connection to be allocated to a
DeviceNet master, at the latter’s request.
This service allows the master/slave connection previously allocated
to a DeviceNet master to be cleared, at the latter’s request.
Assembly Objects (Class 0x04
As a general rule, objects from the “Assembly” class are used to group attributes (data) belonging to different
objects within a single attribute. This allows them to be accessed using a single message. With the LUFP9
gateway, this class has only 2 instances, each one being assigned to the input area (Instance ID = 0x64) or to the
output area (Instance ID = 0x96) of the gateway. This object is described in chapter 6-5. of volume II of the
DeviceNet specifications.
The first instance (Instance ID = 0x64) is assigned to the gateway’s input data area. This input area gathers all
the memory locations receiving data from a Modbus response to be relayed to the DeviceNet master. The
second instance (Instance ID = 0x96) is assigned to the gateway’s output data area. This output area gathers all
the memory locations receiving data to be placed in a Modbus query, that is to say all the data transmitted by the
DeviceNet master.
Attributes of class 0x04
ID
Access Name
0x01
Get
Revision
Need
Type
Value
Required
UINT
2
Description
Revision index of the “Assembly Object” class.
Services in class 0x04
Service code Name of the service
0x0E
Get_Attribute_Single
Need
Optional
Description
This service allows to read the value of one of the class attributes.
112
Appendix D: DeviceNet Objects
Attributes of instance 0x64 of class 0x04 (MODBUS INPUTS)
ID
Access Name
0x03
Need
Type
Value
Data
Get
Required
USINT […]
(array of values)
The data gathered within this attribute correspond to the data of the attribute 0x01 of instance 0x01 from the I/O
Data Input Mapping Object.
With the default configuration, the size of instance 0x64 (input data area of the gateway) is equal to 32 bytes and
the data related to the attribute 0x03 of this instance corresponds to the description given in Appendix B: Default
Configuration, Input Data Memory Area..
Attributes of instance 0x96 of class 0x04 (MODBUS OUTPUTS)
ID
Access Name
0x03
Requirement
Type
Value
Get / Set Data
Required
USINT […]
(array of values)
The data gathered within this attribute correspond to the data of the attribute 0x01 of instance 0x01 from the I/O
Data Output Mapping Object.
With the default configuration, the size of instance 0x96 (output data area of the gateway) is equal to 32 bytes
and the data related to the attribute 0x03 of this instance corresponds to the description given in Appendix B:
Default Configuration, Output Data Memory Area.
Services of instances 0x64 and 0x96 of class 0x04
Service code Name of the service
Need
0x0E
Get_Attribute_Single
Required
0x10
Get_Attribute_Single
Optional
Description
This service allows to read the array of values that corresponds to the
attribute 0x03 of one of the instances of the “Assembly Object.”
This service allows to write an array of values into the array of the
attribute 0x03 of one of the instances of the “Assembly Object.”
Connection Object (Class 0x05)
With the LUFP9 gateway, the “Connection” object has up to four instances (Instance ID = 0x01 to 0x04). Each of
these instances represents one of the two ends of a virtual connection established between two nodes on the
DeviceNet network, in this case the DeviceNet master node and the gateway node. Each instance of this object
belongs to one of the two following types of connection: Explicit connection, allowing Explicit Messages to be
sent, or implicit connection (I/O Connections). This object is described in chapter 5-4. of volume II of the
DeviceNet specifications.
Here is a brief description of the four instances of the LUFP9 gateway’s “Connection” object, and then details are
given in the rest of this chapter:
Instance ID
0x01
0x02
0x03
0x04
Type of connection
Explicit Messaging
I/O Connection
I/O Connection
I/O Connection
Connection name
Explicit Connection
Polled Command/Response Connection
Bit Strobed Command/Response Connection
Change-of-State / Cyclic (Acknowledged) Connection
Each message of an “Explicit Messaging” type connection contains the full addressing path and the values of the
attribute involved, as well as the Service Code describing the action to be taken.
Each message of an “I/O Connection” type connection contains only the I/O data. All of the information
describing the use of this data is located in the instance of the “Connection Object” associated with this
message.
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The “Change-of-State / Cyclic Connection” object (Instance ID 0x04) allows you to select either a “Change-ofstate” (COS) or a “Cyclic” connection.
With “Change-of-state”, the gateway produces its data only when their values change or when a timer called
“heartbeat rate” times out. A minimum time limit is intended to prevent the connection from monopolizing the
DeviceNet network’s bandwidth, should the values of the data it produces change too often.
Going into “Cyclic” mode allows the number of exchanges made via this connection to be reduced if the update
time (sampling) for the data produced is slow. By adjusting the connection’s cycle time to the value of this time,
the produced data corresponds exactly to the data samples, without losing or repeating any sample.
WARNING
UNINTENDED OPERATION OF THE SYSTEM
You must configure the “Change-of-State / Cyclic Connection” object properly. Otherwise, it will affect the
communication over the whole DeviceNet network, leading to the bus saturation and to the non transmission of
data from other slaves.
Failure to follow this instruction may result in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
Attributes of class 0x05
ID
Access Name
Need
Type
Value Description
0x01
Get
Revision
0x64 Get / Set Polled production
Optional
Optional
UINT
USINT
1
0
0x65 Get / Set Polled consumption
Optional
USINT
0
0x66 Get / Set Strobed production
Optional
USINT
0
0x67 Get / Set Strobed consumption
Optional
USINT
0
0x68 Get / Set COS production
Optional
USINT
0
Revision index of the “Connection Object” class.
Index of the input area used by the gateway for
production on its “Polled Command/Response”
connection.
Index of the output area used by the gateway for
consumption on its “Polled Command/Response”
connection.
Index of the input area used by the gateway for
production on its “Bit Strobed Command/Response”
connection.
Index of the output area used by the gateway for
consumption on its “Bit Strobed Command/Response”
connection.
Index of the input area used by the gateway for
production on its “Bit Strobed Command/Response”
connection.
Services in class 0x05
Service code Name of the service
0x0E
Get_Attribute_Single
Need
Required
Description
This service allows to read the value of one of the class
attributes.
Attributes of instance 0x01 of class 0x05: Explicit Connection
ID
Access Name
Need
Type
Value
0x01
State
Get
Required
USINT
0 to 5
This attribute represents the status of the “Explicit Connection” object. The LUFP9 gateway supports the
following values: 0 (non-existent), 1 (in the process of being configured), 3 (connection established), 4 (timed out)
and 5 (deferred deletion). Please see figures 5.16 and 7.4 in volume I of the DeviceNet specifications for further
information on this subject.
0x02
Instance type
Get
Required
USINT
0
This attribute defines the instance’s connection type: Messaging connection (0) or I/O connection (1).
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ID
Access Name
Need
Type
Value
0x03
Get / Set Transport class trigger
Required
BYTE
0x83
This attribute defines the behaviour of the connection. In the case of the LUFP9 gateway’s “Explicit Connection”
object, this attribute takes the value 0x83, broken down as follows:
Bits 0-3 = 2#0011 .... Transport Class = Class 3.
Bits 4-6 = 2#xxx....... Value ignored in the case of a data server.
Bits 7 = 2#1 .......... The gateway behaves as a data server responding to queries from a DeviceNet client.
0x04
Get / Set Produced connection ID
Required
UINT
2#11• ••xx xxxx
The value of this attribute is placed in the CAN protocol’s Identifier Field when the connection goes into
transmission mode (group 3 messages). The term “xx xxxx” represents the 6 bits of the address of the gateway’s
DeviceNet node. The term “• ••” represents the message ID.
E.g. 0x070A = 2#111 0000 1010 (group 3 messages; ID of the messages = 4; Gateway located at address 10).
0x05
2#11• ••xx xxxx
The value of this attribute corresponds to the content of the CAN protocol’s Identifier Field for the messages the
connection should receive (group 3 messages). The term “xx xxxx” represents the 6 bits of the address of the
DeviceNet node. The term “• ••” represents the message ID.
E.g. 0x0601 = 2#110 0000 0001 (group 3 messages; ID of the messages = 0; Producer located at address 1).
0x06
Get / Set Initial comm. characteristics
Required
BYTE
0x21
This attribute defines the Group or Groups of Messages by which the productions and consumptions associated
with the “Explicit Connection” object are carried out. Please see chapters 3-2. and 5-4.3.6. of volume I of the
DeviceNet specifications for further details on this subject.
0x07
Get / Set Produced connection size
Required
UINT
Maximum number of bytes which can be transmitted via this instance’s connection.
516
0x08
Get / Set Consumed connection size
Required
UINT
Maximum number of bytes which can be received via this instance’s connection.
516
0x09
Get / Set Expected packet rate
10,000 (unit = 1 ms,
per 10 ms step)
This attribute allows the gateway to evaluate the values of the Transmission Trigger Timer and the
Inactivity / Watchdog Timer for exchanges made using the “Explicit Connection” object. Please see chapter 5-4.4.
in volume I of the DeviceNet specifications for further information on this subject.
0x0C
Get / Set Watchdog timeout action
Required
USINT
3
This attribute defines the action taken when the watchdog timer is triggered or when the connection is inactive.
The various possible values are as follows: 0 (Transition to timed out), 1 (Auto Delete) and 3 (Deferred Delete).
0x0D
Get / Set Produced connection path length
Required
Size of the USINT array of attribute 0x0E (produced connection path).
0x0E
Get / Set Produced connection path
Required
USINT […]
(empty path)
This attribute defines the local path (without MAC ID) of the gateway’s DeviceNet object used to produce the
connection’s data. In the case of the current instance, there is no production path for the “Explicit Connection”.
0x0F
Get / Set Consumed connection path length
Required
Size of the USINT array of attribute 0x10 (consumed connection path).
0x10
Get / Set Consumed connection path
Required
USINT […]
(empty path)
This attribute defines the local path (without MAC ID) of the gateway’s DeviceNet object used to receive the data
consumed by the connection. In the case of the current instance, there is no consumption path for the “Explicit
Connection”.
Get / Set Consumed connection ID
Required
Required
UINT
UINT
UINT
UINT
0
0
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Attributes of instance 0x02 of class 0x05: Polled Command/Response Connection
ID
Access Name
Need
Type
Value
0x01
State
Get
Required
USINT
0 to 4
This attribute represents the status of the “Polled Command/Response Connection” object. The LUFP9 gateway
supports the following values: 0 (non-existent), 1 (in the process of being configured), 3 (connection established)
and 4 (timed out). Please see figures 5.16 and 7.4 in volume I of the DeviceNet specifications for further
information on this subject.
0x02
Instance type
Get
Required
USINT
1
This attribute defines the instance’s connection type: Messaging connection (0) or I/O connection (1).
0x03
Get / Set Transport class trigger
Required
BYTE
0x82
This attribute defines the behaviour of the connection. In the case of the LUFP9 gateway’s “Polled
Command/Response Connection” object, this attribute takes the value 0x82, broken down as follows:
Bits 0-3 = 2#0010 .... Transport Class = Class 2.
Bits 4-6 = 2#xxx....... Value ignored in the case of a data server.
Bits 7 = 2#1 .......... The gateway behaves as a data server responding to queries from a DeviceNet client.
0x04
2#0•• ••xx xxxx
The value of this attribute is placed in the CAN protocol’s Identifier Field when the connection goes into
transmission mode (group 1 messages). The term “xx xxxx” represents the 6 bits of the address of the gateway’s
DeviceNet node. The term “•• ••” represents the message ID.
E.g. 0x03CA = 2#011 1100 1010 (group 1 messages; ID of the messages = 15; Gateway located at address 10).
0x05
Get / Set Consumed connection ID
Required
UINT
2#10x xxxx x•••
The value of this attribute corresponds to the content of the CAN protocol’s Identifier Field for the messages the
connection should receive (group 2 messages). The term “x xxxx x” represents the 6 bits of the address of the
DeviceNet node. The term “• ••” represents the message ID.
E.g. 0x0455 = 2#100 0101 0101 (group 2 messages; ID of the messages = 5; Producer located at address 10).
0x06
Get / Set Initial comm. characteristics
Required
BYTE
0x01
This attribute defines the Group or Groups of Messages by which the productions and consumptions associated
with the “Polled Command/Response Connection” object are carried out. Please see chapters 3-2. and 5-4.3.6.
of volume I of the DeviceNet specifications for further details on this subject.
0x07
Get / Set Produced connection size
Required
UINT
(size of the input area)
Maximum number of bytes which can be transmitted via this instance’s connection. The value of this attribute
should be set to the size of the input area choosed using attribute 0x0E. With the LUFP9 gateway’s default
configuration, the value of this attribute is set to 32, that is to say to the size of “Input1” area.
0x08
Get / Set Consumed connection size
Required
UINT
(size of the output area)
Maximum number of bytes which can be received via this instance’s connection. The value of this attribute
should be set to the size of the output area choosed using attribute 0x10. With the LUFP9 gateway’s default
configuration, the value of this attribute is set to 32, that is to say to the size of “Output1” area.
0x09
Get / Set Expected packet rate
80 (unit = 1 ms,
per 10 ms step)
This attribute defines the periodicity of the exchanges made via the connections of this instance.
0x0C
Get / Set Watchdog timeout action
Required
USINT
0
This attribute defines the action taken when the watchdog timer is triggered or when the connection is inactive.
The various possible values are as follows: 0 (Transition to timed out), 1 (Auto Delete), 2 (Auto Reset) and 3
(Deferred Delete).
0x0D
Get / Set Produced connection path length
Required
Size of the USINT array of attribute 0x0E (produced connection path).
Get / Set Produced connection ID
Required
Required
UINT
UINT
UINT
6
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Appendix D: DeviceNet Objects
ID
Access Name
Need
Type
Value
0x0E
Get / Set Produced connection path
Required
USINT […]
0x 20 04 24 64 30 03
This attribute defines the local path (without MAC ID) of the gateway’s DeviceNet object used to produce the
connection’s data. In the case of the current instance, the default production path for the “Polled
Command/Response Connection” designates attribute 0x03 of instance 0x64 of class 0x04, that is to say the
data from “Input1” area.
NOTE: Changing the value of attribute 0x64 of instance 0x00 of class 0x04 (“Polled production” EDS parameter)
has a direct influence on the value of the attribute presented here, as the corresponding connection path is
changed to allow access to the selected input area. These changes should only be made using the EDS file
supplied with the gateway.
0x0F
Get / Set Consumed connection path length
Required
Size of the USINT array of attribute 0x10 (consumed connection path).
0x10
Get / Set Consumed connection path
Required
USINT […]
0x 20 04 24 96 30 03
This attribute defines the local path (without MAC ID) of the gateway’s DeviceNet object used to receive the data
consumed by the connection. In the case of the current instance, the default consumption path for the “Polled
Command/Response Connection” designates attribute 0x03 of instance 0x96 of class 0x04, that is to say the
data from “Output1” area.
NOTE: Changing the value of attribute 0x65 of instance 0x00 of class 0x04 (“Polled consumption” EDS
parameter) has a direct influence on the value of the attribute presented here, as the corresponding connection
path is changed to allow access to the selected output area. These changes should only be made using the EDS
file supplied with the gateway.
UINT
6
Attributes of instance 0x03 of class 0x05: Bit Strobed Command/Response Connection
ID
Access Name
Need
Type
Value
0x01
State
Get
Required
USINT
0 to 4
This attribute represents the status of the “Bit Strobed Command/Response Connection” object. The LUFP9
gateway supports the following values: 0 (non-existent), 1 (in the process of being configured), 3 (connection
established) and 4 (timed out). Please see figures 5.16 and 7.4 in volume I of the DeviceNet specifications for
further information on this subject.
0x02
Instance type
Get
Required
USINT
1
This attribute defines the instance’s connection type: Messaging connection (0) or I/O connection (1).
0x03
Get / Set Transport class trigger
Required
BYTE
0x83
This attribute defines the behaviour of the connection. In the case of the LUFP9 gateway’s “Bit Strobed
Command/Response Connection” object, this attribute takes the value 0x83, broken down as follows:
Bits 0-3 = 2#0011 .... Transport Class = Class 3.
Bits 4-6 = 2#xxx....... Value ignored in the case of a data server.
Bits 7 = 2#1 .......... The gateway behaves as a data server responding to queries from a DeviceNet client.
0x04
2#0•• ••xx xxxx
The value of this attribute is placed in the CAN protocol’s Identifier Field when the connection goes into
transmission mode (group 1 messages). The term “xx xxxx” represents the 6 bits of the address of the gateway’s
DeviceNet node. The term “•• ••” represents the message ID.
E.g. 0x038A = 2#011 1000 1010 (group 1 messages; ID of the messages = 14; Gateway located at address 10).
0x05
Get / Set Consumed connection ID
Required
UINT
2#10x xxxx x•••
The value of this attribute corresponds to the content of the CAN protocol’s Identifier Field for the messages the
connection should receive (group 2 messages). The term “x xxxx x” represents the 6 bits of the address of the
DeviceNet node. The term “• ••” represents the message ID.
E.g. 0x0400 = 2#100 0000 0000 (group 2 messages; ID of the messages = 0; Producer located at address 0).
0x06
Get / Set Initial comm. characteristics
Required
BYTE
0x02
This attribute defines the Group or Groups of Messages by which the productions and consumptions associated
with the “Bit Strobed Command/Response Connection” object are carried out. Please see chapters 3-2. and 54.3.6. of volume I of the DeviceNet specifications for further details on this subject.
Get / Set Produced connection ID
Required
UINT
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Appendix D: DeviceNet Objects
ID
Access Name
Need
Type
Value
0x07
Get / Set Produced connection size
Required
UINT
(size of the input area)
Maximum number of bytes which can be transmitted via this instance’s connection. The value of this attribute
should be set to the size of the input area choosed using attribute 0x0E. With the LUFP9 gateway’s default
configuration, the value of this attribute is set to 0, as no input area is assigned to the “Bit Strobed
Command/Response Connection” object. Maximum size = 8 bytes.
0x08
Get / Set Consumed connection size
Required
UINT
(size of the output area)
The value of this attribute is not significant in the case of the “Bit Strobed Command/Response Connection”
object. This value is set to 8.
0x09
Get / Set Expected packet rate
80 (unit = 1 ms,
per 10 ms step)
This attribute defines the periodicity of the exchanges made via the connections of this instance.
0x0C
Get / Set Watchdog timeout action
Required
USINT
0
This attribute defines the action taken when the watchdog timer is triggered or when the connection is inactive.
The various possible values are as follows: 0 (Transition to timed out), 1 (Auto Delete), 2 (Auto Reset) and 3
(Deferred Delete).
0x0D
Get / Set Produced connection path length
Required
Size of the USINT array of attribute 0x0E (produced connection path).
0x0E
Get / Set Produced connection path
Required
USINT […]
(area path)
This attribute defines the local path (without MAC ID) of the gateway’s DeviceNet object used to produce the
connection’s data. In the case of the current instance, the production path for the “Bit Strobed
Command/Response Connection” corresponds to the input area assigned to the “Polled Command/Response
Connection” using the “Strobed production” EDS parameter.
0x0F
Get / Set Consumed connection path length
Required
Size of the USINT array of attribute 0x10 (consumed connection path).
0x10
Get / Set Consumed connection path
Required
USINT […]
(area path)
This attribute defines the local path (without MAC ID) of the gateway’s DeviceNet object used to receive the data
consumed by the connection. In the case of the current instance, the consumption path for the “Bit Strobed
Command/Response Connection” corresponds to the output area assigned to this connection using the “Strobed
consumption” EDS parameter.
Required
UINT
UINT
UINT
0
0
Attributes of instance 0x04 of class 0x05: Change-of-State / Cyclic (Acknowledged) Connection
ID
Access Name
Need
Type
Value
0x01
State
Get
Required
USINT
0 to 4
This attribute represents the status of the “Change-of-State / Cyclic (Acknowledged) Connection” object. The
LUFP9 gateway supports the following values: 0 (non-existent), 1 (in the process of being configured), 3
(connection established) and 4 (timed out). Please see figures 5.16 and 7.4 in volume I of the DeviceNet
specifications for further information on this subject.
0x02
Instance type
Get
Required
USINT
1
This attribute defines the instance’s connection type: Messaging connection (0) or I/O connection (1).
0x03
Get / Set Transport class trigger
Required
BYTE
0x12 or 0x02
This attribute defines the behaviour of the connection. In the case of the LUFP9 gateway’s “Change-of-State /
Cyclic (Acknowledged) Connection” object, this attribute takes the value 0x12 or 0x02, broken down as follows:
Bits 0-3 = 2#0010 ..................... Transport Class = Class 2.
Bits 4-6 = 2#001 or 2#000 ........ “Change-of-State” mode (2#001) or “Cyclic” mode (2#000).
Bits 7 = 2#0
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Appendix D: DeviceNet Objects
ID
Access Name
Need
Type
Value
0x04
2#0•• ••xx xxxx
The value of this attribute is placed in the CAN protocol’s Identifier Field when the connection goes into
transmission mode (group 1 messages). The term “xx xxxx” represents the 6 bits of the address of the gateway’s
DeviceNet node. The term “•• ••” represents the message ID.
E.g. 0x034A = 2#011 0100 1010 (group 1 messages; ID of the messages = 13; Gateway located at address 10).
0x05
Get / Set Consumed connection ID
Required
UINT
2#10x xxxx x•••
The value of this attribute corresponds to the content of the CAN protocol’s Identifier Field for the messages the
connection should receive (group 2 messages). The term “x xxxx x” represents the 6 bits of the address of the
DeviceNet node. The term “• ••” represents the message ID.
E.g. 0x0452 = 2#100 0101 0010 (group 2 messages; ID of the messages = 2; Gateway located at address 10).
0x06
Get / Set Initial comm. characteristics
Required
BYTE
0x01
This attribute defines the Group or Groups of Messages by which the productions and consumptions associated
with the “Change-of-State / Cyclic (Acknowledged) Connection” object are carried out. In this case, it designates
groups 1 and 2. Please see chapters 3-2. and 5-4.3.6. of volume I of the DeviceNet specifications for further
details on this subject.
0x07
Get / Set Produced connection size
Required
UINT
(size of the input area)
Maximum number of bytes which can be transmitted via this instance’s connection. The value of this attribute
should be set to the size of the input area choosed using attribute 0x0E. With the LUFP9 gateway’s default
configuration, the value of this attribute is set to 0, as no input area is assigned to the “Change-of-State / Cyclic
(Acknowledged) Connection” object.
0x08
Get / Set Consumed connection size
Required
UINT
0
Maximum number of bytes which can be received via this instance’s connection. As the LUFP9 gateway does not
consume any data via this connection, the value of this attribute will remains set to 0.
0x09
Get / Set Expected packet rate
0 (unit = 1 ms,
per 10 ms step)
This attribute defines the periodicity of the exchanges made via the connections of this instance.
0x0C
Get / Set Watchdog timeout action
Required
USINT
0
This attribute defines the action taken when the watchdog timer is triggered or when the connection is inactive.
The various possible values are as follows: 0 (Transition to timed out), 1 (Auto Delete), 2 (Auto Reset) and 3
(Deferred Delete).
0x0D
Get / Set Produced connection path length
Required
Size of the USINT array of attribute 0x0E (produced connection path).
0x0E
Get / Set Produced connection path
Required
USINT […]
(area path)
This attribute defines the local path (without MAC ID) of the gateway’s DeviceNet object used to produce the
connection’s data. In the case of the current instance, the production path for the “Change-of-State / Cyclic
(Acknowledged) Connection” corresponds to the output area assigned to this connection using the “COS
production” EDS parameter.
0x0F
Get / Set Consumed connection path length
Required
Size of the USINT array of attribute 0x10 (consumed connection path).
0x10
Get / Set Consumed connection path
Required
USINT […]
(area path)
This attribute defines the local path (without MAC ID) of the gateway’s DeviceNet object used to receive the data
consumed by the connection. In the case of the current instance, the consumption path for the “Change-of-State /
Cyclic (Acknowledged) Connection” designates instance 0x01 of class 0x2B, that is to say the only object of the
“Acknowledge Handler Object” class.
NOTE: The EDS file supplied with the gateway does not contain any parameter whose modification would have
had any influence on the value of this attribute.
Get / Set Produced connection ID
Required
Required
UINT
UINT
UINT
UINT
0
4
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Appendix D: DeviceNet Objects
Attributes of instances 0x01 to 0x04 of class 0x05
Service code Name of the service
Need
Description
0x0E
Get_Attribute_Single
Required
0x10
Set_Attribute_Single
Optional
This service allows to read the value of one of the attributes from
one of the instances of the “Connection Object.”
This service allows to write the value of one of the attributes from
one of the instances of the “Connection Object.”
Acknowledge Handler Object (class 0x2B)
The “Acknowledge Handler” object has only one instance (Instance ID = 0x01). This object is used by
connections whose producer needs to know whether its data has been received by its recipient(s) (consumers).
This object is described in chapter 6-31. of volume II of the DeviceNet specifications.
Attributes of class 0x2B
Need
Type
Value
0x01
ID
Access Name
Get
Revision
Optional
UINT
1
0x02
Get
Max
instance
Optional
UINT
1
Description
Revision index of the “Acknowledge Handler Object”
class.
Maximum number of any instance created within the
“Acknowledge Handler Object” class.
Services in class 0x2B
Service code Name of the service
0x0E
Get_Attribute_Single
Need
Required
Description
This service allows to read the value of one of the attributes of the
class.
Attributes of instance 0x01 of class 0x2B
ID
Access Name
Need
Type
Value
0x01
Get / Set Acknowledge timer
Required
UINT
20 (unit: 1ms)
The value of this attribute determines the waiting time for acknowledgement of the message from a connection.
Once this time has elapsed, the gateway proceeds to re-transmit the message which has just failed to be
acknowledged. The value of this attribute ranges from 1 to 65,535, and its default value is 20.
0x02
Get / Set Retry limit
Required
USINT
1
This attribute determines the maximum number of times that the acknowledge timeout can be successively
triggered for the same message, and therefore the number of re-transmissions allowed for each message. The
value of this attribute ranges from 0 to 255, and its default value is 1.
0x03
Get / Set COS producing connection instance
Required
UINT
4
The value of this attribute is set to the instance number (Instance ID) of the “Connection Object” class
corresponding to the “Change-of-State” connection associated with the “Acknowledge Handler” object. This
association allows the latter to transmit the acknowledgements it receives to the corresponding connection if they
are addressed to it.
0x04
Ack list size
Get
Optional
BYTE
1
This attribute represents the maximum number of members which can be placed in the ack list. If the value of this
attribute is null, the size of the list is dynamic, which is not the case with the LUFP9 gateway.
0x05
Ack list
Get
Optional
BYTE , USINT […]
0 , (empty list)
This attribute corresponds to the list of active instances of the “Connection Object” class for which the receipt of
an acknowledgement is required. It is made up of two elements: The number of members (BYTE) and the list of
the associated instance numbers from the “Connection Object” class (USINT […]). The size of the list is set to the
value of the first element. By default, the list is empty (no term of the USINT type […]) and only the BYTE
element is created.
E.g. “1, 4“ for a list comprising a single instance of the “Connection Object” class. This instance (0x04)
corresponds to the “Change-of-State / Cyclic (Acknowledged) Connection”).
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Appendix D: DeviceNet Objects
ID
0x06
0x07
Access Name
Need
Type
Value
Data with ack path list size
Get
Optional
BYTE
1
This attribute represents the maximum number of members which can be placed in the data with ack path list. If
the value of this attribute is null, the size of the list is dynamic, which is not the case with the LUFP9 gateway.
Get
Data with ack path list
Optional
BYTE , ( UINT , USINT, (data with ack path list)
USINT […] ) […]
This attribute corresponds to the list of “connection instance / consuming application object” pairs allowing the
data received in an acknowledgement to be forwarded. An acknowledgement does not necessarily contain any
data and so this attribute is optional. It is made up of the following elements:
• The number of members of the list (BYTE).
• The list of “connection instance / consuming application object” pairs ( UINT , USINT, USINT […] ) […]. The
size of this list is set to the value of the first element, described above, and this list is made up of the following
elements:
- The acknowledged COS consuming connection instance number (UINT).
- The path length of the DeviceNet object intended to receive the acknowledgement data (USINT).
- The path of the DeviceNet object intended to receive the acknowledgement data (USINT […]).
E.g. 0x 01 00 04 06 20 04 24 98 30 01. The value of this attribute means that this list only contains a single
element (0x01) referring to instance 0x0004 and that the acknowledgement data path (0x06: length 6 bytes)
refers to attribute 0x01 of instance 0x98 of class 0x04, that is to say to data from output area no. 1, that is to say
“Output1.”
Services of instance 0x01 of class 0x2B
Service code
Name of the service
0x0E
Get_Attribute_Single
0x10
Set_Attribute_Single
Need
Description
Required This service allows to read the value of the single instance from the
“Acknowledge Handler Object.”
Required This service allows to write the value of the single instance from the
“Acknowledge Handler Object.”
121
Appendix D: DeviceNet Objects
I/O Data Input Mapping Object (Class 0xA0)
The “I/O Data Input Mapping Object” has only one instance (Instance ID = 0x01) and is specific to the LUFP9
gateway. It contains all the data from the gateway’s unique input area. The only attribute (Attribute ID = 0x01) of
the instance from this object is associated with the “Input1” area. This input area gathers all the memory
locations receiving data from a Modbus response.
Attributes of class 0xA0
ID
Access Name
0x01
Get
Revision
0x64 Get / Set Input1 offset
0x6E Get / Set Input1 length
Need
Type
Optional
Optional
Optional
UINT
USINT
USINT
Value
Description
1
Revision index of “I/O Data Input Mapping Object” class.
0x0000 Relative starting address of input area no. 1. (1)
0x0020 Size, expressed in bytes, of input area no. 1. (1)
(1) These 2 attributes correspond to the “Param6” and “Param7” parameters referenced by the EDS file
supplied with the gateway. Write access to them (Access = Set) is reserved for DeviceNet configuration
tools, since it allows you to change the location or the size of this input data area. So the
“Set_Attribute_Single” service should not be used with these attributes. Changing any one of these two
attributes has direct consequences on the attribute 0x01 of instance 0x01 from the “I/O Data Input
Mapping Object” (size of the data). This attribute is not created if the size of the gateway’s input area is
null. The “Input1 offset” attribute corresponds to an offset from the start of the memory area reserved for
the input data (0x0000).
The values located in the “Value” column correspond to the LUFP9 gateway’s default configuration
(“Input1” area located at address 0x0000 and made up of 32 bytes).
Services in class 0xA0
Service code Name of the service
0x0E
Get_Attribute_Single
Need
Required
Description
This service allows to read the value of one of the class attributes.
Attributes of instance 0x01 of class 0xA0
ID
0x01
Access Name
Need
Type
Value
Data
Get
Optional
USINT […]
(input area no.1)
This attribute corresponds to the gateway’s “Input1” area. Reading it gives access to the values of all the data
located in this area in the form of an array of bytes whose size corresponds to the size of the area. This very
same attribute is also involved when using instance Assembly Objects described in Appendix D: DeviceNet
Objects.
NOTE: With the default configuration, attribute 0x01 corresponds to an array of 32 bytes whose content is
described in Appendix B:, Input Data Memory Area.
Services of instance 0x01 of class 0xA0
Service code Name of the service
0x0E
Get_Attribute_Single
Need
Required
Description
This service allows to read the array of values corresponding to the
sole attribute of the single instance from “I/O Data Input Mapping
Object”.
122
Appendix D: DeviceNet Objects
I/O Data Output Mapping Object (Class 0xA1)
The “I/O Data Output Mapping Object” has only one instance (Instance ID = 0x01) and is specific to the LUFP9
gateway. It contains all the data from the gateway’s unique output area. The only attribute (Attribute ID = 0x01)
of the instance from this object is associated with the “Output1” area. This output area gathers all the memory
locations whose values are transmitted to the Modbus slaves via Modbus queries.
Attributes of class 0xA1
ID
Access Name
Need
Type
0x01
Get
Revision
0x64 Get / Set Output1 offset
0x6E Get / Set Output1 length
Optional
Optional
Optional
UINT
USINT
USINT
Value
Description
1
Revision index of “I/O Data Output Mapping Object” class.
0x0000 Relative starting address of output area no. 1. (1)
0x0020 Size, expressed in bytes, of output area no. 1. (1)
(1) These 2 attributes correspond to the “Param18” and “Param19” parameters referenced by the EDS file
supplied with the gateway. Write access to them (Access = Set) is reserved for DeviceNet configuration
tools, since it allows you to change the location or the size of this output data area. So the
“Set_Attribute_Single” service should not be used with these attributes. Changing any one of these two
attributes has direct consequences on the attribute 0x01 of instance 0x01 from the “I/O Data Output
Mapping Object” (size of the data). This attribute is not created if the size of the gateway’s output area is
null. The “Output1 offset” attribute corresponds to an offset from the start of the memory area reserved for
the output data (0x0200).
The values located in the “Value” column correspond to the LUFP9 gateway’s default configuration
(“Output1” area located at address 0x0200 and made up of 32 bytes).
Services in class 0xA1
Service code Name of the service
0x0E
Get_Attribute_Single
Need
Required
Description
This service allows to read the value of one of the class attributes.
Attributes of instance 0x01 of class 0xA1
ID
0x01
Access Name
Need
Type
Value
Get / Set Data
Optional
USINT […]
(output area no.1)
This attribute corresponds to the gateway’s “Output1” area. Reading it gives access to the values of all the data
located in this area, and writing it allows to change them. These values take the form of an array of bytes whose
size corresponds to the size of the area. This very same attribute is also involved when using instance 0x96 of
the Assembly Objects described in Appendix D: DeviceNet Objects.
NOTE: With the default configuration, attribute 0x01 corresponds to an array of 32 bytes whose content is
described in Appendix B:, Output Data Memory Area.
Services of instance 0x01 of class 0xA1
Service code Name of the service
Need
Description
0x0E
Get_Attribute_Single
Optional
This service allows to read the array of values corresponding to the
sole attribute of the single instance from “I/O Data Output Mapping
Object.”
0x10
Set_Attribute_Single
Required
This service allows to write/change all the values corresponding to
the sole attribute of the single instance from “I/O Data Output
Mapping Object.”
123
Appendix D: DeviceNet Objects
Diagnostic Object (Class 0xAA)
The “Diagnostic Object” has only one instance (Instance ID = 0x01) and is specific to the LUFP9 gateway. It
contains a large amount of diagnostic data of all levels. As a result, some of these diagnoses should not be
used, as these are reserved for maintenance operations carried out on the gateway or when developing its
software. However, the attributes to which they correspond are all described below for the sake of completeness.
Attributes of class 0xAA
ID
Access Name
0x01
Get
Revision
Need
Type
Value
Optional
UINT
1
Description
Revision index of the “Diagnostic Object” class.
Services in class 0xAA
Service code
Name of the service
Need
0x0E
Get_Attribute_Single
Required
Description
This service allows to read the value of one of the class attributes.
Attributes of instance 0x01 of class 0xAA
ID
Access Name
Need
Type
Value
0x01
DeviceNet module serial number
Get
Optional
UDINT
(variable)
The value of the “DeviceNet module serial number” corresponds to the serial number of the gateway’s AnyBus-S
DeviceNet card, that is to say the card on which the block of selector switches and the DeviceNet connector are
located. e.g. 0x 20 DD 00 23.
0x02
Vendor ID
Get
Optional
UINT
0x0001
The value of this attribute is set to 0x0001 for the LUFP9 gateway.
The value 0x0000 cannot be used and values between 0x0002 and 0xFFFF are reserved for the gateway
suppliers.
0x03
Fieldbus type
Get
Optional
UINT
0x0025
With the LUFP9 gateway, this attribute always takes the same value (0x0025), as it characterizes the DeviceNet
network. Any other value would be incorrect (e.g. 0x0001 for a Profibus-DP network).
0x04
DeviceNet module software version
Get
Optional
UINT
0x0105
This attribute shows the software version on the gateway’s AnyBus-S DeviceNet card. The major index of this
version is given by the most significant byte and its minor index is given by the least significant byte, both in BCD
format. e.g. 0x0105 corresponds to version 01.05.
0x05
Interrupt count
Get
Optional
UINT
(counter)
The value of the “interrupt count” is incremented by one every time an interrupt related to the management of the
downstream Modbus network do occur.
0x06
Watchdog counter in
Get
Optional
UINT
0x0000
This counter is not implemented, and using this attribute is pointless.
The primary function of this counter is to provide feedback from the lifetime counter represented by attribute
0x07, which would allow the AnyBus-S DeviceNet card to ensure that the card to which it is connected is working
properly by comparing the values of these two attributes.
0x07
Watchdog counter out
Get
Optional
UINT
(counter)
The value of this counter is incremented by one every millisecond (at least one writing operation every 50 ms)
and operates as an internal presence counter, intended to the gateway’s applicative card, that is to say the card
on which the AnyBus-S DeviceNet card is inserted.
0x08
Access method status
Get
Optional
USINT [4]
0x 40 00 00 80
This array of 4 USINT elements determines the status of the method used to access the gateway’s memory’s
general areas. This attribute is not relevant when using the gateway.
124
Appendix D: DeviceNet Objects
ID
Access Name
Need
Type
Value
0x09
LED status
Get
Optional
USINT [6]
(variable)
The values of the elements of this attribute correspond to the status of the gateway’s 6 LEDs (1 byte per LED).
The first byte corresponds to LED c, the second to LED d, etc., up to LED h. Each byte takes one of the
following values to designate the state of the LED to which it corresponds: 0x00 (LED is off), 0x01 (LED is green)
or 0x02 (LED is red).
0x0A
Module type
Get
Optional
UINT
0x0101
The value of this attribute is always equal to 0x0101 with the LUFP9 gateway, as this is an “AnyBus-S” module.
0x0B
DeviceNet module status
Get
Optional
USINT
(8-bit register)
Reading this attribute’s bits shows certain information about the state of the gateway’s AnyBus-S DeviceNet
card. The four data bits of these registers are described below:
Bit 0: Gateway off-line (0) / on-line (1) on the DeviceNet network.
Bit 1: All outputs are zeroed (0) or held (1) in the output memory area if the gateway is off-line on the DeviceNet
network.
Bit 8: All inputs are zeroed (0) or held (1) in the input memory area if the gateway’s application is stopped.
Bit 9: The “changed data field” register is inhibited (0) / activated (1).
0x0C
Changed data field
Get
Optional
LWORD
—
Each bit of this 64-bit register indicates whether the content of 8 consecutive bytes of the output memory area
has been changed. Bit 0 relates to bytes 0x0200 to 0x0207, bit 1 relates to bytes 0x0208 to 0x0215, etc., up to
bit 63, which relates to bytes 0x03F8 to 0x03FF.
0x0D
Interrupt cause
Get
Optional
BYTE
(8-bit register)
This register allows you to determine the cause of the last interrupt. Each bit is activated when the associated
event occurs, then it is reset by the gateway’s interrupt handler. So this register is not intended to be used by the
DeviceNet master.
Bit 0: The gateway goes on-line on the DeviceNet network.
Bit 1: The gateway goes off-line on the DeviceNet network.
Bit 2: Data changed.
0x0E
Interrupt notification
Get
Optional
BYTE
(8-bit register)
This register allows you to determine what types of interrupts are allowed (see description of attribute 0x0D). Its
value is set when the gateway is initialized, using a specific mailbox (not described in this guide).
Bit 0: Issuing an interrupt when the gateway goes on-line on the DeviceNet network.
Bit 1: Issuing an interrupt when the gateway goes off-line on the DeviceNet network.
Bit 2: Issuing an interrupt when the data are modified. To do this the “change data field” register should be
activated (see description of bit 9 of attribute 0x0B).
0x0F
IN cyclic I/O length
Get
Optional
UINT
0x0020
This attribute indicates the total size of the cyclic input data (I/O IN data), expressed as a number of bytes. This
size covers all the gateway’s memory space occupied by Modbus input data, free locations also being counted.
With the LUFP9 gateway’s default configuration, the value of this attribute corresponds to the size of the input
area of the gateway, that is to say 32 bytes.
0x10
IN DPRAM length
Get
Optional
UINT
0x0020
This attribute indicates the total size of the input data and parameters in the gateway’s memory (valid IN bytes in
DPRAM), expressed as a number of bytes. This size covers all of the gateway’s memory space occupied by
Modbus input data and parameters, free locations also being counted. Since no input parameters are defined,
the values of attributes 0x0F and 0x10 are both identical. With the LUFP9 gateway’s default configuration, the
value of this attribute is equal to 32 bytes.
125
Appendix D: DeviceNet Objects
ID
0x11
Access Name
Need
Type
Value
IN total length
Get
Optional
UINT
0x0020
This attribute indicates the total size of the input data used in the gateway’s extended memory (IN bytes
supported), expressed as a number of bytes. This size is equal to the value of the previous attribute (size of
inputs in DPRAM), as it only contains input data. The values of attributes 0x0F, 0x10 and 0x11 are all identical.
With the LUFP9 gateway’s default configuration, the value of this attribute is equal to 32 bytes.
NOTE: The gateway’s extended internal memory is different from the DPRAM memory, dealt with in the rest of
this guide. As a result, when using the gateway, you will not have to worry about it.
0x12
OUT cyclic I/O length
Get
Optional
UINT
0x0020
This attribute indicates the total size of the cyclic output data (I/O OUT data), expressed as a number of bytes.
This size covers all the gateway’s memory space occupied by Modbus output data, free locations also being
counted. With the LUFP9 gateway’s default configuration, the value of this attribute corresponds to the size of the
output area of the gateway, that is to say 32 bytes.
0x13
OUT DPRAM length
Get
Optional
UINT
0x0020
This attribute indicates the total size of the output data and parameters in the gateway’s memory (valid OUT
bytes in DPRAM), expressed as a number of bytes. This size covers all of the gateway’s memory space occupied
by Modbus output data and parameters, free locations also being counted. Since no output parameters are
defined, the values of attributes 0x12 and 0x13 are both identical. With the LUFP9 gateway’s default
configuration, the value of this attribute is equal to 32 bytes.
0x14
OUT total length
Get
Optional
UINT
0x0020
This attribute indicates the total size of the output data used in the gateway’s extended memory (OUT bytes
supported), expressed as a number of bytes. This size is equal to the value of the previous attribute (size of
outputs in DPRAM), as it only contains output data. The values of attributes 0x12, 0x13 and 0x14 are all identical.
With the LUFP9 gateway’s default configuration, the value of this attribute is equal to 32 bytes.
NOTE: The gateway’s extended internal memory is different from the DPRAM memory, dealt with in the rest of
this guide. As a result, when using the gateway, you will not have to worry about it.
0x15
Reserved attribute
Get
This attribute is not used.
0x16
Application indication
Get
Optional
USINT
(8-bit register)
This 8-bit register is reserved for the gateway’s applicative card, that is to say the card on which the AnyBus-S
DeviceNet card is inserted. The various bits of this register are primarily used when internal commands of the
gateway are intended to act on the gateway’s memory. These bits are not intended to be used by the DeviceNet
master and will not be described here.
0x17
AnyBus indication
Get
Optional
USINT
(8-bit register)
This 8-bit register is reserved for the gateway’s AnyBus-S DeviceNet card. The various bits of this register are
primarily used when internal commands of the gateway are intended to act on the gateway’s memory. These bits
are not intended to be used by the DeviceNet master and will not be described here, except for bit 4:
Bit 4: This bit is set to one once the gateway’s AnyBus-S DeviceNet card has been initialized.
Optional
UINT
0x0000
Services of instance 0x01 of class 0xAA
Service code Name of the service
0x0E
Get_Attribute_Single
Need
Required
Description
This service allows to read the value of the single instance of the
“Diagnostic Object.”
126
Appendix E: Modbus Commands
Only the Modbus commands shown in
the right-hand table are supported by
the gateway. The structure of the query
and response frames for each of these
commands is then described in the
following chapters.
Function code
Broadcast (1)
Modbus command
03
0x03
—
Read Holding Registers
06
0x06
Yes
Preset Single Register
16
0x10
Yes
Preset Multiple Registers
(1) The content of this column shows whether the command can be added (“Yes”) or not (“—”) to the list of a
broadcaster node’s commands, known as “Broadcaster” in ABC-LUFP Config Tool.
In the following chapters, each byte of the query and
response frames of a Modbus command are
described, one after another, with the exception of the
fields shown opposite. These are always present in
the queries and responses of all Modbus commands.
The “Slave Address” and “Function” fields are the first
two bytes of these frames. The two bytes of the
“Checksum” are their last two bytes.
Slave Address
Function
- Value cannot be changed (Modbus
address: 1 to 247. Addresses 65,
126, and 127 reserved)
- Value cannot be changed (code of
the Modbus command)
… Specific features of
Modbus commands …
… Other
fields …
Checksum (Lo) - Type of error check
Checksum (Hi) - Number of the 1st byte checked
The descriptions of the Modbus frames which appear in the following chapters are mainly intended to help you to
configure the gateway’s Modbus exchanges using ABC-LUFP Config Tool. Please see the documentation of
each Modbus slave to check for any restriction regarding these frames (number of registers which can be read
or written in a single Modbus command, for example).
It is a better idea to get hold of a standard Modbus document, such as the guide entitled Modicon Modbus
Protocol Reference Guide (ref.: PI-MBUS-300 Rev. J), so that you can see the correspondence between the
elements displayed in ABC-LUFP Config Tool and the content of the corresponding Modbus frames. Here is an
example of a correspondence for a full frame (including the start and end of frame fields shown above), based
on the Read Holding Registers Command.
Modbus Frame Fields
Modbus
Query
Slave Address
Function Code
Starting Register Address (Hi, Lo)
Number of points (Hi, Lo)
Checksum
Modbus
Response
Slave Address
Function Code
Byte count
Data
Checksum
Elements under
ABC-LUFP Config Tool
Slave Address
Function Code
Starting Address
Quantity of Registers
CRC16
Size
1 byte
1 byte
2 bytes
2 bytes
2 bytes
Slave Address
Function Code
Byte Count
First Register Value
…………………………………
Last Register Value
CRC16
1 byte
1 byte
1 byte
2 bytes
…………
2 bytes
2 bytes
127
Appendix E: Modbus Commands
Chapter 6.11 Adding and Setting Up a Modbus Command also shows a few examples of correspondences
between the elements displayed in ABC-LUFP Config Tool and the corresponding Modbus frame fields.
See also: Chapter 6.11.2 With a Generic Modbus Slave, and chapter 6.11.3 Adding a Special Modbus
Command, if the implementation of one of these commands would be incompatible with its implementation in the
gateway, for example. You then have to create a special Modbus command to compensate for this
incompatibility.
“Read Holding Registers” Command (0x03)
Frame
Query
ABC-LUFP Config Tool
field
Starting Register Address
Number of Registers
Checksum
Response
Byte Count
Data (first register)
………
Data (last register)
Checksum
Value or properties
- Address of the register
- Number of registers
- CRC16
- Number of data bytes = number of registers × 2
- Byte swap = “Swap 2 bytes”
- Data length = Value of the “Byte count” field
- Data location = Address in the gateway’s input memory
- CRC16
“Preset Single Register” command (0x06)
Frame
Query
ABC-LUFP Config Tool Value or properties
field
Register Address
- Address of the register
Preset Data
Response
Register Address
Preset data
Checksum
- Byte swap = “Swap 2 bytes”
- Data length = 0x0002
- Data location = Address in the gateway’s output memory
- Byte swap = “Swap 2 bytes”
- Data length = 0x0002
- Data location = Address in the gateway’s input memory
- CRC16
NOTE: As the slave response is the echo of the request, you do not have to load it to the DeviceNet scanner’s
level.
128
Appendix E: Modbus Commands
“Preset Multiple Registers” Command (0x10)
Frame
Query
ABC-LUFP Config Tool
field
Starting Register Address
Number of Registers
Byte Count
Data (first register)
Response
Value or properties
- Address of the 1st register
- Number of registers
- Number of data bytes = number of registers × 2
- Byte swap = “Swap 2 bytes”
………
Data (last register)
- Data length = Value of the “Byte count” field
- Data location = Address in the gateway’s output memory
Checksum
- CRC16
Starting Register Address
- Address of the 1st register
Number of Registers
- Number of registers
Checksum
- CRC16
Modbus Protocol Exception Responses
When it cannot process a command dictated by a Modbus query, a slave sends an exception response instead
of the normal response to the query.
WARNING
UNATTENDED OPERATION OF THE SYSTEM
With standard Modbus commands, the LUFP9 gateway considers that all exception responses which it
receives from Modbus slaves are incorrect responses. As a result, it will carry out the re-transmissions
configured for the queries involved.
If you want the software application for your DeviceNet master to be able to specifically manage exception
responses, you can replace the Modbus command, in ABC-LUFP Config Tool, with a personalized command
(see chapter 6.11.3.2 User-Customizable Modbus Commands). This then allows you to feed back the “Slave
Address” and “Function” fields to the DeviceNet master.
Failure to follow this instruction may result in death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
The structure of an exception response is independent of the Modbus command associated with the “Function”
field of the query involved. The whole frame of an exception response is shown below:
Slave Address
Function
Exception Code
Checksum (Lo)
Checksum (Hi)
Modbus address (1 to 247; addresses 65, 126 and 127 reserved): The value of this field is
identical to that of the “Slave Address” field of the query involved.
Command code, with exception indicator: The value of this field is set to 0x80 + the value of
the “Function” field of the query involved.
Code indicating the nature of the error which has caused the exception response (see table
on next page).
Error check
129
Appendix E: Modbus Commands
Code
0x01
0x02
0x03
0x04
0x05
(1)
0x06
(1)
0x07
(1)
0x08
(1)
Name of the
Description of the exception
exception
ILLEGAL FUNCTION The query’s “Function” command code is not implemented in the Modbus slave
software, or it is unable to process it for the moment.
The combination of the query’s “Starting Address” and “No. of Registers” fields
ILLEGAL DATA
ADDRESS
(or assimilated fields) gives access to one or more addresses which are not
accessible on the Modbus slave.
The value of one of the Modbus query’s fields is outside the authorized limits.
ILLEGAL DATA
VALUE
This error does not affect the content of the “Data” (or assimilated) fields, as this
error only takes account of the fields used for managing the Modbus protocol.
SLAVE DEVICE
An unrecoverable failure has occurred when processing the command.
FAILURE
ACKNOWLEDGE
The Modbus slave informs the gateway that it has accepted the command
(acknowledgement), but that it will take too long to process it and it cannot afford
to wait for the completion of this process before sending a response.
The gateway should transmit subsequent queries in order to determine whether
the command has finished or not.
The Modbus slave informs the gateway that it is already in the process of
SLAVE DEVICE
BUSY
running a command and therefore it cannot run the one transmitted to it.
So the gateway should re-transmit the query subsequently.
The Modbus slave informs the gateway that it cannot process the requested
NEGATIVE
ACKNOWLEDGE
command. This exception only affects commands 13 and 14 (0x0D and 0x0E).
These functions are not part of the standard Modbus commands and are not
described in this document.
MEMORY PARITY The Modbus slave informs the gateway that it has detected a parity error on the
ERROR
access to its own memory. This exception only affects standard commands 20
and 21 (0x14 and 0x15) which are not supported by the gateway.
(1) Please see the standard Modbus documentation for further information about these various cases.
130
Index
2
2-way TSXSCA62 subscriber connector, 18
A
Address, 21
Allen Bradley
SLC500, 37
Architecture, 8, 25
M
MAC ID address, 32
Modbus cable, 18
Modbus slaves, 8, 9
P
Parameters, 32
Protective Earth, 12
C
Communication speed, 20
Communications
aperiodic, 35, 36, 37
periodic, 35, 36, 37
Cycle time, 26
R
Related documents, 5
RJ45 connector, 11, 16
RSLogix 500, 37
RSNetWorx, 35, 36
D
Data exchanged, 10
DeviceNet master PLC, 31
DeviceNet scanner, 34
DeviceNet slave, 9
Diagnostic LEDs, 11
DIN Rail, 12
S
Selector switch, 20
SLC500, 37
T
E
Tap boxes, 16
Topology
bus, 15
star, 13
TSXCA50 tap box, 18
EDS file, 31
L
LEDs, 23
Line resistance, 19
LU9GC03 hub, 18
V
VW3 A68 306 cable, 16
VW3 A8 306 RC double termination, 18
VW3 A8 306 TF3 drop box, 18
131
Glossary
0x••••
Value expressed in hexadecimal, which is equivalent to the H••••, ••••h and 16#••••
notations, sometimes used in other documents.
NOTE: The ABC-LUFP Config Tool software uses the 0x•••• notation.
E.g. 0x0100 = 16#0100 = 256.
02#•••• ••••
Value expressed in binary. The number of ‘•’ digits depends on the size of the item of data
represented. Each nibble (group of 4 bits) is separated from the other nibbles by a space.
E.g. byte 2#0010 0111 = 39, word 2#0110 1001 1101 0001 = 0x69D1 = 27089.
ABC-LUFP
Config Tool
Abbreviation that refers to the AnyBus Communicator tool used to configure and
implement the LUFP9 gateway. Also found as ‘ABC-LUFP Configurator’.
“ABC” element
ABC-LUFP Configurator element that can be of an input or an output data type.
ATS
Abbreviation of “Altistart” (soft start- soft stop unit).
ATV
Abbreviation of “Altivar” (drive).
Control/Status byte ABC-LUFP Configurator field.
CRC
Cyclical Redundancy Check.
EDS
Electronic Data Sheet. Refers to the file format (“.eds” extension) which allow a tool used
for configuring and preparing DeviceNet masters to configure their exchanges using this
same protocol.
Fieldbus
A term referring to the upstream DeviceNet network in ABC-LUFP Config Tool.
Handshake
An old term referring to the two registers used for initializing and carrying out diagnostics
of the LUFP9 gateway. This term has been replaced by the expression “Control/Status
Byte”.
LED
Light-Emitting Diode.
LRC
Longitudinal Redundancy Check.
LSB
Least significant byte in a 16-bit word.
MAC ID
Media Access Control ID. Address of a module on a DeviceNet bus.
MSB
Most significant byte in a 16-bit word.
Node
A term referring to the connection point of a Modbus slave under ABC-LUFP Config Tool.
ODVA
Open DeviceNet Vendor Association, Inc.
Sub-Network
A term referring to the downstream Modbus network under ABC-LUFP Config Tool.
XML
EXtensible Markup Language. The language used by ABC-LUFP Config Tool to
import/export the configuration of a Modbus slave.
132
LUFP9 User’s Manual
V1.2
2005-08
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