D3--HSC High Speed Counter

D3--HSC High Speed Counter

D3--HSC

High Speed Counter

Manual Number D3--HSC-M

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Manual Revisions

If you contact us in reference to this manual, please include the revision number.

1

Title: DL--305 High Speed Counter

Manual Number: D3--HSC--M

Issue

Original

Rev. A

Date

7/95

6/98

Effective Pages

Cover/Copyright

Contents 1--22

Back Cover

Entire Manual

Manual Revisions

Description of Changes

Original Issue

Downsize to spiral

Rev. A

1

Table of Contents

Getting Started

Manual Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Introduction to High Speed Counters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

What is a High Speed Counter?

Types of Counting

Using Presets and Current Count

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Who Needs a High Speed Counter?

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

What is a Preset and Current Count?

Positive Value Requirement

The HSC Outputs

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Using an Offset Value for Current Count . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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External Outputs OUTPUT1 and OUTPUT2

Two Modes of Controlling Outputs

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Output Logic Control

Status Flags (I/O Points)

Counter Reset

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Current Count Outputs in BCD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

External Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Two Response Rates

General Specifications

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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3 Steps For Setting Up and Using the D3-HSC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Installation and Wiring

Installing the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Selecting a Slot for the HSC Module

Selecting the Response Rate

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Inserting the Module in the Base . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Wiring the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

General Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Soldering the Wires to the Connector Block

Wiring for UP/ DOWN Counting

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Encoder Wiring Diagram

Output Wiring Diagram

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Reset Wiring Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BCD Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

I/O Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

11

11

11

11

10

10

10

10

12

13

14

15

16

4

5

4

4

3

4

3

3

2

3

5

5

5

5

6

7

8

9

7

7

ii

Table of Contents

Writing the Program

Writing the Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

How to Enter Your Program:

Setup Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Flow Diagram of SetupLogic

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Setting Up the Counters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Programming Conventions

Preset and Current Count

Relationship Between Preset and Current Count

What Happens After the Counter Reaches the Upper Limit?

Overflow

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Setting Up the Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

How to Control The Outputs:

Flow Diagram of SetupLogic

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Table 1: Status of Mode and Logic Controls in the Automatic Mode

Setting Mode and Output Logic Control

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Putting It All Together -- Examples

Example 1: Activating both Outputs Automatically

Example 2: Mixing Modes of Operation for Outputs

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Example 3: Changing Presets On the Fly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

22

23

24

20

20

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21

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17

17

D3--HSC

High-Speed Counter

In This Manual. . . .

— Getting Started

— Installation and Wiring

— Writing the Program

— Putting It All Together -- Examples

2

Getting Started

Overview

The Purpose of this Manual

This manual is designed to allow you to setup and install your D3--HSC High-Speed Counter

(HSC).

Supplemental

Manuals

Here are two additional manuals that you may find necessary or helpful:

User Manuals

D

DL305 User Manual

D

DirectSoft Programming Software part number part number

D3--USER--M

DA--DSOFT--M

Who Should Read this Manual

Quality Technical

Manuals and

Technical Support

If you need a High-Speed Counter for your DL305 PLC and you understand the basics of installing and programming PLCs, this is the right manual for you.

We strive to make our manuals the best in the industry, and we rely on your feedback to let us know if we are reaching our goal. If you cannot find the solution to your particular application, or, if for any reason you need additional assistance, please call us at 800--633--0405. Our technical support group is glad to work with you in answering your questions. They are available weekdays from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00

p.m. Eastern Time. You can also contact us on the worldwide web at:

http://www.plcdirect.com

(PLCDirect Web site for general info/file transfers)

You can also find a variety of support solutions at our 24--hour per day BBS at:

770--844--4209

If you find a problem with any of our products, services, or manuals, please fill out and return the ’Suggestions’ card that came with this manual.

Getting Started

3

Introduction to High Speed Counters

What is a High

Speed Counter?

Who Needs a High

Speed Counter?

Types of Counting

Literally, high speed counters count fast! The DL305 High Speed Counter (D3-HSC) has its own microprocessor that asynchronously counts and accumulates the high speed pulses. The D3-HSC will count pulses from sensors, encoders, switches, and so on, at two different response modes. You can use its10 kHz mode when measuring the fast pulses ( 500 Hz to 10kHz), or you can use the 500 Hz mode when measuring pulses being transmitted at a much slower frequency (below 500 Hz).

Both frequencies require 50% duty cycle.

If you are using a DL305 system and have an application that needs to count pulses rapidly, then you are a prime candidate for an HSC. In most applications, the HSC counts pulses being sent from encoders.

DL305 System

2 outputs:

OUTPUT1

OUTPUT2

Encoders are used to emit pulses in relation to a turning motor shaft. The encoders emit a certain number of pluses with each shaft rotation. By counting the pulses, you can easily determine the position of things being controlled by the motors. The pulses are counted at high speed, and are then compared to a preset that you define in your program. The results of this comparison control the built-in HSC outputs or can be used to perform operations within your RLL program.

HSC

Encoder

An example application could be as follows: An encoder could be connected to a motor shaft that is moving boards into position for cutting. An output (OUTPUT1) could control the OFF and ON signal to a motor that advances the boards. Since the same current count and preset can be setup to affect both outputs, you could use

OUTPUT2 to control the cutting blade.

The D3-HSC can do standard UP and DOWN counting. It cannot do quadrature

counting, and therefore cannot be used with a quadrature encoder. The UP/DOWN input signals can come from standard 1--channel encoders. One channel is used for

UP counting and the other channel is used for DOWN counting.

Using 1 Encoder for UP Counting

UP

INA

Using 1 Encoder for DOWN Counting

INB

DWN

3 3

4

Getting Started

Using Presets and Current Count

What is a Preset and Current Count?

High speed counters allow you to enter a target pulse count value (called the Preset

) that you can use to make some event (or events) happen. The event could be turning on a lamp, starting a motor, tripping a switch--virtually anything. When the

HSC starts counting pulses the accumulated count is continuously being written to the HSC’s memory. This value is referred to as the Current Count. In most applications, when current count equals preset (C = P), the event or events will be triggered. The D3--HSC will turn ON or OFF up to two external outputs when C = P.

You determine whether the outputs are turned ON or OFF when you write your ladder logic. Actually with the D3--HSC you are given the option to automatically turn outputs ON or OFF when C = P, or you can turn the outputs on manually at any time regardless of the relationship between C and P. We’ll talk more about automatic and manual operation on the next page.

Normal place to trigger an event (C = P)

Preset Value

Pulse

Count

Using an Offset

Value for Current

Count

Positive Value

Requirement

Time

You do not have to start your current count at zero when starting your high speed counter. If you start at some number other than zero, this is called an “offset”. We’ll show you how to enter the offset when we explain the setup procedure in greater detail.

When setting up the preset or current count offset value, you must use a positive number between 0 and 9999. The D3--HSC does not understand negative numbers.

Getting Started

The HSC Outputs

External Outputs

OUTPUT1 and

OUTPUT2

In most applications, you need to take some type of action when the number of pulses (current count) received equals your preset target (C=P).There are two discrete external outputs (OUTPUT1 and OUTPUT2) for the D3--HSC. The outputs are triggered by a combination of your ladder logic and/or the pulses received on the count inputs of the HSC.

DL305 System

HSC

DL305

5 5

2 outputs:

OUTPUT1

OUTPUT2

INA--UP

Encoder A

Two Modes of

Controlling Outputs

You can control the two outputs of the D3-HSC by choosing one of two modes:

D

Automatic (Mode=1)----If you choose the automatic mode, then the current count alone will determine when an output will change status (ON or OFF).

D

Manual (Mode=0)----If you choose to operate the outputs manually, then the current count of the counter does not affect the outputs. Instead, you can use the outputs just like any normal output, which means you control them with your ladder logic program.

Output Logic Control

Current Count

Outputs in BCD

The relationship between current count and preset controls the outputs, when in automatic mode. However, there is an additional feature called Output Logic Control that lets you choose how the outputs operate. For example, in one application you may want the output to come on when current count equals preset (C=P). However, in another application, you may want the output to go off when current count equals preset (C=P). Fortunately, you can choose the method individually for each point.

Pages 18--19 explain this in more detail.

You cannot read the current count of the HSC by reading an internal register. This is different from the HSC modules offered in the DL205 and DL405 families. However, there are 16 outputs that can be connected to a display (or even an input module) to show the current count in BCD. We’ll talk about this in a later section.

Example Interface for BCD Output of Current Count Value to LED Display

User--Supplied

Display Circuit

6

Getting Started

Status Flags

(Internal Relays)

In addition to the two external outputs (OUTPUT1 and OUTPUT2) and the BCD outputs, the D3-HSC also will set several status flags (C < P, C = P, C > P and

Carry/Borrow) that are assigned to certain I/O points that you can use in your ladder logic. These I/O points are internal to the HSC and have no outside connecting points on the module connector.

Later, we’ll present a table that shows you what memory reference to use in your ladder logic in order for the CPU to read the status of these flags. The numbers referring to the status flag relays are uniquely determined by the base slot position that you choose for your HSC.

Below is a diagram showing the internal and external I/O of the HSC.

Current

Count

BCD

Output

Output1

Output2

Field Devices

HSC

C < P

C = P

C > P

Carry/Borrow

Base Backplane

CPU

Getting Started

Counter Reset

External Reset

Once the pulses have been counted you need a way to reset the counter. There are two options:

D

D

External Reset--You can reset the counter of the HSC externally via a device connected to pins 6A and 6B on the front of the module. The wiring diagram on Page 12 provides the electrical details. This can be a limit switch, proximity switch, photoswitch, or virtually any field device that will provide a logical high pulse (in the range of 3VDC to 7VDC) for a period of at least 100 milliseconds.

Internal Ladder Logic Reset-- You can also reset the counter by using the proper sequence of commands in your ladder logic. You do this by entering a new Current Count value, followed by entering a Preset Value in the same scan cycle. We’ll show you how to do this in the back part of this manual when we show you how to write logic for some specific applications.

Two Response Rates

There are two dip switches located on the circuit board of the HSC----the one marked SW2 (with the letters S and M marking the switch positions) is for matching up the responsiveness of the reset switch with the counting rate. SW1 is for setting the counting rate.

Consequently, when you set the counting rate on SW1 (either 500 Hz or 10 kHz), you will want to set SW2 so that it matches.

SW1

SW2

OPEN

Set response for counting inputs

1 2

S

M

Set response for external reset

Position M= 500 Hz and Position S =

10kHz.

7 7

8

Getting Started

General Specifications

Counter

Counter Speed

Counter Inputs

Reset

Count Value

Counter Preset

Outputs

(External Points)

Status Flags

(Internal Relays)

Item

Output Response

Base Power Requirement

Weight

Specification

UP/DOWN Counter

10 kHz maximum

Dip Switch Selectable Response Rates:

Either 10 kHz or 500 Hz (50% Duty Cycle)

1 Count UP Input

1 Count DOWN Input

External Reset Available

Non-Retentive Upon Power Cycle

Set by CPU Ladder Logic Program

16-Outputs for BCD Display

Output1

Output2

C < P Flag

C = P Flag

C > P Flag

Carry/Borrow Flag

0.01 ms, maximum

9V 70 mA, maximum

4.6 ounces (130 grams)

NOTE: The D3-HSC cannot perform quadrature counting. This module will not work with a quadrature type encoder.

Getting Started

3 Steps For Setting Up and Using the D3-HSC

Step 1: Set Response and Wire

Module

(See “Installation and Wiring”,

Pages 8 through 14)

The HSC has two response speeds--either 10kHz or 500Hz. These are selectable via two sets of dip switches on the side of the module. You should set these to your choice of response speeds. Then, solder the wires to the removable connector block, following the wiring diagram in this manual.

Step 2: Install the Module

(See “Installation and Wiring”,

Pages 8 through 9)

You will decide which slot to use for the

HSC. You have your choice of Slots 0, 1,

2, or 3. This will, in turn, determine the memory locations assigned to the HSC inputs and outputs.

DL305

Choose a slot for the HSC

OPEN

Set response for counting inputs

1 2

S

Removable

Connector

Block

M

Set response for external reset

9 9

Step 3: Write the Setup Program

(See “Writing the Program”,

Pages 15 through 19)

With a segment of ladder logic entered via DirectSOFT or a handheld programmer, you will write ladder logic that sets up the counter and optionally determines the logic and mode of control for the outputs. The setup sequence is as follows:

D

D

D

D

IO020

C160

C160

OUT RST

IO110

SET

IO111

SET

IO112

SET

Set up the current count and preset for the counter.

Select the mode--automatic or manual

If you choose the automatic mode, you must select the Output Logic

Control method (ON-to-OFF or

OFF-ON) for OUTPUT1 and

OUTPUT2

If you choose the manual mode, you must write the logic to control

OUTPUT1 and OUTPUT2 directly.

IO113

SET

Only the first bullet point in Step 3 is necessary if you plan to use no outputs.

10

Installation and Wiring

Installing the Module

Selecting a Slot for the HSC Module

The D3-HSC can occupy Slots 0,1, 2, or 3 of any DL305 base. The module will not

function in any other slots.The memory assignments for the HSC’s inputs and outputs (to be used in your ladder logic) are affected by the slot you choose. Pages

17 through 19 of this manual show you the specific memory assignments for inputs and outputs. For example, the following diagram is of a D3-08B 8-slot base. Notice that the CPU slot has no number.

CPU

Example with

HSC in Slot 1

Slot No.

6 5 4 3 2 1 0

DL305

Base

Power Supply

Selecting the

Response Rate

As mentioned earlier, the response rate for counting is dip switch selectable. Also the speed at which the reset input can be detected is selectable. These switches are on the component side of the module’s internal circuit board. SW1 is at the top and

SW2 at the bottom. Use the table below to select the rate. If the pulses are being sent at a rate higher than 500 Hz, then you need to choose the 10 kHz setting. Be aware

that the frequency response rate of SW1 must match that of SW2 if you plan to use the external reset.

SW1

OPEN

1 2

SW1

Counting Inputs:

Position 1

Position 2

10 kHz

OPEN

OPEN

500 Hz

CLOSED

CLOSED

SW2

S

M

SW2

External Reset

S

Position

M

Position

Inserting the Module in the Base

When inserting components into the base, align the PC board of the HSC module with the grooves on the top and bottom of the base. Push the module straight into the base until it is firmly seated in the backplane connector.

Align module to slots in base and slide in

WARNING: Never connect or install a module into the base while the power is applied. Failure to remove the power prior to the installation can result in damage to the module, other installed modules, the power supply and/or the

CPU itself.

Installation and Wiring

Wiring the Module

General

Considerations

Consider the following guidelines when connecting the field wiring to the D3-HSC.

Soldering the Wires to the Connector

Block

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

There is a maximum size wire the module can accept. We recommend that you use wire that is no smaller than 22 AWG and no larger than 18 AWG.

Always use a continuous length of wire, do not combine wires to attain a desired length.

Use the shortest possible cable length.

Use wire trays for routing where possible

Avoid running wires near high energy wiring.

6.

7.

Avoid running input wiring in close proximity to output wiring where possible.

To minimize voltage drops when wires must run a long distance , consider using multiple wires for the return line.

8.

Avoid running DC wiring in close proximity to AC wiring where possible.

9. Avoid creating sharp bends in the wires.

The D3-HSC is shipped with the connector block and snap-together wire cover packaged separately. This block fits on the 32-pin male connector slot on the front of the module. Before you connect it to the HSC, you may find it easier to solder the wires that you will be connecting from the encoders, the external power supply, the optional BCD outputs, the external reset, and two discrete outputs (OUTPUT1 and

OUTPUT2). Refer to the wiring diagram on the next few pages for details.

Be careful not to create cold solder joints or place so much solder on a connecting pin that it shorts out against a neighboring pin. Make sure you refer to Page 13 for connecting the BCD outputs correctly. Note which bit of the 16-bit word goes with the each weighted position of the BCD value (4 bits per numeral). You don’t want to mix up the bits; otherwise, you will get a current count number that is incorrect.

Take care also to position the wires while soldering so that the cover can be snapped securely around the wires. The cover consists of two pieces. They are held together by small screws and hex nuts. Two long-shaft thumb screws attach the cover securely to the module as a final step.

WARNING: To minimize potential shock, turn off power to the I/O base and any modules installed in the base before inserting or removing a module. Failure to do so may result in potential injury to personnel or damage to the equipment.

Wiring for UP/ DOWN

Counting

On Page 10 of this manual you will be shown how to wire encoders for UP counting or for DOWN counting. Different connecting pins are used for each task.

IMPORTANT: When one channel is counting (either UP or DOWN), the other channel must be held high. If you are using only one encoder, tie the (+) connecting pin for the unused input to the high (positive) side of the encoder’s power supply ; and the (--) pin to the negative side.

12

Installation and Wiring

Encoder Wiring Diagram

10

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

B

16

A

15

14

13

12

11

2

1

B

A

Pin No.

HSC Connector

DOWN Counting

Jumper

2

Encoder

--

12VDC

+

1

B

A

Pin No.

Unused encoder input

1B wired to negative.

Unused encoder input

1A wired to positive.

NOTE: There are two pairs of encoder connecting pins. 1A and 1B are for UP counting and 2A and 2B are for DOWN counting. You must hook your encoder to one set of pins.

The unused set of pins must have the (A) pin connected to the positive side of the encoder supply, and the (B) pin connected to the negative side.

Unused encoder input

2B wired to negative.

UP Counting

Unused encoder input

2A wired to positive.

2

Jumper

12VDC

-+

1

B

A

Encoder

Pin No.

Internal Circuitry

optoisolator

+

Internal circuits on logic side of optoisolator

330 ohms

Internal circuit on field side of optoisolator

To output of encoder

--

Installation and Wiring

Output Wiring Diagram

10

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

B

16

A

15

14

13

12

11

HSC Connector

2

1

B

A

Pin No.

B

16

5

4

3

A

V1+

V1--

Load

Load

5 or 24 VDC

NOTE: Pins 3, 4 and 5 are internally connected. Any one of these pins can be used for the supply wiring.

Internal Circuitry

V1+

Optoisolator

Load

16A

Internal circuits on logic side of optoisolator

Internal circuit on field side of optoisolator

V1+

3A, 4A, or 5A

V1--

3B, 4B, or 5B

5 or 24 VDC

14

Installation and Wiring

Reset Wiring Diagram

10

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

B

16

A

15

14

13

12

11

HSC Connector

2

1

B

A

Pin No.

B

6

A

Internal Circuitry

optoisolator

Internal circuits on logic side of optoisolator

330 ohms

Internal circuit on field side of optoisolator

+

--

+

5 or 12 VDC

--

Installation and Wiring

BCD Outputs

The CPU cannot read the current count directly, but there are 16 BCD outputs for driving a BCD display or connecting to a DC input module to read the current count into the CPU. The 16-connecting points (7A&B thru 14A&B) are attached to the BCD input of the drivers for visually displaying the BCD value or you can wire them to an input module. Such a configuration is completely optional, and requires that you supply the external devices. You determine the voltage level of these 16 points through your choice of an external power supply with the positive side connected to points 3A, 4A, 5A, and negative side connected to 3B, 4B, and 5B.

Internal

Power

V1

Note:

Pins 3, 4 and 5 are internally connected.

B

16

A

15

14

13

Example Interface for BCD Output of Current Count Value to LED Display

HSC Connector

Bit No.

Drivers

Thousands

LEDs

15

14

13

12

8000

4000

2000

1000

12

11

Hundreds

10

9

11

10

9

8

800

400

200

100

8

Tens

7

6

5

4

7

6

5

4

80

40

20

10

3

2

1

B A

Pin No.

+

--

5 or 12 VDC

3

2

1

0

8

4

2

1

Units

User--Supplied Display Circuit

Negative

Logic

10K

BCD Output Circuit (For Interfacing Display Device or Input Module)

V1+

Sinking

Sourcing

V1+

10K

Load

Photocoupler

Photocoupler

Positive

Logic

Load

V1--

V1--

16

Installation and Wiring

I/O Specifications

Input Specifications

Minimum Input Pulse Width

Signal Direction

Power Source Voltage

ON Current

OFF Current

ON Voltage

OFF Voltage

Count Input

25 ms

Falling Edge

12 VDC 10%

10--25 mA

3 mA max.

7 V min.

3 V max.

Reset Input

100 ms

ON

12 VDC 10%

10--25 mA

3 mA max.

7 V min.

3 V max.

BCD Output Specifications

Current Consumption

Ripple

Output Current (source) (6.0 V)

5 V

¦

5%

10 mA max.

1% max.

0.1 mA

External Output Specifications

Output Type

Output Voltage

Output Current

Leakage Current

Rating

NPN Open Collector

5--24 VDC

0.3 A

0.05 mA max.

12V

¦

10%

25 mA max.

3% max.

0.4 mA

Writing the Program

Writing the Program

How to Enter Your

Program:

Setup Procedure

Flow Diagram of

SetupLogic

You can write your PLC program by using a computer with DirectSOFT programming software, or using a handheld programmer compatible with your particular model of

CPU.

Programming via

Computer

HSC

Handheld

Programmer

DL305

The HSC must be set up with your ladder logic in a specified manner. If you are using the counters only (and not the external outputs), then you only have to worry about setting up the counters:

D

Setup the Counters -- Your logic must setup a current count value (C) and a preset value (P) in the same scan cycle. The order of execution must be current count first and preset second. The values used for either C or P can be any integer between 0 and 9999. A value must be entered--there are no default values.

D

Setup the Outputs (Optional) -- If you plan to use the external outputs, you must setup something called Output Mode and Output Logic Control for each of the two outputs. These two settings will ultimately control the logic status (OFF or ON) and the method for triggering each output.

Start

Setup Current Count

Setup Preset

YES!

Stop!

No need to set

Mode or the

Logic Control

AUTOMATIC

(Mode=1)

YES!

Do you want counting only?

NO!

Do you want the counter to automatically control the output?

NO!

MANUAL

(Mode=0)

OFF!

What output status do you want when C< P?

Set Output

Logic=0

ON!

Set Output

Logic=1

Output=ON when C= P and C> P

Output=OFF when C= P and C> P

ON!

Set Output

Logic=1

Output=ON

Immediately

What output status do you want?

OFF!

Set Output

Logic=0

Output=OFF

Immediately

18

Writing Your Program

Setting Up the Counters

Programming

Conventions

Preset and Current

Count

As mentioned earlier, you can use either a handheld programmer or DirectSOFT to enter your ladder logic. The examples we will be giving in this section of the manual are specific to DirectSOFT. We will, however, where necessary point out some subtle differences for the handheld programmer. When setting up your counters, you will be using the following conventions:

D

D

Instructions -- You will not be using the normal counter box when setting up the

HSC. While in DirectSOFT, if you use hot key F7 and examine the list of boxes available, you will find that one of them is called HSC. This is the box that you use in your ladder logic for setting up the HSC. If you are using the handheld programmer for the DL305, you will use the conventional CNT key (followed by the appropriate counter number) in order to do the setup.

Registers or Constants -- In order to setup the current count and preset in your counters, you can either enter constant values directly (i.e. K125) or you can point to any user-register (i.e. R400 ) where the values are stored. This is entirely up to you. We have used the direct reference with a constant in all of our examples.

D

Activating the Setup -- the counter begins counting pulses as soon as the CPU enters the RUN mode and the setup logic is scanned. You can use any type of permissive contact to trigger the setup logic. The setup logic only has to be scanned one time to setup the preset and the current count starting point. Therefore, it is important to trigger the setup logic with a one--shot. (See the example below as to how this is done.) If you don’t use a one-shot, the current count and preset setup will be executed as long as the permissive contact is on. (It will look like the counter isn’t working properly, but in reality your program is simply loading a current count on every scan!)

Shown below is a table with the counter numbers that you will enter either in your

HSC box (when using DirectSOFT) or following your CTR command when using the handheld programmer. Notice that the counter used depends on the module location in the base.

Counter Setup

Current Count

Preset

Slot 0 Cntr Slot 1 Cntr Slot 2 Cntr Slot 3 Cntr

CT100 CT102 CT104 CT106

CT101 CT103 CT105 CT107

Example: The following ladder logic initializes an HSC in Slot 0 with a preset value of 125 and a current count of 0. Notice the OUT RST instruction. In the DL305 instruction set, the

OUT RST is a one-shot, similar to the PD (positive differential) instruction of the DL205 and

DL405 families.

Start Setup

IO120

C160

OUT RST

Setup One--Shot

C160

HSC

CT100

K0

Setup Current

Count

Load 0 into current count counter

HSC

CT101

K125

Setup Preset

Load 125 into preset counter

Writing the Program

Relationship

Between Preset and

Current Count

The relationship between current count and preset will change as your program runs and the HSC continues to count pulses. You can monitor the status of C<P, C=P, and

C>P by checking certain I/O points. Each of the three flags have I/O points assigned to them for storing the status of each. The addresses associated with these points changes according to which slot you have used for the HSC. You can use the I/O points for these flags to trigger events inside your RLL program.

Counter Status

C >P

C = P

C < P

Slot 0

IO000

IO001

IO002

Slot 1

IO010

IO011

IO012

Slot 2

IO020

IO021

IO022

Slot 3

IO030

IO031

IO032

Example: The following ladder logic will turn ON an indicataor lamp when C = P for an HSC in Slot2.

Setup of HSC precedes this section of code.

C = P

IO021

IO150

OUT

Turn ON indicator lamp.

What Happens After the Counter Reaches the Upper Limit?

The upper limit for the counter is 9999. If your ladder logic has been written so that the counter continues to count past C=P and eventually reach a current count of

9999, the counter will stop counting pulses when it reaches the upper limit. It does not wrap around to zero. It is instead in an “overflow” status.

Overflow

The I/O point assigned to the Overflow function (current count greater than 9999 range) of the HSC can also be monitored by your RLL to either report the status or trigger an event. The address associated with the I/O point changes according to

HSC slot position and is shown in the following table:

Counter Overflow

Count > 9999

Slot 0

IO003

Slot 1

IO013

Slot 2

IO023

Slot 3

IO033

Example: The following ladder logic will sound an alarm if the current count exceeds 9999. This example assumes the HSC is in Slot 0.

Setup of HSC precedes this section of code.

Overflow relay

IO003

IO140

OUT

Turn On Alarm connected at IO140

20

Writing Your Program

Setting Up the Outputs

How to Control The

Outputs:

You use your ladder logic to select the way that the HSC outputs operate. You will use your logic to turn ON or OFF certain internal I/O points that control what are called Output Mode and Output Logic Control. By controlling the mode and logic for Outputs1 and 2, we are able to determine when the outputs turn ON or OFF. The flow diagram shown below explains the thought process for setting the mode and logic control to determine the status of the outputs. For example, if you choose to operate OUTPUT1 in the automatic mode, and you want to have the output ON when current count is less thant preset (C < P), then you will want to set Output1

Mode = 1 and set Output1 Logic Control = 1.

Flow Diagram of

SetupLogic

AUTOMATIC

(Mode=1)

YES!

Do you want the counter to automatically control the output?

NO!

MANUAL

(Mode=0)

OFF!

What output status do you want when C< P?

Set Output

Logic=0

ON!

Set Output

Logic=1

ON!

What output status do you want?

OFF!

Set Output

Logic=1

Set Output

Logic=0

Output=ON when C= P

Output=OFF when C= P

Output=ON

Immediately

Output=OFF

Immediately

Table 1

Status of Mode and

Logic Controls in the

Automatic Mode

It may be also useful to look at the relationship between the Output Mode and Output

Logic control and the external outputs for C < P and C = P using a table.

Output 1 Mode Output 1 Logic

Control

1

1

1

1

0

1

Output 2 Mode

Output 2 Logic

Control

0

1

Output 1

C < P

OFF

ON

Output 2

C < P

OFF

ON

Output 1

C = P

ON

OFF

Output 2

C = P

ON

OFF

NOTE: When in the Automatic Mode (Output Mode = 1), the output will assume the state determined by the output logic control as soon as the CPU is placed into the

Run Mode.

Writing the Program

Setting Mode and

Output Logic Control

The table shown below will help you determine the appropriate internal I/O points for selecting the Mode and Output Logic Control associated with the two outputs of the

HSC. Remember the HSC can go into Slots 0, 1, 2 or 3. The numbers associated with the I/O points change depending on which slot you have selected.

CPU Output Reference

Output 1 Mode

Output 1 Logic Control

Output 2 Mode

Output 2 Logic Control

C160

Slot 0

IO100

IO101

IO102

IO103

Slot 1

IO110

IO111

IO112

IO113

Slot 2

IO120

IO121

IO122

IO123

Slot 3

IO130

IO131

IO132

IO133

Example: The following example shows how to set up an HSC installed in Slot 1 to automatically control the outputs. You want both outputs to be ON when the PLC is placed in RUN (C<P), but turn OFF when C=P. The table shows IO110--IO113 for

Slot1. If we follow the flow chart, we see that we need to turn ON IO110--IO113, which selects the automatic mode for both outputs and the C=P operation to go from ON to

OFF.

Start Setup

IO020

C160

OUT RST

Setup One--Shot

IO110

SET

IO111

SET

IO112

SET

IO113

SET

Output 1 Mode= 1 (Automatic)

Output 1 Logic Control = 1

Output 2 Mode= 1 (Automatic)

Output 2 Logic Control= 1

When using the automatic mode (as shown above), the state of Output 1 Logic

Control and Output 2 Logic Control determines the state of Output1 and Output2 until C = P. So in the above example, both outputs will turn ON as soon as the PLC enters RUN mode. These outputs will remain ON until enough pulses have been counted for current count to equal preset (C = P).

The example below, uses the RST command to set the Mode to manual and it uses the OUT command to control the Logic Controls for the two outputs IO21 and IO22.

Start Setup

IO020

C160

IO21

IO22

C160

OUT RST

IO110

RST

IO111

RST

IO112

OUT

IO113

OUT

Setup One--Shot

Output 1 Mode= 0 (Manual)

Output 2 Mode= 0 (Manual)

IO21 and IO22 are inputs from a disctrete input module installed in Slot 2.

Output1 will follow the status of IO21.

Output2 will follow the status of IO22.

22

Putting It All Together

Example 1:

Activating both Outputs Automatically

As you know from reading earlier pages, the HSC module can go in slots

0,1, 2, or 3. In this program, we are assuming that the HSC module has been placed in Slot 1. This means that the counters (HSC boxes) in your program would be designated as

CT102 and CT103 (See Page 16). The

Output Mode and Output Logic control are assigned I/O points 110 through

113 (See Page 19).

We are using IO0 and C160 as a one-shot to start this setup.The

one-shot enables the two HSC boxes,

CT102 and CT103 for one scan. This initializes the preset value to 20 and the current count to 0.

C160 also turns ON IO111 and IO113, enabling the Automatic Mode for both outputs. This means when each output will turn ON or OFF is solely dependent on the current count and preset. When

C = P, OUTPUT1 and OUTPUT2 will be activated. Whether this means either output turns ON or OFF, depends on how you have set the

Output Logic Control in each case.

Here you see that we have set the logic of both to 1. So, this means that the output will be ON when C < P and turn OFF when C = P.

Start Switch

IO0

One-Shot

C160

C160

C160

OUT RST

Setup One--Shot

HSC

CT102

K0

HSC

CT103

K20

Setup Current

Count

Load 0 into current count counter

Setup Preset

Load 20 into preset counter

IO111

SET

IO113

SET

IO110

SET

Set Output1 Mode=Automatic (1)

Set Output2 Mode=Automatic(1)

Set Output1 Logic = 1

IO112

SET

Set Output2 Logic = 1

The core of your program goes here.

END

Putting It All Together

Example 2:

Mixing Modes of Operation for Outputs

In this example, we are illustrating how you can use the manual and automatic modes for controlling outputs in the same program. We have decided to control OUTPUT1 automatically, and to control OUTPUT2 manually. This could be a cut-to-length application where OUTPUT1 advances a board toward a saw for a preset number of pulses recorded by the HSC. OUT-

PUT2 controls the cutting operation.

We will assume the HSC module is in

Slot 1.

When C = P, OUTPUT1 is turned OFF.

At the same time, relay C162 turns on a timer (T600). When T600 times out, we turn ON OUTPUT2 by setting

IO112. In our board cutting example, this could mean that a saw is activated by OUTPUT2. The point being made here is that manual control of an output or outputs operates independently from the status of preset and current count.

In the Manual Mode, the relationship of current count compared to preset does not automatically affect the output. In the example shown here, we have used an internal status flag relay

IO11 (C=P) to start a timer. When the timer times out(1 second), we turn ON

OUTPUT2 by setting IO112. This is done to insure the board has stopped moving before we start the cut.

Start Switch

IO0

C160

OUT RST

Setup One--Shot

HSC

CT102

K0

C160

C = P

IO11

Turns ON when C = P

C162

TMR

T600

K10

T600

HSC

CT103

K20

IO111

SET

IO113

RST

IO110

SET

C162

SET

IO112

SET

C162

RST

Setup Current

Count

Load 0 into current count counter

Setup Preset

Load 20 into preset counter

Set Output1 Mode = Automatic (1)

Set Output2 Mode=Manual (0)

Set Output1 Logic = 1

Set internal relay

C162 when current count equals preset.

cond.

When T600 times out, turn ON

OUTPUT2 and reset the timer.

IO112

RST

When cut is complete, turn OFF

OUTPUT2.

The core of your program goes here.

END

24

Putting It All Together

Example 3: Changing Presets On the Fly

WARNING: The application shown below changes the counter’s preset value while the program is executing. Under some conditions (explained in a moment), this causes OUTPUT1 and OUTPUT2 to turn ON for approximately 1 millisecond as soon as preset is changed. This condition occurs only if the external outputs are OFF when the change is initiated, and you are in the automatic mode of control. This could result in unsafe or unpredictable results if the field device connected to the outputs sees this momentary ON signal. To prevent this, include a segment in your ladder logic that switches the operating mode of the HSC to manual before the preset is changed. The example below illustrates how this is done.

In this example, we are illustrating how you can change the preset value “on the fly”. This means you are changing the preset while the program is still running.

Although we are only showing the logic for controlling OUTPUT1, the same method could be used to affect both outputs.

We have placed the HSC in Slot 1 for this example. It can, of course, go into any Slot

0 through 3. We will assume at the point in in your program where this logic starts, the process has been running with a Preset that had been entered in earlier ladder logic not shown here. At the point this ladder logic is executed, the counter has already been counting pulses and comparing them against the previous

Preset.

This part of the program uses an MCS and

MCR instruction to load a new Current

Count and Preset value. The logic between MCS and MCR will only execute when the MCS rung has power flow.

With this example, the process is started via IO002. When energized, C161 is latched in the ON state. C161 also enables the MCS. C161 resets IO111, putting the

HSC in Manual Mode. The only other rung that executes during this first scan is the rung that causes C161 to turn ON C162.

On the second scan through the logic inside the MCS/MCR, since C162 is now

ON, CT102 loads a new Current Count of

0 and CT103 writes a new Preset of 200.

C162 will one-shot C165, which puts the

HSC back into autmatic mode and resets

IO110. It also disables the MCS/MCR.

Load New Preset

IO002

Disable Load

C165

Configure HSC

C161

Configure HSC

C161

Configure HSC

C161

Load HSC Current Count

C162

Load HSC Preset

C162

C162

Configure HSC

C161

Disable Load

C165

C161

OUT

Configure HSC

MCS

IO111

RST

Set Output1 Mode =0 (manual)

HSC

CT102

K0

Current Count

Value Set to 0

HSC

CT103

K200

Preset Value Set to 200

C165

OUTRST

C162

OUT

Disable Load Using One-shot

Load HSC Current

Count and Preset

MCR

End logic under MCS and MCR Control

IO111

SET

Set Output1 Mode =1 (automatic)

IO110

RST

END

Output 1 Logic Control=0

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