Getting Started with Your GPIB-ENET/100 and NI
GPIB
Getting Started with Your
GPIB-ENET/100 and NI-488.2™
for Windows 2000/NT
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
August 2000 Edition
Part Number 322752A-01
Support
Worldwide Technical Support and Product Information
ni.com
National Instruments Corporate Headquarters
11500 North Mopac Expressway
Austin, Texas 78759-3504
USA Tel: 512 794 0100
Worldwide Offices
Australia 03 9879 5166, Austria 0662 45 79 90 0, Belgium 02 757 00 20, Brazil 011 284 5011,
Canada (Calgary) 403 274 9391, Canada (Ontario) 905 785 0085, Canada (Québec) 514 694 8521,
China 0755 3904939, Denmark 45 76 26 00, Finland 09 725 725 11, France 01 48 14 24 24,
Germany 089 741 31 30, Greece 30 1 42 96 427, Hong Kong 2645 3186, India 91805275406,
Israel 03 6120092, Italy 02 413091, Japan 03 5472 2970, Korea 02 596 7456, Mexico (D.F.) 5 280 7625,
Mexico (Monterrey) 8 357 7695, Netherlands 0348 433466, New Zealand 09 914 0488, Norway 32 27 73 00,
Poland 0 22 528 94 06, Portugal 351 1 726 9011, Singapore 2265886, Spain 91 640 0085,
Sweden 08 587 895 00, Switzerland 056 200 51 51, Taiwan 02 2528 7227, United Kingdom 01635 523545
For further support information, see the Technical Support Resources appendix. To comment on the
documentation, send e-mail to [email protected]
© Copyright 2000 National Instruments Corporation. All rights reserved.
Important Information
Warranty
The GPIB hardware is warranted against defects in materials and workmanship for a period of two years from the date of shipment,
as evidenced by receipts or other documentation. National Instruments will, at its option, repair or replace equipment that proves
to be defective during the warranty period. This warranty includes parts and labor.
The media on which you receive National Instruments software are warranted not to fail to execute programming instructions,
due to defects in materials and workmanship, for a period of 90 days from date of shipment, as evidenced by receipts or other
documentation. National Instruments will, at its option, repair or replace software media that do not execute programming
instructions if National Instruments receives notice of such defects during the warranty period. National Instruments does not
warrant that the operation of the software shall be uninterrupted or error free.
A Return Material Authorization (RMA) number must be obtained from the factory and clearly marked on the outside of
the package before any equipment will be accepted for warranty work. National Instruments will pay the shipping costs of
returning to the owner parts which are covered by warranty.
National Instruments believes that the information in this document is accurate. The document has been carefully reviewed
for technical accuracy. In the event that technical or typographical errors exist, National Instruments reserves the right to
make changes to subsequent editions of this document without prior notice to holders of this edition. The reader should consult
National Instruments if errors are suspected. In no event shall National Instruments be liable for any damages arising out of
or related to this document or the information contained in it.
EXCEPT AS SPECIFIED HEREIN, NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, AND SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS ANY
WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. CUSTOMER’S RIGHT TO RECOVER DAMAGES CAUSED BY FAULT OR
NEGLIGENCE ON THE PART OF NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS SHALL BE LIMITED TO THE AMOUNT THERETOFORE PAID BY THE CUSTOMER. NATIONAL
INSTRUMENTS WILL NOT BE LIABLE FOR DAMAGES RESULTING FROM LOSS OF DATA, PROFITS, USE OF PRODUCTS, OR INCIDENTAL OR
CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY THEREOF. This limitation of the liability of National Instruments will
apply regardless of the form of action, whether in contract or tort, including negligence. Any action against National Instruments
must be brought within one year after the cause of action accrues. National Instruments shall not be liable for any delay in
performance due to causes beyond its reasonable control. The warranty provided herein does not cover damages, defects,
malfunctions, or service failures caused by owner’s failure to follow the National Instruments installation, operation, or
maintenance instructions; owner’s modification of the product; owner’s abuse, misuse, or negligent acts; and power failure or
surges, fire, flood, accident, actions of third parties, or other events outside reasonable control.
Copyright
Under the copyright laws, this publication may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form, electronic or mechanical, including
photocopying, recording, storing in an information retrieval system, or translating, in whole or in part, without the prior written
consent of National Instruments Corporation.
Trademarks
CVI™, LabVIEW™, Measurement Studio™, National Instruments™, NI-488.2™ , and ni.com™ are trademarks of
National Instruments Corporation.
Product and company names mentioned herein are trademarks or trade names of their respective companies.
WARNING REGARDING USE OF NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS PRODUCTS
(1) NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS PRODUCTS ARE NOT DESIGNED WITH COMPONENTS AND TESTING FOR A LEVEL
OF RELIABILITY SUITABLE FOR USE IN OR IN CONNECTION WITH SURGICAL IMPLANTS OR AS CRITICAL
COMPONENTS IN ANY LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEMS WHOSE FAILURE TO PERFORM CAN REASONABLY BE
EXPECTED TO CAUSE SIGNIFICANT INJURY TO A HUMAN.
(2) IN ANY APPLICATION, INCLUDING THE ABOVE, RELIABILITY OF OPERATION OF THE SOFTWARE PRODUCTS
CAN BE IMPAIRED BY ADVERSE FACTORS, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO FLUCTUATIONS IN ELECTRICAL
POWER SUPPLY, COMPUTER HARDWARE MALFUNCTIONS, COMPUTER OPERATING SYSTEM SOFTWARE
FITNESS, FITNESS OF COMPILERS AND DEVELOPMENT SOFTWARE USED TO DEVELOP AN APPLICATION,
INSTALLATION ERRORS, SOFTWARE AND HARDWARE COMPATIBILITY PROBLEMS, MALFUNCTIONS OR
FAILURES OF ELECTRONIC MONITORING OR CONTROL DEVICES, TRANSIENT FAILURES OF ELECTRONIC
SYSTEMS (HARDWARE AND/OR SOFTWARE), UNANTICIPATED USES OR MISUSES, OR ERRORS ON THE PART OF
THE USER OR APPLICATIONS DESIGNER (ADVERSE FACTORS SUCH AS THESE ARE HEREAFTER
COLLECTIVELY TERMED “SYSTEM FAILURES”). ANY APPLICATION WHERE A SYSTEM FAILURE WOULD
CREATE A RISK OF HARM TO PROPERTY OR PERSONS (INCLUDING THE RISK OF BODILY INJURY AND DEATH)
SHOULD NOT BE RELIANT SOLELY UPON ONE FORM OF ELECTRONIC SYSTEM DUE TO THE RISK OF SYSTEM
FAILURE. TO AVOID DAMAGE, INJURY, OR DEATH, THE USER OR APPLICATION DESIGNER MUST TAKE
REASONABLY PRUDENT STEPS TO PROTECT AGAINST SYSTEM FAILURES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO
BACK-UP OR SHUT DOWN MECHANISMS. BECAUSE EACH END-USER SYSTEM IS CUSTOMIZED AND DIFFERS
FROM NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS' TESTING PLATFORMS AND BECAUSE A USER OR APPLICATION DESIGNER
MAY USE NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS PRODUCTS IN COMBINATION WITH OTHER PRODUCTS IN A MANNER NOT
EVALUATED OR CONTEMPLATED BY NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS, THE USER OR APPLICATION DESIGNER IS
ULTIMATELY RESPONSIBLE FOR VERIFYING AND VALIDATING THE SUITABILITY OF NATIONAL
INSTRUMENTS PRODUCTS WHENEVER NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS PRODUCTS ARE INCORPORATED IN A
SYSTEM OR APPLICATION, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE APPROPRIATE DESIGN, PROCESS AND
SAFETY LEVEL OF SUCH SYSTEM OR APPLICATION.
Compliance
FCC/Canada Radio Frequency Interference Compliance*
Determining FCC Class
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has rules to protect wireless communications from interference.
The FCC places digital electronics into two classes. These classes are known as Class A (for use in industrialcommercial locations only) or Class B (for use in residential or commercial locations). Depending on where it is
operated, this product could be subject to restrictions in the FCC rules. (In Canada, the Department of
Communications (DOC), of Industry Canada, regulates wireless interference in much the same way.)
Digital electronics emit weak signals during normal operation that can affect radio, television, or other wireless
products. By examining the product you purchased, you can determine the FCC Class and therefore which of the two
FCC/DOC Warnings apply in the following sections. (Some products may not be labeled at all for FCC; if so, the
reader should then assume these are Class A devices.)
FCC Class A products only display a simple warning statement of one paragraph in length regarding interference and
undesired operation. Most of our products are FCC Class A. The FCC rules have restrictions regarding the locations
where FCC Class A products can be operated.
FCC Class B products display either a FCC ID code, starting with the letters EXN,
or the FCC Class B compliance mark that appears as shown here on the right.
Consult the FCC web site http://www.fcc.gov for more information.
FCC/DOC Warnings
This equipment generates and uses radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in strict accordance with the
instructions in this manual and the CE Mark Declaration of Conformity**, may cause interference to radio and
television reception. Classification requirements are the same for the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)
and the Canadian Department of Communications (DOC).
Changes or modifications not expressly approved by National Instruments could void the user’s authority to operate
the equipment under the FCC Rules.
Class A
Federal Communications Commission
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device, pursuant to part 15
of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the
equipment is operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency
energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to
radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference in
which case the user will be required to correct the interference at his own expense.
Canadian Department of Communications
This Class A digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian Interference-Causing Equipment Regulations.
Cet appareil numérique de la classe A respecte toutes les exigences du Règlement sur le matériel brouilleur du
Canada.
Class B
Federal Communications Commission
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to part 15
of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a
residential installation. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed
and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However,
there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful
interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user
is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:
• Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
• Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
•
•
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected.
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
Canadian Department of Communications
This Class B digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian Interference-Causing Equipment Regulations.
Cet appareil numérique de la classe B respecte toutes les exigences du Règlement sur le matériel brouilleur du
Canada.
European Union - Compliance to EEC Directives
Readers in the EU/EEC/EEA must refer to the Manufacturer's Declaration of Conformity (DoC) for information**
pertaining to the CE Mark compliance scheme. The Manufacturer includes a DoC for most every hardware product
except for those bought for OEMs, if also available from an original manufacturer that also markets in the EU, or
where compliance is not required as for electrically benign apparatus or cables.
* Certain exemptions may apply in the USA, see FCC Rules §15.103 Exempted devices, and §15.105(c).
Also available in sections of CFR 47.
** The CE Mark Declaration of Conformity will contain important supplementary information and instructions
for the user or installer.
Contents
About This Manual
Conventions ...................................................................................................................xi
Related Documentation..................................................................................................xii
Chapter 1
Introduction
How to Use This Manual ...............................................................................................1-1
What You Need to Get Started ......................................................................................1-2
Optional Equipment .......................................................................................................1-3
Optional Hardware ..........................................................................................1-3
Multiple-Computer Software License .............................................................1-3
GPIB-ENET/100 Hardware Overview ..........................................................................1-3
Feature Overview ............................................................................................1-4
LED Overview.................................................................................................1-4
NI-488.2 Overview ........................................................................................................1-5
Time-Saving Development Tools ..................................................................................1-6
Chapter 2
Installation
Installing NI-488.2.........................................................................................................2-1
Installing the GPIB-ENET/100 Hardware .....................................................................2-2
Step 1. Record the Serial Number, Ethernet Address,
and Default Hostname ..................................................................................2-2
Step 2. Connect the Cables..............................................................................2-4
Step 3. Switch on Your GPIB-ENET/100.......................................................2-5
Chapter 3
Ethernet Configuration
Using the NI Ethernet Device Configuration Utility .....................................................3-1
Changing the Network Settings.......................................................................3-3
Static IP Parameters.........................................................................................3-5
Choosing a Static IP Address ..........................................................................3-5
For a Network Administered by a Network Administrator ..............3-5
For a Network without a Network Administrator .............................3-5
Verifying the Hostname ..................................................................................3-7
© National Instruments Corporation
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GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Contents
Chapter 4
GPIB Configuration
Configuring the NI-488.2 Software Characteristics...................................................... 4-1
Chapter 5
Verify the Installation
Running the Diagnostic Utility...................................................................................... 5-1
Connecting the GPIB Cable .......................................................................................... 5-2
Chapter 6
Using Your GPIB-ENET/100 and NI-488.2
Using DHCP.................................................................................................................. 6-1
Using the CFG RESET Switch...................................................................................... 6-2
Using the CFG RESET Switch during Operation........................................... 6-3
Using the CFG RESET Switch at Power-On.................................................. 6-3
Updating the Firmware.................................................................................................. 6-4
Using the Win32 Interactive Control Utility ................................................................. 6-6
Using the GPIB Spy Utility........................................................................................... 6-6
Programming Considerations ........................................................................................ 6-7
Running Existing DOS and Windows GPIB Applications ........................................... 6-7
Appendix A
Uninstalling the Software
Appendix B
PWR/RDY LED Signaling
Appendix C
Troubleshooting and Common Questions
Appendix D
Specifications
Appendix E
Technical Support Resources
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
viii
ni.com
Contents
Glossary
Index
Figures
Figure 1-1.
GPIB-ENET/100 Front Panel................................................................1-4
Figure 2-1.
Figure 2-2.
Figure 2-3.
Figure 2-4.
NI-488.2 Setup Wizard..........................................................................2-2
GPIB-ENET/100 Baseplate Identification Label ..................................2-3
GPIB-ENET/100 Rear Panel.................................................................2-4
Connecting Power to the GPIB-ENET/100...........................................2-5
Figure 3-1.
Figure 3-2.
Figure 3-3.
Figure 3-4.
Figure 3-5.
NI Ethernet Device Configuration Utility .............................................3-2
Properties Window for an Unconfigured GPIB-ENET/100..................3-3
Specifying IP Settings ...........................................................................3-4
Hostname Verification Error Detected..................................................3-7
Fixing a Hostname Verification Error...................................................3-8
Figure 4-1.
GPIB Configuration Dialog Box...........................................................4-1
Figure 5-1.
Diagnostic Utility after Testing.............................................................5-1
Figure 6-1.
NI Ethernet Device Firmware Update Utility .......................................6-5
Tables
Table 1-1.
LED Descriptions ..................................................................................1-5
Table 3-1.
Valid and Invalid IP Addresses for Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0 .........3-6
© National Instruments Corporation
ix
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
About This Manual
This manual contains instructions to help you install and configure
the National Instruments GPIB-ENET/100 and NI-488.2 for
Windows 2000/NT. The NI-488.2 software included in this kit is
intended for use with Windows 2000 and Windows NT 4.0 with
Service Pack 4 or higher installed.
This manual assumes that you are already familiar with Windows 2000
or Windows NT and with TCP/IP networks, and that your computer
is connected to an Ethernet network. Before you can use the driver
software for the GPIB-ENET/100, your host must be configured with
TCP/IP protocols that conform to Windows sockets (WinSock) version 1.1
or higher.
Conventions
The following conventions appear in this manual:
»
The » symbol leads you through nested menu items and dialog box options
to a final action. The sequence File»Page Setup»Options directs you to
pull down the File menu, select the Page Setup item, and select Options
from the last dialog box.
This icon denotes a tip, which alerts you to advisory information.
This icon denotes a note, which alerts you to important information.
This icon denotes a caution, which advises you of precautions to take to
avoid injury, data loss, or a system crash.
bold
Bold text denotes items that you must select or click on in the software,
such as menu items and dialog box options. Bold text also denotes
parameter names and LED names.
italic
Italic text denotes variables, emphasis, a cross reference, or an introduction
to a key concept. This font also denotes text that is a placeholder for a word
or value that you must supply.
© National Instruments Corporation
xi
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
About This Manual
monospace
Text in this font denotes text or characters that you should enter from the
keyboard, sections of code, programming examples, and syntax examples.
This font is also used for the proper names of disk drives, paths, directories,
programs, subprograms, subroutines, device names, functions, operations,
variables, filenames and extensions, and code excerpts.
monospace bold
Bold text in this font denotes the messages and responses that the computer
automatically prints to the screen.
monospace italic
Italic text in this font denotes text that is a placeholder for a word or value
that you must supply.
Related Documentation
The following documents contain information that you might find helpful
as you read this manual:
•
ANSI/IEEE Standard 488.1-1987, IEEE Standard Digital Interface
for Programmable Instrumentation
•
ANSI/IEEE Standard 488.2-1992, IEEE Standard Codes, Formats,
Protocols, and Common Commands
•
ANSI/IEEE Standard 802.3-1988, Information Processing Systems,
Local Area Networks, Part 3
•
Microsoft Win32 Software Developer Kit, Online Documentation for
Win32 Overviews, Win32 Reference, and Microsoft Windows NT
System Guide, Microsoft Corporation
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
xii
ni.com
1
Introduction
This chapter lists what you need to get started and optional equipment
you can order, and briefly describes the GPIB-ENET/100 hardware and
NI-488.2 for Windows 2000/NT.
How to Use This Manual
Chapter 1
Gather What You Need
to Get Started
Install NI-488.2 Software
Connect Power and
Ethernet Cables
Chapter 2
Power-on
GPIB-ENET/100
Acquired network
parameters?
No
Use NI Ethernet Device
Configuration Utility
(Chapter 3)
Yes
Chapter 4
Configure NI-488.2 Software
Verify the Installation
Passes?
Chapter 5
No
Troubleshooting
Yes
Connect GPIB Cable
Review Programming
Requirements
Chapter 6
Learn About NI-488.2 Utilities
Run Interactive Control Utility
User Manual
and Function
Reference Manual
© National Instruments Corporation
Write Application
Program
1-1
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Chapter 1
Introduction
What You Need to Get Started
Before you install your GPIB-ENET/100 hardware and NI-488.2 for
Windows 2000/NT, make sure you have all of the following items:
❑ Windows 2000 or Windows NT 4.0 with Service Pack 4, or higher,
installed on your computer
❑ TCP/IP protocol installed on your computer
❑ GPIB-ENET/100, which is included in your kit
❑ GPIB-ENET/100 power supply, which is included in your kit
❑ One of the following power cords, which is included in your kit:
–
U.S. standard power cord
–
Switzerland power cord
–
Australian power cord
–
Universal European power cord
–
North American power cord
–
U.K. power cord
❑ The NI-488.2 for Windows 2000/NT and GPIB-ENET/100,
Version 1.2 CD, which is included in your kit
❑ One of the following Category 5 twisted-pair network cables,
which you can purchase from National Instruments:
–
Straight-through cable for connecting the GPIB-ENET/100 to
a network hub
–
Cross-over cable for connecting the GPIB-ENET/100 directly
to a computer’s network interface card (NIC)
❑ One of the following shielded GPIB cables, which you can purchase
from National Instruments:
–
Type X1 single-shielded cables (1, 2, or 4 m)
–
Type X2 double-shielded cables (1, 2, or 4 m)
To meet FCC emission limits for this device, you must use a shielded
(Type X1 or X2) GPIB cable. If you operate this equipment with a non-shielded cable,
it may interfere with radio and television reception.
Caution
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
1-2
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Chapter 1
Introduction
Optional Equipment
This section lists optional equipment that you can order from
National Instruments.
Optional Hardware
For information about ordering the following optional equipment,
contact National Instruments:
•
Serial or parallel bus extender and cables
•
Bus expander/isolator
•
GPIB mechanical switch
Multiple-Computer Software License
A multiple-computer software license allows one or more hosts on a
single physical network to access one or more GPIB-ENET/100 boxes.
For information about ordering a software license, contact National
Instruments.
GPIB-ENET/100 Hardware Overview
The GPIB-ENET/100 high-speed interface controls GPIB instruments
across Ethernet networks. You can use the GPIB-ENET/100 to access
remote test equipment from anywhere in the world via TCP/IP protocols on
10Base-T and 100Base-TX networks. By incorporating a new architecture,
100Base-TX Ethernet, and HS488, the GPIB-ENET/100 delivers
performance comparable to that of plug-in boards.
The GPIB-ENET/100 automatically detects if the available network is
10Base-T (10 Mbits/s) or 100Base-TX (100 Mbits/s) and transmits at
the highest available speed.
You can use either the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) or
a simple Ethernet configuration utility to configure the GPIB-ENET/100
without the need for any dip switches or jumpers. Installation options
include rack mounting, DIN rail mounting, wall mounting, and stackable
stand-alone use. You can stack the unit with other GPIB-ENET/100 units
and additional National Instruments products including the ENET-232
Series and ENET-485 Series serial controllers.
For more information about hardware specifications, refer to Appendix D,
Specifications.
© National Instruments Corporation
1-3
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Chapter 1
Introduction
Feature Overview
With the GPIB-ENET/100, you gain all the features inherent in a
networked device: fewer cabling distance restrictions, device sharing,
and communication with devices throughout the Internet.
In a GPIB application, you are restricted to the distance limitations of the
GPIB specification. However, you can overcome these restrictions because
the GPIB-ENET/100 uses Ethernet, and can add an unlimited distance to
your application simply by utilizing the distances available to you by using
a networked device. Because the GPIB-ENET/100 uses standard Internet
protocols, you can exploit the Internet to communicate with your GPIB
instruments throughout the world.
LED Overview
Figure 1-1 shows the six light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on the
GPIB-ENET/100. The LEDs are visible from the top and front of the unit.
1
1
2
2
Power/Ready LED
Ethernet LEDs
3
4
3
4
GPIB Port LEDs
Power Switch
Figure 1-1. GPIB-ENET/100 Front Panel
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
1-4
ni.com
Chapter 1
Introduction
The LEDs show the current status of the GPIB-ENET/100. Table 1-1
describes each LED.
Table 1-1. LED Descriptions
LED
Description
PWR/RDY
Flashes rapidly at start-up while performing self
tests and when acquiring network parameters.
A steady yellow state indicates the box is ready
for operation. Slow flashing pattern indicates an
error occurred.
LINK
10/100
Indicates the GPIB-ENET/100 detected a twisted
pair (10Base-T or 100Base-TX) link. The color
indicates the connection speed. If yellow, the speed
is 10 Mbits/s. If green, the speed is 100 Mbits/s.
TX
Indicates the GPIB-ENET/100 is transmitting to
the Ethernet network.
RX
Indicates the GPIB-ENET/100 is receiving
Ethernet network traffic.
TALK
Indicates the GPIB-ENET/100 is configured as a
GPIB Talker.
LISTEN
Indicates the GPIB-ENET/100 is configured as
a GPIB Listener.
NI-488.2 Overview
NI-488.2 includes a native, 32-bit multitasking Windows 2000/NT driver
and supporting utilities.
NI-488.2 for Windows 2000/NT that comes with this kit supports only the
GPIB-ENET and the GPIB-ENET/100 interfaces. If you need to access
other National Instruments GPIB interfaces, you must remove the software
for this kit and install NI-488.2 for the other interface.
NI-488.2 includes the following components:
•
Device driver
•
Diagnostic utility
•
Configuration utilities
•
Interactive control utility
© National Instruments Corporation
1-5
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Chapter 1
Introduction
•
Utilities for software development and debugging
•
Language interface libraries for Microsoft Visual C/C++ 2.0 or higher,
Borland C/C++ 4.0 or higher, and Microsoft Visual Basic 4.0 or higher
•
Virtual device driver and special DOS and Windows 3 drivers for
running existing GPIB for DOS and Windows 3 applications under
Windows 2000/NT
•
Example programs that use the GPIB API
Time-Saving Development Tools
Your kit includes NI-488.2 for Windows 2000/NT. After you install your
GPIB-ENET/100 and NI-488.2, you can use standard GPIB I/O functions
in LabVIEW and Measurement Studio with your GPIB interface. If you
already have one or more of these applications and want to use them with
your GPIB-ENET/100, refer to your product documentation for
information about GPIB I/O functions. For ordering information, contact
National Instruments.
LabVIEW is a graphical programming environment you can use to acquire
data from thousands of different instruments, including IEEE 488.2
devices, VXI devices, serial devices, PLCs, and plug-in data acquisition
boards. After you acquire raw data, you can convert it into meaningful
results using the data analysis routines in LabVIEW. The LabVIEW
instrument drivers reduce software development time because you do
not have to program the low-level control of each instrument.
Measurement Studio bundles LabWindows/CVI for C, and measurement
tools for Microsoft Visual C++ and Microsoft Visual Basic. Measurement
Studio is designed for building measurement and automation applications
with the programming environment of your choice:
•
LabWindows/CVI is an interactive ANSI C programming environment
designed for building virtual instrument applications.
LabWindows/CVI delivers a drag-and-drop editor for building user
interfaces, a complete ANSI C environment for building your test
program logic, and a collection of automated code generation tools, as
well as utilities for building automated test systems, monitoring
applications, or laboratory experiments.
•
Measurement Studio Tools for Visual C++ takes advantage of COM
and ActiveX technologies to help you build measurement and
automation applications. With the Visual C++ application wizard and
instrument classes, you can use the IEEE 488.2 library to send and
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
1-6
ni.com
Chapter 1
Introduction
receive commands to and from instruments, and you can use VISA,
an industry-standard I/O library, to communicate with GPIB, VXI, or
serial devices using the same set of components.
•
For Visual Basic programmers, Measurement Studio includes a
collection of ActiveX controls designed for building virtual
instrumentation systems. You can use the GPIB, serial, and VISA I/O
controls and property pages to configure communication with your
instruments.
GPIB Analyzer is an optional tool available from National Instruments
that is useful in troubleshooting a variety of IEEE 488 hardware and
software problems. With its built-in time-stamping capability, you easily
can determine the throughput and overhead of your GPIB systems. The
GPIB Analyzer software for Windows NT works with the AT-GPIB/TNT+
and PCI-GPIB+ products, which provide GPIB Analyzer support along
with the functionality of a high-performance GPIB Controller.
© National Instruments Corporation
1-7
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
2
Installation
This chapter describes how to install NI-488.2 for Windows 2000/NT and
the GPIB-ENET/100.
Note If you have a GPIB-ENET instead of a GPIB-ENET/100, refer to Getting Started
with Your GPIB-ENET and the GPIB Software for Windows NT for installation
instructions.
Installing NI-488.2
Complete the following steps to install NI-488.2 for Windows 2000/NT:
1.
Note
Log in as Administrator or as a user who has Administrator
privileges.
Power users are not administrators.
2.
Insert the NI-488.2 for Windows 2000/NT and GPIB-ENET/100 CD.
3.
Select Start»Run and type the following in the Run prompt:
x:\setup
where x is the letter pertaining to the CD-ROM drive.
4.
To begin your software installation, click OK.
The setup wizard, shown in Figure 2-1, guides you through the
necessary steps to install NI-488.2 for Windows 2000/NT. To exit
the setup wizard at any time, click Cancel.
© National Instruments Corporation
2-1
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Chapter 2
Installation
Figure 2-1. NI-488.2 Setup Wizard
After you install NI-488.2, you are ready to install the GPIB-ENET/100
hardware.
Installing the GPIB-ENET/100 Hardware
Complete the following steps to install your GPIB-ENET/100.
Step 1. Record the Serial Number, Ethernet Address,
and Default Hostname
When you configure the GPIB-ENET/100 for use on your network, you
will need to differentiate it from other network devices. Every product has
a unique serial number, Ethernet address, and default hostname.
1.
Locate the serial number, Ethernet address, and default hostname on
the GPIB-ENET/100 baseplate label, as shown in Figure 2-2.
2.
Write down this information and keep it available for later use.
Recording this information is not necessary for proper installation.
However, you will find it convenient when you configure the
GPIB-ENET/100.
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
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The Ethernet address is not the IP address. All devices on an Ethernet network
are assigned a unique physical address—the Ethernet address—so they can communicate
with each other.
Note
1
Serial Number
2
Ethernet Address
3
Default Hostname
Figure 2-2. GPIB-ENET/100 Baseplate Identification Label
You can change the hostname after you finish the installation and
configuration steps in this chapter. Refer to the Changing the Network
Settings section in Chapter 3, Ethernet Configuration, for more
information.
© National Instruments Corporation
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Step 2. Connect the Cables
Note If you do not have an Ethernet cable, as listed in the What You Need to Get Started
section of Chapter 1, Introduction, contact National Instruments for ordering information.
Figure 2-3 shows the locations of the power, Ethernet, and GPIB
connections on the rear panel of the GPIB-ENET/100.
1
2
1
2
3
4
Configuration Reset Switch
Power Connection
3
4
Ethernet Connection
GPIB Connector
Figure 2-3. GPIB-ENET/100 Rear Panel
To connect your cables, complete the following steps:
1.
Connect one end of your Ethernet cable to your GPIB-ENET/100.
Connect the other end of the Ethernet cable to your Ethernet network.
Make sure you comply with all IEEE 802.3 cabling restrictions.
2.
Because AC outlets vary throughout the world, your kit includes a
power cord that meets your local requirements in addition to a power
supply. Figure 2-4 shows how to hook up your power cord and
power supply.
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
a.
Plug one end of the power cord you received in your kit into the
power supply.
b.
Screw the power connector on the other end of the power supply
onto the power jack of the GPIB-ENET/100.
c.
Plug the other end of the power cord into an AC outlet.
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4
1
3
2
1
2
To AC Outlet
Power Cord
3
4
Power Supply
To GPIB-ENET/100 Power Jack
Figure 2-4. Connecting Power to the GPIB-ENET/100
Do not connect GPIB devices to your GPIB port until you configure NI-488.2
as described in Chapter 4, GPIB Configuration, and then run the GPIB Configuration
utility as described in Chapter 5, Verify the Installation. Running the GPIB Configuration
utility requires that you leave the port unconnected.
Note
Step 3. Switch on Your GPIB-ENET/100
Before you power-on your GPIB-ENET/100, contact your network
administrator to determine whether you need to configure your network
settings manually using the NI Ethernet Device Configuration utility or
use the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) to perform the
configuration automatically. For more information about DHCP, refer
to the Using DHCP section in Chapter 6, Using Your GPIB-ENET/100
and NI-488.2.
When you turn on the front-panel power switch, the PWR/RDY LED
alternates rapidly between red and yellow while the GPIB-ENET/100
completes its power-on self-tests and attempts to acquire its network
parameters. Each Ethernet and GPIB LED lights up as its functionality is
tested. By default, the GPIB-ENET/100 attempts its network configuration
through DHCP.
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Installation
The time required for assigning the IP address depends on your network
and the configuration of your GPIB-ENET/100. Allow up to 90 seconds
and observe the state of the PWR/RDY LED to determine the outcome of
the self tests. One of the following should occur:
•
A steady yellow PWR/RDY LED indicates the GPIB-ENET/100
passed its self tests and acquired its IP address. The unit is now ready
to operate. When using DHCP, the GPIB-ENET/100 typically is ready
to operate about 15 seconds after you power it on. Run the GPIB
Configuration utility as described in Chapter 4, GPIB Configuration,
to add the unit to your GPIB system.
•
If the PWR/RDY LED continues to alternate rapidly between red and
yellow, the unit was unable to use DHCP to configure its network
parameters. If your network does not have DHCP, you must use the
NI Ethernet Device Configuration utility, as described in Chapter 3,
Ethernet Configuration, to give your unit its network configuration.
If this utility is successful, the PWR/RDY LED should become
steady yellow. Then you can run the GPIB Configuration utility as
described in Chapter 4, GPIB Configuration. Refer to Appendix C,
Troubleshooting and Common Questions, if the LED does not change
to steady yellow.
•
If the PWR/RDY LED is steady red, the GPIB-ENET/100 has an
unrecoverable error. Contact National Instruments Technical Support.
•
If the PWR/RDY LED blinks a slow red/yellow pattern, the
GPIB-ENET/100 did not pass its self tests. Refer to Appendix B,
PWR/RDY LED Signaling, to interpret the flash pattern before calling
National Instruments Technical Support.
You can skip Chapter 3, Ethernet Configuration, if your GPIB-ENET/100
can use DHCP, although you do need to use the NI Ethernet Device
Configuration utility if you want to change the hostname from the default
hostname listed on the baseplate label.
If at any time you want to return the GPIB-ENET/100 to its default configuration
state as given on the baseplate label, press and hold the CFG RESET switch for three
seconds while you switch the power on. This switch is located on the rear panel, as shown
in Figure 2-3. Refer to the Using the CFG RESET Switch section in Chapter 6, Using Your
GPIB-ENET/100 and NI-488.2, for more information.
Note
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
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3
Ethernet Configuration
This chapter describes how to use the NI Ethernet Device Configuration
utility to configure the network parameters of the GPIB-ENET/100. You
can use this utility for any of the following purposes:
•
Manually configure the network parameters or enable DHCP
•
Verify or change the hostname
•
Add or change a comment to help identify the device
If DHCP is available on your network, it configures the network parameters
for your GPIB-ENET/100 at startup, as described in the Step 3. Switch on
Your GPIB-ENET/100 section of Chapter 2, Installation. In this case, using
the NI Ethernet Device Configuration utility is not required.
If DHCP is not available, the unit automatically enters network
configuration mode if it is configured with the factory default settings.
The GPIB-ENET/100 must be in this mode before you can make changes
to the network parameters.
You also can enter this mode during normal operation by pressing and
holding the CFG RESET switch for three seconds. Refer to the Using the
CFG RESET Switch section in Chapter 6, Using Your GPIB-ENET/100
and NI-488.2 for more information on using this switch.
While in network configuration mode, the PWR/RDY LED alternates
rapidly between red and yellow, and normal operation is halted.
Using the NI Ethernet Device Configuration Utility
If your network administrator says you must manually assign the IP
address, complete the following steps to configure the IP address settings.
1.
© National Instruments Corporation
Select Start»Programs»NI-488.2M for Windows NT»
GPIB-ENET100 Utilities»Device Configuration.
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Ethernet Configuration
Figure 3-1. NI Ethernet Device Configuration Utility
2.
The NI Ethernet Device Configuration window displays a list of
National Instruments Ethernet devices sorted by model. Figure 3-1
shows an example of this display. The listed devices can be in one of
four possible states, as indicated in the IP address/hostname column:
•
A hostname indicates the device has successfully been configured
by DHCP.
•
A numerical IP address indicates the device has successfully been
configured with a static IP address.
•
*Unconfigured* indicates the device is configured to use DHCP,
but DHCP failed to attain network parameters.
•
*Busy* indicates the device is configured to use DHCP and
currently is attempting to acquire network parameters.
Click Properties... for any of the following reasons:
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
•
You need to configure an unconfigured IP address.
•
You need to change the current network parameters.
•
You previously used DHCP, but it is no longer available.
•
You are using DHCP and need to change the hostname of the
GPIB-ENET/100.
•
The IP address/hostname column displays an exclamation
point (!) next to your GPIB-ENET/100, indicating a configuration
problem. Refer to the Verifying the Hostname section for help
fixing this problem.
•
You want to add or change a comment to help identify the device.
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Click Refresh if you do not see your GPIB-ENET/100 in the list of
Ethernet devices, or to discover a device that you recently added to the
network.
Click Exit if you are using DHCP and you do not need to change the
hostname of the GPIB-ENET/100, or if you are finished using the
NI Ethernet Device Configuration utility.
Changing the Network Settings
1.
When you select Properties... from the NI Ethernet Device
Configuration window, a Properties window for your
GPIB-ENET/100 appears, similar to the example shown in Figure 3-2.
Figure 3-2. Properties Window for an Unconfigured GPIB-ENET/100
The current hostname is displayed. The hostname associates a name
with a numerical IP address. Hostname is a required field.
The GPIB-ENET/100 attempts to use the hostname when registering
with DHCP. Many DHCP servers have the ability to register the
hostname and the assigned IP address. You then can reliably use the
hostname to communicate with your GPIB-ENET/100 even if the
numerical IP address changes.
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Ethernet Configuration
However, some DHCP servers do not implement hostname
registration. The GPIB-ENET/100 requires Domain Name Server
(DNS) registration when using DHCP. If your DHCP server does not
support DNS registration, you must use static network parameters.
Consult your network administrator for more details.
2.
In the Properties window, select either Obtain an IP address
automatically (DHCP) or Use the following IP settings.
3.
If you select Obtain an IP address automatically (DHCP), you do
not need to enter any network parameters unless you want to change
the hostname of the Ethernet device. If you select Use the following
IP settings, enter the network parameters you have chosen for the host
IP address, subnet mask, gateway IP, and DNS server IP, as in the
example shown in Figure 3-3. Refer to the next section, Static IP
Parameters, for more information.
Figure 3-3. Specifying IP Settings
Note
The IP settings in Figure 3-3 are shown only as an example of the format.
4.
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
(Optional) You can enter a comment to help you identify each device.
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5.
Click OK to configure the device, or Cancel to exit without saving the
configuration changes.
6.
Click Exit to close the NI Ethernet Device Configuration utility.
The device automatically reboots with the new configuration in effect.
Static IP Parameters
If DHCP is not available, you must provide the GPIB-ENET/100 with
several important network parameters. These parameters are listed below.
•
IP address—The unique, computer-readable address of a device on
your network. An IP address typically is represented as four decimal
numbers separated by periods (for example, 130.164.54.215).
Refer to the next section, Choosing a Static IP Address.
•
Subnet mask—A code that helps the network device determine
whether another device is on the same network or a different network.
•
Gateway IP—The IP address of a device that acts as a gateway, which
is a connection between two networks. If your network does not have
a gateway, set this parameter to 0.0.0.0.
•
DNS Server—The IP address of a network device that stores
hostnames and translates them into IP addresses. If your network does
not have a DNS server, set this parameter to 0.0.0.0.
Choosing a Static IP Address
For a Network Administered by a Network
Administrator
If you are adding the GPIB-ENET/100 to an existing Ethernet network, you
must choose IP addresses carefully. Contact your network administrator to
obtain an appropriate static IP address for your GPIB-ENET/100. Also
have the network administrator assign the proper subnet mask, gateway,
and DNS server addresses.
For a Network without a Network Administrator
If you are assembling your own small Ethernet network, you can choose
your own IP addresses. The format of the IP addresses is determined by
the subnet mask. You should use the same subnet mask as the computer
you are using with your GPIB-ENET/100. If your subnet mask is
255.255.255.0, the first three numbers in every IP address on the
network must be the same. If your subnet mask is 255.255.0.0, only
the first two numbers in the IP addresses on the network must match.
© National Instruments Corporation
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Ethernet Configuration
For either subnet mask, numbers between 1 and 254 are valid choices for
the last number of the IP address. Numbers between 0 and 255 are valid for
the third number of the IP address, but this number must be the same as
other devices on your network if your subnet mask is 255.255.255.0.
Table 3-1 shows examples of valid and invalid IP addresses for a network
using subnet mask 255.255.255.0. All valid IP addresses contain the
same first three numbers. The IP addresses in this table are for example
purposes only.
Table 3-1. Valid and Invalid IP Addresses for Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
IP Address
Comment
123.234.45.211
Valid.
123.234.45.213
Valid. The first three numbers match the previous
IP address. The fourth number must be a unique
number in the range of 1 to 254.
123.202.45.214
Invalid. Second number does not match the
previous IP addresses. The first three numbers
must match on all IP addresses with subnet mask
255.255.255.0.
123.234.45.0
Invalid. The first three numbers are valid but the
fourth number cannot be 0.
123.234.45.255
Invalid. The first three numbers are valid but
the fourth number cannot be 255.
If you are setting up your own network, you probably do not have a gateway
or DNS server, so you should set these values to 0.0.0.0.
Tip
To find out the network settings for your computer, run ipconfig.
1.
Open a Windows NT Command Prompt.
2.
Type ipconfig at the prompt.
3.
Press <Enter>.
If you need more information, you can run ipconfig with the /all option
by typing ipconfig /all at the Command Prompt. This shows you all of
the settings for the Windows 2000/NT machine. Make sure you use the
settings for the Ethernet adapter you are using to communicate with the
GPIB-ENET/100.
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Verifying the Hostname
The NI Ethernet Device Configuration utility automatically verifies that the
hostname for each DHCP-enabled device matches the DNS entry for the
assigned IP address. This verification process automatically occurs when
you either run the utility or click Refresh. The utility alerts you as shown
in Figure 3-4 if it detects a problem with the network settings.
Figure 3-4. Hostname Verification Error Detected
© National Instruments Corporation
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Chapter 3
Ethernet Configuration
To correct the problem with the hostname, complete the following steps:
1.
Locate the device that has a problem. This is indicated by an (!) on the
device icon, as shown previously in Figure 3-1.
2.
Select Properties.... A dialog box similar to the following appears.
Figure 3-5. Fixing a Hostname Verification Error
3.
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
The utility gives you four options for fixing the hostname. Select the
one that best fits your situation and click OK.
•
Change the device’s hostname to match the DNS entry. Use
this option if you want to accept the hostname assigned by the
DHCP server, or if you cannot contact the network administrator
to change the DNS entry.
•
Use static network parameters instead of DHCP. Use this
option if you cannot use the hostname assigned by the DHCP
server. Contact your network administrator to obtain a valid IP
address, subnet, and gateway. This option disables DHCP on the
device.
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•
Edit the current hostname. Use this option to change the
hostname to a name other than either the configured hostname or
the name assigned by the DHCP server. Contact your network
administrator to obtain a valid name.
•
Keep the existing hostname. Use this option if you wish to keep
the previously assigned hostname. If you select this option,
contact your network administrator to change the DNS entry.
4.
Review the network parameter settings in the Properties window.
5.
Confirm that the device is in network configuration mode and click
OK. The device reboots with the new settings in effect.
6.
After the device reboots, click Refresh to verify that the hostname is
now valid.
© National Instruments Corporation
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GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
4
GPIB Configuration
This chapter describes how to configure your Windows 2000/NT machine
to use the GPIB-ENET/100.
Configuring the NI-488.2 Software Characteristics
The GPIB Configuration utility is an interactive utility you can use to view
or change the configuration of the NI-488.2 driver. You must run this utility
before you use NI-488.2 with your GPIB-ENET/100.
1.
Select Start»Settings»Control Panel and double-click the GPIB
icon. The GPIB Configuration dialog box displays a list of all the
GPIB interfaces and device names.
Figure 4-1. GPIB Configuration Dialog Box
2.
Select the GPIB interface name for your GPIB-ENET/100 from the
GPIB Board list, such as GPIB0.
3.
Click Board Type.
4.
Select GPIB-ENET/100 and click OK.
5.
Click Configure.
© National Instruments Corporation
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GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Chapter 4
GPIB Configuration
6.
Type a Host Name or IP address for your GPIB-ENET/100.
7.
(Optional) Configure any other software characteristics in this
dialog box. For more information, refer to the online help.
In the online help, all references to the GPIB-ENET apply also to the
GPIB-ENET/100.
Note
8.
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
To save your changes and exit the utility, click OK twice.
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5
Verify the Installation
This chapter describes how to verify the hardware and software installation.
Running the Diagnostic Utility
The Diagnostic utility installed with NI-488.2 verifies that your hardware
and software are functioning properly. Make sure the GPIB cable is not
attached to your GPIB interface. Select the Diagnostic item under
Start»Programs»NI-488.2M for Windows NT.
If the device you configured using the GPIB Configuration utility does not
appear in the Diagnostic utility display, verify you entered a valid hostname
or IP address in the GPIB Configuration utility. The Diagnostic utility will
not recognize your device unless the hostname or IP address is valid.
Test your GPIB interfaces by clicking the Test All button. If the Diagnostic
is successful, it puts a checkmark next to the interface and changes its status
from untested to passed. If the Diagnostic fails, it puts an X next to the
failing interface, and changes its status from untested to failed. Figure 5-1
shows the Diagnostic utility after it has tested some GPIB interfaces.
Figure 5-1. Diagnostic Utility after Testing
© National Instruments Corporation
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GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Chapter 5
Verify the Installation
For more information about the test results for any tested GPIB interface,
select the interface and click Details. For each failed GPIB interface, click
Details to get a description of the failure. Use that information and the
information in Appendix C, Troubleshooting and Common Questions,
to troubleshoot the problem. Troubleshooting information is also available
in the online help for the Diagnostic utility, which you access by clicking
Help.
Connecting the GPIB Cable
When you finish using the Diagnostic utility, you can connect the GPIB
cable to your GPIB-ENET/100.
If you do not have a GPIB cable, as listed in the What You Need to Get Started
section of Chapter 1, Introduction, contact National Instruments for ordering information.
Note
Connect one end of your GPIB cable to your GPIB-ENET/100 and tighten
the thumb screws on the connector. Connect the other end of your GPIB
cable to your GPIB system. Make sure you comply with all IEEE 488.1
cabling restrictions and use only shielded GPIB cables.
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
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6
Using Your GPIB-ENET/100
and NI-488.2
This chapter lists some general programming requirements and describes
how to use the following options available with the GPIB-ENET/100 and
NI-488.2 for Windows 2000/NT:
•
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)
•
Configuration Reset (CFG RESET) switch
•
Firmware update utility
•
Win32 Interactive Control utility
•
GPIB Spy utility
•
GPIB Virtual Device Driver
Using DHCP
The Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is designed for
large networks in which networking devices are transient and network
parameters cannot be statically assigned and thus tied to specific devices.
DHCP eases the addition of networking devices onto a network by having
a server assign necessary network parameters, including the IP address, the
netmask, and router information, to a newly attached network device.
Optionally, if the device provides a hostname with the configuration
request, DHCP may attempt to configure your network to recognize
the device with the requested hostname.
DHCP requires a Domain Name Server (DNS) to associate the numerical
IP address assigned with the requested hostname. Within the past few years,
an Internet community standard has emerged to provide a standardized way
for these services to provide dynamic domain name services. Using this
standard, after DHCP assigns the numerical IP address, it can communicate
with DNS to register the newly assigned IP address with the requested
hostname. However, the complexity of DHCP and dynamic name
registration typically requires active management by a corporate MIS
department, or equivalent, because of several risks for failure.
© National Instruments Corporation
6-1
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Chapter 6
Using Your GPIB-ENET/100 and NI-488.2
One possible failure can occur if the pool of available addresses contains
no more unassigned IP addresses. This problem is evident if DHCP fails
to work and the PWR/RDY LED continues to flicker for longer than
90 seconds at power on. In this situation, you will need to obtain a static IP
address from your network administrator and configure the device yourself
using the NI Ethernet Device Configuration utility. Refer to the Choosing
a Static IP Address section in Chapter 3, Ethernet Configuration, for more
information. Notice that if DHCP fails to assign you an address, the current
subnet might not have an address available for you to use. In this case,
you may have to move your product to another subnet where there is an
available IP address.
Failure also happens if communication between DHCP and DNS does not
occur. In this situation, DHCP assigns an address to the device, but you
cannot communicate to it using the hostname you assigned. Your network
administrator may have to manually insert the hostname into the DNS table.
Alternatively, you can use the NI Ethernet Device Configuration utility to
determine the hostname associated with your assigned IP address, and
change the hostname to match the DNS entry. Refer to the Verifying the
Hostname section in Chapter 3, Ethernet Configuration, for more
information.
Because there are many other possible reasons for failure, contact your
network administrator if you are having problems getting DHCP to work.
When you can use DHCP and DNS successfully, you can use the hostname
form of the IP address to communicate with your product—even if the
numerical IP address changes with successive reboots.
If you are setting up a small network for your instrumentation system,
it is recommended to use static IP addresses, because they are easier to
implement and maintain. In this system, you can safely use the numerical
form of the IP address to communicate with your product because the
address is unlikely to change. Small networks are less likely to have domain
name services available that would resolve the hostname into a numerical
IP address.
Using the CFG RESET Switch
The Configuration Reset (CFG RESET) switch is a recessed switch located
beside the ENET connector on the rear panel. Refer to Figure 2-3 for an
illustration of its location.
This switch performs two functions, depending on whether you press it
while switching the power on or during operation.
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Using the CFG RESET Switch during Operation
While the GPIB-ENET/100 is operational, as indicated by a steady yellow
PWR/RDY LED, you can use the CFG RESET switch to place the box into
network configuration mode. You then can use the NI Ethernet Device
Configuration utility as described in Chapter 3, Ethernet Configuration.
This special mode ensures that network parameters are not changed while
in use. Because you cannot change the network parameters unless you
deliberately place the GPIB-ENET/100 into network configuration mode,
the parameters are protected while in normal operation. Hosts cannot
connect to the GPIB-ENET/100 while it is in network configuration mode.
Note
Pressing the CFG RESET switch has no effect if hosts are currently connected.
Close all connections, then press and hold the CFG RESET switch for three
seconds. If you release the switch prior to three seconds, the
GPIB-ENET/100 continues to operate normally.
The PWR/RDY LED goes through the following changes during these
three seconds:
1.
The LED begins slowly alternating between red and yellow.
2.
The alternating pattern increases in tempo.
3.
At three seconds, the PWR/RDY LED becomes steady red. This
indicates the GPIB-ENET/100 is ready to enter network configuration
mode.
4.
Now release the CFG RESET switch. The PWR/RDY LED alternates
rapidly between red and yellow to indicate the GPIB-ENET/100 is
now in network configuration mode.
This mode remains in effect until you switch off the GPIB-ENET/100 or
you use the NI Ethernet Device Configuration utility to change its network
characteristics. The GPIB-ENET/100 automatically reboots when you exit
the utility.
Using the CFG RESET Switch at Power-On
If you want to reset the unit to its default network characteristics, you can
use the CFG RESET switch at power-on. By pressing and holding the CFG
RESET switch while you power on the GPIB-ENET/100, the network
parameters revert to the default settings as defined on the baseplate label.
© National Instruments Corporation
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Using Your GPIB-ENET/100 and NI-488.2
You must press and hold the switch for three seconds. If you release
the switch prior to three seconds, no change occurs to the network
configuration, and the GPIB-ENET/100 continues to boot normally.
The PWR/RDY LED goes through the following changes during these
three seconds:
1.
The LED begins slowly alternating between red and yellow.
2.
The alternating pattern increases in tempo.
3.
At three seconds, the PWR/RDY LED becomes steady red. This
indicates the network configuration will be set to the factory default
settings.
4.
When you release the CFG RESET switch, the box continues to boot
as normal, and the PWR/RDY LED indicates the boot process as
described in Table 1-1, LED Descriptions.
Updating the Firmware
NI-488.2 for the GPIB-ENET/100 and Windows 2000/NT contains a
firmware update utility you can use to access new features that may be
added to the GPIB-ENET/100 in the future. You must update the firmware
to take advantage of any new features.
You need to know either the IP address or hostname of your
GPIB-ENET/100 before you run the NI Ethernet Device Firmware Update
utility. If you do not remember this information, first run the NI Ethernet
Device Configuration utility by selecting Start»Programs»NI-488.2M
for Windows NT»GPIB-ENET100 Utilities»Device Configuration.
Refer to Chapter 3, Ethernet Configuration, for more information.
Caution Do not power-off the GPIB-ENET/100 or disconnect the power supply while
running the NI Ethernet Device Firmware Update utility. Doing so will damage the unit.
The GPIB-ENET/100 reboots automatically when the update completes.
The NI Ethernet Device Firmware Update utility cannot update the firmware while
any network connections are active. Close any open connections before you attempt a
firmware update. Hosts cannot connect to the GPIB-ENET/100 while it is updating the
firmware.
Note
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
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Complete the following steps to run the NI Ethernet Device Firmware
Update utility.
1.
Select Start»Programs»NI-488.2M for Windows NT»
GPIB-ENET100 Utilities»Firmware Update.
Figure 6-1. NI Ethernet Device Firmware Update Utility
2.
Enter the IP address or the hostname of the GPIB-ENET/100 in the
IP address or hostname edit box. An example of an IP address is
137.65.220.40. An example of a hostname is myenet1.
3.
Enter the full path of the binary file where the firmware is located in
the EEPROM binary image filename edit box. You also can click
Browse... to locate the file.
4.
Click Update to update the firmware. The NI Ethernet Device
Firmware Update utility communicates with the specified
GPIB-ENET/100 to verify the box has no open network connections
and determine the current version of the firmware in the unit. A dialog
box reports that the update utility is searching for the Ethernet device.
5.
The utility prompts you to confirm the change you are about to
perform. Click OK to continue. As the update utility transfers the
firmware image to your machine, the Update Progress status bar fills,
and the Current status box describes each step in the process. The
Current status box reports whether the firmware update completed
successfully or failed. The GPIB-ENET/100 automatically reboots
with the new firmware in effect.
6.
Click Exit to close the NI Ethernet Device Firmware Update utility.
© National Instruments Corporation
6-5
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Chapter 6
Using Your GPIB-ENET/100 and NI-488.2
Using the Win32 Interactive Control Utility
You can use the interactive control utility to enter NI-488 functions and
IEEE 488.2-style functions interactively and see the values returned by the
function calls. You can use the utility to do the following:
•
Verify GPIB communication with your device quickly and easily.
•
Learn the NI-488 functions and IEEE 488.2-style functions before you
write your application.
•
Become familiar with the commands of your device.
•
Receive data from your GPIB device.
•
Troubleshoot problems with your application.
To run the Win32 Interactive Control utility, select the Win32 Interactive
Control item under Start»Programs»NI-488.2M for Windows NT.
This utility includes extensive online help. For more information, refer to
Chapter 6, Win32 Interactive Control Utility, in the NI-488.2M User
Manual for Windows 95 and Windows NT.
Using the GPIB Spy Utility
NI-488.2 includes a Win32 utility that can monitor NI-488.2 calls made by
your applications. You can use GPIB Spy to do the following:
•
Capture information about NI-488 functions and IEEE 488.2-style
functions as they are invoked by your GPIB applications.
•
Display captured information, including, but not limited to, input and
output parameter values, I/O buffer contents, and return values.
•
Save, restore, and print captured information.
To run GPIB Spy, select the GPIB Spy item under Start»Programs»
NI-488.2M for Windows NT.
For more information about GPIB Spy, refer to Chapter 5, GPIB Spy Utility,
in the NI-488.2M User Manual for Windows 95 and Windows NT, or use
the GPIB Spy context-sensitive online help.
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
6-6
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Chapter 6
Using Your GPIB-ENET/100 and NI-488.2
Programming Considerations
As you begin developing your Win32 NI-488.2 application, remember the
following points:
•
If you are using LabVIEW or Measurement Studio for your
application, you do not need to add any files to implement GPIB.
Everything is included.
•
For your C/C++ application, you must include the NI-488.2 header file
in your source code.
•
NI-488.2 is accessed through the 32-bit DLL, gpib-32.dll, either
by linking with one of the language interfaces provided with NI-488.2,
or by using direct DLL entry from other programming environments.
•
Several sample GPIB applications are included with NI-488.2. Use
these as a guide for your own application development.
For information about choosing a programming method, developing your
application, or compiling and linking, refer to the NI-488.2M User Manual
for Windows 95 and Windows NT. For detailed information about each
NI-488 function and IEEE 488.2-style function, refer to the NI-488.2
Function Reference Manual for Windows.
Running Existing DOS and Windows GPIB Applications
You can run existing DOS and Windows GPIB applications under
Windows 2000/NT by using the GPIB Virtual Device Driver,
gpib-vdd.dll, which is included with NI-488.2.
To run DOS GPIB applications, open a Windows NT Command Prompt,
and load the special GPIB device driver gpib-nt.com instead of
gpib.com, which you normally use with DOS. When you install NI-488.2,
the installation program copies gpib-nt.com into a subdirectory of the
GPIB installation directory called doswin16.
To use gpib-nt.com, modify your config.nt file to load gpib-nt.com
whenever a DOS application runs. The config.nt file is located in your
winnt\system32 directory, where winnt is your Windows NT directory,
for example, c:\windows.
© National Instruments Corporation
6-7
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Chapter 6
Using Your GPIB-ENET/100 and NI-488.2
To load gpib-nt.com, add the following line to your config.nt file:
device=path\doswin16\gpib-nt.com
where path is the directory where you installed NI-488.2. The default
installation directory is c:\gpib-nt.
To run 16-bit Windows GPIB applications, the system uses the
special GPIB dynamic link library, gpib.dll. When you install NI-488.2,
the installation program copies gpib.dll into the winnt\system32
directory, where winnt is your Windows NT directory, for example
c:\windows. As long as gpib.dll is in your Windows NT directory,
your system automatically accesses gpib.dll whenever you launch a
16-bit Windows GPIB application.
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
6-8
ni.com
A
Uninstalling the Software
This appendix describes how to uninstall NI-488.2 for Windows 2000/NT.
This version of NI-488.2 supports only the GPIB-ENET/100 and
GPIB-ENET. If you need to access other National Instruments GPIB
interfaces, you must remove this version and install NI-488.2 for the other
interfaces.
Complete the following steps to remove NI-488.2:
1.
Close all NI-488.2 applications.
2.
Select Start»Settings»Control Panel.
3.
Double-click the Add/Remove Programs icon. A dialog box appears,
listing the software you can uninstall.
4.
Select the NI-488.2 software you want to remove, and click
Add/Remove. An uninstall program runs and removes all folders,
programs, and DLLs associated with NI-488.2.
5.
Reboot your system.
You must reboot your system to complete the uninstallation. The uninstall program
cannot remove some of the components associated with NI-488.2 until you restart the
computer.
Note
To reinstall the hardware and software, refer to Chapter 2, Installation.
© National Instruments Corporation
A-1
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
PWR/RDY LED Signaling
B
This appendix describes how to interpret the PWR/RDY LED error codes.
PWR/RDY LED Overview
The PWR/RDY LED has several purposes on the GPIB-ENET/100.
When you first power on the unit, the PWR/RDY LED alternates rapidly
between red and yellow while it completes its power-on self-tests and
acquires network parameters. When the tests complete successfully and
the IP address is assigned from either nonvolatile memory or the network,
the PWR/RDY LED remains steady yellow, indicating that the unit is
ready to operate.
The PWR/RDY LED also alternates rapidly between red and yellow
while the device is in network configuration mode. At other times, the
PWR/RDY LED blinks slowly in a recognizable pattern to alert you of
internal errors. Use this appendix to interpret and record the pattern that
the PWR/RDY LED flashes, and then contact National Instruments.
By recording the PWR/RDY LED status messages before calling National
Instruments, you can save yourself time, and the Product Support Department can
answer your questions more accurately and efficiently. Do not switch off power to
your GPIB-ENET/100 before recording the flashing PWR/RDY LED pattern.
Note
PWR/RDY LED signaling can report up to 81 different errors. The errors
are numbered from 11 to 99 and are reported through sequences of
PWR/RDY LED flashes.
Note There is no zero in any error message. This means that error message numbers 0–10,
20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90 are not possible.
© National Instruments Corporation
B-1
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Appendix B
PWR/RDY LED Signaling
Step 1. Count the Long Flashes
A three-second interval, during which the PWR/RDY LED is yellow,
separates each repetition of the sequence. The sequence begins with a
series of long one-second flashes—that is, one second red, one second
yellow. These long flashes represent the digit in the tens column. There
can be one to nine long flashes, which represent digits 1 through 9. For
example, one long flash represents the digit 1 in the tens column, and nine
long flashes represent the digit 9 in the tens column.
Step 2. Count the Short Flashes
The long flashes are followed by shorter flashes; each short flash lasts
about one-fifth of a second—that is, one-fifth of a second red, one-fifth of
a second yellow. These short flashes represent the digit in the ones column.
Again, there can be one to nine flashes, which represent the digits 1 through
9. For example, one short flash represents the digit 1 in the ones column,
and nine short flashes represent the digit 9 in the ones column.
Using this method, the PWR/RDY LED flashes the following sequence to
represent status message 11:
<three seconds yellow> <one long red flash> <one short red flash>
<three seconds yellow>…
The PWR/RDY LED flashes the following sequence to represent status
message 31:
<three seconds yellow> <three long red flashes> <one short red flash>
<three seconds yellow>…
Step 3. Record Your Status Code Number
When you have computed your error message number, write it down and
also note the ON/OFF state of the LINK, TX, and RX LEDs. Have this
information available when calling National Instruments.
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
B-2
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C
Troubleshooting and
Common Questions
This appendix describes how to troubleshoot problems and answers some
common questions.
Troubleshooting Hardware Problems
•
Verify that all cables are securely connected to the GPIB-ENET/100.
•
Verify that the unit is plugged in and powered on.
•
Verify with the network administrator that your IP address is valid and
that the network is set up to recognize the IP address properly.
•
If you configured the IP address manually using the NI Ethernet
Device Configuration utility, verify that you have correctly followed
the steps in Chapter 3, Ethernet Configuration.
•
If the PWR/RDY LED continues to flash rapidly after 90 seconds, the
GPIB-ENET/100 is unable to obtain its IP address from the network.
Check with your network administrator to verify your IP address and
make sure that you recorded the Ethernet address correctly.
•
If the PWR/RDY LED is blinking in a slower red/yellow pattern, the
GPIB-ENET/100 is reporting an internal error. Refer to Appendix B,
PWR/RDY LED Signaling, to interpret the error code and contact
National Instruments.
© National Instruments Corporation
C-1
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Appendix C
Troubleshooting and Common Questions
Troubleshooting EDVR Error Conditions
In some cases, calls to NI-488 functions or IEEE 488.2-style functions may
return with the ERR bit set in ibsta and the value EDVR in iberr. The
value stored in ibcntl is useful in troubleshooting the error condition.
EDVR Error Condition with ibcntl Set to 0xE028002C (–534249428)
If a call is made with a board number that is within the range of allowed
board numbers (typically 0 to 31), but which has not been assigned to a
GPIB interface, an EDVR error condition occurs with ibcntl set to
0xE028002C. You can assign a board number to a GPIB interface by
running the GPIB Configuration utility and selecting an interface name.
Refer to Configuring the NI-488.2 Software Characteristics, in Chapter 4,
GPIB Configuration, for information about how to configure NI-488.2.
EDVR Error Condition with ibcntl Set to 0xE0140025 (–535560155)
If a call is made with a board number outside the range of allowed board
numbers (typically 0 to 31), an EDVR error condition occurs with ibcntl
set to 0xE0140025.
EDVR Error Condition with ibcntl Set to 0xE0140035 (–535560139)
If a call is made with a device name that is not listed in the logical device
templates that are part of the GPIB Configuration utility, an EDVR error
condition occurs with ibcntl set to 0xE0140035.
EDVR Error Conditions with ibcntl in the Range from 0xE1002710
(–520083696) to 0xE1002EE0 (–520081696)
These errors are returned from the WinSock Interface. The lower 16 bits of
ibcntl specify the actual WinSock Interface error. Refer to your WinSock
Interface documentation for more information about the specific error.
EDVR Error Condition with ibcntl Set to 0xE1000054 (–520093612)
You are attempting to communicate with a GPIB-ENET/100 that does not
have a hostname (IP address) specified in the GPIB Configuration utility.
Refer to Configuring the NI-488.2 Software Characteristics, in Chapter 4,
GPIB Configuration, for information about how to configure NI-488.2.
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
C-2
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Appendix C
Troubleshooting and Common Questions
EDVR Error Condition with ibcntl Set to 0xE100004E (–520093618)
You are attempting to communicate with a GPIB-ENET/100 that has a
firmware revision that is incompatible with the current driver. Use the
NI Ethernet Device Firmware Update utility to upgrade the firmware to
a compatible version.
To run the utility, select the Firmware Update item under Start»
Programs»NI-488.2M for Windows NT»GPIB-ENET100 Utilities.
Troubleshooting Diagnostic Utility Failures
The following sections explain common error messages generated by the
Diagnostic utility.
Missing Software Components
This error occurs if the software components that are necessary for
NI-488.2 for Windows 2000/NT to function correctly are not present in the
system. If you encounter this problem, uninstall NI-488.2 for Windows
2000/NT, reinstall the software, and run the Diagnostic utility again.
No GPIB Interfaces Present
This error occurs if there are no GPIB interfaces physically present in the
system or there is a resource conflict with the interfaces that are installed.
If you encounter this problem, use the GPIB Configuration utility to
examine the installed GPIB interfaces and the resources assigned to each.
Then run the Diagnostic utility again.
To access this information in the GPIB Configuration utility, complete
the following steps:
1.
Select Start»Settings»Control Panel and double-click the
GPIB icon.
2.
Click the Board Type button and verify that the type of GPIB interface
listed for each logical board name is correct. Click the OK button to
return to the main dialog box.
3.
Double-click each board name and verify that the hardware settings
displayed in the dialog box match your actual hardware settings.
© National Instruments Corporation
C-3
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Appendix C
Troubleshooting and Common Questions
GPIB-ENET/100 Problem Encountered
This error occurs if an unknown problem is encountered while attempting
to access the GPIB-ENET/100. There are several possible reasons that you
might encounter this problem:
•
The GPIB-ENET/100 might not be properly configured. Refer to
the Installing the GPIB-ENET/100 Hardware section in Chapter 2,
Installation, for detailed instructions.
•
The Host Name field in the GPIB Configuration utility might be
incorrect for the GPIB-ENET/100. Run the GPIB Configuration
utility, as described under Configuring the NI-488.2 Software
Characteristics, in Chapter 4, GPIB Configuration, to verify that
the IP address value has been correctly specified.
•
The GPIB-ENET/100 might not be correctly configured for your
network. Try to ping your GPIB-ENET/100 to verify it is recognizable
on the network. Ping is a network utility that sends a packet to a
device/host on the network, then waits for it to be echoed back,
which indicates an active device/host. Find the directory where
ping.exe is installed, run it, and type in the following command:
ping IPaddress
where IPaddress is the IP address assigned to your
GPIB-ENET/100. If your network administrator also assigned you
a hostname, you can type in ping hostname instead. If ping is
unable to communicate with your GPIB-ENET/100 and your
network administrator tells you that your IP address is valid,
contact National Instruments.
Missing WinSock Support
WinSock support is enabled and configured in the Network Control Panel
applet. To configure WinSock support, perform the following steps.
♦
Windows NT
1.
Double-click the Network icon under Start»Settings»Control Panel.
2.
In the Network dialog box that appears, select the Protocols tab.
3.
On the Protocols tab, click Add.
4.
In the Select Network Protocol dialog box that appears, select
TCP/IP Protocol.
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
C-4
ni.com
Appendix C
♦
Troubleshooting and Common Questions
Windows 2000
1.
Double-click the Network and Dial-up Connections icon under
Start»Settings»Control Panel.
2.
Double-click the Local Area Connection icon.
3.
In the Local Area Connection Status dialog, select Properties.
4.
In the Local Area Connection Properties dialog, click Install.
5.
In the Select Network Component Type dialog, select Protocol and
click Add.
6.
In the Select Network Protocol dialog, select TCP/IP Protocol.
7.
Click OK.
After you have properly installed and configured WinSock support, run the
Diagnostic utility again.
GPIB Cables Need To Be Disconnected
This error occurs if you have any GPIB cables connected to the GPIB
interface. Disconnect all GPIB cables and run the Diagnostic utility again.
NI-488.2 Software Problem Encountered
This error occurs if the Diagnostic utility detects that it is unable to
communicate correctly with the GPIB hardware using the installed
NI-488.2 software. If you get this error, shut down your computer, restart it,
and run the Diagnostic utility again. If the problem persists, try uninstalling
and reinstalling NI-488.2 for Windows 2000/NT and the GPIB-ENET/100.
Unknown Problem Encountered
This error occurs if an unknown problem is encountered while trying to
execute the Diagnostic utility. If you encounter this problem, shut down
your computer, restart it, and run the Diagnostic utility again. If the
problem persists, try uninstalling and reinstalling NI-488.2 for
Windows 2000/NT and the GPIB-ENET/100.
© National Instruments Corporation
C-5
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Appendix C
Troubleshooting and Common Questions
Common Questions
I currently do not have a WinSock provider installed. What do I need
to do to install a WinSock provider?
Before you can use the driver software for the GPIB-ENET/100, you must
have a WinSock interface, version 1.1 or higher, installed. You can install a
WinSock interface from Microsoft or another network vendor. Refer to the
Missing WinSock Support section of this appendix for information about
how to install and configure WinSock support.
My driver is not communicating with the GPIB-ENET/100. What
should I do?
Make sure that the GPIB-ENET/100 is configured properly. Refer to
Chapter 2, Installation, and Chapter 4, GPIB Configuration. Then run the
Diagnostic utility again.
My I/O worked with a board interface, but it times out when I use the
GPIB-ENET/100. What should I do?
Network communication is slower than straight cable communication.
You might need to raise the default Timeout value using the GPIB
Configuration utility. Refer to Configuring the NI-488.2 Software
Characteristics, in Chapter 4, GPIB Configuration, for information
about the GPIB Configuration utility.
I powered off my GPIB-ENET/100 before recording the flashing
PWR/RDY LED pattern. What should I do?
Try to duplicate the error before calling National Instruments for
assistance. Recording the PWR/RDY LED pattern is not critical to the
operation of your GPIB-ENET/100, but it saves you time and helps
National Instruments diagnose the problem quickly and accurately.
How can I determine which version of NI-488.2 I have installed?
Run the Diagnostic utility. Select the Diagnostic item under
Start»Programs»NI-488.2M for Windows NT.
A banner at the bottom of the Diagnostic utility window displays the
version of NI-488.2 that is installed.
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
C-6
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Appendix C
Troubleshooting and Common Questions
Can I control the GPIB-ENET/100 and other GPIB interfaces from the
same computer?
This version of NI-488.2 supports only the GPIB-ENET/100 and
GPIB-ENET. If you need to access other National Instruments GPIB
interfaces, you must remove this version and install NI-488.2 for the other
interfaces.
I have a GPIB-ENET. Can I use the GPIB-ENET and GPIB-ENET/100
in the same system?
Yes, this version of NI-488.2 supports systems containing both products as
well as systems containing only one of the two products. The configuration
utility includes options for configuring both products.
How do I configure my existing GPIB-ENET with this software?
This version of NI-488.2 includes a link to utilities specific to the
GPIB-ENET at Start»Programs»NI-488.2M for Windows NT»
GPIB-ENET Utilities. For information on using these utilities, refer to
Getting Started with Your GPIB-ENET and the GPIB Software for
Windows NT.
I have an application using the GPIB-ENET. Can I replace the
GPIB-ENET with a GPIB-ENET/100?
Yes. You do not need to rewrite your application code to replace
a GPIB-ENET with a GPIB-ENET/100. However, you do need to
configure the GPIB-ENET/100 to have the same network identity as the
GPIB-ENET you are replacing. First, acquire network parameters for the
GPIB-ENET/100 using DHCP or the NI Ethernet Device Configuration
utility. Then use the GPIB Configuration utility to remove the GPIB-ENET
information from the GPIB Board list and reassociate the same entry with
the IP address for the GPIB-ENET/100. For example, if your application
code refers to the GPIB-ENET as GPIB0, reconfigure GPIB0 to refer to the
GPIB-ENET/100.
What should I do if the Diagnostic utility fails with an error?
Refer to the troubleshooting sections of this appendix for specific
information about what might cause the Diagnostic utility to fail.
If you already have completed the troubleshooting steps, contact
National Instruments.
© National Instruments Corporation
C-7
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Appendix C
Troubleshooting and Common Questions
How many GPIB interfaces can I configure for use with NI-488.2 for
Windows 2000/NT?
You can configure NI-488.2 for Windows 2000/NT to communicate with
up to 32 GPIB interfaces.
How many devices can I configure for use with NI-488.2 for
Windows 2000/NT?
NI-488.2 for Windows 2000/NT provides a total of 1,024 logical devices
for applications to use. The maximum number of physical devices you
should connect to a single GPIB interface is 14, or fewer, depending on
your system configuration.
When should I use the Win32 Interactive Control utility?
You can use the Win32 Interactive Control utility to test and verify
instrument communication, troubleshoot problems, and develop your
application program. For more information, refer to Chapter 6, Using Your
GPIB-ENET/100 and NI-488.2.
How do I use an NI-488.2 language interface?
For information about using NI-488.2 language interfaces, refer to
Chapter 3, Developing Your Application, in the NI-488.2M User Manual
for Windows 95 and Windows NT.
How do I communicate with my instrument over the GPIB?
Refer to the documentation that came from the instrument manufacturer.
The command sequences you use are totally dependent on the specific
instrument. The documentation for each instrument should include the
GPIB commands you need to communicate with it. In most cases, NI-488
device-level calls are sufficient for communicating with instruments. Refer
to Chapter 3, Developing Your Application, in the NI-488.2M User Manual
for Windows 95 and Windows NT, for more information.
Can I use the NI-488 and NI-488.2 calls together in the same
application?
Yes, you can mix NI-488 functions and IEEE 488.2-style-functions.
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
C-8
ni.com
Appendix C
Troubleshooting and Common Questions
How should I check for errors in my GPIB application?
Examine the value of ibsta after each NI-488 or NI-488.2 call. If a call
fails, the ERR bit of ibsta is set and an error code is stored in iberr.
For more information about global status variables, refer to Chapter 3,
Developing Your Application, in the NI-488.2M User Manual for
Windows 95 and Windows NT.
Why does the NI Ethernet Device Configuration utility list my box as
*BUSY* when I know my network uses DHCP?
For up to one minute, the GPIB-ENET/100 attempts to retrieve network
parameters from a DHCP server. During this time, *BUSY* appears in the
utility display. If this status does not change, there are several reasons why
DHCP may fail to respond. One of the most likely reasons is that your
subnet has no more available addresses to assign using DHCP. Please
consult your network administrator to determine the specific reason for the
problem.
Why does the uninstall program leave some components installed?
The uninstall program removes only items that the installation program
installed. If you add anything to a directory that the installation program
created, the uninstall program does not delete that directory, because the
directory is not empty after the uninstallation. You will need to remove any
remaining components yourself. Also remember to restart your computer
after using the uninstall program. The program cannot remove certain
components associated with NI-488.2 until the computer is restarted.
I just added a GPIB-ENET/100 to the network, but it does not show up
in the NI Ethernet Device Configuration utility. What is the problem?
Allow at least 15 seconds for the GPIB-ENET/100 to complete its
power-on self tests before launching the utility or clicking Refresh.
Communication between the NI Ethernet Device Configuration utility and
the GPIB-ENET/100 is not guaranteed. Though unlikely, it is possible that
the communication gets lost in the network. Click Refresh more than once
before concluding the device is not discovered.
Verify that the GPIB-ENET/100 shares the same subnet as the computer
running the NI Ethernet Device Configuration utility. The utility cannot
communicate with devices through gateways on the network and will not
discover devices on another subnet.
© National Instruments Corporation
C-9
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Appendix C
Troubleshooting and Common Questions
I have GPIB-ENET interfaces as well as GPIB-ENET/100 interfaces.
Why can’t I see the GPIB-ENET interfaces in the NI Ethernet Device
Configuration utility?
The GPIB-ENET/100 uses a configuration protocol that can communicate
with the NI Ethernet Device Configuration utility. Because GPIB-ENET
interfaces are not compatible with this configuration protocol, the utility
does not recognize them on the network.
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
C-10
ni.com
D
Specifications
This appendix describes the characteristics of the GPIB-ENET/100 and the
transfer rates of the NI-488.2 software, along with the recommended
operating conditions.
Electrical Characteristics
Input power requirements ...................... 9–30 VDC
Current requirements
9–30 VDC ....................................... 425 mA maximum
@ 15 VDC ...................................... 250 mA typical
Environmental Characteristics
Operating temperature............................ 0 to 40 °C
Relative humidity, operating.................. 10% to 90% noncondensing
conditions
Storage temperature ............................... –20 to 70 °C
Relative humidity, storage ..................... 5 to 90% noncondensing
conditions
EMI ........................................................ FCC Class A Verified
Physical Characteristics
Overall case size (dimensions)............... 21.0 by 12.4 by 3.7 cm
(8.25 by 4.89 by 1.44 in.)
Case material.......................................... Hard plastic with metal baseplate
Weight .................................................... 0.41 kg (0.9 lb)
© National Instruments Corporation
D-1
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Appendix D
Specifications
Software Characteristics
Maximum software transfer rate1 ...........Over 800 kbytes/s
Electrostatic Discharge Protection
Non-isolated devices...............................1.5 kV
Connectors
Ethernet connector ..................................RJ-45
GPIB connector ......................................IEEE 488 standard 24 pin
Network Specifications
Connection type ......................................IEEE 802.3 compliant
100BaseTX (100 Mbits/s)
10BaseT (10 Mbits/s)
Duplex mode...........................................Half duplex
1
Actual speed may vary considerably from speed shown due to system, network, and instrumentation capabilities.
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
D-2
ni.com
Technical Support Resources
E
Web Support
National Instruments Web support is your first stop for help in solving
installation, configuration, and application problems and questions. Online
problem-solving and diagnostic resources include frequently asked
questions, knowledge bases, product-specific troubleshooting wizards,
manuals, drivers, software updates, and more. Web support is available
through the Technical Support section of ni.com. You also can contact our
application engineers by visiting ni.com/ask and filling out an e-mail
request form.
NI Developer Zone
The NI Developer Zone at ni.com/zone is the essential resource for
building measurement and automation systems. At the NI Developer Zone,
you can easily access the latest example programs, system configurators,
tutorials, technical news, as well as a community of developers ready to
share their own techniques.
Customer Education
National Instruments provides a number of alternatives to satisfy your
training needs, from self-paced tutorials, videos, and interactive CDs to
instructor-led hands-on courses at locations around the world. Visit the
Customer Education section of ni.com for online course schedules,
syllabi, training centers, and class registration.
System Integration
If you have time constraints, limited in-house technical resources, or other
dilemmas, you may prefer to employ consulting or system integration
services. You can rely on the expertise available through our worldwide
network of Alliance Program members. To find out more about our
Alliance system integration solutions, visit the System Integration section
of ni.com.
© National Instruments Corporation
E-1
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Appendix E
Technical Support Resources
Worldwide Support
National Instruments has offices located around the world to help address
your support needs. You can access our branch office Web sites from the
Worldwide Offices section of ni.com. Branch office web sites provide
up-to-date contact information, support phone numbers, e-mail addresses,
and current events.
If you have searched the technical support resources on our Web site and
still cannot find the answers you need, contact your local office or National
Instruments corporate. Phone numbers for our worldwide offices are listed
at the front of this manual.
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
E-2
ni.com
Glossary
Prefix
Meaning
Value
m-
milli-
10 –3
c-
centi-
10 –2
k-
kilo-
10 3
M-
mega-
10 6
Symbols
°
degrees
%
percent
A
A
amperes
ANSI
American National Standards Institute
API
Application Programming Interface
B
b
bits
B
bytes
bps
bits per second
C
C
Celsius
© National Instruments Corporation
G-1
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Glossary
D
DHCP
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
DLL
dynamic link library
DNS
Domain Name Server
E
EMI
electromagnetic interference
F
FCC
Federal Communications Commission
G
g
grams
GPIB
General Purpose Interface Bus
H
Hz
hertz
I
I/O
input/output
IEEE
Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers
in.
inches
IP
Internet Protocol
L
lb.
pounds
LED
light-emitting diode
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
G-2
ni.com
Glossary
M
m
meters
MB
megabytes of memory
N
NIC
network interface card
S
s
seconds
V
V
volts
VAC
volts alternating current
W
Win16
describes a 16-bit Windows application
Win32
describes a 32-bit Windows application
© National Instruments Corporation
G-3
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Index
A
configuring
network parameters, 3-1
NI-488.2, 4-1
connecting
cables, 2-4
GPIB devices (caution), 2-5
connection speed, 1-5
connector types, D-2
conventions, xi
customer education, E-1
adding a GPIB-ENET/100
to GPIB system, 4-1
to network, 2-5
C
cables
Ethernet connection, 2-4
GPIB cable types, 1-2
GPIB connection, 5-2
network cable types, 1-2
power connection, 2-4
CFG RESET switch
accessing Ethernet Device Configuration
utility, 6-3
if hosts are connected, 6-3
location, 2-4
resetting default network configuration, 2-6
using at power-on, 6-3
using during operation, 6-3
changing network settings, 3-3
comment
to help identify your device, 3-4
common questions, C-6
communication problems
between DHCP and DNS, 6-2
with driver, C-6
with Ethernet Device Configuration
utility, C-9
Configuration Reset switch
See CFG RESET switch
© National Instruments Corporation
D
default configuration
resetting, 2-6, 6-3
specifications, 2-2
default hostname, 2-2
development tools for saving time
GPIB Analyzer, 1-7
LabVIEW, 1-6
Measurement Studio, 1-6
DHCP
communication failure with DNS, 6-2
configuring network settings
automatically, 2-6
configuring network settings without
DHCP, 2-6, 3-1
confirming its availability, 2-5
failing to provide IP address, 6-2
registering hostname and IP address, 3-3
risks for failure, 6-1
time required to complete, 2-6
using, 6-1
using with DNS, 3-4, 6-1
I-1
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Index
unconfigured device, 3-2
verifying hostname, 3-7
when to use, 2-6, 3-1
Ethernet Device Firmware Update utility
using, 6-4
Diagnostic utility
example (figure), 5-1
if device fails verification, 5-2
if your device is not listed, 5-1
locating and starting, 5-1
testing GPIB interfaces, 5-1
troubleshooting, C-3
distance capabilities, 1-4
DNS
if not supported, 3-4
manually inserting hostname in DNS
table, 6-2
using with DHCP, 3-4, 6-1
DNS server, 3-5
documentation flowchart, 1-1
DOS
running DOS GPIB applications, 6-7
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
See DHCP
F
failed device
reported by Diagnostic utility, 5-2
reported by PWR/RDY LED, 2-6, B-1
firmware
updating, 6-4
firmware update utility
before using, 6-4
important warning, 6-4
location, 6-4
running, 6-5
when to use, 6-4
front panel (figure), 1-4
E
G
EDVR error conditions, C-2
electrical characteristics, D-1
environmental characteristics, D-1
error checking, C-9
error code, B-1
error messages, C-3
Ethernet address, 2-2
Ethernet connection
location, 2-4
Ethernet Device Configuration utility
accessing during normal operation, 6-3
busy device, 3-2, C-9
example (figure), 3-2
GPIB-ENET, C-10
if GPIB-ENET/100 is not listed, C-9
locating and starting, 3-1
Refresh option, 3-3, C-9
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
gateway IP, 3-5
getting started, 1-2
glossary, G-1
GPIB cable
connecting, 2-5, 5-2
GPIB communication, C-8
GPIB Configuration utility
example (figure), 4-1
locating and starting, 4-1
running before connecting GPIB
devices, 2-5
running before using NI-488.2, 4-1
GPIB connection
location, 2-4
GPIB Spy
location, 6-6
monitoring function calls, 6-6
I-2
ni.com
Index
IP address
acquiring automatically using DHCP, 2-6
choosing static IP address, 3-5
defined, 3-5
examples of valid and invalid IP
addresses (table), 3-6
static IP address, 6-2
IP parameters
DNS server, 3-5
gateway IP, 3-5
if assigned by network administrator, 3-5
if assigned by user, 3-5
IP address, 3-5
subnet mask, 3-5
ipconfig
using to determine network settings, 3-6
GPIB Virtual Device Driver
running DOS and Windows GPIB
applications, 6-7
GPIB-ENET
configuring, 2-1, C-7
installing, 2-1
replacing with GPIB-ENET/100, C-7
using with GPIB-ENET/100, C-7
GPIB-ENET/100
installing, 2-2
properties, 3-2
H
hardware overview, 1-3
hostname
accepting DNS hostname, 3-8
changing DNS entry, 3-9
default hostname, 2-2
editing, 3-9
fixing verification error, 3-8
using to identify device, 6-2
verification error (figure), 3-7
verifying, 3-7
viewing or changing, 3-3
K
kit contents, 1-2
L
label
(figure), 2-3
information to record, 2-2
location, 2-2
LEDs
description of each (table), 1-5
overview, 1-4
license
multiple-computer software license, 1-3
I
information to record, 2-2
installation
Ethernet cable, 2-4
getting started, 1-2
GPIB cable, 5-2
GPIB-ENET, 2-1
GPIB-ENET/100, 2-2
NI-488.2, 2-1
power cable, 2-4
uninstalling the software, A-1
verification, 5-1
© National Instruments Corporation
N
National Instruments Web support, E-1
network administrator
assigning IP parameters, 3-5
confirming DHCP availability, 2-5
if DHCP fails, 6-2
I-3
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
Index
P
network configuration mode
entering, 6-3
when to use, 3-1
network settings
changing, 3-3
configuring with DHCP, 2-6
configuring without DHCP, 3-1, 3-4
determining, 3-6
network specifications, D-2
NI Developer Zone, E-1
NI-488.2
components, 1-5
determining version, C-6
installing, 2-1
interfaces supported by this
version, 1-5, C-7
language interfaces, C-8
monitoring function calls with
GPIB Spy, 6-6
operating systems supported by this
version, 1-5
overview, 1-5
programming considerations, 6-7
references, 6-7
setup wizard, 2-2
uninstalling, A-1
viewing or changing configuration, 4-1
Win32 Interactive Control utility, 6-6
physical characteristics, D-1
ping utility, C-4
placing unit into network configuration
mode, 6-3
power connection
(figure), 2-5
location, 2-4
power cord
installing, 2-4
types, 1-2
power requirements, D-1
powering on your GPIB-ENET/100, 2-5
programming considerations, 6-7
properties, 3-2
changing, 3-3
specifying IP settings (figure), 3-4
unconfigured device (figure), 3-3
PWR/RDY LED
description, 1-5
if blinking a pattern, 2-6, B-1
if flashing rapidly, 2-6, B-1, C-1
if red, 2-6
if yellow, 2-6, B-1
interpreting status messages, B-1
observing during self tests, 2-6
overview, B-1
when using CFG RESET switch, 6-3, 6-4
O
R
optional equipment
hardware, 1-3
multiple-computer software license, 1-3
overview
features, 1-4
GPIB-ENET/100 hardware, 1-3
LEDs, 1-4
NI-488.2, 1-5
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
rear panel (figure), 2-4
rebooting
after Ethernet configuration, 3-5
after firmware update, 6-4
after uninstalling software, A-1, C-9
refreshing list of Ethernet devices, 3-9
related documentation, xii
requirements, 1-2
resetting default network characteristics, 6-3
I-4
ni.com
Index
S
U
setup wizard, 2-2
software
configuring NI-488.2, 4-1
installation, 2-1
overview, 1-5
transfer rate (maximum), D-2
specifications
electrical characteristics, D-1
environmental characteristics, D-1
network specifications, D-2
physical characteristics, D-1
software characteristics, D-2
static IP parameters
assigning, 3-5
choosing static IP address, 3-5
using instead of DHCP, 3-8
when easier than using DNS, 6-2
status code number
recording, B-2
subnet mask
purpose, 3-5
selecting valid IP addresses for, 3-6
system integration, by National
Instruments, E-1
uninstalling the software, A-1, C-9
universal power supply
connecting, 2-4
updating the firmware, 6-4
using
CFG RESET switch, 6-2
DHCP, 6-1
firmware update utility, 6-4
GPIB Spy, 6-6
GPIB Virtual Device Driver, 6-7
Internet, 1-4
this manual, 1-1
Win32 Interactive Control
utility, 6-6, C-8
V
verifying
hostname, 3-7
installation, 5-1
pinging your device, C-4
voltage rating, D-1
W
warning
using firmware update utility, 6-4
Web support from National Instruments, E-1
Win32 Interactive Control utility
location, 6-6
using with GPIB-ENET/100, 6-6
Windows
running 16-bit Windows GPIB
applications, 6-8
running Windows GPIB applications, 6-7
WinSock
before using NI-488.2, C-6
for Windows 2000, C-5
for Windows NT, C-4
worldwide technical support, E-2
T
technical support resources, E-1
testing GPIB interfaces
See Diagnostic utility
timeout problems, C-6
troubleshooting
diagnostic utility failures, C-3
EDVR error conditions, C-2
hardware problems, C-1
© National Instruments Corporation
I-5
GPIB-ENET/100 for Windows 2000/NT
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