Procaster User Manual
Procaster AMTX200 AM Transmitter
Important!
Safety Warning
Never mount near electrical power lines!
Safety Ground Warning
For the built-in lightning protection to work properly, the Procaster grounding lug must be properly
grounded. Consult your local electrical safety standards.
Transmitter RF Ground
For maximum range, the Procaster grounding lug must also be connected to a good RF (radio
frequency) ground. Electrical and RF grounds are often considered to be the same, but
sometimes they are not. A good RF ground will cause maximum current to flow in the antenna
resulting in greater radiation and best range.
IF YOU ARE NOT GETTING SUFFICIENT RANGE, YOU MAY HAVE TO
EXPERIMENT WITH DIFFERENT RF GROUNDING – SEE RF GROUNDING
SECTION AT THE END OF THIS USER MANUAL!
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Quick Setup
This Quick Setup section is to get you up and running with minimal reading. For best
results, greater detail is covered in the Installation/Operation section.
1. In the Procaster, set broadcast frequency using the internal option switch.
Use the highest “clear” frequency available for best range. (“clear” means no
music or talking – static is OK). Note: quiet static might suggest that another
transmitter is present – if that’s the case, use another frequency.
2. Assemble the 3 antenna sections by lining up the black dot on one section with the
edge of the mating section. Secure sections with the provided hose clamps.
3. Remove the plastic shipping protective bolt tubes and discard them and attach the
antenna to the side of the transmitter using the 2 nuts provided.
4. Mount the transmitter vertically as high as possible in a clear area away from trees,
power lines and other obstructions.
5. Connect a 12 or 14 gauge wire from the ground lug to a suitable ground. (grounding
rod in the earth, water pipe, existing electrical ground, metal roof etc. Important: for
best range, you may have to experiment – see RF Grounding section.
6. Connect the 4 conductor wire as follows:
Procaster end…
 Shield to SHLD (shield wire is the bare wire that contacts the foil)
 RED to +12V
 BLACK to 0V
 GREEN to AUD WHITE to AUD+
Studio Interface end…
 RED to +12V
 BLACK to 0V
 GREEN to AUD WHITE to AUD+
Note: the shield is only connected at the Procaster end. At the Studio Interface
– simply cut the shield off.
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7. Plug the wall adapter into the Studio Interface (do not connect the audio yet).
8. Once the broadcast channel is set, turn the ANTENNA TUNING CAPACITOR (this is
the yellow or blue circular component labeled C18 near the yellow antenna wire)
using the included tuning tool until a maximum reading is seen on the TUNING
METER.
Place the recessed end of the tuning tool over the brass slotted screw of the trimmer
capacitor and turn in either direction until a maximum reading is seen on the tuning
meter. Stand away from the antenna when tuning as your body will affect the results.
Do not adjust the METER TRIMMER POTENTIOMETER! – this is only adjusted if the
meter reads fully to the right off-scale – in this case you will not be able to see a
maximum. The only purpose of the tuning meter is to indicate a MAXIMUM – the
numbers are not important.
For best results keep large metal objects such as elevating work platforms
(Skyjacks) and yourself, away from the antenna while doing this.
9. Close up the Procaster. Tighten the 2 cover screws evenly – don’t over-tighten!
10. Connect audio.
11. It may be necessary to adjust the gain control on the Studio Interface to suit the
audio source being used. Some headphone jacks on MP3 players have a low output
voltage. To increase gain on the Studio Interface, adjust the gain control CW
(accessed through a hole in the side of the Studio Interface) using a small
screwdriver.
12. Inside the Studio Interface, adjust the desired modulation depth to suit your
listening preferences.
13. Inside the Studio Interface, select the desired compression using the jumper…




Chezradio
1:1
2:1 (default)
5:1
10:1
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Installation and Operation
Step 1 Choose a Quiet Channel
Drive around your chosen broadcast area and listen for clear channels. Note: car radios are
usually more sensitive than portables, so that should be considered too. If you want to broadcast
at night, you would have to check if the channel is clear then. It's more difficult to broadcast at
night because sky-waves from higher-powered radio stations reach into your broadcast area and
will reduce your effective transmit range; so bear that in mind. Try to choose one of the highest 42
channels available for the Procaster by setting the option switch accordingly. The higher the
frequency, the better the range due to the restrictive short antenna length.
Step 2 Choose a Location for Installation
Locate the Procaster in as clear an area as possible away from metal structures, power lines,
trees and other obstructions which can absorb and deflect your signal. Higher mounted antennas
work best and give best range. Mounting methods vary - see Step 4. Make sure you can access
the transmitter for tuning once it is in its final position. A good height above earth ground is about
25 feet. The roof of a 2-storey building is a good choice. Note: you cannot tune the transmitter
on the ground and then raise it into its final position – the tuning will be off and the range
will be poor. It has to be tuned only when it is in its final position.
Step 3 Assemble Antenna
The antenna consists of 3 aluminum tubes (large 5/8in, medium 1/2in and small 3/8in) which are
assembled together. These sections are held together using 2 stainless steel pipe clamps
fastened at the mid-point of the cut slots.

Join the large tube to the medium tube
o insert the medium tube into the slotted end of the large tube
o line up the black dot on the medium tube with the edge of the large tube
o tighten pipe clamp snugly using a ¼ in nut driver

Join the small tube to the medium tube
o insert the small tube into the slotted end of the medium tube
o line up the black dot on the small tube with the edge of the medium tube
o tighten pipe clamp snugly using a ¼ in nut driver

Fasten the assembled mast to the transmitter using (2) locknuts
o Tighten snugly (don't over tighten)

Antenna assembly is now complete
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Assembling the antenna
Step 4 Mount External Transmitter
In all mounting cases, make sure you can reach the unit for tuning once installed! The antenna
must be clear of all objects. If mounting part way up a metal tower, make sure the Procaster is at
least 2 ft away from the tower on an extension arm otherwise the tower will cause induced loss of
signal.
Direct wall mounting
The Procaster can be mounted directly to a flat vertical surface using the 4 holes in the case
mounting plate. Make sure that there is sufficient space between the antenna mast and the rear
wall such that snow/ice does not cause a short.
Direct wall mounting with standoff brackets
If you need to install the Procaster further away from the wall, use Radio Shack brackets
#15-883. This will give an extra 4 in of clearance.
Pole mounting
For pole mounting use the included U-bolts as shown in the following picture. These U-bolts will
accommodate tubing up to 1-5/8 in diameter.
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U-bolts for pole mounting
Step 5 Install Ground
Connect the copper grounding lug shown below to a suitable ground.
Grounding lug
Good grounding is extremely important and required for safe operation of the lightning protection
circuitry and also an important part of optimum antenna performance. Typical grounds include:




Copper clad steel grounding rod at least 8ft into earth ground
Water pipe ground
Radial ground system
Metal roof
Refer to the Optimizing your Range Tip #4 for more details.
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Step 6 Connect Power and Audio Wiring
The Procaster connects to the Studio Interface with the supplied 4 conductor shielded cable.
Because the audio is balanced and the power consumption is low, up to 250ft of 22 AWG
shielded wire (Belden 8723 or equivalent) can be used. System comes with 50ft standard –
optional 100ft. Proceed as follows:





Open the Procaster cover by removing the 2 screws
Insert the 4 conductor cable through the liquid-tight grommet on the underside
Add electrical tape to cover exposed foil to prevent possible shorting
Connect 5 places…
o SHIELD to SHLD *
o RED to +12V
o BLACK to 0V
o GREEN to AUD o WHITE to AUD +
Tighten nut on liquid-tight grommet
* The shield wire is the bare wire that contacts the foil inside the cable. Only connect the shield
wire at the Procaster end – leave the shield unconnected at the Studio Interface end.
Wiring the Procaster (shield wire connected)
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Step 7 Connect to indoor Studio Interface Module
Bring the 4 conductor cable into the studio area. Remove the 4 screws from the studio interface
enclosure





Remove the cover
Pass the 4 conductor cable through the side hole
Add electrical tape to cover exposed foil to prevent possible shorting
Connect 4 places…
o RED to +12V
o BLACK to 0V
o GREEN to AUD –
o WHITE to AUD +
Replace the cover and screws
Note: the shield wire is NOT connected at this end - simply cut it off.
Studio Interface wiring (no shield wire connected at this end)
Step 8 Connect an audio source
The Procaster is fitted with a universal 3.5mm input jack. It has been designed to accept stereo
left and right audio channels and mix them into a mono signal. If you only have a mono signal,
you can apply it to either the left or the right input connection.
The built-in audio processor has a fairly wide accommodation range and will automatically adjust
audio level for optimum sound quality. If you use an external audio processor you can turn off the
built-in audio processor by moving the jumper to the ‘off’ position. In addition there is an input
audio level adjustment control (normally set at mid-point) accessible through the Studio Interface
front panel using a small screwdriver.
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Step 9 Power Up the Procaster
Connect the AC wall adapter or 12VDC power source. Note: the standard Procaster system is
designed to be powered from 12VDC and consumes approximately 100mA (1W). For remote
locations with no power available, the entire system can easily be run from a 12V battery charged
by a solar panel. Size of panel depends on your location and days of sunlight.
Step 10 Choose Channel Frequency
To choose the desired broadcast channel and other additional options, the 6-position option
switch is used. This switch is located inside the Procaster transmitter case.
Note: always choose the highest clear frequency possible. The short length of the
antenna is more efficient at higher frequencies and you will get better range.
The Procaster is shipped with the following default settings:



Channel frequency – 1610kHz
Audio Processor Compression – 2:1
Modulation depth - midway
Broadcast frequency option switch (1610kHz shown)
Channel Settings
Chezradio
Freq kHz
S1
S2
S3
S4
S5
S6
1290
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
1300
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
1310
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
1320
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
1330
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
1340
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
1350
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
1360
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
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Freq kHz
S1
S2
S3
S4
S5
S6
1370
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
1380
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
1390
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
1400
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
1410
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
1420
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
1430
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
1440
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
1450
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
1460
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
1470
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
1480
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
1490
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
1500
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
1510
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
1520
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
1530
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
1540
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
1550
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
1560
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
1570
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
1580
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
1590
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
1600
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
1610
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
1620
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
1630
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
1640
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
1650
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
1660
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
1670
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
1680
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
1690
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
1700
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
Note: for best range, use 1600kHz and higher
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Step 11 Antenna Tuning
Important!
Once the broadcast channel is set, turn the ANTENNA TUNING CAPACITOR (this is the yellow
or blue circular component labeled C18 near the yellow antenna wire) using the included tuning
tool until a maximum reading is seen on the TUNING METER.
Place the recessed end of the tuning tool over the brass slotted screw of the trimmer capacitor
and turn in either direction until a maximum reading is seen on the tuning meter. Stand away
from the antenna when tuning as your body will affect the results.
Do not adjust the METER TRIMMER POTENTIOMETER! – this is only adjusted if the meter
reads fully to the right off-scale – in this case you will not be able to see a maximum. The only
purpose of the tuning meter is to indicate a MAXIMUM – the numbers are not important.
Antenna tuning
Failing to tune C18 properly is the leading cause of poor range!
The antenna must be tuned after the Procaster is installed in its final
position – you cannot tune the antenna and then raise up the Procaster!
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Choosing a lower frequency will result in a lower reading on the tuning meter - this is normal.
Antenna tuning is now complete. (Now that was easy!)
Step 12 Final Checkout & Adjustments
Check your sound level and range by listening on a radio. The broadcast signal should be clear
and strong when closer to the transmitter, with more noise heard the further you move away.
The built-in audio processor (located in the Studio Interface module) is what makes the Procaster
sound like a big station. If you want to use your own external audio processing equipment, the
Procaster audio processor can be disabled by moving the audio processor jumper to the ‘off’
position.
The Procaster audio processor can be adjusted to suit personal preferences by adjusting the
Compression (jumper selectable) and Modulation Depth (variable control) using the bladed end
of the tuning tool.
Compression and modulation depth controls
Audio Processor: Compression boosts quieter parts of the audio to be more equal to the louder
parts. This makes the overall audio louder resulting in a stronger signal and greater range. The
tradeoff is the subjective audio quality depending on the level of compression. Settings are 1:1,
2:1, 5:1 and 10:1. Default is 2:1.
Modulation Depth: Turning the modulation depth control CW increases the audio modulation
level of the AM signal. Some additional over modulation (depending on your application) adds
'punch' to the received audio resulting in a stronger, louder signal and greater range. Default is
midway.
Limiting: Limiting is automatic to prevent sideband 'splatter' and both the above adjustments
have no affect on the 'hard limiter' built into the audio processor.
Step 13 Secure cover
Secure cover by evenly tightening the 2 screws to ensure a weatherproof seal.
Congratulations! You have set up your broadcast station.
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Optimizing Your Range
Overview
The original intention of the FCC was to allow broadcasting around the home. Their regulations
achieved this by specifying low input power and electrically short antennas. The purpose of this
was to minimize any interference with commercial radio stations and their listeners.
What is the range?
This is probably the #1 question asked. Range for low power transmitters can vary greatly due to
many factors:






Interfering radio signals from other stations on the same frequency
Obstructions such as buildings and trees
Transmitter height
Quality of the grounding
Electrical interference from power lines
Sensitivity of the radio receiver
Typically you can expect a range of between 1/2 to 2 miles. Poor installation can dramatically
reduce that range.
For best results, we have compiled the following as a guide:
Tip #1
Pick the clearest/quietest frequency in your area that you can. Competing with a commercial
radio station, even if far away and weak will severely reduce your range.
Tip #2
If you want to transmit at night, make sure that is free also. This may be difficult because at night
there may be a cluster of distant stations on every frequency (even if it sounds fairly clear).
Tip #3
Mount the Procaster elevated about 25ft or more in an open area as far away from buildings,
trees and electrical overhead wires as possible. Bear in mind that you have to be able to reach
the transmitter in its final position for tuning. SAFETY WARNING - Never install an antenna close
by to any electrical service!
Tip #4
Make sure your ground is good. The FCC rules allow for a total of 3 meters (118in) for antenna,
transmission line and ground lead. The Procaster has a fixed 104 in electrical antenna length, no
transmission line and a ground lug which must be connected to a ground point for lightning
protection. That implies that the "ground lead" from the ground lug to the ground point can be up
to 14 in long to comply with the 15.219 rules.
If you run a long wire from the ground lug to earth ground, an FCC agent might disallow it if he
thinks that this ground lead could radiate and thus effectively extend the antenna length in
violation of the 15.219 rules. Another method which has been acceptable by some FCC agents in
the past is to connect the "ground lead" to a large metal structure, e.g. a metal tower or metal
roof. If you do decide to install the Procaster up on a tall tower (like a TV tower), you may well run
the risk of being reported – you have to decide on what risk you are comfortable with.
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FCC agents do have different opinions and inspection outcomes have varied according to past
history. If you are notified that your installation is not compliant, be courteous and polite to the
agent and seek to correct the issue promptly. FCC agents have a job to do and their
interpretations may vary. Do not contact the FCC office and ask if your installation is OK,
however, they may contact you because somebody complained. If this happens, just give them
the Procaster FCC identification VCJ-AMTX200 which is located on the front of the unit and
assures them that your equipment is a certified tested unit. Chances are they won't waste their
time and gas coming out to visit you.
Bear in mind that the Procaster has lightning protection built in to prevent lightning from entering
into a residence and possibly injuring somebody. For safety reasons, it is ESSENTIAL that proper
grounding is implemented and that all local electrical safety codes are observed. Safety is priority
one!
Tip #5
It is VERY important that the Procaster antenna is tuned to resonance properly. Follow the tuning
procedure in the Installation & Operation section. An improperly tuned system will have poor
range. When optimally tuned, the RF antenna voltage becomes highest, yielding best range.
Tip #6
Range is usually higher in the countryside compared to the city due to lower electrical noise and
shielding effects. This has to be taken into account when deciding on your expected coverage
area.
Tip #7
Don't be surprised if range is more in one direction than another: this is usually caused by
obstructions/interference.
Tip #8
Range will vary due to seasonal changes in weather and humidity. Ground conductivity affects
range greatly and can vary depending on your geographical location and whether the ground is
wet, dry or frozen. Ground rods driven in below the frost line may overcome some of these
issues.
Tip #9
As seasons change, environmental conditions such as ground conductivity, nearby trees, solar
conditions etc. may cause a reduction in your range. Accordingly, your antenna may require retuning for optimum performance and range. So it is a good idea to make sure that you install the
Procaster in a readily accessible location and don’t lose the tuning tool!
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RF Grounding
The ground connection on the Procaster serves 2 purposes:
1. Safety ground for lightning protection.
2. RF (radio frequency) ground for return of ground currents from the antenna.
The base-fed vertical antenna on the Procaster is in reality only half of the antenna, the
other half being a mirror image in the earth. In order to achieve the best range it is
important that the ground be as conductive to RF currents as possible.
Remember, there are other contributing factors as well as the ground that can affect overall range
and performance such as metal shielding, obstructions, absorbers (trees), other broadcasters
nearby (maybe on other frequencies) and electrical fields from power lines. So it's important to
make sure that things that you have control over are done properly.
Here are some grounding choices which will be discussed:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Radial ground system
Grounding rod(s)
Metal roof
Underground metal water pipes
Building electrical ground
1. The Radial Ground System
The most efficient method is to use a radial ground system directly under the Procaster
installation - this will give the best range with the strongest, noise-free signal. The ground system
consists of wires laying on top of or installed under the ground in a pattern similar to the spokes of
a wheel. Because this is a dedicated ground, other electrical noises will not pollute your signal.
We recommend the following items from www.dxengineering.com for a professional job that will
last:
DXE-RADP-1P Radial plate (with 20 sets of stainless steel hardware)
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DXE-RADW-500KBD Bulk radio wire kit (wire, lugs and biodegradable anchors)
In our example, a metal plate is placed under the mount of the Procaster which can be a wooden
or metal post. Make sure you leave enough room to account for snow build up if that is a factor in
your area.
Extend outward 20 radial wires 20 ft long each from the metal plate. If you do not have sufficient
room, then use 40 radial wires 10 ft long each (double up 2 radials per bolt in this case).
The next step is to install the disappearing ground wires without digging...
The best time to do this is early spring but it can be done other times, as well. The idea behind
this is to get the grass of your lawn to grow over the radials and protect them from the mower.
First, mow the grass pretty short (about 1in long after cutting) in the areas where you will be
laying the radials down.
Next, connect the radials to the radial plate with the lugs provided.
Starting from the radial plate, pull the radial wire taught and push in a biodegradable anchor to
hold the radial wire as close to the grass roots as possible. Use a hammer to drive it home. If the
radial wire is sticking up any place due to uneven ground or the wire is loose just put another
staple there. The idea is to get all parts of the wire down as close as possible to the ground so
that the grass can grow over it.
Here is what it should look like.
Typically when you finish the last radial, your job is done. Mother Nature will do the rest. If you
have done this in the early spring, the grass will grow up, surround the wire and pull it down firmly
along its full length. If you do it in the fall after the grass has stopped growing, it will happen the
next spring. This will be done so completely that in a few weeks you will have to actively look for
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the radials to see them. Connect the plate to the ground lug of the Procaster with a 12 or 14 AWG
copper wire.
2. Grounding Rods
If your space is limited, a grounding rod can work well. Drive in a copper-clad steel rod (available
at Home Depot, Lowes and electrical distributors etc.), at least 8ft. If the ground is hard, use
several shorter rods and connect them together using a minimum 12 AWG copper wire and the
proper bronze clamps to make sure the electrical connection is good. Because this is a dedicated
ground, other electrical noises will not pollute your signal. Connect the ground rod(s) to the
ground lug of the Procaster with a 12 or 14 AWG copper wire.
3. Metal roof
A metal roof can provide an effective elevated ground system. If the metal panels are electrically
isolated from each other, performance may not be as good. The Procaster can be mounted on a
tripod which is attached to the roof with bolts or is held in position with concrete blocks. The
advantage of the elevated ground system is that the transmitter is higher and more likely to have
better range. Connect to the ground lug of the Procaster with a 12 or 14 AWG copper wire.
4. Underground metal water pipes
Electrical panels usually ground to the copper water pipe very near to where it comes out from
the ground inside the building. It is unknown how well these pipes are connected electrically, and
the electrical system may induce noise into the Procaster which will be heard on the receiving
radio. In this setup, the Procaster ground wire could be long, and this extra inductance could raise
the impedance of the ground connection, making the ground as a whole, less effective. Connect
to the ground lug of the Procaster with a 12 or 14 AWG copper wire.
5. Building electrical ground
Building electrical grounds can work quite well, but there is the risk of electrical noise from
household appliances getting picked up by the Procaster and transmitted to the receiving radio.
This is something you have to try out and see - all situations are different. Connect to the ground
lug of the Procaster with a 12 or 14 AWG copper wire.
More information about grounding can be found on the Web.
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Compliance Statement
FCC ID: VCJ-AMTX200
This device complies with Part 15.219 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two
conditions: (1) this device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept
any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.
Warning:
Changes or modifications not expressly approved by Chezradio could void the user's authority to
operate the equipment.
FCC Class B Statement:This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device,
pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection
against harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can
radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the
manufacturer’s instructions may cause interference harmful to radio communications.
There is no guarantee, however, that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this
equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be
determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the
interference by one or more of the following measures:




Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
Connect the equipment to an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is
connected.
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio or TV technician for help.
Warning: FCC rules (47 Part 15.219) state: “the total length of the transmission line, antenna and
ground lead (if used) shall not exceed 3 meters.” [3 meters = 118 inches]
The Procaster has a fixed 104 inch electrical antenna, no transmission line and a grounding lug
which must be connected to a ground point for lightning protection. That implies that the "ground
lead" from the grounding lug to a massive ground can be up to 14 in long to comply with the
15.219 rules.
Bear in mind that the Procaster has lightning protection built in to prevent lightning from entering
into a residence and possibly injuring somebody. For safety reasons, it is essential that proper
grounding is implemented and that all local electrical safety codes are observed.
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IC: 7378A-AMTX200
This device complies with Industry Canada license-exempt RSS standard(s). Operation is subject
to the following two conditions: (1) this device may not cause interference, and (2) this device
must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired
operation.
Cet appareil est conforme avec Industrie Canada exempts de licence standard RSS (s). Son
fonctionnement est soumis aux deux conditions suivantes: (1) cet appareil ne doit pas provoquer
d'interférences et (2) cet appareil doit accepter toute interférence reçue, y compris les
interférences pouvant entraîner un fonctionnement indésirable.
Chezradio
19 of 20
5 January, 2014
Procaster User Manual
Specifications
Procaster Transmitter
Electrical
• Channel Frequencies
• PLL Channels
• Fine Frequency Adjust
• Auto Power Setting
• Tuning Meter
• Audio input
1290 - 1700kHz
42 with 10kHz spacing
+/-10Hz
100mW
Built in
600 ohm balanced
Mechanical
• Solid machined aluminum casing and cover
• O-ring weatherproof seal
• Stainless steel hardware
• Antenna
Side-mount 3-section
• Size
8.25in L x 4in W x 2.5in H
• Weight
2.5 lb
• Mounting
4 slots on 7.2in x 2in centres
• Antenna mounting
4in centres
• Finish
UV-resistant outdoor polyester
Studio Interface
Electrical
• Audio level input
• Audio processor
• Compressor settings
• Audio limiter
• Modulation depth
• Audio output
• Audio drive
• Power input (system)
• Solar panel compatible
200mV - 3V adjustable
may be turned off when using external audio processor
1:1 2:1 5:1 10:1
automatic
adjustable
600 ohm balanced
up to 250ft
12VDC @ 100mA
yes
Mechanical
• Black ABS plastic with aluminum cover
• Size
3.4in L x 2.4in W x 1.1in H
• Weight
5 oz
• Mounting
2 holes on flanges on 3.9in centres
Chezradio
20 of 20
5 January, 2014
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