Design of an ACIM
Vector Control Drive
using the 56F8013
Device
Designer Reference Manual
56800E
16-bit Digital Signal Controllers
DRM075
Rev 1
11/2005
freescale.com
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the
56F8013 Device
Designer Reference Manual
To provide the most up-to-date information, the revision of our documents on the World Wide Web will be
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The following revision history table summarizes changes contained in this document. For your
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Revision History
Date
Revision
Level
10/2005
0
Initial release
11/2005
1
Corrected term “Intelligent Power Module” to “Integrated Power Module”
Description
Page
Number(s)
N/A
xi, 3-3
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Chapter 1
Introduction
1.1
Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Chapter 2
Benefits and Features of the 56F8013 Controller
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
56F8013 Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
56800E Core Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Memory Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
56F8013 Peripheral Circuit Reatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AWARD-WINNING DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1
2-1
2-2
2-2
2-2
Chapter 3
Motor Drive System
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.3.1
3.3.2
3.4
Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Features of a Motor Drive System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Introduction to System Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specification and Performance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1
3-1
3-2
3-2
3-5
3-6
Chapter 4
ACIM Theory
4.1
4.2
4.3
AC Induction Motor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Induction Motor Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Digital Control of an AC Induction Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Chapter 5
Design Concept of an ACIM Vector Control Drive
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
Vector Control of AC Induction Machine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Relationship between Rotor Flux Orientation and Stator Flux Orientation Induction
Motor Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Block diagram of Stator Flux Oriented (SFO) Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Forward and Inverse Clarke Transformation (a, b, c to áa , b and backwards) . . . . . .
5-1
5-3
5-3
5-4
Table of Contents, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
i
5.5
5.6
5.7
5.8
5.8.1
5.8.2
5.8.3
5.8.4
5.8.5
Forward and Inverse Park Transformation (a, b to d-q and backwards) . . . . . . . . . . .
Rotor Speed Estimation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Speed Regulator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PFC Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inductor selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Output Capacitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Main Switch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Output Diode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inductor Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-5
5-5
5-6
5-7
5-7
5-8
5-8
5-8
5-9
Chapter 6
Hardware Implementation
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.4.1
6.4.2
6.5
56F8013 Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
High-Voltage Power Stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sensor Stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PFC Hardware Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Drive Circuit Hardware Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sample Circuit Hardware Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Detailed Motherboard Configurations for ACIM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-1
6-3
6-4
6-6
6-7
6-7
6-8
Chapter 7
Software Design
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
7.8
Data Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stator Flux Estimation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electromagnetic Torque . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rotor Speed Estimation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stator Flux Determination. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation (SVPWM) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fault Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PFC Software Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-1
7-2
7-3
7-3
7-3
7-4
7-4
7-4
Chapter 8
JTAG Simulation and SCI Communication
8.1
8.2
JTAG Simulation Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
SCI Communication Function. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
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Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Chapter 9
Operation
9.1
9.2
9.3
9.4
Switch-on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
During Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Switch-off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-1
9-1
9-1
9-1
Table of Contents, Rev. 1
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Preliminary
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Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
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Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
LIST OF FIGURES
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
4-1
4-2
4-3
5-1
5-2
5-3
5-4
5-5
5-6
6-1
6-2
6-3
6-4
6-5
6-6
6-7
6-8
6-9
6-10
6-11
7-1
7-2
7-3
7-4
7-5
8-1
8-2
8-3
8-4
8-5
Washing Machine Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Washing Cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IRAMS10UP60A Circuit Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Induction Motor Speed-Torque Characteristic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware System Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pulse Width Modulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Block Diagram of the Stator Flux Oriented (SFO) System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stator Reference Voltage ref. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clark Transformation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Park Tranformation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Speed Regulator Channel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PFC Configuration Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Demonstration System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hierarchy Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Motor Control System Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DCBus Sampling Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bus Link Current Sample Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Methods to Detect Phase Currents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Protection Circuit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Main PFC Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PFC Drive Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PFC Sampling Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ACIM Jumper Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stator Reference Voltage ref. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Improved Stator Flux Estimation Channel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Simple PFC Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Discrete Voltage Loop Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Communication Board’s Frame Figure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connections for JTAG. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CodeWarrior Development Tool Interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCI Communication Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
4-1
4-3
4-4
5-2
5-2
5-4
5-5
5-6
5-7
6-1
6-2
6-3
6-4
6-5
6-5
6-6
6-7
6-7
6-8
6-8
7-1
7-2
7-3
7-5
7-5
8-1
8-2
8-2
8-3
8-4
List of Figures, Rev. 1
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Preliminary
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Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
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Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
LIST OF TABLES
5-1
6-1
Nameplate Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6
Configuration of the 56F8013’s Resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9
List of Tables, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
vii
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
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Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
About This Document
This manual describes the use of a 56F8013 device in an ACIM Vector Control Drive application.
Audience
This manual targets design engineers interested in developing an ACIM Vector Control Drive
application.
Organization
This User’s Manual consists of the following sections:
•
Chapter 1, Introduction, explains how an AC Induction Motor and a 56F8013 device facilitate a
vector control drive design.
•
Chapter 2, Benefits and Features of the 56F8013 Controller, highlights the advantages in
using a 56F8013 controller.
•
Chapter 3, Motor Drive System, details the features and design of a motor drive system.
•
Chapter 4, ACIM Theory, describes software, control and configuration of an AC Induction Motor.
•
Chapter 5, Design Concept of an ACIM Vector Control Drive, details the design concept of an
AC Induction Motor vector control drive.
•
Chapter 6, Hardware Implementation, describes how to set up the hardware needed for a
vector control drive application.
•
Chapter 7, Software Design, explains the software system design.
•
Chapter 8, JTAG Simulation and SCI Communication, describes the application’s debugging
and communications functions.
•
Chapter 9, Operation, explains how to use the application.
•
Appendix A, Schematics, contains schematics for the ACIM vector control drive application.
•
Appendix B, ACIM Bill of Materials, lists all parts used in the application.
Preface, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
ix
Conventions
This document uses the following notational conventions:
Typeface, Symbol
or Term
Meaning
Examples
Courier
Monospaced Type
Code examples
//Process command for line flash
Italic
Directory names,
project names,
calls,
functions,
statements,
procedures,
routines,
arguments,
file names,
applications,
variables,
directives,
code snippets
in text
...and contains these core directories:
applications contains applications software...
Bold
Reference sources, paths,
emphasis
...refer to the Targeting DSP56F83xx Platform
manual....
...see: C:\Program Files\Freescale\help\tutorials
Blue Text
Linkable on-line
...refer to Chapter 7, License....
Number
Any number is considered a
positive value, unless preceded by a minus symbol to
signify a negative value
3V
-10
DES-1
ALL CAPITAL
LETTERS
# defines/
defined constants
# define INCLUDE_STACK_CHECK
Brackets [...]
Function keys
...by pressing function key [F7]
Quotation
marks, “...”
Returned messages
...the message, “Test Passed” is displayed....
...CodeWarrior project, 3des.mcp is...
...the pConfig argument....
...defined in the C header file, aec.h....
...if unsuccessful for any reason, it will return “NULL”...
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
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Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Definitions, Acronyms, and Abbreviations
The following list defines the acronyms and abbreviations used in this document. As this template
develops, this list will be generated from the document. As we develop more group resources, these
acronyms will be easily defined from a common acronym dictionary. Please note that while the
acronyms are in solid caps, terms in the definition should be initial capped ONLY IF they are
trademarked names or proper nouns.
ACIM
Alternating Current Induction Motor
ADC
Analog-to-Digital Conversion
COP
Computer Operating Properly
DCM
Discontinuous Current Mode
EMF
Electro-Magnetic Force
EVM
Evaluation Module
GPIO
General Purpose Input/Output
HMI
Human Machine Interface
I2C
Inter-Integrated Circuit
or I2C
IC
Integrated Circuit
IM
Induction Motor
IPM
Integrated Power Module
ISR
Interrupt Service Routine
LPF
Low-Pass Filter
PFC
Power Factor Correction
PI
Proportional-Integral
PLL
Phase Locked Loop
PWM
Pulse Width Modulation or Modulator
RMS
Root Mean Square
SCI
Serial Communication Interface
SFOC
Stator-Flux-Oriented Control
SPI
Serial Peripheral Interface
SV
Space Vector
SVPWM
Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation
Preface, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
xi
References
The following sources were used to produce this book; we recommend that you have a copy of these
references:
1. DSP56800E Reference Manual, DSP56800ERM, Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
2. 56F8000 Peripheral User Manual, MC56F8000RM, Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
3. 56F8013 Data Sheet, MC56F8013, Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
4. Inside Code Warrior
5. X.Xu, R.De Donker, and D.W.Novonty, “A Stator Flux Oriented Induction Machine Drive”,
in PESC 1988 Conf.Rec. pp.870-876.
6. C.J.Francis,H.Z.de la Parra, and K.W.E.Cheng, “Practical Implementation of a Stator Flux
Oriented Control Scheme for an Induction Machine,” in Power Electronics and
Variable-speed Drives, October 1994, pp.54-59
7. J.O.Pinto,B.K.Bose, and L.E.B.da Silva, “A Stator-Flux-Oriented Vector-Controlled
Induction Motor Drive with Space-Vector PWM and Flux-Vector Synthesis by Neural
Networks,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Appli.,vol.37, no.5,pp.1308-1318. Sep. 2001.
8. M.H.Shin, D.S.Hyun, and S.B.Cho, “Maximum Torque Control of Stator-Flux-Oriented
Induction Machine Drive in the Field-Weakening Region,” IEEE Trans Ind. Appli.
vol.38,no.1,pp.117-122,Jan.2002.
9. Y.Ruan, X.H.Zhang, J.Xu and etc. “Stator Flux Oriented Control of Induction Motors,” Tans.
Of China Electro.Society, vol.18, no.2, pp.1-4, Apr.2003.
10. Yonghong Xue, Xingyi Xu, and T.G.Habelter, “A Stator Flux-Oriented Voltage Source
Variable-Speed Drive Based on DC Link Measurement,” IEEE Tran. Ind.Appl. vol.27, no.5,
pp.962-969, Sep.1991.
11. Jie Chen,Yongdong Li, and Wei Dong, “A Novel Stator-Flux-Oriented Speed Sensorless
Induction Motor Control System using Flux Tracking Strategy,” in Inter.Conf. On Power
Elec. And Drive System, PEDS’99, Hong Kong, pp.609-614.
12. Ju-Suk.Lee, T.Takeshita, and N.Matsui, “Stator-Flux-Oriented Sensorless Induction Motor
Drive for Optimum Low-Speed Performance,” IEEE Tran. Ind. Appli.
vol.33,no.5,pp.1170-1176, Sep.1997.
13. L.Ben-Brahim and A.Kawamura, “A Fully Digitized Field-Oriented Controlled Induction
Motor Drive using Only Current Sensors,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electro.,vol.39,pp.241-249,
June 1992.
14. Jun Hu, and Bin Wu, “New Integration Algorithms for Estimating Motor Flux over a Wide
Speed Range,” IEEE Trans. on Power Electronics, vol.13, no.5, pp.969-977, Sep.1998.
15. N.R.N.Idris, and A.H.M Yatim, “An Improved Stator Flux Estimation in Steady-State
Operation for Direct Torque Control of Induction Machines,” IEEE Trans. Ind.Appl., vol.38,
no.1, pp.110-116, Jan.2002.
16. 3-Phase AC Induction Motor Vector Control using a 56F80x, 56F8100 or 56F8300 Device
Design of Motor Control Application, Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., 2004
17. 3-Phase AC Motor Control with VHz Speed Close Loop using the 56F80x, Freescale
Semiconductor, Inc., 2001
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
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Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Introduction
Chapter 1
Introduction
1.1 Introduction
This drive application allows vector control of an AC Induction Motor (ACIM) running in a closed-speed
loop without a speed/position sensor coupled to the shaft. The application serves as an example of AC
induction vector control drive design using a Freescale 56F8013 with Processor ExpertTM (PE) software
support.
AC induction motors, which contain a cage, are very popular in variable-speed drives. They are simple,
rugged, inexpensive, and available at all power ratings. Progress in the field of power electronics and
microelectronics enables the application of induction motors for high-performance drives, where
traditionally only DC motors were applied. Thanks to sophisticated control methods, AC induction drives
offer the same control capabilities as high-performance four-quadrant DC drives.
ACIM is an excellent choice for appliance and industrial applications. This design will employ sensorless
Field-Oriented Control (FOC) to control an ACIM using the 56F8013 device, which can accommodate
the sensorless FOC algorithm. A motor control system is flexible enough to implement a washing
machine protocol while it drives a variable load. The system illustrates the features of the 56F8013 in
motor control. The flexible Human Machine Interface (HMI) allows the control board to communicate with
a PC and supports a simplified HMI using push buttons on the processor board, making the system easy
to use.
This document describes the Freescale 56F8013 controller’s features, basic AC induction motor theory,
the system design concept, and hardware implementation and software design, including the PC master
software visualization tool.
Introduction, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
1-1
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
1-2
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
56800E Core Features
Chapter 2
Benefits and Features of the 56F8013 Controller
2.1 56F8013 Benefits
•
Hybrid architecture facilitates implementation of both control and signal processing functions in a
single device
•
High-performance, secured Flash memory eliminates the need for external storage devices
•
Extended temperature range allows for operation of nonvolatile memory in harsh environments
•
Flash memory emulation of EEPROM eliminates the need for external non-volatile memory
•
High performance with 16-bit code density
•
On-chip voltage regulator and power management reduces overall system cost
•
Diversity of peripheral configuration facilitates the elimination of external components, improving
system integration and reliability
•
This device boots directly from Flash, providing additional application flexibility
•
High-performance Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) with programmable fault capability simplifies
design and promotes compliance with safety regulations
•
PWM and Analog-to-Digital (ADC) modules are tightly coupled, reducing processing overhead
•
Low-voltage interrupts protect the system from brownout or power failure
•
Simple in-application Flash memory programming via Enhanced OnCETM or serial
communication
2.2 56800E Core Features
•
Up to 32 MIPS at 32MHz execution frequency
•
DSP and MCU functionality in a unified, C-efficient architecture
•
JTAG/Enhanced On-Chip Emulation (EOnCE) for unobtrusive, real-time debugging
•
Four 36-bit accumulators
•
16- and 32-bit bidirectional barrel shifter
•
Parallel instruction set with unique addressing modes
•
Hardware DO and REP loops available
•
Three internal address buses
•
Four internal data buses
•
Architectural support for 8-, 16-, and 32-bit single-cycle data fetches
•
MCU-style software stack support
•
Controller-style addressing modes and instructions
•
Single-cycle 16 x 16-bit parallel Multiplier-Accumulator (MAC)
•
Proven to deliver more control functionality with a smaller memory footprint than competing
architectures
Benefits and Features of the 56F8013 Controller, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
2-1
2.3 Memory Features
•
Architecture permits as many as three simultaneous accesses to program and data memory
•
On-chip memory includes high-speed volatile and nonvolatile components:
— 16KB of Program Flash
— 4KB of Unified Data/Program RAM
•
All memories operate at 32MHz (zero wait-states) over temperature range (-40° to +125°C), with
no software tricks or hardware accelerators required
•
Flash security feature prevents unauthorized accesses to its content
2.4 56F8013 Peripheral Circuit Reatures
•
Pulse Width Modulator (PWM) module
•
Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI)
•
Serial Communication Interface (SCI)
•
Four 16-bit Timers
•
Software-programmable Phase Lock Loop (PLL)
•
Two 12-bit Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADC) with six inputs at rates up to 1.1µs per sequential
or simultaneous conversion
•
Up to 26 General Purpose I/O (GPIO) pins
•
Computer Operating Properly (COP)
•
Integrated Power-On Reset and Low-Voltage Interrupt module
•
I2C Communication Module supporting Slave, Master and MultiMaster Mode
2.5 AWARD-WINNING DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENT
Processor Expert (PE) provides a Rapid Application Design (RAD) tool that combines creation of an
easy-to-use, component-based software application with an expert knowledge system.
The CodeWarrior Integrated Development Environment (IDE) is a sophisticated tool for code navigation,
compiling, and debugging. A complete set of evaluation modules (EVMs) and development system
cards will support concurrent engineering. Together, PE, CodeWarrior, and EVMs create a complete,
scalable tools solution for easy, fast, and efficient development.
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
2-2
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Features of a Motor Drive System
Chapter 3
Motor Drive System
3.1 Introduction
An AC Induction Motor (ACIM), which is simple, rugged, inexpensive, and available at all power ratings,
is often used in products targeting the consumer and industrial market. This application employs
sensorless Field-Oriented Control (FOC) to control an ACIM using the 56F8013 device, which can
support the complicated sensorless FOC algorithm. By using this algorithm, the motor drive system
achieves excellent torque control performance and supports the driving of variable loads.
3.2 Features of a Motor Drive System
•
The design implements the washing machine protocol, shown in Figure 3-1
Figure 3-1. Washing Machine Protocol
•
The design also fulfills the requirements of the washing cycle, shown in Figure 3-2
Motor Drive System, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
3-1
Figure 3-2. Washing Cycle
•
The motor control algorithm employs Stator-Flux-Oriented Control (SFOC); Power stage
switches are controlled by Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation (SVPWM)
•
No position information devices or stator flux measurement are used, so a speed sensorless
method is employed
•
The motor is capable of forward and reverse rotation and has a speed range from 50rpm to
3000rpm; the tumble wash has a speed of 40rpm and the spin cycle obtains a maximum drum
speed of 1600rpm. The drum can be driven directly or by a belt that connects to the motor shaft.
To acheive the wash and spin cycles, the speed-transfer ratio can be set at 1:2.
•
The user controls motion profiles, rotation direction, and speed. The RS-232 communication
supports further R&D by enabling the easy tuning of control parameters.
•
The motor drive system is designed to create minimal acoustic noise
3.3 Introduction to System Design
3.3.1 Hardware
This application uses a 56F8013 device to drive a 3-phase motor with a complicated motion protocol.
The resistor uses phase current sensors and no optocoupler, so the system is cost-sensitive.
PC master software communicates with the PC through the RS-232 and senses the mid-variables and
modifies the control-variables during the debug process.
The system comprises a 56F8013 board and an ACIM board. The ACIM board includes a 3-phase
power stage, Power Factor Correction (PFC), a communication module which links the PC with the
56F8013 demonstration, simplified Human Machine Interface (HMI) and a protection module, as well as
effective electrical isolation.
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
3-2
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Introduction to System Design
L1
D1
VT1
VT3
VT5
VT2
VT4
VT6
IM
VT0
C
AC Input
i
B
A
LOAD
i
Vdc
ωr*
Oscilloscope
JTAG
56F8013
Processor
Board
power
DA
driver
VT6
VT5
VT4
VT3
VT2
VT1
VT0
1
HMI
Figure 3-3. System Block Diagram
Among the hardware system features are:
•
Integrated Power Module (IPM)
An IRAMS10UP60A, a 600V, 10-Ampere IR Integrated Power Module, powers the ACIM. Its
built-in control circuits provide optimum gate drive and protection for the IGBT. Three bridges are
integrated in its body. It reduces the design scale of hardware and software. Figure 3-4 shows
the Circuit Diagram.
Motor Drive System, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
3-3
Figure 3-4. IRAMS10UP60A Circuit Diagram
•
56F8013
Guaranteeing excellent performance and accurate control of the ACIM requires more complex
software, but the powerful 56F8013 is capable of the heavy computation demanded.
The controller board includes:
— Control system circuit
— CPU circuit
— ADC circuit
— Power supply circuit
— DAC circuit
— SCI interface
— Parallel JTAG interface
— LED display circuit
— Signals output interface
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
3-4
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Introduction to System Design
•
No optocoupler
To keep the application’s costs low, optocouplers are not used as an interface between the
controller and the IPM. A reliable protection circuit improves system safety.
•
Power stage for ACIM, BLDC, and PMSM
The power stage can drive ACIM, BLDC, and PMSM motors with only minor adjustments to
resistor values
•
Signal sample and process board
To control hardware costs, rather than using a Hall effect transducer, a simple difference amplier
circuit detects the current and voltage signals
•
56F8013 Evaluation Module (EVM)
Freescale’s 56F8013 demostration board connects to the main board and highlights the
capability of the EVM
3.3.2 Software
This system drives a 3-phase ACIM using stator-flux orientation. The application features:
• Control technique, which includes:
—
—
—
—
Phase currents and phase voltages reconstruction
Stator-flux observation
Electromagnetic torque estimation, used for the slip frequency calculation
Stator flux orientation to calculate the torque-producing stator current to be used in the speed
regulation channel
— Speed closed loop, allowing the motor a good transient response
— Compensation for the voltage drops across the stator resistor
— SVPWM to generate the desired voltage by the inverter
• Minimum speed of 50rpm
• Maximum speed of 3000rpm
• Power factor correction which eliminates negative effects on the input electric use of switches
• Fault protection against:
— Bus overvoltage
— Bus undervoltage
— Bus overcurrent
— IPM overheating
• PC master software for debug and remote control of the ACIM
Motor Drive System, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
3-5
3.4 Specification and Performance
Input voltage:
85~265VAC
Input frequency:
45~65HZ
Rating bus voltage:
350V
Rating output power:
500W
Switch frequency of PFC switch:
100KHZ
Switch frequency of inverter:
10KHZ
Power factor:
>95%
Efficiency:
>90%
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
3-6
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
AC Induction Motor
Chapter 4
ACIM Theory
4.1 AC Induction Motor
Squirrel-cage AC induction motors are popular for their simple construction, low cost per horsepower,
and low maintenance (they contain no brushes, as do DC motors). They are available in a wide range of
power ratings. With field-oriented vector control methods, AC induction motors can fully replace
standard DC motors, even in high-performance applications. The AC induction motor is a rotating
electric machine designed to operate from a 3-phase source of alternating voltage. In variable-speed
drives, the source is normally an inverter that uses power switches to produce approximately sinusoidal
voltages and currents of controllable magnitude and frequency.
As the sinusoidally-distributed flux density wave produced by the stator magnetizing currents sweeps
past the rotor conductors, it generates a voltage in them. The result is a sinusoidally distributed set of
currents in the short-circuited rotor bars. Because of the low resistance of these shorted bars, only a
small relative angular velocity, ωr, between the angular velocity, ωs, of the flux wave and the mechanical
angular velocity, ω, of the two-pole rotor is required to produce the necessary rotor current. The relative
angular velocity, ωr, is called the slip velocity. The interaction of the sinusoidally distributed air gap flux
density and induced rotor currents produces a torque on the rotor. The typical induction motor
speed-torque characteristic is shown in Figure 4-1.
Figure 4-1. Induction Motor Speed-Torque Characteristic
ACIM Theory, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
4-1
4.2 Induction Motor Model
Stator voltage differential equation:
v
v
v
v
U s = Rs is + pΨ s + jω1Ψ s
Eqn. 4-1
v
v
v
0 = Rr ir + pΨ r + jω s Ψ r
Eqn. 4-2
Rotor voltage differential equation:
Stator and rotor flux linkages expressed in terms of the stator and rotor current space vectors:
v
v
v
Ψ s = Ls is + Lm ir
Eqn. 4-3
v
v
v
Ψ r = Lr ir + Lm is
Eqn. 4-4
Electromagnetic torque expressed by utilizing space vector quantities:
v v
Te = n p (Ψ s × is )
Eqn. 4-5
Where:
v
Us
v
Ψs
v
Ψr
v
is
v
ir
Stator voltage vector
Stator flux vector
Rotor flux vector
Stator current vector
Rotor current vector
Ls
Stator equivalent inductance
Lr
Rotor equivalent inductance
Lm
Mutual equivalent inductance
np
Pole pairs
Te
Electormagnetic torque
ω1
Synchronous speed frequency
ωs
Synchronous slip frequency
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
4-2
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Digital Control of an AC Induction Motor
4.3 Digital Control of an AC Induction Motor
In adjustable-speed applications, AC motors are powered by inverters, which convert DC power to AC
power at the required frequency and amplitude. Figure 4-2 shows the hardware system configuration.
L1
D1
VT1
VT3
VT5
VT2
VT4
VT6
IM
VT0
C
AC Input
i
B
A
LOAD
i
Vdc
ωr*
Oscilloscope
JTAG
56F8013
Processor
Board
power
DA
driver
VT6
VT5
VT4
VT3
VT2
VT1
VT0
1
HMI
Figure 4-2. Hardware System Configuration
The inverter consists of three half-bridge units in which the upper and lower switch are controlled
complementarily, meaning when the upper one is turned on, the lower one must be turned off, and vice
versa. Some dead time must be inserted between the time one transistor of the half-bridge is turned off
and its complementary device is turned on.
The output voltage is mostly created by a Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) technique, where an isosceles
triangle carrier wave is compared with a fundamental-frequency sine modulating wave. This technique is
shown in Figure 4-3. The 3-phase voltage waves are shifted 120° to one another and thus a 3-phase
motor can be supplied.
ACIM Theory, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
4-3
Figure 4-3. Pulse Width Modulation
In this document, the Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation (SVPWM) is employed to reduce the
harmonic distortion and improves the efficient use of the bus voltage. Two basic neighboring voltage
vectors are used to compose the arbitary voltage vector in the control period.
The most popular power devices for motor control applications are Power MOSFETs and IGBTs. A
Power MOSFET is a voltage-controlled transistor. It is designed for high-frequency operation and has a
low-voltage drop, so it has low power losses. An Insulated-Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) is controlled
by a MOSFET on its base. A built-in temperature monitor and overtemperature/overcurrent protection,
along with the short-circuit rated IGBTs and integrated under-voltage lockout function, make the
Integrated Power Module (IPM) more convenient for engineers to develop their systems and make IPMs
widely used in today’s home appliances. This application also incorporates an IPM.
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
4-4
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Vector Control of AC Induction Machine
Chapter 5
Design Concept of an ACIM Vector Control Drive
5.1 Vector Control of AC Induction Machine
Aligning the d axis to the stator flux, Ψ s , written in d-q component, stator voltage is then transformed to:
uds = Rs ids + pΨ s
Eqn. 5-1
uqs = Rs iqs + Ψ sω1
Eqn. 5-2
From Equation 4-2 to Equation 4-4, the following equations can be derived:
(1 + στ r p ) Ls isq − ωsτ r (Ψ s − σ Ls isd ) = 0
(1 + τ r p )Ψ s = (1 + στ r p ) Ls isd − ωsστ r Ls isq
Eqn. 5-3
Eqn. 5-4
then:
Te = n pisq Ψ s
Eqn. 5-5
where:
τr
Rotor Time Constant
L2m
σ = 1−
Ls Lr
Total Leakage Factor
Equation 5-4 indicates the coupling between isd and isq. “A Stator Flux Oriented Induction Machine
Drive” presents a method to decouple the isd from isq using a decouple compensator. However, the use
of a decouple compensator will negatively affect the system performance, depending on the machine
parameters, and increase software complexity. Equation 5-1 represents the relationship between stator
flux, Ψs, and the d-axis stator voltage. The differential will introduce noise, so a Proportional-Integral (PI)
flux regulator is used to approach the effect of stator voltage on flux, as shown in Equation 5-6:
ˆ )dt
ˆ ) + K (Ψ * − Ψ
uds = K p (Ψ *s − Ψ
s
i∫
s
s
Eqn. 5-6
where:
Ψ∗s
Commanded Stator Flux
ˆ
Ψ ∗s
Estimated Stator Flux
Design Concept of an ACIM Vector Control Drive, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
5-1
This information allows calculation of voltage on the d axis.
Assuming Rsiqs < < Ψsω1, Equation 5-2 will simplified to:
uqs ≈ Ψ sω1
Eqn. 5-7
In the steady state, uqs is proportional to ω1 and, in a sense, ω1 possesses a characteristic of the
constant volts/hertz ratio, but at the low speed range, Rsiqs can’t be ignored.
From Equation 5-2 and Equation 5-6, the terminal reference voltage vector, V ref can be established as
shown in Figure 5-1, where ω*1 is the commanded synchronous speed.
θ = ∫ ω1*dt = ω1*Tc + θ 0
Eqn. 5-8
From Figure 5-1, it is clear that uqs takes up the majority of V ref, while uds compensates the stator flux
loss due to the voltage drop across the stator resistance in the transient state.
Based on the analysis, the control scheme can be obtained as shown in Figure 5-2.
isq*
∆w
ω1*
Usq*
iˆsq
iˆsq
ωˆr
Ψ
*
s
ω̂1
ωˆ sl
SVPWM
ωr*
Rs
U
θˆΨˆ
d
dt
*
sd
iˆsq
Vsαβ
s
ˆ
Ψ
s
Slip
Frequency
Estimator
IM
Tˆe
I sαβ
αβ
Iabc Feedback
Observer
ABC
signal
detector
Figure 5-1. Block Diagram of the Stator Flux Oriented (SFO) System
q
β
v
V re f
u qs
d
θ
u ds
α
Figure 5-2. Stator Reference Voltage V ref
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
5-2
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Block diagram of Stator Flux Oriented (SFO) Control
5.2 Relationship between Rotor Flux Orientation and Stator Flux
Orientation Induction Motor Drive
The aim of vector control is to implement control schemes which produce high-dynamic performance
and are similar to those used to control DC machines. To achieve this, the reference frames may be
aligned with the stator flux-linkage space vector, the rotor flux-linkage space vector, or the magnetizing
space vector.
From Equation 4-3 and Equation 4-4, the relationship between stator flux and rotor flux can be
calculated as follows:
uv
v
v
Ψ s = ∫ (U s − rs is )dt
Eqn. 5-9
v
v
L v
Ψ r = r (Ψ s − σ Ls is )
Lm
Eqn. 5-10
Equation 5-9 indicates that the stator flux depends only on the stator resistance, which is relatively easy
to calculate. Equation 5-10 demonstrates that the rotor flux requires the knowledge of instances of the
machine, especially the leakage inductance. The rotor flux estimation suffers when machine parameters
are detuned. When the estimated value of a parameter differs from its actual value, the estimated rotor
flux is then different from the actual rotor flux. The orientation is no longer accurate with respect to the
actual rotor flux. In this case, the system becomes coupled, and instantaneous torque control is lost.
The stator flux can be estimated more easily and precisely than the rotor flux. Thus, the Stator Flux
Oriented (SFO) system has been attracting more attention. However, a coupling exists between the
torque-producing component of the stator current isq and the stator flux-producing component.
Consequently, any change in isq without a corresponding change in isd will cause a transient in stator
flux. See “A Stator Flux Oriented Induction Machine Drive”. Accurate decoupling control still
depends on knowledge of machine parameters.
This application illustrates an ACIM drive using stator flux orientation, without the use of a speed sensor.
5.3 Block diagram of Stator Flux Oriented (SFO) Control
Figure 5-2 shows the basic structure of SFO control of an AC induction motor. To perform vector
control, follow these steps:
1. Measure bus voltage and phase currents
2.
3.
4.
5.
Transform these measurements into a 2-phase system using Clarke transformation
Estimate stator flux and slip frequency
Calculate synchrounous speed, then rotor speed
Calculate the torque-producing current, isq
6. Use the PI regulator to obtain the commanded slip frequency
7. Add the commanded slip frequency to the estimated rotor speed to find the commanded
synchronous speed
8. Use the compensation method to obtain the stator voltage on the direct axis and
quadrature axis.
9. Use SVPWM to generate stator voltage
Design Concept of an ACIM Vector Control Drive, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
5-3
5.4 Forward and Inverse Clarke Transformation (a, b, c to α , β and
backwards)
The forward Clarke transformation converts a 3-phase system (a, b, c) to a 2-phase coordinate system
(α, β). Figure 5-3 shows graphical construction of the space vector and projection of the space vector to
the quadrature-phase components, α, β. Assuming that the a axis and the α axis are in the same
direction, the quadrature-phase stator currents isα and isβ are related to the actual 3-phase stator
currents as follows:
Figure 5-3. Clark Transformation
isβ =
isα = isa
Eqn. 5-11
1
2
isa +
isb
3
3
Eqn. 5-12
The inverse Clarke transformation transforms from a 2-phase (α, β) to a 3-phase (isa, isb, isc) system.
isa = isα
Eqn. 5-13
1
3
isb = − isα +
isβ
2
2
Eqn. 5-14
1
3
isb = − isα +
isβ
2
2
Eqn. 5-15
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
5-4
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Rotor Speed Estimation
5.5 Forward and Inverse Park Transformation (α, β to d-q and backwards)
In stator-vector oriented control, the quanties in the statar reference frame should be transformed into
the synchronous rotation with the stator flux vector reference frame. The relationship of the two
reference frames is shown in Figure 5-4. The d axis is aligned with the stator flux vector, where θΨ s is
the position of the stator flux.
q
β
d
θΨv
o
s
v
Ψs
α
Figure 5-4. Park Tranformation
The quantity in the stationary frame is transformed into synchrounous frame by:
isd = isα cos θ Ψv s + isβ sin θ Ψv s
Eqn. 5-16
isq = −isα sin θ Ψv s + isβ cos θ Ψv s
Eqn. 5-17
isα = isd cos θ Ψv s − isq sin θ Ψv s
Eqn. 5-18
isβ = isd sin θ Ψv s + isq cos θ Ψv s
Eqn. 5-19
And the inverse relation is:
5.6 Rotor Speed Estimation
The synchronous frequency can be calculated:
ωˆ1 =
ˆ
ˆ − (u − R i )Ψ
ˆ
(usβ − Rs isβ )Ψ
Ψ
d ˆ
d
sβ
sα
sα
s sα
sβ
(θ Ψˆ ) = arctan(
)=
2
s
ˆ
ˆ
dt
dt
Ψ
Ψ
sα
s
Eqn. 5-20
where:
usα, usβ, isα, isβ are the stator voltage and current in the α—β stationary reference frame.
Slip frequency can be deduced from Equation 5-3:
ωˆ s =
(1 + στ r p ) Ls iˆsq
ˆ − σ L iˆ )
τ (Ψ
r
s
s sd
Eqn. 5-21
Design Concept of an ACIM Vector Control Drive, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
5-5
It will add to the software complexity to calculate ω̂ s using Equation 5-21, and the detuning of the
parameters will affect the rotor speed calculation.
Slip frequency can be derived from nameplate specification of the induction machine, as shown in
Table 5-1.
Table 5-1. Nameplate Specification
Rated Power
0.12kw
Rated Speed
1310rpm
Rated Current
0.76A
Rated Frequency
50Hz
Rated Voltage
220V
Pole Pairs
2
Slip frequency is obtained by:
∆ω N =
(1500-1310)rounds (1500-1310)r × pn
=
= 6.3Hz
minute
60seconds
Eqn. 5-22
Estimated slip frequency can be determined by the observer of electric torque:
slip _ estimated =
∆ω N ˆ 6.3Hz ˆ
× Te =
× Te = 7.2 × Tˆe
0.875
TeN
Eqn. 5-23
Therefore, the rotor speed can be calculated:
ωˆ r = ωˆ1 − ωˆ s
Eqn. 5-24
5.7 Speed Regulator
From Equation 5-5, the torque is in proportion to the torque-producing current isq . Quick control on isq
will yield a fast transient state. The PI speed regulator generates the command i*sq from the difference
between the commanded rotor speed and estimated rotor speed. Commanded slip frequency can then
be obtained by the difference between the commanded isq and estimated ˆi sq through another PI
regulator. The reference synchronous speed is calculated by finding the sum of the estimated rotor
speed and commanded slip frequency.
The speed regulator channel can be found as shown in Figure 5-5.
isq*
wr*
wˆ r
∆w
Iˆsq
w1*
wˆ r
Figure 5-5. Speed Regulator Channel
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
5-6
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
PFC Design
5.8 PFC Design
The main circuit adopted in this application is a single-switch PFC circuit (see Figure 5-6). The circuit is
composed of Q, D, L, and filter capacitance, C2, C3 and includes an EMI filter, input relay, and full-wave
rectifier. In the 56F8013-based PFC module system, the controller samples the voltage signal output
and voltage DC_bus, and processes these samples in the digital control loop. Because system is based
on current Discontinuous Current Mode (DCM) mode, there is only a voltage loop. Outer voltage loop G
insures the output voltage is constant.
L
D
Q
C2
C3
R1
R2
C1
1
3. 3 VP
PWM1
RX
TX
G
RX
TX
V err DC_ b u s
+
V_ref
56F8013
ADCIN0
Figure 5-6. PFC Configuration Diagram
5.8.1 Inductor selection
A. Maximum peak line current:
Eqn. 5-25
Ripple current:
Eqn. 5-26
B. Determine the duty factor at Ipk, where Vin(peak) is the peak of the rectified line voltage.
Eqn. 5-27
Design Concept of an ACIM Vector Control Drive, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
5-7
C. Calculate the inductance; fs is the switching frequency.
Eqn. 5-28
Round up to 250µH.
5.8.2 Output Capacitor
Output filter inductor can be calculated by the following equation:
Eqn. 5-29
Po = 500W
Vo(min) = 380 x (1 - 10%) = 342V
Vo(max) = 380 x (1+10%) = 418V
∆t = 50ms
According to Equation 5-29, C = 866µH.
Select the output capacitor to be C = 940µH.
Two 470µH/450V electrolytic capacitors connected in parallel are chosen.
5.8.3 Main Switch
The voltage limit of the main switch is:
VCEM(S) > 1.5Vcem(S) = 1.5Vin(max) = 1.5 x 380 = 570V
Eqn. 5-30
The circuit limit of the main switch is calculated by RMS value:
Eqn. 5-31
Select main switch Q400—Q401 to be the MOSFET IRFPC60LC. Parameters are described as follows:
VDSS = 600V
ID = 16A
RDS (on) tye = 0.4Ω
TO-247AC Package
5.8.4 Output Diode
The voltage limit of the output diode is:
VCEM(S) > 1.5Vcem(S) = 1.5Vin(max) = 1.5 x 380 = 570V
Eqn. 5-32
The circuit limit of the output diode is calculated by RMS value:
Eqn. 5-33
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
5-8
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
PFC Design
Select output diode D400—D402 to be FRED DSEP60-06A. Parameters are described as follows:
VRRM = 600V
IFAVM = 60A
trr = 35nS
TO-247AD Package
5.8.5 Inductor Design
In Section 5.8.1, it was found that L= 250µH.
Select Bm= 0.3T.
Select magnetic core to be EI33, with an effective area of 118mm2.
The number of inductor windings can be calculated as follows:
N=
LI L (max)
=38.2
Ae Bm
Eqn. 5-34
Select N = 38.The gap is:
δ=
µ o N 2 Ae
L
=
1.25 × 10 −6 × 382 ×118 × 10 −6
= 0.85mm
250 × 10 −6
Eqn. 5-35
When work frequency of inductance is 100kHz, the penetrate depth of copper lead is:
Λ=
2
1
=
= 0.209mm
2πf s µγ
3.14 × 100 × 103 × 1.25 × 10 −6 × 58 ×10 6
Eqn. 5-36
Where:
γ is the electric conductive ratio of lead
µ is magnetical conductive ratio of lead
A copper lead with a smaller diameter than 0.42mm can be selected. In this case, select high intensity
lead with a diameter of 0.33mm and an effective area of 0.0855mm2.
3.84 = 1.1mm2
.
By selecting circuit density to be J = 3.5A/mm2,the area of leads is S =
3.5
Thirteen leads with a diameter of 0.33mm must be used.
Kc =
38 ×13 × 0.0855
= 0.32 <<0.35
132
Eqn. 5-37
Design Concept of an ACIM Vector Control Drive, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
5-9
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
5-10
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
56F8013 Device
Chapter 6
Hardware Implementation
The motor control system is designed to drive the 3-phase AC motor in a speed closed loop. The
prototype is pictured in Figure 6-1 and It consists of the following blocks:
•
56F8013
•
High-voltage power stage board with sensor board
•
Power supply stage and PFC
•
3-Phase AC motor without speed transducer
6.1 56F8013 Device
The demonstration system is illustrated in Figure 6-1 and the hierarchy diagram is depicted in
Figure 6-2. it clearly shows that the 56F8013 is the core of the system, highlighted atop the mother
board. Figure 6-3 shows the motor control system configuration.
Figure 6-1. Demonstration System
Hardware Implementation, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
6-1
AC Induction Motor
DSC Controller Board
J1 on DSC
Controller Board
RS-232
Connector
Motherboard
Heatsink
J5000 on Power Board
Right Side
Left Side
RS-232
Aeration holes
POWER
OFF
Input
Power
POWER ON
Front Side
Figure 6-2. Hierarchy Diagram
The 56F8013 is the drive’s brain. All algorithms are carried out in this single smart chip, which reads the
input commands, processes the routine, and generates the PWM to govern the power switches driving
the motor and the PFC to make the input current sinusoid.
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
6-2
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
High-Voltage Power Stage
Mother Board
Bus Voltage
110V-220V
ACINPUT
3phase
ACIM
High Voltage
Power Stage
Power supply
stage & PFC
Sensor
Stage
Auxillary Voltage
Control Signal
Feedback Signal
56F8013EVM
LOAD
Speed setup
Figure 6-3. Motor Control System Configuration
6.2 High-Voltage Power Stage
The HV Medium Power Board is designed to meet the power needed by a household washing machine
and lower-power industrial applications. An Integrated Power Module (IPM) is used to simplify the design
and board layout and to lower the cost. IPMs are available from various suppliers and it is simple to use
one from a supplier of choice. The IRAMS10UP60A is an IPM, which targets the household appliance
market. Its features include:
•
Integrated gate drivers and bootstrap diodes
•
Temperature monitor
•
Temperature and overcurrent shutdown
•
Fully isolated package
•
Low VCE (on) non-punch-through IGBT technology
•
Undervoltage lockout for all channels
•
Matched propagation delay for all channels
•
Low-side IGBT emitter pins for current conrol
•
Schmitt-triggered input logic
•
Cross-conduction prevention logic
•
Lower di/dt gate driver for better noise immunity
Its maxium IGBT block voltage is 600V; phase current is 10A at 25°C and 5A at 100°C, making it
suitable for this appliance.
Hardware Implementation, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
6-3
6.3 Sensor Stage
The control algorithm requires DCBus voltage, DCBus current and phase current sensing, so these
sensors are built on the power stage board. Schematics of the sensors circuits can be found in
Appendix A.
A. DCBus Voltage Sensor
The DCBus voltage must be checked because overvoltage protection and PFC are required. A simple
voltage sensor is created by a diffential amplifier circuit. The voltage signal is transferred through a
resistor and then amplified to the reference level. The amplifier output is connected to the 56F8013’s
ADC.
Figure 6-4. DCBus Sampling Circuit
B. DCBus Current Sensor
The bus current is sensed through the detection of the voltage drop across the resistor cascade into the
negative bus link. A differential amplifier is then used to draw the voltage out and transform it to a level
the 56F8013’s AD channel can accommodate. The sample circuit is depicted in Figure 6-5.
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
6-4
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Sensor Stage
2
2 1
8
1
R6001
10K-0.1%
I_Sense_DCB1
C6000
0.1uF
R6003
8.2K-0.1%
D+5V
U6001A
MC33172
1
3
PGND
2
R6005
5
160
R6002
10K-0.1%
U6001B
MC33172
7
I_Sense_DCB
I_Sense_DCB
6
C6003
0.01uF
4
2
R6004
1
2 1
8.2K-0.1%
Figure 6-5. Bus Link Current Sample Circuit
C. Phase Current Sensor
The stator flux and electromagnetic torque can be derived from two phase currents and voltages. The
use of a Hall current transducer will sharply increase the cost, and two channel differential amplifiers are
used as the Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) to sample phase currents as shown in Figure 6-6. The
SVPWM is employed. The state in which all bottom switches are turned on and upper switches are
turned off is defined as state 0, and the corresponding equivalent topology is depicted in Figure 6-6 (b).
The sample is triggered at state 0, shown in Figure 6-6 (c). In this way, two phase currents can be
derived through the differential amplifier channels. The spot worth consideration is that a certain margin
∆ should be maintained between the circle track formed by the reference voltage vector V ref and the
inscribed circle of the hexagon shaped by the six base vectors as described in Figure 6-6 (a), especially
at the high speed range.
V3( 010) I I
V2( 110)
∆
III
T2
Vr ef
PhaseC
IV
PhaseB
V1( 100)
T1
PhaseA
V4( 011)
Cur r ent Sensi ng Ci r cui t
I
A
Td
B
VI
AD1
I nduct i on Mot or
V5( 001)
V
Td
C
T0
T1
T2
AD2
T3
T4
T5
T6
V6( 101)
(a) SVPWM
(b) Equivalent Topology
(c) Sample Time
Figure 6-6. Methods to Detect Phase Currents
D. Power Supply Stage
The power supply stage provides a high-voltage DCBus +5V power supply for the drive and auxillary
power and +15V for the 56F8013, high-voltage drivers and amplifiers. A topswitch generates auxiliary
power supply of +15V for both the ICs and the IPM. PFC is employed to make the input current trace the
input voltage and to reduce the EMI.
Hardware Implementation, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
6-5
E. Protection Circuit
To improve the system safety level, overcurrent and overvoltage in the bus link detection and protection
are introduced into the system, illustrated in Figure 6-7. The signal generated by the circuit “IPMLOCK”
will be connected to the IPM’s drive IC (74HC244) and to the 56F8013’s fault pin. When a fault is
generated, the IPMLOCK signal draws to high level. On the one hand, the IPMLOCK will disable the
74HC244 and the PWM signals won’t pass through; on the other hand, the IPMLOCK signal will drive
the 56F8013’s fault0 pin, and the 56F8013 will block the PWM signal instantly.
C6031
0.01uF
D+5V
C6032
0.01uF
D+5V
RV6002
10K
4
R6011
2K
U6002A
MC33172
1
2
3
D6000
IN4148
1
D+5V
R6008
620
R6009
R6010
1.2K
220K
C6004
0.01uF
C6033
0.01uF
D+5V
C6030
0.01uF
RV6003
10K
6
0.1uF
R6016
6.8K
IPMLOCK
D+5V
IPMLOCK
R6015
3K
U6002B
LM293
7
D6001
IN4148
1
5
2
I_Sense_DCB
LED6001
RED DISPLAY
C6005
8
C
LED6001
RED DISPLAY
R6012
620
2
V_Sense_DCB
R6013
R6014
1.2K
220K
C6006
0.01uF
R6016
6.8K
Figure 6-7. Protection Circuit
6.4 PFC Hardware Design
The topology of the main circuit is a boost circuit. One signal, output bus voltage DC_bus, is sampled
and sent to the 56F8013.
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
6-6
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
PFC Hardware Design
Figure 6-8. Main PFC Circuit
6.4.1 Drive Circuit Hardware Design
IC IR2125, a simple and reliable gate drive circuit based on a current-limiting single channel driver, is
used; it is shown in Figure 6-9.
Figure 6-9. PFC Drive Circuit
6.4.2 Sample Circuit Hardware Design
The output bus voltage, Vbus, sample circuit is shown in Figure 6-10. A simple voltage divider is used for
the bus voltage sample.
Hardware Implementation, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
6-7
Figure 6-10. PFC Sampling Circuit
6.5 Detailed Motherboard Configurations for ACIM
The motherboard shown in Figure 6-2 comprises a high-voltage power stage, a sensor stage, a
protection circuit and PFC. It is a general board which can be used for ACIM, BLDC and PMSM after
simple configuration with resistances and jumpers.
Configurations for the ACIM are shown in Figure 6-11; shorten circuits for the jumpers circled in red.
C5004
JP6000
JP1008
JP1004
JP1005
U6003
U6002
U6001
U6008
C5003
JP1009
DSC
Figure 6-11. ACIM Jumper Configuration
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
6-8
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Detailed Motherboard Configurations for ACIM
Table 6-1 details the configurations of the 56F8013 resources used in the system and the corresponding
variables used in the software.
Table 6-1. Configuration of the 56F8013’s Resources
Target Variables
56F8013 Resources
Software Resources
DCBus Voltage: V_sense_DCB
ANB1 (PC5)
sample3
AD_VDC
Uphase Current Sample: I_sense_U
ANA1 ( PC1
sample0
AD_iA
Vphase Current Sample: I_sense_V
ANA0 (PC0)
sample1
AD_iB
DCBus Current Sample: I_Sense_DCB
ANB0 (PC4
sample4
AD_iDC
Relay: AC_RELAY
PB5
OPEN: OPEN
PB2
DACCLK
PB0
DACDATA
PB3
DACEN
PB1
TXD
PB7
RXD
PB6
FAULT0
PA6
Hardware Implementation, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
6-9
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
6-10
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Data Flow
Chapter 7
Software Design
This section describes the design of the drive’s software blocks. The software will be described in terms
of:
•
Control Algorithm Data Flow
•
State Diagram
7.1 Data Flow
The drive requires the software to gather and process values from the user interface and generate
3-phase PWM signals for inverter. The control algorithm contains the processes, described in the
following sections.
IPM temperature
monitor
DC_Bus Current(A/D)
Washing machine
work pattern
PC master
Phase current
sample(A/D)
iA&iB
U_dc_bus
Desired rotor speed
DC_Bus Voltage(A/D)
I_dc_bus
U_dc_bus
Stator flux
estimation
Speed
regulator
Electromagnetic
torque
Stator_flux_est
Elec_torque_est
w1_command
Fault Control
Slip frequency
estimation
Synchronous
speed estimation
Drive Fault status
Slip_est
w1_est
Block IPM
StatorFlux
Determine
Rotor speed
estimation
Stator_flux_
commanded
Usq determine
StatorFlux
Regulator
Usq
Usd
w2_est
SVPWM
PVAL0
PVAL2
PVAL4
Figure 7-1. Data Flow
Software Design, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
7-1
7.2 Stator Flux Estimation
Estimating stator flux is one of the algorithm’s key tasks. Using the phase voltages and phase currents,
an estimation of stator flux can be derived from the stator flux model. Generally, the stator flux based on
the voltage model is determined by Equation 7-1.
v
v
v
v
v
o
U s − Rs is
E
E
Ψs =
=
= e j ( ∠E −90 )
jω1
jω1 ω1
Eqn. 7-1
Where:
E is the back EMF
E is the magnitude of E
∠E is the phase of E
The pure integral of back EMF involves the drift and saturation problems due to initial condition and DC
offset. The Low-Pass Filter (LPF) is employed to replace the pure integral as shown in Figure 7-2.
q
β
v
V ref
u qs
d
θ
u ds
α
Figure 7-2. Stator Reference Voltage V ref
v
Ψ ′s =
v
v
ω
j ( ∠E − arctan 1 )
E
E
ωc
e
=
jω1 + ωc
ω12 + ωc 2
Eqn. 7-2
Where:
ωc is the cutoff frequency of the LPF in radians per second
As expected, when ω1 >>ωc:
arctan
ω1
≈ 90o
ωc
Eqn. 7-3
ω12 + ω c 2 ≈ ω1
Eqn. 7-4
Design of ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
7-2
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Stator Flux Determination
In this case, the LPF estimator approaches the pure integrator estimator. But when the cut-off frequency,
ωc, is close to the synchronous ω1, errors occur, so a correction factor, G, is used to minimize the errors.
v v v
Ψ ′sG = Ψ s
Eqn. 7-5
Equation 7-6 can be deduced:
ω
v
ω12 + ω c 2 j (arctan ω1c −90o )
G=
e
= G (ω1 )e j ρ (ω1 )
ω1
Eqn. 7-6
The improved stator flux observer channel is shown in Figure 7-3.
ea
eβ
ˆ'
1
Ψ
sα
jωˆ1 + ωc
1
jωˆ1 + ωc
G (ωˆ1 ) cos( ρ (ωˆ1 ))
ˆ
Ψ
sα
Eq.
5-20
ˆ'
Ψ
sβ
G (ωˆ1 ) sin( ρ (ωˆ1 ))
ω̂1
ˆ
Ψ
sβ
Figure 7-3. Improved Stator Flux Estimation Channel
7.3 Electromagnetic Torque
Electromagnetic torque can be estimated from stator flux and stator current and can be determined as
shown in Equation 7-7.
Te = −Ψ sβ isβ + Ψ sα isβ
Eqn. 7-7
7.4 Rotor Speed Estimation
A speed sensorless induction motor drive is a trend in today’s low cost variable speed applications. Due
to the cost and maintenance required by a speed transducer, speed sensorless technology is drawing
more attention. For convenience, this application assumes a simple method to estimate rotor speed,
described in Section 5.6.
7.5 Stator Flux Determination
The motor will get an optimum transformation from energy produced by magnetic field compared to that
produced mechanically when it works at the point of the flux linkage curve. At the high speed range,
however, the flux should be weakened to reach a high speed. Therefore, the electrical machine should
maintain the flux below the rated speed range, and the flux should be weakened at the high speed
range. The flux should be regulated depending on the rotor speed.
Software Design, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
7-3
7.6 Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation (SVPWM)
Space Vector Modulation (SVM) can directly transform the stator voltage vectors from an α, β-coordinate
system to Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) signals (duty cycle values).
The standard technique for output voltage generation uses an inverse Clarke transformation to obtain
3-phase values. Using the phase voltage values, the duty cycles needed to control the power stage
switches are then calculated. Although this technique gives good results, space vector modulation is
more straightforward and realized more easily by a digital signal controller.
7.7 Fault Control
From the consideration of the cost control, optocoupler is not used in this system. The fault control
process and its hardware should be designed to provide a solid protection against damage. In this
application, due to the high complex of the pins, the fault1 to fault3 input pins are coupled with the PWM
output pads. Only fault0 is valid for the detection of the rising edge generated by the fault signals. The
overcurrent, overvoltage and overheat protections are merged together with the OR relation; that is, if
any of them occur, the pin Fault0 will catch the edge and the fault process will dominate all resources
and disable the PWM output pads. The routine will trap into the Interrupt Service Routine (ISR) once the
fault occurs.
7.8 PFC Software Design
Power Factor (PF) is defined as the ratio between real power and apparent power of AC input. Assuming
input voltage is a perfect sine wave, PF can be defined as the product of current distortion and phase
shift. Consequently, the PFC circuit’s main tasks are:
•
Controlling inductor current, making the current sinusoidal and the same phase as input voltage
•
Controlling output voltage, insuring the output voltage is stable.
The PFC main current needs two closed loops to control the circuit:
— The voltage loop is the outer loop, which samples the output voltage and controls it to a
stable level
— The current loop is the inner loop, which samples inductor current and forces the current to
follow the standard sinusoidal reference in order to reduce the input harmonic current
The system in this application is based on current Discontinuous Current Mode (DCM), in which there is
only a voltage loop. DCM can make the current both sinusoidal and the same phase as input voltage.
PI loop control is widely used in industry control because of its simplicity and reliability. In this
application, the voltage loop adopts PI regulator arithmetic.
These assumptions simplify analysis:
•
Input current follows reference perfectly, which is proportional to the input voltage
•
There is no additional power depletion in the circuit; power efficiency is 1
•
Output power is constant
Design of ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
7-4
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
PFC Software Design
Figure 7-4. Simple PFC Mode
The function for output voltage:
⎧Uv(n) = K 0v × Ev(n) + Iv(n − 1)
⎪
⎨ Iv(n) = Iv(n − 1) + K1v × Ev(n) + Kcorrv × Epiv
⎪ Epiv = Usv − Uv(n)
⎩
⎧Uvmax
⎪
Usv = ⎨Uvmin
⎪Uv(n)
⎩
whenUv(n) ≥ Uvmax
whenUv(n) ≤ Uvmin
else
Uv(n)
=
the result of PI unit
Ev(n)
=
input error
Iv(n)
=
integral unit
K0v
=
proportional constant
K1v
=
integral constant
Kcorrv
=
resistant saturation constant
Usv
=
result of voltage loop after limit
iUvmax
=
maximum of voltage loop
Uvmin
=
minimum of voltage loop
Vo*
G ( Z)
vo
K
Figure 7-5. Discrete Voltage Loop Structure
Software Design, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
7-5
Design of ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
7-6
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
JTAG Simulation Function
Chapter 8
JTAG Simulation and SCI Communication
There are abundant software and hardware resources for JTAG simulation and communication in the
56F8013 device. With these resources, a 56F8013-based motor system can accomplish mixed
communication functions, such as JTAG debug and SCI interface, between the power module and PC.
Isolation is necessary between power electronics and microelectronics in the power system for safety.
The communication system consists of two parts:
•
JTAG circuit, designed with for debugging and programming the 56F8013
•
SCI circuit, designed for background communication from the PC; power management and
supervision can be realized conveniently
Figure 8-1. Communication Board’s Frame Figure
8.1 JTAG Simulation Function
Because the 56800E core integrates the JTAG/EOnCE function, the 56F8013 can be debugged and
programmed through the parallel port by a simple interface circuit without any special emulator. The
debug function is provided by JTAG interface.
The power main circuit must be removed to ensure safety. During debugging, the connection for main
power circuit should be cut off by disconnecting the J5000 connector on power board; see Figure 8-2.
JTAG Simulation and SCI Communication, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
8-1
Figure 8-2. System Diagram
Figure 8-3. Connections for JTAG
As shown in Figure 8-3, the JTAG flat cable is connected to the 56F8013‘s J1. A parallel cable links the
JTAG to PC’s parallel port.
CAUTION
Disconnect J5000 in the Power Board before debugging or refreshing the control
program. Otherwise, damage to or invalidation of the demo, or even electrical
shock, can occur.
Debugging or refreshing the control program should only be done by
experienced personnel.
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
8-2
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
SCI Communication Function
Figure 8-4. CodeWarrior Development Tool Interface
CodeWarrior IDE is necessary to debug software and refresh the program; version 7.0 or later is
recommended. Figure 8-4 shows the software interface. Details about installation and use can be found
in the CodeWarrior documentation.
8.2 SCI Communication Function
Connections for SCI communication are shown in Figure 8-5. A serial cable links the RS-232 connector
on the demonstration board to the PC’s serial port.
JTAG Simulation and SCI Communication, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
8-3
Figure 8-5. SCI Communication Connections
The PC Master software tool can be used for development and control of the application. Details about
installation and use of PC master software can be found in the CodeWarrior tool.
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
8-4
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Cautions
Chapter 9
Operation
This section offers brief instructions on operating the ACIM application.
9.1 Switch-on
Follow these steps to start the ACIM application:
1. Make sure the power switch is on the POWEROFF state, then put the plug in a wall socket
2. Switch the appliance on by pressing down the POWERON button.
The 56F8013 starts the main power, and the ACIM begins to work
9.2 During Operation
1. LEDs on controllers can display system information
— LED 1 displays the operating mode
— LED 2 displays the rotation speed
2. SCI communication provides background supervision for the power module
— SCI baud rate configuration: 4800 BPS
3. Debug function is provided by the JTAG interface
See Caution, Section 8.1 and Section 9.4
4. To ensure the demo plate coupled on the shaft of the motor will not fly out, be sure the
upper cover of the box is closed
9.3 Switch-off
To turn the application off, follow these steps:
1. Switch off the POWERON Button
— The 56F8013 cuts off the main power and the bus voltage is decreased
2. Unplug the power line.
— The controller is powered off, and system is switched off
9.4 Cautions
To ensure safety, take care when:
1. Pressing the power switch to 1 on the unit after the power line is plugged in during the
switch-on process
2. Pressing the power switch to 0 before power line is unplugged during the switch-off
process
3. Debugging
Before beginning the debug process, cut off power to the main power circuit by
disconnecting the J5000 connector on the Power Board
Operation, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
9-1
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
9-2
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Appendix A
Schematics
Schematics, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Appendix A-1
D+3.3V
DGND
TXD1
RXD1
D+3.3V
DGND
TXD1
RXD1
R3000 R3001
800
800
0.1uF
C3008
C
NEC2501
U3002
NEC2501
A
U3001
R3003
800
GND_PC1
R3002
800
+5V_SCI1
A
C
4
D+3.3V
1
1
0.1uF
C3009
GND_PC1
D3000
BAV99
1
C3005
10uF/10V
C3001 5
0.1uF 4
3
C3002 1
0.1uF
C2- GND 15
C2+ VCC 16
C1- V- 6
C1+ V+ 2
MAX202CSE
8
13
7
14
D3001
BAV99
C3003
0.1uF
GND_PC1
+5V_SCI1
C3004
0.1uF
1
+5V_SCI1
+5V_SCI1
C3007
10uF/10V
C3006
1
10uF/10V
GND_PC1
2
3
4
D3004
1N4733
NC
CAP+
GND
R2O R2I
R1O R1I
T2I T2O
T1I T1O
U3003
V+
TC7660
OSC
LV
VOUT CAP-
U3000
9
12
10
11
8
7
6
5
+
Appendix A-2
4
+
+
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
1
D3002
BAV99
ISOLATED SCI
D3003
BAV99
1
DB9
5
9
4
8
3
7
2
6
1
J3001
GND_PC1
C3000
0.1uF
+5V_SCI1
5
9
4
8
3
7
2
6
1
GND_PC1
V2.0
Schematics, Rev. 1
DGND
DGND
DGND
DGND
D+3.3V
DGND
D+3.3V
DGND
Function3
S1003
Function2
S1002
Function2
S1001
Function1
S1000
LEDCLK
/LEDEN
TXD1
RXD1
2
4
6
8
10
DGND
C1040
0.1uF
DGND
C1039
0.1uF
DGND
C1038
0.1uF
DGND
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
LED and DA
JP4000
1
3
5
7
9
SCI
JP1007
TDO
JP1014
Jumper for Push Button
TCK
JP1013
Jumper for Push Button
TMS
JP1012
Jumper for PushButton
TDI
JP1011
Jumper for PushButton
C1037
0.1uF
D+3.3V
DGND
D+3.3V
DGND
D+3.3V
LEDDATA
TXD1
RXD1
BUS+
U
UN
V
VN
SensorV02
SensorV02.SCH
1nF
U1
V1
W1
D+5V
DGND
PGND
U1
V1
W1
D+5V
DGND
PGND
1nF
1nF
I_Sense_V
I_Sense_U
IPMLOCK
V_Sense_U
V_Sense_V
V_Sense_W
I_Sense_DCB
V_Sense_DCB
1nF
DGND
1nF
U1001
LM293
1nF
C1030 C1031 C1032 C1033 C1034 C1035
I_Sense_DCB1 I_Sense_DCB1
BUS+
U
UN
V
VN
P+15V
P+15V
DGND
DGND
PFCdrive1
PFCdrive1
AC_RELAY
AC_RELAY
D+5V
D+5V
I_Sense_V
I_Sense_U
IPMLOCK
V_Sense_W
I_Sense_DCB
V_Sense_DCB
V_Sense_U
V_Sense_V
PGND
LED1001
OverTemp
D1001
IN4148
D+5V
R1010
300
R1001
1.2K
PFCdrive1
35
37
39
DSP
JP1004
JP1008
ADC Channel Sub-Jumper
I_Sense_U
ACur_hall
SUB_ANA1
ADC Channel Jumper
V_Sense_U
ANA11
SUB_ANA1
PA5-PWM5/FAULT2/T3
38
40
3.3V
2
GND
PA7-VPP
PB7-TXD/SCL
6
PB6-RXD/SDA/CLKIN
8
PA0-PWM0
PC0-ANA0
PA1-PWM1
PC1-ANA1
PB4-T0/CLK0
PC2-VREFH
PB5-T1/FAULT3
16
PB3-MOSI/T3
PC4-ANB0
PB2-MISO/T2
PC5-ANB1
PB0-SCLK/SCL
PC6-ANB2/VREFL
PB1-/SS/SDA
24
PD0-TDI
PB1-/SS/SDA
PD1-TDO
PB0-SCLK/SCL
PD2-TCK
PA2-PWM2
PD3-TMS
PA3-PWM3
PA6-FAULT0
PA4-PWM4/FAULT1/T2
JP1010
Rotor Speed
JP1006
D+3.3V
RotorSpeedGiv
DGND
C1000
0.01uF
U1000
1Y1 18
1Y2 16
1Y3 14
1Y4 12
2Y1 9
2Y2 7
2Y3 5
2Y4 3
R1018
0.5ACIM
V2
OUT
R1002
130K
U1001
LM293
0.1uF
C1009
26
28
30
32
34
36
18
20
22
10
12
14
4
JP1005
JP1009
ADC CHANNEL SUN_JUMPER
I_Sense_V
BCur_hall
SUB_ANA0
D1000
IN4148
RXD1
TXD1
D+3.3V
DGND
DGND
D+5V
LEDCLK
LEDDATA
/LEDEN
RXD1
TXD1
D+3.3V
DGND
SCIV02
SCIV02.SCH
DGND
D+5V
C1008
0.1mF/25V
PGND
C1001
0.1uF
P+15V
LEDV02
LEDV02.SCH
PSS8050
Q1000
10.2K
R1009
LEDCLK
LEDDATA
/LEDEN
PGND
RV1000 P+15V
10K
OPEN R1011
4.7K
DSP Control ON IPM
ADC Channel Jumper
V_Sense_V
ANA00
SUB_ANA0
PWM2
PWM3
PWM4
PWM5
I_Sense_DCB
V_Sense_DCB
RotorSpeedGiv
ANA00
ANA11
V_Sense_W
1
R1000
1.2K
R1004
6.8K
Induction Motor & Driver
HIN1 HIN2 HIN3 LIN1 LIN2 LIN3 T/Itrip VDD VSS
PWM INPUT SIGNALS LOW ACTIVE
R1019
0.5ACIM
TE10 TE12 TE14 TE11 TE13 TE15
PWM0 PWM2 PWM4 PWM1 PWM3 PWM5
I_Sense_DCB1
1G
2G GND
MC74HC244
2A1
2A2
2A3
2A4
1A1VCC
1A2
1A3
1A4
R1013
5.1K
LEM(FOR DEBUG PURPOSE)
JP1002
1
19
D+5V
R1008
0.5ACIM/2PMSM
NOTE:PGND,DGND are conncected together,for no opto-isolat ion is used
IPMLOCK
D+3.3V
1
DGND
3
TXD1
5
RXD1
7
PWM0
9
PWM1
11
PFCdrive 13
AC_RELAY 15
LEDDATA 17
OPEN
19
LEDCLK 21
/LEDEN
23
TDI
25
TDO
27
TCK
29
TMS
31
IPMLOCK 33
ACur_hall
BCur_hall
DGND
2
4
6
8
PWM1
11
PWM3
13
PWM5
15
PFCdrive 17
PWM0
PWM2
PWM4
IPMLOCK
8 7 86 75 64 53 42 31 2 1
PGND
20
10
D+3.3V
RP1000
8X5K
1
15
U2
16
HEAD
1
U1002
IRAMS10UP60A
17
C1006
0.1uF/630V CBB
R1017
0.5ACIM
18
BUS+
19
R1012
470V1K
C1036
0.1uF/630V CBB
20
JP1000
2
PGND
7
21
BUS+
22
PFC&AP_2
PFC&AP_2.SCH
23
C1002
W1
2.2uF/25V
C1004
2.2uF/25V
U1
U
U2
JP1018
PhaseV_up
JP1017
PhaseV_down
VN1
VN
I_Sense_DCB1
V1
V
V2
PhaseU_down
JP1016
PhaseU_up
JP1015
R1016
2 onlyForPMSM
R1015
2 onlyForPMSM
VN1
R1014
2 onlyForPMSM
UN1
UN1
UN
I_Sense_DCB1
V1
U1
2.2uF/25V
C1003
+
+
+
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Appendix A-3
UVW_OUTPUT
JP1001
ACIM/PMSM MOTOR DRIVER Power Board Top View
V2.0
C4001
0.1uF
74LS164(U4000)
D+5V
D+5V
DGND
/LEDEN
LEDCLK
LEDDATA
C4002
0.1uF
74LS164(4001)
D+5V
/LEDEN
LEDCLK
LEDDATA
D+5V
D+5V
C4000
47uF/10V
D+5V
24
1
18
19
/LEDEN
9
4
12
LEDCLK 13
LEDDATA
R4010
10K
5K
MR
CLK
A
B
GND
GND
MAX7219
LOAD
CLK
DOUT
DIN
ISET
V+
MR
CLK
3
4
5
6
10
11
12
13
DIG0
DIG1
DIG2
DIG3
DIG4
DIG5
DIG6
DIG7
3
4
5
6
10
11
12
13
14
16
20
23
21
15
17
22
2
11
6
7
3
10
5
8
DIG1
DIG2
DIG3
DIG4
DIG5
DIG6
DIG7
DIG8
SEGA
SEGB
SEGC
SEGD
SEGE
SEGF
SEGG
SEGDP
Q0
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
Q5
Q6
Q7
D+5V
Q0
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
Q5
Q6
Q7
74HC164
U4004
9
7
A
B
U4000
74HC164
8
9
7
LEDCLK
/LEDEN
R4009
/LEDEN
8
14
1
2
5K
R4008
U4001
LEDDATA
D+5V
14
1
2
D+5V
SEGA
SEGB
SEGC
SEGD
SEGE
SEGF
SEGG
SEGDG
DIG1
DIG2
DIG3
DIG4
DIG5
DIG6
DIG7
DIG8
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
R4007
R4006
R4005
R4004
R4003
R4002
R4001
R4000
SEGA
SEGB
SEGC
SEGD
SEGE
SEGF
SEGG
SEGDG
11
7
4
2
1
10
5
3
11
7
4
2
1
10
5
3
DIG.1
a DIG.1
a
b
c f g b
d
e e d c
f
dp
g
dp
12
DIG.1
a DIG.1
a
b
c f g b
d
e e d c
f
dp
g
dp
12
d
c
d
c
c
dp
d
LED DISPLAY
d
dp
c
e
dp
e
f
e
DIG.3
DIG.3
a
b
g
dp
DIG.3
DIG.3
a
f
b
g
DIG.2
DIG.2
a
b
g
f
e
DIG.2
DIG.2
a
f
b
g
9
9
8
8
U4002
FYQ-3641A
d
c
U4003
FYQ-3641A
dp
e
d
dp
c
DIG.4
DIG.4
a
b
g
f
e
DIG.4
DIG.4
a
f
b
g
6
6
Appendix A-4
+
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
V2.0
Schematics, Rev. 1
J5000
AC INPUT
PGND
AC_IN11
L2004
3.3uH
2
K
PGND
4
1
C
A
Q5001
PSS8050
PGND
C2005
0.1uF/250VAC
U5021
RELAY
R5023
120/3W
F2000
2A250VAC
5
1
TE5022
PGND
PGND
DGND & PGND Connected together,for no
opto-isolation is used
DGND
AC_IN22
J2000
AC INPUT
AC_IN2
AC_IN1
PGND P+15V
D5023
1N4004
1
+ C5036
47uF/10V
5
C5001
0.1uF
VR2000
P6KE200
3
2
U2000
TOP223YAI
1
D5022
1N4007
D2001
BYV26C
C2006
47uF/400V
PGND
D2002
KBP10
PFC_AP
220uH
L5001
R5022 AC_RELAY
1K
PGND
C5000
D5000
470nF/275V
IR25XB08H
F5000
250V/20A
C5025
0.1uF
9
R5008
0.02
C2009
47uF
C2008
0.1uF
D2003
1N4148
C2007
0.1uF
R5002
10/3W
C5002
680pF/2K
D5001
DSEP60-06A
R2000
6.2
D2006
MUR420
E
C2020
330uF/35V
L2003
3.3uH
U2002
TL431
R2001
2K
PGND
C2028
1.6nF/450VAC
K
NEC2501
U2001
A
C2027
0.1uF
R2002
200/0.5W
P+15V
BUS+
PGND
R2003
10K
RV2000
100K
2
C2016
220UF/25V
L2002
3.3uH
NC
GND
TC4420
2
P+15V
5
6
900
R2005
300
PGND
C2019
1uF
DGND
1
LED2001
RED DISPLAY
VB
5
7
6
8
CS
0.1uF
PGND
C5026
10nF
C5024
DGND
D+5V
R5024
6.8/0.5W
PFCdrive3
VS
HO
CS
PFC & AP
1N4001
C5027
0.1uF
LED2002
RED DISPLAY
1
P+15V
4
PGND
3
D+5V
2
DGND
1
POWER PLUG
R2004
IN
ERR
VCC
U5020
C2018
220UF/25V D+5V
GND
OUTPUT
7
8
PGND
VDD
JP2001
2
3
1
D5020
C5023
10pF
4 COM
IR2125
C5021
0.1uF
INPUT OUTPUT
D+5V
C2017
0.1uF
R5020
1K
VDD
U13
Q2000
7805
PGND
P+15V
PGND
4
3
2
1
P+15V
PFCdrive1
P+15V
P+15V
PGND
PGND
PFCdrive00
Plug for PFC Debug
4
3
2
1
JP5020
PGND
C5020
220UF/25V
PFCdrive1
C50280.1uF
PFCdrive1
PGND
C2015
330uF/35V
C2022
0.1uF
D2005
MUR420
PGND
R5007
470K/2W
R5006
470K/2W
PGND
D5021
1N4007
PFC_AP
C2021
220UF/25V
PFCdrive3
PFCdrive00
PFCdrive2
C5004
330uF
BUS+
PFC DRIVER JUMPER
JP5003
R5003
30K
Q5000
IXTH30N50
PFCdrive00C5003
330uF
APC TRANSFORMER
TR2001
CS
PowerJumper
J5002
AC_RELAY
9
P+15V
1
P+15V
1
3
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Appendix A-5
R5021
6.8/0.5W
V2.0
PFCdrive2
PGND
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
V_Sense_DCB
I_Sense_DCB
R6012
620
R6008
620
C6006
0.01uF
C6004
0.01uF
W1
R6015
330
D+5V
LED6001
OverCur
C6032
0.01uF
D6001
1N4148
D6000
1N4148
R6017
300
LED6002
OverBusVo l
R6016
300
R6011
330
D+5V
U
UN
V
VN
BUS+
PGND
DGND
D+5V
(PROTEC OF DCBUS CURRENT & DCBUS VOLTAGE, FOR
PROJECT OF ACIM AND PMSM)
220K
1.2K
LM293
0.1uF
C6005
OUT
C6033
0.01uF
U6002
R6014
RV600 3
10K
2
D+5V C6030
0.01uF
220K
R6013
1.2K
U
UN
V
VN
BUS+
PGND
DGND
D+5V
R6010
U6002
LM293
D+5V
C6031
0.01uF
RV6002
10K
2
D+5V
I_Sense_DCB 1
R6009
FOR BLDC
1
I_Sense_DCB 1
1
1
U1
V1
7
U1
V1
W1
1
1
PGND
VREF
OUT
GND
R6004
4
+
160
R6044
C6038
0.1uF
C6034
0.01uF
DGND
R6051
10K
R6050
10K
C6035
0.01uF
JP6000
U6008
MC33172
U6007
MC33172
4
U6010
MC33172 8
C6039
0.1uF
VCC
OUT
GND
160
C6003
0.01uF
R6005
U6001
MC33172
I_Sense_V
I_Sense_V
I_Sense_U
I_Sense_DCB
1.65VREF
I_Sense_U
D+5V
I_Sense_DCB
Reference Voltage Jumper(1.65V for PMSM and DGN D for ACIM)
1.65VREF
VREF
DGND
(SAMPLE OF PHASE CURRENT,
FOR PMSM)
160
R6049
(SAMPLE OF PHASE CURRENT,
FOR PMSM)
DGND
C6037
10uF/16V
8
7
6
5
(SAMPLE OF DC BUS CURRENT,
FOR ACIM)
8.2K-0.1%ACIM/1M-0.1%PMSM
R6002
10K-0.1%ACIM/200K-0.1%PMSM
U6001
VCCMC33172
C6000
0.1uF
C6041
0.1uF
OUT
GND
R6048
4
U6008
8
MC33172
D+5V
VCC
1M-0.1%PMSM
1.65VREF
C6040
0.1uF
OUT
GND
R6043
4
U6007
8
MC33172
D+5V
VCC
REF196
U6009
TP
NC
VS
NC
SLEEP OUTPUT
GND
TP
1M-0.1%PMSM
R6001
8
10K-0.1%ACIM/200K-0.1%PMSM
R6003
8.2K-0.1%ACIM/1M-0.1%PMSM
D+5V
IPMLOCK
I_Sense_DCB1
IPMLOCK
R6046
200K-0.1%PMSM
VN
R6045
V 200K-0.1%PMSM
R6047
1M-0.1%PMSM
R6041
200K-0.1%PMSM
UN
R6040
U 200K-0.1%PMSM
R6042
1M-0.1%PMSM
1
2
3
4
1.65VREF
D+5V
R6052
4.7K
1
1
1
C6036
0.1uF
1
7
7
D+5V
7
R6021
V1
I_Sense_DCB1
W1
C6015
0.01uF
R6036
7.25M-0.1%
D6004
1N4733
D6009
1N4733
D6005
1N4733
D6003
1N4733
D6008
1N4733
D6007
1N4733
D6002 D6006
1N4733 1N4733
R6037
51K-0.1%
R6032
51K-0.1%
R6027
51K-0.1%
R6022
51K-0.1%
C6019
0.01uF
R6031
7.25M-0.1%
R6030
7.25M-0.1%
R6035
7.25M-0.1%
I_Sense_DCB1
C6007
0.1uF
C6011
0.01uF
R6026
7.25M-0.1%
R6025
7.25M-0.1%
R6020
7.25M-0.1%
I_Sense_DCB1
U1
PGND
BUS+ 7.25M-0.1%
4
8
C6012
0.1uF
4
8
C6008
0.1uF
OUT
GND
U6004
VCCMC33172
D+5V
C6016
0.01uF
R6033
51K-0.1%
OUT
GND
OUT
GND
U6006
VCCMC33172
C6021
0.01uF
R6038
51K-0.1%
4
8
D+5V
U6005
VCC MC33172
C6017
0.1uF
C6013
0.01uF
C6020
0.1uF
4
8
D+5V
C6009
0.01uF
R6023
51K-0.1%
OUT
GND
U6003
VCC MC33172
R6028 51K-0.1%
D+5V
1
1
R6039
160
R6034
160
R6029
160
R6024
160
U6003
MC33172
C6022
0.01uF
C6018
0.01uF
C6014
0.01uF
(SAMPLE OF W PHASE VOLTAGE, FOR
PMSM ONLY)
U6006
MC33172
V_Sense_W
V_Sense_V
(SAMPLE OF V PHASE VOLTAGE, FOR
PMSM ONLY)
U6005
MC33172
V_Sense_DC B
V_Sense_U
(SAMPLE OF U PHASE VOLTAGE, FOR
PMSM ONLY)
U6004
MC33172
(SAMPLE OF DC BUS+, FOR PROJECT OF
PMSM AND ACIM)
C6010
0.01uF
7
7
1
1
7
7
Appendix A-6
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
V_Sense_W
V_Sense_V
V_Sense_U
V_Sense_DC B
SENSOR CIRCUIT FOR ACIM & PMSM
V2.0
Appendix B
ACIM Bill of Materials
Designator
Description
Footprint
Quantity
C1000, C6003, C6004,C6006, C6009, C6010,
C6011, C6013, C6014, C6015, C6016, C6018,
C6019, C6021, C6022, C6030, C6031, C6032,
C6033, C6034, C6035
0.01 µF
RAD-0.1
21
C1001, C1009, C1037, C1038, C1039, C1040,
C2007, C2008, C2017, C2022, C2027, C3000,
C3001, C3002, C3003, C3004, C3008, C3009,
C4001, C4002, C5001, C5021, C5024, C5025,
C5027, C5028, C6000, C6005, C6007, C6008,
C6012, C6017, C6020, C6036, C6038, C6039,
C6040, C6041
0.1 µF
RAD-0.1
38
C1002, C1003
2.2 µF / 25 V
RB2.5/5
2
C1006, C1036
0.1 µF / 630V CBB
RAD15/18/6
2
C1008
0.1 mF / 25V
RB2.5/6
1
C1030, C1031, C1032, C1033, C1034, C1035
1 nF
RAD-0.1
6
C2005
0.1 uF / 250VAC
RAD15/18/6
1
C2006
47 µF / 400V
RB10/22.4
1
C2009
47 µF
RB2.5/5
1
C2015, C2020
330 µF / 35V
RB5/10
2
C2016, C2018, C2021, C5020
220 µF / 25V
RB3/8
4
C2019
1 µF
RAD-0.2
1
C2028
1.6 nF / 450VAC
RAD-0.4
1
C3005, C3006, C3007
10 µF / 10V
RB2.5/5
3
C4000, C5036
47 µF / 10V
RB2.5/5
2
C5000
470 nF / 275V
RAD22/26/9
1
C5002
650 pF / 2K
RAD-0.2
1
C5003, C5004
330 µF
RB10/30
2
C5023
10 pF
RAD-0.1
1
C5026
10 nF
RAD-0.1
1
ACIM Bill of Materials, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Appendix B-1
Designator
Description
Footprint
Quantity
C6037
10 µF / 16V
RB2.5/5
1
D1000, D1001
IN4148
DIODE-0.4
2
D2001
BYV26C
DIODE-0.4
1
D2002
KBP10
KBP19
1
D2003
IN4148
DIODE-0.4
1
D2005, D2006
MUR420
DIODE-0.5
2
D3000, D3001, D3002, D3003
BAV99
SOT-23
4
D3004
IN4733
DIODE-0.4
1
D5000
IR25XB08H
IR25XB
1
D5001
DSEP60-06A
TO247AD
1
D5020
IN4001
IN4007
1
D5021, D5022
IN4007
IN4007
2
D5023
IN4004
IN4004
1
D6000, D6001
IN4148
DIODE-0.4
2
D6002, D6003, D6004, D6005, D6006, D6006,
D6008, D6009
IN4733
DIODE-0.4
8
F2000
Fuse 2A 250 VAC
FUSE20/5/7
1
F5000
Fuse 250V / 20A
FUSE20/5/7
1
J2000, J5000
AC INPUT Connectors
CON5/3.96
2
J3001
DB9 Connector
DB9/M
1
J5002
Power Jumper
CON2/3.96
1
JP1000
Jumper HEAD
CON5/3.96
1
JP1001
Jumper UVW_OUTPUT
UVW
1
JP1002
Jumper LEM (For Debug
Purpose)
HDR1X3
1
JP1004, JP1005
ADC Channel Jumper
HDR1X3
2
JP1006
Jumper Rotor Speed
HDR1X3
1
JP1007
Jumper SCI
IDC10
1
JP1008
ADC Channel Jumper
HDR1X3
1
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
Appendix B-2
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Designator
Description
Footprint
Quantity
JP1009
ADC Channel Jumper
HDR1X3
1
JP1010
DSC Demo Board
Connector
HDR2X20
1
JP1011, JP1012, JP1013, JP1014
Jumper for Push Button
HDR1X2
4
JP1015
Jumper PhaseU_up
HDR1X3
1
JP1016
Jumper PhaseU_down
HDR1X3
1
JP1017
Jumper PhaseV_up
HDR1X3
1
JP1018
Jumper PhaseV_down
HDR1X3
1
JP2001
Jumper PowerPlug
HDR1X4-5
1
JP4000
LED and DA
IDC10
1
JP5003
PFC Driver Jumper
HDR1X3
1
JP5020
Jumper Plug for PFC
Debug
HDR1X4
1
JP6000
Reference Voltage Jumper
(1.65 for PMSM and DGND
for ACIM)
HDR1X3
1
L2002, L2003
3.3 µH
IND3.3u
2
L2004
3.3 µH
IND
1
L5001
220 µH
IND_PFC
1
LED1001
LED OverTemp
LEDA
1
LED2001, LED2002
RED LED DISPLAY
LEDA
2
LED6001
LED OverCur
LEDA
1
LED6002
LED OverBusVol
LEDA
1
Q1000, Q5001
PSS8050
TO-92A
2
Q5000
IXTH30N50
TO247AC
1
R1000, R1001
1.2K Ohm
AXIAL-0.4
2
R1002
130K Ohm
AXIAL-0.4
1
R1004
6.8K Ohm
AXIAL-0.4
1
R1008
6.8K Ohm
AXIAL-0.4
1
ACIM Bill of Materials, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Appendix B-3
Designator
Description
Footprint
Quantity
R1009
10.2K
AXIAL-0.4
1
R1010
300 Ohm
AXIAL-0.4
1
R1011
4.7K Ohm
AXIAL-0.4
1
R1012
470V 1K Ohm
VVR
1
R1013
5.1K Ohm
AXIAL-0.4
1
R1014, R1015, R1016
2 Ohm (PMSM)
SHANT-0.5
3
R1017, R1018, R1019
0.5 Ohm (ACIM)
SHANT-0.5
3
R2000
6.2 Ohm
AXIAL-0.4
1
R2001
2K Ohm
AXIAL-0.4
1
R2002
200 Ohm / 0.5W
AXIAL-0.5
1
R2003
10K Ohm
AXILA-0.4
1
R2004
300 Ohm
AXIAL-0.4
1
R2005
900 Ohm
AXIAL-0.4
1
R3000, R3001, R3002, R3003
800 Ohm
AXIAL-0.4
4
R4000, R4001, R4002, R4003, R4004, R4005,
R4006, R4007
100 Ohm
AXIAL-0.4
8
R4008, R4009
5K Ohm
AXIAL-0.4
2
R4010, R6050, R6051
10K Ohm
AXIAL-0.4
3
R5002
10 Ohm / 3W
R2WV
1
R5003
30K Ohm
AXIAL-0.4
1
R5006, R5007
470K Ohm / 2W
R2WV
2
R5008
0.02 Ohm
SHANT-0.2
1
R5020, R5022
1K Ohm
AXIAL-0.4
2
R5021, R5024
6.8 Ohm / 0.5W
AXIAL-0.5
2
R5023
120 Ohm / 3W
RXWV
1
R6001, R6002
10K Ohm - 0.1% (ACIM) /
200K Ohm - 0.1% (PMSM)
AXIAL-0.4
2
R6003, R6004
8.2K Ohm -0.1% (ACIM) /
1M Ohm -0.1% (PMSM)
AXIAL-0.4
2
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
Appendix B-4
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Designator
Description
Footprint
Quantity
R6005, R6024, R6029, R6034, R6039, R6044,
R6049
160 Ohm
AXIAL-0.4
7
R6008
620 Ohm
AXIAL-0.4
1
R6009, R6013
1.2K Ohm
AXIAL-0.4
2
R6010, R6014
220K Ohm
AXIAL-0.4
2
R6011, R6015
330 Ohm
AXIAL-04
2
R6012
620 Ohm
AXIAL-04
1
R6016, R6017
300 Ohm
AXIAL-04
2
R6020, R6021, R6025, R6026, R6030, R6031,
R6035, R6036
7.25M Ohm - 0.1%
AXIAL-04
8
R6022, R6023, R6027, R6028, R6032, R6033,
R6037, R6038
51K Ohm - 0.1%
AXIAL-04
8
R6040, R6041, R6045, R6046
200K Ohm - 0.1% (PMSM)
AXIAL-04
4
R6042, R6043, R6047, R6048
1M Ohm - 0.1% (PMSM)
AXIAL-04
4
R6052
4.7K Ohm
AXIAL-04
1
RP1000
Resistor Pack 8 X 5K Ohm
SIP9
1
RV1000, RV6002, RV6003
10K Ohm
VRESLV
3
RV2000
100K Ohm
VRESLV
1
S1000
Button Function1
BUTTON
1
S1001, S1002
Button Function2
BUTTON
2
S1003
Button Function3
BUTTON
1
TE10
Test point PWM0
SIP-1
1
TE11
Test point PWM1
SIP-1
1
TE12
Test point PWM2
SIP-1
1
TE13
Test point PWM3
SIP-1
1
TE14
Test point PWM4
SIP-1
1
TE15
Test point PWM5
SIP-1
1
TE5022
PGND
SIP-1
1
TR2001
APC Transformer
TRAN-E133-2
1
ACIM Bill of Materials, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
Appendix B-5
Designator
Description
Footprint
Quantity
U13
TC4420
DIP8
2
U1000
MC74HC244
DIP20
1
U1001, U6002
LM293
DIP8
2
U1002
IRAMS10UP60A
IRAMS10UP60A-2
1
U2000
TOP223YAI
TO-220
1
U2001, U3001, U3002
NEC2501
DIP4
3
U2002
TL431
TL431
1
U3000
TC7660
SO-8
1
U3003
MAX202CSE
DIP16
1
U4000, U4001
74HC164
DIP14
2
U4002, U4003
FYQ-3641A
LG3641AH
2
U4004
MAX7219
DIP24
1
U5020
IR2125
DIP8
1
U5021
RELAY
U6001, U6003, U6004, U6005, U6006, U6007,
U6008, U6010
MC33172
DIP8
8
U6009
REF196
DIP-8
1
VR2000
P6KE200
DIODE-0.4
1
1
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
Appendix B-6
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
INDEX
Numerics
H
3-Phase AC Induction Motor Vector Control using a
56F80x, 56F8100 or 56F8300 Device Design of Motor
Control Application Preface-xii
3-Phase AC Motor Control with VHz Speed Close Loop
using the 56F80x Preface-xii
56F8300 Peripheral User Manual Preface-xii
56F8323 Data Sheet Preface-xii
HMI Preface-xi
Human Machine Interface Preface-xi
A
A Fully Digitized Field-Oriented Controlled Induction
Motor Drive using Only Current Sensors Preface-xii
A Novel Stator-Flux-Oriented Speed Sensorless Induction
Motor Control System using Flux Tracking
Strategy Preface-xii
A Stator Flux Oriented Induction Machine Drive Preface-xii
A Stator Flux-Oriented Voltage Source Variable-Speed
Drive Based on DC Link Measurement Preface-xii
A Stator-Flux-Oriented Vector-Controlled Induction Motor
Drive with Space-Vector PWM and Flux-Vector
Synthesis by Neural Networks Preface-xii
ACIM Preface-xi
Alternating Current Induction Motor Preface-xi
ADC
Analog-to-Digital Conversion Preface-xi
An Improved Stator Flux Estimation in Steady-State
Operation for Direct Torque Control of Induction
Machines Preface-xii
I
I2C Preface-xi
Inter-Integrated Circuit Preface-xi
IC Preface-xi
Integrated Circuit Preface-xi
IM Preface-xi
Induction Motor Preface-xi
Inside Code Warrior Preface-xii
IPM Preface-xi
Intelligent Power Module Preface-xi
ISR Preface-xi
Interrupt Service Routine Preface-xi
L
LPF Preface-xi
M
Maximum Torque Control of Stator-Flux-Oriented Induction
Machine Drive in the Field-Weakening
Region Preface-xii
N
C
New Integration Algorithms for Estimating Motor Flux over
a Wide Speed Range Preface-xii
COP Preface-xi
Computer Operating Properly Preface-xi
P
D
DCM Preface-xi
DSP56800E Reference Manual Preface-xii
E
EMF Preface-xi
EVM Preface-xi
Evaluation Module Preface-xi
G
PFC Preface-xi
Power Factor Correction Preface-xi
PI
Proportional-Integral Preface-xi
PLL Preface-xi
Phase Locked Loop Preface-xi
Practical Implementation of a Stator Flux Oriented Control
Scheme for an Induction Machine Preface-xii
Proportional-Integral Preface-xi
PWM
Pulse Width Modulation or Modulator
PWM Preface-xi
GPIO Preface-xi
General Purpose Input/Output Preface-xi
Index, Rev. 1
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
i
R
RMS
Root Mean Square Preface-xi
Root Mean Square Preface-xi
S
SCI
Serial Communication Interface
SCI Preface-xi
SFOC Preface-xi
Stator-Flux-Oriented Control Preface-xi
SPI Preface-xi
Serial Peripheral Interface Preface-xi
Stator Flux Oriented Control of Induction
Motors Preface-xii
Stator-Flux-Oriented Sensorless Induction Motor Drive for
Optimum Low-Speed Performance Preface-xii
SV Preface-xi
Space Vector Preface-xi
SVPWM Preface-xi
Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation Preface-xi
Design of an ACIM Vector Control Drive using the 56F8013 Device, Rev. 1
ii
Freescale Semiconductor
Preliminary
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