Access Manager 2000 User Manual

Warning: this product relies on
Windows 3.x which is not Y2K
compliant.
Access System 2000
Access Manager 2000
User Manual
Assembly Part Number 896-502037-001-A
May 1993
Verilink Corporation
145 Baytech Drive
San Jose, California 95134
Important Notice
Before performing any operations, PLEASE
READ AND UNDERSTAND ALL
INSTRUCTIONS IN THIS MANUAL.
WHEN YOU ARE FINISHED, PUT THIS
MANUAL IN A PROMINENT LOCATION; DO
NOT THROW THIS MANUAL AWAY, unless it
is being replaced by a corrected or updated
manual.
VERILINK CORPORATION DISTRIBUTES
THIS REFERENCE “AS IS” WITHOUT
WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER
LIMITED OR IMPLIED. Verilink Corporation
reserves the right to revise this publication from
time to time without notice. Some states or
jurisdictions do not allow disclaimer of express or
implied warranties in certain transactions;
therefore, this statement may not apply to you.
ITC Helvetica and ITC Times / International
Typeface Corporation
Access System 2000, Access Manager 2000,
Advanced Programmable Architecture, and Craft
Interface/ Verilink Corporation
Sun Microsystems, Open Windows, Sparc Printer,
IPX, IPC, and Sun Workstation / Sun
Microsystems, Inc.
FrameMaker and Frame Technology / Frame
Technology Corporation
FCC Warning Statement
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC)
Rules require that you be notified of the following:
Copyright  1992 Verilink Corporation. All rights
reserved.
This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate
radio frequency energy and, if not installed and
used in accordance with this reference, can cause
interference to radio communications.
This reference was written, illustrated, and
produced using FrameMaker workstation
publishing software and AutoCad 10  computer
design software, Sun IPX and IPC Workstations,
Sun Sparc Laser Printers, and the ITC Helvetica
and ITC Times families of typefaces.
This equipment has been tested and found to
comply within the limits for Class A devices
pursuant to Subpart J of Part 15 of the FCC rules,
which are designed to provide reasonable
protection against such interference when operated
in a commercial environment.
Your right to copy Access Manager 2000 and this
manual is limited by copyright law. Making copies
of this reference, or any part thereof, without prior
written authorization from Verilink Corporation is
prohibited by law and constitutes a punishable
violation of the law
Operation of this equipment in a residential area is
likely to cause interference, in which case the
user(s) will be required to take whatever measures
(that can be) required to fix the interference at
their own expense.
The following are trademarks or registered
trademarks of their respective companies or
organizations:
AutoCad 10 / Autodesk Corporation
FrameMaker and Frame Technology / Frame
Technology Corporation
Per FCC Part 68 requirements, the customer is
required to notify the Telephone Company prior to
disconnecting this unit from the network interface.
The FCC registration number for Access
System 2000 is GICUSA-18804-DE-N.
Access Manager 2000 Software Package
Product Support Information
The Access Manager 2000 Software Packages (AM2000-8, AM2000-24,
AM2000-1000) purchased under a master license agreement allow the
customer to monitor up to eight (8), twenty-four (24), or unlimited
number of DS1 circuit elements. A circuit element is defined as a single
ESF DS1 interface device such as an ESF CSU (Extended Superframe
Channel Service Unit).
Under this agreement, a master licensee is entitled to customer support,
maintenance, and service, as specified below.
Training
Customer training is available at the San Jose
(California) Verilink facility or at the customer’s site.
For course fees and a current training schedule, please
contact Verilink at 1-408-945-1199.
Telephone
Support
Telephone Hotline support is available through
Verilink’s Technical Assistance Center (TAC)
twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. Verilink
provides a toll-free number 1-800-543-1008 answered
directly during normal business hours (8AM to 5PM
Pacific Standard Time, Monday through Friday
except holidays). Calls received outside of our normal
business hours will be answered within one hour by a
Verilink Technical Assistance Engineer.
Maintenance
A software maintenance contract can be purchased to
allow the customer to obtain periodic updates of the
Access Manager 2000 software. Please call Verilink’s
Technical Assistance Center (TAC) for details of the
software maintenance contract.
Table of Contents
Using This Manual ...........................................................................................................xvii
Targeted audience ............................................................................................................. xvii
What’s in this Manual? ..................................................................................................... xvii
Chapter 1 .............................................................................................................. xviii
Chapter 2 ................................................................................................................. xix
Chapter 3 ................................................................................................................. xix
Chapter 4 ................................................................................................................. xix
Chapter 5 ................................................................................................................. xix
Chapter 6 ................................................................................................................. xix
Chapter 7 .................................................................................................................. xx
Chapter 8 .................................................................................................................. xx
Appendix A .............................................................................................................. xx
Appendix B .............................................................................................................. xx
Appendix C .............................................................................................................. xx
Appendix D .............................................................................................................. xx
Appendix E ............................................................................................................... xx
Summary of Access Manager changes ............................................................................... xxi
Conventions used in this guide ......................................................................................... xxii
The way text appears ............................................................................................. xxii
Italicized and Bold Text .......................................................................... xxii
Courier Bold Text ................................................................................... xxii
Special Symbols and Notices ............................................................................... xxiii
Instruction Symbol ................................................................................. xxiii
Dangerous Voltage Symbol ................................................................... xxiii
Warning Notices .................................................................................... xxiii
Caution Notices ...................................................................................... xxiv
Notes ....................................................................................................... xxiv
Tips ......................................................................................................... xxiv
Check Boxes ............................................................................................ xxv
Other conventions .................................................................................... xxv
Additional reading ............................................................................................................ xxvi
CHAPTER 1 - Access Manager Overview ............................................................................1-1
Functions ............................................................................................................................ 1-1
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Network Configuring .............................................................................................. 1-2
Status and Performance Monitoring ....................................................................... 1-2
Alarm and System Event Reporting ....................................................................... 1-2
On-line Access and Testing .................................................................................... 1-3
Conditions Monitored ............................................................................................. 1-3
Network Elements .............................................................................................................. 1-3
Single-Line Nodes .................................................................................... 1-5
Dual-Line Nodes ...................................................................................... 1-6
Multiline Nodes ........................................................................................ 1-6
Circuit Element ....................................................................................................... 1-8
Single-Line Circuit Elements ................................................................... 1-8
Dual-Line and Multiline Circuit Elements ............................................... 1-9
Circuit ..................................................................................................................... 1-9
Route ..................................................................................................................... 1-10
Access Manager Connections .......................................................................................... 1-10
Access Levels ................................................................................................................... 1-11
Access Manager 2000 Main Menu ................................................................................... 1-11
Utilities .................................................................................................................. 1-14
Date / Time ............................................................................................. 1-14
Installation .............................................................................................. 1-14
User Definitions ...................................................................................... 1-14
Event Log ............................................................................................... 1-15
Code Download ...................................................................................... 1-15
Alarm Status ......................................................................................................... 1-15
Clear ....................................................................................................... 1-15
Deactivate ............................................................................................... 1-16
View Active ............................................................................................ 1-16
List Active .............................................................................................. 1-16
Print All .................................................................................................. 1-16
Archive ................................................................................................... 1-16
Configuration ........................................................................................................ 1-16
Node ....................................................................................................... 1-17
Circuit Element ....................................................................................... 1-17
Circuit ..................................................................................................... 1-17
Route ...................................................................................................... 1-17
On-line Access ...................................................................................................... 1-17
Display .................................................................................................... 1-18
Access Range (Access CSU) .................................................................. 1-18
Element Configuration and Status-Element (Element Status) ...............1-19
Circuit Status Diagram ........................................................................... 1-19
User Statistics ......................................................................................... 1-19
Telco Statistics ....................................................................................... 1-19
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Reset User Registers ..............................................................................
Performance Data Retrieve ....................................................................
Barchart Display ....................................................................................
Loopbacks ..............................................................................................
Select Test ..............................................................................................
Database Access ...................................................................................................
Report .....................................................................................................
Archive ...................................................................................................
1-19
1-19
1-19
1-20
1-20
1-20
1-20
1-20
CHAPTER 2 - Installing Access Manager .............................................................................2-1
Equipment Installation ....................................................................................................... 2-1
Minimum System Requirements ............................................................................ 2-1
Hard disk storage considerations ............................................................. 2-2
Software Installation .......................................................................................................... 2-4
Installing a new Access Manager system ............................................................... 2-5
Verifying the CONFIG.SYS file ............................................................. 2-5
Updating an existing Access Manager system ....................................................... 2-7
Creating a batch file for automatic start-up ............................................................ 2-9
Limitations ............................................................................................. 2-11
Setting up the remote terminal ............................................................................. 2-11
Remote Access Port ............................................................................... 2-13
Setting up Accumaster ......................................................................................... 2-13
Time Zone Setup for Accumaster .......................................................... 2-14
Before Starting Accumaster ................................................................... 2-15
CHAPTER 3 - Using Access Manager .................................................................................3-1
Basics ................................................................................................................................ . 3-1
Basic Display .......................................................................................................... 3-1
Using a color monitor .............................................................................. 3-1
Screens ..................................................................................................... 3-1
Differences in displays when in VT100 mode ......................................... 3-3
Menus ..................................................................................................................... 3-4
Status Display ......................................................................................................... 3-6
Keyboard ................................................................................................................ 3-6
Function keys ........................................................................................... 3-7
Cursor movement keys ............................................................................ 3-9
Special keys ............................................................................................. 3-9
Equivalent VT100 Keystrokes ............................................................... 3-11
Help ...................................................................................................................... 3-12
Error Messages ..................................................................................................... 3-13
Warning Messages ............................................................................................... 3-14
Alarm Messages ................................................................................................... 3-14
Getting started with Access Manager .............................................................................. 3-14
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iii
Starting the On-Site Access Manager ................................................................... 3-14
Logging on ............................................................................................................ 3-16
Starting the Remote Access Manager ................................................................... 3-17
Making a selection ................................................................................................ 3-18
Entering information into the screens ................................................................... 3-18
Logging off ........................................................................................................... 3-19
Exiting Access Manager ....................................................................................... 3-19
CHAPTER 4 - Configuring Access Manager ........................................................................ 4-1
Configuration procedure overview ..................................................................................... 4-1
Configuration tasks ................................................................................................. 4-1
Utilities Menu ......................................................................................................... 4-1
Setting the date and time .................................................................................................... 4-2
Configuring the site ............................................................................................................ 4-3
Differentiating the site ............................................................................................ 4-3
Configuring the report printer ................................................................................. 4-5
Report output destination ......................................................................... 4-6
Printer Type .............................................................................................. 4-6
Is Printer 80-Column Wide? ..................................................................... 4-8
Configuring the on-line data printer ....................................................................... 4-8
Specifying the alarm destination ............................................................................. 4-8
Sending alarms to a printer or file ............................................................ 4-9
Alarm Channel Protocol ......................................................................... 4-10
Alarm acknowledgement: Manual or automatic? ................................... 4-11
Setting the performance data polling hour ............................................................ 4-11
Assigning database allocations ............................................................................. 4-12
Assigning comline definitions .............................................................................. 4-14
Adding a new comline definition ........................................................... 4-17
Editing a comline definition ................................................................... 4-21
Deleting a comline definition ................................................................. 4-22
Viewing comline definitions .................................................................. 4-23
Listing (printing) comline definitions .................................................... 4-23
Updating user definitions ................................................................................................. 4-23
User Name .............................................................................................. 4-23
Password ................................................................................................. 4-23
Access Level ........................................................................................... 4-23
Viewing the user definitions ................................................................................. 4-25
Listing the user definitions ................................................................................... 4-25
Deleting a user definition ...................................................................................... 4-25
Adding a user definition ....................................................................................... 4-26
Editing a user definition ........................................................................................ 4-27
Reviewing and archiving events logs ............................................................................... 4-28
Viewing system events ......................................................................................... 4-28
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Listing system events ........................................................................................... 4-29
Archiving system events ...................................................................................... 4-29
Printing event records ............................................................................ 4-30
Archiving event records ......................................................................... 4-31
Deleting event records without archiving .............................................. 4-33
Downloading firmware to the nodes ................................................................................ 4-33
CHAPTER 5 - Configuring the T1 Network ...........................................................................5-1
T1 Network Monitoring Overview .................................................................................... 5-1
Node ....................................................................................................................... 5-1
Some rules of thumb ................................................................................ 5-4
Circuit element ....................................................................................................... 5-4
Circuit ..................................................................................................................... 5-4
Summary of tasks ................................................................................................... 5-5
Configuration menu ................................................................................................ 5-9
Configuring nodes ........................................................................................................... 5-10
Getting to the Node Definition screen .................................................................. 5-10
Summary of tasks ................................................................................................. 5-13
Identifying the node ............................................................................................. 5-14
Specifying shelf types for AS2000 nodes .............................................. 5-15
Query and alarm paths .......................................................................................... 5-16
Defining query paths .............................................................................. 5-17
Specifying baud rate .............................................................................. 5-19
Enabling alarm reporting ...................................................................................... 5-20
Selecting options based on access arrangement .................................... 5-21
Defining alternate alarm paths ............................................................................. 5-23
Application scenarios ............................................................................. 5-23
What to do .............................................................................................. 5-26
Assigning priority to an alarm path ....................................................... 5-27
Setting up alarm destination access ....................................................... 5-28
Limiting alarm delivery attempts ........................................................... 5-30
Pacing delivery of new alarms ............................................................... 5-31
Resending undelivered alarms ............................................................... 5-31
Saving the alarm path parameters .......................................................... 5-32
Error messages ....................................................................................... 5-33
Enabling thumbwheel operation ........................................................................... 5-34
Resetting the node clock ...................................................................................... 5-34
Enabling firmware download ............................................................................... 5-35
Activating the node .............................................................................................. 5-35
Adding a node ...................................................................................................... 5-35
Comments .............................................................................................. 5-36
An ounce of prevention . . . .................................................................... 5-37
Conclusion to Adding a Node ................................................................ 5-38
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v
Node Access Failure ............................................................................... 5-39
Editing a node ....................................................................................................... 5-40
Deleting a node ..................................................................................................... 5-42
Viewing a node definition ..................................................................................... 5-43
Printing a node definition ..................................................................................... 5-43
Listing all nodes .................................................................................................... 5-44
Configuring circuit elements ............................................................................................ 5-44
Element Sub-menus .............................................................................................. 5-44
Far-End Circuit Elements ....................................................................... 5-47
Select the circuit element range ............................................................................ 5-47
Editing circuit element definitions ........................................................................ 5-50
Deleting circuit element definitions ...................................................................... 5-54
Viewing circuit element definitions ...................................................................... 5-56
Printing all circuit element definitions .................................................................. 5-56
Configuration Menus of 4016 List 1 and List 2 CSUs ......................................... 5-57
Configuration Options for 551VST Elements .................................................................. 5-58
551VST type CSU Circuit Elements Options Menu ............................................ 5-58
Installed and Operational ...................................................................................... 5-62
Retrieve Performance Data ................................................................................... 5-62
Retrieve Far-End Performance Data ..................................................................... 5-63
Enable Alarm Reporting ....................................................................................... 5-63
Enable Remote Configuration .............................................................................. 5-64
BER Threshold ..................................................................................................... 5-64
Repeater Loopback Time-out ............................................................................... 5-65
Enable Far-End Polling ......................................................................................... 5-66
Enable Transparent Mode ..................................................................................... 5-67
Use FCC Part 68 Rule Only .................................................................................. 5-67
AIS (Not Signal) Loopback .................................................................................. 5-67
AIS (Not ESS) Keep-Alive ................................................................................... 5-67
Enable Alarm Latch .............................................................................................. 5-68
Enable PRM .......................................................................................................... 5-68
Enable Span Side B8ZS Encode and Decode ....................................................... 5-68
Regenerate CRC to Span Side .............................................................................. 5-68
Span Side ESF Framing ........................................................................................ 5-69
Enable YEL Transcode to Span ............................................................................ 5-69
Enable EQP Side B8ZS Encode and Decode ....................................................... 5-70
Regenerate CRC to EQP ....................................................................................... 5-70
EQP Side ESF Framing ........................................................................................ 5-70
Enable YEL Transcode to EQP ............................................................................ 5-70
Idle Code Flags ..................................................................................................... 5-70
Configuration Options for AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus Elements .................................. 5-71
Getting to the CSU configuration screen .............................................................. 5-72
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Installed and Operational ..................................................................................... 5-76
Retrieve Near-End Performance Data / Retrieve Far-End Data .......................... 5-76
Save Configuration to CSU .................................................................................. 5-77
Enable Alarm Reporting ....................................................................................... 5-77
Defining alarm conditions ..................................................................... 5-78
Poll Far-End Status ............................................................................................... 5-81
RLB Loopback Time-out ..................................................................................... 5-81
Enable PRM ......................................................................................................... 5-82
AIS (not SIG) During Loopback .......................................................................... 5-82
EQP Distance ....................................................................................................... 5-83
EQP (Equipment) Framing Format ...................................................................... 5-83
Enable EQP Side B8ZS ........................................................................................ 5-83
Regenerate CRC-6 to EQP ................................................................................... 5-83
Enable Yellow Alarm Transcode to EQP ............................................................ 5-84
Signal to NET on EQP Errors .............................................................................. 5-84
Signal to NET on EQP LOF ................................................................................. 5-84
EQP RCV (Receive) Jitter BUF (Buffer) = 40 Bits ............................................. 5-85
Enable EQP OOF Transparency .......................................................................... 5-85
Network LBO ....................................................................................................... 5-85
NET Density Enforcement ................................................................................... 5-86
NET Keep-Alive .................................................................................................. 5-86
NET Framing Format ........................................................................................... 5-86
Enable NET B8ZS ................................................................................................ 5-87
Regenerate CRC-6 to NET ................................................................................... 5-87
Enable YEL (Yellow Alarm) Transcode to NET ................................................. 5-87
Signal to EQP on NET Errors .............................................................................. 5-87
Signal to EQP on NET LOF ................................................................................. 5-88
Signal to EQP on NET LOS ................................................................................. 5-88
NET RCV Jitter BUF = 40 Bits ........................................................................... 5-88
Data Link Idle Code (Idle code) = Flags .............................................................. 5-88
Power-up Near End Self Test ............................................................................... 5-88
Loopback Enable .................................................................................................. 5-88
Enable Testing Options ........................................................................................ 5-89
Send/Receive Inband Loop Code .......................................................... 5-90
Send Test Signal .................................................................................... 5-90
Framed Test Signal ................................................................................ 5-90
DIU Data Bus Used .............................................................................................. 5-90
DIU Timing .......................................................................................................... 5-91
DIU 2130 and DIU 1 1 30 Configuration .............................................................. 5-92
Installed and Operational ....................................................................... 5-93
Enable Alarm Reporting ........................................................................ 5-93
Save Configuration to DIU .................................................................... 5-93
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Connected CSU Shelf and Plug Numbers .............................................. 5-93
Channel Assignment ............................................................................... 5-93
EQP Name .............................................................................................. 5-95
EQP SER ................................................................................................ 5-95
EQP Interface ......................................................................................... 5-95
EQP Speed .............................................................................................. 5-96
64K Mode ............................................................................................... 5-96
Loop ........................................................................................................ 5-96
Scramble ................................................................................................. 5-96
EQP Clock .............................................................................................. 5-96
EQP Handshaking .................................................................................. 5-97
Loss of Signal ......................................................................................... 5-97
Enable TU ............................................................................................... 5-98
DIU 2140 Configuration ....................................................................................... 5-98
Installed and Operational ........................................................................ 5-99
Save Configuration to DIU ..................................................................... 5-99
Connected CSU Shelf and Plug Numbers .............................................. 5-99
Channel Assignment ............................................................................... 5-99
Mode ....................................................................................................... 5-99
Baud Rate ............................................................................................. 5-101
Asynchronous ....................................................................................... 5-101
DIU Configuration Error Messages ..................................................... 5-102
Configuring circuits ........................................................................................................ 5-102
Defining a new circuit ......................................................................................... 5-103
Circuit Name ........................................................................................ 5-104
From DS1 Point .................................................................................... 5-104
To DS1 Point ........................................................................................ 5-104
Comments ............................................................................................. 5-105
Editing a circuit definition .................................................................................. 5-105
Deleting a circuit definition ................................................................................ 5-107
Viewing a circuit definition ................................................................................ 5-107
List all circuit definitions .................................................................................... 5-107
Configuring routes .......................................................................................................... 5-107
CSU acceptance testing .................................................................................................. 5-108
CHAPTER 6 - Alarm reporting ........................................................................................... 6-1
Clearing the autoacknowledged alarm counter .................................................................. 6-1
Deactivating alarms ............................................................................................................ 6-2
Tagging Alarm Records for Deactivation ............................................................... 6-4
Selecting Alarm Records by Date and Time for Deactivation ...............................6-5
Viewing active alarms ........................................................................................................ 6-6
Listing active alarms .......................................................................................................... 6-7
Printing all alarms .............................................................................................................. 6-7
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Archiving inactive alarms .................................................................................................. 6-8
Alarm Log Record format ...................................................................................... 6-8
Deleting inactive alarms ......................................................................................... 6-9
Printing inactive alarms ........................................................................................ 6-10
Archiving inactive alarms .................................................................................... 6-11
CHAPTER 7 - Analyzing Performance Data ..........................................................................7-1
Effect of Changing a Node Name ...................................................................................... 7-2
Reporting performance data ............................................................................................... 7-2
Archiving performance data ............................................................................................ 7-15
Data Log record format ........................................................................................ 7-16
Printing reports and deleting the data ................................................................... 7-17
Copying reports to disk and deleting the data ...................................................... 7-18
Deleting records without archiving the data ........................................................ 7-19
CHAPTER 8 - Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager ............................................8-1
Selecting a node ................................................................................................................. 8-1
Selecting multiline circuit elements ................................................................................... 8-4
Displaying circuit element status in a node ....................................................................... 8-5
Shelf type ................................................................................................................ 8-7
Configuration symbols ........................................................................................... 8-7
. . . for a non-AS2000 node .................................................................................... 8-8
. . . for an AS2000 node ........................................................................................ 8-10
Displaying individual circuit element status .................................................................... 8-13
Non-AS2000 node ................................................................................................ 8-13
Reviewing the status .............................................................................. 8-15
AS2000 node ........................................................................................................ 8-17
Reviewing CSU status ........................................................................... 8-20
Reviewing DIU status ............................................................................ 8-21
Reviewing TIU status ............................................................................ 8-22
Displaying circuit status .................................................................................................. 8-24
Displaying on-line circuit element configuration ............................................................ 8-26
Displaying Telco and User data ....................................................................................... 8-28
Accessing performance registers .......................................................................... 8-30
1-hour data screens ................................................................................ 8-32
24-hour data screens .............................................................................. 8-32
Getting around in the screens ................................................................. 8-33
Displaying 24-Hour Performance Data Bar Charts ......................................................... 8-33
Computing statistics ......................................................................................................... 8-36
Resetting User performance registers .............................................................................. 8-38
Activating/Deactivating CSU loopbacks ......................................................................... 8-39
CSU loopback descriptions .................................................................................. 8-40
PLB - Payload Loopback ....................................................................... 8-41
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LLB - Line Loopback ............................................................................. 8-41
RLB - Repeater Loopback ..................................................................... 8-42
ELB - Equipment Loopback .................................................................. 8-43
Procedures for loopbacks ...................................................................................... 8-43
CSU loopback options .......................................................................................... 8-46
Activate Repeater Loopback (RLB) ....................................................... 8-46
Activate Line Loopback (LLB) .............................................................. 8-46
Deactivate Network Loopback (PLB or LLB) ....................................... 8-47
Send Inband Loop-Up Code To Far End ................................................ 8-47
Send Inband Loop-Down Code To Far End ........................................... 8-47
Activate PLB .......................................................................................... 8-47
Deactivate PLB ....................................................................................... 8-47
Activate EQPT Loopback (ELB) ........................................................... 8-47
Deactivate EQPT Loopback (ELB and RLB) ........................................ 8-47
Activate Framed ALL-ONEs Signal To Network .................................. 8-47
Deactivate Framed ALL-ONEs Signal To Network ..............................8-48
Send LLB or PLB Activate Message to Far End (T1.403) ....................8-48
Send LLB or PLB Deactivate Message to Far End (T1.403) .................8-48
Activating/Deactivating DIU loopbacks .......................................................................... 8-48
Loopback descriptions .......................................................................................... 8-48
DIU 2130 and DIU 1130 loopbacks ....................................................... 8-49
DIU 2140 loopbacks ............................................................................... 8-49
Procedure for loopbacks ....................................................................................... 8-50
Testing CSUs .................................................................................................................... 8-52
Testing DIUs .................................................................................................................... 8-59
Sending a test signal ............................................................................... 8-59
APPENDIX A - Key Acronyms and Terms ........................................................................... A-1
APPENDIX B - Modem Configuration ................................................................................. B-1
OSI Protocol Configuration ............................................................................................... B-1
Modem Configuration for OSI Protocol With DTR Lead ..................................... B-1
Modem Configuration for OSI Protocol Without DTR Lead ................................ B-1
Hayes Smartmodem‘ 2400 Configuration ............................................................ B-1
Modem Configuration Commands ........................................................................ B-2
Modem Initialization by CSU or Controller .......................................................... B-2
OSI Compatible Equipment ................................................................................... B-2
TABS Protocol Configuration ........................................................................................... B-5
APPENDIX C - Alarm Report Record Format .......................................................................C-1
Alarm Record Layout ........................................................................................................ C-1
Plain English Alarm Notification ...................................................................................... C-1
Terse Alarm Notification ................................................................................................... C-1
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The Status Code Tables ..................................................................................................... C-2
Accumaster Status Code Format ............................................................................ C-2
APPENDIX D - Installing Serial Ports ................................................................................. D-1
Standard PC or PS/2 Serial Port Settings ......................................................................... D-1
Installing a DigiCHANNEL MC/4 or MC/8 and Editing a Comline ............................... D-3
Preparation ........................................................................................................... D-3
Hardware Installation ............................................................................................ D-4
PS/2 Configuration ................................................................................................ D-4
Configuring Access Manager to use the MC/4 or MC/8 ...................................... D-5
Installing a DigiCHANNEL PC/4, PC/8, or PC/16 and Editing A Comline .................... D-8
APPENDIX E - Archive File Formats .................................................................................. E-1
Event Log ........................................................................................................................... E-1
Event Log ID Number Codes ................................................................................. E-1
Alarm Archive Record Layout Log ................................................................................... E-3
Performance Data Log (Performance Database) ............................................................. E-10
Performance Data Log Records ........................................................................... E-12
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List of Figures
Figure 1-1
Figure 1-2
Figure 1-3
Figure 1-4
Figure 1-5
Figure 3-1
Figure 3-2
Figure 3-3
Figure 3-4
Figure 3-5
Figure 3-6
Figure 3-7
Figure 5-1
Figure 5-2
Figure 5-3
Figure 5-4
Figure 5-1
Figure 5-2
Figure 5-3
Figure 5-4
Figure 5-5
Figure 5-6
Figure 5-7
Figure 5-8
Figure 5-9
Figure 5-10
Figure 5-11
Figure 5-12
Figure 5-13
Figure 5-14
Figure 5-15
Figure 5-16
Figure 5-17
Figure 7-1
Figure 8-1
Access Manager 2000 set up ........................................................................................ 1-1
DS1 Network Elements ................................................................................................ 1-4
Typical AS2000 Multiline Configuration .................................................................... 1-7
Access Manager 2000 Main Menu ........................................................................... 1-11
Access Manager 2000 menu tree ............................................................................... 1-13
Username Screen ......................................................................................................... 3-2
Basic display on host PC .............................................................................................. 3-3
Function key display at host PC .................................................................................. 3-4
Escape key sequence display at VT100 terminal ........................................................ 3-4
On-line Help screen (host PC mode) ......................................................................... 3-13
Utilities Menu for a LEVEL1 User ............................................................................ 4-26
Review System Events Menu (Level 1 User) ............................................................ 4-27
SIM node ...................................................................................................................... 5-3
NC/E node .................................................................................................................... 5-3
551 VST ML List 1 node ............................................................................................. 5-3
551VST ML List 2 node .............................................................................................. 5-4
Configuration Menu ................................................................................................... 5-10
How to connect the Access Manager PC and the node ............................................. 5-17
Application using modems ........................................................................................ 5-25
Application using a stat mux device .......................................................................... 5-25
Application using X.25 PADs .................................................................................... 5-26
Access Manager’s view of the node .......................................................................... 5-37
Configuration: 551VST List 2 Menu ......................................................................... 5-45
Configuration: 551VST-ML List 2 Menu .................................................................. 5-46
Configuration: AS2000 Menu .................................................................................... 5-46
551VST List 1/A Options Menu ................................................................................ 5-59
551VST List1/B CSU Options Menu ........................................................................ 5-59
551VST List 2 CSU Options Menu ........................................................................... 5-60
NMC L1 with 4016 L2 CSU Options Menu .............................................................. 5-60
Typical NCC or TAC configuration option menu ..................................................... 5-76
Loopback Enable Sub-menu ...................................................................................... 5-89
DIU 2130 Option Menu ............................................................................................. 5-92
DIU 2140 Option Menu ............................................................................................. 5-98
Typical 24-Hour Performance Data Bar Chart .......................................................... 7-12
DIU 2140 loopbacks .................................................................................................. 8-50
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
xiii
Figure 8-2
Figure E-1
Figure E-2
xiv
Applying a T1 test signal ............................................................................................ 8-53
Circuit Element Detail Menu (no data available) ...................................................... E-12
Circuit Element Detail Menu (slot disabled) ............................................................. E-13
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
List of Tables
Table 2-1
Table 2-2
Table 2-3
Table 3-1
Table 3-2
Table 3-3
Table 3-4
Table 4-1
Table 5-1
Table 5-2
Table 5-3
Table 5-4
Table 5-5
Table 5-6
Table 5-7
Table 5-8
Table 5-9
Table 5-10
Table 5-11
Table 5-12
Table 8-1
Table B-1
Table B-2
Table B-3
Table C-1
Table C-2
Table C-3
Table C-4
Table C-5
Table C-6
Table C-7
Table C-8
Table C-9
Table C-10
Table D-1
Access Manager Installation Files ................................................................................ 2-4
Batch file commands for automatic start-up............................................................... 2-10
Accumaster Time Zone Chart .................................................................................... 2-14
Function key definitions in PC mode............................................................................ 3-7
Cursor movement key definitions in PC mode............................................................. 3-9
Special key definitions in PC mode ............................................................................ 3-10
Function key and escape key sequences in VT100 terminal mode ............................ 3-12
Database allocation at time of shipment ..................................................................... 4-13
Parent nodes and their components............................................................................... 5-2
Allowable AS2000 shelf configurations ..................................................................... 5-16
Assuring compatibility between Query Path and Comline settings............................ 5-18
Selecting baud rates by equipment type and access type............................................ 5-20
Node configuration options for older equipment ........................................................ 5-22
Node Configuration Option for newer equipment...................................................... 5-22
Configuration options for 551 VST-type CSUs.......................................................... 5-61
Older CSU Circuit Elements BER Alarm Rest Times................................................ 5-65
Newer CSU Circuit Elements BER Alarm Reset Times ............................................ 5-65
Repeater Loopback Time-out Options........................................................................ 5-66
Model Names for AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus CSUs and DSUs .............................. 5-71
DIU 2130 and Data Port Handshaking Signals........................................................... 5-97
Types of performance registers................................................................................... 8-28
Modem Configuration for OSI Protocol (DTR Lead) ................................................. B-3
Modem Configuration for OSI Protocol without DTR Lead........................................ B-4
Modem Configuration for TABS Protocol ................................................................... B-6
Terse Alarm Message Layout ...................................................................................... C-2
551VST List 2 Status Codes ........................................................................................ C-4
NC/E Status Codes ....................................................................................................... C-4
SIM Status Codes ......................................................................................................... C-5
NMC List 2 Status Codes ............................................................................................. C-6
AS2000 Near-End Network Status Codes .................................................................... C-6
AS2000 Near-End Equipment Status Codes................................................................. C-8
AS2000 Far-End Network Status Codes....................................................................... C-8
AS2000 Far-End Equipment Status Codes ................................................................... C-9
Additional NCC 2020 Status Codes ........................................................................... C-10
Standard Serial Ports for Micro Channel IBM PS/2 .................................................... D-1
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
xv
Table D-2
Table D-3
Table D-4
Table D-5
Table D-6
Table D-7
Table E-1
Table E-2
Table E-3
Table E-4
Table E-5
Table E-6
Table E-7
Table E-8
Table E-9
Table E-10
Table E-11
xvi
Standard Serial Ports for IBM PC, XT, and AT........................................................... D-2
Serial Ports for Everex Magic I/O, AT Multi I/O, EV-170A, EV-170B...................... D-2
Serial Ports for DigiCHANNEL MC/4 or MC/8 in Micro Channel IBM PS/2 ...........D-6
Serial Ports for First DigiCHANNEL PC/4, PC/8 in IBM PC, XT, and AT ...............D-9
Serial Ports for Second DigiCHANNEL PC/8 in IBM PC, XT, and AT ...................D-10
Serial Ports for DigiCHANNEL PC/16 in IBM PC, XT, and AT.............................. D-11
Event Log ID Number Codes ....................................................................................... E-2
Alarm Archive Record Layout for ESF CSUs ............................................................. E-4
Alarm Archive Record Layout for AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus ................................. E-5
551VST List 2 Alarm Bit Definition............................................................................ E-6
NC/E Alarm Bit Definition........................................................................................... E-7
NC/E Alarm Bit Definition 2........................................................................................ E-7
NC/E Alarm Bit Definition 3........................................................................................ E-8
SIM Alarm Bit Definition............................................................................................. E-8
NC/E Alarm Bit Definition 2........................................................................................ E-9
NMC List 2 Alarm Bit Definition 1 ............................................................................. E-9
NMC List 2 Alarm Bit Definition 2 ........................................................................... E-10
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Preface
Using This Manual
Targeted audience
This introduction tells you how to use this manual and describes its
conventions. It also summarizes the contents of the manual, describes
revisions and equipment changes, and lists all related Verilink manuals.
What’s in this Manual?
This manual has been organized to provide you with a progressive
understanding of the Access Manager 2000 service and equipment you’ll
be using.
Use the Table of Contents and Inde first. Look up the pages where the
information appears, and read the relevant sections before entering
anything on the keyboard.
For an installation or general operating procedure, begin with the
procedures in Chapter 2, Installing Access Manager and Chapter 3,
Using Access Manager. Follow the instructions in these chapters, which
may refer you to further instructions in other chapters.
Whether you’re a novice or experienced user, don’t start in the middle of
a procedure. However, if you are in the middle of an operation and are
about to choose an option, or have been working without the aid of this
manual, it is still important to find the starting point of the relevant
procedure and read each of its steps to be sure you have not skipped any
important items.
When procedures have many steps, each step is numbered in the
execution sequence as in the following example:
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Configure.
2. When the Configuration Menu appears, select Node.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
xvii
3. You have now completed this procedure.
The functional specifications of the various Verilink network access
systems differ; consequently, Access Manager presents a different set of
menus for each of the two different types of nodes.
These two types of nodes are:
■
■
AS2000 type nodes (includes Access System 2000 and ConnecT1
Plus network management systems).
551VST type nodes (includes 551VST type Single-Line nodes;
SIM, NC/E, 551VST ML List 1, and 551VST ML List 2 Multiline
nodes).
This manual presents information through menu descriptions. Access
Manager has two types of menus:
■
■
The AS2000 type of menus reflect the functions of AS2000 and
ConnecT1 Plus Nodes.
The 551VST type menus reflect the functions of all other types of
Nodes. The various configurations for both of these types of nodes
are described in Chapters 2, 3, 4, and 5.
Chapters 6 through 8 provide reference, operations, and information.
Each of these chapters addresses one of Access Manager’s five primary
menus: Utilities, Configuration, Alarm Status, Database Access, and Online. Once you have started a procedure (Chapter s4 and 5), use
Chapters 5 through 9 for specific portions of the operation. If you are not
sure how to select an option, go to the beginning of the operation in each
section, where the instructions will guide you from the Main Menu.
If you have never used Access Manager, Chapter 1, Access Manager
Overview, furnishes you with a quick overview.
Access Manager Overview
Chapter 1
xviii
Describes an overview of the functions, features, and operation of Access
Manager. If you are a novice user, take time to read this chapter.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
What’s in this Manual?
Installing Access Manager
Chapter 2
Provides instructions for installing the Access Manager software on an
IBM PC AT or 100% IBM-compatible computer. It also outlines the
controller and peripheral equipment requirements for using Access
Manager.
Using Access Manager
Chapter 3
Provides the instructions for performing various Access Manager
procedures including start-up, shut-down, and backup. This chapter also
describes the command syntax and keyboard operations used in this
manual.
Configuring Access Manager
Chapter 4
Provides a reference for the Utilities branch of the Access Mana ger2000
menu. Utilities includes setting up communication interfaces between the
host PC, network elements, and peripheral devices. Utilities also
administers Access Manager users, the system’s event log, and
downloading of Advanced Programmable Architecture (APA).
Configuring the T1 Network
Chapter 5
Provides a reference for the Configuration branch of the Access
Manager 2000 menu. Configuration establishes the operating
characteristics of the network elements (such as Channel Service Units
[CSUs], Data Service Units [DSUs], etc.). The proper configuration of
nodes, circuit elements, circuits, and routes is essential for proper
network operation, monitoring, and testing.
Alarm Reporting
Chapter 6
Provides a reference for the Alarm Status branch of the Access
Manager 2000 menu. Alarm Status manages the database of Access
Manager alarm reports, including printing, archiving, viewing, and
deleting these reports.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
xix
Analyzing Performance Data
Chapter 7
Provides a reference for the Database Access branch of the Access
Manager 2000 menu. Database Access manages the records in which
Access Manager has logged the performance data of the DS1 circuits it is
monitoring. It also manages the analysis (with viewing and printing),
archiving, and deletion of these records.
Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
Chapter 8
Provides a reference for the On-line branch of the Access Manag er2000
menu. On-line includes accessing circuit elements for their current status
and configuration. Performance data which is held in registers of the
circuit elements, but not yet stored in performance data records (Chapter
8), can be viewed, printed, and reset. Circuit testing options (including
loopbacks) are controlled through the features in On-line.
Key Acronyms and Terms
Appendix A
This section provides a list of the key data communications acronyms and
terms used in T1 service.
Modem Configuration
Appendix B
Describes the dial-up modem configuration required for operation.
Alarm Report Record Formats
Appendix C
Describes the alarm report record format.
Installing Serial Ports
Appendix D
Shows the installation of serial communication ports.
Archive FIle Formats
Appendix E
xx
Describes the performance data archive file formats.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Summary of Access Manager changes
For information about Access Manag er2000 not covered in this manual,
callVerilink Field Service, (408) 945-1199.
Summary of Access Manager changes
Following are the highlights of Revision 1.3 changes to Access
Manager 2000.
1. Access Manager 2000 packages have been renamed:
Old Name
Performance
Old Capacity
New Name
New Capacity
14
AM2000-8
8
Insight
40
AM2000-24
24
Signature
unlimited
AM2000-1000
unlimited
2. Option for enabling and disabling the update of NCC (CCC)
real-time clock when configuring the node or polling the node.
3. X.25PAD (Packet Assembler Disassembler) support for NCCs with
Revision 4.22 or higher firmware. Verilink equipment has been
tested extensively with the NET TX7000PAD.
4. Support for 9600 baud modem which adhere to the Hayes command
set. For NCCs with Revision 4.22 or higher firmware.
5. Alternate Alarm Path functionality for nodes. Supported by
assigning the Access Manager PC a Manager ID (identifier) in the
Utilities/Installation/Site screen.
6. In CSU configuration, the PRM (Performance Report Message)
option now supports SMDS (Switched Multi-megabit Data Service).
7. Support for TACs LOS of External Clock alarm. This is reflected in
the Online/Status-Element and Online/Circuit Status Diag screens.
8. Access Manager will now track up to thirtee n DIU2130s (Data
Interface Units) with tests in progress.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
xxi
9. Loss of Signal (LOS) is now supported in the configuration screen
for each data port. LOS can be programmed to occur on loss of DTR
(Data Terminal Ready) or RTS (Request To Send).
10. Data port lead status is now reported to AM2000 from the Online/
Status-Element and Online/Select Test/View Test Status Results
screens.
11. The DIU 2140 is now fully supported.
12. New alarms for AM2000 CSUs and DIUs
13. The transaction file (INSTALL.LOG) is now created in the
destination directory during the install procedure. It contains
information such as user-selected directories, disk space
calculations, database revision, and any error messages that may
have appeared. Please refer to this file when problems occur during
the installation process.
Conventions used in this guide
This section defines conventions used in this manual.
The way text
appears
The body text of this manual appears in Times regular (no bold, no italics)
font. By varying the font and format, we emphasize important
information. This section will provide you with a clear description of
what the different formats mean.
Italicized and Bold Text
Italicized text and bold text is used to highlight key concepts or words
which help you understand instructions or applications. See the following
examples:
■
Like a LAN (Large Area Network), SMDS is a connectionless
service.
Courier Bold Text
Courier bold text is used to identify fields or options, and any characters
you need to type and enter. For example:
xxii
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Conventions used in this guide
■
Special Symbols
and Notices
Select SMDS and press
Enter
.
Special symbols are used to draw your attention to particular kinds of
information. All of these symbols are described in this section of the
manual. Please read all of them carefully.
Instruction Symbol
The International Instruction Symbol is used in the left margin of the
manual pages to point out important operating and maintenance
(servicing) instructions.
!
Warnings and Cautions, particularly, use this symbol. Please read them.
Dangerous Voltage Symbol
The lightning flash with arrowhead symbol, within an equilateral triangle,
alerts the user to the presence of uninsulated “dangerous voltage”, within
an enclosure, which may be large enough to constitute a risk of electric
shock to persons.
Warnings and Cautions, particularly, use this symbol. Please read them.
Warning Notices
All Warning Notices indicate a possibility of severe injury, loss of life, or
permanent equipment damage if the instructions are not followed.
Depending on the specific content, Warning Notices may be offset by the
Instruction or Dangerous Voltage symbol respectively. A Warning Notice
appears in the following example:
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
xxiii
WARNING
The DIU 2132 contains static-sensitive circuits. Before unpacking a
DIU, wear an anti-static wrist strap, connected to frame ground, t
prevent shock to yourself or damage to circuits from electrostatic
discharge.
Caution Notices
All Caution notices indicate a possibility of equipment damage if
instructions are not followed. Caution notices will be offset by the
Instructions symbol. A Caution Notice appears in the example below:
!
CAUTION
Always insert and secure the connector module into the shelf
backplane before inserting its circuit element. Failure to do so may
cause equipment failure.
Notes
All notes provide useful information about Access System 2000 in
general or about an operation. An example is shown below:
Note: At this point, Access Manager does not poll the DIU 2132 for
PLCP and L2_PDU performance data to deposit into the
database
Tips
Tips provide information which may simplify or expedite an operation.
An example is shown below:
TIP
To disable alarm reporting during excessiveBPV, ES, or UAS errors, set
their threshold values to 0.
xxiv
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Conventions used in this guide
Check Boxes
Check boxes are used with checklists and sequential lists. Verilink
recommends that you photocopy these lists and use them each time you
attempt to execute a sequential operation.
A check box with a check mark indicates that the instruction may not be
necessary or may have already been done earlier.
Check Box
Check Box with Check Mark
Other conventions
The following conventions are used to reference special keys, keystroke
combinations, or other information:
■
Special keystroke(s) combinations are shown as:
<F5> or
F5
(to press the F5 function key).
<CTRL>-<PgUp> (to press and hold the CTRL key, and then
depress the PgUp key).
■
■
Some people are familiar with the <ENTER> key and some with the
<RETURN> key to end the entry of one or more keystrokes. The
designation <ENTER> is used throughout this manual.
If a message appears on the screen, it is fully capitalized as follows:
... the message NOT YET DEFINED displays.
■
All program and data file names are fully capitalized as follows:
.. the USER.KEY file is copied.
■
References to names of other chapters, sections, and menus are
initial-letter capitalized and italicized as follows:
... refer to the On-line Menu
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
xxv
Additional reading
The manuals listed provide detailed information on the Verilink singleline and multiline DS1 (T1) network systems with which Access
Manager interfaces. They can be ordered directly from Verilink.
xxvi
Manual/Book Titles
Part Number
551VST List 1 CSU
880-500501-001
551VST List 1/A CSU
880-500501-001
551VST List 1/B CSU
880-500993-001
551VST List 2 CSU
880-501558-001
551VST MLB/MLE List 1 (NMS)
880-500543-001
551VST MLB/MLE List 2 (NMS)
880-500969-001
4016-R User’s Manual
880-501713-001
Shelf Interface Module (SIM)
880-501048-001
Network Controller/Expansion (NC/E) Shelf
880-500987-001
NCC 2020 and TAC 2010
880-501522-001
DIU 2130 High-Speed Data Interface Unit
880-501520-001
DIU 2140 Subrate Data Interface Unit
880-501519-001
Access System 2000 Installation and Maintenance
880-501525-001
Access System 2000 Local Operations
880-501531-001
The Book on ESF, Verilink Corporation
-----
AT&T Publications
54016
54075
62411
ANSI Specifications
T1M1.3
T1.403
pcANYWHERE III Software Users Manual
-----
AT&T Accumaster Manuals
-----
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Chapter
1
Access Manager Overview
This chapter describes the functions and features of
Acces sManage r2000.
Functions
Access Manager 2000 is an IBM PC-based (or 100% IBM-compatible)
software program that allows you to perform numerous administrative
operations on a DS1 (T1) transmission network. Figure 1 -1, “Access
Manager 2000 set up”, illustrates how the host computer connects to the
local devices which, in turn, are connected to the remote devices through
a DS1 (T1) network.
Figure 1-1
Access Manager 2000 set up
Host PC
running
Access
Manager
Comlines to
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Local Devices
Node
Remote Devices
Node
Node
Node
Statistical
Multiplexer
Statistical
Multiplexer
Node
Mode
Mode
Node
Alarm Printer
On-line Printer
Report Printer
keyboard/monitor
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
1-1
Access Manager Overview
You can set up Access Manager to meet your specific network needs. For
example, you can edit the system date and time, add users and passwords
to the system, define the Access Manager communication ports and data/
report printers, and establish the performance data collection parameters
(i.e., define polling hours and allocate database storage space).
Network
Configuring
Through Access Manager, you can configure Verilink DS1 (24 channels),
DS0 (single channel), and subrate circuit elements for proper operating
modes and for performance data collection. Each circuit element is
associated with a parent node, which provides the interface to Access
Manager. These nodes may also be configured.
Access Manager maintains a database of the configuration of each node
and its associated circuit elements. This database includes the
performance data collection (for example, alarm thresholds) and
reporting options, the interface to Access Manager options, and the DS1
(for example, line coding, and framing format), DS0, and subrate
operating characteristics options. The configuration functions of Access
Manager also allow you to define each circuit in the network for
performance data analysis and testing (for example, signal output during
loopback).
Access Manager allows you to download new architecture to any Access
System 2000 circuit element. New architecture may include feature or
performance enhancements or changes to a circuit element’s basic
function.
Status and
Performance
Monitoring
Alarm and System
Event Reporting
1-2
Access Manager provides local and remote non-disruptive status and
performance monitoring of Extended Superframe (ESF) DS1
transmission circuits from a central site (typically a hub office). You can
access any circuit element to retrieve current status and performance data.
You can also tell Access Manager when to poll the associated far-end
circuit elements for performance and status data. Polling allows you to
schedule storage of more than 24 hours of data for historical analysis. The
performance data can be archived for future reference.
Access Manager has alarm reporting features which indicate trouble
conditions in the circuit elements it is accessing. (For example, a CSUtype circuit element reports an alarm to Access Manager whenever it
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Network Elements
loses the incoming signal from the equipment or the network, or if the
operator-defined bit error rate threshold in either transmission direction
has been exceeded.)
In addition to alarm reports, the performance data and system events can
be logged for your review. An example of performance data reports is the
Errored Seconds record. System events logged include user log in, log
out, and Access Manager system restart.
On-line Access
and Testing
Conditions
Monitored
Access Manager allows you to access circuit elements and view their
current configuration and status. Once an element is accessed, you can
also activate and deactivate loopbacks on it for circuit testing and
troubleshooting. In addition, some elements can be commanded to send
and receive test signals for further assistance in testing and
troubleshooting.
The network (NET) and equipment (EQPT) conditions monitored by
Access Manager 2000 include:
■
■
On the network side:
•
Bit Error Rate (BER)
•
Errored Seconds (ES)
•
Errored Seconds-Line (ES-L)
•
Unavailable Seconds (UAS) Thresholds Exceeded
•
Loss of Signal (LOS)
•
Payload Loopback (PLB) or Line Loopback (LLB)
On the equipment side:
•
Loss of Signal/Low Density
•
Equipment Loopback (ELB) or Repeater Loopback (RLB)
•
BER, ES-L, ES, and UAS Thresholds Exceeded
Network Elements
A network consists of these network elements:
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
1-3
Access Manager Overview
■
Nodes
■
Circuit Elements
■
Circuits
■
Routes
Figure 1 -2, “DS1 Network Elements” shows the network elements as
they are defined by Access Manager.
Figure 1-2
DS1 Network Elements
ACCESS
MANAGER
2000
Circuit Element
Node / Circuit Element
551VST LIST 2 CSU
(Near End)
EQPT
DS1 Facility
EQPT
EQPT
Circuit Element
Circuit Elements
551VST MLS
FAR END
4016 L1 CSU
DS1 Facility
FAR END
4016 L1 CSU
DS1 Facility
FAR END
DS1 Facility
FAR END
EQPT
DS1 Facility
FAR END
EQPT
DS1 Facility
FAR END
EQPT
DS1 Facility
FAR END
EQPT
(Near End)
EQPT
EQPT
Circuit Elements
NCC 2020
AS2000
(Near End)
Circuit Element
DIU 2130
Data Port
TAC 2010
Data Port
DIU 2130
EQPT
Circuit Elements
AS2000
NCC 2020
(Near End)
DIU 2130
Data Port
NCC 2020
EQPT
DIU 2130
Data Port
Circuit Element
CIRCUIT
A node is any equipment that has a single-point Access Manager port
(i.e., to which Access Manager can connect in order to access its circuit
elements for network management). The single point of access may be in
a variety of modes.
1-4
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Network Elements
The modes of access for near-end nodes are standard implementations of
RS-232 interface methods, that is, direct, daisy-chained, through a
statistical multiplexer, or by modem. The mode of access for far-end
nodes is through the ESF Data Link through the near-end node access.
Since the functional specifications of the various Verilink network access
systems differ, Access Manager presents a different set of menus for the
two different types of nodes.
The two basic types of nodes are:
■
AS2000 type node (includes Access System 2000 and ConnecT1
Plus network management systems). ConnecT1 Plus is a low-cost
implementation of AS2000 hardware available in a dual-line shelf
configuration only
AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus nodes can have up to four shelves per
node. ConnecT1 Plus nodes have only dual-line shelves. AS2000
nodes can have a combination of dual-line and multiline shelves.
However, of the four possible shelves in an AS2000 node, no more
than two can be multiline shelves.
■
551VST type node (551VST type single-line nodes; SIM, NC/E,
551VST ML List 1, and 551VST ML List 2 multiline nodes).
This manual presents information mainly through menu descriptions.
Access Manager has two types of menus:
■
■
The AS2000 type of menus that reflect the functions of AS2000 and
ConnecT1 Plus Nodes.
551VST type menus for the other types of nodes.
The various configurations for these nodes are described in the following
section.
Single-Line Nodes
The single-line nodes with which Access Manager 2000 interfaces are as
follows:
■
551VST List 1/A CSU
■
551VST List 1/B CSU
■
551VST List 2 CSU
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
1-5
Access Manager Overview
Dual-Line Nodes
■
■
ConnecT1 Plus: Accesses up to four dual-line shelves containing up
to 2 circuit elements (CCC 1020, TAC 1010, DIU 1130, and
TIU 1850) per dual-line shelf.
Access System 2000: Accesses up to four dual-line shelves
containing up to 2 circuit elements (NCC 2020, TAC 2010, DIU
2130, and TIU 2850) per dual-line shelf.
Access Manager connects to the master NCC 2020, a plug-in module,
which is also a circuit element. The AS2000 is also available in multiline
node configurations.
Multiline Nodes
The multiline nodes with which Access Manager interfaces are shown in
Figure 1 -3, “Typical AS2000 Multiline Configuration,” on pa ge1-7.
1-6
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Network Elements
Typical AS2000 Multiline Configuration
TAC TAC DIU
ACCESS
MANAGER
2000
TAC DIU
RS 232D DAISY CHAIN
MASTER
NCC
SHELF #1
SHELF #2
DIU DIU DIU DIU
MASTER
NCC
RS 232D
Figure 1-3
■
SHELF #1
To next node
SIM: Accesses one 551VST MLS Shelf containing up to ten circuit
elements (4016-R CSUs). Access Manager connects to the SIM (a
plug-in module in the shelf).
■
■
■
NC/E: Accesses up to five 551VST MLS Shelves containing up to
ten circuit elements (4016-R CSUs) per shelf. Access Manager
connects to the NC/E module.
551VST ML List 1 Accesses up to two 551VST Multiline Shelves
containing up to 14 circuit elements (4016 List 1 and/or List 2
CSUs) per shelf. Access Manager connects to the NMC List 1
module.
551VST ML List 2 Accesses up to two 551VST Multiline Shelves
containing up to 14 circuit elements (4016 List 1 and/or List 2
CSUs) per shelf. Access Manager connects to the NMC List 2
module.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
1-7
Access Manager Overview
■
Access System 2000 Accesses up to two multiline shelves
containing up to 13 circuit elements per shelf (NCC 2020, TA
2010, DIU 2130, DIU 2140, and TIU 2850). Access Manager
connects to the master NCC 2020, a plug-in module which is also a
circuit element. Access System 2000 is also available in a dual-line
configuration; see previous page under Dual-Line Nodes.
Only AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus nodes can be daisy-chained. The
master NCC 2020 or CCC 1020 normally occupies the first slot of the
first shelf in each type of node. Refer to the Access System 2000 and
ConnecT1 Plus manuals for more information about the shelves, their
controller modules, and circuit elements.
Note: You cannot mix AS2000 hardware and ConnecT1 Plus hardware
on the same shelf
Circuit Element
A circuit element is a single module of the parent node to which Access
Manager is connected. If the parent node is a single-line module, such as
a 551VST List 2 CSU, it has only one circuit element. If the parent node
is a multiline module, such as an AS2000 or ConnecT1 Plus, a circuit
element is a plug-in module in one of the shelves controlled by the node.
This module is identified by the parent node’ Node Name and a [shelf,
slot] index. The types of circuit elements are:
■
Single-Line Circuit Elements
■
Dual-Line and Multiline Circuit Elements
Single-Line Circuit Elements
The single-line circuit elements with which Access Manager interfaces
are as follows:
551VST List 1/A CSU Includes the 551VST List 1 and 551VST List 1/A
CSUs.
551VST List 1/B CSU Single-line CSU.
551VST List 2 CSU The Verilink single-line CSU has the same hardware
as the 551VST List 1/B. It also has these additional
features: automatic alarm reporting, 9600 baud direct
connection, and support for the Hayes modem protocol.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Network Elements
Dual-Line and Multiline Circuit Elements
The multiline circuit element plug-in modules with which Access
Manager interfaces are as follows:
4016R
Plug-in CSU module in 551VST MLS shelves.
4016 List 1
Plug-in CSU module in 551VST ML List 1 or 2 shelves.
4016 List 2
Plug-in CSU module in 551VST ML List 1 or 2 shelves.
CCC 1020
Plug-in CSU module in ConnecT1 Plus shelves; it can also
function as the node for ConnecT1 Plus shelves.
TAC 1010
Plug-in CSU module in ConnecT1 Plus nodes.
DIU 1130
Plug-in module in ConnecT1 Plus shelves providing high
speed data features.
TIU 1850
Plug-in module in ConnecT1 Plus shelves providing timing
from external clock for interface between DIUs and CSUs.
NCC 2020
Plug-in CSU module in Access System 2000 shelves; it can
also function as the node for AS2000 shelves.
TAC 2010
Plug-in CSU module in Access System 2000 nodes.
DIU 2130
Plug-in module in Access System 2000 shelves, providing
high speed data features.
DIU 2132
Plug-in module in Access System 2000 shelves, for Switched
Multi-megabit Data Service.
DIU 2140
Plug-in module in Access System 2000 shelves, providing
subrate digital data service feature.
TIU 2850
Plug-in module in Access System 2000 shelves, providing
timing from external clock for interface between DIUs and
CSUs.
Refer to the hardware manuals for more information on these plug-in
modules.
Circuit
A circuit is the combination of any two network CSU circuit elements
and their interconnecting DS1 facility, which have Access Manager
access in a DS1 network.
Since all polled performance data is stored in the database by parent node
name and circuit element number, the circuit definition contains this path
for a circuit element whose performance data is collected through the
ESF Data Link.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
1-9
Access Manager Overview
The circuit definition is also used by Access Manager 2000 during data
analysis. This allows you to access the data stored in both circuit elements
by the associated circuit name. The circuit definition is also used during
the configuration of a far-end CSU through the ESF Data Link.
Route
A route consists of the two network circuit elements at DS1 network
circuit end points as accessed by Access Manager. For Access Manager, a
circuit and a route are functionally equivalent.
Access Manager Connections
Access Manager supports five types of network management ports. These
connect Access Manager to the devices it monitors. This information is
used in Chapter 4, Configuring Access Manager when configuring the
Comlines of the host PC.
■
■
■
■
■
Direct-connect port. This port can be:
•
Hardwired to the network device.
•
Connected through a pair of full-time (dedicated) modems using
a dedicated facility.
•
Connected by a dedicated port into a multiplexer and conveyed
in the multiplexer’s payload.
Remote dial port. The remote dial port can dial-out and receive
dial-in calls from network devices. This port uses the Hayes AT
command set at 1200 or 2400 baud.
Remote dial-in port. This type of port can only answer dial-in calls
from network devices (normally used with INWATS lines).
Routing port. The routing port is designed to connect to a routing
multiplexer such as a ComDesign RS2000 Statistical Multiplexer.
Multiple network devices may be connected through this type of
multiplexer.
Serial device interface. This is a serial output-only port with no
flow control. Sends alarm messages to a printer or to another
computer using the Accumaster protocol.
An optional external Hayes-compatible modem uses the auto-dial/autoanswer feature to automatically forward changes in the status or alarm
conditions of the near-end or far-end CSUs to a central management site.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Access Levels
Appendix B "Modem Configuration" provides the modem configuration
information.
Access Levels
Access Manager provides four levels of user access protection:
■
Level 1: View data only
■
Level 2: Includes Level 1 capabilities plus limited non-service-
affecting operational changes.
■
Level 3: Includes Level 1 and 2 capabilities, plus full maintenance
control (circuit element loopbacks, testing, etc.).
■
Level 4: Includes all preceding Level capabilities, plus Access
Manager system administration (adding/deleting users, archiving
database files, setting passwords, etc.).
Access Manager 2000 Main Menu
Access Manager is divided into five categories of operations. Each of
these may be selected from Access Manager’s Main Menu. This menu
appears after you start Access Manager and log in.
Figure 1-4
Access Manager 2000 Main Menu
The Main Menu provides access to five major menus. The sub-menus list
categories of operations you can perform with Access Manager. Each
sub-menu also has options, additional sub-menus, and screen displays to
assist you in selecting and performing an operation.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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Access Manager Overview
Figure 1 -5, “Access Manager 2000 menu tree,” on page 1-13, provides an
overview of the five major menus. Next to each menu is a short
description of its activities.
Following that figure are diagrams of each of the five major menus and
their options. These provide you with a quick review of what’s in each
major menu.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Access Manager 2000 Main Menu
Figure 1-5
Access Manager 2000 menu tree
This diagram provides a view of the major Access Manager 2000 menus. The Main Menu supports five major menus:
Utilities, Alarm Status, Configuration, Online (Access) , and Database Access.
AM2000 Main Me
Utilities
Menu
Alarm Status
Menu
This allows you to configure the Access Manager. Here you set up certain
“housekeeping” functions like date and time, what comlines are used, and
where you want reports sent and printed.
These commands affect the active alarm counter and the alarm log database.
• An active alarm is an alarm record in the log which has not been manually
deactivated by the user and cannot be deleted or archived.
• Alarms that are deactivated can be deleted and/or archived.
Configuration
Menu
On-Line (Access)
Menu
Allows you to define or edit the configurations of the nodes, circuit
elements, circuits, and routes in the network.
Allows you to access nodes and circuit elements for testing and maintenance
functions.
• Through this menu you can acquire the network configuration, status, and
DS1 performance data.
• You can also reset the user registers and perform out-of-service testing.
Database Access
Menu
Allows you to process DS1 performance data stored in the Access
Manager database.
Not all sub-menus will be accessible at all times. Whether or not a submenu is accessible depends on the type of node you are accessing.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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Access Manager Overview
Utilities
The Utilities option of the Main Menu allows you to configure the
Access Manager system.
It has the following major branches:
Utilities
Menu
Date/Time
Installation
Site
Report
On-line
Alarm
Hour
Quotas
Comlines
User Definitions
Event Log
Code Download
Date / Time
This option allows you to set the system date and time.
Installation
This option allows you to define the system site name, define the system
printer(s), select the hour to start polling for performance data, allocate
database records (for alarms, event logs, and performance data), and
define serial communications (COM) ports.
User Definitions
This option allows you to specify user names, passwords, and access
levels.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Access Manager 2000 Main Menu
Event Log
This option allows you to view, print, and archive system events such as
user log in, user log out, time of scheduled data polling, Access Manager
start-up, shut-down, etc.
Code Download
This option allows you to download new firmware code in order to update
the element firmware or to provide custom applications to a circuit
element (NCC 2020, TAC 2010, DIU 2130, or DIU 2140). Only Verilink
Access System 2000 modules have this Advanced Programmable
Architecture (APA) feature. APA is not available for anyother Verilink
single-line or multiline systems.
Alarm Status
The Alarm Status Menu commands affect the active alarm counter and the
alarm log database. An active alarm is an alarm record in the log that has
not been manually deactivated by the user and cannot be deleted or
archived. Alarms that are deactivated can be deleted and/or archived.
It has the following major branches:
Alarm Status
Menu
Clear
Deactivate
View Active
List Active
Print All
Archiv
Clear
This command clears the automatically acknowledged alarms counter.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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Access Manager Overview
Deactivate
This command deactivates alarm records and makes them available for
deletion and/or archiving.
View Active
This command displays all alarm records that have not yet been
deactivated.
List Active
This command prints all alarm records that have not yet been deactivated.
Print All
This command prints all alarm records whether or not they have been
deactivated.
Archive
This command allows you to print, transfer to disk, and/or delete
deactivated alarm records.
Configuration
The functions under the Configuration menu allow you to define or edit
the configurations of the nodes, circuit elements, circuit, and routes in the
network.
It has the following major branches:
Configuration
Menu
Node
Element
Circuit
Route
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Access Manager 2000 Main Menu
Node
A node is any equipment that has single-point Access Manager access
(i.e., to which Access Manager can connect in order to access its circuit
elements for network management). The single point of access may be in
a variety of modes. The mode of access for far-end nodes is through the
ESF Data Link. The mode of access for near-end nodes is either by direct
connection or through a statistical multiplexer or modem; additionally,
one node controller can access another node controller through a daisy
chain.
Circuit Element
A circuit element is a single module of the parent node to which Access
Manager is connected. If the parent node is a single-line module, such as
a 551VST List 2 CSU, it has only one circuit element. If the parent node
is a multiline module, such as an AS2000 type, the node may have several
elements.
Circuit
A circuit consists of any two network circuit elements, and the
interconnecting DS1 line, that have Access Manager access in a DS1
network.
Route
A route consists of the two network circuit elements at DS1 network
circuit end points as accessed by Access Manager. For Access Manager, a
circuit and a route are functionally equivalent.
On-line Access
The On-line Menu allows you to access nodes and circuit elements for
testing and maintenance functions. Through this menu, you can acquire
the configuration, status, and DS1 performance data of the network. You
can also reset the user registers and perform out-of-service testing.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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Access Manager Overview
It has the following major branches:
On-Line (Access)
Menu
Display
Access Range
Element Configuration Display
Circuit Status Diagram
Status Element
User Statistics
Telco Statistics
Reset User Registers
Performance Data Retrieve
Barchart Display
Loopbacks
Select Test
Note: The actual commands listed in the On-line menu depend on
which type of CSU or multiline node is accessed. The following
commands are typically found in this menu:
Display
For a multiline node, this command allows you to view the multiline
node’s hardware configuration, status, controller firmware, and hardware
revisions.
Access Range (Access CSU)
This command allows you to select a network circuit element. For
multiline CSU nodes, you can access either a single CSU or a range of
sequential CSUs. For Access System 2000 nodes, you can access NCCs,
TACs, or DIUs.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Access Manager 2000 Main Menu
Element Configuration and Status-Element (Element Status)
These commands show the status, configuration, firmware, and hardware
revisions of the CSUs selected by accessing a CSU range. For Access
System 2000 nodes, the NCC, TAC, and DIU configuration status may
also be viewed.
Circuit Status Diagram
This command allows you to access and graphically display the near-end
CSU and associated far-end CSU to which a DS1 circuit is connected.
User Statistics
This command computes and displays the percentages of available and
error-free seconds, plus other user performance data for the selected CSU
and far-end CSU.
Telco Statistics
This command computes and displays the percentages of available and
error-free seconds, plus other Telco performance data for the selected
CSU and far-end CSU.
Reset User Registers
This command allows you to reset the user performance registers and
error event registers in both the near-end and far-end CSUs.
Performance Data Retrieve
These commands allow you to obtain the 1-hour or 24-hour DS1
performance data stored in a CSU or its associated far-end CSU.You can
view either the User data or the Telco data. If the CSU is an AS2000 type,
then EQPT data (as well as extra network registers) are available.
Barchart Display
This menu option displays performance data in bar chart format for the
current 24-hour period. Bar chart displays for historic performance data
are available through Database Access.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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Access Manager Overview
Loopbacks
This command allows you to activate or deactivate a loopback at the nearend or far-end CSU, send an inband loop-up or loop-down code to the farend CSU, or activate or deactivate an ALL-ONEs test signal to the far-end
CSU. Loopbacks can help you isolate circuit troubles to either the DS1
network or the CSU at either end. For Access System 2000 and
ConnecT1 Plus nodes, the loopback command also lets you activate and
deactivate CSU loopbacks with ANSI T1.403-compatible command
messages.
Select Test
This command is available only when interfacing with an Access System
2000 or ConnecT1 Plus node. It allows you to perform diagnostic tests on
a circuit connected to the node. You can apply a DS1 test signal from an
NCC 2020 or CSU 2010 to the associated circuit for testing. You can
similarly apply a test signal to EQPT (i.e., data port) channels of a DIU
2130 or DIU 2140 for path verification.
Database Access
The functions under the Database Access menu allow the processing of
DS1 performance data stored in the Access Manager database.
It has the following major branches:
Database Access
Menu
Report
Archiv
Report
This command analyzes and reports on the performance data stored for
selected network elements over a selected date and time range through the
use of standard filters or user-selected thresholds.
Archive
This command allows you to print performance data records, export them
to a spreadsheet or database system, or delete them.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Chapter
2
Installing Access Manager
This chapter provides instructions for installing Access Manager. It also
describes the host personal computer and peripheral equipment
requirements for Access Manager operation.
Equipment Installation
Before installing Access Manager, verify that your system meets the
requirements listed below. These basic system requirements have been
tested and are known to be compatible with Access Manager.
These are the minimum system requirements for Access Manager.
Minimum System
Requirements
Parameter
Requirements
Recommendations and Notes
Host computer
model
AM2000 may be installed on
one of the following:
Use a color monitor with the
appropriate graphics adapter.
• IBM PS/2 Model 80
A VGA monitor is recommended.
• AT&T 6386/SX WGS
• 100%-compatible 386 PC
Operating
system
DOS version 5.0 or later on the
host PC. DOS must be fully
and properly installed.
Host: 640K of base memory
Total: 4 megabytes minimum
To use expanded or extended onboard memory, see your application
engineer for the specifications on
configuring your system.
Hard disk
memory
Use a minimum 80-megabyte
hard disk with fast access (less
than 20 milliseconds).
Program and overhead files take 2
megabytes. The rest is for data
storage.
Recommended
software drivers
• himem.sys
These are very strongly
recommended.
RAM
Accumaster: 192K
• smartdrv.exe
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
2-1
Installing Access Manager
Parameter
Requirements
Recommendations and Notes
Communication
ports
• 2 serial ports (if a dial-up
interface is being used) and
1 printer port
Also compatible:
Modems
• Hayes1200, 2400, or 9600
baud (external
• An internal Hayes modem works
only if it is configured to use
communications Port 1 (COM1) o
COM2.
• AT&T 2224 (2400 baud
external
• DigiBoard DigiCHANNEL MC/8
(PS/2 Model 80 compatible) serial
communications board (with 8
serial ports)
• If Access Manager uses more
than two ports, using an internal
modem is not recommended.
Printer
Epson LQ-1050 (132-column) printer
Statistical
Multiplexer
The ComDesign RS2000 or SPX
series Statistical Multiplexer,
operating at up to 9600 baud, can b
added to an Access Manage
network as a routing multiplexer to
concentrate the communication lines
between Access Manager and
connected CSUs.
X.25PAD
Tested with NET TX7000 PAD.
Management
software
pcANYWHERE III can be used Do not use newer versions of
pcANYWHERE.
with Access Manager to
enable start-up and/or control
of Access Manager from a
remote terminal.
Remote terminal
• DEC VT100, o
• VT100 emulator
The remote terminal supported by
Access Manager through
pcANYWHERE software. This is
used for remote network
management applications, including
running Access Manager remotely
from an Accumaster site.
Hard disk storage considerations
The maximum available hard disk space is dependent on the size of your
hard drive and what version of DOS your PC is running. Up to a
maximum of 30 megabytes hard disk space can be available for Access
Manager data collection when using DOS 3.3. Newer versions of DOS
(for example, DOS 5.0) will allow for proportional storage space
depending on the size of the hard disk.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Equipment Installation
Note: Verilink recommends that a 80-megabyte hard drive be used when
running Access Manager.
Each alarm record uses 62 bytes of memory, each data record uses up to a
maximum of 150 bytes of memory, and each event record uses 58 bytes of
memory. As the number of records allocated for a particular type are
filled up, the oldest records are deleted to make room for the new records.
The space used on the hard disk for data records, alarm records, or event
log records can be freed by using the Archive option. This option
allows you to store records to diskette and/or delete the records entirely.
Each of these three types of records (data, alarm, event log) has
associated .DATand .KEY files. To decrease a record’s associated .DAT
and .KEY files to minimum size and thereby release disk space, all
records of a type (for example, all alarm records) must be deleted from
the database.
To minimize the space used for data collection, the program stores only
records that are non-ZERO.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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Installing Access Manager
Software Installation
This section provides instructions for installing Access Manager 2000
software on your host PC’s hard disk.
The Access Manager software is provided on two diskette sets:
■
a 3.5-inch (720 kilobyte density) diskette set, and
■
a 5.25-inch (1.2 Mb density) diskette set
Both diskette sets have identical content. The INSTALL.EXE program
file is on Diskette # 1of either disk set. Use the one which fits your floppy
drive.
When you install Access Manager 2000, the following files are copied to
your hard disk.
Table 2-1
2-4
Access Manager Installation Files
ACTIVE.KEY
ALARMLOG.DAT
ALARMLOG.KEY
ALRMDESC.DAT
ALRMDESC.KEY
AM2000.EXE
AM2000.OVL
AM2000.SIG
BUS.KEY
CETABLE.DAT
CETABLE.KEY
CFROM.KEY
CIRCUIT.KEY
CNFSTAT.DAT
CNFSTAT.KEY
COLORATT.DAT
COMLINE.DAT
COMLINE.KEY
CONFIG.SYS
CTO.KEY
DATALOG.DAT
DATALOG.KEY
DBVERS.DAT
DTEVLOG.DAT
DTEVLOG.KEY
EQUIPMNT.DAT
EQUIPMNT.KEY
LEVEL.DAT
LEVEL.KEY
LOCATION.KEY
MONOATT.DAT
NETVLOG.DAT
NETVLOG.KEY
NODE.DAT
NODE.KEY
NODEID.KEY
POINT.DAT
POINT.KEY
PORT.DAT
PORT.KEY
PRENNAME.KEY
RANDC.DAT
RANGE.DAT
RANGE.KEY
README.DOC
RFROM.KEY
ROUTE.KEY
RTO.KEY
SCNAME.KEY
SDDNAME.KEY
SDNAME.KEY
SELECTED.DAT
SELECTED.KEY
SIGCSU.DAT
SIGDDSU.DAT
SIGDSU.DAT
SITE.DAT
SITE.KEY
SSUPARM.DAT
SSUPARM.KEY
TYPE.KEY
UNCLRALM.DAT
UNCLRALM.KEY
USER.DAT
USER.KEY
USERLOG.DAT
USERLOG.KEY
VERINET.DBD
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Software Installation
Two working files are generated during Access Manager operation. The
files function as transaction files for various program functions and to
allow restoration of the database in case of power loss or a computer
reset. They are:
VISTA.TAF
VISTA.LOG
Note: Refer to the README.DOC file on Access Manager Diskette # 1
for last-minute information and any restrictions placed on the
Access Manager revision being installed.
Installing a new
Access Manager
system
Use the following procedure if you are installing Access Manager for the
first time and if you have never installed Access Manager on your host
PC.
To install a new Access Manager system:
1. Insert Diskette # 1 into drive A: (or another floppy diskette drive).
2. To access that drive, type A: (or the other disk drive name) and
press Enter .
3. At the A: prompt, type INSTALL and press
INSTALL program’s main menu then appears.
Enter
. The
4. Select the Database Stats option, and verify that you have at
least two megabytes of space available on the hard disk.
5. After verifying disk space, the INSTALL program’s main menu
reappears. Select the Install option.
6. Respond to the subsequent prompts to complete the installation of
Access Manager in the AM2000 directory.
7. Before starting Access Manager, you must verify the location and
content of your CONFIG.SYS file.
Verifying the CONFIG.SYS file
For Access Manager to run, you must have a CONFIG.SYS file which
satisfies two requirements. It must:
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
2-5
Installing Access Manager
■
■
reside in the root directory of your hard disk’s boot drive (normally
drive C), and
contain the following lines:
FILES=24
This command line sets the maximum number of files
that can be open at one time. The minimum number
required for Access Manager is 24, but the number can
be larger, if required by other programs.
BUFFERS=20
This command line sets the number of disk buffers
DOS allocates in memory when it starts. The minimum
number required by Access Manager is 20, but this
number can be greater if needed by other programs.
If a CONFIG.SYS file did not exist in the install drive directory, then
the one from the database disk was copied to it. However, if the install
drive (for example, drive D:) is not the same as the boot drive (normally,
drive C:), you’ll need to determine whether or not the boot drive has an
appropriate CONFIG.SYS file.
The following instructions assume that your host PC boots from the C:
drive. If the boot drive letter is other than “C”, use that letter in place of
“C” in the steps below.
To determine whether the boot drive has an appropriate
CONFIG.SYS file:
1. At the DOS C:\> prompt, type CD\ and press
Enter
2. At the C:\> prompt, type CONFIG.SYS and press
.
Enter
.
a. If DOS returns the error message FILE NOT FOUND, a
CONFIG.SYS file does not exist in your system.
Then, you must follow the instructions for copying the
CONFIG.SYS file to the root directory of the boot drive.
b. If a CONFIG.SYS file exists, it will open. Verify that the
FILES and BUFFERS lines exist in CONFIG.SYS. Verify
that the number of files and buffers called by these lines is
sufficient. If the lines don’t exist or the number to the right of the
equal (=) sign is too small, you must follow the directions for
modifying the CONFIG.SYS file.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Software Installation
To copy the CONFIG.SYS file to the root directory of the boot drive:
1. Type C: and press
Enter
to return to the boot drive.
2. Type CD\ and press toEnter
return to the root directory on the
boot drive.
3. Insert Diskette #1 of Access Manager 2000 into drive A.
4. At the boot drive prompt, type COPY A: CONFIG.SYS and
press Enter .
The CONFIG.SYS file is created in the root directory.
5. Remove the diskette from drive A.
Note: The new values for FILES and BUFFERS are not in effect until
the host PC is rebooted and DOS is restarted.
6. Reboot your system to activate the new values before starting
Access Manager. Otherwise, you will not be able to log into Access
Manager.
To modify an existing CONFIG.SYS file:
The existing CONFIG.SYS file must be modified if it does not contain
FILES=24 (or greater) and BUFFERS = 20 (or greater).
1. Modify the CONFIG.SYS file with EDLIN (the text editor for
DOS) or with any text editor or word processor with an ASCII text
editor option.
2. Reboot the system after you change the CONFIG.SYS file. The
values for FILES and BUFFERS are not in effect until you do.
Updating an
existing Access
Manager system
Use the following procedure if Access Manager is installed on your host
PC and you want to upgrade to the current version.
To update an existing Access Manager system:
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
2-7
Installing Access Manager
1. If the current Access Manager directory is named AM2000, create a
backup directory named, for instance, AM2000.BAK.
2. Copy the current directory’s contents to AM2000.BAK so that the
current directory can be used by the update.
3. Insert Diskette # 1 into drive A: (or another floppy diskette drive).
4. To access that drive, type A: (or the other diskette drive name)
and press . Enter
5. At the A: prompt, type INSTALL and press
INSTALL program’s main menu should appear
Enter
. The
6. Select the Database Stats option to determine if the host PC
has enough space to hold the new software and modified database.
You need approximately 2 megabytes of hard disk space for the
software files, plus space equal to the size of your Access Manager
database. To calculate the size of the Access Manager database, add
together all files which have the extensions .DAT and .DBD.
For example, if you are updating an Access Manager installation
with an 8-megabyte database, you need 2 + 8 = 10 megabytes of
space on your hard disk.
TIP
The Database Stats selection can be used at any time to determine
database size and available hard disk space.
7. You need to decide how you want the database to be affected.
•
To convert the existing database to the latest Access Manager
format, select the Full Update option. This is the
recommended method.
•
To leave the existing database in its current format, select the
Partial Update option. This should only be used for
interim releases.
8. After choosing one of the above, respond to the subsequent prompts
to complete the selected action.
9. When the program prompts you for the new Access Manager
directory to be created, type AM2000.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Software Installation
The INSTALL program then copies the Access Manager program
files and all blank database files into the newly created directory. It
transfers all data from the current database to the new database and
leaves the current database intact.
10. Now the installation is complete, and you need to update a few other
files:
If pcANYWHERE is being used:
a. Copy the pcANYWHERE files from the old Access Manager
directory into the AM2000 directory.
b. If changes have been made to the factory default settings, either
copy the .CFG file from the AM2000.BAK directory to the
AM2000 directory or reconfigure pcANYWHERE from the
start.
If you made changes to the COLORATT.DAT and
MONOATT.DAT files:
a. You must make the same changes to the new COLORATT.DAT
or MONOATT.DAT files in the AM2000 directory.
b. This can be done with a standard ASCII text editor.
11. After the update is completed, go to the AM2000 directory and
start Access Manager.
12. When you’re sure that the new database is working properly, delete
the old database in the AM2000.BAK directory you created in
Step 1.
Creating a batch
file for automatic
start-up
By using a start-up batch file, you can set up Access Manager to do one of
the following:
■
start up automatically when your system boots up, or
■
start from any directory.
For automatic start-up whenever the host PC is powered up, you can
modify an existing AUTOEXEC.BAT file in the DOS root directory.
For manual start-up from any director , you can create a file called
AM2000.BAT (or anything else you like) in any directory which exists
in the DOS path. Once this file has been created and saved, you can type
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
2-9
Installing Access Manager
AM2000 in any directory to start the program. The batch file
automatically changes to the Access Manager directory and starts the
Access Manager program.
In either case, you must use statements from Table 2-2, “Batch file
commands for automatic start-up,” on pag e2-10. All editing can be done
with an ASCII text editor, such as EDLIN.
Add the following lines to your batch file as required:
Table 2-2
Batch file commands for automatic start-up
Command line
CD drive:\AM2000
Function
To change to the directory where Access Manage
is installed. If the directory is other than AM2000,
use that directory‘s name in lieu of AM2000.
For “drive”, use your appropriate drive letter.
ANYWHERE AUTOMATIC To start up the pcANYWHERE III program.
AM2000
To use a color PC.
AM2000/BW
To use a monochrome monitor with a color PC or
monochrome PC.
AM2000/VT
To start Access manager in the VT100 mode;
required if pcANYWHERE is used.
The /VT command causes Access Manager to
run its VT100 screens. This means that function
and other key combinations are shown on the
screen as the required key strokes used on a
VT100 terminal.
AM2000/VT/BW
To start Access Manager in the VT100 mode on a
monochrome PC; required if pcANYWHERE is
used.
The /BW command causes Access Manager to
run in black-and-white mode.
If a remote computer is being used with:
• a VT100 terminal emulation progra , then the
terminal emulation program capabilities
determine whether or not the /BW command is
required.
• an actual VT100 terminal, then Access Manager
can be used in color mode by leaving off the /BW
command.
TZ = xSTn
2-10
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
This is used to set the clock only if an Accumaster
interface is being used. See“Time Zone Setup for
Accumaster” on page2-14 for values of x and n.
Software Installation
After making any changes to your start-up batch file, save the file and
reboot your system.
Limitations
■
■
■
■
Setting up the
remote terminal
ProComm can operate in the color mode if the remote PC has a
color graphics card and monitor.
Due to the use of certain escape key combinations, Crosstalk XVI
cannot be used.
If Access Manager is to be used from a remote VT100 terminal
most of the time, the AUTOEXEC.BAT file should first start up
pcANYWHERE and then start in VT100 mode.
If Accumaster is being used, the line SET = xSTn must precede
any command that automatically starts Access Manager in the
AUTOEXEC.BAT file.
This section describes how to set up a remote terminal and keyboard. This
requires the installation of pcANYWHERE III.1
pcANYWHERE is a remote access software program available from
Dynamic Microprocessor Associates. It lets you operate an IBM PC, XT,
AT, PS/2, or 100% IBM-compatible from a DEC VT1000 or VT1000
emulator at a remote location. The remote PC or terminal operates as the
monitor and keyboard for the local system.
You must install pcANYWHERE if Access Manager will be run with
Accumaster. pcANYWHERE permits the Accumaster operator to access
and control Access Manager from the Accumaster console.
Proper operation of pcANYWHERE requires the following:
■
a host PC with a minimum 192K of system RAM (45K of RAM is
used when pcANYWHERE is left resident.)
■
a host modem
■
a remote modem, and
■
a remote terminal (or a PC running terminal-emulator software) to
control the host PC.
1. All references to pcANYWHERE III throughout this document are generically called “pcANYWHERE”.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
2-11
Installing Access Manager
For detailed information on the installation or operation of
pcANYWHERE, refer to the manual supplied with it. Additional default
setting information regarding use with Access Manager is given in this
section.
To install pcANYWHERE in a host PC:
1. Install pcANYWHERE onto the host PC hard disk into the same
directory where Access Manager was installed. Typically, this
directory is named AM2000.
2. Copy pcANYWHERE files from the program diskettes into that
directory, as explained in the pcANYWHERE user’s manual.
The following pcANYWHERE III parameters settings should be used
when configuring the host PC:
pcANYWHERE
Parameter
Baud rate
Setting
The baud rate setting depends on the modem type in use.
This setting can range from 50 to 57600 baud, or it can be set
to Auto-baud. Access Manager works at 1200 and 9600 bau
with a modem or, if direct connect, up to 19200 baud.
The DEC VT100 default setting is 300 baud.
Com Port
Alway COM
Connect type
There are 3 connection options: Direct Connect,
Automatic Modem, or Manual Modem, with the
following limitations.
• For Direct Connect, do not use any “log in”; that is,
set the log in parameters to Defaults. Also set the
inactivity time-out to 0.
• For a Manual Modem connection, use “log in”.
Co-pilot mode
2-12
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Either system keyboard may be made active. The normal
setting should be Both Keyboards Active.
Software Installation
pcANYWHERE
Parameter
Inactivity
time-out
Setting
Set to No Time-out or 0 seconds, to allow
pcANYWHERE to hang up only if the remote modem hangs
up.
The inactivity time-out does not work unless it is set to less
than one minute. This is because in the remote terminal (/VT)
mode Access Manager updates the screen (current time
once every minute and pcANYWHERE treats this as activity.
The remote operator is responsible for dropping the line when
communications is complete.
Login
parameters
This option allows you to set the login parameters (such as
the password). Selecting the Defaults option applies the
same login parameters to every remote caller.
Terminal Type
This allows pcANYWHERE to know whether you are using a
remote PC or remote terminal to run the Host PC. Select
VT100.
Remote Access Port
Access Manager 2000 requires that the host PC has one dedicated
communications serial port for access by a remote terminal or computer.
COM1 is normally assigned as the dedicated pcANYWHERE port. This
is the remote access port and is configured in the Host PC setup of
pcANYWHERE. COM2 and upward are then configured within Access
Manager.
!
Setting up
Accumaster
CAUTION
The default configuration of Access Manager includes COM1 as a
Comline Definition. It must be deleted from the database wheneve
using COM1 as the remote access port with pcANYWHERE. When a
modem is used with the remote access port, and pcANYWHERE is
configured for a modem, then pcANYWHERE automatically
configures the modem.
Accumaster is anAT&T network management system which can manage
alarm messages from Access Manager. When used together, Access
Manager sends alarms through a comport in an Accumaster protocol.
Setting this up requires the following:
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
2-13
Installing Access Manager
■
Physical connections between the host PC and xxx.
■
Your host PC must be running pcANYWHERE.
■
You must be using the largest (-1000) Access Manager package.
■
You must use the Access Manager menus to set up a utility.
■
Your AUTOEXEC.BAT file must include the time zone variable,
TZ = xSTn. This must always accurately reflect the appropriate
standard time or daylight savings time.
Time Zone Setup for Accumaster
Since the alarms sent to Accumaster must be time-stamped and include
time zone, an environment variable (TZ) must be set up in your
AUTOEXEC.BAT file.
The following line should be added to the AUTOEXEC.BAT file prior to
any batch command that automatically starts Access Manager.
SET = xSTn
where x and n are filled in from Figur e2-3, Accumaster Time Zone
Chart”. For example, EST5 would be used in the Eastern Time Zone
when daylight savings time is not in effect.
Table 2-3
Accumaster Time Zone Chart
Standard Time
When/If Daylight Saving
Time is in Effect
Hawaii
HST10
HST9
Alaska
LST9
LST8
Pacific
PST8
PST7
Mountain
MST7
MST6
Central
CST6
CST5
Eastern
EST5
EST4
Atlantic
AST4
AST3
Time Zone
The time zone string (for example, PST) is not critical, as long as it is
three characters long. The number following the string is critical because
it represents the number of hours difference from Greenwich Mean Time
(GMT), which must be included in all alarm records sent to Accumaster.
2-14
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Software Installation
Before Starting Accumaster
Before Accumaster is run for the first time, the network should be
configured. In particular, the Alarm output is configured (within Access
Manager) the same as configuring an Alarm Printer. Since only one alarm
output can be defined, the configuration of alarms being sent to
Accumaster precludes the use of a physical alarm printer. The
communications port to be used is configured as a Serial Device. If a
modem is used, it must be set to Auto Answer, as described in
AppendixB, "Modem Configuration".
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
2-15
Installing Access Manager
2-16
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Chapter
3
Using Access Manager
This section provides you with information about:
■
screen appearance and content
■
using the keyboard and keystrokes
■
navigating between screens
Basics
This section discusses the basics of moving around in the Access
Manager screens.
Basic Display
Using a color monitor
If you are in a View screen, or if the present access level prevents you
from making changes to a particular part of the database, the entries and
options appear in red. If you are in an Edit or Add screen and the access
level allows you to change an entry or option, the entries are displayed in
white on blue at the cursor position, and in blue on white for all other
positions.
Screens
When you first log into Access Manager, you’re presented with a
Username screen, shown in Figure 3-1, “Username Screen,” on pag e3-2.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
3-1
Using Access Manager
Figure 3-1
Username Screen
Access Manager
serial numbe
input screen for user name
In this screen, you enter your username and, susequently, your password.
This logs you on to Access Manager 2000.
Once you’ve logged on, the Main Menu will appear. That screen, and all
other Access Manager 2000 screens, are framed within the boundaries of
the screen shown in Figure 3-2, “Basic display on host PC,” on page 3-3.
3-2
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Basics
Figure 3-2
Basic display on host PC
alarm mode
(manual or automatic)
Shows current node when in
On-line Access or
Configuration mode
where Access Manager is located
number of active alarms
number of current automatically acknowledged alarms
logged-in user name and access level
program revision level
VERINET
Date and time by
system clock
main function key definitions
(in reverse video)
Differences in displays when in VT100 mode
The personal computer and VT100 display the same information on their
respective screens, with the following exceptions:
■
Operating Access Manager locally on the personal computer results
in the display showing all commands as function keys (F1 to F10).
This is shown in Figure 3 -3, “Function key display at host PC,” on
page 3-4.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
3-3
Using Access Manager
Figure 3-3
Function key display at host PC
Main function key definitions
(in reverse video)
■
When operating Access Manager remotely with a VT100, the
display shows the commands as escape key combinations. If using a
personal computer keyboard, the function keys may still be used.
This is shown in Figure 3 -4, “Escape key sequence display at
VT100 terminal”.
Figure 3-4
Escape key sequence display at VT100 termina
function keys replaced by
escape key sequences
Menus
3-4
Although we refer to almost all displays as “screens”, those screens
which allow you to select options are menus. Menus either provide access
to another menu or take you to a screen with fields for data entry.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Basics
For example, the Main Menu, shown below, provides access to five other
menus.
If you select the Utilities option, the Utilities Menu appears.
Every field which calls for a choice shows the default or chosen option on
the right. When the available options are few, the options may be enclosed
in parentheses after the field text and before the option area on the right.
available options
option entry area
field
When multiple options are available for a field, the field’s text will
usually be followed by an F8 or instructions at the bottom of the
screen will tell you to use F8 to display options. When you press
F8 , a list of options will appear, superimposed on the current menu.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
3-5
Using Access Manager
Status Display
Status screens provide information directly from on-line data. Status
screens are “read only” and provide status information only for the
moment that you access the screen. The screen does not update itself. To
find out that a condition you see on the screen has changed, you would
have to exit out of the screen and then reaccess it.
Alarm notifications, however, do let you know immediately if there is a
significant change.
Keyboard
This section describes the function keys, cursor movement keys, and
special keys used at a PC keyboard.
■
■
■
Function keys are used to select and/or activate specific operations
in Access Manager.
Cursor movement keys, also known as directional keys, are used to
move between fields and screens.
Special keys are used to perform special functions within Access
Manager. Sometimes, this involves using keystroke combinations.
Because there are differences between the keyboards, it subsequently
describes the equivalent keystrokes used at a VT100 terminal keyboard.
Regardless of the operation mode (PC or VT100), the keyboard directly
attached to the Access Manager computer always uses the normal PC
function keys.
Function keys
The <F1> through <F10> function keys are used to select and/or activate
specific operations in Access Manager.
If you are running pcANYWHERE, the function keys are not available.
3-6
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Basics
Table 3-1
Function key definitions in PC mode
Key
Meaning
Definition
<F1>
Help
Pressing F1 displays the on-line help screen for
Function Key Definitions. It provides help specific to the
terminal mode (PC or VT100) you are currently in.
<F2>
Previous screen
Pressing F2 returns you to the previous scree
from which you selected the current option.
It also aborts any data entry you may have made while
F7
currently in the Data Monitor scre
en ().
<F3>
Main menu
Pressing F3 returns you to the Main Menu from
any point in the program, except when pressed from a
screen expecting keyboard responses.
<F4>
Auto Ack/Manual
Ack
Pressing F4 toggles between the manual an
automatic alarm acknowledge modes.
In the automatic acknowledge mode, the messag
AUTO ACK ALARM flashes in the top center block. In
the monochrome mode, the words are highlighted an
do not flash.
NOTE: When no user is logged in, the alarm mode is
automatic and reverts to the mode selected in the
Installation menu as soon as a user logs in.
<F5>
Accept update
Pressing F5 saves changes or additions made to
the current element or, in most data entry screens, tells
Access Manager to accept the on-screen data.
<F6>
Approve update of
entire range
Pressing F6 for multiline nodes updates the entir
range of circuit elements selected with the options
entered in the Edit Circuit Element option
under the Configuration Menu.
<F7>
Data monitor
Pressing
F7
toggles the status of the data monitor:
A window appears in the lower left of the screen,
showing the number of seconds before scheduled dat
collection and polling begins.
During scheduled data collection, the right side of the
screen shows the circuit element from which data is
being collected and the left side shows the data monitor
status.
<F8>
Display a list of
options
Pressing F8 displays a sub-menu of the selections
available for one of the option-fields in the current menu.
If the F8 function is available, it is indicated at the
bottom of the menu or in the option-field line.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
3-7
Using Access Manager
Key
Meaning
Definition
<F9>
Log off
Pressing F9 logs you off Access Manager without
shutting it down.
Pressing F10 exits you from Access Manager to
DOS. You must have a LEVEL4 access to do this.
<F10> Shut down
After pressing F10 , a message appears that asks
you whether or not to shut Access Manager down.
Typing Y continues the shut-down.
When Access Manager is started in VT100 mode, the bottom of the
screen displays escape key sequences instead of function keys. However,
if you are using the PC keyboard (rather than a terminal keyboard), the
function keys must still be used.
Example:
Using the
F8
function key:
You are in the Printer filename field, and you’d like to know
what other printer options are available.
To find out what other printer options are available, press F8 . A screen
containing a list of options appears, superimposed, over the first screen.
Cursor movement keys
The following keys are also referred to as directional keys throughout the
Access Manager manual. They are used to move between fields, entries,
and screens.
3-8
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Basics
A listing of these definitions is provided in Table 3-2, “Cursor movement
key definitions in PC mode,” on page 3 -9.
Table 3-2
Key
Cursor movement key definitions in PC mode
Meaning
<Up Arrow> and
<Down Arrow>
Definition
These keys move the cursor up or down to position the
cursor at an entry (or item) from a list on the screen.
• If a list extends beyond the top or bottom of the
current screen, the screen scrolls in the direction of
the pressed arrow key.
• On single-screen displays, the cursor wraps around
to the opposite end of the screen.
<Left Arrow> and
<Right Arrow>
These keys move the cursor to the left or right on a data
entry line.
<PgDn>:
Next Page
If more than one screen of information exists for the
current screen, pressing PgDn displays the next
screen (page) of information below the current cursor
position.
<PgUp>
Previou
Page
If an additional screen of information exists above the
current screen (page), pressing displays
the
PgUp
next screen of information above the current cursor
position.
<Home>
Pressing Home moves the cursor to the beginning of a
list. This includes lists which have more items than can
be displayed in a single screen.
<End>
Pressing End moves the cursor to the end of a list.
This includes lists which have more items than can be
displayed in a single screen.
Special keys
The keys described in this section are used to perform special functions
within Access Manager.
A listing of these definitions is provided in Table 3-3, “Special key
definitions in PC mode,” on page 3 -10.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
3-9
Using Access Manager
Table 3-3
Special key definitions in PC mode
Key
Pressing the Enter key either selects the option
highlighted by the current cursor position from a menu
screen, or accepts the value of data entered into a
selected field. If less than the maximum number of
characters are entered in a field, press t Enter
complete the entry for that line and move the highlight to
the next line.
<ENTER>
The following four choices require the Ctrl key to be pressed and held while pressing the
second key. The Ctrl key is displayed on the Function Key Definition screen and many othe
screens as (^).
<Ctrl>-<PgDn>
Next Element Press the Ctrl PgDn key combination to select the
next circuit element in a selected range. This key name
appears on the screen as <Ctrl>-<PgDn>.
<Ctrl>-<PgUp>
Previou
Element
Press the Ctrl PgUp key combination to select the
previous circuit element in the selected range. This key
name appears on the screen as <Ctrl>-<PgUp>.
<Ctrl>-<Left
Arrow>
Near End
Press the Ctrl
key combination from the Online screens to select the near-end CSU information.
This key name appears on the screen as <Ctrl>-<Right
Arrow> Near-end.
<Ctrl>-<Right
Arrow>
Far End
Press the Ctrl
key combination from the Online screens to select the far-end CSU information. This
key name appears on the screen as <Ctrl>-<Right
Arrow> Far-end.
<ESCAPE>
3-10
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Press the Esc key to cancel data input requests on
an operational basis and to exit an option menu without
selecting an option. Also press Esc to immediately
abort a connection request or print request.
Basics
Key
<INS>
Press from
Ins a data entry screen to toggle
between the text insert mode and the text overwrite
(normal) mode. When the insert mode is activated, a
block cursor blinks in the input line. In the overwrite
mode, a smaller cursor blinks at the bottom of the input
line. The insert mode is active for the current line only. If
you move the cursor up or down one line with the arrow
keys, or if you press toF5
save the screen values,
the insert mode goes back to the overwrite mode.
When you are in the overwrite mode on any screen,
entering any character in the first position of the data
entry line deletes all other characters on that line. To
change only the first character in a line, press toIns
change from the overwrite mode to the insert mode. If
all character positions allowed for a data entry line are
filled, delete the first character with the Del key and
enter the new first character.
<DEL>
Press toDel
delete the character or space at the
current cursor position.
<BACKSPACE>
Press the Backspace key to delete the character or
space immediately preceding the current cursor
position.
Equivalent VT100 Keystroke
With Access Manager operating in the VT mode under pcANYWHERE
III, commands entered from the VT100 terminal use different keystroke
combinations than the PC keyboard. This occurs because the VT100
terminal, unlike the PC, does not have function keys.
In the VT terminal mode, the screen displays the applicable escape key
combinations used with the VT100 terminal.
The PC function keys and their corresponding VT100 escape sequences
are listed in Tabl e3-4, “Function key and escape key sequences in VT100
terminal mode,” on page 3 -12. This table also describes the function of
each sequence.
To return to the regular operating mode, shut down Access Manager and
restart it without the /VT command.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
3-11
Using Access Manager
Table 3-4
Help
3-12
Function key and escape key sequences in VT100 terminal mode
PC mode
Function Key
VT100 terminal mode
Escape key sequence
Description
<Esc>
<Esc>-<Esc>
Cancel data/Exit request
<Up Arrow>
<Esc>-<U>
Move one line u
<Down Arrow>
<Esc>-<D>
Move one line down
<Left Arrow>
<Esc>-<L>
Move cursor left
<Right Arrow>
<Esc>-<R>
Move cursor right
<Home>
<Esc>-<H>
Move cursor to first line
<End>
<Esc>-<E>
Move cursor to last line
<PgUp>
<Esc>-<P>
Move to previous page
<PgDn>
<Esc>-<N>
Move to next page
<Ctrl>-<Left Arrow>
<Esc>-<C>-<L>
Select Far-End
<Ctrl>-<Right Arrow>
<Esc>-<C>-<R>
Select Near-End
<Ctrl>-<PgUp>
<Esc>-<C>-<P>
Select Previous CSU
<Ctrl>-<PgDn>
<Esc>-<C>-<N>
Select Next CSU
<Ins>
<Ins>
Toggle insert/overwrite
<Del>
<Del>
Delete character/space
<F1>
<Esc>-<1>
Help
<F2>
<Esc>-<2>
Go to previous screen
<F3>
<Esc>-<3>
Return to Main Menu
<F4>
<Esc>-<4>
Toggle between manual and automatic
alarm acknowledge modes
<F5>
<Esc>-<5>
Accept updated info to element
<F6>
<Esc>-<6>
Accept updated info to range of
element
<F7>
<Esc>-<7>
Toggle status of data monitor
<F8>
<Esc>-<8>
Show a list of options
<F9>
<Esc>-<9>
Log off Access Manager without
shutting down
<F10>
<Esc>-<10>
Shut down Access Manager with
LEVEL4 access onl .
not available
<Esc>-<C>-<S>
Update pcANYWHERE Screen
To get a help screen that provides function key definitions,
press F1 .
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Basics
This displays an on-line help screen labeled Function Key
Definitions. This is shown in Table 3-5, “On-line Help screen (host
PC mode)”.
Figure 3-5
On-line Help screen (host PC mode)
The screen will be appropriate for the terminal mode (PC or VT100) you
are currently in.
If you need technical help, refer to this manual orcall Verilink Technical
Support at 1-408-945-1199.
Error Messages
If you enter an unacceptable value in a data entry screen, an error
message will appear in the middle of your screen. If you’re using a color
monitor, the error message will be white text in a red box. The word
“ERROR” will appear at the top. This is followed by information which
tells you which field and option is causing the error. It may point out the
appropriate range of values or necessary corrective action.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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Using Access Manager
Warning Messages
If you’re using a color monitor, the warning message will be white text in
a red box. The word “WARNING” will appear at the top.
You will receive a warning message when you’re about to perform an
operation which may cause a line to become out of service or database
information to be overwritten.
Warning messages always offer you a choice. They allow you to choose
whether you want to continue the operation or take the often wiser course
of backing out.
Alarm Messages
If you’re using a color monitor, the warning message will be white text in
a red box. The word “ALARM” will appear at the top.
Alarm messages provide information about the state of either Verilink
equipment or the transmission lines. A concurrent alarm record is
generated and deposited into the database.
Getting started with Access Manager
This section tells you about:
Starting the
On-Site Access
Manager
■
Starting the On-Site Access Manager (pag e3-14)
■
Logging on (page 3-16)
■
Entering information into the screens (pag e3-18)
■
Making a selection (pag e3-18)
■
Exiting Access Manager (pag e3-19)
■
Logging off (pag e3-19)
If you modified your AUTOEXEC.BAT file appropriately after you
installed Access Manager, then Access Manager---and any associated
programs---will start automatically when you power up your host PC.
If you didn’t, then either:
■
3-14
modify your AUTOEXEC.BAT file, as explained in “Creating a
batch file for automatic start-up” on page 2 -9, or
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Getting started with Access Manager
■
follow the procedure to manually start Access Manager:
To manually start Access Manager:
1. Turn on and boot up your computer so that the operating system
prompt (usually C:>) appears on the screen.
2. Type CD AM2000 (or the name you assigned the directory where
you installed Access Manager). Press . Enter
3. If you are using pcANYWHERE III, type
AN YWHEREAUTOMATIC.
Press toEnter
load the program.
4. To start Access Manager, use one of the following commands:
If you are using a
Type:
color monitor with a color adapter card
AM2000
monochrome monitor with a monochrome adapter
card
AM2000/BW
monochrome monitor with a color adapter card
AM2000/BW
After Access Manager is started, the AM2000 Username screen
appears and prompts you to enter a user name to log into Access
Manager.
Access Manager
serial numbe
input screen for user name
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
3-15
Using Access Manager
When Access Manager is shipped from Verilink, the database has
only one user name defined---LEVEL4. LEVEL4 has an access
level of four.
5. Now you’re ready to log on.
Logging on
To log on:
1. At the AM2000 Username screen, you need to enter a user name. If
you still haven’t typed a valid user name after three attempts, Access
Manager exits to DOS.
•
If you are logging on to Access Manager for the first time, type
LEVEL4 and press Enter .
•
If your system administrator has already set up user definitions
in Access Manager, type your user name (up to 28 characters)
and press . Enter
After Access Manager accepts your user name, a password entry
screen appears.
2. Type your password and press
Enter
.
The password is hidden while you type it in. Youhave three chances
to enter it correctly before Access Manager returns you to the
Username screen.
•
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
If you are logging onto Access Manager for the first time, type
TEST (the default password for user name LEVEL4).
Getting started with Access Manager
After the user password is accepted, the Main Menu appears.
3. You can now perform Access Manager operations as outlined in the
chapters that follow.
4. If this is the first time Access Manager is started, enter the time and
date (See Chapter 4, Configuring Access Manager for more
information about the date and time menus).
5. This procedure is now completed.
Starting the
Remote Access
Manager
To manually start Access Manager from a remote VT100 terminal (or
equivalent emulation):
1. Turn on and boot up your computer so that the operating system
prompt (usually C:>) appears on the screen.
2. Type CD AM2000 (or the name you assigned the directory where
you installed Access Manager). Press . Enter
3. If you are using pcANYWHERE III, type ANYWHERE
AUTOMATIC. Press toEnter
load the program.
4. If you are using pcANYWHERE to control Access Manager from a
remote VT100 terminal (or equivalent emulation), type
AM2000/BW/VT and press Enter .
Note: The /BW command may be optional for your setup. Refer to
“Creating a batch file for automatic start-up” on p age2-9, for
detailed information on the /BW command.
When Access Manager is started in the VT100 mode, the bottom of
the screen displays escape key sequences instead of function keys.
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Using Access Manager
Note: When Access Manager is started in the VT100 mode, the bottom
of the screen displays escape key sequences instead of function
keys.
5. After Access Manager is started, the AM2000 Startup Screen
appears and prompts you to enter a user name to log into Access
Manager. Figure 3 -1, “Username Screen,” on page 3-2 shows this
screen.
Making a selection
All menu selections can be made by pressing the
or
highlight the desired option and then pressing toEnter
select that
option.
keys to
You can also select a menu option by typing the first character of that
option, unless there are multiple options with the same first character.
When multiple menu options appear with the same first character and you
type that character, Access Manager always chooses the first option.
If an option is numbered, then typing that number will also select that
option.
Entering
information into
the screens
Data entry fields are characterized by the type and maximum number of
characters they accept. When the maximum number of characters is
reached, the field is filled, the data is accepted, and the highlight moves to
the next field.
If an invalid character type is entered in a field, the system beeps. This
occurs, for example, if you try to enter an alphabetic character in an allnumeric field, such as a node number. The system also beeps if you are in
the insert mode and the field is already full.
Note: Typed spaces at the end of a field are treated by Access Manager
as entered characters. Blanks at the end of a field may cause the
system to beep. If this occurs, place the cursor after the last
visible character and press to delete spaces.
The and
keys may be used to move between lines from any
character position. The cursor always positions itself to the left of the first
character in the line selected.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Getting started with Access Manager
Any valid alphanumeric characters or symbols, including spaces, are
valid in an alphanumeric field. A DOS filename is defined by any valid
DOS character and filename.
To log off Access Manager:
Logging off
Press
F9
. You will ber returned to the AM2000 Username screen.
Access Manager
serial numbe
input screen for user name
You cannot shut down Access Manager unless you are logged in with
access at LEVEL4.
Exiting Access
Manager
To shut down Access Manager:
F10 any place in the program except when a screen
1. Press from
requests any key as a response. A warning message now appears.
2. To halt Access Manager and return to DOS, type Y. Any other
response returns you to the Main Menu.
!
CAUTION
The F10
key must be used to exit from Access Manager. Do not
shut down Access Manager by rebooting the computer; Doing so
may corrupt the database.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
3-19
Using Access Manager
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Chapter
4
Configuring Access Manager
This chapter provides instructions for setting up Access Manager 2000.
These operations are performed from the Utilities option of the
Main Menu.
Configuration procedure overview
Configuration
tasks
Utilities Menu
The tasks outlined in this chapter include:
■
Setting the date and time (page 4-2)
■
Configuring the site (pag e4-3)
■
Updating user definitions (pag e4-23)
■
Reviewing and archiving events logs (page 4-28)
■
Downloading firmware to the nodes (pag e4-33)
To access the Utilities Menu:
■
Select the Utilities option from the Main Menu by
highlighting the option and pressing Enter , or by typing U. The
Utilities Menu appears.
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Configuring Access Manager
Setting the date and time
Access Manager uses DOS commands to update the system clock. On
some computers, these DOS commands also update the hardware realtime clock.
■
If your system does not update the hardware clock through DOS
commands, then you may have problems if your system is rebooted
either deliberately or due to power loss.
Therefore, to insure that your system clock remains correct, exit
Access Manager and use the commands or utilities supplied with
your computer to update the hardware clock.
■
■
If your system has an accurate real-time clock, you probably don’t
need to set the date and time.
If your system does not have a real-time clock and you did not set
the time and date when you booted your system, the time and date
may not be correct. Setting the time and date in this menu also sets
the DOS time and date.
To set the date and time
1. From the Utilities Menu, select Date/Time. The Set Time & Date
screen appears.
2. Enter the correct date and time.
•
To save the changes and set the system clock, press
•
If you do not want to set the system clock, press
to the Utilities Menu.
3. The procedure is complete.
4-2
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
F2
F5
.
to return
Configuring the site
Configuring the site
Configuring the site includes the following activities:
■
Differentiating the site (pag e4-3)
■
Configuring the report printer (pag e4-5)
■
Configuring the on-line data printer (page 4-8)
■
Specifying the alarm destination (page 4-8)
■
Setting the performance data polling hour (page 4-11)
■
Assigning database allocations (page 4-12)
■
Assigning comline definitions (page 4-14)
To configure the site, you’ll need to access the Installation Menu from the
Utilities Menu.
■
Differentiating the
site
From the Utilities menu, select Installation. The Installation
Menu will appear.
To differentiate the site, you need to assign the node a site name and a
manager type.
The site name that you assign during this procedure will subsequently
appear in the upper left corner of the monitor screen. Until you define the
site name, the words NOT YET DEFINED will display on the monitor
screen.
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Configuring Access Manager
When a number of Access Managers have access to a given node, the
node needs to know “who it’s talking to”. To do this, you need to identify
each Access Manager by assigning it a Manager Type.
An Access Manager can be assigned one of three Manager Types:
PRIMAR , SECONDAR , or TECHNICIAN.
■
■
You would assign the types, PRIMARY and SECONDAR
Access Managers which are to receive alarms.
, to the two
You would assign the Manager Type, TECHNICIAN, to an
Access Manager that is not designated as one of the alternate alarm
paths and is dialing in only to do diagnostics or troubleshooting
from a remote location.
When a node controller sends an alarm to a PRIMARY or SECONDARY
Manager Type, it subsequently deletes the alarm from its buffer. When
a node controller sends an alarm to a TECHNICIAN Manager Type,
it retains the alarm in its buffer until the diagnostics session is over and it
has been able to send the alarm to the PRIMARY and/or SECONDARY
Access Manager.
To differentiate the site:
1. From the Main Menu, go to the Utilities Menu.
2. From the Utilities Menu, select the Installation option.
3. From the subsequent screen, select the Site option. The
following screen will appear.
You’ll need to assign a Site Name and Manager Type.
Until you assign the site name, the site name displays as NOT YET
DEFINED in the Edit Site Name screen.
4. Type in the name you want to assign to your site. This name can be
up to 20 characters long.
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Configuring the site
5. To see what Manager Type options are available, press
The following screen will appear.
.
F8
6. Assign a Manager Type to your Access Manager.
•
To save the site information, press F5 . The site name will
subsequently appear in the upper left corner of the screen.
•
If you don’t want to change the site information, press
return to the Installation Menu.
to
F2
7. Your task is complete.
Configuring the
report printer
The report printer is the printer that prints the performance data analysis
and bar charts from information in the database. Database information
can be viewed from the Database Access Menu.
To configure the report printer:
■
From the Installation Menu, select Report. The screen labeled
Edit Report Printer Configuration now appears.
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Configuring Access Manager
Report output destination
The Printer Filename option specifies a destination for the report
output. You can print to either:
■
a parallel port (LPT1 or LPT2), or
■
a disk file
You must use the DOS file naming convention to enter a file name or a
full path name for a disk file. The Printer Filename field allows
you to enter up to 20 characters: 8 characters for the file’s name and the
remaining 12 characters for the path. If the file name were PRINT1.DOC
and the path were C:\AM2000\, the entire filename would be
C:\AM2000\PRINT1.DOC.
You should include the full DOS path even though it is not required.
■
■
■
■
■
If a non-reserved name is specified, the report is saved to a disk file
and may be accessed later.
If a full DOS path is not included, the file is placed in the current
directory.
If a filename is specified and you press F5 to save the definition,
a file is created on disk with the name specified and zero bytes
assigned. This is done to verify that the definition is correct and the
file can be created.
If the filename NUL or NONE is used, the output is discarded.
If no printer is to be attached, then NONE should be entered to
avoid the PC attempting to print to a non-existent printer and
“freezing” in the process.
Enter a filename and press
Enter
.
Printer Type
Printer Type selects the type of printer used to print the data. This
field is only valid when LPT1 or LPT2 is entered for the Printer
Filename option.
Access Manager supplies drivers for five printers, but only one of the
predefined printer types can be entered in this field at a time.
The only difference in the five printer types supported is in the characters
used to program the printers for condensed (compressed) mode and to
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuring the site
restore them to normal mode (10 cpi). The hexadecimal values used for
the printer types are listed as follows:
Printer Type
Condensed
Normal
IBM Graphic
0F
12
Epson
0F
12
Okidata
1D
1E
These are for the 320/321 family of printers.
The 190 family of printers use the values shown for the IBM or
Epson printers and, therefore, should be installed as an IBM or
Epson.
DEC LA120
TTY
1B, 5B, 34, 77 (ESC 4w
1B, 5B, 30, 77 (E SC0w)
The TTY option is for printers that are unable to print
compressed characters.
Also, select TTY for a printer not listed or whose compressed
character commands do not match any of those listed in the
options table. Compressed characters are not used.
1. With the cursor positioned on the Printer Type option, press
F8 to display a window of the predefined printer types.
A screen labeled Select Printer Type appears on top of
the Edit Report Printer Configuration screen.
2. Place the cursor on the desired choice, and press
the selection number.
Enter
or press
If you use a name other than LPT1 or LPT2 and then press
F5 to save the options, NOT APPLICABLE will appear in the
Printer Type field.
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4-7
Configuring Access Manager
Is Printer 80-Column Wide?
The Is Printer 80-Column Wide? data entry field appears in
the Edit Report Printer Configuration screen. If you
enter Y, the type may be compressed to print 132 columns on 8.5-inch
paper, if supported by the printer type. Only those reports over 80
columns wide are compressed. Otherwise, the printer is set for 80
columns only. The number of lines is always 66.
When you are satisfied with the menu options and want to save them and
exit from the Installation Menu, press F5 . Or, press F2 to exit this
menu without saving the changes. Records beyond the quota are deleted
from the database when the F5 key is pressed.
Configuring the
on-line data printer
The on-line printer is the printer that prints the performance analysis and
bar charts from information in the elements (cards) themselves. This
information can be viewed from in the On-line Access Menu.
To configure the report printer:
■
From the Installation Menu select On-line. The Edit On-line
Printer Configuration screen appears.
This screen defines where the on-line information is printed and what
type of printer is used. The selections and menu are the same as in the
Edit Report Printer option described in the previous section.
Refer to that section for an explanation of the menus and choices.
Specifying the
alarm destination
4-8
You can specify whether alarm reports go to a printer, file, or a computer.
This is done through the Edit Alarm Destination screen.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuring the site
To select where you want the alarms to go:
■
From the Installation Menu, select Alarm. The Edit Alarm
Destination screen will appear.
Sending alarms to a printer or file
To output the alarm report to a printer or to a file:
■
Follow the same rules for Alarm Printer Filename and
Alarm Printer Type as you did for Printer Filename
and Printer Type in “Configuring the report printer” on
page 4-5, earlier in this chapter.
Sending alarms to a computer
You can choose to output alarm messages to another computer, such as
one running Accumaster.
Before attempting to configure Access Manager to send alarm reports to
another compute , you must first enter SERIAL DEVICE for the
Access Arrangement of a Comline in the Comlines Definition
screen. In other words, the only time you can use COMx (where x is a
number) in the Alarm Printer Filename field is when you have
defined the comline for a serial device.
!
CAUTION
However, if you’re using an actual serial printer, you cannot use a
name such as COM1 in the Alarm Printer Filename field. If you
do, Access Manager may halt. Instead, you must enter LPT1 or LPT2
in the Edit Report Printer Configuration screen, and then use the
MODE command from DOS to redirect the LPT port to a non-
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4-9
Configuring Access Manager
Digiboard COM port. Refer to the DOS manual for proper use of the
MODE command. Do not duplicate filenames listed in Table 2-1,
“Access Manager Installation Files,” on page 2-4.
To output alarm messages to another computer:
1. In the Alarm Printer Filename field, enter the comline
name.
2. Leave the Printer Type field blank. It is not applicable.
Alarm Channel Protocol
The Alarm Channel Protocol data entry field appears in the
Editing the Alarm Destination screen. The Alarm Channel
Protocol option is selected by moving the cursor to that line and
pressing F8 to bring up the selection Alarm Channel
Protocol screen.
If you are using a serial or parallel printe , select the PLAIN ENGLISH
MESSAGE option. This sends the entire alarm information in ASCII
format. The alarms are printed one alarm message per line.
If you are outputting to a serial port or disk file, select the TERSE
MESSAGE option. This sends information in the following formats:
■
the date, time, and node name alarm output in an ASCII format, and
■
the alarm status in an ASCII-formatted hexadecimal format.
Do not use this option with a serial or parallel printer.
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Configuring the site
Note: Refer to Appendix C, "Alarm Report Record Format", for a
description of the alarm printout format.
If your Access Manager includes Accumaster protocol compatibilit , the
Edit Alarm Destination screen includes a third option,
Accumaster Protocol. If Accumaster Protocol is selected,
the alarms are sent to the Accumaster system. This protocol uses flow
control to hold off sending data to Accumaster when requested by
Accumaster. If the connection to Accumaster is disconnected, alarms are
stored in the Access Manager 2000 database until the Accumaster
connection is re-established, at which time all uncleared alarms are sent
to Accumaster.
Note: The Accumaster Protocol option is available only in the Access
Manager-1000 package.
Except when the Accumaster Protocol is chosen, the port sending alarm
messages does not use communication flow control or handshaking.
Alarm acknowledgement: Manual or automatic?
The Acknowledge Alarm Automatically? data entry field
appears in the Editing the Alarm Destination screen. This option specifies
the default setting for the alarm status shown at the top of the screen when
a user logs onto Access Manager. To select the automatic mode, type Y.
Once you are logged on, press F4 to toggle between the manual and
automatic modes. In the automatic mode, when an alarm occurs, you
briefly see the alarm processing message.
Setting the
performance data
polling hour
Access Manager collects DS1 performance data every 12 hours and
discards duplicate data collected during any 24-hour period. It polls all
equipped nodes at the same hour in alphanumeric order. If the connection
to a node fails, polling for that node is rescheduled up to three times after
all other nodes are polled, for a total of four polling attempts.
Access Manager collects data only from CSUs that meet certain
conditions:
a. The CSUs must be configured as Installed and
Operational.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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Configuring Access Manager
b. The CSUs must have collection of performance data enabled.
c. The parent nodes of the CSUs must be configured as
Installed and Operational.
For circuit elements accessed through the 4-kbps ESF Data Link, a circuit
must be built between the near and far circuit elements in order to collect
far-end data. This is because all data is stored under the circuit element’s
parent node name.
Note: To retrieve data from a far-end CSU, the near-end CSU must be
set to retrieve data.
You must specify the hour when the 12-hour polling cycle for collection
of performance data is initiated.
To specify the polling hour:
1. From the Installation screen, select Hou . The Edit Poll Hour
screen appears.
2. Choose one of the following options:
Assigning
database
allocations
•
To specify the polling hou , enter a value from 1 to 12 for the
polling hour from 1 to 12, and press F5 to save the value.
•
To disable performance data polling, enter ZERO or a number
equal to or greater than 13.
•
To exit from this option without saving changes, press
F2
The Access Manager database provides space for the event log, alarm log,
and performance database (that is, log). You may allocate how much
space is given to each log.
The default allocations, at time of shipment, are shown in Table 4-1,
“Database allocation at time of shipment,” on page 4 -13.
4-12
.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuring the site
Table 4-1
Database allocation at time of shipment
Type of record
Number or records
per log (default)
Maximum size
of record
Event
5,000
58 bytes
Alarm
10,000
62 bytes
• data (also known as user records)
50,000
150bytes
• additional
50,000
150bytes
• dtev (also known as EQP records)
50,000
150bytes
Performance (3 kinds)
Each of the three categories of performance records can be edited
separately.
To assign database allocations:
1. From the Installation screen, select Quotas. The screen labeled
Edit Database Record Quotas now appears.
You can
edit these
fields
Tells you which network
manager package you have:
AM2000-8
AM2000-24
AM2000-1000
The Edit Database Record Quotas screen also displays, but does not
permit you to change the following:
•
The current number of records of each type in use (that is, stored
in the database)
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
4-13
Configuring Access Manager
•
The current number of installed CSU circuit elements (that is,
configured in the database as Installed and
Operational)
•
The maximum number of CSU circuit elements which your
Access Manager Package permits to be installed. If there is no
restriction in the package, this is shown as UNRESTRICTED.
The type of Access Manager package you have is shown last. This
can be AM2000-8, AM2000-24, or AM2000-1000.
When the current number of records reaches the maximum allowed,
no new records will be added. You may increase the maximum
number of records allowed to prevent loss of data, or you may
choose to take some time to archive or delete the older data.
2. Adjust the maximum allowable record numbers as needed.
3. Select one of the following actions:
•
To save the changes made, press F5 . The changes are saved,
and the current records used counts are updated.
•
To exit the menu without saving the changes, press
F2
.
4. If you do not increase the allocations, you may reduce the records in
use by saving them to another file using the Archive function.
Assigning comline
definitions
A comline, or communication line, is a serial port on your computer. It is
used to transmit to or receive data from a network node or another
computer through an Electronic Industries Association (EIA) standard
RS232 interface.
When you assign a comline definition, you specify what protocol, or
“language”, the port will be using to communicate with any device
connected to it.
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Configuring the site
Access Manager 2000 supports 1 to 16 comlines operating at the
following rates:
Comlines operating
at:
1200 baud
Support these connections:
• direct
• ComDesign Multiplexer
• modem
2400 baud
• modem
9600 baud
• direct
• multiplexer
• modem (NCC 2020 controller only
• X.25PAD (NCC 2020 controller only
The following are supported if no handshake protocol is used:
■
■
Leased-line circuits using full-time modems. This configuration is
specified as DIRECT under the Access Arrangement
option.
Circuits that are direct-connected using short-haul modems
operating at 9600 baud.
Note: Before defining a Comline in the Access Manager database, make
sure the printed circuit board with the serial port(s) is installed in
your personal computer. Refer to AppendixD, "Installing Serial
Ports" for instructions on installing a standard serial board or
DigiBoard DigiCHANNEL board in your Personal Computer.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
4-15
Configuring Access Manager
The database is shipped with only COM1 installed. The following screen
shows the default definition for COM1 on an IBM PC, PS/2, or 100%
IBM-compatible.
All numeric entries, except the baud rate, are in hexadecimal and are
followed by an “H”. You can enter the “H” manually, or the program will
automatically enter it. The Comline definition is made up of numerous
variables. To change any variables, continue with the following sections.
You can do the following:
■
Add one or more comlines
■
Edit, delete, or view existing comlines
■
List (print) all the comlines that have been defined
From the Installation screen, select Comlines. The screen labeled
Revise Comlines Definitions appears.
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Configuring the site
Adding a new comline definition
1. From the Installation Menu select Comline.
2. From the Revise Comline Definitions screen, select Add.
3. The Add Comline Definition screen appears, showing the default
value for each item listed.
!
•
If no other Comlines were previously defined, COM1 appears as
the Comline name in this screen.
•
If other Comlines were previously defined, the screen shows the
next highest available Comline (COM2 through COM16, as
appropriate).
CAUTION
If Access Manager 2000 is accessed remotely by Accumaster or a
remote terminal, COM1 is the remote access port. It must be
configured in the host PC setup of pcANYWHERE III. It is not
configured in the database. Therefore, when using Access Manager
in a remote access mode, assign COM2 and successive comline
from Access Manager as described in the following paragraphs, and
delete COM1 from the database.
Note: The Comlines must be added in consecutive numeric order.If a
Comline name greater than COM16 is used, the message
COMLINE NAME MUST BE COMx (where x is 1 to 16) appears.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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Configuring Access Manager
The following data entry fields appear in the Add Comline Definition
screen:
Field Name
Meaning
Comline name
The Comline name can be COM1 through COM16. No
other values are accepted by Access Manager.
Port Addr
This is the port address of the serial interface. Refer to
the manual supplied with your computer or to
Appe ndixD, "Installing Serial Ports" for this address.
IRQ Number
The IRQ number is the interrupt request number of the
serial interface. For the IRQ number, refer to the manual
supplied with your computer or to Appe ndixD,
"Installing Serial Ports".
Baud Rate
This field specifies 1200, 2400, or 9600 baud for use by
the serial interface.
Access Arrangement
Access Arrangement specifies the type of connection at
each serial ports of the Access Manager PC. All of the
comlines, except SERIAL DEVICE, are connected to
nodes or devices to which nodes are connected. The
SERIAL DEVICE connection services another compute
or an Accumaster.
Further details are outlined below.
To display the access arrangement(s):
1. Place the cursor on the Access Arrangement option.
2. Press F8 . The screen showing possible access arrangements
appears.
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Configuring the site
The connection choices and their descriptions are as follows:
Type of connection
Direct
Description
Either:
• Hardwired to a node.
• Connected to a node through a pair of full-time (dedicated)
modems using a dedicated facility.
• Connected to a node via a dedicated port into a
multiplexer and conveyed in the multiplexer’s payload.
Modem
Call/Answer
This choice provides dial-out call to a node and dial-in call
from a node. A Modem Call/Answer Comline uses the
Hayes AT command set at 1200, 2400, or 9600 (for AS2000
equipment only) baud.
If a combination of 1200-baud and 2400-baud call/answer
modems are connected to the computer, install the 2400
baud modems with higher Comline numbers than the 1200baud modems. If answer-only modems are connected, install
them with higher Comline numbers than the call/answer
modems. If multiple modems are used for alarm reporting,
their phone lines should be installed by the telephone
company or in a PBX (direct inward dial) as a hunt group.
This allows the hunt group master number to be used as an
alarm report number for all nodes. If you configure a Comline
for 9600 baud, that comline cannot be used to query a node
configured for 1200 baud although on incoming calls to
Access Manager, a 9600-baud modem adapts to the baud
rate (1200, 2400, or 9600) of the incoming call.
Modem Answer
Only
Dial-in call (from a node) only. A Modem Answer Only
Comline (normally used with INWATS lines) uses the Hayes
AT command set on a modem at 1200, 2400, or 9600 baud.
ComDesign Mux
Connection to multiple nodes through a routing multiplexer
such as a ComDesig nRS2000 Statistical Multiplexer. Refer
to the ComDesign Multiplexer manual for proper
configuration of the multiplexer.
X.25 PAD
For use with AS2000 (NCC 2020) only.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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Configuring Access Manager
Type of connection
Autoconfig
Description
Access Manage automatically determines if the Access
Arrangement is DIRECT,MODEM CALL/ANSWER, or
COMDESIGN MUX. When the AUTOCONFIG option is
chosen, the order of automatic configuration attempts is as
follows:
• ComDesign Multiplexer at 9600 baud
• Modem at 2400 baud
• Modem at 1200 baud
• Direct Connection at 9600 baud (Default selection
The automatic configuration procedure takes up to one
minute. If none of the options are successful, the default is
chosen (#4).
The failure to AUTOCONFIG could be caused by any of the
following:
• Option setting on modem set incorrectly. See Append ixB,
"Modem Configuration" for the proper modem settings.
• ComDesign Multiplexer port not configured correctly. See
the ComDesign manual for proper port configuration. (The
port names assigned in the multiplexer must be the same
as the names assigned in Access Manager.
• Access equipment (ComDesign Multiplexer or modem) not
connected to host PC. Connect the equipment, and retry
auto-configuration.
Serial Device
Serial output-only connection with no flow control. A Serial
Device Comline sends alarm messages to a printer or to
another computer using the Accumaster protocol.
Shared I/O
Status Port
Address
This data entry field is used for interface boards containing
more than one serial port and using a shared I/O status port
and interrupt (IRQ). Appe ndixD, "Installing Serial Ports",
gives the correct shared I/O status port addresses for each
port number.
Shared I/O
Status Port
Mask
This data entry field is used for interface boards with more
than one serial port and using a shared IRQ number and
shared I/O status port address. Appe ndixD, "Installing Serial
Ports" gives the correct shared I/O status port masks fo
each port number.
Comments
Up to four lines of alphanumeric comments and spaces can
be entered, with 30 characters per line. This field does not
affect operation of the Comline.
A note about AS2000 or ConnecT1 Plus:
If the node is an AS2000 type, daisy-chained to other AS2000 type nodes,
the daisy chain connection to the first node must be direct, and Modem
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuring the site
Call/Answer, Modem Answer Only, ComDesign Mux, and Autoconfig
are not available for the second and third nodes.
Access Manager uses Hayes protocol for modems. If the phone number
is not preceded by an alpha character, Access Manager assumes that the
phone line in use is a dual-tone multifrequency (DTMF) line and prefixes
the phone number with the characters ATDT. However, if the phone line
requires dial pulsing, you must enter the prefix ATDP to the number
yourself. Refer to the modem manual for more information on how to use
these commands. This number should include an access prefix followed
by a comma if the lines are connected to a PBX. The comma causes the
modem to pause for a set time period to allow for a second dial tone after
dialing the access prefix.
Since Access Arrangement controls only the host computer (i.e.,
PC) end of the Comline, it is necessary to assure that equipment at both
ends of the connection be set for the correct access arrangement. See the
Verilink SIM, NC/E, 551VST List 2 , 551VST ML List 1, 551VST ML List
2, and Access System 2000 Manuals.
Editing a comline definition
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Utilities.
2. From the Utilities Menu, select Installation.
3. From the Installation Menu, select Comline.
4. From the Revise Comline Definitions screen, select Edit. A list of
currently defined Comlines now appears.
5. From this list, choose the comline to be edited by highlighting it and
pressing Enter . The current comline definition option settings are
now listed.
Note: The allowable entries for the Comline definition options ar
determined by the computer and peripheral boards used by
Access Manager. AppendixD, "Installing Serial Ports" lists the
permissible entries for the standard computer and peripheral
board configurations.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
4-21
Configuring Access Manager
Using the entries listed in Appendix D , "Installing Serial Ports", edit the
comline definition options as described in Adding a new comline
definition” on pa ge4-17.
Deleting a comline definition
1. From the Utilities Menu, select Installation. From the
Installation screen, select Comline. The screen labeled Revise
Comline Definitions will appear.
2. From the Revise Comline Definitions screen, select Delete. The
Select Comline to Delete screen now appears.
3. Highlight the comline to be deleted and press
Enter
.
A warning message with the Comline and system port number now
appears, asking you to confirm that you want to delete it.
4. Choose one of the following actions:
!
•
To delete the displayed comline, type Y.
•
To cancel the request, press any other key
CAUTION
With a PS/2 using DigiCHANNEL MC/4 or MC/8 boards, Comline
must be deleted in reverse order from the order in which they were
installed. The highest COM number on a board (Port 4 for MC/4 an
Port 8 for MC/8) must be deleted first and then 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1.
Failure to remove the Comlines in the correct order prevents Access
Manager from using any ports after the deleted ones.
5. After a comline is deleted, the system returns to the Select Comline
to Delete screen so that you can delete more comlines.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Updating user definitions
6. When you have finished deleting comlines, press
the previous menu.
F2
to return to
Viewing comline definitions
This option allows you to view how you have configured your comlines.
Use the same procedure as described earlier (“Editing a comline
definition” on pa ge4-21) except select View rather than Edit.
Listing (printing) comline definitions
This option allows you to print the configuration of your comlines from
the report printer. Use the same procedure as described earlier, except
select List rather than Edit.
Updating user definitions
The User Definitions option allows you to add, delete, or modify
Access Manager user names and their associated passwords and access
levels. Only a user with Level 4 access can access this menu to change the
passwords and access levels for defined users.
The user names, passwords, and access levels are encrypted in the
database to prevent viewing them with an ASCII file editor.
User Name
The User Name data entry field appears in the Add New User screen.
Each user name can have up to 28 alphanumeric characters. Each user
name defined in Access Manager can have a separate password
associated with it.
Password
The Password data entry field appears in the Add New User screen.
Each user password can have up to 20 alphanumeric characters.
Access Level
The Access Level data entry field appears in the Add New User
screen. Each user name has a certain level of access associated with it.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
4-23
Configuring Access Manager
The access level of the current user is shown in the lower right box of
each screen. Four access levels are possible, each permitting a user to
perform certain operations. These levels are as follows.
Access Level and
Definition
Level 1
Read information
Level 2
Read with limited
parameter modifications
Level 3
Read with parameter
modifications
Level 4
System manager
Functions
Information can be retrieved but registers cannot be
reset, and working parameters and options cannot be
modified.
Allows Level 1 capabilities, plus non-service-affecting
functions and parameter modifications, such as resetting
performance registers and enabling circuit element
retrieval of performance data. On color monitors, the
selected screens show parameters that can be modified
in blue and parameters that cannot be modified in red.
On monochrome monitors, the parameters that can be
modified appear as highlighted characters and the
parameters that cannot appear in normal characte
mode.
Allows Level 1 and 2 functions plus service-affecting
functions (for example, loopback or testing), and
parameter modifications (for example, network element
configuration).
Level 1 through 3 functions plus addition and deletion of
users, changing passwords and access levels,
performing all system installation and archive functions,
and shutting down the system. Access Manager doe
not allow the system to be modified in such a way that no
system manager access level exists.
From the Utilities Menu, select User Definitions. The screen
labeled Revise User Definitions appears.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Updating user definitions
Viewing the user
definitions
Listing the user
definitions
Starting from the Main Menu, select Utilities. From the Utilities Menu,
select User Definitions. From the Revise User Definitions screen,
select Vie . You then see the existing user names, passwords, and
current access levels.
To print a list of existing user names, passwords, and current access
levels:
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Utilities. The Utilities
Menu will appear.
2. Select User Definitions. The Revise User Definitions screen
will appear.
3. Select List. This will cause the report printer to output a list of the
information.
Deleting a user
definition
To delete a user definition:
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Utilities.
2. From the Utilities Menu, select User Definitions.
3. From the Revise User Definitions screen, select Delete. You then
see the list of existing users.
4. Highlight the user name you want to delete, and then press
The delete confirmation prompt appears at this time.
Enter
.
5. Choose one of the following actions:
•
To confirm the deletion, type Y at the prompt.
•
To cancel the deletion, press any other key.
Note: You are prevented from editing or deleting user names and access
levels so that there is not at least one access Level 4 user
remaining in the database.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
4-25
Configuring Access Manager
To add a user definition:
Adding a user
definition
1. From the Revise User Definitions screen, select Add. The screen
labeled Add New User now appears.
2. Enter the user name, password, and access level. Choose one of the
following options:
To save the definition, press
To exit without saving, press
F5
F2
.
.
3. The user names, passwords, and access levels are encrypted in the
database to prevent viewing them with an ASCII file editor.
The default user definitions shipped with the Access Manager database
include the following:
■
User Name: LEVEL4
■
Password: TEST
■
Access Level: 4
The default access level for all new users is Level 1.
Not all of the options are displayed on some sub-menus for users with an
access level lower than LEVEL4. For example, the following two figures
show two typical screens that appear for LEVEL1 access users.
Figure 3-6
4-26
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Utilities Menu for a LEVEL1 Use
Updating user definitions
Figure 3-7
Review System Events Menu (Level 1 User)
These screens generally allow Level 1 through Level 3 users to view and
list items, but not to delete or archive them.
Editing a user
definition
If you have LEVEL4 access, you can edit an existing user name,
password, and access level.
To edit a user definition:
1. From the Revise User Definitions screen, select Edit. The Select
User to Edit screen appears. This screen (not illustrated here) shows
the existing user names, passwords, and access levels.
2. Use the directional keys to select a user name.
3. Press
Enter
. The screen labeled Edit User Definition now appears.
4. Make the changes you want.
■
To save the changes, press
■
To abort the changes, press
F5
F2
.
.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
4-27
Configuring Access Manager
Reviewing and archiving events logs
Each time a system event occurs, a record is made in the database. System
events include:
■
system start-up
■
system shutdown
■
user log in
■
user log out
■
the start and finish of scheduled data polling for each node and
circuit element
Access Manager lets you view, list, or archive Event Log Records.
From the Utilities Menu, select Event Log. The Review System Events
screen appears.
Viewing system
events
4-28
To view system events:
1. From the Utilities Menu, select Event Log.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Reviewing and archiving events logs
2. From the Review System Events screen, select Vie . The System
Event Log Entries screen now appears.
The cursor will be positioned at the center of the menu on the last
event recorded.
3. Use the
the log.
Listing system
events
PgUp
and
PgDn
keys and cursor keys to view the events in
1. From the Utilities Menu, select Event Log. The Review System
Events screen appears.
2. Select List.
All system events are printed from the report printer.
Archiving system
events
Only a LEVEL4 user may archive files.
1. From the Utilities Menu, select Event Log. The Review System
Events screen appears.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
4-29
Configuring Access Manager
2. Select Archive. The screen labeled Events: Choose Archive
Option appears.
This screen has 3 options: Print, Archive, and Delete.
Printing event records
When you print all event records, you can elect to retain or delete the
printed records.
To print event records:
1. In the Events: Choose Archive Option screen, select the Print
option. The screen labeled Select archive cutoff date appears,
showing the current date.
2. Enter the desired cutoff date, and press F5 to accept it. All event
log records up to midnight of the selected date are printed. The
printer as used in this context can be defined as a file on the hard
disk in the Report Printer Definition screen.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Reviewing and archiving events logs
3. After all selected records are printed, a warning message appears,
prompting you to confirm deletion of all records up to the chosen
cutoff date.
4. Choose one of the following actions:
•
To delete all records up to and including the cutoff date selected,
type Y.
•
To cancel the Delete function, press any other key.
Archiving event records
The Event Log records are archived in an ASCII, comma-delimited
format. The format is compatible with Lotus 1-2-3, dBase III Plus, and
other similar spreadsheet software. The file names use the format
LOyymmdd.XXX, where:
■
LO is always the first two letters
■
yy = the year of the archive
■
mm = the month of the archive
■
dd = the day of the archive
■
XXX = extension, consecutively numbered from 001 to 999
The month, date, and year used in the archive file name are those selected
in the Archive Cutoff Date screen, not the current date.
Each time archiving is executed, it starts with a file extension of “.001”. If
a previous event log archive has been performed with the same cutoff day,
the previous archive files (which also started with extension .001) are
overwritten if they exist on the same disk and directory.
Refer to Appendix E, "Archive File Formats", for a detailed description
of the event log record format.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
4-31
Configuring Access Manager
To archive event records:
1. From the Events: Choose Archive Option screen, choose the
Archive option. The Select Archive Cutoff Date screen appears.
2. Enter the cutoff date. When you press F5 to accept the data you
entered, the screen labeled Select Drive appears.
If you pressed
appears.
F2
to cancel the archiving, the previous menu
3. You can archive the event log records to any drive on your system. If
the selected drive is the same as the one from which Access
Manager is started, the archived files are placed in the directory. If a
different drive is selected, the files are placed in the root directory of
the selected drive.
Specify the disk to which the event records are to be archived.
•
To copy the previously selected records from the oldest date to
the cutoff date) to a file on the selected disk, press F5 .
•
To cancel the archiving function, press
you to the previous menu.
F2
. This will return
4. After the records are completely archived, you are asked to confirm
that the archived records should be deleted from the database.
•
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
To confirm the deletion, type Y.
Downloading firmware to the nodes
•
To cancel the deletion, press any other key.
Deleting event records without archiving
The Delete option deletes event records from the database without
printing or archiving them.
To delete event records without archiving:
1. In the Events: Choose Archive Option screen, select the Delete
option. The Select Archive Cutoff Date screen appears.
2. Enter the cutoff date. When you press F5 to confirm the data, a
warning message appears, asking you to confirm the deletion.
3. Type Y to continue with the record deletion process, or press any
other key to abort record deletion.
If Y is typed, the selected records (from the oldest date to the
cutoff date) are deleted.
Downloading firmware to the nodes
Code Download, also referred to “Download APA”, is available only to
Verilink Access System 2000 circuit elements: NCC 2020s, TAC 2010s,
TIU 2850s, DIU 2130s, and DIU 2140s.
This option allows you to download new architecture (personality or
features) from Access Manager to one or more circuit elements in a node.
APA is an acronym for Verilink’s Advanced Programmable Architecture.
This feature is available only to Level 4 users.
The procedure that follows takes up to 10 minutes to complete. Before
you begin, verify the following:
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
4-33
Configuring Access Manager
■
■
The download files for the desired Access System 2000 circuit
elements have already been installed on the same hard disk drive
directory as the Access Manager 2000 software. Typically, this
directory is C:\AM2000.
The node has been configured to enable downline loading. You can
check this in the Node Configuration menu. The Enable
Downline load Firmware option must be set to Y.
WARNING
!
During download, the circuit element reverts to its original firmware
load before the new firmware load is completely downloaded.
Furthermore, the circuit element is out of service for up to 6 seconds
during download.
Therefore, downloading should be scheduled as an out-of-service
period.
Since reverting to the original firmware load in the CSU executes the
same operation as a power-up restart, the performance registers in
the CSU will be reset.
If you want to save the performance registers, you should
reconfigure the AM2000 to perform scheduled polling before
downloading of the CSU is started.
To download firmware code to the CSU:
1. Go to the Main Menu, and select Utilities. The Utilities Menu
will appear.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Downloading firmware to the nodes
2. Select the Code download option. The Select a Node screen
now appears. This screen lists all Acce ss System2000 nodes.
3. From this menu, select the node in which the target elements are
located and press Enter . The Select plug type screen will appear.
4. Select the circuit element type from the Select Plug Type screen.
The Select Code Version screen will appear.
EXAMPLE ONLY.
This does not necessarily
show true version numbers.
5. Select the version files to be downloaded to the CSU. Press . Enter
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
4-35
Configuring Access Manager
The Select a shelf and plug range screen appears.
Skip Steps 6 and 7 if the plug type is an NCC 2 0 20.
6. You can extend the range of shelves and plugs across different types
of modules. Only modules of the type that you’ve selected will
accept the download.
Slots (and consequently, plugs) are numbered from left to right. The
leftmost circuit element (that is, plug) in any shelf is always
numbered 1. The second slot is 2, and so on.
The shelf which includes the node controller is shelf number 1.
If the plug is in a multiline shelf, you must enter the same shelf
number you used when you set the shelf address during the initial
hardware installation.
Enter the shelf and range of slots in the fields.
Press toF5confirm the range.
7. If you enter an invalid shelf number or range of elements, an error
message appears. Re-enter the proper numbers.
8. Once you confirm the range, a warning message appears to let you
know that once down-line loading begins, it cannot be aborted.
a. If you’re sure you want to proceed with downline loading, type Y
at the prompt.
b. Otherwise, press any key to exit from this operation.
9. Access Manager now downloads the new firmware to the selected
elements.
•
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
First, the circuit element reverts to its original firmware
(whatever’s in its EPROM) and its processor is reset. Once the
processor is reset, circuit elements perform functions (including
Downloading firmware to the nodes
self-test and clearing performance registers). During this
activity, the CSUs are out of service for up to 3 seconds.
Similarly, DIU circuit elements self-test and interrupt service to
the data ports.
•
After reset, the actual downloading begins. This can take up to
10 minutes, depending on the number of elements receiving the
download. During download, the circuit element operates
normally, running the original code in the EPROM.
•
When the downloading is complete, the circuit element is reset
again and out-of-service for up to 3 seconds. When service
returns, the new code is installed and running.
•
The downloading process has a self check at the end. Access
Manager displays a message identifying which plugs were
downloaded successfully and which, if any, failed:
Downloaded Successfully to plugs: 1 3 4 5
Downloaded Failed to plug: 2
Press any key to continue
After downloading is complete, the Select Plug Type screen
reappears.
ESCthen
10. Press and
toF2return to the
Utilities Menu.
a. If you want to verify the new firmware revision level, go from
the Main Menu into the Online Menu and use the Status
element option.
b. If downline loading fails on any plug, repeat the procedure on
that plug.
If the trouble continues, replace the circuit element in that slot
and repeat the procedure on the new circuit element.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
4-37
Configuring Access Manager
11. Your circuit element has now been updated and is ready for use.
12. This completes APA down-line loading.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Chapter
5
Configuring the T1 Network
This chapter gives you instructions for configuring the DS1 network
elements with Access Manager. These operations are performed from the
Configuration menu.
The tasks outlined in this chapter include:
■
Configuring nodes (pag e5-10)
■
Configuring circuit elements (pag e5-44)
■
Configuring circuits (page 5-102)
■
CSU acceptance testing (page 5-108)
Many operations and features are common to both AS2000 systems and
551VST type systems, but there are also some significant differences.
When there is a difference, you will be presented with a menu that is
customized for the difference.
Access System 2000 hardware is available in both dual-line and multiline
shelving configurations, while ConnecT1 Plus hardware is only available
in a dual-line configuration. The software specifications of the two
products are, however, very similar. Because of this similarity, this
chapter treats them as interchangeable.
T1 Network Monitoring Overview
Configuring the T1 network requires some basic familiarity with nodes,
circuit elements, and circuits.
Node
Physically, all nodes consist of at least one CSU and may contain
additional elements such as DSUs and other CSUs.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
5-1
Configuring the T1 Network
Functionally, the node is the network management connection. It’s often
synonymous with the controller. It provides a point of access between
Access Manager and the circuit elements it manages. As far as Access
Manager is concerned, often the controller is the node.
A controller can take one of three physical forms. It can be:
■
an integral physical part of a standalone CSU
■
an integral physical part of a CSU element in a multiline shelf
■
an electrically independent module in a multiline shelf
Standalone CSUs are also referred to as single-line CSUs.
Each controller has specific CSU circuit elements with which it can be
used. A controller with its CSUs is referred to as a parent node. In Access
Manager, the parent node’s name is used to refer to the controller.
Table 5-1
Parent nodes and their components
Nodes composed of standalone CSUs are shown with the lightest shading. Nodes
with independant controller modules are shown with darker shading. Nodes which
use a controller integrated with a CSU on a multiline shelf are not shaded.
Parent Node Type
Controller
CSU Circuit Elements
551VST List 1/
551VST List 1/A
551VST List 1/A
551VST List 1/
551VST List 1/B
551VST List 1/B
551VST List 2
551VST List 2
551VST List 2
SIM
SIM
4016-R
NC/E
SIM
4016-R
551VST ML List 1
NMC List 1
4016 List (1 or 2)
551VST ML List 2
NMC List 2
4016 List (1 or 2)
AS2000
NCC 2020
NCC 2020 or TAC 2010
ConnecT1 Plus
CCC 1020
CCC 1020 or TAC 1010
Some of the more typical arrangements of shelves, nodes, and circuit
element are shown in the following figures.
5-2
■
Figure 5 -1, “SIM node”
■
Figure 5 -2, “NC/E node”
■
Figure 5 -3, “551 VST ML List 1 node”
■
Figure 5 -4, “551VST ML List 2 node”
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
T1 Network Monitoring Overview
Figure 5-1
SIM node
The SIM node has one SIM controller and up to 10 4016-R CSUs.
SIM
SIM
Figure 5-2
4016-R CSUs
10 each
551V MLS shelf
NC/E node
The NC/E node includes up to 5551V MLS shelves. Each shelf has one SIM and up
to 10 4016-R CSUs.
NC/E
SIM
SIM
SIM
SIM
SIM
4016-R CSUs
10 each
4016-R CSUs
10 each
4016-R CSUs
10 each
4016-R CSUs
10 each
4016-R CSUs
10 each
Figure 5-3
NC/E shelf
551V MLS shelves
551 VST ML List 1 node
This is the CSU shelf configuration with an NMC List 1 Controller, or the NMC List2
Controller without NMC phase II firmware.
The 551VST ML List1 system has one 551VST MLB (Multiline Basic) shelf with or
without the 551VST MLE (Multiline Expansion) shelf and contains up to 28 Model
4016 List 2 CSUs.
551VST ML List 1
NMC 4016 List 1 or 2 CSUs
List 1
14 eac
4016 List 1 or 2 CSUs
14 eac
551VST MLB shelf
551VST MLE shelf
(optional)
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
5-3
Configuring the T1 Network
Figure 5-4
551VST ML List 2 node
The 551VST ML List 2 node includes the old List 1 or new List 2 shelf with a List 2
controller and Phase IINMC software to permit automatic alarm reporting.
551VST ML List 2
NMC 4016 List 1 or 2 CSUs
List 2
14 eac
4016 List 1 or 2 CSUs
14 eac
551VST MLB shelf
551VST MLE shelf
(optional)
A configuration of one or two stand-alone 551VST MLE expansion
shelves at a location can also be configured as this type of node and
should be configured for Data Link access (i.e., far-end) only.
Some rules of thumb
1. A 551VST List 2 with ASCII interface firmware is installed as a
55 1VST List 1/B.
2. A 551 VST MLE shelf, equipped with 4016 List 2 CSU modules
and no controller, can only be used as a far end node.
Circuit element
Circuit
5-4
A circuit element is a single module of the parent node to which Access
Manager is connected.
A circuit is the combination of any two network CSU circuit elements
and their interconnecting DS1 facility, which have Access Manager
access in a DS1 network. One endpoint would be a near-end CSU, and the
other would be a far-end CSU.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
T1 Network Monitoring Overview
Summary of tasks
To communicate withVerilink CSUs from the Access Man ager2000
software package, you must perform these basic sequenced steps:
1. Configure Access Manager’s comline.
Menu used: Main/Utilities/Installation/Comlines
comline
direct
modem
stat mux
X.25 PAD
Node controller
C
S
U
Access Manager 2000
Near-end node
This determines how Access Manager and the node will
communicate.
Depending on your equipment, you have up to four connection
options: direct, modem, stat mux, and the X.25 PAD.
2. Configure the near-end node parameters.
Menu used: Main/Configuration/Node/Add
Node controller
C
S
U
Access Manager 2000
Near-end node
Functionally, a node is the point of access between the network
manager and CSUs. Each CSU must have a parent node.
In a near end node, a node controller serves as the parent node for
each CSU on its shelf (or shelves).
Configure all node parameters, except alarm reporting. Otherwise,
you’ll be interrupted by alarm messages incidentally caused by the
configuration process.
When you save the node definition, the configuration is sent over the
comline to the node controller.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
5-5
Configuring the T1 Network
•
If a connection can’t be made, you’ll get an error message.
Check for the fault.
•
If a successful connection is made from Access Manager 2000
to the node controller, the Element Configuration Menu appears.
3. Configure the near-end CSU parameters.
Menu used: Main/Configuration/Element/Edit
Node controller
C
S
U
Access Manager 2000
Near-end node
If connected to a standalone CSU, configure the options for that
CSU. If connected to a multiline controller, sequentially select and
configure each CSU you’ll use in that multiline shelf.
DIUs
If you are using an Access System CSU with a DIU, configure your
near end DIU parameters now.
4. Configure the far-end node parameters.
Menu used: Main/Configuration/Node/Add
Generally, each near-end CSU is paired, over the network, with a
far-end CSU. Before you can configure a far-end CSU, you must
define its node. Access Manager 2000 will communicate with the
far-end node and CSU over the Facility Data Link.
5-6
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
T1 Network Monitoring Overview
Operationally, each far-end CSU is managed as if it were a node as
well as a circuit element. The node Query Path field must have
NONE as its chosen option.
Far-end node #3
Near-end node
C
S
U
C
S
U
C
S
U
C
S
U
Access Manager 2000
T1 Facility Data Link
C
S
U
C
S
U
Far-end node #1
Far-end node #2
In summary, the far-end CSU is both defined as a node and
configured as an element.
5. Build the database for the far-end CSU parameters.
Menu used: Main/Configuration/Element/Edit
Far-end node #3
Near-end node
C
S
U
C
S
U
C
S
U
C
S
U
Access Manager 2000
T1 Facility Data Link
C
S
U
C
S
U
Far-end nodes #1 & #2
Select the configuration parameters for each far-end CSU you’ll use,
and use F5 to attempt to download the configuration. A message
will come up saying that you need to build a circuit first. Although
your actual download was “unsuccessful”, you did succeed in
building a spot for the configuration in the database.
6. Configure a circuit between the CSUs.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
5-7
Configuring the T1 Network
Menu used: Main/Configuration/Circuit/Add
Once the far end is configured, you must configure a circuit between
the near-end CSU and its far-end CSU. A circuit provides a path for
all informational flow between the two CSUs. It defines how the
CSU will talk to the node and, hence, to the network manager.
Add a circuit between the near end (From DS1 point) and the
far end (To DS1 point).
Near end node
Node Name = San Jose
C
S
U
C
S
U
[1,2] [1,4]
C
S
U
Far end
Node Name = NYC
C
S
U
[1,12]
[1,2]
Access Manager 2000
Circuit A
Circuit B
Circuit C
C
S
U
C
S
U
[1,1] [1,3]
KEY
[2,4] = shelf 2, slot 4
Far end
Node Name = Chicago
For both of these options, you must enter the Node Name exactly as
you first defined it, character for character. If you’re dealing with
multiline CSUs, you must also select a shelf number and slot
number.
Examples
For Circuit A: From DS1 point = San Jose,1,2
To DS1 point = Chicago,1,1
For Circuit B: From DS1 point = San Jose,1,4
To DS1 point = Chicago,1,3
For Circuit C: From DS1 point = San Jose,1,12
To DS1 point = NYC,1,2
7. Download the far-end CSU configuration built in Step 5.
Menu used: Main/Configuration/Element/Edit
5-8
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
T1 Network Monitoring Overview
Now that you’ve built a circuit with the help of the database “place
holder” you created in Step 5, return to the far-end CSU
configuration screen and download the parameters you set.
DIUs
If you are using an Access System CSU with DIU, you need to
configure your far end DIU parameters now. However, you cannot
configure the far end DIU over the Facility Data Link. You must
access the far-end DIU via its associated and co-located node
controller.
8. Enable alarm reporting for the nodes.
Menu used: Main/Configuration/Node/Edit
Now, go back to each node you configured and enable the alarm
reporting option.
9. Verify your access to the nodes and elements.
Menu used: Main/On-line/Element Configuration
Display
Select the near-end node. Once connected, confirm that the Node
Name appears in the upper right hand corner of the display screen,
under the words Current Node. Repeat this process for the
far-end node.
10. The nodes are now part of your Access Manager 2000 database.
You can now go “on-line” to perform diagnostics, perform
loopbacks, and query registers.
Configuration
menu
All configuration of nodes, elements, and circuits is done from the
Configuration menu, which is selected from the Main Menu.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
5-9
Configuring the T1 Network
Figure 5-1
Configuration Menu
Each type of configuration is described in the subsequent sections.
Configuring nodes
This section describes how to add, edit, delete, view, print, and list node
definitions. The following subsections will show you how to arrive at the
appropriate screens for the procedure you wish to execute. All of the
fields within each screen are described in the order they appear (from top
to bottom).
Getting to the
Node Definition
scree
To do any node configuration, you must first get to the Node Definition
screen.
To access the Node Definition screen:
1. From the Main Menu, select Configuration. This will take you
to the Configuration Menu.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuring nodes
2. From the Configuration Menu, select Node. This will take you to
the menu labeled Co nfiguration:Node.
a. If you are adding a node, select Add. This will take you directly
to the Add Node Definition screen.
b. If you are editing a node, select Edit. This will take you to a
screen labeled Se le ct NodetoEdit. Use the
or
key to highlight the node you wish to edit, and press
Enter .
This will take you to the Edit Node Definition screen.
Lets operator choose when to set the node clock
from the PC running Access Manager
Identifies the node
Defines query path
Identifies the node
For configuration by
hardware switches
Defines alarm path
“Activates” node
Lets operator install firmware upgrades
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
5-11
Configuring the T1 Network
The contents of the Add Node Definition screen and the Edit Node
Definition screen are identical. Therefore, we’ll refer to them collectively
as the Node Definition screen.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuring nodes
Summary of tasks
The following diagram shows you how what tasks are involved in
configuring the node.
BEGIN
Identify
the Node
Define the
Query Path
Enable
thumbwheel
operation
Node configuration option
How the option lets you complete your task:
Node Name
Node ID
Location
Equipment Type
System Shelf Type
Previous Node in Chain
Lets you identify each node with a unique
name and number. Identifies the
equipment type, location, shelf
arrangement, and node order in a daisy
chain.
Query Path Type
Lets you define the method Access
Query Path (COMn, phone# or PORT) Manager will use to open an informational
Query Baud Rate
path to the node.
Enable Thumbwheel Operation
Allows an operator to configure by using
thumbwheel switches on the circuit
elements.
Enable Alarm Reporting
Lets you define an alarm path from the
node to Access Manager. For Access
System equipment, you’ll be able to define
alternate alarm paths.
Set Node Clock When Configuring
Set Node Clock When Polling
Lets you choose when to set the node
clock from the PC running Access
Manager.
Enable Downline Load Firmware
Lets you deny or allow an operator to use
Access Manager to download firmware
into circuit elements.
Node installed & operational
Lets you “activate” the node for operation
in the network and with Access Manager.
Define the
Alarm Path(s)
Decide when
to reset the
Node Clock
Enable
firmware
download
Activate
the node
END
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
5-13
Configuring the T1 Network
The following desired node definition values can now be entered.
Identifying the
node
Node Name
This uniquely identifies each node. This identifier is
always unique and cannot be duplicated for use with other
nodes. It can have up to 16 characters, including spaces or
dashes.
Node ID
This identification number can only be in the range from
1 to 65,535. Every time you add a new node, the node ID
that appears is the next higher available number. You may
keep that number or change it, but two nodes cannot share
the same Node ID.
Location
This identifies the node site---usually the location of a
customer’s equipment. This field can be up to 30
characters long. It is used to display nodes in alphabetical
order, by location. Multiple nodes can have the same
location.
Equipment type
The default type is a 551 VST List 2 CSU.
Alistoftheavailableoptionscanbeaccessedbypressing F8 .
Use this option for a 551VST List 2
with ASCII interface firmware.
The available equipment types are as follows:
System Shelf Type(s)
With an AS2000 or
ConnecT1 shelf, you must specify the type of shelf or
shelves you’re using. You must follow certain rules of
syntax when entering this information. This information
can be found in “Specifying shelf types for AS2000
nodes” on page 5 -15.
Previous Node in chain
You can access up to three
AS2000 or ConnecT1 Plus nodes through a single node
connection. This access arrangement is called a daisy
chain.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuring nodes
Type NONE for this field if the nodes are daisy-chained
and this is the first node. Also enter NONE if this is not
a daisy-chained node.
If this is the second node in the daisy chain, enter the
Node Name which you entered for the first node in the
chain.
If this is third node in the daisy chain, enter the Node
Name which you entered for the second node in the
chain.
Specifying shelf types for AS2000 node
For an Access System 2000 node, specify the arrangement of the shelves
accessed by this node. There are three types of shelves to choose from:
■
■
S specifies the Multiline Shelf 2200 (MLS 2200)
•
13 slots with redundant power supplies (A, B)
•
Split backplane (Bus A)
M specifies the Multiline Shelf 2000 (MLS 2000)
•
■
13 slots with redundant power supplies (A,B)
D specifies the Dual-line Shelf 2000 (DLS 2000/1000)
•
2 slots with redundant power supply inputs
More details about the bus arrangement of each of these shelves is
available in the Access System 2000 Overview Manual.
You must follow certain syntax rules when specifiying AS2000 shelves.
Use a comma (,) when entering arrangements of multiple shelves. For
example, if the AS2000 node is a multiline, dual-line combination, enter
M, D for Shelf Type. The first shelf, in this case, M, is hardware
addressed 1, and the second shelf, D, is hardware addressed 2.
Dual-line shelves must always be the last shelf. For example, when you
are entering an MLS 2200, MLS 2000, and two DLS 2000, the nodes
could be entered one of two ways:
■
S,M,D,D
■
M,S,D,D
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
5-15
Configuring the T1 Network
Table 5-2, “Allowable AS2000 shelf configurations,” on page 5-16 shows
several possible configurations of the AS2000 nodes.
Table 5-2
Allowable AS2000 shelf configurations
M
M, M
D
D, D
M, D
M, D, D
M, M, D
M, M, D, D
S
S, S
M, S
S, D
M, S, D
S, D, D
S, S, D
S, S, D, D
For a ConnecT1 Plus node, specify the arrangement of the shelves
accessed by this node. The only possible arrangements are such that the
number of Ds is equal to the number of shelves being used. (For
example, for the four-shelf maximum, the arrangement would be
D,D,D,D.)
Query and alarm
paths
The query path is used by Access Manager to query the node for status or
other information or to download to the node. The alarm path is used by
the node to report alarms to Access Manager.
Alarm Paths and Query Paths (and hence, their device types) are set from
the Node Definition screen
Before you can define these paths for the node, you must configure your
comlines to support the node’s access arrangement. The access
arrangement specifies the type of connection at each serial port of the
Access Manager PC.
Until now, if you wanted to set up an Alarm path or a Query path between
Access Manager and your system node, you were limited to using either a
direct connection, a modem, or a stat mux to connect.
If you’re using either Access System 2000 or ConnecT1 Plus equipment
with this new revision (Rev. 1.3) of Access Manager software, you also
have the option of using an X.25 PAD (Packet Assembler Disassembler).
This feature is not available with other Verilink ESF CSUs (for example,
the 551 series).
The options you have for connecting the Access Manager PC to the node
are summarized in Figure 5 -2, “How to connect the Access Manager PC
and the node,” on page 5 -17. An AS2000 node is shown because it’s the
only one which can use the X.25 PAD.
5-16
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuring nodes
Figure 5-2
How to connect the Access Manager PC and the node
Connection Options
Direct connection
AS2000 Node
(with NCC 2020)
Modem
Access Manager
Port 2
Stat Mux Port 3
Port 1
X.25 PAD
Query Path
Alarm Path
Defining query paths
To define the Query Path, you must, identify the device which transfers
the query from Access Manager to the node, enter the destination address,
and specify the baud rate used.
The fields which are used to do this are:
Query path type
The following options are available:
Query path (COMn, phone# or PORT)This specifies the
“address” of the connected device.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
5-17
Configuring the T1 Network
TIP
Before you configure the node, make sure you have configured your
comlines to support the node’s access arrangement. The comlines are
configured in the Comline Definition screen of the Utilities Menu.
The query and alarm paths can be set according to the parameters in
Table 5-3, “Assuring compatibility between Query Path and Comline
settings”. For each path option, you are asked to verify how you defined
the corresponding comline in the Utilities/Comline Definition/Access
Arrangement menu. This is designed to keep oversight from getting you
into trouble:
Table 5-3
Assuring compatibility between Query Path and Comline settings
For this
Query path type:
Enter the following for
Query path (COMn, phone# or PORT
What you should have in the
Utilities/Comline Definition/Acces
Arrangement menu.
No comlines are used. These far-end
elements are accessed through the ESF
Facility Data Link.
None
Use this if a node is second or third in a daisy chain (up to three are allowed).
Direct
The comline used (for example, COM3).
DIRECT or
AUTOCONFIG
Modem
Phone number
MODEM CALL/ANSWER,
MODEM ANSWER ONLY, or
AUTOCONFIG
At least one comline must be connecte
to a modem.
If you wish to have a separate Query Path from the Alarm Path, then the comline
reached by the Alarm Path phone number should be configured to Access
Arrangement = MODEM ANSWER ONLY.
ComDesign Mux
Port name assigned in the ComDesign
RS2000 Multiplexer to the physical port
where the node is connected.
COMDESIGNMUX, or
AUTOCONFIG
The Alarm Path is the port name assigned in the multiplexer to the physical port
where Access Manager (that is, the PC collecting alarm reports) is connected.
X.25 PAD
Port name
X.25PAD
Autoconfig
COMn, phone #, or Port Name
AUTOCONFIG
(Port Name assumes ComDesign mux).
If you have several PCs running Access Manager, you can configure a
system so all the PCs can access the node, but only one receives the alarm
reports.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuring nodes
To do this, the Node ID must be the same for all of the PCs. The PCs
should access the node by modem or through a ComDesign statistical
multiplexer. Since the PCs are at different phone numbers or ComDesign
ports, the Alarm Path matches only the last PC that configured it. This PC
is your designated alarm report PC. Alarm reports are only sent to this
PC. Even when the node is accessed for its current status, it only sends
the accumulated alarm reports if the alarm report PC accesses it. This
allows multiple locations to access a node, but the alarms are reported
only to a single master site.
The node checks the alarm path sent to it from the PC during the
connection sequence. If this alarm path matches the one saved in the
node, or if it is set to NONE, alarms are reported to the PC while it is
connected. If the alarm path does not match, alarm reports are not sent.
When Access Manager disconnects, the stored alarms are reported to the
proper Access Manager site.
When the node’s alarm path is set to NONE, alarms reports are
accumulated until the node is accessed for its current status or
configuration, at which point the alarm reports are sent and the buffer is
emptied. Any PC accessing this node receives the alarm reports.
!
CAUTION
Regardless of how you last set the node’s alarm path, if the
accessing PC has in its database alarm path=NONE, you still ca
receive and empty the node’s alarm reports buffer.
Only the 551VST List 2, 551VST ML List 2, SIM, NC/E, and Access
System 2000 nodes have the ability to perform automatic alarm
reporting. All other node types should have the Alarm Path option
set to NONE. The alarm path is the phone number, PC
communication port, or multiplexer port for the alarm reporting
port(s) connected to Access Manager. It is downloaded to the node
and used to access Access Manager to report alarms.
Specifying baud rate
When defining a query path, you must specify the baud rate of the device
which accesses the node. You can choose 1200, 2400, or 9600 baud. The
default value is 9600 baud.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
5-19
Configuring the T1 Network
Specifics are given in Table 5-4, “Selecting baud rates by equipment type
and access type”.
Table 5-4
Selecting baud rates by equipment type and access type
Type of access
Equipment type
ComDesign
Mux
X.25PAD
1200 o
2400
9600
Not applicable
9600
9600
9600
Direct
Modem
9600
Access System 2000
9600
All other equipment
Can only be accessed at 1200 baud.
For direct interface or 4-wire dedicated
modem, set baud rate to either 1200 o
9600.
• 551 VST List 2
• 551 VST ML List 2
• SIM
• NC/E
Not applicable
Note: Newer revisions of the 551VST List 2, 551VST ML List 2, SIM,
and NC/E can be accessed in dial-up mode using the Hayes
protocol at either 1200 or 2400 baud with an external modem.
Existing revisions of the above products can be upgraded to this
capability with a firmware change.
Enabling alarm
reporting
The Enable Alarm Reporting option tells a node that alarm
messages should be sent to Access Manager either as they occur or when
the node is accessed.
Only a node that has alarm reporting capability can have this option set to
YES and then only if access to the node is through a direct connection,
modem, or ComDesign multiplexer. Access System equipment is also
compatible with the X.25 PAD (Packet Assembler Disassembler).
If access to the circuit elements in a node is through the ESF Facility Data
Link, set this option to NO.
The following types of nodes can report alarms:
5-20
■
551VST List 2
■
551VST ML List 2 without ASCII interface firmware
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuring nodes
■
SIM
■
NC/E
■
Access System 2000
The node will auto-dial Access Manager and report status changes if both
of these conditions are met:
a. the Enable Alarm Reporting option is set to YES, and
b. the Alarm Path option is set to anything other than NONE
or DIREC .
For all of the latest revisions of the above listed multiline nodes (not the
single-line 551VST List 2), if Alarm Path is set to NONE and
Enable Status Change Reporting is YES, these circuit
elements will report all accumulated uncleared alarms to Access Manager
when they are contacted by Access Manager either during on-line access
or scheduled polling.
Selecting options based on access arrangement
To continue configuring the node, you must view the following tables and
select the appropriate data to enter into upcoming fields.
■
Table 5-8, “Older CSU Circuit Elements BER Alarm Rest Times”
■
Table 5-9, “Newer CSU Circuit Elements BER Alarm Reset Times”
Choose the table for your specific type of node.
Each column is an access arrangement type. Determine which column
applies to the node you are adding. Enter the values in that column when
you configure the node.
The access arrangement types listed in these tables are:
■
■
■
Direct: The node’s network management port connects directly to a
comline on the Access Manager host PC.
Modem: The node’s network management port connects to a
modem that receives calls from the Access Manager host PC and if
enabled, calls Access Manager to report alarms.
None: The node’s network management port is not used. Access to
the node is limited to the Facility Data Link (which implies you’re
dealing with a far-end node) or via daisy chain.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
5-21
Configuring the T1 Network
■
■
Table 5-5
ComDesign: The node’s network management port connects to a
statistical multiplexer.
X.25 PAD: The node’s network management port connects to an
X.25 PAD (Packet Assembler Disassembler).
Node configuration options for older equipment
This includes the for 551VST List 1, 551VST List 1/A, 551VST List 1/B, and 551VST ML List 1. These equipment types
use TABS Protocol and do not support alarm reporting.
Modem
None
(Facility Data Link
or Daisy Chain)
ComDesign
1200
1200
1200
120
Query Path
COM 1-16
Phone No.
None
Port Name
Enable Alarm Reporting
No
No
No
No
Access Arrangement (Connection)
Option
Direct
Baud Rate (Note 1)
NOTE 1. Currently, a modem (Comline) configured for 2400 baud cannot initiate calls to a node configured for
1200 baud. Configure the node in Access Manage for 2400 baud, and allow the modem to automatically
downgrade to 1200 baud.
Table 5-6
Node Configuration Option for newer equipment
This includes the 551VST (ML) List 2, SIM, NC/E, ConnecT1 Plus, and AS2000. These equipment types use OSI
protocol. The X.25PAD can only be used with AS2000 equipment.
ComDesign
or
X.25 PAD
Direct
Modem
None
(Facility Data Link
or Daisy Chain)
Baud Rate (Note 1)
9600
1200/2400
1200/9600
9600
Query Path
COM 1-16
Phone No.
None
Port Name
Alarm Path
COM 1-16
Phone No.
None
Access Manager Port
Name
Previous Node in Chain
(Note 2, 3
Node Name
None
None
None
Enable Alarm Reporting
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
None
None
None
None
Access Arrangement
(Connection) Option
Report alarms:
Do not report alarms:
Alarm Path
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuring nodes
Access Arrangement
(Connection) Option
Enable Alarm Reporting
ComDesign
or
X.25 PAD
Direct
Modem
None
(Facility Data Link
or Daisy Chain)
No
No
No
No
Report alarms only when Access Manager contacts node:
Alarm Path
None
None
None
None
Enable Alarm Reporting
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
NOTE 1. Currently, a modem (COMline) configured for 2400 baud cannot be used to originate calls to a nod
configured for 1200 baud. Configure the node in Access Manager for 2400 baud, and allow the modem to
automatically downgrade to 1200 baud.
NOTE 2. Modem and ComDesign are not available for the second and third AS2000 nodes in a daisy chain, although
either of these access arrangements are available to the first AS2000 node.
NOTE 3. The Previous Node in Chain option is only available for AS2000 nodes.
Defining alternate
alarm paths
Access Manager’s new Alternate Alarm Path (AAP) feature is available
for use with Access System 2000 products.
The alternate alarm path lets you establish separate alarm paths from one
node to two different Access Managers. Consequently, you can
■
■
simultaneously send each alarm to two Access Managers
designate an auxiliary Access Manager to receive alarms when
problems exist with the primary Access Manager
In addition, for each alarm path, you can specify the:
■
■
■
number of times the node controller will try to send an alarm to
Access Manager
time interval between notification attempts
length of time alarms are gathered before a notification attempt is
made
Application scenarios
There are four ways to physically connect a PC running Access Manager
to a node controller (located in an Access System 2000 node). You can
connect directly with a cable, or you can use one of three com port access
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
5-23
Configuring the T1 Network
devices (modem, stat mux, or X.25 PAD). Consequently, when an alarm
is sent from the node controller to the Access Manager, it will travel along
whichever of these connections you have installed. The alarm may be
sent:
1. Directly from the node controller to the PC (via a NULL modem
cable)
2. To a modem which will dial another modem connected to an Access
Manager
3. To an X.25 PAD (Packet Assembler Disassember) which will
contact another specified X.25 PAD attached to an Access Manager
4. To a stat mux for relay through an assigned port to another Access
Manager
Direct connection allows you to set up only one dedicated path for the
alarm.
However, because modems, X.25 PADs, and stat muxes are addressable
com port access devices, any one of them may now be used to set up two
alarm destinations.
The following diagrams show three typical scenarios set up for the new
Alternate Alarm Path functionality.
5-24
■
Figure 5 -3, “Application using modems”
■
Figure 5 -4, “Application using a stat mux device”
■
Figure 5 -5, “Application using X.25 PADs”
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuring nodes
Figure 5-3
Application using modems
Modem
Telephone
Network
Modem
Access Manager #1
Access Manager #2
Modem
N
C
C
2
0
2
0
AS2000 Node
Figure 5-4
Application using a stat mux device
Port 2
Stat Mux
Access Manager #1
Port 1
Port 3
Access Manager #2
N
C
C
2
0
2
0
AS2000 Node
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
5-25
Configuring the T1 Network
Figure 5-5
Application using X.25 PADs
Channel 2
X.25 PAD Link Port
Public Data
Network
Link Port
X.25 PAD
Link Port
Channel 1
Access Manager #2
Access Manager #1
X.25 PAD
Channel 1
N
C
C
2
0
2
0
AS2000 Node
What to do
To set up your alarm paths, you’ll need to:
■
Identify each Access Manager (see “Differentiating the site” on
page 4-3).
■
Assign priority to an alarm path
■
Set up alarm destination access
■
Determine how long to collect alarms before sending
■
Determine how often to try resending an alarm when a connection is
not made
You can define the alarm path when you first add a node or whenever you
edit a node. In either case, you need to access the new Alarm Path
Definition screen for the alarm configuration parameters.
To access the Alarm Path Definition screen:
■
5-26
In the Node Definition screen, go to the line labeled, Enable
alarm reporting, and press F8 .
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuring nodes
A screen labeled Alarm Path Definition will appear as an
overlay.
Now that you’ve reached this screen, you can begin to define your alarm
path.
The left column lists the alarm path parameters. The middle and right
columns are provided for defining separate alarm paths. Although the
columns are labeled Primary and Secondar , the terms themselves
do not designate a relative importance or sequence of alarm paths.
Assigning priority to an alarm path
When you set up two alarm paths, you can choose to use:
■
Neither path, so no alarms are sent
■
Only one of the paths
■
■
The second path as a backup, if the first path cannot deliver the
message
Both paths simultaneously, so both Access Managers receive any
alarm
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
5-27
Configuring the T1 Network
The Use field is used to assign a relative priority to an alarm path. To
view the available options, go to the Use field and press F8 . A pop up
menu will appear with these options:
SEND
The alarm will be reported to this alarm path.
BACKUP
The alarm will be sent to this path if the SEND path is
unable to deliver the alarm.
NONE
Alarms are not to be sent to this path.
The acceptable combinations of options for this field are listed below:
Primary
Secondary
Description
SEND
SEND
Send to both addresses specified
SEND
BACKUP
Send to Secondary address only if Primary address is unavailable
BACKUP
SEND
Send to Primary address only if Secondary address is unavailable
SEND
NONE
Send only to the Primary address
NONE
SEND
Send only to the Secondary address
NONE
NONE
Do not send any alarms to either address
Based on the relative priorities you want to assign, enter your choices in
the Primary and Secondary columns.
Setting up alarm destination access
To set up alternate alarm paths, you’ll be using either a modem, a stat
mux, or an X.25 PAD to communicate with Access Manager.
You need to specify the:
■
type of device connected to the node controller
■
speed at which the device operates
■
address of the alarm destination
You must use the same com port access device and baud rate for both
alarm paths.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuring nodes
To specify the com port access device:
1. Go to the Device Type field, and press
will appear listing the supporting devices:
F8
. A pop up menu
Type of device
Definition
NONE
Either communication is provided through the
ESF Facility Data Link or you are working with a
daisy-chained node.
DIRECT
This is a direct connection to the Network
Manager through a NULL modem cable. This
option cannot be used for setting up alternate
alarm paths.
MODEM
A modem that supports the Hayes command set.
X.25 PAD
An X.25 Packet Assembler Disassembler.
STAT MUX
A statistical multiplexer device.
AUTOCONFIG
Access Manager will select the device type.
This option will not work if you have a
X.25 PAD.
2. Use the up and down arrow keys to highlight the device type
attached to the node controller, and press Enter .
The pop up menu will disappear and the selected device type will
appear in the field.
To select the device operating speed:
The only supported device operating speeds are baud rates of 1200,
2400, and 9600.
■
Modems are available and supported at all three operating speeds.
■
Stat muxes and X.25 PADs generally operate at 9600 baud.
The field’s default value is 9600.
1. If you’re using a direct connection, a stat mux, an X.25 PAD, or
modems which operate at the same speed, go to the Baud Rate
field and type in the speed at which the device will operate.
When setting up alternate alarm paths, make sure you enter the same
baud rate in the other alarm path column.
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2. If you’re using modems which operate at the different speeds, go to
the Baud Rate field and type in the speed of the slowest modem
in the particular alarm path you’re configuring.
To name the alarm destination:
Each alarm destination must be designated by an address in the form of a
contact number or string. A maximum of 40 characters are allowed, and
the format of the string is dependent upon the device being used.
The supported devices use the following formats:
DIRECT
The address is a defined com port. Valid ranges are from
COM1 to COM16. This option cannot be used for setting
up alternate alarm paths.)
MODEM
The address is a valid AT dial string. If only digits are
used, Access Manager presumes the address to be a phone
number and defaults to using the ATDT (dial tone)
command when connecting. For your ease, you may use
parentheses and hyphens in the phone number. They
won’t confuse the modem.
X.25 PAD
The address is an ASCII string that corresponds to a
vendor-specific connect command for the X.25 PAD
being used. Complete addresses usually follow the format
of a connect command followed by a device address.
STAT-MUX
This address is an ASCII string that corresponds to
whatever name the port has been given in the stat mux
device. For example, the port in the stat mux may have
been named PORT1, CHANNEL2, or CHICAGO.
1. To specify the endpoint of the first alarm path, go to the Primary
Alarm Path field and enter the appropriate contact number or
string.
2. To specify the endpoint of the auxiliary alarm path, go to the
Secondary Alarm Path field and enter the appropriate contact
number or string.
Limiting alarm delivery attempts
You can choose the number of Attempts to deliver the alarm before
giving up. If the path is specified as SEND and the number of retries
expires, the alarm is sent to the BACKUP path.
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Configuring nodes
The valid range is 0 to 255, with the default set to 10. Modems are limited
to 1 to 15 attempts.
If a path’s attempts are set at 0, then the alarm is sent as many times as
necessar , until it’s delivered. In other words, think of 0 as “no
permission to give up”. If the attempts are set to 4, then only four
attempts will be made to deliver the alarm along that path.
Pacing delivery of new alarms
To pace the delivery of new alarms, you can specify a Wait Time. The
wait interval is defined, simply enough, as the amount of time to wait
before sending new alarms.
When the first alarm is received, a timer is started with the time specified
in this field. No alarms are sent to the Access Manager until the timer
expires. This allows the node controller to collect (or “buffer”) as many
alarms as possible before establishing the connection to Access Manager
to deliver alarms. If you’re already accessing to the node controller, either
through the Configuration or On-Line Access menus, the wait time will
be ignored and you’ll be sent the alarms as they come up.
This is especially useful when you’re using a modem setup. It enables
you to reduce the number of connections made (and telephone call
charges incurred) when delivering single alarm messages.
To set the amount of time between attempts, go to the Wait Time field,
and type in a time period in one of the following formats. The possible
values include:
•
1 to 59 SEC
•
1 to 59 MIN
•
1 to 24 HR
The default value is 15 SEC for each path.
Resending undelivered alarms
There are times when your alarm will not be delivered on the first
attempt. For example, if you’re using a modem, maybe the line was busy
at the other end.
You can specify the time period before trying again if an alarm delivery
was unsuccessful.
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Configuring the T1 Network
To set the amount of time between attempts, go to the Retry
Interval field, and type in a time period in one of the following
formats:
•
1 to 59 SEC
•
1 to 59 MIN
•
1 to 24 HR
If you forget to put a space between the number and the time unit, a space
will be added automatically when you press F5 to accept the
configuration parameters.
You can specify different retry intervals for each alarm path. The default
value is 1 MIN for each path.
Access Manager will always attempt immediate delivery along an SEND
alarm path. However, there are a few things to keep in mind:
■
■
If both your alarm paths are designated SEND, the reality is that
delivery is sequential. The node will alternate which Access
Manager it tries to contact if both lines are busy. Also, in this case,
the Retry Interval must be set to the same value.
If your alarm paths are designated SEND and BACKU , respectively,
the node will retry the SEND alarm path until the number of
specified attempts is exhausted. Only then will it use the BACKUP
alarm path.
Saving the alarm path parameters
Once you’ve set the parameters for each alarm path, press F5 . This
does some error checking to see if the parameters you’ve selected are
acceptable to the system. If you’ve made a mistake, your screen will
display an error message. Take the corrective action indicated, and try
again.
Once this acceptance test is successful, you’ll be returned to the
uncovered Node Definition screen. At that point, press F5 to download
the configuration to the database.
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Configuring nodes
Error messages
If you’ve made an error in selecting your alarm path parameters, one of the following
error message will appear on your screen.
Error Message
Cause
Corrective Action
Invalid USE on Primary
Path
You selected a Use type other
than NONE, SEN , or BACKU .
Go to the Use field and verify that each
alarm path has a value of eithe NONE,
SEN , or BACKU .
You selected a Device Type
other than DIREC , MODEM,
STAT-MUX, or X.25 PA .
Go to the Device Type field and verify that
each alarm path has a value of eithe
DIREC , MODEM, STAT-MUX, or X.25 PA .
At least one SEND path
must be specified
A BACKUP path has been
selected with no existing SEND
path.
If you want to use a backup path, go to the
Use field and see which alarm path you’ve
labeled BACKU . Change the other alarm
path’s Use field to SEN .
Primary and Auxiliary
device types must be
the same
Two different device types were
selected.
Go to the Device Type field and verify that
both alarm paths are either MODEM,
STAT-MUX, or X.25 PA .
Time format must be 159 SEC, 1-59 MIN, 1-24
HR
• The Retry Interval is not
in the proper format, or
Go to the Retry Interval and Wait
Interval fields. Verify the following:
• The Wait Interval is not in
the proper format.
• The time unit is abbreviated correctly.
A BACKUP path is specified while
the SEND path set for continuous
(attempts = 0). In other words, if
the SEND path is set to 0, it never
gives up, and a BACKUP path is
irrelevant.
Either:
User specified X.25 PAD for use
with non-AS2000 equipment
Check you Alarm path and Query Path
setups to see which of the following
connections you’re using: direct, modem, or
stat mux. Then change the entry in the
Device Type field to reflect that.
Invalid USE on
Secondary Path
Invalid Device
specified on Primary
Path
Invalid Device
specified on Secondary
Path
BACKUP unreachable
because SEND set for
continuous
X.25 PAD supported only
by AS2000 equipment
• The number is appropriate to the time
unit. (For example, you haven’t entered
27 HRS.)
• Set the SEND path for 1 to 256 attempts,
or
• Change the alarm path Use field from
BACKUP to NONE.
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Configuring the T1 Network
Error Message
Cause
Corrective Action
Retry Interval must be
the same if SEND/SEND
specified
Although you have specified
SEND for both alarm paths, you
have specified different Retry
Intervals.
Make both Retry Intervals the same.
Attempts must be
limited to 15 or less
when MODEM is selected
The Device Type is MODEM and
the Attempts are greater than
15.
For Attempt , select a value from 1 to 15.
Enabling
thumbwheel
operation
For each Access System 2000 or ConnecT1 plus node:
■
■
Resetting the node
clock
To allow a local operator to use the thumbwheel switches on the
master NCC 2020 or CCC 1020 for CSU access, configuration, and/
or testing, select YES (default setting).
To prevent unauthorized use of these switches, select NO. This
setting disables the thumbwheel switches.
Until this release of Access Manager, the node clock in the NCC2020
(and NCC 1020) would be set from the PC running Access Manager
whenever:
■
you configured a node
■
Access Manager polled the node controller for performance data.
Now you can choose whether or not you want the clock set in either or
both of these conditions.
This is especially helpful whenever two Access Managers, in different
time zones, communicate with the same node. In such an instance, you’d
probably want to give only one Access Manager the power to set the
clock.
The two parameters which deal with this in the Node Definition menu are:
Set Node Clock When Configuring . . ? N
Set Node Clock When Polling . . . . ? N
Entering a Y will enable the feature. Entering an N will disable it.
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Configuring nodes
Enabling firmware
download
In AS2000 nodes, the Enable Downline load Firmware?
option gives permission for an operator logged in with LEVEL4 access to
download a new “personality”---or features---to the circuit elements in
that node. The actual code download is executed from the Utilities menu.
■
■
Activating the
node
To allow code download to the circuit elements in that node, select
YES.
To prevent downloading to the node, select NO (default value).
After installing the node and verifying that it is ready to be connected to
Access Manager, set the Node Installed and Operational
option to YES. This option should only be set if three conditions have
been satisfied:
1. The communication link to the node has been installed.
2. The node has been installed and tested locally.
3. The connection is known to operate properly.
If you set this option to YES when adding a node while Access Manager
cannot successfully communicate with the node, an error message is
generated and the installed option is reset to NO.
If you set this option to YES when editing a node and Access Manager
cannot successfully connect to the node, this option stays set to YES.
Adding a node
The first configuration item to be entered is the node definition.
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Configuring the T1 Network
To add a node definition:
1. From the Configuration Menu , select the Node option (type N).
to revise node definitions. The Configuration: Node screen appears.
2. Press the “A” key. The Add Node Definition screen appears.
Comments
Four lines of comments leave room for you to enter information about the
node. You can enter up to 120 characters, including spaces.
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Configuring nodes
An ounce of prevention . . .
When you configure a node, you’re actually creating access to a location
in the database where an informational “picture” of the node is stored and
can be modified. A Node ID provides a means of access to the database
and a reference to the location within the database.
Every network manager which communicates with a given node must use
the same Node ID for that node and have the same “picture” or
representation of that node.
Figure 5-6
941-1131
Modem A
Access Manager’s view of the node
Primary
2400 baud
Access Manager #1
Telephone
Network
Node ID: 12
945-2211
Modem C
2400 baud
Node ID: 12
Node Name: SMITH
Location: FRESNO
AS2000 System Node
653-1111
Modem B
Secondary
1200 baud
Access Manager #2
Query Path
Alarm Path
As a consequence, review these pointers to avoid errors:
1. When using two Access Managers to manage the same node, enter
the same node configuration data in the Node Definition screen at
both Access Managers. Yes, this creates a redundant information
base.
The only deviation from this rule occurs when using modems
operating at different baud rates. This is explained in #3.
2. When setting up alternate alarm paths to two different Access
Managers, you must make the same entries for Alarm Path
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Configuring the T1 Network
Definition at each Access Manager. That way, each network
manager knows under what conditions it will be receiving alarms
from a node.
3. When using modems, always set the Baud Rate to the speed of
the slowest modem in the path you’re configuring.
To clarify, let’s refer to Figure 5 -6, “Access Manager’s view of the
node,” on page 5 -37:
•
The baud rate for the Query path from Modem A to Modem C
would be 2400. This value is entered in the Node Definition
screen at Access Manager #1.
•
The baud rate for the Query path from Modem B to Modem C
would be 1200. This value is entered in the Node Definition
screen at Access Manager #2.
•
The baud rate for the Alarm path from Modem C to Modem A
(Primary Alarm Path) would be 2400. This value would be
entered in the Alarm Path Definition screen at both Access
Managers.
•
The baud rate for the Alarm path from Modem C to Modem B
(Secondary Alarm Path) would be 1200. This value would be
entered in the Alarm Path Definition screen at both Access
Managers.
4. The Node Name and Location fields are there to help the user
(not the system) keep track.
For example, Access Manager #1 could have a Node name of
SMITH for Node 12, and Acce ssManag er#2 could have a Node
name of JONES for Node 12.
However, minimize user confusion by using identical terms or
abbreviations across network managers.
Conclusion to Adding a Node
After you finish entering the required information for each node, press
F5 to save the definitions. If insufficient or invalid information was
entered, error messages tell you what to do in order to supply the correct
information.
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Configuring nodes
Node Access Failure
If Access Manager returns a NO CIRCUITS AVAILABLE message or
an Access Manager FAILED TO ESTABLISH CONNECTION TO
THE NODE message, try to access the node once more. Verify that the
node is configured to be Installed and Operational.
If Access Manager still fails to access the node, refer to the following
paragraphs.
Dial-Up Connection: If the node uses a dial-up connection, verify
that the correct telephone number and Hayes modem protocol (if
required) have been entered in the query path of the node definition
and that the node modem answers.
If the NO CIRCUITS AVAILABLE message appears, Access
Manager could not find an available modem to access the node. Use
the following steps to troubleshoot this error:
1. Verify that there is a Comline defined with the proper baud rate for
that modem. If the node is equipped with a 1200 baud modem and
you do not have a 1200 baud modem at the Access Manager site,
then configure the node in Access Manager for 2400 baud and let
the modems automatically downgrade when the connection is made.
2. If Access Manager fails to access the second or a successive node of
a multiple-node Access System 2000 or ConnecT1 Plus system, the
RS232 daisy chain from the first node to the desired node may be
faulty. Try accessing a preceding (lower-numbered) node in this
daisy chain. If the access to that node is successful, either the RS232
daisy chain is faulty and the originally requested node, or the NCC
2020 or CCC 1020 in the original node may be faulty.
3. If Access Manager still fails to access, repeat this step, going
gradually back toward the first Access System 2000 or ConnecT1
Plus node until the access is successful. If the RS232 daisy-chain
cabling is good, the master NCC 2020 or CCC 1020 may be faulty
in one of the nodes.
4. If Access Manager cannot access any node, verify that the
connected modem is properly configured, that the cabling is correct,
and that the Comline is configured correctly. Refer to the
appendices for cabling requirements, modem requirements, and
Comline requirements. Verify that all the following are true:
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Configuring the T1 Network
•
The modem is configured for Modem Call/Answer.
•
The phone line is connected to the proper modem jack.
•
The jack type is correctly configured in the modem.
Direct Connection: If a direct connection is used between Access
Manager and the desired network node, verify that the connecting
cable is wired correctly and that the proper COM port is defined in
the Configuration: Node screen.
ComDesign Multiplexer Connection: If a ComDesign Multiplexer
is used, verify that the Comline is set for access arrangement of
ComDesign or automatic configuration. Also, verify that the access
circuit between the near-end multiplexer and the multiplexer at the
node is operational and that the multiplexer ports are configured
correctly. It is important that you review your Comline
configuration and installation.
Editing a node
A node definition can be edited any time after it has been added to the
Access Manager database. The following steps show you how to edit a
node:
1. From the Main Menu, type C to select the Configuration Menu.
2. Select the Revise Node Definitions option by typing N.
The screen labeled Configuration: Node appears.
3. Type E to select the Edit Node Definitions screen. A Select Node to
Edit screen similar to the one shown below now displays the first
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Configuring nodes
eleven nodes in the Access Manager database in alphanumeric
order.
4. Position the cursor at the node you wish to edit by using the Home ,
End , PgUp , PgDn , and/or the Arrow keys on the keypad. Press
Enter to select that node. An Edit Node Definition menu no
appears.
5. Make the required changes as described in the Adding a Node
section above.
6. After making the changes, press
abort editing.
F5
to accept them or
F2
to
If the Node Installed and Operational option is set to
YES, Access Manager immediately connects to the node and
downloads the new data into it.
If the connection is not successful, if the query path is NONE, or if
Node Installed and Operational is NO, obviously the
changes are not downloaded to the node; however, these changes are
saved in Access Manager’s database of the node’s configuration for
future downloading.
If the Node Installed and Operational option was
YES before editing and you did not change it, it remains YES. (See
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Configuring the T1 Network
the preceding section, Node Access Failure, if Access Manager
indicates a failure to connect to the Node.)
7. After the database is updated, if these changes have not been
downloaded to the node, the database configuration of the edited
node is displayed. However, if these changes have been successfully
downloaded, the Element Configuration screen appears. This menu
sets the operating and reporting characteristics of the circuit
element(s) of this node.
!
CAUTION
A change to a node name is not carried over into any circuit or route
definitions using the node. For proper operation during database
analysis, any change in a node name should also be made in the
appropriate circuit or route definition(s).
8. To return to node definition editing, press F2 . Access Manager
now disconnects the node and returns to the Select Node to Edit
screen.
You can delete a node from the Access Manager database at any time.
Deleting a node
Before deleting a node, remove any alarm path reporting telephone
number that has been configured. Otherwise, the node, if physically
installed, still attempts to call in alarms.
To delete a node from the system:
1. From the Configuration Menu, type N to select the Node option.
The Configuration: Node screen now appears.
2. Type D to select Delete Node Definition. The Select
Node to Delete screen now shows the Access Manager nodes in the
same manner as the Select Node to Edit screen.
3. Use the direction keys to position the cursor at the node you want to
delete.
4. Press Enter to select the node. You are now prompted to confirm
that you want to delete the selected node.
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Configuring nodes
5. Type Y to delete the node, or press any other key to abort the
deletion.
Viewing a node
definition
The view option of the Configuration: Node screen lets you look at the
node’s configuration without changing the current settings.
To view a node definition without changing it:
1. From the Configuration: Node screen, select the View option. The
Configuration menu will appear.
2. From the Configuration Menu, select Revise Node
Definitions by typing N. The Configuration: Node screen
appears.
3. Type V to select the View Node Definition option. The
Select Node to View screen displays the Access Manager nodes the
same as in the Select Node to Edit screen.
4. Use the directional keys to position the cursor at the node you wish
to view.
5. Press Enter to select that node. The detailed node definition now
appears.
If you’re using a color monitor, the text appears in red to show that no
editing is allowed when in the viewing mode.
Printing a node
definition
A single node and its circuit element definitions can be printed by using
the Print option.
To print the nodes configuration settings:
1. From the Configuration Menu, select the Node option to go to the
Configuration: Node screen.
2. Select the Print Node Definitions option by typing P.
The Select Node to Print screen now shows the nodes in the same
manner as the Select Node to Edit screen.
3. Use the directional keys to position the cursor at the node you wish
to print.
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4. Press the Enter key to select that node, and print the node and its
associated circuit element definitions.
Listing all nodes
All defined nodes and their descriptions can be printed by using the
List option.
■
To select this option from the Configuration: Node screen, type L.
Configuring circuit elements
This section describes how to select, edit, delete, view, list, and configure
network elements. The following subsections will show you how to arrive
at the appropriate screens for the procedure you wish to execute. All the
fields within each screen are described in the order they appear (from top
to bottom).
The Configuration menus for circuit elements do not always display the
type of circuit element you are accessing. When the node may access
more than one type (such as 4016-L 1 and 4016-L 2 CSUs), this can be
confusing. When the node is a 551VST ML List 1, both types of CSU
circuit elements are referred to as NMC-L 1 CSU. Similarly, when the
node is a 551VST ML List 2, both types of CSU circuit elements are
referred to as NMC-L 2 CSU.
You must be logged in with LEVEL3 access or higher to change
parameters in the Edit Circuit Elements Options screen. Access Level 2
allows you to change whether or not the near-end and far-end
performance data are collected. Access Level 1 limits you to viewing and
listing the circuit element configuration options.
To reach the appropriate element configuration menu:
Element
Sub-menus
5-44
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Configuration.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuring circuit elements
2. From the Configuration Menu , select Element. The Edit
Element: Select Parent Node screen now appears.
If this menu has no nodes listed, then no nodes have yet been
configured and you cannot access any elements to edit, view, list,
etc. If this is the case, go back and configure the node, first.
3. If nodes are listed, select a parent node by moving the cursor to your
choice and pressing Enter . Depending on the type of node, one of
the Configuration Actions menus appears:
Figure 5-7
Configuration: 551VST List 2 Menu
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Configuring the T1 Network
Figure 5-8
Configuration: 551VST-ML List 2 Menu
Figure 5-9
Configuration: AS2000 Me
This is the first step in selecting the circuit element(s) to be configured. It
tells Access Manager who is the circuit element’s parent node (i.e., its
node name). The parent node’s name appears in the Current Node block
in the upper right portion of the screen. The node type appears in the
menu title.
If the parent node is a multiline type, the circuit element is selected by
node name [shelf, slot].
If the parent node is a single element type, the circuit element is selected
by node name only. If you are accessing a multiline circuit element
continue in the Selecting a Circuit Element Range section that follows.
Because every CSU (or DSU) has a default value, there is no Add
option in the Configuration Actions Menus. To add a circuit element,
select the Edit option and choose a parent node; then use Ctrl PgUp
and Ctrl PgDn to choose the plug number which will hold the new
circuit element.
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Far-End Circuit Elements
Access Manager supports configuration of CSU circuit elements, whether
far-end or near-end. Far-end CSU circuit elements are accessed through
the ESF Data Link. For this capability to function, follow these steps:
1. The parent node of the near-end circuit element must be installed
and operational.
2. A direct or dial-up connection to the host PC must be in place for
the near-end node. (DIU circuit elements can be configured if, and
only if, the parent node is near-end.)
3. The near-end circuit element must be installed and operational.
4. The parent node of the (far-end) circuit element must be installed
and operational.
5. The far-end circuit element must be defined in the database.
6. A circuit must be defined between a near-end circuit element and
the far-end circuit element to be configured.
7. The far-end circuit element may now actually be accessed.
The Configuration: AS2000 Plug screen has the same selections as the
Configuration: ConnecT1 Plus Plug screen.
To select the range of circuit elements:
Select the circuit
element range
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Configuration. The
Configuration Menu appears.
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2. From this screen, select Element. The screen labeled Edit
Element: Select Parent Node now appears.
If this menu has no nodes listed, it means that no nodes have been
configured yet.
3. Select the circuit elements’ parent node. The menu that appears
depends on the type of node. The menus are:
5-48
•
551VST-ML List 2
•
Access System 2000
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuring circuit elements
4. Choose the Select option. The Select xxx Range data entry
screen appears, where xxx indicates the type of parent node. This is
a typical CSU range selection menu.
5. One or more CSUs or plugs in a shelf may be selected. If more than
one is selected, Ctrl PgUp and Ctrl PgDn allow access to each of
the circuit elements.
The ranges selected for each multiline node are stored in the
database and are used as the default range the next time you
configure the circuit elements in that node.
Enter the shelf number and the slot (i.e., CSU or plug) range
designating the circuit element(s) as follows:
Type of parent node
Conditions
551VST ML List 1
The possible CSU (i.e., slot range) is 1 to 28.
The shelf number is always 1 and is not entered.
551VST ML List 2
SIM-equipped 551V MLS
The possible CSU (i.e., slot range) is 1 to 10.
The shelf number is always 1 and is not entered.
NC/E node
The possible CSU (i.e., slot) range is from 1 to
10. This type of node also has a SIM shelf
selection entry. The shelf number can be from 1
to 5.
Access System 200
node
The shelf number ranges from 1 to 4,
corresponding to its hardware address. The plug
(i.e.,slot) number ranges are:
• from 1 to 13, if the shelf is a Multiline typ
• from 1 to 2, if the shelf is a Dual-line type
ConnecT1 Plus node
The shelf number ranges from 1 to 4 and the
plug number also ranges from 1 to 2.
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Configuring the T1 Network
To edit a circuit element’s definition:
Editing circuit
element definitions
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Configuration. The
screen labeled Configuration appears.
2. From this screen, select Element. The screen labeled Edit
Element: Select Parent Node now appears.
If this menu has no nodes listed, it means that no nodes have been
configured yet.
3. Select the circuit elements’ parent node. The menu that appears
depends on the type of node. The screens are shown as follows:
•
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
551VST List 2
Configuring circuit elements
•
551VST-ML List 2
•
Access System 2000
4. If the parent node is an AS2000 type and the circuit element has not
yet been configured or deleted, then the screen labeled Select
AS2000 Element Type appears.
If this is the case, choose a circuit element type from the list of
options.
If you choose CSU, the Select CSU Application screen will appear:
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Configuring the T1 Network
Select CSU.
Note: SMDS CSU capability is discussed in the Access System 2000
SMDS User Manual, PN 896-502018-001-1. Release is targeted
for mid-1993..
5. If the parent node is not an AS2000 type, then one of the following
screens will appear:
5-52
•
551VST List 1/A CSU
•
551 VST List 1/B CSU
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuring circuit elements
•
551VST List 2 CSU
•
NMC L1 with 4016 L2 CSU:
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Configuring the T1 Network
•
ConnecT1 Plus CSU
6. At this point, you’ll need to configure the parameters available for
your equipment type.
Deleting circuit
element definitions
You must delete an AS2000 or ConnecT1 Plus circuit element before you
can replace it with one of a different type.
To delete a circuit element configuration:
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Configuration. The
screen labeled Configuration appears.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuring circuit elements
2. From this screen, select Element. The screen labeled Edit
Element: Select Parent Node now appears.
If this menu has no nodes listed, it means that no nodes have been
configured yet.
3. Select the parent node.
If it is an AS2000 node, a screen listing configuration actions
appears.
4. Select the Delete option. The screen labeled Select Shelf and
Plug Range for Delete appears. The menu will look very similar to
this:
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Configuring the T1 Network
5. Enter the range and press
database.
F5
. This saves the information to the
To view a circuit element definition:
Viewing circuit
element definitions
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Configuration.
2. From the Configuration Menu, select Element. The Edit Element:
Select Parent Node screen now appears. If this menu has no nodes
listed, no nodes have yet been configured.
3. After the parent node has been selected, depending on the type of
node, one of the configuration actions menus will appear. See the
following figures:
•
Figure 5 -7, “Configuration: 551VST List 2 Menu,” on pag e5-45
•
Figure 5 -8, “Configuration: 551VST-ML List 2 Menu,” on
page 5-46
•
Figure 5 -9, “Configuration: AS2000 Menu,” on page 5 -46
4. Select the View option. This option allows you to view an existing
circuit element definition without changing it.
Printing all circuit
element definitions
For a selected parent node, you can print out a report listing all
parameters for that node’s circuit elements. The report goes to the printer
defined in the Report screen of the Utilities Menu.
To print out a node’s circuit element definitions:
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Configuration.
2. From the Configuration Menu, select Element. The Edit Element:
Select Parent Node screen now appears.
If this menu has no nodes listed, no nodes have yet been configured.
3. Select the parent node has been selected. One of the configuration
action menus appears. The menu that appears depends on the type of
node being used. See the following figures to see which menu
should appear for your type of module:
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuring circuit elements
•
Figure 5 -7, “Configuration: 551VST List 2 Menu,” on pag e5-45
•
Figure 5 -8, “Configuration: 551VST-ML List 2 Menu,” on
page 5-46
•
Figure 5 -9, “Configuration: AS2000 Menu,” on page 5 -46
4. Select the List option.
Configuration
Menus of 4016 List
1 and List 2 CSUs
When the parent node is a 551VST ML List 1 or List 2 and Access
Manager has configured none of its CSU circuit elements, then the first
time you access these circuit elements, they are all shown with 4016 List
2 options, because the true type of CSUs are not yet known.
For example, consider a 4016 List 1 CSU installed in a 551VST ML shelf
and accessed through the Data Link. When you configure the circuit
element the first time, the option menu for a 4016 List 2 is displayed.
After you press F5 to confirm the configuration with the
Installed and Operational and Enable Remote
Configuration options as YES, a connection is made to the far-end
node and the 4016 List 1 identification is retrieved through the Data Link.
When the CSU returns a 4016 List 1 identification, it is configured as a
4016 List 1 and not a 4016 List 2. Since the CSU identification is now
stored in the database, any future access to this circuit element’s
configuration displays the correct 4016 List 1 options menu.
!
CAUTION
For all installations equipped with 551VST ML List 1 or List 2 and
4016 List 1 or List 2, firmware upgrades must be performed to the
NMC List 1 or List 2 Controller and the 4016 List 1 CSUs before
attempting to remotely configure either of the following.
■
551VST ML List 1 or List 2 (with NMC List 1 Controller with
revision 2.3 or earlier firmware) with near-end 4016 List 2. For
operation with Access Manage , the NMC List 1 Controller must be
upgraded to firmware revision 3.0 or later. If 4016 List 1 CSUs are
provided, they must also be upgraded to firmware revision 2.4 or
later.
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Configuring the T1 Network
■
551VST ML List 1 or List 2 (with NMC List 1 Controller with
revision 2.3 or earlier firmware) with near-end 4016 List 1 (with
revision 2.3 or earlier firmware) and far-end 551VST List 1/B,
551VST List 2, 4016 List 2, or 4016-R. For operation with Access
Manager, the NMC List 1 Controller must be upgraded to firmware
revision 3.0 or later. The 4016 List 1 CSUs must also be upgraded to
firmware revision 2.4 or later
Configuration Options for 551VST Elements
551VST type CSU
Circuit Elements
Options Menu
See the preceding Editing the Circuit Element Definitions section for the
steps required to arrive at the Circuit Element Configuration Options
menus. See the following figures for your module’s menu:
■
Figure 5 -10, “551VST List 1/A Options Menu,” on page 5-59
■
Figure 5 -11, “551VST List1/B CSU Options Menu,” on pa ge5-59
■
Figure 5 -12, “551VST List 2 CSU Options Menu,” on pa ge5-60
■
5-58
Figure 5 -13, “NMC L1 with 4016 L2 CSU Options Menu,” on
page 5-60
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuration Options for 551VST Elements
Figure 5-10 551VST List 1/A Options Me
Figure 5-11 551VST List1/B CSU Options Me
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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Configuring the T1 Network
Figure 5-12 551VST List 2 CSU Options Me
Figure 5-13 NMC L1 with 4016 L2 CSU Options Me
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuration Options for 551VST Elements
CAUTION
!
The 4016 List 1 CSU circuit elements can be soft-configured using
Access Manager. However, service interruption may occur if the soft
option settings do not agree with the hardware switches on the 4016
List 1 printed circuit boards. This occurs only when the 4016 List 1
recovers from a power failure and reconfigures itself according to the
hardware switch settings. Therefore, you should configure all 4016
List 1 CSUs so that the hardware switch settings on the CSU agree
with the soft options you choose in Access Manager.
The configuration options for 551VST-type CSUs are summarized in the
following table:
Table 5-7
Configuration options for 551 VST-type CSU
KEY:
= available
= available in some revisions =
not available
standalone CSUs
551VST-type CSU configuration
option
List 1/A
List 1/B
List 2
4016-R
4016 L1 4016 L2
Installed and Operational
Retrieve Performance Data
Retrieve Far-End Performance Data
Enable Alarm Reporting
Enable Remote Configuratio
BER Threshold
Repeater Loopback Timeout
Enable Far-End Pollin
EnableTransparent Mode
Use FCC Part 68 Rule Only
AIS (Not Signal) Loopback
AIS (Not ESS) Keep-Alive
Enable Alarm Latch
Enable PRM
Enable Span Side B8ZS Encode
Enable Span Side B8ZS Decode
Regenerate CRC to Span Side
Span Side ESF Framing
a
Enable YELTranscode to Span
Enable EQP SIde B8ZS Encode
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Configuring the T1 Network
KEY:
= available
not available
= available in some revisions =
standalone CSUs
551VST-type CSU configuration
option
List 1/A
List 1/B
List 2
4016-R
4016 L1 4016 L2
Enable EQP SIde B8ZS Decode
Regenerate CRC to EQP
EQP Side ESF Framing
Enable YELTranscode to EQP
Idle Code Flags
a. For a remote 4016 L1, you must set this option through the hardware.
Installed and
Operational
This option determines whether the circuit element is installed and
operational. This option, marked with an asterisk (*), must be set to YES
to enable any of the subsequent options (including collection of
performance monitoring data, alarm reporting, and so on).
Before Access Manager will allow you to set this option to YES for the
circuit element, you must set the Installed and Operational
option for the circuit element’s parent node to YES.
The default setting is NO.
Retrieve
Performance Data
Performance data is stored in registers of CSU circuit elements. Each
CSU circuit element has registers to store data. Access Manager can
access these registers through the Retrieve Performance Data
function. Use the following conditions for setting this field:
■
■
If the circuit element is accessed only through the ESF Data Link,
set this option to NO, regardless if performance data is to be
retrieved. A CSU accessed only by the ESF Data Link is a far-end
CSU, and it should have its data collected by the near-end CSU.
If the CSU circuit element is a near-end CSU, set this option to
YES if retrieval of near-end or far-end performance data is desired.
Setting Retrieve Performance Data to YES is sufficient to
enable retrieval of near-end performance data, but not sufficient to
retrieve far-end performance data. For this, you’ll need to set the
Retrieve Far-End Performance Data option.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuration Options for 551VST Elements
■
■
Retrieve Far-En
Performance Data
These registers are known as near-end and far-end user registers
because only the user can reset them. The Telco can examine this
data but cannot reset these registers.
The default setting for this option is YES.
This option permits Access Manager to retrieve and store the
performance data from a far-end CSU through this CSU.
For this option to work, the following two conditions must be met:
a. The Retrieve Performance Data option must also be
set to YES.
b. An Access Manager circuit must be configured between the
near-end and far-end CSUs.
The following descriptions will aid you in setting the Retrieve FarEnd Performance Data field:
■
■
If access to a far-end CSU is not required, set this option to NO.
If access to a far-end CSU is required for collection of performance
data, set this option to YES .
The default setting for this option is NO.
Enable Alarm
Reporting
Before you can enable alarm reporting with this option, the parent node
must have the following:
a. Its Enable Alarm Reporting option enabled, and
b. A downloaded alarm path
If a CSU circuit element should not report alarm conditions, set this
option to NO.
If a CSU circuit element is accessed only through the ESF Data Link, set
this option to NO.
To enable alarm reporting for CSU circuit elements accessed only
through the Data Link, set this option to YES for the near-end CSUs
whose parent node is accessed directly, by modem, or by statistical
multiplexer.
The default setting for this option is YES.
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Configuring the T1 Network
Enable Remote
Configuration
This option must be set to YES and the Installed and
Operational option must also be set to YES to enable Access
Manager to configure the selected CSU circuit elements.
In the following figures, the options following Enable Remote
Configuration are downloaded to the CSU circuit element when
F5 is pressed. View the appropriate figure (for your equipment) from
the list below:
If this option is set to NO, any changes made are only saved in the
database but are not downloaded to the CSU circuit element. Remote
configuration refers to the fact that these options are downloaded from the
Access Manager database.
Note: You should set the Enable Remote Configuration
option to YES only during the time that the actual remote
configuration is being performed. This is to avoid performing a
remote configuration (if this option is set to YES) each time you
edit a circuit element just to change the data to be collected.
BER Threshold
This option sets the bit error rate (BER) threshold on the network side to a
rate from 10-4 to 10-9, with a default value of 10-6.
A value of ZERO disables the BER alarm function.
The approximate length of time for automatic alarm to reset may vary
according to which BER threshold you select, as shown in the following
two tables.
5-64
■
Table 5-8, “Older CSU Circuit Elements BER Alarm Rest Times”
■
Table 5-9, “Newer CSU Circuit Elements BER Alarm Reset Times”
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuration Options for 551VST Elements
Table 5-8
Older CSU Circuit Elements BER Alarm Rest Time
Applicable equipment:
• 551VST List 1/A, all revisions
• 551VST List 1/B BER alarm, all
revisions
• 4016 List 1, all revisions
• 4016 List 2, firmware revision 2.2
or earlier
• 4016-R, firmware revision 2.4 o
earlie
BER Threshold
Alarm Reset
10-4
4 seconds
10
-5
4 seconds
10
-6
10 seconds
10-7
70 seconds
10
-8
70 seconds
10
-9
660 seconds
• 551VST List 2, firmware revision
2.1 or earlie
Table 5-9
Newer CSU Circuit Elements BER Alarm Reset Time
The longer BER alarm reset times reduce the number of BER alarms reported to
Access Manager.
Applicable equipment:
BER Threshold
Alarm Reset Times
• 4016 List 2, firmware revision 2.3
or later
10-4
97 -194 seconds
10
-5
97 -194 seconds
10
-6
97 -194 seconds
10-7
97 -194 seconds
• 4016-R, firmware revision 2.5 or
later
• 551VST List 2, firmware revision
2.2 or later
Repeate
Loopback Timeout
10
-8
453 - 906 seconds
10
-9
647 - 1,294 seconds
The repeater loopback time-out is the time period after which the repeater
loopback (RLB) automatically releases. It has a default value of 300
seconds(5 minutes).
An RLB loops the CSU transmit-side output towards the equipment
(EQP) through the CSU repeater and disconnects the incoming signal
from the NET. Without this time-out, there would be no ESF Data Link
access path to the CSU from the far-end to tell the CSU to drop the
loopback. The RLB time-out therefore drops the loopback after the timeout period has elapsed.
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Configuring the T1 Network
You can select one of 32 time-outs ranging in duration from one second to
twelve hours, as listed in Table 5-10, “Repeater Loopback Time-out
Options”.
Table 5-10
Repeater Loopback Time-out Options
Seconds
Minutes (seconds)
Hour (Seconds)
1
1 (60)
1 (3,600)
2
2 (120)
2 (7,200)
3
3 (180)
3 (10,800)
4
4 (240)
4 (14,400)
5
5 (300)
5 (18,000)
10
10 (600)
6 (21,600)
20
20 (1,200)
7 (25,200)
30
30 (1,800)
8 (28,800)
40
40 (2,400)
9 (32,400)
50
50 (3000
10 (36,000)
----
-----
11 (39,600)
----
-----
12 (43,200)
Choosing zero seconds is not allowed, causing time-out to reset to one
second. Any value greater than 43,200 seconds is reset to 43,200 seconds,
and any value between those listed is reset to the next lowest value.
Enable Far-En
Polling
Enabling this option allows the near-end CSU circuit element to poll the
far-end CSU circuit element for BER alarm status. The Enable FarEnd Polling option works only if the network uses ESF framing.
When there is no direct or dial-up access to the far-end CSU, enable it for
nodes with access to Access Manager through either direct or dial-up
connections.
Only one end of a circuit (as defined in Access Manager) should be set
for polling.
If both parent nodes are set for alarm reporting and both are accessible by
Access Manager, set the CSUs at both ends to NO POLL, in order to
avoid double reporting of the same alarm.
The default setting for this option is NO (disabled).
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Configuration Options for 551VST Elements
Enable
Transparent Mode
This option has a default setting of NO and should remain set to NO
unless the CSU circuit element is to transmit an unframed signal using
B8ZS. Presently, only certain U.S. government agencies are allowed to
use the unframed format on the public network.
In the transparent mode, if an unframed signal is received from the EQP
and the CSU is not in an inband loopback mode, all BPVs received from
the EQP are passed straight to the network.
In the non-transparent (normal cut-through) mode, with an unframed
signal, all BPVs from the EQP are removed, except those resulting from
B8ZS encoding.
Use FCC Part 68
Rule Only
When you choose this mode (YES), the circuit element stuffs a ONE into
every string of eight (8) consecutive ZEROs whenever either the average
density is below 12.5% or there are more than 80 consecutive ZEROs
(referred to as FCC Part 68 Rule in earlier manuals). This is the default
setting.
If you choose NO, this rule is still applied, plus the AT&T TR-62411
density enforcement rule is additionally applied.
AIS (Not Signal)
Loopback
This option determines whether the AIS or the received signal is passed
on to one side when the other side is looped back. For example, if a line
loopback (LLB) is activated and this option is enabled (YES), an AIS
signal is transmitted to the EQP.
If an LLB occurs with this option set to NO, the received signal from the
network is transmitted to the EQP during an LLB. The default setting for
this option is YES.
Note: An RLB always passes the signal to the network, regardless of
this option setting.
AIS (Not ESS)
Keep-Alive
This option determines whether:
■
AIS (unframed ALL-ONEs) is transmitted to the network, or
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Configuring the T1 Network
■
the signal received from the network is looped back to the network
(ESS) as a keep-alive when a loss of signal (LOS) is detected on the
incoming signal from the EQP.
The default setting for this option is YES (AIS keep-alive).
Enable Alarm
Latch
This option determines the mode of operation of the local BER alarm.
When this option is set to NO (default setting), the alarm indicator on the
CSU clears when the alarm condition clears.
If this option is set to YES, the local alarm indicator stays on after the
condition clears, until the alarm cutoff (ACO) button is pressed.
If the ACO button is pressed while the alarm condition still exists, the
ACO LED and function activate, but the alarm LED remains lit. When the
alarm condition clears, the alarm clears and the ACO LED goes off.
Enable PRM
Enable Span Side
B8ZS Encode and
Decode
Regenerate CRC to
Span Side
When this option is enabled (YES), it allows automatic transmission of
Performance Report Messages (PRMs) defined by ANSI T1.403-1989.
The PRM transmits the last four seconds of performance data every
second on the ESF Data Link for use by Telco monitoring equipment.
Enable this option only when the use of PRMs is required. The default
setting is NO.
The Encode option controls the transmit direction to the NET, and the
Decode option controls the receive direction from the NET. These
options are both defaulted to NO, which selects AMI line coding.
To select B8ZS coding on the NET, set both options to YES. These two
options are combined in the 4016 List 1. If you enter YES, then the CSU
encodes the signal to the NET and decodes the signal from the NET.
This option determines whether the CSU circuit element generates a new
CRC-6 code toward the NET or passes the incoming CRC-6 code from
the EQP to the NET.
To pass the incoming CRC-6 bits from the EQP to the network, set this
option to NO (disable CRC regeneration when the EQP generates the
CRC-6 code).
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Configuration Options for 551VST Elements
This option is defaulted to YES.
Note: Revision 2.2 or later of the 551VST List 2 firmware forces the
CRC options to be correct based on the framing format,
regardless of what the soft option switches are set to when the
CSU is powered up. This also applies to the 4016-R with
firmware revision 2.6 or later and 4016 List 2 with firmware
revision 2.3 or later.
!
Span Side ESF
Framing
Enable YEL
Transcode to Span
CAUTION
The correct settings for the EQP and NET CRC regeneration options
in relation to the framing formats for the EQP and NET are critical to
the proper operation of the ESF CSU families, except for the 551VST
List 1/A. If the EQP is set for SF (D4) framing and the NET is set for
ESF framing, the NET CRC regeneration option must be set to YE . I
the EQP is set for ESF and the NET is set for SF, the EQP CRC
regeneration must be set to YE . For any other combination of
framing formats, the settings of the EQP and NET CRC regeneration
options are up to you. If these options are not set correctly for the
first two cases, constant CRC-6 errors result.
This option determines whether the framing format transmitted to the
network is ESF or SF (D4).
If SF framing is required on the network, set this option to NO (disable
ESF). The default setting is YES for ESF framing.
When the Enable YEL Transcode to Network option is
enabled (YES), it allows the CSU circuit element to detect an SF (D4)
yellow alarm on the EQP side and transcode it to ESF format on the
network.
If the EQP uses SF framing, the yellow alarm is B2=0 in all 24 channels.
If this alarm is detected for 400 +/- 1 milliseconds, it is transcoded to an
ESF yellow alarm on the ESF Data Link.
If the incoming signal from the EQP is ESF, the time for the CSU to
detect the yellow alarm and start transcoding it is 63 to 66 milliseconds.
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Configuring the T1 Network
Yellow alarm transcoding to NET should be enabled any time the EQP
and network framing are not the same and transcoding is desired.
This option has a default of NO.
Enable EQP Side
B8ZS Encode and
Decode
Regenerate CRC to
EQP
These two options control whether the equipment (EQP) side is encoding
the signal toward the EQP and decoding the signal received from the EQP
for B8ZS.
If AMI (Alternate Mark Inversion) line coding is required, select NO. This
is the default setting.
This option determines whether the CRC is regenerated toward the
equipment (EQP) from the NET.
If the NET is SF (i.e., D4) and the EQP is ESF, set this option to YES.
The default setting is NO (not to regenerate CRC).
Refer to the CAUTION under the Regenerate CRC to NET Side
option.
EQP Side ESF
Framing
Enable YEL
Transcode to EQP
Idle Code Flags
5-70
This option determines whether the framing format on the EQP side of
the CSU circuit element is ESF or SF. The default setting is NO
(SF framing). If the EQP uses ESF, set this option to YES.
This option on the equipment (EQP) is functionally equivalent to the
Enable YEL Transcode to Network option above, except it is
for transcoding yellow alarms toward the EQP. If the far-end CSU EQP
side is also SF, the Enable YEL Transcode to EQP option
should be set to NO because the yellow alarm is carried in the payload.
When set to NO, this option sets the ESF Data Link idle code to ALLONEs. When this option is set to YES, the Data Link idle code is
FLAGS. The default is NO.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuration Options for AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus
!
CAUTION
Set this option to YES only if the CSUs at BOTH ENDS of the circuit
have this option available. Otherwise, set this option to NO. After
making your selection of CSU options, the selected circuit element
configuration options can be updated individually by pressing F5 .
Or, the entire selected range of elements can be updated
automatically by pressing F6 .
Configuration Options for AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus
Elements
ConnecT1 Plus dual-line hardware is a low-cost implementation of the
AS2000 firmware/software specification. The maximum configuration
for a single node is 4 dual-line shelves.
Because of the similarity in the user interface with Access Manager, this
section may use menu samples from either of the two products
interchangeably. Most software features are typical to both products.
Exceptions are noted as follows:
There are some nomenclature differences in the model names and
numbers between the CSUs and DSUs of the two products. These are
summarized in the following table:
Table 5-11
DSUs
Model Names for AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus CSUs and
Node Type
AS2000
ConnecT1 Plus
CSU
DSU
NCC 2020
DIU 2130
TAC 2010
DIU 2140
CCC 1020
DIU 1130
TAC 1010
Not applicable
The DIU 2140 is unique to AS2000 hardware. Otherwise, each element in
the AS2000 line has a functional counterpart in the ConnecT1 Plus line.
The ConnecT1 Plus functional counterpart to the AS2000’s NCC 2020
(Channel Service Unit) is the CCC 1020, and so forth.
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Configuring the T1 Network
The following section will reflect these similarities by showing the
ConnecT1 Plus model name and number in parentheses; for example:
NCC 2020 (CCC 1020).
Note: APA (Advanced Programmable Architecture) provides Access
Manager with the ability to download code to the CSU to update
firmware or provide for special functions. This feature is unique
to the AS2000 hardware.
To get to the element configuration screen:
Getting to the CSU
configuration
scree
1. From the Main Menu, select Configuration.
The screen labeled Configuration appears.
2. Select Element.
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Configuration Options for AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus
The screen labeled Edit Element: Select Parent Node appears.
At this screen, you select the node which contains the element you
want to configure.
3. Move the up and down arrows until the desired node is highlighted,
and press . Enter
The Configuration: AS2000 Plug screen appears.
a. To simultaneously configure multiple CSUs which reside on
the same shelf, choose Select. The Select Shelf and Plug
Range screen appears.
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Type the number of the shelf on the first line, the leftmost slot on
the second line, and the rightmost slot on the third line.
After you have made your selections, press F5 to save them.
You will be returned to the Configuration: AS2000 Plug screen,
shown at the beginning of this step.
b. If you have just completed Step 3a or you want to configure
a single plug, select Edit.
The Select AS2000 Element Type for Shelf _ Plug_ screen
appears.
4. If you are configuring a single plug, use Ctrl Pg Up and
Ctrl Pg Dn to choose the targeted shelf and slot number.
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Configuration Options for AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus
The numbers in the top right area of this screen will indicate which
slot you are targeting at any given moment.
5. To configure a targeted CSU (for anything but SMDS which, by the
way, is discussed in a separate soon-to-be-released manual), select
CSU. The Select CSU Application screen will appear:
Select CSU and press
Enter
.
The CSU Configuration Options Menu appears, showing the
configuration options to be edited for the first NCC 2020, CCC
1020, TAC 2010, or TAC 1010 in the specified range.
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Configuring the T1 Network
Figure 5-14 Typical NCC or TAC configuration option menu
These options are described in the following sections.
Installed and
Operational
This option determines whether the circuit element is installed and
operational. This option, marked with an asterisk (*), must be set to YES
in order to enable any of the following options, including collection of
performance monitoring data, alarm reporting, etc.
You must set the Installed and Operational option for the
circuit element’s parent node to YES before Access Manager will allow
you to set this option to YES for the circuit element. The default setting
is NO.
Retrieve Near-En
Performance Data /
Retrieve Far-En
Data
These options enable or disable an NCC, CCC, or TAC collection of nearend or far-end performance data.
If you select YES for either option, also press F8 and then select the
network and/or EQP data registers to be retrieved. The register types are
NET User, NET Additional, and EQP.
The near-end defaults are NET User=YES, NET Additional=NO,
and EQP=NO. All far-end defaults are NO.
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Configuration Options for AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus
If you set the Retrieve Far-End Data option to YES, you must
also set the Retrieve Near-End Data option to YES, and there
must be a circuit built between the near-end and far-end circuit elements.
Do not set Retrieve Far-End Data to YES at both the near-end
and far-end circuit elements. For example, set Retrieve Far-End
Data to YES for the near-end NCC, CCC, or TAC and set Retrieve
Far-End Data to NO for far-end circuit element. The defaults for
these options is NO, except near-end Net Use , which is YES.
Save
Configuration to
CSU
Enable Alarm
Reporting
This option must be set to YES and the Installed and
Operational option must also be set to YES to enable Access
Manager to configure the selected CSU circuit elements.
The options following Save Configuration to CSU are
downloaded to the CSU circuit element when F5 is pressed. If this
option is set to NO, any changes made are saved in the database but are
not downloaded to the CSU circuit element.
CSUs can report alarm conditions to Access Manager when excessive
errors occur or the line service is degraded.
If you don’t want the CSU to report alarm conditions to Access Manager,
your choice is simple. Set the Enable Alarm Reporting field to
NO.
To allow the CSU to report alarm conditions to Access Manager:
1. Set Enable Alarm Reporting to YES.
2. Make sure that in the Node Configuration screen of the parent node,
you have:
•
set the Enable Alarm Reporting to YES
•
downloaded the alarm path for that node
Otherwise, the CSU will send alarms to the node controller, but the
node controller will not forward these alarms to Access Manager.
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3. Review the alarm condition settings by pressing
Alarm Condition Sub-Menu screen.
F8
to get the
Y
Here you decide how many errors in how short a time period are
excessive and worth defining an alarm condition.
Defining alarm conditions
Alarm conditions are designed to alert you to conditions that can
negatively affect service on the T1 line. From a functional point of view,
alarm conditions actually include alarms, performance alerts, and events.
■
■
■
Alarms imply that something is out-of-service or broken.
Performance alerts indicate that line service is degraded. Usually, a
user-specified threshold has been exceeded.
Events include loopbacks. An alarm condition from setting a
loopback lets you know, preventatively, that you are putting part of
the line out of service.
These distinctions are not reflected in the registers nor do they need to be.
They’re only made to give you an understanding of the wide range of
conditions which solicit alarms.
To define alarm conditions, follow these steps:
1. Set the EQP BER (Bit Error Rate) threshold and the NET BER
threshold.
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Configuration Options for AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus
The NET BER threshold is the maximum bit error rate allowed for
signals coming from the network. The EQP BER threshold is the
maximum bit error rate allowed for signals coming from the
network. Each can be set to any value between 10 -4 and 10-9. The
default is to 10-6.
Go to the EQP BER threshold field , and enter the positiv
value of the exponent. For example, for a bit error rate of 10-5,
enter 5. Remember, the higher the exponent, the lower the
threshold. Do the same with the NET BER threshold field.
The default value is 6, for 10-6.
To disable the alarm, select 0 (zero).
2. Set alarm thresholds and interval counts for each of these three
types of trouble seconds:
•
Errored Seconds-Line - ES-L; that is, the number of seconds
with bipolar violations, indicating formatting errors. This refers
only to BPVs which are not an intentional part of B8ZS line
coding.
•
Errored Seconds - ES; that is, the number of seconds with
CRC-6 errors, indicating a violation of data integrity
•
Unavailable Seconds - UAS, that is, any second during which a
UASS (Unavailable Signal State) exists
Y
trouble second
definitions
First, an explanation of thresholds and interval counts.
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An interval is a 15-minute (900-second) segment of time, and there
are 96 intervals in 24 hours. An Interval Count is defined as the
time window within which you want to count trouble seconds. It
includes the number of intervals you specify plus the current
interval you’re in.
A Threshold is the maximum number of trouble seconds allowable
in an Interval Count.
It takes the length of the configured Interval Count to clear an
alarm.
These are the default values:
Type of Trouble
Second
Interval Count
(0-96 intervals)
Threshold
(0-900 trouble seconds)
ES-L (BPVs)
1
25
ES (CRC-6 errors)
1
25
UAS
1
10
If the interval count is 0, then:
TIP
•
only the current interval is used to determine if the Threshold is
exceeded, and
•
the alarm is cleared at the end of the current interval.
To disable alarm reporting during excessiveBPV, ES, or UAS errors, set
their threshold values to 0.
3. To report turn on the alarm relay when a loopback toward the
NET is either activated or cleared, set the NET Loopback
Alarm Relay option to YES (default).
The alarm relay is a 3-pin terminal strip, surrounded by bright
orange plastic, located in the middle of every CIM faceplate. It can
be connected to an external device---such as a light, bell, or
buzzer---to provide a noticeable alarm when a loopback toward the
net is activated or cleared.
4. Decide how long an alarm condition must persist before the CSU
reports it to Access Manager.
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Configuration Options for AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus
Go the the Alarm Set Delay Time field, and select the delay
time in the range of 0 to 255 seconds.
The default value for the this option is 3 seconds.
5. Decide how soon an alarm condition will clear.
Go to the Alarm Clear Delay Timefield, and select the delay
time in the range of 0 to 255 seconds.
The default setting for the this option is 10 seconds.
6. Decide how soon an LOF alarm will clear.
Go the the Alarm Clear Delay Time for LOF field, and
select the delay time before a loss of frame (LOF) alarm condition
clears. Choose a value in the range of 0 to 255 seconds.
The default is 10 seconds.
Set this option to one of the following:
Poll Far-End Statu
Option
Description
NO POLL
At both ends, to disable alarm polling. Select this option (the
default) when the nodes at both ends are connected to Access
Manager and both nodes report local alarms. Otherwise, the
same alarm is reported to Access Manager twice.
POLL
To have the near-end CSU automatically poll the far-end CSU
for alarms every four seconds and report those alarms to
Access Manager.
UNSOL
To have the far-end NCC, CCC, or TAC automatically (when it
detects a Loss of Signal) send its alarm status to the near-end
NCC, CCC, or TAC.
Select this option for the far-end CSU circuit element when the
near-end CSU is set to POLL.
RLB Loopback
Time-out
Use this option to define the time period after which an RLB releases.
Choose the setting desire from the following list:
■
DISABLE
■
xx SE , where xx = 01 to 59
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Configuring the T1 Network
■
xx MIN, where xx = 01 to 59
■
xx HR, where xx = 01 to 24
■
FOREVER
The default is 1 minute.
Enable PRM
The CSU can generate performance report messages (PRMs) over the
ESF Data Link once every second. If enabled, the PRM carries a bit
which identifies the PRM sender
To enable these messages, go to the Enable PRM field and press the
F8 function key. The Select PRM Enable screen will appear.
Choose from one of the following options:
■
■
■
AIS (not SIG)
During Loopback
To not generate the PRM, select NO (PRM disabled). This is the
default option.
To generate PRMs and label them as sent by the CPE (Customer
Premises Equipment), select USER.
To generate PRMs and label them as sent by the Telco, select
TELCO.
This option determines whether the AIS or the received signal (SIG) is
passed on to one side when the other side is looped back.
For example, if a line-side line loopback (LLB) is activated when this
option is set for AIS, then AIS is transmitted to the EQP when this option
is set to YES (default setting).
If the option is set to NO, the received signal from the network is
transmitted to the EQP during an LLB.
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Note: An RLB always passes the signal to the network, regardless of
this option setting.
EQP Distance
This option allows you to select the amount of equalization required (in
cabling feet) for the transmit signal on the equipment (EQP) side to meet
the DSX-1 interface requirement.
Press F8 to see the available values, then select the value
corresponding to the distance from the CSU to the equipment or DSX-1
bay.
The default setting is 0 to 133 feet.
EQP (Equipment
Framing Format
Use F8 in this option to select the framing format used on the
equipment (EQP) side of the CSU.
The options are SF (Superframe), ESF (Extended Superframe), and
UNFRAMED. The default is SF. If the CSU is used with one or more nondrop-and-insert DIU 2130s, DIU 1130s, and/or DIU2140s, this option is
ignored by the CSU.
Note: If EQP Framing Format is Unframed, then the NET Framing
Format must also be Unframed.
Enable EQP Side
B8ZS
Set this option to YES if the equipment (EQP) uses B8ZS line coding, or
to NO if it uses AMI (Alternate Mark Inversion). The default setting is
NO (AMI coding).
If the CSU is used with one or more DIU 2130s, DIU 1130s and/or
DIU 2140s, this option is ignored by the non-drop-and-insert CSU.
Regenerate CRC-6
to EQP
To correctly process CRC-6 codes, set this option to YES if the
equipment (EQP) framing mode is ESF and the network framing mode is
SF.
If both the equipment and network use ESF framing, set this option to
NO. The default setting is YES.
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Enable Yellow
Alarm Transcode
to EQP
This option allows the CSU to convert an SF yellow alarm (all B2 bits =
ZERO) from the network to an ESF yellow alarm (repetitive [11111111
00000000] bit pattern on the ESF Data Link).
If the network uses SF framing and the equipment (EQP) uses ESF
framing, select YES.
If the CSU is used with one or more DIU 2130s, DIU 1130s, and/or DIU
2140s, such as drop-and-insert, choose NO.
Otherwise, set this option to NO (default setting).
Signal to NET on
EQP Errors
If you want the CSU to continue sending the signal from the equipment to
the network, even after detecting the EQP side signal has excessive BER,
set this option to YES.
The default setting is YES.
!
Signal to NET on
EQP LOF
5-84
CAUTION
Setting this option to NO causes an out-of-service condition during
excessive BER. It begins when the BER threshold is exceeded and
lasts as long as the condition persists, with an additional 97 seconds
to 22 minutes (depending on the BER Threshold option selected). If
NO is selected, the signal applied is AIS.
This option is similar to the one above for an alarm caused by a Loss of
Frame (LOF) condition on the incoming signal from the network. Also
set this option to YES if the CSU is used with DIUs. The default setting
is YES.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuration Options for AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus
!
EQP RCV
(Receive) Jitter
BUF (Buffer) = 40
Bits
CAUTION
If NET Keep-Alive is FAIS (framed AIS) or AIS, then setting this optio
to NO causes out-of-service condition during excessive BER; it starts
when the OOF (Out Of Frame) is detected and lasting as long as the
condition persists, with an additional 0 to 255 seconds (depending
on the user-selected alarm delay time). The default is 10 seconds.
Each CSU has an input buffer in each direction that allows it to tolerate
jitter in the incoming signal from the equipment (EQP) and network. The
40-bit buffer provides maximum jitter tolerance and a maximum signal
throughput delay time of 42 microseconds (65 bits) in each direction.
Set the equipment-side jitter buffer to YES (default value) for most
applications.
To reduce the equipment-side throughput delay time to 17 microseconds
(27 bits), select NO. If NO is selected, a buffer length of 16 bits is used.
However, this setting also reduces the CSU’s input jitter tolerance.
Enable EQP OOF
Transparency
When enabled (set to YES), this option allows the CSU to pass all BPVs,
including both non-B8ZS and B8ZS-coded ones, from the equipment
(EQP) to the network.
When transparency is disabled (NO), the CSU removes non-B8ZS BPVs
from the equipment input and passes only the B8ZS-coded BPVs to the
network. However, remember that B8ZS is passed only if the CSU is
configured for B8ZS NET side encoding and the equipment is set for
B8ZS decoding.
The default is NO.
Network LBO
Set this option for the amount of line build-out (LBO) needed to provide a
DS1 signal of the proper amplitude to the first line repeater on the
network. Choose one of the following:
0 dB
The first repeater is 2000 to 3000 feet from the CSU. This
is the default setting.
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Configuring the T1 Network
NET Density
Enforcement
7.5 dB
The first repeater is 1000 to 2000 feet away.
15 dB
The first repeater is less than 1000 feet away.
0 dB
The network does not use line repeaters.
This option lets you select the type of minimum-ONEs density
enforcement on the network. If the CSU uses AMI line coding, choose
one of the following settings:
12%+80Z
When you choose this mode, the CSU stuffs a ONE into
every string of eight (8) consecutive ZEROs whenever
either the average density is below 12.5 percent or there
are more than 80 consecutive ZEROs. This is the default
setting.
AT&T TR-62411
When you choose this mode, the CSU
stuffs a ONE into every string of more than 15
consecutive ZEROs or whenever there is not a minimum
of N ONEs in every window of 8(N + 1) consecutive
pulses, where N has a value from 1 to 23.
NET Keep-Alive
1 in 80
Stuffs a ONE into every string of more than 80
consecutive ZEROs.
1 in 15
Stuffs a ONE into every string of more than 15
consecutive ZEROs.
NONE
Pulse densityenforcement is notused. Use this mode for AMI
unrestricted ZEROs operation. Also, select NONE if
B8ZS coding is used.
This option lets you choose which type of signal the CSU applies to the
network as a keep-alive. The options are:
FAIS
framed alarm indication signal, all-ONEs
AIS
unframed AIS
NONE
pass signal to NET
LPBK
looped network signal through a line loopback [LLB].
The default setting is for unframed AIS.
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Configuration Options for AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus
NET Framing
Format
Select the framing format used on the network. This can be SF (D4),
ES , or UNFRAMED, as required. The default setting is ES . The far-end
circuit element must use the same framing option.
Note: If EQP Framing Format is Unframed, then the NET Framing
Format must also be Unframed.
Enable NET B8ZS
If clear-channel operation is required, enter YES to select B8ZS line
coding.
When selecting B8ZS coding, first be sure the network is compatible with
B8ZS, which introduces intentional bipolar violations into the transmitted
DS1 signal. Call the telephone company to confirm this. Set this option
identically at both ends of the circuit.
Otherwise enter NO, which will select AMI coding (default setting).
Regenerate CRC-6
to NET
If the equipment uses SF framing and the network uses ESF, select YES
to ensure proper handling of CRC-6 codes toward the network by the
CSU. This is the default setting.
If both the equipment and network use ESF, set this option to NO
(disabled).
Enable YEL
(Yellow Alarm
Transcode to NET
If the equipment uses D4 framing and the network uses ESF, select YES
(default setting) to allow the CSU to transcode an SF (D4) yellow alarm
to an ESF yellow alarm on the ESF Data Link.
If both the equipment and network use the same type of framing, select
NO to disable yellow alarm transcoding. When disabled, yellow alarms
are passed through without being transcoded.
Yellow alarm is also known as Remote Alarm Indication Signal (RAIS).
Signal to EQP on
NET Errors
The Signal to EQP on NET Errors option is functionally
similar to the Signal to NET on EQP Errors option previously
described. See warning in that section. The default is YES (signal).
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Configuring the T1 Network
Signal to EQP on
NET LOF
Signal to EQP on
NET LOS
!
NET RCV Jitte
BUF = 40 Bits
Data Link Idle
Code (Idle code) =
Flags
Power-up Near End
Self Test
Loopback Enable
5-88
This option functions like Signal to EQP on LOS option
described below, except the trigger condition is LOF. See warning in that
section. The default is YES.
If this option is set to YES, then whatever signal is received from the
network is sent to the equipment.
If this option is set to NO, then AIS is sent to the equipment until the LOS
alarm clears. The default is YES (signal).
CAUTION
Setting this option to NO causes an out-of-service condition during
LOS from the network, starting when the condition is detected and
lasting as long as the condition persists plus from 0 seconds to 255
seconds (depending on the user-selected alarm delay time). The
default is 10 seconds.
This option is functionally similar to the EQP Receive Jitter
Buffer = 40 Bits option, except that the buffer in this option is for
the incoming signal from the network. The default setting is YES.
When set to YES (the default), the ESF Data Link idle code is ALLONEs. When this option is set to NO, the Data Link idle code is Flags.
Set this option to YES (default) to allow the CSU to automatically
perform a self-test each time it is powered up.
Set this option to YES (default setting) if you want the CSU to respond to
loopback commands sent to it either on the ESF Data Link or directly
from Access Manager.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuration Options for AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus
Then, press F8 to go to the Loopback Enable screen, and enable each
desired loopback by typing Y. All loopbacks are enabled by default.
Figure 5-15 Loopback Enable Sub-menu
To allow the CSU to do any of the following:
Enable Testing
Options
■
■
■
Send or respond to inband loopback codes
Apply a test signal to a DS1 circuit when commanded by Access
Manager via the On-line Menu
Apply a test signal to a DS1 circuit when commanded by local
switch controls at the circuit element
Execute the following steps:
1. Set the Enable Testing Options field to YES.
2. Press
F8
to access the following screen.
INBAND LOOPBACK CODES and TEST SIGNALS SUB-MENU:
3. Select a framed or unframed test signal.
Set the Enable Testing Options field to NO (disabled) to:
■
use external test equipment, or
■
prevent unauthorized circuit testing through the CSU
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Configuring the T1 Network
The default for all testing options is YES.
Send/Receive Inband Loop Cod
This option allows the CSU to control loopbacks with inband loop-up and
loop-down codes. If this option is disabled, the CSU does not respond to
inband loopback codes, nor will it send inband loopback codes.
Send Test Signal
This option allows the CSU to apply the desired test signal to the circuit.
If this option is disabled, the CSU does not apply test signals when
commanded by an operator.
Framed Test Signal
This option allows the CSU to apply framed test signals to the circuit. If
this option is set to NO (disabled), the CSU applies only unframed test
signals.
DIU Data Bus Used
When the CSU is used with DIUs, it interfaces with them through one or
two of the three data buses on the Access System shelf backplane.
Press
■
■
!
5-90
F8
to see the available choices. If the CSU is used with:
no DIUs, select NONE (the default).
DIUs in applications without drop-and-insert, assign data bus A, B,
or C, whichever is available.
WARNING
If the TIU 2850 or TIU 1850 is installed in the shelf, do not select C,
because C is dedicated to providing timing from the TIU to the shelf
If the TAC is used with DIUs for drop-and-insert operation, selec
either D&I NET or D&I EQ (depending on the desired direction for this
operating mode). If D&I NET is chosen, databus A is assigned. If D&I
EQP is chosen, data bus B is assigned.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuration Options for AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus
DIUs must be synchronized to the CSU for proper operation.
DIU Timin
To view the timing options, press
F8
. The following screen appears:
See the individual CSU hardware manuals for further information on the
clock source options listed below.
Option
Conditions
NONE
(default)
Choose if the CSU circuit element is not associated with any
DIUs. The Data Bus Used option must first be set to
NONE.
THROUGH
Choose fo CSU/DIU drop-and-insert configurations that
require through timing. This is the choice for drop-and-insert
operation. Do not select this for DSU/CSU mode of operation.
INT
Choose fo CSU /DIU configurations in which the clock
generated internally is to be used for data timing and both
DS1’s transmit timing.
EXT 422 or
EXT TTL
Choose one if an external 1.544 MHz gapped or non-gapped
clock is connected directly to the CSU. Choose EXT 422 if the
clock is RS422, or choose EXT TTL if the clock is TTL.
NET
Choose fo CSU/DIU configurations in which timing is provide
from a clock recovered from the incoming network signal. This
is the default setting for CSU/DIU configurations without dropand-insert.
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Configuring the T1 Network
Option
Conditions
EQ
Choose for drop-and-insert configurations in which timing is
provided from a clock recovered from the incoming DS1
equipment signal. Do not select this for DSU/CSU mode of
operation.
TU
Choose if the CSU circuit element you are configuring is to
receive its clock from a TIU 2850 installed in the shelf,
regardless of the source of the clock that is used.
DIU
Choose if the timing source is the TT (Terminal Timing) signal
from a data equipment device connected to a DIU 2130 or DIU
1130 data port. This selection also automatically assigns data
bus C to the CSU for TT signal application to the CSU.
After making your selection of CSU options, the selected CSU’
configuration options can be updated individually by pressing F5 . Or,
all the CSUs in the entire selected range of slots can be updated
automatically by pressing F6 .
DIU 2130
Configuration
To configure the DIUs, choose circuit element type DIU 2130 in Step 3
of “Getting to the CSU configuration screen” on page 5 -72. TheDIU
2130 Options Menu appears, showing the configuration options to be
edited for the first DIU 2130 in the specified range. These options are
described as follows:
Figure 5-16 DIU 2130 Options Menu
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Configuration Options for AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus
Installed and Operational
This setting should be the same as the Installed and
Operational option setting of the associated CSU.
Enable Alarm Reporting
This setting should be the same as the Enable Alarm Reporting
option setting of the associated CSU.
Save Configuration to DIU
To store the configuration from the database into the DIU, set the Save
configuration to DIU option to Y. If this option is set to N, any
updated changes are saved to the database but are not downloaded to the
DIU.
Connected CSU Shelf and Plug Numbers
Enter the Access System 2000 shelf number and plug-in slot number of
the CSU to which the DIU is connected. This setting allows the DIU to
send data to and receive data from that CSU over the DIU data bus
assigned to that module. The shelf number can be from 1 to 4.
Channel Assignment
Assign one or more DS0 channels of the DS1 line to each DIU 2130 and
DIU 1130 data port, based on the data equipment’s transmission speed
(EQP Speed). One channel is required for every 56 kbps or 64 kbps of
bandwidth.
For example, if the customer data equipment operates at 256 k b ps, it
needs four DS0 channels (4 channels x 64 kbps per channel = 256 kbps
bandwidth) for DS1 transmission.
There are three types of channels:
Contiguous
The channel assignments are in numerical sequence (for
example: Port 1 = 1-3, Port 2 = 14-17, and so on, for the
ports of other DIUs used with the same CSU). Contiguous
channel assignments allow the DIU 2130 and DIU 1130
to interface properly with AT&T Accunet bundled DS0
applications.
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Configuring the T1 Network
Alternate
Alternate channels are those which are assigned to a port
where every other channel carries user data, and the
channel before and channel after are unassigned. The DIU
fills each 8-bit word of the unassigned channel slots with
at least two ONEs, as outlined in AT&T TR 62421. (For
example, Port 1 = 1, 3 and Port 2 = 6, 8, 10.) Alternate
channel assignments allow the DIU 2130 and DIU 1130
to properly interface with the AT&T Accunet bundled
DS0 applications when unrestricted zeros applications are
required and B8ZS is not available.
Random
The random channels are those which are not assigned in
either a contiguous or alternate sequence. Some carriers
allow users to create bundled DS0 applications with
channels assigned in any order they choose (i.e., random
channel assignments).
To assign DSO channels:
1. At the Port Channel Assignment/Port 2 Channel
Assignment lines of the DIU 2130 and DIU 1130 Option
Menus, press the F8 key.
The T1 Allocation screen appears.
This screen allows the user to view which channels are already
allocated and which channels are available.
2. Enter the channel assignments of unused channels in order,
separating each channel from the next by commas. Contiguous
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Configuration Options for AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus
channels may be entered by using a hyphen between the first and
last channel.
Certain DIU 2130 and DIU 1130 applications require unrestricted ZEROs
density operation. Remember the following:
■
■
■
If the data rate is a multiple of 56 kbps and you configure the DIU
for the 56 kbps user data/channel mode, the DIU data ports are in
the unrestricted ZEROs density operating mode.
If the data rate is a multiple of 64 kbps and you configure the DIU
for the 64 kbps user data/channel mode, review the configuration of
the CSU used with the DIU 2130 and DIU 1130. Youhave
unrestricted ZEROs operation if the configuration of the CSU is
(1)NET Density Enforcement = NONE, and (2)Enable
NET B8ZS = YES.
If the data rate is a multiple of 64 kbps and you configure the DIU
for the 64 kbps user data/channel mode, you have unrestricted zeros
operation if your Channel Assignments are not contiguous
and none of the channels are adjacent. Alternate channel
assignments satisfy this criterion.
EQP Name
Type the name of the equipment (EQP) connected to I/O Port 1 of the
DIU. This name can have up to 25 characters, including spaces. After
entering this name, press the right-arrow key and do the same for the
equipment on I/O Port 2.
EQP SER
Type the serial number (or other identification) of the equipment (EQP)
associated with the port. Move to the next column, and enter the serial
number of this port’s equipment. Each entry can be up to 25 characters.
This parameter is informational only.
EQP Interface
Enter the type of interface (V.35, RS449, or RS530) of each data port.
This parameter is informational only.
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Configuring the T1 Network
EQP Speed
Type the transmission speed for each port on the next line of the menu.
This rate must be 56 kbps, 64 kbps, or a multiple of either rate. The total
(aggregate) rate for the data ports of all DIU 2130s and DIU 1130s
connected to a CSU cannot exceed 1.536 Mbps. This parameter is
informational only.
64K Mode
If you set this option to YES, each channel of the DS1 line carries 64 kbps
of data. If you set this option to NO (default setting), each DS0 channel
carries 56 kbps of data. If the data rate of your equipment is a multiple of
56 kbps, set this option to NO. If it is a multiple of 64 kbps, set this option
to YES.
Loop
If you enable this option (Y), the DIU responds to loopback commands.
Scramble
The customer data on a DIU data port may require protection from
unauthorized access.
If scrambling is required, set this option to YES on each equipment (EQP)
port. This setting allows the DIU to randomize the data before
multiplexing and sending it to the CSU.
If scrambling is not required, set this option to NO (default setting) on the
associated DIU data port.
Be sure to set the Scramble option the same way at the far-end NCC,
DIU 1130 so that it can restore the original customer data upon receiving
it.
EQP Clock
Select the timing source for the incoming data from the customer data
equipment. This can be either the TT (Transmit Timing) signal from the
data equipment or an internal clock (either ST or inverted ST) generated
by the DIU. If the TT lead is not available from the data equipment,
select either ST or INVERT ST to have the DIU clock the data in. The
ST choice depends on which clock signal transition is to be used for data
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Configuration Options for AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus
timing and probably requires some trial and error. First, choose ST and
check the end-to-end data transmission on the data port. If transmission
does not work properly, choose INVERT S .
EQP Handshaking
The DIU 2130 and DIU 1130 supports five handshaking signals on each
data port. The V.35 names appear in the DIU menu screen, although
RS449 and RS530 interfaces are also available. Set each signal to N or Y.
The DIU 2130 and data port handshaking signals are listed below.
Table 5-12
DIU 2130 and Data Port Handshaking Signals
EQP Handshaking Options
Handshaking Signals
V.35
(screen)
RS449
RS530
Circuit
Direction
RTS
RS
CA
to DIU
signal from data equipment
forced on (asserted)
DTR
TR
CD
to DIU
signal from data equipment
forced on (asserted)
CTS
CS
CB
from DIU
follow conditioned RTS from
data equip.
(Note 1
forced on (asserted)
DSR
DM
CC
from DIU
follow conditioned DTR from
data equip. (Note 2)
forced on (asserted)
RLSD
RR
CF
from DIU
on
(Note 3)
forced on (asserted)
(DCD)
N (default)
Y
NOTE 1. (CTS) Set this option to NO (default) if you want CTS from the DIU to follow conditioned RTS from the data
equipment. If NO, CTS turns off automatically if the associated NCC, CCC, or TAC goes into an LOF state or receives a
Yellow (i.e., RAI) alarm regardless of RTS. Or, set this option to YES to permanently turn on DSR.
NOTE 2. (DSR) Set this option to NO (default) if you want DSR from the DIU to follow conditioned DTR from the data
equipment. If NO, DSR turns off automatically if the associated NCC, CCC, or TAC goes into an LOF state or receives
a Yellow alarm regardless of DTR. Or, set this option to YES to permanently turn DSR on.
NOTE 3. (RLSD) Set this option to NO (default) if you want RLSD on except when the associatedNCC, CCC, or TAC
goes into an LOF state. Or, set the RLSD t YES to permanently turn it on.
Loss of Signal
Select from one of the following options:
NO
Do not generate a Loss of Signal signal.
RTS
Generate an LOS alarm when RTS is missing.
DTR
Generate an LOS alarm when DTR is missing.
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Configuring the T1 Network
Enable TU
Select from one of the following options:
■
■
■
■
■
DIU 2140
Configuration
5-98
If this DIU is receiving a TT input from a data port, then enter Y
for the port with the TT signal. Enter N for all other ports of all
other DIUs in the node. This is necessary because only one bus is
available to carry this clock, and more than one clock source on the
bus causes a synchronization conflict.
If Enable TU =
, the timing mode is called data equipment
timing. Its application depends on how the connected CSU timing is
configured.
For T1-mux applications, configure the CSU: DIU Timing =
DIU; then TT is the timing source for the CSU.
For drop-and-insert, configure DIU Timing = TU; then TT is
the timing source for the TIU.
If you use any other DIU timing mode, enter N for all ports.
The DIU 2140 Options screen shows the configuration options for
the first DIU 2140 in the specified range.
Figure 5-17 DIU 2140 Option Menu
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuration Options for AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus
Installed and Operational
This setting should be the same as the Installed and
Operational option setting for the associated CSU.
Save Configuration to DIU
To store the configuration from the database into the DIU, set the Save
configuration to DIU option to Y. If this option is set to N, any
updated changes are saved to the database but are not downloaded to the
DIU.
Connected CSU Shelf and Plug Numbers
Specify the AS2000 shelf number and plug-in module slot number of the
CSU associated with the selected DIU 2140. The shelf number can be
from 1 to 4. The plug-in module slot number can be from 1 to 13 for a
multiline shelf or 1 to 2 for a dual-line shelf.
Channel Assignment
Assign an available DS0 channel of the associated DS1 line to the DIU.
This number can be from 1 to 24.
This parameter also has an F8 key associated with it so that you can
view the allocated channels. For additional information, see “Channel
Assignment” on page 5 -93.
Mode
To select the transmission mode of the DIU 2140, press
Mode field. The Select Mode screen will appear.
F8
in the
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Configuring the T1 Network
Each mode determines which data ports are to be used. The total
(aggregate) data rate for each DIU 2140 cannot exceed 48 kbps. Set the
DIU 2140 mode to one of the following, then press its corresponding
number key to select the setting and return to the DIU 2140 Options
Menu.
5-100
DS0B
This mode allows subrate data to be transmitted on all five
ports of the DIU. In the DS0B transmission mode, each
port operates at 0.3, 0.6, 1.2, 2.4, 4.8, or 9.6 kbps, or the
five ports may operate in any combination of these rates.
The signals are multiplexed into one data signal and
transmitted over the DS1 network on the assigned DS0
channel slot. After selecting DS0B mode, also set the data
rate individually for each data port. See “Baud Rate” on
page 5-101.
19.2 + 3S
Use this mode to transmit 19.2 kbps data on Port 1 and
subrate data of 9.6 kbps or less on Ports 2, 3, and 4. When
this option is chosen, the data rate for Port 1 is
automatically entered as 19.2 kbps in the BAUD RATE
column, and the rates for the other ports must be specified
individually (in “Baud Rate” on pa ge5-101). Also, data
Port 5 of the DIU is not available for use if this mode is
chosen. The DS0B channels are assigned as follows:
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuration Options for AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus
Port 1 = Channels1 and 2
Port 2 = Channel 3
Port 3 = Channel 4
Port 4 = Channel 5.
DS0A
Use this mode to transmit subrate data on data Port 1. The
rate on this port can be 0.3, 0.6, 1.2, 2.4, 4.8, or 9.6 kbps.
After selecting DS0A, also set the data rate individually
for data Port 1. Ports 2 through 5 are not available if the
DS0A mode is selected. In this mode, the data is repeated
enough times to fill the 48 kbps payload.
19.2 + FEC
Use this mode to transmit data on a 19.2 kbps port with
forward error correction (FEC). In this mode, Port 1 is
used for transmission with error correction according to
AT&T Publication 54075. Ports 2 through 5 are not used
in this mode.
19.2 + 19.2 + S
Use this mode to transmit 19.2 kbps on
EQP Ports 1 and 2 and subrate data of 9.6 kbps or less on
Port 3. In this mode, Ports 4 and 5 are not available. When
this mode is chosen, the rates for Ports 1 and 2 are
automatically entered in the Baud Rate column of the
DIU 2140 Configuration Menu and you must specify the
desired subrate for Port 3 as described in “Baud Rate” on
page 5-101. The DS0B channels are assigned as follows:
Port 1 = Channels 1 and 2
Port 2 = Channels 3 and 4
Port 3 = Channel 5
Ports 4 and 5 are not used.
Baud Rate
After choosing the data transmission mode option above, specify the data
rate for each data port as required. The rates for some of the ports may
already be entered, depending on which mode was chosen above.
Generally, you must specify the rate whenever a data port transmits
subrate data at 9.6 kbps or less.
Asynchronous
Set this option to YES for each data port operating in the asynchronous
transmission mode, or set it to NO if synchronous transmission is used.
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Configuring the T1 Network
Each DIU 2140 can have any combination of asynchronous and
synchronous data equipment connected to it.
DIU Configuration Error Messages
If you see an error message when you press F5 to store and download
your DIU settings, the message indicates that the settings you have
chosen are invalid. One of the following error messages may appear:
■
■
■
■
TOO MANY DIU CONFIGURED appears if you assigned more
than 24 total DS0s to the same NCC 2020 (CCC 1020) or TAC 2010
(TAC 1010).
DUPLICATE CHANNEL ASSIGNMENT appears if you assigned a
channel of a DS1 line to a DIU data port and that channel was
previously assigned to another DIU or data port.
SUM OF THE BAUD RATES EXCEEDS SYSTEM MAXIMUM
(48000) appears if the sum of the data port baud rates assigned to
a DIU 2140 exceeds the maximum aggregate rate of 48 kbps.
INVALID PORT xxx BAUD RATE appears when the baud rate
(xxx) you entered is not valid for the mode of operation selected.
Configuring circuits
This section describes how to add, edit, delete, view, and list circuit
definitions. The following subsections will show you how to arrive at the
appropriate screens for the procedure you wish to execute. All fields
within each screen are described in the order they appear (from top to
bottom).
A circuit is defined as two CSUs (Channel Service Units) and the
connecting DS1 facilities between each element accessed by Access
Manager. If a network circuit is only an end section and does not have a
far-end CSU (for example, a network circuit that terminates in a DACS or
ESS switch), then an Access Manager circuit cannot be built for the
network circuit.
If you change the node name in the node definition, that change in name
is not automatically made in the circuit and route definitions that include
that node. This creates problems during database analysis by circuit and
on-line element status; furthermore, in polling the far-end, data might not
be stored properly
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Configuring circuits
If you ever edit a circuit or route with a changed node name, then the
node name must be updated before Access Manager recognizes the node
and accepts the changes to the circuit/route definition.
Defining a new
circuit
Before you can define a circuit, you must already have defined the nodes
and circuit elements at each end of the circuit. If you have questions, refer
to the configuration steps defined in “Summary of tasks” on page 5 -5.
To define a new circuit:
1. At the Main Menu, type C to bring up the Configuration Menu.
2. Then, type C to select Revise Circuit Definitions. The
Configuration: Circuit screen of now appears.
3. From the Configuration: Circuit screen, type A to bring up the Add
Circuit Definition screen.
4. When you have finished entering the circuit definition, press the
F5 key to accept your entries. After the database has been
updated, you are returned to the Add Circuit Definition screen.
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Configuring the T1 Network
Circuit Name
In the Add Circuit Definition screen, type in the circuit name. The name
can be either the circuit number or a brief description of the circuit itself.
The choice is up to you, so long as the name you select does not exceed
twenty alphanumeric characters.
From DS1 Point
The next option is the From DS1 Point entry, which is used to
define a circuit element. This must include the node name exactly as it is
spelled in the node definition, and it must also must include any other
information needed to define a single circuit element. Otherwise, an error
message appears indicating a non-existent node or lack of sufficient
parameters. The node name is sufficient to define a single-line CS
circuit element.
All multiline CSUs, except a node identified as an AS2000, ConnecT1
Plus, or NC/E, require a single parameter after the node name to define
the circuit element.
The AS2000 and NC/E require two additional parameters after the node
name. The first parameter defines the 551VST MLS Shelf (1 to 5), and
the second defines the 4016-R CSU (from 1 to 10) within each shelf.
The other parameters needed to define individual circuit elements in
multiline CSUs are surrounded by square brackets: [c] for SIM, 551VST
ML List 1 and 551VST ML List 2 nodes, and [s,c] for AS2000,
ConnecT1 Plus, or NC/E nodes, where c = slot number in the multiline
shelf and where s = shelf number accessed through an AS2000,
ConnecT1 Plus, or NC/E node.
When entering circuit element parameters, you are not required to enter
the brackets.You can use a comma between the node name and the first
parameter instead; if so, when you press the F5 key to accept the
parameters, the system automatically encloses them within brackets.
Notice that twenty-two (22) is the maximum number of characters
allowed for defining a circuit element with its parent node.
To DS1 Point
Enter the To DS1 Point using the node name exactly as you would
when entering the From DS1 Point option described above.
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Configuring circuits
Comments
You can add up to four lines of comments, with up to thirty characters
allowed on each line. The first line should describe the circuit because
this line appears in the description column during circuit selection.
Editing a circuit
definition
Once your circuits are defined, you can change them with the Edit
Circuit Definition option. From the Configuration Menu,
proceed as follows:
1. Type E to select Edit Circuit Definition.. The Select
Circuit to Edit screen appears, along with the first page of circuits.
2. Use the directional keys to reach the circuit you wish to edit. After
positioning the cursor on that circuit, press Enter to display the
Edit Circuit Definition screen for that circuit.
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Configuring the T1 Network
3. Make any required changes as described in the Adding a
Circuit Definition section above.
4. Press
!
5-106
F5
to accept the changes or
F2
to cancel editing.
CAUTION
If you edit a circuit or route with a changed node name, that name
must be updated before Access Manager will recognize the node and
accept the changes to the circuit/route definition.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Configuring routes
A circuit can be deleted from the database at any time.
Deleting a circuit
definition
1. In the Configuration: Circuit screen, type D to select Delete
Circuit Definition. The Select Circuit to Delete screen
appears, along with the first page of circuits.
2. Use the directional keys to position the cursor on the circuit you
want to delete.
3. Press Enter . You are asked to confirm that you want to delete the
selected circuit by typing Y. Any other response aborts the deletion.
Viewing a circuit
definition
You can view a circuit definition without changing it by selecting the
View option.
1. In the Configuration: Circuit screen, type V to select View
Circuit Definition. The Select Circuit to View screen
appears, along with the first page of circuits.
2. Use the directional keys to position the cursor on the circuit you
want to view.
3. To display the detailed circuit definition, press
Enter
.
A list of all circuit definitions can be printed using the List option.
List all circuit
definitions
1. In the Main Menu, type C to select the Configuration:
Circuit Menu.
2. In that menu, type L to select Print All Circuit
Definitions, and the circuit definitions will be printed.
Configuring routes
Although screens have been created for connecting circuits by
configuring routes, routes have not been implemented in Access Manager
software.
Therefore, we have removed any references to routes from this manual.
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Configuring the T1 Network
CSU acceptance testing
Before performing the CSU acceptance tests from an Access Manager
2000 PC, verify the following:
The Access Manager 2000 PC is powered up, started, and ready for
operation.
The Access System 2000 node definitions are already entered in the
Access Manager 2000 database.
The CSU of each NCC or TAC to be tested is configured.
If the Access Manager 2000 PC interfaces with the Access System
2000 over a modem or multiplexer, the node to be tested has already
been auto-configured for modem or multiplexer communication.
To perform the CSU acceptance tests from an Access Manager 2000 PC,
proceed with the following steps.
Note: These tests use the CSU repeater loopback (RLB) function. The
RLB remains active until the operator-defined time-out period
ends. For test purposes, you can temporarily change this interval
from an Access Manager 2000 PC. The default RLB time-out
setting is one minute.
1. Start up the Access Manager 2000 PC and log in by entering the
proper user name and password. A user level of 4 is required for
these tests. Also verify that the current Access Manager 2000
software revision is 2.3B or higher. This revision appears at the
bottom of the Main Menu.
2. Access the CSU to be tested and temporarily set the repeater
loopback (RLB) time-out option of each CSU to be tested to 1 HR.
3. Starting from the Main Menu of Access Manager 2000, select Online Access. The On-line Access (Select Node) Menu appears.
4. Select the Access System 2000 node in which the desired NCC or
TAC is located and press Enter . The On-line: AS2000 screen
appears.
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CSU acceptance testing
5. Choose the Loopbacks option and press
Enter
.
6. Type the shelf and plug (plug-in module slot) numbers of the NCC
or TAC, and press the F5 function key.
7. Choose the Activate Repeater Loopback (RLB) option
and press Enter .
8. Type N to specify the near-end RLB and press
.
Enter
9. When the loopback warning screen appears, type Y to activate the
loopback.
10. Press
Enter
to return to the On-line: AS2000 screen.
11. Choose the Select Test option and press
Enter
.
12. Type shelf and plug-in slot numbers of the NCC or TAC, and press
the F5 function key. The Select CSUTest Activity screen appears.
13. Choose the Send QRSS Test Pattern option and press
Enter . The Test Current Node screen appears. Enter the following
settings and press:
• Test Duration: FOREVER
• To Network or Equipment: N (Network)
•
Test From Far End: N (No)
14. Type Y to send the test signal when the test warning screen
appears. The Select CSU Test Activity screen appears again.
15. Verify that the EQP and STAT LEDs are both lit yellow on the nearend NCC or TAC. The RLB is activated and the test is in progress.
Note: If the STAT LED flashes red and yellow, the test has failed (CSU
is detecting errors in the looped QRSS signal). Replace the NCC
or TAC.
16. Select the View Test Status Results option. If the screen
shows some errors, the CSU test has failed. Replace the NCC or
TAC.
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Configuring the T1 Network
17. Press Enter to return to the Select CSU Test Activity menu, then
select the Abort Test in Progress option and press
Enter .
18. Press
Enter
to return to the On-line: AS2000 menu.
19. Choose the Loopbacks option and press
Enter
.
20. Type the shelf and plug-in slot numbers of the NCC or TAC, and
press the F5 function key.
21. Choose the Deactivate EQP Loopback (ELB and RLB)
option and press Enter .
22. Type N to specify the near-end RLB and press
Enter
.
23. Choose the Activate Line Loopback (LLB) option and
press Enter .
24. Type Y to specify the far-end LLB and press
Enter
.
25. Type Y to activate the LLB when the loopback warning screen
appears. At the far-end NCC or TAC, also verify that the NET LED
is solid yellow (LLB is activated).
26. Press
Enter
to return to the On-line: AS2000 screen.
27. Choose the Select Test option and press
Enter
.
28. Enter the Shelf number and Plug slot number of the NCC or TAC
and press the function key. The Select CSUTest Activity Menu
appears.
29. Choose the Send QRSS Test Pattern option and press
Enter . The Test Current Node screen appears. Enter the following
settings and press Enter .
• Test Duration: FOREVER
• To Network or Equipment: N (Network)
• Test From Far End: N (No)
30. Type Y to send the test signal when the test warning screen
appears. The Select CSU Test Activity screen appears again.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
CSU acceptance testing
31. Verify that the STAT LED is lit yellow on the near-end and far-end
CSUs (NCC or TAC), indicating that the test is in progress.
If the STAT LED flashes red and yellow at either end, the test has
failed (CSU is detecting errors in the looped QRSS signal). Check
the T1 circuit between the two CSUs. The source of the failure is
either in the circuit between the CSUs or in either CSU. Replace the
CSUs and re-route the circuit as required, then repeat the acceptance
testing procedure.
32. Select the View Test Status Results option. If the screen
shows some Errors, the test has failed. Check the T1 circuit between
the two CSUs.
33. Press Enter to return to the Select CSU Test Activity screen, then
select the Abort Test in Progress option and press
Enter .
34. Press
Enter
to return to the On-line: AS2000 screen.
35. Choose the Loopbacks option and press
Enter
.
36. Type the shelf and plug numbers of the NCC or TAC and press the
function key.
37. Choose the Deactivate Network Loopback (PLB and
LLB) option and press Enter .
38. Type Y to specify the far-end network loopbacks and press
Enter .
39. Choose the Activate PLB option and press
Enter
.
40. Type Y to specify the far-end payload loopback (PLB), and press
Enter .
41. Type Y to activate the PLB when the loopback warning screen
appears. At the far-end NCC or TAC, also verify that the NET LED
is solid yellow (PLB is activated).
42. Press
Enter
to return to the On-line: AS2000 screen.
43. Choose the Select Test option and press
Enter
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
.
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Configuring the T1 Network
44. Type the shelf and plug-in slot numbers of the NCC or TAC, and
press the F5 function key. The Select CSU Test Activity menu
appears.
45. Choose the Send QRSS Test Pattern option and press
Enter . The Test Current Node screen appears. Enter the following
settings and press Enter :
• Test Duration: FOREVER
• To Network or Equipment: N (Network)
• Test From Far End: N (No)
46. Type Y to send the test signal when the test warning screen
appears. The Select CSU Test Activity menu appears again.
47. Verify that the STAT LED is lit yellow on the near-end and far-end
CSUs (NCC or TAC), indicating the test is in progress.
If the STAT LED flashes red and yellow at the far-end, the test has
failed (CSU is detecting errors in the looped QRSS signal). Replace
the far-end NCC or TAC and repeat the acceptance procedure. (The
near-end NCC or TAC and the T1 circuit were checked in the
previous steps, using the LLB loopback of this procedure.)
48. Select the View Test Status Results option. If the screen
shows some Errors, the test has failed. Replace the far-end NCC or
TAC and repeat the acceptance procedure. (The near-end NCC or
TAC and the DS1 circuit were checked in the previous steps, using
the LLB loopback of this procedure.)
49. Press Enter to return to the Select CSU Test Activity screen, then
select the Abort Test in Progress option and press
Enter .
50. Press
Enter
to return to the On-line: AS2000 screen.
51. Choose the Loopbacks option and press
Enter
.
52. Enter the Shelf number and Plug slot number of the NCC or TAC,
and press the F5 function key.
53. Choose the Deactivate Network Loopback (PLB and
LLB) option and press Enter .
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CSU acceptance testing
54. Type Y to specify the far-end Network Loopbacks and press
Enter .
55. Repeat this procedure for each remaining NCC and TAC to be
tested.
56. This procedure is complete. The NCCs and TACs are now ready for
operation.
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Configuring the T1 Network
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Chapter
6
Alarm reporting
This chapter gives you instructions for performing the operations that
handle the Alarm Log. These operations are:
■
Clearing
■
Deactivating
■
Viewing
■
Printing
■
Archiving
■
Deleting alarm records from the alarm log
These operations are performed from the Alarm Status option of
the Main Menu.
To get to the Alarm Status screen:
■
Starting from the Main Menu, select Alarm Status. The Alarm
Status (Review Alarm Log Database) screen appears.
Clearing the autoacknowledged alarm counte
In this section, Clear means to reset the auto-acknowledged alarms
counter to zero. It is important to note that clear is referred to in other
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
6-1
Alarm reporting
sections of this manual to describe a trouble condition that no longer
exists.
To reset the auto-acknowledged alarms counter to zero:
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Alarm Status. The Alarm
Status (Review Alarm Log Database) screen appears.
2. From this screen, select Clea . The automatic acknowledge
counter at the top of the screen to the right of the colon (:) is now
reset to zero, without displaying additional menus or confirmation
messages.
alarm mode
(manual or automatic)
number of active alarms
number of current automatically acknowledged alarms
This is reset to zero when you “clear”.
Selecting Clear does not affect the alarm reports in the alarm log.
Deactivating alarms
To deactivate alarms:
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Alarm Status. The Alarm
Status (Review Alarm Log Database) screen appears.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Deactivating alarms
2. From this screen select Deactivate. The Deactivate (Select
Alarm to Deactivate) screen appears.
3. You may now proceed to tag or select alarm records and deactivate
them.
See the following Tagging Alarm Records for Deactivation and Selecting
Alarm Records by Date and Time to Deactivate sections.
Alarm records are saved in the alarm log by Access Manager. The alarm
records are either Active or Deactivated. Deactivate only those alarm
records that you have determined are no longer present and that you want
to delete from the active alarm log.
!
CAUTION
The Deactivate option allows you to remove alarm records (that is,
reports) from the alarm log whether or not the trouble condition tha
caused it has ended. Check the alarm records log for the
corresponding cleared record, and check the On-line condition of the
circuit element before deactivating an alarm record. Select the
Deactivate option by typing “D” in the Review Alarm Log Database
screen.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
6-3
Alarm reporting
To tag alarm records for deactivation:
Tagging Alarm
Records for
Deactivation
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Alarm Status. The Alarm
Status (Review Alarm Log Database) screen appears.
2. From this screen, select Deactivate. The Select Alarm to
Deactivate screen appears. Follow these steps to tag and deactivate
alarm records.
3. Notice that the cursor is positioned on the left side of the menu,
initially beside the last alarm record. Move the cursor to the first
alarm you wish to deactivate. Press Shift - to deactivate the
alarm.
4. Move the cursor to the next alarm record you wish to deactivate and
press Shift - to deactivate the alarm.
5. Continue the process for each alarm record to be deactivated. To
remove a tag from an alarm record, press the “hyphen” key. The
screen response in this option can be slow if the number of active or
deactivated alarms is large.
6. Verify that the correct alarm records are tagged for deactivation.
Tagged alarm records are indicated on the screen by an intensified
background for that alarm record in the color mode. In monochrome
mode, the tagged alarm records are shown in black on a white
background.
7. Press
F2
Enter to deactivate the selected alarm reports, or press
to abort deactivation.
8. If you pressed Enter , a prompt appears, asking you to confirm that
you want to deactivate the selected alarms. To deactivate the alarms,
type Y. Pressing any other key cancels deactivation of the selected
alarms.
9. If you wish to deactivate additional alarm records by selecting a date
and time range, follow the instructions on the next section.
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Deactivating alarms
To deactivate alarm records by date and time:
Selecting Alarm
Records by Date
and Time for
Deactivation
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Alarm Status. The Alarm
Status (Review Alarm Log Database) screen now appears.
2. From this screen, select Deactivate. The Deactivate (Select
Alarm to Deactivate) screen now appears. Follow these steps to
select a date and time range through which alarm records are
deactivated.
3. Press F8 . The Enter Date/Time Range for Alarm Deactivation
screen appears.
The date and time range is displayed from the oldest alarm record in
the database to the current time. Change the date and time to the
range you want to deactivate.
4. To select all the alarms within the range entered, press the
key. Or, press F2 to abort.
F5
5. To deactivate the alarm reports in the selected range, press
Or, press F2 to abort deactivation.
Enter
.
6. If you pressed Enter , a prompt appears, asking you to confirm that
you want to deactivate the selected alarms. To deactivate the alarms,
type Y. Pressing any other key cancels deactivation of the selected
alarms.
Note: The alarm records selected by date and time are not shown on the
screen as they were in the preceding Tagging Alarm Records for
Deactivation section.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
6-5
Alarm reporting
Viewing active alarms
To view active alarms:
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Alarm Status. The
Alarm Status (Review Alarm Log Database) screen appears.
2. From this screen, select View Active. The View (Select Alarm
to View) screen appears.
3. Move the cursor to an alarm record you wish to view, and press
Enter . If more than one alarm condition is stored in the record, the
View Alarm screen lists them.
4. Use this option to view active alarm records (that is, reports) from
551VST type circuit elements before deactivating them.
When you acknowledge an alarm message from a 551VST type
circuit element, there may be more than one condition causing that
message. The View Alarm screen lists all the conditions that were
reported in one message for that circuit element.
The alarm Time Stamp for 551VST type circuit elements is the
time the alarm report is received by Access Manager.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Listing active alarms
The Alarm Time Stamp for AS2000 and 551VST type circuit
elements (hardware) is the time the alarm report is detected by the
AS2000 type node (if AS2000 CSU is near-end).
It is important to note that the AS2000 type node’s date/time clock
is synchronized to Access Manager’s clock every time the node is
polled. Therefore, if the node is not set for polling, the date/time
clocks stamps in its reports may be invalid.
Note: The screen response in this option can be slow if the number of
active or deactivated alarms is large.
Listing active alarms
The List Active option prints a list of active alarm records to the
report printer
To print a list of active alarm records to the report printer:
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Alarm Status. The Alarm
Status (Review Alarm Log Database) screen appears.
2. From this screen, select List. The active records will be sent to
the report printer
Printing all alarms
The Print All option prints all the alarm records, including the
deactivated alarm records, to the report printer.
To print all alarm records to the report printer:
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Alarm Status. The Alarm
Status (Review Alarm Log Database) screen appears.
2. From this screen, select Print. The active records will be sent to
the report printer
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Alarm reporting
Archiving inactive alarms
To archive inactive alarm records:
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Alarm Status. The Alarm
Status (Review Alarm Log Database) screen appears.
2. From this screen, select Archive. A screen labeled (Inactive
Alarms: Choose Archive Option) appears.
Four options are available for deactivated alarms:
■
The Archive option copies deactivated alarm records to a disk
file.
■
The Print option prints active and deactivated alarm records.
■
The Archive (List) option prints deactivated alarm records.
■
The Delete option deletes deactivated alarm records without
copying or printing.
The archived alarm log records are in a format compatible with:
Alarm Log Record
format
■
Lotus 1-2-3 or similar spreadsheet file formats
■
dBase III Plus or similar database file formats
The format uses a comma-delimited ASCII record format. The maximum
file size is 65 kilobytes. If necessary, multiple files are created and
identified by the file name extension. The filename format is
month of archive
year of archive
day of archive
ALyymmdd.XXX
filename extension,
numbered consecutively from 001 to 999
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Archiving inactive alarms
Note: The month, date, and year used in the archive file name are those
selected in the Archive Cutoff Date screen, not the current date.
The archive process always creates files starting with extension 001. If
you have performed previous alarm log archives with the same cutoff day
the existing archive file(s) are overwritten if they are on the same disk
drive and directory. Refer to Appendix E "Archive File Formats" for the
alarm archive record format.
Deleting inactive
alarms
The Delete option removes inactive (i.e., deactivated) alarm records
from the database (i.e., log) without saving them.
If you wish to save the records before removing them from the database,
choose the Archive Inactive Alarms option instead.
To delete inactive alarms:
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Alarm Status. The Alarm
Status (Review Alarm Log Database) appears.
2. From this screen, select Archive. The Archive (Inactive Alarms:
Choose Archive Option) screen appears.
3. From this screen, select Delet . The Select Archive Cutoff Date
screen appears.
4. Enter the date of the last alarm record you want deleted.
5. To delete the deactivated alarm reports in the selected range, press
F5 . Or, press F2 to abort deletion.
6. If you pressed F5 , a prompt appears, asking you to confirm that
you want to delete the selected alarm records.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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Alarm reporting
•
To delete the alarm records, type Y.
•
To cancel deletion of the selected alarm records, press any other
key.
To print inactive alarms:
Printing inactive
alarms
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Alarm Status. The Alarm
Status (Review Alarm Log Database) screen appears.
2. From this screen, select Archive. The Archive (Inactive Alarms:
Choose Archive Option) screen appears.
3. From this screen, select Print. The Select Archive Cutoff Date
screen appears.
4. Enter the date of the last alarm record you want printed.
5. Press F5 to print the deactivated alarm reports in the selected
range, or press F2 to abort printing.
6. If you pressed F5 , a prompt appears, asking you to confirm that
you want to delete the selected alarm records.
•
To delete the alarm records, type Y.
•
To cancel deletion of the selected alarm records, press any other
key .
Note: The Print option prints the inactive alarm records (i.e.,
reports) to the report printer and gives you the option of deleting
the deactivated alarm records after they are printed.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Archiving inactive alarms
To archive inactive alarms:
Archiving inactive
alarms
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Alarm Status. The Alarm
Status (Review Alarm Log Database) screen appears.
2. From this screen, select Archive. The Archive (Inactive Alarms:
Choose Archive Option) screen appears.
3. From this screen, select Archive. The Select Archive Cutoff Date
screen now appears.
4. Enter the date of the last alarm record you want archived.
5. Press F5 to archive the deactivated alarm reports in the selected
range, or press F2 to abort archiving.
6. If you pressed F5 , the Select Drive screen appears and
prompts you to specify the disk where the file is to be written.
You can archive the alarm records to any drive installed in your
system. If the drive selected is the drive on which Access Manager
is running, the archived files are placed in the Access Manager
database directory. If any other drive is selected, the files are placed
in the root directory of that drive.
Enter the drive letter and press
archiving.
Enter
, or press
F2
to cancel
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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Alarm reporting
Note: If the drive selected is the drive on which Access Manager is
running, the archived files are placed in the Access Manager
database directory. If any other drive is selected, the files are
placed in the last previously selected directory of that drive.
7. If you pressed F5 , a prompt appears, asking you to confirm that
you want to delete the selected alarm records.
6-12
•
To delete the alarm records, type Y.
•
To cancel deletion of the selected alarm records, press any other
key .
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Chapter
7
Analyzing Performance Data
This chapter gives you instructions for retrieving, analyzing, archiving,
and deleting DS1 (T1) performance data that has been stored in the
Access Manager 2000 PC by “polling” each CSU. Without polling, there
is no data to analyze!
These operations are performed from the Database Access option
of the Main Menu.
To get to the performance data:
■
Starting from the Main Menu, select Database Access. The
Performance Database Analysis screen appears.
All performance data analysis operations are performed from this menu.
It allows you to:
■
obtain a database analysis report
■
archive the data stored in the Access Manager database
Performance data can be analyzed from two perspectives:
■
a single node
■
a circuit having two circuit elements
The analysis applies to data collected from the nodes and circuit elements
on a scheduled basis over short or long periods of time, depending on how
much data has been stored in the Access Manager database.
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Analyzing Performance Data
Effect of Changing a Node Name
When you change a node name with the Node Configuration screen, this
change will not automatically carry over into the circuit definitions.
Therefore, a valid analysis of the performance records of circuits cannot
be performed.
You must change the node name individually in each circuit. If you don’t,
you will have missing or invalid configuration data, as shown below.
Node Name is missing
Be careful when trying to correlate database analysis over extended
intervals. Changes to the node name and circuit definitions should be
considered when setting the time and date ranges of the analysis.
Reporting performance data
To report performance data:
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Database Access. The
Database Access (Performance Database Analysis) screen appears.
2. From this screen, select Report. The following screen appears:
Use the procedures to select the performance data you want. You must
begin with the first step in this procedure to ensure that the Performance
Data Analysis Reports are compiled properly.
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Reporting performance data
The Performance Data Analysis procedure is divided into thirteen steps.
The steps are grouped into the following categories:
■
■
■
■
■
■
Step 1 deals with selecting a register for data analysis.
Steps 2 through 5 deal with choosing filters for the performance
data.
Steps 6 and 7 deal with setting the date and time range for the
S-User or P-User filters.
Steps 8 and 9 deal with choosing the network elements and circuits.
Steps 10 through 12 deal with choosing performance data filters.
distinction is made between the bar-chart analysis and other
performance filters.
Steps 13 through 15 deal with editing the performance data filter
options.
Step 1 deals with selecting a register for data analysis.
1. Access Manager reports performance data as records that are stored
in a log called the Performance Database. Access Manager collects
DS1 performance data at 12-hour intervals and stores it in the log.
The intervals are specified by the Performance Data
Polling Hou . Telco registers are not stored in the Performance
Database. The performance records are stored in one of three
following registers:
•
User: Network side User Performance Data Registers. These
registers are ES, UAS, BES, SES, LOFC, and ES-L. The SEFS
register is included if the circuit element is a 551VST type. User
Registers also include OOFS.
•
Additional: Additional Network side User Performance Data
Registers. Only AS2000 type nodes have these registers. The
registers are LOFS, LOSS, RAIS, AISS, BERS, and OOFS.
•
EQP: Equipment side User Performance Data Registers. Only
AS2000 type nodes have these registers. The registers are ES,
UAS, ES-L, OOFS, DTED, and DBER.
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Analyzing Performance Data
Move the cursor to Use , Additional, or EQPT and press
Enter . The Choose Filter for Performance Data screen appears.
Steps 2 through 5 deal with choosing filters for the performance data.
2. If you selected USER on the Choose register for data analysis
screen, all of the filters shown in the screen above are available to
you.
If you selected ADDITIONAL or EQP , only the No Filter
and Bar Chart options are available.
3. Select the performance data analysis filter you want and press
Enter .
a. If you choose P-Use , continue with Step 4.
b. If you choose S-Use , continue with Step 5.
c. If you choose other filters or the Bar Chart option, continue
with Step 6.
When you select a particular filter, you ask to see only that data
which exceeds the filter’s parameters. Base your selection on the
following descriptions of the filters:
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Reporting performance data
•
No Filter: This option allows you to display all 15-minute
intervals (within the selected time frame) which have been
stored in the database, including the intervals for which data was
not available when the circuit element was polled.
•
HCDS Filter: High Capacity Digital Service (HCDS) filter
performs data analysis based on the standard tariff of 95% errorfree seconds and 99.7% availability.
•
DDS Filter: This is equivalent to the DS1 line performance
requirements for Digital Data Service (DDS*), which has an
error-free seconds requirement of 99.5% and an availability of
99.9%.
•
ENDS: Customer Premise (CP)-to-Central Office (CO),
(access). This filter performs a 24-hour data analysis based on
the standard tariff of 98.75% error-free seconds and 99.925%
availability.
•
CSCPCP: Customer Premise-to-Customer Premise (end-toend) short circuit length (less than 250 airline miles). This filter
performs a 24-hour data analysis based on the standard tariff of
97.4% error-free seconds and 99.7% availability.
•
MCPCP: Customer Premise-to-Customer Premise (end-to-end)
medium circuit length (250 to 1000 airline miles). This filter
performs a 24-hour data analysis based on the standard tariff of
97.1% error-free seconds and 99.7% availability.
•
LCPCP: Customer Premise-to-Customer Premise (end-to-end)
long circuit length (more than 1000 airline miles). This filter
performs a 24-hour data analysis based on the standard tariff of
96.8% error-free seconds and 99.7% availability.
•
TCOCO: Central Office-to-Central Office (interoffice) short
circuit length (less than 250 airline miles). This filter performs a
data analysis based on the standard tariff of 99.9% error-free
seconds and 99.85% availability.
•
OCOCO: Central Office-to-Central Office (interoffice) medium
circuit length (250 to 1000 airline miles). This filter performs a
24-hour data analysis based on the standard tariff of 99.6%
error-free seconds and 99.85% availability.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
7-5
Analyzing Performance Data
•
FCOCO: Central Office-to-Central Office (interoffice) long
circuit length (greater than 1000 airline miles). This filter
performs a 24-hour data analysis based on the standard tariff of
99.3% error-free seconds and 99.85% availability.
•
ACPCP: Average Customer Office-to-Customer Office
(interoffice). This filter performs a 24-hour data analysis based
on the standard tariff of 96.5% error-free seconds and 99.7%
availability.
•
P-User: This filter allows you to set the filter thresholds as
percentages of error-free seconds and availability.
•
S-User: This filter allows you to define the thresholds in terms
of seconds per 15-minute interval for ES, UAS, BES, SES,
LOFC, ES-L, SEFS, and OOFS. Only the register intervals that
exceed the thresholds are displayed.
•
Bar Chart: This additional option allows you to observe a
graphic display of the performance data for the 24-hour period
selected. The data displayed depends on the hardware revision
level of the CSU circuit element whose data is requested. For
AS2000 circuit elements, the data displayed depends on the
register set (USER, Additional, etc.) selected. 551VST type
hardware revisions 2.0 and earlier show only the ES, UAS, BES,
and SES data.
4. If you choose P-Use , the Select Minimum Threshold(s) screen
appears.
Enter the desired percentage of error-free seconds and percent
availability threshold settings and press F5 to accept the
thresholds. If you only want to inspect one of these thresholds, enter
a zero to disable either threshold check.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Reporting performance data
5. If you choose S-Use , the Choose Filter Selection Logic screen
appears.
Select from one of the two choices on this screen:
•
Select a logical OR function so that the filter logic is met if any
of the thresholds are exceeded per interval.
•
Select a logical AND function so that all selected thresholds
must be met or exceeded before the data meets the filter logic for
each interval.
The Select Maximum Threshold(s) screen appears.
You may choose “0” (zero) to disable a threshold check, or you may
choose a time interval between 1 and 900 seconds in any 15-minute
interval.
Type in the threshold settings, and press F5 to store them. Only
those intervals that have at least one parameter exceeding the
thresholds (if you selected an OR function) or have all parameters
exceeding the threshold (if you selected an AND function) appear.
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7-7
Analyzing Performance Data
Steps 6 and 7 deal with setting the date and time range for the S-user or
P-user filters.
6. After selecting the filter option in Step 3 and completing Step 4 or 5
(if S-User or P-User was chosen), the Enter Date/Time
Range for Report screen appears.
Enter the date and time range over which you want performance
data analysis to occur. The beginning and end of the period for the
analysis is set to the nearest quarter hour.
After entering the date and time range, press F5 to accept the
date/time range, or press F2 to return to the previous screen.
(This step does not apply if the Bar Chart filter is chosen.)
If the From and/or To dates fall outside the range of available
data, Access Manager generates a warning message indicating
which date parameters have fallen outside the range. This message
also indicates that the date and time range has been reset.
Pressing any key returns you to the Enter Date/Time Range for
Report screen. From this screen, you can either change the date and
time to some period within the available range, or you can press
F2 to return to the previous screen.
7. If the Bar Chart option was chosen in Step 3, a different Date
and Time screen appears. Enter the starting date and time only. The
ending date and time is always 24 hours after your entered starting
time.
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Reporting performance data
Steps 8 and 9 deal with choosing network elements and circuits.
8. After you specify the date and time range, the Choose Network
Element to be Analyzed screen appears.
This screen gives you a choice of analysis methods (by node, location,
circuit, or route). In the following sub-steps, please wait while Access
Manager analyzes the performance data records.
•
If you chose Circuit in Step 8, the Select A Circuit screen
appears.
Place the cursor at the circuit to be analyzed, and press Enter .
Both the circuit elements associated with the circuit are listed.
•
If you chose Node in Step 8, the Select a Node screen appears.
Select the node. All the circuit elements associated with the node
are listed.
•
If you chose Location in Step 8, the Select a Location
screen appears. Select the node at the location you want. All the
circuit elements associated with the node are listed.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
7-9
Analyzing Performance Data
•
If you chose Route in Step 8, the Select A Route screen
appears. Place the cursor at the route to be analyzed, and press
Enter . All the circuit elements associated with the route are
listed.
9. The Select A Circuit Element screen appears after a period of time
dependent on the size of the record log.
If, instead of getting this menu, you get a message that there is no
detail data, you cannot analyze the performance data. There are
three possible reasons for this message:
■
■
■
7-10
The circuit elements associated with the selected node, location,
route or circuit have no data that meets the filter’s minimum
criterion. (That is, a circuit element is only listed for further analysis
if it has a percentage of availability and percentage of error-free
seconds less than or equal to the minimum of the filter.)
The circuit elements associated with the selected node, location,
route, or circuit are not configured.
No data was collected by Access Manager for one or more of the
following reasons:
•
Access Manager was not operating during the time period
selected.
•
Polling was disabled for the time period selected.
•
The Installed and Operational option in the
selected node and/or circuit elements are set to NO.
•
The Retrieve Performance Data option for the circuit
elements (associated with the selected node, location, route, or
circuit) are set to NO.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Reporting performance data
From this screen, select the circuit element to be viewed for detailed
data. (See Step 13 for the F8 options.)
Steps 10 through 12 deal with choosing performance data filters. A
distinction is made between the bar chart analysis option and other
performance data filters
10. One of two screens will appear:
•
If the Circuit Element Detail screen appears, continue with Step
11.
•
If the bar chart of Figure 7 -1, “Typical 24-Hour Performance
Data Bar Chart” appears; then continue with Step 12.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
7-11
Analyzing Performance Data
Figure 7-1
KEY:
Typical 24-Hour Performance Data Bar Chart
|
*
indicates the end of available data
indicates that the data overflows the vertical scale
You can select any of the available registers by pressing the PgUp
- key combinations
or PgDn keys. The Ctrl
or Ctrl
can be used to access the far-end CSU circuit element or to return to
the near-end CSU circuit element.
Note: If you do not see either of the above screens, you will probably
get a message stating that there is no detail data. This message
will appear during Step 9 if none of the circuit elements
associated with the node, location, or circuit have detailed data.
11. When the Circuit Element Detail screen appears (Step 10), use the
directional (arrow) keys to view the different intervals.
All intervals in the performance database (including unavailable
intervals within the selected date and time range) are displayed,
except the S-User (user-selected seconds) filter.
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Reporting performance data
For S-Use , only those intervals with at least one parameter
exceeding the specified thresholds are shown.
This in a data field
Means
. . . . (dots)
No data is available for that time interval.
N/A
The circuit element does not support that
type of data collection.
dis
Collection of performance data in the slot
was disabled for the period displayed
(AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus only
12. The bar chart is displayed. If intervals of data are missing in the
selected 24-hour interval, they appear as a solid block in the line
below the time axis. If the vertical bar (|) appears below the time
axis, it indicates there is no data after that time. If an asterisk (*)
appears at the top of a bar of data, it indicates the data is greater than
the top of the chart.
Steps 13 through 15 deal with editing the performance data filter
options.
13. If you wish to change the options by which you analyze the selected
circuit element (including changing theY-axis of the bar chart) or if
you want to print selected data, press F8 . The Choose Option
screen appears, showing numerous options.
This screen is available when F8 is pressed from Bar Chart
Display or from the Select A Circuit Element or Circuit Element
Detail screens. Not all options appear for all analyses.
14. Place the cursor on the desired option, and press
Esc to cancel.
Enter
to select or
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
7-13
Analyzing Performance Data
•
If you select the Print Selected Data option, the data
printed depends upon what screen you were in when you pressed
F8 . If you were in the Select a Circuit Element screen, a list
of circuit elements is printed. If you were in the Circuit Element
Detail screen, the detailed data for that circuit is printed.
Furthermore, if you were viewing a bar chart, you must reply to
the Select Registers to Print screen before you can start printing.
•
If you select the Respecify Date/Time Range option,
you are presented with the Date And Time Range Selection
screen with the range you last selected. After changing the
range, press F5 to save your selection and then press F2
to start the data analysis.
•
If you select the Thresholds option, you are returned to the
Choose Filter for Performance Data screen. After changing the
exception threshold (that is, the filter), you are given
confirmation that the threshold has been successfully changed.
Depending on the previous threshold selected, you may also be
presented with the Time and Date Range screen.
After you have changed the exception threshold and pressed
F5 , the message THE THRESHOLD HAS BEEN
SUCCESSFULLY CHANGED appears. After acknowledging
the message, or if no confirmation message is displayed, the data
is analyzed and the Select A Circuit Element screen reappears.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Archiving performance data
•
If you select the Change the Y axis option (which
appears only if you are displaying the bar chart), the Enter YAxis Range for Report screen appears.
Set the range as desired and press F5 to save the selected
range. The available Y-axis range is from 0 to 900 seconds per
interval.
15. This completes the procedure for reporting and analyzing the
performance data records of a circuit element.
Archiving performance data
To archive performance data:
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Database Access. The
Database Access (Performance Database Analysis) screen appears.
2. From this screen, select Archive. The Choose Register Set to be
Archived screen appears.
3. After selecting the register set, the Archive (Performance
Database: Choose Archive Option) screen appears.
This screen gives you three options:
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
7-15
Analyzing Performance Data
Data Log record
format
•
The first option, Print, allows printing selected records, with
an option of deleting those records from the database after these
records were printed.
•
The second option, Archive, allows you to archive the
selected records to a diskette, with an option of deleting those
records after archiving is complete.
•
The third option, Delete, allows you to delete the selected
records without archiving.
The data log records are archived in a format that is compatible with
Lotus 1-2-3 (or similar spreadsheet file formats) and dBase III plus (or
similar database file formats).
The maximum file size is 65 kilobytes.
The format uses a comma-delimited, ASCII record format. Three
different file formats are used:
■
PDyymmdd.XXX (USER data)
■
NDyymmdd.XXX (Additional data)
■
DDyymmdd.XXX (EQPT data)
Where:
•
yy = year of archive
•
mm = month of archive
•
dd = day of archive
•
XXX = filename extension, numbered sequentially from 001 to
999
The month, date, and year (yymmdd) used in the archive file name are
those that you specify in the Archive Cutoff Date screen. The current date
(or system date) is not automatically used.
The archive process always creates records starting with extension 001. If
previous data log archives have been performed with the same cut-off
date on the same disk drive, and in the same directory, then existing
archive file(s) are overwritten.
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Archiving performance data
To print records, with the option of deleting those records:
Printing reports
and deleting the
data
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Database Access. The
Database Access (Performance Database Analysis) screen appears.
2. From this screen, select Archive. The Archive (Performance
Database: Choose Archive Option) screen appears.
3. From this screen , select Print. The Choose Register Set to be
Archived screen now appears.
4. Select the register type whose performance data records you want to
print. EQPT and Additional register types are not present nor
reported for 551VST type circuit elements.
A Select Archive Cutoff Date screen appears.
5. Enter the month, day, and year (four digits) of the date up to which
you wish to print the performance data records. The default date is
the current date.
6. Enter a new date, or press F5 to accept the date displayed. Press
F2 to cancel the request. Pressing Esc (escape key) any time
after the printing has started aborts the print function.
7. After all the selected records are printed, you are presented with the
option of deleting all the performance data records up to the date
that you had selected. To retain the records in the database, type N
(or any key other than Y).
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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Analyzing Performance Data
8. All information in the database prior to and including the selected
date is sent to the report printer. The printer can be a file on a disk
drive, as defined in the Report Printer Definition screen.
9. See Appendix E "Archive File Formats" for an analysis of this
performance data log. This completes the printing of performance
data records (of the type selected).
To copy the reports to disk and delete the data:
Copying reports to
disk and deleting
the data
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Database Access.
2. From the Database Access (Performance Database Analysis)
screen, select Archive. The Archive (Performance Database:
Choose Archive Option) screen appears.
3. From this screen, select Archive (Copy Records to Disk
with Delete Option).
The Choose Register Set to be Archived screen now appears.
4. Select the register type whose performance data records you want to
archive. EQPT and Additional register types are not present
nor reported for 551VST type circuit elements. A Select Archive
Cutoff Date screen appears.
5. Enter the month, day, and year (four digits) of the date up to which
you wish to archive the performance data records. The default date
is the current date.
6. Press
F2
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
F5 to accept the date displayed or enter a new date. Press
to cancel the request.
Archiving performance data
7. The Select Drive screen now appears. Enter the letter of the disk
drive where you want the archived records to be sent and then press
F5 . Or, press F2 to cancel the archive process.
8. Verify that the files are being copied. If the drive you select is not
ready or no diskette has been inserted, an error message appears. If a
disk not ready error message is received, type Y after the drive is
ready and a diskette has been inserted, or press any other key to halt
the operation.
If the drive selected is the drive on which Access Manager is
running, the archived files are placed in the Access Manager
database directory. If any other drive is selected, the files are placed
in the last previously selected directory of that drive.
9. If you wish to abort the archive function while the records are being
copied, press Esc key.
10. After all the selected records are copied, you are presented with the
option of deleting all the performance data records up to the date
that you have selected. Type N (or any key other than Y) to not
delete the records and retain them in the database.
11. This completes the copying of performance data records (of the type
selected).
Note: The archive process always creates files starting with extension
001. If you have performed previous alarm log archives on the
same drive, under the same directory, with the same cutoff day,
the existing archive file(s) are overwritten. Refer to Appendix E
"Archive File Formats" for the record format.
To delete the records without archiving the data:
Deleting records
without archiving
the data
1. Starting from the Main Menu, select Database Access.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
7-19
Analyzing Performance Data
2. From the Database Access (Performance Database Analysis)
screen, select Archive. The Archive (Performance Database:
Choose Archive Option) screen appears.
3. From this screen, select Delet . The Choose Register Set to be
Archived screen now appears.
4. Select the register type whose performance data records you want to
delete. EQPT and Additional register types are not present
nor reported for 551VST type circuit elements.
A Select Archive Cutoff Date screen appears.
5. Enter the month, day, and year (four digits) of the date up to which
you wish to delete the performance data records. The default date is
the current date.
6. Press
F2
F5 to accept the date displayed, or enter a new date. Press
to cancel the request.
7. A warning message appears to confirm the deletion process. The
Delete option erases performance data records from the database
(that is, log) without saving them. Type Y to continue with
deletion, or press any other key to cancel deletion.
8. This completes the deletion of performance data records (of the type
selected).
7-20
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Chapter
8
Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Access Manager
This chapter tells you how to use Access Manager 2000 to perform
operations on circuit elements on a DS1 (T1) network. The categories of
operations you can perform are:
■
Viewing circuit element status individually and in a node
■
Verifying on-line circuit element configuration
■
Retrieving performance data
■
Resetting user performance registers
■
Activating and deactivating CSU and DIU loopbacks
■
Applying test signals to CSUs and DIUs
These operations are performed within the On-line Access option
of the Main Menu. To access a node on-line, a query path must first be
defined in its node configuration.
Selecting a node
To perform these operations, you need to access a circuit element by first
defining its parent node. Follow these general steps to access a node:
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
8-1
Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
1. Select On-line Access from the Main Menu. The Online
Access: Select Node screen appears.
2. Select the node you want from the On-line Access: Select Node
screen, and press Enter .
This step defines the parent node. The sub-menu you see depends on
the type of node you selected. The nodes and their corresponding
On-line Access sub-menus are as follows:
•
8-2
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
If you selected a 551VST type node, you will see this screen.
Selecting a node
•
If you selected an AS2000 type node, you will see this screen.
The sub-menu you see displays a list of access options. These
options let you access the node and perform a variety of operations.
The options listed in the On-line Menu depend on which type of
single-line or multiline node is accessed.
The single-line CSU node types do not have the Display or
Access Range options in their On-line Access menus.
Furthermore, a 551VST List 1/A doesn’t have the element status
display capability. When the far-end status is displayed via the
Ctrl
key combination, the near-end CSU status reappears.
3. Select the option you want and press Enter . You will see another
screen that corresponds to the option you selected.
Since the functional specifications of the variousVerilink access systems
differ, Access Manager presents a different set of menus for the two basic
types of nodes.
These two types of nodes are:
■
AS2000 type node (includes Access System 2000 and ConnecT1./
Plus hardware; ConnecT1 Plus is a low-cost Dual-Line Shelf
implementation of the AS2000 system). AS2000 and ConnecT1
Plus menus are used almost interchangeably in this chapter. This
chapter will also reflect these similarities by showing the ConnecT1
Plus model name and number in parentheses: For example, NCC
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
8-3
Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
2020 (CCC 1020). There are some nomenclature differences in the
model names and numbers between the CSUs and DIUs of the two
products:
CSU/DSU type
CSU Model Name
AS2000:
ConnecT1 Plus:
DSU Model Name
NCC 2020
DIU 2130
TAC 2010
DIU 2140
CCC 1020
DIU 1130
TAC 1010
No ConnecT1 Plus equivalent
to DIU 214
The DIU 2140 is unique to AS2000 hardware. Otherwise, each
element in the AS2000 line has a functional counterpart in the
ConnecT1 Plus line. The ConnecT1 Plus functional counterpart to
the AS2000 CSU NCC 2020 is the CCC 1020, and so forth.
■
551VST type node (includes 551VST type Single-Line nodes;
SIM, NC/E, 551VST ML List 1, and 551VST ML List 2 multiline
nodes). There are some functional differences among these systems.
Specific menus may be shown to point out these differences.
Selecting multiline circuit elements
You must access a circuit element before you can perform an operation on
it. Only the NC/E and Access System 2000 multiline systems have shelf
number and plug-in unit range selection options.A single-line CSU circuit
element does not have an Access Range option in its On-line Menu.
Follow these steps to access a circuit element:
1. Select On-line Access from the Main Menu.
When you get the On-line Access: Select Node screen, select the
node you want and press Enter .
You will be presented with the On-line Access sub-menu that
corresponds to type of node you selected. These sub-menus are
described at the beginning of this chapter
2. If you are presented with the On-line: 551VST Type screen, move
the cursor to Access CSU and press Enter .
8-4
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Displaying circuit element status in a node
If you are presented with the On-line: AS2000 Type screen, move
the cursor to Access Range and press Enter .
3. You will be presented with the sub-menu shown below.
2
4. Select the circuit elements you want by entering the shelf number
and the range of the associated plug-in slot numbers for those
elements. The shelf and plug-in slot number ranges for the different
node types are as follows:
Type of node
Shelf range
Plug (element) range
NC/E
1, 2. 3. 4. or 5
1 to 10
SIM
1 to 10
551VST ML List 1
1 to 28
551VST ML List 2
1 to 28
Access System
1 to 4 (?)
1 to 13 (multiline shelf)
1 to 2 (dual-line shelf)
ConnecT1 Plus
1 to 2
1 to 2
If the range of elements is set to less than the maximum the shelf
allows, only the specified elements can be accessed.
5. Press
F5
to accept the selected range.
6. The On-line: xxx screen reappears. We’ll refer to this as the On-Line
Access sub-menu. Proceed with the on-line operation you wish to
perform.
Displaying circuit element status in a node
The Display option shows a multiline node’s configuration and the
operational status of its circuit elements. If a status change to a circuit
element occurs while in the display, Access Manager retrieves the current
status of the circuit element and updates the display
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
The Display option is not available single-line CSUs. The single-line
CSUs are:
■
551VST List 1/A
■
551VST List 1/B
■
551VST List 2
To view circuit element status in a node:
1. In the On-line Access sub-menu, move the cursor to Displa , and
press Enter .
2. You are presented with a configuration screen that corresponds to
the node you selected on the On-line Access: Select Node screen.
The node types and their corresponding configuration sub-menus
areas follows:
8-6
•
If you selected a 551VST type node, you’ll a screen similar to
this.
•
If you selected an AS2000 type node, you’ll see this screen.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Displaying circuit element status in a node
3. When you are finished reviewing the display, press F2 to return
to the On-line Access: Select Node screen.You may now select
another node.
The configuration Display sub-menus present you with the following
information:
Shelf type
Configuration
symbols
Underneath the word Shelf is a number followed by a dash then a letter:
example: 1 - S. This indicates that the first shelf in the node is a Multiline
Shelf (MLS). There are only three types of shelves:
■
Multiline (MLS 2200, 13 slots; 551V ST MLB/MLE, 14 slots)
■
Dual-line (2 slots)
■
Single (self-contained unit)
Configuration symbols, or codes, are used to display the status of the
different elements in each shelf. They appear as the second letter in each
slot’s configuration line.
Code
O
Condition and Meaning
Operative: The equipment is installed, configured, and has
not failed at the near end.
For a far-end circuit element, it indicates that a T1 signal is
being received.
-
Absent: The module is physically absent from the shelf and
is not configured.
If the incoming T1 signal is lost from a near-end CSU, the
far end displays the element as absent.
X
Missing: The CSU or SIM is configured in the Access
Manager database, but the module itself:
• is missing
• has failed
• has a blown 5V fuse.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
Code
S
Condition and Meaning
Spare: The CSU is present in a shelf but not configured in
the Access Manager database as Installed and
Operational.
The far-end CSU, if equipped, is shown as an operative CSU.
?
Undetermined: The status of the element cannot be
determined. Either:
The node controller (SIM) in the shelf has
• failed
• blown a fuse
• been powered down, or
• been removed
so that the status of the elements in that particular shelf
cannot be determined.
or
An individual multiline CSU has a blown fuse, and the CSU
is Installed and Operational in the database.
. . . for a
non-AS2000 node
8-8
Access Manager 2000 handles non-AS2000 nodes, including NC/E
multiline nodes and 551 series nodes.
A typical NC/E Configuration display shows up to five 551VST
MLS shelves controlled by an NC/E.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Displaying circuit element status in a node
Each shelf has one SIM shelf controller and up to ten 4016-R CSU circuit
elements.
The CSUs are designated by C01 to C10, reading from left to right.
Paired with each of these CSUs is a far-end CSU, designated by a column
labeled “FAR”.
For a 551VST ML List 1 or List 2 node, the status of the 28 possible nearend CSUs are on one line with the corresponding far-end CSU status on
the next line. The fuse status is not shown, and the power supply status
appears on the right side.
Specifically, the display example shows the following:
On Shelf 1, CSUs #2 and #5 are
• equipped
• configured
• receiving signals from the far end
On Shelf 2, CSU #10
is a spare.
On Shelf 2, CSU #3 is not
receiving a signal from the far end.
On Shelf 4, the shelf is equipped
and the SIM is missing or has failed.
The status of the first 3 CSUs is
undetermined.
On Shelf 5, the shelf is not equipped (SIM is absent).
• CSUs #1 to #8 are not installed in the database
• CSUs # 9 and #10 are undetermined. If they are physically
absent, set the Installed and Operational
configuration option to NO.
On Shelf 3, CSU #10 is missing. The
blown fuse status is YES, indicating
that CSU #10 has a blown 5V fuse.
For the 551VST ML List 1 and 2, the following differences exist in the
NC/E Configuration Display and SIM Configuration Display screens:
■
The possible CSUs are numbered 1 to 28.
■
The Far-End CSU indicator is on the line below the near-end.
■
The right side of the screen has a Power Supply A and B (551VST
List 1/A or List 1/B), or A, B, C, and D (for 551VST List 2) status
indication.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
A typical Access System 2000 node configuration is shown below.
. . . for an AS2000
node
Slot #2 on near end
Far end CSU of CSU in Slot #2
shelf number
shelf type
To have the maximum number of slots, each node can have up to 2
multiline and 4 dual-line shelves, numbered 1, 2, 3, and 4. The multiline
shelves have 13 slots for circuit elements, and the dual-line shelves have 2
slots for circuit elements.
In this screen, the slots are numbered S01 to S13, reading from left to
right. Paired with each of these slots is FAR, which designates the far-end
CSU if the near-end slot holds a CSU circuit element. But FAR should be
disregarded if the near-end slot holds a DIU or a TIU
Finally, the first column to the right of the shelf number indicates the slot
of the node’s master controller (an NCC 2020 or CCC 1020). The node’s
master controller must always be in Shelf 1, Slot 1.
The near-end Access System 2000 circuit element status is displayed with
two letters shown in the S01 through S13 columns. The first letter
identifies the type of circuit element:
Code
8-10
Element
Element Function
S
NCC 2020
Node Controller and Channel Service Unit
(CSU)
C
TAC 2010
T1 Aggregate and Channel Service Unit (CSU)
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Displaying circuit element status in a node
D
DIU 2130
High-Speed Data Interface Unit
T
TIU 2850
Timing Interface Unit
M
DIU 2132
SMDS Data Interface Unit
O
DIU 2140
Low Speed Data Interface Unit
Codes are used to display the status of the different elements in each
shelf. They appear as the second letter in each slot’s configuration line.
Code
Condition and Meaning
O
Operational - Alarm Enabled: The equipment is installed,
configured, and has not failed at the near end. For a CSU or
DIU, it also indicates that alarm reporting is enabled.
For a far-end circuit element, it indicates that a T1 signal is
being received.
• If the O is green, it indicates the element is not in alarm.
• If the O is red, it indicates the element is in alarm.
N
Operational - Alarm Disabled: Element is operational with
a disabled alarm reporting capability.
• If the N is green, it indicates the element is not in alarm.
• If the N is red, it indicates the element is in alarm.
-
Absent: The module is physically absent from the shelf and
is not configured.
If the incoming T1 signal is lost from a near-end CSU, the
far end displays the element as absent.
X
Missing: The element is configured in the Access Manager
database, but the module itself:
• is missing
• has failed, or
• has a blown 5V fuse.
S
Spare: The element is present in a shelf but not configured in
the Access Manager database as Installed and
Operational.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
8-11
Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
Code
?
Condition and Meaning
Undetermined: The status of the element cannot be
determined. Either:
The node controller (NCC 2020) in the shelf has
• failed
• blown a fuse
• been powered down, or
• been removed
so that the status of the elements in that particular shelf
cannot be determined.
or
The node controller does not recognize an element type
identifier code.
The indicators that are red on a color monitor are shown as intensified
white on a monochrome monitor.
The FAR column of the Access System 2000 configuration display shows
the status of the associated far-end circuit element.
Example:
The screen below shows a node consisting of one multiline shelf with two
elements.
■
8-12
[Shelf1, Slot1] has an operational NCC 2020. The element is
installed, configured, and has not failed. Alarm reporting is enabled.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Displaying individual circuit element status
■
[Shelf1, Slot 6] has a missing DIU 2132. The element’s
configuration is stored in the database, but the module itself is
missing, has failed, or has blown a 5V fuse.
If you press F8 while viewing a Node Configuration screen,
the current configuration of the node and accessed circuit element is
retrieved and stored in the AM2000 database.
For the 551VST ML List 1 and 2, the following differences exist in the
NC/E Configuration and SIM Configuration Display
Menus:
■
The possible CSUs are numbered 1 to 28.
■
The Far-End CSU indicator is on the line below the near-end.
■
The right side of the screen has a Power Supply A and B (for
551VST List 1/A or List 1/B), or A, B, C and D (for 551VST List 2)
status indication.
Displaying individual circuit element status
Element status gives you the current configuration, status, and revision
level of the first CSU in the selected range.
The 551VST List 1/A does not have an Element Status option.
Non-AS2000 node
For all other ESF CSUs except the 4016 List 1, the Element Status screen
is nearly identical to that for the NC/E and SIM equipped with a 4016-R.
Only 551VST List 1/B and List 2 CSUs have the Enable Alarm
Latch option.
To determine the current status for a 551VST type circuit element:
1. In the On-line Access sub-menu, move the cursor to Element
Status, and press Enter .
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
2. A CSU status screen appears.
[shelf,slot] if multiline element
This indicates standalone unit.
element type
if can’t be determined,
this says UNKNOWN
circuit name -- if not defined,
this says NOT SPECIFIED
node levels
name
revision
This screen shows a typical status screen for a 551VST ML List 2
CSU. If the CSU is a multiline element, its slot and shelf appear in
the first line.
3. View all the circuit elements in the range.
The Ctrl PgUp and Ctrl PgDn key combinations, respectively,
let you access the previous or next circuit element in the range you
have selected.
To display the status of a circuit element (such as a CSU) at the farend via the ESF Data Link, press Ctrl
after accessing the
near-end circuit element.
All circuit element revisions, except for the 551VST List 1/B CSU,
respond to this command. A 551VST List 1/A does not have the
status display capability. When the far-end status is displayed, press
Ctrl
to see the near-end CSU status again.
8-14
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Displaying individual circuit element status
4. Press
F2
to return to the On-line Access Menu.
Reviewing the status
This figure shows status and configuration information for a 4016 List 2
CSU in a shelf.
revision levels
Both equipment side and network status of the CSU is displayed. Notice
that one column of status conditions applies only to the DTE side, while
beside it is a column of status conditions applying only to the NET side.
The parameters listed in this display depend on the type of CSU.
The Circuit Element Status screen is identical (except for the Enable
Alarm Latch, Framed All-Ones, and Idle Code Flags options, which are
only on the 551VST List 1/B and List 2) only for the following node
types:
•
NC/E
•
SIM
•
551VST List 1/B
•
551VST List 2
•
551VST ML List 1 (with 4016 List 2)
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
8-15
Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
The fields and their values are described below
Field
Value
Meaning
BER Exceeded
No
The user-set BER threshold for the
network has not been exceeded.
Line Power Loss
No
The critical circuits are receiving power
(line or local).
Enable Transparent No
Mode
The CSU is not operating in transparent
mode.
Far-end Polling
Enabled
No
The near-end CSU is not set to poll the farend CSU status.
AIS (Not Signal)
Loopback
Yes
AIS is sent to the non-looped direction
during a PLB, LLB, or ELB..
AIS (Not ESS)
Keep-Alive
Yes
AIS is used as a network keep-alive signal.
BER threshold
6
The BER threshold is 10-6. Other options
include INVALID, DISABLED, 4, 5, 6,
7, 8, and 9. INVALID indicates that an
incorrect combination of hardware
switches has been set.
Repeater Loopback
Time-out
300
The permissible range for the RLB time-out
is from 1 to 43,200 seconds.
PRM (Performance
Report Messages)
Enabled
No
PRMs are not being sent. If this status is
YES, the PRMs are transmitted according
to ANSI T1.403-1989.
Framed All-ONEs to
SPAN (NET)
No
A framed All-ONEs test signal is not being
sent to the network.
The first YES indicates that an excess of
ZEROs or a low average density is being
received from the EQPT. The second YES
indicates that the CSU is receiving pulses
from the NET.
8-16
Idle Code Flags
No
Low Density Pulse
No
Out of Frame
Yes, No The signal from the EQPT is out of frame,
while the NET signal is not out of frame.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
The ESF Data Link has an All-ONEs idle
code (not an ANSI flags idle code).
Displaying individual circuit element status
Field
Value
Meaning
CRC/Frm Bit Errors Yes, No The framing bit error are being received
from the EQPT, while no CRC errors are
being received from theNET.
For ESF framing, YES indicates that
CRC errors are being received.
For SF (D4) framing, YES indicates that
frame bit errors are being received.
BPV Errors
No
BPV error are not being received fro
either the EQPT side or NET side.
DTE (EQPT)/SPAN
(NET) Looped
No
Neither an RLB nor an ELB is in progress
(EQPT side), and either an LLB or PLB is
in progress (NET side).
ESF Framing toward
the NET
Yes
But since ESF toward the EQPT is NO, the
framing toward the EQPT isSF.
B8ZS Encode
No
Neither the network (NET) nor the
equipment (EQPT)is set for B8ZS line
coding (transmit direction).
B8ZS Decode
No
Neither the NET nor the EQPT is set for
B8ZS decoding (receive direction).
Regen Transmit CRC
YEL AL Tran Enable No
YEL AL Transcode
To
No
Yellow alarms are not currently being
transcoded from the network to the
equipment, or from the equipment to the
network.
Note: The single-line 551VST List 1/A and List 2 also have an Enable
Alarm Latch configuration, showing whether the local BER
alarm deactivates on clearing (NO) or stays on until manually
cleared (YES).
AS2000 node
To view the current status for a AS2000 or ConnecT1 Plus circuit
element:
Move the cursor to Status-Element, and press Enter . A Circuit
Status screen for the first circuit element appears. Each type of circuit
element has specific screen.
The circuit elements and their corresponding screens are as follows:
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
8-17
Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
■
If the circuit element is an NCC 2020, CCC 1020, TAC 2010, or
TAC 1010, a status screen similar to the one below appears.
This is defined when a circuit is configured.
This particular CSU is not part of a defined circuit.
accessed element
[shelf,slot]
current revisions
•
8-18
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
If the circuit element is a DIU 2130 or DIU 1130, a status screen
similar to the one below appears.
Displaying individual circuit element status
•
If the circuit element is a DIU 2140, a status screen similar to the
one below is displayed.
•
If the circuit element is a TIU 2850 or TIU 1850, a status screen
similar to the one below appears.
5. View all the circuit elements in the range.
The Ctrl PgUp and Ctrl PgDn key combinations, respectively,
let you access the previous or next circuit element in the range you
have selected.
To display the status of a circuit element (such as a CSU) at the farend via the ESF Data Link, press Ctrl
after accessing the
near-end circuit element.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
8-19
Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
6. After viewing the current status, press
Access Menu.
F2
to return to the On-line
Reviewing CSU status
Except for Low Densit , the CSU monitors the status conditions for both
the NET and EQPT (i.e, data equipment) sides. Loopbacks apply to one
side only. The status items are as follows:
Field
Meaning
Loss of Signal
SeeAT&T Reference 62411.
Loss of Frame
SeeAT&T Reference 54016.
Out of Frame
Although this condition, as defined in AT&T
Reference 54016, might not last long enough
to be visible to the operator, the CSU keeps
the YES indication alive for up to 1 second
after the condition clears, to make it visible.
AIS (Alarm
Indication
Signal)
See ANSI T1.403.
CRC Error
See Out of Frame above. The CRC-6 error
indication is also kept alive for 1 second.
Low Density
The circuit element is stuffing ONEs into the
signal it has been configured to do when
receiving a low density signal. This only
applies to the EQPT side.
Active ELB, LLB,
RLB, PLB
BPV Error
8-20
Value
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
No
None of these loopbacks are in progress.
These loopbacks are activated and
deactivated by commands sent over the ESF
Data Link.
See Out of Frame above. The BPV error
indication is also kept alive for 1 second.
Displaying individual circuit element status
Field
Value
Meaning
ES-L, ES, UAS,
BER Sec Exceeded
No
The number of user-defined ES-L, ES, UAS,
and/or BER alarm threshold seconds with
excessive error counts have not been
exceeded and therefoer have not caused an
alarm. These thresholds are displayed for the
incoming signals from both the EQPT and
network (NET).
For more information on these alarm
threshold setting options, seeAT&T
Reference 54016.
Test Signal
Circuit element is sending a test signal.
Yellow Alarm
See ANSI T1.403
Reviewing DIU statu
This section covers status and revision levels for the DIU 2130, DIU
2140, and DIU 1130. All associated screens show the circuit element
number [shelf, slot] and type, DIU name, associated DS1 circuit name,
and current DIU hardware and firmware revisions. Additional status
information also appears for each EQPT data channel (i.e., data port) of
the current DIU.
Field
Value
Meaning
Near-End Looped
No
A loopback is not in progress on an EQPT
channel (that is, data port) of the near-end
DIU.
Far-End Looped
No
A loopback is not in progress on an EQPT
channel (that is, data port) of the far-end
DIU.
Sending Loop Up
No
A loop-up code is not being sent to the farend DIU to activate a channel (that is, data
port) loopback there.
Sending Loop Down
No
A loop-up code is not being sent to the farend DIU to deactivate a channel (that is,
data port) loopback there.
Sending Test
Pattern
No
The DIU is not currently applying a test
signal to an EQPT channel (that is, data
port).
Runnign BER Test
No
A bit error rate test is not currently in
progress on the DIU.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
8-21
Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
Field
Value
Meaning
BER Error Counter
0
No bit errors were recorded by the DIU
during a bit error rate (BER) test.
BER
XX
The bit error rate, XX (calculated by the
DIU after a BER test), was completed on
an EQPT channel (that is, data port).
Handshake signals
Y = high signal, N = low signal
TxD
Y or N Transmit Data
RxD
Y or N Receive Data
DTR
Y or N Data Terminal Ready
DSR
Y or N Data Set Ready
RTS
Y or N Ready To Send
CTS
Y or N Clear to Send
DCD
Y or N Data Carrier Detect - when this has a value
of Y, the line is up and running.
V.54 Leads
Y = present, N = absent
LL
Y or N Refers to the data channel loopbacks on
the DI U2130 at the local node (the node to
which the DTE sending LL is connected).
RL
Y or N Refers to the data channel loopbacks on
the DI U2130 on the far end of the network
connection.
TM
Y or N This is set high Y) by the DIU 2130 upon
successfully activating LL or RL to notify
the DTE of its current state.
Reviewing TIU statu
This section covers revision levels for the TIU 2850 and TIU 1850.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Displaying individual circuit element status
In the following screen, the status indicators show the source of timing
for the TIU .
■
■
If both the EXT TTL and EXT 422 lines on the screen are NO
and the Frequency line indicates Nx56kbps or Nx64kbps,
then the TIU is timing off the data bus from a DIU.
If either the EXT TTL or EXT 422 line is YES on the screen
and Frequency line is Nx56kbps or Nx64kbps, then the
TIU is timing off a data port.
The following items explain the fields in this screen.
Field
Value
Meaning
The frequency of the clock source from which
the TIU derives synchronization.
Frequency
EQPT Clock
Yes
The source clock is in the signal received fro
the EQPT.
NET Clock
Yes
The source clock is in the signal received fro
the NET.
DIU
Yes
The source clock is derived internally, from the
DIU
EXT-TTL
Yes
The source clock is from an external source,
not EQPT or NET signal, at TTL levels.
EXT-442
Yes
The source clock is from an external source,
not EQPT or NET signal, at RS422 levels.
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Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
Field
Value
Meaning
TWO CLOCK
(2 or more
clocks)
Yes
More than one clock source is present. This is
a trouble indication because neither clock is
used and the TIU is timed internally.
Regen Transmit
CRC
Yes
This shows that CRC regeneration occurs
toward the network, but not toward the EQPT.
No
This shows that CRC regeneration occurs
toward the EQPT, but not toward the network.
No
Yellow alarm transcoding is currently not
enabled toward either the network or the
equipment.
YEL AL Tran
Enable
If the frequency line on the screen is 0 and all other indicators are NO,
the TIU is timed internally.
Note: If an external timing frequency has been applied and the above
condition still exists, check the external device providing the
timing frequency and all connecting cables.
Displaying circuit status
If you want a larger overview of what errors are occurring in the circuit,
you can review a status diagram of the circuit.
To review the circuit status:
1. In the On-line Access sub-menu, move the cursor to Circuit
Status Diag, and press Enter .
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Displaying circuit status
A status diagram like the one below will appear.
These display information when a circuit
and far-end circuit elements are defined.
All possible error indications are shown in the screen above.
2. After viewing the current status diagram, press
the On-line Access Menu.
F2
to return to
Alarms are shown at the location at which they occur. If alarms are
present, the DS1 line section in alarm appears in flashing red. If no
alarms are present, the line section is green (or blank if you are
using a monochrome display). Alarm designations are shown
flashing adjacent to the circuit section in which they occur.
Any change in status reported by the near-end CSU causes the
screen to be updated.
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Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
Displaying on-line circuit element configuration
For any AS2000 circuit element, you can review the configuration data
present in the element, as opposed to the database. The screens you’ll
view look exactly like the configuration screens. The difference is that the
fields are “read-only”. Also, the color of the displayed information is red
for the On-line Access menu and blue for the Configuration menu.
To view on-line circuit element configuration:
1. In the On-line Access screen, move the cursor to Element
Config, and press Enter .
A circuit configuration screen appears for the first circuit element.
Each type of circuit element has a specific screen. The circuit
elements and their corresponding screens are as follows:
•
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
If the circuit element is an NCC 2020, CCC 1020, TAC 2010, or
TAC 1010, a configuration screen like the one below appears.
Displaying on-line circuit element configuration
•
If the circuit element is a DIU 2130 or DIU 1130, a
configuration screen similar to the one below appears.
•
If the circuit element is a DIU 2140, a configuration screen
showing the current on-line DIU configuration is displayed.
2. View all the circuit elements in the range.
The Ctrl PgUp and Ctrl PgDn key combinations, respectively,
let you access the previous or next circuit element in the range you
have selected.
To display the status of a circuit element (such as a CSU) at the farend through the ESF Data Link, press Ctrl
after accessing
the near-end circuit element.
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Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
3. After viewing the configuration screen, press
On-line Access Menu.
F2
to return to the
Displaying Telco and User data
For any Verilink CSU, you can review Telco and user data from
performance registers. These on-line registers are located in the CSU
element.
For allVerilink CSUs, this information is available in breakdowns of 1
hour and 24 hours.
You can also view this information in three different forms. These include
performance data registers, statistics, and barcharts.
■
■
■
Performance data registers provide you with raw data, displayed by
type of error and time interval.
Statistics take that raw data and present it to you in terms of
percentages.
Barcharts provide a visual representation of the performance data.
Up to four types of register sets are available forVerilink equipment: one
for equipment parameters and three for network parameters.
Verilink CSUs have register sets for User performance data and Telco
data. Older equipment has fewer registers than newer equipment. AS2000
CSUs also provide register sets for equipment data and additional
(Verilink-defined) user data for more comprehensive network monitoring.
These register sets are summarized in Table 8-1, “Types of performance
registers”.
Only the Telco register set cannot be reset by the user.
If a given register is not supported by the equipment, then the data register
column will sho N/A for “not available” when you use the On-line
Menu to access the data summaries.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Displaying Telco and User data
Table 8-1
Types of performance registers
Four register sets are shown here. The first 2 sets, with a white background, are
partially or completely available to all Verilink CSUs. The last 2 sets, shown with
shading, are only additionally available to AS2000 equipment.
User Performance Data - network user-resettable parameters
ES
Errored Seconds
UAS
Unavailable Seconds
BES
Burst Errored Seconds
SES
Severely Errored Seconds
LOFC
Loss-Of-Frame Counts
ES-L
Errored Seconds - Line
SEFS
Severely Errored Frame Seconds
OOFS
Out-Of-Frame Seconds
For non-AS2000 type equipment
onl , info included in this data set.
Telco Data - network telco parameters (not user-resettable)
ES
Errored Seconds
UAS
Unavailable Seconds
BES
Burst Errored Seconds
SES
Severely Errored Seconds
LOFC
Loss-Of-Frame Counts
EQPT Data - equipment user-resettable parameters
ES
Errored Seconds
UAS
Unavailable Seconds
ES-L
Errored Seconds - Line
OOFS
Out-Of-Frame Seconds
DTED
EQPT Low Density Seconds
DBER
EQPT Bit Error Rate Alarm
Second
Additional (Verilink-defined) Data - network user-resettable parameters
OOFS
Out-Of-Frame Seconds
LOFS
Loss-Of-Frame Seconds
LOSS
Loss-Of-Signal Seconds
RAIS
Remote (Yellow) Alarm Indication
Second
AISS
Alarm Indication Signal Seconds
BERS
Bit Error Rate Second
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
To access 551-type performance registers:
Accessing
performance
registers
1. From the On-line Access submenu,
select one of the following options:
• 1 Hour USER data
• 1 Hour TELCO data
• 24 Hour USER data
• 24 Hour TELCO data
The appropriate screen will appear
To access AS2000 performance registers:
1. In the On-line Access sub-menu, select the Perf Data
Retrieve option, and press Enter .
The following screen will appear:
2. Select the CSU option.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Displaying Telco and User data
Note: SMDS CSU capability, provided by the DIU 2132, is discussed in
a separate manual.
You are presented with the Retrieve performance data screen.
3. Select one of the EQP or network options listed, and press Enter .
The screen which appears will display either 1-hour o r 24hour data
for the first circuit element defined in the access range.
The presentation format is identical for all registers. The columns
displayed are appropriate to the type of register set selected.
If data for some registers are not available (typically because the circuit
element accessed through the node does not support those registers), the
registers appear as N/A in their respective columns. However, if all the
registers for an interval are unavailable due to resetting or disabling of the
registers, that interval is not shown.
If multiple intervals contain all-zero data, they are shown as To and
From intervals, with the time shown as the start time of the latest
interval (lowest numbered interval).
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Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
1-hour data screens
A 1-hour register screen looks like this:
current interval
Include the current
15-minute interval.
24-hour total = 86,400 seconds
However, only a maximum of 65,535 seconds can be displayed.
You can view the last four 15-minute intervals. The 24-hour summary is
always shown in the last row.
To print the performance data, press
F8
.
To return to the On-line Access Menu, press
24-hour data screens
A 24-hour register screen looks like this:
current interval
This screen also has a 24-hour
total (not shown here).
It doe not include the current
15-minute interval.
24-hour total = 65,535 seconds
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
F2
.
Displaying 24-Hour Performance Data Bar Charts
You can view the last 96 15-minute intervals. The 24-hour summary is
always shown in the last row.
Getting around in the screens
Use the following keystrokes to “travel” between screens.
To do this:
Use these keystrokes:
Scroll up, one row at a time
Scroll down, one row at a time
Go to the beginning
Home
Go to the en
End
Go to the next page of data in this screen
PgUp
Go to the previous page of data in this screen
PgDn
Access the previous CSU in the selected range
Ctrl
PgUp
Access the next CSU in the selected range
Ctrl
PgDn
Display the registers of a CSU at the far-end of
the ESF Facility Data Link
First, access the corresponding
near-end CSU, then press
Ctrl
Displaying 24-Hour Performance Data Bar Charts
The bar charts displayed and printed through this option graphically
display the performance data registers for the past 24 hours of each
register type.
To access bar charts:
1. When you get the On-line Access sub-menu, select a bar chart as
follows:
If you are examining a 551VST type CSU, select Bar chart
User or IXC/TELCO Bar Chart.
•
User performance data includes the ES, UAS, BES, SES, LOFC,
ES-L, and SEFS registers.
•
IXC/Telco performance data includes the ES, BES, UAS, SES,
and LOFC registers.
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Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
If you are examining an AS2000 CSU, select Bar Chart
Displa .
The Retrieve Bar chart Data screen appears, listing the groups of
performance data registers which may be selected for bar chart
display.
2. Select one of the groups listed, and press
8-34
Enter
.
•
A. 24-Hour USER data: This bar chart shows the performance
of the CSU registers, including the ES, UAS, BES, SES, LOFC,
ES-L, and SEFS registers.
•
B. 24-Hour Additional data: This Bar chart shows the
performance of the CSU registers, including the OOFS, LOFC,
LOSS, RAIS, AISS, and BERS registers.
•
C. 24-Hour EQPT data: This bar chart shows the performance
of the CSU registers, including the ES, UAS, ES-L, OOFS,
DTED, and DBER registers. It is important to note that these are
the only EQPT side registers, and all other registers are NET
side.
•
D. 24-Hour Telco data: This bar chart shows the performance
of the nodes registers, including the ES, UAS, BES, SES, and
LOFC registers.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Displaying 24-Hour Performance Data Bar Charts
3. The 24-Hour xxx Performance Data Bar Chart of the first CSU
circuit element is now displayed
View performance data bar charts from the other registers.
To access the previous or next CSU circuit element in the range you
have selected, use the Ctrl PgUp and Ctrl PgDn key
combinations, respectively.
To display the registers of a CSU at the far end via the ESF Data
Link, press Ctrl
after accessing the near-end CSU circuit
element.
4. If you wish to print the bar chart, or change the Y axis, press
The following screen appears.
F8
Select the desired option.
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Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
•
If you select Print, the following screen will appear.
Select the performance data registers you want to print by typing
Y beside each, and press F5 to send the data to the on-line
printer.
•
If you select y axis, then the following screen appears.
Press F5 to accept range entered
This option aids in viewing performance which changes within a
narrow range.
Computing statistics
Use these sub-menus to access percentages of available and error-free
seconds for the circuit elements you select.
The User and Telco statistics displayed through these options include
percentages of available seconds and error-free seconds for the CSU
circuit element(s) you select. These statistics are calculated from the user
or telco performance data available from the registers for the current 15minute interval plus up to the previous 96 intervals (24 hours).
■
8-36
The percentage of available seconds is calculated by dividing the
available seconds by the total seconds.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Computing statistics
■
The percentage of error-free seconds is calculated by dividing errorfree seconds by available seconds.
The Telco Statistics display is the same as the User Statistics display,
except that the analysis is based on the performance data in the Telco
registers, rather than in the User registers.
To access User or Telco Statistics:
1. When you get the On-line Access screen, select either USER
Statistics or Telco Statistics.
2. The CSU statistics screen appears.
View all the CSUs in the range.
To access the previous or next CSU circuit element in the range you
have selected, use the Ctrl PgUp and Ctrl PgDn key
combinations, respectively.
To display the registers of a CSU at the far end via the ESF Data
Link, press Ctrl
after accessing the near-end CSU circuit
element.
3. This completes the User/Telco Statistics procedure.
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Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
Resetting User performance registers
Use this sub-menu to reset User registers. The NCC, CCC, and TAC do
not maintain CV-L and CV-P performance data registers.
To reset user performance registers:
1. When you get the On-line Access sub-menu, select Reset USER
Registers. The Select Registers to Reset screen appears.
2. Enter Y for all those registers you wish to reset. Enter N for those
that should not be reset.
■
Near end Performance Data Registers:
Include User, Additional (AS2000 only), and EQPT (AS2000 only)
registers.
For AS2000, these are NET side: ES, UAS, BES, SES, LOFC, ESL, SEFS, and OOFS.
Included for AS2000 CSUs are NET side: LOFS, LOSS, RAIS,
AISS, and BERS; and the EQPT side: ES, UAS, ES-L, OOFS,
DTED, and DBER registers.
■
Near end ESF Error Events Register:
The sum of the following error events: CRC-6 errors and OOF
events. (See AT&T54016).
■
8-38
Far end CV-L Events Register:
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Activating/Deactivating CSU loopbacks
The Code Violations-Line register. (See ANSI T1M1.3). These
registers are not available for reset in the AS2000 or ConnecT1 Plus
CSU circuit elements.
■
Far end CV-P Events Register:
The Code Violations-Path register. (See ANSI T1M1.3). These
registers are not available for reset in the AS2000 or ConnecT1 Plus
CSU circuit elements.
!
CAUTION
Resetting the 1-hour and 24-hour User Performance Data Registers
affects the collection of data stored in the Performance Data Log. If
you do not record this operation in your network management
notebook, you are likely to interpret the Performance Data Log
incorrectly.
3. Perform one or more of the following:
•
If you want to reset the selected registers in the first CSU in the
range, press F5 .
•
If you want to reset the selected registers for all the CSUs in the
range, press F6 .
•
If you want to return to the previous menu without resetting
registers, press F2 .
When you press F5 or F6 , a reset warning message appears.
Confirm that you want to reset the registers and clear the data.
If the selected set of registers to test are not equipped, an error
message to that effect appears after you confirm the reset by typing
Y.
4. This completes the Reset User Registers procedure.
Activating/Deactivating CSU loopback
This section deals with activating and deactivating loopbacks.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
To help you quickly isolate problems within the transmission path, most
of the Verilink CSUs (including NCC, CCC, or TAC) provide the
following four basic loopbacks shown in the following diagram.
NETWORK
INTERFACE
CSU
EQ
OUT
SM
IN
LBO
EQ
MON
SIG
PROC
DTE
CRIT
PROC
ELB PLB
EQ
IN
LLB
RLB
NETWORK
CSU loopback
descriptions
SM
OUT
Repeater
SM
MON
These include the following loopbacks.
■
LLB, or Line Loopback
■
PLB, or Payload Loopback
■
RLB, or Repeater Loopback
■
ELB, or Equipment Loopback
All loopbacks can be activated and deactivated via the data port, the
diagnostic interface port, or an ESF 4 kbps message received from the farend CSU or an intra-network device, except as described in the previous
section.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Activating/Deactivating CSU loopbacks
PLB - Payload Loopback
When a PLB is in effect, the signal from the DS1 line is looped back to
the line. Since the looped signal passes through the CSU (including the
repeater), the PLB is useful in testing the CSU from the far end of the
circuit. MostVerilink units can be configured to either pass the network
signal intact or send an Alarm Indication Signal (AIS, which is unframed
ALL-ONEs) to the EQPT during a PLB.
The following LEDs on theVerilink CSUs (NCC 2020, CCC 1020, and
TAC 1010) indicate a PLB in progress (SPAN is equivalent to network
[NET]):
Equipment
Message
551 VST List 1
551 VST List 1/A
SPAN MM LOOPED
4016 List 1
SPAN MM LOOPED
551 VST List 1/B
551 VST List 2
SPAN NEAR END LOOPED
4016 List 2
SPAN LOOPED
4016-R
SPAN LOOPED
NCC orTAC
NET LED flashes amber
LLB - Line Loopback
When a line loopback (LLB) is activated, the signal from the DS1
network is looped back to the network .
Since the looped signal does not pass through the CSU (except for the
repeater and critical protection circuitry), the LLB is useful for testing the
DS1 line. All BPVs received from the network are returned on the
transmit pair.
Most CSUs may be configured to pass the network signal intact to the
EQPT or send unframed ALL-ONEs (i.e., AIS) to the EQPT during
loopback.
A far-end LLB can be activated and deactivated via the 4 kbps ESF Data
Link or with inband codes sent from the near-end CSU. These inband
codes can be generated by all Verilink ESF CSUs except for the 551VST
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
List 1, 1/A, and 4016 List 1. Note that Access Manager blocks
transmission of the inband loop-up and loop-down codes from the far-end
CSU to the near-end CSU.
The following LEDs light up on the CSUs (NCCs (CCCs) and TACs)
during an LLB (SPAN is equivalent to network [NET]):
Equipment
Message
551 VST List 1
551 VST List 1/A
SPAN INBAND LOOPED
4016 List 1
SPAN INBAND LOOPED
551 VST List 1/B
551 VST List 2
SPAN NEAR END LOOPED
4016 List 2
SPAN LOOPED
4016-R
SPAN LOOPED
NCC orTAC
NET LED flashes amber
If the LLB at the far end is activated by sending the inband loopback code
from the near-end CSU, the near-end 551VST List 1/A, List 2, and 4016
List 2 activate their network (NET) Far-End Looped LEDs when inband
loop-up code is received back at the near-end CSU. This indicates that the
far-end CSU or network is looped back to the near-end CSU.
Note: Releasing the far-end LLB by any method except sending an
inband loop-down code does not extinguish the span (i.e.,
network) far-end looped LED. If a far-end LLB is activated by a
Data Link message, the far-end CSU will not respond to an
inband loop down code
RLB - Repeater Loopback
When a repeater loopback (RLB) is in effect, the signal from the EQPT is
looped back to the EQPT through the CSU repeater.
Since the looped signal passes through all CSU circuitry except the
network input and output transformers, the RLB EQPT is useful in testing
the operation of the CSU locally. The CSU always passes the EQPT
signal intact to the network during RLB.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Activating/Deactivating CSU loopbacks
After an operator-defined time, the RLB is deactivated by the RLB timer.
This prevents lockout during far-end-initiated loopback via the ESF Data
Link. The default value for this time-out option varies depending on the
type of CSU used. The RLB time-out is in effect regardless of whether
the loopback to the near-end or to the far-end was initiated locally at the
CSU or remotely via Access Manager.
!
CAUTION
Performing a far-end RLB locks out any messages from the ESF
Facility Data Link.
The CSU front panel EQPT LOOPED LED illuminates while the RLB is
in effect. For an NCC 2020, CCC 1020, TAC 2010, and TAC 1010, the
EQPT LED flashes amber during an RLB. The 551VST List 1 or 1/A and
4016 List 1 do not have the RLB and respond with the error message,
REQUEST REJECTED BY NODE OF CIRCUIT ELEMEN
.
ELB - Equipment Loopback
When an equipment loopback (ELB) is in effect, the signal from the
equipment is looped back to the equipment on the EQPT side of the CSU.
Since the looped signal does not pass through the CSU circuitry, the ELB
is useful in testing the operation and connection of the EQPT. Most CSUs
can be configured to pass the EQPT signal intact to the network or to send
unframed All-ONEs (i.e., AIS) to the network during loopback.
The EQPT Looped LED on the CSU front panel lights while the ELB is
in effect. For an NCC 2020, CCC 1020, TAC 2010, and TAC 1010, the
STATUS LED flashes amber during an ELB.
Procedures for
loopbacks
Before setting up any loopbacks, you need to verify a timing issue if the
CSU is used with a DIU. You must determine the appropriate CSU timing
for that loopback. For example, avoid tests with no timing source: when
an LLB is set and the network does not supply timing, then NET timing
the unlooped CSU is invalid and introduces errors in the test.
To set loopbacks:
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Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
1. When you get the On-line Access sub-menu, select the
Loopbacks option.
The Specify Circuit Element to Receive Loopback screen appears.
Single-line CSUs do not present this screen.
•
CSU Shelf Number: Enter the shelf number of the plug-in CSU
circuit element to receive the loopback request. Only AS2000 or
ConnecT1 Plus CSUs, and CSUs in shelves controlled by an
NC/E, have a CSU Shelf Number option.
•
CSU Plug Number: Enter the slot number of the plug-in CSU
circuit element to receive the loopback request.
2. Press the F5 key to enter the CSU shelf and slot numbers. A
Select Loopback Activity screen appears.
•
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
If you are working on an AS2000 or ConnecT1 Plus CSU, you
will see the following menu:
Activating/Deactivating CSU loopbacks
•
If you are working on a 551VST type CSU, you will see the
following menu:
AllVerilink 551VST type CSUs respond to functions A
through I on this menu; the exceptions are the 551VST List 1
and 1/A CSUs and the 4016 List 1 CSU, which respond to
functions F and G only (PLB). When these CSUs are
equipped as far-end circuit elements, they respond only to D
and E when these codes are sent from the near-end CSU.
3. Select the CSU loopback operation you want.
4. After choosing a loopback function, the Specify Near End or Far
End screen appears.
5. Enter N for the near-end CSU to receive the loopback request, or
enter Y for the far-end CSU to receive the request. This menu does
not appear if you choose the Send Inband Loop Up or
Send Inband Loop Down option.
6. Press F5
cancel it.
to execute the loopback command, or press
F2
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
to
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Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
7. If you are deactivating a loopback and you previously changed the
CSU timing, restore the timing to its original mode.
8. If you are activating a loopback, a warning message appears telling
you that the selected test will place the DS1 line out of service .
A prompt also appears, asking you to confirm that you want to
proceed with the loopback. To do so, type Y. Any other response
aborts the test.
9. All loopbacks you have activated remain active until you deactivate
them, with the exception of RLB. The RLB time-out was set when
you configured the CSU. If the RLB time-out was set to the value
FOREVER, it does not time out.
CSU loopback
options
Access Manager allows you to activate or deactivate a loopback on a CSU
circuit element for DS1 circuit troubleshooting purposes. Each CSU
circuit element has loopbacks at four locations along the circuit path.
Activate Repeater Loopback (RLB)
The repeater loopback (RLB) connects the CSU output signal back
toward the equipment (EQPT). It loops the whole CSU (except the CSU
network input and output transformers) toward the EQPT. This loopback
has a time-out that automatically releases the loopback after the time
selected. This time-out is programmable from Access Manager.
Activate Line Loopback (LLB)
The line loopback (LLB) connects the incoming signal from the network
(NET) back to the network at a point just after the CSU repeater. It
includes only the NET-side repeater and the network-side critical
circuitry in the loopback.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Activating/Deactivating CSU loopbacks
Deactivate Network Loopback (PLB or LLB)
This command deactivates the LLB or payload loopback (PLB) in the
direction of the network.
Send Inband Loop-Up Code To Far End
This command causes the near-end CSU to send the industry-standard
inband loop-up code to the far-end CSU.
Send Inband Loop-Down Code To Far End
This command allows the near-end CSU to send an inband loop-down
code to the far-end CSU.
Activate PLB
This command causes the CSU to activate the PLB toward the network
(NET). This loopback is performed just inside the input/output
transformers on the EQPT side of the CSU. The PLB therefore includes
most of the CSU circuitry in the looped path.
Deactivate PLB
This command deactivates a PLB in progress.
Activate EQPT Loopback (ELB
This loopback loops the CSU toward the EQPT just inside the input/
output transformers on the EQPT side. As most of the CSU circuitry is
bypassed by this loopback, ELB is useful for testing the EQPT-to-CSU
cabling.
Deactivate EQPT Loopback (ELB and RLB)
This command deactivates an ELB or RLB in progress.
Activate Framed ALL-ONEs Signal To Network
This command causes framed ALL-ONEs test signal to be transmitted to
the network. This signal can be used in conjunction with a far-end LLB or
PLB to do limited testing of the network and far-end CSU. An upgraded
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Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
firmware revision in the CSU is required to use this feature. If you hav
an NCC 2020 or CCC 1020 and TAC 2010 or TAC 1010, this function is
available from the On-line Select Test Menu.
Deactivate Framed ALL-ONEs Signal To Network
For 551VST type CSUs, this command deactivates the framed ALLONEs test signal activated by the Activate option above.
Send LLB or PLB Activate Message to Far End (T1.403)
These options are available only for the NCC 2020 or CCC 1020 and
TAC 2010 or TAC 1010 of Access System 2000 type nodes. Each option
activates an LLB or PLB at the far-end NCC, CCC, or TAC by sending it
an ANSI T1.403-compatible bit-oriented message on the ESF Data Link.
Send LLB or PLB Deactivate Message to Far End (T1.403)
These options are also available only for NCC, CCC, or TAC. They
deactivate the LLBs or PLBs previously activated via the T1.403 loop-up
messages above.
Note: If the framed ALL-ONEs signal is being transmitted, send inband
codes will not work; use options (Activate LLB) and/or C
(Deactivate PLB and LLB) instead. However, this procedure does
not work if the far-end CSU is a 4016 List 1 or 551VST List 1/A.
In these cases, you must first deactivate framed ALL-ONEs signal
(option K); then transmit the inband code (options D and E) and
finally restore framed ALL-ONEs (option J).
Activating/Deactivating DIU loopbacks
This section provides a description of DIU loopbacks and the procedure
for activating and deactivating them.
Loopback
descriptions
8-48
The data port loopback of a DIU affects only the data ports on which it is
activated. All other data ports of the DIU remain uninterrupted.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Activating/Deactivating DIU loopbacks
DIU 2130 and DIU 1130 loopbacks
The DIU 2130 and DIU 1130 loopbacks are shown in the following
figure:
DIU 2130
Driver
EQUIPMENT
Receiver
Loopback
MUX
and
INTFC
Logic
FIFO,
Logic
Circuit
RS232
INTFC
The selected data equipment transmitter output is connected to the
receiver through the associated interface driver and receiver in the DIU.
This looping path allows you to check the operation of the data
equipment and associated cabling to the DIU.
At the same time, the data port of the DIU is also looped back to the DS1
network and returned to the far-end EQPT. This path allows you to
perform end-to-end data port tests and to check the data circuit end-toend.
DIU 2140 loopbacks
The DIU 2140 loopbacks are shown in the following figure:
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Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
Figure 8-1
DIU 2140 loopbacks
DIU 2140
CPU
XMTR
XMTR
and
RCVR
Driver
EQUIPMENT
Receiver
DUSARTs
Logi
Circuits
and
RS422
INTFC
BACKPLANE
DATA BUS
TO/FROM
NCC 2020
OR
TAC 2010
CPU
RCVR
The selected data equipment transmitter is connected to the data receiver
through the associated interface driver and receiver in the DIU. This
looping path allows you to check the operation of the data equipment and
associated cabling to the DIU. The data port of the DIU is also looped
back toward the far-end EQP. This path allows you to perform end-to-end
data port tests and check the EQPT circuit end-to-end.
Procedure for
loopbacks
Before starting this procedure, determine the appropriate CSU timing for
the DIU loopback. For example, avoid split timing: when a DIU loopback
is set, THROUGH timing with non-synchronized timing sources for
receive data and transmit data is invalid and introduces errors.
In general, DIU loopbacks may introduce errors if the CSU is THROUGH
timed.
To activate or deactivate DIU loopbacks
1. When you get the On-line Access sub-menu, select the
Loopbacks option.
2. The Specify Circuit Element to Receive Loopback screen appears.
8-50
•
The first field is DIU Shelf Numbe . Enter the shelf
number of the plug-in DIU circuit element which will receive
the loopback request.
•
The second field is DIU Plug Numbe
. Enter the slot of the
plug-in DIU circuit element which will receive the loopback
request.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Activating/Deactivating DIU loopbacks
•
Press the
F5
key to enter the DIU slot and shelf number.
3. One of the following Select xxx Loopback Activity screens will
appear:
•
For the DIU 2130:
•
For the DIU 2140:
Select DIU 1130 Loopback Activity
•
For the DIU 1130:
Select the DIU loopback operation you want.
The DIU 2130, DIU 1130, and DIU 2140 of an Access System 2000
node are each equipped with two simultaneous loopbacks for data
port (i.e., data channel) end-to-end testing.
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After selecting the loopback activity, the Select Port Number to
Receive Loopback Request screen appears.
4. Select the data port to loop up by typing its number (1 or 2 for a DIU
2130 or DIU 1130;1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 for a DIU 2140) and pressing
F5 , or press F2 to cancel the operation.
5. If you are activating a DIU loopback, a warning message now
appears telling you that the selected test will place the data port out
of service. A prompt also appears, asking you to confirm that you
want to proceed with the loopback. To do so, type Y. Any other
response aborts the test.
6. If you are deactivating a DIU loopback and previously changed the
timing mode of the CSU, restore the CSU to its original timing.
7. All loopbacks you have activated (i.e., loop up) will remain active
until you deactivate (i.e., loop down) them.
Testing CSUs
This procedure applies to AS2000 CSU circuit elements only.
If the CSU is used with a DIU, and a CSU loopback is required,
determine the appropriate CSU timing for that loopback. For example,
avoid tests with no timing source: when an LLB is set and the network
does not supply timing, then NET timing the unlooped CSU is invalid and
introduces errors in the test.
When this test is complete, you will remove the loopback and restore the
CSU to its original timing.
You will then configure the CSU timing that is required for this test.
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Testing CSU
You will activate the CSU loopback that is required for this test. For
example, when sending a test signal toward the NET (network), an RLB
is first activated at the near-end NCC or TAC. An LLB or PLB can be
activated at the far end. As another example, when a test signal is sent
toward the EQPT (equipment), a PLB is first activated at the near end.
This T1 test signal application is shown in the figure below
Figure 8-2
Applying a T1 test signal
Test toward equipment
GEN
Eqpt
RLB
DET
Network
LLB
PLB
Eqpt
Repeater
Near-end NCC or TAC
Far-end NCC or TAC
Test toward net
DET
Eqpt
Network
PLB
GEN
NCC or TAC
GEN = Test Signal Generator
DET = Error Detector / Counter
To test an AS2000 CSU
1. When you get the On-line Access sub-menu, select the Select
Test option. The Specify Circuit Element to Receive Test Request
screen appears.
2. Enter the shelf in which the desired NCC or TAC is located. This
number can be from 1 to 4 in each Access System 2000 node or
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Monitoring and Troubleshooting Access Manager
from 1 to 2 in each ConnecT1 Plus node. For this test, this CSU is
the near-end CSU.
3. Enter the plug-in slot number (i.e., the number of the circuit
element) of the NCC or TAC. This number depends on the shelf
number selected above and is within the range below. Press F5 to
accept the shelf and slot (plug) numbers.
•
Multiline Shelves: 1 to 13
•
Dual-line Shelves: 1 to 2
The Select CSU Test Activity screen appears.
4. Select the desired option.
•
To send a test signal, select an option from A through D and
continue. Each of these test signals (options) are described in the
following paragraphs.
•
The NCC or TAC reports the error count to Access Manager
during the test. You can view the results of the test while it is in
progress or after the test is completed. To view results at any
time, continue with Step 11.
•
To abort a test, continue with Step 7.
Options A through D in the Select CSU Test Activity menu
correspond to test signals that the NCC or TAC may apply to a DS1
circuit: You can send each test signal toward either the equipment
side or the network side of the NCC or TAC.
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Testing CSU
These signals are either framed or unframed, depending on how you
configured the NCC or TAC in the Enable Testing Options screen
when you configured the CSU. Furthermore, how you configured
the NCC or TAC determines whether these inband test signals are
permitted at all.
•
1-in-8 ONEs: A stress pattern with a single pulse in every 8-bit
sequence. This signal checks a circuit’s ability to function under
low-density conditions.
•
3-in-24 ONEs: A stress pattern containing three pulses in every
24-bit sequence. It tests the ability of a circuit to function under
extremely low-density conditions.
•
Quasi-random Signal (QRSS): A 220 - 1 randomized bit
sequence modified according to AT&T TR-54016. This signal
exercises the circuit with a varying pattern of ONEs and ZEROs.
If the QRSS is applied unframed, it is limited to 14 consecutive
ZEROs. If applied framed, it is limited to 15 consecutive
ZEROs.
•
ALL-ONEs: A keep-alive signal sent in the desired direction.
Whichever test signal is chosen, if it is sent toward the net, then the
equipment receives an AIS (All-ONEs) signal.
5. After selecting a test operation, the CSU Test Options screen
appears.
Enter the Test Duration (i.e., the period of time for which to
apply the test signal). This can be done in one of the following
ways:
•
A specific time interval in xx SEC, xx MIN, xx HR (up to
24), or FOREVER.
•
To apply the test signal toward the network, type N.
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•
To apply the test signal toward the equipment, type E.
•
Test from Far End should be Y if you want the far-end
CSU to send the test signal or N if you wish the near-end CSU
to send the test signal. In either case, the CSU must be an
NCC 2020, CCC 1020, or TAC.
•
Press F5 to accept the selected values. The test begins when
you type Y at the warning prompt, whereupon the test signal is
applied in the chosen direction and any errors detected by the
NCC (CCC) or TAC are counted and recorded.
After the test begins, the CSU Status results will be displayed for
every test pattern option, as in the screen below.
6. If you are not using a loopback to return the test signal to the
transmitting CSU, repeat Steps 1 through 4 for the second CSU (far
end), using the same test pattern. After both CSUs are transmitting,
synchronize both CSUs by repeating Steps 1 through 4 for the first
CSU. Because the initial and ending conditions are not in synch for
both transmitters, the final error count is disregarded.
7. Use the Abort Test in Progress option if you wish to
abort a test in progress; however, the CSU sending the test pattern
must be near-end. Select the Abort Test in Progress
option of the Select CSU Test Activity screen. Then, select the near
or far end.
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Testing CSU
The test signal is no longer applied to the circuit by the NCC (CCC)
or TAC, and all loopbacks are deactivated. If you select this option,
the test procedure is completed.
8. If you selected one of the View options, continue with this step.
•
If you selected View Test Status Results (from the
Select Test Activity screen), you are prompted to select the nearend or far-end CSU. Enter your selection, and press F5 . Go
to Step 9.
•
If you selected View Test in Progress, go to Step 11.
9. The CSU Test Status screen is updated during the test once every 5
seconds (+/- 1 second). The status of this test can also be updated at
any time by pressing and releasing any key (except F2 or ESC). The
following results are displayed in the CSU Test Status Results
screen.
This screen displays the currently running test or, if no test is
currently running, the results of the previous test.
•
Test: The first line shows the type of test signal currently being
applied and the direction of the signal.
•
Elapsed Time: The amount of time which the screen has been
displayed.
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•
Test Time Remaining: This line shows time in hours, minutes,
and seconds (hh:mm:ss) that the CSU will be generating the test
signal. When the timer reaches 00:00:00, the test generation will
be disabled and error counting will stop.
•
Looped: Indicates which near-end loop is in effect (LLB, PLB,
ELB, or RLB). Although different loopbacks may be used
concurrently, only the relevant loop to the CSU test will be
displayed.
•
Errors: This shows the number of errors which the NCC (CCC)
or TAC has detected in the incoming test signal.
•
Lower Screen Section: Shows the monitored condition of the
received signal. This screen only shows what type of error is
occurring; it does not indicate what is causing the error. A green
N under the current column indicates that no errors are
occurring for the listed condition. A red Y indicates a testing or
error condition.
10. Press
F2
to return to the Select Test Activity screen.
11. The list of CSU circuit elements which are accumulating test results
are displayed on the CSU Tests in Progress screen.
Each CSU circuit element is listed with the test it is performing.
Access Manager keeps track of up to 13 separate tests.
Test entries are deleted in three ways:
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Testing DIUs
•
After the results have been viewed if no (0) time is remaining.
•
When the system is shutdown and restarted again.
•
When more than 13 tests are running concurrently, only the last
13 test entries are retained.
12. Press
F2
to return to the Select Test Activity screen.
13. If the configuration was changed in order to run this test, restore
your configuration now
Testing DIUs
You can also use Access Manager to perform end-to-end tests on a data
port of a DIU 2130 in an Access System 2000 node. The following tests
options are available for DIUs:
You can apply a pseudo-random bit sequence (PRBS) test signal on a
data port under test. This four-bit pattern can be used to check circuit
continuity on an end-to-end basis.
Sending a test signal
To apply a PRBS test signal to a data port of a DIU 2130 (DIU 1130):
1. When you get the On-line Access sub-menu, select the Select
Test option.
2. Select the DIU to apply the PRBS by entering its shelf and plug-in
slot numbers and pressing F5 . A Select DIU Test Activity screen
appears.
3. Choose the Send Test Pattern option in the Select DIU Test
Activity screen by typing A or highlighting this option and pressing
Enter .
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4. Select the data port on which to send the PRBS. For a DIU 2130 or
DIU 1130, this can be Port 1 or 2. A warning message appears.
5. Press Y to begin testing. The selected data port is now placed out
of service and the PRBS is applied to it. All other data ports are
unaffected and continue to operate normally.
6. To stop sending the PRBS, select the Stop Sending Test
Pattern option from the Select DIU Test Activity screen. The
data port is now restored to normal service.
7. To view tests in progress, select the Stop Sending Test
Pattern option. The DSU Tests in Progress screen appears.
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Testing DIUs
8. To view DIU test results, select the Stop Sending Test
Pattern option. The DIU 2130 Test Status screen appears.
Node name
slot number
shelf number
V.54 data channel loopback detection
The DIU 2130 can now detect the three V.54 leads which equipment
can use to activate data channel loopbacks. The definitions are as
follows:
•
LL: The data channel loopbacks on the DIU 2130 at the local
node (the node to which the DTE sending LL is connected).
•
RL: The data channel loopbacks on the DIU 2130 on the far end
of the network connection.
•
TM: This is set high by the DIU 2130 upon successfully
activating LL or RL to notify the DTE of its current state.
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Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Appendix
A
Term
Key Acronyms and Terms
Definition
A
A
Ampere.
AC
Alternating Current.
Acknowledged Alarm
An alarm sent to Access Manager which has been acknowledged
manually by the user or automatically by the software.
Adjacent Channels
If two channels are assigned so there is no unassigned channel between
them, these channels are said to be adjacent. (For example, if P ort1 =
Channels 2, 3, 5, 7-9 and Port 2 = Channels10, 2 4 ; then 2 is adjacent to
3, 7 is adjacent to 8, 8 is adjacent to 9, 9 is adjacent to 10, and 24 is
adjacent to 1.)
AIS
See Alarm Indication Signal.
Alarm Indication
Signal
An unframed ALL-ONEs bit pattern that indicates that an alarm
condition exists upstream in a circuit leading to the downstream
equipment. This is also called an ALL-ONEs Keep-Alive or Blue Alarm
Signal.
AISS
See Alarm Indication Signal Second.
Alarm Indication
Signal Second
A second during which the CSU receives an ALL-ONEs (AIS) code
from the network.
ALL-ONEs
A signal on a DS-1 (T1) line which is comprised entirely of ones
(11111111). This signal is transmitted when there is an alarm condition
upstream on the network or as a keep-alive signal to the network from a
CSU.
Alternate Mark
Inversion
A 1.544 Mbps signal in which successive ONEs (pulses) are normally
of alternating polarity and in which ZEROs (spaces) are of zero
amplitude.
Access Manager 2000 Manual
A-1
Term
Definition
AMI
See Alternate Mark Inversion.
ANSI
American National Standards Institute.
ASCII
American National Standard Code for Information Exchange.
Asynchronous
A type of transmission that is not related to a specific frequency, or to
the timing of the transmission equipment. Messages are controlled with
start and stop bits from which the receiver calculates the necessary
timing.
Auto-configure
Automatic configuration of the serial communication port to match the
device connected to it. Term used to describe either when Access
Manager configures its COM ports or when a node configures its
network management port.
Available Second
Any second that is not a failed or unavailable second (UAS).
B
A-2
B8ZS
See Bipolar Eight-Zero Substitution.
Baud Rate
In data transmission, the reciprocal of the length in seconds of the
shortest pulse used; for instance, a system whose shortest pulses are
1/300 second is operating at 300 baud.
BER
See Bit Error Rate.
BERS
See Bit Error Rate Alarm Seconds.
BES
See Bursty Errored Seconds.
Bit
A binary digit, either zero or one.
Bit Error Rate
The ratio of bits received in error to the total number of bits
transmitted. The time over which this rate is calculated is not inherent
to the definition and can be separately specified. For low error rates, the
Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) can be used to estimate the BER,
assuming that not more than one error will occur per ESF.
Bit Error Rate Alarm
Seconds
A count of one-second intervals during which a bit error rate alarm
existed.
Access Manager 2000 Manual
Term
Definition
Bit Error Rate
Threshold
A bit error rate (BER) level above in which a CSU alarm is generated
and reported to Access Manager 2000.
Bipolar Eight-Zero
Substitution
A physical layer of protocol for implementing a pattern that replaces
eight consecutive ZERO bits. This pattern includes two intentional
bipolar violations (BPVs) that would otherwise indicate transmission
errors. Using B8ZS allows for 64 kbps per DS-0 with unlimited zeros.
Bipolar Violation
A violation of the T1 bipolar AMI transmission pattern requiring
successive ONEs (pulses) to be transmitted as pulses of opposite
polarities. BPVs normally indicate transmission errors. B8ZS patterns
contain intentional BPVs, which are not counted as errors.
Bipolar Violation
Count
The number of bipolar violations (BPVs) occurring over a given period
of time.
Blue Alarm Signal
See ALL-ONEs.
Bps
Bits per second; a basic unit of measure for serial data transmission.
kbps (kilobits per second) indicates a transmission rate of 1000’s bps
BPV
See Bipolar Violation.
Bursty Errored
Second
A second having between 2 and 319 CRC-6 (Cyclical Redundanc
Checksum) error events.
Byte
In most cases, an 8-bit quantity of information used mainly in parallel
data transfer or data storage. Also referred to as an octet.
C
Cable
An assembly of one or more conductors within a protective sheath,
made so as to permit the use of the conductors separately or in groups.
Carrier Registers
These registers store the previous 24 hours’ performance monitoring
data accumulated as ESs, UASs, BESs, SESs, and LOFCs, plus the
current interval’s ESs, UASs, BESs, SESs, and LOFCs. There is also an
ESF Error Event register, which provides a continuous count of ESF
error events. The carrier registers can be read by both the carrier (telco)
and end user, but they can be reset only by the carrier.
Channel
In communications, a physical or logical path allowing the
transmission of information to flow from point-to-point.
Access Manager 2000 Manual
A-3
Term
Definition
Channel Service Unit
The portion of the NCC or TAC that performs CSU functions, such as
line framing and coding conversions, alarm transcoding, performance
data storage and processing, alarm reporting, and circuit loopback and
test signal application operations.
Circuit
A circuit consists of any two network circuit elements and the
interconnecting T1 facility, that have Access Manager 2000 access in a
T1 network.
Circuit
Configuration
A set of circuit element attributes describing the locations of nodes and
equipment in a circuit.
Circuit Element
A circuit element is a single module of the parent node to which Access
Manager 2000 is connected. If the parent node is a multiline module,
such as an AS2000 type, a circuit element is one of the plug-ins in one
of shelves controlled by the node; it is identified by the parent node’s
Node Name and a [shelf, slot] index. The shelf index is identical to the
shelf address set during the hardware installation.
Circuit Name
The name for a circuit supplied by a user of Access Manager 2000.
Clear
(1) To reset the auto-acknowledged alarms counter to zero.
(2) A trouble condition that no longer exists.
A-4
Clock
An oscillator-generated signal that provides a timing reference for a
transmission link.
Code Violation - Line
For an AMI-coded signal, this is a bipolar violation BPV occurrence.
For a B8ZS-coded signal, this is the occurrence of aBPV, which is not
a zero-substitution code.
Code Violation - Path
When SF (D4) framing is used, this is a framing error. For ESF
framing, this is a CRC-6 error
Connector
A physical interface, such as DA-15 or DC-37, typically with male and
female components.
CRC-6
See Cyclic Redundancy Check.
CRC-6 Error Event
Occurs when the CRC code in a received ESF signal fails to match the
CRC code calculated locally by the CSU. A CRC-6 error event
indicates that at least one bit of the frame has not been received
correctly.
Access Manager 2000 Manual
Term
Definition
CRC-6 Regeneration
A mode in which the CRC-6 is recalculated for incoming data before it
is retransmitted. In this mode, any incoming CRC-6 errors are not
propagated (although the data may be corrupted).
CSU
See Channel Service Unit.
CSU Slot Number
The plug-in slot location of a CSU in a multiline or dual-line shelf.
CTS
Clear To Send.
Current
The amount of electrical charge flowing past a specified circuit point
per unit of time. See Ampere (A).
Current Status
An indication of current line and/or circuit element status, including
CSU signal state and Payload Loopback (PLB) status.
CV-L
See Code Violation - Line.
CV-P
See Code Violation - Path.
Cyclic Redundancy
Check (1)
A check sum indicator, which is based on the remainder of a
polynomial calculation performed on the transmitted data, that is used
to verify, with some fixed probability of correctness, whether that data
was corrupted.
Cyclic Redundancy
Check (2)
This code is embedded in the ESF format and derived from a
mathematical calculation performed on the data bits of an Extended
Superframe (ESF) field (all 4632 bits) to obtain a six-bit Cyclic
Redundancy Checksum (CRC-6) code for those data bits. The near-end
DTE or ESF CSU transmits these six bits in the appropriate CRC-6
positions of the next ESF field across the facilities to the far-end DTE
or ESF CSU. The CRC-6 code is recalculated by the far-end CSU
(based on the current ESF field received) and then compared to the
CRC-6 that was originally transmitted. If the two CRC-6s match, it is
highly probable that the ESF field arrived without error. If the CRC-6s
do not match, one or more errors may have occurred during
transmission of that particular ESF field. The CRC-6 code is capable of
detecting 98.4% of all ESFs containing transmission errors. These error
events are logged into an internal register within the ESF CSU and may
be recalled on a last 24-hour basis from the local or remote CSU
through the ESF Data Link using Access Manager 2000.
Access Manager 2000 Manual
A-5
Term
Definition
D
D4
See Superframe.
Data
Digitally represented information which includes voice, text, video, or
facsimile.
Data Bus
(1) A common connection using one or more conductors by which data
and timing information are conveyed between a related group of
devices (e.g., NCC, DIU, TIU).
(2) The means by which data and timing information are conveyed
between a CSU and associated DIUs. The backplane of each system
shelf provides three data buses (or 7 data buses with the MLS 2200)
that can be assigned to individual CSUs for DIU interfaces.
A-6
Data Channel
The internal circuit path through the DIU, including the data equipment
and network assigned time slots.
Data Circuitterminating
Equipment
Data Circuit Terminating Equipment (incorrectly, data communication
equipment): Equipment that is either part of the network, an access
point to the network, a network node, or equipment at which the
network circuit terminates. DIU 2140 / DIM 2232 or possibly HLM
2035, depending on its configuration.
Data Equipment
The customer’s data equipment that is connected to a DIU 2130 or DIU
2140 for network transmission through an NCC or TAC for
transmission over a T1 network.
Data Interface
Module
A backplane interface module of a data interface Unit (DIU) in Access
System 2000 which allows V.35 and other wiring formats to be
connected from the customers equipment into the DIU.
Data Interface Unit
A device that interfaces T1 data equipment ports at the customer’s
premises with a NCC or TAC over a T1 network.
Data Link
See ESF Data Link.
Data Port
The physical connection on the DIU that allows data from the data
equipment to enter the DIU.
Data Service Unit
A DSU is a multiplexer that apportions the 24 channels of a DS-1 (T1)
(not necessarily of equal size).
Access Manager 2000 Manual
Term
Definition
Data Terminal
Equipment
Generally, user devices, such as terminals and computers, that connect
to data circuit-terminating equipment (DCE); they either generate or
receive data carried by the network.
DC
Direct Current.
DCE
See Data Circuit-terminating Equipment.
DDS
Dataphone Digital Service (AT&T). A private line digital service
offered with data rates typically at 2.4, 4.8, 9.6, 19.2, and 56 kbps.
Decibel (dB)
A measure of the relative strength of two signals. The number of
decibels is ten times the log of the ratio of the power of two signals or
20 times the log of the ratio of the voltage of two signals.
Digital Signal
Level 0
This term describes the signal carried on a lower than T1 speed carrier
facility, specifically, a 64 kbps rate signal.
Digital Signal
Level 1
This term describes the 1.544 Mbps digital signal carried on a T1 or
higher-order carrier facility. There are 24 DS0s in a T1 line. Each DS0
is capable of 64 kbps or 56 kbps signal transmission.
Digital Data Service
(DDS)
A digital communications service which carries data at 56 kbps.
Digital
Multiplexer/
Demulitplexer
A digital multiplexer takes several lower speed digital lines (channels)
and combines them into one faster digital line (channel/signal).
A digital demultiplexer device which takes a digital line and divides it
into several usable channels.
DIM
See Data Interface Module.
DIU
See Data Interface Unit.
DLS
See Dual-Line Shelf.
DSU
See Data Service Unit.
DS-0
See Digital Signal Level 0.
DS-1
See Digital Signal Level 1.
Access Manager 2000 Manual
A-7
Term
Definition
DS-1 Equipmen
The customers DS-1 data transmission equipment connected to the
CSU of a NCC 2020 or TAC 2010.
DTE
See Data Terminal Equipment.
DTR
Data Terminal Ready.
Dual-Line Shelf
A dual-line shelf is a component of the Access System 2000 and is
used to house two or less plug-in modules such as NCCs, TACs, TIUs,
and DIUs. The DLS also provides three buses and several input and
output jacks for module interconnection and usability.
E
A-8
EFS
See Error-Free Second.
EIA
Electronic Industries Association, see RS-XX specifications under the
alphabetical listing in this glossary.
ELB
See Equipment Loopback.
Electronic
Programmable
Read-only
Memory
An EPROM is a non-volatile memory chip which can be erased by
exposing the chip to ultraviolet light. It may then be reprogrammed.
EPROM
See Electronic Programmable Read-only Memory.
Equipment
Any type of equipment that is connected to the node controller, TAC,
TIU, or DIU.
Equipment
Loopback
An ELB is a loop which sends the signal from the equipment back to
the equipment. When the ELB is in affect, the equipment signal is not
sent out to the line and does not pass through the CSU circuitry.
Equipment Low
Density Second
A second during which pulse stuffing or a keep-alive signal was applied
to the network.
EQP
See Equipment.
EQPT
See Equipment.
Errored Second
A second with one or more ESF error events.
Access Manager 2000 Manual
Term
Definition
Error-Free Second
A second with no detected errors.
Errored Seconds Line
The number of seconds with one or more Code Violation-Lines.
See CV-L.
Errored SecondsPath
The number of seconds that a bipolar violation occurs on the DS-1 (T1)
line. See CV-P.
ES
See Errored Seconds.
ES-L
See Errored Seconds-Line.
ES-P
See Errored Seconds-Path.
ESF
See Extended Superframe Format.
ESF Facility Data
Link
The ESF Facility Data Link is used in ESF circuits to transmit framing
(performance report messages PRMs), error events, and loopback
controls. The ESF Facility Data Link uses 4 kbps of bandwidth to
transmit data.
ESF Error Event
An event that occurs when an ESF contains either a CRC-6 error event
or an Out of Frame event.
Event Log
Each time a system event occurs (such as a system start-up, shut-down,
log in, log off, start or finish of polling, etc.), a record is made and
saved (“logged”) to database in Access Manager 2000. These events
can then be viewed at a later time.
Extended
Superframe
Format
Extended Superframe Format: an AT&T imposed T1 framing standard
that provides a frame synchronization, cyclic redundancy check, and
checking data and link bits. This standard allows errors to be stored and
retrieved easily, enhancing network maintenance.
The Extended Super-frame framing format divides a 1.544 Mbps
(DS-1) line into four main sections and contains 24 frames:
(1) Traffic and signalling [1.536 Mbps] --- Divided into 24 64-kbps
channels in one frame.
(2) Framing [2 kbps]
(3) CRC-6 [2 kbps] --- See ESF Error Event
(4) Facility Data Link [4 kbps] --- See ESF Facility Data Link
Access Manager 2000 Manual
A-9
Term
Definition
F
A-10
Failed Second
See Unavailable Seconds (UAS).
Failed Signal State
A failed signal state is declared whenever 10 SESs occur consecutively.
(The FSS will not clear until 10 consecutive seconds of data are
processed with no SESs present). New standards refer to a failed signal
state as an Unavailable Signal State (UASS).
Far-En
This refers to a circuit element located at the remote end of a T1 circuit,
which may be accessed through the ESF Data Link to control and
retrieve performance data.
FCC
Federal Communications Commission: a board of commissioners
appointed by the President under the Commissions Act of 1934, with
the authority to regulate all interstate telecommunications originating
in the United States.
FDL
See ESF Facilities Data Link.
FE
See Frame Bit Error.
FEC
See Forward Error Correction.
Forward Error
Correction
A technique used by a receiver for correcting errors incurred in
transmission over a communications channel without requiring the
retransmission of the information by the transmitter.
Frame Bit Error
An error in the received framing bit pattern.
Frame Bit Errored
Second
The number of whole seconds that a framing bit error has occurred.
Front-end Processor
A special purpose computer dedicated to the handling of
communication links for a host computer.
FS
Failed Second. See Unavailable Seconds (UAS).
FSS
See Failed Signal State.
Full Duplex
A communication link where both pieces of equipment can transmit in
both directions at the same time.
Access Manager 2000 Manual
Term
Definition
G, H
Hub Office
A central location from which an operator can access an Access
System 2000 node for administration and/or testing. The Access
Manager 2000 controller is normally located at the hub office for
dial-up interface with systems at one or more distant customer
premises.
Hz
Hertz: A unit of frequency equal to one cycle per second.
I, J,
Idle Code
The code that is transmitted when no user data is present on the net.
The Idle Code may be configured for ALL-ONES or Flags [01111110].
In-band
Within the same frequency band.
Jitter
The slight movement of a transmission signal which can introduce
errors and loss of synchronization in high speed synchronous
transmission links.
kbps
See Kilobits Per Second.
Kilobits per
Second
A measure of data transfer equaling one thousand binary digits
transmitted or received through a medium every (one) second.
L
LAN
See Local Area Network.
LBO
See Line Build-Out
LED
See Light Emitting Diode.
Light Emitting Diode
A light-emitting diode is a device which will light up when the proper
current is passed through it. It is used on Verilink modules for
identifying loops, errors, and other current conditions of T1 lines.
Line Build-Out
Line Build-Out is the attenuation signal strength used by the CSU to
the network interface and is determined byh the distance from the CSU
to the first line repeater.
Access Manager 2000 Manual
A-11
A-12
Term
Definition
Line Loopback
An LLB is a loop which takes the signal from the DS-1 network and
loops it back toward the network. The loop does not allow the DS-1
signal to pass through the CSU (except for critical protection circuitry
and the repeater), making it useful for testing the DS-1 line.
LLB
See Line Loopback.
Local Area Network
A type of high-speed data communications connection where all
segments of the transmission medium are in the office.
LOF
See Loss-of-Frame.
LOFS
See Loss-of-Frame Second.
Login
To log in to a computer is to establish a connection through an input
device to identify yourself as an authorized user.
Loopback
A method of checking the accuracy of a data transmission in which the
transmitted data is looped back to its source for comparison.
Loopbacks may be initiated from various point along the circuit.
LOS
See Loss-of-Signal.
Loss-of-Frame
Loss-of-Frame alarm is declared when a 3-second interval of
continuous Out-Of-Frame (OOF) or Loss-Of-Signal (LOS) state is
detected. An LOF alarm is cleared when at least 10 seconds of
continuous non-LOS or non-LOF condition exists.
Loss-of-Frame Count
An accumulation of the number of times a Loss-Of-Frame alarm is
declared.
Loss-of-Frame
Second
LOFS is the total number of seconds that the CSU was in the LOS
state.
Loss-of-Signal
The state of a T1 line when no bits are detected on input to the
receiving equipment. The time for detection of loss of signal will vary
depending on the type of equipment used. The Loss-Of-Signal state is
then integrated into a LOS alarm after 3 seconds of continuous
Loss-Of-Signal state.
Loss-of-Signal
Second
A second during which the CSU is in a Loss of Signal state. These
seconds are recorded by the NCCs and TACs in Access System 2000
nodes.
Access Manager 2000 Manual
Term
Definition
M
Master NCC 2020
This module provides the operator interface between an Access
Manager 2000 controller, ASCII terminal, or NCC front panel
thumbwheel switch and an NCC, TAC, or DIU in an Access System
2000 node. When multiple nodes are present, each node has one master
NCC which is linked through a RS-232D daisy chain to all other master
NCCs for Access Manager 2000 operator interface over a single line.
The Master NCC occupies the first slot of Shelf 1 in each system node.
Mbps
See Megabits per second.
Megabits per Second
A measure of data transfer equaling one million binary digits
transmitted or received through a medium every (one) second.
Megahertz
Megahertz means “million hertz” or “million cycles per second.”
MHz
See Megahertz.
MLS
See Multiline Shelf.
Modem
Modulator / Demodulator; an electronic device that enables digital data
to be sent across the network.
Multiline Shelf
A multiline shelf (MLS) is a component of the Access System 2000
which is used to house 13 (or less) plug-in modules such as NCCs,
TACs, TIUs, and DIUs. The MLS also provides three buses and several
input and output jacks for module interconnection and usability.
The MLS 2200 shelf provide the same module capacity, as well as,
providing 7 Data Buses.
Multiplex
A combination of information channels onto a single transmission
bearer.
Multiplexer
A multiplexer takes several lower speed lines (channels) and combines
them into one faster line (channel).
Mux
See Multiplexer.
Access Manager 2000 Manual
A-13
Term
Definition
N
A-14
NCC
See Node Controller.
Near-En
This refers to a circuit element that is accessed locally by Access
Manager (i.e., does not require the ESF data link.).
Network
The DS-1 (T1) transmission medium provided by a telephone company
or other provider for use by customers. This can be twisted-pair cables
and line repeaters, a higher level digital multiplexer, fiber optic system,
or other carrier facility.
Network
Interface
The equipment that provides the NCC connection to the network. The
NI is normally equipped with a jack, connector, or punch-down block.
NI
See Network Interface.
NMS
Network Management System (e.g., Access Manager 2000).
Node
A location where one or more pieces of equipment interconnect
transmission lines (ISO). A physical device that allows transmission of
data onto a network (e.g., Access System 2000).
Node Access Type
The particular type of connection between Access Manager and the
node being addressed.
Node Controller
The circuit in the NCC that performs operator control and interface
operations.
Node Controller and
Channel
Service Unit (NCC)
An AS2000 circuit element providing both node controller and channel
service unit functionality. The node controller provides ASCII craft
interface and thumbwheel interface, for local management and RE-232
interface for Access Manager 2000 management.
Access Manager 2000 Manual
Term
Definition
O, P
On-line
On-line is a selection of Access Manager 2000 available from the Main
Menu. Under On-line are operations that access the contents of a circuit
element’s performance registers and any trouble conditions which the
circuit element may be detecting. Under the On-line menu, circuit
elements may be commanded to run diagnostic tests and set loopbacks.
The current configuration of network elements is accessible from the
On-line menu of Access Manager 2000.
OOF
See Out-of-Frame.
Out-of-Frame
A condition when any two of four or two of five consecutive frame bits
received from the T1 line are incorrect. This causes the CSU to attempt
to reframe.
Out-of-Frame
Second
A second during which an Out-of-Frame condition exists.
Parity
A technique used to help detect data transmission errors. A noninformation bit is added to a byte.
Parts per Million
This refers to the number of unique units present in a group of one
million units.
Payload Loopback
This loopback loops the signal from the DS-1 (T1) line back to the
DS-1 line intact. The signal passes through the CSU when using PLB,
including the repeater, making it useful for testing the CSU from the
far-end circuit.
Performance Data
Information generated and stored by the CSU of an NCC or TAC that
indicates the transition quality of a signal received from the DS-1 (T1)
equipment or network.
This information includes data such as ESF error events, errored
seconds, etc. The performance data is stored in numerous registers for
operator retrieval.
Phase
The time or angle that a data signal is delayed with respect to a
reference point(s).
PLB
See Payload Loopback.
ppm
See Parts per Million.
Access Manager 2000 Manual
A-15
Term
Definition
Point-to-point
A term used to describe a circuit that interconnects two points directly.
Port
The point of access into a computer network or other electronic device.
Power Supply
(PAC/PDC)
A power supply is the device which converts AC to DC or DC to a
different DC voltage for use by the NCCs, TACs, DIUs, etc.
Privileged
Password
A password that allows an ACSII terminal operator to perform network
management functions on a Access System 2000 module.
Q, R
A-16
QRSS
See Quasi-Random Signal Sequence.
Quasi-Random
Signal Sequence
One of four test patterns sent from the CSU. It is used to diagnose
problems with either equipment or the telco DS-1 line.
RAI
See Remote Alarm Indication.
RAM
See Random Access Memory.
Random Access
Memory
A memory device whereby any location in memory can be written to or
retrieved from with the same average speed. RAM is usually measured
in kilobytes.
Read-Only
Memory
A memory device which can only be read.
Remote Alarm
Indication
See Yellow Alarm.
Remote Alarm
Indication
Seconds
The number of seconds during which a CSU is in Yellow Alarm. The
RAIS counts are stored by the NCCs and CSUs in Access System 2000
nodes.
Register
A circuit in a CSU that stores a T1 circuit performance data parameters
for retrieval by an ASCII terminal operator or AM2000. Each register
can be reset by an authorized operator after data retrieval.
Access Manager 2000 Manual
Term
Definition
Repeater Loopback
The repeater loopback connects the CSU network output signal back
toward the equipment. It loops the whole CSU (except the CSU
network input and output transformers) toward the equipment. This
loopback has an automatic time-out that releases the loopback after a
pre-selected time.
This loopback is helpful in testing the NET-side repeater and the
network-side critical circuitry in the loopback.
RLB
Repeater Loopback.
ROM
See Read-Only Memory.
Route
A route consists of the two network circuit elements at T1 circuit endpoints as accessed by Access Manager. For these programs, a circuit
and a route are functionally equivalent.
RS-232
A common interface standard that permits DTEs and DCEs to
successfully interconnect.
RTS
Request To Send.
S
SEFS
See Severely Errored Framing Second.
Severely Errored
Framing Second
Those seconds in which two or more framing bit errors occur within a
3-millisecond period. For ESF, this interval may or may not coincide
with an ESF (i.e, six framing bits).
SF
See Superframe.
Stop-bit
In asynchronous transmission, the last transmitted element in each
character, which informs the receiver to become idle before accepting
another character.
Subchannel
A subchannel is any segment of a DS-0 channel that is used to
complete a circuit without effecting other traffic within the DS-0.
Subrate
In the reference the transmission speeds falling between 300 bps and
9.6 kbps.
Access Manager 2000 Manual
A-17
Term
Definition
Superframe
The superframe framing format divides a 1.544 Mbps DS-1 (T1) line
into two major sections and contains 24 frames:
(1) Traffic and signalling [1.536 Mbps] --- Divided into 24 DS0
(64 kbps) channels in one frame.
(2) Framing [8 kbps]
SF is the predecessor of ESF and still is used when ESF in not
available.
Synchronous
A method of transmission where an uninterrupted block of data is sent.
Each block is preceded by one or more sync characters to synchronize
the receiver with the datastream.
System Node
All modules (NCC, TACs, DIUs, TIUs) controlled by a master node
controller (NCC) through the Access Manager or ASCII terminal
operator interface. Each master NCC in a node performs these control
functions. Each node can have up to 30 modules in any combination.
T
A-18
T1
A 24 channel, 1.544 Mhz bit stream used for data transmission. T1 uses
two twisted pair conductors to accomplish full duplex transmission.
TAC
T1 Aggregate and Channel Service Unit Module.
Telco
See Telephone Company.
Telephone Company
A company that provides its customers with a communications line
whether digital or analog.
Telephone Company
Register
A DS-1 performance data register from which either a Telco or
customer operator can retrieve data, but only a telco operator can reset.
Terminal
A computer terminal is an input/output device whereby a user is able to
communicate directly with a computer. A terminal must have a
keyboard and a display
Twisted Pair
A pair of insulated conductors that are twisted around each other,
mainly to reduce the effects of electrical noise. Twisted pair is typical
of standard telephone T1 wiring.
Access Manager 2000 Manual
Term
Definition
U
UAS
See Unavailable Second.
UL
See Underwriters Laboratory
Unavailable Second
Counted for every second in which an Unavailable Signal State occurs.
This term is used by new standards in place of Failed Seconds (FS).
Underwriters
Laboratories
A company that tests equipment for electronic safety. If the instrument
passes this company’s tests, it is underwritten and given the “UL” seal.
Unavailable Signal
State
An Unavailable Signal State is declared whenever 10 consecutive SESs
occur. The Unavailable Signal State will not clear until 10 consecutive
seconds of data are processed with no SESs present.
Unprivileged
Password
An ASCII interface (CRAFT) password that permits an ASCII operator
to perform limited operations on an Access System module.
U, V
User
The operator of any device.
Volts Alternating
Current (Vac)
An acronym used for labeling the number of volts on an alternating
current. For example: 32 Vac = 32 volts on alternating current.
Volts Direct Current
(Vdc)
An acronym used for labeling the number of volts on a direct current.
For example: 32 Vdc = 32 volts on direct current.
W, X, Y, Z
Word Length
The number of bits or characters in a word, which is usually
determined as a convenient size for processing storages or
transmission. Word length is often based on the register size and
internal operation of a computer.
Access Manager 2000 Manual
A-19
Term
Definition
Yellow Alarm
A Yellow Alarm is the alarm a receiving channel bank or multiplexer
sends to the other end of the circuit when it detects a loss of signal or
loss of frame. There is a 2- to 3-second integration period upon
detection of loss of signal or loss of frame before a yellow alarm is sent
to the far-end equipment. This condition is also referred to as a remote
alarm or remote alarm indication:
In the Superframe format, a yellow alarm consists of Bit 2 of all 24
channels set to zero.
In ESF format, the yellow alarm is a repeating pattern of eight ONEs
followed by eight ZEROs transmitted over the ESF Data Link.
A-20
Yellow Alarm
Transcoding
When a DS1 signal undergoes framing format conversion from SF (D4)
to ESF, or ESF to SF, an existing yellow alarm must be transcoded to
the new format so that the alarm can be detected by the network or
DTE equipment. An integration time is used before transcoding occurs
to allow for data that merely looks like yellow alarm (in the SF mode),
and to allow for detection of a yellow alarm in the presence of errors.
For SF, the detection and clear time is 400 +/- 1 millisecond. For ESF,
this time is 63 to 66 milliseconds.
Zero Code
Suppression
The insertion of a “one” bit to prevent the transmission of eight or more
consecutive “zero” bits; used primarily with T1 and related digital
circuits.
Access Manager 2000 Manual
Appendix
B
Modem Configuration
This appendix describes how to configure modems when used with CSUs
or shelf controllers when operating in the Open Systems Interconnection
(OSI) or Telemetry Asynchronous Block Serial (TABS) protocol.
OSI Protocol Configuration
This section describes the modem configuration options for the OSI
feature of Access Manager.
Modem
Configuration for
OSI Protocol With
DTR Lead
Table B-1, “Modem Configuration for OSI Protocol (DTR Lead),” on
page B-3, lists the switch configurations for a Hayes Smartmodem 
1200. This table also lists the AT commands for a Hayes Smartmodem
2400 when used to connect a PC running Access Manager 2000 to a CSU
or Controller equipped with a DTR lead. For further instruction, see the
Hayes SmartModem 2400 user manual for configuration information.
Modem
Configuration for
OSI Protocol
Without DTR Lead
Table B-2, “Modem Configuration for OSI Protocol without DTR Lead,”
on pag eB-4 lists the switch configurations for a Hayes Smartmodem 
1200 and the ATcommands for a Hayes Smartmodem  2400 when
used to connect a PC running Access Manager to a CSU or Controller
without a DTR lead. For further information, see the Hayes Smartmodem
 2400 user manual in the configuration section.
Hayes
Smartmodem
2400 Configuration
If a Hayes Smartmodem  2400 is to be used with a CSU or Controller,
it must be configured before connecting it to the CSU or Controller. This
is performed by connecting it to:
■
An ASCII terminal
■
APC equipped with an ASCII terminal emulation program
■
A communications program
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
B-1
The modem must be configured to communicate at 2400 baud, 8 data
bits, no parity, one stop bit.
Modem
Configuration
Commands
All the commands listed i n TableB-1, “Modem Configuration for OSI
Protocol (DTR Lead),” on page B - 3 through TableB-3 , M
“ odem
Configuration for TABS Protocol ,” on page B-6 must be preceded by the
charactersAT. For example, to disable character echo, type“ATE0&W”.
Otherwise, the following command should also be entered to cause the
modem to recall User Profile 0 on power-up:
AT&Y0&W
The “&W” command writes the changes to User Profile 0. See the
following tables:
■
■
Table B-1, “Modem Configuration for OSI Protocol (DTR Lead),”
on pag eB-3
Table B-3, “Modem Configuration for TABS Protocol,” on
page B-6
Be careful if you enter commands after you have completed the
Smartmodem configuration. Any subsequent commands at a different
baud rate may override the 2400 baud speed selection. The last command
entered and stored with “&W” determines the speed at which the
Smartmodem initially answers an incoming call.
Note: This configuration does not apply to CSUs and Controllers in the
OSI Mode. It is for use only with non-OSI Protocol CSUs or
Controllers.
Modem
Initialization by
CSU or Controller
OSI Compatible
Equipment
To properly initialize the modem after it is configured, powered up, and
connected to the CSU or Controller, the CSU or Controller should be
powered down for a few seconds and then powered up again. This will
allow the CSU or Controller to initialize the modem and configure itself
The following devices operate with the configuration shown in Table B - 1,
“Modem Configuration for OSI Protocol (DTR Lead),” on page B - 3.
■
B-2
NC/E
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
OSI Protocol Configuration
■
■
Current 551VST ML List 2 with List 2 MLB shelf or upgraded List
1 shelf and NMC List 2 Controller
■
Current 551VST List 2
■
Access System 2000
■
ConnecT1 Plus
■
■
Table B-1
SIM
551VST List 2 (without DTR lead), hardware revision 0.0 as
displayed by Access Manager
551VST ML List 2 Controller with List 1 shelf (without DTR lead)
Modem Configuration for OSI Protocol (DTR Lead)
Parameter

Smartmodem
1200
Switch Position
Option
Smartmodem 2400 AT
Command
SW1 up
Follows DTR. Hangs up
and goes to command
state if signal drops
&D2&W
Result code format
SW2 down
Numbers
V0&W
Result code display
SW3 down
Codes are displayed
Q0&W
Character echo
SW4 down
Characters not echoed in
command state
E0&W
Auto-answer
SW5 down
Disabled
S0=0&W
Carrier detect and data
set ready
SW6 up
Reflects actual result of
attempt to connect
&C1&S1&W
TELCO jack type (Note 2)
SW7 up
RJ-11, RJ-41S,
RJ-45S
&J0&W
SW7 down
RJ-12, RJ-13
&J1&W
SW8 down
Enabled
Internal jumper set to
Command Recognition
Communication standard
at 1200 bps
SW9 up
Bell 212A
B1&W
Response to DTR
transition (when SW1 is
up)
SW10 u
Hangs up and goes to
command state
Set by SW1 option
DTR status not ignored
Command
recognition
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
B-3

Parameter
Smartmodem
1200
Switch Position
Option
Smartmodem 2400 AT
Command
NOTE 1. Factory position indicated by boldface.
NOTE 2. Position of SW7 depends on the type of phone jack used.
Most installations use an RJ11 jack (SW7 up).
Table B-2
Modem Configuration for OSI Protocol without DTR Lead
Parameter

1200
Smartmodem
Switch Position
Option
Smartmodem 2400 AT
Command
DTR status ignored
SW1 down
Ignores DTR state if
signal drops
&D0&W
Result code format
SW2 down
Numbers
V0&W
Result code display
SW3 down
Codes are displayed
Q0&W
Character echo
SW4 down
Characters not
echoed in command
state
E0&W
Auto-answer
SW5 down
Disabled
S0=0&W
Carrier detect and data set
read
SW6 up
Reflects actual result of
attempt to connect
&C1&S1&W
TELCO jack type
(Note 2)
SW7 up
RJ-11, RJ-41S,
RJ-45S
&J0&W
SW7 down
RJ-12, RJ-13
&J1&W
SW8 down
Enabled
Internal jumper set to
Command
Recognition
Communications standard at
1200 bps
SW9 up
Bell 212A
B1&W
Response to DTR transition
(when SW1 is up)
SW10 up
Hangs up and goes to
command state
Set by SW1 option
Command recognition
NOTE 1. Factory position indicated by boldface.
NOTE 2. Position of SW7 depends on the type of phone jack used. Most installations use an RJ-11 jack (SW7 up).
B-4
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
TABS Protocol Configuration
TABS Protocol Configuration
The switch configurations for a Hayes Smartmodem  1200 or 2400
connected to a CSU or Controller operating in the TABS mode are
detailed in Tabl eB-3, “Modem Configuration for TABS Protocol,” on
page B-6. The modem at the Access Manager end should be configured
per Table B-1, “Modem Configuration for OSI Protocol (DTR Lead),” on
page B-3. For further information, see the user manual for the modem.
Note that the CSU or Controller is limited to 1200 baud when configured
for TABS.
The following CSUs and Controllers will only work in the TABS mode:
■
551VST List 1, 1/A, 1/ B
■
551VST ML List 1 Controller
■
!
551VST List 2 in TABS mode (installed in Access Manager as a
551VST 1/B)
CAUTION
The 551VST List 2 CSU should always be configured to perform
automatic configuration during power-up. Otherwise, a service
interruption may occur.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
B-5
Table B-3
Modem Configuration for TABS Protocol

Smartmodem
1200
Switch Position
Option
Smartmodem 2400 AT
Command
DTR status ignored
SW1 down
Ignores DTR
&D0&W
Result code format
SW2 down
Number
V0&W
Result code display
SW3 up
Codes are not displayed
Q1&W
SW4 down
Characters not echoed in
command state
E0&W
Auto-answer
SW5 up
Enabled
S0=1&W
Carrier detect
SW6 up
Reflects actual result of
attempt to connect
&C1&S1&W
TELCO jack type (Note 2
SW7 up
RJ-11, RJ-41S,
RJ-45S
&J0&W
SW7 down
RJ-12, RJ-13
&J1&W
Command
recognition
SW8 up
Disabled
Internal jumper set to
disable command
recognition
(Note 3)
Communication standard
at 1200 bps
SW9 up
Bell 212A
B1&W
Response to DTR
transition
(when SW1 is up)
SW10 up
Hangs up and goes to
command state
Set by SW1 option
Parameter
Character echo
NOTE 1. Factory position indicated by boldface.
NOTE 2. Position of SW7 depends on the type of phone jack used. Most installations use an RJ-11 jack (SW7 up).
NOTE 3. The internal jumper should be set to enable command recognition to configure the other options in the table.
After the configuration is complete, power down the modem and set the internal jumper to disable command
recognition.
B-6
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Appendix
C
Alarm Report Record Format
Alarm Record Layout
The alarm processing logic in Access Manager 2000 allows you to send
the alarm notification to a user-specified alarm channel. This alarm
channel can be a serial port, printer port, or file.
You can specify alarm notification to be sent in plain English text
(verbose), terse format (ASCII-encoded binary), or Accumaster Alarm
format. The terse version is designed to be processed by other computing
equipment, with all status changes for a circuit element packed into one
notification message for alarm-activated status and another notification
message for alarm-cleared status. The plain-English version sends one
notification for each status change. It is designed to be used with a printer
and to be written to a disk file. The Accumaster format is used to send
alarms to the Accumaster Integrator system.
Plain English Alarm Notification
Access Manager prints one alarm notification for each alarm condition.
The notification has the following general format:
mm/dd/yy hh:mm:ss <alarm description> at
<circuit element>
Terse Alarm Notification
The layout of the terse alarm notifications is given in Table C-1, “Terse
Alarm Message Layout,” on page C - 2.
Node types 551VST List 1/A, 551VST List 1/B, and 551VST ML List 1
do not generate alarm records. Do not use the terse alarm format for
output to printers.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
C-1
The Status Code Tables
The following tables contain status codes:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Table C-2, “551VST List 2 Status Codes,” on pag eC-4 lists the
551VST List 2 status codes.
Table C-3, “NC/E Status Codes,” on page C - 4 lists the NC/E status
codes.
Table C-4, “SIM Status Codes,” on pa geC-5 lists the SIM status
codes.
Table C-5, “NMC List 2 Status Codes,” on page C - 6 lists the NMC
List 2 status codes.
Table C-6, “AS2000 Near-End Network Status Codes,” on page C-6
lists the AS2000 near-end network status codes.
Table C-7, “AS2000 Near-End Equipment Status Codes,” on
page C-8 lists the AS2000 near-end equipment status codes.
Table C-8, “AS2000 Far-End Network Status Codes,” on page C - 8
lists the AS2000 far-end network status codes.
Table C-9, “AS2000 Far-End Equipment Status Codes,” on page
9 lists AS2000 far-end equipment status codes.
Table C-10, “Additional NCC 2020 Status Codes,” on pag eC-10
lists additional status codes.
The master CSU of each Access System 2000 reports separate status
codes for the near-end and corresponding far-end NCC 2020s, and TAC
2010s in that node.
Accumaster Status
Code Format
Table C-1
Field
C-2
Contact AT&T for information on the Accumaster Integrated Alarm
Interface Specification. This information is proprietaryto AT&T.
Terse Alarm Message Layout
Byte
Length
1
0
1
SOH (0 x 01)
2
1-2
2
Year of the alarm timestamp
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Description
The Status Code Tables
Field
Byte
Length
Description
3
3-4
2
4
5-6
2
Day of the alarm timestamp
5
7-8
2
Hour of the alarm timestamp
Month of the alarm timestamp
6
9 - 10
2
Minute of the alarm timestamp
7
11 - 12
2
Second of the alarm timestamp
8
13 - 32
20
Name of the node
9
33 - 37
5
Node I
10
38 - 40
3
Node (or Circuit Element) type
26 = 551VST List 2
33 = NC/E
32 = SI
24 = 551VST ML List 2 (NMC List 2)
48 = NC
49 =TAC
56 = ConnecT1 Plus
58 = CC
11
41 - 42
2
Shelf number - A value of 00 indicates the alarm is for the Controlle
(NCC/CCC) itself rather than for a specific shelf.
12
43 - 44
2
Plug-in number - A value of 00 indicates that alarm is for the shelf
specified by shelf number. Otherwise, the alarm is for a specific plugin.
NOTE:
If you are using AS2000 or ConnecT1 Plus equipment, use Field 13 for byte 45.
Otherwise, use Fields 13A and 13B.
13
45
3
These bytes are used as status codes for identifying changes-incondition of Access System equipment.
13A
45
1
Set or clear flag
1 = status changes reported are set conditions.
0 = status changes reported are cleared conditions.
13B
46 - n
-
Status codes changed - Each code is represented by two ASCII
characters. Since these codes are not unique among various devices,
the node type must be used in conjunction with the code to identify
the alarm type. The status codes for the various equipments are
listed in Tab leC-2, “551VST List 2 Status Codes,” on pa geC-4
through Ta bleC-5, “NMC List 2 Status Codes,” on p ageC-6.
14
n+1
1
Terminator
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
C-3
Field
Byte
Length
Description
15
n+2
1
Byte n+2 is a One-byte checksum. This checksum is 2’s complement
of the sum of all bytes in the alarm record (modulo 256), excluding
the SOH (Field 1) and terminator (Field 14) bytes.
Table C-2
551VST List 2 Status Code
Status Code (hex)
Description
00
Near BER exceeded
01
Near SPAN LOS alarm
02
Near EQPT low density
03
Near LLB or PLB looped
04
Near ELB or RLB looped
08
Far BER exceeded
09
Far SPAN LOS alarm
0A
Far EQPT low density alar
0B
Far LLB or PLB looped
0C
Far ELB or RLB loope
0F
Far CSU absent alarm
Table C-3
NC/E Status Codes
Status Code (hex)
C-4
Description
00
Near BER exceeded
01
Near SPAN LOS alarm
02
Near EQPT low density alarm
03
Near LLB or PLB looped
04
Near ELB or RLB looped
06
Near fuse blown
07
Near CSU absent alarm
08
Far BER exceeded
09
Far SPAN LOS alarm
0A
Far EQPT low density alar
0B
Far LLB or PLB looped
0C
Far ELB or RLB loope
0F
Far CSU absent alarm
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
The Status Code Tables
Status Code (hex)
Description
12
Power fuse blown
15
SIM absent
20
NC/E powered up
Table C-4
SIM Status Codes
Status Code (hex)
Description
00
Near BER exceeded
01
Near SPAN LOS alarm
02
Near EQPT low density alarm
03
Near LLB or PLB looped
04
Near ELB or RLB looped
06
Near fuse blown
07
Near CSU absent alarm
08
Far BER exceeded
09
Far SPAN LOS alarm
0A
Far EQPT low density alar
0B
Far LLB or PLB looped
0C
Far ELB or RLB loope
0F
Far CSU absent alarm
12
Power fuse blown
21
SIM powered up
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
C-5
Table C-5
NMC List 2 Status Codes
Status Code (hex)
Description
00
Near BER exceeded
01
Near SPAN LOS alarm
02
Near EQPT low density alarm
03
Near LLB or PLB looped
04
Near ELB or RLB looped
06
Near fuse blown
07
Near CSU absent alarm
08
Far BER exceeded
09
Far SPAN LOS alarm
0A
Far EQPT low density alar
0B
Far LLB or PLB looped
0C
Far ELB or RLB loope
0F
Far CSU absent alarm
11
Power Fuse A failure
12
Power Fuse B failure
13
Power Fuse C failure
14
Power Fuse D failure
20
NMC List 2 powered up
Table C-6
AS2000 Near-End Network Status Codes
Status Code (hex)
Decimal Equivalent
65
101
Near NET BER exceeded
66
102
Near NET BER exceeded cleared
67
103
Near NET ES-L exceeded
68
104
Near NET ES-L exceeded cleared
C-6
Description
69
105
Near NET ES exceeded
6A
106
Near NET ES exceeded cleared
6B
107
Near NET UAS exceeded
6C
108
Near NET UAS exceeded cleared
6D
109
Near NET LLB looped
6E
110
Near NET LLB looped cleared
6F
111
Near NET PLB looped
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
The Status Code Tables
Status Code (hex)
Decimal Equivalent
Description
70
112
Near NET PLB looped cleared
71
113
Near NET LOS alarm
72
114
Near NET LOS alarm cleared
73
115
Near NET RAI alarm
74
116
Near NET RAI alarm cleared
75
117
Near NET LOF alarm
76
118
Near NET LOF alarm cleared
77
119
Near NET AIS alarm
78
120
Near NET AIS alarm cleared
79
121
Near NETTest SIG alarm
7A
122
Near NETTest SIG alarm cleared
7B
123
Near CSU loss of external clock alarm
7C
124
Near CSU loss of external clock alarm cleared
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
C-7
Table C-7
AS2000 Near-End Equipment Status Codes
Status Codes (hex)
Decimal Equivalent
C9
201
Near EQPT BER exceeded
CA
202
Near EQPT BER exceeded cleared
CB
203
Near EQPT ES-L exceeded
CC
204
Near EQPT ES-L exceeded cleared
CD
205
Near EQPT ES exceede
CE
206
Near EQPT ES exceeded cleare
CF
207
Near EQPT UAS exceeded
D0
208
Near EQPT UAS exceeded cleared
D1
209
Near EQPT ELB looped
D2
210
Near EQPT ELB looped cleared
D3
211
Near EQPT RLB looped
D4
212
Near EQPT RLB looped cleared
D5
213
Near EQPT LOS alarm
D6
214
Near EQPT LOS alarm cleared
D7
215
Near EQPT RAI alarm
D8
216
Near EQPT RAI alarm cleared
D9
217
Near EQPT LOF alarm
DA
218
Near EQPT LOF alarm cleared
DB
219
Near EQPT AIS alarm
DC
220
Near EQPT AIS alarm cleared
DD
221
Near EQPTTest SIG alarm
DE
222
Near EQPTTest SIG alarm cleared
DF
223
Near EQPT low density alarm
E0
224
Near EQPT low density alarm cleared
Table C-8
AS2000 Far-End Network Status Codes
Status Codes (hex)
C-8
Description
Decimal Equivalent
Description
12D
301
Far NET BER exceede
12E
302
Far NET BER exceeded cleared
12F
303
Far NET ES-L alarm
130
304
Far NET ES-L alarm cleared
131
305
Far NET ES alarm
132
306
Far NET ES alarm cleared
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
The Status Code Tables
Status Codes (hex)
Decimal Equivalent
Description
133
307
Far NET UAS alarm
134
308
Far NET UAS alarm cleared
135
309
Far NET LLB loope
136
310
Far NET LLB loop cleared
137
311
Far NET PLB looped
139
312
Far NET PLB loop cleared
139
313
Far NET LOS alarm
13A
314
Far NET LOS alarm cleared
13B
315
Far NET RAI alarm
13C
316
Far NET RAO alarm cleared
13D
317
Far NET LOF alarm
13E
318
Far NET LOF alarm cleared
13F
319
Far NET AIS alarm
140
320
Far NET AIS alarm cleared
141
321
Far NET Test SIG applied alarm
142
322
Far NET Test SIG alarm cleared
143
323
Far CSU loss of external clock alarm
144
324
Far CSU loss of external clock alarm cleared
Table C-9
AS2000 Far-End Equipment Status Codes
Status Codes (hex)
Decimal Equivalent
Description
191
401
Far EQPT BER exceeded
192
402
Far EQPT BER exceeded cleared
193
403
Far EQPT ES-L exceeded
194
404
Far EQPT ES-L exceeded cleared
195
405
Far EQPT ES exceeded
196
406
Far EQPT ES exceeded cleared
197
407
Far EQPT UAS exceeded
198
408
Far EQPT UAS exceeded cleared
199
409
Far EQPT ELB looped
19A
410
Far EQPT ELB looped cleared
19B
411
Far EQPT RLB looped
19C
412
Far EQPT RLB looped cleared
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
C-9
Status Codes (hex)
Decimal Equivalent
Description
19D
413
19E
414
Far EQPT LOS alarm cleare
19F
415
Far EQPT RAI alarm
1A1
416
Far EQPT RAI alarm cleared
1A2
417
Far EQPT LOF alarm
1A3
418
Far EQPT LOF alarm cleared
1A4
419
Far EQPT AIS alarm
1A5
420
Far EQPT AIS alarm cleared
1A6
421
Far EQPT Test SIG alarm
1A7
422
Far EQPT Test SIG cleared
1A8
423
Far EQPT low density alarm
1A9
424
Far EQPT low density alarm cleare
Far EQPT LOS alarm
Table C-10 Additional NCC 2020 Status Code
Status Codes (hex)
Decimal Equivalent
1
001
Near CSU Power Up
3
003
Far CSU Power Up
1F5
501
Near New Plug
1F7
503
Near Plug Absent alarm
1F9
505
Near Plug Present
259
601
Dual Clocks Present alarm
25A
602
Dual Clocks Present alarm cleared
25B
603
No Clocks Present alarm
C-10
Description
25C
604
No Clocks Present alarm cleared
3E9
1001
Alarm Buffer Full
3EA
1002
Near A Power Supply alarm
3EB
1003
Near A Power Supply alarm cleared
3EC
1004
Far A Power Supply alarm
3ED
1005
Far A Power Supply alarm cleared
3EE
1006
Near B Power Supply alarm
3EF
1007
Near B Power Supply alarm cleared
3F0
1008
Far B Power Supply alarm
3F1
1009
Far B Power Supply alarm cleared
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
The Status Code Tables
Status Codes (hex)
Decimal Equivalent
Description
3F2
1010
3F3
1011
Power-Up Self Test to NET Failure alarm
3F4
1012
Power-Up Self Test to EQPT Failure alarm
3F5
1013
Near CSU Power Up
321
801
Port 1 Loss of Signal alarm
322
802
Port 1 Loss of Signal alarm cleared
323
803
Port 2 Loss of Signal alarm
324
804
Port 2 Loss of Signal alarm cleared
Power-Up Loop Exists alarm
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
C-11
C-12
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Appendix
D
Installing Serial Ports
This appendix describes the settings and procedures used to add a
standard serial board or a DigiBoard multichannel board in your personal
computer (PC or PS/2). Access Manager can address more than the one or
two standard serial ports as Comlines. DigiBoard DigiCHANNEL boards
have been tested to work with the Access Manager running on IBM or
100% IBM-compatible personal computers (PC’s). The three parts of this
appendix describe the following:
■
Standard PC and PS/2 serial port settings
■
Installing multichannel boards in Micro Channel PS/2s
■
Installing multichannel boards in PC-A
Standard PC or PS/2 Serial Port Settings
Before DigiBoard multichannel boards can be added to your PC, you
should configure the serial ports supplied with the PC. Tables D-1 to D-3
list settings for the most common serial boards supplied with personal
computers. For other serial port cards, refer to the associated hardware
manual.
Table D-1
Standard Serial Ports for Micro Channel IBM PS/2
Comline Name
(Caution)
Port Addr
IRQ
Shared I/O
Addr
Status Mask
COM1
3F8H
4H
0H
0H
!
CAUTION
Using the PS/2 Reference Disk, install the built-in serial port a
COM1. Installing it as any other port may cause the system to lock
up.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
D-1
Table D-2
Standard Serial Ports for IBM PC, XT, and AT
Comline Name
(Note 1.)
Port Addr
IRQ
Shared I/O
Addr
Status Mask
COM1
3F8H
4H
0H
0H
COM2
2F8H
3H
0H
0H
NOTE 1. Set the built-in serial port(s) as shown.
CAUTION
!
Table D-3
To use the built-in serial ports with Access Manager, they must be
installed and configured by the hardware switches. Installing the
into the computer as any other port may cause the system to lock-up.
Serial Ports for Everex Magic I/O,AT Multi I/O, EV-170A, EV-170
Comline Name
Port Addr
IRQ
Shared I/O
Addr
Status Mask
COM1
(Note 1)
3F8H
4H
0H
0H
COM2
2F8H
3H
0H
0H
COM3
(Note 2)
3E8H
2H
0H
0H
COM4
(Note 2)
2E8H
5H
0H
0H
NOTE 1. COM1 should be reserved for the built-in serial port equipped on many computers.
NOTE 2. Only two COM ports are equipped on the EV-170A.
D-2
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Installing a DigiCHANNEL MC/4 or MC/8 and Editing
Installing a DigiCHANNEL MC/4 or MC/8 and Editing a
Comline
The DigiBoard DigiCHANNEL MC/4 and MC/8 boards are designed for
use in IBM PS/2 Micro Channel personal computers. Each MC/8 board
provides up to eight Comline ports. The MC/4 boards provide up to four
Comline ports.
Installing the DigiCHANNEL MC/4 or MC/8 board is a four-part
procedure:
1. Preparation
2. Hardware Installation
3. PS/2 Configuration
4. Configuring Access Manager.
Each part is relatively simple in itself, but you must perform all four
procedures sequentially for your DigiCHANNEL MC/4 or MC/8 board to
work.
Preparation
Copy the DigiBoard-supplied @6FE5.ADF and @6FE6.ADF files from
your DigiWARE disk to your working copy of the Reference Diskette.
This disk is used later by the System Configuration procedure. The ADF
file contains the information that the system needs to automatically
configure the DigiCHANNEL MC/4 or MC/8 board. The ADF file is in
the subdirectory CONF on the DigiWARE disk that comes with the
DigiCHANNEL board.
1. Make a working (backup) copy of your original IBM Reference
Diskette, and store the original in a safe place. The backup disk
must be a formatted high-density 1.44-megabyte 3.5-inch diskette.
At this time, also make a copy of yourDigiWARE disk, and store
the original in a safe place.
2. Copy the @6FE5.ADF and @6FE.ADF files from your DigiBoard
DigiWARE disk to your working copy of the Reference Diskette.
The ADF file contains the information that the system needs to
know about the DigiCHANNEL MC/4 or MC/8 board.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
D-3
!
Hardware
Installation
PS/2 Configuration
CAUTION
It is imperative that the @6FE5.ADF and @6FE6.ADF files are copied
to your configuration disk (Reference Diskette) BEFORE you install
the DigiCHANNEL board. The self-configuring PS/2 system may not
be able to boot up with the board in place and the ADF file missing.
You can’t go back and copy the file with a system that doesn’t boot.
The second procedure, hardware installation, involves installing the
DigiCHANNEL board in your system unit. Refer to your PS/2 hardware
manual for this procedure.
When you have completed the hardware installation, you are ready to use
the disk prepared in the preparation procedure and boot the system to run
the IBM Automatic Configuration program. With the DigiCHANNEL
MC/4 or MC/8 board installed in the system unit, you are now ready to
configure the system to recognize the DigiCHANNEL board.
1. Insert the Reference Diskette into drive A:.
2. Boot the system with the Reference Diskette, containing the ADF
file.
3. Follow the on-screen instructions to automatically reconfigure your
system.
4. Type “Y” when the system tells you that it has found a board it
doesn’t recognize and asks you whether or not it should run
Automatic Configuration.
The @6FE5.ADF and @6FE6.ADF files contain information used
by the automatic configuration program to select interrupts and
addresses for interfacing with the DigiCHANNEL board. The
default settings for the first DigiCHANNEL board are:
D-4
•
Board Interrupt 3
•
Start of Port Addresses DB80h
•
Status Port Address DBC0h
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Installing a DigiCHANNEL MC/4 or MC/8 and Editing
•
COM2 Compatibility Disabled
The PS/2 auto configuration program automatically selects
interrupts or addresses other than the ones listed above if it finds
them already being used.
5. Review the settings selected to verify the board configuration before
attempting to configure Access Manager. If a different starting
address is desired, the start of port addresses should be changed at
this time. Refer to Table D-4, “Serial Ports for DigiCHANNEL
MC/4 or MC/8 in Micro Channel IBM PS/2,” on page D -6, Note 4,
for a list of allowed starting addresses.
6. Press the <F10> key to save the changes.
7. Remove the Reference Diskette from drive A:.
8. Reboot your computer.
Configuring
Access Manager to
use the MC/4 o
MC/8
To configure Access Manager, install the Comlines as described in
Chapter 4, Configuring Access Manager. Ensure that your computer has
been rebooted before you start configuring the Comlines. Tabl eD-4,
“Serial Ports for DigiCHANNEL MC/4 or MC/8 in Micro Channel IBM
PS/2,” on pag eD-6 lists the parameters used to define the ports of the
DigiBoard MC/4 and MC/8.
The following list describes conditions for the table columns of
Table D-4, “Serial Ports for DigiCHANNEL MC/4 or MC/8 in Micro
Channel IBM PS/2,” on page D -6:
PORT #: DigiBoard DigiCHANNEL MC/4 boards use only Ports 1
through 4.
COMline Name: For an MC/8, eight consecutive Comlines must be
reserved even if all ports are not used. The starting Comline can be from
COM1 to COM9. For an MC/4, four consecutive Comlines must be
reserved. The starting Comline can be from COM1 to COM13. If the
built-in serial port is not used, you may start with COM1.
Port Address and Shared I/O Address: Use a different IRQ number for
each DigiBoard, with the first board being IRQ 3. Use only the following
IRQs for the second board: 4 or 5.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
D-5
IRQ: The Shared I/O Status Port Mask always has the same value for the
same port, number-independent of the port address range of the board.
Status Mask: The following range of starting and ending Port Addresses
and Shared I/O Status Port Addresses may be used (each port address is
8h above the previous port on the board):
!
CAUTION
When adding Comline definitions, make sure you add them in
consecutive ascending Comline Name order (COM1, COM2, COM3,
etc.) and consecutive ascending port number (port 1, port 2, port 3,
etc.).
If your computer has DigiCHANNEL MC/4 or MC/8 boards and if you
add Comline definitions in any other order, Access Manager may lock up
your computer. For example, this may happen if you do not install port 1
as COM3 and then install port 3 as COM2. IF ANY OF THESE
CONDITIONS EXIST, YOUR COMPUTER MAY LOCK UP. The
following list may assist you in troubleshooting this problem:
■
■
Table D-4
Copy the COMLINE.DAT and COMLINE.KEY files from the
original database disk and restart Access Manager. If this does not
clear the problem, contact Verilink Field Service for assistance.
Current revisions of Access Manager have software to prevent the
user from performing an incorrect installation for every other
combination.
Serial Ports for DigiCHANNEL MC/4 or MC/8 in Micro Channel IBM PS/2
Port No.
D-6
Reboot your computer and restart Access Manager. The database
recovery process should delete the incorrect record and allow you to
log onto Access Manager.
Comline Nam
Port Addr)
IRQ
Shared I/O
Addr
Status Mask
1
COM2
DB80H
3H
DBC0H
1H
2
COM3
DB88H
3H
DBC0H
2H
3
COM4
DB90H
3H
DBC0H
4H
4
COM5
DB98H
3H
DBC0H
8H
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Installing a DigiCHANNEL MC/4 or MC/8 and Editing
Port No.
Comline Nam
Port Addr)
IRQ
Shared I/O
Addr
Status Mask
5
COM6
DBA0H
3H
DBC0H
10H
6
COM7
DBA8H
3H
DBC0H
20H
7
COM8
DBB0H
3H
DBC0H
40H
8
COM9
DBB8H
3H
DBC0H
80H
Port Address
RangeShared I/O Status Port Address
DB80H - DBBFH
DBC0H
DC00H - DC3FH
DC40H
BB80H* - BBBFH
BBC0H
BC00H - BC3FH
BC40H
AB80H - ABBFH
ABC0H
AC00H - AC3FH
AC40H
CB80H - CBBFH
CBC0H
NOTE 1. Two DigiBoard DigiCHANNEL MC/4 and MC/8 boards are presently usable with Access Manager. Refer to
the appropriate hardware manual for port addresses, IQRs, shared I/O addresses, and status masks. When two (2)
MC/8 are used, do not configure the built-in serial port in Access Manage .
NOTE 2. Page 26 of the DigiBoard manual incorrectly lists the start address as BB00H; the correct start address is
BB80H.
!
CAUTION
Do not install software drivers provided by Digiboard for the MC/4 o
MC/8. Since Access Manager has its own drivers for these boards
using the Digiboard drivers will prevent Access Manager from
working with the MC/4 or MC/8.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
D-7
Installing a DigiCHANNEL PC/4, PC/8, or PC/16 and
Editing A Comline
The DigiBoard DigiCHANNEL PC/4 and PC/8 boards are designed for
use in IBM PC, XT, and AT personal computers and AT&T6386. The
PC/16 provides up to 16 serial ports for Access Manager to configure as
comlines. Each PC/8 board provides up to eight comlines, and each PC/4
board provides up to four comlines.
Installing the DigiCHANNEL PC/4, PC/8, or PC/16 board is a three-part
procedure:
1. Configure the DigiCHANNEL board per the strapping option
shown in the following tables:
•
For a PC/16 board use Table D-7, “Serial Ports for
DigiCHANNEL PC/16 in IBM PC, XT, andAT ,” on pag eD-11.
•
For a PC/4 or PC/8 board use Table D-5, “Serial Ports for First
DigiCHANNEL PC/4, PC/8 in IBM PC, XT, and AT,” on
page D-9
•
If a second PC/4 or PC/8 board is used, see Tabl eD-6, “Serial
Ports for Second DigiCHANNEL PC/8 in IBM PC, XT, and
AT,” on pa geD-10
2. Install the board(s) in your personal computer (PC). Refer to your
computer manual for these instructions.
3. Configure Access Manager comlines to use the DigiCHANNEL
boards, using the parameters in Tables E-5, E-6, and E-7.
Note: Your Digiboard user’s manual refers to the Shared I/O Address
(TablesD-5, D-6 and D-7) as the Status Register Address. Also,
the Port Address in these tables is referred to as the I/O Port
Address.
D-8
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Installing a DigiCHANNEL PC/4, PC/8, or PC/16 and
Table D-5
Serial Ports for First DigiCHANNEL PC/4, PC/8 in IBM PC, XT, andAT
Port No.
(Note 2)
Comline Nam
(Note 3)
Port Addr
(Note 4)
IRQ
(Notes 4&5)
Shared I/O
Addr
(Notes 4&5)
Status Mask
1
COM2
100H
3H
140H
0H
2
COM3
108H
3H
140H
1H
3
COM4
110H
3H
140H
2H
4
COM5
118H
3H
140H
3H
5
COM6
120H
3H
140H
4H
6
COM7
128H
3H
140H
5H
7
COM8
130H
3H
140H
6H
8
COM9
138H
3H
140H
7H
NOTE 1. The DigiBoard DigiCHANNEL PC/4 and PC/8 were formerly called DigiCHANNEL COM/4 and COM/8
respectively. If you are installing a second DigiCHANNEL PC /8 board, see TableD-6, “ Serial Ports for Secon
DigiCHANNEL PC/8 in IBM PC, XT, and AT,” on pageD-10, for more Comline definitions. Refer to the appropriate
hardware manual for other port addresses, IRQs Shared I/O addresses, and status masks.
NOTE 2. DigiBoard DigiCHANNEL PC/4 boards only use Ports 1 through 4.
NOTE 3. If your personal computer has a physical COMport before the Digiboards are added, see the following tables
show the numbering sequence for data ports:
• Table D-5, “Serial Ports for First DigiCHANNEL PC/4, PC/8 in IBM PC, XT, andAT ,” on pageD-9
• Table D-6, “Serial Ports for Second DigiCHANNEL PC/8 in IBMPC,XT, and AT ,” on pageD-10.
In this case, the first port of the digiboard would be labeled COM 2.
If your computer has more than one physical COM port before installing the Digiboard, the number of the first
Digiboard port would rise respectively.
REMEMBER: no matter how many physical COM ports your computer has, ALWAYS number the first DigiBoard port
address at 100H
NOTE 4. The options shown are the factory default options. Use only IRQ 2, 3, 4, or 5 or your PC may not work with
Access Manage . If IRQ 2 or 4 is used, the Shared I/O Address for this board should be 141H.
NOTE 5. If you plan on using your PC’s built-in serial port as a Access Manager comline, first you must configure the
comline to match the hardware switches for these ports. Configuring them in any other way may cause your system to
lock-up.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
D-9
CAUTION
!
Table D-6
Serial Ports for Second DigiCHANNEL PC/8 in IBM PC, XT, andAT
Port No.
D-10
Do not install software drivers provided by Digiboard for the PC/4 o
PC/8. Since Access Manager has its own drivers for these boards
using the Digiboard drivers will prevent Access Manager from
working with the PC/4 or PC/8.
Comline Nam
(Note 2)
Port Addr
IRQ
(Note 3)
Shared I/O
Addr
(Note 3)
Status Mask
1
COM10
148H
5H
188H
0H
2
COM11
150H
5H
188H
1H
3
COM12
158H
5H
188H
2H
4
COM13
160H
5H
188H
3H
5
COM14
168H
5H
188H
4H
6
COM15
170H
5H
188H
5H
7
COM16
178H
5H
188H
6H
8
(See Note 2)
180H
5H
188H
7H
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Installing a DigiCHANNEL PC/4, PC/8, or PC/16 and
Port No.
Comline Nam
(Note 2)
Port Addr
Shared I/O
Addr
(Note 3)
IRQ
(Note 3)
Status Mask
NOTE 1. The DigiBoard DigiCHANNEL PC/8 was formerly called DigiCHANNEL COM/8. This table gives the
Comline definitions if you install a second DigiCHANNEL PC/8 board. For the first 8 comline definitions, se
Table D-5, “Serial Ports for First DigiCHANNEL PC/4, PC/8 in IBM PC, XT, andAT ,” on pageD-9. Refer to the
appropriate hardware manual for other port addresses, IRQs, Shared I/O addresses, and status masks.
NOTE 2. If your personal computer has a physical COMport before the Digiboards are added, see the following tables
show the numbering sequence for data ports:
Table D-5, “Serial Ports for First DigiCHANNEL PC/4, PC/8 in IBM PC, XT, andAT ,” on pageD-9
• Table D-5, “Serial Ports for First DigiCHANNEL PC/4, PC/8 in IBM PC, XT, andAT ,” on pageD-9
• Table D-6, “Serial Ports for Second DigiCHANNEL PC/8 in IBMPC,XT, and AT ,” on pageD-10.
In this case, the first port of the digiboard would be labeled COM 2.
If your computer has more than one physical COM port before installing the Digiboard, the number of the first
Digiboard port would rise respectively. REMEMBER: no matter how many physical COM ports your computer has,
ALWAYS number the first DigiBoard port address at 100H
NOTE 3. Use only IRQ 2, 3, 4, or 5 or your PC may not work with Access Manage . If IRQ 2 or 4 is used, the Shared
I/O Address for this board should be 189H.
NOTE 4. Install multiple DigiCHANNEL PC/X boards without daisy-chaining. Therefore, you should use the IRQs
shown in these tables and set both boards to Board Identification Number=0 (i.e. jumper J9, pin 2 to pin 3; an
jumper J10, pin 2 to pin 3).
!
Table D-7
CAUTION
Do not install software drivers provided by Digiboard for the PC/4 o
PC/8. Since Access Manager has its own drivers for these boards
using the Digiboard drivers will prevent Access Manager from
working with the PC/4 or PC/8.
Serial Ports for DigiCHANNEL PC/16 in IBM PC, XT, and AT
Port No.
Comline Nam
(Note 1)
Port Addr
(Note 2)
IRQ
(Notes 2 & 3)
Shared I/O
Addr
(Notes 2&3)
Status Mask
1
COM2
100H
3H
140H
0H
2
COM3
108H
3H
140H
1H
3
COM4
110H
3H
140H
2H
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
D-11
Port No.
Comline Nam
(Note 1)
Port Addr
(Note 2)
IRQ
(Notes 2 & 3)
Shared I/O
Addr
(Notes 2&3)
Status Mask
4
COM5
118H
3H
140H
3H
5
COM6
120H
3H
140H
4H
6
COM7
128H
3H
140H
5H
7
COM8
130H
3H
140H
6H
8
COM9
138H
3H
140H
7H
9
COM10
148H
3H
140H
8H
10
COM11
150H
3H
140H
9H
11
COM12
158H
3H
140H
AH
12
COM13
160H
3H
140H
BH
13
COM14
168H
3H
140H
CH
14
COM15
170H
3H
140H
DH
15
COM16
178H
3H
140H
EH
16
(See Note 1)
180H
3H
140H
FH
NOTE 1. Table D-7, “Serial Ports for DigiCHANNEL PC/16 in IBM PC, XT, and AT,” on pageD-11 assumes you
computer is equipped with a built-in serial port at COM1. The DigiBoard ports should not include Comlines that are
built into your PC and cannot be disabled; therefore, this table starts with COM2.
However, if your computer is not equipped with a built-in serial port, number the DigiBoard ports from COM1 through
COM 16.The DigiBoard’s first COM port is always given Port A ddress=100H. All of the Digiboard’s other ports are
addressed according to the tables in this appendix.
NOTE 2. The options shown are the factory default options. The Port Addresses are for Board 0 only and are not
changeable. See the Digiboard manual for Board 1. The Shared I/O Address is not changeable.
NOTE 3. Use only IRQ 2, 3, 4, or 5 or your personal computer may not work with Access Manage . Whichever IRQ is
used the Shared I/O Address for this board should be 140H.
!
D-12
CAUTION
Do not install software drivers provided by Digiboard for the PC/16 o
PC/16. Since Access Manager has its own drivers for these boards,
using the Digiboard drivers will prevent Access Manager from
working with the PC/16 or PC/16.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Appendix
E
Archive File Formats
Event Log
The format of the User Login Event archive file uses the LOTUS 1-2-3
import format, in which each item is separated by a comma. From left to
right, the data items on each line of the archive file are:
1. Event timestamp YEAR 2
2. Event timestamp MONTH 3
3. Event timestamp DAY 4
4. Event timestamp HOUR 5
5. Event timestamp MINUTE 6
6. Event timestamp SECOND 7
7. Event ID number
8. Event details (character format)
Event Log ID
Number Codes
Access Manager keeps a record of all events occurring on the system in a
database. When the database is archived, the title of these events are
converted to a single integer. The following Event Log ID Number Codes
table matches these integers to their respective events.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
E-1
Table E-1
Event Log ID Number Codes
Event ID
E-2
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Descripti
0
System start-up
1
System shut-down
2
User login
3
User logout
4
Polling node
5
End polling node
6
Node connection failed
7
Rescheduled polling
8
Get node ID failed
9
Get node status failure
10
Polling element
11
End polling element
12
Get ES data failure
13
Get UAS data failure
14
Get BES data failure
15
Get SES data failure
16
Get AIS data failure
17
Get LOS data failure
18
Get YEL data failure
20
Polling terminated by user
22
Get LOF data failure
23
Get ES-L data failure
24
Get SEFS data failure
25
Get OOFS data failure
26
Get Network OOFS failure
27
Get LOSS failure
Alarm Archive Record Layout Log
Event ID
Descripti
28
Get AISS failure
29
Get BERS failure
30
Get Remote AISS failure
31
Get LOFS failure
32
Get DTE ES failure
33
Get DTE ES-L failure
34
Get DTE LC-V failure
35
Get DTE OOF failure
36
Get DTE Low Density Seconds failure
37
Get DTE BERS failure
Alarm Archive Record Layout Log
Access Manager stores the alarm records by archiving the alarm database.
After being archived, the fields (which are changed into integers) in the
alarm archive record are separated by commas. The record layout of the
alarm archive record is as shown in the following tables:
■
Table E-2, “Alarm Archive Record Layout for ESF CSUs,” on
page E-4 and Table E -3, “Alarm Archive Record Layout for AS2000
and ConnecT1 Plus,” on pag eE-5
■
Table E-4, “551VST List 2 Alarm Bit Definition,” on page E -6
■
Table E-5, “NC/E Alarm Bit Definition,” on page E -7
■
Table E-6, “NC/E Alarm Bit Definition 2,” on page E -7
■
Table E-7, “NC/E Alarm Bit Definition 3,” on page E -8
■
Table E-8, “SIM Alarm Bit Definition,” on page E -8.
■
■
Table E-9, “NC/E Alarm Bit Definition 2,” on page E -9 This table
lists the SIM alarm bits for the 4016 when the plug-in number is
zero.
Table E-10, “NMC List 2 Alarm Bit Definition 1,” on page E -9
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
E-3
■
Table E-11, “NMC List 2 Alarm Bit Definition 2,” on page E -10.
This table lists the NMC List 2 alarm bits for the 4016 L1 or L2
when the plug-in number is zero.
Note: If the Node type (Field #11) of the reporting node is Access
System2000 and the far-end circuit element is 551VST type, then
the only far-end alarm Status Codes (Fields # 13-27) reported
are: 301, 302, 311, 312, 313, 314, 409, and 410..
Table E-2
Alarm Archive Record Layout for ESF CSU
Field No.
Description
1
Year, last two digits
2
Month
3
Day
4
Hour
5
Minutes
6
Seconds
7
Circuit element name (i.e., node name [shelf, slot])
8
Node ID number
9
Shelf number, less than or equal to 128 if the alarms reported are set conditions. Otherwise, the
alarms reported are clear conditions.
10
Plug-in number 9 (i.e., slot number)
11
Node (or Circuit Element) type:
26 = 551VST List 2
33 = NC/E
32 = SIM
24 = NMC List 2
E-4
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Alarm Archive Record Layout Log
Field No.
12
Description
Alarm bit 0. See the alarm bit description for your specific type of equipment in the following
tables:
Table E-4, “551VST List 2 Alarm Bit Definition,” on p ageE-6
Table E-5, “NC/E Alarm Bit Definition,” on pa geE-7
Table E-6, “NC/E Alarm Bit Definition 2,” on pageE-7
Table E-7, “NC/E Alarm Bit Definition 3,” on pageE-8
Table E-8, “SIM Alarm Bit Definition,” on pageE-8
Table E-9, “NC/E Alarm Bit Definition 2,” on pageE-9
Table E-10, “NMC List 2 Alarm Bit Definition 1,” on pageE-9
13 - 27
Alarm bits 1 through 15, or Status Codes
28
Node Name
29 - 33
Table E-3
Not used
Alarm Archive Record Layout for AS2000 and ConnecT1 Plus
Field No.
Description
1
Year, last two digits
2
Month
3
Day
4
Hour
5
Minutes
6
Seconds
7
Circuit element name (i.e., node name [shelf, slot])
8
Node ID number
9
Shelf number
10
Plug-in number 9 (i.e., slot number)
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
E-5
Field No.
11
Description
Node (or Circuit Element) type:
48 = NCC
49 =TAC
56 = CCC
12
Alarm numbers.
13
Node Name
14- 33
Table E-4
Not used
551VST List 2 Alarm Bit Definition
Alarm Bit
0
Far BER exceeded Alarm
1
Far SPAN LOS Alarm
2
Far DTE Low Density Alarm
3
Far LLB or PLB Looped Alarm
4
Far ELB or RLB Looped Alarm
5-6
Not used
7
Far CSU Absent Alarm
8
Near BER Exceeded Alarm
9
Near SPAN LOS Alarm
10
Near DTE Low Density Alarm
11
Near LLB or PLB Looped Alarm
12
Near ELB or RLB Looped Alarm
13 - 15
E-6
Description
Not used
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Alarm Archive Record Layout Log
Table E-5
NC/E Alarm Bit Definitio
Alarm Bit
Description
0
Far BER exceeded Alarm
1
Far SPAN LOS Alarm
2
Far DTE Low Density Alarm
3
Far LLB or PLB Looped Alarm
4
Far ELB or RLB Looped Alarm
5-6
Not used
7
Far CSU Absent Alarm
8
Near BER Exceeded Alarm
9
Near SPAN LOS Alarm
10
Near DTE Low Density Alarm
11
Near LLB or PLB Looped Alarm
12
Near ELB or RLB Looped Alarm
13 - 15
Table E-6
Near CSU Absent Alarm
NC/E Alarm Bit Definition
Alarm Bit
0-8
9
10 -14
15
Description
Not used
CSU Fuse Blown
Not used
SIM Absent Alarm
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
E-7
Table E-7
NC/E Alarm Bit Definition
Alarm Bit
0-8
Not used
9
NC/E Powered Up
10 -15
Table E-8
Description
Not used
SIM Alarm Bit Definition
Alarm Bit
0
Far BER exceeded Alarm
1
Far SPAN LOS Alarm
2
Far DTE Low Density Alarm
3
Far LLB or PLB Looped Alarm
4
Far ELB or RLB Looped Alarm
5-6
Not used
7
Far CSU Absent Alarm
8
Near BER Exceeded Alarm
9
Near SPAN LOS Alarm
10
Near DTE Low Density Alarm
11
Near LLB or PLB Looped Alarm
12
Near ELB or RLB Looped Alarm
13 - 14
15
E-8
Description
Not used
Near CSU Absent Alarm
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Alarm Archive Record Layout Log
Table E-9
NC/E Alarm Bit Definition
Alarm Bit
0-8
9
10 - 11
12
13 -15
Description
Not used
CSU Fuse Blown
Not used
SIM Absent Alarm
Not used
Table E-10 NMC List 2 Alarm Bit Definition 1
Alarm Bit
Description
0
Far BER exceeded Alarm
1
Far SPAN LOS Alarm
2
Far DTE Low Density Alarm
3
Far LLB or PLB Looped Alarm
4
Far ELB or RLB Looped Alarm
5-6
Not used
7
Far CSU Absent Alarm
8
Near BER Exceeded Alarm
9
Near SPAN LOS Alarm
10
Near DTE Low Density Alarm
11
Near LLB or PLB Looped Alarm
12
Near ELB or RLB Looped Alarm
13 - 14
15
Not used
Near CSU Absent Alarm
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
E-9
Table E-11 NMC List 2 Alarm Bit Definition 2
Alarm Bit
0-8
Description
Not used
9
Power Supply A Failure
10
Power Supply B Failure
11
Power Supply C Failure
12
Power Supply D Failure
13
NMC L2 Powered Up
14 -15
Not used
Performance Data Log (Performance Database)
The Performance Log Database stores all of the information about how
the DS1 (T1) line is performing. The database archive file uses the
LOTUS 1-2-3 import format; each item is separated by a comma. Each
line in the archive file represents one interval for one circuit element
(Table E-12, “Database Archive Files Formats,” on pag eE-10). From left
to right, the data items on each line are:
Table E-12 Database Archive Files Formats
Item
User data
EQPT data
Additional data
1
Interval timestamp YEAR
Interval timestamp YEAR
Interval timestamp YEAR
2
Interval timestamp MONTH
Interval timestamp MONTH
Interval timestamp MONTH
3
Interval timestamp DA
Interval timestamp DAY
Interval timestamp DAY
4
Interval timestamp HOUR
Interval timestamp HOUR
Interval timestamp HOUR
5
Interval timestamp MINUTE
Interval timestamp MINUTE
Interval timestamp MINUTE
6
Circuit Element Name
Circuit Element Name
Circuit Element Name
7
Node ID number
Node ID number
Node ID numbe
8
Circuit Element Shelf Numbe
Circuit Element Shelf Number
Circuit Element Shelf Number
E-10
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Performance Data Log (Performance Database)
Item
User data
EQPT data
Additional data
9
Circuit Element Slot
Number
Circuit Element Slot Number
Circuit Element Slot Number
10
Circuit Element Side
Circuit Element Side
Circuit Element Side (numeric
11
Errored Seconds
Errored Seconds
Out of Frame Seconds
12
Unavailable Seconds
Unavailable Seconds
Loss of Signal Seconds
13
Bursty Errored Seconds
Errored Seconds-Line
AIS seconds
14
Severely Errored Seconds
Out of Frame Seconds
BER Seconds
15
Loss of Frame Count
DTE Low Density Seconds
Remote AIS
16
Errored Seconds-Line
BER Alarm Seconds
Loss of Frame Seconds
17
Severely Errored Framing Seconds
Reserved
Reserved
18
AS2000
Reserved
Reserved
551VST type: Out of Frame Seconds
19
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
20
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
If you change the node ID number (item 7) or node name (item 6) by
Access Manager’s configuration commands, the archived data will also
change as of that date and time. For this reason, exercise care when trying
to correlate data over extended intervals. If archive data is used as input
for reports, unexpected changes in node definitions could produce
undesired results. For items 11 through 20, the following codes apply:
■
0 - 900 Able to access, not available
■
1 - Attempt to access, unable to get circuit/element data
■
2 - Not available by design
■
3 - Data collection disabled
For 551VST type circuit elements, Item 18 of the User Performance Data
file becomes Out of Frame Seconds, only when the EQPT and Additional
Performance data files do not exist. The User, EQPT, and Additional data
files all exist for AS2000 circuit elements.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
E-11
Note: When the Performance Database is archived, the Circuit Element
Name is labelled with the node name [shelf, slot].
Performance Data
Log Records
This section describes the interpretation of records in the Performance
Data Log. This interpretation is the same whether you are examining an
archived log that has been saved to a file or a current log in the Circuit
Elements Detail Screen (called up through the Database Access Menu).
Figure E -1, “Circuit Element Detail Menu (no data available),” on
page E-12 shows a typical Circuit Elements Detail Screen. The following
lines store the different types of information. Lines 4 through 11 present
Performance Data Log records, one record per line (see Tab leE-12,
“Database Archive Files Formats,” on page E -10). Each column presents
different information, see below.
■
Column 1 through 2 are presented as the Date and Time
■
Column 3 is the circuit element’s name.
■
Column 4 through 11 are the performance data registers for each 15minute interval in the reporting time range.
Dots (...) in the performance data register fields indicate that no data is
available for that time interval. (Fig u reE-1, “Circuit Element Detail
Menu (no data available),” on page E -12).
Figure E-1
E-12
Circuit Element Detail Menu (no data available)
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Performance Data Log (Performance Database)
N/A (Not Applicable) in the performance data register fields indicates
that the circuit element does not support that type of data collection.
“dis” indicates that the collection of performance data in the slot was
disabled for the period displayed. (FigureE- 2, “Circuit Element Detail
Menu (slot disabled),” on pag eE-13)
Figure E-2
Circuit Element Detail Menu (slot disabled)
Note:
■
■
All 15-minute intervals are not displayed or recorded. The
explanation for unrecorded is:
If a performance data type (User, Additional, or EQPT) is disabled,
“dis” records are created to mark the beginning and end of the
disabled period. During the disabled period, records are created
every 12 hours on the polling hour. No other “dis” records are
created.
If a performance data type is all zeros for all its registers, “0
records” are created to mark the beginning and end of the all-zeros
period. During the period when all registers remain all zeros,
records are created every 12 hours, on the polling hour. No other “0
records” are created.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
E-13
■
E-14
If a record type contains non-zero data or has no data (i.e., the data
is missing), “... records” are created. In either case, a data record for
every 15-minute interval is created. The data could be missing for a
number of reasons (see Fig u reE-1, “Circuit Element Detail Menu
(no data available),” on page E-12):
•
Connection to the node could not be made.
•
Connection to the node was made, but access to the circuit
element could not be made.
•
The registers in the circuit element were reset, either manually
or by powering down the CSU within in the last 12 hours.
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Index
Numerics
4016 List1 and 2 CSUs
Configuration Menus,
5-57
4016 List1 CSU configuration,
5-44
4016 List2 CSU configuration,
5-44
551V type CSU configuration, 5-68
551V type CSU configuration, 5-70
551V type CSU configuration
12%+80Z density
enforcement, 5-67
AIS keep-alive, 5-67
AIS loopback, 5-67
alarm latch, 5-68
EQP side ESF framing, 5-70
far-end polling, 5-66
idle code flags, 5-70
PRM (performance report
messages), 5-68
regenerate CRC toward EQP,
5-70
regenerate CRC toward span,
5-68
remote configuration-enable,
5-64
repeater loopback time-out,
5-65
Span (NET) side ESF framing,
5-69
transparent mode, 5-67
yellow alarm transcode toward
EQP, 5-70
yellow alarm transcode toward
NET, 5-69
A, B
Access arrangement, 4-19, 5-20
direct-connect, 4-19
remote dial-up, 4-19
Access level, 1-11
Access protection, 1-11
Access Manager, 4-1
functions, 1-1
overview, 1-1
updating, 2-8
user interface connections,
1-10
Access Manager 2000
Main menu tree, 1-13
Access Manager Connections, 4-20
Accumaster, 2-15
direct-connect, 1-10
remote dial-in answer port,
1-10
remote dial-up port, 1-10
routing port, 1-10
serial device, 1-10
Access Manager Requirements
pcANYWHERE, 2-2
Access System 2000
single-node configuration,
1-6, 1-8
Access System2000, 5-102
query and alarm paths, 5-15
Accessing a single-line CSU, 8-3
Accumaster, 4-20
before starting, 2-15
setup, 4-11, 4-17, 4-20
setup alarm printer, 2-15
setup time zone, 2-14
status code format, C-2
Activate framed ALL-ONEs to
network, 8-47
activate T1.403 LLB or PLB, 8-48
Active alarm, 1-15
Additional
performance data, 7-3
affect of resetting registers, 8-39
Alarm
record layout, C-1
thresholds, 7-6
Alarm conditions
defining, 5-78 to 5-81
turning on the alarm relay,
5-80
Alarm conditions, setting
Alarm Clear Delay time, 5-81
alarm delay time, 5-81
alarm thresholds, 5-79 to 5-80
interval counts, 5-79 to 5-80
LOF Clear Delay time, 5-81
NET BER threshold, 5-79
Alarm Log
archive record, E-3
Alarm log, 6-2, 6-3
Alarms
accumulation, 5-19, 5-21
channel protocol, 4-10
double reporting of, 5-66, 5-81
monitoring by Accumaster,
4-20
monitoring by other hosts,
5-18
monitoring by Accumaster,
2-15
plain English format, C-1
print inactive, 6-10
report record formats, C-1
selecting by time/date for
deactivation, 6-5
status operations, 6-1
tagging for deactivation, 6-4
terse messages, C-1
viewing current, 8-25
Archive
alarm log records, 6-8
file formats, E-1
performance database records,
7-15
archive, 7-15
Automatic data port configuration,
4-20
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Index-1
Index
Bar chart of performance data, 7-6
C
changing, 4-21
Circuit, 1-9
definition, 5-102
listing all definitions, 5-107
viewing a definition, 5-107
Circuit element, 5-47, 5-57
Circuit element, 1-8
definition, 5-44
mixed 4016 List1 and 2 CSUs,
5-57
multiline plug-ins, 1-9
single-line, 1-8
ComDesign Mux., 4-19
adding node, 5-40
port, 1-10
Comline
adding, 4-17
built-in, D-12
COM1 port assignment, 4-17
comlines, 4-16
Configuration
DIU 2140, 5-98
configuration, 5-98
configuration error messages,
5-102
Configuration operations, 1-16,
4-16
communication ports, 4-16
Configuration, SMDS CSU
defining alarm conditions,
5-78 to 5-81
Configuring network circuit
elements, 5-44
ConnecT1 Plus
multiline node configuration,
1-6
Connections
direct-connect access
arrangement, 4-19
remote dial-up port access
arrangement, 4-19
routing port access
arrangement, 4-19
serial device, 4-20
Connections to nodes, 4-21
copy and delete records, 7-18
CSU (NCC or TAC) shelf and plug
Index-2
numbers, 5-93, 5-99
CSU alarms
reporting conditions/
requirements, 5-19
CSU loopbacks, 8-47, 8-48
activate LLB, 8-46
activate PLB, 8-47
activate RLB, 8-46
deactivate PLB or LLB, 8-47
deactivate PLB, 8-47
description, 8-40
equipment (ELB), 8-43
repeater (RLB), 8-42
D
Daisy chain, 5-14
Daisy chained, 4-20
nodes, 1-5
Data analysis
central office filters, 7-5
customer premise filters, 7-5
filter selection logic, 7-7
user-defined threshold
percentages, 7-6
user-defined threshold
seconds, 7-6
Data analysis, 7-5
Data log, E-10
Database
alarms, 6-3
Database access operations, 1-20
density enforcement, 5-86
DigiBoard
PC - PS/2 serial port settings,
D-1
DigiCHANNEL
hardware installation, D-4
installing - PS/2, D-3
PC-XT/AT installation, D-8
preparation, D-3
PS/2 configuration, D-4
displaying all error event data, 7-5
DIU 2130
data scramble/descramble,
5-96
DIU 2130 (DIU 1130)
status, 8-18
DIU 2130 (DIU 1130), 8-49
DIU 2130 options, 5-93
64 kbps transmission mode,
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
5-96
DS1 channel assignment, 5-93
enable, 5-93, 5-99
EQP clock, 5-96
EQP interface type, 5-95
EQP name, 5-95
EQP serial number, 5-95
EQP speed, 5-96
handshaking control, 5-97
DIU 2140, 5-98
DIU 2140 options, 5-99
baud rate, 5-101
DS1 channel assignment, 5-99
synchronous data interface,
5-101
transmission mode, 5-99
DIU 2140, 8-19
DIU data bus assignment, 5-90
DIU loopbacks, 8-49
descriptions, 8-48
DIU2140, 8-49
DIU testing
sending a test signal, 8-59
Download
APA, 1-15
personality, 1-15
Drop-and-insert, 5-90
DTR Lead, with, B-1
DTR lead, without, B-1
E
enable, 5-90
enable EQP OOF transparency,
5-85
enable remote configuration, 5-77
enable testing options, 5-89
EQP
performance data, 7-3
EQP framing, 5-83
EQP side B8ZS encode/decode,
5-70, 5-83
Equipment type
551VST ML List1, 5-3
Event Log, 4-28
Event log, E-1
F, G
Far-end circuit element
configuration, 5-47
Index
far-end configuration, 5-47
Field entries, 3-18
Files
README.DOC, 2-5
Framed
test signals, 8-55
framed, 5-90
I, J,
Inband codes
enable, 5-90
inband loop test, 5-90
installed and operational, 5-76,
5-93, 5-99
Keep-alive
network, 5-86
main, 3-17
performance database
choose archive option,
7-15
select alarm to deactivate, 6-3
select loopback activity, 8-44
select minimum threshold(s),
7-6
specify element to receive
loopback, 8-44,
8-50
Modem
Hayes protocol, 4-21
Modem Configuration, B-1
Hayes Smartmodem 2400,
B-1
initialization, B-2
OSI Protocol, B-1
TABS protocol, B-5
L
line or payload loopback, 1-3
Loopback
inband, 5-67
loopback enable, 5-88
Loopbacks
activating the alarm relay,
5-80
CSU options, 8-46
deactivate T1.403 LLB or
PLB, 8-48
DIU enable, 5-96
timing, 8-43, 8-50, 8-52
see also Alarm conditions
loss of signal, 1-3
M
Menus
add comline definition, 4-17
choose filter for performance
data, 7-4
choose filter select logic, 7-7
circuit element detail, 7-11
description and organization,
1-11
inactive alarm record
choose archive option,
6-8
installation, Access Manager,
4-3
N
NCC, 5-85
NCC and TAC configuration, 5-77
NCC, 5-88
NCC and TAC configuration, 5-76,
5-77, 5-81, 5-82, 5-83,
5-84, 5-85, 5-86, 5-87,
5-88, 5-89, 5-90
DIU timing, 5-91
enable PRM, 5-82
EQP distance (equalization),
5-83
network, 5-85
network B8ZS, 5-87
regenerate CRC toward
network, 5-87
Network, 1-3
definition and description, 1-3
Network configuration, 1-2
network framing, 5-86
network keep-alive, 5-86
network line coding, 5-87
NMC/L1 CSU
configuration, 5-44
NMC/L2 CSU
configuration, 5-44
Node
access failure, 5-39
comments, 5-36
dual-line, 1-6
far-end, 1-5, 1-17
multiline, 1-6
near-end, 1-5
single-line, 1-5
O
Online access operations, 1-17
Options
archive, 2-3
P, Q, R
Performance alerts, see Alarm
conditions, 5-78
Performance Data analysis, 7-14,
7-18
Performance Database, 7-3, 7-15
Performance Data analysis
change Y-axis range, 7-15
respecify filter, 7-14
respecify date/time range,
7-14
Performance data analysis filters
ACPCP, 7-6
bar chart, 7-6
CSCPCP, 7-5
DDS, 7-5
ENDS, 7-5
FCOCO, 7-6
HCDS, 7-5
LCPCP, 7-5
MCPCP, 7-5
OCOCO, 7-5
P-User, 7-6
S-User, 7-6
TCOCO, 7-5
Performance data records analysis,
7-9
Performance Database, 8-39
Performance database, 7-1
Performance Log, 7-3, 8-39
record formats, E-12
poll far-end status, 5-81
port, 1-10
Ports
built-in, D-12
network management, 4-18
print selected data, 7-14
Printer
serial, 4-20
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
Index-3
Index
type, 4-6
Query and alarm paths
Access System2000, 5-15
RAI, 5-97
real-time system clock, 4-2
regenerate CRC toward EQP, 5-83
regenerate CRC toward network,
5-87
Register type, 5-76
repeater loopback timeout, 5-81,
5-82, 5-83, 5-84
respecify exception threshold, 7-14
Retrieve
perf. data, 5-63
perf. data, 5-76, 7-10
retrieve far-end performance data,
5-63
retrieve performance data, 5-76
S
Self Test
AS2000 CSU, 5-88
send inband loop-down code, 8-47
send inband loop-up code, 8-47
Setting the system date and time,
4-2
Shelf type
AS2000 node, 5-15
signal to EQP on network LOS,
5-88
signal to EQP on network OOF,
5-88
signal to network on EQP errors,
5-84, 5-87
signal to network on EQP OOF,
5-84
Single-line CSUs
551VST List1/, 1-8
551VST List1/A, 1-8
551VST List2, 1-8
span side B8ZS encode/decode,
5-68
Statistical multiplexer, 1-10
Statistical multiplexer, 4-19
adding node, 5-40
statistical routing, 4-19
status, 8-19
Status and alarm conditions, 1-3
Status and alarm conditions
equipment loopback, 1-3
Index-4
low density, 1-3
repeater loopback, 1-3
Status codes
Accumaster, C-2
terse alarm message layout,
C-2
T
Tagging files, 6-4
Test signals, 5-90
enable, 8-55
Thumbwheel
AS2000 node, 5-34
U, V, W
Unrestricted ZEROs, 5-86, 5-95
User
performance data, 7-3
User definition
access levels, 4-23
name, 4-23
password, 4-23
User definitions
access level, 1-11
default, 4-26
User password access levels, 4-23
Utilities Operations, 1-14
utilities operations, 4-1
X, Y, Z
yellow alarm transcode toward
EQP, 5-84
yellow alarm transcode toward
network, 5-87
Access Manager 2000 User Manual
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