Command Builder Manual v3.6.1
Logitek Electronic Systems
CommandBuilder 3.6
Reference Manual
Revision 3.6.1
May 2013
Logitek Electronic Systems, Inc.
5622 Edgemoor Drive
Houston, Texas 77081
USA
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Fax
+1-713-664-4470
+1-713-664-4479
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Contents © 2013 Logitek Electronic Systems, Inc
Notice
Every effort has been made to supply complete and accurate information. However, Logitek Electronic Systems, Inc. assumes no
responsibility for its use, nor any infringement of patents or other rights of third parties, which would result.
Worldwide rights reserved. Except for your own personal use, no part of this publication may be stored in a retrieval system,
transmitted or reproduced in any way, including but not limited to photocopy, photograph, magnetic or other record, without the
prior agreement and written permission of Logitek Electronic Systems, Inc.
Logitek is a trademark of Logitek Electronic Systems, Inc.
All other trademarks acknowledged.
All specifications are subject to change without notice.
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
3
Document Revisions
Date
May 2009
August 2009
May 2013
4
Revision
3.5
3.6
3.6.1
Author
Ben Hietbrink
Ben Hietbrink
John Davis
Notes
First release of CommandBuilder 3.5 manual
First release of CommandBuilder 3.6 manual
Addition of commands to support second generation Mosaic and ROC consoles
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Contents
Document Revisions................................................................................................................... 4
Contents
5
Command Index.......................................................................................................................... 9
Part A: Using CommandBuilder................................................................................................. 11
1 Introduction............................................................................................................................ 11
About this Manual............................................................................................................. 11
How to Use This Manual.................................................................................................... 12
Which Parts to Read.......................................................................................................... 13
System Requirements......................................................................................................... 14
2 Trigger Concepts..................................................................................................................... 15
CommandBuilder – do I need it?........................................................................................ 15
What are Triggers and Procedures?..................................................................................... 15
Where are Triggers stored?................................................................................................. 17
Where are Triggers executed?............................................................................................. 17
3 Installing CommandBuilder.................................................................................................... 18
Software Installation.......................................................................................................... 18
4 Working with Trigger Table files............................................................................................ 20
Read Existing Trigger Table................................................................................................. 21
Create New Trigger Table................................................................................................... 21
Save Trigger Table.............................................................................................................. 21
Upload Trigger Table.......................................................................................................... 22
5 Creating & Editing Trigger Tables........................................................................................... 25
System Page...................................................................................................................... 25
Triggers & Procedures........................................................................................................ 27
Trigger & Procedure Lists.................................................................................................... 28
Editing Triggers & Procedures............................................................................................. 31
Keyboard Shortcuts............................................................................................................ 34
Part B: Logitek Scripting Language............................................................................................ 35
6 Language Overview................................................................................................................. 35
Triggers............................................................................................................................. 35
Procedures........................................................................................................................ 36
Action Commands............................................................................................................. 36
General Syntax.................................................................................................................. 36
Device Numbers................................................................................................................ 37
7 Trigger Types – General Triggers............................................................................................ 38
Introduction...................................................................................................................... 38
General Rules.................................................................................................................... 38
Declaring General Triggers................................................................................................. 38
General Trigger Types......................................................................................................... 38
General Trigger Format...................................................................................................... 39
8 Trigger Types – Init Trigger..................................................................................................... 44
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
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Introduction...................................................................................................................... 44
General Rules.................................................................................................................... 44
Declaring the Init Trigger.................................................................................................... 44
Init Trigger Format............................................................................................................. 44
Applications...................................................................................................................... 45
9 Trigger Types – Conditional Triggers...................................................................................... 46
Introduction...................................................................................................................... 46
General Rules.................................................................................................................... 46
Declaring Conditional Triggers............................................................................................ 46
Conditional Trigger Types................................................................................................... 46
Conditional Trigger Format................................................................................................. 47
10 Trigger Types – Schedule Event Triggers.............................................................................. 49
Introduction...................................................................................................................... 49
General Rules.................................................................................................................... 49
Declaring Schedule Triggers................................................................................................ 49
Schedule Trigger Format..................................................................................................... 49
11 Procedures............................................................................................................................. 51
Introduction...................................................................................................................... 51
General Rules.................................................................................................................... 51
Declaring Procedures......................................................................................................... 51
Procedure Format.............................................................................................................. 52
Writing Procedures............................................................................................................ 52
Using Procedures............................................................................................................... 53
12 Action Commands................................................................................................................. 54
Introduction...................................................................................................................... 54
On, Off & Flash Commands............................................................................................... 55
Fader Commands.............................................................................................................. 59
External Communications................................................................................................... 69
Other Functions................................................................................................................. 72
Execution Control.............................................................................................................. 73
13 Surface Text Commands
............................................................................................ 77
Introduction...................................................................................................................... 77
ROC Screens..................................................................................................................... 77
Numix I Screens................................................................................................................. 78
Numix I Selector Wedge Screens........................................................................................ 78
Numix I Fader Wedge Screens............................................................................................ 83
Numix II Screens................................................................................................................ 88
Numix II Selector Wedge Screens....................................................................................... 89
Numix II Fader Wedge Screens........................................................................................... 92
Remora Screens................................................................................................................. 97
Remora Selector Screens.................................................................................................... 97
Remora Fader Screens........................................................................................................ 99
Mosaic Screens................................................................................................................ 105
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Mosaic Fader Screen........................................................................................................ 106
Mosaic Wide Softkey Screen............................................................................................. 107
Mosaic Monitor Screen.................................................................................................... 109
Mosaic Meter Bridge Screens............................................................................................ 109
Artisan Screens................................................................................................................ 113
Artisan Fader Screen........................................................................................................ 114
Artisan Effects Screen ...................................................................................................... 116
Artisan Master Screen ..................................................................................................... 116
Artisan Monitor Screen.................................................................................................... 117
Artisan Wide Softkey Screen............................................................................................. 118
Artisan Meter Bridge Screens............................................................................................ 120
Route 3 Text.................................................................................................................... 123
Text Select Functions........................................................................................................ 127
14 Additional Surface Commands........................................................................................... 136
Introduction.................................................................................................................... 136
Artisan/Mosaic Features................................................................................................... 136
15 User & System Variables..................................................................................................... 143
Introduction.................................................................................................................... 143
User Variables.................................................................................................................. 143
System Variables.............................................................................................................. 143
Defining Variables............................................................................................................ 143
Route Variables................................................................................................................ 145
16 Test Statements................................................................................................................... 146
Part C: Examples and application notes.................................................................................. 153
17 Trigger Layout...................................................................................................................... 153
Allocating Stub Triggers.................................................................................................... 153
Trigger Naming................................................................................................................ 155
18 Basic Examples.................................................................................................................... 157
CD Preview..................................................................................................................... 157
Quick Record.................................................................................................................. 159
Route Select.................................................................................................................... 162
Mic Mute........................................................................................................................ 163
12 x 1 Router.................................................................................................................. 165
Record Start with Tally..................................................................................................... 167
Console Scenes................................................................................................................ 169
Mosaic Monitor Hotkeys.................................................................................................. 172
19 Delay Control Examples...................................................................................................... 174
Delay Start...................................................................................................................... 174
Delay Dump.................................................................................................................... 176
Post Monitor.................................................................................................................... 178
Delay Exit – Method A (Timer Based)................................................................................ 180
Delay Exit – Method B (Hard Cut)..................................................................................... 182
Delay Exit – Method C (Next Event) .................................................................................. 184
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
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Delay Exit – Method D (Ramp Down)............................................................................... 186
20 Intercom Examples.............................................................................................................. 188
Logitek Intercom with calling station display..................................................................... 188
21 On-air Switching Examples................................................................................................. 193
Assignment Mixer............................................................................................................ 193
Network Source Switcher – Direct Access Version............................................................. 194
Network Source Switcher – XY Version............................................................................. 196
22 Device Control Examples.................................................................................................... 197
BetaBrite Signs................................................................................................................. 197
Functionality Description................................................................................................. 199
23 Guest Panel Examples......................................................................................................... 201
Mic On/Off...................................................................................................................... 201
Mic Mute........................................................................................................................ 202
Lamp Tallies.................................................................................................................... 204
24 vSnapshot Examples............................................................................................................ 206
Capture On..................................................................................................................... 206
Recall On........................................................................................................................ 207
Edit On........................................................................................................................... 208
Appendix A Release Notes....................................................................................................... 210
What’s New in CommandBuilder..................................................................................... 210
Release Notes.................................................................................................................. 210
Appendix B Keyword Summary............................................................................................... 214
Introduction.................................................................................................................... 214
Keywords........................................................................................................................ 214
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Command Index
Assembly Command...................................71
Bus On/Off.................................................55
Button On/Off............................................56
Call Procedure............................................73
Cancel Timer..............................................75
Clear Trigger...............................................75
Clear When Off..........................................76
If Button.....................................................47
If State......................................................149
If State And...............................................149
If State Or.................................................150
If State Scan..............................................150
If Timer.......................................................48
If Timer Talk Delay.....................................48
If Toggle....................................................146
If Trigger.....................................................47
If Variable.................................................147
If Variable And..........................................148
If Variable Or............................................148
If Variable Talk Time.................................151
Init Trigger..................................................44
Input Route................................................59
Lamp Flash.................................................58
Lamp On/Off .............................................57
Mosaic Clock....................................110, 121
Mosaic Label Text.....................106, 114, 116
Mosaic Meter Bridge Text.................110, 121
Mosaic Set Channel Color.................136, 139
Mosaic Set Lamp Intensity.........................141
Mosaic Wide Softkey Route Select. .107, 108,
111, 119, 122
Mosaic Wide Softkey Text.................107, 118
Numix I Clock.............................................87
Numix I Function Screen Text.....................79
Numix I Label Text.....................................85
Numix I Large Font Text..............................84
Numix I Message Arrow..............................86
Numix I Selections Screen Text...................80
Numix I Small Font Text..............................84
Numix I Softkeys Screen Text......................82
Numix I Temperature.................................87
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Numix II Clock............................................96
Numix II Label Text....................................94
Numix II Large Font Text.............................93
Numix II Message Arrow.............................95
Numix II Question Screen Text...................90
Numix II Selections Screen Text..................90
Numix II Small Font Text.............................93
Numix II Softkeys Screen Text.....................91
Numix II Temperature................................96
Off Trigger..................................................40
On Trigger..................................................39
Procedure...................................................52
Quit/Exit.....................................................73
Remora Clock...........................................104
Remora Label Text....................................101
Remora Large Font Text............................100
Remora Message Arrow............................102
Remora Questions Screen Text...................98
Remora Selections Screen Text...................98
Remora Small Font Text............................100
Remora Temperature................................104
ROC Clock.................................................77
Route 3 Button Trigger................................40
Route 3 Message Mode Text.....................126
Route 3 Normal Mode Text......................124
Route 3 Set Message Mode.......................125
Route Recall.............................................145
Route Select If Accept...............................134
Route Select If Cancel...............................135
Route Select Set Mode..............................132
Route Select Text......................................134
Route Store...............................................145
Route Trigger..............................................41
Schedule Event Trigger................................49
Set Device Alias..........................................60
Set Fader Compression...............................66
Set Fader Equalization.................................67
Set Fader Level...........................................61
Set Fader Limiter.........................................65
Set Fader Mode..........................................62
Set Fader Pan..............................................64
9
Set Fader Trim............................................63
Set Mix Minus.............................................68
Set Toggle State..........................................74
Set Trigger Active/Not Active.......................74
Set Variable..............................................144
Set Variable Talk Time..............................144
Talk Delay..................................................72
Text to Com Port........................................70
10
Text to UDP Port........................................69
Unroute Trigger..........................................42
Variable Change Trigger..............................43
Variable Select If Accept...........................128
Variable Select If Cancel...........................130
Variable Select Set Mode..........................128
Variable Select Text..................................128
When Off.................................................152
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Part A: Using CommandBuilder
This section provides an overview of the CommandBuilder program, and how to use
it to design, create, load, save and upload Logitek Trigger Tables.
1
Introduction
About this Manual
This manual describes the installation and operation of the Logitek CommandBuilder application.
Intended Audience
This manual is aimed at Engineers and Technical Operators responsible for installing, configuring
and supporting a Logitek Console Router System utilizing the Supervisor and vTools applications.
CommandBuilder is used to design macros, or “triggers” that perform advanced functionality. The
Logitek Scripting Language is a simple programming language that provides a level of control over
your Logitek system, that is limited only by your imagination. It is assumed that the person
responsible for installing and configuring Supervisor has a solid understanding of Microsoft Windows
desktop operating systems, or has ready access to IT support. Users wishing to develop complex
Trigger functionality will benefit from any programming experience.
Manual Conventions
The following conventions are used in this manual:
This text indicates a menu choice to be made, with an arrow separating a multi-level selection,
e.g. Control Panel  Users & Passwords. This can be a menu choice in a Logitek application, or
within Windows.
 Indicates a “see-also” section in this manual, or another Logitek manual.
The exclamation symbol signifies an important note or critical information.
This text represents a command, script block example, instruction to
be typed, or directory path.
TIP:
A useful tip from our knowledge base!
This page is intentionally left blank.
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
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About CommandBuilder
The CommandBuilder program is a special text editor developed by Logitek to add advanced
functionality to your Logitek system. It allows you to “program” the various buttons and GPIs on the
Audio Engine and Surfaces, and write “triggers” that react to almost anything that occurs.
In CommandBuilder the user writes Audio Engine action commands that are executed when a
trigger occurs in the Audio Engine. Triggers are basically events, for example a button is pressed,
a GPI is activated, or a fader source is changed. Triggers are built in CommandBuilder and stored
in text format. The Trigger Table is compiled into proprietary format and uploaded to Supervisor.
The true power of Triggers is unleashed in multi-engine systems. Supervisor can control interactive
events among multiple Audio Engines, such as an intercom between studios, or on-air switching.
How to Use This Manual
The primary purpose of this manual is to introduce the reader to the Logitek Scripting Language
and to provide a useful starting point for developing your own Triggers.
The manual is divided into three main parts. These can be read in isolation, to suit the level of
knowledge the reader requires.
Part A – Using CommandBuilder
The first section of the manual provides an introduction to the application and how to navigate your
way around it. CommandBuilder operates like most Logitek applications, so these topics are quick
summaries.
Part B – Logitek Scripting Language
The majority of the manual is devoted to a Logitek Scripting Language reference, providing
detailed explanations of all keywords and functions. It is not necessary to read these chapters
completely, but we suggest you skim read the topic summaries and read the detail for any areas of
interest.
Part C – Trigger Applications
The last section provides real world Trigger examples to help you achieve common functions
quickly. These include intercoms, on-air switching and console scenes. These examples are based
on the best Triggers users, integrators, resellers and Logitek itself has designed and implemented
worldwide.
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Which Parts to Read
This manual can be read from cover to cover, but not all users will need to do so.
System Administrators
If you are a System Administrator, responsible only for uploading new Trigger tables (supplied by
other engineers at your station, Logitek, or resellers), then you only need to read the first few
chapters of Part A, stopping at the end of Chapter 4.
Maintenance Engineers
If you need to maintain or modify existing Trigger Tables, we suggest you read all of Part A, to
learn your way around the entire application.
You can then use Part B as a reference, looking up only the commands and Trigger types used by
your station. Part C may be of interest to get ideas for future changes or additions.
System Engineers
If you are designing and configuring a Logitek System, you’ll probably want to read this manual
from cover to cover. We suggest you become familiar with the application and commands first, and
then use the examples in Part C to help you develop and test Triggers to suit your needs.
System Integrators / Value Added Resellers
System Integrators and VARs should also read this manual from cover to cover.
In particular, we encourage you to thoroughly evaluate the example Triggers in Part C, as these
provide comprehensive examples of how to perform complex tasks.
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
13
System Requirements
CommandBuilder is designed to run on Microsoft Windows NT based operating systems, including
Windows 2000 & Windows XP. The application will also run on non-NT based systems (such as
Windows 95, 98 and ME) but these are not recommended due to their instability and less robust
networking features.
Recommended PC Specification
Although CommandBuilder can run under a lower specification, the following is provided as the
recommended minimum under new or recent hardware.
Processor
Memory
System
Screen Size
Disk Space
Pentium 4
512MB
Windows NT based (2000, XP, Server 2003, or newer)
1024x768 or greater (High Color modes recommended)
Minimal disk space required
CommandBuilder does not have to be executed on your Supervisor machine. It is designed to run
on your local machine, and upload to Supervisor over a TCP/IP network.
Compatibility
This manual is for CommandBuilder 3, designed for use with Supervisor 3.
CommandBuilder 3 is a release that supports both 8-character and 16-character Audio Engine
configuration files. It also contains some updates and bug fixes from previous versions. A compatible
version of Supervisor 3 is required.
CommandBuilder and Supervisor are inter-related when it comes to Trigger compilation. The
version of both applications should be the same, and the build dates should also match. This is
because the compiled Trigger Table file format must match between both applications.
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
2
Trigger Concepts
You can use Supervisor without making use of any of the Trigger functionality of CommandBuilder.
However, most recent Logitek installations now make use of Triggers in some way. If you have any
button panels on your surfaces, you will almost certainly need CommandBuilder to program those
buttons. Numix II, Remora, Artisan and Mosaic surfaces all include programmable buttons in their
basic configurations. Additional panels may be added if more buttons are needed.
CommandBuilder – do I need it?
If you want to make use of the advanced macro programming functionality offered by Supervisor,
you will need CommandBuilder. There are two primary uses for the application:
Developing Triggers and Procedures
Depending on your situation, you may be developing triggers and procedures, or using a third party
such as Logitek, a reseller or a systems integrator.
CommandBuilder is used to develop Triggers and Procedures into a Trigger Table that is later
uploaded to Supervisor.
Uploading Existing Triggers and Procedures
Regardless of the origin of your Trigger Table, it needs to be uploaded to Supervisor to be
executed. If your station uses a third party to provide Trigger Tables, you’ll only need to read and
upload the Triggers and Procedures with CommandBuilder.
What are Triggers and Procedures?
A Trigger is an event “hook” that tells Supervisor what to do when something inside an Audio
Engine happens. Triggers contain two primary parts:
1. The first line, which tells Supervisor what to “trigger” on (e.g. a particular button press)
2. A number of lines of code to execute when that Trigger event occurs.
For example, if you have a Numix Button24 Wedge (a panel with 24 buttons/lamps), you have a
trigger for each button on that panel that you assign a function to. Often, you might have Triggers
assigned only to the “ON” function, i.e. to run a function when the button is pressed. In some
cases, you will also have a corresponding “OFF” trigger, that runs when the button is released (e.g. a
push-to-talk type function).
Procedures are reusable code blocks that can be called by Triggers, or other Procedures. These
are useful for reducing code repetition for frequently used functionality.
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
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 The exact format of Trigger and Procedure commands is covered in Part B of this
manual.
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Where are Triggers stored?
Like standard software development, there are two parts to Trigger Tables – the original source
code used to develop them, and the compiled code to be executed.
The process below outlines the various stages of Trigger development and execution. The Trigger
source code is stored in text format by CommandBuilder. The actual source files are editable in a
text editor, provided the line numbers and trigger numbers are not upset.
When you upload a Trigger Table to Supervisor, CommandBuilder compiles the table into
commands that Supervisor understands, and uploads the compiled table to Supervisor. Supervisor
then stores the compiled file in memory and on disk. The disk file is only replaced when you
upload a new copy of the Trigger Table.
CommandBuilder
Triggers
developed in
CommandBuilder
Trigger Table
saved in text
format (source
code)
Supervisor
Trigger Table
compiled &
uploaded to
Supervisor
Compiled Triggers
stored by
Supervisor
Figure 1 - Trigger storage
Where are Triggers executed?
The trigger execution process is generally as follows:
1. An event is originated by a control surface (this step is skipped if the event originates in the
engine).
2. The Audio Engine receives this event, and sends a copy of the command to Supervisor.
3. Supervisor logs the event and updates its Audio Engine State and Log pages.
4. Supervisor checks the event to see if it has a matching trigger for that command.
5. If a trigger exists, Supervisor processes the logic and commands of the trigger.
6. If the trigger contains Audio Engine commands, Supervisor sends these to the Engine.
7. The Audio Engine executes the commands, or for lamp/text displays, sends it to the surface.
8. The Surface executes the commands.
Surface
Audio Engine
Supervisor
Control surface
sends command
to Audio Engine
Audio Engine
executes and
sends a copy to
Supervisor
Supervisor logs
command and
updates Audio
Engine status
Supervisor checks
for a matching
trigger for that
command
Surface executes
command
Audio Engine
executes
commands and
sends to surface
Supervisor sends
commands to
Audio Engine
Supervisor
processes trigger
Figure 2 - Trigger execution
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
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3
Installing CommandBuilder
This chapter describes the first time installation of CommandBuilder. If you are upgrading
CommandBuilder to this version, certain aspects of this chapter are also relevant.
Software Installation
The Logitek CommandBuilder software will be supplied via Email or download from the Logitek
website.
Logitek software is developed without reliance on components that are not standard in Windows.
Upon first execution, CommandBuilder will setup default registry keys and make configuration files
in the program directory.
It is possible to use the software without running an installer package. However, an installer
package, Setup3.6.exe will do all the installation tasks for you.
To upgrade or install using Setup3.6.exe
1.
2.
3.
4.
Create a new folder on your PC, such as C:\Temp.
Download all of the new applications to that folder, including Setup 3.6.
Launch Setup 3.6.
Select the option that fits your situation. The first option when you are installing the apps for
the first time. Use the second option when you are upgrading a previous installation where
Supervisor is dated before 2007 (This will not copy profile data and Registry entries). Use
the third option when you are upgrading a previous installation where Supervisor is dated
after 2007 (This will copy profile data and Registry entries).
5. The setup program will prompt you for the location of your existing Logitek files. Point it to
the existing folder (usually, this is c:\Logitek but may be different at your site).
6. The setup program will prompt you for the location of the new files. The default is
c:\Logitek3.6. Adjust this if you use a different folder or drive letter.
7. The setup program will also give you a choice of, setting up a folder called Logitek Programs
in the Windows Start menu, and creating Desktop shortcuts.
8. Launch AEConfig 3.6, read each config file (.aec or .a16) and save it without making any
changes to ensure that any new formatting is correctly done.
9. Launch Supervisor 3.6 and set up the COM ports for the engines if necessary. In
Supervisor 3.6 you can change COM port assignments without having to restart the
program.
10. Launch CommandBuilder 3.6, read your trigger table from c:\Logitek3.6, (or the
directory you have stored your configs in, if you did not use the defaults) save it, and upload
it to Supervisor.
11. Configure and launch any other PC applications that you use at your facility. Do not try using
older versions of our software with version 3.6 as it will not be compatible.
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
The setup program will copy the required files to the program directory, establish a folder called
Logitek Programs in the Windows Start menu (if ticked), and create desktop shortcuts (if ticked).
These tasks can also be done manually by copying the program file to an appropriate directory.
Figure 3 - Setup3.6 Installation Type Choice
The CommandBuilder program doesn't require any auxiliary or special files to run. The program
creates user named trigger table files that are read or stored as ASCII text files with the file extension
.txt. Some features of the CommandBuilder program require data available only in the
.aec/.a16 and .nco files created by the AEConfig program. For this reason, it is recommended
that the Trigger Tables be in the same folder as the AEConfig configuration files.
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
19
4
Working with Trigger Table files
This chapter outlines how to create, save, read and upload Trigger Table files. You do not need to
be familiar with Trigger programming to use these functions.
The files are standard ASCII .txt files, with the addition of trigger and line numbers throughout the
file. Whilst the files can be viewed and edited in a standard text editor, care should be taken not to
disrupt the structure of the file – in particular no lines should be deleted or added.
CommandBuilder provides the ability to copy and paste blocks of Triggers and Procedures, to
allow for faster duplication of similar code. Advanced users can also directly edit the Trigger file in
a text editor, provided the above warnings are heeded.
When you first open CommandBuilder, you will see a number of buttons across the top. These are
used to access core functions of the program.
Figure 4 - CommandBuilder main page
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Read Existing Trigger Table
The Read Trigger Table button allows you to read an existing
file into CommandBuilder. A Trigger Table must be read
before it can be edited or uploaded to Supervisor. Clicking the Read Trigger Table button displays a
standard Windows Open File dialog box. Select the appropriate file and press Open to read the file.
Choose Cancel if you accidentally click the button.
A warning message will be displayed if you attempt to read an existing Trigger Table after editing
the current Trigger Table without saving.
The last file that was read or saved is automatically loaded the next time CommandBuilder is
started. The Edit Triggers screen is automatically displayed after the Trigger Table file is read.
Create New Trigger Table
The New Trigger Table button allows you to create a new
empty Trigger Table.
A warning message will be displayed if you attempt to make a new Trigger Table after editing the
current Trigger Table without saving.
Any changes to the current file are not saved unless explicitly done so by
the user.
Save Trigger Table
The Save Trigger Table button allows you to save the current
Trigger Table in CommandBuilder to a file. Clicking the Save Trigger Table button displays a
standard Windows Save As dialog box. Select an existing file name or enter a new file name and
press Save to write the file to disk. Select Cancel to go back to the program without saving.
A warning message will be displayed if you attempt to make a new Trigger Table, read an existing
Trigger Table or exit the program after editing the current Trigger Table without saving it. Any
changes to the current Trigger Table are not saved unless explicitly done so by the user. Although
not required, it is a good idea to save the current Trigger Table before uploading it to Supervisor.
TIP:
As with any configuration editing and development, it’s a good idea to save
different revisions of the file when you make major changes. This gives you an easy
rollback path if your changes don’t work as intended, or you need to review
previous code. You can use any naming convention that works for you.
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
21
Upload Trigger Table
Trigger Tables must be uploaded to Supervisor to be put into
use on your Logitek System. You do not need to be familiar
with Trigger programming to upload to Supervisor. In many cases, Triggers may be supplied by
Logitek, a value added reseller or a systems integrator, and uploaded by the on-site system
administrator.
The upload process
The Upload Table to Supervisor screen contains three basic functions, as follows:
1. Connects to Supervisor via the IP network.
2. Checks all active Triggers and Procedures for errors and compiles them.
3. Uploads the compiled Trigger Table to Supervisor.
The checking of the current Trigger Table for errors may be performed at any time, even if
CommandBuilder is not connected to Supervisor.
Before you upload
In order to upload the Trigger Table, CommandBuilder must be connected to Supervisor via the IP
network. Data fields on the right side of the System Page must be filled in correctly. In the
Supervisor Primary box either the IP Address or Computer Name must be entered, as it appears
in the System Administrator screen in the Primary Supervisor. The Server Port number must also
contain the Server Port number found on the same System Administrator screen. The default
Server Port number is 10200.
In the User Profile screen in the Primary Supervisor, a valid user name and password must be
entered in the proper fields, with the checkbox for “CommandBuilder” ticked. This data only needs
to be entered once, and is usually setup when your system is installed.
A new Remember Password tickbox has been included as of
CommandBuilder v3.6.2.0. This is ticked by default, however, if you are
remotely managing multiple sites it is a good idea to untick the
Remember Password box.
This can greatly assist in preventing the accidental uploading of an incorrect
Trigger Table to a site.
Uploading to Supervisor
Click the Press to Connect button to attempt to connect to Supervisor. When successfully
connected, the red status "Not Connected" bar will change to a green status "Connected" bar and
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the button title will change to Press to Disconnect. The log is cleared and the Check Trigger Table
button is also reset at this time.
Click the Check Trigger Table button to check all active Triggers and Procedures for errors. If any
errors are found, the Trigger Table can not be uploaded to Supervisor.
The Check Trigger Table button can be used at any time you want to verify the entire table, even
when there is no connection to Supervisor. A green progress bar at the top of the log window shows
the status, and any problems are listed below. Possible errors include mistakes in Triggers or
Procedures, duplicated Trigger events, or duplicated Procedure names.
When the checking is complete, a grid below the progress bar will display a summary of the
number of duplicate, invalid, active and total Triggers and Procedures. If there are no errors or
duplicates and Supervisor is connected, the log will indicate that the Trigger Table may be
uploaded.
Click the Upload Trigger Table button to transfer the compiled Trigger Table to Supervisor. A
yellow progress bar in the log shows the status of the upload as it progresses. The progress bar will
turn green when the Trigger Table has been successfully uploaded and accepted by Supervisor.
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Figure 5 - CommandBuilder Upload page
After Uploading
Click the Press to Disconnect button to disconnect from Supervisor. The connection is
automatically closed when the CommandBuilder program is terminated.
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5
Creating & Editing Trigger Tables
This chapter explains the tools required to setup a new Trigger Table and edit an existing one. The
editing tools follow most Windows conventions and provide many functions for streamlining the
process.
System Page
The System Page is used to setup information about a Trigger Table and the
associated Audio Engine configuration files. The current Trigger Table file name and its associated
project folder are displayed in the upper right hand portion of the screen.
TIP:
The Trigger Table files associated with a set of Audio Engine configuration files
should be kept in the same folder. You may wish to create new project folders for
major revisions of your Configurations and/or Triggers – this can help keep the
number of files in the directory manageable, and provides a rollback path when
revisions do not work as intended.
The System Page is used to create a link between the Trigger Table and the Audio Engine
Configuration files. This allows CommandBuilder to reference Audio Engine resources by name,
rather than by Device Number. The friendly name of an input or output is not only easier to read
and work with, but is less likely to change during configuration changes.
In addition, Trigger programming for large, networked systems is greatly aided, as the same input
name will almost certainly have different Device Numbers across each Engine. By referencing the
input by name, only the Audio Engine number needs to be changed.
The Trigger Table is linked to the Audio Engines’ Network Configuration (.nco) file. This file tells
CommandBuilder where to find each of the Engine Configuration (.aec) files needed to read the
inputs, outputs and resources for each Audio Engine. For this reason, the .nco, .aec and Trigger
Table files should all be in the one directory.
Selecting a Network Config File
The Browse button allows you to select a Network Config file name to be associated with the
current Trigger Table. This only needs to be entered on the System Page once. The appropriate file
is read at startup and whenever a different Trigger Table is loaded, so recent changes in
configurations will be reflected. The Network Config file name must be chosen before source and
destination device names can be used.
Once an appropriate Network Config file has been selected, the list of Source Devices and
Destination Devices will be populated for each Audio Engine. You can browse the lists for each
Engine using the Audio Engine Number scrollbars. In addition, the Network AE List section will
show the Configuration files for each Audio Engine in your system.
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User Variables
The System Page is also used to declare the names of variables used in the Trigger Table. A variable
must be declared on this page before you can use it. You will receive an error when you translate a
Trigger or try to upload the table if a variable has been used but not declared.
To enter a new variable name or edit an existing variable, double click the appropriate cell in the
list. You can also use the up and down arrows to navigate the list, the F2 key to edit a name, and
enter to accept.
 Using variables in Triggers is covered in later Language Reference chapters.
 TIP:
User Variables are prefixed with a small “v” when they are referenced in a Trigger
or Procedure. Do not enter the “v” when naming variables on the System Page.
Figure 6 - CommandBuilder System Page
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Triggers & Procedures
The uses of Triggers & Procedures are covered in detail in the Language Reference chapters of this
manual. In short:
 Triggers are events that contain commands to be executed when something happens in
your Logitek System.
 Procedures are reusable code blocks that can be called by Triggers, or other Procedures.
These are useful for reducing code repetition for frequently used functionality.
Figure 7 - CommandBuilder Trigger List
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Trigger & Procedure Lists
Use the buttons at the top of CommandBuilder to access the
Trigger List and Procedure List screens. These screens provide
a summary of the Triggers and Procedures in the Trigger Table. The functions on both screens are
similar.
Each screen contains a grid that displays the Trigger or Procedure number, along with its
descriptive title, the number of commands, whether it is valid and whether it is active. The
Procedure List also shows the name of the Procedure, whilst the Trigger List shows the Main
Trigger it will fire on.
Both screens also show the file name of the Trigger Table you are currently working with, as well as
a percentage bar showing the amount of available space occupied by Triggers and Procedures.
CommandBuilder has been tested on very large systems with thousands of triggers, so it is unlikely
you will run out of internal memory for Triggers and Procedures.
The grid can be scrolled to view all Triggers and Procedures. Use the arrows on the scroll bar to
move through the list slowly, and the page up/down function of the scroll bar to move quickly.
Double clicking on a desired Trigger or Procedure line will open the edit window, detailed in the
next section. This will occur even if the line is blank.
Planning Trigger & Procedure Allocation
Like any programming language, it pays to keep associated functionality in groups, and leave room
for the addition of future Triggers and Procedures. Experience has shown that the most logical
layout of your Trigger list is to keep the related Triggers together – i.e. setup the Audio Engine GPI
on and off triggers, ordering them by GPI input number. It also pays to leave some blank lines
between each group.
 See the Trigger Examples later in the manual to get a feel for a logical Trigger layout.
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Figure 8 - CommandBuilder Procedure List page
Insert New Trigger/Procedure
This function will insert a new Trigger or Procedure directly above or below the line that is
selected. If you wish to enter a Trigger or Procedure against a blank line, you do not need to use
the Insert function; you can just double click the line you wish to use.
Selecting a block of Triggers or Procedures
To select a block of Triggers or Procedures click on the desired first Trigger or Procedure and drag
to the desired last item in the list. Alternatively you can click the first item, then shift-click the last
item to select the desired block. This allows you to scroll through the item list to select a large block.
A highlighted block can be cut, copied or pasted using the buttons described below.
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Copy Trigger/Procedure Block
Once you have selected a block, click the Copy Trigger Block or Copy Procedure Block button to
copy that block into the clipboard. These functions are used to duplicate Trigger and Procedure
blocks.
Cut Trigger/Procedure Block
You can also cut a block of Triggers or Procedures to the clipboard, using the Cut Trigger Block or
Cut Procedure Block functions. In addition to putting the block into memory, you will be asked
whether you wish to move the remaining Triggers or Procedures up to fill the cut block. This is
useful for moving an entire set of Triggers or Procedures to another location.
Paste Trigger Block
The Paste Trigger Block button when clicked, will pop up an option screen. From this screen, you
can choose to Insert Before, Insert After, Overwrite or Cancel. The first two options will insert the
selected block from the clipboard to the list just before or after the item that is currently highlighted.
The Overwrite option will insert the selected block from the clipboard in place of the item or items
that are currently highlighted. The Cancel option will cancel the Pasting of the block. Once you
have pasted a block, it is discarded from the clipboard.
Paste Procedure Block
The Paste Procedure Block button inserts the selected block from the clipboard to the list just
before the item that is currently highlighted. Once you have pasted a block, it is discarded from the
clipboard.
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Editing Triggers & Procedures
The Edit Triggers and Edit Procedures buttons open an editing
screen where the respective Trigger or Procedure can be
created or edited. The editing interface is very similar between both Triggers and Procedures. Only
the Edit Triggers page is shown below – the same functions are available in the Edit Procedures
page. In each edit window, the current Trigger Table file name is displayed for reference. The file
name will be blank for a new table.
The Trigger or Procedure number and its current valid or invalid status are also displayed. When
making a new item, a description should be entered in the Name/Title box. This is displayed in the
list summary view, and should briefly describe the function and relevant information.
A check box allows the Trigger or Procedure to be made active or not active. Items that are
unchecked (not active) will not be uploaded to Supervisor and, therefore will not respond to events.
Figure 9 - CommandBuilder Edit Triggers page
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31
Navigation Buttons
A group of buttons is provided to move quickly between items in the table without going back to
the list view. Many of these buttons also have keyboard shortcuts, listed at the end of this chapter.
The First button will display the first Trigger or Procedure in the file.
The Prev button will go the previous Trigger or Procedure in the list. This item will be displayed
even if it is blank.
The Next button will go to the next Trigger or Procedure in the list. This item will be displayed
even if it is blank.
The Last button will display the last Trigger or Procedure that has a name that is not blank.
The Go To button allows an item number to be entered in the box. Pressing the Go To button, or
Enter, will display the numbered Trigger or Procedure even if it is blank.
Function Buttons
The Edit Triggers and Edit Procedures screens have a text editing window in which commands are
created and edited. The edit window works like most text editors and may be scrolled left or right
and up or down. Blocks of text may be highlighted by clicking and dragging the mouse over the
desired text.
The Run Translation button will cause CommandBuilder to scan the text and attempt to compile it.
Commands are not checked as you write, but only when the Run Translation button is pressed.
The Show Translation button will display an additional Machine Hex window that shows the
commands translated into Logitek hex code. This window is intended for advanced debugging and
error message display purposes. If there is a problem translating commands to hex code, the error
message will be displayed in red in the Machine Hex window. During debugging, if you have
changed the trigger, you must press the Run Translation button again to retranslate the commands
to hex code. The Machine Hex window can be hidden by pressing the Hide Translation button.
The Find button finds the first Trigger or Procedure that contains the word or phrase that has been
entered in the text box. The Find function always scans from the first Trigger or Procedure. The
Find Next button finds the next Trigger or Procedure that contains the word or phrase in the Find
edit box.
The Cut, Copy and Paste buttons act like standard Windows text editing functions, allowing for
manipulation of highlighted text.
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The Clear button completely erases everything in the text edit window. The Clear button will not
erase the contents of the clipboard.
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Keyboard Shortcuts
The following keyboard shortcut keys can be used to assist with text editing:
Home
End
Go to the beginning of the current line.
Go to the end of the current line.
CTRL-Home
CTRL-End
Go to the beginning of the current trigger.
Go to the end of the current trigger.
ALT-D
ALT-K
ALT-L
ALT-V
Display the source and destination device lists.
Delete from cursor to end of line.
Highlight entire current line.
Display User Defined Variable list.
Del
Keypad +
Keypad -
Delete next character or highlighted lines.
Copies current line or highlighted lines to Clipboard.
Cuts current line or highlighted lines to Clipboard.
Insert
CTRL-C
CTRL-X
CTRL-V
Same as Paste button.
Same as Copy button.
Same as Cut button.
Same as Paste button.
PageUp
PageDown
Same as Prev button.
Same as Next button.
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Part B: Logitek Scripting Language
This section of the manual covers the Logitek Scripting Language, starting with an
overview of the summary, followed by a command reference.
6
Language Overview
The Logitek Scripting Language allows the user to write Triggers and action commands that
control the operation of Audio Engines. These events and commands are written in the
CommandBuilder program and uploaded to the Supervisor program. The Audio Engine only
understands its own Audio Engine Protocol. This Protocol is published and available to the user if
required. The Logitek Scripting Language allows control of the Audio Engine using commands that
are more user friendly than those of the Audio Engine Protocol itself.
Triggers
Triggers are user defined events in the Audio Engine or control surface. For example, an event may
be a button press or release, the opening or closing of a relay, or even a routing assignment. When
Supervisor detects the trigger event, any associated action commands from a Trigger are executed.
There are three types of triggers: General Triggers, the Init Trigger, and Conditional Triggers.
General Triggers
General Triggers are Audio Engine events that Supervisor watches for at all times. General
Triggers can be the turning ON or OFF of a button or relay, the “route” or “unroute” of an input
assignment, or the change in the value of a variable.
 See Chapter 7 for more details on General Triggers.
Init Trigger
The Init Trigger is a special Trigger that occurs each time the Supervisor program starts and
whenever the user clicks the Execute Init Triggers button in Supervisor.
 See Chapter 8 for more details on the Init Trigger.
Conditional Triggers
A Conditional Trigger is a Trigger that responds when a Conditional event occurs, for example a
timer. A General trigger must be used to set a Conditional Trigger. After being started by a
General Trigger, the firing of the timer is the Conditional Trigger event.
 See Chapter 9 for more details on Conditional Triggers.
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Procedures
Procedures are sets of action commands that can be called by name in other Triggers and
Procedures. They are like subroutines in programming or macros in word processing, and allow a
repetitive group of action commands to be stored in one place and used many times. Each
Procedure is given a unique user defined name. A simple call of the procedure name replaces
typing many lines of action commands in a Trigger. The use of Procedures reduces the overall size
of the stored Trigger Table by avoiding the duplication of frequently used code. They also improve
the manageability of the Trigger Table by reducing the number of places where changes might
need to be made. We strongly encourage the use of Procedures for code blocks that are used in
many Triggers.
Unlike full programming languages, Procedures in the Logitek Scripting Language cannot accept
any arguments or return values to the calling function. However, through the smart use of User
Variables, similar functionality can be achieved.
 See Chapter 11 for more details on Procedures.
Action Commands
Action Commands are direct commands to the Audio Engines or to Supervisor that are executed
when their Trigger event or Procedure occurs. Action Commands make the things happen that
we want to occur in an event. These commands can be entered in both Triggers and in
Procedures, and follow the Trigger or Procedure definition.
 See Chapter 12 for more details on Action Commands.
General Syntax
All Triggers, event declarations and Action Commands must be completed on one line. Triggers
and action commands can not be continued on a second or subsequent line.
The ~ (tilde) character is used to denote the beginning of documentation comment. All words to
the right of the tilde character are ignored. Thus if the first character in a line is the tilde character,
the entire line is considered a comment. The tilde character may be used to temporarily "comment
out" certain lines for testing. These lines can then be restored to service by removing the tilde
character, saving you from re-typing the entire line. The tilde character is not allowed on the first
line of a Trigger or Procedure. This line is reserved for the definition of the Trigger event or the
Procedure name. All comments are stored in the Trigger Table and are available for future
reference. A documentation banner near the beginning of a Trigger or Procedure with further
descriptions throughout the command listing is considered good practice.
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The scripting language decodes the key words that it finds on each line. Keyword entries in the
scripting language are not case sensitive. They may be entered in upper, lower or mixed case as
desired. All keywords must be separated by at least one blank space on either side. All words that
are not defined or recognized by the scripting language are treated as spaces. Since extra spaces
and words are ignored, they may be used to improve the readability of command lines. Unless
noted, the keywords may be in any order on the line. The recommended order shown in examples
is for the most logical readability.
 See B for a complete list of keywords.
Device Numbers
All signals in the Audio Engine are referenced by an internal number called a Device Number.
Each input signal is assigned a unique Device Number by the AEConfig program. Each output signal
is assigned a Device Number defined by the DSP table associated with a configuration file, or
assigned by an output in AEConfig. Input Device Numbers are called Source Devices and the
output Device numbers are called Destination Devices. Most commands sent from Supervisor to
the Audio Engine refer to a specific Source or Destination Device Number.
Source Devices are referred to using the keyword DEVICE followed by the device number in
hexadecimal notation. For example, DEVICE 010B could refer to a Source Device for an input on
a given Audio Engine.
Destination Devices are referred to using the keywords CHANNEL or FADER followed by the
console channel or fader number in decimal notation. The console channel or fader number is
translated by CommandBuilder to the proper destination device number in hexadecimal. You can
also directly enter the hex device number if known, although for code readability this is not
recommended.
Source Devices can also be referred to using the “s bracket” notation – the device name is
enclosed in square brackets prefixed with the letter “s”. For example, a device named "Host Mic"
could be referred to as s[Host Mic] in a trigger or action command.
Destination Devices can be referred to using the “d bracket” notation – the device name is
enclosed in square brackets prefixed with the letter “d”. For example, a device named "Fader 1"
could be referred to as d[Fader 1] in a trigger or action command.
The bracket notation is not dependent on knowing device numbers and is automatically looked up
by CommandBuilder when triggers are uploaded. This greatly simplifies the use of Device Numbers
over previous versions of CommandBuilder.
Pressing the Alt-D key combination will display a pop-up window from which Source and
Destination Devices can be selected and inserted into the code using the “bracket” notation.
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37
7
Trigger Types – General Triggers
Introduction
General Triggers are Audio Engine or Surface events that Supervisor watches for at all times.
When the event occurs, Supervisor responds by executing the action commands listed for the
General Trigger.
The basic form of a General Trigger is “TRIGGER DEVICE ACTION” where TRIGGER is the
required keyword; DEVICE is where the action will occur, and ACTION is what happens. The
DEVICE description includes items such as Audio Engine and Surface numbers, Device number,
Bus number, button names, variable names and Source or Device names. The ACTION item
includes things like ON, OFF, ROUTE, UNROUTE, SET, and CHANGE.
General Rules
 The keyword TRIGGER must be the first word on the first line.
 The first line can't be a comment line.
 A Trigger need not contain Action Commands – it can be a definition only.
Declaring General Triggers
A Trigger is defined by placing the appropriate Trigger command on the first line of an available
Trigger in the Trigger List page. Once you have found the Trigger you wish to define, double click
that row to edit the Trigger text. The Trigger definition is then the first line in the edit box.
The Trigger must be marked active for Supervisor to process the Action Commands that follow it.
General Trigger Types
There are six types of General Triggers, as follows:
Type
ON
OFF
ROUTE
UNROUTE
USER VARIABLE
SYSTEM VARIABLE
Description
An ON Trigger is fired when a channel ON event occurs
An OFF Trigger is fired when a channel OFF event occurs
A ROUTE Trigger is fired when a specified route occurs to
a specified device.
An UNROUTE Trigger is fired when a specified route is
replaced on a specified device
A USER VARIABLE Trigger is fired when there is a change
to the value of a user defined variable
A SYSTEM VARIABLE Trigger is fired when there is a
change to the value of a system variable.
Example Scenarios
Button pressed, GPI input goes high
Button released, GPI input goes low
Specific Input routed to fader
Other Input routed to fader
User Variable value change
System Variable value change
The General Triggers are described in more detail on the following pages.
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General Trigger Format
On Trigger
Fires when the specified Bus On event occurs.
Keyword
trigger
trigger
trigger
trigger
trigger
trigger
trigger
Engine
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
Not Used
Not Used
surf# | surface#
surf# | surface#
Not Used
surf# | surface#
surf# | surface#
Device
device#### (dest)
device#### (source)
fader#
chan# | channel#
d[DeviceName]
s[DeviceName]
bridge | softkey
Bus
bus#
bus#
bus#
bus#
bus#
bus#
butt# | button#
State
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
Option
{toggle}
{toggle}
{toggle}
{toggle}
{toggle}
{toggle}
{toggle}
 This Trigger must include the Audio Engine number, Surface number, Device or Fader
number, Bus number and the required keyword ON.
 One of the keywords CHANNEL, FADER, DEVICE, BRIDGE or SOFTKEY is required.
 The required Device or Fader number may be given using the s[Source Device] or
d[Destination Device] notation instead of using the DEVICE keyword.
 If using a Source Device, the Surface number is not required and will be ignored if present –
the Trigger will be fired no matter which Surface on the Engine causes the Bus On event.
 If using the BRIDGE or SOFTKEY Device keyword, use BUTT or BUTTON number.
 There are two types of On Triggers – the Single State Trigger and the Toggle Trigger.
 Single state On Triggers are like momentary contact switches – when they are pressed the
commands are executed each time.
 A Toggle Trigger will switch between two different states like a push-on/push-off button.
Different sets of Action Commands can be associated with the two states. Each time the
Toggle Trigger fires, only the action commands associated with the current state are
executed, and then the state is changed to the opposite value ready for the next execution.
The following are examples of Single State On Triggers:
trigger ae3 surface1 device 000B bus0 on
trigger ae4 d[Port 2 Fader 1 In] on
trigger ae1 surface2 softkey button2 on
The following are examples of Toggle State On Triggers:
trigger ae3 surface1 device 000B bus0 on toggle
trigger ae4 d[Port 2 Fader 1 In] on toggle
trigger ae1 surface2 softkey button2 on toggle
TIP:
Toggle Triggers are useful for push-on/push-off function buttons, for example a
button that changes monitoring to post-delay and restores it when pressed again.
 See Chapter 16 for more details on using the If Toggle Equals Test Statement.
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
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Off Trigger
Fires when the specified Bus Off event occurs.
Keyword
trigger
trigger
trigger
trigger
trigger
trigger
trigger
Engine
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
Not Used
Not Used
surf# | surface#
surf# | surface#
Not Used
surf# | surface#
surf# | surface#
Device
device#### (dest)
device#### (source)
fader#
chan# | channel#
d[DeviceName]
s[DeviceName]
bridge | softkey
Bus
bus#
bus#
bus#
bus#
bus#
bus#
butt# | button#
State
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
 This Trigger must include the Audio Engine number, Surface number, Device or Fader
number, Bus number and the required keyword OFF.
 One of the keywords CHANNEL, FADER, DEVICE, BRIDGE or SOFTKEY is required.
 The required Device or Fader number may be given using the s[Source Device] or
d[Destination Device] notation instead of using the DEVICE keyword.
 If using a Source Device, the Surface number is not required and will be ignored if present –
the Trigger will be fired no matter which Surface on the Engine causes the Bus Off event.
 If using the BRIDGE or SOFTKEY Device keyword, use BUTT or BUTTON number.
 The Off Trigger does not have a Toggle State, it only has a Single State.
The following are examples of an Off Trigger:
trigger ae3 surface1 device 000B bus0 off
trigger ae4 d[Port 2 Fader 1 In] off
trigger ae1 surface2 softkey button 2 off
TIP:
When writing button Triggers, an Off Trigger is only required if commands should
occur when the button is released, otherwise you only need an On Trigger.
Route 3 Button Trigger
A variation of the On Trigger for use with Route 3 CH1 and CH2 button presses.
Keyword
trigger
Engine
ae#
Surface
Not Used
Device
device#### (dest)
Bus
butt # | button#
State
on
 The Route 3 must be in Message Mode for this Trigger to occur.
 This command only supports a hard coded Destination Device number. It does not support
the SURFACE or CHANNEL. It does not support the d[Destination Device] notation.
 The CH1 button uses the keyword BUTTON1.
 The CH2 button uses the keyword BUTTON2.
 There is only an On Trigger for the Route 3 buttons. There is no Off Trigger.
TIP:
40
You will need a Logitek Device Reference table to determine the correct Device.
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Route Trigger
Fired when a specified Source Device is routed (assigned) to a specified Destination Device (e.g.
fader).
Keyword
trigger
trigger
Engine
ae#
ae#
Device
device ####
s[Device Name]
Keyword
{to}
{to}
Destination
chan# | channel #| fader #
d[Device Name]
Option
{any}
{any]
 This Trigger must include the Audio Engine number, Surface number, Source Device
number, Destination Device number and the required keyword ROUTE.
 The Source Device can be specified using keyword DEVICE or using the s[Source
Device] notation.
 The Destination Device can be specified by using the keywords FADER or CHANNEL or
using the d[Destination Device] notation. Device number is not supported.
 The use of the TO keyword is optional. If omitting the TO keyword, place the Source Device
first for improved readability.
 If no Source Device is specified, the Trigger will fire whenever any source is routed to the
specified Destination Device.
 If no Destination Device is specified, the Trigger will fire whenever the specified source is
routed to any Destination Device.
 The optional keyword ANY can be used to improve the readability in these scenarios.
The following are examples of a Route Trigger:
trigger
trigger
trigger
trigger
TIP:
ae1
ae3
ae1
ae1
surface1 route device 0103 channel2
route s[Port1 Aux 1 Out] to d[Port1 Fader 7 In]
surface1 chan25 route any
d[MD 1 Record] route any
If using a Route Trigger on a Route 3 device (or similar) which is configured to use a
Direct Route address (e.g. 6E or higher), you cannot specify a Route Trigger using
the Device Number, Surface Number or Channel Number. In this case you will
need to use the d[Destination Device] notation.
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41
Unroute Trigger
Fired when a specified Source Device is replaced (unassigned) on a specified Destination Device.
Keyword
trigger
trigger
Engine
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface#
Not Used
Keyword
route
route
Source
device ####
s[Device Name]
Keyword
{from}
{from}
Destination
chan# | channel #| fader #
d[Device Name]
 This Trigger must include the Audio Engine number, Surface number, Source Device
number, Destination Device number and the required keyword UNROUTE.
 The Source Device can be specified using keyword DEVICE or using the s[Source
Device] notation.
 The Destination Device can be specified by using the keywords FADER or CHANNEL or
using the d[Destination Device] notation. Device number is not supported.
 The use of the FROM keyword is optional.
 If no Source Device is specified, the Trigger will fire whenever any source is replaced on the
specified Destination Device.
 If no Destination Device is specified, the Trigger will fire whenever the specified source is
replaced on any Destination Device.
 The optional keyword ANY can be used to improve the readability in these scenarios.
The following are examples of an Unroute Trigger:
trigger ae2 surface1 unroute device 0105 channel4
trigger ae8 unroute s[Port2 Aux 1 out] from d[Port2 Fader 3 In]
trigger ae1 surface1 chan25 unroute any
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Variable Change Trigger
Fired when a value is assigned to a User or System Variable.
Keyword
trigger
trigger
Variable Name
v[UserVariable] | z[SystemVariable]
v[UserVariable] | z[SystemVariable]
Option
{change}
{change}
 This Trigger must contain the name of a User Variable using the v[UserVariableName]
notation, or a System Variable using the z[SystemVariableName] notation.
 For User Variables, the name must be declared in the System Page.
 For System Variables, the name must be an internally declared Supervisor System Variable.
 Appending the optional keyword CHANGE to the Trigger will cause the trigger to fire only if
the new value is different from the previous value.
 Otherwise, this Trigger is fired each time a value is assigned, even if the value is unchanged.
 System Variables are read only variables that can only be set by Supervisor itself.
The following Trigger will fire every time a value is assigned to the user variable
Studio5OnAirSource, regardless of if that value has actually changed:
trigger v[Studio5OnAirSource]
The following Trigger will fire only if the new value of the variable is different from the previous
value of the User Variable Studio5OnAirSource:
trigger v[Studio5OnAirSource] change
The following Trigger will fire every time a new value is assigned to the System Variable
SupervisorANetworkFail:
trigger z[SupervisorANetworkFail]
The following Trigger will fire only if the new value of the variable is different from the previous
value of the System Variable SupervisorANetworkFail:
trigger z[SupervisorANetworkFail] change
 See Chapter 14 for more details on using User & System Variables.
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43
8
Trigger Types – Init Trigger
Introduction
The Init Trigger is a special Trigger that is run each time that Supervisor starts, and when the
Execute Init Triggers button is clicked. The purpose of the Init Trigger is to perform one-off setup
commands, for example writing text labels to surfaces.
The user can fire the Init Trigger at any time by pressing the Execute Init Triggers button on the
Audio Engine Log page of the Supervisor. Care should be taken in selecting the commands in an
Init Trigger since these items will be executed every time Supervisor is started. The Init Trigger is
not required to be active or even exist.
General Rules






The keyword INIT TRIGGER must be the first line of the Trigger.
The first line can't be a comment line.
There is no Audio Engine or Surface numbers for the Init Trigger – it is a global event.
The Init Trigger is usually listed first in the Trigger list, but may be inserted at any position.
The Init Trigger is not required – it is optional.
There can only be one Init Trigger per Trigger Table.
Declaring the Init Trigger
The Init Trigger is defined by placing the keywords INIT TRIGGER on the first line of an available
Trigger in the Trigger List page. Once you have found where you wish to place the Init Trigger,
double click that row to edit the Trigger text. The Init Trigger definition is then the first line in the
edit box.
Init Trigger Format
Init Trigger
Occurs on Supervisor startup and when manually activated from Supervisor.
Keyword
trigger
Keyword
Init
 The Init Trigger must be marked active for Supervisor to process the Action Commands
that follow.
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Applications
The Init Trigger is useful for setting up various parts of your Triggers upon startup of Supervisor. It
can also be used to reset the state of variables, toggles, lamp indicators, etc to a known good
scenario. This is particularly important if your Trigger Table performs logic tests that disable
functions based on certain situations.
Some examples of applications for the Init Trigger are:
 Reset Not Active Triggers
 Reset User Variables used for tracking statuses
 Write text labels to Surfaces
 Setup clock and temperature display on Surfaces
 Set maximum delay time for Profanity Delay
 Update lamp indicators from variables
Before writing an Init Trigger, carefully evaluate the logic of your Trigger
Table to determine what needs to be setup and reset in the Init Trigger.
The Init Trigger should not perform tasks that could have a detrimental
effect to your on-air operation.
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45
9
Trigger Types – Conditional Triggers
Introduction
A Conditional Trigger is a Trigger that is set to respond the next time the conditional event occurs.
A General Trigger is used to set a Conditional Trigger. There are three types of Conditional
Triggers: IF TRIGGER, IF BUTTON, and IF TIMER.
Any Conditional Trigger can be cleared by a CMD CLEAR action command in another General
Trigger.
A Conditional Trigger is useful for setting up Trigger events that will occur within or after a
specified delay time.
TIP:
It is easy to confuse General and Conditional Triggers. General Triggers are defined
as an action that will run each and every time a specified event occurs. General
Triggers are declared as the first line of a Trigger. Conditional Triggers are declared
“on the fly” inside General Triggers. These can be set to run upon a particular event
occurring, but can be later cancelled so they no longer occur.
General Rules
 Conditional Triggers are declared inside General Triggers.
 There can only be one Conditional Trigger for a particular event (e.g. timer number) –
setting the same event Conditional Trigger a second time will replace the first set of
commands.
Declaring Conditional Triggers
A Conditional Trigger is declared inside a General Trigger, using one of the three Conditional
Trigger types detailed below. A Conditional Trigger cannot be declared on its own. The
Conditional Trigger IF statement must have a corresponding ENDIF.
Conditional Trigger Types
There are three types of Conditional Triggers, as follows:
Type
IF TRIGGER
Description
Declares a Trigger “on the fly”, which can later be
replaced or cancelled
IF BUTTON
Similar to IF TRIGGER, but uses button keywords and can
include timeouts if button is not pressed in a certain time
Sets a Trigger that will occur after the time expires
(specified time, or tied to Talk Delay)
IF TIMER
46
Example Scenarios
A Trigger needs to set temporarily, or the
actions of a Trigger changed depending on
circumstances
Setup an event to occur if the ACCEPT or
CANCEL button is pressed
Set an event to occur after a specified time
period
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Conditional Trigger Format
If Trigger
Sets a Conditional Trigger that will fire when the specified Trigger action occurs.
Keyword
if





Keyword
trigger
Trigger
TriggerDefinition|
(TriggerDefinition)
Keyword
{then}
The specification of the Trigger is the same as a General Trigger.
The On Trigger, Off Trigger, or Route Trigger may be used as a Conditional Trigger.
Commands must appear between the IF TRIGGER and a corresponding ENDIF keyword.
This Conditional Trigger can be canceled using the CMD CLEAR TRIGGER command.
The keyword THEN and parenthesis are optional.
 See Chapter 7 for more information on General Trigger syntax.
The following is an example of the If Trigger Conditional Trigger:
if trigger ( ae2 surface2 route s[Cass 1] to d[Port 2 Fader 3 In] ) then
cmd ae2 surface2 d[Port 1 Fader 2 In] bus0 on
endif
If Button
Sets a Conditional Trigger that will fire when the specified button is pressed or released.
Keyword
If
If
Engine
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface#
surf# | surface#
Keyword
function | softkey | bridge
accept | cancel
Button
button #
button
Keyword
{on | off}
{on | off}
Keyword
{delay#}
{delay#}
Keyword
then
then
 The allowable button keywords are FUNCTION BUTTON, SOFTKEY BUTTON, BRIDGE
BUTTON, ACCEPT BUTTON and CANCEL BUTTON.
 A button number can be used with the keywords FUNCTION, SOFTKEY & BRIDGE.
 The action keywords for the buttons are ON and OFF. ON is the default if not specified.
 The optional keywords TIMEOUT or DELAY followed by a number of seconds can be used
to automatically fire the If Button Conditional Trigger.
 Commands must appear between the IF BUTTON and a corresponding ENDIF keyword.
 This Conditional Trigger can be canceled using the CMD CLEAR BUTTON command.
The following are examples of the If Button Conditional Trigger:
if ae1 surf1 button cancel delay30
cmd ae1 surf1 question text clear all
endif
 See Page 75 for more information on the Clear Trigger command.
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47
If Timer
Sets a Conditional Trigger that will fire when a specified time period elapses.
Keyword
if
Keyword
timer
Number
#
Keyword
wait
Seconds
#
Keyword
{then}
 The required keyword WAIT is used to specify the time in seconds before the timer fires.
 Each timer must have a unique user defined number. This number is used in the CMD
CANCEL TIMER action command that is used to cancel the timer and prevent its
commands from executing.
 The If Timer requires a unique timer number.
 The timers are not specified for a given Audio Engine or Surface.
 Commands must appear between the IF TRIGGER and a corresponding ENDIF keyword.
 The keyword THEN is optional.
The following are examples of the If Timer Conditional Trigger:
if timer 3 wait 25 then
cmd ae1 surface2 d[Port 1 Fader 2] bus 0 on
cmd ae1 surface2 bridge button 3 off
endif
If Timer Talk Delay
Sets a Conditional Trigger that will fire when a time period equal to a Talk Delay elapses.
Keyword
if
Keyword
timer
Number
#
Keyword
talk
Destination
d[DeviceName]
Keyword
{then}
 Instead of specifying a WAIT time, the If Timer can be tied to a Talk Delay, to set a Timer
equal to the current delay time of a Talk Delay.
 This function is useful when you need to delay a command to match an audio delay.
 When the Timer is set, the current delay for the specified Destination Device is used.
 If the Destination Device is not a Talk Delay device, or the Talk Delay is off, the wait time
is set to zero and the enclosed commands execute immediately.
 The resolution is 0.1 seconds; ensuring commands match delayed audio very closely.
 The If Timer Talk Delay requires a unique timer number.
 Commands must appear between the IF TRIGGER and a corresponding ENDIF keyword.
 The keyword THEN is optional.
The following is an example of the If Timer Talk Delay Conditional Trigger:
if ae1 timer 102 talk d[Port1 Router 1 In] then
cmd port 8 "MC1EVT1"
endif
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
10 Trigger Types – Schedule Event Triggers
Introduction
A Schedule Event Trigger is a special Trigger that responds at a user designated date and time.
Schedule Event Triggers can be made to be activated just once or can be repeated at a specified
interval. These Triggers can also be made to repeat on given days of the week.
General Rules
 The keywords TRIGGER SCHEDULE must be the first words on the first line.
 The date for the Trigger to fire must follow the keyword DATE in DD MONTH YYYY format.
 The time for the Trigger must follow the keyword TIME, with the time in HH:MM:SS 24hour format.
 Other date and time formats (including the use of AM & PM) will result in an error.
 The first line can't be a comment line.
Declaring Schedule Triggers
A Schedule Trigger is defined by placing the appropriate command on the first line of an available
Trigger in the Trigger List page. Once you have found the Trigger you wish to define, double click
that row to edit the Trigger text. The Trigger definition is then the first line in the edit box.
The Trigger must be marked active for Supervisor to process the Action Commands that follow it.
Schedule Trigger Format
Schedule Event Trigger
Sets a Trigger to occur at a particular date and time, with a recurring schedule.
Keyword
trigger
trigger
Keyword
schedule
schedule
Keyword
date
date
Date
DD MONTH YYYY
DD MONTH YYYY
Keyword
time
time
Time
HH:MM:SS
HH:MM:SS
Keyword
repeat
repeat
Value
# minutes | # hour | # day
DAY (see below)
 Any action commands can follow in the scheduled event, just like a General Trigger.
 The Schedule Event Trigger can be repeated at a desired time interval by using the keyword
REPEAT.
 The time interval for the repeat can be specified by using a number followed by the
keywords MINUTES, HOURS, or DAYS.
 The Schedule Event Trigger may also be repeated at the given time on any day of the week
by using the keywords SUNDAY, MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, FRIDAY, or
SATURDAY.
 The Triggers will begin responding from the date specified by the DATE keyword if it is
used.
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
49
The following are examples of the Schedule Event Trigger for a specific date and time only:
trigger schedule date 15 JUNE 2008 time 15:30:00
trigger schedule date 22 SEPTEMBER 2008 time 09:00:00
The following are examples of the Schedule Event Trigger with repeat intervals:
trigger schedule date 15 JUNE 2008 time 15:30:00 repeat 10 minutes
trigger schedule date 22 SEPTEMBER 2008 time 09:00:00 repeat 2 hour
trigger schedule date 01 MAY 2008 time 22:30:00 repeat 1 day
trigger schedule date 09 AUGUST 2008 time 15:00:00 repeat SUNDAY
trigger schedule date 01 MAY 2008 time 08:00:00 repeat MONDAY FRIDAY
50
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
11 Procedures
Introduction
Procedures are groups of commands that are used like macros in word processing or subroutines in
programming. Instead of repeating the same sets of commands in many different general triggers,
the commands can be placed in a procedure. This procedure can then be called by a simple
CALL ProcedureName command in many different Triggers. Procedures can also call other
Procedures, allowing for even further functional grouping of commands.
Another advantage of Procedures is that the set of commands can be changed in one place in a
Procedure instead of changing it in many different Triggers. When the commands in a Procedure
are completed, the Trigger that called the Procedure will execute the next command after the
CALL ProcedureName command.
TIP:
It is good programming practice to use Procedures for code centralization and reuse. This reduces the number of lines of code, and makes future debugging and
changes easier.
General Rules





The keyword PROCEDURE must be the first word on the first line.
The name of the Procedure should follow after the PROCEDURE keyword.
The Procedure name cannot contain any spaces.
The first line can't be a comment line.
A Procedure need not contain Action Commands – it can be a definition only.
Declaring Procedures
A Procedure is defined by placing the appropriate Procedure command on the first line of an
available Procedure in the Procedure List page. Once you have found the Procedure you wish to
define, double click that row to edit the Procedure text. The Procedure definition is then the first
line in the edit box.
The Procedure must be marked active for Supervisor to process the Action Commands that follow
it.
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51
Procedure Format
Procedure
Used to group a set of commands together to be called in one unit from other Triggers or
Procedures.
Keyword
procedures
Name
ProcedureName (no spaces allowed)
 See General Rules on previous page.
Writing Procedures
All of the commands and statements that can be used in General Triggers can be used in
Procedures. Procedures look very much like General Triggers with the exception of the first line
which must contain the required keyword PROCEDURE followed by a user defined unique
ProcedureName.
The following is an example of a procedure that is used to turn off all the faders of a 6 channel
console on Audio Engine 1 Surface 2:
procedure AE1Surface2AllFadersOff
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
surface2
surface2
surface2
surface2
surface2
surface2
channel1
channel2
channel3
channel4
channel5
channel6
bus0
bus0
bus0
bus0
bus0
bus0
off
off
off
off
off
off
If there were similar procedures for other surfaces, the following procedure could be used to turn
off all the faders on all the surfaces:
procedure AE1AllSurfacesAllFadersOff
call AE1Surface1AllOff
call AE1Surface2AllOff
call AE1Surface3AllOff
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Using Procedures
The following is an example of a Trigger that needs to turn all faders on a given Surface off when a
particular Bridge Button on the Surface is pressed. Other commands can occur before and after
the Procedure call:
trigger ae1 surface2 bridge button12 on
cmd ae1 surface2 bridge lamp12 on
call AE1Surface2AllFadersOff
cmd ae1 surface2 route s[CD 2] to d[Port 2 Fader 6]
Following is an example of a Trigger that needs to turn all faders on all Surfaces off when a
particular Bridge Button on the Surface is pressed:
trigger ae1 surface2 bridge button 8 on
cmd ae1 surface2 bridge lamp8 on
call AE1AllSurfacesAllFadersOff
cmd ae1 surface2 route s[CD 2] to d[Port 2 Fader 6]
cmd ae1 surface2 route s[ISDN 3] to d[Port 2 Fader 1]
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
53
12 Action Commands
Introduction
Action Commands are any of the actions or events that an Audio Engine or Supervisor is capable
of performing. Each Action Command must start with the keyword CMD and must be completed on
one line. Action Commands can be used in both Triggers and Procedures. The Action
Commands are the events that are to happen when the Trigger fires or a Procedure is called.
Each of the listed commands includes a reference table listing the available options and usages of
the command. Generally, alternative keywords are shown, however there are some equivalent
keywords that are not shown.
The following keywords are equivalent and can be used interchangeably:
Keyword
bus
delay
exit
fader
lamp
surf
Alternative(s)
relay
wait
timeout
quit
chan
channel
light
surface
For maximum readability, we suggest using the same keyword consistently throughout your Trigger
Table. In some situations, you might want to use an alternative word for clarity, e.g. using relay
instead of bus when pulsing or changing the state of a relay.
You will also note some command descriptions have different order of words. In most cases the
order of keywords is not important – we suggest using the recommended order as per examples.
 See B for a full list of allowed keywords and their equivalents.
Commands that are directed at a Source and/or Destination Device number can be written using
the bracket notation s[Source Device] and d[Destination Device]. The use of this
notation is strongly encouraged as it is easier to read and allows more flexibility for future changes.
“Hard coded” Device numbers can make it more difficult to manage your Trigger Table in the
future.
 See Chapter 6 for more information on the bracket notation for Device numbers.
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
On, Off & Flash Commands
This group of commands turns channels, faders, devices, and lamps on or off.
Bus (Channel, Fader, Relay) On/Off
Turns the bus of a specified channel, fader or device on or off. Can be used to set bus assignments.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
Engine
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
Not Used
surf# | surface#
surf# | surface#
surf# | surface#
Not Used
Not Used
surf# | surface#
Device
device#### (dest)
device#### (source)
fader#
chan# | channel#
d[DeviceName]
d[LastRoute]
s[DeviceName]
Bus
bus# | relay#
bus#
bus#
bus#
bus# | relay#
bus#
bus#
State
on | off
on | off
on | off
on | off
on | off
on | off
on | off
 This command must include the Audio Engine number, Surface number, Device or Fader
number, Bus number and the required keyword ON or OFF.
 One of the keywords CHANNEL, FADER or DEVICE is required.
 The required Device or Fader number may be given using the s[Source Device] or
d[Destination Device] notation instead of using the DEVICE keyword.
 The special system destination d[LastRoute] will use the Destination Device number of
the last Route command that was executed on the specified Audio Engine.
 The keywords BUS and RELAY can be used interchangeably, however for readability RELAY
should only be used when the command is directed at an actual relay.
 If the Device Number is a Source Device or a named s[Source Device], the command
will scan faders on the specified surface from left to right until the Source Device is found.
The specified Bus for that fader is then turned on or off. If the Source Device appears more
than once on the Surface, only the first matching fader will be changed.
The following are examples of this command with a Source Device:
cmd ae1 surface1 device 0103 bus0 on
cmd ae3 surface1 s[CD 1] bus2 off
The following are examples of this command using a Destination Device:
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
ae1
ae3
ae4
ae1
ae1
device 000b bus0 on
surface1 fader2 bus2 on
surface2 channel3 bus1 on
d[Port2 Fader 4 In] bus0 off
d[LastRoute] bus3 off
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
55
Button (Bridge or Softkey) On/Off
Turns a Bridge or Softkey button (not lamp) on or off.
Keyword
cmd
Engine
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface#
Device
bridge | softkey
Bus
button# | butt#
State
on | off
 The Bridge or Softkey button on a given Surface may be turned on or off.
 This command applies to the button itself, not to the lamp in the button.
 This command must include the Audio Engine number, Surface number and the required
keyword BRIDGE or SOFTKEY, and BUTTON.
 The keyword LAMP must NOT be used.
 One of the keywords ON or OFF is also required.
The following are examples of the Bridge or Softkey button commands:
cmd ae1 surface1 bridge button11 on
cmd ae3 surface1 softkey button2 off
TIP:
56
You can also set a Bridge or Softkey Button on or off using its Device Number and
Bus Number, however it is much easier to use the notation above.
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Lamp On/Off
Turns a bridge or softkey lamp on or off.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
Engine
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface#
surf# | surface#
Not Used
Not Used
Device
bridge | softkey
channel #
device####
d[Device Name]
Bus
lamp#
bus#
bus#
bus#
State
on | off
on | off
on | off
on | off
 The Lamp in a specified Bridge Button, Softkey Button or other Destination Device may
be turned on or off.
 This command applies to the lamp in the button, not the button itself.
 This command must include the Audio Engine number, Surface number, and the required
keyword LAMP or BUS.
 The keyword BUTTON must NOT be used.
 The keyword BRIDGE or SOFTKEY must be used for a Bridge Lamp or a Softkey Lamp.
 The Destination Device can be specified using keyword DEVICE or using the
d[Destination Device] notation.
 When using a Device name/number or Channel number, BUS must used instead of LAMP.
 One of the keywords ON or OFF is also required.
 Do not use the keyword PULSE with regard to lamp commands.
The following are examples of the Lamp commands:
cmd ae1 surface1 bridge lamp11 on
cmd ae3 surface1 softkey lamp2 off
 See the Relay Pulse command on page 70 to pulse a relay.
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
57
Lamp Flash
Flashes a lamp with variable rate.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
Engine
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface#
surf# | surface#
Not Used
Not Used
Device
bridge | softkey
channel #
device####
d[Device Name]
Bus
lamp#
bus#
bus#
bus#
State
flash
flash
flash
flash
Flash Time
continuous | # times
continuous | # times
continuous | # times
continuous | # times
Rate
slow | medium | fast
slow | medium | fast
slow | medium | fast
 This command applies to the lamp in the button, not the button itself.
 This command must include the Audio Engine number, Surface number, and the required
keyword LAMP or BUS.
 The keyword FLASH is required. The keyword BUTTON must NOT be used.
 The keyword BRIDGE or SOFTKEY must be used for a Bridge Lamp or a Softkey Lamp.
 The Destination Device can be specified using keyword DEVICE or using the
d[Destination Device] notation.
 When using a Device name/number or Channel number, BUS must used instead of LAMP.
 The number of times followed by the optional keyword TIMES is used to specify how long
the lamp flashes for. The timeframe depends on flash speed.
 The keyword continuous is assumed if the flash time is not specified.
 On Artisan, Mosaic and COM12 hardware, a flash time of SLOW, MEDIUM or FAST can be
used.
 If the rate is not specified, MEDIUM is assumed. This is the rate supported by older hardware.
 SLOW flash is on for 1 second then off for 1 second
 MEDIUM flash is on for ½ second then off for ½ second
 FAST flash is on for ¼ second then off for ¼ second
 To flash for a certain amount of time, use this formula (based on flash speed and number)
(seconds on + seconds off) * No of Flashes
 The keyword FLAG is no longer required, but is retained for compatibility.
 The keyword CONTINUOUS is no longer required, but is retained for compatibility.
 Do not use the keyword PULSE with regard to lamp commands.
The following are examples of the Lamp commands:
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
58
ae4
ae2
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
surface2 bridge lamp2 flash once
surf1 chan13 bus33 flash once 5
device27 bus1 flash continuous 3 times
device27 bus1 flash 3 times
d[Ctrl – Surf1 GPI out] bus43 flash fast
surf1 chan13 bus44 flash medium
~
~
~
~
~
~
old
old
old
new
new
new
format
format
format
format
format
format
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Fader Commands
This group of commands is used to manipulate faders, including routes, levels, trim, mode, alias and
effects.
Input Route
Assigns a specified Source Device to a Destination Device. Same as assigning input on surface.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
Engine
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface#
Not Used
Keyword
route
route
Source
device ####
s[Device Name]
Keyword
{to}
{to}
Destination
chan# | channel #| fader #
d[Device Name]
 This command must include the Audio Engine number, Surface number, Source Device
number, Destination Device number and the required keyword ROUTE.
 The Source Device can be specified using keyword DEVICE or using the s[Source
Device] notation.
 The Destination Device can be specified by using the keywords FADER or CHANNEL or
using the d[Destination Device] notation.
 The use of the TO keyword is optional.
 The last routed Destination Device number is automatically stored in a special system
Destination Device that can be referenced with the d[LastRoute] notation.
The following are examples of the Route command:
cmd ae1 surface1 route device 0103 to channel2
cmd ae3 route s[Port1 Program Out] to d[Port1 Fader7 In]
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
59
Set Device Alias
Assigns an 8 character alias to a Source Device, for display on Surfaces.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
Engine
ae#
ae#
Source Device
device ####
s[Device Name]
Keyword
{set} alias
{set} alias
Alias
“
“ (8 characters)
“
“ (8 characters)
 Each Source Device can have a user defined Alias name assigned to it. For example, the
source (OB/Remote venue) of an ISDN line could be assigned as an alias name.
 Alias names are automatically displayed on all Surfaces in the label position above all
Faders to which the Device is assigned.
 The displayed alias is changed anytime a Route is changed or the Alias itself is changed.
 Alias names are limited to a maximum of eight characters.
 This command must include the Audio Engine number, Source Device number, and the
required keyword ALIAS.
 The keyword SET is optional and can be used for improved code readability.
 The Source Device can be specified using DEVICE or s[Source Device] notation.
The following are examples of the Set Alias command with 8 character strings:
cmd ae1 device 0103 set alias " Game 1 "
cmd ae3 s[ISDN 1] set alias " Ready "
TIP:
60
The Device Alias is an 8 character string on both 8 & 16 character Audio Engines.
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Set Fader Level
Sets the Fader level of a specified fader or Destination Device. Same as moving fader on surface.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
Engine
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface#
surf# | surface#
Not Used
Not Used
Destination
chan# | channel#
fader#
d[Device Name]
device ####
Keyword
{set} level
{set} level
{set} level
{set} level
Value
0 to 255 | -INFINITY to +10dB | OFF | INF
0 to 255 | -INFINITY to +10dB | OFF | INF
0 to 255 | -INFINITY to +10dB | OFF | INF
0 to 255 | -INFINITY to +10dB | OFF | INF
 This command must include the Audio Engine number, Surface number, the fader or
destination device number and the required keyword LEVEL.
 The keyword SET is optional and can be used for improved code readability.
 The Destination Device can be specified by using the keywords FADER or CHANNEL, or by
using the d[Destination Device] notation.
 The Fader Level value may be expressed in dB or in internal Audio Engine units (0-255).
 A value of 195 is equal to unity gain, or 0 dB.
 The keyword dB is required for levels expressed in dB units.
 The allowable range of levels in dB is –INFINITY (off) to +10 dB.
 The keywords INF or OFF may be used to set the fader level to infinity.
The following are examples of the Set Fader Level command:
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
ae1
ae2
ae3
ae1
surface1 set fader2 level 195
surface2 channel6 level -10 db
set d[Port1 Fader4 In] level 0 db
d[Port1 Fader2 In] level off
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
61
Set Fader Mode
Sets the Fader mode of a specified fader or Destination Device. Same as setting mode on surface.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
Engine
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface#
surf# | surface#
Not Used
Not Used
Destination
chan# | channel#
fader#
d[Device Name]
device ####
Keyword
{set} mode
{set} mode
{set} mode
{set} mode
Value
STEREO | MONO | PHASE | LL | RR | Lx | xR
STEREO | MONO | PHASE | LL | RR | Lx | xR
STEREO | MONO | PHASE | LL | RR | Lx | xR
STEREO | MONO | PHASE | LL | RR | Lx | xR
 This command must include the Audio Engine number, Surface number, the Fader or
Destination Device number and the required keyword MODE.
 The keyword SET is optional and can be used for improved code readability.
 The Destination Device can be specified by using the keywords FADER or CHANNEL or by
using the d[Destination Device] notation.
The Fader Mode may be set to the following values:
STEREO
MONO
PHASE
LL
RR
Lx
xR
For stereo source, Left source to Left, Right source to Right
For mono source, Left Right source average to Left and Right
Left Right source average to Left and Right
Left source to Left, minus Right source to Right
Left source to Left and Right
Right source to Left and Right
Left source on Left, silence on Right
Silence on Left, Right source on Right
The following are examples of the Set Fader Mode command:
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
62
ae1
ae2
ae3
ae1
surface1 set fader2 mode mono
surface2 channel6 mode stereo
set d[Port1 Fader4 In] mode LL
d[Port1 Fader2 In] mode xR
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Set Fader Trim
Sets the Fader mode of a specified fader or Destination Device. Same as setting fader trim on surface.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
Engine
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface#
surf# | surface#
Not Used
Not Used
Destination
chan# | channel#
fader#
d[Device Name]
device ####
Keyword
{set} trim
{set} trim
{set} trim
{set} trim
Value
-10 to +10 (dB) | none
-10 to +10 (dB) | none
-10 to +10 (dB) | none
-10 to +10 (dB) | none
 This command must include the Audio Engine number, Surface number, the Fader or
Destination Device number and the required keyword TRIM.
 The keyword SET is optional and can be used for improved code readability.
 The Destination Device can be specified by using the keywords FADER or CHANNEL or by
using the d[Destination Device] notation.
 The allowable range of trim values is from -10 dB to +10 dB where 0 indicates 0 dB.
 The plus sign and the keyword dB are optional.
 The keyword NONE may be used to set 0 dB trim.
The following are examples of the Set Fader Trim command:
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
ae1
ae3
ae2
ae3
surface1 channel2 set trim 10 db
d[Port2 Fader6 In] trim 0
surface2 fader7 set trim -3
d[Port3 Fader1 In] trim none
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
63
Set Fader Pan
Sets the pan value of a specified fader or Destination Device. Same as setting fader pan on surface.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
Engine
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface#
surf# | surface#
Not Used
Not Used
Destination
chan# | channel#
fader#
d[Device Name]
device ####
Keyword
{set} pan
{set} pan
{set} pan
{set} pan
Value
-20 to +20 | center | left |right
-20 to +20 | center | left |right
-20 to +20 | center | left |right
-20 to +20 | center | left |right
 This command must include the Audio Engine number, Surface number, the Fader or
Destination Device number and the required keyword PAN.
 The keyword SET is optional and can be used for improved code readability.
 The Destination Device can be specified by using the keywords FADER or CHANNEL or by
using the d[Destination Device] notation.
 The allowable range of pan values is from -20 for full pan left to +20 for full right pan.
 A pan value of 0 indicates the channel center.
 The plus sign is optional.
 The keyword LEFT may be used for full pan left values and the keyword RIGHT may be
used for full pan right values.
 The keyword CENTER may be used to set the pan value to the center of the channel.
The following are examples of the Set Fader Pan command:
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
64
ae1
ae3
ae2
ae3
ae1
surface1 channel 2 set pan -20
d[Port2 Fader6 In] pan center
surface2 fader 7 pan right 18
d[Port 3 Fader 1 In] set pan 0
d[Port 1 Fader 1 In] pan left 10
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Set Fader Limiter
Sets the limiter parameters of a specified fader or Destination Device. Same as surface controls.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
Engine
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface#
surf# | surface#
Not Used
Not Used
Destination
chan# | channel#
fader#
d[Device Name]
device ####
Keyword
{set} limiter
{set} limiter
{set} limiter
{set} limiter
Value
threshold # ratio # release #
threshold # ratio # release #
threshold # ratio # release #
threshold # ratio # release #
 This command must include the Audio Engine number, Surface number, the Fader or
Destination Device number and the required keyword LIMITER.
 The keyword SET is optional and can be used for improved code readability.
 The Destination Device can be specified by using the keywords FADER or CHANNEL, or by
using the d[Destination Device] notation.
 This command can change one or more of the limiter parameters values by using the
appropriate keywords THRESHOLD, RATIO, or RELEASE.
 Any parameters omitted are not changed.
 The attack value of the limiter is fixed at 100 microseconds and can not be changed.
The following are examples of the Set Fader Limiter command:
cmd ae1 surface1 channel2 set limiter threshold 8 ratio 3 release 20
cmd ae3 d[Port2 Fader6 In] set limiter threshold -8 ratio 4 release 30
cmd ae3 surface2 fader2 set limiter ratio 6
TIP:
To programmatically turn the limiter/compressor (dynamics) on or off, send the
appropriate bus on/off command to BUS22 of the appropriate destination. There is
no separate Command Builder command to achieve this.
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
65
Set Fader Compression
Sets the compressor parameters of a specified fader or Destination Device. Same as surface controls.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
Engine
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface#
surf# | surface#
Not Used
Not Used
Destination
chan# | channel#
fader#
d[Device Name]
device ####
Keyword
{set} compression
{set} compression
{set} compression
{set} compression
Value
threshold # ratio # attack # release #
threshold # ratio # attack # release #
threshold # ratio # attack # release #
threshold # ratio # attack # release #
 This command must include the Audio Engine number, Surface number, the Fader or
Destination Device number and the required keyword COMPRESSION.
 The keyword SET is optional and can be used for improved code readability.
 The Destination Device can be specified by using the keywords FADER or CHANNEL, or by
using the d[Destination Device] notation.
 This command can change one or more of the compressor parameters by using the
appropriate keywords THRESHOLD, RATIO, ATTACK or RELEASE.
 Any parameters omitted are not changed.
The following are examples of the Set Fader Compression command:
cmd ae1 surface1 channel2 set compression threshold 8 attack 10
cmd ae2 d[Port1 Fader6 In] set compression threshold 10 ratio 4
cmd ae3 surface2 fader2 set compression ratio 6 release 1500
TIP:
66
To programmatically turn the limiter/compressor (dynamics) on or off, send the
appropriate bus on/off command to BUS22 of the appropriate destination. There is
no separate Command Builder command to achieve this.
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Set Fader Equalization
Sets the equalization parameters of a specified fader or Destination Device. Same as surface controls.
Keyword
cmd
Engine
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface#
Destination
chan# | channel#
Keyword
{set} eq
cmd
cmd
cmd
ae#
ae#
ae#
surf# | surface#
Not Used
Not Used
fader#
d[Device Name]
device ####
{set} eq
{set} eq
{set} eq
Value
high | high mid | low mid | low
freq # gain {db} # bandwidth #
As above
As above
As above
 This command must include the Audio Engine number, Surface number, the Fader or
Destination Device number and the required keyword EQ.
 The keyword SET is optional and can be used for improved code readability.
 The Destination Device can be specified by using the keywords FADER or CHANNEL, or by
using the d[Destination Device] notation.
 The equalization can be set in one of four bands that are designated using the keywords
HIGH, HIGH MID, LOW MID and LOW.
 The frequency and gain can be set in any of the four bands using the keywords FREQ and
GAIN.
 The bandwidth can be set only in the High Mid and Low Mid bands using the keyword
BANDWIDTH.
 Gain values are assumed to be in dB.
 The dB keyword is optional.
The following are examples of the Set Fader Equalization command:
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
TIP:
ae1
ae1
ae3
ae3
surface2 fader1 set eq high freq 17000 gain 12
surface1 channel2 set eq high mid freq 1000 gain -10
d[Port2 Fader6 In] set eq low freq 1400 gain 10
surface2 fader2 set eq low mid freq 2000 gain 12 bandwidth 1000
To programmatically turn the equalization on or off, send the appropriate bus on/off
command to BUS23 of the appropriate destination. There is no separate Command
Builder command to achieve this.
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67
Set Mix Minus
Sets the output bus for a Mix Minus on a surface. These settings are not available on the surface.
Keyword
cmd
Engine
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface#
Keyword
set mix minus | set mix-
Destination
#
Values
bus # | {always} {addmic} {stereo}
This command overrides the default operation of the mix minus system for a particular engine and
surface. The default mix minus settings are entered on the system page of the AEConfig program.
 This command must include the Audio Engine number, Surface number, keywords SET
MIX MINUS (or SET MIX-) and the desired Mix Minus output number.
 The keyword BUS is used to change the mix bus used as the source of the mix minus.
 If the keyword BUS is omitted, the feature keywords ALWAYS, ADDMIC & STEREO are used.
 The Set Mix Minus command sets all three features if the BUS keyword is not used. If the
keyword is present, the feature is turned on. If the keyword is absent, the feature is turned
off.
 The keyword ALWAYS causes the Mix Minus output to be active, even when the Source
Devices allocated to it are not in use. If ALWAYS is omitted, the output is silent unless an
appropriate Fader is turned on.
 The keyword ADDMIC routes the talkback microphone to the Mix Minus output when the
Fader allocated to the Mix Minus output is turned off.
 The keyword STEREO switches the mix minus output to stereo (if your configs support it).
The Bus number may be set to the following values:
BUS1
BUS2
BUS3
BUS4
BUS5
BUS6
BUS9
BUS10
BUS11
BUS12
PGM mix bus
CUE mix bus
AUX1 mix bus
AUX2 mix bus
AUX3 mix bus
AUX4 mix bus (available on Surface 1 only)
AUX5 mix bus (available on Surface 1 only)
AUX6 mix bus (available on Surface 1 only)
AUX7 mix bus (available on Surface 1 only)
AUX8 mix bus (available on Surface 1 only)
The following are examples of the Set Mix Minus command:
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
68
ae1
ae2
ae2
ae4
ae2
ae1
surface1
surface3
surface2
surface1
surface1
surface1
set
set
set
set
set
set
mix
mix
mix
mix
mix
mix
minus
minus
minus
minus
minus
minus
3
4
4
2
1
3
bus 1
always
addmic
stereo
always addmic stereo
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
External Communications
Supervisor has the capability to act as a serial data router, as well as control external devices through
serial and TCP/IP commands. CommandBuilder uses the following commands to control serial
routing and send commands via serial, IP and GPI to external devices.
Text to UDP Port
Sends an ASCII text string to a specified UDP destination port, from the local port set in Supervisor.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
Keyword
udp
udp
Destination
ip[0.0.0.0]
u[ComputerName]
Keyword
port
port
Port
#
#
Data
“Data enclosed in Quote Marks”
“Data enclosed in Quote Marks”
 The required keyword is UDP.
 The destination IP address must be specified in the command using the u[UserName]
notation or ip[100.100.1.1] address bracket notation.
 The destination port number is specified using the required keyword PORT.
 The data to send must be enclosed in quotes.
The following are examples of the Text to UDP Port command:
cmd udp ip[192.100.67.1] port 10300 "Text to 192.100.67.1 Port 10300"
cmd udp u[PC-12345] port 10600 "Hello World"
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69
Text to Com Port
Sends an ASCII text string out the specified Auxiliary Com Port.
Keyword
cmd






Hex
<esc>
<nul>
<soh>
<stx>
<sub>
<eot>
<lf>
<cr>
<1c>
Keyword
port
Dest Port
#
Data
“Data enclosed in Quote marks / Hex Bytes within <> marks”
The Com Port is assumed to have been configured and opened in Supervisor.
The required keyword is PORT.
The destination port must be included. This is the Com Port number assigned in Windows.
The data to send should be enclosed in quotes.
<00> Numbers enclosed in < > are treated as hex bytes.
Common ASCII code shortcuts can also be used, as listed below.
ASCII Code
27
0
1
2
26
4
10
13
28
The following are examples of the Text to Com Port command:
cmd port 22 "This is Text to Port 22"
cmd port 16 "Hello World"
This command can be used to send text to a BetaBrite scrolling LED panel. This has been used at a
number of Logitek sites around the world. The following example will send text to a BetaBrite sign:
cmd port 3 "<nul><nul><nul><eot><1c><2d>
G'Day Fellas"
 For more information on the BetaBrite signs, see http://www.betabrite.com/ or see
Chapter 22 for more detailed information.
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Relay Pulse
Used to pulse a relay on an Audio Engine or Control Surface.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
Engine
ae#
ae#
Destination
device####
d[Device Name]
Bus
relay # | bus#
relay # | bus#
Keyword
pulse
pulse
 This command must include the Audio Engine number, the Destination Device number
and requires keywords RELAY, and PULSE.
 The Destination Device can be specified using the d[Destination Device] notation.
 The Relay number is equivalent to the Bus number. The two keywords can be interchanged.
 This command will also accept the Destination in the Surface and Channel/Fader notation,
however for improved readability this usage is not recommended.
The following are examples of the Relay Pulse command:
cmd ae1 device0001 relay5 pulse
cmd ae1 d[Ctrl – Surf1 GPI out] relay12 pulse
 See the On/Off command on Page 55 to turn a relay on or off instead of pulse it.
Assembly Command
Used to send Audio Engine Protocol command messages to an Audio Engine (for advanced users).
Keyword
cmd




Engine
ae#
Keyword
asm
Data
“02 xx xx xx xx”
This command sends a command to an Audio Engine using the Audio Engine Protocol.
This command must include the Audio Engine number and the required keyword ASM.
The command should follow as a hex code string with one space between each hex byte.
See the Audio Engine Protocol or contact Logitek for more information on hex commands.
The following is an example of the Assembly command:
cmd ae1 asm "02 03 b2 0b 03"
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
71
Other Functions
This section covers some useful commands not listed in previous sections.
Talk Delay
Controls the Audio Engine Talk Delay when using SharcAttack DSP cards.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
Engine
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface#
Not Used
Not Used
Destination
chan# | channel#
d[Device Name]
device ####
Keyword
talk
talk
talk
Command
start | stop | off | dump | max #
start | stop | off | dump | max #
start | stop | off | dump | max #
 This command must include the Audio Engine number, Surface number, Destination
Device, and required keyword TALK.
 One of the following commands is required, START, STOP, OFF, DUMP or MAX seconds.
 The value following MAX must be between 0 and 25.5 seconds, in increments of 0.1
seconds. An error will occur if the value is omitted or outside this range.
 The Destination Device can be specified by using the keyword CHANNEL, or by using the
d[Destination Device] notation.
 The Destination Device is usually d[Port1 Router 1 In] or d[Port2 Router 1
In], but some configurations are set for multiple delays on Port 1 and Port 2.
 The Surface display for the Talk Delay is linked to the Router 1 Crosspoint on Port 1 & 2.
The following commands can be sent to the Talk Delay:
START
STOP
OFF
DUMP
MAX 0.0
Begins buildup of delay, and turns on the Surface display.
Ramps down to zero delay time.
Immediately turns off delay, dumps any remaining delay and turns off the Surface display.
Dumps 4 seconds from the delay buffer.
Sets the maximum delay time, from 0 to 25.5 seconds in 0.1 second increments. The DSP
card may impose a shorter delay maximum depending on number of delays used and
available memory.
The following are examples of the Talk Delay command:
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
72
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
d[Port1
d[Port1
d[Port1
d[Port2
d[Port1
Router
Router
Router
Router
Router
1
1
1
1
2
In]
In]
In]
In]
In]
talk
talk
talk
talk
talk
start
stop
off
dump
max 9.9
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Execution Control
These statements are used for controlling the execution of Triggers and Procedures.
Quit/Exit
Stops Supervisor from executing any further commands in the current trigger.
Keyword
cmd
Keyword
quit | exit
 The keyword QUIT or EXIT is required.
 This command is useful in Triggers that contain conditional test statements where a value
has been changed earlier in the Trigger.
The following are examples of the Quit and Exit commands:
cmd quit
cmd exit
Call Procedure
Calls a Procedure from within a Trigger or another Procedure.
Keyword
cmd
Procedure
ProcedureName
 This command requires the keyword CALL followed by the name of the Procedure.
 All commands in the Procedure are executed before control returns to the calling code.
 Any Procedure can call other Procedures within itself.
The following is an example of the Call Procedure command:
call Surface1AllFadersOff
 See Chapter 11 for more information on writing Procedures.
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
73
Set Trigger Active/Not Active
Controls whether an existing Trigger will be executed by Supervisor.
Keyword
cmd
Keyword
set
Keyword
trigger
Keyword
active | notactive
Trigger
TriggerDefinition| (TriggerDefinition)
 When a General Trigger has been set not active, it will not execute the specified action
commands when the Trigger event occurs. It can be enabled again by using the Set Trigger
Active command.
 The required keywords are SET, TRIGGER, and either ACTIVE or NOTACTIVE.
 The definition of the General Trigger that is to be set active or not active should follow the
keywords.
 The General Trigger should exist before using the Set Trigger Active/Not Active command.
 The optional parenthesis around the General Trigger definition increases user readability.
 If the specified General Trigger that has been set not active is a Toggle Trigger, it may still
have it's toggle state changed using a Set Toggle State command and its Toggle state tested
using an If Toggle Equal statement.
The following are examples of the Set Trigger Active/Not Active command:
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
set
set
set
set
trigger
trigger
trigger
trigger
notactive ae3 d[Port1 Fader 4 In] bus0 off
notactive ( ae1 surface2 device 0105 bus0 on )
active ae3 d[Port1 Fader 4 In] bus0 off
active ( ae1 surface2 device 0105 bus0 on )
Set Toggle State
Programmatically sets the state of a Toggle Trigger.
Keyword
cmd








Keyword
set
Keyword
toggle =
Value
1|2
Trigger
TriggerDefinition| (TriggerDefinition)
The specified General Trigger must be a Toggle Trigger.
The allowable Toggle states are 1 (normal) or 2 (toggle).
The required keywords are TOGGLE, the equal sign (=) and the desired toggle state (1 or 2).
The keyword SET is optional.
The specification of the General Trigger should follow the keywords.
The General Trigger should exist before the Set Toggle State command is written.
The optional parenthesis around the General Trigger increases user readability.
The current state of a Toggle Trigger can be tested using the If Toggle Equal statement.
The following are examples of the Set Toggle State command:
cmd set toggle = 1 ( ae3 d[Port1 Fader 4 In] bus0 on )
cmd set toggle = 2 ( ae1 surface2 bridge button6 on )
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Cancel Timer
Cancels a Conditional Trigger that was previously started by an If Timer statement.
Keyword
cmd
Keyword
cancel
Keyword
timer
Timer
#
 The required keywords are CANCEL and TIMER followed by the number of the Timer from
specification of the If Timer statement.
 It is not an error to cancel a timer that is not running.
The following is an example of the Cancel Timer command:
cmd cancel timer 2
Clear Button
Clears a Conditional Trigger previously set using the If Button statement.
Keyword
cmd
Keyword
clear
Keyword
button
Trigger
TriggerDefinition| (TriggerDefinition)
 The required keywords are CLEAR and BUTTON followed by the definition of the
Conditional Trigger.
 The optional parenthesis around the Conditional Trigger increases user readability.
 It is not an error to clear a Conditional Trigger that has not been set.
The following are examples of the Clear Button command:
cmd clear button ( ae3 surface1 softkey button3 on )
cmd clear button ( ae2 surface2 bridge button6 off )
Clear Trigger
Clear a Conditional Trigger previously set using the If Trigger statement.
Keyword
cmd
Keyword
clear
Keyword
trigger
Trigger
TriggerDefinition| (TriggerDefinition)
 The required keywords are CLEAR and TRIGGER followed by the definition of the
Conditional Trigger.
 The optional parenthesis around the Conditional Trigger increases user readability.
 It is not an error to clear a Conditional Trigger that has not been set.
The following are examples of the Clear Trigger command:
cmd clear trigger ( ae3 surface1 d[Port1 Fader 3 In] on )
cmd clear trigger ( ae2 surface2 route device 0102 to channel3 )
 See Chapter 9 for more information on Conditional Triggers.
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
75
Clear When Off
Clears any commands that were stored by a previous When Off statement.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
Keyword
clear
clear
clear
clear
clear
Keyword
when
when
when
when
when
Keyword
off
off
off
off
off
AE
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface#
surf# | surface#
surf# | surface#
surf# | surface#
Not Used
Destination
chan# | channel#
chan#-# | channel#-# (range)
fader#
fader#-# (range)
d[Device Name]
The When Off statement stores commands as “Pending” if a fader is on.
Use Clear When Off to cancel a prior When Off command, before setting another.
The required keywords are CLEAR WHEN OFF.
The CHANNEL or FADER keywords may include a range of channels to be cleared.
The Destination Device can be specified using the d[Destination Device] notation.
The optional parenthesis can be used to enclose the specification of the When Off test
statement.
 It is not an error to clear a fader that is not "Pending".






The following are examples of the Clear When Off command:
cmd clear when off ( ae3 d[Port1 Fader 4 In] )
cmd clear when off ( ae1 surface2 channel 1-6 )
cmd clear when off ( ae2 surface1 fader 6 )
 See Chapter 16 for more information about the When Off Test Statement.
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13 Surface Text Commands
Introduction
Logitek Surfaces have the ability to display user generated text on their LCD screens. The type, size
and amount of text varies widely between different generations of console. The methods for
displaying text are similar, but, due to small differences each method is detailed below in a separate
section.
The types of text that can be displayed include user defined text strings, a continuously updated
time display and a continuously updated temperature display generated by an external device. The
time display is obtained and formatted from the Supervisor PC’s current Windows time format. The
temperature is formatted in the System Administrator  External Devices tab in Supervisor.
A number of menu based text display commands is also available for obtaining user selections.
ROC Screens
The ROC5 and ROC10 Surfaces are early generation Logitek consoles.
As these were designed and sold before the existence of Supervisor,
their text display capabilities are limited. The ROC5 and ROC10 have
a small screen that supports a clock display.
Figure 10 - ROC Clock
ROC Clock
This command is used to write a clock display to the ROC5 or ROC10.
Keyword
cmd
cmd








AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
Not Used
surf# | surface #
Keyword
clock
clock
Screen
d[Device Name]
chan# | channel#
Line
line1
line1
Pos
pos1
pos1
Options
{clear} | {insert}
{clear} | {insert}
This command requires the keyword CLOCK.
CHAN30 LINE1 POS1 is used for the ROC clock display,
The channel can also be specified as d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI In] or similar.
Large size text is not supported on the ROC Surface.
A quoted string is not required and will be ignored if present.
The keyword INSERT is supported, but not required for the ROC5 display space.
The display is continuously updated until a CLOCK CLEAR command is used.
The Clock Clear command must contain the same Audio Engine, Surface, line and position
numbers as the original Clock command.
The following are examples of how to display and clear the clock on the ROC Screen:
cmd ae1 surface2 clock softkey insert line3 pos6
cmd ae1 surface2 clock clear softkey line3 pos6
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Numix I Screens
The Numix I has four monochrome screens on the Selector Wedge and a large monochrome
screen on each Fader Wedge.
Time or temperature text may be displayed on the Softkeys Screen or the top of a Fader Wedge.
User generated text and menus can be displayed on screens on the Fader and Selector wedges.
The Fader Wedge screens accept user generated text, in two different sizes.
Numix I Selector Wedge Screens
The Numix I Selector Wedge has three screens that can display user generated text. These are
labeled as the Function Screen, the Selections Screen and the Softkeys Screen. Each of these
screens has different capabilities and requires different style text commands.
Picture:
78
Numix I Selector Wedge overall shot
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Numix I Function Screen Text
These commands are used to write text to the Numix I Function Screen.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Keyword
text
Screen
function
function
Line
Pos
line# (1-13)
pos# (1-8)
Text/Keyword
radio mode
“12345678”
 The Function Screen will display 13 lines of 8 characters each.
 This screen is often used to present a list of choices of which one can be selected by pressing
the corresponding selection button.
 Only lines 2-13 have selection buttons. The first line is usually used to display a title only.
 The text command must contain the keyword FUNCTION.
 Before text can be written to the Function Screen, it must be placed in the Radio mode
using the keywords FUNCTION RADIO MODE.
The following is an example of placing the Function Screen into the Radio mode and then
displaying several lines of text:
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
surface1
surface1
surface1
surface1
surface1
function radio mode
text function line 1
text function line 2
text function line 3
text function line 4
pos
pos
pos
pos
1
1
1
1
"
"
"
"
On-air"
Phone 1"
Phone 2"
Phone 3"
 See Chapter 9 for more information on Conditional Triggers for button presses.
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Numix I Selections Screen Text
These commands are used to write text selections to the Numix I Selections Screen.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
AE
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Keyword
text
text
Screen
selection
selection
selection
Line
Pos
line# (1-12)
line# (1-6)
pos# (1-6)
pos# (121)
Text/Keyword
list mode | message mode
“123456”
“123456789012345678901”
 The Selections Screen displays text in one of two modes.
 List Mode displays two columns of six lines each, while Message Mode displays six lines of
21 characters each.
 Before text can be written to the Selections Screen, it must be placed in either List Mode or
Message Mode.
 Specify List Mode by using the keywords SELECTION LIST MODE.
 Specify Message Mode by using the keywords SELECTION MESSAGE MODE.
 Placing the Selections Screen into either mode clears all existing text from the screen.
 Text commands in the List Mode are displayed immediately when received by the surface.
 Text commands in the Message Mode are buffered by the surface and displayed all at once
when a text command for line 6 is received. The text command to line 6 acts as a strobe and
must be present for the other text commands to be made visible.
 The text command must contain the keyword SELECTION to send text to the Selections
Screen.
The following is an example of placing the Selections Screen into the List Mode and then
displaying several lines of text. Note that lines 1-4 are displayed in the left hand column and lines 810 are displayed in the right hand column:
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
surface1
surface1
surface1
surface1
surface1
surface1
surface1
surface1
selection list
text selection
text selection
text selection
text selection
text selection
text selection
text selection
mode
line1 pos1 " On-air"
line2 pos1 " Phone 1"
line3 pos1 " Phone 2"
line4 pos1 " Phone 3"
line8 pos1 " Host Mic"
line9 pos1 " Guest 1"
line10 pos1 " Guest 2"
The following is an example of placing the Selections Screen into the Message Mode and then
displaying several lines of text. Note that none of the lines will be displayed until line 6 is sent to the
surface:
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
surface1
surface1
surface1
surface1
selection message mode
text selection line1 pos1 " Assign Studio 2 To"
text selection line2 pos1 " Spare Tx"
text selection line6 pos1 " Yes
No"
 See Chapter 9 for more information on Conditional Triggers for button presses.
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81
Numix I Softkeys Screen Text
These commands are used to write text selections to the Numix I Softkeys Screen.
Keyword
cmd
AE
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
Keyword
text
Screen
softkey
cmd
ae#
surf# | surface #
text
softkey
cmd
ae#
surf# | surface #
text
softkey
Line
line# (16)
line# (16)
numix1
Pos
pos# (1-21)
Options
{insert}
Text
“One to 21 characters”
Not Used
clear
Not Used
Not Used
clear all
Not Used
 The Softkeys Screen will display six lines of 21 characters each.
 The text command must contain the keyword SOFTKEY to send text to the Softkeys Screen.
 Normal Mode erases the entire line before displaying the specified text. This provides a fast
way to erase any old text and be sure that only the specified text is displayed on the line.
 Insert Mode overwrites the text at the LINE and POS given without erasing the entire line
first. This allows the user to change only one word or part of a line if necessary.
 The keyword INSERT is used to specify Insert Mode, otherwise Normal Mode is assumed.
 An entire line of text on the Softkeys Screen can be erased or cleared by using the keyword
CLEAR. The POS keyword and a quoted text string are not required.
 The entire Softkeys Screen can be cleared at one time by using the keyword ALL instead of
a specified LINE number. Specify the type of surface with the required keyword NUMIX1
when using the keyword ALL.
The following are examples of text lines written to the Softkeys Screen in Normal Mode:
cmd ae1 surface2 text softkey line3 pos1 "Text For Line 3"
cmd ae3 surface1 text softkey line5 pos12 "Second Text"
The following are examples of text lines written to the Softkeys Screen in Insert mode:
cmd ae1 surface2 text softkey line3 pos10 insert "This Line"
cmd ae3 surface1 text softkey line5 pos19 insert "Base"
The following are examples of clearing all or part of the Softkeys Screen:
cmd ae1 surface2 text numix1 softkey clear all
cmd ae3 surface1 text softkey line 5 clear
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Numix I Fader Wedge Screens
The screen on the Numix I Fader Wedge is capable of displaying three types of text. These include
small and large font text to the upper half of the screen and large font text to the label section of a
fader. This screen will also display a special Message Arrow in the upper half of the screen. The
Supervisor computer clock and an external temperature device can also be displayed.
Each Fader Wedge can display two text sizes, but the sizes can not be mixed on the same screen.
When the size of text is changed, all text of the other size is cleared from the screen.
Figure 10 - Numix I Fader Screen
Figure 11 - Numix I Fader Screen showing clock
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83
Numix I Small Font Text
This command is used to write a small font text to the upper half of the Fader Wedge Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd








AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Keyword
text
text
Screen
chan# | channel#
fader#
Options
{insert}
{insert}
Line
line#
line#
Pos
pos#
pos#
Text
“36 chars”
“36 chars”
Small text is displayed on the upper half of the screen as 12 lines of 36 characters.
This text is divided into two columns of six lines each.
There are two lines for each channel on the surface
The first three channels are the left column; the second three channels are the right column.
Channels 1-6 are on the first wedge, 7-12 on the second, and so on.
The command must contain the CHANNEL or FADER number and LINE1 or LINE2.
To clear a line, write a single space string to that line, without the INSERT keyword.
Use the keyword INSERT to replace only the written text and keep other text on the line.
The following are examples of small font text commands written to the Fader Wedge:
cmd ae1 surface1 text channel1 line1 pos1 "This is Text"
cmd ae1 surface1 text channel6 line2 pos1 " "
Numix I Large Font Text
This command is used to write a large font text to the upper half of the Fader Wedge Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Keyword
text
text
Screen
chan# | channel#
fader#
Options
{insert}
{insert}
Line
line#
line#
Pos
pos#
pos#
Text
“36 chars”
“36 chars”
 Large text is displayed on the upper half of the screen as 4 lines of 52 characters.
 The command must contain a CHANNEL or FADER number of the Fader Wedge, the
keyword BIG and can be written to LINE 1, LINE 2, LINE 3 or LINE 4.
 Use Channel 1 for the first wedge, Channel 7 for the second, and so on.
 To clear a line, write a single space string to that line, without the INSERT keyword.
 Use the keyword INSERT to replace only the written text and keep other text on the line.
The following are examples of large font text commands written to the Fader Wedge:
cmd ae1 surface1 text big channel1 line1 pos1 "This is Text"
cmd ae1 surface1 text big channel6 line3 pos21 " "
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Numix I Label Text
This command is used to write a label to an input on the Fader Wedge Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Screen
chan# | channel#
fader#
Keyword
text
text
Keyword
label
label
Text
“12345678”
“12345678”
 The label is large font text displayed in a label space directly above the fader information.
 This label may have a maximum of 8 characters.
 The channel label text lines must contain the CHANNEL number on the Fader Wedge and
the keyword LABEL.
 The LINE or POS keywords are not required for this type of text.
 To clear the label write a blank string of 8 characters
 The label may be replaced by flashing text “PENDING” if a WHEN OFF command is used.
 The label is replaced if a SET ALIAS command is issued to the source device on that fader.
 The label is cleared when a route is performed on that fader.
 To center a label you must manually pad the text string with spaces.
The following are examples of channel label text commands written to the Fader Wedge:
cmd ae1 surface1 channel1 text label " Active "
cmd ae1 surface1 channel6 text label "
"
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Numix I Message Arrow
This command is used to display message above an input on the Fader Wedge Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd

















AE
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
Not Used
Not Used
surf# | surface#
surf# | surface#
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Destination
device#### (dest)
device#### (source)
fader#
chan# | channel#
d[DeviceName]
d[LastRoute]
s[DeviceName]
Keyword
message
message
message
message
message
message
message
State
on | off | flash | pulse
on | off | flash | pulse
on | off | flash | pulse
on | off | flash | pulse
on | off | flash | pulse
on | off | flash | pulse
on | off | flash | pulse
A special Message Arrow can be displayed above a fader to display an alert to the user.
The fixed text string "EOM" ( End of Message ) is displayed above the Message arrow.
Only one Message Arrow can be displayed at a time on a Numix I Surface.
A second Message Arrow will automatically clear the first Message Arrow.
The Message Arrow will temporarily clear text lines from the upper half of the screen.
All text lines will be restored when the Message Arrow is turned off.
This command must include the Audio Engine number, Surface number, Channel, Fader or
Device number and the required keyword MESSAGE.
One of the keywords CHANNEL, FADER or DEVICE is required.
The required Device or Fader number may be given using the s[Source Device] or
d[Destination Device] notation instead of using the DEVICE keyword.
The special system destination d[LastRoute] will use the Destination Device number of
the last Route command that was executed on the specified Audio Engine.
If the Device Number is a Source Device number or a named s[Source Device], the
command will affect all instances of that Source Device on the specified Audio Engine.
Unlike the On/Off command, a Message Arrow is not directed at a particular Surface when
using a Source Device.
The Message Arrow may be turned on or off, set to flash continuously, or made to flash
once only.
One of the keywords ON, OFF, PULSE or FLASH is needed to set the mode of operation.
If the mode keywords are missing, the message will default to ON.
The keyword PULSE will cause the Message Arrow to go on and off only once.
The keyword FLAG is no longer required, but will not cause harm if present.
The monochrome display of the Numix I doesn't support different color Message arrows.
The following are examples of Message Arrow commands written to the Fader Wedge:
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
86
ae1
ae4
ae4
ae6
ae8
ae2
ae2
ae2
surface1 channel1 message on
surface2 d[Port1 Fader 2 In] message off
surface2 d[LastRoute] message off
surface3 fader7 message flash
surface2 channel10 message pulse
s[CD1] message flash
device0100 message flash
device000b message on
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Numix I Clock
This command is used to write a clock display to the Softkeys or Fader Wedge Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
AE
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Keyword
clock
clock
clock
Size
Not Used
{big}
{big}
Screen
softkey
chan# | channel#
fader#
Line
line#
line#
line#
Pos
pos#
pos#
pos#
Options
{clear} | {insert}
{clear} | {insert}
{clear} | {insert}
 This command is similar to the text command but uses the keyword CLOCK instead of the
keyword TEXT. See Fader Wedge and Softkeys commands for line/pos numbers.
 A quoted string is not required and will be ignored if present.
 The keyword INSERT can be used to insert the time display text into an existing line.
 The display is continuously updated until a CLOCK CLEAR command is used.
 The Clock Clear command must contain the same Audio Engine, Surface, line and position
numbers as the original Clock command.
The following are examples of how to display and clear the clock:
cmd ae1 surface2 clock softkey insert line3 pos6
cmd ae3 surface1 clock big channel7 line1 pos1
cmd ae1 surface2 clock clear softkey line3 pos6
Numix I Temperature
This command is used to write a temperature display to the Softkeys or Fader Wedge Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
AE
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Keyword
temperature
temperature
temperature
Size
Not Used
{big}
{big}
Screen
softkey
chan# | channel#
fader#
Line
line#
line#
line#
Pos
pos#
pos#
pos#
Options
{clear} | {insert}
{clear} | {insert}
{clear} | {insert}
 This command is similar to the text command but uses the keyword TEMPERATURE instead
of the keyword TEXT. See Fader Wedge and Softkeys commands for line/pos numbers.
 A quoted string is not required and will be ignored if present.
 The keyword INSERT is used to insert the temperature display text into an existing line.
 The display is continuously updated until a TEMPERATURE CLEAR command is used.
 The Temperature Clear command must contain the same Audio Engine, Surface, line and
position numbers as the original Temperature command.
The following are examples of how to display and clear the temperature:
cmd ae1 surface2 temperature softkey insert line3 pos6
cmd ae3 surface1 temperature big channel7 line1 pos1
cmd ae1 surface2 temperature clear softkey line3 pos6
TIP:
The clock and temperature display can be written to the Softkeys Screen if desired.
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Numix II Screens
The Numix II has one large color screen on the Selector Wedge (shown on the right), and a color
screen per Fader Wedge (left two wedges below).
The user can display text in certain areas of the Selector Wedge screen or on the screen of the
Fader Wedge.
Text can be displayed in white on the top half of the Fader Wedges. A label can be displayed in
white at the top of each fader information section. In addition, a colored Message Arrow can be
displayed above each fader.
Figure 12 - Numix II Surface
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Numix II Selector Wedge Screens
The Numix II has one large color screen with three functional areas where text commands can be
displayed. These are the Selections Screen (bottom right), the Softkeys Screen (bottom left) and
the Question Screen (not shown). In addition, the Numix II supports a delay status display (top
right) which is turned on automatically when using the appropriate Talk Delay on a SharcAttack
card.
Each of these screens has different capabilities and requires a different style of text commands,
detailed on the following pages.
Figure 13 - Numix II Selector Screen showing all screens
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89
Numix II Question Screen Text
These commands are used to write text to the Numix II Question Screen.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Keyword
set
text
Screen
question
question
cmd
ae#
surf# | surface #
text
question
Line
Pos
line# (1-2)
pos# (129)
Text/Keyword
mode
“29 characters”
clear all
 The Question Screen will display 2 lines of 29 characters each.
 This screen is used to ask a question, answered with the ACCEPT or CANCEL buttons.
 Before text can be written to the Question Screen, it must be placed in Question Mode,
using the keywords QUESTION MODE.
 Placing the Question Screen in this mode clears all existing text from the Question Screen.
 Text commands in Question Mode are displayed immediately when received by the
surface.
 Use the IF BUTTON CANCEL and IF BUTTON ACCEPT Conditional Triggers to react to
the user selection.
 You must use CLEAR ALL to clear the Question Screen when ACCEPT or CANCEL is
pressed, otherwise the screen will not clear.
The following is an example of placing the Question Screen into the Question Mode and then
displaying several lines of text:
cmd ae1 surface2 set question mode
cmd ae1 surface2 text question line1 pos1 "Assign Studio A to air?"
if ae1 surf1 button cancel delay30
cmd ae1 question text clear all
endif
Figure 14 - Numix II Question Screen
 See Chapter 9 for more information on Conditional Triggers to accept or cancel.
Numix II Selections Screen Text
The Selections Screen can be used to display a menu of options to the user.
These can be a user defined list, or a list of inputs for a router Crosspoint (e.g.
record source selector). This command is available on the Numix I, Numix II
and Remora, and therefore is documented in a separate section.
 See Text Selection Screens at the end of this chapter for more
information.
90
Figure 16 - Numix II
Selections Screen
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Numix II Softkeys Screen Text
These commands are used to write text selections to the Numix II Softkeys Screen.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
AE
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Keyword
text
text
text
Screen
softkey
softkey
softkey
Line
line# (1-15)
line# (1-15)
numix2
Pos
pos# (1-51)
Not Used
Not Used
Options
{insert}
clear
clear all
Text
“Up to 51 characters”
Not Used
Not Used
The Softkeys Screen will display 15 lines of 51characters each.
The text command must contain the keyword SOFTKEY to send text to the Softkeys Screen.
Normal Mode erases the entire line before displaying the specified text.
Insert Mode overwrites the text at the LINE and POS given without erasing the entire line
first. This allows the user to change only one word or part of a line if necessary.
 The keyword INSERT is used to specify Insert Mode, otherwise Normal Mode is assumed.
 An entire line of text on the Softkeys Screen can be erased or cleared by using the keyword
CLEAR. The POS keyword and a quoted text string are not required.
 The entire Softkeys Screen can be cleared at one time by using the keyword ALL instead of
a specified LINE number. Specify the type of surface with the required keyword NUMIX2
when using the keyword ALL.




The following are examples of text lines written to the Softkeys Screen in Normal Mode:
cmd ae1 surface2 text softkey line3 pos1 "Text For Line 3"
cmd ae3 surface1 text softkey line5 pos12 "Second Text"
The following are examples of text lines written to the Softkeys Screen in Insert mode:
cmd ae1 surface2 text softkey line3 pos10 insert "This Line"
cmd ae3 surface1 text softkey line5 pos19 insert "Base"
The following are examples of clearing all or part of the Softkeys Screen:
cmd ae1 surface2 text numix2 softkey clear all
cmd ae3 surface1 text softkey line 5 clear
Figure 15 - Numix II Softkeys Screen
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Numix II Fader Wedge Screens
The screen on the Numix II Fader Wedge is capable of displaying three types of text. These include
small and large font text to the upper half of the screen and large font text to the label section of a
fader. This screen will also display a special Message Arrow in the upper half of the screen. The
Supervisor computer clock and an external temperature device can also be displayed.
Each Fader Wedge can display two text sizes. Four lines of large text or twelve lines of small text
can be displayed. When in small text mode, one line of large text can be displayed at the top of the
screen.
Whilst the Numix II has color screens, the majority of text functions will write text in white only.
However, the Message Arrow function is able to display messages in a number of colors.
Figure 16 - Numix II Fader Screen
Figure 17 - Numix II Fader Screen with clock & temperature
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Numix II Small Font Text
This command is used to write a small font text to the upper half of the Fader Wedge Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd








AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Keyword
text
text
Screen
chan# | channel#
fader#
Options
{insert}
{insert}
Line
line#
line#
Pos
pos#
pos#
Text
“36 chars”
“36 chars”
Small text is displayed on the upper half of the screen as 12 lines of 36 characters.
This text is divided into two columns of six lines each.
There are two lines for each channel on the surface. The channel number prefaces the text.
The first three channels are the left column; the second three channels are the right column.
Use CHANNEL 1-6 for the first wedge, CHANNEL 7-12 for the second, and so on.
The command must contain the CHANNEL or FADER number and LINE1 or LINE2.
To clear a line, write a single space string to that line, without the INSERT keyword.
Use the keyword INSERT to replace only the written text and keep other text on the line.
The following are examples of small font text commands written to the Fader Wedge:
cmd ae1 surface1 text channel1 line1 pos1 "This is Text"
cmd ae1 surface1 text channel6 line2 pos1 " "
Numix II Large Font Text
This command is used to write a large font text to the upper half of the Fader Wedge Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Keyword
text
text
Screen
chan# | channel#
fader#
Options
{insert}
{insert}
Line
line#
line#
Pos
pos#
pos#
Text
“52 chars”
“52 chars”
 Large text is displayed on the upper half of the screen as 4 lines of 52 characters.
 Large text can be displayed as 1 line of 52 characters in conjunction with small text below.
 The command must contain a CHANNEL or FADER number of the Fader Wedge, the
keyword BIG and can be written to LINE 1, LINE 2, LINE 3 or LINE 4.
 Use CHANNEL 1 for the first wedge, CHANNEL 7 for the second, and so on.
 To clear a line, write a single space string to that line, without the INSERT keyword.
 Use the keyword INSERT to replace only the written text and keep other text on the line.
The following are examples of large font text commands written to the Fader Wedge:
cmd ae1 surface1 text big channel1 line1 pos1 "This is Text"
cmd ae1 surface1 text big channel6 line3 pos21 " "
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Numix II Label Text
This command is used to write a label to an input on the Fader Wedge Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Screen
chan# | channel#
fader#
Keyword
text
text
Keyword
label
label
Text
“12345678”
“12345678”
 The label is large font text displayed in a label space directly above the fader information.
 This label may have a maximum of 8 characters.
 The channel label text lines must contain the CHANNEL number on the Fader Wedge and
the keyword LABEL.
 The LINE or POS keywords are not required for this type of text.
 To clear the label, write a blank string of 8 characters, with quote marks.
 The label may be replaced by flashing text PENDING if a WHEN OFF command is used.
 The label is replaced if a SET ALIAS command is issued to the source device on that fader.
 The label is cleared when a route is performed on that fader.
 To center a label you must manually pad the text string with spaces.
The following are examples of channel label text commands written to the Fader Wedge:
cmd ae1 surface1 channel1 text label " Active "
cmd ae1 surface1 channel6 text label "
"
Figure 18 – Numix II Fader Screen showing alias & message
 To set an alias for an input, see the Set Device Alias command in Chapter 12.
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Numix II Message Arrow
This command is used to display message above an input on the Fader Wedge Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd

















AE
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
Not Used
Not Used
surf# | surface#
surf# | surface#
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Destination
device#### (dest)
device#### (source)
fader#
chan# | channel#
d[DeviceName]
d[LastRoute]
s[DeviceName]
Keyword
message
message
message
message
message
message
message
Color
See
List
Below
For
Color
Key
Words
State
on | off | flash | pulse
on | off | flash | pulse
on | off | flash | pulse
on | off | flash | pulse
on | off | flash | pulse
on | off | flash | pulse
on | off | flash | pulse
Text
“12345678”
“12345678”
“12345678”
“12345678”
“12345678”
“12345678”
“12345678”
A special Message Arrow can be displayed above a fader to display an alert to the user.
An 8 character user defined text string is displayed above the Message Arrow.
More than one Message Arrow can be displayed at a time on a Numix II Surface.
The Message Arrow will temporarily clear all but the top text line from the screen.
All text lines will be restored when the Message Arrow is turned off.
This command must include the Audio Engine number, Surface number, Channel, Fader or
Device number and the required keyword MESSAGE.
One of the keywords CHANNEL, FADER or DEVICE is required.
The required Device or Fader number may be given using the s[Source Device] or
d[Destination Device] notation instead of using the DEVICE keyword.
The special system destination d[LastRoute] will use the Destination Device number of
the last Route command that was executed on the specified Audio Engine.
If the Device Number is a Source Device number or a named s[Source Device], the
command will affect all instances of that Source Device on the specified Audio Engine.
Unlike the On/Off command, a Message Arrow is not directed at a particular Surface when
using a Source Device.
The Message Arrow may be turned on or off, set to flash continuously, or made to flash
once only.
One of the keywords ON, OFF, PULSE or FLASH is needed to set the mode of operation.
If the mode keywords are missing, the message will default to ON.
The keyword PULSE will cause the Message Arrow to go on and off only once.
The keyword FLAG is no longer required, but will not cause harm if present.
Since the Numix II has a color screen, the color of the Message Arrow and text can be set
by using one of the optional keywords WHITE, RED, YELLOW, GREEN, AQUA, or MAGENTA.
If no color keyword is selected the Message Arrow and text are displayed in white.
The following are examples of Message Arrow commands written to the Fader Wedge:
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
ae1
ae4
ae4
ae6
ae2
ae2
ae2
surface1 channel1 message green on "On-Air"
surface2 d[Port1 Fader 2 In] message off
surface2 d[LastRoute] message off
surface3 fader7 message aqua flash "On-Air"
s[CD1] message red flash "On-Air"
device0100 message yellow pulse "On-Air"
device000b message green on "On-Air"
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Numix II Clock
This command is used to write a clock display to the Softkeys or Fader Wedge Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
AE
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Keyword
clock
clock
clock
Size
Not Used
{big}
{big}
Screen
softkey
chan# | channel#
fader#
Line
line#
line#
line#
Pos
pos#
pos#
pos#
Options
{clear} | {insert}
{clear} | {insert}
{clear} | {insert}
 This command is similar to the text command but uses the keyword CLOCK instead of the
keyword TEXT. See Fader Wedge and Softkeys commands for line/pos numbers.
 A quoted string is not required and will be ignored if present.
 The keyword INSERT can be used to insert the time display text into an existing line.
 The display is continuously updated until a CLOCK CLEAR command is used.
 The Clock Clear command must contain the same Audio Engine, Surface, line and position
numbers as the original Clock command.
The following are examples of how to display and clear the clock:
cmd ae1 surface2 clock softkey insert line3 pos6
cmd ae3 surface1 clock big channel7 line1 pos1
cmd ae1 surface2 clock clear softkey line3 pos6
Numix II Temperature
This command is used to write a temperature display to the Softkeys or Fader Wedge Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
AE
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Keyword
temperature
temperature
temperature
Size
Not Used
{big}
{big}
Screen
softkey
chan# | channel#
fader#
Line
line#
line#
line#
Pos
pos#
pos#
pos#
Options
{clear} | {insert}
{clear} | {insert}
{clear} | {insert}
 This command is similar to the text command but uses the keyword TEMPERATURE instead
of the keyword TEXT. See Fader Wedge and Softkeys commands for line/pos numbers.
 A quoted string is not required and will be ignored if present.
 The keyword INSERT is used to insert the temperature display text into an existing line.
 The display is continuously updated until a TEMPERATURE CLEAR command is used.
 The Temperature Clear command must contain the same Audio Engine, Surface, line and
position numbers as the original Temperature command.
The following are examples of how to display and clear the temperature:
cmd ae1 surface2 temperature softkey insert line3 pos6
cmd ae3 surface1 temperature big channel7 line1 pos1
cmd ae1 surface2 temperature clear softkey line3 pos6
TIP:
96
The clock and temperature display can be written to the Softkeys Screen if desired.
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Remora Screens
The Remora has one large color screen for each wedge. Though there are not separate Selector and
Fader Wedges in the Remora, it can still perform the Selection and Question Screen functions.
Text and labels can be displayed in white on these screens. In addition, a colored Message Arrow
can be displayed.
Remora Selector Screens
The Remora has a small section of the Selector Wedge (Remora 4 module) devoted to selector
screens. These are the Selections Screen and the Question Screen. Each of these screens has
different capabilities and requires different style text commands.
Due to its smaller profile, the Remora does not have a separate Softkeys Screen for displaying text.
The main module of a Remora console (the REM4) has four faders, plus some additional space for
monitoring selections & menus as shown below.
Figure 19 - Remora REM4 screen
TIP:
The Logitek vScreen program can be used on a PC in the studio to display text
messages from Triggers. This can be used to emulate a Surface Softkey Screen.
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97
Remora Questions Screen Text
These commands are used to write text to the Remora Question Screen.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Keyword
set
text
Screen
question
question
Line
Pos
line# (1-2)
pos# (129)
Text/Keyword
mode
“29 characters”
 The Question Screen will display 2 lines of 29 characters each.
 This screen is used to ask a question, with the user able to select the ACCEPT or CANCEL
buttons.
 Before text can be written to the Question Screen, it must be placed in Question Mode,
using the keywords QUESTION MODE.
 Placing the Question Screen in this mode clears all existing text from the Question Screen.
 Text commands in Question Mode are displayed immediately when received by the
surface.
 Use the IF BUTTON CANCEL and IF BUTTON ACCEPT Conditional Triggers to react to
the user selection.
 You must use CLEAR ALL to clear the Question Screen when ACCEPT or CANCEL is
pressed, otherwise the screen will not clear.
The following is an example of placing the Question Screen into the Question Mode and then
displaying several lines of text:
cmd ae1 surface2 set question mode
cmd ae1 surface2 text question line1 pos1 "Assign Studio A to air?"
if ae1 surf1 button cancel delay30
cmd ae1 question text clear all
endif
 See Chapter 9 for more information on Conditional Triggers to accept or cancel.
Remora Selections Screen Text
The Selections Screen can be used to display a menu of options to the user. These can be a user
defined list, or a list of inputs for a router Crosspoint (e.g. record source selector). This command is
available on the Numix I, Numix II and Remora, and therefore is documented in a separate section.
 See Text Selection Screens at the end of this chapter for more information.
Figure 23 - Remora Selections screen
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Figure 22 - Remora Question Screen
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Remora Fader Screens
The fader section of the screen on the Remora is capable of displaying three types of text. These
include small and large font text to the upper half of the screen and large font text to the label
section of a fader. This screen will also display a special Message Arrow in the upper half of the
screen. The Supervisor computer clock and an external temperature device can also be displayed.
Each Fader Wedge can display two text sizes. Four lines of large text or twelve lines of small text
can be displayed. When in small text mode, one line of large text can be displayed at the top of the
screen.
Whilst the Remora has color screens, the majority of text functions will write text in white only.
However, the Message Arrow function is able to display messages in a number of colors.
Figure 24 - Remora Fader Screen showing small text
Figure 25 - Remora Fader Screen showing large text
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99
Remora Small Font Text
This command is used to write a small font text to the upper half of the Fader Wedge Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd








AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Keyword
text
text
Screen
chan# | channel#
fader#
Options
{insert}
{insert}
Line
line#
line#
Pos
pos#
pos#
Text
“36 chars”
“36 chars”
Small text is displayed on the upper half of the screen as 12 lines of 36 characters.
This text is divided into two columns of six lines each.
There are two lines for each channel on the surface
The first three channels are the left column; the second three channels are the right column.
Channels 1-6 are on the first wedge, 7-12 on the second, and so on.
The command must contain the CHANNEL or FADER number and LINE1 or LINE2.
To clear a line, write a single space string to that line, without the INSERT keyword.
Use the keyword INSERT to replace only the written text and keep other text on the line.
The following are examples of small font text commands written to the Fader Wedge:
cmd ae1 surface1 text channel1 line1 pos1 "This is Text"
cmd ae1 surface1 text channel6 line2 pos1 " "
Remora Large Font Text
This command is used to write a large font text to the upper half of the Fader Wedge Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Keyword
text
text
Screen
chan# | channel#
fader#
Options
{insert}
{insert}
Line
line#
line#
Pos
pos#
pos#
Text
“52 chars”
“52 chars”
 Large text is displayed on the upper half of the screen as 4 lines of 52 characters on a REM6
module. On a REM4 module each line can display 35 characters.
 Large text can be displayed as 1 line of 52 or 35 characters in conjunction with small text
below.
 The command must contain a CHANNEL or FADER number of the Fader Wedge, the
keyword BIG and can be written to LINE 1, LINE 2, LINE 3 or LINE 4.
 Use the first channel number of the desired Remora wedge to access that screen.
 To clear a line, write a single space string to that line, without the INSERT keyword.
 Use the keyword INSERT to replace only the written text and keep other text on the line.
The following are examples of large font text commands written to the Fader Wedge:
cmd ae1 surface1 text big channel1 line1 pos1 "This is Text"
cmd ae1 surface1 text big channel6 line3 pos21 " "
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Remora Label Text
This command is used to write a label to an input on the Fader Wedge Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Screen
chan# | channel#
fader#
Keyword
text
text
Keyword
label
label
Text
“12345678”
“12345678”
 The label is large font text displayed in a label space directly above the fader information.
 This label may have a maximum of 8 characters.
 The channel label text lines must contain the CHANNEL number on the Fader Wedge and
the keyword LABEL.
 The LINE or POS keywords are not required for this type of text.
 To clear the label write a blank string of 8 characters
 The label may be replaced by flashing text “PENDING” if a WHEN OFF command is used.
 The label is replaced if a SET ALIAS command is issued to the source device on that fader.
 The label is cleared when a route is performed on that fader.
 To center a label you must manually pad the text string with spaces.
The following are examples of channel label text commands written to the Fader Wedge:
cmd ae1 surface1 channel1 text label " Active "
cmd ae1 surface1 channel6 text label "
"
Figure 20 - Remora Fader Screen showing label & message
 To set an alias for an input, see the Set Device Alias command in Chapter 12.
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101
Remora Message Arrow
This command is used to display message above an input on the Fader Wedge Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd

















102
AE
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
Not Used
Not Used
surf# | surface#
surf# | surface#
Not Used
Not Used
Not Used
Destination
device#### (dest)
device#### (source)
fader#
chan# | channel#
d[DeviceName]
d[LastRoute]
s[DeviceName]
Keyword
message
message
message
message
message
message
message
Color
See
List
Below
For
Color
Key
Words
State
on | off | flash | pulse
on | off | flash | pulse
on | off | flash | pulse
on | off | flash | pulse
on | off | flash | pulse
on | off | flash | pulse
on | off | flash | pulse
Text
“12345678”
“12345678”
“12345678”
“12345678”
“12345678”
“12345678”
“12345678”
A special Message Arrow can be displayed above a fader to display an alert to the user.
An 8 character user defined text string is displayed above the Message Arrow.
More than one Message Arrow can be displayed at a time on a Remora Surface.
The Message Arrow will temporarily clear all but the top text line from the screen.
All text lines will be restored when the Message Arrow is turned off.
This command must include the Audio Engine number, Surface number, Channel, Fader or
Device number and the required keyword MESSAGE.
One of the keywords CHANNEL, FADER or DEVICE is required.
The required Device or Fader number may be given using the s[Source Device] or
d[Destination Device] notation instead of using the DEVICE keyword.
The special system destination d[LastRoute] will use the Destination Device number of
the last Route command that was executed on the specified Audio Engine.
If the Device Number is a Source Device number or a named s[Source Device], the
command will affect all instances of that Source Device on the specified Audio Engine.
Unlike the On/Off command, a Message Arrow is not directed at a particular Surface when
using a Source Device.
The Message Arrow may be turned on or off, set to flash continuously, or made to flash
once only.
One of the keywords ON, OFF, PULSE or FLASH is needed to set the mode of operation.
If the mode keywords are missing, the message will default to ON.
The keyword PULSE will cause the Message Arrow to go on and off only once.
The keyword FLAG is no longer required, but will not cause harm if present.
Since the Remora has a color screen, the color of the Message Arrow and text can be set by
using one of the optional keywords WHITE, RED, YELLOW, GREEN, AQUA, or MAGENTA.
If no color keyword is selected the Message Arrow and text are displayed in white.
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
The following are examples of Message Arrow command written to the Fader Wedge:
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
ae1
ae4
ae4
ae6
ae2
ae2
ae2
surface1 channel1 message green on "On-Air"
surface2 d[Port1 Fader 2 In] message off
surface2 d[LastRoute] message off
surface3 fader7 message aqua flash "On-Air"
s[CD1] message red flash "On-Air"
device0100 message yellow pulse "On-Air"
device000b message green on "On-Air"
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103
Remora Clock
This command is used to write a clock display to the Softkeys or Fader Wedge Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Keyword
clock
clock
Size
{big}
{big}
Screen
chan# | channel#
fader#
Line
line#
line#
Pos
pos#
pos#
Options
{clear} | {insert}
{clear} | {insert}
 This command is similar to the text command but uses the keyword CLOCK instead of the
keyword TEXT. See Fader Wedge and Softkeys commands for line/pos numbers.
 The keyword SOFTKEY can not be used with a Remora as it has no Softkey Screen.
 A quoted string is not required and will be ignored if present.
 The keyword INSERT can be used to insert the time display text into an existing line.
 The display is continuously updated until a CLOCK CLEAR command is used.
 The Clock Clear command must contain the same Audio Engine, Surface, line and position
numbers as the original Clock command.
The following are examples of how to display and clear the clock:
cmd ae1 surface2 clock softkey insert line3 pos6
cmd ae3 surface1 clock big channel7 line1 pos1
cmd ae1 surface2 clock clear softkey line3 pos6
Remora Temperature
This command is used to write a temperature display to the Softkeys or Fader Wedge Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Keyword
temperature
temperature
Size
{big}
{big}
Screen
chan# | channel#
fader#
Line
line#
line#
Pos
pos#
pos#
Options
{clear} | {insert}
{clear} | {insert}
 This command is similar to the text command but uses the keyword TEMPERATURE instead
of the keyword TEXT. See Fader Wedge and Softkeys commands for line/pos numbers.
 The keyword SOFTKEY can not be used with a Remora as it has no Softkey Screen.
 A quoted string is not required and will be ignored if present.
 The keyword INSERT is used to insert the temperature display text into an existing line.
 The display is continuously updated until a TEMPERATURE CLEAR command is used.
 The Temperature Clear command must contain the same Audio Engine, Surface, line and
position numbers as the original Temperature command.
The following are examples of how to display and clear the temperature:
cmd ae1 surface2 temperature softkey insert line3 pos6
cmd ae3 surface1 temperature big channel7 line1 pos1
cmd ae1 surface2 temperature clear softkey line3 pos6
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Mosaic Screens
The Mosaic has color LCD screens for each fader, which can be used to show fader information and
labels. In addition, the Meter Bridge, Monitor module and Wide Softkey module have screens that
support user defined text.
All screens on the Mosaic are color.
The Mosaic has less user screen space than a Numix or Remora console. However, the Mosaic is
designed to be used in conjunction with vScreen, to show additional user defined information
(including clocks, meters and text).
 See the vTools Reference Manual for further information on configuring vScreen.
Figure 21 - Mosaic Surface
The Mosaic introduces many new surface text functions, and therefore
commands requiring destination addresses will be affected by the Mosaic
layout your surfaces’ use. Please contact Logitek Electronic Systems or
your reseller to obtain the latest information.
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105
Mosaic Fader Screen
The Mosaic Fader Module (MLX-20/MLX-FADER) contains one screen (shared between two faders)
that allows an Alias to be written. The Alias is an 8 character string in large font, as shown below.
Figure 22 - Mosaic Fader Alias (8 character)
Mosaic Label Text
This command is used to write a label to an input on a Fader Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd









AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Screen
chan# | channel#
fader#
Keyword
text
text
Keyword
label
label
Text
“1234567890123456”
“1234567890123456”
The label is large font text displayed in a label space directly above the fader information.
This label may have a maximum of 8 characters.
The command must contain the CHANNEL number and the keyword LABEL.
The LINE or POS keywords are not required for this type of text.
To clear the label, write a blank string.
The label may be replaced by flashing text “PENDING” if a WHEN OFF command is used.
The label is replaced if a SET ALIAS command is issued to the source device on that fader.
The label is cleared when a route is performed on that fader.
To center a label you must manually pad the text string with spaces.
The following are examples of channel label text commands written to the Fader Screen:
cmd ae1 surface1 chan1 text label "
cmd ae1 surface1 chan6 text label "
MUTE
"
"
 To set an alias for an input, see the Set Device Alias command in Chapter 12.
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Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Mosaic Wide Softkey Screen
The Mosaic Wide Softkey Module (MLX-40/MLXWSOFT) has two screens for user text. Each screen
has three buttons to the left, for initiating Triggers.
Both screens can display user defined text. In
addition they can be used with Route Select or
Variable Select Triggers to present menu or router
choices to the user. The options are selected by the
user with the Select knob and Cancel and Take
buttons.
When using Route Select, the selected route can
tallied next to the button as shown on the right.
Figure 23 - Route Select
tally
Mosaic Wide Softkey Text
This command is used to write text to the Fader Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Keyword
text
text
Screen
device27
device28
Options
{insert}
{insert}
Line
line#
line#
Pos
pos#
pos#
Figure 24 - Route Select
menu
Color
See below
See below
Text
“14 chars”
“14 chars”
 Text is displayed on as 11 lines of 14 characters.
 Device 28 is the top screen; device 27 is the bottom screen for surface on Port 1. Use device
50 and 4f for surface on Port 2. Channel number is not supported.
 The command must contain the DEVICE or FADER number and LINE number.
 To clear a line, write a single space string to that line, without the INSERT keyword.
 Use the keyword INSERT with a position reference to overwrite written text occupying that
position and keep exisitng text on the line
 The text color can be specified by adding a predetermined value to the postion value. White
is assumed if no value is added to the postion value.
Mosaic Text Color values
The following values are added to the postion value to give the text a specific color:
White
Blue
Green
Red
Cyan
Magenta
Yellow
50% Gray
+0
+16
+32
+48
+64
+80
+96
+112
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
107
The following are examples of small font text commands written to the Wide Softkey Screen:
cmd ae1 surface1 text device28 line2 pos1 "This is Text"
cmd ae1 surface1 text device28 line6 pos1 " "
Mosaic Wide Softkey Route Select
This command is described in full later in this chapter. When using the Route Select command, the
selection can be written to the screen next to the relevant button using these locations:
Button 1
Button 2
Button 3
Button 4
Button 5
Button 6
108
device28 line2 pos1
device28 line6 pos1
device28 line10 pos1
device27 line2 pos1
device27 line6 pos1
device27 line10 pos1
Logitek CommandBuilder 3.6 Reference Manual
Mosaic Monitor Screen
The Mosaic Monitor Module (MLX-34/MLX-MON) has one screen. It does not support user text.
Figure 25 - Mosaic Monitor Screen
Mosaic Meter Bridge Screens
The Mosaic Wide Meter Bridge (MLX-WBRIDGE) has six screens, as shown below:
Figure 26 - Mosaic Wide Meter Bridge
CommandBuilder does not have any keywords to address these screens directly. Each screen has 8
lines of text available, which must be addressed using the following channel & line numbers:
Mosaic Wide Meter Bridge Screens
Screen
Screen 1
Screen 2
Screen 3
Screen 4
Screen 5
Screen 6
LCD
Purpose
Clock & Temperature display
User text
User text
Monitor meter & user text
Timer
Delay status & user text
Main meter label
Device / Channel
device2b/chan43
device2b/chan43
device2b/chan43
device2c/chan44
device2c/chan44
device2c/chan44
device2b/chan43
Lines
1-8
65-72
129-136
1-8
65-72
129-136
16
Notes
Not available if using clock
Lines
1-8
1-8
16
Notes
Lines 7 & 8 below the monitor meter
Lines 7 & 8 (135 & 136) below the delay tally
16 characters available
Mosaic Narrow Meter Bridge Screens
Screen
Left
Right
LCD
Purpose
Monitor meter & user text
Monitor meter & user text
Main meter label
Device / Channel
device2b/chan43
device2c/chan44
device2b/chan43
16 characters available
Figure 27 - Mosaic Wide Meter Bridge Screens 1-3
Mosaic Clock
This command is used to write a clock display to the Meter Bridge Screens.
Keyword
cmd





AE
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
Keyword
clock
Screen
chan# | channel#
Line
line#
Options
{clear}
This command enables a large clock display on screen 1 of the Mosaic Meter Bridge.
For the Mosaic Wide Meter Bridge, use CHAN33 LINE15 to set the clock.
A standard text clock can also be written to other screens if desired.
The display is continuously updated until a CLOCK CLEAR command is used.
The Clock Clear command must contain the same Audio Engine, Surface, line and position
numbers as the original Clock command.
The following are examples of how to display and clear the clock:
cmd ae1 surface1 clock chan33 line15
cmd ae1 surface1 clock clear chan33 line15
Mosaic Meter Bridge Text
This command is used to write text to the Meter Bridge Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Keyword
text
text
Screen
device#
chan# |
channel#
Options
{insert}
{insert}
Line
line#
line#
Pos
pos#
pos#
Color
See below
See below
Text
“18 chars”
“18 chars”
Text is displayed on Screens 1-6 as 8 lines of 18 characters.
See page 109 for the screen addresses & lines.
This command can also be used to set the text on the LCD display below the main meter.
The command must contain the DEVICE or FADER number and LINE number.
To clear a line, write a single space string to that line, without the INSERT keyword.
Use the keyword INSERT with a position reference to overwrite written text occupying that
position and keep exisitng text on the line.
 The text color can be specified by adding a predetermined value to the postion value. White
is assumed if no value is added to the postion value.






Mosaic Text Color values
The following values are added to the postion value to give the text a specific color:
White
Blue
Green
Red
Cyan
Magenta
Yellow
50% Gray
+0
+16
+32
+48
+64
+80
+96
+112
The following are examples of small font text commands written to the Meter Bridge:
cmd ae1 surface1 text chan33 line66 pos33 "This is Text"
cmd ae1 surface1 text chan33 line16 pos1 " "
Figure 28 - Mosaic Wide Meter Bridge Screens 4-6
Mosaic Monitor Meter
The Monitor Meter is set to follow the Monitor source, or depending on your Audio Engine
configuration, another source device. This is set by the Audio Engine, and is not dependent upon
CommandBuilder.
Lines 7 & 8 on Screen 4 can be used for additional text displays, as per the Mosaic Meter Bridge
Text command detailed on the previous page.
Mosaic Timer
The Mosaic Timer is controlled automatically on the surface. There are currently no Trigger
commands to alter the timer functionality. When running in “auto” mode, the timer will reset and
display the source name each time a new fader is started (provided that input is set to “timer reset”
enabled).
Mosaic Delay Display
The Talk Delay display will automatically show on Screen 6 on a Mosaic Wide Meter Bridge, when
the SharcAttack Talk Delay is turned on.
The time display and bar graph are sent by Supervisor when this function is enabled in Supervisor.
Lines 7 & 8 are available for additional delay text tally (as shown above). The standard Mosaic
Meter Bridge Text command can be used for this.
 See page 72 for the Talk Delay command set.
Artisan Screens
The Artisan has color LCD screens for each fader, which can be used to show fader information and
labels. In addition, the Meter Bridge, Monitor module and Wide Softkey module have screens that
support user defined text.
All screens on the Artisan are color.
The Artisan has user screen space similar to a Mosaic console. Like the Mosaic, the Artisan is
designed to be used in conjunction with a new software application, vScreen, to show additional
user defined information (including clocks, meters and text).
 See the vTools Manual for further information on configuring vScreen.
Figure 29 - Artisan Surface
The Artisan introduces many new surface text functions, and therefore
some commands requiring destination addresses will be affected by the
Artisan layout your surfaces use. Please contact Logitek Electronic Systems
or your reseller to obtain the latest information.
Artisan Fader Screen
The Artisan Fader Module (MTK-FADER) contains one screen (shared between two faders) that
allows an Alias to be written. The Alias is an 8 character string in large font, as shown below.
Figure 36 - Fader Screen
Artisan Label Text
This command is used to write a label to an input on a Fader Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd









AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Screen
chan# | channel#
fader#
Keyword
text
text
Keyword
label
label
Text
“1234567890123456”
“1234567890123456”
The label is large font text displayed in a label space directly above the fader information.
This label may have a maximum of 8 characters.
The command must contain the CHANNEL number and the keyword LABEL.
The LINE or POS keywords are not required for this type of text.
To clear the label, write a blank string.
The label may be replaced by flashing text “PENDING” if a WHEN OFF command is used.
The label is replaced if a SET ALIAS command is issued to the source device on that fader.
The label is cleared when a route is performed on that fader.
To center a label you must manually pad the text string with spaces.
The following are examples of channel label text commands written to the Fader Screen:
cmd ae1 surface1 channel1 text label "
cmd ae1 surface1 channel6 text label "
MUTE
"
"
 To set an alias for an input, see the Set Device Alias command in Chapter 12.
Artisan Effects Screen
The Artisan Effects Module (MTK-EFFECTS) contains one screen. This screen does not support user
text.
 For further details, see the Artisan Manual.
Artisan Master Screen
The Artisan Master Module (MTK-MASTER) contains two screens that allow Aliases to be written.
The Alias is an 8 character string in small font.
Artisan Master Text
This command is used to write a label to the Artisan Master Screen.
Keyword
cmd
cmd






AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
Not Used
Not Used
Destination
device#### (dest)
d[Device Name] (dest)
Keyword
set
Set
Keyword
alias
alias
Text
“12345678”
“12345678”
The label is small font text displayed for each meter directly below the meter.
This label may have a maximum of 8 characters.
The command must contain the SOURCE number and the keyword SET ALIAS.
The LINE or POS keywords are not required for this type of text.
To clear the label, write a blank string.
To center a label you must manually pad the text string with spaces.
The following are examples of meter text labels written to the Master Screen:
cmd ae1 s[Sub 1
cmd ae1 s[Aux 1
TIP:
Pre Fdr Out] set alias “ Sub 1”
Pre Fdr Out] set alias “ Aux 1”
When the Artisan surface first starts up, it labels the meters for Aux 1-4 and
Submasters 1-8. Then, when Supervisor starts up, it looks to see if there are any
aliases for every source on the system, and if there is no alias, it sends out a blank
string for every device with an alias. This means that once Supervisor starts, all of
the labels for Aux 1-4 and Submasters 1-8 on the Artisan are overwritten by the
blank aliases.
The following example contains the neccessary commands for inclusion in an Init Trigger or
Procedure called from the Init Trigger or Surface Reset Trigger to ensure that meter text labels are
written to the Master Screen on an Artisan connected to Audio Engine 1:
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
s[Sub
s[Sub
s[Sub
s[Sub
s[Sub
s[Sub
s[Sub
s[Sub
s[Aux
s[Aux
s[Aux
s[Aux
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
2
3
4
Pre
Pre
Pre
Pre
Pre
Pre
Pre
Pre
Pre
Pre
Pre
Pre
Fdr
Fdr
Fdr
Fdr
Fdr
Fdr
Fdr
Fdr
Fdr
Fdr
Fdr
Fdr
Out]
Out]
Out]
Out]
Out]
Out]
Out]
Out]
Out]
Out]
Out]
Out]
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
set
alias
alias
alias
alias
alias
alias
alias
alias
alias
alias
alias
alias
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
Sub
Sub
Sub
Sub
Sub
Sub
Sub
Sub
Aux
Aux
Aux
Aux
1"
2"
3"
4"
5"
6"
7"
8"
1"
2"
3"
4"
 For further details, see the Artisan Manual.
Artisan Monitor Screen
The Artisan Monitor Module (MTK-MON) has one screen. This screen does not support user text.
 For further details, see the Artisan Manual.
Artisan Wide Softkey Screen
The Artisan Wide Softkey Module (MLX-WSOFT)
has two screens for user text. Each screen has three
buttons to the left, for initiating Triggers.
Both screens can display user defined text. In
addition they can be used with Route Select or
Variable Select Triggers to present menu or router
choices to the user. The options are selected by the
user with the Select knob and Cancel and Take
buttons.
When using Route Select, the selected route can
tallied next to the button as shown on the right.
Figure 30 - Route Select
tally
Artisan Wide Softkey Text
This command is used to write text to the Fader Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Keyword
text
text
Screen
device52
device51
Options
{insert}
{insert}
Line
line#
line#
Pos
pos#
pos#
Figure 31 - Route Select
menu
Color
See below
See below
Text
“14 chars”
“14 chars”
 Text is displayed on as 11 lines of 14 characters.
 Device 52 is the top screen; device 51 is the bottom screen for the surface. Channel number
is not supported.
 The command must contain the DEVICE or FADER number and LINE number.
 To clear a line, write a single space string to that line, without the INSERT keyword.
 Use the keyword INSERT with a position reference to overwrite written text occupying that
position and keep exisitng text on the line.
 The text color can be specified by adding a predetermined value to the postion value. White
is assumed if no value is added to the postion value.
Artisan Text Color values
The following values are added to the postion value to give the text a specific color:
White
Blue
Green
Red
Cyan
Magenta
Yellow
50% Gray
+0
+16
+32
+48
+64
+80
+96
+112
The following are examples of small font text commands written to the Wide Softkey Screen:
cmd ae1 surface1 text device52 line2 pos1 "This is Text"
cmd ae1 surface1 text device51 line6 pos1 " "
Artisan Wide Softkey Route Select
This command is described in full later in this chapter. When using the Route Select command, the
selection can be written to the screen next to the relevant button using these locations:
Button 1
Button 2
Button 3
Button 4
Button 5
Button 6
device52 line2 pos1
device52 line6 pos1
device52 line10 pos1
device51 line2 pos1
device51 line6 pos1
device51 line10 pos1
Artisan Meter Bridge Screens
The Artisan Wide Meter Bridge (MLX-WBRIDGE) has six screens. The Artisan Wide Bridge supports
a clock, a timer and text on any of the 6 LCD screens. You cannot send auxiliary meter displays to
the bridge in an Artisan configuration as those meters are already displayed on the Master module
by default.
The Artisan Narrow Meter Bridge (MLX-BRIDGE) has two screens. The Artisan Narrow Bridge
supports a clock, a timer and text on any of the 2 LCD screens. You cannot send auxiliary meter
displays to the bridge in an Artisan configuration as those meters are already displayed on the
Master module by default.
The screens of a Wide Bridge are shown below:
Figure 32 - Artisan Meter Bridge
In the above example, the clock and the timer are shown on LCD 1 and LCD 5 respectively. They
can however, be located on any other screen through the use of triggers. Therefore, any screen not
being used for a clock or a timer may also be used for text.
Each screen has 8 lines of text available, which must be addressed using the following channel &
line numbers:
Artisan Wide Meter Bridge Screens
Screen
Screen 1
Screen 2
Screen 3
Screen 4
Screen 5
Screen 6
LCD
Purpose
Clock
User text
User text
Master 2 Meter
Timer
User text
Main meter label
Device / Channel
device53
device53
device53
device54
device54
device54
device53
Lines
1-8
65-72
129-136
1-8
65-72
129-136
16
Notes
Lines
1-8
1-8
16
Notes
Text can go on lines 7 & 8 below the meter
16 characters available
Artisan Narrow Meter Bridge Screens
Screen
Left
Right
LCD
Purpose
Monitor meter & user text
Monitor meter & user text
Main meter label
Device / Channel
device53
device53
device53
16 characters available
Figure 33 - Artisan Meter Bridge Screens 1-3
Artisan Clock
This command is used to write a clock display to the Meter Bridge Screens.
Keyword
cmd





AE
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
Keyword
clock
Screen
chan# | channel#
Line
line#
Options
{clear}
This command enables a large clock display on screen 1 of the Artisan Meter Bridge.
For the Artisan Meter Bridge, use DEVICE53 LINE15 to set the clock.
A standard text clock can also be written to other screens if desired.
The display is continuously updated until a CLOCK CLEAR command is used.
The Clock Clear command must contain the same Audio Engine, Surface, line and position
numbers as the original Clock command.
The following are examples of how to display and clear the clock:
cmd ae1 surface1 clock device53 line15
cmd ae1 surface1 clock clear device53 line15
Artisan Meter Bridge Text
This command is used to write text to the Meter Bridge Screens.
Keyword
cmd
cmd







AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Keyword
text
text
Screen
device#
chan# |
channel#
Options
{insert}
{insert}
Line
line#
line#
Pos
pos#
pos#
Color
See below
See below
Text
“18 chars”
“18 chars”
Text is displayed on Screens 1-6 as 8 lines of 18 characters.
See page 109 for the screen addresses & lines.
This command can also be used to set the text on the LCD display below the main meter.
The command must contain the DEVICE or FADER number and LINE number.
To clear a line, write a single space string to that line, without the INSERT keyword.
Use the keyword INSERT to replace only the written text and keep other text on the line.
The text color can be specified by adding a predetermined value to the postion value. White
is assumed if no value is added to the postion value.
Artisan Text Color values
The following values are added to the postion value to give the text a specific color:
White
Blue
Green
Red
Cyan
Magenta
Yellow
50% Gray
+0
+16
+32
+48
+64
+80
+96
+112
The following are examples of small font text commands written to the Meter Bridge:
cmd ae1 surface1 text device53 line66 pos1 green "This is Text"
cmd ae1 surface1 text device53 line16 pos1 " "
Figure 34 - Artisan Meter Bridge Screens 4-6
Artisan Master 1/2 Meter
The Master 1/2 Meter is set to follow the Master 1/2 source, or depending on your Audio Engine
configuration, another source device. This is set by the Audio Engine, and is not dependent upon
CommandBuilder.
Lines 7 & 8 on Screen 1 & 4 can be used for additional text displays, as per the Artisan Meter
Bridge Text command detailed on the previous page.
Artisan Timer
The Artisan Timer is controlled automatically on the surface. There are currently no Trigger
commands to alter the timer functionality. When running in “auto” mode, the timer will reset and
display the source name each time a new fader is started (provided that input is set to “timer reset”
enabled).
Route 3 Text
The Route 3 display screen has two modes of operation in which text can be displayed, Normal
Mode and Message Mode.
Normal Mode is used to display labels below a route selection, for example to label a record device
name. The label is displayed on the bottom line, with the top line showing the selected route.
Message Mode is used to prompt the user for a response with the CH1 and CH2 buttons on the
Route 3’s front panel. When in Message Mode the route displays are temporarily hidden.
Before you can send text to a Route 3, you need to know its surface addressing. Addresses are set
with thumbwheels on the back of the unit. There are two ways that Route 3 units can be addressed:
1. Using a standard Surface Address, with the thumbwheels set to 01, 04, 07, 10 etc (multiple
units can be daisy chained on one Audio Engine Port and will use three channels per unit).
2. Using an Output Address, under DSP v3 and higher, with the thumbwheels set to the first of
three sequential output routes to be controlled by the Route 3. These device addresses are
allocated by AEConfig in the Output Settings page, and will be hex 6E or higher. In this
scenario it doesn’t matter which port the Route 3 is connected to, or where it is in a chain.
The recommended address style depends on the Port usage of Control Surfaces at your facility.
TIP:
Older Route 3 units may require a firmware update to support Output Addressing.
Figure 35 - Route 3
Route 3 Normal Mode Text
This command is used to write a label underneath a router selection on the Route 3.
Keyword
cmd
cmd













AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
Not Used
Channel
chan# | channel#
d[DeviceName]
Command
route3
route3
Keyword
text
text
Keyword
label | default
label | default
Text
“123456789012”
“123456789012”
With Surface Addressing, use a Surface number and Channel number.
Channel number is 1-3 for the first Route 3 on a Port, 4-6 for the second, and so on.
With Output Addressing, the device number is required.
This command supports the d[Destination Device]notation.
Required keywords are ROUTE3 TEXT and LABEL or DEFAULT.
The screen display in Normal Mode is divided into three columns of two lines each.
The upper line in each column is the Source Device name for the Route 3 channel.
When a new Source Device is selected, this line changes automatically to the new Source
Device name. This upper line can not be changed in any other way.
The lower line in each column is a user defined text label for that channel.
This label may have up to 12 characters and is left justified.
Leading blanks are required to center short labels.
The user defined text label can be permanently stored as the default label within the Route
3. Whenever a new Source Device is selected for a channel, that channel's default label is
displayed on the lower line overwriting the current label.
When the default label is permanently stored it is also displayed on lower line for the
specified channel. Use the keyword DEFAULT in place of LABEL to set default text.
The following are examples of temporarily changing the label on a Route 3 display:
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
surface2 route3 text label channel1 "Temp 1"
surface2 route3 text label channel2 "Temp 2"
surface2 route3 text label channel3 "Temp 3"
d[OutputName] text line5 "Temp 3"
The following are examples of changing the stored default labels and at the same time changing the
lower line on a Route 3 display:
cmd ae1 surface2 route3 text default channel1 "Chan 1"
cmd ae1 surface2 route3 text default channel2 "Chan 2"
cmd ae1 surface2 route3 text default channel3 "Chan 3"
TIP:The recommended location to set Route 3 labels is in the Init Trigger.
Figure 36 - Route 3 Normal Mode text
Route 3 Set Message Mode
This command is used to set the text mode of a Route 3.
Keyword
cmd
cmd





AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
Not Used
Channel
chan# | channel#
d[DeviceName]
Command
route3
route3
Keyword
set
set
Mode
message mode | normal mode
message mode | normal mode
With Surface Addressing, use a Surface number and Channel number.
With Output Addressing, the d[Destination Device] notation is recommended.
This command does not support a Destination Device number.
Channel number is 1-3 for the first Route 3 on a Port, 4-6 for the second, and so on.
Required keywords are ROUTE3 SET NORMAL MODE or ROUTE3 SET MESSAGE MODE.
The following is an example of setting the Route 3 screen to Message Mode:
cmd ae1 surf1 channel1 route3 set message mode
The following is an example of restoring the Route 3 screen to Normal Mode:
cmd ae1 d[MiniDisc Record] route3 set normal mode
Figure 37 - Route 3 in Message Mode
Route 3 Message Mode Text
This command is used to display messages or questions to a Route 3.
Keyword
cmd
cmd









AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
Not Used
Channel
chan# | channel#
d[DeviceName]
Command
route3
route3
Keyword
text
text
Line
line#
line#
Text
“40 characters”
“40 characters”
With Surface Addressing, use a Surface number and a Channel number.
Channel number is 1-3 for the first Route 3 on a Port, 4-6 for the second, and so on.
With Output Addressing, the device number is required.
This command does not support the d[Destination Device]notation.
Required keywords are ROUTE3 TEXT and LINE1 or LINE2.
The line always starts at the far left, so leading blanks are required to center short text lines.
Use an If Trigger for the CH1 and CH2 buttons to get responses to desired questions.
This button press can only be detected when the Route 3 is in Message Mode.
Normal Mode is automatically restored when the CH1 or CH2 button is pressed.
The following is an example of sending two lines of text to a Route 3 display after setting it to
Message Mode. A response is expected by pressing CH1 or CH2. Adding an If Timer statement so
that the message display times out to a No (CH2) response, improves usability.
trigger ae1 d[Port 1 Fader 1 In] route any
cmd ae1 d[Port 1 Fader 1 In] route3 set message mode
cmd ae1 d[Port 1 Fader 1 In] route3 text line1 "Send ISDN return audio?"
cmd ae1 d[Port 1 Fader 1 In] route3 text line2 "CH1=yes CH2=no"
if timer 1 wait 20
cmd ae1 d[Port 1 Fader 1 In] route3 set normal mode
cmd ae1 d[Port 1 Fader 1 In] route3 text label "No ISDN TB"
endif
The following is an example of a Trigger and Commands that could be associated with the CH1
button press after the message was displayed:
trigger ae1 d[Port 1 Fader 1 In] route3 button1 on
cmd cancel timer 1
cmd ae1 route s[ISDN 1] to d[Port 1 Fader 1 In]
cmd ae1 d[Port 1 Fader 1 In] route3 text label channel 1 "ISDN TB Set"
The following is an example of a Trigger and Commands that could be associated with the CH2
button press after the message was displayed:
trigger ae1 d[MD 1 Record] route3 button2 on
cmd cancel timer 1
cmd ae1 d[Port 1 Fader 1 In] route3 text label channel 1 "No ISDN TB"
 See Chapter 7 for information on Route 3 Button Triggers.
Text Select Functions
These functions are special implementations of the Selection Screen commands. They allow the
user to select options from the Selection Screen. The Route Select function can also be used to
present a list of inputs for a particular router Crosspoint (e.g. a record selector).
The functions are available on the Numix II, Remora, Artisan & Mosaic Surfaces.
Variable Select
 This set of commands allows the value of a User Variable to be set by selecting from a list.
This value can then be immediately tested to execute sets of Action Commands.
 The displayed selection list text is also user defined.
 The Select Knob is used to move the highlight bar to the desired line and then the Accept
button is pressed to make that selection.
 The Cancel button can be pressed to exit Selection Mode without making a selection.
The examples for the individual Variable Select commands follow the command descriptions.
Figure 38 - Variable Select menu (Remora shown)
Variable Select Set Mode
This command is used to set the Variable Select mode on a surface.
Keyword
cmd
AE
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
Type
numix1 | numix2 | remora
| artisan | mosaic
Variable
vUserVariabl
e
Keywords
set selection mode
 This command sets the surface display to Selection Mode.
 The Audio Engine number, Surface number and type, and the keywords SELECTION
MODE are required.
 The surface must be NUMIX1, NUMIX2, REMORA, ARTISAN or MOSAIC.
 If no surface type is given, then NUMIX1 is assumed.
 The keyword SET is optional.
 The selection value is saved in the User Variable specified with vUserVariable notation.
 The User Variable is required, and must be uniquely assigned. The User Variable cannot be
used by another Variable Select or Route Select Trigger, or unpredictable results will occur.
 An IF CANCEL statement is required.
 When using a ROC (2013 or newer) console or Mosaic (second generation, released summer
2013) console, substitute the display keyword for the surface (numix1, numix2, remora,
artisan, mosaic) keyword as follows: display ( device 27 screen 2 ) Use the
screen number that corresponds with the console module as described in the console
manual. See example command at the end of this section.
Variable Select Text
This command is used to enter selection text for the Variable Select mode on a surface.
Keyword
cmd
Keyword
text
Keyword
selection
Line
# (line)
Text
“12345678”
 This command is used to set the title and selection text lines for the list.
 The Audio Engine number and Surface are not required in these commands and are
assumed to be those specified in the SET SELECTION MODE command.
 The keywords TEXT SELECTION TITLE are required for the title line of the selection list.
 The keywords TEXT SELECTION and the line number are required for each line in the list.
Variable Select If Accept
This Test Statement is used to test for an accept selection from the user.
Keyword
if
Keyword
accept
Selection Number
selection = #
Keyword
{then}
 This Test Statement tests for the selection that is accepted by the user and contains the
Action Commands to be executed.
 There is usually one group of commands for each value of selection line in the list.
 The keywords IF ACCEPT SELECTION = and the selection line value are required.
 The keyword THEN is optional.
 The Audio Engine and Surface numbers are not required and are assumed to be those
specified in the above SET SELECTION MODE command.
 The commands to be executed must contain the required Audio Engine and Surface.
 The commands to be executed must be followed by the required ENDIF line.
 The selection is stored in the User Variable from the SET SELECTION MODE command.
Variable Select If Cancel
This Test Statement is used to test for a cancel selection from the user.
Keyword
if










Keyword
cancel
Keyword
delay
Time
# (seconds)
Keyword
{then}
This Test Statement contains commands to be executed when Cancel is pressed.
This is required even if there are no commands to be executed when Cancel is pressed.
The keywords IF CANCEL are required.
The keyword THEN is optional.
The Audio Engine and Surface numbers are not required and are assumed to be those
specified in the SET SELECTION MODE command.
The commands to be executed must contain the required Audio Engine and Surface.
The commands to be executed must be followed by the required ENDIF line.
The statement contains an internal timer that will execute the specified commands when it
expires. The delay time is set using the keyword DELAY followed by the number of seconds
The IF CANCEL automatically sets its timer to 60 seconds.
When the Cancel button is pressed or the internal timer expires, the value of the User
Variable is not changed and the Selection Mode display on the surface is cleared.
The following is a complete example of a Variable Select function for consoles designed before
Summer 2013 (Artisan, Numix1, Numix2, Mosaic (first generation), Remora):
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
ae1 surface1 remora vCurrentShow set selection mode
text selection title " Scene? "
text selection 1 "Brekky"
text selection 2 "Morning"
text selection 3 "Arvo"
if accept selection = 1
cmd ae1 surface1 route
cmd ae1 surface1 route
cmd ae1 surface1 route
endif
then
s[Host Mic] to d[Port1 Fader 1 In]
s[Guest Mic 1] to d[Port1 Fader 3 In]
s[Guest Mic 2] to d[Port1 Fader 4 In]
if accept selection = 2 then
cmd ae1 surface1 route s[Host Mic] to d[Port 1 Fader 4 In]
endif
if accept selection = 3 then
cmd ae1 surface1 route s[Host Mic] to d[Port 1 Fader 1 In]
endif
if cancel delay 30 then
cmd ae1 surface1 bridge lamp4 off
endif
The following is a complete example of a Variable Select function for consoles designed after
Summer 2013 (ROC, second generation Mosaic):
cmd ae1 surface1 vCurrentShow set selection mode display ( device 27 screen 2 )
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
text
text
text
text
selection
selection
selection
selection
title " Scene? "
1 "Brekky"
2 "Morning"
3 "Arvo"
if accept selection = 1
cmd ae1 surface1 route
cmd ae1 surface1 route
cmd ae1 surface1 route
endif
then
s[Host Mic] to d[Port1 Fader 1 In]
s[Guest Mic 1] to d[Port1 Fader 3 In]
s[Guest Mic 2] to d[Port1 Fader 4 In]
if accept selection = 2 then
cmd ae1 surface1 route s[Host Mic] to d[Port 1 Fader 4 In]
endif
if accept selection = 3 then
cmd ae1 surface1 route s[Host Mic] to d[Port 1 Fader 1 In]
endif
if cancel delay 30 then
cmd ae1 surface1 bridge lamp4 off
endif
Route Select
 The Route Select function is similar to the Variable Select function.
 The user selects a Source Device from a displayed list.
 The items in the selection list will be the available Source Device names for a specified
Destination Device (set in AEConfig), similar to a Fader input select.
 The Select Knob is used to move the highlight bar to the desired Source Device and then
the Accept button is pressed to make that selection.
 The Cancel button can be pressed to exit Selection Mode without making a selection.
The examples for the individual Route Select commands follow the command descriptions.
Figure 39 - Route Select menu (Remora shown)
Route Select Set Mode
This command is used to set the Route Select mode on a surface.
Keyword
cmd
AE
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
Type
numix1 | numix2 |
remora| artisan|
mosaic
Variable
vUserVariabl
e
Keywords
set route selection mode
Destination
d[DeviceName]
 This command sets the surface display to Route Selection Mode.
 The Audio Engine number, Surface number and type, and the keywords ROUTE
SELECTION MODE are required.
 The surface type must be NUMIX1, NUMIX2, REMORA, ARTISAN or MOSAIC.
 If no surface type is given, then NUMIX1 is assumed. The selection list appears in slightly
different displays on each type of surface, so it is important that the correct type is given.
 When using a ROC (2013 or newer) console or Mosaic (second generation, released summer
2013) console, substitute the display keyword for the surface (numix1, numix2, remora,
artisan, mosaic) keyword as follows: display ( device 27 screen1 ) Use the
screen number that corresponds with the console module as described in the console
manual. See example command at the end of this section.
 The keyword SET is optional.
 The selected Source Device value is saved in the required User Variable specified with
vUserVariable notation.
 The User Variable is required, and must be uniquely assigned. The User Variable cannot be
used by another Variable Select or Route Select Trigger, or unpredictable results will occur.
Route Select Text
This command is used to enter the title for the Route Select mode on a surface.
Keyword
cmd
Keyword
text
Keyword
selection
Line
title
Text
“1234567890123” (13 characters)
 This command is used to set the title for the list.
 The Audio Engine number and Surface are not required in these commands and are
assumed to be those specified in the SET SELECTION MODE command.
 The keywords TEXT SELECTION TITLE are required for the title line of the selection list.
 The items in the selection list will be the available Source Device names for the specified
Destination Device.
 An IF CANCEL statement is required. In May 2005 versions and later, an error will be
generated if no IF CANCEL follows a Route Select command.
Route Select If Accept
This Test Statement is used to test for an accept selection from the user.
Keyword
if
Keyword
accept
Selection
selection
Keyword
{text}
Destination
{device#### | d[DeviceName]}
 This Test Statement contains commands to be executed when Accept is pressed.
 The Source Device that is highlighted when the Accept button is pressed will be routed to
the Destination Device specified in the SET ROUTE SELECTION MODE command.
 The keyword THEN is optional.
 The Audio Engine and Surface numbers are not required and are assumed to be those
specified in the above SET SELECTION MODE command.
 The commands to be executed must contain the required Audio Engine and Surface.
 The commands to be executed must be followed by the required ENDIF line.
 The selected Source Device number is stored in the User Variable specified in the SET
ROUTE SELECTION MODE command.
 The selected Source Device name can also be displayed (tallied) on the surface by using the
optional keyword TEXT followed by the desired location.
 The text tally destination can be specified by Device number or d[Destination
Device] notation.
 The text tally destination does not support the SOFTKEY keyword. Use DEVICE28 to write
to the Softkey screen on a Numix II.
 The text tally does not support channel numbers, use the channel’s Device Number to write
to the Numix, Remora, Artisan and Mosaic fader screens.
Route Select If Cancel
This Test Statement is used to test for a cancel selection from the user.
Keyword
if










Keyword
cancel
Keyword
delay
Time
# (seconds)
Keyword
{then}
This Test Statement contains commands to be executed when Cancel is pressed.
This is required even if there are no commands to be executed when Cancel is pressed.
The keywords IF CANCEL are required.
The keyword THEN is optional.
The Audio Engine and Surface numbers are not required and are assumed to be those
specified in the SET SELECTION MODE command.
The commands to be executed must contain the required Audio Engine and Surface.
The commands to be executed must be followed by the required ENDIF line.
The statement contains an internal timer that will execute the specified commands when it
expires. The delay time is set using the keyword DELAY followed by the number of seconds.
The IF CANCEL automatically sets its timer to 60 seconds if no time is specified.
When the Cancel button is pressed or the internal timer expires, the value of the User
Variable is not changed and the Selection Mode display on the surface is cleared.
The following is a complete example of the Route Select function:
cmd ae1 surface1 bridge lamp 3 on
cmd ae1 numix2 vFader1Route set route selection mode d[Port1 Fader 1 In]
cmd text route selection title "Fader 1"
if accept selection
cmd ae1 surface1 bridge lamp 3 off
cmd ae1 surface1 d[Port 1 Fader 1 In] bus 0 on
endif
if cancel delay 30 then
cmd ae1 surface 1 bridge lamp 3 off
endif
If using a ROC select panel (summer 2013 or later) or Mosaic (second generation, summer 2013 or
later) substitute this line for the second line of the example:
cmd ae1 vFader1Route set route selection mode d[Port1 Fader 1 In] display ( device27, screen 3 )
14 Additional Surface Commands
Introduction
Some Logitek Surfaces have additional features to enhance the operation and usability. This section
details Surface specific feature commands.
Artisan/Mosaic Features
The Artisan and Mosaic consoles are fitted with a variety of different button lamps.
All programmable Softkey buttons support 16 brightness levels, which can be used to give the
operator further feedback (for example, an Intercom lamp may glow brightly when the station is
calling, but dimly when it is in use from another studio).
The on & off lamps in the faders (no off button for the Artisan) can be changed to many different
colors using an RGB color value. This can be used to denote “ready” or “EOM” states on a
particular source, or the main microphone color could be changed to make it easy to find.
In addition, all lamps support a three speed flash which can be used to denote different events.
Figure 40 - Mosaic Surface
Artisan Set Channel Color
Sets the color of an Artisan Channel On lamp.
Keyword
cmd
Engine
ae#
Surface
surf# |
surface#
Device
chan# | channel#
| fader#
Bus
chon
cmd
ae#
surf# |
surface#
s[Device Name]
chon
cmd
ae#
Not Used
device####
chon
cmd
ae#
Not Used
d[Device Name]
chon
Keyword
set color
| artisan
| tally
set color
| artisan
| tally
set color
| artisan
| tally
set color
| artisan
| tally
Value
RGB000015
Option
slow | medium | fast
RGB001500
slow | medium | fast
RGB000015
slow | medium | fast
RGB151515
slow | medium | fast
 The Channel On buttons on the Artisan support a variety of colors and flash rates.
 To set fixed colors for specific faders, use the Init Trigger and send the color command
using a SURFACE and CHANNEL or FADER; DEVICE number, or d[Device] notation.
 To change colors based on a particular input, establish a Route Trigger and send the
appropriate color command using the s[Source] notation.
 The color value is set with individual Red, Green and Blue values from 0-15.
 Values higher than 15 for each color are not allowed and will result in an error.
 Due to the inherent properties of the three colored LEDs, many color combinations may be
dull or unattractive. The values below are a recommended starting point.
 The keyword ARTISAN must be used.
 The keyword TALLY must be used. This allows the setting of color based on a High (ON) or
Low (OFF) tally.
 An optional keyword SLOW, MEDIUM or FAST can be used to set a flash rate on the lamp.
 A flash rate of 0 is assumed if the keyword is omitted, and equates to solid illumination.
 The lamp can be set to flash even when its current state is off.
 It is not possible to set the flash rate without setting color values.
Colors and flash rates are stored in the lamp and apply when it next comes on. Turning the
lamp or switch off does not reset the stored values.
Red
Green
Blue
White
Crimson
Blue White
RGB150000
RGB001500
RGB000015
RGB151515
RGB040000
RGB041215
Purple
Light Aqua
Dark Aqua
Orange
Yellow
Magenta
RGB030015
RGB021411
RGB000915
RGB151200
RGB091500
RGB150015
The following is an example of an Artisan Set Channel Color command to change the lamp color
to GREEN for the low (OFF) tally:
trigger ae1 device0b bus0 off
cmd ae1 surf1 device0b artisan set color chon RGB001500 tally
The following is an example of an Artisan Set Channel Color command to change the lamp color
to RED for the high (ON) tally:
trigger ae1 device0b bus0 on
cmd ae1 surf1 device0b artisan set color chon RGB150000 tally
Mosaic Set Channel Color
Sets the color of a Mosaic Channel On or Channel Off lamp.
Keyword
cmd
Engine
ae#
Device
chan# | channel#
| fader#
s[Device Name]
Bus
choff | chon
ae#
Surface
surf# |
surface#
surf# |
surface#
Not Used
cmd
ae#
cmd
device####
choff | chon
cmd
ae#
Not Used
d[Device Name]
choff | chon
choff | chon
Keyword
set color
| mosaic
set color
| mosaic
set color
| mosaic
set color
| mosaic
Value
RGB000015
Option
slow | medium | fast
RGB001500
slow | medium | fast
RGB000015
slow | medium | fast
RGB151515
slow | medium | fast
 The Channel On and Off buttons on the Mosaic support a variety of colors and flash rates.
 To set fixed colors for specific faders, use the Init Trigger and send the color command
using a SURFACE and CHANNEL or FADER; DEVICE number, or d[Device] notation.
 To change colors based on a particular input, establish a Route Trigger and send the
appropriate color command using the s[Source] notation.
 The color value is set with individual Red, Green and Blue values from 0-15.
 Values higher than 15 for each color are not allowed and will result in an error.
 Due to the inherent properties of the three colored LEDs, many color combinations may be
dull or unattractive. The values below are a recommended starting point.
 The keyword MOSAIC must be used.
 An optional keyword SLOW, MEDIUM or FAST can be used to set a flash rate on the lamp.
 A flash rate of 0 is assumed if the keyword is omitted, and equates to solid illumination.
 The lamp can be set to flash even when its current state is off.
 It is not possible to set the flash rate without setting color values.
 The flash rate option is only supported in Mosaic v2.0 and above.
 CHOFF refers to the lower button and CHON the upper button, even if their function has
been swapped using a Mosaic feature command.
 Colors and flash rates are stored in the lamp and apply when it next comes on. Turning the
lamp or switch off does not reset the stored values.
Red
Green
Blue
White
Crimson
Blue White
Purple
Light Aqua
Dark Aqua
Orange
Yellow
Magenta
RGB150000
RGB001500
RGB000015
RGB151515
RGB040000
RGB041215
RGB030015
RGB021411
RGB000915
RGB151200
RGB091500
RGB150015
The PDF version of this manual shows
each of the above colors from left to
right.
Figure 48 - Mosaic Fader lamps colors
Artisan/Mosaic Set Lamp Intensity
Sets the intensity of a Mosaic small button lamp.
Keyword
cmd
Engine
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface#
Device
chan# | channel#
Bus
bus# |
lamp#
cmd
ae#
Not Used
device####
bus#
cmd
ae#
Not Used
d[Device Name]
bus#
Keyword
set intensity
| artisan
| mosaic
set intensity
| artisan
| mosaic
set intensity
| artisan
| mosaic
Value
0-15 | DIM | MID(DLE) | BRIGHT
0-15 | DIM | MID(DLE) | BRIGHT
0-15 | DIM | MID(DLE) | BRIGHT
 The small and large softkey buttons on the Artisan/Mosaic support 16 brightness levels.
 Brightness levels are stored by the lamp and do not change until a new value is set or the
Surface is power cycled. All lamps default to maximum brightness on Surface power-up.
 This command uses the required keywords SET INTENSITY.
 This command must include the Audio Engine number, Device or Destination, and the
required keyword LAMP or BUS.
 The Device can be specified using the d[Destination] notation.
 If using keyword LAMP, a Mosaic specific lamp address must also be used.
 This command applies to the lamp in the button, not the button itself.
 The keyword ARTISAN or MOSAIC must be used.
 The keyword BUTTON must NOT be used.
 The intensity level is set with a value from 0-15, or the keywords DIM (=0), MIDDLE (=8) or
BRIGHT (=15). Only one intensity keyword should be used.
 The difference in value between adjacent brightness levels is quite subtle, particularly on the
brighter (higher) values). Values 0-11 are pictured below.
The following are examples of the Set Intensity commands:
cmd ae1 device27 bus88 artisan set intensity 0
cmd ae1 surf1 chan13 bus44 mosaic set intensity dim
cmd ae1 d[Ctrl – Surf1 GPI out] bus99 mosaic set intensity bright
Figure 41 - Mosaic Small Lamp intensity (0-11)
Artisan/Mosaic Variable Lamp Flash
This command is the same as is used with other hardware, and as such is detailed on page 58.
SOURCENAME
This command displays the source that is routed to a destination. The destination may be
referenced either by device number or by d[destination] notation. This command is valid for Mosaic
(first generation and second generation), Artisan, Numix, and ROC. You will need to know the
device number and line number of the display. The keyword display, as well as the parentheses
and spacing are required.
cmd ae1 sourcename d[Port1 Fader 3] display ( device 27 line 7 pos 6 )
cmd ae1 device 6e display ( device 27 line 4 pos 1 )
15 User & System Variables
Introduction
Variables are memory places in Supervisor to store numeric values. User Variables can be set inside
Triggers. System Variables are internal to Supervisor and are set upon certain system events
occurring.
CommandBuilder has Test Statements that allow the value of both types of variables to be tested,
similar to most programming languages. These Test Statements can be nested to provide very
powerful and complex logic tests.
 See Chapter 16 for more details on Test Statements.
User Variables
User Variables can contain user defined integer numeric values, and Device numbers assigned to a
Faders and Routes.
There can be a maximum of 320 user defined variables. The variables are not assigned to a
particular Audio Engine and are accessible from all Triggers and Procedures. The changing or
setting of the User Variable value is itself a General Trigger.
 See Chapter 7 for more details on using a User Variable set in a General Trigger.
System Variables
System Variables store numeric values generated by Supervisor itself. The values of these variables
are read only, and can only be changed by Supervisor in response to certain events. They are
intended to provide the ability to respond to status and error events in the system.
The changing or setting of a System Variable value (by Supervisor) is itself a General Trigger.
 See Chapter 7 for more details on using a System Variable set in a General Trigger.
Defining Variables
User Variables are defined on the System Page in CommandBuilder program. The variable name
can contain a maximum of 30 alphanumeric characters. Spaces are not allowed in variable names.
A User Variable is referred to using the vMyVariableName notation. This notation is the User
Variable name with the prefix v. The v prefix is not part of the variable definition.
 See Chapter 5 for more information on defining User Variables.
Setting User Variables
Set Variable
This command is used to set a User Variable.
Keyword
cmd
Keyword
set
Variable
vVariableName
Assignment
=
Value
# (integer) | vOtherVariable | zSystemVariable
 The value of a User Variable may be set in any Trigger or Procedure.
 The variable value is set using the keywords CMD SET followed by the variable name using
the vMyVariableName notation, followed by the equal sign.
 The value of the variable may be set equal to a number, or set equal to the current value of
another User Variable or System Variable.
The following are examples of setting the value of User Variables:
cmd set vStudio5Phone = 3
cmd set vStudio5Phone = vStudio3Phone
Set Variable Talk Time
This command is used to set a User Variable from the current delay time of a Talk Delay Crosspoint.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
Keyword
set
set
set
Variable
vVariableName
vVariableName
vVariableName
Assignment
=
=
=
Engine
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
Not Used
surf# | surface#
Not Used
Device
device ####
chan# | channel#
d[Device Name]
Keywords
talk time
talk time
talk time
 The value of a User Variable may be set in any Trigger or Procedure.
 The variable value is set using the keywords CMD SET followed by the variable name using
the vMyVariableName notation, followed by the equal sign.
 The value of the variable may be set equal to the current time of a Talk Delay Crosspoint.
 The keywords TALK TIME are required for this command.
 A valid Audio Engine and Destination Device is required, along with the keywords TALK
TIME.
 The Destination Device may be in DEVICE####, d[Destination Device] or SURF#
CHAN# notation.
 The delay time (in tenth of seconds) is multiplied by ten (delay time 1.1 seconds = 11).
The following is an example of setting the value of User Variables from a Talk Delay time:
cmd set vStudio5DelayTime = ae1 d[Port1 Delay CP1 In] talk time
Route Variables
A User Variable can also be used to store and recall a Source Device route. This function is useful
for copying Source Devices from one Destination Device to another. It can be combined with a
TRIGGER ROUTE ANY to copy a route to a User Variable and other devices.
Route Store
This command is used to store a current route to User Variable.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
Keyword
store
store
store
store
Keyword
route
route
route
route
AE
( ae#
( ae#
( ae#
( ae#
Surf
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Not Used
Not Used
Destination
chan# | channel # )
fader # )
device#### )
d[DeviceName] )
Keyword
{to}
{to}
{to}
{to}
Variable
vVariableName
vVariableName
vVariableName
vVariableName
 The Source Device number is saved in the variable using the keywords CMD STORE
ROUTE followed by the Audio Engine number and destination, then the User Variable
name using the vMyVariableName notation.
 The parenthesis and the keyword TO are optional.
Route Recall
This command is used to recall a route value from a User Variable.
Keyword
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
Keyword
store
store
store
store
Keyword
route
route
route
route
AE
( ae#
( ae#
( ae#
( ae#
Surf
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Not Used
Not Used
Destination
chan# | channel # )
fader # )
device#### )
d[DeviceName] )
Keyword
{to}
{to}
{to}
{to}
Variable
vVariableName
vVariableName
vVariableName
vVariableName
 The Source Device number can be recalled from a User Variable and assigned to a
Destination Device.
 The Destination Device does not need to be the same as the device used to store the route.
 The route is recalled from the variable using the keywords CMD RECALL ROUTE followed
by the Audio Engine number and destination, then the User Variable name using the
vMyVariableName notation.
 The parenthesis and the keyword FROM are optional.
 Device numbers are usually different across Audio Engines, even when the inputs are
named the same. For this reason a Route Recall should only be performed from a User
Variable that had a matching Route Store on the same Audio Engine.
The following is an example of storing and recalling a route in a User Variable:
cmd store route ( ae1 d[Port1 Fader 1 In] ) to vPort1Fader1Route
cmd recall route ( ae1 d[Port1 Fader 1 In] ) from vPort1Fader1Route
16 Test Statements
Introduction
Test Statements provide a means to execute different sets of Action Commands depending on the
outcome of the Test Statement. The available Test Statements include If Toggle Equals, If
Variable, If State Equals, If State Scan and When Off.
The use of Test Statements allows for very powerful Trigger logic. If you have prior programming
experience, you will no doubt be familiar with IF/END IF type tests.
The Logitek Scripting Language has two primary types of Test Statements – IF and WHEN. The
group of Action Commands enclosed in a Test Statement must be completed with a corresponding
ENDIF or ENDWHEN.
Like most programming languages, CommandBuilder supports the nesting of IF statements. This
allows for even further depth to the logic tests that can be performed.
If Toggle
Tests the current state of a Toggle Trigger.
Keyword
if
Keyword
toggle
Comparator
=
Value
1|2
Keyword
{then}
If the Toggle State is equal, the commands enclosed in the If Toggle block are executed.
This Test Statement can be used only with Toggle Triggers.
Appropriate sets of commands can be executed depending on the current state.
The desired commands for a specified state must appear between the IF TOGGLE =
statement and its corresponding required ENDIF keyword.
 Toggle Triggers start in Toggle State 1, and alternate between 1 and 2 on each execution.
 The keyword THEN is optional, but recommended for improved code readability.




The following example illustrates the use of the If Toggle Equals statement:
if toggle = 1 then
cmd ae3 surface1 fader2 bus2 on
cmd ae4 surface2 channel3 bus1 on
cmd ae1 d[Port2 Fader 4 In] bus 0 on
endif
if toggle = 2 then
cmd ae3 surface1 fader2 bus 2 off
cmd ae4 surface2 channel3 bus 1 off
cmd ae1 d[Port 2 Fader 4 In] bus 0 off
endif
 See Chapter 12 for information on setting the Toggle State manually.
If Variable
Compares the current value of a User or System Variable to another value, variable or device.
Keyword
if
Variable
vUserVariable | zSystemVariable
Comparator
= (equal)
<> (not equal)
< (less than)
> (greater than)
<= (less/equal)
>= (greater/equal)
Value
vUserVariable
zSystemVariable
#
ae# s[DeviceName]
ae# d[DeviceName]
ae# device####
Keyword
{then}
 Variable values can be compared as equal (=); not equal (<>); less than (<); greater than (>);
less than or equal (<=); or greater than or equal (>=).
 If the comparison is true, the enclosed block of Action Commands is executed.
 The Action Commands to be executed if true must appear between the If Variable
statement and its corresponding required ENDIF keyword.
 A System Variable is specified using the zSystemVariableName notation.
 A User Defined variable is specified using the vMyVariableName notation.
 The Variable value can be compared to integer values; the current value of other Variables;
Source Device numbers using the DEVICE keyword or s[Source Device] notation; or
Destination Devices using the keywords AE, SURF, and CHANNEL or FADER, or the
d[Destination Device] notation.
 The keyword THEN is optional, but recommended for improved code readability.
The following example illustrates the use of the If Variable statement:
if vPhoneLine = 1 then
cmd ae3 surface1 route s[Outside Phone 1] to d[Port1 Fader 1 In]
cmd ae3 surface1 fader1 bus0 on
endif
if vPhoneLine <> vCurrentStudio then
cmd ae3 surface1 route s[Outside Phone 1] to d[Port2 Fader 2 In]
cmd ae3 surface1 fader2 bus0 on
endif
if vPhoneLine = s[Outside Phone 1] then
cmd ae3 surface1 route s[Outside Phone 1] to d[Port1 Fader 3 In]
cmd ae3 surface1 fader3 bus0 on
endif
if zSupervisorANetworkFail = 1 then
cmd ae3 surface1 route s[Outside Phone 1] to d[Port1 Fader 7 In]
endif
if zSupervisorASerialFail = 0 then
cmd ae3 surface1 route s[Outside Phone 1] to d[Port2 Fader 12 In]
endif
If Variable And
A variation of If Variable for multiple tests, which must all evaluate as true to execute code block.
Keyword
if






Test 1
( VariableName
Comparator
= | < | > | < | > | <= | >=
Value
Value )
Operator
{AND}
Additional Tests
(…) optional
Keyword
{then}
The If Variable Test Statement can be combined with itself to test values of many variables.
If all of the individual Test Statements are true, the block of commands is executed.
Each separate statement must be enclosed in parenthesis and joined using the keyword AND.
Spaces are required either side of any Variable name to ensure the variable is found.
Individual Test Statements follow the same rules as the If Variable Test Statement above.
The keywords AND and OR can't be mixed in the same multiple Test Statement.
The following are examples of the If Variable statement using multiple AND test conditions:
if ( vPhoneLine = 1 ) and ( vAirStudio = 3 ) and ( vScene = 4 ) then
cmd ae3 surface1 route s[Outside Phone 1] to d[Port2 Fader 2 In]
cmd ae3 surface1 fader2 bus0 on
endif
if (vPhoneLine = s[CD 2] ) and ( zSupervisorASerialFail = 0 ) then
cmd ae3 surface1 route s[Outside Phone 2] to d[Port 3 Fader 4 In]
endif
If Variable Or
A variation of If Variable for multiple tests, of which one must evaluate as true to execute code block.
Keyword
if






Test 1
( VariableName
Comparator
= | < | > | < | > | <= | >=
Value
Value )
Operator
{OR}
Additional Tests
(…) optional
Keyword
{then}
The If Variable Test Statement can be combined with itself to test values of many variables.
If one of the individual Test Statements is true, the block of commands is executed.
Each separate statement must be enclosed in parenthesis and joined using the keyword OR.
Spaces are required either side of any Variable name to ensure the variable is found.
Individual Test Statements follow the same rules as the If Variable Test Statement above.
The keywords AND and OR can't be mixed in the same multiple Test Statement.
The following are examples of the If Variable statement using multiple OR test conditions:
if ( vPhoneLine = 1 ) or ( vAirStudio = 3 ) or ( vScene = 4 ) then
cmd ae3 surface1 route s[Outside Phone 1] to d[Port2 Fader 2 In]
cmd ae3 surface1 fader2 bus0 on
endif
if (vPhoneLine = s[CD 2] ) or ( zSupervisorASerialFail = 0 ) then
cmd ae3 surface1 route s[Outside Phone 2] to d[Port 3 Fader 4 In]
endif
If State
Tests the state of a set of conditions in a specified Audio Engine.
Keyword
if
Keyword
state {=}
Test Condition
( test condition statement ON | OFF | ROUTE | NOT ROUTE )
Keyword
{then}
 If the conditions are true, then the command block is executed.
 The Action Commands for a specified set of conditions must appear between the
IF STATE Test Statement and its corresponding required ENDIF keyword.
 The required state keyword must be ON, OFF, ROUTE, or NOT ROUTE.
 The keyword THEN is optional, but recommended for improved code readability.
 The EQUALS sign is not required.
 The parentheses are optional when there is only one test condition.
 The parentheses are required for multiple sets of conditions (see following).
The following are examples of the If State statement with only one test condition:
if state = ( ae1 surface3 channel3 bus0 on ) then
cmd ae1 surface3 route s[ISDN 2] to d[Port1 Fader3 In]
endif
if state = ( ae1 surface2 route device 010C to channel 6 ) then
cmd ae1 surface2 d[Port1 Fader3 In] bus0 off
endif
if state = ( ae3 surface2 not route s[CD 1] to d[Port2 Fader5 In] ) then
cmd ae3 surface2 d[Port1 Fader5 In] bus0 on
endif
If State And
Tests the state of multiple conditions in a specified Audio Engine. All must evaluate to true.
Keyword
if






Keyword
state {=}
Test Condition
( first test condition )
Operator
{AND}
Additional Tests
( second test condition ) …
Keyword
{then}
The If State Test Statement can be combined with itself to test multiple states.
If all of the individual Test Statements are true, the block of commands is executed.
Each separate statement must be enclosed in parenthesis and joined using the keyword AND.
Individual Test Statements follow the same rules as the If State Test Statement above.
The keywords AND and OR can't be mixed in the same multiple test statement.
The EQUALS sign is not required.
Following is an example of the If State test with multiple test conditions using the AND condition:
if state = (ae1 surf3 chan3 bus0 on) and (ae1 surf3 chan4 bus0 on) then
cmd ae1 surf3 route s[ISDN 2] to d[Port1 Fader 3 In]
endif
If State Or
Tests the state of multiple conditions in a specified Audio Engine. One must evaluate to true.
Keyword
if






Keyword
state {=}
Test Condition
( first test condition )
Operator
{OR}
Additional Tests
( second test condition ) …
Keyword
{then}
The If State Test Statement can be combined with itself to test multiple states.
If one of the individual Test Statements is true, the block of commands is executed.
Each separate statement must be enclosed in parenthesis and joined using the keyword OR.
Individual Test Statements follow the same rules as the If State Test Statement above.
The keywords AND and OR can't be mixed in the same multiple test statement.
The EQUALS sign is not required.
Following is an example of the If State test with multiple test conditions using the OR condition:
if state = (ae2 chan1 bus0 off) or (ae2 chan2 bus0 off) then
cmd ae2 route s[CD 2] to d[Port 1 Fader 4 In]
endif
If State Scan
Tests the state of a Source Device wherever it appears in a specified Audio Engine.
Keyword
if
if
Keyword
state scan
state scan
AE
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Source
s[Device]
device####
Bus
bus#
bus#
State
ON | OFF
ON | OFF
Keyword
{then}
{then}
 If State Scan is a special case of If State, which includes a Source Device.
 The faders on the specified Surface are checked from left to right until the specified Source
Device is found. If the Source appears more than once, only the first instance is evaluated.
 If the condition is true for that fader, then the commands in the code block are executed.
 The Source Device may be specified by device number or s[Source Device] notation.
 The Action Commands for a specified set of conditions must appear between the
IF STATE SCAN Test Statement and its corresponding required ENDIF keyword.
 The required action keyword must be ON or OFF.
 The keyword THEN and parentheses are optional.
 Only one set of conditions may be specified in a single If State Scan Test Statement.
The following are examples of the If State Scan Test Statement:
if state scan ( ae1 surface3 s[CD 1] bus0 on ) then
cmd ae1 surface3 route s[ISDN 2] to d[Port1 Fader3 In]
endif
if state scan ( ae2 device0104 bus1 off ) then
cmd ae2 route s[CD 2] to d[Port1 Fader4 In]
endif
If Variable Talk Time
Compares the current delay time value of a Talk Delay Crosspoint in a specified Audio Engine.
Keyword
if
Engine
ae#
Surface
Not Used
Device
device ####
Keywords
talk time
if
if
ae#
ae#
surf# | surface#
Not Used
chan# | channel#
d[Device Name]
talk time
talk time
Comparator
= (equal)
<> (not equal)
< (less than)
> (greater than)
<= (less/equal)
>= (greater/equal)
As Above
As Above
Keyword
{then}
{then}
{then}
 Talk Delay time can be compared as equal (=); not equal (<>); less than (<); greater than
(>); less than or equal (<=); or greater than or equal (>=).
 If the comparison is true, the enclosed block of Action Commands is executed.
 The Action Commands to be executed if true must appear between the If Talk Time
statement and its corresponding required ENDIF keyword.
 A valid Audio Engine and Destination Device is required, along with the keywords TALK
TIME.
 The Destination Device may be in DEVICE####, d[Destination Device] or SURF#
CHAN# notation.
 The delay time (in tenth of seconds) is multiplied by ten (delay time 1.1 seconds = 11).
 The keyword THEN is optional, but recommended for improved code readability.
 This Test Statement cannot be combined with other Test Statements using AND / OR.
The following examples illustrate the use of the If Talk Time statement:
if ae1 d[Port1 Delay CP1 In] talk time = 70 then
cmd ae1 surface1 bridge lamp12 on
endif
if ae1 surface1 chan38 talk time < 70 then
cmd ae1 surface1 bridge lamp12 off
endif
When Off
Executes a set of commands when a specified fader is turned off.
Keyword
when
when
when
when
Keyword
off
off
off
off
AE
ae#
ae#
ae#
ae#
Surface
surf# | surface #
surf# | surface #
Not Used
Not Used
Destination
chan# | channel#
fader#
d[Device Name]
device ####
 The When Off statement tests a specified Surface Channel or Destination Device to
determine if its Bus 0 (main on/off switch) is currently off.
 If Bus 0 is off, the Action Commands associated with the When Off Test Statement are
executed immediately.
 If Bus 0 is not off, the Action Commands are stored and executed when Bus 0 does go off.
 This Test Statement is often used to route a new Source Device to a Fader when the Fader
is turned off (preventing it the source from changing while the Fader is on-air or in use).
 While the commands are stored, the flashing text "Pending" is displayed over the Fader.
 One of the keywords CHANNEL, FADER or DEVICE is required.
 The required Device or Fader number may be given using the d[Destination Device]
notation instead of using the DEVICE keyword.
 The keyword BUS is not used since the Test Statement always checks Bus 0.
 The Action Commands to be executed must appear between the WHEN OFF Test
Statement and its corresponding required ENDWHEN keyword.
 The stored commands and "Pending" text can be cleared using the Clear When command.
The following examples illustrate the use of the When Off statement:
when off ae1 surface1 d[Port1 Fader2 In]
cmd ae1 route s[Phone 1] to d[Port1 Fader 2 In]
endwhen
when off ae2 surface2 fader4
cmd ae2 surface2 fader4 route s[Phone 1]
endwhen
Part C: Examples and application notes
The final section of the manual contains example Triggers and application notes to
help you achieve more complex tasks. These examples are based on some of the best
Trigger applications used at Logitek sites around the world.
17 Trigger Layout
The layout of Triggers is entirely up to the user, and does not affect the way Supervisor operates.
However, a logical layout will greatly aid future maintenance and additions to the table.
The recommended layout is to allocate a “stub” Trigger for every possible Trigger Event, and then
code against the Triggers that are to be used. This makes it easy to find Triggers in the list, and see
which buttons, GPIs and other events are allocated. In addition, this layout also makes it easy to add
Triggers in place in the future.
A “stub” Trigger is essentially a placeholder. It contains the Trigger definition and description,
without any code. It is left “Not Active” until code is added.
If required, Logitek can supply example Trigger files to assist with your file layout and design.
Allocating Stub Triggers
We suggest allocating blocks of Triggers for related Trigger Events. The following blocks are
suggested:







Summary (documentation) & Init Triggers
Audio Engine GPIs
Surface GPIs
Surface Bridge Buttons
Surface Softkey Buttons
Surface Button Wedge Buttons
Surface Miscellaneous Triggers
For maximum readability, each block should start at the next “hundred”, e.g. 101, 201, etc.
Within each block, allocate the ON and OFF Triggers for each relevant Engine or Surface, e.g.
Audio Engine GPI ONs at #101, then Audio Engine GPI OFFs at #121. This layout and spacing
makes it very easy to find related Triggers.
Example Stub Triggers Allocation
Following is a suggested Trigger layout for a system with one Audio Engine, and one Surface with a
Button Wedge.
01
02
03
04
11-100
101-115
121-135
Site Information (documentation – no active code)
Summary of Triggers (documentation – no active code)
Summary of Timers (documentation – no active code)
Init Trigger
Audio Engine Triggers (if used)
Audio Engine GPI On Triggers
Audio Engine GPI Off Triggers
[ repeat this sequence for each Audio Engine ]
201-212
221-232
Surface GPI On Triggers (use 201-225 for Mosaic)
Surface GPI Off Triggers (use 231-255 for Mosaic)
[ repeat this sequence for each Surface ]
301-312
321-332
Surface Bridge Button On Triggers
Surface Bridge Button Off Triggers
[ repeat this sequence for each Surface ]
401-412
421-432
Surface Softkey Button On Triggers
Surface Softkey Button Off Triggers
[ repeat this sequence for each Surface ]
501-524
531-554
Surface Button Wedge On Triggers
Surface Button Wedge Off Triggers
[ repeat this sequence for each Surface / Button Wedge]
601+
Miscellaneous Triggers (e.g. fader, input, route, etc)
Each block should be adjusted to the next available block of one hundred where more Audio
Engines and Surfaces are required.
Different Surfaces have different buttons and will influence the allocation of Triggers. For example,
the Numix II surface has a Softkey panel, whereas the Remora does not. The Mosaic Surface has
many different button panels, depending on the modules ordered.
 Consult the relevant Surface manual for more information on available buttons.
Figure 42 - Trigger List showing stub triggers
The above screenshot shows a section of “stub” Triggers following our suggested layout.
Trigger Naming
The naming of Triggers is entirely up to the user. Examples from the recommended naming are:





AE1 - Engine GPI 1 - ON
St1 - Surface GPI 1 - ON
St1 - Bridge BUTT1 - ON - Scene 1 "Talk"
St1 - Softkey BUTT5 - OFF
St1 - NW24 BUTT1 - ON
In each case, add a short description of the Trigger where relevant, e.g.:
 AE1 Engine GPI 15 - ON - St1 Comm Break Pulse
 St1 - Bridge BUTT1 - ON - Scene 1 "Talk"
A Trigger must not have the word Trigger as the first word in its name,
otherwise CommandBuilder will delete its name from the table.
18 Basic Examples
This chapter includes some examples of basic Trigger functions that perform useful functions. These
are based on popular functions used by Logitek stations around the world.
CD Preview
Functionality Description
This is a hotkey function to put the CD fader on CUE and send a GPI to the CD player to preview
the start of the cued track.
It requires a CD player that supports a GPI to provide this function (either GPI held high when in
preview, or GPI to start and GPI to recue). The example may need to be adjusted to suit the
equipment you use.
Components
This function has an ON (button pressed) and OFF (button released) Trigger.
Button On Trigger (pressed)
 Check if CD player is OFF (don’t execute function while it is playing to air).
 Turn CUE channel ON for CD.
 Turn button lamp ON.
 Turn GPI ON to CD player.
 Enabled OFF trigger (so the OFF component only runs following a successful ON).
Button Off Trigger (released)
 Turn CUE channel OFF for CD.
 Turn button lamp OFF.
 Turn GPI OFF to CD player.
Further Information
 If State Scan – Page 150
 Bus On/Off – Page 55
 Set Trigger Active – Page 74
Script Examples
trigger ae1 surf1 chan14 bus37 on
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: CD Preview
REVISED: 18th May 2005
~ DATA/ID: CD1 Preview - ON
~ DESCRIPTION: Puts CD on/off cue. Sends GPI to CD.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES:
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
if state
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
cmd set
endif
(ae1 scan surf1 s[StA CD 1] bus00 off)
surf1 s[StA CD 1] bus02 on
surf1 chan13 bus37 on
device0001 bus03 on
active trigger ae1 surf1 chan14 bus37 off
~
~
~
~
is CD 1 off?
Cue on
turn lamp on
GPI on
trigger ae1 surf1 chan14 bus37 off
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: CD Preview
REVISED: 18th May 2005
~ DATA/ID: CD1 Preview - OFF
~ DESCRIPTION: Puts CD on/off cue. Sends GPI to CD.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES:
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
ae1
ae1
ae1
set
surf1 s[StA CD 1] bus02 off
~ Cue off
surf1 chan13 bus37 off
~ turn lamp off
device0001 bus03 off
~ GPI off
notactive trigger ae1 surf1 chan14 bus37 off
Quick Record
Functionality Description
This function will change desired faders (eg microphones and telephone channels) to a record bus,
and change the monitoring to suit. Pressing the button again will restore the channels to PGM and
monitoring back to original state.
Optionally, this function could also be used to send a GPI to put a device into record mode.
Components
This is a toggle (two-state) button function.
Toggle State = 1 (go into Quick Record)
 Flash the Quick Record button lamp.
 Check if Mic 1-4 are off: If Off, turn off PGM bus and turn on AX1 bus.
 Check if Tel 1 is off: If Off, turn off PGM bus and turn on AX1 bus, set mix minus to AX1,
label the Tel 1 fader to show the return path.
 Repeat previous step for Tel 2.
 Store the current Monitor, Operator and Guest Headphone device routes into variables.
 Route AX1 to the Monitor, Operator and Guest Headphones.
Toggle State = 2 (exit Quick Record)
 Turn off the Quick Record button lamp.
 Check if Mic 1-4 PGM is Off: If Off, turn on PGM bus and turn off AX1 bus, turn off
channel.
 Check if Tel 1 PGM is Off: If Off, turn on PGM bus, turn off its AX1 bus, turn off channel, set
mix minus to PGM, label the Tel 1 fader to show the return path.
 Repeat previous step for Tel 2.
 Recall the previous Monitor, Operator and Guest Headphone routes from their variables.
Further Information





If Toggle – Page 39
Bus On/Off – Page 55
If State Scan – Page 150
Set Fader Label – Page 61
Device Store/Recall – Page 144
Script Examples
trigger ae1 surf1 chan14 bus35 on toggle
~ <--- put your required button here!
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Remote record with tally
REVISED: 18th May 2005
~ DATA/ID: Quick Record - ON
~ DESCRIPTION: Puts mics and tel on to AX1 ON & AX1 OFF. Change Tel mix minus to AX1. Monitoring to AX1.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Toggle function - all changes reversed on toggle. Faders on / PGM are not touched.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
~== Toggle On ========================================================================================================~
if toggle = 1
cmd ae1 bridge lamp05 flash continuous
~ lamp tally on
if state (ae1 scan surf1 s[St1 Mic 1] bus00 off)
cmd ae1 surf1 s[St1 Mic 1] bus01 off
cmd ae1 surf1 s[St1 Mic 1] bus03 on
endif
~ is Mic 1 off?
~ PGM off
~ AX1 on
if state (ae1 scan surf1 s[St1 Mic 2] bus00 off)
cmd ae1 surf1 s[St1 Mic 2] bus01 off
cmd ae1 surf1 s[St1 Mic 2] bus03 on
endif
~ is Mic 2 off?
~ PGM off
~ AX1 on
if state (ae1 scan surf1 s[St1 Mic 3] bus00 off)
cmd ae1 surf1 s[St1 Mic 3] bus01 off
cmd ae1 surf1 s[St1 Mic 3] bus03 on
endif
~ is Mic 3 off?
~ PGM off
~ AX1 on
if state (ae1 scan surf1 s[St1 Mic 4] bus00 off)
cmd ae1 surf1 s[St1 Mic 4] bus01 off
cmd ae1 surf1 s[St1 Mic 4] bus03 on
endif
~ is Mic 4 off?
~ PGM off
~ AX1 on
if state
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
endif
(ae1 scan surf1 s[St1
surf1 s[St1 Telephone
surf1 s[St1 Telephone
set surf1 mix- 4 bus4
surf1 s[St1 Telephone
Telephone 1] bus00 off) ~ is Tel 1 off?
1] bus01 off
~ PGM off
1] bus03 on
~ AX1 on
~ set MM4 to AX2
1] text label "Rtn: AX2"
if state
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
endif
(ae1 scan surf1 s[St1
surf1 s[St1 Telephone
surf1 s[St1 Telephone
set surf1 mix- 5 bus4
surf1 s[St1 Telephone
Telephone 2] bus00 off) ~ is Tel 2 off?
2] bus01 off
~ PGM off
2] bus04 on
~ AX2 on
~ set MM5 to AX2
2] text label "Rtn: AX2"
cmd store ae1 d[Port1 Monitor In] route to vMonSt1MonAmp
cmd store ae1 d[Port1 Headphones In] route to vMonSt1OprHP
cmd store ae1 d[Port1 Studio In] route to vMonSt1GstHP
~ store Monitor Amp crosspoint setting
~ store Opr Headphones crosspoint setting
~ store Gst Headphones crosspoint setting
cmd ae1 route s[Port1 Aux 2 Out] to d[Port1 Monitor In]
cmd ae1 route s[Port1 Aux 2 Out] to d[Port1 Headphones In]
cmd ae1 route s[Port1 Aux 2 Out] to d[Port1 Studio In]
~ route AX2 to Monitor
~ route AX2 to headphones
~ route AX2 to guest headphones
endif
~== Toggle Off =======================================================================================================~
if toggle = 2
cmd ae1 bridge lamp05 off
~ lamp tally off
if state
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
endif
(ae1 scan surf1
surf1 s[St1 Mic
surf1 s[St1 Mic
surf1 s[St1 Mic
s[St1 Mic 1] bus01 off)
1] bus01 on
1] bus03 off
1] bus00 off
~
~
~
~
is Mic 1 off PGM?
PGM on
AX1 off
channel off
if state
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
endif
(ae1 scan surf1
surf1 s[St1 Mic
surf1 s[St1 Mic
surf1 s[St1 Mic
s[St1 Mic 2] bus01 off)
2] bus01 on
2] bus03 off
2] bus00 off
~
~
~
~
is Mic 2 off PGM?
PGM on
AX1 off
channel off
if state
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
endif
(ae1 scan surf1
surf1 s[St1 Mic
surf1 s[St1 Mic
surf1 s[St1 Mic
s[St1 Mic 3] bus01 off)
3] bus01 on
3] bus03 off
3] bus00 off
~
~
~
~
is Mic 3 off PGM?
PGM on
AX1 off
channel off
if state
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
endif
(ae1 scan surf1
surf1 s[St1 Mic
surf1 s[St1 Mic
surf1 s[St1 Mic
s[St1 Mic 4] bus01 off)
4] bus01 on
4] bus03 off
4] bus00 off
~
~
~
~
is Mic 4 off PGM?
PGM on
AX1 off
channel off
if state
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
endif
(ae1 scan surf1 s[St1
surf1 s[St1 Telephone
surf1 s[St1 Telephone
surf1 s[St1 Telephone
set surf1 mix- 4 bus1
surf1 s[St1 Telephone
Telephone 1] bus01 off)
~ is Tel 1 off PGM?
1] bus01 on
~ PGM on
1] bus03 off
~ AX1 off
1] bus00 off
~ channel off
~ set MM4 to PGM
1] text label "Rtn: PGM"
if state
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
endif
(ae1 scan surf1 s[St1
surf1 s[St1 Telephone
surf1 s[St1 Telephone
surf1 s[St1 Telephone
set surf1 mix- 5 bus1
surf1 s[St1 Telephone
Telephone 2] bus01 off)
~ is Tel 2 off PGM?
2] bus01 on
~ PGM on
2] bus03 off
~ AX1 off
2] bus00 off
~ channel off
~ set MM5 to PGM
2] text label "Rtn: PGM"
cmd recall ae1 surf1 d[Port1 Monitor In] from vMonSt1MonAmp
cmd recall ae1 surf1 d[Port1 Headphones In] from vMonSt1OprHP
cmd recall ae1 surf1 d[Port1 Studio In] from vMonSt1GstHP
endif
~ recall Monitor Amp
~ recall Opr Headphones
~ recall Gst Headphones
Route Select
Functionality Description
This function is used to select a route from a list. It is commonly used for record selection on a
surface. The Mosaic surface Wide Softkey module contains two text screens which support up to 6
Route Select buttons. The Numix and Remora surfaces do not have button specifically designed for
Route Selects, but do support the command.
Components
This function is contained within a single Trigger, however sets If Accept and If Cancel Conditional
Triggers. The Route Select will:





Set selection mode using a variable (the Source Device is stored to this variable).
Turns the button lamp on.
Labels the screen with the selection options.
If accepted then perform the route and label the screen with the selected source.
If cancelled or no action after 30 seconds then turn the lamp off.
If the same route is to be controlled elsewhere in the system, you will need some form of Route
Trigger to update the text on the surface screen, otherwise they will be out of sync.
Further Information
 Bus On/Off – Page 55
 Route Select – Page 132
Script Examples
trigger ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI In] bus81 on
~ Mosaic Wide Softkey, Text Button 3
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Route Select v1.0
REVISED: 24th February 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port1 (StA) Wide Softkey TEXT3
~ DESCRIPTION: Turn on Route Select Mode
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES:
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd ae1 remora vRoute_StA_MD1 set route selection mode d[StA MD1]
cmd ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI Out] bus81 on
~ turn on route select mode
~ turn on lamp 3
cmd text route selection title "MD 1"
~ display text title to route screen
if accept selection text ae1 device28 line10 pos1
cmd ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI Out] bus81 off
endif
~ display routed source to route screen
~ turn off lamp 3
if cancel delay 30 then
cmd ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI Out] bus81 off
endif
~ after 30 seconds of inactivity...
~ turn off lamp 3
Mic Mute
Functionality Description
This function can be used to mute a microphone. The example uses a console button to activate,
however, could easily be adapted to be triggered from an external GPI (eg external cough mute
panel).
Components
This function has an ON (button pressed) and OFF (button released) Trigger.
Button On Trigger (pressed)
 Check if the Mic 1 fader is turned On (if Off, no more code will be executed).
 Turn Bus 8 (Cough Mute Bus) On for that source.
 Label the fader with the text “MUTE”.
 Turn the button lamp on.
Button Off Trigger (released)
 Turn Bus 8 (Cough Mute Bus) Off.
 Clear the label from the Fader.
 Turn the lamp off.
Note the Off Trigger does not check to see if the fader is off, therefore will execute whenever the
button is released. As it is just clearing the label and turning off the mute (Bus 8), there is no need to
check if the fader is on.
Further Information
 Bus On/Off – Page 55
 If State Scan – Page 150
 Set Fader Label – Page 61
Script Examples
trigger ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI In] bus86 on
~ Mosaic Wide Softkey, Misc Button #2
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Cough Mute
REVISED: 22nd February 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Surf1 (StA) Mic 1 Mute ON
~ DESCRIPTION: Activate Mic Mute if Mute button pressed. Cancel Mic Mute if Mute button released.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Activates/Deactivates Mute bus for Mic input.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
if state
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
endif
scan ( ae1 surf1 s[StA Mic 1] bus0 on ) then
s[StA Mic 1] bus8 on
~ cough mute on
s[StA Mic 1] text label " MUTE "
~ tally label to fader
d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI Out] bus86 on
~ mute lamp on
trigger ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI In] bus86 off
~ Mosaic Wide Softkey, Misc Button #2
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Cough Mute
REVISED: 22nd February 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Surf1 (StA) Mic 1 Mute OFF
~ DESCRIPTION: Activate Mic Mute if Mute button pressed. Cancel Mic Mute if Mute button released.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Activates/Deactivates Mute bus for Mic input.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd ae1 s[StA Mic 1] bus8 off
cmd ae1 s[StA Mic 1] text label " "
cmd ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI Out] bus86 off
~ cough mute off
~ tally label to fader
~ mute lamp off
12 x 1 Router
Functionality Description
This function uses a group of buttons to control a destination output, making the panel a 12x1
router. It could easily be adapted to any other number of buttons, e.g. to make the bottom row of a
COM12 panel a 6x1 router.
Components
This function uses an On Trigger when the button is pressed, to execute the command. A
Procedure is used to turn all lamps in the group off, rather than repeat that code for each button.
This makes it easier to change the buttons in the group in the future.
Button On Trigger
 Call procedure to turn OFF all lamps in group.
 Turn appropriate lamp ON.
 Route audio.
Procedure
 Turn OFF all lamps in group.
Further Information
 Call Procedure – Page 53
 Bus On/Off – Page 55
 Route – Page 59
Script Examples
trigger ae1 d[PA Monitor Amp] bus62 on
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: 12x1 Router
REVISED: 23rd May 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port4 (PA) COM-12 Button 12
~ DESCRIPTION: Routes audio, lights tally lamps.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES:
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
call COM12_PA_LampsOff
cmd ae1 d[PA Monitor Amp] bus42 on
cmd ae1 route s[Sat Net NERR] to d[PA Monitor Amp]
~ procedure to turn off Lamps 7-12
~ turn on lamp 12
~ routes NERR to PA Intercom
procedure COM12_PA_LampsOff
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: PA COM12 Lamps Off
REVISED: 23rd May 2005
~ DATA/ID: PA - COM12 Lamps
~ DESCRIPTION: Turns off all lamps on Production Assistant COM12
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES:
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
d[PA
d[PA
d[PA
d[PA
d[PA
d[PA
d[PA
d[PA
d[PA
d[PA
d[PA
d[PA
Monitor
Monitor
Monitor
Monitor
Monitor
Monitor
Monitor
Monitor
Monitor
Monitor
Monitor
Monitor
Amp]
Amp]
Amp]
Amp]
Amp]
Amp]
Amp]
Amp]
Amp]
Amp]
Amp]
Amp]
bus31
bus32
bus33
bus34
bus35
bus36
bus37
bus38
bus39
bus40
bus41
bus42
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
~
turn
turn
turn
turn
turn
turn
turn
turn
turn
turn
turn
turn
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
lamp
lamp
lamp
lamp
lamp
lamp
lamp
lamp
lamp
lamp
lamp
lamp
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Record Start with Tally
Functionality Description
This function is used to start a device recording. It utilizes a record tally back from the device to
update the status of the button, which is a Record/Stop toggle. If the device is put into record
locally, the button will illuminate and change into a stop function. Likewise, is the device is put into
record from the remote button, but stopped locally, the lamp will turn off and button state reset.
Components
This function uses an On Trigger when the button is pressed, to execute the commands. GPI
Triggers from the device update the lamp status and button state. When the record tally goes high,
the lamp changes from flashing (set by the button) to solid, to indicate the recording did start.
Trigger Toggle State = 1 (Record Start)
 Send pulses to MiniDisc.
 Flash lamp in button.
Toggle State = 2 (Record Stop)
 Send pulses to MiniDisc.
 Turn off lamp in button.
GPI On (Tally High)
 Reset toggle state on button trigger (device has gone into record, change button to “stop”).
 Tally lamp ON (solid).
GPI Off (Tally Low)
 Reset toggle state on button trigger (device stopped recording, change button to “record”).
 Tally lamp OFF.
Further Information





If Toggle – Page 146
Relay Pulse – Page 70
Lamp Flash – Page 57
Bus On/Off – Page 55
Set Toggle State – Page 74
Script Examples
trigger ae1 surf1 chan14 bus34 on toggle
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Remote record with tally
REVISED: 27th April 2005
~ DATA/ID: MD1 Record - ON
~ DESCRIPTION: Sends Record GPI to MD1
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Relies on a record tally GPI from device to update lamp and toggle state
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
if toggle = 1 then
cmd ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI Out] bus07 pulse
cmd ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI Out] bus05 pulse
cmd ae1 surf1 chan13 bus34 flag flash continuous
endif
~
~
~
~
do this if the button was off
set MiniDisc 1 to record (record GPI)
set MiniDisc 1 to record (play GPI)
flash lamp
if toggle = 2 then
cmd ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI Out] bus06 pulse
cmd ae1 surf1 chan13 bus34 off
endif
~ do this if the button was on
~ set MiniDisc 1 to stop (stop GPI)
~ turn off lamp
trigger ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI In] bus07 on
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Record Tally
REVISED: 28th February 2005
~ DATA/ID: MD1 Record - ON
~ DESCRIPTION: Updates status of record button lamp
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES:
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd set toggle=2 ae1 surf1 chan14 bus34 on
cmd ae1 surf1 chan13 bus34 on
~ set toggle state
~ turn lamp on
trigger ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI In] bus07 off
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Record Tally
REVISED: 28th February 2005
~ DATA/ID: MD1 Record - OFF
~ DESCRIPTION: Updates status of record button lamp
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES:
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd set toggle=1 ae1 surf1 chan14 bus34 on
cmd ae1 surf1 chan13 bus34 off
~ set toggle state
~ turn lamp off
Console Scenes
A “scene” is a way of quickly assigning certain sources to a set of faders. This is useful in many
situations, such as a studio changeover from one program to another.
Functionality Description
Instead of the operator having to change the sources on every fader, a button can be programmed
to complete a series of events in one “snapshot”. In the example given below, the commands
written into this Trigger can reassign 6 faders with the push of just one button.
Components
A scene in usually programmed to a single button in a group, or from a menu activated by a button.
In our example, a button within a group is used. This On Trigger will:
Set a variable to track active scene (useful for other functions that reference current scene).
Updates lamp group to turn selected scene lamp ON, and all others OFF.
Clear Pending routes stored by previous scenes (so new pending routes can be set).
Write text to display scene number and name to one of the surface screens.
Turn PGM bus ON for all faders (except any faders that are turned ON).
Perform specific routes for each fader, unless the route is already active. If the fader is
currently ON, the WHEN OFF is used to store that route as PENDING).
 Set the Mix Minus bus to PGM on Telephone channels. Label these with Rtn: PGM.






Whilst this Trigger appears quite long, it is mostly just the same commands repeated for each fader,
with the relevant sources for that fader.
Note: the check as to whether a source is already routed is not absolutely necessary. However, this
prevents an on-air fader being labeled PENDING when it would not actually be changed.
Further Information







Set Variable Equals - Page 144
Bus On/Off – Page 55
Clear When Off – Page 76
Text – Chapter 13 (see commands for specific surface).
If State / If State Not – Page 149
When – Page 151
Route – Page 59
Script Example
trigger ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI In] bus32 on
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Load Scene V2.4 PD
REVISED: 29th April 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port1 (StA) Wide Softkey Scene Button 1
~ DESCRIPTION: Loads scene to console. Delays fader change if it is on (pending). A1, A2 & A3 assignments unchanged.
~
PGM assignment unchanged if fader (BUS0) is turned on.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Monitoring unchanged in scenes - delegation/delay does this.
~
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd set vSceneStA = 1
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
d[Ctrl
d[Ctrl
d[Ctrl
d[Ctrl
d[Ctrl
d[Ctrl
-
Surf1
Surf1
Surf1
Surf1
Surf1
Surf1
~ update current scene
GPI
GPI
GPI
GPI
GPI
GPI
Out]
Out]
Out]
Out]
Out]
Out]
bus32
bus33
bus34
bus35
bus36
bus37
on
off
off
off
off
off
cmd clear when ae1 surf1 chan01-10
cmd ae1 device2b text big line69 pos1 "SCENE: #1"
cmd ae1 device2b text big line70 pos1 "Default"
~
~
~
~
~
~
update
update
update
update
update
update
Softkey
Softkey
Softkey
Softkey
Softkey
Softkey
Scene
Scene
Scene
Scene
Scene
Scene
Lamp
Lamp
Lamp
Lamp
Lamp
Lamp
1
2
3
4
5
6
~ clear when/pending - Faders 1 to 12
~ set text on Bridge screen 2
~ set text on Bridge screen 2
if state (ae1 surf1 chan01 bus0 off)
cmd ae1 surf1 chan01 bus1 on
endif
~ Fader 01 - PGM on (if channel is off)
if state (ae1 surf1 chan02 bus0 off)
cmd ae1 surf1 chan02 bus1 on
endif
~ Fader 02 - PGM on (if channel is off)
if state (ae1 surf1 chan03 bus0 off)
cmd ae1 surf1 chan03 bus1 on
endif
~ Fader 03 - PGM on (if channel is off)
if state (ae1 surf1 chan04 bus0 off)
cmd ae1 surf1 chan04 bus1 on
endif
~ Fader 04 - PGM on (if channel is off)
if state (ae1 surf1 chan05 bus0 off)
cmd ae1 surf1 chan05 bus1 on
endif
~ Fader 05 - PGM on (if channel is off)
if state (ae1 surf1 chan06 bus0 off)
cmd ae1 surf1 chan06 bus1 on
endif
~ Fader 06 - PGM on (if channel is off)
if state (ae1 surf1 chan07 bus0 off)
cmd ae1 surf1 chan07 bus1 on
endif
~ Fader 07 - PGM on (if channel is off)
if state (ae1 surf1 chan08 bus0 off)
cmd ae1 surf1 chan08 bus1 on
endif
~ Fader 08 - PGM on (if channel is off)
if state (ae1 surf1 chan09 bus0 off)
cmd ae1 surf1 chan09 bus1 on
endif
~ Fader 09 - PGM on (if channel is off)
if state (ae1 surf1 chan10 bus0 off)
cmd ae1 surf1 chan10 bus1 on
endif
~ Fader 10 - PGM on (if channel is off)
if state not (ae1 surf1 chan01 route device s[Sat Net])
when ae1 surf1 chan01 off
cmd ae1 route surf1 chan01 device s[Sat Net]
endwhen
endif
if state not (ae1 surf1 chan02 route device s[Ed2 PGM St *N*])
when ae1 surf1 chan02 off
cmd ae1 route surf1 chan02 device s[Ed2 PGM St *N*]
selected)
endwhen
endif
~ Fader 01 - Network (if not already selected)
~ Fader 02 - Edit 2 PGM (if not already
if state not (ae1 surf1 chan03 route device s[StA CD1])
when ae1 surf1 chan03 off
cmd ae1 route surf1 chan03 device s[StA CD1]
endwhen
endif
~ Fader 03 - CD 1 (if not already selected)
if state not (ae1 surf1 chan04 route device s[StA CD2])
when ae1 surf1 chan04 off
cmd ae1 route surf1 chan04 device s[StA CD2]
endwhen
endif
~ Fader 04 - CD 2 (if not already selected)
if state not (ae1 surf1 chan05 route device s[StA MD1])
when ae1 surf1 chan05 off
cmd ae1 route surf1 chan05 device s[StA MD1]
endwhen
endif
~ Fader 05 - MD 1 (if not already selected)
if state not (ae1 surf1 chan06 route device s[StA Mic 1])
when ae1 surf1 chan06 off
cmd ae1 route surf1 chan06 device s[StA Mic 1]
endwhen
endif
~ Fader 06 - Mic 1 (if not already selected)
if state not (ae1 surf1 chan07 route device s[StA Mic 2])
when ae1 surf1 chan07 off
cmd ae1 route surf1 chan07 device s[StA Mic 2]
endwhen
endif
~ Fader 07 - Mic 2 (if not already selected)
if state not (ae1 surf1 chan08 route device s[StA Mic 3])
when ae1 surf1 chan08 off
cmd ae1 route surf1 chan08 device s[StA Mic 3]
endwhen
endif
~ Fader 08 - Mic 3 (if not already selected)
if state not (ae1 surf1 chan09 route device s[StA DAW 1])
when ae1 surf1 chan09 off
cmd ae1 route surf1 chan09 device s[StA DAW 1]
endwhen
endif
~ Fader 09 - DAW 1 (if not already selected)
~ no "if
when ae1
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
endwhen
state not" for telephone - we want this to run every time to update the MM, even if already selected
surf1 chan10 off
route surf1 chan11 device s[StA Telephone 1]
~ Fader 10 - Telephone 1 (if not already)
set surf1 mix- 4 bus1
~ set MM4 to PGM
surf1 chan10 text label "Rtn: PGM"
Mosaic Monitor Hotkeys
Functionality Description
This function is designed for the Mosaic’s Monitor hotkeys. It routes the selected source and
updates the lamp statuses.
In addition, we have a function that will respond to a route change and update the Mosaic hotkey
button lamps. This is necessary in case the route was changed externally (e.g. by another Trigger).
Components
This function has an On Trigger (when the button is pressed), plus a Procedure and a Route
Trigger. The latter two allow for a source to be changed externally, with the appropriate tally.
Button On Trigger
 The button on Trigger performs the route.
Procedure
 The Procedure is used to check the existing route, and update the lamps if the route
matches a known preset button.
 This is called from a Route Trigger, or any other Trigger that updates the monitor routing
(remember, Triggers do not cascade, so the Route Trigger will be called if we do a route
from inside another Trigger).
Route Trigger
 Calls the procedure to check the current route.
 Note, this Trigger will not execute if a Trigger performs a route to this destination (prevents
endless loops).
Further Information




Bus On/Off – Page 55
Input Route – Page 59
Call Procedure – Page 51
If State – Page 149
Notes
The Mosaic has a function called “Follow Monitor” for the Headphones and Guest/Studio sends.
This function is automatically turned off when a Monitor Hotkey is updated from a Trigger. An
improvement to this function would first check whether “Follow Mon” is selected, and if so, ignore
the change.
Script Examples
trigger ae1 surf1 chan27 bus16 on
~ Mosaic Monitor Hotkey #1
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Monitor Routing
REVISED: 22nd February 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port1 (StA) Phones USER 1
~ DESCRIPTION: If on, route source to announcer headphones.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES:
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd route ae1 s[Port1 Program Out] to d[Port1 Headphones In]
~ routes PGM to announcer h/p
trigger ae1 d[Port1 Monitor In] route any
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Monitor Route Change with Tally
REVISED: 27th April 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port 1
~ DESCRIPTION: Updates Monitor Hot Key Lamps.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES:
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
call MosaicMonitor_StA_Monitor
~ Call Monitor Tally (external route was performed)
procedure MosaicMonitor_StA_Monitor
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Mosaic Monitor Hotkey Update
REVISED: 27th April 2005
~ DATA/ID: StA - Monitor
~ DESCRIPTION: Updates monitor hotkey lamps based on current route
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES:
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
d[Port1
d[Port1
d[Port1
d[Port1
d[Port1
Monitor
Monitor
Monitor
Monitor
Monitor
In]
In]
In]
In]
In]
bus16
bus17
bus18
bus19
bus20
off
off
off
off
off
~
~
~
~
~
turn
turn
turn
turn
turn
off
off
off
off
off
lamps
lamps
lamps
lamps
lamps
for
for
for
for
for
Supervisor
Supervisor
Supervisor
Supervisor
Supervisor
if state = ( ae1 route s[Port1 Program Out] to d[Port1 Monitor In] ) then
cmd ae1 d[Port1 Monitor In] bus16 on
endif
~ Hotkey Source 1 is selected
~ Turn lamp 1 on
if state = ( ae1 route s[Port1 Aux 1 Out] to d[Port1 Monitor In] ) then
cmd ae1 d[Port1 Monitor In] bus17 on
endif
~ Hotkey Source 2 is selected
~ Turn lamp 2 on
if state = ( ae1 route s[Port3 CP1 TXA Stereo] to d[Port1 Monitor In] ) then~ Hotkey Source 3 is selected
cmd ae1 d[Port1 Monitor In] bus18 on
~ Turn lamp 3 on
endif
if state = ( ae1 route s[5MV 1062 Rx] to d[Port1 Monitor In] ) then
cmd ae1 d[Port1 Monitor In] bus19 on
endif
~ Hotkey Source 4 is selected
~ Turn lamp 4 on
if state = ( ae1 route s[Port1 Delay CP1 Out] to d[Port1 Monitor In] ) then ~ Hotkey Source 5 is selected
cmd ae1 d[Port1 Monitor In] bus20 on
~ Turn lamp 5 on
endif
19 Delay Control Examples
CommandBuilder can be used to build sophisticated delay control logic to assist operators get in
and out of delay. The examples in this chapter us the Logitek SharcAttack internal delay, however
could be easily adapted to external profanity delay units, using GPI control.
There are many different ways to enter and exit delay. These examples show methods that have
been used at different stations around the world.
Delay Start
Functionality Description
This function starts the internal Talk Delay.
Components
The Delay Start button has an On Trigger, which performs these tasks, plus a Procedure to update
display tallies.
Button On Trigger
 Check the value of a variable (if = 0, then continue). This prevents going into delay again.
 Disables Post Swap mode, turn off Post Swap Lamp and reset toggle (see later in this
chapter).
 Send Delay Off command to Talk Delay (just to be sure).
 Route Program to Monitor Amp and Headphones.
 Call procedure to update Mosaic monitor hotkey lamps (see Chapter 18 for more info).
 Send Delay On command to Talk Delay.
 Call a procedure a to update lamps and text.
 Turn on “Dump” lamp.
 Update variables to track status.
Tally Procedure
 Turns on appropriate lamps in the studio.
 Writes text to screen.
 Can also be used to display status lamps elsewhere in the facility.
Further Information







If Variable – Page 147
Set Variable – Page 144
Bus On/Off – Page 55
Set Toggle State – Page 74
Talk Delay Off/Start – Page 72
Route – Page 59
Call Procedure – Page 53
 Text – Chapter 13.
Notes
This function uses a variable to track delay status. Because of this, the vDelay application should not
be used to activate the delay, or the studio functions will not be in sync. However, you may choose
not to use variables, in which case vDelay can be used (but the lamps in the studio will still be out of
sync if vDelay starts or stops the delay).
Script Examples
trigger ae1 surf1 chan14 bus40 on
~ Mosaic Narr Softkey, Button 9
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Delay Start v2.0 (SharcAttack)
REVISED: 27th April 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port1 (StA) Narr Softkey BIG9
~ DESCRIPTION: If off, send start to SharcAttack Delay. If on, ignore button press.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Variable status determines whether we are in delay or not.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
if vDelayStAOn = 0
~ no-one is on delay
cmd set vDelayStAPostSwap = 0
~ set post swap mode off
cmd ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI Out] bus87 off
~ lamp FUNC3 off
cmd set toggle = 1 ( ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI In] bus87 )
~ reset
cmd ae1 d[Port1 Delay CP1 In] talk off
~ force
cmd route ae1 s[Port1 Program Out] to d[Port1 Monitor In]
~ route
cmd route ae1 s[Port1 Program Out] to d[Port1 Headphones In]
~ route
call MosaicMonitor_StA_Monitor
~ update monitor hotkey lamps
call MosaicMonitor_StA_Headphones
~ update monitor hotkey lamps
cmd ae1 d[Port1 Delay CP1 In] talk start
~ start delay (PGM)
call DelayTally_StA_On
~ update lamps and text
cmd set vDelayStAOn = 1
~ update variable
cmd set vDelayStASafe = 0
~ update variable
endif
toggle to off state
off to clear delay (PGM)
Program to Monitor Amp
Program to Opr Headphones
procedure DelayTally_StA_On
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Delay Text Tally
REVISED: 21st February 2005
~ DATA/ID: Studio A (StA) - Delay On
~ DESCRIPTION: Updates delay status on Mosaic surfaces.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES:
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd ae1 surf1 chan13 bus40 on
cmd ae1 surf1 chan13 bus43 on
cmd ae1 surf1 chan13 bus41 off
cmd ae1 device2C line135 text pos33 "
~ turn on "Delay On" lamp in this studio
~ turn on "Dump" lamp in this studio
~ turn off "Delay Off" lamp in this studio
Delay ON
"
Delay Dump
Functionality Description
This function dumps the Talk Delay chain, but keeps Talk Delay ON. The delay will then rebuild.
Components
The Delay Dump button has an On Trigger, which performs these tasks, plus an Off Trigger, which
handles status updates when the button is released.
Button On Trigger
 Check the value of status variable. This prevents dumping when not in delay.
 Send Dump command twice to dump full delay (2 lots of 4 seconds).
 Write text to screen.
Button Off Trigger
 Sets a timer that will clear the text display 3 seconds after the button is released.
Further Information




If Variable – Page 147
Talk Delay Dump – Page 72
Text – Chapter 13
If Timer – Page 48
Script Examples
trigger ae1 surf1 chan14 bus43 on
~ Mosaic Narr Softkey, Butt 12 (press)
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Delay Dump v2.0 (SharcAttack)
REVISED: 22nd February 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port1 (St1) Narrow Softkey BIG 12
~ DESCRIPTION: If on, send a "dump" to delay. If off, do nothing.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Variable status determines whether we are in delay or not.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
if vDelayStAOn = 1
~ we are on delay at the moment
cmd ae1 d[Port1 Delay CP1 In] talk dump
~ send dump to delay (PGM)
cmd ae1 d[Port1 Delay CP1 In] talk dump
~ send dump to delay (PGM)
cmd ae1 device2C line137 text pos49 " ***Delay DUMP***"
endif
trigger ae1 surf1 chan14 bus43 off
(release)
~ Mosaic Narr Softkey Butt 12
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Delay Dump v2.0 (SharcAttack)
REVISED: 22nd February 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port1 (StA) Narrow Softkey BIG 12
~ DESCRIPTION: If on, send a "dump" to delay. If off, do nothing.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Variable status determines whether we are in delay or not.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
if timer 112 wait 3 then
cmd ae1 device2C line137 text " "
endif
Post Monitor
Functionality Description
This function allows the operator to switch to post-delay monitoring temporarily to verify they are
correctly in delay. The button is a toggle function, and will flash while active. This example also
updates the Mosaic’s hotkey buttons (this can be omitted on Remora and Numix surfaces).
Components
The Post Mon has an On Toggle Trigger, which performs these tasks.
Button On Toggle Trigger (State 1)
 Checks toggle state (1 = normal, 2 = toggle).
 Updates variable (optional) – this may be referenced by other triggers.
 Stores current Monitor and Headphones routes to variables.
 Routes Post Delay Crosspoint output to Monitor and Headphones.
 Flashes the Post Monitor button lamp.
 Call procedure to update Mosaic monitor hotkey lamps (see Chapter 18 for more info).
Button On Toggle Trigger (State 2)
 Checks toggle state (1 = normal, 2 = toggle).
 Updates variable (optional) – this may be referenced by other triggers.
 Restores routes to Monitor and Headphones from variables.
 Turns the Post Monitor button lamp off.
 Call procedure to update Mosaic monitor hotkey lamps (see Chapter 18 for more info).
Further Information





If Toggle – Page 146
Set Variable – Page 144
Device Store/Recall – Page 144
Lamp Flash – Page 57
Call Procedure – Page 53
Notes
If you use this function, you need to consider the implications of changing the monitor sources from
other Triggers. For example, our Delay On and Delay Exit Triggers will update the monitor source,
and therefore these Triggers also update the toggle state and button lamp.
These updates ensure the operation of the console is consistent and predictable, and avoids
operator confusion.
Script Examples
trigger ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI In] bus87 on toggle
3
~ Mosaic Wide Softkey Function Button
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Pre/Post swap
REVISED: 27th April 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port1 (StA) Wide Softkey FUNC3
~ DESCRIPTION: Swaps delay between pre/post monitoring. Swaps between prior setting, and "PostDelay".
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Toggle and restore can also be done in the delay "direct" trigger.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
if toggle = 1
~ normal state
cmd set vDelayStAPostSwap = 1
~ set post swap mode
cmd store ae1 d[Port1 Monitor In] route to vMonStAMonAmp
~
cmd store ae1 d[Port1 Headphones In] route to vMonStAOprHP
~
cmd route ae1 s[Port1 Delay CP1 Out] to d[Port1 Monitor In]
~
cmd route ae1 s[Port1 Delay CP1 Out] to d[Port1 Headphones In]
~
cmd ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI Out] bus87 flag flash continuous
~
call MosaicMonitor_StA_Monitor
~ update monitor hotkey
call MosaicMonitor_StA_Headphones
~ update monitor hotkey
endif
if toggle = 2
~
cmd set vDelayStAPostSwap = 0
~
cmd recall ae1 d[Port1 Monitor In] from vMonStAMonAmp
cmd recall ae1 d[Port1 Headphones In] from vMonStAOprHP
cmd ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI Out] bus87 off
~
call MosaicMonitor_StA_Monitor
~
call MosaicMonitor_StA_Headphones
~
endif
store
store
route
route
flash
lamps
lamps
Monitor Amp source device
Opr Headphones source device
post delay to Monitor Amp
post delay to Opr Headphones
lamp FUNC3
toggled state
set post swap mode off
~ recall Monitor Amp
~ recall Opr Headphones
lamp FUNC3 off
update monitor hotkey lamps
update monitor hotkey lamps
Delay Exit – Method A (Timer Based)
Functionality Description
This function turns off Talk Delay. When the operator presses “Delay Off”, their monitoring is
changed to Post Delay and a timer is set based on the current delay time. The Delay Off button
lamp will flash, and once the delay has emptied the delay is turned off. At this time, the lamps and
text are also updated.
This method provides a fairly simple control method for operators.
Components
The Delay Exit button has an On Trigger, which performs these tasks, plus two tally Procedures to
update display tallies.
Button On Trigger
 Check the value of a variable (if = 1, then continue). This prevents exiting delay again.
 Set toggle state on Post Swap button (see Post Swap function above).
 Update Post Swap variable (optional) – this may be referenced by other triggers.
 Store current Monitor and Headphones routes to variables.
 Route Post Delay Crosspoint output to Monitor and Headphones.
 Call procedure to update Mosaic monitor hotkey lamps (see Chapter 18 for more info).
 Flash the Post Monitor button lamp.
 Set timer based on current delay time. When that time expires:
o Call a procedure a to update lamps and text.
o Update variables to track status.
o Send Delay Off command to Talk Delay.
Tally Procedures
 Turn on appropriate lamps in the studio.
 Write text to screen.
 Can also be used to display status lamps elsewhere in the facility.
 Send assembler command to active fast lamp flash (to be replaced by Fast Flash command).
Further Information








If Variable – Page 147
Call Procedure – Page 53
Set Toggle State – Page 74
Device Store/Recall – Page 144
Route – Page 59
Lamp Flash – Page 57
If Timer – Page 48
Talk Delay Off – Page 72
Script Examples
trigger ae1 surf1 chan14 bus41 on
~ Mosaic Narr Softkey Button 10
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Delay Timer Exit v2.0 (SharcAttack)
REVISED: 27th April 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port1 (StA) Narrow Softkey Big Button 10
~ DESCRIPTION: Change monitoring to Post Delay. Set timer to switch off delay when delay time expires.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Variable status determines whether we are in delay or not.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
if vDelayStAOn = 1
~ we are on delay at the moment
call DelayTally_StA_Exit
~ update lamps and text
cmd set toggle = 2 ( ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI In] bus87 )
~ reset toggle to on state
cmd set vDelayStAPostSwap = 1
~ set post swap mode
cmd store ae1 d[Port1 Monitor In] route to vMonStAMonAmp
~ store Monitor Amp source device
cmd store ae1 d[Port1 Headphones In] route to vMonStAOprHP
~ store Opr Headphones source device
cmd route ae1 s[Port1 Delay CP1 Out] to d[Port1 Monitor In]
~ route post delay to Monitor Amp
cmd route ae1 s[Port1 Delay CP1 Out] to d[Port1 Headphones In]
~ route post delay to Opr Headphones
call MosaicMonitor_StA_Monitor
~ update monitor hotkey lamps
call MosaicMonitor_StA_Headphones
~ update monitor hotkey lamps
cmd ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI Out] bus87 flag flash continuous
~ flash lamp FUNC3
if ae1 timer 111 talk d[Port1 Delay CP1 In] then
call DelayTally_StA_Off
cmd set vDelayStAOn = 0
cmd set vDelayStASafe = 0
cmd ae1 d[Port1 Delay CP1 In] talk off
endif
endif
~
~
~
~
update lamps and text
update variable
update variable
force off to clear delay (PGM)
procedure DelayTally_StA_Exit
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Delay Text Tally
REVISED: 21st February 2005
~ DATA/ID: Studio A (StA) - Delay Exit
~ DESCRIPTION: Updates delay status on Mosaic surfaces.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES:
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd ae1 surf1 chan13 bus40 off
cmd ae1 asm "02 04 B1 17 29 05"
cmd ae1 surf1 chan13 bus43 off
cmd ae1 device2C line135 text pos49 "
~ turn off "Delay On" lamp in this studio
~ fast flash "Delay Off" lamp in this studio
~ turn off "Dump" lamp in this studio
Delay EXIT "
procedure DelayTally_StA_Off
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Delay Text Tally
REVISED: 21st February 2005
~ DATA/ID: Studio A (StA) - Delay Off
~ DESCRIPTION: Updates delay status on Mosaic surfaces.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES:
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd ae1 surf1 chan13 bus41 on
cmd ae1 device2C line135 text pos97 "
~ turn on "Delay Off" lamp in this studio
Delay OFF "
Delay Exit – Method B (Hard Cut)
Functionality Description
This function turns off Talk Delay. When the operator wishes to exit delay, they will first press the
“Post Mon” button to hear the delay empty. At the appropriate point in time, they press the
“Delay Off”. When the operator presses “Delay Off” button, the delay is instantly killed and they
are live. At this time, the lamps and text are also updated.
This method provides a fairly simple control method for operators.
Components
The Delay Exit button has an On Trigger, which performs these tasks, plus a Procedure to update
display tallies.
Button On Trigger
 Check the value of a variable (if = 1, then continue). This prevents exiting delay again.
 Call a procedure a to update lamps and text.
 Update variables to track status.
 Send Delay Off command to Talk Delay.
Tally Procedures
 Turns on appropriate lamps in the studio.
 Writes text to screen.
 Can also be used to display status lamps elsewhere in the facility.
Further Information
 If Variable – Page 147
 Call Procedure – Page 53
 Talk Delay Off – Page 72
Script Examples
trigger ae1 surf1 chan14 bus41 on
~ Mosaic Narr Softkey Button 10
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Delay Hard Exit v2.0 (SharcAttack)
REVISED: 27th April 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port1 (StA) Narrow Softkey Big Button 10
~ DESCRIPTION: Switch off delay immediately and update tallies.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Variable status determines whether we are in delay or not.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
if vDelayStAOn = 1
call DelayTally_StA_Off
cmd set vDelayStAOn = 0
cmd set vDelayStASafe = 0
cmd ae1 d[Port1 Delay CP1 In] talk off
endif
~
~
~
~
~
we are on delay at the moment
update lamps and text
update variable
update variable
force off to clear delay (PGM)
procedure DelayTally_StA_Off
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Delay Text Tally
REVISED: 21st February 2005
~ DATA/ID: Studio A (StA) - Delay Off
~ DESCRIPTION: Updates delay status on Mosaic surfaces.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES:
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd ae1 surf1 chan13 bus41 on
cmd ae1 device2C line135 text pos97 "
~ turn on "Delay Off" lamp in this studio
Delay OFF "
Delay Exit – Method C (Next Event)
Functionality Description
This function turns off Talk Delay. When the operator presses “Delay Off”, monitoring is changed to
Post Delay and tallies are updated to show “Exit Ready”. This arms all of the fader ON buttons, and
the next ON button that is pressed will activate the cut to live program. This method is well suited
to stations that will fire an event (eg CD track or hard-disk replay) from a GPI activated source. It
provides a very tight and definite cut-over point, whilst still being easy to use.
Components
The Delay Exit button has an On Trigger, which performs tally & status updates, and a Procedure
to exit delay. In addition, a Trigger is required for every fader BUS0 ON event on that surface.
These will check the status of the delay variable, and execute the exit procedure if required.
Button On Trigger
 Check the value of a variable (if = 1, then continue). This prevents exiting delay again.
 Update delay status variable (2 = delay exit ready) – this “arms” the fader exit routine.
 Set toggle state on Post Swap button (see Post Swap function above).
 Update Post Swap variable (optional) – this may be referenced by other triggers.
 Store current Monitor and Headphones routes to variables.
 Route Post Delay Crosspoint output to Monitor and Headphones.
 Call procedure to update Mosaic monitor hotkey lamps (see Chapter 18 for more info).
 Flash the Post Monitor button lamp.
Exit/Tally Procedure
 Sends off command to delay.
 Turns on appropriate lamps in the studio.
 Writes text to screen.
Fader On Triggers (one per fader on surface)
 Turns off CUE & TB on that channel (unrelated optional extra).
 If delay status = 2 then call procedure to exit.
Further Information








If Variable – Page 147
Call Procedure – Page 53
Set Toggle State – Page 74
Set Variable – Page 144
Device Store/Recall – Page 144
Lamp Flash – Page 57
Talk Delay Off – Page 72
Bus On/Off – Page 55
Script Examples
trigger ae1 surf1 chan14 bus40 on
~ Mosaic Narr Softkey, Button 10
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Delay Exit Next Event v2.0 (SharcAttack)
REVISED: 27th April 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port1 (StA) Narrow Softkey BIG10
~ DESCRIPTION: If on, enter exit mode (flash lamp). Next event triggers Delay Off GPI.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Variable status determines whether we are in delay or not.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
if vDelayStAOn = 1
~ we are on delay at the moment
cmd set vDelStAOn = 2
~ update delay status to exit ready (2)
call DelayTally_StA_Exit
~ update lamps and text
cmd set toggle = 2 ( ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI In] bus87 )
~ reset toggle to on state
cmd set vDelayStAPostSwap = 1
~ set post swap mode
cmd store ae1 d[Port1 Monitor In] route to vMonStAMonAmp
~ store Monitor Amp source device
cmd store ae1 d[Port1 Headphones In] route to vMonStAOprHP
~ store Opr Headphones source device
cmd route ae1 s[Port1 Delay CP1 Out] to d[Port1 Monitor In]
~ route post delay to Monitor Amp
cmd route ae1 s[Port1 Delay CP1 Out] to d[Port1 Headphones In]
~ route post delay to Opr Headphones
call MosaicMonitor_StA_Monitor
~ update monitor hotkey lamps
call MosaicMonitor_StA_Headphones
~ update monitor hotkey lamps
cmd ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI Out] bus87 flag flash continuous
~ flash lamp FUNC3
endif
procedure DelOffDelay_StA
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Send Delay Off Commands & Text Tally
REVISED: 27th April 2005
~ DATA/ID: StA - Delay Off
~ DESCRIPTION: Sends off commands to delay. Updates delay status on Mosaic surfaces
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES:
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
set
set
ae1
ae1
ae1
vDelayStAOn = 0
vDelayStASafe = 0
d[Port1 Delay CP1 In] talk off
surf1 chan13 bus41 on
device2C line135 text pos97 "
~ update variable
~ update variable
~ force off to clear delay (PGM)
~ turn on "Delay Off" lamp in this studio
Delay OFF "
trigger ae1 surf1 chan01 bus00 on
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Kill Cue & TB / Delay Exit on next
REVISED: 27th April 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port1 (StA) Fader 1
~ DESCRIPTION: Turns off Cue bus (BUS02) and TB bus (BUS14) on fader when fader goes on (BUS00)
~
Also checks for Delay "Exit Ready" status, and runs delay off procedure if necessary.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES:
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd ae1 surf1 chan01 bus02 off
cmd ae1 surf1 chan01 bus14 off
if vDelSt1OnDelay = 2
call DelOffDelay_StA
endif
~ Repeat this fader trigger for every fader on surface!!
Delay Exit – Method D (Ramp Down)
Functionality Description
This function turns off Talk Delay. When the operator presses “Delay Exit”, the delay will begin to
ramp down. This may take a number of minutes. The delay time will eventually reach 0.0, but the
display will stay on. Monitoring will remain on pre-delay during this time.
This method provides simple operation, however does not provide a quick exit. It would usually be
offered in conjunction with another form of quick exit (Methods A, B, or C).
Components
The Delay Exit button has an On Trigger, which performs these tasks, plus a Procedure to update
display tallies.
Button On Trigger
 Check the value of a variable (if = 1, then continue). This prevents exiting delay again.
 Call a procedure a to update lamps and text.
 Update variables to track status.
 Send Delay Exit command to Talk Delay.
Tally Procedures
 Turns on appropriate lamps in the studio.
 Writes text to screen.
 Can also be used to display status lamps elsewhere in the facility.
Further Information
 If Variable – Page 147
 Call Procedure – Page 53
 Talk Delay Off – Page 72
Script Examples
trigger ae1 surf1 chan14 bus41 on
~ Mosaic Narr Softkey Button 10
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Delay Ramp Down v2.0 (SharcAttack)
REVISED: 27th April 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port1 (StA) Narrow Softkey Big Button 10
~ DESCRIPTION: Switches delay into ramp down and update tallies.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Variable status determines whether we are in delay or not.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
if vDelayStAOn = 1
call DelayTally_StA_Off
cmd set vDelayStAOn = 2
cmd set vDelayStASafe = 0
cmd ae1 d[Port1 Delay CP1 In] talk stop
endif
~
~
~
~
~
we are on delay at the moment
update lamps and text
update variable
update variable
force ramp down to exit delay (PGM)
procedure DelayTally_StA_Off
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Delay Text Tally
REVISED: 21st February 2005
~ DATA/ID: Studio A (StA) - Delay Off
~ DESCRIPTION: Updates delay status on Mosaic surfaces.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES:
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd ae1 surf1 chan13 bus41 on
cmd ae1 device2C line135 text pos97 "
~ turn on "Delay Off" lamp in this studio
Delay EXIT "
20 Intercom Examples
You can use your Logitek system to create sophisticated Intercoms between studios. Setting up an
Intercom is as simple as routing the appropriate source (e.g. a microphone) to the Talkback Rtn
input of the appropriate surface. However, with a little more programming you can create a more
powerful version that your operators will love to use.
Logitek Intercom with calling station display
Functionality Description
This Intercom system uses the internal Logitek Fiber Network and Triggers to create a slick user
interface. It is designed to make use of fibre-linked Audio Engines, with all possible Intercom mics
already shared across all Engines. If not, you need to set this up in AEConfig first.
It can also interface with external units, although for best results each external station should
provide a GPI closure to indicate each destination it calls. If this is not possible, you can use the
External Cue input on the surface – however, without a GPI interface external stations will not be
able to activate Monitor or Headphones dimming upon talkback being activated.
When an Intercom destination is in use, a Procedure is called to light up the appropriate buttons
for that station at all other stations. This provides the operators with an indication that station is in
use. A lockout feature then prevents other stations from breaking in when one station is receiving
talkback. At the called station, the calling station will flash to indicate who is speaking. The lamp will
continue flashing for a few seconds longer, in case the operator was not watching the console at the
time they were called. This also provides a good visual cue of which button to press to respond.
To build this Intercom system, first allocate appropriate buttons for each studio and the stations it
can call. It is important to allocate these first.
Components
The Intercom system makes use of a number of Trigger and Procedure components. Procedures
are used to cut down on code repetition, and centralise updates.
In each studio, an ON and OFF Trigger set is required for each button that calls another location.
This Trigger will call upon the required procedures to turn ON or OFF the destination lamps, and
assist with routing.
You will notice that two timer numbers are referenced in each Trigger set. These timers allow the
flashing source lamp to stay on for a number of seconds after a station called.
The logic is also structured so that a button release can only turn off an Intercom route when that
particular station set it in the first place. This prevents another station accidentally killing a
conversation that is already in place.
Button On Trigger (press)
 Check lockout variable to ensure it is equal to zero (destination not currently in use).
 Cancel the timer that the destination Off Trigger sets (restart when the button is released).
 Cancel the timer that the destination sets for this source (prevents the lamp being turned off
when this studio replies).
 Set the Off Trigger Active (ensures the off only happens after the on successfully executes).
 Route the source Mic to the Talkback Return at the destination.
 Call Procedure to turn Talk Return audio on.
 Call Procedure to turn on all lamps for that destination so all surfaces see it is in use.
 Set the calling station lamp to flash at destination.
Button Off Trigger (release)
 Call Procedure to turn Talk Return audio off.
 Call Procedure to turn off all lamps for that destination so all surfaces see it is free.
 Set appropriate timer with 4 seconds delay.
 This timer will turn off the flashing source lamp when the time expires.
 Disable this Off Trigger, so it won’t run until the next On Trigger enables it.
Lamps On Procedures (one per destination station)
 Turn ON that destination lamp at each station (except itself, where there is no button).
 For consistency and code copying, we have kept the self-to-self line, but commented it out.
Lamps Off Procedures (one per destination station)
 Turn OFF that destination lamp at each station (except itself, where there is no button).
 For consistency and code copying, we have kept the source-to-source line, but commented
it out
Receive On Procedure (one per destination station)
 Turn ON the Talkback Return bus at the destination (bus numbers may vary on older DSP).
 Set the lockout variable to 1.
Receive Off Procedure (one per destination station)
 Turn OFF the Talkback Return bus at the destination (bus numbers may vary on older DSP).
 Route silence source to Talkback Return bus, just to be sure no audio continues (optional).
 Restore the lockout variable to 0.
Options
These scripts can be customized to suit your requirements. For example, Talkback Rtn can be
routed to Cue Speaker, Headphones (including selectable mute when Mics on), Monitor speakers,
and Guest/Studio send. These functions are set by various bus switches on the monitoring inputs,
and are usually pre-set in your AEConfig DSP tables.
If you wish to send talkback to an external location, you can omit the Talkback Rtn bus on/off lines
in the procedure. If you wish to receive talkback from an external location, write a Trigger that is
activated by a GPI ON and OFF instead of a button (it will have no lamp tallies obviously).
Timers
Each Intercom source/destination set needs a unique timer number allocated to it. It is important
these timers are not shared, or unpredictable results may occur with source lamp flashing.
To allocate the timer numbers, we suggest you make a matrix of all studios/stations down the page,
with 12 columns for timer numbers across the page. 12 is the normal number to use, as most
Logitek button panels have groups of 12 buttons. It doesn’t matter if you don’t use all the buttons.
Studio B
Etc
Etc
Etc
Etc
Source
Studio A
Studio B
Etc
Studio A
Dest
1
13
25
2
14
26
3
15
27
4
16
28
5
17
29
6
18
30
7
19
31
8
20
32
9
21
33
10
22
34
11
23
35
12
24
36
When allocating the timers, first start at the source and locate the destination you are calling. E.g.,
for Studio A calling Studio B, timer 2 will be used to set the source lamp flash.
Then find the reverse direction, in this case timer 13. This timer must be cancelled in the On
Trigger, otherwise if Studio A promptly replies to Studio B, the lamp would be turned off by the
previously set timer from Studio B.
This may sound a little cryptic. If so, try some Intercoms without the second timer being cancelled.
You will notice if you have a two-way conversation with a particular station, you will often end up
with the lamp going off unexpectedly on the button you are pressing. This timer logic prevents that
situation.
Further Information









If Variable – Page 147
Cancel Timer – Page 75
Set Trigger Active/Notactive – Page 74
Route – Page 59
Call Procedure – Page 53
Lamp Flash – Page 57
If Timer – Page 48
Bus On/Off – Page 55
Set Variable – Page 144
Script Examples
trigger ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI In] bus88 on
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Intercom On
REVISED: 17th February 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port1 (StA) Wide Softkey TALK1
~ DESCRIPTION: Routes intercom audio, turns return bus on, lights tally lamps.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Off trigger is set active only if this trigger runs (to ensure an OFF can't happen without an ON)
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
if vIcomInUse_Ed1 = 0
cmd cancel timer1
~ cancel timer to allow restart in off trigger
cmd cancel timer13
~ cancel timer from dest to prevent source lamp cancel
cmd active trigger ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI In] bus88 off
~ set off trigger active
cmd ae2 route s[StA Mic1] to d[Port1 TalkbackRtn In]
~ route audio to talk rtn input
call IcomRxOn_Ed1
~ talk rtn audio on
call IcomDestLampsOn_Ed1
~ tally destination lamps
cmd ae2 surf1 bridge lamp01 flash continuous
~ flash source lamp
endif
trigger ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI In] bus88 off
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Intercom Off
REVISED: 17th February 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port1 (StA) Wide Softkey TALK1
~ DESCRIPTION: Turns return bus off, turns off tally lamps.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: This trigger is set active only if ON trigger runs (to ensure an OFF can't happen without an ON)
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
call IcomRxOff_Ed1
~ talk rtn audio off
call IcomDestLampsOff_Ed1
~ tally off destination lamps
if timer1 wait4
cmd ae2 surf1 bridge lamp01 off
~ turn off source lamp after delay
endif
cmd notactive trigger ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI In] bus88 off
~ set off trigger not active again
procedure IcomDestLampsOn_StA
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Intercom Destination Lamps on/off
REVISED: 17th February 2005
~ DATA/ID: ABC Renmark Studio A (StA)
~ DESCRIPTION: Turns intercom destination lamps on or off at all stations.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Commented lines not used, but included for possible future use.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
~
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
ae1
ae2
ae2
ae2
d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI Out] bus
on
surf1 bridge lamp01 on
surf2 bridge lamp01 on
d[ER Intercom Send] bus31 on
~
~
~
~
Dest
Dest
Dest
Dest
Lamp
Lamp
Lamp
Lamp
ON
ON
ON
ON
at
at
at
at
stn
stn
stn
stn
-
Studio A (Not used)
Edit 1 (Bridge Lamp 1)
Edit 2 (Bridge Lamp 1)
Equip Room (COM-12 Lamp 1)
procedure IcomDestLampsOff_StA
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Intercom Destination Lamps on/off
REVISED: 17th February 2005
~ DATA/ID: ABC Renmark Studio A (StA)
~ DESCRIPTION: Turns intercom destination lamps on or off at all stations.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Commented lines not used, but included for possible future use.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
~
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
ae1
ae2
ae2
ae2
d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI Out] bus
off
surf1 bridge lamp01 off
surf2 bridge lamp01 off
d[ER Intercom Send] bus31 off
~
~
~
~
Dest
Dest
Dest
Dest
Lamp
Lamp
Lamp
Lamp
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
at
at
at
at
stn
stn
stn
stn
-
Studio A (Not used)
Edit 1 (Softkey Lamp 1)
Edit 2 (Bridge Lamp 1)
Equip Room (COM-12 Lamp 1)
procedure IcomRxOn_StA
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Intercom Receive Bus on/off
REVISED: 17th February 2005
~ DATA/ID: ABC Renmark Studio A (StA)
~ DESCRIPTION: Turns intercom receive bus on at station (either TalkRtn1 bus or crosspoint level)
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES:
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd ae1 d[Port1 Monitor In] bus03 on
cmd set vIcomInUse_StA = 1
~ monitor dim and TB receive enable ON
~ lockout status ON
procedure IcomRxOff_StA
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Intercom Receive Bus on/off
REVISED: 17th February 2005
~ DATA/ID: ABC Renmark Studio A (StA)
~ DESCRIPTION: Turns intercom receive bus off at station (either TalkRtn1 bus or crosspoint level)
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES:
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd ae1 d[Port1 Monitor In] bus03 off
~ monitor dim and TB receive enable OFF
cmd ae1 route s[AE1 Silence] to d[Port1 TalkbackRtn In] ~ route silence to be sure no audio continues
cmd set vIcomInUse_StA = 0
~ lockout status OFF
21 On-air Switching Examples
The Logitek system can be used to build flexible on-air delegation switchers. These can be
customized to suit station requirements and provide for almost any switching scenario.
As the design of a delegation switcher can be complex in many cases, we suggest engaging Logitek
Electronic Systems or your local reseller to consult on the design and programming.
Examples of different on-air switchers from real-life customer sites are provided below. The script
examples for these are not included, due to the size and number of Triggers required. Please
contact Logitek Electronic Systems or your reseller for more information on these.
Assignment Mixer
The Assignment Mixer allows studios to mix into the final output. A studio may assign itself to a
particular on-air path, with multiple studios assigned at the same time if desired. This facilitates
seamless studio changeovers and allows news booths to directly assign to-air if required.
An available Mixer Surface port is required on an Audio Engine. This is a virtual surface, so no
physical console is required.
The size of this virtual surface depends on the assignment mixer size. One fader input is required
per studio (additional studio Mix Minus or Network Cleanfeeds will also require a fader each). One
Mix Bus (e.g. PGM, AUX1-8) is required per destination path. If using AUX4-8 as destination paths,
the virtual surface must be on Port 1. In larger facilities, we suggest using a dedicated MCR Audio
Engine for the Assignment Mixer. In some cases, custom DSP tables can be provided to re-allocate
other Audio Engine resources to gain additional destination paths.
If using SharcAttack DSP cards, each input to the delegation mixer can have EQ and dynamics
settings applied, providing basic protection limiting and compression prior to link paths.
The DSP table for this Audio Engine Port will be customized to set fader inputs to unity gain by
default, with the relevant BUS settings. The mixer is then controlled by Triggers.
Panel Example
Below is an example of a 12 button panel. This could be a Numix Bridge, Remora Bridge (vertical),
or a Mosaic MLX-42/MLX-NSOFT modules mounted in a compatible Wide Meter Bridge assembly.
Network Network Network Network Network Network Network Network
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Local
ENABLE
OnAir
Master
Functionality





Press the Enable button to turn the panel lock off. It will flash.
Use the On-air Master to turn your studio on or off air in on action.
When on-air, press any of the paths to add your studio into that mix. Press again to remove.
When off-air, press any of the paths to pre-select (flashing). Press again to remove.
Routes can also be tallied to text screens.
Requirements




Virtual surface port available on Audio Engine.
1 Fader per input to Assignment Mixer.
1 Mix Bus per output to destination paths.
1 button per path in each studio, plus a master on/off button.
Network Source Switcher – Direct Access Version
The Network Source Switcher provides simple cut-based switching between sources.
On a 24-button panel, this switcher works well for up to 5 outputs with 3-5 sources each. One
button is required per source/destination combination (e.g. Studio A Post Delay to transmitter 1). If
more source/destinations combinations are required, the XY version of this switcher can be used
(see following section).
This panel allows an operator to preselect a number of sources, which will indicate with a flashing
lamp in all studios. The “TAKE” button will execute all these pre-selected routes in one action.
The Network Source Switcher provides easy to use operation, with visibility of the current routes
on the button panel in each studio. A “TAKE” operation is a cut from one source to another – there
is no capacity to mix two sources simultaneously.
One DSP Crosspoint or Output Route is required per output path. Any number of inputs can be
routed, limited only by button capacity on the panel. DSP Crosspoints are recommended if gain
control or mono mixing is required. If using DSP Crosspoints on a SharcAttack DSP card, processing
and input meters are also available.
Commonly, the DSP Crosspoints could be allocated to a Port 3 virtual surface. The stereo
Crosspoints on Port 3 will allow a mono mix from a stereo source if required. As Port 3 is often
unused, the outputs can be duplicated on two Audio Engines for redundancy. This also removes
the need for a separate Audio Engine just for MCR switching and is therefore quite suitable for
smaller facilities.
Panel Example
Below is an example of a 24 button panel. This could be a Numix NW24 wedge, Remora BTN24
module, or two Mosaic MLX-42/MLX-NSOFT modules mounted in a compatible Wide Meter
Bridge assembly.
For each destination, a number of sources are available. These lights will be shown in each studio,
providing an overview of the delegation at all times. Pre-selects (flashing) also show in each studio.
TX - A
TX - B
Studio A Prod Bth Network Studio A Prod Bth Network
Post Delay Post Delay
Post Delay Post Delay
EXCH / OB RETURN
Studio A Studio A Prod Bth TX A
Post Delay Mix Minus Mix Minus
TAKE
Studio A Studio A Prod Bth Prod Bth NewsBth TX A
Post Delay Mix Minus Post Delay Mix Minus Mix Minus
ISDN
Studio A Post Delay is selected to TX-A, TX-B, EXCH & ISDN. TX-A is pending to ISDN.
Functionality






Press the desired source-to-destination button.
Lit destinations cannot be de-selected.
Unlit destinations can be pre-selected (flashing) if allowed.
Once pre-selected to destination, you have a lock on that pre-select. The button will flash.
Press TAKE to accept, or press the flashing pre-select again to cancel.
Routes can also be tallied to text screens.
Requirements




1 Output or DSP Crosspoint & Output per path (DSP provides gain control and mono mix).
If using DSP Crosspoints a virtual Router surface is required on an available port.
1 Button panel per studio.
1 Button on panel per source/destination combo.
Network Source Switcher – XY Version
The Network Source Switcher – XY Version provides the same functionality as the Direct Access
Version, but allows for more source/destination combinations.
The disadvantage is that current routes are less visible on the panel itself and surface or virtual text
screens must be used to tally routing information.
Like the Direct Access NSS, the XY version uses DSP Crosspoints on a virtual surface or Output
Routes.
Panel Example
Below is an example of a 24 button panel. This could be a Numix NW24 wedge, Remora BTN24
module, or two Mosaic MLX-42 modules mounted in a compatible Wide Meter Bridge assembly.
The top row of 12 buttons is for sources and the TAKE button.
The bottom row of 12 buttons is for destinations, creating up to an 11x12 router.
Studio A Studio A Studio B Studio B Edit Bth Edit Bth Network Network
Post Delay Mix Minus Post Delay Mix Minus Program Mix Minus
Standby
TX A
TX B
POTS
ISDN
EXCH
ISDN
TX A
Silence
TAKE
SPARE
In this example, Studio A Post Delay, TX A, TX B and TAKE buttons are lit. ISDN path is flashing.
Functionality
 Press source button (top row). If allowed in this studio, it will display the current destination
routes on the bottom row.
 Lit destinations cannot be de-selected.
 Unlit destinations can be pre-selected (flashing) if allowed.
 Once pre-selected to a destination, you have a lock on that pre-select. The button will flash.
 Press TAKE to accept, or press the flashing pre-select again to cancel.
 Press the source to clear all.
 To view, you can press the source you are interested and see which destinations it feeds.
 Routes can also be tallied to text screens.
Requirements





1 Output or DSP Crosspoint & Output per path (DSP provides gain control and mono mix).
If using DSP Crosspoints a virtual Router surface is required on an available port.
1 Button panel per studio.
1 Button on panel per source, plus 1 “TAKE” button (12 suggested, using top row of BTN24).
1 Button on panel per destination (12 suggested, using bottom row of BTN24).
22 Device Control Examples
The Logitek system can interface to a variety of external devices using serial or IP based control.
This chapter shows examples of commonly used device control.
BetaBrite Signs
BetaBrite manufacture scrolling LED signs that can be used to display messages from Supervisor.
For more information on BetaBrite signs, see the company’s website at http://www.betabrite.com.
For this example, you will require:
 A BetaBrite message board
 Supervisor
 An unused RS-232 port on your Supervisor PC
When you setup the sign, program a static message into the display using either the remote control
or the supplied PC software. It's best to not overwhelm the operators with text and flashy displays so
it will be more obvious to the operator when an alarm condition exists.
We suggest setting one message with the time of day only, or a single period mark set to "Hold".
This will give you a static display that lets you know the sign is turned on. Once that is stored in the
BetaBrite, connect it to the available RS-232 port on your Supervisor computer.
Current BetaBrite signs that are commonly available use USB instead of
serial. BetaBrite signs using the older serial protocol are still available as the
"BetaBrite Classic" although they are difficult to find.
Configuring Supervisor
To configure Supervisor to support the external device:
1. Click on the Com Port Control tab
2. Look in the Auxiliary Ports box. In the "Lowest Aux Ports" box, put the port number the sign
is connected to. In the "Number of Aux Ports" box, put 1.
3. In the grid inside the Auxiliary Ports box you will now see the new Aux port and it will be
highlighted in blue. Right click on this line. You will now be able to set the port's parameters.
You must set the port as follows to communicate with the BetaBrite:
Baud Rate
Data Bits
Stop Bits
Parity
9600
7
2
Even
4. Click Accept once you have set the parameters and then check the Aux Ports Active box.
5. Close and re-open Supervisor to open the required Com Ports.
 For more information on Aux Ports see the Supervisor User’s Manual.
Functionality Description
In this example, we will use the Priority Message command in the BetaBrite to display alert
messages to operators. When the BetaBrite receives a Priority Message, it interrupts whatever the
sign was displaying and switches to the text sent with the priority command, until it receives a
command to stop and return to the previous message routine.
Components
In this example, we have used an Audio Engine GPI as the ON & OFF Triggers to display the
message on the BetaBrite sign.
To activate the message, we need to send a serial string to the Aux port. Please note the required
space between the <ESC> and the lowercase letter that follows it.
In this example, we will send "On Air" to com 2:
GPI On Trigger
 Send text “On Air” to BetaBrite.
GPI Off Trigger
 Send clear command to BetaBrite (if you do not issue this command, the alarm display will
never turn off!).
Further Information
 Text to Com Port – Page 70
If you would like further assistance with BetaBrite signs, please visit the Logitek Tech Forum at
http://www.logitekaudio.com. Further examples are available here, and you can communicate with
other Logitek users who have implemented BetaBrites.
Some additional BetaBrite protocol information follows.
Font Size & Effects
You can adjust the mode (effect) and character set (font size) by adjusting two characters in the
string.
In the command below, the “b” character makes the message hold on screen. The “2” preceding
the text sets the font size. These characters can be substituted to provide other effects.
cmd port2 "<nul><nul><nul><nul><nul><soh>Z00<stx>A0<esc> b<sub>9On Air<eot>"
Name
Rotate
Hold
Flash
Roll Up
Roll Down
Roll Left
Roll Right
Wipe Up
Wipe Down
Wipe Left
Wipe Right
Automode
Description
Message travels right to left
Message remains stationary
Message remains stationary and flashes
Previous Message is pushed up by a new message
Previous Message is pushed down by a new message
Previous Message is pushed left by a new message
Previous Message is pushed right by a new message
New message wipes over old from bottom to top
New message wipes over old from top to bottom
New message wipes over old from left to right
New message wipes over old from right to left
Sign picks modes at random
Command
a
b
c
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
l
o
Name
Five Slim
Five Stroke
Seven Slim
Seven Stroke
Seven Slim Fancy
Seven Stroke Fancy
Seven Shadow
Wide Stroke Seven Fancy
Wide Stroke Seven
Seven Shadow Fancy
Five Wide
Seven Wide
Seven Fancy Wide
Wide Stroke Five
Command
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
:
;
<
=
>
 Contact BetaBrite for further information on the sign protocol.
Script Examples
trigger ae1 device01 bus01 on
~ AE1 GPI Input #1
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: BetaBrite Message
REVISED: 14th June 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 GPI 1 ON
~ DESCRIPTION: Sends / clears message text to Beta Brite sign on COM2
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: COM port must be active in Supervisor as AUX port
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd port2 "<nul><nul><nul><nul><nul><soh>Z00<stx>A0<esc> b<sub>9On Air<eot>"
trigger ae1 device01 bus01 off
~ AE1 GPI Input #1
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: BetaBrite Message
REVISED: 14th June 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 GPI 1 OFF
~ DESCRIPTION: Sends / clears message text to Beta Brite sign on COM2
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: COM port must be active in Supervisor as AUX port
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd port2 "<nul><nul><nul><nul><nul><soh>Z00<stx>A0<eot>"
23 Guest Panel Examples
This chapter includes some examples of using Trigger functions with Logitek’s guest headphone
panels. These Triggers allow the guest to control their mic on/off/mute functions, receive tally
information, and control the guest panel timer display. These examples are for a GST-22 panel,
however also apply to a GST-20.
 See the Logitek Utility Panel User’s Manual for how to set up guest panels.
Mic On/Off
Functionality Description
Allows the guest to turn their microphone on and off from the guest panel. The microphone input
can be on any fader of a surface – the command is sent to the first matching instance of the mic
input on any Surface of the specified Audio Engine.
If you do not wish the guest to have mic on/off control, either omit these Triggers, or disable them
in CommandBuilder. You could also customize the Triggers using Variables and If Statements to
only permit the functionality during certain scenes.
Components
This function has an ON (button pressed) Trigger for the mic ON and OFF buttons.
On Trigger – Mic ON button
 Turn on microphone.
 Turn GST-22 ON lamp on.
 Turn GST-22 OFF lamp off.
 Turn GST-22 Relay Tally on.
 Turn GST-22 timer on.
 Run GST-22 timer.
 Reset GST-22 timer to zero.
On Trigger – Mic OFF button
 Turn off microphone.
 Turn GST-22 ON lamp off.
 Turn GST-22 OFF lamp on.
 Turn GST-22 Relay Tally off.
 Reset GST-22 timer to zero.
 Stop GST-22 timer.
Off Triggers
Off Triggers for these buttons are not required (an Off Trigger occurs when a button is released).
The “stubs” for these can be included if desired, and are shown at the bottom of the examples.
Further Information
 Bus On/Off – Page 55
Script Examples
trigger ae1 d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus31 on
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Guest Mic ON/OFF
REVISED: 12th July 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port5 (731) GST-22 #1 Mic ON
~ DESCRIPTION: Activate Mic if On button pressed. Cancel Mic if Off button pressed.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Activates/Deactivates Main bus for Mic input.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
s[St731
d[St731
d[St731
d[St731
Mic 2] bus0 on
Guest 1 H/P] bus11 on
Guest 1 H/P] bus12 off
Guest 1 H/P] bus20 on
cmd ae1 d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus21 on
cmd ae1 d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus22 on
cmd ae1 d[ST731 Guest 1 H/P] bus23 on
~
~
~
~
Mic on
On lamp on
Off lamp off
Tally Output on
~ timer on
~ timer run
~ timer reset
trigger ae1 d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus32 on
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Guest Mic ON/OFF
REVISED: 12th July 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port5 (731) GST-22 #1 Mic OFF
~ DESCRIPTION: Activate Mic if On button pressed. Cancel Mic if Off button pressed.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Activates/Deactivates Main bus for Mic input.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd
cmd
cmd
cmd
ae1
ae1
ae1
ae1
s[St731
d[St731
d[St731
d[St731
Mic 2] bus0 off
Guest 1 H/P] bus11 off
Guest 1 H/P] bus12 on
Guest 1 H/P] bus20 off
cmd ae1 d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus23 on
cmd ae1 d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus22 off
trigger ae1 d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus31 off
~ not required
trigger ae1 d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus32 off
~ not required
~
~
~
~
Mic off
On lamp off
Off lamp on
Tally Output off
~ timer reset
~ timer stop
Mic Mute
Functionality Description
Allows the guest to mute their microphone from the guest panel. The microphone input can be on
any fader of a surface – the command is sent to the first matching instance of the mic input on any
Surface of the specified Audio Engine. The mic input should be on ONE fader only.
If you do not wish the guest to have mic mute control, either omit these Triggers, or disable them
in CommandBuilder. You could also customize the Triggers using Variables and If Statements to
only permit the functionality during certain scenes.
Components
This function has an ON (button pressed) and an OFF (button released) Trigger for the mic mute.
Button On Trigger (pressed)
 Scan surface to see if microphone channel is on.
 Turn on Cough Mute function (BUS8) on microphone channel.
 Tally text “MUTE” to microphone channel on surface (so operator sees mute is active).
 Turn GST-22 MUTE lamp on.
Button Off Trigger (released)
 Turn off Cough Mute function (BUS8) on microphone channel.
 Clear tally text to microphone channel on surface (so operator sees mute is not active).
 Turn GST-22 MUTE lamp off.
Further Information
 If State Scan – Page 150
 Bus On/Off – Page 55
 Text Label – Page 94
Script Examples
trigger ae1 d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus33 on
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Cough Mute
REVISED: 12th July 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port5 (731) GST-22 #1 Mic Mute ON
~ DESCRIPTION: Activate Mic Mute if Mute button pressed. Cancel Mic Mute if Mute button released.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Activates/Deactivates Mute bus for Mic input.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
if state
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
endif
scan ( ae1 surf1 s[St731 Mic 2] bus0 on ) then
s[St731 Mic 2] bus8 on
~ cough mute on
s[St731 Mic 2] text label " MUTE "
~ tally label to fader
d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus13 on
~ guest mute lamp on
trigger ae1 d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus33 off
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Cough Mute
REVISED: 12th July 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port5 (731) GST-22 #1 Mic Mute OFF
~ DESCRIPTION: Activate Mic Mute if Mute button pressed. Cancel Mic Mute if Mute button released.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Activates/Deactivates Mute bus for Mic input.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd ae1 s[St731 Mic 2] bus8 off
cmd ae1 s[St731 Mic 2] text label "
cmd ae1 d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus13 off
"
~ cough mute off
~ tally label to fader
~ guest mute lamp off
Lamp Tallies
Functionality Description
Tallies the microphone on/off lamps on the GST-22 panel when the console operator turns the mic
on or off. The microphone input can be on any fader of a surface – the command is registered
whenever a matching instance of the mic input is changed on any Surface of the specified Audio
Engine.
Even if you do not give the guest control of their mic on/off, you should include these Triggers to
provide the guest with tally status when their mic is turned on or off by the console operator.
Components
This function has an ON (mic turned on) and an OFF (mic turned off) Trigger for the mic channel.
On Trigger
 Scan surface to ensure microphone channel is ON at this surface.
 Turn GST-22 ON lamp on.
 Turn GST-22 OFF lamp off.
 Turn GST-22 Relay Tally on.
 Turn GST-22 timer on.
 Run GST-22 timer.
 Reset GST-22 timer to zero.
Off Trigger
 Scan surface to ensure microphone channel is OFF at this surface.
 Turn GST-22 ON lamp off.
 Turn GST-22 OFF lamp on.
 Turn GST-22 Relay Tally off.
 Reset GST-22 timer to zero.
 Stop GST-22 timer.
Further Information
 If State Scan – Page 150
 Bus On/Off – Page 55
Script Examples
trigger ae1 s[St731 Mic 2] bus0 on
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Mic ON/OFF
REVISED: 12th July 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port5 (731) GST-22 #1 Mic Mute OFF
~ DESCRIPTION: Activate Mic Mute if Mute button pressed. Cancel Mic Mute if Mute button released.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Activates/Deactivates Mute bus for Mic input.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
if state
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
scan ( ae1 surf1 s[St731 Mic 2] bus0 on ) then
d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus11 on
~ On lamp on
d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus12 off
~ Off lamp off
d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus20 on
~ Tally Output on
cmd ae1 d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus21 on
cmd ae1 d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus22 on
cmd ae1 d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus23 on
endif
~ timer on
~ timer run
~ timer reset
trigger ae1 s[St731 Mic 2] bus0 off
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: Mic ON/OFF
REVISED: 12th July 2005
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port5 (731) GST-22 #1 Mic Mute OFF
~ DESCRIPTION: Activate Mic Mute if Mute button pressed. Cancel Mic Mute if Mute button released.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Activates/Deactivates Mute bus for Mic input.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
if state
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
cmd ae1
scan ( ae1 surf1 s[St731 Mic 2] bus0 off ) then
d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus11 off
~ On lamp off
d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus12 on
~ Off lamp on
d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus20 off
~ Tally Output off
cmd ae1 d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus23 on
cmd ae1 d[St731 Guest 1 H/P] bus22 off
endif
~ timer reset
~ timer stop
24 vSnapshot Examples
This chapter includes some examples of using Trigger functions with Logitek’s vSnapshot
application. These Triggers allow the user to perform Capture, Recall and Edit functions from the
Mosaic / Artisan surface. These examples are for a MLX-WSOFT panel, but also apply to any panel
with user programmable buttons.
 See the Logitek vTools User’s Manual for how to set up vSnapshot.
Capture On
Functionality Description
Launches vSnapshot Capture Mode and captures settings in the console’s RAM. The command is
sent to the specified Audio Engine.
Components
This function has an ON (button pressed) Trigger for the specified button.
On Trigger – Capture ON button
 Turn on reserved bus to launch vSnapshot Capture Mode.
 Turn button’s lamp on.
Off Triggers
Off Triggers for these buttons are activated when the Done button is clicked on the vSnapshot
Capture Page.
Further Information
 Bus On/Off – Page 55
Script Examples
trigger ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI In] bus42 on
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: vSnapshot Capture ON/OFF
REVISED: 1st February 2007
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port1 (StA) Wide Softkey SCENE 11
~ DESCRIPTION: Activate vSnapshot Capture Mode if On button pressed.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Tally Lamp is turned off when Done is clicked in vSnapshot.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd ae1 device02 bus201 on
cmd ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI Out] bus42 on
~ turn on vSnapshot Capture Mode
~ turn lamp on
trigger ae1 device02 bus201 off
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: vSnapshot Capture ON/OFF
REVISED: 1st February 2007
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port1
~ DESCRIPTION: Activate vSnapshot Capture Mode if On button pressed.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Tally Lamp is turned off when Done is clicked in vSnapshot.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI Out] bus42 off
~ turn lamp off
Recall On
Functionality Description
Launches vSnapshot Recall Mode and recalls settings to the console’s RAM. The command is sent to
the specified Audio Engine.
Components
This function has an ON (button pressed) Trigger for the specified button.
On Trigger – Recall ON button
 Turn on reserved bus to launch vSnapshot Recall Mode.
 Turn button’s lamp on.
Off Triggers
Off Triggers for these buttons are activated when the Done button is clicked on the vSnapshot
Recall Page.
Further Information
 Bus On/Off – Page 55
Script Examples
trigger ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI In] bus43 on
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: vSnapshot Recall ON/OFF
REVISED: 1st February 2007
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port1 (StA) Wide Softkey SCENE 12
~ DESCRIPTION: Activate vSnapshot Recall Mode if On button pressed.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Tally Lamp is turned off when Done is clicked in vSnapshot.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd ae1 device02 bus202 on
cmd ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI Out] bus43 on
~ turn on vSnapshot Recall Mode
~ turn lamp on
trigger ae1 device02 bus202 off
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: vSnapshot Recall ON/OFF
REVISED: 1st February 2007
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port1
~ DESCRIPTION: Activate vSnapshot Recall Mode if On button pressed.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Tally Lamp is turned off when Done is clicked in vSnapshot.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI Out] bus43 off
~ turn lamp off
Edit On
Functionality Description
Launches vSnapshot Edit Mode. The command is sent to the specified Audio Engine.
Components
This function has an ON (button pressed) Trigger for the specified button.
On Trigger – Edit ON button
 Turn on reserved bus to launch vSnapshot Edit Mode.
 Turn button’s lamp on.
Off Triggers
Off Triggers for these buttons are activated when the Done button is clicked on the vSnapshot Edit
Page.
Further Information
 Bus On/Off – Page 55
Script Examples
trigger ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI In] bus40 on
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: vSnapshot Edit ON/OFF
REVISED: 1st February 2007
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port1 (StA) Wide Softkey SCENE 9
~ DESCRIPTION: Activate vSnapshot Edit Mode if On button pressed.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Tally Lamp is turned off when Done is clicked in vSnapshot.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd ae1 device02 bus203 on
cmd ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI Out] bus40 on
~ turn on vSnapshot Recall Mode
~ turn lamp on
trigger ae1 device02 bus203 off
~========================================^=======================================^====================================~
~ PROCEDURE: vSnapshot Edit ON/OFF
REVISED: 1st February 2007
~ DATA/ID: AE1 Port1
~ DESCRIPTION: Activate vSnapshot Edit Mode if On button pressed.
~ NOTES/DEPENDENCIES: Tally Lamp is turned off when Done is clicked in vSnapshot.
~ DEBUG STATUS:
~========================================^=================~=====================^====================================~
cmd ae1 d[Ctrl - Surf1 GPI Out] bus40 off
~ turn lamp off
Appendix A Release Notes
What’s New in CommandBuilder
 Designed for Trigger Table compatibility with Supervisor 3.
 Support for 8 & 16 character Audio Engines (from August 2005 versions).
Release Notes
The following notes details known issues, version history and current releases of CommandBuilder.
Known Issues
The following issues have been reported and confirmed by Logitek. As these issues do not affect
many users, they have not been assigned development priority. If any of these issues affect your
installation, please contact Logitek Electronic Systems for possible workarounds or further
information.
Known Issues as at May 2009: (see release notes for info on fixed issues)
 Variable Select doesn't work when you use the first variable in the list - the list displays, but
you can't select anything. A workaround is to not use the first variable in the variable list for
Variable Select commands. Variable Select does not support “Select” in the variable name.
 A space is required before and after any variable name. The phrases vUserVariable=1
and (vUserVariable = 1) do not work. They should be stated as vUserVariable =
1 or ( vUserVariable = 1 ).
 The Route 3 Button Trigger (trigger ae1 device006e route3 button1 on) does not support the
d[Destination Device] notation.
 The Route 3 Button Trigger does not function with a Destination Device – the Trigger is
uploaded to the wrong Bus number and will not function.
 The If Trigger Conditional Trigger does not support the Route 3 Buttons.
 A Variable Select command sends the title to the wrong line of a Remora or Numix.
 When using a Route Select command, the destination tally text AE comes from the Route
Select command, not what is listed in the command. This is generally not a problem, but
prevents a tally being sent to another Audio Engine.
 The text tally destination does not support the SOFTKEY keyword. DEVICE28 must be used
to write to the Softkey screen on a Numix II. The text tally does not support channel
numbers, use the channel’s device number to write to the Numix and Remora fader screens.
 Some Mosaic Keywords are still under development.
 Talk Delay Triggers and Test Statements are currently under development.
 The CommandBuilder paste function works correctly only if the file is saved and reloaded
after every time the paste button is used. Files damaged with the paste button can be fixed
with Notepad or WordPad. The bug makes Trigger titles or scripts seem to disappear.
 Text To UDP commands are not currently supported.
Version History
Dec 2004
 Service Release
Jan 2005
 Corrected issues with IF VARIABLE tests using device numbers and variable comparisons.
April 2005
 Problems with COMPRESSOR GAIN commands corrected.
May 2005
 16 character version CommandBuilder16.exe release.
 Service release of CommandBuilder2002.exe (compiled in Delphi 7).
 Prevents VARIABLE SELECT without corresponding IF CANCEL (which can freeze Supervisor).
June 2005
The following updates apply only to CommandBuilder2002.exe:
 New flash rates now supported. Keyword ONCE for flash is no longer supported.
 Fixes incorrect error message on incomplete SET SELECTION MODE.
 Fixes TEXT TO COM PORT problem with <1C> hex byte being sent.
For 16 character systems, the June 2005 fixes have been incorporated into CommandBuilder 3.
August 2005
CommandBuilder3 merges recent fixes and support for 8 & 16-character Audio Engines in the one executable:
 TIMERS were incorrectly translating to support tenths of seconds prior to Supervisor support being
added. CB 3 & Supervisor 3 will ultimately support tenths of seconds. Some beta versions of CB 3 may
contain incorrect translations and should not be used. The release version does not have this issue.
 IF STATE and IF STATE SCAN test statements were not translating correctly if the device name contained
“CHAN”. This has been resolved.
 IF STATE SCAN test statement now validates the device name, and will warn of an invalid device name.
 ROUTE SELECT command now validates the device name, and will warn of an invalid device name.
 MESSAGE FLAG command now validates the device name, and will warn of an invalid device name.
 ROUTE3 TEXT commands now fully support the use of d[Device] notation.
 VARIABLES now allow the text “IF” to appear in the variable name. Previously this would attempt to
translate as an IF test statement.
September 2005
The following updates apply only to CommandBuilder3.exe:
 Mosaic Set Color command can now be sent to a source device using the s[Device] notation.
November 2005
The following updates apply only to CommandBuilder3.exe:
 Mosaic Set Color command now supports the v2.x fader module format in Mosaic. This version, and
future updates should not be used with Mosaic v1.x if using the Set Color command for fader On/Off
buttons. The new format allows a flash rate to be specified (see Mosaic manual for more information).
January 2009
The following updates apply only to CommandBuilder3.5.exe:
 Fixes a bug with TIMERS contained within IF VARIABLE and IF STATE test statements. Previously,
TIMERS contained within these statements would start regardless of whether the conditions being tested
for were true or not and the ensuing commands would execute. This bug fix remedies the problem so
that TIMERS contained within these test statements do not start unless the test conditions are true. This
has been fixed in both the Trigger and Procedure sections of CommandBuilder.
August 2009
The following updates apply only to CommandBuilder3.6.exe:
 A new Remember Password tickbox has been included as of CommandBuilder v3.6.2.0. This is ticked
by default, however, if you are remotely managing multiple sites it is a good idea to untick the
Remember Password box. This can greatly assist in preventing the accidental uploading of an incorrect
Audio Engine Config to a site.
Appendix B Keyword Summary
Introduction
This is the list of keywords which are recognized by CommandBuilder and which cause actions to
occur or are a part of a command statement. Words not on this list can be added to improve the
readability of the Trigger scripts but will be ignored. The parameters required by certain keywords
should not be separated from them by other keywords. Usually a keyword and its parameter are
separated only by spaces.
Keywords
d[
s[
u[
ip[
]
]
]
]
Destination Device name
Source Device name
UDP address
IP address
=
<>
<
>
<=
>=
+
Equal sign – also used to connect a variable or keyword to a parameter value
Not equal
Less than
Greater than
Less than or equal to
Greater than or equal to
Minus sign. Used to set fader trim or pan
Plus sign. Same as using no sign
ACCEPT
ACTIVE
ADDMIC
AE
ALL
ALWAYS
ANY
AQUA
The accept button on the console
Sets a Trigger to active state
Adds talkback mic to Mix Minus
Audio Engine number
Refers to all lines in a text commands
Used to set the Mix Minus Bus always on
Optional keyword for use with a Route Trigger
A color used for text on Numix II color display
BIG
BRIDGE
BUS
BUTTON
Sets user text string displayed on a console to large size
Refers to the Bridge buttons on console
Bus number in engine
Refers to Softkey, Bridge, or other buttons on console
CANCEL
CALL
CENTER
CHAN
CHANNEL
CHANGE
CLOCK
CLEAR
CMD
CONNECT
Used to cancel a Timer or other command
Calls a named Procedure set of commands
Used in pan setting commands
Shortened form of CHANNEL
Refers to a Fader on a console (same as FADER)
Used in show selection commands
Used to display a system time string on the console
Used to clear displayed text from a console
Indicates the beginning of a command line
Makes a serial port connection
DATE
Used to set the date of a Schedule Event Trigger
DAY
Used in the repeat interval of a Schedule Event Trigger
DEFINE
Used to define a group of commands
DELAY
Sets the number of seconds before which a timer will fire
DESTINATIONSets the destination com port for outgoing serial data
DEVICE
Audio Engine Device number
DISCONNECT Removes a serial port connection
DUMP
Used to dump the time in a Talk Delay
ENDDEF
ENDIF
ENDWHEN
EXIT
Defines the end of a define section
Defines the end of an IF section of commands
Defines the end of a WHEN section of commands
Stops processing of any further commands in the current trigger (same as QUIT)
FADER
FLAG
FLASH
FRIDAY
FUNCTION
Refers to a console Fader (same as CHANNEL)
Sets large arrow above fader with optional text message
Same as blink
Day of the week used in Schedule Event trigger
Refers to the function screen on the console
GREEN
A color used for text on Numix II color display
HOUR
Used in the repeat interval of a Schedule Event Trigger
IF
INIT
INSERT
Begins a Conditional Trigger or Test Statement
A Trigger that is executed whenever Supervisor is started
Sets the insert mode for user text strings – the line is not erased before the text is displayed
LABEL
LAMP
LEFT
LEVEL
LINE
LIST
LIGHT
Text to the screen above a Fader on a console
Refers to the Lamp in a Button (same as LIGHT)
Used in setting Fader pan
Used to set console Fader level
Line number for user text strings displayed on a console
A mode of the selection screen (alternate to the message mode)
Refers to the Lamp in a Button (same as LAMP)
MAGENTA
MAX
MESSAGE
MINUTES
MIX MINUS
MIXMONDAY
A color used for text on Numix II console
Used to set the maximum delay in a Talk Delay function
A mode of the selection screen (alternate to the list mode)
Used in the repeat interval of a Schedule Event Trigger
Sets the Mix Minus in effects commands
Same as Mix Minus
Day of the week used in a Schedule Event Trigger
NONE
NORMAL
NOTACTIVE
NOT
NUMIX1
NUMIX2
Equivalent to a 0 setting for Fader Trim
User text string that is not highlighted
Used to set a trigger to the inactive mode
Negates
Specifies Numix version 1 control surface
Specifies Numix version 2 control surface
OFF
ON
ONEWAY
Not on, usually a button or talk delay
Not off, usually a button
Com port communicates from source to destination only
PAN
PORT
POSITION
PROCEDURE
PULSE
Sets a Fader pan value
Reference to a Com Port (with a number to identify)
Position in a line of text
Used in naming a procedure or subroutine
Sends a pulse command to a relay in the Audio Engine or a Surface
QUESTION
QUIT
Sends text to the Question display area on a console
Stops processing of any further commands in the current Trigger (same as EXIT)
RADIO
RECALL
RED
RELAY
RELEASE
REMORA
REPEAT
RIGHT
ROC
ROUTE
Sets the Function Button on the console to radio push button mode
Retrieve a value that has been stored in a User Variable
A color used for text on Numix II console
Refers to a relay in Audio Engine or Surface (with number to identify)
Used to set release time with Set Fader Limiter and Set Fader Compressor commands
Specifies Remora control surface
Used to make a Schedule Event Trigger repeat on a given interval
Used in setting Fader pan
Refers to the ROC 5 or ROC 10 consoles
Assigns a Source Device number to a Destination Fader or Channel
SATURDAY
SCAN
SCHEDULE
SELECT
SET
SOFTKEY
SOURCE
START
STATE
STEREO
STOP
STORE
SUNDAY
SURFACE
SWITCH
Day of the week used in a Schedule Event Trigger
Checking for state or Fader input
Used to denote Schedule Event Triggers
Used in selection routines
Used to set User Variables and Trigger States
Refers to the Softkey Buttons on Numix console
Com port that receives incoming data stream
Used to begin the Talk Delay function
Used in “if state of engine equals” tests
Sets Mix Minus bus to stereo
Used to remove a clock text display from a console or stop the Talk Delay function
Saves a value to a User Variable
Day of the week used in a Schedule Event Trigger
Port number of console
Same as BUS or RELAY
TALK
TEMPERATURE
TEXT
THURSDAY
TIME
TIMEOUT
TIMER
TITLE
TOGGLE
TRIGGER
TRIM
TUESDAY
UDP
UNROUTE
Used to set a Talk Delay function
Sets the temperature sensor parameters
Defines a line of text for console
Day of the week used in Schedule Event Trigger
Used to set the time of a Schedule Event Trigger
Sets the number of seconds before which a timer will fire (same as DELAY or WAIT)
Numbered timer for system use
Sets the title in show selection routines
Defines an on Trigger as the Toggle Type
Define trigger event line
Sets the Fader input trim
Day of the week used in Schedule Event Trigger
Specifies UDP socket address for text data destination
Refers to a route that is replaced by a new route
v
Lower case as a prefix designates a User Variable name
WAIT
WEDNESDAY
WHITE
WHEN
Sets the number of seconds before which a timer will fire (same as DELAY or TIMEOUT)
Day of the week used in Schedule Event Trigger
A color used for text on Numix II color display
Specifies command to execute when channel goes off
YELLOW
A color used for text on Numix II color display
z
Lower case as a prefix designates a System Variable name
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