Using the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch

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Part No. 214391-A
March 2003
4655 Great America Parkway
Santa Clara, CA 95054
Using the BayStack 380-24F
Gigabit Switch
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2
Copyright © 2003 Nortel Networks
All rights reserved. March 2003.
The information in this document is subject to change without notice. The statements, configurations, technical data, and
recommendations in this document are believed to be accurate and reliable, but are presented without express or implied
warranty. Users must take full responsibility for their applications of any products specified in this document. The
information in this document is proprietary to Nortel Networks Inc.
Trademarks
Nortel Networks, the Nortel Networks logo, the Globemark, Unified Networks, and BayStack 380 are trademarks of
Nortel Networks.
Microsoft, Windows, and Windows NT are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
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IBM and AIX are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation (IBM).
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Ethernet is a trademark of Xerox Corporation.
Restricted rights legend
Use, duplication, or disclosure by the United States Government is subject to restrictions as set forth in subparagraph
(c)(1)(ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and Computer Software clause at DFARS 252.227-7013.
Notwithstanding any other license agreement that may pertain to, or accompany the delivery of, this computer software,
the rights of the United States Government regarding its use, reproduction, and disclosure are as set forth in the
Commercial Computer Software-Restricted Rights clause at FAR 52.227-19.
Statement of conditions
In the interest of improving internal design, operational function, and/or reliability, Nortel Networks Inc. reserves the
right to make changes to the products described in this document without notice.
Nortel Networks Inc. does not assume any liability that may occur due to the use or application of the product(s) or
circuit layout(s) described herein.
Portions of the code in this software product may be Copyright © 1988, Regents of the University of California. All
rights reserved. Redistribution and use in source and binary forms of such portions are permitted, provided that the
above copyright notice and this paragraph are duplicated in all such forms and that any documentation, advertising
materials, and other materials related to such distribution and use acknowledge that such portions of the software were
developed by the University of California, Berkeley. The name of the University may not be used to endorse or promote
products derived from such portions of the software without specific prior written permission.
SUCH PORTIONS OF THE SOFTWARE ARE PROVIDED “AS IS” AND WITHOUT ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED
WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY
AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
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In addition, the program and information contained herein are licensed only pursuant to a license agreement that contains
restrictions on use and disclosure (that may incorporate by reference certain limitations and notices imposed by third
parties).
Japan/Nippon Requirements Only
Voluntary Control Council for Interference (VCCI) Statement
Taiwan Requirements
Bureau of Standards, Metrology and Inspection (BSMI) Statement
Canada Requirements Only
Canadian Department of Communications Radio Interference Regulations
This digital apparatus (Baystack 380 Switch) does not exceed the Class A limits for radio-noise emissions from digital
apparatus as set out in the Radio Interference Regulations of the Canadian Department of Communications.
Règlement sur le brouillage radioélectrique du ministère des Communications
Cet appareil numérique (Baystack 380 Switch) respecte les limites de bruits radioélectriques visant les appareils
numériques de classe A prescrites dans le Règlement sur le brouillage radioélectrique du ministère des Communications
du Canada.
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Nortel Networks Inc. software license agreement
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own data and information and for maintaining adequate procedures apart from the Software to reconstruct lost or altered
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Contents
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Before you begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Text conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
How to get help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Chapter 1
BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Physical description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Front panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Console port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Small Form Factor Pluggable (SFP) Gigabit Interface Converter . . . . . . . . . . 27
LED display panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Back panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Redundant power supply and uninterruptible power supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
DC-DC module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
AC power receptacle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Virtual Local Area Networks (VLANs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
RADIUS-based network security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
MAC address-based security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Flash memory storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Switch software image storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Configuration parameters storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
MultiLink Trunking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Port mirroring (conversation steering) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
RFCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
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Contents
SNMP MIB support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
SNMP trap support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
BootP automatic IP configuration/MAC address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Configuration and switch management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Chapter 2
Network configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Network configuration examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
High-bandwidth Desktop switch configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
High-bandwidth server configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
OEL2 Aggregation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Layer 2 Aggregator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
IEEE 802.1Q VLAN workgroups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
IEEE 802.1Q tagging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
VLANs spanning multiple switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
VLANs spanning multiple 802.1Q tagged switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
VLANS spanning multiple untagged switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Shared servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
VLAN workgroup summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
VLAN configuration rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Independent VLANs (IVL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
IEEE 802.1p Prioritizing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
MultiLink Trunks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Client/server configuration using MultiLink Trunks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Split MultiLink Trunks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Trunk configuration screen examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Trunk configuration screen for Switch S1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Trunk configuration screen for Switch S2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Trunk Configuration screen for Switch S3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Trunk Configuration screen for Switch S4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Before you configure trunks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Spanning tree considerations for MultiLink Trunks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Additional tips about the MultiLink Trunking feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Port mirroring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
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Chapter 3
Using the console interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Accessing the CI menus and screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Using the CI menus and screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Navigating the CI menus and screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Screen fields and descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Main menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
IP Configuration/Setup screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Choosing a BootP request mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
SNMP Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
System Characteristics screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Switch Configuration Menu screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
MAC Address Table screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
MAC Address Security Configuration Menu screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
MAC Address Security Port Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
MAC Address Security Table screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
VLAN Configuration Menu screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
VLAN Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
VLAN Port Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
VLAN Display by Port screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
VLAN Traffic Class Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Port Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
High Speed Flow Control Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Choosing a high speed flow control mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Symmetric mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Asymmetric mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
MultiLink Trunk Configuration Menu screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
MultiLink Trunk Utilization screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Port Mirroring Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Port Statistics screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
System Log screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Console/Comm Port Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Hardware Unit Information screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Spanning Tree Configuration Menu screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
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Contents
Spanning Tree Port Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Spanning Tree Switch Settings screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
TELNET Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Software Download screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
LED Indications during the download process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Configuration File Download/Upload screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Interpreting the LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Diagnosing and correcting problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Normal power-up sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Port connection problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Autonegotiation modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Port interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Appendix A
Technical specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Environmental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Electrical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Physical dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Performance specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Network protocol and standards compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Safety agency certification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Electromagnetic emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Electromagnetic immunity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Appendix B
Installing Gigabit Interface Converters (GBICs) and SFP GBICS . . . . . . 181
GBIC Product description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
GBIC labeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
GBIC Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
GBIC specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Standards, connectors, cabling, and distance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
1000BASE-SX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
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Contents
11
1000BASE-LX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
1000BASE-XD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
1000BASE-ZX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Handling, Safety, and Environmental Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
SFP GBIC Product description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Handling, safety, and environmental guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Product models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
SFP GBIC labeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Installing a Small Form Factor Pluggable SFP GBIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Removing a Small Form Factor Pluggable SFP GBIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Small Form Factor Pluggable SFP GBIC specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Standards, connectors, cabling, and distance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
1000BASE-SX (LC Type) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
1000BASE-LX (LC Type) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
1000BASE-SX (MT-RJ Type) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Coarse Wavelength Division Multiplexed (CWDM) Small Form Factor Pluggable (SFP)
Gigabit Interface Converters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
CWDM SFP GBIC description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
About the optical routing system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
CWDM SFP GBIC specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Appendix C
Quick configuration for MultiLink Trunking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
Appendix D
Connectors and pin assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
RJ-45 (10BASE-T/100BASE-TX) port connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
MDI and MDI-X devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
MDI-X to MDI cable connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Auto-polarity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
DB-9 (RS-232-D) Console/Comm Port connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Appendix E
Default settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Appendix F
Using the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
420.book Page 12 Monday, March 3, 2003 4:28 PM
12
Contents
Sample BootP configuration file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
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13
Figures
Figure 1
BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Figure 2
BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch front panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Figure 3
BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch LED display panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Figure 4
BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch back panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Figure 5
BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch security feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Figure 6
BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch used as a desktop switch . . . . . . . . . . 46
Figure 7
BayStack 380-24F Gigabit used in a high-bandwidth server configuration 48
Figure 8
BayStack 380-24F Gigabit used in an OEL2 Aggregation . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Figure 9
Layer 2 Aggregator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Figure 10
Port-based VLAN example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Figure 11
Default VLAN settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Figure 12
Port-based VLAN assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Figure 13
802.1Q tagging (after port-based VLAN assignment) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Figure 14
802.1Q tag assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Figure 15
802.1Q tagging (after 802.1Q tag assignment) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Figure 16
VLANs spanning multiple 802.1Q tagged switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Figure 17
VLANs spanning multiple untagged switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Figure 18
Possible problems with VLANs and Spanning Tree Protocol . . . . . . . . . . 58
Figure 19
Multiple VLANs sharing resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Figure 20
VLAN broadcast domains within the switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Figure 21
Default VLAN Configuration screen example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Figure 22
VLAN Configuration screen example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Figure 23
Default VLAN Port Configuration screen example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Figure 24
VLAN Port Configuration screen example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Figure 25
VLAN configuration spanning multiple switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Figure 26
Prioritizing packets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Figure 27
Port Transmit Queue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Figure 28
Default Traffic Class Configuration Screen Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Figure 29
Traffic Class Priority Configuration screen example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Using the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
420.book Page 14 Monday, March 3, 2003 4:28 PM
14
Figures
Figure 30
Switch-to-switch trunk configuration example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Figure 31
Switch-to-server trunk configuration example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Figure 32
Client/server configuration example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Figure 33
Split MultiLink Trunk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Figure 34
Choosing the MultiLink Trunk Configuration Menu screen . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Figure 35
MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Figure 36
MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen for Switch S2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Figure 37
MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen for Switch S3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Figure 38
MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen for Switch S4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Figure 39
Path Cost arbitration example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Figure 40
Example 1: correctly configured trunk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Figure 41
Example 2: detecting a misconfigured port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Figure 42
Port Mirroring Configuration port-based screen example . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Figure 43
Map of console interface screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Figure 44
Console interface main menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Figure 45
IP Configuration/Setup screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Figure 46
SNMP Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Figure 47
System Characteristics screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Figure 48
Switch Configuration Menu screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Figure 49
MAC Address Table screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Figure 50
MAC Address Security Configuration Menu screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Figure 51
MAC Address Security Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Figure 52
MAC Security Port Configuration screen (1 of 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Figure 53
MAC Security Port Configuration screen (2 of 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Figure 54
MAC Address Security Table screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Figure 55
MAC Address Security Table screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Figure 56
VLAN Configuration Menu screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Figure 57
VLAN Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Figure 58
VLAN Port Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Figure 59
VLAN Display by Port screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Figure 60
VLAN Traffic Class Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Figure 61
Traffic Class Policy Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Figure 62
Traffic Class Priority Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Figure 63
Port Configuration screen (1 of 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Figure 64
Port Configuration screen (2 of 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
214391-A
420.book Page 15 Monday, March 3, 2003 4:28 PM
Figures
Figure 65
15
High Speed Flow Control Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Figure 66
MultiLink Trunk Configuration Menu screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Figure 67
MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Figure 68
MultiLink Trunk Utilization screen (1 of 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Figure 69
MultiLink Trunk Utilization screen (2 of 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Figure 70
Port Mirroring Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Figure 71
Port Statistics screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Figure 72
System Log screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Figure 73
Console/Comm Port Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Figure 74
Hardware Unit Information screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Figure 75
Spanning Tree Configuration Menu screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Figure 76
Spanning Tree Port Configuration screen (1 of 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Figure 77
Spanning Tree Port Configuration screen (2 of 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Figure 78
Spanning Tree Switch Settings screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Figure 79
TELNET Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Figure 80
Software Download screen for a BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch . . . 165
Figure 81
Configuration File Download/Upload screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Figure 82
LED display panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Figure 83
SFP GBIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Figure 84
Nortel Networks SFP GBIC label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Figure 85
Inserting a LC SFP GBIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Figure 86
Inserting a MT-RJ SFP GBIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Figure 87
Removing a SFP GBIC (Bottom view) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
Figure 88
Configuring MultiLink Trunks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
Figure 89
RJ-45 (8-pin modular) port connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Figure 90
DB-9 Console port connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
Using the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
420.book Page 16 Monday, March 3, 2003 4:28 PM
16
Figures
214391-A
420.book Page 17 Monday, March 3, 2003 4:28 PM
17
Tables
Table 1
Components on the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch front panel . . . . . 26
Table 2
BayStack 380-24F switch LED descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Table 3
Components on the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch back panel . . . . . 30
Table 4
International power cord specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Table 5
SNMP MIB support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Table 6
Support SNMP traps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Table 7
Independent VLAN (IVL) Forwarding Database Table Example . . . . . . . . 66
Table 8
Console interface main menu options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Table 9
IP Configuration/Setup screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Table 10
SNMP Configuration screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Table 11
System Characteristics screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Table 12
Switch Configuration Menu options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Table 13
MAC Address Table screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Table 14
MAC Address Security Configuration Menu options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Table 15
MAC Address Security Configuration screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Table 16
MAC Security Port Configuration screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Table 17
MAC Address Security Table screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Table 18
VLAN Configuration Menu options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Table 19
VLAN Configuration screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Table 20
VLAN Port Configuration screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Table 21
VLAN Display by Port screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Table 22
Policy Configuration screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Table 23
Priority Configuration screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Table 24
Port Configuration screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Table 25
High Speed Flow Control Configuration screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Table 26
MultiLink Trunk Configuration Menu options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Table 27
MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Table 28
MultiLink Trunk Utilization screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Table 29
Port Mirroring Configuration screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Using the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
420.book Page 18 Monday, March 3, 2003 4:28 PM
18
Tables
Table 30
Monitoring modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Table 31
Port Statistics screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Table 32
System Log screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Table 33
Console/Comm Port Configuration screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Table 34
Spanning Tree Configuration Menu options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Table 35
Spanning Tree Port Configuration screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Table 36
Spanning Tree Switch Settings parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Table 37
TELNET Configuration screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Table 38
Software Download screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Table 39
Configuration File Download/Upload screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Table 40
Parameters not saved to the configuration file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Table 41
BayStack 380-24F switch LED descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Table 42
Corrective actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Table 43
Environmental specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Table 44
Electrical parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Table 45
Physical dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Table 46
Performance specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Table 47
Nortel Networks SFP GBIC models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Table 48
SFP GBIC specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Table 49
1000BASE-SX SFP GBIC specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Table 50
1000BASE-LX SFP GBIC specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
Table 51
1000BASE-SX (MT-RJ) SFP GBIC specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Table 52
Nortel Networks CWDM SFP GBIC List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Table 53
40 Kilometer CWDM SFP GBIC specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Table 54
70 Kilometer CWDM SFP GBIC specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Table 55
RJ-45 port connector pin assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Table 56
1000BASE-T Pin Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Table 57
DB-9 Console port connector pin assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
Table 58
Factory default settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
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19
Preface
This guide describes the Nortel Networks* BayStack* 380-24F Gigabit Switch
features and uses. The terms “BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch” and “BayStack
380-24F Switch” are both used in this document.
Before you begin
This guide is intended for network managers and administrators with the
following background:
•
•
•
•
Basic knowledge of networks, Ethernet* bridging, and IP
Familiarity with networking concepts and terminology
Specific knowledge about the networking devices, protocols, topologies, and
interfaces that comprise your network
Experience with windowing systems, graphical user interfaces (GUIs), or
Web browsers
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20
Preface
Text conventions
This guide uses the following text conventions:
angle brackets (< >)
Indicate that you choose the text to enter based on the
description inside the brackets. Do not type the
brackets when entering the command.
Example: If the command syntax is:
ping <ip_address>, you enter:
ping 192.32.10.12
bold text
Indicates command names and options and text that
you need to enter.
Example: Enter show ip {alerts | routes}.
Example: Use the dinfo command.
braces ({})
Indicate required elements in syntax descriptions
where there is more than one option. You must choose
only one of the options. Do not type the braces when
entering the command.
Example: If the command syntax is:
show ip {alerts | routes}, you must enter
either:
show ip alerts or show ip routes, but not
both.
brackets ([ ])
Indicate optional elements in syntax descriptions. Do
not type the brackets when entering the command.
Example: If the command syntax is:
show ip interfaces [-alerts], you can enter
either:
show ip interfaces or show ip interfaces
-alerts.
ellipsis points (. . . )
Indicate that you repeat the last element of the
command as needed.
Example: If the command syntax is:
ethernet/2/1 [<parameter> <value>] . . . ,
you enter
ethernet/2/1 and as many parameter-value pairs as
needed.
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Preface
21
italic text
Indicates file and directory names, new terms, book
titles, and variables in command syntax descriptions.
Where a variable is two or more words, the words are
connected by an underscore.
Example: If the command syntax is:
show at <valid_route>
valid_route is one variable and you substitute one value
for it.
screen text
Indicates system output, for example, prompts and
system messages.
Example: Set Trap Monitor Filters
separator ( > )
Shows menu paths.
Example: Protocols > IP identifies the IP option on the
Protocols menu.
vertical line ( | )
Separates choices for command keywords and
arguments. Enter only one of the choices. Do not type
the vertical line when entering the command.
Example: If the command syntax is:
show ip {alerts | routes}, you enter either:
show ip alerts or show ip routes, but not
both.
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22
Preface
Related publications
For more information about using the BayStack 380-24F Switch, refer to the
following publications:
•
Using Web-Based Management for the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
(part number 214394-A)
Describes how to use the Web-based management tool to configure switch
features.
•
Installing the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch (part number 214390-A)
Describes how to install the BayStack 380-24F Switch.
•
Release Notes for the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
(part number 214395-A)
Documents important changes about the software and hardware that are not
covered in other related publications.
•
Getting Started with the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch Management
Software (part number 2114392-A)
Describes how to install the Java-based device level software management
application.
•
Reference for the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch Management Software
(part number 214393-A)
Describes how to use the Java-based device level software management
application.
You can print selected technical manuals and release notes free, directly from the
Internet. Go to the www.nortelnetworks.com/documentation URL. Find the
product for which you need documentation. Then locate the specific category and
model or version for your hardware or software product. Use Adobe* Acrobat
Reader* to open the manuals and release notes, search for the sections you need,
and print them on most standard printers. Go to Adobe Systems at the
www.adobe.com URL to download a free copy of the Adobe Acrobat Reader.
You can purchase selected documentation sets, CDs, and technical publications
through the Internet at thewww.vervante.com/nortel URL.
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Preface
23
How to get help
If you purchased a service contract for your Nortel Networks product from a
distributor or authorized reseller, contact the technical support staff for that
distributor or reseller for assistance.
If you purchased a Nortel Networks service program, contact one of the following
Nortel Networks Technical Solutions Centers:
Technical Solutions Center
Telephone
Europe, Middle East, and Africa
(33) (4) 92-966-968
North America
(800) 4NORTEL or (800) 466-7835
Asia Pacific
(61) (2) 9927-8800
China
(800) 810-5000
An Express Routing Code (ERC) is available for many Nortel Networks products
and services. When you use an ERC, your call is routed to a technical support
person who specializes in supporting that product or service. To locate an ERC for
your product or service, go to the www.nortelnetworks.com/erc URL and click
ERC at the bottom of the page.
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Preface
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Chapter 1 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
25
Chapter 1
BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
This chapter introduces the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch and covers the
following topics:
•
•
“Physical description,” next
“Features” on page 34
Physical description
Figure 1 depicts the front and side views of the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch.
Figure 1 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
BayStac
k 380-2
4F Sw
itch
10463FB
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26
Chapter 1 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
Front panel
Figure 2 shows the configuration of the front panel on the BayStack 380-24F
Gigabit Switch. Table 1 describes the components on the front panel.
For descriptions of the back panel BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch components,
see “Back panel” on page 30.
Figure 2 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch front panel
1
2
3
GBIC
21
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
23
5
BayStack 380-24F Switch
Console
19
1
10/100 BASE-T
3
5
7
9
11 13 15 17 19 21 23
Pwr
Link
RPSU
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
BayStack 380-24F Switch
24
In-band
Management
Only
Link
Activity
Status
2
4
6
8
10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24
Activity
4
10464EB
Table 1 Components on the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch front panel
Item
Description
1
Mini-GBIC Ports
2
GBIC ports
3
Console port
4
10/100 BASE-T out-of-band management port
5
LED display panel
Console port
The Console port allows you to access the console interface (CI) screens and
customize your network using the supplied menus and screens (see Chapter 3,
“Using the console interface,” on page 89).
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Chapter 1 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
27
The Console port is a DB-9, RS-232-D male serial port connector. You can use
this connector to connect a management station or console/terminal to the
BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch by using a straight-through DB-9 to DB-9
standard serial port cable. You must use a VT100/ANSI-compatible terminal (for
cursor control and to enable cursor and functions keys) to use the console port.
See Installing the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch for more information.
Note: The console port is configured as a data communications
equipment (DCE) connector. Ensure that your RS-232 cable pinouts are
configured for DCE connections (see Appendix D, “Connectors and pin
assignments,” on page 207).
The Console port default settings are: 9600 baud with eight data bits, one stop bit,
and no parity as the communications format, with flow control set to enabled.
Small Form Factor Pluggable (SFP) Gigabit Interface Converter
Small Form Factor Pluggable Gigabit Interface Converters are hot-swappable
input/output enhancement components designed for use with Nortel Networks
products to allow Gigabit Ethernet ports to link with Short Wavelength (SX),
Long Wave length (LX), and Coarse Wavelength Division Multiplexed (CWDM)
fiber optic networks.
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Chapter 1 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
LED display panel
Figure 3 shows the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch LED display panel. See
Table 2 for a description of the LEDs.
Figure 3 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch LED display panel
BayStack 380-24F Switch
Console
1
10/100 BASE-T
3
5
7
9
11 13 15 17 19 21 23
Pwr
Activity
Status
Link
RPSU
Out-of-band
Management
Only
Link
2
4
6
8
10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24
Activity
10473EC
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Chapter 1 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
29
Table 2 BayStack 380-24F switch LED descriptions
Label
Type
Pwr
Color
Power status Green
Status
System
status
RPSU
Green
RPSU status Green
1000
Speed/Link
Status
indicator
Activity
Port activity
Solid
Green
Green
State
Meaning
On
DC power is available to the switch’s internal circuitry.
Off
No AC power to switch or power supply failed.
On
Self-test passed successfully and switch is operational.
Blinking
A nonfatal error occurred during the self-test. (This
includes nonworking fans.)
Off
The switch failed the self-test.
On
The switch is connected to the RPSU and can receive
power if needed.
Off
The switch is not connected to the RPSU or RPSU is not
supplying power.
On
The corresponding port is set to operate at 1000 Mb/s
and the link is good.
Blinking
The corresponding 1000 Mb/s port has been disabled by
software.
Off
The link connection is bad, or there is no connection to
this port.
Blinking
Indicates network activity for the corresponding port. A
high level of network activity can cause the LEDs to
appear to be on continuously.
Note: The speed indicator LED for a port operating at 10 Mb/s is solid amber for 5
seconds, then switches to green for 1 second. It alternates in this way while the switch is
on.
Multi-mode LEDs are used per port to display 1000BaseTX speed and port status:
•
•
•
•
•
1000Mbps - solid green
If the port is disabled, the port speed LED blinks at a rate of once per second:
disabled 1000Mbps - blink green
System ready LED
Redundant power LED
Activity LED: to be driven directly by PHYs Mini-GBICs and the corresponding
copper ports are sharing the same activity LEDs
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Chapter 1 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
Back panel
The switch back panel is shown in Figure 4. Table 3 describes the components on
the back panel.
Figure 4 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch back panel
2
1
100-240 V50-60Hz 2A
10474EB
Table 3 Components on the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch back panel
Item
Description
1
DC-DC module for the Redundant power supply unit
(RPSU)
2
AC power receptacle
Redundant power supply and uninterruptible power supply
The redundant power supply connector allows you to connect a backup power
supply unit to the BayStack 380 Switch. Nortel Networks provides an optional
redundant power supply unit (RPSU) for this purpose. The BayStack 10 Power
Supply Unit (Order number AA0005005) is a hot-swappable power supply unit
that provides uninterrupted operation to as many as four BayStack 380 Switches
in the event that any of the switch power supplies fail.
The BayStack 10 Power Supply Unit has a powerful, modular redundant and
uninterruptible power supply (UPS) functionality in a single chassis. It provides
scalable power redundancy and protection to your networking equipment. The
modules fit into the right-hand side of the rear of the chassis. The UPS and
associated battery pack module fit into the front of the chassis.
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Chapter 1 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
31
For further information, refer to Installation and Reference for the BayStack 10
Power Supply Unit (part number 208296-C). Contact your Nortel Networks sales
representative for more information.
DC-DC module
The 100 Watt DC-DC Converter operates in conjunction with the Nortel
Networks BayStack 10 Power Supply Unit and 200 Watt AC/DC Power Supply
Module. The 100 Watt DC-DC Converter (Order number AA0005010) provides a
plug-and-play redundant power supply unit for the BayStack 380 Switch, as well
as other products available from Nortel Networks. Contact your Nortel Networks
sales representative for information about the Nortel Networks products that use
the 100 Watt DC-DC Converter.
AC power receptacle
The AC power receptacle accepts the AC power cord (supplied). For installation
outside of North America, make sure that you have the proper power cord for your
region. Any cord used must have a CEE-22 standard V female connector on one
end and must meet the IEC 320-030 specifications. Table 4 lists specifications for
international power cords.
Table 4 International power cord specifications
Country/Plug description
Specifications
Continental Europe:
• CEE7 standard VII male plug
• Harmonized cord (HAR marking
on the outside of the cord jacket
to comply with the CENELEC
Harmonized Document HD-21)
220 or 230 VAC
50 Hz
Single phase
U.S./Canada/Japan:
• NEMA5-15P male plug
• UL recognized (UL stamped
on cord jacket)
• CSA certified (CSA label
secured to the cord)
100 or 120 VAC
50–60 Hz
Single phase
Typical plug
228FA
227FA
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32
Chapter 1 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
Table 4 International power cord specifications (continued)
Country/Plug description
Specifications
United Kingdom:
• BS1363 male plug with fuse
• Harmonized cord
240 VAC
50 Hz
Single phase
Typical plug
229FA
Australia:
• AS3112-1981 Male plug
240 VAC
50 Hz
Single phase
230FA
Caution: Please read immediately.
Inspect this power cord and determine if it provides the proper plug and is
appropriately certified for use with your electrical system. Immediately discard this
cord if it is inappropriate for your country's electrical system and obtain the proper
cord as required by your national electrical codes or ordinances.
Refer to this product's technical documentation for detailed installation procedures to
be followed by qualified service personnel.
Vorsicht: Bitte sofort lesen.
Sehen Sie nach, ob dieses Netzkabel über den richtigen Stecker verfügt und für die
Verwendung in Ihrem Stromversogungsnetz zertifiziert ist. Falls dieses Kabel nicht für
das Stromversorgungsnetz in Ihrem Land geeignet ist, darf es nicht verwendet werden.
Besorgen Sie sich ein Kabel, das die Vorschriften der Zulassungsbehörden in Ihrem
Land erfüllt.
Die technische Dokumentation dieses Produkts enthält ausführliche
Installationsanweisungen, die nur von qualifiziertem Kundendienstpersonal
ausgeführt werden dürfen.
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Chapter 1 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
33
Attention: Lisez ceci immédiatement.
Examinez ce cordon d'alimentation pour déterminer s'il dispose de la fiche appropriée
et s'il est bien agréé pour utilisation sur votre installation électrique.
Débarrassez-vous en immédiatement s'il ne convient pas à l'utilisation sur le secteur
électrique en usage dans votre pays et procurez-vous un cordon conforme à la
réglementation nationale en vigueur.
Reportez-vous à la documentation technique de ce produit pour obtenir des
instructions détaillées d'installation, destinées à un technicien qualifié.
Attenzione: Leggere attentamente.
Controllare questo cavo di alimentazione, verificarne il collegamento con la presa
appropriata nonché la certificazione per l'uso nell'impianto elettrico posseduto. Non
utilizzare assolutamente in caso tale cavo non sia adatto al sistema elettrico del paese
in cui viene utilizzato e richiederne un altro certificato dall'ente nazionale di fornitura
elettrica.
Per le procedure di installazione che devono essere seguite dal personale di servizio,
consultare questa documentazione tecnica del prodotto.
Advertencia: Sírvase leer inmediatamente.
Inspeccione este cable de alimentación eléctrica y determine si viene con el enchufe
apropiado y está debidamente certificado para el uso con su sistema eléctrico. Si no
cumple con los reglamentos del sistema eléctrico de su país, despójese de este cable de
alimentación inmediatamente y obtenga el cable requerido, según las ordenanzas y
códigos eléctricos nacionales.
Refiérase a la documentación técnica de este producto para recibir información
detallada sobre los procedimientos que el personal calificado de reparaciones deberá
seguir.
Caution:
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34
Chapter 1 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
Warning: Removal of the power cord is the only way to turn off power to this
device. The power cord must always be connected in a location that can be
accessed quickly and safely in case of an emergency.
Vorsicht: Die Stromzufuhr zu diesem Gerät kann nur durch Ziehen des
Netzstromkabels unterbrochen werden. Die Netzsteckdose, an die das
Netzstromkabel angeschlossen ist, muß sich stets an einem Ort befinden, der
bei einem Notfall schnell und einfach zugänglich ist.
Avertissement: Le débranchement du cordon d'alimentation constitue le
seul moyen de mettre cet appareil hors tension. Le cordon d'alimentation doit
donc toujours être branché dans une prise accessible pour faciliter la mise hors
tension en cas d'urgence.
Advertencia: La única forma de desconectar la alimentación de este
dispositivo es desenchufar el cable de alimentación. El cable de alimentación
siempre debe estar conectado en una ubicación que permita acceder al cable de
forma rápida y segura en caso de emergencia.
Avvertenza: Estrarre il cavo di alimentazione è l'unico sistema per spegnere
il dispositivo. Il cavo di alimentazione deve essere sempre collegato in una
posizione che permetta l'accesso facile e sicuro in caso di emergenza.
Features
The BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch provides wire-speed switching that allows
high-performance, low-cost connections to full-duplex and half-duplex
10/100/1000 Mb/s Ethernet local area networks (LANs). The BayStack 380-24F
Gigabit Switch provides the following features.
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Chapter 1 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
35
Virtual Local Area Networks (VLANs)
In a traditional shared-media network, traffic generated by a station is transmitted
to all other stations on the local segment. Therefore, for any given station on the
shared Ethernet, the local segment is the collision domain because traffic on the
segment has the potential to cause an Ethernet collision. The local segment is also
the broadcast domain because any broadcast is sent to all stations on the local
segment. Although Ethernet switches and bridges divide a network into smaller
collision domains, they do not affect the broadcast domain. In simple terms, a
virtual local area network provides a mechanism to fine-tune broadcast domains.
Your BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch allows you to create port-based VLANs:
•
IEEE 802.1Q port-based VLANs
A port-based VLAN is a VLAN in which the ports are explicitly configured to
be in the VLAN. When you create a port-based VLAN, you assign a Port
VLAN Identifier (PVID) and specify which ports belong to the VLAN. The
PVID is used to coordinate VLANs across multiple switches.
•
Auto PVID
When Auto PVID is active, a port that is assigned to a numbered VLAN has
the same number for its PVID. For example, if the VLAN is 2, the PVID is 2.
Security
The BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch security features provide two levels of
security for your local area network (LAN):
•
•
RADIUS-based security—limits administrative access to the switch through
user authentication
MAC address-based security—limits access to the switch based on allowed
source MAC addresses
Figure 5 shows a typical campus configuration using the BayStack 380-24F
Gigabit Switch security features. This example assumes that the switch, the
teachers’ offices and classrooms, and the library are physically secured. The
student dormitory may (or may not be) physically secure.
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Chapter 1 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
Figure 5 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch security feature
RADIUS
server
To Network
Center
RADIUS-based
security
Switch
Teachers’ offices
and classrooms
Student Dormitory
Legend
= Secure locked area
Library
BS45077C
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Chapter 1 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
37
In this configuration example, the following security measures are implemented:
•
•
The switch
— RADIUS-based security is used to limit administrative access to the
switch through user authentication (see “RADIUS-based network
security” on page 38).
— MAC address-based security is used to allow up to 448 authorized
stations (MAC addresses) access to one or more switch ports
(see “MAC address-based security” on page 38).
— The switch is located in a locked closet, accessible only by authorized
Technical Services personnel.
Student dormitory
Dormitory rooms are typically occupied by two students and have been
prewired with two network connections. Only students who are authorized (as
specified by the MAC address-based security feature) can access the switch
on the secured ports.
•
Teachers’ offices and classrooms
The PCs that are located in the teachers’ offices and in the classrooms are
assigned MAC address-based security that is specific for each classroom and
office location. The security feature logically locks each wall jack to the
specified station and prevents unauthorized access to the switch should
someone attempt to connect a personal laptop PC into the wall jack. The
printer is assigned as a single station and is allowed full bandwidth on that
switch port.
It is assumed that all PCs are password protected and that the classrooms and
offices are physically secured.
•
Library
The wall jacks in the library are set up so that the PCs can be connected to any
wall jack in the room. This arrangement allows the PCs to be moved
anywhere in the room. The exception is the printer, which is assigned as a
single station with full bandwidth to that port.
It is assumed that all PCs are password protected and that access to the library
is physically secured.
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Chapter 1 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
RADIUS-based network security
The RADIUS-based security feature allows you to set up network access control,
using the RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial-In User Services) security
protocol. The RADIUS-based security feature uses the RADIUS protocol to
authenticate local console and Telnet logins.
You will need to set up specific user accounts (user names and passwords, and
Service-Type attributes) on your RADIUS server before the authentication
process can be initiated. To provide each user with appropriate levels of access to
the switch, set the following username attributes on your RADIUS server:
•
•
Read-write access—Set the Service-Type field value to Administrative.
Read-only access—Set the Service-Type field value to NAS-Prompt.
For detailed instructions to set up your RADIUS server, refer to your RADIUS
server documentation.
For instructions to use the console interface (CI) to set up the RADIUS-based
security feature, see Chapter 3, “Using the console interface,” on page 89.
MAC address-based security
The MAC address-based security feature allows you to set up network access
control, based on source MAC addresses of authorized stations.
You can:
•
•
Create a list of up to 448 MAC addresses and specify which addresses are
authorized to connect to your switch configuration. The 448 MAC addresses
can be configured within a single standalone switch.
Specify which of your switch ports each MAC address is allowed to access.
The options for allowed port access include: NONE, ALL, and a single port.
The MAC address-based security feature is based on Nortel Networks BaySecure
LAN Access for Ethernet, a real-time security system that safeguards Ethernet
networks from unauthorized surveillance and intrusion.
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Chapter 1 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
39
For instructions to use the console interface (CI) to set up the RADIUS-based
security feature, see Chapter 3, “Using the console interface,” on page 89.
Flash memory storage
Switch software image storage
The BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch uses flash memory to store the switch
software image. The flash memory allows you to update the software image with
a newer version without changing the switch hardware (see “Software Download
screen” on page 163). An in-band connection between the switch and the TFTP
load host is required to download the software image.
Configuration parameters storage
All configuration parameters are stored in flash memory. These parameters are
updated every 60 seconds (if a change occurs) or whenever a reset command is
executed.
Warning: Do not power off the switch within 10 seconds of changing
any configuration parameters. Powering down the switch within 10
seconds of changing configuration parameters can cause the changed
configuration parameters to be lost.
MultiLink Trunking
The MultiLink Trunking feature allows you to group multiple ports, two to four
together, when forming a link to another switch or server, thus increasing
aggregate throughput of the interconnection between two devices, up to 8 Gb/s in
full-duplex mode. The BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch can be configured with
up to six MultiLink Trunks.
For more information about the MultiLink Trunking feature, see “MultiLink
Trunk Configuration Menu screen” on page 135.
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Chapter 1 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
Port mirroring (conversation steering)
The port mirroring feature (sometimes referred to as conversation steering) allows
you to designate a single switch port as a traffic monitor for a specified port. You
can specify port-based monitoring for ingress and egress at a specific port. You
can also attach a probe device (such as a Nortel Networks StackProbe, or
equivalent) to the designated monitor port.
For more information about the port mirroring feature, see “Port Mirroring
Configuration screen” on page 141.
RFCs
For more information about networking concepts, protocols, and topologies,
consult the following RFCs:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
RFC 1213 (MIB-II)
RFC 1493 (Bridge MIB)
RFC 1573 (Interface MIB)
RFC 1643 (Ethernet MIB)
RFC 1757 (RMON)
RFC 1271 (RMON)
RFC 1157 (SNMP)
Standards
The following IEEE Standards also contain information germane to the BayStack
380-24F Gigabit Switch:
•
•
•
•
•
•
214391-A
IEEE 802.3 10BASE-T (ISO/IEC 8802-3, Clause 14)
IEEE 802.3z (gigabit ethernet)
IEEE 802.1Q (VLAN Tagging)
IEEE 802.3x (Flow Control with 802.1D compliant device)
IEEE 802.1D (Spanning tree protocol)
IEEE 802.1p (Prioritization)
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Chapter 1 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
41
SNMP MIB support
The BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch supports an SNMP agent with industry
standard MIBs, as well as private MIB extensions, which ensures compatibility
with existing network management tools. The switch supports the MIB-II (RFC
1213), Bridge MIB (RFC 1493), and the RMON MIB (RFC 1757), which provide
access to detailed management statistics. With SNMP management, you can
configure SNMP traps (on individual ports) to generate automatically for
conditions such as an unauthorized access attempt or changes in a port’s operating
status. Table 5 lists supported SNMP MIBs.
Table 5 SNMP MIB support
Application
Standard MIBs
Proprietary MIBs
S5 Chassis MIB
s5cha127.mib
S5 Agent MIB
s5age140.mib
RMON
rfc1757.mib
MLT
rcMLT
SNMPv3 MIBs
RFCs 2571, 2572,
2573, 2574, 2575,
2576
MIB2
rfc1213.mib
IF-MIB
rfc2233.mib
Etherlike MIB
rfc1643.mib
Interface Extension MIB
s5ifx100.mib
Switch Bay Secure
s5sbs102.mib
System Log MIB
bnlog.mib
S5 Autotopology MIB
s5emt104.mib
VLAN
rcVlan
Entity MIB
RFC 2037
Spanning Tree
RFC1493 Bridge
MIB
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Chapter 1 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
SNMP trap support
The BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch supports an SNMP agent with industry
standard SNMPv1 traps, as well as private SNMPv1 trap extensions (Table 6).
Table 6 Support SNMP traps
Trap name
Configurable
Sent when
linkUp
Per port
A port’s link state changes to up.
linkDown
Per port
A port’s link state changes to down.
authenticationFailure
System wide
There is an SNMP authentication failure.
coldStart
Always on
The system is powered on.
warmStart
Always on
The system restarts due to a management
reset.
RFC 1215 (industry standard):
s5CtrMIB (Nortel proprietary traps):
s5CtrUnitUp
Always on
A unit is added to a configuration.
s5CtrUnitDown
Always on
A unit is removed from a configuration.
s5CtrHotSwap
Always on
A unit is hot-swapped in a configuration.
s5CtrProblem
Always on
An assigned unit fails.
s5EtrSbsMacAccessViolation
Always on
A MAC address violation is detected.
BootP automatic IP configuration/MAC address
The BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch has a unique 48-bit hardware address, or
MAC address, that is printed on a label on the back panel. You use this MAC
address when you configure the network BootP server to recognize the BayStack
380-24F Gigabit Switch BootP requests. A properly configured BootP server
enables the switch to automatically learn its assigned IP address, subnet mask, IP
address of the default router (default gateway), and software image file name.
The BootP Request Mode field in the IP Configuration screen allows you to
choose which method the switch uses to broadcast BootP requests:
•
•
214391-A
BootP When Needed
BootP Always
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Chapter 1 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
•
•
43
BootP Disabled
BootP or Last Address
Note: Whenever the switch is broadcasting BootP requests, the BootP
process will eventually time out if a reply is not received. When the
process times out, the BootP request mode automatically changes to
BootP Disabled mode. To restart the BootP process, change the BootP
request mode to any of the three following modes:
• BootP When Needed
• BootP Always
• BootP or Last Address.
For more information and an example of a BootP configuration file, see
Appendix F, “Sample BootP configuration file,” on page 217.
Configuration and switch management
You must assign an IP address to the switch, depending on the mode of operation.
You can set both addresses by using the console port or BootP, which resides on
the switch. You can manage the switch using:
•
Console interface
The console interface allows you to configure and manage the switch locally
or remotely. Access the CI menus and screens locally through a console
terminal attached to your BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch, remotely
through a dial-up modem connection, or in-band through a Telnet session.
For information about the console interface, see Chapter 3, “Using the
console interface,” on page 89.
•
Web-based management
You can manage the network from the World Wide Web. Access the
Web-based graphical user interface (GUI) through the Embedded Web Server
(EWS), the HTML-based browser located on your network. The GUI allows
you to configure, monitor, and maintain your network through Web browsers.
You can also download software using the Web.
For information about Web-based management, refer to Using Web-Based
Management for the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch.
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Chapter 1 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
•
Java-based Device Manager
Device Manager is a Java-based set of graphical network management
applications used to configure and manage a BayStack 380-24F Gigabit
Switch. See Reference for the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch Management
Software for more information.
•
Any generic SNMP-based network management software.
You can use any generic SNMP-based network management software to
configure and manage a BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch.
•
Nortel Networks Optivity* network management software
Optivity network management software consists of views, most of which are
maps that illustrate the interconnections between the segments, rings, and
nodes of your network. The views allow you to analyze network performance
and fault conditions on the individual segments and specific areas in your
network. They can also alert you when a problem has occurred in a specific
location. For further information about Optivity, contact your Nortel
Networks sales representative.
214391-A
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45
Chapter 2
Network configuration
Use BayStack 380-24F Gigabit switches to connect workstations, personal
computers (PCs), and servers to each other by connecting these devices directly to
the switch.
This chapter describes the following topics:
•
•
•
•
•
“Network configuration examples,” next
“IEEE 802.1Q VLAN workgroups” on page 51
“IEEE 802.1p Prioritizing” on page 66
“MultiLink Trunks” on page 70
“Port mirroring” on page 86
Network configuration examples
This section provides four network configuration examples using BayStack
380-24F Gigabit switches. In these examples, the packet classification feature can
be used to prioritize the traffic of the network to ensure uninterrupted traffic of
critical applications. The examples are:
•
•
•
•
High-bandwidth Desktop switch configuration (next)
High-bandwidth server configuration
OEL2 Aggregation
Layer 2 Aggregator
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
High-bandwidth Desktop switch configuration
Figure 6 shows a BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch used as a desktop switch,
where desktop workstations are connected directly to BayStack 380-24F Gigabit
Gigabit switch ports. A Passport 8600 provides high-capacity and low latency
connections to the rest of the network. Users can transfer files to and from the
network with much greater speed. Configuring a high bandwidth desktop
configuration requires only three major steps:
1
Configure the multi-link transfer (MLT) ports that link to the Passport 8600
2
Configure the MLT ports on the Passport 8600 that attach to the BayStack
380-24F Gigabit switch.
3
Attach one or more high-speed workstations to the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit
switch.
Figure 6 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch used as a desktop switch
PP 8600
MLT
BayStack
380-24F
10565EB
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
47
High-bandwidth server configuration
Figure 7 shows an example of a BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch used to service
a group of servers, where the servers are connected directly to BayStack 380-24F
Gigabit switch ports. A Passport 8600 provides high-capacity and low latency
connections to the rest of the network. The BayStack 380-24F Gigabit provides up
to four gigabit links for each server, and can balance the high speed server
connections with mult-gigabit links back to the network. The BayStack 380-24F
Gigabit also provides configuration of multiple 1000 Mbps link.
Configuring a high-bandwidth server configuation requires only four major steps:
1
Configure the network servers.
2
Configure the multi-link transfer (MLT) ports on the BayStack 380-24F
Gigabit that link to the network servers.
3
Configure the MLT ports that link to the Passport 8600.
4
Configure the MLT ports on the Passport 8600 that attach to the BayStack
380-24F Gigabit.
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
Figure 7 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit used in a high-bandwidth server configuration
PP 8600
MLT
BayStack
380-24F
10566EB
OEL2 Aggregation
Figure 8 shows an example of the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit used to aggregate
the uplink connection from OPTera Metro 1200 Ethernet Service modules (OM
1200 ESM) at one site to a Passport 8600 at another site. Inexpensive copper
connections can be used to connect the OM 1200 OSM units to the BayStack
380-24F Gigabit at one site, while small form factor plugggable gigabit interface
connectors (SFP GBICs) connect the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit to the Passport
8600 at the other site.
Configuring the OEL2 aggregation requires four major steps:
214391-A
1
Configure the OM 1200 ESM units
2
Configure the multi-link transfer (MLT) ports that link the OM 1200 ESM
units to the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit.
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
3
Configure the MLT ports on the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit that link to the
Passport 8600.
4
Configure the MLT ports on the Passport 8600 that link to the BayStack
380-24F Gigabit.
49
Figure 8 BayStack 380-24F Gigabit used in an OEL2 Aggregation
PP 8600
MLT
BayStack
380-24F
OM 1200 ESM
OM 1200 ESM
10567EA
Layer 2 Aggregator
Figure 9 shows an example of the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit used to aggregate
the uplink connection from several Business Policy Switch 2000 (BPS 2000)
switches to a Passport 8600.
Configuring the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit as a layer 2 aggregator requires three
major steps:
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50
Chapter 2 Network configuration
1
Attach the BPS 2000 switches to tagged VLAN ports on the BayStack
380-24F Gigabit
2
Configure the multi-link transfer (MLT) ports on the BayStack that connect to
the Passport 8600.
3
Configure the MLT ports on the Passport 8600 that connect to the BayStack
380-24F Gigabit.
Figure 9 Layer 2 Aggregator
PP 8600
MLT
BayStack
380-24F
BPS 2000
Stack
BPS 2000
Stack
BPS 2000
Stack
10568EB
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
51
IEEE 802.1Q VLAN workgroups
BayStack 380-24F Gigabit switches support up to 64 port-based VLANs with
IEEE 802.1Q tagging available per port. Ports are grouped into broadcast domains
by assigning them to the same VLAN. Frames received in one VLAN can only be
forwarded within that VLAN, and multicast frames and unknown unicast frames
are flooded only to ports in the same VLAN.
Setting up virtual LANs (VLANs) is a way to segment networks to increase
network capacity and performance without changing the physical network
topology (Figure 10). With network segmentation, each switch port connects to a
segment that is a single broadcast domain. When a switch port is configured to be
a member of a VLAN, it is added to a group of ports (workgroup) that belong to
one broadcast domain.
The BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch allows you to assign ports to VLANs using
the console, Telnet, Web-based management, or an appropriate SNMP-based
application. You can assign different ports (and therefore the devices attached to
these ports) to different broadcast domains. This feature allows network flexibility
because you can reassign VLANs to accommodate network moves, additions, and
changes, eliminating the need to change physical cabling.
Figure 10 Port-based VLAN example
VLAN 1
VLAN 2
BayStack
380-24F
10004EC
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
IEEE 802.1Q tagging
BayStack 380-24F Gigabit switches operate in accordance with the IEEE 802.1Q
tagging rules. Important terms used with the 802.1Q tagging feature are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
214391-A
VLAN identifier (VID)—the 12-bit portion of the VLAN tag in the frame
header that identifies an explicit VLAN. When other types of VLANs are
enabled, this default value can be overridden by the values enabled in the
Web-based management interface. Refer to Using Web-Based Management
for the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch.
Port VLAN identifier (PVID)—a classification mechanism that associates a
port with a specific VLAN. For example, a port with a PVID of 3 (PVID =3)
assigns all untagged frames received on this port to VLAN 3.
Tagged frame— the 32-bit field (VLAN tag) in the frame header that
identifies the frame as belonging to a specific VLAN. Untagged frames are
marked (tagged) with this classification as they leave the switch through a
port that is configured as a tagged port.
Untagged frame— a frame that does not carry any VLAN tagging information
in the frame header.
VLAN port members— a set of ports that form a broadcast domain for a
specific VLAN. A port can be a member of one or more VLANs.
Untagged member—a port that has been configured as an untagged member
of a specific VLAN. When an untagged frame exits the switch through an
untagged member port, the frame header remains unchanged. When a tagged
frame exits the switch through an untagged member port, the tag is stripped
and the tagged frame is changed to an untagged frame.
Tagged member—a port that has been configured as a member of a specific
VLAN. When an untagged frame exits the switch through a tagged member
port, the frame header is modified to include the 32-bit tag associated with the
PVID. When a tagged frame exits the switch through a tagged member port,
the frame header remains unchanged (original VID remains).
User priority—a three-bit field in the header of a tagged frame. The field is
interpreted as a binary number, therefore has a value of 0 - 7. This field allows
the tagged frame to carry the user-priority across bridged LANs where the
individual LAN segments may be unable to signal priority information.
Port priority—the priority level assigned to untagged frames received on a
port. This value becomes the user priority for the frame. Tagged packets get
their user priority from the value contained in the 802.1Q frame header.
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
•
53
Unregistered packet—a tagged frame that contains a VID where the receiving
port is not a member of that VLAN.
The default configuration settings for BayStack 380-24F Gigabit switches have all
ports set as untagged members of VLAN 1 with all ports configured as PVID = 1.
Every VLAN is assigned a unique VLAN identifier (VID) that distinguishes it
from all other VLANs. In the default configuration example shown in Figure 11,
all incoming packets are assigned to VLAN 1 by the default port VLAN identifier
(PVID =1). Untagged packets enter and leave the switch unchanged.
Figure 11 Default VLAN settings
802.1Q Switch
VLAN 1
Port 1
Port 2
Port 3
Port 4
Port 5
Port 6
Port 7
Port 8
PVID = 1
DA
CRC
SA
Incoming
untagged
packet
Data
Outgoing
untagged packet
(unchanged)
CRC
Data
SA
DA
Key
By default:
All ports are assigned PVID = 1
All ports are untagged members of VLAN 1
BS45010A
When you configure VLANs, you configure the switch ports as tagged or
untagged members of specific VLANs (see Figure 12 through Figure 20).
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
In Figure 11, untagged incoming packets are assigned directly to VLAN 2
(PVID = 2). Port 5 is configured as a tagged member of VLAN 2, and port 7
is configured as an untagged member of VLAN 2.
Figure 12 Port-based VLAN assignment
Data
SA
Port 4
CRC
DA
Port 2
Port 3
Tagged member
of VLAN 2
Port 5
Port 1
PVID = 2
Untagged packet
802.1Q Switch
Before
Port 6
Port 7
Port 8
Untagged member
of VLAN 2
BS45011A
As shown in Figure 13, the untagged packet is marked (tagged) as it leaves the
switch through port 5, which is configured as a tagged member of VLAN 2. The
untagged packet remains unchanged as it leaves the switch through port 7, which
is configured as an untagged member of VLAN 2.
Figure 13 802.1Q tagging (after port-based VLAN assignment)
Port 4
Port 1
Port 2
802.1Q Switch
Port 6
Untagged member
of VLAN 2
Port 7
Tagged member
of VLAN 2
Port 3
Port 8
Port 5
PVID = 2
CRC*
Data
Tag
SA
DA
(*Recalculated)
CRC
8100
Priority
CFI
VID = 2
16 bits
3 bits
1 bits
12 bits
Data
After
Outgoing
untagged packet
(unchanged)
SA
DA
Key
Priority
CFI
VID
- User_priority
- Canonical format indicator
- VLAN identifier
BS45012A
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
55
In Figure 14, tagged incoming packets are assigned directly to VLAN 2 because
of the tag assignment in the packet. Port 5 is configured as a tagged member of
VLAN 2, and port 7 is configured as an untagged member of VLAN 2.
Figure 14 802.1Q tag assignment
Data
Tag
SA
Port 4
CRC
DA
Before
Port 2
Port 3
Tagged member
of VLAN 2
Port 5
Port 1
PVID = 2
Tagged packet
802.1Q Switch
Port 6
Port 7
Port 8
Untagged member
of VLAN 2
BS45013A
As shown in Figure 15, the tagged packet remains unchanged as it leaves the
switch through port 5, which is configured as a tagged member of VLAN 2.
However, the tagged packet is stripped (untagged) as it leaves the switch through
port 7, which is configured as an untagged member of VLAN 2.
Figure 15 802.1Q tagging (after 802.1Q tag assignment)
Port 4
Port 1
Port 2
802.1Q Switch
Port 6
Untagged member
of VLAN 2
Port 7
CRC*
Tagged member
of VLAN 2
Port 3
Port 5
PVID = 2
CRC
Data
Tag
SA
DA
Port 8
(*Recalculated)
8100
Priority
CFI
VID = 2
16 bits
3 bits
1 bit
12 bits
Data
SA
DA
Outgoing
untagged packet
changed
(tag removed)
After
Key
Priority
CFI
VID
- User_priority
- Canonical format indicator
- VLAN identifier
BS45014A
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
VLANs spanning multiple switches
You can use VLANs to segment a network within a switch. When you connect
multiple switches, it is possible to connect users of one VLAN with users of that
same VLAN in another switch. However, the configuration guidelines depend on
whether both switches support 802.1Q tagging.
With 802.1Q tagging enabled on a port for a VLAN, all frames leaving the port
for that VLAN are marked as belonging to that specific VLAN. You can assign
specific switch ports as members of one or more VLANs that span multiple
switches, without interfering with the Spanning Tree Protocol.
VLANs spanning multiple 802.1Q tagged switches
Figure 16 shows VLANs spanning two BayStack 380-24F Gigabit switches. The
802.1Q tagging is enabled on S1, port 2 and on S2, port 1 for VLAN 1 and VLAN
2. Both ports are tagged members of VLAN 1 and VLAN 2.
Figure 16 VLANs spanning multiple 802.1Q tagged switches
VLAN 1
S1
VLAN 2
BayStack
380-24F
Both ports are tagged
members of VLAN 1
and VLAN 2
S2
BayStack
380-24F
10480EB
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
57
Because there is only one link between the two switches, the Spanning Tree
Protocol (STP) treats this configuration as any other switch-to-switch connection.
For this configuration to work properly, both switches must support the 802.1Q
tagging protocol.
VLANS spanning multiple untagged switches
Figure 17 shows VLANs spanning multiple untagged switches. In this
configuration, Switch S2 does not support 802.1Q tagging and you must use a
single switch port on each switch for each VLAN.
For this configuration to work properly, you must set spanning tree participation
to Disabled (the STP is not supported across multiple LANs).
Figure 17 VLANs spanning multiple untagged switches
VLAN 1
S1
VLAN 2
BayStack
380-24F
Untagged ports
S2
Non-802.1Q
tagging switch
10481EB
When the STP is enabled on these switches, only one link between each pair of
switches will be forwarding traffic. Because each port belongs to only one VLAN
at a time, connectivity on the other VLAN is lost. Exercise care when configuring
the switches to ensure that the VLAN configuration does not conflict with
spanning tree configuration.
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
To connect multiple VLANs across switches with redundant links, you must
disable the STP on all participating switch ports. Figure 18 shows possible
consequences of enabling the STP when using VLANs between untagged
(non-802.1Q tagged) switches.
Figure 18 Possible problems with VLANs and Spanning Tree Protocol
Station A
BayStack
380-24F
S1
VLAN 2
No
Communications
Blocking
VLAN 1
VLAN 1
Forwarding
VLAN 2
S2
BayStack
380-24F
Station B
10482EC
As shown in Figure 18, with STP enabled, only one connection between Switch
S1 and Switch S2 is forwarding at any time. Communications failure occurs
between VLAN 2 of S1 and VLAN 2 of S2, blocking communications between
Stations A and B.
The STP selects the link connecting VLAN 1 on Switches S1 and S2 as the
forwarding link based on port speed, duplex-mode, and port priority. Because the
other link connecting VLAN 2 is in Blocking mode, stations on VLAN 2 in
Switch S1 cannot communicate with stations in VLAN 2 on Switch S2. With
multiple links only one link will be forwarding.
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
59
Shared servers
BayStack 380-24F Gigabit switches allow ports to exist in multiple VLANs for
shared resources, such as servers, printers, and switch-to-switch connections. It is
also possible to have resources exist in multiple VLANs on one switch as shown
in Figure 19.
In this example, clients on different broadcast domains share resources. The
broadcasts from ports configured in VLAN 3 can be seen by all VLAN port
members of VLAN 3.
Figure 19 Multiple VLANs sharing resources
BayStack
380-24F
S1
V2
V2
V1
V3
V2
V1
Key
VLAN 1 (PVID=1)
VLAN 2 (PVID=2)
VLAN 3 (PVID=3)
10483EB
In the above configuration, all of the switch ports are set to participate as VLAN
port members. This arrangement allows the switch to establish the appropriate
broadcast domains within the switch (Figure 20).
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
Figure 20 VLAN broadcast domains within the switch
S1
VLAN 3
VLAN 2
Port 2
Port 4
Port 10
PVID = 2
VLAN 1
Port 8
PVID = 3
V2
V2
V2
V3
Port 6
Port 11
PVID = 1
V1
V2
Key
VLAN 1 (PVID = 1)
VLAN 2 (PVID = 2)
VLAN 3 (PVID = 3)
BS45019A
For example, to create a broadcast domain for each VLAN shown in Figure 20,
configure each VLAN with a port membership, and each port with the appropriate
PVID/VLAN association:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Ports 8, 6, and 11 are untagged members of VLAN 1.
The PVID/VLAN association for ports 6 and 11 is: PVID = 1.
Ports 2, 4, 10, and 8 are untagged members of VLAN 2.
The PVID/VLAN association for ports 2, 4, and 10 is: PVID = 2.
Ports 2, 4, 10, 8, 6, and 11 are untagged members of VLAN 3.
The PVID/VLAN association for port 8 is: PVID = 3.
The following steps show how to use the VLAN configuration screens to
configure the VLAN 3 broadcast domain shown in Figure 20.
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
61
To configure the VLAN port membership for VLAN 1:
1
Select Switch Configuration from the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch Main
Menu (or press w).
2
From the Switch Configuration Menu, select VLAN Configuration
(or press v).
3
From the VLAN Configuration Menu select VLAN Configuration
(or press v).
The default VLAN Configuration screen opens (Figure 21).
Figure 21 Default VLAN Configuration screen example
The VLAN Configuration screen settings shown in Figure 21 are default settings
with all switch ports classified as untagged members of VLAN 1.
Figure 22 shows the VLAN Configuration screen after it is configured to support
the VLAN 3 broadcast domain shown in Figure 20 on page 60 (VLAN Name is
optional).
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
Ports 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 11 are now untagged members of VLAN 3 as shown in
Figure 20 on page 60.
Figure 22 VLAN Configuration screen example
To configure the PVID (port VLAN identifier) for port 8:
1
From the VLAN Configuration screen, press [Ctrl]-R to return to the VLAN
Configuration Menu.
2
From the VLAN Configuration Menu, select VLAN Port Configuration
(or press c).
The default VLAN Port Configuration screen opens (Figure 23).
The VLAN Port Configuration screen settings shown in Figure 23 are default
settings.
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Figure 23 Default VLAN Port Configuration screen example
Figure 24 shows the VLAN Port Configuration screen after it is configured to
support the PVID assignment for port 8, as shown in Figure 20 on page 60 (Port
Name is optional).
The PVID/VLAN association for VLAN 3 is now PVID = 3.
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Figure 24 VLAN Port Configuration screen example
VLAN workgroup summary
This section summarizes the VLAN workgroup examples discussed in the
previous sections of this chapter.
As shown in Figure 25, Switch S1 (BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch) is
configured with multiple VLANs:
•
•
•
Ports 1, 6, 11, and 12 are in VLAN 1.
Ports 2, 3, 4, 7, and 10 are in VLAN 2.
Port 8 is in VLAN 3.
Because S4 does not support 802.1Q tagging, a single switch port on each switch
must be used for each VLAN (see “VLANS spanning multiple untagged
switches” on page 57).
The connection to S2 requires only one link between the switches because S1 and
S2 are both BayStack 380-24F Gigabit switches that support 802.1Q tagging (see
“VLANs spanning multiple 802.1Q tagged switches” on page 56).
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Figure 25 VLAN configuration spanning multiple switches
BayStack
380-24F
Non-802.1Q
tagging switch
S4
S2
Untagged ports
(STP disabled)
Both ports are tagged
members of VLAN 1
and VLAN 2
BayStack
380-24F
S1
V1
Non-802.1Q
tagging switch
S3
V2
V2
V1
V3
V2
Key
VLAN 1 (PVID=1)
VLAN 2 (PVID=2)
VLAN 3 (PVID=3)
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VLAN configuration rules
VLANs operate according to specific configuration rules. When creating VLANs,
consider the following rules that determine how the configured VLAN reacts in
any network topology:
•
All ports that are involved in port mirroring must have memberships in the
same VLANs. If a port is configured for port mirroring, the port’s VLAN
membership cannot be changed.
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
•
•
•
If a port is a trunk group member, all trunk members are added or deleted
from the VLAN.
All ports involved in trunking and port mirroring must have the same VLAN
configuration. If a port is on a trunk with a mirroring port, the VLAN
configuration cannot be changed.
When you enable AutoPVID for the ports in a new VLAN, you enable
AutoPVID for all the ports that will later be added to that VLAN.
Independent VLANs (IVL)
You can configure a VLAN as an Independent VLAN (IVL). Each independent
VLAN maintains its own MAC Address table.
Independent VLANs can have duplicate MAC Addresses on different VLANs. In
Table 7, both VLANs use the duplicate MAC Address “A”.
Table 7 Independent VLAN (IVL) Forwarding Database Table Example
Port
MAC Address
VLAN
1
00081XXXA
1
2
00081XXXA
2
For more information about configuring VLANs, see “VLAN Configuration
Menu screen” on page 118.
See also Appendix C, “Quick configuration for MultiLink Trunking,” on page 205
for configuration flowcharts that can help you use this feature.
IEEE 802.1p Prioritizing
You can use the VLAN Configuration screens to prioritize the order in which the
switch forwards packets, on a per-port basis. For example, if messages from a
specific segment are crucial to your operation, you can set the switch port
connnected to that segment to a higher priority level (by default, all switch ports
are set to Low priority). When the switch receives untagged packets on that port,
the untagged packets are tagged according to the priority level that you assign to
the port.
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Figure 26 Prioritizing packets
Before
CRC
PVID = 2
Priority = 6
Port configuration
parameters
Data
SA
Port 1
Port 2
Tagged member
of VLAN 2 (Port 5)
Port 3
DA
High
Port 5
Port 4
Port 5
transmit
queue
Low
Port 6
Untagged member
of VLAN 2
Port 7
CRC*
Data
Tag
SA
DA
(*Recalculated)
Port 8
CRC
810D
Priority = 6
CFI
VID = 2
16 bits
3 bits
1 bit
12 bits
Data
After
SA
Outgoing
untagged packet
(unchanged)
DA
Key
Priority
CFI
VID
- User_priority
- Canonical format indicator
- VLAN identifier
10545EA
The newly tagged frame is read within the switch and sent to the port’s high or
low transmit queue for disposition. The port transmit queue example shown in
Figure 27 applies to all ports in the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit switch.
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
Figure 27 Port Transmit Queue
Traffic
class
High priority
packet
7
6
Highest
5
User priority
(7)
Port
transmit
queue
4
3
High
Low
2
1
Lowest
0
As shown in Figure 27, the switch provides four transmission queues, Highest,
High, Low, and Lowest for any given port. Frames are assigned to one of these
queues on the basis of the user_priority value, using a traffic class table. This
table is managed by using the Traffic Class Configuration screen. The table
indicates the traffic class assigned to the frame for each user_priority value. If the
frame leaves the switch formatted as a tagged packet, the traffic class assigned to
the frame is carried forward to the next 802.1p-capable switch. This allows the
packet to carry the assigned traffic class priority through the network until it
reaches its destination.
The following steps show how to use the Traffic Class Configuration screen to
configure the port priority level.
To configure the priority level, follow these steps:
1
Determine the priority level you want to assign to the switch port.
User priority levels are assigned default settings in all BayStack 380-24F
Gigabit switches. The range is from 0 to 7. The traffic class table can be
modified. You can view the settings shown in the Traffic Class configuration
screen, and then set the port priority in the VLAN Port Configuration screen.
2
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Select Switch Configuration from the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Main Menu
(or press w).
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69
3
From the Switch Configuration Menu, select VLAN Configuration (or press
w).
4
From the VLAN Configuration Menu, select Traffic Class Configuration (or
press t).
The Traffic Class Configuration screen opens.
Figure 28 Default Traffic Class Configuration Screen Example
5
Select a priority level from the range shown in the Traffic Class Configuration
screen (or modify the Traffic Class parameters to suit your needs).
6
Assign the priority level to ports using the VLAN Port Configuration screen:
a
Press [Ctrl]-R to return to the VLAN Configuration Menu.
b
From the VLAN Configuration Menu, select VLAN Port Configuration
(or press c).
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Figure 29 Traffic Class Priority Configuration screen example
MultiLink Trunks
MultiLink Trunks allow you to group from two to four switch ports together to
form a link to another switch or server, thus increasing aggregate throughput of
the interconnection between the devices (up to 8 Gb/s in full-duplex mode). You
can configure up to six MultiLink Trunks. The trunk members can only reside on
a single unit. MultiLink Trunking software detects misconfigured (or broken)
trunk links and redirects traffic on the misconfigured or broken trunk link to other
trunk members within that trunk. If there is only a single trunk, the trunk can be
blocked and no traffic will get through.
You can use the Trunk Configuration screen to create switch-to-switch and
switch-to-server MultiLink Trunk links (Figure 30 and Figure 31).
Figure 30 shows two trunks (T1 and T2) connecting Switch S1 to switches S2
and S3.
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Figure 30 Switch-to-switch trunk configuration example
BayStack
380-24F
S1
T1
BayStack 380-24F
S2
T2
BayStack
380-24F
S3
10485EB
You can configure each of the trunks shown in Figure 30 with up to four switch
ports to provide up to 8 Gb/s aggregate bandwidth through each trunk, in
full-duplex mode. As shown in this example, when traffic between
switch-to-switch connections approaches single port bandwidth limitations,
creating a MultiLink Trunk can supply the additional bandwidth required to
improve the performance.
Figure 31 shows a typical switch-to-server trunk configuration. In this example,
file server FS1 uses dual MAC addresses, using one MAC address for each
network interface card (NIC). For this reason, FS1 does not require a trunk
assignment. FS2 is a single MAC server (with a four-port NIC) and is set up as
trunk configuration T1.
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Figure 31 Switch-to-server trunk configuration example
FS1
FS2
T1
S1
BayStack
380-24F
10486EA
Client/server configuration using MultiLink Trunks
Figure 32 shows an example of how MultiLink Trunking can be used in a
client/server configuration. In this example, both servers connect directly to
Switch S1. FS2 is connected through a trunk configuration (T1). The
switch-to-switch connections are through trunks (T2, T3, T4, and T5).
Clients accessing data from the servers (FS1 and FS2) are provided with
maximized bandwidth through trunks T1, T2, T3, T4, and T5. Trunk members
(the ports making up each trunk) do not have to be consecutive switch ports; you
can select ports randomly, as shown by T5.
With spanning tree enabled, one of the trunks (T2 or T3) acts as a redundant
(backup) trunk to Switch S2. With spanning tree disabled, you must configure
trunks T2 and T3 into separate VLANs for this configuration to function properly
Refer to “IEEE 802.1Q VLAN workgroups” on page 51 for more information.
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73
Figure 32 Client/server configuration example
FS2
FS1
T1
T2
BayStack
380-24F
S1
T3
S2
BayStack 380-24F
T4
S3
T5
BayStack 380-24F
S4
BayStack 380-24F
10487EB
The trunk configuration screens for switches S1 to S4 are shown in “Trunk
configuration screen examples” following this section. For detailed information
about configuring trunks, see “MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen” on
page 137.
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
Split MultiLink Trunks
This section provides an example of a split MultiLink Trunk. To use split MLT,
you must disable spanning tree on the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit switch.
Figure 33 shows an example of a split MultiLink Trunk:
Figure 33 Split MultiLink Trunk
BayStack 380-24F
Passport 8600 switch
Passport 8600 switch
10716EB
Trunk configuration screen examples
This section shows examples of the MultiLink Trunk configuration screens for the
client/server configuration example shown in Figure 32. The screens show how
you could set up the trunk configuration screens for switches S1 to S4. See
“Spanning tree considerations for MultiLink Trunks” on page 83, and “MultiLink
Trunk Configuration screen” on page 137 for more information.
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75
Trunk configuration screen for Switch S1
Switch S1 is set up with five trunk configurations: T1, T2, T3, T4, and T5.
To set up the S1 trunk configuration:
Choose MultiLink Trunk Configuration (or press t) from the MultiLink
Trunk Configuration Menu screen (Figure 34).
Figure 34 Choosing the MultiLink Trunk Configuration Menu screen
The MultiLink Trunk Configuration Menu screen opens (Figure 35).
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
Figure 35 MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen
Switch S1 is configured as follows:
•
•
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Trunk (read only) indicates the trunks (1 to 6) that correspond to the switch
ports specified in the Trunk Members fields.
Trunk Members indicates the ports that can be configured, in each row, to
create the corresponding trunk:
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
—
—
—
—
—
77
Ports 17, 19, 21, and 23 are assigned as trunk members of trunk 1.
Ports 5 and 7 are assigned as trunk members of trunk 2.
Ports 6 and 8 are assigned as trunk members of trunk 3.
Ports 18 and 20 are assigned as trunk members of trunk 4.
Ports 22 and 24 are assigned as trunk members of trunk 5.
Note: Assigning ports across the 12 port groups is not recommended.
For example, do not assign ports 11 and 14 as members of trunk 6.
•
•
STP Learning indicates the spanning tree participation setting for each of the
trunks:
— Trunks 1 through 4 are enabled for Normal STP Learning.
— Trunk 5 is enabled for Fast STP Learning.
Trunk Mode (read only) indicates the Trunk Mode for each of the trunks.
The Trunk Mode field values for trunks 1 to 6 are set to Basic. Source MAC
addresses are statically assigned to specific trunk members for flooding and
forwarding, which allows the switch to stabilize and distribute the data
streams of source addresses across the trunk members.
•
•
Trunk Status indicates the Trunk Status for each of the trunks. When set to
Enabled, the configuration settings for that specific trunk are activated.
Trunk Name indicates optional fields for assigning names to the
corresponding configured trunks.
The names chosen for this example provide meaningful information to the
user of this switch (for example, S1:T1 to FS2 indicates that Trunk 1, in
Switch S1, connects to File Server 2).
Trunk configuration screen for Switch S2
As shown in Figure 32 on page 73, Switch S2 is set up with two trunk
configurations (T2 and T3). Both trunks connect directly to Switch S1.
As in the previous screen examples, to set up a trunk configuration, choose
MultiLink Trunk Configuration from the MultiLink Trunk Configuration Menu
screen.
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Figure 36 shows the MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen for Switch S2.
Figure 36 MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen for Switch S2
Switch S2 is configured as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
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Trunk (read only) indicates the trunks (1 to 6) that correspond to the switch
ports specified in the Trunk Members fields.
Trunk Members indicates the ports that can be configured, in each row, to
create the corresponding trunk:
— Ports 11 and 13 are assigned as trunk members of trunk 1.
STP Learning indicates the spanning tree participation setting for each of the
trunks. Trunks 1 and 2 are enabled for Normal STP Learning.
Trunk Mode (read only) indicates the Trunk Mode for each of the trunks. The
Trunk Mode field values for trunks 1 and 2 are set to Basic. Source MAC
addresses are statically assigned to specific trunk members for flooding and
forwarding, which allows the switch to stabilize and distribute the data
streams of source addresses across the trunk members.
Trunk Status indicates the Trunk Status for each of the trunks. When set to
Enabled, the configuration settings for that specific trunk are activated.
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•
79
Trunk Name indicates optional fields for assigning names to the
corresponding configured trunks.
The names chosen for this example provide meaningful information to the
user of this switch (for example, S2:T2 to S1 indicates that Trunk 1, in Switch
S2, connects to Switch 1).
Trunk Configuration screen for Switch S3
As shown in Figure 32 on page 73, Switch S3 is set up with one trunk
configuration (T4). This trunk connects directly to Switch S1.
As in the previous screen examples, to set up an interswitch trunk configuration,
choose MultiLink Trunk Configuration from the MultiLink Trunk Configuration
Menu screen.
Figure 37 shows the MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen for Switch S3.
Figure 37 MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen for Switch S3
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
Switch S3 is configured as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Trunk (read only) indicates the trunk (1 to 6) that corresponds to the switch
ports specified in the Trunk Members fields.
Trunk Members indicates the ports that can be configured, in each row, to
create the corresponding trunk.
— Ports 11 and 13 are assigned as trunk members of trunk 1.
STP Learning indicates the spanning tree participation setting for each of the
trunks. Trunk 1 is enabled for Normal STP Learning.
Trunk Mode (read only) indicates the Trunk Mode for each of the trunks. The
Trunk Mode field value for trunk 1 is set to Basic. Source MAC addresses are
statically assigned to specific trunk members for flooding and forwarding,
which allows the switch to stabilize and distribute the data streams of source
addresses across the trunk members.
Trunk Status indicates the Trunk Status for each of the trunks. When set to
Enabled, the configuration settings for that specific trunk are activated.
Trunk Name indicates optional fields for assigning names to the
corresponding configured trunks.
Trunk Configuration screen for Switch S4
The names chosen for this example provide meaningful information to the user of
this switch (for example, S3:T4 to S1 indicates that Trunk 1, in Switch S3,
connects to Switch 1).
As shown in Figure 38, Switch S4 is set up with one trunk configuration (T5).
This trunk connects directly to Switch S1.
As in the previous screen examples, to set up a trunk configuration, choose
MultiLink Trunk Configuration from the MultiLink Trunk Configuration Menu
screen.
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81
Figure 38 shows the MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen for Switch S4.
Figure 38 MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen for Switch S4
Switch S4 is configured as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Trunk (read only) indicates the trunk (1 to 6) that corresponds to the switch
ports specified in the Trunk Members fields.
Trunk Members indicates the ports that can be configured, in each row, to
create the corresponding trunk.
— Ports 15 and 19 are assigned as trunk members of trunk T5.
STP Learning indicates the spanning tree participation setting for each of the
trunks. Trunk 1 is enabled for Normal STP Learning.
Trunk Mode (read only) indicates the Trunk Mode for each of the trunks. The
Trunk Mode field value for trunk 1 is set to Basic. Source MAC addresses are
statically assigned to specific trunk members for flooding and forwarding,
which allows the switch to stabilize and distribute the data streams of source
addresses across the trunk members.
Trunk Status indicates the Trunk Status for each of the trunks. When it is set
to Enabled, the configuration settings for that specific trunk are activated.
Trunk Name indicates optional fields for assigning names to the
corresponding configured trunks.
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The names chosen for this example provide meaningful information to the
user (for example, S4:T5 to S1 indicates that Trunk 1, in Switch S4, connects
to Switch 1).
Before you configure trunks
When you create and enable a trunk, the trunk members (switch ports) take on
certain settings necessary for correct operation of the MultiLink Trunking feature.
Before you configure your MultiLink Trunk, you must consider these settings,
along with specific configuration rules, as follows:
1
Read the configuration rules provided in the next section, “Spanning tree
considerations for MultiLink Trunks” on page 83.
2
Determine which switch ports (up to four) are to become trunk members (the
specific ports making up the trunk). A minimum of two ports are required for
each trunk.
Ensure that the chosen switch ports are set to Enabled, using either the Port
Configuration screen (see “Port Configuration screen” on page 129) or
network management.
Trunk member ports must have the same VLAN configuration.
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3
All network cabling should be complete and stable before configuring any
trunks, to avoid configuration errors.
4
Consider how the existing spanning tree will react to the new trunk
configuration (see “Spanning tree considerations for MultiLink Trunks” on
page 83).
5
Consider how existing VLANs will be affected by the addition of a trunk.
6
After completing the above steps, see “MultiLink Trunk Configuration
screen” on page 137 for screen examples and field descriptions that will help
you configure your MultiLink Trunks.
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83
Spanning tree considerations for MultiLink Trunks
The spanning tree Path Cost parameter is calculated based on the aggregate
bandwidth of the trunk. For example, Figure 39 shows a two-port trunk (T1) with
two port members operating at an aggregate bandwidth of 2 Gb/s, with a
comparable Path Cost of 1.
Figure 39 Path Cost arbitration example
BayStack
380-24F
S1
1000 Mb/s
Path Cost T1 = 1
1000 Mb/s
T1
Aggregate Bandwidth
2 Gb/s
S2
BayStack
380-24F
10488EC
The switch can also detect trunk member ports that are physically misconfigured.
For example, in Figure 40, trunk member ports 2, 4, and 6 of Switch S1 are
configured correctly to trunk member ports 7, 9, and 11 of Switch S2. The
Spanning Tree Port Configuration screen for each switch shows the port state field
for each port in the Forwarding state.
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
Figure 40 Example 1: correctly configured trunk
S1 Port Configuration screen
BayStack
380-24F
S1
T1
BayStack
380-24F
S2
S2 Port Configuration screen
10489EB
If Switch S2’s trunk member port 7 is physically disconnected and then
reconnected to port 9, the Spanning Tree Port Configuration screen for Switch S1
changes to show port 6 in the Blocking state (Figure 41).
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Figure 41 Example 2: detecting a misconfigured port
[Blocking]
S1 Port Configuration screen
S1
BayStack
380-24F
T1
S2
BayStack
380-24F
S2 Port Configuration screen
10490EB
Additional tips about the MultiLink Trunking feature
When you create a MultiLink Trunk, the individual trunk members (the specific
ports that make up the trunk) logically connect and react as a single entity. For
example, if you change spanning tree parameters for any trunk member, the
spanning tree parameters for all trunk members change.
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All configured trunks are indicated in the Spanning Tree Configuration screen.
The Trunk field lists the active trunks, adjacent to the port numbers that
correspond to the specific trunk member for that trunk.
When a trunk is active, you can disable spanning tree participation using the
Trunk Configuration screen or using the Spanning Tree Configuration screen.
When a trunk is not active, the spanning tree participation setting in the Trunk
Configuration screen does not take effect until you set the Trunk Status field to
Enabled.
The trunk is also viewed by management stations as a single spanning tree port.
The spanning tree port is represented by the trunk member with the lowest port
number. For example, if ports 13, 14, 15, and 16 are trunk members of trunk T1,
the management station views trunk T1 as spanning tree port 13.
For more information about using the MultiLink Trunking feature, see “MultiLink
Trunk Configuration Menu screen” on page 135.
See also Appendix C, “Quick configuration for MultiLink Trunking,” on page 205
for a configuration flowchart that can help you use this feature.
Port mirroring
You can designate one of your switch ports to monitor ingress traffic on a single
specified switch port (port-based).
Figure 38 provides a sample Port Mirroring Configuration screen. Note that the
displayed screens do not show all of the screen prompts that precede some
actions.
For example, when you configure a switch for port mirroring or when you modify
an existing port mirroring configuration, the new configuration does not take
effect until you respond [Yes] to the following screen prompt:
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Chapter 2 Network configuration
Is your port mirroring configuration complete?
87
[ Yes ]
Figure 42 Port Mirroring Configuration port-based screen example
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Chapter 3
Using the console interface
This chapter describes how to configure and manage the BayStack 380-24F
Gigabit Switch using the menu-driven console interface (CI).
This chapter covers the following topics:
•
•
•
“Accessing the CI menus and screens,” next
“Using the CI menus and screens” on page 90
“Main menu” on page 92
Accessing the CI menus and screens
You can access the CI menus and screens locally through a console terminal
attached to your BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch, remotely through a dial-up
modem connection, or in-band through a Telnet session (see “Console port” on
page 26). You can connect your console cable into any BayStack 380-24F Gigabit
Switch..
Note: If you have a properly configured BootP server in your network,
it detects the IP address; you will not need to configure the IP address.
For information about SNMP, see your network management documentation.
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Chapter 3 Using the console interface
Using the CI menus and screens
The CI menus and screens provide options that allow you to configure and
manage BayStack 380-24F switches. Help prompts at the bottom of each menu
and screen explain how to enter data in the highlighted field and how to navigate
the menus and screens.
The Console port default settings are: 9600 baud with eight data bits, one stop bit,
and no parity as the communications format, with flow control set to disabled.
Some options allow you to toggle among several possible values; other options
allow you to set or modify a parameter.
Navigating the CI menus and screens
Use the following methods to navigate the CI menus and screens.
To select a menu option:
1
Use the arrow keys to highlight the option name.
2
Press [Enter].
The option takes effect immediately after you press [Enter].
Alternatively, you can press the key corresponding to the underlined letter in
the option name. For example, to select the Switch Configuration option in
the main menu, press the w key. Note that the text characters are not
case-sensitive.
To toggle between values in a form:
1
Use the spacebar to highlight the value.
2
Press [Enter].
To clear a string field:
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1
Position the cursor in the string field.
2
Press [Ctrl]-K.
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91
To return to the previous menu, press [Ctrl]-R.
To go to the next screen in a series, press [Ctrl]-N.
To return to the main menu at any time, press [Ctrl]-C.
Press [Backspace] to delete entered text.
Options that appear in brackets (for example, [Enabled]) are user-settable options.
Screen fields and descriptions
Figure 43 shows a map of the CI screens. The remainder of this chapter describes
the CI screens and their fields, beginning with the main menu.
Figure 43 Map of console interface screens
Main Menu
IP Configuration/Setup
SNMP Configuration
System Characteristics
Switch Configuration
Console/Comm Port Configuration
Display Hardware Units
Spanning Tree Configuration
TELNET Configuration
Software Download
Configuration File
Display Event Log
Reset
MAC Address Security Configuration
MAC Address Table
MAC Address Security Port Configuration
MAC Address-Based Security
MAC Address Security Table
VLAN Configuration
Port Configuration
VLAN Configuration
High Speed Flow Control Configuration VLAN Port Configuration
MultiLink Trunk Configuration
VLAN Display by Port
Port Mirroring Configuration
Traffic Class
Display Port Statistics
Policy Configuration
Clear Port Statistics
Priority Configuration
Spanning Tree
Display Spanning Tree Switch Setting
MultiLink Trunk Configuration
MultiLink Trunk Utilization
Reset to Default Settings
Logout
BS45041F
The CI screens for your specific switch model will show the correct model name
in the main menu screen title and the correct number of ports and port types in the
Port Configuration screen.
Note: The field values shown in the CI screens in this section are
provided as examples only.
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Chapter 3 Using the console interface
Main menu
This section describes the options available from the CI main menu (Figure 44).
The CI screens and submenus for these options are described in the following
sections.
Note: Some menu options shown in this main menu example and in
other screen examples in this chapter may not appear on your screen,
depending on the switch options installed. However, the full menu
options are shown in the screen examples and described in the following
sections.
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Figure 44 Console interface main menu
Table 8 describes the CI main menu options.
Table 8 Console interface main menu options
Option
Description
IP Configuration/
Setup...
Displays the IP Configuration/Setup screen (see “IP Configuration/Setup screen”
on page 96). This screen allows you to set or modify IP configuration
parameters.
SNMP Configuration...
Displays the SNMP Configuration screen (see “SNMP Configuration screen” on
page 102). This screen allows you to set or modify the SNMP read-only
community and read-write community strings, enable or disable the
authentication trap and the link Up/down trap, set the IP address of trap
receivers, and set the trap community strings.
System
Characteristics...
Displays the System Characteristics screen (see “System Characteristics
screen” on page 103). This screen allows you to view switch characteristics,
including number of resets, power status, hardware and firmware version, and
MAC address. This screen also contains three user-configurable fields:
sysContact, sysName, and sysLocation.
Switch Configuration...
Displays the Switch Configuration Menu screen (see “Switch Configuration
Menu screen” on page 105). This menu provides the following configuration
options: MAC Address Table, MAC Address-Based Security, VLAN
Configuration, Port Configuration, MultiLink Trunk Configuration, Port Mirroring
Configuration, Display Port Statistics, Clear All Port Statistics, and Display
System Log.
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Table 8 Console interface main menu options (continued)
Option
Description
Console/Comm Port
Configuration...
Displays the Console/Comm Port Configuration screen (see “Console/Comm
Port Configuration screen” on page 148). This screen allows you to configure
and modify the console/Comm port parameters, including the console port
speed and password settings for the switch operation.
Spanning Tree
Configuration...
Displays the Spanning Tree Configuration Menu (see “Spanning Tree
Configuration Menu screen” on page 153). This menu provides the following
options: Spanning Tree Port Configuration, Display Spanning Tree Switch
Settings.
TELNET
Configuration...
Displays the TELNET Configuration screen (see “TELNET Configuration screen”
on page 161). This screen allows you to set your switch to enable a user at a
remote console terminal to communicate with the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit
Switch as if the console terminal were directly connected to it. You can have up
to four active Telnet sessions running at one time in a standalone switch.
Software Download...
Displays the Software Download screen (see “Software Download screen” on
page 163). This screen allows you to revise the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit
Switch software image that is located in nonvolatile flash memory.
Configuration File
Displays the Configuration File Download/Upload screen (see “Configuration
File Download/Upload screen” on page 167). This screen allows you to store
your switch configuration parameters on a TFTP server. You can retrieve the
configuration parameters for automatically configuring a replacement switch with
the same configuration when required.
Display System Log
Displays the System Log screen (see “System Log screen” on page 146).
Reset
Resets the switch with the current configuration settings. This option is followed
by a screen prompt that precedes the action. Enter Yes to reset the switch; enter
No to abort the option:
• When you select this option, the switch resets, runs a self-test, then displays
the Nortel Networks logo screen. Press [Ctrl]-Y to access the BayStack
380-24F Gigabit Switch main menu.
Reset to Default
Settings
Resets the switch to the factory default configuration settings. This option is
followed by a screen prompt that precedes the action. Enter Yes to reset the
switch to the factory default configuration settings; enter No to abort the option:
• When you select this option, the switch resets, runs a self-test, then displays
the Nortel Networks logo screen. Press [Ctrl]-Y to access the BayStack
380-24F Gigabit Switch main menu.
Caution: If you choose the Reset to Default Settings option, all of your
configured settings will be replaced with factory default settings when
you press [Enter]
Achtung: Bei Auswahl des Befehls zur Rücksetzung auf die
Standardeinstellungen werden alle von Ihnen konfigurierten
Einstellungen durch die werkseitigen Standardeinstellungen ersetzt,
wenn Sie die Eingabetaste drücken.
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95
Table 8 Console interface main menu options (continued)
Option
Description
Attention: Si vous restaurez la configuration usine, votre configuration
courante sera remplacée par la configuration usine dès que vous
appuierez sur [Entrée].
Precaución: Si selecciona el comando Restaurar valores
predeterminados, todos los valores de configuración se sustituirán por
las valores predeterminados en fábrica al pulsar [Intro].
Attenzione: Nel caso in cui si selezioni la reimpostazione dei valori di
default, tutte le impostazioni configurate verranno sostituite dai default di
fabbrica premendo il tasto [Invio].
Logout
Allows a user in a Telnet session or a user working at a password-protected
console terminal to terminate the session.
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IP Configuration/Setup screen
The IP Configuration/Setup screen (Figure 45) allows you to set or modify the
BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch IP configuration parameters. Data that you
enter in the user-configurable fields takes effect as soon as you press [Enter].
To open the IP Configuration/Setup screen:
Choose IP Configuration/Setup (or press i) from the main menu.
Figure 45 IP Configuration/Setup screen
Table 9 describes the IP Configuration/Setup screen fields.
Note: The read-only fields in this screen are updated based on the BootP
mode specified in the BootP Request Mode field. (See “Choosing a
BootP request mode” on page 98 for more information.)
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Table 9 IP Configuration/Setup screen fields
Field
Description
BootP Request
Mode
One of four modes of operation for BootP. (See “Choosing a BootP request mode” on
page 98 for details about the four modes.)
Default Value
BootP Disabled
Range
BootP Disabled, BootP When Needed, BootP Always, BootP or Last
Address
Configurable
Column header for the user-configurable IP configuration fields in this screen.
In Use
Column header for the read-only fields in this screen. The read-only data displayed in
this column represents IP configuration that is currently in use.
Last BootP
Column header for the read-only fields in this screen. The read-only data displayed in
this column represents IP configuration obtained from the last BootP reply received.
In-Band Switch
IP Address
The in-band IP address of the switch.
Default Value
0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned)
Range
Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is represented
as a decimal value, between 0 and 255, separated by a decimal
point
Note: When the IP address is entered in the In-Band IP Address field, and the
In-Band Subnet Mask field value is not present, the software provides an in-use
default value for the In-Band Subnet Mask field that is based on the class of the
IP address entered in the In-Band IP Address field.
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Table 9 IP Configuration/Setup screen fields (continued)
Field
Description
In-Band Subnet
Mask
The subnet address mask associated with the in-band IP address shown on the screen
(see In-Band Switch IP address field). Network routers use the subnet mask to
determine the network or subnet address portion of a host’s IP address. The bits in the
IP address that contain the network address (including the subnet) are set to 1 in the
address mask, and the bits that contain the host identifier are set to 0.
Default Value
0.0.0.0 (no subnet mask assigned)
Range
Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is represented
as a decimal value, between 0 and 255, separated by a decimal
point
Default Gateway The IP address of the default gateway.
IP Address to
Ping
Default Value
0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned)
Range
Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is represented
as a decimal value, between 0 and 255, separated by a decimal
point
The IP address of the network device you want to ping.
Start Ping
Default Value
0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned)
Range
Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is represented
as a decimal value, between 0 and 255, separated by a decimal
point
Pings the selected network device when you choose Yes.
Default Value
No
Range
No, Yes
Choosing a BootP request mode
The BootP Request Mode field in the IP Configuration screen allows you to
choose which method the switch uses to broadcast BootP requests:
•
•
•
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BootP When Needed
BootP Always
BootP Disabled
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•
99
BootP or Last Address
Note: Whenever the switch is broadcasting BootP requests, the BootP
process will eventually time out if a reply is not received. When the
process times out, the BootP request mode automatically changes to
BootP Disabled mode. To restart the BootP process, change the BootP
request mode to any of the three following modes:
• BootP When Needed
• BootP Always
• BootP or Last Address.
BootP When Needed
Allows the switch to request an IP address if one has not already been set from the
console terminal. When selected, this mode operates as follows:
•
•
When the IP data is entered from the console terminal, the data becomes the
in-use address of the switch and BootP requests are not broadcast. The switch
can be managed using this in-band IP address.
When the in-band IP address is not set from the console terminal, the switch
broadcasts BootP requests until it receives a BootP reply containing an IP
address. If the switch does not receive a BootP reply that contains an IP
address, the switch cannot be managed in-band.
If an IP address is not currently in use, these actions take effect immediately. If an
IP address is currently in use, these actions take effect only after the switch is reset
or power cycled.
BootP Always
Allows the switch to be managed only when configured with the IP address
obtained from the BootP server. When selected, this mode operates as follows:
•
•
The switch continues to broadcast BootP requests, regardless of whether an
in-band IP address is set from the console terminal.
If the switch receives a BootP reply that contains an in-band IP address, the
switch uses this new in-band IP address.
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•
If the switch does not receive a BootP reply, the switch cannot be managed
using the in-band IP address set from the console terminal.
If an IP address is not currently in use, these actions take effect immediately. If an
IP address is currently in use, these actions take effect only after the switch is reset
or power cycled.
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101
BootP Disabled
Allows the switch to be managed only by using the IP address set from the
console terminal. When selected, this mode operates as follows:
•
•
The switch does not broadcast BootP requests, regardless of whether an IP
address is set from the console terminal.
The switch can be managed only by using the in-band switch IP address set
from the console terminal.
These actions take effect after the switch is reset or power cycled, even if an IP
address is not currently in use.
BootP or Last Address
Allows the switch to be managed even if a BootP server is not reachable. When
selected, this mode operates as follows:
•
•
When the IP data is entered from the console terminal, the data becomes the
in-band address of the switch and BootP requests are not broadcast. The
switch can be managed using this in-band IP address.
When the in-band IP address is not set from the console terminal, the switch
broadcasts BootP requests until it receives a BootP reply containing an
in-band IP address. If the switch does not receive a BootP reply that contains
an in-band IP address within 10 minutes, the switch uses the last in-band IP
address it received from a BootP server. This IP information is displayed in
the Last BootP column.
If an IP address is not currently in use, these actions take effect immediately. If an
IP address is currently in use, these actions take effect only after the switch is reset
or power cycled.
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SNMP Configuration screen
The SNMP Configuration screen (Figure 46) allows you to set or modify the
SNMP configuration parameters.
To open the SNMP Configuration screen:
Choose SNMP Configuration (or press m) from the main menu.
Figure 46 SNMP Configuration screen
Table 10 describes the SNMP Configuration screen fields.
Table 10 SNMP Configuration screen fields
Field
Description
Read-Only
Community String
The community string used for in-band read-only SNMP operations.
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Default Value
public
Range
Any ASCII string of up to 32 printable characters
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Table 10 SNMP Configuration screen fields (continued)
Field
Description
Read-Write
Community String
The community string used for in-band read-write SNMP operations.
Trap #1 IP Address
1
Community String
Authentication Trap
Autotopology
Default Value
private
Range
Any ASCII string of up to 32 printable characters
Number one of four trap IP addresses. Successive trap IP address fields
are numbered 2, 3, and 4. Each trap address has an associated community
string (see Community String).
Default Value
0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned)
Range
Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is
represented as a decimal value, separated by a decimal
point
The community string associated with one of the four trap IP addresses
(see Trap #1 IP Address).
Default Value
Zero-length string
Range
Any ASCII string of up to 32 printable characters
Determines whether a trap will be sent when there is an SNMP
authentication failure.
Default Value
Enabled
Range
Enabled, Disabled
Allows you to enable or disable the switch participation in autotopology,
which allows network topology mapping of other switches in your network.
Default Value
Enabled
Range
Disabled
1 The Trap IP Address and Community String fields can be set using a MIB table (in a Nortel Networks
proprietary MIB). The status of the row in the MIB table can be set to Ignore. If the row status is set to Ignore,
the fields appear to be set when viewed from the console terminal; however, no traps will be sent to that
address until the row status is set to Valid.
System Characteristics screen
The System Characteristics screen (Figure 47) allows you to view system
characteristics and contains three user-configurable fields: sysContact, sysName,
and sysLocation.
To open the System Characteristics screen:
Choose System Characteristics (or press s) from the main menu.
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Figure 47 System Characteristics screen
Table 11 describes the System Characteristics screen fields.
Table 11 System Characteristics screen fields
Field
Description
Operation Mode
Read-only field that indicates the operation mode of the switch.
MAC Address
The MAC address of the switch
Reset Count
A read-only field that indicates the number of resets since the operational firmware
was first loaded on the switch.
Last Reset Type
Power Status
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Default Value
1
Range
0 to 232 -1 (4,294,967,295)
A read-only field that indicates the last type of reset.
Default Value
Power Cycle
Range
Power Cycle, Software Download, Management Reset,
Management Factory Reset
A read-only field that indicates the current power source (primary, RPSU, or both).
Default Value
Primary Power
Range
Primary Power, Redundant Power, Primary and Redundant
Power
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Table 11 System Characteristics screen fields (continued)
Field
Description
sysDescr
A read-only field that specifies hardware and software versions.
sysObjectID
A read-only field that provides a unique identification of the switch, which contains
the vendor’s private enterprise number.
sysUpTime
A read-only field that shows the length of time since the last reset. Note that this field
is updated when the screen is redisplayed.
sysServices
A read-only field that indicates the switch’s physical and data link layer functionality.
sysContact
The name and phone number of the person responsible for the switch.
sysName
sysLocation
Default Value
Zero-length string
Range
Any ASCII string of up to 56 printable characters1
A name that uniquely identifies the switch.
Default Value
Zero-length string
Range
Any ASCII string of up to 56 printable characters1
The physical location of the switch.
Default Value
Zero-length string
Range
Any ASCII string of up to 56 printable characters
1 Although this field can be set to up to 255 characters from a Network Management Station (NMS), only 56 characters
are displayed on the console terminal.
Switch Configuration Menu screen
The Switch Configuration Menu screen (Figure 48) allows you to set or modify
your switch configuration.
Choose Switch Configuration (or press w) from the main menu to open the Switch
Configuration Menu screen (Table 12).
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Figure 48 Switch Configuration Menu screen
Table 12 describes the Switch Configuration Menu options.
Table 12 Switch Configuration Menu options
Option
Description
MAC Address Table
Displays the MAC Address Table screen (see “MAC Address Table
screen” on page 107). This screen allows you to view all MAC
addresses and their associated port or trunk that the switch has
learned, or to search for a particular MAC address (to see if the switch
has learned the address).
MAC Address Security
Configuration...
Displays the MAC Address Security Configuration menu (see “MAC
Address Security Configuration Menu screen” on page 110). This
screen allows you to set up the MAC address security feature and
provides the following options: MAC Address Security Configuration,
MAC Address Security Port Configuration, and MAC Address Security
Table. This menu allows you to enable and disable security features
on the port and trunk levels.
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Table 12 Switch Configuration Menu options (continued)
Option
Description
VLAN Configuration...
Displays the VLAN Configuration Menu (see “VLAN Configuration
Menu screen” on page 118). This menu provides the following options:
VLAN Configuration, VLAN Port Configuration, VLAN Display by Port,
MAC-SA, and Return to Switch Configuration Menu screen. This
menu allows you to create and modify VLANs.
Port Configuration...
Displays the Port Configuration screen (see “Port Configuration
screen” on page 129). This screen allows you to configure a specific
switch port, or all switch ports.
High Speed Flow Control
Configuration...
Displays the High Speed Flow Control Configuration screen.
MultiLink Trunk Configuration... Displays the MultiLink Trunk Configuration Menu (see “MultiLink Trunk
Configuration Menu screen” on page 135). This menu provides the
following options: MultiLink Trunk Configuration, MultiLink Trunk
Utilization, and Return to Switch Configuration Menu screen. This
menu allows you to create and modify trunks, and to monitor the
bandwidth utilization of configured trunks.
Port Mirroring Configuration...
Displays the Port Mirroring Configuration screen (see “Port Mirroring
Configuration screen” on page 141). This screen allows you to
designate a single switch port as a traffic monitor for one specific port.
Display Port Statistics
Displays the Port Statistics screen (see “Port Statistics screen” on
page 143). This screen allows you to view detailed information about
any switch port.
Clear All Port Statistics
Allows you to clear all port statistics.
This option is followed by screen prompts that precede a choice of the
actions:
• Cchoose one of the following:
• Yes, to clear all port statistics for all switch ports
• No, to abort the option
MAC Address Table screen
The MAC Address Table screen (Figure 49) allows you to view MAC addresses
that the switch has discovered or to search for a specific MAC address.
The MAC Address Table screen also operates in conjunction with the Port
Mirroring Configuration screen. When you configure a switch for MAC
address-based port mirroring, you can use the MAC Address Table screen to find
an address and enter the address directly from this screen. You can enter addresses
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Chapter 3 Using the console interface
from either screen, but you must return to the Port Mirroring Configuration screen
to activate the feature (see “Port Mirroring Configuration screen” on page 141).
When you add a security MAC Address, it is added to the MAC Address Table
screen (Figure 49).
Choose MAC Address Table (or press m) from the Switch Configuration Menu
screen to open the MAC Address Table screen (Figure 49).
Note: This screen does not refresh dynamically to show new entries. To
refresh the screen, press [Ctrl]-R to return to the previous menu.
Figure 49 MAC Address Table screen
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109
Table 13 describes the MAC Address Table screen fields.
Table 13 MAC Address Table screen fields
Field
Description
Aging Time
Specifies how long a learned MAC address remains in the switch’s
forwarding database. If an entry is inactive for a period of time that exceeds
the specified aging time, the address is removed.
Find an Address
Default Value
300 seconds
Range
10 to 1,000,000 seconds
Allows the user to search for a specific MAC address.
Default Value
00-00-00-00-00-00 (no MAC address assigned)
Range
00-00-00-00-00-00 to FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF
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MAC Address Security Configuration Menu screen
The MAC Address Security Configuration Menu screen (Figure 50) allows you to
specify a range of system responses to unauthorized network access to your
switch. The network access control is based on the MAC addresses of the
authorized stations. You can specify a list of up to 448 MAC addresses that are
authorized to access the switch. You can also specify the ports that each MAC
address is allowed to access. The options for allowed port access include: NONE,
ALL or a single port that is specified in a list, for example, 1, 6, 9, etc. You must
also include the MAC address of any router connected to any secure ports.
To open the MAC Address Security Configuration screen:
Choose MAC Address Security Configuration from the Switch
Configuration Menu.
Figure 50 MAC Address Security Configuration Menu screen
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111
Table 14 describes the MAC Address Security Configuration Menu options.
Table 14 MAC Address Security Configuration Menu options
Option
Description
MAC Address Security
Configuration...
Displays the MAC Address Security Configuration screen (see “Table 14
describes the MAC Address Security Configuration Menu options.” on
page 111). This screen allows you to Enable or Disable the MAC Address
Security feature.
MAC Address Security
Port Configuration...
Displays the MAC Address Security Port Configuration screen (see “MAC
Address Security Port Configuration screen” on page 113”). This screen
allows you to Enable or Disable MAC Security for each port.
MAC Address Security
Table...
Displays the MAC Address Security Table screen (see “MAC Address
Security Table screens” on page 116). This screen allows you to specify the
MAC addresses that are allowed to access the switch.
Return to Switch
Configuration Menu...
Exits the MAC Address Security Configuration Menu screen and displays the
Switch Configuration Menu screen.
The MAC Address Security Configuration screen (Figure 51) allows you to
enable or disable the MAC address security feature.
Choose MAC Address Security Configuration from the MAC Address Security
Configuration Menu to open the MAC Address Security Configuration screen.
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Figure 51 MAC Address Security Configuration screen
Table 15 describes the MAC Address Security Configuration screen fields.
Table 15 MAC Address Security Configuration screen fields
Field
Description
MAC Address Security
When this field is set to enabled, the switch checks source MAC addresses
of packets that arrive on secure ports against MAC addresses listed in the
MAC Address Security Table for allowed membership. If the switch detects a
source MAC address that is not an allowed member, the switch drops the
packets.
MAC Address Security
SNMP-Locked
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Default
Disabled
Range
Disabled, Enabled
When this field is set to enabled, the MAC address security screens cannot
be modified using SNMP.
Default
Disabled
Range
Disabled, Enabled
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113
Table 15 MAC Address Security Configuration screen fields (continued)
Field
Description
Clear by Ports
This field clears the specified port (or ports) that are listed in the Allowed
Source Port(s) field of the MAC Address Security Table screen (see “MAC
Address Security Table screens” on page 116). When you specify a port (or
ports) to be cleared using this field, the specific port (or ports) will be cleared
for each of the entries listed in the MAC Address Security Table. If you totally
clear the allowed Source Port(s) field (leaving a blank field) for an entry, the
associated MAC address for that entry is also cleared.
Learn by Ports
Default
NONE
Range
NONE, ALL, a port number list (for example, 1, 6, etc.)
All source MAC addresses of any packets received on the specified port (or
ports) are added to the MAC Security Table when the Current Learning Mode
field is set to Learning in Progress. You cannot include any of the port values
whose security is enabled. You must disable port security for that port..
Current Learning Mode
Default
NONE
Range
NONE, ALL, a port number list (for example, 1, 6, etc.)
Indicates the current learning mode for the switch ports. When this field is set
to Learning in Progress, all source MAC addresses of any packets received
on the specified port (or ports) are added to the MAC Security Table
(maximum of 448 MAC address entries allowed). If you exceed the limit of
448 entries, the system prompts you with an alert message.
Default
Disabled
Range
Disabled, Enabled
MAC Address Security Port Configuration screen
The MAC Address Security Port Configuration screens (Figure 52 and Figure 53)
allow you to set or modify your MAC address port security configuration on a per
port basis.
To open the MAC Address Security Port Configuration screen:
Choose MAC Address Security Port Configuration from the MAC Address
Security Configuration Menu.
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Chapter 3 Using the console interface
Figure 52 MAC Security Port Configuration screen (1 of 2)
Figure 53 MAC Security Port Configuration screen (2 of 2)
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Table 16 describes the MAC Security Port Configuration screen fields.
Table 16 MAC Security Port Configuration screen fields
Field
Description
Port
Displays a numbered port list.
Trunk
Displays the trunk number if the port is a member of that trunk.
Default
Security
blank field
This field value determines whether or not security is enabled or disabled on
the port level. This field must be enabled for a port to be a member of MAC
Security.
Default
Disabled
Range
Disabled, Enabled
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MAC Address Security Table screens
The MAC Address Security Table screens allow you specify one port for each
MAC address.. You must also include the MAC addresses of any routers that are
connected to any secure ports.
There are 16 available MAC Address Security Table screens (Figure 54) that you
can use to create up to 448 MAC address entries (28 per screen).
Figure 54 MAC Address Security Table screens
[
[
[
[
[
[
[
[
[
[
[
[
[
[
-
MAC Address
----------- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
MAC Address Security Table
Find an Address: [ 00-00-00-00-00-00 ]
Allowed Source
MAC Address
Allowed Source
------------------------------------] [
]
[
- - - - ] [
]
] [
]
[
- - - - ] [
]
] [
]
[
- - - - ] [
]
] [
]
[
- - - - ] [
]
] [
]
[
- - - - ] [
]
] [
]
[
- - - - ] [
]
] [
]
[
- - - - ] [
]
] [
]
[
- - - - ] [
]
] [
]
[
- - - - ] [
]
] [
]
[
- - - - ] [
]
] [
]
[
- - - - ] [
]
] [
]
[
- - - - ] [
]
] [
]
[
- - - - ] [
]
] [
]
[
- - - - ] [
]
Screen 1
More...
Screen 1
Press Ctrl-N to display next screen.
Enter MAC Address, xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx, press <Return> or <Enter> when complete.
Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu. Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.
MAC Address Security Table
Find an Address: [ 00-00-00-00-00-00 ]
MAC Address
Allowed Source
MAC Address
Allowed Source
---------------------------------MAC Address Security
Table -------------[
- - - - ] [ Find
] an Address:
[
- 00-00-00-00-00-00
- - - ] [] ]
[
[
- - -MAC
- Address
] [ Allowed
]
[
- - MAC
- -Address
] [Allowed
]
Source
Source
[
- - ------------ ] [ -------------]
[
- - ----------- - ] [-------------]
[
-[ - - - - - - - - ]- [ ] ][
[
-[ - - - - - - - - ]- [ ] ][
]
]
[
-[ - - - - - - - - ]- [ ] ][
[
-[ - - - - - - - - ]- [ ] ][
]
]
[
-[ - - - - - - - - ]- [ ] ][
[MAC -Address
- - - - ]-Table
[ ] ][
]
[ - - - -Security
]
[
-[ - - - - - - - - ]- [ ] ][
-[ - - - -[- 00-00-00-00-00-00
] Find [an Address:
- - - ]- [ ] ][
]]
MAC
Address
Allowed
Source
MAC
Address
[
-[ - - - - - - - - ]- [ ] ][
[
-[ - - - - - - - - ]- [ ] ][
]
]Allowed Source
[
-[ - - - - - - - - ----------]- [ ] ][
[
-[ - - - - - - - -----------]- [ ] ][
] -------------]-------------]
[
-[ - - - - -[ - - -- ]-- [- ] -][ - ] ] [ [ ] -[ - - - - -[ - - -- ]-- [- ] -][ - ] ] [
]
[
-[ - - - - -[ - - -- ]-- [- ] -][ - ] ] [ [ ] -[ - - - - -[ - - -- ]-- [- ] -][ - ] ] [
]
[
-[ - - - - -[ - - -- ]-- [- ] -][ - ] ] [ [ ] -[ - - - - -[ - - -- ]-- [- ] -][ - ] ] [
[
]
[
]
[
]
[
]
[
-[ - - - - - - - - ]- [ ] ][
[
-[ - - - - - - - - ]- [ ] ][
]
]
]
[
-[ - - - - -[ - - -- ]-- [- ] -][ - ] ] [ [ ] -[ - - - - -[ - - -- ]-- [- ] -][ - ] ] [
] [
-- - ] 1- [ -More...
]
[
- - [ - -- -- - ] - [ - ] ] [
- - [ - -- Screen
] ] [
] [
]
[
- - [ - -- -- - ] - [ - ] ] [
- - [ - -- -- - ] - [ - ] ] [
] [
]
[
- - [ - -- -- - ] - [ - ] ] [
- - [ - -- -- - ] - [ - ] ] [
[
]
[
]
[
]
[
]
Press Ctrl-N to display next screen.
Screen 1
More...
[
-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx,
- - - ] [press
] <Return> [or <Enter>
- - - when
- -complete.
] [
]
Enter MAC Address,
- - to- previous
- ]menu.
[
]Press Ctrl-C
[ to- return
- - to
- Main
]Menu.
[
]
Press Ctrl-R to[ return
[ to
- display
- - - next
- screen.
] [
]
[
- - - - ] [
]
Press Ctrl-N
- - xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx,
- - ] [
] press <Return>
[
- or- <Enter>
- - -when] complete.
[
]
Enter MAC [Address,
[ to
- return
- - -to -previous
] [ menu.
]
- -to -return
- - to ]Main
[ Menu.
]
Press Ctrl-R
Press [Ctrl-C
Screen 16
Screen 16
Press Ctrl-P to display previous screen.
Enter MAC Address, xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx, press <Return> or <Enter> when complete.
Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu. Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.
Choose MAC Address Security Table from the MAC Address Security
Configuration Menu to open the MAC Address Security Table screen (Figure 55).
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117
Figure 55 MAC Address Security Table screen
Table 17 describes the MAC Address Security Table screen fields.
Table 17 MAC Address Security Table screen fields
Field
Description
Find an Address
Allows you to search for a specific MAC address that is used in any of the
MAC Address Security Table screens.
MAC Address
Allows you to specify up to 448 MAC addresses that are authorized to access
the switch. You can specify the port that each MAC address is allowed to
access using the Allowed Source field (see next field description). The
specified MAC address does not take effect until the Allowed Source field is
set to some value. You can clear an existing MAC address field by entering
zero (0) in the field and pressing [Enter].
Default
Range
Allowed Source
-
-
-
-
-
(no address assigned)
A range of 6 Hex Octets, separated by dashes (multicast1
and broadcast addresses are not allowed).
Allows you to specify a port that each MAC address is allowed to access. The
options for the Allowed Source field include a single port number or a port list
value. The port security for the allowed sources should be enabled for the
security to be effective.
Default
Range
- (Blank field)
A single unit/port or a port list value (for example, 1, 6, etc.).
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1 Multicast address -- Note that the first octet of any Multicast address will always be an odd number.
VLAN Configuration Menu screen
The VLAN Configuration Menu screen (Figure 56) allows you to select the
appropriate screen to configure up to 64 VLANs.
When you create VLANs, you can assign various ports (and therefore the devices
attached to these ports) to different broadcast domains. Creating VLANs increases
network flexibility by allowing you to reassign devices to accommodate network
moves, additions, and changes, eliminating the need to change physical cabling.
To open the VLAN Configuration Menu:
Choose VLAN Configuration (or press v) from the Switch Configuration
Menu screen.
Figure 56 VLAN Configuration Menu screen
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119
Table 18 describes the VLAN Configuration Menu options.
Table 18 VLAN Configuration Menu options
Option
Description
VLAN Configuration...
Displays the VLAN Configuration screen (see “VLAN Configuration screen” on
page 119). This screen allows you to set up VLAN workgroups.
VLAN Port
Configuration...
Displays the VLAN Port Configuration screen (see “VLAN Port Configuration
screen” on page 122). This screen allows you to set up a specific switch port.
VLAN Display by Port...
Displays the VLAN Display by Port screen (see “VLAN Display by Port screen”
on page 124).
Return to Switch
Configuration Menu
Exits the VLAN Configuration Menu screen and displays the Switch
Configuration Menu screen.
Traffic Class
Specifies the traffic class, either policy or priority.
VLAN Configuration screen
The VLAN Configuration screen (Figure 57) allows you to create and assign
VLAN port memberships to unit ports. You can create port-based and
policy-based VLANs for the following purposes:
•
IEEE 802.1Q port-based VLANs allow you to explicitly configure switch
ports as VLAN port members.
When you create a port-based VLAN, you assign a Port VLAN Identifier (PVID)
manually, or use Auto PVID to assign it automatically.
When you configure ports as VLAN port members, they become part of a set of
ports that form a broadcast domain for a specific VLAN. You can assign switch
ports as VLAN port members of one or more VLANs.
You can add or remove port members from a VLAN in accordance with the
IEEE 802.1Q tagging rules. See “IEEE 802.1Q VLAN workgroups” on page 51
for a description of important terms used with 802.1Q VLANs.
You can also use this screen to create and to delete specific VLANs, to assign
VLAN names, and to assign any VLAN as the management VLAN.
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To open the VLAN Configuration screen:
Choose VLAN Configuration (or press v) from the VLAN Configuration
Menu screen.
Figure 57 VLAN Configuration screen
Table 19 describes the VLAN Configuration screen fields.
Table 19 VLAN Configuration screen fields
Field
Description
Create VLAN
Allows you to set up or view configured VLAN workgroups. Enter the number of the
new VLAN you want to create or view, then press [Return]. The Port Membership
fields indicate the corresponding VLAN workgroup configuration, if configured.
Dashes (-) indicate no VLAN Members are configured. Alternatively, you can use
the space bar to toggle through the various configured VLAN workgroups. You can
create up to 64 different VLANs (except VLAN #1).
Delete VLAN
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Default
1
Range
2 to 4094
Allows you to delete specified VLANs, except the assigned management VLAN
(See Management VLAN field). Enter the number of the VLAN you want to delete,
then press [Return], or use the space bar to toggle through the selection until you
reach the VLAN you want to delete, then press [Return].
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121
Table 19 VLAN Configuration screen fields (continued)
Field
Description
The specified VLAN is deleted as soon as you press [Return]. The software does
not prompt you to reconsider this action. If you delete a VLAN, all configuration
parameters that are associated with that VLAN are deleted also.
You cannot delete VLAN 1. By default, all switch ports are assigned as untagged
members of VLAN 1 with all ports configured as PVID = 1. See “IEEE 802.1Q VLAN
workgroups” on page 51 for more information.
VLAN Name
Default
blank field
Range
2 to 4094
Allows you to assign a name field to configured VLANs.
Default
VLAN # (VLAN number)
Range
Any ASCII string of up to 16 printable characters
Management VLAN Allows you to assign any VLAN as the management VLAN. VLAN 1 is the default
management VLAN for the switch. To set this field, the VLAN State field value must
be Active.
VLAN State
Port Membership
Default
No
Range
Yes, No
Allows you to activate your newly created VLAN.
The following field values: VLAN Type, Protocol Id (PID), or User-defined PID must
be configured appropriately before this field can be set to active. After you set the
VLAN State field value to Active, you cannot change the VLAN State, VLAN Type,
Protocol Id, or User-defined PID field values, unless you delete the VLAN.
If you delete a VLAN, all configuration parameters that are associated with that
VLAN are also deleted.
Default
Inactive
Range
Inactive, Active
Allows you to assign port memberships to VLANs. The ports can be configured in
one or more VLANs. To set this field, you must set the VLAN State field to Active.
This field is dependent on the Tagging field value in the VLAN Port Configuration
screen (see the Tagging field description in “VLAN Port Configuration screen fields”
on page 123).
For example:
•
When the Tagging field is set to Untagged Access, you can set the Port
Membership field as an untagged port member (U) or as a non-VLAN port
member (-).
•
When the Tagging field is set to Tagged Trunk, you can set the Port Membership
field as a tagged port member (T) or as a non-VLAN port
member (-).
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Table 19 VLAN Configuration screen fields (continued)
Field
Description
The Port Membership fields are displayed in six-port groups (for example, 1-6, 7-12,
13-18). The number of ports displayed depends on the switch model or type of
optional GBIC installed in the Uplink Module slot.
Default
U (All ports are assigned as untagged members of VLAN 1.)
Range
U, T, and -
VLAN Port Configuration screen
The VLAN Port Configuration screen (Figure 58) allows you to configure
specified switch ports with the appropriate PVID/VLAN association that enables
the creation of VLAN broadcast domains (see “Shared servers” on page 59 for
more information about setting up VLAN broadcast domains).
You can configure specified switch ports to filter (discard) all received untagged
frames (see “IEEE 802.1Q VLAN workgroups” on page 51).
To open the VLAN Port Configuration screen.
Choose VLAN Port Configuration (or press c) from the VLAN
Configuration Menu screen.
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123
Figure 58 VLAN Port Configuration screen
Table 20 describes the VLAN Port Configuration screen fields.
Table 20 VLAN Port Configuration screen fields
Field
Description
Port
Allows you to select the number of the port you want to view or
configure. To view another port, type its port number and press [Enter],
or press the spacebar to toggle the port numbers.
Filter Untagged Frames
Sets this port to filter (discard) all received untagged frames.
Port Name
PVID
Default
No
Range
No, Yes
The default port name assigned to this port. You can change this field to
any name that is up to 16 characters long.
Default
Port x
Range
Any ASCII string of up to 16 printable characters
Associates this port with a specific VLAN. For example, a port with a
PVID of 3 assigns all untagged frames received on this port to VLAN 3.
Default
1
Range
1 to 4094
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Table 20 VLAN Port Configuration screen fields (continued)
Field
Description
Tagging
Allows you to assign VLAN Port Membership tagging options to this port,
as follows:
•
Auto PVID
Untagged Access: Any VLAN that this port is a member of will not be
802.1Q tagged.
Default
Untagged Access
Range
Untagged Access, Tagged Trunk
Specifies the
port VLAN identifier (PVID) automatically
VLAN Display by Port screen
The VLAN Display by Port screen (Figure 59) allows you to view VLAN
characteristics associated with a specified switch port.
Choose VLAN Display by Port (or press d) from the VLAN Configuration Menu
screen to open the VLAN Display by Port screen.
Figure 59 VLAN Display by Port screen
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125
Table 21 describes the VLAN Display by Port screen fields.
Table 21 VLAN Display by Port screen fields
Field
Description
Port
Allows you to select the number of the port you want to view. To view another port,
type its port number and press [Enter], or press the spacebar on your keyboard to
toggle the port numbers.
PVID
Read-only field that indicates the PVID setting for the specified port.
Port Name
Read-only field that indicates the port name assigned to the specified port.
VLANs
Column header for the read-only fields listing the VLANs associated with the
specified port.
VLAN Name
Column header for the read-only fields listing the VLAN Names associated with the
specified port.
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VLAN Traffic Class Configuration screen
The VLAN Traffic Class Configuration screen allows you to specify policy or
priority configuration.
Figure 60 VLAN Traffic Class Configuration screen
The Policy Configuration screen prioritizes the order in which a switch forwards
packets, on a per-port basis. BayStack 380-24F provides 4 transmission queues.
Frames are assigned to one of these queues on the basis of the user-priority using a
traffic class table. The table indicates the traffic class that is assigned to the frame
for each possible user-priority value.
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127
Figure 61 Traffic Class Policy Configuration
Table 22 Policy Configuration screen fields
Field
Description
Policy Type
Specifies the type of policy. There are 2 types: weighted round robin, and strict.
Weighted RR
Each queue is assigned a weight. This value indicates how many packets may
be transmitted out of the queue before the next highest queue is serviced.
Control may transfer to the next highest queue even though the higher priority
queues have not emptied
To determine the percentage of bandwidth allocated to each queue, add the
total weight and then divide each queue weight by that value. This formula
works only when all queues are fully utilized.
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Field
Description
Strict
The strict dequeuing algorithm empties the higher priority queues first
Once the higher priority queue is empty, then the next priority queue is
serviced.
If a packet comes out of a higher priority queue transmission out of the lower
priority queue is suspended until transmission from the higher priority queues
finish transmitting.
Q Weight
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.This value indicates how many packets may be transmitted out of the queue
before the next highest queue is serviced.
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129
Figure 62 Traffic Class Priority Configuration
Table 23 Priority Configuration screen fields
Field
Description
User Priority
Specifies the user priority.
Traffic Class
Specifies the associated traffic class from low to highest
Port Configuration screen
The Port Configuration screen (Figures 63 and 64) allows you to configure
specific switch ports or all switch ports. You can enable or disable the port status
of specified switch ports, set the switch ports to autonegotiate for the highest
available speed of the connected station, or set the speed for selected switch ports
(autonegotiation is not supported on fiber optic ports).
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You can disable switch ports that are trunk members; however, the screen prompts
for verification of the request before completing the action. Choosing [Yes]
disables the port and removes it from the trunk.
Note: The Autonegotiation fields, the Speed fields, and the Duplex
fields are independent of MultiLink Trunking, VLANs, and the STP.
To open the Port Configuration screen:
Choose Port Configuration (or press p) from the Switch Configuration Menu
screen.
Figure 63 Port Configuration screen (1 of 2)
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131
Figure 64 Port Configuration screen (2 of 2)
Table 24 describes the Port Configuration screen fields.
Table 24 Port Configuration screen fields
Field
Description
Port
Indicates the switch port numbers that correspond to the field values in that row of
the screen (for example, the field values in row 2 apply to switch port 2). The values
that you set in the Switch row will affect all switch ports.
Trunk
The read-only data displayed in this column indicates the trunks that correspond to
the switch ports specified in the Trunk Members fields of the Trunk Configuration
screen (see “MultiLink Trunk Configuration Menu screen” on page 135).
Status
Allows you to disable any of the switch ports. You can also use this field to control
access to any switch port.
Link
Default Value
Enabled
Range
Enabled, Disabled
A read-only field that indicates the current link state of the corresponding port, as
follows:
• Up: The port is connected and operational.
• Down: The port is not connected or is not operational.
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Table 24 Port Configuration screen fields (continued)
Field
Description
LnkTrap
Allows you to control whether link up/link down traps are sent to the configured trap
sink from the switch.
Autonegotiation
Default Value
On
Range
On, Off
When enabled, sets the corresponding port speed to match the best service provided
by the connected station, up to 1000 Mb/s in full-duplex mode. This field is disabled
for all fiber optic ports.
Default Value
Enabled
Range
Enabled, Disabled
High Speed Flow Control Configuration screen
The High Speed Flow Control Configuration screen (Figure 65) allows you to set
the port parameters for the Gigabit Ethernet Interface.
Note: The GBIC module does not need to be installed to configure the
port.
Choose High Speed Flow Control Configuration (or press h) from the Switch
Configuration Menu screen to open the High Speed Flow Control Configuration
screen.
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133
Figure 65 High Speed Flow Control Configuration
Table 25 describes the High Speed Flow Control Configuration screen fields.
Table 25 High Speed Flow Control Configuration screen fields
Field
Description
Port
Allows you to select the port number to view or configure. To view or configure
another port, type its unit number and press [Enter], or press the spacebar to
toggle the port numbers .
Autonegotiation
When enabled, the port only advertises support for 1000 Mb/s operation, in
full-duplex mode. Note: Autonegotiation can be changed only in the Port
Configuration screen.
Speed/Duplex
Default Value
Enabled
Range
Enabled, Disabled
Specifies the speed and duplexity mode (read only) and whether full or not.
Note: The speed can be changed in the Port Configuration screen.
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Table 25 High Speed Flow Control Configuration screen fields (continued)
Field
Description
Flow Control
Allows you to control traffic and avoid congestion on the Gigabit port. Two
modes are available (see “Choosing a high speed flow control mode,” next, for
details about the two modes). The Flow Control field can be configured only
when you set the Autonegotiation field value to Disabled and the speed to
1000M/bs/full duplex.
Default Value
Disabled
Range
Disabled, Symmetric, Asymmetric
Choosing a high speed flow control mode
The high speed flow control feature allows you to control traffic and avoid
congestion on the Gigabit full-duplex link. If the receive port buffer becomes full,
the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch issues a flow-control signal to the device at
the other end of the link to suspend transmission. When the receive buffer is no
longer full, the switch issues a signal to resume the transmission. You can choose
Symmetric or Asymmetric flow control mode.
Note: For high speed flow control, the BayStack 380-24F must be
connected to a device that is IEEE802.3x compliant.
Symmetric mode
This mode allows the ports and their link partner to send flow control pause
frames to each other.
When a pause frame is received (by either the port or its link partner), the port
suspends transmission of frames for a number of slot times specified in the control
frame or until a pause-release control frame is received. Both devices on the link
must support this mode when it is selected.
Asymmetric mode
This mode allows the link partner to send flow control pause frames to the port.
When a pause frame is received, the receiving port suspends transmission of
frames for a number of slot times specified in the control frame or until a
pause-release control frame is received.
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135
In this mode, the port is disabled from transmitting pause frames to its link
partner. Use this mode when the port is connected to a buffered repeater device.
MultiLink Trunk Configuration Menu screen
The MultiLink Trunk Configuration Menu screen (Figure 66) allows you to select
the appropriate screen to configure up to six MultiLink Trunks (you can group up
to four switch ports together to form each trunk).
You can monitor the bandwidth usage for the trunk member ports within each
trunk. For more information about configuring MultiLink Trunks, see “MultiLink
Trunks” on page 70.
Note: When a trunk is not active (Trunk Status field set to Disabled),
configuration changes do not take effect until you set the Trunk Status
field to Enabled.
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To open the MultiLink Trunk Configuration Menu screen:
Choose MultiLink Trunk Configuration (or press t) from the Switch
Configuration Menu screen.
Figure 66 MultiLink Trunk Configuration Menu screen
Table 26 describes the MultiLink Trunk Configuration Menu options.
Table 26 MultiLink Trunk Configuration Menu options
Option
Description
MultiLink Trunk
Configuration...
Displays the MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen (Figure 67). This screen
allows you to configure up to six MultiLink Trunks within a switch configuration.
You can group up to four switch ports together to form each trunk.
MultiLink Trunk
Utilization...
Displays the MultiLink Trunk Utilization screen (Figure 68 and Figure 69). This
screen allows you to monitor the bandwidth utilization of the configured trunks.
Return to Switch
Configuration Menu
Exits the MultiLink Trunk Configuration Menu screen and displays the Switch
Configuration Menu screen.
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137
MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen
The MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen (Figure 67) allows you to configure up
to six trunks in a switch.
To open the MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen:
Choose Trunk Configuration (or press t) from the MultiLink Trunk
Configuration Menu screen.
Figure 67 MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen
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Table 27 describes the MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen fields.
Table 27 MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen fields
Field
Description
Trunk
Column header for the read-only fields in this screen. The read-only data displayed in
the Trunk column indicates the trunk (1 to 6) that corresponds to the switch ports
specified in the user-configurable Trunk Members fields.
Trunk Members
(Port)
The Trunk Members column contains fields in each row that can be configured to create
the corresponding trunk. Each switch port can only be a member of a single trunk. The
appropriate trunk number for each trunk member configured within this field is shown
adjacent to the corresponding switch port in the following screens: Port Configuration
screen, and Spanning Tree Configuration screen.
STP Learning
Default Value
blank field
Range
1 to 8 or 1 to 28 (depending on model type)
The STP Learning column contains a single field for each row that, when enabled,
allows the specified trunk to participate in the spanning tree. This setting overrides those
of the individual trunk members.
Fast is the same as Normal, except that the state transition timer is shortened to two
seconds.
Trunk Mode
Default Value
Normal
Range
Normal, Fast, Disabled
The Trunk Mode column contains a single read only field for each row that indicates the
default operating mode for the switch.
Basic: Basic mode is the default mode for the switch. When in this mode, source MAC
addresses are dynamically assigned to specific trunk members for flooding and
forwarding, which allows the switch to stabilize and distribute the data streams of source
addresses across the trunk members.
Trunk Status
Trunk Name
214391-A
The Trunk Status column contains a single field for each row that allows users to enable
or disable any of the trunks.
Default Value
Disabled
Range
Enabled, Disabled
The Trunk Name column contains a single optional field in each row that can be used to
assign names to the corresponding configured trunks. The names chosen for this
example can provide meaningful information to the user (for example, S1:T1 to FS2
indicates Trunk 1, in switch S1 connects to File Server 2).
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139
MultiLink Trunk Utilization screen
The MultiLink Trunk Utilization screen (Figure 68 and Figure 69) allows you to
monitor the percentage of bandwidth used by configured trunk members. You can
choose the type of traffic to monitor.
Figure 68 shows an example of bandwidth utilization rates for the trunk member
ports configured in Figure 67. Because two screens are necessary to show all of
the configured trunks (up to six), the screen prompts you to Press [Ctrl]-N to view
trunks five and six.
Choose MultiLink Trunk Utilization (or press u) from the MultiLink Trunk
Configuration Menu screen to open the MultiLink Trunk Utilization screen.
Figure 68 MultiLink Trunk Utilization screen (1 of 2)
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Figure 69 MultiLink Trunk Utilization screen (2 of 2)
Table 28 describes the MultiLink Trunk Utilization screen fields.
Table 28 MultiLink Trunk Utilization screen fields
Field
Description
Trunk
Column header for the read-only fields in this screen. The read-only data displayed in
this column indicates the trunk (1 to 6) that corresponds to the switch ports specified
in the Port field.
Traffic Type
Allows you to choose the traffic type to be monitored for percent of bandwidth
utilization (see Range).
Default Value
Rx and Tx
Range
Rx and Tx, Rx, Tx
Port
Lists the trunk member ports that correspond to the trunk specified in the Trunk
column. .
Last 5 Minutes
This read-only field indicates the percentage of packets (of the type specified in the
Traffic Type field) utilized by the port in the last 5 minutes. This field provides a
running average of network activity and is updated every 15 seconds.
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Table 28 MultiLink Trunk Utilization screen fields (continued)
Field
Description
Last 30 Minutes
This read-only field indicates the percentage of packets (of the type specified in the
Traffic Type field) utilized by the port in the last 30 minutes. This field provides a
running average of network activity and is updated every 15 seconds.
Last Hour
This read-only field indicates the percentage of packets (of the type specified in the
Traffic Type field) utilized by the port in the last 60 minutes. This field provides a
running average of network activity and is updated every 15 seconds.
Port Mirroring Configuration screen
The Port Mirroring Configuration screen allows you to configure a specific switch
port to monitor one specific port. You can specify ingress and egress port-based
monitoring.
For more information about the port mirroring feature, see “Port mirroring
(conversation steering)” on page 40.
Figure 70 shows an example of a Port Mirroring Configuration screen.
To open the Port Mirroring Configuration screen:
Choose Port Mirroring Configuration (or press i) from the Switch
Configuration Menu screen.
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Figure 70 Port Mirroring Configuration screen
Table 29 describes the Port Mirroring Configuration screen fields.
Table 29 Port Mirroring Configuration screen fields
Field
Description
Monitoring Mode
Allows a user to select any one of six port-based monitoring modes or any one of five
address-based monitoring modes (see Table 30 on page 143). Selecting any one of
the six port-based modes activates the port X and port Y screen fields, where a user
can choose up to two ports to monitor. Selecting any one of the five address-based
modes activates the Address A and Address B screen fields, where a user can
specify MAC addresses to monitor.
Monitor Port
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Default Value
Disabled
Range
See Table 30 on page 143
Indicates the port number (of the specified unit) that is designated as the monitor
port.
Default Value
Zero-length string
Range
1 to 8/ 1 to 28 (depending on model type)
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Table 29 Port Mirroring Configuration screen fields (continued)
Field
Description
Port X
Indicates one of the ports that will be monitored by the designated port monitor when
one of the port-based monitoring modes is selected.
This port will be monitored according to the value of Port X in the Monitoring Mode
field (see Table 30).
Default Value
Zero-length string
Range
(depends on model type)
Table 30 describes the various monitoring modes available from the Port
Mirroring Configuration screen.
Table 30 Monitoring modes
Field
Description
Port-based:
Disabled
Default value for this feature.
-> Port X
Monitor all traffic received by Port X.
Port X->
Monitor all traffic sent by Port X.
<-> Port X
Monitor all traffic sent or received by Port X.
Port Statistics screen
The Port Statistics screen (Figure 71) allows you to view detailed information
about any switch or port in a standalone configuration. The screen is divided into
two sections (Received and Transmitted) so that you can compare and evaluate
throughput or other port parameters. All screen data is updated approximately
every 2 seconds.
You can use the Port Statistics screen to clear (reset to zero) port counters for a
specific switch or port. Alternatively, you can use the Clear All Port Statistics
option to clear port counters for all switches or ports (see “Switch Configuration
Menu screen” on page 105).
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To open the Port Statistics screen:
Choose Display Port Statistics (or press d) from the Switch Configuration
Menu screen.
Figure 71 Port Statistics screen
Table 31 describes the Port Statistics screen fields.
Table 31 Port Statistics screen fields
Field
Description
Port
Allows you to select the number of the port you want to view or reset to zero.
To view another port, type its port number and press [Enter], or press the spacebar
on your keyboard to toggle the port numbers.
Packets
Received column: Indicates the total number of packets received on this port,
including bad packets, broadcast packets, and multicast packets.
Transmitted column: Indicates the total number of packets transmitted successfully
on this port, including broadcast packets and multicast packets.
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Table 31 Port Statistics screen fields (continued)
Field
Description
Multicasts
Received column: Indicates the total number of good multicast packets received
on this port, excluding broadcast packets.
Transmitted column: Indicates the total number of multicast packets transmitted
successfully on this port, excluding broadcast packets.
Broadcasts
Received column: Indicates the total number of good broadcast packets received
on this port.
Transmitted column: Indicates the total number of broadcast packets transmitted
successfully on this port.
Total Octets
Received column: Indicates the total number of octets of data (including data in
bad packets) received on this port, excluding framing bits but including FCS octets.
Transmitted column: Indicates the total number of octets of data transmitted
successfully on this port, including FCS octets.
Packets 64 bytes
Received column: Indicates the total number of 64-byte packets received on this
port.
Transmitted column: Indicates the total number of 64-byte packets transmitted
successfully on this port.
65-127 bytes
Received column: Indicates the total number of 65-byte to 127-byte packets
received on this port.
Transmitted column: Indicates the total number of 65-byte to 127-byte packets
transmitted successfully on this port.
128-255 bytes
Received column: Indicates the total number of 128-byte to 255-byte packets
received on this port.
Transmitted column: Indicates the total number of 128-byte to 255-byte packets
transmitted successfully on this port.
256-511 bytes
Received column: Indicates the total number of 256-byte to 511-byte packets
received on this port.
Transmitted column: Indicates the total number of 256-byte to 511-byte packets
transmitted successfully on this port.
512-1023 bytes
Received column: Indicates the total number of 512-byte to 1023-byte packets
received on this port.
Transmitted column: Indicates the total number of 512-byte to 1023-byte packets
transmitted successfully on this port.
1024-Max bytes
Received column: Indicates the total number of 1024-byte to 1518-byte packets
received on this port.
Transmitted column: Indicates the total number of 1024-byte to 1518-byte packets
transmitted successfully on this port.
Max 9216 bytes
(Jumbo)
Received column: Indicates the total number of 1519-byte packets to 9216 byte
packets received on this port.
Transmitted column: Indicates the total number of 1519-byte packets to 9216 byte
packets transmitted successfully on this port.
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Table 31 Port Statistics screen fields (continued)
Field
Description
Undersized Packets
Indicates the total number of packets received on this port with fewer than 64 bytes
and with proper CRC and framing (also known as short frames or runts).
Oversized Packets
Indicates the total number of packets received on this port with more than 1548
bytes (if MAC Security is disabled) and with proper CRC and framing (also known
as oversized frames).
Filtered Packets
Indicates the number of packets filtered (not forwarded) by this port.
Flooded Packets
Indicates the total number of packets flooded (forwarded) through this port
because the destination address was not in the address database.
FCS Errors
Indicates the total number of valid-size packets that were received with proper
framing but discarded because of cyclic redundancy check (CRC) errors.
Collisions
Indicates the total number of collisions detected on this port.
Single Collisions
Indicates the total number of packets that were transmitted successfully on this
port after a single collision.
Multiple Collisions
Indicates the total number of packets that were transmitted successfully on this
port after more than one collision.
Excessive Collisions
Indicates the total number of packets lost on this port due to excessive collisions.
Late Collisions
Indicates the total number of packet collisions that occurred after a total length of
time that exceeded 512 bit-times of packet transmission.
Control packets
Transmitted column: Indicates the total number of pause frames transmitted on this
port. Pause frames cause the transmitting port to temporarily suspend the
transmission of packets when the receiving port’s frame buffer is full.
Received column: Indicates the total number of pause frames received on this port.
Pause frames cause the transmitting port to temporarily suspend the transmission
of packets when the receiving port’s frame buffer is full.
System Log screen
The System Log screen (Figure 72) displays or clears messages obtained from
system nonvolatile random access memory (NVRAM) or dynamic random access
memory (DRAM) and NVRAM.
System Log messages operate as follows:
•
•
•
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NVRAM messages are retrievable after a system reset.
DRAM messages can be viewed while the system is operational.
All NVRAM and DRAM messages are time stamped.
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•
•
147
When you restart your system after a reset, the DRAM messages are deleted.
After a reset, all messages stored in NVRAM are copied to DRAM (DRAM
messages are not copied to NVRAM). The messages copied to DRAM are
time stamped to zero (0).
To open the System Log screen:
Choose Display System Log (or press y) from the main menu.
Figure 72 System Log screen
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Table 32 describes the System Log screen fields.
Table 32 System Log screen fields
Field
Description
Display Messages
From
This field allows you to select the RAM source your messages are obtained
from. Choose Non Volatile (NVRAM) or Volatile (DRAM) + Non Volatile. Use the
spacebar to toggle between the options.
Default
Non Volatile
Range
Non Volatile, Volatile, Volatile + Non Volatile
Display configuration
complete?
This field allows you to determine whether the configuration information received
from NVRAM/DRAM (depending on what is selected in the Display Messages
From field) is complete. Use the spacebar to toggle between the options.
Default
No
Range
No, Yes
Clear Messages From
This field allows you to clear the information messages from DRAM, NVRAM or
both. If you clear DRAM messages, existing NVRAM messages are copied into
DRAM. After a system reset, all existing NVRAM messages are copied to
DRAM. Use the spacebar to toggle between the options.
Default
None
Range
None, NVRAM, DRAM + NVRAM
Console/Comm Port Configuration screen
The Console/Comm Port Configuration screen (Figure 73) allows you to
configure and modify the console/comm port parameters and security features of a
switch.
To open the Console/Comm Port Configuration screen:
Choose Console/Comm Port Configuration (or press o) from the main menu.
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Figure 73 Console/Comm Port Configuration screen
Table 33 describes the Console/Comm Port Configuration screen fields.
Table 33 Console/Comm Port Configuration screen fields
Field
Description
Comm Port Data Bits
A read-only field that indicates the current console/comm port data bit setting.
Comm Port Parity
A read-only field that indicates the current console/comm port parity setting.
Comm Port Stop Bits
A read-only field that indicates the current console/comm port stop bit setting.
Console Port Speed
Allows you to set the console/comm port baud rate to match the baud rate of the
console terminal.
Default Value:
9600 Baud
Range:
2400 Baud, 4800 Baud, 9600 Baud, 19200 Baud, 38400 Baud
Caution: If you choose a baud rate that does not match your console
terminal baud rate, you will lose communication with the configuration
interface when you press [Enter]. If communication is lost, set your
console terminal to match the new service port setting.
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Table 33 Console/Comm Port Configuration screen fields (continued)
Field
Description
Achtung: Bei Auswahl einer Baud rate, die nicht mit der Baudrate des
Konsolenterminals übereinstimmt, geht die Kommunikation mit der
Konsolenschnittstelle verloren, wenn Sie die Eingabetaste drücken.
Stellen Sie in diesem Fall das Konsolenterminal so ein, daß es mit der
neuen Einstellung der Service-Schnittstelle übereinstimmt.
Attention: Si vous sélectionnez un débit différent de celui de votre
terminal, vous perdrez le contact avec l'interface de votre console dès
que vous appuierez sur [Entrée]. Pour restaurer la communication,
alignez le débit de votre terminal sur le nouveau débit de votre port de
service.
Precaución: Si selecciona una velocidad de transmisión que no
coincide con la velocidad de transmisión del terminal de la consola,
perderá la comunicación con el interfaz de la consola al pulsar [Intro]. Si
se pierde la comunicación, ajuste el terminal de la consola para que
coincida con el nuevo valor del puerto de servicio.
Attenzione: Nel caso in cui si scelga una velocità di trasmissione non
corrispondente a quella del terminale della console, la comunicazione
con l'interfaccia della console cadrà premendo il tasto [Invio]. Se la
comunicazione cade, impostare il terminale della console in modo tale
che corrisponda alla nuova impostazione della porta di servizio.
Console Switch
Password Type
Enables password protection for accessing the console interface (CI) of a
standalone switch through a console terminal.
If you set this field to Required, you can use the Logout option to restrict access
to the CI. Thereafter, you will need to specify the correct password at the
console-terminal prompt. See Console Read-Only Switch Password and
Console Read-Write Switch Password for more information.
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Default Value
None
Range
None, Local Password, RADIUS Authentication
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Table 33 Console/Comm Port Configuration screen fields (continued)
Field
Description
TELNET Switch
Password Type
Enables password protection for accessing the console interface (CI) of a switch
through a Telnet session.
If you set this field to Required, you can use the Logout option to restrict access
to the CI. Thereafter, you will need to specify the correct password at the
console-terminal prompt. See Console Read-Only Switch Password and
Console Read-Write Switch Password descriptions for more information.
Console Read-Only
Switch Password
Console Read-Write
Switch Password
Default Value
None
Range
None, Local Password, RADIUS Authentication
When the Console Switch Password field is set to Required (for Telnet, for
Console, or for Both), this field allows read-only password access to the CI of a
standalone switch. Users can access the CI using the correct password (see
default), but cannot change parameters or use the Reset option or Reset to
Default option.
Default Value
user
Range
An ASCII string of up to 15 printable characters
When the Console Switch Password field is set to Required (for Telnet, for
Console, or for Both), this field allows read-write password access to the CI of a
standalone switch. Users can log in to the CI using the correct password (see
default) and can change any parameter.
You can change the default passwords for read-only access and read-write
access to a private password.
Default Value:
secure
Range:
Any ASCII string of up to 15 printable characters
Caution: If you change the system-supplied default passwords, be
sure to write the new passwords down and keep them in a safe place. If
you forget the new passwords, you cannot access the console interface.
In that case, contact Nortel Networks for help.
Achtung: Wenn Sie die für das System standardmäßig eingestellten
Paßwörter ändern, notieren Sie sich die neuen Paßwörter, und
bewahren Sie sie an einem sicheren Ort auf. Falls Sie die neuen
Paßwörter vergessen, können Sie nicht mehr auf die
Konsolenschnittstelle zugreifen. Wenden Sie sich in diesem Fall an
Nortel Networks, um Unterstützung zu erhalten.
Attention: Si vous changez les mots de passe par défaut du système,
assurez-vous de bien noter vos nouveaux mots de passe et de les
conserver dans un endroit sûr. Si vous perdez vos nouveaux mots de
passe, vous ne pourrez plus accéder à votre interface. Le cas échéant,
veuillez contacter Nortel Networks.
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Table 33 Console/Comm Port Configuration screen fields (continued)
Field
Description
Precaución: Si modifica las contraseñas predeterminadas asignadas
por el sistema, asegúrese de anotar las nuevas contraseñas y
guárdelas en un lugar seguro. Si olvida las nuevas contraseñas, no
podrá acceder al interfaz de la consola. En ese caso, póngase en
contacto con Nortel Networks para obtener ayuda al respecto.
Attenzione: In caso di modifica delle password predefinite nel sistema,
assicurarsi di annotare le nuove password e di conservarle in un luogo
sicuro. Nel caso in cui le nuove password vengano dimenticate, non
sarà possibile accedere all'interfaccia della console. In tal caso,
contattare la Nortel Networks per avere assistenza.
Primary RADIUS Server The IP address of the Primary RADIUS server.
Secondary RADIUS
Server
RADIUS UPD Port
RADIUS Shared Secret
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Default
0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned)
Range
Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is
represented as a decimal value, separated by a decimal point
The IP address of the Secondary RADIUS server.
Default
0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned)
Range
Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is
represented as a decimal value, separated by a decimal point
The user datagram protocol (UDP) port for the RADIUS server.
Default
1645
Range
0 to 65536
Your special switch security code that provides authentication to the RADIUS
server.
Default
Null string (which will not authenticate)
Range
Any contiguous ASCII string that contains at least 1 printable
character, up to a maximum of 35
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153
Hardware Unit Information screen
The Hardware Unit Information screen (Figure 74) lists the switch models,
including any installed mini-GBICs that are configured in your standalone
configuration.
To open the Hardware Unit Information screen:
Choose Display Hardware Unit (or press h) from the main menu.
Figure 74 Hardware Unit Information screen
Spanning Tree Configuration Menu screen
The Spanning Tree Configuration Menu screen (Figure 75) allows you to view
spanning tree parameters and configure individual switch ports to participate in
the spanning tree algorithm (STA). To modify any of the spanning tree
parameters, see your SNMP documentation.
To open the Spanning Tree Configuration Menu screen:
Choose Spanning Tree Configuration (or press p) from the main menu.
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Figure 75 Spanning Tree Configuration Menu screen
Table 34 describes the Spanning Tree Configuration Menu options.
Table 34 Spanning Tree Configuration Menu options
Option
Description
Spanning Tree Port Configuration...
Displays the Spanning Tree Port Configuration screen (see
“Spanning Tree Port Configuration screen” on page 155).
Spanning Tree Switch Settings
Displays the Spanning Tree Switch Settings screen (see
“Spanning Tree Switch Settings screen” on page 158).
Return to Main Menu
Exits the Spanning Tree Configuration Menu and displays the
main menu.
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Spanning Tree Port Configuration screen
The Spanning Tree Port Configuration screen allows you to configure individual
switch ports or all switch ports for participation in the spanning tree.
Note: If spanning tree participation of any trunk member is changed
(enabled or disabled), the spanning tree participation of all members of
that trunk is changed similarly.
Figure 76 and Figure 77 show sample port configurations for the two Spanning
Tree Port Configuration screens.
Choose Spanning Tree Port Configuration (or press c) from the Spanning Tree
Configuration Menu to open the Spanning Tree Port Configuration screen.
Figure 76 Spanning Tree Port Configuration screen (1 of 2)
Spanning Tree Port Configuration
Port
---1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
Trunk
-----
Participation
------------------[ Normal Learning ]
[ Normal Learning ]
[ Normal Learning ]
[ Normal Learning ]
[ Normal Learning ]
[ Normal Learning ]
[ Normal Learning ]
[ Normal Learning ]
[ Normal Learning ]
[ Normal Learning ]
[ Normal Learning ]
[ Normal Learning ]
[ Normal Learning ]
[ Normal Learning ]
Priority
-------128
128
128
128
128
128
128
128
128
128
128
128
128
128
Path Cost
--------1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
State
---------Forwarding
Forwarding
Forwarding
Forwarding
Forwarding
Forwarding
Forwarding
Forwarding
Forwarding
Forwarding
Forwarding
Forwarding
Forwarding
Forwarding
More...
Press Ctrl-N to display choices for additional ports..
Use space bar to display choices, press <Return> or <Enter> to select choice.
Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu. Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.
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Figure 77 Spanning Tree Port Configuration screen (2 of 2)
Table 35 describes the Spanning Tree Port Configuration screen fields.
Table 35 Spanning Tree Port Configuration screen fields
Field
Description
Port
Indicates the switch port numbers that correspond to the field values in that row of the
screen (for example, the field values in row 2 apply to switch port 2). Note that the values
in the Switch row affect all switch ports.
Trunk
The read-only data displayed in this column indicates the trunks that correspond to the
switch ports specified in the Trunk Members fields of the Trunk Configuration screen (see
“MultiLink Trunk Configuration Menu screen” on page 135).
Participation
Allows you to configure any (or all) of the switch ports for Spanning tree participation.
When an individual port is a trunk member (see Trunk field), changing this setting for one
of the trunk members changes the setting for all members of that trunk. You should
consider how this can change your network topology before you change this setting.
The Fast Learning parameter is the same as Normal Learning, except that the state
transition timer is shortened to 2 seconds.
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Default Value
Normal Learning
Range
Normal Learning, Fast Learning, Disabled
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Table 35 Spanning Tree Port Configuration screen fields (continued)
Field
Description
Priority
This read-only field is a bridge spanning tree parameter that prioritizes the port’s lowest
path cost to the root. When one or more ports have the same path cost, the STA selects
the path with the highest priority (lowest numerical value). See also Path Cost.
Path Cost
Default Value
128
Range
0 to 255
This read-only field is a bridge spanning tree parameter that determines the lowest path
cost to the root.
Default Value
1 (1 for Gigabit port)
Path Cost = 1000/LAN speed (in Mb/s)
The higher the LAN speed, the lower the path cost.
See also Priority.
Range
State
1
This read-only field indicates the current port state within the spanning tree network.
Each port can transition to various states, as determined by the Participation field setting.
For example, when the Participation field is set to Disabled, the port does not participate
in the STA and transitions to the Forwarding state (the default). When the Participation
field is set to Enabled, the port transitions from the Disabled state through the Blocking,
Listening, and Learning states before entering the Forwarding state.
Default Value
Topology dependent
Range
Disabled, Blocking, Listening, Learning, Forwarding
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Spanning Tree Switch Settings screen
The Spanning Tree Switch Settings screen (Figure 78) allows you to view
spanning tree parameter values for the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch.
To open the Spanning Tree Switch Settings screen:
Choose Display Spanning Tree Switch Settings (or press d) from the
Spanning Tree Configuration Menu screen.
Figure 78 Spanning Tree Switch Settings screen
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Table 36 describes the Spanning Tree Switch Settings parameters.
Table 36 Spanning Tree Switch Settings parameters
Parameter
Description
Bridge Priority
Indicates the management-assigned priority value of the bridge ID in hexadecimal
notation, which is the most significant byte of the bridge ID. The STA uses this parameter
to determine the root bridge (or designated bridge). For example, the bridge with the
lowest bridge ID becomes the root bridge, with Bridge Priority values compared first,
followed by the hardware addresses.
Designated
Root
Root Port
Root Path Cost
Hello Time
Default Value
8000
Range
0 to 65535
Indicates the bridge ID of the root bridge, as determined by the STA.
Default Value
8000 (bridge_id)
Range
0 to 65535
Indicates the switch port number that offers the lowest path cost to the root bridge.
Default Value
0
Range
Port: 24
Indicates the path cost from this switch port to the root bridge.
Default Value
0
Range
Not applicable
Indicates the Actual Hello Interval, the amount of time between transmissions of
configuration Bridge Protocol Data Units (BPDUs) that the root bridge is currently using.
Note that all bridges participating in the spanning tree network use the root bridge’s Hello
Interval parameter value. See also Bridge Hello Time.
Maximum Age
Time
Default Value
2 seconds
Range
1 to 10 seconds
Indicates the Maximum Age Time parameter value that the root bridge is currently using.
This value specifies the maximum age that a Hello message can attain before it is
discarded.
Note that the root bridge’s Maximum Age Time parameter value becomes the actual
Maximum Age Time parameter value for all bridges participating in the spanning tree
network. See also Bridge Maximum Age Time.
Default Value
20 seconds
Range
6 to 40 seconds
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Table 36 Spanning Tree Switch Settings parameters (continued)
Parameter
Description
Forward Delay
Indicates the Forward Delay parameter value that the root bridge is currently using. This
value specifies the amount of time that the bridge ports remain in the Listening and
Learning states before entering the Forwarding state.
Note that the root bridge’s Forward Delay parameter value becomes the actual Forward
Delay parameter value for all bridges participating in the spanning tree network. See also
Bridge Forward Delay.
Bridge Hello
Time
Default Value
15 seconds
Range
4 to 30 seconds
Indicates the Hello Interval (the amount of time between transmissions of BPDUs)
specified by management for this bridge. This parameter takes effect only when this
bridge becomes the root bridge.
Note that, although you can set the Hello Interval for a bridge using bridge management
software, once the spanning tree computation process is complete, all bridges
participating in the spanning tree network use the root bridge’s Hello Interval parameter
value. If any bridge becomes the root bridge, its Hello Interval parameter value becomes
the Actual Hello Interval parameter value for all bridges participating in the spanning tree
network. See also Hello Time.
Bridge
Maximum Age
Time
Default Value
2 seconds
Range
1 to 10 seconds
Specifies the maximum age (in seconds) that a Hello message can attain before it is
discarded. This parameter, specified by management for this bridge, takes effect only
when the bridge becomes the root bridge.
Note that, if this bridge becomes the root bridge, its Maximum Age Time parameter value
becomes the Actual Maximum Age Time parameter value for all bridges participating in
the spanning tree network. See also Maximum Age Time.
Default Value
20 seconds
Range
6 to 40 seconds
Bridge Forward Indicates the Forward Delay parameter value specified by management for this bridge.
Delay
This parameter takes effect only when this bridge becomes the root bridge.
The Forward Delay parameter value specifies the amount of time that the bridge ports
remain in the Listening and Learning states before entering the Forwarding state.
Note that all bridges participating in the spanning tree network use the root bridge’s
Forward Delay parameter value. See also Forward Delay.
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Default Value
15 seconds
Range
4 to 30 seconds
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161
TELNET Configuration screen
The TELNET Configuration screen (Figure 79) allows a user at a remote console
terminal to communicate with the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch as if the
console terminal were directly connected to it. You can have up to four active
Telnet sessions at one time.
To open the TELNET Configuration screen:
Choose TELNET Configuration (or press t) from the main menu.
Figure 79 TELNET Configuration screen
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Table 37 describes the TELNET Configuration screen fields.
Table 37 TELNET Configuration screen fields
Field
Description
TELNET Access Allows a user remote access to the CI through a Telnet session.
Login Timeout
Login Retries
Inactivity
Timeout
Event Logging
Default Value:
Enabled
Range:
Enabled, Disabled
Specifies the amount of time a user has to enter the correct password at the
console-terminal prompt.
Default Value:
1 minute
Range:
0 to 10 minutes (0 indicates “no timeout”)
Specifies the number of times a user can enter an incorrect password at the
console-terminal prompt before terminating the session.
Default Value:
3
Range:
1 to 100
Specifies the amount of time the session can be inactive before it is terminated.
Default Value:
15 minutes
Range:
0 to 60 minutes (0 indicates “no timeout”)
Specifies the types of events that will be displayed in the Event Log screen (see “System
Log screen” on page 146.
Default Value:
All
Range:
All, None, Accesses, Failures
Description:
All: Logs the following Telnet events to the Event Log screen:
•
•
•
TELNET connect: Indicates the IP address and access mode of a
Telnet session.
TELNET disconnect: Indicates the IP address of the remote host
and the access mode, due to either a logout or inactivity.
Failed TELNET connection attempts: Indicates the IP address of
the remote host whose IP address is not on the list of allowed
addresses, or indicates the IP address of the remote host that did
not supply the correct password.
None: Indicates that no Telnet events will be logged in the Event Log
screen.
Accesses: Logs only Telnet connect and disconnect events in the
Event Log screen.
Failures: Logs only failed Telnet connection attempts in the Event Log
screen.
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163
Table 37 TELNET Configuration screen fields (continued)
Field
Description
Allowed Source Specifies up to 10 user-assigned host IP addresses that are allowed Telnet access to the
IP Address
CI.
Default Value:
0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned)
Range:
Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is represented
as a decimal value, separated by a decimal point
Allowed Source Specifies up to 10 user-assigned allowed source address masks. The remote IP address
Mask
is masked with the Allowed Source Mask and, if the resulting value equals the Allowed
Source IP address, the connection is allowed.
For example, a connection would be allowed with the following settings:
Remote IP address = 192.0.1.5
Allowed Source IP Address = 192.0.1.0
Allowed Source Mask = 255.255.255.0
Default Value:
0.0.0.0 (no IP mask assigned)
Range:
Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is represented
as a decimal value, separated by a decimal point
Software Download screen
The Software Download screens (Figure 80 and Figure 81) allow you to revise the
BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch software image that is located in nonvolatile
flash memory.
Caution: Do not interrupt power to the device during the software
download process. If the power is interrupted, the firmware image can
become corrupted.
Achtung: Unterbrechen Sie die Stromzufuhr zum Gerät nicht, während
die Software heruntergeladen wird. Bei Unterbrechung der Stromzufuhr
kann das Firmware-Image beschädigt werden.
Attention: Ne pas couper l'alimentation de l'appareil pendant le
chargement du logiciel. En cas d'interruption, le programme résident
peut être endommagé.
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Precaución: No interrumpa la alimentación del dispositivo durante el
proceso de descarga del software. Si lo hace, puede alterar la imagen de
la programación (firmware).
Attenzione: Non interrompere l'alimentazione elettrica al dispositivo
durante il processo di scaricamento del software. In caso di interruzione,
l'immagine firmware potrebbe danneggiarsi.
To download the software image, you need a properly configured Trivial File
Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server in your network, and an IP address for the
switch. To learn how to configure the switch IP address, refer to “IP
Configuration/Setup screen” on page 96.
To open the Software Download screen:
Choose Software Download (or press f) from the main menu.
You can monitor the software download process by observing the LEDs
(see “LED Indications during the download process” on page 166).
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165
Figure 80 Software Download screen for a BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
Table 38 describes the Software Download screen fields.
Table 38 Software Download screen fields
Field
Description
BayStack
380-24F Image
Filename
The BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch software image load file name.
NOTE: Certain software releases may require you to download two images: the boot
code image and the agent image. For proper operation of the switch, the new boot code
image must be downloaded before the agent image is downloaded.
BayStack
380-24F
Diagnostics
Filename
Default Value
Zero-length string
Range
An ASCII string of up to 30 printable characters
The BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch diagnostics file name.
Default Value
Zero-length string
Range
An ASCII string of up to 30 printable characters
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Table 38 Software Download screen fields (continued)
Field
Description
TFTP Server IP
Address
The IP address of your TFTP load host.
Default Value
0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned)
Range
Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is represented
as a decimal value, separated by a decimal point
Start TFTP Load Specifies whether to start the download of the switch software image (default is No).
of New Image
Use the spacebar to toggle the selection to Yes.
Press [Enter] to initiate the software download process.
NOTE: The software download process can take up to 60 seconds to complete (or more
if the load host path is congested or there is a high volume of network traffic).
To ensure that the download process is not interrupted, do not power down the switch for
approximately 10 minutes.
Default Value
No
Range
Yes, No
The software download process automatically completes without user
intervention. The process erases the contents of flash memory and replaces it with
a new software image. Be careful not to interrupt the download process until after
it runs to completion (the process can take up to 10 minutes, depending on
network conditions).
Note: If problems occur during the software download process, the
Software Download screen displays error codes that define the problem.
The error codes are described in Chapter 4, “Troubleshooting,” on page
171.
LED Indications during the download process
During the software image download, the link and speed LEDs turn to green and
begin a browsing display pattern. The two rows of 1000 LEDs illuminate from in
to out. After the download, the system automatically reboots and the LEDs return
to the initialization state.
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167
Configuration File Download/Upload screen
The Configuration File Download/Upload screen (Figure 81) allows you to store
your switch configuration parameters on a TFTP server.
You can retrieve the configuration parameters of a switch and use the retrieved
parameters to automatically configure a replacement switch. Certain requirements
apply when automatically configuring a switch using this feature. You must set up
the file on your TFTP server and set the filename read/write permission to enabled
before you can save the configuration parameters.
Although most configuration parameters are saved to the configuration file,
certain parameters are not saved (see Table 40 on page 168).
To open the Configuration File Download/Upload screen:
Choose Configuration File (or press g) from the main menu.
Figure 81 Configuration File Download/Upload screen
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Table 39 describes the Configuration File Download/Upload screen fields.
Table 39 Configuration File Download/Upload screen fields
Field
Description
Configuration Image
Filename
The file name you have chosen for the configuration file. Choose a
meaningful file name that will allow you to identify the file for retrieval when
required. The file must already exist on your TFTP server and must be read/
write enabled.
TFTP Server IP Address
Copy Configuration
Image to Server
Default Value
Zero-length string
Range
An ASCII string of up to 30 printable characters
The IP address of your TFTP load host.
Default Value
0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned)
Range
Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is
represented as a decimal value, separated by a decimal
point
Specifies whether to copy the presently configured switch parameters to the
specified TFTP server (default is No).
Use the spacebar to toggle the selection to Yes.
Press [Enter] to initiate the process.
Retrieve Configuration
Image from Server
Default Value
No
Range
Yes, No
Specifies whether to retrieve the stored switch configuration parameters from
the specified TFTP server (default is No). If you choose Yes, the download
process begins immediately and, when completed, causes the switch to reset
with the new configuration parameters.
Use the spacebar to toggle the selection to Yes.
Press [Enter] to initiate the process.
Default Value
No
Range
Yes, No
Table 40 describes configuration file parameter information.
Table 40 Parameters not saved to the configuration file
These parameters are not saved:
In-Band Switch IP Address
In-Band Subnet Mask
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Used in this screen:
See page:
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169
Table 40 Parameters not saved to the configuration file
These parameters are not saved:
Used in this screen:
See page:
Console/Comm Port Configuration
148
Configuration File Download/Upload
167
Default Gateway
Console Read-Only Switch Password
Console Read-Write Switch Password
Configuration Image Filename
TFTP Server IP Address
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Chapter 4
Troubleshooting
This chapter describes how to isolate and diagnose problems with your BayStack
380-24F Switch and covers the following topics:
•
“Interpreting the LEDs,” next
•
“Diagnosing and correcting problems” on page 173
— Normal power-up sequence
— Port connection problems
The chapter topics lead you through a logical process for troubleshooting the
BayStack 380-24F Switch. For example, because LEDs provide visual indications
of certain problems, see “Interpreting the LEDs” on page 171 to understand the
various states (Table 41) that your switch LEDs can exhibit during normal
operation.
For more help in determining the problem, “Diagnosing and correcting problems”
on page 173 describes symptoms and corrective actions (Table 42) you can
perform to resolve specific problems. Subsequent sections give step-by-step
procedures to correct the problems.
Interpreting the LEDs
Figure 82 shows the BayStack 380-24F Switch LED display panel. Table 41
describes the LEDs.
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Chapter 4 Troubleshooting
Figure 82 LED display panel
BayStack 380-24F Switch
Console
1
10/100 BASE-T
3
5
7
9
11 13 15 17 19 21 23
Pwr
Activity
Status
Link
RPSU
Out-of-band
Management
Only
Link
2
4
6
8
10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24
Activity
10473EB
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173
Table 41 BayStack 380-24F switch LED descriptions
Label
Pwr
Status
RPSU
1000
Activity
Type
Color
Power status Green
System
status
Green
RPSU status Green
Speed/Link
Status
indicator
Port activity
Solid
Green
Green
State
Meaning
On
DC power is available to the switch’s internal circuitry.
Off
No AC power to switch or power supply failed.
On
Self-test passed successfully and switch is operational.
Blinking
A nonfatal error occurred during the self-test. (This
includes nonworking fans.)
Off
The switch failed the self-test.
On
The switch is connected to the RPSU and can receive
power if needed.
Off
The switch is not connected to the RPSU or RPSU is not
supplying power.
On
The corresponding port is set to operate at 1000 Mb/s
and the link is good.
Blinking
The corresponding 1000 Mb/s port has been disabled by
software.
Off
The link connection is bad, or there is no connection to
this port.
Blinking
Indicates network activity for the corresponding port. A
high level of network activity can cause the LEDs to
appear to be on continuously.
Diagnosing and correcting problems
Before you perform the problem-solving steps in this section, cycle the power to
the BayStack 380-24F Switch (disconnect and then reconnect the AC power
cord); then verify that the switch follows the normal power-up sequence.
Warning: To avoid bodily injury from hazardous electrical current,
never remove the top cover of the device. There are no user-serviceable
components inside.
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Chapter 4 Troubleshooting
Vorsicht: Um Verletzungsgefahr durch einen elektrischen Stromschlag
auszuschließen, nehmen Sie niemals die obere Abdeckung vom Gerät
ab. Im Geräteinnern befinden sich keine Komponenten, die vom
Benutzer gewartet werden können.
Avertissement: Pour éviter tout risque d'électrocution, ne jamais
retirer le capot de l'appareil. Cet appareil ne contient aucune pièce
accessible par l'utilisateur.
Advertencia: A fin de evitar daños personales por corrientes eléctricas
peligrosas, no desmonte nunca la cubierta superior de este dispositivo.
Los componentes internos no son reparables por el usuario.
Avvertenza: Per evitare lesioni fisiche dovute a scariche pericolose di
corrente, non rimuovere mai il coperchio superiore del dispositivo. I
componenti interni non possono essere manipolati dall'utente.
Normal power-up sequence
In a normal power-up sequence, the LEDs appear as follows:
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1
After power is applied to the switch, the Pwr (Power) LED turns on within 5
seconds.
2
The switch initiates a self-test, during which the port LEDs display various
patterns to indicate the progress of the self-test.
3
After the self-test, the remaining port LEDs indicate their operational status,
as described in Table 42.
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175
Table 42 Corrective actions
Symptom
Probable cause
Corrective action
All LEDs are off.
The switch is not receiving AC Verify that the AC power cord is fastened
power.
securely at both ends and that power is available
at the AC power outlet.
The fans are not operating or Verify that there is sufficient space for adequate
the airflow is blocked, causing airflow on both sides of the switch.
the unit to overheat.
Note: Operating temperature for the
switch must not exceed 40°C (104°F). Do
not place the switch in areas where it can
be exposed to direct sunlight or near
warm air exhausts or heaters.
The Activity LED for a
connected port is off or
does not blink (and you
have reason to believe
that traffic is present).
The switch is experiencing a
port connection problem.
See “Port connection problems” next.
The switch’s link partner is not
autonegotiating properly.
Port connection problems
You can usually trace port connection problems to either a poor cable connection
or an improper connection of the port cables at either end of the link. To remedy
these types of problems, make sure that the cable connections are secure and that
the cables connect to the correct ports at both ends of the link.
Port connection problems are also traceable to the autonegotiation mode or the
port interface.
Autonegotiation modes
Port connection problems can occur when a port (or station) is connected to
another port (or station) that is not operating in a compatible mode (for example,
connecting a full-duplex port on one station to a half-duplex port on another
station).
The BayStack 380-24F Switch negotiates port speeds according to the IEEE
802.3z, autonegotiating standards. The switch adjusts (autonegotiates) its port
speed and duplex mode to match the best service provided by the connected
station, up to 1000 Mb/s in full-duplex mode as follows:
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Chapter 4 Troubleshooting
•
If the connected station uses a form of autonegotiation that is not compatible
with the IEEE autonegotiating standard, the BayStack 380-24F Switch cannot
negotiate a compatible mode for correct operation.
•
If the autonegotiation feature is not present or not enabled at the connected
station, the BayStack 380-24F Switch may not be able to determine the
correct duplex modes.
In both situations, the BayStack 380-24F Switch “autosenses” the speed of the
connected station and, by default, reverts to half-duplex mode. If the connected
station is operating in full-duplex mode, it cannot communicate with the switch.
To correct this mode mismatch problem:
1
Use the Port Configuration screen to disable autonegotiation for the suspect
port (see “Port Configuration screen” on page 129).
2
Manually set the Speed/Duplex field to match the speed/duplex mode of the
connected station (see Table 24 on page 131).
You may have to try several settings before you find the correct speed/duplex
mode of the connected station.
If the problem persists:
1
Disable the autonegotiation feature at the connected station.
2
Manually set the speed/duplex mode of the connected station to the same
speed/duplex mode you have manually set for the BayStack 380-24F Switch
port.
Port interface
Ensure that the devices are connected using the appropriate crossover or
straight-through cable (see Appendix D, “Connectors and pin assignments,” on
page 207), or that autonegotiation is active.
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Appendix A
Technical specifications
This appendix provides technical specifications for the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit
Switch.
Environmental
Table 43 lists environmental specifications for the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit
Switch.
Table 43 Environmental specifications
Parameter
Operating specification
Storage specification
Temperature
0° to 40°C (32° to 104°F)
-25° to 70°C (-13° to 158°F)
Humidity
85% maximum relative humidity, 95% maximum relative humidity,
noncondensing
noncondensing
Altitude
3024 m (10,000 ft)
12,096 m (40,000 ft)
Electrical
Table 44 lists power electrical parameters for the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit
Switch.
Table 44 Electrical parameters
Parameter
Electrical specification
Input Voltage
100 to 240 VAC @ 47 to 63 Hz
Input Power
Consumption
150 W maximum
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Technical specifications
Table 44 Electrical parameters (continued)
Parameter
Electrical specification
Input current
1.5 A @ 100 VAC
0.6 A @ 240 VAC
Maximum thermal
output
250 BTU/hr
Physical dimensions
Table 45 lists physical dimensions for the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch.
Table 45 Physical dimensions
Parameter
Specifications
Height
2.77 in (7.04 cm)
Width
17.25 in (43.82 cm)
Depth
12.75 in (32.34 cm)
Weight
10.6 lb (4.8 kg)
Performance specifications
Table 46 lists performance specifications for the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit
Switch.
Table 46 Performance specifications
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Parameter
Specifications
Frame Forward Rate
(64-byte packets)
Up to 3.35 million packets per second (pps) maximum,
learned unicast traffic
Port Forwarding/Filtering
Performance
(64-byte packets)
•
•
•
Address Database Size
32,000 entries at line rate
Addressing
48-bit MAC address
Frame Length
64 to 9,216 bytes (IEEE 802.1Q Tagged)
For 10 Mb/s: 14,880 pps maximum
For 100 Mb/s: 148,810 pps maximum
For 1000 Mb/s: 1,488,100 pps maximum
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Technical specifications
179
Network protocol and standards compatibility
The following are protocols and standards used by the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit
Switch:
•
•
•
•
•
IEEE 802.3z (gigabit ethernet)
IEEE 802.1Q (VLAN Tagging)
IEEE 802.3x (Flow Control with 802.1D compliant device)
IEEE 802.1D (Spanning tree protocol)
IEEE 802.1p (Prioritization)
Safety agency certification
•
•
•
•
•
•
The safety certifications follow for the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch:
UL Listed (UL 1950)
IEC 950/EN60950 (CB report) with all national deviations
C22.2 No. 950 (CUL)
UL-94-V1 flammability requirements for PC board
NOM (NOM-019)
Electromagnetic emissions
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The electromagnetic emission standards for the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit
Switch:
US. CFR47, Part 15, Subpart B, Class A
Canada. ICES-003, Issue 2, Class A
Australia/New Zealand. AS/NZS 3548:1995, Class A
Japan. V-3/97.04:1997, Class A
Taiwan. CNS 13438, Class A
EN55022:1995, Class A
EN61000-3-2:1995
EN61000-3-3:1994
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Technical specifications
Electromagnetic immunity
The BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch meets the EN50082-1:1997 standard.
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Appendix B
Installing Gigabit Interface Converters (GBICs) and
SFP GBICS
This appendix describes how to install a Gigabit Interface Converter (GBIC) and
Small Form Factor Pluggable (SFP) Gigabit Interface Converter (GBIC) to the
BayStack 380-24F Gigabit switch. It also provides a description of the SFP GBIC,
the SFP GBIC label, and SFP GBIC specifications.
Note: In the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit, ports 21 through 24 are shared
copper and fiber ports. A copper port is always active until a SFP GBIC
is inserted with an active link.
GBIC Product description
Gigabit Interface Converters (GBICs) are hot-swappable input/output
enhancement components designed for use with Nortel Networks™ products to
allow Gigabit Ethernet ports to link with fiber optic networks.
The following GBIC versions are available for the Baystack 380-24F Gigabit
Switch:
•
1000BASE-SX—uses multimode fiber over distances up to 550 meters
•
1000BASE-LX—uses multimode fiber over distances up to 550 meters or
single-mode fiber over distances up to 10 kilometers
•
1000BASE-XD—uses single-mode fiber over distances up to 50 km
•
1000BASE-ZX—uses single-mode fiber over distances up to 70 km
GBICs are available in different case styles. One type has two spring tabs at the
front of the GBIC; the other type has an extractor handle on the front.
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Installing Gigabit Interface Converters (GBICs) and SFP GBICS
GBIC model with
extractor tabs
GBIC model with
extractor handle
9702FA
Figure 0-1.
Types of GBICs
GBICs are shipped with a protective rubber plug in the connectors. Leave the plug
in place when no cables are connected to the GBIC.
GBIC labeling
The Nortel Networks label on a typical GBIC (see following illustration) contains
a Nortel Networks serial number, a bar code, a manufacturer’s code, an interface
type, and a part number.
Part number
Serial number
GBIC interface type
Bar code
Manufacturer code
9706EA
Note: You must have the Nortel Networks serial number, the
manufacturer’s code, the interface type, and the part number of your
GBIC available when you contact a Nortel Networks service
representative for troubleshooting purposes.
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183
GBIC Models
The following table lists the available Nortel Networks GBIC models.
Model number
Product number
Description
1000BASE-SX
AA1419001
Short wavelength 550 m
1000BASE-LX
AA1419002
Long wavelength 5 km
1000BASE-XD
AA1419003
Extended distance 50 km
1000BASE-ZX
AA1419004
Extended distance 70 km
GBIC specifications
This section discusses GBIC general specifications.
GBIC specifications are listed in the following table.
Specification
Dimensions (H x W x D)
Descriptions
0.39 x 1.18 x 2.56 inches
(1 x 3 x 6.5 cm)
Connectors
Multimode fiber optic: SC
Single-mode fiber optic: SC
Standards, connectors, cabling, and distance
This section discusses GBIC standards, connectors, cabling, and distance. The
tables provide specifications for GBICs to be installed in Gigabit Ethernet ports.
All GBIC ports have SC-type connectors, and the minimum cable distance for all
GBICs (multimode fiber and single-mode fiber) listed is 6.5 feet (2 m).
1000BASE-SX
The Model 1000BASE-SX GBIC provides 1000BASE-SX (850 nm, short
wavelength, Gigabit Ethernet) connectivity using SC duplex multimode fiber
connectors.The Model 1000BASE-SX SFP GBIC supports full-duplex operation
only.
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Installing Gigabit Interface Converters (GBICs) and SFP GBICS
The following table describes standards, connectors, cabling, and distance for the
Model 1000BASE-SX GBIC.
Type
Specifications
Standards
Conformity to the following standards:
802.3z, 1000BASE-SX
Connectors
Duplex SC fiber optic connector
Cabling
62.5 µm MMF optic cable
50 µm MMF optic cable
Distance
902 ft. (275 m) using 62.5 µm MMF optic
cable
1804 ft. (550 m) using 50 µm MMF optic
cable
Wavelength
850 nm
Optical budget
7 dB
Laser Transmitter Characteristics
Minimum launch power
-10 dBm
Maximum launch power
-4 dBm
Receiver Characteristics
Minimum receiver sensitivity
-17 dBm
Maximum input power
0 dBm
1000BASE-LX
The Model 1000BASE-LX GBIC provides 1000BASE-LX (1300 nm,
wavelength, Gigabit Ethernet) connectivity using SC duplex fiber connectors. The
long wavelength optical transceivers used in the LX model provide variable
distance ranges using both multimode and single-mode fiber optic cabling. The
Model 1000BASE-LX GBIC supports full-duplex operation only.
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185
The following table describes standards, connectors, cabling, and distance for the
Model 1000BASE-LX GBIC.
Type
Specifications
Standards
Conformity to the following standards:
802.3z, 1000BASE-LX
Connectors
Duplex SC fiber optic connector
Cabling
62.5 µm MMF optic cable
50 µm MMF optic cable
10 µm SMF optic cable
Distance
1804 ft. (550 m) using 62.5 µm MMF
optic cable
1804 ft. (550 m) using 50 µm MMF optic
cable
16405 ft. (5 km) using 10 µm SMF optic
cable
Wavelength
1300 nm
Optical budget
10.5 dB
Laser Transmitter Characteristics
Minimum launch power
-9.5 dBm
Maximum launch power
-3 dBm
Receiver Characteristics
Minimum receiver sensitivity
-20 dBm
Maximum input power
-3 dBm
Note: When multimode fiber is used in long distance applications,
external, removable, mode-conditioning patch cords may be required to
prevent differential mode delay (DMD). You can order mode
conditioning patch cords through Nortel Networks:
• SC-SC Mode Conditioning Patch Cord 62.5/125—part number
AA0018035
• SC-SC Mode Conditioning Patch Cord 50/125—part number
AA0018036
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Installing Gigabit Interface Converters (GBICs) and SFP GBICS
1000BASE-XD
The Model 1000BASE-XD GBIC provides Gigabit Ethernet connectivity using
SC duplex single-mode fiber connectors. High-performance optical transceivers
enable Gigabit Ethernet link distances up to 50 kilometers (km) over single-mode
fiber. The ports operate in full-duplex mode only.
The following table describes standards, connectors, cabling, and distance for the
Model 1000BASE-XD GBIC.
Type
Specifications
Standards
Conformity to the following standards:
802.3z, Ethernet full duplex
Connectors
SC duplex single-mode fiber optic
connector
Cabling
Single-mode fiber optic cable
Distance
Up to 50 km using single-mode fiber
cable, depending on the quality of the
fiber
Optical budget
17 dB
Laser Transmitter Characteristics
Wavelength
1550 ± 10 nm
Maximum spectral width
0.2 nm
Maximum launch power
0 dBm or 1.0 mW
Minimum launch power into fiber
-5 dBm or 0.3 mW
Distance
50 km
Receiver Characteristics
Wavelength
214391-A
1200 to 1550 nm
Minimum receiver sensitivity
-22 dBm
Maximum input power
-3 dBm
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187
Note: Nortel Networks recommends that you use an
in-line attenuator for shorter link distances to avoid overloading the
receiver.
Note: The Model 1000BASE-XD GBIC is based on proprietary
signaling and is compatible with Accelar 1000 Series XD modules.
1000BASE-ZX
The Model 1000BASE-ZX GBIC provides Gigabit Ethernet connectivity using
SC duplex single-mode fiber connectors. High-performance optical transceivers
enable Gigabit Ethernet link distances up to 70 km over single-mode fiber cable.
The ports operate in full-duplex mode only.
The following table describes standards, connectors, cabling, and distance for the
Model 1000BASE-ZX GBIC.
Type
Specifications
Standards
Conformity to the following standards:
802.3z, Ethernet full duplex
Connectors
SC duplex single-mode fiber optic
connector
Cabling
Single-mode fiber optic cable
Distance
Up to 70 km using single-mode fiber
optic cable, depending on the quality of
the fiber
Optical budget
22 dB
Laser Transmitter Characteristics
Wavelength
1550 ± 10 nm
Maximum spectral width
0.2 nm
Maximum launch power
3.0 mW ± 5 dBm
Minimum launch power into fiber
0 dBm
Distance
70 km
Receiver Characteristics
Wavelength
1200 nm to 1550 nm
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Installing Gigabit Interface Converters (GBICs) and SFP GBICS
Type
Specifications (continued)
Minimum receiver sensitivity
-22 dBm
Maximum input power
-3 dBm
Note: When shorter lengths of single-mode fiber cable are used, there is
a risk of overloading the receiver. It may be necessary to insert an in-line
optical attenuator in the link to prevent overloading, as follows:
• Insert a 10dB in-line optical attenuator between the fiber optic cable
plant and the receiving port on the 1000BASE-ZX GBIC, at each end
of the link, if the fiber optic cable span is less than 25 km.
• Insert a 5dB in line optical attenuator between the fiber optic cable
plant and the receiving port on the 1000BASE-ZX GBIC, at each end
of the link, if the fiber optic cable span is less than 50 km.
Note: The 1000BASE-ZX GBIC is based on proprietary signaling.
Nortel Networks recommends that this product be used only with other
Nortel Networks 1000BASE-ZX GBICs.
Handling, Safety, and Environmental Guidelines
Before installing your GBIC, read the following handling, safety, and
environmental guidelines:
•
•
•
•
214391-A
GBICs are static sensitive. To prevent damage from electrostatic discharge
(ESD), follow your normal board and component handling procedures.
GBICs are dust sensitive. When storing a GBIC, or when a GBIC is
disconnected from a fiber optic cable, always keep the dust cover over a
GBIC’s optical bores.
To clean contaminants from the optical bores of a GBIC, use an alcohol swab
or equivalent to clean the ferrules of the optical connector.
Dispose of this product according to all national laws and regulations.
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189
Installing a GBIC
GBIC bays are covered by spring-loaded filler panels that rotate out of the way as
you push the GBIC into place. You can install or replace a GBIC in a Baystack
420 switch without turning off power to the switch.
Warning: Fiber optic equipment can emit laser or infrared light that can injure
your eyes. Never look into an optical fiber or connector port. Always assume
that fiber optic cables are connected to a light source.
Vorsicht: Glasfaserkomponenten können Laserlicht bzw. Infrarotlicht
abstrahlen, wodurch Ihre Augen geschädigt werden können. Schauen Sie
niemals in einen Glasfaser-LWL oder ein Anschlußteil. Gehen Sie stets davon
aus, daß das Glasfaserkabel an eine Lichtquelle angeschlossen ist.
Avertissement: L’équipement à fibre optique peut émettre des rayons laser
ou infrarouges qui risquent d’entraîner des lésions oculaires. Ne jamais
regarder dans le port d’un connecteur ou d’un câble à fibre optique. Toujours
supposer que les câbles à fibre optique sont raccordés à une source lumineuse.
Advertencia: Los equipos de fibra óptica pueden emitir radiaciones de láser
o infrarrojas que pueden dañar los ojos. No mire nunca en el interior de una
fibra óptica ni de un puerto de conexión. Suponga siempre que los cables de
fibra óptica están conectados a una fuente luminosa.
Avvertenza: Le apparecchiature a fibre ottiche emettono raggi laser o
infrarossi che possono risultare dannosi per gli occhi. Non guardare mai
direttamente le fibre ottiche o le porte di collegamento. Tenere in
considerazione il fatto che i cavi a fibre ottiche sono collegati a una sorgente
luminosa.
8769EA
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Installing Gigabit Interface Converters (GBICs) and SFP GBICS
To install a GBIC:
1
Remove the GBIC from its protective packaging.
2
Insert the GBIC into the slot on the Baystack switch (Figure 0-2).
GBICs are keyed to prevent improper insertion. If the GBIC resists pressure,
do not force it. Remove it, turn it over, and reinsert it.
9703FA
Figure 0-2.
Installing a GBIC
3
Press on the front of the GBIC until it snaps into place.
4
Remove the rubber plug to connect cables.
To remove an installed GBIC:
1
214391-A
If the GBIC has spring tabs, press in on the tabs on each side of the GBIC as
you pull the GBIC out of the bay (Figure 0-3).
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Installing Gigabit Interface Converters (GBICs) and SFP GBICS
191
9704FA
Figure 0-3.
2
Removing a GBIC
If the GBIC has an extractor handle, grasp the handle and pull firmly to
remove the GBIC from the bay.
SFP GBIC Product description
SFP GBICs are hot-swappable input/output enhancement components designed
for use with Nortel Networks products to allow Gigabit Ethernet ports to link with
fiber optic networks.
Table 47 lists and describes the Nortel Networks SFP GBIC models.
Table 47 Nortel Networks SFP GBIC models
Model number
Product number
Description
1000BASE-SX (LC Type)
AA1419013
Small Form Factor Pluggable,
short wavelength 550 m
1000BASE-SX (MT-RJ Type)
AA1419014
Small Form Factor Pluggable,
short wavelength 550 m
1000BASE-LX (LC Type)
AA1419015
Small Form Factor Pluggable,
long wavelength 5 km
Note: The cable distance may vary depending on the quality of fiber optic
cable used.
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Handling, safety, and environmental guidelines
Before installing your SFP GBIC, read the following handling, safety, and
environmental guidelines:
•
•
•
•
SFP GBICs are static sensitive. To prevent damage from electrostatic
discharge (ESD), follow your normal board and component handling
procedures.
SFP GBICs are dust sensitive. When storing a SFP GBIC, or when a SFP
GBIC is disconnected from a fiber optic cable, always keep the dust cover
over a SFP GBIC’s optical bores.
To clean contaminants from the optical bores of a SFP GBIC, use an alcohol
swab or equivalent to clean the ferrules of the optical connector.
Dispose of this product according to all national laws and regulations.
Warning: Fiber optic equipment can emit laser or infrared light that can injure
your eyes. Never look into an optical fiber or connector port. Always assume
that fiber optic cables are connected to a light source.
214391-A
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193
Installing a SFP GBIC
SFP GBIC bays are covered by spring-loaded filler panels that rotate out of the
way as you push the SFP GBIC into place. You can install or replace a SFP GBIC
in a BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch without turning off power to the switch.
Warning: Fiber optic equipment can emit laser or infrared light that can injure
your eyes. Never look into an optical fiber or connector port. Always assume
that fiber optic cables are connected to a light source.
Vorsicht: Glasfaserkomponenten können Laserlicht bzw. Infrarotlicht
abstrahlen, wodurch Ihre Augen geschädigt werden können. Schauen Sie
niemals in einen Glasfaser-LWL oder ein Anschlußteil. Gehen Sie stets davon
aus, daß das Glasfaserkabel an eine Lichtquelle angeschlossen ist.
Avertissement: L’équipement à fibre optique peut émettre des rayons laser
ou infrarouges qui risquent d’entraîner des lésions oculaires. Ne jamais
regarder dans le port d’un connecteur ou d’un câble à fibre optique. Toujours
supposer que les câbles à fibre optique sont raccordés à une source lumineuse.
Advertencia: Los equipos de fibra óptica pueden emitir radiaciones de láser
o infrarrojas que pueden dañar los ojos. No mire nunca en el interior de una
fibra óptica ni de un puerto de conexión. Suponga siempre que los cables de
fibra óptica están conectados a una fuente luminosa.
Avvertenza: Le apparecchiature a fibre ottiche emettono raggi laser o
infrarossi che possono risultare dannosi per gli occhi. Non guardare mai
direttamente le fibre ottiche o le porte di collegamento. Tenere in
considerazione il fatto che i cavi a fibre ottiche sono collegati a una sorgente
luminosa.
8769EA
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Installing Gigabit Interface Converters (GBICs) and SFP GBICS
Product models
Small Form Factor Pluggable Gigabit Interface Converters (SFP GBICs) are
hot-swappable input/output enhancement components designed for use with
Nortel Networks* products to allow Gigabit Ethernet ports to link with fiber optic
networks.
Figure 83 shows the SFP GBIC
Figure 83 SFP GBIC
MTRJ GBIC model with
extractor button
LC GBIC model with
extractor tab
10515FA
SFP GBIC labeling
The Nortel Networks label on a typical SFP GBIC (Figure 84) contains a Nortel
Networks serial number, a bar code, a manufacturer’s code, an interface type, and
a part number.
Figure 84 Nortel Networks SFP GBIC label
Part number
GBIC interface type
AA141901x
SFP 1000 BASE-xx
21CFR(J) CLASS1
Top view
Serial number
Bar code
Side view
10516EA
214391-A
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195
Note: When you contact a Nortel Networks service representative for
troubleshooting purposes, you must have the following information
available:
• Nortel Networks serial number
• Manufacturer’s code
• Interface type
• GBIC part number
Installing a Small Form Factor Pluggable SFP GBIC
This section lists the steps to install a SFP GBIC.
To install a SFP GBIC:
1
Remove the SFP GBIC from its protective packaging.
2
Verify that the SFP GBIC is the correct model for your network configuration
(Table 47 on page 191).
3
Remove the dust cover from the SFP GBIC’s optical bores.
4
Grasp the SFP GBIC between your thumb and forefinger.
5
Insert the SFP GBIC into the slot on the front panel of the Gigabit Ethernet
switching module (Figure 86).
Figure 85 Inserting a LC SFP GBIC
Link
Act
E MDA
00-2G
BPS20
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Installing Gigabit Interface Converters (GBICs) and SFP GBICS
Figure 86 Inserting a MT-RJ SFP GBIC
Link
Act
E MDA
00-2G
BPS20
Note: SFP GBICs are keyed to prevent incorrect insertion.
Removing a Small Form Factor Pluggable SFP GBIC
This section lists the steps for removing a SFP GBIC.
To remove a SFP GBIC:
1
Disconnect the network fiber cable from the SFP GBIC connector.
2
Depending on your SFP GBIC model, either pull the LC extraction tab
located in the front of the SFP GBIC (below right) with your thumb and
forefinger, or press the button on the botton of the MT-RJ SFP GBIC (below
left).
Figure 87 Removing a SFP GBIC (Bottom view)
MT-RJ
SFP GBIC
LC SFP GBIC
10518FA
214391-A
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197
3
Slide the SFP GBIC out of the Gigabit Ethernet module slot.
4
If the SFP GBIC does not slide easily from the module slot, use a gentle
side-to-side rocking motion while firmly pulling the SFP GBIC from the slot.
5
Dispose of the SFP GBIC according to all national laws and regulations.
Note: If you are storing a SFP GBIC, remember to place a
dust cover over the fiber optic bores.
Small Form Factor Pluggable SFP GBIC specifications
Table 48 describes general SFP GBIC specifications.
Table 48 SFP GBIC specifications
Specification
Descriptions
Dimensions (H x W x D)
0.53 x 0.33 x 2.22 inches
(13.4 x 8.5 x 56.4 mm)
Connectors
Multimode fiber optic: LC or MT-RJ
Single-mode fiber optic: LC
Standards, connectors, cabling, and distance
This section describes SFP GBIC standards, connectors, cabling, and distance;
and provides specifications for the following SFP GBICs:
•
•
•
“1000BASE-SX (LC Type)” on page 198
“1000BASE-LX (LC Type)” on page 199
“1000BASE-SX (MT-RJ Type)” on page 200
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1000BASE-SX (LC Type)
The Model 1000BASE-SX SFP GBIC provides 1000BASE-SX (850 nm, short
wavelength, Gigabit Ethernet) connectivity using LC duplex multimode fiber
connectors.The Model 1000BASE-SX SFP GBIC supports full-duplex operation
only.
Table 49 describes standards, connectors, cabling, and distance for the Model
1000BASE-SX SFP GBIC.
Table 49 1000BASE-SX SFP GBIC specifications
Type
Specifications
Standards
Conformity to the following standards:
802.3z, 1000BASE-SX
Connectors
Duplex LC fiber optic connector
Cabling
62.5 µm MMF optic cable
50 µm MMF optic cable
Distance
902 ft. (275 m) using 62.5 µm MMF optic cable
1804 ft. (550 m) using 50 µm MMF optic cable
Wavelength
850 nm
Optical budget
7 dB
Laser Transmitter Characteristics
Minimum launch power
-10 dBm
Maximum launch power
-4 dBm
Receiver Characteristics
214391-A
Minimum input power
-17 dBm
Maximum input power
0 dBm
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199
1000BASE-LX (LC Type)
The Model 1000BASE-LX SFP SFP GBIC provides 1000BASE-LX (1300 nm,
wavelength, Gigabit Ethernet) connectivity using LC duplex fiber connectors. The
long wavelength optical transceivers used in the LX model provide variable
distance ranges using both multimode and single-mode fiber optic cabling. The
Model 1000BASE-LX SFP GBIC supports full-duplex operation only.
Table 50 describes standards, connectors, cabling, and distance for the Model
1000BASE-LX SFP GBIC.
Table 50 1000BASE-LX SFP GBIC specifications
Type
Specifications
Standards
Conformity to the following standards:
802.3z, 1000BASE-LX
Connectors
Duplex LC fiber optic connector
Cabling
10 µm SMF optic cable
Distance
16405 ft. (5 km) using 10 µm SMF optic cable
Wavelength
1300 nm
Optical budget
11.0 dB
Laser Transmitter Characteristics
Minimum launch power
-9.0 dBm
Maximum launch power
-3 dBm
Receiver Characteristics
Minimum input power
-20 dBm
Maximum input power
-3 dBm
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1000BASE-SX (MT-RJ Type)
The Model 1000BASE-SX (MT-RJ Type) SFP GBIC provides Gigabit Ethernet
connectivity using MT-RJ multi-mode fiber connectors.
Table 51 describes standards, connectors, cabling, and distance for the Model
1000BASE-SX (MT-RJ Type) SFP GBIC.
Table 51 1000BASE-SX (MT-RJ) SFP GBIC specifications
Type
Standards
Specifications
Conformity to the following standards:
802.3z, Ethernet full duplex
Connectors
Cabling
Duplex MT-RJ fiber optic connector
62.5 µm MMF optic cable
50 µm MMF optic cable
Distance
275 mm (62.5 µm MMF optic cable)
550 mm (50 µm MMF optic cable)
Optical budget
7 dB
Laser Transmitter Characteristics
Wavelength
850 nm
Maximum spectral width
0.85 nm
Maximum launch power
-4.0 dBm
Minimum launch power
-10.0 dBm
Receiver Characteristics
214391-A
Wavelength
850 nm
Minimum input power
-17 dBm
Maximum input power
0 dBm
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201
Coarse Wavelength Division Multiplexed (CWDM) Small
Form Factor Pluggable (SFP) Gigabit Interface
Converters
This section describes how the Nortel Networks* Coarse Wavelength Division
Multiplexed Small Form Factor Pluggable Gigabit Interface Converter (CWDM
SFP GBIC) works within the optical routing system. It also provides a list of
CWDM SFP GBICs by wavelength and shows how they are labeled and
color-coded.
CWDM SFP GBIC description
CWDM SFP GBICs are transceivers that link Gigabit Ethernet ports with fiber
optic networks. WDM technology consolidates multiple optical channels, using
specific wavelengths to expand available bandwidth, on a common optical fiber.
About the optical routing system
CWDM SFP GBICs are a component in the optical routing system designed to
support high speed data communication for Metropolitan Area Networks
(MANs). The system uses a grid of eight CWDM optical wavelengths in both ring
and point-to-point configurations. All components are color-coded by
wavelength.
CWDM SFP GBIC Listing
Table 52 lists the Nortel Networks CWDM SFP GBICs and describes their
wavelengths, color codes, part numbers, and cable lengths.
Table 52 Nortel Networks CWDM SFP GBIC List
CWDM SFP GBIC
Product number
Maximum distance
1470nm/Gray
AA1419025
40 KM
AA1419033
70 KM
AA1419026
40 KM
AA1419034
70 KM
1490nm/Violet
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Table 52 Nortel Networks CWDM SFP GBIC List (continued)
CWDM SFP GBIC
Product number
Maximum distance
1510nm/Blue
AA1419027
40 KM
AA1419035
70 KM
AA1419028
40 KM
AA1419036
70 KM
1550nm/Yellow
AA1419029
40 KM
AA1419037
70 KM
1570nm/Orange
AA1419030
40 KM
AA1419038
70 KM
AA1419031
40 KM
AA1419039
70 KM
AA1419032
40 KM
AA1419040
70 KM
1530nm/Green
1590nm/Red
1610nm/Brown
Note: The cable distance may vary depending on the quality of
fiber optic cable used.
Note: CWDM SFP GBICs are installed and removed like any
other LC type SFP GBIC.
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203
CWDM SFP GBIC specifications
The following tables list the specifiications for the 40 kilometer and 70 kilometer
CWDM SFP GBICs
Table 53 40 Kilometer CWDM SFP GBIC specifications
Item
Specification
Physical dimensions
0.457 X .604 X 2.18 inches
(11.6 X 15.3 X 55.43 mm)
Connectors
Duplex LC fiber optic
Cabling
SMF, 9 µm
Data rate
Nominal range
50 to 1300 Mb/s
Average launch power
minimum
maximum
-4.0 dBm
+1.0 dBm
Transmitter extinction ratio
minimum
9 dB
Data format
8 B/10 B
Average receive power
minimum
maximum
-21.0 dBm
-3.0 dBm
Power supply
maximum
3.15 to 3.45 V, 175 mA
0oC to 60oC
Operating temperature range
Regulatory
Class 1 devices per FDA/CDRH and 1EC8251 Laser Safety
Regulations
17 dB
Optical budget
Table 54 70 Kilometer CWDM SFP GBIC specifications
Item
Specification
Physical dimensions
0.457 X .604 X 2.18 inches
(11.6 X 15.3 X 55.43 mm)
Connectors
Duplex LC fiber optic
Cabling
SMF, 9 µm
Data rate
Nominal range
50 to 1300 Mbaud
Average launch power
minimum
maximum
-3.0 dBm
+2.0 dBm
Transmitter extinction ratio
minimum
9 dB
Data format
8 B/10 B
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Table 54 70 Kilometer CWDM SFP GBIC specifications (continued)
Item
Specification
Average receive power
minimum
maximum
-23.0 dBm
-3.0 dBm
Power supply
maximum
3.15 to 3.45 V, 175 mA
Operating temperature range
Regulatory
Optical budget
0oC to 60oC
Class 1 devices per FDA/CDRH and 1EC8251 Laser Safety
Regulations
20 dB
Note: A minimum attenuation of 5 dB must be present between the transmitter
and receiver. To avoid receiver saturation, you must insert a minimum
attenuation of 5 dB when:
• testing the CWDM SFP GBIC in loopback mode
• using short runs of fiber with no intermediate CWDM OADM or CWDM
OMUX
To determine the expected signal loss for a CWDM OADM, CWDM OMUX,
or fiber length, see Installation and Networking Guidelines for Optical Routing,
part number 212257-A.
Given a loss budget of 24 dB and assuming fiber loss of .25 dB/km, up to 96 km
reach is supported with no intermediate CWDM OADM or CWDM OMUX.
214391-A
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205
Appendix C
Quick configuration for MultiLink Trunking
If you are a system administrator with experience configuring BayStack 380-24F
Switch MultiLink Trunking, use the flowchart in Figure 88 on page 206 as a quick
configuration guide. The flowchart refers you to the “configuration rules”
appropriate for this feature.
To open the MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen:
Choose MultiLink Trunk Configuration (or press t) from the MultiLink
Trunk Configuration Menu screen.
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Quick configuration for MultiLink Trunking
Figure 88 Configuring MultiLink Trunks
MultiLink Trunk
Configuration screen
Are all
trunk members
configured?
No
Configure trunk members
(see "MultiLink Trunking
Configuration Rules").
Yes
Is trunk
STP Enabled?
No
Configure STP field.
Yes
Is trunk
Enabled?
No
Enable Trunk Status field
(see "MultiLink Trunking
Configuration Rules").
Yes
Key
Done
Off-page reference
On-page reference
BS45050A
214391-A
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207
Appendix D
Connectors and pin assignments
This appendix describes the BayStack 380-24F Switch port connectors and pin
assignments. The BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch support one 10/100
management port.
RJ-45 (10BASE-T/100BASE-TX) port connectors
The RJ-45 port connectors (Figure 89) are wired as MDI-X ports to connect
end stations without using crossover cables. (See “MDI and MDI-X devices” on
page 208 for information about MDI-X ports.) For 10BASE-T connections, use
Category 3 (or higher) UTP cable. For 100BASE-TX connections, use only
Category 5 UTP cable.
Figure 89 RJ-45 (8-pin modular) port connector
1
8
616EA
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Connectors and pin assignments
Table 55 lists the RJ-45 (8-pin modular) port connector pin assignments.
Table 55 RJ-45 port connector pin assignments
Pin
Signal
Description
1
RX+
Receive Data +
2
RX-
Receive Data -
3
TX+
Transmit Data +
4
Not applicable
Not applicable
5
Not applicable
Not applicable
6
TX-
Transmit Data -
7
Not applicable
Not applicable
8
Not applicable
Not applicable
For 1000BASE-T, all 8 pins are used for four pairs of bi-directional data.
Table 56 lists the types of bi-directional data for each of the 1000BASE-T pin
connectors.
Table 56 1000BASE-T Pin Connectors
Pin
Type of Data
1
Bi-directional data A+
2
Bi-directional data A-
3
Bi-directional data B+
4
Bi-directional data C+
5
Bi-directional data C-
6
Bi-directional data B-
7
Bi-directional data D+
8
Bi-directional data D-
MDI and MDI-X devices
Media dependent interface (MDI) is the IEEE standard for the interface to
unshielded twisted pair (UTP) cable.
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Connectors and pin assignments
209
For two devices to communicate, the transmitter of one device must connect to the
receiver of the other device. The connection is established through a crossover
function, which can be a crossover cable or a port that implements the crossover
function internally.
Ports that implement the crossover function internally are known as MDI-X ports,
where X refers to the crossover function.
Note: For the transmitter of one device to connect to the receiver of
another device, the total number of crossovers must always be an odd
number.
The following sections describe the use of straight-through and crossover cables
for connecting MDI and MDI-X devices.
MDI-X to MDI cable connections
The BayStack 380 Switch features Auto-MDI/MDI-X detection. With
auto-negotiation enabled, you can use straight Category 5 cables for MDI to
MDI-X connections.
Auto-polarity
The BayStack 380-24F Switch features auto-polarity. With autonegotiation
enabled, auto-polarity automatically reverses the polarity of a pair of pins from
positive to negative or negative to positive. This corrects the polarity of the
received data if the port detects that the polarity of the data has been reversed due
to a wiring error.
DB-9 (RS-232-D) Console/Comm Port connector
The DB-9 Console/Comm Port connector (Figure 90) is configured as a data
communications equipment (DCE) connector. The DSR and CTS signal outputs
are always asserted; the CD, DTR, RTS, and RI signal inputs are not used. This
configuration enables a management station (a PC or console terminal) to connect
directly to the switch using a straight-through cable.
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210
Connectors and pin assignments
Figure 90 DB-9 Console port connector
1
5
6
9
619EA
Table 57 lists the DB-9 Console port connector pin assignments.
Table 57 DB-9 Console port connector pin assignments
Pin
Signal
Description
1
CD
Not used
2
TXD
Transmit data (output)
3
RXD
Receive data (input)
4
DSR
5
GND
Signal ground
6
DSR
Not used
7
CTS
8
RTS
Not used
9
RI
Not used
Shell
214391-A
Chassis ground
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211
Appendix E
Default settings
Table 58 lists the factory default settings for the BayStack 380-24F Switch
according to the console interface (CI) screens and fields for the settings.
Table 58 Factory default settings
Field
Default setting
Appears in this CI screen
BootP Request Mode
BootP Disabled
“IP Configuration/Setup screen” on
page 96
In-Band Switch IP Address
0.0.0.0
(no IP address assigned)
In-Band Subnet Mask
0.0.0.0
(no subnet mask assigned)
Default Gateway
0.0.0.0
(no IP address assigned)
Read-Only Community String
public
Read-Write Community String
private
Trap IP Address
0.0.0.0
(no IP address assigned)
Community String
Zero-length string
Authentication Trap
Enabled
Link Up/Down Trap
Enabled
sysContact
Zero-length string
sysName
Zero-length string
sysLocation
Zero-length string
“SNMP Configuration screen” on
page 102
“System Characteristics screen” on
page 103
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Default settings
Table 58 Factory default settings (continued)
Field
Default setting
Appears in this CI screen
Aging Time
300 seconds
“MAC Address Table screen” on
page 107
Find an Address
00-00-00-00-00-00
(no MAC address assigned)
MAC Address Security
Disabled
MAC Address Security
SNMP-Locked
Disabled
Clear by Ports
NONE
Learn by Ports
NONE
Current Learning Mode
Not Learning
Trunk
blank field
Security
Disabled
Find an Address
blank field
MAC Address
- - - - - - (no address
assigned)
Allowed Source
- (blank field)
Display/Create MAC Address
00-00-00-00-00-00
Create VLAN
1
Delete VLAN
blank field
VLAN Name
VLAN # (VLAN number)
Management VLAN
Yes, VLAN #1
VLAN Type
Port-based
VLAN State
Inactive
Subnet Addr
0.0.0.0.
Subnet Mask
0.0.0.0.
Port Membership
U (all ports assigned as
untagged members of
VLAN 1)
Port
1
Filter Untagged Frames
No
214391-A
“MAC Address Security Configuration
Menu screen” on page 110
“MAC Address Security Port
Configuration screen” on page 113
“MAC Address Security Table screens”
on page 116
“VLAN Configuration screen” on
page 119
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Default settings
213
Table 58 Factory default settings (continued)
Field
Default setting
Appears in this CI screen
Port Name
Unit 1, Port 1
PVID
1
Tagging
Untagged Access
Port
1
PVID
1 (read only)
Auto PVID
Disabled
Port Name
Unit 1, Port 1 (read only)
Status
Enabled (for all ports)
Autonegotiation
Enabled (for all ports)
Speed/Duplex
100Mbs/Half (when
Autonegotiation is Disabled)
Trunk
1 to 6 (depending on
configuration status)
Trunk Members (Unit/Port)
Blank field
STP Learning
Normal
Trunk Mode
Basic
Trunk Status
Disabled
Trunk Name
Trunk #1 to Trunk #6
Traffic Type
Rx and Tx
“MultiLink Trunk Configuration Menu
screen” on page 135
“MultiLink Trunk Utilization screen” on
page 139
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214
Default settings
Table 58 Factory default settings (continued)
Field
Default setting
Appears in this CI screen
Monitoring Mode
Disabled
“Port Mirroring Configuration screen”
on page 141
Monitor Port
Zero-length string
Port
1
Console Port Speed
9600 Baud
Console Switch Password
Not Required
Console Read-Only Switch
Password
user
Console Read-Write Switch
Password
secure
Participation
Normal Learning
Priority
128
Path Cost
10 or 100
Bridge Priority
8000 (read only)
Designated Root
8000 (bridge_id) (read only)
Root Port
0 (read only)
Root Path Cost
0 (read only)
Hello Time
2 seconds (read only)
Maximum Age Time
20 seconds (read only)
Forward Delay
15 seconds (read only)
Bridge Hello Time
2 seconds (read only)
Bridge Maximum Age Time
20 seconds (read only)
Bridge Forward Delay
15 seconds (read only)
TELNET Access
Enabled
Login Timeout
1 minute
Login Retries
3
Inactivity Timeout
15 minutes
214391-A
“Console/Comm Port Configuration
screen” on page 148
“Spanning Tree Switch Settings
screen” on page 158
“TELNET Configuration screen” on
page 161
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Default settings
215
Table 58 Factory default settings (continued)
Field
Default setting
Appears in this CI screen
Event Logging
All
Allowed Source IP Address
(10 user-configurable fields)
First field: 0.0.0.0
(no IP address assigned)
Remaining nine fields:
255.255.255.255
(any address is allowed)
Allowed Source Mask
(10 user-configurable fields)
First field: 0.0.0.0
(no IP address assigned)
Remaining nine fields:
255.255.255.255
(any address is allowed)
Image Filename
Zero-length string
TFTP Server IP Address
0.0.0.0
(no IP address assigned)
Start TFTP Load of New Image
No
Configuration Image Filename
Zero-length string
TFTP Server IP Address
0.0.0.0
(no IP address assigned)
Copy Configuration Image to
Server
No
“Software Download screen” on
page 163
“Configuration File Download/Upload
screen” on page 167
Retrieve Configuration Image from No
Server
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Default settings
214391-A
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217
Appendix F
Sample BootP configuration file
This appendix provides a sample BootP configuration file. The BootP server
searches for this file, called bootptab (or BOOTPTAB.TXT, depending on your
operating system), which contains the site-specific information (including IP
addresses) needed to perform the software download and configuration. You can
modify this sample BootP configuration file or create one of your own.
A sample BootP configuration file follows:
# The following is a sample of a BootP configuration file that was extracted
# from a Nortel Networks EZ LAN network management application. Note that
other BootP daemons can use a configuration file with a different format.
#
# Before using your switch BootP facility, you must customize your BootP
# configuration file with the appropriate data.
#
# Blank lines and lines beginning with '#' are ignored.
#
# Legend:
#
#
first field -- hostname
#
ht -- hardware type
#
ha -- host hardware address
#
tc -- template host (points to similar host entry)
#
ip -- host IP address
#
hd -- bootfile home directory
#
bf -- bootfile
# EZ
dt -- device type
# EZ
fv -- firmware version
# EZ
av -- agent version
#
# Fields are separated with a pipe (|) symbol. Forward slashes (/) are
# required to indicate that an entry is continued to the next line.
#
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218
Sample BootP configuration file
# Caution
#
#
Omitting a Forward slash (/) when the entry is continued to the next
#
line, can cause the interruption of the booting process or the
#
incorrect image file to download. Always include forward slashes
#
where needed.
#
# Important Note:
#
#
If a leading zero (0) is used in the IP address it is calculated as an
#
octal number. If the leading character is "x" (upper or lower case),
#
it is calculated as a hexadecimal number. For example, if an IP address
#
with a base 10 number of 45 is written as .045 in the BOOTPTAB.TXT file,
#
the Bootp protocol assigns .037 to the client.
#
# Global entries are defined that specify the parameters used by every device.
# Note that hardware type (ht) is specified first in the global entry.
#
# The following global entry is defined for an Ethernet device. Note that this
# is where a client's subnet mask (sm) and default gateway (gw) are defined.
#
global1|/
|ht=ethernet|/
|hd=c:\opt\images|/
|sm=255.255.255.0|/
|gw=192.0.1.0|
#
# The following sample entry describes a BootP client:
bay1|ht=ethernet|ha=0060fd000000|ip=192.0.0.1|hd=c:\ezlan\images|bf=BS380_20046.img
BS380_20046.img
# Where:
#
host name:
bay1
#
hardware type:
Ethernet
#
MAC address:
00-60-FD-00-00-00
#
IP address:
192.0.0.0
#
home directory of boot file: c:\ezlan\images
BS380_20046.img
#
boot file:
BS380_20046.img
214391-A
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219
Index
A
Broadcasts field 145
Actual Hello Interval 159
Business Policy Switch
front panel 26
Aging Time field 109
Allowed Source IP Address field 163
Allowed Source Mask field 163
Authentication Trap field 103
autonegotiation
modes 175
troubleshooting 175
Autonegotiation field 132
C
Clear All Port Statistics option 107
Collisions field 146
Comm Port Data Bits field 149
Comm Port Parity field 149
Comm Port Stop Bits field 149
Community String field 103
B
Configurable field 97
BayStack 460 switch
connectors 207
default port settings for VLANs 53
configuration rules
VLANs 65
BootP
Always mode 99
BOOTPTAB.TXT file 217
Bootstrap Protocol
choosing a request mode 42, 98
Disabled 101
Last Address setting 101
Last BootP field 97
Request Mode field 97
sample configuration file 217
When Needed mode 99
BPS 2000 Image Filename field 165
Bridge Forward Delay field 160
Bridge Hello Time field 160
Bridge Maximum Age Time field 160
Bridge Priority field 159
connectors 207
DB-9 console/comm port connector 209
RJ-45 port connector 207
console interface (CI)
main menu 92
menus, using 90
Console Password field 150
Console Port Speed field 149
Console Read-Only Password field 151
Console Read-Write Password field 151
console/comm port
configuration screen 148
illustration 210
pin assignments 210
Console/Comm Port Configuration options 94
conventions, text 20
conversation steering 40
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220
Index
handling 188, 192
installation 195
introduction 194, 201
labels 182, 194
Model
1000BASE-LX 183, 184, 199
1000BASE-SX 183, 184, 198
1000BASE-XD 183, 186, 200
1000BASE-ZX 183, 187
removal 196
specifications 183, 197, 203
storing 188, 192, 197
customer support 23
D
DB-9 console/comm port connector 209
Default Gateway field 98
default settings 211
Designated Root field 159
Display Event Log option 94
Display Port Statistics option 107
Display Spanning Tree Switch Settings option 154
E
electrostatic discharge
and GBICs 188, 192
Event Logging field 162
Excessive Collisions field 146
F
FCS Errors field 146
fiber optic equipment
warning notice 192
Gigabit Ethernet ports,
linking with fiber optic networks 27, 181, 191,
194
H
Hello Interval 159, 160
Hello Time field 159
I
IEEE 802.1Q tagging important terms 52
In Use field 97
fiber optic networks
linking with Gigabit Ethernet ports 27, 181,
191, 194
Inactivity Timeout field 162
Filtered Packets field 146
infrared light
warning notice 192
Find an Address field 109
flash memory for software image upgrades 39
Flooded Packets field 146
Forward Delay field 160
In-Band IP Address field 97
In-Band Subnet Mask field 98
interoperability issues
configuration requirements 182
setting up your configuration 191
IP Configuration option 93
G
IP Configuration screen 96
GBIC
cleaning 188, 192
connectors 183, 197
description 183, 191, 201
dimensions 183, 197
disposal 188, 192, 197
L
214391-A
labels
reading 182, 194
Late Collisions field 146
420.book Page 221 Monday, March 3, 2003 4:28 PM
Index
LEDs
display panel 28, 172
Link field 131
Login Retries field 162
O
optical attenuators,
when to use 188
mulitmode fiber,
in long distance applications 185
options
Clear All Port Statistics 107
Console/Comm Port Configuration 94
Display Event Log 94
Display Port Statistics 107
Display Spanning Tree Switch Settings 154
IP Configuration 93
Logout 95
MAC Address Table 106
MultiLink Trunk Configuration 107
Port Configuration 107
Port Mirroring Configuration 107
Reset 93, 94
Reset to Default Settings 94
SNMP Configuration 93
Software Download 94
Spanning Tree Configuration 94
Spanning Tree Port Configuration 154
Switch Configuration 93
System Characteristics 93
TELNET Configuration 94
VLAN Configuration 107
Multicasts field 145
Oversized Packets field 146
Login Timeout field 162
Logout option 95
M
MAC Address Table option 106
MAC Address Table screen 107
MAC address-based network security 38
main menu, console interface 92
Maximum Age Time field 159
MDI-X to MDI cable connections 209
MIBs SNMP MIB support 41
Model
1000BASE-LX
1000BASE-SX
1000BASE-XD
1000BASE-ZX
183, 184, 199
183, 184, 198
183, 186, 200
183, 187
221
MultiLink Trunk Configuration option 107
MultiLink Trunk Configuration screen 135
P
MultiLink Trunking
configuration example 70
feature 39
Packets field 144
Multiple Collisions field 146
N
network configuration
configuring power workgroups and a shared
media hub 48
network protocol/standards compatibility 179
Participation field 156
patch cords,
for multimode fiber applications 185
Path Cost field 157
Port Configuration option 107
Port Configuration screen 129
port connections, troubleshooting 175
Port field 128, 129, 131, 144, 156
port mirroring
coversation steering 40
monitoring modes 143
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222
Index
Nortel Networks StackProbe 40
Port Mirroring Configuration option 107
Port Mirroring Configuration screen 141
Port Statistics screen 143
power cord warnings (multilingual) 32
power cords 31
power status 29, 173
power-up sequence 174
Priority field 157
product support 23
publications
related 22, 40
R
RADIUS-based network security 38
Read-Only Community String field 102
Read-Write Community String field 103
request mode, choosing 42, 98
requirements
power cords 31
SNMP Configuration screen 102
software
download process 166
image upgrades 39
Software Download option 94
Spanning Tree Configuration Menu 153
Spanning Tree Configuration option 94
Spanning Tree Port Configuration option 154
Spanning Tree Port Configuration screen 155
Spanning Tree Switch Settings screen 158
specifications
GBIC 183, 197, 203
specifications,
Model
1000BASE-LX
1000BASE-SX
1000BASE-XD
1000BASE-ZX
184, 199
184, 198
186, 200
187
standards 40
Start TFTP Load of New Image field 166
State field 157
Reset to Default Settings option 94
Status field 131
RFC 40
support, Nortel Networks 23
RJ-45 port connector
illustration 207
pin assignments 208
Switch Configuration Menu 105
options 106
Switch Configuration option 93
Root Path Cost field 159
System Characteristics option 93
Root Port field 159
System Characteristics screen 103
S
safety notice
infrared light 192
Security
MAC address-based network security 38
RADIUS-based network security 38
settings, default 211
Single Collisions field 146
SNMP Configuration option 93
214391-A
System Characteristics screen fields
Last Reset Type 104
MAC Address 104
Operational Mode 104
Power Status 104
Reset Count 104
sysContact 105
sysDescr 105
sysLocation 105
sysName 105
sysObjectID 105
420.book Page 223 Monday, March 3, 2003 4:28 PM
Index
sysServices 105
sysUpTime 105
T
technical specifications 177
technical support 23
technical terms
port priority 52
port VLAN identifier (PVID) 52
tagged frame 52
tagged member 52
unregistered packet/frame 53
untagged frame 52
untagged member 52
user_priority 52
VLAN identifier (VID) 52
VLAN port members 52
223
V
virtual LAN (VLAN)
configuration rules 65
VLANs
Configuration option 107
Configuration screen 118
port-based 35
TELNET Access field 162
TELNET Configuration option 94
TELNET Configuration screen 161
text conventions 20
TFTP Server IP Address field 166, 168
Total Octets field 145
Trap IP Address fields 103
Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP)
software download 164
troubleshooting 182, 195
port interface 175
power-up sequence 174
tutorial
IEEE 802.1Q tagging 52
IEEE 802.1Q VLAN workgroups 51
U
Undersized Packets field 146
Uplink/Expansion slot 27
Using the BayStack 380-24F Gigabit Switch
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