View / the Complete Manual
DL305
Handheld Programmer
Manual Number D3--HP-M
WARNING
Thank you for purchasing automation equipment from PLCDirectä. We want your new DirectLOGICä automation
equipment to operate safely. Anyone who installs or uses this equipment should read this publication (and any other
relevant publications) before installing or operating the equipment.
To minimize the risk of potential safety problems, you should follow all applicable local and national codes that regulate
the installation and operation of your equipment. These codes vary from area to area and usually change with time. It is
your responsibility to determine which codes should be followed, and to verify that the equipment, installation, and
operation is in compliance with the latest revision of these codes.
At a minimum, you should follow all applicable sections of the National Fire Code, National Electrical Code, and the
codes of the National Electrical Manufacturer’s Association (NEMA). There may be local regulatory or government
offices that can also help determine which codes and standards are necessary for safe installation and operation.
Equipment damage or serious injury to personnel can result from the failure to follow all applicable codes and
standards. We do not guarantee the products described in this publication are suitable for your particular application,
nor do we assume any responsibility for your product design, installation, or operation.
If you have any questions concerning the installation or operation of this equipment, or if you need additional
information, please call us at 1--800--633--0405.
This publication is based on information that was available at the time it was printed. At PLCDirectä we constantly
strive to improve our products and services, so we reserve the right to make changes to the products and/or
publications at any time without notice and without any obligation. This publication may also discuss features that may
not be available in certain revisions of the product.
Trademarks
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company names may be trademarked and are the sole property of their respective owners. PLCDirectä disclaims any
proprietary interest in the marks and names of others.
Stage is a trademark of Koyo Electronics Industries Co., LTD. Think & Do Software is a trademark of Think & Do
Software, Inc. Texas Instruments is a registered trademark of Texas Instruments, Inc. TI, TIWAY, Series 305, Series
405, TI305, and TI405 are trademarks of Texas Instruments, Inc. Siemens and SIMATIC are registered trademarks of
Siemens, AG. GE is a registered trademark of General Electric Corporation. Series One is a registered trademark of
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trademark of International Business Machines. MS-DOS and Microsoft are registered trademarks of Microsoft
Corporation. Windows and Windows NT are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. OPTOMUX and PAMUX are
trademarks of OPTO 22.
Copyright 1998, PLCDirectä Incorporated
All Rights Reserved
No part of this manual shall be copied, reproduced, or transmitted in any way without the prior, written consent of
PLCDirectä Incorporated. PLCDirectä retains the exclusive rights to all information included in this document.
1
Manual History
If you contact us in reference to this manual, remember to include the revision number.
Title: DL305 Handheld Programmers, D3--HP & D3--HPP
Manual Number: D3--HP--M
Issue
Date
Original
1/94
REV A
3/96
Rev. B
5/98
Effective Pages
Cover/Copyright
Contents
Manual Revisions
1-1 -- 1-15
2-1 -- 2-26
3-1 -- 3-13
4-1 -- 4-9
5-1 -- 5-11
6-1 -- 6-13
A-1 -- A-14
Description of Changes
Original Issue
Minor changes throughout
Entire Manual
1--15, 2--5 and 2--15
Downsized to spiral version.
Minor changes
1
Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Getting Started
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL305 Handheld Programmer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Purpose of this manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Who should read this manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How this manual is organized . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supplemental Manuals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How can I use the Handheld? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
As a Programming Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To Monitor Machine Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Physical Characteristics and Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Handheld Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connection Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Handheld Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Status LEDs and Key Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RLL PLUS vs. RLL Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Instruction Identifier and Numeric Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address / Data Display Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Instruction LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPU Status LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clearing the Display Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPU Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the CPU Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clearing an Existing Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
You’ve got the Basics! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1--2
1--2
1--2
1--2
1--3
1--3
1--4
1--4
1--5
1--6
1--6
1--6
1--7
1--8
1--8
1--8
1--10
1--10
1--11
1--11
1--12
1--13
1--14
1--14
1--15
1--15
ii
Table of Contents
Chapter 2: Entering RLL Programs
Entering Simple Ladder Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Purpose of the Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Handheld Key Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting at Address 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering an END Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering Simple Rungs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering Normally Closed Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
a constant value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering Series Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering Parallel Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Joining Series Branches in Parallel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Joining Parallel Branches in Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering Timers and Counters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering Master Control Relays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering Shift Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering Data Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking for Program Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatic Error Checking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Syntax Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2--2
2--2
2--2
2--2
2--3
2--3
2--4
2--5
2--6
2--7
2--8
2--10
2--12
2--16
2--18
2--20
2--22
2--26
2--26
2--26
Chapter 3: Entering RLL PLUS Programs
RLL PLUS Programming Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3--2
Entering an Initial Stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3--4
Entering Jump Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3--5
Entering Stage Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3--6
Entering Timers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3--8
Entering Counters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3--10
Entering Shift Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3--12
Chapter 4: Changing Programs
Displaying a Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4--2
Finding a Specific Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4--4
Finding a Specific Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4--5
Changing an Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4--6
Inserting an Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4--7
Inserting an END Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4--8
Deleting an Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4--9
Table of Contents
iii
Chapter 5: Protecting and Storing Programs
Password Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5--2
Storing Programs on Cassette Tapes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cassette Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting the Cassette Recorder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program Names on Cassettes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Writing a Program to the Cassette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Verifying the Tape Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reading a Program from a Cassette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5--3
5--3
5--3
5--3
5--4
5--6
5--9
Chapter 6: System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting Suggestions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6--2
Monitoring Discrete Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6--3
Forcing Discrete Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6--4
Monitoring Register Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6--6
Changing Register Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6--6
Monitoring Timer/Counter Current Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6--7
Changing Timer/Counter Current Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6--7
Monitoring Program Stages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6--8
Forcing Program Stages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6--10
Error Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6--12
Appendix A: DL305 Memory Map
DL330 Memory Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A--2
DL330P Memory Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A--3
DL340 Memory Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A--4
I/O Point Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A--5
Control Relay Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A--6
Special Relays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A--8
Timer / Counter Registers and Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A--9
External Timer/Counter Setpoint Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A--9
Data Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A--10
Stage Control / Status Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A--12
Shift Register Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A--13
Special Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A--14
Getting Started
11
In This Chapter. . . .
— Introduction
— How can I use the Handheld?
— Physical Characteristics and Specifications
— Handheld Basics
— CPU Setup
1--2
Getting Started
Getting Started
Introduction
DL305 Handheld
Programmer
Purpose of this
manual
Who should read
this manual
The DL305 Handheld Programmer is a
general purpose programming tool for
use with the DL305 family of automation
products.
The Handheld is well suited for entering
small programs or for troubleshooting
machine operations. It is not the ideal
choice for entering larger, more complex
programs. For these types of programs,
you should consider using DirectSOFT,
our PC-based programming software.
DL305 Handheld
There are two versions of Handheld Programmers available.
S D3--HP — RLL version for all RLL CPUs
S D3--HPP — RLL PLUS version for all RLL PLUS CPUs
RLL PLUS is just like normal RLL, but a few instructions have been added that make it
much easier to use and understand. Programs are usually much shorter and
considerably easier to troubleshoot. The best thing to do right now is to make sure
you have the correct version of Handheld for use with your CPU. (Trust me, it’s
easier this way.)
This manual will teach you the basic keystrokes used with the Handheld. It does not
provide an example of every instruction. Once you understand the basic keystroke
techniques, you should use the DL305 User Manual to determine the instruction
operation details and keystroke requirements for the individual instructions.
Since we constantly try to improve our product line, we occasionally issue addenda
that document new features and changes to the products. If there are addenda
included with this manual, please read through them to see which areas of the
manual or product have changed.
If you understand the DL305 instruction set and system setup requirements, this
manual will provide all the information you need to get a basic understanding of the
Handheld. This manual is not intended to be a tutorial on the DL305 instruction set or
system operation, but rather a user reference manual for the Handheld
Programmer.
Getting Started
1--3
Getting Started
How this manual is Ch 1: Getting Started -- this chapter provides an overview of the Handheld
Programmer, general specifications, and the basic things you need to start entering
organized
programs.
Ch 2: Entering RLL Programs -- discusses all the operations used to enter a
program.
Ch 3: Entering RLL PLUS Programs -- provides the keystrokes needed to enter
RLL PLUS programs.
Ch 4: Changing Programs -- shows you how to quickly edit an existing program.
Ch 5: Protecting and Storing Programs -- shows you how to store programs on
cassette tapes.
Ch 6: System Monitoring and Troubleshooting -- provides an overview of the
various features used to monitor and troubleshoot the system.
Appendix A: DL305 Memory Map -- provides a detailed listing of the DL305
memory map for I/O, timers, counters, etc.
There is another manual that may occasionally be referenced by this manual. This
Supplemental
manual is not absolutely necessary to use the Handheld, but it does provide
Manuals
additional details on several related subjects.
S DL305 User Manual (D3--USER--M)
Now, you know what material is necessary to quickly understand the DL305
Handheld Programmer. So, let’s get started!
1--4
Getting Started
Getting Started
How can I use the Handheld?
As a Programming
Tool
The DL305 Handheld Programmer is
ideally suited for entering or changing
small
programs
with
instruction
mnemonics. You can enter programs up
to the limits of the CPU you are using, but
larger programs are much easier to
design and enter with DirectSOFT
Programming Software.
In addition to entering programs, the
Handheld is ideal for making on-site
program or system changes.
Since the Handheld has a built-in
cassette tape interface, you can also use
it to store and load programs from
cassette tapes.
DirectSOFT
001
Set
050
002
010
DSTR F50
K0201
Handheld
STR 001
OR 002
SET 050
Getting Started
The Handheld is especially useful if you need to quickly look at the status of an I/O
point, timer/counter value, or register location.You can monitor up to 16 I/O points at
one time. For example, the following diagram shows how the Handheld display area
indicates I/O status.
Indicates I/O
Status Display
Reference
Number
n000
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
16 LEDs Total
show on/off
status
0
4
0
4
1
5
1
5
2
6
2
6
3
7
3
7
00--07
10--17
Getting Started
To Monitor
Machine
Operations
1--5
1--6
Getting Started
Getting Started
Physical Characteristics and Specifications
Handheld Layout
The Handheld was designed to be more than a program entry tool and includes
many different status LEDs that make it easy to understand the machine operations.
5.7”
(145 mm)
Address or
Data Display
Area
LED Display
Keypad
Keyswitch
4.65”
(118 mm)
1.2”
(30 mm)
Connection
Options
Cassette Interface Port
You can mount the Handheld directly to the CPU, or you can use a cable. The cable,
part number D3--HPCBL--1, is approximately 4.6 feet (1.5m) in length and provides
much more flexibility.
A cassette interface cable, supplied with the Handheld Programmer, is required to
connect a cassette recorder.
WARNING: The CPU will automatically change modes when you connect the
Handheld Programmer if the keyswitch is set for a different mode of operation.
For example, if the CPU is in Run mode and the Handheld Programmer
keyswitch is set to the PRG (Program) position, the CPU will automatically
enter Program mode when the Handheld is connected.
Getting Started
Specifications
1--7
The following table provides specifications for the DL305 Handheld Programmer.
32_ to 140 F_ (0_ to 60 C_)
--4_ to 176 F_ (--20_ to 80 C_)
5 to 95% (non-condensing)
No corrosive gases
MIL STD 810C 514.2
MIL STD 810C 516.2
NEMA ICS3--304, impulse
1KV, 1µs
Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Obtained through PLC port,
60 mA @ 5 VDC
60 mA @ 9 VDC
Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3” L x 4.7” H x 0.9” D
110mm W x 118mm H x 24mm D
Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.5 oz. (210 g)
CPUs Supported
Programming Operations
DL330, DL330P, DL340
Read, Write, or erase programs
Insert or delete an instruction
Simaticr TI315t,TI325t, TI330t,
TI335t, plus stage versions*
Search for a specific instruction
Texas Instrumentsr
Locate a specific address
TI315t,TI325t, TI330t, TI335t,
Read or write to cassette tapes
plus stage versions*
* Stage versions require the D3--HPP
Cables
D3--HPCBL--1, 1.5m programmer
cable
Machine Monitoring Operations
I/O status (up to 16
simultaneously)
On / Off status for contacts, coils,
control relays, and register
locations
Timer and counter current values
Debugging Operations
Forcing (one scan only)
Run and Program Mode display
Program syntax check
Predefined error codes
Getting Started
Environmental
Operating Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Storage Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Humidity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Environmental Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shock Resistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Noise Immunity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1--8
Getting Started
Getting Started
Handheld Basics
Status LEDs and
Key Groups
RLL PLUS vs.
RLL Units
When you enter a program, you need to be able to select the instruction, enter any
parameters for that instruction, and move to the next task. The Handheld keypad is
organized into LED display areas and key areas that make this task easier.
As you examine the keys, you’ll notice some of the keys have more than one label.
The top label describes the key when the Shift (SHF) key is pressed. (These keys
work just like the number keys on a computer keyboard.)
The keys and LEDs areas are as follows.
S Instruction identifier and numeric keys — used to select the type of
instruction. Also used to enter numeric values for instruction references
and constants (by pressing SHF first).
S Editing keys — used during program entry and editing to scroll through
addresses, insert and delete instructions, etc. These same keys also
have Shift functions that are primarily used during cassette or machine
monitoring operations.
S Address / Data Display — this 4-character, seven-segment display
shows the address, reference number (such as the I/O point being used
with an instruction), or data value (such as the current value for a timer.)
S Instruction LEDs — show the type of instruction used at the address
being displayed.
S CPU Status LEDs — show the status for Power, CPU mode, etc.
As mentioned earlier there are differences between the two models of DL305
Handheld Programmers. This difference is clearly visible if you examine the keypad
and display layout shown on the following page. This manual uses the DL3--HP (RLL
version) for most of the examples. This is because, for most instructions, the only
difference between the two versions is the key location or the location of the display
LED. The key titles are the same, they’re just in different locations.
You may have noticed we said the two versions are the same for most instructions.
The RLL PLUS version does have keys for the Master Control Relay Set (MCS),
Master Control Relay Reset (MCR), and Shift Register (SR) instructions, but instead
has keys for the extra instructions required for RLL PLUS programs.
The following diagram shows the key areas, LED areas, and differences between
the two types of units.
Getting Started
0
AND
1
OR
2
ON/OFF RUN BATT STR
3
PWR CPU NOT
ADDRESS/DATA
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
0
4
0
4
AND
OUT
MCS
ADR
1
5
1
5
OR
TMR
MCR
SHF
4
ADR
5
SHF
ADDRESS/DATA
6
DATA
7
REG
ON/OFF
RUN
BATT
PWR
CPU
2
6
2
6
STR
CNT
SET
DATA
3
7
3
7
NOT
SR
RST
REG
7
8
9
F
AND
OUT
MCS
4
5
6
R
OR
TMR
MCR
DEL
SHF
INS
CHECK
SCH
1
2
3
STR
CNT
SET
ENT
READ
PRV
0
×
NOT
SR
MON
RST
CLR
WRITE
NXT
RLL PLUS Version
0
STR
1
ADDRESS/DATA AND
2
ON/OFF RUN BATT OR
3
STAGE PWR CPU NOT
4
I.SG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
0
SG
1
OUT
2
SET
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN
BATT
STAGE
PWR
CPU
0
4
0
4
STR
I.SG
SG
ADR
1
5
1
5
AND
JMP
OUT
SHF
2
6
2
6
OR
SET
TMR
DATA
3
7
3
7
NOT
RST
CNT
REG
7
8
9
F
STR
I.SG
SG
4
5
6
R
AND
JMP
OUT
1
2
3
OR
SET
TMR
0
×
MON
NOT
RST
CNT
DEL
SHF
CHECK
INS
SCH
READ
ENT
PRV
WRITE
CLR
NXT
Getting Started
RLL Version
1--9
Getting Started
1--10
Getting Started
Instruction
Identifier and
Numeric Keys
Editing Keys
The identifier keys are used to specify the
exact instruction type and the instruction
reference. For example, if you want to
store a contact, you have to specify the
STR instruction and which contact you
want to use.
For example, to enter Store I/O point 001,
you would press STR, SHF, 1 and ENT.
A timer instruction would work the same
way. In this case, you would press TMR,
SHF, 6, 0, 0, ENT to load the timer. To
enter the constant, you would then press
SHF, 2, 0, ENT. (This would load a preset
of 20.)
7
8
9
F
AND
OUT
MCS
4
5
6
R
OR
TMR
MCR
DEL
SHF
INS
CHECK
SCH
1
2
3
STR
CNT
SET
ENT
READ
PRV
0
×
NOT
SR
MON
RST
CLR
WRITE
NXT
DEL
SHF
These keys are used to perform various
operations during program entry and
editing. For example, you can use these
keys to insert (INS), delete (DEL), or
search (SCH) for a specific instruction.
These keys also have shift functions that
are primarily used during cassette tape
operations. However, there is one key,
Monitor (MON), that is used when you
want to monitor the status of an I/O point,
timer/counter value, or register location.
7
8
9
F
STR
I.SG
SG
4
5
6
R
AND
JMP
OUT
1
2
3
OR
SET
TMR
0
×
MON
NOT
RST
CNT
CHECK
INS
SCH
READ
ENT
PRV
WRITE
CLR
NXT
Getting Started
The Address / Data primarily shows two things.
S For programs, it shows address locations or instruction reference
numbers.
S For monitoring operations, it shows the current value of timers,
counters, and registers.
How do you know which one you’re seeing on the display? Simple, whenever an
address is shown there are periods that follow each digit. If the periods are missing,
you’re seeing a data value, a constant, an I/O reference, etc.
Data Values or Address
0000
....
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Periods indicate an Address
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Since the display area can show two types of information, you can easily switch
between the two types by pressing CLR and NXT. The following display shows an
example of the display if a SET instruction was loaded at address 0000 and you
pressed the CLR key. (You can then press NXT to return to the address display.)
Shows I/O Reference
Periods are missing
0050
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Instruction LEDs
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
The instruction LEDs show you which instruction is used at the address being
displayed. For example, if a SET instruction is located at address 0000, then the SET
LED would be on.
Shows I/O Reference
Instruction Type
0050
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
These LEDs are also used during monitoring operations to show the On/Off status
for up to 16 points. (We’ll discuss this in more detail in Chapter 6.)
Getting Started
Address / Data
Display Area
1--11
1--12
Getting Started
Getting Started
CPU Status LEDs
The CPU LEDs show you the mode of operation, battery status, power indication,
and CPU error condition (if any exists). The ON/OFF LED shows the status for the
individual instructions as you step through the program during Run mode. For
example, if the instruction was SET 050 and the CPU was in Run mode, then the
display would appear as follows.
Status of the point
being displayed
CPU and Status
0050
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
(In Run mode, you can also toggle between the address display and the status
display by pressing CLR and NXT. Remember, the address display would have the
periods as shown earlier.)
Getting Started
Sometimes we all make mistakes, so it’s important to know how to clear the display
and start from the beginning. Since the Handheld Programmer buffers the
keystrokes until you press ENT, you can clear the display at any time up until the ENT
button is pressed. When you press CLR, the Handheld clears the keystrokes you’ve
entered and remains at the current address. At this point you can now enter the
correct instruction.
Consider the following example that starts at address 0001.
Keystroke Error (should have used SET instead of OUT)
OUT
SHF
3
0
030
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Press CLR
0001
....
CLR
display returns to
address 0001.
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Getting Started
Clearing the
Display Area
1--13
1--14
Getting Started
Getting Started
CPU Setup
Even if you have years of experience using PLCs with handheld programmers, there
are a few things you may need to know before you start entering programs. This
section includes some basic things, such as changing the CPU mode and clearing
the CPU memory.
Changing the CPU
Modes
There are two modes available with the
DL305 CPUs.
S RUN — executes program and
updates I/O modules
S PGM — allows program entry, does
not execute program or update I/O
modules
You can only change the CPU mode by
using the keyswitch on the front of the
handheld programmer.
RUN PRGLOADTAPE
WARNING: The CPU will
automatically change modes when
you connect the Handheld
Programmer if the keyswitch is set
for a different mode of operation.
For example, if the CPU is in Run
mode and the Handheld Programmer
keyswitch is set to the PRG
(Program) position, the CPU will
automatically enter Program mode
when the Handheld is connected.
The keyswitch also has a third position, called LOAD. If the keyswitch is in this
position you can upload a program from CPU memory to a cassette tape, or
download a program from cassette tape to CPU memory.
Getting Started
Before you enter a new program, you should always clear the CPU memory. Only a
few keystrokes are required.
Use these keystrokes
CLR
SHF
3
4
CLR
8
ADDRESS/DATA
DEL
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Press NXT to clear memory
or
Press CLR to abort the operation
NXT
0000
....
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
You’ve got the
Basics!
Now that you understand how to use the display and how to perform some basic
CPU operations, you’re ready to enter a program. Chapter 2 provides the keystrokes
for entering many of the instructions you’ll use in any type of program. If you plan on
using RLL PLUS programs, you’ll also want to look at Chapter 3 for information on the
the extra instructions for RLL PLUS. Also, with RLL PLUS, some of the basic
instructions, like timers and counters, are used differently.
Getting Started
Clearing an
Existing Program
1--15
Entering
RLL Programs
In This Chapter. . . .
— Entering Simple Ladder Programs
— Checking for Program Errors
12
2--2
Entering RLL Programs
Entering Simple Ladder Programs
Purpose of the
Examples
Entering
RLL Programs
Entering
RLL Programs
Handheld Key
Sequences
The Basics
This section includes many examples that are intended to help you become familiar
with the keystrokes required to enter the most basic DL305 instructions. Once you
are familiar with the basic keystrokes, you should use the DL305 User Manual as a
reference for the remaining instructions.
The Handheld buffers all keystrokes until you press the ENT key. Then, it
automatically checks the instruction to make sure that is has been entered correctly.
If the instruction is entered incorrectly an error message will be displayed. See
Chapter 6 for a complete listing of error messages.
There are a few basic instructions that you must become familiar with to enter
programs with the Handheld.
S STR -- Stores a normally open element and indicates the beginning of a
rung or network.
S AND -- Joins one element (such as a contact) in series with another
element or group of elements.
S AND STR -- Joins a group of elements in series with another group of
elements.
S OR -- Joins a one element in parallel with a previous element or group of
elements.
S ORSTR -- Joins parallel branches (each branch must begin with a STR
instruction)
S OUT -- Each rung must have at least one output (Y, C, or box
instruction)
S NOT -- used with other instructions to utilize normally closed elements.
S All programs must contain an END statement (automatically provided).
The following diagram shows a typical network and how each of these elements are
used.
000
STR
STR
STR
001
ORSTR
AND 004
050
Output
OUT
002 AND 003
005
ANDSTR
OR
END Statement
END
2--3
Entering RLL Programs
Starting at
Address 0
If you’re entering a complete program, you should always start at Address 0. The
following example shows the keystrokes required to start at address 0000. (The
remaining examples will not show this step, but it is required.)
Start at address 0
SHF
NXT
Address Display
0000
....
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Entering
RLL Programs
Once you’re at address 0, you can start entering a program. After you start entering
the program, the Handheld automatically increments to the next address after you
enter an instruction. You can toggle from the address display to the data display by
pressing the NXT key. You can toggle from the data display to the address display by
pressing the CLR key. For example, if you start at address 0000 and press NXT, the
display changes and shows the instruction type located at address 0000. The
following example shows what the display would look like.
Start at address 0, change to data display instead of address display
End
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Entering an END
Statement
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
The example keystrokes shown throughout this chapter will indicate which display
method is being used. This will make the examples easier to follow. If you prefer a
different display you now have the means to change it.
All DL305 programs must have an END statement as the last statement in the
program. Whenever you clear the CPU memory, the CPU assumes that all memory
locations contain an END statement. This means that you do not have to enter an
END statement. Just enter your program starting at address 0. You should be aware
that if an END statement precedes your ladder logic, the program will not be
executed.
Entering
RLL Programs
NXT
2--4
Entering RLL Programs
Entering Simple
Rungs
You use the STR instruction to start rungs that contain both contacts and coils. The
following example shows how to enter a single contact and a single output coil.
Remember, with the DL305 CPUs, you do not have to enter an END statement with
the Handheld Programmer. In the following example, notice that when you enter the
output and move to the next address, the END statement is already there.
001
050
OUT
Entering
RLL Programs
END
Enter the contact
STR
SHF
1
Data display before ENT is pressed
001
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
Entering
RLL Programs
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Enter the output
OUT
SHF
5
0
ENT
050
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Check the next address
NXT
END Statement
End
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
The example shows an input contact and an output coil. Control relays are entered
exactly the same as the I/O points.
2--5
Entering RLL Programs
Entering Normally
Closed Elements
Normally closed elements are entered by using the STR and NOT instructions. The
following example shows a simple rung with a normally closed contact.
001
050
OUT
Enter the contact
STR
NOT
SHF
Data Display before ENT is pressed
1
ENT
001
ADDRESS/DATA
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the output
OUT
SHF
5
0
ENT
050
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
Entering
Timer/Counter
Contacts
T600
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
050
OUT
Enter the contact
STR
TMR
SHF
0
0
ENT
Data Display before ENT is pressed
6
0
600
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the output
OUT
SHF
5
0
ENT
050
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Entering
RLL Programs
PWR CPU
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
Entering
RLL Programs
ON/OFF
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
2--6
Entering RLL Programs
You may also need to enter timer and counter contacts or relational contacts based
on counter values. These types of contacts are entered slightly differently than
normal input contacts. The following example shows the keystrokes.
CT600
050
Counter Contact
OUT
Entering
RLL Programs
CT600 K20
CT600 R400
=
=
Compared to a constant
Compared to register value
To enter a Timer/Counter contact
STR
CNT
0
ENT
SHF
6
0
Data Display before ENT is pressed
600
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
Entering
RLL Programs
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
To enter a Timer/Counter comparative contact with ...
STR
SHF
6
0
0
600
ADDRESS/DATA
ENT
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
a constant value
SHF
2
0
020
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
PWR CPU
or
a data register
R
4
0
RUN BATT
0
ENT
r400
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
REV A
2--7
Entering RLL Programs
Entering Series
Elements
You must program the first element in a rung with a STR instruction, since it is the
beginning of the network. The rung can contain more than one element joined
together in series by AND instruction(s). The following example shows how to enter
two series contacts and a single output coil.
001
002
050
OUT
STR
SHF
1
Data Display before ENT is pressed
001
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Enter the second contact
AND
SHF
2
002
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the output
OUT
SHF
5
0
ENT
050
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Entering
RLL Programs
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
Entering
RLL Programs
Enter the first contact
2--8
Entering RLL Programs
Entering Parallel
Elements
You must program each element with a STR instruction. The elements are joined in
parallel by OR instruction(s). The following example shows how to enter two parallel
contacts and a single output coil.
001
050
OUT
Entering
RLL Programs
Entering
RLL Programs
002
2--9
Entering RLL Programs
Enter the first contact
STR
SHF
1
Data Display before ENT is pressed
001
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Enter the second contact
OR
SHF
2
002
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the output
OUT
SHF
5
0
ENT
050
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Entering
RLL Programs
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
Entering
RLL Programs
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
2--10
Entering RLL Programs
Entering
RLL Programs
Entering
RLL Programs
Joining Series
Branches in
Parallel
Quite often it is necessary to join several groups of series elements in parallel. The
OR STR instruction allows you to do this quite easily. The following example shows a
simple network consisting of series elements joined in parallel.
001
002
003
004
2--11
Entering RLL Programs
Enter the first contact
STR
SHF
1
ENT
Data Display before ENT is pressed
001
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Enter the second contact
AND
SHF
2
ENT
002
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Entering
RLL Programs
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
Enter the third contact
SHF
3
ENT
003
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the fourth contact
AND
SHF
4
ENT
004
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Join the branches
OR
STR
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Entering
RLL Programs
STR
2--12
Entering RLL Programs
The AND STR instruction joins one or more branches in series. The following
Joining Parallel
Branches in Series example shows a simple network with parallel and series branches.
001
002
Entering
RLL Programs
003
Enter the first contact
STR
SHF
1
ENT
Data Display before ENT is pressed
001
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
Entering
RLL Programs
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Enter the second contact
STR
SHF
2
ENT
002
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the third contact
OR
SHF
3
ENT
003
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Join the elements
AND
STR
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
2--13
Entering RLL Programs
Combination
Networks
You can combine the various types of series and parallel branches to solve most any
application problem. It is doubtful that you will ever exceed them, but there are limits
when you build complex networks. This is because the DL305 CPUs use a “stack” to
evaluate the boolean elements. If the stack exceeds eight levels, an error code E03
will be displayed on the Handheld when the CPU is switched to Run mode. (See the
DL305 User Manual for additional information.)
The following example shows a simple combination network.
000
À
003
Â
006
Ä
À. Start the network
STR
SHF
0
à 005
Á
ENT
Å
Data Display before ENT is pressed
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
1
ENT
001
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Á. Enter branch 2.
STR
SHF
2
ENT
002
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Entering
RLL Programs
000
ON/OFF
SHF
OUT
004
ADDRESS/DATA
OR
050
Entering
RLL Programs
001
002
2--14
Entering RLL Programs
000
Entering
RLL Programs
001
002
À
à 005
Á
003
Â
006
Ä
Å
OUT
004
Â. Start branch 3, add join with branch 2
STR
SHF
3
003
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Entering
RLL Programs
050
AND
NOT
SHF
4
ENT
004
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
OR
STR
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Ã. Add branch 4
AND
SHF
5
ENT
005
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Entering RLL Programs
2--15
Ä. Add branch 5, join with branches 1--4
SHF
6
ENT
006
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
AND
STR
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Entering
RLL Programs
NOT
Entering
RLL Programs
OR
Å. Add branch 6
OUT
SHF
5
0
ENT
050
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
2--16
Entering RLL Programs
Entering Timers
and Counters
To enter a timer, you also have to enter a preset value. One important thing to
remember is that with the DL305, the timers and counters share the same memory
area. The range is from 600 -- 677, but if you use 600 as a timer, you cannot use it as a
counter.
001
TMR
CT 600
Timer Number
K100
Entering
RLL Programs
Timer Preset
Enter the contact
STR
SHF
1
001
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
Entering
RLL Programs
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Enter the Timer
TMR
SHF
6
0
0
600
ADDRESS/DATA
ENT
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the Timer preset
SHF
1
2
3
.
.
1234
ADDRESS/DATA
4
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
NOTE: With timer preset values you must use a decimal point to enter a fourth digit.
When the timer (or counter) reaches the preset value, a coil is turned on. You can use
this coil as an contact in other parts of the program. See Page 2--5 for the keystrokes
required to enter a timer or counter contact.
REV A
2--17
Entering RLL Programs
Counters are very similar to timers, but they have enable / reset legs that allow you to
reset the counter. The following example shows how to enter the additional input
line. Notice that you enter both contacts before you complete the counter.
001
CNT
CT601
Counter Number
K50
002
Counter Preset
STR
SHF
1
Data Display before ENT is pressed
001
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Enter the enable / reset leg
STR
SHF
2
002
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the counter
CNT
SHF
6
0
1
601
ADDRESS/DATA
ENT
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the preset
SHF
5
0
050
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
REV A
Entering
RLL Programs
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
Entering
RLL Programs
Enter the first contact
2--18
Entering RLL Programs
Entering Master
Control Relays
The Master Control Set (MCS) and Master Control Reset (MCR) instructions allow
you to quickly enable (or disable) sections of the RLL program. This provides
program control flexibility. (See the DL305 User Manual for more details.) The
following example shows how the MCS and MCR instructions operate.
000
When contact 000 is on, logic
under the first MCS will be
executed.
MCS
050
OUT
001
Entering
RLL Programs
002
MCR
MCS
When contact 002 is
on, logic under the
second MCS will be
003 executed.
MCR
Entering
RLL Programs
010
The MCR instructions note the end of the Master
Control area. (They will be entered in adjacent
addresses since they are nested.)
Enter the contact
STR
SHF
0
Data Display before ENT is pressed
ENT
000
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Enter the first MCS instruction
MCS
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the next contact
STR
SHF
1
ENT
001
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
2--19
Entering RLL Programs
Enter the output
OUT
SHF
5
Data Display before ENT is pressed
0
050
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Enter the next contact
SHF
2
002
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Entering
RLL Programs
STR
Enter the second MCS instruction
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the first MCR instruction
MCR
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the second MCR instruction
MCR
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Entering
RLL Programs
MCS
2--20
Entering RLL Programs
Entering
RLL Programs
Entering
RLL Programs
Entering Shift
Registers
The DL305 CPUs allow you to use Control Relays with a Shift Register. You can
have any number of Shift Registers, but there are only 128 Control Relays that can
be used (400--577). Also, you cannot use these bits as Control Relays and Shift
Register bits. (See the DL305 User Manual for more details.)
The Shift Register has three input contacts.
S Data — used to determine a value (1 or 0) that will be shifted through
the register
S Clock — on each low to high transition, the value that is on the data line
will be shifted into the shift register.
S Reset — if the reset contact comes on, then the Shift Register is reset
and all Control Relays are reset.
The following diagram shows a brief example of how the Shift Register works.
001
Data
002
Clock
003
Reset
SR
SR420
Inputs on Successive Scans
Data
Clock
Reset
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
SR400
Shift Register Bits
400
417
-- indicates ON
REV A
-- indicates OFF
2--21
Entering RLL Programs
You can use the following keystrokes to enter a Shift Register.
Enter the Data input
STR
SHF
1
Data Display before ENT is pressed
001
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Enter the Clock input
STR
SHF
2
002
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the Reset input
STR
SHF
3
003
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the Shift Register and starting location
SR
SHF
4
0
400
0
ADDRESS/DATA
ENT
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the end of the Shift Register
SHF
4
1
7
ENT
417
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Entering
RLL Programs
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
Entering
RLL Programs
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
2--22
Entering RLL Programs
Entering Data
Instructions
In addition to the simple RLL instructions, the DL305 CPUs also provide Data
Instructions that allow you to manipulate words of data. For example, you may want
to perform simple math operations on register values. The following table provides a
listing of the various Data Operation Instructions. You should see the DL305 User
Manual for complete details on how the instructions operate.
Entering
RLL Programs
Entering
RLL Programs
Category
Data Load
Instructions
Mnemonic
Function #
Description
DSTR
F50
Load a 4-digit constant or 2-bytes of
register data into the accumulator
DSTR 1
F51
Load 1-byte of register data into the
accumulator
DSTR 2
F52
Load the upper 4 bits of a register into
the lower 4 bits of the accumulator
DSTR 3
F53
Load the lower 4 bits of a register into
the upper 4 bits of the accumulator
DSTR 5
F55
Load the digital value of a 16 point
module (2 bytes) into the accumulator
DOUT
F60
Write the accumulator to 2 sequential
registers
DOUT 1
F61
Write the lower byte of the accumulator
to a register
DOUT 2
F62
Write the lower 4 bits of the
accumulator to the upper 4 bits of a
register
DOUT 3
F63
Write the lower 4 bits of the
accumulator to the lower 4 bits of a
register
DOUT 5
F65
Write the contents of the accumulator to
a 16-point output module (2 bytes)
CMP
F70
Compare a 2-byte BCD reference or a
4-digit BCD constant to the accumulator
ADD
F71
Add a 2-byte BCD reference or a 4-digit
BCD constant to the accumulator
SUBTRACT
F72
Subtract a 2-byte BCD reference or a
4-digit BCD constant from the
accumulator
MULTIPLY
F73
Multiply a 2-byte BCD reference or a
4-digit BCD constant by the value in the
accumulator
DIVIDE
F74
Divide the accumulator by a 2-byte
BCD reference or a 4-digit BCD
constant
Data Out
Instructions
Math
Instructions
Entering RLL Programs
Category
Bit
Manipulation
Instructions
Function #
Description
DAND
F75
Performs a bit “AND” on a 2-byte
reference or a 4-digit BCD constant
and the bits in the accumulator
DOR
F76
Performs a bit “OR” on a 2-byte
reference or a 4-digit BCD constant
and the bits in the accumulator
SHIFT
RIGHT
F80
Shifts the contents of the accumulator
to the right a specified number of times.
1 -- 15 bits can be shifted.
SHIFT LEFT
F81
Shifts the contents of the accumulator
to the left a specified number of times.
1 -- 15 bits can be shifted.
DECODE
F82
Decodes the first 4 bits of the
accumulator into a decimal number.
ENCODE
F83
Encodes an accumulator bit into a 4-bit
code that represents the decimal
number (0--15).
INV
F84
Logically inverts the bit pattern
contained in the accumulator (1 to 0, 0
to 1).
BCD--BIN
F85
Converts the accumulator value from
BCD to Binary
BIN--BCD
F86
Converts the accumulator value from
Binary to BCD
FAULT
F20
Sends a 4-digit BCD number, from a
2-byte reference or a constant, to the
programmer display
The following pages show you how to enter these functions with the Handheld
Programmer.
Entering
RLL Programs
Fault
Detection
Instructions
Mnemonic
Entering
RLL Programs
Data
Conversion
Instructions
2--23
2--24
Entering RLL Programs
If you examine the Handheld Programmer keypad, you’ll notice two keys labeled F
and R. These keys are used to access the various Data Operation Instructions. We’ll
use the following example to show how the keys are used.
001
DSTR
F50
K1234
DOUT
Constant
Register
The example uses the DSTR and DOUT instructions. As you enter the instructions
you will use the Function Numbers that were shown in the previous instruction table.
Entering
RLL Programs
Entering
RLL Programs
R400
F60
Instruction
REV A
Entering RLL Programs
2--25
Enter the contact
STR
SHF
1
001
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Enter the DSTR instruction
F
5
0
F50
ENT
(Notice that you did not have to
press the SHF key before
entering the numbers.)
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Entering
RLL Programs
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
Enter the constant
1
2
3
4
1234
ADDRESS/DATA
ENT
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the DOUT instruction
F
6
0
F60
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the Register location
R
4
0
0
ENT
(Notice that the R key is used
for entering registers and that
you do not have to press the
SHF key before entering the
numbers.)
r400
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Entering
RLL Programs
SHF
2--26
Entering RLL Programs
Checking for Program Errors
Automatic Error
Checking
Syntax Check
The Handheld automatically checks for some errors during program entry.
Chapter 6 provides a complete listing of the error codes.
You can also execute a program syntax check which will identify programming
errors. This check can be performed in either Program mode or Run mode. The
following example shows how the syntax check works.
Entering
RLL Programs
001
CNT
CT601
K50
Counter Reset Leg is missing
Execute the syntax check
CLR
E07
SCH
Entering
RLL Programs
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Press CLR to display the address where the error occurred
0003
....
CLR
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
Correct the problem and continue running the Syntax check until the
E07 message no longer appears.
REV A
Entering
RLL PLUS Programs
In This Chapter. . . .
— RLL PLUS Programming Basics
— Entering an Initial Stage
— Entering Jump Instructions
— Entering Stage Instructions
— Entering Timers
— Entering Counters
— Entering Shift Registers
13
3--2
Entering RLL Plus Programs
Entering RLL
Programs
Entering Programs
RLL PLUS Programming Basics
RLL PLUS is a simplified programming method that makes program design and
troubleshooting much easier. This programming method is similar to Sequential
Function Chart programming and only uses a few new instructions. Before you
continue, make sure you have a Handheld Programmer that supports the extra
instructions needed with this style of programming (part number DL3--HPP). This
chapter does not provide a complete discussion of these instructions. Instead, it just
provides a quick overview of how to enter the instructions with the DL305 Handheld
Programmer.
The primary benefit from this programming method is the number of logic interlocks
is significantly reduced. This is because the individual program segments, called
“stages” are completely self contained. When a program segment is active, the
inputs and outputs in that stage will be examined and updated as appropriate. If the
stage is not active, that portion of the program is not even scanned. How does this
remove the interlocking burden? Simple, most interlocks are used because you not
only have to make something happen, but you also have to prevent unwanted
actions from happening. See the DL305 User Manual for details on RLL PLUS
programming.
We’ll use the following cutoff saw example to show the different instructions that are
used. This example is not intended to show you how to design RLL PLUS programs,
but is merely used to point out the instructions and the Handheld Programmer
keystrokes needed to enter the instructions. If you want to know more about this
style of programming, see the DL305 User Manual for complete details.
This simple cutoff saw operates in the
following manner.
1. Once the operator presses a start
switch, the pipe conveyor is started.
(The operator can also press a Stop
switch to stop the operation at any
time.)
2. The pipe travels along a conveyor
until it reaches a physical stop. The
stop contains a limit switch that
signals the system to stop the
conveyor and begin the cutting
operation.
3. The pipe is clamped in place.
4. The saw motor is started and the saw
cuts the pipe.
5. The saw is retracted, the motor is
turned off and the clamp is released.
6. If the saw is in one-cycle mode, the
operator must press the start switch
again. If it is not in one-cycle mode,
the saw continues the operations
sequence.
Cutoff Saw
The operator can stop the process at any time just by pressing a stop switch.
3--3
Entering RLL Plus Programs
The instructions used to create this
program are very similar to the ones used
in normal RLL programs. For example,
you still enter contacts and output coils
the same way. There are a couple of new
instructions and these instructions have
keys on the Handheld Programmer.
You’ll notice the Initial Stage (ISG)
instruction begins the program. If you
examine the Handheld you’ll notice a key
for the ISG instruction.
Here’s a list of the primary instructions
you’ll use with RLL PLUS programs.
S Initial Stage (ISG)
S Stage (SG)
S Jump to Stage (JMP)
There are also a few other instructions
that are used differently (and entered
differently) in RLL PLUS programs.
S Timers
S Counters
S Shift Registers
The following pages show you how to
enter these instructions.
ISG
S0000
Wait for start
Start
S1
JMP
000
SG
Move pipe down
conveyor
S0001
S10
JMP
Conveyor
OUT
020
Pipe Limit
S2
JMP
001
SG
Lock the clamp
S0002
Clamp
SET
021
S3
JMP
Pipe
Locked
002
SG
Cut the pipe
S0003
Saw On
SET
022
Saw Down
OUT
023
Lower
Limit
S4
JMP
003
SG
Raise the saw
S0004
TMR
T600 50
Top
Limit
600
Saw Off
RST
022
Clamp
RST
021
004
S5
JMP
SG
One cycle or automatic?
S0005
One
Cycle
S0
JMP
005
One
Cycle
S1
JMP
005
SG
Monitor for Stop
S0010
Stop
S0 -- S5
RST
010
S0
JMP
Entering RLL
Programs
WARNING: The example program
shown is not suitable for actual
applications. There are many safety
aspects that have not been
considered, which could result in a
risk of personal injury or damage to
equipment.
Only executes logic in stages that are active
Entering Programs
The following diagram shows a very
simple RLL PLUS program that would
control this operation.
This representation is what you could
expect to see if you were using our
DirectSOFT programming software.
You may notice the diagram doesn’t
appear very different from a normal RLL
program. However, there are significant
advantages that aren’t obvious at first
glance. If you want to know more, take a
few extra minutes to read about this
time-saving approach in the DL305 User
Manual.
3--4
Entering RLL Plus Programs
Entering Programs
Entering an Initial Stage
The Initial Stage identifies a starting point
in the program. When the CPU enters
Run mode, this is where the program
execution will begin. The following
keystrokes are used to enter an initial
stage. (Remember, the RLL PLUS
Handheld programmer keypad layout
and display is different from the RLL
Handheld programmer.)
Only executes logic in stages that are active
ISG
S0000
Wait for start
Start
S1
JMP
000
SG
Move pipe down
conveyor
S0001
S10
JMP
Conveyor
OUT
020
Pipe Limit
S2
JMP
001
SG
Lock the clamp
S0002
Clamp
SET
021
S3
JMP
Pipe
Locked
Entering RLL
Programs
002
Enter the initial stage
ISG
SHF
0
ENT
Data display before ENT is pressed
000
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
STR
1
AND
2
OR
3
NOT
4
ISG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
0
SG
1
OUT
2
TMR
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
STR
1
AND
2
OR
3
NOT
4
ISG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
0
SG
1
OUT
2
TMR
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Enter the contact
STR
SHF
0
ENT
000
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
3--5
Entering RLL Plus Programs
Entering Jump Instructions
Only executes logic in stages that are active
ISG
S0000
Wait for start
Start
S1
JMP
000
SG
Move pipe down
conveyor
S0001
S10
JMP
Conveyor
OUT
020
Pipe Limit
S2
JMP
001
SG
Lock the clamp
S0002
Clamp
SET
021
S3
JMP
Pipe
Locked
Entering Programs
The Jump (JMP) instruction provides a
way to transition to multiple points in the
program. If you look at the example
program you’ll notice the program
branches to two locations after the
operator presses the start switch. The
Jump instruction provides this transition.
Since the program is jumping to two
locations, you’ll use two Jump
instructions.
002
Monitor for Stop
S0010
Stop
S0 -- S5
RST
010
S0
JMP
Enter the first jump
JMP
SHF
1
Data display before ENT is pressed
001
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
STR
1
AND
2
OR
3
NOT
4
ISG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
0
SG
1
OUT
2
TMR
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
STR
1
AND
2
OR
3
NOT
4
ISG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
0
SG
1
OUT
2
TMR
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Enter the second jump
JMP
SHF
1
0
ENT
010
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Entering RLL
Programs
SG
3--6
Entering RLL Plus Programs
Entering RLL
Programs
Entering Programs
Entering Stage Instructions
The Stage (SG) instruction identifies the
starting point of a program segment.
Unlike an initial stage, a regular stage
does not automatically activate when the
CPU enters Run mode. There are three
ways to activate a stage.
S Jump Transition — if you jump from
a stage to another stage, then the
destination stage is automatically
activated. (Remember the jump
example.)
S Power Flow Transition — power
can flow through the stages which
will activate the next stage.
S SET — just as you can use a SET
instruction to turn on an output, you
can use a SET to turn on a stage.
With this method, the stage will stay
on until it is reset (RST) or, until the
logic within that stage causes a
jump or power flow transition.
Only executes logic in stages that are active
ISG
S0000
Wait for start
Start
S1
JMP
000
SG
Move pipe down
conveyor
S0001
S10
JMP
Conveyor
OUT
020
Pipe Limit
001
SG
Lock the clamp
S0002
Pipe
Locked
Clamp
SET
021
S3
JMP
002
SG
Monitor for Stop
S0010
Stop
S0 -- S5
RST
010
S0
JMP
The keystrokes on the following page show how to enter stages 1 and 2. Notice we
have changed Stage 2 slightly. This is an example of how a power flow transition
looks. A JMP instruction is not required in this example to move from Stage 1 to
Stage 2. How do you know when to use a JMP instruction? Simple, if you’re moving
from one stage to a single stage, you may use a power flow transition. If you’re
moving from one stage to multiple stages, you must use the JMP instruction.
3--7
Entering RLL Plus Programs
Enter Stage 1
SG
SHF
Data display before ENT is pressed
1
001
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
SG
1
OUT
2
TMR
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
STR
1
AND
2
OR
3
NOT
4
ISG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
0
SG
1
OUT
2
TMR
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
STR
1
AND
2
OR
3
NOT
4
ISG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
0
SG
1
OUT
2
TMR
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
STR
1
AND
2
OR
3
NOT
4
ISG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
0
SG
1
OUT
2
TMR
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Enter the output for the conveyor
OUT
SHF
2
0
ENT
020
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the Pipe Limit contact
STR
SHF
1
ENT
001
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter Stage 2
SG
SHF
2
ENT
002
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Entering RLL
Programs
4
ISG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
Entering Programs
0
STR
1
AND
2
OR
3
NOT
3--8
Entering RLL Plus Programs
Entering RLL
Programs
Entering Programs
Entering Timers
Timers work differently in RLL PLUS
programs because they do not require
the entry of a preset value. Once the
timer input contact has started the timer,
the timer continues until the input contact
SG
Raise the saw
S0004
is turned off.
You may recall RLL timers have a timer
contact associated with them. When the
T600 50
timer reaches the preset, it turns on the
contact, which can then be used as an
Top
input contact for other parts of the
Limit
program.
004
As well as not having a preset value, Relational Contact
RLL PLUS timers also do not have a timer
contact. Instead of using the timer
contact, relational contacts are used to
examine the timer value.
TMR
T600
Saw Off
RST
022
Clamp
RST
021
S5
JMP
The following example shows how a time delay was added when the saw was being
raised. We wanted to keep the saw motor running for 5 seconds so the saw could
clear the pipe before being turned off. (Note, the keystrokes only show how to enter
the timer and the relational contact, not the whole stage.)
3--9
Entering RLL Plus Programs
Enter the Timer
TMR
SHF
6
Data display before ENT is pressed
0
0
600
ADDRESS/DATA
ENT
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
SG
1
OUT
2
TMR
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
STR
1
AND
2
OR
3
NOT
4
ISG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
0
SG
1
OUT
2
TMR
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
STR
1
AND
2
OR
3
NOT
4
ISG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
0
SG
1
OUT
2
TMR
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Enter the comparative timer contact
STR
TMR
0
ENT
SHF
6
0
600
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the compare value
SHF
5
0
ENT
050
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Entering RLL
Programs
4
ISG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
Entering Programs
0
STR
1
AND
2
OR
3
NOT
3--10
Entering RLL Plus Programs
Entering RLL
Programs
Entering Programs
Entering Counters
Counters also work differently in
RLL PLUS programs because they do not
require either a reset input or a preset
value. Once the stage is active, the
counter input contact controls the value
of the counter. Each time the counter
input contact has an off to on transition,
the counter will increment one count.
When the stage becomes inactive, the
counter is disabled and reset to 0.
(Remember, the CPU does not even
scan the logic contained in an inactive
stage.)
You may recall RLL counters have a
counter contact associated with them.
When the counter reaches the preset, it
turns on the contact, which can then be
used as an input contact for other parts of
the program.
As well as not having the reset input and
preset value, the RLL PLUS counters also
do not have a counter contact. Instead of
using the counter contact, relational
contacts are used to examine the
counter value.
SG
Raise the saw
S0004
TMR
T0
K0050
Saw Off
RST
022
T0 50
Top
Limit
Clamp
RST
021
004
S5
JMP
SG
One cycle or automatic?
S0005
One
Cycle
S0
JMP
005
One
Cycle
S1
JMP
005
SG
Monitor for Stop
S0010
Stop
S0 -- S5
RST
010
S0
JMP
SG
Automatic shut off
S0011
Count
Switch
006
C601 R400
CTR
601
R400
S0 -- S10
RST
S0
JMP
Let’s say we wanted to use an operator interface to tell the machine how many pipes
to cut. (We’ll assume the number is loaded into a register, R400.) Once the correct
number of pipes have been cut, the saw should automatically stop. The following
example shows how you would add an automatic shutoff stage to the cutoff saw
example by using a counter and a relational contact. (Note, the keystrokes only
show how to enter the counter and the relational contact, not the whole program.)
3--11
Entering RLL Plus Programs
Enter the Counter
CNT
SHF
6
Data display before ENT is pressed
0
1
601
ADDRESS/DATA
ENT
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
SG
1
OUT
2
TMR
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
STR
1
AND
2
OR
3
NOT
4
ISG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
0
SG
1
OUT
2
TMR
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
STR
1
AND
2
OR
3
NOT
4
ISG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
0
SG
1
OUT
2
TMR
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Enter the relational contact
STR
CNT
1
ENT
SHF
6
0
601
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the relational contact comparison register
R
4
0
0
ENT
(Notice you did not have to
press the SHF key before
entering the numbers.)
r400
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Entering RLL
Programs
4
ISG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
Entering Programs
0
STR
1
AND
2
OR
3
NOT
3--12
Entering RLL Plus Programs
Entering Shift Registers
Entering RLL
Programs
Entering Programs
Shift Registers operate the same in RLL PLUS programs as they do in RLL programs.
However, the keystrokes required to enter a Shift Register are different because the
SR key is not on the RLL PLUS Handheld Programmer. Also, you do not have a
separate range of bits available for use as shift register bits. Instead you have to use
the control relays. The following page shows the keystrokes used with this type of
Handheld.
001
Data Input
002
Clock Input
SR
200
003
Reset Input
217
3--13
Entering RLL Plus Programs
Enter the Data input
STR
SHF
1
Data Display before ENT is pressed
001
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
SG
1
OUT
2
TMR
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
STR
1
AND
2
OR
3
NOT
4
ISG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
0
SG
1
OUT
2
TMR
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
STR
1
AND
2
OR
3
NOT
4
ISG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
0
SG
1
OUT
2
TMR
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
STR
1
AND
2
OR
3
NOT
4
ISG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
0
SG
1
OUT
2
TMR
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
STR
1
AND
2
OR
3
NOT
4
ISG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
0
SG
1
OUT
2
TMR
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Enter the Clock input
STR
SHF
2
002
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the Reset input
STR
SHF
3
003
ENT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the Shift Register and starting location
SET
RST
0
ENT
SHF
2
200
0
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the end of the Shift Register
SHF
2
1
7
ENT
217
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Entering RLL
Programs
4
ISG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
Entering Programs
0
STR
1
AND
2
OR
3
NOT
Changing Programs
In This Chapter. . . .
— Displaying a Program
— Finding a Specific Instruction
— Finding a Specific Address
— Changing an Instruction
— Inserting an Instruction
— Inserting an END Statement
— Deleting an Instruction
14
4--2
Changing Programs
Displaying a Program
Since the Handheld displays the mnemonic instructions, you can step through the
individual program instructions. If the CPU is in the RUN mode, the status of the
instruction is also displayed in the status display area.
000
001
002
À
à 005
Á
003
Â
006
Ä
Å
050
OUT
004
Mnemonic Listing and Addresses
Changing Programs
ADDRESS
0000
0001
0002
0003
0004
0005
0006
0007
0008
0009
0010
INSTRUCTION
STR 000
OR 001
STR 002
STR 003
ANDN 004
ORSTR
AND 005
ORN 006
ANDSTR
OUT 050
END
DESCRIPTION
Starts branch 1 with 000
Joins 001 in parallel with 000
Starts branch 2 with 002
Starts branch 3 with 003
Joins 004 (NOT) with 003
Joins branches 2 and 3
Starts branch 4 with 005
Joins 006 (NOT) in parallel with 005
Joins branches 4 and 5 with 1--3
Stores the output and finishes the network
Ends the program
Press SHF and NXT to display the beginning of the program
SHF
0000
....
NXT
Displays the first
address
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
4--3
Changing Programs
Use PRV or NXT to scroll through the program
NXT
In Run Mode,
On/Off status
is displayed
0000
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
NXT
0001
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
PRV
0000
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Press CLR or NXT to toggle between the address and instruction display
0000
....
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Changing Programs
CLR
4--4
Changing Programs
Finding a Specific Instruction
If you do not want to scroll through the program, you can use the Search feature to
automatically search for an instruction. The following example shows the
instructions, addresses, and corresponding Handheld displays for a small program.
000
002
050
005
OUT
001
003
004
Find Input 005
006
Mnemonic Listing and Addresses
ADDRESS
INSTRUCTION
0000
0001
—
0006
—
0010
STR 000
OR 001
—
AND 005
—
END
DESCRIPTION
Starts branch 1 with 000
Joins 001 in parallel with 000
—
Starts branch 4 with 005
—
Ends the program
Changing Programs
Search for the instruction reference
SHF
5
0006
....
SCH
Displays the
address where the
instruction is located
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
You can also specify how the reference is used
(All outputs require the additional key to indicate how the point is used.)
OUT
SHF
5
0
SCH
Displays the
address where the
instruction is located
0009
....
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
4--5
Changing Programs
Finding a Specific Address
You can also search for a specific address. The following example shows the
instructions, addresses, and corresponding Handheld displays for a small program.
000
002
050
005
OUT
001
003
004
006
Mnemonic Listing and Addresses
ADDRESS
0000
0001
—
Find
—
0006
—
—
0010
INSTRUCTION
STR 000
OR 001
—
—
AND 005
—
—
END
DESCRIPTION
Starts branch 1 with 000
Joins 001 in parallel with 000
—
—
Starts branch 4 with 005
—
—
Ends the program
SHF
6
NXT
0006
....
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Changing Programs
Search for the address
4--6
Changing Programs
Changing an Instruction
Sometimes you need to change an instruction. For example, you may want to use a
different input or output point than the one originally entered into the program. The
following example shows the instructions, addresses, and corresponding Handheld
displays for a small program.
000
002
050
005
OUT
001
003
Change to 060
004
006
Mnemonic Listing and Addresses
ADDRESS
INSTRUCTION
Changing Programs
0000
0001
—
0006
—
0009
0010
STR 000
OR 001
—
AND 005
—
OUT 060
END
DESCRIPTION
Starts branch 1 with 000
Joins 001 in parallel with 000
—
Starts branch 4 with 005
—
Stores the output and finishes the network
Ends the program
Search for the address
SHF
9
0009
....
NXT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Change the instruction
OUT
SHF
6
0
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
(Display before ENT is pressed)
ENT
060
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
4--7
Changing Programs
Inserting an Instruction
Use the INSERT feature to add an instruction to the program. Insert adds an
instruction before the instruction being displayed, so make sure you are at the
correct program address. Once you’ve inserted the new instruction, the remaining
addresses increment. The following example shows the instructions, addresses,
and corresponding Handheld displays for a small program.
000
002
005
007
050
OUT
001
003
004
Insert 007
006
Mnemonic Listing and Addresses
ADDRESS
0000
—
0006
0007
—
0010
INSTRUCTION
STR 000
—
AND 005
Insert AND 007
ORN 006
—
END
DESCRIPTION
Starts branch 1 with 000
—
Starts branch 4 with 005
Adds 007 in series with 005
Joins 006 (NOT) in parallel with 005
—
Ends the program
SHF
7
0007
....
NXT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Insert the new instruction
AND
SHF
7
INS
NXT
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
(Display before NXT is pressed)
i 007
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Changing Programs
Search for the address
4--8
Changing Programs
Inserting an END Statement
There may be times when you need to insert an END statement (before an address)
in the program. This is commonly done when you only want to check a portion of the
program during machine startup or troubleshooting. You use the INSERT feature,
but since the Handheld does not have an END key, special keystrokes are required.
000
002
005
007
050
OUT
001
003
004
Insert END
before this
rung
006
051
010
OUT
Mnemonic Listing and Addresses
ADDRESS
0000
—
0006
Changing Programs
0008
—
0013
INSTRUCTION
DESCRIPTION
STR 000
—
AND 005
Insert END
ORN 006
—
END
Starts branch 1 with 000
—
Starts branch 4 with 005
Ends the program
Joins 006 (NOT) in parallel with 005
—
Ends the program
Search for the address
SHF
8
0008
....
NXT
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Insert the END statement
CLR
SHF
INS
NXT
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
(Display before NXT is pressed)
i
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
4--9
Changing Programs
Deleting an Instruction
Use the DELETE feature to remove an instruction from the program. Delete
removes the instruction being displayed, so make sure you are at the correct
program address. Once you’ve deleted the instruction, the remaining addresses
decrement. The following example shows the instructions, addresses, and
corresponding Handheld displays for a small program.
000
002
005
007
050
OUT
001
003
004
Delete 007
006
Mnemonic Listing and Addresses
ADDRESS
0000
—
0006
Delete
0007
0008
—
0011
INSTRUCTION
STR 000
—
AND 005
AND 007
ORN 006
—
END
DESCRIPTION
Starts branch 1 with 000
—
Starts branch 4 with 005
Adds X7 in series with X5
Joins 006 (NOT) in parallel with 005
—
Ends the program
SHF
7
NXT
0007
....
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Delete the instruction
DEL
PRV
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
(Display before PRV is pressed)
d 007
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Changing Programs
Search for the address
Protecting and
Storing Programs
In This Chapter. . . .
— Password Protection
— Storing Programs on Cassette Tapes
15
5--2
Protecting and Storing Programs
Password Protection
The DL305 CPUs provide an extra measure of protection by allowing you to enter a
password that prevents unauthorized machine operations. The password must be a
four-character numeric (0--9) code. Once you’ve entered a password, you can
remove it by entering all zeros (0000). This is the default from the factory.
The password is stored in the CPU, not in the Handheld Programmer. If the battery
backup is lost and the power is cycled, you could lose the password (and the
program too.)
You can enter a password in either the Run or Program mode. Use the following
keystrokes to use the password features.
Use these keystrokes to enter a password
CLR
SHF
9
8
7
6
DEL
SHF
X
X
XXXX
....
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
X
X
ENT
NXT
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
(X represents the password. The display depends on the password entered.)
Once you’ve entered the password, you can enable it by using the following
keystrokes.
Use these keystrokes to enable the password
CLR
SHF
1
4
DEL
NXT
2
3
1234
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Protecting and Storing
Programs
Once password protection has been enabled, you must enter the password before
you can make any changes to the program. You can still view the program and use
the Handheld to monitor machine operations, but you cannot make changes.
Use these keystrokes to access a password protected CPU
CLR
SHF
5
6
7
8
DEL
SHF
X
X
0000
....
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
X
X
ENT
NXT
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
(X represents the password. The display depends on the password entered.)
REV A
Protecting and Storing Programs
5--3
Storing Programs on Cassette Tapes
Although the best way to store programs is to use DirectSOFT and computer
diskettes, you can also copy the programs from the CPU to cassette tapes. Both
forms of media allow you store several programs, but the diskette method is much
easier to use and it’s more reliable due to the differences in various cassette
recorders.
When you select a recorder, choose one designed for use with Personal Computers
(PCs). These types of recorders are much more suitable than those used for normal
audio recordings. However, most audio recorders will record or play the digital
information accurately if they have both volume and tone controls.
The cassette recorder cable, included with the Handheld Programmer, connects to
Connecting the
the
small jack on the front of the Handheld Programmer.
Cassette Recorder
Cassette
Characteristics
Microphone
(Red)
Earphone
(White)
NOTE: Connect the cable to the tape recorder microphone jack when you are writing
a program to the cassette. Connect the cable to the earphone jack when you are
reading a program from the cassette.
Program Names on Since it is very easy to store multiple programs on a single cassette it is very
important idea to name each program. You can use a four-digit number to name the
Cassettes
various programs. You do not have to use a name, but it’s a good idea.
Protecting and Storing
Programs
5--4
Protecting and Storing Programs
Writing a Program
to the Cassette
If you examine the front of the Handheld
Programmer you will notice one of the
keyswitch positions is labeled “LOAD”.
You must set the keyswitch to this position
before you can save a program to a
cassette.
It generally takes about 75 seconds to
copy a program from the CPU to a
cassette tape.
NOTE: Remember tape programs are
stored sequentially. It is very easy to
overwrite existing programs if you do not
position the tape correctly before
beginning this procedure. Use the tape
counter on the recorder to keep track of
program locations.
RUN PRGLOADTAPE
Protecting and Storing
Programs
If you want to make your life easier, it’s a good idea to make a few notes on the
cassette case.
S File number (if you use one)
S Tape counter reading (helps you position the tape later)
S Volume and tone control settings (helps you read the tape later)
5--5
Protecting and Storing Programs
When you have the cable connected to the recorder microphone jack, place the
Handheld Programmer keyswitch in the LOAD position. Once the keyswitch has
been placed in the LOAD position, the display will go blank and the SHF LED will be
turned on. Then, use the following procedure to copy the program.
Enter a four-digit program name (or 0 if you do not want a name)
X
X
X
XXXX
X
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Start the cassette recorder
REC
OR
REC
PLAY
Press Write
WRITE
(Program takes about 75
seconds to transfer.)
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Display when transfer is complete
END
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
STOP
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Protecting and Storing
Programs
Stop the cassette recorder
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
5--6
Protecting and Storing Programs
Verifying the Tape
Contents
It’s usually a good idea to verify the tape contents match what is stored in the CPU.
The last thing you want to do is to reload the program at a later date only to find the
program isn’t what you expected.
Before you begin, it’s important to understand how the information is placed on the
tape. You’ll need to know this when in order to position the tape correctly.
5 Sec
25 Sec
Aproximately 45 Sec
Head Mark
User Program
File # (0001--9999)
End Mark
The Head and End marks are written with 2kHz signals
One signal is at 2kHz and 0 signal is at 1kHz
This can be omitted if program identification by number is not needed
Protecting and Storing
Programs
Part of the problem with cassette storage is that tape positioning can mean the
difference between a successful transfer and a serious headache. Before you begin
the procedure make sure you have positioned the tape just before the first head
mark, or, just before the location of the program you want to read. If you position the
tape in the head mark, an error will occur.
Set the tape recorder TONE and VOLUME controls to the settings you used when
you recorded the program. If you don’t remember the settings, set the controls to the
midway position. (You may have to adjust the volume later.)
Also, remember the Handheld Programmer keyswitch has to be in the LOAD
position to perform tape operations.
5--7
Protecting and Storing Programs
When you have the cable connected to the earphone jack, place the Handheld
Programmer keyswitch in the LOAD position. The display will go blank and the SHF
LED will be turned on. Then, use the following procedure to copy the program.
Enter the four-digit program name (if you used one)
X
X
X
X
CHECK
XXXX
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Start the cassette recorder
PLAY
E 28
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
LED 5 flashes and the message E28 appears when the head mark is found. The
message disappears and LED 7 comes on if the procedure is working correctly. If the
E28 message does not disappear, adjust the volume level until it does. You have 12
seconds to complete the volume adjustment.
If you entered a file number, the system will check the tape to make sure the file
numbers match. If the file does not match, the current file will be “passed” and the
process will continue until the correct file is located. The following displays are used.
Display when the file number does not match
PASS
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Display when the file number is found
F
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Protecting and Storing
Programs
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
5--8
Protecting and Storing Programs
When the check is complete, one of two displays will appear.
Display when the programs match
End
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Display when an error occurs
E 25
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Protecting and Storing
Programs
You can press CLR to remove the error message and start over. If you get an error
there are several things you can check.
S Check the tape positioning. It is very important to position the tape
correctly. This is the cause of most errors.
S Adjust the volume level and/or tone controls.
S Check the cable connections.
S Clean the tape recorder head. Use the documentation that came with
your recorder to determine the correct cleaning procedures.
5--9
Protecting and Storing Programs
Reading a Program The procedure to read a program is almost exactly the same as the one for verifying
the tape contents. Before you begin the procedure make sure you have positioned
from a Cassette
the tape just before the first head mark, or just before the location of the program you
want to read. If you position the tape in the head mark, an error will occur.
Set the tape recorder TONE and VOLUME controls to the settings you used when
you recorded the program. If you don’t remember the settings, set the controls to the
midway position. (You may have to adjust the volume later).
Also, remember the Handheld Programmer keyswitch has to be in the LOAD
position to perform tape operations.
When you have the cable connected to the earphone jack, place the Handheld
Programmer keyswitch in the LOAD position. The display will go blank and the SHF
LED will be turned on. Then, use the following procedure to copy the program.
Enter the four-digit program name (if you used one)
X
X
X
X
READ
XXXX
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Start the cassette recorder
PLAY
E 28
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
LED 5 flashes and the message E28 appears when the headmark is found. The
message disappears and LED 7 comes on if the procedure is working correctly. If the
E28 message does not disappear, adjust the volume level until it does. You have 12
seconds to complete the volume adjustment.
Protecting and Storing
Programs
REV A
5--10
Protecting and Storing Programs
If you entered a file number, the system will check the tape to make sure the file
numbers match. If the file does not match, the current file will be “passed” and the
process will continue until the correct file is located. The following displays are used.
Display when the file number does not match
PASS
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Display when the file number is found
F
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
When the program has been loaded, the following display will appear.
Display when the program has been loaded
END
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
Protecting and Storing
Programs
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
You can press CLR to remove the error message and start over. If you get an error
there are several things you can check.
S Check the tape positioning. It is very important to position the tape
correctly. This is the cause of most errors.
S Adjust the volume level and/or tone controls.
S Check the cable connections.
S Clean the tape recorder head. Use the documentation that came with
your recorder to determine the correct cleaning procedures.
Protecting and Storing Programs
5--11
As you’ve seen, entering and storing programs with the Handheld is a pretty simple
task. Once you’ve got the program entered and the machine is up and running, you
can use the Handheld to monitor and change machine operations almost as easily.
The next chapter shows the details.
Protecting and Storing
Programs
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
In This Chapter. . . .
— Troubleshooting Suggestions
— Monitoring Discrete Points
— Forcing Discrete Points
— Monitoring Register Locations
— Changing Register Values
— Monitoring Timer/Counter Values
— Changing Timer/Counter Values
— Monitoring Program Stages
— Forcing Program Stages
— Error Codes
16
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
6--2
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting Suggestions
The Handheld is very useful in troubleshooting your machine. As with any problem,
you have to find it before you can fix it. There are several operations and features
that help you quickly find the exact cause of system problems.
S Monitor Discrete I/O Points — to examine I/O power flow for individual
I/O points.
S Force Discrete I/O Points — to examine machine sequences or
inconsistencies.
S Monitor Register Locations — to examine word locations to determine if
correct values are being used.
S Change Register Values — to force word locations with different values.
S Monitor Timer/Counter Values — to adjust machine timing elements.
S Understand Error Codes — to know where to look first.
6--3
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
You can monitor up to 16 discrete points at one time. The points can be from the
following data types.
S Inputs
S Output
S Control relays
The status display area is also used to show the status for the points being
monitored. Here’s how the display is organized.
Indicates I/O
Status Display
Reference Number
n050
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
16 LEDs Total
show on/off
status
0
4
0
4
1
5
1
5
2
6
2
6
3
7
3
7
50--57
60--67
Use the following keystrokes to monitor discrete points. To select a different data
type, use the corresponding reference number instead of the one shown. The DL305
memory map is included in Appendix A. This will help you determine the appropriate
ranges for the various data types.
Select the reference number to monitor
SHF
5
0
MON
n050
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
4
0
4
1
5
1
5
2
6
2
6
3
7
3
7
Use PRV or NXT to scroll through the references (8 point increments)
PRV
n040
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
4
0
4
1
5
1
5
2
6
2
6
3
7
3
7
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
Monitoring Discrete Points
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
6--4
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Forcing Discrete Points
You can also force discrete points with the Handheld Programmer.
It is important to note that the DL305 CPUs only retain the forced value for one scan if
the output point is used in the logic program or if the input point used corresponds to
module that is installed in the base. The following example shows how the forcing
actually works.
Force 050 ON
Force I/O Points
000
002
005
001
003
010
Force 010 ON
007
050
004
051
END
On due to
010
forced ON
Next Scan
010 is off”
000
002
001
003
010
CPU reads the I/O status from
the modules. Sees that point 010
is off, overwrites force to turn off
010.
Read
Inputs
005
007
050
004
Force is overwritten
051
Logic is solved. Point 010,
even
though
previously
forced on, is turned off. Points
050 and 051 are turned off
since conditions are not met.
END
050 and 051
are off
Update
Outputs
CPU updates the output status
with the results obtained from the
logic execution. Y0 and Y1 were
turned off.
NOTE: If you use a CR as an input, you will not have the “one scan” problem.
6--5
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
WARNING: Depending on your application, forcing I/O points may cause
unpredictable machine operation that can result in a risk of personal injury or
equipment damage.
To turn a point on
CLR
SET
SHF
Display returns to address display
5
0
0000
....
ADDRESS/DATA
ENT
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
4
0
4
1
5
1
5
2
6
2
6
3
7
3
7
Monitor the point to verify the force (optional)
CLR
SHF
5
0
MON
n050
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
To turn a point off
CLR
ENT
RST
SHF
Display returns to address display
5
0
0000
....
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
The following example shows the keystrokes required to force an I/O point.
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
6--6
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Monitoring Register Locations
You can use the Handheld to monitor and change register locations. When a register
is monitored, the handheld programmer will display two register locations (eight bits
each) this means that 4 digits of data will be shown. Since data register locations are
8-bit locations, two consecutive data registers will be displayed. When changing
values in data register locations, you can also write two consecutive data register
locations.
Select the location to monitor
CLR
R
4
0
0
R401
R400
1453
ADDRESS/DATA
MON
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
AND
1
OR
2
STR
3
NOT
4
OUT
5
TMR
6
CNT
7
SR
0
MCS
1
MCR
2
SET
3
RST
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Changing Register Values
Select the location to monitor
CLR
R
4
0
0
R401
R400
1453
ADDRESS/DATA
MON
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
Enter the new value
SHF
ENT
1
3
5
R401
4
R400
1354
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
6--7
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
You can also use the Handheld to monitor and/or change timer and counter current
values. There are two ways to do this. You can use the register monitoring procedure
discussed previously which will display the current value with the decimal point
implied for timers. The second method uses slightly different keystrokes and will
show timer current values with the decimal point. Using this method also uses the
instructions LEDs to indicate the last two digits of the timer/counter memory
reference.
Select the location to monitor
CLR
SHF
6
0
0
4569
.
ADDRESS/DATA
MON
Shows accumulated
time or count
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
4
0
4
1
5
1
5
2
6
2
6
3
7
3
7
00--07
10--17
LEDs show last two digits of the
register reference number
Changing Timer/Counter Current Values
Select the timer location to monitor
CLR
SHF
6
0
0
4569
.
ADDRESS/DATA
MON
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
4
0
4
1
5
1
5
2
6
2
6
3
7
3
7
0
4
0
4
1
5
1
5
2
6
2
6
3
7
3
7
Enter the new value
SHF
ENT
1
3
5
4
1354
.
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
Monitoring Timer/Counter Current Values
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
6--8
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Monitoring Program Stages
The RLL PLUS CPUs also have stages that can be monitored. This is especially useful
since it can quickly show you exactly which parts of the program are being executed.
The procedure is very similar to the one used for monitoring discrete I/O points.
Here’s how the display is organized.
Indicates
Stage Status
Display
Stage Number
s010
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
16 LEDs Total
Show on/off
status
0
4
0
4
1
5
1
5
2
6
2
6
3
7
3
7
10--17
20--27
6--9
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Select the stage number to monitor
SG
SHF
1
0
MON
s010
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
4
0
4
1
5
1
5
2
6
2
6
3
7
3
7
Use PRV or NXT to scroll through the references (8 stage increments)
PRV
n020
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
4
0
4
1
5
1
5
2
6
2
6
3
7
3
7
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
Use the following keystrokes to monitor the stages.
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
6--10
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Forcing Program Stages
You can also force Program Stages with the Handheld Programmer. However, due
to the self-contained nature of this style of programming, you can really cause some
problems by forcing stages on and off.
It is important to note that the DL305 CPUs only retain the forced value for one scan if
the logic within the stage (or another stage) causes the status to be discarded. The
following example shows how the forcing actually works. Assume that the saw takes
approximately 10 seconds to reach the bottom limit. (Which is many, many, CPU
scans.)
Force a Stage ON
Stage
10
Stop
005
RST all stages
Jump to Stage 0
Stage 5 forced ON
Current Stage
ISG
0
Start
000
Stage
1
Pipe limit
001
Stage
2
Clamped
002
020
021
Converyor
SET
Clamp
Bottom
003
Stage
3
022
Stage
4
023
SET Saw
Saw Down
On
Top
004
Stage
5
024
022
021
Saw
Up
RST
Saw
Off
RST
Clamp
Next Scan
Stage
10
Stop
005
RST all stages
Clamp is reset,
which may cause a
saw jam.
Jump to Stage 0
ISG
0
Start
000
Stage
1
Pipe limit
001
Stage
2
Clamped
002
020
021
Converyor
SET
Clamp
Bottom
003
Stage
3
022
023
SET Saw
Saw Down
On
Stage
4
Top
004
Stage
5
024
022
021
Saw
Up
RST
Saw
Off
RST
Clamp
6--11
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
WARNING: As shown in the example, forcing stages may cause unpredictable
machine operation that can result in a risk of personal injury or equipment
damage.
To turn a stage on
CLR
SET
SG
SHF
5
005
ADDRESS/DATA
ENT
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
0
STR
1
AND
2
OR
3
NOT
4
ISG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
0
SG
1
OUT
2
TMR
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
0
4
0
4
1
5
1
5
2
6
2
6
3
7
3
7
0
STR
1
AND
2
OR
3
NOT
4
ISG
5
JMP
6
SET
7
RST
0
SG
1
OUT
2
TMR
3
CNT
4
ADR
5
SHF
6
DATA
7
REG
Monitor the stage to verify the force (optional)
CLR
SG
SHF
5
MON
s000
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
To turn a stage off
CLR
ENT
RST
SG
SHF
5
005
ADDRESS/DATA
ON/OFF
RUN BATT
PWR CPU
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
Obviously, there are times when it’s perfectly OK to force a program stage on or off.
The following example shows the keystrokes required to force an stage.
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
6--12
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
Error Codes
The following table lists the error codes that may appear on the Handheld.
DL305 Error Code
Description
E01
Invalid Keystrokes
Invalid keystroke or series of keystrokes entered into the handheld
programmer. Refer to the DL305 Handheld Programmer manual for
assistance in the operation you are trying to perform.
E02
Input Point
Programmed as
Output
An I/O point dedicated to an input module has been used as an output in the
application program. Change the I/O reference number in the program which
is causing the error.
E03
Stack Overflow
The maximum number of instructions utilizing the internal stack has exceeded
eight. These instructions can be a combination of AND STRs, OR STRs and
MCS/MCR groups. Reduce the number of these instructions which are
pushed onto the stack at one time.
E05 (NON Stage)
Duplicate Coil
Reference
Two or more output coils have the same data type and number. Change the
duplicate coil to correct the error. Duplicate coil references are valid with the
SET instruction.
E05 (Stage)
Duplicate Stage
Reference
Two or more Stages have the same reference number. Change the duplicate
Stage number to correct the error.
E06
MCR/MCS Mismatch
The number of MCR instructions do not match the number of MCS
instructions. Each MCR must have an accompanying MCS.
E07
Missing CNT or SR
Contact
A required input contact is missing from a CNT (example, RESET input) or a
SR instruction. Refer to the DL305 User Manual for details on these
instructions.
E08
Invalid Data Values
The required data values for a TMR, CNT or SR are missing or incorrect.
Refer to the DL305 User Manual for details on these instructions.
E09
Incomplete Program
Rung
The rung does not terminate with an output as required. Program an output to
terminate the rung properly.
E11
Program Full
There is no available program addresses in memory. Reduce the size of the
program.
System Monitoring and Troubleshooting
6--13
Description
E21
Program Memory
Parity Error
A parity error has occurred in the program memory of the CPU. Clear the
memory and reload the program. If the error reoccurs replace the CPU.
Electrical noise will cause this problem.
E22
Password Error
The password stored in the CPU is invalid. Press the “CLR” key twice on the
handheld programmer and the password will be reset to 0000. Re-enter the
password if required.
E25
Tape/Program
Mismatch
A mismatch was found when a compare was performed on the program in
CPU memory and the program stored on tape.
E28
Volume Incorrect On
Tape Device.
The volume is incorrect on the tape player being used to load the program to
the CPU. Adjust the volume and retry the operation. Refer to the DL305
Handheld Programmer manual for details on tape operation.
E31
RAM Limit Exceeded
The application program required more RAM for execution than is available.
Reduce the length of the program.
E99
A search was performed and the specified instruction was not found in the
Instruction Not Found application program.
System Monitoring
and Troubleshooting
DL305 Error Code
DL305 Memory Map
In This Chapter. . . .
— DL330 Memory Map
— DL330P Memory Map
— DL340 Memory Map
— I/O Point Bit Map
— Control Relay Bit Map
— Special Relays
— Timer / Counter Registers and Contacts
— Data Registers
— Stage Control / Status Bit Map
— Shift Register Bit Map
— Special Registers
1A
Appendix A
DL305 Memory Map
A--2
DL305 Memory Map
DL330 Memory Map
Memory Type
Discrete Memory
Reference
(octal)
Register Memory
Reference
(octal)
Qty.
Decimal
Symbol
Input / Output
Points
000 -- 157
700 -- 767
R000 -- R015
R070 -- R076
168 Total
Control Relays
160 -- 373
R016 -- R037
140
C0
C0
Special Relays
374 -- 377
770 -- 777
R037
R077
12
772
376
Timers /
Counters
600 -- 673
674 -- 677*
None
64
Timer / Counter
Current Values
None
R600 -- R673
R674 -- R677*
64
Timer / Counter
Status Bits
T600 -- T673
T674 -- T677*
None
64
Data Words
None
R400 -- R563
116
Shift Registers
400 -- 577
None
128
Special
Registers
None
R574 -- R577
4
010
000
TMR
T600
K100
R600
CNT C600
K10
K100
T600
None specific, used with many
instructions
SR
400
417
R574 -- R575 used with FAULT
R576 -- R577 Auxiliary Accumulator
* T/ C Setpoint Unit Only. Can be used as data registers if the Timer/Counter Setpoint Unit or Thumbwheel Interface Module is not used. R564 -- R573
contain the preset value used with the Timer / Counter Setpoint Unit. R674 -- R677 contain the current values for these timers or counters.
A--3
DL305 Memory Map
Memory Type
Discrete Memory
Reference
(octal)
Register Memory
Reference
(octal)
Qty.
Decimal
Appendix A
DL305 Memory Map
DL330P Memory Map
Symbol
Input / Output
Points
000 -- 157
700 -- 767
R000 -- R015
R070 -- R076
168 Total
Control Relays
160 -- 174
200 -- 277
R016 -- R017
R020 -- R027
77
C0
C0
Special Relays
175 -- 177
770 -- 777
R017
R077
11
772
176
Timers /
Counters
600 -- 673
674 -- 677*
None
64
Timer / Counter
Current Values
None
R600 -- R673
R674 -- R677*
64
Timer / Counter
Status Bits
T600 -- T673
T674 -- T677*
None
64
Data Words
None
R400 -- R563
116
Stages
S0 -- S177
R100 -- R117
128
Special
Registers
None
R574 -- R577
4
010
000
TMR
T600
K100
R600
CNT C600
K10
K100
T600
None specific, used with many
instructions
SG
S1
S 001
R574 -- R575 used with FAULT
R576 -- R577 Auxiliary Accumulator
* T/ C Setpoint Unit Only. Can be used as data registers if the Timer/Counter Setpoint Unit or Thumbwheel Interface Module is not used, which
provides a total of 128 data registers.
R564 -- R573 contain the preset value used with the Timer / Counter Setpoint Unit. R674 -- R677 contain the current values for these timers or
counters.
Appendix A
DL305 Memory Map
A--4
DL305 Memory Map
DL340 Memory Map
Memory Type
Discrete Memory
Reference
(octal)
Register Memory
Reference
(octal)
Qty.
Decimal
Symbol
Input / Output
Points
000 -- 157
700 -- 767
R000 -- R015
R070 -- R076
168 Total
Control Relays
160 -- 373
1000 -- 1067
R016 -- R037
R100 -- R106
180
C0
C0
Special Relays
374 -- 377
770 -- 777
1070 -- 1077
R037
R077
R107
20
772
376
Timers /
Counters
600 -- 673
674 -- 677*
None
64
Timer / Counter
Current Values
None
R600 -- R673
R674 -- R677*
64
Timer / Counter
Status Bits
T600 -- T673
T674 -- T677*
None
64
Data Words
None
R400 -- R563
R700 -- R767
172
Shift Registers
400 -- 577
None
128
Special
Registers
None
R574 -- R577
R770 -- R777
12
010
000
TMR
T600
K100
R600
CNT C600
K10
K100
T600
None specific, used with many
instructions
SR
400
417
R574--R575 used with FAULT
R576--R577 Auxiliary Accumulator
R770--R777 Communications Setup
* T/ C Setpoint Unit Only. Can be used as data registers if the Timer/Counter Setpoint Unit or Thumbwheel Interface Module is not used. R564 -- R573
contain the preset value used with the Timer / Counter Setpoint Unit. R674 -- R677 contain the current values for these timers or counters.
DL305 Memory Map
A--5
These tables provide a listing of the individual Input points associated with each
register location for the DL330, DL330P, and DL340 CPUs.
MSB
007
017
027
037
047
057
067
077
107
117
127
137
147
157
167
177
707
717
727
737
747
757
767
I/O References
006
016
026
036
046
056
066
076
106
116
126
136
146
156
166
176
706
716
726
736
746
756
766
005
015
025
035
045
055
065
075
105
115
125
135
145
155
165
175
705
715
725
735
745
755
765
004
014
024
034
044
054
064
074
104
114
124
134
144
154
164
174
704
714
724
734
744
754
764
003
013
023
033
043
053
063
073
103
113
123
133
143
153
163
173
703
713
723
733
743
753
763
LSB
002
012
022
032
042
052
062
072
102
112
122
132
142
152
162
172
702
712
722
732
742
752
762
001
011
021
031
041
051
061
071
101
111
121
131
141
151
161
171
701
711
721
731
741
751
761
000
010
020
030
040
050
060
070
100
110
120
130
140
150
160
170
700
710
720
730
740
750
760
Register
Number
R0
R1
R2
R3
R4
R5
R6
R7
R10
R11
R12
R13
R14
R15
n/a
n/a
R70
R71
R72
R73
R74
R75
R76
NOTE: 160 -- 167 can be used as I/O in a DL330 or DL330P CPU under certain
conditions. 160 -- 177 can be used as I/O in a DL340 CPU under certain conditions.
You should consult the DL305 User Manual to determine which configurations allow
the use of these points.
These points are normally used as control relays. You cannot use them as both
control relays and as I/O points. Also, if you use these points as I/O, you cannot
access these I/O points as a Data Register reference.
Appendix A
DL305 Memory Map
I/O Point Bit Map
Appendix A
DL305 Memory Map
A--6
DL305 Memory Map
Control Relay Bit Map
The following tables provide a listing of the individual control relays associated with
each register location for the DL305 CPUs.
NOTE: 160 -- 167 can be used as I/O in a DL330 or DL330P CPU under certain
conditions. 160 -- 177 can be used as I/O in a DL340 CPU under certain conditions.
You should consult the DL305 User Manual to determine which configurations allow
the use of these points.
You cannot use them as both control relays and as I/O points. Also, if you use these
points as I/O, you cannot access these I/O points as a Data Register reference.
MSB
167
177
207
217
227
237
247
257
267
277
307
317
327
337
347
357
367
166
176
206
216
226
236
246
256
266
276
306
316
326
336
346
356
366
DL330
Control Relay References
165
164
163
162
175
174
173
172
205
204
203
202
215
214
213
212
225
224
223
222
235
234
233
232
245
244
243
242
255
254
253
252
265
264
263
262
275
274
273
272
305
304
303
302
315
314
313
312
325
324
323
322
335
334
333
332
345
344
343
342
355
354
353
352
365
364
363
362
373
372
LSB
161
171
201
211
221
231
241
251
261
271
301
311
321
331
341
351
361
371
160
170
200
210
220
230
240
250
260
270
300
310
320
330
340
350
360
370
Register
Number
R16
R17
R20
R21
R22
R23
R24
R25
R26
R27
R30
R31
R32
R33
R34
R35
R36
R37
* Control relays 340 -- 373 can be made retentive by setting a CPU dipswitch. See the DL305 User Manual for details
on setting CPU dipswitches.
DL305 Memory Map
167
166
207
217
227
237
247
257
267
277*
206
216
226
236
246
256
266
276
DL330P
Control Relay References
165
164
163
162
174
173
172
205
204
203
202
215
214
213
212
225
224
223
222
235
234
233
232
245
244
243
242
255
254
253
252
265
264
263
262
275
274
273
272
LSB
161
171
201
211
221
231
241
251
261
271
160
170
200*
210
220
230
240
250
260
270
Register
Number
R16
R17
R20
R21
R22
R23
R24
R25
R26
R27
* Control relays 200 -- 277 can be made retentive by setting a CPU dipswitch. See the DL305 User Manual for details on setting CPU dipswitches.
MSB
167
177
207
217
227
237
247
257
267
277
307
317
327
337
347
357
367
166
176
206
216
226
236
246
256
266
276
306
316
326
336
346
356
366
1007
1017
1027
1037
1047
1057
1067
1006
1016
1026
1036
1046
1056
1066
DL340
Control Relay References
165
164
163
162
175
174
173
172
205
204
203
202
215
214
213
212
225
224
223
222
235
234
233
232
245
244
243
242
255
254
253
252
265
264
263
262
275
274
273
272
305
304
303
302
315
314
313
312
325
324
323
322
335
334
333
332
345
344
343
342
355
354
353
352
365
364
363
362
373*
372
1005
1004
1003
1002
1015
1014
1013
1012
1025
1024
1023
1022
1035
1034
1033
1032
1045
1044
1043
1042
1055
1054
1053
1052
1065
1064
1063
1062
LSB
161
171
201
211
221
231
241
251
261
271
301
311
321
331
341
351
361
371
1001
1011
1021
1031
1041
1051
1061
160
170
200
210
220
230
240
250
260
270
300
310
320
330
340*
350
360
370
1000
1010
1020
1030
1040
1050
1060
Register
Number
R16
R17
R20
R21
R22
R23
R24
R25
R26
R27
R30
R31
R32
R33
R34
R35
R36
R37
R100
R101
R102
R103
R104
R105
R106
* Control relays 340 -- 373 can be made retentive by setting a CPU dipswitch. See the DL305 User Manual for details
on setting CPU dipswitches.
Appendix A
DL305 Memory Map
MSB
A--7
Appendix A
DL305 Memory Map
A--8
DL305 Memory Map
Special Relays
The following table shows the Special Relays used with the DL305 CPUs.
CPUs
DL330P
DL330
DL340
DL330
DL330P
DL340
DL340
Special
Relay
Description of Contents
175
100 ms clock, on for 50 ms and off for 50 ms.
176
Disables all outputs except for those entered with the SET
OUT instruction.
177
Battery voltage is low.
374
On for the first scan cycle after the CPU is switched to Run
Mode.
375
100 ms clock, on for 50 ms and off for 50 ms.
376
Disables all outputs except for those entered with the SET
OUT instruction.
377
Battery voltage is low.
770
Changes timers to 0.01 second intervals. Timers are
normally 0.1 second time intervals.
771
The external diagnostics FAULT instruction (F20) is in use.
772
The data in the accumulator is greater than the comparison
value.
773
The data in the accumulator is equal to the comparison
value.
774
The data in the accumulator is less than the comparison
value.
775
An accumulator carry or borrow condition has occurred.
776
The accumulator value is zero.
777
The accumulator has an overflow condition.
1074
The RX or WX instruction is active.
1075
An error occurred during communications with the RX or
WX instructions.
1076
Port 2 communications mode: on = ASCII mode, off = HEX
mode
1077
Port 1 communications mode: on = ASCII mode, off = HEX
mode
A--9
DL305 Memory Map
The following table shows the locations used for programming timer or counters.
Since timers and counters share the same data area, you cannot have timers and
counters with duplicate numbers. For example, if you have Timer 600, you cannot
have a Counter 600.
Each register contains the current value for the timer or counter. Each timer or
counter also has a timer or counter contact with the same reference number.
NOTE: Counter current values are retentive and retain their state after a power
cycle.
607
617
627
637
647
657
667
677*
606
616
626
636
646
656
666
676*
Timer/Counter References/Registers
605
604
603
602
615
614
613
612
625
624
623
622
635
634
633
632
645
644
643
642
655
654
653
652
665
664
663
662
675*
674*
673
672
601
611
621
631
641
651
661
671
600
610
620
630
640
650
660
670
* Used with Timer / Counter Setpoint Unit and /or Thumbwheel Interface Module.
External
Timer/Counter
Setpoint Unit
Registers 674--677 are used in programming for use with the Timer/Counter
Setpoint Unit and the Thumbwheel Interface Module that are available in some
compatible product families. The registers contain the current time or count. There is
also a status bit for each register with the same reference number. For example, the
current value for Timer 674 is stored in R674 and the status contact is T674.
The presets for these modules are stored
in R564 -- R573 as follows.
S R564 -- R565 — 1st T/C preset
S R566 -- R567 — 2nd T/C preset
S R570 -- R571 — 3rd T/C preset
S R572 -- R573 — 4th T/C preset
The example shows how a 4-digit
number would be represented in these
registers.
R565
0 0 0 1 00 1 1
1
3
R564
0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1
4
5
Appendix A
DL305 Memory Map
Timer / Counter Registers and Contacts
Appendix A
DL305 Memory Map
A--10
DL305 Memory Map
Data Registers
The following 8-bit data registers are primarily used with data instructions to store
various types of application data. For example, you could use a register to hold a
timer or counter preset value.
Some data instructions call for two bytes, which will correspond to two consecutive
8-bit data registers such as R401 and R400. The LSB (Least Significant Bit) will be in
register R400 as bit0 and the MSB (Most Significant Bit) will be in register R401 as
bit17.
NOTE: Data Registers are retentive.
407
417
427
437
447
457
467
477
507
517
527
537
547
557
406
416
426
436
446
456
466
476
506
516
526
536
546
556
405
415
425
435
445
455
465
475
505
515
525
535
545
555
DL330 / DL330P
8-Bit Data Registers
404
403
414
413
424
423
434
433
444
443
454
453
464
463
474
473
504
503
514
513
524
523
534
533
544
543
554
553
563
402
412
422
432
442
452
462
472
502
512
522
532
542
552
562
401
411
421
431
441
451
461
471
501
511
521
531
541
551
561
400
410
420
430
440
450
460
470
500
510
520
530
540
550
560
DL305 Memory Map
406
416
426
436
446
456
466
476
506
516
526
536
546
556
405
415
425
435
445
455
465
475
505
515
525
535
545
555
707
717
727
737
747
757
767
706
716
726
736
746
756
766
705
715
725
735
745
755
765
402
412
422
432
442
452
462
472
502
512
522
532
542
552
562
702
712
722
732
742
752
762
401
411
421
431
441
451
461
471
501
511
521
531
541
551
561
701
711
721
731
741
751
761
400
410
420
430
440
450
460
470
500
510
520
530
540
550
560
700
710
720
730
740
750
760
Appendix A
DL305 Memory Map
407
417
427
437
447
457
467
477
507
517
527
537
547
557
DL340
8-Bit Data Registers
404
403
414
413
424
423
434
433
444
443
454
453
464
463
474
473
504
503
514
513
524
523
534
533
544
543
554
553
563
704
703
714
713
724
723
734
733
744
743
754
753
764
763
A--11
Appendix A
DL305 Memory Map
A--12
DL305 Memory Map
Stage Control / Status Bit Map
This table provides a listing of the individual stages and stage control bits. These are
only available with the DL330P CPU.
MSB
007
017
027
037
047
057
067
077
107
117
127
137
147
157
167
177
Stage References
006
016
026
036
046
056
066
076
106
116
126
136
146
156
166
176
005
015
025
035
045
055
065
075
105
115
125
135
145
155
165
175
004
014
024
034
044
054
064
074
104
114
124
134
144
154
164
174
003
013
023
033
043
053
063
073
103
113
123
133
143
153
163
173
LSB
002
012
022
032
042
052
062
072
102
112
122
132
142
152
162
172
001
011
021
031
041
051
061
071
101
111
121
131
141
151
161
171
000
010
020
030
040
050
060
070
100
110
120
130
140
150
160
170
Register
Number
R100
R101
R102
R103
R104
R105
R106
R107
R110
R111
R112
R113
R114
R115
R116
R117
DL305 Memory Map
A--13
The shift register bits listed below are used in the shift register instruction. These
outputs are discrete bits and are not the same locations as the 8 Bit Data Registers.
These bits are retentive meaning they retain their state after a power cycle.
NOTE: The DL330P does not have Shift Register bits. Shift Register instructions in
the DL330P use Control Relays memory references.
MSB
407
417
427
437
447
457
467
477
507
517
527
537
547
557
567
577
406
416
426
436
446
456
466
476
506
516
526
536
546
556
566
576
DL330 / DL340
Shift Register References
405
404
403
402
415
414
413
412
425
424
423
422
435
434
433
432
445
444
443
442
455
454
453
452
465
464
463
462
475
474
473
472
505
504
503
502
515
514
513
512
525
524
523
522
535
534
533
532
545
544
543
542
555
554
553
552
565
564
563
562
575
574
573
572
LSB
401
411
421
431
441
451
461
471
501
511
521
531
541
551
561
571
400
410
420
430
440
450
460
470
500
510
520
530
540
550
560
570
Register
Number
R40
R41
R42
R43
R44
R45
R46
R47
R50
R51
R52
R53
R54
R55
R56
R57
With the DL340 CPU, these bits can also be used as control relays if they are not
used with a Shift Register instruction.
Appendix A
DL305 Memory Map
Shift Register Bit Map
Appendix A
DL305 Memory Map
A--14
DL305 Memory Map
Special Registers
This table provides a listing of the special registers used with the DL305 CPUs.
CPUs
Special
Register
Description of Contents
DL330
R574 -- 575 Contains the error code used with the FAULT instruction.
DL330P
DL340
R576 -- 577 Auxiliary accumulator used with the MUL and DIV
instructions.
DL340 Only
R771
Sets the upper byte of the station address assigned to the
bottom communication port. Therefore, this will contain the
1st and 2nd digits of the address.
R772
Sets the lower byte of the station address assigned to the
bottom communication port. This only contains one digit,
which is the 3rd digit of the address.
R773
Sets the baud rate for the bottom communication port.
R774
Sets the leading communications delay time for the bottom
communication port.
R775
Sets the trailing communications delay time for the bottom
communication port.
R776
Sets the leading communications delay time for the top
communication port.
R777
Sets the trailing communications delay time for the top
communication port.
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