Having Your Baby - Fraser Health Authority

Having Your Baby - Fraser Health Authority
Having Your Baby
Your Hospital Stay
Table of Contents
Your Birth Experience (introduction) .................................................
Before Your Baby Comes .................................................................
Touring your delivery hospital .....................................................
Getting Ready for Your Baby ............................................................
Crib Shopping....................................................................................
Car Seat Shopping ............................................................................
What to Pack for the Hospital ............................................................
It’s Time to Have Your Baby .............................................................
Arriving at the Hospital ......................................................................
Your Healthcare Team ......................................................................
Labour Support .................................................................................
Labour Comfort .................................................................................
The Birth ............................................................................................
Caesarean Section .....................................................................
Vaginal Birth After C-Section ......................................................
Skin-to-Skin .......................................................................................
Feeding Your Baby ...........................................................................
Your Hospital Stay ............................................................................
Your room ..................................................................................
Preferred Accommodation ..........................................................
We are family-centred.................................................................
Photos and videos ......................................................................
Meals ..........................................................................................
Smoke-free and Scent-free ........................................................
Length of hospital stay ................................................................
Visitors ........................................................................................
Sharing news ..............................................................................
Your Baby’s Health ...........................................................................
Your Baby’s Second Night (After 24 hours) ......................................
Safety and Security for You and Your Baby .....................................
Supports and Services ......................................................................
The Unexpected ................................................................................
Transfer to another hospital ........................................................
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit ......................................................
Going Home ......................................................................................
Caring for yourself at home ...............................................................
Support at Home ...............................................................................
Websites and Resources ..................................................................
Fraser Health Public Health Units .....................................................
Fraser Health Delivery Hospitals.......................................................
Having Your Baby – Your Hospital Stay
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1
Your Birth Experience
Having a baby is a very exciting time! Our goal is to help you and
your family welcome this baby in a safe and caring environment.
Let us know your wishes. You always have a choice in the care we
provide. If you have a ‘Birth Plan’, please talk to your doctor or
midwife about it. Bring your Birth Plan with you when you come
to the hospital.
Read this booklet carefully. It is meant to help you plan your stay
and know what to expect when you come to the hospital to have
your baby.
Bring this booklet with you when you come to the hospital.
2
Before Your Baby Comes
 Ask your doctor or midwife for the ‘Pregnancy Passport’ if
it did not come in your registration package. The ‘passport’ is a
record of your pregnancy, birth, and early newborn time. It also
includes information about caring for yourself and your baby.
 Get all of your blood tests and other tests done.
 Eat healthy foods and stay physically active (including
exercise).
 Talk to your doctor or midwife about getting help if you are
smoking, drinking alcohol, or using drugs.
 See your pregnancy doctor or midwife regularly. Tell them
about any concerns you have.
 See your dentist for regular dental checks and teeth cleaning.
 Register to have your baby.
Step 1: Early in your pregnancy, register for our Best
Beginnings program so you can get connected with
supports and services.
Go online to bestbeginnings.fraserhealth.ca
Click on the ‘Register Now’ button
Step 2: Register to deliver your baby. Do this by contacting
the maternity unit at your delivery hospital.
Having Your Baby – Your Hospital Stay
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 Go to Prenatal Classes.
 Go to a free breastfeeding class offered by Public Health (see
page 37 for the public health unit near you).
 Ask your healthcare provider for the results of your Group B
Strep test. Write down the result here.
I am Group B Strep
 Negative
 Positive
 Read ‘Baby’s Best Chance’ (see page 5 for more details).
 Check our Best Beginnings website
(bestbeginnings.fraserhealth.ca).
 Be sure you have a safe crib and safe car seat for your baby
(see pages 6 to 8).
4
Touring your delivery hospital
Take a virtual tour of your delivery hospital and maternity floor.
Go to bestbeginnings.fraserhealth.ca
Click on the ‘Delivery Hospitals’ button
Find your delivery hospital on the list
Click on ‘More >’ (at the far right)
Click to view the hospital maternity tour online
Having Your Baby – Your Hospital Stay
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Getting Ready for Your Baby
The ‘Baby’s Best Chance’ book is a great resource for
information in getting ready for your baby. This book is free to
every woman in British Columbia.
If you do not have a copy, go to any hospital Maternity unit listed
on the back of this booklet and ask for one. You can also go to
www.healthyfamiliesbc.ca (select the ‘Pregnancy and Parenting’
tab).
Here are some topics you might want to read a little more about in
‘Baby’s Best Chance’:
 Pregnancy

Labour and Delivery

Becoming a Parent

Breastfeeding Your Baby

Baby Care

Your feelings during this time of transition

Preparing older children for a new sibling
6
Crib Shopping
Babies spend a lot of time in their cribs. Here are some tips to help
you make sure your baby’s crib is as safe place as possible.
When buying a crib and mattress:
 Make sure the crib was built after 1986.

Choose a crib that meets federal government regulations for
construction, assembly, use, and warnings (Cribs, Cradles, and
Bassinets Regulations – SOR/2010-261) .

Check that the space between the vertical bars is less than 2
inches (6cm) wide.

Choose a mattress that is 6 inches (15 cm) thick or less.

Choose a mattress that has a flat, firm surface, and free of any
damage.

Make sure the mattress fits tightly in the frame. It is best if the
mattress is designed for the crib.
When using the crib and mattress:
 Follow the instructions for putting the crib together.

Make sure the side rails are secured properly.

If the side rails raise and lower, make sure they are always
locked in the raised position when your baby is in the crib.

Use firm, tight sheets.

Check the mattress regularly. Replace the mattress if it is
damaged.

Always place your baby on his or her back to sleep .
Having Your Baby – Your Hospital Stay
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Car Seat Shopping
Car seats are very effective at saving lives and reducing injury.
However, they can cause injury if they do not meet safety
standards.
First, answer these questions about your car seat:
 Does your car seat meet Canadian Motor Vehicle Safety
Standards?
(The underside of the car seat must have the ‘Canada
Transport’ National Safety Mark. It is illegal to use a
car seat that does not meet Canadian standards.)

Does your car seat ‘fit’ your baby?

Does your baby meet the manufacturer’s weight and height
limit for your car seat?

Do you know how to position your baby safely in the car seat?
*If your car seat is ‘Used’, also answer these questions:
 Do you know its history?

Has it been in an accident?

Is there a recall on it?

Is it expired?

Do you have your car seat user manual?
*If your car seat is ‘New’, also answer this question:
 Have you sent in the product registration card?
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For information on crib safety and safe sleeping:
 Read the fact sheet called ‘Every Sleep Counts’ (given to you
before you go home from the hospital. You can also find it by
typing the title in the Search box on the Healthy Families BC
website: www.healthyfamiliesbc.ca).

Visit HealthLinkBC (www.HealthLinkBC.ca). Search ‘Crib
Safety’
- Read ‘Crib Safety’ Health Topic
-

Read ‘Safe Sleeping for Babies’ (HealthLinkBC file 107).
Read ‘Choosing a Crib and Mattress’ on the Healthy Families
BC website (www.healthyfamiliesbc.ca). Type ‘newborn
equipment’ in the Search box.
For information on infant car seats:
 Read our fact sheet called ‘Car Seat Safety -Choosing a safe
car seat for your new baby and using the car seat correctly’
(found in your registration package or online on the ‘Your
Delivery Hospital’ page of bestbeginnings.fraserhealth.ca)

Visit a BCAA office or check their website
(www.bcaa.com/road-safety). Select the ‘Child Passenger
Safety’ tab.

Visit the ICBC website (www.icbc.com) and select the ‘Road
Safety’ tab.

Read ‘Choosing and Installing a Car Seat’ on the Healthy
Families BC website (www.healthyfamiliesbc.ca). Type
‘newborn equipment’ in the Search box.
Having Your Baby – Your Hospital Stay
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What to Pack for the Hospital
For you
For your partner
 Pyjamas
 A bathing suit for the shower
 Slippers
 A pillow and blanket
 A few pairs of underwear
 Snacks
 Nursing Bra
 A camera
 Personal care items such as
soap, toothbrush, toothpaste,
shampoo
 Personal care items
 Sanitary pads


 Breast pads
 Music player such as an MP3
player
For your baby
 Snacks and Specialty Food
Items
 Diapers
 Water Bottle
 Pens and paper to make
notes
 Clothing to wear home
 This booklet, ‘Having your
Baby’



Please keep jewellery and other
valuables safely at home.
 Diaper wipes
 Car seat
 Clothing and blankets for the
trip home


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It’s Time to Have Your Baby!
The best place for a woman to be in Early Labour is at home.
Knowing when to come in to the hospital is never easy. We
understand that you might need some help deciding when to come
in.
Call us first
 If you feel you need to come in to the hospital to be checked
for labour

If you have any concerns about your labour
One of our nurses is available 24 hours a day. The nurse can give
you valuable advice over the phone and help you decide if you
need to come in to be checked.
To speak to a nurse, see phone numbers for every maternity unit in
Fraser Health on the back of this booklet.
See your ‘Baby’s Best Chance’ booklet for a complete guide to
knowing when it is the right time to come in to the hospital.
Having Your Baby – Your Hospital Stay
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Arriving at the Hospital
Each hospital has a slightly different process for being admitted to
the hospital to have a baby. See the back page of this booklet for
the admitting process for your delivery hospital.
Some hospitals ask you to go directly to the Maternity Unit
(Labour and Delivery). Other hospitals ask you to stop at the
Admitting Department first to check in. After hours, you might be
asked to go through Emergency Admitting to check in.
Do not wait to be seen by a doctor in the Emergency
Department when you are in labour or for any other pregnancy
concerns. Let Emergency staff know you need to be seen in the
Maternity Department.
Once in the Labour and Delivery area, a nurse will do the
following:
 Check your baby’s heartbeat.

Check you to see how your labour is progressing.

Call your doctor or midwife.
Together with your doctor or midwife, you decide on a plan to
either go home for a little while or stay in the hospital.
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Your Healthcare Team
As well as your doctor or midwife, a nurse is assigned to you
during your labour. Our goal is to have the same nurse with you as
much as possible.
Fraser Health is a place of learning. We believe in sharing our
knowledge and experience with current and future professionals.
Often, we have students from various health professions work with
us. They help us care for you and your family.
You might meet:
 nursing students
 medical students
 medical residents
 paramedic students
 other healthcare students
Experience in caring for women in labour is essential to their
education. We want you to know that you do have a choice as to
whether or not you want a student to take part in your care.
We hope you will welcome these learners to be a part of your
birthing experience.
Having Your Baby – Your Hospital Stay
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Labour Support
Having the right people give you support during labour is very
important. In fact, it can increase the chances of delivering
naturally (a vaginal birth), it can reduce your need for pain
medicine, and it can reduce how long you are in labour.
As well as your healthcare team, you are welcome to have your
partner/spouse, a family member, a friend, or your doula with you.
You can have as many support people with you as you want. We
do not limit the number of support people as long as we can
continue to safely care for you and your baby.
We want you to have a positive, peaceful place to labour and
deliver.
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Labour Comfort
While good labour support is one of the most effective comfort
measures, you might need extra support to help ease the pain
during labour.
Examples of extra support:
 using birthing balls
 taking warm showers
 sitting in warm baths (in some hospitals)
 taking pain relieving medications
Pain medications could include:
 breathing in laughing gas (called entonox)
 having a narcotic injected into a muscle or intravenous drip
 having numbing medication injected through a needle into
the space around your spinal cord (this is called an
epidural)
For more information on epidurals, ask for our factsheet
called ‘Epidural Analgesia During Labour’.
Ask your doctor or midwife for more information about these
options or see ‘Baby’s Best Chance’.
You can also look on the Health Families BC website
(www.healthyfamiliesbc.ca).
Having Your Baby – Your Hospital Stay
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The Birth
All delivery rooms are private rooms.
Whether you are having a vaginal birth or a caesarean section
birth, your safety is our priority. Every labouring woman is
assigned a nurse. That nurse is there to give you care and support
through your delivery.
You can also have family or friends to be your support people. We
only ask that your family and friends follow our directions
whenever it is needed.
Caesarean Section (C-Section)
There are times when the best and safest option for you and your
baby is C-Section. For more information on what this is, refer to
‘Baby’s Best Chance’ or the Health Families BC website
(www.healthyfamiliesbc.ca).
Whether a C-Section was the plan at the start of your pregnancy or
it is unexpected, we are here to help you. We want this to be a safe
and happy time for you.
Our goal is to keep families together as much as possible during
this time. Sometimes, this means you stay on the Maternity unit for
the C-Section and your baby and partner are always with you.
Other times, it means that you go to the Operating Room and
Recovery Room. Your baby and partner remain together until they
can join you a little later.
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VBAC (Vaginal Birth After C-Section)
Have you had a C-Section in the past? Ask your doctor if a
Vaginal Birth is an option for you with this baby.
For more information, please visit BC Women’s Power to Push
website (www.powertopush.ca).
(Image used with permission from BC Women’s Hospital)
Having Your Baby – Your Hospital Stay
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Skin-to-Skin
The best place for your baby after birth is on your bare skin. We
call this ‘skin-to-skin’. When born, we place your baby on your
abdomen or chest. If it is not
possible for you to be ‘skin-toskin’ with your baby, we can
place the baby on your partner or
support person.
‘Skin-to-skin’:
 Calms and relaxes both
mother and baby

Helps your baby breastfeed

Keeps your baby warm

Helps your baby’s heart and
breathing rates stay steady
and even
 Keeps your baby’s blood sugar at normal levels
We believe you should keep your baby skin to skin until after
feeding for the first time. We usually wait to weigh your baby
until after this feeding.
Hold your baby ‘skin-to-skin’ as much as possible for the first 48
hours, starting right after your baby is born.
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Feeding Your Baby
Human milk is best for babies. It is especially good for babies born
too early or babies with special medical needs.
Like any new skill, breastfeeding is a new skill to learn. Some
women need help with positioning, getting baby to latch on,
knowing when baby is hungry, or feeling good about having
enough milk. We are here to help you feel confident feeding and
caring for your baby.
For medical reasons or personal reasons, a woman might decide to
formula feed instead of (or in addition to) breastfeeding. To help
you decide how to feed your baby, we can share what we know
from current research. We are here to support you, whether you
decide to breastfeed, formula feed, or both. It is up to you to decide
what is acceptable, affordable, and safe for your baby.
After you go home, a Public Health Nurse from your local Health
Unit will call you within 1 to 2 days to see if you need any added
support.
Having Your Baby – Your Hospital Stay
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Benefits of human milk:
 Protects your baby from infection and disease
 Easy for your baby to digest
 Always the right temperature
 Easy to provide
 Always available
 Changes as your baby grows
 Free
Babies who are fed mother’s milk get some protection from health
conditions such as:
 diarrhea and vomiting
 colds, the flu, ear infections, chest infections
 diabetes
 bowel problems
 obesity
 Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)
Mothers who breastfeed their babies have some protection against:
 Type II Diabetes
 breast cancer before menopause
 other reproductive cancers
Donor Human Milk
BC Women’s Milk Bank provides pasteurized donor milk to
children in need. Most babies who get this milk are sick and their
mothers are not able to breastfeed or produce enough breast milk
to feed their babies. The Milk Bank supplies several hospitals in
B.C. with pasteurized donor breast milk.
If you have more breast milk than your baby can drink, you might
want to think about becoming a ‘human milk’ donor.
To learn more, go online to: bcwomensmilkbank.ca
20
Your Hospital Stay
Your room
In our hospitals, we have 2 different types of Maternity Units:
Single Room Maternity and Labour and Delivery/Post-Partum.
Single Room Maternity is where you and your baby stay in the
same room you give birth in until you go home.
Labour and Delivery/Post-Partum is where you have a private
delivery room to deliver your baby. You and your new baby move
to a different room and stay here until you go home.
Preferred Accommodation
If you would like a private room or you only want to share a room
with one other mother and baby (called semi-private), you can
request this when you are admitted. This is called ‘Preferred
Accommodation’. There is a charge for this service. Included in
this service is free TV rental for your stay and a Fraser Health
infant T-shirt.
Extended Health Benefit plans cover all or part of the cost of
Preferred Accommodation. If you do not have an Extended Health
Benefit plan and wish to have Preferred Accommodation, refer to
your registration package for more information including the cost.
Having Your Baby – Your Hospital Stay
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We are family-centred
Family-centred means we encourage new fathers or other support
people (adults) to stay the night with mothers and babies when
they are in a private room. Whenever possible we are happy to
provide cots or comfortable chairs to sleep in. Please remember
bedding if your support person is staying overnight.
Photos and videos
You are welcome to take pictures and videos of your family during
your stay.
Please make sure you do not include other patients or other visitors
in the background. To protect the privacy of others, no one is
allowed to take pictures or record videos of other patients or
visitors in the hospital without their consent.
If you wish to take a picture or videotape hospital staff, please ask
permission first. If any staff do not wish to have their picture taken
or be videotaped, please respect their wishes, and stop if asked. We
may ask you not to use a recording device during certain
procedures.
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Meals
Your meals (the mother’s) are delivered to your room three times a
day. If you have any allergies or special diet needs, let us know
when you first arrive at the hospital.
Please check with your nurse if you wish to have food brought in
from home.
Each hospital has a cafeteria or coffee shop where family and
support people can purchase food. Check the hours the cafeteria is
open.
Smoke-free and Scent-free
There is no smoking anywhere in the hospital or on hospital
property. If you are a smoker, you can get nicotine patches or gum
while in the hospital. Let your nurse know you smoke.
Many people are sensitive or have allergies to fragrances. Use only
unscented soaps and shampoos. Do not wear perfumes or colognes.
Length of hospital stay
How long you stay in the hospital depends on your health and the
health of your baby. It also depends on how you deliver your baby.
For women who have a vaginal birth, they usually stay in the
hospital for 24 hours after the baby is born.
For women who have a C-Section, they usually stay in the hospital
for at least 48 hours after the C-Section.
Having Your Baby – Your Hospital Stay
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Visitors
It is wonderful to share this exciting time with family and friends.
However, it can be a very busy time for you and your baby. Keep
this in mind when inviting visitors to the hospital. If you are
having trouble asking your visitors to let you rest, please ask us to
help you with this.
We like to keep the maternity unit a peaceful place for all patients.
Please ask your visitors to be quiet and respectful.
To protect you, your baby, and others, we ask visitors to:
 Clean their hands before and after visiting as well as before
and after touching you or your baby.

Stay home and not visit if they:
 feel sick or feel like they have the flu
 have a cold
 have been exposed to communicable diseases such as
chicken pox
If you have other children coming to visit their new brother or
sister, we recommend they have their childhood immunizations up
to date. This helps protect your new baby.
Sharing news
Friends and family often want to call the hospital to find out how
you and your baby are doing. You need to know that we protect
your privacy at all times. We will not share your personal
information without you saying we can.
Ideally, family and friends will contact you directly on your cell
phone. If you do not have a cell phone, please choose one person
who can then keep others informed. Tell us who that person is so
we know who we can give information to.
24
Your Baby’s Health
While in the hospital, we will ask you if we can do some tests on
your baby and give your baby some medicine. These tests and
medicines are routine in British Columbia. They help guide your
baby’s care.
Parents are always welcome to be there when babies are having
tests done.
Recommended for all babies
Erythromycin Eye Ointment - This is an antibiotic ointment. We
place it in your baby’s eyes after birth. This medicine helps prevent
eye infection from any bacteria the baby might have been exposed
to during birth.
Vitamin K injection - Babies are known to have low levels of
Vitamin K when they are born. Vitamin K plays an important role
in making our blood clot. Without Vitamin K, small cuts can go on
bleeding for a long time, and small injuries can cause big bruises.
Just one injection of Vitamin K in the leg after birth can help
prevent this.
Newborn Screening - We do this blood test by pricking the baby’s
heel and collecting blood on a card before the baby goes home. We
send the card to the provincial laboratory at BC Children’s
Hospital. The laboratory tests the baby’s blood for more than 20
rare but treatable conditions.
If a baby goes home before they are 24 hours old, the baby must
come back to hospital to have this test done again after they are 24
hours old and before they are 48 hours old.
Having Your Baby – Your Hospital Stay
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Hearing Screening - This is a test to check the baby’s hearing for
any problems. The BC Early Hearing Program is a province-wide
program for checking the hearing of all babies. To do this test, we
bring a small machine into the mother’s hospital room. The test
does not hurt the baby.
Recommended for some babies
Bilirubin Level - If a baby’s skin or eyes are looking slightly
yellow, we might check the baby’s bilirubin level (sounds like bilee-ru-bin). If a baby’s skin and whites of the eyes turn very yellow,
this is called jaundice (sounds like jaw-n-dis). To do this test, we
either use a small device called a ‘bili-meter’ (uses light to check
bilirubin) or we do a blood test.
Glucometer Check - We check the baby’s blood sugar if a baby is
jittery or shaky, or there is a chance the baby could have a low
blood sugar (called hypoglycemia, sounds like hi-po-gl-eye-see-meah). We do this by pricking the baby’s heel and testing a drop of
blood. Babies who are more likely to have a low blood sugar are
babies of mothers with diabetes, babies born early, or babies born
with certain medical conditions.
26
Your Baby’s Second Night (After 24 hours)
During the first night, new babies will often sleep to recover from
their big journey. After 24 hours, babies have a strong need to be
skin-to-skin and may want to breastfeed very often. You might
find your baby awake wanting to feed frequently during this time.
This is nature’s way of establishing breastfeeding.
This first 48 hours can be a very tiring time. You have been
through a big journey yourself. You might be feeling some pain.
You might have many visitors (whether in the hospital or at home).
A wide awake baby can be exhausting.
Plan for the first few nights:
 Get some sleep during the day.

Treat any pain with pain medicine.

Ask a family member to stay the night and stay awake to help
you during the night, in particular, between 11:00 p.m. and
3:00 a.m.

Be gentle with yourself. Remind yourself this stage might only
last about 24 to 48 hours.

Surround yourself with people who support you and support
breastfeeding. This helps you have a more positive experience.
Having Your Baby – Your Hospital Stay
27
Safety and Security for You and Your Baby

Baby Bracelets- All babies receive bracelets that match their
mother’s bracelet at the time of delivery.
Always leave these bracelets on until you go home.
Some hospitals have a bracelet security system as well. This
bracelet alarms if babies leave the Maternity unit.

Never leave your baby alone.

Always check identification of any healthcare provider caring
for your baby. Everyone who works in Fraser Health is
required to wear picture identification.

You are always welcome to go with your baby should we need
to take your baby to another location for a test or procedure.

It is okay to ask us if we have cleaned our hands before caring
for you and your baby. Don’t forget to ask your visitors to
clean their hands as well.

Even though we have security on site 24 hours a day, you are
responsible for your own belongings.

You might hear fire alarm bells. We practice regular Fire
Safety drills so we are ready in case of an emergency. If you
hear the fire alarm, return to your room.
28
Supports and Services
Supports
There are many people and departments available to help with your
care while you are in hospital.
Some of them are:
 language interpreters
 pastoral or spiritual care workers
 social workers
 aboriginal liaisons
 dietitians
Services
Small Kitchens – Each maternity unit has small kitchens for
patients to use. They are stocked with ice, milk, juice, coffee, and
tea. You are welcome to store your own food in the fridge as long
as it is labelled with your name and the date you put it in the
fridge.
Cafeteria –Both patients and visitors are welcome to use the
hospital cafeteria. It has a variety of foods and drinks. Please check
the open and closing times because they can be different day to
day.
Waiting Room – Each maternity unit has a waiting area. This is a
comfortable place for family and friends to await ‘new arrivals’.
This is also a great place to visit after the baby is born if there is
not enough space in your room.
Having Your Baby – Your Hospital Stay
29
TV and telephones –TVs and telephones are available to rent. If
you choose a ‘Preferred Accommodation’ option, the TV is
included.
Cellular phones–You are welcome to bring in and use your
cellular phone. This is a good way for your family to contact you
directly. There are places in the hospital where you cannot use a
cellular phone. Please ask us if you are not sure.
Wireless Internet- Wireless internet might be available in the
lobby of some of our hospitals. It is not available in most of the
maternity units.
Gift shops –There is a gift shop in the lobby. You can find cards,
gifts, newspapers, and supplies.
Parking – There are many places to park but most locations are
pay parking. Our parking lots are managed by a private company.
You will find instructions and payment machines at the hospital
entrances.
30
The Unexpected
Transfer to another hospital
There are three reasons we might move you to another hospital
when you arrive to deliver your baby. Should you need to be
moved to another hospital, we will transfer you by ambulance.
1. For Mother - Sometimes a mother has a medical condition
that needs a specialized doctor who is only available at a large
hospital. Some women know early in their pregnancy that they
will need specialized care. Some medical conditions do not
appear until later in pregnancy. Either way, it is safest for the
woman to be in the right hospital for her medical needs.
2. For Baby - We want to make sure your baby is born in the
safest place possible. If you start having signs of labour too
early (premature labour), or your baby has special medical
needs, we could move you to a hospital that has a Neonatal
Intensive Care Unit (NICU).
3. Diversion - Sometimes we have so many babies born at the
same time the maternity unit becomes full. If this happens, we
might move labouring mothers to a hospital that has space
available. We call this ‘diversion’. Even though this does not
happen often, you should know it is a possibility. All of the
Fraser Health Authority maternity units follow the same
guidelines and strive to offer the same services.
Our priorities are to:
 give you and your baby the attention you deserve and
 give safe care to all of our patients
Having Your Baby – Your Hospital Stay
31
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU)
If your baby needs some extra care and monitoring after birth, we
have specialists here to help them. Pediatricians are always
available. When babies need added medical care, they are taken to
the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. If your hospital does not have a
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, we will arrange to move your baby
to a hospital with one of these special units. We do our best to
move you to that hospital with your baby.
NICU staff encourage parents to take part in the baby’s care. One
of the ways to help is for mothers to breastfeed or express breast
milk to be fed to the baby. Another way is for parents to hold the
baby skin-to-skin as much as possible if the baby’s health allows it.
If your baby needs extra care in an NICU, ask how you can be part
of your baby’s care.
32
Going Home
Now is a good time to think about preparing to go home.
 Make sure you have a safe crib for your baby and it is ready to
use.
 Make sure you have a safe car seat and it is ready to use.
 Complete the Car Seat ‘Safety Checklist’ either before you
come to the hospital or while in the hospital (found in the
Fraser Health fact sheet ‘Car Seat Safety’ - see page 8). Your
nurse reviews the checklist with you before you go home.
 Write down any questions you have.
 Learn as much as you can from your nurse.
 Take any classes offered in the hospital that prepare you for
going home.
Having Your Baby – Your Hospital Stay
33
Caring for yourself at home
Whether this is your first or fourth baby, getting into this new role
can be difficult for any woman.
To be sure you are taking care of yourself, ask yourself these
questions:
 Am I eating at least three meals today? Am I eating
healthy snacks if I'm still hungry?
 Have I enjoyed some physical activity, such as walking
with my baby in the stroller?
 Have I taken a short break? Have I done something nice
for myself?
When your baby is asleep or when your partner can
care for your baby, take a nap, read a book, have a
bath, or just sit outside.
 Have I talked with my partner, friends, or family about my
feelings, worries, or concerns?
 Have I met with a support group of people who
understand my feelings?
Your public health nurse can tell you about
postpartum support groups.
 Have I shared the care of our baby with my partner?
(Adapted from ‘Your Body after Pregnancy’, Healthy Families BC, August 14, 2013))
34
Support at Home
A Public Health Nurse from your community calls you 1 to 2 days
after you have gone home, and again in 6 weeks. This nurse asks
you about you and your baby’s health and how feeding is going.
You are welcome to ask this nurse any questions or talk about any
concerns you have now that you are at home. Feel free to ask this
nurse for help with breastfeeding and baby care. This nurse can
also give you information about support services in your
community.
Arrange to see your doctor or midwife within 7 days of going
home.
Having Your Baby – Your Hospital Stay
35
Websites and Resources
Best Beginnings
bestbeginnings.fraserhealth.ca
Easy online access to health information and resources
Topics:
Prepare for Pregnancy
Your Baby (0 to 6 months)
Pregnancy
Your Toddler (6 to 24 months)
Labour and Birth
For Dads
Breastfeeding
Depression and Anxiety
Other web resources
BC Automobile Association (BCAA)
www.bcaa.com
Healthy Families BC
www.healthyfamiliesbc.ca
HealthLinkBC
www.healthlinkbc.ca
HealthLinkBC Files
www.healthlinkbc.ca/servicesresources/healthlinbcfiles
Healthy Pregnancy BC
www.healthypregnancybc.ca
Insurance Corporation of BC (ICBC)
www.icbc.com
La Leche League
www.lllc.ca
The Period of PURPLE Crying
www.purplecrying.info
Power to Push
www.powertopush.ca
36
My Notes
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Having Your Baby – Your Hospital Stay
37
Fraser Health Public Health Units
Abbotsford
#104 34194 Marshall Road
604-864-3400
Mission
7298 Hurd Street
604-814-5500
Agassiz
7243 Pioneer Avenue
604-793-7160
New Westminster
#218 610 Sixth Street
604-777-6740
Burnaby
#300 4946 Canada Way
604-918-7605
Surrey – Cloverdale
#205 17700 56 Avenue
604-575-5100
Chilliwack
45470 Menholm Road
604-702-4900
Surrey – Guildford
#100 10233 153 Street
604-587-4750
Delta – North
11245 84 Avenue
604-507-5400
Surrey – Newton
Delta – South
4470 Clarence Taylor Crescent
604-952-3550
Surrey – North
10362 King George Boulevard
604-587-7900
Hope
444 Park Street
604-860-7630
Tri-Cities – Port Coquitlam
2266 Wilson Avenue
604-777-8700
Langley
20389 Fraser Highway
604-539-2900
Tri-Cities –
Port Moody/Coquitlam
#200 205 Newport Drive
604-949-7200
Maple Ridge
#400 22470 Dewdney Trunk
Road
604-476-7000
White Rock/South Surrey
15476 Vine Avenue
604-542-4000
#200 7337 137 Street
604-592-2000
38
Fraser Health Delivery Hospitals
Abbotsford Regional Hospital
32900 Marshall Road
Abbotsford, BC
604-851-4817
Peace Arch Hospital
15521 Russell Avenue
White Rock, BC
604-535-4500 Ext.757273
Go directly to Maternity to be
admitted. After hours, use the
Emergency Entrance.
Monday to Friday, between
6:00AM and 5:00PM, go to
Admitting. After hours and on
weekends, go to Emergency.
Burnaby Hospital
3935 Kincaid Street
Burnaby, BC
604-412-6293
Ridge Meadows Hospital
11666 Laity Street
Maple Ridge, BC
604-463-1818
Between 6:00AM and 6:00PM,
go to Admitting. After hours, go
to Emergency.
Monday to Friday, between
8:00AM and 4:00PM, go to
Admitting. After hours and on
weekends, go to Emergency.
Chilliwack General Hospital
45600 Menholm Road
Chilliwack, BC
604-795-4107
Royal Columbian Hospital
330 East Columbia Street
New Westminster, BC
604-520-4586
Go directly to Maternity to be
admitted. After hours, use the
Emergency Entrance.
Go to Emergency Admitting on
the Main Floor.
Langley Memorial Hospital
22051 Fraser Highway
Langley, BC
604-514-6034
Surrey Memorial Hospital
13750 96 Avenue
Surrey, BC
604-585-5638
Monday to Friday, between
7:00AM and 3:00PM, go to
Admitting. After hours and on
weekends, go to Emergency
Go directly to Maternity to be
admitted.
www.fraserhealth.ca
This information does not replace the advice given to you by your healthcare provider.
Stores #448419 (December 2014)
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