Circle Track/Road Race DataMite v3.2

Road Race &
Circle Track
DataMite Analyzer
V3.2 for Windows
User’s Manual
Performance Trends, Inc.
Box 530164 Livonia, MI 48153
248-473-9230 Fax 248-442-7750
Website: www.performancetrends.com
Email: feedback@performancetrends.com
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Performance Trends, Inc. PO Box 530164, Livonia, MI 48152
Tech Assistance for Registered Owners (248) 473-9230 Fax: 248-442-7750 Email: feedback@performancetrends.com
Website (tips, correspond with other users, download demos, update schedule, etc.) www.performancetrends.com
Copyright Notice
Copyright (C) 2004 PERFORMANCE TRENDS, INC.
All Rights Reserved
These software programs and user's manual are reserved by PERFORMANCE TRENDS, INC. and are intended for the use
of the original owner only. Copying or duplicating these products except for the personal use of the original owner is a
violation of U. S. Copyright Law and is hereby expressly forbidden.
Portions Copyright (C) Microsoft Corp. 1987-2004
All Rights Reserved
International Business Machines Corp. makes no warranties, either expressed or implied, regarding the enclosed computer
package, its merchantability or its fitness for any particular purpose.
IBM PC, XT, and AT are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corp.
Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corp.
DISCLAIMER Of WARRANTIES:
THE SOFTWARE PROVIDED HEREUNDER IS LICENSED "AS IS" WITHOUT ANY WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, ANY WARRANTIES FOR MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR
A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. NO ORAL OR WRITTEN STATEMENTS, REPRESENTATIONS OR OTHER
AFFIRMATION Of FACT, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO STATEMENTS REGARDING CAPABILITY,
CAPACITY, SUITABILITY FOR USE OR PERFORMANCE Of SOFTWARE SHALL BE RELIED UPON BY USER OR
BE DEEMED TO BE A WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION BY PERFORMANCE TRENDS, INC. FOR ANY
PURPOSE, OR GIVE RISE TO ANY LIABILITY Of OBLIGATION Of PERFORMANCE TRENDS, INC.
WHATSOEVER. USER ACCEPTS ALL RESPONSIBILITY FOR SELECTING THE SOFTWARE TO MEET USER
NEEDS OR SPECIFIC PURPOSES. PERFORMANCE TRENDS INC. IS UNDER NO OBLIGATION TO FURNISH
USER UPDATES OR ENHANCEMENTS EVEN IF FURNISHED TO OTHER USERS.
LIMITATION Of LIABILITY:
If at the time of delivery to the original User only there are any defects in the media on which the Software is provided,
User's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the replacement of any media returned to Performance Trends, Inc. within 90 days
of the receipt of the Software by User, or at Performance Trends Inc.'s sole option, a refund of the License fees paid to
Performance Trends, Inc. by User.
IN NO EVENT SHALL PERFORMANCE TRENDS, INC. OR THIRD PARTIES WHO HAVE RIGHTS IN THE
SOFTWARE BE LIABLE TO USER FOR LOSS Of PROFITS, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL OR
CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES EVEN IF PERFORMANCE TRENDS, INC. IS AWARE Of THE POSSIBILITY Of
SUCH DAMAGES.
Continued on next page.
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IN THE EVENT ANY REMEDY HEREUNDER FAILS Of ITS ESSENTIAL PURPOSE, OR IN ANY OTHER EVENT,
PERFORMANCE TRENDS INC.'S LIABILITY HEREUNDER SHALL NOT EXCEED ANY AMOUNTS PAID BY
USER TO PERFORMANCE TRENDS, INC. UNDER THIS AGREEMENT.
Some states do not allow the limitation or exclusion of liability for incidental or consequential damages and some states do
not allow the exclusion of implied warranties, so the above limitations or exclusions may not apply to you.
No action, regardless of form, arising out of any claimed breach of this agreement or performance under this agreement
may be brought by either party more than one year after the affected party learns of the cause of action.
Refer to diskette envelope for full license agreement.
******************************************* W A R N I N G ******************************************
The DataMite Analyzer makes calculations based on equations and data found in various published and heretofore reliable
documents. The program is designed for use by skilled professionals experienced with engines and Tests. The following
processes are hazardous, particularly if done by an unskilled or inexperienced user:
-
Obtaining data to input to the program
Interpreting the program's results
Before making measurements of or modifications to any vehicle, engine or driving situation, DO NOT FAIL TO:
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Regard the safety consequences
Consult with a skilled and cautious professional
Read the entire user's manual
Obey all federal, state & local laws
Respect the rights and safety of others
Acknowledgements:
Many thanks to Paul Skiba, Ford Engineer, retired for helping in the assembly of this User’s Manual. Paul was the dyno
development engineer for the 1969-1970 Boss 302 Trans Am program.
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Table of Contents
Chapter 1 Introduction
1.1 Overview of Features
1.2 Before You Start
1.3 A Word of Caution
1.4 Getting Started (Installation)
1.5 Example to Get You Going
Chapter 2 Definitions
2.0 Basic Program Operation
2.1 Main Screen (test summary)
2.2 Preferences
2.3 Track Conds
2.4 Log Book (Pro version only)
2.5 DataMite Specs
2.6 Vehicle Specs
2.7 Current Readings
2.8 Calculation Menus
2.9 New Test Screen (get data from DataMite)
2.10 Edit Test File Options
Chapter 3 Output
3.1 Reports
3.2 ASCII Data Files (Pro version only)
3.3 Graphs
3.4 Printer Output
3.5 Data Libraries
3.6 Filter Test Files (Pro version only)
3.7 History Log (Pro version only)
3.8 Send Data (Pro version only)
3.9 Run Log (Pro version only)
3.10 Track Map & Friction Circle (Pro version only)
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1
2
3
4
7
11
11
15
23
27
31
37
49
53
59
67
71
77
79
89
91
107
109
113
115
119
123
125
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Table of Contents, cont
Chapter 4 Examples
135
Example 4.1 Installing the DataMite on a Vehicle
and Recording a Test Session
137
Example 4.2 Analyzing Data
159
Example 4.3 Measure Tq and HP From Acceleration
169
Appendix 1:
Accuracy and Assumptions
177
Appendix 2:
Hardware Installation and Operation
179
Appendix 3:
Troubleshooting Data Recording
191
Appendix 4:
Backing Up Data
197
Appendix 5:
Calibrating an Analog Sensor
201
Index
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Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 1 Introduction
Chapter 1 Introduction
1.1 Overview of Features
The DataMite data logger packages by Performance Trends, Inc is a system to let racers, engine & chassis builders, and
motorsports enthusiasts measure and optimize vehicle performance, especially for Road Racing and Circle Track Racing. The
hardware comes in either a small 4 channel system or much larger 30 channel system, with many options to measure RPM,
temperature, pressure, movement, acceleration rate, and more. The DataMite Analyzer software can analyze this data with
graphs, comparison graphs and reports. This analysis lets you calculate lap times, torque and HP, cornering Gs, clutch slip,
temperatures, pressures, etc to detect performance differences from suspension, engine or vehicle modifications.
The software is also available in 2 versions, Basic and Pro. The Basic version has fewer options and features to make the
program easier to operate. In the Pro version, you have additional data recording and analysis features. Should you start with
the Basic version, you can easily update to the Pro version later. The DataMite system provides sophisticated data acquisition
and computer analysis at a fraction of the cost of other systems. The DataMite’s major features are listed below:
Basic Features:
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Configure and calibrate the software for most any combination of sensors you have installed on the DataMite data logger.
Capability to tailor the program to work with most any type of vehicle, including Karts, most any Formula class, dirt and
asphalt circle track, SCCA, and others.
User friendly, Windows interface, compatible with Windows 95, 98, Me, XP, 2000 and NT.
Can print results using most any Windows compatible printer, many times in color.
Save nearly unlimited number of tests for recall, comparison and analysis in the future.
Allows several reporting and graphing options for analysis, either vs time or distance.
Graphing features include cursor to pin-point values, overlaying runs, zooming and shifting, and more.
Automatic finding and time aligning of laps.
Record and save basic information about each run like weather, ET, MPH, comments, etc.
Added Features for Pro Version
•
•
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•
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A full Log Book is added so you can record all types of details about each run, like suspension and tire settings and notes,
tire pressure, shock and spring settings, user defined settings, engine specs and checks, and much more.
Customize printed reports and especially graphs. You can include comments for each graph.
Many more graph options like time aligning, dual cursors, more overlay and printing options, and more.
Write ASCII files for importing data into other computer programs.
Filter (find) past tests based on certain criteria, like ET, Track or Event, dates, etc.
"History Log", keeps a running log of tests you have recently started new, run, graphed or reported.
Track mapping and friction circle analysis.
Accelerator/brake pedal and steering wheel position and relative shock travel graphics.
Automatic exporting of shock travel and other data to our Suspension Analyzer for further analysis.
Lap comparison reports and lap segment analysis reports.
Engine RPM Histogram graphs.
Please read Sections 1.2 "Before You Start" and 1.3 "A Word of Caution" before you turn on the computer. Then try running
the program following the guidelines in 1.4 "Getting Started" and 1.5 "Example to Get You Going". When you feel familiar
with the program, take time to read this entire manual. It will show you all the things you can do with this powerful tool.
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Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 1 Introduction
1.2 Before You Start
What you will need:
• IBM Pentium computer running Windows 95, 98, Me, 2000, XP or NT (or 100% compatible).
• 64 Meg of RAM.
• Approximately 30 Megabyte of disk space. (More is required for storing large #s of tests.)
Many terms used by the Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer and this user's manual are similar to terms used by
other publications, i.e. Inertia, Correction Factor, etc. However, these terms may have different definitions. Therefore, read
Chapter 2 to see what these terms mean to the Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer.
Occasionally it will be necessary to identify "typos" in the manual, known "bugs" and their "fixes", etc. which were not known
at the time of publication. These will be identified in a file called README.DOC in the Road Race & Circle Track DataMite
Analyzer directory or folder. This file can be displayed right in the DataMite Analyzer by clicking on Help at the Main Screen,
then clicking on Display Readme.doc File. You can also read it using utilities like NotePad or WordPad.
Unlocking Program Options:
The Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer is equipped with copy protection. This ensures the legitimate users do not
have to cover the costs for unauthorized distribution of the program. When you first receive the program, it is in demo mode.
All features work in Demo mode. In demo mode you can try either the Basic version or the full Professional version for ten
days. Sometime during those 10 days, you must call Performance Trends to obtain an “Unlocking Code”. This Unlocking
Code will be for either the Basic version or the Pro Version, whichever you have purchased.
Before you call Performance Trends, you should get your disk serial number (stamped in blue on the disk), your registered
name and code number, and computer hardware number. The registered name and code numbers are available by clicking on
File in the upper left hand corner of the Main Screen, then clicking on Unlocking Program Options. A screen will appear as
shown in Figure 1.1.
Figure 1.1 Menu to Unlock Program Options
Performance Trends will provide you an
unlocking code number. Type in the unlocking
code number and click on OK. If you typed in
the number correctly, you will be given a
message that the program is permanently
unlocked to either the Basic or Pro mode. The
program will only run on this one computer.
If you want to run the program on another
computer, you must install it, obtain the
computer hardware number and registered code
number as shown in Figure 1.1, and call Performance Trends for a new Unlocking Code for that computer. There may be a
charge for additional computers.
You may need to transfer the program to another computer, like when you buy a new computer. If so, install the program on
the new computer. It will run for 10 days. During that 10 days, call when you can have your old computer up and running.
Go into the DataMite program, click on File, then Transfer Program to Another Computer. Performance Trends will ask for
some numbers from this screen and give you a code # which will permanently turn the program Off on this old computer.
Then give Performance Trends the information for the new computer and they will give you a new unlocking code free.
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Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 1 Introduction
1.3 A Word of Caution
To install the DataMite data logger, you must install some sensors on your vehicle. This is covered in Appendix 2.
If you are not familiar with proper safety precautions when working on engines or vehicles,
HAVE A QUALIFIED MECHANIC, ENGINE or CHASSIS BUILDER HELP YOU.
Road Racing and testing can be dangerous. Vehicle components DO fail, possibly throwing
“shrapnel” and burning fuel in all directions. Take the proper precautions using shields
and high quality fuel system components to minimize these dangers. Anticipate that the
engine or vehicle component can fail and you will cut down on the chances they ever will.
The Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer has features which estimate the vehicle's performance based recorded data,
some user input and assumptions. These estimates can be used for analysis of performance on the race track or on the street.
However, these assumptions (like knowing the friction losses in the drivetrain, accurately knowing the vehicle’s rotating
inertia, etc) limit the accuracy of these estimates. (See other assumptions in this manual listed under Assumptions and
Accuracy in the Index.)
With any data acquisition and analysis, the computer can help the user by automatically doing various calculations, plotting the
data easily, etc. However, the computer is not thinking for you. You, the user, are the key to properly understanding and using
the data. If confusing results are obtained, take a minute to:
•
•
•
•
•
Plot the Raw (not calculated) data and see if that looks correct. See Appendix 3 on Troubleshooting.
If the Raw data looks OK, double check all your data input like Vehicle Specs, DataMite Setup Specs, etc.
Refer back to this manual, especially Appendix 3, Troubleshooting and Example 4.1 on testing procedure.
Ask someone else skilled and experienced in the particular area.
Give the retailer or Performance Trends Inc's. Tech Help Line a call for an explanation. (Remember, computer programs
are written by people so it's always possible there may be an error in the calculations. Your phone call may help us correct
it.)
Please also read the Warranty and Warning at the beginning of this manual and on the diskette envelope.
IMPORTANT: The Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
program will ask for vehicle specs and measurements, and engine
specs. The Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer program is
NOT checking for safe limits of the vehicle or engine design. You
must have your vehicle design checked by a qualified engineer to
determine its safe operating range.
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Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 1 Introduction
1.4 Getting Started (Installation)
You must install the Road Race & Circle
Track DataMite Analyzer from the CD to a
hard drive before it will run. To do this,
generally you can simply put the CD in the
CD drive and close the door. The installation
program should start automatically, bringing
up the Performance Trends Installation
Wizard. This program can install most any
of our products in Demo mode, including the
Road Race & Circle Track DataMite you just
purchased. Select (click on) the button for
Road Race & Circle Track DataMite and the
installation will begin.
Figure 1.1a Installation Wizard
Click here to start
installing this program.
If you have some problems or error messages
during the start up of the Installation Wizard,
you can possibly bypass these problems by
running the Road Race & Circle Track DataMite installation directly. This is done by clicking on Start, then Run, then
Browse. In the Browse window, you will look for your CD rom drive, the drive with the Road Race & Circle Track DataMite
CD. Double click on it to display its contents, which should included a yellow folder called Programs. Double click on
Programs to display its contents, which includes the individual product installation programs, including
RoadRaceDataMite.exe. Click on this file to highlight it, then click on Open, then click on OK when returned to the Run
screen.
Figure 1.1b Bypassing the Installation Wizard
3) Find the
Programs folder on
the CD Rom drive
4) Find the
RoadRaceDataMite.exe
file and Open it.
2) Click on Browse
1) Click on Start, then Run
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Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 1 Introduction
Entering Registered Owner's Name:
The first time you run the Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer, you will be asked to enter your name as the
Registered Owner. During this first session, you can modify it until you are satisfied. Once you accept the name, the computer
will generate a Registered Code # based on the name. To be eligible for Tech Help, you will need both your registered name
and code #, and to have sent in your registration card. The name you enter should be very similar to the name you enter on the
registration card.
Click on Help, then About Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer at the Main Screen to review your name and code # .
Figure 1.2 Menu to Unlock Program Options
Unlocking Program Options:
The Road Race & Circle Track DataMite
Analyzer is equipped with copy protection.
This ensures that legitimate users do not have
to cover the costs for unauthorized distribution
of the program. When you first receive the
program, it is in demo mode. In demo mode
you can try either the Basic version, or the full
Professional version for ten days. All features
are working in demo mode.
Sometime during those 10 days, you should call Performance Trends to obtain an “Unlocking Code”. This Unlocking Code
will be for either the Basic version or the Pro Version, whichever you have purchased.
Before you call Performance Trends, you should get your disk serial number, registered name and code number, and
computer hardware number. These are available by clicking on file in the upper left hand corner of the Main Screen, then
clicking on Unlocking Program Options. A screen will appear as shown in Figure 1.2.
Performance Trends will provide you with an unlocking code number. Type in the unlocking code number and click on OK. If
you typed in a number correctly you will be given a message that the program is permanently unlocked to either the Basic or
Pro mode. The program will only run on this one computer.
If you want to run the program on another computer, you must install it, obtain the computer hardware number and registered
code number as shown in Figure 1.2, and call Performance Trends for a new Unlocking Code for that computer. There may be
a charge for additional computers.
Also See Section 1.2.
Important: In the 10 day Demo mode, all features work as in the working
version. Therefore you do not need to immediately unlock it before you use
it. Then, even after 10 days, you can still call for an unlock code. Its just that
after 10 days, the program will not do anything other than let you unlock it.
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Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 1 Introduction
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Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 1 Introduction
1.5 Example to Get You Going
To start the Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer, click on Start, then Programs, then Performance Trends, and then
Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer (or click on the Road Race & Circle Track DataMite icon on your desktop).
During startup of the program, you will be given some introductory tips.
After these brief introduction screens and questions, you will be left at the Main Screen shown below: Notice that there is
already a circle track run loaded and displayed. This is for the last circle track run the program was working with when the
program was last shut down. If you just got your program, this would be an example test which was loaded at the factory. The
name of the test is shown at the top in square brackets [ ] , Late Model Example.CFG shown in Figure 1.3 .
Figure 1.3 Main Screen (Pro Version)
Name of
current vehicle
you are
working with
Menu
Commands
Click on File,
then choose
from different
Save or Open
options
Click on Unlock
Program
Options to
obtain codes to
give to
Performance
Trends to
permanently
unlock the
program (take
out of the 10
day demo
mode).
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Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
From this Main Screen, you can:
Chapter 1 Introduction
Figure 1.4 Graph Options Menu
Select Data Types in this section
•
•
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•
Choose to review your options by clicking on the menu items at the top
of the screen.
Open or save a file of test results and specs by clicking on File in the
upper left corner, and then the Open or Save commands.
Edit or review test data, settings or comments for the file you are
currently working with.
Graph or report the test for the file you are currently working with.
Change the Preferences options to somewhat customize the program for
your needs.
Click on File, then Unlock Program Options to obtain codes to give to
Performance Trends to permanently unlock the program (take out of the
10 day demo mode). See Section 1.4.
Get HELP to explain these options by clicking on Help.
Quit the program by clicking on File, then Exit.
All these options are explained in detail in Chapters 2 and 3.
In the Main Screen’s blue title bar you will notice the name of the current
test is contained in square brackets [ ]. The program has several examples of
tests saved in the Test Library’s Example folder right from the factory.
To get started, let's try a couple of Menu commands. Click on the Graph
menu command to open up the graph options menu shown in Figure 1.4.
The graph settings shown in Figure 1.4 are for some recorded and calculated
(MPH calculated from front wheel RPM) circle track data vs time .
Select to graph vs
time on X axis here
Click on the Make Graph button to produce the graph shown in Figure 1.5.
At the graph screen you have several other options available for changing the graph. These options are available by clicking
on the commands in the menu bar
Figure 1.5 Graph from Options Selected in Figure 1.4
or on the buttons at the top of the
screen, including the Help
command. The Help command at
this screen (and most screens)
provide a good background on
what the various options are. For
Click on
Help for an
now, just click on Back at the
overview
upper left to return to the Main
of your
Screen.
options for
this screen.
A Test File is actually made up of
3 files:
1. The .DAT file (data file)
which is the data recorded by
Click on
Back to
the DataMite
return to
2. The .CFG file (configuration
the Main
file) which is the DataMite
Screen
and vehicle settings, engine
specs, test comments, etc.
This is the file the program
actually looks for when you
open a test or save a test, etc.
For that reason, you will see a
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3.
Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 1 Introduction
“.CFG” after
Figure 1.6 Test Conditions Menu (Pro version)
the test name,
The “Type”
like in the
setting is what
square brackets
determines if the
[ ] at the top of
program analyzes
the main screen
the data as Road
shown in
Race or Circle
Figure 1.3.
Track data.
The .LAP file
(lap or run file)
Click on most
which the
any spec or spec
DataMite
name, and a brief
Analyzer uses
Help description
to determine
is given here in
where each run
the Help Frame,
starts and stops.
with a page # in
Even though
this manual for
you may have
additional info.
recorded 345
seconds of time
for a run, the
actual laps which the DataMite Analyzer found may start 13.050 seconds, with the 1st lap ending at 23.23 seconds, the 2nd
lap ending at 43.65 seconds, etc, approximately 20 second laps.
This is explained in Section 3.5 "Data Libraries". Click on the Test Conditions command to obtain a menu as shown in Figure
1.6. The “Type” setting in the upper right corner is critical for easy data analysis. Your choices are either Circle
Track Laps, Road Race Laps or Custom. This one setting is what determines if your run will be analyzed as a Road
Race or a Circle Track Race. Other specs are used for calculating certain outputs (like corrected torque and HP, etc), and
they are useful descriptions to remind you of what this test run was in the future.
Many of the input specifications you see in the various menus may not be familiar to you. For a brief definition of the inputs,
simply click on the specification name. The definition will appear in the Help frame with a page # in this manual for more
info.
Some specs have “Clc” buttons. One example is Compression Ratio in the Pro version’s Engine Specs menu. “Clc” stands for
"calculate". For example, if you
Figure 1.7 Pro Version’s Engine Specs Menu Showing Clc Button
want to calculate compression
ratio from chamber volume, deck
height, etc., simply click on the
Clc button. The program will
display a new menu listing the
inputs and the Calc Compression
Ratio from these inputs. For
further explanation, click on the
Help buttons in these menus. To
use the Calc Compression Ratio
calculated from these inputs, click
on the Use Calc Value button.
Otherwise click on Cancel to
return to the Engine Specs menu
with no change to Compression
Clc button calculates the value of
Ratio. Section 2.8, Calculation
this spec based on other inputs.
Menus explains all these
calculations.
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Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 1 Introduction
Once you feel comfortable changing specifications in the various menus and making various graphs and reports, read Section
3.5 of this manual called Data Libraries to learn how to save tests or recall tests which have been previously saved. Then you
will know all the basic commands to operate the program. For a more in-depth knowledge of using these commands and an
explanation of the results, read this entire manual.
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Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 2 Definitions
Chapter 2 Definitions
2.0 Basic Program Operation:
Whenever you start the Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer (Basic or Pro versions), you are brought to a Main
Screen which will look like Figure 2.1.
Figure 2.1 Main Screen
Name of Current Test File
Menu Commands of File, Graph, etc.
These give you all the options to operate
the program and change test data.
Click on these
tabs to switch
between the
different runs of a
particular file.
Enter most any
test comments
here to keep
notes about this
vehicle or test.
Move the mouse
over an area on
the screen, and
a Help
description of
that item is given
here.
This summary
graph shows how
RPM and MPH
for current run. If
more than 1 lap
in a test, they are
graphed also, in
gray for
comparison.
You can click on a point on the graph line and
that point will be highlighted in the test data grid.
Click on Slide Bars to display more Test Data, which may not be able
to fit on the screen.
A summary of critical test settings is given here. Click on a setting to change it, or to bring
up the menu where it can be changed (in this case shown, the Log Book menu).
Log book (Pro version only) lets you review various runs in the order you downloaded
them, and open them up to this main screen. Click on Details for full view.
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Chapter 2 Definitions
If you want to Open a previously saved test, you can click on File in the upper left corner, then click on Open (from all saved
tests). You will get a screen as shown in Figure 2.2 where you are presented with a list of saved tests in the Test Library.
Some tests are examples provided by Performance Trends. As you run tests yourself and save the results, you will add many
more tests to the library. These saved
Figure 2.2 Opening a Test File
files are useful for making comparisons
in the future, and can be used as test
patterns (or templates) for new tests
(saving you considerable time by not
having to type in specs which match a
past test).
Figure 2.2 shows that the Test Library is
divided into sections (called Folders in
Figure 2.2) to help organize a large
number of tests. For example, all tests
for the company ABC Engines could be
saved under a section name of ABCENG. All 4 cylinder Ford tests could be
saved under a section name of 4CYLFORD. This will save considerable time
and confusion when trying to locate a
particular test in the future. To look in
different sections, click on the Folder
name from the list shown at the lower
right of Figure 2.2. The list of tests will
then be updated for that Folder. To pick
a test, simply click on it from the list of
tests, then click on the Open button.
(For those familiar with computers,
Folders are actually subdirectories or
folders in the DTMDATA folder. The
Name “Folder” can be changed to
something else, like “Track” used in the
DOS v1.x, in the Preferences menu.)
Click here to pick a different category or group of
tests (Folder) from which to display a list of Test Files.
Note these commands (and right click
commands) for editing Folders.
Notice in Figure 2.1 that a current test name is listed at the top in square brackets [ ]. This is the file of recorded DataMite
data, engine data, and DataMite and Vehicle settings which are currently saved in the Test Library, and are the data and specs
you are currently working with. If you change the Log Book settings, DataMite specs, Test Conditions or Vehicle Specs, make
a graph or report, it is for this test file.
If you click on one of the Menu Commands at the top of the Main Screen, you can be presented with a screen of specs. Figure
2.3 shows the screen for the Pro version’s Engine Specs. Figure 2.3 discusses some of the commands to enter or change
settings at this menu.
Before Recording Your First Road Race or Circle Track run:
It is recommend you becoming very familiar with the Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer before starting "real" tests.
Points to consider include:
• Be sure your DataMite is installed correctly, is recording data properly. See Appendix 2.
• Review the proper procedure for recording a run as outlined in Example 4.1.
• Become familiar with how to validate your data, to ensure the raw data that was recorded is correct, as shown in
Example 4.1 and Appendix 3 Troubleshooting.
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Figure 2.3, Explanation of Sections of Typical Menu (General Engine Specs menu from Log
Book shown which is only available in the Pro version)
Names of component specs. Click on them for a description in the Help frame at the
bottom of this screen.
Name of component file displayed in this menu.
Standard text entry box where you can type in a number for a spec.
For many others in this screen, like Head(s), Cam, etc, you can type
in most any descriptive words you want or leave them blank. These
can be useful comments for describing how this engine was built or
modified for this particular circle track or road race run.
Drop down combo box (not shown here). For some specs (like Track or
Event in the Log Book) you can either type something in the box, or click
on the arrow button to select a pre-programmed selection. For most others
you can only select from a list of pre-programmed choices.
Comment text
frame to enter a
comment to
describe these
component specs.
These comments
are saved with the
specs in the
Component
Library, in the
case shown here,
the Engine
Library.
Some specs have
a Clc (calculate)
button, where you
can either enter the
specs directly (in
this case the
compression ratio)
or click on the Clc
button to calculate
it from other inputs.
Standard menu commands which provide the options for closing this menu (Back),
saving or open files of these individuals specs (click on File, then Save or Open),
erasing a set of specs (click File, then New, printing this screen (click on File, then Print),
etc. See the sections later in this chapter for more details on individual menus.
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2.1 Main Screen (Test Summary)
The Main Screen is shown in Figure 2.4 and shows a summary of a run. It is not meant for detailed analysis or comparisons
which can be done with Graphs or Reports. The Main Screen is made up of 6 basic sections as shown in Figure 2.4. These are
discussed in the next 6 sections. The rest of this section gives an overview of how the Main Screen is organized.
Figure 2.4 Main Screen (Pro version)
5) Menu Commands of File, Graph, etc.
These give you all the options to operate the
program and change test data.
1) Click on these
Tabs to switch
between the
different laps of
this particular file.
2) Race &
Vehicle
Conditions
summarizes some
critical test specs,
and includes a
comments section
to keep notes
about this test.
3) This Summary
Graph shows
Engine RPM and
MPH for this lap.
If you click on a
graph line (as
pointed out here),
that data point will
be displayed and
highlighted in the
Test Data grid.
4) Click on slide bar and slide up or down to display all results. The
Filtering (smoothing) and time increments (unless lap is very long) of the
graph is selectable in the Preferences Menu, Section 2.2.
6) The Run Log (shown here empty because the program is brand new) keeps a
chronological list of the runs you have download from the DataMite box. Click on
the Details button at the top for more information to be displayed.
2.1.1 Tabs
A test you download from the DataMite usually is for several laps, probably 10 or more. You move to view different laps of
this test by clicking on the Tabs at the top of the screen. The DataMite software will automatically find the beginning and end
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of each lap when you download the test. If you do not think this was done correctly, or you have made some configuration
changes in the program settings, you can have the program find these laps again. Do this by clicking on Edit at the top of the
Main Screen, and select Redetermine Beginning or End of Run. See Section 2.10, page 71.
2.1.2 Race and Vehicle Conds
Run # (Pro version only)
Track & Event (Pro version only)
Run Description (Pro version only)
Describes the run, track and event based on settings in the Log Book menu Click on this item to display the Log Book menu
where this data is contained.
Density Altitude or Dry Density Altitude
Is the effective altitude factor based on the Weather Specs entered in the Test Conds menu. Click on this item to display the
Test Conditions menu where this data is contained. You can select either std or Dry Density Altitude in the Preferences
section.
Run Time and Date
This records the time and date at the time you downloaded the test from the DataMite. When a new test/ race session is started
with the New Test command (click on File, then click on New Test at the Main Screen), the computer's current time and date
are saved as the test time and date. The test time and date can also be changed by clicking on it here at the Main Screen.
Track Length
Is the length of the race track in feet. Click on this item to display the Test Conditions menu where this data is contained.
Finish Position
Is your finishing position as entered into the Test Conditions screen. Click on this item to display the Test Conditions menu
where this data is contained.
Type of Run
Is the type of run for analysis as entered into the Test Conditions screen. Click on this item to display the Test Conditions menu
where this data is contained. This setting is critical for easy analysis.
Test Comments
Test comments are for making most any notes about the test, unusual observations, customer requirements, etc. In the Pro
version, you can search the Comments for various words. For example, you could search for all the tests which had the word
“Watkins Glen” or “Johnson” in the Test Comments.
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Help
The help frame will describe what ever portion of the screen the mouse has passed over or clicked on.
2.1.3 Summary Graph
The summary graph shows Engine RPM and vehicle MPH graphed versus Time for the current lap of this particular file
(Figure 2.6). The level of Filtering (smoothing) and the time increments can be selected in the Preferences Menu, Section 2.2.
(If the laps are very long, the time increments will be increased by the program so as not require a great deal of time or
memory.) If you click on a graph line in the Summary Graph, that particular data point will be highlighted and displayed in
the Test Data Grid. This is a quick way to find data points which may look unusual or be important.
2.1.4 Test Data Grid
Point
The point column simply numbers the rows of data, and is used by the program to identify a row of data for messages.
Seconds
Is the time for this row of data in seconds. The increment of the Seconds can be selected in the Preferences Menu, Section 2.2.
Engine RPM
Vehicle MPH
Figure 2.6 File Options at Main Screen
This is the engine RPM and vehicle speed in MPH for the
corresponding times. These numbers are averaged for all the time data
which is closer to this time than the time above or below it. For
example, if the times are 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 etc, the RPM and MPH numbers
given at 2.5 seconds RPM are for all times from 2.25 to 2.75 seconds.
2.1.5 Main Screen Commands
The next section discusses some of the commands available at the top
of the Main Screen. Most will not be discussed here in detail, as they
are discussed in other sections of this manual.
File (see Figure 2.6 for File Options)
New (get data from DataMite)
Click on File, then New to start a new run. This process will “walk
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you through” some critical steps to preparing to download data from the DataMite. You can select to keep certain data from
the previous test like test comments, engine specs, etc. Keeping data can save you considerable time since you don’t have to
type in information which may be the same as the current test. The New Test command is discussed in detail in Section 2.9.
Open (from all saved tests)
This option presents the Open Test File menu discussed in Section 3.5, Data Libraries. From there you have several options to
open a previously saved test file from any place in the Test Library, or from most any place on the computer, including the
floppy disk drive.
Open (from History Log)
(Pro version only)
This option presents the History Log, a chronological list of test files you have been working with as discussed in Section 3.7.
From there you can review a summary of the last 25 to 100 tests, and pick one to open. This method can make it easier to find
a file you have just worked with lately, say in the last couple of weeks.
Save
Select Save if you want to save the current test and any recent changes to the same name as you are currently working with.
This is the file name shown in square bracket [ ] at the top of the Main Screen.
Save As
Select Save As if you want to save the current test and any recent changes to a new name or new folder. You will be presented
with the menu discussed in Section 3.5 where you can change the test name, change the folder you are saving it to, or add a
new folder name.
Open from Floppy/CD Drive
Save to Floppy/CD Drive
The Open command provides a simple 1 click command to open a standard Windows “File Open” menu displaying the
contents of the disk in the Floppy or CD Drive. The Save command provides a simple 1 click command to save the current test
file to the disk in the Floppy or CD Drive to the same name as is currently being used. IMPORTANT: Saving a file to a CD
drive is only possible if your computer has a writable CD drive and the CD has been formatted correctly using the
software for the writable CD drive.
These commands provide a convenient method for copying files from one computer to another. The drive letter (A or B) that
the program defaults to can be changed in the Preferences menu, Section 2.2 (Advanced Users: This command copies all 3
files which make up a test file, the .CFG, .DAT and .LAP file. See Section 3.5 Data Libraries.)
Search For (find) Runs (Pro Version Only)
This option simply explains how to use the “Filter (find)” option in the Open (from all saved tests) command. After a brief
explanation, you will be presented with the same screen as if you had clicked on Open (from all saved tests).
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Print
Windows This Main Screen
Select this option to print the summary data shown on this main screen.
Print Other Screens
This option gives some general instructions on how to print data from other screens.
Windows Printer Setup
The Windows Printer Setup lets you change your Windows default printer, paper orientation, etc for printing reports or graphs
in other areas of the program.
Make Track Map (Pro Version Only)
Friction Circle (Pro Version Only)
These 2 options provide for some very useful analysis of handling data. These are covered in Section 3.10.
Unlock Program Options
Figure 2.7 Menu to Unlock Program Options
The Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer is
equipped with copy protection. This ensures that
legitimate users do not have to cover the costs for
unauthorized distribution of the program. When you first
receive the program, it is in demo mode. In demo mode
you can try either the Basic version, or the full
Professional version for ten days. All features are
working in demo mode.
Sometime during those 10 days, you must call
Performance Trends to obtain an “Unlocking Code”. This Unlocking Code will be for either the Basic version or the Pro
Version, whichever you have purchased.
Before you call Performance Trends, you should get your registered code number and computer hardware number. These are
available by clicking on File in the upper left hand corner of the Main Screen, then clicking on Unlocking Program Options. A
screen will appear as shown in Figure 2.7. See Section 1.2 for more information on how to unlock the program.
Edit
The Edit command lets you cut out portions of a test to save separately to different files, Redetermine Lap Times and Edit Out
Noise Spikes. The Edit options are discussed in detail is Section 2.10, page 71.
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Graph
The Graph command lets you graph several different types of data from the current test, either by itself or with data from other
tests for comparisons. The Graph options are discussed in detail is Section 3.3, page 91.
Report
The Report command lets you create reports of several different types of data from the current test. The Report options are
discussed in detail is Section 3.1, page 79.
Test Conds
The Test Conds command opens up the Test Conditions menu. There you tell the program what type of test you ran and the
weather conditions which are used for the correction factor. In the Pro version you can also specify what type of corrections
you want to make and have a place to record some race conditions, like Lap Time, Avg MPH, etc.
Log Book (Pro version only)
The Log Book command opens up the Log Book menu. There you can describe in detail the run you made. Most of the specs
in this screen and the 5 additional screens you can get to through the Log Book screen are just spots to record info about this
run. The Log Book is discussed in detail in Section 2.4, page 31.
DataMite
The DataMite command opens up the DataMite Specs menu, where you can describe the DataMite you are using, what each
channel is recording and how each channel is calibrated.
The specs in the DataMite menu are critical for accurate results. Be sure to
read and understand the DataMite Specs as discussed in detail in Section
2.5, page 37.
Vehicle
The Vehicle command opens up the Vehicle Specs menu, where you can describe the vehicle you are running. These specs are
critical for calculating information like acceleration rate, tire slip, clutch/converter slip, etc from the raw RPM data you are
actually recording. Many of the specs in the Vehicle menu are critical for accurate calculated results, like tire slip, MPH,
acceleration rate, etc. Be sure to read and understand the Vehicle Specs as discussed in detail in Section 2.6, page 49.
Preferences
Preferences let you customize the program for your needs and for your computer and printer. See Section 2.2, page 23.
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Help
Click on Help for several options to help describe your options at the Main Screen, and for other information to help you
understand how this program works.
2.1.6 Run Log
The Run Log is a chronological list of all tests in the order they have been downloaded from the DataMite. It is similar to the
History Log and is explained in Section 3.9, page 123.
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2.2 Preferences
Figure 2.8 Preferences Menu
Click on the Preferences item in the menu bar at the
top of the Main Screen to bring up the Preferences
menu shown in Figure 2.8. There are 5 categories of
settings, which you select by clicking on the different
tabs. Here you can adjust some program items to
personalize the program for your needs. Preferences
may also save time by eliminating steps you don't
require.
Main Screen Tab
Main Screen Graph Lines
This option lets you choose the line thickness of the
summary graph of Engine RPM and MPH for the
current run of the current test file displayed on the
Main Screen.
Main Screen RPM Increment
This spec lets you pick how often you want RPM and MPH reported on the Main Screen, much like the similar spec for
Reports. The smaller this number, the more data which is reported, the longer the list of RPM and MPH data, and the
“jumpier” (less smooth) the Main Screen’s graph.
Main Screen Filtering Level
This spec lets you pick how much filtering (smoothing) the program does to the RPM and MPH data on the Main Screen, much
like the similar spec for Reports. The higher the filtering, the less “jumpy” (more smooth) the Main Screen’s graph.
Display in Summary
This spec lets you pick to display either the standard Density Altitude or Dry Density Altitude (which is corrected for humidity)
on certain screens. It is recommended to use Dry Density Altitude, however many racers are used to the less accurate Density
Altitude.
Filing System Tab
Default Floppy/CD Disk Drive
Choose the letter of the Floppy/CD disk drive on your computer, usually A . This is the disk drive which will be first opened
when using the Save to Floppy/CD Disk or Open from Floppy/CD Disk File commands at the Main Screen. . IMPORTANT:
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Saving a file to a CD drive is only possible if your computer has a writable CD drive and the CD has been formatted
correctly using the software for the writable CD drive.
Test Folder Name in Program
The Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer saves tests under different folders (directories) under the main folder
DTMDATA. Some users may prefer to have the 'Folder' be called 'Track' or 'Vehicle', depending how they choose to organize
their tests. Your entry here of most any text up to 40 characters is what the program will use to call the different folders where
test files are stored.
# Tests Kept in History Log (Pro version only)
Pick the number of tests which you want the History Log to hold, from 25 to 100.
Calculations Tab
Torque/HP # decimals
Pick the number of decimal places you want displayed for Torque and HP on graphs and reports. For small engines (like
Briggs), choose 2 to obtain more detail, like 7.45 HP. For larger engines, choose 1 or 0 for numbers like 122.3 HP or 591 HP
respectively. This is only used if you calculate torque and HP from the vehicle’s acceleration.
Torque/HP Output
Pick the type of units for reporting torque and power in either Ft Lbs or NM (Newton Meters, metric) and Horsepower and Kw
(kilowatts, metric). This is only used if you calculate torque and HP from the vehicle’s acceleration.
Allow Correction in Calibration of Selected Recorded Channels
Select Yes to allow for a Correction factor input to be enabled in the Sensor and Calibration screens for the DataMite Channels.
A Correction factor allows for minor readjustments to a calibration without changing the actual calibration. This is used to rezero sensors or to zero out shock travel sensors at ride height. See Appendix 5, Calibrating an Analog Sensor for more details.
Allow Engine RPM up to 60000 RPM
Select Yes to allow the Engine RPMs to be calculated up to 60,000 RPM. With this set to No, Engine RPMs are limited to
around 30,000 RPM. Do not choose Yes unless it is really needed, as you may find other limitations to your analysis.
Config DataMite II for Engine PPR
This setting has a minor “fine tuning” effect on how the DataMite II determines accurate engine RPM. Typically this should
be set to Yes unless directed to do otherwise by Performance Trends.
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Operation Tab
When Getting New Data from DataMite (Pro Version Only)
Automatically Filter Out Noise (Pro Version Only)
Choose Yes for Automatically Edit Out Noise and the program will automatically remove 'noise spikes' from each new test you
record from the DataMite. This is good for beginners. Choosing No can be useful to troubleshoot the source of the noise.
Display Run Summary (Pro Version Only)
Choose Yes for Display Run Summary and the program automatically shows a summary of how it divided a test into different
runs. This is good for beginners. Choosing No can save time by eliminating extra screens when getting (downloading) data
from the DataMite.
Warn if Changing Run Numbers (Pro Version Only)
The DataMite program will generate Run Numbers based on the order you have downloaded them from DataMite and the
current Run Number. If you change the Run Number in the Log Book screen, the program will warn that you may produce
Run Numbers which are not in order and lead to confusion in the exact order of runs in the future. If this warning becomes
bothersome, you can turn it off with this preference.
Auto. Check Other Com Ports
Choose Yes for this option and the DataMite software will always check all 4 likely Com ports on your computer if the
DataMite can not be found. Set this to No, and the software will always use the Com Port specified in the DataMite screen.
See Section 2.5.
Allow Resize of Current Readings
Choose Yes and you can click on the Maximize button in the Current Readings screen and the all gauges will be resized
accordingly. However, sometimes if this is set to Yes, the current readings screen seems distorted maximized or in its standard
size. Then you may want to choose No here.
Graphing / Printing
Program Title Comments
Enter most any text here for the First and Second lines. These 2 lines will appear at the top of printouts and printed graphs.
This is a good place for your business name or your personal name. You can change these entries as often as you wish.
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Lap Top Graph Adjustment
Choose Yes and the graph screen is slightly more narrow. This ensures you can read the legend on the right side of the screen
on some lap top screens.
Always Autoscale New Graph (Pro version only)
Choose Yes for 'Always Autoscale New Graph' and each time you do a new graph, the graph is autoscaled (program picks the
scales to show all data). This is usually the best for beginners. Choose No and any manual scales you have set will be
maintained for each new graph, until you quit the program.
Printer Fonts
Choose which basic type of font to use for printouts. You may not get your choice if your printer does not support that
particular font.
Printed Graph Width, % of Page
Due to the endless combinations of computers, Windows setups and printers, some printed graphs may not fill the page, some
may extend off the page to the right. This option lets you expand (% greater than 100) or shrink (% less than 100) the printed
graph to better fit the page.
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2.3 Track Conds
The Track Conds let you record weather conditions and a summary of the race results. In the Pro version, these race results are
also linked to info you enter in the
Figure 2.9 Track Conds Menu (Pro version)
Log Book and the actual DataMite
recorded data can be “fine tuned”
Data Type is critical to how the DataMite data is divided up into runs,
based on these results for better
which can have a large impact on the final results.
accuracy.
These specs are mostly recorded for information only.
In Pro version data can be adjusted based on this info.
Type of Test
Click on down arrow to select the
type of test you ran. This choice
can have a large impact on what
data is graphed and analyzed. Your
choices are:
• Circle Track Laps
• Road Race Laps
• Accel to measure torque and
HP.
• Custom Test, which would be
anything else.
Notice that some of the choices are
not used, as they are used for Test
Types in the other versions of the
software.
These specs are additional weather information.
Weather
Conditions
Weather conditions are used to correct torque and HP to standard
conditions.
The weather conditions surrounding the engine affect the air's oxygen density which affects engine power. You can use your
own “weather stations”, or purchase one from Performance Trends to record weather information automatically. Be sure you
read the Notes on Weather Conditions at the end of this section, page 29.
Method of Recording Weather Data
Click on the down arrow button of this combo box to be presented with this list of options:
• Radio/TV Report with Rel Hum
• Radio/TV Report with Dew Pt
• Uncorr. Baro with Rel Hum
• Uncorr. Baro with Dew Pt
• Altimeter with Rel Hum
• Altimeter with Dew Pt
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If you change the Method, the 4 inputs specs in the Weather section are changed or enabled/disabled as necessary to represent
the new Method. In addition, all the input specs are adjusted to what they would be with the new Method. For example, Corr.
Barometer of 29.3” at an elevation of 1200 feet is converted to 28.03” Obs Barometer with Elevation disabled. (Elevation is
not important when you are using an uncorrected or observed barometer, as this type of barometer shows the actual air pressure
at the track.)
If you change from “Uncorr Baro” to Radio/TV Report with a “Corr. Baro”, the program will ask for an Elevation for the track,
since this is needed to make the Barometer Correction. All these different inputs are explained below.
Barometric Pressure
Corr. Barometer, ''Hg
This input is used for either “Radio/TV Report with Rel Hum” or “Radio/TV Report with Dew Pt”. It is the Corrected
Barometric Pressure in inches of Mercury you will hear from most any TV or radio weather report. This spec is disabled if you
are using an Altimeter, because the altimeter alone is measuring the air pressure.
Obs. Barometer, ''Hg
This input is used for either “Uncorr. Baro with Rel Hum” or “Uncorr. Baro with Dew Pt”. It is the actual or observed
Barometric Pressure in inches of Mercury at the track. These barometers measure the actual air pressure at the track, and will
read approximately 0.1 inches of mercury less than the barometric pressure you will hear from a TV or radio weather report for
each 100 feet of elevation. This spec is disabled if you are using an Altimeter, because the altimeter alone is measuring the air
pressure. For example, at 600 ft, if the a barometer reported by at Radio weather report (Corrected Barometer) is 30.2 inches,
you Observed Barometer on a weather station should be about 30.2 - .6 or 29.6 inches.
Air Temperature
Air Temperature deg F
Air temperature in degrees F of the air at the entrance to the air cleaner, carb or throttle body. Be careful not to get this too
close to the carb if there is fuel “stand off” (fuel mist spraying back out of the engine). This fuel on any temperature
measurement instrument will make the air temperature look much colder than the air actually is. This spec is used for all
Methods of Recording Weather Data.
Humidity
Relative Humidity, %
Describes the air’s humidity level in percent of humidity the air could hold at its present temperature. Relative Humidity can be
calculated from either wet and dry bulb temperatures, or from dew point and air temperature readings by clicking on the Clc
button. See Section 2.8.4, page 63.
Relative humidity is only useful when you know the air temperature where the relative humidity is
measured. Since that temperature may be quite different than the air temperature going into the engine,
Dew Point described below is a better, less confusing way to enter the air’s moisture level.
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Dew Point, deg F
The dew point in degrees F of the air at the track, which describes the air's humidity level. The Dew Point, deg F must be less
than the Air Temperature. Dew Point can be calculated from either wet and dry bulb temperatures, or from relative humidity
and air temperature readings by clicking on the Clc button. See Section 2.8.3, page 62.
Dew Point is a less confusing way of describing the air's moisture level than relative humidity. Relative humidity readings are
only meaningful if the air temperature when the reading was made is also known. However, the air's dew point remains
constant even when the air temperature changes. For example, 40 degree air with an 80 % relative humidity has only a 10%
relative humidity when the same air is heated to 100 degrees. However, the dew point remains at 36 degrees for both air
temperatures.
Elevation
Elevation, ft
The elevation of the track above sea level in feet. This spec is only used if you are using a Corrected Barometer, like from a TV
or radio station weather report. If the elevation is below sea level (very unlikely), enter a negative (-) feet for this reading.
Altimeter
The altitude in feet above sea level from an altimeter instrument. The program assumes the altimeter is corrected to 29.92”.
This means on a standard 29.92” barometric pressure, 60 deg day, the altimeter would read 0 feet at sea level. If the altimeter
is reading feet below sea level, enter a negative (-) feet for this reading.
Notes on Weather Readings and Weather Stations
Some Road and Circle Track racers will use “weather stations”, a collection of temperature, humidity and barometric pressure
measuring devices. When using these instruments, here are some things to keep in mind:
• Unless you are very close to sea level, an actual (observed or uncorrected) barometer will usually read less than a TV
or radio weather report barometer. For elevations less than 5000 feet, an uncorrected barometer should read
approximately 0.1 “ Mercury less for each 100 feet of elevation above sea level. For example, if your barometer
instrument is at 850 feet elevation and the closest weather station reports 30.46” barometric pressure, your barometer
should read approximately .85” (850/100 x .1) less, or 30.46-.85= 29.61. It is useful to keep records of information
like this (what your actual barometer reads versus what this simple calculation says it should approximately read) to
see if the comparison is constantly jumping around. If you always make the check at the same place (same elevation)
like your home or shop, and the difference is varying high by .1”, than low by .2”, etc., you may want to have the
barometer or altimeter checked out.
• If you find that you are making many adjustments to your weather station, you are probably doing something wrong.
A barometer or altimeter which reads low, but consistently reads low is better for correcting torque and HP to see
trends than one you are trying to keep accurate by constantly adjusting it.
Performance Trends sells electronic weather stations to help eliminate any confusion, save time and improve accuracy.
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Race Summary
Track Length, ft
Click on the down arrow button to select the length of the track, or type in most any number of feet for the track. If you type in
the feet, you can add a name for the track also, like “Watkins Glen”. As you enter new distances these are added to the list
here and you can pick them in the future. Picking from a list if you’ve already entered a distance is best as it is likely to keep
your analysis consistent, for example every time you run a Watkins Glen, you would be using the same distance in feet for
analysis.
Fastest Lap Time
Enter the time for the fastest lap and the program will calculate the average Lap MPH for that fastest lap . This entry is for
information only. No entry is required.
Position
Enter the number for your finishing position. You may want to come up with your own number for a “DNF” (did not finish),
like 999. This entry is for information only. No entry is required.
Lap MPH
Typically this number is calculated from the Track Length and Fastest Lap Time described above. However, if you enter the
average Lap MPH for a lap, the Fastest Lap Time above will be calculated from that and the Track Length.
Corner Tail W ind
Side W ind
Corner Head W ind
Wind Conditions
Wind Speed, MPH
Enter the wind speed during the race in MPH. This entry
is for information only. No entry is required.
Wind Direction
Tail W ind
Vehicle Direction
Head W ind
Figure 2.9 B
Choose a direction for the wind speed during the race. This entry is for information only. No entry is required.
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2.4 Log Book (Pro version only)
The Log Book lets you record additional data for each run, data not recorded by the DataMite recorder like fastest Lap Time
and Lap Distance (which you can record in the Track Conds screen), Track and Event Name, finish position, tire pressures,
suspension settings, engine specs and checks, and much more. Since most all these entries are for your information only (not
used by the DataMite software for calculations), you need to enter only the information you are interested in. You can leave
most all entries blank if you wish.
Figure 2.10 Main Log Book Screen
You can branch out from this screen to
other, more detailed Log Book screens by
clicking on these menu items.
Items you are not
interested in or that
do not apply to you
can be left blank.
If some data is not already listed in these Log Book
Screens, you can add them here as “User Defined” records.
From the main Log Book screen shown above, you can branch out to 4 other Log Book Details screens shown in this section.
Some important notes about the Log Book entries include:
•
The Log Book entries are for your information only. You need not enter anything in the Log Book ever.
•
The entries of Track Length, Fastest Lap Time, Position and Lap MPH in the Log Book main screen are linked to the
Track Length, Fastest Lap Time, Position, and Lap MPH entries in the Track Conds screen. If you change them in
one screen, they are automatically changed in the other.
•
The Log Book screens can be printed with reports, and you can select which screens. See Section 3.4, page 107.
•
The Log Book screens can be searched using the Filter (find) option when you use the “Open (from all saved tests)”
option after clicking on File at the upper left of the Main Screen. For example, you may want to search for a
particular event, search for what tire pressure you used at a particular track, etc.
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Chapter 2 Definitions
As with most all screens, when you click on an input, you are given a description of that input in the “Help” box,
usually at the bottom of the screen. For this reason, and because most inputs here are for info only (not critical), each
input is not listed and described in this section.
Engine Details
The Engine Details screen shown in Figure 2.11 is obtained by clicking on More Engine at the top of the main Log Book
screen, then choosing Engine Details. There are 3 tabs at the top which let you choose any of 3 categories of inputs.
Figure 2.11 Engine Details Log Book Screen
Click on these 3 tabs for various
sections of the Engine Log Book.
Jet Suggestions are
only possible if you
enter the weather
conditions for your
runs, you have
selected a
“Comparison” or
“Baseline” run (in
this case Sequence
# 282 in the Run
Log down the left
side of the Main
Screen), and the
Fuel System
settings for the
current run and the
Baseline run are the
same. See
explanation in this
section on page 33.
Engine Comments can be most anything you want, but are kept
separate from the Main comments on the Main Screen.
Fuel Metering
Most all Fuel Metering inputs are for info only. However, if you want the program to accurately recommend different jet sizes
for weather changes, these inputs are critical. Jet suggestions are determined by you picking one particular run (the
“Comparison” run) that you always want to match. The assumption is that this run had the carb jetted exactly correct for that
run’s weather conditions, and this is the jetting you want the program to match for different weather conditions.
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Jet Suggestions are only possible if:
•
You enter the correct weather conditions for the current run and some “Comparison” run.
•
You have selected a “Comparison” or “Baseline” run (in this case Sequence # 282 in the Run Log). The Run Log is
the list of runs down the left side of the Main Screen. You can click on the details button at the top of this list to see
more details about each run. One of the columns is called “Sequence Number” and is the programs assignment of a
sequential number for each run downloaded from the DataMite. This number should be unique for each run. The file
name for this Sequence # is also displayed in the “File:” box. See Section 3.9, Run Log, page 123 for information of
the Sequence #.
•
The Fuel System settings (type of carb, for example) for the current run and the Baseline run are the same.
Figure 2.11 shows that Comparison run #282 had 78 jets (Holley Jet #) with a Dry Density Altitude of 2717 ft. For the current
run, you kept the 78 jets when you ran in a Dry Density Altitude of 4217 ft, but the program would have recommended 77 jets
instead.
Figure 2.12 Mechanical Checks in Engine Details
Leakdown was
not checked so
it was left blank
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Figure 2.13 Other Checks in Engine Details
Figure 2.14 General Engine Description Screen
Click on File, then:
• New to blank out this menu.
• Print or Windows Printer Setup to print this screen.
Engine Comments
(different than main
Comments at the main
screen) lets you describe
the engine itself. These
are the same comments
displayed in the Engine
Details screens.
Most specs in this screen are
for recording information only,
and are not used for any
calculations. You can enter
most anything you want, or
leave them blank.
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Figure 2.15 Suspension Details Log Book Screen
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Figure 2.17 User Defined Section of Log Book
You can right click on any of
these “User Defined” input
names and the program will
ask what name you want to
call this input. This input will
now be called, say the “Ballast
Location” for all past and
future records. Note, that if
you previously called this field
“Trans Fluid Type”, and used
ratings from A-G, the data you
entered for previous runs of
letters from A-G will still be
displayed. Its just that the
name will now be “Ballast
Location”.
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2.5 DataMite Specs
The DataMite menu tells the program what type of DataMite you have, what sensors you are using and how the sensors are
calibrated.
The entries in this screen are critical to accurately recording data.
Master DataMite Specs
Figure 2.18 Typical Note on Master DataMite Specs
A critical concept for DataMite Specs is the
idea of the Master DataMite Specs. When
you download data from the DataMite, you
are using a particular DataMite Setup with
certain sensors and calibrations. (A
calibration describes how the DataMite
should convert a sensor input into useful
information, like 2.2 volts is 1.4 inches of
shock travel .) When you save the run, the
program saves a copy of the DataMite Specs with the test. Let’s call this test “TestCh4” and assume it was run with a 4
Channel DataMite.
Let’s say several months later that
you buy a new DataMite II 30
Channel system. (Or you could
have changed any DataMite spec:
different sensors, different
calibrations, etc.) Your current
DataMite II specs do not match the
specs for “TestCh4”. If you open
the old “TestCh4”, the program
installs the 4 Channel DataMite
specs which you used when you ran
that test. This lets you accurately
calculate torque and HP and other
data just as you did when you first
ran the test.
If you go into the DataMite Specs
menu, you will likely get a message
shown in Figure 2.18, saying that
the DataMite Specs for TestCh4 do
not match your Master DataMite
Specs, the specs for your current
DataMite II 30 Channel system.
You may ask ”What are Master
DataMite Specs?”
The program keeps track of any
changes to DataMite Specs, asking
Figure 2.19 Illustration of Master DataMite Specs
A Test File contains the raw DataMite data and other
specs to calculate Tq and HP and analyze results.
Test File “TestCh4”
DataMite Data:
Ch # Pt1
1
2344
2
566
3
85.5
Pt2
2357
571
85.5
...
...
...
...
Vehicle Specs:
Front Wheel Dia = 25
Vehicle Wt = 3150 ...
DataMite Specs:
Type: 4 Channel
Ch 1 = EngRPM, 2 cyl 4 stroke
...
The program keeps
separate records of your
Master DataMite Specs,
the specs describing the
DataMite you are
currently using. These
Master DataMite Specs
are used whenever you
start a New Test.
Master DataMite Specs:
Type: 30 Channel
Ch 1 = Exh Temp, 0-1600 deg
...
Etc
Note that the DataMite Specs for a particular test may not match
the DataMite you are currently using, the Master DataMite Specs
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you if these changes should only apply to the DataMite Specs for a particular test session, or if these changes represent your
actual DataMite, the Master DataMite specs. Whenever, you start a new test, either based on a previous test or starting
completely blank, the Master DataMite Specs are used. Whenever you open an old test file, the DataMite specs used for that
particular test are used.
Figure 2.20 DataMite Specs Menu
Click on File, then:
• Save as My Master DataMite Specs
• Open Master DataMite Specs
• Print or Windows Printer Setup to print this screen.
Click here to bring up
the Sensor and
Calibration screen for
defining each channel,
as shown in Figures
2.21 and 2.22.
If you specify the 31
channel DataMite II, you
have many more
settings.
The combination of
Rate, number of active
channels (Used set to
Yes), and Segments
determine the
approximate recording
time for each segment.
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Type
Is the type of DataMite you are using, either a 3 Channel (very old), 4 Channel or the DataMite II 30 Channel system. You
choice here will affect how the Channel Settings grid is displayed and how you can specify various channel #s. Differences
between DataMite and DataMite II are further discusses at the end of this section and in Appendix 3.
One major difference between the DataMite and DataMite II is the DataMite II box needs information from the DataMite
program on your computer to work correctly. This is information like, sample rate, # segments, which channels are being
used, etc. When you first enter the DataMite
specs screen, the program asks the question
Figure 2.20B Checking DataMite II Configuration when
shown in Figure 2.20B. This is to help ensure
Entering the DataMite Specs Screen
the program’s configuration matches the
DataMite II box’s configuration.
In addition, when you make changes in this
DataMite screen, the program will ask if you
want these changes saved (sent to) the
DataMite II box when you exit this screen.
You can force these changes to be saved to the
DataMite box by clicking on File, then Save
as Master DataMite Specs at the top of the
DataMite screen.
Com Port
Click on the down arrow button to select computer's Com (serial) port # you are using to 'talk' to the DataMite. This spec is
used to hold the last Com port the computer used to talk to the DataMite. If this particular port does not work and you have
selected the correct Preference (see Section 2.2), the program automatically checks all Com Ports on your computer, 1-8.
Weather Station
Is the type of Weather Station being used by the DataMite program, if any. If you choose the Performance Trends Black Box,
you will then have a new menu choice at the top of this screen, to Calibrate the Weather Station. Here you can enter
calibration specs you received with the Black Box to improve its accuracy.
Com Port
Click on the down arrow button to select computer's Com (serial) port # you are using to 'talk' to the Weather Station, if any. If
you have set this to the same port as the DataMite com port listed earlier, then the DataMite will request you to switch to the
Weather Station (assuming you have a switch box) after downloading the DataMite data.
DataMite II Rate
Is the sampling rate for all DataMite II channels. The higher the number, the more data recorded. This allows for less
recording time, but will possibly make the data slightly more accurate, and definitely make the data respond more quickly to
changes. Changes to this DataMite II spec must be downloaded from the DataMite program to the DataMite II box
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DataMite II Recording Segments
Is the number of memory segments you want for the DataMite II’s memory. At the time of publishing this manual, the
DataMite II’s memory works differently than the standard 4 channel DataMite’s memory. The box operation will be updated
in the future through the DataMite software to work more like the smaller, more flexible standard DataMite. For now, the
memory works as follows:
The current DataMite II has memory which can be broken up into from 1 to 8 segments. This is selectable in the
DataMite menu, available at the top of the Main Screen. Say, for example, the DataMite’s memory has 8000 seconds of
recording time available, and you select 8 segments. Each segment will record for 1000 seconds. At the end of 1000
seconds, recording stops no matter where you are on the track. The next time you press the red button to start recording,
the DataMite II automatically records in the next segment, overwriting any data which was in that segment. If there was
good data in that segment that you have not yet downloaded to the PC, it is gone. If segment 8 was the last segment, the
DataMite II will start recording in segment 1 for the next recording session.
When you go to get data from the box in the DataMite software, the program shows which segment was the last one
recorded. You can select to download this segment (by default) or any of the other segments recorded.
In the program, if you click on DataMite at the top of the Main Screen, you will display the DataMite configuration
screen. Here you tell the DataMite program (which can in turn tell the DataMite box), what channels you want recorded,
at what rate and into how many segments. You also tell the DataMite which channels are analog inputs and which are
thermocouple inputs.
Channel Settings
Channel
This column describes the type of data recorded with this channel, like RPM, On/Off Switch, Analog Input, etc. You can not
change what is in this column, as this is determined by your choice of the Type of DataMite.
Used?
Click on this column to set it to “Yes”, or if it is already ”Yes”, to blank it out (which means it is not currently being used).
Data Name
Click in this column to bring up a screen which simply asks for a new name for this data channel. This name is what will be
used on graphs and reports when this channel is graphed or reported.
Sensor and Calibration
If you click in the Sensor and Calibration column, you will be presented with one of the screens shown if Figures 2.21 (if you
click on the top row for Engine RPM) or 2.22 for most other rows (other RPM channels).
In each screen, you choose from the options below, and the calibration description is displayed at the top. This description is
read by the program so it knows how to interpret the DataMite’s readings and convert them to “engineering units”, things like
RPM, degrees F, movement in inches, etc.
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Engine RPM Calibration, Figure 2.21
# Cylinders
Chapter 2 Definitions
Figure 2.21 Sensor and Calibration
Screen: Engine RPM, Channel 1
Pick the number of cylinders that obtain spark from the source of the
DataMite’s ignition signal. Usually, this is the number of cylinders in the
engine. However, for some engines, there may be 2 or more ignition
coils. A modern “distributerless” V-8 may have 4 coils, each firing 2
spark plugs. In that case, if you attached the DataMite’s engine RPM
wire to one of these coils, you would use 2, since each coil fires 2
cylinders.
Engine Type
This input specifies how often this spark source fires each cylinder, either
1 time for each revolution (typical 2 stroke), or 1 time for every 2
revolutions (typical 4 stroke). Again, you may have to adjust this input to
match your engine. For example, a Briggs & Stratton engine fires each
revolution, even though it is a 4 stroke engine with a cam and valves. For
the Briggs engine, you would specify # Cylinders as 1 and Engine Type as
2 Stroke. (Note, you could also specify # Cylinders as 2 and Engine Type
as 4 Stroke to obtain the same RPM data.)
Notes on RPM Data:
Engine RPM, as with most of the other RPMs, is not going to be off just a little bit. It will be off a lot if you put in the wrong
calibration specs. For example, if you put in # Cylinders as 1 and Engine Type as 4 Stroke for the Briggs example above, you
would obtain RPMs exactly double what they should be. If you should read 5000 RPM, you would read 10,000 RPM, if you
should read 3000 RPM, you would read 6000 RPM, etc. Therefore, it is easy to find errors in calibration. You may have to
adjust these inputs to make the Engine RPM read correctly. It is recommended that you only change the Engine Type, or drop
the # Cylinders by one half, then one half again. This means on a V-8, you might try 4 cylinders (half), or 2 cylinders (half
again), but not 7, 5 or 3 cylinders.
If you think the recorded RPM is off only a little bit (you think you should read 5000 RPM but actually read 5200 RPM), the
DataMite is probably correct and your other measurement system is probably wrong. The recorded and downloaded DataMite
data is much faster responding and more accurate than typical tachometers.
Other RPM Calibrations, Figure 2.22
Sensor
Pick the source of the RPM data. This can be very critical for calculated results like MPH, distance, acceleration rate, clutch
slip, etc.
The choices for this sensor include:
• Front Wheel RPM (which is used for MPH, distance, acceleration rate and tire slip unless you have an accelerometer).
• Rear Wheel RPM (which is used for tire slip and clutch or converter slip).
• Driveshaft RPM (which is used for tire slip and clutch or converter slip).
• “Other RPM”, which could be some RPM on an engine pulley, like water pump or supercharger RPM.
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•
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Analog Converter (for sensors like thermocouples for temperature,
pressures, shock travel, etc.)
Not Being Used
Chapter 2 Definitions
Figure 2.22 Sensor and Calibration
Screen: Other RPM Channels
Your choice here will determine what other inputs on this screen are
made available.
# Magnets
If you have specified an RPM type of Sensor, click on the down arrow
button to choose the number or magnets on the shaft or wheel.
Be sure to read the Notes on RPM Data concerning the Engine RPM
calibration on the previous page. Unlike Engine RPM, where you may
not be sure of the number of cylinder firings per engine revolution, the #
Magnets you pick should be the same as what are actually mounted. If
not, or the recorded data is “noisy”, you have some other problem with
your setup. See Appendix 3, Troubleshooting.
Or, Sensor Type
If you have specified an Analog Converter type of Sensor, click on the
down arrow button to choose the type of sensor. For most, the program
will know the calibration simply by your choice. However, if you choose
“Custom (user supplies specs)”, then the lower section called Analog
Sensor Specs becomes enabled. See Analog Sensor Specs on the next
page.
Multiplier
If you selected “Other RPM” as the Sensor, then the Multiplier spec
becomes enabled. This allows you to multiply this RPM by some number.
Often this is used by motorcycle racers who multiply clutch RPM by the
gear reduction between the engine and the clutch. This allows them to
see when Engine RPM matches “multiplied” clutch RPM, then they have
zero clutch slip.
Screen for Analog Converter
Pick Analog Converter as Sensor
Data Name
This is the Data Name shown in Column 4 of the Channel Settings grid
of the main DataMite screen shown in Figure 2.20 on page 38. You can
change the name here in this screen, or by clicking on the name in the
Channel Settings grid and entering a new name there.
# Magnets spec is now
called Sensor Type.
Click here for list of Sensor
Types if using an Analog
Converter.
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Analog Sensor Specs
1st Value, Engineering Units
1st Value, Freq (hz)
2nd Value, Engineering Units
2nd Value, Freq (hz)
Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 2 Definitions
Figure 2.23 Illustration of a Custom Sensor Calibration
Throttle Angle
90 deg
82 deg
2nd Value
4.4 volts = 82 deg
These 4 specs are used to calibrate a “Custom
Sensor” to read most anything you want.
These specs can be used 2 ways:
45 deg
• Type in the information provided with the
sensor. This will be on a sheet with this
menu printed on it with the required
information written in. This tells the
1st Value
computer the sensor output at 2
1.0 volts = 0 deg
conditions.
0 deg
• Perform a calibration. A calibration is
0
1
2
3
4 4.4 5
Volts
the process where you set the sensor to 2
known conditions (positions,
temperatures, etc) and let the computer
read the sensor output at these 2 conditions. You can click on the ‘Read’ buttons to have the DataMite actually read the
sensor values for these 2 conditions.
Custom (user supplies table) Calibration
Sometimes you have a sensor where the output is not linear (not a straight line). Then you can select the Type as “Custom
(user supplies table) and you can enter in most any set of 10 calibration points you want. See Figure 2.24.
Figure 2.24 Custom (user supplies table)
Enter pairs of
calibration points here
and the response
curve is graphed to
ensure the calibration
looks correct.
If this calibration is for
a DataMite II, then the
signal can be based on
different scalings of the
particular channel.
These buttons let you
organize the data and
read the DataMite’s
signals just as the
“Read” button was
described above.
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Signal Based On
If this calibration is for a DataMite II, then the signal can be based on different scalings of the particular channel, either
• 0-4095 bits of resolution (works for either type of scaling of a channel, 0-5 or 0-10 volts)
• 0-5 volts (5 volts full scale on this particular channel, which is determined by a jumper inside the DataMite II)
• 0-10 volts (10 volts full scale on this particular channel, which is determined by a jumper inside the DataMite II)
For the analog converters for RPM channels, 0-4095 bits is replaced by 0-1000 Hz frequency. Your choice here changes the
labels in the table.
Sensor Calibration Table Button Commands
The 6 buttons below the table let you move, delete, reorder and insert blank rows in the table. To tell the program which row to
work with, the blinking cursor must be in that row. To place the cursor in that row, click on either the Data or Volts box in the
row. The Read DataMite button will read the data from the DataMite channel you are currently calibrating and load the results
with the appropriate scaling into the row with the cursor.
The process of actually performing a calibration is somewhat involved and is
outlined in Appendix 5, Calibrating an Analog Sensor.
DataMite II Analog Channels
The analog channels for the DataMite II are calibrated much the same way as for the Analog Converter channels described
above. However, there are these differences.
The first 16 analog channels are configured in the DataMite II box’s hardware as either:
• Not Used (no electronics installed for these channels)
• Thermocouples (special sensors for recording temperatures)
• Analog (A jumper inside determines if the channel is 0-5 or 0-10 volts, which is most always set to 0-5 from the
factory.)
These 16 channels are broken down into 4 groups of 4 channels. The 4 channels of each group must all be the same, either Not
Used, Thermocouples or Analog channels. If you change a channel in a set of 4 that was previously set to, say Analog to
thermocouples, the program will warn you that all channels for this group of 4 must be the same, and make this change for
you.
The next 2 analog channels (17 and 18) are reserved for the standard accelerometers in the DataMite box. The next channel 19
is reserved for the 3rd axis accelerometer, and channel 20 is reserved for DataMite II power, typically car battery power.
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DataMite II Switch and Timer Channels
The next 4 channels are On/Off switch channels. These are useful for recording things like if the brake light comes on (you’re
on the brakes), a throttle switch which trips when the throttle is fully open is on or off, whether a nitrous oxide solenoid is on
or off, etc. Switches are only recorded at the sampling rate of the other channels, say 25 or 50 times a second They are set in a
screen very similar to Fig 2.24B.
Timer channels are the same as switch channels except they are recorded to the nearest .001 second or even finer. They are
most useful as a lap timer input from a beacon. See Figure 2.24 B.
Figure 2.24 B Timer Configuration
The “Source” you choose for a Timer or Switch can be WOT Switch,
Brake Switch, Lap Timer or Other Switch. Try to pick an accurate
“Source” so the program can do the best analysis of your test data.
The “Name” you use can be most anything of your choosing.
Important: Some channel names have special meaning to the
DataMite program. For example, if you are recording a temperature,
you could just select one of the several Thermocouple calibrations, like
“Std Thermocouple, Misc” and then name it yourself as Exh #2. This
will get you a temperature reading, but some of the program’s features
may not work correctly. In this case, displaying this channel in the
Current Readings screen’s Exhaust Temp bar graph, and analyzing
average exhaust temperatures and exhaust temperature spread would
not include this channel. Therefore, try to pick a Calibration which is
most appropriate for that particular channel and sensor. The Data
Name for the channel can be most anything you want as this is not
used by the program for anything critical, just to label graphs and reports. Also see Section 3.8, Send Data for additional
special Calibration names to denote special analysis of a channel.
Menu Commands
Back
Simply closes this menu and returns you to the Main Screen.
If you made changes to these specs, you will be asked if you want to keep them for the current test. If you answer Yes, the
results of the current test may be changed based on these changes. This is good if you are correcting a mistake. If you answer
Yes, you will also be asked if these changes should be saved to the Master DataMite specs. Only answer Yes if all the current
settings in this screen match the current settings, sensors and calibrations of the DataMite right now and for the near future.
Remember that the Master DataMite specs will be used for the next test you download from the DataMite.
As mentioned earlier about the DataMite II, if you save these settings as the Master DataMite, you must also download these
changes to the DataMite II box, so it also has the new configuration.
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File
Open Master DataMite Specs
Click on File, then Open Master DataMite Specs and the Master DataMite specs (which should be the current DataMite setup)
will be copied to this screen. When you back out of this screen, you can then keep these Master DataMite specs as the
DataMite specs (sensors and calibrations) which will be used for calculating this test’s results.
Save As Master DataMite Specs
Click on File, then Save As Master DataMite Specs and the current settings in this screen will be copied to the Master
DataMite specs. Do this only if all the current settings in this screen DO match the current settings, sensors and calibrations of
the DataMite right now and for the near future. Remember that the Master DataMite specs will be used for the next test you
download from the DataMite.
Print
Click on File, then Print to print this screen.
Figure 2.25 Comparing DataMite
Configurations (Box vs Program)
DataMite II Options
Compare to DataMite II
This option compares the current DataMite configuration on
this screen to that loaded in the DataMite II box. You will get a
response as shown in Figure 2.25
Save to DataMite II
This option saves the current DataMite configuration on this screen as the Master DataMite specs, and then loads this
configuration into the DataMite II box.
Force a Reconfiguration of the DataMite II
This option forces the program to rebuild the DataMite II’s configuration from a known good configuration. This is typically
only used if the DataMite is acting strangely, like not accepting a normal reconfiguration or not allowing a comparison between
the program and the DataMite II box.
Current Readings
Click Current Readings to display the screen showing current readings for most sensors. This screen can be very useful for
troubleshooting problems with signals, or for watching the signals if a passenger is present in the car. See Section 2.7 for more
details.
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Troubleshoot
These options let you troubleshoot problems you may be having with your DataMite or DataMite II. Usually you will be
requested to try these from a Performance Trends technician when doing diagnostics. These are covered in Appendix 3 in
Troubleshooting.
Help
Click on Help for help on this screen.
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Chapter 2 Definitions
2.6 Vehicle Specs
The specs shown in Figure 2.26 describe the vehicle which produced the data. These specs are used to do many of the
calculations. Nearly all data calculated from wheel, engine or driveshaft RPM inputs depend on these specs being correct.
These data include:
MPH *
Accel Gs *
Feet *
Gear #
Clutch Slip
Converter Slip
Tire Slip
Tire Growth
Tq *
HP *
Calc Gear Ratio
* Calculated from accelerometer data or front wheel RPM, whichever is available.
Therefore, if the raw RPM data looks correct but one of these calculated outputs does not, double check these Vehicle Specs.
Figure 2.26 Vehicle Specs Menu
Click on File, then:
• New to blank out this
screen.
• Open Example to
pick an example
vehicle provided with
the program.
• Save or Save As to
save these vehicle
specs to a name of
your choosing.
• Print or Windows
Printer Setup to print
this screen.
Vehicle Specs
Total Weight with Driver, lbs
The weight of the vehicle with the driver in pounds.
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Final Drive Ratio
The ratio of the final drive gears or chain ratio or both. Click on the Clc button to calculate from # of gear teeth.
Rear Tire Radius, in
Distance from the ground to the center of the Rear wheel/tire in inches. Click on Clc button to calculate from tire size specs.
Front Tire Radius, in
Distance from the ground to the center of the Front wheel/tire in inches. Click on Clc button to calculate from tire size specs.
Drive Layout
Click on down arrow button to pick the location of the driving tires or axle. 'Motorcycle With Pri GR' means 'Primary Gear
Reduction' between the engine and the clutch, which enables the Primary Gear Reduction spec in the Engine Specs section.
Aerodynamics
Type
Click on down arrow button to pick a general description of the car's aerodynamics, or choose 'Use Specs Below' to enable the
aerodynamics specs. Then you can type in your own numbers to the specs below. These specs only affect torque and HP
calculated from acceleration tests.
Drag Coefficient
The coefficient of drag (Cd) is an engineering term used to describe how aerodynamic a vehicle's exterior design is (how easily
it "slices" through the wind). A low value for the Cd indicates the car is aerodynamic and requires little power from the engine
to overcome wind resistance. Many automotive manufacturers now publish the vehicle's Cd in advertising, since an
aerodynamic car is a more fuel efficient car. An aerodynamic car is also a faster car. If the actual Cd of a particular vehicle
can not be found, use Table 2.3 to estimate the Cd for different types of vehicles Use Table 2.4 to estimate how much Cd will
change from a modification. A more complete list is obtained by selecting one of the examples of Body Details.
Table 2.3: Estimate Drag Coefficient (Cd)
Type of Vehicle or Modification
Cd
Motorcycle
Modern Motorcycle (fairings, etc.)
Pickup Truck
Sedan before 1980
Sports Car before 1980
Open Convertible
Modern Aerodynamic Sedan
Modern Aerodynamic Sports Car
“Best Case" vehicle
50
.70-1.10
.50-.70
.50-.70
.45-.60
.45-.55
.50-.70
.35-.45
.30-.40
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Table 2.4: Estimate How Modifications Affect Cd and Cl (lift coefficient)
Modification
Change Cd
Change Cl (lift)
-4 deg Angle of Attack (vs stock) *1
+4 deg Angle of Attack (vs stock)
Open Side Windows (vs closed)
Open T-Top & Side Windows
4" Flat Air Dam (width of vehicle) *2
8" Flat Air Dam (width of vehicle)
12" Flat Air Dam (width of vehicle)
1" Flat Spoiler (width of vehicle) *3
2" Flat Spoiler (width of vehicle)
4" Flat Spoiler (width of vehicle)
Blocking half radiator air flow
-.04
+.04
+.02
+.08
-.04
.00
+.08
-.03
.00
+.08
-.04
-.20
+.20
-.05
-.10
-.11
-.03
-.05
-.07
-.07
Notes concerning Table 2.3 and 2.4:
1* Change the vehicle's attitude from the production attitude 4 degrees, where a negative angle of attack is when the front is
lowered and the rear is raised.
2* For this table, an air dam is defined as a flat plate the full width of the vehicle projecting vertically down directly below
front bumper (based on typical 1970s or earlier design, say a 1974 Nova). Most modern designs integrate air dams for
optimum Cd, therefore adding an air dam to a modern vehicle will likely show an increase in Cd but perhaps a reduction
in Cl.
3* For this table, a spoiler is defined as a flat plate extending the full width of the vehicle at the top rear edge of the rear deck
(trunk) lid, angled back 20 degrees from vertical.
•
•
•
Cl is the lift coefficient. Assume that the lift coefficient was changed on the end of the car where the modification took
place. For example, if you added a 4” Flat Air Dam to the front, subtract .05 from the current Front Lift Coefficient and
leave the Rear Lift Coefficient unchanged. For changing the “Angle of Attack”, make the change to both the front and rear
Lift Coefficients.
Table 2.4 shows typical effects from modifications.
Individual vehicle's can differ considerable.
Advertised Cds are usually the "best case". For a realistic
Cd, add .03 to .05 to the
Figure 2.28, Estimate of Frontal Area, sq ft
advertised Cd.
Frontal Area, sq ft
The frontal area is the area in square
feet the vehicle's silhouette occupies
when viewed from the front. Use the
formula in Fig 2.28 to estimate frontal
area. Frontal areas are in the range of
5 sq ft for a motorcycle, to 20 sq ft for
a small passenger car to 30 sq ft or
more for a full size pick-up truck.
Also see Section 2.8.6 for calculating
Frontal Area, sq ft by clicking on the
Clc button.
Vehicle Height
Track Width
Frontal Area, sq ft = Vehicle Height (in) X Track Width (in)
144
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Transmission
Chapter 2 Definitions
Figure 2.29 Picking a Type of Example
Transmission
Type
Click on down arrow button to pick a type of transmission. Select
one of the “User Defined” types and you can enter most any specs
in this section. If you select one of the “pre-programmed”
example transmissions, these example specs are loaded. However,
if you change any of these “pre-programmed” specs, the Type of
the Transmission is converted to a “User Defined” type.
Clutch/Converter
Click on down arrow button to pick a type of coupling between the
engine and transmission (or drive axle if no transmission), either a friction clutch or torque converter. This affects how the
program checks for transmission shifts, etc.
Efficiency, %
Efficiency of the transmission. The lower the number, the more HP the transmission wastes. Click on down arrow button to
pick a value, or pick "Program will estimate" if you are not sure.
1st – 6th Gear Ratio
Gear ratio of transmission gear #1. If you are not sure, pick an example transmission. If your transmission is not listed, pick
one with the same # of gears.
Engine Specs
Engine Size, cubic inches (Pro Version Only)
Engine Size in cubic inches, which is used to improve accuracy in calculating Torque and HP. This information is contained
in the Log Book specs under Engine, General Notes. This value can not be changed in this screen, but only in the Log Book
General Engine Notes screen.
Primary Gear Reduction
Gear Ratio between engine crankshaft and clutch, typically found only on some motorcycles. Click on Clc button to calculate
from number of gear teeth.
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2.7 Current Readings
This screen displays the current readings of selected channels from the DataMite. Some channels are displayed on the two
gauges. All channels are shown in the boxes below the gauges. For the DataMite II, there are only 16 boxes for numbers, so
you must select which channels to view, either the RPM and Accelerometer channels, or the other 16 Analog Channels.
Figure 2.30 Current Reading Screens
Current Readings screen
for 30 channel DataMite II
Click on Options to
change the screen
update rate, what is
displayed on the
gauges, gauge scales,
smoothing, etc.
Click on either of
these option buttons
to display the digital
(number) values of
either the RPM and
Accelerometer
channels, or the other
16 Analog Channels.
Current Readings screen
for 4 channel DataMite
The scaling of the gauges (and bar gauges
and exhaust temperature gauges in the
DataMite II screen) can be set by the user
by clicking on Options at the top of this
screen.
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The Current Readings screen is very useful for troubleshooting the DataMite setup with the car in the shop. For example, you
could wiggle connections and watch to see if a pressure reading jumps around, indicating faulty wiring.
IMPORTANT: Do Not use this screen while driving the car, unless you have a
passenger dedicated to only watch this computer screen.
Click on the Options menu item to open a menu where you can select which channels to view on the gauges, and the range of
the gauges. For example, if you want to see Engine RPM, you would probably pick a range like 0 – 2400 RPM. However, if
you were to watch Engine RPM, you would probably pick a range like 0 - 12000 RPM, because Engine RPM would go much
higher than 2400 RPM. See Figure 2.32.
IMPORTANT: It is strongly recommended that you purchase Performance
Trends Optical Isolation box if you use this screen while running an engine.
This will prevent 'voltage spikes' from the engine passing back through the
DataMite to your computer, possibly damaging the computer.
Click on Options to either select to:
• Change the update rate of this screen.
• Change what is displayed on the circular gauges.
• Change what is displayed on the Bar Gauge Settings (DataMite II only)
• Change the scale of the Exhaust Temp Scale (DataMite II only)
• Change the Color Warning Settings
• Change the Analog Filtering (smoothing)
Figure 2.31 Change Update Rate
Change the update rate of this screen
Click on Options, then Change Update Rate (currently x ), to be presented with
the screen of Figure 2.31. Enter any number between 1 and 10 to specify the
number of screen updates per second. On slower computers, you may want to
specify a low number like 1 or 2. This can produce more reliable readings on
this screen. If you want smoother dial operation and more accurate (less lag)
readings, then specify a higher update rate.
Gauge Settings
Click on Options, then Gauge Settings, to be presented with the screen of Figure 2.32. Here you set what channels are
displayed on the gauges, and what the range of the gauge will be.
Channel
Click on the down arrow button to select the channel to display on Gauge 1 or 2.
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Range
Chapter 2 Definitions
Figure 2.32 Current Readings Gauge
Settings
Click on the down arrow button to select the range for either gauge 1 or
2. You can select from the pre-programmed ranges provided, or select
the top choice of User Specified. Then the User Specified Max and Min
specs become enabled so you can enter or change them.
User Specified Max
If you set Range to User Specified, this spec will be enabled. Enter the
highest number you want to see on the gauge here. The gauge dial is
divided into 6 sections. It is less confusing if the difference between the
User Specified Max and User Specified Min is evenly divisible by 6. For
example, if you set User Specified Max to 60 and User Specified Min to
0, each gauge increment will be 10. If you set User Specified Max to 70
and User Specified Min to 0, each gauge increment will be 11.67, which
is much more confusing.
User Specified Min
If you set Range to User Specified, this spec will be enabled. Enter the
lowest number you want to see on then gauge here. The gauge dial is
divided into 6 sections. It is less confusing if the difference between the
User Specified Max and User Specified Min is evenly divisible by 6. For
example, if you set User Specified Max to 60 and User Specified Min to
0, each gauge increment will be 10. If you set User Specified Max to 70 and User Specified Min to 0, each gauge increment
will be 11.67, which is much more confusing.
Bar Gauge Settings (DataMite II Only)
Click on Options, then Bar Gauge Settings, to be presented with a screen similar to the screen of Figure 2.32. Here you set
what channels are displayed on the bar gauges, and what the range of the bar gauge will be.
Exhaust Temp Scale (DataMite II Only)
Click on Options, then Exhaust Temp Scale and the program will ask for a minimum and maximum temperature to display on
the exhaust temperature bar graphs. Note that you must have set the Sensor and Calibration in the DataMite specs screen to
one of the Exhaust Thermocouple settings for that channel to be displayed on the Exhaust Temperature Bar graph.
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Color Warnings
Chapter 2 Definitions
Figure 2.33 Changing the
Color Warning Settings
Click on Options, then Bar Gauge Settings, to be presented with a screen as
shown in Figure 2.33. Here you can select if a particular channel should be
highlighted in Yellow if it reaches a “Caution” limit or displayed in bright red
if it reaches a “Warning” limit. This can be very handy if you want the
operator to not go above 7000 RPM on the engine RPM, or if oil pressure
should fall below 20 PSI. IMPORTANT: This only affects what happens
on the computer screen, and does not provide for safety warning lights to
come on when you are out on the track (unless you have a laptop computer
running showing this screen).
Analog Filtering
Click on Options, then Analog Filtering to select how much filtering
(smoothing) should be done to just the analog readings. RPM readings are not
filtered.
Trace Recorder (Pro Version Only)
Click on Trace Recorder to select which channels should be shown on a time graph and what the scales should be.
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Figure 2.34 Trace Recorder
Chapter 2 Definitions
Options for
configuring the
trace recorder.
Trace Recorder
(time graph) for 2
selected channels
Buttons to pause
or continue the
trace, or turn it
Trace Recorder Data
Click on Trace Recorder, then Trace Recorder Data at the top of the Current
Readings screen to be presented with the screen shown in Figure 2.35. This
works the same as the other screens for setting which data to graph and what
scales to use. One difference here is both data types are graphed on the same
graph. The numbers on the graph for the Y axis are for Trace Recorder #1
data.
Figure 2.35 Setting Options
for Trace Recorder
Trace Recorder Data
Click on Trace Recorder, then Trace Recorder Speed at the top of the Current
Readings screen to display the question shown if Figure 2.36. The higher the
number of seconds, the more data you can see on the trace, but you will see it
with less detail.
Figure 2.36 Setting Trace Recorder Speed
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Chapter 2 Definitions
2.8 Calculation Menus
The following section explains the user input for specs listed with Clc buttons. These specs are ones where you can simply
enter a value, or click on the Clc button and the program will present a menu of inputs which will calculate that particular
parameter. These menus are like computer “scratch pads” for calculating specs like Compression Ratio from other inputs.
Notes:
The starting values in each calculation menu are always blanked out. Once enough specs have been entered, the calculated
value(s) at the top of the menu will be displayed. This calculated value(s) will now be updated each time you change a spec. If
you want to use this calculated value,
click on Use Calc Value. If the
Figure 2.37 Typical Calculation Menu
calculated value is within expected
Click on Clc button to bring up Calculation Menu
limits, it will be loaded into the
original menu. If you click on
Cancel, you will be returned to the
original menu with the original value
unchanged. If you click on Help, you
will be given a general explanation of
calculation menus, and a page # in
this section for more info about the
particular menu you are using.
The input values or calculated values
in any calculation menu have NO
affect on calculated performance
unless you load the Calculated value
into the original menu. If you
already know a spec in the form
required by the program, then you
have no need to use the calculation
menu. For example, if you know the
Compression Ratio is 10.3, you have
no need to use a calculation menu to
calculate Compression Ratio based on
Gasket Thickness, Piston Dome CCs,
etc.
2.8.1 Calc Compression Ratio
Is the Compression Ratio calculated from the following specs and the current cylinder volume (based on the current Bore and
Stroke in the Engine menu). See page 59 for general notes on Calculation Menus and for an example of their use.
The equation for Compression Ratio depends on the cylinder displacement (swept volume). This displacement is based on the
current Bore and Stroke in the Engine menu and is displayed in the Notes section at the bottom of this menu. Make sure these
specs match the engine for which you are calculating Compression Ratio before using this menu.
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Chamber Specs
Chamber CCs in Head
Is the combustion chamber volume in the cylinder head, measured in cubic centimeters. This is the value obtained if the heads
are "cc'd".
If you know the entire clearance volume of the cylinder, but do not know Piston Dome CCs, Gasket Thickness or Deck Height
Clearance, enter that volume here as Chamber CCs in Head. Then enter 0 for Piston Dome CCs, Gasket Thickness and Deck
Height Clearance. The program will calculate compression ratio based on the equation below where Clearance Volume is the
Chamber CCs in Head.
Compression Ratio = Clearance Volume + Swept Volume
Clearance Volume
Piston Dome CCs
Is the volume of the "pop up" in the piston measured in cubic centimeters. The "pop up" is the volume of piston material added
to the top of a flat top piston. If the piston has a "dish" (depression), enter the dish volume as a negative (-) number.
Gasket Thickness, in
Is the thickness of the engine gasket in inches after it has been "crushed". "Crushed" thickness is after the head bolts have been
torqued to spec.
Gasket Bore Diameter, in
Is the diameter of the bore in the head gasket. A good approximation is to use the same as the Bore in the Engine menu, and
this value is loaded in when you first open up this menu. You can change it to most any value you want. (In actual use, gasket
bores are usually .030-.100” larger than the cylinder bore.)
Deck Height Clearance, in
Deck Height Clearance is the distance in inches from the top of the piston to the top of the cylinder block when the piston is at
TDC. The top of the cylinder is the deck, or surface to which the engine bolts. If the outer edge of the piston travels above the
deck, this is called negative deck height and you must enter a negative (-) number.
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2.8.2 Calc Gear Ratio
Chapter 2 Definitions
Figure 2.38 Calc Gear Ratio
This menu is available by clicking on the Gear Ratio Clc button in the
Dyno specs menu.
Type
Click on this combo box to select from:
• Gearbox Only
• Chain Drive Only
• Primary Ratio & Chain Drive
• Primary Gears & Chain Drive
For motorcycles with a Primary gear drive between the engine and
transmission: Select 'Primary Ratio & Chain Drive' as the Type if you
know the Primary Ratio. Select 'Primary Gears & Chain Drive' if you
know the # Teeth on the Primary Gears or Sprockets
Depending on your choice certain inputs will now be enabled.
# Teeth, Engine Gear
# Teeth, Engine Primary Gear
This is the number of teeth on the gear or sprocket attached to the engine crankshaft, or what will spin at engine RPM when
the clutch has locked up. If you selected Gear Reduction & Chain Drive as the Type (typical of motorcycles), this will be called
# Teeth, Engine Primary Gear and is the # teeth on the sprocket or drive gear on the engine’s crankshaft. In almost all cases,
this number will be smaller than # Teeth Dyno Gear.
# Teeth, Axle Gear
# Teeth, Clutch Primary Gear
This is the number of teeth on the gear which attaches to the axle, or spins at wheel RPM. If you selected Gear Reduction &
Chain Drive as the Type (typical of motorcycles), this will be called # Teeth, Clutch Primary Gear and is the # teeth on the
sprocket or drive gear on the transmission input shaft or clutch shaft. In almost all cases, this number will be larger than #
Teeth Engine Gear.
# Teeth, Engine Sprocket
This is the number of teeth on the smaller drive sprocket on the engine or clutch for chain drive systems. In almost all cases,
this number will be smaller than # Teeth Axle Sprocket.
# Teeth, Axle Sprocket
This is the number of teeth on the larger driven sprocket on the axle for chain drive systems. In almost all cases, this number
will be larger than # Teeth Engine Sprocket.
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2.8.3 Calc Dew Point, deg F
Chapter 2 Definitions
Figure 2.39 Calc Dew Point
Depending on your choice of Method of Recording Weather Data, you
will be entering either Dew Point or Relative Humidity in the Track
Conditions menu. This is the Calculation Menu you will get if you are
using Dew Point.
See Section 2.3, Test Conds menu to see why Dew
Point is usually more accurate and less confusing than
Relative Humidity for entering humidity information.
Know Relative Humidity?
If you know the relative humidity of the air and the air temperature, select Yes. Otherwise select No to input Wet and Dry bulb
temperatures from a psychrometer. Depending on your choice the appropriate inputs are enabled.
Outside Air Temp, deg F
Is the outside air temperature when the relative humidity measurement was made. For example, if the weather service or
weather report gives a relative humidity of 56 % and a temperature of 68 degrees, use 68 degrees. This is not the temperature of
the air which enters the engine.
Outside Rel Humidity, %
Is the air's relative humidity as reported by a weather service or measured by humidity instruments.
Dry Bulb Temp, deg F
Is the temperature of the dry bulb thermometer on the psychrometer in degrees F. This is also the temperature of any
thermometer mounted in the shade when the Wet Bulb Temp reading is taken. The Dry Bulb Temp must not be less than the
Wet Bulb Temp.
Wet Bulb Temp, deg F
Is the temperature of the wet bulb thermometer on the psychrometer in degrees F. The wet bulb has a "wick" or cloth covering
the bulb which is moistened with water. The dryer the air, the greater the difference between the wet and dry bulb readings.
Relative humidity or dew point can be manually read off a Psychometric chart from these two readings. This calculation
replaces reading the chart. The Wet Bulb Temp must be less than the Dry Bulb Temp.
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2.8.4 Relative Humidity, %
Chapter 2 Definitions
Figure 2.40 Calc Relative Humidity
Depending on your choice of Method of Recording Weather Data, you
will be entering either Dew Point or Relative Humidity in the Track
Conds menu. This is the Calculation Menu you will get if you are
using Relative Humidity.
See Section 2.3, Track Conds menu to see why Dew
Point is usually more accurate and less confusing than
Relative Humidity for entering humidity information.
Know Dew Point?
If you know the dew point of the air and the air temperature, select Yes. Otherwise select No to input Wet and Dry bulb
temperatures from a psychrometer. Depending on your choice the appropriate inputs are enabled.
Outside Air Temp, deg F
Is the outside air temperature when and where the Dew Point measurement was made. This is not the temperature of the air
which enters the engine.
Dew Point, deg F
Is the air's Dew Point in degrees F as reported by a weather service or measured by humidity instruments.
Dry Bulb Temp, deg F
Is the temperature of the dry bulb thermometer on the psychrometer in degrees F. This is also the temperature of any
thermometer mounted in the shade when the Wet Bulb Temp reading is taken. The Dry Bulb Temp must not be less than the
Wet Bulb Temp.
Wet Bulb Temp, deg F
Is the temperature of the wet bulb thermometer on the psychrometer in degrees F. The wet bulb has a "wick" or cloth covering
the bulb which is moistened with water. The dryer the air, the greater the difference between the wet and dry bulb readings.
Relative humidity or dew point can be manually read off a Psychometric chart from these two readings. This calculation
replaces reading the chart. The Wet Bulb Temp must be less than the Dry Bulb Temp.
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2.8.5 Weight Percents
Chapter 2 Definitions
Figure 2.41 Weight Percents Menu
This Calculation Menu is available at the Suspension Log Book
screen, where you click on the Clc button next to the Weight %
inputs. When enough inputs have been entered, it shows Weight
%s (which can be copied back to the Vehicle Specs menu by
clicking on Use Calc Values), the Current Vehicle Weight in the
Vehicle specs menu (for comparison), and the new Vehicle
Weight based on the 4 corner weights entered into this menu.
The weight measurements should be taken with the driver in the
car, all fluid and fuel levels in race condition and on a very flat
surface.
Left Front Weight, lbs
Right Front Weight, lbs
Left Rear Weight, lbs
Right Rear Weight, lbs
Are the weights on the respective tire in lbs. When you first open
this menu, these are filled in with the corner weights which
produce the Weight %s for the Vehicle Weight currently entered
in the Vehicle Specs menu.
If you use the new weight %s from this menu, and the New Vehicle Weight is significantly different from the current vehicle
weight, you will be asked if you want to load the New Vehicle Weight into the Vehicle Specs menu also.
2.8.6 Frontal Area
This calculation is available from the Vehicle Specs menu and allows you
to estimate a vehicle's frontal area.
Track Width, inches
Is the distance from the center of one front tire to the center of the other
front tire. This value is initially set to the Rear Track Width in the Body
and Axle specs menu, but can be changed to most anything you want.
Roof Height, inches
The distance in inches from the ground to highest portion of the roof or
vehicle in inches which extends nearly the full width of the vehicle.
For example, for a truck with a roll bar behind the cab, measure to the top
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Figure 2.42 Calc Frontal Area
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Chapter 2 Definitions
of the roll bar, but not to the top of one of the spot lights mounted on the bar. However, if so many lights are mounted on the
bar that they are nearly continuous for the full width of the vehicle, it may be more accurate to then measure to the top of the
spot lights.
2.8.7 Primary Gear Reduction
Figure 2.43 Calc Pri. Gear Reduction
This calculation is available from the Vehicle Specs menu and allows
you to calculate the Primary Gear Reduction between the Engine and
Clutch. This is typically only used in some motorcycles.
# Teeth, Engine Gear
Is the number of gear teeth on the gear on the engine crankshaft.
# Teeth, Clutch Gear
Is the number of gear teeth on the gear on the clutch input shaft.
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Chapter 2 Definitions
2.9 New Test Menu (get data
from DataMite):
The New Test command is available by clicking on File at the top, left of the Main Screen, then selecting New. You will then
be presented with the screen shown in Figure 2.44.
The New Test command is the only way to get a recorded data set
(race or test session) from the DataMite. See Example 4.1 and 4.2 for
more details on the New Test menu.
Figure 2.44 New Test Menu
When starting a New
Test, it is usually best
to first Open a previous
test which is similar to
the New Test you will
be running (similar
Vehicle specs, similar
Test Conditions and
Similar Test
Comments.) This
previous test will then
be the 'pattern' or
'template' for the New
Test and will save you
from having to type in
many specs to describe
this New Test. This
also ensures
consistency between
your tests and reduces
the possibility of
errors.
Important: The
DataMite Specs for
the new test will be
from the current
Master DataMite,
which should match
your current DataMite
setup. This will be the
same no matter what
previous test you are
starting from.
If the current test is not
a good 'pattern' for this
new test, you can abort
6 Critical specs for the new test are listed here at the top.
Click here to start a New Test based on these settings
and start downloading data from the DataMite.
These are the comments which you can
modify. Uncheck Test Comments to start
with blank comments for the New Test.
Click on these buttons to see the current
Engine or Test Conditions Setup.
A summary of the current settings is given here.
Click here to Check or Uncheck these options. Checking means you
want to keep these specs for the new test. Once the new test is started
you can then make modifications to these specs if you want.
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Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 2 Definitions
starting this new test by clicking on 'Cancel (don't start new test)' at the top of the New Test screen. Then click on 'File' at the
top, left of the Main Screen and select one of the 'Open' options to open a past test to serve as a pattern.
If you want to check some of the specs in the other screens, or want to modify some specs from the previous test, click on the
'See Specs' buttons for each category of specs. Click on Help at these menus for more info on how to enter these specs.
When you close out these menus, you are brought back to the New Test screen. Be sure to check the check box at the left for all
specs you want to use for your new test. All Categories not checked will be blanked out. Blank specs may cause problems with
more detailed analysis, and won't allow you to keep track of important details about the vehicle you are testing.
Most all specs in these categories can also be changed once the test has started with no problems. This includes specs which
simply describe the test and vehicle and do not affect any calculations or what is recorded, like Engine Specs, Test Comments,
etc.
Six (6) other critical specs are listed separately at the top:
1.
File Name for New Test is the file name the program will create for saving the Road Race/Circle Track Data for the new
test you are starting. The program fills in a default name of the current test name, but incrementing the last digit in the
name by 1. You can change this name to most anything you like. The program will warn you if the name entered is not
valid and show you what is wrong.
2.
Run # (Pro Version Only) is the Run # for the Log Book and for the Run Log listed down the left side of the Main Screen.
This is automatically incremented up by 1 by the program, but you can change it in this screen. Note that this is not based
on the Run # from the current run on the Main Screen, because this could have been from several months ago. It is based
on the Run Log listed down the left side of the Main Screen, which is based on recent runs downloaded from the DataMite.
See Section 3.9, Run Log.
3.
Track/Event (Pro Version Only) is the Track & Event for the Log Book and for the Run Log listed down the left side of the
Main Screen. This is for information only. Click on the down arrow button to its right to change the Track & Event to
one you have already entered or type in a new one and it will be saved.
4.
Run Description (Pro Version Only) is the Run Description for the Log Book and for the Run Log listed down the left side
of the Main Screen. This is for information only. Click on the down arrow button to its right to change the Run
Description to one you have already entered or type in a new one and it will be saved.
5.
Folder Name for New Test is the folder in the DTMDATA folder where the test will be saved. The program may not be
using the name 'folder' for this spec, but whatever word you have assigned in the Preferences menu at the Main Screen.
The folder name 'Examples' is reserved for Performance Trends example tests supplied with the program, and can NOT be
used for your tests.
6.
Type of Test describes what type of test was run and how the data should be analyzed and divided up into runs. This is the
same spec as the Test Type in the Track Conds menu. Click on down arrow to select the type of test you ran. This choice
can have a large impact on what data is graphed and analyzed. Your choices are basically:
• Circle Track Laps
• Road Race Laps
• Accel to measure torque and HP (very useful for engine testing in the vehicle).
• Custom Test, which would be anything else.
Notice that some of the choices are not used, as they are used for Test Types in the other versions of the software.
When you are ready to start the new test, click on 'Start New Test' at the top of the screen. If some critical specs have not been
entered, the program may warn you and ask you for it at that time. The program will fill in the Test Time and Date based on
the computer's time and date. This can be changed later by clicking on the Test Time/Date at the Main Screen.
Important: When you start a New Test, the DataMite Specs will be from the current
Master DataMite Specs, which should match your current DataMite setup. This will be
the same no matter what previous test you are starting from.
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Chapter 2 Definitions
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Chapter 2 Definitions
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Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 2 Definitions
2.10 Edit Test File Options:
Click on Edit at the top of the Main
Screen for 3 very important options
for editing the DataMite’s test data,
as shown in Figure 2.45. For all 3
of these Edit commands, you will
edit the Current Test, which is the
test which is named in the square
brackets [ ] at the top of the Main
Screen.
Figure 2.45 Edit Options at Main Screen
Test File you will Edit
Delete Beginning or End of File
Figure 2.45 also shows that you can choose which 1 channel is used to represent the data from the file. Usually, Engine RPM
is the best single channel, but you can choose any of the first 4 frequency channels.
Figure 2.46 Cut Beginning or End of File Screen (showing cutting 1 run from a test with 2 runs)
Click on OK (keep this
section) if you want the
outlined section of the
test to be saved
Click and drag
mouse from upper
left to lower right to
draw a frame
around the part of
the test you want to
keep
This option lets you delete portions of the recorded data and keep some main section. This is useful as it can create smaller
data files, saving disk space on your computer or saving time when doing calculations for graphs or reports. You can also cut
out “bad” portions of a data set, perhaps a section where you spun out. A major problem like a spin out can cause problems
when the software tries to automatically find laps without a beacon. If you save each kept portion to a new file name, you can
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actually use this command to break
up 1 data file into several smaller
data files. This can make it much
easier to compare one run of a test to
another run of the same test if
instead each run is a separate test.
Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 2 Definitions
Figure 2.47 Options Presented When You Click on OK (keep this
section)
If you click on Edit, then Delete
Beginning or End of File, you will
be presented with a graph screen
showing Engine RPM for the this
entire test. Click and drag the
mouse to draw a square frame
around the portion of the test you
want to keep. The rest of the test will be deleted. When you are satisfied with the section you’ve drawn, click on OK (keep
this section) to be presented with the options shown in Figure 2.47.
If you select No, you will then be asked for a new name to which this data will be saved. This is the method used to break up 1
test into one or more smaller tests. In this case shown, you would save this section to a new name, perhaps “formula vee
watkins glenn–2”, which would then become the Current Test. You would then have to open the original “formula vee watkins
glenn–” test again so it becomes the Current Test and do the Delete Beginning or End of File command again. This time draw
the frame around a different section and save this file to a name of perhaps “Watkins glenn-3”.
Redetermine Beg./End of Runs
Any time you download data for a New Test, the program checks for the type of test runs you’ve specified (Circle Track Laps,
Road Race Laps, Accel to Meas Tq/HP or Custom). Unless you have a beacon identified as “2 Lap Timer” as one of the Switch
Inputs, it will also ask you for an approximate lap time for Road Race Laps. It looks for the patterns in the data it expects to
see for the different types. When if finds a pattern, it remembers the beginning and end of this pattern for each pattern or lap it
finds. It then gives you a summary of what it found. See Figure 2.48.
You can also do this at any other
time. The only reasons for doing
this is when you have changed
something about the test so that
now the pattern looks different
than when you first downloaded
the data from the DataMite. These
changes could include:
• You have Edited Out some
Noise Spikes.
• You have Cut the Beginning
or End of Data so the data file
now looks different.
• You have changed the Test
Type from Custom to Accel to
Meas Tq/Hp or vice versa.
• You have changed the
DataMite or Vehicle Setup,
although many times changes
to these specs will not affect
the Runs found.
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Figure 2.48 Redetermine Beg/End of Runs
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Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 2 Definitions
Edit Out ‘Noise’ Spikes
Noise spikes are simply bad data points the DataMite has picked up as shown in Figure 2.46. These can be caused by:
• Electrical noise, especially from the ignition wires.
• Weak or unusual engine ignition signals.
• “Dirty” (pulsing, unsteady) power to the DataMite.
• Bad or intermittent ground.
• Bad connections in the wiring.
• Excessive vibration in a sensor (but this usually looks more like simple noise).
• Or the every popular "Stuff happens."
If these bad data points are left in the data set, it reduces the accuracy of any analysis. This is
especially true for doing the Test Type of “Accel to Meas. Tq/HP” if the noise spikes occur in the
Accelerometer or Front Wheel RPM. One rather small spike can completely distort the entire
torque and HP curve. See Troubleshooting, Appendix 3 for more information.
The process of checking for "noise spikes" happens automatically when
you start a New Test (get data from DataMite) or download data. If
spikes are found, you can select to NOT have them corrected. This is
useful to determine the source of the noise spikes. Although accuracy
improves by editing the spikes out, it is best to eliminate spikes at the
source if you can.
Figure 2.49 Graph Specs to Graph
Noise Spikes (4 channel DataMite)
To see Noise Spikes, graph the raw data (not calculated data like
torque, clutch slip, etc) vs Time with Filtering set to None. See Figure
2.49 for typical Graph Specs to show Noise Spikes.
If you selected to have the spikes edited out when the data is
downloaded, it is unlikely any more spikes will be found again. This
edit command is most useful if you did NOT edit out the spikes when
the data file was first downloaded.
Note: Noise spikes are different than the "jumpy" or "noisy" data that
filtering is designed to fix. "Noisy" data is noisy or jumpy throughout
the data file. "Noise spikes" occur here and there, and jump out from
the rest of the relatively smooth data. Figure 2.50 illustrates the
difference between "noisy" data and "noise spikes".
Some times the noise spikes are too numerous or come so close together
that the program can not determine what is real data and what is a noise
spike. In cases like this, especially if the noise is in a channel used to
calculate something else, like Engine RPM and Driveshaft RPM to
calculate converter or clutch slippage, or an accelerometer to calculate
vehicle MPH or distance traveled, you must try to eliminate the source
of the noise. If the noise spike is in a channel that is not used to calculate something else , the noise spike is not as critical, say
in an Exhaust Temperature. However, you must realize that the immediate jump up or down (the “spike”) is not real.
Figure 2.50 shows how even a relatively minor noise spike in the Front Wheel RPM
for “Meas Tq/HP from Accel” race run can completely distort the torque and HP
curve.
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Figure 2.50 Noise Spikes vs Just Noisy (jumpy) Data
Typical “Small” Noise Spike (a couple of data
points are significantly different than the data
points surrounding them)
Typical “noisy” or “jumpy” data shows all data points
being quite different than the surrounding data points.
In this case the “noise” is due to magnets on the shaft
not being exactly evenly spaced.
Noisy Data
Noise Spike
Dyno RPM is shown here, but the same
effect will be seen for Front Wheel RPM.
Dyno RPM after program edit outs Noise spikes.
Errors Caused by Relatively Minor Noise Spike
High error in torque and HP caused
by relatively small noise spike.
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Correct Torque and HP after
program edit outs noise spike
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Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 2 Definitions
Figure 2.51 Example of Not Editing Out Noise Spikes Very Well
Original Data with Noise Spikes
Data After Editing Out 32 Noise Spikes
(many Noise Spikes remain, too many for
accurate torque and HP calculations)
This reading shown by the
Noise Spike is totally wrong.
The readings next to the Noise
Spike are a good approximation of the real reading.
If many Noise Spikes occur close together, the
program can not accurately determine if a
spike is “noise” or real data, and leaves it in.
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Chapter 2 Definitions
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Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 3 Output
Chapter 3 Output
The Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer provides several ways to view and output the test results, including:
• Reports of tabular data displayed on the screen
• ASCII files for importing results to other software packages (Pro version only)
• Linking (Sending) recorded data to one of Performance Trends’ suspension analysis programs (Pro version only)
• High resolution graphs
• Printer output of reports or graphs
• History Log (Pro version only)
• Data Libraries for recording test data (and sets of engine specs in the Pro version) for later use.
• Run Log listing all tests in the order they were downloaded from the DataMite
All these topics will be covered in this chapter. Figure 3.1 shows how to reach all these various features.
Figure 3.1 Various Output Options from the Main Screen
Click on File to display several options to Save test files, Open test files which were previously
saved, display the History Log, or print information.
Click on Graph to display several Graph Options and produce a high resolution graph.
Click on Report to display several Report Options and produce a tabular report. Once a
report is displayed, it can be output as an ASCII file, or printed.
Name of current Test File
Open from Pro version’s
History Log displays a
chronological log of test
files you have recently
worked with (started
new, opened, made
graphs or reports of,
etc.) Section 3.8.
Saving options to Save
a test file are discussed
in Section 3.5.
Opening options to
open a previously
saved test file are
discussed in Section
3.5.
Make Track Map and Friction
Circle are 2 powerful analysis
tools discussed in Section 3.10.
Print options let you
print the contents of
this Main Screen,
which is a good
summary of this
current test. See
Section 3.4.
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Chapter 3 Output
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3.1 Reports
Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 3 Output
Figure 3.2 Report Options Menu
Click on the Report menu command at the
Main Screen to be presented with the Report
Options Menu shown in Figure 3.2. The
inputs in this menu are described below.
Type
There are 3 basic types of reports:
1. Pick Individual Items.
2. Lap Summaries
3. Segment Time Analysis.
They can be picked by clicking on the down
arrow key of this combo box. If you select
Lap Summaries or Segment Time Analysis,
several options in this menu may be enabled
or disabled (dimmed to gray and you can not
change them because they are not applicable
to that report type).
If you selected the Pick Individual Items or Lap Summaries report types, click on the Data Types in the top, right section to
select (or 'deselect' if it has already been selected) that Data Type for reporting.
Time/RPM/Distance Report
Click on the down arrow button to choose either Time, RPM or Distance for the various rows of the report. Your choice will
appear in the left column of the report. RPM is usually only chosen for doing torque and HP curves for Accel to Meas Tq/HP
type of runs.
What to Report
Select what part of the run you want to make the report of, either All Data (entire run) or just a particular lap.
Click on the down arrow button to choose either to report All the Data (all data recorded) or just a particular run. If you have
selected an RPM graph, you can only choose a particular run, not All the Data.
Filtering (smoothing)
Click on the down arrow button to select the level of filtering (smoothing) to be done to the data, before the report is made:
- None
- Medium
- Light (some)
- Heavy (lots)
Select the lowest level that eliminates most (not all) of the 'jitter' in the data. Be careful not to 'over-filter', as this can
completely distort the data. See page 92 and 93 in the Graphs Section for an illustration of Filtering.
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Chapter 3 Output
For reports, filtering is not as critical as for graphs. Let’s say you specify reporting data at, 250 RPM increments. If your
report includes 4500 RPM, then all data within that 250 RPM increment (from 4375 - 4625 RPM) is averaged together to make
the number you see reported at 4500. This averaging process is much the same as filtering
Range of Data
Starting Time, Distance or RPM
Is the first or lowest time, distance or RPM for the report.
If you have selected a Time or Distance Report: If you have selected All Data for What to Report, then this is the time after
the start of first data the DataMite recorded. If you have selected Just Lap #1 for What to Report, then this is the time after the
start of what the program saw as being the start of the first lap.
If you have selected an RPM Report: Your only choice for What to Report is one of the power runs. This is the lowest RPM
or starting RPM for the report.
To be sure that all data is reported for a particular run, enter 0 for Starting RPM or Time, and a number much larger than
possible for the Ending RPM or Time, something like 30000.
Ending Time, Distance or RPM
Is the last time or highest distance or RPM for the report. See Starting Time, Distance or RPM above.
Time, Distance or RPM Increment
Is the step size between report times, distances or RPMs for the report. See Starting Time, Distance or RPM above. The
smaller this number, the longer and more detailed the report. To report RPM data at every 250 RPM, say at 2500, 2750, 3000,
etc, enter 250 for the RPM increment.
Note on data reporting: Let’s say you specify reporting data at, 250 RPM increments. If your report includes 4500 RPM, then
all data within that 250 RPM increment (from 4375 - 4625 RPM) is averaged together to make the number you see reported at
4500.
Use MM:SS.SS Time
For Time reports, select whether to 'Use MM:SS.SS' time formatting. If you select Yes, then 122.333 seconds will be displayed
as 2:02.33 (minutes and seconds).
Include Averages
Start Average At
Stop Average At
Select 'Yes' for Include Averages to enable the Start and Stop Averages specs. Enter the RPM, Distance or Time range you
want for data averaging in the report. In the report, you will see an asterisks (*) at the times or RPMs in this Average range,
and averages on the bottom row of the report for the data in the rows with these asterisks.
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Chapter 3 Output
Report Types
Pick Individual Items
This report will include columns of data you have selected in the Report What section of the Reports menu. They will be
reported following the other specifications you have set in the Reports menu. The Data Types are defined in Table 3.1. Figure
3.3 shows a report for the settings in the Report Menu shown in Figure 3.2.
Table 3.1 Data Types for Reports
Data Type
Report
Column
Name
Definition
Engine RPM
Engine RPM
Engine speed in revolutions per minute, as recorded by channel 1 on the
DataMite
Individual
Channels
User
Specified
Name
Driven Wheel
RPM
Driven RPM
These are the individual raw data channels which the DataMite or DataMite II is
recording. These are listed in the DataMite Specs calibration table as shown in
Section 2.5. The names for these channels are what you have entered into the
Calibration Table.
RPM of the driven wheel (front wheel on a rear wheel drive car). Because this
is from an “unpowered” wheel, there should be little or no tire slip. Therefore,
this RPM is very useful for calculating things like MPH, distance traveled,
acceleration rate, etc. If you have an accelerometer set to Front Acceleration,
then Acceleration Gs can be used to determine things usually calculated by
Driven RPM. Usually, Driven RPM is more accurate than an Accelerometer,
however some tracks/events do not allow front wheel RPM to be measured.
Drive Wheel
RPM
Drive RPM
Vehicle Speed in
MPH
Acceleration Rate
in Gs
MPH
Calcd Trans Gear
Ratio
Tire Slip
Gear Ratio
Accel Gs
Tire Slip
Clutch/converter
slip, %
Tire Growth, %
Cltch Slip
Distance from
Start, ft
Lap Number
Distance
Tire Grwth
Lap#
Note for Calculations based on Driven RPM: If the front wheels leave the
ground at the start of the run, the program then looks for when they touch down
(Driven RPM jumps up) and fills in what it should have been if the tires had
stayed on the ground. This is what the program uses for calculations which
depend on Driven RPM. However, what is graphed for Driven RPM is the
actual recorded data.
RPM of the driving wheel or driveshaft (rear wheel or driveshaft on a rear wheel
drive car). Because this is directly tied to the transmission output, it can be
used to determine clutch or converter slip, trans gear ratio, etc.
Is Vehicle Speed in MPH calculated from Driven RPM or an Accelerometer.
Is Vehicle Acceleration in Gs (1 G is 22 MPH increase every second, or 32.2
ft/sec increase every second). This is the same acceleration of an object
dropped in “free fall”, or the acceleration of gravity. This is based on Driven
RPM or Accelerometer data if available.
Is the Gear Ratio based on Drive RPM and Engine RPM and Final Drive Ratio
if necessary.
Is the tire slip based on Driven RPM, Drive RPM and the tire diameters and
final drive ratio if necessary. This assumes tire diameters are constant.
Clutch slip in %. It is critical you have the Final Drive and Gear Ratios in the
Vehicle Specs correct for Clutch Slip to be accurate.
Is the tire growth based on Driven RPM, Drive RPM and the tire diameters and
final drive ratio if necessary. This is similar, but opposite of Tire Slip, %.
Is distance traveled from the start of the run or data set calculated from Driven
RPM or an Accelerometer.
The sequential Lap Number, more useful for road racing data sets.
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Transmission
Gear
Gear#
Lap Time
Lap Time
Observed
flywheel torque
Obs Tq
Observed
flywheel HP
Corrected
flywheel torque
Obs HP
Corrected
flywheel HP
Road torque, HP,
Corr. torque, HP
Corr HP
Brake Specific
Fuel
Consumption
Shock Velocity
BSFC
Corr Tq
Obs RoadTq,
etc.
Shock Vel
Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 3 Output
Is the transmission gear the analysis believes the transmission is in, based on
the calculated Gear Ratio and the Trans Gear Ratios entered in the Vehicle
Specs.
The time from beginning to end of each lap. Laps can be determined by Lap
Beacon Timers or automatically (but less accurately) by the program itself.
Is the observed (uncorrected) torque the program estimates to be at the
flywheel under steady state (non-accelerating) conditions. This is estimated to
be similar to what an engine dyno would measure. The program makes
estimates of driveline and inertia losses to arrive at this number.
Is the observed (uncorrected) horsepower calculated from Observed flywheel
torque above. See Observed flywheel torque above.
Is the Observed flywheel torque described above corrected for weather
conditions. Corrected torque should be more repeatable from day to day, even
if weather conditions change, if you enter accurate weather conditions in
the Test Conditions menu for each test. In the Pro version, you can select
what standard conditions to correct the data to,
Is the corrected horsepower calculated from Corrected flywheel torque above.
See Corrected flywheel torque above.
Is the same as the Flywheel numbers above, except the program does not try
to correct for driveline and inertia losses This is estimated to be similar to what
a chassis dyno would measure.
Is the amount of fuel consumed for the amount of HP the engine is producing,
and is a measure of an engine’s fuel efficiency. You need to be measuring fuel
flow and HP to have this value calculated.
Is the shock velocity if you have specified that shock travel sensors are present
as one of the individual channels.
Figure 3.3 Pick Individual Items Report (from settings in Figure 3.2)
Click here for
Report Options
menu.
Slide “Slide Button” down to
view more rows of data (if any).
Slide “Slide Button” left or right to view
more columns of data (if any).
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Chapter 3 Output
Figure 3.4 Comparison Report of 3 Runs (or Laps)
These 3 Menu Items
control what types of
Comparison Reports are
done. Click on Single
Test to just report for the
current test (run).
The “Dif.” column
is the difference
from the first test
to the test directly
to the left of the
“Dif.” column.
Click on History Log at top of Report Screen to display this screen “History Log”.
Click in this “Report?” column to put a “Yes” here, so this test will be
included in the Comparison Report. Click on a “Yes” to remove it.
Note that these 3 tests are actually copies
of the same test, and that different Laps
have been selected for comparison.
As Figure 3.4 shows, Multiple Tests are possible by clicking on Multiple Tests or History Log at the top of the Report screen.
You select which tests to include in the comparison by clicking in the “Report?” column of the History Log. This is the same
History Log as is used in the Graph screen to do comparison graphs of 2 or more tests. To go back to a single report of just the
current test, click on Single Test at the top of the Report screen, or remove all the ‘Yes’ notations in the “Report?” column of
the History Log. Removing a ‘Yes’ is done by clicking on the ‘Yes’ that is already there.
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Chapter 3 Output
Lap Summary and Lap Segment Analysis, Pro Version Only
The DataMite Road Race & Circle Track Software has several features to analyze your results lap by lap and lap segment by
lap segment. These are done in reports, which can be selected from the Report Options screen shown in Figure 3.5.
Lap Summaries, Pro Version Only
This special report gives either the Average, Maximum or Minimum value (or combined Average, Maximum and Minimum
values) for all laps for the Data Types you have selected.
Figure 3.5 Report Options for Lap Summary and Lap Segment Time Analysis
Select one of the Lap Summary
Report Types. You can also select
Segment Time Analysis, and then all
other options on this screen are
disabled, since that Report Type
needs no options.
For Lap Summary reports, you will
also pick which Data Types to
include in the report. Your choices
are listed in the Notes section
shown here.
Figure 3.6 Typical Lap Summary Report
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Note Correlation Options for
Lap Summary Reports
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Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 3 Output
You will notice a drop down menu at the top of this report screen called "Correlation". Correlation is a statistical term which
tries to determine if there is any relationship between 2 sets of numbers. In the case of a Lap Analysis, you might like to know
if one of these channels seems to have an effect on Lap Times. For example, say there is a relationship between Max Braking
Force and Lap Time, that as Max Brake Force goes down, Lap Times also go down. What that could mean to the driver is that
if they were easier on the brakes, their lap times could improve.
Say you produced the Lap Summary report above, and then you clicked on the Show Correlation in Report. The program
would check the correlation between all reported items and Lap Time to look for a correlation (relationship). It would then
show the results in a report as shown below.
Figure 3.7 Typical Correlation Report and Graph
If you see a high correlation in the report,
you can select to graph that particular data
type and see the correlation in more detail.
This correlation graph is saying that when the average throttle
opening in higher, the lap times are shorter. This particular case
may seem obvious. But if it had said that when the Max F Brake
is lower, the lap times are shorter, this might be saying that if the
driver was easier on the brakes, his lap times may improve (drop).
The closer the "Correlation" number is to 1 (or -1) the higher the relationship between Lap Times and that particular
parameter. Some correlations are nearly "automatic", like Engine RPM (for a circle track car with no shifting) or MPH and
Lap Times. In order for a lap time to be short, the average MPH must be high. But other correlations can lead to driver or
vehicle insights. As shown above, there is a VERY HIGH correlation between "Throttle, avg" and Lap Times. (The Negative
correlation (-) just means that as one number goes up the other number goes down. When Average Throttle increases, Lap
Times are reduced.) This may be an automatic correlation like MPH and Lap Times, but does give the chassis tuner and driver
something to think about.
After making a correlation report, you may want to investigate some of the high correlations. For example, say you click in the
"Throttle, avg" column to highlight as shown in Figure 3.6 on the previous page. Then you click on "Show Correlation in
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Graph", the program will show the individual data points for "Throttle, avg" and Lap Time, as shown in Figure 3.7. The
correlation graph does show a pretty strong relationship between Lap Times coming down as Average Throttle increases.
Lap Segment Analysis, Pro Version Only
For road race courses, the program can break the course into individual segments based on accelerating and decelerating.
These can be viewed in the Track map as shown in Figure 3.8. The Track Map can be displayed at the Main Screen by
clicking on File, then Display Track map.
Figure 3.8 Track Map showing Segments.
If you don’t like how the program
has automatically marked lap
segments, you can click on the
“Segments” menu command,
then select Edit Current
Segments. Then by clicking on
the track map, you will put in new
Segment markers. By Right
Clicking on existing Segment
markers, you will be deleting
those markers.
This is the starting point of the
Lap, as identified by the
horizontal line and the segment
marking circle. This is typically
where the Timer Beacon is set
up on the track.
Click on the Left or Right arrow buttons to move this Table to either the left side
or right side of the track map screen
When Editing segments, this table will appear. It shows each segment and its
cumulative track length in ft from the beginning of the lap (generally where the lap
beacon is positioned) to the end of that segment. As you edit segment markers, this
table is updated. When you are finished with editing, click on the “Done” button. To
abort the editing process (lose your changes), click on “Cancel”
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The software allows you to:
1. Have the program find segments automatically
2. Change, add or delete segments manually
3. Save segment settings, so the same settings can be used the next time you are at this road course.
4. Print the track map with segment settings
Once segments have been determined, you can choose to do a Segment Analysis type of report as shown in Figure 3.9. Here
the times for the individual segments for each lap are reported. A fictitious "Best" lap is also generated (2nd column from the
left) based on the best segment times from each segment. Then for each lap, a "Dif" column is generated to show the difference
between that segment time and the "Best" segment time. Then at the bottom is the cumulative difference between for the whole
lap between each lap and the "Best" lap. Note: For several reasons about vehicle attitude, speed, etc upon entering and exiting
each segment, the "Best" lap time is probably NOT achievable for this particular vehicle.
Figure 3.9 Lap Segment Analysis Report
Segment Times from each lap are shown with a column
showing the difference between the segment for that particular
lap (or the entire lap in the bottom row) and the “Best” lap.
The “Best”, but probably unachievable lap time is shown in this column, and is
obtained by using the shortest segment times from all the laps.
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3.2 ASCII Data Files (Pro version only)
You may want to use the results from the Road Race & Circle Track
DataMite Analyzer in other software packages. This could be for
additional graph capabilities, statistical analysis, data basing, etc.
Once you have created a report (as shown in Section 3.1), click on File
to write the results to an ASCII file with a name of your choosing. The
ASCII File command is possible any time a report is displayed on the
screen.
Figure 3.10 ASCII Files Options Menu
Click on File from
Report Screen for
ASCII File menu.
You can only save the results currently displayed on the Report screen.
If you want to write an ASCII file of a test file you have previously run,
you must open that test file first, then create a report for that test file.
ASCII File Options
Comma Separated
Select this option to insert commas between data points. Leave this
unchecked for data to be arranged in evenly spaced columns.
Include Text
Uncheck this option to strip out all titles and letters, leaving only numbers.
Convert to Columns
If you do not select this option, data will be written to the file much like it is displayed in the report on the screen. Select this
option to have the report turned on its side, that is, the rows will become columns and the columns will become rows.
File Name
Enter a file name for saving this ASCII file. You can also include the complete path plus file name. Checks are made to ensure
what you enter is a valid file name and that you are not overwriting an existing file. If just a file name is entered, the file is
written to the Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer folder (directory), the folder which contains the DTM-RR.EXE
program file.
See Section 3.5 for more details on files and file names.
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3.3 Graphs
Note: Also check Preferences, Section 2.2 for several Preferences which pertain to graph line colors, printing options, etc.
Graphs are obtained by clicking on the Graph menu command at the top of the Main Screen. Figure 3.11 shows a typical graph
and a description of some of the basic graph screen items.
Figure 3.11 Primary Graph Screen Items
Command buttons. Some commands can only be done through these buttons, some of these
buttons just provide a graphical button for performing action of some menu items.
Menu bar provides for several graph commands and options.
Graph Title, which can be changed by clicking on Format, then Edit Titles/Legend (Pro version).
Name of current Test File containing all recorded data, vehicle specs, etc.
Graph Legend, which
describes the data
graphed. This includes
Name of the Test Results
file, the particular Run
graphed, Type of Data,
which data goes with
which file, if any
multiplier is applied to
the data. You can also
click on Data Type
names and the
corresponding data line
will flash. This is useful
to find a particular line
when several are
graphed. In the Pro
version, names in the
Legend can be changed
by clicking on Format,
then Edit Titles/Legend.
The Lap #, or All (if all
data is graphed) is
included in the Test
Name.
Horizontal X axis. The scaling of this axis can be easily changed as
described in this section.
If 2 or more tests are graphed vs Time, then buttons will appear here letting you shift
1 test with respect to another, a process called “time aligning” (Pro version only.)
Grid lines. The style or elimination of grid lines can be changed by clicking on
Format, then Grid Style (Pro version only).
Data graph lines. The style and thickness of these lines can be changed by clicking on
Format, then Line Style.
Vertical Y axis. The scaling of this axis can be easily changed as described in this section.
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The Graph Menu is shown in Figure 3.12. It is very similar to the Reports
menu in that you select what Data Types you want to graph from the list at
the top. Click on a Data Type to select, or click on a selected Data Type to
“de-select” it.
Chapter 3 Output
Figure 3.12 Graph Options Menu
Data Types
The Data Types you can select are listed and defined in the Report’s
section Table 3.1 on page 81. You are limited to selecting only 8 Data
Types for a graph.
Other Graph Specs
Type
Click on the down arrow button to choose either Pick Individual Channels
(as show here) or several choices of the special graph type of Engine RPM
Histogram.
Time/RPM/Distance Graph
Click on the down arrow button to choose either Time or RPM or Distance
for the horizontal X axis of the graph. RPM is usually chosen for doing
torque and HP curves for Accel to Meas Tq/HP type of runs.
What to Report
Select what part of the test session you want to make the report of:
- All Data
- Just Lap #2 (if it exists)
- Just Lap #1
- Just Lap #3 (if it exists), etc
Click on the down arrow button to choose either to report All the Data (all data recorded) or just a particular run. If you have
selected an RPM graph, you can only choose a particular run or lap.
Note: In the Pro version, you can also select which run to graph or report by entering the Run number in the History Log. See
Section 3.7.
Filtering (smoothing)
Click on the down arrow button to select the level of filtering (smoothing) to be done to the data, before the report is made:
- None
- Medium
- Light (some)
- Heavy (lots)
Select the lowest level that eliminates most (not all) of the 'jitter' in the data. Be careful not to 'over-filter', as this can
completely distort the data. The dip seen in the Graphs of Figure 3.13 is real and is due to exhaust tuning effects on this 2
stroke engine. Note that the graph with Heavy Filtering has lower Peak values than the graph with Filtering set to None. Also
note that the dip at 11000 RPM is not as deep with Heavy Filtering. This shows how Heavy Filtering can distort the data.
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Figure 3.13 Examples of Various Levels of Filtering
Note that the peak is the highest and the valley
is the deepest when filtering is the least, in this
case None. These torque and HP graphs look
fairly smooth, even with Filtering = None, so
even None would be an acceptable for these
torque and HP graphs.
Filtering = None
In most cases for torque and HP graphs,
Filtering = Some is the best choice. The peak
torque and HP values for this graph are fairly
accurate and repeatable. For other types of
data Some or None is best. Picking a Filtering
Level too high can distort the data and cover
up problems with the data.
Filtering = Some
Note that the peak is the lowest and the valley
is the least deep when filtering is the most, in
this case Heavy. Heavy Filtering can hide
problems with data. Before you use Heavy
Filtering, be sure to check the data with
Filtering set to None first.
Filtering = Heavy
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Histogram Specs
An Engine RPM Histogram is a graph which shows the amount of time the engine spends at different RPMs. This information
can be useful for your engine builder in designing your engine. Your choices for the Type of Histogram include:
Including all RPM data, or just data when the engine is accelerating. Histograms when the engine is accelerating, is time when
the engine is probably wide open throttle, and is typically what you are more
interested in. Reporting the numbers in seconds of time, or percent time for
Figure 3.13 B Typical Engine RPM
the whole run. Using percent (%) makes it easier to compare Histograms for
Histogram
runs which may be quite different in length of time.
Histogram RPM Increment, Starting & Ending RPM
These specs determine the lowest and highest RPM which will be displayed
on the Histogram graph, and what RPM increment there will be between
different RPM points.
Figure 3.14 Graphing Multiple Tests, Basic Version
Graphs Comparing More
Than 1 Test (Basic Ver.)
Choose Add New Test
to open up the entire
Test Library from which
to choose a New Test.
Choose Add Last Test to add the
last test you had added to the graph
for comparison. (Test Folder and
File name are shown for your info.)
There are 3 basic types of tests which can
be graphed in the Basic version:
• Current test results. These are
the test results of the test file
which you are working with on
the Main Screen.
• Last test results graphed. These
are the test results which you
previously included in the graph
for comparison. This allows you a way to easily refer back to one particular test for comparison.
• Add Test lets you pick any test from the Test Library to compare to the Current test results. This test now becomes the
Last test results graphed.
In the Basic version, you can only compare 1 additional test to the Current Test. If an additional test is graphed for
comparison, the Add Test command changes to Remove Test. You must first click on Remove Test before the Add Test
command reappears so you can add a different test.
Graphs Comparing More Than 1 Test (Pro Version)
There are 3 basic types of tests which can be graphed in the Pro version:
• Current test results. These are the test results of the test file which you are working with on the Main Screen.
• Tests marked in the History Log. These are the test results which you previously graphed, started new, opened, etc.
which you have marked “Yes” to graph in the History Log (see Section 3.7).
• Add Test lets you pick any test from the Test Library to add to the top of the History Log, and mark as a test you want
to graph. Since it is at the top of the History Log, it should definitely be included in the next graph.
In the Pro version, you can compare data from up to 6 tests, as long as there is room for the Legends (labels) for each graph on
the right side of the graph. Usually this ends up being about 24 graph lines, which could be 6 tests with 4 graph lines (for
example, MPH, Engine RPM, Tire Slip and Converter Slip for 6 different test sessions or laps).
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Figure 3.15 History Log (Pro version only See Section 3.7 for more details.)
Click on the History Button or the History menu item to display the History Log.
Click on Single Test to graph only the Current Test.
Click on Add
Test to pick a
new test to add
the graph to
the History Log
from the entire
Test Library.
Choose a ‘Graph’
option from the
menu bar to
close the History
Log and graph
the tests
identified by the
menu option you
pick.
Click in this column
to show Yes or
remove Yes. Tests
marked Yes will be
graphed, if there is
room (typically not
more than 24 graph
lines total).
Click here to specify which run or
runs to graph if more than 1 run in
this test. The settings shown here
will graph Lap 1 and 4 from the
nd
first race and Lap 2 from the 2 .
Click and drag slide bar to
display entire History Log.
Some tests marked Yes
may be at the bottom of the
Log and not be visible now.
This column shows the Standard name the program will display in
graph Legend for this test. Click on the name to change it.
Alternate names are possible by clicking on Format, then Edit Titles.
Other Graphing Features
The next section discusses lists and discusses several other features from this screen, including:
• Printing
• Eliminating Scale Multipliers
• Displaying Comments and/or Density Altitudes for all tests graphed.
• Single or Dual Cursor(s) to pinpoint the value of a particular point or section on the graph
• Changing titles and legend names
• Changing the scales to zoom in or zoom out
• Time Aligning (moving one test forward or backward in time or distance for better comparisons)
• Saving and recalling specific graph formats and scales.
• Showing Track Map & Friction Circle and more.
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Printing
Figure 3.16 shows the options for printing graphs and how to access these options. Figure 3.17 shows the screen for changing
the Windows Printer Setup. Figure 3.13 shows how you can add information to a graph printout by clicking on Format, then
Edit Printed Comments and Data Output.
Figure 3.16 Printing Graphs
Clicking on the Printer button is the same as clicking on File and then Print Color.
Click on File to display the 3
print menu options
Click here to print the graph in
color (solid lines).
Click here to print the graph in
black & white (various styles
of dashed and solid lines).
Click here change the printer
or printer driver, page
orientation, etc.
Select between these 2
options for your printer type.
If you are getting a “break” in
the border around a printed
graph, try the other option.
Figure 3.17 Standard Windows Printer Options
The Options (sometimes
called “Advanced”)
button displays a screen
for selecting various
printing and color
options. Try changing
these settings to correct
certain print problems.
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Figure 3.18 Adding Information to a Graph Printout (Most of these options have no effect on
the graph on the screen, only the graph that is printed.)
Click on these #s to change which Data Set’s (test file’s) comments and title you are working with.
Click here to change the Test
Comments (comments which
appear on the Main Screen).
Changes to Data Set 1’s
comments (the current test) are
permanent. Changes to other
Data Set’s comments are
temporary.
This one comment is printed
directly under the graph.
The Titles to Use options give
you a way to reach the Menu in
Figure 3.26 to change the Titles
and Legends of the graph.
Check or uncheck these 3 options to determine what gets printed, and what options are enabled
and disabled on this screen.
Bottom
Section of
Printed Graph
Graph
Comment
Test
Summaries
Test
Comments
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Cursor
The cursor feature is very useful for determining or comparing the value of the graph lines at various places. See Figure 3.19
for explaining the use of the cursor.
Figure 3.19 Cursor Features and Commands
Cursor line,
usually pink or
green,
depending on
background
color.
Click here to turn cursor ON.
Click here to turn cursor OFF.
Click on these buttons to move the cursor left or right. Hold down the
<shift key> while clicking these buttons and the cursor moves faster.
You can enable the cursor by clicking on View, then Turn Cursor On.
The value of each
graph line at the
cursor is displayed
here.
The X value of
the cursor is
shown here, in
this case 7.550
seconds.
You can also enable the cursor by single clicking on a graph
line at a data point. This also provides a quick way to move
the cursor from 1 area of the graph to another. (Do not drag
the mouse while clicking or you will zoom in on that area.)
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Figure 3.20 Dual Cursor Features and Commands
Two (2) cursor
lines, usually pink
or green,
depending on
background color.
Once you have surrounded the section of graph you want
to analyze, click on one of these 3 buttons to display the
Average, Maximum or Minimum for each graph line in the
legend on the right side of the graph.
Click here to turn Dual Cursors ON.
Click here to turn Dual Cursors OFF.
Click on these buttons to move the Left cursor left
or right. Hold down the <ctrl key> while clicking
these buttons to move the Right cursor. Hold down
the shift key also and the cursor moves faster.
Section of Run
being Analyzed
Average button was
clicked on, so Averages
are displayed here.
Time between cursors
is displayed here.
Once cursors are displayed,
you can move the Left one
by simply clicking on a line.
Hold down the <Ctrl> key
while clicking on a line to
move the Right cursor.
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Changing titles and legend names (Pro version only)
Many times you may want to customize a graph by displaying and printing labels of your choice. Click on Format and then
Edit Titles/Legend to bring up the menu shown in Figure 3.21 which will allow you to do this.
Note that the names you enter here are for a particular position in the graph legend, not the particular file. The name you enter
for Grp 1 (group 1 or the first file in the legend) will stay with first group in the legend, even if it is now for a different file.
For this reason, it is often better to enter a descriptive “Graph Name” in the History Log that will stay with the particular file,
and not use this method of changing names. This feature is very useful for printing a particular graph, or one time
modifications.
Figure 3.21 Menu to Edit Title and Legend
This is the list of Standard names the program uses unless you click on the Use New
Titles button below. Select (click on) a Standard name you want to change. The
Standard Name appears in the edit box, along with the current New name if there is
one. Once you have selected a name from this list (that row will be highlighted)
it is easier to use the up and down arrow keys to select the next item to edit than
clicking the item with the mouse.
This is the list of New names the program will use if you click on
Use New Titles. If a title in the List of New Names is blank, the
program will use the Standard name.
Standard name from row selected.
New name for you to edit. Other options
include clicking on the Copy Std Name
to New or Blank Out New Name buttons.
Click here to close this menu and use
the New names you have entered.
Where New names have been left
blank, the Standard name will be used.
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Changing the scales
Many times you may want to change the scale of the X or Y axis. This may be to show an area in more detail or to match the
scales of a previous graph. The Pro has several ways to change the scales as shown in Figures 3.22 and 3.23.
Figure 3.22 Changing Scales for the X or Y Axis
Clicking on these buttons shifts
the graph left, right, up or down.
Hold down the shift key while
clicking on them and the graph
moves farther each step.
Clicking on these buttons zooms in or zooms
out on the graph, either vertically or horizontally Hold down the shift key while clicking on
them and the graph moves farther each step.
Click here to restore “autoscaling”. That is where the
computer picks the scale to
show all the graph in good detail.
Click here for menu in Fig 3.23
You can use the mouse to
outline an area to be zoomed in
on. Simply click on the mouse
key in the upper left corner of
the area, then hold the key down
and drag the mouse to the lower
right corner of the desired area.
A box will be drawn as shown.
When you release the mouse
key, this area will fill the whole
graph. This feature is disabled if
the cursor is turned on. Also,
start the upper left corner well
away from a graph line or the
program may turn on the cursor
instead.
Figure 3.23 Menu to Specify Graph Axes Scales
This menu can be obtained 2 ways. You can click on View in the menu bar then Specify Scales
(axes), or click on the Set Scales button, the right most button on the graph screen.
Depending on the type of graph data you currently
working with, one of these 3 sections will be enabled.
These 3 menu options let you save, open (recall) and delete combinations
of scale settings for standard types of graphs you often make.
The current scale limits are
loaded when this menu opens.
Change any or all these to most
any value you want.
Click the Turn Autoscaling Off
button to turn Autoscaling Off to
enable changing specs in this
menu.
Click on OK to have the graph
redrawn to these new scale
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Time Aligning (shifting) Graphs
Many times you may want to realign 1 graph with respect to another, for example to line up the start of a run, a shift, etc. The
program allows you to shift (advance or delay) one test over another on the graph, as shown in figure 3.24.
Figure 3.24 Showing Options to Shift Data from 1 File Over Another File
Example of Graph before Time Aligning
Example of Graph after Time Aligning
Click here to shift the selected test
left or right (advance or delay).
The test you are shifting is
identified by printing the name
and outline in bright pink.
The number of seconds
each test has been shifted
is displayed here.
To switch to a different file
for time aligning, click on
one of the graph data types
for that file.
Click on View for other Shift options.
Click here to show the amount you have shifted
each test.
Click here to return the graph to its “unshifted”
original condition. Note that the program remembers
the amount of shifting for the displayed data until you
close the graph screen, open the History Log, or pick
different file(s) to graph.
Click here to zero out the amount of shifting you
have done.
Click on Timing Shift Size, then select the amount of
time you want the selected test to shift for each click
on the Shift Button. Note: You can also hold the
Shift key down while clicking the shift button to shift
a much larger amount.
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Saving and recalling specific graph formats and scales.
A Graph format consists of all settings in the Graph Options Menu shown in Figure 3.12, which includes the graph’s Data
Types, Filtering, What to Graph, etc. In addition, it includes the scaling of the X and Y axis (if the graph is not auto-scaled),
or the fact that the graph is auto-scaled. These saved formats make it easy to switch between 2 or more completely different
graph types, by simply pressing the <F3> key. See Figure 3.25 below.
Figure 3.25 Graph Format Options
Click on Format, then Save/Open/Edit Current Format (or
simply press the <F3> key when in the graph screen) to
be presented with the Graph Format screen shown below.
Click on one of these saved Formats for it to appear
in the “Graph Format Name” box below this list.
Then you can click on the buttons to either Delete it
(click on Delete button) or use it (click on OK button).
To save the current Graph Settings
(Graph Options menu settings and
graph scaling), type in a name in
the “Graph Format Name” box and
click on the Save button.
Click on Close to close this
Format screen.
If the graph is current Auto-Scaled (computer is
picking the best scales), you can click on “Turn
Auto-Scaling Off” and then choose which axis’s
scaling to save with this format.
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Showing Track Map & Friction Circle and more
If you click on View, then Track Map/Friction Circle/More you will add the 5 sections shown in Figure 3.26 to the bottom of
your graph. These sections make it much easier to visualize what the car and driver are doing and exactly where on the track
you are at any particular time on the graph.
Figure 3.26 Showing Track Map Data and More
Click on View, then Track Map/Friction Circle/More to get
the view shown below.
See Section 3.10 on interpreting the Track Map and
Friction Circle results.
This section shows the relative brake, throttle
and steering wheel position and motion. These
signals are what ever you have assigned as
“Brake”, “Throttle” and “Steering” in the
DataMite specs.
Click on a graph
line, the Track
Map or Friction
Circle to have a
cursor line drawn
and cursor
“circles” drawn
on the map and
circle for that
particular point in
time. This
feature lets you
easily find points
of interest
quickly.
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This section shows the relative position and
motion of the shock sensors. The Red line
connects the 2 rear shocks. This is a rear
view of the car and this line is drawn with a
longer line to simulate it is closer to the
viewer. The 2 front shocks are connected with
a shorter, blue line. This section is good to
visualizing general trends, but much more
detailed results are available in the
Suspension Analyzer software.
This section shows relative
engine RPM on the Tach
Gauge and relative vehicle
speed on the bar graph.
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The 5 sections at the bottom of the graph consist of, from right to left, as identified in Table 3.2.
Table 3.2 Graph Track Map Sections
1
Track Map
2
Friction Circle
3
Steering, Throttle,
Brake
4
Shock Movement
5
Engine RPM, MPH
The Track Map is described in detail in Section 3.10. If you click on a point on the
map, then the circular “cursor” identifying that point is drawn on the map. At the
same time, a corresponding “cursor” is drawn on the Friction Circle for the same
point, and a vertical cursor line is drawn on the graph. The values of the graph at the
cursor are shown in the legend at the right side of the graph.
The Friction Circle is described in detail in Section 3.10. If you click on a point on the
friction circle, then the circular “cursor” identifying that point is drawn on the friction
circle. At the same time, a corresponding “cursor” is drawn on the Track Map for the
same point, and a vertical cursor line is drawn on the graph. The values of the graph
at the cursor are shown in the legend at the right side of the graph.
This section shows the relative brake, throttle and steering wheel position and
motion. These signals are what ever you have assigned as “Brake”, “Throttle” and
“Steering” in the DataMite specs. If the steering wheel’s motion seems to be
opposite of what the actual motion is, then click on the Options button and you can
change it. See the explanation below. The term “relative” is used because before
this section is drawn, the program finds both the maximum and minimum values for
the brake, throttle and steering channels. Then the program “auto-scales” these 2
bar graphs and the steering wheel motion to show good resolution of this movement.
This section shows the relative position and motion of the shock sensors. These
signals are what ever you have assigned as “RF Shock”, “LF Shock”, “RR Shock”
and “LR Shock” in the DataMite specs. The assumption for this display is that as the
Shock Signal gets larger, that the shock is extending (getting longer). The Red line
connects the 2 rear shocks. This is a rear view of the car and this line is drawn with a
longer line to simulate it is closer to the viewer. The 2 front shocks are connected
with a shorter, blue line. This section is good to visualizing general trends, but much
more detailed results are available in the Suspension Analyzer software. See
Section 3.8.
This section shows relative engine RPM on the Tach Gauge and relative vehicle
speed on the bar graph.
There are 4 Option buttons above the Track Map, which control this section of the graph. These are explained in the Table 3.3
below.
Table 3.3 Graph Track Map Option Buttons
1
Off
2
Run
3
4
Options
Help
Click on the Off button and these 5 sections will be removed and the graph will go
back to full screen.
Click on Run and the cursor position will automatically start to advance around the
track and you can get a sense of the motion of all vehicle parameters on these
displays. Note that the timing of these displays will NOT match what happened on
the track. If your lap time was 20 seconds, a lap could be displayed here as only
taking 10 seconds or maybe 40 seconds, depending on your computer’s processing
speed.
Click on the Options button bring up the Options screen shown in Figure 3.27.
Click on help for basic explanation of these options.
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Figure 3.27 Graph Track Map Options
Engine Sound is not working at the time of printing
this manual.
This number changes the scaling of the Friction
Circle. The higher the number, the more likely all
data will be displayed, but the harder to read the
data in detail. The program will round this to the
nearest 0.5 G.
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3.4 Printer Output
The Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer can print the tabular test results of a report for a permanent hardcopy by
clicking on Print in the menu bar or the Printer icon. The menu of options shown in Figure 3.28 will appear. Check the
options you want to use for the printout by clicking on any or all of the Option boxes. All options and buttons are discussed in
this section.
Figure 3.28 Printer Button and Print Menu Command Options - Report Screen
Click on Print or the Printer button
(shown hidden here) for the Printout
Options menu shown to the right.
This options lets you choose the
printer or printer driver being used by
Windows and also page orientation.
Check this one box to
enable choosing which “Log
Book Categories to Print”.
Leave unchecked to omit
printing any Log Book info.
Pro version Only.
Check or uncheck these
options, then click on this
button to print the current
report with these options.
Test Results Report Options
Include Track Conditions
Include Log Book Entries (Pro Version Only)
Include Test Summary
Include DataMite Specs
Include Vehicle Specs
Select these options if you want all the specs from these menus printed with the report. This will add 1-2 pages to the printed
report. Important: Check Include Log Book Entries to enable you to pick which Log Book Categories to include in the
printout. Uncheck this one option and no Log Book Entries will be included.
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Include Test Comments
Select this option if you want all the comments for the Test File printed with the results.
Request Report Comment
Select this option if you want to be asked for a comment for each particular report you send to the printer. These "report
comments" are useful to identify important points for future reference, like engine modifications, special test conditions, etc.
Larger Font (Print Size)
Check this option if your particular printer is printing the results with a small print font. This option will increase the font size
for some parts of some reports. Also see Preferences for Selecting Printer Fonts, page 26.
Figure 3.29 Print Commands under File Options (Pro Version Only)
Click on File in some
menus (Main Menu,
Log Book, etc) to
display these Print
Options.
Other Print Options
Figure 3.30 Print Button
Other menus have print menu commands
or print buttons as shown in Figures 3.29
and 3.30. Graphs have their own set of
print options. See Section 3.3.
Many screens and menus
have a Print button. Click
on it to print that particular
screen or menu.
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3.5 Data Libraries
The Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer allows you to save recorded DataMite Data and related specs (Vehicle
Specs, Track Conds, etc) to the Test File Library under a name of your choosing. You can then open these test files out of the
Test File Library in the future for comparison or modification. The Open window is explained below.
Figure 3.31 Test Library Options
Click on File, then Open (from all saved tests) to display Test Library shown here.
Click on File, then Save or Save As to save current test and specs to the Test Library.
Total # Tests in Library under this Folder
Name of chosen Test
(currently highlighted
in Test List)
Click and drag slide
bar to view all Tests
in list
Preview of Test chosen
Single click on a Test
to choose it for
preview. Double click
to immediately open it.
Click here to
delete the
chosen Test.
Click here to bring up the Filter Options menu
where you can select to show only tests which
fit certain criteria. See Section 3.6.
Click here to bring up “on screen” help.
Tests can be saved
under various
categories (folders) to
help you organize
large #s of tests. Click
on a different name
here and a different
list of Test Files will be
displayed. The name
“Folder” was called
“Track” in the DOS
version, but can be
changed in the
Preferences menu to
most any word.
Click here to bring up
standard Windows File Open
screen, to let you open a file
in most any folder (directory)
and disk drive.
Click here to close the Test Library with No changes (without opening a test)
Click here to open the chosen Test
Select one of these options to list the test files alphabetically, either by test file name, or by run
date. This option can save you time looking for a particular test file. (Pro Version Only)
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Open a Test File
To open a test file saved in the Test Library, click on File at the upper left corner of the Main Screen, then on the Open (from
all saved tests). In the Pro version you have an additional option of “Open (from History Log)” which will be discussed in
Section 3.7.
You will obtain the window shown on the previous page. Single click on one of the tests in the list, or click and drag the slide
button on the right side of the list to display more tests. Once you single click on a test, it is now the Chosen Test File and a
preview of the test is given in the Preview section. If the file you chose was not a valid Road Race & Circle Track DataMite
Analyzer file (either Windows V2.0 or the older v1.x for DOS), the program will tell you and you can not choose it. Tip: Once
you click on a test and get a preview, use the up and down arrow keys to go through the list test-by-test getting a preview of
each test.
Once a test has been chosen, you can delete it by clicking on the Delete button, or Open it by clicking on the Open button in
this window. You can also click on a different test to Preview it or close this window and return to the Main Screen without
choosing a new test file.
If you are sure of the test you want to open, you can simply double click on it from the Test List. This opens the test without a
preview and closes this menu.
Note for Pro Version: You can also save sets of Vehicle specs to its own separate library. This is done very similarly as
with the Test Files, except you click on File, then Open from the Vehicle menu. See Figure 3.32.
Figure 3.32 Engine File Options (Pro version only)
Current Vehicle File Name
Click on File in the Vehicle menu to Open a set of saved
specs, or to save the current set of specs in just that screen.
This allows you to build libraries of Vehicles for easily
creating new tests in the future.
• New blanks out the current specs and comments.
• Open Example opens a library of example specs
provided by Performance Trends.
• Open Saved opens a library of specs you have saved.
• Save saves the current specs to the same name as
these specs are currently called.
• Save As saves the current specs to a new name that
you will enter.
Save a Test File
Before you discuss saving a test file, it is important for you to understand how the program opens and uses test files. When you
open a test from the Test Library, you are only using a copy of the test. The original test file is kept in the library.
As you make changes to the test, they are only made to this copy. The original file is not changed. If you want to delete your
changes, you can simply open a fresh, unchanged copy of the original test file from the Library. If you want to keep your
changes, you must save them. This can be done by clicking on File, then Save. You are also asked if you want to save your
changes whenever you open a new test, and the program has detected you have made changes to the current file.
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Figure 3.33 Saving Test File Options
Click on File
then Save As to
bring up this
Save menu.
Click here to
save specs
to New Test
name shown
Chapter 3 Output
New name to save test data to. Leave unchanged
and click OK to save to the current test name. (This
would be the same as clicking on File, then Save.)
Click on name in the box to change it, then click OK
to save it to the new name. Note: The test name
must have a CFG extension. That means it must
end with .CFG. This will be added to the name by
the program if you do not add it yourself.
Name of current test file you are working
with.
Click on the down arrow button to pick a
different folder to save this test to. Note
that the top choice in this list is “Add New
Folder”. Pick this option and then you can
type in a new folder name, This new
folder name will be added to the list so
that you can save the test file to that
folder if you wish. The word “folder” can
be changed to most any word in the
Preferences menu. In the previous DOS
version, this was the “Track” name.
Type in a New Folder Name here if you
select “Add New Folder” as the Folder
Name.
Click here to bring up standard
Windows File Save screen, to let you
save a file in most any folder (directory)
and disk drive, and to most any file
name (Pro version only). Note that
files saved this way are not found in the
standard Test Library and are not
“searchable” using the Filter options
discussed in Section 3.6.
To save a Test File, you will be presented with the Save Window as shown above. The program suggests a new test name
which is the same as the current test name shown at the top of the Main Screen. If you want to save your changes to the same
name, simply click on OK. This will update the current test file with your latest changes.
If you want to save the current set of test specs with your changes to a new name (and leave the current test file in the Library
unchanged), then click on the suggested file name and modify it as you want. For example, in the window shown above, you
may want to add 2 to the current name CAMTEST to create CAMTEST2 to indicate this is the 2nd revision of CAMTEST.
This is the safest way to make changes, because you can always return to an earlier version and see what you had done.
The test name must have a CFG extension. That means that the test name can be most any name of up to 8 characters or
numbers, but it must end with the 4 characters .CFG. If you do not add the .CFG to the name itself, it will be added to the
name by the program.
Because the DataMite is a 32 bit program (not compatible with the older Windows 3.1), it can use most any type of file name.
The names can be up to 50 characters long and can include spaces, and upper case and lower case letters. However, there are
certain limitations for file names, as they can not contain certain characters, like / \ : | > < * ? “ . The program will
warn you if you use an illegal character.
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Test files are saved to folders (directories) you have created in the DTMDATA folder (directory) in the DTM20 folder
(directory) under PERFTRNS.PTI folder (directory). You can copy Windows Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
files from programs on other computers to this folder (directory) and they will be found by the program. The Windows
Version 2.0 will read files produced with the older DOS v1.1 or 1.2. Just copy them into a folder under the DTMDATA folder
(other than the Examples folder). The Save to Floppy and Open From Floppy commands discussed on page 18 are an
alternate, perhaps easier way to copy files from one computer to another.
The method of saving an Engine file is exactly the same as complete Test Files, except that you access the Save menu by
clicking on File at the top of these individual menus, as shown in Figure 3.29. These files are saved to the ENGINE folder
(subdirectory).
Advance Open or Save Screen
If you click on the Advanced
button in either the Open or Save
As screen, you will obtain the
screen shown in Figure 3.34.
From here you can access most any
file on the computer on most any
disk drive.
Figure 3.34 Advanced Open or Save Screen
Tips to Advanced
Users:
DataMite test files actually consist of 3 files:
1.
2.
3.
.DAT file (which is the recorded DataMite data)
.CFG file (which is the configuration file, including DataMite specs, Vehicle Specs, Engine Specs, etc.)
.LAP file (which is the Lap or Run file, identifying where the beginning and end of each lap or run is in the .DAT file)
If you want to copy a DataMite test from one computer to another, you must copy all 3 files. This is done automatically
whenever the program saves or opens a file, or when you used the Save to Floppy and Open From Floppy commands discussed
on page 18.
If you have a file from another computer, from another disk (like a floppy) or folder, you can simply copy it into any folder in
the DTMDATA folder and it will be found by the DataMite program. This can be done with a program like Windows
Explorer. You can also create new folders (directories) in the DTMDATA folder and these will also be used by the DataMite
program.
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3.6 Filter Test Files (Pro Version Only)
The Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer has a powerful way to search for tests in the Test Library called the Filter
Option. Click on the Filter button in the Open Test File menu (Figure 3.31, page 109) to be presented with the screen shown in
Figure 3.35.
Figure 3.35 Filter Files Menu
Click on the down arrow button to pick the spec or comment to
check for a certain condition “Has this relationship”.
Click on the down arrow button to pick the condition to
look for. These change depending on the spec or
comment you have chosen.
Type in (or pick
from a list for
some specs)
the condition to
look for. The
program treats
UPPER and
lower case
letters the
same (bowtie =
BOWTIE =
BowTie).
Check here to
include a 2nd
condition. This
enables specs in
this section.
Click on this
button to return
to the File Open
menu which will
now show all
test files.
These options let you choose which folders to search, All
Folders or just the ones you have selected in the list.
Click here to produce a report of all files meeting the Filter
conditions IN ALL FOLDERS in the DTMDATA folder (the entire
Test Library). This way you can avoid looking in each folder
separately and can save time.
Click on this button to return to the File Open menu which will now only show files which fit
the Filter Conditions.
Select And and the Test Files displayed must fit both conditions specified. Select Or and the Test
Files displayed can fit either of the conditions specified.
The settings in this screen will display all test files with the word BowTie (or bowtie
or BOWTIE) somewhere in the test comments and with a Dry Density Altitude
between 1000 and 4000 ft (calculated from weather info in the Track Conds menu).
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The Filter Feature is very useful for finding a specific test or to find all the tests which meet a certain set of conditions. For
example, say you want to find a test that Operator “Jack” ran for Customer “Smith” on a “Big Block Chevy” engine. Or, say
you want to check on all tests run with Weber carbs, where “Weber” would be in the Carb description in the Engine Specs
menu. Or perhaps you want to find all Small Block Chevys that produced more than 700 HP. In all these cases, the filtering
specs would allow you to find the test files.
First you must select the condition you want to look for by clicking on the down arrow button on the 'This comment or spec'
box. Your choice of this spec will determine what the 'Has this relationship' options are, and what specs can be entered in the
'To what I enter here' spec.
You can select up to 3 conditions to look for. For the Operator “Jack”, Customer “Johnson”, “Big Block Chevy” example
above, you would need to search for 3 conditions. For the valve seal example, you could just search for 1 condition. You add
conditions by checking the 'Include this condition also' box. This enables the other specs for each condition.
If more than 1 condition is being used for the search, you must determine if you want the search to include tests which fit ANY
of the conditions (Or) or must match ALL conditions (And). For example, if you are looking for tests run by either Operator
Jack or Operator Joe, you would select “Or”. If you want Tests which made more than 300 HP and were done since Jan 1999
(the tests must match both conditions), you would select “And”.
Figure 3.36 Print List of All Files Fitting These Limits
The 3 command buttons will do the
following:
Show Files Only Fitting These
Conditions will return you to the
Open Test File screen. Only files fitting
these conditions will be displayed (which
may be no files in some situations). You
can click on various folders (or whatever
name you have given to folders in the
Preferences menu at the Main Screen) to
see if there are any matches in other
folders.
Click and Drag Mouse to highlight a File Name,
then click on Open button below to open it.
Turn Off Filtering (show all files) will return you to the Open Test File screen and now all files will be displayed.
Print List of All Files Fitting These Conditions will search through the entire Test Library (all folders in the
DTMDATA folder) for files matching these conditions and display them in a new screen. From this screen, you can also print
the list. This is the quickest way to see which folders may contain test files matching your conditions.
Tip: When looking for a word, the program doesn’t care if it is in CAPITAL (upper case) or small (lower case)
letters. In Figure 3.32 above you are looking for the word BowTie in the test comments. The program will display
all files which have the word “BowTie” or the word “BOWTIE” or the word “bowtie” or the word “BowTIE”
anywhere in the comments. The program will not find files with the words “Bow Tie” (with a space between Bow
and Tie) . Therefore, it may be smarter to just look for the word “bow” to avoid this problem. Note, however, that
if you do this, the program will also find tests with the word “elbow” or “crossbow” , for example, in the test
comments.
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3.7 History Log (Pro Version Only)
Click on File, then Open from History Log at the Main Screen to obtain the History Log shown below in Figure 3.37. This
screen shows a summary of the results for the last 25-100 tests you have worked with (started new, opened, graphed, etc.) The
number of tests in the log (25-100) is selectable in the 'Preferences' menu at the Main Screen. When you work with a new test,
it is added to the top of the History Log, and (if the Log is full) the last run drops off the bottom of the list. In the Pro Version,
the History Log is an alternate way to Open tests which have been saved to the Test Library. The advantage of the History Log
is it lists the tests you most recently worked with at the top.
Also see Section 3.9, Run Log, for a comparison of the similarities and differences to this History Log.
Figure 3.37 History Log and Options
Click on Test Title to Open that Test File.
Click on File, then Open from History Log
Click in the Save
column to enter a
Yes or erase a
Yes. All tests
move to the
bottom of the
History Log and
eventually fall off
the list as you
work with new
tests. However,
Tests marked Yes
do not fall off the
list.
Click and move
slide bar down to
display all 25-100
tests in the
History Log.
From this screen you can Open a test file by clicking on the 'Test File and Path' column (first column on the left). If the test
file was saved to a standard folder (directory, or whatever you have chosen to call folders in the Preferences menu), the folder
name is given first, followed by the test file name.
If a test file has been Opened from or Saved to a non-standard folder (a folder not in the DTMDATA folder) using the
'Advanced' function, the entire path is given. If the 'Path and File Name' won't fit, it is shortened and preceded by '...'.
You can choose to Save certain results you believe are special and you may want to recall or graph in the future by clicking on
the Save column to insert a Yes there. Tests marked Yes to Save eventually move to the bottom of the History Log, but
are never dropped off the list or erased until you again click on the Yes to make it blank.
Note that just the Test File Name stays in the History Log. Should you delete the file using the Open (from all
saved tests) command, the test file will be deleted but the name will stay in the History Log. When you try to open
it or graph if from the History Log, you will get note saying the file can not be found.
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You can print the History Log on a printer by clicking on the 'Print' menu command. Note that the History Log will be most
readable when the Page Orientation is in Landscape setting.
Position/Lap Time, Win?, Trk Len, Dens Alt, and AvgMPH. are handy to remind you what a run was, and for comparing
different test sessions.
History Log at Graph Screen
At the Graph Screen, several options are available to graph selected tests from the History Log, and change the Graph Titles.
You can obtain the History Log by clicking on the menu command History Log at the top of the Graph Screen. The History
Log is how you graph different tests together for comparison. From this screen you can:
•
Choose to Graph certain Test Results by clicking on the Graph column to insert a Yes there. Tests marked Yes to
Graph will be graphed when you click on the 'Graph Tests Marked 'Yes' '. The first test (usually the current Test you
are working with) is always graphed even with no Yes marked. The number of tests actually graphed is limited by
available space, usually a limit of about 24 graph lines total.
•
Graph only the current test results (the test file at the top of the Log) by clicking on 'Graph Current Test Only'.
•
Click on 'Graph Title' to change the Standard Title for this test. The program will default to the test file name without
the .CFG extension. (You can also specify 'Alternate' titles and legend names by clicking on 'Format' at the top of the
Graph Screen, then 'Edit Titles/Legends'.)
Figure 3.38 History Log at Graph Screen
Click on the History Log button or Menu Command to display History Log.
From the Graph
Screen, 2 additional
columns are
displayed:
1. Click in the
Graph? column to
add a Yes or
remove a Yes.
Tests marked Yes
to graph are
graphed if you
select Graph
Tests Marked
‘Yes’.
2. Click in the Std
Graph Title
column to change
the Std Graph
Title. Alternate
titles are also
possible by
clicking on
Format, then Edit
Legend/Titles.
Click in the Graph Laps column to change which lap (or
laps) you want to graph, a number from 1 to the number in
the adjacent “Laps” column.
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•
Choose to Save certain results you believe are special and you may
want to recall or graph in the future. See the Save explanation of the
previous page.
•
Choose which run or runs you want to graph by clicking in the
Graph Runs column. The program will ask which runs you want to
graph. Enter the number for each run, separated by a comma. See
Figure 3.39. Most of your tests will probably be for only 1 run, so
there is no need to specify the Run #. The program defaults to Run
#1 if there is more than 1 run.
Chapter 3 Output
Figure 3.39 Specifying Which
Runs to Graph (if more than 1 run
in a test)
History Log at Report Screen
You can also make comparison reports, where the current run is compared to
the runs marked “Yes” in the Report Column. See Figure 3.40. This is done almost exactly the same way as done in the
History Log displayed at the Graph Screen.
Figure 3.40 Report History Log
Click on History Log to display Test History Log
Report History
Log options are
very similar to
Graph History
Log. Click in this
column to put in a
“Yes” to signify
that this test
should be
included in the
comparison
report. Click on a
Yes already
displayed to
erase that Yes, to
de-select that test
from the
comparison
report.
This report will
compare Lap 1
and Lap 2.
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3.8 Send Data (Pro Version Only)
The DataMite’s data can be analyzed in Performance Trends suspension analysis program, the Suspension Analyzer. This
DataMite program will send Shock Travel and Steering data, where the program will determine the dive, squat, roll, pitch and
steer of the vehicle based on shock and steer travel data and suspension geometry and measurements. In addition, the
DataMite program can send Track Map, Friction Circle, braking, throttle and engine RPM data. See Fig 3.41.
Figure 3.41 Send Options
Click here then
choose how much
data to send to the
Performance Trends
Suspension
Analyzer program.
If the program is not
currently running, it
will be started
automatically.
Figure 3.42 Typical Shock Travel Sensor
To send data, you first must make sure the DataMite has
the required shock travel and steering data and it has the
correct calibration following these steps:
1. Install shock & steering travel sensors. See
Figure 3.42.
2. Assign the appropriate DataMite channels as
Shock Travel and Steering sensors and do the
appropriate calibration.
3. Click on Send at top of main screen to send data from current file to one of the suspension analysis programs.
Figure 3.43 Selecting Shock Sensor Channels for Suspension Programs
Click here to select
which channel to
calibrate as a Shock
Travel sensor.
You must select
one of the 4
Shock Travel
sensor types, or
Steering, for that
data to be
recognized as the
appropriate data
for the suspension
analysis program.
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The Suspension Analyzer can use RF Shock, LF
Shock, RR Shock, LR Shock and Steering inputs.
For the additional channels, they must be assigned
as Throttle and Brake. Engine RPM is almost
always recorded, as is the F/B (long) Accel and L/R
(lat) Accel. However, you must be sure that these
channels are turned On (put a Yes in the Used
column) for the data to be available.
Chapter 3 Output
Figure 3.44 Example of Motion Ratio (MR)
Say sensor moves only .65 inches
and the wheel moves 1.12 inches
MR = Sensor Movement
Wheel Movement
MR = .65 / 1.12 = .58
Shock Sensor
Shock sensors, or more accurately called suspension
motion sensors, have a motion ratio associated with
them. Motion Ratio is the ratio between the sensor’s
movement and the actual wheel’s movement. See
Figure 3.44. The Suspension Analyzer, because it
calculates the motion ratio for all suspension motion
Side view of rear ladder bar with shock sensor
sensors, you can calibrate the sensor directly. You
would move the sensor, say, 2.0 inches and tell the
Figure 3.45 Typical Calibration Screen
DataMite program the sensor motion was 2.0 inches. See
Figure 3.45.
When
calibrating,
When the DataMite sends data to the Suspension
these values
Analyzer, data is sent with a vehicle file name. This is
describe the
the name of the Suspension Analyzer file. When this
Shock Sensor
program opens up, the program automatically tries to
travel.
load this file and automatically go into displaying the
DataMite data. If this file can not be found, or if this is
the first time you are trying to send data to these
programs, instructions are given in those programs on
The Correction
how to open the correct vehicle file, and then display the
value lets you
DataMite data. Now that you have picked the
“zero out”
appropriate vehicle file in the program, this vehicle file
these sensor
channels, for
name will be remembered by the DataMite program.
example at
“ride height.”
If you click on the Send button in the DataMite program,
and the Suspension Analyzer can not be found where it
should be, a “File Seek” screen will appear. Here you
Figure 3.46 Sent DataMite Data in Suspension Analyzer
You can manually
start displaying
DataMite data by
clicking on
Animate and
selecting
DataMite data file
as Data Source.
Additional data like
Distance and
Engine RPM are
also displayed in
this section so you
can better relate to
where you were on
the track.
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can choose which disk drive to search for the appropriate file, usually the “C:” drive. The screen will display all files which
match the name of these files. When done searching, double click on
the file you want to use. The DataMite program will then remember
Figure 3.47 Seeking a Vehicle File
this path and you should not have to do this again.
Figure 3.48 Send to Suspension Analyzer w Track Map
This Send command also
includes the data required
to create these additional
5 sections in the
Suspension Analyzer.
These have the same
definitions as they do
when displayed on the
Graph screen in the
DataMite Software. See
Section 3.3, Graphs.
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3.9 Run Log (Pro Version Only)
The Run Log is similar to the History Log described in Section 3.7, except:
•
The Run Log is a chronological list of the tests in the order you have downloaded them from your DataMite.
•
The History Log is a chronological list of the tests in the order you have opened them for graphing, making reports,
etc. These are intended to be tests you are most recently interested in, even if you actually downloaded them several
years ago.
The only way to add a test to the top of this list is to download a new test from your DataMite. You can not change the order of
the tests. However, you can delete tests from the Run Log, by clicking on a test to highlight it (or clicking and dragging the
mouse down to highlight several tests), then right clicking on this (these) highlighted tests. See Figure 3.49. You can then
select to delete these tests from the Run Log, or open this test. If more than one test has been highlighted, only the first test
will be opened.
Figure 3.49 Run Log and Options
Click on the Details button to expand the Run Log as shown to the right.
Click on Cancel to shrink Run Log to single column as shown to left.
Click on (or click and drag) to highlight
1 to several rows, then Right Click on
them for this Pop Up menu.
The Sequence
# is the number
of the file as
downloaded
from the
DataMite. For
example, # 165
is the 165th test
ever
downloaded to
this program
since you first
installed the
program. This
number is
permanent and
can not be
changed like
the Run # in the
1st column
These columns are much the same as the History Log, but the rows are in
a different order and probably contain different tests.
Any time you open a past test, it is added to the top of the History Log. The History Log is what is used to pick which tests you
want to include in Graph and Report comparisons of several tests.
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3.10 Track Map & Friction Circle (Pro
Version Only)
These 2 features are available by clicking on File at the top of the Main Screen, then choosing either as shown in Figure 3.50.
Figure 3.50 Selecting Track Map or Friction Circle
If you select Track Map, the program will “build” a map of the circuit the
vehicle has run, based on the F/B (long) Accel and L/R (lat) Accel channel
data. You must have these channels turned on in the DataMite Specs screen
for this to be possible. Also, you must have the DataMite II mounted in the
correct orientation for the built in accelerometers to record this data correctly.
If you have a 4 channel DataMite, you must mount the Analog Converter with
Accelerometer(s) correctly. These mounting instructions will be included with
your hardware. Also, see Appendix 2.
Figure 3.51 Typical Track
Map for Circle Track Laps
Figure 3.51 shows several of the features available for viewing the Track Map
and for assigning segments to the Track Map. Segments are sections of the
track which represent a mode of driving, like accelerating or decelerating,
cornering and straight-aways. The program will automatically break the track
up into segments based on accelerations and decelerations. However, if you
want different segments or segments based on cornering and straight-aways,
you will have to “Edit” these segments. These Edit options are shown in
Figure 3.52 and include:
Table 3.4 Segment Editing Commands
Automatically
Find
Segments
Edit Current
Segments
Show Current
Segments
This command has the program automatically assign segments based on front to back
(longitudinal) accelerations, like stepping on the throttle or the brake. This is what the program will
automatically do if you do any type of segment analysis, like a Segment Analysis report, and have
not manually assigned or edited any segments. Note that the starting segment (where the lap
timer beacon is positioned) is always a segment break point.
This command brings up the segment list box and allows editing of the segment points as shown in
Figure 3.52. Then you can Left Click on the map to insert a new segment point, or Right Click on
an existing segment point to delete it. If you don’t like the changes you have made, click on the
Cancel button in the Segment List Box. If you want to keep the changes you have made, click on
the Done button in the Segment List Box. If you want to start completely over, click on Cancel to
stop editing, then click on the Automatically Find Segments menu command.
This command simply shows the segment break points as small circles on the Track Map.
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Figure 3.52 Track Map showing Segments.
If you don’t like how the program
has automatically marked lap
segments, you can click on the
“Segments” menu command,
then select Edit Current
Segments. Then by clicking on
the track map, you will put in new
Segment markers. By Right
Clicking on existing Segment
markers, you will be deleting
those markers.
This is the starting point of the
Lap, as identified by the
horizontal line and the segment
marking circle. This is typically
where the Timer Beacon is set
up on the track.
Click on the Left or Right arrow buttons to move this Table to either the left side
or right side of the track map screen
When Editing segments, this table will appear. It shows each segment and its
cumulative track length in ft from the beginning of the lap (generally where the lap
beacon is positioned) to the end of that segment. As you edit segment markers, this
table is updated. When you are finished with editing, click on the “Done” button. To
abort the editing process (lose your changes), click on “Cancel”
Other Track Map Features
Other commands available in the Track Map Screen include:
Animate When you click on Animate, the program will redraw the Track Map (and Friction Circle if that has been opened
also) with a wider gray line so you can watch the progress of the car around the track. Animate has 2 options of Go Faster and
Go Slower to speed up or slow down this redrawing process. Note that nothing is designed to reproduce the vehicle’s actual lap
time, travel or position around the track. This speed is complete based on the processor speed of the particular computer. See
Figure 3.53 for more details.
File When you click on File, you are presented with 2 main options. The first has to do with Saving, Opening or Deleting a
file of Segment spacings. Note that what you are saving is just the spacing of the segments, and not some measure of straightaways, braking etc. If you open some segment spacing, say from a road course and apply it to a different road course, the
segments may appear to make some sense, because they will be evenly distributed around the track as spaced for the original
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track. However, upon closer inspection, you may see segment breakpoints showing up in the middle straights, or not appearing
at all during some braking and accelerating segments, etc. These segments will likely only make sense on data recorded on the
original track. The other File command is to print the Track Map or to change the Windows Printer setup. See Figure 3.54 for
more details.
Figure 3.53 Track Mapping Animate Feature
These 2 options change the speed of the animation.
When you click on Animate, the
program will redraw the Track Map
(and Friction Circle if that has been
opened also) with a wider gray line
so you can watch the progress of the
car around the track.
After you open either the Track Map or
Friction Circle screens, their icons appear
on the Task Bar here. Generally, to get
both these screens to appear on the same
screen, you may have to single, right click
on these icons to get both to appear on the
screen at one time.
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Figure 3.54 File Options in Track Map
Click on File for the options shown in this Figure.
If you clicked on “Save”, you will be asked for
a name under which to save the current
segment spacing. Note that what you are
saving is just the spacing, and not some
measure of straightaways, braking etc. These
segments will likely only make sense on data
recorded on this exact same track.
If you clicked on
Open (or Delete),
you can then select
from a list of saved
Segments. Just
click on one to
open it. If you
clicked on Delete,
you will be asked if
you want it deleted.
If you clicked on Print Setup, you’d be
presented with this standard Windows
Printer Setup screen.
Click here to close this list
without picking a Segment File.
If you clicked on Open,
you will be asked this
question before the new
Segment spacing is
applied to your data.
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Friction Circle and Friction Circle Theory
A friction circle is a method to analyzing how effectively you are using the available traction (friction) from the vehicle’s tires.
Large tire companies test tires for the available traction the tire can produce. These tests are conducted with various vertical
loads applied to the tire (simulating vehicle weight pressing the tire onto the pavement), and measuring the traction the tire can
provide forward (for acceleration), backward (for braking) and sideways (for cornering). The resulting traction is measured in
a number called “Coefficient of Friction”. If a tire can provide, say 400 lbs of sideways traction when it is loaded with 500 lbs
of vertical load, it is given a Coefficient of Friction of 400 / 500 or .8. Tests are run at many different vertical loads, with the
results graphed as shown in Figure 3.55. This figure shows 2 very important points:
•
•
As the vertical load goes up, the traction force goes up, but at a slower rate. This is also shown by the Friction
Coefficient curves going down as the Vertical Load goes up. That means the more load you apply to the tire, the
worse its overall traction rating becomes. That is why go karts handle like they are on rails, but 2500 lb Late Models
don’t. It is also why the best suspension setup on asphalt is one which most evenly loads all 4 tires.
Tires generally can produce slightly more accelerating and decelerating traction than cornering traction.
Figure 3.55 Simple Tire Test
Typical Front/Back Test (acceleration/braking)
500 lbs of
vertical force
applied to tire
Traction
Force
Typical Side Load
Test (cornering)
Friction
Coefficient
400 lbs of max.
cornering force
produced by
tire
Vertical Load
The Coefficient of Friction rating is useful because if a car has 4 tires with a Coefficient of Friction of .8, it means that it can
theoretically brake at a “G” rate of .8 Gs, can corner at .8 Gs, and (if it is 4 wheel drive) can accelerate at .8 Gs. Knowing this,
we can analyze how well a vehicle is using its available traction using friction circle theory. To simplify things for
explanation, assume a tire can produce 1.0 G of front/back traction, and 1.0 G of cornering traction. However, seldom is a car
doing purely corning or braking or accelerating. It typically is doing some combination of braking or accelerating while it is
also cornering. Friction Circle Theory would say that this tire can produce a traction vector of total length of 1.0G in any
direction. See Figure 3.56.
You will see that these vector lengths drawn if all possible directions around the tire end up being a circle with a radius of 1.0
G. If this was a stickier tire, with a friction coefficient of 1.25, then this “Friction Circle” would have a radius of 1.25 G. Now
if the 4 tires are the same, then the Friction Circle for the entire vehicle (with a perfect suspension setup) would have a Friction
Circle radius the same as the individual tires.
The DataMite II has accelerometers built in (and ones can be added to the 4 channel DataMite) so the program can build
graphs of Front to Back (longitudinal) and Sideways (lateral) accelerations. By graphing these sets of numbers on a circular
graph, you can start to see a real Friction Circle produced by the car. See Figure 3.57.
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Figure 3.56 Friction Circle Theory for Tire with Friction Coefficient of 1.0 G
1.0G Accelerating
.7 G Accelerating plus .7 G Cornering Left,
which would be the condition coming out of
a turn. This vector adds up (using
trigonometry) as being 1.0 G in length.
1.0G Cornering Left
1.0G Braking
1.0G Cornering Right
Figure 3.57 Typical Friction Circle
Each circle
represents
0.5 Gs.
Accelerating on
straightaway, where the
max Gs are limited by
available engine power.
This car is capable of 1.5
Gs cornering left. This is
quite high for normal tires
and is probably being
improved by track banking.
If 1.5 Gs of cornering was
possible without banking or
aerodynamic downforce,
then the vehicle should
also be capable of at least
1.5 Gs of braking and
somewhat less for
accelerating (since this car
is rear wheel drive and has
traction only available
from the rear tires). Since
we do NOT see anything
close to 1.5 Gs anywhere
else, and since 1.5 Gs is
not even listed in Table
3.5, we must conclude that
the high cornering Gs are
from banking and/or
aerodynamic downforce.
130
Braking on straightaway. The
driver could have braked
harder (probably up to at least
1.0 Gs), but that could upset
the handling of the car.
The direction
of the
accelerations
are the same
as the
direction you
are
accelerating in
the car going
toward the top
of the screen.
Toward the
top is
accelerating,
toward the
bottom is
braking,
toward the left
is turning left
and toward
the right is
turning right.
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Table 3.5 Typical Friction Coefficients for Tires on Level Ground
Type of Track
Lateral Friction
Longitudinal Friction
Typical “Total Car”
Coefficient (for
Coefficient (for
Friction Coefficient
cornering)
accelerating and braking)
Dirt Track, Dry and Slick
.4-.7
.4-.7
.3-.6 *
Dirt Track, Wet & “Greasy”
.4-.7
.4-.7
.3-.6 *
Dirt Track, Wet & Heavy (sticky)
.55-.85
.55-.95
.45-.75 *
Asphalt, DOT Style Tires
.7-1.05
.75-1.10
.6-1.0 *
Asphalt, Racing Slick
.9-1.25
.95-1.40
.8-1.25 *
* This assumes a rear wheel drive car with only 2 rear tires providing traction for accelerating. For braking or for an all wheel
drive car, this number will be slightly higher.
Generally, the Friction Coefficient of the entire car is less than that of the individual tires, due to imperfections in the
suspension setup causing uneven loading of the tires, and having only 2 driving tires for accelerating (unless you have an all
wheel drive car). However, anything which increases the vertical load on the tire without increasing the vehicle’s weight will
increase the Friction Coefficient of the car. These factors include aerodynamic downforce and track banking effects.
Therefore, on level ground you would expect Friction Circle readings as shown in Table 3.5. If you see numbers much higher
than this, there must be some aerodynamic downforce present or significant track banking effects.
Figure 3.57 shows how you can interpret the friction circle from a particular car. For example, Figure 3.57 shows the car is
consistently pulling 1.5 Gs in the corners. Gs of 1.5 are quite high, and are probably enlarged due to the high amount of
banking at this particular track. The vehicle speeds are not sufficiently high (less than 110 MPH) to create significant
downforce. However, if you notice that this week we are getting 1.5 Gs and last week you only got 1.45 Gs on the same track,
you could assume that either the tires have a higher Friction Coefficient or the suspension setup is better utilizing the Friction
Coefficient of all 4 tires.
Other Track Map Features
Other commands available in the Track Map Screen include:
Print Lets you print the Track Map
Print Setup Opens the Windows Printer Setup screen to change printer, landscape vs portrait orientation, etc.
Animate Although Animate is not available from the Friction Circle, it is available from the Track Map screen. If you have
both of these screens open at the same time, and run the Animate feature from the Track Map, you will see the progression of
the Friction Circle as the vehicle drives around the track.
As Figure 3.53 says, after you open either the Track Map or Friction Circle screens, their icons appear on the Task Bar. When
you open the second screen, either the Track Map or the Friction Circle, the previous screen will become minimized. To get
both these screens to appear on the same screen, you may have to single (left) click on these icons to get both to appear on the
screen at one time. Then you can click on the blue, title bar of one of the screens, and drag the 2 screens so both can be seen
side-by-side.
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Chapter 4 Examples
Chapter 4 Examples
Each example in this chapter becomes progressively more complex, assuming you have performed and understand the
preceding example. Section 1.5's example is somewhat more basic than Example 4.1, so it may be a better place to start if
Example 4.1 looks complicated.
The results shown in these examples may be
somewhat different than what you obtain with
your particular version of the program That
is due to minor upgrades in the calculations
in later versions.
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Example 4.1 Installing the DataMite on a
Vehicle and Recording a Test Session
Suggested Background Reading:
• Section 1.5, Example to Get You Going
• Most all of Sections 2 and 3, Definitions of Inputs and Outputs
• Appendix 2, Hardware Installation and Operation
• Appendix 5, Calibrating an Analog Sensor
This example demonstrates the basic steps to installing a 30 channel DataMite on a circle track car, setting up the program’s
specs for this vehicle, and recording a circle track run. This example will be very thorough so all possible steps are presented.
You may decide to omit some steps.
DataMite & Sensor Installation
Example 4.1 will be fairly long, covering the entire process of
getting and analyzing data. We will assume you have installed
a 30 channel DataMite II as outlined in Appendix 2. Three
critical steps include:
Figure 4.1 30 Channel DataMite II
1) Mount the DataMite box on a solid part of the car which is
not prone to vibration. Floorboards and body sheet metal are
typically not a good choice. The frame or roll cage seem to
work well. Use the rubber mounting pads to dampen out higher
frequency vibration. Since we are using the 2 built in
accelerometers, it is important to mount the box in the correct
orientation so the accelerometers measure correctly. We have
chosen to mount it on a special platform attached to the roll
cage on the passenger side of the car. The box is mounted flat
with the printed top facing up as pictured in Figure 4.1 with the
connectors pointing toward the front of the car.
2) Power to the DataMite comes from the car’s battery through a toggle switch mounted on the dash for the driver. The
ground for the DataMite goes back to the battery’s negative post. The push button control panel is also mounted on the dash
with the Velcro provided.
3) Determine what sensors will be used and how to route the wiring. DO NOT route sensor wires close to engine ignition
components. Note that most position or travel sensors can be destroyed if they are forced beyond their measurement
range. Be sure to check that the motion of the sensor is limited by the vehicle and not the sensor. For example, if your
shock has 8 inches of travel, use a 9” shock travel sensor and be sure that the sensor’s limit is not encountered before the
shock’s travel limit. The sensors used for this car include:
• Frequency Channel 1 is engine RPM wired to an MSD ignition module, Tach Out pin.
• Frequency Channel 2 is recording front wheel RPM with 4 magnets epoxied to the inside edge of the front wheel.
• Frequency Channel 3 is recording rear wheel RPM with 4 magnets epoxied to the inside edge of the rear wheel.
• Analog Channel 1 is recording steering position with a 5” linear position sensor.
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•
•
•
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Analog Channel 2 is recording throttle position with a 2.8” string potentiometer.
Analog Channel 3 is recording brake pressure with Performance Trends’ standard 500 PSI pressure sensor.
Analog Channels 5-8 are recording shock (suspension) motion with 5” linear position sensors.
Analog Channel 17 is recording F/B (long.) Accel. This is the Front to Back acceleration, or longitudinal acceleration of
the vehicle from accelerating and braking. This is from the internal accelerometers mounted in the DataMite box and by
mounting the DataMite box as we described in Step 1.
Analog Channel 18 is recording L/R (lat.) Accel. This is the Left to Right acceleration, or lateral acceleration of the
vehicle from turning left and right. This is from the internal accelerometers mounted in the DataMite box and by
mounting the DataMite box as we described in Step 1.
Timer Channel 1 is hooked up to an infra-red lap timer supplied by Performance Trends. Note that the Lap Timer gets its
12 VDC power from the DataMite, but this requires that a certain jumper from inside the DataMite be set correctly.
•
•
Each sensor comes with a printed instruction sheet. If you need a copy of these instructions, you can click on Help, then
Display Hardware/Sensor Installation Tips for a replacement sheet. See Figure 4.3.
Figure 4.2 Some Sensors used for This Circle Track Car
RPM sensor mounted in fabricated bracket,
with magnet epoxied to wheel and
approximately .100” clearance.
Linear travel or position
sensor used for shock
and steering movement.
String Potentiometer for
throttle position.
Lap timer system, consisting
of transmitter (to be mounted
by edge of track, typically on
a camera tripod), receiver and
dashboard lap timer display.
The display is not need for the
DataMite system to record
accurate lap times.
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Figure 4.3 Getting Sensor Information from Inside the Program
Click here for several pages describing how
each type of sensor can be installed and
calibrated in the DataMite Software.
DataMite Software Setup
Once you have the sensors installed, you will need to tell the DataMite program which channels are being used and what type
of sensor and calibration is on each channel. To do this, start the program by clicking on Start, then Programs, then Perf
Trends, then Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer V3.2. Or you can click on the Road Race & Circle Track DataMite
Figure 4.4 Main Screen (Pro version)
Late Model Example is
the current circle track
run.
Click on Vehicle to set
up Vehicle Specs to
match your vehicle
measurements and
settings.
Click on DataMite to
set up the DataMite
Specs to match your
sensors for particular
channels.
These current results
are from the last run you
were working with. This
is identified by the name
in square brackets [ ] at
the top of the screen, in
this case [Late Model
Example].
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Icon on your desktop.
Each time you start the Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer, the program will put you back to precisely where you
were when you last quit the program, displaying the same Current Test as when you shut down. When you first get the
program, this will be for some test Performance Trends was working with at the factory. You should obtain a Main Screen, as
shown in Figure 4.4, where Late Model Example is the Current Test.
Click on DataMite at the top of the Main Screen to open the DataMite Specs menu shown in Figure 4.3. There will already be
specs in this menu, which are the DataMite settings used when test Late Model Example was run. You will change these specs
to match your DataMite. Put a Yes in each row you are using for each channel where you have a sensor hooked up. If there is
not already a yes there, then click in the Used? column in the row you need to switch a blank to a Yes.
For DataName, you can change it to something you think is more descriptive, or simply leave them at their default names of
Eng RPM, Chnl 2. etc. The Sensor and Calibration descriptions are very important. Review what is outlined in Figure 4.5
and 4.6, Appendix 5 and in Section 2.5.
Other critical settings in the DataMite Specs are the “DataMite II Rate, samples/second” and the “DataMite II Recording
Segments”.
The Rate determines how many times a second each sensor is sampled and saved. The higher the sampling rate, the more
detail you can see in the results. For example, to see shock travel over some small bump in the track you may need to
record at 100 samples per second, or at .01 second intervals. To see the suspension move from vehicle dive and roll, 10 to
25 samples per second are probably fast enough. Because we are looking for detail in this test session, we have chosen 100
samples per second.
The Recording Segments is how many of different sections is the DataMite II’s memory broken into. The more segments,
the smaller the memory segment sizes and the shorter the recording time.
The higher the sampling Rate, the higher the Recording Segments, the more channels being Used, the less recording time you
have. An estimate of the amount of recording time is shown below “DataMite II Recording Segments”. In Figure 4.6 you see
it being only 1 min 40 seconds, or 100 seconds. But since this is for testing only, not a complete 50 lap feature race, this is
sufficient time.
When you are finished with the DataMite specs, click on File, then Save as Master DataMite Specs to save these changes.
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Figure 4.5 DataMite Specs Menu
Chapter 4 Examples
When finished changing these specs, click on File, then
Save as Master DataMite Specs to save these
Click here to switch between
Yes and blank. Be sure
there is a Yes for all
channels you are using.
Set # Segments here to
give enough Recording
Time for your needs.
Click here to set the #
cylinders and engine type
for accurate Engine RPM
data. See menu below.
Click here to set the #
magnets and sensor
source for the other
sensors. See menu
below.
Calibrating Analog channels is shown in Figure
4.6 on the next page
Click on Current Readings to show
what each channel is recording
right now. See Figure 4.7.
Specs Menu for Other RPMs
Engine RPM Specs Menu
For V-8, 8 cylinder, 4 stroke.
Pick Front Wheel for channel
2 and Driveshaft RPM for
channel 3. You would open
this menu twice, once for
each channel you want to
change.
For Channel 4, pick Analog
Converter, and then Std
Thermocouple as the Type.
Specify 2 magnet since that
is what you installed on the
Front Wheel and the
Driveshaft. Be sure to get
these magnets as evenly
spaced as possible.
Click on Keep Specs to keep
and return to DataMite screen.
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Figure 4.6 DataMite Sensor and Calibration Screens for Selected Analog Channels
For the 2 accelerometers built in the DataMite II, all that is required is for you to
specify which sensor is measuring Front/Back acceleration and give it a Data Name.
This accelerometer calibration has been “fine tuned” by letting the vehicle set at ride
height and then clicking on the Read button to obtain a Correction of .04.
The shock sensors were calibrated very much like the Steering sensor, except these sensors came
with a know calibration sheet showing 0-5 volts being 0-10 inches of travel. Since shock travel is
measured directly in inches, there was no need to change this calibration. All that was done was that
once the sensor was installed and the vehicle was at ride height, the Correction “Read” button was
pressed and the user entered 0 as being the desired reading at that time. The program then filled in
the -5.5 Correction needed to make this channel read 0 at that particular shock sensor setting.
Steering sensor calibrated for -1 being for ¼ turn to the left. Then +1 is ¼ turn to the right This
choice for engineering units can be anything that makes sense to the one who must analyze the
data. This sensor was mounted between the frame and a location on the center link, joining tie rods
on both sides. This calibration was done by first selecting “Signal Based on” as “0-5 Volts”. Then
the steering wheel was placed straight ahead, 0 was entered for the engineering units, then the
st
“Read” button for the “1 Value, volts” was clicked on a voltage of 2.5 volts was read. Then the
nd
steering wheel was turned ¼ turn to the left, -1 was entered for “2 value, engineering units”, and
nd
the “2 Value, volts” was clicked on which read 3.5 volts. You will then see the “Calib” displayed at
the top. Click on Keep Specs to keep this calibration for “Steer”. Note that the Data Name of Steer
can be most anything you want and this channel will appear on graphs and reports as “Steer” A
correction has never been entered, but could be by simply placing the steering wheel straight ahead,
clicking on the “Read” button, then telling the program that the Signal should read 0 at that time.
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Figure 4.7 Lap Timer Sensor & Calibration
Chapter 4 Examples
Click on Timer 1’s
Sensor and
Calibration to
display this
screen. Here you
simply select “Lap
Timer” as the
source and give it
most any name
you want. Then
click on the “Keep
Calib.” button.
Click and drag slide button
down to bottom to display the
last 30 channels available in
the DataMite II.
Figure 4.8 Current Readings Screen to Read Channels
You can select which channels you want
displayed on these gauges by clicking
on Options and then Gauge and Bar
Graph settings.
Numerical data for all channels can be
displayed in this lower section in 2
groups of 16 channels each. You
choose which channels by clicking on
the “RPMs & Accelerometers” or “Std
Analog Channels” option buttons. Here
we have chosen to display the Std
Analog Channels, of which we are only
using 7 or the first 8 at this time.
Note that all 7 channels read very close
to 0 with the vehicle at ride height. You
can move each sensor individually to
see if that channel responds like it
should. This confirms that you have
the calibration in the program assigned
to the correct sensor.
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Now that you have saved these settings as the Master DataMite specs, you can check these readings by clicking on the Current
Readings menu option. This will bring up a screen like that shown in Figure 4.7. From here you can start the engine, jack the
car up and spin the tires or driveshaft, move the throttle, press the brake pedal, move each shock sensor by pushing on that
corner of the car, etc. Then you can verify that each sensor is connected to the appropriate channel and you have the correct
“Sensor and Calibration” information in the program. If they are not reading correctly, be sure you have the correct sensor
plugged into the correct spot in the harness. Disconnect sensors one at a time to ensure you get a response on the Current
Readings screen for the appropriate channel.
Note: If you run the engine, it is recommended you use screen only if you have protected your
computer’s serial port with Performance Trends’ optical isolation system. Although unlikely, it is
possible for “stray” high voltage ignitions signals to pass back through the DataMite and destroy your
computer’s serial port.
Click on Close (back) to close the Current Readings screen and return to the DataMite screen. Then click on Back to close the
DataMite Specs menu. You will probably be asked if you want to keep these changes for the current test Late Model Example.
Since they were not the DataMite specs for that test, answer No. Now when you start a New Test and download data from the
DataMite, these Master DataMite specs you created and saved will be the ones used for determining what channel is recording
what.
Recording a Test Session or Race
You have now done the preliminary work which checks that the DataMite seems to be working well, and have setup the
software’s Master DataMite specs to correctly match your DataMite. These initial settings and checks are only done for your
first installation. Now you can actually start recording vehicle data. The first tests you run will be basically for practice. Do
not expect them to be exactly correct because you will forget to do something, etc.
The DataMite program is actually smart enough to find the individual laps in your recorded data without a lap timer beacon.
This method is fairly accurate but the lap-to-lap break point will be at some time of the program’s choosing and not yours.
Also, if one of the laps is very different that the rest, like you spun out, the lap times and lap break points will not be accurate.
We will be using an infrared beacon as shown in Figure 4.2. With the beacon, you will be able to determine exactly where the
lap times will be started from. This is done by placing the Infrared Transmitter at the desired “Lap Start” point on the track.
Many racers use a camera tripod for mounting the transmitter. It actually has female threads in the bottom to do this.
Note that if other racers are using an infrared beacon, you may trip off their beacon as well. The Performance Trends system
has a 10 second hold off time before it triggers off another beacon. So if there are 2 beacons close together on the track that
both happen to trip the lap timer, the system will trigger off the first one encountered, your beacon or some other racers. This
is generally not a problem if you understand what is happening. (A white jumper wire can be cut in the Lap Time Converter
“black box” to increase this hold off time to 30 seconds. This means the total lap time must be much longer than 30 seconds
and this is typically used only for road racing.)
You do not have to time the pushing of the Record button with the actual start and end of a particular lap or the race. The
program works fine if it “sees” some data before and after the actual race session. Therefore start recording during pre-race or
pre-test warm up laps and stop recording on the way back to the pits. See Figure 4.9
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Circle Track/Road Race Recording Procedure (outlined in Figure 4.9)
1.
In the pits, power up the DataMite II with the main power toggle switch. The LED on the control panel will start to blink
at 1 second intervals indicating the DataMite II is in standby mode, ready for recording.
2.
Start the engine and drive on to the track. Do your warm up laps.
3.
Some time before the Green Flag or before your testing session, start the DataMite II recording data by pressing the Record
button. This will light steady the Record LED by the yellow button.
4. The race or test session starts and you do not need to think about the DataMite data logger. You may want to watch lap
times on the Lap Timer dash display.
5.
After you are finished racing or testing, and slowed to a safe speed, press the Red button to turn Off the Record LED. This
stops the DataMite from recording any more data. Recording may stop automatically if you have selected the number of
recording segments to give too little time for recording the entire race. For example, in this test session, we selected 8
segments which only allowed for 100 seconds of recording time.
6.
Drive back to the pits and download the data recorded by the DataMite II to the DataMite program in your computer.
Figure 4.9 Basic Procedure for Recording a Race or Test Run
1) Power up
DataMite
from main
power switch.
Light by Red
Button
flashes at 1
second
interval
indicating
DataMite is
ready to
record.
2)
Start
Engine,
drive
out
onto
track.
3) Press Yellow Button
to start recording data at
some point on the track.
Exact point is not critical
4) Run race or test session,
consisting of several laps.
5) Press Red
Button to stop
DataMite
recording. This
exact point in
time is also not
critical
Engine
RPM
Typical circle track lap, 2
accels and 2 decels..
6) Drive to Pits to download
data to DataMite program in
computer.
Figure 4.10 The New Test Screen with Tip Message
Downloading Data
Once you have recorded a test
with the DataMite, you must
download it to your computer.
Click on File (upper left corner of
the Main Screen), then New (get
data from DataMite) to bring up
the New Test screen, which will
likely show a Tip message. See
Figure 4.10. As the Tip in Figure
4.10 says, it is usually easiest to
start with a previous file that is as
close as possible to the race or test
session run you just ran, usually
the previous run. This prevents
us from having to make major
6 Critical
Specs at
Top.
Click on
File, then
New (get
data from
DataMite)
to bring
up the
New Test
Screen.
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changes to test information like the Vehicle Specs, Test Conds, Log Book entries, etc. However, assuming you have not tested
a vehicle like this one before, you can start this test with whatever the Current Test is.
As shown in Figure 4.10. There are 6 critical specs at the top which must be filled out or picked.
If this is the first New Test you have run (you just got the program) and you had not already entered the Master DataMite specs,
there would be no summary of the Master DataMite specs. You would have to fill out the DataMite Specs before the program
would let you start a New Test.
Filling Out Other Specs (other than DataMite Specs) to Start a New Test
If you want to modify some specs from the previous run, click on the 'See Specs' buttons for each category of specs. Click on
Help at these menus for more info on how to enter these specs.
Vehicle Specs are quite critical for some calculated results, like tire slip, clutch or converter slip, etc. To check these settings,
click on “See Specs” button by Vehicle to obtain the screen shown in Figure 4.11. Again, these were the Vehicle specs for the
Late Model Example test. You should enter the specs for your vehicle, the Monte Carlo. If you didn’t know an input, say front
tire diameter, you can click on the Clc button by it to bring up a calculation menu. There you can enter the tire specs, say for a
P225-75-15 or something similar, to come up with the correct diameter. You can also pick one of the preloaded example
transmissions, or click on File, then Open Example Vehicle to see what the specs for other typical vehicles look like.
Figure 4.11 Vehicle Specs
When finished changing these specs, click of File, then Save
As to save these changes to a name of your choosing. These
are saved in a separate Vehicle Library.
If you don’t know a spec,
click on the Clc button to
bring up a Calculation
Menu to calculate an input
from other types of inputs.
You can pick from a list
of standard transmission
ratios, or pick one of the
“User Defined”
transmissions and enter
your own custom ratios.
It is very important to let
the program know if the
transmission has a
clutch or torque
converter.
Enter most any descriptive comments for this vehicle here.
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Tire Radius and Gear
Ratios are very important
to calculate distance
traveled, MPH, tire or
clutch slip, etc.
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With all the Vehicle specs set to match your vehicle, click on File, then Save As to save these changes to some vehicle name of
your choosing, something like “Monte Carlo”. Then click on Back to close the Vehicle Specs menu and return to the New Test
screen. Since you saved these specs, you will not have to enter them again. If they are not already loaded for some new run,
you can just go into the Vehicle Specs screen, click on File, then Open Vehicle and pick the “Monte Carlo” vehicle you have
just saved.
Figure 4.12 Filling in Track Conds Menu
Select this Type for Circle
Track Laps
This section lets you save
critical notes summarizing
your race results. Track
Length, Lap Time and MPH
are inter-related. If you
change one, one of the
others will be calculated
and/or changed to keep
these results consistent.
Choose the appropriate “Method”
based on your weather station
instrument. See Section 2.3.
Density Altitudes can not be input
directly, but are calculated from the other
weather inputs above.
Track Conditions are also important records of the run, and contain things like length of track, your fastest lap time (either
recorded by a stop watch or from the Lap Summary report option in the DataMite software), your finishing position, etc. Click
on the Track Conds button in the New Test screen so you can enter your finishing position of “2”. After you get your new
results, the program will automatically update the Fastest Lap Time (currently shown as 20.1 seconds in Figure 4.12) with the
one the program finds in its initial “Find Beg/End of Laps” analysis. See Figure 4.15.
Log Book Specs (Pro version only) can be filled out now or after you download data from the DataMite. However, it will save
you considerable time and produce more reliable records to check the appropriate box on the New Test Screen. The “keep most
non-changing inputs” is usually the best choice, as this keeps things like Engine specs and part descriptions, clutch or
converter specs, suspension specs, but not things like Winning Driver, Winning Car , shock travel, etc. See Section 2.4 for
more details.
There are six critical specs listed separately at the top. Most of these must be filled out before you can start the new test. The
program usually fills them in with default values based on the current test.
1.
File Name for New Test is the file name the program will create for saving the Test Data for the new test you are starting.
The program fills in a default name of the current test name, but incrementing the last digit in the name by 1. You can
change this name to most anything you like. The program will warn you if the name entered is not valid and show you
what is wrong. For this example, type in the name: Monte Carlo 1 for this first test of the Monte Carlo. When you click
on Start New Test, the program will add the .CFG extension to produce Monte Carlo 01.CFG.
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2.
Run # (Pro version only)
Figure 4.13 New Test Screen for Starting This New Test
is based on the last test you
Click Here to Start the New Test
downloaded from the
DataMite, not the Run
number of the current test
displayed at the main
screen. The DataMite
program’s Run Log ,
shown down the left side of
the main screen, lists tests
in the order they were
downloaded from the
Note Vehicle File Name
DataMite. Each new test
you just created.
you download is
incremented up by one. If
you manually change the
Run # at this New Test
screen, or in the Log Book
Screen, that will be the Run
# that the next test
downloaded will have its
number based on. For
example, say the last run
downloaded from the
DataMite box was Run #
245, and you called this test
Monte Carlo 0.cfg. The
Run # for a new test would
be 246. If you change the Run # for Monte Carlo 0 to Run #1, like at the start of a particular event, to Run #1 in the Log
Book, then the next Run # would be 2.
3.
Track and Event (Pro version only) is a description of the track or event. You can type in most any name you want, or
click on the down arrow button at the right of the name to pick from a list of previous Track and Event descriptions you
have already entered. If possible, it is best to use a name from the list of your previous entries. Then it is easier to find
tests because the names are more consistent between different test files.
4.
Run Description (Pro version only) is much like Track and Event above. It is a description of the run, like Feature Race,
test and tune, etc. You can type in most any name you want, or click on the down arrow button at the right of the name to
pick from a list of previous Track and Event descriptions you have already entered. If possible, it is best to use a name
from the list of your previous entries. Then it is easier to find tests because the names are more consistent between
different test files.
5.
Folder Name for New Test is the folder in the DTMDATA folder where the test will be saved. Folders are a way to group
similar tests together. You could start a new folder for each event, or a folder for each car (if you use the DataMite on
more than 1 car), or a folder for each type of event or track (like “Test and Tune”, “Dover” and “Rockingham”. You can
come up with most any way you want to organize your tests. The program may not be using the name 'folder' for spec, but
whatever word you have assigned in the Preferences menu. The folder name 'Examples' is reserved for Performance
Trends example tests supplied with the program, and can not be used for your tests. By clicking on Add New, you could
enter a new folder name like Year 2002. This folder will be used for all tests you download for the 2002 season.
6.
As you should do for most all circle track runs, you choose the Data Type of Circle Track Runs. (Road Racers would
select Road Race Runs. This has more to do with the shape of the track than the type of car. Road Race courses are
assumed to be irregular with possible right turns, where Circle Tracks are assumed to be mostly oval.) Meas Tq/HP from
Accel is a special type of test where you do a full power acceleration in 1 trans gear to obtain an engine power curve. See
Example 4.3. Custom is used for anything else, like troubleshooting in the shop with the car up on jacks.
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The New Test screen should now
look like Figure 4.13. When you
are ready to start downloading
data from the DataMite, click on
'Start New Test' at the top of the
screen. If some critical specs
have not been entered, the
program will warn you and ask
you for it at that time. The
program will fill in the Test Time
and Date based on the computer's
current time and date. This can
be changed later by clicking on
the Test Time/Date at the Main
Screen.
Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 4 Examples
Figure 4.14 Main Screen While Downloading DataMite Data
The memory
segment for the last
data recorded is
shown here. You
can also select to
download any of the
other segments
which have been
recorded.
Click here to stop
the downloading
process and abort
starting a New Test.
The program will then ask which
Click here to download
of the 8 Memory Segments should
the recorded data.
be downloaded as shown in
Figure 4.14. The program always defaults to the last memory segment which was recorded, in this case Segment 2.
Figure 4.15 Messages After Download DataMite Data
Message to
acknowledge data was
read from the DataMite
Message stating that
data looks “clean”, or
free of what appears
to be “bad” data points
If “Noise Spikes” had been found, you would have
gotten a message like this, stating that the program has
found what it believes is “bad data” points. You can
elect to have the program edit them out now
(recommended for beginners), or Not edit them now so
you can try to investigate the source of the problem.
This message lets you know
how many laps the program
found in the data you just
downloaded.
This screen lets you load
in the fastest lap time
found by the program as
the ‘Fastest Lap’ time in
the Track Conditions and
Log Book.
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After the data is read from
the DataMite, the program
performs 2 important
functions:
1. It checks for “noise
spikes” and eliminates
all that it can. A noise
spike is basically a bad
data point, caused by
electrical noise or
vibration in a sensor.
See Section 2.10
Editing Out Noise
Spikes and Appendix 3,
Troubleshooting.
2. It checks to find the
beginning and end of
the Circle Track laps,
based on fact that this
system is using a Lap
Timer on Timer
Channel 1.
Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Chapter 4 Examples
Figure 4.16 Main Screen After Downloading Test Data
Click on Tabs to select
which laps to view on
this Main Screen.
This screen is just to
summarize a race or
test. Detailed
analysis is available
by clicking on Graph
and Report.
Figure 4.15 shows the
messages the program could give to let you know how the data appears. If you get several noise spikes, you should investigate
the source. Noise spikes can also cause problems when the program tries to find the beginning and end of the dyno run. Note
that editing out noise spikes, and having the program find the circle track laps can also be done at anytime in the future by
clicking on Edit at the top of the Main Screen. See Section 2.10 Editing Tests. Figure 4.15 also shows the program asking to
update the ‘Fastest Lap’ time with the one it found from its initial analysis of the lap timer data.
Analyzing Data
The Main Screen should now look like Figure 4.16, with a graph of the individual laps on the right side, and a table of engine
RPM and MPH numbers on the left side. The specs which determine the RPM increment for the data table, or how much
filtering (smoothing) should be done to the data on this Main Screen are in the Preferences menu. See Section 2.2,
Preferences.
The results on the Main Screen are not designed for detailed analysis, but just to give a summary of the run, and to show how
some critical data looks. Detailed Graph and Report analysis is discussed in the upcoming sections.
Graphing to Check Data Quality
You’ve heard the saying “a picture is worth a thousand words”, well “a graph is worth a thousand numbers”. Graphs are
generally the best and quickest way to analyze data because your eye can quickly spot trends, see data points which look “out of
line”, etc.
To make a graph, click on Graph at the top of the Main Screen. Set the Type to Pick Individual Channels, and then select the
data types to include in the graph from the list at the top of this Graph Specs menu. (In the Pro version you could have also
selected one of the Histogram Types.) A good choice for a first look at a test run is to graph some “raw” recorded data like
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Engine RPM, other RPMs like driveshaft or wheel RPMs, accelerometer data, etc. That is because other information is
calculated from these main inputs, like distance traveled, clutch/converter or tire slip, etc.
Once you have selected what data to graph, set the remaining specs below the list of data types. Set Time/RPM/Distance to
Time and set What to Graph to All Data so we can check the data quality of all the data recorded. Set Filtering to None so that
you see the data in its most detailed, and un-smooth state. The graph specs should look like those in Figure 4.17. Click on the
Make Graph button to produce the graph shown in Figure 4.18. The graph shows no major “noise” spikes, but all channels
show a little variation up and down. This is actually the sign of very good data, as it indicates the response of the sensors is
quite fast, but the number they record is repeating within a couple percent. You can click on Graph Type at the top of the
Graph Screen and set Filtering to Light. This smoothes out the data to eliminate some of the variation, but you know you still
can have confidence in the data because it looked so good with Filtering set to None.
Figure 4.18 shows the basic accel/decel nature of circle track laps. Each accel and each decel are quite similar, and a pair of 2
accels and decels is a circle track lap. You will also notice that we artificially drew in some “noise spikes” just to show what
you would be looking for if there were problems in the data.
Figure 4.17 Graph Menu Specs for
Graph in Figure 4.18
Figure 4.18 RPM Graph of All Data
Click on Graph Type to get
Fig 4.17’s screen
These 3 “noise spikes” have
been added artificially to show
what they look like in data.
You can also graph the raw shock travel, accelerometer, and steering data to check the data quality as done with the RPM data.
Figure 4.19 shows all 4 shock travel sensors. This data is much more confusing if several types of data are graphed together.
Shock travel data is, by its nature, very jumpy. Every bump in the track is recorded and that may not be of interest to you.
Figure 4.19 shows how you can more accurately evaluate the data quality. First, just graph 1 channel by only selecting LF
Shock as the data to graph in Figure 4.17. Then just graph 1 channel for just 1 lap. To graph just 1 lap, select “1st Lap”
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instead of “All Data” for “What to Graph” in Figure 4.17. Then, to eliminate some of the “jumpiness” in the data, set
“Filtering (smoothing)” to “Heavy” in Figure 4.17 to see more general trends. However, the first graph in Figure 4.19 also
points out that even with all the shock data graphed with no filtering, the data all stayed within a fairly small range of motion,
from -2.4 inches (compression) to 1.6 inches (rise). If there had been significant “noise” or bad data points in the data, the
range of data graphed would have probably been much larger.
Figure 4.19 Shock Data Graphs
Note that all shock data is graphed within a scale of -2.4 to 1.6
inches, which gives confidence there are no significant noise spikes.
These graphs are auto-scaled meaning the program will expand the
scale to fit all data on to the graph screen.
All 4 Shocks, All Data
LF Shock, Lap 1 Only
LF Shock Only, All Data
LF Shock, Lap 1 Only, Filtering = Heavy
Figure 4.20 shows the remaining channels of Steer, Brake, Throttle and the 2 accelerometers graphed for All Data. Here you
can again see the cyclic nature of the data, braking for each accel, opening the throttle for each accel. The Steer sensor does
show 2 times which look unusual, where the steering was actually turned to the right. As the zoomed in portion of the graph
shows, these dips are real because they occur over a large section of time (over 0.5 seconds) and there are several data points
showing this trends, of relatively smoothly turning to the right, then turning back to the left.
The accelerometers are quite jumpy, like the shock sensors. But they are recording every bump and vibration the car is exposed
to. Even with no filtering, the cyclic trends can be easily observed, indicating high data quality. Again, with a little filtering
the trends are more easily seen.
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Figure 4.20 Graphing Steer, F Brake, Throttle and Accelerometer Data
Zooming in on one of these “dips”
shows it is occurring for over half
a second. At 100 samples per
second, that is about 50 data
points showing this definite trend.
These dips are “real”.
Steer, Throttle, F
Brake, All Data,
Filtering = None
In contrast, this artificially generated
noise “dip” has sharp corners,
returns quickly to near its original
value and is quite short in time.
Since we calibrated the steering sensor
to show positive numbers when turned
left, these 2 occasions are times when
the steering wheel was actually turned
right. Since these are not single data
points, but several points show this
smooth trend, this is “real” data.
F/B Accel Gs and L/R Accel Gs,
All Data, Filtering = None
F/B Accel Gs and L/R Accel Gs,
All Data, Filtering = Medium
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Figure 4.21 Overlaying Graphs from Several Laps
Click in the Graph Laps column to bring up
the screen to the left, where you can enter
the individual laps to graph for this run.
Click here to make graph
shown below of the individual
laps overlaying each other.
Click here or here to
bring up History Log
shown above.
Note that except for these 2 dips from Lap 5,
that the trends (even for the “jumpy” shock
data) is quite similar from run to run. This is
indicating repeatability in the car and driver and
good data quality.
One of the first things you must learn with data acquisition is that you can not blindly believe the data as presented. The data
can be misleading because you’ve entered the wrong calibration data, attached the sensor to the wrong channel, labeled the
channel wrong in the software, etc. It can be in error due to electrical interference from the ignition system (called “noise” in
most of this manual, have intermittent connections in the wiring, have a sensor that is bad or going bad, have poor sensor
mounting, etc.
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When you see something that looks strange, do not automatically assume that you must fix the car or suspension. First take the
time to confirm that what you see is real. Many of the techniques shown in Figures 4.17 to 4.21 let you confirm that data is
good. These points to look for include:
• The laps are very evident by seeing the periodic up-and-down nature of all data.
• When you graph All the Data with No Filtering (smoothing) and the graph is Auto-Scaled (so all data points are
graphed on the screen) the range of data is what you would expect, like when the Shock Travel Data of Figure 4.19 all
fell within a normal range of -2.4 to 1.6 inches.
• If you see a dip or spike in the data and zoom in on that data, the dip or spike is shown to be of a significant number of
data points. The trend in the dip or spike should also be relatively smooth and not show a sharp corner on the graph.
Figure 4.20.
• If you change the filtering from None to, say, Medium you should not see a large change in the maximum or
minimum values graphed. You should not see a large change in the scales picked by the program in the graph is
Auto-Scaled.
• If you overlay graphs of the individual laps for a particular race, the trends should appear the same from lap to lap. If
most laps are the same and only 1 or 2 are different, that could indicate a problem to be investigated (car or driver) or
a problem with the sensor. For example, in Figure 4.21, when the shock travel data looks different in lap 5, you could
graph the shock data for the other 4 shocks. If it also looks different at those points in time for lap 5, it is probably
indicating the vehicle or driver really did something different at that point in time, and it is not a problem with the
sensors.
All the raw data graphed here, except the artificially inserted
“noise” to illustrate certain points, looks quite good. Therefore, you
can have good confidence in the calculated results like tire slip,
distance traveled, friction circle, track map, etc. Most of these
calculated outputs appear farther down the list of Data Types in the
Graph Menu. Click on Graph Type at the top of the Graph Screen,
and select to graph Tire Slip %, Corrected Flywheel HP and RF
Shock Velocity. Change the Filtering to Heavy, as HP and Shock
Velocity can be rather “jumpy” and What to Graph to Just Lap #1.
See Figure 4.22. With these changes, click on Make Graph button
and you will obtain a graph shown in Figure 4.23. Figure 4.23 also
shows how you can zoom in on a particular area, or bring up the
vertical cursor line, to pin-point values on the graph.
Figure 4.22 Graph Data to Create
Graph in Figure 4.23
For more details on other graph options, check Example 4.2,
Analyzing Data.
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Figure 4.23 Graphing Calculated Outputs
Chapter 4 Examples
One way to zoom in on an
area of the graph is to click on
the area in the upper left
corner and drag (holding the
mouse button down) to the
lower right corner. A box is
drawn around the area which
will fill the graph once you
release the mouse button.
The graph below shows the
result of this action.
Another way to zoom in (or
out) is to click on the 8 arrow
keys here or click on Set
Scales button.
You can display the cursor
line by clicking on one of the
graph lines.
Cursor
The value of all the graph
lines at the cursor is
displayed here.
You can move the line left or
right by clicking on the cursor
arrow buttons here
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Conclusions:
•
The installation of the DataMite hardware is critical and is covered in Appendix 2.
•
Program settings, especially the DataMite settings, are critical for accurate data. These DataMite specs are saved in
“Master” DataMite file so each new test starts with the current settings for these critical specs.
•
Recording a race or test session is outlined as 6 basic steps.
•
Once a test is performed, the data is downloaded to your computer from the DataMite by clicking on File, then New (get
data from DataMite) commands at the Main Screen.
•
You should check the raw recorded data for noise spikes and general data quality.
•
Once you are confident the raw data is good, you can better trust other calculated results are good also.
•
Results can be quickly and thoroughly analyzed with graphs, and the many graph features.
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Example 4.2 Analyzing Data
Sometimes you may want to just see how the car is running, if the engine RPM looks like it should, what the tire slip is
throughout the run, how much a shock is compressing in a turn, etc. This was outlined in Example 4.1.
Other times you want to make more detailed analysis of a particular run, and compare a particular lap to other laps, or test
sessions to other test sessions. This could be to check the effects of a modification, to see if the car has developed a problem, or
see why some laps are faster than others. This process will be shown in this example. We will look at the Monte Carlo 01 laps
from Example 4.1 and do some comparisons and detailed analysis .
First you will want to make Monte Carlo 01 (the baseline run you want to compare to the other runs) the current test. If you
had just downloaded this run, it would be the current test. If you had run this test several days or months ago, you may have to
Open it from the Test Library to make it the current test. Click on File, then Open (from all saved tests) to open the Monte
Carlo 01 test with the original converter. See Figure 4.24. (In the Pro version you have 2 other methods of Opening tests,
click on File, then Open (from History Log), or find the appropriate Run # from the Run Log down the left side of the Main
Screen and click on it.)
Figure 4.24 Opening a Past Test
Click on File, then Open (from all saved tests) to bring up the Open Test File screen shown here.
Name of Current Test you are working with.
Click on test
file you want to
open.
Preview shows
details of the
run you are
currently
highlighting
Click on Open
to open this
test file.
Click on the
folder here
which
contains the
test run to be
opened
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Summary Reports
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Figure 4.25 Making Reports
What most racers want to know is what
makes a fast lap. Is there something they
are doing different on the fast laps than the
slow laps. Then they can learn from the
fast laps and make all laps fast. The
DataMite software has several useful
reports to do just that. Click on Report at
top of the Main Screen, to obtain the
screen of Figure 4.25. Choose the Lap
Summary, Avg, Max, Min as the type of
report and choose Throttle, F Brake, Tire
Slip and L/R Accel as the Data Types.
See the resulting report in Figure 4.26.
You see lap times in the 2nd column from
the left, with 19.87 being the fastest and
20.09 being the slowest. What you would
want to look for is what Data Type seems
to be related to Lap Time. This can be
somewhat time consuming and confusing,
but the DataMite program has some
convenient features to do this
automatically, called Correlation.
Figure 4.26
Chapter 4 Examples
Click on Report for this screen
Choose a Lap
Summary
Type. This
disables most
Report Specs.
Choose the Data
Types to include
in the Report from
this list.
Click here to make the report
Lap Summary Report Created from Screen in Figure 4.25
Click on Correlation, then
Show Correlation in Report for
report shown in Figure 4.27.
Lap Times shown here
Average, Maximum and Minimum values
for each lap are shown in 3 separate
columns for each Data Type selected.
Figure 4.27 shows a Correlation Report for the Lap Summary report shown in Figure 4.26. All that it points out is a “VERY
HIGH” correlation between Average Throttle opening and “Some” correlation between average slip.
To get a graph of, say, Average Throttle, click on that column to highlight it and then click on Correlation, Show Correlation
in Graph. You will get the graph shown in Figure 4.27. It does show a strong relationship between Average Throttle opening
and lap times. As the Average Throttle opening increases, the lap times come down. Now this may be information you already
know, that if you can keep on the throttle more, your lap times will increase. It does prove the point that the Correlation
feature can quickly find relationships in the Lap Time data.
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Figure 4.27 Correlation Report and Correlation Graph
Figure 4.28 Displaying the Track Map and Lap Segments
Click on File, then Make Track Map at top of Main Screen.
Segments show with circles. Circle with
horizontal line is position of Lap Timer beacon.
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Another type of Summary Report is the Lap Segment Analysis. The program will automatically break up your laps into
sections called Segments based on accelerations and decelerations. You can alter (edit) these choices yourself manually as
described in Section 3.10 Track Map and Friction Circle. We manually altered the segments to produce the segments shown in
Figure 4.28 into accels out of turns, straights and decels into turns.
Figure 4.29 Segment Time Analysis Report
Lap 3 is fastest for 4
of the 6 segments.
“Best” Lap Time is 19.753 by using fastest segment from each lap.
Now we can make a Report where the Type is Segment Times Analysis, where you picked Lap Summary, Avg, Max, Min in
Figure 4.25. You will notice that all report specs have become disabled
Figure 4.30 Graph Specs Menu
because they are not needed to build this very standard type of report. This
report is shown in Figure 4.29 above. It shows a “Best” lap time being 19.753
seconds. This time is obtained by using the best segment time from each of the
5 laps in the test run. You will notice in the “Dif.” column, that most of the
fastest segments come from Lap #3, with only Segment 6 (corner exit) from
Lap 3 being .102 seconds off the best.
Since Lap #3 seems so good, we should take a look at it and compare it to, say,
Lap 1, which was fairly slow overall, but had the fastest Segment 6 time. A
good way to investigate the difference between these 2 laps would be with
graphs shown in the next section. Click on Back at the upper left corner of the
Report screen to return to the Main Screen.
Comparison Graphs
Graphs are often the most insightful way to compare two or more different laps
or runs. You can see at a glance how the laps compare, where one setup is
stronger (higher acceleration rates, reaching certain distances quicker). First,
click on Graph at top of the Main Screen and set the Graph Specs screen as
shown in Figure 4.30. Since we’re not sure what type of data will point out the
critical difference between these 2 laps, we pick some types which the driver
can control. Engine RPM is chosen as it is always an important factor. Then
Steer, Throttle and Brake are chosen as these are the primary driver controls.
Then we look at the accelerometers to see how hard the tires are working, and
Tire Slip to see if the tires are spinning. You could have chosen other
variables.
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Pick “Just lap #1” to tell the program that you will be doing individual laps and that Lap 1 is one of these laps for comparison.
Then click on Make Graph to get a graph like Figure 4.31. On this graph, click on History Log and then choose to graph Laps
1 and 3 as shown in Figure 4.31.
Figure 4.31 Just Lap #1 of 7 Data Types, then Adding Lap #3
Click on History Log
or History Log Button
to bring up History
Log shown at bottom
of screen.
Click in the Graph
Laps column to enter
which laps you want
to graph.
Enter “1,3” and click on
OK to request graphing
laps 1 and 3.
Figure 4.32 Overlay Graph of Laps 1 and 3
Tire Slip
is higher
on Lap 3
Legend
shows color
codes for the
7 Data Types
graphed for
the 2 different
laps.
Lap 3 had Steer
actually turning
right for a small
amount of time
toward the end of
the lap.
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Although Figure 4.32 is quite, some differences can be seen. They include Tire Slip being higher with Lap 3, which is
somewhat surprising. Usually high tire slip indicates spinning and loosing traction. This tire slip is not that high, only 8% vs
5%. (You may not know this but tires are always slipping some during acceleration, up to 10% or more depending on the tires.
They slip more the harder the acceleration up to a point where they “break loose” and then Slip goes way up, over 15% and
acceleration drops off. Therefore, 8% may be indicating more aggressive use of the tires.)
Another major difference is that Lap 3 has the Steer sensor actually showing right steer for about 1 second toward the end of
the lap. This may be the reason for Lap 3 looking good for most of the lap (Tire Slip being higher but not too high which
indicates aggressive driving), but lap 3 was probably in traffic requiring a steering correction. Figure 4.33 shows graphs of Lap
1 and Lap 3 for these 2 Data Types separately for more clarity.
Figure 4.33 Graphing just Data Types of Interest, Steer and Tire Slip
More Tire Slip
% for Lap 3.
Steering
turning right
for Lap #3.
Figure 4.34 Graph Showing Track Map & Friction Circle and More
Click on View, then
Track Map & Friction
Circle to display the
screens shown at the
bottom of the Graph
Screen here.
Track Map with
Segment points.
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Figure 4.35 Graph with Track Map to Locate Steering Points
Chapter 4 Examples
Click on Graph Line
to place cursor on
that point, dip in
Steering graph.
The values at the
cursor line are
shown here and
here
Click on Run
to animate
these screens.
Note that this point
is in the last
segment and that
the steering wheel
is turned right.
Figure 4.34 shows how to get additional windows on the graph like Track Map, Friction Circle, etc to better locate certain
points on the graph. Figure 4.35 shows that if you click on the “dip” in the steering curve, that point will have a cursor line
drawn on the graph and all the data frames at the bottom will illustrate that point. You will notice in Figure 4.35 that the “dip”
is in the 6th segment (the only slow segment in Lap 3) and the steering wheel is indeed turned right.
Important: To get the Track Map, Friction Circle, etc to display results for Lap #3, you must only graph Lap #3. This is done
by choosing “Just Lap 3” in the Graph Specs screen shown in Figure 4.30.
Further Analysis
Figure 4.35 also shows you a “Run” button above the Track Map. If you click on Run, the cursor on the graph screen and
circle cursors on the Track Map and Friction Circle will advance from the current cursor location to the end of the graph. If
you want to watch an entire lap, be sure the cursor is either turned Off or all the way to the right on the graph. The “Options”
button next to “Run” has some options to slow down or speed up the animation.
An interesting screen is the Shock Movement screen, which shows the relative motion of the 4 shock sensors. Note that this is
not the actual motion of the car because there is a motion ratio between the shock sensor and the tire. However, if you have
Performance Trends’ Suspension Analyzer program, you can view the actual vehicle motion based on the shock and steering
sensors.
To send data to the Suspension Analyzer, follow these steps:
• You must have the Suspension Analyzer program installed on the same computer as the DataMite software.
• The Suspension Analyzer must be licensed to include the Data Logger options.
• You must have built a vehicle file in the Suspension Analyzer program that has the shock sensor and steering sensor
mounting points, in addition to the other suspension points.
• You must have identified specific channels in the DataMite Specs screen as being Shock Sensors, a Steer Sensor, a
Brake Sensor, etc. This is done by picking the appropriate Sensor and Calibration.
• You must have a test like the Monte Carlo 01 test.
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At the Main Screen, simply click on Send at the top of the screen and choose one of the Send options. See Figure
4.36. We will choose the more complete “w Track Map” option.
Figure 4.36 Send Data to Suspension Analyzer Options
Click on Send for these options.
The Suspension Analyzer program will start up and do either of two things:
1 Ask you to load the file for the data which has been sent.
2 Or, automatically load the suspension file that was used last time you sent data from the DataMite program.
Figure 4.37 DataMite Data in Suspension Analyzer
Animation and
analysis control
buttons.
Click here or
simply shut
down program
to return to
the DataMite
program.
Numerical
data shown
here.
Segments not
shown, but again
at this point on
the track, the
wheels are turned
to the right.
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Click and
drag slide
bar to
view all
numerical
data.
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Figure 4.38 Rear Suspension Analysis in Suspension Analyzer
Click on these View tabs for
either front/rear, side or top
views. Side view shown below.
Click on these buttons
to switch between Front
and Rear Suspensions.
As Figures 4.37 and 4.38 show, the Suspension Analyzer provides for many detailed analysis options.
Conclusions
•
Various Reports allow you to spot differences and trends between laps of the same run.
•
Graphs allow you to compare one lap to another to check the reasons for differences between laps.
•
The Track Map, Friction Circle and other screens available on the graph screen help you visualize where things are taking
place on the track.
•
Shock travel and other sensor data can be automatically sent to the Performance Trends’ Suspension Analyzer for detailed
analysis.
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Example 4.3 Measure Torque and HP
from Acceleration
Suggested Background Reading:
• Examples 4.1 and 4.2
• Appendix 3, Troubleshooting
Note: Example 4.3 uses the standard 4 channel DataMite, but the process is nearly
identical for the 30 channel DataMite II. It also describes doing this test on a street
car at a drag strip. Although this is not a circle track or road race car, the process is
the same on most any car.
Example 4.3 shows how you can do "dyno testing" right in your vehicle. By doing full throttle accelerations in 1 gear (manual
transmission), you can obtain nearly dyno quality torque and HP curves.
The car is a stock, manual transmission 4.6L 96 Mustang. You are doing "baseline" testing for comparison to modifications
you will do in the future. The sensor installation is nearly identical to that in Example 4.1 and 4.2 except there are 4 magnets
installed on each wheel. You are doing your runs at a drag strip (not public roads), both for safety and to avoid tickets. Again
we will assume you are the driver. You have installed your DataMite following the guidelines in Appendix 2.
Before testing, you should decide what 1 gear to use for the acceleration tests. The gear should not be too low as to cause tire
spin, but not be so high as to cause excessive speed. Excessive speed is unsafe and may produce less accurate data since the
aerodynamic specs of Drag Coefficient and Frontal Area must be very accurate. However, a slower acceleration (from a higher
gear) can show smoother and more detailed torque and HP curves.
The acceleration should take approximately 6 to 12 seconds. Second gear is generally a good choice. Third gear may be
needed if the final drive is very high numerically (over 4.0), or you if second gear gives "jumpy" or "noisy" curves. Since you
have a 3.08 axle and the tires do not spin when you "stab the throttle" in 2nd gear, you decide to try 2nd gear.
Similar analysis is possible with automatic transmission vehicles. However, two aspects of automatic transmissions make it
less accurate:
•
•
The RPM range the engine goes through during full throttle tests is generally smaller, especially with high stall
converters.
There are more power losses in the converter and transmission which are more difficult to estimate.
For these reasons, the data (especially torque) is not as accurate with automatic transmissions.
DataMite Installation
Example 4.1 will be fairly long, covering the entire process of getting and analyzing data. We will assume you have installed a
4 channel DataMite as outlined in Appendix 2. The sensors include:
•
•
•
•
Channel 1 is engine RPM wired to the negative side of one of the coils on this stock Ford distributerless ignition system.
Channel 2 is recording front wheel RPM with 4 magnets epoxied to the inside edge of the front wheel.
Channel 3 is recording driveshaft RPM with 4 magnets epoxied to the inside edge of the rear wheel.
Channel 4 is recording Boost Pressure for just the run with the supercharger.
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Check Out DataMite with Setup Mode
Before doing any tests, you check out the RPM signals by putting the DataMite in Setup Mode. (Set up mode is NOT available
with the larger DataMite II.) Put the DataMite into Setup Mode by powering up the DataMite. The Record LED (light
emitting diode) may flash, or stay off for several seconds, but will eventually light steady. (If the DataMite’s memory was full,
then the Clear Memory will eventually light steady and the Record LED will go off.) Then hold down the yellow Record
button on the DataMite control panel while you momentarily press (for about half a second) the red Clear Memory key. Then
release the Record button also You see the Record LED flash once, then remain off for about a second. This flash pattern
repeats. The one flash shows the DataMite is displaying the signal for channel #1, or Engine RPM, on the other LED. When
you start the engine, you see the Clear Memory LED flash to indicate tach pulses are entering the DataMite. The flash rate
increases as you "blip" the throttle and engine RPM increases. The Engine RPM signal looks good. (Note that it takes about
10 engine firings to get the LED to either light or go out. Therefore, the flash rate may be slower than you expect.)
To check out the front wheel RPM sensor, press and release the yellow Record button once, holding it down for about half a
second. Now you see the Record LED flash twice, then remain off for about a second. This new flash pattern repeats. The 2
flashes show the DataMite is displaying the signal for channel #2, or the front wheel RPM. If you jack the front wheel off the
ground, or just drive slowly forward, you should see a flash each time a magnet passes the sensor. Otherwise, rotate the front
wheel to place the magnet over the sensor and leave it there. The Clear Memory LED lights and remains on. Channel 2 or the
front wheel RPM looks OK.
Again, press and release the yellow Record button once, holding it down for about half a second. Now you see the Record LED
flash three times, then remain off for about a second. This new flash pattern repeats. The 3 flashes mean you are now
checking Channel 3. Check it also as you did Channel 2 above. You can also check channel 4, the same as the other channels,
except the 0-5 Volt Analog converter for the pressure sensor will be flashing so fast that it may be difficult to see anything
other than a light. You can disconnect the pressure sensor and see that the flash rate or LED brightness changes, indicating it
is working.
Figure 4.40 DataMite Setup Mode
P ower up DataMite and wait for Record LED to light steady. P ush and release C lear
Memory button while holding Record Button down to put into Setup Mode. Setup Mode
starts with displaying C hannel 1, engine RP M.
LED flashes either once,
twice, 3 times, etc quickly
to show which channel #
is being checked.
LED flashes as signal comes
into DataMite. W hen engine
running and on C hannel 1,
LED should flash. For RP M
sensors, LED lights as
magnet passes sensor, or
brightens or dims with
analog sensors.
170
Setup Mode starts with
displaying channel #1,
engine RP M. P ush Record
button to C hannel #2, and
again to display C hannel
#3, etc.
P ush C lear Memory
button to bring out of
Setup Mode and go back
to Recording Mode.
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DataMite Software Setup
Figure 4.41 shows how the 4 channel DataMite is set up for this particular vehicle.
Figure 4.41 DataMite Settings for This Vehicle
Although this is
an 8 cylinder, 4
stroke engine, it’s
“distributerless”
ignition give s a
tach signal of 1
pulse every
revolution, just as
a 2 cylinder 4
stroke engine
would fire.
This pressure sensor
and analog
converter was only
used for the
Supercharged run.
Recording Acceleration Data
1.
Press the Clear Memory button to bring the DataMite out of Setup Mode and go into Recording Mode. You will
notice the Record LED is On indicating you are recording data. You let the DataMite record this "non-race" data
while you stage at the drag strip.
2.
You watch the “Christmas tree”, and launch in first gear, then shift nearly immediately to 2nd gear. Remember, you
are not racing, so you can take your time. After you shift to 2nd gear, you apply the brakes to lug the engine down to
1000 RPM with the clutch fully released (foot off the clutch pedal). The vehicle will be rolling slowly. (For some
race vehicles with race cams, do not lug the engine down to 1000 RPM. Pick some relatively smooth running RPM
below the RPM range you are interested in testing.)
3.
You quickly open the throttle to full throttle, being careful not to "break the tires loose" or cause a "jerky" acceleration.
Note: Engines are prone to knock and detonate at low RPM and full throttle. If this happens, quickly close the
throttle, and try the test again with higher octane fuel or starting at a higher RPM.
4.
You close the throttle after reaching the maximum engine speed, being careful not to over-rev and damage the engine.
You roll through the finish line.
5.
You then press Record on the DataMite control panel to not record a lot of "non-test" data and drive back to the pits.
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Important! If you press the red Clear Memory button at this time instead of the Record button, you will erase the
first run from memory.
Note: The method the DataMite Analyzer uses to calculate torque and HP produces less accurate results at the very
beginning and end of the RPM range of the acceleration. For example, if you want accurate data from 3000 - 6000
RPM, the ideal acceleration test would be from say 2500 - 6500 RPM. However, for engine and driver safety, do not
over-rev the engine.
Getting DataMite Data
Back at the pits, you start the DataMite program to download the data. You select the Get New Data from DataMite option
from the Main Menu and download the file as explained in Example 4.1.
Since you will want to obtain Corrected torque and HP numbers, weather conditions are very important. Be sure to enter
accurate readings into the Track Conditions menu, either before or after downloading data. You also enter General Comments
about the test. For Track/Event, type in the name of the drag strip, or pick from the list if you have already typed in this strip’s
name. The same can be done for Run Description.
Figure 4.42 New Test Screen Filled Out for First Power Run
You give the new data file the name TQ-HP1 and save in a new folder name called “Power Runs”. Adding a new Folder is
done by clicking on the Add button by the folder name in the New Test screen. You also pick the Type of Run as “Meas Tq/HP
from Accel“ from the list of possible types. The program says 1 run has been found, which is 10 seconds long, and looks
correct.
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Making Graphs
The program then leaves you at the Main Screen, where you see Engine RPM and MPH steadily increasing in the graph. This
is exactly what the car did for this test. However, you are probably more interested in dyno type power curves of torque and HP
vs RPM. To obtain these, click on Graph at the top of the Main Screen.
Figure 4.43, Main Screen for Power Run
Graph and
tabular data
show a
smooth
acceleration
for both
Engine RPM
and MPH.
In the Graph Data screen, you select a Type of “Pick Individual Channels”, and then select the Data Types of Corr Flywheel
Torque and Corr Flywheel HP only. “Corr” means the data is corrected to standard dyno conditions for weather. “Flywheel”
means the program estimates the losses in the vehicle based on Vehicle Specs and engine size to obtain a reasonable estimate
of what the engine would produce on an engine dyno. If you had selected “Road” torque and HP, the power curves would be
lower, more typical of a chassis dyno.
For Time/RPM/Distance, set it to RPM. Note that power curves are generally the only types of data which should be graphed
versus RPM. What to Graph, set to Power Run #1. Filtering set to Medium. Note: Most power curves require some level of
filtering, either Light or Medium, to appear as typical dyno curves and to be repeatable from run to run.
Click on the Make Graph button at the lower left to produce the graph shown in Figure 4.44. You are probably impressed at
how much this looks like a dyno graph, one that could cost hundreds of dollars and many hours of time to produce on an
engine dyno or chassis dyno.
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Figure 4.44 Graph Data Menu to Create Corr Tq and HP vs RPM Graph
Table 4.1 Comparison of DataMite Results with Factory Rating
Factory Rating
From Figure 4.37, using cursor
Corr Flywheel Torque
285 ft lbs @ 3500 RPM
279.6 ft lbs @ 3450
Corr Flywheel HP
215 HP @ 4400 RPM
209.5 HP @ 4450
Some points concerning Figure 4.44 and Table 4.1 include:
• These plots are of Corrected torque and HP. That means they use the specs in the Test/Race Conditions to calculate a
correction factor which has a major effect on the results. If you accurately enter Test/Race Conditions for this run and
for your future runs, Corrected torque and HP will make better comparisons of your modifications. That is because
Corrected torque and HP should correct for any change in performance due to weather. Any change you see in
performance should then be due to a real change in the engine, not simply weather changes.
• Table 4.1 shows that not only do the levels of torque and HP match very well, but the RPMs where the peaks occur
match very well also.
• By making changes in Vehicle Weight, aerodynamics specs, etc in the Vehicle Specs menu, you can shift the torque
and HP numbers up or down. However, the RPMs where the peaks occur can not be changed by doing this.
You make two more runs, down load them, and call them TQ-HP2 and TQ-HP3. Figure 4.45 shows a graph of these multiple
runs. The graph shows the resulting plot, which shows the resulting curves all agree quite closely. When you make a
modification in the future, any one of these runs will make a good baseline to check for performance improvement.
Now, assume that you make some improvements to your 4.6L, like heads, Vortech, cams, etc. To check how these
modifications have changed performance, you run another single acceleration to measure torque and HP. Figure 4.45 shows
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the huge improvement you have gained. Since both the torque and HP peak now occur at a much higher RPM, you will have to
move your shift points to a higher RPM also.
Figure 4.45 Overlay of the 3 Baseline Runs with Modified 4.6L “Vortech” Run
Torque and HP
curves from
doing accels
after adding a
Vortech
supercharger
and other
mods, showing
huge increase.
3 Stock runs
show good
repeatability
and power
levels very
similar to the
factory ratings.
Conclusions:
•
The DataMite offers features for measuring engine torque and HP similar to a dynamometer without removing the
engine from the vehicle. This feature is available for both automatic and manual transmission vehicles, but is more
accurate with manual transmission vehicles.
•
Done correctly, the results are both accurate and repeatable.
•
The program can correct for weather conditions if these conditions are accurately entered into the program's Track
Conditions menu.
•
The graph features of the Pro version allow up to 4 (and more) different runs to be graphed together for comparison.
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Appendix 1: Accuracy and Assumptions
Repeatability:
The difference between
Figure A1.1
repeatability and accuracy is
a concept you may not
Repeatable Measurements
Accurate Measurements
understand. Graphically,
produce the same readings, test
produce a reading which is close
accuracy and repeatability are
after test, but the reading may
to the true Slip reading, which is a
shown in Figure A.1.1.
not be the true Slip %
reading other accurate data logger
Think of the data logger as an
testers would get.
"archer" which is trying to hit
the "bulls eye" or the
converter’s true % Slip
through the traps. Let's say
the true converter slip was
8%, but one data logger
always comes up with values
between 4.5% and 5% slip.
This data logger is not very
accurate, but is very
repeatable (only a 0.5% slip
spread in the results). Another data logger comes up with measurements which vary from 5% to 11% Slip, which average out
to the true 8% Slip. This data logger with the 6% spread in data is not nearly as repeatable as the first, but is more accurate.
Ideally, you want both a repeatable and accurate data logger, but this is not always possible. When are accurate measurements
and repeatable measurements most desirable?
• If you very accurately want to determine if a modification (for example, changing the intake manifold) has improved
the performance, the repeatable data logger is the one to use.
• If you want data logger numbers to use in a magazine article, for other people to compare their data logger with, you
are better off with the accurate data logger.
• If you want % Slip numbers to use for certifying the torque converter, for example selling a converter with a guarantee
it produces a certain amount of slip, you are better off with the accurate data logger.
For most testing, repeatability is more important. Fortunately, repeatability is also easier to obtain.
To Improve Repeatability:
The most basic thing for improving repeatability is “Don’t change things”. This means, that you should not “tweak” Vehicle
Specs or DataMite sensor calibrations to make minor improvements.
Many times the DataMite will record actual difference from run to run, caused by difference in the actual vehicle’s
performance. Again, the best thing you can do to improve your vehicle’s repeatability is to do your preliminary prep exactly
the same from run to run, and to stop “tweaking” and making adjustments. (Adjustments are obviously important for making
improvements, but not for repeatability.)
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To Improve Accuracy:
There are many types of calculations being performed by the Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer. Their accuracy
depends on the following:
•
It is critical that the Vehicle Specs in the program be accurate. This includes things like gear ratios, vehicle weight, tire
size, etc.
•
Corrections can be made for changes in weather conditions to produce Corrected Torque and HP readings. It is critical
that you accurately enter the weather conditions for each test in the Test Conditions menu. See Section 2.3. An error here
will affect accuracy and repeatability.
Major Assumptions:
The DataMite Analyzer program makes several simplifying assumptions about the vehicle which are listed below. Other
approximations and assumptions exist as identified in Section 1.3 A Word of Caution and scattered throughout this manual.
See Assumptions in the Index.
•
There is no slip inside the transmission. For automatic transmissions, there may be slip in the clutches and bands.
This slip is combined with Converter Slip and reported as Converter Slip in % .
•
Tire growth is reported as the decrease in rear wheel RPM compared to front wheel RPM, correcting for differences in
Tire Radius. However, there is also tire slip occurring with growth, which the program can not separate. Therefore,
your actual tire growth will likely be HIGHER than what is calculated by the program as Tire Growth in %.
•
Torque and HP are estimated based on the vehicle's acceleration rate, MPH, aerodynamics, etc. Obviously any error in
Vehicle Specs will cause an error in calculating torque and HP. However, the program makes additional assumptions
for specs which are difficult for the user to estimate, like driveline efficiency, engine inertia, transmission inertia,
wheel & tire inertia, etc. Therefore, the absolute accuracy of torque and HP may be in error due to these assumptions.
See Example 4.3.
Also see Example 4.1 for tips to check for accurate data
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Appendix 2: Hardware Installation and
Operation
Most all DataMite sensors and wiring come with their own installation
and instruction sheet. Those instructions are more detailed and up-todate than what is contained in this Appendix. For that reason, it is
important for you to read and keep those individual instructions.
See Example 4.1 for additional detail on Installation.
1 Ensure All Pieces Were Shipped
Check your invoice or packing slip to be sure you received all pieces. The invoice or packing slip will probably have check
marks by each like item to note that we checked it off before we shipped it to you. The standard 4 channel DataMite data
logger system should be shipped with:
1
1
1
4
1
DataMite module !!! Important !!! The standard DataMite module is NOT designed for Magneto ignition
(like injected alcohol sprint car or blown alcohol V-8s) systems or uneven firing engines (for example, Harley
Davidson V twins). Call Performance Trends for exchange with proper module (possibly at extra charge) before
hooking up. Small engine magnetos (like on a Briggs & Stratton engine are OK.)
DataMite Mini Control panel with LEDs (pushbutton control panel with LEDs is optional)
Wiring harness with standard wheel RPM sensors
Magnets for wheel RPM sensors
Serial cable for connecting DataMite to your computer’s COM port.
The larger 30 channel DataMite II data logger system should be shipped with:
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
DataMite II module !!! Important !!! The DataMite module is NOT designed for Magneto ignition systems
(like injected alcohol sprint car or blown alcohol V-8s) or uneven firing engines (for example, Harley Davidson
V twins). Call Performance Trends for exchange with proper module (possibly at extra charge) before hooking
up. Small engine magnetos (like on a Briggs & Stratton engine are OK.)
DataMite Control panel with 2 push buttons
RPM harness with standard wheel RPM sensors
Magnets for wheel RPM sensors
Serial cable for connecting DataMite to your computer’s COM port.
Power cable for 12V power
Configuration diagram identifying which of the 16 analog channels are activated as thermocouples or 0-5 or 010 volt inputs.
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Common DataMite Options:
• Inductive Pickup and wiring harness for measuring engine RPM on single cylinder Briggs or other cart engines.
• Optical isolation connector for the COM port. This is good protection for your computer against high voltage spikes
from the engine getting back through the DataMite to your computer’s COM port. This can happen any time you are
running the engine and have the serial cable attached to the COM port. This condition is necessary if you want to
watch the “live” display in the Current Readings screen.
• Thermocouples to measure temperatures (analog converter required for standard 4 channel DataMite)
• Pressure sensors (analog converter required for standard 4 channel DataMite)
• Position sensors for shock to suspension travel
• String potentiometers (pots) for measuring throttle or steering motion.
• Fuel Flow sensors
• Weather station for correction factors or air density measurements.
In addition, you may need:
• Epoxy or some other method of mounting magnets to the wheels or driveshafts.
• Heavy metal strips to build brackets to mount the RPM sensors to monitor the magnets.
• Shrink tubing, solder, soldering iron, wire terminals, etc if you are going to shorten, lengthen or change the wiring
harness. Important: Performance Trends ships most all cabling and sensors with connectors already installed.
You are not expected to cut or solder any wires (except the 12 VDC power cable). These sensors should just
plug into cables with the correct mating connector. If you think you will have to cut or change any connectors,
CALL PERFORMANCE TRENDS first. You may be making a mistake.
• Optional power switch to cut power to the DataMite.
The hardware instructions given here are very general and describe the
overall DataMite system. Most DataMite options come with their own
installation and instruction sheet. These instructions are more detailed
and up to date than what could be contained in this manual. For that
reason, it is important for you to read and keep those individual
instructions.
2 Determine Signals to Record
Both the DataMite and the DataMite II systems are designed to record engine RPM on channel 1. Figure A2.9 gives typical
sources for Engine RPM signals for various ignition systems. With the Inductive Pickup options, you can record spark from a
spark plug wire or sometimes (with coil on plug ignitions) with close placement to the ignition coil, with no direct electrical
connection to an ignition module or coil.
For the standard 4 channel DataMite, channels 2, 3 and 4 are for recording RPMs, or can record analog signals like
temperatures and pressures with the addition of an optional Analog Converter.
The 30 channel DataMite II 5 several different types of channels for recording different types of signals:
1. RPM Channels 1-5
2. Selectable Analog Channels 1-16
3. Preset Analog Channels 17-20 (sensors installed inside the main box)
4. On/Off Switch Channels 1-4
5. Timer Channels 1-2
All of these 30 channels (except the Preset Analog Channels) are accessed through the 9 pin Amp connectors at the front of the
main box.
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Figure A2.1A Signal Inputs on Front Panel of DataMite II
Preset Analog Channels 17-20 include accelerometers and power voltage, and are installed
inside the main DataMite II box
Analogs
13-16
Analogs
9-12
Analogs
5-8
Analogs
1-4
Switches &
Timers
RPMs
Depending on how you order your DataMite II, the analog channels from 1-16 may not be configured for anything, or can be
configured as thermocouple channels for temps, or 0-5 or 0-10 volt analog inputs for most any other type of sensor. Check the
documentation which comes with your DataMite II. These analog channels are configured in sets of 4 for each type of input,
either thermocouple or analog. The analog range of 0-5 or 0-10 can be configured for each of these 16 channels individually
with jumpers inside the box.
If thermocouple channels are turned On, they usually start on the right end, channels 13-16, then 9-12, etc. If analog channels
are turned On, they usually start on the left end, channels 1-4, then 5-8, etc.
Generally, timer and switch channels, and the accelerometer channels for analog channels 17 and 18 are all turned On. Note:
If you are using the Infra Red Lap Timer, only 1 Timer channel is available and a jumper inside the DataMite II box must
positioned correctly to provide 12 VDC on the 4 pin Lap Timer connector.
As you attach sensors, you must remember that you must also let the software know which sensors are attached to which
channel. This is done in the DataMite Specs screen.
3 Build Brackets, Mount Magnets for RPM Sensors
For wheels and driveshafts, epoxying the standard magnets supplied to the outside of the inertia wheel works well. For clutch
RPM on Lenco and Jehrico and other transmissions, there may already be a magnet installed on the trans input shaft.
Performance Trends has sensors that typically fit the required size and thread for this application. For an additional charge,
Performance Trends can supply other types of magnets for other installations, including:
• Tiny (approximately 1/4" diameter, .050" thick magnets) to be
Figure A2.1 B Spacing Required for
epoxied in place. These usually work better on driveshafts or smaller
RPM Sensor and Magnets
diameter shafts or wheels.
• High temperature magnets which withstand higher temperatures.
Mount on Edge of
• Small plastic bolts, 1/4 x 20 with magnets embedded in the head for
Inertia Wheel
.050” to
mechanically fastening the magnets.
.200” gap
Wheel RPM Sensor
Epoxy the magnets in place following the directions with the epoxy. Be
sure the mounting surface is clean and grease free. We recommend using
light sand paper or oil free steel wool to clean the surface. The epoxy
should be designed to work with metal and ceramic. We recommend
epoxies which are 2 parts which must be mixed, including:
Mount on Side
magnet
of Inertia Wheel
Inertia Wheel
Ace Hardware 5 Minute Epoxy
Duro Master Mend 5 Minute Epoxy
Devcon High Strength 5 Minute Epoxy
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When locating the magnets, be sure they are evenly spaced. Apply epoxy and press into place, then apply tape until set.
Evenly spacing the magnets insures more accurate, less "noisy" RPM data.
For doing acceleration tests, it is critical that the magnets be evenly spaced for accurate torque and HP results.
Occasionally, racers just use 1 magnet on the wheels or driveshaft to avoid this spacing issue (1 magnet is always evenly
spaced). However, with only magnet, the DataMite’s RPM measurements are slower and more erratic to record the exact start
of the drag run from a standing start.
You must fabricate your own brackets to allow
adjustment of the sensors from .050" to .200" from the
magnets. See Figure A2.1 B.
Figure A2.2 DataMite II Box Mounting
Tips for brackets:
• The brackets must be sturdy, either thick metal or
very short.
• They should keep the sensor reasonable square with
the face of the magnet.
• They should keep the sensor away from heat, either
exhaust or brake heat.
• To avoid vibration problems, see Figure A3.3 in
Appendix 3, Troubleshooting.
4 Select DataMite Mounting
Locations
A good place to mount the DataMite module and control panel
would on a metal plate away from the engine. Metal is preferred
because it can absorb some of the electrical noise emitted by the
engine’s ignition system. Keeping the DataMite box away from
the engine also reduces the likelihood of electrical noise
problems. Also keep it out of sunlight to keep it cooler.
To mount the 4 channel DataMite module, hold the module in
place on the flat surface you've selected and mark the 2 bolt
holes. Drill holes as required. When bolting the module in
place, DO NOT over tighten. Tighten just until the rubber
grommet starts to compress. Use a flat washer against the
rubber grommet, and a lock washer against the nut. In extreme
vibrating conditions, you may have to "double nut" to avoid
loosening of the mounting bolts. The same procedure is used for
the DataMite II except 4 screws are used.
Note the installation instructions for the DataMite II to obtain
the correct orientation for the accelerometers to read correctly.
Box Mounting Alignment for Accelerometers
The DataMite II has built in accelerometers standard on analog
channels 17 and 18. Channel 19 can be converted to an analog
input as an option. Figure 1 shows the directions for the
accelerometers. Knowing these directions and which channels
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DataMite II
Channel 19 Accelerometer
(from bottom to top of box)
Channel 17 Accelerometer
Channel 18 Accelerometer
Figure A2.3 Typical DataMite II Box Mounting
DataMite II
Rear of Car
Typical Circle Track
or Road Race mounting
Right side
of car
Channel 17 longitudinal Accel
Channel 18 lateral Accel
Box faces
up
DataMite II
Top of Car
Typical Drag Race mounting
Front of car
Channel 17 vertical Accel
Channel 18, longitudinal Accel
Box faces
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you have available are critical for mounting the DataMite II box in your vehicle. See Figure A 2.2 and A 2.3.
For example, assume you only have the std channels 17 and 18, and you want to measure front to rear acceleration
(longitudinal) and side to side acceleration (lateral). You should mount the box flat in the car, with to cover plate facing up. If
the connectors on the DataMite II box are toward the front of the car, then channel 17 would be for measuring front to rear
acceleration (longitudinal) and channel 18 would measure side to side acceleration (lateral). This would be a standard
configuration for a circle track or road racing car which would want to measure “friction circle” and handling type of data.
For drag racing, you could mount the box on the passenger (right side) door, with the cover facing the driver and the
connectors down. Then the channel 18 would be for measuring front to rear acceleration (longitudinal) and channel 17 would
measure top to bottom acceleration (vertical). Vertical acceleration is useful for measuring the tilt attitude of the car.
The standard mount for the push button control panel is to attach the supplied "high grip" Velcro strip to the mounting
location. Peel the backing from this strip and press it firmly onto a clean, dry, oil free surface. Do not touch the adhesive
surface. The surface should be smooth, flat and away from heat (65-85 degrees). (Control Panel is optional for the 4 channel
DataMite.) Then simply press the control panel enclosure with its own mating Velcro strip into this mounted Velcro. You
should hear an audible snap when closure is made.
Note: The cable from the control panel and the DataMite module can NOT be lengthened. However, the panel can be removed
from its enclosure and mounted directly in a cutout in some type of panel. This is best done with screws (can use those
provided with the plastic enclosure) or pop rivets.
5 Determine Cable Routing
It is recommended you do not lengthen or shorten the DataMite harness unless you solder and shrink tube all connections and
are familiar with good electronic cabling practices. Therefore, be sure all wiring reaches the wheels, sensors, ignition, power
and ground. This may effect where you mount the DataMite module. Excess wiring can be coiled in a location by the
DataMite, away from the engine's ignition system.
6 Install Wiring Harness
With the harness NOT hooked up to the DataMite module, string the connections and RPM sensors to the intended locations.
You may have to change the standard connectors supplied with the harness.
The instructions which come with the harnesses must be followed as they are the most detailed and up to date.
Important !!! The power to the DataMite must be clean. If you are using the car’s battery, connect to the
battery with separate wires. Do not connect to the same switch that controls power to the ignition system.
Engine RPM, Inductive Pickup:
Wrap the Blue or Purple wire from the inductive pickup around the engine’s spark plug wire. You may need to adjust the
number of wraps around the spark plug wire for different situations. See Appendix 3, Troubleshooting.
Engine RPM, Typical Automotive Spark Signal
Connect the yellow ignition lead to your ignition module's "tach" or "spark" output, or the negative side of the coil, or the
yellow wire of the optional inductive pickup. See Figure A2.9, page 188 for examples of ignition sources. The standard
DataMite module is not designed for Magneto ignitions or uneven firing engines. (Note: It is designed for small engine
magnetos, like that found on Briggs & Stratton or 2 stroke kart engines.) For uneven firing engines, you may need to
pull an ignition signal from just 1 coil (if each cylinder has its own coil), or use a wheel RPM sensor or inductive pickup.
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Wheel RPM sensors. You may want to remove the nuts for stringing the cable through small openings. Install these sensors
and adjust them to come within .150" to .200" of the magnets initially. During testing, you may have to adjust them closer.
When the harness is strung and all cables connected, plug in the DataMite module and the control panel. You should see the
Record LED light up on the control panel to indicate the DataMite is powered up. You may see a delay of up to 12 seconds
between power up and an LED lighting on the more memory 512K DataMites.
Figure A2.4 Typical 4 Channel DataMite Vehicle Wiring Harness Installation
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Figure A 2.5 Overview of DataMite II Installation
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7 Check Out Signals (4 Channel DataMite Only with Control Panel)
Put the DataMite into Setup Mode by pressing the Clear Memory button while holding the Record button down. See Figure
A2.3. You should see the Record LED start to flash once every second or so. This indicates it is in Setup Mode and is
checking channel 1 since it is flashing once.
When you start the engine, you should see the Clear Memory LED start to flash. The flash rate should increase as engine RPM
is increased. If not, check the ignition lead for proper installation. (Note that when checking Engine RPM, the LED will not
flash for every engine firing, because this would be so fast the LED would appear to be constantly on. The LED changes state
for approximately every 10 engine firings to slow the flash rate down.)
Press the Record button once, and the Record LED will flash twice quickly every second or so. This shows it is now displaying
channel 2 which is the sensor or connector with white shrink tubing. The Clear Memory LED should light when the magnet
passes the sensor for Channel 2. If it does not, adjust the sensor closer to the magnets. Be sure the Clear Memory lights for all
magnets.
Check the other channels following the pattern described above for checking Channel 2.
Figure A 2.6 DataMite Setup Mode for Checking Channels
P ower up DataMite and wait for Record LED to light steady. P ush and release C lear
Memory button while holding Record Button down to put into Setup Mode. Setup Mode
starts with displaying C hannel 1, engine RP M.
LED flashes either once,
twice, 3 times, etc quickly
to show which channel #
is being checked.
LED flashes as signal comes
into DataMite. W hen engine
running and on C hannel 1,
LED should flash. F or R P M
sensors, LED lights as
magnet passes sensor, or
brightens or dims with
analog sensors.
186
Setup Mode starts with
displaying channel #1,
engine RP M. P ush Record
button to C hannel #2, and
again to display C hannel
#3, etc.
P ush C lear Memory
button to bring out of
Setup Mode and go back
to R ecording Mode.
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Figure A 2.7 DataMite Recording Mode
DataMite automatically goes to Recording Mode when power comes on. R ecord LED
(light) comes on.
Record LED is On when
data is being recorded,
goes Off when not
recording.
LED Flashes when data
storage memory is 75%
full, and remains On when
memory is full and no
more data can be
recorded.
Figure A 2.8 Keyboard Method of Setup Mode
P ush Record button to pause
recording data (Record LED
goes Off). P ush R ecord
button again to resume data
recording (Record LED
comes back On).
!!! C aution !!! P ushing
C lear Memory button
erases all data stored in
DataMite.
Press <F4> to go into
Setup Mode. See the
large circle change color
like the LED would. The
channel you are
checking is shown by a
number, the number 1 in
this case.
Press <F5> to go to the
next channel.
Press <F6> to exit from
Setup Mode
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Figure A2.9 Alternate Sources for Ignition Signal for Engine RPM
NOTE: Attach yellow wire where Figure says "Red Clip"
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Appendix 3: Troubleshooting Data
Should you encounter problems recording data, or obtain unusual results from your recorded data, check the suggestions below.
No Data Recorded
First, check if data signals are coming to the DataMite by running the Setup Mode, discussed on page 186. Based on
what you find, try the following:
DataMite Not Going Into Setup Mode (4 channel DataMite Only)
Check DataMite power. Do any of the LED (lights) come on in the control panel. Note that it may take 5
seconds or more on 128K systems, 10 seconds or more on 512K systems for an LED to light after turning power
On. If not:
• First press the Clear Memory button and wait at least 20 seconds to see if an LED will light.
• Check that the power switch (if you installed one) is turned On.
• Check that your power supply is On or plugged in. Plug something else into that outlet (a light or radio) to
make sure there is power there.
Press the red Clear Memory button momentarily once. The Record LED should go Off, then come On. Press the
yellow Record button momentarily several times waiting about 5 seconds each time. The Record LED should
switch between Off and On. If this does not happen as described, call Performance Trends.
If the Record LED does switch Off and On, try the Setup Mode again. Be sure to hold the yellow Record button
down for 5-10 seconds. During the middle of this time, quickly press and release the red Clear Memory key. Try
this up to 10 times to be sure the problem is consistent. If the problem persists, call Performance Trends.
See if the DataMite has an internal problem. Run the trouble shooting options in the DataMite screen.
Figure 3.1 DataMite Troubleshooting Options in Program
Click here for
troubleshooting options
Check Com
Ports Screen
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DataMite Not Reading Data Signals
If the DataMite does go into Setup Mode, do the signals look as described on page 186 or in Example 4.1 section
“Graphing to Check Data Quality”.
If the Engine RPM signal is not coming through:
• Yellow ignition wire has a break in the harness.
• Black ground wire in harness is not well grounded.
• You are not hooked to the correct terminal or wire in the ignition system to record RPM.
• Fault in the Inductive Pickup or Inductive Pickup harness wiring.
• Fault in DataMite module.
If other RPM signals are not coming through:
• Magnets must be adjusted closer to the sensor. (Note: Do not adjust closer than .050", or so close that the
sensor may hit the magnet.)
• Leads to wheel sensors have a break in the harness.
• Black ground wire in harness is not well grounded. (A ground usually does not affect wheel RPM sensors.)
• Fault in DataMite module.
DataMite Reading Data Signals, but Not Sending to Computer
Be sure you take the DataMite out of Setup Mode and it goes into Record mode. Record data for at least 1 minute, with
at least the engine running to create engine RPM data. Follow the procedure in Example 4.1 for downloading the data.
If during this downloading
Figure A3.2 Error Message When Not Reading DataMite Data
process, you receive the
message shown in Figure
A3.2, follow the suggestions
in Figure A3.2 for
troubleshooting.
If you have disconnected the
DataMite from the vehicle and
the main harness to download
at a computer away from the
vehicle, be sure the
DataMite’s power supply is
connected and On.
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Only Some Data Recorded
This would be situations where the DataMite starts a run recording data, then during the run it stops recording:
If both LEDs start flashing on the control panel, the DataMite has become
“confused” and has “locked up”, much as your computer can “lock up”. This is
usually caused by electrical noise from the engine, a noisy “unsteady” power
source, bad wiring connections, or a bad or intermittent ground. Turn the
Power Off, then On to “reboot” the DataMite.
On earlier DataMite systems, vibration of the control panel could actually “false push” the Record button, stopping
recording. Try mounting the control panel away from vibration. Also, current DataMites have a built in delay time
in the buttons, which means you must press and hold the button down for a half second or so. This is also to
prevent “false button pushes” from vibration.
RPM Data Recorded, but Looks Bad
RPM Data Noisy or Jumpy
See Figures 2.50 and 2.51 on pages 74 and 75 for examples of "noisy" data versus "noise spikes". See Section 2.10 for
the process to Edit Out 'Noise' Spikes. If an occasional noise spike appears in your data, this is normal (1-30) per test.
Simply use the program's Edit feature to get rid of them.
Filtering is designed to help "noisy" data. See pages 93 and 94. However, if the problem is severe or if it is possible to
eliminate either the noise or 'noise spikes', the following suggestions may help.
For engine RPM, this
can be caused by:
• Electrical "noise"
from ignition
system. See Noise
Sources described
below.
• Point ignition
systems can cause
problems at high
speed where the
points can
"bounce" which
looks like
additional spark
firings. The
engine will not
run poorly since
the first bounce
fires the plug
correctly. This
problem is
identified when:
Figure A3.3 Inductive Pickup Adjustments for Signal Strength
Typical Installation
Tie Wrap Inductive
Pickup Wire to
Spark Plug Wire
For Stronger Signal,
Wrap Inductive Pickup
Wire Around Spark Plug
Wire Several Times
For Weaker Signal,
Move the Inductive
Pickup Wire a Few
Inches Away from
Spark Plug Wire
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•
•
•
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• RPM looks correct at relatively low RPM, 1000 - 3000 RPM.
• At higher RPM, the computer reads RPM too high, say the tachometer says 5000 but the computer reads 6000.
This problem can be corrected by switching to new or higher spring tension points.
Even though the Setup Mode seems to show engine RPM signals are entering the DataMite, the source of the
ignition signal may not be as correct as possible. Refer to ignition signal sources described in Appendix 2.
If you are using an Inductive Pickup, with a wire tied to the spark plug wire, the signal may be too strong or too
weak. It is hard to predict which way to go, to try stronger or weaker signal. See Figure A3.3 on previous page.
On some applications, where engine RPM can actually be quite variable from firing to firing (like single cylinder
engines at lower RPM or when running rough), Performance Trends has a different DataMite chip which may
correct this problem. Contact Performance Trends for details.
If your engine has an unusual ignition system (very new production system, "distributorless", etc.), there may not be
a clean signal the DataMite can use. NOTE: THE STANDARD DATAMITE IS NOT DESIGNED TO WORK
WITH MAGNETO OR UNEVEN FIRING IGNITION SYSTEMS. (It is designed to work on magnetos on small
engines like Briggs & Stratton and 2 stroke kart engine.)
For other RPM signals using wheel speed sensors, the problem may be:
• Unevenly spaced magnets will cause noisy or jumpy data (not noise spikes). See Appendix 2 about magnet spacing.
• The sensors may be getting hot. If the problem appears Ok when you first start, but get noisy when the engine heats
up, this is likely the problem. You may have to position the wheel sensors away from the brakes, or possibly the
exhaust.
• You may be specifying the wrong # magnets in the DataMite Specs menu.
• A magnet may have fallen off.
• There may be metal debris or shavings on the magnets.
• The sensor may be “false triggering” due to vibration. See
Figure A3.3B Mounting Suggestion to
Figure A3.3B and A3.4.
Avoid Vibration Problems
Eliminate Electrical Noise Sources
There can be several sources of electrical "noise" which can look like
additional spark firings to the DataMite. The major source is from the
spark plug wires. Solid core wires can produce noise to the DataMite
just as they do to an AM radio. Switch to resistor or suppresser spark
plugs and plug wires. Also check that the spark plug gap is proper and
the spark is not arcing somewhere, for example around a fouled plug.
Running the engine in the dark can show up arcing plug wires.
Try to position the yellow Ignition lead and any other DataMite cables
away from the plug wires, other ignition components, etc. Position the
DataMite away from the fire wall, engine, or ignition system.
Bracket should
be as short as
practical and
stiff (fairly
thick material,
about 12
gauge or
thicker)
Flat Washer
Rubber Washers (on top of
bracket, bottom or both)
Mounting surface (trans extension housing,
rear axle housing, brake backing plane, etc)
If the noise problem still persists, try shielding the yellow ignition lead and/or possibly the leads to the wheel sensors. Wrap
with aluminum foil or cable shield available from electronics stores and attach a wire from the foil or shield to a good engine or
battery ground.
Use a “clean” (steady) power source which can maintain 9-16 volts. A battery is excellent source if you wire directly to the
battery. Do not power the DataMite from a terminal which also powers the ignition system, as this will be very unsteady.
Use a “solid” ground source. Do not ground the DataMite to a terminal which also grounds the ignition system, as this will
also be very unsteady.
Make sure the engine is well grounded to the vehicle frame. This would mean a large ground strap which connects to a bare
metal spot on the frame or back to the negative post on the battery.
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Figure A3.4 Examples of Engine RPM “Drop Out” from Inductive Pickup
Examples of “drop outs” shown here happen
to be on the decel (after throttle closes and
spark voltage drops), but it can occur on
the accel also, causing more severe
data calculation problems.
Engine RPM will drop to about 1/2 or 1/3 of what it
should be in signal to inductive pickup wire is weak.
The “fix” is to wrap the inductive pickup wire around
the spark plug wire 1 to 2 turns for a stronger signal.
If the inductive pickup signal is too strong (you wrap the spark plug wire too many times), you may not be able
to record Engine RPM at high RPM. Engine RPM may drop in half or all the way to 0 RPM.
RPM Data Looks OK but Too High or Too Low
If engine RPM looks like it is exactly half a high, one third as high, three times too high, etc as it should be, read the
definitions for # Cylinders and Engine Type on page 41.
The DataMite’s microprocessor is constantly trying to make sure Engine RPM is clean and free from errors. If engine RPM is
changing VERY rapidly (for example on engine start up, from 0 RPM then it “flares up” to 3000 RPM), the DataMite may not
think this is possible, and can jump into a “half RPM mode” or “third RPM mode” by mistake. Usually the DataMite will
recover from this by itself if you run normal RPMs for a while (a few seconds).
With Inductive Pickup signals, if the inductive pickup signal is too strong (you wrap the spark plug wire too many times), you
may not be able to record Engine RPM at high RPM. Engine RPM may drop in half or all the way to 0 RPM.
For the other RPM signals, the problem may be:
• You may be specifying the wrong # magnets. See page 41.
• A magnet may have fallen off.
• Wrong calibration for an Analog channel. See Appendix 5.
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Recorded Data Good, Calculated Data Bad
Calculated data includes these types:
MPH
Accel Gs
Feet
Gear #
Clutch Slip
Converter Slip
Tire Slip
Tire Growth
Tq
HP
Calc Gear Ratio
These calculated outputs require some signal to determine vehicle speed. Typically this is done with a front wheel speed
sensor, but these can be illegal in many drag racing events. Then you may want to use an accelerometer. Two (2)
accelerometers are built into the DataMite II box, and they can be added to the smaller 4 channel DataMite with the proper
choice of analog converter. Either way, you must pay attention to how you mount the DataMite II or analog converter box in
the vehicle, so the axis of the accelerometer is aligned correctly with the axis of the car.
These data types are all based on the settings in the Vehicle Specs, DataMite Specs and Track Conditions menus. Check these
settings and their definition in Chapter 2.
If the problem appears with the graphs, be sure you are reading the graph correctly. Sometimes data types are multiplied by 10,
100, etc so data types which are very different can show up on the same graph. For example, 15 ft lbs of torque may be
multiplied by 1000 so it shows up well on a graph which also includes Engine RPM up to 15,000. Use the Cursor option to
read the graphs which corrects for the multiplier. See page 98. Or make a report of the data type to eliminate the need for any
multiplier.
Calculated data types usually need some filtering. If the calculated data looks noisy or jumpy, increase the filtering level to
Medium or Heavy. See Figure 2.50 and 2.51 on pages 74 and 75, and Figure 3.13 on page 93.
If the problem is with Clutch, Converter or Tire Slip, Tire Growth or CalcGear Ratio be sure the Tire Radius and gear ratios
are correct in the Vehicle Specs menu. Also, do a special test of cruising at a steady, slower speed like 30-50 MPH. When you
look at this cruising data, you should see:
•
•
•
0 Clutch, Converter and Tire Slip
0 Tire Growth
Calc Gear Ratio which matches the transmission gear ratio
If they are just slightly off (5% or so) adjust the Tire Radius as necessary to get them to read 0.
If you are getting negative (-) Tire Slip or Tire Growth, it sounds like the front and rear wheel signals are mixed up:
• Check that the RWD/FWD/AWD spec is correct for your car in the Vehicle Specs.
• Check that the Auxiliary RPM specs are set correct in the DataMite and Data Specs menu. Note: The white shrink
tubing is on the Auxiliary RPM 1 sensor.
• If you are off a lot, be sure you not specifying a Driveshaft Sensor in the DataMite and Data Menu when you are using
a wheel sensor, or vice versa.
Note: The following conditions are normal:
• Clutch slip can go either positive or negative during shifts when the clutch is disengaged.
• Converter slip can go negative when you are engine braking.
• Tire growth can go negative during the launch or shifts. This is indicating tire squat or slip.
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Appendix 4 Backing Up Data
Backing up data means to make more than one copy of the data which can be used or referred to at a later date. This may be
needed in the event one copy becomes lost or erased, or you need room in the Test Library. Backing up data can take 2 basic
forms:
Paper Reports
Copying files with Windows copy commands
Other than making Paper Reports, backing up data requires knowledge of Windows File Manager (3.1) or Windows Explorer
(95, 98, NT) commands. Unless you are experienced with Windows commands, have someone experienced with Windows
assist you to prevent losing data.
Paper Reports:
Figure A4.1 Print Test Summary
If you already keep written copies of all test sessions you perform, you
already understand this form of backing up data. You could continue to
do this by simply clicking of File, the Print at the Main Screen to print a
summary of each test.
Disadvantage of Paper Back Ups:
For example, say you have accidentally erased a Circle Track race
run File but have a paper report of that data. There is no way to reenter the DataMite data. You won’t be able to recalculate that data,
correct the data to a new Weather Conditions, compare new data to
this old data, etc.
Copying data to disk with Windows commands:
Click here to print a Test Summary
This method is the preferred method. If you are not familiar with Windows commands, have someone help you the first couple
of times. However, this is the most reliable and most efficient way to back up your data.
Note: Unless stated otherwise, all mouse clicks are with the normal, left button on the mouse.
To copy Entire DTMDATA Folder using Windows 95, 98, Me, XP, 2000 or NT, which contains all folders and test files in the
Test Library:
Click on Start, then Programs, then Windows Explorer (usually at the bottom of the list of programs). You will obtain
the Windows Explorer screen shown in Figure A4.2.
Locate the PERFTRNS.PTI folder (may not be printed in capital letters) on the left side of the Windows Explorer screen,
usually on the C drive. Click on the [+] sign to the left of it to display the contents of the PERFTRNS.PTI folder.
You should now see the DTM-RR20 folder. Click on the [+] sign to the left of it to display the contents of the DTM-RR20
folder.
You should now see the DTMDATA folder. Right click on the yellow DTMDATA folder icon to display the menu of
options. Click on the Copy command to copy this entire folder (all test files in the standard Test File Library).
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Figure A4.2 Copying Files with Windows 95, 98, ME, XP, 2000 or NT Windows Explorer
Find the DTM20 folder under the PERFTRNS.PTI folder, usually on the C drive.
Click on the [ +] box to the left of a folder to show its contents (folders).
Click and drag
the slide bar
button to move
up and down
the list of
folders.
The contents
of the open
(clicked on)
folder on the
left is shown
here, including
both folders
and files.
Right click
(with the right
mouse button)
on the
DTMDATA
folder (not
seen here) to
open a menu
of options.
Click on Copy
to copy the
entire contents
of the
DTMDATA
folder (the
entire test file
library). DO
NOT click on
Cut.
Drag slide
bar to the
top of the
list to find
your
Floppy disk
drive
(usually A)
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Right click on
the Floppy
drive icon
Then click on
Paste to paste
whatever you
copied (in this
example, the
entire
DTMDATA
folder) to the
disk in the
Floppy drive.
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Now you must tell the computer where you want to copy the files to. Click and drag the slide bar for the left section of the
Windows Explorer screen to the top. (You can also click on the up or down arrow buttons on the slide bar.) Look for the
Floppy Drive icon, usually the “A” drive. Put a new, formatted disk in the floppy drive. Then right click on the Floppy
Drive icon, and select Paste from the list of options. You will see the floppy drive light come on as the entire DTMDATA
folder and all its contents are copied to the floppy disk. Label this disk with something like “DTMDATA folder,
xx/xx/xx” with a name and date.
Notes:
If you have so many tests in the Test Library, they may not all fit onto 1 floppy disk. Windows Explorer will tell you this and
ask you to insert another new, formatted disk. If this happens, be sure to label all disks with a name, date and sequential #s,
and keep the entire disk set together. A suggestion for novice computer users is to make each folder under DTMDATA a
separate floppy disk. This may require more floppy disks, but will make it easier to understand restoring just certain folders in
the future.
You may just want to back up one particular folder in the test library (in the DTMDATA folder) or just 1 particular test. You
would do this the same as with copying the entire DTMDATA folder, just click on the [+] by the DTMDATA folder to display
the folders under DTMDATA. Then right click on the folder you want to Copy. To find individual test files, click on the
yellow folder icon containing the test file and the contents of the folder will be shown on the right side of the Windows
Explorer screen. Then right click on the test file name and select Copy. Note that each test file is made up of 3 files, a .CFG, a
.DAT and a .LAP file. All 3 files must be copied for the Circle Track race run to be copied. For example, if the test file in
question is called Briggs04, you must copy the Briggs04.CFG, Briggs04.DAT and Briggs04.LAP files.
You can also copy individual test files to the floppy drive inside the Road Race & Circle Track DataMite Analyzer program.
Open the file you want to copy so it is the current test file. Then click on File at the top of the Main Screen, then select Copy to
Floppy Disk. This command takes care of all 3 files mentioned in the previous paragraph automatically.
More experienced computer users may want to use the “Backup” features built into Windows 95 and 98 (click on Start,
Programs, Accessories, System Tools, Backup). This compresses test files so it takes fewer floppy disks. However you need to
use the Backup program to restore test files, which can be more confusing to novice computer users.
Restoring Data
Be very careful when restoring data, as you may overwrite Test Files with old, erroneous
information. Read all the information below before restoring data. If you are not familiar with
Windows Explorer, have someone more experienced help you.
The ONLY reason to restore data is if you have lost test files. This could be because you
mistakenly erased it, you had a major computer failure, or you are moving the program to
another computer. Do NOT restore data unless you have one of these problems, as you
could possible create many more problems than you are trying to fix.
When restoring test files and folders, you pretty much reverse the procedure for backing up. First you put your backed up
floppy disk in the floppy drive. Then open Windows Explorer, find the Floppy drive icon and click on it to display its contents.
Right click on the folder you want to restore and select Copy.
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Now find the DTMDATA folder under DTM-RR20 under PERFTRNS.PTI, usually on the C: drive. Right click on the folder
1 level up from the folder you are restoring.
For example, if you are restoring the test file folder CHEV which was in the
DTMDATA folder, you must click on the DTMDATA folder. If you are restoring the entire Test Library folder DTMDATA,
you must click on the DTM-RR20 folder. If you are restoring the test file 194-150 which was in the CHEV folder under the
DTMDATA folder, you must click on the CHEV folder.
During the restoring (copying) process, Windows Explorer checks to see if it is overwriting an existing file (Figure A4.3). If it
is, it will ask you if the existing file or folder should be overwritten. Be very careful when overwriting files, as you may
overwrite a new test file with data from an old test file of the same name.
Before restoring test files, it is good practice to back up all test files first. Then if you make a
mistake, and overwrite test files you didn’t mean to, you have your backup copies to restore
the test files from.
Figure A 4.3 Windows Explorer Warnings when Overwriting Test Files
Overwriting a Test File
Overwriting an Entire Folder (several files)
Be very careful selecting
this option, as several files
may be overwritten at once.
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Appendix 5 Calibrating an Analog
Sensor
An analog sensor is one that records a signal that can gradually and continually change. In contrast, a switch signal is either
On or Off, not 95% open, then 94% open, etc. An RPM signal is a series of switch openings and closings. How close these
changes come together determines the RPM. See Figure A5.1.
Figure A5.1 Examples of Various Types of Sensor Signals
Analog (for example throttle angle)
Switch (digital)
RPM (frequency)
This time
determines
the RPM
Full Open Throttle
On
3/4 Throttle
1/2 Throttle
Closed
Throttle
Off
1/4 Throttle
Volts
Volts
Volts
Switch Sensors and RPM Sensors do not require much calibration. Tell the program if either high or low voltage is opened or
closed, or On or Off and the switch channel is calibrated. Just tell the program how many pulses you get on 1 revolution of a
shaft, and the RPM channels are calibrated. These 2 types of channels are not usually in error just some. It is usually very
obvious if there is a calibration error (like specifying the wrong number of magnets on the dyno inertia wheel).
Analog signals are more complicated. In the example above, the close throttle position could occur at .48 volts and the full
open throttle could occur at 4.73 volts. Or the
Figure A5.2 Illustration of an Analog Sensor Calibration
close throttle position could occur at 3.21 volts
and the full open throttle could occur at 1.76
Absorber Dyno Load
volts. Just about any 2 combinations of
2nd Value
conditions could happen. If you don’t tell the
30 lbs
4.4 volts = 28 lbs
computer the correct combination, the data may
28 lbs
be off just a little bit, or be completely wrong.
The process of telling the program these 2
combinations is called calibrating the sensor.
This is done in the DataMite screen, as
described in Section 2.5.
In the standard 4 channel DataMite, analog
sensor signals must be conditioned by an
Analog Converter, which converts the analog
signal into a frequency, similar to an RPM
signal. However as far as you, the user, are
concerned, it functions just like an Analog
Sensor shown in Figure A5.1.
15 lbs
1st Value
1.0 volts = 0 lbs
0 lbs
0
1
2
3
Volts
4 4.4
5
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Example of Calibrating a Steering Travel Sensor
A Steering Travel Sensor was described in Section 2.9. It is a
variable resistor that measures suspension travel, and must be
calibrated so that the voltage output means something “real”
like inches of travel. As with any calibration, you must put at
least 2 known inputs into the sensor and then see how the
DataMite reads the signal from the sensor. These are the 2
combinations mentioned earlier.
Figure A5.3 Steer Sensor Calibration Points
Static
Length
Usually one input is very easy, like zero steering, or the
steering position with the wheels pointed straight ahead. The
second combination can be a little more complicated. You
must put a known travel on the sensor. The best way to do this
is to shorten or elongate the sensor by turning the steering
wheel a know amount, say 90 degrees left.
Length with
90 degrees
turning left
Calibration Procedure
1) Turn on the DataMite to Read the Steering Sensor Channel
This procedure assumes you have installed the steering sensor following the instructions with the sensor for wiring and
mechanical hookup. Turn on the DataMite or DataMite II and let the system warm up.
2) Pick the Analog Channel from the DataMite Specs Screen
Click on the channel with the steering sensor installed as shown in Figure A5.5 This will open the Calibration Screen shown
in Figure A5.6.
Figure A5.5 Open DataMite Specs Menu
Click here to open DataMite Specs menu.
Click on
the “cell”
in this
column in
the row
for the
channel
with the
steering
travel
sensor
installed.
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In the calibration screen of Figure A5.6, select Analog Converter as the Sensor and Steer as the Sensor Type. Steer is a special
channel name reserved to let the program know this channel is for the steering wheel. This channel is then used for the
steering wheel picture in graph screens and for sending to the Suspension Analyzer program. You will notice the lower section
called Analog Sensor Specs become enabled
3) Obtain a Zero Reading
Position the steering wheel straight ahead. You might want to turn the wheel left and right slightly to “free up” any “stiction”
in the system.
Type in 0 for the 1st Value, engineering units in the calibration screen.
Then click on the Read button for 1st Value, Freq (hz) and the program will read the signal from the sensor with 0 steering
position. It will store this reading as the 1st Value, Freq (hz) where you can see it.
Figure A5.6 Calibration Menu for Torque Sensor Using Analog Converter
“A” Choose Analog Converter as
Sensor and Steering as Sensor
Type. Type in some Data Name
like Steer.
Click on Read buttons and
program will read signal currently
coming from this sensor.
“B” Type in 0 for the 1st Value and
click on Read button for program to
read sensor at 0 steering position
(wheel point straight ahead).
Click here to load final
calibration back into
DataMite Specs menu.
“C” Type in upscale travel for the
2nd Value (like 90 deg) and click on
Read button for program to read
sensor at the 90 deg turned value.
Note Correction
becomes enabled.
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4) Obtain an “Upscale” Reading
Turn the wheel 90 degrees to the left Again, you might want to turn the wheel left and right slightly to “free up” any “stiction”
in the system. When done, the wheel should remain at 90 degrees without you holding it.
Then click on the Read button for 2nd Value, Freq (hz) and the program will read the signal from the sensor with 90 degrees of
motion. It will store this reading as the 2nd Value, Freq (hz) where you can see it.
Notes:
•
•
In the case of shock travel, where static length is 0, you could decide that 1 inch of compression (shorter) is a positive
number, or 1 inch of elongation is positive. The choice is yours and you simply must remember which it is when you
read your recorded data. However, if you send data to either Suspension Analyzer, you must do it so compression
(going shorter) is a positive number.
In the case of shock travel data being sent to Suspension Analyzer, you calibrate for actual change in length of the
shock sensor itself. The Suspension Analyzer will figure out the motion ratio automatically.
5) Save the Calibration
In Figure A5.6 “C” you will note the calibration shown at the top of:
Steering 467-679=0-90 Steer
This is the information the program will use to figure out how much steering travel is produced from a certain sensor signal.
Click on the Keep Specs to keep this calibration and load it into the DataMite Specs “Sensor and Calibration” column for this
channel.
6) Correction Factor
You may have noticed an input called “Correction” which
became enabled after all calibration inputs were entered. The
Correction factor is a convenient way to index the calibration
to match a certain value at a certain signal. This is most often
used to “re-zero” a sensor which may have drifted slightly.
Another use is to “zero out” the shock travel sensors at static
ride height.
Figure A 5.7 shows a standard 8” shock travel sensor, which
produces a 0-5 volt output when the sensor goes through 0-8
inches of travel. At 0” travel, the signal is 0 volts. However,
when the sensor is installed on the car, the installed height
may be with 3 inches of compression. At static ride height
you probably want the sensor to read 0 and not 3. This can be
easily accomplished by entering the Correction factor of -3, to
subtract 3 inches from the original reading. Or, with the car
at ride height, you can simply click on the “Read” button next
to the Correction input. See Figure 5.8.
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Figure A 5.7 Diagram of Correction Factor
Inches
Travel
Standard calibration:
0-5 volts = 0-8 inches
Slope of line
(calibration)
stays the same
8
0
New calibration w correction:
0-5 volts = -3 to 5 inches
(so 3 inches compression of
sensor at ride height = 0 )
-8
0
Volts
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Figure A5.8 Process of Using the Read Button for the Correction Factor
2) Notes on obtaining a
Correction Factor.
3) Enter the number
you want the sensor
to read with the
sensor in its current
position or state.
This is typically 0.
4) The program
determines the correct
Correction Factor and
loads it in.
1) Click on Read to start
process of getting a Correction
factor for an 8 inch shock travel
sensor with the car at ride height.
5) Click here to keep
calibration specs and
Correction.
Notes
Other sensors are calibrated much the same as a steering travel sensor. For example:
To calibrate a throttle position sensor: With the throttle closed, type in 0 and click on the Read button for the 1st Value.
Then open the throttle fully, type in 90 degrees (or possibly 85 degrees would be more exact) and click on the Read
button for the 2nd Value. Click on Keep Specs and you’re done.
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To calibrate a pressure sensor: With zero pressure on the system (crack a line fitting to let all pressure bleed off), type in
0 and click on the Read button for the 1st Value. Then Tee in a good pressure gauge to the same source as the pressure
sensor and run the system to produce some fairly high pressure. Read the pressure off the gauge and type the reading in.
Then click on the Read button for the 2nd Value. Click on Keep Specs and you’re done.
Zero is usually a good choice for the 1st Value. You want the 2nd Value to always be fairly high, at least 65% of the full range
or higher. For a 200 PSI pressure gauge, this would be .65 x 200 or at least 130 PSI. For a 6” shock travel sensor with the
static position at about half travel (3 inches), it should be at least .65 x 3” or at least 1.95”.
The DataMite program has “built in” sensor calibrations for several standard sensors, like MSI Pressure Sensors,
Thermocouples, RTD type temperature sensors, accelerometers, etc. However, for the sensors which are used to transfer
information to the Suspension Analyzer, the calibrations must be entered as done with the Steering sensor. Luckily,
Performance Trends can provide a calibration sheet for most of these sensors, like the 8 inch shock sensor shown in Figure 5.8.
Then all you need to do is to obtain a correction factor to zero out the sensor, also as shown in Figure 5.8.
The process above works well for Linear Sensors. A linear sensor is one where if what you are measuring doubles, the signal
doubles also. Some sensors are non-linear, and then it may be best to use the Sensor Type of “Custom, user supplies table”.
Figure A5.9 Calibration Table for Non-Linear Sensors
Choose this Sensor
Type for entering a
calibration table.
Enter pairs of numbers
for the calibration
curve. In this case, for
an Analog Converter,
st
the 1 column is in
counts, from 0-1000.
For the DataMite, this
column is typically 0-5
volts.
These buttons are used
to more easily fill the
table. The Read
DataMite button will
read the DataMite signal
from the sensor and
insert it in the row where
the blinking cursor (used
for typing in numbers).
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Index
Accelerometer, 41, 44, 49, 73, 81, 151, 181, 196
Accuracy, 6, 3, 20, 23, 24, 27, 29, 32, 37, 39, 41, 45, 52,
54, 62, 63, 65, 73, 75, 81, 82, 120, 144, 151, 157, 169,
172, 174, 175, 177, 178, 182
Add Test, 94
Advanced, 18, 112, 115
Air Temperature deg F, 28
All Data, 79, 80, 92, 151, 152
Altimeter, 27, 28, 29
Always Autoscale New Graph, 26
Analog, 6, 24, 40, 42, 43, 44, 53, 54, 56, 125, 137, 138,
170, 179, 180, 181, 182, 195, 196, 201, 202, 203
Assumptions, 6, 3, 29, 51, 81, 177, 178, 202
Automatically Filter Out Noise, 25
back up, 197, 199, 200
Barometer, 28, 29
Barometric Pressure, 28
Baseline, 33
Basic Version, 1, 2, 5, 19, 94
Beacon, 45, 71, 72, 125, 144
Block, 114
Bore, 59, 60
calibrate, 1, 43, 120, 204, 205, 206
calibration, 24, 37, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 81, 119, 139,
154, 195, 201, 202, 203, 204, 206
Carb, 114
Chamber CCs, 60
Chamber CCs in Head, 60
Clear Memory, 170, 171, 172, 186, 191
clearance vol, 60
Clearance Volume, 60
Clutch Slip, 49, 81, 196
Coefficient, 50, 51, 129, 131, 169
color, 1
Com Port, 25, 39
Comment, 108
Comparison Graphs, 162
Compression Ratio, 9, 59, 60, 152, 204
Configuration, 179
Convert to Columns, 89
Converter, Torque, 52, 177
copy, 2, 5, 19, 37, 110, 112, 138, 197, 199
Corr. Barometer, ''Hg, 28
Corrected flywheel HP, 82
Corrected flywheel torque, 82
Corrected Torque, 178
correction, 20, 164, 174, 180, 206
Correction Factor, 2, 204
Correlation, 85, 160
Current Readings, 5, 25, 45, 46, 47, 53, 54, 55, 57, 143,
144, 180
Current Test, 8, 12, 18, 20, 23, 45, 67, 68, 71, 72, 83, 94,
111, 116, 140, 144, 146, 147, 148, 159, 199
Cursor, 98, 196
Customer, 114
Data Name, 40, 42, 45, 140
DataMite, 1, 4, 5, 6, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 15, 16,
18, 19, 20, 21, 24, 25, 27, 31, 33, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42,
43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 53, 54, 55, 67, 68, 71, 72, 73, 77, 80,
81, 84, 89, 105, 107, 109, 110, 112, 113, 119, 120, 123,
125, 129, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 144, 145, 146, 147,
148, 149, 150, 157, 160, 165, 166, 169, 170, 171, 172,
174, 175, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 186,
187, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 199, 201, 202,
204, 206
DataMite ii, 24, 37, 39, 40, 44, 45, 46, 47, 53, 54, 55, 81,
125, 129, 137, 140, 145, 169, 170, 179, 180, 181, 182,
183, 196, 202
DataMite Specs, 5, 20, 37, 38, 67, 68, 81, 107, 125, 140,
141, 144, 146, 165, 181, 194, 196, 202, 204
date, 16, 68, 149, 179, 180, 183, 197, 199
delete, 44, 71, 87, 110, 115, 123, 125
Delete, 71, 72, 110
Delete Beginning or End of File, 71, 72
Demo, 2, 5, 8, 19
Density Altitude, 16, 23, 33, 95
Dew Point, 28, 29, 62, 63
Disk, 23, 199
Display Run Summary, 25
Distance, 1, 30, 41, 50, 60, 64, 73, 79, 80, 81, 92, 95, 151,
155, 173
DOS, 12, 110, 112
Dry Bulb Temp, 62, 63
Dry Density Altitude, 16, 23, 33
Dual Cursor, 1, 95, 99
Dyno Specs, 12, 112
Edit, 5, 8, 16, 19, 25, 71, 72, 73, 96, 100, 116, 125, 150,
193
Edit Out ‘Noise’ Spikes, 73
Elevation, 28, 29
Email, 1, 3
Engine Details, 32
Engine File, 110
Engine RPM, 1, 17, 23, 24, 40, 41, 42, 54, 71, 72, 73, 81,
85, 92, 94, 105, 120, 151, 162, 170, 173, 180, 183, 186,
188, 192, 195, 196
Engine Specs, 9, 12, 13, 50, 52, 68, 112, 114
Engine Type, 41, 195
Engineering Units, 43
Error, 192
209
(C) Performance Trends Inc 2004
Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
errors, 41, 67, 195
Errors, 74
file, 2, 4, 5, 8, 9, 12, 17, 18, 23, 24, 33, 38, 68, 71, 72, 73,
89, 94, 100, 110, 111, 112, 115, 116, 119, 120, 121,
126, 145, 147, 157, 165, 166, 172, 199, 200
Filter, 5, 1, 17, 18, 31, 54, 56, 73, 79, 92, 93, 103, 113,
114, 151, 152, 155, 173, 193
Filtering, 17, 54, 56, 73, 79, 92, 93, 103, 151, 152, 155,
173, 193
Floppy Drive, 199
Folders, 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, 24, 68, 89, 112, 114, 115, 148,
172, 197, 199, 200
Freq (hz), 43, 203, 204
Friction Circle, 5, 19, 95, 104, 105, 119, 125, 126, 129,
131, 162, 165, 167
Friction Coefficient, 129, 131
Friction Losses, 1, 3, 52, 105, 129, 131, 155, 183
Fuel, 32, 33, 82, 180
Gasket Bore Dia, 60
Gasket Thickness, 59, 60
Gauge Settings, 54, 55, 56
Graph, 1, 8, 12, 17, 20, 23, 26, 45, 55, 56, 57, 72, 73, 79,
83, 86, 89, 91, 92, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 100, 101, 102,
103, 104, 105, 115, 116, 117, 123, 129, 150, 151, 152,
155, 157, 160, 162, 163, 165, 167, 173, 174, 175, 196,
203
Graph Type, 151, 155
Graphs, 5, 15, 79, 91, 92, 94, 96, 102, 108, 150, 162, 167,
173
Growth, tire, 49, 81, 178, 196
Help, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 17, 21, 32, 47, 59, 68, 105, 138, 146
Histogram, 1, 92, 94, 150
History Log, 5, 1, 18, 21, 24, 77, 83, 92, 94, 95, 100, 115,
116, 117, 123, 163
horsepower, 82
HP, 6, 1, 9, 24, 27, 29, 37, 49, 50, 52, 68, 72, 73, 75, 79,
82, 92, 114, 148, 155, 169, 172, 173, 174, 175, 178,
182, 196
Humidity, 28, 62, 63
Icon, desktop, 7, 107, 197, 199
Ignition, 188, 194
Include Averages, 80
Include Text, 89
Inductive Pickup, 180, 183, 192, 194, 195
Inertia Dyno, 3, 82, 178, 181, 201
Inertia, engine, 178
Infra Red, 138, 181
Install, 3, 37, 72, 131, 139, 170, 171, 186, 191, 192, 194
Jets, 33
Just Power Run, 92
210
Appendicies
Lane, 31
Lap Summary, 84, 85, 147, 160, 162
Lap Timer, 45, 72, 138, 145, 150, 181
Larger Font (Print Size), 108
Launch, 171, 196
Legend, Graph, 26, 95, 100, 105, 116
Length, 16, 30, 31
Library, 8, 12, 18, 94, 109, 110, 111, 113, 114, 115, 159,
197, 199, 200
Log Book, 5, 1, 13, 16, 20, 25, 27, 31, 32, 52, 64, 68, 107,
146, 147, 148
Magnets, 42, 179, 181, 192
Main Screen, 5, 2, 5, 7, 8, 11, 12, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 21,
23, 31, 33, 40, 45, 67, 68, 71, 77, 79, 86, 91, 94, 110,
111, 114, 115, 125, 139, 140, 145, 149, 150, 157, 159,
160, 162, 166, 173, 197, 199
Main Screen Filtering Level, 23
Main Screen Graph Lines, 23
Main Screen RPM Increment, 23
Master DataMite Specs, 37, 38, 39, 68, 140
Method of Recording Weather Data, 27, 62, 63
Motion Ratio, 120, 165, 204
MPH, 1, 8, 17, 20, 23, 30, 31, 41, 49, 73, 81, 85, 94, 105,
116, 131, 150, 173, 178, 196
MSI, 206
Multiple Tests, 83, 94
Multiplier, 42
New (get data from DataMite), 17, 145, 157
New Test, 5, 16, 18, 67, 68, 72, 73, 144, 145, 146, 147,
148, 149, 172
Noise, 19, 25, 42, 72, 73, 74, 75, 150, 151, 152, 154, 155,
157, 169, 182, 193, 194, 196
Obs. Barometer, ''Hg, 28
Observed flywheel HP, 82
Observed flywheel torque, 82
Open, 4, 8, 12, 18, 23, 31, 46, 50, 51, 67, 68, 109, 110,
112, 113, 114, 115, 146, 147, 159, 199, 202
Open (from all saved tests), 12, 18, 31, 110, 115, 159
Open (from History Log), 18, 110, 159
Open Master DataMite Specs, 46
Operator, 114
Opponent, 31
Other RPM, 41, 42
Pick Individual Items, 79, 81, 82
piston, 60
Preferences, 5, 8, 12, 16, 17, 18, 20, 23, 68, 91, 108, 114,
115, 148, 150
Print, 19, 46, 87, 107, 108, 114, 116, 131, 197
Print List of All Files Fitting These Conditions, 114
Printed Graph Width, % of Page, 26
Printer, 5, 26, 77, 96, 107, 108, 127
Printer Fonts, 26, 108
(C) Performance Trends Inc 2004
Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Pro Version, 5, 1, 2, 5, 7, 9, 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 18, 19, 20,
24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 52, 56, 68, 77, 82, 84, 86, 89, 92, 94,
95, 100, 107, 108, 110, 113, 115, 119, 123, 125, 139,
147, 148, 150, 159, 175
Program Title Comments, 25
Quality, Data, 150
Range, 55, 80
Reaction Time, 31
Record, 1, 144, 145, 170, 171, 172, 180, 184, 186, 191,
192, 193
Recording Segments, DataMite II, 40, 140
Redetermine Beg./End of Runs, 72
registered, 3, 2, 5, 19
Registered Owner, 3, 5
Relative Humidity, 28, 62, 63
Remove Test, 94
Repeatability, 177
Report, 20, 27, 28, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 89, 92, 107,
108, 117, 123, 150, 160, 162
Report Type, 81
Reports, Comparison, 83, 94
Road (tq/HP), 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 11, 12, 19, 24, 27, 68, 72,
77, 81, 82, 84, 86, 87, 89, 107, 109, 110, 112, 113, 126,
139, 140, 144, 145, 148, 169, 173, 178, 183, 199
RPM, 1, 8, 17, 20, 23, 24, 40, 41, 42, 44, 49, 53, 54, 56,
61, 73, 79, 80, 81, 92, 94, 105, 119, 137, 140, 150, 151,
159, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 178, 179, 180,
181, 182, 183, 184, 186, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 201
Run #, 16, 68, 92, 117, 148, 159, 173
Run Description, 16, 68, 148, 172
Run Log, 5, 21, 33, 68, 77, 115, 123, 148, 159
Runs, Graph, 117
Sampling Rate, DataMite II, 39, 140
Save, 1, 8, 10, 12, 18, 19, 23, 25, 29, 37, 39, 45, 46, 67,
71, 72, 87, 89, 109, 110, 111, 112, 115, 116, 140, 147,
172, 204
Save As, 18, 46, 112, 147
Save As Master DataMite Specs, 46
Search (find), 18
Segment Times, 79, 162
Segments, 39, 40, 86, 87, 125, 126, 140, 145, 149, 162
Send Data, 5, 45, 119
Sensor, 6, 24, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 55, 137, 138, 140, 144,
165, 181, 196, 201, 202, 203, 204, 206
Sensor and Calibration, 24, 40, 41, 42, 55, 140, 144, 165,
204
Setup, 3, 37, 72, 131, 139, 170, 171, 186, 191, 192, 194
Setup Mode, 170, 171, 186, 191, 192, 194
Shock Travel, 119, 155
Shock Velocity, 82, 155
Show Files Only Fitting These Conditions, 114
Single Test, 83
Stroke, 41, 59
Appendicies
Summary, 15, 17, 23, 30, 107, 160, 162, 197
Summary Graph, 17
Suspension Analyzer, 1, 105, 111, 119, 120, 165, 166,
167, 203, 204, 206
Tabs, 15, 23, 32
Tabs, dyno runs, 15, 23, 24, 25
Tech Help, 3, 5
Temperature, 28, 29, 55, 73
Test Comments, 16, 67, 68, 108
Test Conds, 9, 12, 16, 20, 62, 63, 67, 68, 82, 146, 178
Test Data Grid, 17
Test Folder Name in Program, 24
test time, 16
thermocouple, 40, 42, 44, 179, 181
Thermocouple, 40, 45, 55, 181
Time Align, 1, 95, 102
Time/Date, 68, 149
torque, 1, 9, 24, 27, 29, 37, 50, 52, 68, 73, 75, 79, 82, 92,
169, 172, 173, 174, 175, 177, 178, 182, 196
Torque, 24, 52, 169, 173, 174, 178, 203
Torque/HP # decimals, 24
Tq, 6, 49, 72, 73, 79, 82, 92, 148, 172, 196
TQ, 172, 174
Track & Event, 16, 68
Track Map, 5, 19, 86, 87, 95, 104, 105, 119, 125, 126,
127, 131, 155, 162, 165, 166, 167
Transfer Program, 2, 206
Troubleshooting, 6, 3, 12, 42, 47, 73, 150, 182, 183, 191
Turn Off Filtering, 114
Type of Test, 27, 68
Unlocking, 2, 5, 8, 19
Unlocking Code, 2, 5, 19
Unlocking Program Options, 2, 5, 19
update rate, 54
Use MM
SS.SS Time, 80
Used?, 40, 140
User Defined, 1, 52
User Specified Max, 55
User Specified Min, 55
Vibration, 73, 137, 150, 152, 182, 193, 194
Weather, 16, 27, 28, 29, 39, 180, 197
Weather Station, 27, 28, 29, 39
Weight, 49, 64, 174
Wet Bulb Temp, 62, 63
What to Report, 79, 80, 92
When Getting New Data from DataMite, 25
Width, 51, 64
Wind, 30, 50
Windows, 1, 3, 1, 2, 18, 19, 26, 51, 96, 110, 111, 112, 127,
131, 197, 198, 199, 200
Windows Printer Setup, 19, 96, 131
211
(C) Performance Trends Inc 2004
212
Road Race-Circle Track DataMite Analyzer
Appendicies
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