null  null
School of Mathematics and Systems Engineering
Reports from MSI - Rapporter från MSI
Recoder with Eclipse
Saúl Díaz González
Álvaro Pariente Alonso
June
2009
MSI
Växjö University
SE-351 95 VÄXJÖ
Report 09031
ISSN 1650-2647
ISRN VXU/MSI/DA/E/--09031/--SE
Abstract
RECODER is a Java framework aimed at source code analysis and metaprogramming.
It works on several layers to offer a set of semi-automatic transformations and tools,
ranging from a source code parser and unparser, offering a highly detailed syntactical
model, analysis tools which are able to infer types of expressions, evaluate compile-time
constants and keep cross-reference information, to transformations of the very Java
sources, containing a library of common transformations and incremental analysis
capabilities.
These make up an useful set of tools which can be extended to provide the basis for
more advanced refactoring and metacompiler applications, in very different fields, from
code beautification and simple preprocessors, stepping to software visualization and
design problem detection tools to adaptive programming environments and invasive
software composition.
The core system development of RECODER started in the academic field and as
such, it was confined into a small platform of users. Although a powerful tool,
RECODER framework lacks usability and requires extensive and careful configuration
to work properly.
In order to overcome such limitations, we have taken advantage of the Eclipse
Integrated Development Environment (Eclipse IDE) developed by IBM, specifically its
Plugin Framework Architecture to build a tool and a vehicle where to integrate
RECODER functionalities into a wide-used, well-known platform to provide a semiautomated and user-friendly interface.
In this bachelor thesis we will document how we have integrated RECODER into an
Eclipse plug-in to perform a “proof of concept” transformation of an Eclipse Java
Project, directly mapping the Eclipse-generated configuration of the project into
RECODER's to automate the tedious task of manually configuring RECODER.
Keywords: recoder, eclipse, plug-in, integration
i
Contents
1 INTRODUCTION.........................................................................................................1
1.1 Context of the thesis................................................................................................1
1.2 Problem...................................................................................................................1
1.3 Goal criteria............................................................................................................2
1.4 Motivation...............................................................................................................2
1.5 Outline.....................................................................................................................2
2 Background.....................................................................................................................3
2.1 RECODER framework...........................................................................................3
2.2 Eclipse Rich-Client Platform..................................................................................3
2.3 Standard Widget Toolkit (SWT).............................................................................4
2.4 JFace ......................................................................................................................5
2.5 Eclipse Workbench.................................................................................................6
2.6 Equinox OSGi.........................................................................................................7
2.7 Java Development Tools (JDT)...............................................................................8
2.8 Basics of Plug-in Development in Eclipse..............................................................9
2.9 Building and installing the plug-in.......................................................................10
3 Implementation.............................................................................................................12
3.1 Approach: Integrating RECODER........................................................................12
3.2 Graphical Integration with Eclipse.......................................................................13
3.3 Wizard introduction..............................................................................................15
3.4 Wizard Implementation.........................................................................................16
3.5 Wizard RECODER integration.............................................................................16
3.6 Applying JDT interface to extract Project Information........................................17
4 Technical Documentation.............................................................................................19
5 Conclusion and future work.........................................................................................20
5.1 Conclusion............................................................................................................20
5.2 Future work...........................................................................................................20
References.......................................................................................................................22
Appendix A: End-User Manual.......................................................................................23
A.1 Installing RECODER plug-in into Eclipse IDE...................................................23
A.2 Accessing RECODER plug-in functionality .......................................................23
A.3 Select Input Path..................................................................................................24
A.4 Select Output Path................................................................................................25
A.5 Results..................................................................................................................26
A.6 Updating RECODER plug-in...............................................................................26
A.7 Uninstalling RECODER plug-in..........................................................................26
ii
List of Figures
Fig. 2.1: Overview of Eclipse Framework Architecture....................................................4
Fig. 2.2: Comparison between SWT, AWT and Swing architectures................................5
Fig. 2.3: An overview of Java development perspective in Eclipse IDE 3.4....................7
Fig. 2.4: Description of an OSGi-compliant platform.......................................................8
Fig. 3.1: Overview of the thesis objective.......................................................................12
Fig. 3.2 : Screenshot of the defined action button of the plug-in....................................15
Fig. 3.3: RECODER Transformation Wizard page 1......................................................15
Fig. 3.4: RECODER Transformation Wizard page 2.....................................................16
Fig. 3.5: Overview of the plug-in transforming process..................................................18
Fig. 4.1: Class diagram of the RECODER plug-in..........................................................19
Fig. A.1: Location of RECODER plug-in transformation icon.......................................23
Fig. A.2: Project Selection Dialog for configuring Eclipse Source Project....................24
Fig. A.3: Folder selection for outputting RECODER transformation. ...........................25
Fig. A.4: Overview of an example transformation output...............................................26
iii
1 INTRODUCTION
In the modern programming world, Java is the top one widespread programming
language, and it is been the most used one steadily since 2002 [1]. This means that Sun
Microsystems' creation can be found everywhere, from stand-alone desktop
applications, embedded in mobile devices like phones or PDAs and even in highdemanding scientific and enterprise applications.
This results into an increasing demand for Java software in the market. However,
before user demands come, software developers look for new software paradigms and
more advanced tools which help them to deliver faster state-of-the-art code and
technology.
In case of long-term projects which require a lot of iterations and are divided among
several teams, sometimes additional advanced refactoring, transformations and analysis
are required. This is where the RECODER framework comes in.
On the other hand, Eclipse Integrated Development Environment (Eclipse IDE)
provides an extensible platform with a large user base (almost 3 million downloads on
the Ganymede 3.4 version, which does not include GNU/Linux distributed releases[2]). It
is praised for his Plug-in Architecture Framework, where additional functionalities to
the IDE can be easily deployed and ported between the different platforms Eclipse IDE
supports, taking advantage of the resources it provides.
1.1 Context of the thesis
The RECODER framework is a set of tools, part of the COMPOST (COMPOsition
SysTem) started by Prof. Dr. Uwe Aßmann at the University of Karlsruhe (Universität
Karlsruhe) in Germany, with the support from co-author Rainer Neumann. In 2001 the
core system of COMPOST was released as RECODER. It provides a base of analysis
and metaprogramming functionalities relating Java code.[3] Currently part of the code
maintenance is carried by University of Växjö (Växjö Universitet) where several teams
are devoted to optimize and update RECODER's source code.
1.2 Problem
As RECODER is a framework which requires careful and tedious configuration, it has
been decided to integrate the framework into Eclipse IDE, in order to provide a userfriendly interface and a larger degree of automation on performing the code
transformations.
The objective for this thesis is to develop a RECODER GUI based on the Eclipse
Plug-in Framework Architecture. It will serve as a “proof of concept” for a future
evolved Plug-in which will allow the full functionalities of RECODER to be supported,
and maybe further extensibility.
Part of the task will require basic knowledge of RECODER workings, so we will
have to research on how to configure the transformations. Currently the RECODER
manual is more technical-detail oriented rather than usage-oriented.
After that knowledge of the Eclipse Rich-Client Platform (Eclipse RCP) will be
needed, in short, it is necessary to know how the Eclipse Plug-in Architecture
Framework works and which limitations and resources we have at our disposal.
1
1.3 Goal criteria
This section describes the goals we aim to reach in order to solve the problem
previously described in Section 1.2. As a previous step we will need to get a good
understanding on how Eclipse Plug-in Framework Architecture works, and which
resources are at our disposal to design and implement the required task.
As such, we can summarize our goals into the following four points:
•
•
•
•
Develop a GUI for RECODER by taking advantage of Eclipse Plug-in
Framework Architecture (also known as Eclipse Rich-Client Platform)
Provide a user-friendly interface which eases RECODER configuration.
The plug-in must be able to read classpath information and library
dependencies from the Eclipse source project in order to provide an input data
set.
A short technical and end-user documentation is to be provided.
1.4 Motivation
Eclipse Plug-in Architecture Framework (Eclipse Rich-Client Platform) offers a
platform where to develop rapid application deployment. The framework delivers
enough functionality to provide a friendly interface to the user, while keeping inner
logic totally transparent.
Thanks to the widespread of the Eclipse platform, you can deploy the RECODER
directly to the source of the Java project, being able to perform complex behaviour
thanks to the Eclipse API, which allows to pick the project data directly, instead of
solving the dependencies manually.
1.5 Outline
The structure of this paper thesis is as follows:
•
•
•
•
Chapter 2 describes the background behind RECODER and Eclipse Rich-Client
Platform, giving an overview of those technologies.
Chapter 3 deals with the RECODER plug-in itself, explaining the approach
taken to its implementation, and the solution to the problems faced to it.
Chapter 4 gives a more technical view of the plug-in.
Chapter 5 concludes the thesis and describes future work on the plug-in.
2
2 Background
This section presents a brief description of the RECODER framework and the Eclipse
Rich-Client Platform which are referenced through the thesis, and also explains the
necessary concepts to understand properly the platform where the RECODER plug-in is
being developed into. First of all, we will describe RECODER with a more detail, then
a brief overview of the Eclipse Rich-Client Platform (RCP) and by extension, each of
the components which are part of it.
2.1 RECODER framework
RECODER is a Java framework that provides many kinds of analyses and
transformation tools. Its development started as a part of the COMPOST following Prof.
Dr. Uwe Aßmann's idea. The core system, which in 2001 would be released as
RECODER, was implemented by Andreas Ludwig as part of his PhD thesis[4], with the
help of Prof. Dr. Aßmann and co-author Rainer Neumann at the Software Engineering
and Compiler Construction Group leaded by Prof. Dr. Goos at the University of
Karlsruhe.
It provides several features, in different layers:
•
•
•
•
Syntactic level: RECODER is able to perform parsing and unparsing of Java
files, supported by a highly-accurate model, being able to transform while trying
to preserve the comments and formatting information.
Semantic level: RECODER can infer types of expressions and resolve
references, even keeping cross-reference information.
Source level: RECODER contains a library of analyses, code snippet generators
and source code transformations.
Model level: Source level transformations will eventually change the underlying
program model. RECODER can analyse change impacts to the global model and
perform updates automatically.
One of the limitations of the RECODER framework is its complicated command line
structure and configuration for performing some of its advanced features.
2.2 Eclipse Rich-Client Platform
In most of the applications, specially on integrated development environments, all the
functionalities are hard coded into the sources. However, Eclipse IDE makes use of a
plug-in mechanism to provide all of its functionality on the top of the runtime system.
The runtime system of Eclipse is based on Equinox, a OSGi standard compliant
implementation (see Section 2.6).
This plug-in mechanism is in fact a lightweight software component framework. Java
and CVS are provided by the Eclipse SDK, but additional support can be added,
possibly coding different extensions in Java, C, Python and more. They can
subsequently support on different libraries available for each programming language,
providing Eclipse with new functionalities, ranging from typesettings to additional
language support and networking and database embedded applications, like Web
Services support.[5]
The key to this cohesive integration relies on the architecture. Everything in Eclipse
IDE is bundled as a plug-in, with the exception of a small run-time kernel which loads
3
the Framework and all the available plug-ins. In that sense, all the plug-ins are created
equal, and they entangle with Eclipse IDE by using different extension points, from
toolbars, pop-up menus to windows and perspectives which heavily modifies the
environment itself. Eclipse Foundation provides a vast, but basic array of plug-ins, and
gives support to both free and commercial models.
As seen in figure 2.1, the Eclipse Framework Architecture can be divided in three
families of components which work in tandem to provide an application layer to the
plug-ins in order to produce a working functionality. They will be explained in further
sections.
From a bottom – top approach, the lower component family is the runtime-related
one, composed of the core functionalities of Eclipse and the Equinox OSGi framework
implementation.
The second one provides the internal integration of the plug-in by taking advantage
of Java Development Tools for Eclipse (JDT), which allow the plug-in to access Eclipse
resources, as well as the possible external libraries the user can add to a plug-in as a
base for bringing a new functionality into the Eclipse IDE.
The last one is user-interface oriented set of graphical tools for providing a standard
look and feel to the developed plug-ins. This family is made up of the Standard Widget
Toolkit (SWT), a graphical toolkit developed by Eclipse Software Foundation in which
the JFace and Eclipse Workbench extensions lean on to provide further complex
graphical objects and paradigms to the graphical development.
Functionality
JDT
Result
JFace
Development
SWT
Development
Plugin
Eclipse
Workbench
Runtime
Eclipse
Core
Ext.
Libraries
Equinox
OSGi
Fig. 2.1: Overview of Eclipse Framework Architecture
2.3 Standard Widget Toolkit (SWT)
The Standard Widget Toolkit (SWT) is a graphical toolkit for the Java platform. It was
developed by IBM and now is maintained by Eclipse Foundation in tandem with
Eclipse IDE. As such, it is the chosen graphical and widget toolkit for the user interface
layer of Eclipse RCP.[6] We understand “widget” as a graphical object which displays
information for the user inside a user interface, or allow him to interact with it in some
way, as a button or a text area.
4
SWT is not a graphical toolkit per se, but a wrapper around operating system's native
graphical objects. This allows the user interfaces to be portable and keep a look & feel
similar to the platform they are executed on. In that sense has more similarities with the
Abstract Window Toolkit (AWT), the first graphical toolkit for Java. On the other hand,
Swing, the other does not rely as much on the operating system, and it offers a common
look and feel which is independent on all the platforms, as it is due to of being based
into Java SDK instead of relying in native widgets.[7]
The key of SWT architecture lies in the fact that it uses native widgets thanks to
wrapping them on Java code. This helps on performance where in some test cases
outperforms Swing's one. However, the drawback is that for each platform deployed,
the interface needs to be ported every time SWT is released into a new platform. As
SWT is not part of the Java release, SWT is not available for all the platforms Java is,
and platform-dependant libraries must be deployed together with different versions of
the application. As SWT is just an extra layer that communicates the native interface
with Java, it is prone to be affected by platform-specific bugs.[8] However, as part of the
Eclipse RCP, no additional requirements will be needed for development, as it
guarantees portability and extensibility through all platforms supported by Eclipse IDE.
In Figure, 2.2, a compared overview of the three graphical toolkit architectures is
shown.
SWT
Architecture
AWT
Architecture
Swing
Architecture
User Interface
User Interface
User Interface
SWT
AWT
Swing
Java Native
Interface
AWT
High-Level OS UI Functions
Low-Level OS UI Functions
Fig. 2.2: Comparison between SWT, AWT and Swing architectures.
2.4 JFace
SWT does not provide a Model-View-Controller (MVC) architecture, the architectural
pattern in which the data (“model”) is decoupled from the actual way it is displayed (the
“view”) and the logic which processes it (the “controller”). This is provided by the
JFace library, which offers a platform-independent MVC abstraction on top of SWT,
providing more advanced and complex elements than the original toolkit does, like tree
5
views, tables and structured elements to provide data presentations.
It is composed of several packages, but the most relevant are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
provides an interface to commonly shared UI resources as menu,
status and tool bars.
jface.dialogs provide dialog support.
jface.resource provide support for managing resources such as fonts or
images.
jface.text provides resources for text files IO handling.
jface.viewer provides a framework for model-based viewers, content adapters
for SWT widgets.
jface.windows provides support for window handling.
jface.wizard provides support frameworks for wizards.
jface.action
JFace is completely dependent on SWT, however SWT is not on JFace. The Eclipse
Workbench is built both on SWT and JFace.[9][10]
2.5 Eclipse Workbench
The Eclipse Workbench is a set of tools, menus, editors, views and perspectives, where
all the jobs will be carried out. It aims to integrate a set of tools provided by the
different plug-ins installed in the system. It is in fact, the development environment, and
in any given moment, one or more Workbench windows can be opened out. Figure 2.3
illustrates the Java development perspective of Eclipse IDE.
Each Workbench window contains one or more perspectives. A perspective defines
the disposition of the views and the general layout of them. Each perspective provides a
set of functionalities related to a specific aspect of the development, working with the
same type of resources or accomplish a specific task. However, only one perspective
can be activated at a time.
A perspective control manages the content of menus and toolbars. These controls are
fully customizable by the user or by the developer, defining action sets the perspective
is able to handle.
The views within the perspective have the aim to provide interaction with the
information contained in it. They can offer alternative presentations to the data the user
is handling.
The editors can be defined as a special view specialized in showing and modifying
data. Usually one perspective is comprised of an editor and several views surrounding
it.[11]
All these components are advanced widgets which perform complex behaviours.
These are based on SWT and JFace components, and as the rest of the Eclipse RCP are
fully customizable and expendable, so they can show almost anything the developer
thinks of.
A plug-in can consist up to several views and perspectives which takes charge of a
certain functionality. An example of this is, for example, the C/C++ development plugin, which changes drastically the Java editor, adding Makefile editor support and several
properties pages regarding C/C++ development.
All the Workbench graphical resources can be found under the packages labeled as
org.eclipse.ui.*.
6
Fig. 2.3: An overview of Java development perspective in Eclipse IDE 3.4
2.6 Equinox OSGi
The Open Service Gateway Initiative (OSGi) is a consortium founded by IBM,
Ericsson, Oracle and Sun Microystems. It is also known as Dynamic Module System for
Java. This platform defines the framework for deploying fully modular applications.
Equinox is the implementation of the OSGi R4 core specification directly into Eclipse
runtime.[12]
The point of the OSGi platform is based on deploying the application as a set of
services which are able to interact between them, rather that as a whole, stand-alone
program. These services can be dynamically discovered at runtime and bound to other
parts of the application. Since these services are bound dynamically, these parts of the
system can be stopped, removed and updated in runtime without taking offline the
whole application.
In that sense, Eclipse RCP consist of a series of functionalities that are implemented
as a set of plug-ins, by reusing parts of the already defined core services and framework.
This plug-ins comes as a “bundle”. A bundle is a highly-coupled set of collection,
classes, libraries and configuration files that can be dynamically loaded. They must
explicitly declare their external dependencies.
The OSGi framework comes divided in several overlapping layers, as shown in
Figure 2.4:
•
•
•
•
Bundles: These are small Java applications with additional explicit manifest
files
Services: This layer connects the bundles by offering a publish-discover-bind
listeners for Java objects.
Registry: The API for managing services, providing registration, service
tracking and references to the service.
Life-Cycle: The API for bundle managing, providing execution services like
7
•
•
•
install, uninstall, start, stop and update.
Modules: This layer defines the encapsulation level and dependency behaviour
of the different bundles, in the sense of how an application manages its input and
output data.
Security: This module wraps all the previous ones by limiting bundle access to
the predefined functionalities.
Execution Environment: Defines which methods are available for a specific
platform. This is a pluggable interface, as Java is constantly evolving. Currently
it supports the most popular implementations of Java Virtual Machines. [13]
Application/Bundles
Services
Life-cycle
Security
Service Registry
Modules
Java VM
Operating System
Hardware
Fig. 2.4: Description of an OSGi-compliant platform.
2.7 Java Development Tools (JDT)
Java Development Tools (JDT) is a set of tool plug-ins which provides support to Java
development, including Eclipse plug-ins. It includes perspectives, views and editors to
add to an Eclipse Workbench regarding Java development, as many code beautification,
refactoring tools and wizards.
The components of the JDT are able to act on its own, and are also entangled to
provide a full development perspective or as a pluggable module for third-party
applications. The list of components is as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
jdt.apt: Adds
annotation support for Java 5 projects in Eclipse.
jdt.core: Contains the non UI infrastructure mostly regarding the
transformation and managing of Java code and structures.
jdt.debug: Provides the execution environment of the JDT, being able to
communicate to any JDPA-compliant (Java Debugger Platform Architecture)
Java VM, and launch Run or Debug modes.
jdt.text: Offers non-invasive source code services like syntax highlight,
documentation assist and code formatting.
jdt.ui: Implements specific Workbench contributions like Eclipse Package
Explorer, hierarchy views and it is able to locate and update references to
packages, types, classes, methods and fields.[14][15]
8
2.8 Basics of Plug-in Development in Eclipse
In order to develop a plug-in into the Eclipse Rich Client Application, we can directly
define a plug-in project inside the IDE itself. It is a special project type which bundles
some additional information into a XML file called “plugin.xml”. This will serve as a
cornerstone for the rest of the development.
That the plug-in is included in what we would call a “subset of Java projects”, means
that we can treat it as a standard Eclipse Java project. Here is where the flexibility of the
Eclipse RCP comes into play: we can easily attach an external library to the project,
providing in first place its functionalities to the IDE on a real easy way. Any .jarbundled library or API can be plugged into a plug-in, being able to add almost any
functionality desired to the Eclipse IDE.
Most of the plug-in related inner configuration is made through Eclipse RCP's
“plugin.xml” editor. While most of the actual coding will happen on a standard Java
editor, the way that code entangles with the application itself is described editing
manually plugin.xml or interacting with the editor itself. The plug-in is fully
configurable and the editor will reflect the changes made to the XML and vice versa, so
the developer can use different levels of depth when defining his plug-in features.
The plugin.xml is divided into several tabs, as shown in figure 2.5 and described as
follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Overview: Contains the general description of the plug-in ,allowing different
basic options to be edited and provides links to several more advances features
of the editor. It also contains basic instructions on the plug-in's basic operations.
Dependencies: This tab describes which internal libraries does the plug-in
depend on. It also provides several dependency-related tools, like a circulardependency, unused and plug-in dependencies scanner.
Runtime: In this tab the external dependencies (i.e. RECODER library) are
declared. This tab also allows the user to define visibility constraints to other
plug-ins, not allowing other attached systems to make use of the resources
available for the plug-in.
Extensions: Here are specified which parts of the graphical interface will be
extended when the plug-in will be installed. The RCP allows to define new
buttons on tool bars, menus and sub-menus, even new perspectives, views and
editors.
Extension points: The extension points define the outside interfaces our plug-in
provide. In Eclipse RCP the plug-ins are not only thought to be stand-alone sets
of functionalities. They can interact between each other, combining themselves
to provide highly-sophisticated behaviours.
Build: This tab allows the user to exclude some parts of the project from the
binary build (.jar file) and/or the source build (source code). In that sense, a
developer could add proprietary code which does not want to reveal on the
source build of its plug-in.
Plugin.xml: This tab is the actual editor of the XML files. It is a simple XMl
editor. The changes made to the XML, if correct, will be reflected on the
advanced editor and vice versa.
Build.properties: It is a special text editor for editing the building
configurations.
9
Fig. 2.5: Plugin.xml editor.
2.9 Building and installing the plug-in
We have described how to integrate the plug-in with Eclipse interface and the actual
design and coding processes. This means we have a lot of related graphical, logical and
meta resources ready for deployment, but we have to perform the actual building of the
plug-in.
A plug-in is bundled as a special .jar file which contains the compiled sources,
optionally the uncompiled sources, the plugin.xml generated during our development
and the resources needed to properly work (help files, icons, etc...).
In order to deploy a version of the plug-in is necessary to have the source code of it
loaded into Eclipse workspace. Under “File...” menu or by right-clicking on the Java
Navigator view the “Export...” command will be available. A tree of different exporting
options will appear. We will be interested on “Plug-in development” section. An
example of this is shown in Figure 2.6.
From the three options, to deploy a plug-in we require to click on “Deployable plugins and fragments”. This will lead us to the next part of the Deployment Wizard. In this
page the available deployable plug-in projects will appear on a list. A developer can
choose to deploy a single, stand-alone plugin, or bundle several in a .zip file or a
directory.
Also, there are additional options available like:
•
•
•
•
Including uncompiled source files.
Bundling all the plug-ins projects into individual .jar files for modularity.
Saving the ANT script for further generation.
Sign the jar file.
10
As stated earlier this will generate the .zip file or the directory as chosen. Inside of
any of them a .jar file with the name of the plug-in project and its version. This jar file
can be copied to any Eclipse release, independently of the platform, to gain access to, in
this case, RECODER transformation functionalities.
Fig. 2.6: Screenshot of the Plug-in Deployment Wizard.
11
3 Implementation
In this chapter we will talk about the approach we took on integrating RECODER into
Eclipse IDE. First we will review the thesis objective on a general outline, based on the
information we gathered from the previous chapter. Secondly we will explain in more
detail how a plug-in is actually developed under Eclipse RCP, and the tools available for
the process. Next, the different aspects of the development will be described in detail,
including design issues, graphical integration with Eclipse and RECODER integration
with the plug-in.
3.1 Approach: Integrating RECODER
The idea behind the RECODER integration is to provide a simple, easy to use interface
to the framework, merging it into Eclipse IDE Java perspective. The bulk of RECODER
configuration consists of defining the classpaths and library dependencies of the project,
and that is the part we want to ease as much as possible.
Thus, we are substituting the generic Java project by a configured Eclipse-managed
Java Project, this is, a set of Java sources with additional information about it retrieved
or generated by Eclipse IDE itself. By using JDT core API we can freely access and
manage the underlying Eclipse interface, getting access to the resources this provides.
First of all, the path needs to be extracted from the user input project selection. Then,
RECODER will be configured calling its execution method and specifying the right
parameters such as the input path extracted and worked before. Meanwhile, exclude
files are taken into consideration to avoid their transformation. Finally, transformations
executed by RECODER method will be stored in the output folder specified by the
user. This is shown in the figure 3.1 as follows:
RECODER
Wizard
Query JDT interface
Eclipse
Project
Retrieve Project Data
Configure RECODER
RECODER
Transform Project
Transformed
Output
Fig. 3.1: Overview of the thesis objective
12
3.2 Graphical Integration with Eclipse
In order to graphically integrate RECODER we have decided to take the approach of
building a easy, intuitive Wizard which will be executed from a button in the tool bar. It
was previously experimented with other different approaches, like a drop down menu
addition into the Navigator view or addition to the top menu bar. However, we decided
that in terms of visibility and accessibility the chosen way is the best, as both menus are
extensions of the tool bars and as such, they provide extra functionalities which
obscures the user's sight, and tool bar provides also a visual aid the user can easily
recognize, even integrating with it with Eclipse's look and feel.
Defining the new Extension to the plug-in requires several steps. First of all it is
required to define the extension point itself in plugin.xml. This is done as an extension
of org.eclipse.ui.actionSets. This contains the elements necessary to extend the
common menus, tool bars and pop-up menus common to all the perspectives.
As an element is fully customizable, being able to define the behaviour of more than
ten properties, however, we will focus on the basic necessary declarations to define an
extension point of the UI. The one used on the proof-of-concept is defined as:
<extension id="NewRecoderAction"
name="Recoder Proof-of-concept Transformation"
point="org.eclipse.ui.actionSets">
…
</extension>
As seen, the basic outlying of an extension point of the UI (not to be mistaken with
Extension Points for plug-in interface) requires at least:
•
•
•
Unique identifier for the extension.
The alternative name which will be given to the extension point. In case
of menus or buttons, this is also the name which will take when shown
graphically.
point: This is the extension point of the UI. In this case we are defining an
action. Other different extension points include, without being the full list:
◦ Perspectives
◦ Editors
◦ Views
◦ Drop down menus
id field:
name:
Additional simple level configurable properties are, for instance, visibility (visible,
default TRUE) or description.
After that we cannot use an existing actionSet, as it is already defined and closed,
like Source or Run. We have to define our own and customize it. This again allows the
edition of several properties which are not interesting to the point of the project. The
basic definition of a new actionSet is like follows:
<actionSet id="recoder.actionSet"
label="Recoder Actions"
visible="true">
…
</actionSet>
13
Again the definition requires at least a unique identifier, and a label, in order to show
a certain title within the UI. Although implied, the visibility tag has been enabled as
true.
Now is the point to define the different actions our actionSet will provide. As this is a
proof-of-concept, only one is required, however a full-functional plug-in can hold
dozens of actions which can be customized to the point of appearing only if the selected
item matches some kind of class. In our case:
<action id="recoder.wizard.RunWizardAction"
label="New Proof-of-Concept transformation"
menubarPath="file/new.ext"
toolbarPath="org.eclipse.ui.workbench.file/new.ext"
icon="icons/RecoderIcon16.GIF"
tooltip="Starts the New Recoder Proof-of-Concept transformation"
class="recoder.wizard.RunWizardAction">
</action>
As we are defining the actual action, new properties need to be defined:
•
•
•
•
menubarPath / toolbarPath: An action can be inserted simultaneously into a
menu and a tool bar. Eclipse IDE has a toolbar per default menu, as it is usual
that many important actions able to be performed have an entry on their
correspondent menu and its subsequent tool bar.
icon: As we are defining an action, it will be visually nice to have some sort of
visual aid to click the correspondent action in the tool bar.
tooltip: Self-explanatory, the UI will allow a small description of the action to
pop-up if the mouse hovers over the action itself.
class: This field will trigger the class / method which will perform the desired
operation.
After that we will have defined the appearance of our proof-of-concept action into
the Eclipse IDE Java Perspective.
Other interesting properties not needed to be defined in our XML but useful for
future development will be mentioned in the next table:[16]
enablesFor [!, ?, +,
Enables this action for [0, 0 or 1,
2+, n, *]
1 or more, 2 or more, n items only,
any] items selected.
style [push, radio,
Attribute to define the user
toggle, pulldown]
interface style type for the action. If
omitted, then it is push by default.
hoverIcon
Defines an icon for when the
mouse is hovering over it.
14
The results of the implementation of the extension point can be seen as a result in
Figure 3.2.
Fig. 3.2 : Screenshot of the defined action button of the plug-in.
3.3 Wizard introduction
A wizard is a help mechanism in an application that makes an easy usage to the user
through different pages with the goal of performing a task.
TheWizard consists in two different pages which interact with the user specifying a
new runnable configuration for RECODER in turn. On one hand, the first wizard page
provides a button called 'Browse' which when clicked, gives the possibility to choose a
project within workspace in order to configure the input path needs. (Figure 3.3)
On the other hand, the second wizard page shows a system tree where the user
should choose a folder, in order to specify where RECODER transformations files will
be stored. (Figure 3.4)
Fig. 3.3: RECODER Transformation Wizard page 1.
15
Fig. 3.4: RECODER Transformation Wizard page 2
3.4 Wizard Implementation
Wizard implementation is based upon Wizard class provided by IBM Corporation. This
class handles all methods that a wizard needs to build an entirely guide graphical
interface. Within these methods it is noteworthy that addPage, setWindowTitle,
setDialogSettings, performCancel and performFinish are the most important
ones.
The method performFinish is called when user presses the finish button to execute
transformations. In addition, it is the responsible of all logical operations. Getting
classpath configuration is one of the major task required by RECODER to specify the
right input path together with the source project selected by the user. Getting the output
path selected by the user and calling the execute RECODER class with the input and
output path as parameters are tasks that this method performs as well.
Besides the Wizard class, it is necessary to have two classes which interface
components are described. These classes are RecoderWizardPage and
RecoderWizardPage2. Both classes perform different methods to handle needs required
such as a browser with workspace projects or a complete system folder tree.
3.5 Wizard RECODER integration
RECODER role consists in executing the transformation with the right configuration
given by the user through input and output path. A separate package has been created
with a 'Test' class which makes use of configuration and execution actions of
RECODER.
RECODER requires some input and output configurations to make this framework
works as user needs. On one hand, an input path has to be chosen by the user in order to
select which project will be transformed by RECODER. Furthermore, this input path
needs to contain all resources attached to the project selected such as libraries and other
projects needed for compilation. On the other hand, the user shall have the possibility to
16
choose an output path where all transformed code will be written to.
3.6 Applying JDT interface to extract Project Information
RECODER plug-in needs some hard configurations to specify the right input path,
which is made up by different paths separated with semicolons. These paths consist in
classpath configuration properties of the project selected by the user. There are three
different properties that must be taken in consideration: source folders, required projects
and .jar folders on the build path.
Source folders provide important relevant information about include and exclude
files within the project. As projects may not be compiled, Eclipse supports one property
which files or packages can be excluded from compilation. Users have the possibility to
configure this property before executing RECODER plug-in in order to make a project
compiles and exclude those files of transformation.
Required projects and .jar folders are necessary for the project selected by the user,
to be compiled.
JDT offers some important methods to access these classpath and workspace
configurations as are described in next figure.
IWorkspace workspace1 = ResourcesPlugin.getWorkspace();
IJavaModel javaModel = JavaCore.create(workspace1.getRoot());
IJavaProject projects[] = null;
try {projects = javaModel.getJavaProjects();}
IClasspathEntry[] entry = projects[j].getResolvedClasspath(false);
case IclasspathEntry.CPE_SOURCE:{
// Exclude files configuration
exclude = entry[i].getExclusionPatterns();}
case IclasspathEntry.CPE_PROJECT:{
// Projects attached}
case IclasspathEntry.CPE_LIBRARY:{
//Jar libraries attached}
Once the user chooses the input project, the plug-in reads the classpath configuration
properties and depending on which property, the path is added to the input path or some
changes need to be done before. In projects and libraries related, the path is added
without any change required. However, source folders need a special treatment.
Excluding files can be done in different cases: excluding file by file or excluding a
package which will automatically exclude files inside them.
For instance, if the user selects the project called 'myproject' and it contains one
package called 'exclude', the result transformation will not take the exclude package
java classes in consideration for the result. As next figure shows, exclude package
changes its icon to a folder once is configured to exclude.
17
Execute RECODER
transformation
Fig. 3.5: Overview of the plug-in transforming process.
This last operation success thanks to a filter which gives the possibility to leave
those exclude files out of transformation. The filter consists in a method which accepts
or denies files. As a exclude List is given as a parameter while calling execute method,
it forces to accept the Java classes which are not include in that list.
public void execute(String inputPath,String outputPath,final IPath[] exclude,
final List excludeFolder)
FilenameFilter filter = new FilenameFilter(){
public boolean accept(File dir, String name) {
List childrenExclude = null;
for (int i=0;i<exclude.length;i++){
if(exclude[i].toString().equals(name) || !(name.endsWith(".java")) ||
excludeFolders.contains(name) ){
return false;
}
}
return true;
}
};
Finally, RECODER takes the right input and output path calling the final execute
transformation method.
CrossReferenceServiceConfiguration sc = new CrossReferenceServiceConfiguration();
sc.getProjectSettings().setProperty(PropertyNames.INPUT_PATH, inputPath);
sc.getProjectSettings().setProperty(PropertyNames.OUTPUT_PATH, outputPath);
new TransformAll(sc).execute();
18
4 Technical Documentation
In this section we will describe technically how the plug-in is implemented by showing
its class diagram.
The core of the plug-in is, as shown in Figure 4.1, built around the RecoderWizard
class.
This
is
an
extension
of
a
JFace
Wizard
class
(org.eclipse.jface.wizards.Wizard) and implementation of a new INewWizard
interface (org.eclipse.ui.INewWizard). This is the actual RECODER wizard
described in Section 3.3.
This
wizard
makes
use
of
two
extended
WizardPages
(org.eclipse.jface.wizard.WizardPage),
RecoderWizardPage
and
RecoderWizardPage2 to provide the interface shown in Figures 3.3 and 3.4 respectively.
The RECODER wizard method performFinish() includes the actual code shown
in Section 3.6 to call the execute(string, string, Ipath[], ArrayList) which
performs the transformation, provided by Test class, which in turn will communicate
as necessary with the RECODER library.
Fig. 4.1: Class diagram of the RECODER plug-in.
19
5 Conclusion and future work
This last chapter summarizes the results of the thesis. It will point out up to which
extent the problems posed in the Section 1.3 have been solved and the criteria fulfilled.
It will also further discuss the directions of future developments over the
implementation.
5.1 Conclusion
As described in Section 1.3 of this thesis report, we described the problems posed to us
as:
•
•
•
•
Develop a GUI for RECODER by taking advantage of Eclipse Plug-in
Framework Architecture (also known as Eclipse Rich-Client Platform)
Provide an user-friendly interface which can ease RECODER configuration.
The plug-in must be able to read classpath information and library
dependencies from the Eclipse source project in order to provide an input data
set.
A short technical and end-user documentation which is to be provided.
As shown in Sections 3.2 and 3.3, we have developed a user interface into Eclipse.
We have taken advantage of the extensibility of the Eclipse Rich-Client Platform and
lean on its graphical components, JFace and Eclipse Workbench to integrate it into the
Eclipse IDE platform.
We used JFace and Eclipse Workbench dependent widgets to build a proof-ofconcept Wizard which allows the user to quickly map the resources inside his Eclipsemanaged Java projects to the RECODER configuration by selecting a source project and
an output folder, being able to perform the transformation way easier than if configuring
it manually, and as such, getting rid of the nuisance of manually pointing the Java
classpath and project sources, a very error-prone and sometimes confusing task. In that
sense we believe we have achieved the improvement on user-friendlyness. The Wizard
has been shown in Figures 3.3 and 3.4.
The plug-in also makes use of the core API of Eclipse to read the project
dependencies and sources, and as as sub-task we have been able to sort out excluded
sources within the project, ensuring that only user-chosen source files come into play
when performing the transformation. In that sense, we have included an additional layer
of configuration to RECODER, by taking advantage of some features already
implemented into the IDE.
As stated on the previous chapter, and as on Appendix A, expand more the technical
and end-user documentation.
We have, thus, fulfilled all our goal criteria.
5.2 Future work
The proof-of-concept implementation of RECODER plug-in serves its purpose on
deliver an example of the potential of Eclipse RCP for presenting this and other many
frameworks on an easier way and on a natural environment for their application.
Currently the plug-in only performs one single “proof-of-concept” transformation of
the sources. The next step on development would be to integrate the full transformations
library into the plug-in. In that sense RECODER could provide a more plug-in oriented
20
configuration interface to produce more reusable pieces of code. However, it is the plugin duty to adapt to RECODER design and not the other way around.
In terms of design, the plug-in could offer more extensibility by some kind of
additional information on which transformations are available to the plug-in, so it is
adaptable to different versions of the RECODER library.
Graphically, the plug-in delivers an easy to use interface through a button placed in
the tool bars. This will display the Project Transformation Wizard. However, the Wizard
could have been made additionally available through specific RECODER menu
extension into the menu bar, and into a drop down menu into the Java Navigator.
By using the API provided by the Java Navigator, the transformations could be
applied specifically to only packages or single source files, or load the Project
automatically into the Wizard instead of picking it manually from the Chooser.
It should be also desirable that, as we are working inside Eclipse IDE, the source
Eclipse Java project should be transformed into a new Eclipse Java project.
21
References
[1] Tiobe Programming Community Index. (09/05/08)
http://www.tiobe.com/index.php/content/paperinfo/tpci/index.html
[2] Eclipse Software Foundation. “Eclipse Download Page”. (09/05/09)
http://www.eclipse.org/downloads
[3] Rainer Neumann, Uwe Aßmann. “RECODER Manual”, 2008
[4] Andreas Ludwig, Automatische Transformation großer Softwaresysteme, dec 2002
[5] Eclipse Plugin Central. (09/05/09) http://www.eclipseplugincentral.com/
[6] “Why does Eclipse use SWT?”. (09/05/13)
http://wiki.eclipse.org/FAQ_Why_does_Eclipse_use_SWT%3F
[7] Manilli, Mauro. “Swing and SWT: A Tale of Two Java GUI Libraries”. (09/05/15)
http://www.developer.com/java/other/article.php/2179061
[8] Steve Northover & Carolyn MacLeod, (2001). “Creating your own Widgets using
SWT”. (09/05/15) http://www.eclipse.org/articles/Article-Writing%20Your%20Own
%20Widget/Writing%20Your%20Ow%20Widget.htm
[9] Eclipse Software Foundation. “The JFace UI Framework”. (09/05/16)
http://help.eclipse.org/help32/index.jsp?
topic=/org.eclipse.platform.doc.isv/guide/jface.htm
[10] Eclipse Software Foundation. “Eclipse API Reference”. (09/05/18)
http://help.eclipse.org/help32/index.jsp?
topic=/org.eclipse.platform.doc.isv/reference/api/overview-summary.html
[11] The Eclipse Workbench. (09/05/18) http://gild.cs.uvic.ca/student
%20docs/workbench.html
[12] Eclipse Software Foundation. “Equinox”.(09/05/18)
http://www.eclipse.org/equinox/
[13] Wikipedia. “OSGi”.(09/05/18) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OSGi
[14] Eclipse Software Foundation. "JDT Programmer's Guide".(09/05/19)
http://help.eclipse.org/ganymede/topic/org.eclipse.jdt.doc.isv/guide/jdt_int.htm
[15] Eclipse Software Foundation. “JDT API Reference”.(09/05/19)
http://help.eclipse.org/ganymede/topic/org.eclipse.jdt.doc.isv/reference/api/overviewsummary.html
[16] Eclipse Software Foundation. “Eclipse Extension Points Reference”.(09/05/19)
http://help.eclipse.org/help32/index.jsp?
topic=/org.eclipse.platform.doc.isv/reference/extension-points/index.html
22
Appendix A: End-User Manual
This manual explains how to install and make use of RECODER plug-in in Eclipse.
A.1 Installing RECODER plug-in into Eclipse IDE
The RECODER plug-in package consists of the Eclipse Project source code and the
compiled plug-in jar. In order to install it, the user only needs to extract
RecoderPlugin_[version].jar into the “plugin” sub folder inside the Eclipse IDE
installation.
Tip: Sometimes Eclipse's cache is not properly updated. In that case try to run
“eclipse -clean” for forcing the cache cleaning.
A.2 Accessing RECODER plug-in functionality
Once the installation is complete, a new icon should be available in the tool bar.
Clicking on it will provide access to the Proof-of-Concept Transformation, by opening
the RECODER Transformation Wizard.
Fig. A.1: Location of RECODER plug-in transformation icon.
23
A.3 Select Input Path
The first page is a simple button together with a selection screen which will lead to a
Folder Selection Dialog. The Folder Selection Dialog is constrained inside Eclipse's
Workspace and will allow available Eclipse projects to be selected.
The user is able to cancel the transformation at any time by clicking the “Cancel”
button. Once a project is selected, the “Next >” button will be available for the next step
in the transformation.
Fig. A.2: Project Selection Dialog for configuring Eclipse Source Project
24
A.4 Select Output Path
This second Wizard page provides a folder system tree which the user can navigate in
order to choose the output folder. In this output folder, RECODER will output the result
of the transformation.
Once a folder is selected, the “Finish” button will enable, allowing the plug-in to
perform the transformation.
Tip: Watch out that the Project is configured properly. The plug-in can read which files are
excluded from the compilation. However due to RECODER's nature, a non-compiling
Project will not be able to transform.
Fig. A.3: Folder selection for outputting RECODER transformation.
25
A.5 Results
Results are produced from those Java files configured in the selected Eclipse project. An
Eclipse project can have source files or even packages excluded from the compilation.
These files won't be mapped into the transformation.
The results will be outputted in the chosen folder structured as they were in the
Eclipse project, providing they are not subjected to change by the transformation.
Fig. A.4: Overview of an example transformation output.
A.6 Updating RECODER plug-in
In order to update the RECODER plug-in, it is necessary to remove the previous
RECODER plug-in jar files in “plugin” sub folder of Eclipse IDE installation path, and
install the new version as stated in section A.1.
A.7 Uninstalling RECODER plug-in
In order to uninstall RECODER plug-in, it is necessary to remove the previous
RECODER plug-in jar files in “plugin” sub folder of Eclipse IDE installation path, and
restart the IDE.
26
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http://www.vxu.se/msi/
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