Chapter 3 - AutomationDirect

Chapter 3 - AutomationDirect
CPU SPECIFICATIONS AND
OPERATION
CHAPTER
34
In This Chapter:
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3–2
CPU Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3–3
CPU Hardware Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3–4
CPU Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3–11
I/O Response Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3–15
CPU Scan Time Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3–18
Memory Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3–22
DL05 System V-memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3–26
DL05 Aliases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3–29
X Input Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3–30
Y Output Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3–30
Control Relay Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3–31
Stage Control/Status Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3–32
Timer Status Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3–32
Counter Status Bit Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3–33
Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
1 Introduction
The Central Processing Unit (CPU) is the heart of the Micro PLC. Almost all PLC
operations are controlled by the CPU, so it is important that it is set up correctly. This
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chapter provides the information needed to understand:
• Steps required to set up the CPU
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• Operation of ladder programs
• Organization of Variable Memory
4
5
DL05
PLC
2 Comm.
CPU
6
Ports
Main
7
Power
Supply
8
Input Circuit
Output Circuit
9
10
NOTE: The High-Speed I/O function (HSIO) consists of dedicated but configurable hardware in the
DL05. It is not considered part of the CPU, because it does not execute the ladder program. For more
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on HSIO operation, see Appendix E.
12 DL05 CPU Features
The DL05 Micro PLC which has 6K words of memory comprised of 2K of ladder memory
and
4K words of V-memory (data registers). Program storage is in the FLASH memory which
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is a part of the CPU board in the PLC. In addition, there is RAM with the CPU which will
store system parameters, V-memory, and other data which is not in the application program.
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The RAM is backed up by a “super-capacitor”, storing the data for several hours in the event
of a power outage. The capacitor automatically charges during powered operation of the PLC.
A
The DL05 supports fixed I/O which includes eight discrete input points and six output
points. If more than the fourteen fixed I/O points are needed, select an I/O module for your
application from the DL05/06 Option Modules User Manual. This module will plug into the
B
expansion slot.
Over 120 different instructions are available for program development as well as extensive
C
internal diagnostics that can be monitored from the application program or from an operator
interface. Chapters 5, 6, and 7 provide detailed descriptions of the instructions.
D
The DL05 provides two built-in RS232C communication ports, so you can easily connect a
To Programming Device
or Operator Interface
Power
Input
8 Discrete Inputs Commons
6 Discrete Outputs Commons
handheld programmer, operator interface, or a personal computer without needing any
additional hardware.
3–2
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Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
CPU Specifications
Specifications
Feature
Total Program memory (words)
Ladder memory (words)
Total V-memory (words)
User V-memory (words)
Non-volatile V-Memory (words)
Contact execution (boolean)
Typical scan (1k boolean)
RLL Ladder Style Programming
RLL and RLLPLUS Programming
Run Time Edits
Supports Overrides
Scan
Handheld programmer
DirectSOFT 5 programming for Windows.
Built-in communication ports (RS232C)
FLASH Memory
Local Discrete I/O points available
Local Analog input / output channels maximum
High-Speed I/O (quad., pulse out, interrupt, pulse catch, etc.)
I/O Point Density
Number of instructions available (see Chapter 5 for details)
Control relays
Special relays (system defined)
Stages in RLLPLUS
Timers
Counters
Immediate I/O
Interrupt input (external/timed)
Subroutines
For/Next Loops
Math
Drum Sequencer Instruction
Time of Day Clock/Calendar
Internal diagnostics
Password security
System error log
User error log
Battery backup
DL05
6K
2048
4096
3968
128
2.0us
2.7–3.2ms
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Variable / fixed
Yes
Yes
Yes
Standard on CPU
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None
Yes, 2
8 inputs, 6 outputs
129
512
512
256
128
128
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Integer
Yes
Only with the optional Memory Cartridge
Yes
Yes
No
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6
7
8
9
10
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No
No (built–in super–cap)
Yes, with memory cartridge
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Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
1 CPU Hardware Setup
Communication Port Pinout Diagrams
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Cables are available that allow you to quickly and easily connect a Handheld Programmer or a
personal computer to the DL05 PLCs. However, if you need to build your own cables, use
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the pinout information shown below. The DL05 PLCs require an RJ-12 phone plug to fit the
built-in jacks.
The Micro PLC has two built-in RS232C communication ports. Port 1 is generally used for
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connecting to a D2-HPP, a PC with DirectSOFT, operator interface, Modbus slave, or a
DirectNET slave. The baud rate is fixed at 9600 baud. Port 2 can be used to connect to a D25
HPP, DirectSOFT, operator interface, Modbus master/slave, or a DirectNET master/slave.
Port 2 has a range of speeds from 300 baud to 38.4K baud.
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NOTE: The 5V pins are rated at 220mA maximum, primarily for use with some operator interface
units.
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Port 1 Pin Descriptions
Port 2 Pin Descriptions
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9 6-pin Female
Modular Connector
10
11
12
13
Top View
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A
B
C
D
1234 5 6
1
2
3
4
5
6
0V
5V
RXD
TXD
5V
0V
Power (–) connection (GND)
Power (+) connection
Receive Data (RS232C)
Transmit Data (RS232C
Power (+) conection
Power (–) connection (GND)
1
2
3
4
5
6
0V
5V
RXD
TXD
RTS
0V
Power (–) connection (GND)
Power (+) connection
Receive Data (RS232C)
Transmit Data (RS232C
Request to Send
Power (–) connection (GND)
1
1
Communication Port 1
Communication Port 2
Com 1 Connects to HPP, DirectSOFT,
operator interfaces, etc.
6-pin, RS232C
9600 Baud (Fixed)
Parity - odd (default)
Station address 1 (fixed)
8 data bits
1 start, 1 stop bit
Asynchronous, Half-duplex, DTE
Protocol: (Auto-Select)
K sequence (Slave only)
Com 2 Connects to HPP, DirectSOFT,
operator interfaces, etc.
6-pin, RS232C
Communication speed (baud)
300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800,
9600, 19200, 38400
Parity - odd (default), even, none
Station address 1 (default)
8 data bits
1 start, 1 stop bit
Asynchronous, Half-duplex, DTE
Protocol: (Auto-Select)
K sequence (Slave only)
DirectNET (Slave only)
Modbus RTU (Slave only)
DirectNET (Master/Slave)
Modbus RTU (Master/Slave)
Non-sequence/Print
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Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
Connecting the Programming Devices
If you’re using a Personal Computer with the DirectSOFT 5 programming package, you can
connect the computer to either of the DL05’s programming ports. For an engineering office
environment (typical during program development), this is the preferred method of
programming.
Use cable part no.
D2–DSCBL
The Handheld programmer is connected to the CPU with a handheld programmer cable.
This device can be used for maintaining existing installations or making small program
changes whenever a PC is not available. The handheld programmer is shipped with a cable,
which is approximately 6.5 feet (200 cm) long.
(cable comes with HPP)
For replacement
cable, use part #
DV–1000CBL
CPU Setup Information
Even if you have years of experience using PLCs, there are a few things you need to do before
you can start entering programs. This section includes some basic things, such as changing
the CPU mode, but it also includes some things that you may never have to use. Here’s a brief
list of the items that are discussed. Selecting and Changing the CPU Modes
• Using Auxiliary Functions
• Clearing the program (and other memory areas)
• How to initialize system memory
• Setting retentive memory ranges
The following paragraphs provide the setup information necessary to get the CPU ready for
programming. They include setup instructions for either type of programming device you are
using. The D2–HPP Handheld Programmer Manual provides the Handheld keystrokes
required to perform all of these operations. The DirectSOFT 5 Programming Software User
Manual provides a description of the menus and keystrokes required to perform the setup
procedures.
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Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
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Mode Switch
Status
Indicators
Status Indicators
The status indicator LEDs on the CPU front panels have specific functions which can help in
programming and troubleshooting.
Indicator
PWR
RUN
CPU
TX1
RX1
TX2
RX2
Status
Meaning
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
Blinking
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
Power good
Power failure
CPU is in Run Mode
CPU is in Stop or program Mode
CPU is in upgrade Mode
CPU self diagnostics error
CPU self diagnostics good
Data is being transmitted by the CPU - Port 1
No data is being transmitted by the CPU - Port 1
Data is being received by the CPU - Port 1
No data is being received by the CPU - Port 1
Data is being transmitted by the CPU - Port 2
No data is being transmitted by the CPU - Port 2
Data is being received by the CPU - Port 2
No data is being received by the CPU - Port 2
Mode Switch Functions
The mode switch on the DL05 PLC provides positions for enabling and disabling program
changes in the CPU. Unless the mode switch is in the TERM position, RUN and STOP
mode changes will not be allowed by any interface device, (handheld programmer,
DirectSOFT 5 programing package or operator interface). Programs may be viewed or
monitored but no changes may be made. If the switch is in the TERM position and no
program password is in effect, all operating modes as well as program access will be allowed
through the connected programming or monitoring device.
NOTE: If the DL05 is switched to the RUN Mode without a program in the PLC, the PLC will produce
a FATAL ERROR which can be cleared by cycling power to the PLC.
DL05 Micro PLC User Manual, 6th Edition, Rev. C
Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
1
Changing Modes in the DL05 PLC
Modeswitch Position
CPU Action
CPU is forced into the RUN mode if no errors are
encountered. No changes are allowed by the attached
programming/monitoring device.
PROGRAM and the TEST modes are available. Mode and
program changes are allowed by the
programming/monitoring device.
RUN (Run Program)
TERM (Terminal) RUN,
CPU is forced into the STOP mode. No changes are allowed
by the programming/monitoring device.
STOP
There are two ways to change the CPU mode. You can use the CPU mode switch to select
the operating mode, or you can place the mode switch in the TERM position and use a
programming device to change operating modes. With the switch in this position, the CPU
can be changed between Run and Program modes. You can use either DirectSOFT 5 or the
Handheld Programmer to change the CPU mode of operation. With DirectSOFT 5 use the
PLC menu option PLC > Mode or use the Mode button located on the
Online toolbar. With the Handheld Programmer, you use the MODE key.
PLC MODE
MODE KEY
Mode of Operation at Power-up
The DL05 CPU will normally power-up in the mode that it was in just prior to the power
interruption. For example, if the CPU was in Program Mode when the power was
disconnected, the CPU will power-up in Program Mode (see warning note below).
WARNING: Once the super capacitor has discharged, the system may not power-up in the mode it
was in when this occurred. There is no way to determine which mode will be entered as the
startup mode. However, the PLC can power-up in either Run or Program Mode if the mode switch
is in the TERM position. Failure to adhere to this warning greatly increases the risk of unexpected
equipment startup.
The mode which the CPU will power-up in is also determined by the state of B7633.13. If
the bit is set and the Mode Switch is in the TERM position, then the CPU will power-up in
the state it was in at power-down.
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Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
Auxiliary Functions
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Many CPU setup tasks involve the use of Auxiliary (AUX) Functions. The AUX Functions
perform many different operations, ranging from clearing ladder memory, displaying the scan
time, copying programs to EEPROM in the handheld programmer, etc. They are divided into
categories that affect different system parameters. Appendix A provides a description of the
AUX functions.
You can access the AUX Functions from DirectSOFT 5. or from the D2–HPP Handheld
Programmer. The manuals for those products provide step-by-step procedures for accessing
the AUX Functions. Some of these AUX Functions are designed specifically for the Handheld
Programmer setup, so they will not be needed (or available) with the DirectSOFT 5 package.
The following table shows a list of the Auxiliary functions for the Handheld Programmer.
AUX 2* — RLL Operations
21
22
23
24
Check Program
Change Reference
Clear Ladder Range
Clear All Ladders
AUX 3* — V-Memory Operations
31
Clear V-Memory
AUX 4* — I/O Configuration
41
Show I/O Configuration
AUX 5* — CPU Configuration
51
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
Modify Program Name
Display Scan Time
Initialize Scratchpad
Set Watchdog Timer
Set Communication Port 2
Set Retentive Ranges
Test Operations
Override Setup
5B
5D
HSIO Configuration
Scan Control Setup
AUX 6* — Handheld Programmer Configuration
61
62
65
Show Revision Numbers
Beeper On / Off
Run Self Diagnostics
AUX 7* — EEPROM Operations
71
72
73
74
75
76
Copy CPU memory to HPP EEPROM
Write HPP EEPROM to CPU
Compare CPU to HPP EEPROM
Blank Check (HPP EEPROM)
Erase HPP EEPROM
Show EEPROM Type (CPU and HPP)
AUX 8* — Password Operations
81
82
83
Modify Password
Unlock CPU
Lock CPU
Clearing an Existing Program
Before you enter a new program, be sure to always clear ladder memory. You can use AUX
Function 24 to clear the complete program.
You can also use other AUX functions to clear other memory areas.
• AUX 23 — Clear Ladder Range
• AUX 24 — Clear all Ladders
• AUX 31 — Clear V-Memory
Initializing System Memory
The DL05 Micro PLC maintain system parameters in a memory area often referred to as the
“scratchpad”. In some cases, you may make changes to the system setup that will be stored in
system memory. For example, if you specify a range of Control Relays (CRs) as retentive,
these changes are stored in system memory. AUX 54 resets the system memory to the default
values.
DL05 Micro PLC User Manual, 6th Edition, Rev. C
Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
WARNING: You may never have to use this feature unless you want to clear any setup information
that is stored in system memory. Usually, you’ll only need to initialize the system memory if you
are changing programs and the old program required a special system setup. You can usually
load in new programs without ever initializing system memory.
Remember, this AUX function will reset all system memory. If you have set special parameters
such as retentive ranges, etc. they will be erased when AUX 54 is used. Make sure you that you
have considered all ramifications of this operation before you select it.
Setting Retentive Memory Ranges
The DL05 PLCs provide certain ranges of retentive memory by default. The default ranges
are suitable for many applications, but you can change them if your application requires
additional retentive ranges or no retentive ranges at all. Appendix F has more information
pertaining to the different types of memory. The default settings are:
Memory Area
Control Relays
V-memory
Timers
Counters
Stages
DL05
Default Range
Available Range
C400 – C777
C0 – C777
V1400 – V7777
V0 – V7777
None by default
T0 – T177
CT0 – CT177
CT0 – CT177
None by default
S0 – S377
You can use AUX 57 to set the retentive ranges. Appendix A contains detailed information
about auxiliary functions. You can also set the retentive ranges by using Setup in DirectSOFT
5, PLC > Setup > Retentive Ranges.
WARNING: The DL05 PLCs do not have battery back-up (unless the memory cartridge, D0–01MC,
is installed) The super capacitor will retain the values in the event of a power loss, but only for a
short period of time, depending on conditions.
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Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
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Using a Password
The DL05 PLCs allow you to use a password to help minimize the risk of unauthorized
program and/or data changes. Once you enter a password you can “lock” the PLC against
access. Once the CPU is locked you must enter the password before you can use a
programming device to change any system parameters.
You can select an 8-digit numeric password. The Micro PLCs are shipped from the factory
with a password of 00000000. All zeros removes the password protection. If a password has
been entered into the CPU you cannot just enter all zeros to remove it. Once you enter the
correct password, you can change the password to all zeros to remove the password
protection.
WARNING: Make sure you remember your password. If you forget your password you will not be
able to access the CPU. The Micro PLC must be returned to the factory to have the password
(along with the ladder project) cleared from memory. It is the policy of AutomationDirect to
require the memory of the PLC to be cleared along with the password.
You can use the D2–HPP Handheld Programmer or
DirectSOFT 5. to enter a password. The following
diagram shows how you can enter a password with the
Handheld Programmer.
DirectSOFT
D2–HPP
Select AUX 81
CLR
CLR
I
B
8
1
AUX
ENT
PASSWORD
00000000
Enter the new 8-digit password
X
X
X
ENT
PASSWORD
xxxxxxxx
Press CLR to clear the display
There are three ways to lock the CPU once the password has been entered.
1. If the CPU power is disconnected, the CPU will be automatically locked against access.
2. If you enter the password with DirectSOFT 5, the CPU will be automatically locked against access
when you exit DirectSOFT 5.
3. Use AUX 83 to lock the CPU.
When you use DirectSOFT 5, you will be prompted for a password if the CPU has been
locked. If you use the Handheld Programmer, you have to use AUX 82 to unlock the CPU.
Once you enter AUX 82, you will be prompted to enter the password.
DL05 Micro PLC User Manual, 6th Edition, Rev. C
Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
CPU Operation
Achieving the proper control for your equipment or process requires a good understanding of
how DL05 CPUs control all aspects of system operation. There are four main areas to
understand before you create your application program:
• CPU Operating System — the CPU manages all aspects of system control. A quick overview of all
the steps is provided in the next section.
• CPU Operating Modes — The two primary modes of operation are Program Mode and Run
Mode.
• CPU Timing — The two important areas we discuss are the I/O response time and the CPU scan
time.
• CPU Memory Map — DL05 CPUs offer a wide variety of resources, such as timers, counters,
inputs, etc. The memory map section shows the organization and availability of these data types.
CPU Operating System
Power up
At powerup, the CPU initializes the internal electronic
hardware. Memory initialization starts with examining the
retentive memory settings. In general, the content of
retentive memory is preserved, and non-retentive memory
is initialized to zero (unless otherwise specified).
After the one-time powerup tasks, the CPU begins the
cyclical scan activity. The flowchart to the right shows
how the tasks differ, based on the CPU mode and the
existence of any errors. The “scan time” is defined as the
average time around the task loop. Note that the CPU is
always reading the inputs, even during program mode.
This allows programming tools to monitor input status at
any time.
The outputs are only updated in Run mode. In program
mode, they are in the off state.
Error detection has two levels. Non-fatal errors are
reported, but the CPU remains in its current mode. If a
fatal error occurs, the CPU is forced into program mode
and the outputs go off.
Initialize hardware
Initialize various memory
based on retentive
configuration
Update input
Service peripheral
Update Special Relays
PGM
Mode?
RUN
Execute program
Update output
Do diagnostics
OK?
YES
NO
Report error, set flag
register, turn on LED
Fatal error
YES
Force CPU into
PGM mode
DL05 Micro PLC User Manual, 6th Edition, Rev. C
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Program Mode
In Program Mode, the CPU does not execute the
application program or update the output points.
The primary use for Program Mode is to enter or
change an application program. You also use
program mode to set up the CPU parameters, such
as HSIO features, retentive memory areas, etc.
You can use a programming device, such as a PC
with DirectSOFT 5 Programming Software or the
D2–HPP Handheld programmer to place the CPU
in Program Mode.
Download
Run Mode
In Run Mode, the CPU executes the application
program and updates the I/O system. You can
perform many operations during Run Mode. Some
of these include:
• Monitor and change I/O point status
• Update timer/counter preset values
• Update Variable memory locations
Run Mode operation can be divided into several key
areas. For the vast majority of applications, some of
these execution segments are more important than
others. For example, you need to understand how
the CPU updates the I/O points, handles forcing
operations, and solves the application program. The
remaining segments are not that important for most
applications.
You can use DirectSOFT 5 or the D2–HPP
Handheld Programmer to place the CPU in Run
Mode.
You can also edit the program during Run Mode.
The Run Mode Edits are not “bumpless” to the
outputs. Instead, the CPU maintains the outputs in
their last state while it accepts the new program
information. If an error is found in the new
program, then the CPU will turn all the outputs off
and enter the Program Mode. This feature is
discussed in more detail in Chapter 9.
Normal Run mode scan
Read Inputs
Service Peripherals
Update Special Relays
Solve the Application Program
Write Outputs
Diagnostics
WARNING: Only authorized personnel fully familiar with all aspects of the application should
make changes to the program. Changes during Run Mode become effective immediately. Make
sure you thoroughly consider the impact of any changes to minimize the risk of personal injury or
damage to equipment.
DL05 Micro PLC User Manual, 6th Edition, Rev. C
Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
Read Inputs
The CPU reads the status of all inputs, then stores it in the image register. Input image
register locations are designated with an X followed by a memory location. Image register data
is used by the CPU when it solves the application program.
Of course, an input may change after the CPU has just read the inputs. Generally, the CPU
scan time is measured in milliseconds. If you have an application that cannot wait until the
next I/O update, you can use Immediate Instructions. These do not use the status of the
input image register to solve the application program. The Immediate instructions
immediately read the input status directly from the I/O modules. However, this lengthens the
program scan since the CPU has to read the I/O point status again. A complete list of the
Immediate instructions is included in Chapter 5.
Service Peripherals and Force I/O
After the CPU reads the inputs from the input modules, it reads any attached peripheral
devices. This is primarily a communications service for any attached devices. For example, it
would read a programming device to see if any input, output, or other memory type status
needs to be modified. There are two basic types of forcing available with the DL05 CPUs.
• Forcing from a peripheral – not a permanent force, good only for one scan
• Bit Override – holds the I/O point (or other bit) in the current state. Valid bits are X, Y, C, T, CT,
and S. (These memory types are discussed in more detail later in this chapter).
Regular Forcing — This type of forcing can temporarily change the status of a discrete bit.
For example, you may want to force an input on, even though it is really off. This allows you
to change the point status that was stored in the image register. This value will be valid until
the image register location is written to during the next scan. This is primarily useful during
testing situations when you need to force a bit on to trigger another event.
Bit Override — Bit override can be enabled on a point-by-point basis by using AUX 59 from
the Handheld Programmer or, by using the Data View option within DirectSOFT 5. Bit
override basically disables any changes to the discrete point by the CPU. For example, if you
enable bit override for X1, and X1 is off at the time, then the CPU will not change the state
of X1. This means that even if X1 comes on, the CPU will not acknowledge the change. So, if
you used X1 in the program, it would always be evaluated as “off ” in this case. Of course, if
X1 was on when the bit override was enabled, then X1 would always be evaluated as “on”.
There is an advantage available when you use the bit override feature. The regular forcing is
not disabled because the bit override is enabled. For example, if you enabled the Bit Override
for Y0 and it was off at the time, then the CPU would not change the state of Y0. However,
you can still use a programming device to change the status. Now, if you use the
programming device to force Y0 on, it will remain on and the CPU will not change the state
of Y0. If you then force Y0 off, the CPU will maintain Y0 as off. The CPU will never update
the point with the results from the application program or from the I/O update until the bit
override is removed. The following diagram shows a brief overview of the bit override feature.
Notice the CPU does not update the Image Register when bit override is enabled.
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Input Update
Bit Override OFF
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Force from
Programmer
Result of Program
Solution
Input Update
X128
OFF
Y128
OFF
C377
OFF
...
...
...
...
...
...
X2
ON
Y2
ON
C2
ON
X1
ON
Y1
ON
C1
OFF
X0
OFF
Y0
OFF
C0
OFF
Image Register (example)
Force from
Programmer
Bit Override ON
Result of Program
Solution
WARNING: Only authorized personnel fully familiar with all aspects of the application should
make changes to the program. Make sure you thoroughly consider the impact of any changes to
minimize the risk of personal injury or damage to equipment.
Update Special Relays and Special Registers
Download
There are dedicated V-memory locations that contain Special Relays and other dedicated
register information. This portion of the execution cycle makes sure these locations get
updated on every scan. Also, there are several different Special Relays, such as diagnostic
relays, etc., that are also updated during this segment.
Solve Application Program
The CPU evaluates each instruction in the application
program during this segment of the scan cycle. The
instructions define the relationship between the input
conditions and the desired output response. The CPU
uses the output image register area to store the status of
the desired action for the outputs. Output image register
locations are designated with a Y followed by a memory
location. The actual outputs are updated during the write
outputs segment of the scan cycle. There are immediate
output instructions available that will update the output
points immediately instead of waiting until the write
output segment. A complete list of the Immediate
instructions is provided in Chapter 5.
The internal control relays (C), the stages (S), and the
variable memory (V) are also updated in this segment.
You may recall that you can force various types of points
in the system. (This was discussed earlier in this chapter.)
If any I/O points or memory data have been forced, the
output image register also contains this information.
DL05 Micro PLC User Manual, 6th Edition, Rev. C
Normal Run mode scan
Read Inputs
Service Peripherals
Update Special Relays
Solve the Application Program
Write Outputs
Diagnostics
Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
Write Outputs
Once the application program has solved the instruction logic and constructed the output
image register, the CPU writes the contents of the output image register to the corresponding
output points. Remember, the CPU also made sure that any forcing operation changes were
stored in the output image register, so the forced points get updated with the status specified
earlier.
Diagnostics
During this part of the scan, the CPU performs all system diagnostics and other tasks such as
calculating the scan time and resetting the watchdog timer. There are many different error
conditions that are automatically detected and reported by the DL05 PLCs. Appendix B
contains a listing of the various error codes.
Probably one of the more important things that occurs during this segment is the scan time
calculation and watchdog timer control. The DL05 CPU has a “watchdog” timer that stores
the maximum time allowed for the CPU to complete the solve application segment of the
scan cycle. If this time is exceeded the CPU will enter the Program Mode and turn off all
outputs. The default value set from the factory is 200 ms. An error is automatically reported.
For example, the Handheld Programmer would display the following message “E003 S/W
TIMEOUT” when the scan overrun occurs.
You can use AUX 53 to view the minimum, maximum, and current scan time. Use AUX 55
to increase or decrease the watchdog timer value.
I/O Response Time
Is Timing Important for Your Application?
I/O response time is the amount of time required for the control system to sense a change in
an input point and update a corresponding output point. In the majority of applications, the
CPU performs this task in such a short period of time that you may never have to concern
yourself with the aspects of system timing. However, some applications do require extremely
fast update times. In these cases, you may need to know how to determine the amount of
time spent during the various segments of operation.
There are four things that can affect the I/O response time.
• The point in the scan cycle when the field input changes states
• Input Off to On delay time
• CPU scan time
• Output Off to On delay time
The next paragraphs show how these items interact to affect the response time.
Normal Minimum I/O Response
The I/O response time is shortest when the input changes just before the Read Inputs portion
of the execution cycle. In this case the input status is read, the application program is solved,
and the output point gets updated. The following diagram shows an example of the timing
for this situation.
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Scan
Scan
Solve
Program
Solve
Program
Read
Inputs
Solve
Program
Solve
Program
Write
Outputs
Field Input
CPU Reads
Inputs
CPU Writes
Outputs
Input
Off/On Delay
Output
Off/On Delay
I/O Response Time
In this case, you can calculate the response time by simply adding the following items:
Input Delay + Scan Time + Output Delay = Response Time
Normal Maximum I/O Response
The I/O response time is longest when the input changes just after the Read Inputs portion
of the execution cycle. In this case the new input status is not read until the following scan.
Scan
Scan
Solve
Program
Solve
Program
Read
Inputs
Solve
Program
Solve
Program
Write
Outputs
Field Input
CPU Reads
Inputs
CPU Writes
Outputs
Input
Off/On Delay
Output
Off/On Delay
I/O Response Time
The following diagram shows an example of the timing for this situation.
In this case, you can calculate the response time by simply adding the following items:
Input Delay +(2 x Scan Time) + Output Delay = Response Time
DL05 Micro PLC User Manual, 6th Edition, Rev. C
Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
Improving Response Time
There are a few things you can do the help improve throughput.
• You can choose instructions with faster execution times
• You can use immediate I/O instructions (which update the I/O points during the program
execution)
• You can use the HSIO Mode 50 Pulse Catch features designed to operate in high-speed
environments. See Appendix E for details on using this feature.
• Change Mode 60 filter to 0 msec for X0, X1, X2 and X3.
Of these four things the Immediate I/O instructions are probably the most important and
most useful. The following example shows how an immediate input instruction and
immediate output instruction would affect the response time.
Scan
Solve
Program
Scan
Normal
Read
Input
Solve
Program
Read
Input
Immediate
Solve
Program
Write
Output
Immediate
Solve
Program
Normal
Write
Outputs
Field Input
Input
Off/On Delay
Output
Off/On Delay
I/O Response Time
In this case, you can calculate the response time by simply adding the following items.
Input Delay + Instruction Execution Time + Output Delay = Response Time
The instruction execution time would be calculated by adding the time for the immediate
input instruction, the immediate output instruction, and any other instructions in between
the two.
NOTE: Even though the immediate instruction reads the most current status from I/O, it only uses the
results to solve that one instruction. It does not use the new status to update the image register.
Therefore, any regular instructions that follow will still use the image register values. Any immediate
instructions that follow will access the I/O again to update the status.
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Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
Time Considerations
1 CPU Scan
The scan time covers all the cyclical tasks that are
performed by the operating system. You can use
2
DirectSOFT 5 or the Handheld Programmer to display
the minimum, maximum, and current scan times that
have occurred since the previous Program Mode to Run
3
Mode transition. This information can be very important
when evaluating the performance of a system. As we’ve
4
shown previously there are several segments that make up
the scan cycle. Each of these segments requires a certain
5
amount of time to complete. Of all the segments, the
following are the most important.
• Input Update
6
• Peripheral Service
• Program Execution
7
• Output Update
• Timed Interrupt Execution
8
The only one you really have the most control over is the
amount of time it takes to execute the application
9
program. This is because different instructions take
different amounts of time to execute. So, if you think you
10
need a faster scan, then you can try to choose faster
instructions.
11
Your choice of I/O type and peripheral devices can also
affect the scan time. However, these things are usually
dictated by the application.
12
The following paragraphs provide some general
information on how much time some of the segments
13
can require.
Inputs
14 Reading
The time required during each scan to read the input status is 40 µs. Don’t confuse this with
the I/O response time that was discussed earlier.
A
Writing Outputs
The time required to write the output status is 629 µs. Don’t confuse this with the I/O
B
response time that was discussed earlier.
C
D
Power up
Initialize hardware
Initialize various memory
based on retentive
configuration
Update input
Service peripheral
Update Special Relays
PGM
Mode?
RUN
Execute program
Update output
Do diagnostics
OK?
YES
NO
Report error, set flag
register, turn on LED
Fatal error
YES
Force CPU into
PGM mode
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NO
Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
Application Program Execution
The CPU processes the program from address 0 to the END instruction. The CPU executes
the program left to right and top to bottom. As each rung is evaluated the appropriate image
register or memory location is updated. The time required to solve the application program
depends on the type and number of instructions used, and the amount of execution overhead.
Just add the execution times for all the instructions in your program to determine to total
execution time. Appendix C provides a complete list of the instruction execution times for the
DL05 Micro PLC. For example, the execution time for running the program shown below is
calculated as follows:
Instruction
Time
STR X0
OR C0
ANDN X1
OUT Y0
STRN C100
LD K10
STRN C101
OUT V2002
STRN C102
LD K50
STRN C103
OUT V2006
STR X5
ANDN X10
OUT Y3
END
2.0 µs
1.6 µs
1.6 µs
6.8 µs
2.3 µs
42.7 µs
2.3 µs
16.6 µs
2.3 µs
42.7 µs
2.3 µs
16.6 µs
2.0 µs
1.6 µs
6.8 µs
24.0 µs
SUBTOTAL
174.2 µs
Overhead
Minimum
Maximum
X0
X1
Y0
OUT
C0
C100
LD
C101
OUT
V2002
C102
LD
C103
X5
DL05
0.66 µs
2.5 µs
K10
K50
OUT
V2006
X10
Y3
OUT
END
TOTAL TIME = (Program execution time + Overhead) x 1.1
The program above takes only 174.2 µs to execute during each scan. The DL05 spends
0.1 ms, on internal timed interrupt management, for every 1.0 ms of instruction time. The
total scan time is calculated by adding the program execution time to the overhead (shown
above) and multiplying the result (ms) by 1.1. “Overhead” includes all other housekeeping
and diagnostic tasks. The scan time will vary slightly from one scan to the next, because of
fluctuation in overhead tasks.
Program Control Instructions — the DL05 PLCs have an interrupt routine feature that
changes the way a program executes. Since this instruction interrupts normal program flow, it
will have an effect on the program execution time. For example, a timed interrupt routine
with a 10.0 ms period interrupts the main program execution (before the END statement)
every 10.0 ms, so the CPU can execute the interrupt routine. Chapter 5 provides detailed
information on interrupts.
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PLC Numbering Systems
octal
binary
BCD
?
If you are a new PLC user or are using AutomationDirect
1482
?
0402 ?
? 3
PLCs for the first time, please take a moment to study how
3A9
our PLCs use numbers. You’ll find that each PLC
7 –961428 ASCII
hexadecimal
manufacturer has their own conventions on the use of
1001011011
177
1011
numbers in their PLCs. We want to take just a moment to
?
decimal
familiarize you with how numbers are used in
A
72B
?
–300124
AutomationDirect PLCs. The information you learn here
applies to all of our PLCs.
As any good computer does, PLCs store and manipulate numbers in binary form: just ones
and zeros. So why do we have to deal with numbers in so many different forms? Numbers
have meaning, and some representations are more convenient than others for particular
purposes. Sometimes we use numbers to represent a size or amount of something. Other
numbers refer to locations or addresses, or to time. In science we attach engineering units to
numbers to give a particular meaning (see Appendix I for numbering system details).
PLC Resources
PLCs offer a fixed amount of resources, depending on the model and configuration. We use
the word “resources” to include variable memory (V-memory), I/O points, timers, counters,
etc. Most modular PLCs allow you to add I/O points in groups of eight. In fact, all the
resources of our PLCs are counted in octal. It’s easier for computers to count in groups of
eight than ten, because eight is an even power of 2.
Decimal 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Octal means simply counting in groups of eight
things at a time. In the figure to the right, there are
eight circles. The quantity in decimal is “8”, but in
Octal
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 10
octal it is “10” (8 and 9 are not valid in octal). In
octal, “10” means 1 group of 8 plus 0 (no individuals).
In the figure below, we have two groups of eight circles. Counting in octal we have “20”
items, meaning 2 groups of eight, plus 0 individuals Don’t say “twenty”, say “two–zero octal”.
This makes a clear distinction between number systems.
Decimal 1 2 3 4
5
6
7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
1
5
6
7 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 20
Octal
2 3 4
After counting PLC resources, it is time to access PLC resources (there is a difference). The
CPU instruction set accesses resources of the PLC using octal addresses. Octal addresses are
the same as octal quantities, except they start counting at zero. The number zero is significant
to a computer, so we don’t skip it.
X= 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Our circles are in an array of square containers to
the right. To access a resource, our PLC instruction
X
will address its location using the octal references
1X
shown. If these were counters, “CT14” would
access the black circle location.
2X
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Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
V–memory
1
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8
9
Binary-Coded Decimal Numbers
Since humans naturally count in
decimal (10 fingers, 10 toes), we prefer
10
to enter and view PLC data in decimal
as well. However, computers are more efficient in using pure binary numbers. A compromise
11
solution between the two is Binary-Coded Decimal (BCD) representation. A BCD digit
ranges from 0 to 9, and is stored as four binary bits (a nibble). This permits each V-memory
12
location to store four BCD digits, with a range of decimal numbers from 0000 to 9999.
In a pure binary sense, a 16-bit word can represent numbers from 0 to 65535. In storing
BCD numbers, the range is reduced to only 0 to 9999. Many math instructions use Binary- 13
Coded Decimal (BCD) data, and DirectSOFT 5 and the handheld programmer allow us to
enter and view data in BCD.
14
Hexadecimal Numbers
Hexadecimal numbers are similar to BCD numbers, except they utilize all possible binary
A
values in each 4-bit digit. They are base-16 numbers so we need 16 different digits. To extend
our decimal digits 0 through 9, we use A through F as shown.
B
C
A 4-digit hexadecimal number can represent all 65536 values in a V-memory word. The range
is from 0000 to FFFF (hex). PLCs often need this full range for sensor data, etc. Hexadecimal D
is just a convenient way for humans to view full binary data.
V-memory address
V-memory data
(octal)
(binary)
MSB
LSB
Variable memory (called V-memory)
V2017
0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1
stores data for the ladder program
and for configuration settings. V-memory locations and V-memory addresses are the same
thing, and are numbered in octal. For example, V2073 is a valid location, while V1983 is not
valid (“9” and “8” are not valid octal digits).
Each V-memory location is one data word wide, meaning 16 bits. For configuration registers,
our manuals will show each bit of a V-memory word. The least significant bit (LSB) will be
on the right, and the most significant bit (MSB) on the left. We use the word “significant”,
referring to the relative binary weighting of the bits.
V-memory data is 16-bit binary, but we rarely program the data registers one bit at a time. We
use instructions or viewing tools that let us work with decimal, octal, and hexadecimal
numbers. All these are converted and stored as binary for us.
A frequently-asked question is “How do I tell if a number is octal, BCD, or hex”? The answer
is that we usually cannot tell just by looking at the data... but it does not really matter. What
matters is: the source or mechanism which writes data into a V-memory location and the
thing which later reads it must both use the same data type (i.e., octal, hex, binary, or
whatever). The V-memory location is just a storage box... that’s all. It does not convert or
move the data on its own.
BCD number
V-memory storage
0 1 2 3
0 1 2 3
Decimal
Hexadecimal
Hexadecimal number
V-memory storage
4 5
4 5
6
6
7
7
4
9
3
6
0 1 0 0
1 0 0 1
0 0 1 1
0 1 1 0
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
8 9 A B C D E F
A
7
F
4
1 0 1 0
0 1 1 1
1 1 1 1
0 1 0 0
DL05 Micro PLC User Manual, 6th Edition, Rev. C
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Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
Map
1 Memory
With any PLC system, you generally have many different types of information to process.
This includes input device status, output device status, various timing elements, parts counts,
2
etc. It is important to understand how the system represents and stores the various types of
data. For example, you need to know how the system identifies input points, output points,
data words, etc. The following paragraphs discuss the various memory types used in DL05
3
Micro PLCs. A memory map overview for the
CPU follows the memory descriptions.
4
Octal Numbering System
All memory locations and resources are numbered
5
in Octal (base 8). For example, the diagram shows
how the octal numbering system works for the
6
discrete input points. Notice the octal system does
not contain any numbers with the digits 8 or 9.
7
Discrete and Word Locations
As you examine the different memory types, you’ll
8
notice two types of memory in the DL05, discrete
and word memory. Discrete memory is one bit
that can be either a 1 or a 0. Word memory is
9
referred to as V-memory (variable) and is a 16-bit
location normally used to manipulate
Word Locations – 16 bits
10
data/numbers, store data/numbers, etc.
Some information is automatically stored in
0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1
11
V-memory. For example, the timer current
values are stored in V-memory.
12 V-memory Locations for Discrete Memory Areas
The discrete memory area is for inputs, outputs, control relays, special relays, stages, timer
status bits and counter status bits. However, you can also access the bit data types as a V13
memory word. Each V-memory location contains 16 consecutive discrete locations. For
example, the following diagram shows how the X input points are mapped into V-memory
14
locations.
8 Discrete (X) Input Points
A
B
C
Bit #
V40400
D
These discrete memory areas and their corresponding V-memory ranges are listed in the
X0
X1
X2
X3
X4
X5
X6
Discrete – On or Off, 1 bit
X0
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
X7
X6
X5
X4
X3
X2
X1
X0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
memory area table for DL05 Micro PLCs on the following pages.
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Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
Input Points (X Data Type)
The discrete input points are noted by an X data
type. There are 8 discrete input points and 256
discrete input addresses available with DL05
CPUs. In this example, the output point Y0 will
be turned on when input X0 energizes.
X0
Y0
OUT
X1
Y1
OUT
X6
C5
OUT
C5
Y10
OUT
Output Points (Y Data Type)
The discrete output points are noted by a Y data
type. There are 6 discrete outputs and 256 discrete
output addresses available with DL05 CPUs. In
this example, output point Y1 will be turned on
when input X1 energizes.
Control Relays (C Data Type)
Control relays are discrete bits normally used to
control the user program. The control relays do
not represent a real world device, that is, they
cannot be physically tied to switches, output coils,
etc. They are internal to the CPU. Because of this,
control relays can be programmed as discrete
inputs or discrete outputs. These locations are used
in programming the discrete memory locations
(C) or the corresponding word location which
contains 16 consecutive discrete locations.
In this example, memory location C5 will energize
when input X6 turns on. The second rung shows a
simple example of how to use a control relay as an
input.
Y20
OUT
Timers and Timer Status Bits (T Data Type)
Timer status bits reflect the relationship between
the current value and the preset value of a specified
timer. The timer status bit will be on when the
current value is equal or greater than the preset
value of a corresponding timer.
When input X0 turns on, timer T1 will start.
When the timer reaches the preset of 3 seconds
(K30) timer status contact T1 turns on. When T1
turns on, output Y12 turns on. Turning off X0
resets the timer.
X0
TMR
T1
K30
T1
DL05 Micro PLC User Manual, 6th Edition, Rev. C
Y12
OUT
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2
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4
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6
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D
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Timer Current Values (V Data Type)
As mentioned earlier, some information is automatically
stored in V-memory. This is true for the current values
associated with timers. For example, V0 holds the
current value for Timer 0, V1 holds the current value for
Timer 1, etc.
The primary reason for this is programming flexibility.
The example shows how you can use relational contacts
to monitor several time intervals from a single timer.
X0
TMR
T1
K1000
V1
K30
Y2
OUT
V1
K50
Y3
OUT
V1
K75
V1
K100
Y4
OUT
Counters and Counter Status Bits (CT Data type)
Counter status bits that reflect the relationship between
the current value and the preset value of a specified
counter. The counter status bit will be on when the
current value is equal to or greater than the preset value
of a corresponding counter.
Each time contact X0 transitions from off to on, the
counter increments by one. (If X1 comes on, the counter
is reset to zero.) When the counter reaches the preset of
10 counts (K of 10) counter status contact CT3 turns
on. When CT3 turns on, output Y2 turns on.
X0
CNT
CT3
K10
X1
CT3
Y2
OUT
Counter Current Values (V Data Type)
Just like the timers, the counter current values are also
automatically stored in V-memory. For example, V1000
holds the current value for Counter CT0, V1001 holds
the current value for Counter CT1, etc.
The primary reason for this is programming flexibility.
The example shows how you can use relational contacts
to monitor the counter values.
DL05 Micro PLC User Manual, 6th Edition, Rev. C
X0
CNT
CT3
K10
X1
V1003
K1
Y2
OUT
V1003
K3
Y3
OUT
V1003
K5
V1003
K8
Y4
OUT
Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
Word Memory (V Data Type)
Word memory is referred to as V-memory (variable) and is a
16-bit location normally used to manipulate data/numbers,
store data/numbers, etc. Some information is automatically
stored in V-memory. For example, the timer current values
are stored in V-memory. The example shows how a fourdigit BCD constant is loaded into the accumulator and then
stored in a V-memory location.
X0
LD
K1345
OUT
V2000
Word Locations – 16 bits
0 0 0 1 00 11 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1
Stages (S Data type)
Stages are used in RLLPLUS programs to create a
structured program, similar to a flowchart. Each program
Stage denotes a program segment. When the program
segment, or Stage, is active, the logic within that segment
is executed. If the Stage is off, or inactive, the logic is not
executed and the CPU skips to the next active Stage. (See
Chapter 7 for a more detailed description of RLLPLUS
programming.)
Each Stage also has a discrete status bit that can be used as
an input to indicate whether the Stage is active or
inactive. If the Stage is active, then the status bit is on. If
the Stage is inactive, then the status bit is off. This status
bit can also be turned on or off by other instructions,
such as the SET or RESET instructions. This allows you
to easily control stages throughout the program.
1
3
4
5
Ladder Representation
ISG
S0000
Wait for Start
Start
S1
JMP
X0
SG
S500
JMP
Check for a Part
S0001
Part
Present
X1
Part
Present
S2
JMP
S6
JMP
X1
SG
Clamp the part
S0002
Part
Locked
Clamp
SET
S400
S3
JMP
X2
Special Relays (SP Data Type)
Special relays are discrete memory locations with pre-defined
functionality. There are many different types of special relays.
For example, some aid in program development, others provide
system operating status information, etc. Appendix D provides
a complete listing of the special relays.
In this example, control relay C10 will energize for 50 ms and
de-energize for 50 ms because SP5 is a pre–defined relay that will
be on for 50 ms and off for 50 ms.
SP5
C10
OUT
SP4: 1 second clock
SP5: 100 ms clock
SP6: 50 ms clock
DL05 Micro PLC User Manual, 6th Edition, Rev. C
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Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
1 DL05 System V-memory
System Parameters and Default Data Locations (V Data Type)
2
The DL05 PLCs reserve several V-memory locations for storing system parameters or certain
types of system data. These memory locations store things like the error codes, High-Speed
I/O data, and other types of system setup information.
3
System
Default
Description of Contents
4 V-memory
Values/Ranges
V2320–V2377
5 V7620–V7627
Locations for DV–1000 operator interface parameters
V7620
V7621
6
V7622
V7623
7
V7624
V7625
8
V7626
V7627
9
10 V7630
11 V7631–V7632
12
13 V7633
14
A
- X0
B V7634
V7635 - X1
V7636 - X2
C V7637
V7640–V7646
D V7647
The default location for multiple preset values for the High-Speed Counter
Sets the V-memory location that contains the value
V0 – V2377
Sets the V-memory location that contains the message
V0 – V2377
Sets the total number (1 – 16) of V-memory locations to be displayed.
1 – 16
Sets the V-memory location containing the numbers to be displayed.
V0 – V2377
Sets the V-memory location containing the character code to be displayed
V0 – V2377
Contains the function number that can be assigned to each key.
V-memory location for X, Y,
or C points used
Power-up operational mode.
Change preset value.
0, 1, 2, 12, 3
0000 to 9999
Starting location for the multi–step presets for channel 1. The default value is
2320, which indicates the first value should be obtained from V2320. Since there
are 24 presets available, the default range is V2320 – V2377. You can change the
starting point if necessary.
Reserved
3–26
Default: V2320 Range:
V0 – V2320
N/A
Sets the desired function code for the high speed counter, interrupt, pulse catch,
pulse train, and input filter.
Location can also be used to set the power-up in Run Mode option.
Default: 0060
Lower Byte Range:
Range: 10 – Counter
20 – Quadrature
30 – Pulse Out
40 – Interrupt
50 – Pulse Catch
60 – Filtered discrete In.
Upper Byte Range:
Bits 8–12, 14, 15: Unused
Bit 13: Power–up in RUN,
if Mode Switch is in TERM
position.
Setup Registers for High-Speed I/O functions
Default: 1006
Pulse/Direction
Reserved
Default: 0000
N/A
Default: 0000
Range: 0003–03E7h
(3–9999ms)
N/A
Default: 00E0
Default: 8501
Timed Interrupt
V7650–V7654
V7655
V7656
N/A
Reserved
Port 2: Setup for the protocol, time-out, and the response delay time.
Port 2: Setup for the station number, baud rate, STOP bit, and parity.
DL05 Micro PLC User Manual, 6th Edition, Rev. C
Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
System
V-memory
V7657
V7660
V7661
V7662–V7717
V7720–V7722
V7720
V7721
V7722
V7723–V7750
V7751
V7752–V7754
V7755
V7756
V7757
V7760–V7762
V7763
V7764
V7765
V7766
V7767
V7770
V7771
V7772
V7773
V7774
V7775
V7776
V7777
Description of Contents
Default
Values/Ranges
Port 2: Setup completion code used to notify the completion of the parameter setup
Default: 0A00
Scan control setup: Keeps the scan control mode
Setup timer over counter: Counts the times the actual scan time exceeds the user
setup time
Reserved
Default: 0000
Locations for DV–1000 operator interface parameters
Titled Timer preset value pointer
Title Counter preset value pointer
HiByte-Titled Timer preset block size, LoByte-Titled Counter preset block size
Reserved
Fault Message Error Code — stores the 4-digit code used with the FAULT instruction
when the instruction is executed
Reserved
Error code — stores the fatal error code
Error code — stores the major error code
Error code — stores the minor error code
Reserved
Program address where syntax error exists
Syntax error code
Scan — stores the total number of scan cycles that have occurred since the last
Program Mode to Run Mode transition
Contains the number of seconds on optional Memory Cartridge clock (00-59)
Contains the number of minutes on optional Memory Cartridge clock (00-59)
Contains the number of hours on optional Memory Cartridge clock (00-23)
Contains the day of week on optional Memory Cartridge (Mon., Tues., Wed., etc.)
Contains the numerical day of month on optional Memory Cartridge (01, 02, etc.)
Contains the numerical month on optional Memory Cartridge (01 to 12)
Contains the year on optional Memory Cartridge (00 to 99)
Scan — stores the current scan time (milliseconds)
Scan — stores the minimum scan time that has occurred since the last Program
Mode to Run Mode transition (milliseconds)
Scan — stores the maximum scan time that has occurred since the last Program
Mode to Run Mode transition (milliseconds)
DL05 Micro PLC User Manual, 6th Edition, Rev. C
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Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
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DL05 Memory Map Table
Memory Type
Discrete Memory
Reference
(octal)
Word Memory
Reference
(octal)
Decimal
Symbol
X0
Input Points
(See note)
X0 – X377
V40400 - V40417
256
Output Points
(See note)
Y0 – Y377
V40500 – V40517
256
Control Relays
C0 – C777
V40600 - V40637
512
Special Relays
SP0 – SP777
V41200 – V41237
512
Timers
T0 – T177
V41100 – V41107
128
Timer Current Values None
V0 – V177
128
Timer Status Bits
T0 – T177
V41100 – V41107
128
Counters
CT0 – CT177
V41140 – V41147
128
Counter
Current Values
None
V1000 – V1177
128
Counter Status Bits
CT0 – CT177
V41140 – V41147
128
Data Words
(See Appendix F)
None
V1200 – V7377
3968
None specific, used with many
instructions.
None specific, used with many
instructions.
May be non-volatile if MOV inst. is used.
Data can be rewritten to EEPROM at least
100,000 times before it fails.
Y0
C0
C0
SP0
Data Words
Non-volatile
(See Appendix F)
None
V7400 – V7577
128
Stages
S0 – S377
V41000 – V41017
256
System parameters
None
V7600 – V7777
128
3–28
TMR
T0
K100
V0 K100
T0
CNT CT0
K10
V1000 K100
CT0
SG
SP0
S001
None specific, used for various purposes
NOTE: The DL05 has 8 discrete inputs and 6 discrete outputs which are standard. The number of
inputs and/or outputs can be increased by adding one of the available option modules. Refer to either
the DL05/06 Option Modules User Manual (D0-OPTIONS-M), our catalog or our website.
DL05 Micro PLC User Manual, 6th Edition, Rev. C
Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
DL05 Aliases
An alias is an alternate way of referring to certain memory types, such as timer/counter
current values, V-memory locations for I/O points, etc., which simplifies understanding the
memory address. The use of the alias is optional, but some users may find the alias to be
helpful when developing a program. The table below shows how the aliases can be used.
DL05 Aliases
Address Start
Alias Start
Example
V0
TA0
V1000
CTA0
V40400
VX0
V40500
VY0
V40600
VC0
V41000
VS0
V41100
VT0
V41140
VCT0
V41200
VSP0
V0 is the timer accumulator value for timer 0; therefore, its
alias is TA0. TA1 is the alias for V1, etc.
V1000 is the counter accumulator value for counter 0;
therefore, its alias is CTA0. CTA1 is the alias for V1001, etc.
V40400 is the word memory reference for discrete bits X0
through X17; therefore, its alias is VX0. V40401 is the word
memory reference for discrete bits X20 through X37; therefore,
its alias is VX20.
V40500 is the word memory reference for discrete bits Y0
through Y17; therefore, its alias is VY0. V40501 is the word
memory reference for discrete bits Y20 through Y37; therefore,
its alias is VY20.
V40600 is the word memory reference for discrete bits C0
through C17; therefore, its alias is VC0. V40601 is the word
memory reference for discrete bits C20 through C37; therefore,
its alias is VC20.
V41000 is the word memory reference for discrete bits S0
through S17; therefore, its alias is VS0. V41001 is the word
memory reference for discrete bits S20 through S37; therefore,
its alias is VS20.
V41100 is the word memory reference for discrete bits T0
through T17; therefore, its alias is VT0. V41101 is the word
memory reference for discrete bits T20 through T37; therefore,
its alias is VT20.
V41140 is the word memory reference for discrete bits CT0
through CT17; therefore, its alias is VCT0. V41141 is the word
memory reference for discrete bits CT20 through CT37;
therefore, its alias is VCT20.
V41200 is the word memory reference for discrete bits SP0
through SP17; therefore, its alias is VSP0. V41201 is the word
memory reference for discrete bits SP20 through SP37;
therefore, its alias is VSP20.
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Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
1 X InputThisBittableMap
provides a listing of individual Input points associated with each V-memory
address bit for the DL05’s eight physical inputs. Actual available references are X0 to X377
2
(V40400 – V40417).
3 MSB
DL05 Input (X) Points
Address
15 14 13 12 11 10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
V40400
4
This table provides the listing for the individual option slot Input points available.
5
DL05 Option Slot Input (X) Points
Address
6 MSB
15 14 13 12 11 10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
V40404
7
8 Y Output Bit Map
This table provides a listing of individual output points associated with each V-memory
address bit for the DL05’s six physical outputs. Actual available references are Y0 to Y377
9
(V40500 – V40517).
10 MSB
DL05 Output (Y) Points
LSB
Address
15
14 13 12 11 10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
11
V40500
This table provides the listing for the individual option slot Output points available.
12
DL05 Option Slot Output (Y) Points
LSB
Address
13 MSB
15
14 13 12 11 10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
V40504
14
A
B
C
D
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
007
006
005
004
003
002
001
000
117
116
115
114
113
112
111
110
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
005
004
003
002
001
000
117
116
115
114
113
112
111
110
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
3–30
DL05 Micro PLC User Manual, 6th Edition, Rev. C
Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
Control Relay Bit Map
This table provides a listing of the individual control relays associated with each V-memory
address bit
MSB
DL05 Control Relays (C)
LSB
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
017
037
057
077
117
137
157
177
217
237
257
277
317
337
357
377
417
437
457
477
517
537
557
577
617
637
657
677
717
737
757
777
016
036
056
076
116
136
156
176
216
236
256
276
316
336
356
376
416
436
456
476
516
536
556
576
616
636
656
676
716
736
756
776
015
035
055
075
115
135
155
175
215
235
255
275
315
335
355
375
415
435
455
475
515
535
555
575
615
635
655
675
715
735
755
775
014
034
054
074
114
134
154
174
214
234
254
274
314
334
354
374
414
434
454
474
514
534
554
574
614
634
654
674
714
734
754
774
013
033
053
073
113
133
153
173
213
233
253
273
313
333
353
373
413
433
453
473
513
533
553
573
613
633
653
673
713
733
753
773
012
032
052
072
112
132
152
172
212
232
252
272
312
332
352
372
412
432
452
472
512
532
552
572
612
632
652
672
712
732
752
772
011
031
051
071
111
131
151
171
211
231
251
271
311
331
351
371
411
431
451
471
511
531
551
571
611
631
651
671
711
731
751
771
010
030
050
070
110
130
150
170
210
230
250
270
310
330
350
370
410
430
450
470
510
530
550
570
610
630
650
670
710
730
750
770
007
027
047
067
107
127
147
167
207
227
247
267
307
327
347
367
407
427
447
467
507
527
547
567
607
627
647
667
707
727
747
767
006
026
046
066
106
126
146
166
206
226
246
266
306
326
346
366
406
426
446
466
506
526
546
566
606
626
646
666
706
726
746
766
005
025
045
065
105
125
145
165
205
225
245
265
305
325
345
365
405
425
445
465
505
525
545
565
605
625
645
665
705
725
745
765
004
024
044
064
104
124
144
164
204
224
244
264
304
324
344
364
404
424
444
464
504
524
544
564
604
624
644
664
704
724
744
764
003
023
043
063
103
123
143
163
203
223
243
263
303
323
343
363
403
423
443
463
503
523
543
563
603
623
643
663
703
723
743
763
002
022
042
062
102
122
142
162
202
222
242
262
302
322
342
362
402
422
442
462
502
522
542
562
602
622
642
662
702
722
742
762
001
021
041
061
101
121
141
161
201
221
241
261
301
321
341
361
401
421
441
461
501
521
541
561
601
621
641
661
701
721
741
761
000
020
040
060
100
120
140
160
200
220
240
260
300
320
340
360
400
420
440
460
500
520
540
560
600
620
640
660
700
720
740
760
DL05 Micro PLC User Manual, 6th Edition, Rev. C
Address
V40600
V40601
V40602
V40603
V40604
V40605
V40606
V40607
V40610
V40611
V40612
V40613
V40614
V40615
V40616
V40617
V40620
V40621
V40622
V40623
V40624
V40625
V40626
V40627
V40630
V40631
V40632
V40633
V40634
V40635
V40636
V40637
1
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3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
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B
C
D
3–31
Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
Bit Map
1 Stage Control/Status
This table provides a listing of individual™ Stage control bits associated with each V-memory
address bit.
2
MSB
DL05 Stage (S) Control Bits
LSB
3 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Address
V41000
V41001
4
V41002
V41003
5
V41004
V41005
V41006
6
V41007
V41010
7
V41011
V41012
V41013
8
V41014
V41015
9
V41016
V41017
10
Timer Status Bit Map
11
This table provides a listing of individual timer contacts associated with each V-memory
address bit.
12
MSB
DL05 Timer (T) Contacts
LSB
Address
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
13
V41100
V41101
14
V41102
V41103
V41104
A
V41105
V41106
B
V41107
C
D
017
037
057
077
117
137
157
177
217
237
257
277
317
337
357
377
017
037
057
077
117
137
157
177
3–32
016
036
056
076
116
136
156
176
216
236
256
276
316
336
356
376
016
036
056
076
116
136
156
176
015
035
055
075
115
135
155
175
215
235
255
275
315
335
355
375
015
035
055
075
115
135
155
175
014
034
054
074
114
134
154
174
214
234
254
274
314
334
354
374
014
034
054
074
114
134
154
174
013
033
053
073
113
133
153
173
213
233
253
273
313
333
353
373
013
033
053
073
113
133
153
173
012
032
052
072
112
132
152
172
212
232
252
272
312
332
352
372
012
032
052
072
112
132
152
172
011
031
051
071
111
131
151
171
211
231
251
271
311
331
351
371
011
031
051
071
111
131
151
171
010
030
050
070
110
130
150
170
210
230
250
270
310
330
350
370
010
030
050
070
110
130
150
170
007
027
047
067
107
127
147
167
207
227
247
267
307
327
347
367
006
026
046
066
106
126
146
166
206
226
246
266
306
326
346
366
007
027
047
067
107
127
147
167
005
025
045
065
105
125
145
165
205
225
245
265
305
325
345
365
006
026
046
066
106
126
146
166
004
024
044
064
104
124
144
164
204
224
244
264
304
324
344
364
005
025
045
065
105
125
145
165
DL05 Micro PLC User Manual, 6th Edition, Rev. C
003
023
043
063
103
123
143
163
203
223
243
263
303
323
343
363
004
024
044
064
104
124
144
164
002
022
042
062
102
122
142
162
202
222
242
262
302
322
342
362
003
023
043
063
103
123
143
163
001
021
041
061
101
121
141
161
201
221
241
261
301
321
341
361
002
022
042
062
102
122
142
162
000
020
040
060
100
120
140
160
200
220
240
260
300
320
340
360
001
021
041
061
101
121
141
161
000
020
040
060
100
120
140
160
Chapter 3: CPU Specifications and Operation
Counter Status Bit Map
This table provides a listing of individual counter contacts associated with each V-memory
address bit.
MSB
DL05 Counter (CT) Contacts
LSB
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
017
037
057
077
117
137
157
177
016
036
056
076
116
136
156
176
015
035
055
075
115
135
155
175
014
034
054
074
114
134
154
174
013
033
053
073
113
133
153
173
012
032
052
072
112
132
152
172
011
031
051
071
111
131
151
171
010
030
050
070
110
130
150
170
007
027
047
067
107
127
147
167
006
026
046
066
106
126
146
166
005
025
045
065
105
125
145
165
004
024
044
064
104
124
144
164
003
023
043
063
103
123
143
163
002
022
042
062
102
122
142
162
001
021
041
061
101
121
141
161
000
020
040
060
100
120
140
160
Address
V41140
V41141
V41142
V41143
V41144
V41145
V41146
V41147
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
A
B
C
D
DL05 Micro PLC User Manual, 6th Edition, Rev. C
3–33
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