Shark 100-S Submeter User Manual V.1.11r

Shark 100-S Submeter User Manual V.1.11r

Shark100-S

Electronic Submeter with Advanced WIFI Ethernet Capability

Installation & Operation Manual

Revision 1.11

August 3, 2009

Doc #: E145721 V1.11

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Electro Industries/GaugeTech

1800 Shames Drive

Westbury, New York 11590

Tel: 516-334-0870

X

Fax: 516-338-4741

[email protected]electroind.com

X www.electroind.com

“The Leader in Power Monitoring and Control”

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Shark® 100-S Submeter

User Manual

Version 1.10

Published by:

Electro Industries/GaugeTech

1800 Shames Drive

Westbury, NY 11590

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or information storage or retrieval systems or any future forms of duplication, for any purpose other than the purchaser’s use, without the expressed written permission of

Electro Industries/GaugeTech.

© 2009

Electro Industries/GaugeTech

Shark® is a registered trademark of

Electro Industries/Gauge Tech.

Printed in the United States ofAmerica.

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Customer Service and Support

Customer support is available 9:00 am to 4:30 pm, eastern standard time, Monday through Friday.

Please have the model, serial number and a detailed problem description available. If the problem concerns a particular reading, please have all meter readings available. When returning any merchandise to EIG, a return authorization number is required. For customer or technical assistance, repair or calibration, phone 516-334-0870 or fax 516-338-4741.

Product Warranty

Electro Industries/GaugeTech warrants all products to be free from defects in material and workmanship for a period of four years from the date of shipment. During the warranty period, we will, at our option, either repair or replace any product that proves to be defective.

To exercise this warranty, fax or call our customer-service department. You will receive prompt assistance and return instructions. Send the instrument, transportation prepaid, to EIG at 1800 Shames

Drive, Westbury, NY 11590. Repairs will be made and the instrument will be returned.

Limitation of Warranty

This warranty does not apply to defects resulting from unauthorized modification, misuse, or use for any reason other than electrical power monitoring.

Our products are not to be used for Primary Over-Current Protection. Any protection feature in our products is to be used for Alarm or Secondary Protection only.

THIS WARRANTY IS IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER WARRANTIES, EXPRESSED OR

IMPLIED, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR

FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. ELECTRO INDUSTRIES/GAUGETECH

SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY INDIRECT, SPECIAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL

DAMAGES ARISING FROM ANY AUTHORIZED OR UNAUTHORIZED USE OF ANY

ELECTRO INDUSTRIES/GAUGETECH PRODUCT. LIABILITY SHALL BE LIMITED

TO THE ORIGINAL COST OF THE PRODUCT SOLD.

Statement of Calibration

Our instruments are inspected and tested in accordance with specifications published by Electro

Industries/GaugeTech. The accuracy and a calibration of our instruments are traceable to the National

Institute of Standards and Technology through equipment that is calibrated at planned intervals by comparison to certified standards.

Disclaimer

The information presented in this publication has been carefully checked for reliability; however, no responsibility is assumed for inaccuracies. The information contained in this document is subject to change without notice.

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About Electro Industries/GaugeTech

History

Founded in 1973 by engineer and inventor Dr. Samuel Kagan, Electro Industries/GaugeTech changed the face of power monitoring forever with its first breakthrough innovation: an affordable, easy-to-use AC power meter. A few of our many Technology Firsts include:

1978: First microprocessor-based power monitor

1986: First PC-based power monitoring software for plant-wide power distribution analysis

1994: First 1 Meg Memory high performance power monitor for data analysis and recording

1999: NexusTM Series generation power monitoring with industry-leading accuracy

2000: First low profile socket meter with advanced features for utility deregulation

Today

Over thirty years later, Electro Industries/GaugeTech, the leader in Web-Accessed Power Monitoring, continues to revolutionize the industry with the highest quality, cutting edge power monitoring and control technology on the market today. An ISO 9001:2000 certified company, EIG sets the standard for web-accessed power monitoring, advanced power quality, revenue metering, artificial intelligence reporting, industrial submetering and substation data acquisition and control. EIG’s products can be found on site at virtually all of today’s leading manufacturers, industrial giants and utilities.

World Leader

In fact, EIG products are used globally and EIG is accepted as the world leader in power monitoring and metering technology. With direct offices in the United States, Turkey, Brazil, Mexico, Guatemala,

Croatia and the Phillipines, EIG support is available in most regions around the world. Our worldwide support, advanced technology and quality manufacturing standards make EIG the superior choice when dependable, reliable service is paramount.

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Table of Contents

EIG Warranty

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Chapter 1: Three-Phase Power Measurement

1.1: Three-Phase System Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1

1.1.1: Wye Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1

1.1.2: Delta Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3

1.1.3: Blondell’s Theorem and Three Phase Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4

1.2: Power, Energy and Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6

1.3: Reactive Energy and Power Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8

1.4: Harmonic Distortion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-10

1.5: Power Quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-13

Chapter 2: Shark® 100-S Submeter Overview and Specifications

2.1: Hardware Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1

2.1.1: Voltage Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2

2.1.2: Model Number plus Option Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2

2.1.3: V-Switch

ΤΜ Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . 2-2

2.1.4: Measured Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3

2.1.5: Utility Peak Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3

2.2: Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4

2.3: Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6

2.4: Accuracy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6

Chapter 3: Mechanical Installation

3.1: Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1

3.2: Install the Base . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1

3.3: Secure the Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3

Chapter 4: Electrical Installation

4.1: Considerations When Installing Meters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1

4.2: Voltage and Power Supply Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2

4.3: Ground Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2

4.4: Voltage Fuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2

4.5: Electrical Connection Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3

Chapter 5: Communication Installation

5.1: Shark® 100-S Meter Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1

5.1.1: IrDA Port (Com 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1

5.1.1.1: USB to IrDA Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2

5.1.1.2: USB to IrDA Adapter Installation Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2

5.1.2: RS-485 Communication Com 2 (485 Option) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3

5.1.3: KYZ Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4

5.1.4: Ethernet Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5

5.2: Meter Communication and Programming Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6

5.2.1: How to Connect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6

5.2.2: Shark® Meter Profile Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7 e

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Chapter 6: Ethernet Configuration

6.1: Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1

6.2: Factory Default Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2

6.2:1 Modbus/TCP to RTU Bridge Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2

6.3.: Configure Network Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3

6.3.1: Configuration Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3

6.3.2: Configuring the Ethernet Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3

6.3.3: Detailed Configuration Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5

6.3.4: Setup Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-6

6.3.4.1: Encryption Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8

6.4.: Network Module Hardware Initialization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9

Chapter 7: Using the Meter

7.1: Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1

7.1.1: Submeter Face Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1

7.1.2: Submeter Face Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1

7.2: % of Load Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2

7.3: Watt-Hour Accuracy Testing (Verification) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3

7.3.1: KYZ Pulse Constants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3

7.4: Upgrade the Submeter Using V-Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4

Chapter 8: Configuring the Shark® 100-S Meter Using the Front Panel

8.1: Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1

8.2: Start Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1

8.3: Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2

8.3.1: Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2

8.3.2: Reset Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2

8.3.2.1: Enter Password (ONLY IF ENABLED IN SOFTWARE) . . . . . . . . . . 8-3

8.3.3: Configuration Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4

8.3.3.1: Configure Scroll Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4

8.3.3.2: Program Configuration Mode Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5

8.3.3.3: Configure CT Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6

8.3.3.4: Configure PT Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-7

8.3.3.5: Configure Connection (Cnct) Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-8

8.3.3.6: Configure Communication Port Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9

8.3.4: Operating Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10

Appendix A: Shark® 100-S Meter Navigation Maps

A.1: Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1

A.2: Navigation Maps (Sheets 1 to 4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1

Main Menu Screens (Sheet 1)

Operating Mode Screens (Sheet 2)

Reset Mode Screens (Sheet 3)

Configuration Mode Screens (Sheet 4) e

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Appendix B: Modbus Mapping for Shark® 100-S Submeter

B.1: Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1

B.2: Modbus Register Map Sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1

B.3: Data Formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1

B.4: Floating Point Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2

B.5: Modbus Register Map (MM-1 to MM-8) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2

Appendix C: DNP Mapping for Shark® 100-S Submeter

C.1: Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1

C.2: DNP Mapping (DNP-1 to DNP-2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1

Appendix D: DNP Protocol Assignments for Shark® 100-S Submeter

D.1: DNP Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1

D.2: Data Link Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1

D.3: Transport Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-2

D.4: Application Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-2

D.4.1: Object and Variation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-3

D.4.1.1: Binary Output Status (Obj. 10, Var. 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-3

D.4.1.2: Control Relay Output Block (Obj. 12, Var. 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-4

D.4.1.3: 32-Bit Binary Counter Without Flag (Obj. 20, Var. 5) . . . . . . . . . . . D-5

D.4.1.4: 16-Bit Analog Input Without Flag (Obj. 30, Var. 4) . . . . . . . . . . . . D-6

D.4.1.5: Class 0 Data (Obj. 60, Var. 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-10

D.4.1.6: Internal Indications (Obj. 80, Var. 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-10

Appendix E: Using the USB to IrDA Adapter

E.1: Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-1

E.2: Installation Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-1 e

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Three-P

Chapter 1

Phase Power Measurement

This introduction to three-phase power and power measurement is intended to provide only a brief overview of the subject. The professional meter engineer or meter technician should refer to more advanced documents such as the EEI Handbook for Electricity Metering and the application standards for more in-depth and technical coverage of the subject.

Three-phase power is most commonly used in situations where large amounts of power will be used because it is a more effective way to transmit the power and because it provides a smoother delivery of power to the end load. There are two commonly used connections for three-phase power, a wye connection or a delta connection. Each connection has several different manifestations in actual use.

When attempting to determine the type of connection in use, it is a good practice to follow the circuit back to the transformer that is serving the circuit. It is often not possible to conclusively determine the correct circuit connection simply by counting the wires in the service or checking voltages. Checking the transformer connection will provide conclusive evidence of the circuit connection and the relationships between the phase voltages and ground.

1.1.1: Wye Connection

Q

The wye connection is so called because when you look at the phase relationships and the winding relationships between the phases it looks like a wye (Y). Fig. 1.1 depicts the winding relationships for a wye-connected service. In a wye service the neutral (or center point of the wye) is typically grounded. This leads to common voltages of 208/120 and 480/277 (where the first number represents the phase-to-phase voltage and the second number represents the phase-to-ground voltage).

Phase B

Phase C

Phase A

Figure 1.1: Three-Phase Wye Winding

Q

The three voltages are separated by 120o electrically. Under balanced load conditions with unity power factor the currents are also separated by 120o. However, unbalanced loads and other conditions can cause the currents to depart from the ideal 120o separation.

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Three-phase voltages and currents are usually represented with a phasor diagram. A phasor diagram for the typical connected voltages and currents is shown in Figure 1.2.

Fig 1.2: Phasor diagram showing Three-phase Voltages and Currents

Q

The phasor diagram shows the 120 o angular separation between the phase voltages. The phase-tophase voltage in a balanced three-phase wye system is 1.732 times the phase-to-neutral voltage. The center point of the wye is tied together and is typically grounded. Table 1.1 shows the common voltages used in the United States for wye-connected systems.

Phase-to-Ground Voltage Phase-to-Phase Voltage

120 volts

277 volts

2,400 volts

7,200 volts

7,620 volts

208 volts

480 volts

4,160 volts

12,470 volts

13,200 volts

Table 1.1: Common Phase Voltages on Wye Services

Q Usually a wye-connected service will have four wires; three wires for the phases and one for the neutral. The three-phase wires connect to the three phases (as shown in Fig. 1.1). The neutral wire is typically tied to the ground or center point of the wye (refer to Figure 1.1).

In many industrial applications the facility will be fed with a four-wire wye service but only three wires will be run to individual loads. The load is then often referred to as a delta-connected load but the service to the facility is still a wye service; it contains four wires if you trace the circuit back to its source (usually a transformer). In this type of connection the phase to ground voltage will be the phase-to-ground voltage indicated in Table 1.1, even though a neutral or ground wire is not physically present at the load. The transformer is the best place to determine the circuit connection type because this is a location where the voltage reference to ground can be conclusively identified. e

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1.1.2: Delta Connection

Q

Delta connected services may be fed with either three wires or four wires. In a three-phase delta service the load windings are connected from phase-to-phase rather than from phase-to-ground.

Figure 1.3 shows the physical load connections for a delta service.

Phase C

Phase B

Phase A

Figure 1.3: Three-Phase Delta Winding Relationship

In this example of a delta service, three wires will transmit the power to the load. In a true delta service, the phase-to-ground voltage will usually not be balanced because the ground is not at the center of the delta.

Fig. 1.4 shows the phasor relationships between voltage and current on a three-phase delta circuit.

In many delta services, one corner of the delta is grounded. This means the phase to ground voltage will be zero for one phase and will be full phase-to-phase voltage for the other two phases. This is done for protective purposes.

Ic

Vca

Vbc

Ib

Ia

Vab

Figure 1.4: Phasor diagram showing three-phase voltages, currents delta connected.

Q

Another common delta connection is the four-wire, grounded delta used for lighting loads. In this connection the center point of one winding is grounded. On a 120/240 volt, four-wire, grounded delta service the phase-to-ground voltage would be 120 volts on two phases and 208 volts on the third phase. Figure 1.5 shows the phasor diagram for the voltages in a three-phase, four-wire delta system.

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Fig 1.5: Phasor diagram showing Three-phase, Four-wire Delta Connected System

1.1.3: Blondell’s Theorem and Three Phase Measurement

In 1893 an engineer and mathematician named Andre E. Blondell set forth the first scientific basis for poly phase metering. His theorem states:

Q

If energy is supplied to any system of conductors through N wires, the total power in the system is given by the algebraic sum of the readings of N wattmeters so arranged that each of the N wires contains one current coil, the corresponding potential coil being connected between that wire and some common point. If this common point is on one of the N wires, the measurement may be made by the use of N-1 wattmeters.

The theorem may be stated more simply, in modern language:

Q

In a system of N conductors, N-1 meter elements will measure the power or energy taken provided that all the potential coils have a common tie to the conductor in which there is no current coil.

Q

Three-phase power measurement is accomplished by measuring the three individual phases and adding them together to obtain the total three phase value. In older analog meters, this measurement was accomplished using up to three separate elements. Each element combined the single-phase voltage and current to produce a torque on the meter disk. All three elements were arranged around the disk so that the disk was subjected to the combined torque of the three elements.

As a result the disk would turn at a higher speed and register power supplied by each of the three wires.

Q According to Blondell's Theorem, it was possible to reduce the number of elements under certain conditions. For example, a three-phase, three-wire delta system could be correctly measured with two elements (two potential coils and two current coils) if the potential coils were connected between the three phases with one phase in common.

In a three-phase, four-wire wye system it is necessary to use three elements. Three voltage coils are connected between the three phases and the common neutral conductor. A current coil is required in each of the three phases.

Q

In modern digital meters, Blondell's Theorem is still applied to obtain proper metering. The difference in modern meters is that the digital meter measures each phase voltage and current and calculates the single-phase power for each phase. The meter then sums the three phase powers to a e

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single three-phase reading.

Some digital meters calculate the individual phase power values one phase at a time. This means the meter samples the voltage and current on one phase and calculates a power value. Then it samples the second phase and calculates the power for the second phase. Finally, it samples the third phase and calculates that phase power. After sampling all three phases, the meter combines the three readings to create the equivalent three-phase power value. Using mathematical averaging techniques, this method can derive a quite accurate measurement of three-phase power.

More advanced meters actually sample all three phases of voltage and current simultaneously and calculate the individual phase and three-phase power values. The advantage of simultaneous sampling is the reduction of error introduced due to the difference in time when the samples were taken.

C

B

Phase B

Phase C

Node “n”

A

N

Phase A

Figure 1.6: Three-Phase Wye Load illustrating Kirchhoff’s Law

and Blondell’s Theorem

Blondell's Theorem is a derivation that results from Kirchhoff's Law. Kirchhoff's Law states that the sum of the currents into a node is zero. Another way of stating the same thing is that the current into a node (connection point) must equal the current out of the node. The law can be applied to measuring three-phase loads. Figure 1.6 shows a typical connection of a three-phase load applied to a threephase, four-wire service. Krichhoff's Laws hold that the sum of currents A, B, C and N must equal zero or that the sum of currents into Node "n" must equal zero.

If we measure the currents in wires A, B and C, we then know the current in wire N by Kirchhoff's

Law and it is not necessary to measure it. This fact leads us to the conclusion of Blondell's Theorem that we only need to measure the power in three of the four wires if they are connected by a common node. In the circuit of Figure 1.6 we must measure the power flow in three wires. This will require three voltage coils and three current coils (a three element meter). Similar figures and conclusions could be reached for other circuit configurations involving delta-connected loads.

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1.2: Power, Energy and Demand

Q It is quite common to exchange power, energy and demand without differentiating between the three. Because this practice can lead to confusion, the differences between these three measurements will be discussed.

Q Power is an instantaneous reading. The power reading provided by a meter is the present flow of watts. Power is measured immediately just like current. In many digital meters, the power value is actually measured and calculated over a one second interval because it takes some amount of time to calculate the RMS values of voltage and current. But this time interval is kept small to preserve the instantaneous nature of power.

Q Energy is always based on some time increment; it is the integration of power over a defined time increment. Energy is an important value because almost all electric bills are based, in part, on the amount of energy used.

Q Typically, electrical energy is measured in units of kilowatt-hours (kWh). A kilowatt-hour represents a constant load of one thousand watts (one kilowatt) for one hour. Stated another way, if the power delivered (instantaneous watts) is measured as 1,000 watts and the load was served for a one hour time interval then the load would have absorbed one kilowatt-hour of energy. A different load may have a constant power requirement of 4,000 watts. If the load were served for one hour it would absorb four kWh. If the load were served for 15 minutes it would absorb ¼ of that total or one kWh.

Q Figure 1.7 shows a graph of power and the resulting energy that would be transmitted as a result of the illustrated power values. For this illustration, it is assumed that the power level is held constant for each minute when a measurement is taken. Each bar in the graph will represent the power load for the one-minute increment of time. In real life the power value moves almost constantly.

Q The data from Figure 1.7 is reproduced in Table 2 to illustrate the calculation of energy. Since the time increment of the measurement is one minute and since we specified that the load is constant over that minute, we can convert the power reading to an equivalent consumed energy reading by multiplying the power reading times 1/60 (converting the time base from minutes to hours).

Kilowatts

100

80

60

40

20

Time (minutes) Æ

Figure 1.7: Power use over time e

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Time Interval

(Minute)

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

6

7

4

5

8

1

2

3

Power (kW)

60

70

80

50

50

70

80

55

60

60

70

70

30

50

40

Energy (kWh)

1.00

1.17

1.33

0.83

0.83

1.17

1.33

0.50

0.83

0.67

0.92

1.00

1.00

1.17

1.17

Accumulated

Energy (kWh)

8.26

9.43

10.76

12.42

12.42

13.59

14.92

0.50

1.33

2.00

2.92

3.92

4.92

6.09

7.26

Table 1.2: Power and energy relationship over time

As in Table 1.2, the accumulated energy for the power load profile of Figure 1.7 is 14.92 kWh.

Q

Demand is also a time-based value. The demand is the average rate of energy use over time. The actual label for demand is kilowatt-hours/hour but this is normally reduced to kilowatts. This makes it easy to confuse demand with power. But demand is not an instantaneous value. To calculate demand it is necessary to accumulate the energy readings (as illustrated in Figure 1.7) and adjust the energy reading to an hourly value that constitutes the demand.

In the example, the accumulated energy is 14.92 kWh. But this measurement was made over a

15-minute interval. To convert the reading to a demand value, it must be normalized to a 60-minute interval. If the pattern were repeated for an additional three 15-minute intervals the total energy would be four times the measured value or 59.68 kWh. The same process is applied to calculate the

15-minute demand value. The demand value associated with the example load is 59.68 kWh/hr or

59.68 kWd. Note that the peak instantaneous value of power is 80 kW, significantly more than the demand value. e

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Q

Figure 1.8 shows another example of energy and demand. In this case, each bar represents the energy consumed in a 15-minute interval. The energy use in each interval typically falls between 50 and 70 kWh. However, during two intervals the energy rises sharply and peaks at 100 kWh in interval number 7. This peak of usage will result in setting a high demand reading. For each interval shown the demand value would be four times the indicated energy reading. So interval 1 would have an associated demand of 240 kWh/hr. Interval 7 will have a demand value of 400 kWh/hr. In the data shown, this is the peak demand value and would be the number that would set the demand charge on the utility bill.

Kilowatt-hours

100

80

60

40

20

Intervals Æ

Figure 1.8: Energy use and demand

Q

As can be seen from this example, it is important to recognize the relationships between power, energy and demand in order to control loads effectively or to monitor use correctly.

1.3: Reactive Energy and Power Factor

Q

The real power and energy measurements discussed in the previous section relate to the quantities that are most used in electrical systems. But it is often not sufficient to only measure real power and energy. Reactive power is a critical component of the total power picture because almost all real-life applications have an impact on reactive power. Reactive power and power factor concepts relate to both load and generation applications. However, this discussion will be limited to analysis of reactive power and power factor as they relate to loads. To simplify the discussion, generation will not be considered.

Q

Real power (and energy) is the component of power that is the combination of the voltage and the value of corresponding current that is directly in phase with the voltage. However, in actual practice the total current is almost never in phase with the voltage. Since the current is not in phase with the voltage, it is necessary to consider both the inphase component and the component that is at quadrature (angularly rotated 90 o or perpendicular) to the voltage. Figure 1.9 shows a single-phase voltage and current and breaks the current into its in-phase and quadrature components. e

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I

X

I

R V

I

Angle

θ

Figure 1.9: Voltage and complex current

Q

The voltage (V) and the total current (I) can be combined to calculate the apparent power or VA.

The voltage and the in-phase current (IR) are combined to produce the real power or watts. The voltage and the quadrature current (IX) are combined to calculate the reactive power.

The quadrature current may be lagging the voltage (as shown in Figure 1.9) or it may lead the voltage. When the quadrature current lags the voltage the load is requiring both real power (watts) and reactive power (VARs). When the quadrature current leads the voltage the load is requiring real power (watts) but is delivering reactive power (VARs) back into the system; that is VARs are flowing in the opposite direction of the real power flow.

Q

Reactive power (VARs) is required in all power systems. Any equipment that uses magnetization to operate requires VARs. Usually the magnitude of VARs is relatively low compared to the real power quantities. Utilities have an interest in maintaining VAR requirements at the customer to a low value in order to maximize the return on plant invested to deliver energy. When lines are carrying VARs, they cannot carry as many watts. So keeping the VAR content low allows a line to carry its full capacity of watts. In order to encourage customers to keep VAR requirements low, most utilities impose a penalty if the VAR content of the load rises above a specified value.

A common method of measuring reactive power requirements is power factor. Power factor can be defined in two different ways. The more common method of calculating power factor is the ratio of the real power to the apparent power. This relationship is expressed in the following formula:

Total PF = real power / apparent power = watts/VA

This formula calculates a power factor quantity known as Total Power Factor. It is called Total PF because it is based on the ratios of the power delivered. The delivered power quantities will include the impacts of any existing harmonic content. If the voltage or current includes high levels of harmonic distortion the power values will be affected. By calculating power factor from the power values, the power factor will include the impact of harmonic distortion. In many cases this is the preferred method of calculation because the entire impact of the actual voltage and current are included.

A second type of power factor is Displacement Power Factor. Displacement PF is based on the angular relationship between the voltage and current. Displacement power factor does not consider the magnitudes of voltage, current or power. It is solely based on the phase angle differences. As a e

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result, it does not include the impact of harmonic distortion. Displacement power factor is calculated using the following equation:

Displacement PF = cos

θ, where θ is the angle between the voltage and the current (see Fig. 1.9).

In applications where the voltage and current are not distorted, the Total Power Factor will equal the

Displacement Power Factor. But if harmonic distortion is present, the two power factors will not be equal.

1.4: Harmonic Distortion

Q Harmonic distortion is primarily the result of high concentrations of non-linear loads. Devices such as computer power supplies, variable speed drives and fluorescent light ballasts make current demands that do not match the sinusoidal waveform of AC electricity. As a result, the current waveform feeding these loads is periodic but not sinusoidal. Figure 1.10 shows a normal, sinusoidal current waveform. This example has no distortion.

A Phase Current

1500

1000

500

0

-500

1

-1000

-1500

33 65

Figure 1.10: Non-distorted current waveform

Q Figure 1.11 shows a current waveform with a slight amount of harmonic distortion. The waveform is still periodic and is fluctuating at the normal 60 Hz frequency. However, the waveform is not a smooth sinusoidal form as seen in Figure 1.10.

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Total A Phase Current with Harmonics

1500

1000

500

0

-500

1

-1000

-1500

33 65

Figure 1.11: Distorted current wave

Q

The distortion observed in Figure 1.11 can be modeled as the sum of several sinusoidal waveforms of frequencies that are multiples of the fundamental 60 Hz frequency. This modeling is performed by mathematically disassembling the distorted waveform into a collection of higher frequency waveforms. These higher frequency waveforms are referred to as harmonics. Figure 1.12 shows the content of the harmonic frequencies that make up the distortion portion of the waveform in Figure

1.11.

Expanded Harm onic Currents

250

200

150

100

50

0

-50

-100

-150

-200

-250

2 Harmonic Current

7 Harmonic Current

3 Harmonic Current

A Current Total Hrm

5 Harmonic Current

Figure 1.12: Waveforms of the harmonics

The waveforms shown in Figure 1.12 are not smoothed but do provide an indication of the impact of combining multiple harmonic frequencies together.

When harmonics are present it is important to remember that these quantities are operating at higher frequencies. Therefore, they do not always respond in the same manner as 60 Hz values. e

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Q

Inductive and capacitive impedance are present in all power systems. We are accustomed to thinking about these impedances as they perform at 60 Hz. However, these impedances are subject to frequency variation.

X

L

= j

ωL and

X

C

= 1/j

ωC

At 60 Hz,

ω = 377; but at 300 Hz (5 th harmonic)

ω = 1,885. As frequency changes impedance changes and system impedance characteristics that are normal at 60 Hz may behave entirely different in presence of higher order harmonic waveforms.

Traditionally, the most common harmonics have been the low order, odd frequencies, such as the

3 rd

, 5 th

, 7 th

, and 9 th

. However newer, non-linear loads are introducing significant quantities of higher order harmonics.

Q

Since much voltage monitoring and almost all current monitoring is performed using instrument transformers, the higher order harmonics are often not visible. Instrument transformers are designed to pass 60 Hz quantities with high accuracy. These devices, when designed for accuracy at low frequency, do not pass high frequencies with high accuracy; at frequencies above about 1200 Hz they pass almost no information. So when instrument transformers are used, they effectively filter out higher frequency harmonic distortion making it impossible to see.

Q

However, when monitors can be connected directly to the measured circuit (such as direct connection to 480 volt bus) the user may often see higher order harmonic distortion. An important rule in any harmonics study is to evaluate the type of equipment and connections before drawing a conclusion. Not being able to see harmonic distortion is not the same as not having harmonic distortion.

Q

It is common in advanced meters to perform a function commonly referred to as waveform capture.

Waveform capture is the ability of a meter to capture a present picture of the voltage or current waveform for viewing and harmonic analysis. Typically a waveform capture will be one or two cycles in duration and can be viewed as the actual waveform, as a spectral view of the harmonic content, or a tabular view showing the magnitude and phase shift of each harmonic value. Data collected with waveform capture is typically not saved to memory. Waveform capture is a real-time data collection event.

Waveform capture should not be confused with waveform recording that is used to record multiple cycles of all voltage and current waveforms in response to a transient condition.

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1.5: Power Quality

Q

Power quality can mean several different things. The terms ‘power quality’ and ‘power quality problem’ have been applied to all types of conditions. A simple definition of ‘power quality problem’ is any voltage, current or frequency deviation that results in mis-operation or failure of customer equipment or systems. The causes of power quality problems vary widely and may originate in the customer equipment, in an adjacent customer facility or with the utility.

In his book “Power Quality Primer”, Barry Kennedy provided information on different types of power quality problems. Some of that information is summarized in Table 1.3 below.

Cause

Impulse Transient

Oscillatory transient with decay

Sag / swell

Interruptions

Undervoltage /

Overvoltage

Voltage flicker

Harmonic distortion

Disturbance Type Source

Transient voltage disturbance, sub-cycle duration

Lightning

Electrostatic discharge

Load switching

Capacitor switching

Transient voltage, sub-cycle duration

RMS voltage, steady state, repetitive condition

Line/cable switching

Capacitor switching

Load switching

RMS voltage, multiple cycle duration

Remote system faults

RMS voltage, multiple second or longer duration

System protection

Circuit breakers

Fuses

Maintenance

RMS voltage, steady state, multiple second or longer duration

Motor starting

Load variations

Load dropping

Intermittent loads

Motor starting

Arc furnaces

Steady state current or voltage, long term duration

Non-linear loads

System resonance

Table 1.3: Typical power quality problems and sources

Q

It is often assumed that power quality problems originate with the utility. While it is true that may power quality problems can originate with the utility system, many problems originate with customer equipment. Customer-caused problems may manifest themselves inside the customer location or they may be transported by the utility system to another adjacent customer. Often, equipment that is sensitive to power quality problems may in fact also be the cause of the problem.

Q

If a power quality problem is suspected, it is generally wise to consult a power quality professional for assistance in defining the cause and possible solutions to the problem.

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Shark

®

100-S

Chapter 2

S Submeter Overview and Specifications

2.1: Hardware Overview

Q

The Shark

®

100-S multifunction submeter is designed to measure revenue grade electrical energy usage and communicate that information via various communication media. The unit supports RS485, RJ-45 Ethernet or IEEE

802.11 Wi-Fi Ethernet connections. This allows the unit to be placed anywhere within a complex and it communicates back to central software quickly and easily. The unit also has an IrDA Port for direct PDA interface.

Q

The unit is designed with advanced meaurement capabilities, allowing it to achieve high performance accuracy. The Shark

®

100-S meter is specified as a 0.2% class energy meter for billing applications. To verify the submeter’s performance and calibration, power providers use field test standards to ensure that the unit’s energy measurements are correct. The Shark

®

100-S meter is a traceable revenue meter and contains a utility grade test pulse to verify rated accuracy.

Figure 2.1: Shark 100-S

Shark

®

100-S Meter Features detailed in this manual are:

·

0.2% Class Revenue Certifiable Energy and Demand Submeter

Submeter

·

Meets ANSI C12.20 (0.2%) and IEC 687 (0.2%) Classes

·

Multifunction Measurement including Voltage, Current, Power, Frequency, Energy, etc.

·

Power Quality Measurements (%THD and Alarm Limits)

·

3 Line 0.56” Bright Red LED Display

·

V-Switch

TM

Technology - Field Upgrade without Removing Installed Meter

·

Percentage of Load Bar for Analog Meter Perception

·

Modbus RTU and Modbus TCP (Over Ethernet)

·

Serial RS485 Communication

·

Ethernet and Wireless Ethernet (Wi-Fi)

·

Easy to Use Faceplate Programming

·

IrDA Port for PDA Remote Read

·

Direct Interface with Most Building Management Systems

·

DNP 3.0

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The unit uses standard 5 or 1 Amp CTs (either split or donut). It surface mounts to any wall and is easily programmed in minutes. The unit is designed specifically for easy installation and advanced communication.

2.1.1: Voltage Inputs

Q

Universal Voltage Inputs

Voltage Inputs allow measurement to 416 Volts Line-to-Neutral and 721 Volts Line-to-Line. This insures proper meter safety when wiring directly to high voltage systems. One unit will perform to specification on 69 Volt, 120 Volt, 230 Volt, 277 Volt, 277 Volt and 347 Volt power systems.

2.1.2: Model Number plus Option Numbers

Model Frequency Current

Class

V-Switch™ Power

Key Pack

Communication

Supply Format

Shark

®

100-S

- 50

Submeter

- 10

50 Hz 5 Amp

- V3 - D2

Default with (90 - 400)V ac

System Secondary Energy Counters (100 - 370)V dc

- 60

60 Hz

- 2 - V4

1 Amp Above with

System Secondary Harmonics & Limts

- 485

RS-485

-WIFI

Wireless and

LAN Based

Ethernet

(also configurable for RS-485)

Example:

Shark 100-S - 60 - 10 - V3 - D2 - 485

2.1.3: V-S

TM

Technology

The Shark

®

100-S meter is equipped with EIG’s exclusive V-Switch

TM technology. V-Switch

TM technology is a virtual firmware-based switch that allows you to enable meter features through communication, allowing the unit to be upgraded after installation to a higher model without removing the unit from service.

Q

Available V-Switch

TM

Keys

V-Switch™ key 3 (-V3): Volts, Amps, kW, kVAR, PF, kVA, Freq., kWh, kVAh, kVARh & DNP 3.0

V-Switch™ key 4 (-V4): Volts, Amps, kW, kVAR, PF, kVA, Freq., kWh, kVAh, kVARh, %THD

Monitoring, Limit Exceeded Alarms & DNP 3.0

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2.1.4: Measured Values

The Shark® 100-S meter provides the following Measured Values all in Real Time and some additionally as Avg, Max and Min values.

Measured Values

Shark 100-S Measured Values

Real Time Avg Max

Voltage L-N

Voltage L-L

Current Per Phase

Current Neutral

Watts

VAR

VA

PF

+Watt-Hr

- Watt-Hr

Watt-Hr Net

+VAR-Hr

-VAR-Hr

VAR-Hr Net

VA-Hr

Frequency

%THD

Voltage Angles

Current Angles

% of Load Bar

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Min

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

2.1.5: Utility Peak Demand

The Shark® 100-S meter provides user-configured Block (Fixed) Window or Rolling Window

Demand. This feature allows you to set up a Customized Demand Profile. Block Window Demand is demand used over a user-configured demand period (usually 5, 15 or 30 minutes). Rolling

Window Demand is a fixed window demand that moves for a user-specified subinterval period.

For example, a 15-minute Demand using 3 subintervals and providing a new demand reading every

5 minutes, based on the last 15 minutes.

Utility Demand Features can be used to calculate kW, kVAR, kVA and PF readings. All other parameters offer Max and Min capability over the user-selectable averaging period. Voltage provides an Instantaneous Max and Min reading which displays the highest surge and lowest sag seen by the meter e

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2.2: Specifications

Q

Power Supply

• Range:

• Power Consumption:

Universal, (90 to 400)V ac @50/60Hz or (100 to 370)V dc

16 VA Maximum

Q

Voltage Inputs (Measurement Category III)

• Range:

• Supported hookups:

• Input Impedance:

• Burden:

• Pickup Voltage:

• Connection:

• Input Wire Gauge:

• Fault Withstand:

• Reading:

Universal, Autoranging up to 416V AC L-N, 721V AC L-L

3 Element Wye, 2.5 Element Wye

2 Element Delta, 4 Wire Delta

1M Ohm/Phase

0.36VA/Phase Max at 600V, 0.0144VA/Phase at 120V

10V AC

Screw terminal (Diagram 4.1)

AWG#16 - 26

Meets IEEE C37.90.1 (Surge Withstand Capability)

Programmable Full Scale to any PT Ratio

Q

Current Inputs

• Class 10:

• Class 2:

• Burden:

• Pickup Current:

• Connections:

• Fault Withstand:

• Reading:

5A Nominal, (0-11) Amp

1A Nominal Secondary, (0-2) Amp

0.005VA Per Phase Max at 11 Amps

0.1% of Nominal

Screw terminal - #6-32 screws (Diagram 4.1)

20A/10sec., 60A/3sec., 100A/1sec.

Programmable Full Scale to any CT Ratio

Q

Isolation

• All Inputs and Outputs are galvanically isolated and tested to 2500V AC

Q

Environmental Rating

• Storage:

• Operating:

• Humidity:

• Faceplate Rating:

(-40 to +85)

0

C

(-30 to +70)

0

C to 95% RH Noncondensing

NEMA12 (Water Resistant) e

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Q

Measurement Methods

• Voltage, Current:

• Power:

• Harmonic %THD

• A/D Conversion:

Q

Update Rate

• Watts, VAR and VA:

• All other parameters:

Q

Communication Format

1. RS485

2. IrDA Port through Face Plate

• Protocols:

• Com Port Baud Rate:

• Com Port Address:

• Data Format:

Q

Wireless Ethernet (Optional)

• 802.11b Wireless or

10/100BaseT Ethernet

• 128 bit WEP Encryption

• Modbus TCP Protocol

Q

Mechanical Parameters

• Dimensions:

• Weight:

True RMS

Sampling at 400+ Samples per Cycle on All Channels Measured

Readings Simultaneously

% of Total Harmonic Distortion

6 Simultaneous 24 bit Analog to Digital Converters

100 milliseconds (Ten times per second)

1 second

Modbus RTU, Modbus ASCII, DNP 3.0, Modbus TCP

(Ethernet)

9600 to 57,600 b/s

001-247

8 Bit, No Parity

WiFi or RJ-45 Connection

128 bit Wireless Security

(H7.9 x W7.6 x D3.2) inches, (H200.1 x W193.0 x

D81.3) mm

4 pounds e

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2.3: Compliance

• IEC 687 (0.2% Accuracy)

• ANSI C12.20 (0.2% Accuracy)

• ANSI (IEEE) C37.90.1 Surge Withstand

• ANSI C62.41 (Burst)

• IEC1000-4-2: ESD

• IEC1000-4-3: Radiated Immunity

• IEC1000-4-4: Fast Transient

• IEC1000-4-5: Surge Immunity

• UL Listed

Meter Accuracy by Measured Parameters

Measured Parameters

Voltage L-N

Voltage L-L

Current Phase

Current Neutral (Calculated)

+/- Watts

+/- Wh

+/- VARs

+/- VARh

Accuracy % of

Reading*

0.1%

Display Range

0-9999 V or kV Autoscale

0.1%

0.1%

2.0% F.S.

0-9999 V or kV Autoscale

0-9999 A or kA Autoscale

0-9999 A or kA Autoscale

0.2%

0.2%

0.2%

0.2%

0-9999 Watts, kWatts, MWatts

5 to 8 Digits Programmable

0-9999 VARs, kVARs, MVARs

5 to 8 Digits Programmable

VA

VAh

PF

Frequency

0.2%

0.2%

0.2%

+/- 0.01 Hz

0-9999 VA, kVA, MVA

5 to 8 Digits Programmable

+/- 0.5 to 1.0

45 to 65 Hz

% THD 2.0% F.S.

0 to 100%

% Load Bar 1 - 120% 10 Segment Resolution Scalable

* Accuracy stated for 5 amp secondary WYE or Delta connections. For 1 amp secondary or 2.5 element connections, add 0.1% of Full Scale + 1 digit to accuracy specification.

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Chapter 3

Mechanical Installation

3.1: Overview

Q

The Shark® 100-S meter can be installed on any wall The various models use the same installation.

See Chapter 4 for wiring diagrams.

Q Mount the meter in a dry location, which is free from dirt and corrosive substances.

3.2: Install the Base

1. Determine where you want to install the submeter.

2. Then, with the submeter power off, open the top of the submeter. Use the

Front Cover Support to keep the cover open as you perform the installation.

CAUTIONS!

Q

Remove the antenna before opening the unit.

Q

Only use the front cover support if you are able to open the front cover to the extent that you can fit the front cover support into its base. DO NOT rest the front cover support on the inside of the meter, even for a short time - by doing so, you may damage components on the board assembly.

Screws

3. Find the 4 Installation

Slots and insert screws through each slot into the wall or panel.

Figure 3.1: Shark® 100-S Meter Opened

Fasten securely.

DO NOT overtighten.

Front

Cover

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3.2.1: Mounting Diagrams

12”

304.80 mm

(Space needed for cover to be opened.)

12”

304.80 mm

(Space needed for cover to be opened.)

Figure 3.2: Mounting Dimensions

12”

304 mm

Figure 3.3: Side View

Figure 3.4: Open Cover View

Figure 3.5: Bottom View with Access Holes e

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3.3: Secure the Cover

1. Close the cover, making sure that power and communications wires exit the submeter through the openings at the base.

Screw

CAUTION!

To avoid damaging components on the board assembly, make sure the front cover support is in the upright position before closing the front cover.

2. Using the 3 enclosed screws, secure the cover to the base in three places.

Do not overtighten (you may damage the cover).

The unit can be sealed after the front cover is closed. To seal the unit, thread the seal tag through the housing located between the bottom access holes.

3. Reattach the antenna, if appropriate.

Seal Housing

Figure 3.5: Shark® 100-S Meter Closed

Q

Recommended Tools for Shark® 100-S Meter Installation: #2 Phillips screwdriver and wire cutters. e

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Chapter 4

Electrical Installation

4.1: Considerations When Installing Meters

Q

Installation of the Shark® 100-S meter must be performed by only qualified personnel

who follow standard safety precautions during all procedures. Those personnel

should have appropriate training and experience with high voltage devices.

Appropriate safety gloves, safety glasses and protective clothing are recommended.

Q

During normal operation of the Shark® 100-S meter, dangerous voltages flow through

many parts of the meter, including: Terminals and any connected CTs (Current

Transformers) and PTs (Potential Transformers), all I/O Modules (Inputs and

Outputs) and their circuits. All Primary and Secondary circuits can, at times, produce

lethal voltages and currents. Avoid contact with any current-carrying surfaces.

Q

Do not use the meter or any I/O Output Device for primary protection or in an

energy-limiting capacity. The meter can only be used as secondary protection. Do

not use the meter for applications where failure of the meter may cause harm or death.

Do not use the meter for any application where there may be a risk of fire.

Q

All meter terminals should be inaccessible after installation.

Q

Do not apply more than the maximum voltage the meter or any attached device can

withstand. Refer to meter and/or device labels and to the Specifications for all

devices before applying voltages. Do not HIPOT/Dielectric test any Outputs, Inputs

or Communications terminals.

Q

EIG recommends the use of Shorting Blocks and Fuses for voltage leads and power

supply to prevent hazardous voltage conditions or damage to CTs, if the meter needs

to be removed from service. CT grounding is optional.

NOTE: IF THE EQUIPMENT IS USED IN A MANNER NOT SPECIFIED

BY THE MANUFACTURER, THE PROTECTION PROVIDED BY THE

EQUIPMENT MAY BE IMPAIRED.

NOTE: THERE IS NO REQUIRED PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE OR

INSPECTION NECESSARY FOR SAFETY. HOWEVER, ANY REPAIR OR

MAINTENANCE SHOULD BE PERFORMED BY THE FACTORY.

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DISCONNECT DEVICE: The following part is considered the equipment disconnect device.

A SWITCH OR CIRCUIT-BREAKER SHALL BE INCLUDED IN THE END-USE

EQUIPMENT OR BUILDING INSTALLATION. THE SWITCH SHALL BE IN

CLOSE PROXIMITY TO THE EQUIPMENT AND WITHIN EASY REACH OF THE

OPERATOR. THE SWITCH SHALL BE MARKED AS THE DISCONNECTING

DEVICE FOR THE EQUIPMENT.

4.2: Electrical Connections

Q

All wiring for the Shark® 100-S meter is done through the front of the unit (lifting the cover

with the power to the unit OFF) so that the unit can be surface mounted. Connecting

cables exit the unit via two openings in the base plate.

Wireless Ethernet Connection

Current

Inputs

Electronic Circuits

Ia Ia Ib Ib Ic Ic

(+) (-) (+) (-) (+) (-)

Va Vb Vc Vn L1 L2 PE

Z K Y A B SH

(+)(-)

Voltage

Inputs

Power Supply

Inputs (Inputs are unipolar)

Access Holes for

Wiring

Figure 4.1: Submeter Connections

Ethernet, RJ-45

Jack

RS-485 Output

(Do not put the

Voltage on these terminals!)

RS-485

KYZ Pulse

Output

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4.3: Ground Connections

Q The meter’s Ground Terminal (PE) should be connected directly to the installation’s protective earth

ground.

4.4: Voltage Fuses

Q EIG recommends the use of fuses on each of the sense voltages and on the control power, even

though the wiring diagrams in this chapter do not show them.

Use a 0.1 Amp fuse on each voltage input.

Use a 3 Amp fuse on the power supply.

4.5: Electrical Connection Diagrams

Choose the diagram that best suits your application. Make sure the CT polarity is correct.

1. Three Phase, Four-Wire System Wye with Direct Voltage, 3 Element

2. Three Phase, Four-Wire System Wye with Direct Voltage, 2.5 Element

3. Three-Phase, Four-Wire Wye with PTs, 3 Element

4. Three-Phase, Four-Wire Wye with PTs, 2.5 Element

5. Three-Phase, Three-Wire Delta with Direct Voltage (No PTs, 2 CTs)

6. Three-Phase, Three-Wire Delta with Direct Voltage (No PTs, 3 CTs)

7. Three-Phase, Three-Wire Delta with 2 PTs, 2 CTs

8. Three-Phase, Three-Wire Delta with 2 PTs, 3 CTs

9. Current Only Measurement (Three Phase)

10. Current Only Measurement (Dual Phase)

11. Current Only Measurement (Single Phase)

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1. Service: WYE, 4-Wire with No PTs, 3 CTs

A B C N

Wireless Ethernet Connection

Ic

Ib

Ia

Electronic Circuits

Ethernet, RJ-45

Jack

Ia Ia Ib Ib Ic Ic

(+) (-) (+) (-) (+) (-)

Va Vb Vc Vref L1 L2 PE

Z K Y A B SH

(+)(-)

RS-485

KYZ Pulse

Output

Power Supply Inputs

A B C N

C

Select: “3 EL WYE” (3 Element Wye) in Meter Programming setup.

B

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A

4-4

2. Service: 2.5 Element WYE, 4-Wire with No PTs, 3 CTs

A B C N

Wireless Ethernet Connection

Ic

Ib

Ia

Electronic Circuits

Ethernet, RJ-45

Jack

Ia Ia Ib Ib Ic Ic

(+) (-) (+) (-) (+) (-)

Va Vb Vc Vref L1 L2 PE

Z K Y A B SH

(+)(-)

RS-485

KYZ Pulse

Output

Power Supply Inputs

A B C N

C

.

A

B

Select: “2.5 EL WYE” (2.5 Element Wye) in Meter Programming setup.

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3. Service: WYE, 4-Wire with 3 PTs, 3 CTs

A B C N

Wireless Ethernet Connection

Ic

Ib

Ia

Electronic Circuits

Ethernet, RJ-45

Jack

Ia Ia Ib Ib Ic Ic

(+) (-) (+) (-) (+) (-)

Va Vb Vc Vn L1 L2 PE

Z K Y A B SH

(+)(-)

RS-485

KYZ Pulse

Output

Power Supply Inputs

A B C N

C

.

A

Select: “3 EL WYE” (3 Element Wye) in Meter Programming setup.

B

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4. Service: 2.5 Element WYE, 4-Wire with 2 PTs, 3 CTs

A B C N

Wireless Ethernet Connection

Ic

Ib

Ia

Ethernet, RJ-45

Jack

Ia Ia Ib Ib Ic Ic

(+) (-) (+) (-) (+) (-)

Va Vb Vc Vref L1 L2 PE

Z K Y A B SH

(+)(-)

RS-485

KYZ Pulse

Output

Power Supply Inputs

A B C N

C

B

Select: “2.5 EL WYE” (2.5 Element Wye) in Meter Programming setup.

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A

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5. Service: Delta, 3-Wire with No PTs, 2 CTs

A B C

Wireless Ethernet Connection

Ia

Ic

Electronic Circuits

Ethernet, RJ-45

Jack

Ia Ia Ib Ib Ic Ic

(+) (-) (+) (-) (+) (-)

Va Vb Vc Vref L1 L2 PE

Z K Y A B SH

(+)(-)

RS-485

KYZ Pulse

Output

Power Supply Inputs

A B C

C

or

B

.

A B

Select: “2 Ct dEL” (2 CT Delta) in Meter Programming setup.

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A

4-8

6. Service: Delta, 3-Wire with No PTs, 3 CTs

A B C

Wireless Ethernet Connection

Ia

Ib

Ic

Electronic Circuits

Ethernet, RJ-45

Jack

Ia Ia Ib Ib Ic Ic

(+) (-) (+) (-) (+) (-)

Va Vb Vc Vref L1 L2 PE

Z K Y A B SH

(+)(-)

RS-485

KYZ Pulse

Output

Power Supply Inputs

A B C

C

or

B

.

A B

Select: “2 Ct dEL” (2 CT Delta) in Meter Programming setup.

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A

4-9

7. Service: Delta, 3-Wire with 2 PTs, 2 CTs

A B C

Wireless Ethernet Connection

Ia

Ic

Electronic Circuits

Ethernet, RJ-45

Jack

Ia Ia Ib Ib Ic Ic

(+) (-) (+) (-) (+) (-)

Va Vb Vc Vref L1 L2 PE

Z K Y A B SH

(+)(-)

RS-485

KYZ Pulse

Output

Power Supply Inputs

A B C

C

or

B

.

A B

Select: “2 Ct dEL” (2 CT Delta) in Meter Programming setup.

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8. Service: Delta, 3-Wire with 2 PTs, 3 CTs

A B C

Wireless Ethernet Connection

Ia

Ib

Ic

Electronic Circuits

Ethernet, RJ-45

Jack

Ia Ia Ib Ib Ic Ic

(+) (-) (+) (-) (+) (-)

Va Vb Vc Vref L1 L2 PE

Z K Y A B SH

(+)(-)

RS-485

KYZ Pulse

Output

Power Supply Inputs

A B C

C

or

B

.

A B

Select: “2 Ct dEL” (2 CT Delta) in Meter Programming setup.

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A

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9. Service: Current Only Measurement (Three Phase)

A B C N

Wireless Ethernet Connection

Ic

Ib

Electronic Circuits

Ia

Ethernet, RJ-45

Jack

Ia Ia Ib Ib Ic Ic

(+) (-) (+) (-) (+) (-)

Va Vb Vc Vref L1 L2 PE

Z K Y A B SH

(+)(-)

RS-485

KYZ Pulse

Output

Voltage AN

Input needed for

Frequency

Reference

Power Supply Inputs

A B C N

Select: “3 EL WYE” (3 Element Wye) in Meter Programming setup.

NOTE:

Even if the meter is used for only amp readings, the unit requires a Volts AN reference.

Please make sure that the voltage input is attached to the meter.

AC Control Power can be used to provide the Reference Signal.

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10. Service: Current Only Measurement (Dual Phase)

A B N

Wireless Ethernet Connection

Ib

Electronic Circuits

Ia

Ethernet, RJ-45

Jack

Ia Ia Ib Ib Ic Ic

(+) (-) (+) (-) (+) (-)

Va Vb Vc Vref L1 L2 PE

Z K Y A B SH

(+)(-)

RS-485

KYZ Pulse

Output

Voltage AN

Input needed for

Frequency

Reference

Power Supply Inputs

A B N

Select: “3 EL WYE” (3 Element Wye) in Meter Programming setup.

NOTE:

Even if the meter is used for only amp readings, the unit requires a Volts AN reference.

Please make sure that the voltage input is attached to the meter.

AC Control Power can be used to provide the Reference Signal.

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11. Service: Current Only Measurement (Single Phase)

A N

Wireless Ethernet Connection

Electronic Circuits

Ia

Ethernet, RJ-45

Jack

Ia Ia Ib Ib Ic Ic

(+) (-) (+) (-) (+) (-)

Va Vb Vc Vref L1 L2 PE

Z K Y A B SH

(+)(-)

RS-485

KYZ Pulse

Output

Voltage AN

Input needed for

Frequency

Reference

Power Supply Inputs

A N

Select: “3 EL WYE” (3 Element Wye) in Meter Programming setup.

NOTE:

Even if the meter is used for only amp readings, the unit requires a Volts AN reference.

Please make sure that the voltage input is attached to the meter.

AC Control Power can be used to provide the Reference Signal.

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Chapter 5

Communication Installation

5.1: Shark

®

100-S Communication

Q The Shark® 100-S submeter provides two independent Communication Ports plus

KYZ Pulse Output. (For information on Ethernet configuration, see Chapter 6.)

The first port, Com 1, is an IrDA Port, which uses Modbus ASCII. The second port,

Com 2, provides RS-485 or RJ-45 Ethernet or WI-FI Ethernet Communication.

5.1.1: IrDA Port (Com 1)

Q The Shark® 100-S submeter’s Com 1 IrDA Port is on the face of the submeter. The

IrDA Port allows the unit to be set up and programmed with any device capable of

IrDA communication, including a PDA with CoPilot, some laptops and USB/IrDA

wands (such as the USB to IrDA Adapter [CAB6490] described in Appendix E).

Just point at the meter with an IrDA-equipped PC or PDA and configure it.

Q

Communicator EXT CoPilot is a Windows Mobile software package for a PDA that

can communicate with the meter to configure settings and poll readings. Refer to

the Communicator EXT User’s Manual for details on programming and accessing

readings.

Q

IrDA port settings are:

Figure 5.1: Simultaneous Dual Communication Paths

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5.1.1.1: USB to IrDA Adapter

PC

USB

Port

USB

Extension

Cable

USB to IrDA Adapter

IrDA

Enabled

Device

IrDA

Module

Figure 5.2: USB to IrDA Adapter

The USB to IrDA Adapter (CAB6490) enables IrDA wireless data communication

through a standard USB port. The adapter is powered through the USB bus and

does not require any external power adapter. The effective data transmission

distance is 0 to .3 meters (approximately 1 foot).

The USB to IrDA Adapter enables wireless data transfer between a PC and the

Shark. The adapter can also be used with other IrDA-compatible devices.

The adapter is fully compatible with IrDA 1.1 and USB 1.1 specifications.

System Requirements: IBM PC 100 MHz or higher (or compatible system),

available USB port, CD-ROM drive, Windows

® 98, ME, 2000 or XP.

See Appendix E for instructions on using the USB to IrDA Adapter.

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5.1.2: RS485 Communication Com 2 (485 Option)

The Shark® 100-S submeter’s RS485 port uses standard 2-Wire, Half Duplex

Architecture. The RS485 connector is located on the front of the meter, under the cover.

A connection can easily be made to a Master device or to other Slave devices, as shown

below.

Care should be taken to connect

+

to

+

and

-

to

-

connections.

Wireless Ethernet Connection

Electronic Circuits

Ia Ia Ib Ib Ic Ic

(+) (-) (+) (-) (+) (-)

Va Vb Vc Vn L1 L2 PE

Z K Y A B SH

(+)(-)

JP2: Must be in

position 1-2 for

RS485

RS485

To Other

Devices

Pulse Contacts

The Shark® 100-S submeter’s RS485 can be programmed with the buttons on the

face of the meter or by using Communicator EXT software.

Standard RS485 Port Settings:

Baud Rate:

Protocol:

9.6, 19.2, 38.4 or 57.6

Modbus RTU, Modbus ASCII, DNP 3.0

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5.1.3: KYZ Output

The KYZ Pulse Output provides pulsing energy values that verify the submeter’s

readings and accuracy.

The KYZ Pulse Output is located on the face of the meter, under the cover

and just below the RS485 connection.

See section 2.2 for the KYZ Output Specifications.

See section 7.3.1 for Pulse Constants.

Wireless Ethernet Connection

Electronic Circuits

Ia Ia Ib Ib Ic Ic

(+) (-) (+) (-) (+) (-)

Va Vb Vc Vn L1 L2 PE

Z K Y A B SH

(+)(-)

RS-485

To Other

Devices

Pulse Contacts

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5.1.4: Ethernet Connection

In order to use the Ethernet capability of the Shark

®

100-S submeter, the Ethernet

Module must be installed in your meter, and the JP2 must be set to positions 2-3. You can use either wired Ethernet, or Wi-Fi.

For wired Ethernet, use Standard RJ-45 10/100Base T cable to connect to the

Shark

®

100-S submeter. The RJ-45 line is inserted into the RJ-45 Port of the meter.

For Wi-Fi connections, make sure you have the correct antenna attached to the meter.

Wireless Ethernet Connection

Electronic Circuits

Ia Ia Ib Ib Ic Ic

(+) (-) (+) (-) (+) (-)

Va Vb Vc Vn L1 L2 PE

Z K Y A B SH

(+)(-)

Ethernet Module

RJ-45 Port

RS-485

JP2: Must be in position 2-3 for

Ethernet (RJ-45 or

WiFi)

To Other

Devices

Refer to Chapter 6 of this manual, Ethernet Configuration, for instructions on how to set up the Network Module for the Shark

®

100-S Submeter.

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5.2: Meter Communication and Programming Overview

Q

Programming and communication can utilize the RS485 connection as shown in Section 5.1.2 or the

RJ-45/Wi-Fi connection as shown in Section 5.1.4. Once a connection is established,

Communicator EXT software can be used to program the meter and communicate to other devices.

Q

Meter Connection

To provide power to the meter, use one of the wiring diagrams in Chapter 4 or attach an Aux cable to GND, L(+) and N(-).

The RS485 cable attaches to SH, B(-) and A(+) as shown in Section 5.1.2.

5.2.1: How to Connect

Connect Button

1. Open Communicator EXT software.

2. Click the Connect button on the Icon bar.

The Connect screen opens, showing the Initial settings.

Make sure your settings are the same as those shown here.

NOTE: The settings you make will depend on whether you are connecting to the meter via Serial Port or Network. Use the pulldown windows to make any necessary changes.

Serial Port Connection

Network Connection

3. Click the Connect button on the screen.

You may have to Disconnect power,

Reconnect power and then click Connect.

The Device Status screen appears, confirming a connection.

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Profile

Button

The main screen of Communicator EXT software reappears.

4. Click the Profile button on the toolbar.

You will see the Shark

® meter’s Profile screen.

5.2.2: Shark

®

Meter Device Profile Settings

Click the tabs to access the settings for the Shark

® meter’s Device Profile.

Q

Communication Settings

COM1 (IrDA)

Response Delay (0-750 msec)

COM2:

(For RS485)

Address (1-247)

Protocol (Modbus RTU, ASCII or DNP)

Baud Rate (9.6 to 57.6)

Response Delay (0-750 msec)

(For Ethernet)

Address (1)

Protocol (Modbus RTU)

Baud Rate (57600)

Response Delay (No Delay)

Use pull-down menus to change settings, if desired.

6. When changes are complete, click the

Update button to send the new profile to the Shark

® meter.

7. Click Cancel to exit the Profile; click other tabs to update other settings of the Profile. e

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Q

Scaling (CT, PT Ratios and System Wiring)

CT Numerator:

CT Denominator:

CT Multiplier:

CT Face Plate Value:

Calculation Based on Selections

PT Numerator:

PT Denominator:

PT Multiplier:

PT Face Plate Value

Calculation Based on Selections

System Wiring:

Number of Phases: One, Two or Three

NOTE: VOLTS FULL SCALE = PT Numerator x PT Multiplier

Example:

A 14400/120 PT would be entered as:

Pt Numerator

Pt Denominator

1440

120

Pt Multipler 10

This example would display a 14.40kV.

WARNING: You must specify Primary and Secondary Voltage in Full Scale. Do not use ratios!

Q

Example CT Settings:

200/5 Amps:

800/5 Amps:

2,000/5 Amps:

10,000/5 Amps:

Set the Ct-n value for 200, Ct-Multiplier value for 1.

Set the Ct-n value for 800, Ct-Multiplier value for 1.

Set the Ct-n value for 2000, Ct-Multiplier value for 1.

Set the Ct-n value for 1000, Ct-Multiplier value for 10.

Q

Example PT Settings:

277/277 Volts

14,400/120 Volts:

138,000/69 Volts:

345,000/115 Volts:

345,000/69 Volts:

Pt-n value is 277, Pt-d value is 277, Pt-Multiplier value is 1.

Pt-n value is 1440, Pt-d value is 120, Pt-Multiplier value is 10.

Pt-n value is 1380, Pt-d value is 69, Pt-Multiplier value is 100.

Pt-n value is 3450, Pt-d value is 115, Pt-Multiplier value is 100

Pt-n value is 345, Pt-d value is 69, PT-Multiplier value is 1000.

NOTE: Settings are the same for Wye and Delta configurations.

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Q

Energy and Display

Power and Energy Format

Power Scale

Energy Digits

Energy Decimal Places

Energy Scale

(Example Based on Selections)

Power Direction: View as Load

Demand Averaging

Averaging Method: Block or Rolling

Interval (Minutes)

Sub Interval

Auto Scroll: Click to Activate

Display Configuration:

Click Values to be displayed.

NOTE: You MUST have at lease ONE selected.

NOTE: If incorrect values are entered on this screen the following message appears:

WARNING: Current, CT, PT and Energy Settings will cause invalid energy accumulator values.

Change the inputted settings until the message disappears.

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Q

Settings

Password

(Meter is shipped with Password Disabled and there is NO DEFAULT PASSWORD)

Enable Password for Reset

Enable Password for Configuration

Change Password

Change VSwitch

(Call Electro Industries for Update Information)

Change Device Designation

Q

Limits (VSwitch

TM

Key 4 Only)

For up to 8 Limits, Set:

Address: Modbus Address (1 based)

Label: Your Designation

High Set Point: % of Full Scale

Example: 100% of 120VFS = 120V

90% of 120V FS = 108V

Return Hysteresis: Point to go back in Limit

Example: High Set Point = 110%

(Out of Limit at 132V)

Return Hysteresis = 105%

(Stay Out until 126V)

Low Set Point: % of Full Scale

Return Hysteresis: Point to go back in Limit

Settings appear in the Table at the bottom of the screen

NOTE: If Return Hysteresis is > High Set Point, the Limit is Disabled.

Click Update to send a new Profile.

NOTE: If the Update fails, the software will ask you if you want to try again to Update.

Click Cancel to Exit the Profile.

Use Communicator EXT to communicate with the device and perform required tasks.

NOTE: Refer to the Communicator EXT User’s Manual for more details and additional instructions.

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Chapter 6

Ethernet Configuration

6.1: Introduction

The Shark® 100-S submeter has an option for a Wi-Fi (Wireless) or RJ-45 Ethernet connection. This option allows the submeter to be set up for use in a LAN (Local Area

Network), using standard Wi-Fi base stations. Configuration for these connections is easily accomplished through your PC using Telnet connections. Then you can access the submeter to perform meter functions directly through any computer on your LAN: the Shark® 100-S meter does not need to be directly connected (wired) to these computers for it to be accessed.

This chapter outlines the procedures you use to set up the Shark® 100-S submeter to function via its Ethernet configuration.

IMPORTANT!

These instructions are for Shark® 100-S meters that have a Reset button, located on

the main board. You can easily tell whether or not your meter has a Reset button: open the front cover of the Shark

®

100-S meter. The Reset button is located at the top, right of the main board. Refer to the figure below.

Some earlier versions of the Shark® 100-S meter are not equipped with a Reset

button. The instructions for Ethernet configuration are slightly different for these meters.

If your meter does not have a Reset button, please call EIG’s Technical Support department (at 516-334-0870) to obtain configuration instructions for your meter’s

Ethernet connection.

Reset button on the Main Board

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6.2: Factory Default Settings

The settings shown in Section 6.2.1 are the default settings for your Shark® 100-S meter: they are the settings programmed into your meter when it is shipped to you. You may need to modify some of these settings when you set up your Ethernet configuration.

NOTES:

Change Settings 1 and 6 ONLY. Settings 2, 3, and 4 must be the same as shown in

Section 6.2.1. If they are not, reset them to the values shown in Section 6.2.1.

If setting 3 is not CP0..! Defaults (In), the procedure for Network Module Hardware

Initialization (Section 6.3.4) will not work.

6.2.1: Modbus/TCP to RTU Bridge Setup

1) Network/IP Settings:

Network Mode…………Wired Only

IP Address ...............….. 10.0.0.1

Default Gateway ............ --- not set ---

Netmask .................... …255.255.255.0

2) Serial & Mode Settings:

Protocol ................... Modbus/RTU,Slave(s) attached

Serial Interface ........... 57600,8,N,1,RS232,CH1

3) Modem/Configurable Pin Settings:

CP0..! Defaults (In) CP1..! GPIO (In) CP2..! GPIO (In)

CP3..! GPIO (In) CP4..! GPIO (In) CP5..! GPIO (In)

CP6..! GPIO (In) CP7..! GPIO (In) CP8..! GPIO (In)

CP9..! GPIO (In) CP10.! GPIO (In)

RTS Output ................. Fixed High/Active

4) Advanced Modbus Protocol settings:

Slave Addr/Unit Id Source .. Modbus/TCP header

Modbus Serial Broadcasts ... Disabled (Id=0 auto-mapped to 1)

MB/TCP Exception Codes ..... Yes (return 00AH and 00BH)

Char, Message Timeout ...... 00050msec, 05000msec

6) WLAN Settings:

WLAN ....................... Disabled, network:LTRX_IBSS

Topology……………. AdHoc, Country: US, Channel: 11

Security……………… none

TX Data rate………… 11 Mbps auto fallback

Power management….. not supported in ad hoc mode

D)efault settings, S)ave, Q)uit without save

Select Command or parameter set (1..6) to change:

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6.3: Configure Network Module

These procedures detail how to set up the Shark

®

100-S meter on the Network Module.

Only one person at a time can be logged into the network port. This eliminates the possibility of several people trying to configure the Ethernet interface simultaneously.

6.3.1: Configuration Requirements

You may want to consult your network administrator before performing these procedures.

Some functions may be restricted to the network administrator.

If you have only one Ethernet adapter (network card), the screen displays only that configuration. You will use this Ethernet adapter to access the Shark

®

100-S meter’s

Network Module. You may have to configure the Ethernet adapter in order to use it with the Shark

®

100-S meter’s Network Module, using the instructions in Section 6.4.2.

If you have multiple Ethernet adapters (network cards) installed on your computer, you must choose, configure and use the correct one to access the Network Module.

The Ethernet Adapter must be set up for point-to-point connection in order for it to connect to the Shark® 100-S meter’s Network module, as follows:

IP Address should be 10.0.0.2

6.3.2.

Subnet Mask should be 255.255.255.0

These settings can be made in the Ethernet Adapter. Follow the procedure in Section

6.3.2: Configuring the Ethernet Adapter screen shown below.

2. Right click on the Local Area Network Connection you will be using to connect to the Shark® 100-S meter, and select Properties from the pull-down menu. You will see the screen shown on the next page.

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Properties button. You will see the screen shown below.

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you to enter the IP Address and Subnet Mask.

6. You can now close the Local Area Connection Properties and Network

Connection windows.

6.3.3: Detailed Configuration Parameters

Certain parameters must be configured before the Ethernet Interface can function on a network.

The Ethernet Interface can be locally or remotely configured using the following procedures:

Use a Telnet connection to configure the unit over the network. The Ethernet Interface's configuration is stored in memory and is retained without power. The configuration can be changed at any time. The Ethernet Interface performs a reset after the configuration has been changed and stored.

As mentioned above, to configure the Ethernet Interface over the network, establish a Telnet connection to port 9999. Follow this procedure:

1. From the Windows Start menu, click Run and type 'cmd’.

2. Click the OK button to bring up Windows's Command Prompt window.

3. In the Command Prompt window, type:

'telnet 10.0.0.1 9999' and press the Enter key.

Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]

(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.

C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator>telnet 10.0.0.1 9999

NOTE: Be sure to include a space between the IP address and 9999.

The following parameters appear; for example:

Serial Number 5415404 MAC Address 00:20:4A:54:3C:2C

Software Version V01.2 (000719)

Press Enter to go into Setup Mode

After entering Setup Mode (confirm by pressing Enter), you can configure the parameters for the software you are using by entering one of the numbers on the Change Setup

Menu, or you can confirm default values by pressing Enter. Be sure to store new configurations when you are finished. The Ethernet Interface will then perform a power reset.

5. The Factory Default Settings will display again (refer to Section 6.2.1).

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6.3.4: Setup Details

This section illustrates how each Section of settings appears on the screen, if you press Y (Yes) to change one or more of the settings.

NOTE: Change Settings 1 and 6 ONLY. Settings 2, 3, and 4 must be the same as shown in

Section 6.2.1. If they are not, reset them to the values shown in Section 6.2.1.

Network IP Settings Detail (1) (Set device with static IP Address.)

Network Mode: 0=Wired only, 1=Wireless Only <0> ? 1

IP Address <010> 192.<000> 168.<000> .<000> .<001>

Set Gateway IP Address <N> ? Y

Gateway IP Address : <192> .<168> .<000> .<001>

Set Netmask <N for default> <Y> ? Y

<255> .<255> .<255> .<000>

Change telnet config password <N> ? N

Serial & Mode Settings (2) (Make sure these settings match those shown in Section 6.2.1.)

Attached Device (1=Slave 2=Master) (1) ? 1

Serial Protocol (1=Modbus/RTU 2=Modbus/ASCII) (1) ? 1

Use serial connector (1=CH1 2=CH2) (1) ? 1

Interface Type (1=RS232 2=RS422/RS485+4-wire 3=RS485+2-wire) (1) ? 1

Enter serial parameters (57600,8,N,1) 57600, 8, N, 1

Modem/Configurable Pin Settings (3) (Make sure these settings match those shown in

Section 6.2.1.)

CAUTION! You must configure this setting correctly in order to be able to use the

Network Module Hardware Initialization procedure (Section 6.3.4).

Press 3. The following appears on the screen:

CP0 Function (hit space to toggle) GPIO (In)

Press the Space bar until the following appears on the screen:

CP0 Function (hit space to toggle) Defaults(In)

Press Enter. The following appears on the screen:

Invert (active low) (Y) ?

Press Y.

Ignore other settings (press Enter through the rest of Setting 3).

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Advanced Modbus Protocol settings (4) (Make sure these settings match those shown in

Section 6.2.1.)

Slave address (0 for auto, or 1..255 fixed otherwise) (0) ? 0

Allow Modbus Broadcasts (1=Yes 2=No) (2) ? 2

Use MB/TCP 00BH/00AH Exception Responses (1=No 2=Yes) (2) ? 2

Disable Modbus/TCP pipeline (1=No 2=Yes) (1) ? 1

Character Timeout (0 for auto, or 10-6950 msec) (50) 50

Message Timeout (200-65000 msec) (5000) 5000

Serial TX delay after RX (0-1275 msec) (0) 0

Swap 4x/0H to get 3x/1x (N) ? N

Local slave address for GPIO (0 to disable, or 1..255) (0) ? 0

WLAN Settings Detail (6)

(The settings shown are recommended by EIG for use with Shark® 100-S meter.)

Topology: 0=Infrastructure, 1=Ad-Hoc <1> ? 0

Network name <SSID> <LTRX_IBSS> ? EIG_SHARKS

Security suite: 0=none, 1=WEP, 2=WPA, 3=WPA2/802.11i <0> ? 0

TX Data rate: 0=fixed, 1=auto fallback <1> ? 1

TX Data rate: 0=1, 1=2, 2=5.5, 3=11, 4=18, 5=24, 6=36, 7=54 Mbps <3> ? 7

Enable power management <N> ? Y

IMPORTANT NOTES:

The settings for the Wireless Access Point should be IDENTICAL to the settings for

LWAN above. For programming, see the User’s Manual for the Wireless Access Point in use.

See Section 6.3.4.1 for information on using an Encryption key.

Exiting the screen

CAUTION! DO NOT PRESS ‘D.’

Press ‘S’ to Save the settings you’ve entered.

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3.

6.3.4.1: Encryption Key

EIG recommends that you use 128-bit encryption when setting up your Ethernet configuration.

In the WLAN Settings (6), set Security WEP (1), Authentication shared (1), WEP128 (1) and

Change Key (Y).

When Change Key (Y) is entered, you are required to enter an Encryption Key. You can manually enter 26 hexadecimal characters (required for 128-bit encryption) or you can use a WEP

Key provider online (example: www.powerdog.com/wepkey.cgi). WEP Key providers should note on their website that their encryption algorithm is for the Wired Equivalent Privacy portion of IEEE 802.11b/g.

WEP Key Provider Steps

1. Input 26 alphanumeric characters as your Passphrase.

Remember your Passphrase.

2. Click the Generate Keys button.

Your Hexadecimal WEP

Keys appear.

PASSPHRASE TO HEXADECIMAL WEP KEYS

Enter the passphrase below.

1009egbck001036ab

1009egbck001036ab

Generate keys

PASSPHRASE TO HEXADECIMAL WEP KEYS

The passphrase 1009egbcke001306ab produces the following keys:

64-BIT (40-BIT KEYS)

1. AA43FB768D

2. 637D8DB9CE

3. AFDE50AF61

4. 0c35E73E25

128-BIT (104-BIT) KEY

041D7773D8B2C1D97BE9531DC

Input the 128-bit Key in the Change Key section of the WLAN Settings (6).

Continue inputting settings.

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6.4: Network Module Hardware Initialization

If you don’t know your current Network Module settings, or if the settings are lost, you can use this method to initialize the hardware with known settings you can then work with.

Reset

Button

Right Side of Main Board

JP3

JP2

1. Place a shorting block on JP3 and press the Reset button on the main board.

NOTE: JP3 is located at the right hand side, upper corner of the main board. The

shorting block can be “borrowed” from JP2, located at the middle, right hand side. See the

figure shown above.

2. After you press the Reset button, relocate the jumper back to JP2.

3. Make sure your settings are the same as those in Section 6.2.1. Follow the steps in Section 6.3

to configure the Network Module.

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Chapter 7

Using the Submeter

7.1: Introduction

Q

The Shark® 100-S Submeter can be configured and a variety of functions can be accomplished simply by using the Elements and the Buttons on the submeter face. This chapter will review Front

Panel Navigation. Complete Navigation Maps can be found in Appendix A of this manual.

7.1.A: Submeter Face Elements

Reading Type Indicator:

Indicates Type of Reading

IrDA Communication Port:

Com 1 Port for Wireless

Communication

% of Load Bar:

Graphic Display of Amps as % of the Load

Parameter Designator:

Indicates Reading Displayed

Watt-Hour Test Pulse:

Energy Pulse Output to Test

Accuracy

Scale Selector:

Kilo or Mega multiplier of

Displayed Readings

Reading Type

Indicator

IrDA

Comm

Port

% of

Load Bar

Figure 7.1: Face Plate of 100-S with Elements

Parameter

Designator

Watt-Hour

Test Pulse

Scale

Selector

7.1.B: Submeter Face Buttons

Q

Using Menu, Enter, Down and Right

Buttons, perform the following functions:

• View Submeter Information

• Enter Display Modes

• Configure Parameters

(Password Protected)

• Perform Resets

• Perform LED Checks

• Change Settings

• View Parameter Values

• Scroll Parameter Values

• View Limit States

Menu

Down

Figure 7.2: Face Plate of 100-S with Buttons

Enter

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Q

Enter Button:

Press and release to enter one of four Display Modes

Operating Mode (Default),

Reset Mode (ENTER once, then Down)

Settings Mode (ENTER twice, then Down) and

Configuration Mode (ENTER three times, then Down)

Q

Menu Button:

Press and release to navigate Config Menu, return to Main Menu

Q

Right Button:

Operating Mode - Max, Min, %THD, Del kW, Net kW, Total kW

Reset Mode - Yes, No

Settings Mode - On, Off, Settings

Config Mode - Password Digits, Available Values, Digits

Q

Down Button:

Scroll DOWN through Mode menus

Q

Use Buttons in Modes of Operation:

Operating Mode (default): View Parameter Values

Reset Mode: Reset Stored Max and Min Values

Settings Mode: View Submeter Setting Parameters and Change Scroll Setting

Configuration Mode: Change Submeter Configuration (Can be Password Protected)

NOTE: The above is a brief overview of the use of the Buttons. For Programming, refer to Chapter 8.

For complete Navigation Maps, refer to Appendix A of this manual.

7.2: % of Load Bar

Q

The 10-segment LED bargraph at the bottom of the submeter display provides a graphic representation of Amps. The segments light according to the load in the %Load Segment Table below.

When the Load is over 120% of Full Load, all segments flash “On” (1.5 secs) and “Off” (0.5 secs).

% Load Segment Table

Segments Load >= % Full Load

none

1 no load

1%

1 - 2

1 - 3

1 - 4

1 - 5

1 - 6

1 - 7

1 - 8

1 - 9

1 - 10

All Blink

15%

30%

45%

60%

72%

84%

96%

108%

120%

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Q

The Shark® 100-S meter has a Watt-Hour Test Pulse on the face of the submeter. This is an infrared pulse that can be read easily to test for accuracy.

Q To be certified for revenue metering, power providers and utility companies have to verify that the billing energy submeter will perform to the stated accuracy. To confirm the submeter’s performance and calibration, power providers use field test standards to ensure that the unit’s energy measurements are correct. Since the Shark® 100-S meter is a traceable revenue submeter, it contains a utility grade test pulse that can be used to gate an accuracy standard. This is an essential feature required of all billing grade meters and submeters.

Refer to Figure 5.2 below for an example of how this process works.

Refer to the Table below for the Wh/Pulse Constant for Accuracy Testing.

Figure 7.3: Using the Watt-Hour Test Pulse

7.3.1: KYZ Pulse Constants

Infrared & KYZ Pulse Constants for Accuracy Testing

Voltage Level Class 10 Models Class 2 Models

Below 150V

Above 150V

0.2505759630

1.0023038521

0.0501151926

0.2004607704

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7.4: Upgrade the Submeter Using V-S

ΤΤΜ

Technology

Q The Shark® 100-S meter is equipped with V-Switch

ΤΜ technology. V-Switch

ΤΜ technology is a virtual firmware-based switch that allows you to enable submeter features through communication.

This allows the unit to be upgraded after installation to a higher model without removing the unit from service.

Q Available V-Switch

ΤΜ keys

V-Switch 3 (-V3): Volts, Amps, kW, kVAR, PF, kVA, Freq., kWh, kVAh, kVARh & DNP 3.0

V-Switch 4 (-V4): Volts, Amps, kW, kVAR, PF, kVA, Freq., kWh, kVAh, kVARh, %THD

Monitoring, Limit Exceeded Alarms & DNP.3.0

Q

To change the V-Switch

ΤΜ key, follow these simple steps:

1. Install Communicator EXT 3.0 in your computer.

2. Set up the Shark® 100-S submeter to communicate with your computer (see Chapter 5); power up your submeter.

3. Log on to Communicator EXT 3.0 software.

4. Click on the Profile Icon. A set of screens appears.

5. The first screen is the Settings screen.

Click CHANGE V-SWITCH.

A small screen appears that requests a code (shown here).

7. Enter the code which EIG provides.

7. Click OK.

The V-Switch

ΤΜ key has been changed and the submeter resets.

NOTE: For more details on software configuration, refer to the Communiator EXT 3.0 User Manual.

Q

How do I get a V-Switch key?

V-Switch

ΤΜ keys are based on the particular serial number of the ordered submeter. To obtain a higher V-Switch

ΤΜ key, you need to provide EIG with the following information:

1. Serial Number or Numbers of the submeters for which you desire an upgrade.

2. Desired V-Switch

ΤΜ key upgrade.

3. Credit Card or Purchase Order Number.

Contact EIG’s inside sales staff with the above information at [email protected] or

(516) 334-0870 (USA) and EIG will issue you the Upgrade Code.

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Chapter 8

S Meter with the Front Panel

Reading Type Indicator Parameter Designator

8.1: Overview

Q

The Shark® 100-S meter’s front panel can be used to configure the submeter.

The front panel has three MODES:

Operating Mode (Default),

IrDA

Comm

Reset Mode and

Configuration Mode.

The MENU, ENTER, DOWN and

Port

RIGHT buttons navigate through the

MODES and navigate through all the

SCREENS in each mode.

In this chapter, a typical set up is demonstrated. Other settings are possible. The complete Navigation

Map for the Display Modes is in

Appendix A of this manual. The submeter can also be configured with software

(see Communicator EXT 3.0 Manual).

% of Load Bar Scale Selector

Figure 8.1: Shark® 100-S Meter Label

Watt-

Hour

Test

Pulse

8.2: Start Up

Q

Upon Power Up, the submeter will display a sequence of screens. The sequence includes the following screens:

Lamp Test Screen where all LEDs are lighted

Lamp Test Screen where all digits are lighted

Firmware Screen showing build number

Error Screen (if an error exists)

The Shark® 100-S meter will then automatically Auto-Scroll the Parameter Designators on the right side of the front panel. Values are displayed for each parameter.

The KILO or MEGA LED lights, showing the scale for the Wh, VARh and VAh readings.

An example of a Wh reading is shown here.

Figure 8.2: Wh Reading Detail

Q

The meter will continue to scroll through the Parameter Designators, providing readings until one of the buttons on the front panel is pushed, causing the submeter to enter one of the other MODES.

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8.3: Configuration

8.3.1: Main Menu

Q

Push MENU from any of the Auto-Scrolling Readings. The MAIN MENU Screens appear.

The String for Reset Mode (rSt) appears (blinking) in the A Screen.

If you push DOWN, the MENU scrolls and the String for Configuration Mode (CFG) appears

(blinking) in the A Screen.

If you push DOWN again, the String for Operating Mode (OPr) appears (blinking) in the A

Screen.

If you push DOWN again, the MENU scrolls back to Reset Mode (rSt).

If you push ENTER from the Main Menu, the submeter enters the Mode that is in the A Screen and is blinking. See Appendix A for the Navigation Map.

8.3.2: Reset Mode

Q

If you push ENTER from the Main Menu, the submeter enters the Mode that is in the A Screen and is blinking. Reset Mode is the first mode to appear on the Main Menu. Push ENTER while (rSt) is in the A Screen and the “RESET ALL? no” screen appears. Reset ALL resets all Max and Min

values. See Appendix A for Navigation Map.

If you push ENTER again, the

Main Menu continues to scroll.

The DOWN button does not change the screen.

If you push the RIGHT button, the

RESET All? YES screen appears.

To Reset All, you must enter a

4-digit Password, if Enabled in the software.

Push ENTER; the following

Password screen appears.

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8.3.2.1: Enter Password (ONLY IF ENABLED IN SOFTWARE)

Q

To enter a Password:

If PASSWORD is Enabled in the software (see Communicator EXT section 5.22 to Enable/

Change Password), a screen appears requesting the Password. PASS appears in the A

Screen and 4 dashes in the B Screen. The LEFT digit is flashing.

Use the DOWN button to scroll from 0 to 9 for the flashing digit. When the correct number appears for that digit, use the RIGHT button to move to the next digit.

Example: On the Password screens below:

On the left screen, four dashes appear and the left digit is flashing.

On the right screen, 2 digits have been entered and the third digit is flashing.

Q

PASS or FAIL

When all 4 digits have been entered, push ENTER.

If the correct Password has been entered, “rSt ALL donE” appears and the screen returns to

Auto-Scroll the Parameters.

(In other Modes, the screen returns to the screen to be changed. The left digit of the setting is flashing and the Program (PRG) LED flashes on the left side of the submeter face.)

If an incorrect Password has been entered, “PASS ---- FAIL” appears and the screen returns to

Reset ALL? YES.

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8.3.3: Configuration Mode

Q

The next Mode on the Main Menu is Configuration Mode. See Appendix A for Navigation Map.

To reach Configuration Mode, push the MENU Button from any of the Auto-Scrolling Readings, then push the DOWN button to reach the String for Configuration Mode (CFG).

Push ENTER and the Configuration Parameters scroll, starting at the “SCROLL, Ct, Pt” screen.

Push the DOWN Button to scroll all the parameters: Scroll, CT, PT, Connection (Cnct) and Port.

The ‘Active” parameter is in the A Screen and is flashing.

8.3.3.1: Configure Scroll Feature

Push ENTER and the Scroll no screen appears.

Push RIGHT and changes to Scroll YES.

When in Scroll Mode, the unit scrolls each parameter for 7 seconds on and 1 second off. The submeter can be configured through software to display only selected screens. If that is the case, it will only scroll the selected display. Additionally, the submeter will only scroll the display enabled by the V-Switch that is installed.

Push ENTER (YES or no) and the screen scrolls to the Ct Parameters.

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8.3.3.2: Program Configuration Mode Screens

Q

To program the screens in Configuration Mode, other than SCROLL:

1. Push DOWN or RIGHT button (Example Ct-n screen below).

2. The Password screen appears, if Enabled (see section 5.22). Use the DOWN and RIGHT buttons to enter the PASSWORD. See section 8.3.2.1 for all Password steps.

Once the correct password is entered, push ENTER. The Ct-n screen reappears. The Program

(PRG) LED flashes on the left side of the submeter face.

The first digit of the setting will also flash.

3. Use the DOWN button to change the digit.

Use the RIGHT Button to move to the next digit.

4. When the new setting is entered, push MENU twice.

The STORE ALL screen appears.

5. Use the RIGHT Button to scroll from YES to no.

6. While in STORE ALL YES, push

ENTER to change the setting.

Store All Done appears.

Then, the submeter RESETS.

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8.3.3.3: Configure CT Setting

Push the DOWN Button to scroll all the parameters in Configuration Mode: Scroll, CT, PT,

Connection (Cnct) and Port. The ‘Active” parameter is in the A Screen and is flashing.

Push ENTER when CT is the ‘Active’ parameter and the Ct-n (Numerator) screen appears.

Push ENTER and the screen changes to Ct-d (Denominator).

The Ct-d screen is PRESET to a 5 or 1 Amp value at the factory and cannot be changed.

ENTER again changes the screen to Ct-S (Scaling). The Ct-S setting can be ‘1’, ‘10’ or ‘100’.

To program these settings (except Ct-d), see section 8.3.3.2 above.

NOTE: Ct-d is FIXED to a 5 or 1 Amp

Value.

Example Settings:

200/5 Amps:

800/5 Amps:

2,000/5 Amps:

10,000/5 Amps:

Set the Ct-n value for 200 and the Ct-S value for 1.

Set the Ct-n value for 800 and the Ct-S value for 1.

Set the Ct-n value for 2000 and the Ct-S value for 1.

Set the Ct-n value for 1000 and the Ct-S value for 10.

NOTE: The value for Amps is a product of the Ct-n value and the Ct-S value.

Q

Push ENTER and the screen scrolls through the other CFG parameters.

Push DOWN or RIGHT and the Password screen appears (see section 8.3.2.1).

Push MENU and you will return to the MAIN MENU.

NOTE:

Ct-n and Ct-S are dictated by Primary Current.

Ct-d is Secondary Current.

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8.3.3.4: Configure PT Setting

Push the DOWN Button to scroll all the parameters in Configuration Mode: Scroll, CT, PT,

Connection (Cnct) and Port. The ‘Active” parameter is in the A Screen and is flashing.

Push ENTER when PT is the ‘Active’ parameter and the Pt-n (Numerator) screen appears.

Push ENTER and the screen changes to Pt-d (Denominator).

ENTER again changes the screen to Pt-S (Scaling). The Pt-S setting can be ‘1’, ‘10’ or ‘100’.

To program any of these settings, see section 8.3.3.2 above.

Example Settings:

14,400/120 Volts:

138,000/69 Volts:

345,000/115Volts:

345,000/69 Volts:

Pt-n value is 1440, Pt-d value is 120, Pt-S value is 10.

Pt-n value is 1380, Pt-d value is 69, Pt-S value is 100.

Pt-n value is 3450, Pt-d value is 115, Pt-S value is 100.

Pt-n value is 345, Pt-d value is 69, Pt-S value is 1000.

Q

Push ENTER and the screen scrolls through the other CFG parameters.

Push DOWN or RIGHT and the Password screen appears (see section 8.3.2.1).

Push MENU and you will return to the MAIN MENU.

NOTE:

Pt-n and Pt-S are dictated by Primary Voltage.

Pt-d is Secondary Voltage.

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8.3.3.5: Configure Connection (Cnct) Setting

Push the DOWN Button to scroll all the parameters in Configuration Mode: Scroll, CT, PT,

Connection (Cnct) and Port. The ‘Active” parameter is in the A Screen and is flashing.

Push ENTER when Cnct is the ‘Active’ parameter and the Connection screen appears for your submeter. To change this setting, use the RIGHT button to scroll through the three settings. Select the setting that is right for your submeter.

Q

The possible Connection configurations include:

• 3 Element WYE

• 2.5 Element WYE

• 2 CT Delta

3 Element Wye

2.5 Element Wye

Q Push ENTER and the screen scrolls through the other CFG parameters.

Push DOWN or RIGHT and the Password screen appears (see section 8.3.2.1).

Push MENU and you will return to the MAIN MENU.

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8.3.3.6: Configure Communication Port Setting

Push the DOWN Button to scroll all the parameters in Configuration Mode: Scroll, CT, PT,

Connection (Cnct) and Port. The ‘Active” parameter is in the A Screen and is flashing.

Push ENTER when PORT is the ‘Active’ parameter and your submeter’s POrt screens appear.

Q To program the PORT screens, see section 8.3.3.2.

Q

The possible PORT configurations include:

Address (Adr) (Three digit number)

BAUD (bAUd) 9600, 19.2, 38.4, 57.6

Protocol (Prot): DNP 3.0 (dnP)

Modbus (Mod) RTU (rtU)

Modbus (Mod) ASCII (ASCI)

Q

Q

The first PORT screen is Address (Adr).

The current Address appears on the screen.

Follow the Programming steps in section 8.3.3.2 to change the Address.

Address 005

The Baud Rate (bAUd) appears next. The current Baud Rate appears on the screen. To change the setting, follow the Programming steps in section 8.3.3.2. Possible screens appear below.

Q The Protocol (Prot) appears next. The current Protocol appears on the screen. To change the setting, follow the Programming steps in section 8.3.3.2. Possible screens appear below.

NOTE: JP2 must be in positions 1-2 for RS485 or positions 2-3 for Ethernet. Refer to Chapter 5 of this manual, sections 5.1.2, 5.1.4, and 5.2.2 for related Communication instructions.

Baud Rate 9600

Baud Rate 19,200

Baud Rate 38,400

Baud Rate 57,600

Modbus RTU Protocol

Modbus ASCII Protocol

DNP 3.0 Protocol

Q Push ENTER and the screen scrolls through the other CFG parameters.

Push DOWN or RIGHT and the Password screen appears (see section 8.3.2.1).

Push MENU and you will return to the MAIN MENU.

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8.3.4: Operating Mode

Q

Operating Mode is the Shark® 100-S submeter’s Default Mode. After Start Up, the submeter automatically scrolls through these parameter screens, if scrolling is enabled. The screen changes every 7 seconds. Scrolling is suspended for 3 minutes after any button is pressed.

Q

Push the DOWN Button to scroll all the parameters in Operating Mode.

The ‘Active” parameter has the Indicator light next to it on the right face of the submeter..

Push the RIGHT Button to view additional readings for that Parameter.

A Table of the possible readings for Operating Mode is below.

See Appendix A (Sheet 2) for the Operating Mode Navigation Map.

OPERATING MODE PARAMETER READINGS

Parameter

Designator

Available by

V-Switch Key

Possible Readings

VOLTS L-N V1-4

VOLTS L-L V1-4

AMPS V1-4

W/VAR/PF V2-4

W_VAR_PF

VA/Hz V2-4

VOLTS_LN

VOLTS_LL

AMPS

VA_FREQ

VOLTS_LN_

MAX

VOLTS_LN_

MIN

VOLTS_LL_

MAX

AMPS_

NEUTRAL

VOLTS_LL_

MIN

AMPS_MAX

W_VAR_PF

_MAX_POS

VA_FREQ_

MAX

W_VAR_PF

_MIN_POS

VA_FREQ_

MIN

AMPS_MIN

W_VAR_PF

_MAX_NEG

W_VAR_PF

_MIN_NEG

V4 Only

VOLTS_LN

_THD

AMPS_THD

Wh V3-4

KWH_REC KWH_DEL KWH_NET KWH_TOT

VARh V3-4

VAh V3-4

KVARH_

POS

KVAH

KVARH_

NEG

KVARH_

NET

KVARH_

TOT

NOTE: Reading or Groups of readings are skipped if not applicable to the submeter type or hookup, or if explicitly disabled in the programmable settings.

NOTE: AMPS_NEUTRAL (Neutral Current) appears for Wye hookups only.

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Appendix A

Navigation Maps for the Shark® 100-S Meter

A.1: Introduction

Q

The Shark® 100-S meter can be configured and a variety of functions performed using the

Buttons on the meter face.

• An Overview of the Elements and Buttons on the meter face can be found in

Chapter 7.

• An Overview of Programming using the Buttons can be found in Chapter 8.

• The meter can also be programmed using software (see the Communicator EXT 3.0

User Manual).

A.2: Navigation Maps (Sheets 1 to 4)

Q The Shark® 100-S meter’s Navigation Maps begin on the next page.

They illustrate how to move from one screen to another, and from one Display Mode to

another, using the buttons on the face of the meter.

NOTE: After 10 minutes without user activity, the display automatically returns to

Operating Mode

Q

Shark® 100-S meter Navigation map titles:

Main Menu Screens (Sheet 1)

Operating Mode Screens (Sheet 2)

Reset Mode Screens (Sheet 3)

Configuration Mode Screens (Sheet 4)

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Main Menu Screens (Sheet 1)

STARTUP sequence run once at meter startup. 2 lamp test screens, hardware information screen, firmware version screen, error screen (conditional) sequence completed

10 minutes with no user activity

10 minutes with no user activity

MENU

OPERATING MODE grid of meter data screens See Sheet 2

10 minutes with no user activity

ENTER

MENU

MENU

CONFIGURATION MODE* RESET MODE grid of meter settings screens with passwordprotected edit capability.

See Sheet 4

ENTER

MAIN MENU:

CFG (blinking)

OPR

RST

DOWN

MAIN MENU:

OPR(blinking)

RST

CFG

DOWN

MAIN MENU:

RST (blinking)

CFG

OPR

ENTER sequence of screens to get password, if required, and reset meter data.

See Sheet 3

DOWN

MAIN MENU Screen

MENU

*Configuration Mode is not available during a

Programmable Settings update via a COM Port.

MAIN MENU screen scrolls through 3 choices, showing all 3 at once. The top choice is always the "active" one, which is indicated by the blinking legend.

MENU

ENTER

DOWN, RIGHT

Navigation:

Editing:

BUTTONS

Returns to previous menu from any screen in any mode.

Indicates acceptance of the current screen and advances to the next one.

Navigation and Edit buttons

No digits or legends are blinking. On a menu, DOWN advances to the next menu selection, RIGHT does nothing.

In a grid of screens, DOWN advances to the next row, RIGHT advances to the next column.

Rows, columns and menus all navigate circularly.

A digit or legend is blinking to indicate that it is eligible for change. When a digit is blinking, DOWN increases the digit value, RIGHT moves to the next digit. When a legend is blinking, either button advances to the next choice legend.

single screen all screens for a display mode group of screens action taken button

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Operating Mode Screens (Sheet 2)

VOLTS_LN

RIGHT

VOLTS_LN_

MAX

RIGHT

RIGHT

See Notes 1 & 3

VOLTS_LN_

MIN

RIGHT

DOWN 2

(from any VOLTS_LN screen)

VOLTS_LL

RIGHT

DOWN

2

RIGHT

VOLTS_LL_

MAX

RIGHT

VOLTS_LL_

MIN

VSwitches 1 - 4

DOWN

2

(from any VOLTS_LL screen)

See Note 1

AMPS

RIGHT

AMPS_

NEUTRAL

RIGHT

RIGHT

See Note 1

AMPS_MAX

RIGHT

AMPS_MIN

DOWN 2

(from any AMPS screen)

DOWN 2

W_VAR_PF

RIGHT

W_VAR_PF

_MAX_POS

RIGHT

DOWN

2

RIGHT

W_VAR_PF

_MIN_POS

RIGHT

W_VAR_PF

_MAX_NEG

RIGHT

RIGHT

See Note 1

AMPS_THD

VSwitch 4

Only

See Note 1

W_VAR_PF

_MIN_NEG

DOWN

2

(from any W_VAR_PF screen)

See Notes 1 & 3

VOLTS_LN_

THD

VSwitch 4

Only

KEY:

VA_FREQ

RIGHT

RIGHT

VA_FREQ_

MAX

RIGHT

VA_FREQ_

MIN

See Note 1

VSwitches

2 - 4

VSwitches 1-4

VSwitches 2-4

VSwitches 3-4

VSwitch 4 Only

DOWN 2

(from any VA_FREQ screen)

KWH_RE C

RIGHT

KWH_DEL

RIGHT

RIGHT

KWH_NET

RIGHT

KWH_TOT

See Note 1

VSwitches 3 - 4

DOWN

2

(from any KWH screen)

RIGHT

KVARH_NEG

RIGHT

KVARH_NET

RIGHT

See Note 1

KVARH_TOT

KVARH_POS

RIGHT

DOWN 2

(from any KVARH screen)

See Note 1

KVAH

NOTES

1. Group is skipped if not applicable to the meter type or hookup, or if explicitly disabled via programmable settings.

2. DOWN occurs without user intervention every 7 seconds if scrolling is enabled.

3. No Volts_LN screens for Delta 2 CT hookup.

4. Scrolling is suspended for 3 minutes after any button press.

5. AMPS_NEUTRAL appears for WYE hookups.

MENU

(from any operating mode screen) to Main Menu

(see Main Menu for overview)

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Doc # E145721

A-3

from MAIN MENU

Reset Mode Screens (Sheet 3)

ENTER

RESET_NO:

RST

ALL?

no (blinking)

RIGHT

RIGHT

RESET_YES:

RST

ALL?

yes (blinking)

ENTER

2 sec no is password required?

yes increment blinking digit

DOWN

RESET_ENTER_PW:

PASS

#### (one # blinking)

RIGHT reset all max

& min values yes

ENTER is password correct?

no make next digit blink

RESET_PW_FAIL:

PASS

####

FAIL

RESET_CONFIRM:

RESET

ALL

DONE

2 sec to previous operating mode screen see sheet 2

Menu

(from any reset mode screen) to Main Menu see sheet 1

E

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Doc # E145721

A-4

Configuration Mode Screens (Sheet 4)

See Note 1

MENU

CONFIG_MENU:

SCRL ( blinking)

CT

PT

DOWN

CONFIG_MENU:

CT( blinking)

PT

CNCT

DOWN

MENU

CONFIG_MENU:

PT( blinking)

CNCT

PORT

DOWN

DOWN

MENU

MENU

ENTER

SCROLL_EDIT:

SCRL yes or no

(choice blinking if edit)

DOWN or

RIGHT

3 toggle scroll setting

ENTER

ENTER

DOWN increment blinking digit

CTD_EDIT:

CT-N

####

(one # blinking if edit)

ENTER

RIGHT blink next digit

ENTER

ENTER

CTD_SHOW:

CT-D

1 or 5

ENTER

DOWN increment blinking digit

ENTER

PTN_EDIT:

PT-N

####

(one # blinking if edit)

RIGHT blink next digit

DOWN increment blinking digit

ENTER

PTD_EDIT:

PT-D

####

(one # blinking if edit)

CONFIG_MENU:

CNCT( blinking)

PORT

PASS

2

DOWN

MENU

CONFIG_MENU:

PORT( blinking)

PASS

SCRL

2

DOWN

2

MENU

CONFIG_MENU:

PASS

2

SCRL

CT

( blinking)

2

ENTER

CONNECT_EDIT:

CNCT

1 of 3 choices

(choice blinking if edit)

DOWN or RIGHT show next choice

ENTER

ENTER

DOWN

ADDRESS_EDIT:

ADR

###

(one # blinking ) increment blinking digit

ENTER

RIGHT blink next digit

ENTER

2

CNCT choices:

3 EL WYE,

2 CT DEL,

2.5 EL WYE

ENTER

ENTER

RIGHT blink next digit

ENTER

BAUD_EDIT:

BAUD

##.#

(choice blinking if edit )

DOWN or

RIGHT show next choice

CT_MULT_EDIT:

CT-S

1 or 10 or 100

(choice blinking if edit)

PT_MULT_EDIT:

PT-S

1, 10, 100 or 1000

(choice blinking if edit)

DOWN or

RIGHT

Protocol Choices:

RTU, ASCI, DNP show next choice

DOWN or

RIGHT show next choice

PROTOCOL_EDIT:

PROT

1 of 3 choices

(choice blinking if edit)

DOWN or

RIGHT show next choice

CONFIG_MENU screen scrolls through 6 choices, showing 3 at a time. The top choice is always the

"active" one, indicated by the blinking legend.

DOWN increment blinking digit

PASSWORD_EDIT:

PASS

####

(one # blinking )

RIGHT blink next digit

Notes:

1. Initial access is view only. View access shows the existing settings. At the

first attempt to change a setting (DOWN or RIGHT pressed), password is

requested(if enabled) and access changes to edit. Edit access blinks the

digit or list choice eligible for change and lights the PRG LED.

2. Skip over password edit screen and menu selection if access is view only.

3. Scroll setting may be changed with view or edit access.

4. ENTER accepts an edit; MENU abandons it.

MENU any changes?

no to Main Menu see sheet 1

MENU

SAVE_YES:

STOR

ALL?

yes (blinking )

RIGHT

RIGHT

MENU

SAVE_NO:

STOR

ALL?

no

(blinking )

MENU

(per row of the originating screen)

ENTER save new configuration

SAVE_CONFIRM:

STOR

ALL

DONE

2 sec reboot

ENTER no to previous operating mode screen see sheet 2 first DOWN or RIGHT in view access (if password required)

See Note 1

DOWN increment blinking digit

CFG_ENTER_PW:

PASS

###

(one # blinking )

RIGHT blink next digit

ENTER yes is password correct?

to the originating

EDIT screen

E

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Doc # E145721

A-5

E

Electro Industries/GaugeTech

Doc # E145721

A-6

Appendix B

Modbus Mapping for Shark ® 100-S Meter

B.1: Introduction

Q

The Modbus Map for the Shark® 100-S meter gives details and information about the possible readings of the meter and about the programming of the meter. The Shark® 100-S meter can be programmed using the buttons on the face plate of the meter (Chapter 8). The meter can also be programmed using software. For a Programming Overview, see section 5.2 of this manual. For further programming details, see the Communicator EXT 3.0 User Manual.

B.2: Modbus Register Map Sections

Q

The Shark® 100-S meter's Modbus Register Map includes the following sections:

Fixed Data Section, Registers 1- 47, details the Meter’s Fixed Information described in Section 8.2.

Meter Data Section, Registers 1000 - 5003, details the Meter’s Readings, including Primary

Readings, Energy Block, Demand Block, Maximum and Minimum Blocks, THD Block, Phase Angle

Block and Status Block. Operating Mode readings are described in Section 8.3.4.

Commands Section, Registers 20000 - 26011, details the Meter’s Resets Block, Programming Block,

Other Commands Block and Encryption Block.

Programmable Settings Section, Registers 30000 - 30067, details the Meter’s Basic Setups.

Secondary Readings Section, Registers 40001 - 40100, details the Meter’s Secondary Readings

Setups.

B.3: Data Formats

Q ASCII: ASCII characters packed 2 per register in high, low order and without any termination charcters.

Example: “Shark 100” would be 4 registers containing 0x5378, 0x6172,

0x6B31, 0x3030.

Q

SINT16/UINT16: 16-bit signed/unsigned integer.

Q

SINT32/UINT32: 32-bit signed/unsigned integer spanning 2 registers. The lower-addressed register is the high order half.

Q

FLOAT:

32-bit IEEE floating point number spanning 2 registers. The lower-addressed register is the high order half (i.e., contains the exponent).

e

Electro Industries/GaugeTech

Doc # E145721

B-1

B.4: Floating Point Values

Q

Floating Point Values are represented in the following format:

Register

Byte

Bit 7

Meaning s sign

6 e

5 e

0

4 3 2 1 0

0

7 e e e exponent e e

6 e m

1

5 4 m m

3 m

2 1 0 m m m

7 m

6 m

5 m

0

4 3 2 m m m mantissa

1

1 0 m m

1

7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 m m m m m m m m

Q The formula to interpret a Floating Point Value is: -1

sign

x 2

exponent-127

x1.mantissa = 0x0C4E11DB9

1

sign x

2

x

i

x

10

x

1.75871956

1800.929

Register

Byte

Bit

Meaning

7

1 s sign

1

0x0C4E1 0x01DB9

0x0C4 0x0E1 0x01D 0x0B91

6 5 4 3 2 1 0 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 e e e e e e e e m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m exponent

0x089 = 137 mantissa

0b011000010001110110111001

Q

Formula Explanation

C4E11DB9 (hex) 11000100 11100001 00011101 10111001 (binary)

The sign of the mantissa (and therefore the number) is 1, which represents a negative value.

The Exponent is 10001001 (binary) or 137 decimal.

The Exponent is a value in excess 127. So, the Exponent value is 10.

The Mantissa is 11000010001110110111001 binary.

With the implied leading 1, the Mantissa is (1).C23B72 (hex).

The Floating Point Representation is therefore -1.75871956 times 2 to the 10.

Decimal equivalent: -1800.929

NOTE:

Exponent = the whole number before the decimal point.

Mantissa = the positive fraction after the decimal point.

B.5: Modbus Register Map (MM-11 to MM-88)

Q

The Shark® 100-S meter's Modbus Register Map begins on the following page.

e

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Doc # E145721

B-2

Modbus Address

Hex Decimal

Identification Block

0000 - 0007

0008 - 000F

0010 - 0010

1 - 8

9 - 16

17 - 17

0011 - 0012

0013 - 0013

0014 - 0014

18 - 19

20 - 20

21 - 21

0015 - 0015

0016 - 0026

0027 - 002E

22 - 22

23 - 39

40 - 47

Meter Name

Meter Serial Number

Meter Type

Firmware Version

Map Version

Meter Configuration

ASIC Version

Reserved

GE Part Number

Description

1

Primary Readings Block, 6 cycles (IEEE Floating Point

0383 - 0384 900 - 901 Watts, 3-Ph total

0385 - 0386

0387 - 0388

902 - 903

904 - 905

VARs, 3-Ph total

VAs, 3-Ph total

Primary Readings Block, 60 cycles (IEEE Floating Point)

03E7 - 03E8 1000 - 1001 Volts A-N

03E9 - 03EA 1002 - 1003 Volts B-N

03EB - 03EC 1004 - 1005 Volts C-N

03ED - 03EE 1006 - 1007 Volts A-B

03EF - 03F0 1008 - 1009 Volts B-C

03F1 - 03F2 1010 - 1011 Volts C-A

03F3 - 03F4 1012 - 1013 Amps A

03F5 - 03F6 1014 - 1015 Amps B

03F7 - 03F8 1016 - 1017 Amps C

03F9 - 03FA 1018 - 1019 Watts, 3-Ph total

03FB - 03FC 1020 - 1021 VARs, 3-Ph total

03FD - 03FE 1022 - 1023 VAs, 3-Ph total

03FF - 0400 1024 - 1025 Power Factor, 3-Ph total

0401 - 0402 1026 - 1027 Frequency

0403 - 0404 1028 - 1029 Neutral Current

Primary Energy Block

e

Electro Industries/GaugeTech

Format Range

6

Fixed Data Section

ASCII 16 char

ASCII 16 char

UINT16 bit-mapped

ASCII 4 char

UINT16 0 to 65535

UINT16 bit-mapped

UINT16 0-65535

ASCII 16 char

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

-9999 M to +9999 M

-9999 M to +9999 M

-9999 M to +9999 M

-1.00 to +1.00

0 to 65.00

0 to 9999 M volts volts volts volts volts volts amps amps amps watts

VARs

VAs none

Hz amps

Doc# E145721

Units or

Resolution Comments

#

Reg read-only

none none

-------t -----vvv t = transducer model (1=yes, 0=no), vvv = V-switch(1 to 4) none none

-------- --ffffff ffffff = calibration frequency (50 or 60) none none

Block Size:

1

17

8

47

8

8

1

2

1

1

Meter Data Section

2

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

-9999 M to +9999 M

-9999 M to +9999 M

-9999 M to +9999 M watts

VARs

VAs

read-only

Block Size:

read-only

Block Size:

2

30

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

6

read-only

MM-1

Modbus Address

Hex Decimal

044B - 044C 1100 - 1101 W-hours, Received

Description

1

044D - 044E 1102 - 1103 W-hours, Delivered

044F - 0450 1104 - 1105 W-hours, Net

0451 - 0452 1106 - 1107 W-hours, Total

0453 - 0454 1108 - 1109 VAR-hours, Positive

0455 - 0456 1110 - 1111 VAR-hours, Negative

0457 - 0458 1112 - 1113 VAR-hours, Net

0459 - 045A 1114 - 1115 VAR-hours, Total

045B - 045C 1116 - 1117 VA-hours, Total

Primary Demand Block (IEEE Floating Point)

07CF - 07D0 2000 - 2001 Amps A, Average

07D1 - 07D2 2002 - 2003 Amps B, Average

07D3 - 07D4 2004 - 2005 Amps C, Average

07D5 - 07D6 2006 - 2007 Positive Watts, 3-Ph, Average

07D7 - 07D8 2008 - 2009 Positive VARs, 3-Ph, Average

07D9 - 07DA 2010 - 2011 Negative Watts, 3-Ph, Average

07DB - 07DC 2012 - 2013 Negative VARs, 3-Ph, Average

07DD - 07DE 2014 - 2015 VAs, 3-Ph, Average

07DF - 07E0 2016 - 2017 Positive PF, 3-Ph, Average

07E1 - 07E2 2018 - 2019 Negative PF, 3-PF, Average

Primary Minimum Block (IEEE Floating Point)

0BB7 - 0BB8 3000 - 3001 Volts A-N, Minimum

0BB9 - 0BBA 3002 - 3003 Volts B-N, Minimum

0BBB - 0BBC 3004 - 3005 Volts C-N, Minimum

0BBD - 0BBE 3006 - 3007 Volts A-B, Minimum

0BBF - 0BC0 3008 - 3009 Volts B-C, Minimum

0BC1 - 0BC2 3010 - 3011 Volts C-A, Minimum

0BC3 - 0BC4 3012 - 3013 Amps A, Minimum Avg Demand

0BC5 - 0BC6 3014 - 3015 Amps B, Minimum Avg Demand

0BC7 - 0BC8 3016 - 3017 Amps C, Minimum Avg Demand

0BC9 - 0BCA 3018 - 3019 Positive Watts, 3-Ph, Minimum Avg Demand

0BCB - 0BCC 3020 - 3021 Positive VARs, 3-Ph, Minimum Avg Demand

0BCD - 0BCE 3022 - 3023 Negative Watts, 3-Ph, Minimum Avg Demand

0BCF - 0BD0 3024 - 3025 Negative VARs, 3-Ph, Minimum Avg Demand

0BD1 - 0BD2 3026 - 3027 VAs, 3-Ph, Minimum Avg Demand

0BD3 - 0BD4 3028 - 3029 Positive Power Factor, 3-Ph, Minimum Avg Demand e

Electro Industries/GaugeTech

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

Format

SINT32

SINT32

SINT32

SINT32

SINT32

SINT32

SINT32

SINT32

SINT32

Range

6

Units or

Resolution Comments

0 to 99999999 or Wh per energy format * Wh received & delivered always have

0 to -99999999

0 to 99999999 or Wh per energy format

0 to -99999999 opposite signs

* Wh received is positive for "view as load", delivered is positive for "view as generator"

-99999999 to 99999999 Wh per energy format

0 to 99999999 Wh per energy format * 5 to 8 digits

#

Reg

2

2

2

2

2 0 to 99999999 VARh per energy format

* decimal point implied, per energy format

0 to -99999999 VARh per energy format

-99999999 to 99999999 VARh per energy format

0 to 99999999

0 to 99999999

* resolution of digit before decimal point = units, kilo, or mega, per energy format

VARh per energy format

VAh per energy format * see note 10

Block Size:

2

2

18

2

2

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

-9999 M to +9999 M

-9999 M to +9999 M

-9999 M to +9999 M

-9999 M to +9999 M

-9999 M to +9999 M

-1.00 to +1.00

-1.00 to +1.00

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to +9999 M

0 to +9999 M

0 to +9999 M

0 to +9999 M

-9999 M to +9999 M

-1.00 to +1.00

Doc# E145721 amps amps watts

VARs watts

VARs

VAs none volts volts volts volts volts volts amps amps amps amps watts

VARs watts

VARs

VAs none none

read-only

Block Size:

2

2

20

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

read-only

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

MM-2

Modbus Address

Description

1

Hex Decimal

0BD5 - 0BD6 3030 - 3031 Negative Power Factor, 3-Ph, Minimum Avg Demand

0BD7 - 0BD8 3032 - 3033 Frequency, Minimum

Format

FLOAT

FLOAT

Range

6

-1.00 to +1.00

0 to 65.00

none

Units or

Resolution

Hz

Primary Maximum Block (IEEE Floating Point)

0C1B - 0C1C 3100 - 3101 Volts A-N, Maximum

0C1D - 0C1E 3102 - 3103 Volts B-N, Maximum

0C1F - 0C20 3104 - 3105 Volts C-N, Maximum

0C21 - 0C22 3106 - 3107 Volts A-B, Maximum

0C23 - 0C24 3108 - 3109 Volts B-C, Maximum

0C25 - 0C26 3110 - 3111 Volts C-A, Maximum

0C27 - 0C28 3112 - 3113 Amps A, Maximum Avg Demand

0C29 - 0C2A 3114 - 3115 Amps B, Maximum Avg Demand

0C2B - 0C2C 3116 - 3117 Amps C, Maximum Avg Demand

0C2D - 0C2E 3118 - 3119 Positive Watts, 3-Ph, Maximum Avg Demand

0C2F - 0C30 3120 - 3121 Positive VARs, 3-Ph, Maximum Avg Demand

0C31 - 0C32 3122 - 3123 Negative Watts, 3-Ph, Maximum Avg Demand

0C33 - 0C34 3124 - 3125 Negative VARs, 3-Ph, Maximum Avg Demand

0C35 - 0C36 3126 - 3127 VAs, 3-Ph, Maximum Avg Demand

0C37 - 0C38 3128 - 3129 Positive Power Factor, 3-Ph, Maximum Avg Demand

0C39 - 0C3A 3130 - 3131 Negative Power Factor, 3-Ph, Maximum Avg Demand

0C3B - 0C3C 3132 - 3133 Frequency, Maximum

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

FLOAT

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to 9999 M

0 to +9999 M

0 to +9999 M

0 to +9999 M

0 to +9999 M

-9999 M to +9999 M

-1.00 to +1.00

-1.00 to +1.00

0 to 65.00

amps watts

VARs watts

VARs

VAs none volts volts volts volts volts volts amps amps none

Hz

THD Block

7, 13

0F9F - 0F9F 4000 - 4000 Volts A-N, %THD

0FA0 - 0FA0 4001 - 4001 Volts B-N, %THD

0FA1 - 0FA1 4002 - 4002 Volts C-N, %THD

0FA2 - 0FA2 4003 - 4003 Amps A, %THD

0FA3 - 0FA3 4004 - 4004 Amps B, %THD

0FA4 - 0FA4 4005 - 4005 Amps C, %THD

0FA5 - 0FA5 4006 - 4006 Phase A Current 0th harmonic magnitude

0FA6 - 0FA6 4007 - 4007 Phase A Current 1st harmonic magnitude

0FA7 - 0FA7 4008 - 4008 Phase A Current 2nd harmonic magnitude

0FA8 - 0FA8 4009 - 4009 Phase A Current 3rd harmonic magnitude

0FA9 - 0FA9 4010 - 4010 Phase A Current 4th harmonic magnitude

0FAA - 0FAA 4011 - 4011 Phase A Current 5th harmonic magnitude

0FAB - 0FAB 4012 - 4012 Phase A Current 6th harmonic magnitude

0FAC - 0FAC 4013 - 4013 Phase A Current 7th harmonic magnitude

0FAD - 0FAD 4014 - 4014 Phase A Voltage 0th harmonic magnitude

0FAE - 0FAE 4015 - 4015 Phase A Voltage 1st harmonic magnitude e

Electro Industries/GaugeTech

UINT16 0 to 9999, or 65535

UINT16 0 to 9999, or 65535

UINT16 0 to 9999, or 65535

UINT16 0 to 9999, or 65535

UINT16 0 to 9999, or 65535

UINT16 0 to 9999, or 65535

UINT16 0 to 65535

UINT16 0 to 65535

UINT16 0 to 65535

UINT16 0 to 65535

UINT16 0 to 65535

UINT16 0 to 65535

UINT16 0 to 65535

UINT16 0 to 65535

UINT16 0 to 65535

UINT16 0 to 65535

Doc# E145721 none none none none none none none

0.1%

0.1%

0.1%

0.1%

0.1%

0.1% none none none

Comments

Block Size:

#

Reg

2

2

34

read-only

Block Size:

read-only

2

34

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

MM-3

Modbus Address

Description

1

Hex Decimal

0FAF - 0FAF 4016 - 4016 Phase A Voltage 2nd harmonic magnitude

0FB0 - 0FB0 4017 - 4017 Phase A Voltage 3rd harmonic magnitude

0FB1 - 0FB8 4018 - 4025 Phase B Current harmonic magnitudes

0FB9 - 0FBC 4026 - 4029 Phase B Voltage harmonic magnitude

0FBD - 0FC4 4030 - 4037 Phase C Current harmonic magnitudes

0FC5 - 0FC8 4038 - 4041 Phase C Voltage harmonic magnitude

Phase Angle Block

14

1003 - 1003 4100 - 4100 Phase A Current

1004 - 1004 4101 - 4101 Phase B Current

1005 - 1005 4102 - 4102 Phase C Current

1006 - 1006 4103 - 4103 Angle, Volts A-B

1007 - 1007 4104 - 4104 Angle, Volts B-C

1008 - 1008 4105 - 4105 Angle, Volts C-A

Status Block

1387 - 1387 5000 - 5000 Meter Status

1388 - 1388 5001 - 5001

Limits Status

7

1389 - 138A 5002 - 5003 Time Since Reset

Resets Block

9

4E1F - 4E1F 20000 - 20000 Reset Max/Min Blocks

4E20 - 4E20 20001 - 20001 Reset Energy Accumulators

Meter Programming Block

55EF - 55EF 22000 - 22000 Initiate Programmable Settings Update

55F0 - 55F0 22001 - 22001

Terminate Programmable Settings Update

55F1 - 55F1 22002 - 22002

Calculate Programmable Settings Checksum e

Electro Industries/GaugeTech

Format Range

UINT16 0 to 65535

6

UINT16 0 to 65535 none

Units or

Resolution Comments

none same as Phase A Current 0th to 7th harmonic magnitudes same as Phase A Voltage 0th to 3rd harmonic magnitudes same as Phase A Current 0th to 7th harmonic magnitudes same as Phase A Voltage 0th to 3rd harmonic magnitudes

Block Size:

#

Reg

1

1

8

4

42

8

4

SINT16

SINT16

SINT16

SINT16

SINT16

SINT16

-1800 to +1800

-1800 to +1800

-1800 to +1800

-1800 to +1800

-1800 to +1800

-1800 to +1800

UINT16 bit-mapped

UINT16 bit-mapped

UINT32 0 to 4294967294

read-only

0.1 degree

0.1 degree

0.1 degree

0.1 degree

0.1 degree

0.1 degree

Block Size:

read-only

--exnpch ssssssss exnpch = EEPROM block OK flags

(e=energy, x=max, n=min, p=programmable settings, c=calibration, h=header), ssssssss = state (1=Run, 2=Limp, 10=Prog

Set Update via buttons, 11=Prog Set

Update via IrDA, 12=Prog Set Update via

COM2)

87654321 87654321 high byte is setpt 1, 0=in, 1=out low byte is setpt 2, 0=in, 1=out

4 msec wraps around after max coun

Block Size:

1

1

6

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

4

Commands Section

4

UINT16 password

5

UINT16 password

5

UINT16 password

5

UINT16 any value

UINT16

Doc# E145721

write-only

Block Size:

read/conditional write

meter enters PS update mode meter leaves PS update mode via reset meter calculates checksum on RAM copy of PS block

MM-4

1

1

1

1

1

2

Modbus Address

Hex Decimal Description

55F2 - 55F2 22003 - 22003

Programmable Settings Checksum

1

55F3 - 55F3 22004 - 22004

Write New Password

3

59D7 - 59D7 23000 - 23000 Initiate Meter Firmware Reprogramming

Other Commands Block

61A7 - 61A7 25000 - 25000 Force Meter Restart

Encryption Block

658F - 659A 26000 - 26011 Perform a Secure Operation

Basic Setups Block

752F - 752F 30000 - 30000 CT multiplier & denominator

7530 - 7530 30001 - 30001 CT numerator

7531 - 7531 30002 - 30002 PT numerator

7532 - 7532 30003 - 30003 PT denominator

7533 - 7533 30004 - 30004 PT multiplier & hookup

7534 - 7534 30005 - 30005 Averaging Method

7535 - 7535 30006 - 30006 Power & Energy Format

Format

UINT16

Range

UINT16 0000 to 9999

6

UINT16 password

5

UINT16 password

5

UINT16

Units or

Resolution Comments

read/write checksum register; PS block saved in EEPROM on write

8 write-only register; always reads zero

#

Reg

1

1

Block Size:

read/write

1 causes a watchdog reset, always reads 0

Block Size:

1

read/write

encrypted command to read password or change meter type

Block Size:

12

12

1

6

Programmable Settings Section

UINT16 bit-mapped

UINT16 1 to 9999

UINT16 1 to 9999

UINT16 1 to 9999

UINT16 bit-mapped

UINT16 bit-mapped

UINT16 bit-mapped

write only in PS update mode

dddddddd mmmmmmmm high byte is denominator (1 or 5, read-only), low byte is multiplier (1, 10, or 100)

1 none none none mmmmmmmm MMMMhhhh MMMMmmmmmmmm is PT multiplier (1,

10, 100, 1000), hhhh is hookup enumeration (0 = 3 element wye[9S], 1 = delta 2 CTs[5S], 3 = 2.5 element wye[6S])

--iiiiii b----sss iiiiii = interval (5,15,30,60) b = 0-block or 1-rolling sss = # subintervals (1,2,3,4) pppp--nn -eee-ddd pppp = power scale (0-unit, 3-kilo, 6-mega,

8-auto) nn = number of energy digits (5-8 --> 0-3) eee = energy scale (0-unit, 3-kilo, 6-mega) ddd = energy digits after decimal point (0-6)

See note 10.

1

1

1

1

1

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Modbus Address

Hex Decimal Description

7536 - 7536 30007 - 30007 Operating Mode Screen Enables

1

7537 - 753D 30008 - 30014 Reserved

753E - 753E 30015 - 30015 User Settings Flags

753F - 753F 30016 - 30016 Full Scale Current (for load % bargraph)

7540 - 7547 30017 - 30024 Meter Designation

7548 - 7548 30025 - 30025 COM1 setup

7549 - 7549 30026 - 30026 COM2 setup

754A - 754A 30027 - 30027 COM2 address

754B - 754B 30028 - 30028 Limit #1 Identifier

754C - 754C 30029 - 30029 Limit #1 Out High Setpoint

754D - 754D 30030 - 30030 Limit #1 In High Threshold

754E - 754E 30031 - 30031 Limit #1 Out Low Setpoint

754F - 754F 30032 - 30032 Limit #1 In Low Threshold

7550 - 7554 30033 - 30037 Limit #2

7555 - 7559 30038 - 30042 Limit #3

755A - 755E 30043 - 30047 Limit #4

755F - 7563 30048 - 30052 Limit #5

7564 - 7568 30053 - 30057 Limit #6 e

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Format

UINT16 1 to 247

UINT16 0 to 65535

SINT16 -200.0 to +200.0

SINT16 -200.0 to +200.0

SINT16 -200.0 to +200.0

SINT16 -200.0 to +200.0

SINT16

SINT16

SINT16

SINT16

SINT16

Range

UINT16 bit-mapped

UINT16 bit-mapped

UINT16 0 to 9999

ASCII 16 char

UINT16 bit-mapped

UINT16 bit-mapped

6

same as Limit #1

Units or

Resolution Comments

00000000 eeeeeeee eeeeeeee = op mode screen rows on(1) or off(0), rows top to bottom are bits low order to high order

#

Reg

1

7

1

---g--nn srp--wfg = enable alternate full scale bargraph current (1=on, 0=off) nn = number of phases for voltage & current screens (3=ABC, 2=AB, 1=A,

0=ABC) s = scroll (1=on, 0=off) r = password for reset in use (1=on, 0=off) p = password for configuration in use

(1=on, 0=off) w = pwr dir (0-view as load, 1-view as generator) f = flip power factor sign (1=yes, 0=no) none If non-zero and user settings bit g is set, this value replaces CT numerator in the full scale current calculation.

none

----dddd -0100110

----dddd -ppp-bbb dddd = reply delay (* 50 msec) ppp = protocol (1-Modbus RTU, 2-Modbus

ASCII, 3-DNP) bbb = baud rate (1-9600, 2-19200, 4-

38400, 6-57600) none

0.1% of full scale

0.1% of full scale

0.1% of full scale

0.1% of full scale use Modbus address as the identifier (see notes 7, 11, 12)

Setpoint for the "above" limit (LM1), see notes 11-12.

Threshold at which "above" limit clears; normally less than or equal to the "above" setpoint; see notes 11-12.

Setpoint for the "below" limit (LM2), see notes 11-12.

Threshold at which "below" limit clears; normally greater than or equal to the "below setpoint; see notes 11-12.

1

1

1

1

1

1

8

1

1

1 same as Limit #1 same as Limit #1

5

5

5

5

5

Doc# E145721 MM-6

Modbus Address

Hex Decimal

7569 - 756D 30058 - 30062 Limit #7

756E - 7572 30063 - 30067 Limit #8

12-Bit Block

9C40 - 9C40 40001 - 40001 System Sanity Indicator

9C41 - 9C41 40002 - 40002 Volts A-N

9C42 - 9C42 40003 - 40003 Volts B-N

9C43 - 9C43 40004 - 40004 Volts C-N

9C44 - 9C44 40005 - 40005 Amps A

9C45 - 9C45 40006 - 40006 Amps B

9C46 - 9C46 40007 - 40007 Amps C

9C47 - 9C47 40008 - 40008 Watts, 3-Ph total

9C48 - 9C48 40009 - 40009 VARs, 3-Ph total

9C49 - 9C49 40010 - 40010 VAs, 3-Ph total

9C4A - 9C4A 40011 - 40011 Power Factor, 3-Ph total

9C4B - 9C4B 40012 - 40012 Frequency

9C4C - 9C4C 40013 - 40013 Volts A-B

9C4D - 9C4D 40014 - 40014 Volts B-C

9C4E - 9C4E 40015 - 40015 Volts C-A

9C4F - 9C4F 40016 - 40016 CT numerator

9C50 - 9C50 40017 - 40017 CT multiplier

9C51 - 9C51 40018 - 40018 CT denominator

9C52 - 9C52 40019 - 40019 PT numerator

9C53 - 9C53 40020 - 40020 PT multiplier

9C54 - 9C54 40021 - 40021 PT denominator

9C55 - 9C56 40022 - 40023 W-hours, Positive

9C57 - 9C58 40024 - 40025 W-hours, Negative

9C59 - 9C5A 40026 - 40027 VAR-hours, Positive

9C5B - 9C5C 40028 - 40029 VAR-hours, Negative

9C5D - 9C5E 40030 - 40031 VA-hours

9C5F - 9C5F 40032 - 40032 Neutral Current

9C60 - 9CA2 40033 - 40099 Reserved

9CA3 - 9CA3 40100 - 40100 Reset Energy Accumulators

Description

1

Format

SINT16

SINT16

Range

6

12-Bit Readings Section

UINT16 0 or 1

UINT16 2047 to 4095

UINT16 2047 to 4095

UINT16 2047 to 4095

UINT16 0 to 4095

UINT16 0 to 4095

UINT16 0 to 4095

UINT16 0 to 4095

UINT16 0 to 4095

UINT16 2047 to 4095

UINT16 1047 to 3047

UINT16 0 to 2730

UINT16 2047 to 4095

UINT16 2047 to 4095

UINT16 2047 to 4095

UINT16 1 to 9999

UINT16 1, 10, 100

UINT16 1 or 5

UINT16 1 to 9999

UINT16 1, 10, 100

UINT16 1 to 9999

UINT32 0 to 99999999

UINT32 0 to 99999999

UINT32 0 to 99999999

UINT32 0 to 99999999

UINT32 0 to 99999999

UINT16 0 to 4095

N/A N/A

UINT16 password

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Units or

Resolution Comments

Block Size:

#

Reg

5

5

68 none volts volts volts amps amps amps watts

VARs

VAs none

Hz

read-only except as noted

0 indicates proper meter operatio

2047= 0, 4095= +150 volts = 150 * (register - 2047) / 2047

0= -10, 2047= 0, 4095= +10 amps = 10 * (register - 2047) / 2047

0= -3000, 2047= 0, 4095= +3000 watts, VARs, VAs =

3000 * (register - 2047) / 2047

1047= -1, 2047= 0, 3047= +1 pf = (register - 2047) / 1000

0= 45 or less, 2047= 60, 2730= 65 or more freq = 45 + ((register / 4095) * 30) volts volts volts none none none

2047= 0, 4095= +300 volts = 300 * (register - 2047) / 2047

CT = numerator * multiplier / denominator none none none

PT = numerator * multiplier / denominator

Wh per energy format * 5 to 8 digits

Wh per energy format

* decimal point implied, per energy format

VARh per energy format

VARh per energy format

VAh per energy format

* see note 10 amps none

* resolution of digit before decimal point = units, kilo, or mega, per energy format see Amps A/B/C above write-only register; always reads as 0

1

67

1

2

2

2

Block Size:

100

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

MM-7

Modbus Address

Hex Decimal Description

1

Format

End of Map

Range

6

Units or

Resolution Comments

#

Reg

Data Formats

ASCII

SINT16 / UINT16

SINT32 / UINT32

FLOAT

Notes

1

2

ASCII characters packed 2 per register in high, low order and without any termination characters. For example, "Shark100" would be 4 registers containing 0x5378, 0x6172, 0x6B31,

0x3030.

16-bit signed / unsigned integer.

32-bit signed / unsigned integer spanning 2 registers. The lower-addressed register is the high order half.

32-bit IEEE floating point number spanning 2 registers. The lower-addressed register is the high order half (i.e., contains the exponent).

All registers not explicitly listed in the table read as 0. Writes to these registers will be accepted but won't actually change the register (since it doesn't exist).

Meter Data Section items read as 0 until first readings are available or if the meter is not in operating mode. Writes to these registers will be accepted but won't actually change the register.

3

4

5

Register valid only in programmable settings update mode. In other modes these registers read as 0 and return an illegal data address exception if a write is attempted.

Meter command registers always read as 0. They may be written only when the meter is in a suitable mode. The registers return an illegal data address exception if a write is attempted in an incorrect mode.

If the password is incorrect, a valid response is returned but the command is not executed. Use 5555 for the password if passwords are disabled in the programmable settings.

9

10

11

6

7

8

M denotes a 1,000,000 multiplier.

Not applicable to Shark 100, V-Switch 1, 2, or 3

Writing this register causes data to be saved permanently in EEPROM. If there is an error while saving, a slave device failure exception is returned and programmable settings mode automatically terminates via reset.

Reset commands make no sense if the meter state is LIMP. An illegal function exception will be returned.

Energy registers should be reset after a format change.

Entities to be monitored against limits are identified by Modbus address. Entities occupying multiple Modbus registers, such as floating point values, are identified by the lower register address. If any of the 8 limits is unused, set its identifier to zero. If the indicated Modbus register is not used or is a non-sensical entity for limits, it will behave as an unused limit.

12 There are 2 setpoints per limit, one above and one below the expected range of values. LM1 is the "too high" limit, LM2 is "too low". The entity goes "out of limit" on LM1 when its value is greater than the setpoint. It remains "out of limit" until the value drops below the in threshold. LM2 works similarly, in the opposite direction. If limits in only one direction are of interest, set the in threshold on the "wrong" side of the setpoint. Limits are specified as % of full scale, where full scale is automatically set appropriately for the entity being monitored:

13 current FS = CT numerator * CT multiplier voltage FS = PT numerator * PT multiplie power FS = CT numerator * CT multiplier * PT numerator * PT multiplier * 3 [ * SQRT(3) for delta hooku frequency FS = 60 (or 50) power factor FS = 1.0

percentage FS = 100.0

angle FS = 180.0

THD not available shows 65535 (=0xFFFF) in all THD and harmonic magnitude registers for the channel when V-switch=4. THD may be unavailable due to low V or I amplitude, or delta hookup (V only).

14 All 3 voltage angles are measured for Wye and Delta hookups. For 2.5 Element, Vac is measured and Vab & Vbc are calculated. If a voltage phase is missing, the two voltage angles in which it participates are set to zero. A and C phase current angles are measured for all hookups. B phase current angle is measured for Wye and is zero for other hookups. If a voltage phase is missing, its current angle is zero.

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Doc# E145721 MM-8

Appendix C

DNP Mapping for Shark ® 100-S Meter

C.1: Introduction

Q

The DNP Map for the Shark® 100-S meter shows the client-server relationship in its use of

DNP Protocol.

C.2: DNP Mapping (DNP-11 to DNP-22)

Q

The Shark® 100-S meter's DNP Point Map begins on the third page of this chapter.

Binary Output States, Control Relay Outputs, Binary Counters (Primary) and Analog Inputs are described on Page 1.

Internal Indication is described on Page 2.

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C-1

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C-2

Object Point Var Description

Binary Output States

10 0 2 Reset Energy Counters

10 1 2 Change to Modbus RTU

Protocol

Format Range

BYTE

BYTE

Always 1

Always 1

Control Relay Outputs

12 0 1 Reset Energy Counters N/A N/A

Multiplier

N/A

N/A

Units

none none

Comments

Read via Class 0 only

12 1 1 Change to Modbus RTU

Protocol

Binary Counters (Primary)

20 0 4 W-hours, Positive

20

20

20

20

1

2

3

4

4 W-hours, Negative

4 VAR-hours, Positive

4 VAR-hours, Negative

4 VA-hours, Total

N/A N/A

UINT32 0 to 99999999

UINT32 0 to 99999999

UINT32 0 to 99999999

UINT32 0 to 99999999

UINT32 0 to 99999999

N/A none none

Responds to Function 5 (Direct Operate),

Qualifier Code 17x or 28x, Control Code 3,

Count 0, On 0 msec, Off 1 msec ONLY.

Responds to Function 6 (Direct Operate -

No Ack), Qualifier Code 17x, Control Code

3, Count 0, On 0 msec, Off 1 msec ONLY.

N/A multiplier = 10

(n-d)

, where n and d are derived from the energy format. n = 0,

3, or 6 per energy

W hr

W hr

VAR hr

VAR hr format scale and d = number of decimal places.

VA hr

Read via Class 0 only example: energy format = 7.2K and W-hours counter

= 1234567 n=3 (K scale), d=2 ( 2 digits after decimal point), multiplier = 10

(3-2)

= 10

1

= 10, so energy is 1234567 * 10 Whrs, or 12345.67

KWhrs

Analog Inputs (Secondary)

30

30

0

1

5 Meter Health

5 Volts A-N

30

30

30

30

2

3

4

5

5 Volts B-N

5 Volts C-N

5 Volts A-B

5 Volts B-C

30

30

6

7

5 Volts C-A

5 Amps A

30

30

8

9

5 Amps B

5 Amps C

SINT16 0 or 1

SINT16 0 to 32767

SINT16 0 to 32767

SINT16 0 to 32767

SINT16 0 to 32767

SINT16 0 to 32767

SINT16 0 to 32767

SINT16 0 to 32767

SINT16 0 to 32767

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N/A

(150 / 32768)

(150 / 32768)

(150 / 32768)

(300 / 32768)

(300 / 32768)

(300 / 32768)

(10 / 32768)

(10 / 32768)

(10 / 32768)

A

A

A

V

V

V

V

V none

V

0 = OK

Read via Class 0 only

Values above 150V secondary read 32767.

Values above 300V secondary read 32767.

Values above 10A secondary read 32767.

DNP-1

Object Point Var

30 10

30

30

11

12

30

30

30

13

14

15

30

30

30

30

30

30

30

30

30

30

30

30

30

30

30

30

30

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

Description

5 Watts, 3-Ph total

5 VARs, 3-Ph total

5 VAs, 3-Ph total

5 Power Factor, 3-Ph total

5 Frequency

5 Positive Watts, 3-Ph,

Maximum Avg Demand

5 Positive VARs, 3-Ph,

Maximum Avg Demand

5 Negative Watts, 3-Ph,

Maximum Avg Demand

5 Negative VARs, 3-Ph,

Maximum Avg Demand

5 VAs, 3-Ph, Maximum Avg

Demand

5 Angle, Phase A Current

5 Angle, Phase B Current

5 Angle, Phase C Current

5 Angle, Volts A-B

5 Angle, Volts B-C

5 Angle, Volts C-A

5 CT numerator

5 CT multiplier

5 CT denominator

5 PT numerator

5 PT multiplier

5 PT denominator

5 Neutral Current

Format Range Multiplier

SINT16 -32768 to +32767 (4500 / 32768)

SINT16 -32768 to +32767 (4500 / 32768)

SINT16 0 to +32767 (4500 / 32768)

SINT16 -1000 to +1000

SINT16 0 to 9999

0.001

0.01

SINT16 -32768 to +32767 (4500 / 32768)

SINT16 -32768 to +32767 (4500 / 32768)

SINT16 -32768 to +32767 (4500 / 32768)

SINT16 -32768 to +32767 (4500 / 32768)

SINT16 -32768 to +32767 (4500 / 32768)

SINT16 -1800 to +1800

SINT16 -1800 to +1800

SINT16 -1800 to +1800

SINT16 -1800 to +1800

SINT16 -1800 to +1800

SINT16 -1800 to +1800

SINT16 1 to 9999

SINT16 1, 10, or 100

SINT16 1 or 5

SINT16 1 to 9999

SINT16 1, 10, or 100

SINT16 1 to 9999

SINT16 0 to 32767

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

(10 / 32768)

Units

W

VAR

VA none

Hz

W

VAR

W

VAR

Comments

VA degree degree degree degree degree degree none none none none none none

A

CT ratio =

(numerator * multiplier) / denominator

PT ratio =

(numerator * multiplier) / denominator

For 1A model, multiplier is (2 / 32768) and values above 2A secondary read 32767.

Internal Indication

80 0 1 Device Restart Bit N/A N/A N/A none Clear via Function 2 (Write), Qualifier Code

0.

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DNP-2

Appendix D

DNP 3.0 Protocol Assignments for Shark ®100-S Meter

D.1: DNP Implementation

Q

PHYSICAL LAYER

The Shark® 100-S submeter is capable of using RS485 as the physical layer. This is accomplished by connecting a PC to the Shark® 100-S meter with the RS485 connection on the face of the submeter.

Q

RS485

RS485 provides multi-drop network communication capabilities. Multiple submeters may be placed on the same bus, allowing for a Master device to communicate with any of the other devices.

Appropriate network configuration and termination should be evaluated for each installation to insure optimal performance.

Q

Communication Parameters

Shark® 100-S submeters communicate in DNP 3.0 using the following communication settings:

• 8 Data Bits

• No Parity

• 1 Stop Bit

Q

Baud Rates

Shark® 100-S submeters are programmable to use several standard baud rates, including:

9600 Baud

• 19200 Baud

• 38400 Baud

• 57600 Baud

D.2: Data Link Layer

Q

The Data Link Layer as implemented on Shark® submeters is subject to the following considerations:

Q

Control Field

The Control Byte contains several bits and a Function Code. Specific notes follow.

Control Bits

Communication directed to the submeter should be Primary Master messages ( DIR = 1, PRM = 1 ).

Response will be primary Non-Master messages ( DIR = 0, PRM = 1 ). Acknowledgment will be

Secondary Non-Master messages ( DIR = 0, PRM = 0 ).

Q

Function Codes

Shark® 100-S submeters support all of the Function Codes for DNP 3.0. Specific notes follow.

Reset of Data Link ( Function 0 )

Before confirmed communication with a master device, the Data Link Layer must be reset. This is necessary after a submeter has been restarted, either by applying power to the submeter or reprogramming the submeter. The submeter must receive a RESET command before confirmed e

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D-1

communication may take place. Unconfirmed communication is always possible and does not require a RESET.

User Data ( Function 3 )

After receiving a request for USER DATA, the submeter will generate a Data Link

CONFIRMATION, signaling the reception of that request, before the actual request is processed. If a response is required, it will also be sent as UNCONFIRMED USER DATA.

Unconfirmed User Data ( Function 4 )

After receiving a request for UNCONFIRMED USER DATA, if a response is required, it will be sent as UNCONFIRMED USER DATA.

Address

DNP 3.0 allows for addresses from 0 - 65534 ( 0x0000 - 0xFFFE ) for individual device identification, with the address 65535 ( 0xFFFF ) defined as an all stations address. Shark 100-S submeters' addresses are programmable from 0 - 247 ( 0x0000 - 0x00F7 ) and will recognize address

65535 ( 0xFFFF ) as the all stations address.

D.3: Transport Layer

The Transport Layer as implemented on Shark® submeters is subject to the following considerations:

Transport Header

Multiple-frame messages are not allowed for Shark® 100-S submeters. Each Transport Header should indicate it is both the first frame ( FIR = 1 ) as well as the final frame ( FIN = 1 ).

D.4: Application Layer

The Application Layer contains a header ( Request or Response Header, depending on direction ) and data. Specific notes follow.

Q

Application Headers

Application Headers contain the Application Control Field and the Function Code.

Q

Application Control Field

Multiple-fragment messages are not allowed for Shark® 100-S submeters. Each Application Header should indicate it is both the first fragment ( FIR = 1 ) as well as the final fragment ( FIN = 1 ).

Application-Level confirmation is not used for Shark® 100-S submeters.

Q

Function Codes

The following Function codes are implemented on Shark® 100-S submeters.

Read ( Function 1 )

Objects supporting the READ function are:

• Binary Outputs ( Object 10 )

• Counters ( Object 20 )

• Analog Inputs ( Object 30 )

• Class ( Object 60 ) e

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D-2

These Objects may be read either by requesting a specific Variation available as listed in this document, or by requesting Variation 0. READ request for Variation 0 of an Object will be fulfilled with the Variation listed in this document.

Write ( Function 2 )

Objects supporting the WRITE function are:

• Internal Indications ( Object 80 )

Direct Operate ( Function 5 )

Objects supporting the DIRECT OPERATE function are:

• Control Relay Output Block ( Object 12 )

Direct Operate - No Acknowledgment ( Function 6 )

Objects supporting the DIRECT OPERATE - NO ACKNOWLEDGMENT function are:

• Change to MODBUS RTU Protocol

Response ( Function 129 )

Application responses from Shark® 100-S submeters use the RESPONSE function.

Q

Application Data

Application Data contains information about the Object and Variation, as well as the Qualifier and Range.

D.4.1: Object and Variation

The following Objects and Variations are supported on Shark® 100-S submeters:

• Binary Output Status ( Object 10, Variation 2) †

• Control Relay Output Block ( Object 12, Variation 1 )

• 32-Bit Binary Counter Without Flag ( Object 20, Variation 5 ) †

• 16-Bit Analog Input Without Flag ( Object 30, Variation 4 ) †

• Class 0 Data ( Object 60, Variation 1 ) †

• Internal Indications ( Object 80, Variation 1 )

† READ requests for Variation 0 will be honored with the above Variations.

D.4.1.1: Binary Output Status (Obj. 10, Var. 2 )

Binary Output Status supports the following functions:

Read ( Function 1 )

A READ request for Variation 0 will be responded to with Variation 2.

Binary Output Status is used to communicate the following data measured by Shark® submeters: e

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D-3

Q

Energy Reset State

Change to MODBUS RTU Protocol State

Energy Reset State ( Point 0 )

Shark® 100-S submeters accumulate power generated or consumed over time as Hour Readings, which measure positive VA Hours and positive and negative W Hours and VAR Hours. These readings may be reset using a Control Relay Output Block object ( Obj. 12 ). This Binary

Output Status point reports whether the Energy Readings are in the process of being reset, or if they are accumulating. Normally, readings are being accumulated and the state of this point is read as '0'. If the readings are in the process of being reset, the state of this point is read as '1'.

Change to Modbus RTU Protocol State ( Point 1 )

Shark® 100-S submeters are capable of changing from DNP Protocol to Modbus RTU Protocol.

This enables the user to update the Device Profile of the submeter. This does not change the

Protocol setting. A submeter reset brings you back to DNP. Status reading of "1" equals Open, or de-energized. A reading of "0" equals Closed, or energized.

D.4.1.2: Control Relay Output Block (Obj. 12, Var. 1 )

Control Relay Output Blocks support the following functions:

Direct Operate ( Function 5 )

Direct Operate - No Acknowledgment ( Function 6 )

Control Relay Output Blocks are used for the following purposes:

Q

Energy Reset

Change to MODBUS RTU Protocol

Energy Reset ( Point 0 )

Shark® 100-S submeters accumulate power generated or consumed over time as Hour Readings, which measure positive VA Hours and positive and negative W Hours and VAR Hours. These readings may be reset using Point 0.

Use of the DIRECT OPERATE ( Function 5 ) function will operate only with the settings of

Pulsed ON ( Code = 1 of Control Code Field ) once ( Count = 0x01 ) for ON 1 millisecond and

OFF 0 milliseconds.

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Change to Modbus RTU Protocol ( Point 1 )

Shark® 100-S submeters are capable of changing from DNP Protocol to Modbus RTU Protocol.

This enables the user to update the Device Profile of the submeter. This does not change the

Protocol setting. A submeter reset brings you back to DNP.

Use of the DIRECT OPERATE - NO ACKNOWLEDGE ( Function 6 ) function will operate only with the settings of Pulsed ON ( Code = 1 of Control Code Field ) once ( Count = 0x01 ) for ON 1 millisecond and OFF 0 milliseconds.

Counters support the following functions:

Read ( Function 1 )

A READ request for Variation 0 will be responded to with Variation 5.

Counters are used to communicate the following data measured by Shark 100-S submeters:

Hour Readings

Q

Hour Readings (Points 0 - 4)

Point

2

3

4

0

1

Readings

+W Hour

-W Hour

+VAR Hour

-VAR Hour

+VA Hour

Unit

Wh

Wh

VARh

VARh

VAh

* These readings may be cleared by using the Contol Relay Output Block.

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Analog Inputs support the following functions:

Read ( Function 1 )

A READ request for Variation 0 will be responded to with Variation 4.

Analog Inputs are used to communicate the following data measured by Shark 100-S submeters:

• Health Check

• Phase-to-Neutral Voltage

• Phase-to-Phase Voltage

• Phase Current

• Total Power

• Three Phase Total VAs

• Three Phase Power Factor Total

• Frequency

• Three Phase +Watts Max Avg Demand

• Three Phase + VARs Max Avg Demand

• Three Phase -Watts Max Avg Demand

• Three Phase -VARs Max Avg Demand

• Three Phase VAs Max Avg Demand

• Angle, Phase Power

• Angle, Phase-to-Phase Voltage

• CT Numerator, Multiplier, Denominator

• PT Numerator, Multiplier, Denominator

Q

Health Check ( Point 0 )

The Health Check point is used to indicate problems detected by the Shark 100-S submeter. A value of zero ( 0x0000 ) indicates the submeter does not detect a problem. Non-zero values indicate a detected anomaly.

Q

Phase-to-Neutral Voltage ( Points 1 - 3 )

Point

1

2

3

Reading

Phase AN Voltage

Phase BN Voltage

Phase CN Voltage

These points are formatted as 2's complement fractions. They represent a fraction of a 150 V

Secondary input. Inputs of above 150 V Secondary will be pinned at 150 V Secondary. e

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Q

Phase-to-Phase Voltage ( Points 4 - 6 )

Point

4

5

6

Reading

Phase AB Voltage

Phase BC Voltage

Phase CA Voltage

These points are formatted as 2's complement fractions. They represent a fraction of a 300 V

Secondary input. Inputs of above 300 V Secondary will be pinned at 300 V Secondary.

Q

Phase Current ( Points 7 - 9 )

7

8

9

Point Reading

Phase A Current

Phase B Current

Phase C Current

These points are formatted as 2's complement fractions. They represent a fraction of a 10 A

Secondary input. Inputs of above 10A Secondary will be pinned at 10 A Secondary.

Q

Total Power ( Points 10 - 11 )

Point

10

11

Reading

Total Watt

Total VAR

These points are formatted as 2's complement fractions. They represent a fraction of 4500 W

Secondary in normal operation, or 3000 W Secondary in Open Delta operation. Inputs above/below

+/-4500 or +/-3000 W Secondary will be pinned at +/-4500 or +/-3000 W Secondary, respectively.

Q

Total VA (Point 12 )

Point

12

Reading

Total VA

This point is formatted as a 2's complement fraction. It represents a fraction of 4500 W Secondary in normal operation, or 3000 W Secondary in Open Delta operation. Inputs above/below +/-4500 or

+/-3000 W Secondary will be pinned at +/-4500 or +/-3000 W Secondary, respectively. e

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Q

Power Factor ( Point 13 )

Point

13

Reading

Power Factor Total

This point is formatted as a 2's complement integer. It represents Power Factors from -1.000

( 0x0FC18 ) to +1.000 ( 0x003E8 ). When in Open Delta operation, Total Power Factor

( Point 13 ) is always zero.

Q

Frequency ( Point 14 )

Point

14

Reading

Frequency

This point is formatted as a 2's complement fraction. It represents the Frequency as measured on

Phase A Voltage in units of cHz ( centiHertz, 1/100 Hz ). Inputs below 45.00 Hz are pinned at 0

( 0x0000 ), while inputs above 75.00 Hz are pinned at 9999 (0x270F ).

Q

Maximum Demands of Total Power ( Points 15 - 19 )

Point

15

16

17

18

19

Reading

Maximum Positive Demand Total Watts

Maximum Positive Demand Total VARs

Maximum Negative Demand Total Watts

Maximum Negative Demand Total VARs

Maximum Average Demand VA

These points are formatted as 2's complement fractions. They represent a fraction of 4500 W

Secondary in normal operation, or 3000 W Secondary in Open Delta operation. Inputs above/below

+/-4500 or +/-3000 W Secondary will be pinned at +/-4500 or +/-3000 W Secondary, respectively. e

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Q

Phase Angle ( Points 20 - 25 )

Point

20

21

22

23

24

25

Reading

Phase A Current Angle

Phase B Current Angle

Phase C Current Angle

Volts A-B Angle

Volts B-C Angle

Volts C-A Angle

These points are formatted as 2's complement integers. They represent angles from -180.0

0

(0x0F8F8) to +180.0

0

(0x00708).

Q

CT & PT Ratios ( Points 26 - 31 )

Point

26

27

28

29

30

31

Value

CT Ratio Numerator

CT Ratio Multiplier

CT Ratio Denominator

PT Ratio Numerator

PT Ratio Multiplier

PT Ratio Denominator

These points are formatted as 2's complement integers. They can be used to convert from units in terms of the Secondary of a CT or PT into units in terms of the Primary of a CT or PT. The ratio of

Numerator divided by Denominator is the ratio of Primary to Secondary.

Shark 100-S submeters typically use Full Scales relating Primary Current to 5 Amps and Primary

Voltage to 120 V. However, these Full scales can range from mAs to thousands of kAs, or mVs, to thousands of kVs. Following are example settings:

CT Example Settings:

200 Amps:

800 Amps:

2,000 Amps:

10,000 Amps:

Set the Ct-n value for 200 and the Ct-S value for 1.

Set the Ct-n value for 800 and the Ct-S value for 1.

Set the Ct-n value for 2000 and the Ct-S value for 1.

Set the Ct-n value for 1000 and the Ct-S value for 10.

NOTE: CT Denominator is fixed at 5 for 5 ampere unit.

CT Denominator is fixed at 1 for 1 ampere unit.

PT Example Settings:

120 Volts (Reads 14,400 Volts):

69 Volts (Reads 138,000 Volts):

115 Volts (Reads 347,000 Volts):

69 Volts (Reads 347,000 Volts):

Pt-n value is 1440, Pt-d value is 120, Pt-S value is 10.

Pt-n value is 1380, Pt-d value is 69, Pt-S value is 100.

Pt-n value is 3450, Pt-d value is 115, Pt-S value is 100.

Pt-n value is 345, Pt-d value is 69, Pt-S value is 1000.

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D.4.1.5: Class 0 Data (Obj. 60, Var. 1 )

Class Data support the following functions:

Read ( Function 1 )

A request for Class 0 Data from a Shark 100-S submeter will return three Object Headers.

Specifically, it will return 16-Bit Analog Input Without Flags ( Object 30, Variation 5 ), Points 0

- 31, followed by 32-Bit Counters Without Flags ( Object 20, Variation 4 ), Points 0 - 4, followed by Binary Output Status ( Object 10, Variation 2 ), Points 0 - 1.

(There is NO Object 1.)

A request for Object 60, Variation 0 will be treated as a request for Class 0 Data.

D.4.1.6: Internal Indications ( Obj. 80, Var. 1 )

Internal Indications support the following functions:

·

Write ( Function 2 )

Internal Indications may be indexed by Qualifier Code 0.

Q

Device Restart ( Point 0 )

This bit is set whenever the submeter has reset. The polling device may clear this bit by Writing

( Function 2 ) to Object 80, Point 0.

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Appendix E

Using the USB to IrDA Adapter (CAB6490)

E.1: Introduction

Com 1 of the Shark

®

100-S submeter is the IrDA port, located on the face of the meter. One way to communicate with the IrDA port is with EIG’s USB to IrDA Adapter (CAB6490), which allows you to access the Shark

®

100-S meter’s data from a PC. This Appendix contains instructions for installing the

USB to IrDA Adapter.

E.2: Installation Procedures

The USB to IrDA Adapter comes packaged with a USB cable and an Installation CD. Follow this procedure to install the Adapter on your PC.

1. Connect the USB cable to the USB to IrDA Adapter, and plug the USB into your PC’s USB port.

3. You will see the screen shown below . The Found New Hardware Wizard allows you to install the software for the Adapter. Click the Radio Button next to Install from a list or specific location.

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Select these

options

5. Make sure the first Radio Button and the first Checkbox are selected, as shown in the above screen. These selections allow the Adapter’s driver to be copied from the Installation disk to your

PC.

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8. You do not need to be concerned about the message on the bottom of the screen. Click Next to

continue with the installation.

9. You will see the two windows shown below. Click Continue Anyway.

10. You will see the screen shown on the next page while the Adapter’s driver is being installed on your PC.

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11. When the driver installation is complete, you will see the screen shown below.

12. Click Finish to close the Found New Hardware Wizard.

IMPORTANT! Do NOT remove the Installation CD until the entire procedure has been

completed.

13. Position the USB to IrDA Adapter so that it points directly at the IrDA on the front of the Shark

®

100-S submeter. It should be as close as possible to the meter, and not more than 15 inches/38 cm away from it.

14. The Found New Hardware Wizard screen opens again.

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This time, click the Radio Button next to Install the software automatically.

15. Click Next. You will see the screen shown below.

16. Make sure the first Radio Button and the first Checkbox are selected, as shown in the above screen. Click Next. You will see the two screens shown on the next page.

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17. When the installation is complete, you will see the screen shown on the next page.

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Click Finish to close the Found New Hardware Wizard.

18. To verify that your Adapter has been installed properly, click Start>Settings>Control

Panel>System>Hardware>Device Manager. The USB to IrDA Adapter should appear under both

Infrared Devices and Modems (click on the + sign to display all configured modems). See the example screen below.

NOTE: If the Adapter doesn’t show up under Modems, move it away from the meter for a minute and then position it pointing at the IrDA, again.

19. Double-click on the Standard Modem over IR link (this is the USB to IrDA Adapter). You will see the Properties screen for the Adapter.

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20. Click the Modem tab. The Com Port that the Adapter is using is displayed in the screen.

21. Use this Com Port to connect to the meter from your PC, using the Communicator EXT software.

Refer to Chapter 5 of the Communicator EXT 3.0 User’s Manual for detailed connection instructions.

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