Dark Reader™ Transilluminators

Dark Reader™ Transilluminators
Clare Chemical Research
www.clarechemical.com
Dark Reader
Transilluminators
™
Copyright 1997-2004 by Clare Chemical Research, Inc.
Dark Reader technology is the subject of issued US patents 6198107 and 6512236 as well as US and international patents
pending.
Dark Reader is a trademark of Clare Chemical Research,Inc., SYBR, SYPRO, Pro-Q, TOTO, YOYO and Alexa are registered
trademarks of Molecular Probes Inc., Eugene, OR. GelStar and Gelbond are registered trademarks of Cambrex, Inc. Rockland,
ME
.
Table of Contents
Safety Instructions............................................................................................................. 1
Basic Instructions for Use................................................................................................. 3
Overview................................................................................................................ 3
Recommended DNA Stains.................................................................................... 4
A Brief Method.......................................................................................... 4
SYBR Green............................................................................................... 4
SYBR Gold.................................................................................................4
GelStar ....................................................................................................... 5
Ethidium bromide....................................................................................... 5
Recommended Protein Stains................................................................................. 5
SYPRO Ruby............................................................................................. 5
SYPRO Orange.......................................................................................... 5
Excising DNA and Protein Bands.......................................................................... 6
Photography and Imaging....................................................................................... 6
Camera Filters............................................................................................ 6
More Information.............................................................................................................. 7
Other Fluorophors...................................................................................................7
Viewing Lab Samples............................................................................................. 7
Where to Purchase Stains....................................................................................... 7
More About Imaging.............................................................................................. 8
A Simple Digital Imaging System..............................................................8
Camera Filter Attachment.......................................................................... 8
Other Components...................................................................................... 8
Infrared....................................................................................................... 9
Tips for Good Photography........................................................................ 9
Fixed-Focus Cameras............................................................................... 10
Troubleshooting...............................................................................................................11
Service & Parts................................................................................................................ 12
Fuse Replacement................................................................................................. 12
Lamp Replacement............................................................................................... 13
General Procedure.................................................................................... 13
DR45 and DR88 Transilluminators.......................................................... 13
DR195 Transilluminators......................................................................... 13
Warranty Information...................................................................................................... 14
Contact Information........................................................................................................ 15
1
Safety Instructions
Keep these instructions available for easy reference by any user of this Dark
Reader unit. For further assistance contact:
Clare Chemical Research
18390 Hwy 145, PO Box 180, Dolores, CO 81323
Tel: 970 882 7499
Fax: 970 882 7068
email: [email protected]
web: www.clarechemical.com
*** This transilluminator is only to be operated at the voltage specified on the
accompanying Parts Checklist. The operating voltage is also listed on the side on
the unit.
*** This unit is only intended for research and development purposes only.
*** The Dark Reader transilluminator is designed to be used by individuals who
are experienced in using transilluminators to view fluorescent samples. Do not let
untrained personnel operate this device!
*** Measurements show that the Dark Reader emits less UV light than the
standard fluorescent tubes used in most offices and laboratories. However, the blue
light emitted is fairly intense and it is unwise to look at any bright light source for
extended periods of time. Always wear the viewing glasses or use the amber
screen.
*** Unplug from the mains socket before attempting to open the Dark Reader box.
The only replaceable component in the shell is the lamp. Seek advice from Clare
Chemical technical support before attempting to open the box.
*** The Dark Reader transilluminator is not designed to be used in the bath! The
Dark Reader is not waterproof. As with any electrical device, great caution must be
taken when using near liquids. Mop up liquid spills immediately. (Disconnect the
unit from the power supply first.)
*** Turn off after use to prevent over-heating. The Dark Reader should not be left
switched on for a continuous period exceeding 1 hour. Do not locate the unit in an
enclosed space that will prevent air circulation.
*** The Dark Reader has not been designed to withstand substantial impact. Do
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not drop it on the floor!
*** Though data published by researchers at Molecular Probes show that SYBR
Green and SYBR Safe stains are significantly safer than ethidium bromide, it
should be remembered that any dye that stains DNA is potentially hazardous.
Gloves should be worn when handling solutions or gels containing such dyes.
Always follow the manufacturer's instructions regarding dye handling.
*** Contact of the Dark Reader and its parts with organic solvents or concentrated
acids can damage the unit. Do not let organic solvents or acids come into contact
with the Dark Reader.
*** The surface of the transilluminator should be cleaned only with soap and water
or ethanol soaked onto a soft cloth or tissue paper. Disconnect the unit before
cleaning.
*** The glasses and amber screen are ONLY for viewing in conjunction with Dark
Reader products. The glasses and screen are NOT safety devices and do NOT
provide eye protection. Do not use with UV sources.
3
Basic Instructions for Use
Questions? - Do not hesitate to contact us:
Clare Chemical Research
18390 Hwy 145, PO Box 180, Dolores, CO 81323.
Tel: 970 882 7499
Fax: 970 882 7068
email: [email protected]
web: www.clarechemical.com
Overview
Familiarize yourself with the parts of the Dark Reader as describes on the accompanying Parts
Checklist sheet and read the Safety Instructions (pages 1-2 of this manual) before using your
Dark Reader transilluminator!
To achieve maximum sensitivity, viewing fluorescence should be done in a darkened room.
Set up the transilluminator on a level surface and plug the power cord into a grounded wall
socket.
Place the gel or other fluorescent samples on the Dark Reader transilluminator surface.
Place the amber screen on top of the gel. Alternatively, the glasses can be worn.
Switch on the Dark Reader transilluminator and view the gel.
After viewing / photographing the gel, turn off the Dark Reader.
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Recommended DNA Stains
The new generation of DNA stains, such as SYBR® Green, SYBR Gold and GelStar®, are intrinsically much more
sensitive than ethidium bromide. When used in conjunction with a Dark Reader transilluminator, the new stains are
especially effective. Indeed, we recommend that you load about 5 times less DNA on your gel to avoid the 'sudden'
appearance of minor DNA bands you never knew you had in your samples!
A Brief Method
The new stains are all used in a similar manner. (Always follow the manufacturer's detailed instructions carefully.)
Make a 1:10,000 dilution of stain in 1 x TAE or TBE buffer. (Unused stain can be stored in a dark bottle at 4 oC for
about 1 week.) Gently rock the agarose gel in the dye solution for 20 - 30 min. and then view on the Dark Reader
transilluminator. No destaining is required. For maximum sensitivity, the gel should be removed from the tray, but
because the Dark Reader visible excitation light passes through many kinds of plastic and glass, there is often no
need to remove the gel from the container in order to view the major DNA fragments. If the gel or Dark Reader
surface warms up after an extended period, it may be necessary to occasionally remove condensation off the
underside of the amber screen to achieve the best sensitivity.
SYBR Green
SYBR Green stain was the first of the new generation of DNA stains introduced by Molecular Probes. Using a Dark
Reader transilluminator it is possible to detect less than 100 pg of SYBR Green-stained DNA by eye and 10 - 20 pg
using a CCD or Polaroid camera system. More information is available at: www.clarechemical.com/green.htm
SYBR Green stain can also be used by just adding it to the DNA samples before electrophoresis. This technique has
2 advantages: (i) It drastically reduces the amount of potentially hazardous waste, (ii) It provides results quickly
because the staining time is eliminated. Proceed as follows: make a 1:100 dilution of SYBR Green in 1 x TAE. Add
1 microL of this solution to each 9 microL of DNA sample. Load the gel and run in 2 hours or less. The dye is not
added to the gel or running buffer. The disadvantages of this technique are: (i) the detection sensitivity is
significantly reduced to about 300 pg of dsDNA, (ii) the migration rates of DNA fragments become unpredictable
and this technique cannot be used to determine the sizes of DNA bands accurately.
SYBR Gold
SYBR Gold stain was also developed by Molecular Probes. Our tests on the sensitivity of DNA detection show that
SYBR Gold is the most sensitive of the new DNA stains and it is possible to see (by eye) less than 75 pg of DNA.
Furthermore, SYBR Gold enters agarose gels very rapidly and major DNA bands become visible in less than 2
5
minutes after adding staining solution. More information is available at: www.clarechemical.com/gold.htm
GelStar
GelStar stain (Cambrex) can be used as a post-stain, just like both of the SYBR dyes, but also works very well as an
'in-gel' stain if it is added to the agarose before electrophoresis. This is done as follows: melt the required amount of
agarose; allow to cool to ~ 60 oC, add GelStar to give a 10,000-fold dilution; pour the gel. The presence of GelStar
in the gel does not significantly affect the relative migration behavior of DNA bands. In-gel staining has the
advantage that the DNA bands can be viewed immediately after the gel has been run. More information is available
at: www.clarechemical.com/gelstar.htm
Ethidium bromide
Ethidium bromide detection of DNA using a Dark Reader transilluminator is less sensitive than with a 312 nm UV
device. It is possible to detect ~5 ng of ethidium bromide-stained DNA using the Dark Reader by eye and about 600
pg using a CCD camera. It is important not to use an excessive amount of ethidium bromide. (0.1 - 0.2 microgram /
mL is optimal.) Also, the room needs to be well darkened. More information is available at:
www.clarechemical.com/ethidium.htm
Recommended Protein Stains
Several new fluorescent protein stains have been recently developed by Molecular Probes, Inc. These SYPRO®
stains display excellent sensitivity similar to that of silver staining, less protein-to-protein variability than silver, a
greater quantitation range, a simple one step staining procedure, and do not interfere with subsequent downstream
characterization techniques. Most of the SYPRO stain family can be very effectively detected using a Dark Reader
transilluminator.
SYPRO Ruby
The family of SYPRO Ruby stains can be used to detect proteins in SDS-polyacrylamide gels, isoelectric focusing
gels and on membranes. About 2 ng of SYPRO Ruby-stained protein can be detected directly by eye in an SDSpolyacrylamide gel using a Dark Reader transilluminator and about 8 ng after transfer to a PVDF membrane. More
information is available at: www.clarechemical.com/ruby.htm
SYPRO Orange
SYPRO Orange is a more economical alternative to SYPRO Ruby for SDS gels. To ensure maximum sensitivity it
is important to run the gel using 0.05% SDS rather than the more typical 0.1%. The detection limit for Orangestained proteins using a DR transilluminator is around 2 - 4 ng both by eye and using either a CCD or Polaroid
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camera. More information is available at: www.clarechemical.com/sypro.htm
Excising DNA and Protein Bands
Obviously this should be done using the Dark Reader viewing glasses. Before cutting out a band, placing a sheet of
glass under the gel will protect the blue screen of the transilluminator from scratching.
You can can relax a little while band cutting! Various experiments show that:
1. Transformation efficiencies are increased over 100-fold when SYBR Gold-stained DNA samples are
exposed on a Dark Reader transilluminator rather than a UV device.
2. Photobleaching of SYPRO Orange-stained proteins is significantly reduced when using a Dark Reader
transilluminator compared to UV.
Photography and Imaging
Because the amber screen acts as an optical filter, any additional filter attached to the camera must be removed. An
exposure time of 1 - 4 seconds at an f-stop of 5.6 is optimal using a Polaroid camera and 667 film. The exposure
time using a CCD camera will vary, depending on the particular model. For example, using a basic Olympus 3000
digital camera with an f-stop of 2.8, typical exposure times are 2 - 5 sec. Additional imaging tips are available at:
www.clarechemical.com/imaging.htm and on page 8 of this manual.
Camera Filters
Clare Chemical has available a variety of different sizes of camera filters. These filters have exactly the same optical
properties as the amber screen. They have been introduced for those researchers who prefer to photograph
fluorescent samples on their Dark Reader transilluminator without the amber screen. Substituting the screen with a
camera filter can be helpful, for example, in humid climates where condensation tends to form more rapidly under
the screen. More information is available at: www.clarechemical.com/filters.htm
Note that there is only one 'best' filter for use with the Dark Reader transilluminator and that is provided by the Dark
Reader amber. This long-pass filter is designed to maximize the fluorescence signal and minimize the background.
The actual excitation and emission maxima of a particular fluorophor are not especially relevant. Of course, if a
'black-and-white' camera is being used and the goal is to 'isolate' several different colored fluorophors by recording a
series of images, then it will be necessary to experiment with a selection of bandpass filters.
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More Information
Other Fluorophors
It is a commonly held misconception that a fluorophor, to work with the Dark Reader, must have an excitation
maximum between 420 - 500 nm and an emission maximum above ~520 nm. While these are useful guidelines, it
should be emphasized that the DR can also be effectively used to detect fluorophors that have maxima outside the
above ranges. The more general criteria for visualizing a fluorophor with a Dark Reader transilluminator are (i) a
portion of the excitation spectrum is between about 420 - 500 nm and (ii) a portion of the emission spectrum is
above ~520 nm. This encompasses a large number of commonly used fluorophors besides those mentioned above
such as Pro-Q® Diamond phosphoprotein stain, Pro-Q Emerald 488 glycoprotein stain, various fluorescein and
rhodamine derivatives, Cy3, GFP variants such as EGFP, EYFP and dsRed, alkaline phosphatase substrates such as
AttoPhos® and ECF®, dimeric cyanine stains such as YOYO® and TOTO® and some of the Alexa® dye series.
There are many other dyes that can be used effectively with the Dark Reader transilluminator and this list is by no
means exhaustive.
Viewing Lab Samples
Most lab samples are contained, one way or another, whether it be a gel, tube, plate, etc. More often than not, UV
will fail to excite such samples because the container material absorbs UV. However, because the excitation light
generated by the Dark Reader transilluminator is visible light, it easily passes through transparent glass and plastic
(and even some semi-opaque materials). Consequently, fluorophors can be conveniently viewed in electrophoresis
apparatus, 96-well plates, tubes, Petri dishes, cell culture bottles and even on blotting membranes.
Another problem often encountered when attempting to use a UV light source to view fluorescent samples is that the
support or the container itself may fluoresce strongly enough to mask the fluorescence from the sample. For
example, GelBond® film which is used to reinforce delicate gels, fluoresces under 300 nm light. With the Dark
Reader transilluminator, there is minimum membrane fluorescence and the fluorophors in the gel can be viewed
without any significant background interference
Where to Purchase Stains
SYBR Green stain (catalog #S-7563), SYBR Gold stain (# S-11494) SYPRO Ruby (# S-12000) and SYPRO Orange
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(# S-6650) can be obtained from Molecular Probes, Eugene, Oregon. USA. Phone 1 800 438 2209.
www.probes.com. Gelstar stain (# 50535) can be obtained from Cambrex, Inc. Rockland, Maine, USA. Phone 1 800
341 1574. www.cambrex.com
More About Imaging
A Simple Digital Imaging System
By way of example, here is some information about the imaging system currently used in the Clare Chemical lab:
The CCD camera is an Olympus 3000. This is an ordinary (3 megapixel, color) 'consumer-level camera that costs
about $500. It has a USB connection that allows images to be downloaded to a computer.
Using the Olympus 3000, it is possible to detect about 10 pg of dsDNA (in color!) with exposure times of about 5
seconds. The maximum exposure time is 16 seconds. The 3 megapixel images provides a spatial resolution of better
than 100 micrometers over the area of a standard mini-gel. The color capabilities can be used to distinguish multiple
fluorophors in the same image.
On the downside, the CCD chip is 8-bit - 256 shades each of red, green and blue - whereas most 'high-end' cameras
are 16-bit grayscale. This does reduce the quantification range of the Olympus camera. (One work-round is to record
multiple images at different exposure times and then combine the data sets.) Also, the USB connection is relatively
slow and there are no computer control or 'real-time' image acquisition capabilities. In spite of these limitations the
Olympus is a very effective little camera.
Camera Filter Attachment
Attaching a filter to a digital camera requires, more often than not, some accessory parts that are not included in the
camera package. For example, the Olympus 3000 requires a lens tube (Olympus #CLA-1) that attaches over the
retractable lens, and a 43-46 filter step-up ring that attaches to the lens tube and converts the existing threads to 46
mm. With these attachments in place, a standard 46 mm DR filter (Clare Chemical #AF460) can now be attached to
the camera.
Other Components
Freeware (Windows only) has recently been released by PineTree Computing that allows a variety of Olympus
cameras to be controlled and images monitored 'live' using a PC.
www.pinetreecomputing.com/camctl.asp
If you want to photograph gels or other samples in a well-lit area of the lab, a hood is necessary. A variety of hoods
9
are available from Peca Products.
Infrared
All lamps emit IR radiation. Unfortunately, this is the region of the spectrum to which CCD chips are most sensitive.
All basic digital cameras from companies such as Olympus, Kodak, Fuji, Nikon, etc., contain a built-in IR filter but
the more expensive the CCD camera, the less likely, it seems, it will have this filter. The absence of IR filtering will
result in an excessive background 'flare' in the recorded images that effectively obscures any fluorescence signal.
IR filters (or 'hot mirrors' which reflect IR rather than absorb it) are readily available from Tiffen in a variety of sizes
and can be obtained from your local photographic store for around $50. Alternatively, IR filters are available from
Edmund Industrial Optics.
Tips for Good Photography
The following tips are the results of our experience with a variety of digital cameras:
1. Turn all the auto functions off. Always use manual settings. The auto functions are designed for 'average'
conditions. Photographing fluorescent samples is not average and the auto software becomes hopelessly confused.
2. The LCD screen on the back of the camera warms up over time. This warming significantly increases the
noise level in the images. Always try to turn on the camera just before use and take a picture immediately.
3. You should not have any filters on the camera except a DR filter (either in the form of the amber viewing
screen or a separate camera filter).
4. Wipe the surface of the transilluminator with a little ethanol soaked onto a tissue before use to remove
absorbed dye left by previous users.
5. The new generation of DNA dyes are sensitive to dust particles in the agarose. Try to avoid dust in the
agarose and running buffer.
6. Because the new dyes are so much more sensitive then EtBr, it is easy to overload gels and get some
ugly looking smearing. This is easily avoided by cutting down the DNA loaded by a factor of about 5.
7. Specific manual settings for the Olympus 3000 camera are given below:
- flash off
- zoom in as necessary. (Not digital zoom)
- Macro mode on
- ISO 100
- TIFF file 1600x1200. (This generates a 5.5 Mb file)
- f2.8
- focus manually (we place a piece of white card with fairly large type on the surface of the transilluminator to set
the focus if the camera position has been moved since the last session.)
10
- exposure time set somewhere between 1 and 5 seconds to get the appropriate exposure.
Fixed-Focus Cameras
The most popular fixed-focus camera is the Polaroid DS34. Typically, this is mounted on a hood that contains a
built-in correction lens that corrects for the short sample-to-camera distance. If the hood is placed on the Dark
Reader amber screen, the distance is increased by about 0.25". At the lowest f-stop value of 4.5, the depth of field
will be too shallow to properly focus the image. Increasing the f-stop to 5.6 increases the depth of field sufficiently
to bring the image back into focus. A slightly longer exposure time will be required to account for the smaller
apeture.
11
Troubleshooting
Problem
Cause
Fluorescence is difficult to see. The room needs to be darker.
Solution
Switch off overhead lighting.
Move the transilluminator
away from windows.
Fluorescent 'smudges' on the Fluorescent dye is present on Wipe the surface with a little
transilluminator surface.
the surface.
ethanol. Rinse the gel briefly in
water to remove excess dye.
DNA bands are smeared.
The gel is overloaded. The
Try loading ~5 times less
new DNA dyes are much more sample onto the gel.
sensitive than EtBr.
Fluorescent bands in the gel
Condensation is forming on
Wipe off the condensation. If it
seem to gradually disappear
the underside of the amber
continues to form, use the DR
when viewing the gel.
screen.
glasses or a separate DR
camera filter.
No light from the
A lamp may be broken.
Replace the lamp (see page
transilluminator.
15). If this fails to correct the
problem, contact CCR.
Photograph of gel does not
There are several possible
See the Photography &
look as good as when just
causes but, in general, if a
Imaging Section for more
viewing by eye.
photograph does NOT look as information. (Pages 9 and 11)
good as when viewed by eye, as well as items in this list.
photographic conditions need
optimizing.
The photo is very dark.
Not enough light is reaching
Make sure you are using only a
the camera.
DR filter. Increase the
exposure time. Decrease the fstop.
The photo is very light.
Too light is reaching the
Make sure you are using only a
camera.
DR filter. Decrease the
exposure time. Increase the fstop.
A background 'flare' in images The camera is not equipped
Obtain a separate IR filter.
recorded using a CCD camera. with an IR blocking filter.
(See page 12 for details.)
Image is not in focus.
The usual causes are using
With a digital camera, set the
auto-focus or using too low an focus manually. With a fixed
f-stop.
focus camera, increase the fstop.
12
Service & Parts
Remember to disconnect the unit from the electric supply before replacing any parts!
If you have any questions, contact Clare Chemical Research.
The fuse and the lamp are the only user-replaceable parts. All other problems require that the unit be returned to
Clare Chemical Research for servicing.
Fuse Replacement
The fuse-holder is located on the back of the unit. Fuses are available from Clare Chemical Research. Use the table
below to identify the correct fuse. (The transilluminator model is printed on the side of the unit next to the switch.)
Do not use a fuse with other specifications.
Disconnect the unit from the power supply!
Unscrew the fuse-holder cap.
Remove the old fuse from the cap.
Insert the new fuse into the cap.
Screw the cap/fuse back onto the fuse-holder securely.
If the fuse continues to blow, contact Clare Chemical Research
* The VDC transilluminators contain a built-in fuse that is not user-replaceable.
13
Lamp Replacement
Replacement lamps are available from Clare Chemical Research. Do not use a lamp with other specifications.
NOTE: if a lamp is broken, some of the glass may be a very fine dust. DO NOT WIPE THE INSIDE OF THE BOX!
Wear a pair of gloves and protective glasses when cleaning up broken glass. DO NOT TRY TO BLOW THE DUST
OUT OF THE BOX! A vacuum cleaner is the best way to remove glass fragments.
General Procedure
Disconnect the unit from the power supply! Wear gloves and protective glasses!
Turn the unit upside-down onto a piece of plastic wrap (to protect the blue screen) and take out the screws that
secure the blue screen.
Turn the unit right-side up (hold the blue screen in place)
Remove the blue screen and white diffuser screen from the unit.
After installing the new lamp according to the specific instructions below, reassemble the unit. and replace the
screws. Only now can you switch the unit on.
If the new lamp fails to light, contact Clare Chemical Research.
DR45 and DR88 Transilluminators
DR45 and DR88 transilluminators use the blue 9W compact fluorescent lamp.
Remove the lamp from its socket by gently pulling on the lamp.
Put in a new lamp by gently pressing the lamp into the socket. The lamp 'clicks' into place.
DR195 Transilluminators
DR195 transilluminators use two blue 32W compact fluorescent lamps.
Remove the lamp from its socket by gently pulling apart the lamp and the socket.
Twist the lamp and carefully pull to remove the lamp from the clips.
(Note: because of the stresses of shipping, some DR195 units may contain lamps with extra securing features
including wire wraps across the clips and a silicone sealant between the lamp and the socket. If present, the wire and
sealant should be removed first. (Note that these features are only needed if the unit is being shipped commercially
and there is no need to replace.)
14
Warranty Information
If you are not satisfied with the Dark Reader transilluminator for any reason, return it within 30 days for a full
refund (less shipping and handling).
The DR transilluminator parts and workmanship are guaranteed for 1 year from the date of purchase. (See details
below.) Please fill out the warranty card and send it back to Clare Chemical.
To obtain warranty service contact Clare Chemical (see p.16) and obtain a Return Form. Ship the unit to Clare
Chemical postage prepaid, together with a completed Form. All products returned for warranty service must be
carefully repackaged in the original packing materials:
Clare Chemical Research makes the following limited warranties.
Clare Chemical Research products are guaranteed to be free of defects in materials and workmanship under normal
use for period of 1 year after the date of original purchase. During this period Clare Chemical will repair or replace a
defective product or part without charge to you.
The warrant conditions and limitations are set out below:
The warranty applies only to defect in material or workmanship and does not include normal wear. The warranty
applies only to defects which occur during normal use and does not extend to damage to products or parts which
results from alternation, repair, modification, faulty installation or service by anyone other than Clare Chemical or
an authorized representative; damage to products or parts caused by accident, abuse, or misuse, or maintenance,
mishandling, misapplication, or use in violation of instruction furnished by us.
The warranty and remedies set forth above are exclusive and in lieu of all others, whether oral or written, express or
implied, Clare Chemical specifically disclaims any and all implied warranties, including, without limitation,
warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose.
In no event shall Clare Chemical be liable for special, incidental, consequential or punitive damages, including,
without limitation, damage to other property caused by any defect in this product, inconvenience, loss of goodwill,
lost profits or revenue, loss of use of this product or any associated equipment, cost of substitutive equipment,
downtime costs or claims of any part dealing with purchaser for such damages, resulting from the use, installation or
servicing of this product. Nor is Clare Chemical Research liable or responsible for any personal injuries occurring as
a result of the use, installation or servicing of this product This warranty does not supersede any statutory rights that
may be available in certain States or Countries.
15
Contact Information
Clare Chemical Research
18390 Hwy 145
PO Box 180
Dolores, Colorado 81323
USA
Toll-free: (888) 292 0356
Tel: (970) 882 7499
Fax: (970) 882 7068
email: [email protected]
web: www.clarechemical.com
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