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Contents
• Getting Started
• Looking at the Work Area
• Converting Electronic Files to PDF
• Setting Acrobat Distiller Options
• Converting Scanned Documents to PDF
• Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
• Customizing PDF Navigation
• Working with PDF Documents
• Annotating PDF Documents
• Creating and Using PDF Forms
• Adding Interactive Features
• Indexing Document Collections
• Searching Catalog Indexes
• Distributing Documents in PDF
• Working with Digital
Signatures (Windows)
• Troubleshooting
How to use this online guide
Page 2
How to use this online guide
The online Adobe Acrobat User Guide provides detailed information on all the
Acrobat commands and features for both Windows and Mac OS systems.
Go to the table of contents.
Go to the index.
Go to the Search command, or choose Edit > Search > Query.
How to print this online guide
Because the pages of this online guide are optimized for online viewing, you
may prefer to print them two to a page (two-up). The Acrobat CD also includes
a print-on-demand version of this online user guide (AcroHelpForPrint.pdf)
optimized for printing on 8-1/2-by-11 or A4 stock. The print-on-demand version
of the user guide is in the Help folder on your CD.
To print pages two up:
1 Choose File > Print Setup (Windows) or File > page Setup (Mac OS).
2 Follow the instruction for your platform:
In Windows, click Options, select 2 up on the paper tab, click OK to return to
the Print Setup dialog box, and click OK again to close it.
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On a Macintosh, choose 2 Up from the Layout menu and click OK.
How to use this online guide
Page 3
Note: If you can’t perform step 2 in Windows, you may not be using the Adobe
PostScript printer driver. In this case, install the Adobe printer driver from the
Acrobat CD. See the Getting Started guide for installation instructions.
3 Choose File > Print.
4 Indicate the page range.
5 Click OK (Windows) or Print (Mac OS).
Getting Started
Page 4
Getting Started
Welcome to the Adobe Acrobat program—the essential tool for universal
document exchange. You can use Acrobat to publish virtually any document in
Portable Document Format (PDF). Documents in PDF preserve the exact look
and content of the originals, complete with fonts and graphics, and they can be
distributed by e-mail or stored on the World Wide Web, an intranet, a file
system, or a CD-ROM for other users to view on Microsoft Windows , Mac OS,
and UNIX platforms.
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What’s new in Acrobat 4.0
Version 4.0 of Adobe Acrobat includes many improvements to the interface
that streamline your work on PDF files. A tool bar and command bar give you
easy access to both new and familiar Acrobat features, while the status bar
provides quick ways to change the on-screen display. Floating palettes with
bookmarks, thumbnails, annotations, signatures, articles, and destinations
offer enhanced display, navigation, and editing functionality. And in addition
to the menu bar at the top of the screen, Acrobat now provides contextsensitive menus with commands related to the item under the pointer.
Getting Started
Page 5
Acrobat 4.0 also includes many new features:
Converting documents to PDF You can now simply drag and drop many
popular file types to the Acrobat icon or Acrobat window to convert the files
to PDF.
Microsoft Office macros Acrobat installs macros in the Windows versions of
Microsoft Office applications so that you can create PDF files directly from
those applications. The PDFMaker macro is installed for Microsoft Word 97 and
PowerPoint 97; it can create PDF using Acrobat Distiller or PDFWriter, and it
supports new Acrobat features such as structured bookmarks. The PDFWriter
macro works with Microsoft Word 95, PowerPoint 95, and Excel 97.
Opening documents in Acrobat With the Open command in Acrobat for
Windows, you can now open documents from many popular applications and
convert them automatically to PDF.
Opening Web pages You can download HTML pages from the Web in Acrobat
for Windows and convert the pages to PDF at the same time. Any links on the
pages in PDF retain an association with the Web site so that you can click links
to download additional pages quickly.
Distiller job options Distiller now provides more options for converting
documents to PDF. You can use one of three predefined sets of job options to
optimize PDF files for different purposes, and you can customize and save your
own sets of job options. The 4.0 job options include the ability to manage color
in your documents and even embed ICC profiles to maintain accurate color in
PDF files from one ICC-aware application or output device to another.
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Getting Started
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CMYK color options With the Prepress dialog box in Acrobat, you can bypass
any color management system and preserve the original CMYK and gray values
in a PDF document if the file is to be used to make color plates for printing.
Annotations Acrobat provides an extensive array of annotation tools for
marking up text and attaching notes and commentaries to PDF documents.
You can create annotations in text, graphic, and audio formats, and even
embed entire files.
Structured bookmarks You can use the new structured bookmarks to
reorganize or delete content in PDF. Acrobat generates these bookmarks when
you create PDF from a Microsoft Word file or from a Web page. You can also use
structured bookmarks generated from Web pages to download additional
pages.
Destinations You can create custom destinations to give other users the ability
to navigate to specific named locations across PDF documents. These links are
easier to maintain than links to pages because they are not affected by the
addition or deletion of pages in the target document.
Digital signatures You can now add a digital signature to the current version of
a PDF document in Acrobat for Windows. You can also see all the signatures
that have been added to the document, check the validity of signatures, and
go back to an earlier signed version of a document.
Getting Started
Page 7
Document comparison Acrobat can now show you differences between
analogous pages in two versions of a PDF document in Windows. It marks all
differences on the pages, including content revisions and even subtle
formatting changes you may not be able to see.
Page renumbering You can renumber pages in Acrobat in a variety of ways—
for example, you can make the PDF numbering match the original document’s
numbering.
Text formatting The table/formatted text select tool allows you to select tables
and text in a PDF document and retain the original formatting when you copy
(or import) them into other applications. You can specify vertical or horizontal
format, the type of text flow, and whether you want ANSI (simple text) or Rich
Text Format (RTF).
Support for other languages You can now create, view, and print PDF
documents that have Japanese, Korean, Traditional Chinese, and Simplified
Chinese text, even on a non-native system, as long as you have the proper
support files installed. (The original documents must be authored on a native
system.) You can create, view, and print documents that have Cyrillic, Eastern
European, and Middle Eastern text on a native system, using the Englishlanguage version of Acrobat.
Getting Started
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About support for Asian languages
In Acrobat 4.0, you can create, view, and print PDF documents that contain
Japanese, Korean, Traditional Chinese, and Simplified Chinese text by installing
the Asian support files. In Windows, install Acrobat with the custom installation, and select the Asian Language Support option. In Mac OS, use the
custom installation, and select the Asian Language Kit and the Asian Language
Distiller Extensions options.
All of the Acrobat features are supported for Asian-language text, with the
following exceptions:
In Windows, you can use Distiller to create PDF files from documents with
Asian text on any system, as long as you have the Asian language support files
installed, but you cannot use PDFWriter to create these files unless you are on a
native-language system. In Mac OS, you can use either Distiller or PDFWriter to
create files on any system, as long as you have the Asian language Kit installed.
The original documents must be created on a native system.
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In Windows, you can use the Web Capture command in Acrobat to download
Web pages with Japanese text, and you can use the Open command to convert
some types of Japanese documents to PDF. To take advantage of these
features, you must have the Acrobat Asian language files installed on your
system, as well as the Japanese version of Internet Explorer Multilanguage
Support (which you can find on the Microsoft Web site). These features are not
available for the other Asian languages and are not available in Mac OS.
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Getting Started
Page 9
The Acrobat Catalog tool, the Search command, the Compare Pages
command, the Paper Capture feature, and the PDFMaker macro are not
available for Asian text.
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You can use the text annotation tool to attach comments to Japanese text
and the table/formatted text select tool to select Japanese text; these features
are not supported for other Asian text. The text markup tools for highlighting,
striking through, and underlining are not available for any Asian text.
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You can create forms that have Japanese text and fill in form fields with
Japanese text. You can also use the digital signature feature in Japanese
documents. These features are not available for other Asian text.
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Note: Asian text in bookmarks, annotations, and the Document Info dialog
boxes require support from the operating system to display correctly.
About support for Eastern European and Middle Eastern
languages
You can create, view, and print PDF documents in Acrobat 4.0 that contain
Cyrillic text (including Bulgarian, Russian, and Ukrainian), Eastern European
text (including Czech, Hungarian, and Polish), and Middle Eastern text (Arabic
and Hebrew). If the fonts are embedded in the PDF documents, you can view
and print the documents on any system. However, you must have the proper
(language kit) fonts installed on a system to be able to create the documents,
or to view or print them without the fonts being embedded.
Getting Started
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Acrobat creates bookmarks for documents with Cyrillic, Eastern European, and
Middle Eastern text, and you can use the text annotation tool to attach
comments to the text. You can use the Find command to search for Cyrillic and
Eastern European text. Other features in Acrobat 4.0 are not supported for
these languages.
Resources for learning Acrobat
Adobe provides documentation and services for learning how to use Acrobat
and for solving problems as you work with PDF files.
Acrobat documentation
The printed and online documentation in the Acrobat package get you up and
running with Acrobat and should answer most of your questions:
Adobe Acrobat Getting Started Guide Contains information on system requirements and features in the program, and tells how to install the software on
Windows and Mac OS systems. This guide is included in the package in printed
form and as the introductory chapter of the online user guide.
Adobe Acrobat User Guide Provides detailed information on all Acrobat
commands and features, for both Windows and Mac OS systems. This online
user guide is designed to be used as a reference tool in your everyday work
with Acrobat. To open the user guide, choose Acrobat Guide from the Acrobat
Help menu.
Getting Started
Page 11
The user guide has a table of contents with links you can click to go to
particular chapters and sections. To go to the table of contents, click the First
Page button
at the top of any page in the guide.
In addition, there are two indexes: a traditional book-type index and a full-text
index generated by Acrobat Catalog . To use the traditional index, click Index in
the table of contents, or click the index icon
at the top of any page. Clicking
a term in the traditional index takes you to the main discussion of that subject.
To use the full-text index, choose Edit > Search > Query, or click the Search
Query button
on the Acrobat command bar. When you search for a term in
the full-text index, you go to the first occurrence of the subject; you can use the
Find Again command to go to subsequent occurrences.
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The Acrobat CD includes a print-on-demand version of the user guide, with the
same material but on larger pages more suitable for printing. You can print
pages from the online user guide, but if you’re printing more than a few pages,
you’ll find it quicker and more efficient to print from the print-on-demand
version. The print-on-demand version of the user guide (AcroHelpForPrint.pdf )
is in the Help folder on your Acrobat CD.
Adobe Acrobat Tour Gives you a quick overview of Acrobat. This online tour
uses sample files to illustrate some of the most important features in the
software and includes step-by-step instructions for working with those
features yourself. To start the tour, choose Acrobat Tour from the Acrobat
Help menu.
Getting Started
Page 12
You’ll find a print-on-demand version of the tour (AcroTourForPrint.pdf ) in the
Help folder on your Acrobat CD.
The Adobe Web site
Visit the Adobe Web site for up-to-the minute information on technology
related to Acrobat, links to Acrobat plug-ins, product tips, support updates, and
much more.
In Acrobat, click the Adobe Web site button
, or choose File > Adobe Online.
Use the dialog box that appears to update pages from the Web site manually,
to configure how often to update pages automatically, or to set up your
proxy service.
In your Web browser, you can go to the main page of the Adobe Web site by
entering the URL www.adobe.com.
On the Adobe Web site home page, you can click a country name in the Adobe
Sites pop-up menu to choose a language for viewing the site. The exact information in the site may vary from one language version to another.
Classroom in a Book
Classroom in a Book is the official training series for Adobe software developed
by experts at Adobe and published by Adobe Press. For information on
purchasing Adobe Acrobat 4.0 Classroom in a Book, visit the Adobe Web site
(www.adobe.com), or contact your local book distributor.
Getting Started
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Training & Certification
The Adobe Training & Certification Programs are designed to help Adobe
customers improve and promote their product proficiency skills. The Adobe
Certified Expert (ACE) program is designed to recognize the high-level skills of
expert users. Adobe Certified Training Providers (ACTP) use only Adobe
Certified Experts to teach Adobe software classes. Available in either ACTP
classrooms or on site, the ACE program is the best way to master Adobe
products. For Adobe Certified Training Programs information, visit the
Partnering with Adobe Website at partners.adobe.com, where you can link to
the appropriate regional site for your location.
About the Acrobat package
The Acrobat package includes the Adobe Acrobat CD-ROM, Adobe Acrobat
Getting Started (a printed copy of this chapter), and a printed registration card.
The Adobe Acrobat CD contains the following:
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Adobe Acrobat software for your platform.
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Adobe Acrobat Reader software for your platform.
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Adobe PostScript printer drivers and other utilities you may need.
An online user guide that provides complete documentation for Acrobat and
its plug-ins.
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Getting Started
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An interactive online Tour that takes you through Acrobat, with accompanying sample files and step-by-step instructions.
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■ Sample interactive forms and related materials to help you design your own
forms in Acrobat.
A Security folder with information from vendors who are providing digital
signature capabilities in Acrobat.
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A Software Development Kit (SDK) with libraries, source code, and documentation for developing plug-ins that extend the functionality of Acrobat.
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Tryout versions of Adobe flagship products.
System requirements
Acrobat requires certain hardware and software components to be able to run
properly. (See Improving performance for tips on maximizing Acrobat performance and suggestions for reducing memory requirements.)
Windows
An Intel i486 or Pentium processor-based personal computer (Pentium
recommended).
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Microsoft Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows NT 4.0 with Service Pack 3
or later.
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Getting Started
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16 MB of RAM for Acrobat on Windows 95 and Windows 98, 24 MB of RAM for
Acrobat on Windows NT (32 MB recommended).
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32 MB of RAM for the Paper Capture plug-in (64 MB recommended).
A hard drive with at least 75 MB of available space (134 MB for Asian font
support).
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A CD-ROM drive.
Mac OS
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An Apple Power Macintosh computer.
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Apple System Software version 7.5.3 or later for Acrobat.
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6 MB of RAM for Acrobat (12 MB recommended).
■ 16 MB of RAM for Distiller or the Paper Capture plug-in (32 MB
recommended).
A hard drive with at least 60 MB of available space (134 MB for Asian font
support).
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A CD-ROM drive.
Getting Started
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Registration
Please register your copy of Acrobat so that Adobe can provide you with the
highest quality software, offer technical support, and keep you informed of
new Acrobat software developments. You can use the enclosed registration
card, or register online at the end of the installation process or at a later date.
Follow the on-screen instructions to register at the end of the installation
process.
To register online at a later date:
1 Follow the instructions for your platform:
In Windows, click the Start Menu, choose Programs > Adobe Acrobat 4.0, and
click Register Acrobat 4.0.
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In Mac OS, open the Adobe Acrobat 4.0 folder, and double-click the Adobe
Registration Utility icon.
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2 Follow the on-screen instructions to complete the registration.
Getting Started
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Installing and starting Acrobat (Windows)
You install the Acrobat program files from the CD-ROM. Note that you cannot
run Acrobat from the CD; you must install the components onto your hard
drive and run the software from that drive.
Important: If you have an earlier version of Acrobat on your system, Adobe
recommends uninstalling it before installing Acrobat 4.0. See the documentation for the earlier Acrobat version for information on uninstalling.
Installing Acrobat (Windows)
In addition to Adobe Acrobat, the Acrobat installer includes the AdobePS 4.2.4
(Windows 95/98) and 5.0.1 (Windows NT) printer drivers and a set of Distiller
PostScript Printer Description (PPD) files. The PPD files provide information
about the particular printer (such as what fonts are on the printer’s ROM) for
the AdobePS driver. Before using Distiller to create PDF files, you may need to
select a PPD file for the printer you intend to use. See Creating PostScript files in
Windows for details.
Getting Started
Page 18
The default installation in Windows includes macros that allow you to create
PDF files easily in Microsoft Office applications. If you have Microsoft Word 97
or PowerPoint 97 on your system, the PDFMaker macro is installed. If you have
Word 95, PowerPoint 95, or Excel 97 on your system, the PDFWriter macro
is installed.
Note: The serial number for your copy of the software is located on the printed
registration card.
To install Acrobat (Windows):
1 Restart Windows, and do not start any other applications.
2 Insert the Adobe Acrobat CD into your CD-ROM drive.
3 In the Adobe Acrobat 4.0 Setup dialog box, click Next whenever you are
ready to proceed to the next panel. Follow the on-screen instructions to move
past the introduction, to select a country, and to accept the license agreement.
4 Select the type of installation you want:
Typical installs the program files for Acrobat, Acrobat Catalog, Acrobat
Distiller, PDFWriter, PDFMaker, several standard plug-ins, and the online
documentation.
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Compact installs only the Acrobat, Distiller, PDFWriter, and PDFMaker
program files.
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Custom lets you specify what components to install. You can include any of
the components in the typical installation, plus support for PDF documents
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Getting Started
Page 19
with Asian-language text and the accessories QuickTime 3.0 and Photoshop
5.0 PDF Plug-in.
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For a description of any component that can be installed, select Custom,
and click Next. Then select the component in the list to see a description of it.
You can click Back to return to the panel for selecting a type of installation if
you do not intend to continue with the custom installation.
5 If you want to change the destination folder for the Acrobat files, click
Browse, and use the browser to locate a folder.
6 Click Next.
7 If you selected custom installation, select the components you want to
install, and click Next. The dialog box displays the amount of disk space
required to install each component and the amount of space available. You can
also select a component in the list and click Change to include or remove any
item within that component.
Note: The Acrobat Capture plug-in requires Acrobat and PDFWriter. If you
select the Capture plug-in, you must also select Acrobat Program Files and
PDFWriter Program Files or already have them installed.
8 Enter your name, your organization (optional), and the serial number for
your copy of the program, and then click Next.
9 Click Yes to verify the user information.
Getting Started
Page 20
10 Click Next to begin the installation. When the process is complete, a
message tells you that Acrobat is installed. You can register as part of the installation process, or you can cancel the registration when prompted and register
at a later time.
11 Select Yes, and click Finish to restart your computer.
Configuring Photoshop and Illustrator for image or PDF editing in
Acrobat
If you install Adobe Acrobat after installing Adobe Photoshop 5.0, Acrobat will
automatically supply Photoshop with a PDF plug-in that enables you to take an
image from a PDF document, edit it in Photoshop, save it, and return the image
to the PDF document. If you install Photoshop after installing Acrobat,
however, you may need to configure this application manually.
Adobe Illustrator 7 and Illustrator 8 install a PDF plug-in that enables you to
take a PDF page from a PDF document, edit it in Illustrator, save it, and return
the page to the PDF document. There should be no need to configure this
manually.
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To configure Adobe Photoshop manually:
1 Copy the Photoshop plug-in file PDFFormat.8bi from the Program
Files\Adobe\Acrobat 4.0\Acrobat folder to the
Program Files\Adobe\Photoshop 5.0\Plug-ins\File Formats folder.
Getting Started
Page 21
2 Quit Photoshop if it is running. The next time you start Photoshop, it should
recognize the plug-in.
Starting Acrobat (Windows)
To use Acrobat, you must have installed the files from the CD onto your local
hard drive. You cannot run Acrobat from your CD-ROM drive.
To start Acrobat (Windows):
Click the Start Menu, choose Programs > Adobe Acrobat 4.0, and click the
name of the program you want to start. You can also double-click the Adobe
Acrobat icon on your desktop to start the Acrobat program, or double-click a
PDF file icon to start the program with that file open.
Start the Adobe Acrobat 4.0 program to view, enhance, or create PDF
documents. Start Acrobat Catalog to build a searchable index for a collection of
PDF documents. Start Acrobat Distiller to customize Distiller job options,
change the Distiller preferences, set up watched folders, or convert PostScript
files to PDF.
To start Acrobat without plug-ins (Windows):
Hold down Shift immediately after starting up the Acrobat program.
Getting Started
Page 22
Uninstalling Acrobat (Windows)
You can remove all of the Acrobat components installed on your system with
the Uninstall utility.
To uninstall Acrobat (Windows):
Click the Start Menu, choose Programs > Adobe Acrobat 4.0, and click Uninstall
Adobe Acrobat 4.0. Click Yes to confirm that you want to remove the program.
Installing and starting Acrobat (Mac OS)
You install the Acrobat program files from the CD-ROM. Note that you cannot
run Acrobat from the CD; you must install the components onto your hard
drive and run the software from that drive.
Important: If you have an earlier version of Acrobat on your system, Adobe
recommends uninstalling it before installing Acrobat 4.0. See the documentation for the earlier Acrobat version for information on uninstalling.
Getting Started
Page 23
Installing Acrobat (Mac OS)
In addition to Adobe Acrobat, the Acrobat installer includes the AdobePS 8.5.1
printer driver and a set of Distiller PostScript Printer Description (PPD) files. The
PPD files provide information about the particular printer (such as what fonts
are on the printer’s ROM) for the AdobePS driver. Before using Distiller to create
PDF files, you may need to select a PPD file for the printer you intend to use.
See Creating PostScript files in Mac OS for details.
Note: The serial number for your copy of the software is located on the printed
registration card.
To install Acrobat (Mac OS):
1 Insert the Adobe Acrobat CD into your CD-ROM drive.
2 Double-click the Install Adobe Acrobat 4.0 icon.
3 In the Adobe Acrobat Installer dialog box, click Continue to move past
the introduction.
4 Specify the type of installation you want:
To use the standard installation, choose Easy Install from the pop-up menu.
This installs the program files for Acrobat, Acrobat Catalog, Acrobat Distiller,
PDFWriter, several standard plug-ins, and the online documentation.
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To install only particular components, choose Custom Install, and select the
components in the list box. You can include any of the components in Easy
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Getting Started
Page 24
Install, plus support for PDF documents with Asian-language text (Language
Kit) and the ability to display the Acrobat interface in French or German
(European Language Files).
If you install the European Language Files and want to display Acrobat in
French or German, choose File > Preferences > General in Acrobat after
installing, and choose the language from the Application Language pop-up
menu. The change takes effect the next time you start Acrobat.
For a description of any component that can be installed, choose Custom
Install to see a list of the components, and click the I button to the right of the
component you want in the list.
5 Click Install, and follow the on-screen instructions to complete the installation. When the process is complete, a message tells you that Acrobat is
installed. You can register as part of the installation process, or cancel the registration when prompted and do it at a later time.
6 Click Restart to restart your computer.
Installing QuickTime (Mac OS)
You need QuickTime to be able to play QuickTime movies pointed to from PDF
files. QuickTime is installed on most Mac OS computers, but if you need it, you
can install it from the Acrobat CD.
Getting Started
Page 25
To install QuickTime (Mac OS):
1 Insert the Adobe Acrobat CD into your CD-ROM drive.
2 Open the QuickTime folder, and open the Readme file.
3 Follow the installation instructions in the Readme file.
Starting Acrobat (Mac OS)
To use Acrobat, you must have installed the files from the CD onto your local
hard drive. You cannot run Acrobat from your CD drive.
To start Acrobat (Mac OS):
Open the Adobe Acrobat 4.0 folder, and double-click the icon for the program
you want to start. Or double-click a PDF file icon to start the program with that
file open.
Start the Adobe Acrobat 4.0 program to view, enhance, or create PDF
documents. Start Acrobat Catalog to build a searchable index for a collection of
PDF documents. Start Acrobat Distiller to customize Distiller job options,
change the Distiller preferences, set up watched folders, or convert PostScript
files to PDF.
If you installed Japanese fonts with Acrobat, the first time you start Distiller you
are asked to process the fonts for use with Distiller. Click OK to allow Distiller to
process the fonts. See Using MakeCID to create width-only fonts for more information.
Getting Started
Page 26
To start Acrobat without plug-ins (Mac OS):
Hold down Shift immediately after starting up the Acrobat program.
Managing plug-ins
Acrobat uses plug-ins to add more functionality. Plug-ins increase the required
amount of memory needed to run Acrobat. To minimize the amount of
memory needed to run Acrobat, you may want to install only the plug-ins you
use with the program. A plug-in must be located in the Acrobat Plug-ins folder
to load with Acrobat. If the plug-in is moved to another location, it will not load
with the program. Alternatively, you can temporarily disable plug-ins when
starting Acrobat.
If you install Acrobat after you install Photoshop, the Acrobat installer will
automatically supply Photoshop with a PDF plug-in that enables you to edit an
image in a PDF document using Photoshop. With this plug-in, you can edit an
image in Photoshop while in the PDF document, save the changes, and
automatically return the image to the PDF document for viewing. The Acrobat
Installer puts the required Photoshop plug-in in the File Formats folder in your
Photoshop application folder. The plug-in file is named PDFFormat.8bi
(Windows) or PDFFormat (Mac OS). If you install Photoshop after you’ve
installed Acrobat, you will need to configure the application manually.
Getting Started
Page 27
Adobe Illustrator 7.0 and 8.0 automatically install a PDF plug-in that enables
you to select a graphic object in a PDF document, edit it in Illustrator, save the
changes, and automatically return the image to the PDF document for viewing.
There should be no need to configure this manually.
To configure Adobe Photoshop to work with Acrobat:
1 Open Windows Explorer and locate the Photoshop plug-in in Desktop >
Program > Files > Adobe > Acrobat 4.0 > Acrobat > PDFFormat.8bi.
2 Copy this file to Desktop > Program Files > Adobe > Photoshop 5.0 > Plugins > File > Formats.
3 Shut down Photoshop if it is currently running. When you restart Photoshop,
it will recognize the new plug-in.
To disable a plug-in:
1 Open the Plug-ins folder in your Acrobat folder.
2 Select the plug-ins you do not want to load. Some of the plug-ins may be in
folders within the Plug-ins folder.
3 Move the selected plug-ins to the Optional folder in the Acrobat folder
(Windows) or the Optional Plug-ins folder in the Acrobat folder (Mac OS).
Getting Started
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To temporarily disable all plug-ins:
Hold down Shift immediately after starting the Acrobat program.
To increase the processing speed of the Paper Capture plug-in:
Do one of the following:
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Add more RAM than the required 32 MB minimum.
In Windows, have available the required 32 MB of RAM and free disk space
equal to twice the size of the largest uncompressed image you will process.
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Looking at the Work Area
Page 29
Looking at the Work Area
You use Acrobat to view and work in PDF documents—both your own
documents and documents created by other users. The Acrobat work area
provides a powerful set of features for navigating in PDF documents, for
adjusting the magnification and other aspects of your view, for controlling the
look of documents when they open, and for customizing interaction with them
in many other ways.
Using the work area
The Acrobat work area includes a window with a document pane for viewing
PDF documents and a navigation pane with bookmarks, thumbnails, annotations, and so on related to the current document. A menu bar, command bar,
tool bar, and status bar around the outside of the window provide everything
you need to work with documents.
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A
B
C
I
D
E
F
G
H
A. Command bar B. Menu bar C. Adobe Online button D. Tool bar E. Navigation pane
F. Palette menu G. Status bar H. Document pane I. Document pane menu
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The buttons and menus in the status bar provide quick ways to change your
on-screen display and to navigate through documents.
A
B
C
D E
F
G H
I
J
A. Navigation Pane button B. Magnification level C. Magnification pop-up menu D. First Page
button E. Previous Page button F. Current page G. Next Page button H. Last Page button
I. Page size J. Page Layout pop-up menu
Using commands and tools
The command bar contains buttons for many of the most commonly used
commands in Acrobat. The document pane menu contains a smaller group of
commands for setting General preferences and for getting information on the
current document.
The tool bar contains tools for scrolling and zooming; cropping pages;
changing the appearance of text; adding graphics, annotations, and signatures; and making other changes to the current PDF document. A small triangle
at the lower right of a tool indicates the presence of hidden tools.
To show or hide the command bar, menu bar, or tool bar:
Do one of the following:
To show or hide the command bar, choose Window > Show Command Bar or
Window > Hide Command Bar.
■
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To hide the menu bar, choose Window > Hide Menu Bar. To show it again,
press F7.
■
■ To show or hide the tool bar, choose Window > Show Tool Bar or
Window > Hide Tool Bar.
To move the command bar or tool bar over the window (Windows):
Drag the bar by its right or bottom edge or by a separator bar between two
groups of icons. You can drag the bar back to its original location to reattach it.
To choose a command from the command bar:
Click the button.
To choose a command from the document pane menu:
Position the pointer over the triangle in the upper right corner of the
document pane, hold down the mouse button to open the menu, and drag to
the command you want.
To select a tool in the tool bar:
Do one of the following:
To select a visible tool, click the tool, or press the letter key shown in the
tool’s tip. (Move the pointer over a tool to see its tip.)
■
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To select a visible tool for only one use, Ctrl-click (Windows) or Option-click
(Mac OS) the tool. This works for any tool except zoom, select text, select
graphic, crop, movie, and article.
■
To select a hidden tool, hold down the mouse button on the related tool with
the triangle until the additional tools appear, and then drag to the tool you
want. Or hold down Shift, and press the letter key showing in the tool’s tip to
cycle through the group of tools.
■
Press on a tool with a triangle to open a hidden group of tools.
■ To select the hand tool temporarily, hold down the spacebar. To select the
zoom-in tool temporarily, hold down Ctrl-space (Windows) or Command-space
(Mac OS). To select zoom-out temporarily, hold down Ctrl-Alt-space (Windows)
or Command-Option-space (Mac OS). The tools are selected as long as you hold
down the keys.
Using context menus
In addition to menus in fixed locations in the work area, Acrobat provides
context-sensitive menus that display commands for the particular item under
the pointer.
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To choose a command from a context menu:
1 Position the pointer over an item in the work area, such as a thumbnail,
annotation, bookmark, or document page.
2 Hold down the right mouse button (Windows), or press Control and hold
down the mouse button (Mac OS), until the context menu appears. Then drag
to the command you want.
Using palettes
Palettes help you organize and keep track of a document’s bookmarks, thumbnails, signatures, annotations, articles, and destinations. Palettes can be docked
inside the navigation pane, or they can float in windows over the work area.
They can also be grouped with other palettes.
To show or hide the navigation pane:
Click the Navigation Pane button
the document pane.
in the status bar, or click the left border of
To show or hide a palette:
Choose the palette’s Show or Hide command from the Window menu. The
palette appears in the navigation pane or in a floating window, depending on
where the palette was located the last time it was visible.
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To change the display of a palette:
Do the following:
■ To change the width of the navigation pane while it is visible, drag its
right border.
■
To bring a palette to the front of its group, click the palette’s tab.
To move a palette to another group, drag the palette’s tab to the other group.
The other group can be in the navigation pane or in a floating window. You can
drag a palette to an existing group or drag a palette over the document pane
to create a new floating window for it.
■
Drag the palette’s tab to another group.
To move a palette to its own floating window, drag the palette’s tab to the
document pane.
■
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To collapse a floating palette window to show only the tabs, double-click any
tab in the palette. Double-click a tab again to return the window to its full size.
■
■
To move a floating palette window, drag it by the title bar.
To choose a command from a palette menu:
Position the pointer over the triangle in the upper right corner of the palette,
hold down the mouse button to open the menu, and drag to the command
you want.
Press on the triangle in a palette to open a palette menu.
Creating PDF documents
You begin the Acrobat process by converting existing documents or source
material to PDF. Acrobat creates a copy of the source material in PDF (it does
not alter the original material). The source material can be in a variety of
formats:
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Electronic files from applications To convert an electronic file to PDF, you can
drag and drop the file to Acrobat, use the Create PDF command or Acrobat
icon in a Microsoft Office application, “print” the file to PDF from another application, or (in Windows) simply open the file in Acrobat. You can also set a
variety of options that precisely control the fonts, colors, compression, and
other characteristics of your converted files. See Chapter 2, Converting
Electronic Files to PDF for details.
Web pages (Windows) In Acrobat, you can collect one page or all pages from
any portion of a Web site. The Web pages are converted to one PDF document
and maintain all the original links. You can click the links to download more
pages or to go to a URL on the Web. See Chapter 5, Converting Web Pages to
PDF (Windows) for details.
Printed pages You can run a scanner from Acrobat to convert printed pages to
an image-only form of PDF, which stores a bitmap picture of the pages. If you
want to be able to search, index, and correct text on the pages, you can use the
Paper Capture feature to turn the file into a full-text searchable PDF file.
Acrobat performs optical character recognition (OCR) on the pages to convert
them from PDF Image Only to searchable PDF Normal. See Chapter 4,
Converting Scanned Documents to PDF for details.
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Image files Import image files into Acrobat to convert them to a PDF image.
Acrobat can import many common graphic file formats, including TIFF, BMP,
PCX, GIF, and JPEG. If the imported images have text and if you’d like to make
them full-text searchable, use the Paper Capture feature to convert the pages
from PDF Image Only to searchable PDF Normal. See Converting image files to
PDF for details.
Opening PDF documents
The creator of a PDF document can set the document to open in a variety of
ways. For example, a document might open to a particular page number, at a
particular magnification, or with the bookmarks or thumbnails visible.
If a document is set to open in Full Screen view, the tool bar, command bar,
menu bar, and window controls are not visible. You can exit Full Screen view by
pressing Escape, if your preferences are set this way, or by pressing Ctrl+L
(Windows) or Command+L (Mac OS). For more on this view, see Reading
documents in Full Screen view.
To open a PDF document:
Do one of the following:
■ Click the Open button
, or choose File > Open. In the Open dialog box,
select the filename, and click Open. PDF documents usually have the
extension .pdf.
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Choose the document’s filename from the File menu. The menu lists the four
PDF documents you last opened.
■
■
Double-click the file icon in your file system.
Note: On Mac OS, you may not be able to open a PDF document created in
Windows by double-clicking the icon. If double-clicking the icon on Mac OS
does not open the document, use File > Open in Acrobat to open the document,
close the document, and try again. After you’ve used the Open command once
on the document, you’ll be able to open the document next time by doubleclicking.
Adjusting the view of PDF documents
You can change the magnification level of a PDF document and set a page
layout that determines whether you’ll see one page at a time or a continuous
flow of pages.
Magnifying and reducing the view
The minimum and maximum zoom levels available depend on the current
page size.
If you need to magnify a page to a size larger than the window, use the hand
tool
to move the page around so that you can view all the areas on it.
Moving a PDF page with the hand tool is like moving a piece of paper on a desk
with your hand.
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To increase magnification:
Do one of the following:
■
Select the zoom-in tool
, and click the page.
Select the zoom-in tool, and drag to draw a rectangle, called a marquee,
around the area to magnify.
■
Click the Magnification button
cation level.
■
in the status bar, and choose a magnifi-
To decrease magnification:
Do one of the following:
■
Select the zoom-out tool
, and click the page.
■ Select the zoom-out tool, and drag to draw a marquee the size you want the
reduced page to be.
Click the Magnification button
cation level.
■
in the status bar, and choose a magnifi-
Note: When the zoom-in tool is selected, you can press Ctrl (Windows) or
Option (Mac OS) while clicking or dragging to zoom out instead of in. When the
zoom-out tool is selected, press Ctrl or Option to zoom in.
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To change the magnification level using a thumbnail:
Position the pointer over the lower right corner of the red page-view box in the
thumbnail until the pointer changes to a double arrow . Then drag the
corner of the box to reduce or expand the view of the page.
To resize a page to fit the window:
Do one of the following:
■
To resize the page to fit entirely in the window, click the Fit In Window button
, or choose View > Fit in Window.
■
To resize the page to fit the width of the window, click the Fit Width button
, or choose View > Fit Width. Part of the page may be out of view.
■ To resize the page so that its text and graphics fit the width of the window,
choose View > Fit Visible. Part of the page may be out of view.
To return a page to its actual size:
Click the Actual Size button , or choose View > Actual Size. The actual size for
a PDF page is typically 100%, but the document creator may have set it to
another magnification level.
Setting the page layout
You can use three page layouts when viewing PDF documents:
■
Single Page layout displays one page in the document pane at a time.
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■
Continuous layout arranges the pages in a continuous vertical column.
Continuous - Facing layout arranges the pages side by side. This configuration accommodates a two-page spread display and multiple-page viewing in
the window. If a document has more than two pages, the first page is displayed
on the right to ensure proper display of two-page spreads.
■
Single Page layout, Continuous layout, Continuous - Facing layout
In Single Page layout, the Edit > Select All command selects all text on the
current page. In Continuous and Continuous - Facing layouts, it selects all text
in the PDF document.
To set page layout:
Do one of the following:
■
Click the Page Layout button
in the status bar, and choose a page layout.
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Choose Single Page, Continuous, or Continuous - Facing from the View
menu.
■
To see two-page spreads most efficiently, use the Continuous - Facing page
layout, and choose View > Fit Width.
Reading documents in Full Screen view
In Full Screen view, PDF pages fill the entire screen; the menu bar, command
bar, tool bar, status bar, and window controls are hidden. A document creator
can set a PDF document to open in Full Screen view, or you can set the view for
yourself. Full Screen view is often used for presentations, sometimes with
automatic page advancement and transitions.
The pointer remains active in Full Screen view so that you can click links and
open notes. You can use keyboard shortcuts for navigational and magnification
commands, even though the menus and tool bar are not visible. You can also
set preferences to define how Full Screen view appears on your system.
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To read a document in Full Screen view:
Choose View > Full Screen. Press Return or the Down or Right Arrow key to
page through the document. Press Shift-Return or the Up or Left Arrow key to
page backward through the document.
Note: If you’re using Mac OS and have two monitors installed, the Full Screen
view of a page appears on only one screen. To page through the document,
click the screen displaying the page in Full Screen mode.
To exit Full Screen view:
Press Escape, if your Full Screen preferences are defined this way, or press
Ctrl+L (Windows) or Command+L (Mac OS).
To set preferences for Full Screen view:
1 Choose File > Preferences > Full Screen.
2 Select the navigation options:
Advance Every specifies whether to advance automatically from page to
page every set number of seconds. You can page through a document using
mouse or keyboard commands even if automatic paging is selected.
■
Advance On Any Click lets you page through a PDF document by clicking the
mouse. If this is not selected, you can page through a document by pressing
Return, Shift-Return (to go backward), or the arrow keys.
■
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Loop After Last Page lets you page through a PDF document continuously,
returning to the first page after the last. This option is typically used for setting
up kiosk displays.
■
Escape Key Exits lets you exit Full Screen view by pressing the Escape key. If
this is not selected, you can exit by pressing Ctrl+L (Windows) or Command+L
(Mac OS).
■
3 Choose the appearance options:
Background Color specifies the window’s background color. If you choose
Custom, the system color palette is displayed. See your computer’s user guide
for instructions on setting a custom color.
■
■ Default Transition specifies the transition effect to display when you switch
pages in Full Screen view.
Mouse Cursor specifies whether to show or hide the cursor in Full Screen
view.
■
■ Zoom To (Mac OS) selects a monitor to use for Full Screen view when two
monitors are installed. You can choose Main (for the monitor with the menu
bar), Largest Intersection (for the monitor that displays the largest portion of
the document), Deepest (for the monitor with the most colors), Widest (for the
monitor with the greatest horizontal resolution), Tallest (for the monitor with
the greatest vertical resolution), or Largest Area (for the monitor with the
most pixels).
4 Click OK.
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Navigating in PDF documents
You can navigate in PDF documents by paging through them or by using
navigational structures. You can also retrace your steps through documents to
return to where you started.
Paging through documents
Acrobat provides buttons, keyboard shortcuts, and menu commands for
paging through a PDF document.
Note: If you use the number keys on your keyboard’s number pad, make sure
Num Lock is off.
To go to another page:
Do one of the following:
To go to the next page, click the Next Page button in the command bar or
status bar, press the Right Arrow key, press Ctrl (Windows) or Option (Mac OS)
and the Down Arrow key, or choose Document > Next Page.
■
■ To go to the previous page, click the Previous Page button
in the
command bar or status bar, press the Left Arrow key, press Ctrl (Windows) or
Option (Mac OS) and the Up Arrow key, or choose Document > Previous Page.
■
To move down one line, press the Down Arrow key.
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■
To move up one line, press the Up Arrow key.
Note: The Down and Up Arrow keys move you one line at a time when you are
not in Fit in Window view. In Fit in Window view, these keys move you one page
at a time.
■
To move down one screenful, press Page Down or Return.
■
To move up one screenful, press Page Up or Shift+Return.
■ To go to the first page, click the First Page button
in the command bar or
status bar, press the Home key, or choose Document > First Page.
To go to the last page, click the Last Page button
in the command bar or
the status bar, press the End key, or choose Document > Last Page.
■
To jump to a page by its number:
Do one of the following:
Select the current page number in the status bar, type the page number to
jump to, and press Return.
■
If the Use Logical Page Numbers option is selected in General preferences, and
if your document’s page numbers are different from the page position in the
PDF file, the page position appears in parentheses in the status bar. For
example, if a first page is numbered “iii”, the numbering might appear as “iii(1 of
10)”. You can double-click inside the parentheses, edit the page-position
number, and press Return to go to that page.
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■
Choose Document > Go To Page, type the page number, and click OK.
If the Use Logical Page Numbers option is selected in General preferences, and
your document’s page numbers are different from the page position in the PDF
file, you can enter the page-position number in parentheses in Go To Page to
go to that page.
Drag the vertical scroll bar until the number of the page you want to jump to
is displayed.
■
Browsing with navigational structures
Acrobat offers a wide range of navigational structures to help you move to
specific places in PDF documents:
■ Bookmarks provide a visual table of contents and usually represent the
chapters, sections, and other organizational items in a document.
Thumbnails provide miniature previews of document pages. You can use
thumbnails to edit pages, to change the display of pages, and to go to other
pages. A red page-view box in a thumbnail indicates the area of the page
currently showing in the document pane.
■
Links take you to specific locations another user (usually the document
creator) has defined; these locations can be in the current document, in other
electronic files, or in Web sites. A link usually points to a titled section or other
organizational item.
■
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Articles are electronic threads that lead you through a document. An article
typically begins on one page and continues on another, just as articles do in
traditional newspapers and magazines. When you read an article, Acrobat
zooms in or out so the current part of the article fills the screen.
■
Destinations are links that take you to locations a user has defined. Generally,
these links go to other documents.
■
To browse with a bookmark:
1 Show the Bookmarks palette. You may need to choose Window > Show
Bookmarks to open the palette or click the Bookmarks tab to bring the palette
to the front of its group.
2 To jump to a topic using its bookmark, click the bookmark’s icon or text in
the palette.
Note: Clicking a bookmark might perform an action, such as playing a movie,
instead of taking you to another location. It depends on how the bookmark
was defined.
The bookmark for the part of the document currently showing is boldfaced.
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Bookmarks can be subordinate to other bookmarks in their hierarchy; a higher
level bookmark in this relationship is the parent, and a lower level bookmark is
the child. You can collapse a parent bookmark in the palette to hide all its
children. When a parent bookmark is collapsed, it has a plus sign (Windows) or
a triangle (Mac OS) next to it. If the bookmark you want to click is hidden in a
collapsed parent, click the plus sign or triangle next to the parent to show it.
To select the bookmark for the part of the document showing in the
document pane, choose Find Current Bookmark from the Bookmarks palette
menu, or click the find current bookmark icon
at the bottom of the palette. If
the bookmark is hidden in a collapsed parent, the parent bookmark is opened
so you can see the selected bookmark.
To browse with a thumbnail:
1 Show the Thumbnails palette. You may need to choose Window > Show
Thumbnails to open the palette or click the Thumbnails tab to bring the palette
to the front of its group.
2 Do one of the following:
■
To jump to another page, double-click the page’s thumbnail.
To display another part of the current page, position the pointer over the edge
of the page-view box in the page’s thumbnail until the pointer changes to a
hand tool
. Then drag the box to move the view area.
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To follow a link:
1 Select the hand tool
, a zoom tool, or a selection tool.
2 Position the pointer over the linked area on the page until the pointer
changes to a hand with a pointing finger
. (The hand has a plus sign in it if
the links point to the Web.) Then click the link.
Note: Clicking a link might perform an action, such as playing a movie, instead
of taking you to another location. It depends on how the link was defined.
To read an article:
1 Do one of the following:
Show the Articles palette. Then double-click the article’s icon in the palette to
start reading at the beginning of the article.
■
Select the hand tool
. Then click in the article to start reading it at that
point, or press Ctrl (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) and click anywhere in the
article to start reading at the beginning.
■
2 The pointer changes to the follow article pointer
the article:
. Navigate through
■
To go to the next page in the article, press Return or click.
■
To go to the previous page, press Shift-Return, or press Shift and click.
■ To go to the beginning of the article, press Ctrl (Windows) or Option (Mac
OS) and click.
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To exit the article before reaching the end, press Shift-Ctrl (Windows) or
Shift-Option (Mac OS) and click.
■
3 When you reach the end of the article, the pointer changes to the end article
pointer
. Press Return or click to return to the view displayed before you
started reading the article.
To follow a destination:
1 Show the Destinations palette. You may need to choose Window > Show
Destinations to open the palette or click the Destinations tab to bring the
palette to the front of its group.
2 Choose Scan Document from the Destinations palette menu, or click the
Scan Document button
at the bottom of the palette.
3 To change the sort order of names in the palette, do one of the following:
Click the Name bar at the top of the Destinations palette to list the destinations alphabetically by name.
■
■ Click the Page bar at the top of the Destinations palette to list the destinations by their order in the document.
4 To jump to a topic using its destination, right-click (Windows) or Controlclick (Mac OS) the destination in the palette, and choose Go To Destination
from the context menu.
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Retracing your viewing path
After you have paged through documents or used navigational structures to
move through documents, you can retrace your path back to where you
started. You can go 64 steps back in Acrobat, or 32 steps back for documents in
external browser windows.
To retrace your viewing path:
Do one or more of the following:
To retrace your path within a PDF document, click the Go To Previous View
button in the command bar, or choose Document > Go Back for each step
back. Or click the Go To Next View button , or choose Document > Go
Forward for each step forward.
■
To retrace your viewing path through other PDF documents, choose
Document > Go Back Doc for each step back or Document > Go Forward Doc
for each step forward. Or hold down Shift, and click the Go Back or Go Forward
button. This command opens the other PDF documents if the documents
are closed.
■
Finding words in PDF documents
You can use the Find command to find a complete word or part of a word in the
current PDF document. Acrobat looks for the word by reading every word on
every page in the file, including text in form fields.
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If a full-text index has been created for your PDF document, you can search the
index for a word rather than using the Find command. A full-text index is an
alphabetized list of all the words used in a document or, more typically, in a
collection of documents. Searching with an index is much faster than using the
Find command, because when Acrobat looks for a word in the index it goes
right to the word in the list rather than reading through the documents. See
Chapter 12, Searching Catalog Indexes for more information.
To find a word using the Find command:
1 Click the Find button
, or choose Edit > Find.
2 Enter the text to find in the text box.
3 Select search options if necessary:
Match Whole Word Only finds only occurrences of the complete word you
enter in the text box. For example, if you search for the word stick, the words
tick and sticky will not be highlighted.
■
■ Match Case finds only words that contain exactly the same capitalization you
enter in the text box.
Find Backwards starts the search from the current page and goes backward
through the document.
■
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Distinguish Between Full And Half Width Kana finds only those Kana
characters that exactly match the text you enter. This option is available only in
the Japanese version of Acrobat.
■
4 Click Find. Acrobat finds the next occurrence of the word.
To find the next occurrence of the word:
Do one of the following:
■
Choose Edit > Find Again.
Reopen the Find dialog box, and click Find Again. (The word must already be
in the Find text box.)
■
Getting information on PDF documents
When you view a PDF document, you can get information on the file, such as
the title, the fonts used, and any security settings. Some of this information is
set by the person who created the document, and some is generated by
Acrobat. You can change any of the information that can be set by the
document creator (unless the file has been saved with security settings that do
not allow you to change the document).
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To get information on the current document:
Choose from the File > Document Info menu or from the document pane
menu to open an information dialog box. (You can open only the General,
Security, and Font dialog boxes from the document pane menu.)
General shows basic information about the document. The title, subject,
author, and keywords may have been set by the document creator and can be
changed. If you create an index in Acrobat, you can search for these items in
Acrobat to find particular documents.
■
Note: Acrobat Catalog and many Web search engines use the title to describe
the document in their search results list. If a PDF file does not have a title, the
filename appears in the results list instead. A file’s title is not necessarily the
same as its filename.
The binding option affects how the pages are arranged side by side when you
view pages using the Continuous - Facing page layout. This is provided so that
the arrangement of pages will match the reading direction (left to right or right
to left) of text in the document. Right Edge binding is useful for viewing Arabic
or Hebrew text or vertical Japanese text. You can change this setting.
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Some information is generated by Acrobat and cannot be modified. This
includes the application that created the original document, the Acrobat utility
that produced the PDF file, the date and time the PDF file was created and last
changed, whether the file was optimized for online Web viewing, the file size,
and the PDF version number. Acrobat generates this information from
comments in the PostScript file.
■ Open describes the opening view of the PDF document. This includes the
initial window size, the opening page number and magnification level, and
whether bookmarks, thumbnails, the tool bar, and the menu bar are displayed.
You can change any of these settings to control how the document displays
the next time it is opened.
Fonts lists the fonts and the font types used in the original document, and
the fonts, font types, and encoding used in Acrobat to display the original
fonts. Only the fonts viewed in the document so far are listed. To see a list of all
fonts used in the entire document, click List All Fonts.
■
Note: You can look at this dialog box to see what fonts were used in the
original document and whether the same fonts are used in Acrobat. If
substitute fonts are used and you aren’t satisfied with their appearance, you
may want to install the original fonts on your system or ask the document
creator to recreate the document with the original fonts embedded in it.
Security shows whether or not the file has passwords and describes other
security settings.
■
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Prepress gives information about the document that may be helpful in a
prepress workflow. The Trapping pop-up menu describes whether trapping has
been applied to the file; this information can be used by prepress software to
determine whether to apply trapping to the file at print time. The Print 4 Color
setting tells whether four-color ICC profiles should be treated as devicedependent CMYK.
■
■ Index gives the name of an autoindex associated with the file. Opening the
file adds the associated index to the list of indexes that can be searched. The
Browse button in this dialog box allows you to mount a different index for
the file.
■ Base URL displays the base Uniform Resource Locator (URL) set for Weblinks
in the document. Specifying a base URL makes it easy for you to manage
Weblinks to other Web sites. If the URL to the other site changes, you can
simply edit the base URL and not have to edit each individual Weblink that
refers to that site. The base URL is not used if a link already contains a complete
URL address.
Printing PDF documents
You can specify a range of pages to print in the Acrobat Print dialog box, or you
can specify noncontiguous pages or a particular page area to print before
opening the dialog box.
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To print a PDF document:
1 If necessary, do one of the following:
■ To select pages to print, click thumbnails in the Thumbnails palette. You can
Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) thumbnails to select noncontiguous pages, or Shift-click to select a contiguous range of pages. You can
also select a contiguous page range in the Print dialog box.
■ To select an area on a page to print, select the graphics select tool
drag on the page to draw the area you want.
, and
2 Use File > Page Setup to set general printing options. The available options
will vary with different printers and drivers. See your printer driver documentation for details.
3 Click the Print button
, or choose File > Print. Specify the printer, page
range, number of copies, and other options, and click OK. Most of the options
are the same as they are for other applications, but note the following:
■ Selected Pages Or Selected Graphic (Windows) or Selected Thumbnails/
Graphic (Mac OS) prints only the pages or page area you selected before
opening the Print dialog box.
Page From/To prints a range of pages. In Windows, if the Use Logical Page
Numbers option is selected in General preferences, you can enter pageposition numbers in parentheses to print those pages. For example, if the first
page of a document is numbered “iii”, you can enter (1) to print that page.
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Annotations prints Acrobat annotation graphics on the pages. The annotations are always printed as closed, even if they are open on the pages online.
■
■ Fit To Page scales pages up or down (and if necessary rotates them) to fit
the paper size currently installed in your printer. This is not available in most
other applications.
Print As Image (Windows) prints the pages as bitmap images. (In Mac OS, this
is set in the Print Method pop-up menu.) You may want to print pages as
images if they have too many fonts to print as PostScript or if the pages use
non-embedded Asian fonts not available on your system.
■
Print Method, in Windows, specifies which level of PostScript to generate for
the pages. Choose the level of PostScript appropriate for your printer. In Mac
OS, this specifies whether to print using PostScript (without selecting level) or
to print pages as bitmap images.
■
Force Language Level 3 (Mac OS) prints the pages using LanguageLevel 3
PostScript. Select this option if you’re printing PostScript to a file rather than to
a printer and you want to use LanguageLevel 3 PostScript. (When you send
PDF to a printer, let the printer driver specify what level of PostScript to use.)
This is available only when you choose PostScript in the Print Method pop-up
menu; if you choose PostScript in the menu and do not select this option,
PostScript Level 2 is used.
■
Download Asian Fonts downloads Asian fonts to a PostScript printer. Select
this option if you want to print a PDF document with Asian fonts but do not
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have the fonts installed on the printer and do not have the fonts embedded in
the document. (Embedded fonts are downloaded whether or not this option is
selected.) You can use this option with a PostScript Level 2 or higher printer, or
a Level 1 printer that supports Type 0 font extensions.
Note: Some fonts cannot be downloaded to a printer, either because the font is
a bitmap or because embedding of the font is restricted in that document. In
these cases, a substitute font is used for printing, and the printed output may
not match the screen display exactly. See Previewing substituted fonts for information on seeing what substituted fonts will look like on another system.
If Download Asian Fonts is not selected, the PDF document prints correctly
only if the referenced fonts are installed on the printer. If the fonts are not on
the printer but the printer has similar fonts, the printer substitutes the similar
fonts. If there are no suitable fonts on the printer, Courier is used for the text.
If you have a PostScript Level 1 printer that does not support Type 0 font extensions, or if Download Asian Fonts does not produce the results you want, print
the PDF document as a bitmap image. Printing a document as an image may
take longer than using a substituted printer font.
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Use Printer Halftone Screens prints halftones using the printer’s halftone
screens. If you do not select this option, the halftones are printed using
halftone information from the PDF file.
■
Note: If Use Printer Halftone Screens is not selected, and if the halftone information sent to the printer from the PDF file is not appropriate for that printer,
the screens may produce “muddy” images.
Setting Acrobat preferences
You can use preferences to define a default page layout, set an author name for
annotations, select a browser for Weblinks, and customize Acrobat in many
other ways. General preferences settings are described here. For information
on other sets of preferences, see the index.
Note: These preferences control the Acrobat application on your system; they
are not associated with a particular document.
To open a preferences dialog box:
Choose a dialog box from the File > Preferences menu.
To set General preferences:
Choose File > Preferences > General, or choose Preferences from the document
pane menu. Define a default page layout, a color management system, and
other basic options, and click OK.
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Default Page Layout sets a page layout used for scrolling when you first open
a document. You can display pages one at a time as you scroll, continuously
one above the next, or continuously side by side.
■
Page Units specifies a unit of measure for displaying page size in the status
bar and in the Crop dialog box.
■
Substitution Fonts specifies multiple master fonts that Acrobat uses to
substitute for Type 1 and TrueType fonts not available on your computer. If
PDF documents do not print because of insufficient printer memory, choose
Sans from the Substitution Fonts pop-up menu. If you change this setting, the
change takes effect the next time you start Windows or your Macintosh.
■
™
■ Application Language sets a language for the Acrobat user interface. The
pop-up menu shows the languages you installed with Acrobat. If you choose
a different language, the change takes effect the next time you start the
application.
■ Use Greek Text Below displays text below the designated point size as gray
lines (or greeked text) to speed display time.
Smooth Text And Images smooths the edges of text and monochrome
images to minimize the contrast between the background and the text or
image. This sometimes improves the quality of the display on-screen, especially
with larger text sizes.
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Display Large Images displays images larger than 128K. If you do not select
this option, a gray box appears in place of a large image. Selecting this option
can slow down paging through a document.
■
Display Page To Edge prints PDF documents to the edge of the pages. If you
do not select this option, pages from PDF documents are printed with a white
border, as defined by the printer driver.
■
■ Use Logical Page Numbers allows you to set page numbering in a PDF
document using the Document > Number Pages command. You typically do
this when you want PDF page numbering to match the numbering printed on
the pages. A page’s number, followed by the page position in parentheses,
appears in the status bar and in the Go To Page, Delete Pages, and Print dialog
boxes. For example, if the first page in a document is numbered “i”, it might
appear as “i(1 of 10)”. If this option is not selected, Acrobat ignores page
numbering information in documents and numbers pages using arabic
numbers starting at 1.
Default Zoom sets the magnification level for PDF documents when they are
first opened. This affects only documents that have Default set for their magnification in Document Info > Open.
■
■ Max “Fit Visible” sets the maximum magnification level for the Fit Visible view
and for viewing articles.
Color chooses a color management system for interpreting color accurately
across devices. See Setting color options for information on how a color
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management system works with an ICC profile tagged to an image in a PDF
document.
■ Allow Background Downloading allows a PDF document to continue
downloading from the Web, even after the first requested page displays onscreen in a Netscape Navigator-compatible browser. If you do not select this
option, only the requested page downloads to your computer, and other pages
are downloaded as you request them.
Note: You will get unexpected results from the Go Back command in your Web
browser if you do not select this option. For example, if you link to another
document from a partially downloaded PDF document and then want to
return to that document by using Go Back, you return to the first page of the
PDF document, even if you were not on the first page. This option should
alleviate most cases of unexpected Go Back behavior in your Web browser.
Display Splash Screen At Startup shows the splash screen each time Acrobat
is started.
■
Display Open Dialog At Startup shows the Open dialog box each time
Acrobat is started.
■
Open Cross-Doc Links In Same Window opens linked PDF documents and
views in one window to minimize the number of windows open in Acrobat. If
you do not select this option, a new window is opened for each new Go To
View link. If a linked document is open when a Go To View link to it from
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another document is activated, the document remains open in a separate
window.
Note: To override this setting, either selected or deselected, you can press Ctrl
(Windows) or Option (Mac OS) when clicking a link.
Use Page Cache places the next page in a buffer even before you view the
page in Acrobat. This reduces the amount of time it takes to page through
a document.
■
Allow File Open Links warns you of security risks when you open a file in
another application from a link in a PDF document and gives you a chance to
cancel the operation. If this option is not selected, links to files in other applications are disabled.
■
Web Browser Integration (Windows) displays PDF documents in your Web
browser when viewing PDF documents on the Web. If you do not select this
option, the documents display in Acrobat as a helper application to the Web
browser. See Configuring Web browsers for viewing PDF for more information
on viewing PDF documents on the Web.
■
Skip Editing Warnings disables warning boxes when you delete notes, links,
pages, thumbnails, bookmarks, and other items in PDF documents.
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Viewing PDF documents on the Web
You can view PDF documents that are on the World Wide Web or an intranet
using a Web browser. Every document on the Web is identified by a unique
address called a Uniform Resource Locator (URL). When a PDF document is
stored on the Web, you can click a URL link to it to open the document in your
Web browser. You can also read PDF documents that are embedded in HTML
pages on the Web.
Reading PDF documents in a Web browser
PDF documents can display in Web browsers compatible with Netscape
Navigator 3.0 (or later) or Internet Explorer 3.0 (or later). The necessary plug-ins
are automatically installed when you install Acrobat. For information on
getting your browser ready, see Configuring Web browsers for viewing PDF.
When you view a PDF document in a Web browser, all of the Acrobat Reader
tools are available in the browser. In Windows, you can click the two small
vertical lines (next to the Adobe icon at the left of the tool bar) to minimize or
maximize the tool bar.
Note: Many keyboard commands are mapped to the Web browser rather than
to Acrobat, so some Acrobat keyboard shortcuts may not be available in the
browser window.
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Searching in a Web browser
Some Web search engines index PDF documents as well as HTML documents
on Web servers. And some search engines support PDF search highlighting,
although not all search engines that support PDF indexing support search
highlighting.
If you visit a Web site that uses a search engine that indexes PDF documents,
your search results list may include PDF documents. If the Web site uses a
search engine that supports PDF search highlighting, and if you open one of
the PDF documents in the search results list, the Highlight Next
and
Highlight Previous
buttons activate on the Acrobat command bar in your
Web browser. The search term is also highlighted in the document.
To go to the next search hit, click the Highlight Next button. To go to the
previous hit, click the Highlight Previous button. These two commands jump
across PDF documents, but not across HTML documents.
Reading PDF documents embedded in HTML
HTML pages can include embedded PDF documents. An embedded PDF
document normally displays an image of the first page of the document in the
HTML document. The PDF document can be configured by the HTML author to
display, when clicked, in a separate window. The document displays in a
browser window or in an Acrobat window, depending on how you have
configured your browser.
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If an embedded PDF file is not configured to open in a separate window, you
can interact with the file in a browser compatible with Internet Explorer, but
not one compatible with Netscape Navigator. For example, links would not be
active in a PDF file displayed embedded in HTML in Netscape Navigator, but
they would be active in Internet Explorer. For more information, see
Embedding PDF documents in HTML using the <EMBED> tag.
Configuring Web browsers for viewing PDF
You can view PDF documents in Web browsers compatible with Netscape
Navigator 3.0 (or later) or Internet Explorer 3.0 (or later). The Web browser you
use, the Web server, and several other factors determine how your system
handles the PDF documents.
About viewing PDF documents on the Web
Here are four possible scenarios for viewing PDF on the Web:
The browser supports PDF viewing, the PDF file is optimized, and the Web
server supports page-at-a time downloading (byte-serving), so the PDF file
downloads a page at a time and displays in the Web browser window. This is
the fastest scenario possible for viewing PDF documents on the Web.
■
The browser supports PDF viewing, but the PDF file is not optimized or the
server does not support byte-serving, so the entire PDF file downloads to the
machine with the browser and then appears within the browser window.
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The browser supports PDF viewing, and PDF files are embedded in an HTML
page. An ActiveX browser such as Internet Explorer supports navigating
through the document. Netscape Navigator-compatible browsers can display
the PDF document within an HTML page, but require a link to a full-window
view for navigation.
■
Acrobat or Acrobat Reader is configured as a helper application for the
browser, and the browser may support PDF viewing within the browser
window. The entire PDF file downloads to the machine with the browser, and
the Acrobat viewer launches as a separate application and displays the PDF
document.
■
Enabling page-at-a-time downloading
With page-at-a-time downloading (byte-serving), the Web server sends only
the requested page of information to the user, not the entire PDF document. As
a reader of the PDF document, you do not have to do anything to make this
happen; it is communicated in the background between Acrobat and the Web
server. If you want the entire PDF document to continue downloading in the
background while you view the first page of requested information, be sure
Allow Background Downloading is selected in the General preferences dialog
box (default). For more information, see Setting Acrobat preferences.
If your Web server does not support page-at-a-time downloading, you can use
a CGI application to do it.
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Setting up Acrobat as a helper application
If your Web browser does not display PDF documents in the browser window,
or if you prefer not to view PDF documents in the Web browser, you can set up
Acrobat as a helper application in your browser’s preferences. Then, when you
view a PDF document on the Web, Acrobat will start and display the document.
When Acrobat works as a helper application, you cannot use page-at-a-time
downloading, form submittal in a browser, or search highlighting on the Web,
and you cannot view embedded PDF documents.
To set up your Web browser to recognize PDF files, you must define a MIME
type and a file type. The file type should be pdf. The MIME type should be
application/pdf. See your browser’s documentation for information on configuring it.
If you are using Netscape Navigator 2.0 or later with Windows or on a
Macintosh, and if you want to use Acrobat as a helper application, rename the
PDFViewer plug-in or delete it from the Netscape plug-in folder. The plug-in is
named nppdf32.dll (Windows) or PDFViewer (Mac OS).
To use Acrobat as a helper application in Windows:
1 Choose File > Preferences > General.
2 Select Web Browser Integration and click OK.
Note: This is not necessary in Mac OS.
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Installing the Web browser plug-in
Browsers compatible with Netscape Navigator need the nppdf32.dll file
(Windows) or PDFViewer plug-in (Mac OS) to display PDF. When you install
Acrobat, this plug-in is automatically installed in the Netscape plug-in folder, if
you have Navigator on your system. If you install Navigator after installing
Acrobat, or if you’re using another browser compatible with Navigator, you can
install this plug-in yourself.
To install the Web browser plug-in (Windows):
1 Open the Browser folder in the Acrobat folder.
2 Copy the nppdf32.dll file to your Web browser’s plug-ins folder.
To install the Web browser plug-in (Mac OS):
1 Open the Web Browser Plug-in folder in the Acrobat folder.
2 Copy the PDFViewer plug-in to your Web browser’s plug-ins folder.
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Converting Electronic Files to PDF
You can use Acrobat to convert an electronic file from virtually any application
to the Portable Document Format (PDF). Acrobat can use two different
utilities—PDFWriter and Acrobat Distiller—to make this conversion for you. In
general, PDFWriter converts files more quickly, but Distiller gives you more
control over the process and provides higher quality output.
About the methods of converting files
Acrobat provides several ways to convert electronic files to PDF. Use whichever
method yields the most suitable PDF output and is most convenient for
your situation:
In the Windows desktop, drag a file’s icon onto the Acrobat icon or a shortcut
Distiller icon or into the Acrobat application window. In the Mac OS desktop,
drag a file’s icon onto the PDFWriter icon or the Acrobat PDF icon. See Creating
PDF files with PDFWriter and Creating PDF files with Distiller for details.
■
In a Microsoft Office application in Windows, use a File menu command or an
Acrobat icon on the Microsoft tool bar to create a PDF file from the current
document in one quick step. Acrobat installs macros in Microsoft Word, Excel,
and PowerPoint on your system to enable this. See Converting files to PDF in
Microsoft applications (Windows) for details.
■
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In the Windows version of Acrobat, use the File > Open command to open a
file from another application. Acrobat converts the file to PDF and opens it in
one step. This method always uses Distiller to make the conversion. See
Creating PDF files with Distiller for details.
■
In an authoring application, use the File > Print command with an Acrobat
printer driver to “print” the current document as PDF. See Creating PDF files
with PDFWriter and Creating PDF files with Distiller for details.
■
In some authoring applications, including Adobe FrameMaker and Adobe
PageMaker , use a Save or Export command to create a PDF file from the
current document. See the documentation that came with your application for
information on converting files this way.
■
®
®
Create a PostScript file from a document, and then use Distiller to convert
that file to PDF. This requires more manual steps than the other methods but
gives you better control over the conversion settings. You can also convert
PostScript files to PDF as a batch process and combine multiple PostScript files
into a single PDF file. See Converting PostScript files to PDF, Using watched
folders to convert PostScript to PDF, and Combining multiple PostScript files
into one PDF file for details.
■
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About the Portable Document Format (PDF)
PDF is a file format that represents a document in a manner independent of the
hardware, operating system, and application software used to create the file.
Adobe Systems developed PDF to enable documents to be transferred and
shared across computer platforms. This section gives some background on how
PDF works. For more detailed information, see the Portable Document Format
Reference Manual, available from the Adobe Web site (www.adobe.com).
You do not need to understand how PDF works to be able to use Acrobat.
Properties of PDF
Here are some highlights of how documents are stored in PDF:
■ PDF represents text and graphics by using the imaging model of the
PostScript language. Like a PostScript program, a PDF page description draws
a page by placing “paint” on selected areas, which allows for device independence and resolution independence.
■ PDF files are extremely portable across diverse hardware and operatingsystem environments. PDF makes use of binary as well as ASCII-encoded data.
To reduce file size, PDF supports JPEG, CCITT Group 3, CCITT Group 4, ZIP, and
LZW industry-standard compression filters.
■
■ PDF files contain information necessary for either displaying embedded fonts
or for font substitution. A PDF file contains a font descriptor for each font used
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in the document. The font descriptor includes the font name, character metrics,
and style information. If a font used in a document is available on the computer
on which the document is viewed, or if it’s embedded in the PDF file, it is used.
If the font is not available or is not embedded, a special serif or sans serif
Multiple Master font is used to simulate the font. This solution applies to Type 1
fonts and to fonts in the TrueType format. Symbol fonts and Expert fonts are
automatically embedded or converted to graphics.
PDF font substitution does not cause documents to reformat. Substitute
fonts created from serif and sans serif Multiple Master fonts retain the width
and height of the original characters.
■
■ A PDF file contains a cross-reference table that can be used to locate and
directly access pages and other important objects in the file. Because it uses
this cross-reference table (called xref ), the time needed to view a given page
can be nearly independent of the total number of pages in a document.
■ PDF is designed to be extensible; that is, new features can easily be added to
the file format through the plug-in architecture. (Plug-ins are software
programs that add functionality to a base program such as Acrobat.)
PDF file construction
PDF files are constructed in layers:
■
One layer contains the text and image content of the document.
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A second layer contains enhancements, such as bookmarks, hypertext links,
and article information.
■
■ A third layer contains basic information about the file, such as font information and the cross-reference table needed for navigating the PDF file.
Because of this layered construction, you can replace pages in a PDF file while
retaining established links. When you replace a page, you remove the content
layer but not the enhancement layer, so the enhancement information is
retained. This reduces the amount of work it takes to maintain the electronic
document, because you do not have to recreate the links.
About PDFWriter and Distiller
Acrobat can use either PDFWriter or Distiller to convert your files to PDF. Both
utilities are included in the default Acrobat installation. PDFWriter is a printer
driver that converts files directly to PDF from another software application.
Distiller is a tool that converts PostScript files to PDF, and in many cases it
provides higher quality output than PDFWriter. (In some installations, Distiller
can also convert the original file to PostScript and then convert the PostScript
to PDF.) PDFWriter is often quicker to use than Distiller.
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Your workflow process and the file’s type and contents may determine which
utility is most suitable for your purposes. If you’re converting simple business
memos and other documents that have only text, either utility should be
acceptable. But if you need precise control over the conversion process, or if
you’re converting documents with rich graphical content, Distiller is more
appropriate than PDFWriter.
Susan Hall
A document appropriate for PDFWriter and one appropriate for Distiller
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When to use PDFWriter
PDFWriter is a printer driver that converts files to PDF quickly. It is most suitable
for documents that contain mainly text. Here are a few guidelines that can help
you decide when to use PDFWriter:
■ You’re converting simple business documents, such as those created with
Microsoft Word or Excel.
■
Your documents do not contain Encapsulated PostScript (EPS) graphics.
■
Your system has a limited amount of RAM.
■
You want to produce PDF files more quickly than you can with Distiller.
For information on using PDFWriter, see Converting files to PDF in Microsoft
applications (Windows) and Creating PDF files with PDFWriter.
When to use Distiller
Distiller creates a PDF file from a PostScript version of a document. A PDF file
created by Distiller maintains all the formatting, graphics, and photographic
images from the original document, and it provides more precise control over
the conversion process than PDFWriter. Here are a few guidelines that can help
you decide when to use Distiller:
You’re converting documents created with desktop publishing applications
such as Adobe PageMaker, Adobe FrameMaker, Adobe Illustrator, QuarkXPress ,
or Macromedia FreeHand .
■
®
®
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■
Your documents contain EPS graphics.
You need to choose specific resampling and compression methods for
bitmap images in the documents.
■
The documents have color management information or use deviceindependent color.
■
You need to preserve PostScript features, such as document structuring
convention (DSC) comments, in the PDF files.
■
You need to send PDF files to a prepress shop or a service provider for
high-end publishing.
■
■
You want to convert PostScript files to PDF in a batch process.
■ You’re using the Create PDF File command in Word 97 and want to include
bookmarks and links.
■
You want to embed Asian fonts in PDF files.
For information on using Distiller, see Converting files to PDF in Microsoft
applications (Windows), Creating PDF files with Distiller, and Converting
PostScript files to PDF.
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Converting files to PDF in Microsoft applications
(Windows)
The default Acrobat installation in Windows includes macros that allow you to
create PDF files quickly and easily from Microsoft Office applications. A macro
called PDFMaker works with Microsoft Word 97 and PowerPoint 97; a
PDFWriter macro works with Microsoft Word 95 and Excel 97 and 95. These
macros are installed automatically with Acrobat if you have the appropriate
Microsoft application on your system.
When you create a PDF file directly from Microsoft Word, you can set options
that control the appearance and other aspects of the PDF file. The PDFMaker
macro (with Word 97) can create PDF using either PDFWriter or Distiller, andit
supports Acrobat 4.0 features such as structured bookmarks. The PDFWriter
macro (with Word 95) is a more basic utility that uses PDFWriter to create
PDF files.
To convert a file to PDF in a Microsoft application (Windows):
Do one of the following:
In Microsoft Word 97, choose File > Create PDF File, or click the Adobe
Acrobat PDF icon on the Microsoft application tool bar. Select PDFWriter or
Distiller, set other options if necessary, and click Create. You can click the Help
button in this dialog box to open a document with more information.
■
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In Microsoft Word 95, choose File > Create Adobe PDF > Print, or click the
Adobe Acrobat PDF icon on the Microsoft application tool bar.
■
■ In PowerPoint, click the Adobe Acrobat PDF icon on the Microsoft application
tool bar.
In Excel, choose File > Create Adobe PDF, or click the Adobe Acrobat PDF icon
on the Microsoft application tool bar.
■
Creating PDF files with PDFWriter
PDFWriter “prints” a document quickly in PDF. You can drag and drop to create
PDF files with PDFWriter or use the Print command in your authoring application. PDFWriter is most suitable for simple business documents that contain
mostly text. If your documents have rich graphical content, use Distiller instead.
When you create a PDF file with PDFWriter, you can provide a title, a subject, an
author name, and other keywords for the file in the Document Information
dialog box. This information can be used in searches on the file and is optional.
If you do not provide a title, the filename will be used as the title in search
results lists. For more information, see Getting information on PDF documents.
In most cases, PDFWriter’s default compression and font settings create an
acceptably small and efficient PDF file. If you want more control over file size or
image quality, see Setting PDFWriter properties for information on changing
these settings.
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To create a PDF file with PDFWriter by dragging and dropping (Mac OS):
1 Drag the file’s icon onto the PDFWriter icon on the desktop.
2 In the Print dialog box for PDFWriter, enter a page range. You can also set
options if these appear in your Print dialog box:
■
View PDF File opens the new PDF file automatically in Acrobat.
■
Short (DOS) File Names truncates the filename to an 8.3 DOS filename.
■
Prompt For Document Info lets you attach search information to the PDF file.
3 Click OK.
4 If the Document Information dialog box appears, enter a title and other
search keywords, and click OK. (The information is optional.) This dialog box
appears if Prompt For Document Info is selected in the Print dialog box.
5 In the Save As dialog box, enter a filename and location, and click Save.
Note: If the PDFWriter icon is not on your Mac OS desktop, open the Chooser,
select the PDFWriter printer driver, and close the Chooser.
To create a PDF file with PDFWriter using the Print command (Windows):
1 Open the document in its authoring application.
2 Choose File > Print.
3 In the Print dialog box, choose Acrobat PDFWriter from the Printer Name
menu, enter the page range, and click Print or OK. In some applications, you
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may need to click Setup in the Print dialog box to get access to the Printer
Name menu.
4 In the Save As dialog box, enter a filename and location for the PDF file, and
set other options if necessary:
■
View PDF File opens the new PDF file automatically in Acrobat.
Edit Document Info opens the Document Information dialog box so you can
provide search keywords for the PDF file. Enter a title and other keywords, and
click OK. (The information is optional.)
■
5 Click Save.
To bypass the Save As dialog box and view the document in Acrobat before
saving it in PDF, hold down the Control key, and click the Print button in the
application’s tool bar, or the Print or OK button in the Print dialog box. Then use
the Save command in Acrobat to save the file in PDF. To be able to use this
shortcut, PDFWriter must be selected as the default printer.
To create a PDF file with PDFWriter using the Print command (Mac OS):
1 Open the document in its authoring application.
2 Do one of the following:
Hold down the shortcut key (Control by default), and choose File > Print. This
uses PDFWriter to create a PDF file without changing your printer driver
■
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setting. (You cannot use this shortcut with Command+P, the print shortcut in
Mac OS applications.)
■ Open the Chooser, select the PDFWriter printer driver, and close the Chooser.
Then return to the application, and choose File > Print.
3 In the Print dialog box for PDFWriter, enter a page range. You can also set
options if these appear in your Print dialog box:
■
View PDF File opens the new PDF file automatically in Acrobat.
■
Short (DOS) File Names truncates the filename to an 8.3 DOS filename.
■
Prompt For Document Info lets you attach search information to the PDF file.
4 Click OK.
5 If the Document Information dialog box appears, enter a title and other
search keywords, and click OK. (The information is optional.) This dialog box
appears if Prompt For Document Info is selected in the Print dialog box.
6 In the Save As dialog box, enter a filename and location, and click Save.
To change the shortcut key for PDFWriter (Mac OS):
Choose PDFWriter Shortcut from the Control Panel in the Apple menu, define a
new shortcut, and close the Shortcut window. You can set any combination of
Control, Option, and Shift.
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Setting PDFWriter properties
The PDFWriter properties control the page setup, the compression settings,
and the font embedding of all PDF files created with PDFWriter.
Changing the page setup
The page setup for PDFWriter determines the size and orientation of pages. In
Windows, you can also set the resolution of PDF files you send to a printer.
To change the page setup:
1 Do one of the following:
In a Windows application, choose File > Print (Print Setup in some applications), select Acrobat PDFWriter from the Printer Name menu, and click
Properties (Setup in some applications). This will change the settings for the
open file and for other files you convert to PDF during the current session with
this application.
■
In the Windows 95 or 98 desktop, choose Settings > Control Panel > Printers
from the Start menu, right-click Acrobat PDFWriter, choose Properties, click the
Details tab, and click Setup. In the Windows NT desktop, choose Settings >
Printers from the Start menu, right-click Acrobat PDFWriter, and choose
Document Defaults. This will change the settings for all PDF files created with
PDFWriter.
■
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In a Mac OS application, hold down the shortcut key (Control by default), and
choose File > Page Setup. Or open the Chooser, select the PDFWriter printer
driver, close the Chooser, and then choose File > Page Setup in an application.
This will change the settings for all PDF files created with PDFWriter.
■
2 To change the page size, do one of the following:
■
Select Standard, and choose a page size from the menu.
■ Select Custom, choose a unit of measure, and enter the page dimensions
and margins. The minimum page size is 1-by-1 inch; the maximum is
45-by-45 inches.
3 To change the orientation, select Portrait or Landscape.
4 To change the scaling, enter a percentage in the Scaling text box. Scaling
lets you magnify or shrink the document for printing. For example, a document
that is 8-1/2-by-14 inches can be scaled to 75% to fit on a 8-1/2-by-11-inch
page. Similarly, if an 8-1/2-by-11-inch document is scaled to 200%, you will
need to adjust the page size to 17-by-22 inches to display the entire page.
5 To change the resolution (Windows), choose a Resolution value. The
resolution setting determines the number of dots per inch (dpi) with which a
PDF file is printed and can sometimes alter character spacing. For best results,
use the resolution setting of the printer chosen when the original file
was created.
6 Click OK.
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Changing the compression options
PDFWriter can compress text, line art, and bitmap images to reduce file size.
You can change the compression options for specific purposes, or remove
compression altogether if file size is not an issue. Because small files open and
display more quickly than large ones, you should normally compress a PDF file
as much as possible without noticeably degrading the quality of the images in
it. In most cases, the PDFWriter default compression settings create an
acceptably small PDF file.
PDFWriter can also downsample high-resolution bitmap images to reduce file
size. A bitmap consists of digital units called pixels. Downsampling reduces the
number of pixels in a file by averaging the color of pixels in a sample area and
replacing that area with one pixel of the averaged color. By default, PDFWriter
downsamples images to the following resolutions:
■
Color images are downsampled to 96 dpi (Windows) or 72 dpi (Mac OS).
Grayscale images (those that have a continuous tone of gray, such as black
and white photographs) are downsampled to 96 dpi (Windows) or 150 dpi
(Mac OS).
■
Monochrome images (those in which each pixel is either black or white, with
no shades of gray) are downsampled to 300 dpi.
■
Note: PDFWriter does not downsample 8-bit grayscale images, and it does not
downsample when the bitmap source rectangle is smaller than the image
rectangle.
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If you need more precise control over compression and resampling, use
Distiller instead of PDFWriter. For information on the Distiller and PDFWriter
compression options and a more detailed discussion of the subject, see
Applying compression and resampling to PDF files.
You may want to try different compression settings to fine tune the
balance between image quality and file size. Create a few PDF files from your
document using different types of compression, and compare the results.
Zoom in at 200% or 400%, and look at a detail of the same image in each file.
For your final PDF file, use the compression settings that produced the smallest
file with acceptable image quality.
To change the compression options:
1 Do one of the following:
In a Windows application, choose File > Print (Print Setup in some applications), select Acrobat PDFWriter from the Printer Name menu, and click
Properties (Setup in some applications). This will change the settings for the
open file and for other files you convert to PDF during the current session with
this application.
■
In the Windows 95 or 98 desktop, choose Settings > Control Panel > Printers
from the Start menu, right-click Acrobat PDFWriter, choose Properties, click the
Details tab, and click Setup. In the Windows NT desktop, choose Settings >
Printers from the Start menu, right-click Acrobat PDFWriter, and choose
■
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Document Defaults. This will change the settings for all PDF files created with
PDFWriter.
■ In a Mac OS application, hold down the shortcut key (Control by default), and
choose File > Page Setup. Or open the Chooser, select the PDFWriter printer
driver, close the Chooser, and then choose File > Page Setup in an application.
This will change the settings for all PDF files created with PDFWriter.
2 Click the Compression Options tab (Windows), or click the Compressions
button (Mac OS).
3 Select the options you want:
Compress Text And Line Art applies ZIP compression (a lossless method) to
all text and line art in the file.
■
ASCII Format creates PDF files in ASCII text format. This option is useful if you
want to open files in a text editor to read or edit them, but it increases file size.
■
Downsample Images downsamples bitmap images to a lower resolution.
Turn this option off if you want a specific resolution.
■
4 To apply compression to color or grayscale images, select the appropriate
Compress Using option, and choose a method from the pop-up menu.
PDFWriter applies the compression to all color or grayscale bitmap images in
the PDF files.
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5 To apply compression to monochrome images, select the Compress Using
option, and choose a method from the pop-up menu. PDFWriter applies the
compression to all monochrome bitmap images in the PDF files.
6 To restore the original compression options, click Default.
7 Click OK.
Embedding fonts in PDF files
PDFWriter can embed Roman Type 1, TrueType, and base fonts (Windows only)
in a PDF file. This ensures that the original font is used for display and printing
on computers that do not have the font installed. Adobe Type Manager (ATM)
must be installed and loaded as a control panel for PDFWriter to be able to
embed Type 1 fonts. PDFWriter cannot embed Asian fonts.
PDFWriter embeds only the set of characters used in the file if fewer than 35%
of the characters in a font are used in the file. (Standard Roman fonts contain
256 characters; 35% of a Roman font is approximately 90 characters.) You
cannot change this threshold in PDFWriter. If you need more precise control,
see Setting the Fonts job options for information on embedding fonts with
Distiller.
Note: When you combine PDF files that have the same font subset, the subsets
are not combined. As a result, combining files with subsets of fonts may result
in a large file. To combine subsets using PostScript files, see Combining multiple
PostScript files into one PDF file.
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If you do not embed fonts in a PDF file and a user opens the file on a system
that does not have the file’s fonts, Acrobat temporarily substitutes fonts. For
Roman text, Acrobat uses serif and sans serif Multiple Master fonts to simulate
the original font. For Asian text, Acrobat uses fonts from the installed Asian
Language Kit or from similar fonts on the user’s system. (See About font
embedding and substitution for an example.) If you embed a font and the user
has that font on their system, they can edit the text in the PDF file.
An embedded font typically adds about 30K to 40K to a PDF file. If it is not
important that readers see the file in its original fonts, do not embed fonts. Let
Acrobat use substitute fonts when necessary. This will produce the smallest file
possible.
To help you decide which fonts to embed in a PDF file, you can get a
preview of how the substituted fonts will look in the file. See Previewing substituted fonts.
To modify which fonts are embedded in a PDF file:
1 Do one of the following:
In a Windows application, choose File > Print (Print Setup in some applications), select Acrobat PDFWriter from the Printer Name menu, and click
Properties (Setup in some applications). This will change the settings for the
open file and for other files you convert to PDF during the current session with
this application.
■
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In the Windows 95 or 98 desktop, choose Settings > Control Panel > Printers
from the Start menu, right-click Acrobat PDFWriter, choose Properties, click the
Details tab, and click Setup. In the Windows NT desktop, choose Settings >
Printers from the Start menu, right-click Acrobat PDFWriter, and choose
Document Defaults. This will change the settings for all PDF files created with
PDFWriter.
■
■ In a Mac OS application, hold down the shortcut key (Control by default), and
choose File > Page Setup. Or open the Chooser, select the PDFWriter printer
driver, close the Chooser, and then choose File > Page Setup in an application.
This will change the settings for all PDF files created with PDFWriter.
2 Click the Font Embedding tab (Windows), or click the Fonts button (Mac OS).
3 To rebuild the set of available fonts, click Rebuild (Mac OS).
4 Do one of the following:
■
To embed all fonts used in the file, select Embed All Fonts.
■ To embed only certain fonts, make sure Embed All Fonts is not selected, and
move the fonts you want embedded to the Always Embed list. You can move a
font by selecting it in the Available Fonts list and clicking the Add button
associated with the Always Embed list or by dragging the font to this list. Ctrlclick (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) to select multiple fonts. Shift-click
to select a contiguous range of fonts.
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To embed all but some fonts, select Embed All Fonts, and move the fonts you
do not want embedded to the Never Embed list. You can move a font by
selecting it in the Always Embed list and clicking the Add button associated
with the Never Embed list or by dragging the font to this list. Ctrl-click
(Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) to select multiple fonts. Shift-click to
select a contiguous range of fonts.
■
■ To remove a font from the Always Embed or Never Embed list, select the font,
and click Remove, or drag the font to the Available Fonts list. If you remove a
symbol font from the Never Embed list, it is added back to the list if you
reinstall PDFWriter or if you click the Default button.
Note: Some TrueType fonts cannot be embedded. You will not be able to
remove these fonts from the Never Embed list.
Font types are indicated in the font lists in the following ways:
■
Type 1 fonts have the Type 1 icon
next to the font name.
■
TrueType fonts have the TrueType icon
next to the name.
Underlined font names indicate symbol fonts, such as ITC Zapf Dingbats.
Acrobat cannot substitute these, which is why (except for any symbol base
font) they are on the Always Embed list by default.
■
®
In Windows, the font lists show additional restrictions by color:
Black font names indicate normal fonts with no restrictions, except as
indicated by any underlining.
■
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Blue font names indicate base fonts. These fonts are in the Never Embed list
by default.
■
■ Red font names indicate TrueType fonts that cannot be embedded. These
fonts will appear only in the Never Embed list.
■
Green font names are for Chinese, Japanese, and Korean fonts.
5 To restore the original font settings, click Default.
6 Click OK.
Previewing substituted fonts
When a user opens a PDF document, the text in the file appears in its original
font if that font is embedded in the file, or if the user has the font installed on
their system. If the font is not available, the text is displayed in a substitute font.
For Roman text, Acrobat uses serif and sans serif Multiple Master fonts to
simulate the original font. For Asian text, Acrobat uses fonts from the installed
Asian language kit or from similar fonts on the user’s system. Fonts from some
languages or with unknown encodings cannot be substituted; in these cases,
the text appears as bullets in the file.
You can embed fonts in a PDF file to be sure that users will see text in the right
font, but embedding fonts can dramatically increase the size of the file. You
may want to see a preview of how substituted fonts will look in your PDF file to
help you decide which fonts to embed.
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To preview substituted fonts in a PDF file:
Choose View > Use Local Fonts to turn off embedded fonts. (The command has
a check mark by it when it is on and no check mark when it’s off.) The PDF file
displays with substitute fonts for all fonts that are not embedded. If a font
cannot be substituted, the text in it appears as bullets, and Acrobat displays
an error message.
Note: For a PDF file to be portable, at a minimum you should embed the fonts
that cannot be substituted.
When Use Local Fonts is off, the PDF file also prints using substituted fonts.
Creating PDF files with Distiller
Distiller creates a PDF file from a PostScript version of a document. A PDF file
created by Distiller maintains all the formatting, graphics, and photographic
images from the original document, and it usually provides higher quality
output than PDFWriter. For more on the comparison with PDFWriter, see About
PDFWriter and Distiller.
Note: For Distiller to be able to create PDF files, you must have a PostScript
printer driver on your system set up with a Distiller PostScript printer
description (PPD) file. The default Acrobat installation includes the AdobePS
4.2.4 (Windows 95 and 98), 5.0 or 5.0.1 (Windows NT), and 8.5.1 (Mac OS)
drivers. Adobe recommends using these drivers or later versions. If you did not
use the default installation and did not include one of these drivers in a custom
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installation, you can install one manually from your Acrobat CD. You can also
find the most recent printer drivers on the Adobe Web site (www.adobe.com).
You can drag and drop to create PDF files with Distiller or use the Print
command in the authoring application. In Windows, you can also open files in
Acrobat to convert them to PDF. Distiller uses a file’s source application and
your PostScript driver to create a PostScript file and then converts the
PostScript to PDF using the current set of Distiller job options. You should have
16 MB of available memory to run Distiller (32 MB are recommended).
Distiller can create a PDF file with Asian-language text as long as it has the
information it needs to process the fonts used in the document. See Preparing
to convert Asian text to PDF (Windows) or Preparing to convert Asian text to
PDF (Mac OS) for details.
Note: When processing large files, Distiller can slow down other tasks on your
system. If you frequently use Distiller to process files of 10 MB or more, and
especially if you process groups of ten or more files at a time, consider running
Distiller on a stand-alone system.
To create a PDF file with Distiller by dragging and dropping (Windows):
1 Do one of the following:
■ To save the file in a new PDF file, drag the file’s icon onto the Acrobat icon or
the shortcut Distiller icon on the desktop or onto the title bar in the Acrobat
application window. The new file opens in Acrobat.
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To append the file to an existing PDF file, drag the file’s icon onto the existing
PDF file in the Acrobat application window.
■
You can drag a file from Adobe FrameMaker, Corel WordPerfect , or Microsoft
Word, Excel, or PowerPoint; an HTML or text file; or an image file of type GIF,
JPEG, TIFF, PCX, PNG, or BMP. Files from FrameMaker, WordPerfect, and the
Microsoft applications are always saved in a new PDF file, even if you drag them
onto an existing file.
®
2 If you created a new PDF file (rather than appending to a file), choose File >
Save As in Acrobat, enter a filename and location for the new file, and click
Save.
Note: If the Distiller icon is not on your Windows desktop, select AcroDist.exe in
your Acrobat Distiller folder in the file system, choose File > Create Shortcut,
and drag the shortcut to the desktop.
To create a PDF file with Distiller by dragging and dropping (Mac OS):
1 Drag the file’s icon onto the Acrobat PDF icon on the desktop.
2 In the Print dialog box for Acrobat PDF, enter a page range, set other options
if necessary, and click Distill.
3 In the Save As dialog box, enter a filename and location, and click Save.
Acrobat creates a PostScript file, and then Distiller creates the PDF file. The file
does not open automatically in Acrobat.
4 In the Save As dialog box, enter a filename and location, and click Save.
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To create a PDF file with Distiller by opening the file in Acrobat (Windows):
1 Choose File > Open, choose All Files from the Files Of Type pop-up menu,
select the file you want to convert to PDF, and click Open.
You can open a document from Adobe FrameMaker, Corel WordPerfect, or
Microsoft Word, Excel, or PowerPoint; an HTML or text file; or an image file of
type GIF, JPEG, TIFF, PCX, PNG, or BMP.
2 Choose File > Save As, enter a filename and location for the new PDF file,
and click Save.
To create a PDF file with Distiller using the Print command (Windows):
1 Open the document to convert in its authoring application.
2 Choose File > Print.
3 Choose Acrobat Distiller from the Printer Name menu, enter other print
options you want, and click Print or OK. In some applications, you may need to
click Setup in the Print dialog box to get access to the Printer Name menu.
By default, Distiller appends the extension .pdf and places the file in the PDF
Output folder in your Acrobat folder. You can configure Distiller to ask you for a
location when it creates PDF files. See Setting Distiller preferences for details.
To create a PDF file with Distiller using the Print command (Mac OS):
1 Make sure you have a default PostScript printer set up with the AdobePS
printer driver. If necessary, open the Chooser, select the AdobePS printer driver,
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select a PostScript printer, and click Setup. Then click Select PPD, select Acrobat
Distiller (PPD) in the list, click Select, and click OK. Close the Chooser.
Note: Adobe recommends creating a “virtual” printer just for generating
PostScript. Use a printer you would not normally use with your other drivers.
2 Open the document in its authoring application.
3 Choose File > Page Setup, choose Acrobat PDF as the printer, enter other
setup options you want, and click OK.
4 Choose File > Print, enter the print options you want, and click Distill.
Selecting Distiller job options
The Distiller job options define compression, font embedding, color
management, and many other properties for all PDF files that Distiller creates.
Acrobat comes with three sets of options already defined for common
scenarios:
The Screen Optimized job options are suggested for PDF files that will be
displayed on the World Wide Web or an intranet, or that will be distributed
through an e-mail system for online viewing.
■
■ The Print Optimized job options are suggested for PDF files that are intended
for printers or digital copiers, that will be published on a CD, or that will be sent
to a client as a publishing proof.
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The Press Optimized job options are suggested for PDF files that will be
printed as high-quality final output.
■
You cannot modify these three predefined sets of job options, but you can start
with any of these three and create new sets based on them, or define and save
sets of options from scratch. See Setting Distiller job options for more information on the three predefined sets of options and for instructions on specifying custom options.
Note: Before creating a PDF file to send to a commercial printer or a service
bureau, check with the provider to find out what the output resolution and
other settings should be, or ask them to provide a .joboptions file containing
their recommended settings. You may need to customize the job options for a
particular provider and then provide them with a .joboptions file of your own.
To select Distiller job options:
1 Start the Distiller application.
2 Choose a set of job options from the Job Options pop-up menu. You can
choose a predefined set of options (Screen Optimized, Press Optimized, or Print
Optimized), or you can choose a set that you have already defined and saved.
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Creating PostScript files to convert to PDF
A PostScript file contains a detailed description of each page in an electronic
document. Distiller interprets this information to create a PDF file that
accurately preserves the look and content of the original document.
When Distiller creates a PDF file, it uses the original file’s application and the
PostScript driver on your system to create a PostScript file and then converts
the PostScript file to PDF. You may sometimes want to create PostScript files
manually so you have more control over the page descriptions or so Distiller
can batch process the PostScript files in a watched folder.
You can insert Distiller parameters in a PostScript file to control PDF processing
of the file. For example, you might use parameters to embed fonts or to set
downsampling for individual images. See the related technical notes on your
Acrobat CD for more information.
Note: Inserted Distiller parameters will not be applied unless you select Allow
PostScript File To Override Job Options in Distiller’s Advanced job options. For
more information, see Setting the Advanced job options.
Tips on creating PostScript files
Because Print dialog boxes can vary from application to application, it is
difficult to provide specific instructions for creating a PostScript file from each
application. For specific instructions on creating a PostScript file from the application you are using, see the application’s user manual.
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Keep the following guidelines in mind when creating PostScript files:
Give a PostScript file the same name as the original document, but with the
extension .ps. When Distiller creates the PDF file, it replaces the .ps extension
with .pdf. This makes it easy to keep track of the original, PostScript, and PDF
versions of a document.
■
Color and custom page sizes are available if you use one of the Acrobat
Distiller 4.0 PPDs. Choosing a PPD from some other printer may result in PDF
files that do not contain appropriate color, font, or page size information. In
other words, if your source document is intended for PDF rather than directly
for print, use the AdobePS printer driver and the Acrobat Distiller PPD to create
your PostScript files.
■
To create PDF files with custom page sizes, select a printer that supports
custom sizes. The Acrobat Distiller PPDs support custom page sizes. For information on PPDs, see About printer drivers and PostScript printer description
(PPD) files.
■
When using FTP to transfer PostScript files between computers, send the files
as 8-bit binary data to avoid conversion of line feeds to carriage returns or
vice versa.
■
■ In Mac OS, do not select Substitute Fonts, Smooth Text, or Smooth Graphics
in the PostScript Options panel of the Page Setup dialog box. If you select these
options, the printer driver smooths graphics by adding many tiny images to
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the document. This may result in a large PDF file that takes a long time to
display and print.
■ The file Pdfmrkex.ps is a PostScript file that has examples of how to create
various markers for such things as cropping pages, adding annotations, and
creating text in articles directly in the PostScript file. This file is located in the
Acrobat/Distiller/Xtras folder and can be viewed in a text editor. You need to be
familiar with the PostScript language to use this file. See the related technical
note on your Acrobat CD for more information.
About printer drivers and PostScript printer description (PPD) files
A printer driver is a software utility that helps transfer information between an
application and a specified printer, enabling the application to control the
printer. The AdobePS printer driver is an example of a PostScript printer driver.
A PostScript printer description (PPD) file provides the PostScript language
extensions, or information, needed to use particular features available on a
specific model of printer. A PPD file also includes information about the fonts
built into the ROM of each printer.
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Setting up a Distiller printer (Windows)
The AdobePS printer driver and an Acrobat Distiller PPD are included in the
default Acrobat installation. You can set up additional Distiller printer drivers—
for example, if you need to have both an RGB printer and a CMYK printer, or if
you want to have different printers for different applications. For each Distiller
printer, you need to select a PPD and a destination folder for the PDF output.
The AdobePS printer driver uses a folder called PDF Output in your Acrobat
folder as the destination for PDF files. You can change this to another folder,
which can be helpful if you prefer to keep PDF files in another part of your hard
drive or if the drive with the PDF Output folder is full.
To set up a printer to use the AdobePS driver and a Distiller PPD
(Windows):
1 Launch the setup utility for AdobePS Printer Driver from the Drivers folder
on your Acrobat CD.
2 Follow the online instructions to progress through the introduction, accept
the license agreement, and copy the setup program to your local disk.
3 Choose Local Printer as your printer type, and click Next.
4 Locate the Xtras folder in your Acrobat Distiller folder, select an Acrobat
Distiller PPD in the list, and click Next.
5 Select FILE: in the list of ports, and click Next.
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6 Follow the online instructions to proceed with the setup, and click Exit when
you are finished.
7 Choose Settings > Printers from the Windows Start menu.
8 Do one of the following:
In Windows 95 or 98, right-click the printer you want to use, and choose
Properties. Click the Fonts tab, click Send Fonts As, choose Type 42 (for
TrueType fonts) or Outlines (for Type 1 outline fonts) from the pop-up menu,
enter 1 as the threshold, and click OK. Click OK in the Properties dialog box.
■
In Windows NT, right-click the printer you want to use, and choose
Document Defaults. Click the Advanced tab, select TrueType Font Download
Option under PostScript Options, select Automatic or Native TrueType (for
TrueType fonts) or Outline (for Type 1 outline fonts, and click OK.
■
Note: Entering the threshold value in Windows 95 or 98 ensures that TrueType
fonts will not be converted to Type 3 fonts in a PostScript file. Type 3 fonts can
cause PDF files to be unnecessarily large. Instead, the fonts will be converted to
Type 42 or Type 1.
To change a Distiller printer to use a different output folder:
1 Choose Setting > Printers from the Windows Start menu, right-click on the
Distiller printer, and choose Properties.
2 Click Add Port, select PDF Port, and click New Port.
3 Select an output folder in the browser, and click OK.
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4 Click Close in the Printer Ports dialog box, and click OK in the Properties
dialog box.
Creating PostScript files in Windows
You can create PostScript files in Windows using the AdobePS driver and an
Acrobat Distiller PPD with the source application. AdobePS and a PPD are
installed automatically in the default Acrobat installation. For information on
using a different driver or PPD, see Setting up a Distiller printer (Windows).
To create a PostScript file from a source application (Windows):
1 Open the document to convert in its authoring application.
2 Choose File > Print.
3 Choose the PostScript printer from the Printer Name pop-up menu. In some
applications, you may need to click Setup in the Print dialog box to get access
to the Printer Name menu.
4 Select Print Only To File, and enter a name and location for the PostScript file.
Use .ps as the filename extension (for example, “myfile.ps”).
Note: Some applications use a .prn extension instead of the .ps extension that
you designate. Distiller recognizes both .ps and .prn extensions.
5 Enter other print options you want, and click Print or OK.
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6 If the Save As dialog box appears, choose All Files (*.*) from the Save As Type
menu, and click Save. This dialog box appears if you’re using the Acrobat
Distiller printer.
Creating PostScript files in Mac OS
You can create PostScript files in Mac OS using the AdobePS driver and an
Acrobat Distiller PPD with the source application. AdobePS and a PPD are
installed automatically in the default Acrobat installation.
To create a PostScript file from a source application (Mac OS):
1 Make sure you have a default PostScript printer set up with the AdobePS
printer driver. If necessary, open the Chooser, select the AdobePS printer driver,
select a PostScript printer, and click Setup. Then click Select PPD, select Acrobat
Distiller (PPD) in the list, click Select, and click OK. Close the Chooser.
Note: Adobe recommends creating a “virtual” printer just for generating
PostScript. Use a printer you would not normally use with your other drivers.
2 Open the document in its authoring application.
3 Choose File > Page Setup, choose the PostScript printer from the Format For
pop-up menu, enter other setup options you want, and click OK.
4 Choose File > Print, and choose Save as File from the main pop-up menu to
change the options panel in the dialog box.
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5 Choose PostScript Job from the Format pop-up menu, enter the PostScript
options you want, and click Save.
6 In the Save As dialog box, enter a name and location for the PostScript file,
and click Save. Use .ps as the filename extension (for example, “myfile.ps”).
Converting PostScript files to PDF
Once you have a PostScript file, you’re ready to convert the file to PDF. You can
open the PostScript file in Distiller, drag and drop the file onto the Distiller icon,
place the file in a watched folder for batch processing, or specify the Distiller
and file pathnames in the Run dialog box in Windows. Distiller converts the file
to PDF using the current set of job options.
While Distiller converts a PostScript file to PDF, the Distiller window shows
information about the job:
■ The Info area in the window tells the name and size of the PostScript file and
the source of the job request, such as User Selection or Watched Folder. The bar
in the Progress area illustrates the progress of the job.
The pane at the bottom of the window gives the source and destination
pathnames, the start time, and any error messages. This information remains in
the pane after processing is complete until you convert another file or quit
Distiller; it is also stored in the Messages.log file in the Distiller folder. You can
lengthen the Distiller window to view more messages.
■
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To convert a PostScript file by opening it in Distiller:
1 Start the Distiller application.
2 Choose File > Open, and use the browser to select the PostScript file. Choose
All Files from the Files Of Type pop-up menu if the PostScript file has an
extension other than .ps (such as .prn).
3 Do one of the following:
■
Click Open, enter a name and location for the PDF file, and click Save.
Hold down Shift (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) while clicking Open. The PDF
file has the same name as the PostScript file, plus the extension .pdf, and is
stored in the same folder as the PostScript file.
■
To convert a PostScript file by dragging and dropping:
Do one of the following:
Drag the file’s icon onto the Distiller icon on the desktop or into the Distiller
window. The PDF file has the same name as the PostScript file, plus the
extension .pdf, and is stored in the same folder as the PostScript file.
■
Hold down Ctrl (Windows) or Command (Mac OS), and drag the file’s icon
onto the Distiller icon or into the Distiller window. In the Save As dialog box,
enter a filename and location for the PostScript file, and click Save.
■
To place a Distiller icon on your desktop in Windows, select AcroDist.exe in
your file system, choose File > Create Shortcut, and then drag the new icon to
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the desktop. In Mac OS, select Acrobat Distiller 4.0 in your file system, choose
File > Make Alias, and then drag the new icon to the desktop.
To convert a PostScript file using the Run command (Windows):
1 Choose Run from the Windows Start menu.
2 Enter the pathname of Distiller on your system, a space, and then the
pathname of the file to be converted. If there are spaces within a pathname,
enclose the pathname in quotation marks. To convert more than one file,
separate the pathnames with a comma. The files are processed in the order
they are listed, with one PDF file for each PostScript file.
For example: "C:\Program Files\Adobe\Acrobat 4.0\Distillr\AcroDist.exe"
C:\q1\chart.ps,C:\q1\report.ps
3 Click OK.
To interrupt or cancel a processing job:
Do one of the following in the Distiller window:
■ Click Pause to have Distiller stop distilling after it finishes processing the
current PostScript file. Click Resume when you’re ready to go on to the next file.
Click Cancel Job to stop processing on the current PostScript file. Distiller
begins processing the next file. If a PDF file is partially processed, Distiller
deletes the file and creates a log file (with the name filename.log) reporting
■
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that the job was terminated at the user’s request. The log file is saved in the
same folder as the PostScript file.
Using watched folders to convert PostScript to PDF
You can configure Distiller to look in certain folders for PostScript files. When it
finds a PostScript file in the In folder in one of these watched folders, it converts
the file to PDF and moves the resulting PDF file to the Out folder. A watched
folder can have its own Distiller job options and security settings that will apply
to all files processed from that folder.
Distiller does not convert a PostScript file in a watched folder if the file is
marked with read-only permission. In Windows, however, you can convert a
read-only file using the Open command in Acrobat.
Important: You cannot set up watched folders as a network service for other
users. Every user who creates PDF files must have his or her own Acrobat
license. Use watched folders only for converting your own files.
To set up watched folders:
1 Start the Distiller application.
2 Choose Settings > Watched Folders.
3 For each folder you want to add, click Add. Use the browser to select the
folder, and click OK. Distiller automatically puts an In folder and an Out folder in
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the watched folder (unless it already has In and Out folders). Distiller can
monitor up to 100 watched folders.
You can place In and Out folders at any level of a disk drive. In Windows, for
example, you can create a pair of DOS folders E:\In and E:\Out by selecting E:\
as a watched folder. To do this in Mac OS, select the drive as a watched folder.
4 Set options for the folders:
■ To define security options for a folder, select the folder, click Security, and
set the options you want. See Adding security to PDF files for more information.
To select an existing set of job options for a folder, select the folder, click Load
Options, and select a job options file. See Setting Distiller job options for more
information. This file is saved to the watched folder as folder.joboptions. The
original job options file is not changed or moved.
■
To customize or define and save your own set of job options, click Job
Options or Load Options. See Setting Distiller job options for more information.
The resulting file is saved to the watched folder as folder.joboptions. Any
original job options file is not changed or moved.
■
To return a folder to the original options selected in the Distiller Window,
select the folder, and click Clear Options.
■
5 Set options to manage the processing of files:
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Enter a number of seconds to specify how often to check the folders. You can
enter a value from 1 to 9999. (For example, 120 equals 2 minutes and 9999
equals about 2-3/4 hours.)
■
Choose what to do with a PostScript file after it has been processed. The file
can be moved to the Out folder along with the PDF file or deleted altogether.
Any log file is also automatically copied to the Out folder.
■
■ To delete PDF files after a certain period of time, select the option and enter a
number of days. You can enter a value from 1 to 999. This option also deletes
PostScript and log files, if you have chosen to delete them.
6 Click OK.
To remove a watched folder:
Select a folder in the Watched Folders dialog box, and click Remove.
Note: When you remove a watched folder, Distiller does not delete the In and
Out folders, their contents, or the Folder.JobOptions file. You can delete these
when appropriate.
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To convert a PostScript file to PDF in a watched folder:
1 Copy the PostScript file to the In folder in the watched folder. Distiller checks
the In folder for PostScript files on a set schedule and converts any files in it to
PDF.
Important: If two PostScript files with the same name are placed in an In
folder, the second PDF file created by Distiller automatically replaces the first.
2 After the file has been converted, move the PDF file out of the Out folder
to save it.
Combining multiple PostScript files into one PDF file
Distiller can convert two or more PostScript files together to produce a single
PDF file. If the PostScript files have embedded font subsets, Distiller gives the
resulting PDF file only one subset for each font. This is much more efficient
than creating a set of several PDF files with duplicate font subsets.
For more information on font subsets, see Embedding fonts in PDF files with
Distiller.
To combine PostScript files into one PDF file:
1 Start a text editor or a word processor.
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2 Choose File > Open, use the browser to locate Runfilex.ps (Windows) or
RunFilEx.ps (Mac OS) in the Acrobat Distiller Xtras folder, and open the file as a
text file with carriage returns.
3 Follow the instructions in the Runfilex.ps or RunFileEx.ps file. Note that this
utility combines PostScript files in alphabetical order.
4 Choose File > Save As, and save the modified Runfilex.ps or RunFileEx.ps
under a new name. Use the name you want Distiller to give the PDF file. For
example, if you name the file Handbook.ps, Distiller creates a PDF file called
Handbook.pdf. If you’re using a word processor, save the file as a text file.
5 Quit the text editor or word processor.
6 Open the file in Distiller.
7 Convert the combined file to PDF, or place the file in an In folder to be
converted later.
8 When the PDF file is ready, open the file in Acrobat and make sure that all of
the document parts are present and in the correct order.
To combine PostScript files that are in the same folder:
Follow the instructions in the Rundirex.txt (Windows) or RunDirEx.txt (Mac OS)
file in the Acrobat Distiller Xtras folder.
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Converting image files to PDF
You can import BMP, GIF, JPEG, PCX, PICT (Mac OS only), PNG, or TIFF image files
into Acrobat. If you have a digital camera with a TWAIN scanner driver
connected to your computer, you can also import a JPEG from the camera into
Acrobat. An imported image is automatically converted to the PDF Image Only
format. The maximum image size you can import is 45-by-45 inches.
In the PDF Image Only format, images and text are bitmaps, and therefore text
cannot be edited. If your converted image has text, you may want to “capture”
the image to change the bitmap text to regular PDF text that can be edited and
searched in Acrobat. See Capturing pages to convert to searchable text for
information. For information on editing images in PDF documents, see Editing
graphic objects within PDF documents.
An imported image can be in a new PDF file or appended to an existing file.
To convert image files by importing:
1 Choose File > Import > Image.
2 Do one of the following:
In Windows, select an image file, and click Open. You can Control-click to
select multiple files or Shift-click to select a contiguous range of files.
■
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In Mac OS, select an image file, click Add, and click Done. You can select and
click Add to convert multiple files or click Add All to convert all files in the
folder list.
■
Note: When you import multiple image files, the images are combined into one
PDF file. You may be able to select up to 50 image files on either platform,
depending on your system’s resources.
3 If a Destination dialog box appears, select Current Document to append the
images to the current PDF file, or select New Document to create a new PDF
file. Then click OK.
This dialog box appears if a PDF file is already open when you choose File >
Import > Image. If no file is open, Acrobat creates a new PDf file with the
filename “Untitled,” plus the extension .pdf.
4 If you selected New Document in the Destination dialog box, choose
File > Save As, enter a filename and location, and click OK.
To convert image files by dragging and dropping:
Do one of the following:
In the Windows desktop, drag an image file’s icon onto the Acrobat icon on
the desktop or into the Acrobat application window. You can Control-click to
select multiple file icons or Shift-click to select a contiguous range of icons to
drag. If you drag onto the icon or the title bar of the application window,
■
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Acrobat creates a new PDF file for each image. If you drag into a PDF file in the
application window, the images are appended to that file.
■ In the Mac OS desktop, drag the image file’s icon onto the PDFWriter icon or
the Acrobat PDF icon. You can Shift-click to select a contiguous range of icons
to drag. Acrobat creates a new PDF file for each image.
To convert an image file by opening it in Acrobat (Windows):
1 Choose File > Open, choose Image Files from the Files Of Type pop-up menu,
select the file you want to convert to PDF, and click Open. You can convert only
one image file at a time using this method.
2 Choose File > Save As, enter a filename and location for the new PDF file,
and click Save.
To convert JPEG images by scanning from a digital camera:
1 Turn on your digital camera, and connect it to the computer.
2 In Acrobat, choose File >Import > Scan.
3 Choose the digital camera and a page format from the pop-up menus. The
Device pop-up menu lists all TWAIN drivers and Photoshop Acquire plug-ins
installed on your system.
4 Select whether to add the images to the end of the current PDF file or to put
them in a new file.
5 Click Scan.
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6 Select the image or images in the digital camera’s interface. In most cases,
you also need to click a button or send the image to Acrobat in some other
way. See the documentation that came with your camera for details.
7 Click Done.
Exporting to PostScript or EPS for color separations
You can export a PDF file to PostScript for use in printing and prepress applications. The PostScript file will include full DSC comments and other advanced
information preserved by Distiller.
You can also create an EPS file of any page in a PDF document for placement in
another application file. The placed EPS file will generate color separations
correctly.
To export to PostScript or EPS:
1 Choose File > Export > PostScript or EPS.
2 Choose a PostScript or EPS file format.
3 Choose a PostScript language level for file formatting. Choose Language
Level 1 if the file is an EPS file that will be placed in another document and color
separated as part of that other document.
Note: If you’ve used LanguageLevel 3 PostScript operators for smooth shading
or image masks, the file will not be translated correctly.
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4 Select ASCII or Binary to specify what type of file to create.
5 Enter a page range. If an EPS file format is selected, each page in the range
will be saved as a separate EPS file.
6 Choose a set of fonts for the exported file.
7 Select whether to convert TrueType fonts to Type 1 and whether to include
RGB and Lab images and halftone screens. The availability of these options
varies depending on which PostScript language level you’re using.
8 Click Save, enter a filename and location, and click Save again.
Specifying prepress options
You can use the Prepress Info dialog box to declare whether a PDF file contains
trapping information. This can help prevent a service bureau from adding
potentially conflicting trapping commands to the file. See the documentation
that came with your authoring application for details on including trapping
information in a PostScript file.
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The Prepress Info dialog box also lets you bypass a color management system
and thus preserve the original CMYK and gray values in the PDF file, if the file is
used to make color plates for printing. The CMYK and gray values may have
been set when an image was originally scanned, or they may have been set in
the authoring application in which it was created or edited (such as Adobe
Photoshop). You can have the CMYK and gray values in the PDF file pass
directly to the output device, rather than going through a color management
system that might calibrate the values.
For more information on ICC profiles and color management, see About color
management and Setting color options.
To specify prepress options:
1 Open the PDF file, and choose File > Document Info > Prepress.
2 Choose a Trapped option:
Yes if the file contains trapping information, or No if the file does not contain
trapping information.
■
■
Unknown if you do not know whether the file contains trapping information.
3 To preserve the original CMYK and gray values in the PDF file, select Print 4
Color ICC Profiles as Device CMYK.
4 Click OK.
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Setting Acrobat Distiller Options
Acrobat Distiller converts PostScript files to PDF files. You can select fonts to
embed in the new PDF file, define how to compress images in the file, choose a
profile to provide color information about images in the file, and customize the
conversion in many other ways.
You do not need to explicitly start Distiller when converting documents. You do
need to start Distiller, though, when setting its options. For information on
using Distiller to convert documents to PDF, and advice on whether to use
Distiller or PDFWriter, see Converting Electronic Files to PDF.
Setting Distiller job options
The Distiller job options define compression and resampling, font embedding,
color management, and many other properties for PDF files that Distiller
creates.
Distiller comes with three predefined sets of options:
The ScreenOptimized job options are suggested for PDF files that will be
displayed on the World Wide Web or an intranet, or that will be distributed
through an e-mail system for on-screen viewing. This set of options uses
compression, downsampling, and a relatively low resolution; converts all colors
to CalRGB, CalGray, or Lab; maintains compatibility with Acrobat 3.0; and
■
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embeds subsets of all fonts used in the file except the Base 14 fonts (which are
not embedded), for example, to create a PDF file that is as small as possible.
■ The PrintOptimized job options are suggested for PDF files that are intended
for desktop printers, digital copiers, publishing on a CD-ROM, or to send to a
client as a publishing proof. In this set of options, file size is still important, but
it is not the only objective. This set of options uses compression and downsampling to keep the file size down, but it also embeds subsets of all fonts used in
the file, tags everything for color management, and prints to a medium
resolution to create a reasonably accurate rendition of the original document.
The PressOptimized job options are suggested for PDF files that will be
printed as high-quality final output to an imagesetter or platesetter, for
example. In this case, file size is not a consideration. The objective is to maintain
all the information in a PDF file that a commercial printer or service bureau will
need to print the document correctly. This set of options downsamples color
and grayscale images at 300 dpi, monochrome images at 1200 dpi, embeds
subsets of all fonts used in the file, prints to a higher resolution, and uses other
settings to preserve the maximum amount of information about the original
document.
■
For details on each of these job options, view the settings in their job
options dialog boxes.
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You cannot modify these three predefined sets of Distiller job options.
However, you can create new ones based on them, or you can define and save
your own custom sets of options and use them at any time. For example, in
many cases you may have particular fonts you need to use, or you may want to
experiment with compression to find a suitable balance between file size and
image quality.
Note: Before creating a PDF file to send to a commercial printer or a service
bureau, check with the provider to find out what the output resolution and
other settings should be, or ask them to provide a .joboptions file containing
their recommended settings. You may need to customize the job options for a
particular provider and then provide them with a .joboptions file of your own.
To set the Distiller job options:
1 Start Distiller.
2 Choose one of the sets of predefined job options from the Job Options popup menu in Distiller’s main window: ScreenOptimized (for online viewing, such
as for the Web), PrintOptimized (for typical print use), and PressOptimized (for
high-end print use).
3 To define a custom set of Distiller job options, choose Settings > Job
Options.
4 Make changes to the job options. You can move from one panel to another
by clicking the tabs at the top of the dialog box:
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For information on the General job options, see Setting the General job
options.
■
■ For information on the Compressions job options, see, Applying
compression and resampling to PDF files.
For information on the Fonts job options, see Embedding fonts in PDF files
with Distiller.
■
■
For information on the Color job options, see Setting color options.
For information on the Advanced job options, see Setting the Advanced job
options.
■
5 Do one of the following:
■ To apply the changes to the current job options, click OK. If the current
options file is one of the three predefined ones, a Save As dialog box appears,
so that you can rename the current options file.
To save the changes as a different job options file and make that the new job
options file, click Save As. Then enter a name and location for the new job
options, click Save in the Save Job Options As dialog box, and click OK. By
default, these files are saved in the Distillr/Settings folder in the Acrobat folder.
You cannot overwrite the three predefined sets of options.
■
Note: Although you can save a set of options in any folder, you can only
see job option files in the Distiller window that are saved in the default
(Settings) folder.
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Setting the General job options
The General job options allow you to specify the version of Acrobat for file
compatibility and other file and device settings, including resolution and
optimization.
You can create PDF files that are compatible with Acrobat 3.0 or Acrobat 4.0. If
you create files with Acrobat 4.0 compatibility, the resulting PDF files may not
be compatible with earlier versions of Acrobat. These are some of the differences between PDF files created with Acrobat 3.0 and 4.0 compatibility.
Acrobat 3.0 compatibility
Acrobat 4.0 compatibility
PDF files can be opened by Acrobat
viewers 3.0 and later.
PDF files can be opened by Acrobat viewers
3.0 and later. However, some or all of the
document may be unviewable if opened
with versions earlier than 4.0.
Patterns display as 50% gray, but print
correctly.
Patterns display and print correctly
Places halftone information in file
Places halftone information in file if
Preserve Halftone Information is selected
in the Color dialog box.
Users can preserve, remove, or apply
Transfer functions.
Users can preserve or remove Transfer
functions.
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Acrobat 3.0 compatibility
Acrobat 4.0 compatibility
Can convert all colors to CalRGB
Can convert all colors to sRGB.
ICC profile color management
supported
ICC profile color management supported
DeviceN color space is converted to
alternate color space.
DeviceN color space is supported.
Smooth shaded objects are converted
to images.
Smooth shading is supported.
Masked images do not display or print
correctly.
Masked images display and print correctly.
Can convert pages up to 45 inches
to PDF
Can convert pages up to 200 inches to PDF
Can convert documents up to 32,768
pages long, depending on disk space
and available memory
Can convert documents of unlimited
length, depending on disk space and available memory
Cannot embed double-byte fonts
Can embed double-byte fonts
TrueType fonts not searchable
TrueType fonts can be searchable
Supports PDF level 1.2
Supports PDF level 1.3
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The compatibility also determines the type of settings available in the Color
panel of Job Options.
To set the General job options:
1 Start Distiller.
2 Select an existing set of job options from the Job Options menu in the
Acrobat Distiller dialog box to use as a starting point.
3 Choose Settings > Job Options.
4 Choose a compatibility setting from the pop-up menu. The 4.0 compatibility
creates a PDF version 1.3 file, which takes advantage of 4.0 improvements to
Acrobat and LanguageLevel 3 PostScript. But unless you know that all recipients of your PDF files have Acrobat 4.0, you can use the 3.0 compatibility
(which creates a PDF version 1.2 file) until they have upgraded to ensure access
to your files.
It is a good idea to keep a copy of the original file so that you can make
3.0- or 4.0-compatible PDF versions at any time.
5 Select other options:
ASCII Format creates the PDF file in ASCII text format. This option is useful if
you want to open the file in a text editor to read or edit it, or if you want to send
a PDF file across networks or mail gateways that don’t support binary files. You
should normally leave this unselected to save the file in binary format and
create a smaller file.
■
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Optimize PDF optimizes a PDF file to reduce file size. To optimize a file,
Acrobat removes repeated background text, line art, and images, replacing
them with pointers to the first occurrences of those objects, and restructures
the file to prepare for page-at-a-time downloading from Web servers. This
option compresses text and line art regardless of what you have selected in the
Compression settings. This makes for faster access and viewing when
downlaoding the file from the Web or a network. For more information, see
Optimizing PDF documents for the Web.
■
Generate Thumbnails creates a thumbnail preview for each page in the PDF
file. For more information, see Working with thumbnails.
■
Note: Adding thumbnails increases the file size of the PDF file.
Resolution specifies a resolution for vector objects and type in EPS files in
dots per inch (dpi). You can enter a value from 72 to 4000. However, note that a
low-resolution setting can cause banding in gradients and change the
positioning of objects slightly. Generally, you should leave this at the default
setting unless you plan to print the PDF file on a specific printer and you want
Distiller to emulate the resolution defined in the original PostScript file.
■
Note: Increasing the resolution setting increases the file size and may slightly
increase the time required to process some files.
Binding specifies whether to display a PDF file with left-side or right-side
binding. This affects the display of pages in the Facing Page - Continuous
layout and the display of thumbnails side by side.
■
Setting Acrobat Distiller Options
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6 Do one of the following:
■
To apply the changes to the current job options, click OK.
■ To save the changes as a different job options file and make that the new job
options file, click Save As. Then enter a name and location for the new set, click
Save in the Save Job Options As dialog box, and click OK. By default, these files
are saved in the Distillr/Settings folder (Windows) or Distiller/Settings folder
(Mac OS) in the Acrobat folder. You cannot overwrite the three predefined sets
of options.
Applying compression and resampling to PDF files
When converting files, you can have Distiller compress text and line art, and
compress and resample color, grayscale, and monochrome bitmap images.
Depending on the settings you choose, compression and resampling can
significantly reduce the size of a PDF file with little or no loss of detail and
precision.
Line art, or vector graphics, is described with a mathematical equation; it is
usually created with a drawing program such as Adobe Illustrator.
■
■ Bitmap images are described as pixels and are created with paint programs
or from scanners. Monochrome bitmap images include most black-and-white
illustrations made by paint programs and any images scanned with an image
depth of 1 bit.
Setting Acrobat Distiller Options
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About methods of compression
Distiller applies ZIP compression to text and line art; ZIP or JPEG compression
to color and grayscale bitmap images; and ZIP, CCITT Group 3 or 4, or Run
Length compression to monochrome images:
■ ZIP is a compression method that works well on images with large areas of
single colors or repeating patterns, such as screen shots and simple images
created with paint programs, and for black-and-white images that contain
repeating patterns. Acrobat provides 4-bit and 8-bit ZIP compression options. If
you use 4-bit ZIP compression with 4-bit images, or 8-bit ZIP with 4-bit or 8-bit
images, the ZIP method is lossless, which means it does not remove data to
reduce file size and so does not affect an image’s quality. However, using 4-bit
ZIP compression with 8-bit data can affect the quality, since data is lost.
Note: Adobe’s implementation of the ZIP filter is derived from the zlib package
of Jean-loup Gailly and Mark Adler, whose generous assistance we gratefully
acknowledge.
The JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group) compression method is
suitable for grayscale or color images, such as continuous-tone photographs
that contain more detail than can be reproduced on-screen or in print. JPEG is
lossy, which means that it removes image data and may reduce image quality,
but it attempts to reduce file size with the minimum loss of information.
Because JPEG eliminates data, it can achieve much smaller file sizes than ZIP
compression.
■
Setting Acrobat Distiller Options
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Acrobat provides five JPEG options, ranging from Maximum quality (the least
compression and the smallest loss of data) to Minimum quality (the most
compression and the greatest loss of data). The loss of detail that results from
the Maximum and High quality settings are so slight that most people cannot
tell an image has been compressed; at Minimum and Low, however, the image
may become blocky and acquire a mosaic look. The Medium quality setting
usually strikes the best balance in creating a compact file while still
maintaining enough information to produce high-quality images.
The CCITT (International Coordinating Committee for Telephony and Telegraphy) compression method is appropriate for black-and-white images made
by paint programs and any images scanned with an image depth of 1 bit. CCITT
is a lossless method.
■
Acrobat provides the CCITT Group 3 and Group 4 compression options. CCITT
Group 4 is a general-purpose method that produces good compression for
most types of monochrome images. CCITT Group 3, used by most fax
machines, compresses monochrome bitmaps one row at a time.
Run Length is a lossless compression option that produces the best results
for images that contain large areas of solid white or black.
■
Setting Acrobat Distiller Options
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Push Button
Chuck
Come join us for the
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Suitable compression methods for different source art types: A. ZIP B. JPEG
C. CCITT D. Run Length
Setting Acrobat Distiller Options
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About resampling
Resampling refers to changing the pixel dimensions (and therefore file size) of
an image. When you downsample (or decrease the number of pixels), information is deleted from the image. When you resample, new pixel information is
added based on color values of existing pixels.
Distiller can downsample or subsample a bitmap image to reduce the amount
of data in the image to no more than what an output device needs. You should
resample bitmap images when they contain more data than the output device
can use. (For a table showing different output resolutions, see Setting the
Compression job options.) If your images are sampled at a higher resolution
than the device, the extra resolution only increases the time it takes the device
to process the image. Note that Distiller never resamples images to a higher
resolution, only to a lower one.
To resample an image, Distiller combines pixels in a sample area to make one
larger pixel. You provide the resolution of your output device in dots per inch
(dpi), and Distiller combines pixels as needed to reduce the image’s resolution
to the specified dpi setting:
Average downsampling averages the pixels in a sample area and replaces the
entire area with the average pixel color at the specified resolution.
■
Bicubic downsampling uses a weighted average to determine pixel color and
usually yields better results than the simple averaging method of downsam■
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pling. Bicubic is the slowest but most precise method, resulting in the
smoothest tonal gradations.
■ Subsampling chooses a pixel in the center of the sample area and replaces
the entire area with that pixel at the specified resolution. Subsampling significantly reduces the conversion time compared with downsampling but results
in images that are less smooth and continuous.
Setting the Compression job options
The Compression job options specify compression for text and line art, and
compression and resampling for bitmap images. Compression and resampling
can significantly reduce the size of a PDF file but can also degrade the quality of
images. However, it does not affect the quality of text and line art. You may
want to experiment with these options to find an appropriate balance between
file size and image quality.
To set the Compression job options:
1 Start Distiller.
2 Select an existing set of job options from the Job Options menu in the
Acrobat Distiller dialog box to use as a starting point.
3 Choose Settings > Job Options, and click the Compression tab.
4 To resample color or grayscale bitmap images, select Resampling in the
Color Bitmap Images or Grayscale Bitmap Images area as appropriate, choose
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Average Downsampling At, Subsampling At, or Bicubic Downsampling At, and
enter a resolution in dots per inch (dpi). Acrobat resamples all color or
grayscale bitmap images in a PDF file.
The resolution setting for color and grayscale should be 1.5 to 2 times the line
screen ruling at which the file will be printed. (As long as you don’t go below
this recommended resolution setting, images that contain no straight lines or
geometric or repeating patterns won’t be affected by a lower resolution.)
You should also consider whether users will need to magnify a page. For
example, if you are creating a PDF of a map, consider using a higher image
resolution so that users can zoom in on the map.
The following table shows common types of printers and their resolution
measured in dpi, their default screen ruling measured in lines per inch (lpi), and
a resampling resolution for images measured in pixels per inch (ppi). For
example, using the table, if you were printing to a 600 dpi laser printer, you
would enter 170 for the resolution at which to resample images.
Printer resolution
Default line screen
Image resolution
300 dpi (laser printer)
60 lpi
120 ppi
600 dpi (laser printer)
85 lpi
170 ppi
1200 dpi (imagesetter)
120 lpi
240 ppi
2400 dpi (imagesetter)
150 lpi
300 ppi
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5 To apply compression to color or grayscale bitmap images, select
Compression in the Color Bitmap Images or Grayscale Bitmap Images area as
appropriate, and choose Automatic, JPEG, or ZIP compression, and a quality
setting. Acrobat applies the compression to all color or grayscale bitmap
images in a PDF file.
If you select the Automatic option, Acrobat determines the best compression
method and quality for your color or grayscale bitmap images. For most PDF
files, this provides satisfactory results. JPEG is applied to 8-bit grayscale images
and to 8-bit, 16-bit, and 24-bit color images when the images have continuous,
smooth tones; ZIP is applied to 2-bit, 4-bit, and 8-bit grayscale images, to 4-bit
color images and indexed 8-bit color images, and to 16-bit and 24-bit color
images when the images have sharp color changes.
6 To resample monochrome bitmap images, select Resampling in the
Monochrome Bitmap Images area; choose Average Downsampling At,
Subsampling At, or Bicubic Downsampling At; and enter a resolution in dpi.
Acrobat resamples all monochrome bitmap images in a PDF file.
Use the same resolution as the output device but do not exceed 1500 dpi.
Saving a monochrome image at a resolution higher than 1500 dpi increases
the file size but does not improve image quality.
Note: Resampling monochrome images can have unexpected viewing results,
such as no image display. If this happens, turn off resampling and convert the
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file again. This problem is most likely to occur with subsampling and least likely
with bicubic downsampling.
7 To apply compression to monochrome images, select Compression in the
Monochrome Bitmap Images area, and choose CCITT Group 4, CCITT Group 3,
ZIP, or Run Length compression. Acrobat applies the compression to all
monochrome bitmap images in a PDF file.
Note: Make sure that monochrome images are scanned as monochrome and
not as grayscale. Scanned text is sometimes saved as grayscale images by
default. Grayscale text compressed with the JPEG compression method is
muddy at best and may be unreadable.
8 To apply compression to text and line art, select the setting. Distiller applies
the ZIP compression method to all text and line art in a PDF file. This method
results in no loss of detail or quality.
Note: If you selected Optimize PDF in the General settings, text and line art are
compressed regardless of what you choose here.
9 Do one of the following:
■
To apply the changes to the current job options, click OK.
To save the changes as a different job options file and make that the new job
options file, click Save As. Then enter a name and location for the new set, click
Save in the Save Job Options As dialog box, and click OK. By default, these files
are saved in the Distillr/Settings folder (Windows) or Distiller/Settings folder
■
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(Mac OS) in the Acrobat folder. You cannot overwrite the three predefined sets
of options.
Applying different settings to different images
When Distiller processes a PDF file, it normally applies your compression
settings to bitmap images throughout the file. If you want images in a file to
be compressed and resampled using different methods, you can do this in
several ways:
Use the Adobe Photoshop application to resample and compress images
before processing with Distiller. In this case, you should deselect the
compression and resampling options in Distiller.
■
■ Create separate PostScript files for each part of the document you want to
process differently, and use different compression options to distill each part.
Then use Acrobat to merge the resulting PDF files. You can write Distiller scripts
that use the RunFileX procedure to process every page with different resampling and compression settings. For more information, see Combining multiple
PostScript files into one PDF file.
Create color, grayscale, and monochrome images. Then select different
compression and resampling settings for each image type.
■
Insert Distiller parameters before images in a PostScript file. You can use this
technique to process every image in a document differently. The technique is
the most difficult because it requires that you edit a PostScript file and requires
■
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knowledge of PostScript programming. See the related technical note on the
Acrobat CD for more information on using parameters.
Note: The inserted distiller parameters will not be applied unless you select
Allow PostScript File To Override Job Options in Distiller’s Advanced job options
dialog box. However, selecting this option overrides the settings you selected
through the job options dialog boxes. For more information, see Setting the
Advanced job options.
Giving Distiller access to fonts
When converting a PostScript file to PDF, Distiller needs access to the file’s fonts
to be able to insert appropriate information in the PDF file. Distiller can access a
file’s fonts in several ways:
Type 1 fonts or TrueType fonts may be included in the PostScript file. For
information on putting fonts in a PostScript file, see the documentation that
came with the application and printer driver you are using to create the
PostScript file.
■
Type 1 fonts may be available in a font folder that Distiller monitors, and font
substitution information is contained in the Adobe Type Manager Font
Database. The fonts are called out by name in the PostScript file, and Distiller
looks in the folders to get the actual fonts or in the database to get font shape
information for substituting fonts. Acrobat provides a default font folder for
Distiller to monitor; you can also add your own folders. By default, Acrobat
■
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monitors the psfonts folder on your main drive in Windows and the System/
Fonts folder on Mac OS. The font database is contained in these folders as well.
■ Acrobat includes width-only versions of many common Chinese, Japanese,
and Korean fonts. On Mac OS, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean fonts can be
converted to a width-only font and stored in a Resource folder that Distiller
monitors. You can use the MakeCID utility on Mac OS to extract the width information and store the width-only font in the folder.
Note: Distiller does not support Type 32 fonts.
If Distiller cannot get access to a font in one of these ways, it uses Courier or
attempts font substitution for the font in the PDF file. Depending on your
preferences, Distiller may also display an error message and stop processing
the file.
Acrobat comes with a folder containing fonts that Distiller may need for
converting documents to PDF. If a PostScript file that Distiller is converting
refers to a font but does not contain the font itself, Distiller looks in this folder
for the font information to embed the font. You can set up additional font
folders for Distiller.
By default, fonts are placed in the following folders:
■ (Windows): Resource/Font in the Acrobat folder (and in /psfonts if ATM is
installed).
(Mac OS): Resource/Font in the Acrobat folder (and in System Folder/Fonts if
ATM is installed).
■
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To add a font folder:
1 Start Distiller.
2 Choose Settings > Font Locations. The dialog box displays a list of the folders
that Distiller searches for fonts. These folders can be on your hard drive or on
a network.
Note: Distiller indicates that a font folder is available by displaying a folder
icon to the left of the folder name. If no icon appears, or if an icon with an “x”
through it appears with a folder name, the connection to the folder has
probably been lost. You’ll need to reestablish the connection.
3 Click Add, use the browser to select the folder to add, and click OK
(Windows) or Select “folder” (Mac OS).
4 Click OK.
Note: To provide Distiller with access to a font folder that has been moved, use
this dialog box to remove the folder listed in its old location and add it in its
new location.
To remove a font folder:
1 Start Distiller.
2 Choose Settings > Font Locations.
3 Select the folder, and click Remove.
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4 Click OK.
Note: There must be at least one font folder available to Distiller. If the default
font folders are removed and you do not add others in their place, the defaults
are automatically added back to the list.
Embedding fonts in PDF files with Distiller
When Distiller has access to a font used in a PostScript file, it can embed that
font in the resulting PDF file. Embedding ensures that all readers will see the
text in its original font, but it increases file size.
About font embedding and substitution
Distiller can embed roman Type 1 and TrueType fonts in a PDF file to prevent
font substitution when someone who doesn’t have that font on their system
views or prints the file. For each font embedded, Distiller can embed the subset
of characters used in the file. Type 1 and TrueType fonts can be embedded if
they are included in the PostScript file or are available in one of the font
locations Distiller monitors. For more information, see Embedding fonts in PDF
files.
Note: In some cases, TrueType fonts that have gone through a PostScript driver
and Distiller can no longer be searched, copied, cut, or pasted. To minimize this
problem, use Distiller on the same system on which the PostScript file was
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created, and make sure that the TrueType fonts used in the file are available
on the system.
If a font is not embedded in a PDF file and the user who opens or prints the file
does not have access to the original font, Acrobat temporarily substitutes the
font with a Multiple Master serif or sansserif typeface. If the metrics of the
original font are included in the PDF file, the Multiple Master typeface can
stretch or condense to fit, to ensure that line and page breaks are maintained
from the original document. The substitution cannot always match the shape
of the original characters, however, especially if the characters are unconventional ones, such as script typefaces.
Font metrics
Substituted fonts
Original font: Adobe Garamond Italic
Original
The quick brown fox jumped over
the lazy dog on its way to the frog
jumping competition in the
countryside.
Substituted
A A
Substituted font: Adobe Serif MM
The quick brown fox jumped over
the lazy dog on its way to the frog
jumping competition in the
countryside.
A A
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You can have Distiller embed only the particular characters used in the file. This
saves file space, but if you need to edit text in the file later with the touchup
text tool, the characters you need may not be stored in the file. For more information, see Editing text with the touchup text tool.
Important: To edit files you must have a licensed copy of the font used in that
file on your local system.
Setting the Fonts job options
The Fonts job options specify fonts to embed in a PDF file. You can have
Distiller embed the subset of characters used in the PDF file.
Note: When you combine PDF files in Acrobat with the same font subset, the
subsets are not combined. As a result, combining files that contain subsets may
result in a large file.
To set the Fonts job options:
1 Start Distiller.
2 Select an existing set of job options from the Job Options menu in the
Acrobat Distiller dialog box to use as a starting point.
3 Choose Settings > Job Options, and click the Fonts tab.
4 Do one of the following:
■
To embed all fonts used in the file, select Embed All Fonts.
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To embed only certain fonts, make sure Embed All Fonts is not selected, and
move the fonts you want embedded to the Always Embed list.
■
You can move a font to the Always Embed list by selecting the font in the list on
the left and clicking the arrow button next to Always Embed. If necessary,
choose a different font folder from the pop-up menu to display the font in the
font list. Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) to select multiple
fonts to move, or Shift-click to select a contiguous range of fonts.
If the font you want is not in a font folder, click Add Name, enter the name of
the font, select Always Embed List, and click Add. See Finding PostScript font
names for information on getting an exact font name.
Note: A TrueType font can contain a setting added by the font’s designer that
prevents the font from being embedded in PDF files. Even though you can move
such a font to an embed list, Distiller does not embed it in the PDF file, but
displays an error message and lists the font in the log file. You can check
whether the font was embedded by opening the resulting PDF file and viewing
the Font Info dialog box as described in Finding PostScript font names.
5 To embed only a subset of the fonts, select Subset All Embedded Fonts
Below and specify a threshold percentage. If the threshold is 35, for example,
and less than 35% of the characters are used, Distiller embeds only those
characters.
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6 Choose how Distiller should respond if it cannot find a font to embed when
processing a file. You can have Distiller ignore the request and substitute the
font, warn you and substitute the font, or cancel processing of the current job.
7 Do one of the following:
■
To apply the changes to the current job options, click OK.
To save the changes as a different job options file and make that the new job
options file, click Save As. Then enter a name and location for the new set, click
Save in the Save Job Options As dialog box, and click OK. By default, these files
are saved in the Distillr/Settings folder (Windows) or Distiller/Settings folder
(Mac OS) in the Acrobat folder. You cannot overwrite the three predefined sets
of options.
■
To prevent fonts from being embedded:
Do one of the following in the Fonts panel of the Job Options dialog box:
If the font is in an available font folder, select the font in the list on the left,
and click the right arrow button next to the Never Embed list. If necessary,
choose a different font folder from the pop-up menu to display the font in the
list. You can Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) to select multiple
fonts, or Shift-click to select a contiguous range of fonts.
■
■ If the font is not in a font folder, click Add Name, enter the name of the font,
select Never Embed List, and click Add. See Finding PostScript font names for
information on getting an exact font name.
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To remove a font from the Always Embed or Never Embed list:
Select the font from the list and click Remove. This does not remove the font
from your system, it just removes the reference to it in the Always Embed or
Never Embed list.
Finding PostScript font names
If you need to enter a font name manually in the Fonts panel of Job Options,
you can use a PDF file to find the exact spelling of the name.
To find a PostScript font name:
1 Use any application to create a one-page document with the PostScript font.
2 Create a PDF file from the document.
3 Open the PDF file with Acrobat, and choose File > Document Info > Fonts. If
the file contains more than a single page and the font you’re interested in is not
on the first page, click List All Fonts.
4 Write down the name of the font, using the exact spelling, capitalization,
and hyphenation of the name as it appears in the Font Info dialog box.
5 Click OK to close the dialog box.
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About color management
By their very natures, a monitor and printer reproduce color in completely
different ways.
A color management system (CMS) is a collection of software tools designed to
reconcile the different color capabilities of scanners, monitors, and printers to
ensure consistent color throughout the creation, display, and print process.
Ideally, this means that the colors displayed on your monitor accurately
represent the colors of the final output. It also means that different applications, monitors, and operating systems will display colors consistently.
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The RGB color model
A monitor uses red, green, and blue (RGB) light to create colors. Combining full
intensities of all three colors makes white. RGB colors are used for lighting,
video, and monitors. Your computer monitor, for example, creates color by
emitting light through red, green, and blue phosphors.
RGB color model
The CMYK color model
A color printer uses a CMYK color model, in which three colors of transparent
ink—cyan (C), magenta(M), and yellow (Y)—are combined along with black
(noted as K instead of B to avoid confusion with blue) in varying amounts to
create colors. CMYK inks filter the white light that reflects back from the paper
and subtract some of the red, green, and blue light from the spectrum. The
color we see is what’s left.
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In theory, pure cyan, magenta, and yellow pigments should combine to absorb
all color and produce black. But because all printing inks contain some
impurities, these three inks actually produce a muddy brown and must be
combined with black ink to produce a true black. Combining these inks to
reproduce color is called four-color process printing.
CMYK color model
The Grayscale color model
Black-and-white and grayscale printers and scanners typically use a Grayscale
color model to produce images. The Grayscale color model uses shades of gray.
Every pixel of a grayscale image has a brightness value ranging from 0% (white)
to 100% (black).
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Gamuts and color spaces
Most problems associated with accurately reproducing colors from a software
program stem from reconciling the differences between the total set of colors,
or gamut, produced by the red, green, and blue phosphors of a computer
monitor and the gamut produced by the cyan, magenta, yellow, and black inks
of a printer. In addition, colors can vary dramatically between different
monitors, printers, and software. The color space for a device is defined by the
gamut it can represent.
For example, an RGB image (that is, an image whose colors are represented
with the RGB color model) may contain colors that cannot be reproduced by a
particular monitor. That is because the image has colors that are outside the
gamut, or color space, of that monitor.
A
B
C
A. Lab color gamut B. RGB color gamut
C. CMYK color gamut
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Device-dependent color
Color varies depending on the device that produces it. An image (a vector
drawing or bitmap image) with a device-dependent color space displays colors
that depend on the hardware with which the image is created and output.
Device-dependent color works best when each part of the imaging process is
controlled. For example, in a print service bureau, the scanner is calibrated to
digitize color in a photo accurately, the electronic image is then displayed on a
particular calibrated monitor, and the resulting file is printed on a particular
calibrated printer. All of these devices are calibrated to display color accurately
from one device to the other.
However, the devices on which an image is reproduced may not all be under a
single person’s or group’s control. Take, for instance, an image of a rainbow. If
the monitor on which it was created accentuates blues, the person creating the
rainbow might have lessened the blue in the rainbow to compensate.
But suppose that image is then displayed on a monitor that displays blues
normally, but accentuates reds. The blue portion of the rainbow will seem
washed out and the reds overly strong. Even if the monitors are the same
model, one monitor may have its contrast and brightness adjusted differently
than another, affecting colors when viewed on each monitor.
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Device-independent color
In a sense, each device speaks its own color language, and it can’t communicate that color very well to another device. What’s needed is an interpreter,
such as a color management system.
A color management system uses a device-independent color model as the
color language by which all color information is referenced. The color model
Acrobat uses is called CIELAB, developed in 1976 by the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (International Committee on Illumination, or CIE). The
CIE’s standard for measuring color is based on how the human eye perceives it,
not on the device that created it.
Images can be edited in a device-independent color space which is larger than
the color space of the output device, such as a computer monitor, a TV screen,
film, or a four-color press. Images can then be saved with profiles that contain
information describing the characteristics of the source and output color
devices.
This makes a color-managed workflow advantageous. The images become
portable since they can be displayed on widely differing devices simply by
tagging the images with different output profiles.
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Managing ICC profiles in files
One of the methods Acrobat uses to manage color is to apply ICC profiles to
grayscale, RGB, and CMYK images. The ICC profile format was defined by the
International Color Consortium (ICC). An ICC profile is a color space description
(for example, a description of the type of monitor on which the image was
created). ICC profiles help you reproduce colors accurately across different
platforms, devices, and ICC-compliant applications (such as Adobe Illustrator
and Adobe PageMaker).
To manage color effectively across systems and applications, it is important to
attach (or tag) ICC profiles to images in files. The ICC profile for an image then
indicates the correct color space for that image. When another ICC-aware application opens a properly tagged image, that application knows what, if any,
color conversions are required.
Take the instance of an ICC profile for an RGB image that indicates the image
was created on a monitor whose color space accentuates blues. When an ICCaware application opens the image on a monitor that displays blues normally
but accentuates reds, the application temporarily converts the color for display
on that monitor, so that blues and reds display correctly. The file itself is not
changed. The application that displays the image simply uses the profile to
compensate for the difference between the color space in which the file was
created and the color space in which it is being displayed.
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Setting color options
The Color dialog box lets you specify how Distiller uses ICC profiles (“tags”) and
whether it converts colors when distilling files. The settings control which color
spaces are assumed when the resulting PDF files are exchanged between
different applications and output devices.
It’s worth noting the following when attaching profiles:
■ PostScript files can contain calibrated color information. However, they do
not contain ICC profiles. Instead, images using device-independent colors
(such as those tagged with ICC profiles) are saved in a device-independent CIE
color space in PostScript. Images using device-dependent colors remain as
they were. No color information is lost in the resulting PostScript file. You can
use the Color dialog box to attach new, and even different, ICC profiles to the
distilled PDF file. This action doesn’t alter the colors, it just calibrates them to
different profiles.
■ When tagging for color management, Distiller attaches a separate profile for
each color space in a file. For example, a document might contain five images:
one in Grayscale, and two each in the RGB and CMYK color spaces. In this case,
Distiller would attach a separate ICC profile to calibrate the color for each color
space, for a total of three profiles.
Note: To ensure that the final printed output is the color you want, it is a good
idea to consult your printer or service bureau and specify color options based
on their recommendations.
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To set color options:
1 Start Distiller.
2 Select an existing set of job options from the Job Options menu in the
Acrobat Distiller dialog box to use as a starting point.
3 Choose Settings > Job Options.
4 Click the Color tab.
5 Choose a Conversion option:
Leave Color Unchanged. This option leaves device-dependent colors
unchanged. With this option you cannot choose assumed profile options. The
Leave Color Unchanged option can be useful for print shops that have
calibrated all their devices, used that information to specify color in the file, and
are only outputting to those devices.
■
Tag Everything For Color Mgmt (No Conversion)/Convert Everything For
Color Management. With Acrobat 4.0 compatibility selected in the General job
options, the Tag Everything For Color Mgmt (No Conversion) option appears
and lets you embed an ICC profile when distilling files and calibrates color in
the images, making colors in the resulting PDF files device-independent.
■
With Acrobat 3.0 compatibility selected, the option appears as Convert Everything For Color Management, and no ICC profiles are embedded in the files.
However, device-dependent color spaces in files (RGB, Grayscale, and CMYK)
are converted to device-independent color spaces (CalRGB, CalGray, and LAB).
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Tag Only Images For Color Management (No Conversion)/Convert Only
Images For Color Management. With Acrobat 4.0 compatibility selected in the
General dialog box, the Tag Only Images For Color Management (No
Conversion) only embeds ICC profiles in bitmap images, not text or graphics,
when distilling files. This prevents black text from undergoing any color shift.
■
With Acrobat 3.0 compatibility selected, the option appears as Convert Only
Images For Color Management, and no ICC profiles are embedded in the files.
However, device-dependent color spaces in bitmap images (RGB, Grayscale,
and CMYK) are converted to device-independent color spaces (CalRGB,
CalGray, and LAB). Text and graphics are not converted.
■ Convert All Colors To sRGB/CalRGB. As with the Tag For Color Management
(No Conversion)/Convert For Color Management option, this option calibrates
color in the file, making the color device-independent. With Acrobat 4.0
compatibility selected in the General dialog box, CMYK and RGB images are
converted to sRGB. With Acrobat 3.0 compatibility selected, CMYK and RGB
images are converted to calibrated RGB (CalRGB).
Regardless of the compatibility option you select, grayscale images are left
unchanged. This option usually reduces the size and increases the display
speed of PDF files because less information is needed to describe RGB than
CMYK images. Because RGB is the native color space used on monitors, no
color conversion is necessary during display, which contributes to fast online
viewing. This option is recommended if the PDF file will be used online or with
low-end printers.
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6 If you chose Tag/Convert Everything For Color Management, Tag/Convert
Only Images For Color Management, or Convert All Colors to sRGB/CalRGB,
choose an Assumed Profiles option for each color space. These options let you
choose which ICC profiles to use for defining and calibrating the Grayscale,
RGB, and CMYK color spaces in distilled PDF files:
For Gray, choose a profile to define the color space of all grayscale images in
files. This option is only available if you chose Tag Everything For Color Mgmt
(no conversion) or Tag Only Images For Color Management (no conversions).
The default ICC profile for gray images is Adobe Gray - 20% Dot Gain. You can
also choose None to prevent grayscale images from being converted.
■
■ For RGB, choose a profile to define the color space of all RGB images in files.
The default, sRGB IEC61966-2.1, is generally a good choice because it is
becoming an industry standard and is recognized by many output devices. You
can also choose None to prevent RGB images from being converted.
■ For CMYK, choose a profile to define the color space of all CMYK images in
files. The default is Adobe CMYK. You can also choose None to prevent CMYK
images from being converted.
Note: Choosing None for all three color spaces has the same effect as selecting
the option Leave Color Unchanged.
You can add ICC profiles (such as ones provided by your print service
bureau) by placing them in the ICCProfiles folder in the Acrobat folder, the
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Windows/System/Color folder (Windows), or the System Folder/ Preferences/
ColorSync folder (Mac OS).
™
7 Choose any of the following options (these settings are typically used with
documents from high-end documentation and graphics applications such as
Adobe Illustrator and Adobe PageMaker. For more information, see the
documentation that came with the application):
■ Preserve Overprint Settings retains any overprint settings in files being
converted to PDF. Overprint colors are two or more transparent inks printed on
top of each other. For example, when a cyan ink prints over a yellow ink, the
resulting overprint is a green color. Without overprinting, the underlying
yellow would not be printed, resulting in a cyan color.
Preserve Under Color Removal And Black Generation Settings retains these
settings if they exist in the PostScript file.
■
Black generation calculates the amount of black to be used when trying to
reproduce a particular color. Undercolor removal (UCR) reduces the amount of
cyan, magenta, and yellow components to compensate for the amount of
black that was added by the black generation. Because it uses less ink, UCR is
generally used for newsprint and uncoated stock.
■ Preserve Transfer Functions retains the transfer functions traditionally used
to compensate for dot gain or dot loss that may occur when an image is transferred to film. Dot gain occurs when the ink dots that make up a printed image
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are larger (for example, due to spreading on paper) than in the halftone screen;
dot loss occurs when the dots print smaller.
Transfer functions are specific to an output device. For example, a file that is
intended for output on a particular imagesetter may contain transfer functions
that compensate for the dot gain inherent with that printer.
Preserve Halftone Information retains any halftone information in files.
Halftone information consists of dots that control how much ink is deposited
by halftone devices at a specific location on the paper. Varying the dot size
and density creates the illusion of variations of gray or continuous color. For a
CMYK image, four halftone screens are used: one for each ink used in the
printing process.
■
In traditional print production, a halftone is produced by placing a halftone
screen between a piece of film and the image and then exposing the film.
Electronic equivalents, such as in Adobe Photoshop, let users specify the
halftone screen attributes before producing the film or paper output.
As with transfer functions, halftone information is intended for use with a
particular output device.
8 Do one of the following:
■
To apply the changes to the current job options, click OK.
To save the changes as a different job options file and make that the new job
options file, click Save As. Then enter a name and location for the new set, click
■
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Save in the Save Job Options As dialog box, and click OK. By default, these files
are saved in the Distillr/Settings folder (Windows) or Distiller/Settings folder
(Mac OS) folder in the Acrobat folder. You cannot overwrite the three
predefined sets of options.
Setting the Advanced job options
The Advanced job options specify DSC comments to keep in a PDF file, define a
default page size, and set other options that affect the conversion from
PostScript.
In a PostScript file, DSC comments contain information about the file (such as
the originating application, the creation date, and the page orientation) and
provide structure for page descriptions in the file (such as beginning and
ending statements for a prologue section). DSC comments can be useful when
your document is going to print or press.
The default page size is used if a PostScript file does not specify a page size.
Typically, PostScript files include this information, except for EPS files, which
give a bounding box size but not a page size.
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When working with the Advanced job options, it is helpful to have an understanding of the PostScript language and how it is translated to PDF. See the
PostScript Language Reference Manual (Addison-Wesley), the Portable
Document Format Reference Manual, and Updates to the Portable Document
Format Reference Manual. (The latter two documents are available on the
Adobe Web site at www.adobe.com.)
To change the Advanced job options:
1 Start Distiller.
2 Select an existing set of job options from the Job Options menu in the
Acrobat Distiller dialog box to use as a starting point.
3 Choose Settings > Job Options, and click the Advanced tab.
4 Select the file conversion options you want:
Use Prologue.ps And Epilogue.ps sends a prologue and epilogue file with
each job. These files have many purposes. For example, prologue files can be
edited to specify cover pages; epilogue files can be edited to resolve a series of
procedures in a PostScript file. A sample Prologue.ps and Epilogue.ps file is
located in the Distillr/Data folder (Windows) and Distiller/Data folder (Mac OS).
■
Note: Distiller processes prologue and epilogue files only if they are located
properly. The files need to be in the same folder as the Distiller application if the
Open command or a watched folder is used to process a PostScript file. If the
prologue and epilogue files are at the same level as the In and Out folders of a
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watched folder (that is, local to the watched folder), they are used instead of
the ones in the same folder as the Distiller application.
■ Allow PostScript File To Override Job Options uses settings stored in a
PostScript file, rather than your current job options. Before processing a
PostScript file, you can place Distiller parameters in the file to control
compression of text and graphics, downsampling and encoding of sampled
images, and embedding of Type 1 fonts and instances of Type 1 Multiple
Master fonts. See the related technical note on the Acrobat CD for more information on using parameters.
Preserve Level 2 Copypage Semantics uses the copypage operator defined in
LanguageLevel 2 PostScript rather than in LanguageLevel 3 PostScript. This
means that if you have a LanguageLevel 3 PostScript file and select this option,
Distiller will make the copypage a showpage operation.
■
Save Portable Job Ticket Inside PDF File preserves a PostScript job ticket in a
PDF file. The job ticket contains information about the PostScript file itself, such
as page size, resolution, and trapping information, rather than about content.
This information can be used later in a workflow or for printing the PDF.
■
5 To maintain document structuring information from a PostScript file, select
Process DSC Comments (Windows) or Process DSC (Mac OS) and related
options:
Log DSC Warnings displays warning messages about problematic DSC
comments during processing and adds them to a log file for these messages.
■
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Resize Page And Center Artwork For EPS Files centers an EPS image and
resizes the page to fit closely around the image. This option applies only to jobs
that consist of a single EPS file.
■
Preserve EPS Information From DSC (Windows) and Preserve EPS Info From
DSC (Mac OS) retains information, such as the originating application and
creation date for an EPS file. With this option deselected, the page is sized and
centered based on the top left corner of the top left object and bottom right
corner of the bottom right object on the page.
■
Preserve OPI Comments retains information needed to replace a For
Placement Only (FPO) image or comment with the high-resolution image
located on servers that support OPI versions 1.3 and 2.0.
■
Preserve Document Information From DSC (Windows) and Preserve
Document Info (Mac OS) retains information such as the title, creation date,
and time. When you open a PDF file in Acrobat, this information appears in the
General Info dialog box (through File > Document Info > General).
■
6 To specify a default page size, enter a width and height, and choose a unit of
measure. The maximum size is 200-by-200 inches. Distiller uses this page size
only if a PostScript file does not specify a paper size.
7 Do one of the following:
■
To apply the changes to the current job options, click OK.
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To save the changes as a different job options file and make that the new job
options file, click Save As. Then enter a name and location for the new set, click
Save in the Save Job Options As dialog box, and click OK. By default, these files
are saved in the Distillr/Settings folder (Windows) or Distiller/Settings folder
(Mac OS) in the Acrobat folder. You cannot overwrite the three predefined sets
of options.
■
Adding security to PDF files
You can limit access to all PDF files created by Distiller by giving the files
passwords and restricting certain features such as printing and editing. You can
limit the access when you first create a PDF file or any time you save the file in
Acrobat. When files have restricted features, any tools and menu items related
to those features are dimmed.
A PDF file can have an open document password and a change security
settings password. If the file has both passwords, it can be opened with either
one. When a file is opened with an open document password, the security
restrictions are temporarily disabled. If you set any security restrictions in your
file, you should also specify a change security setting password; otherwise
anyone who opens the file could remove the restrictions.
Acrobat uses the RC4 method of security from RSA Corporation to secure
PDF files.
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To add security to PDF files:
1 Start Distiller.
2 Choose Settings > Security.
3 Enter a password in one or both of the password text boxes:
For Open Document, enter the password users must enter before they can
open the file.
■
■ For Change Security, enter the password users must enter before they can set
or change any security options.
Note: It is a good idea to use different passwords for the two text boxes.
Otherwise, a user who has the password to open the document can also
change the document’s security options.
4 Select options to prevent users from printing, changing the document,
selecting text and graphics, or adding or changing notes and form fields:
■
Printing prohibits users from printing the file.
■ Changing The Document prohibits users from filling in form fields, as well as
making any other changes.
■
Selecting Text and Graphics prohibits users from selecting these elements.
Adding Or Changing Notes And Form Fields prohibits users from adding or
changing these areas, but does allow users to fill in the fields.
■
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5 Do one of the following:
■
To apply the changes to the current job options, click OK.
■ To save the changes as a different job options file and make that the new job
options file, click Save As. Then enter a name and location for the new set, click
Save in the Save Job Options As dialog box, and click OK. By default, these files
are saved in the Distillr/Settings folder (Windows) or Distiller/Settings folder
(Mac OS) in the Acrobat folder. You cannot overwrite the three predefined sets
of options.
Preparing to convert Asian text to PDF (Windows)
On Windows systems, Distiller can create PDF files from documents with Asian
text, as long as it has access to information about the fonts needed to process
the text. This information can come from Asian TrueType fonts included in the
PostScript file or from PostScript fonts on the system.
To be able to create PDF files with Asian text, you need to install Asianlanguage resource files for Distiller when you install Acrobat. See Installing
Acrobat (Windows) for details. For additional information, see the Asian fonts
PDF document in the Help folder on your Acrobat CD-ROM.
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Embedding Asian TrueType fonts in a PDF file
If you’re creating a PDF file from a document that has Asian TrueType fonts, you
may want to embed those fonts in the PDF file so that the file will look exactly
like the original document on every system. To be able to do this, you need to
include information about the fonts in the interim PostScript file in a form that
Distiller can interpret. Distiller will recognize the fonts and embed them in the
resulting PDF file.
Note: Because the ability to embed Asian fonts is an Acrobat 4.0 feature,
Distiller’s job options must be set to 4.0 compatibility. For more information,
see Setting the General job options.
To embed Asian TrueType fonts in a PDF file:
1 Choose Settings > Printers from the Windows Start menu. Then right-click
on the Acrobat Distiller printer, and choose Properties. See your Windows
documentation for details on the Properties dialog box.
2 In the Fonts panel, select the Send TrueType Fonts to Printer option, and
click Edit the Table.
3 Set the download option to Type 42 for each TrueType font used in the
document. Type 42 is a format that “wraps” TrueType character outlines in a
PostScript format that Distiller can recognize.
4 Click OK in the Font Substitution Table dialog box and in the Properties
dialog box.
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Substituting Asian TrueType fonts with printer font references
Another option for handling Asian TrueType fonts is to substitute them with
PostScript printer fonts in the PDF file. Distiller puts references to the appropriate printer fonts in the file rather than embedding the original fonts, so this
usually results in a smaller PDF file. The disadvantage is that the PDF file will not
maintain the original look of the TrueType fonts.
If you use your own printer to create the PostScript file rather than the Distiller
printer, use the AdobePS 4.2.4 driver installed with Acrobat and the Acrobat
Distiller PPD (Adist4*.ppd in your Windows/System folder).
To substitute Asian TrueType fonts with printer font references:
1 Choose Settings > Printers from the Windows Start menu. Then right-click
on the Acrobat Distiller printer or other printer you are using, and choose
Properties. See your Windows documentation for details on the Properties
dialog box.
2 In the Fonts panel, select the Always Use PostScript Fonts option. Then
click OK.
Working with Japanese ATM Type 1 fonts
If your document has Japanese ATM Type 1 PostScript fonts, and you have
these fonts installed on your Windows system, Distiller can directly access the
fonts to display and print Asian text.
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The fonts must be in the default ATM folder for Distiller to access them. In
addition, the fonts must be in the CID-keyed (character ID-keyed) format; the
earlier OCF (original composite format) is not supported. You can use the
Distiller job options to specify whether to embed the fonts in the resulting PDF
file or to put references to the fonts in the file.
Preparing to convert Asian text to PDF (Mac OS)
Distiller can create PDF files from documents with Asian text on a Mac OS
system, as long as it has access to information about the fonts needed to
process the text. This information comes from fonts that are included in the file
or on the system.
To be able to create PDF files with Asian text, you need to install Asianlanguage resource files for Distiller when you install Acrobat. See Installing
Acrobat (Mac OS) for details. For additional information, see the Asian fonts
PDF document located in the Help folder on your Acrobat CD-ROM.
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Working with TrueType fonts
In Mac OS, the PostScript printer driver cannot embed TrueType fonts in the
PostScript file that Distiller processes. As a result, TrueType fonts cannot be
embedded. If your document has Asian TrueType fonts, you can run the
MakeCID (character ID) utility to convert the fonts to a form Distiller can
process to create references to Asian fonts in the PDF file. See Using MakeCID
to create width-only fonts for details on this utility.
Working with Asian ATM Type 1 fonts
If your document has Asian ATM Type 1 PostScript fonts, and if you have these
fonts installed on your Mac OS, Distiller can directly access the fonts to display
and print Asian text. The fonts must be in the System Folder/Fonts folder for
Distiller to access them. In addition, the fonts must be in the CID-keyed
(character ID-keyed) format; the earlier OCF (original composite format) is not
supported. You can use the Distiller job options to specify whether to embed
the fonts in the resulting PDF file or to put references to the fonts in the file.
If you have Type 1 fonts in OCF, you can run MakeCID to create CID fonts with
the same properties as the OCF fonts. The fonts will be referenced in the PDF
file; they cannot be embedded in the file. See Using MakeCID to create widthonly fonts for details on this utility.
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Working with Adobe Type Composer Japanese fonts
The Adobe Type Composer (ATC) utility enables you to create a composite
Japanese font that may use different fonts for different types of characters, one
font for Kanji and another font for Kana or Gaiji. When you create an ATC font
and place it in your Mac OS system font folder, MakeCID runs automatically,
creates a width-only CID font, and updates the PPD.
By creating an ATC font with Gaiji rows, you can write documents that contain
Gaiji characters as if they were part of the original font. When Distiller creates a
PDF file, the Gaiji are automatically embedded in the file so that the Gaiji will
display and print correctly on any system.
Preventing ATM from rasterizing Asian fonts
If you have Adobe Type Manager (ATM) on your system, you need to make sure
that ATM will not rasterize the Asian characters. (Rasterizing means converting
character outlines to bitmap images. ATM rasterizes text if a printer does not
have the appropriate font installed.)
To prevent ATM from rasterizing Asian fonts:
1 In Acrobat, choose File > Print.
2 Choose Save As File in the pop-up menu for printing options.
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3 Do one of the following:
Choose None from the Font Inclusion pop-up menu to download no
bitmapped fonts to the printer.
■
Choose All But Fonts In PPD File from the pop-up menu, and make sure the
fonts you want in the PDF file are in the Distiller PPD file. When MakeCID
converts an OCF or TrueType font to CID, it updates the PPD file to include the
new CID font.
■
4 Click Print.
Using MakeCID to create width-only fonts
If your document has Asian TrueType or Type 1 OCF fonts, Distiller needs
character-width information from roman characters found in the fonts to be
able to create a PDF file. You can run a utility called MakeCID to extract the
width information and store special width-only CID fonts in a Resource folder
for Distiller to use. The width-only fonts do not have character outlines and are
used only by Distiller.
The first time you start Distiller on a Macintosh, you are asked to run MakeCID.
If you click OK, Distiller creates the width-only fonts from Asian fonts on your
system. If you add or remove Asian fonts, the next time you start Distiller you
are prompted to run MakeCID again. You can also run MakeCID manually by
double-clicking its icon. The fonts are stored in the Distiller/Data/PSdisk/
Resource/CIDFont folder.
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MakeCID runs only on a Macintosh and extracts information from only
Macintosh Asian fonts. If you want Distiller to use the width-only CID fonts in
Windows, you can copy the fonts to your Windows system. The Windows
version of Distiller will then process PostScript files created on a Mac OS system
that have references to the Macintosh Asian fonts.
Acrobat comes with width-only CID fonts and compatible fonts for all Chinese,
Japanese, and Korean fonts in the Adobe Type Library, and all Macintosh and
Windows Chinese, Japanese, and Korean system fonts. Distiller can process
these fonts without having to run MakeCID.
Note: The widths of roman characters in Adobe Japanese fonts are predefined
for Distiller, so you do not need to run MakeCID on Adobe Japanese fonts.
To run MakeCID manually:
1 Open the Acrobat Xtras folder, and double-click the MakeCID icon.
2 Choose File > Open Font Folder.
3 Use the browser to select a font folder or a single font.
4 Select the Acrobat/Data/PSdisk/Resource folder, and click Select, or doubleclick the folder. MakeCID processes the font or fonts and places width-only
fonts in appropriate subfolders of the Resource folder.
Note: If you select a folder other than Resource, CIDFonts and CompatibleFonts
subfolders are automatically created in the folder you select.
5 Choose File > Quit.
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To copy the width-only fonts to a Windows system:
1 Copy the contents of the Acrobat 4.0/Distiller/Data/PSdisk/Resource/
CIDFonts folder on the Mac OS system to the Acrobat/Distillr/Data/PSdisk/
Resource/CIDFonts folder on the Windows system.
2 Copy the contents of the Acrobat/Distiller/Data/PSdisk/Resource/CompatibleFonts folder on the Mac OS system to the Acrobat/Distillr/Data/PSdisk/
Resource/CompatibleFonts folder on the Windows system.
3 Restart Acrobat in Windows.
Setting Distiller preferences
The Distiller preferences control various aspects of the conversion process.
To set Distiller preferences:
1 Start Distiller, and choose File > Preferences.
2 Select the preferences you want:
Restart Distiller After PostScript Fatal Error (Mac OS only) automatically
restarts Distiller after a PostScript error that would otherwise force you to quit
Distiller. (In Windows, a prompt appears asking whether you want to quit or
restart Distiller.)
■
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Notify When Watched Folders Are Unavailable notifies you if a folder on the
list of available watched folders becomes unavailable or if Distiller cannot
find it.
■
Notify When Startup Volume Is Nearly Full warns you if less than 1 MB of
space is available on the hard disk where Distiller is installed. Although the size
of the PDF file in relation to the PostScript file can vary, and is typically smaller
than the PostScript file, the hard disk space you need to convert to PDF is often
double the size of the PostScript file being processed.
■
Ask For PDF File Destination (Windows only) displays a dialog box that lets
you name and specify a location for files when you use drag-and-drop or the
Print command with Distiller.
■
Ask To Replace Existing PDF File (Windows only) displays a dialog box that
warns you when you are about to overwrite an existing PDF file with a file of
the same name.
■
■ View PDF When Using Distiller Printer (Windows only) automatically displays
a converted PDF file when you use the Print command with Distiller.
View PDF When Using Distiller (Windows only) automatically displays a
converted PDF file when you convert a document with Distiller.
■
3 Click OK.
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Converting Scanned Documents to PDF
You can use Acrobat with a scanner to create a PDF file from a paper document.
The resulting file is a PDF Image Only file—that is, a bitmap picture of the
pages that can be viewed in Acrobat but not searched.
If you want to be able to search, correct, and copy the text in an Image Only file,
you can “capture” the pages in the file to convert the file to PDF Normal. When
you capture pages, Acrobat applies optical character recognition (OCR) and
font and page recognition to the text images and converts them to searchable,
scalable text. You can also convert a file to PDF Original Image With Hidden Text
when you capture pages. This type of file has a picture of the pages in the
foreground, with the captured text behind it.
PDF Normal files are generally the smallest files, making them ideal for online
distribution. PDF Original Image With Hidden Text files are recommended
when you need to have regular text but must keep the original scanned image
of a page for legal or archival purposes.
Scanning pages from paper documents
You can use the Acrobat Scan command to run your scanner from Acrobat.
Before you begin scanning, make sure that your scanner is installed correctly
and that it works independently of Acrobat. Follow the scanner instructions
and test procedures to ensure proper setup.
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Acrobat supports TWAIN scanner drivers, which are industry-standard drivers
compatible with almost all desktop scanners, and Photoshop Acquire plug-ins.
To install an Acquire plug-in, add the plug-in to the Plug-ins folder in your
Acrobat Scan folder.
You can also use the Scan command to import images stored in a digital
camera, as long as the camera has a TWAIN driver installed. See Converting
image files to PDF.
To scan pages from a paper document:
1 Start your scanner, and place the first page in it.
2 In Acrobat, choose File > Import > Scan.
3 Choose the scanner and a page format from the pop-up menus. The Device
pop-up menu lists all TWAIN drivers and Photoshop Acquire plug-ins installed
on your system.
Note: Even if you install a TWAIN driver after installing Acrobat, the new driver
should be listed in the menu. If it is not, check to be sure your driver is TWAIN
software and is installed properly.
4 Select whether to add the scanned pages to the end of the current PDF file
or to put them in a new file.
5 Click Scan.
6 Set the scanning options in the scanner’s interface. Some scanners open a
dialog box with options, and others display a menu bar that gives you access to
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commands for setting options. In most cases, you also need to click a Scan
button or send the page to the scanner in some other way. See the documentation that came with your scanner for details.
For tips on setting options for particular situations, see Tips on scanning pages.
7 For each additional page you want to scan, place the page in the scanner,
and click Next in the Acrobat dialog box that appears.
8 Click Done. The scanned pages open in Acrobat.
Tips on scanning pages
The following guidelines cover scanning text you plan to capture, scanning
pages with line art and photographs, and working with a scanner to produce
the cleanest scanned pages possible.
Scanning text you plan to capture
■ For normal text, set up the scanner to create black-and-white (or 1-bit)
images.
Black-and-white images and text must be scanned at 200 to 600 dpi. Color
images and text must be scanned at 200 to 400 dpi.
■
Note: Pages (8.5-by-11 inches) scanned in 24-bit color and 300 dpi are very
large files (24 MB); your system must have at least twice that amount of virtual
memory available to be able to scan. If you’re scanning in color, check that you
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have at least 50 MB of space available on your hard drive before beginning the
scanning process.
■ For color or grayscale pages with large type, consider scanning at 200 dpi for
faster processing.
For the Capture Pages command to be able to recognize text, the text must
be upright and not rotated. (The text can be skewed as much as 7 degrees,
however.) If you scan black-and-white text that has been rotated 90 degrees
(landscape), Acrobat will rotate it 90 degrees back (portrait) when you capture;
Acrobat will not automatically rotate color or grayscale pages or pages that are
upside-down. In Windows, you can use the Document > Rotate Pages
command to rotate color, grayscale, or upside-down pages manually before
capturing them.
■
For most pages, scanning at 300 dpi produces the best captures. However, if
a page has many unrecognized words or very small text (9 points or below), try
scanning at a higher resolution (up to 600 dpi). Scan in black and white
whenever possible.
■
Do not use dithering or halftone scanner settings. These settings can
improve the appearance of photographic images, but they make it difficult to
recognize text.
■
For text printed on colored paper, try increasing the brightness and contrast
by about 10%. If your scanner has color-filtering capability, consider using a
filter or lamp that drops out the background color.
■
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If your scanner has a manual brightness control, adjust it so that characters
are clean and well formed. If characters are touching because they are too
thick, use a higher (brighter) setting. If characters are separated because they
are too thin, use a lower (darker) setting.
■
Characters that are too thin, well-formed characters,
and characters that are too thick
Note: The Capture Pages command is designed primarily for black-and-white
text, but it can be adjusted to work with color text if there is a high contrast and
a minimum of background color or graphics. For complex color OCR work, see
the Adobe Web site (www.adobe.com) for information on the full Acrobat
Capture product.
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Scanning line art and photographs
For line art, set up the scanner to create a black-and-white (line art or
1-bit) image.
■
For black-and-white photographs, set up the scanner to create a grayscale
image. Remember that a grayscale scan will create a much larger file than a
black-and-white scan will.
■
■
For color photographs, set up the scanner to create a color image.
Working with scanners
■
Clean the scan bed glass frequently.
When scanning from a bound book or magazine, place something heavy,
such as a large dictionary, on the lid of the scanner to flatten the pages.
■
When scanning from a magazine or newspaper, cut out the articles or parts
of the page you want to scan. Use a paper cutter or a straightedge to keep cut
edges vertical and horizontal.
■
Make sure the edges of the page are aligned correctly in the scan bed.
Although the Capture Pages command can convert pages skewed as much as 7
degrees, processing can be less accurate with incorrectly aligned pages.
■
When scanning a document printed on glossy paper, try lowering the
brightness setting with your scanner control software. Or photocopy the glossy
page, and scan the photocopy.
■
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Capturing pages to convert to searchable text
You can capture pages in a PDF Image Only file to convert text images to text
that can be searched, corrected, and copied. When you capture pages, Acrobat
performs optical character recognition (OCR) and font and page recognition on
the pages and assigns a confidence rating to each word it finds.
Note: The Capture Pages command is designed to convert small collections of
paper documents and electronic images to the PDF Normal file type (10 to 15
pages at a time). If you need to convert more pages or want additional
features, consider upgrading to the full Acrobat Capture product, which offers
automated high-volume processing and enhanced reviewing capabilities. See
the Adobe Web site (www.adobe.com) for more information.
Using the Capture Pages command
You can use Capture Pages on pages that were scanned or imported with the
following resolutions:
■ Black-and-white images and text at 200 to 600 dpi (300 dpi is optimal in
most cases).
■
Grayscale or color images and text at 200 to 400 dpi.
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Ideally, text on the pages should be dark against a light background. Text on a
dark or shaded background, or on a page with complex color gradients, may
not be recognized. For additional advice on preparing pages to be captured,
see Scanning text you plan to capture. Capturing pages does not change any
device-independent color properties associated with the pages. (Acrobat does
not support CMYK TIFF images.)
Note: Capture Pages uses the PDFWriter settings for font embedding and
subsetting. Before you begin the Capture process, make sure that font
subsetting is not selected in PDFWriter, or you will not be able to touch up
the captured pages. See Embedding fonts in PDF files to change this setting.
To use the Capture Pages command:
1 Open the PDF Image Only file.
2 Choose Tools > Paper Capture > Capture Pages.
3 Select whether to capture all pages in the file, the current page only, or a
range of pages.
4 To change the Capture preferences, click Preferences, and set options in the
dialog box that appears. See Customizing the Capture process for details.
5 Click OK.
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Correcting words on captured pages
During the capture process, Acrobat “reads” bitmaps of text and tries to
substitute words and characters for the bitmaps. When it isn’t certain that one
of its substitutes is correct, it marks the word as suspect and gives you a chance
to accept it as it is or change it. Acrobat keeps the bitmap in the meantime so
that no data is lost in the process.
If you converted pages to the PDF Normal file type when you captured them,
you can correct any text on those pages. Acrobat can identify suspect words to
help you find words that may need to be corrected. If you converted pages to
PDF Original Image With Hidden Text, you cannot correct text on the pages
because the captured text is behind a bitmap picture of the original pages
(though you can change the font and color of text in this format).
To review and correct suspect words on captured pages:
1 Choose Tools > Paper Capture > Show Capture Suspects. The boxes show
the suspect words on the pages.
Converting Scanned Documents to PDF
Page 188
2 Choose Tools > Paper Capture > Find First Suspect. The first suspect word is
highlighted on the page, and its original bitmap image appears in the Suspect
Image window.
3 Compare the suspect word on the page with the image of the word in the
Suspect Image window. If necessary, select the zoom tool
, and drag it
across the word on the page to zoom in on it.
4 Do one of the following:
To accept the word as correct, click Accept. You move to the next
suspect word.
■
■ To correct the word, select the text touchup tool
, and edit the word
directly on the page. See Editing text with the touchup text tool for details.
Then click Next to move to the next suspect word.
5 Review and correct remaining suspect words on the pages.
6 Close the Suspect Image window.
Converting Scanned Documents to PDF
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Customizing the Capture process
You can set several Capture preferences, such as a language for the OCR
process and an output file type. In Windows, you can also provide a custom
dictionary for Acrobat to use along with its standard language dictionary. Put
terms in the custom dictionary that would not appear in a standard dictionary,
such as company names and other proper nouns and specialized terms for
your type of business.
To set Capture preferences:
1 Choose File > Preferences > Paper Capture.
2 Choose a language. Acrobat uses a standard dictionary for that language to
recognize words during the capture process.
3 Choose an output file type for the captured files:
PDF Normal files contain electronic text that is scalable and can be corrected,
indexed, searched, and copied. Page formatting and graphical images are
preserved.
■
PDF Original Image With Hidden Text files contain a bitmap picture of the
original text with scalable text in the background. This kind of file is identical in
appearance to the original, but it can also be indexed and searched because
the captured text is underneath the image.
■
Converting Scanned Documents to PDF
Page 190
PDF Original Image With Hidden Text files are useful when you must keep
the original scanned image of a page for legal or archival purposes. These files
are sometimes much larger than Normal files, however, and you cannot edit
text in them. See Tips on controlling PDF file sizes for a comparison of file sizes.
4 Select whether to apply downsampling to images in the captured pages
(Windows). This setting overrides the Downsample Images setting in
PDFWriter. In the Mac OS version, images are downsampled if Downsample
Images is selected in PDFWriter. (Downsampling is selected by default in
PDFWriter.)
Downsampling reduces file size by combining the information in several pixels
into one larger pixel. Black-and-white images over 300 dpi are downsampled to
200 dpi. Grayscale and color images over 225 dpi are downsampled to 150 dpi.
(If you downsample images in a PDF Original Image With Hidden Text file,
grayscale and color images are sampled below 200 dpi. You will not be able to
reprocess the resulting file with Capture Pages.) See About resampling for
more information on downsampling.
If you scan page images at 300 dpi, which is ideal for OCR, you will probably
want to apply downsampling to any photographs so that they can be viewed
quickly online and so that the PDF file is as small as possible.
5 Specify a temporary location for storing files during the OCR process
(Windows).
Converting Scanned Documents to PDF
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6 To save the current settings as the defaults, click Default.
7 Click OK.
To edit the custom dictionary (Windows):
Edit the Custdict.spl file in the Acrobat Capture folder using a text editor or a
word processor. Add, change, or delete words in the dictionary. If you’re using a
word processor, open and save the file as a text file.
Note: Each word must be on a separate line, and the words must be in alphabetical order.
Tips on controlling PDF file sizes
When you capture pages in Acrobat, the content of the original pages, the file
type you’re using, and the downsampling setting affect the size of the resulting
PDF file. The larger a file is, the longer it takes to capture, to send over networks,
and to display on-screen. You should be aware of the factors that affect file
size so you can create files that are only as large as they need to be for
your purposes.
The table shows the sizes of PDF files resulting from the scan and capture of the
following page containing text, line art, and a photograph. The file was
captured in Acrobat for Windows.
Converting Scanned Documents to PDF
Page 192
IO
RUSTC
.IT
ALIA
N.FO
OD
.
Welcome to rustico
A n a bu n d a n t m e n u o f c l a s s i c I t a l i a n f avo r i t e s
highlights this intimate restaurant on the ground floor
o f t h e H o t e l M e t r o p o l e . S t a r t y o u r ev e n i n g w i t h
R o m a n - s t y l e b r a i s e d a r t i c h o k e s , m o v i n g o n t o f avo r i t e s
like risotto with porcini mushrooms and spaghetti with
s p i c y s c a l l o p s a u c e , a n d t o p p i n g ev e r y t h i n g o ff w i t h
f r e s h - b a k e d c a l a b r e s i c o o k i e s a n d c o ff e e . Wi t h i t s t o p notch wine cellar and warm service, this establishment
l iv e s u p t o t h e u n p r e t e n t i o u s , f u n - l o v i n g s p i r i t o f i t s
legendary actress namesake.
Hours
We d n e s d a y – M o n d a y
11am–10pm
44 Saint James Palace
555-123-5736
Converting Scanned Documents to PDF
Page 193
In some cases, a file in the PDF Original Image With Hidden Text type is smaller
than the PDF Image Only file because Capture Pages uses additional
compression methods for creating files of this type. A captured file is generally
much smaller when downsampling is used. (In Windows, downsampling is set
in Capture preferences. On Mac OS, images are always downsampled.)
Image type
(Scanned at
300 dpi)
Black and white
Original TIFF image PDF Image Only
file (uncompressed
and compressed)
783K
PDF Normal
PDF Original
Image With
Hidden Text
Downsampling
Downsampling
Downsampling
On
Off
On
Off
On
Off
95K
95K
48K
48K
69K
69K
3769K
3769K
102K
352K
187K
654K
1018K
1018K
480K
480K
1017K
1017K
1050K
4216K
2589K
10483K
LZW 112K
8-bit grayscale
12414K
LZW 4677K
8-bit indexed
color
24-bit RGB color
12416K
LZW 1756K
24823K
LZW 12301K
10538K 10538K
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
Page 194
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
If you’re working in Windows, you can download Hypertext Markup Language
(HTML) pages from the World Wide Web or an intranet in Acrobat and convert
them to PDF. You provide the address, or Uniform Resource Locator (URL), of
the Web pages, and Acrobat converts and opens the pages in one step.
All of the text, images, and links from multiple HTML pages and image files are
contained in a single new PDF document. You can navigate in the new
document and edit it as you can any other PDF document. In this way, you can
gather information from the Web into one document that you can read off-line,
save for future reference, annotate, e-mail, and print reliably.
About PDF documents created from Web pages
In most respects, a PDF document created from HTML Web pages is like any
other PDF document. You can navigate through the document and add
annotations and other enhancements to it. Any Weblinks on the pages are still
active in PDF—just click a link to download the link’s pages, and add them to
the end of the document.
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
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Depending on the options you select when downloading Web pages, a PDF
document created from Web pages can display special structured bookmarks
that retain Web information, such as the URLs for all links on the pages. You can
use these structured bookmarks to navigate, to reorganize or delete pages, and
to download more pages, and you can add more structured bookmarks to
represent paragraphs, images, table cells, and other items on the pages.
Note that one “Web page” may correspond to more than one PDF page. This is
because Acrobat divides long HTML pages into standard-size pages
(depending on the PDF page layout settings).
To take advantage of Web Capture, Internet Explorer must be installed and
the Internet Properties dialog box configured to allow access to the World Wide
Web. In particular, the Proxy Server box on the Connection tab must have a
valid proxy address if you are accessing the Web through a firewall in an enterprise environment. Once Internet Explorer has been installed and configured,
you may use any browser as your default browser. If your version of Internet
Explorer does not have an Internet Properties dialog box, you must upgrade to
a current version of Internet Explorer (available from the Microsoft Web site).
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
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Downloading Web pages in Acrobat
You can download Web pages by specifying a URL in Acrobat, by opening the
pages for a Weblink in a PDF document you already have open, and by
dragging and dropping a Weblink or HTML file to an Acrobat window or
Acrobat icon. The Web pages are converted to PDF and open in the Acrobat
work area.
Note the following when downloading Web pages in Acrobat:
Acrobat can download HTML pages, JPEG and GIF graphics (including the
last frame of animated GIFs), text files, image maps, and password-secured
areas from a Web site.
■
■ HTML pages can include tables, links, frames, background colors, text colors,
and forms. Certain advanced features, such as cascading stylesheets, are not
supported at this time. HTML links are turned into Weblinks, and HTML forms
are turned into PDF forms. See Creating PDF forms for information on working
with forms.
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
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■
JavaScript and Java applets in HTML pages are not supported at this time.
To convert Japanese Web pages to PDF on a Roman (Western) system, you
must have the Acrobat Asian language files installed, as well as the Japanese
version of Internet Explorer Multilanguage Support (which you can find on the
Microsoft Web site). You must also select a Japanese encoding from the HTML
conversion settings. The conversion of Web pages to PDF is not supported for
other Asian languages. See About support for Asian languages for information
on the language files.
■
The instructions for downloading Web pages in this chapter assume that
Consolidate Menu Items In Top-Level Menu is not selected in your Web Capture
preferences. See Specifying conversion options for capturing Web pages f
or details.
■
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
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About pages on Web sites
Keep in mind that a Web site can have more than one level of pages. The
opening page is the top level of the site, and any links on that page go to other
pages at a second level. Links on second-level pages go to pages at a third
level, and so on. In addition, links may go to external sites (for example, a link at
a Web site on tourism may connect to a Web site for a travel agency). Most Web
sites can be represented as a tree diagram that becomes broader as you move
down the levels.
A
B
C
A. First level B. Second level C. Third level
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
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Important: You need to be aware of the number and complexity of pages you
may encounter when downloading more than one level of a Web site at a time.
It is possible to select a complex site that will take a very long time to
download. Use the Get Entire Site command with great caution. In addition,
downloading pages over a modem connection will usually take much longer
than downloading them over a high-speed connection.
Converting Web pages by specifying a URL
You can open Web pages in a new PDF document or append them to an
existing document. You provide the URL by using a command in Acrobat, and
Acrobat downloads the page from the top level of that URL, breaking it into
units of multiple PDF pages if necessary. Acrobat can also download pages
from the entire site or from a specified number of levels below the top level.
If you later append another level in a site that is already converted to PDF, only
the additional levels are added. For example, if you have downloaded two
levels of a site, and if you later append four levels from the same site, only
the pages from the additional third and fourth levels are added to the
PDF document.
To convert Web pages by specifying a URL:
1 Do one of the following:
■
To open the pages in a new PDF document, click the Open Web Page button
, choose File > Open Web Page, or choose Tools > Web Capture > Open Web
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
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Page. The Open Web Page button appears in the command bar if you have
Show Toolbar Buttons selected in your Web Capture preferences. See Setting
Web Capture preferences for details.
To add the pages to the end of the current document, choose Tools > Web
Capture > Append Web Page.
■
2 Enter the URL for the Web pages to open or append.
3 Enter the number of levels you want to include, or select Get Entire Site to
include all levels from the Web site.
Some Web sites may have hundreds or even thousands of pages and can
take a long time to download. You may want to begin by downloading only
one level of pages and then go through the pages in Acrobat to find particular
links to download. Some sites are extremely large and can use up your system’s
hard disk space and available memory, causing a system crash.
4 If you entered a number of levels, you can specify the following options:
■ Only Get Pages Under Same Path downloads only Web pages that are subordinate to the URL you provide.
Stay On Same Server downloads only Web pages that are stored on the same
server as the pages for the URL you provide.
■
5 To set other options that apply to all Web pages you convert, click
Conversion Settings, and follow the instructions in Specifying conversion
options for capturing Web pages. You can define a page layout for PDF
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
Page 201
documents, set options for converted HTML and text, and choose to generate
supporting items such as structured bookmarks.
6 Click Download. A status dialog box shows the progress of the conversion to
PDF. Click Stop to cancel the processing of pages not yet converted.
If you’re downloading more than one level of pages, the Download Status
dialog box moves to the background after the first level is downloaded. The
globe in the Open Web Page button in the command bar continues spinning to
show that pages are being downloaded. Choose Tools > Web Capture > Bring
Status Dialogs To Foreground to see the dialog box again.
Note: You can view pages in Acrobat while they are downloading, however you
cannot modify a page until it has completed the download process. Once they
are downloaded, you can view and modify pages as desired. Acrobat may seem
unresponsive if it is in the process of downloading a lot of pages.
If Acrobat encounters an error while downloading, a message lists the type of
error and the URL with which the error is connected.
Converting a link’s Web pages
You can convert the Web pages for a link (Weblink) on a page already in PDF.
The new pages can be appended to the current PDF document or opened in a
new document. The link is changed from a Weblink to an internal link, and
clicking the link takes you to that (converted) PDF page, rather than to the
(original) HTML page on the Web.
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
Page 202
If, while you are viewing a PDF document inside a browser, you spawn a new
page, from there go to another Web page, and then return to the original PDF,
the spawned page will no longer be there.
To append a link’s Web pages to the current PDF document:
Do one of the following:
Move the pointer over the Weblink. If your Web Capture preferences are set
to open Weblinks in Acrobat, a plus sign appears with the hand tool when you
point on a Weblink; if your preferences are set to open Weblinks in a Web
browser, a W appears with the hand tool. You can press Shift to change this to
the other setting temporarily. Click or Shift-click the Weblink to append the
link’s Web pages.
■
Right-click the Weblink, and choose Append to Document from the
context menu.
■
Choose Tools > Web Capture > View Web Links. Or right-click a structured
bookmark, and choose View Web Links from the context menu. The dialog box
lists all the links on the current page or on the structured bookmark’s pages.
Select the links to download, and click Download. You can Ctrl-click to select
multiple links or Shift-click to select a contiguous range of links.
■
For information on the options available through the View Web Links dialog
box, see Converting Web pages by specifying a URL.
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
Page 203
To append Web pages for all links on a page:
Do one of the following:
■ To add pages for all Weblinks on the current page, choose Tools > Web
Capture > Append All Links On Page. Or choose Tools > Web Capture > View
Web Links, click Select All, and click Download.
To add pages for all Weblinks on a structured bookmark’s pages, right-click
the structured bookmark, and choose Append Next Level from the
context menu.
■
To open a link’s Web pages in a new PDF document:
Do one of the following:
■ Right-click the Weblink, and choose Open Weblink As New Document from
the context menu.
■
Ctrl-click the Weblink.
To copy the location of a link:
Right-click the Weblink, and choose Copy Link Location. You can then paste the
URL of that Weblink into a text document, for example.
Converting Web pages by dragging and dropping
You can convert Web pages to PDF by dragging a Weblink into the Acrobat
window or by dragging an HTML file on your system onto the Acrobat icon.
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
Page 204
To convert Web pages by dragging and dropping:
Do one of the following:
■ Drag a Weblink or a Web site icon from the Web browser into an open
Acrobat window. Acrobat downloads the page from the top level of that URL,
breaking it into multiple PDF pages if necessary. If you have a PDF document
open, the Web page is appended to that document; if you do not have a
document open, the Web page opens in a new document. This option
preserves links and graphics.
Drag an HTML file’s icon onto the Acrobat shortcut icon on the desktop, the
Acrobat application icon, or into an open Acrobat window. Unless the images
and other files referred to in the HTML file are on your local disk, they will not
appear in the PDF file. For this reason, it’s generally better to use the Open Web
Page command to create PDF files of Web sites that are not on your system.
■
Specifying conversion options for capturing Web pages
You can specify two groups of options for converting Web pages to PDF—
General options and Page Layout options. The General options define features
such as structured bookmarks and headers for the PDF documents and set
options for displaying content from HTML and text files. They also preserve any
refresh commands from the Web site. The Page Layout options define the page
size, margins, orientation, and scaling properties for the PDF documents.
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
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These options apply to Web pages you will convert to PDF, not to pages already
converted. You can use the preferences to restore the original options. For
information on customizing or streamlining the downloading process, see
Opening converted pages in a Web browser.
To set global options in the Conversion Settings dialog box:
1 Do one of the following:
■
Click the Open Web Page button
, and click Conversion Settings.
■
Choose File > Open Web Page, and click Conversion Settings.
Choose Tools > Web Capture > Open Web Page or Append Web page, and
click Conversion Settings.
■
2 Do any of the following:
To control structured bookmarks, headers and footers, and a PDF structure
for Web pages, or to configure the preservation of the refresh commands from
the Web site, set the General options. See Setting General conversion options.
■
■ To determine the font properties and other display characteristics of HTML
pages you convert to PDF, set the HTML options. See Setting display options for
HTML files.
To determine the font properties and other display characteristics of text
pages you convert to PDF, set the Text options. See Setting display options for
text files.
■
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
Page 206
To determine the page size, margins, orientation, and scaling of Web pages
in your PDF documents, set the Page Layout options. See Defining page
layouts.
■
3 Click OK to return to the Open Web Page, Append Web Page, View Web
Links, or Refresh Commands List dialog box.
To set options specific to an individual Weblink:
1 Do one of the following:
Choose Tools > Web Capture > View Web Links, select a link, and click
Properties.
■
Choose Tools > Web Capture > Refresh Pages, click Edit Refresh Commands
List, select a link, and click Properties.
■
2 Then click the General tab, and select the desired options.
3 Click OK.
Setting General conversion options
The General conversion options control structured bookmarks, headers and
footers, and a PDF structure for Web pages. They also configure the preservation of the refresh commands from the Web site.
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
Page 207
To set General conversion options:
1 In the General Conversions Settings dialog box, select from the following
options:
Create Bookmarks To New Content creates a structured bookmark for each
downloaded Web page, using the page’s title (from the HTML Title tag) as the
structured bookmark name. If the page has no title, Acrobat uses the URL as
the structured bookmark name.
■
Add PDF Structure stores a structure in the PDF file that corresponds to the
HTML structure of the original Web pages. If this option is selected, you can
create structured bookmarks for paragraphs, list elements, table cells, and
other items that use HTML tags.
■
Put Headers And Footers On New Pages places a header and footer on every
page. The header shows the Web page’s title, and the footer shows the page’s
URL, the page number in the downloaded set, and the date and time of
the download.
■
Save Refresh Commands saves a list of all URLs and remembers how they
were downloaded in the PDF file for the purpose of refreshing (updating)
pages. This option must be selected for Acrobat to update a PDF-converted
Web site. For more information, see Refreshing converted Web pages.
■
2 To set conversion options for a specific content type, select a file description
from the list, click Settings, and follow the instructions in Setting display
options for HTML files and Setting display options for text files. If the Settings
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
Page 208
button is not grayed out, there are file type specific settings you can make.
Currently, only HTML and Plain Text file types have additional settings available.
Note: A content type is a description of a file format that an application can
read in the filename’s extension. The file format extensions are standard extensions used by most applications, For example, a filename extension of .txt tells
Acrobat to interpret the information as a text file. Acrobat is installed with
associations already established between formats and content types for PDF
files, HTML files, plain text files, and JPEG and GIF graphics files.
3 Click OK to return to the Open Web Page, Append Web Page, View Web
Links, or Refresh Commands List dialog box.
Setting display options for HTML files
You can determine the font properties and other display characteristics of
HTML pages you convert to PDF.
To set display options for HTML pages:
1 In the General Conversion Settings dialog box, double-click HTML, or select
HTML, and click Settings.
2 In the HTML Conversion Settings dialog box, click the Layout tab if
necessary.
3 Select the display options:
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
Page 209
Text, Background, Links, And Alt Text sets the default colors for text, page
backgrounds, Weblinks, and text that replaces an image in a file when the
image is unavailable. For each color, click a button to open a palette, and select
the color.
■
Force These Settings For All Pages uses your selected colors on all HTML
pages, including those that have their own colors defined. If you do not select
this option, your colors are used only on pages that do not have colors defined.
■
Background Options specify whether to display colors and tiled images in
page backgrounds and colors in table cells. If you do not select these options,
the Web pages may look different than they do in a Web browser, but they may
be easier to read if printed.
■
Wrap Lines Inside PREs wraps preformatted (HTML) lines of text if they are
longer than a specified length. Acrobat scales a Web page so the longest line
on the page will fit on the screen. Select this setting if an HTML file you’re
downloading has unreasonably long lines of text.
■
Convert Images includes images in the conversion to PDF. If you do not
select this option, an image is indicated by a red border (and possibly text, if
specified by the page’s design).
■
■ Underline Links underlines textual Weblinks on the pages if they aren’t
already underlined.
4 For roman fonts, click the Fonts tab to specify fonts for body text, headings,
or preformatted text:
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
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■
For each font, click Choose Font, select the font and text size, and click OK.
Click Embed Platform Fonts if you want the fonts used on the pages to be
stored in the PDF file so that the text always appears in the original fonts in
Acrobat. Note that embedding fonts increases the size of the file. For information on whether to embed fonts, see About font embedding and substitution.
■
5 For Japanese fonts, click the Japanese tab, and do the following:
Choose an encoding option. Auto allows Acrobat to automatically set the
encoding, ShiftJIS chooses a specific Japanese character set whereby you then
must also specify JIS or EUC.
■
■
For body text, headings, and preformatting, choose Gothic or Mincho,
For roman characters, you may choose whether roman characters on a
Japanese page are laid out using proportional spacing or fixed spacing.
■
6 Click OK in the HTML Conversion Settings and General Conversion Settings
dialog boxes to return to the Open Web Page, Append Web Page, View Web
Links, or Refresh Commands List dialog box.
Setting display options for text files
You can determine the font properties and other display characteristics of text
pages you convert to PDF.
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
Page 211
To set display options for text files:
1 In the General Conversion Settings dialog box, double-click Plain Text, or
select Plain Text and click Settings.
2 In the Text Conversion Settings dialog box, select the display options:
Text and Background set the colors for text and page backgrounds. For each
color, click a button to open a palette, and select the color.
■
■ Font specifies a font. Click Choose Font, select the font and text size, and
click OK.
Embed Platform Fonts stores the font used on the pages in the PDF file so
that the text always appears in the original fonts in Acrobat. Note that
embedding fonts increases the size of the file. For information on whether to
embed fonts, see About font embedding and substitution.
■
Wrap Lines At Margin wraps lines that reach the margin of the text files. It is
generally a good idea to select this option because Web pages have no preset
page width. Otherwise lines will be defined only by carriage return or newline
characters, and the page will be scaled so the longest line will fit on the screen.
■
Reflow Text puts as much text on a line as possible. If the original text was
entered in many short lines, the text is displayed continuously, wrapping to
other lines as it reaches the margin. Blank lines and white space at the
beginning of sentences are preserved from the original text. Other formatting
■
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
Page 212
is ignored when the text reflowed. This option is available only if Wrap Lines At
Margin is selected.
■ Limit Lines Per Page limits the number of lines that can appear on a PDF page
to the specified number.
3 Click OK in the Text Conversion Settings and General Conversion Settings
boxes to return to the Open Web Page, Append Web Page, View Web Links, or
Refresh Commands List dialog box.
Defining page layouts
The page layout options determine the page size, margins, orientation, and
scaling of Web pages in your PDF documents.
To define a page layout:
1 In the Conversion Settings dialog box, click the Page Layout tab. A sample
page with the current settings applied appears in the dialog box.
2 Choose a page size from the menu, or enter a custom page width and height
in the text boxes below the menu.
3 Select portrait or landscape orientation.
4 Enter margins for the top, bottom, left, and right borders of the page.
5 Specify the scaling options:
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
Page 213
Scale Wide Contents To Fit Page rescales a page’s contents, if necessary, to
fit the width of the page. If this option is not selected, Acrobat ignores the
preferred paper size and resizes the width and height to fit pages up to
200 inches.
■
Note: A large PDF page may not be compatible with Acrobat Exchange 3.0,
which has a page-size limit of 45-by-45 inches.
■ Auto-Switch To Landscape If Scaling Smaller Than changes the orientation of
the page from portrait to landscape if the contents of a page are rescaled
beyond a specified percentage. If the new version will be less than say 70% (the
default setting) of the original size, the display switches to landscape. This
option is available only if you selected portrait orientation.
6 Click OK in the Page Layout dialog box to return to the Open Web Page,
Append Web Page, View Web Links, or Refresh Commands List dialog box.
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows)
Page 214
Working with Web pages converted to PDF
You can navigate through a PDF document created from Web pages, print
pages from the document, zoom in and out, and work with it in the ways
described in Adjusting the view of PDF documents. Depending on how you’ve
configured Acrobat, if you click a link on a Web page you’re viewing, Acrobat
adds the pages for that link to the end of the PDF document, if the pages aren’t
already there. For other ways to append Web pages, see Converting a link’s
Web pages.
Note: Remember that one Web page can become multiple PDF pages. The Web
page is a single topic (or URL) from a Web site. It is usually one continuous
HTML page that is divided into multiple standard-size PDF pages to make it
easier to view and print as a document.
Depending on the options selected when the Web pages were converted to
PDF, structured bookmarks may be available as well. For information on structured bookmarks, see About PDF documents created from Web pages and
Setting General conversion options.
The context menu for Web bookmarks includes commands for downloading
more Web pages, but in other respects these structured bookmarks are just like
other structured bookmarks in Acrobat. For information on structured
bookmarks not described in this section, see Working with bookmarks.
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Using structured bookmarks to organize converted Web pages
When you first create a PDF document from Web pages, Acrobat generates
structured bookmarks for the document if Create Bookmarks For New Content
is selected when you download. A standard (unstructured) bookmark representing the Web server appears at the top of the Bookmarks palette. Under the
server bookmark is a structured bookmark for each Web page downloaded; the
name of the structured bookmark comes from the page’s HTML title or the URL,
if no title is present.
A
B
C
D
A. Standard bookmark representing the Web server B. Structured bookmark
representing downloaded Web pages C. Parent bookmark D. Child bookmark
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Structured Web bookmarks are initially all at the same level (subordinate to the
server bookmark), but you can rearrange the structured bookmarks and nest
them in family groups to help you keep track of the hierarchy of material on the
Web pages. You can also use the structured bookmarks to rearrange their
corresponding pages in the PDF document.
Acrobat maintains the family relationships you set up among structured
bookmarks. If you move or delete a parent structured bookmark, its children
structured bookmarks are moved or deleted along with it. It helps to work with
the navigation pane open, so you can see the Web pages and their structured
bookmarks side by side.
To move or delete a Web bookmark:
1 Select the structured bookmark. You can Ctrl-click to select multiple structured bookmarks or Shift-click to select a contiguous range of structured
bookmarks.
2 To move or delete the structured bookmark, do one of the following:
To move the structured bookmark, drag it to where you want it in the
hierarchy. Release the mouse button when the black line is in the correct
position. If the line is below another structured bookmark’s icon, the relocated
structured bookmark will be a sibling, immediately after that structured
bookmark. If the line is below another structured bookmark’s name, the
relocated structured bookmark will be a child of that structured bookmark.
■
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To delete the structured bookmark, press the Delete key, choose Edit >
Delete, or right-click the structured bookmark, and choose Delete from the
context menu.
■
To move or delete a Web page along with its structured bookmark:
Do one of the following:
To move the Web page along with its structured bookmark, press Ctrl while
dragging the structured bookmark.
■
To delete the Web page along with its structured bookmark, right-click the
structured bookmark, and choose Delete Page(s) from the context menu.
■
Adding more structured bookmarks
If Add PDF Structure is selected when you download Web pages, Acrobat stores
structure information in the PDF document that corresponds to the HTML
structure of the original pages. You can use this information to add structured
bookmarks to the file for paragraphs and other items that have HTML tags.
To add structured bookmarks to a PDF document:
1 Choose New Bookmarks From Structure from the Bookmarks palette menu.
2 Select the items you want specified as structured bookmarks. An article is a
complete Web page, represented by the HTML Title tag. The other items in the
list are HTML tags used in the Web pages.
3 Click OK.
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Getting information on converted Web pages
Acrobat can display a dialog box with the current page’s URL, the page’s title
(from the HTML <TITLE> tag or URL of the page), the date and time
downloaded, the content type (such as HTML text or JPEG graphic), and the
preferred zoom setting (based on the scaling and image size).
To get information on the current Web page:
Choose Tools > Web Capture > Page Info.
If the PDF document has headers and footers, you can also find most of this
information there. For information on adding headers and footers, see Setting
General conversion options.
Refreshing converted Web pages
You can refresh Web pages in a PDF document to retrieve the most up to date
from the Web site. When you refresh, you download the entire Web site or link
again and build a new PDF file. In the resulting new PDF file, Acrobat lists any
pages where components have changed, including text, Weblinks, embedded
filenames, and formatting. It also downloads new pages if they have been
added to the site. The changed pages are listed as bookmarks in the
Bookmarks pane under a bookmark labeled New and Changed Pages.
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Acrobat can refresh Web pages only if Save Refresh Commands was selected
when the pages were first downloaded. For more information, see
Downloading Web pages in Acrobat.
When you refresh Web pages, Acrobat retains both the original PDF and
the refreshed version. To keep an archive of changes made to a Web site, save
both versions.
To create bookmarks that show changes to previously converted
Web pages:
1 Choose Tools > Web Capture > Refresh Pages.
2 To view new and changed pages, select Create Bookmarks For New And
Changed Pages. Then specify the scope of the updated structured bookmarks:
Compare Only Page Text To Detect Changed Pages compares only the text
on the pages.
■
Compare All Page Components To Detect Changed Pages compares all page
components, including text, images, Weblinks, embedded filenames, and
formatting.
■
3 To refrain from resubmitting any previously submitted form data, unselect
Resubmit Form Data. Be very careful if you have Resubmit Form Data selected.
It could result in duplicate purchases or other submissions. This option is
available only if a form and query results are on the pages.
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4 To change which pages are updated by the refresh, select Edit Refresh
Commands List, select the URLs you want, and click OK.
5 Click Refresh.
Opening converted pages in a Web browser
You can start a Web browser and display a Web page you’ve already
downloaded in Acrobat. This can be useful if you want to compare any differences between the downloaded PDF version and the current Web page at the
site. The browser opens in a new application window to the page you specify.
In the PDF document, you can open a Web page or a Weblink in a Web browser.
Opening a Weblink is useful for deciding if you want to download and convert
a Web page linked to the PDF document.
Acrobat uses the Web browser selected in your Weblink preferences.
To open a converted page in a Web browser:
Do one of the following:
■ Choose Tools > Web Capture > Open Page In Web Browser to open the
current page in a Web browser.
Shift-click a link if your Web Capture preferences are set to open Weblinks in
Acrobat. Click a link if your preferences are set to open Weblinks in a browser.
For more information, see Setting Web Capture preferences.
■
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Right-click a Web bookmark, and choose Open Page In Web Browser from
the context menu to open the bookmark’s page.
■
■ Right-click a link, and choose Open Weblink In Browser from the context
menu to open the link’s page.
Setting Web Capture preferences
You can set several preferences to customize the process of converting Web
pages to PDF.
To set Web Capture preferences:
1 Choose File > Preferences > Web Capture.
2 Choose how often to check if images have changed on the current Web site
before downloading.
3 Choose whether to open pages for Weblinks in Acrobat or in a Web browser.
Clicking a Web link opens the link based on this preference setting; Shiftclicking opens the link in the other way. If you use a Web browser, you need to
select a browser in your Weblink preferences (see Setting Weblink preferences).
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4 Select any of the following options:
Consolidate Menu Items In Top-Level Menu creates a top-level menu named
Web that combines all the commands for downloading Web pages, getting
information on the pages, and refreshing pages.
■
Show Bookmarks When New File Opened automatically opens the
navigation pane and displays structured bookmarks when you open a new
document. If this option is not selected, the navigation pane is closed when
you open Web pages, but the structured bookmarks are still created. You
can choose Window > Show Bookmarks to see the structured bookmarks in
the pane.
■
■ Show Toolbar Buttons shows the Open Web Page button
in the
command bar. You can click the button to open the Open Web Page dialog box.
5 Select Reset Warning Dialogs To Default to turn on any disabled Web
Capture warning dialogs.
6 Select Always or After to skip secured pages when downloading multiple
levels of a Web site. If you select After, Acrobat displays a password dialog box
which times out and skips the secured pages after the specified number
of seconds.
7 Select Reset Conversion Settings To Default to change the conversion
options back to their original settings. See Specifying conversion options for
capturing Web pages.
8 Click OK.
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Customizing PDF Navigation
When creating documents for electronic publication, it is important to provide
the reader with a way to move efficiently through a document, as well as across
documents. Acrobat provides a variety of methods you can use for navigation,
including thumbnails, bookmarks, articles, and links. Each navigation method
has its own special features. You can choose when and where to apply each
one to create a document structure and flow that is best for your audience.
For the most efficient workflow, it is best if you implement navigation paths for
your document after your PDF document is complete in content and organization. Using the navigation methods described in this chapter as the last stage
in the workflow ensures that you will no longer need to insert or delete pages,
or perform major editorial tasks that might cause you to have to redo
navigation procedures.
Working with thumbnails
Thumbnails, located in the navigation pane, are miniature previews of the
pages in a document. You can use thumbnails to jump quickly to a selected
page and to adjust the view of the current page. Thumbnails allow you to
direct the reader’s attention and to move, insert, copy, replace, and delete
pages. You can use the small thumbnails option to display more pages in the
Thumbnails palette.
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Double clicking on a thumbnail takes you directly to the corresponding page.
Moving, copying, or deleting a thumbnail actually moves, copies, or deletes the
corresponding page. Because thumbnails take up extra file space, approximately 3K per thumbnail, they are not automatically created with a document
unless you set the Acrobat Distiller option to do so. Instead, blank thumbnail
placeholders are generated when a PDF document is created. The blank
thumbnails perform all the functions of a preview thumbnail, but do not offer
the visual page representation.
To show the Thumbnails palette:
Do one of the following:
■ Click the Show/Hide Navigation Pane button
Thumbnails tab.
■
, and then click the
Choose Window > Show Thumbnails.
Creating and deleting thumbnails
When you create a PDF document, the thumbnails appear as blank placeholders rather than as representations of actual pages. You can use the blank
placeholders for navigation, but you will not see the contents of the corresponding pages. You can generate thumbnails at any time. Thumbnails are
especially useful during the development phase of a document, and they can
easily be removed later if file size becomes an issue.
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To create thumbnails:
1 Click the Thumbnails tab in the navigation pane to bring the Thumbnails
palette to the front.
2 Choose Create All Thumbnails from the Thumbnails palette menu to create
thumbnails for all document pages. One thumbnail is generated per page.
3 Choose Small Thumbnails from the Thumbnails palette menu to view
thumbnails at approximately one-half the default size (38 x 48 pixels). To toggle
the view back to the default size (76 x 98 pixels), choose Large Thumbnails from
the palette menu.
To create thumbnails for an entire collection of PDF documents, choose File
> Batch Process. Select the folder with the documents you want to process, and
select the Thumbnails check box. Create is automatically selected for this
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option, but you can choose to delete all the thumbnails for an entire document
collection, if desired. Select any of the other options that apply, and click OK.
Blank placeholdersComparison of large and small thumbnails
To delete all thumbnails from a document:
1 Click the Thumbnails tab in the navigation pane to bring the Thumbnails
palette to the front.
2 Choose Delete All Thumbnails from the Thumbnails palette menu.
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3 Click OK. All thumbnails are automatically removed; the corresponding
pages are not deleted from the document.
Important: If you use the Delete All Thumbnails command to remove all
thumbnails from the document, the corresponding pages are not deleted.
However, if you delete an individual thumbnail using the Delete command, the
corresponding page is deleted.
Creating and deleting thumbnails in a document collection
(Windows)
Acrobat allows you to create or delete thumbnails for an entire collection of
documents in one automatic process. Any number of documents can comprise
a documentation set, but all the documents must be contained in the same
folder. Performing a process on a number of files at once is known as
batch processing.
To create or delete thumbnails in a document collection (Windows):
1 Choose File > Batch Process, navigate to the folder whose content you want
to process, and select the folder.
2 Select from the following options:
■ Process All Subfolders to process all the folders contained in the selected
folder.
■
Optimize to generate the thumbnails in the most efficient manner.
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Passwords to give the passwords originally used to open a specified
document and change the security options for the file.
■
■ Security to specify a password for a document and change its security
options. You can also specify actions that are not allowed, such as printing,
changing the document, selecting text and graphics, and adding and changing
annotations or form fields. Click OK to accept your selections.
■ Open Info to set options for the initial view, window options, and user
interface options. Click OK to accept your selections.
3 Select Thumbnails, and then select one of the following:
■
Create to create thumbnails for a document collection.
■
Delete to remove thumbnails from a document collection.
4 With the folder containing the documents still selected, click OK. Click Stop if
you need to halt the process.
5 Click Close when the process is complete.
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Working with bookmarks
A bookmark is a type of link with representative text in the navigation pane.
Each bookmark in the navigation pane goes to a different view or page in the
document. You can use electronic bookmarks as you would paper bookmarks,
to mark a place in a document where you want to return. You can also use
bookmarks to modify the view of its link, thus directing your reader’s attention
where you want it. Bookmarks allow you to jump within a PDF document, to
another document (PDF or non-PDF), or to a Web page. They can also perform
actions, such as playing a movie or sound, executing a menu item, or
submitting a form.
Acrobat generates bookmarks automatically from the table of contents of
documents created by most desktop publishing programs. The creator (or
sometimes the user) of a PDF document can set up additional bookmarks in an
existing PDF document to link to another PDF document or to a Web page. In
addition to the bookmarks Acrobat generates automatically from a table of
contents and index, Acrobat can create structured bookmarks from Web pages
(HTML) and Microsoft Word documents converted to PDF using PDFMaker. For
information on creating structured bookmarks, see Downloading Web pages in
Acrobat and Using PDFMaker for Microsoft Word 97 and Microsoft PowerPoint 97
(which is available as online help when you use the Create PDF command from
within a Microsoft application).
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To show the Bookmarks palette:
Do one of the following:
■ Click the Show/Hide Navigation Pane button
Bookmarks tab.
■
Choose Window > Show Bookmarks.
, and then click the
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Creating bookmarks
Bookmarks generated from a table of contents are usually adequate to
navigate through a document. There may be times, however, when you will
want to add bookmarks that point to specific sections to draw the reader’s
attention to them.
Creating a new bookmark
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To create a new bookmark in the current document:
1 Click the Bookmarks tab in the navigation pane to bring the Bookmarks
palette to the front.
2 Click the bookmark under which you want to place the new bookmark. If
you don’t select a bookmark, the new bookmark is automatically added at the
end of the list.
3 Use the Next Page and Previous Page arrows on the command bar to
navigate to the destination in the PDF document to which you want the
bookmark to link.
4 Modify the view so it directs the reader’s attention to the correct information. For more information, see Setting magnification options. Any magnification option you set will apply to any new bookmarks you create, as well as to
the current bookmark, until you change the option.
5 Choose New Bookmark from the Bookmarks palette menu, or select the new
bookmark icon at the bottom of the Bookmarks palette.
6 Type in the text for the bookmark label, and press Enter (Windows) or Return
(Mac OS). Bookmark labels can be up to 128 characters long.
7 To make sure the correct location and magnification are set, go to another
page in the document, and then test the bookmark.
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To create a bookmark linked to another PDF file, an application file, or to
specify an action:
1 Click the Bookmarks tab in the navigation pane to bring the Bookmarks
palette to the front.
2 Choose New Bookmark from the Bookmarks palette menu.
3 Type in the text for the bookmark label, and then click outside the text box.
You can type in up to 125 characters for a bookmark label.
4 Select the bookmark, and then choose Edit > Properties.
5 Select an action type. Follow the on-screen directions, or see Using actions
for special effects for more information.
Note: If you want to link your PDF document with another PDF document, use
the Go To View action. Open the file in Acrobat, and then navigate to the
location where you want it to open.
6 Click Set Action.
Editing and deleting bookmarks
Bookmark destinations default to the view you are looking at when you create
a bookmark. Although you can set bookmark destinations as you create each
bookmark, it is sometimes easier to create a group of bookmarks, and then set
the destinations later. Once you’ve created a bookmark, you can change
bookmark text, destination, or action type at any time.
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To edit a bookmark:
1 To edit a bookmark name, select the bookmark, click inside the text box, and
type in the new text.
2 To edit a bookmark destination, select the bookmark, and then (in the
document pane) move to the location you want to specify as the new
destination.
3 Adjust the magnification. For more information, see Setting magnification
options.
4 Choose Set Bookmark Destination from the Bookmarks palette menu, and
click Yes in the warning dialog box. The bookmark is now set to the new
location.
To delete a bookmark:
1 Select the bookmark you want to delete, or Shift-click to select a range of
bookmarks. Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) to toggle the
selection of individual bookmarks.
2 Choose Edit > Delete (Windows) or Clear (Mac OS), and then click OK.
Important: Deleting a bookmark deletes any bookmarks that are subordinate
to it (children); deleting a bookmark does not delete any document text.
To delete all bookmarks:
1 Select the bookmarks.
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2 Choose Delete Bookmarks from the palette menu.
3 Click OK.
Creating a bookmark hierarchy
You can modify a list of bookmarks to show a relationship between topics
using nesting. Nesting creates a parent/child relationship, and you can expand
and collapse this hierarchical list, as desired.
To expand and collapse the bookmark hierarchy:
1 Click the plus sign (+) (Windows) or the horizontal triangle (Mac OS) next to
the bookmark icon to show any children related to the bookmark.
2 Click the minus sign (-) (Windows) or the inverted triangle (Mac OS) to
collapse the list again.
To nest a bookmark under another bookmark:
1 Click the bookmark icon you want to nest, or Shift-click to select range
bookmarks. Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) to toggle the
selection of individual bookmarks.
2 Drag the icon(s) underneath the first letter in the parent bookmark; a black
bar shows the position of the icon(s).
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3 Click OK. The bookmark is nested; however, the actual pages remain in their
original location in the document.
Nesting a bookmark
To move a bookmark out of a nested position:
1 Select the bookmark icon you want to move, or Shift-click to select a range
of bookmarks. Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) to toggle the
selection of individual bookmarks.
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2 Drag the icon(s) to the left, positioning the black bar directly under the
parent bookmark.
3 Click OK.
Moving a bookmark out of its nested position
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Creating structured bookmarks
Structured bookmarks give you greater control over page content than do
regular bookmarks. Because structured bookmarks use the underlying structural information (metadata) of the document elements (for example, heading
levels, paragraphs, table titles, and the like) to create bookmarks, they can be
used for editing the document. Structured bookmarks, which are easily
identified by their icon, allow you to move, copy, extract, and delete pages.
Currently, Microsoft Word is the only word-processing application that
provides the necessary internal information to support structured bookmarks.
To create a PDF document with structured bookmarks, you must use PDFMaker
and set the necessary options for structured bookmarks. For more information,
see About PDFWriter and Distiller, or Using PDFMaker for Microsoft Word 97 and
Microsoft PowerPoint 97 (which is available as online help when you use the
Create PDF command from within a Microsoft application). Acrobat 4.0
provides a second type of structured bookmark—structured bookmarks for
Web pages. For more information, see Using structured bookmarks to organize
converted Web pages.
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Working with articles
Many traditional print documents, such as magazines and newspapers, arrange
text in multiple columns. Stories flow from column to column and sometimes
across several pages. While the format is effective for printed material, this type
of structure can be difficult to follow on-screen because of the scrolling and
zooming required.
Acrobat’s article feature allows you to guide readers through material
presented in multiple columns and across a series of pages. You use the article
tool to create a series of linked rectangles or boxes that connect the various
sections of the piece and follow the flow of text. You can choose to automatically generate article threads from a page layout file as you convert it to PDF.
Most, but not all, desktop publishing programs allow you to automatically
generate article threads for files. If the file you’re viewing has articles, you can
show the names of the articles in a palette and navigate easily through them.
For information on using article threads when reading a PDF document, see
Navigating in PDF documents.
To open the Articles palette:
Choose Window > Show Articles.
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Defining articles
You specify an article by defining a series of boxes around the content in the
order in which you want the content read. The navigational path you define for
an article is known as the article thread. You use the article tool to create a
thread connecting the various boxes that hold the content of the article,
unifying them into a continuous text flow.
A
B
A
1
C
2
A
3
The flow of an article thread
To define an article:
1 Select the article tool
. When you first use the article tool, it appears as a
cross-hair pointer in the document window.
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2 Drag a marquee to define the first article box, and release the mouse button
when the marquee is complete. An article box appears around the enclosed
text, and the pointer changes to the article pointer.
Each article box you create has a label.The label consists of the article number
in the PDF document and its sequence within the article. For example, the first
box for the first article you define in a document would be labeled “1-1,” the
second box “1-2,” and so on. The boxes for the second article in the same
document would be labeled “2-1,”“2-2,”“2-3,” and so on.
3 Go to the next part of the document you want to include in the article, and
draw a marquee around this text. Repeat this step until you have defined the
entire article. The articles are numbered according to the order in which they
are created.
To resize or move an article box, you must first end the article.
4 To end the article, press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS).
5 In the Article Properties dialog box, type the article title, subject, author, and
any keywords to describe the article, and click OK.
Editing and deleting articles
You can edit an existing article thread at any time using the article tool. For
example, you can delete an article box, insert an article box, move or resize an
article box, combine article boxes, and edit article properties.
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To delete an article or article box:
1 Select the article tool
to display the articles in the document.
2 Choose Window > Show Articles, and do one of the following:
To delete the entire article, select the article in the Articles palette, press the
Delete key, and click OK in the prompt dialog.
■
To delete only one box from an article, select the box in the document. From
the context menu, choose Delete. In the Adobe Acrobat dialog box, select Box.
If you select Article, the entire article is deleted.
■
The remaining articles or article boxes are automatically renumbered.
To insert an article box into an article thread:
1 Select the article tool
the new article box after.
, and then select the article box you want to insert
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2 Click the plus tab at the bottom of the selected box, and click OK when
prompted to drag and create a new article box.
1-1
Selected article and article tool cursor
3 Draw a new article box. The new box is inserted into the article flow, and all
subsequent boxes are renumbered.
To move or resize an article box:
1 Select the article tool
, select the article box you want to move or resize,
and do one of the following:
■
To move the box, drag it to the new location.
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To resize the box, drag one of the corner points until the box is the
correct size.
■
1-1
Resizing an article box
To edit article properties:
1 Select the article tool
, and select the article box that you want to edit.
2 Choose Edit > Properties.
3 Change the information in the Articles Properties dialog box text fields as
necessary, and click OK.
To combine two articles:
1 Select the article tool
to be read first.
, and select any article box in the article you want
2 Select the plus tab at the bottom of the article box.
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3 Hold down Ctrl (Windows) or Option (Mac OS), and click the article box you
want to be read next. The second article is appended to the end of the first
article. All article boxes in the piece are renumbered automatically.
Working with destinations
A destination is a link represented by text in the Destinations palette. Destinations provide a means for setting navigation pathways across a collection of
PDF documents. Linking to a destination (rather than a specific page) is recommended when linking across documents because, unlike a link to a page, a link
to a destination is not affected by the addition or deletion of pages within the
target document.
To display and sort the destinations list:
1 Choose Window > Show Destinations, and do one of the following:
■
Choose Scan Document from the Destinations palette menu.
■
Select the scan document icon
at the bottom of the palette.
2 To sort the destinations, do one of the following:
Click the Name bar at the top of the Destinations palette to sort the destination names alphabetically.
■
Click the Page bar at the top of the Destinations palette to sort the destinations by page number.
■
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To go to, delete, reset, or rename a destination:
1 Choose Window > Show Destinations, and do one of the following:
■
Choose Scan Document from the Destinations palette menu.
■
Select the scan document icon
at the bottom of the palette.
2 Press the right mouse button (Windows) or Ctrl-click (Mac OS) to select the
destination. Choose one of the following from the context menu:
■
Go To Destination to move to the target location.
■
Delete to delete the destination.
■
Set Destination to reset the target of the destination.
■
Rename to give the destination a different name.
To create and name a destination and to create a link to another PDF
document:
1 Choose Window > Show Destinations.
2 Choose Scan Document from the Destinations palette menu.
Note: You must scan a document for any existing destinations before you can
create a new destination. This step is required, even when you are creating the
first destination for the document.
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3 In the target document, navigate to the location where you want to create a
destination, and set the desired view. For more information on setting the view,
see Setting magnification options.
4 Set the destination by doing one of the following:
■
Choose New Destination from the Destinations palette menu.
■
Click the create new destination icon at the bottom of the palette.
5 Enter the text for the name of the destination, and press Enter (Windows) or
Return (Mac OS). A destination name should be unique for it to work.
6 Open the source document (the document you want to create the link
from), and select the link tool .
7 Drag a rectangle to specify a source for the link.
8 Choose Go To View as the action type. This is the action you apply to execute
a link to a destination. For information on the other action types, see Using
actions for special effects.
9 Choose a magnification option. For more information, see Setting magnification options.
10 Open the target document (leaving the source document open as well),
and display the Destinations palette. Scan the document to show the list
of destinations.
11 Select the destination you want to link to. When the destination (page or
view) is displayed, click Set Link. The filename of the target document and the
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destination name appear in the dialog box. A link is created from the source
document to the target document.
To delete a destination:
1 Choose Window > Show Destinations.
2 Choose Scan Document from the Destinations palette menu, and scan the
document for destinations.
3 Select the destination from the list.
4 Choose Edit > Delete, and click OK to confirm your action.
Working with links
Links provide the ability to jump to other locations in the same document, to
other electronic documents, or to Web sites. You can use links when you want
to ensure that your reader has immediate access to related information. You
can also use links to initiate actions, such as playing a sound or movie file, or to
enter articles, to show annotations, or to submit forms. See Chapter 10, Adding
Interactive Features.
Creating links
You create links in a document using the link tool. You can specify your links as
visible or invisible.
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To create a link:
1 Navigate to the section of the document where you want to create a link.
2 Select the link tool . The pointer becomes a cross hair (+), and any existing
links in the document—including invisible links—are temporarily visible.
3 Create the link rectangle in one of the following ways:
■
Drag the mouse to create a marquee.
■ Press Ctrl (Windows) or Option (Mac OS), and select the target text with the Ibeam. This allows you to fit a link rectangle exactly around the selected text.
4 In the Create Link dialog box, choose a rectangle type:
Visible Rectangle indicates that the link rectangle is visible. Set the
appearance of the link rectangle by choosing a width, color, and style.
■
Invisible Rectangle indicates that the link rectangle should be invisible under
normal circumstances.
■
5 Select a highlight option for when the link is selected.
6 Choose an action type. This specifies the action that occurs when the link is
selected. For more information, see Using actions for special effects.
Note: If you want to link your PDF document with another PDF document, use
the Go To View action. Open the file in Acrobat and then navigate to the
location where you want it to open.
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7 Choose a magnification option. This allows you to control the view that
appears when the link is selected. For more information, see Setting magnification options.
8 Click Set Link.
Editing links
You can edit a link at any time—changing its appearance, hotspot area, or link
action, deleting or resizing the link rectangle, or changing the destination
of the link. Changing the properties of a link only affects the currently
selected link.
To move or resize a link rectangle:
1 Select the link tool , and then move the pointer over one of the corners
of the link rectangle. The cross hair changes to a double-headed arrow. If the
cursor is not directly over a corner of the link rectangle, the cursor is a
standard pointer.
2 To move the link rectangle, position the arrow anywhere in the rectangle,
and drag it to the new location.
3 To resize the link rectangle, drag any corner point until the rectangle is the
correct size.
To change the properties of a link:
1 Select the link tool
, and double-click inside the link rectangle.
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2 Change the properties of the link, as described in Creating links, and
click OK.
To delete a link:
1 Select the link tool
, and select the link rectangle you want to delete.
Note: You cannot undo this action.
2 Do one of the following:
■
Choose Edit > Delete (Windows) or Clear (Mac OS).
■
Press the Delete key.
■
Choose Delete from the context menu.
3 Click OK.
Creating and editing Weblinks
Acrobat allows you to connect to sites on the World Wide Web as easily as you
connect to another PDF document. If you click a link to the Web, the linked Web
page opens in a Web browser. If your PDF document was created by
downloading Web pages, however, clicking a link in it may add the linked page
to the PDF document. See Converting a link’s Web pages.
To create a link to the World Wide Web:
1 Select the link tool
, and create a link rectangle.
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2 Select Visible Rectangle or Invisible Rectangle as the type. If you select
Visible, set the appearance for the link rectangle.
3 Choose an option for highlighting the link when it is selected.
4 Choose World Wide Web Link as the action type, and click Edit URL. For more
information on action types, see Using actions for special effects.
5 Type in the URL, or select one from the list of previously used URLs. You can
edit a URL once you select it from the list.
6 Click OK to accept the URL, and then click Set Link.
7 Check the link by clicking the link with the hand tool
. You can choose to
view the link inside Acrobat or another Web browser. Your computer must be
connected to the Internet.
To edit a link to the World Wide Web:
1 Select the link tool
, and double-click the link you want to modify.
2 Click Edit URL, and make the desired changes in the text box. You can also
select a URL from the menu list of previously used URLs and edit it
once selected.
3 Click OK on the Weblink Edit URL dialog box, and click OK on the Link
Properties dialog box.
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Setting Weblink preferences
You can specify which browser to use for viewing Web pages and set several
other preferences.
If your PDF document was created from Web pages in Windows, you can open
its linked pages in Acrobat rather than in a Web browser. See Converting a link’s
Web pages for information.
To set Weblink preferences:
1 Choose File > Preferences > Weblink.
2 From the menu, choose whether to display link information below the
pointer when the pointer is over a Weblink. You can display a URL for a Weblink
always, never, or only when you press Ctrl (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) while
pointing on the link.
3 Set the following options for displaying Web information:
Show Toolbar Button shows the Web Browser button
in the command
bar. You can click this button to open the Web browser from Acrobat.
■
Show Progress Dialog displays status information such as how much data is
being downloaded when you click a Weblink.
■
4 Click Browse (Windows) or Select (Mac OS), locate the Web browser you
want to use, and click Open.
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5 Choose the connection type that matches your browser. If your browser is
not listed, choose the Standard connection type.
6 Click OK.
Setting magnification options
You can specify a particular view of a page for the destination of the link,
bookmark, or thumbnail by setting the magnification for the page. You can
choose from any of the following options:
Fixed displays the magnification level and page position that were in effect
when you created the link or bookmark as the destination. Use the zoom tool,
the view buttons in the tool bar, the status bar, or the scroll bar to adjust the
view before accepting this setting.
■
Fit View displays the visible portion of the current page as the destination.
The magnification level and window size vary with monitor resolution.
■
■
Fit Page displays the current page in the destination window.
■
Fit Width displays the width of the current page in the destination window.
■
Fit Height displays the height of the current page in the destination window.
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Fit Visible displays the width of the visible contents of the current page in the
destination window. This usually means the margins are not displayed.
■
■ Inherit Zoom displays the destination window at the magnification level the
reader is using when he or she clicks the link or bookmark.
Note: When you specify a magnification setting for a link or bookmark, it is
inherited by all subsequent links and bookmarks you create until you change it.
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Working with PDF Documents
Acrobat allows you to edit PDF documents in a variety of ways. You can edit
text and graphics within a file, and a new feature allows you to edit images and
line art using Adobe Photoshop 5.0 and Adobe Illustrator 7.0 or 8.0 (Windows)
from within a PDF document. You can also crop and rotate pages in a PDF
document. You can rearrange the order of pages in a document, add new
pages, or extract pages from a PDF document and create a new document with
them. You can combine two or more PDF files to create a new PDF document
file. You can delete pages, and you can renumber pages.
Important: PDF links exist in a separate layer on top of pages in a document.
Links are not inherently tied to graphic or text elements in a document. When
you replace or insert pages from a document, the links remain unaffected and
maintain their relative positions and sizes in the link layer.
Cropping and rotating pages
The crop tool provides an easy method for modifying a page layout. You can
adjust the margins of one or all the pages in a document, or you can specify
margins on a per-page basis. The crop tool allows you to adjust page margins
by setting specific parameters or by visually setting page boundaries.You
cannot undo a crop operation. Cropping does not reduce file size.
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Acrobat also provides the option of rotating all pages in a document or only
selected pages. You can rotate a page from a portrait (vertical) display to a
landscape (horizontal) display. Rotation is based on 90-degree increments.
To use the crop tool:
1 Choose View > Single Page to display the document in single page layout. It
is recommended that you crop pages in Single Page layout.
2 Do one of the following:
■
Choose Document > Crop Pages.
Select the crop tool
, and drag a cropping rectangle. Double-click inside
the rectangle to bring up the Crop Pages dialog box.
■
3 Specify the area to crop in one of the following ways:
If you used the crop tool to specify the page boundaries, select a handle at a
corner of the cropping rectangle, and drag to the correct size.
■
Select Bounding Box from the Margins menu. This sets the margins at one
pixel outside the text on the page.
■
Select Custom (Windows) or Custom Margins (Mac OS) from the Margins
menu, and enter values for the left, right, top, and bottom margins.
■
Select Custom (Windows) or Custom Margins (Mac OS) from the Margins
menu, and use the (left, right, top, bottom) increment arrows to adjust the
■
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margins. As you define new margin values, their boundaries display on the
thumbnail display in the Crop Pages dialog box.
If you have inches specified as your unit of measure, the increment arrows
adjust the margins to one hundredth of an inch (default). If you have points
specified as your unit of measure, the default is adjusted to one tenth of a
point. Press Ctrl + arrow (Windows) or Option + arrow (Mac OS) to adjust to one
hundredth of a point.
Use the following table as a guide for adjusting margins when the unit of
measure is set to inches:
Inch increments (Windows)
Inch increments (Mac OS)
Ctrl+arrow = .001” (one thousandth)
Option+arrow = .001” (one thousandth)
Alt+arrow = .010” (one hundredth)
Ctrl+arrow = .010” (one hundredth); also
Command+ arrow
Shift+arrow = .100” (one tenth)
Shift+arrow = .100” (one tenth)
4 Select All to apply the margins to the entire document, or select Pages From,
and enter the range of pages to which the new margins should apply.
5 Select All Pages In Range (Windows) or Even And Odd Pages (Mac OS), Odd
Pages Only, or Even Pages Only from the Crop menu.
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6 If you are cropping multiple pages, click OK to accept the new margins. The
warning dialog does not appear if you are only cropping a single page.
7 Click OK to apply the new margins.
To rotate pages:
1 Click the Thumbnails tab in the navigation pane. From the palette menu,
choose Rotate Pages.
2 Select Clockwise or Counterclockwise as the direction to rotate the pages
(90 degrees).
3 Specify a range of pages to rotate, or select All to rotate all the pages in
the document.
4 Click OK, and then click OK in the prompt dialog box for final acceptance.
Moving and copying PDF pages and files
Acrobat allows you to move a PDF page or range of pages, or copy a PDF page
or range of pages within a document or from one document to another. When
you copy a PDF page or pages, the information is left in the original location, as
well as being put in the new destination. When you move a PDF page or pages,
the original information is extracted (taken away) from the original location
and relocated to the new destination.
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Acrobat also allows you to easily combine PDF files with one another. You can
append a file to the beginning or end of another file, or specify the page where
you want it located.
Combining PDF files
Acrobat allows you to combine one PDF file with another with the Insert Pages
command and specify where the new file is placed in the target document. If
you insert more than one document using drag and drop (Windows), all the
documents are inserted in the order specified by Windows Explorer. For
example, if files are sorted by name, the files will be inserted alphabetically. If
the files are sorted by size, they are inserted in ascending or descending order,
according to the sort in Windows Explorer. Acrobat only supports combining
PDF documents with other PDF documents. At present, you cannot insert nonPDF files (such as Photoshop or Illustrator) into a PDF file without first
converting them to PDF.
To combine two PDF files:
1 With the target document open, choose Document > Insert Pages.
2 In the Select File To Insert dialog box, select the source document you want
to insert into the target document, and select Open (Windows) or Select
(Mac OS).
3 In the Insert dialog box, specify whether you want to insert the document
Before or After the specified page.
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4 Specify whether the document is to be inserted before or after the first page,
last page, or enter a page number.
5 Click OK.
To combine PDF files by dragging and dropping (Windows):
1 Set up your Windows environment so Acrobat and Windows Explorer
windows are tiled side by side.
2 Select and drag files from Windows Explorer to the document area of an
open PDF file. If you selected multiple files, press Ctrl while dragging to insert
the files. If you press Ctrl, the files are added automatically without the Insert
dialog box appearing.
3 In the Insert dialog box that appears, specify the location (Before or After) for
the dropped file, and then the respective page in the target document: First
Page, Last Page, or enter a Page Number in the text box.
4 Click OK.
Moving and copying using thumbnails
Thumbnails provide an easy means for moving and copying pages within a
document. You can copy and move one thumbnail at a time or multiple thumbnails simultaneously.
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To move or copy a PDF page within a document using a thumbnail:
1 Select one or more thumbnails to move.
2 Do one of the following:
To move a thumbnail page, select and drag the page number box, or the
thumbnail itself, to the new location. A page icon containing an arrow appears
at the lower right of the cursor, and a bar appears to show the new position of
the thumbnail. Release the mouse button when the bar is in the correct
location. The thumbnail page is inserted at that point in the document, and the
pages are renumbered.
■
To copy a thumbnail page, hold down Ctrl (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) as
you drag. When copying a thumbnail page, the page icon at the lower right of
the cursor changes to contain a plus sign (+) instead of an arrow.
■
To move or copy a PDF page between documents using a thumbnail:
1 Open both PDF documents, and display them side by side with their
navigation panes showing the Thumbnails palette.
2 Select one or more thumbnails.
3 Do one of the following:
To copy a thumbnail page, drag it into the thumbnail area of the target
document. A page icon containing a plus sign (+) appears at the lower right of
the cursor, and a bar appears at the bottom or top when the thumbnails are in
a single column, or to the left or right if more than one column of thumbnails is
■
Working with PDF Documents
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displayed. Release the mouse button when the black bar is in the correct
location. The thumbnail page is copied into the document, and the pages are
renumbered.
To move a thumbnail page, hold down Ctrl (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) as
you drag. The thumbnail page is inserted into the target document and
deleted from the source document. The pages are renumbered.
■
Moving and copying using structured bookmarks (Windows)
Structured bookmarks are another method you can use for moving and
copying pages within a document. Structured bookmarks use the internal
information, or metadata, of the document to create a bookmark hierarchy. You
define the levels of structure (head1, head2, head3, paragraph, table, and so
on) when the document is converted to PDF using PDFMaker. Structured
bookmarks are easily identified by their icon. For more information on how to
specify structure levels for a document, see Using PDFMaker for Microsoft Word
97 and Microsoft PowerPoint 97 (which is available as online help when you use
the Create PDF command from within a Microsoft application).
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You can rearrange the organization of the structured bookmark hierarchy and
rearrange the content in the document at the same time. Currently, Microsoft
Word is the only word-processing application that provides the necessary
internal information, or metadata, in its documents to support structured
bookmarks. Acrobat Web Capture has the ability to generate a different type of
structured bookmark from HTML documents it downloads from the Web. For
more information, see Chapter 5, Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows) and
Configuring Web browsers for viewing PDF.
To move material associated with a structured bookmark:
1 Click the Show/Hide Navigation Pane button
on the command bar to
display the navigation pane. Select the Bookmarks tab to bring the palette to
the front.
2 Select the structured bookmark
for the material you want to move. Shiftclick to add more bookmarks to the selection. You can select bookmarks from
different levels in the hierarchy; the hierarchy is maintained when the
bookmarks are moved.
If you select a parent bookmark, its children are selected automatically. To
move a child without the parent, you must select it individually (that is, without
selecting the parent).
3 Hold down Ctrl (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) as you drag. A black bar
appears above or to the left of the new location. Release the mouse button
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when the black cursor bar is in the correct location. The hierarchy in the
Bookmarks palette changes, as does the organization of the document content.
If you don’t hold down Ctrl (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) as you drag, the
bookmarks are rearranged in the Bookmarks palette, but the actual pages of
the document remain unaffected.
Important: This procedure only works with structured bookmarks, which are
represented with a special icon in the navigation pane.
Extracting pages
You can extract pages from a PDF document and save them to a separate file.
Be aware that when you extract a page from a PDF document, all annotations,
form fields, and links associated with the page content are also extracted.
Bookmarks and articles associated with the pages, however, are not extracted.
To extract a page:
1 Choose Document > Extract Pages.
2 Specify the range of pages to extract.
3 To delete the pages from the document during the extraction process, select
Delete Pages After Extraction. If you do not select this option, the extracted
pages are copied to create a new file, but they still remain in the original
document.
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4 Click OK. If you choose Delete Pages After Extraction, you need to click OK
again to confirm the deletion. A new document is opened with the name Pages
from <document_name.pdf>.
Deleting and replacing pages
You can delete pages from a PDF document with the Delete Pages command
or by deleting the page’s thumbnail or structured bookmarks. You can
minimize the size of the document file by using the Save As command after
deleting pages. If you want to keep a copy of the original document intact, use
the Save As command, and save the restructured document under a new
name.
Important: You cannot undo the Delete Pages command.
There may be times when you want to replace an entire PDF page with another
PDF page. When you replace a page, only the text and graphics on the original
page are replaced. Any interactive elements associated with the original
page, such as links and bookmarks, are not affected. Likewise, bookmarks and
links that may have been previously associated with the replacement page
do not carry over. Annotations, on the other hand, are carried along with the
replacement page and are combined with any existing annotations in
the document.
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Dining in New Triton
Dining in New Triton
As an aid to the discerning diner, we’ve compiled
a list of our favorite establishments in New Triton.
Click on a restaurant name to read more about it.
Bon Appetit!
As an aid to the discerning diner, we’ve compiled
a list of our favorite establishments in New Triton.
Click on a restaurant name to read more about it.
Bon Appetit!
ge
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1
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Financial district
Opera Center
4 Giuletta’s
5 Java Junction
6 Ranch House Grill
1 Chez Maison
2 Dinh’s Garden
3 Fragrant Harbor
South Wharf
95
2
1
es
East 1 st
East 10 th
NM
4
t
a r ke
East 14 th
Jo n
3
Central
Park
Ha
rb
or
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205
6
East 17 th
5
3
2 Dinh’s Garden
5 Java Junction
East 10 th
t
a r ke
4 Giuletta’s
NM
1 Chez Maison
4
Central
Park
East 14 th
205
6
East 17 th
3 Fragrant Harbor
6 Ranch House Grill
5
Financial district
Opera Center
South Wharf
Before and after a page is replaced. Bookmarks and links remain in the same location.
To delete a page using the Delete Pages command:
1 Choose Document > Delete Pages.
2 Enter the page range to be deleted, and click OK. Click OK on the prompt
dialog box for final acceptance.
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You cannot delete all pages; at least one page must remain in the document.
Note: If you select Use Logical Page Numbers in the General Preferences dialog
box (File > Preferences > General), you can enter a page number in parentheses
to delete its logical equivalent. For example, if the first page in the document
is numbered i, you can enter (1) in the Delete Pages dialog box, and page i will
be deleted.
To delete a page using a thumbnail:
1 Select the page number box of the thumbnail or the thumbnail itself:
■
Select one thumbnail.
Shift-click to select a range of thumbnails. Ctrl-click (Windows) or Commandclick (Mac OS) to toggle the selection of individual thumbnails. When you
select multiple thumbnails for deletion, all the pages between the first and last
selections are deleted, including thumbnails (in between) that were not
selected.
■
■
Drag a rectangle around a grouping of thumbnails.
2 Choose Edit > Delete (Windows) or Edit > Clear (Mac OS).
3 Click OK on the prompt dialog box to accept the deletion.
To delete material associated with a structured bookmark:
1 Click the Show/Hide Navigation Pane button
on the command bar to
display the navigation pane. Click the Bookmarks tab to bring the Bookmarks
palette to the front.
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2 Click the structured bookmark for the material you want to delete. Shift-click
to select multiple bookmarks.
3 Hold down Ctrl (Windows) or Option (Mac OS), and drag the bookmark to
the trash at the bottom of the palette. The structured bookmark and its
associated page are deleted from the document.
For more information on how to use structured bookmarks for editing, see
Moving and copying PDF pages and files.
To replace the contents of a page using the Replace command:
1 Open the PDF document that contains pages you want to replace.
2 Choose Document >Replace Pages.
3 Select the document containing the replacement pages, and click Select.
4 Under Original, enter the pages to be replaced in the original document.
5 Under Replacement, enter the first page of the replacement page range. The
last page is calculated based on the number of pages to be replaced in the
original document. You can only replace the same number of pages.
6 Click OK.
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To replace a page using a thumbnail:
1 Open two PDF documents, and click the Show/Hide Navigation Pane button
to display the navigation pane. Click the Thumbnail tab to bring the
Thumbnails palette to the front.
2 Select the page number box of the thumbnail or thumbnails you want to
use as replacement pages:
■
Select one thumbnail.
Shift-click to select multiple thumbnails. Ctrl-click (Windows) or Commandclick (Mac OS) to toggle the selection of individual thumbnails.
■
■
Drag a rectangle around a grouping of thumbnails.
3 Drag the selected thumbnails onto the Thumbnails palette of the target
document. Position the cursor directly over the page number box of the
thumbnail you want to replace.
4 Release the mouse to replace the pages. The pages you selected in the first
document replace the same number of pages in the second document,
starting at the page number you selected to drop the new pages on.
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Renumbering pages
You may notice that the page numbers on the document pages do not always
match the page numbers that appear below the thumbnails and in the status
bar. Acrobat always numbers pages with integers, starting with page 1 for the
first page of the document, and so on. Because some PDF documents may
have originally been hard-copy documents that contain front matter, such as
the copyright page and table of contents, their body pages may not follow the
numbering shown in the status bar.
XXX
i
ii
1
2
3
XXX
2
3
4
5
Printed page numbering compared to online page numbering
6
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Acrobat allows you to number or renumber the pages in your documents in a
variety of ways. You can specify a different numbering style for groups of
pages, for instance, 1, 2, 3, or i, ii, iii, or a, b, c. You can also customize the
numbering system by adding a prefix. For example, the numbering for chapter
1 could be 1-1, 1-2, 1-3, and so on, and for chapter 2, it could be 2-1, 2-2, 2-3,
and so on.
To renumber one or more pages:
1 Click the Show/Hide Navigation Pane button
tab to bring the palette to the front.
, and click the Thumbnails
2 Choose Number Pages from the Thumbnails palette menu.
3 Specify a page range in one of the following ways:
■
Choose Select All to specify the entire document.
■
Choose Select From, and type in a range of pages.
4 Select one of the following:
■ Begin New Section starts a new numbering sequence. Choose a style from
the pop-up menu, and enter a starting page number for the section. Specify a
prefix, if desired.
Merge With Previous Section removes the numbering currently assigned to
the selected pages. The numbering used for the previous set of pages will be
extended to cover the selected pages.
■
5 Click OK.
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Editing text
You can perform last-minute corrections to PDF documents using the touchup
text tool. You can choose from a variety of properties to apply to selected text,
including font size, embedding, color scale, baseline shift, tracking, word
spacing, and line alignment.
Editing with the touchup text tool
Note: The touchup feature cannot be used with forms.
For information on how to touch up graphics using the touchup object tool,
see Editing graphic objects within PDF documents.
About the new touchup text features
Acrobat 4.0 offers the following new features for touching up text:
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Ctrl-click (Windows) or Command-click (Mac OS) creates a new empty line of
text at the location where you clicked in the document. This feature is for
horizontal text only.
■
■
A single level of Undo is now available with touchup text.
The Embed check box allows you to quickly remove embedding from any
embedded font by selecting it.
■
■ Touchup edits text on rotated lines in the same way as it edits text on
horizontal lines.
Touchup edits text using vertical fonts in the same way as it edits text using
horizontal fonts. The baseline shift for vertical fonts is left and right, instead of
up and down for horizontal fonts.
■
Editing text with the touchup text tool
While you can use the touchup text tool to edit text, you can only do so one
line at a time. As a result, editing large sections of text can be a slow and
laborious task. In general, you should reserve use of the touchup text tool for
minor text edits in a PDF document. For extensive revisions, however, you
should edit the document in the original document creation program and then
regenerate the PDF file. You may choose to regenerate only the corrected
pages and insert these corrected PDF pages into the document that needs to
be corrected.
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Embedded fonts require special attention when editing a PDF document. Be
aware that embedding or unembedding a font affects all the characters in the
file using this font. This applies whether you embed or unembed a font from
the Text Attributes dialog box or from the warning dialog box that tells you the
only way to enter characters is to remove the embedding.
If an embedded or subsetted font is not installed on your system, you are
only allowed to make limited editing changes to the text using this font.
Without the font installed on your system, you can only make changes to color,
tracking, word spacing, baseline, margins, or justification. To be able to edit the
content of the text by adding more characters, you must first install the font.
Follow these guidelines when using the touchup text tool:
You can always change text attributes, with the exceptions of Font and
Embedding. You can always delete characters.
■
You can add characters using a font, or you can change existing characters in
a font, if that font is installed on your system or if the font is a non-embedded
single-byte font in the system’s encoding. If you attempt to add characters to a
single-byte embedded font that is not installed, you will be asked if you want to
remove the embedding. You cannot add characters unless you choose to
remove the embedding.
■
If you attempt to add characters to a single-byte embedded font that is not
installed, you receive a message that asks if you want to remove the
■
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embedding. If the single-byte embedded font is not in the system’s encoding,
the message you receive says “You cannot edit this text font.”
■ You can embed added characters only if the font is installed and any instance
of the font is embedded. Otherwise added characters are not embedded.
You cannot add characters to selected text using a multi-byte font unless the
font is installed on your system.
■
■
You can always unembed an embedded font.
Single-byte fonts are fully embedded when you choose Embed. Multi-byte
fonts are subset embedded when you choose Embed.
■
To use the touchup text tool:
1 Select the touchup text tool
.
2 Select the text you want to change. Shift-select to extend your text
selection, up to one line.
Note: Cut, Copy, and Paste commands work on touchup text selections. The
Select All command selects all characters in the currently active line.
3 Choose Tools > TouchUp > Text Attributes, and set the properties of the
selected text. If you change the text attributes when more than one line of text
is selected, only the first line of text is changed.
4 Click the Font tab, and set the appearance of the text:
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Select a font from the font menu. You can select any font installed on your
system or any font that has been fully embedded in the PDF document.
■
■
Enter a point size in the box represented by the icon
.
Select the fill box to bring up the custom color dialog box from which you
can choose a color, or choose a standard color from the pop-up menu.
■
Select the outline box to bring up the custom color dialog box from which
you can choose a color, or choose a standard color from the pop-up menu.
■
5 Click the Character tab, and set the scale, baseline shift, tracking, and
spacing options:
Enter a value to change the horizontal scale in the box by the icon . The
horizontal scale specifies the proportion between the height and the width
of the type.
■
Enter a value to offset the text from the baseline in the box by the icon
The baseline is the line on which the type rests.
■
.
Enter a value to set tracking in the box by the icon
. Tracking inserts
uniform spacing between more than two characters in selected text.
■
Enter a value to set word spacing in the box by the icon
. Word spacing
inserts uniform spacing between two or more words in selected text.
■
6 Click the Line tab, and set the text alignment options:
Select the alignment icon for left justified, right justified, center justified, or
uniformly justified.
■
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Enter a point value in the appropriate box to move the line a specified
amount to the left or right.
■
7 Type your corrections.
Note: For legal reasons, you must have purchased a font and have it installed
on your system to be able to revise text using that font. For more information
on embedded fonts, see Creating PDF files with Distiller.
Fitting text within a selected text line
You can automatically fit new text into a specified space within a text line by
using the Fit Text To Selection command.
To fit type into a text selection area:
1 Select the touchup text tool
, and select a line of text.
2 Choose Fit Text To Selection from the context menu.
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3 Type in the new text. The new text will stretch or condense to fit the area of
the originally selected text without disturbing the spacing of the other text on
the line.
Fitting new text into a selected area
To adjust the margins of a line:
1 Select the text select tool
text you want to modify.
or touchup text tool
, and select the line of
2 Choose Tools > TouchUp > Show Line Markers (default selection). Selecting
this command again toggles it off or on, depending on the current state.
3 Drag the markers to the left or right.
You can also adjust alignment using the Line tab of the Text Attributes dialog
box. Margin values in the Attributes dialog box are relative to the page boundaries. The line markers that appear depend on the selected alignment mode.
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Editing graphic objects within PDF documents
Acrobat allows you to edit any number of individual PDF graphic objects, such
as line art, images, or text blocks, using Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator,
and other applications that can read and write PDF files directly. If you choose
to edit a text box, the entire text box is selected, even if it spans several pages.
Be aware that the touchup object tool cannot select individual characters that
are part of larger text blocks. You need to use the touchup text tool to edit
individual characters and words. The touchup object tool enables you to make
last-minute corrections to graphic objects in a PDF document. For major
revisions, it is recommended that you revert to your original authoring application, make the necessary changes, and then regenerate the PDF document.
Using the touchup object tool , you can select a graphic object in a PDF
document and move it to a new location, edit it using the touchup object tool
task features, or take it into Photoshop, Illustrator, or other application directly
from the PDF document, and edit it. Once you complete the edit, you can place
the object directly back in the PDF document if you are using an external application, and view the newly edited object in its original context. To take full
advantage of this tool, you should have prior experience using the external
editing applications accessed by the touchup object tool.
Note: Acrobat annotations are not considered page elements and therefore
cannot be selected or manipulated by touchup. Since some annotations have
graphical appearances, this can be deceiving at first.
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The touchup object tool context menu enables you to perform some editing
tasks without launching an external editing application:
■ Cut removes the selected graphic object from the PDF document and places
it on the clipboard.
■
Copy copies a selected graphic object onto the clipboard.
Paste places a graphic object from the clipboard into a select object, or onto
the document page.
■
Paste In Front places a graphic object from the clipboard in front of the
topmost selected object, or on top of everything on the document page if
nothing is selected.
■
■ Paste In Back places a graphic object from the clipboard in back of the
bottommost selected object, or behind everything on the document page if
nothing is selected.
■
Delete removes any selected graphic objects from the document.
■
Select All selects all graphic objects on the document page.
■
Select None deselects any selected graphic objects in the PDF document.
Delete Clip deletes the objects that are clipping the selected objects. For
example, if you scale text and if the resulting characters are clipped, selecting
this option shows you the entire characters.
■
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Edit Image, Object, Objects, Page changes according to what is currently
selected (image, object, objects, page). Page is shown if nothing is selected on
the page.
■
Important: To be able to save an edited graphic object directly back into the
PDF document, you must have Adobe Photoshop (version 5.0 or later) or Illustrator (version 7.0 or later) installed on your system. You must also have the
appropriate Photoshop plug-in installed in the correct folder on your hard
drive, Otherwise, a graphic object edited using Photoshop will be saved to disk
instead of back into the PDF document. See Managing plug-ins for more information. Illustrator does not require a special plug-in to work
with Acrobat.
To move a graphic object in a PDF document:
1 Open the PDF document to the page where the graphic object or text block
is located.
2 Select the touchup object tool
.
3 Select the object, and drag it to the desired location. Release the mouse
button to place the image.
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If you mistakenly place the object and want to move it back to its original
position, there is only one level of Undo. Otherwise you have to manually
reposition the image, which only provides an approximation of the original
placement. For this reason, it is recommended that you save a backup of the
PDF document before you begin editing.
Note: When Photoshop 5.0 is launched using the touchup object tool, editing
an image is limited to a single layer. In this situation, Photoshop 5.0 also does
not convert the ICC profile when you change viewing modes. To ensure the
display of the correct colors for the image after changing the viewing mode,
choose Image > Mode > Profile, and then change the mode (that is, Lab Color
to RGB.1).
To edit a graphic object inside a PDF document:
1 Open the PDF document to the page where the image is located.
2 Select the touchup object tool
.
3 Select the object, and then choose an option from the context menu. Or
hold down Ctrl (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) and double-click the image. The
external editing application is launched.
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If your graphic object cannot be opened in Adobe Photoshop, verify that
Photoshop is configured correctly. See Managing plug-ins for information. If
you receive a message asking whether to convert to ICC profiles, choose “Don’t
Convert.” If the image window displays a checkerboard pattern when it opens,
the image data could not be read.
Editing in Photoshop and Illustrator from within Acrobat is a modal feature. If
you change the object selection, the editing session is terminated. Any subsequent changes in the external editor (after the session is terminated), even if
saved, are not placed into the PDF file by Acrobat. For this reason, if a session is
terminated, you should start a new session before continuing to make changes
to the object. Or you can use this as a means to extract graphic objects from
PDF files for use in creating new PDF files.
4 Make the desired changes, and then flatten the image (if you are working
in Photoshop). You must flatten the image to be able to save it in PDF
Photoshop format.
If you change the dimensions of the image in Photoshop, the image returns to
its place in the PDF document, but the alignment may be different than before
it was edited. Also, transparency information is only preserved for masks
specified as index values in an indexed color space. Image masks are not
supported. Last, if you change image modes while editing the image, you may
lose valuable information that can only be applied in the original mode.
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5 Choose File > Save, and the graphic object is automatically updated and
displayed in the PDF document. If you choose Save As, choose Photoshop PDF
as the file type. The object is saved as a new file, and Acrobat won’t automatically incorporate the changed object into the PDF file.
Copying PDF text and graphics to other applications
Acrobat allows you to copy text and graphics from a PDF document and paste
them into a file in another application. You can also paste text from a PDF
document into an annotation or bookmark name. Acrobat does not support
copying non-PDF file types (such as Photoshop or Illustrator) directly into PDF
files. You must first convert the non-PDF document to PDF.
While in a PDF document, you select the text or graphic and copy it onto the
clipboard. Once the text or graphic is on the clipboard, you can launch the
other application and paste the text or graphic into a file. If the other application supports Object Linking and Embedding (OLE), you can use OLE
commands to paste text into an OLE compound document. For more information, see Incorporating PDF documents in documents with OLE support.
Note: If a font copied from a PDF document is not available on the system
displaying the copied text, a default font is substituted.
To select text and copy it to the clipboard:
1 Select the text select tool
, and do one of the following:
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To select a line of text, select the first letter of the sentence or phrase and
drag to the last letter.
■
■ To select multiple columns of text (horizontally), hold down Ctrl (Windows)
or Option (Mac OS) as you drag across the width of the document.
To select a column of text (vertically), hold down Ctrl+Alt (Windows) or
Option+Command (Mac OS) as you drag the length of the document.
■
■ To select all the text on the page, choose Edit > Select All. In Single Page
mode, all the text on the current page is selected. In Continuous or Continuous
- Facing mode, most of the text in the document is selected. When you release
the mouse button, the selected text is highlighted. To deselect the text and
start over, click anywhere outside the selected text.
The Select All command will not select all the text in the document. A
workaround for this (Windows) is to use the Edit > Copy File To Clipboard
command.
2 Choose Edit > Copy to copy the selected text to the Clipboard.
3 To view the text, choose Window > Show Clipboard.
In Windows 95, the Clipboard Viewer is not installed by default, and you cannot
use the Show Clipboard command until it is installed. To install the Clipboard
Viewer, choose Start > Settings > Control Panel > Add/Remove Programs, and
then click the Windows Setup tab. Double-click Accessories, check Clipboard
Viewer, and click OK.
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To copy text to a new bookmark:
1 Select the text select tool
, and select a line of text.
2 Choose New Bookmark from the context menu. A new bookmark is created,
and the selected text automatically displays as its title.
To copy graphics to the Clipboard:
1 Select the graphics select tool
. The cursor changes to the cross-hair icon.
2 Drag a rectangle around the graphic you want to copy. To deselect the
graphic and start over, click anywhere outside the selected graphic.
3 Choose Edit > Copy to copy the graphic to the Clipboard.
4 To view the graphic, choose Window > Show Clipboard. The graphic is
copied using the WMF (Windows) or PICT (Mac OS) format.
Selecting tables and formatted text (Windows)
The table/formatted text select tool allows you to select tables and text in a
PDF document and retain the original formatting when the material is copied
(or imported) into other applications. You can specify vertical or horizontal
format, the type of text flow, and whether you want ANSI (simple text) or Rich
Text Format (RTF).
You can copy and export selected tables and text in the following ways:
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Drag and drop the selected table or text to a Windows application. Drag and
drop is always performed in Rich Text Format.
■
■
Copy to a clipboard for use with Windows applications.
Save to a file that can then be loaded or imported to Windows applications.
The default for the Save As command is ANSI text format.
■
Using the table/formatted text select tool
The table/formatted text select tool is a hidden tool under the text select tool
on the tool bar. The default settings automatically read the nature and format
of the selected data as table or text, horizontal or vertical. Currently, vertical
format is used only with CJK fonts.
Note: When working with multiple columns of text, such as a newspaper or
magazine article format, you must manually choose the Table option from the
context menu for the tool to correctly read the selected text.
To change the default settings, choose from the options in the context menu or
the Preferences menu. For more information, see Setting preferences for the
table/formatted text select tool.
Important: You cannot select both horizontal and vertical text in a single zone.
Also, if you select vertical (Japanese) text to be copied into Word, you must
change the text direction settings to vertical to be able to view the outcome.
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To copy a table or formatted text:
1 Select the table/formatted text select tool
a crosshair.
. The cursor changes to
2 Drag a rectangle to enclose the table or formatted text you want to copy.
3 Press the right mouse button, and choose the necessary options from
context menu:
■ Text - Flow disregards the PDF line breaks and flows the text into column
format. Paragraph breaks are applied as they were in the PDF document.
Text - Preserve Line Breaks keeps the line breaks that were in the PDF
document, as well as keeping the original paragraph breaks. If RTF output is
specified, horizontal positioning is maintained using tabs. For more information, see Setting preferences for the table/formatted text select tool.
■
Table maintains the original format of the table, preserving the data as rows
and columns of cells. If you specify RTF for output, spanning cells are preserved.
If ASCII is specified, cells are delimited with tabs (the standard format for
importing text into most spreadsheets).
■
■
Horizontal specifies a horizontal format for tables or (Roman) fonts.
■
Vertical specifies a vertical format for tables or (CJK) fonts.
4 From the context menu, choose a method to preserve the information:
Copy copies to the clipboard. You can then paste the material into a
Windows application.
■
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Save As saves the information at a specified location and with a given
filename. You can then import this file into a Windows application.
■
■ Clear negates the selection and closes the bounding box. You are free to
make another selection, or use another tool.
Setting preferences for the table/formatted text select tool
You can set the preferences for selected tables and text to specify the selection
type, text layout, document language, color selection. You can also set
paragraph and character formatting.
To set table/formatted text select tool preferences:
1 Choose File > Preferences > Table/Formatted Text.
2 Choose from the following options from the General tab:
Default Selection Type menu allows you to choose between Auto-Detect,
Text, or Table. Auto-Detect determines the data type of the selection automatically, Text always specifies the selection as text, and Table always specifies the
selection as a table.
■
Default Text Layout menu allows you to choose between Horizontal for
Roman fonts and tables in a linear format, or Vertical for CJK fonts.
■
Preserve Line Breaks keeps the original line breaks intact, when selected. It
ignores the original line breaks if not selected.
■
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PDF Document Language allows you to specify the correct language for the
PDF document: English, French, German, or Japanese.
■
■ Table Border Color allows you to choose a color for the table selection
border. Select the color swatch, and then choose a new color from the pop-up
menu. Click OK to accept the new color.
Text Border Color allows you to choose a color for the text selection border.
Select the color swatch, and then choose a new color from the pop-up menu.
Click OK to accept the new color.
■
3 Click the RTF Export tab, and choose from the following Character
Formatting options:
■ Font Name preserves the font typeface, but does not embed the font. If the
font name matches a font installed on your system, that font is used. If the font
is not installed, a substitute font is chosen that best matches the font metrics of
the selected font. If this is disabled, the default font in the destination
document is used.
■
Font Style preserves bold and italic styles.
■
Font Size preserves the PDF font size.
Text Color preserves text foreground and background colors. Disabling this
option outputs RTF text using black on white.
■
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Superscripts/Subscripts detects and preserves superscripts and subscripts
automatically. These are preserved using superscript and subscript RTF
formatting tags.
■
4 Choose from the following Paragraph Formatting options:
Alignment preserves paragraph alignment (left, center, right, justified) as it
appears in the original PDF document.
■
■ Line Spacing preserves the space between lines of text (single, double, and
so on) as it appears in the original PDF document.
Space Before/After preserves space before and after paragraphs as they
appear in the original PDF document.
■
■ Indentation preserves the left, right, and first line indent settings so the RTF
text appears like that in the original PDF document.
5 Choose one of the following actions:
■
Defaults to revert to the original system settings.
■
OK to accept and apply your selections.
Cancel to quit the Table/Formatted Text Preferences dialog box and revert to
the previous settings.
■
■
Apply to use these choices on the current selection.
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Incorporating PDF documents in documents with OLE
support
You can incorporate PDF documents into any container document with Object
Linking and Embedding (OLE) support and later edit the PDF documents
in Acrobat.
Note: If you are using Acrobat Reader, you are able to read the PDF documents
but not edit them. You must have Acrobat 4.0 installed on your system to be
able to edit PDF documents.
To incorporate PDF documents into an application with OLE support:
Do one of the following:
Choose the Insert Object command to insert the document directly into the
container application.
■
Choose Edit > Copy File to Clipboard to copy the document to the clipboard,
and then choose the Paste Special command in the container application.
■
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Comparing pages in two PDF documents (Windows)
The Compare Pages command compares every page in two documents. It
looks at PDF information that describes the pages precisely, and it can find
even the most subtle differences between pages. You can use Compare Pages
to identify both content changes between documents and changes that may
not be visible.
This command is especially useful for comparing PDF documents that are
nearly identical, such as document versions that have been digitally signed.
Compare Pages looks at the two most recently active PDF documents. It then
produces a third document, a comparison file that shows every page that
differs between the documents and highlights the differences on the pages.
To compare pages in two PDF documents:
1 Open the two documents. Make active the document you want on the right
in the comparison file, and then make active the document you want on
the left.
2 Choose Tools > Compare Pages, or choose Compare Pages from the
Signatures palette menu. The two documents appear side by side in a
comparison file.
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Each document in the comparison file begins with a summary page that gives
the document’s filename and describes how many pages were altered, added,
moved, or deleted. The rest of the file shows the pages that differ between the
documents. In the document on the left, the pages are listed in ascending
order and are paired with pages from the document on the right.
Note: The pages on the right may not be in ascending order if any content or
pages have been rearranged in the documents.
The differences are highlighted in magenta on the pages. Acrobat identifies
differences in these ways:
If any pixels differ on the two pages, the specific differences are highlighted
on both pages. For example, a word may have been edited or deleted, or an
annotation may have been added. The change may also be one that is barely
noticeable, such as a slightly different tab stop or a small shift of the page’s
content to one side.
■
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If no pixels differ but the PDF information on the pages differs, both pages
are entirely highlighted. For example, some PDF marking behind an opaque
object may have changed, or the crop box may have changed without any
additional cropping being obvious.
■
If a page has been added, it is paired with a new blank page. If a page has
been deleted, it is represented by a blank page and paired with its corresponding page in the other document.
■
The highlighted differences are stored as pencil annotations in the comparison
file. You can use the Annotations palette to see a list of all the differences, and
you can double-click a difference in the palette to go to that place on a page. If
the annotations do not appear in the palette, choose Rescan Document from
the Annotations palette menu, or click the Scan Annotations button
on the
palette’s status bar.
Each page in a comparison file is labeled with A (for pages on the left) or B (for
pages on the right), plus the page’s number in the actual PDF document. You
can find this information on both lower corners of a page, surrounded by equal
signs (for example, =A4=). The page number is helpful for matching these
pages with those in the PDF document, especially when pages on the right
side are not in ascending order.
Note: The side-by-side display of pages in comparison files is designed for twoup printing. If you are printing only one page, select Fit to Page in the Print
dialog box to be sure you include all highlights and the page numbering in the
printed copy.
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Annotating PDF Documents
The Acrobat annotation tools provide a variety of methods for marking up text
and attaching notes and commentaries to PDF documents. These annotations
can be in text, graphic, or audio format; you can even attach external files if you
like. Annotations and markups can be imported and exported from a PDF
document.
About annotations
There are three types of annotation and markup tools available on the tool
bar—annotation, graphic markup, and text markup. Each has a hidden
tool menu.
The annotation tools—notes tool, text annotation tool, audio annotation
tool, stamp tool, and file annotation tool—allow you to attach comments to a
PDF document in a variety of formats. Each tool provides a unique method for
conveying annotation information. For information on how to use these tools,
see Using the annotation tools.
■
The graphic markup tools—pencil tool, rectangle tool, ellipse tool, and line
tool—allow you to visually mark an area of a PDF document with a graphic
symbol and associate a note with the markup for additional comments. For
information on how to use these tools, see Marking up documents with
graphic markup tools.
■
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Text markup tools—highlight text tool, strikethrough text tool, and
underline text tool—allow you to visually mark up text on a PDF document
page and associate a text note with the markup for further comments. For
information on how to use these tools, see Marking up documents.
■
You can change the properties of the current annotation with the annotation’s
Properties dialog box; however, you must use the Preferences dialog box to
change the properties globally for all subsequent annotations.
Using the Annotations palette
The Annotations palette lists the annotations in a document and sorts them by
type, author, page number, or creation date. The annotation list initially groups
annotations by author. The text displayed next to each annotation depends on
the annotation type and how it was created. The following rules apply:
■
You must scan the document to display a list of annotations.
■
Note and text annotations display their first line automatically.
Stamp, graphic markup, and text markup annotations have pop-up note
windows in which you can enter text. The first line of text (up to 128 characters)
appears in the Annotations palette next to the annotation. If there is no
comment for graphic markup and text markup annotations, then the underlying text (text beneath the annotation) is displayed.
■
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Sound annotations display the text entered in the Description text box of the
Sound Properties dialog box. If the Description text box is empty, Sound
appears instead.
■
File annotations display the filename of the attached file or the text entered
in the Description text box of the File Annotations Properties dialog box.
■
To show the Annotations palette:
1 Click the Show/Hide Navigation Pane button
to display the navigation
pane, and then click the Annotations tab to bring the palette to the front.
2 Select the Scan Annotations button
on the status bar, or choose Rescan
Document from the palette menu to display a list of annotations in the
document.
To view and update the annotations outline:
1 Select the Scan Annotations button
Document from the palette menu.
on the status bar, or choose Rescan
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2 Do one of the following to update the outline:
To expand or collapse the annotations outline, click the plus sign (+) or the
minus sign (-) next to an annotation (Windows), or click the down arrow or
horizontal arrow (Mac OS).
■
To update the annotation list, choose Rescan Document from the Annotations palette menu, or click the Scan Annotations button
on the status bar.
The list of annotations associated with the open document is updated.
■
To sort the list of annotations, choose Type, Author, Page Number, or Date
from the palette menu.
■
Note: If a document has a lot of annotations, it can take a few seconds to
update the annotations list.
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To navigate using annotations:
Double-click an annotation from the annotation list. The page on which the
selected annotation is located is displayed in the document pane, and the
highlighted annotation is scrolled into view. To go to the page where another
annotation is located, simply double-click the annotation from the list. The
annotation is highlighted on the document page.
Annotations are grouped initially by type.
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To search for an annotation:
1 Choose Find Annotation from the Annotations palette menu.
2 Type in a key word in the Search For field, and then click OK. If the word is
found, it is highlighted in the Annotations palette.
3 To find another annotation, choose one of the following from the Annotations palette menu:
■
Find Next goes to the annotation after the current annotation.
■
Find Previous goes to the annotation before the current annotation.
Using the annotation tools
You can place annotations anywhere on a page in a PDF document, and you
can tailor the style and format of the annotation to suit the document and type
of comment. Lengthy remarks can be put into a note, recorded as an audio file,
or embedded as a file that can be opened. Brief comments can be expressed by
applying a stamp annotation, marking up the text, or using one of the graphic
markup tools.
To open and close an annotation:
1 Double-click the annotation in the PDF document, or choose Open from the
context menu. Opening a note annotation brings up a note window, opening a
sound annotation plays the audio file, and opening a file annotation launches
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the embedded file (if you have the program used to create the file on your
system). Graphic markup, text markup, and stamp annotations can have
note annotations associated with them. In these cases, double-clicking the
annotation brings up the note window in the same way as with a
note annotation.
2 Click the close box in the upper left corner of the window to close a note, or
choose Close Note from the context menu. A sound annotation plays through
to the end and stops automatically. For a file attachment, the method for
closing the file depends on the file format and program used to create the file.
Using the notes tool
You can create notes on any page in a PDF document, and you can position
them anywhere on the page. If you enter more text than will fit in the window,
the text scrolls. You can resize the window, if desired.
You can set the Annotations preferences so that note windows open automatically. For more information, see Setting annotation preferences.
To add a note annotation:
1 Select the notes tool
.
2 Click the location where you want to place the note, or drag to create a
custom-sized window. The maximum size for the note window is 288 pixels
high and 432 pixels wide.
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3 With the annotation still active, choose Edit > Properties, or choose
Properties from the context menu to display the Properties dialog box. Set the
desired options:
Select an icon to represent your type of note. You can choose from Text Note,
Insert, Comment, New Paragraph, Paragraph, Key, and Help.
■
■
Specify an author name if you wish to replace the default author name.
■ Select a color for the note. To specify a custom color, see Setting the custom
color option.
4 Click OK.
5 Click inside the window, and type the text for the note. You can use the
standard editing commands for your system. You can also use the text select
tool
to copy text from the document into the note.
6 Click the close box in the upper left corner of the window to close a note.
Using the text annotation tool
You can create a text annotation on any page in a PDF document, and position
it anywhere on the page. A text annotation remains visible on top of the
document page; it does not close like a note annotation.
You can annotate Japanese text with the text annotation tool, but you must
have the Asian-language resource files installed. Vertical text is not supported.
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To add a text annotation:
1 Select the text annotation tool
.
2 Click the location where you want to place the text annotation, or drag a
rectangle to define the boundaries of the text field.
3 Enter the text and click outside the bounding box to complete the entry.
4 Select the text annotation to make it active again, and choose Edit >
Properties, or choose Properties from the context menu. You have to complete
the text before you can edit the properties.
5 Set the desired options:
■
Choose a font style from the pop-up menu.
■
Choose a font size from the pick list in the pop-up menu, or enter a number.
Select a font color. To specify a custom color, see Setting the custom color
option.
■
Select a border thickness around the annotation or no border at all. The
default border setting is None.
■
Select a background. Transparent is the default background setting. If you
deselect Transparent, you can select a background color. To specify a custom
color, see Setting the custom color option.
■
■
Specify an author name if you wish to replace the default author name.
6 Click OK.
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7 Click inside the text field, and edit the text for the annotation.
8 Click anywhere outside the text field to finish the task.
Using the audio annotation tool
The audio annotation tool allows you to record and place an audio annotation
in a document. You must have a microphone plugged into the audio-in port of
your computer or sound system to record an audio annotation. You must also
have a sound card installed to be able to play back the sound file.
To record an audio annotation:
1 Select the audio annotation tool
.
2 Click the location where you want to place the audio annotation.
3 In Windows, click Start on the Audio Annotation dialog box, and speak into
the microphone. Click Stop when you’re finished. In Mac OS, click Record, and
speak into the microphone. Click Stop to complete the recording, and then
click Save. An audio icon marks the location of the annotation.
4 Choose Edit > Properties. In the Properties dialog box, choose the
desired options:
Select a color for the audio annotation icon. To specify a custom color, see
Setting the custom color option.
■
■
Specify an author name if you want to replace the default name.
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Type in a description for the annotation. This text appears in the Annotations
palette.
■
■
Click OK.
Using the stamp tool
The stamp annotation tool allows you to apply a stamp to a document in much
the same way you would use a rubber stamp on a paper document. You can
also create and add your own stamps to the selection list.
Before you can add your own stamp to the selection list, it must be in PDF
format, categorized, and placed in the correct folder or directory. For
information on how to categorize a stamp, see Adding custom stamps to the
stamp library.
To stamp a document:
1 Select the stamp tool
.
2 Click the document page where you want to place the stamp at its default
size, or drag a rectangle to define the size and placement of the stamp. You can
move a stamp by dragging it to a new location, or you can resize it by dragging
a corner of the bounding box.
3 In the Properties dialog box, set the desired options:
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Select a category of stamps. Your list may contain custom stamp categories
you have added. For more information, see Adding custom stamps to the
stamp library.
■
Select a stamp from the list in the left-hand pane, and preview the associated
graphic in the right-hand pane.
■
■
Specify an author name if you want to replace the default name.
■ Select a color for the pop-up note for the stamp. To specify a custom color,
see Setting the custom color option.
■
Click OK.
4 To associate a note with the stamp, double-click the stamp. Type the text in
the note window that appears, and click the close box in the upper left corner
of the window to close the note.
To change an existing stamp:
1 Select the stamp you want to change, and choose Edit > Properties to
display the Stamp Properties dialog box.
2 Select a stamp category (if there are multiple stamp files) from the Category
menu. Then select a stamp from the list in the left pane of the Stamp Properties
dialog box. The stamp is previewed in the right pane.
3 Set the desired options for the associated annotation:
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Select a color or custom color. For more information, see Setting the custom
color option.
■
■
Type in a different author name, if desired.
4 Click OK to accept the stamp. The newly selected stamp is used for this and
all subsequent stamp annotations, until you change the stamp selection again.
5 To move the stamp, select it, and drag it to a new location. To resize the
stamp, select it, and drag a corner of the bounding box to the desired size.
For instructions on how to add your own stamps to the stamp selection list, see
Adding custom stamps to the stamp library.
Adding custom stamps to the stamp library
You can add your custom stamps to the Acrobat stamp library and use them as
annotations. All stamp files must be PDF files and must be located in the Plugins folder in the Stamps subfolder. Otherwise Acrobat won’t be able to find
them. Each file in a subfolder is a stamp Category. Either the filename or the
title of the document is used as the category name. Each page of a PDF
document can be used as an individual stamp. There is a preferred naming
convention for stamps to ensure they are easily recognizable. Name each
stamp page using the following format:
<CategoryName><StampName>=<Stamp Label>
Example: MyStampsHello=Guten Tag
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The CategoryName (MyStamps in this example) is the name of the stamp
category or filename, and StampName (Hello in this example) is the name of
the stamp page. Both of these names should be in English. The Stamp Label
(Guten Tag in this example) should be in your native language. This naming
convention ensures proper cross-language distribution and easy identification
of stamps.
To specify a category name for a file containing one or more stamps:
1 Open the PDF document you want to use as a stamp.
2 Choose File > Document Info > General.
3 Type the category name in the Title text box.
4 Click OK.
To specify a page name for a stamp:
1 Open your PDF document in Acrobat, and go the page you want to name.
2 Choose Tools > Forms > Page Templates, and enter a name for the stamp
page. This should be in the format <CategoryName><StampName>=<LocalizedName>.
3 Click Add, and then click Yes. The name is now associated with that page of
the document.
4 To name another stamp page, go to the appropriate page in the PDF
document, and repeat steps 2 and 3.
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Using the file annotation tool
The file annotation tool allows you to embed a file at a selected location in a
PDF document, so the reader can open it for viewing. Rather than referencing
the file, as you would with a link, the file becomes part of the PDF document.
Thus if you move the PDF document to a new location, the embedded file
annotation automatically goes with it.
When attached files are launched from a PDF document, temp files are created
in a TEMP directory. The location of this directory varies in Windows and Mac
OS. See the user documentation for your system for more information.
To attach a file:
1 Select the file annotation tool
.
2 Select the document page location where you want to place the
file annotation.
3 Select the file to embed in the Select File To Attach dialog box. You can
change the filename, if you want to make it more meaningful for the PDF
document into which it is being embedded.
Note: You can attach any file type as a file annotation. However, your user will
not be able to open the file unless they have the authoring application installed
on their system.
4 Click Open.
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5 In the File Annotations Properties dialog box, set the desired options:
Select an icon to represent the type of file that is embedded (Windows) or
the name of an icon (Mac OS). You can choose from Attach, Tags, Graph,
and Paperclip.
■
Select a color for the annotation icon. To specify a custom color, see Setting
the custom color option.
■
■
Add a description of the file.
■
Specify an author name if you wish to replace the default.
■
Click OK.
Marking up documents
There are times when marking up a document with a graphic is the most
efficient means to convey your ideas. Other times, directly marking up a
document with text is a better choice. Acrobat provides a suite of both graphic
and text markup tools that allow you the flexibility to mark up a document and
have these markups saved as annotations.
Marking up documents with graphic markup tools
The graphic markup tools provide several methods for visually annotating a
document. They also allow you to add a note to the graphic markup, if desired.
When selecting a tool, consider the effect you want:
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■
The pencil tool creates a freeform line.
The rectangle tool creates a rectangle boundary you can position over text
or graphics.
■
The ellipse tool creates a circular boundary you can position over text
or graphics.
■
■
The line tool creates a straight line from two specified points.
The visual information you convey with this type of annotation can be purely
abstract or highly symbolic. For instance, you might draw an ellipse as an
abstract representation of the workflow process and attach your comments on
the workflow in an associated note. Or you might draw a rectangle that
encloses a graphic and write your critique on the image in the associated note.
Examples of graphic markup annotations
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To draw with a pencil:
1 Select the pencil tool
.
2 Move the cursor to the location where you want to begin writing. You do not
have to use one unbroken stroke. You can release the mouse button, move the
cursor to a new location, and continue drawing.
3 Click anywhere on the document page to end the markup annotation, or
select any other tool on the tool bar. A bounding box appears around the
border to show that the annotation is still active.
4 With the annotation still active, choose Edit > Properties to display the
Properties dialog box. Set the desired options:
■
Select a line thickness.
Select a color for the markup. To specify a custom color, see Setting the
custom color option.
■
■
Specify an author name if you wish to replace the default.
The color and author name are applied automatically to the associated
pencil annotation.
5 To adjust the placement, select the hand tool and move the cursor over
the bounding box until the cursor changes to an arrow. Drag to the
correct location.
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6 To adjust the size, with the hand tool still selected, move the cursor over a
handle at one of the corners, until the cursor changes to a double-headed
arrow. Drag to the desired size—up, down, left, or right.
7 To associate a note with the pencil annotation, with the hand tool selected,
double-click the pencil markup, and type the note text inside the window. Click
the close box in the upper left corner of the window to close the note.
To use the line, rectangle, or ellipse tool:
1 Select the line
, rectangle
, or ellipse tool
.
2 Click a start point on the document page, and hold down the mouse button
and drag the graphic element to the required size. Release the mouse button
to complete the graphic element.
3 To adjust the placement, move the cursor over the bounding box until the
cursor changes to an arrow. Drag to the correct location.
4 To adjust the size, move the cursor over a handle at one of the corners, until
the cursor changes to a double-headed arrow. Drag to the desired size—up,
down, left, or right.
5 With the annotation still active, choose Edit > Properties to display the
Properties dialog box. Set the desired options:
■
Select a line thickness.
Select a color for the markup annotation. To specify a custom color, see
Setting the custom color option.
■
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■
Specify an author name if you wish to replace the default.
The color and author name of the graphic tool are applied automatically to
associated notes.
6 To associate a note with a graphic markup annotation, double-click the
markup and type the text in the note window. Click the close box in the upper
left corner of the window to close the note.
To edit a graphic annotation:
1 Select the hand tool
.
2 Select the annotation. A bounding box appears around the graphic
element.
3 To adjust the size, select a handle at one of the corners of the bounding box,
and drag to the desired size.
4 To adjust the placement, select the annotation, and drag to a new location.
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Marking up documents with text markup tools
The text markup tools provide several methods for visually marking up text in a
document. You can use these annotations by themselves or in conjunction
with other annotation types. For example, you may want to highlight or strike
through a section of text, then double-click to add a note window to explain
your reason for the markup.
Examples of the uses for text markup tools
To highlight, strike through, or underline text:
1 Select the highlight text tool
underline text tool .
, the strikethrough text tool
, or the
2 Move the cursor to the beginning of the text you want to mark up and drag:
■
Left/right mouse actions mark up text horizontally.
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■
Up/down mouse actions mark up text vertically.
■
Ctrl-drag mouse actions create a rectangle to mark up a column of text.
Release the mouse button to complete the action. The selected text area
changes color when the action is complete.
3 With the annotation still active, choose Edit > Properties to display the
Properties dialog box. Set the desired options:
■ Select a color for the markup. To specify a custom color, see Setting the
custom color option.
■
Specify an author name if you wish to replace the default name.
4 To associate a note with the marked-up text, double-click the annotation,
and type the text in the note window. Click the close box in the upper left
corner of the window to close the note.
Important: The printed version of a document marked up with highlighted
text looks different from the screen version. Text that is highlighted on-screen
prints with a box around it. This is because of a printing limitation.
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Setting the custom color option
You can set the color of your annotations. For example, you might want to
change the color of your annotations to make them easily identifiable from
those of other reviewers in a document, or you might want to specify a
different color for each type of annotation.The options you select apply to the
current and subsequent annotations of the same type within a document; they
are not applied retroactively to prior annotations.
To specify a custom color (Windows):
1 Click inside the Color field in the Properties dialog box.
2 In the Color dialog box, click the Define Custom Colors button, and do one
of the following:
Drag the marker over a color in the palette, or specify numerical values for
hue, saturation, and luminosity in their respective fields.
■
Adjust the pointer on the value scale, or specify numerical values for red,
green, and blue.
■
3 Click Add to Custom Colors. The new color appears in the Custom colors
palette and is saved for future use.
4 Select the custom color from the Custom colors palette, and click OK. The
annotation changes to the custom color.
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To specify a custom color (Mac OS):
1 Click inside the Color field in the Properties dialog box.
2 Select a color picker, and do one of the following:
■
Choose the desired color from the palette.
■
Specify numerical values.
■
Move the slider to adjust the color values.
3 Click OK to accept the values, and then click OK again to apply the color.
Managing annotations
Acrobat provides functionality for editing all types of annotations. This allows
you to make changes and corrections to annotations, as well as replace them.
The Acrobat sort and display capabilities make it easy to manage annotations
from a number of sources. You can sort annotations by type, author, date, and
page, and selectively display them as groups. The annotation outline is a hierarchical list that is shown in the Annotations palette; it is both a navigation tool
and an organization tool.
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Editing annotations
Acrobat allows you to move annotations, edit notes and text annotations, and
edit graphic markup and text markup annotations. Acrobat also allows you to
edit the pop-up note that is associated with an annotation. Audio and file
annotations are the exceptions. Although you can move audio and file
annotation icons, you cannot edit these files from within Acrobat and preserve
the changes.
To open an annotation:
1 Double-click the annotation. If it is a text markup, graphic markup, stamp, or
note annotation, its pop-up note window opens. If it is a sound annotation,
the sound clip is played. If it is a file annotation, the file is opened (if you have
the authoring application). Text annotations are always visible on the
PDF document.
2 Click the close box in the upper left corner of the window to close
the annotation.
Sound annotations play through to the end; you do not have to close them.
The method for closing a file annotation depends on the file format of the
embedded file and the program in which it was launched.
To edit an annotation:
1 Select the hand tool
or the appropriate annotations tool.
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2 Select the annotation in one of the following ways:
■
Double-click an annotation to open the note window.
■ Select the boundary of a text, text markup, or graphics annotation to make it
active and available for editing.
3 Edit the text as needed, and click the close box in the upper left corner of the
window to close the note. Click outside a text annotation to conclude the edit.
4 Resize the annotation in one of the following ways:
For a note annotation, click the resize button in the lower right-hand corner
of the window, and drag to the appropriate size.
■
For a text annotation or graphic markup annotation, select a handle at one of
the corners, and drag to the appropriate size. You cannot resize a text markup
annotation once it is created.
■
5 Close, or deactivate, the annotation.
To move an annotation:
1 Select the hand tool
or the appropriate annotation tool.
2 Select the annotation, and drag it to the new location.
3 To reset the location of an associated pop-up note window, hold down the
right mouse button (Windows) or Control-click (Mac OS). Choose Reset Pop-up
Note Location from the menu. The note window realigns with the associated
annotation.
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To replace a stamp annotation:
1 Select a stamp annotation in the document.
2 Choose Edit > Properties.
3 Select a stamp from the list in the Stamp Properties dialog box. The graphic
associated with the stamp is displayed.
4 Click OK to accept the stamp. The previous stamp is replaced.
To delete annotations:
Do one of the following:
Select the annotation, and choose Delete Annotation from the
context menu.
■
■ Select the hand tool
, and select the annotation you want to delete (in
the Annotations palette or in the document). Choose Edit > Delete, or press the
Delete key, and click the Yes or OK button on the warning dialog box.
Choose Tools > Annotations > Delete All to delete all annotations in
a document.
■
Important: You can only delete annotations from a document if you have the
proper security permissions. Deleting annotations cannot be undone.
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Generating annotation summaries
The annotations summary is a convenient way to generate a synopsis of all the
annotations associated with a document. Acrobat generates this summary on a
page-by-page basis, listing each annotation, its type, author, and date and time
of creation. When you select the option for showing sequence numbers in
summarized notes, the sequence number for each annotation also appears in
the summary.
To prepare a summary of annotations:
Choose Tools > Annotations > Summarize Annotations.
A new PDF document is created. This new file is neither associated with nor
linked to the parent PDF document that the annotations are derived from.
Sorting, showing, and hiding annotations
The annotations filter provides an easy means for sorting and filtering annotations. You can sort by annotation type, as well as by author. You can choose to
hide or show annotations based on their type or author, and hide or show all
annotations or none. The Annotations Filter dialog box allows you to classify,
sort, and display any specific set of annotations easily.
To show or hide all annotations in a document:
1 Choose Tools > Annotations > Filter Manager.
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Click Select All or Deselect All beneath the annotations types list or author list.
Select All and Deselect All are toggle switches.
If you choose Deselect All and then close the document, this choice remains
valid for the next document you open. You will have to open the annotations
filter and choose Select All to display the annotations in the newly opened
document. These options also affect PDF documents open inside the browser.
2 Click OK.
To show only a select group of annotations:
1 Choose Tools > Annotations > Filter Manager.
2 Turn off the annotation types you do not want to display by selecting their
check boxes. The boxes toggle on or off when selected.
3 Click OK.
Setting annotation preferences
Setting annotation preferences sets global defaults for subsequent annotations. For example, you can change the author name for a single annotation
with the Properties dialog box, but to change the author name for future
annotations, you must specify the change in the Preferences dialog box.
To set preferences for annotations:
1 Choose File > Preferences > Annotations.
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2 Type in an author name, if other than the name displayed. The name of the
person Acrobat is registered to appears in the Author text box by default.
3 Select a font style from the Font menu.
4 Enter a number for the Font Size, or choose a size from the pop-up menu.
5 Select the options you want for preferences:
Auto-Open Notes Windows automatically displays the window when you
create a new note annotation. This is an authoring preference.
■
Auto-Open Other Markup Windows automatically displays the window when
you create a new graphic or text markup annotation.
■
Show Sequence Numbers In Summarized Notes displays sequential numbers
with each annotation to show the order in which they were created. This is
useful when used in conjunction with the summarize annotation feature.
■
6 Click OK.
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Importing and exporting annotations
You can exchange annotations between Form Data Format (FDF) documents
using the annotations import and export features. When you import annotations from another document, they are added to your document in the
location that corresponds to their original location, page, and positioning.
Importing annotations does not affect the annotations already in your
document. This page matching of annotations on import provides for easy
correlation between documents.
When you export annotations, you can export all the annotations associated
with a document, or you can filter the annotations and export a selected group
of annotations. Exported annotations are placed in their original positions in a
new empty FDF document. The new FDF document is much smaller than the
original because it contains only annotations. The smaller file size makes it
more convenient to distribute by e-mail or disk. For information on the Forms
Data Format (FDF), see the PDF Reference Manual, which is available on the
Adobe Web site (www.adobe.com).
Importing and exporting can be especially useful when you need to collate
comments from several reviewers into one draft. First export each set of
comments into a new FDF document. Then import the comments into the draft
(from the new documents), one at a time. Once imported, you can use the
Annotations Filter Manager to organize the comments. For more information,
see Managing annotations.
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To import annotations:
1 In the document you want to receive the annotations, choose File > Import
> Annotations, or choose Import from the context menu.
2 Choose Acrobat (*.fdf or *.pdf ) from the Files Of Type menu.
3 Select the name of the document with the annotations, and click Select. The
annotation positioning matches that of the file they were imported from.
Annotations on mismatched pages are ignored. Any existing annotations in
the receiving file are unaltered.
To export all the annotations for a document:
1 In the document with the annotations you want to export, choose File >
Export > Annotations, or choose Export from the context menu.
2 Go to the directory to which you want the annotations exported, and enter a
filename for the export document.
3 Click Save. An FDF file is created. The annotations maintain the same
location and position they occupied in the original file.
To export a selected group of annotations:
1 In the document with the annotations you want to export, choose Tools >
Annotations > Annotations Filter Manager.
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2 Choose the annotation types and author names you want to export, and
click OK. The check boxes toggle on and off when selected. Check boxes with
an x (on) are exported.
3 Choose Export from the Annotations palette menu.
4 Navigate to the destination where you want the annotations exported, and
then type a filename in the text box.
5 Click Save to complete the export.
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Creating and Using PDF Forms
Adobe Acrobat makes it easy for you to create, fill in, and submit electronic PDF
forms. You can design and create an entirely new form, or you can quickly
convert your existing paper and electronic forms to PDF and then add PDF
form fields. Creating a PDF form from an existing form lets you maintain your
organization’s corporate identity and branding, while saving you the effort of
recreating the form. You can create forms with text boxes, buttons, check
boxes, combo boxes, list boxes, radio buttons, and signature fields. And if all
the proper software and hardware components are in place, form data can be
submitted over the Web and collected in a database, just as if you were using
HTML forms.
Adobe Acrobat’s ability to import and export form data also makes it possible
for a user to populate different forms with the same set of data. A user can
enter commonly requested information, such as name, address, phone
number, and so on just once, and then use the data again and again to fill out
different forms.
Creating PDF forms
The process of creating a PDF form that can collect data includes several tasks:
Creating a new form or scanning an existing form, and then converting it to
PDF. For more information, see Designing, building, and editing forms.
■
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Generating form fields for a PDF form and specifying type, appearance,
action, and other options. For more information, see Creating form fields.
■
■ Creating or working with an existing Common Gateway Interface (CGI) script
to collect and route form data over the Web. For more information, see Making
forms Web ready.
Creating form fields
The form tool allows you to create form fields that an Acrobat user can interact
with. You create a form field by defining the area of the field on the PDF
document page, providing a name for the field, and specifying the type of
the field. For each field type (button, text box, check box, and so on), you can
set a variety of options through the Field Properties dialog box that allow you
to customize the field for your form. For more information, see Setting form
field options.
To create a form field:
1 Select the form tool
.
2 Create a form field by dragging the cross-hair pointer to make a box of the
required size.
3 In the Field Properties dialog box, enter a name in the Name text box, and
select a format from the Type menu:
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Text boxes allow you to create a field into which you can enter text using the
keyboard. See Creating text boxes.
■
■ Buttons allow you to activate a series of actions. Buttons can have alternate
appearances, according to the mouse behavior over the button. For more information, see Creating interactive buttons.
Combo boxes allow you to specify a list of items that appear in a pop-up
menu. For more information, see Creating combo boxes and list boxes.
■
Digital signature fields allow you to create a form field that your user can
then fill in with a signature and a printable representation. This field can be set
to lock other fields after it is signed. For more information, see Creating
signature fields (Windows).
■
Check boxes allow your user to make multiple selections from a group of
items. For more information, see Creating check boxes.
■
Radio buttons allow your user to select one item from the displayed options.
For more information, see Creating radio buttons.
■
List boxes allow the user to create a list of items in a form field that displays
all the time. For more information, see Creating combo boxes and list boxes.
■
4 Select the options for your field type, and click OK.
5 Select the hand tool
to display the finished form field.
Note: You cannot create a form field on top of an annotation. For information
on moving an annotation, see Editing annotations.
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Creating buttons
The button’s surface area can appear as a line of text, an icon (or other graphic
image), or a combination of text and icon. You can specify up to three icons for
the same button—one for the button in the up position, another for the button
when it is pushed (down position), and one for a rollover effect (when the
mouse passes over the button area).
You can use buttons in your forms to specify an action, such as opening a file,
playing a sound, or submitting data to a Web server. For information on
buttons, see Creating interactive buttons.
Creating check boxes
You can use check boxes for lists of items in which more than one item can be
selected. For a list of items in which only one item can be selected, you should
use related radio buttons, combo boxes, or list boxes.
Note: The size of the check (inside the check box) is determined by the size of
the font you specify for the check. A check is a character in a font.
How did you hear about us?
A selected check box
Newspaper
Catalog
Friend
Other
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To create a check box:
1 Create a form field, as described in Creating form fields, and select Check
Box from the Type menu of the Field Properties dialog box.
2 Click the Options tab.
3 Select a check style to display when a user selects the check box. The default
value is Check.
4 Enter an export value (optional) that will represent the chosen item if
it is exported to a CGI application. For more information, see Defining CGI
export values.
5 Select whether you want the check box to appear checked by default.
6 Click the Appearance tab, and select border and text attributes for the form
field. For more information, see Setting appearance options.
7 To specify an action for your form field, click the Actions tab, and select a
mouse behavior. Then select Add, specify an action, and select Set Action. For
more information, see Setting action options.
You can select any combination of mouse behaviors for a field. Mouse Up is the
most common button behavior, and Mouse Up is the default appearance. You
can also select any combination of mouse behaviors for a field and specify any
combination of actions for a mouse behavior, although no more than 10 are
recommended.
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Creating combo boxes and list boxes
You can use combo boxes and list boxes to present a list of items on your form.
Users can select only one item in either a combo box or list box. The shape of
the display area for these boxes is determined by their content.
■ Use a combo box to present a list of items in a pop-up menu (uses less space
on a form).
Use the list box to display the entire list and allow the user to scroll
through it.
■
You can assign a custom action that is activated when a user switches between
items in a list box. For example, you can play a sound or display an image as
the user changes selections. You define the list box actions using custom JavaScripts. For information, see Using custom JavaScripts in forms, or choose
Help -> Forms JavaScript Guide to display the Acrobat Forms JavaScript Object
Specification.
Category
Retro Toys
12-24
Games
01-12
12-24
50-100
Craft Kits
Total
A combo box
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To create a combo box:
1 Create a form field, as described in Creating form fields, and select Combo
Box from the Type menu of the Field Properties dialog box.
2 Click the Options tab.
3 Enter a name in the Item field. Items should be no longer than 100
characters.
4 Enter an export value (optional) to represent the chosen item if it is exported
to a CGI application. See Defining CGI export values for information. If no
export value is entered, the item name is used as the exported value.
5 Select Add, and continue to enter items and export values until the list is
complete. Lists should be no longer than 50 items.
6 You may also select from the following options:
To sort the items numerically and alphabetically, select the Sort Items option.
A numeric sort (if applicable) is performed before an alphabetical sort.
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To allow user editing of the list, select the Editable option.
To move an item one position up or down in the list, select the item, and click
the Up or Down button. This option is not available if the Sort Items option
is selected.
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7 Click the Appearance tab, and select border and text attributes for the form
field. For more information, see Setting appearance options.
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8 To specify an action for your form field, click the Actions tab, and select a
mouse behavior. Then click Add, specify an action, and click Set Action. For
more information, see Using actions for special effects.
You can select any combination of mouse behaviors for a field, Mouse Up is the
most common button behavior, and Mouse Up is the default appearance. You
can also select any combination of mouse behaviors for a field and specify
any combination of actions for a mouse behavior, although no more than 10
are recommended.
9 Click the Format tab, and choose a category type from the list. This specifies
the type of data (numeric, date, time, and so on) the user can enter. The edit
option must be set for this to be effective. For more information, see Setting
format options.
10 Click the Validate tab to specify a method for validating data. You can use
custom JavaScripts to define types of validation, such as allowing only numeric
entries in a field. For more information, see Setting validation options.
11 Click the Calculate tab if you want to perform mathematical operations on
two or more form field entries. For more information, see Setting calculation
options.
To create a list box:
1 Create a form field, as described in Creating form fields, and select List Box
from the Type menu of the Field Properties dialog box.
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2 Click the Options tab, and enter a name in the Item field. Items should be no
longer than 100 characters.
3 Enter an export value (optional) to represent the chosen item if it is exported
to a CGI application. See Defining CGI export values for information. If no
export value is entered, the item name is used as the exported value.
4 Select Add, and continue to enter items and export values until the list is
complete. Lists should be no longer than 50 items.
5 Click the Selection Change tab, and do one of the following:
■
Select “Nothing happens when a listbox changes.”
Select “This script executes when the listbox selection changes.” Then click
Edit, and copy and paste a predefined script into the provided editing area. Or
you can enter the script directly. Click OK. For information on creating JavaScripts, see Working with JavaScript actions. You must click Edit to enter or
modify the script; you cannot edit the script that appears in the preview area.
■
6 Click the Appearance tab, and select border and text attributes for the form
field. For more information, see Setting appearance options.
7 If you need to specify an action for your form field, click the Actions tab, and
select a mouse behavior. Then click Add, specify an action, and click Set Action.
For more information, see Using actions for special effects.
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You can select any combination of mouse behaviors for a field. Mouse Up is the
most common button behavior, and Mouse Up is the default appearance. You
can also select any combination of mouse behaviors for a field and specify
any combination of actions for a mouse behavior, although no more than 10
are recommended.
Creating radio buttons
You can use related radio button fields to ensure that a user selects only one
item from a list of choices. When you create related radio button fields, field
names must be the same, and export values must be different. The export
value is the information used by a CGI application on a Web server to identify
the selected field.
Visa
MasterCard
AmericanExpress
Discover
Radio buttons
To create a radio button:
1 Create a form field, as described in Creating form fields, and select Radio
Button from the Type menu of the Field Properties dialog box.
2 Click the Options tab.
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3 Select a style for the radio button. Circle is the default.
4 Enter an export value (optional) to represent the chosen item if it is exported
to a CGI application. The export value for each radio button must be unique.
See Defining CGI export values for information.
5 Select whether you want the radio button to appear selected by default.
6 Click the Appearance tab, and select border and text attributes for the form
field. For more information, see Setting appearance options.
7 If you need to specify an action for your form field, click the Actions tab, and
select a mouse behavior. Then click Add, specify an action, and click Set Action.
For more information, see Using actions for special effects.
You can select any combination of mouse behaviors for a field. Mouse Up is the
most common button behavior, and also the default appearance. You can
also select any combination of mouse behaviors for a field and specify any
combination of actions for a mouse behavior, although no more than 10 are
recommended.
Note: Related radio buttons must have the same name; however, the export
values must be different.
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Creating signature fields (Windows)
Acrobat provides for the secure digital signing of PDF documents in the
following ways:
Field signing allows you to create a blank signature field in a form. This
method is useful when the signature field must be filled in as part of filling out
a form. The blank signature field is filled in, and a printable copy is placed in
the field.
■
Note: You use the form tool to create a blank signature field inside a form. The
other types of digital signatures are created using the digital signature tool on
the tool bar. For more information, see Chapter 14 Working with Digital Signatures (Windows).
Blind signing allows the document to be signed with no visible appearance
on the page. This method is useful for signing documents where a printable
signature is not important.
■
Manual signing allows you to drag a rectangle to create the signature field
and sign on the page. This signing method is useful for document approval
when the document was not originally designed with a signature field. In this
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case, a generated appearance of the signature is placed on the PDF page that
is printable.
Credit Card #
Signature
Digital signature field
To create a blank signature field:
1 Create a form field, as described in Creating form fields, and select Signature
from the Type menu of the Field Properties dialog box.
2 Click the Signed tab, and select an action for when the signature field
is signed:
Nothing Happens When The Signature Field Is Signed. This is the
default action.
■
Lock and a selected value: All Fields, Just These Fields, or All Fields Except
These. If you choose Just These Fields or All Fields Except These, click Pick. In
the Select a Field dialog box, select a field, and then click Add. Select Done to
complete the step.
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This executes a script when the signature is signed. Click Edit to edit an
existing JavaScript or create a new JavaScript in the dialog box.
■
Note: The appearance of a signature is stored as the field’s annotation.
You can duplicate a signature field (using the Duplicate command in the
context menu) and copy it to the same location on more than one page. This
is convenient for instances when the user signs the document once, but the
signature appears on all pages. Duplicating the field on each page in this
manner automatically adds the signature on each page when the first page
is signed. It is common for a document to be designed with a signature field
on every page.
3 Click the Appearance tab, and specify border display, text attributes,
and a visibility state for the form field. For more information, see Setting
appearance options.
4 If you need to specify an action for your form field, click the Actions tab, and
select a mouse behavior. Then click Add, specify an action, and click Set Action.
For more information, see Using actions for special effects.
You can select any combination of mouse behaviors for a field, although the
Mouse Up behavior is most common. You can also specify any combination of
actions for a mouse behavior, although no more than 10 are recommended.
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Creating text boxes
You can use a text box to allow a user to fill in text such as name, address, and
phone number.
Name
Home Phone
Address
Work Phone
Text fields
To create a text box:
1 Create a form field, as described in Creating form fields, and select Text from
the Type menu of the Field Properties dialog box.
2 Click the Options tab, and select from the following options:
Default specifies text to display as the suggested default value. You can leave
the text box empty. You can also use the Appearance tab to make the text box
Read Only. See Setting appearance options.
■
Alignment sets the alignment of text within the text box; it does not align the
text box itself.
■
■
Multi-line allows you to create a text box with more than one line.
■ Limit Of Characters limits the number of characters that can be entered in
the field from 1K to 32K. You can enter from 1 to 32,000 characters.
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Password specifies that text will be displayed as a series of asterisks, so the
text entry cannot be read when typed.
■
3 Click the Appearance tab, and select border and text attributes for the form
field. For more information, see Setting appearance options.
4 To specify an action for your form field, click the Actions tab, and select a
mouse behavior. Then click Add, specify an action, and click Set Action. For
more information, see Using actions for special effects.
You can select any combination of mouse behaviors for a field. Mouse Up is the
most common button behavior, and Mouse Up is the default appearance. You
can also select any combination of mouse behaviors for a field and specify any
combination of actions for a mouse behavior, although no more than 10 are
recommended.
5 Click the Format tab to format and limit the type of data (numeric, date,
time, and so on) the user can enter in the text box. For more information, see
Setting format options.
6 Click the Validate tab to restrict entries to a certain range, for example. You
can also use custom JavaScripts to define other types of validation, such as
allowing only numeric entries in a field. For more information, see Setting
validation options.
7 Click the Calculate tab if you want to perform mathematical operations on
two or more form field entries. For more information, see Setting calculation
options.
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Setting form field options
Depending on the field type, you can set a variety of options. These options
allow you to specify the appearance of the form field, the associated actions,
the format and type of data that it allows, as well as the types of calculations
that can be performed within the field.
The interactive capabilities of these options can be enhanced with the use of
custom JavaScripts. For more information, see Using custom JavaScripts in
forms, or choose Help -> Forms JavaScript Guide to display the Acrobat Forms
JavaScript Object Specification.
Setting appearance options
You can set appearance properties for each field type by clicking the
Appearance tab in the Field Properties dialog box:
The Border panel sets the border color, background color, width, and style.
Click a color box to select a color from the Color dialog box. To specify a custom
color, see Setting the custom color option.
■
The Text panel sets the text color, font, and size for text typed into the form
field. The Auto option under Size specifies a font’s vertical size on a text line,
button, radio button, check box, or combo box. List boxes automatically adjust
the text to fit the form field. If there are multiple lines of text in a field, resize the
text (using anywhere from 12- to 4-point text), so all text in the string is visible.
■
■
Read Only specifies whether or not the text field can be modified by the user.
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Required specifies that the user must fill in this field before data can
be submitted.
■
■ Form Field Is specifies whether the field is visible, hidden, visible but doesn’t
print, or hidden but printable. The hidden but printable option can be used to
create a watermark on a document that prints (when the document is printed),
but otherwise is not visible.
Setting action options
You can specify different actions to occur for a form field, depending on the
behavior of the mouse over the field. Acrobat also lets you assign a custom
action that is activated when a user changes selections in a list box. For
example, you can play a sound or display an image as the user switches
between items.
To specify action options:
1 Click the Actions tab in the Field properties dialog box.
2 Select a mouse behavior that will trigger an action:
Mouse Up specifies releasing the mouse button. This is the most common
button action, because it gives the user one last chance to drag the cursor off
the button and not register the selection.
■
■
Mouse Down specifies pressing the mouse button.
■
Mouse Enter specifies moving the mouse into the field boundaries.
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Mouse Exit specifies moving the mouse out of the field boundaries.
3 Click Add, and select an action Type in the Add an Action dialog box. For a
description of the actions, see Using actions for special effects.
4 Click Set Action. Actions are executed in the order they appear in the Do the
Following window.
5 If you defined more than one action for a behavior, and if you want to
reorder the actions, select the action, and then select the Up or Down button.
6 To edit a field action, select the action item, click Edit, and make the
necessary changes.
7 To delete a field action, select the action item, and click Delete.
Setting format options
You can specify a format for data entered in text and combo box fields, such
as the number of decimal places for numbers. You can also create new data
formats and keystroke validation scripts with your own custom JavaScripts,
such as defining a new currency format or limiting the form field entry to
specific keystroke characters. For more information, see Using custom JavaScripts in forms.
Formatting is optional and available only for the text and combo box form
fields. The default format is None.
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To specify format options:
1 Click the Format tab in the Field properties dialog box.
2 For Category, select a data type and desired formatting options.
3 If you select Custom, do one or both of the following:
Click Edit, next to Custom Format Script. Copy and paste a predefined
custom format script, or type the script in the text box provided. Then click OK.
■
■ Click Edit, next to Custom Keystroke Script. Copy and paste a predefined
custom keystroke script, or type the script in the text box provided. Then
click OK.
For more information, see Using custom JavaScripts in forms, or choose Help ->
Forms JavaScript Guide to display the Acrobat Forms JavaScript Object
Specification.
Setting validation options
You use validation options to restrict entries to specified ranges, values, or
characters. By setting validation properties, you can ensure that users enter the
appropriate data for a specified form field. You can also use custom JavaScripts
to define other types of validation, such as allowing only numeric entries in a
form field. Validation is available only for text and combo box fields.
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To specify validation options:
1 Select either Text or Combo Box in the Field properties dialog box, and click
the Validate tab.
2 Do one of the following:
To validate that the form field entry is within a numeric range, select Value
Must Be, and enter the lower and upper bounds of the desired range (the
bounds themselves are included in the range of valid entries).
■
Range validation is available only for form fields that use number or
percentage formats. See Setting format options.
To use a custom validation script, select Custom Validate Script, and click Edit.
Copy and paste a predefined script into the editing area, or enter the script
directly; then click OK.
■
You must click Edit in the Field Properties dialog box to enter or modify the
script; you cannot edit the script that appears in the preview area. For more
information, see Using custom JavaScripts in forms.
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Setting calculation options
The calculation options let you perform mathematical operations on two or
more existing form field entries and display the result. You can use the
common operations predefined in the Field Properties dialog box, or you can
define more complex operations using a custom JavaScript. For more information, see Using custom JavaScripts in forms, or choose Help -> Forms JavaScript Guide to display the Acrobat Forms JavaScript Object Specification.
When you define two or more calculations in a form, the order in which these
calculations are carried out is the same as the form fields’ tab order. In some
cases, you may need to change this default calculation order to obtain the
correct results. For example, if you wanted to use the result obtained from
calculating two form fields to calculate the value of a third form field, the first
two form fields must be calculated first to obtain the correct final results.
Acrobat automatically performs all assigned field calculations when you are
creating and testing your form fields. For convenience, you can turn off this
automatic calculation while you work.
To specify form field calculation options:
1 Select either Text or Combo Box in the Field properties dialog box, and click
the Calculate tab.
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2 Do one of the following:
To define the form field without calculation properties, select Value Is Not
Calculated (default).
■
To define the form field as a simple calculation result, select Value Is the
<operation> of the Following Fields, and select an operation from the menu.
Click Pick to bring up the Select a Field dialog box, and select the form fields
you want to calculate. Click Done when you have finished selecting form fields.
You can also enter the case-sensitive form field names directly in the text box
(beneath the Value Is The radio button), separating the names with commas.
■
Simple calculations are available only for form fields that use number or
percentage formats. See Setting format options.
To use a custom calculation script, select Custom Calculation Script, and click
Edit. Copy and paste a predefined script into the editing area, or enter the
script directly; then click OK.
■
You must click Edit in the Field Properties dialog box to enter or modify the
script; you cannot edit the script that appears in the preview area. For more
information, see Using custom JavaScripts in forms.
To set the calculation order:
1 Choose Tools > Forms > Set Field Calculation Order.
2 Select the desired form field name or form field names, and select Up or
Down to move their position in the list. Then click OK.
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To turn calculations off and on:
Choose Tools > Forms > Auto Calculate Field Values to toggle the feature off
and on. A check mark appears next to the command when Auto Calculate is
turned on.
Note: The Auto Calculate command does not affect calculations when you are
using the form tool. Form fields defined with calculation properties are always
calculated in Acrobat.
Designing, building, and editing forms
Acrobat offers several features that simplify the process of putting together an
entire form. Acrobat allows you to select multiple form fields and edit,
duplicate, or move them simultaneously. This saves time and effort in creating
and redesigning forms and ensures the exact reproduction of form fields
across pages and documents.With the Set Tab Order command, you can set the
order in which users tab from one form field to the next. And with grids, you
can precisely place and align form fields on a page.
Selecting form fields
You can select multiple form fields and then modify the appearance, size, and
location of all of them within the selection.
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To select a form field:
1 Select the form tool
, and do one of the following:
■
Click inside an existing form field.
■
Shift-click to select multiple form fields.
Hold down Ctrl (Windows) or Shift (Mac OS), and drag a selection rectangle,
or marquee, around the desired form field.
■
When you use Shift-click to select multiple form fields, the first form field you
select is highlighted in red, and all other form fields are highlighted in blue.
When you drag a marquee, the form field located in the top left position of the
selection is designated as the first form field. Any size or alignment changes
you make to the selected form fields are made relative to the first form field.
You can select a different form field as the first form field, if desired.
2 To specify a form field as the first form field, do one of the following:
■
Shift-click inside the form field.
■ Press Tab to designate the next form field in the tab order as the first form
field. If the next form field in the tab order is not included in the current
selection, the selection is deselected.
To change a selection:
1 To add to a selection, select the form tool
■
, and do one of the following:
Shift-click inside another form field to add it to the selection.
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Press Shift-Ctrl (Windows) or Shift (Mac OS), and drag a selection marquee
around an additional form field or fields (Windows).
■
When you add to a selection, the first form field does not change.
2 To remove a form field from a selection, Shift-click inside the form field you
want to remove from the selection. To deselect an entire selection, click outside
a form field. If you remove the first form field from a selection, the form field
located in the top left position of the selection becomes the new first
form field.
Editing form fields
You can move, resize, copy, cut, and paste multiple form fields on the same
page, across pages, or across PDF documents. For more information on
moving, resizing, and duplicating individual form fields, see Setting form field
options and Duplicating form fields.
Note: You cannot cut and paste button form fields.
To edit a form field:
1 Use the form tool
to select the form field you want to edit.
2 To move a form field, do one of the following:
Approximately position the form field by moving the pointer inside one of
the selected form fields, and drag the field to the new location. To constrain
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movement to a horizontal or vertical direction, begin dragging, and then hold
down Shift while continuing to drag the selection.
■ Precisely position the form field by using the arrow keys to nudge the
selected form fields into position.
Exactly relocate the form field to the center of the current view by choosing
Edit > Cut, navigate to the desired location, and then choose Edit > Paste. The
form field is pasted in the center of the current view.
■
3 To copy form fields on the same page (not across pages in a document), do
one of the following:
Approximately position the copied form field by holding down Ctrl
(Windows) or Option (Mac OS), and drag the selected form field to the new
location. To constrain the movement to a horizontal or vertical direction, hold
down Ctrl or Option, begin dragging, and then hold down Shift while
continuing to drag the selection. The form field or fields are copied to the
new location.
■
Exactly relocate the form field to the center of the current view by choosing
Edit > Copy, navigate to the desired location, and then choose Edit > Paste. The
form field is pasted to the center of the current view.
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4 To resize a form field, position the pointer over a corner anchor point of the
selected form field. When the pointer changes to the double-headed arrow,
hold the mouse button down, and drag to resize the form field. To resize
multiple form fields, do one of the following:
Hold down Shift, and press an arrow key to resize the form fields in small
increments. To reduce or enlarge the form field widths, use the Left or Right
arrow key, respectively; to reduce or enlarge the heights, use the Up or Down
arrow key, respectively.
■
Choose Tools > Forms > Fields > Size > Height to make all form fields in the
selection the same height as the first form field.
■
■ Choose Tools > Forms > Fields > Size > Width to make all form fields in the
selection the same width as the first form field.
Choose Tools > Forms > Fields > Size > Both to make all form fields in the
selection the same height and width as the first form field.
■
Note: Holding down the Control key when resizing a form field maintains the
original aspect ratio of the form field.
5 To align form fields with the first form field, choose one the following
commands from the Tools > Forms > Fields > Align menu:
■ Left, Right, Top, or Bottom aligns all form fields with the respective border of
the first form field.
■
Vertically aligns all form fields along the vertical axis of the first form field.
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Horizontally aligns all form fields along the horizontal axis of the first
form field.
■
You must select a minimum of two form fields.
6 To center form fields, choose one of the following commands from the Tools
> Forms > Fields > Center menu:
Vertically centers the group of form fields with respect to the page’s
vertical dimension.
■
Horizontally centers the group of form fields with respect to the page’s
horizontal dimension.
■
■
Both centers the group of form fields in the page.
7 To distribute form fields, choose one of the following commands from the
Tools > Forms > Fields > Distribute menu:
Vertically distributes the intermediate form fields evenly between the
topmost and bottommost form fields in the selection. This action disregards
Snap to Grid.
■
Horizontally distributes the intermediate form fields evenly between the
leftmost and rightmost form fields in the selection. This action disregards Snap
to Grid.
■
You must select a minimum of three form fields.
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8 To delete form fields, do one of the following:
■
Press Delete, and select Yes in the confirmation dialog box.
■
Choose Edit > Delete, and select Yes in the confirmation dialog box.
If you are deleting a form field that has a duplicate, another dialog box asks if
you want to remove all occurrences of the form field.
Important: You cannot undo this procedure.
Duplicating form fields
You can duplicate form fields on the same page or across pages. When you
duplicate a form field, users can fill in one form field and have that information
appear in all the form fields with the same name, no matter what page they are
on. The copied form fields can be given different appearances, but they must
have the same name and actions. Changing an action in a form field will
change the action for all form fields with the same name.
To duplicate a form field on the same page:
1 Select the form tool
, and select a form field.
2 Do one of the following:
Approximately position the form field by pressing Ctrl (Windows) or Option
(Mac OS), and drag the form field to the new location. To constrain the
movement horizontally or vertically, hold down Ctrl or Option, begin dragging,
and then hold down Shift while continuing to drag the form field.
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Exactly duplicate the form field to the center of the current view by choosing
Edit > Copy, and then choose Edit > Paste. The duplicate form field appears in
the center of the current view.
■
To duplicate a form field across pages:
1 Select the form tool
, and select the form field.
2 Do one of the following:
■ Choose Tools > Forms > Fields > Duplicate, select All or type in a page range,
and click OK. The form field is duplicated across the specified page range and
placed in the location (x and y coordinates) of the selected form field across the
entire page range.
■ Choose Edit > Copy, and then choose Edit > Paste. Position the duplicate
form field in the new location. Go to each page (on which you want the form
field to appear), and repeat these actions.
Changing the appearance of form fields
You can change the appearance of multiple form fields simultaneously by
setting the options in the Field Properties dialog box. For information on how
to change the appearance of a field using a JavaScript, see Using custom JavaScripts in forms, or choose Help -> Forms JavaScript Guide to display the Acrobat
Forms JavaScript Object Specification document.
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To change a form field’s appearance:
1 Select the form tool
, and select the form fields you want to change.
2 Choose Edit > Properties to open the Field Properties dialog box.
Note: The Field Properties dialog box displays only the Appearance tab when
multiple form fields are selected.
3 Select the options that you want to change. For information about the
available options, see Setting appearance options and Setting form field
options.
If a particular property differs among the selected form fields, the property
setting will either be blank or contain a dimmed check or question mark. You
can change the marked option and apply the new property to all form fields in
the selection, or you can keep the existing properties.
4 Click OK.
Positioning form fields with the grid
You can use grids to help position form fields at precise points on a page.
Although the lines of a grid appear on-screen, they do not print with the page.
Acrobat lets you define the grid spacing, color, and position of a grid. You can
also choose whether to have the boundaries of a form field snap to grid lines
when you are editing the form field.
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To show or hide the grid:
Choose View > Show Grid to toggle between showing and hiding the grid. A
check mark appears next to the command when the grid is visible.
To set grid preferences:
1 Choose File > Preferences > Forms Grid to open the Grid Settings dialog box.
2 Do one or more of the following:
■ To set the spacing between major grid lines, enter values for Width
and Height.
To display subdividing lines between the major grid lines, select the desired
number of subdivisions from the menu. Subdividing lines display as dotted
lines between the solid major lines.
■
To offset the origin of the grid from the top left corner of the page, enter
values for Horizontal and Vertical.
■
To set the color of grid lines, select the color box. Select the desired color
from the Color dialog box, and click OK.
■
3 Click OK to accept the grid settings.
To set snap-to-grid behavior:
Choose View > Snap to Forms Grid to toggle between having form fields snap
or not snap to grid lines. A check mark appears next to the command when the
snap-to-grid behavior is on.
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Setting tabbing order
You can determine the order that a user tabs through form fields on a single
page. The default tab order is the order in which the form fields were created.
To set tabbing order:
1 Select the form tool
.
2 Choose Tools > Forms > Fields > Set Tab Order.
3 The form fields display the tab order currently set. Select from the following:
To reorder the tabs, click the form fields in the order that they should be
numbered.
■
To start at a number other than 1, press Ctrl (Windows) or Option (Mac OS),
and click the form field numbered one less than you want to start with. Then
click the form field you want to renumber.
■
4 Click outside a form field, or switch tools to exit Set Tab Order.
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Making forms Web ready
PDF forms can be useful for submitting and collecting information over the
Web. This is done in Acrobat forms by providing several button actions that
perform functions similar to some HTML scripting macros. For this process to
work, you must have a CGI application on the Web server to collect and route
the data to a database. Any existing CGI application that collects data from
forms (in HTML or FDF format) can be used to collect data from PDF forms.
Before you complete these tasks, make sure that your form field names match
those set in the CGI application. For information on the Form Data Format
(FDF), see the PDF Reference Manual, which is available on the Adobe Web site
(www.adobe.com).
Important: CGI scripts must be built outside of Acrobat, and their creation is
not covered by the Adobe Acrobat product. See Defining CGI export values.
Creating submit form and reset form buttons
You can send form data to a Web server by specifying a Uniform Resource
Locator (URL) with the Submit Form action. You can use the Reset Form action
to clear any form data already entered.
To create a submit form button and reset form button:
1 Select the form tool
.
2 Create a form field, and choose Button from the Type menu.
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3 Click the Actions tab. Select Mouse Up as the behavior (that triggers the
action), and click Add.
4 In the Add an Action dialog box, do one of the following:
To create a button that enables the user to submit a form, select Submit
Form, click the Select URL button, and enter the (destination) URL. Select Forms
Data Format (FDF) or HTML Form (URL encoded) as the export format. If you
choose Include Empty Fields, the selected form fields are exported, even if they
do not contain values. If you choose All Except Or Only These, click Select Fields,
and indicate the form fields to exclude (All Except) or include (Only These), and
then click OK.
■
Note: If the server returns data to the user in Forms Data Format, the server’s
URL must end with the #FDF suffix, for example, http://myserver/cgi-bin/
myscript#FDF.
To create a button that enables the user to clear data entered in the form,
select Reset Form. If you choose All Except Or Only These, click Select Fields,
and indicate the form fields to exclude (All Except) or include (Only These), and
then click OK.
■
5 Click OK to accept the selections.
6 Click Set Action.
7 Click another tab in the Field Properties dialog box to continue defining
properties of the form field, or click OK.
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Creating import data buttons
You can use the Import Form Data action to enable users to automatically fill
out common form fields, such as name and e-mail address, with data imported
from another form. Before you set an Import Form Data action, you must have
set up a form with common information form fields from which data will be
imported. For more information, see Exporting and importing form data.
Personal Field Names (PFN) can be used with Acrobat forms to create a
personal profile that automates filling out Acrobat forms. With any form that
uses the same form fields as those in your personal profile, you can apply your
personal profile and automatically fill in the form. Forms that conform to this
standard should display the PFN icon (included in the folder) and should also
be equipped with a button that automatically imports personal profile data
when selected. For sample forms and the tools to create a personal profile
form, go to the Pfn_kit folder inside the Forms folder located on the Acrobat 4.0
product CD.
Note: The Import Form Data action searches for the data file from which to
import data in different locations in Windows than on Mac OS. In Windows, the
Import Form Data action searches Acrobat or Acrobat Reader, the current
folder, the System folder, the Windows folder, and the folders that are in the
PATH statement. On Mac OS, the Import Form Data action searches the Acrobat
or Acrobat Reader folder and the System Preferences folder.
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To create an import data button:
1 Select the form tool
.
2 Create a form field, and choose Button from the Type menu.
3 Click the Actions tab. Select Mouse Up as the behavior that triggers the
action, and select Add. In the Add an Action dialog box, select Import
Form Data.
4 Click Select File, select a file, and click Select (Windows) or Open (Mac OS).
In most cases, there is a standardized filename (on a per-site basis) for a specific
application, such as a personal profile. If you enter an invalid filename, a dialog
box appears that allows you to browse and select another file. You can choose
another file type at this point, if desired.
5 Click Set Action.
6 Click another tab in the Field Properties dialog box to continue defining
properties of the form field, or click OK.
Users can use this Import Data button to populate the common form fields
with their personal profile information. Only form fields that match are
updated. Those that do not match are ignored.
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Submitting images with a PDF form
You can create buttons that allow users to submit image data to a database. For
example, users can select scanned images, such as identification photos, Xrays, or insurance photos, and attach them to the form. The selected images
are encoded as button icons and are submitted along with the rest of the
form data.
You can also use a JavaScript action to update the button display with the
selected image as the user fills in the form. For more information, see Using
custom JavaScripts in forms, or choose Help -> Forms JavaScript Guide to
display the Acrobat Forms JavaScript Object Specification.
To create an image submission button:
1 Select the form tool
.
2 Create a new form field or double-click inside an existing button form field
to open the Field Properties dialog box. If this is a new form field, choose
Button from the Type menu.
3 Click the Actions tab, and select a mouse behavior that will trigger
the action.
4 If the Submit Form action is already listed, select it, and click Edit. Otherwise,
click Add, and select Submit Form.
5 Enter the appropriate URL for the target database.
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6 For Export Format, select Forms Data Format (FDF). Button icons will not be
exported if you select HTML Form (URL encoded). For more information on
buttons, see Creating interactive buttons.
7 For Field Selection, select All Except Or Only These. Button icons will not be
exported if you select All Fields. For more information on buttons, see Creating
interactive buttons.
8 Click Select Fields, indicate the form fields to exclude (All Except) or include
(Only These), and click OK.
9 Click OK to accept the Submit Form selections.
10 Click Set Action.
11 Click another tab in the Field Properties dialog box to continue defining
properties of the form field, or click OK.
Defining CGI export values
An export value is the information sent to a CGI application to identify a userselected form field. You need to define an export value only if both the
following are true:
The data will be collected electronically in a database over a company
intranet or the Web.
■
■ The data is different from the item designated by the form field, or the form
field is a radio button.
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You can also define export values for check boxes, combo boxes, list boxes, and
radio buttons:
■ Use the default export value Yes to indicate that a check box, or radio button,
has been selected.
Enter an export value for combo boxes or list boxes only if you want the
value to be different from the item listed—for example, to match the name of
the form field in a database. The item selected in the combo box or list box is
used as the export value unless a different export value is explicitly entered in
the Field Properties dialog box.
■
Related radio buttons must have exactly the same form field name but
different export values. This ensures that the radio buttons toggle and that the
correct values will be collected in the database.
■
You should work with your webmaster to define export values appropriately.
Support for the Adobe Acrobat SDK is provided to members of the Acrobat
Developers Program by the Adobe Developers Association (ADA). For information on joining the ADA, requesting developer technical support, or
obtaining updates to this SDK, refer to the Developer Support section of the
Adobe Web site (www.adobe.com).
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Using custom JavaScripts in forms
The JavaScript scripting language was developed by Netscape Communications so you could more easily create interactive Web pages. Adobe has
enhanced JavaScript so you can easily integrate this level of interactivity into
your PDF forms. The most common uses for JavaScript in Acrobat forms are
formatting data, calculating data, validating data, and assigning an action.
While there are plug-in, document, and field levels of JavaScripts, we are only
concerned with document and field level scripts here. For information on plugin level scripts, see Working with JavaScript actions, or choose Help -> Forms
JavaScript Guide to display the Acrobat Forms JavaScript Object Specification.
■ Document level scripts are executed with the document open and apply
only to this document.
Field level scripts are associated with a specific form field or fields. This type
of script is executed when an event occurs, such as a mouse up action.
■
Creating simple JavaScripts
There are a number of simple JavaScripts you can integrate into your forms to
enhance their interactive capabilities. The scripts described here are commonly
used with Acrobat forms. Trying out these scripts in the forms you create will
give you a glimpse of what JavaScript offers.
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Careful selection of field names when creating forms is an important factor in
data collection. If two fields share the same name, they also share the same
value. You can use this capability to create fields that have different appearances (that is, appear on different pages and have different background colors)
but have the same value. This means you can modify one field and the other
field is updated automatically.
Note: For more information on JavaScript naming conventions for Acrobat
forms, choose Help -> Forms JavaScript Guide to display the Acrobat Forms
JavaScript Object Specification.
Creating an automatic date field
Many forms require a date for tracking purposes, whether it’s a creation date or
last modification date. The following procedure shows you how to create a text
field that automatically displays the current date when the document is
opened and how to include another field that displays the date the document
was last modified.
The script you create to display the current date when the document is opened
is a document level script. The script you create to display the last modification
date is a field level script.
To create an automatic date field:
1 Select the form tool
, and create a text field. For information, see Creating
form fields. Name the field Today.
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2 Click the Format tab, choose Date, and choose the short month, day, and
long year format option (for example, Feb 2, 1999). Make sure the field is readonly because it will be a calculated field, and click OK.
3 To create a document level script that is executed each time the document is
opened, choose Tools -> Forms -> Document JavaScripts. Name the field Today,
and click Add.
4 Delete the automatically generated text that is displayed in the script
window, type in the following text in the exact format, and click OK.
var f = this.getField(“Today”);
f.value = util.printd(“mm/dd/yyyy”, new Date());
This script binds the Today field to the variable f, and then calculates the value.
The new Date() expression creates a new date object initialized to the current
date and time. The utility object is used to format the date into the month/day/
year format.
5 Click OK in the JavaScript dialog box, and then click Close in the Field
Properties dialog box.
To create an automatic modification date field:
1 Select the form tool, and create a text field. Name this field LastModified. For
information, see Creating form fields.
2 Click the Format tab, choose Date, and choose the short month, day, and
long year format option (for example, Feb 2, 1999).
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3 Click the Appearance tab and select Read Only as a Common Property. A
calculated field should always be set as read-only.
4 Click the Calculate tab, select Custom Calculation Script, and then click Edit.
5 In the script window, type in the following text in the exact format, and
click OK.
event.value = util.printd(“mm/dd/yyyy”, this.modDate);
This script sets the calculation for the modification date, which is the value of
LastModified. The object is formatted into the month/day/year format and
assigned the value of the LastModified field.
6 Click OK in the JavaScript dialog box, and then click OK in the Field
Properties dialog box.
Subtracting and dividing two values
Being able to automatically calculate the difference between the values in two
fields and display the results is another useful application for JavaScript. In the
following example, you create three form fields in which the value in one field
is subtracted from the value in another. The results are calculated, and the
value is automatically displayed in the third field.
You can use this same JavaScript to divide two values by simply substituting a
division sign (/) for the minus sign (-) in the last line of the script.
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To create a field that automatically calculates the difference between two
values and displays the results:
1 Select the form tool
, and create a text field. For more information, see
Creating form fields. Name this field ValueA.
2 Click the Format tab, choose Number, and choose the number of decimal
places, a currency symbol if needed, and a separator style.
3 Create a second text field, and name this field ValueB. Make the format of
this field the same as for the previous field.
4 Create a third text field, name this field ResultsC. Make the format of this field
the same as for the previous field.
5 Click the Calculate tab, choose Custom Calculation Script, and then
click Edit.
6 In the script window, type in the following text in the exact format, and
click OK:
var f = this.getField(“ValueA”);
var g = this.getField(“ValueB”);
event.value = f.value - g.value;
This script defines a variable f, which corresponds to the value of the ValueA
field, and another variable g, which corresponds to the value of the ValueB field.
It then structures an event that calculates the difference between the two
variables. This calculation is automatically displayed in the ResultsC form field.
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To divide the value for variable f from variable g, type in the following script (in
its exact format instead):
var f = this.getField(“ValueA”);
var g = this.getField(“ValueB”);
event.value = f.value / g.value;
To multiply the value for variable f with variable g, type in the following script
(in its exact format instead):
var f = this.getField(“ValueA”);
var g = this.getField(“ValueB”);
event.value = f.value x g.value;
7 Click OK in the Field Properties window.
Assigning a ‘go to page’ action
If you create a multiple page form, it is useful to add a button that automatically takes you to the next page. This type of action is most commonly
associated with the mouse up action.
The JavaScript you use to take you to the next page at the click of a button can
be easily modified to automatically take you to the previous page of the form,
the first page of the form, or to the last page of the form. All these variations are
presented in the following procedure.
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To specify a ‘go to page’ action for a button:
1 Select the form tool
, and create a form field. For information, see
Creating form fields. Name this field GoNext.
If you want to create several ‘go to page’ buttons on the same form, name each
field accordingly: GoNext, GoPrev, GoFirst, and GoLast.
2 Choose Button from the type menu, and specify the border, background,
text, and field appearances. Click the Options tab, and specify selections as
needed. For more information, see Creating interactive buttons.
3 Click the Actions tab, choose Mouse Up, and then click Add.
4 Choose JavaScript from the Type menu, and then click Edit.
5 To specify go to the next page when the button is selected, in the script
window, type in the following text in the exact format, and click OK:
this.pageNumm++;
For other go to page buttons, use the following scripts with the appropriate
button fields:
Go to the previous page:
this.pageNumm--;
Go to the first page:
this.pageNumm = 0;
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Go to the last page:
this.pageNumm - 1;
6 Click Set Action. Click OK in the Field Properties dialog box.
Sending a document or form via e-mail (Windows)
You can create a button on your form that automatically mails the PDF
document to a specified e-mail address when selected. You can also specify
that only the form data is mailed as an FDF file.
In the following example, the [email protected] variable represents the email address the form is to be sent to. Most e-mails have a message subject that
gives a brief description of the content of the message. The Message Subject
Description variable in the example represents the description that would
accompany an e-mail message. The double sets of quotes are where you can
enter a cc: e-mail address and (blind) bcc: e-mail address, if desired.
To assign an action that e-mails a document or form:
1 Select the form tool
, and create a form field. For more information, see
Creating form fields. Name this field MailPDF.
If you want to create a second button that mails only the forms data (an FDF
file), do so, and name the field MailFDF. An FDF file is smaller in size because it
only contains the data entered into the form, and not the form itself.
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2 Choose Button from the type menu, and specify the border, background,
text, and field appearances. Click the Options tab, and specify selections as
needed. For more information, see Creating interactive buttons.
3 Click the Actions tab, choose Mouse Up, and then click Add.
4 Choose JavaScript from the Type menu, and then click Edit.
5 To mail the PDF document to the specified e-mail address when the button
is selected, in the script window, enter the following text in the exact format,
and click OK:
this.mailDoc(true, “[email protected]”, ““, ““, “Message
Subject Description”);
To mail the forms data (only) as an FDF file, use the following script instead:
this.mailForm(true, “[email protected]”,““, ““, “Message Subject Description”);
6 Click Set Action. Click OK in the Field Properties dialog.
Hiding a field until a condition is met
In more complex forms, you might want to have one field that is hidden, or
inactive, until a specific condition is met. For example, a field could be hidden,
grayed out, or read only until a dollar amount greater than a specified number
is entered into another field.
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In our example, a dollar amount greater than 100 must be entered in the
ActiveValue field to activate the GreaterThan field. The active field is called
ActiveValue, and the inactive field is called GreaterThan.
To activate a field when a condition is met in another field:
1 Select the form tool
, and create a text field. For information, see Creating
form fields. Name the field ActiveValue.
2 Click the Format tab, and choose Number from the Category list. Choose
two decimal places, Dollar as the Currency Symbol, and the common Separator
Style (the default). Click OK.
3 Create a second text field, and name it GreaterThan.
4 Click the Format tab, and choose Number from the Category list. Choose
two decimal places, Dollar as the Currency Symbol, and the common Separator
Style (the default).
5 Click the Validate tab, select Custom Validation Script, and click Edit.
6 To keep the GreaterThan field hidden until an amount greater than 100 is
entered in the ActiveValue field, in the script window, type in the following in
the exact format, and click OK:
var f = this.getField(“GreaterThan”);
f.hidden = (event.value < 100);
event.value = util.printf(“$ %.2f”, event.value);
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To keep the GreaterThan field read only until an amount greater than 100 is
entered in the ActiveValue field, in the script window, type in the following in
the exact format, and click OK:
var f = this.getField(“GreaterThan”);
f.readonly = (event.value < 100);
event.value = util.printf(“$ %.2f”, event.value);
To keep the GreaterThan field grayed out and read only until an amount greater
than 100 is entered in the ActiveValue field, in the script window, type in the
following in the exact format, and click OK:
var f = this.getField(“GreaterThan”);
f.readonly = (event.value < 100);
f.fgcolor = (event.value < 100);
color gray : color black;
7 Click OK in the JavaScript dialog box, and then click OK in the Field
Properties dialog box.
Using templates to generate forms on the fly
Acrobat lets you define a page in your document as a template, which can then
be used to dynamically generate a new form, or duplicate PDF pages on the fly.
In essence, you can build a form that dynamically creates another form.
Templates are useful in several ways:
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They allow the user to fill out as many form pages as needed. Additional
pages (complete with new form fields) are spawned on the fly. For information
on defining an action that dynamically creates new pages, choose Help ->
Forms JavaScript Guide to display the Acrobat Forms JavaScript Object
Specification.
■
If you are generating a form by importing data from a database, you can spawn
as many pages as needed to contain different quantities of data.
They can be used as button icons in another form by invoking the template
names from an FDF file. See the FDF Toolkit or the PDF Reference Manual
(available on the Adobe Web site at www.adobe.com) for more information.
■
Important: Template functionality is not supported in Acrobat Reader.
Therefore, if you create an Acrobat application that uses template functionality, a user who only has access to Acrobat Reader will not be able to use
your application.
To define a template:
1 Navigate to the page you want to use as a template, and choose Tools >
Forms > Page Templates.
2 Enter a name for the template, and click Add. Click Yes in the confirmation
dialog box.
3 Click Close to define the template and close the Document Templates
dialog box.
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To edit a template:
1 Choose Tools > Forms > Page Templates.
2 Select the desired template in the list, and do one of the following:
To hide the selected template page, click the eye icon to the left of the
template name. To show the template, click the icon again. When you show a
hidden template page, it appears appended to the end of the document. You
cannot hide a template page if it is the only page in the document. If you
delete a hidden template page, it is deleted from the PDF file.
■
To change the template contents to the current displayed page, click
Change.
■
■
To remove the selected template from the list, click Delete.
To display the selected template page, click Goto. You cannot use Goto to
display a template that is hidden.
■
3 Click Close to accept the template changes and close the Document
Templates dialog box.
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Exporting and importing form data
You can export form data from a PDF file and create a new file containing only
the form data. The newly created file will be in Forms Data Format (FDF) and
will be considerably smaller than the container PDF file. The smaller FDF file is
useful for archiving or electronically sharing data. You can also import data
from this file into another form, if that form has fields with the same names.
If you are using Acrobat Reader (without having Acrobat 4.0 installed), you are
not able to export form information. If you are creating forms that will be used
by people who only have Acrobat Reader, this is something you should be
aware of when you are creating your forms.
Note: The folder entitled Pfn_kit contains sample forms and the tools to create
a personal profile form. If you use these tools to develop a personal profile for
use in filling out Acrobat forms, any form that uses these same form fields can
be filled in automatically. Forms that conform to this standard should display
the PFN icon (included in the folder) and should also be equipped with a button
that automatically imports personal profile data when selected.
To export form data to a file:
1 Choose File > Export > Form Data.
2 Enter a filename, and click Save.
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To import form data from a file:
1 Choose File > Import > Form Data.
2 Select a file, and click Select (Windows) or Open (Mac OS).
Note: If you import form data from a form that does not match the form you
are importing into, only the form fields that match are updated, and those that
do not match are ignored.
Filling out forms
You can fill out forms in Acrobat and submit them across the Web if you are
filling them out from inside a Web browser or using Acrobat Web Capture. For
information, see Chapter 5, Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows) and
Configuring Web browsers for viewing PDF.
With Acrobat, you can also print the form or export the form data to a separate
file. Exporting form data allows you to save the existing data, or to transport it
with an alternative method such as e-mail.
To fill out a form:
1 Select the hand tool
.
2 Position the pointer inside a form field, and click. The I-beam pointer allows
you to type text. The arrow pointer allows you to select a button, a check box, a
radio button, or an item from a list.
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3 After entering text or selecting an item, check box, or radio button, do one
of the following:
■
Press Tab to accept the form field change and go to the next form field.
Press Shift+Tab to accept the form field change and go to the previous
form field.
■
Press Enter (Windows) or Return (Mac OS) to accept the form field change
and deselect the current form field.
■
In a multiline text form field, Enter or Return goes to the next line in the same
form field. You can use Enter on the keypad to accept a change and deselect
the current form field.
■ Press Escape to reject the form field change and deselect the current
form field.
If you are in Full Screen mode, pressing Escape a second time causes you to exit
Full Screen mode.
4 Once you have filled in the appropriate form fields, do one of the following:
Click the Submit Form button, if one exists. The button may be named differently. Clicking this button sends the form data to a database across the Web or
over your company intranet. This button only works if you are viewing the PDF
document from inside a Web browser.
■
Choose File > Export > Form Data to save the form data in a separate FDF file.
The form itself is not saved. Type a filename, and click Save. Opening the Forms
■
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Data Format (FDF) file in an Acrobat viewer automatically opens the associated
PDF document containing the form if the files maintain their relative locations.
Important: You cannot save the data in a form using the Save or Save As
commands. These commands save the form itself, but not the data entered into
the form fields. To preserve data entered into form fields, you must export the
data. For more information, see Exporting and importing form data.
To clear a form in a browser window:
Do one of the following:
■
Select a Reset Form button, if one exists.
■
Exit the Acrobat viewer without saving the file, and start again.
Clicking the Reload button or the Go Back button, or following a link in a World
Wide Web browser window, does not clear a form.
Important: There is no undo for this action.
To clear a form in Acrobat:
Choose File > Revert.
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Adding Interactive Features
Acrobat provides a variety of interactive features you can add to a PDF
document to enhance its visual appeal and provide supplemental information.
For example, adding movie and sound clips can transform a PDF document
into a multimedia experience. Movies and sounds can be played when they are
selected, or they can be assigned as actions so they play when a link,
bookmark, or button is activated. You can also assign sounds and movies as
page actions that occur when a page is opened or closed.
Integrating media clips into PDFs
Movie files are not physically embedded in the PDF document. Instead, you
define a rectangle within the document, and then associate a pointer with the
movie file. Sound files, unlike movie files, are physically embedded in a PDF
document. You can specify how media files play by setting options for the file.
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The following table shows the movie and sound files that can be used with
Acrobat PDF documents for Windows and Mac OS.
Media
Type
File Types for Win- File Types for Mac OS
dows
Video
QuickTime, AVI
QuickTime
Sound
AIF, WAV
System 7 sound files, AIFF, Sound
Mover (FSSD)
Note: System 7 sound files and Sound Mover (FSSD) files are automatically
converted to QuickTime movies before they are played (Mac OS). This
conversion may cause a slight delay in the playback response time. With
Windows, no conversion is necessary before playing AIF or WAV files so this is
not an issue.
Adding movie clips
When you add QuickTime movie clips to a PDF document, you create a pointer
to them. Therefore, if you distribute the PDF document, you must remember to
distribute the movie files as well. Be sure to use the correct filenames and
relative path locations for the movie clips when you distribute them.
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The movie image format is made up of a set number of pixels and is, therefore,
a set size. For this reason, it is recommended that you keep the magnification
of the document page at 100% to prevent the added movie file from being
scaled inadvertently. Also, when you click to place a movie, the pixel size of the
movie frame determines the activation area for the clip in the document.
However, if you define the play area for the movie by dragging and creating a
rectangular boundary, the movie frame is stretched or compressed to fit the
specified area. This resizing of the movie frame to fit the custom area can result
in a distorted image quality. For this reason, clicking to place a movie is recommended over creating custom frame sizes.
Note: Movie files can also be played from links, bookmarks, form fields, and
page actions. For more information, see Using actions for special effects.
To add a movie clip and specify movie properties:
1 Select the movie tool
.
2 Click a location on the page to place the movie. Where you click specifies the
center of the movie frame. The play area is the exact size of the movie frame.
3 In the Open dialog box, select a movie file, and click Open.
If it is a QuickTime movie file that has not yet been converted to cross-platform
format, click Yes to convert it (Mac OS). No conversion is required for AIF or WAV
files (Windows).
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4 In the Movie Properties dialog box, enter a name for the file in the Title text
box. By default, the name of the movie file appears as the title.
5 Select Show Controller if you want to display a controller bar at the bottom
of the play area.
6 Select a Mode option from the pop-up menu to determine the play action of
the movie clip. You can have the movie play once then stop, play once and stay
open, play repeatedly, or play forward and then backward repeatedly.
When you choose Play Once Then Stop, selecting the clip or the controller bar
stops the movie when it is playing. Double-clicking inside the movie frame
starts the clip playing again. When you choose Play Once And Stay Open
and set the default to floating window, the movie plays until you press the
Escape key.
7 To create a floating clip, Select Use Floating Window. This specifies that the
movie plays in a separate window. Then specify the dimensions, including scale
factors, of the floating window from the pop-up menu.
8 Select Movie Poster to show the first frame in the clip as a still image when
the movie is not playing. You can choose to display the poster in the document
or retrieve it directly from the movie file. If you are displaying the poster,
choose the number of colors from the pop-up menu. Choose 256 colors to
display 24-bit color images; choose Millions Of Colors to display 32-bit
color images.
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9 Specify the appearance of the border for the play area:
For a visible border, choose a Width value of Thin, Medium, or Thick, and the
desired style and color options.
■
For no border around the unselected play area, choose Invisible for the
Width value.
■
For information on how to specify a custom color, see Setting the custom
color option.
■
10 To save this movie file’s options as defaults, click Save Preferences. Any
further movie files that are added default to these properties.
11 Click OK.
To edit a movie clip:
1 Select the movie tool
.
2 Select a movie icon to make it active, and choose Edit > Properties. Set the
options in the Movie Properties dialog box for the selected movie and all
subsequent movie clips, and click Save Preferences.
3 Move or resize the movie clip in the following ways:
■
Move the clip by dragging its icon to a new location on the page.
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Resize the clip by dragging one of the corners of the movie frame until it
is the desired size. This is not recommended, as it results in a distortion of
the image.
■
4 Click OK.
Adding sound clips
You add sound clips using the movie tool, and you can also play sound clips
from links, bookmarks, form fields, and page actions. For more information, see
Using actions for special effects.
To add a sound clip:
1 Select the movie tool
, and drag to create a rectangle that defines the
play area. The rectangle boundaries define the activation area for the
sound clip.
2 In the Open dialog box, change the file type to All files (.mov is the default),
select a sound file, and click Open. If the file is not in a format that can be read
by QuickTime, you may be asked to convert it. Follow the instructions
displayed on-screen.
A compressed sound file cannot be added. Use a sound utility to uncompress
the file, and try again.
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3 In the Audio Properties dialog box, type a name for the clip in the Title text
box. By default, the name of the sound file appears as the title. This title must
be a unique name.
4 Choose a play action mode for the sound clip. You can have the clip play
once then stop, play once and stay open, play repeatedly, or play forward and
then backward repeatedly.
5 Specify the appearance of the border for the play area:
For a visible border around the play area, choose a Width value of Thin,
Medium, or Thick, and the desired style and color options.
■
■
For no border around the play area, choose Invisible for the Width value.
■ For color, choose a standard color from the menu (black, white, red, green,
blue, cyan, magenta, yellow), or custom. For information on specifying a
custom color, see Setting the custom color option.
Note: When the movie tool is selected, the borders around all play areas are
highlighted, even those with invisible borders. The highlight disappears when
the movie tool is no longer active.
6 Click OK.
To edit sound properties:
1 Select the movie tool
, select a sound clip, and choose Edit > Properties.
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2 In the Sound Properties dialog box, select the necessary options for play
action and appearance of the border of the play area:
■ For a visible border around the play area, choose a Width value of Thin,
Medium, or Thick, and the desired style and color options.
■
For no border around the play area, choose Invisible for the Width value.
For color, choose a standard color from the menu (black, white, red, green,
blue, cyan, magenta, yellow), or custom. For information on specifying a
custom color, see Setting the custom color option.
■
3 Click OK.
Tips for adding movie and sound clips
When adding movie and sound clips to PDF documents, consider the following
suggestions:
Use a graphic image for the activation area of the link to a movie. You can do
this by inserting an image that you capture from the movie. (Capture the image
using a movie authoring application.) Once the image is incorporated into the
PDF document, draw a rectangle around it to specify the play area for the
movie. Then deselect the Put Poster In Document option from the Movie
Properties dialog box, and select Use Floating Window.
■
■ Use a miniature version of the movie poster to create an icon for the movie.
The movie can play in a separate window. You can create the icon by adjusting
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the movie boundaries to less than full size, and then selecting Display Poster.
The Use Floating Window option sets the movie to play in a separate window.
■ Use a play action other than Play Once Then Stop when a controller bar is
used with a clip. Selecting the controller bar stops the clip. Double-clicking
inside the movie frame starts it playing again.
Use movie and sound files that are located on your hard disk or on a CD with
your PDF files. This ensures optimum performance. If you link your PDF
documents to movie or sound files residing across a network or on the World
Wide Web, performance decreases.
■
Playing movies and sound clips
Before you can play movies or sounds, your computer must have the appropriate sound and video boards installed. See Integrating media clips into PDFs
for information on the movie and sound file formats for Windows and Mac OS.
See your system’s documentation for more information. You must also have the
necessary software installed on your system:
■
Apple QuickTime 2.0 or later, or Microsoft Video (Windows).
■
Apple QuickTime 2.0 or later (Mac OS)
To play a movie or sound clip:
1 Select the hand tool
.
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2 Move the cursor over a movie or sound clip, the cursor changes to a filmstrip.
3 Click to begin playing the clip.
4 Click again to stop playing, or press Escape.
Using actions for special effects
Acrobat allows you to add special effects to PDF documents. You can specify
that a particular action will occur when a bookmark, link, or form field is
selected, or when a page or form is viewed. For example, you can use links and
bookmarks to jump to different locations in a document, but you can also use
them to play movies, and sound clips, execute commands from a menu, or
other actions. Page actions are another way of activating special effects in a
PDF document. For example, you can specify a movie or sound clip to play
when a page is opened or closed.
About action types
You can specify actions for links, bookmarks, page actions, buttons, and other
form fields. To assign an action to a link, you choose an action type from the
Actions menu in the Create Link dialog box. To assign an action to a bookmark,
you choose an action type from the Type menu in the Bookmark Properties
dialog box. To assign an action to a button or other form field, you choose an
action type from the Type menu in the Add Action dialog box. You bring up the
Add Action dialog box from the form tool Field Properties dialog box.
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Execute Menu Item Executes a specified menu command as the action. Click
Edit Menu Item, select a menu item, and then click OK.
Go To View Jumps to a destination within the current document or in another
PDF document. Go to the destination where you want the reader to end up,
and set the position and magnification for the view. You can either navigate to
the location in the current document or choose File > Open, select a PDF file,
then go to the destination.
Import Form Data Brings in form data from another file, and places it in the
active form. See Exporting and importing form data for
more information.
JavaScript Runs a specified Java script. The Edit button allows you to create or
edit a Java script action that is activated when the bookmark, link, etcetera is
selected. For more information, see Using custom JavaScripts in forms.
Movie Plays a specified QuickTime or AVI movie. Click Select Movie, and select
the movie you want to play when the action is activated. The movie must
already be added to the PDF document for you to be able to select it.
Open File Launches and opens a non-PDF file. Click Select File, locate the file,
and click Select. (If you are distributing a PDF file with a link to a non-PDF file,
the reader needs the native application of the non-PDF file to open it
successfully.)
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Read Article Follows an article thread in the active document or in another
PDF document. To choose an article from the active document, Click Select
Article, select an article from the list, and click OK. To choose an article in
another PDF document, make the destination file the active document, click
Select Article, select an article from the list, and click OK.
Reset Form Clears previously entered data in a form. You can control the fields
that are reset with the Select Fields dialog box.
Show/Hide Field Toggles between showing and hiding a field in a PDF
document. Choose Edit to select a field and specify whether to show or hide it.
Sound Plays a specified sound file. The sound will be embedded into the PDF
document in a cross-platform format that will play in Windows and Mac OS. In
Mac OS, you can add QuickTime, System 7 sound files, AIFF, Sound Mover
(FSSD), and WAV files. In Windows, you can add AIF and WAV files.
Submit Form Sends the form data to a specified URL. See Setting action
options for more information.
World Wide Web Link Jumps to a destination on the World Wide Web. You can
use http:, ftp, and mailto protocols to define your link. See Chapter 5,
Converting Web Pages to PDF (Windows) and Configuring Web browsers for
viewing PDF for more Weblink information.
None Specifies no action. This is often used for a bookmark representing a
section heading that does not have a specific destination.
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Using page actions
To enhance the interactive quality of a document, you can specify actions, such
as playing sounds or movies, to occur when a page is opened or closed.
If you choose Go To Next Page as a page action and later want to change
the action, you must first switch to Continuous - Facing Pages layout to edit the
action. If you are in Single Page layout, the page always goes to the next page,
making it impossible to edit that action.
To set a page action or edit an existing page action:
1 Go to the page in the document that will activate the action.
2 Choose Document > Set Page Action.
3 Select one of the following:
■
Page Open sets an action when the page opens.
■
Page Close sets an action when the page closes.
4 Click Add and choose an action. For a list of action types and descriptions on
how to use them, see About action types.
To create a series of actions, click Add again. Choose an action from the
menu, and use the Up and Down buttons to arrange the actions in the order
you want them to occur.
■
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To edit a page action, select the page action, and select an item from the Do
The Following Things list. Select Edit, and make the desired changes to the
Type or Destination. Click OK to accept these changes.
■
To delete a page action, select an item from the Do The Following Things list,
and then click Delete.
■
Note: If you set a Page Action/Execute Menu Item to Full Screen on Page Open
or Page Close, the next time the same page opens or closes, Full Screen is
toggled off.
5 Click OK to accept the page actions.
Using buttons
Buttons are most commonly thought of in relation to the standard functionality associated with the form tool. They offer great potential, however, for
enhancing the visual and interactive quality of a document, as well as
providing another method for instigating an action. Buttons can open a file,
play a sound, play a movie, submit data to a Web server, and much more.
When deciding on how to initiate an action, remember that buttons offer the
following capabilities that links and bookmarks do not:
■
A button can activate a series of actions, not just a single action.
A button can have alternate appearances, relating to mouse behavior over
the button.
■
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■
A button can be easily copied across many pages.
Mouse actions can activate different button actions: Mouse Up, Mouse
Down, Mouse Enter, or Mouse Exit.
■
Order Form
Spring 1999
Name
Home Phone
Address
Work Phone
JUGGLER
City, State, Zip
How did you hear about us?
Newspaper
Category
Catalog
Friend
Quantity
Other
Price
Retro Toys
Games
Craft Kits
Total
Calculate
Credit Card #
Visa
MasterCard
AmericanExpress
Signature
Buttons on a sample PDF page
Discover
Submit
Reset
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Creating interactive buttons
The functionality for creating buttons is closely associated with the form tool.
There is a much broader application for buttons, however. While buttons are a
needed element in many forms, they can generate visual interest and interactive usability options when used in many types of online documents. For
more information about using the form tool, see Creating form fields.
Mouse Down is the most common button behavior, and Mouse Up is the
default mouse appearance. You can select any combination of mouse
behaviors for a field and specify any combination of actions for a mouse
behavior, although no more than 10 are recommended.
To add an interactive button:
1 Select the form tool
, and drag the cross-hair pointer to create a box.
2 Enter a name in the Name text box of the Field Properties dialog box, and
select Button from the Type menu.
3 With the Field Properties dialog box still active, set the desired options:
■
Specify a border color, background color, and border width and style.
■
Specify a font, font size, and text color.
Select Read Only or Required, and specify whether the form field is to be
hidden, visible, visible but doesn’t print, or hidden but printable.
■
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Specify the appearance and actions associated with the button. See About
action types.
■
4 Select the Options tab.
5 Specify the display of the button when clicked, choosing one of the
following options:
■
Invert inverts the colors in the button.
■
None results in no change to the appearance of the button.
■
Outline highlights the field border.
■
Push uses the elements specified in the Button Face attributes section.
6 Choose a button layout from the menu. You can choose a text only display,
an icon only display, or various combinations of icon and text. You select the
text and icon for the button layout in the Button Face Attributes section of the
dialog box.
Home
Home
Home
Home
Home
A
B
C
D
E
F
A. Icon only B. Icon over text C. Text left, icon right D. Text over icon E. Text in icon F. Icon left,
text right
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7 If you want the button to change in appearance when the mouse interacts
with it, select a button state from the Button Face When list, and then enter
text or select an icon from the Button Face Attributes. Choose from the
following options:
Up indicates the button display when the mouse is not interacting with
the button.
■
■ Down indicates the button display when the mouse is pressed over
the button.
Rollover indicates the change in the button display when the cursor moves
across the button (before it is actively selected).
■
It is recommended that you assign a navigational action, such as Next
Page, as a Mouse Up action so the action happens when the user releases the
mouse button.
8 Enter text or select an icon from the Button Face Attributes box. See Customizing button displays.
9 Click OK.
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Customizing button displays
Acrobat allows you to specify up to three different displays for the same
button, depending on its relation with the mouse. The Advanced Layout option
on the Options panel of the Field Properties dialog allows you to specify how a
button icon fits into a field border.
Note: The Acrobat forms crop box overrides the bounding box (if there is one)
for an image or PDF page you may choose for a button display. This can result
in white space or margins being ignored and the dimensions being recalculated, resulting in a change in height/width ratio.
To specify button display properties:
1 Select the form tool
, and drag the cross-hair pointer to create a box.
2 Choose Button from the Type menu.
3 Click the Options tab in the Field Properties dialog box, and do one of the
following:
If you chose a text option from the Layout menu, type the text in the
Text box.
■
■ If you chose an icon option from the Layout menu, click Select Icon, and then
click Browse. Choose a PDF file to use as the icon, click Open, and then click OK.
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If you want to use only a portion of the page as an icon—for example, only the
bitmap on the page—you need to crop the page before carrying out this
procedure. The smallest allowable PDF page size is 1-by-1 inch. If you want the
icon to appear smaller than 1-by-1 inch, shrink it to fit the size of the box drawn
with the form tool.
4 To set another display for the button, select another button state from the
Button Face When list, select an option from the Layout menu, and choose the
appropriate option from step 3.
5 Click OK to accept these display properties.
Note: Clicking the Clear button does not clear the text entered in the text box.
To scale button icons:
1 Select the form tool
, and drag the cross-hair pointer to create a box.
2 Choose Button from the Type menu.
3 From the Options tab, choose a button state from the Button Face When list,
and choose an icon option from the Layout menu.
4 Click Select Icon, choose a PDF file for your icon image, and click OK
to accept.
5 Select Advanced Layout, and choose one of the following for the Scale
When option:
■
Always scales the icon regardless of its size in relation to the field size.
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■
Never preserves the icon’s original size; it clips the icon if it doesn’t fit.
■
Too Big scales the icon only if it is larger than the field.
■
Too Small scales the icon only if it is smaller than the field.
Note: If you select Never, the Scale How options are not available.
6 Choose whether or not to scale the icon proportionally.
7 To define where the icon is placed inside the field, drag the slider arrows.
Icon placement is defined according to the percentage of space preserved
between the icon and the left field boundary, and between the icon and the
bottom field boundary. The default setting (50, 50) places the icon in the
middle of a field. You can click Reset at any time to revert to the default
placement setting.
8 Click OK.
Showing and hiding graphic form fields
Form fields can include both graphics and text. You can use buttons, links,
bookmarks, and page actions to show or hide a form field. By alternately
showing and hiding a graphic form field, you can create interesting visual
effects within a document. For example, when you move a cursor over a city on
a map, a detail map of the city could be displayed. When the cursor moves
away from the city, the detail map could disappear.
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To create the effect of showing and hiding a graphic form field, you first specify
a graphic element for the button that will be shown and hidden. Next, you
create a second button to activate the Show-Hide Field action. You do not
assign an icon for the appearance of the second button. Instead, you assign
actions to occur when the mouse enters and exits the field border. For more
information, see Setting appearance options and Setting action options.
To define an image field that is shown and hidden:
1 Select the form tool
image field.
, and drag a box to represent the area of the
2 Type a name in the Name text box, and choose Button from the Type menu.
3 From the Options tab, choose Push from the Highlight menu.
4 From the Button Face When list, choose Up.
5 For Layout, choose Icon Only.
6 Click Select Icon, and then click Browse. Navigate to the location of the PDF
(image) file, select the file, and click Open. Click OK to accept the previewed
image as the button.
7 Click the Appearance tab. If needed, deselect Border Color and Background
Color. Choose Solid for Style, and then click OK.
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To assign actions to occur when the mouse enters and exits a field:
1 Select the form tool
, and drag a box to represent the activation area.
This will be a hotspot that causes the graphic that you defined to appear
and disappear.
2 Enter a name in the Name text box, and choose Button from the Type menu.
You do not assign a graphic to this button. Instead you assign actions to occur
when the cursor enters and exits the field border.
3 Click the Actions tab. Select Mouse Enter, and click Add.
4 Choose Show-Hide Field as the Type, and click Edit.
5 Navigate to the location of the PDF (graphic) file you specified, click Show,
click OK, and then click Set Action.
6 Select Mouse Exit, and click Add.
7 Choose Show-Hide Field as the Type, and click Edit.
8 Select the same image you specified in step 5, click Hide, click OK, and then
click Set Action.
9 Click OK to close the Field Properties dialog.
10 Select the hand tool
, and move the cursor across the hotspot area. The
image field you defined appears as the cursor enters the hotspot area and
disappears when it exits.
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Working with JavaScript actions
A JavaScript action allows you to invoke a JavaScript from a form field, a link, a
bookmark, or a page action. Familiarity with JavaScript is required. Storing a
JavaScript for a commonly used function as a field level script allows you to
invoke the function from other JavaScripts. Storing a function as a document
level JavaScript makes the function available to all JavaScripts in the current
document. Storing a function as a plug-in level script makes the function
available to all JavaScripts in the application. Plug-in level scripts are contained
in files with a .js extension. These scripts should be located in the Plug-ins
folder in the JavaScripts subfolder.
For more information on creating simple JavaScripts, see Using custom JavaScripts in forms, or choose Help -> Forms JavaScript Guide to display the Acrobat
Forms JavaScript Object Specification. This document provides information
about the classes and objects that have been defined to accommodate
Acrobat forms.
To choose the JavaScript action:
1 Create or select a form field, link, bookmark, or page action.
2 Press the right mouse button (Windows) or Control-click (Mac OS), and
choose Properties.
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3 Click Add, and select JavaScript as the action. For information about
selecting an action for a form field, link, bookmark, or page action, see About
action types.
4 Click Edit.
5 Copy and paste a predefined custom script, or type the script in the text box
provided, and then click OK.
6 Click Set Action or Set Link, as appropriate.
To create a document level JavaScript:
1 Choose Tools > Forms > JavaScript Document.
2 Type the name of the script in the text box.
3 Click Add.
4 Copy and paste a predefined custom script, or type the script in the text box
provided, and then click OK. The name of the script appears in the lower
text box.
5 Click Close.
6 Choose Tools > Forms > JavaScript Console to bring up the console window.
When a JavaScript is launched, any performance issues appear in the console
window. Click Clear to clear the results, or Close to close the window.
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To edit or delete an existing document level JavaScript:
1 Choose Tools > Forms > Document JavaScripts.
2 To edit a document level JavaScript, select the JavaScript from the list, and
click Change. Edit the existing text, or copy and paste a predefined custom
script into the text box provided. Click OK to accept and conclude the edits.
3 To delete a document JavaScript, select the JavaScript from the lower text
box, and click Delete.
4 Click Close.
To create a JavaScript plug-in level script:
1 Create a text file containing the function JavaScript. Name and save the file
with a .js extension.
2 Copy the text file into the Plug-ins directory inside the Acrobat directory
(Windows) or folder (Mac OS).
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Indexing Document Collections
You can use Acrobat Catalog to create a full-text index of your PDF documents
or document collections. After building an index, you can use the Search
command to search the entire library quickly. A full-text index is a searchable
database of all the text in a document or set of documents.
You can create a full-text index for PDF Normal and PDF Original Image With
Hidden Text files only. For information on converting PDF Image Only files to
searchable PDF files, see Chapter 4, Converting Scanned Documents to PDF.
Note: Acrobat Catalog is useful for indexing collections of PDF documents for
use on a local hard drive or CD-ROM drive. If you want to search and retrieve
documents over the Web, use standard Web search engines that index PDF,
HTML, and many other document formats.
Preparing PDF document collections for indexing
Before you index a document collection, you need to organize the documents
on the disk drive or network server volume, make sure the filenames comply
with cross-platform conventions, break large documents up into smaller files to
enhance search performance, and complete Document Info fields in each
document, if appropriate.
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You can set options for your index, such as Case Sensitive, Sounds Like, and
Word Stemming, that support the options used with the Search command.
Using these options can enhance the searchability of an index.
Note: Your documents should be complete in content and electronic features,
such as links, bookmarks, and form fields, before you use Catalog to
index them.
A
B
Large file should be broken up into smaller files on disk. For example, original file
“sample A” is broken up into multiple smaller files “sample B.”
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Structuring PDF collections for indexing
When you define and build an index, you must create a folder to contain the
index definition file and a support folder. The index definition file has the same
name as the index folder but has a .pdx extension. The folder has the same
name as the PDX file and contains related folders that are automatically
generated by Catalog.
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Catalog creates the PDX file (leglindx.pdx in this example) and the support
folder (leglindx in this example) in the folder that contains the indexed
document collection. The following guidelines apply:
The entire index—both the PDX file and the support folder—must be
located inside a single folder. See Moving document collections and their
indexes for more information.
■
■ The indexed documents must reside on a single disk drive or network server
volume, and the index must be on the same drive or volume as the indexed
documents (Windows).
Consider creating a separate PDF file for each chapter or section of a
document. When you separate a document into parts and then search it,
search performance is optimized.
Naming PDF files for cross-platform compatibility
When you name PDF documents and build indexes for cross-platform
document collections, the safest approach is to observe MS-DOS filenaming
conventions. While Acrobat has a sophisticated mapping filter for identifying
formats of indexed documents, ambiguities caused when names created for
one platform are mapped to usable names on another platform can slow down
the searches. There may even be cases where this prevents documents from
being located.
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Consider the following guidelines when naming PDF files and documents:
If you are using the Mac OS version of Catalog to build a cross-platform
indexed document collection, and if you don’t want to change long PDF
filenames to MS-DOS filenames, select Make Include/Exclude Folders DOS
Compatible in the Index group of preferences before you build your index. If
you check this preference, you must use MS-DOS filenaming conventions for
the folder names (8 digits with 3 digit extension); however, you do not have to
use these conventions for the names of the files inside the folders.
■
If you are using Mac OS with an OS/2 LAN Server and if you want to be sure
that the indexed files are searchable on all PC platforms, either configure LAN
Server Macintosh (LSM) to enforce MS-DOS filenaming conventions, or index
only FAT volumes. (HPFS volumes may contain unretrievable long filenames.)
■
If you are indexing PDF documents with long filenames that will be
truncated for Windows use, be consistent in your use of either the Windows or
Mac OS version of Catalog to build or update the index.
■
If you are creating documents that will be searched only by Macintosh users,
do not use deeply nested folders or pathnames longer than 256 characters.
■
If you are planning to deliver the document collection and index on an ISO
9660-formatted disc, you should use ISO 9660 filenames. With the Macintosh
version of Catalog, check Log Compatibility Warnings in the Logging prefer■
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ences to be warned of noncompliant filenames. For more information, see
Naming PDF documents.
Important: Avoid using extended characters, such as accented characters and
some non-English characters, in the names of files and folders used for the
index or the indexed files. The font used by Catalog does not support character
codes 133 through 159.
Filling out Document Info fields
If the Document Info fields have been filled out, index searches can be limited
to those documents that contain specific Document Info field values. See
Searching with Document Info and Date Info for more information. For best
results, entries in the Document Info fields should be standardized across a set
of documents or even within an organization.
Consider the following guidelines when filling out Document Info fields:
Use a descriptive title in the Title field. Even though the filename of the
document appears in the Search Results dialog box if the title field is empty,
filenames are often not very descriptive.
■
Always use the same field for category information. For example, don’t use
the Subject field for some documents and the Keywords field for others.
■
Use the same word for the same category. For example, don’t use biology for
some documents and life sciences for others.
■
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Use the Author field to identify the group responsible for the document. For
example, the author of a hiring policy document might be the Human
Resources department.
■
Add the document part numbers as keywords. For example, add something
like doc#=m234 to the Keywords field.
■
Use the Subject or Keywords field or both to categorize documents by type.
For example, you might use status report as a Subject value and monthly or
weekly as a Keywords field value for a single document.
■
Make a table that shows the values assigned to each document if you are
publishing a large number of documents. While you are developing the index,
use the table to maintain consistency. When you publish the index, include the
table as part of your documentation.
■
You can also define custom data fields, such as Document Type, Document
Number, and Document Identifier, to improve searchability. Be advised,
however, that you need a strong understanding of the PDF format to be able
to create these customizations. For more information see, Defining custom
data fields.
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Providing information about indexes
The primary index-description document is the index-definition (PDX) file itself.
When you define an index, you can put up to 250 characters in the Index
Description text box. When index users list available indexes, they can read
these descriptions.
Even if you can fit all the necessary index information into the Index
Description text box, consider providing a separate index description in a
Readme file. Such a document could provide the following information:
■
The kind of documents indexed.
■
The search options supported.
■
The person to contact or a phone number to call with questions.
■
A list of numbers or words that are excluded from the index.
■ A list of the folders containing documents included in a LAN-based index, or
a list of the documents included in a disc-based index. You might also include a
brief description of the contents of each folder or document.
A list of the values for each document, if Document Info field values are
assigned to indexed documents.
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You can place index-description Readme files in the same folders as the
indexes they describe. Alternatively, you can place them in a central location.
That way users can easily find descriptions of all the indexes without having to
know where the indexes themselves are located.
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Defining and building indexes
The first step in building an index is to provide a definition for the index. The
index definition should list the folders containing the documents to be
indexed and the settings for index options. An index title and a description of
the index are optional.
Important: Before you can build an index, you need to ensure you have
enough free disk space (10–30% more than the size of the files being indexed)
to accommodate the index and the temporary files created during the build.
To define and build an index:
1 Double-click the Catalog application on your desktop to start Catalog.
2 Choose Index > New (Windows) or File > New (Mac OS).
Note: In the New Index Definition dialog box, you may enter a title and provide
a description of the index (up to 250 characters). See Providing information
about indexes for more information.
3 To add folders to the index, click Add under Include Directories, navigate to
the folder you want to include in the index, and do one of the following:
■
Double-click the folder name, and click OK (Windows).
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Select the folder name, and select folder name (Mac OS).
Note: On Mac OS, if you do not plan on moving the index and document
collection, you can add folders from multiple servers or disk drives.
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4 To exclude folders from the index, click Add under Exclude Directories,
navigate to the folders, and select them. You cannot exclude individual files
inside a folder; you have to exclude the entire folder.
5 To change index options, select Options, make the necessary selections, and
click OK. You can exclude specific words (stopwords) from the index, exclude
numbers, and disable some of the user’s search options (Case Sensitive,
Sounds Like, Word Stemming). See Selecting word search options for
more information.
6 Enter an index title and description, and then click Build. Retain the .pdx
extension provided for the filename. Use the following guidelines when
selecting a location for index folder and file:
The folder must be on the disk or network server volume where the
documents to be indexed are stored (Windows).
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The folder may be put on a different disk or network server volume from that
of the indexed documents, if you don’t plan to move the index and documents.
In this case, choose Allow Indexing On a Separate Drive from the Edit > Preferences > Index menu (Mac OS only).
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The pathname of the folder should not contain high ANSI characters (such as
some foreign characters) or the slash (/) character (Windows and Mac OS).
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7 Click OK (Windows) or Save (Mac OS).
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As Catalog builds the index, it displays messages that report the progress of
the build. You can stop the build at any time. For more information, see
Stopping and restarting builds.
Whenever Catalog builds or updates an index, it creates a log file of errors and
messages. In Windows, the log file (.log) is in the same folder as the index files.
On Mac OS, the log file is in the Catalog application folder by default. You can
set the preferences to save the log file in the same folder as the index, or any
other folder.
To rebuild an index:
1 Choose Index > Build.
2 Locate and select the PDX file for the index you want to rebuild.
3 Click Open. Acrobat Catalog rebuilds the index and places it in the
selected folder.
On Mac OS, you can also rebuild an already defined index by dragging and
dropping. For information on building already defined indexes in batches, see
Automatically updating indexes.
Using drag-and-drop to build indexes (Mac OS)
When you use the drag-and-drop index-build feature, define the index using
the Drop Folders preferences, or use the Acrobat Catalog default value.
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To build an index using drag-and-drop (Mac OS):
Drag a folder, multiple folders, or an entire disk containing PDF documents to
the Catalog application icon. Catalog begins building or rebuilding the index:
If a folder does not contain a PDX file, Catalog places a new default index
(named index.pdx) in the folder and uses it to index the documents in
the folder.
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If a folder contains a PDX file, Catalog uses that definition to rebuild the
document index in the folder and in any other folders listed in the definition.
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Deleting indexes
You can delete the entire contents of an index at any time. This differs from
purging, which flushes out all unnecessary files and information. For more
information on purging an index, see Purging and rebuilding indexes.
To delete an index:
If you need to delete an index rather than just purging it, delete the indexdefinition (PDX) file, the log file for the index, the index folder, and all its nested
folders. Use the normal file-deletion procedures for your operating system.
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Stopping and restarting builds
You can stop a build any time from the Acrobat Catalog window. The message
“Build stopped by user” appears in the dialog box. It takes a few seconds for all
the active processes to halt.
Catalog maintains the partial results of the build for use when you next update
the index. This partial index can be searched.
To restart a stopped build:
1 Choose Index > Schedule.
2 Select the stopped index from the list, and click Start. It takes a few seconds
for all the processes involved in the build to restart.
Changing index definitions
There may be cases when the documents in a collection change. In this
situation, you should change the index definition and rebuild the index.
To change an index definition:
1 Choose Index > Open (Windows) or File > Open (Mac OS).
2 Locate and select the PDX file, and click Open.
3 Make the necessary changes, and click Save.
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Setting index options
You can optimize your index by reducing its size, thereby improving the search
time. You can do this by changing some of the Acrobat Catalog defaults in the
Options dialog box. You can exclude specified terms (stopwords) and numbers,
and you can disable support for the match case, sounds like, and word
stemming search features.
When you are setting index options, follow these guidelines:
You can change options for a particular definition, but not for all new
indexes. The Index defaults are fixed (Windows).
■
You can change the defaults for most of the options in the Index Defaults
group of preferences (Mac OS).
■
To set index options:
1 Choose Index > Open (Windows) or File > Open (Mac OS).
2 Locate and select the PDX file, and click Open.
3 Make additions or changes in the Options dialog box:
Exclude stopwords and numbers from the index. For more information, see
Excluding words (stopwords) and numbers from indexes.
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Choose not to support any of the word search options: case sensitive, sounds
like, and word stemming. For more information, see Selecting word search
options.
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4 Click OK, and then click Save. These changes are applied the next time you
build or update the index.
Selecting word search options
Several word search options can be used in conjunction with the Acrobat
Search command to enhance search performance:
Case Sensitive enables the Match Case option in Acrobat Search. The Case
Sensitive option limits the search to word matches with specified upper- and
lowercase elements.
■
Sounds Like enables the Sounds Like option in Acrobat Search. The Sounds
Like option expands searches for proper names.
■
Word Stemming enables the Word Assistant preview in Acrobat Search.
The Word Stemming option finds words that share a word stem with the
search term.
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The Case Sensitive, Sounds Like, and Word Stemming options increase the size
of the index when used. If disc space is a critical issue, you may want to disable
support for these options. For more information on these options, see Setting
the search options.
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To disable support for a word search option:
In the Options dialog box, deselect the desired word options, and then
click OK.
Excluding words (stopwords) and numbers from indexes
You can exclude, or stop, up to 500 words from an index. For instance, you
might want to exclude words such as the, a, but, or, for, and by. When you
exclude stopwords from an index, it makes the index 10–15% smaller. The
drawback is that users will be unable to search using phrases that contain
these stopwords. For this reason, it is helpful to provide a list of the stopwords
with the index.
In the Options dialog box, select the options for your index:
To add a stopword, type the word in the Word text box, and select Add.
Stopwords can be up to 26 characters long and are case sensitive.
■
To remove a word from the list of stopwords, select a word in the Word to Not
Include in Index text box, and select Remove.
■
To exclude numbers, specify the exclusion in the index definition. For
Windows, this is necessary because the default is to include numbers. For Mac
OS, change the default in the Index Defaults group of preferences, as well as
specify exclusion for a particular index.
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Excluding numbers can significantly reduce the size of an index. However, the
disadvantage of excluding numbers is that users will not be able to find
phrases that contain numbers. You should always inform users when numbers
are excluded from an index.
Optimizing indexes for CD-ROMs
The Optimize For CD-ROM option in the Options dialog box arranges index files
for the fastest possible access on a CD. This option also makes it easier for you
to modify Document Info fields or security settings after you have indexed a
document. Normally when a user searches a document that has been modified
after it was indexed, a message indicates that the document was changed, and
the user must choose whether to use the index. When you select the Optimize
For CD-ROM option, the message and choice are bypassed.
Adding document identifiers to 1.0 PDF files for cross-platform
compatibility
You may need to add unique document identifiers to PDF documents created
with version 1.x of Acrobat Distiller or PDFWriter and used in cross-platform
environments. Version 2 and later of these programs add the identifiers
automatically.
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Document identifiers are needed when Mac OS filenames are shortened when
translated to DOS filenames. Filenaming ambiguities often result from this
cross-platform renaming process. Acrobat Search uses the unique identifiers
to resolve such ambiguities. Add these document identifiers in the Options
dialog box.
Setting Catalog preferences (Mac OS)
There are a number of preferences available to skilled users of Adobe Catalog.
The default settings are designed to work for most users, and it is recommended that you do not customize these preferences unless you are familiar
with the underlying programming concepts.
To set Catalog preferences:
1 Choose Edit > Preferences.
2 Edit the settings you want to change:
Time Before Purge (seconds): 30–905. Specifies the delay from the time the
purge command is invoked. It is strongly recommended that you leave this as
the default of 905 seconds.
■
■ Document Section Size (words): Small=200000, Medium=400000, and
Large=800000. Specify Small if you have low memory configuration.
■
Group Size For CD-ROM: Should not be set above 4000.
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Index Available After (Number of ) Documents: Options 16–4000
(Default=1024). Specifies the number of PDF files Catalog processes before
making a partial index available or before updating the current index with
entries for new and changed documents.
■
Index Disk Cache Size (kilobytes): (Default=128). Specifies that the build
stops if the percentage of memory available at the start of a build drops below
this figure.
■
Allow Indexing On A Separate Drive: Permits you to index on a separate drive
when this check box is selected.
■
Make Include/Exclude Folders DOS Compatible: Makes these folders DOS
compatible when this check box is selected.
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3 Click OK.
Defining custom data fields
Custom data fields can be changed in the Catalog Preferences dialog box.
Choose Edit > Preferences.
For information on customizing Acrobat, see the Acrobat Software Development Kit. Support for the Adobe Acrobat SDK is provided to members of the
Acrobat Developers Program by the Adobe Developers Association (ADA). For
information on joining the ADA, requesting developer technical support, or
obtaining updates to this SDK, refer to the Developer Support section of the
Adobe Web site (www.adobe.com).
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Tips on reducing index size
For small indexes and fast searches, specify the largest possible build-group
size (1024 files) with Index Available in the Index preferences.
■
To make partial indexes available quickly during large updates, specify a
small build-group size (100 or fewer) with Index Available in the preferences.
However, note that decreasing this setting slows the update and the execution
of search queries.
■
For fast updates, use the largest setting for the Document Section Size
preference in the Index preferences.
■
Note: The Document Section Size setting determines the maximum size of
a document before Acrobat Catalog creates two or more indexes for
the document.
■ For fast updates, increase the Index Disk Cache Size in the Index preferences
as much as possible.
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Automatically updating indexes
You can schedule one-time updates (Once), schedule updates at regular
intervals (Every), or arrange for updating to go on continuously (Continuously).
Catalog updates are incremental to minimize updating time and permit
searching to go on uninterrupted during updates. This technique causes the
index to grow with each update, however, and you need to purge and rebuild
the index periodically to reclaim disk space and speed up searches.
To build several indexes in a single batch process, use the Once method.
To schedule an automatic build:
1 Choose Index > Schedule.
2 Navigate to the PDX file for the index, select it, and then click Open.
3 Select a build time: Every, Once, or Continuously.
If you select Once or Continuously, the index begins building or updating
immediately. If you select Continuously, it updates the indexes in the order
they are listed in the Indices to Build list.
■
If you select Every, enter a numeric time interval, and then choose Minutes,
Hours, or Days from the menu. If you want to delay processing the selected
indexes until a specified time, select Starting At, and use the up and down
arrows to select the time.
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4 Click Start. If you selected the Starting At option, the index begins building
or updating at the time you specified.
5 Click Stop to halt the update process.
To add a new index to the existing schedule:
1 Choose Index > New (Windows) or File > New (Mac OS), and create a new
index definition.
2 Click Save As.
3 Select Add Index to Schedule, and then click Save.
Purging and rebuilding indexes
When you update an index by rebuilding it, entries for deleted documents and
for the original versions of changed documents remain in the index but are
marked as invalid. This incremental updating increases the time required for
searches that use the index slightly. It also can greatly increase the disk space
required by the index. For example, if every document indexed has changed
since an initial build, the space required for the index is doubled.
Because these increases accumulate over time, you should occasionally purge
the index before rebuilding it. You should also purge and rebuild if you change
the optional search features supported by an index or change the stopwords
list used to build an index. Otherwise search performance may be slowed or
search results distorted.
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To purge and rebuild an index:
1 Choose Index > Purge.
2 Locate and select the index-definition (PDX) file for the index.
3 Click Open. The index is purged. If the index is currently in use, users are
given time to complete queries in progress before the purge begins.
The default “time before purge” is 905 seconds, which is equal to 15 minutes.
Users receive an “Index unavailable for searching” message if they attempt to
enter a new query. If a message appears indicating that the purge has failed to
complete, look up the message in Troubleshooting for help.
4 After the purge completes, choose Index > Build.
5 Select the PDX file (for the index), click Open, and then click Yes (Windows)
or OK (Mac OS). Catalog rebuilds the index.
Tips for updating indexes
You must update an index if documents are added to or removed from the
collection, or if the hierarchy of the indexed folders has changed.
You should also consider updating an index when documents in the indexed
document collection have changed, or data values for the new field have been
added because a new Document Info field has been defined.
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You can reduce the index update time by following these guidelines:
Don’t support the Sounds Like, Case Sensitive, or Word Stemming search
options.
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■
Use stopwords, and exclude numbers.
Install Acrobat Catalog on the system where the indexed documents are
stored. If the program and documents are on different systems and it is feasible
to move the documents temporarily, move them to the Catalog system for
updating, and then move them back.
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Moving document collections and their indexes
You can develop and test an indexed document collection on a local hard drive
and then move the finished document collection to a network server or disk.
An index definition contains relative paths between the index-definition (PDX)
file and the folders containing the indexed documents. If these relative paths
are unchanged, you don’t have to rebuild the index after moving the indexed
document collection. If the PDX file and the folders containing the indexed
documents are in the same folder, you can maintain the relative path simply by
moving that folder.
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If the relative path changes, you must create a new index after you move the
indexed document collection. However, you can still use the original PDX file.
To use the original PDX file, first move the indexed documents. Then copy the
PDX file to the folder where you want to create the new index, and update the
Include and Exclude lists as necessary.
If the index resides on a drive or server volume separate from any part of the
collection it applies to, moving either the collection or the index will break the
index (Mac OS). If you intend to move a document collection either to another
network location or onto a CD, create and build the index in the same location
as the collection.
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Searching Catalog Indexes
The Acrobat Search command allows you to perform full-text searches of PDF
document collections that have been indexed using Acrobat Catalog, whereas
the Acrobat Find command allows you to search only a single document. The
Find command is further limited by having to look at every word on every
page. For these reasons, searches of full-text indexes created using Catalog are
faster and more convenient than using the Find command. The Search
command also provides powerful tools for limiting and expanding a search.
About searching Acrobat Catalog indexes
The focus of your search will depend a lot on how the index was constructed.
Consider the following questions before setting search options and defining
search queries:
Was document and date information provided for the PDF documents, and
can it be used for searching? See Filling out Document Info fields for more
information.
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Were common words and numbers excluded when the index was built? See
Setting index options for more information.
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A well built index will often include a file that provides information that can
help you plan your search strategies. See Providing information about indexes
for more information.
Searching indexes
To search an index created using Adobe Catalog, you first select the indexes to
search, define a search query, select the documents to review from those
returned by the search, and then view the occurrences of the search term
within the documents you selected to review. A search query is an expression
made up of text and other items to define the information you want to find.
Opening a PDF document associated with an index automatically makes
the index searchable.
Selecting indexes
You can search any or all indexes displayed in the Index Selection dialog box.
Dimmed indexes are not available for searching.
To customize index selection:
1 Launch Adobe Acrobat 4.0.
2 Choose Edit > Search > Select Indexes to list the currently available indexes
and to add or delete indexes, and then do one of the following in the Index
Selection dialog box:
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To add an index to the available indexes list, click Add, navigate to the index,
and double-click on the index file.
■
■
To remove an index, select the index name, click Remove, and then click OK.
To select or deselect an index, select the box for the index, and then click OK.
Indexes that are grayed out are currently unavailable for searching.
■
To view information about an available index, highlight the index name, click
Info, and then click OK. The information displayed includes the build date,
creation date, number of documents in the index, location of the index, and
information provided by the builder of the index. For more information, see
Providing information about indexes.
■
Using the Search command
The Search command allows you to perform a search on PDF documents. You
can search for a simple word or phrase, or you can expand your search query by
using wild-card characters and operators. You can use the search options to
further refine your search. And if document and date information were
provided for the documents you are searching, you can use that information to
narrow your search.
To perform a full-text search:
1 Launch Acrobat 4.0, and choose Edit > Search > Query.
2 Type the text you want to search for in the Find Results Containing Text box:
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The text that you type in can be a single word, a number, a term, or a phrase. It
can be a word, with or without wild-card characters (*, ?), or any combination of
letters, numbers, and symbols. Because you can use Boolean operators in the
text box, you must enclose any search term that includes and, or, or not in
quotes. You can also use the operators =, ~, and != with text, but only to
perform exact matches, contains, and does not contain searches, respectively.
You can use comparison operators (<, <=, >, >=) with values of the same type.
For more information, see Tips on defining search queries.
To clear the search dialog box and redefine the search, click Clear.
3 To refine your search query, select one or more of the search options: Word
Stemming, Sounds Like, Thesaurus, Match Case, or Proximity. If the search
options are not displayed in the Acrobat Search dialog box, restore them by
choosing File > Preferences > Search, and selecting Show Options. For
information on how these options affect your search query, see Setting the
search options.
Note: Before you perform a search with one of these options, you can preview
the type of results you’ll receive using the Word Assistant. For more information, see Using Word Assistant.
4 To refine your search query using document and date information, enter
document information values in the Title, Subject, Author, and Keywords text
boxes, and enter date information in the creation and modification date text
boxes. If these text boxes are not displayed in the Acrobat Search dialog box,
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restore them by choosing File > Preferences > Search, and selecting Show
Fields.
5 Select Search. The Search dialog box is hidden, and documents that match
your search query are listed in the Search Results window in order of relevancy.
6 Double-click a document that seems likely to contain the relevant information, probably the first document in the list. The document opens on the
first match for the text you typed.
7 Click the Search Next button or Search Previous button to go to other
matches in the document. Or choose another document to view.
Alternatively, you can redefine the query by typing new text in the Acrobat
Search dialog box or by using other techniques to expand the search to include
more documents or to limit the search to fewer documents. For more information, see Limiting searches.
Viewing documents returned from searches
A search returns a list of indexed documents containing items that match your
search query. The results are displayed in the Search Results window. When you
open a document in the list, you view only pages containing matches. All the
matches on a page are highlighted.
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Documents more likely to contain relevant information are listed first on the
list. The relevancy ranking of each document is indicated by an icon. The
degree of fill in the circle in the icon indicates the probability that the
document contains the search information. A solid fill indicates a high probability that the document contains your search term; an empty circle indicates a
low probability that the document contains your search term.
Relevancy ranking for search results
The relevancy ranking also depends on how you defined your search query:
When you use ordinary search text, the relevancy ranking indicates how
frequently the search word appears in the document. This means both in
absolute terms and relative to the number of other words in the document.
■
When you use a Boolean OR operator between two words or phrases in a
search, documents that contain both items have a higher relevancy ranking
than documents that contain just one item.
■
■ When you use the Proximity option, the closer the matches are within a
document, the higher the relevancy ranking of that document.
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To view a document returned from a search:
1 Double-click the document name to open the document.
2 Use the Search buttons on the tool bar to view all the matches for
your query.
3 Review the search results that automatically appear in the text box:
To highlight the next occurrence of a match in the document, click
Search Next.
■
To highlight the previous occurrence of a match in a document, click
Search Previous.
■
To highlight the first occurrence of a match in the next document listed or
previous document listed, Shift-click Search Next or Search Previous.
■
To view any other document listed, select Search Results to redisplay the list,
then double-click the document name.
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Refining your searches
If your search returns too many documents or provides too many matches in
individual documents, you can pair down the search results by confining the
search to documents returned by a previous search, or you can more narrowly
define your search term, use the document and date information, and use the
general search options and the Word Assistant. Alternatively, if your search did
not provide the information you were looking for, you can broaden your search
query using the search options, for example.
Note: If the search options and document and date information text boxes are
not displayed in the Acrobat Search dialog box, restore them by choosing File >
Preferences > Search, and selecting Show Options.
Refining searches in progress
If you want to narrow a search further, you can refine or confine your search to
documents listed in a prior search. For example, you can first search for (and
find) all documents by an author, and then define a search query for that
subset of documents. The result would be a subset of documents that are
authored by the specified author and that contain the search string.
To refine a search:
1 Choose Edit > Search > Query to display the Search Results window. Select
and show the results of a previous search.
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2 In the Search dialog box, refine or replace the query that produced the list
of documents.
If you used a simple text string for the search query, you might consider
refining the search query by using the search options, by including document
and date information in the search, or by using Word Assistant. For more information, see Using Word Assistant.
3 Press Ctrl (Windows) or Option (Mac OS). The button label changes from
Search to Refine.
4 Click Refine. This produces a Search Results list of documents that are a
subset of the previous list and that match the new query.
Using Word Assistant
Word Assistant enables you to build a list of terms that will appear when you
specify a search using the Sounds Like, Word Stemming, or Thesaurus options.
The resulting list shows you if the option you are using is likely to return helpful
results. If the list is too long or full of irrelevant words, you can quickly construct
a list of words to find by copying words from the Word Assistant dialog box and
pasting them into the search dialog box.
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To use the Word Assistant with search options:
1 Choose Edit > Search > Word Assistant.
2 To check the available indexes or change the selection of indexes,
click Indexes.
3 In the Index Selection dialog, select the indexes you want to use.
4 Select a search option (Sounds Like, Word Stemming, or Thesaurus) from
the Assist menu.
5 Enter the search word in the Word text box, and click Look Up.
To copy words from the Word Assistant dialog box:
1 Choose Edit > Search > Query to open the Search dialog box.
2 Use the Word Assistant to generate a list of related words.
3 Double-click a word to search.
4 Double-click and copy the word in the Word text box to the clipboard.
5 In the Search dialog box, select the Find text box, and paste in the
selected word.
6 Repeat steps 3 through 5 for each word you want to use; separate each pair
of words in the Find text box with AND or OR.
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Setting the search options
You can expand your search term by using the search options Sounds Like,
Word Stemming, or Thesaurus. To determine if your choices will be useful in
limiting your search, you can use the Word Assistant to build a list of terms that
will appear when you specify these options. For more information, see Using
Word Assistant.
You can limit your search term by using the search options Match Case
and Proximity.
To set the search options:
In the Search dialog box, select one or more of the options:
Word Stemming finds words that contain part of (a word stem) the specified
search word. It applies to single words, not phrases; does not apply to words
that contain wild-card characters (*, ?); finds words that end in ing, ed, s, ion,
and so on, but not er; and cannot be used with the Match Case option. Word
Stemming works only for indexes built with this option.
■
Sounds Like finds different spellings for proper names. It applies to single
words, not phrases; does not apply to words that contain wild-card characters;
and cannot be used with the Match Case option. Sounds Like works only for
indexes built with this option.
■
Thesaurus finds similar words that appear in the documents you are
searching, not necessarily all the similar words you might find in a complete
■
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thesaurus. It applies to single words, not phrases; does not apply to words that
contain wild-card characters; and cannot be used with the Match Case option.
Match Case limits the results of the search by finding only those documents
that contain words with the same capitalization. It can be used with a Boolean
expression and with terms that use wild-card characters. Characters matched
by wild-card characters can be either uppercase or lowercase.
■
■ Proximity limits the results of simple AND searches to one pair of matches
per document—the pair closest together. The two matches must be within
three pages or fewer of each other. This option is useful for locating a
document that concentrates on some topic of interest.
Proximity affects relevancy ranking in searches. The closer the matches are
within a document, the higher the ranking. Proximity does work with complex
AND searches—such as, Hawaii AND (cruise OR fly).
If you want to keep the search dialog box small, you can hide (or keep
hidden) the options and type in their names in the Find Results Containing Text
box. Along with the text box names, you need to use operators such as =
(equals) and > (greater than). For the options, type in /st (stemming), /so
(sounds like), /th (thesaurus), /ca (match case), or /pr (proximity).
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Searching with Document Info and Date Info
If document and date information was provided for the documents you are
searching, you can use this information in the Search dialog box to limit your
search. For example, you can limit your search to documents authored by one
person and created or modified within a given period or on a given date. You
can view the document and date information (if any) provided by choosing File
> Doc Info > General from within the PDF document.
If you want to keep the search dialog box small, you can hide the document
and date text boxes and type the text box names in the Find Results Containing
box. You will need to use operators such as = (equals) and > (greater than).
To search using Document Info:
In the Search dialog box, enter your search query information in the appropriate title, subject, author, and keywords text boxes. You can use Boolean
operators and wild-card characters in these text boxes, with the search text. All
documents that contain the value are returned. If the With Document Info text
boxes are not displayed in your Search dialog box, choose
File > Preferences > Search, and select Show Fields. You may see additional
custom text boxes in your display, depending on the information supplied for
the PDF document.
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To search using Date Info:
In the Search dialog box, do one of the following:
■ Enter a date (month, day, year), or use the Up and Down Arrow keys to select
a value.
To limit a search to documents created or modified after a specific date,
specify the after date, and leave the before date blank.
■
■ To limit a search to documents that were created or modified before a
specific date, specify the before date, and leave the after date blank.
To create a Boolean AND condition, enter the creation and modification
dates in the Search dialog box. An AND condition returns only documents
created or modified during the specified period.
■
If the With Date Info text boxes are not displayed in your Search dialog box,
choose File > Preferences > Search, and select Show Date.
Tips on defining search queries
You can improve your search by narrowly defining the term or phrase you
search for, being aware that some words (stopwords) and numbers may have
been excluded when the index was built, and by using wild-card characters
and Boolean operators.
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Searching for terms or phrases
If your search phrase includes the words and, or, or not used in their ordinary
sense (not as a Boolean operator), put the phrase in quotes. The search phrase
■
“once or twice”
finds all occurrences of the phrase once or twice, not all occurrences of once and
all occurrences of twice as it would without the quotes.
If your search phrase includes punctuation (other than an apostrophe) or
special characters (such as @ and *), they are ignored. For example, either of the
terms
■
son-in-law, son in law
finds all occurrences of both son-in-law and son in law.
Excluding stopwords, numbers, and separator characters
■ If you are unsuccessful in searching for a phrase that includes a common
word, it is probably because it is a specified stopword.
If you are unsuccessful in searching for a term that includes numbers, it is
probably because numbers have been excluded from the index. Acrobat
Catalog defines a number to be a sequence of one or more digits (0 through 9),
optionally preceded by a minus sign (-), optionally separated by one or more
commas (,) or periods (.), and optionally containing a decimal point, which can
be a period (.) or a comma (,).
■
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If you use a separator character in a search term, it is automatically discarded.
Separator characters include all symbols, the space character, and punctuation
characters except the apostrophe. When indexing a PDF document, Acrobat
Catalog uses separator characters to recognize where one term ends and the
next term begins.
■
If alphanumeric terms are made up of numbers and separator characters,
they can also be excluded.
■
Expanding searches
Use wild-card characters in the search text to increase the number of
matches for the text.
■
■ Use an asterisk (*) to match zero, one, or more characters; use a question
mark (?) to match any one character.
■
Use wild-card characters in a term that is part of a Boolean expression.
Use wild-card characters to specify Document Info text box values. However,
you cannot use wild-cards to represent separator characters such as the
hyphen (-) and the slash (/).
■
■
Use Boolean expressions in Document Info text box values.
Use a Boolean OR operator between two words to return documents
containing either word.
■
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Use the Sounds Like, Word Stemming, and Thesaurus options to increase the
number of matches for the text.
■
■
Use a comma (,) or vertical bar (|) to separate items in an OR search.
Limiting searches
Use a Boolean NOT operator before a word or search term to exclude
documents containing the word or search term.
■
■ Use an exclamation point (!) as another way to specify a NOT search.
However, be sure to place a space between the exclamation point and the
search item.
Use a Boolean AND operator between two words to return only documents
containing both words.
■
Use the Proximity option to limit AND searches. This specifies that words
must be in close proximity to each other—within three pages or fewer.
■
■
Use the Match Case option to match exact capitalization.
Using Boolean operators
To avoid building inaccurate search queries, follow these guidelines:
When NOT is used with either or both of the AND and OR operators, it is
evaluated before either the AND or OR. For example, evolution AND NOT Darwin
finds all documents that contain the word evolution but not the word Darwin.
■
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When you combine AND and OR in the same expression, AND is evaluated
before OR. For example, Darwin OR origin AND species finds all documents that
contain Darwin or that contain both origin and species.
■
When you use parentheses, you change the default order of evaluation for
Boolean operators. For example, (Darwin OR origin) AND species finds all
documents that contain either Darwin and species or that contain origin and
species. Parentheses can be nested.
■
When you use a literal phrase that contains an operator name, a symbol for
an operator name (such as & for AND), or parentheses, the phrase must be
enclosed in quotation marks. For example: “cats and dogs” finds all documents
that contain the phrase cats and dogs, not all documents that contain either the
word cats or the word dogs. The phrase cats & dogs also needs quotes to be
interpreted literally.
■
In addition to and, or, not, and parentheses, the symbols that require quotation
marks are
&
AND
| and ,
OR
!
NOT
However, quoted search phrases that contain parentheses or vertical bars can
produce unexpected results.
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Using operators
You can use operators in text and Document Info text boxes.
You can use =, ~, and != with text only to perform exact matches, contains,
and does not contain searches, respectively.
■
■ You can use comparison operators (<, <=, >, >=) with values of the
same type.
Setting search preferences
You can change the default settings in the Search Preferences dialog box to
add more choices to your search dialog box, if necessary. For example, if you
check Show Fields, a With a Document Info section is added to the search
dialog box.
To change search preferences:
1 Choose File > Preferences > Search.
2 Set the preferences in the dialog box as necessary:
Show Fields displays Document Info fields. For more information,
seeSearching with Document Info and Date Info.
■
Show Options displays search word options. For more information, see
Setting the search options.
■
■
Show Date displays the date of the items returned by a search query.
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■
Hide on Search hides the dialog box during a search.
Sort by allows you to specify a sort by Modified, Producer, Score, Subject,
or Title.
■
Show Top displays a specified number of documents that are the first
returned from the search.
■
■
Hide on View hides the dialog box when viewing results.
■ Highlight Display allows you to specify highlighting By Page, By Word, or
No Highlight.
3 Click OK.
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Distributing Documents in PDF
With its small file sizes, platform independence, and online navigation, PDF is
an ideal format for distributing documents electronically. You can e-mail PDF
documents to other users directly from Acrobat, or you can distribute the
documents on the World Wide Web, an intranet, or a CD.
E-mailing documents from Acrobat (Windows)
You can send an e-mail message from Acrobat with a PDF document as an
attachment. Acrobat uses the Messaging Application Program Interface (MAPI)
to communicate with your e-mail application. Most e-mail applications come
with a MAPI server to handle this interface.
Before you begin, make sure that your e-mail application is working outside
Acrobat, and set it up to use its MAPI server. When you choose the Send Mail
command in Acrobat, the MAPI server opens a new outgoing message with the
current PDF document attached.
For information on running the MAPI server and on setting options that affect
the attached PDF document, see the documentation that came with your
e-mail application.
To e-mail a PDF document from Acrobat:
1 Open the document you want to attach to an e-mail.
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2 Choose File > Send Mail.
3 If you have not saved the document, enter a filename and location in the
Save As dialog box, and click Save.
4 If you have not logged into the e-mail application, enter your password in
the Log In dialog box, and click OK.
5 Address and write the e-mail message in the new message window. Then
click Send.
Preparing documents for electronic distribution
Before putting PDF documents on a Web site or a CD, check to see that the text,
artwork, and layout in the documents are complete and correct, and that all
links, bookmarks, and other enhancements are in place. The documents should
be at the point where you would print them if you were distributing on paper.
You should also think about filenames and file sizes for your documents, and
consider including searchable information, defining opening views, and
setting up passwords and other security options.
Instead of distributing one large document, it’s usually better to distribute
a collection of small documents with links between them. Small documents
open faster than large ones, and with links between them, users can go straight
to the relevant information instead of trying to locate the information on
their own.
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Naming PDF documents
When naming a PDF document that is going to be distributed electronically, it’s
a good idea to follow standard naming conventions:
Use the MS-DOS filenaming convention, because many network and e-mail
programs truncate long filenames. This convention requires a filename of up to
eight characters, followed by an extension of up to three characters. Using the
MS-DOS convention ensures that your documents retain their .pdf extensions
when they are transferred among computers. If you’re putting the document
on a CD, see Distributing PDF documents on a CD for additional naming
considerations.
■
Use the .pdf extension with a PDF filename. In Windows, documents without
the .pdf extension may not display in the Open dialog box if you search for
documents by typing in *.pdf. Most Web browsers, Web servers, and versions of
Microsoft Windows have been configured to associate .pdf documents with
Acrobat or the Web browser plug-in and to launch the appropriate application
when they encounter a filename ending in .pdf.
■
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Optimizing image quality and file sizes
To make bitmap images small enough for network distribution or for mass
storage on CDs, you generally need to compress PDF documents to save the
images in a way that uses less space. For continuous-tone images, such as
photographs, JPEG Medium compression saves a lot of space with little loss
of quality.
You may want to try applying different compression settings to your PDF
documents and comparing the resulting image quality and file size. Use
Distiller to convert two or three versions of a document to PDF, each with a
different compression setting, and save each version of the document. Then
open the versions in Acrobat and compare them, zooming in at 400% for a
close look at the images. Compare their file sizes also. If it is difficult to detect
any degradation in images in a document with default compression, other
compression settings may not be worth the increase in file size. For more information, see Applying compression and resampling to PDF files.
Adding searchable information and setting the binding
You can provide a title, a subject, an author, and one or more keywords for a
PDF document. This provides users with basic data about the document and
gives them a useful way to search for information, especially if the document is
part of a collection that is going to be indexed. For information on creating an
index, see Defining and building indexes.
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You can also select a type of binding to be used when the document is viewed
on-screen with its pages side by side.
To add searchable information and set the binding:
1 Choose File > Document Info > General.
2 Enter a title, subject, and author, and one or more keywords. Separate
keywords with a comma and no space.
Note: Many Web search engines use the title to describe the document in their
search results list. If you do not provide a title, the filename will appear in the
results list instead.
3 Choose left-edge or right-edge binding for the document. This affects how
the pages are arranged side by side when the pages are viewed in the
Continuous - Facing page layout. Set the binding to match the reading
direction of text in the document: left-edge for text read from left to right, and
right-edge for text read from right to left. Right-edge binding is useful for
viewing Arabic, Hebrew, or vertical Japanese text.
4 Click OK.
Defining opening views
You can define how the Acrobat work area will appear when a user first opens a
PDF document.
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To define an opening view for a document:
1 Choose File > Document Info > Open.
2 Choose an initial page view:
■
Page Only opens only the document pane.
Bookmarks And Page or Thumbnails And Page opens the navigation pane
with bookmarks or thumbnails in front. The document pane is also opened.
■
3 Enter an opening page number.
4 Choose a magnification level:
The numbers in the pop-up menu represent a percentage of the actual
page size.
■
■
Fit In Window sizes the page to fit entirely in the window.
■
Fit Width sizes the page to fit the width of the window
Fit Visible sizes the page so that its text and graphics fit the width of
the window.
■
■
Default uses the default magnification set in the user’s General preferences.
5 Choose a page layout for scrolling. If you choose Default, Acrobat uses the
default layout set in the user’s General preferences.
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6 Select the window options:
Resize Window To Initial Page sizes the application window to fit snugly
around the first document page.
■
Center Window On Screen opens the application window in the middle of
the screen.
■
Open In Full Screen Mode opens the document without the menu bar,
command bar, tool bar, or window controls. See Reading documents in Full
Screen view for information on working with the full screen.
■
Note: A user can exit Full Screen view by pressing Escape if his or her preferences are set this way, or by pressing Ctrl-L (Windows) or Command-L
(Mac OS).
7 To hide part of the work area, even when a user is not in Full Screen view,
select appropriate user interface options
Note: If you hide the menu bar, command bar, and tool bar, users will not be
able to apply commands and select tools unless they know the keyboard
shortcuts. You may want to set up page actions or buttons in the document to
provide this functionality for them. See Using actions for special effects and
Using buttons for information.
8 Click OK.
To define an opening view for a collection of documents:
1 Choose File > Batch Process.
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2 In the Select Folder To Process dialog box, select the folder of documents to
process in the browser list. (On Mac OS, select the folder but do not click the
Select button until you’re finished setting the options.)
3 Select Process All Subfolders if you also want the opening view to apply to
documents in subfolders of the folder.
4 Select Open Info, and click the Open Info button.
5 In the Open Info dialog box, set options for the opening view as described in
the preceding procedure, and click OK. All documents in the folder will have
the same opening view.
6 Click OK (Windows) or Select (Mac OS) in the Select Folder To Process
dialog box.
To stop the batch optimization process:
Click Stop in the Batch Processor Progress dialog box. The process stops after
the current document finishes processing (which may take some time).
Setting security for documents
You can limit access to a PDF document by setting up passwords and by
restricting certain features, such as printing and editing. When a document
has restricted features, any tools and menu items related to those features
are dimmed.
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A document can have an open password and an owner password. If the
document has both types of passwords, it can be opened with either one, but
you can set or change the restricted features only with the owner password.
Note: If you forget a password, there is no way to recover it from the document.
It’s a good idea to store passwords in another secure location in case you
forget them.
Acrobat uses the RC4 method of security from RSA Corporation to secure
PDF documents.
To set security for a document:
1 Choose File > Save As.
2 Choose the Standard security method.
3 In the Security dialog box, enter a password in one or both of the password
fields:
Users can enter the first password, the open password, to open the
document. Any restricted features in the document are disabled, and the user
cannot set or change the security options.
■
Users can enter the second password, the owner password, to open the
document with the ability to set or change security options.
■
Important: Do not use the same password for both fields. The owner password
should be only for you or for other users who are allowed to modify the
security options.
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4 Select options to prevent users from printing, changing the document,
selecting text and graphics, or adding or changing annotations and form fields:
Changing The Document prohibits users from filling in form fields, as well as
making any other changes.
■
Adding Or Changing Annotations And Form Fields prohibits users from
changing form fields but allows them to fill in the fields.
■
5 Click OK.
6 If you entered passwords, retype the passwords in the Confirmation dialog
box, and click OK.
7 Click Save.
To set security for a collection of documents:
1 Choose File > Batch Process.
2 In the Select Folder To Process dialog box, select the folder of documents to
process in the browser list. (On Mac OS, select the folder but do not click the
Select button until you’re finished setting the options.)
3 Select Process All Subfolders if you also want the settings to apply to
documents in subfolders of the folder.
4 If you’re changing security settings for documents that already have
passwords, select Passwords, and click the Passwords button. In the Passwords
dialog box, enter one or both of the existing passwords, and click OK.
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You must enter the old open password to be able to change the open
password for documents. You must enter the owner password to be able to
change the owner password or the Do Not Allow settings.
5 Select Security, and click the Security button.
6 In the Security dialog box, set options for the current document, as
described in the preceding procedure, and click OK. All documents in the folder
will have the same security settings.
7 Click OK (Windows) or Select (Mac OS) in the Select Folder To Process
dialog box.
To stop the batch optimization process:
Click Stop in the Batch Processor Progress dialog box. The process stops after
the document currently being processed has been completed (which may take
some time).
Organizing PDF document collections
In many cases, you may want to distribute material in a collection of PDF
documents rather than in a single document. It often helps your users if you
include a Welcome page in your collection and if you give your users access to
Acrobat Reader in case they do not have Acrobat on their system.
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If your document collection will be distributed on a CD, Adobe recommends
indexing the collection using Acrobat Catalog so that users can search the
documents quickly. See Defining and building indexes for information on
building an index. An index created by Catalog is not searchable over the Web
or a company intranet, but your documents can be indexed
by a Web search engine that supports indexing PDF documents. See the
Adobe Web site (www.adobe.com) for a list of search engines that support
PDF indexing.
Adding a Welcome page
When a user first visits a Web site or opens a CD, it can be difficult to know
where to begin or to determine what’s in the document collection. To point
your users in the right direction, consider including a Welcome page. Such a
page typically gives an overview of the documents and provides links to
specific places in them.
If you’re setting up a Web site, you may want to use an HTML page as the
Welcome page and put links to the PDF documents in the HTML code. See
Linking to PDF documents from HTML for details.
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Including Acrobat Reader
You should provide access to Acrobat Reader for users who do not have
Acrobat on their system.
If you’re distributing documents on the Web, you’ll probably want to point
users to the Adobe Web site (www.adobe.com) for the downloadable
Reader software.
■
If you’re distributing documents on a CD, include the Acrobat Reader
installer on the CD, and put a Readme file at the top level that describes how to
install Reader and provides any last-minute information. You can find the
Acrobat Reader installer for your platform on the Acrobat CD in your Acrobat
package, and Acrobat Reader for all platforms on the Adobe Web site
(www.adobe.com).
■
You may make and distribute unlimited copies of Acrobat Reader, including
copies for commercial distribution, as long as each copy you make and
distribute includes all of the following:
■
The Acrobat Reader installer, exactly as provided by Adobe.
■
The Acrobat Reader Electronic End User License Agreement.
■
Copyright and other proprietary notices included in Acrobat Reader.
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The following attribution statement on any media and packaging that
includes Reader:
■
“Acrobat Reader Copyright © 1987–1999 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All
rights reserved. Adobe, the Adobe logo, Acrobat, and the Acrobat logo are
trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated.”
®
The Acrobat Reader Electronic End User License Agreement and proprietary
notices are contained in the Reader installer program. You are expressly
prohibited from modifying or creating your own installer for the Acrobat
Reader software. Details on the terms of use for the Acrobat Reader products
are found in the Acrobat Reader Electronic End User License Agreement
presented during installation of each product.
A special “Includes Adobe Acrobat” logo is available from Adobe for use when
distributing Acrobat Reader. See the Adobe Web site (www.adobe.com)
for details.
Staging and testing document collections
When you have collected all the PDF documents and the Acrobat Reader
installer, set up a staging area for the collection on a network file server. Then
test the document links, bookmarks, actions, forms, and indexes on the server
to make sure everything works the way you planned.
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It’s a good idea to keep a copy of the original documents in another location.
Backup copies can save you from having to recreate documents if they are
accidentally deleted or corrupted.
Distributing PDF documents on the Web
You can distribute PDF documents on the World Wide Web or on an intranet for
other users to view with a Web browser. Before putting documents on the Web,
you should optimize them to minimize file size and to facilitate page-at-a-time
downloading. You may also want to link to the documents from an HTML page
or embed the documents in HTML.
When you view PDF documents on the Web, several aspects of their display
depend on which browser is used and whether the Web server can deliver PDF
documents one page at a time. See Chapter 5, Converting Web Pages to PDF
(Windows) and Configuring Web browsers for viewing PDF for more information.
For general information on distributing PDF documents, see also
Preparing documents for electronic distribution and Organizing PDF
document collections.
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Optimizing PDF documents for the Web
In most cases, optimizing PDF documents reduces their file size significantly.
When you optimize a document, Acrobat removes any repeated images in it
and replaces them with pointers to the first occurrences of those images.
Nonoptimized files repeat the same source art. Optimized files use pointers to repeated elements.
Optimizing also restructures a PDF document to prepare for page-at-a-time
downloading (byte-serving) from Web servers. With page-at-a-time
downloading, the Web server sends only the requested page of informationto
the user, rather than the entire PDF document. This is especially important with
large documents, which can take a long time to download from a server.
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To find out if a PDF document has been optimized:
Choose File > Document Info > General, and look at the Optimized option.
To optimize a document:
Choose File > Save As, select Optimize, and click Save.
To optimize a collection of documents:
1 Choose File > Batch Process.
2 Select the folder of documents to process in the browser list. (On Mac OS,
select the folder but do not click the Select button until you’re finished setting
the options.)
3 Select Process All Subfolders if you also want to optimize documents in
subfolders of the folder.
4 Select Optimize.
5 Click OK (Windows) or Select (Mac OS).
Note: PDF documents that are already optimized, that are read-only, that
require an open password, or that are stored in a location for which you do not
have write access are not optimized (unless you are creating or deleting
thumbnails in optimized files). The Optimize.log file, located in the folder that
contains the optimized documents, lists any documents that were not
optimized in the process.
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To stop the batch optimization process:
Click Stop in the Batch Processor Progress dialog box. The process stops after
the document currently being optimized has been completed (which may
take some time). Any documents processed before you click Stop are
already optimized.
Linking to PDF documents from HTML
You can link to a PDF document from an HTML document with the HTML
<HREF> tag. When a Web user clicks the link on the HTML page, the PDF
document opens. The document can fill an entire browser window or launch
an Acrobat viewer as a helper application (it depends on how users have
configured their Web browsers).
The following example uses <HREF> to link to a PDF document:
<a href=http://www.adobe.com/prodlist.pdf>
You can also specify actions to be performed on the PDF document once it is
opened. For example, you might want to open the document to a particular
page or destination or set it to open with bookmarks displayed. To include one
of these action commands with your <HREF> link, type a number sign (#) and
then the command immediately after the PDF filename.
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The following table shows the possible action commands. Replace variables (in
italics) with the specific instructions for your PDF document. The variables in
square brackets ([ ]) are optional.
Description
Command
Comments
Go to a page
page=page_number
The page number must be an integer. A PDF file’s first page has a page
number of 1.
Go to a destination
nameddest=destination_string
Zoom or scroll
a page
zoom=scale[, left, top]
All values must be integers or in
floating-point notation. A scale of
100 gives 100% zoom. Scroll values
for left and top are user coordinates
(0,0 is the top left of a visible page,
regardless of page rotation).
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Description
Command
Comments
Set the view of
a page
view=Fit
view=FitH[, top]
view=FitV[, left]
view=FitB
view=FitBH[, top]
view=FitBV[, left]
Fit, FitH, and so on are keywords
defined in the Portable Document
Format Reference Manual
(www.adobe.com). Scroll values for
left and top must be integers or in
floating-point notation. These values are user coordinates (0,0 is the
top left of a visible page, regardless
of page rotation).
Set the location and viewrect=left, top, width,
height
size of the view
rectangle
All values must be integers or in
floating-point notation. Scroll values for left and top are user coordinates (0,0 is the top left of a visible
page, regardless of page rotation).
Display bookmarks
or thumbnails
pagemode=mode
The possible values are bookmarks,
thumbs, and none.
Display the
scrollbars
scrollbar=boolean_value
The possible values are true
and false.
Display the tool bar toolbar=boolean_value
The possible values are true
and false.
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Note: The action commands are not case-sensitive (except for the value of a
destination). There can be no spaces in the URL command line, and each
command cannot be more than 32 characters in length. If you supply a
floating-point value, only one digit following a decimal is used.
These are examples of valid action commands for PDF documents linked
from HTML:
<a href=http://www.adobe.com/prodlist.pdf#page=3>
<a href=http://www.adobe.com/prodlist.pdf#namedest=DigitalImaging>
<a href=http://www.adobe.com/prodlist.pdf#zoom=200,250,100
You can put multiple action commands in a single URL command line if you
separate the commands with an ampersand (&). Each command can be up to
32 characters in length. Be careful not to introduce any spaces in the line.
For example,
<a href=http://www.adobe.com/
prodlist.pdf#page=72&view=FitH,100>
<a href=http://www.adobe.com/
prodlist.pdf#pagemode=bookmarks&page=3>
The actions are executed from left to right as they appear in the command line.
It is possible that later actions will override the effects of previous actions, so be
sure to order the actions appropriately. For example, page actions should
appear before zoom actions.
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See an HTML guide for more information on the <HREF> tag.
Embedding PDF documents in HTML using the <EMBED> tag
You can embed a PDF document in an HTML document with the HTML
<EMBED> tag. Embedding displays an image of a page from the PDF
document in the HTML document. The <EMBED> tag is understood by
browsers compatible with Netscape Navigator 3.0 or later and Internet Explorer
3.0 or later.
Netscape Navigator Readers who use a browser compatible with Netscape
Navigator 3.0 or later will be able to see only the first page of an embedded
PDF document and will not be able to navigate to other pages. If the <EMBED>
tag is combined with an <HREF> tag, the embedded PDF may be used as a link,
as in the following example:
<embed src=http://www.adobe.com/cgi-bin/byteserver/
ordrform.pdf
width=25% height=200
href=http://www.adobe.com/index.html>
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In this case, the embedded PDF is actually a link to a nonembedded PDF
document. Once the PDF document is opened in a separate window, the links
within the document are accessible.The <HREF> tag can be followed by any
URL, including the URL of another PDF document. The <HREF> URL is the URL
that the browser opens when the user clicks the embedded PDF. The <HREF>
URL needs to be a fully qualified <HREF>. If you specify a relative URL, the link
may not activate.
Internet Explorer Readers who use a browser compatible with Internet
Explorer 3.0 or later can interact with the embedded PDF document. For
example, they can follow links in the document.
Note: If an embedded PDF document is displayed in an Internet Explorercompatible browser window, the Acrobat tool bar, command bar, and window
controls display by default; you can hide these items by changing settings in
the Open Info dialog box for the PDF document (File > Document Info > Open).
If an embedded PDF document is displayed in a Netscape Navigatorcompatible browser window, the Acrobat tool bar, command bar, and window
controls do not display.
See an HTML guide for more information on the <EMBED> tag.
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Embedding PDF documents in HTML using the <OBJECT> tag
If your audience uses an Internet Explorer-compatible browser that supports
ActiveX controls, you can embed PDF documents using <OBJECT> tags instead
of <EMBED> tags. The <OBJECT> tag is understood only by browsers
compatible with Internet Explorer 3.0 or later.
The <OBJECT> tag has the same effect as the <EMBED> tag, but it also does
the following:
The <OBJECT> tag allows you to use VB Script or JavaScript to access the
Print and AboutBox methods in the ActiveX control, so you can create a Print
button that will print the PDF document from the HTML document. If you use
the standard Print command in your browser, the HTML document prints with
the image of the first page of the PDF document. (If the Acrobat tool bar is
visible, users can use the Print button to print the PDF document.)
■
You can use the <OBJECT> tag to specify automatic downloading and
installing of Acrobat Reader if a user does not already have it installed.
■
The following example uses <OBJECT> to embed a PDF document in an HTML
document:
<OBJECT CLASSID="clsid:CA8A9780-280D-11CF-A24D-444553540000"
WIDTH=423 HEIGHT=333
ID=Pdf1>
<PARAM NAME="SRC"
VALUE="PDFS/map.pdf">
Distributing Documents in PDF
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</OBJECT>
If your audience might not use a browser that supports the <OBJECT> tag, you
should include the <EMBED> tag and appropriate information (or the
<NOEMBED> tag to display a GIF image) within the <OBJECT> tag.
For example:
<OBJECT CLASSID="clsid:CA8A9780-280D-11CF-A24D-444553540000"
WIDTH=423 HEIGHT=333
ID=Pdf1>
<PARAM NAME="SRC" VALUE="skagit.pdf">
<EMBED SRC="skagit.pdf" HEIGHT=423 WIDTH=333>
<NOEMBED>
<img src="images/tour083.gif" alt="Skagit River" width=179
height=134>
</NOEMBED>
</OBJECT>
See an HTML guide or an ActiveX control guide for more information on the
<OBJECT> tag. See also the Adobe Web site (www.adobe.com) for more
examples and the latest ActiveX information.
Scaling embedded PDF documents
You may need to scale an embedded PDF document to make it fit the design of
your Web page.
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Netscape Navigator If your Web pages will be viewed primarily by users of
browsers compatible with Netscape Navigator 3.0 or later, you can scale a PDF
document embedded in an HTML document. An embedded PDF document
displays at actual size unless you scale it. The following example scales a
document 50% in a Netscape Navigator-compatible browser:
<EMBED SRC=http://www.adobe.com/prodlist.pdf
WIDTH=50% HEIGHT=50%>
You can specify the width and height of the document as a percentage, as in
the example, or in points. To determine the actual width and height in points,
open the PDF document in Acrobat. The width and height are displayed in the
page-size box in the status bar. (If necessary, choose File > Preferences >
General and select points as the unit of measure for pages.) Enter that information, or a percentage of those values, as the width and height values.
Internet Explorer Browsers compatible with Internet Explorer 3.0 or later use
the information included in a PDF document’s Document Info settings to
determine the view of an embedded document. They ignore any scaling information in an <EMBED> tag.
Note: If you need an embedded PDF document to display similarly in browsers
compatible with either Netscape Navigator or Internet Explorer, do not scale
the document with the <HEIGHT> and <WIDTH> tags or with the Document
Info settings. Instead, crop the PDF document to fit without scaling.
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Distributing PDF documents on a CD
If you’re distributing PDF documents on a CD, you’ll probably want to follow
some naming and format conventions to ensure platform compatibility and
create an index for the documents to enable quick searching in them. You
should also test the documents on a sample CD.
Note: If any contributors to your files have copyrights for their material, you
must obtain permission to place their files on a CD.
For general information on distributing PDF documents, see
Preparing documents for electronic distribution and Organizing PDF
document collections.
Preparing for cross-platform distribution
When producing a CD for more than one platform, you need to decide whether
to put each version on a different disc or to put all versions on the same disc.
Putting all versions on one disc reduces the costs of disc-mastering, replication,
and other production tasks.
If you’re putting all versions on one CD, follow these guidelines to ensure
platform compatibility:
Use the hybrid CD format. The hybrid format is accessible to DOS, Windows,
Mac OS, and UNIX users, so it makes an ideal medium for cross-platform
document collections.
■
Distributing Documents in PDF
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Use ISO 9660 filenames. An ISO 9660 filename can contain one to eight
characters (with no spaces), optionally followed by an extension (a period and
from one to three characters). Only uppercase roman letters, the underscore
(_), and digits (0–9) can be used in ISO 9660 folder names and filenames. Folder
names must be no more than eight characters, have no extension, and can be
no more than eight levels deep. If you’re using a Macintosh as the host system,
make sure that your filenames and folder names don’t have a leading space.
■
Indexing document collections
Adobe recommends using Acrobat Catalog to index document collections
distributed on a CD. Indexing builds a searchable database of all text in the
documents in alphabetical order. Users who have Acrobat on their system can
use the Search command to quickly find specific text in the index.
See Defining and building indexes for details on building
an index.
Testing CDs
Once you have organized the PDF documents and the Acrobat Reader installer
in a staging area, create and test a sample CD. Follow these guidelines:
Defragment the disc drive that contains the staging area before building the
master CD.
■
Distributing Documents in PDF
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If you’re preparing a hybrid CD for Mac OS and either Windows or UNIX or
both, build the CD on a Macintosh. If you create the disc on another system, a
Mac OS file system may not recognize the Macintosh installer on it.
■
For Mac OS partitions or hybrid disks, make sure the boot block is removed
from the HFS disk image.
■
Check for viruses before creating the CD, or have the service bureau check
for viruses.
■
For Mac OS users, make sure the folders open in the upper left corner of the
screen to accommodate the many monitor sizes available.
■
For Mac OS partitions or hybrid disks, empty the trash. If you leave
documents in the trash file for your CD image, the trash may appear full when a
user mounts the CD on the desktop. The latest versions of CD mastering
software handle the trash properly. Check with your service bureau or the
mastering software’s user guide for details.
■
■ Make sure the icon for your disk matches what you want the users to see
when they mount the CD.
Perform your tests on the CD, not on the disk image, to ensure that you’re
seeing exactly what the users will see.
■
Working with Digital Signatures (Windows)
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Working with Digital Signatures
(Windows)
You can add a digital signature to a document in Acrobat to attest to
something about the document in its current state. For example, you might
sign a document to show that you have read it or approved it, or to certify that
it is ready for others to review. You can also see all the signatures that have
been added to a document, check the validity of signatures, and go back to an
earlier signed version of a document.
To work with digital signatures in a document, you use a signature handler
plug-in with Acrobat. You add, validate, and manage your signatures using
commands and tools in the Acrobat interface, but the signature handler determines the nature of the signatures—their appearance on the page, the exact
information stored in them, and the attributes and method used for their
validation. You can use a variety of signature handlers with Acrobat, providing
both mathematical and biometric validation schemes. The flexibility of this
structure allows you to use whichever signing method your company or
regulations require, with Acrobat providing a consistent and convenient
front end.
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Acrobat comes with the signature handlers Acrobat Self Sign for basic signing
purposes and Acrobat Entrust Security for use with the public-key infrastructure from Entrust Technologies Limited. Self Sign is included in the default
Acrobat installation, and Acrobat Entrust Security is in the Entrust folder on the
Acrobat CD-ROM for custom installation. You can also obtain compatible
handlers from third-party vendors. See the Security folder on the Acrobat CDROM or the Adobe Web site (www.adobe.com) for current information on
signature handlers.
About digital signatures
A digital signature, like any other signature, identifies a person or entity signing
a document. Digital signatures in Acrobat offer significant advantages over
traditional signatures on paper. Each digital signature stores information
behind the scenes about the person signing and about the exact state of the
document when it was signed. When you view a signed document in Acrobat,
you can validate its signature to confirm the identity of the signer and to verify
that the document has not been altered since it was signed.
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In Acrobat, a signature can appear on a page in many different forms—a
handwritten name, a logo or other graphic, or some text explaining the
purpose of the signing. (Note that the appearance of a signature is just its
representation on the page and is not the actual signature information.) The
particular appearance of the signature is determined by the signature handler.
Some handlers also allow a signature to be invisible.
A
B
C
A. Text signature B. Graphic signature
C. Handwritten name signature
A document in Acrobat can be signed more than once and by more than one
person. Each signature is associated with a version of the document that represents the state of the document when that person signed it. The first time a
document is signed, it is saved in an append-only form of PDF that can be
appended but not altered. Every time the document is signed after that, the
new signature and any changes made since the preceding version are
Working with Digital Signatures (Windows)
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appended to the file. When you view a document with more than one
signature, you’re viewing the most recent version, but you can open an
earlier version in a separate file and compare two versions to see changes
between them.
Tracking signatures in the palette
The Signatures palette lists all the signatures in the current document, in the
order they were added. You can collapse a signature to see only a name, date,
and time, or expand it to see more information.
To show the Signatures palette:
Choose Window > Show Signatures, or choose Show Signatures from the
security key pop-up menu
in the status bar. The security key menu is
available only when a document has signatures or other security properties.
Working with Digital Signatures (Windows)
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To expand or collapse a signature in the palette:
Click the plus sign to the left of the signature to expand it, or click the minus
sign to the left of the signature to collapse it.
Expanded signature
Each signature in the palette has an icon identifying its current validation
status. For an explanation of these icons, see Validating signatures.
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If you edit a signed document, a line with an alert triangle
appears in the
palette indicating that the document has been altered. If you sign the
document later, the triangle is incorporated into your signature’s validation
icon
to show that you signed an altered version. To see an explanation of
the edit, expand the signature in the palette.
You can move the Signatures palette to a floating window, keep it in a group of
palettes, and work with it in the same ways that you use other Acrobat palettes.
See Using palettes for general information on palettes.
Signing documents
Acrobat provides several ways to sign a document, both visibly and invisibly.
You start the process in Acrobat, and then your signature handler takes over
and prompts for information on the signature.
Before you begin, you must have a signature handler installed as an Acrobat
plug-in. The Acrobat Self Sign handler is included in the default Acrobat installation. You can also install the Entrust Security handler from the Acrobat CD for
use with the Entrust public-key infrastructure, or you can install a third-party
signature handler.
Note: The first time a document is signed, Acrobat saves it as append-only in a
new PDF file. Each time the document is signed after that, the new version is
saved and appended to the file. You can name the PDF file and set its security
Working with Digital Signatures (Windows)
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and permissions only the first time you sign it. You cannot use the Save As
command on a signed document without making all of its signatures invalid.
About signature fields
When you sign a document, your signature and the related information are
stored in a signature field embedded on a page. A signature field is a type of
Acrobat form field.
You can add a signature field to a page as you sign, or you can use the form tool
to create an empty signature field that can be signed later. When you create
a field with the form tool, you can have Acrobat execute a script or lock all fields
in the document when it is signed. You can also customize the field in several
other ways. For information on creating empty signature fields with the form
tool, see Creating signature fields (Windows).
Working with Digital Signatures (Windows)
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Adding signatures
Your document may have a signature field already set up, perhaps as part of a
larger form; in this case, you enter your signature in the field to sign the
document. If the document does not already have a signature field, you can
add a field wherever you want it and sign at the same time.
A
B
A. Sign a field in a form. B. Put a signature where you want it.
Note: If you’re signing an existing field, be aware that the document author
may have put duplicates of the field on other document pages. For example,
sometimes a field is copied to the same place on every page. You need to
sign the field only once, and your signature will appear in all occurrences of
the field. This is sometimes done to allow quick initialing of every page in
a document.
You can also sign a document invisibly, if your signature handler allows it. The
signature will not appear on a page but will appear in the Signatures palette
along with other signatures in the document.
Working with Digital Signatures (Windows)
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To add a signature:
1 Do one of the following:
■ To fill in an existing signature field, click the unsigned field in the document
pane. Or select the unsigned field in the Signatures palette, and choose Sign
Signature Field from the palette menu. Or right-click the field in the palette or
document, and choose Sign Signature Field from the context menu.
■ To add a new signature field and sign at the same time, select the signature
tool
, and drag to draw the field.
■
To sign the document invisibly, choose File > Sign and Save.
2 Follow the instructions for your signature handler. You may be prompted to
log in to the handler. The handler might also ask for information about the
signature, such as a signature appearance and a reason for signing.
If you’re using Acrobat Self Sign as the handler, see Signing and validating with
Acrobat Self Sign for details. If you’re using Acrobat Entrust Security, choose
Help > Entrust Security to open a document with instructions.
3 If this is the first signature added to the document, the Save As dialog box
appears. Enter a filename, specify a location for the file, and click Save.
Note: Except in Windows Explorer, you will not have another opportunity to
use Save As on the document (because Save As invalidates existing signatures),
so you may want to use a name that is not based on a date or a particular
version. You can rename a signed document in Windows Explorer.
Working with Digital Signatures (Windows)
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The new signature appears as the last item in the Signatures palette, with an
icon
signifying that it is valid.
Changing or removing signatures
You can change or remove a signature, but like other edits you make to a
signed document, this adds another version to the document without altering
earlier versions. Another user can roll back to an earlier version to see the
original signature.
To change a signature:
1 Double-click the signature in the document pane, select the signature in the
Signatures palette, and choose Sign Signature Field from the palette menu. Or
right-click the signature in the palette or document, and choose Sign Signature
Field from the context menu.
2 Click Yes to confirm that you want to re-sign.
3 Follow the instructions for your signature handler.
The new signature appears at the last position in the Signatures palette, with
an icon
signifying that it is valid and that it incorporates a change to the
document.
Note: The old signature is removed from the palette, so you will not be able to
roll back to its version of the document.
Working with Digital Signatures (Windows)
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To remove a signature:
Select the signature in the Signatures palette, and choose Delete Signature
Field from the palette menu. Or right-click the signature in the palette or
document pane, and choose Delete Signature Field from the context menu.
The signature is removed, and the Signatures palette notes that the document
was altered after the last signing.
Validating signatures
You can validate a digital signature to verify that the document version the
person signed has not been altered and to confirm the identity of the signer.
Your signature handler uses the following methods to ensure the integrity
of signatures.
Document content When you add a signature to a document, the signature
handler calculates a checksum that is based on the content of the document at
that time and embeds the checksum in the signature. When you validate, the
handler recalculates the checksum for that signed version of the document
and compares it with the value in the signature. If the signed version has
changed in any way, the signature handler detects the change and marks the
signature as invalid.
Working with Digital Signatures (Windows)
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Because a signed document version is saved as append-only within a PDF file,
you normally cannot edit the content of the version. A version’s checksum
changes, however, if you apply the Save As command to the file, if you edit the
file in a text editor and resave it, or if you try to move the signature to another
document. (Save As changes the checksum because it causes a completely
new save, which reorders and renumbers objects in the file.)
Identity of the signer When you add a signature to a document, the signature
handler typically embeds information that uniquely identifies you as the signer.
This may be a mathematical representation, such as a “public key” value, or
biometric data, such as a fingerprint or handwritten signature. When you
validate a signature, your signature handler compares the signature in the
document with this background information.
Some signature handlers also confirm the identity of a signer by comparing the
signature with information stored outside the PDF file. For example, with the
Acrobat Self Sign handler you can build a mini-database called an address book
that stores information on signers you have chosen to trust. When you validate
signatures with Self Sign, the signatures are checked against credentials in the
address book. Other handlers may use an online mechanism to authenticate a
signature with a third-party authority.
Working with Digital Signatures (Windows)
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To validate one signature:
Right-click the signature in the Signatures palette or document pane, and
choose Validate Signature from the context menu.
To validate all signatures in a document:
Choose Validate All Signatures from the Signatures palette menu.
If the signature handler determines that a signature’s document version is
unaltered and that the signature is consistent with internal information about
the signer, the signature is partially valid. If the signature is also consistent with
external information about the signer, the signature is fully valid.
Note: You might think of this as analogous to how a credit card is checked in a
store. If your signature on a bill matches the signature on the back of the card,
the signature is partially valid. If the card is also checked online to be sure it has
not been revoked, the signature is fully valid.
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You can view a signature’s validation status on the document page and in the
Signatures palette. The following table shows how the Acrobat Self Sign and
Entrust Security handlers display this information. Other signature handlers
may display it differently.
Validation status
Icon on document page
Icon in palette
Unsigned
Signature tool
Signature tool
Signed but not validated
Question mark
Question mark
Partially valid
Signature handler logo
Check mark
Fully valid
Signature handler logo
Check mark and shield
Invalid
X over signature
To get detailed validation information on a signature:
Right-click the signature in the Signatures palette or document pane, and
choose Properties from the context menu.
Working with Digital Signatures (Windows)
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Viewing earlier versions of a signed document
If a document is signed more than once, Acrobat maintains all of the signed
versions in a single PDF file. Each time the document is signed, that version is
saved as append-only to ensure that it will not be altered, and it is then
appended to the existing file. When you view a signed document, you’re
normally viewing the most recent version of it, but the other versions are still
available for review.
Name
Today’s Date
Manager’s Name
Department
Check all that apply:
JUGGLER
Name
Conference Expense
Relocation Expense
A
Expense Report
Submit
Unused tickets attached?
Today’s Date
Recruiting Expense
Expense Report
Reset
No
Yes
Transportation
Date
Manager’s Name
Description
Airfare
Fares
Department
Personal Auto
(Taxi, Bus, Ferry,
Parking, & Tolls)
Check all that apply:
Rental Auto
Conference Expense
Submit
Unused tickets attached?
Today’s Date
Relocation Expense
JUGGLER
Total
(enter Miles only)
Miles
Expense
Name
Recruiting Expense
Expense Report
Reset
No
Yes
Transportation
Manager’s Name
Description
Date
Total
Airfare
Department
Personal Auto
Fares
(Taxi, Bus, Ferry,
Parking, & Tolls)
Rental Auto
Total
Accommodations and Meals
Date
Check all that apply:
Lodging
Conference Expense
Description
JUGGLER
(enter Miles only)
Miles
Expense
Submit
Unused tickets attached?
Total
No
Yes
Meals
Conference &
Telephone
(by yourself)
Meeting Fees Recruiting Expense
& Fax
Relocation Expense
Reset
Transportation
Date
Total
Description
Airfare
Fares
Personal Auto
(Taxi, Bus, Ferry,
Parking, & Tolls)
Rental Auto
Total
(enter Miles only)
Miles
Expense
Accommodations and Meals
Total
Date
Date
Digitally signed by Jane Fischer
cn=Jane Fischer, o=Adobe Systems, c=US
Date: 1999.01.25 16:12:40 -08’00’
Reason: This document is ready for approval
San Jose, CA
Digitally signed by Doug Pearson
cn=Doug Pearson, o=Adobe Systems, c=US
Date: 1999.01.25 16:32:40 -08’00’
Reason: This document is ready for approval
San Jose, CA
Total
Lodging
Manager’s Signature
Telephone
& Fax
Total
Date
Total
Date
Lodging
Description
Meals
Conference &
Meeting Fees
(by yourself)
Traveler’s Signature
Traveler’s Signature
Conference &
Meeting Fees
Accommodations and Meals
Total
Digitally signed by John Smith
cn=John Smith, o=Adobe Systems, c=US
Date: 1999.01.25 15:49:17 -08’00’
Reason: This document is ready for approval
San Jose, CA
Date
Manager’s Signature
Telephone
& Fax
Total
Date
Digitally signed by Jane Fischer
cn=Jane Fischer, o=Adobe Systems, c=US
Date: 1999.01.25 16:12:40 -08’00’
Reason: This document is ready for approval
San Jose, CA
Total
Traveler’s Signature
Digitally signed by John Smith
cn=John Smith, o=Adobe Systems, c=US
Date: 1999.01.25 15:49:17 -08’00’
Reason: This document is ready for approval
San Jose, CA
Meals
(by yourself)
Traveler’s Signature
Digitally signed by John Smith
cn=John Smith, o=Adobe Systems, c=US
Date: 1999.01.25 15:49:17 -08’00’
Reason: This document is ready for approval
San Jose, CA
Description
Digitally signed by Jane Fischer
cn=Jane Fischer, o=Adobe Systems, c=US
Date: 1999.01.25 16:12:40 -08’00’
Reason: This document is ready for approval
San Jose, CA
Date
Manager’s Signature
Date
Digitally signed by John Smith
cn=John Smith, o=Adobe Systems, c=US
Date: 1999.01.25 15:49:17 -08’00’
Reason: This document is ready for approval
San Jose, CA
B
Digitally signed by Doug Pearson
cn=Doug Pearson, o=Adobe Systems, c=US
Date: 1999.01.25 16:32:40 -08’00’
Reason: This document is ready for approval
San Jose, CA
A. You see the most recent version. B. Two earlier versions are in the file but not visible.
Working with Digital Signatures (Windows)
Page 503
It’s possible to make any change to a signed document, so the versions of a
document stored in a PDF file may differ. If a signature incorporates changes
made since the signature immediately before it, the palette icon
for the
signature reflecting changes has a triangle, showing that its version includes
alterations. With some signature handlers, you can also right-click the
signature, and choose Properties from the context menu to find out what
version a signature applies to.
The most accurate way to see exactly what someone signed is to roll back to
the version for that signature. Acrobat opens the earlier version in a new
temporary PDF file. (You can use Save As to name and save the file.) Any
changes you make to this file are appended to it, so even by rolling back you
cannot alter a version that has been signed.
Once you have two versions of a document open, you can also have Acrobat
identify differences between them using the Compare Pages command. For
information on this feature, see Comparing pages in two PDF documents
(Windows).
To open an earlier signed version:
Select the signature in the Signatures palette, and choose Rollback To
Signature from the palette menu. Or right-click the signature in the palette or
document pane, and choose Rollback to Signature from the context menu.
The earlier version opens in a new PDF file, with the version number, name of
the signer, and date and time of the signing in the title bar.
Working with Digital Signatures (Windows)
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Setting preferences for digital signatures
The preferences for digital signatures define a default signature handler and
display the signature tool in the tool bar.
To set preferences for digital signatures:
1 Choose File > Preferences > Digital Signatures.
2 Choose a default signature handler. The pop-up menu lists all handlers
installed in your Acrobat Plug-ins folder. If you do not choose a handler, you
can specify one when you add a signature.
3 To include the signature tool
in the Acrobat tool bar, select Enable
Signature Toolbar Button. You must restart Acrobat for this option to
take effect.
4 Click OK.
About Acrobat Self Sign
The default Acrobat installation includes the Acrobat Self Sign signature
handler. Acrobat Self Sign provides a quick and easy method of signing
documents and uses a private/public key (PPK) system to verify the authenticity of signatures and the integrity of signed document versions.
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To use Acrobat Self Sign, you first set up a profile with a password, your name
and other information to store in signatures, any graphic signature appearances you want, and several other options. Whenever you need to sign
documents, you log in to your profile and provide the password.
Acrobat Self Sign gives each profile unique security data that can be used to
validate signatures made with that profile. Your profile stores a numerical value
called a private key that represents you as a signer; you need access to this key
to be able to sign a document. The profile also stores a public key that is
embedded in all signatures you add to a document; when the document is
validated, Self Sign uses the public key to mathematically verify your signatures. (More specifically, a private key encrypts a checksum that is stored with
a signature when you sign, and a public key decrypts the checksum when
you validate.)
A public key is contained in a certificate that can be distributed to other users,
to store in the address book of their profile. This gives other users a more
thorough way to check the authenticity of your signatures in documents they
receive. You can also store other certificates in your profile so you can verify
signatures from those users.
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The system of sharing certificates in Acrobat Self Sign is referred to as directtrust, which means that you share directly with other users rather than going
through a third-party agent.
Note: Acrobat Self Sign does not include a public-key infrastructure with thirdparty certification, and it is not intended to serve all signing purposes. You can
obtain other handlers and use them as plug-ins with Acrobat if you need more
advanced features. See the Security folder on the Acrobat CD or the Adobe Web
site (www.adobe.com) for information on available signature handlers.
Acrobat Self Sign uses the RSA algorithm for generating key pairs and the X.509
standard for certificates.
Setting up profiles in Acrobat Self Sign
Before you can sign documents with Acrobat Self Sign, you need to set up your
profile. The profile is a combination of user information and security data.
Creating profiles
You define a user name and other basic attributes for your profile, and Acrobat
Self Sign generates a password-protected file for PPK information in it. You may
want to create more than one profile if you sign documents in different roles.
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The profile file stores the private key (encrypted), the public key wrapped in a
certificate, your address book of other users’ certificates, and a time-out value
representing when a password is required for signing. The name of the file is
the profile name you provide, plus the extension .apf.
Important: Make a backup copy of your profile file, store it in a secure place,
and commit your password to memory. If your profile file is lost or corrupted, or
if you forget your password, you will never again be able to add or validate
signatures with that profile. Acrobat Self Sign does not perform any backups of
its own.
To create a profile:
1 Choose Tools > Self Sign Signatures > Log In. Or begin adding a signature
using any of the methods described in Adding signatures. Choose Acrobat Self
Sign if you are asked for a signature handler.
2 Click New Profile.
3 Enter a name and other user attributes. When you add a signature to a
document, you’ll see the profile name in the Signatures palette. Any of these
attributes may appear in the signature itself, if the signature’s appearance is
defined to include them.
4 Enter the pathname for a folder in which to store the profile file. Or click
Browse, and use the browser to locate a folder. If you do not specify a folder, the
file is stored in the Acrobat Plug-ins folder.
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5 Enter a password containing at least six characters. You need to enter the
same password in both password text boxes.
6 Click OK.
7 If an alert appears confirming that you are logged in, click OK. Your
preference settings determine whether this alert appears. You can click User
Settings in the alert to change the profile’s password options, to configure
picture appearances, or to add certificates to your address book.
Changing the password options
Your profile is preset to prompt for a password every time you sign a
document. You can change it to prompt only after a certain period of time has
elapsed or to never prompt for a password. You can also change the profile’s
password.
To change the password options:
1 Choose Tools > Self Sign Signatures > User Settings. Or if you’re not logged
in, choose Tools > Self Sign Signatures > Log In to log in, and then click User
Settings in the alert.
2 Click the Password tab.
3 To change when a password should be required, choose from the pop-up
menu, enter your password in the text box, and click Apply Change. Then click
OK in the alert that appears. The periods of time in the menu give the amount
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of time that has passed since you last entered a password while logged in to
Acrobat Self Sign in the current session.
4 To change your password, click Change Password, enter the old password,
enter the new password in the New and Confirm text boxes, and click OK. Then
click OK in the alert that appears.
5 Click Close.
Configuring pictures for signatures
A signature can appear as a picture on a document page. For example, you
might want a company logo to appear on the page or an image of your
handwritten signature.
Note: A picture affects only the part of a signature you see on the document
page. Even if the picture is a handwritten signature, a fingerprint, or other
biometric representation, it has no effect on the verification of the signature.
A signature’s appearance is included in the document’s checksum, so if you
change the appearance, the change is considered to be an alteration of
the document.
You can create signature pictures in many different applications and save them
in a PDF file. To configure the pictures for Acrobat Self Sign, you just select
them from the PDF file and give each one a name. The pictures are stored in a
PDF file in the Acrobat Plug-ins folder.
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To configure a picture for signatures:
1 Create or import a picture in an authoring application, place the graphic on
a page by itself, and convert the file to PDF. When you use the picture in a
signature, Acrobat Self Sign copies only the picture out of the page and not the
white space on the rest of the page, and it crops and scales the picture to fit in
the signature field.
Acrobat Self Sign takes just the picture from the page.
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2 Choose Tools > Self Sign Signatures > User Settings. Or if you’re not logged
in, choose Tools > Self Sign Signatures > Log In to log in, and then click User
Settings in the alert.
3 Click the Configure Picture tab.
4 Click New.
5 In the Signature Picture Configuration dialog box, enter a title for
the picture.
Note: When you sign a document later, you’ll select the picture by its title, so
use a short title that describes the image accurately.
6 Click Browse.
7 In the Select Picture dialog box, enter the pathname for the PDF file with the
picture, or click Browse, and use the browser to locate the file.
8 Use the scroll bar to find the picture you want, and click OK.
9 In the Signature Picture Configuration dialog box, select any text items you
want to appear with the picture on document pages:
Distinguished Name shows the user attributes defined in the profile, which
may include common name, organization, and country.
■
Add Labels displays labels such as Signed by, Date, and Reason with any text
in the signature appearance.
■
10 Click OK in Signature Picture Configuration, and click Close in User Settings.
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To edit a configured picture:
Select the picture in the Configure Picture panel of User Settings, and click Edit.
Or double-click the picture in the picture configuration pane. You can change
the title, select a different picture, or change the text items, as described in the
procedure for configuring a new picture.
To remove a picture from the configuration file:
Select the picture in the Configure Picture panel of User Settings, and
click Delete.
Configuring signatures written on a Palm organizer
You can write text on a Palm organizer, store the text as a picture, and then use
the picture as a signature appearance in PDF documents. Most often, the text is
a handwritten signature, but you can also use this feature to create a short
handwritten message or a freehand drawing to appear with digital signatures.
Note: A handwritten signature created on a Palm organizer is only a picture
and has no effect on the verification of the digital signature.
Acrobat provides an application to use for writing text on your Palm organizer.
You can install and use this application on a PalmPilot, PalmPilot Pro, Palm III, or
IBM WorkPad PC Companion, or a later version of any of these organizers.
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To configure a signature written on a Palm organizer:
1 Use the organizer’s installation tool to install the application AcroSign.prc.
Run Instapp.exe in the organizer’s Install folder, use the browser that appears to
locate AcroSign.prc in your Acrobat PalmPilot folder, and choose the name of
your organizer in the pop-up menu. See the documentation that came with
your organizer for more information on installing applications.
2 HotSync the organizer to load the AcroSign application on it.
3 Start the organizer, press the Applications icon, and press the AcroSign icon
in the applications panel.
4 Write your text in the two boxes that appear in the display area of the
organizer. Using the organizer’s stylus, write directly in the boxes rather than in
the Graffiti area that you normally write in.
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You can begin writing in either box and, if necessary, continue in the other box.
Continue writing from one box to the other until you have added all the text
you need. In the signature appearance, the segments of text from the boxes
will be pieced together left to right to look like continuous text. A line at the
top of the display shows how your final text will appear.
A
B
A. How the text will appear in a signature. B. Write in one or
both boxes. Leave space to include a word space before text.
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If you want space (such as a word space) in front of a continuing segment of
text, leave the space at the left edge of the segment’s box. Begin writing the
segment at the beginning of the left edge if you do not want any space in
front of it.
Clicking the Clear button deletes the most recently added segment. You can
click Clear repeatedly to delete as many segments as you want, one at a time.
5 Click Done.
6 HotSync the organizer to copy the picture file to your hard drive.
7 In Acrobat, choose Tools > Self Sign Signatures > User Settings. Or if you’re
not logged in, choose Tools > Self Sign Signatures > Log In to log in, and then
click User Settings in the alert.
8 In the User Settings dialog box, click the Configure Picture tab.
9 Click New.
10 In the Signature Picture Configuration dialog box, enter a title for
the picture.
Note: When you sign a document later, you’ll select the picture by its title, so
use a short title that describes the image accurately.
11 Choose the picture file from the Palm Organizer pop-up menu.
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12 Select any text items you want to appear with the picture on document
pages:
Distinguished Name shows the user attributes defined in the profile, which
may include common name, organization, and country.
■
Add Labels displays labels such as Signed by, Date, and Reason with any text
in the signature appearance.
■
13 Click OK in Signature Picture Configuration, and click Close in User Settings.
Building an address book of certificates
In Acrobat Self Sign, each user has a certificate containing information that can
be used to verify his or her digital signature. When a user creates a profile,
Acrobat Self Sign generates this certificate and stores it in the user’s profile. You
can keep a copy of other users’ certificates in an address book in your own
profile so that when you validate documents, Self Sign can check those users’
signatures against their certificates.
You add another user’s certificate to your address book by importing the certificate from an Acrobat key file or from a PDF document signed by another Self
Sign user. Before you can import from a key file, the user must already have
exported their certificate to the file. The format of this key file is specific to
Self Sign; you cannot import from key files that have been exported by other
applications.
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Acrobat Self Sign provides a unique validation string for each certificate to help
you ensure the certificate’s authenticity when you import it.
To import a certificate from a key file:
1 Choose Tools > Self Sign Signatures > User Settings. Or if you’re not logged
in, choose Tools > Self Sign Signatures > Log In to log in, and then click User
Settings in the alert.
2 Click the Personal Address Book tab.
3 Click Import Key File, use the browser to locate the Acrobat key file with the
certificate, and click Open. A key file has the extension.akf.
4 In the Import Validation String dialog box, note the validation string, and
click OK. (You can copy this out of the dialog box.) Then confirm with the certificate’s originator that the string is correct. If the string is incorrect, the certificate should not be trusted.
5 Click Close.
To import a certificate from a signature in a document:
1 Right-click the signature in the Signatures palette or document pane, and
choose Properties from the context menu.
2 If the signature is not valid, click Validate. You can import a certificate only
from a validated signature.
3 Click Import into PAB.
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4 In the Import Validation String dialog box, note the validation string, and
click OK. (You can copy this out of the dialog box.) Then confirm with the certificate’s originator that the string is correct. If the string is incorrect, the certificate should not be trusted.
5 Click Close.
To view the attributes for a certificate:
Select the certificate in the Personal Address Book panel of User Settings, and
click Certificate. You can view the user attributes (such as distinguished name
and common name), the validation string, and the validity period. See Getting
information on certificates for information on these properties.
To remove a certificate from the address book:
Select the certificate in the Personal Address Book panel of User Settings, and
click Delete.
Exporting your certificate for other users
Other users may want to add your certificate to their address books so they can
verify the authenticity of your signature in documents. To give users access to
your certificate, you export a copy of it to an Acrobat key file. Acrobat Self Sign
provides a unique validation string for the certificate to help other users ensure
its authenticity.
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To export your certificate for other users:
1 Choose Tools > Self Sign Signatures > User Settings. Or if you’re not logged
in, choose Tools > Self Sign Signatures > Log In to log in, and then click User
Settings in the alert.
2 Click the Personal Address Book tab.
3 Click Export Key File, use the browser to specify a location for the key file,
and click Save.
4 In the Export Validation String dialog box, make a note of the validation
string, and click OK. (You can copy this out of the dialog box.) When other users
import your certificate, they’ll probably ask you to check this validation string
against the one they receive with the certificate.
5 Click Close.
Getting information on certificates
You can open a dialog box to view user attributes, validation parameters, and
other information on a particular certificate. The dialog box is not editable, but
you can copy text from it.
This is some of the information you can find:
The distinguished name (DN) is the name, organization, and country that the
user provided when he or she created the profile. In Acrobat Self Sign, the user
■
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DN and the certificate issuer DN are the same, because a certificate is always
issued by the user rather than by a third-party authority.
The validation string is an identifier that two users compare when importing
a certificate to make sure the certificate came from the user it represents. The
serial number is a unique number that ensures no two certificates from the
same DN can be identical.
■
The validation period specifies a span of time in which the certificate is valid.
It begins with the date and time the certificate was created.
■
To get information on a certificate:
1 Choose Tools > Self Sign Signatures > User Settings. Or if you’re not logged
in, choose Tools > Self Sign Signatures > Log In to log in, and then click User
Settings in the alert.
2 Do one of the following:
To get information on your own certificate, click the General tab, and click
Show Certificate.
■
To get information on a certificate in your address book, click the Personal
Address Book tab, select the certificate in the list, and click Certificate.
■
3 Click the General and Validity tabs to page through the dialog box, and click
Close when you have finished. You can copy text from this dialog box to paste
into another location.
4 Click Close.
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Signing and validating with Acrobat Self Sign
Once you have an Acrobat Self Sign profile, you’re ready to sign and validate
documents.
Logging in to a profile
You need to log in to a profile to be able to sign documents. You should also log
in if you want Acrobat to check signatures against your address book when you
validate signatures. It is possible to validate without being logged in, but
without access to an address book Acrobat cannot test for full validity.
To log in to a profile:
1 Choose Tools > Self Sign Signature > Log In. If you are already logged in to a
profile, this command changes to Log In As Different User.
2 Choose a profile. Or click Find Profile, and use the browser to find a profile.
The menu lists the five most recently opened or created profiles.
3 Enter the password, and click OK.
4 If an alert appears confirming that you are logged in, click OK. Your
preference settings determine whether this alert appears.
To log out of a profile:
Choose Tools > Self Sign Signature > Log Out.
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Adding signatures to a document
When you add a signature with Acrobat Self Sign, the new signature appears
with an Acrobat logo to show that it is valid. In the Signatures palette, the
signature has the fully valid icon
to show that it is valid and that the identity
of the signer has been verified by your certificate. (Your address book always
contains at least your own certificate.) Adding a signature does not affect the
validation status of existing signatures in the document.
The logo shows that the signature is valid.
For general information on adding signatures in Acrobat, see Signing
documents.
To add a signature to a document:
1 Do one of the following:
To fill in an existing signature field, click the unsigned field in the document
pane, select the unsigned field in the Signatures palette, and choose Sign
Signature Field from the palette menu. Or right-click the field in the palette or
document, and choose Sign Signature Field from the context menu.
■
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To add a new signature field and sign at the same time, select the signature
tool
, and drag to draw the field.
■
■
To sign the document invisibly, choose File > Sign and Save.
2 If you are not already logged in to a profile, do the following:
If the Digital Signature Plug-in dialog box appears, choose Acrobat Self Sign
Signatures as the signature handler, and click OK. Select Save As Default if
you do not want to be prompted for a handler the next time you log in. This
dialog box appears if you do not have a default signature handler set in your
preferences.
■
In the Log In dialog box, choose a profile, or click Find Profile and use the
browser to find a profile. Then enter the password, and click OK. If an alert
appears confirming that you are logged in, click OK in it.
■
Note: If you get a Log In dialog box for a different signature handler, the other
handler is defined to be the default handler. Change your preferences to use
Acrobat Self Sign as the default handler or to have no default handler. See
Setting preferences for digital signatures for details.
3 In the Sign Document dialog box, enter a reason for signing the document.
You can either type a reason or choose one from the pop-up menu. The menu
lists the ten most recently entered reasons.
4 Enter a location for the signature, such as your city, state, or country, or the
hostname of your computer.
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5 Choose a signature appearance:
Text Signature displays the Acrobat logo with the distinguished name
defined in the profile, the date and time of the signing, and the reason
for signing.
■
Other options in the menu are picture appearances configured in the profile.
These may be defined to include text.
■
6 If the dialog box asks for a password, enter the password. Your profile’s user
settings determine how often a password is required.
7 Click Save.
For information on the Show Certificate button in the Sign Document dialog
box, see Getting information on certificates.
Validating signatures
When you validate a signature that was added with Acrobat Self Sign, Acrobat
can confirm the authenticity of the signature in two ways:
■ Acrobat checks to see that the document and the signature have not been
altered since the signing.
If you are logged in to a profile and have the signer’s certificate in the profile’s
address book, Acrobat compares information in the signature against the
certificate to verify the identity of the signer.
■
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If Acrobat determines that the document and signature are unaltered, the
signature is partially valid and appears with a check mark
in the Signatures
palette. If the signature also matches a certificate in your address book, it is fully
valid and appears with a shield and check mark
in the palette.
For general information on how Acrobat validates signatures, see
Validating signatures.
To validate one signature:
Right-click the signature in the palette or document pane, and choose Validate
Signature from the context menu.
To validate all signatures in a document:
Choose Validate All Signatures from the Signatures palette menu.
Getting information on signatures
You can open a dialog box to view an explanation of a signature’s validity
status, the document version the signature applies to, and information such as
date and time of the signing. This dialog box is not editable, but you can copy
text from it and click buttons to work with the signature.
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To get information on a signature:
1 Select the signature in the Signatures palette, and choose Properties from
the palette menu. Or right-click the signature in the palette or document pane,
and choose Properties from the context menu.
2 Do any of the following:
To validate the signature, click Validate. This also updates information in the
dialog box.
■
To view user attributes, validation parameters, and other information on
the signature’s certificate, click Show Certificate. See Getting information on
certificates for details. This button is available only if the signature has
been validated.
■
To import the signature’s certificate into your address book, click Import into
PAB. See Building an address book of certificates for details. This button is
available only if the signature has been validated and you are logged in to
a profile.
■
3 Click Close.
Setting Acrobat Self Sign preferences
You can set several preferences to customize the process of signing
documents.
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To set Acrobat Self Sign preferences:
1 Choose File > Preferences > Self Sign Signatures.
2 Select the options you want:
Create Self Sign Menu moves the Acrobat Self Sign menu from the Tools
menu to the main menu bar. This gives you quicker access to the Self
Sign commands.
■
Show Confirmation Alert opens an alert every time you log in to a profile. The
alerts confirms that you are logged in and gives you access to the profile’s
user settings.
■
Display Stamp for Valid Signatures shows the Acrobat logo behind valid
signatures on document pages.
■
3 Click OK.
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Troubleshooting
This appendix contains solutions to common problems you may encounter
when using Adobe Acrobat.
Additional technical support resources
Adobe Systems provides several forms of automated technical support free
of charge.
See the Readme file installed with the program for any last-minute information not included in this user guide.
■
Explore the extensive customer support information on the Adobe Web
site. Choose File > Adobe online, or enter http://www.adobe.com into a
Web browser.
■
Browse through the technical notes on the application CD for additional
technical and troubleshooting information.
■
Before you call Adobe technical support
The troubleshooting advice in this appendix covers viewing, creating, printing,
indexing, and searching PDF documents. Common Web issues and Acrobat
error messages are also described.
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Improving performance
Acrobat’s performance can be measured by the amount of time it takes to
complete certain operations, such as opening a file, sending a file to a printer,
or redrawing the screen. In part, performance is determined by the type of
computer and amount of memory you’re using. Other factors that can dramatically affect Acrobat’s performance are the way you set up your software, the
amount of RAM you have, the size and complexity of your files, and the applications you have open.
The best ways to improve performance are to increase the RAM installed on
your computer, create more swap space in Windows, and increase the amount
of RAM allocated to Acrobat on Mac OS. Deselecting Page Cache in Acrobat
General preferences helps to minimize the amount of memory needed to run
Acrobat, but this also decreases the speed of screen redraw. Deselecting
Smooth Text and Monochrome Images in the preferences increases the speed
of screen redraw, but has no effect on memory requirements.
To increase the memory available to Acrobat (Windows):
When an Acrobat component is running, exit other applications, and close
other windows.
To create more swap space (Windows):
1 Choose Settings > Control Panel from the Windows Start menu.
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2 Double-click the System icon, and click the Performance tab in the dialog
box that appears.
3 Click the Change button, and change the paging file size for the drive with
Acrobat. See your Microsoft Windows documentation for details.
To increase the memory allocation for Acrobat (Mac OS):
1 Start all applications, except Acrobat, Distiller, or Catalog, that you will use at
the same time as those components.
2 Return to the Finder, and choose About This Macintosh from the
Apple menu.
3 In the About This Computer window, refer to the Largest Unused Block
value. This value shows the amount of memory currently available.
4 Subtract 1 MB to 2 MB of that value for system use, and note the result. You
will use this result in step 6.
5 Select an Adobe Acrobat icon, and choose Get Info from the File menu.
6 In the Acrobat Info window, set the Preferred Size option to the amount of
memory you noted in step 4.
7 Close the About This Computer and Acrobat Info windows.
8 Follow steps 5–7 for each Acrobat component.
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Troubleshooting PDF viewing
This section provides solutions for problems you may encounter when viewing
PDF files. There may be additional troubleshooting information in the
Readme file.
Blank pages appear in a PDF file.
Blank pages can appear in PDF files for several reasons:
■ The original file contained blank pages. See Deleting and replacing pages,
for more information about how to remove these pages.
You have opened a PDF file (created with a 4.0 compatibility setting or
Distiller job options that are available only in Acrobat 4.0) in an Adobe Acrobat
3.0 or earlier viewer. Either open the file in a 4.0 viewer, or recreate the PDF file
with 3.0 compatibility selected. For more information, see Setting the General
job options.
■
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The downloading of a long document must be canceled.
If you selected Allow Background Download of Entire File in General preferences, any PDF file linked to on the Web will continue to download to your
computer until you interrupt the download. To interrupt the download, go to
the last page of the document using the Last Page button . The downloading
of the entire file will stop, and only the specific pages requested from that time
on will be downloaded. The full download will not resume. For information on
canceling a download using the Status Dialog box, see Converting Web pages
by specifying a URL.
Characters are missing or wrong.
Missing characters or wrong characters displayed in a PDF file can be caused by
combining PDF files with subsetted fonts of the same name. To address this
issue, recreate the files without subsetting fonts. See Setting the Fonts job
options and Combining multiple PostScript files into one PDF file.
Courier is substituted for another font.
Courier will be substituted for a font if the original file is converted to PDF with
Adobe Acrobat Distiller and Distiller does not have access to the font being
referenced either through the PostScript file or one of its monitored font
locations. Give Distiller access to the font to avoid having Courier display in its
place. For more information, see Giving Distiller access to fonts in Chapter 3 of
this online Adobe Acrobat User Guide.
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Find tool and select text tool are not working.
There are several reasons why you may not be able to find a word or select text:
The file is a PDF Image Only file created with the Scan or the Import
command in Acrobat. See Converting Scanned Documents to PDF for information on this file type.
■
The PDF file originated from a PostScript file on the Windows platform that
contained TrueType fonts.
■
Select Text and Graphics is not allowed by a security setting. (The Find tool
would work in this case). See Setting security for documents for information on
the security settings.
■
If the file is a PDF Image Only file, use Capture to convert the PDF Image Only
file to a PDF Normal file that allows you to find words and select text.
If the file originated on Windows and contains TrueType fonts, open the
original file in the original application and either change the fonts to Type 1
fonts or use PDFWriter to create the PDF file.
If the file is secured against selecting text and graphics, contact the document
author to discuss your options.
Fonts are slow to display and print.
Type 3 fonts and TrueType fonts converted to Type 1 fonts may display and
print slowly in your Acrobat viewer.
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To avoid this problem, do not use Type 3 fonts.
To solve the problem with TrueType fonts converted to Type 3 bitmap fonts,
you need to edit your printer settings in Windows 95, 98, and NT.
To edit your printer settings (Windows 95 and 98):
1 Choose Settings > Printers from the Start menu, right-click the Distiller
printer (or other default printer), and select Properties.
2 Click the Fonts tab, and then click the Send Fonts As button.
3 Choose Outlines from the Send TrueType Fonts As menu for conversion to
Type 1. Choose Type 42 for the Adobe PS version of TrueType.
4 Enter 1 in the Threshold to switch between downloading bitmap or
outline fonts.
5 Click OK.
Image quality is poor.
If the display of images within an Acrobat viewer is not satisfactory, you
will need to recreate the PDF file or the image itself. Do one or more of
the following:
■
If the file was created with PDFWriter originally, recreate it with Distiller.
■
Turn downsampling off in PDFWriter or Distiller, and recreate the file.
■ Turn automatic compression off in Distiller, and choose ZIP or JPEG
compression for image compression.
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■
Turn all compression off in PDFWriter or Distiller.
Check the resolution of the original image in a photo-editing program like
Adobe Photoshop. Rescan or recreate the image if its resolution is less than
72 dpi.
■
Images are not displaying.
If images appear as gray boxes, the Display Large Images option might be
deselected. Choose File > Preferences > General to select this option. You
should also check to see if the Smooth Text and Images check box is set in the
General Preferences dialog box.
If images do not appear at all, they could be downsampled monochrome
images. Deselect downsampling in Distiller or PDFWriter, and recreate the
PDF file
Pages are cropped incorrectly.
If pages appear cut off or cropped in a viewer, you should check the page size
setting in Adobe Acrobat PDFWriter and Distiller, adjust if necessary, and
recreate the PDF file. For more information, see Creating PDF files with
PDFWriter, Changing the page setup, and Setting the Advanced job options.
An incorrectly generated PostScript file can also result in cropped pages. Select
another printer driver, recreate the PostScript file, and distill the file again.
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If the original file is an EPS file, check the Distiller EPS settings, as described in
Setting the Advanced job options.
Lines and rules disappear in a PDF file.
Sometimes very thin lines and rules do not display at 100% magnification.
Increasing the magnification usually solves this problem. See Magnifying and
reducing the view for details.
The menu bar is missing.
Document authors can choose to hide the menu bar when a file opens. To
retrieve the menu bar, press F7. To always show the menu bar, see Defining
opening views.
The command bar or tool bar is missing.
Document authors can choose to hide the command bar or the tool bar when
a file opens. To retrieve the command bar, press F8. To retrieve the tool bar,
press F9. To always show the tool bar, see Defining opening views.
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Pages display in the wrong orientation.
Distiller can create a PDF file that displays the PDF file in the correct orientation
if it can find the orientation information in the PostScript file (supplied by the
printer driver) or if a majority of the text is oriented in one direction. If the file
displays in an incorrect orientation, use the Document > Rotate Pages
command to correct it. For more information, see Cropping and rotating pages.
Proportional Japanese fonts do not display or print correctly.
Two-byte characters that have proportional widths will not be positioned
correctly when viewed or printed from Acrobat or Reader on a computer that
does not have the fonts installed.
In Windows 95-J, Microsoft introduced proportional width two-byte Japanese
TrueType fonts. MS P Mincho and MS PGothic are examples of proportional
two-byte fonts.
Adobe does not recommend using proportional two-byte Japanese TrueType
fonts in PDF documents that are intended for cross-platform use. To view and
print documents from Windows 95-J correctly, follow the procedure below.
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To ensure that PDF documents containing proportional two-byte Japanese
fonts display properly on Windows 95-J, create the PDF document with
Distiller. For more information on Distiller, see Creating PDF files with Distiller.
Note: All two-byte characters in PDF documents created by PDFWriter are
converted to full-width characters. The PDF document will display and print
well, but the layout may not match the layout of your original document.
To ensure that PDF files containing proportional two-byte fonts print correctly
from Windows 95-J, deselect the Use Printer Fonts option in the print dialog
box. You should also edit the Font Substitution table to send every font to the
printer as an outline.
To edit the Font Substitution table (Windows 95-J):
1 Choose Start > Settings > Printers.
2 Right-click the printer icon, and choose Properties.
3 Click the Fonts tab.
4 Select Send TrueType fonts to printer according to the Substitution Table,
and click Edit the Table.
5 Select a proportional Japanese font from the list of fonts, and select Send As
Outline from the Printer font for: fontname menu.
6 Repeat step 5 for each proportional Japanese font.
7 Click OK.
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Some text in the font and character ‘Font name’ could not be
displayed or printed correctly. The font could not be reencoded.
A TrueType version of a Base 14 font was given a custom font encoding in the
PostScript file that was converted to PDF. Use a different PostScript printer
driver to create the PostScript file and re-distill the file. If that does not solve the
problem, install the Type 1 version of the font, recreate the PostScript file, and
distill it again.
Pages can’t be changed when specifying a Go To View action to a
form field.
You cannot change pages when specifying a Go To View action to a form field,
although you can set a Go To View action on the same page as a form field.
To create a form field that goes to a view on another page,:
1 Go to the destination page.
2 Create the form field and specify the Go To View action. See, Creating form
fields.
3 Choose Tools > Fields > Duplicate.
4 Enter a page range and click OK.
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Go To Page action can’t be edited.
If you choose Go To Next Page as a page action and later wish to change the
action, you must first switch to the Continuous - Facing Pages layout to edit the
action. If you are in the Single Page layout, the page will always go to the next
page, making it impossible to edit that action.
There is no page numbered number in this document.
You have entered a wrong page number in the status bar or a dialog box, or
the page numbering in the document may be making it difficult to enter page
numbers correctly (for example, the page numbers use a Japanese prefix but
you are on a roman system). If Use Logical Page Numbers is selected in General
preferences, you may want to enter a page position in parentheses instead
of entering a page number. For example, if the third page in the document is
numbered vii, you can enter (3) to specify its page number. Or turn off
Use Logical Page Numbers to renumber the document using integers
beginning at 1.
When printing pages on Mac OS, you cannot specify page positions in the Print
dialog box. If you are having problems entering page numbers, you can select
thumbnails before choosing Print to select those pages for printing. Or turn off
Use Logical Page Numbers to renumber the document using integers
beginning at 1.
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PDF file can’t be opened.
If you are unable to open a PDF file by double-clicking it on Mac OS, see
Opening PDF documents for information.
PDF files created with 3.0 or 4.0 compatibility, compressed fonts, and ZIP
compression cannot be opened in an Acrobat 2.1 viewer. Recreate the PDF file
with 2.1 compatibility selected (compressed fonts and ZIP compression are not
available options then), or open the file in a 4.0 viewer.
If you are unable to open a PDF file for any other reason, you should recreate
the PDF file and try again.
PDF files can’t be viewed within a browser window.
For information about the requirements to view PDF within a browser window,
see Opening converted pages in a Web browser.
Magnification is unpredictable at link and bookmark destination.
Links and bookmarks created with a Fit View magnification setting can result
in an unexpected destination view when activated. To avoid unpredictable
magnification, choose Inherit Zoom as the magnification for a link or
bookmark. Inherit Zoom uses the magnification level that is active when the
link or bookmark is activated to display the destination. See Working with
bookmarks and Working with links for more
information.
Troubleshooting
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PDF file uses incorrect fonts.
If the computer displaying the PDF file does not have access to the original font
either on the system itself or embedded in the PDF file, then a substitute font
will be used to display the font. If you need to maintain the exact look of the
font, you should embed the font in the PDF file. See Embedding fonts in PDF
files and About font embedding and substitution.
You should also check to ensure that View > User Local Fonts is turned on.
Troubleshooting PDF creation
This section provides solutions for problems you may encounter when creating
PDF files. There may be additional troubleshooting information in the Readme
file and Release Notes document.
Create Adobe PDF command in PageMaker 6.0J does not produce
proper PDF files (Windows).
The File > Create Adobe PDF command in PageMaker 6.0J does not create a
usable PDF file from the Japanese version of Distiller. To produce a usable PDF
file from PageMaker, use the File > Print command to create a PostScript file
from PageMaker, and then process that PostScript file with Distiller.
1 Do one of the following:
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If the document does not contain Japanese TrueType fonts, choose File >
Print, select the Adobe PostScript driver, and click Options. Choose “Do
Not Download.”
■
If the document does contain Japanese TrueType fonts, press ALT while
choosing File > Print.
■
2 Convert the resulting PostScript file to PDF with Distiller. See Converting
PostScript files to PDF for more information.
Distiller is not recognizing a PostScript file (Windows).
Some Windows PostScript printer drivers append PostScript files with the
extension .prn. The .prn extension is recognized for drag-and-drop operations
and in watched folders. In all other instances, however, Distiller looks for .ps
and .eps extensions. To make Distiller see a PostScript file with a .prn extension
other than in a watched folder or in a drag-and-drop operation, choose File >
Open and select All files (*.*) from the Files of type menu.
File placed in watched folder is not processing.
Files placed in watched folders may not process because Distiller is no longer
monitoring the folder, the file is not a valid PostScript file, other files have been
given priority, or there is no room on the drive containing the watched folder.
Confirm that you have created the PostScript file correctly. See Creating
PostScript files to convert to PDF.
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Verify that the watched folder has been added and configured correctly. Check
that the folder is available in the Settings > Watched Folders menu.
Check how often Distiller is checking the watched folder.
Check that there is sufficient disk space available.
If Distiller is watching the folder and you have a valid PostScript file, read the
following section about how Distiller prioritizes its work.
Distiller processing priorities need to be set.
Given two or more PostScript language files to distill, Distiller processes the
files in the following order:
Files opened in Distiller (by using the Open command, dragging files to the
Distiller icon, or specifying files in the command line) are processed before files
placed in watched folders. If a PostScript language file is opened while Distiller
is working on a file placed in an In folder, Distiller processes the opened file as
soon as it completes the current file. You can open two or more files while
Distiller is processing another file.
■
Files placed into In folders are processed in a round-robin fashion: First a file
from one watched folder is distilled, then a file from the next watched folder,
and so on.
■
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Within a watched folder, the order in which files are processed depends on the
operating system. For Windows, files are processed in the order they are listed
in a Windows directory, which usually means that files are processed in alphanumeric order (numbers first, followed by uppercase letters and then
lowercase letters). For Mac OS, files are processed in alphabetical order.
Image quality is poor.
Photographic images can require a great deal of storage. A 24-bit color image,
for example, can require several megabytes of storage. To keep the size of PDF
files to a minimum, Distiller can be set up to use various techniques to
resample or compress scanned images. These resampling and compression
techniques, however, reduce the amount of detail in a scanned image. After
being compressed, some images take on a quilted look, and sharp lines are
distorted. To improve the quality of scanned images in your PDF files, reduce
the amount of compression performed by Distiller or PDFWriter. In Distiller,
resampling or compression is set in the Job Options dialog box, which is
accessed from the Settings > Job Options menu. For more information, see
Changing the compression options and Applying compression and resampling
to PDF files.
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Links generated by FrameMaker 5.0 and later go nowhere or to the
wrong place.
To create links that go to the correct link destination, you must regenerate the
Acrobat Data from within FrameMaker, create another PostScript file, and
convert the PostScript file to PDF with Distiller again. You can also save a file in
PDF using the Save As command in FrameMaker. For details about creating
Acrobat Data, see your FrameMaker documentation.
Distiller status messages are written to Message.log file and error
log files.
All messages displayed in the Messages area of the Distiller window are written
to the Messages.log file in the same folder as the Distiller application. (This log
file can be read by any Windows or Mac OS word processor or text editor.) The
Messages.log file represents a record of all the processing performed
by Distiller.
Distiller records the start time and the distill time for each file. You can use the
Messages.log file to determine the throughput of the Distiller application.
Distiller limits the Messages.log file to 32K bytes. When the file reaches 32K,
Distiller deletes the first 10K bytes in the file and then continues adding new
messages to the end of the file.
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Error messages produced for a PostScript file are also written to an individual
log file for the PostScript file. Distiller places the log file in the same folder as
the PS or PDF file and gives the log file the same name as the PDF file, but with
.log or .LOG appended, rather than .pdf.
There is not enough memory to run Distiller.
The Windows version of Distiller requires 8 megabytes (MB) of RAM to operate.
The Mac OS version of Distiller requires 10 MB of RAM to operate. When you try
to start Distiller with insufficient RAM, it displays a message that tells you it
does not have enough memory to run. (32 MB of RAM is recommended in
both cases.)
If you see this message while trying to start the Windows version of Distiller,
use the System Control Panel to increase the size of virtual memory available.
If you see this message while trying to start the Mac OS version of Distiller,
use the Distiller Info dialog box to increase the amount of memory allocated
to Distiller.
The PDF file is too large.
If a PDF file is too large, you should optimize the file. You can also try to reduce
the size of the file by changing the compression settings in Distiller or
PDFWriter. Not embedding fonts also contributes to a smaller PDF file. See
Optimizing PDF documents for the Web for information. Also, be sure that
thumbnail generation is turned off.
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The PostScript file must be regenerated.
You may have to do one or more of the following to create a good
PostScript file:
Follow the same procedure you first followed to create the PostScript file and
distill it again. The file may have been written to the hard disk incorrectly.
■
Use a different PostScript printer driver, recreate the PostScript file, and then
distill the file again.
■
Use Distiller to “print” directly to PDF. Check Print to File to create a PostScript
file using the AdobePS driver and the Acrobat Distiller PPD. (On Mac OS, use
the PDF printer driver plug-in 8.5.3 for AdobePS 8.5.1. In Windows, use the
Acrobat Distiller printer.)
■
Break the file into pieces. For example, print half of the file to one PostScript
file and the other half to a different file and redistill both files. If you still receive
an error, break the file down into smaller pieces. You will probably be able to
pinpoint the problem area with this technique. You may find a corrupt image or
font. Replace or recreate the problem image or font, recreate the PostScript file,
and distill it again.
■
Troubleshooting
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TWAIN scanner software does not appear in the Select Scanner
dialog box.
If you install new TWAIN scanner software after installing Acrobat, the new
software should appear in the Select Scanner list. If it does not, check to be sure
your scanner driver is TWAIN software and is installed properly.
A PostScript file cannot be converted to PDF with Distiller.
Distiller can encounter problems with a PostScript file that prevent it from
creating a PDF file. When Distiller fails to create a PDF file for a PostScript file,
Distiller creates a log file that describes the problem in the folder where the
PDF file would have been created. (The extension .log is appended to the
PostScript filename.) A log file is a text file that you can open with any wordprocessing program.
If Distiller fails to create a PDF file because of a PostScript error, the PostScript
file may be corrupted, or the error might have been introduced by the application that created the PostScript file. Make sure that the document prints
correctly on a PostScript printer, and try making a new PostScript file.
Distiller will generate a PostScript error if it cannot convert a PostScript file to
PDF. Limitcheck, VMError, Undefined, Typecheck, and Stackunderflow or Stackoverflow are the most common errors.
Troubleshooting
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PDFWriter can’t be used for printing because the disk is full.
If you receive the message “Can’t print to PDFWriter, temporary file on Drive C:
is Full.,” you can change the drive location of the temporary file. Open your
WIN.INI file in a text editor. Locate:
[Acrobat PDFWRITER]
tempdrive=<driveletter>
Change the <driveletter> to a drive that you have access to other than C:
The watched folder disk space is full.
If the watched folder runs out of hard disk space, a message to this effect is
logged in the Messages.log file, and a warning is placed into the last job’s log
file, if possible. Distiller does not watch this folder again until you open and
close the Watched Folders dialog box. Processing will not resume until
adequate disk space is available.
WordPerfect fonts are not available when PDF Writer is used.
WordPerfect printer drivers offer fonts that are not available when you select a
different printer driver such as PDFWriter. To ensure access to the fonts used in
your document, select PDFWriter as your printer driver before you begin to
create your document in WordPerfect.
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WordPerfect document reflow when converted with PDFWriter.
WordPerfect printer drivers specify different margin sizes than other printer
drivers such as PDFWriter. The difference in margin size can cause a document
to reflow. To ensure that your document does not reflow, select PDFWriter as
your printer driver before you begin to create your document in WordPerfect.
Troubleshooting PDF Web issues
This section provides solutions for problems you may encounter when
publishing or viewing PDF files on the Web. There may be additional troubleshooting information in the Readme file.
Internet Explorer installation to support Acrobat Web Capture.
To take advantage of Web Capture, Internet Explorer must be installed and the
Internet Properties dialog box configured to allow access to the World Wide
Web. In particular, the Proxy Server box on the Connection tab must have a
valid proxy address if you are accessing the Web through a firewall in an enterprise environment. Once Internet Explorer has been installed and configured,
you may use any browser as your default browser. If your version of Internet
Explorer does not have an Internet Properties dialog box, you must upgrade to
a current version of Internet Explorer (available from the Microsoft Web site).
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The downloading of a long document must be canceled.
If you selected Allow Background Download of Entire File in General preferences, then any PDF file linked to on the Web will continue to download to your
computer until you interrupt the download. To interrupt the download, go to
the last page of the document using the Last Page button . The downloading
of the entire file will stop and only the specific pages requested from that time
on will be downloaded. The full download will not resume. See Setting Acrobat
preferences for information on the General preferences.
Only the first page of a PDF file prints from Internet Explorer 3.0
(Windows).
Only the first page of a PDF file embedded in an HTML file will print from
Internet Explorer 3.0 if you use Internet Explorer’s print command.
If the embedded PDF file displays a tool bar, you can use the print tool in that
tool bar to print the entire PDF file. Otherwise, the author of the HTML page
must provide a Print button associated with an embedded PDF file (and implemented using a VBScript) to enable you to print the entire file.
An entire PDF file cannot be printed from Internet Explorer 3.0
(Windows).
Internet Explorer’s print icon and Print command will not correctly print a PDF
file displayed in the full Internet Explorer window.
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Use the print tool in the Acrobat tool bar to print the entire PDF file.
A PDF file can’t be saved properly from Internet Explorer 3.0
(Windows).
When a PDF file is displayed in the Internet Explorer 3.0 window, Internet
Explorer’s File > Save As menu will not correctly save the PDF file to your disk. If
you opened the PDF file by clicking on a link to it in an HTML page, you can
save the PDF file using the Save Copy (disk icon) button on the command bar.
A PDF document can’t be viewed in a Web browser.
See Web viewing scenarios for information about the requirements to view
PDF within a browser window.
Weblinks don’t work.
If you click a Web link in a PDF document and nothing happens, verify the
following information:
■ You are connected to the Internet, and the host is responding. Web browsers
and Acrobat cannot follow a link if your connection is down or if the host
doesn’t respond.
The URL address is valid. If the target URL was typed incorrectly in the Link
dialog box or is invalid, the Web browser and Acrobat cannot follow it.
■
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You have correctly configured your browser to use Acrobat or Reader and
have configured Acrobat or Reader to use your Web browser.
■
White space displays instead of a PDF file in Internet Explorer 3.0
(Windows).
Internet Explorer 3.0 may display white space where it should display a PDF file.
This can occur if Internet Explorer has an old or bad copy of the PDF file in its
cache. You may be able to correct the problem by clearing its cache as follows:
1 In Internet Explorer, choose View > Options and click the Advanced tab.
2 Click Settings in the Temporary Internet files section.
3 Click Empty Folder.
4 Click Yes and OK until you close all the dialog boxes.
5 Click the Refresh button or choose View > Refresh to redisplay the PDF file.
Troubleshooting PDF printing
This section provides solutions for problems you may encounter when printing
PDF files. There may be additional troubleshooting information in the
Readme file.
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Printing performance is a problem.
To improve printing performance, enter the correct amount of memory for
your printer in the printer driver settings. Many times, your printer will have
more memory than the settings indicate. You can significantly improve performance by setting this field correctly.
To improve performance when printing to a PostScript printer, use the Adobe
printer driver that is installed automatically with Acrobat during the default
installation.
Fonts don’t align correctly.
Captured documents align fonts incorrectly when printing to a PCL printer
with the default printer settings. Selecting bitmap fonts instead of outline fonts
should fix the font alignment problem.
PCL printing is a problem.
If your PDF file prints incorrectly to a PCL printer, try modifying the driver
settings. In general, try raster graphics instead of vector graphics and bitmap
fonts instead of outline fonts. (Each driver has different settings, so we cannot
tell you exactly which settings to use—see your printer manual for details.)
If your file still prints incorrectly, print to a PostScript printer. Using LaserJet
Enhanced drivers instead of standard drivers can also help resolve printing
problems.
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Page 556
A PDF file embedded as an EPS file cannot be separated in another
application.
To ensure that the PDF file is separable, select LanguageLevel 1 when using the
Export > PostScript or EPS option to create an EPS file for embedding in
another application.
Troubleshooting PDF indexing
This section provides solutions for problems you may encounter when
indexing PDF files. There may be additional troubleshooting information in the
Readme file.
Builds on Mac OS System 7.5.2 fail.
If you are running Adobe Acrobat Catalog native on a Power Macintosh and
using a version of AppleTalk’s Open Transport before 1.1, Catalog may crash
during indexing. To check the version of Open Transport, open the AppleTalk
Control Panel and choose Get Info from the File menu.
Indexes take too long to build (Mac OS).
If an index takes a long time to build and you notice a large amount of disk
activity, stop the build, increase the Index Disk Cache Size in the Index group of
preferences as much as possible, and build the index again.
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The Stop button is nonresponsive.
During lengthy operations such as removing unnecessary indexes, clicking the
Stop button may seem to have no effect. This is because Catalog needs to finish
the operation before it can stop the build.
Unchanged files are being reindexed.
When you update an index, files that are unchanged since the previous build
may nevertheless be reindexed. This can happen when a file has been
damaged, or when it doesn’t observe MS-DOS filenaming conventions.
A stopped or failed build must be restarted.
If the index-building process was purposely stopped, or an index failed to build
for another reason, you can try to rebuild the index by doing one of the
following:
Restart Catalog and rebuild the index. For more information, see Defining
and building indexes in Chapter 11.
■
If the search engine says that it could not repair the index, then go to the
directory with the same name as your index description file (the .PDX file) and
remove the file named COLLECTN.STP.
■
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Indexes are unavailable.
Indexes will not be available when the index includes PDF files with double
quotes (“ ”) in their pathname or if the index has double quotes in its
pathname. A pathname is the name of the file plus the name of the folder that
contains it and the names of all of its parent folders. If an index is always
unavailable check to see if there were transaction errors in the Catalog file
generated when building the index. If there were transaction errors, the index
can be made available by removing the double quotes from the filenames or
folders included in this index and building the index again.
An index may also be unavailable if by accident two copies of Catalog tried to
build the index at the same time. One of these copies of Catalog will give an
error (Vdb Access Error), but the other will appear to finish successfully. In fact it
was not successful and the index should be purged and rebuilt.
Troubleshooting PDF searches
If you have trouble with a search that includes a possible stopword, a number,
punctuation, or a special character, see Selecting word search options and
Excluding words (stopwords) and numbers from indexes in Chapter 11.
This section provides solutions for problems you may encounter when
searching PDF files. There may be additional troubleshooting information in
the Readme file.
Troubleshooting
Page 559
An expected file doesn’t appear in the Search Results list.
Consider these possibilities:
If the Proximity option is on, files containing the words being searched for
may not appear in the list if the words are more than one page apart. Try
searching without the option.
■
Words in Type 3 fonts will not be found if they contain high ANSI characters
such as ligatures.
■
A file in the Search Results list is slow to open.
Try the following:
Rename your files and folders, particularly your top-level folders, using 8.3
conventions; then rebuild the index.
■
■
Select Add IDs to 1.0 Files in Catalog’s Index Options dialog box.
Avoid searching for common words (like “the”) by themselves. The number of
hits can be so large that it takes a long time to retrieve them.
■
Network server is overloaded.
A network file server can reach maximum utilization when many users are
running broad searches at the same time. Avoid broad searches such as
“*report” (which will read the entire index).
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Unexpected words are highlighted.
Searches with the Sounds Like, Word Stemming, and Thesaurus options may or
may not produce relevant results. Use the Word Assistant to preview the words
that will be highlighted before you use one of these options. For more information, see Setting index options in Chapter 11.
Acrobat error messages
Acrobat generates error messages specific to Acrobat, Reader, Page Capture,
Catalog, and PostScript.
Acrobat viewer error messages
The following error messages may appear when you are using Acrobat
or Reader.
A drawing error occurred which is probably due to an out-ofmemory condition. You may want to increase the application’s
memory size using Get Info in the Finder. (Mac OS)
See Improving performance for information on increasing application memory.
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A drawing error occurred which is probably due to an out-ofmemory condition. (Windows and UNIX)
Exit other applications or close windows to free memory. You may also consider
increasing the amount of RAM on your system.
Capture error messages
This page is larger than the maximum page size of 14” by 14”
You tried to process a page image that is either wider or taller than the
maximum image size that Capture can process (14-by-14 inches). Either rescan
the page as a smaller image or use image-editing software, such as Adobe
Photoshop, to crop or resize the image.
This page is of an unsupported resolution (200-600 dpi for b/w, 200400 dpi for gray/color). It cannot be captured.
You tried to process a page image with a resolution that falls outside the
following ranges: for black-and-white images, 200–600 dpi; for grayscale and
color images, 200–400 dpi.
Either rescan the page using a scanner resolution setting within acceptable
limits or use image-editing software, such as Adobe Photoshop, to resample
the image at an acceptable resolution.
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Insufficient memory to perform operation
If you are running other programs, quit those programs to free memory. You
might have to restart your computer to free all the memory used by other
programs. You can also install more memory in your computer.
Not enough space for temporary files. Please change location for
temporary files in Acrobat Paper Capture Preferences.
Delete unnecessary files to free disk space. Alternatively, use a disk drive with
more free disk space. See Customizing the Capture process for information on
specifying another drive for temporary files.
The specified starting value is not a legal page number/label.
Enter the range of pages you want to capture in the From and To text boxes. If
you enter only a From value, Acrobat captures pages from that page to the end
of the document. If you select the page range option and do not enter at least a
starting value, Acrobat captures all pages in the document.
The font font name could not be found or system resources are too
low to access the font
Be sure the font is installed on your system. If it is installed and the problem
persists, the font may be corrupt. You should remove it and then reinstall it.
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This page has graphics other than images or text on it. It cannot be
captured. Skip page and continue?
If you get this message while capturing a multi-page document, click Yes to
skip to the next page and resume the capture process.
This message occurs when:
■
The current page has already been captured.
Check to see if the page has already been captured by choosing Edit > Select
All. If some or all of the text on the page is highlighted, the page may have
already been captured.
■
The current page is not a simple bitmap.
Even if a page has not already been captured, it may contain graphics or text
that prevents it from being captured. Scan or import the original page again to
create a PDF Image Only file and then capture it.
Catalog error messages
Catalog displays error messages in the Messages box. If the error occurred
while an index was being built, it also writes the message to the log file. See
Defining and building indexes.
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Catalog error messages starting with a filename
Access denied.
Problem: Catalog could not open an index-definition (PDX) file, a log file, or a
PDF file.
Solution: If the PDX, log, and PDF files are stored on a DOS computer, make sure
that none of these files has read-only, hidden, or system file attributes. If the
files are stored on a Macintosh or UNIX computer, make sure that Catalog (or
the person running the program) has permission to change and delete the
files. Also, be sure you have sufficient disk space.
Acrobat Catalog fatal error—Either the message database is
inaccessible or there are insufficient permissions/space to write to
the PDX file.
Problem: There is either insufficient disk space to build the index or Catalog
cannot open or write to the PDX or log file.
Solution: If the PDX, log, and PDF files are stored on a DOS computer, make sure
that none of these files has read-only, hidden, or system file attributes. If the
files are stored on a Macintosh or UNIX computer, make sure that Catalog
(or the person running the program) has permission to change and delete
the files.
Troubleshooting
Page 565
Attempting to fix broken collection.
Problem: The last time this index was built or updated, the computer running
Catalog crashed or Stop was clicked. Or you are attempting to purge an index
optimized for CD-ROM.
Solution: If the attempt to fix the broken collection or purge the index
succeeds, no action is necessary. If the attempt fails, delete and rebuild
the index.
Could not create directory directory name.
Problem: Catalog did not have permission to create an index folder or
subfolder.
Solution: Make sure that Catalog (or the person running the program) has
permission to create folders on the server volume where the index is
being created.
Could not write ID into filename.
Problem: Catalog tried to write a unique Acrobat document identifier to a PDF
file created by a version 1.0 PDFWriter or Distiller program, but did not have
permission to change the file.
Solution: Make sure that Catalog (or the person running the program) has
permission to change PDF files.
Troubleshooting
Page 566
Directory Full.
Problem: There is insufficient free disk space to create, update, or rebuild
the index.
Solution: Delete files on the disk or server where you are trying to build the
index, or build the index on a disk or server with more free space. If you are
updating an index that has already been updated, consider purging and
rebuilding the index to reduce the disk space required for the index. For more
information, see Purging and rebuilding indexes in Chapter 11.
Disk Full.
Problem: There is insufficient free disk space to create, update, or rebuild
the index.
Solution: Delete files on the disk or server where you are trying to build the
index, or build the index on a disk or server with more free space. If you are
updating an index that has already been updated, consider purging and
rebuilding the index to reduce the disk space required for the index. For more
information, see Purging and rebuilding indexes in Chapter 11.
Troubleshooting
Page 567
Document filename: Parsing error on page number nn—Skipping
rest of document.
Problem: The indicated page is corrupt.
Solution: Replace the corrupt page. If you cannot open the file with Acrobat,
recreate the file.
Document filename: Unable to read page number nn.
Problem: The indicated page is corrupt.
Solution: Replace the corrupt page. If you cannot open the file with Acrobat,
recreate the file.
Error in writing to log file—please check disk space.
Problem: There is insufficient free disk space to create, update, or rebuild
the index.
Solution: Delete files on the disk or server where you are trying to build the
index, or build the index on a disk or server with more free space. If you are
updating an index that has already been updated, consider purging and
rebuilding the index to reduce the disk space required for the index.
Troubleshooting
Page 568
File locked—perhaps by another application.
Problem: Catalog cannot open the PDX or log file because the file is locked.
Solution: Stop the application that has the file locked.
File not found—perhaps a server has gone down.
Problem: Catalog tried to index a PDF file that was found at the beginning of
the build but is now unavailable.
Solution: If the file server containing the file became unavailable, you can build,
update, or rebuild the index after the server is available. If the file was deleted
between the time that the build began and the error occurred, ignore the error.
Hardware error writing to file.
Problem: Catalog failed because of equipment failure.
Solution: Repair the equipment.
Troubleshooting
Page 569
Included directory directory name not found.
Problem: Catalog tried to index a PDF file that was found at the beginning of
the build, but the folder containing the file is not available.
Solution: If the file server containing the file became unavailable, you can build,
update, or rebuild the index after the server is available. If the folder containing
the file was deleted between the time that the build began and the error
occurred, remove the folder from the Include list and rebuild the index.
Index directory directory name has less than nn bytes of space—
Build will be terminated.
Problem: There is insufficient free disk space to create, update, or rebuild
the index.
Solution: Delete files on the disk or server where you are trying to build the
index, or build the index on a disk or server with more free space. If you are
updating an index that has already been updated, consider purging and
rebuilding the index to reduce the disk space required for the index. See
Purging and rebuilding indexes for more information.
Troubleshooting
Page 570
Index directory directory name not found—Perhaps a server has
gone down.
Problem: Catalog tried to index a PDF file that was found at the beginning of
the build, but the folder containing the file is not available.
Solution: If the file server containing the file became unavailable, you can build,
update, or rebuild the index after the server is available. If the folder containing
the file was deleted between the time that the build began and the error
occurred, remove the folder from the Include list and rebuild the index.
Insufficient memory to perform operation.
Problem: There is insufficient memory available to run Catalog.
Solution: If other applications are running, stop the applications and run
Catalog by itself. If the index build continues to fail at a specific document, try
the following:
If the document is large, make sure that the DocumentWordSections setting
in the acrocat.ini file (Windows), or the Document Section Size setting in the
Index group of preferences (Mac OS), matches the amount of memory
available. See Defining custom data fields in Chapter 11 for
more information.
■
On the Macintosh, increase the Index Disk Cache Size value in the Index
group of preferences. When building large indexes, you may also want to
increase the memory allocated to Catalog by increasing its Preferred size value
■
Troubleshooting
Page 571
in the Get Info dialog box. See Defining custom data fields in Chapter 11 for
more information.
■ Try removing the failing document from the indexed collection. If this
corrects the problem, try recreating the document and indexing again. If this
fails, try indexing only the recreated document.
Try running Catalog on a computer that has more memory, or adding
memory to the computer where the program is running.
■
If none of these solutions work, see The Adobe Web site for more information.
■
Memory exhausted—Please close other applications and try again.
See Improving performance for information on increasing the amount of
memory available to Acrobat.
Not enough memory to continue.
See Improving performance for information on increasing the amount of
memory available to Acrobat.
Search Engine Message: E3-0024 (VDK): Failed 1 times to build
partition.
Problem: You clicked Stop while Catalog was building an index.
Solution: None required. This message is normal.
Troubleshooting
Page 572
Search Engine Message: E0-1203 (Guards): Failed after 1 attempts
to lock file. (Windows)
Problem: The DOS Share program is not running.
Solution: Run the DOS Share program before starting Catalog. You might want
to put the Share Run command in the autoexec.bat file. See your DOS manual
for a description of the Share program.
Search Engine Message: various numbers and messages.
Problem: Many problems can cause search engine messages.
Solution: If the build failed, make sure that there is sufficient free disk space.
Then try to build or update the index again. If that doesn’t work, purge and
rebuild the index. If the build still fails and there are search engine errors,
reinstall Catalog and try to rebuild the index. See Purging and rebuilding
indexes for more information.
Sharing violation—Perhaps another application has it open.
Problem: Catalog cannot open the PDX or log file, or it cannot open a PDF file to
add an Acrobat document identifier because another application is using
the file.
Solution: If you can identify the application that has the file open, close the file.
Otherwise, wait until the application closes the file.
Troubleshooting
Page 573
Some files were still open during purge—users are still searching
the index—their next search will fail.
Problem: A computer running Acrobat Search crashed while using an index you
are trying to purge, so the purge operation cannot complete successfully.
Solution: Click OK to close the message box and release Catalog to work on
other indexes. To complete the failed purge, find and restart the failing
computer, wait for a few minutes, and try the purge operation again.
Too many open files. (Windows)
Problem: The number of concurrent file opens specified with the FILES
command in the config.sys file has been exceeded.
Solution: If other programs are running on the computer where Catalog is
running, quit those programs. Otherwise, increase the number of allowable
concurrent file opens with the FILES command in the config.sys file. In most
cases, setting FILES to 80 is sufficient.
Unable to open log file for exclusive write.
Problem: Catalog cannot open the log file because another application is using
the file.
Solution: If you can identify the application that has the file open, close the file.
Otherwise, wait until the application closes the file.
Troubleshooting
Page 574
Filename cannot be opened for indexing.
Problem: Catalog cannot open the indicated file.
Solution: If the file is stored on a DOS computer, make sure that the file does not
have the read-only, hidden, or system file attributes. If the file is stored on a
Macintosh or UNIX computer, make sure that Catalog (or the person running
the program) has permission to open the file.
Filename is in previously included directory filename.
Problem: You may have tried to include a folder whose name is a substring of
the name of an already included folder. For example, if you have already
included the folder “docsbac,” you can’t also include the folder “docs.”
Solution: Change the name of one of the folders.
Filename needs an open password—Password protected files
cannot be indexed.
Problem: Catalog cannot open the indicated file without an Acrobat password.
Solution: Open the file with Acrobat, and use Save As to create a new file that
does not require a password in order to be opened.
Troubleshooting
Page 575
Filename: Page: nn had a serious error; the rest of the file will be
skipped.
Problem: The indicated page is corrupt.
Solution: Replace the corrupt page. If you cannot open the file with Acrobat,
recreate the file.
PostScript error messages
If a PostScript error message appears while you are using Distiller, read the .log
file for information on the error. The errors listed in this section are the most
likely PostScript error messages you may encounter, not the complete list of all
possible errors.
Findfont
When Distiller cannot find a Type 1 or TrueType font used in a PostScript file to
create a substitute for the missing font, it issues an error message and substitutes Courier for the missing font.
If Distiller can’t find the font because it is not installed on the same system or in
a font folder identified with the Font Locations dialog box, install the font on
the system that has Distiller, or place it into a font folder listed in the Font
Locations dialog box.
Troubleshooting
Page 576
If Distiller cannot find the Type 1 or TrueType font because the font is in a folder
on a network server to which Distiller has lost access, restore Distiller’s access to
the server and reprocess the PostScript file.
For more information, see Giving Distiller access to fonts.
A findfont error will also occur if the Base 14 fonts are not available to Distiller.
Limitcheck
This error occurs because an implementation limit has been exceeded or
Distiller has run out of memory while processing a file.
Typecheck
These errors occur if a PostScript operand’s type is different from what the
operator expects.
Stackoverflow
The operand stack is too large.
Stackunderflow
An attempt has been made to remove an object from an empty stack.
Troubleshooting
Page 577
Undefined
Distiller has encountered code that is not correct PostScript or a name used as
a dictionary key in some context cannot be found.
VMError
This error occurs when Distiller runs out of memory. Allocate more RAM to
Distiller (Mac OS) or increase the amount of RAM or virtual memory available to
the system (Windows and Mac OS). Sometimes this error occurs for the same
reason as limitcheck.
Search error messages
If a Search error message appears while you are using the Search command,
click the message for information.
The index is unavailable
Problem: An index is unavailable, probably for one of the following reasons:
■
The connection to the network server containing the index has been lost.
■
The index is being purged and rebuilt.
■
The index has been moved to a new location.
■
The index has been deleted.
Troubleshooting
Page 578
■
There is not enough memory for the index to be attached.
You are using a Macintosh, and there are double quotes in the pathname of
the index or the indexed files.
■
You are using a Macintosh connected to a UNIX file server, and the software
and configuration used for the connection are causing the problem.
■
Solution: Contact the person responsible for the index if you suspect that the
index is being purged and rebuilt, or if you suspect that it has been moved or
deleted. If you think there is not enough memory for the index, free more
memory by closing other applications and then restart your Acrobat viewer. If
you are using a Macintosh with a UNIX file server and think there is a
connection problem, try using Mac TCP/IP.
Highlights will not be displayed
Problem: You tried to open a PDF document from the Search Results window
that changed since the index was built.
Solution: The changes may not have altered the locations of the words on the
page. For example, adding a note to a PDF document or changing its security
settings causes the message to be displayed. If you are using a Macintosh and
the document is on a Novell network, there may be no changes at all—a
change may have been reported incorrectly because of inconsistencies
between Novell and Macintosh date reporting.
Troubleshooting
Page 579
However, if changes to the file did alter the locations of words, the query-match
highlights will be incorrect. If a page was deleted, for example, highlights will
indicate the wrong words.
If you think the changes to the PDF document did not alter the locations of
words in the document, or if you think you will be able to tell whether the
highlights are correct, click the Highlight Anyway button to close the message
box and view the document. Otherwise, arrange to rebuild the index.
If the search query reports that a file on a Novell network has been changed
since the index was last built, consider using the index anyway. The report
may be in error because of inconsistencies between Novell and Macintosh
date reporting.
No documents were found that matched your query
Problem: No documents in the currently selected indexes meet the criteria you
specified with a search query.
Solution: Try these steps:
Make sure you have selected the indexes that contain the documents with
the information you seek.
■
Make sure you are not using Document Info or Date Info field values—or
search options—from a previous query by mistake.
■
Make sure you are not searching for a phrase that contains a stopword in an
index that has stopwords.
■
Troubleshooting
Page 580
Make sure you are not searching for a number in an index from which
numbers have been excluded.
■
If you are using and, or, or not in a literal phrase, not as Boolean operators,
make sure the phrase is enclosed in quotation marks (“ ”).
■
On a Macintosh, find out whether the index has been purged and rebuilt
since your last search. If it has, you will need to detach from that index and then
reattach to find any documents.
■
Out of file handles
Problem: You are running too many programs or you have too many windows
open.
Solution: Close some windows, and try the search query again. If you are
running two or more applications, quit all applications except the Acrobat
viewer you are searching from and retry the query.
Not enough memory (Mac OS)
Problem: You do not have enough memory to find the documents that match
your search query.
Solution: Try increasing the memory available to the Acrobat viewer you are
searching from.
Troubleshooting
Page 581
To increase available memory:
1 If the Acrobat viewer is running, quit it.
2 From the Finder, click to select the Acrobat viewer’s program icon.
3 Choose File > Get Info.
4 In the Memory Requirements box, increase the Minimum size value. For
example, you might increase the Minimum size value to 2500 or 3000. (The
maximum amount of memory available for the application is limited by the
amount of memory installed in your Macintosh.)
5 Click the close box in the upper left corner of the Get Info dialog box.
6 Launch the Acrobat viewer. If a message appears telling you that there is not
enough memory to run the program, decrease the Minimum size value in the
viewer’s Get Info box.
Troubleshooting
Page 582
The Adobe Web site
Visit the Adobe Web site for up-to-the minute information on technology
related to Acrobat, links to Acrobat plug-ins, product tips, support updates, and
much more.
In Acrobat, click the Adobe Web site button
, or choose File > Adobe Online.
Use the dialog box that appears to update pages from the Web site manually,
to configure how often to update pages automatically, or to set up your proxy
service.
In your Web browser, you can go to the main page of the Adobe Web site by
entering the URL www.adobe.com.
On the Adobe Web site home page, you can click a country name in the Adobe
Sites pop-up menu to choose a language for viewing the site. The exact information in the site may vary from one language version to another.
Index
Symbols
.pdf extension 461
A
Acrobat
as a helper application 71
comparing versions 3.0 and 4.0 127
error messages 560
Acrobat Capture, Catalog, Distiller,
PDFWriter. See Capture, Catalog,
Distiller, PDFWriter
Acrobat Distiller PPD 105
Acrobat documentation 10
Acrobat Entrust Security
adding signatures 496
installing 489
validation status 501
Acrobat package 13
Acrobat Reader
distributing 471
error messages
installer 471
Acrobat Self Sign 504–527
adding signatures 522–524
installing 489
logging in to 521
preferences 527
profiles 506–521
validating signatures 524
validation status 501
Acrobat viewers. See Acrobat Reader
action options, setting for
form fields 347
actions
Execute Menu Item 398
Go To View 398
Import Form Data 398
JavaScript 398, 411
mouse actions 402, 410
Movie 398
None 399
Open File 398
page 400
playing movies and sound 388
Read Article 399
Reset Form 399
setting options 347, 377
Show/Hide Field 399
Sound 399
special effects 397
Submit Form 399
types of 397
using buttons 401
with bookmarks 229
with JavaScript 377
with Weblinks 252
World Wide Web Link 399
ActiveX controls 482
Actual Size command 41
Add Labels option 511
Add PDF Structure option 207, 217
Adding Or Changing Notes And Form
Fields option 168, 468
adding signatures 496–497, 522–524
address books 505
building 516
signature 499
Adobe Acrobat. See Acrobat
Adobe Photoshop
resampling and compressing images
with 140
Adobe training and certification 13
Adobe Type Composer (ATC)
utility 174
Adobe Type Library 176
Adobe Type Manager. See ATM
Adobe Web site 12, 582
AdobePS printer driver 105
Advance Every option 44
Advance On Any Click option 44
Advanced job options 163–167
Advanced Layout option 406, 407
AIF sound files 389
Alignment option 292
All Pages In Range command 258
Allow File Open Links option 66
Allow PostScript File To Override Job
Options 102, 141, 165
annotation preferences 325
Auto-Open Notes Windows
option 326
Auto-Open Other Markup Windows
option 326
Show Sequence Numbers
option 326
annotation tools 302
See also individual tool names
annotations 297
custom color option 319
deleting 323
editing 321
exporting 327
Filter Manager 324
importing 327
managing 320, 324
moving 322
navigating with 301
opening and closing 302
printing 60
replacing a stamp 323
scanning 299
searching for 302
setting preferences 325
sorting 300
summarizing 324
Annotations palette 298
Show/Hide 299
updating 299
appearance options, form fields 346
Append All Links On Page
command 203
Append Next Level command 203
Append To Document command 202
Append Web Page command 200
append-only PDF file 490, 493
article boxes 241, 242, 243
article threads 241
article tool 240
articles 239, 245
defining 240
deleting 242
editing 241
reading 51
Articles palette 239
ASCII Format option 90, 121, 129
Asian fonts 142, 176
Asian language support 8
Asian text
converting to PDF in Windows 169
converting to PDF on
Mac OS 172–177
preventing ATM from rasterizing 174
Asian TrueType fonts 169–171
substituting printer fonts 171
Asian Type 1 fonts 173
Ask For PDF File Destination
option 178
Ask To Replace Existing PDF File
option 178
Assumed Profiles options 160
ATM 91
Asian Type 1 fonts 171, 173
font substitution 141
attaching files to PDF documents 311
audio annotation tool 297, 306
Auto-Detect command 290
autoindexes 58
Auto-Switch To Landscape If Scaling
Smaller Than option 213
B
Back And Forth option 391
Background Color option 45
Background Options 209
backgrounds, setting 211
base fonts 91, 95
base URL 58
baseline option 277
Batch Process command
creating and deleting
thumbnails 227
defining opening views 465
optimizing files 475
setting security 468
bicubic downsampling 135
binary file option 121
Binding option 130
binding, left or right 56, 463
bitmap images 117
printing 60
resampling and
compressing 136–141
black generation 161
blank pages in PDF files 531
BMP image files 117
bookmarks 229–238
actions with 229, 233
creating 231, 232
deleting 234
editing 233
expanding and collapsing 235
hierarchies 235
linking with 233
moving nested 236
navigating with 49, 229
nesting 235
Bookmarks And Page view 464
Bookmarks palette 230
Boolean operators 450, 455
Bounding Box command 257
browsers
See also Web browsers
troubleshooting 541
Build command 424
building an index
restarting a stopped index build 426
stopping an index build 426
Button Face Attribute options 404
buttons 332, 401
Advanced Layout option 406
appearance 409
changing 405
creating 333, 403
customizing 406
field properties 403
importing data with 366
layout 404
scaling icons 407
See also individual button names
submitting and resetting forms 364
submitting images with 368
byte-serving 70
C
calculating, with JavaScript 374
calculation options, setting for form
fields 351
CalGray color space 158
calibrating color 156–163
See also managing color
CalRGB color space 158, 159
canceling PDF conversion 111
Capture 179–193
RAM requirements 28
Capture Pages command 183, 185
Capture preferences 189
capturing pages 185, 189
file size 191
Case Sensitive option 415, 423, 428
Catalog 414, 424, 486
error messages 563
options 427
preferences 431
Search command 439
word search options 428
CCITT compression filters 75, 132, 134
CDs
distributing PDF documents
on 485–487
testing 486
Center Window On Screen option 465
certificates
defining 505
exporting 519
getting information on 518, 526
importing 516–518, 526
storing 516
X509 standard 506
CGI export values 369
Changing The Document
option 168, 468
Character Formatting options 291
characters, missing or wrong 532
check boxes 332
creating 333
checksum
for signatures 498, 505
CID (character ID) format 172
Classroom in a Book 12
CMS. See color management system
CMYK color 151, 158, 160
color
device-dependent 154
device-independent 155
in online displays 159
managing 150–163
color gamut 153
color images
compressing 88
resampling and
compressing 136–141
color management system 150, 155
bypassing 122
default 64
color separations, exporting 120
color spaces
controlling in file exchange 157–163
converting device-dependent to
independent 158
defining 153
defining and calibrating 160
ICC profiles for 157
See also individual color space names
color, printing 103
combo boxes 332
creating 335, 336
command bar 31–33
Commission Internationale de
l'Eclairage (CIE) 155
Compare All Page Components To
Detect Changed Pages option 219
Compare Only Page Text To Detect
Changed Pages option 219
Compare Pages command 294
compatibility settings
color management 158
comparing versions 127–129
Compress Text And Line Art option 90
compressing files
for electronic distribution 462
in Distiller 131–141
in PDFWriter 88–91
varying settings by image type 140
compression filters 75
Compression job options 136–141
compression methods 132
Consolidate Menu Items In Top-Level
Menu option 197, 222
content type 208
context menus 33
Continuous - Facing layout 42, 463
Continuous layout 42
continuous-tone images,
compressing 132
conversion options, Web page
display 208–213
general 206
resetting 222
Convert All Colors To sRGB/CalRGB
option 159
Convert Everything For Color
Management option 158
Convert Images option 209
Convert Only Images For Color
Management option 159
converting electronic files to
PDF 73–122
converting Microsoft files to PDF 81
converting Web pages to PDF 194–222
by dragging and dropping 203
by specifying a URL 199–201
conversion options 204
HTML page display options 208
preferences 221
text display options 210
turning on warnings 222
Copy File To Clipboard command 293
Copy Link Location command 203
copying
graphics to Clipboard 287
table or formatted text 289
text to Clipboard 286
text to new bookmark 287
to other applications 285
Weblink locations 203
copypage 165
CorelDraw 131
Courier font substitution
troubleshooting 532
Create Adobe PDF
command 81, 82, 542
Create All Thumbnails command 225
Create Bookmarks For New And
Changed Pages command 219
Create Bookmarks To New Content
option 207, 215
Create PDF File command 81
Create Self Sign Menu option 527
creating
buttons 333
check boxes 333
combo boxes 336
form fields 331
form radio buttons 339
list boxes 337
radio buttons 339
signature fields 341
text boxes 344
creating PDF files 36
by dragging and dropping 83, 97, 98
by opening a file 99
in ASCII text format 90
troubleshooting 542
with Print command 83–85
creating PDF forms 330
Crop menu 258
Crop Pages command 257
crop tool 256
cross-platform compatibility 430, 485
in indexes 417
Custdict.spl file 191
Custom Calculation Script option 374
Custom color option 319
Custom colors palette 319
Custom command 257
custom data fields
defining 432
Document Identifier 420
Document Info 420
Document Number 420
Document Type 420
custom dictionary, editing 191
Custom Margins command 257
custom stamps 309
Custom Validation Script option 380
D
Date Info fields 451
DCS comments 165
Default Selection Type menu 290
Default Transition option 45
defining opening view 463
Delete All Thumbnails command 226
Delete Bookmarks command 234
Delete command 246
Delete Pages command 266, 267
destinations 245–248
creating 246
deleting 246, 248
going to 52, 246
linking to 246, 247
listing 245
moving to 246
Name bar 245
Page bar 245
renaming 246
scanning 246
setting 246
Destinations palette 245
device-dependent color 154, 157, 158
device-independent color 155, 157
digital signature
form fields 332
digital signatures
See signatures
Digital Signatures preferences 504
Display Open Dialog At Startup
option 65
Display Poster option 395
Display Splash Screen At Startup
option 65
Display Stamp For Valid Signatures
option 527
Distiller 96–122
compared to PDFWriter 77
converting files to PDF 96–109
creating PostScript files 102–109
font access 141–149
job options 100–101, 123–149
memory requirements 97, 547
naming files 178
options 123–177
preferences 177–178
printer drivers 105
processing priority 544
restarting after error 177
Run command 111
troubleshooting 543
watched folders 112–115
Distinguish Between Full And Half
Width Kana option 55
distinguished name (DN) 519
Distinguished Name option 511
distributing documents
electronically 459–487
compressing 462
cross-platform considerations 485
preparing documents 460–469
document collections
indexing 486
opening view 465
optimizing 475
organizing 469–473
security 468
testing 472
Document Identifier field 420
document identifiers 430
Document Info fields 414
Boolean operators in 451, 454, 457
custom data 420
Document Identifier 420
Document Number 420
Document Type 420
filling out 419
in indexes 419
searching with 451
wild-card characters in 451, 454
Document Info menu 56
document information, adding 462
Document JavaScripts command 373
document level
JavaScript 371, 411, 412
Document Number field 420
document pane 29
document pane menu 32
document structuring conventions
comments. See DCS comments
Document Type field 420
Download Asian Fonts option 60
Download Status dialog box 201
downloading
Acrobat Reader 471
downloading from the Web 194–204
by level 200
page-at-a-time 70
troubleshooting 552
Downsample Images option 90
downsampling
average 135
bicubic 135
captured pages 190
file size 193
See also resampling
dragging and dropping
image files 118
in Distiller 110
in PDFWriter 97
drivers 17
DSC comments 120
retaining 165
E
Eastern European Language support 9
Edit Refresh Commands List
command 220
Edit URL command 252
editing
annotations 321
combining PDF files 260
configured pictures 512
copying files 259
copying pages 259
cropping and rotating pages 256
deleting pages 266, 267
extracting pages 265
form fields 355
graphic markup annotations 316
graphic objects 283
images 280
movies 392
moving and copying with
thumbnails 262
moving files 259
moving pages 259
PDF pages 280
renumbering pages 271
replacing pages 266, 269
revising text 274
rotating pages 259
signatures 497
text 273
with structured bookmarks 264
with thumbnails 261
ellipse tool 297, 313, 315
properties 315
e-mailing PDF documents 459
Embed Platform Fonts option 210, 211
EMBED tag 480
embedding fonts 91–96, 144–149
preventing 148
threshold 147
embedding PDF documents in
HTML 480–484
Enable Signature Toolbar Button
command 504
Entrust Security. See Acrobat Entrust
Security
epilogue file 164
EPS files
centering and resizing 166
exporting 120
keeping origin information 166
troubleshooting 556
error log file 546
error messages 560
Escape Key Exits option 45
Even Pages Only command 258
Excel, creating PDF files from 81
Execute Menu Item option 398
Export fonts 75
export values, form 369
exporting
annotations 328
CGI values 369
for color separations 120
form data 384
Extract Pages command 265
F
FDF 327, 364
field level JavaScript 371, 411
file annotation tool 297, 311
file construction, PDF 76
file conversion options 164
File Format option 120
file formats
content description 208
PDF 75
file size
reducing 130
reducing in PDFWriter 88
file-naming conventions 461, 486
Filter Manager command 324
Find Again command 53
Find Annotation command 302
Find Backwards option 54
Find command 53, 533
Find First Suspect command 188
Find Next command 302
Find Previous command 302
First Page button 31, 47
Fit Height option 254
Fit In Window command 41
Fit Page option 254
Fit Text To Selection command 278
Fit To Page option 60
Fit View option 254
Fit Visible command 41
Fit Visible option 255
Fit Width command 41
Fit Width option 254
Fixed option 254
floating window, movie 391
font display, slow 533
font folders 143
Font Name option 291
font recognition 185
Font Size option 291
Font Style option 291
font subsetting 146
page capture 186
font substitution 92, 141, 144
printer fonts for Asian TrueType
fonts 171
fonts
downloading to printer 60
embedding in PDF files 91–96
giving Distiller access to 141–149
HTML options 209
including in PostScript file 121
information on 57
PostScript names 149
specifying for text files 211
troubleshooting 539, 542
Fonts job options 146–149
footers, conversion options 206
Force Language Level 3 option 60
Force These Settings For All Pages
option 209
Form Data command 384
Form Data Format 327, 364
form fields
See also signature fields
action 347
appearance 346
calculations in 351
changing appearance of 360
creating 331
creating buttons 333
creating check boxes 333
creating combo boxes 335
creating list boxes 335
creating radio buttons 339
creating signature 341
creating text boxes 344
digital signatures 332
duplicating 359
editing 355
export values 369
exporting data 384
filling in 385
format options 348
grid preferences 362
importing data 384
positioning on grid 361
securing 168
selecting 353
setting tabbing order 363
show/hide 408
validating 349
form tool 401
for signature fields 494
format options, setting for
form fields 349
formatted text, selecting 287
forms
clearing in a browser 387
creating PDF forms 330
designing, building, and editing 353
form fields 331
import data buttons 366
making web ready 364
reset and submit buttons 364
Resubmit Form Data 219
submitting images 368
templates 381
Forms Grid command 362
FrameMaker 79
FSSD sound files 389
FTP transfer, PostScript files 103
Full Screen view 43–45
G
gamut, color 153
general document information 56
General job options 127–131
General preferences. See preferences
and names of specific preferences
general printing options 59
Generate Thumbnails option 130
getting information
from document DCS 166
on certificates 520
on converting PostScript files to
PDF 109
on signatures 525
getting started 4–28
GIF image files 117
downloading 196
Go Back button 53
Go Back Doc command 53
Go Forward button 53
Go Forward Doc command 53
Go To Destination command 246
Go To Next Page option 400
Go To Next View button 53
Go To Page command 48, 540
Go To Previous View button 53
Go To View command 539
Go To View option 398
gradients, banding in 130
graphic markup tools 297, 312
editing 316
ellipse tool 297, 313
highlight text tool 298
line tool 297, 313
pencil tool 297, 313
rectangle tool 297, 313
strikethrough text tool 298
underline text tool 298
graphics
copying and pasting to other
applications 285
graphics select tool 59, 287
Grayscale color space 152, 158
grayscale images
color model 152
color space profile 160
compressing 88
resampling and
compressing 136–141
greeking text 63
grid
show/hide for form fields 362
snap to 362
Group Size For CD-ROM option 431
H
halftone information
preserving 162
handheld organizers. See Palm
organizers
headers, conversion options 206
helper application, Acrobat as 71
hidden field, JavaScript 380
Hidden Text files 414
hidden tools 32
Hide Command Bar command 31
Hide Menu Bar command 31
Hide Tool Bar command 32
Highlight Next/Previous button 68
highlight text tool 298, 317
horizontal scale option 277
HREF tag 476
HTML pages
display options 208
downloading from the Web 194–204
dragging and dropping 203
embedding PDF 480–483
forms in 196
linking to PDF files 476
links in 196
hybrid CD format 485
I
IBM WorkPad PC Companion
organizer. See Palm organizers
ICC compliance 156
ICC profiles 156–163
attaching 157–163
device-dependent CMYK 58
embedding in images 159
Illustrator 79, 131, 280
calibrating color 161
configuring 20
image file
See also images
image files
combining 117
converting to PDF 117–120
image quality
troubleshooting 534, 545
image submission button 368
images
compressing 88–91
converting to CalRGB 159
displaying large 64
editing 280
importing 117
including embedded in PDF
conversion 209
preventing selection of 168
scanning 184
troubleshooting 535
verifying changes on Web 221
images. See also image files
Import Form Data option 398
Import Key File option 517
importing
annotations 328
form data 366, 384
importing graphics 117
Indentation option 292
Index Default preferences 427
Index Definition
changing 426
index definition file 416
Index Disk Cache Size option 432, 433
indexes
defining and building 422
definition of 422
deleting 425
description of 421
drag-and-drop (Mac OS) 424
excluding words 429
incremental updates 435
moving 422, 437
optimizing for CD 430
options 427
purging 435
rebuilding 424, 435
reducing size 433
restarting a build 426
scheduling a build 434
stopping a build 426
troubleshooting 556
updating automatically 434
indexing
document collections 414
document collections on CD 486
Index Description 421
naming files 417
options 427
organizing document
collections 416
required disk space 422
Schedule command 434
Search command 439
search options 423
stopping a build 424
tips 433
using Document Info fields 419
using Keywords field 420
using Subject field 420
word search options 428
Inherit Zoom option 255
Insert Object command 293
installing
Acrobat, Mac OS 22, 23
Acrobat, Windows 17, 18
QuickTime, Mac OS 24
signature handlers 489, 493
interface language 63
International Color Consortium (ICC)
standards 156
See also ICC profiles
International Coordinating Committee
for Telephony and Telegraphy
compression. See CCITT
compression
Invisible Rectangle option 249
ISO 9660 filenames 486
J
Japanese fonts
composite 174
troubleshooting 537
Japanese Web pages 197
JavaScript 371
assigning an action 376
automatic date field 372
deleting 413
document level 371, 411, 412
e-mailing a document 378
field level 411
field level scripts 371
hiding fields 380
in forms 371
plug-in level 371, 411, 413
read only field 381
subtraction and division 374
with actions 411
JavaScript Console command 412
JavaScript Document command 412
JavaScript option 398, 412
job options 123–149
advanced 163–167
customizing 125
Distiller 100–101
general 127–131
overriding 141
watched folders 113
JPEG
downloading graphics 196
image files 117
JPEG compression 75, 134
JPEG Medium compression setting 462
jumping to page 47
K
keywords 462
L
Lab color space 158
Lab images
including in PostScript file 121
Large Thumbnails command 225
Last Page button 31, 47
Layout menu 404, 406
Leave Color Unchanged
option 158, 160
Limit Lines Per Page option 212
limiting access to PDF files 167
line art 131
compressing 139
Line Spacing option 292
line tool 297, 313, 315
properties 315
lines and rules, missing 536
link tool 247, 249
links 248, 251
appearance 249
changing properties of 250
creating 248
creating Weblinks 251
deleting 251
editing 250
editing Weblinks 252
following 51
magnification options 254
on replaced pages 76
troubleshooting 546
visible rectangle 249
with bookmarks 233
list boxes 332
creating 335, 337
Log Compatibility Warnings
option 418
Log DSC Warnings option 165
Logging preferences 418
logical page numbers 64
Loop After Last Page option 45
lossless compression 132
lossy compression 132
LZW compression filter 75
M
Macromedia FreeHand 79, 131
magnification 31
troubleshooting 541
magnification options
with links 254
magnifying view 39–41
default 64
maximum 64
setting opening 464
MakeCID utility 142, 174, 175
managing color 150–163
MAPI server 459
Margins menu 257
Match Case option 54, 428, 450, 455
Match Whole Word Only option 54
media clips 388
adding 391
adding movies 388, 389
adding sound 388, 393
editing movies 392
editing sound clips 394
file types 389
play actions 396
play mode 391
playing 396
Quick Time 389
system requirements 389
tips for adding 395
memory requirements
Distiller 547
memory requirements, Distiller 97
menu bar 29
missing 536
message.log file 546
Messaging Application Program
Interface (MAPI) 459
Microsoft application files
converting to PDF 81
Middle Eastern language support 9
monitors, default color 151
monochrome images
compressing 88
resampling and
compressing 138–141
unexpected viewing results 138
mouse actions 402, 410
Mouse Cursor option 45
Mouse Down 402, 403
Mouse Enter 402, 410
Mouse Exit 410
Mouse Up 377, 402, 403
Movie option 398
Movie Poster option 391
movie posters 395
movie tool 390
movies
adding 389, 391
appearance 392
as an action 388
color display options 391
editing 392
floating window 391
movie poster option 391
moving and resizing frame 392
options 390, 392
play actions 391
playing 396
Quick Time 389
system requirements 389, 396
tips for adding 395
MS-DOS file-naming convention 461
Multiple Master fonts 75, 92
substituting for missing fonts 145
N
naming conventions. See file-naming
conventions
navigating
with bookmarks 229
with thumbnails 223
navigating PDF documents 46–53
navigation methods 223–255
Navigation Pane button 31
nested bookmarks 235
New Bookmark
command 232, 233, 287
New Bookmarks From Structure
command 217
New Destination command 247
new features 4
Next Page button 31, 46
None action 399
notes
securing 168
notes tool 297, 303
options 304
Notify When Startup Volume Is Nearly
Full option 178
Notify When Watched Folders Are
Unavailable option 178
nppdf32.dll file, installing 72
Number Pages command 272
numbering pages 64
O
Object Linking and
Embedding 285, 293
OBJECT tag 482
OCF (old composite format) 172
OCR 185
language for 189
Odd Pages Only command 258
OLE 285, 293
commands 285
compound document 285
Only Get Pages Under Same Path
option 200
Open command (Catalog) 426
Open File option 398
Open In Full Screen Mode option 465
Open Info option 228
Open Page In Web Browser
command 220
open password 467
Open Web Page command 199, 204
Open Weblink As New Document
command 203
Open Weblink In Browser
command 221
opening
application files in Acrobat 99
converted Web pages 220
image files in Acrobat 119
PDF files automatically 84, 85
PostScript files in Acrobat 110
Weblinks 203, 220
opening linked documents and views
in same window 65
opening PDF files 38, 541
opening view, defining 463
OPI comments 166
optical character recognition. See OCR
Optimize For CD-ROM option 430
Optimize option 227
Optimize PDF option 130, 139
optimizing PDF documents for the
Web 474–476
output file type 189
output profiles 155
overprinting
preserving settings 161
owner password 467
P
page actions 400
deleting 401
editing 401
Go to Next Page 400
Page Close 400
Page Open 400
Set Page Action command 400
Page Close option 400
page controls 31
page cropping, troubleshooting 535
Page Down/Up button 47
page edge, printing 64
Page Info command 218
page layouts
default 63
for converted Web pages 212
for document viewing 41–43
Page Only view 464
Page Open option 400
page orientation, troubleshooting 537
page recognition 185
page setup
PDFWriter 86
Page Setup command 59
page size
changing 87
custom 103
default 163, 166
units 63
page view, defining 464
page-at-a-time downloading 70
PageMaker 79
calibrating color 161
pages
capturing 185
cropping and rotating 256
orientation 87
rotating 257
scaling 87
scanning 179–184
specifying print range 121
paging through documents 46–53
quickly 66
palette menu
choosing commands from 36
palettes 34–36
Palm organizers
configuring signatures 512–516
Paper Capture command 189
Paragraph Formatting options 292
Alignment 292
Indentation 292
Line Spacing 292
Space Before/After 292
passwords 167, 466
changing signature 508
information on 57
signature 507
Passwords option 228
Paste Special command 293
pasting
to other applications 285
PCL printing, troubleshooting 555
PCX image file 117
PDF Document Language option 291
PDF documents
adding structured bookmarks 217
converted from Web pages 194
displaying in Web browser 66
distributing on CD 485–487
distributing on the Web 473–484
downloading in background 65
editing signed 493
e-mailing 459
embedding in HTML 480–483
finding words in 53
from Microsoft files 81
from other applications 96
getting information on 55–58
linking to HTML 476
naming 461
opening view 57, 464
optimizing 474–476
preparing to distribute 460–469
reading embedded 68
scaling embedded 483
security 466–469
signing 493
version 490
PDF file size
troubleshooting 547
PDF files
advantages 75
combining PostScript 115–116
construction of 76
controlling size 191
converting with Distiller 96–115
converting with PDFWriter 82–119
displaying converted files 178
exporting to PostScript 120
for high-quality output 124
for online viewing 123
for printed output 124
general properties 75
making colors device-independent
158
optimizing 130
overwriting alert 178
security 167
using Asian TrueType fonts in 170
version 1.2 129
version 1.3 129
PDF Image Only file 117, 185
PDF Normal file 185, 187, 189, 414
PDF Original Image file 414
PDF Original Image With Hidden Text
file 187, 189
PDFMaker 81, 238, 263
PDFViewer plug-in
installing 72
PDFWriter 81
Capture Pages command 186
compared to Distiller 77
compression options 88–91
creating PDF files 82
job options 86–95
shortcut key 85
troubleshooting 550
PDX file 416, 426
pencil tool 297, 313, 314
options 314
performance, improving 529
personal address book. See address
books
PFN icon 384
Pfn_kit 384
photographs, compressing 132
Photoshop 280
configuring 20
Photoshop Acquire plug-ins 180
PICT format 117, 287
pictures, as signatures 509–512
play mode, movies 391
Play Once Then Stop option 391, 396
Play Once, Stay Open option 391
plug-in level JavaScript 371, 411, 413
plug-ins, managing 26
PNG image file 117
Portable Document Format (PDF). See
PDF files
PostScript error messages in
Distiller 575
PostScript files
color information 157
combining 115–116
converting to PDF 109–115
creating color separations 120
creating in Windows 107–108
creating on Mac OS 108–109
creating with Distiller 102–109
examples 104
exporting to 120
FTP transfer 103
in watched folders 112–115
job ticket 165
language level 120
troubleshooting 548, 549
varying compression with 140
PostScript printers 60
PowerPoint
creating PDF files from 81
PPD files 103, 104
PPK system 504
preferences 62–66
Acrobat Self Sign 527
annotations 325
Catalog 431
digital signatures 504
Distiller 177–178
Full Screen view 44
Index Default 427
Search 457
Prepress option 58, 121
Preserve Document Information From
DSC option 166
Preserve EPS Information From DSC
option 166
Preserve Halftone Information
option 162
Preserve Level 2 Copypage Semantics
option 165
Preserve OPI Comments option 166
Preserve Overprint Settings option 161
Preserve Transfer Functions option 161
Preserve Under Color Removal And
Black Generation Settings
option 161
PressOptimized job options 101, 124
Previous Page button 31, 46
Print 4 Color ICC Profiles As Device
CMYK option 122
Print As Image option 60
Print Method option 60
Print4 Color option 58
printer drivers 17
See also names of specific printer
drivers
required version 96
printing
PDF documents 58–62, 82–85
PDF from HTML document 482
preventing 168
troubleshooting 554
printing from the Web,
troubleshooting 552
printing inks 152
printing, PCL
troubleshooting 555
PrintOptimized job options 100, 124
private key 505
private/public key (PPK) system 504
Process All Subfolders option 227
profiles, Acrobat Self Sign 505, 521
changing password 508
creating 506
prologue file 164
Prompt For Document Info option 85
Proximity option 444, 450, 455
public key 505
Purge command 435, 436
Put Headers And Footers On New
Pages option 207
Q
Quark XPress 79
queries
Boolean operators in 455
expanding 454
limiting searches 455
refining searches 446
setting search options 449
terms or phrases 453
tips on defining 452
Word Assistant 448
Query command 441, 446, 448
QuickTime
installing, Mac OS 24
QuickTime movies 389
R
radio buttons 332
creating 339
RAM, increasing 529
RC4 security method 167, 467
Read Article option 399
Reader. See Acrobat Reader
reading embedded PDF documents 68
readonly 381
rectangle tool 297, 313, 315
options 315
reducing view 39–41
Reflow Text option 211
Refresh Pages command 219
refreshing Web pages 218
registering your product 16
relevancy ranking 444
Proximity option 450
removing
certificates 518
configured pictures 512
font folders 143
signatures 497
watched folders 114
Rename command 246
renumbering pages 271
Begin New Section option 272
Merge With Previous Section
option 272
Repeat Play option 391
Replace Pages command 266, 269
resampling 135
PDF files 131–141
Rescan Document command 296, 300
Reset Form option 399
resetting
Web Capture warnings 222
Web page conversion options 222
Resize Page And Center Artwork For
EPS Files option 166
Resize Window To Initial Page
option 465
resizing
page views 41
pages when printing 60
resolution
for scanning pages 181
PDFWriter downsampling 88
printing 87
setting in Distiller 130
Restart Distiller After PostScript Fatal
Error option 177
restricting features 466
Resubmit Form Data option 219
retracing viewing path 53
RGB color space 151, 158
profile 160
RGB images
including in PostScript file 121
Rollback To Signature command 503
Rotate Pages command 257, 259
RSA algorithm 506
RTF 287
Run command 111
Run Length compression 132, 134
RunFileEx file 116
Runfilex.ps file 116
S
Save As, from the Web 553
Save Portable Job Ticket Inside PDF
File option 165
Save Refresh Commands
option 207, 219
Scale How options 408
Scale When options
Always 407
Never 408
Too Big 408
Too Small 408
Scale Wide Contents To Fit Page
option 213
scaling
embedded documents 483
pages 87
Scan command 180
Scan Document command 246
scanner software, troubleshooting 549
scanners, using 184
scanning pages 179–184
retaining original image 190
Schedule command 426, 434
ScreenOptimized job options 100, 123
Search command 414, 439, 441
error messages 577
full-text search 441
search options
Case Sensitive 423
See also word search options 428
setting 449
Sounds Like 423
Word Stemming 423
Search preferences 457
Search Previous option 445
search results
document title or filename 56
PDF documents in Web site 68
refining 446
relevancy ranking 444
viewing 443
Search Results window 446
searchable document information,
adding 463
searching
in a Web browser 68
troubleshooting 558
searching indexes 439
Boolean operators in 450, 455
customizing index selection 440
excluding numbers 453
expanding a search 454
full-text search 441
limiting searches 455
queries 448
Query command 441
refining results 446
refining searches 446
relevancy ranking 444
Search command 441
selecting an index 440
separator characters 453
stopwords 453
terms or phrases 453
tips on queries 452
using Word Assistant 447
viewing results 443
wild-card characters 450
with Date Info 451
with Document Info 451
securing documents 466–469
security
for linked PDF documents 66
for PDF files 167
for watched folders 113
information on 228
Security option 57
See also PDF documents
See also PDF files
Select All command 286
Select Indexes command 440
select text tool, troubleshooting 533
selecting
formatted text 287
tables 287
tools 32
Selecting Text And Graphics option
168
Send Mail command 459
Send TrueType Fonts to Printer
option 170
separator characters 453
Set Bookmark Destination
command 234
Set Destination command 246
Set Page Action command 400
Set Tab Order command 363
Short (DOS) File Names option 85
Show Articles command 242
Show Bookmarks command 230
Show Bookmarks When New File
Opened option 222
Show Capture Suspects command 187
Show Clipboard command 286, 287
Show Command Bar command 31
Show Destinations
command 245, 246, 248
Show Line Markers command 279
Show Navigation Pane button 230
Show Progress Dialog option 253
Show Thumbnails command 224
Show Tool Bar command 32
Show Toolbar Button option 222, 253
Show/Hide Field action 399
Show/Hide Navigation Pane
button 224
showpage 165
signature fields 494–496
action options 342
blank 342
creating 341
duplicate 495
signature handlers 493, 496
default 504
installing
signature tool 496
including in toolbar 504
signatures 488–527
adding 496–497, 522–524
editing 497
explained 489
getting information on 525
handwriting on organizers 512–516
identifying 499
pictures as 509–512
tracking 491
validating 498–501, 517, 524
signatures handlers. See also Acrobat
Self Sign and Acrobat Entrust
Security
Signatures palette 294, 491
signed documents, viewing 502
signing documents 493–497
with Acrobat Self Sign 522–524
simple text format, ANSI 287
Single Page command 257
Single Page layout 41
Skip Editing Warnings option 66
Small Thumbnails command 225
smoothing text and images 63
sound
as an action 388
system requirements 396
sound clips
adding 393
appearance of 394
editing 394
play options 394
playing 396
tips for adding 395
sound files
AIF 389
Sound Mover (FSSD) 389
System 7 sound files 389
system requirements 389
WAV 389
Sound Mover files 389
Sound option 399
Sounds Like option 415, 423, 428, 448,
449
Space Before/After option 292
special effects 397
actions 397
assigning mouse actions 410
buttons 401
executing a command 397
page actions 397
playing a media clips 397
show/hide field 397, 408
sRGB color space
converting images to 159
staging document collections 472
stamp tool 297, 307
adding custom stamps 309
changing the stamp 308
options 307
replacing a stamp annotation 323
stamps 307
replacing 323
starting
Acrobat, Mac OS 25
Acrobat, Windows 21
status bar 31
page numbers in 47
Stay On Same Server option 200
stopwords 429, 437, 453
strikethrough text tool 298, 317
structured bookmarks 215–217, 229
appending Weblinks 203
conversion options 206
copying and moving pages with 264
creating 238
deleting 216
deleting pages with 268
moving 216
updating 219
Submit Form action 399
Submit Form option 399
subsampling 136
Subset All Embedded Fonts Below
option 147
substituting fonts 63
Summarize Annotations
command 324
Superscripts/Subscripts option 292
Suspect Image window 188
suspect words 187
Symbol fonts 75, 94
System 7 sound files 389
system requirements 14
movie and sound files 389, 396
T
tabbing order, forms 363
Table command 290
table/formatted text select tool 287
Table/Formatted Text Tool
command 290
tables, selecting 287
Tag Everything For Color Mgmt
option 158
Tag Only Images For Color
Management option 159
templates, form 381
testing
CDs 486
document collections 472
text
appearance 276
compressing 139
converting Asian 169–177
copying and pasting to other
applications 285
correcting when capturing 187–188
editing 273
Hidden Text 414
in image files 117
preventing color shifts 159
preventing selection 168
revising 274
scanning 139, 181–183
selecting formatted 287
setting color 211
Text - Flow option 289
Text - Preserve Line Breaks option 289
Text And Background option 211
text annotation tool 297, 305
options 305
text attributes
baseline 277
character scale 277
fonts 276
shift 277
spacing 277
text alignment options 277
tracking 277
Text Attributes command 276
text boxes 332
creating 344
options 344
Text Color option 291
Text command 290
text files
display options 210
from PDF 129
from PDF files 90
text markup tools 298, 317
highlight text tool 317
options 318
printing with 318
strikethrough text tool 317
underline text tool 317
text select tool 285
text tool 297
Text, Background, Links, And Alt Text
option 209
Thesaurus 448, 449
threshold, font embedding 147
thumbnails 223, 228
batch processing 227
creating 224, 225, 227
deleting 224, 226, 227
deleting pages with 268
editing with 261
effect on file size 130
large 225
moving and copying pages between
documents 262
moving and copying pages in same
document 262
navigating with 50
replacing pages 270
resizing view 41
selecting pages to print using 59
small 225
Thumbnails And Page view 464
Thumbnails palette 224
TIFF image file 117
tips
controlling file size 191
creating PostScript files 102
defining search queries 452
expanding an index search 454
limiting index searches 455
reducing index size 433
scanning pages 181–184
tool bar 31–33
missing 536
tools
selecting 32
touchup
fit to selection 278
line markers 279
text attributes 276
TouchUp command 276
touchup object tool 273, 280, 282
touchup text tool 274, 276
tracking option 277
transfer functions, preserving 161
trapping information 58
TrueType fonts 75, 91, 94
Asian 169–171
converting to Type 1 121
embedding 144
TWAIN scanner drivers 180
Type 1 fonts 75, 91, 94
Asian ATM 171, 173
embedding 144
location 141
Type 32 fonts 142
U
UCR 161
undercolor removal 161
Underline Links option 209
underline text tool 298, 317
uninstalling Acrobat, Windows 22
URL
base 58
displaying 252
editing 252
specifying 199–201
Use Floating Window option 391
Use Logical Page Numbers option 64
Use Page Cache option 66
Use Printer Halftone Screens option 62
User Floating Window option 395
V
validating
with javaScript 380
validating signatures 498–501
in Acrobat Self Sign 524
validation options, for form fields 350
validation period 520
validation strings 518–519
defined 520
vector graphics 131
Verify Stored Images option 221
View PDF File option 84, 85
View PDF When Using Distiller Printer
option 178
View Web Links command 202
viewing in a Web browser,
troubleshooting 554
viewing path
retracing 53
viewing PDF documents 39–45
before saving 84
earlier signed versions 502
on the Web 67–70
troubleshooting 531
virtual memory
scanning requirements 181
Visible Rectangle option 249
W
warning boxes, disabling 66
watched folders 112–115
prologue and epilogue files 164
troubleshooting 543, 550
unavailable 178
WAV sound files 389
Web browsers
configuring 69–72
displaying PDF documents 66, 67
installing 72
searching in 68
troubleshooting 551
Web Capture 194–222
Web Capture preferences 221
Web pages
appending links 201
conversion options 204
deleting 217
displaying backgrounds 209
getting information on 218
moving 217
PDF structure 206
updating converted 218
wrapping lines 209, 211
Web. See also World Wide Web
Weblink preferences 253–254
Weblinks
Base URL 58
converting to PDF 201
creating 251
dragging and dropping 203
editing 251, 252
opening 221
opening converted pages 220
opening in a new PDF document 203
troubleshooting 553
underlining 209
Welcome page 470
width-only fonts 142
copying to Windows 177
creating 175
wild-card characters 450
window options 465
WMF format 287
Word
creating PDF files from 81
Word Assistant 428, 448
using in searches 447, 449
Word Assistant command 448
word search options 448
Case Sensitive 428
disabling 429
expanding a search 455
limiting searches 455
Match Case 450
Proximity 450
setting 449
Sounds Like 428, 449
Thesaurus 449
Word Stemming 428, 449
word spacing option 277
Word Stemming option 415, 423, 428,
448, 449
WordPerfect, troubleshooting 550, 551
words, correcting 187–188
work area 29
World Wide Web
distributing PDF documents
on 473–484
downloading pages 194–204
World Wide Web Link
action type 252, 399
option 399
Wrap Lines At Margin option 211
Wrap Lines Inside PREs Longer Than
option 209
X
xref tables 76
Z
ZIP compression 90, 134, 139
ZIP compression filter 75
Zoom To option 45
zoom tools 40
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