Chapter 1 - Rockwell Automation

Chapter 1 - Rockwell Automation
Batch Management Implementation
Publication Number -- Date
Copyright © 2011 Rockwell Automation, Inc.
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•
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•
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Batch Management Implementation
Contents
ABOUT THIS LAB .............................................................................................................................................................5
Document Conventions ..........................................................................................................................................6
Tools & prerequisites .............................................................................................................................................6
Initial Checks ..........................................................................................................................................................9
Controller Setup SoftLogix .....................................................................................................................................9
LAB1: FACTORY TALK BATCH BASICS ...............................................................................................................................29
Operator’s Perspective.........................................................................................................................................29
Engineer’s Perspective .........................................................................................................................................70
R&D (Recipe Author) Perspective.......................................................................................................................101
Plant Management’s Perspective - Batch Reporting .........................................................................................123
Quality’s Perspective - Batch Reporting.............................................................................................................139
LAB2: FACTORY TALK BATCH “EPROCEDURE”..................................................................................................................159
Sample Process Overview: .................................................................................................................................159
Sample SOP ........................................................................................................................................................160
Operator Perspective: ........................................................................................................................................161
Electronic Work instructions operator view .......................................................................................................165
Engineering aspect ............................................................................................................................................169
Equipment Definition .........................................................................................................................................169
Procedure Definition ..........................................................................................................................................173
Configuring Formula Values ..............................................................................................................................177
Configuring the transition conditions ................................................................................................................178
Defining the recipe flow .....................................................................................................................................181
Recipe overview .................................................................................................................................................185
Recipe Details ....................................................................................................................................................186
Creating an eProcedure instruction: ..................................................................................................................191
Displaying images on the operator instructions ................................................................................................208
LAB3: FACTORY TALK BATCH “ MATERIAL MANAGER”......................................................................................................210
Introduction .......................................................................................................................................................210
Split Feeds (Tank Depletion) and Rebinding ......................................................................................................211
Plug Flow Transition ..........................................................................................................................................225
Container Selection ............................................................................................................................................229
Inventory Check .................................................................................................................................................234
Material Management implementation with FactoryTalk Batch ......................................................................238
Solid Receiving Area...........................................................................................................................................241
Liquid Receiving Area .........................................................................................................................................249
Pre-Weigh 1 .......................................................................................................................................................253
LAB4: FACTORYTALK HISTORIAN SE / BATCH ANALYSIS LAB...............................................................................................272
Section 1 – Overview, Highlights of Lab, and Terminology ................................................................................272
Section 2 – Engineer constructs FactoryTalk Historian SE points.......................................................................275
Section 3 – Engineer’s take on the FactoryTalk Batch Interface ........................................................................304
Section 4 – Engineer’s perspective of ProcessBook with BatchView..................................................................325
LAB5: LOGIX BATCH & SEQUENCE MANAGER .................................................................................................................342
SETUP ......................................................................................................................................................................342
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Start the software and open a project ...............................................................................................................342
OPERATOR’S PERSPECTIVE ............................................................................................................................................348
HMI Visualization & Navigation.........................................................................................................................348
LBSM Reporting .................................................................................................................................................382
ENGINEER’S PERSPECTIVE .............................................................................................................................................397
Modifying the Configuration for an Existing Phase ...........................................................................................399
Configuring a New Phase ...................................................................................................................................401
Connecting LBSM to the Controller Code ...........................................................................................................405
R&D (RECIPE AUTHOR) PERSPECTIVE .............................................................................................................................415
LBSM APPENDIX:.......................................................................................................................................................431
LBSM Sample Application ..................................................................................................................................431
FactoryTalk Batch 11.01 Features .....................................................................................................................432
!
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Before you begin
The following steps should be completed before starting the lab exercise:
1. VMware image running. The image is configured for auto logon. Should the auto logon fail and you
receive the logon screen, log on to the desktop with the following credentials:
•
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Username: administrator
Password: Rockwell1
2. For the batch FactoryTalk security users within your lab, you have the option to use the following
FactoryTalk users that have no passwords assigned if you find that easier:
•
Operator username:
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Supervisor username: S1
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Engineer username:
O1
E1
About this lab
There are 5 lab options for you to select from during this session:
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Lab 1 - PlantPAx FactoryTalk Batch Basic Lab (2 hours)
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Lab 2 - PlantPAx FactoryTalk eProcedure Batch Lab (1 hour)
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Lab 3 - PlantPAx FactoryTalk Material Manager Batch Lab (1.5 hour)
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Lab 4 - PlantPAx FactoryTalk Batch Historian SE and Batch Analysis Lab (1.25 hour)
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Lab 5 – Logix Batch & Sequence Manager Lab (1.5 hour)
Labs 1, 2, and 3 use two VMWare images named PASS01 and AppSerBatch. Lab 4 requires three
VMWare images which puts a real strain on this single PC, so be patient at times, please. Lab 5 only
requires the PASS01 VMWare image. Time estimates for each lab have been provided, but they are
simply an estimate. Please note that you may not have time to finish the lab that you desire to take within
a single session. If so, please consider signing up for another session later in the week. The following
are brief descriptions of the labs you may consider taking during this session:
Lab 1: PlantPAx FactoryTalk Batch Basic lab - it exposes the user to the various aspect of the
FactoryTalk Batch core product from the point of view of view of different users, the operator, the
supervisor and the engineer.
Lab 2: PlantPAx Factory Talk eProcedure lab – it show the user how the commonly found paper based
manual operating procedures can be converted into an electronic work instructions driven procedure, this
lab uses predefined generic instructions to create and execute a recipe. It shows how these instructions
can be created if different ones are required.
Lab 3: Material Manager - This lab is designed to demonstrate some of the capabilities of the Material
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manager component of FactoryTalk Batch. It shows how materials can be tracked from its arrival to the
plant, how the tank and silo farm can be managed as well as how material can prioritize and managed for
its usage in the process.
Lab 4: PlantPAx Process Information - provides a reporting and analysis solution for your process
operations. Offering a multitude of client access options, time-series information can be shared with all
levels of the organization providing essential data on how things are running or the ability to drill down
into more detail on how a specific operational component is functioning. Integration with our data
historian provides detailed historical context for further batch analysis or comparison of past performance
against current running operations, past operations, and time-series data. This lab uses the new
Historian Batch Event Interface.
Lab 5: Controller Base Batch Management Implementation - This section provides you with an
opportunity to explore the capabilities of PlantPAx Logix Batch and Sequence Manager (LBSM) from
various users’ perspectives. A “day in the life” perspective of several system users (operator, engineer,
R&D) will be explored to design, control, troubleshoot, and optimize a running batch/sequencing
production process built leveraging the capabilities of the PlantPAx controller based solution.
Document Conventions
Throughout this workbook, the following conventions are used to guide you through the lab materials.
This style or symbol:
Indicates:
Words shown in bold italics
Any item or button that you must click on, or a menu name from
(e.g., RSLogix 5000 or OK)
which you must choose an option or command. This will be an
actual name of an item that you see on your screen or in an
example.
Words shown in bold italics,
An item that you must type in the specified field. This is information
enclosed in single quotes
that you must supply based on your application (e.g., a variable).
Note: When you type the text in the field, remember that you do not
(e.g., 'Controller1')
need to type the quotes; simply type the words that are contained
within them (e.g., Controller1).
The text that appears inside of this gray box is supplemental
NOTE:
information regarding the lab materials, but not information that is
required reading in order for you to complete the lab exercises.
Tech Tip:
The text that follows this symbol may provide you with helpful hints
that can make it easier for you to use this product. Most often,
authors use this “Tip Text” style for important information they want
their students to see.
Note: If the mouse button is not specified in the text, you should click the left mouse button.
Tools & prerequisites
Software programs required:
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•
•
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Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Standard R2 (64 bit) with Microsoft Internet Explorer 9.0
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Standard Edition
Microsoft Office 2010
RSLinx Classic v2.59 (CPR9 SR5)
RSLogix 5000 v20 with Phase Manager option
SoftLogix v20
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
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FactoryTalk Batch v11.01
FactoryTalk eProcedure v11.01
FactoryTalk Material Manager 11.01
FactoryTalk Historian Site Edition v3.0.
FactoryTalk Historian ProcessBook v3.2.0
FactoryTalk Historian DataLink v4.1.1
FactoryTalk PI Batch Interface
FactoryTalk View Site Edition 7.0 (CPR9 SR6)
FactoryTalk Services Platform v2.6 (CPR 9 SR6)
Hardware required for 3 images to run acceptably:
•
High-end I7 processor, or better, 16GB min, high speed disk drives 10,000 rpm, or solid state.
Lab files required are listed below:
On the PASS01 image are the controllers (SoftLogix), and the HMI server.
PlantPAx Logix 5000 Project :
C:\PlantPAx Demo\CLX\ PlantPAx Demo Processor ACD Files
\PlantPAx_Demo_Controller1_2_3_2014.ACD
C:\PlantPAx Demo\CLX\ PlantPAx Demo Processor ACD Files
\PlantPAx_Demo_Controller2_2_3_2014.ACD
PlantPAx View HMI Project :
C:\Users\Public\Public Documents\RSView Enterprise\SE\HMI Projects\PlantPAx CPG HMI Server\
On the AppSerBatch image is the Batch Server:
PlantPAx Batch Project :
C:\Program Files (x86)\Rockwell Software\Batch\PlantPAx Demo\
Equipment\
Instructions\
Journals\
Logs\
Recipes\
Restart\
PlantPAx ProcessBook Historian –
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C:\PlantPAxDemo\Historian
8
Initial Checks
Initial Checks
Before you begin
1. To begin, please make sure you are on PASS01 image. You can confirm this by looking for the
image name in the top banner of the VMWare Workstation (PASS01).
Note: There is two, and possibly, even three images for this lab.
Controller Setup SoftLogix
1. SoftLogix v. 20 should launch with your image logged on to the desktop. Everything should be
running - SoftLogix controllers, FTBatch server, eProcedure server, Batch System Status server,
data server, HMI server and client, etc. There should be no faults in the controllers and the mode
should be running.
First, verify that the controller appears to be running with no faults.
A red light on the controller OK status indicates that a fault has occurred.
Note: If the SoftLogix controller is faulted in slot 2, you will need to use the
Chassis Monitor to clear the fault and then place it into Run mode. You may
clear the fault by right-mouse clicking on the faulted controller slot. Select Clear
Major Faults from the task menu to clear the fault.
9
Initial Checks
2. Your SoftLogix controller should look like the following if no issues exist. Verify controllers are
running (the green box is lite up next to RUN):
Note: If the SoftLogix controllers in slot 2 and 3 are not Running, you will need
to right-mouse click on each controller to place it into the Run mode. This may
take a few moments to finish.
3. If your image did not boot with running applications and logged onto the desktop, please let your
instructor know. This may indicate that there is a problem with your station. If another nearby
station is open, you may consider moving to that station to save time. It could take about 10-15
minutes to load and boot your application software for this lab.
4. If any of your slots in the SoftLogix controller have a red X, move to step 8. If you are unsure how
to rectify this issue, let your instructor know.
Skip Ahead: If there are no apparent problems with SoftLogix which means
each controller is running, and the status on each controller is OK, and
there are no Red X boxes in the chassis, please skip ahead by going to the
next section called Batch Setup Checks
10
Initial Checks
5. If SoftLogix is not launched as a running application, please launch the SoftLogix controller
software that will emulate Logix series controllers in the field. Please allow a few minutes for this
application to startup and display. Wait several minutes for the green light next to the OK to
become lite up indicating everything is OK. If there is a red X in a slot, go to step 8. A red light
on the controller OK status indicates that a fault has occurred during startup. You will need to
clear the fault and place the controller into Run.
6.
Place the controllers into Run mode by right mouse clicking on a controller slot and selecting
RUN:
7. It should look like this:
11
Initial Checks
8. If there is a red X in either controller slot, you will need to remove the slot and then add it back
again. You will also have to load the controller software to the appropriate controller slot. Got to
the next section for loading and setting up the controller, if needed.
9. It may take a few minutes for SoftLogix to load. If there no slots with a red X, try to place the
controller into Run mode. Select the controller and right-mouse click the RUN menu option.
12
Initial Checks
Loading the Controller:
Skip Ahead: If there are no apparent problems with SoftLogix which means
each controller is running, and the status on each controller is OK, and
there are no Red X boxes in the chassis, please skip ahead by going to the
next section called Batch Setup Initial Checks.
The next section only describes fixing controller or EtherNet slot failures.
1. First we will show you how to fix a controller slot failure. Next we will show you how to fix an
EtherNet slot failure. A red X in the controller slot means there was a problem. Follow this section
for how to resolve a red X in the controller as shown here for slot 2:
2. Select the controller with the red X, then right-mouse click to remove it.
13
Initial Checks
3. The Remove Module window appears, please check the Clear Chassis checkbox and select OK.
4. The warning message appears, select OK.
5. Select the empty slot that was removed and right-mouse click to Create a new module.
14
Initial Checks
6. Follow the wizard to create a new controller whether slot 2 or slot 3. For this example we are
showing slot 2 only. Do the same for slot 3 if needed. Select OK.
7. In the General window, change the Memory Size to 8192, then select Next.
8. Take the default on NT System window, and select Finish.
15
Initial Checks
9. From the start bar, launch RSLogix5000, Start > RSLogix 5000.
10. Open the appropriate .ACD file for either Slot 2 (Controller 1) or Slot 3 (Controller 2). For this
example we are choosing Controller 1 for Slot 2.
16
Initial Checks
11. Select PlantPAxDemo_Controller1_2_3_2014.ACD control file from File menu under the recent
open listings, or use File>Open menu and browse to “C:\PlantPAx Demo\CLX\ PlantPAx Demo
Processor ACD Files \” folder to select the PlantPAxDemo_Controller1_2_3_2014.ACD file.
For Controller 2 in Slot 3 you would use PlantPAxDemo_Controller2__2_3_2014.ACD
12. Please verify that you opened the correct ACD file for the correct controller. Observe the RSLogix
5000 title bar to verify that the proper file was opened as shown:
17
Initial Checks
13. From the communications menu, select Communications > Download.
14. Select Download
15. From the communications menu, select Run Mode.
18
Initial Checks
Another way to place the controller into Run is by selecting the controller within SoftLogix.
Right-mouse click the controller slot to display the menu for options to set into RUN mode.
16. In RSLogix 5000, right-mouse click on the controller to edit Properties, select the Date/Time tab.
19
Initial Checks
17. Select the Set Date, Time and Zone from Workstation; select OK to close the Properties
window.
20
Initial Checks
18. Minimize RSLogix5000.
19. Repeat these steps for the other controller only if it is needed due to a red X.
20. If your controller’s EtherNet card has failed due to a red X, it will look like this:
21. Right-mouse click the failed slot to Remove. Please Check “Clear Chassis Monitor module
configuration” and then select OK.
22. Right-mouse click the empty slot to Create a new module.
21
Initial Checks
23. Select the EtherNet/IP type for slot 4, select OK
24. Select Next,
25. Select Finish
26. Verify that EtherNet indicator status is OK.
22
Initial Checks
Batch Setup
1. Your two controllers should be running without faults. From the Start menu open Batch Service
Manager, select Start > Batch Service Manager.
2. From the Batch Service Manager drop-down, select FactoryTalk Batch Server service and
press the Start/Continue button. (If currently running, first stop, and then restart)
3. From the Batch Service Manager drop-down, select FactoryTalk eProcedure Server service
and press the Start/Continue button. (If currently running, first stop, and then restart)
23
Initial Checks
4. When the eProcedure traffic lights turns green, re-select FactoryTalk Batch Server service,
and select the Server Statistics
button.
5. The server statistics window will open. The General tab will show you the status of the three
data servers configured in the area model as well as other information. GGG indicates that all 3
data servers configured for this area model have a Good status.
6. Select the PCD Communications tab, press the Start
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button to verify all tags.
Initial Checks
7. Confirm that tags verify Status is Complete and there are zero bad tags.
Note: If bad tags exist, you will need to stop and restart the batch server service. Inform
your instructor that there was a problem. Please verify tags again once communication is
GOOD. You want 0 bad tags before moving on in the lab or you will have problems
8. Select the Cancel
button to close the Server Statistics window.
9. From the Batch Service Manager drop-down, Select BatchSystemStatus service and press
the Start/Continue button. (If currently running, first stop, and then restart)
25
Initial Checks
10. When the BatchSystemStatus light turns green, Close the Service Manager.
Batch System Status
The Batch System Status service is a PlantPAx tool used to move important batch server
data into the controller. This application can be found on the Rockwell Automation
Knowledgebase “Answer ID 62366 – PlantPAx Table of Contents”. Additional information
on its use can be found later in this lab.
26
Initial Checks
HMI Setup - Client
1. On the PASS01 image, there is an icon located on the desktop,
, please double click
to launch the SE Client Wizard, or another alternative is to launch from the Start menu - Start >
FactoryTalk View Site Edition Client and do step 2, if the HMI client is not already running.
2. In the FactoryTalk View SE Client Wizard dialog select the “FTView SE Client.cli” client file
in the Most recently used configuration files:
27
Initial Checks
Press the Run button.
3. Wait while the HMI Client starts up. When the main screen is displayed, you may proceed.
4. Start up is now complete. Begin your desired lab section.
28
Lab 1: Factory Talk Batch
“Basics”
Lab1: FactoryTalk Batch “Basics”
Lab1: Factory Talk Batch Basics
Operator’s Perspective
This is Lab 1 of 5 possible labs that you could take. This lab starts with a focus on the operator’s
perspective of S88 FactoryTalk batch. You will be exposed to a manufacturing facility via the PlantPAx
HMI graphics and navigation displays. This section will take you through the process of browsing master
recipes, creating and commanding control recipes, and observing the S88 components of the batch.
While the batch is running, you will have a chance to explore the different integrated views of the system
as well as interact with the batch through standard operator tasks. These include: completing manual
additions, following electronic work instructions, performing signature signoffs, changing runtime set point
values, adding comments into the batch record, and much more.
To start this lab we will get you familiarized with the PlantPAx HMI interface that we built for this lab and
demo. While the demo software is not available for download, most of the components that we used for
building this demo are available for download such as the PlantPAx library graphics, and controller code
components.
29
Lab 1: Factory Talk Batch
“Basics”
HMI Visualization & Navigation
Security & Login
1. From the SE Startup Display, please change the logon user to BatchOper by selecting the
Login button,
in the upper right quadrant of the display.
2. At the login window, type User name = ‘BatchOper’ with the Password = ‘Operator’ and click
OK. For those that don’t like to type, use the shortcut User name (e.g. letter O, number 1) =
‘O1” with no password.
3. This will cause the SE graphic display to automatically change to the CPG section of this Demo
as shown below:
30
Lab 1: Factory Talk Batch
“Basics”
31
Lab 1: Factory Talk Batch
“Basics”
HMI Application
In this section you will familiarize yourself with the basic HMI displays for the batch process.
1. The Process Overview display shows all the major equipment components and units for the
batch process. There are buttons on the navigation bar that will take you quickly to areas of
interest. Take some time now to look at the three premix unit displays. Select the Batch
Premix 1 button:
2. The “Premix 1 Process Display” appears
3. Use the navigation bar to view Batch Premix 2 which is not an automated unit. The tasks
performed in this unit are all performed manually by field operators. Fortunately, we have a
component of the Factory Talk Batch product that allows you to make your manual batching
S88 compliant with structured recipes following SOPs, electronic batch records for complete
paperless record archive, manual batch reporting, electronic security and signatures. This can
be combined with material manager for a comprehensive manual batch solution including
material tracking.
32
Lab 1: Factory Talk Batch
“Basics”
Manual Batch Process – There is no automated equipment
The PlantPAx batch system display shows no process equipment for the
Premix 2 unit. None of this equipment in this unit has been automated. All
batching for this unit is done by direct operator interaction. Prior to our
eProcedure product, operators would use clipboards and sheets of paper to
capture their batch information. Now, it can all be done electronically with
more accuracy, better standardization and security, greater speed and higher
efficiencies.
4. Continue to view the system by selecting the navigation bar buttons for Batch Premix 3:
5. Notice the navigation bar is completely full of different buttons. This is called the Batch System
menu. The previous menu we will call the CPG menu bar.
33
Lab 1: Factory Talk Batch
“Basics”
Batch System Menu bar:
and
6. Choose the appropriate buttons to investigate the following process equipment and units:
a. Reactor Area (Reactor 1 & Reactor 2)
b.
Raw Material Small Tanks, Pre-Weigh, Silos and Tanks
7. There is another way to get to the batch units (Premix, Reactor, etc.). It is through the Process
Overview display shown here:
8. How do you get to this Process Overview display? Through enabling the CPG Menu navigation
bar. Notice there is a CPG Menu button on the Batch System menu bar, select it. The following
CPG navigation bar will appear:
CPG Menu:
34
Lab 1: Factory Talk Batch
“Basics”
and
9. Select the Process Overview button at the far left to get the display. To go to a specific unit
display, simply select the unit graphic such as Premix 1,
10. Something to notice about this display, it is a larger process display than what you saw earlier
for Premix 1 using the Batch System menu. This display does not initialize with the integrated
batch graphics for examining, controlling, and commanding recipes.
11. Next to the Premix 1 unit graphic, there should be a batch interface area to allow you to display
more batch interface functionality. Please locate these buttons on the graphic:
35
Lab 1: Factory Talk Batch
“Basics”
Note: These buttons will not be present if your batch server is not running.
If this is your situation, please start the batch server.
12. The Operator Instructions button displays the instruction page provided by eProcedure for
manual batch instructions that might be relevant to a batch within that unit. A batch can be fully
automated, fully manual, or a combination of manual and automated.
Note: To close the Batch Instruction window, select the red X checkbox at
the upper right-hand corner of the window.
13. The Batch Premix1 button displays the main interfaces for commanding a controlling a recipe.
Once selected, in order to return to the full size Premix display, select the PreMix 1 button.
14. The Batch Configuration button allows you to quickly set specific criteria for some of the batch
process equipment. The Tank Status popup window appears.
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Lab 1: Factory Talk Batch
“Basics”
Close the window by selecting the red X at the upper right-hand corner.
15. The Unit Timer button displays any timer information that may be running for a control recipe
within the unit. The timer equipment phase data will not be present, since no control recipes
are being processed by this unit.
16. If you are still showing the CPG menu navigation bar, please change to the Batch System
menu navigation bar by selecting the Batch System Menu
button.
17. On the Batch System menu navigation bar, select the Production Overview button
to display details about any batches in the unit equipment including Preweigh tanks, Premixers
and Reactors.
37
Lab 1: Factory Talk Batch
“Basics”
The Production Overview display will open. This screen highlights key information for each unit
vessel as well instruction prompts if enabled. When you execute batches later in this lab, you
will return to this screen for system wide updates. This data is provided through the service
that was started earlier in the lab called Batch System Status.
PlantPAx Batch System Status
The PlantPAx batch system status application collects runtime data from the
batch server and downloads directly to pre-defined Logix controller data
structures. This data is then displayed through pre-build FactoryTalk View
“Global Objects”. This screen contains no custom VBA scripting.
18. Another important function on this display is the feature to enable instruction prompts
notification. Select the Enable Instruction Prompts,
to set orange
background “?” question marks as signals when a manual instruction needs attention by the
operator.
19. If you get a script error, select Yes to close it.
NOTE: the orange background ? mark appears when there is an active prompt awaiting
the operator’s attention.
38
Lab 1: Factory Talk Batch
“Basics”
21. From the Batch System navigation menu bar, select the Batch Overview button.
22. The following Batch Status Overview graphic will open. This standard PlantPAx screen offers
integrated FactoryTalk Batch visualization components. There are buttons that provide
comprehensive options for S88 batch interactions by the operators. The top portion of the
screen will display control recipes in a top-down list. The lower portion of the screen will
provide a SFC view of a recipe. The lower portion can also display a tabular view of a recipe
for those that prefer a table format.
23. From the Batch System navigation menu bar, select the eProcedure View button,
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Lab 1: Factory Talk Batch
“Basics”
24. The Batch eProcedure display will open. This is an HMI interface that the operators can use for
dynamic manual batch instructions. SOPs can be transformed into S88 compliant recipes,
batch operations can be made more consistent, clipboards and paper can become electronic
records with security and signature timestamps. Integrated troubleshooting instructions, quick
access to material safety datasheets, and other information can be integrated with the batch to
give operators quick and relevant access to information they need.
40
Lab 1: Factory Talk Batch
“Basics”
25. From the Batch System navigational menu bar, select the Batch Premix 1 button
26. The Batch Premix 1 display will open. This standard template for the “Batch Unit Display” has
pre-defined section for the process Unit Display, the Batch List View, the Batch SFC/Table
View, the Dynamic Runtime Control buttons, the Create and Remove Batch buttons, and the
Operator Instructions.
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Lab 1: Factory Talk Batch
“Basics”
27. You will discover a similar display format for each of the other unit displays: Batch Premix 3,
Reactor 1, and Reactor 2. Using the PlantPAx “Batch Unit” display template will help you build
all your own specific Batch Unit displays quickly.
28. Go to the Batch System navigational menu bar, select the Batch Add-a-Batch button,
29. The “Add Batch” popup will open. From this graphic the user can select some the more
common batches with the option to automatically start the batch, and remove it when complete.
This screen is configured during the engineering stage of a project to point to specific units and
recipes. Generally, this screen should only be used for small systems or systems where a
fixed number of recipes exist. Different types of unit binding might be added, but is not shown
here for this lab’s common recipes.
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30. From the Batch System navigational menu bar, select the Batch Prompts button
31. The Batch Prompts popup window will open. This is the “Prompts List” screen. These prompts
will be generated by the batch as it runs. These prompts are programmed into the equipment
phase and recipe to prompt the operator at the required time for a response. That response
could be a simple acknowledgement – OK to continue. It could be many other things as well a prompt for recipe data such as, amounts to use in the batch, time to agitate, blending speed,
preferred unit to use, etc. It will be different for every batch process to meet the specific needs
for the operator to interact with the running batch.
32. From the Batch System navigational menu bar, select the Batch Signatures button,
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33. The Batch Signatures popup window will open. This is the “Signatures List” screen. These
signatures exist to allow users to define and enforce timestamps with user identity for
configurable actions or events. This helps users apply multiple levels of security to various
aspects of the batch process interactions, as well as batch data such as, parameters or reports.
34. From the Batch System navigational menu bar, select the Batch Instructions button,
35. The “Batch Instructions Page” popup window will open. This is the “Instructions List” display.
Manual Batch instructions will appear in this window for recipes requiring manual batching. The
instructions are presented in html form as coded for each particular manual equipment phase.
This text instruction is customized by each user to present appropriate instructions at
appropriate times. Specific batch data can be easily integrated into the instruction which is
customized by each user. Pictures, hyperlink, and videos can be embedded into these
instructions providing operators additional data along with their instructions. The buttons at the
bottom filter the instructions by unit.
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View Recipe List & Create a Batch
In this section you will start using the displays to create, command, and use batches.
1. From the Batch System navigational menu bar, select the Batch Overview button,
2. Select the Create
command button within this display. This allows you to create a
control recipe (i.e. batch) from the list of master recipes that have been released to production
and provided that your security authentication allows you such permissions.
3. The create batch popup will open. Select ”PRODUCT_A_PM_RX” from the list, and select the
OK button
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4. The Batch Creation popup window will open.
Tech Tip:
 When using this screen, the user
can enter a custom “Batch_ID”,
scale the batch, fill out any runtime
formula values, and select which unit
to run the batch on.
5. In the Batch ID entry box, replace the default text with “PRODUCT_A.01”.
NOTE: This Batch ID will be referenced in a later section of this lab.
6. Confirm that the Scale entry box is 100. This specifies that the new control recipe will be a fullsize batch. Adjusting this scale will proportionally adjust all formula values that are allowed to
scale like material amounts.
7. From the Unit Binding dropdown, select the PREMIX_01, and REACTOR_01 units.
8. Select the Create
button
NOTE: Alternatively, the user can add a batch through the pre-configured “Add-a-Batch”
graphic. It is important to note that the “Add Batch” screen limits unit and recipe
selection to a finite number of pre-defined instances as configured by your engineer. The
example shown above is the most flexible option. All new recipes show up in this list
without additional engineering effort.
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9. The newly created control recipe will appear on the batch overview graphic within the batch view
list. Select this newly created recipe with your mouse cursor. The procedure view, or SFC view
below will display the recipe steps (i.e. unit procedures, operations) as a sequential function
chart, or SFC. This can be altered to show a table view as well, but we don’t recommend that for
this lab.
NOTE: This graphic has been configured for default un-filtered view of the batch system.
Dynamic filter buttons have been configured in the upper right side of the screen. Also
notice this screen defaults to show the SFC view in the bottom of the screen. The filters
and default view are basic design configurations of the graphic. During runtime, the
operator can change the filter and view through the buttons on the right side of the
screen. It will only show if operations within the unit procedure for that control recipe is
actual active for the recipe. Filters can be dangerous if you forget to disable them. Use
the No Filter button to disable any filters.
NOTE: Take a moment to look at the data in the batch list table. Each line item shows
key data for the batch. Also note that the recipe utilizes batch comments. These
comments offer additional information for the runtime user. In the bottom window, the
screen is set to default to SFC view. You can change this to table view by selecting the
“table view” button on the right hand side. Give it a try!
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10. Now let’s look at the Premix_01 unit display. From the Batch System navigational menu Batch
Premix 1 button,
11. The Batch Premix 1 display will open, select the batch. If the SFC view is too small, you can
adjust the size of the display by selecting the Zoom +, or Zoom – buttons. Give them a try.
NOTE: This graphic has been configured with a static filter to only show Premix_01 unit
batches.
12. The SFC display is showing the highest level of the recipe, the Procedure level that contains unit
procedures. We want to go to the Operation level of the recipe. Double-click on the PREMIX_01
Unit Procedure step in the SFC View.
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13. The Operation step,
for the unit procedure in Premix 01 should appear
within the SFC view. Double click on it to get to the Phase level of the recipe.
14. Your SFC View should look something like this,
15. Before we start this control recipe, let’s look at a few more features of the integrated graphic for
Premix 1. You should have already tried the Zoom buttons, now let’s try the Table View button.
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16. From the Batch Table View, Select the ADDITION_01:1 phase line 5.
17. Below the Table View display, the Properties
View ActiveX and right-mouse click for Properties menu.
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button, or select the Batch Table
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18. The Properties popup will appear. The default Parameters tab has focus.
NOTE: The Parameters tab shows all configured formula values for the phase.
19. Double-click the Setpoint_01 line. The Change Parameter Value popup will appear. This
gives a user, with appropriate security access, the ability to change recipe values.
20. Select the Cancel
button.
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21. From the Properties popup, select the Reports tab.
NOTE: The Reports tab will show the values for this step once he phase is run, and the
report values are reported to the batch journal, typically, this occurs when the phase
completes. Reports can be sent at any time by the phase logic to the journal, but most
do so at the end of their running logic, or automatically in Terminal state.
22. From the Properties popup, select the Recipe tab.
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NOTE: The Recipe tab will show the header data for the recipe, including:
Name identifier, code, version information, descriptions, & abstracts.
23. From the Properties popup, select the Binding tab.
NOTE: The Binding tab shows all unit requirements including binding requirements and
preferences.
24. Select the Close
button.
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Run & Interact with the Batch
Start Batch
1. From the Premix 1 screen, select the Start
button.
2. The batch will begin. Active steps are highlighted in green and the dynamic control buttons are
changed to allow valid commands during execution.
NOTE: The first activity for this batch will be adding two ingredients to the tank while
agitating. You can view the material and amount setpoint information in the list table
view. You can view the dynamic runtime values in the totalizer blocks on the screen.
NOTE: If you prefer, try the alternative SFC view by selecting the SFC button on the bottom right
of the screen. Also note in the lower right hand corner a text box that shows the
messages of the Message phases, informing what the recipe step is doing.
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3. The batch continues by adding the third material, Material C, also while agitating. When the
automatic ingredient additions are complete, the batch proceeds.
4. Now we will add a comment into the batch journal. Select the Comment
button.
5. The comment box will open. Enter a comment for the batch journal and select OK
NOTE: Batch comments get entered into the master electronic batch journal. This allows
a user to enter batch activity commentary.
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6. The batch continues to the manual additions and recirculation step. Select the Hold command
to see both, the state transition, and command options change.
7. The phases will go Held, and the Restart command button will become active. Select Restart
command
NOTE: In this stage of the recipe, we introduce manual operations via eProcedure.
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Once the batch is Running and the Premix is recirculating you can call up the manual instructions
through the button directly above the batch list towards the middle section called Operator
Instructions,
Or you may select the Batch Instructions
navigational menu bar.
button from the Batch System
NOTE: the orange background ? mark appears when there is an active prompt awaiting
the operator’s attention.
8. The “Batch Instructions Page” popup will appear. This popup contains all active instructions for
the system. Please enter 35.2 for the “Quantity” and “ABCD” for the “Lot Name” Box, and select
the OK
button.
NOTE: When this popup is accessed from the unit display, it will be filtered for that unit.
When accessed from the menu button bar, it will be unfiltered. The user can filter the
display at any time through the buttons on the bottom of the screen.
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9. Wait to confirm that the instruction shows complete
10. Select the Close
button.
11. The next stage of the batch will continue to recirculate as well as start agitation for 30 seconds.
12. Next, the batch advances to the “Sample PH” step.
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NOTE: In this stage of the recipe, we will again use manual operations via eProcedure.
13. You can call up the manual instructions display through the button called, Operator Instructions
, or you may select the Batch Instructions
Batch System navigational menu bar.
14. This is a two part prompt, so select the OK button
message to acknowledge that a sample was taken.
button from the
to the far right of the instructional
15. The second step of this prompt will be to enter a pH reading.
NOTE: Electronic Signatures and eProcedure
Batch Electronic Signatures are electronically recorded representations of a signature
and their associated data. Signature data includes timestamps, security permissions,
meanings for Signoffs, and comments. When a Signature Request is created, an entry is
recorded in the Event Journal. If the Signature Request is user generated, a Signature
dialog box is displayed to the user. Additional journal entries are recorded when a
Signature Request is completed, user cancelled, system cancelled or when a Signoff is
successful or unsuccessful. These electronic signatures include all the components
necessary for compliance with 21 CFR Part 11.
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The requested user information in a Signature dialog box is defined by the Signature
Template configured in the FactoryTalk Batch area model. Signature Templates
determine the number of Signoffs required to complete a Signature Request. Each
Signoff has associated security permissions and may require a comment. Signature
Templates are used with Command Verification Policies, Parameter Deviation
Verification Policies, General Usage Phase Logic Requests or eProcedure Step
Verifications to generate Signature Requests displayed in the Batch View, ActiveX
Controls and eProcedure.
16. Enter a pH of 75 and select OK. This is an erroneous entry. The expected entry should have
been 7.5 but we want to simulate an accidental entry without the decimal.
17. The signature page comes up for a sign off as 75 is outside the acceptable range. Select the
Cancel Signature.
and select YES to the confirm prompt.
button at the bottom center of signature display,
18. This will strike out the old value and allow the operator to enter a new value. All the data and
events that happened are being recorded in the journal. This is the equivalent of striking out a
value on paper and entering a new value.
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19. Now let’s follow through with an out of range value. Modify the previous value 75 and enter a
value of ‘10’ in the pH field and select the OK
button to the far right.
20. This causes another electronic signature since the pH value is still out of bounds to the high side.
Scroll to the bottom of the prompt screen, enter an Operator User ID = “BatchOper” and
Password = “Operator” or User ID = ‘O1” no password – a blank password.
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21. Enter an optional comment, and select the Sign
button.
NOTE: This signature template has been configured for double sign off with optional
comments. The first signature must be from an “Operator”
22. Scroll to the bottom of the screen, enter a Supervisor/Engineer User ID = “Supervisor” and
Password = “Supervisor” or User ID = ‘S1’ no password – blank password.
23. Enter an optional comment, and select the Sign
button.
.
24. Wait to confirm that the instruction shows complete
25. Select the red X on the Instruction Page window at the far upper right to close the window.
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26. The batch progresses to the final step which is to transfer the tank’s contents and empty the tank.
The Reactor 01 unit is now running and the Premix 01 unit procedure is complete.
27. Switch to the Reactor_01 Unit display by selecting it from the Batch System navigational menu
bar - Batch Reactor 1,
28. Our focus needs to change to the reactor unit since this contains the batch. Double click on the
SFC step for the Reactor_01 unit procedure step to go to the S88 operation level.
29. Double click on the SFC step for the Reactor_01 unit procedure step to go into the S88 operation
level.
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30. Double click on the SFC step for the Reactor_01 operation step to go to the S88 phase level.
Wait until the transitions to the PROMPT_OK step which requires another operator interaction to
continue.
31. Notice when the Instruction prompt indicator tells you there is an unanswered instruction for the
reactor 01 unit. Open the manual instructions display through the button called, Operator
Instructions
within the Unit display, or you may select the Batch Instructions
button from the Batch System navigational menu bar.
32. It is asking you to hook up the reactor discharge to a storage tank. In order to do this, you need
to go to the reactor 01 display. Close the instruction window, on the unit reactor 01 display,
select the Reactor 1 button
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33. Once you do this as the operator, there is a manual transfer switch on the far right bottom of the
display, you can set the transfer path here.
34. Please set the Manual Transfer Panel to Storage Tank 1 by clicking the panel on the display.
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35. Once you have done this, go back to the instruction prompt. A quick way is to use the button in
the Reactor 01 graphic, select Operator Instructions
36. For the instruction prompt, enter your comments into the text as shown here:.
37. Select the OK button to progress the phase. The next instruction prompts you to input your
transfer location chosen. Select STRG_TNK_01, then select OK
38. Wait to confirm that the instruction shows complete
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39. Select the red X on the Instruction Page window at the far upper right to close the window.
40. Got to the Reactor 1 unit display to see the rest of the recipe execute. The Temperature control
phase will complete as the material transfer comes to an end. In the SFC view you should see
the final phase steps empty the reactor.
41. On the Control Recipe List, you will see the batch state go from Running to Complete,
42. With the tank empty, the batch is now complete; please select the Remove
in the bottom right hand corner to take the batch off the list.
button
43. Congratulations, you are now a fully qualified operator!! We should shut the batch server down
since we are done with production. From the Start menu, launch the Batch Service Manager,
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44. Issue a Stop command to the batch server,
The Operator’s Perspective is now complete!
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Notes
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Engineer’s Perspective
System modifications may be required over time; therefore, this user perspective will introduce you to
several standard system engineering changes. These include: adding new system capabilities to the
batch area model, enabling system optimization by defining new unit attributes, and synchronizing the
batch area model with the Logix controller to pick up engineering changes.
In this lab you will be making equipment requirement changes, controller changes and recipe changes.
To begin you will use the Batch Equipment Editor which is a graphical interface used to configure and
maintain an equipment database, or a virtual representation of the ISA88 physical model for the facility.
This equipment database, or what is often referred to as the Area Model, is saved as a customer relevant
projectname.cfg file. For this lab we named it, PlantPAx_Demo.cfg.
This equipment database is accessed upon startup by the Equipment Editor as well as other Batch
applications such as Recipe Editor, Batch Server service, and eProcedure Server. Any equipment
changes often require a restart of these applications to enforce those changes.
Later you will use the Recipe Editor tool that allows you to create, edit, and maintain your master recipes.
While the area model represents the equipment database, this database is the basis to provide a list of
available units and phases for the recipe building tool. During recipe verification, the equipment database
is used to ensure that the designated equipment is capable of executing the procedures. During recipe
execution, resource arbitration functions use the equipment database to allocate equipment based on
recipe and operator requests.
The importance of the area model cannot be overstated. It is the foundation for a properly designed
ISA88 compliant batch system. Modular batch automation is a key benefit of having a properly defined
area model. Other components are defined by the Equipment Editor inside the area model, such as
arbitration resources, unit tags, parameter tags, report tags, and data server connections for interfaces to
process-connected devices, or other control system objects (e.g. simulator, PC phases, etc.).
View & Edit Batch Area Model
Every batch project should maintain the following folders (sub-directories) for batch-related files and data:

Instructions (a repository for eProcedure instructions)

Journals (a repository for batch records #.evt)

Logs (a repository for the batchsvr.log file)

Recipes (a repository for binary, or xml recipes)

Restart (a repository for restart boot data)
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For purposes of time in this lab exercise, your project folders have been created for you under
“C:\Program Files (x86)\Rockwell Software\Batch\PlantPAxDemo”. This is on the AppSerBatch
image, and not the PASS01 image. We will use the Equipment Editor on the PASS01 image.
1. Go to the AppSerBatch image. Open Windows Explorer and go the above to view the project
folders.
2. Return to the PASS01 image. From the start bar, open the batch equipment editor, Start >
Batch Equipment Editor.
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3. The equipment editor will open. Select File  Open
4.
Select the PlantPAx_Demo.cfg and click the Open
button
5. The “PlantPAx Demo” area model will open and display all defined process cells. Let’s explore
this area model where we have only one process cell named PRODUCTION,
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6. Double-Click the PRODUCTION
icon
7. All units defined in the “Production” process cell are displayed such as PREMIX_01,
REACTOR_02, etc.
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8.
Double-Click the PREMIX_01
unit icon
All phases defined in the “Premix_01” unit are displayed.
9. Select the Up
arrow to navigate back to the unit listing
Browse a few more units within the area model by:
a. Double-Click the Reactor_01
unit icon.
b. Double-Click the Reactor_02
unit icon.
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NOTE: If dealing with many units within an area model, the Location Bar View may help
you identify where you are working at all times. Use the View menu, and select Location
Bar to toggle it on if off as seen in this example below:
10. Set the Location Bar in the editor window. From the menu, select View – Location Bar so it is
checked. This item acts as a toggle – check/uncheck.
11. Let’s edit an existing phase class. Return to the PREMIX_01
unit using the Up
arrow and drilll down into the equipment phase level of the unit. Once there, please select
(single click) the PM01_AGITATE
equipment phase icon seen below:
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NOTE: When you single click the phase instance, the associated phase class is
highlighted on the left. This is the quick way to find the phase class for the specific
phase instance.
NOTE: When you double click the phase instance (of a PhaseManager phase), this will
launch directly into that phase in your RSLogix5000 project. If you do this, it may take a
moment to load the RSLogix 5000 application. The Equipment Editor must be on the
same computer as RSLogix5000 and the ACD file to double click on a phase in the area
model and have it go to the phase in the RSLogix5000 project.
The phase class for the equipment phase instance will become highlighted on the far left:
12. Right-mouse click on the AGITATE phase class icon listed under Phases column at the left to
open the phase class configuration window - Edit Phase: AGITATE.
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This will bring up the Edit Phase: AGITATE popup window:
NOTE: Phases are the lowest level of procedural elements in the procedural control
model. In FactoryTalk Batch, phases are defined as process actions and are configured
with Parameters and Reports.
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Parameters are used by FactoryTalk Batch to send desired process information (such as
amounts, temperatures and flow-rates) to the Process Connected Device.
Reports are used by the Process Connected Device to send actual process information
(e.g. material amounts, levels, pressures, temperatures, density, etc.) back to
FactoryTalk Batch.
Phases are instantiated on a per unit basis and serve as the building blocks for master
recipes.
13. Under the General tab, the user can assign the phase class name, choose an appropriate icon,
enable Control Strategy, enable Message Partners, enable Material Based Recipe phase type,
configure Tag Locking and define appropriate # of Parameters, Report and Request tags.
Select the Parameters tab. Four parameters are defined for this agitation phase. Upon starting
the agitation phase in the recipe, the batch server will download data from the recipe to the
corresponding controller automatically for any parameters with DL on Start checked. The
parameters that are not define as DL on Start; can be sent by the Batch Server to the controller
when the phase logic requests the data.
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14. Select the Reports tab. Three report tags are defined for this agitation phase in the controller.
When the agitation phase completes, the batch server will upload data from the controller phase
and save it to the batch journal file for all report tags defined as UL on Terminal State.
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Let’s begin with a manufacturing scenario, where quality has recently noticed product issues.
They have requested that the tank level be recorded for each agitation step.
NOTE: In your role as engineer, you have identified that a new phase report register
must be added to the premix agitation phase class. Since we are already there let’s
make that change.
15. Near the bottom of the reports tab window on the AGITATE phase class configuration window,
please select the Add Report
button
16. Fill out the new report register by entering Name = Level and Enum/E.U.= %, and check the UL
on Terminal State checkbox.
17. On the configuration window, select the Apply
button to make the new change.
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button, then select the OK
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NOTE: The UL on terminal state is the indicator for batch to automatically upload this
value when the phase completes. No additional logic is required.
NOTE: You have now successfully added the new value to the batch area model
definition. Now we need to update the controller. We will use the phase manager
“synchronize” feature to make the change.
18. We need to save the changes. Therefore, save your area model which defines your S88
equipment model. Please select File  Save, from the menu of the Equipment Editor, or use
the Save
button icon.
The “Audit Comments” box will appear. Comments entered here can be viewed in the change
log later. If you desire, enter a comment and then select the OK
Congratulations, you have now made a change in your equipment model which batch server will
become aware of upon a service restart. However, the controller and the recipes are not aware
of this change. So we have more work to do.
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Synchronize Batch & Logix
NOTE: Equipment Phase Synchronization will synchronize equipment in the FactoryTalk
Batch Area Model and RSLogix 5000 project file. Synchronization can operate bidirectionally, i.e. synchronize changes in Area Model down to project file, or synchronize
changes in project file up to the Area Model. Synchronization will result in building new
phase(s) (structure-wise), phase tags (e.g. phase.StepIndex, phase.State, etc.), and
phase parameter/report in the DESTINATION automatically. The Phase Tag will be
automatically built as a GLOBAL “PHASE” Pre-defined type tag and all phase recipe and
report parameter tags will be built local to the phase itself, i.e. each phase will have its
own “Phase Tags”. Other than the Phase associated recipe and report parameters tags,
users may wish to build (declare) more phase specific (local) tags, such as, timer(s),
temporary result or calculation buffers, etc. Note: Phase recipe parameter tag(s) will
have “Usage” attribute of “Input” and Phase report tag(s) will have “Usage” attribute of
“Output”.
From the Area model in the Equipment Editor, you will initiate the Synchronization feature
to automatically build the PhaseManager phases in the RSLogix 5000 project.
1. First we need to ensure that our Logix file is offline. If the Logix 5000 project is open and online,
Alt-Tab to it or maximize from the windows toolbar.
2. Select the Communications drop-down, select Go Offline.
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3. Return to the Batch Equipment Editor. To synchronize, click the Synchronize toolbar button
or select from the menu bar Edit > Synchronize Logix5000 Data Servers.
4. The Save Before Synchronizing warning displays:
Click the Continue Without Saving
button.
NOTE: We are choosing “Continue Without Saving” for this step because the area model
was saved in the last example. Typically, you would choose the “save” option if changes
have been made since your last saved.
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5. Click the Continue
button on the Synchronize Logix5000 Data Servers popup
window. Notice the Status of Last Synchronization – it’s Incomplete.
6. After a few seconds the “Synchronize with Logix5000:Plant_PAx” dialog box appears. It knows
what has been changed since the last synchronization – PM01_AGITATE.
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7. The synchronization tool identified the recent change. Set the Resolution option from ‘Skip this
Time’ to Update Project for PM01_AGITATE.
8. Update project will make changes to the ACD controller code so that it has the same components
as the area model equipment phase.
Click the Synchronize
button at the bottom of this window
9. The following dialog box opens; the PM01_Agitate phase update was successful. The phases
that show results of :”Skipped” are phases that were previously used by FactoryTalk Batch, but
are now only used by Logix Batch & Sequence Manager and can be ignored.
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10. Select YES
to save changes to the RSLogix 5000 project file, PlantPAx_Demo.
11. Look under the column labeled, Status of Last Synchronization, for the results, a Complete
status would be displayed if the area model and RSLogix5000 project were completely
synchronized, but in our case the status is Incomplete
12. The Premix 01 and Premix 03 are class-based units since they came from the same unit phase
class for Premix. Therefore, Premix 03 has an agitate phase from the same AGITATE phase
class. This phase instance needs to be synchronization with the equipment phase in the
controller. Click the Continue
popup window to see which one it is.
button on the Synchronize Logix5000 Data Servers
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13. It is PM03_AGITATE, change the Resolution to Update Project.
Click the Synchronize
button at the bottom of this window
14. The ACD file should get updated for the PM03_AGITATE equipment phase with Result as
Successful. You have added a new report tag for this equipment phase in the ACD file. Select
YES to continue.
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15. Notice the Status of Last Synchronization – it’s still Incomplete You have completed the
synchronization with the two Premix phases. We won’t worry about these other equipment
phases since we never changed them.
16. Click the Close
17. Click the Save
button.
button.
18. When “Save After Synchronization” dialog opens; click the Save
19. The Save As window appears.
Click the Save
button.
20. When prompted to “replace”; click the Yes
button.
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21. Enter a comment for the audit / change record and
You have now completed synchronization. Now let’s look at the controller code.
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Editing the Logix Project File
NOTE: For PhaseManager phases it is possible to invoke the RSLogix Editor and the
project file through the Equipment Editor. Within the Equipment Editor double-click on the
equipment phase to open up the corresponding equipment phase in the RSLogix 5000
project file for viewing and/or editing. However, FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor and
RSLogix 5000 software must be loaded on the same machine.
1. Double-click on the PM01_AGITATE equipment phase.
NOTE: New PhaseManager phases are created in the Unscheduled Programs /
Phases section. It is the responsibility of the engineer to move them into the appropriate
task. In addition, it is the engineer’s responsibility to implement custom code segments
for ISA88 state logic required in the project (Running-, Holding-, Restarting-, Stoppingand Aborting-Logic) for the process task each phase represents. However, there is no
need to implement and support Phase Logic Interface code (i.e. PLI) to ensure proper
communication, command and state protocols with the Batch Server. There is no longer
the need to create associated phase tags for each PhaseManager phase; it is done
automatically within the design environment using the CIP protocol.
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2. The RSLogix5000 Editor opens directly to the PM01_AGITATE phase running state routine.
You may need to switch over to view the Logix 5000 Editor.
3. In Logix 5000, right-click on the PM01_AGITATE phase
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4. Select Properties
5. Switch to the Parameters tab.
6. Here you can find the Parameters (Inputs) and Reports (Output) that were originally defined
from the Equipment Editor. Note that the new Level Report (Output) that was created through
the synchronization from Batch. You never had to build the tag in the ACD; it was done
automatically for you when you synchronized. You could check PM03_AGITATE, but you
probably don’t have time.
7. Click Cancel to close this dialog box. We will now map the Level control module into this report
(Output) Tag.
8. The PM01_AGITATE phase is a non-terminating phase; it never goes to a complete state and is
always used in parallel with a phase that does terminate. The report parameters for this phase
are updated in the Prestate routine. Double-click on the Prestate routine to open it, and Scroll
down to rung 7.
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9. Right-click to the left of the last MUL instruction at bottom and select Add Branch Level.
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10. From the toolbar, click the Right Arrow to scroll to the Move/Logical instruction set.
11. Click the MOV
instruction from the list.
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12. The MOV instruction will be added to the rung 7.
13. Double-Click in the Source box and enter CPG1_LT104.Val
14. Double-Click in the Dest box and enter LEVEL - when finished it should look like this:
NOTE: CPG1_LT104.Val is the control module tag address for the Premix 01 Level.
LEVEL is the PM01_AGITATE phase Report (Output) tag. By adding this single
instruction to the phase manager code, the batch engine will record the tank level when
the phase stops.
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15. Verify the routine using the icons
to be sure there are no errors.
16. Please repeat these steps for PM03_AGITATE using CPG1_LT404.Val as the level to be
reported.
17. From the menu, select File  Save.
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Finalize Edits
To continue we will need to download the new code to the Controller are restart the batch server.
18. On SoftLogix place the controller for Slot 2 into Rem-Program mode by right-mouse clicking on
the controller slot an setting into Program.
Next, place into Remote
19. From the communications menu in RSLogix 5000, select Communications > Download.
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20. Select Download
21. From the communications menu, select Run Mode. If the controller faults, clear the fault and try
again.
22. Minimize RSLogix5000.
23. From the start menu, open Batch Service Manager
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24. From the Batch Service Manager drop-down, select FactoryTalk Batch Server service and
press the Start button.
25. When the Batch traffic lights turns green, select the Server Statistics
button.
26. The server statistics window will open. Select the PCD Communications tab, Verify that all
three lines indicate GOOD status. This may take a few moments to transition to good status.
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After adding tags to the project it is always good to verify all tags, to do this press the Start
button. You should have 0 bad tags. If you do not, and you need help, ask your
lab assistants.
Notice that the tag count has been increased by 2 (1481 to 1483) as a result of adding the two
new Agitation “Level” tags in the Premixers.
27. Select the Cancel
button to close the Server Statistics window, then
28. Close the Service Manager.
The Engineer’s Perspective is now complete!
If you choose, you can re-run the modified recipe by following the Operator’s perspective. But
due to lab time constraints, we will move to the next section.
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R&D (Recipe Author) Perspective
The goal of an ISA88 based batch management & control system is to separate the recipe from the
equipment. This user perspective will demonstrate how you as a recipe author can create and edit
recipes (both procedure and formula) independent of the plant floor equipment. Optimize unit selection in
your running system with the “smart binding” feature.
The Requested Recipe Changes
Lab tests have shown that the agitation speed for “Product_A” is too high for the reactors. Our first task
will be to lower that speed. Further tests have shown that we can improve batch cycle time by adding
both the premix material and header material to the reactor at the same time. Currently they add
sequentially one after the other.
Production and maintenance would like to utilize the smart binding feature. Production would like to
optimize the reactor selection process by selecting the warmest reactor for the next batch. Therefore we
will need to add a Smart Binding Preference that looks for the warmest vessel (maximize temperature).
Maintenance has recently added an indication for reactor “In-Service”. They would like the batch system
to prevent production on those reactors when this indicator is off. Although this is not intended to be
used as a safety mechanism, it does offer an easy way for the batch system to exclude reactors from use
while scheduling batches. Therefore we will need to add a Smart Binding Requirement to only use “InService” reactors.
Batch Recipe Editor
The Batch Recipe Editor is used to create and configure master recipes for use in batch automation. The
interface is based on IEC 1131-3 sequential function charts to graphically organize recipe procedures into
procedures, unit procedures, operations, and phases.
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1. From the start menu, open FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor, Start > Batch Recipe Editor.
2. The Recipe Editor application opens.
3. If prompted to “Verify” recipes, select the Verify and Validate All
button.
NOTE: The “validate” option was added to FactoryTalk Batch v10 and enhanced in v11.
This option will check the SFC structure for common invalid structures between “AND”
and “OR” branches. This feature will detect those structural errors prior to running the
batch in production.
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4. Since we just completed making changes to the Agitate phase in the previous section, the recipe
editor needed to re-verify all recipes containing this phase. When complete, select the Accept
button. We will ignore any other messages at this time.
5. The recipe editor will prompt you to enter comments prior to saving the recipes. Enter any text
you choose and select the OK
button.
6. From the verification window, select the Close
button
7. Select File > Open Top Level from the Recipe Editor File Menu.
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8. When the Open Binary Recipe dialog opens, select a filter on Procedure from the “List Recipe of
Type” drop down menu to change what recipes to select.
9. Select the PRODUCT_A_PM_RX procedure and select the Open
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10. The “Product_A_PM_RX” procedure level master recipe will open.
NOTE: This master recipe (procedure) consists of two sub-recipes (unit procedures): one
for “Premix” and one for “Reactor”. Each unit procedure defines the process for making
a portion of the product in the specific vessel. To produce “Product A”, a mixture is first
batched in the Premix vessel, and then transferred to the reactor.
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View & Edit Batch Recipe
Now let’s make our first recipe update: change the agitation speed from 50 to 43 RPM.
1. From the windows “tree view” on the left hand side, Under the GENERIC_R_UP:1/ GENERIC_R
_OP:1 folder, select the AGITATE_VFD:1 step.
Be careful, there is also an Agitate step under the Premix unit procedure and a second Agitate
under the Reactor unit procedure.
2. The recipe editor will take you directly to the SFC step. From the menu select Step 
Parameter Values/Report Limits or from the toolbar, select the Value Entry
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3. The “Parameter Value Entry” screen will appear. Change the SETPOINT_RUN_SPEED value
from 50 to 43, and change the DISPLAY value from 43R/50H.
4. Select the OK
button. The recipe now shows 43R/50H on the step display.
Now let’s make our second recipe update: Remove then add header material at the same time
as the premix material.
5. Select the HEADER_ADD:1
operation.
phase step in the REACTOR_OP:1
6. From the menu select Edit  Remove Step, or from the toolbar, select the Remove Step
button. Note that the amount being added was 300 LBS.
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7. The recipe step has now been removed. Now, select the MESSAGE_HMI:3 step From the menu
select Edit  Remove Step, or from the toolbar, select the Remove Step
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8. The recipe step has now been removed. Next, select the X_IN:1 step.
9. From the menu select Edit  Add Parallel, or from the toolbar, select the Add Parallel
icon button.
10. The “Select Phase” popup will appear. Select HEADER_ADD from the list
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11. Select the OK
button.
12. You have now added updated the recipe sequence to add the header material at the same time
as the premix material.
13. Next, select the HEADER_ADD:1 step that you just added.
14. From the menu select Step  Parameter Values/Report Limits or from the toolbar, select the
Value Entry
button.
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15. The “Parameter Value Entry” screen will appear. Change the values per the screen below:
MATERIAL_01 = MATERIAL_D, SETPOINT_01 = 300, TOLERANCE_01 = 5. Be sure to check
the Display checkbox for SETPOINT_01. This configures which setpoint will show up in the
SFC.
16. Select the OK
button.
17. Save your work. From the menu, select File  Save All.
Enter comments and select OK.
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Select Yes.
You have now completed the requested changes for production on the master recipe named,
PRODUCT_A_PM_RX. The next time production selects this recipe, the agitator speed and
ingredient addition sequence will be updated.
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Optimize System with Smart Binding
Now let’s make a new change for production: have the recipe select the warmest
reactor at runtime of the two reactors .
1. Within the same “Product_A” recipe, select PRODUCT_A_PM_RX from the tree view on the left.
2. This will take you to the top level of the recipe. Select the GENERIC_R_UP:1 step.
3. From the menu select Step  Bind Preferences or from the toolbar, select the Bind
Preferences
button.
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4. The “Bind Preferences” window will appear. Select the Add Preference
5. A new “preference” will be added. From the dropdown for Type, select the Maximize
Expression
6. Then, select the Ellipses
button on the far right.
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7. The “Expression Builder” will appear. First select the Unit Attributes folder on the left. Next
Double-click on the Temperature attribute. The Temperature tag will be added to the
expression window.
8. Select the OK
button.
9. You have now successfully added the maximize temperature configuration to the recipe.
10. Select the OK
button.
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Now let’s make our change for maintenance: add the “in-service” requirement.
11. Again, select the GENERIC_R_UP:1 step.
12. From the menu select Step  Bind Requirements or from the toolbar, select the Bind
Requirements
button.
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13. The “Bind Requirements” window appears with the completed requirement. To get experience
with this feature, let’s delete the current Bin Requirement then add the requirement. Select the
requirement, then select the
button.
14. Now, select the Add Requirement
button.
15. A new “requirement” will be added. From the drop-down, select the Expression
16. Then, select the Ellipses
button on the far right.
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17. The “Expression Builder” will appear. First select the Unit Attributes folder on the left with your
mouse cursor. Next, double-click the IN_SERVICE attribute Name in the middle of the screen,
then select the ‘=’ operator, then double-click the Yes Enumeration value on the right. This
creates the expression in the top window. An alternative is to just type the expression in by
hand. IN_SERVICE = “YES”
18. Select the OK
button.
19. You have now successfully added the “in-service” requirement to the recipe.
20. Select the OK
button.
21. Save your work. From the menu, select File  Save All. Enter comments and select OK.
You have now completed the requested changes for production and maintenance.
The next time production selects this recipe, the recipe will evaluate the preferences
to pick the “warmest” reactor and the requirement to pick an “in-service” reactor
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Applying a Parameter Expression
Now let’s make another change for production: Production would like to reformulate
Product A. They would like to base the setpoint amount of “Material C” as 17.5% of the
actual amount of “Material A” added into the batch. We will leverage the FactoryTalk
Batch Version 11 feature called “parameter expressions” in this step.
1. In the GENERIC_PM_1_3_OP:1 select the ADDITION_03:1 phase to select it. The recipe editor
will take you directly to the SFC step.
2. From the menu select Step  Parameter Values/Report Limits or from the toolbar, select the
Value Entry
button.
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3. The “Parameter Value Entry” window will appear. Select the SETPOINT_01 parameter’s Origin
field to choose Expression.
4. Select the Ellipses
button under the Value column to enter your expression formula builder
based upon a report value uploaded from the Addition_01 phase.
5. Enter the starting expression shown by first opening the ADDITION_01:1 folder, then selecting
the Report Parameters folder, and finally selecting the ACTUAL_01 report of the
ADDITION_01:1 phase.
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6. Now, select the multiplication operator * so it goes next to the report parameter. Now, type in
the numerical value to multiply by, 0.175.
7. Select OK. This expression will now be displayed as the value for the ADDITION_03 phase for
the SETPOINT_01 formula value..
You have modified the Product A formulation such that you changed the way in which the
SETPOINT_01 parameter is determined based upon a previous phase’s action and it’s reported
process value. This is a very powerful option.
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NOTE: It is important to note that no special HMI or controller code changes were
required to make these recipe changes. The FactoryTalk Batch product leverages the
concepts of ISA88 and separates the equipment from the recipe. Changes to the
FactoryTalk Batch recipe are the only changes needed. This enables the “owner” of the
product to maintain and update the recipes as needed.
The R&D’s (Recipe Author) Perspective is now complete!
If you choose, you can re-run the modified recipe by following the Operator’s perspective and
selecting the “Product_A” recipe. But due to lab time constraints, we will move to the next
section.
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Plant Management’s Perspective - Batch Reporting
In the role of Plant management, you need a clear view of batch production at a high level, but may still
want the ability to access details when needed. This user perspective demonstrates the capabilities of
web-based batch reporting. Use your Internet Explorer web browser to run production queries, view
exception reports, and compare batch cycles. Find and view your data of interest on-line, then export
locally for further analysis or print out a hard copy for your files.
Web-Based Reporting - Electronic Batch Records
FactoryTalk Batch maintains an electronic batch record of all the events that happen as the batch runs.
The electronic batch record is stored as a flat ASCII file on the Batch Server. This file can be encrypted
with an electronic key record that can tell you if it has ever been modified after it was written by the Batch
Server. This ASCII text file can be archived into an ODBC database as well. There is a web-based
reporting application that will move the journals into SQL Server 2008 and use Microsoft Reporting
Services (SSRS) to extract data out of the journal for various production reports. SSRS provides the
tools for building templates that can retrieve, analyze, and report batch data. The following reports have
been developed for your use without programming. You can customize these reports to fit your own
needs if required.
010 – Batch Listing
• Provides a list of batches that meet a user’s search or query criteria
020 – Batch Summary
1
• Offers batch specific summary information on batch data (step time) and setpoint vs. actual
030 – Batch Detail
• Offers batch specific detailed information on batch data (step times, parameters, reports),
1
abnormal state changes, batch failures, FactoryTalk alarms & events, setpoint vs. actual , and
out of tolerance values.
1
040 – Material Usage
• Offers material specific consumption information including: batch that consumed it, quantity & lot
consumed, total consumption over period of search.
1
050 – Forward Tracking
• Enables you to find all batches that consumed a material lot or used a piece of equipment.
1
060 – Backward Tracing
• Enables you to trace all ingredients consumed and equipment used by a specific batch.
070 – Batch Execution
• Review a specific batch’s step execution times in a bar chart format.
080 – Duration Comparison
• Compare the durations of multiple batches in a bar chart format.
090 – Batch Exceptions
• Review all batches with exceptions. Includes abnormal state changes, FactoryTalk alarms &
1
events, batch failures, out of tolerance values
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1 - Requires use of specific naming conventions during design of the FactoryTalk Batch
area model. This naming convention can be found in the user manual for the reporting
application.
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View Batch Reports
1. The Batch Reports are viewed using Internet Explorer, both AppSerBatch and PASS01 VMWare
images can be used to view the reports. The reports can also, be viewed in the HMI by selecting
the Batch Report button
from the Batch navigation bar. This brings up a display
with a Microsoft Webbrowser control pointed to the reporting service URL. The examples below
use Internet Explorer.
2. From the Windows taskbar, select Internet Explorer.
The eProcedure client interface will launch in Internet Explorer as the default on the
AppSerBatch VMware image.
3. At the far upper right corner of Internet Explorer, select the Favorites menu
Reports - Report Manager.
, select Batch
NOTE: It may take a couple of minutes to get all the services loaded and running.
The URL for the batch reports is http://AppSerBatch/Reports/.
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4. The home screen will load. From this page, all pre-defined reports are available
NOTE: At any time, you can return to the last screen using the web browser back button.
You can also navigate through the folder path from the header of the report.
(Home>Batch Reports)
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Report Query Header
Let’s first get familiar with the query capability of the report system. Each report uses this similar
query method at the top of the report
1. Select 010-BatchListing
2. The report will open with the following query header.
3. Start Time/End Time –
The reporting system first filters all searches based on time. All sub-filter lists (Batch ID, Recipe
Name, Process Cell, & Unit Name) are trimmed based on the user selection of time. You should
consider “time” to be the master search criteria.
•
•
“Null” selections are available for both start and end time. These can be used to
search from the beginning of time (start time null) or to most recent time (end time null).
Standard Microsoft Reporting Services Date/Time syntax
is used. Selecting the Calendar
icon allows you to search in more detail or simply type
date and/or time into the box. The minimum data required is the date.
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4. Batch ID Filter –
The “Batch ID” is the
user defined name given to a batch at runtime. This filter allows the user to trim the query list to
those matching the specified text. Expand your filter capability through use of the asterisk (*)
wildcard at any point in the filter.
5. Recipe Name –
The “Recipe Name” is the
name to which the batch recipe is saved. The Recipe Name dropdown list is populated in realtime by listing all recipe names run during the user specified time frame. By default, all items in
this drop down are selected. Any individual line items can be selected/un-selected by
checking/un-checking the box next to the name. Alternatively, the user can select all/un-select all
by checking/un-checking the “select all” check box.
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Batch Listing Report
Now that we are familiar with the query header, let’s perform our first batch list search. As Plant
Manager, I am interested in reviewing a specific production run for a new product recently introduced
at the plant in the month of May 2014. The specific Batch ID identifier was “*20140503*”. Let’s
take a look!
1. From the query header, select Start Time Calendar, and select May 1, 2014. (Alternatively, you
could just type 5/1/2014 into the entry field and hit the Enter key.)
2. From the query header, select End Time Calendar, and select May 4, 2014. (Alternatively, you
could just type 5/4/2014 into the entry field and hit the Enter key.)
3. From the query header, enter * *20130430** into the “Batch ID Filter” (Be sure to use the asterisk
(*) wildcard both before and after the entry. This ensures we get the full production run)
NOTE: As you select dates and complete the Batch ID Filter, the remaining dropdowns
are updated to reflect your search criteria.
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4. From the top right side of the report, select View Report
5. A listing of 10 batches will appear. This shows the full production run of this new “Product A” run
on May 3, 2014.
NOTE: From this view, we can see that the first nine batches completed normally, but
someone “Stopped” the tenth batch after 3 mins 52 sec (elapsed time column).
Production noted that batches took a varying amount of time to complete, why? Let’s
take a closer look.
6. Notice that for each line item, a set of four “hotlink” icons are shown. These enable quick
navigation to other reports that keep you in context of the specific “Unique ID” (unique identifier
for each batch.) on that line. We will use these links later in this lab.
- Batch Summary Report
- Batch Detail Report
- Backward Tracing Report
- Batch Execution Report
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Batch Exception Report
As Plant Manager, I may also be interested in reviewing all batch exceptions for a specific production
run for a new product recently introduced at the plant in the month of May, 2014. Again we will use
the specific Batch ID identifier “*20140503*”. Let’s take a look!
1. From the top of the report, click on Batch Reports.
2. This will return us to the main window that lists all available reports.
3. Select 090-Batch Exceptions
4. From the query header, select Start Time Calendar, and select May 1, 2014. (Alternatively, you
could just type 5/1/2014 into the entry field.)
5. From the query header, select End Time Calendar, and select May 4, 2014. (Alternatively, you
could just type 5/4/2014 into the entry field.)
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6. From the query header, enter *20140503* into the “Batch ID Filter” and hit the Enter key (Be sure
to use the asterisk (*) wildcard both before and after the entry. This ensures we get the full
production run)
7. The “Exception Report” introduces the new filter criteria “Unique ID”.
The “Unique ID” filter will update based on all other query
boxes above it. This allows the user to further refine their exception search to a minimum set of
unique batches if desired. Select “Unique ID “10”.
8. From the top right side of the report, select View Report
9. The “Batch Exception” report displays all batches in range with
a. Abnormal State Changes – These states include Held, Stopped, Aborted, and/or Paused.
b. Alarms & Events – The web based reports can be linked to the standard FactoryTalk
Alarms & Events database table in SQL server. The FTAE “Alarm Class” field of the
report is used to associate a specific alarm/event with a batch unit name. Simply add the
batch unit name to this alarm/event field and all alarms/events triggered during the batch
unit execution will be reported.
c.
Batch Failures – Includes all FactoryTalk Batch configured alarms.
d. Out Of Tolerance – Includes a list of all Setpoint vs. Actual comparisons identified as out
of tolerance. The “out-of-tolerance” flag is a report register set by the control system
during execution of the phase based on coded conditions, not batch server interpretation.
This ensures maximum flexibility in determining the out-of-tolerance state.
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10. The Batch Exception report will appear.
NOTE: From this view, we can see each of the four sections defined above. Each
section can contain multiple lines. Each line represents a unique batch. The wording
“No Data Available” will be shown when no batches meet the search criteria.
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11. Select the Expansion
box next to Unique ID = 10 in the “Abnormal State Change” table.
Here we can see that the batch was stopped. Select the Collapse
box to collapse the row.
12. Select the Expansion
box next to Unique ID = 10 in the “Alarms & Event” table. We see
that two over tolerance alarms were logged in the FactoryTalk Alarms & Event database. Select
the Collapse
box to collapse the row.
13. There are no “Batch Failures” for this batch
14. Select the Expansion
box next to Unique ID = 10 in the “Out Of Tolerance” table. Here
we can see that “Addition_01:1-1” and ”Addition_03:1-1” over delivered by 5.179 Kg and 3.329
Kg. Select the Collapse
box to collapse the row.
NOTE: This report offers a good overview of exceptions in the system.
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Batch Duration Comparison Report
As Plant Manager, I may also be interested in comparing the duration of all batches for a specific
production run of the new product recently introduced at the plant in the month of May 2014. Again
we will use the specific Batch ID identifier “*20140503*”. Let’s take a look!
1. From the top of the report, click on Batch Reports.
2. This will return us to the main window that lists all available reports.
3. Select 080-Duration Comparison
4. From the query header, select Start Time Calendar, and select May 1, 2014. (Alternatively, you
could just type 5/1/2014 into the entry field.)
5. From the query header, select End Time Calendar, and select May 4, 2014. (Alternatively, you
could just type 5/4/2014 into the entry field.)
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6. From the query header, enter *20140503* into the “Batch ID Filter” and hit the Enter key (Be sure
to use the asterisk (*) wildcard both before and after the entry. This ensures we get the full
production run)
7. We want to compare all batches in this campaign, so we will leave all batches checked under the
“Unique ID”.
8. From the top right side of the report, select View Report
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9. The “Duration Comparison” report displays all batches in range.
NOTE: From this view, we can see both a bar chart view of batch duration as well as a
table of raw data
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Saving and Printing Data
1. Microsoft Reporting Services (MRS) follows a standard WYSIWYG format. The layout and
presentation of the reports are as they would print. From MRS you see a menu to save / print the
data.
Refresh button
Export report
Print Button
2. The print button would print the report to a printer using the standard print dialog box.
3. Let’s save / export the report. From the Export box, select the Acrobat (PDF) file.
4. Click on the PDF Export link.
5. For the prompt to Open, Save, or Cancel at the bottom of the screen; Select Open.
6. The report is now presented in Adobe Acrobat Reader. You could save and send the report to
someone else for follow up. Close the acrobat window.
The Plant Management’s Perspective is now complete!
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Quality’s Perspective - Batch Reporting
In quality, you strive toward the highest level of product standards. You may continuously work to
understand past batches while working to improve future production. Having batch data at your fingertips
is crucial to solving the day-to-day conditions that arise. In this user perspective, you will use web-based
reporting to view abnormal batch states, system alarms, and out-of-tolerance conditions for a detailed
batch. Perform a mock product recall through a backward tracing search on a batch to identify all raw
materials and equipment used. Once the problem is found, perform a raw material or equipment forward
tracking search to identify all affected historical batches. And last but not least, run a material usage
report to identify how much of a new material has been used in production.
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View Batch Reports
1. From the windows taskbar, select Internet Explorer.
2. From the Favorites menu
, select Batch Reports – Report Manager.
NOTE: It may take a couple of minutes to get all the services loaded and running.
3. The home screen will load. From this page, all pre-defined reports are available.
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Batch Detail Report
In the Quality role, you may be interested in reviewing the details of specific batches. Recently,
Production has asked you to review Batch ID = 20140503_PROD_A10 (Unique ID = 11). They noted
that the batch did not run correctly and had to be stopped. Let’s take a look!
1. From the top of the report, click on Batch Reports.
2. This will return us to the main window that lists all available reports.
3. Select 030-Batch Detail
4. From the query header, select Start Time Null
5. We will leave the End Time set to the current date and time. No action needed.
NOTE: We use the “Null” setting for start time to quickly search the entire batch history.
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6. Since Production gave us the specific “Unique ID = ”, select 11 from the Unique ID dropdown.
If Unique ID is not present, check Select All in Recipe Name drop box.
7. From the top right side of the report, select View Report
8. The “Batch Detail” report will appear for Unique ID = 11. (Batch ID = 20140503_PROD_A11).
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From above we can see the pH was too high, the reason the batch was stopped.
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NOTE: Alternatively you could have accessed this report by selecting the
detail hotlink icon from the batch list report.
batch
NOTE: The batch detail report shows the detail for several aspects of the batch. This
includes: 1) batch data 2) abnormal state changes 3) alarms & events 4) batch failures
5) setpoint vs. actual table. The batch data table can be expanded down to see more
detail as needed. The default view is “collapsed” to show the units used in the batch.
The “Show All Levels” option is available from the button in the report header. This
quickly expands the report to multiple pages to show all detail. Use this option just prior
to printing.
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9. Since the default view is collapsed, select Show All Levels
to get a detailed view.
10. After “showing all levels”, notice that the report is now split into multiple pages to show the large
amount of detailed data. Use the page control in the report toolbar to move between pages.
11. After “showing all levels”, the “Batch Data” table will have expanded. From here we can see the
detailed information for all Unit Procedures, Operations, & Phases that executed. Each line
represents a different part of the batch and includes start time, end time, & duration. Each phase
is further expanded to show the Recipe Parameters and Report Parameters configured for the
batch. This offers a complete record of batch activity.
NOTE: The user can sort each column by selecting the “sort arrows”
banner bar.
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in the red
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Batch Execution Report
Better understanding the details of batch execution can lead to optimization of cycle time. It can also
give a clear picture of what happened during the product run.
In this example we will look at how long it took the operator to complete the manual addition’s step
within Unique ID = 606
1. From the top of the report, click on Batch Reports.
2. This will return us to the main window that lists all available reports.
3. Select 070-Batch Execution
4. From the query header, select Start Time Null
5. We will leave the End Time set to the current date and time. No action needed.
NOTE: We use the “Null” setting for start time to quickly search the entire batch history.
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6. From the Unique ID dropdown, select 7
If Unique ID is not present, check Select All in Recipe Name drop box.
7. From the top right side of the report, select View Report
NOTE: Alternatively you could have accessed this report by selecting the
execution hotlink icon from the batch list report.
batch
8. The “Batch Execution” report will appear for Unique ID = 7. This report graphically shows the
detailed time execution of the batch. To maximize the value of this report, the user needs an
understanding of the process. In this production process, the premix material is first created and
then added to the reactor. Any delay in the premix process can delay the overall reactor cycle
time. Here we can see that the Manual Add took 63 seconds to complete.
. With this information we can optimize the overall batch cycle time by
reducing this time.
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9.
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Track & Trace
Track and Trace requirements are a very critical in many industries today. Track & Trace can be
separated into the following two parts.
•
Forward Tracking enables a search on raw material lot or equipment to provide a list of
all final batches that used that material or equipment. This is primarily used when there
is a raw material recall or issues with equipment are discovered.
•
Backward Tracing enables a search on a specific batch produced and returns the list of
all raw material lots and equipment used in that batch. This is primarily used to
determine all items in the batch when a defective batch is identified. (i.e. Customer issue
or final product recall.)
Backward Tracing
In this example we will perform a mock recall based on a customer issue with the final product. The
data given by the customer indicates that “Batch ID 20140503_PROD_A06” is in question. Let’s find
all material and equipment used by this batch!
1. From the top of the report, click on Batch Reports.
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2. This will return us to the main window that lists all available reports.
3. Select 060-Backward Tracing
4. From the query header, select Start Time Null
5. We will leave the End Time set to the current date and time. No action needed.
NOTE: We use the “Null” setting for start time to quickly search the entire batch history.
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6. From the query header, enter *20130430_PROD_A06* into the “Batch ID Filter” and hit the Enter
key
7. This complete Batch ID will trim the “Unique ID” dropdown to the single batch in question. Select
6 from the Unique ID dropdown.
If Unique ID is not present, check Select All in Recipe Name drop box.
8. From the top right side of the report, select View Report
NOTE: Alternatively you could have accessed this report by selecting the
backward tracing hotlink icon from the batch list report.
9. The “Backward Tracing” report will appear for Unique ID = 6. (Batch ID = 20140503_PROD_A06).
In this report we can see a listing of all materials, lots, quantities, and event times along with all
equipment used by the batch.
10. Since the default view is collapsed, select Show All Levels
for each line.
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to get additional data
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Forward Tracking
In this example we will perform a raw material mock recall. The data given by the manufacturer is
that Lot “A1A1” is in question. Let’s find all batches that used this material.
1. From the top of the report, click on Batch Reports.
2. This will return us to the main window that lists all available reports.
3. Select 050-Forward Tracking
4. From the query header, select Start Time Null
5. We will leave the End Time set to the current date and time. No action needed.
NOTE: We use the “Null” setting for start time to quickly search the entire batch history.
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6. The “Forward Tracking” report introduces the new selection “Report Type”. This dropdown allows
the user to define if the search should be by “Lot” or by “Equipment”. For this example, select
Lot from the dropdown
7. The “Forward Tracking” report also introduces the new selection “Equip/Lot”. This dropdown
allows the user to define which “Lot” or “Equipment” should be used in the search. This
dropdown dynamically changes based on the user selection of “Report Type” For this example,
select A1A1 from the dropdown
8. From the top right side of the report, select View Report
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9. The “Forward Tracking” report will appear. Each line of this report shows the Batch ID, recipe
name, amount consumed, and event time for the consumption of “A1A1”.
NOTE: If you are interested in seeing more detail on the specific batch. Select the
yellow tag hotlink icon to take you to the batch summary report.
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Material Usage
Understanding material usage and consumption can be very useful. In this example, we will further
explore the capabilities of the batch system by running a material usage report for “Material A”
1. From the top of the report, click on Batch Reports.
2. This will return us to the main window that lists all available reports.
3. Select 040-Material Usage
4. From the query header, select Start Time Null
5. We will leave the End Time set to the current date and time. No action needed.
NOTE: We use the “Null” setting for start time to quickly search the entire batch history.
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6. The “Material Usage” report introduces the new selection “Material Name”. This dropdown allows
the user to define which material to search for. For this example, select Material_A from the
dropdown
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7. From the top right side of the report, select View Report
8. The “Material Usage” report will appear. Each line of this report shows the Unique ID, Batch ID,
amount consumed, & Lot ID consumed for “Material_A”. By expanding each line, you can also
see the unit that used the material, along with the consumption event time.
NOTE: The Material Usage report provides a “Total Consumed” amount in the header of
the report. This example shows that 2,232.364 Kg was consumed. By adjusting the
time, unit, recipe, batch ID filters a user can run various consumption reports for shift,
line, product, etc.
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The Quality Perspective is now complete!
For further references see: PlantPAx Table of Content – AID #62366
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Lab2: Factory Talk Batch “eProcedure”
Lab2: Factory Talk Batch “eProcedure”
Sample Process Overview:
PlantPAx Factory Talk eProcedure is a component of FactoryTalk Batch, its primary purpose is to enable
the interaction between the operator and the control system and this is primarily used when the required
activities can’t be performed automatically because there is no automation component to perform that
task.
This lab will show the user how the commonly found paper based manual operating procedures can be
converted into electronic work instructions driven procedures, this lab uses predefined generic
instructions to create and execute a recipe. It also shows how to create a new instruction.
Premix 2 is a premix unit that has no automation; we wish to convert all the paper driven standard
operating procedures (SOP) into a set of electronic work instructions.
Premix 2 is shown on the Process Overview display, but when you drill down to the Premix 2 unit from the
Batch navigation bar there is no process equipment. The display consists of the FactoryTalk Batch
ControlRecipeList and ProcedureView ActiveX controls along with command buttons.
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Sample SOP
The following is a sample SOP that is performed in Premix 2.
Product C manufacturing procedure.
Product Identifier: Product_C_PM2
Version Number: 1.0
Author: DemoUser
Product Name: Product C
Product Code: 1234
Batch size: 385 Kg
Estimated Duration: 20 minutes
Procedure description: Manual Manufacturing of intermediate product C.
Step:
1. Confirm the Premix unit is clean and ready before proceeding, operator signature required.
2. Add 200 Kg of Material A to tank, record actual amount as well as lot ID.
3. Start Agitator.
4. Add 125 Kg of Material B to tank, record actual amount as well as lot ID.
5. Add 25 Kg of Material C to tank, record actual amount as well as lot ID.
6. Add 35 Kg of Material E to tank, record actual amount as well as lot ID.
7. Start recirculation.
8. Stop Agitator.
9. Wait 30 seconds.
10. Take a pH sample
11. If pH less than 6 or greater than 9.5 requires Supervisor or Engineer signoff.
12. Transfer product to a tote.
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Operator Perspective:
The HMI incorporates several ways to use the eProcedure client:
1. Select the eProcedure View button
to bring up a display that consists of a
Microsoft Webbrowser control pointed at the eProcedure URL, this is the complete eProcedure
Client in a FactoryTalk View display.
2. Select the Batch Premix 2 button
to bring up a display that consists of same
Batch ActiveX controls as on the other unit displays, minus process objects. From here batches
can be added and commanded using the command buttons. When eProcedure instruction
prompts are active they can be access by selecting the Operator Instruction button
or form the navigation bar the Batch Instruction button
.
3. The final way to use the client is to start Internet Explorer which by default is set up with
eProcedure Server machine as the home page when the eProcedure Client is installed.
The HMI project has a display that runs in the background that is used to notified operators when there
are eProcedure instructions present. Follow the following steps to start this display.
1. From the navigation bar select Production Overview.
2. On the Production Overview display select Enable Instruction Prompts.
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3. This brings up the display shown below, which consists of a Microsoft WebBrowser ActiveX
control pointed at the eProcedure Instruction page. VBA script runs in the background that
checks for the present of instructions on the eProcedure instruction page. When instructions are
present it sets a bit which makes the instruction present icon visible
. Additional VBA code
filters the instructions by units, e.g. in the graphic below there are instructions present for Premix
02.
4. The setting for the above display are set for cache, always updating, closing the display or
navigating to another display will not stop the VBA code running. Selecting Disable Instruction
Prompts fill flush the cache turning off the instruction prompting.
Let run a batch
1. From the navigation bar select the eProcedure View button
eProcedure Client display.
2. Select the ADD button to add a batch of Product C to the batch list.
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this opens the
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“eProcedure”
3. Select the “PRODUCT_C_PM2_ALL_MANUAL_OP” recipe, and then select OK.
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4. Give the batch a batch ID then select Create.
5. Select the batch from the list then select Start.
6. Select the INSTRUCTION button at the bottom of the display; this will take you to the main
operator interface for prompted instructions.
If prompts are present this button will blink (very faint blink)
7. Also, when instructions are present, the instruction present icon is visible on the unit buttons
and Batch Instructions button
8. For now we will stay on the eProcedure View display.
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9. Follow the instructions presented. When signatures are required you can use the following User
IDs:
User ID: O1 with no password for operator
User ID: S1 with no password for supervisor
User ID: E1 with no password for engineer
Once the batch is started the following instruction prompts will be displayed during the execution of the
selected recipe (Product_C product SOP)
Electronic Work instructions operator view
Step 1 - Confirm the Premix unit is ready for production, operator signature required to proceed.
The following prompts will be presented. The ‘Observations’ text box allows the operator to add a note to
the instruction which will show up as a Batch report parameter.
Because this prompt was originated from a phase requiring a signature the signature window will be
displayed, fill out the signature as required. Use O1 without a password if you want less typing.
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Step 2-Add 200 Kg of Material A to tank, record actual amount as well as lot ID.
Step 3 –Start the Agitator.
Step 4 –Add 125 Kg of Material B to tank, record actual amount as well as lot ID.
Step 5 – Add 25 Kg of Material C to tank, record actual amount as well as lot ID.
Step 6 – Add 35 Kg of Material E to tank, record actual amount as well as lot ID.
Step 7 – Turn on tank recirculation.
Step 8 – Stop the agitator.
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Step 9 - Wait 30 seconds to allow material to fuse.
Step 10 – Take a pH sample.
Step 11 – Record the pH. If the pH is out of range it needs an Operator and Supervisor signatures, at this
point the batch would probably be scrapped. Enter a value above 9.5 to bring up the signature
instruction.
Step 11 – Sign off the signature using BatchOper/Operator or O1/no password for Operator user and
password. Sign off the Supervisor/Engineer with Supervisor/Supervisor or S1/no password .
Step 12 Transfer the material to the tote.
The batch has completed, select the Batches
button to go to the batch list.
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The electronic batch record has been created for the manufacturing of the First batch of product Product
C. Select the Remove to remove the batch from the list.
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Engineering aspect
Equipment Definition
The equipment model of our process is what defines the capabilities or tasks that can be performed on
the system, for Premix 2 these capabilities are going to be performed by the operator and not by the
automation process equipment.
1. In order to view what those capabilities Start the FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor and open
the Plant PAx equipment definition (CFG), This can be done using the Windows Start button and
selecting Equipment Editor or the Equipment Editor icon on the Windows desktop
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2. From the Equipment Editor select File->PlantPAx_Demo.cfg
3. Navigate to the Premix 2 unit to view the phases defined in it.
A set of Generic Prompt instructions has been created in the Batch Equipment Editor as seen in
the following screen; these generic phases are typically applied to every unit.
These phases do not require a Controller and do not require an HMI, but can be an integral
component of a semi-automated system.
For this unit a set of generic phase classes have been defined:
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•
Generic Prompt to acknowledge with 0, 1, or 2 passwords required to complete the phase.
•
Generic Prompt Yes or No with 0, 1, or 2 passwords required to complete the phase.
•
•
Generic Prompt Value with 0, 1, or 2 passwords required to complete the phase.
•
Manual material adds.
•
Sample pH
•
Synchronize phase
(used to coordinate activities with other units)
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Generic phases consist of a web page that can display configured text, Images and videos that will be
displayed to operators.
The operator will follow the instructions and acknowledge them as required.
The set of generic prompt phases contain 3 types of prompts:
•
•
•
One type where the operator needs to confirm an instruction.
One requiring the operator to enter a value.
One requiring answering Yes or No.
In order to confirm and complete the instruction the phase may require no signature, one operator
signature or an Operator and a Supervisor signature.
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Procedure Definition
Formulator aspects.
Creating an electronic SOP may be achieved with the use of generic phases; if specific instructions are
required new phases can be created.
The Recipe Editor is used to create procedures, open the Recipe Editor by double-clicking its icon
on the desktop or through the Windows Start button, selecting Recipe Editor.
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1. Create a new operation level recipe; this will be for a new product Product_XYZ.
Recipes can be assigned to a specific unit or can be specified to run on a class of unit.
If the process contains 10 premix units and they can all make a product, only one recipe needs to be built,
this recipe is then read by the batch server and can run on any and all of the units at the same time.
These recipes are called “Class Based” recipes.
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2. For this lab we will build a recipe that can only run in premix 02. Select Instance Based in order
to create an operation that can only run in PREMIX_2, then select OK
The following display provides us with a recipe that has no steps, it consist of a start point and an end
point and a transition condition.
In order to start adding the steps of the SOP we start by adding a prompt that requires 2 signatures, we
would prompt the operator and supervisor to answer if the reactor is clean?
If the premix is clean the recipe will continue to the next step, if the premix is not clean the operator will be
instructed to clean the premix
Once he acknowledges that it has been cleaned step one will be repeated.
3. Before inserting this step, select the location the step is to be inserted into. Add a phase use the
blue arrows on the top of the editor tool bar.
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An undefined phase is inserted; a selection box shows the possible phases to be inserted.
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4. Select the PROMPT_YES_NO_2 phase that requires 2 passwords
Configuring Formula Values
5. Select the parameter configuration button in order to fill out the values to be used for this phase
instance.
The message or
instruction to be displayed
to the operator needs to
be specified in the value
field of the
INSTRUCTION
parameter.
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Configuring the transition conditions
Double click the transition labeled T2 to open and edit the expression for this transition.
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6. At this point we wish to evaluate the operator’s response to the prompt in order to take the
required actions.
(*1) Go to the expression tree to open the Steps folder
(*2) Locate the phase instance
(*3) Expand the report parameters
(*4) Select the “YES_NO”.
(*5) At this point double click the “value” field to insert the report parameter into the expression field
(*6) Follow it with an “=”
(*7) Then double click the “YES”
New Expression
(*1)
(*2)
(*3)
(*6)
(*4)
(*5)
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(*7)
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7. Your transition expression has been built, select OK to close.
At this point we have only evaluated if the operators response was yes.
8. Let’s now create the expression and action for the “NO” response.
(*1) Add a new transition to the recipe by selecting the Transition Tool.
(*2) and clicking on the recipe
(*3) Double click transition “T2” open and copy the previously built expression,
(*4) Double click T3 to open then paste the expression and change the “YES” to a “NO”.
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Defining the recipe flow
9. Now, let’s add a new phase to prompt the operator to clean the tank and loop back to the Premix
Ready step.
(*1) Select the connection button and
(*2) Click and drag the link from the premix ready step to T3
(*2)
(*1)
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10. Add the Prompts_OK_0 phase to the operation.
(*1) Select T3
(*2) Insert a step
(*3) Select “PROMPT_OK_0”
(*1)
(*2)
(*3)
11. Make the required connections.
(*1) Select the connection button and
(*2) Click and drag the link from T4 to the Premix Ready step.
(*2)
(*1)
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12. Now add the instruction to be displayed to the operator on step Promp_OK_0:1
(*1) Select phase instance
(*2) Select the Parameter Configuration button
(*3) Fill in the parameter values as shown.
(*2)
(*1)
(*2)
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Fill out the recipe Header data, this identifies and provides recipe information.
(*1) Select the Header data button
(*2) Fill out the required fields
(*3) The release to production needs to be checked in order to be able to run this recipe. Select OK
(*1)
(*2)
(*3)
The editor will check to inform you if any other recipes will be affected by this operation being renamed.
Select the Proceed button, then the OK button.
You have created one of the steps for making Product XYZ. This step of the recipe can now be run.
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Recipe overview
The following diagram shows the completed electronic work instruction for the Manual manufacturing of
recipe XYZ; we will take a closer look at this recipe.
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Recipe Details
Recipe XYZ Step 1
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Recipe XYZ Step 2 – 7
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Recipe XYZ Step 8 - 11
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Recipe XYZ Step 12 – 13
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Recipe XYZ Step 14 – x
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“eProcedure”
Creating an eProcedure instruction:
Let use an existent instruction and modify it to show how to set up an eProcedure Phase.
1. Start by Defining the Phase Class in the equipment editor. Copy and paste PROMPT_VALUE_0.
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The new phase will be at the bottom of the Phase Class list.
Rename the new class “TEST_PROMPT_PHASE”
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2. Configure the new phase parameter values and reports as per the following displays.
3. Select OK when done.
We have defined the phase class.
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Now let’s define the instruction that will be displayed when this phase is run.
1. Switch to the AppSerBatch and from Windows Explorer drill down to C:\Program Files
(x86)\Rockwell Software\Batch\PlantPAxDemo\Instructions.
2. Copy and paste the instruction file
.
and rename it
Instructions can be edited using different tools, such as ‘FrontPage’ or ‘Word’, but a text editor like
Notepad will work just fine. We will use Notepad to do our editing.
3. Open Notepad using the Windows Start button and drill down to the folder from step 1 and select
Test_Prompt_Phase.htm.
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4. Edit the file to match the parameters and reports defined in the phase class. The file should look
like this when done. Save the file. The screen capture shows up to ‘INSTRUCTION_2’ and
‘VALUE_2’ add two more copies of these lines. There is a completed phase you can use, if you
don’t want to do all the editing, “Test_Prompt_Phase_Complete.htm”.
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Test Prompt
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5. Double-clicking on the file when done will open it in Internet Explorer as shown below.
Note: The value of the parameters will be displayed in the field with the parameter names, shown above
in orange the values entered in the text boxes will be captured as reports of the phase.
Now let’s add an instance of this phase class to the unit.
1. Go to the Equipment Editor and open the Premix_02 unit.
2. Select the phase class TEST_PROMPT_PHASE then click the unit (white area displaying the
phases). A configuration popup will allow you to name this phase instance, NAME it
“PM02_Test_Prompt_Phase” as shown in the picture.
The data server for this phase will be set for “INSTRUCTIONBASEDSERVER”
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3. Select the Instruction File by selecting the selection box. Once the Instruction Selection opens,
select the instruction Test_Prompt_Phase.htm file. Select OK to close dialogue boxes.
4. Save your work.
This phase is now ready to be used in a recipe.
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Stop the eProcedure and Batch service so the new configuration can be read upon restarting.
Once these services have been stopped restart them.
To confirm that the data servers are working properly, select the Server statistics button then the PCD
Communication tab, confirm all services have a GOOD status.
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“eProcedure”
Let’s create a recipe that will run in the Premix 02 unit and contains the Test Prompt phase.
1. Open the Recipe Editor, make sure the Recipe Editor is closed before you open it again; this is
required so it can read the new area definition that includes the new phase.
From the Equipment Editor select the Recipe Editor button.
2. Once the recipe editor is open. Create a New Top Level recipe, select an Operation type recipe.
Select the Instance Based radial button and pick the PREMIX_02 unit.
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3. A new Operation level recipe is created; to insert a phase select the transition labeled T1 then
selects the Blue down arrow button.
4. The available phases for that unit will be listed, select TEST PROMPT PHASE then the OK
button.
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5. The new phase has been added to the operation, now it is time to configure the values we wish to
display to the operator once this phase is run.
6. For this lab let’s record the material properties that the Lab analysis had provided.
Type in to the value field the desired message to be displayed. Select the display button for the
first parameters.
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7. Complete the recipe information by selecting the Recipe Header data, naming the operation and
releasing it to production, then OK.
The recipe editor checks if this name change will affect any other recipes.
8. Select Proceed to complete the recipe setup, then select Save.
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9. Switch back to the PASS01 image and create a control recipe from the eProcedure Batch list
available from the HMI. Select the eProcedure View button from the navigation bar
.
10. Add a Batch of the newly created recipe.
11. Select the start and wait for the prompt indicator to become active.
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12. Select the Instruction button to view the prompts coming from the recipe.
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13. The following will be displayed. Enter values for the required field and then select the OK button.
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14. Go back to Procedure View confirm that the batch has completed and the values had been
captured. Select the phase then select the DETAILS button and the Report tab.
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Displaying images on the operator instructions
The following is an example of a phase using Photo or bitmap to aid operators with equipment setup.
Videos, Word documents and pdf files, also can be displayed in an eProcedure instruction.
End of lab.
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Lab 3: Factory Talk Batch
“Material Manager”
Lab3: Factory Talk Batch “ Material Manager”
Lab3: Factory Talk Batch “ Material Manager”
Introduction
Material Management with FactoryTalk Batch “Material Manager”
Material Manager catalogs inventory of raw, intermediate, and finished materials in a format commonly
found in batch processing. For each received or produced material, inventory includes:
• Material type,
• On-hand quantity,
• Received lot id,
• Distribution sub lot id,
• Received date,
• Status (such as “QA Hold” or “Released),
• Attributes (such as lab assay results),
• Consumption priority, and
• Storage locations.
Storage locations are defined as containers, again, a format that readily supports batch processing. The
three container types are:
• Composite
(one material & lot / container)
for example
a liquid storage tank
• Plug Flow
(one material & many lots / container)
solids in a silo
• Pallet
(many materials / container)
a “kitted” delivery
Containers can be assigned attributes including:
• Capacity
• Allowable materials
• Status (such as “Available” or “Out-of-Service”)
• Current material and quantity
As one of the FactoryTalk Batch components, Material Manager embeds Material Management features
into Batch Process Management. When Material Manager is incorporated into a FactoryTalk Batch
solution, the following occurs seamlessly and automatically:
• Containers, needed to support materials defined in the recipe, are selected
• Theoretical inventory is maintained, updated from batch phase execution
• Lot and Sub Lot ID’s are recorded in the batch journal
• Container(s) are recorded in the batch journal
Material Manager Features and this Lab
This lab explores Material Manager benefits when incorporated in a FactoryTalk Batch solution and
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consists of two parts. The first part of the lab uses four common process scenarios to demonstrate the
features of a Material Manger based solution. The four scenarios are:
•
•
•
•
Split Feeds
Plug Flow
Container
Inventory
more than one container is needed to satisfy a recipe’s quantity
more than one lot, in single container, is needed to satisfy a recipe’s quantity
proper container selection when the same material exists in multiple locations
a phase is held until needed inventory is received and distributed
The material database is initially configured for each scenario, however full instructions are provided for
receiving and distributing materials needed to support the scenarios. This provides participants the ability
to understand and explore the Material Manager database as well as repeat a scenario if desired.
The second part of the lab demonstrates how Material Manager can be extended into the plant, in this
case the receiving dock. The solution demonstrates how the open materials database (MicroSoft SQL
based) can be accessed from a HMI using product supported ActiveX components, FactoryTalk Batch
API’s (Application Programming Interfaces) , and VBA (Visual Basic for Applications). Finally, the
example shows Material and Batch Management functions in a weighing scenario.
Split Feeds (Tank Depletion) and Rebinding
Split feeds occur when a material phase step does not add or distribute all of the material configured by
the step. By default, the batch is HELD and the Material Server calculates and sends new AMOUNT
parameters to the FactoryTalk Batch Server. To resume processing, the operator must perform an active
step change away from the unfinished step, manually rebind the unfinished step, perform an active step
change back, and then restart the batch. Optionally, the recipe can be configured to automatically
process a split feed. The following example illustrates the automatic rebinding to a new container after
the contents of the initial container are depleted.
Setup
1. On the AppSerBatch image, open the Material Editor. (Start> Material Editor.)
2. Expand Material Configuration -> Materials.
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For this example, the citric acid material will be configured per the table below:
Container Material
Quantity
Priority Lot ID
Label
ST301
ST302
ST303
75kg
500kg
500kg
50
90
80
XI
XII
XIII
Citric Acid
Citric Acid
Citric Acid
AA
AB
AC
Note: The container priorities define the order in which containers are considered as candidates
for binding the material.
3. Double-click Citric_Acid to launch the Edit Material dialog box.
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4. Click on the Priorities tab. Confirm the priorities are configured per the table above. If not,
update the priority value, and then click Apply. Each container is listed twice because they are
bound to both units Premix_01 and Premix_03.
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5. Select the Lots tab. Update the quantity for each of the lots per the table above. Highlight the
row for the Lot, and then click Edit Lot. If no lots are present skip to step 9.
6. Select the Storage tab, highlight the distribution, and then click Edit Distribution
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7. Enter the desired quantity, and then click OK. Click OK again to close the Edit Lot dialog box.
8. If a lot has been depleted, you will need to delete the Lot and add a new Lot. Delete Lots by
highlighting the lot and clicking Delete Lot.
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9. Add Lots by selecting New Lot, enter the Lot name and quantity, and then click Apply.
10. Select the Inventory Tab. For each newly added lot, distribute the lot by clicking Distribute.
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11. Enter the desired label and quantity, select the appropriate storage container and
then click OK.
12. The Citric Acid Inventory should be setup as shown below.
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Run the Batch
1. From the HMI on the PASS01 image, select Batch Premix 1 from the menu bar. Select Batch
System Menu if the Batch menu bar is not displayed and then Batch Premix 1.
2. Click Create
3. Select the Acid_Rebind recipe. Click OK.
4. Enter a Batch ID and click Create.
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5. Click on the batch then on SFC View and note the procedure, with loop-back if
Feed_Complete = No.
Note: The FEED_COMPLETE report parameter is a signal to the FactoryTalk Batch Server that
the addition or distribution completed successfully. A lack of material, lack of storage capacity,
phase failure, or stopping a phase could all result in the interruption of a material addition or
distribution. When this occurs, the phase logic sets FEED_COMPLETE to false, so that batch
execution is held until the phase can rebind to another container.
The Material Server updates the material database with actual amounts consumed or distributed
during a batch run. During an addition or distribution, when the Feed Complete is true, the
FactoryTalk Batch Server communicates the actual amount to the Material Server. When the
Feed Complete is not true, the FactoryTalk Batch Server communicates the actual amount to the
Material Server, which in turn calculates the difference between the promised amount and the
actual amount and sends this back to the FactoryTalk Batch Server. The FactoryTalk Batch
Server uses this difference to update the setpoint for the split feed.
6. Start the Batch.
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7. Note the Tank and Lot Number being used as the acid source.
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8. When the delivered amount exceeds 75kg, the simulation indicates the tank is empty. Click Clear
Fail.
9. Click Restart.
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10. When the feed begins a second time, note the new Tank and Lot Numbers.
The batch has rebound to a new container, and picked the highest priority container. The system has
also calculated a new setpoint (Parameter 2), which is the remaining amount needed to add.
11. Let the batch complete, when completed select the batch and remove it from the Batch List by
selecting the Remove button
.
12. Start Batch View from the AppSerBatch image.
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13. Click Event Journal.
14. Click the Journal button.
15. Select your batch from the list. Click OK.
16. Set Filters (click Refresh once set)
a. Column 1: Event Type
b. Filter 1:
Material Tracking (type this in)
c. Click the Refresh button.
Note that additions from both tanks are recorded, along with their quantities and lot ID’s.
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17. Observe inventory for Citric Acid in Material Manager. (Select Start -> Material Editor, expand
Materials, double-click Citric Acid and select Inventory tab)
a. Lot AA is depleted and no longer in inventory in Tank ST_301
b. Lot AC has been decremented accordingly.
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Plug Flow Transition
A plug flow container holds one type of material, but is comprised of two or more different lots. The first
lot that went in is the first to come out. The following example illustrates the transition between lots when
a lot is depleted.
Note: Admittedly, it is unrealistic to have a liquid tank configured as plug-flow. Imagine this material is a
powder and the delivery system to the Premix Tank is a powder delivery system.
Setup
1. On the AppSerBatch image, open the Material Editor. (Start -> Material Editor.)
2. Expand Material Storage Configuration -> Locations -> Bases.
For this example, the Sodium Bicarbonate material will be configured per the table below:
Container
Material
Quantity
Priority
Lot ID
Label
ST201
Sodium
Bicarbonate
Sodium
Bicarbonate
Sodium
Bicarbonate
75kg
n/a
BA
XXI
25kg
n/a
BB
XXII
500kg
n/a
BC
XXIII
ST201
ST201
Note: Container priority is not applicable since all additions are from the same
container. Be sure to add the distributions listed in the order above.
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3. Double click ST_201 to launch the Edit Material Storage Container dialog box. Select the
Inventory tab.
4. Delete any existing distributions (this does not need to be done if inventory is already properly
configured, skip to running a batch).
5. Click Create Distribution.
6. Select Material Lot BA, enter ‘XXI’ for the label and ‘75’ for the quantity (per the table above).
7. Create two more distributions per the table above. Your inventory should look like the following:
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Run the Batch
1. From the HMI client on the PASS01 image, select Batch Premix 1 from menu bar
2. Click Create
3. Select the Base_Plug_Flow_Addition recipe. Click OK.
4. Select SODIUM_BICARBONATE from the material drop-down list. Click Create.
5. Type in a Batch ID
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6. Start the batch.
7. Wait for the batch to complete and remove the batch from the Batch List.
8. On the AppSerBatch image, open the journal file for this batch (Batch View -> Event
Journal). Note that all three lot numbers and their associated quantities are documented in
the batch log.
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Container Selection
Setup
1. On the AppSerBatch image, open the Material Editor. (Start -> Material Editor.)
2. Expand Material Configuration>Materials
For this example, the color containers will be configured per the table below:
Container
Material
Quantity
Priority
Lot ID
Label
ST101
ST102
ST103
Red_Dye
Green_Dye
- none -
75kg
75kg
--
50
50
--
CA
CD
--
XXXI
XXXII
--
3. Lot CA has already been created for the red dye. A new lot, CD, will need to be created for the
green dye. Double click on Green_Dye and select the Lots tab in the Edit Material dialog.
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4. Select New Lot. Enter ‘CD’ for the lot name and ‘75’ for the quantity. Click OK.
5. Expand the Material Storage Configuration -> Locations>Colors folder and double click on
ST_101.
6. Select the Inventory tab. Delete any existing distributions and create a distribution for Red_Dye
per the table above (once again not necessary to delete if pre-configure).
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7. Double click on ST_102 in the Locations>Colors folder. Select the Inventory tab. Delete any
existing distributions and create a distribution for Green_Dye per the table above.
8. Double click on ST_103 in the Locations -> Colors folder. Select the Inventory tab. Delete any
existing distributions.
Run the Batch
1. From an HMI on the PASS01 image, select Batch Premix 1 from the menu bar
2. Click Create
3. Select the Add_Color recipe. Click OK.
4. Select GREEN_DYE from the material drop down list. Click Create.
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5. Type in a name for the Batch ID. Click Create.
6. Start the batch.
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7. Note the Tank, Material, and Lot match the configuration table above.
8. Wait for the batch to complete and examine the batch journal if desired.
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Inventory Check
Setup
1. On the AppSerBatch image, open the Material Editor. (Start -> Material Editor.)
2. Expand Material Storage Configuration -> Locations -> Colors
For this example, the color containers will be configured per the table below:
Container Material
Quantity
Priority
Lot ID
Label
ST101
ST102
ST103
75kg
75kg
--
50
50
--
CA
CD
--
XXXI
XXXII
--
Red_Dye
Green_Dye
- none -
3. This setup is the same as the setup used in the color tank selection example above. If the
inventory was configured for the previous example, the only setup necessary for this example
should be to update the quantity of green dye (since 60 Kg were used in the color tank example.)
Double click on ST_102.
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4. Select the Inventory tab. Highlight the existing distribution and click Edit Distribution.
5. Change the quantity to ‘75’.
Run the Batch
1. From the HMI on the PASS01 image, select Batch – Premix 1 from the menu bar
2. Click Create
3. Select the Add_Color recipe. Click OK.
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4. Select ORANGE_DYE from the material drop down list. Click Create.
Note: The batch can be setup even though the material is not found in inventory. (New feature of Batch
V11, Late Material Binding)
5. Type in a name for the Batch ID.
6. Start the batch.
7. The batch will not run because the material cannot be found in inventory.
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8. From the Material Editor, add “Orange_Dye” to storage tank ST_103. Add 100kg, with a Lot
ID = “CB” and Label = “XXXIII.” See earlier steps for example on how to do this.
9. Clear the batch fault and restart the batch.
10. The batch proceeds now that Orange_Dye inventory has been found.
11. Wait for the batch to complete and examine the batch journal if desired.
This completes Part 1 of the Material Manager lab.
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Material Management implementation with FactoryTalk Batch
This part of the lab introduces the material management capabilities of FactoryTalk Batch. It will show
how material enabled equipment phases can be used to track material to and from storage locations.
The solution demonstrates how the materials database (MicroSoft SQL based) can be accessed from a
HMI using product supported ActiveX components, FactoryTalk Batch API’s (Application Programming
Interfaces), and VBA (Visual Basic for Applications).
The scenario is a truck receiving area where material is unloaded from trucks and loaded into silos and
tanks. These storage locations then feed a process Pre-Weigh hopper unit.
From the Process Overview screen you can navigate to the Raw Material Silos, Raw Materials Tanks and
the Pre-weigh Unit used for this example. The Process Overview display can be reached from the
button.
In the FTBatch Material editor we have configured each of the tanks and silos as material storage
locations, we have also defined the materials that can be stored in those locations. Open the Material
Editor on the AppSerBatch image if you want to following along with screen captures below.
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The tanks store liquids, the liquids defined are LI_A, LI_B, LI_C, and LI_D.
All of these materials have been configured to be stored in any of the tanks except LI_D which can only
be stored in Tank 01.
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The silos store solids, the solids defined are MA_A, MA_B and MA_C.
Any of these materials can be stored in any silo.
Go back to the PASS01 image and navigate to the Silos display by selecting the “SILOS” button from the
Process Overview page.
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Solid Receiving Area
The following screen shows a method of receiving material into the plant.
Typically, incoming material arrives via truck or train, and the operators refer to an unloading schedule to
determine the unload location. Often, unloaded material is tracked by paper work that eventually gets
consolidated using manual entry or data transcription.
Here we demonstrate how FTBatch Material Manager and a Material Enabled Phase reduce the risk of
errors, making the scheduling of silo rotation an electronically driven activity thus improving the overall
process.
In this example, we start with empty silos, one can see from the CONTAINER SUMMARY window that no
material exists in inventory.
The “CONTAINER LOADING PRIORITY SELECTION” window is used to establish and prioritize
incoming material storage locations.
The following display indicates how the list box displays possible locations to store each material. Since
there is no inventory, all silos are listed as possible destinations.
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Below each “CONTAINER LOADING PRIORITY SELECTION” box are buttons used to change the
loading priority. In this example, the priorities, first to last, for material MA_A are Silo 01 followed by 02,
03 and 04. If, during loading, a silo is filled, (as determined in the phase logic) then the system
automatically finds the next configured silo for loading.
This example represents a process where the operator sets up the destination path using a transfer
panel.
A truck button toggles the presence of a truck in the unloading area. If the truck is removed during the
transport process, the system will continue to run for 30 seconds at which time the transport system will
stop and the unloading sequence will complete.
The operator will be required to enter the total amount of material unloaded from the truck or trucks.
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To start the truck unloading sequence, the UNLOAD TRUCK button is enabled. Once this button is
selected the system automatically starts an operation containing a material enabled phase.
The material enabled phase prompts the operator for the material to be unloaded and the associated lot
ID. Once material and log ID are confirmed, the transport system will start.
If the transfer panel is not setup properly the system will prompt the operator to check the path. The
required path is indicated in the phase summary box located in the top left corner of the display. To
change the destination, click on the transfer panel. The system will prompt if no possible destination is
available.
Let’s begin by unloading a truck of material MA_A.
Click the TRUCK PRESENT box to indicate that a truck has arrived.
Select the
button to start the sequence.
The popup will require you to select the material and enter a Lot ID;
Select MA_A and enter A_001 for the lot ID, then ACCEPT.
The material pull down menu will only display materials that have been defined in the material editor.
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Note that the phase information, located on the top left corner of the display, now indicates that the
unloading system or phase is running, but the transport system has not started. This is because,
according to the container loading priority selection schedule, the required destination is Silo 01 but the
transfer panel is set to Silo 04.
1
Because the required destination is different from the selected one, the system is displaying a prompt to
the operator in the OPERATOR PROMPTS window.
Change the destination silo by clicking on the transfer pane.
After correcting the transfer panel destination, double-click on the prompt and select, “Retry” to continue
with truck unloading.
The system will now indicate that the transport system is running.
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This will continue until the truck is removed using the truck present button. If no other truck is present in
the next 30 seconds, the system will assume there is no more material to unload and complete. Another
way to complete is to select the END TRANSFER button.
Additionally, material transport can be held and restarted using buttons located below the OPERATOR
PROMPTS window.
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Once the unloading process has ended, the operator must input the unloaded material quantity, using
another operator prompt.
Note: an operator entry is required in this scenario. If the unloaded amount can be captured using a flow
meter or perhaps from truck tare weight then operator prompting can be omitted.
Double-click the prompt and enter the amount. For this example let’s enter an amount of 1000 Kg.
Select the RESET button below the Operator Prompts window if you selected the End Transfer button.
Selecting the REFRESH button updates inventory in the CONTAINER SUMMARY window. Please see
the following screen capture.
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We can now see in the CONTAINER SUMMARY window that Silo 01 contains 1000 Kg. of material MA_A
with a Lot ID of A_001.
Reviewing the “CONTAINER LOADING PRIORITY SELECTION” we see that:
Material MA_A can be loaded into any silo.
Material MA_B and MA_C can only be loaded into Silos 02, 03 or 04, since material MA_A is in Silo 01.
Material Manager has reserved Silo 01 for material MA_A. This feature prevents the loading of dissimilar
materials into the same container.
Let's receive a new lot of material MA_A but send it to Silo 02. To do so, requires changing Silo 02’s
container priority.
From the table listing MA_A select Silo 02 then select the UP button. Silo 02 is now the next silo for
receiving this material.
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=>
Follow the previously established procedure to unload 1600 Kg. of MA_A to Silo 02 with a lot ID of A_002.
Select the REFRESH button to update inventory.
Silo 01 and 02 will not be available to unload any other material other than MA_A.
Repeat this process to add:
800 Kg. of MA_B to Silo 03 with a Lot ID of B_001
1200 Kg. of MA_C to Silo 04 with a Lot ID of C_001
Refresh the display to review the Container Summary window.
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If another truck of material MA_B needs to be unloaded, it can only be delivered to Silo 03.
Receive another 500 Kg. of MA_B with a Lot ID of B_002.
The Lot ID indicated in Silo 03 reflects the lot of the material at the bottom of the silo since it is a Plug
Flow type container and materials are not mixed.
Liquid Receiving Area
Liquid receiving operates under the same philosophy as solids, but utilizes a flow meter which provides
automatic inventory updates. Inventory is updated when the operator indicates that the transfer is
complete.
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From the menu bar select Batch System Menu then Raw Material Tanks to go to the Liquid Receiving
Area.
Create an inventory of liquids using materials Liquids LI_A, LI_B, LI_C and LI_D
Remember that we are able to isolate possible destinations or containers for each material, in this
example material LI_A can only go into Tank 01.
Create some inventory of the following (approximate amount):
Container
Tank 01
Tank 02
Tank 03
Tank 04
Material
LI_A
LI_A
LI_B
LI_C
Quantity - Kg
150
200
200
200
Lot ID
LI_A_001
LI_A_001
LI_B_001
LI_C_001
Note that the priority can be set in advance; this is often performed by the operations department.
Simulate the presence of a truck by clicking the following button.
Note that a truck is now shown in the receiving area:
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The amount of material transferred in this system is totalized using an in line totalizer.
When the approximate material required has been added, end the unloading sequence by selecting
Select the REFRESH button to update the inventory, which can be seen in the CONTAINER SUMMARY
window.
Remember to change the priority of the destination container (tank or silo) when necessary.
We have now created an inventory of bulk liquids and solids.
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Pre-Weigh 1
The previous sections unloaded materials into containers. Now we will consume these materials in the
Pre-Weigh.
Note: unloading and consumption functionality requires only one Equipment Phase per unloading unit as
seen in this screen capture from the FTBatch Equipment Editor.
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Batch #1
Navigate to the PREWEIGH unit display by selecting the Raw Material Preweigh 1 button.
The Pre-Weigh 01 unit has the ability to add materials from any of the storage silos and tanks.
The material additions are totalized in the weigh hopper via load cells.
Material Manager will be responsible for determining the source of these materials based on the criteria
specified in the “CONTAINER UNLOADING PRIORITY SELECTION.”
The system will update storage container inventory as material is consumed by the process.
Take a moment and examine the PREWEIGH unit display which presents:
• a MATERIAL INVENTORY window
• CONTAINER UNLOAD PRIORITY SELECTION windows
• an OPERATOR PROMPTS window, used by the system when operator intervention is required
• Pre-Weigh Hopper weigh status
• a Unit “Activity Display” to inform the users of process activities. (No Message if inactive).
The Material Addition phase has two operating control strategies. When using Strategy “A” one specifies
an explicit amount of material (i.e. Kg). Strategy “B” calculates the material quantity needed based on a
material property.
Note: An example of Strategy “B” might be calculating the amount of milk to add based on the shipment’s
fat content. Since the fat content changes with each shipment, a new quantity is required. Property
values, such as fat content, can be stored in Material Manager as Lot attributes.
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A recipe, PRODUCT_W_PW_OP, has been created to add the following to the Pre-Weigh hopper:
Material
LI_A
LI_B
MA_A
Strategy
Explicit
Implicit
Implicit
Quantity – Kg
50
Unit / Unit
50
50
Note: Implicit is based on a specific lot’s material concentration.
Open the eProcedure View by selecting:
.
Select ADD a batch and select the recipe named “PRODUCT_W_PW_OP.” Select OK.
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Fill in the Batch ID field. Use: TEST_001 or any other name.
A batch will be placed on the Batch List.
To view the recipe steps and batch status select the PROCEDURE button at the bottom of the screen,
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which displays the recipe procedure for this batch.
Select the batch from the Batch List and then select Start to initiate the batch.
Navigate to the Pre-Weigh unit and watch as the recipe configured materials are added to the batch.
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“Material Manager”
You may recall that 50 Kg of liquid LI_A is to be added. Based on where this material is stored and the
usage priorities, the material should be taken from Tank 02 as shown on the following display.
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“Material Manager”
Recall the second addition is liquid LI_B. Inventory and priority dictates Tank 03 will be used. Also recall,
the recipe specified the addition of 50 units of material based on concentration. This material lot has a
90% concentration, from which the system calculates a required addition amount of 55.6 Kg.
The properties and setpoints are displayed on the PROPERTIES DOSING section of the display.
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“Material Manager”
The third addition is a solid material, MA_A. This material will be taken from Silo 02, based on storage
locations and priorities.
The lot of material MA_A, currently stored in Silo 02, has an 80% concentration so the calculated
quantity, based on a 50 unit / unit recipe setpoint is 60.0 Kg.
Again, as with earlier additions, attribute values, setpoints, and actuals are displayed in the WEIGHT
DOSING section of the Pre-Weigh 01 Unit Display.
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“Material Manager”
When the “pre-act” value is reached, phase logic closes the silo discharge valve and the system
continues to deliver the remaining material in the transport system to the Pre-Weigh 01 Unit.
This recipe was configured to unload the hopper’s contents after pre-weigh to Premix 3.
As materials are consumed by the unit, material inventory is updated, deducting the actual amount dosed
to the batch.
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“Material Manager”
Select Refresh button to see the final Material Inventory
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Batch #2
Batch #2 uses the same recipe, but this time we will demonstrate Material Manager’s container rebind
feature by simulating a depleted source.
This phase has been designed to prompt the operator when there is an incomplete feed. The operator
makes the decision whether to (a) retry from the same source or (b) have the system (Material Manager /
FT Batch) look for another source. Both options are demonstrated.
A lot is going in when running this batch, read ahead before starting the batch to understand what you will
need to do.
The simulated depletion will be liquid LI_A which exists in both Tank 01 and Tank 02. The priorities are
set so Tank 02 is the primary source and Tank 01 is the secondary source.
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“Material Manager”
Select the eProcedure View button and then add and start another “PRODUCT_W_PW_OP” batch.
Return to the Raw Material Preweigh 1 display.
As expected the system starts dosing liquid LI_A from Tank 02.
After some material has been transferred, a few kilos is enough, select “Simulate Zero Flow:”
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“Material Manager”
The system will stop adding from Tank 02. Select “Simulate Zero Flow” after the addition has stopped to
reset the button and then double click on the prompt in the Operator Prompts window.
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“Material Manager”
The prompt asks the operator to “Retry_Current_Source” or “Find a New Source”.
If the operator selects “Retry_Current_Source” the system resumes adding material from the initial
source, Tank 02. If enough material exists to complete the required addition the remainder will come from
that source.
A “retry” option is practical in many situations. Perhaps additional inventory is added to the source or
often, particularly in the case of solid materials, there is sufficient inventory but a bridge or blockage is
stopping flow.
Select “Retry_Current_Source” and Acknowledge. As soon as the addition begins select the “Simulate
Zero Flow” button. When the addition stops select the button again to reset it.
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“Material Manager”
Note that the actual dosed amount. In this example, 25.5 Kg was obtained from Tank 02, before the
“Simulate Zero Flow” button was pressed the second time.
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“Material Manager”
Double click on the prompt and this time select “Find a New Source” and click on Acknowledge.
Finding a new source caused the Batch to go to the Held state, we simulated a hold on a split feed, this
was shown in one of the examples at the start of the lab. You will need to go to the eProcedure View
clear the failures and restart the batch.
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“Material Manager”
The system will evaluate the Container Unloading Priority and find the next source, in this case Tank 01.
Note that the system recalculated the remaining amount required to meet the original 50 KG setpoint,
which, in this example, is 13.2 Kg.
The phase adds the remaining liquid LI_A and completes.
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“Material Manager”
The batch continues with the remaining material adds then finishes by unloading the Pre-Weigh unit to
Premix 3.
This completes Part 2 of “Material Management with FactoryTalk Batch.”
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Lab4: FactoryTalk Historian SE / Batch Analysis
Lab4: FactoryTalk Historian SE / Batch Analysis Lab
Section 1 – Overview, Highlights of Lab, and Terminology
Overview:
FactoryTalk Historian SE is optimized to collect and analyze time-series data. Time-series data is
continuously being sampled over time, and each sampled value can be saved in a database. In order to
optimize the system and minimize storage requirements, there are different ways to run exception testing
and compression on the data, so only relevant changes to the data are stored for analysis. This way the
system can store much more data than if it was stored directly onto a traditional relational database.
With FactoryTalk Historian SE simply select a tag in the control system that you want the historian to
monitor, and FactoryTalk Historian does the rest. The result is a series of data values which are collected
over time in an optimal way to minimize storage space in the historian. With the FactoryTalk Batch
Interface simply install the product, configure the INI, and FactoryTalk Batch control recipe (batch)
records will be archived by FactoryTalk Historian SE to the Module database.
A Batch Event Interface will efficiently take data from your FactoryTalk Batch event journals files for data
storage within the historian database. This batch data can be used by other FactoryTalk Historian SE
applications providing a comprehensive set of analysis and visualization tools. Process Book combined
with Batch View and Active View help make delivery of the tools flexible and targeted to the right users.
With the BatchView add-in to Process Book, the batch data can be configured to allow the operators or
engineers to analyze batch data and easily compare time-series data against the batch execution data.
This information can provide knowledge to help operations make improvement in overall yield and quality
of their batches. The ability to compare cycle times, tag a Golden Batch, compare different batches,
compare unit execution, and better understand patterns and repeatable events. This valuable information
may lead to identifying and removing process bottlenecks, optimize your batch times, increase overall
production, increase equipment utilization, minimize reprocessing and discarded batches!
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NOTE: This lab assumes that you are familiar with the FactoryTalk Batch
application as well as the PlantPAx process control system to perform various
operations like creating, commanding and removing batches without help. If you
are not familiar with this, please take the basic batch lab before taking this lab.
This lab does not require a strong working knowledge of FactoryTalk Historian
SE.
We apologize in advance to any FactoryTalk Historian SE power users; this lab assumes the user has no
strong working knowledge of the FactoryTalk Historian SE product. Here are the main highlights of each
remaining section for this lab:
Section 2: (Engineer constructs FactoryTalk Historian SE Points)
You will select a few control system tags from the Logix controller for the two reactor unit’s levels as data
points within the FactoryTalk Historian. You will verify that these data points exist as well as understand
that other relevant control system tags for your units that have been previously configured as data points
to the historian. In addition, you will explore the Excel SMT Add-In, also called the Tag Configuration tool
that allows you to work with Historian tags in Microsoft Excel.
Section 3: (Engineer’s take on the FactoryTalk Batch Interface)
Here you will explore the new FactoryTalk Batch Interface. This interface dynamically builds your
equipment model in the Historian database, and it efficiently allows you to capture detailed batch event
information from your batch records.
Section 4: (Engineer’s perspective of ProcessBook with BatchView)
Here you will use Batch View in a thick-client application for ProcessBook. Within ProcessBook,
BatchView will make it easy to make batch-to-batch comparisons for completed or active batches.
Comparisons against a golden or anchored batch become very simple. Relative time comparisons can
be made between batches as if they all started at the same time. Time series data can be simply
configured for trending against the batch data. The BatchView in ProcessBook can simply and efficiently
enable engineers to analyze their data, as well as expose this tool for the operators within the View SE
environment.
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Terminology:
Control system tag, or memory tag refers to a name assigned to a memory register in the control
system that holds some sort of process data. For example, this could be a memory register in a
controller, or a data value in the HMI server.
A data point is a Factory Talk Historian SE term which refers to a location in the control system from
which FactoryTalk Historian SE collects data. A data point can be a control system tag or memory tag
(i.e..any FactoryTalk Data Live tag).
A reporting tag is a Historian term for the time-series data stored in the FactoryTalk Historian database
that was sampled from a single point such as a control system tag.
Auto Discovery: allows the system to automatically discover controllers and other data sources without
the need for the user to identify the controller name and/or address. The system will start in the data tree
within FactoryTalk Application from where the user identifies the starting point of the search, and discover
all data sources from that point and all tags in those sources.
Auto Configure: allows the system to automatically configure known tags and points based on templates
that define what points to search. This means that the system will very quickly find only the relevant
points to configure, and allow the user to configure these in one step.
FTLD1 Interface: is a component of the FactoryTalk Historian and is responsible for the FactoryTalk
LiveData data collection from Data Servers in the FactoryTalk Directory. This interface will apply
exception and compression as necessary on a tag by tag basis. The tag data that is collected can be
stored in a local buffer if the FactoryTalk Historian is not available.
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Section 2 – Engineer constructs FactoryTalk Historian SE points
There are many ways to define data points of interest within FactoryTalk Historian SE. In this lab will
demonstrate one option which is to Add Individual Historian Points by the engineer, or configurator. In
addition, we will demonstrate a mass configuration change within Excel to export the information back to
the FactoryTalk Historian server using the PI SMT (System Management Tool) Add-In. This lab does not
demonstrate Rockwell exclusive feature that includes Auto Discovery (Discover Historian Points), or Auto
Configure. To work more with this and other features of FactoryTalk Historian, please consider attending
a FactoryTalk Historian SE specific lab sometime later this week.
In this lab, we will briefly expose the user to how they might use MS Excel to import tags from the
Historian to harness the power available through Microsoft Excel and the SMT Add-In for viewing,
documenting, modify, creating and deleting(if option enabled) Historian tags.
Initially, you will run the Add Individual Historian Points to allow you to identify or create just a few data
points of interest. You will see how to add data points to the historian server database with a default
configuration. The control system tags that we choose will become captured data points by the historian
server. This will allow you to view the time-series data with batch execution data in later sections of this
lab.
Let’s get started identifying our points with Historian so we have our time series data …
1. This lab assumes that you are familiar with the basic batch functions of the FactoryTalk Batch
application as well as the PlantPAx process control system. If this is not true, you should take the
basic batch lab before trying to go further in this lab.
2. Please verify that you are in the AppSerHist VMWare image. This is the VMWare image where the
FactoryTalk Historian SE product has been installed. There are 2 other images with this lab that we
will abbreviate PASS01 and AppSerBatch.
3. To add our new historian data points, please open the FactoryTalk Administrator Console tool by
selecting it from the Start Menu shortcut list.
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4. On the Select FactoryTalk Directory dialog, select Network Directory and press the OK button.
5. Expand Network, and select PlantPAx Demo. Right mouse click and select Add Individual
Historian Points.
Right mouse click and select Add Individual Historian Points.
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6. Keep the default scan rate at 1 second from application PlantPAx Demo. Press the Browse Tags
button to add tags.
This will take a moment to collect a list of tags and display the tag browser.
7. Within the Tag Browser window, expand the PlantPAx Demo, open CPG1 area, double-click on the
Online folder to open. We are using the FactoryTalk Live Data connection to the controller where the
CPG1 desired device inputs happen to exist.
.
8. You can scroll down the Folders list to find the desired control system tags which are level inputs for
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Reactor 1 and Reactor 2 named, CPG1_LIT118.Val and CPG1_LIT218.Val, respectively. You can
find the Val parameter in the Contents list to the right.
9. Add the two control system tags for reactor level to the browser’s selected tag list by double-clicking
on the Val parameter of the tag, then press OK to close the window.
10. Notice that you can only change the Default scan rate, everything else is predefined. Select OK.
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This is one way that you can add Factory Talk SE Historian points for capture within the Module
database.
We have previously added some additional process input tags for the reactor which you will use later
for analysis in conjunction with your batch execution data. These tags are:
CPG1_TIC116.VAL_PV – Reactor 1 Temperature Process Value
CPG1_TIC116.VAL_SP – Reactor 1 Temperature Set Point Value
CPG1_TIC116.VAL_CVOUT – Reactor 1 Temperature Control Value
CPG1_PIC118.PV – Reactor 1 Pressure Process Value
CPG1_PIC118.SP – Reactor 1 Pressure Set Point Value
CPG1_PIC118.CV – Reactor 1 Pressure Control Value
CPG1_TIC216.PV – Reactor 2 Temperature Process Value
CPG1_TIC216.SP – Reactor 2 Temperature Set Point Value
CPG1_TIC216.CV – Reactor 2 Temperature Control Value
CPG1_PIC218.PV – Reactor 2 Pressure Process Value
CPG1_PIC218.SP – Reactor 2 Pressure Set Point Value
CPG1_PIC218.CV – Reactor 2 Pressure Control Value (output value of the PID controller)
These tags will be used in Aliases for real-time trending with Unit Batch data later.
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NOTE: This previous method for adding tags may not be a very good choice
when many tags are required to be established. A distinction of the FactoryTalk
Historian SE product is a simpler way for users to add a large group of tags into
the Module database using the Discover Historian Points feature within the
FactoryTalk Administrator Console. To understand more details about how to
use the auto discovery of tags, there is a YouTube video to watch called, Tag
Auto Discovery in FactoryTalk Historian SE at:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m99c103qYMg
11. Please close the FactoryTalk Administration Console: File -> Exit
12. Let’s verify that these data points are recorded values within the FTHistorian. To do this we need to
run some batches to get dynamic level data archived into the Historian Module database. If data is
not changing, it certainly won’t be interesting and without the changes, the event to trigger the
collection and compression of data won’t occur within Historian.
NOTE: To understand more about the Historian algorithm for data archive and
compression, there is a YouTube video to watch called, Data Compression and
Exception in FactoryTalk Historian SE at:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fdH7dYTN7gM
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13. We can use the FactoryTalk Batch View application to create and run batches that will cause process
data to change and be recorded within the Historian. This FactoryTalk Batch View is a much different
application than the PI Historian Batch View product that we will explore later in this lab to analyze
batch data.
Please switch to the VMWare AppSerBatch or PASS01 image, whichever you are more comfortable
using. The FactoryTalk Batch View application is installed on both, the PASS01, and AppSerBatch
VMware images. To create and run batches, you must use a batch interface of some kind, even the
SE client would work. To keep it simple we will just use the Batch View application.
NOTE: Everything needs to be running properly in the controller and the
FactoryTalk batch server services. The initial check section of this lab has you
verify that all your hardware and software is in an acceptable state. If you did not
verify Initial Checks in the beginning section “About this Lab,” then please do
so now.
14. Start the FactoryTalk Batch View application. There is a desktop icon that you can launch,
or you can choose the Start menu, select View as seen below:
15. From the FactoryTalk Batch View, you should be logged on as APPSERBATCH\ADMINISTRATOR.
This will reflect how you are logged on to FactoryTalk Security for this FactoryTalk Batch View
application. Please create a batch by selecting the
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icon button on the right.
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16. Answer Yes, you would like to create a batch. This Yes/No popup is a configurable prompt to the
command.
17. Select the Product_A_PM_RX_NO_PROMPT_STEPS master recipe to instantiate a new control
recipe to make a batch of Product A material.
Select OK
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18. In the Batch Creation pop-up window, please enter a unique Batch ID. May I suggest something
simple like, PA_ followed by R1 or R2 for the reactor it will run in, ending with _001 for the first batch,
_002 for the second batch, and so on. For a formula value you may choose STRG_TNK_01 for
reactor 1 and STRG_TNK_02 for reactor 2, then select the Create button.
For reactor 1, the bound units will be Premix_01 and Reactor_01, use the Batch ID: PA_R1_001
Repeat this step for reactor 2, the bound units will be Premix_03 and Reactor_02, use the Batch ID:
PA_R2_001
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19. Select the Start button to command each of the batches to run.
While waiting for the first set of recipes to Complete, you can create the next set of control recipes, or
batches - PA_R1_002 and PA_R2_002. Do not start the second set of recipes until instructed later.
These first 2 running recipes should finish in about 10 minutes, but reactor 2 recipe may take a
minute longer than reactor 1. Call the lab assistant if it is taking much longer, and you are not sure it
is progressing properly.
Do not start the second set of recipes until instructed later.
20. Remove the COMPLETE recipes. To remove a recipe once Complete, select the recipe on the list
and choose the Remove command icon on the right,
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.
21. For the remaining control recipe that will run in Premix 1, let us setup an operational delay before
starting this recipe in premix 01 and reactor 1. Go to the Phase Execution screen, and select
PREMIX_01 in the equipment list, and select the Next button twice for the Phases to get to the
PM_ADDITION_03 phase to select it and acquire ownership ( + icon button) as an operator.
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22. Start just this one recipe in the Procedure View (SFC), and wait for the acquiring transition state,
23. Wait a minute, then Release the ownership of the phase PM_ADDITION_03
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24. Verify that the control recipe takes ownership of the phase and continues running,
25. With the recipe running, let’s wait until the unit procedure running in PREMIX_01 is Complete,
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Drill into the running Reactor 1 unit procedure to see the phases that area actively running:
26. This time you shall cause an operational problem within the reactor unit, Go back to the procedure
level, or top of the recipe quickly, either by scrolling up the step hierarchy on the left, or double-click in
the initial steps
at each level until it brings you to the top of the procedure, and
touch the white space area so the command buttons have focus. With the procedure level selected,
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press the Hold command,
so the recipe goes to Held:
Wait a minute, then Restart the recipe. Repeat this same process again (i.e. Hold, Wait, and
Restart) when the recipe control gets to the very last phases with the transfer out running,
REACTOR_XFER_OUT :
27. Let the control recipe go COMPLETE, then Remove this completed recipe from the batch list.
NOTE: The other control recipe that will run in reactor 2 has not been started. We will start this recipe
later.
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28. Switch back to the AppSerHist VMWare image to continue on with this Historian lab.
29. On the AppSerHist image please click to open the System Management Tool, or PI SMT 2012 SP1
as it is pinned to both, the Start Menu, and Task Bar.
, and wait for it to load.
30. Once open, the default server is AppSerHist. Under System Management Tools, please select to
open Data, and then choose Archiver Editor.
31. This Archive Editor will allow us display specific data points that have been previously archived within
Historian.
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If you are familiar with this Historian feature, you may skip ahead to step # 38 where we explore
Current Values feature.
From the work area on the right there is an icon
for the Tag Search launching a popup search
window. You can browse tags in the system from this window. Please select this Tag Search icon.
Note:
checked.
- this Tag Search icon will not be available unless the Historian server is
32. Within the Tag Search browser you may apply filters to reduce the number of tags in the return list.
Select the Point Class to set its value to classic and choose Point Source as FTLD* and set the
Tag Mask filter setting its value to *.CPG1* to limit our display of points of interest for this lab. Select
the Search button. How many are in the List Count?
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To see the tagnames, please expand the Tag column in the window list by clicking on it and dragging
it wider. There are 1344 tags from CPG1 area being historized in the module database through a
FactoryTalk Live Data connection to the controller.
Since we are interested in a few points, a better search would be to change the Tag Mask to be more
specific like, *LIT118*. Select the Search button. A much smaller list appears to manage through.
33. Scroll down the short tag list to find CPG1_LIT118.Val tag and select OK. The tag will be added to
the first tab. The start time can be changed from *-2h (2 hours) to something longer or shorter in
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duration. Try a start time as *-1d (1 day), or *-1m (1 month), and just click the Get Events button,
for a refresh of values:
34. You can add another point by selecting the + tab
to the right of the newly added point.
Let’s add one more point to the archive, select the + tab
To remove a point from the tab list, select it, and right-mouse click the tab to select Close Tab.
35. Do a tag search using the Tag Mask *LIT218*, then select OK.
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Scroll down the short tag list to find CPG1_LIT218.Val tag and select OK.
36. You should see two points among two tabs in the archive editor.
Note: you will not see data on these new points if you did not run batches during the time specified.
37. Another feature of this Archive Editor allows you to provide a substitute tag value for a point. It does
not replace the existing point that was sent to archive previously in time, but it does provide a
substitute value. This is good if it is known that there was an error or a bias in the data at a given
time. You can also set a configuration parameter to not allow substituted values for data after a
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certain amount of time has passed since the data was collected including never.
38. Now, we can look at current data values for the points that we are archiving. Within the same Data
tree, there is a Current Values, select this feature.
If you are familiar with this feature of Historian, please skip ahead to PI SMT add-in at step # 44
39. From the icon list, select the Tag Search icon
window.
. This action will bring up the Tag Search browser
Note:
- this Tag Search icon will not be available unless the Historian server
is checked.
40. Within the Tag Search browser, use the Tag Mask filter setting its value to *LIT118 * to quickly
display our point of interest. Scroll down the tag list to find LIT118.Val recorded points.
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41. The point CPG1_LIT118.Val will be displayed with its current value as a snapshot.
42. Use the Tag Search browser again
. Set the Tag Mask filter setting its value to *LIT218 * to
quickly display our point of interest. Scroll down the tag list to find CPG1_LIT218.Val recorded points.
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43. Now, both tags should be in the current value list as snapshots. To get current real-time updates,
please select the start updating icon
Notice the data may not change if no batches are running in a reactor. If this is the case, add a batch
to run against a reactor of your choice, and start it.
Data could be changing every second if there is a batch running in reactor 1 or 2. From this example
(above and below) you can see that reactor 2 is static with a value of 21.11288, but reactor 1 has
changed from the snapshot of zero to 47.85.
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44. Let’s examine how an engineer might use MS Excel with the PI SMT add-in to see what data points
of interest are currently within the Historian. This spreadsheet import/export can provide a quick way
of changing a large set of tags.
If you are familiar with this feature, feel free to skip to next section, Section 3.
Open MS Excel 2010.
45. Select File > Options, this brings up the Excel Options window
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46. Select Add-Ins
.
47. With Manage defined for Excel Add-ins, select Go… to bring up the Add-Ins window seen below:
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From this Add-Ins window, we see PI Tag Configurator has been added all ready. If it were not there,
you would want to select the Browse button to find the recommended file and location. It should be
located at:
C:\Program Files (x86)\Rockwell Software\FactoryTalk Historian\PIPC\SMT
The filename is PITagCnf.xla
48. If it is there already, please select the Cancel button.
49. With this Add-In, you will be able to see the PI SMT Add-In when you select Excel’s Add-Ins menu
tab
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To get tags from Historian into the Excel spreadsheet, pull-down your options from PI-SMT
Select Import Tags…
50. From the Import Tags window, add FTLD* to the Point Source, and *CPG1* to the Tag Mask
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51. Select OK, it will fetch PI tags for the spreadsheet. This may take a minute as it fetches over 1000
points.
52. The PI Tag Configurator window appears, select OK
Notice: there were 0 errors, and 1359 tags successfully imported. You could reduce this number of
points based upon the granularity of your tag masks.
53. If you are interested go to the Home menu to use the FIND feature in Excel to locate some of those
points we had mentioned earlier. If not, just close Excel.
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NOTE: All the FactoryTalk Historian tag attributes are displayed in each record
on the worksheet. This allows you to document, create, and edit tags on a global
scale. Exporting them back into Historian gives you an efficient way to manage
Historian tags...
54. Congratulations! You have successfully added new data points to the Historian and verified them by
several methods. Later, you can trend this data overlaid with your batch execution data through the
Batch View’s engineer perspective. In the next section, we will explore the Interface Configuration
Utility – ICU, and the System Management Tool - SMT to get the engineer’s perspective on the
FactoryTalk Batch Interface.
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Section 3 – Engineer’s take on the FactoryTalk Batch Interface
The new FactoryTalk Batch Interface requires configuration for the Historian to receive data from the
batch records. This software was loaded on the AppSerBatch node where the FactoryTalk batch server
resides. This may not be the best location to load the interface software due to potential resource
contention with the batch server, but for this lab it is a convenient option.
You can observe the current connections within the FactoryTalk Administration Console for the Network.
Currently, a FactoryTalk Live Data connection exists named, FTLD1. The FTLD1 connection is how
Historian will collect time series tags from the controller as we observed in the previous section. The
FactoryTalk Batch Interface will not appear in the FactoryTalk Administrator Console. The PI Interface
Configuration Utility will tell you where the PIFTBOInt1 interface is installed. The data which this interface
transfer to the Historian module database is very different than a controller tag. Through this interface, it
is batch journal data that will be pushed from the FactoryTalk Batch Server’s event journal directory into
the FactoryTalk Historian SE Module database when the interface is running and new batch journal data
exists.
During normal production the resource impact of the FactoryTalk Batch Interface is not usually an issue of
concern. However, if you are starting this interface for the first time, or the interface has not been running
for a period, yet many batch journals have been produced since that time, you will need to exercise some
caution upon starting this interface. If a large number of event files exist in the journal folder, the interface
will consume massive amounts of system resources to check all evt files – both archived and not
archived. Moving older evt files that have been archived out of the production journal folder, or limiting
the amount of time which the interface can check past batches may help contain this potential issue.
1. For this lab the Batch Event interface was installed on the batch server image. Please go to the
AppSerBatch VMWare image.
2. Before we start, let’s examine what batch journal file data looks like. We could use the FactoryTalk
Batch View application to examine some of this data, or we could open an existing journal file using
Windows Explore and any ASCII text file editor such as Notepad.
3. Open the FactoryTalk Batch View application, and select the Journals view,
4. From the event journal view, select the Journals search button,
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5. From the list of batch journals that is displayed, select one and press OK,
Please take some time to observe and explore the results which is data contained by an event journal
record for a specific batch, or control recipe. They are event descriptions and values with a time.
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6. The same data could be examined through Notepad, Wordpad, or Excel. Use Windows Explore to
find an .evt file of interest and open it with Notepad using right-mouse click on the file,
7. It will display all the details about a specific batch record,
8. Spend a minute looking at the different entry records within the log. Much of this data is what the
Historian will be capturing within it’s module database.
9. From the AppSerHist image Start Menu shortcut list, select FactoryTalk Administrator Console.
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Open Connections\Historical Data\Production Historian
You can observe the current connections defined within the FactoryTalk Administration Console for
the historian. Currently only, a FactoryTalk Live Data connection exists.
10. On the AppSerBatch VMWare image we will examine and start, if stopped, the FactoryTalk Batch
Interface, please launch the Interface Configuration Utility, or ICU from the Start Menu on the
machine that the new FactoryTalk Batch Interface was loaded (i.e. AppSerBatch).
11. From the Interface Configuration Utility, we will see that there exists the interface PIFTBOInt that was
preconfigured for this lab. Please pull-down the interface window to select the FactoryTalk Batch
event interface, PIFTBOInt -> APPSERHIST
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The General window provides information about the interface such as point source, scan classes,
connection status with the Historian, user, version, port, etc. Please note that the batch interface
does not use typical scan classes since data is being pulled from event journal files. Also notice, the
General window tells you where the Interface was installed:
C:\Program Files (x86)\Rockwell Software\FactoryTalk Historian\PIPC\Interfaces\FTBOInt
where the .bat file, PIFTBOInt1.bat, is located.
12. Select FTBOInt in the left side of the interface utility to bring up the configuration window.
Notice that the Administration tab defines information about the interface including the mode and
start date/time for the interface to begin archives.
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The alternate INI file is an important part of the interface configuration. It defines the location for the
batch records to archive, and what data to transfer into the Historian. Its current path is defined as:
C:\Program Files (x86)\Rockwell Software\FactoryTalk Historian\PIPC\Interfaces\FTBOInt
where the ini file, PIFTBOInt_RA.ini, is located can be verified by selecting the browse button,
13. To examine the contents of the Configuration INI file, select the Configure INI File button,
However, the configuration of this file is outside the scope of this class, and there should be no strong
reason for why an end user would want to make changes to it.
14. Let’s look quickly at the other tabs, select the Time Settings tab. This is the default setting.
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.
15. Select the Batch Setup tab. This is the default setting.
16. Please select the Diagnostics tab. This is the default setting.
17. Please select Service in the ICU. Notice here that the Startup Type is set to Auto. The ICU should
be running upon boot of the O/S when startup type is auto. If it were not, there are command buttons
on the toolbar under the menu that allow you to stop and start the interface.
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18. The service configuration includes Windows security authentication information and service
dependencies for the ICU service. In the ICU utility window, the IO Rate doesn’t apply to this
interface, and Interface Status provides minimal information.
19. Please switch back to the FactoryTalk Historian SE image AppSerHist. The FactoryTalk Batch
Interface dynamically builds the equipment model and phases within its database. If this was a new
install of the interface and the Batch Interface and you had previously run no batches, the equipment
database would be empty for the initial image. Once a batch is archived, the equipment (units, and
phases) will be built dynamically for you. If you happen to add new units, or phases to your batch
system in the future, the Historian database will dynamically update its model as soon as a phase or
unit is recorded into any batch journal that is pushed to the Historian. To observe this database, you
must go to the Historian image, AppSerHist. Next, go to the System Management Tool - SMT, select
Batch to open and the Batch Database.
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20. Expand the tree AppSerHist,. Upon opening the tree you will see units under PRODUCTION.
Within each unit, there will be phases which were run by recipe operations against that unit. If no
recipes have ever been run, there would be no units, or phases in this tree
UNITS are:
Expand the tree for PREMIX_01 to observe all the phases within that unit,
UNIT(PREMIX_01)\PHASES are:
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NOTE: As the FactoryTalk FactoryTalk Batch Interface moves the batch journal file
information into the Batch Database, this equipment hierarchy is dynamically built. The tree
above will include only the unit equipment, operations and recipe/equipment phases from the
batches that have been run.
21. From here we can perform a database search for all batches. Right-Click on Production and select
“Search for PIBatch”
22. The Search window will appear. Select the OK button with the default search. The default will find all
batches produced in the past day. To include more batches, you could change the start-time search
from Day, to Days where 90 Days is approximately 3 months, 60 Days is approximately 2 months,
etc.
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23. With *-1 Day specified, select the OK button, notice that it has found 7 batches on my system in the
past day. It should show you all the batches that you have created today which may only be 4 to 6.
24. Expand the search results, and select one of the batches within the list tree. Upon selecting a
particular batch, detailed information about the batch is provided: Batch ID, Recipe, Start Time, End
Time, PIUnitBatches, etc.
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25. Now, select one of the batches to expand, observe that all units/unit procedures run within the
batch will be displayed. This will give you detailed information about the unit procedure that ran
against the unit chosen.
26. Expand each of the units within the batch. This will give you the list of equipment operations that
ran within the unit procedures for the units within the batch. Select an operation for detailed
information that is stored within the historian for that procedure level.
27. Expand the operations for a list of recipe/equipment phases that ran within the batch. Select a
recipe/equipment phase within the operation for details about the phase.
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28. Open a recipe/equipment phase listed within the operation, here you see the various states which the
phase had during its lifespan. Select one such as Running, notice the details captured,
29. Did you notice that there was no formula value data, no report values on any of these details for each
level of the database? If you wish to use the SMT to investigate a phase’s data such as download
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parameters, report upload parameters then the Module Database is where you need to go. In the
SMT, open Operation and Module Database. Expand the tree to the reactor unit, then open up
Reactor_01 to observe all equipment phases within that unit.
30. Expand on the equipment phase R01_TEMP_CONTROL, and the Aliases folder,
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31. The Aliases folder within the equipment phase stores a list of the phase Aliases - Alias Names and
Tag Name references. Double click an Alias item to get the Attribute popup window, select Cancel
to close popup
32. Go up to the REACTOR_01 unit, expand the Aliases folder under the unit. Scroll through the list
of Aliases until you reach the end. As you see, the previous Aliases for all the phases that we
observed earlier are listed there as well. In addition, you can observe some time-series Alias tags
(i.e. RX_Temp_PV, RX_Pressure_PV, etc.) that were previously built by the engineer.
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33. Notice that your newly added level indicators should not be present in the list of Reactor 01 unit
aliases. You have not assigned an alias name to the actual device tag for the unit. While we have
not done that yet, it may be possible that it was left over in the image you are working on.
If so, you can delete this RX_Level_PV alias, and build it per the following instruction steps with some
caution; it may take several minutes to delete this alias if it exists. If you are short on time at this
point, skip to the next section of the lab, section 4 using Process Book when the alias has been built.
To delete, select RX_Level_001, right-mouse click for a delete action,
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34. The remainder of this section will show you how an alias such as RX_LEVEL_PV can be tied to tags
across multiple units, reactors in this case. Let’s quickly do this for Reactor 01 and Reactor 02 level
tags that we added earlier as though they were new Historian points.
Select the Aliases folder under the unit REACTOR_01, right-mouse click to add a New alias.
35. The Edit/View PIAlias Atributes window will appear, enter an Alias Name for our newly added tag.
Call it RX_Level_PV. If there were multiple PI Servers, you would select the appropriate PI Server
from the pull-down option which is AppSerHist.
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NOTE: The reason we have kept the alias name rather generic verses a more specific name
like R01_Level_PV, or R02_Level_PV, is that the generic name will makes it easier to embed
and use with the BatchView graphic with time-series historian data. If a BatchView graphic
as built initially trends Reactor 01 with the RX_Level_PV in the time series graph, if the
operator changes the unit to Reactor 02 during run-time, the time series trend change units
level to the appropriate tag provided the same alias, RX_Level_PV, exists in Reactor 02.
Operators might have a more difficulty if we used the more specific names for our aliases.
36. Select the tag browser icon,
, to find the historian tag for level in Reactor 01, and later in
Reactor 02. The tag names for these inputs were CPG1_LIT118.Val and CPG1_LIT218.Val, use this
as part of the Tag Mask for the search.
Select OK to link the historian data point for level tag, LIT118.Val, to the alias tag, RX_Level_PV
within Reactor 01.
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37. See that you now have the new alias for level in Reactor 01 alias folder called RX_Level_PV.
38. Repeat and create an alias level tag within Reactor 02 alias tag folder.
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39. Fill in the appropriate data, and browse to select LIT218.Val for Reactor 02 much like you did for
reactor 1 earlier.
NOTE: From these screens we define all aliases we want to reference at a later date
for analysis. Notice that this alias is looking at the LIT218.Val historian point..
40. Select OK, verify that the new alias, RX_Level_PV, exists in Reactor 02 as well.
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41. By creating these alias tags, we can use them in a Batch View trend so if we change units, the
system knows which tag to associate on the trend with the unit selected. Minimize the SMT
application.
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Section 4 – Engineer’s perspective of ProcessBook with BatchView
Here you will use Batch View for ProcessBook. Batch View will make it possible for batch-to-batch
comparisons of completed or active batches. Comparisons against a golden or anchored batch become
an everyday routine. Relative time comparisons can be made between batches as if they all started at
the same time. Creating trends and leveraging the capabilities built into the tool is a powerful feature. We
will examine several trends, and explore some of the capabilities of this tool.
Using ProcessBook is not usually something the operators will do, but for an engineer, this tool can be
indispensible.
1. From the Start menu, select the FactoryTalk Historian ProcessBook to open.
2. Close the PBDEMO.PIW
3.
Select File>Connections to verify the Historian connection.
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Close the Connection Manager window. You are connected to the correct historian server.
4. From the top menu select File>Open to select an existing Batch Group pdi file, browse to
C:\inetpub\wwwroot\BatchAnalysis.
5. When you open an existing file, you must change to the Build mode to edit. Otherwise, if building a
new file, ignore as it should be in build mode already.
Select Build mode (hammer icon), and just double-click the Batch Group object in the work area for
the Batch Definition window to appear. If you are in Run mode, double-clicking on the Batch Group
object will only expand the object size. The Batch Definition window may look like this :
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Double click anywhere on the (Batch Group1) [BatchGantt1] object area in the left upper corner
area. When you do, a Batch Definition window pops up.
This Batch Definition window allows you to configure the entire look and feel of the graphic display for
batch analysis with trending. For now, let’s close this pdi file, and make our own. Select File Close.
6. To create a new file, select Cancel on the Batch Definition window; we don’t want to edit an existing
pdi file. Select File>Close on the menu to remove the currently opened pdi file. Select File>New to
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launch the New window popup. Here select the radio button for ProcessBook Display(.pdi) file.
Enter a unique Display Name such as Display_1 as shown here:
7. Select OK and open the Display_1 design window Full screen
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8. You will use the Batch Group icon,
on the toolbar that exists within ProcessBook. Select the
icon from the toolbar menu. Note: you must install the Batch View product for this to be available for
use in ProcessBook.
9.
Once Batch Group is selected, place your mouse cursor in the ProcessBook work area, click and
drag to make the Batch Group a decent size. Be very careful not to drag the Batch Group too
close to bottom of work area, the tool will expand the size greatly without you being aware that the
work area is scrolling down for the coordinates. Upon release of your cursor it will plant the
coordinates, and the Batch Definition window will appear. The size and the objects within the group
can be manipulated and arranged according to your preference. This is the Batch Definition window
that appears:
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10. Within the Batch Definition window there is a definition area for the Search Parameters. This area
provides extensive search options. Before our search we need to set the parameters for the search.
Please change All to The Last which specifies the most recent batches. If you had selected “The
First”, it would infer the oldest batches to meet your criteria. Alll simply means every batch, and the
number to search disappears. Please specify the last 6 batches. Following this is a drop-down menu
for PIUnitBatches, or PIBatches where you should choose PIUnitBatches. Specify the Historian
server as AppSerHist. Notice the other criteria can be added via radio buttons - Running,
Completed, or Both types of batches – please choose Both. Running are any real-time batches that
are currently being processed by the FactoryTalk Batch server. Next, there are three rows of filter
criteria that can be used, BatchID, Product, and Unit Name; the pull-down menu on each allows two
other options - Unit Heading, and Procedure as well. Notice the Time Range and Duration options to
specify for enhanced searching capabilities. Select Search,
Use the scroll feature to move the list of batches up or down, how many batches are there from the
search?
11. Try a search of Active Batches for the last year *-365 days, and Find: All. Select the Search button
to see what batches show up in the list. Notice there are some from 2013 when batches were run on
this image. Feel free to use this data later if you have time to explore deeper with these tools for
analysis and comparison of batches.
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12. Data is usually tied to PIUnitBatches to analyze for a specific unit. To do this, please select the Unit
Name browse button icon,
, or type in *Reactor_01*, or *Reactor_02*,
If you select the Unit Name browse button,
the left of Reactor_01 as seen below:
, expand the equipment tree, and check the box to
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Once you do this, the Reactor_01 unit is placed into the Units and Masks column at the right.
13. Select OK to go back to the Batch Definition window. Next, select Search again to find the batches.
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14. Within the Batch Definition window, you may select the Tag Search button. This will help you list the
historian tags of interest to add to the trend analysis within the Batch Group from anywhere. All
phase tags are defined as string by default due to definition within the Batch Event Interface INI file.
Therefore, to trend time-series data, you must use something other than string data. Therefore, the
alias tags for level, pressure and temperature assigned in the reactor units give us such trend
capabilities. You can choose from these aliases to add to the Batch Group for time-series trending. If
you notice, those aliases don’t require you to use the Tag Search, they are listed on the bottom left of
the Batch Definition window. Scroll down the list of Aliases until you find those starting with RX_
15. For the Alias tags in the Batch Group, select the tag of interest on the left then select the Add Alias->
button to add it as a time-series trend tag on the right. Please try this for RX_Temp_PV.
NOTE: RX_Temp_PV is tied to the historian tag for the Reactor Temperature. By
defining this as the alias for both, Reactor 01 and Reactor 02 temperature PVs, it
allows you to switch the unit for the BatchView during run-time without creating an
invalid trend where Reactor 02 batch data might be compared with the wrong
reactor’s temperature. The properly associated time-series temperature PV tag will
be applied to the trend for the appropriate reactor defined for the trend.
16. Another option that you have within the Batch Definition window is to anchor a batch to the Batch
Group. Therefore, if the operator changes the search criteria to bring up other batches, the anchored
batch will always remain. Often times, this is a valuable practice for what many would describe as a
golden batch. The golden batch is considered by some to be the batch that operators aspire all their
batches to emulate. By anchoring a golden batch in the group, it helps operators and engineers
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make comparisons to understand characteristics and results of the other batches in relationship to
one that was considered to be spectacular. To anchor a batch in the definition window, use the
search criteria to find your golden batch, then select the anchor box in its row. It will be anchored like
the middle batch shown here with blue anchor after selecting it with the cursor and mouse click.
Let’s try it for one of your batches in the list. Make sure that Find: is set to All, and span *-365 days,
select Search, then scroll down through the Batch IDs to find “GOLDENBATCH”, select the anchor
on it,
Now, change Find: to The Last, and 6 PI UnitBatches, between *-365 day and *, select Search
Notice this older GOLDENBATCH is grouped with the 6 newest recipes for Reactor 01.
17. From the Batch Definition window you can select the Layout for your Batch Group. There are 4
possible components to make visible in the group. This includes: a Search pane, a Result pane, a
Gantt pane and a time-series Trend pane. Each of these is a separate object in the work area within
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ProcessBook, each with its own configuration for display.
NOTE: The search pane may not be necessary; you can always right-mouse click
the object to get the search option at any time.
18. Select the Results check box, select the Configure button. Here you can modify what columns of
data to be included in the batch results pane. There is limited space so it may not be helpful to
choose everything. Try different arrangements of column data.
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Select Cancel if you wish to void any changes.
19. Select Configure next to the Gantt option to display the Gantt Configuration window:
The best way to learn what you like for these settings is simply by trial and error – just do it!
20. The Settings tab allows you more options to customize the look and feel of your Batch Group. You
can plot time as relative or absolute. Colors schemes for your Gantt chart batches to easily identify
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some key properties of your batches.
21. Select OK on the Batch Definition window. This will take you into the work area of ProcessBook.
You can move each object that makes up your Batch Group around, and resize them to completely
customize your design. Learning how to size everything may be difficult at first so I don’t suggest it in
this lab.
22. Switch the Batch Group from Build mode,
into Run mode,
. Select on the various
objects to get a feel for using them and seeing their data. Select your batches in the Result pane to
see how the trend highlights for each selection. Notice the yellow colored batch is your Golden Batch,
- the one you had pinned.
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23. We will expand a batch in the Gantt chart to observe time, and phase execution. Observe the phase
execution. If you can’t read the expanded phases, you may need to alter your time span for the
graph. For this chart, we would not able to view the expanded phases in the yellow and blue batch.
The long red batch is extending the time span of our x-axis, thus compressing the other batches of
interest space within the display.
24. While in the run mode, if you right mouse click the Gantt chart, select Batch Search…
25. Modify the batch time criteria under DURATION to allow this to apply a shorter time span of batches.
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Change this to Less Than 20 or 15 minute
26. Select Search. Expand the results. Notice how the shorter batches take up a larger percentage of
the graph due to this duration time change:
27. Once finished, Close this pdi file.
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28. Open the GoldenBatch1.pdi file. You will be adjusting different settings such as the number of
batches to change what is displayed and observed in Run mode.
Make sure this graphic is in Run mode,
29. Now, while in the Run mode, right-mouse click on your Batch Group objects to see your dynamic
options to change data within the Batch Group during Run mode. With the right-mouse click Search
option you can change the data that is being displayed. Try the Search option, and change from the
unit Reactor_01 to Premix_01
Try changing tag trend analysis using RX_Level_PV and RX_Pressure_PV instead of reactor
temperature.
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Here the unit was changed to Premix 01, and the duration shortened to less than 5 minutes, and the
number of batches increased to 6. Take time to try different features and ask lab assistant questions
if you have any.
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Lab5: Logix Batch & Sequence Manager
Setup
Start the software and open a project
SoftLogix Setup
The SoftLogix, RSLogix 5000 and FactoryTalk ViewSE programs should all be running and you can go
straight to the Operator’s Perspective section. If the programs are not running the steps below describe
how to start the project.
1.
SoftLogix will start with the start of Windows Server 2008, look for its icon in the system tray in
the lower right of the screen.
2. Wait a minute or two for SoftLogix to initialize, if the image has just been started.
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Controller Setup
3. From the start bar, open RSLogix5000, Start > RSLogix 5000.
4. Select PlantPAxDemo_Controller1_2_3_2014.ACD control file from File menu under the recent
open listings, or use File>Open menu and browse to “C:\PlantPAx Demo\CLX\PlantPAx Demo
Processor ACD Files” selecting the PlantPAxDemo_Controller1_2_3_2014.ACD file.
Please verify that you opened the correct ACD file. Observe the RSLogix 5000 title bar to verify that
the proper file was opened as shown:
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Note: If the wrong file is opened and downloaded in the next step, an error will occur.
5. From the communications menu, select Communications > Download.
6. Select Download
7. From the communications menu, select Run Mode.
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8. Check that the controller has the correct time by right-clicking on the controller name to bring up
its properties pages, select the “Date/Time” tag and select ‘Set Date, Time and Zone from
Workstation” if the controller time is incorrect.
9. Minimize RSLogix5000.
HMI Setup - Client
10. From the Desktop select the “PlantPAx Client” icon or from the start menu select Start >
FactoryTalk View Site Edition Client and complete step 10 and 11.
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11. In the FactoryTalk View SE Client Wizard dialog select the “FTView SE Client.cli” client file
in the most recently used configuration files window.
12. Press the Run button.
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Enable LBSM
13. When the HMI client opens, maximize the screen and select the “Core Process General” button
which will open the “Process Overview” display.
14. On the “Process Overview” display select the “CPG Batch SetupReset” button.
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15. Click on the box “Enable Logix Batch & Sequence Manager for Premix 1 Tank” and uncheck
“Enable FactoryTalk Batch Material Manager”, then Click “Close”. The FactoryTalk Batch
Server should not be running as shown below.
16. Setup is now complete.
Operator’s Perspective
This user perspective will take you through the process of browsing sequences, creating a sequence, and
running the automated sequence using LBSM. While the sequence is running, you will have a chance to
explore the LBSM system while interacting with the sequence through standard operator tasks. These
include: completing manual additions, initiating manual actions, hold/resume sequencing,
advance/repeat steps and more. The user will also enable LBSM reporting and look at the preconfigured
reports.
HMI Visualization & Navigation
Security & Login
Logix Batch & Sequence Manager leverages standard FactoryTalk View security. The default application
has been configured according to the base PlantPAx library object security model. For more details, refer
to the LBSM user’s manual.
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4. From the Overview Display button bar, select the Login
quadrant of the display.
button in the top right hand
5. At the log on prompt, Log In as the Operator with User ID = ‘BatchOper’ with the Password =
‘Operator’ and click OK.
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HMI Application
This section of the lab will familiarize you with basic HMI application.
1. Display the Sequence Control Window. To display the Run-Time Sequence window open the
Premix 1 display by selecting the Premix 1 button from HMI navigation bar..
The Premix 1 screen will open.
Then click on the magnifying glass to open the Sequence Control Window.
The Display Sequence Control window will open:
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2. Click on the Display Selection List.
3. Select Product D if it has not already been selected.
Now the sequence shown is for Product D.
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4. Start the sequence, by clicking on the Start icon
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found on Product D Sequence Display.
Lab 5: Logix Batch & Sequence Manager
5. Note (a) that the sequence has transitioned from the “Idle” state to the “Running” state, and (b)
the sequence command buttons (Hold, Stop, Abort) are now activated.
Sequence State
Sequence Control
buttons
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Run the Sequence
We will continue to run, monitor, and interact with the sequence that was started above.
1. The first step, step 0, “Initialization” completes, the sequence then transitions to step 1 where
Additions 1 and 2 are dispensed automatically and the agitator starts when sufficient volume has
been added to the tank. The sequence progress is represented as shown below. Sequence
control activity can also be monitored on the dynamic process graphic. Shown at the bottom of
the page.
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2. A significant amount of information is available for the operator. Let’s look at the screen in detail.
Highlight shows current step
Black “dot” indicates that phases is
complete for this step
Green boxes indicate active phases in this
step
Phase Sequence State Indicators
a. A rectangular outline highlights the current step
b. A green box indicates that the phase, in that step, is active
c.
A black dot indicates that the phase, in that step, is complete
d. A green box with a black dot indicates that the phase has completed its actions but is still
active. Typically this will be seen for phases that transition several steps such as
agitation.
e. The indicators at the far left display the current phase state.
The vertical axis displays the configured equipment and current phase status.
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A key to the indicators can be found by clicking on the Sequence State
displays the following:
which
The sequence state diagram is both functional and a key to the control icons.
3. Once both Material 1 and 2 additions are complete, the sequence progresses to Step 2, where
Material 3 is added also while agitating.
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The Display Sequence Control windows has been size such that most of Premix 1 display is visible
and allows the process actions to be observed.
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4. The sequence progresses to Step 3, after the Material 3 addition is completed. At this point
agitation stops, recirculation begins (see PreMix display), and a Manual phase is initiated. The
blinking, orange, Manual Phase indicator and an exclamation mark indicate operator attention is
required.
5. Clicking on the blinking Manual phase box
displays the Prompt
Popup. Or you can click on the Respond to Manual Prompt Request button.
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The Manual input window opens:
6. After reading and performing the actions indicated in the Prompt popup, the operator would enter
a Lot Number and acknowledge the prompt by clicking on the checkmark.
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7. The sequence progresses to Step 4, where Agitation while circulating contents takes place. The
time setpoint is a formula parameter of the Agitation phase, therefore the phase will complete
when time has expired. The Recirculation phase has completed the transition requirements but
will continue until the Agitation phase is also complete.
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8. When the required agitation time has expired, the sequence progress to Step 5, where another
Manual action, by the operator is required. Clicking on the Manual box
displays the Prompt popup, where this time, the operator is prompted to take a sample and enter
the results.
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9. Enter a value for the actual pH, ‘7.5’ and press the ENTER key. After entering the data,
acknowledge the prompting by clicking on the green checkmark.
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10.
The sequence transitions to step 6 and transfers the contents out of the tank.
In the PreMix display note the open valve, pump on and the tank level dropping.
11. After the tank is empty, the sequence is complete. No steps are active, the sequence state is
“Complete” and the “Reset” button is active.
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12. Pressing RESET SEQUENCE
returns the sequence to the “Idle” state.
13. Close the “Product D Sequence Display” by clicking on the red ‘X’
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Run the Sequence
Let’s run another sequence to show the functions LBSM provides to the operator for additional sequence
interaction and control. We will explore the Pause and Skip, Hold/Resume, and Manual Phase control
features.
Pause and Skip
1. Click on the Display Sequence Control Window button in the lower left of the Premix 1 display.
The Run-time Sequence window will appear. Click on the Display Selection List button.
2. Select Product G
, the Run-Time Sequence display will open.
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3. Notice that for this product, “Pause” points have been configured into the sequence
Commands
Pause points
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4. START a sequence of “Product G”
5. When step 1 is reached acknowledge the manual step.
6. Let’s suppose that during the first material additions, Step 2, the operator wanted to check the
tank before continuing with the timed agitation in Step 3. Note that there is a configured pause
point between Step 2 and Step 3. Therefore, the operator can select Request sequence to
pause at next pause point. Click this button.
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7. At the end of the material additions, Step 2, we see that the sequence has paused, being
indicated by a green bar and pause point. Furthermore the “Step Control” buttons are now active.
8. The operator can continue to select “Request sequence to pause at pause point” or one can
select to enable “Auto Pause,” where the sequence will automatically pause at every configured
pause point. Let’s go ahead and Pause sequence at each pause point by checking the
appropriate box.
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9. At this point, the operator can step forward to the next pause point or continue from this point.
Let’s continue from this point by pressing Resume Sequence.
10. The sequence progresses with the timed agitation, Step 3. At the end of the time agitation, the
sequence is again paused. Let’s assume that after checking the tank contents, the operator
needed to repeat the timed agitation. Press the Skip to Previous Pause Point button.
Notice that the sequence has indexed back to the previous pause point (which could be more than
one step).
11. Continue the sequence by pressing RESUME SEQUENCE.
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12. The same process works for skip forward; again noting that a user can skip as many steps as
needed to get to the next configured pause point.
Hold and Resume
1. After the timed agitation, continue the sequence by pressing RESUME SEQUENCE.
2. After Matl 3 is added in Step 4, continue the sequence by pressing RESUME SEQUENCE.
3. Acknowledge the manual prompt, Step 5, by pressing ACKNOWLEDGE.
The sequence will again stop at a pause point.
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4. Before pressing RESUME SEQUENCE to step on to step 6, read the next step’s instructions and
be prepared to put the sequence in “Hold.” RESUME SEQUENCE and move to step 6 when
ready.
5. Now, suppose during the timed mixing cycle, Step 6, the operator needs to stop the circulation
and check the connection on the transfer pump. Press HOLD
phases into their respective hold states.
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You can view the Premix Overview process graphic to see that the recirculation has stopped.
Valve is closed and pump is stopped
Note: The Sequence Status and Control screen can be displayed by pressing the
“Sequence Button” in the lower left corner of the process graphic.
This button allows one to easily toggle between sequence display / control and the
process graphic.
This button shows the current sequence, the sequence state, and the current step.
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6. After tightening the Tri-Clamp on the pump, the operator can continue the sequence by pressing
the RESTART SEQUENCE button.
7. If you check the Premix Overview process graphic, you will see that the recirculation has
continued from where it left off.
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Manual Control
1. Suppose, that after the timed agitation completes in Step 6, we need to take another sample,
because of the pump failure. Step Back
The sequence should appear as follows:
and Resume
the sequence at Step 5.
2. Now suppose that after taking and analyzing a sample, the operator needs to add more Material
3. Click on MATL 3 ADDITION in the phase listing and the Manual Phase Control popup
appears.
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3. Take ownership of the phase by pressing ACQUIRE.
4. Click on the setpoint field and enter a setpoint of ’23.7’ Kg and then click OK. Also enter a
tolerance of ‘5’ %.
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5. Then press START Phase.
6. The addition begins, which can be seen both on the Premix Overview process graphic and by the
phase status on the Manual Phase Control popup.
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7. After completing the addition, the phase transitions to “Complete.”
8. Reset the phase back to the “Idle” state by pressing RESET.
9. Release the phase from manual control by pressing RELEASE Equipment.
the Manual Phase control window.
Manual Phase Control can be initiated anytime, with or without a sequence running.
Furthermore, the sequence can be in any state, (e.g. running, held) for manual phase
control.
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Abort Sequence
1. At this point we realize the sequence cannot be salvaged and needs to be aborted. Press
ABORT
. Click Yes to confirm this decision.
2. All phase activity aborts and the sequence transitions to the “Aborted” state.
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3. Press RESET to return the sequence to the “Idle” state.
4. The sequence and system returns to “Idle.”
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LBSM Reporting
The Logix Batch & Sequence Manager v1.5 reporting add on uses a modified database from the
FactoryTalk Batch reporting package to store data from the LBSM batches running in the controller. Let’s
take a look.
Note: LBSM Reporting currently only works with FactoryTalk ViewSE.
The following reports are pre-developed.
010 – Batch Listing
• Provides a list of batches that meet a user’s search or query criteria
020 – Batch Summary
• Offers batch specific summary information on batch data (step time) and setpoint vs. actual
030 – Batch Detail
• Offers batch specific detailed information on batch data (step times, parameters, reports).
070 – Batch Execution
• Review a specific batch’s step execution times in a bar chart format.
080 – Duration Comparison
• Compare the durations of multiple batches in a bar chart format.
1. To enable LBSM Reporting select the “Configure Premix LBSM” button in the lower left quadrant
of the Premix 01 display.
2. This brings up the “Premix Tank Unit Configuration” popup, the three buttons on the bottom half
of the popup are used for LBSM Reporting.
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3. Select Click Here to Start Report Generation
.
4. This brings up the small display below. This display contains VBA code that takes the data from
tags running in the controller and places it in a XML files and a SQL database. This data consists
of parameters and report tags and other batch information such as date and time, phase state,
etc. Don’t close this display for the remainder of this section. Its display properties are set for
cache after displaying, always running always updating, this keeps the batch data updating even
when the display is not visible.
5. The Click Here to ABORT Report Generation button will close and uncache the Report
Generator display and stop archiving the batch data.
6. The final button on the “Premix Tank Unit Configuration” is Report Viewer
.
Selecting this button brings up a display that can be used to look at the XML file version of the
batch reports. These XML files are stored in the Report Location you see at the top of display.
Selecting a file name on the left will display the report in a Webbrowser control on the right.
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7. Go back to the FactoryTalk View client Premix 1 display and select the Display Sequence
Control Window button.
8. From the Run-time Sequence window select Display Selection List and select Product D and
run two batches.
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9. Now we will use Internet Explorer to look at the batch reports, we will do this two ways first using
Windows Internet Explorer, then using a display in FactoryTalk ViewSE containing the Microsoft
Webbrowser control. Start Internet Explorer, the home page is set for the report page. Select
LBSM Reports to display the reports.
LBSM Reporting requires the installation of Batch Reporting, which is why Batch Reports
is listed on web page. FactoryTalk Batch and LBSM can log data to the same underlying
database, but for the lab we have keep the two separate, the FactoryTalk Batch report is
on the database on the AppSerBatch VMware image.
NOTE: It may take a couple of minutes to get all the services loaded and running.
10. The second way to look at the reports is to create a display containing the Microsoft Webbrowser
control pointed to the report page URL. In the FactoryTalk ViewSE project there is such a
display. In the upper right on the navigation bar select the LBSM Reports button.
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11. The LBSM Reports display appears with the five LBSM reports.
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Report Query Header
Before we look at the reports let’s first get familiar with the query capability of the report system.
Each report uses this similar query method at the top of the report
6. Start Time/End Time –
The reporting
system first filters all searches based on time. All sub-filter lists (Batch ID, Recipe Name,
Process Cell, & Unit Name) are trimmed based on the user selection of time. You should
consider “time” to be the master search criteria.
•
“Null” selections are available for both start and end time. These can be used to search
from the beginning of time (start time null) or to most recent time (end time null).
•
Standard Microsoft Reporting Services Date/Time syntax
is used. Selecting the Calendar
icon allows you to search in more detail or simply type
date and/or time into the box. The minimum data required is the date.
7. Batch ID Filter –
The “Batch ID” is the user defined name given to a
batch at runtime. This filter allows the user to trim the query list to those matching the specified
text. Expand your filter capability through use of the asterisk (*) wildcard at any point in the filter.
8. Recipe Name –
The “Recipe Name” is the name to which the batch
recipe is saved. The Recipe Name dropdown list is populated in real-time by listing all recipe
names run during the user specified time frame. By default, all items in this drop down are
selected. Any individual line items can be selected/un-selected by checking/un-checking the box
next to the name. Alternatively, the user can select all/un-select all by checking/un-checking the
“select all” check box.
Batch Listing Report
Now that we are familiar with the query header, let’s perform our first batch list search.
1. Select 010-BatchListing
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2. The report will open with the following query header and the two reports that were just run
displayed. Notice that the default Start Time is 24 hours before the current time, hence any batch
run in the last 24 hours would be displayed. The screen capture below shows batches run on 7
May 2014.
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3. To see a listing of all the batches in the database select the Null checkbox to the right of the Start
Time.
4. . In the Recipe Name drop down list check the Select All box.
5. From the top right side of the report, select View Report
.
6. All the batches that have been archived to the database are now displayed.
7. If time allows try filtering the batches by using the Start Time Calendar.
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NOTE: As you select dates and complete the Batch ID Filter, the remaining dropdowns
are updated to reflect your search criteria.
8. Notice that for each line item, a set of two “hotlink” icons are shown. These enable quick
navigation to other reports that keep you in context of the specific “Unique ID” (unique identifier
for each batch.) of that line. As their names indicate the Batch Summary Report icon will open
up the batch summary report for the selected batch and the Batch Detail Report icon will open
the batch detail report for the selected batch.
- Batch Summary Report
- Batch Detail Report
Batch Summary Report
We will use what we have learned to look at the Batch Summary Report.
1.
Select LBSM Reports and then select 020-Batch Summary
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2. The report will open with the following query header shown in the upper part of the display below.
Notice that there are several different selection fields from the Batch Listing report page; these are
Recipe Name, Process Cell, Unit Name and Unique ID. In our example we only have one process
cell and one unit, if there were more units, like Premix and Reactor units seen earlier then there
would be multiple selections for Unit Name. The Recipe Name selection field is used to narrow
down what recipes you want to look at and the Unique ID field select the batch to look at.
Once the unique id for the batch is selected click on the
button and the
summary report for the selected batch will be displayed. Clicking on the plus-sign next to the unit
name or “Show All Level“ will expand the data that is shown.
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Batch Detail Report
If more detail is require than supplied by the Batch Summary Report, the Batch Detail Report can
supply it.
12. Select LBSM Reports and then select 030-Batch Detail
13. This report will open with the same query header as the Batch Detail Report. Selecting a batch
to view is done the same way as with the Batch Detail Report.
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14. Once the batch is select and the report appears, clicking on the plus-sign or “Show All Level“ will
expand the data that is shown. This report shows the parameters and reports that were recorded
for the batch. The suffixes on the end of the phase names, e.g. Agitation:1, correspond to the
recipe’s step numbers.
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Batch Execution Report
Better understanding the details of batch execution can lead to optimization of cycle time. It can also
give a clear picture of what happened during the product run.
10. Select LBSM Reports and then select 070 – Batch Execution
.
11. This report will open with the now familiar query header. Select a batch as have been done in the
earlier steps.
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12. As shown below there is a bar graph showing the total time phases, with positive time values, ran
in the Product D recipe. Notice that there are Agitation phases and the Recirculation phases with
a negative time and they don’t show up in the bar graph. This is due to the phases being
configured as “Indefinite”, which results in the phase’s endtime being set to “NULL” in the
database. The duration time is a simple calculation of “endtime – startime”, which for a phase
with “NULL” as its “endtime” value produces the large negative number. This will be fixed in a
future release.
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Batch Duration Comparison Report
The Batch Duration Report allows comparison of batch executions time.
10. Select LBSM Reports and then select 080 – Duration Comparison
.
11. Using the same steps as above select a date, recipe(s) and unique id(s). Since on this report the
execution time of batches is being compare you can select multiple batches. Below show the
report with two batches selected. Product D has two manual steps in the recipe; the longer run
time of Batch ID 8 was due to taking longer to perform the manual steps.
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The Operator’s Perspective is now complete!
Engineer’s Perspective
System modifications may be required over time; therefore, this user perspective will introduce you to a
couple of system engineering changes. In this lab, we will modify an existing phase and add a new
phase to the system.
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Security & Login
1. From the Overview Display button bar, select the Login
quadrant of the display.
button in the top right hand
2. At the log on prompt, Log In as the Engineer with User ID = ‘Engineer’ with the Password =
‘Engineer’ and click OK.
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Modifying the Configuration for an Existing Phase
The Requested Equipment Change
In recent research, R&D has found that limiting the rate of material 1 addition to each sequence will
improve the quality of the product. They have made this change request to engineering.
Engineering can easily accommodate this request by adding a new sequence parameter called “Flow
Rate” in KG/Sec for the material 1 addition phase. Let’s take a look at how we can update LBSM.
1. LBSM phase configuration is performed from the Engineering HMI display. From the “Premix 1,”
display selects “Configure Premix LBSM”.
Select the “Wrench and Motor” on the “Premix Tank Unit Configuration” popup to display the
“Equipment Configuration Window.
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2. Once on the “Engineering” screen select a phase to modify. Suppose it has been determined
that product consistency is improved when the rate, at which Matl 1 is added, is specified as a
sequence parameter. Select MATL 1 ADDITION from the phase listing to display the “Phase
Configuration” screen.
3. First, check phase
(for phase parameters) in the third, available, real parameter location.
Add the parameter ‘FLOW RATE’ to the phase. Press ENTER. Tab over and enter ‘Kg/Sec’ for
the engineering units. Press ENTER. Leave the “Scaled” box unchecked, since the same flow
rate would be used, regardless of sequence size.
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We have now completed this LBSM configuration change for R&D. Keep in mind that
additional control code would also need to be added into the system, but the lab will not cover
that change.
Configuring a New Phase
The Requested Equipment Change
The Quality department has requested that all products running on Premix_01 take advantage of the
newly installed “Steam in Place” (SIP) system. This ensures a quality product.
Engineering has developed standard SIP phase logic, and would now like to add this functionality into the
LBSM system. Let’s take a look at how we can update the LBSM equipment configuration
1. Continuing from above, “SIP” now needs to be configured in LBSM, thus making a SIP phase
available for use in sequence configuration.
2. From the Premix_01 equipment configuration screen, Select the next open box, below the
existing “CIP” phase.
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3. Type ‘STERILIZER’ for Equipment Name. Type ‘SIP’ for Phase Name. Press PAGE DOWN to
save both entries. (“Page Down” is an alternative to pressing “Enter” after each entry. Page
Down downloads all information on the screen.)
4. Under “Real Parameters” configuration, Check PHASE and add ‘MINUTES’ for the “Parameter
Name.” Continue by entering ‘MIN’ for the Engineering Units (EU). Press PAGE DOWN.
5. Check PHASE and add ‘SECONDS’ for the “Parameter Name.” Continue by entering ‘SEC’ for
the Engineering Units (EU). Press PAGE DOWN.
6. We have now added the new configuration for SIP and have included two setpoints for time delay
on the step. Close the configuration window by clicking on the red ‘X.’
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7. Click on the Run-Time Sequence Window button.
Notice that SIP is now included in the listing of phases.
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You have successfully configured a new piece of equipment in LBSM. Now we will connect it
to the controller code that runs the equipment.
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Connecting LBSM to the Controller Code
LBSM interfaces to user developed logic, in an automation controller (e.g. CLX), through
a defined data structure. The application logic can be written with or without the use of
the PhaseManager instruction set.
This demo application uses the PhaseManager interface so that the same phase can
easily be managed with either a FTB (FactoryTalk Batch) or a LBSM (Logix Batch and
Sequence Manager) system.
Coding phases is beyond the scope of this session, but we will look at the interface and
data structures then import a pre-developed SIP Phase.
1. Open the previously minimized PlantPAxDemo_Batch_Controller1_2_3_2014.ACD RSLogix
5000 project.
NOTE: Each of the following activities will be done to the online running controller.
There is no need to shut your process down to make these connection to LBSM.
2. Coding phases is beyond the scope of this session, but we will look at the interface and data
structures then import
3. Select Controller Tags and scroll down to the _Equipment tag.
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4. Expand the _Equipment tag and note this is an array. Each member of the array aligns with a
position on the “Phase Configuration” display. For example, the phase “Matl 1 Addition” phase
aligns with EquipmentPhase[3] and the “SIP” phase you created above aligns with
EquipmentPhase[9]
5. Now let’s import a pre-developed SIP phase. Right-Click on “UP_PREMIX_01_Basic_Phases”,
and select “Import Equipment Phase”.
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6. Browse to the “C:\PlantPAx Demo\LBSM” folder.
7. Select the “PM01_SIP.L5X” import file, and then click the
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8. On the import screen, leave the default values and click
.
9. When prompted, Select “Finalize all edits in Equipment Phase”, then select
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10. The new SIP phase will be added into the project tree.
11. When PhaseManager is used, an interface routine is added to each PhaseManager program.
This interface routine translates general LBSM commands to PhaseManager commands. Now
let’s import this interface routine. Right-Click on the “PM01_SIP” routine and select “Import
Routine”.
12. Browse to the “C:\PlantPAx Demo\LBSM” folder.
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13. Select the “LBSMIntfc.L5X” import file, and then click the
button
14. In the Import Configuration dialog box, select Tags.
15. Change the alias for “ThisPhase” to “PM01_SIP”
16. From the “Your_Phase_Name_Here” Operation pull-down menu, choose Discard.
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17.
We will now assign the Premix_01 SIP phase pointer. This is the primary way LBSM
connects to this specific PhaseManager phase. Therefore, from the EP Alias For pull-down
th
menu, Select “_Equipment[0,9]” from the list. (Remember SIP was assigned to the 9
equipment position in the previous section when the SIP phase was configured in LBSM.)
18. Select “Other Components” and replace the “Final Name” with “PM01_SIP”
19. Click OK to import the configuration.
20. When prompted, Select “Finalize all edits in Equipment Phase”, then select
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21. When the interface routine successfully imports, right-click on the PM01_SIP phase and select
“Properties”.
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22. Under the Configuration tab, Use the dropdown to set “LBSMIntfc” as the Prestate routine, and
Select OK.
You have now successfully linked the LBSM engine to this specific PM01_SIP
PhaseManager phase.
In an earlier section we defined 2 input parameters for the SIP phase, Minutes & Seconds.
We need to now map these values into the PhaseManager phase.
23. Double-click the “LBSM_Intfc” routine under the “PM01_SIP” phase to open the routine.
24. Select the second rung as shown in the picture below, and then click the “Start Pending Rung
Edits” from the toolbar.
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25. Change the Destination tag address of the first move instruction to “Minutes” and change the
destination tag address of the second move instruction to “Seconds”
26. Select “Finalize all edits in the Equipment Phase” from the toolbar.
27. When prompted, select YES to complete the edit.
You have now successfully mapped the input parameters from LBSM to the PM01_SIP
PhaseManager inputs.
The Engineer’s Perspective is now complete!
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R&D (Recipe Author) Perspective
The goal of an ISA88 based batch management & control system is to separate the sequence from the
equipment. This user perspective will demonstrate how you as a recipe author can create and edit
sequences (both procedure and formula) independent of the plant floor equipment.
The Requested Sequence Changes
1. Lab tests have shown that we can maintain product quality while reducing cost by adding less of
Matl 1.
2. Testing has also shown that less separation occurs, if we continue to circulate the tank’s contents
while the operator is taking a sample.
3. Next, we can eliminate a build-up issue if Matl 3 is added in two stages rather than all at once, as
is currently done.
4. Finally, we will add the SIP step into the product sequence to satisfy the new request from the
quality department.
We will be making these procedural and formula changes next, using the LBSM Sequence Editor.
LBSM Sequence Editor
The LBSM Sequence Editor is used to create and configure sequences. All configurations are performed
from a HMI client display. In LBSM, the user can create/edit either a master sequence for the unit or edit
sequence already loaded into the unit.
Navigate to the Sequence Editor
1. LBSM recipe configuration is performed from the Engineering HMI display. From the “Premix 1,”
display selects “Configure Premix LBSM”.
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2. The LBSM “Sequence Management” display appears.
3. Select the “Display Master Sequence Edit Selection Window” button
under Premix
01. When the popup opens, select Product D, by clicking on the appropriate button.
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4. Now, let’s make the desired set-point adjustment for the “Matl 1 Addition” in Step 1. Begin by
clicking on the green box at the intersection of Step 1 and Matl 1 Addition.
The sequence display shows “steps” on the horizontal axis and “phases” on the vertical
axis. A green box, at any intersection of step/phase, indicates that the phase will execute
in that step.
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The “Step Edit” screen opens.
Take a moment and familiarize yourself with this screen.
The blue triangle, on the top row, indicates the step currently being edited, in this case
“Step 1.” Highlighted green phases are those phases that are executed in this step.
The blue triangle on the left hand side points to the phase being configured. Highlighted
green step numbers above, indicate all steps that have the selected phase configured in
them.
The top data box is the step configuration window. This allows the user to name each
step, assign timeouts and fault propagation, and enables a pause point.
The parameters and selections in the working area of the screen are configurations for
that phase instance. Finally, the checkmark enables or activates the phase in this step.
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Lab 5: Logix Batch & Sequence Manager
5. To change the amount of “Matl 1” click on the set-point field and enter the desired amount ‘195.3’
in the data entry pop-up followed by OK.
6. Close the “Step Edit” display by clicking on the red “X” in the upper right hand corner of the
screen.
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Lab 5: Logix Batch & Sequence Manager
7. Now, let’s address the second new requirement, which was, to continue circulating the tank’s
contents while a sample is being taken (which occurs in “Step 5.”). Begin, as before, by clicking
on the intersection between the “Recirc” phase and “Step 5.”
8. Check the Active box to enable this phase while in this step.
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Lab 5: Logix Batch & Sequence Manager
9. We have now completed the second requirement of adding circulation while the also sampling the
contents. Note again the completed step and the significance of the various indicators on this
display.
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Lab 5: Logix Batch & Sequence Manager
10. Close the “Step Edit” display and return to the “Sequence Edit” display by clicking on the red “X”
in the upper right corner of the “Step Edit” screen.
11. For the third requirement, “Split the Material 3 Addition, before and after the Hand Addition,” we
need to add a new activity between what is currently Steps 3 & 4. To insert a step, first enter the
Insert/Delete Step Mode by checking the appropriate box on the “Sequence Edit”
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Lab 5: Logix Batch & Sequence Manager
12. Next insert a new step by checking the box between Steps 3 & 4.
Note the position of the “+” and “-“ buttons. Selecting “+” will insert a step between two
existing steps, while selecting “-“ will delete the existing step.
13. Click Insert.
14. Add another Material 3 addition to the “new” Step 4, by clicking on the intersection between Step
4 and the Material 3 Addition phase.
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Lab 5: Logix Batch & Sequence Manager
15. Enable the phase, enter ’12.5’ Kg and ‘5’% tolerance for the addition, and provide a “Step
nd
Description” such as ‘2 Matl 3 Add.’
The completed step configuration should appear as follows:
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Lab 5: Logix Batch & Sequence Manager
To save entries and edits, be sure to press ‘ENTER’ while on the field. Alternatively, all
entries can be made, then press ‘PAGE DOWN,’ which will save all page edits.
16. Note, by the green highlight, that Material 3 is also added in Step 2. Click “Step 2“ to change the
amount of Material 3 added in that step.
17. Change the amount of “Material 3” added in “Step 2” from 25 kg to ’12.5’ kg (since we are now
adding the other half in Step 4). The completed step configuration should appear as follows.
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Lab 5: Logix Batch & Sequence Manager
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Lab 5: Logix Batch & Sequence Manager
18. Close the sequence edit windows and navigate back to the Premix 01 screen. Open the runtime
detail screen by clicking on the magnifying glass in the bottom left hand corner.
19. Select the “Display Selection List”, and from the popup select Product D to load the updated
master sequence for the Premix_01.
20. You should now see the 3 changes we just made in the newly loaded Product D sequence.
th
But wait! We forgot the 4 sequence change request which was to add the SIP step into
the sequence! No problem, we will edit the runtime sequence and save it back to the
master sequence.
21. Now, let’s address the last new requirement, which was, to add an SIP step into the sequence
(which occurs in “Step 8.”). Select the Edit the currently running sequence
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button.
Lab 5: Logix Batch & Sequence Manager
22. Begin, as before, by clicking on the intersection between the “SIP” phase and “Step 8.”
23. The blank step configuration window will appear. Change the Step name to “SIP Step”, Select
the Active checkbox, and enter a value of 30 into the Seconds Parameter field.
24. Press the Page Down key to download all changes on the page.
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Lab 5: Logix Batch & Sequence Manager
25. Close the window by selecting the Red X
26. Now we need to save the runtime sequence back to the master sequence list. Select the Save
current recipe as master recipe button.
27. Select Product D.
28. When prompted to confirm the save, select Yes.
29. We are now ready to run a new sequence which would execute with the requested sequence
modifications, those being:
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Lab 5: Logix Batch & Sequence Manager
a. Changing the amount of Matl 1 added from 250 kg to 195.3 kg.
b. Continue to circulate the tank’s contents while also taking a sample in Step 5.
c.
Adding a new step and splitting the Matl 3 addition between Step 2 and a new Step 4.
d. Added a new SIP step at the end of the sequence in step 8.
The R&D’s (Recipe Author) Perspective is now complete!
If you choose, you can re-run the modified sequence by following the Operator’s perspective and
selecting the “Product D” sequence.
This completes this lab section on Logix Batch & Sequence Manager
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Lab 5: Logix Batch & Sequence Manager
LBSM Appendix:
LBSM Sample Application
If you have time and would like to look at the sample application that comes with LBSM when you
download the files from technote AID 68709, follow these steps.
1. Close the FactoryTalk ViewSE client.
2. Close the open RSLogix 5000 project that we have been using for this lab.
3. Add a SoftLogix controller to slot 5 of the SoftLogix Chassis.
4. From RSLogix 5000 do a file open and go to C:\LBSM V1.5-01\Controller\Sample Projects\With
Journal\LBSM_Sample_V1_5.ACD.
5. Download this project to the controller in slot 4, when done set it to Run. Check the time.
6. Select Start and FactoryTalk View Site Edition Client and from the wizard select
LBSM_Reporting.cli and Run.
7. This will bring up FactoryTalk ViewSE project that comes with LBSM reporting.
8. From here you can run batches and enable reporting. Use Internet Explorer to look at the
reports. Raise your hand if you have any questions.
LBSM and LBSM Reporting can be found on the Rockwell Automation
Knowledgebase “Answer ID 62366 – PlantPAx Table of Contents
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Appendix
Appendix
FactoryTalk Batch 11.01 Features
FactoryTalk Batch Equipment Editor
The following enhancements and features have been added to the FactoryTalk Batch
Equipment Editor:
• The Create Enumeration Sets and Enumerations dialog box now includes a system provided
REPORTING_CONTEXTS enumeration set. This enables the equipment author to add labels to the
system-provided REPORTING_CONTEXTS enumeration set and then assign one or more Context IDs to
a phase parameter or phase report. You can add, remove and edit enumeration set members to this
enumeration set. The default enumeration is NULL, with an ordinal value of 0.
• The Equipment Editor now includes an Accumulate definition for Integer and Real phase class
report parameters to accumulate the values uploaded to them.
• The Edit Command Verification Policies dialog now includes three new commands that can be
configured for electronic signatures. The new commands are Force Transition, Override, and Override
Clear.
FactoryTalk Batch Recipe Editor
The following enhancements and features have been added to the FactoryTalk Batch
Recipe Editor:
Report parameters on operations, unit procedures, and batch procedures
A report parameter is a parameter holding a value resulting from the execution of a
sequence or procedure. A report parameter on a recipe is expected to hold process data
collected from the execution of the recipe’s sequence of steps.
Report parameters on higher level recipes provide a simple way for process variables
representing the execution of the whole recipe to be aggregated. The recipe itself can
amass data in real time for analysis and reporting, thus simplifying reporting overall.
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Parameter expressions
A parameter expression is an arithmetic expression that may be assigned to a recipe
parameter or report parameter of a recipe or a step at all levels of the procedural
control hierarchy (phase, operation, unit procedure, batch procedure) where it is
appropriate.
Aggregated report values
Phase report parameters now give you the ability to accumulate values uploaded by
phase logic. This simplifies the reporting process.
Binding expressions have been updated to support:
• Absolute Value, Truncate, Round, Round Up, and Modulo math functions
• Referencing report parameters on parent operations, unit procedures, and batch procedures and peer
steps within the recipe.
• Referencing data in the parent recipe’s header.
Transition expressions have been updated to support:
• Absolute Value, Truncate, Round, Round Up, and Modulo math functions
• Referencing report parameters on parent operations, unit procedures, and batch procedures and peer
steps within the recipe
• Referencing data in the parent recipe’s header
•
•
•
•
Significant enhancements for reporting:
Recording initial value of recipe parameters
Recording the use of dependent resources
Adding a reporting context ID to parameters
Recording when a transfer of control is taking place
SFC validation improvements
Scalability of the algorithm that checks for possible problems in the construction of
SFCs has been improved to find more problems in much larger SFCs.
Ability to bind a material-enabled unit without inventory
The recipe author now has the option of editing the unit requirement of a unit
procedure to specify whether the unit is to be bound “By Inventory” as in previous
versions of FactoryTalk Batch, or “By Configuration”; which relaxes the requirement
for inventory to be identified as part of choosing a unit for binding. The FactoryTalk
Batch Server and FactoryTalk Batch Material Server will determine the appropriate
set of binding candidates at runtime.
Recipe printing functions have been enhanced to include procedure reports and
parameter expressions.
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Appendix
More Features are detailed in the Getting Started product manual.
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Appendix
Exploring New Command Policies and Operator features
Let's explore the Command Policies feature which includes three new commands that can be
configured for electronic signatures. The new commands are Force Transition, Override, and
Override Clear.
These new policies provide functionality that can be very helpful to production during abnormal
circumstances with the process or the instrumentation. However, a complete understanding of these
features combined with extreme caution should be exercised when applying these features in the
plant. These policies should not be taken glibly, so we have assigned electronic signature security to
each in the following example.
Notice that there are 3 signature templates that we created previously – one for each of the new
command policies. For convenience, we have chosen to name the signature templates with the
respective name of the command policy it will be assigned.
1. Within the Equipment Editor, select menu Edit -> Signature Templates...
Observe the three signature templates named, Force_Transition, Override and Override_Clear.
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Appendix
Force_Transition will require 1 sign-off from anyone a member of the Engineer group as shown
below:
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Appendix
Override will require 2 sign-offs. One user from the Operator group.
Another, the second user, from the Supervisor group. Both are shown below:
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Appendix
Supervisor Group…
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Appendix
Override_Clear requires 1 signature from a user in the Supervisor Group.
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Appendix
2. Notice that we have assigned a signature template to each new command policy feature.
Within the Equipment Editor, select Edit->Command Policies...
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Appendix
Observe the boxes that are check marked to the right of the policy to enable them.
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Select OK when done.
3. Notice within the Network Directory that these new settings are present under Product Policies:
This screen is brought up using the FactoryTalk Administrator Console to connect to the Network
directory.
Please note: With FactoryTalk Batch version 11, you should run a post-install update for the
FTSP policies using a bat file after completing the installation of the batch product. This update
will create the new product policies inside the FactoryTalk Directories.
4. Now let’s switch over to production to see how an operator might use the Force Transition
command policy. This new feature allows you to easily force a transition to fire so the recipe
sequences without the need for an Active Step Change. You will run a recipe called
Z_Force_Transition_OP.
From the Batch Mgmt & Control overview, select Batch Premix 1
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Appendix
5. Select the Create button on the screen. This generates the Master Recipe List. Scroll down the
list to the bottom.
6. Select the recipe named Z_Force_Transition_OP Select OK.
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Appendix
7. When the Batch Create Window comes up, select OK to add a batch to the list.
8. Select the new recipe in the list, and issue a START command to the control recipe.
9. Select the SFC View button,
ZOOM property setting it to 75%
and right-mouse click in the SFC to select the
10. Notice the transition will never go true under the built-in Timer step. This step will count up in
minutes indefinitely. The transition is a static FALSE for the illustration of this new feature.
However, this could be analogous to a faulty instrument reading, or a process condition that may
never be reached to unexpected process conditions. In such a case, the Force Transition
command policy will allow you to change the Boolean expression result of False to True. Once
True, the batch server will fire the transition so the recipe will sequence to the next step without
the need for an Active Step Change.
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Appendix
11. Double-click upon the T2 transition. The transition expression window will launch.
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Appendix
Notice the Force Transition button.
12. Select the Force Transition button. Select OK to the prompt:
13. The electronic signature security window will launch.
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You will need to login as a member of the engineer group users to cause this action to occur. Use
the following logon:
User ID = Engineer Password = Engineer
14. Since a comment is Required in the signature, you must enter some information about why the Force
Transition is about to take place. The sign button will not become active until you type something into
this required box.
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Appendix
15. Select the Sign button to complete the action.
16. Notice that the recipe has moved onto the next Timer step.
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Appendix
This Timer:2 phase step will Complete in 15 seconds as determined by its set point, and Countdown.
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