User manual
Océ User manual
Arizona 250 GT
User Manual Rev B
Océ-Technologies B.V.
Copyright
2007, Océ
All rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced, copied, adapted, or
transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission from Océ.
©
Océ makes no representation or warranties with respect to the contents hereof and
specifically disclaims any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for any
particular purpose.
Further, Océ reserves the right to revise this publication and to make changes from
time to time in the content hereof without obligation to notify any person of such
revision or changes.
Order number ODGS Part # 3010105832
Edition Revision B
US
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Chapter 1
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Preface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Product Compliance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Chapter 2
Product Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Arizona 250 GT Printer Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Chapter 3
Safety Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Safety Guidelines for Ink Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
UV Curing System Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interlock Safety System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Arizona 250 GT Safety Labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Safety Awareness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17
18
23
25
27
29
Chapter 4
How to Navigate the User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operator Interface Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operator Interface Software. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Print Job Control Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Printer Setup Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Special Prints Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation and Upgrade Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
39
40
46
48
56
58
60
Chapter 5
How to Operate the Arizona 250 GT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Training Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Switch the Printer On and Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Install the Onyx Printer Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Manage Print Jobs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Daily Start-up and Shut-down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Set Up a Print Job. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Manage the Media Vacuum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Media Vacuum System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Create Custom Vacuum Zones. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Manage Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Handle Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Underlay Board to Reduce Artifacts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
61
62
63
67
70
70
71
74
74
77
80
80
83
3
Table of Contents
Chapter 6
Ink System Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Arizona 250 GT Ink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
How to Change Ink Bags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Chapter 7
Error Handling and Troubleshooting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Troubleshooting Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
How To Improve Quality When Banding Occurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Chapter 8
Printer Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Maintenance Guidelines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Maintenance Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Printhead Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Swab Printheads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Clean Carriage Underside. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Remove Ink From the Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Empty the Ink Waste Tray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Clean UV Lamp Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Fill the Coolant Reservoir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Clean Gantry Rails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Change Ink Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
How to Change a UV Lamp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Print a Nozzle Check. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Appendix A
Application Hints and Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Hints and Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
4
Chapter 1
Introduction
5
Preface
Preface
Summary
This User Guide introduces you to the Océ Arizona® 250 GT inkjet printer. It will
orient you to the many features and procedures that enable you to print quality
images on various media.
Océ DGS on the Internet
For further information on documentation and support for your Arizona 250 GT or
for information on other Océ Display Graphics Systems products, please visit our
web site: http://www.dgs.oce.com
To provide feedback and report errors in this document:
[email protected]
Safety Information
This manual has three sections that contain details on safety when handling ink and
using the printer. Also, where applicable, cautions and warnings are used throughout
this manual to draw your attention to safety precautions.
■
■
■
"Safety Guidelines for Ink Materials" offers advice in the proper handling of UV
inks;
"Interlock Safety System" explains the safety features built in to the printer that
prevent and minimize access to Mechanical, Electrical, Thermal and UV hazards;
and
"UV Curing System Safety" presents warning about the dangers of exposure to
UV light. Some of the material from that section are duplicated here.
UV Curing System Safety
Caution: UV Light Hazard: Wear Eye and Skin Protection. Eyewear,
Gloves, and Long Sleeves are essential for Users and Bystanders. Special
restrictions and protective measures are essential - These include the use of
Eye and Dermal (skin) Protection. Industrial Protective Eyewear with
lenses that block both UVA and UVB must be used. Long sleeved work
clothes and gloves are essential to reduce the Skin's exposure to UV
emissions. Avoid looking directly at UV lamps.
6
Chapter 1 Introduction
Preface
Caution: Warning for Seated Individuals: The UV Emissions and Blue
Light Emissions profile of the Arizona 250 GT is at its worst for individuals
in a seated position (Table Height of 90cm). Remove all chairs within 5
metres (16 feet) of the printer.
UltraViolet Light Radiation Hazards Emission:
Effective UV-irradiance Emission Category of Arizona 250 GT According to 7.1 of
EN12198-1:2000 ( Category 2 ) - Special restrictions and protective measures are
essential - These include the use of Eye and Dermal (skin) Protection. Industrial
Protective Eyewear with lenses that block both UVA and UVB must be used. Long
sleeved work clothes and gloves are essential to reduce the Skin's exposure to UV
emissions.
Blue Light Radiation Hazards Emission (Visible radiation in the range of 400nm
to 700nm (Blue Light 300nm - 700nm):
Effective Irradiance respective the Effective Radiance Emission Category of Arizona
250 GT According to 7.1 of EN12198-1:2000 (Category 1).
Customer Service
If you are unable to resolve problems, field engineers can be dispatched to your site
to conduct repairs. Service visits are paid for by the customer, either under a
maintenance agreement, by purchase order or prepayment. Time and material rates
are charged for any service not covered under a maintenance agreement. Before
calling to report a problem, gather as much information about the problem as
possible and have it ready to provide to the customer care center engineer. The more
information you can provide initially, the more quickly the problem can be corrected.
Responsibilities of the Operator
The operator of the Arizona 250 GT must be properly trained. Océ provides training
for the operator in the use of the printer hardware and software at the time of
installation. It is the customer's responsibility to ensure that only properly trained
personnel operate the printer. Operators must be fully versed in the operation of
Onyx ProductionHouse® . For any operator unfamiliar with its operation, Onyx
ProductionHouse® training is required. Training courses are available; contact your
local Océ representative.
The operator or other trained personnel are expected to handle all user maintenance
as detailed in the User Guide, and also replacement of consumable parts (except print
heads). If your site has a technician in charge of printer maintenance, that person is
the optimal candidate. While any trained operator may perform routine maintenance,
the best maintenance results from familiarity with the printer's internal operation and
history.
7
Preface
The printer requires some daily maintenance. Periodic cleaning must be scheduled
for some components on a weekly basis. A few minutes spent cleaning ensures the
highest quality prints. Several areas require maintenance to ensure the highest print
quality, and the printer design gives you easy access to all these areas.
It is the responsibility of the operator to try to eliminate simple problems before
calling a service representative. But knowing when to call for service is also
important. An untrained operator must not attempt to service the printer as this may
cause further damage. When you have determined that a service call is required, call
as soon as possible. See the Maintenance section for more details.
Responsibilities of the Arizona 250 GT Service Technician
Field service technicians must have Océ Display Graphics Systems Arizona 250 GT
service training. The service technician is responsible for all repairs, upgrading and
modification requested by the customer or mandated by the Océ Display Graphics
Systems Service and Support Group. Service personnel are furnished with proper
tools for the installation and maintenance of the printer. In addition to the tools and
custom kits, each engineer will have basic tools for proper maintenance and
servicing.
Statement of Foreseen Use
The Arizona 250 GT flatbed inkjet printer uses piezo printing technology and UV
curable inks to produce outdoor-durable output. It can print directly onto rigid and
flexible substrates up to 2.5 m (98.4") x 1.25 (49.2") and up to 0.48 mm (1.89")
thickness. The printer holds substrates stationary while the print head assembly
moves across to create the print, eliminating image skew problems associated with
rigid stock feed systems.
8
Chapter 1 Introduction
Product Compliance
Product Compliance
Introduction
This section details the compliance and agency standards that the Arizona 250 GT
conforms to. It also provides manufacturing and contact information.
Electromagnetic Compatibility
This equipment generates, uses and radiates radio frequency energy and if not
installed and used as designed or intended, may cause interference to radio
communications. This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the
limits for a Class A computing device. This equipment has been designed to provide
reasonable protection against such interference when operated in residential and
commercial environments. Operation of this equipment in a residential area may
cause interference, in which case the user, at his own expense, is required to take
whatever measures are required to correct the interference.
Compliance Category
This device complies with Class A emmision limits.
This equipment is considered to be information technology equipment for use in a
light industrial setting. The equipment falls under the scope of the Machinery
Directive due to the movement associated with the gantry carrying the printer head
carriage assembly. As such, a full risk assessment per EN 1050 and a full mechanical
and machinery assessment per 292-2 + A1 Annex 1 was performed. As the
equipment is primarily information technology equipment (large format printer
receiving data from a computer terminal), and is within the scope of EN 60950
(mains operated ITE equipment under 600V including plotters and photoprinters clause 1.1.1, EN 60950: 2000), a full electrical evaluation was performed per EN
60950:2000.
Agency Compliance and Standards
The Arizona 250 GT complies to the following Agencies and Standards:
Note: Third Party confirmation of all declared will be obtained.
Safety
CSA 60950-1:2003, UL 60950:2002, EN60950-1, IEC 60950-1:2001
CB Scheme Report and Certificate, EN60204 including Annex 1
EMC
EMC Directive: CE Marking
EN55022: 1998 Information Technology Equipment. Emmisions Characteristics.
EN55024: 1998 Information Technology Equipment. Immunity Characteristics.
EN 61000-6-3:2001 Emissions: Residential, Commercial and Light-Industrial
Equipment, Generic
9
Product Compliance
EN 61000-6-1:2001 Immunity: Residential, Commercial and Light-Industrial
Equipment, Generic
R&TTE Directive: ETSI EN 301 489-01 V1.5.1, ETSI EN 301 489-03 V1.4.1
USA and Canada: 47 CFR Part 15 & Industry Canada
Noise Measurement Test Summary
Tested according to EN13023:2003, EN11204, ISO3744:1994(E)/ISO3746:1995(E)
and declared according to ISO4871:1984(E)
Measurements taken at the sample in 5 different locations, Printer in normal
operation with Vacuum Pump, does not exceed 75dB (maximum measured value:
66dB). For all locations, provide noise protection enclosure or remove pump from
location.
Manufacturer:
Océ Display Graphics Systems (ODGS)
13231 Delf Place - Building #501
Richmond, British Columbia
Canada V6V 2C3
http://www.dgs.oce.com/ Direct Dial (604) 273-7730 - Fax (604) 273-2775
Representatives Marketing the Arizona 250 GT in Europe:
Océ Technologies B.V.
St. Urbanusweg 43, Venlo, The Netherlands
P.O. Box 101, 5900 MA Venlo
Telephone: (31) 77 359 2222
Fax: (31) 77 354 4700
E-mail: [email protected]
Océ-Deutschland GmbH
Solinger Straße 5-7
45481 Mülheim/Ruhr
Germany
Telephone: (49) 2084 8450 - Fax: (49) 2084 80950
E-mail: [email protected] - Web site: http://www.oce.de/
Océ (UK) Ltd.
Langston Road Loughton, Essex IG10 3SL
United Kingdom
Telephone: (44) 870 600 5544 - Fax: (44) 870 600 1113
E-mail: [email protected] - Web site: www.oce.co.uk
10
Chapter 1 Introduction
Product Compliance
Toxic and Hazardous Substances or Elements in the Product
[1]
Part
Name
Lead
(pb)
Mercury
(Hg)
Cadmiu
m (Cd)
Hexavale Polybro
miated
nt
(CrVI)
biphenyl
s (PBB)
Polybro
minated
dipenylet
her
(PBDE)
UV
Curing
Lamps
0
X
0
0
0
0
VGA
Monitor
0
X
0
0
0
0
Vacuum
Guage
Indicator
X
0
0
0
0
0
Linear
X
Encoder
Readhead
s
0
0
0
0
0
Printhead X
s
0
0
0
0
0
FCC Notice
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules.
Operation is subject to the following two conditions:
1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and
2) This device must accept any interference received, including
interference that may cause undesired operation.
Any change or modification not expressly approved by the manufacturer
could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
11
Product Compliance
12
Chapter 1 Introduction
Chapter 2
Product Overview
13
Arizona 250 GT Printer Specifications
Arizona 250 GT Printer Specifications
Introduction
The Arizona 250 GT is a 4 color (CMYK) UV flatbed inkjet printer capable of
producing large format images on various rigid and flexible media. The printer
consists of a large vacuum table and moving gantry. The material is held flat and
stationary on the vacuum table during printing. The gantry contains a carriage that
sweeps across the table as the gantry moves in steps along the length of the table to
print an image on the media. In addition to the benefits of stationary positioning, the
use of UV ink technology on rigid material eliminates finishing processes such as
mounting and lamination.
Note: The Arizona 250 GT must be operated in accordance with the environmental
conditions specified in the Arizona 250 GT Site Preparation Guide and safety
requirements noted in this document.
Illustration
[1]
[1] Arizona 250 GT Printer
Arizona 250 GT Specifications
[2]
[2] Specifications
14
(1 – 2)
Feature
Specification
Printing Technology
Piezoelectric inkjet using Océ VariaDot™ technology;
with two variable dot printheads per color, 8 in total.
Print Speed
Production Mode: 16 m2/hour (172 ft2/h)
Chapter 2 Product Overview
Arizona 250 GT Printer Specifications
[2] Specifications
(2 – 2)
Feature
Specification
Ink System
UV-curable inks available in Black, Cyan, Magenta and
Yellow. Packaged in quick-change, 2 liter ink bags.
Maximum Media Size
2.5m (98.4") x 1.25m (49.2")
Maximum Media
Thickness
48mm (1.890")
Maximum Print Size
2.51m (98.8") x 1.26m (49.6")
Maximum Media
Weight
34 kg/sqm (7 lbs/sqft)
Nozzle Drop Volume:
Variable droplet sizes
from 6 to 42 picolitres
The ability to vary the drop size to as little as 6 picolitres
produces sharp images with smoother gradients and
quartertones. The ability to jet larger droplets up to 42
picolitres produces dense, solid colors. The result is
near-photographic image quality. Text as small as 6 pt. is
perfectly legible.
Print Modes /
Productivity
Production: 16 sq.metres/hr. (170 sq.ft./hr.)
Quality: 12 sq.metres/hr. )130 sq.ft./hr.)
Quality-Matte: 8 sq. metres/hr. (85 sq. ft./hr.)
Fine Art: 8 sq.metres/hr. (85 sq.ft./hr.)
Ink Colors
Black, Cyan, Magenta, Yellow
Curing System
UV curing lamp
Weight
544kg (1200lbs)
Dimensions
Table: 2.65m (8.7 ft.) 2.00m (6.5 ft.)
Gantry: 4.0m (13.4 ft.) x .45 m (x 1.5 ft.)
Power
Requirements
Voltage:
208 through 240VAC ±10% 60Hz Single Phase, Rated
Current: 16A
200 through 240VAC ±10% 50Hz Single Phase, Rated
Current: 16A
Recommended Circuit Breaker:
North America 20A, European Union 16A
Hardware Interface
USB, Ethernet TCP/IP, 100 base-T
Image Processing
Software
ONYX® ProductionHouse Océ Edition version 7 or
greater (ONYX® PosterShop available but not
recommended). The driver for the Arizona 250 GT is
included in the ProductionHouse Océ edition, but is not
in the PosterShop Océ edition.
15
Arizona 250 GT Printer Specifications
Océ VariaDot™ Variable Droplet Imaging Technology
The Océ Arizona 250 GT offers superior print quality and ink economy through the
use of Océ VariaDot imaging technology, the next evolution in piezoelectric inkjet
technology that enables a print head to produce droplets of varying volume. This
differs from the current piezoelectric print head technology that is restricted to the
use of fixed droplets. The use of variable sized droplets results in dots on the media
of varying size (area) and density which in turn allows the use of four-color (CMYK)
printing for all image features. Using Océ VariaDot imaging technology results in
excellent print quality and a superior ink economy over 6-color printing systems.
Océ VariaDot imaging technology allows piezoelectric print heads to produce
droplets of varying volume on demand. This allows the ONYX™ ProductionHouse
software to specify the appropriate droplet size for each specific image feature.
When imaging fine detail such as small type or fine lines, very small droplets can be
used, when imaging areas of tonal transition or quarter-tone values such as skin tones
drops of medium volume can be used and when printing areas of high density such
as solid colors, large droplets can be used.
Océ VariaDot™ for Improved Image Quality
Océ VariaDot imaging technology can be compared to painting a room in your
house. You use a large brush size for quick coverage over large areas and a much
smaller, finer brush for detailed areas. Trying to paint a large wall with a tiny brush
would result in many artefacts and trying to paint a fine fresco trim with a large brush
would be very frustrating. In the same way, Océ VariaDot uses the appropriate size
droplet for each specific image feature resulting in the best possible image quality in
every part of the printed image.
Océ VariaDot™ for Reduced Ink Consumption
A significant benefit of Océ VariaDot imaging technology is that it allows the use of
only four inks (CMYK) for all areas of the printed image. This is very significant to
the user in terms of ink consumption per square meter because the current "de facto
standard" in the industry is six-color piezoelectric printing. This older technology
uses lighter versions of Cyan and Magenta inks, often referred to commercially as
"Light Cyan" and "Light Magenta" to overcome the image quality problem
previously associated with four-color (CMYK only) printing.
16
Chapter 2 Product Overview
Chapter 3
Safety Information
17
Safety Guidelines for Ink Materials
Safety Guidelines for Ink Materials
Introduction
This section outlines the safety concerns involved with the handling and use of the
UV ink and Flush for the Arizona 250 GT printer. Read all of the material in this
section and also review the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) documents before
handling any UV ink or using the printer.
Note: The full text of the MSDS for all UV inks and Flush is found on the ODGS
web site at the following location:
http://www.dgs.oce.com/PrinterSupport/MSDS_Support/MSDS_Sheets.htm
Caution: Both UV inks and the curing lamps can be harmful if not properly
handled. Follow these guidelines carefully in order to ensure maximum
safety.
Personal Safety
The operator should wear nitrile gloves, a protective apron, and safety glasses with
side shields when handling inks.
Note: Warning for Seated Individuals- The UV Curing System on the Arizona 250
GT generates hazardous levels of thermal, electrical and UV energies. UV light
exposure is at it's worst for individuals in a seated position (Table Height of 90cm).
Do not sit within 5 metres of the printer and do not look at the UV lamps if your eyes
are positioned below the level of the printer table.
Ventilation and Room Volume
The minimum space/ working room volume for using the Arizona 250 GT is 69 m3
or 2430 cubic feet. The printer should operate in an area where a good standard of
general ventilation is available at 5 to 10 air changes per hour. Mechanical
Ventilation must be added where the air changes per hour are under 5 per hour.
Handling UV Inks
Read and practice safety guidelines as outlined in the MSDS for each ink. Post these
documents in the work area as required by prevailing law. MSDS for all four inks
are provided when you purchase inks. The following is a summary of the important
safety aspects of the MSDS that are common to all UV inks.
18
Chapter 3 Safety Information
Safety Guidelines for Ink Materials
[3]
[3] Immediate (Acute) Health Effects by Route of Exposure
Exposure
by:
Effect:
Inhalation:
Can cause severe respiratory irritation, dizziness, weakness, fatigue,
nausea, headache and possible unconsciousness.
Skin
Contact:
Can cause severe irritation, defatting, and dermatitis. Irritation
effects may last for hours or days but will not likely result in
permanent damage.
Eye
Contact:
Corrosive to eye tissue. Can cause severe irritation, tearing, and
burns that can quickly lead to permanent injury including blindness.
Ingestion:
Severely irritating to mouth, throat, and stomach. Can cause
abdominal discomfort, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.
[4]
[4] Long-Term (Chronic) Health Effects
Exposure
by:
Effect
Inhalation:
Upon prolonged and/or repeated exposure, can cause severe
respiratory irritation, dizziness, weakness, fatigue, nausea, headache
and possible unconsciousness.
Skin
Contact:
Upon prolonged or repeated contact can cause severe irritation,
defatting, and dermatitis. May cause lingering affects but not likely
to result in permanent damage if the exposure is eliminated. Upon
prolonged or repeated exposure, harmful if absorbed through the
skin. May cause severe irritation and systemic damage
[5]
[5] First-aid Measures
(1 – 2)
Exposure
by:
Remedy
Inhalation
Remove to fresh air. If breathing is difficult, have a trained individual
administer oxygen. If not breathing, give artificial respiration and
have a trained individual administer oxygen. Get medical attention
immediately.
Eyes
Immediately flush eyes with plenty of water for at least 20 minutes
retracting eyelids often. This corrosive material can cause immediate
and permanent eye damage. Tilt the head to prevent chemical from
transferring to the uncontaminated eye. Get immediate medical
attention and monitor the eye as advised by your physician.
19
Safety Guidelines for Ink Materials
[5] First-aid Measures
20
(2 – 2)
Exposure
by:
Remedy
Skin
Contact
Wash with soap and water. Remove contaminated clothing, launder
immediately, and discard contaminated leather goods. Get medical
attention immediately.
Ingestion
Severely irritating. Do not induce vomiting. Seek medical attention
immediately. Drink 2 glasses of water or milk to dilute.
Chapter 3 Safety Information
Safety Guidelines for Ink Materials
[6]
[6] Accidental Release Measures - Dealing With Spilled Ink
Personal
Precaution
s and
Equipment
Exposure to the spilled material may be severely irritating or toxic.
Follow personal protective equipment recommendations found in
Section VIII of this MSDS. Personal protective equipment needs
must be evaluated based on information provided on the MSDS sheet
and the special circumstances created by the spill including; the
material spilled, the quantity of the spill, the area in which the spill
occurred, and the expertise of employees in the area responding to
the spill. Never exceed any occupational exposure limits.
[7]
[7] Handling & Storage
Handling
Precaution
s
Toxic or severely irritating material. Avoid contacting and avoid
breathing the material. Use only in a well ventilated area. As with all
chemicals, good industrial hygiene practices should be followed
when handling this material. Avoid contact with material, avoid
breathing dusts or fumes, use only in a well ventilated area. Wash
thoroughly after handling. Do not get in eyes, on skin or clothing.
Remove contaminated clothing and wash before reuse.
Storage
Store in a cool dry place.
Conditions Isolate from incompatible materials.
[8]
[8] Exposure Controls
Engineerin Local exhaust ventilation or other engineering controls are normally
g Measures required when handling or using this product to avoid overexposure.
It is recommended that facilities storing or using this material be
equipped with an eyewash and safety shower.
[9]
[9] Personal Protection
(1 – 2)
Area
Strategy
Respiratory
Protection
Follow a respiratory protection program that meets 29 CFR
1910.134 and ANSI Z88.2 requirements whenever work place
conditions warrant the use of a respirator. Respiratory protection
may be required in addition to ventilation depending upon
conditions of use.
Eye
Protection
Wear safety glasses with side shields when handling this product.
Wear additional eye protection such as chemical splash goggles
and/or face shield when the possibility exists for eye contact with
splashing or spraying liquid, or airborne material. Do not wear
contact lenses. Have an eye wash station available.
21
Safety Guidelines for Ink Materials
[9] Personal Protection
(2 – 2)
Area
Strategy
Skin
Protection
Avoid skin contact by wearing chemically resistant gloves, an apron
and other protective equipment depending upon conditions of use.
Inspect gloves for chemical break-through and replace at regular
intervals. Clean protective equipment regularly. Wash hands and
other exposed areas with mild soap and water before eating,
drinking, and when leaving work. Use of protective coveralls and
long sleeves is recommended.
Gloves
Wear impervious material.
Disposal of UV Ink
[10]
[10] Disposal Considerations
Disposal
Methods
22
Dispose in accordance with Federal, State, Provincial and Local
regulations. Material may be compatible with industrial waste
incineration or inclusion in a fuel blending program. This
characterization is subject to approval by your waste management
contractor. This material should be recycled if possible.
Chapter 3 Safety Information
UV Curing System Safety
UV Curing System Safety
Introduction
The UV Curing System on the Arizona 250 GT generates hazardous levels of
thermal, electrical and UV energies.
The Arizona 250 GT printer uses UV-curable ink that needs a high energy level of
UV light to cure. The system is made up of two medium pressure mercury arc lamps
attached to the carriage. The ink has been designed using the proper photo-initiator
to cure at the highest efficient wavelength of the Lamp (366nm).
UV Lamp Hazards: Superficial eye damage and burning of the skin can occur with
even brief exposure to UV light. Serious injuries can result from prolonged exposure,
especially if unshielded. UV lamps operate at very high temperatures
(approximately 800° Centigrade). For this reason, never touch a lamp which has
been in operation. Let the lamp cool before attempting any maintenance, and then
use extreme care in handling the lamp cartridges. The UV bulbs contain a small
amount of metallic mercury which is toxic when ingested, handled, or breathed.
Therefore, if bulbs are broken, care should be taken to clean up the spill immediately,
and then disposed of according to local regulations concerning Mercury disposal.
Bare skin contact with the UV lamps must be avoided. Compounds from the skin
when heated on lamps operating at 600 to 850° C will form permanent etching on
the quartz surface that can decrease UV energy transmission. A contaminated lamp
eventually may overheat, causing premature failure.
Ozone: Ozone is a toxic gas which all medium pressure UV lamps create. As the
lamp warms up, it briefly passes through a section of the light spectrum which
excites oxygen molecules enough to create ozone. Once a UV lamp has completely
warmed up, only very minute amounts of ozone are present.
Note: The Arizona 250 GT printer has a built-in interlock safety system that shuts
down the motion motors if the interlock is tripped. This ensures that the operator is
not exposed to any hazards. The interlock system includes an aluminum safety gate
around the perimeter of the carriage that reduces the UV light exposure and also
stops carriage motion if it is not properly seated. See the section "(see ‘Interlock
Safety System’ on page 25)" for more details on how it works.
Caution: Warning for Seated Individuals: The UV Emissions and Blue
Light Emissions profile of the Arizona 250 GT is at its worst for individuals
in a seated position (Table Height of 90cm). Remove all chairs within 5
metres (16 feet) of the printer.
23
UV Curing System Safety
Caution: UltraViolet Light Radiation Hazards Emission: Effective
UV-irradiance Emission Category of Arizona 250 GT According to 7.1 of
EN12198-1:2000 ( Category 2 ) - Special restrictions and protective
measures are essential - These include the use of Eye and Dermal (skin)
Protection. Industrial Protective Eyewear with lenses that block both UVA
and UVB must be used. Long sleeved work clothes and gloves are essential
to reduce the Skin's exposure to UV emissions.
UltraViolet and Blue Light Hazards Categories
Blue Light Radiation Hazards Emission (Visible radiation in the range of 400nm
to 700nm (Blue Light 300nm - 700nm):
Effective Irradiance respective the Effective Radiance Emission Category of Arizona
250 GT According to 7.1 of EN12198-1:2000 (Category 1).
24
Chapter 3 Safety Information
Interlock Safety System
Interlock Safety System
Introduction
The Arizona 250 GT printer has an integrated safety interlock system that stops all
machine motion when a situation that might compromise operator safety occurs. The
printer has three Emergency-Stop buttons: one on each end of the gantry, and one on
the Control Station podium. Activating an Emergency-Stop button will switch the
Safety Monitoring Relay input circuits. This causes the system to isolate the power
to the motion control motors, and also turns off the Arizona 250 GT curing system
(UV lamps). The Maintenance Station and the Safety Gate on the carriage also have
an interlock function. Beacons lights indicate the status of the safety system as
explained in this section.
How the Interlock System Works
All system Interlock circuits operate as one. This means that any open interlock
switch and/or Emergency Stop switch kills motion ability in all system electronics.
Drive(s) needed for media loading purposes are exempt from this requirement. Both
System PCB's contain the same Safety Interlock Circuit that functions as a single
unit. However, an over-current condition in the Drive circuit on one PCB can disable
itself without the knowledge/action of the other PCB's.
Emergency Stop Function:
There are three Emergency Stop buttons, one is located at the Operator Control
Station, and one at each end of the Gantry. The fourth Emergency Stop is the AC
power Supply Disconnect. Motion Motors that are disabled include the Gantry
Drive, Carriage Drive, Z-Axis Drive (Carriage up and down movement), all Ink and
Maintenance Pumps, Heaters, Table Vacuum Pump, and UV Lamps (not UV
Cooling Fans).
Upon release (reset) of an Emergency Stop, no motion may be initiated without
acknowledgment of the Operator, i.e. User interface message on the LCD display
with Operator intervention acknowledgment. To re-activate the printer after you
press an Emergency Stop button, turn the button counter-clockwise. If the printer has
encountered an error, you must correct that error first. Errors are displayed on the
LCD panel that is part of the Control Station. When the error is corrected, release the
Emergency-Stop button, acknowledge the User interface message and continue
printer operation.
Maintenance Station Interlock Function:
The Maintenance Station is located under the carriage and provides access to clean
the printheads. Carriage and Gantry motion motors are disabled and UV lamps are
turned off (if they were On), when the station sliding door is open. This includes the
Gantry Drive and Carriage Drive. Interlock system is automatically reset when
25
Interlock Safety System
sliding door is closed. No User interface message with operator acknowledgment is
required to re-enable function of the printer.
Safety Guard Interlock Function:
The Safety Guard is an aluminum fence around the perimeter of the carriage. Motion
Motors disabled when it is not properly seated include the Gantry Drive and Carriage
Drive. Also UV Lamps switch Off (Not UV Cooling Fans), and Z-Axis drive
initializes (Carriage drives to Top Position and Holds there).
Carriage Interlock must be cycled to ensure the Interlock is functional and that the
Carriage Safety Guard is in place. User interface message with user intervention
acknowledgment is required to re-enable functioning.
Power-up Interlock Test for Carriage
On power-up, the Interlock System will not permit the motion motors to be turned,
so the machine will be unable to initiate motion. To satisfy the requirements for
Machinery Directive, the Carriage Interlock must be cycled to ensure the Interlock
is functional and that the Carriage Safety Guard is in place. Upon cycling of Carriage
Interlock, no motion may be initiated without acknowledgment of the Operator, i.e.
User interface message with operator intervention acknowledgment.
Beacon Light Status
The green beacon light is mounted to the top surface of the printer carriage. The
purpose of this light is to indicate basic printer status to the operator.
Beacon off: indicates the printer can be approached without caution. The machine
cannot initiate movement since the interlock Safety System has disabled all motion
to the electrical control system.
Beacon on: indicates the Machine is powered up and ready to initiate motion. This
tells an operator to approach the machine with caution, because it could initiate
motion at any moment.
26
Chapter 3 Safety Information
Arizona 250 GT Safety Labels
Arizona 250 GT Safety Labels
Introduction
The safety labels are placed at strategic locations on the printer to warn the operator
of possible dangers and hazards. It is important to be aware of the meaning of these
labels to ensure safe operation of the printer.
Caution: Read and understand all of the safety label descriptions in the
table below before operating the printer.
Safety Labels
[11]
[11] Safety Labels
(1 – 2)
Description
Warning: UV Light Hazard.
Avoid looking directly at UV lamps.
Located on carriage cover to remind the operator
that looking at the UV light source is dangerous.
Wear Safety Gloves
Located on the maintenance station as a reminder
to always wear gloves when handling ink.
Risk of Eye Injury. Wear Eye Protection Located on the maintenance station as a reminder
that the UV-curable ink is harmful to the eyes and
skin. Always wear glasses and gloves when
handling ink.
Machine lockout: a reminder to turn off and lock
out the AC power switch before servicing any
electrical components.
Located on the mains power switch.
Label
[2]
[3]
[4]
[5]
27
Arizona 250 GT Safety Labels
[11] Safety Labels
(2 – 2)
Description
Warning: Electric Shock Hazard
Label
[6]
Located on the door to the electronics enclosure,
the UV lamp power supply cover, the carriage
cover, and the vacuum pump enclosure. This area
can only be accessed by a trained service
technician.
General Warning
Located on the AC enclosure cover. This area can
only be accessed by a trained service technician.
Pinch Point
A reminder that horizontal movement of the
carriage can create a pinch hazard as it moves
along the gantry.
Located on both ends and the rear of the carriage.
Crush Hazard: Keep hands clear while
operating.
A reminder that vertical movement of the carriage
can be a crush hazard if hands or objects are
placed in these locations. Located on the
maintenance station and both ends of the gantry.
Thermal Hazard
Radiated heat from the UV lamps can cause burns.
Located on the carriage near the two UV lamps.
28
Chapter 3 Safety Information
[7]
[8]
[9]
[10]
Safety Awareness
Safety Awareness
Introduction
This section contains two sets of principles that must be followed to assure
maximum safety when operating the Arizona 250 GT printer. The first set uses
negative examples to show you residual risks to avoid in order to prevent injury to
the operator. The second set of principles illustrates some of the residual risks that
are inherent in the operation of the printer. These are situations or physical aspects
of the printer that may present a potential danger to the operator, but would
compromise the capabilities of the printer if changed. Therefore, they are pointed out
as a precaution the operator must be aware of when using the printer.
Attention: The photos in the following table illustrate residual risks that must
be avoided when operating the Arizona 250 GT printer.
29
Safety Awareness
Situations and Actions to Avoid
[12]
[12] How NOT to use the Arizona 250 GT
(1 – 3)
Avoid these Situations For Your Personal Safety
[11]
[11] Keep the table clear
Do not place your
hand in the carriage
pathway when
printer power is on.
Do not leave any
objects on the table
printing surface,
except for media that
you will print on.
Also make sure the
media is 48 mm (1.89
inches) or less in
thickness.
[12]
Do not push or force
the carriage to move
manually. Always
use the "Move
Carriage" command
in the Interface menu
to move the carriage
to the maintenance
station if you need to
access the area under
the carriage.
[12] Avoid Carriage
30
Chapter 3 Safety Information
Safety Awareness
[12] How NOT to use the Arizona 250 GT
(2 – 3)
Avoid these Situations For Your Personal Safety
[13]
Do not push or force
the gantry to move
manually. Use the
“Move Gantry”
command in the
interface menu to
move the gantry
along the table
surface.
[13] Do not push gantry
[14]
When the
Maintenance Station
is open to clean
heads, do not touch
the UV lamp
assembly as it can be
hot. Also be aware
that the carriage will
move up or down
when the Raise
Carriage switch is
pushed.
[14] Hot UV Lamps
31
Safety Awareness
[12] How NOT to use the Arizona 250 GT
(3 – 3)
Avoid these Situations For Your Personal Safety
[15]
Avoid placing
fingers, hands or
other objects in the
IGUS track unless
power is off and the
printer is locked out.
[15] IGUS Hazard
[16]
[16] UV Lamp Hazard
Avoid looking at the
UV lamps, especially
if you are seated at
the same level as the
carriage.
Also do not touch the
UV lamp assembly or
the surrounding
guard as they will be
hot and may result in
burns of the skin.
Residual Safety Risks
The Arizona 250 GT is engineered to minimize machine components and operating
procedures that may compromise operator safety. However, in order to maintain
some machine operations and functionality, certain compromises are required. The
following table documents some of these residual hazards. By making the operator
aware of the potential risks, we hope to ensure maximum safety in the operation of
this printer.
Caution: there may be a time lag between when a print job is issued and when the
gantry movement actually begins as the UV lamps must warm up first.
32
Chapter 3 Safety Information
Safety Awareness
[13]
[13] Arizona 250 GT Residual Risks
Risk Area
(1 – 6)
Crushing/Shear Hazard
[17]
A high risk crushing
hazard is created by
the movement of the
carriage and gantry
supports. Keep hands
away from this area
unless the printer
power is off.
[17] Carriage and Gantry Supports
[18]
A high risk
crushing/pinch
hazard is created by
the table and the
gantry.
[18] Table/Gantry Pinch hazard
33
Safety Awareness
[13] Arizona 250 GT Residual Risks
Risk Area
Crushing/Shear Hazard
[19]
A high risk
crushing/pinch
hazard is created by
the table and the
carriage.
[19] Table/Carriage Pinch Hazard
A high risk
crushing/pinch
hazard is created by
the carriage and the
gantry when the
Z-Axis is moving
(carriage moves up or
down).
[20]
[20] Gantry/Carriage Crush Hazard
34
Chapter 3 Safety Information
(2 – 6)
Safety Awareness
[13] Arizona 250 GT Residual Risks
Risk Area
(3 – 6)
Crushing/Shear Hazard
[21]
A medium risk
crushing/pinch
hazard is created by
the gantry and the
table frame.
[21] Gantry/Table Pinch harard
[22]
A medium risk
crushing/pinch
hazard is created by
the gantry and the
table frame stop on
the underside of the
table at the
electronics enclosure
end.
[22] Gantry/Table Frame Crush Hazard
35
Safety Awareness
[13] Arizona 250 GT Residual Risks
Risk Area
Crushing/Shear Hazard
[23]
Shearing hazard
A high risk shearing
hazard is created by
the carriage and the
gantry frame from
the bottom.
[23] Carriage/Gantry Frame Shear Hazard
[24]
A high risk shearing
hazard is created by
the carriage and the
gantry frame from
the bottom.
[24] Hazard
36
Chapter 3 Safety Information
(4 – 6)
Safety Awareness
[13] Arizona 250 GT Residual Risks
Risk Area
(5 – 6)
Crushing/Shear Hazard
[25]
A high risk shearing
hazard is created by
the carriage and the
gantry frame.
[25] Hazard
[26]
Entanglement hazard
A medium risk of
finger or material
entanglement is
created by the web
assembly (IGUS
track).
[26] IGUS Impact Hazard
37
Safety Awareness
[13] Arizona 250 GT Residual Risks
Risk Area
Crushing/Shear Hazard
[27]
A medium risk
impact hazard is
created by the
carriage when
cycling from left to
right.
[27] Carriage Impact Hazard
[28]
Heat hazard: the UV
lamp assembly and
the surrounding
guard can be hot.
[28] UV Lamp Heat Hazard
38
Chapter 3 Safety Information
(6 – 6)
Chapter 4
How to Navigate the User
Interface
39
Operator Interface Hardware
Operator Interface Hardware
Introduction
The Operator interacts with some of the printer components to operate, maintain,
and monitor the state of the printer: This section identifies and explains the functions
of these components.
[29]
[29] User Interface Hardware
[14]
(1) Main Power Switch
(9) Maintenance Station
(2) Operator Control Station
(10) Coolant Reservoir Level
(3) Vacuum Zone Control Handles
(11) Ink Filters
(4) Vacuum Table Foot Pedal
(12) Control Station Panel
(5) Vacuum Bleed Valve
(13) UV Lamp Cartridges
(6) Print Button
(14) Carriage Guard
(7) Printer Status Light
(15) Vacuum Shut-off Valves
(8) Emergency Stops
40
Chapter 4 How to Navigate the User Interface
Operator Interface Hardware
Illustration
[30]
[30] Vacuum System Hardware
[31]
[31] Carriage Area Hardware
41
Operator Interface Hardware
Operator Interface Components
[15]
[15] Hardware Interface Components
42
(1 – 3)
Component
Function
1) Main Power
Switch
The Arizona 250 GT has an AC power switch that turns the
printer On and Off. The switch also serves as a lock-out
device. It also has an AC power connector. All of these
power-related items are located on the end of the electronics
enclosure.
2) Operator Control
Station
The operator control station consists of a podium stand, an
LCD display monitor, a mouse, and an emergency stop
button. The station allows the operator to control the
printer's onboard computer system by way of the Operator
Interface software displayed on the LCD monitor. Print jobs
are sent to the printer's hard drive from the host computer
over an Ethernet network.
3) Vacuum Zone
Control
The three vacuum zone control handles determine which of
the three print zones on the printer table will have vacuum
applied when the vacuum pump is switched on. The
vacuum zones are opened or closed by the handles.
4) Vacuum Table
Foot Pedal
A vacuum foot pedal switch is provided to facilitate the
process of securing the media on the vacuum table. The foot
pedal toggles the table vacuum on/off. The vacuum must be
turned on prior to starting a print.
5) Vacuum Bleed
Valve & Gague
A bleed valve can be adjusted to reduce or increase the
amount of vacuum suction on the media. Less vacuum
reduces artifacts caused by suction when imaging on
flexible media.
6) Print Button
The print button is located at the corner where media is
loaded on the table. After positioning the media and
activating the vacuum, press the button to start the print.
7) Printer Status
Light
The green colored beacon light is mounted on the top
surface of the carriage. The purpose of the light is to
indicate basic machine status to the operator. See the table
after this section for the significance of the different states
of the light.
Chapter 4 How to Navigate the User Interface
Operator Interface Hardware
[15] Hardware Interface Components
Component
(2 – 3)
Function
8) Emergency Stops If a situation requires an immediate shutdown of all printer
activity, press one of the three Emergency Stop buttons. To
recover from an emergency shutdown, resolve the problem
that prompted the shutdown and then release the
Emergency Stop by twisting it slightly clockwise. Restoring
functionality to all disabled systems can only occur through
an operator command at the Control Station. See below for
the parts of the hardware interface affected by an
Emergency Stop.
9) Maintenance
Station
Daily printhead maintenance consists of an ink purge and
suction cleaning of the printheads. The maintenance station
cover is slid open to access the printheads and the suction
nozzle. The maintenance station is located under the
carriage. Maintenance is performed when the carriage is
parked at the end of the gantry.
10) Coolant
Reservoir
The coolant reservoir is mounted at the service access end
of the gantry. The operator has the ability to refill the
reservoir and to monitor the level of coolant at this location.
See Maintenance section for instructions.
11) Ink Filters and
Ink Bay
The ink filters ensure that ink flows easily and is free of
particulate matter. These filters must be changed
periodically to ensure that they are working efficiently. See
the Maintenance section, How to Change Ink Filters for a
schedule and instructions.
The Ink Bay contains 2 liter bags of each color (CMYK) of
ink. The ink bay is located under the table in the corner
where media is loaded. ID tags ensure the correct ink color
is installed in the correct location and that expired ink is not
installed. A warning is issued to the operator when a
specific ink bag is empty and needs to be replaced.
12) Control Station
Panel
This panel contains all of the receptacles for connections
from the printer to the Operator Control Station. This
includes power and video for the LCD display, an Ethernet
network cable plug for communication and data transfer
from the host computer, a cable to the Emergency stop and
a USB cable for the mouse on the Control Station.
(13) UV Lamps
Two UV lamp are housed in cartridges to cure the ink. UV
amps have a finite life and must be changed periodically.
43
Operator Interface Hardware
[15] Hardware Interface Components
Component
(3 – 3)
Function
(14) Carriage Guard The Carriage Guard protects the Operator from exposure to
UV light and it also protects the lamps and the carriage by
stopping all motion if it encounters an obstacle in the path
of the carriage.
(15) Vacuum
Shut-off Valves
On top of the carriage are vacuum shut-off valves can be
shut off to avoid ink drips when the printer is turned off.
They also allow longer purges to select printheads (those
not shut off).
(16) Waste Tray
The waste ink tray is located below the printhead
maintenance station. A manual valve allows the operator to
drain the waste ink to a portable container for disposal .
Status of Beacon Light States
The status light indicates the following printer status to the operator.
[16]
[16] Status Light
Beacon Status Light
Definition
Possible Conditions
Green Off
Printer interlock system
or the emergency stop
buttons have been
triggered. No motion can
be initiated.
Maintenance station door
has been opened or one
the emergency stop
buttons has been
triggered.
Green On
Printer is functional and
ready to initiate motion.
Emergency Stop Effects
Note: There are three Emergency Stop buttons, one on the control station podium
and one on each end of the gantry. The AC power On/Off switch can also function as
an emergency stop. There are more details on the Emergency stops in the Interlock
section (see ‘Interlock Safety System’ on page 25).
Activating an Emergency Stop will disable the following:
■
■
■
■
■
44
Carriage motion
Gantry motion
UV curing lamps
Ink pumps
Thermal fluid (coolant) pump
Chapter 4 How to Navigate the User Interface
Operator Interface Hardware
■
■
■
■
Thermal fluid heater
Purge pump
Purge valve
Printheads jetting
45
Operator Interface Software
Operator Interface Software
Introduction
The Arizona 250 GT Operator Interface Software (OIS) is displayed on the LCD
monitor that is part of the Operator Control Station. The interface has five main
working modules that are accessed by tabs located at the bottom of the display. Click
on these tabs with the mouse to access the modules. Print Job Control is the default
module displayed when the printer is switched on.
The display is divided into functional and status areas. The functional areas supports
all operator input necessary to operate, maintain and service the printer. The status
areas are used to report printer status.
Onscreen Keyboard & Numeric Keypad
A mouse is used as the input device. For operations that require operator input, the
mouse is used to select numeric characters from a virtual keypad displayed on the
interface LCD monitor.
Illustration
[32]
[32] Operator Interface Tabs
Operator Interface Module Tabs
[17]
[17] Interface Modules
46
(1 – 2)
Component
Function
Print Job
Control (Print
tab)
Provides management of all aspects of working with print jobs
and also controls some features of the printer.
Printer Setup
(Setup tab)
Displays information about network connection settings, sets
how units are displayed, set the language preference, set the date
and time, and sets image quality.
Service and
Diagnostics
This area is reserved for use by trained field service technicians
only.
Chapter 4 How to Navigate the User Interface
Operator Interface Software
[17] Interface Modules
(2 – 2)
Component
Function
Special Prints
(Special Prints
tab)
Provides access to the special adjustment prints, the Quality
Control Reference print image and the Nozzle Check print.
Software
Upgrade
(Upgrade tab)
Provides access to the latest version of the Operator Interface
software and firmware.
47
Print Job Control Module
Print Job Control Module
Introduction
Print Job Control is the default module displayed when the printer is switched on.
From this module you can manage all aspects of working with print jobs and also
control many features of the printer. The table "Job Control Panels" documents the
number callouts and the rest of this section explains each area in more detail.
Illustration
[33]
[33] Print Job Control Module
48
Chapter 4 How to Navigate the User Interface
Print Job Control Module
Components of the Print Job Control Module
[18]
[18] Job Control Panels
Component
Function
1) Job Status Panel Displays the status and progress of print jobs
2) Printer Status
Panel
Displays the last four lines of the log file - click to see more
of the log. To the right is the Pause/Resume button and the Ink
level indicators.
3) Command
Toolbar
Displays icons for actions related to the print jobs and control
of the printer
4) Active Jobs List Displays a list of all Active print jobs
5) Inactive Jobs
Displays a list of all Inactive print jobs
6) Table Placement Displays a preview that shows the placement of the current
Preview
job on the printer
7) Job Information This panel shows the parameters of the currently selected
and Parameters
print job and also allows changes to the parameters associated
panel.
with that job
8) Printer Module
Tabs
These tabs allow the operator to switch between different
functional modules of the printer
9) Software
Version Number
Displays the current installed version of the printer software.
10) Image Upload
Progress
The image upload progress panel indicates the name of a
print job that is currently uploading to the printer. This panel
is not always visible and appears only when an image is
loading to the printer. It is located below the software version
number when it is active.
Job Control Components Explained
1) Job Status Panel
The job status panel is in the top left corner of the display screen. It shows
information about the current state of the printer or job activities.
■
■
■
■
Printer Status
Job name currently printing
Total copies, number of printed copies and copy progress
Overprint progress of number if overprints is more than zero
All incoming jobs go directly into the active session at the end of the job list.
Selecting a job in the list highlights the job and updates the job information area.
49
Print Job Control Module
The job information area contains offsets, print quality mode information, number
of copies and overprints, and the name of the ProductionHouse profile used and the
image to be printed is also displayed.
Jobs can be moved up or down in the list and can either be printed, held or canceled.
2) Printer Status Panel
The printer status panel is in the top right corner of the display. It shows the last four
lines of the printer log that contains printer status information and error messages.
To see more of the log file, click on the panel.
To the right of the status panel are two buttons:
Pause/Resume print button. This button can be used to pause or resume on when
a job is printing.
Ink Level Indicators. Click the icon to open an ink subsystem status dialog that
displays ink-related information.
3) Command Toolbar
The printer toolbar contains icons that allow you to interact with the printer (listed
here in displayed order). Note that the buttons have a checked and unchecked state.
50
Chapter 4 How to Navigate the User Interface
Print Job Control Module
[19]
[34]
[34] Command Toolbar
Print job
Hold job
This command can do the following actions depending on
context:
■ Activates a selected inactive job by moving it to the active
list.
■ Un-holds a held job.
■ Un-holds an job that had an error currently.
The command can do following actions depending on context:
Puts an active job on hold.
■ Waits until the printer finishes a currently printing copy and
puts the job on hold.
■
Cancel job
The command can do following actions depending on context:
Deactivates a selected active job by moving it to the inactive
list.
■ Cancels a currently printing job.
■
Delete job
Deletes a job from the printer. Only an Inactive job can be
deleted. In order to delete an Active job, the job has to be
deactivated first using Cancel command.
Flatbed
Process flatbed jobs toggle command - Allows printer to process
flatbed jobs. This must be selected to enable flatbed printing whe
the printer is booted or after re-setting the printer due to an error.
Note: Other job types will be added at a later date.
Media
Thickness
Enter or confirm the thickness of the media. The printer will
automatically adjust the carriage height to media thickness and
also the print gap. Media thickness confirmation is required only
for the first copy of a print job, unless it is changed during
printing. If the media thickness value is changed while printing,
confirmation is requested before printing the next copy.
Lamp Power
Control
Allows the operator to control the power output of both UV
lamps. To extend lamp life, use the lowest setting that provides
adequate curing for a particular media.
Ink
Temperature
Control
This button controls the ink heater and also displays the ink
temperature. The state of the button reflects the status of the ink
heater. The heater times out after two hours of inactivity (time
can be changed up to four hours by a service technician). If the
ink heater is turned off when timeout expired, then the button
changes its status to unchecked.
The print heads must be at operating temperature (47°C - 116°F)
before a job will start printing.
51
Print Job Control Module
UV Curing
This button controls the UV curing lamps. The state of the button
Lamp Control reflects the state of the lamps. The UV lamps will timeout after
Button
15 minutes of inactivity (time can be changed by a service
technician). If lamps are extinguished when the timeout expired,
then the button change its status to unchecked. If lamps are off
before the print starts, then lamps are turned on automatically
and the button would reflect the state accordingly.
Table vacuum
button
This button controls the table vacuum and duplicates the
function of the table vacuum footswitch. The button reflects the
actual state of the table vacuum. Note: Once turned off, vacuum
cannot be turned on again for approximately 5 seconds.
Nozzle check
This button populates the active job list with a job that prints a
nozzle check pattern. The nozzle check print is used to identify
nozzle dropouts that can cause banding and other print quality
problems [See (see ‘Print a Nozzle Check’ on page 121)] .
4) Active Print Job List
The active job list consists of a table, job count summary on top and job order control
buttons on the left. A job count summary displays total number of active jobs and
number of jobs put on hold. Job order control buttons can be used to change order of
jobs enqueued for printing. The active job list has the following features:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
All incoming jobs printed using the ONYX workflow go directly into the active
job list.
After a job is printed it automatically moves from the active to the inactive job
list.
The operator can drag and drop jobs to move them between the active and
inactive job lists (except for a job that is being prepared to print).
All the jobs are stored locally on the printer hard drive. Print jobs can be sorted
by selecting the labels at the top of each column in the list.
Selecting a job highlights the job and updates the job information area.
Jobs can be moved up/down in the active list and can either be printed, held or
deleted. Jobs deleted from the active list are moved to the inactive list.
The current job being printed can be paused or canceled. A canceled job will
move from the active to the inactive print job list.
A job count summary displays the total number of active and inactive jobs and
the number of active jobs on hold.
5) Inactive Print Job List
Inactive job list consists of a table and job count summary on top. A job count
summary displays total number of inactive jobs. The list can be sorted by clicking on
the appropriate column header. First column reflecting the job status is sorted by job
status only. The size column is sorted by image area. Date column is sorted by a
compound value of date and time. The inactive job list has the following features:
52
Chapter 4 How to Navigate the User Interface
Print Job Control Module
■
■
The operator can drag and drop jobs to move them between the active and
inactive job lists.
Jobs deleted from the inactive list are deleted from the hard drive.
6) Table Placement Preview
The table placement preview shows the print location and a proportional
representation of the image in relation to the table. The zoom button in the bottom
right corner activates a popup preview window. If a preview image is not available,
an approximately sized gray box is used as a placeholder
7) Job information and parameters panel
The job information area displays job parameters of the current print job. Some of
the parameters may be modified.
53
Print Job Control Module
[20]
Offsets
A job's vertical and horizontal offset parameters can be
changed with the mouse wheel when mouse cursor is
positioned over the field. Rotating the mouse wheel up or
down increments or decrements offset at the rate of one
unit per notch. Holding right mouse button and rotating the
wheel increments or decrements at the rate of 10 units per
notch.
Print Parameters
Displays information about the print job that is currently
selected:
■ Print quality mode - Production, Quality, or Fine Art
mode.
Note that when Quality mode is set in
ProductionHouse, this field will have a pull-down box
that allows you to select Quality-Matte. Select this to
provide a matte finish to the entire image. This is
needed on some media such as FomeCore, GatorPlast
or Styrene as a glossy image tends to have a matte line
at the end of each swath with these media.
Quality-Matte resolves this issue.
■ Direction - Bidirectional or Forward or Reverse
unidirectional printing
■ Overprints - If the Overprint count is set to greater
than 0 (zero), the printer will re-print the image again
on the same piece of media.
■ Copies
■ Print Method - Flatbed
■ ProductionHouse Media used
■ Notes - Appears only if a note was specified for the job.
Notes are entered in ONYX ProductionHouse.
Job Parameters
■
■
■
Notes
Copies - use the mouse to increase or decrease, as
required
Type - currently only Flatbed type is available.
Media used - displays the type of media.
Appears only if a note was specified for the job. Notes are
entered in ONYX ProductionHouse.
8) Printer Module Tabs
These tabs allow you to switch between different functional modules of the printer.
Click on a tab to display the screen associated with each of the modules available.
9) Software Version Number
Displays the version of the currently installed printer software.
10) Image Upload Progress
54
Chapter 4 How to Navigate the User Interface
Print Job Control Module
The image upload progress panel indicates the name of a job that is currently
uploading to the printer. This panel only displays information when an image is
uploading from the ProductionHouse computer.
55
Printer Setup Module
Printer Setup Module
Introduction
The Printer Setup Module allows the operator to look at the network connection
settings, configure how units are displayed, set the language preference, set the date
and time, and set image quality settings.
Illustration
[35]
[35] Printer Setup
Date and Time Settings
■
■
■
Date - display only, cannot change the date.
Time - change the time of day, if required.
Time Zone - select the time zone for the printer location.
Network Connection Settings
Note: Typcally, DHCP is used to automatically obtain network settings. If "Use
DHCP" is selected, the only thing you might want to change is the network name of
56
Chapter 4 How to Navigate the User Interface
Printer Setup Module
the printer. The settings are displayed to troubleshoot possible network connection
problems. One situation that would require changes is if your network does not use
DHCP to automatically obtain network settings. In this case network settings have
to be entered manually. If you don't know how to do this, bring in a network
consultant to determine what the setting must be for the network (alternately, you
can purchase a DHCP router for your network that will automatically supply the
network settings).
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Network Name
Printer Description
Network Adapter Name
MAC Address
Use DHCP
IP Address
Subnet Mask
Default Gateway
User Interface Settings
Languages Supported
The user interface can be set to display the following languages:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
English - US
English - UK
German
French
Dutch
Japanese
Italian
Spanish
Measurement Units
Allows you to specify how to display offsets and dimensions units:
■
■
Metric
Imperial
57
Special Prints Module
Special Prints Module
Introduction
The Special Prints module consist of two lists.
The list on the left displays available special test prints. Most of these prints are used
by service technicians to adjust and troubleshoot the printer. The one that is of
interest to the Operator is the Nozzle Check (see ‘Print a Nozzle Check’ on
page 121). The Nozzle Check is used to determine if there are any clogged nozzles
that can affect print quality (note that it is also available on the command toolbar in
the Print Job Control module).
The list on the right shows all active jobs that are currently in the print queue. If you
remove a job from this list, it is also removed from the active job list.
Illustration
[36]
[36] Special Prints Module
How to Load a Special Print
1) Click to select a test print in the left window
2) Click the Add button to place it in the print queue on the right.
The test print is now available in the Active job list.
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Chapter 4 How to Navigate the User Interface
Special Prints Module
How to Print a Special Print
Go to the Print Job Control module to actually print the test print. It will appear in
the active job list and is printed like any other print job.
Note: Refer to the sections that document the two special prints for details on
printing. For example, the Nozzle check is printed on I/O paper, while the Ruler Print
is printed directly on the table.
59
Installation and Upgrade Module
Installation and Upgrade Module
Introduction
As we are committed to improve and refine the quality and functionality of the
Arizona 250 GT printer, there will be periodic upgrades to the underlying firmware
and printer software. Software updates are available only to customers with a service
contract. Your local service representative will either install the upgrade or provide
you with the upgrade file in some circumstances.
Illustration
[37]
[37] Printer Upgrade Module
How to Upgrade the Firmware and Software
Your dealer or service representative will advise you when an upgrade of the printer
software is necessary. If they request that you install the upgrade, instructions will
be provided with the upgrade file.
60
Chapter 4 How to Navigate the User Interface
Chapter 5
How to Operate the Arizona
250 GT
61
Training Requirements
Training Requirements
Introduction
The operator must receive training for safety, printer operation, and
ProductionHouse® software prior to operating the Arizona 250 GT printer.
Safety Training
Before operating the Arizona 250 GT printer, make sure you have read and
understood all of Chapter 3 "Safety Guidelines".
Océ Operator Training
For optimal safety and print quality, all Arizona 250 GT printer operators must have
received training by qualified Océ service personnel. Océ training provides a general
orientation to printer safety and operating procedures. This User Manual is not a
substitute for official training.
Onyx ProductionHouse Training
Maximum performance from the Arizona 250 GT printer requires a properly trained
operator. Océ trains the operator in the use of the printer hardware and software at
installation. However, this is not a substitute for formal ProductionHouse® training.
Operators of the Arizona 250 GT should be fully versed in the operation of Onyx
ProductionHouse® . For any operator unfamiliar with its operation, Onyx
ProductionHouse® training is required. Training courses are available; contact your
local representative for an Onyx-certified training program.
Note: PosterShop is not capable of producing profiles for color management with
the Arizona 250 GT and also does not have the layout editor capabilities of
ProductionHouse. Also, if you use PosterShop the Arizona 250 GT printer driver
must be purchased (it is included at no cost with ProductionHouse). Therefore we
recommend that customers not use PosterShop with this printer.
62
Chapter 5 How to Operate the Arizona 250 GT
How to Switch the Printer On and Off
How to Switch the Printer On and Off
Introduction
This section describes how to switch the printer On and Off. When the printer is
switched On, the Arizona 250 GT software is displayed on the LCD flat panel
monitor. The monitor is located on the Operator Control Station. From there the
operator can access and control the printer (see ‘Operator Interface Software’ on
page 46). When the printer is switched Off for long periods, there are things to
consider that are documented in this section.
Before you begin
Before you apply AC power to the printer, make sure that loose objects such as
clothing, tools and cleaning materials are not interfering with the printer
mechanisms. Position the power cord so that it does not pose a hazard when walking
around or moving media or other objects near the printer. The Arizona 250 GT has
an AC power switch that turns the printer On or Off. The switch also functions as
an AC power lock-out switch. It is located at the Power end of the printer.
Caution: THE SOCKET OUTLET MUST BE INSTALLED NEAR THE
EQUIPMENT AND BE EASILY ACCESSIBLE. Ensure that you follow the
guidelines in the Arizona 250 GT Site Preparation Guide before plugging
the printer AC power plug into the socket.
Attention: Unplug the blue power cord from the printer to completely isolate
the electronics of the printer, especially when you move or service the printer.
How to Power ON
1. Ensure that the blue AC power plug is properly seated; and
2. Turn on the AC power On/Off switch.
63
How to Switch the Printer On and Off
[38]
[38] AC Power Switch
3. If it is not already on, turn on the power of the Control Station LCD display.
During the boot-up procedure, the printer operating system is loaded and the User
Interface software is automatically started. The software displays a splash screen
followed by the initial Job Control module screen. The initialization is complete
when the top left panel of the display shows "Ready".
Attention: After powering the printer On, leave it running continuously, even
when at idle. Failure to leave the printer powered on may result in ink draining
out of the ink reservoirs.
How to Power Off
1. Turn the AC power switch to the OFF position.
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Chapter 5 How to Operate the Arizona 250 GT
How to Switch the Printer On and Off
2. Close the vacuum shut-off valves on top of the Carriage ink reservoir to prevent the
ink from draining out and filling the waste tray.
[39]
[39] Vacuum Shutoff Valves (Magenta, Yellow are Off - Black, Cyan still ON)
3. Open the vacuum shutoff valves again when the power is turned back on.
Note: Extended Power Off
If the power is switched off for only a short period (for example, when the printer is
shut down and then immediately restarted to correct an electrical problem), it is not
necessary close the ink valves. However, if it is necessary to turn off the power for
an extended period, then close all of the ink valves to prevent the ink from draining.
Also if the printer is powered off for more than one day, perform a Printhead
Maintenance and Swab the heads before power is turned off.
How to Lock Out the Power Switch
Attention: Some simple maintenance and service procedures require locking
out the On/Off switch to ensure operator safety. When the switch is locked out,
it is impossible to supply power to the printer.
1. Turn the AC power switch to the Off position.
2. Apply a lock and a tag-out label to the Lock-out area of the switch for the duration
of any service or maintenance procedures.
3. Close the shutoff valves on top of the Carriage ink reservoir to prevent the ink from
draining into the maintenance Station.
4. Open the shutoff valves again when the power is turned back on.
5. When maintenance or service is complete, remove the lock and tag-out label and turn
the AC power switch to the On position.
65
How to Switch the Printer On and Off
Illustration
[40]
[40] AC Power Switch and Lockout
How to Use the Disconnect Device
Attention: The AC power switch is the main disconnect device for the printer.
For maximum safety, if the printer is moved, the blue AC power plug must first
be unplugged from the printer.
1. Follow the Lock-out procedure above.
2. For additional safety, also disconnect the blue power plug.
3. When the printer is successfully moved or the repair work is complete, re-connect
the power plug and unlock the AC power switch.
66
Chapter 5 How to Operate the Arizona 250 GT
How to Install the Onyx Printer Driver
How to Install the Onyx Printer Driver
Introduction
This section explains how to install and configure the Onyx ProductionHouse
Arizona 250 GT printer installation file.
Purpose
The printer installation file configures the Onyx software so that it knows how to
communicate with the Arizona 250 GT. This prepares the printer so that the operator
can manage print jobs.
Before you begin
Make sure that the Onyx ProductionHouse application software is installed before
you install the printer driver.
Note: The Onyx Printer Installation Driver File can be installed as the final step in
the installation of the Onyx ProductionHouse software application or it can be
downloaded separately and installed later. However, it must be available for the
software to communicate with the printer.
Installation Procedure
1. Power on the printer.
2. Select the Setup tab in the printer software to access the printer's network name.
3. Verify that there is an Ethernet network connection between the ProductionHouse
computer and the printer. To do this click on the Windows Start button the select My
Computer, My Network Places and ensure that the network name for the Arizona
250 GT is on the list.
4. Install the Arizona 250 GT Printer Installation File on the ProductionHouse
computer (if you have not already done this during the installation of the
ProductionHouse software). To install, click Start, All Programs, then
ProductionHouse and select Add Printer.
5. Select the media to be installed and continue with the installation.
6. After the printer driver is installed the Configure Printer Port window will launch
automatically. Select TCP/IP Printer then click on Configure.
67
How to Install the Onyx Printer Driver
[41]
[41] Configure Printer Port
7. Enter the Network name of the printer (as displayed in Step 3) and make sure <Port
9100> is selected for the port.
[42]
[42] Configure Printer Host Name
Note: If you have more than one Arizona 250 GT printer, each printer must have a
unique network name. The network name can be changed in the Settings module of
the printer User Interface.
Check Configuration
Click on Test to verify that the computer and printer are in communication.
If the Test was successful, a verification message is displayed to indicate a Valid IP
address was found.
Correction
1. If no valid IP address is found, check that the network name of the printer is correct
and that port 9100 was selected.
2. Run the Test again.
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Chapter 5 How to Operate the Arizona 250 GT
How to Install the Onyx Printer Driver
Result
When a Valid IP address for the printer is verified, click on OK to complete the
configuration of the communication link between ProductionHouse and the Arizona
250 GT printer.
69
Daily Start-up and Shut-down
How to Manage Print Jobs
Daily Start-up and Shut-down
Introduction
Keep your printer clean and perform all recommended scheduled maintenance to
ensure that the printer is ready to produce optimal quality images.
When to do
The start-up procedure must be performed every morning or after a period of time
when the printer has not been used. The shut-down procedure indicated here is for
the end of a regular workday. If the printer is shut down for longer periods of time
than a few days, then there are more considerations, as documented in the previous
section on How to Switch the Printer Off (see the note on Extended Power Off).
Before you begin
Review the sections on hardware and software interface if you are not familiar with
the Command Toolbar and other components mentioned in this section.
Note: Make sure the ink is up to temperature before you perform Printhead
Maintenance.
Start-up Procedure
1. Turn on the Ink Heater (click on the Ink Temperature Control icon located on the
Command Toolbar of the Job Control screen).
2. Clean the carriage underside ((see ‘Clean Carriage Underside’ on page 108)
3. Perform Printhead Maintenance (see ‘Printhead Maintenance’ on page 100) after
the ink temperature has reached at least 40° Centigrade.
Shut-down Procedure
1. Turn off the UV lamps (click on the lamp icon located on the Command Toolbar of
the Job Control screen).
2. Turn off the table vacuum.
3. If it is the end of the work week, swab the printheads ((see ‘Swab Printheads’ on
page 105)
4. Turn off the ink heater (click on the Ink Temperature Control icon located on the
Command Toolbar of the Job Control screen).
70
Chapter 5 How to Operate the Arizona 250 GT
How to Set Up a Print Job
How to Set Up a Print Job
Introduction
This section explains how to select an image to print on the Arizona 250 GT. The
basic steps are outlined here and explained below. More detailed explanations for
some of these steps are available (see ‘Print Job Control Module’ on page 48).
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
Prepare A Digital Image Using Onyx ProductionHouse
Print The Job From Onyx ProductionHouse To The Arizona 250 GT Printer
Perform Printhead Maintenance (If First Print Of The Day)
Select Job To Be Printed and Check Print Parameters
Measure Media Thickness
Select Print Icon, select Print Mode, and Confirm Media Thickness
Prepare Media for Printing
Place And Register Media On The Printer Vacuum Table
Select Active Print Zones
Mask Active Vacuum Zones Not Covered With Media
Turn On Table Vacuum
Adjust Bleed Valve, If Required
Clean Media, If Required
Check the table to make sure that there are no obstacles that can interfere with the
travel of the gantry or carriage
Start the Print
Prepare a Digital Image with ProductionHouse
Operator must be trained to use ProductionHouse, (documentation and training
provided by Onyx).
Print The Job From Onyx ProductionHouse
When the job is sent from ProductionHouse, the job transmission progress is
indicated in the lower right corner of the User Interface display. After the
transmission has completed it will appear in the list of Active print jobs in the Job
Control Module.
Perform Printhead Maintenance (if this is the first print of the day)
Refer to the Maintenance section in this manual for details (see ‘Printhead
Maintenance’ on page 100). This must be done at the beginning of the work day or
when image quality such as banding appears.
71
How to Set Up a Print Job
Measure Media Thickness
Use a digital slide caliper or micrometer to accurately measure the media thickness
of the media. An error in measurement of media thickness will affect bi-directional
alignment and can contribute to the amount of graininess in the printed image or
cause a carriage/printhead crash with the media.
Set the Printer to Flatbed
Select the Flatbed button on the toolbar to prepare the printer. This is required only
when the printer is initially started, or if it is reset due to an error condition.
Select Job To Be Printed, Check Print Parameters And Verify Media Thickness
Click on the job to be printed from the active job list to select it. After it is selected
the parameters on the job information and parameters panel will be displayed and
may be modified if desired. Refer to the section Graphical User Interface Display for
details on what is displayed and how to modify the job information.
Select Print Icon, Print Mode, and Confirm Media Thickness
When you select the Print toolbar icon it will gray-out the icon and the hand icon to
the left of the job to be printed will turn green.
When printing Flatbed mode and Flatbed icon on the command toolbar is not
selected, select it. Similarly, if printing in roll mode and the Roll icon is not selected
select it.
The print job's icon should change to red/orange, and also the Pause icon and
Confirm thickness buttons should appear in the command toolbar right beside Media
thickness field.
Enter the measured media thickness value in indicated measurement units.
Select the 'Confirm thickness' button.
Prepare Media for Printing
Place And Register Media On The Printer Vacuum Table
Place the media on the table in the orientation that matches the job to printed and
register the media to the print origin. In the next section there are more details on
how to perform the following actions (see ‘The Media Vacuum System’ on page 74).
Select Active Vacuum Zones
Select the required vacuum zones to hold the media to the table using the table
vacuum. The three vacuum zone control handles control which of the three zones on
the printer table will have vacuum applied when the table vacuum pump is turned on.
The vacuum zones are opened or closed using a quarter turn handle. Refer to the next
section for details on the dimensions and placement of the vacuum zones (see ‘How
to Create Custom Vacuum Zones’ on page 77).
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Chapter 5 How to Operate the Arizona 250 GT
How to Set Up a Print Job
Mask Active Vacuum Zones Not Covered With Media
To hold the media to the table it is important to completely cover active vacuum
zones with either the media to be printed on, or a masking material. The masking
material should not be thicker than the media to be printed on. If a full bleed image
is to be printed, the masking material should be the same thickness as the media to
be printed on to prevent overspray from accumulating on the print head nozzle
plates.
Turn On Table Vacuum
Click on the Vacuum button in the top right corner of the UI display to activate the
table vacuum. Also a vacuum foot pedal switch is provided to help secure the media
on the table vacuum. Step on the foot pedal to toggle the table vacuum on or off.
Note: When the vacuum is switched off, wait a few seconds before you switch it on
again.
Adjust Vacuum Bleed Valve, If Required
A bleed valve can be adjusted to reduce or increase the amount of vacuum suction
on the media. Less suction reduces artifacts caused by the suction when imaging on
flexible media. In most cases when printing on rigid material, full vacuum suction is
desired.
Clean Media, If Required
If the media is dusty or dirty, clean it with an appropriate cleaner. If using a liquid
like isopropyl alcohol, allow sufficient time to dry prior to imaging.
Start Print
The Print button is located at the corner of the table where media is loaded. Press the
Print button to start the print job. If the job was selected, the media thickness
confirmed and the vacuum is turned on, printing will start after the ink and lamps
reach operating temperature.
Note: When the ink is at a low room temperature it may take up to 20 minutes for it
to warm up to operating temperature. The printer will not print until the ink warms
up. Also, when the printer is idle it will maintain the ink at operating temperature for
two hours.
Note: The image is printed towards the print origin instead of away from it (i.e., the
last data line to be printed is the line at the print origin). The reason the image is
printed in this direction is to allow the gantry to lead the image in the print direction
so it does not block the image when it starts printing. Also it reduces the time it takes
for the gantry to start the print.
73
The Media Vacuum System
How to Manage the Media Vacuum
The Media Vacuum System
Introduction
The Arizona 250 GT uses a low-flow, high-vacuum system to secure rigid media for
printing on the printer table. A fabricated aluminum overlay sheet placed on the
surface of the table creates the vacuum field. The overlay sheet is pin-registered to
the table. A rotary vane vacuum pump is used to evacuate the chamber of air between
the sheet and the table. Three air-feed ports connect the chamber to the vacuum
pump through a series of manually operated flow valves. These valves are used to
activate or shut down the different vacuum zones. In order for the system to work
effectively during printing all the circular pockets on the top surface of the overlay
sheet connected to an active vacuum chamber must be covered. This creates a closed
vacuum system. A bleed valve is provided to adjust the level of vacuum, if so
desired.
Vacuum Overlay Sheet
The vacuum overlay sheet is supported on the table by 5mm diameter formed
half-shear features. This produces a small gap between the sheet and the top of the
table for air to flow. Foam tape applied around the perimeter of the sheet provides an
edge seal. Additional foam tape can be used within the perimeter to create up to three
custom vacuum zones. The 5mm diameter half-shear feature creates the equivalent
of a counter-bored hole or circular pocket on the top surface of the panel. Each of
these pockets is connected to the sealed underside of the panel by 1.5mm diameter
punched holes.
Default Vacuum Zones
The printer is shipped from the factory configured with one large vacuum zone that
accomodates the maximum media size. There are two suggested custom vacuum
zone configurations, one for Metric and one for Imperial units. These zones can be
set up for common media sizes, and can be modified with additional foam tape. The
next section has more information on how to create custom zones (see ‘How to
Create Custom Vacuum Zones’ on page 77).
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Chapter 5 How to Operate the Arizona 250 GT
The Media Vacuum System
Illustration
[21]
1 - Bleed Valve partly
open
2 - Left Zone is Open
[43]
3 - Top Zone is
Open
4 - Right Zone is
Closed
[43] Vacuum Zone Controls
Vacuum Zone Control Handles
These controls are meant for use with custom vacuum zones. If you only use the
factory default of one large zone, make sure all three handles are left in the open
position. When you create custom zones the three control valves are used to control
which zones of the printer table will have vacuum applied when the table vacuum
pump is turned on. To close a zone turn the control handle a quarter turn clockwise.
Vacuum Table Foot Pedal
The vacuum foot pedal toggles the table vacuum on or off. It helps the operator to
secure the media on the vacuum table since it allows hands-free operation. The
vacuum must be turned on prior to starting a print, and the vacuum cannot be turned
off until a print is completed.
Vacuum Bleed Valve & Guage
The bleed valve handle is located to the left of the vacuum control handles. This
bleed valve can be adjusted to control the amount of vacuum suction on the media.
Less suction reduces artifacts caused by the suction when imaging on flexible media.
If you see dimples on the media that are the same size and location as the vacuum
table punched holes, introduce bleed until the dimples disappear from the media.
The bleed valve is off when its handle is in the horizontal position. To activate the
bleed valve, turn the handle to the vertical position. The closer the handle is to the
vertical position, the more vacuum pressure is reduced. The guage on the side of the
75
The Media Vacuum System
table above the bleed valve handle provides a visual representation of the actual
vacuum pressure.
How to Maintain the Vacuum Overlay Sheet
If an overlay sheet is damaged, replace it. The overlay is an optional commercial
item and can be ordered from your local sales representative. You may want to
purchase multiple overlays if you need multiple common material sizes or a regular,
repeating job that is non-square or unusually sized.
If ink build-up occurs on the overlay sheet, remove the ink. If it is not removed, the
print gap could be affected and this may affect the vacuum table's ability to secure
the media properly. To remove ink we recommend that you use a paint scraper
containing a straight edge razor blade (these can be found at a local hardware store).
Refer to the Maintenance section for more detailed instructions.
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Chapter 5 How to Operate the Arizona 250 GT
How to Create Custom Vacuum Zones
How to Create Custom Vacuum Zones
Introduction
A fabricated aluminum overlay sheet placed on the surface of the printer table is used
to create a vacuum field that is divided into zones. When the printer is installed, a
single zone equal to the maximum media size is available. Vacuum zones can be
configured in the field to meet specific customer requirements for media sizes. This
section describes the procedure to re-configure the vacuum overlay sheet to use
custom zones. These recommended zones shown below are either in Metric or
Imperial dimensions according to operator preference.
The vacuum control handles are used with the custom vacuum zones. When you
create custom zones the three control valves control which zones of the printer table
will have vacuum applied when the table vacuum pump is turned on. The left handle
controls the Left zone, the middle controls the Top zone and the right controls the
Right zone. The vacuum zones are open when the handles are vertical. To close a
zone, turn the control handle a quarter turn clockwise.
Purpose
The vacuum system holds the media in place. The three three suggsted zones
described in this section are arranged to accommodate common media dimensions.
If you create custom zones, they can be turned off or on according to where media
is placed. If you have additional aluminum overlays you can quickly change the
configuration of the vacuum zones by placing another overlay.
When to do
If the suggested custom zones on your printer do not match with media sizes that you
use frequently, it is possible to change the layout of the zones to suit your particular
purpose. This helps to minimize the use of tape and placement of media that will not
be printed on when the media size does not match exactly with the zone size.
Required tool
foam tape (part # 3010044085 is supplied in the Accessory Kit)
Note: Make sure you clean the area with isopropyl alcohol before you apply foam
tape to create a new zone.
77
How to Create Custom Vacuum Zones
Illustration
[22]
(0,0) Print Origin
(1) Left Vacuum
Zone
(2) Right Vacuum (3) Top Vacuum
Zone
Zone
[44]
(4) Vacuum Bleed (5) Left Zone
Valve
Control
(6) Top Zone
Control
[44] Imperial Vacuum Zones
[45]
[45] Metric Vacuum Zones
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Chapter 5 How to Operate the Arizona 250 GT
(7) Right Zone
Control
How to Create Custom Vacuum Zones
How to Set Up Custom Zones
1. Flip the aluminum overlay sheet over (requires two people).
2. Remove any foam tape that is no longer required in the new configuration
3. Clean with isopropyl alcohol the area of the overlay sheet where the new foam tape
4.
5.
6.
7.
is to be applied.
Measure and add foam tape in desired locations to create zones. When creating a
zone it is recommended active vacuum holes are a minimum of 15 mm from the
outside edges of the media. This will optimize the sealing effect between the media
and the table.
Flip the overlay sheet over and position it on the registration pins.
Completely cover all zones, close the bleed valve, turn on vacuum and verify the
closed system vacuum level is > 20 inches of Hg. Also verify that the time it takes
for the vacuum to establish is less than 4 seconds.
Repeat step 6 for the all other zones individually.
79
How to Handle Media
How to Manage Media
How to Handle Media
Introduction
Océ Display Graphics Systems has conducted extensive testing of many media.
Since the Arizona 250 GT printer is capable of imaging on a wide range of material,
we encourage you to explore various media so that you can establish your own
criteria for achieving high quality images in your work environment.
Use ICC profiles to control ink density and to help achieve consistent color. If an ICC
profile is not available for a particular media and it is not possible or convenient to
create one specifically for that media, select an ICC profile for another media that is
similar in composition and color and the results will very likely be acceptable.
Profiles are much less media-dependant for UV ink printers like the Arizona 250 GT
than for solvent-based printers. For access to Onyx ProductionHouse profiles, please
consult our web site at:
http://www.dgs.oce.com/PrinterSupport/Arizona250GT_Customer/
Definition
The term media covers a wide range of possible materials for the Arizona 250 GT
printer. Essentially, any material that is less than 45mm (1.9 inches) thick, and less
than the maximum size of 1.25m wide x 2.5m long (49.2 in x 98.4 in), can be
considered viable media. Some materials will hold the ink better than others, so we
encourage you to experiment with media to determine what works best for your
purpose.
Attention: Do not print on mirrors or any other highly reflective media as UV
light is reflected off such media. This results in curing the ink in the heads and
thus damaging them.
How to Handle, Store, and Clean Media
See material-specific documentation for recommended handling and storage
requirements. General material storage and handling suggestions follow:
■
80
Store media in a dry environment avoiding high temperature, high humidity, or
direct sunlight. The size of the material can change according to the temperature
Chapter 5 How to Operate the Arizona 250 GT
How to Handle Media
■
■
■
■
■
■
and/or humidity changes of the working environment. Ideally, store media in the
same environmental conditions as it will be used.
Store media flat to reduce tendency to bow. Do not use creased, damaged, torn,
curled, or warped material.
Do not leave material loaded in the printer for an extended period of time. The
material may curl resulting in misalignment, jams, or decreased printing quality.
Some material has a printable side and a non-printable side. If you print on a
non-printable side, adhesion and color may be affected.
Handle media with lint-free gloves. Oil deposits from fingers will degrade print
quality. Do not touch the printable side of material.
Media must be free of lint, dust, oil or other debris. Use techniques and solutions
that are appropriate to the manufacturer's recommendations.
Use a tack cloth to clean media as it will reduce static buildup. Press lightly when
you use a tack cloth to prevent residue deposit on the media.
Note: Dirty media can affect image quality and reliability of printer output. If you
wipe the media with a tack cloth before printing, it will reduce ink buildup on the
carriage underside. The tack cloth removes static and also removes particles that
tend to attract stray ink drops that result in ink buildup. Tack cloths are used by
auto-body shops to clean cars before painting. Océ does not provide additional tack
cloths beyond what is in the Accessory kit. If you did not receive a cloth or if you wish
to purchase additional tack cloths, they are available at local hardware or
auto-oriented stores.
Carriage Collision Recovery
If something on the table is higher than the media (or if the media is thicker than what
is actually set in the print job settings), a carriage collision may occur. If a collision
occurs, the carriage will stop and display a message on the User Interface panel.
After the operator clears the offending media from the table and before the next print
is started, printhead maintenance must be performed (see ‘Printhead Maintenance’
on page 100).
Media Adhesion
Some media have better adhesion quality than others. Also other factors such as the
amount of ink used and the amount of curing energy from the UV lamps can affect
adhesion.
If you are having a difficult problem with ink adhesion on a particular media, UV
Adhesion Master 720 is a pre-treatment solution that can be used to clean and treat
media surfaces to promote good adhesion. It is particularly useful when printing on
objects of unknown composition and for use in industrial applications. It is not
available in all countries due to substance/transport restrictions.
81
How to Handle Media
Thermal Expansion of Media
When imaging on media that will expand when subjected to heat (e.g., styrene or
Plexiglas, etc.), don’t wedge the media by butting other material against it as this
may cause the media to buckle. Also if multiple pieces of the media are used, allow
enough space between the pieces to allow for thermal expansion. Placing tape on
the table prior to laying down the media will prevent ink from being imaged onto
the table. Finally, if you overprint on media that expands when heat is applied, we
recommend that you group the desired image with a preceding image so the printer
is a consistent temperature when starting to print the desired image.
Thermal Deformation of Media
Some heat-sensitive media may deform when subjected to high heat. If this occurs
you can reduce the lamp power from the default setting of 7 to find a compromise
level that allows the ink to cure but does not warp the media. You can also try to print
uni-directional using only the trailing lamp (to do this set the power of the leading
lamp to 0).
Media Registration
Media can be registered on the table using the table rulers. These rulers are printed
on the table and provide a horizontal and vertical rule that originate from the 0,0 print
origin point on the table. The rulers can also help to provide offset distances if you
need to start a print away from the origin point.
Alternately, the media registration cards can be used to register media if it must be
placed consistently away from the table rulers. These PVC adhesive-backed card can
be placed anywhere on the table to set new coordinates for print origin to enable
consistent registration of media in that location. Make sure that you set the offsets to
match the location of the cards. Note: these cards can be stacked, but if more than
two of them are stacked, the carriage will collide with them if you print at zero media
height. Always check the height if you use multiple stacked cards so that they match
the height of your media and the set the carriage height accordingly.
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Chapter 5 How to Operate the Arizona 250 GT
Underlay Board to Reduce Artifacts
Underlay Board to Reduce Artifacts
Introduction
When printing on thin, flexible, or porous media, the holes in the vacuum table of
the printer can cause print artifacts (sometimes referred to as “dimpling”). If you
encounter this problem when printing, use the provided underlay board between the
media and the table to reduce the problem.
Purpose
To reduces print artifacts (dimples) on thin or flexible media.
When to do
If you use a thin media that shows dimples that correspond to the holes in the
vacuum table, then you may need to use the underlay board beneath your media to
avoid this problem.
Before you begin
A Medium Density Fiber (MDF) underlay board ships with the printer. If this board
is damaged, replacements are not available from Océ Display Graphics Systems.
You must source the underlay locally (these boards are used with routers that require
vacuum tables, which may help you locate a local supplier). If you can't source an
underlay board locally, here is a possible source for them.
North American contact information (a suggested source - other sources of similar
products may be available. For other areas, check your local hardware and router
supply stores):
THERMWOOD Corp.
904 Buffaloville Road
PO Box 436 DALE, IN 47523
USA Contact: Melanie Tullis
Tel.1-800-221-3865 Ext. 266
email: [email protected]
You can get more information from their website:
http://www.woodworkerswholesale.com/
Note: If you use the underlay board, make sure that you cover over any areas of the
board not covered by the media or the vacuum pressure will be reduced. Also make
sure that there are no high spots that could cause a carriage collision.
83
Underlay Board to Reduce Artifacts
Illustration
[46]
[46] Underlay Board with Media
How to Prepare the Underlay Board
1. Seal the edges of the underlay board with tape or use a liquid sealer to prevent
vacuum leaks through the edges of the board.
2. Cover any area of the board not covered by the media to avoid vacuum loss.
Tips On How to Use the Underlay Board:
1. Use scrap pieces of media to cover any exposed area of the underlay board that the
carriage will travel over. This prevents the board from lifting off the table and
colliding with the carriage.
2. It may be necessary to bleed the vacuum by opening, or partially opening an
additional vacuum zone to reduce dimple artifacts.
3. Confirm that the underlay thickness is added to the media thickness and set correctly.
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Chapter 5 How to Operate the Arizona 250 GT
Chapter 6
Ink System Management
85
Arizona 250 GT Ink
Arizona 250 GT Ink
Introduction
The Arizona 250 GT uses UV-curable inks including Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and
Black. Due to the UV curing technology, the ink dries immediately, but can take up
to 24 hours to cure fully. In most cases, the printed material may be handled or cut
directly after printing. The ink part numbers, which are necessary for ordering more
ink, are provided in the table in this section.
These inks have very little odor, but for optimal safety some ventilation is needed.
The printer should operate in an area where a good standard of general ventilation is
available at 5 to 10 air changes per hour. Mechanical Ventilation must be added
where the air changes per hour are under 5 per hour. The minimum space/working
room volume for the printer is 69 m3 or 2430 cubic feet.
Note: Read the section on ink safety (see ‘Safety Guidelines for Ink Materials’ on
page 18) before you handle the ink.
The printer is optimized for IJC255 UV-curable ink. The ink is supplied to the printer
in 2 liter collapsible bags that are loaded into the printer by means of quick-change
connectors that are bonded into the top corner. To install on the printer, the bags are
inverted and the quick connect couplers are pushed into their corresponding female
coupling. This opens up the flow path for the ink. The bags contain tags that
identifies them to the printer when they are loaded. This allows the printer to ensure
that the correct ink is loaded.
This method of ink delivery has several benefits over bottles or cartridges:
The self-collapsing bags make it easy to see how much ink remains in each bag
without having to reference the user-interface.
■
■
■
Virtually all the ink is successfully extracted from the bag by the printer, reducing
the otherwise costly waste of usable ink.
Ink changes are performed without mess or spills, keeping the environment
around the printer clean.
Ink changes can be performed during printing - this prevent wasted prints and lost
time.
Only qualified inks can be used. If a bag of ink with an invalid serial number, expired
use-by date, incorrect color placement in the ink bay, or if an expired tag is connected
to the printer, then the operator is alerted and an error message is recorded is
displayed.
The ink delivery system provides the printheads with ink at the appropriate
temperature and pressure. Each printhead has a corresponding ink reservoir on the
carriage. Pumps supply ink to the reservoirs on demand. Float sensors in the
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Chapter 6 Ink System Management
Arizona 250 GT Ink
reservoirs control the level of ink and initiate demand when required. Ink
temperature control is achieved by pumping a coolant fluid through the ink reservoir
block and printheads. An internal thermostat on each printhead and one on the
reservoir block provides temperature feedback.
The condition of the printheads is maintained by periodic cleaning at the
maintenance station on the gantry. During this procedure the operator suctions the
printhead nozzle plates, removing ink and possible contaminates in the process
(details of this procedure are available in the Maintenance section(see ‘Printhead
Maintenance’ on page 100)).
UV Flush
UV Flush is used as a cleaning agent for the printheads or to flush the ink lines of
ink for a printer relocation or long-term storage.
Attention: Do not install inks that are not certified by Océ Display Graphics
Systems for use in this printer, as this may result in:
Poor quality prints, uncured ink in the finished prints (NOTE: This is a serious
health and safety risk!), and permanent damage to the ink pumps, filters, ink lines
or printheads.
87
Arizona 250 GT Ink
Illustration
[47]
[47] Ink Bay With Bags
IJC255 UV-Curable Inks
[23]
[23] Ink and Flush Part Numbers
Océ Part Number Description
3010104960
Black UV Curable Ink
3010104961
Cyan UV Curable Ink
3010104962
Magenta UV Curable Ink
3010104963
Yellow UV Curable Ink
3010105397
UV Flush solution
3010102599
Ink Filter
Ink Filters
The Arizona 250 GT ink system is protected from contaminants in the ink by means
of four ink filters. These are easily accessed and can be replaced by the end-user
when they become blocked with debris. The expected average lifetime for a filter is
approximately 6 months or 11 bags of ink (22 liters). However, some filters can last
88
Chapter 6 Ink System Management
Arizona 250 GT Ink
longer and some will require more frequent replacements due to the ink color
(pigment) and varying rates of use.
Note: A loss of pigment when printing a nozzle check indicates that a filter is
clogged and must be replaced.
How to Store and Handle UV Ink
To ensure good quality images and to extend the life of printheads in the Arizona 250
GT printer, it is important to have good UV ink management procedures. UV inks
must be properly handled and stored correctly.
■
■
■
■
Inks must be stored within a temperature range of 15º to 40ºC (59º to104ºF).
Exposure to extreme temperatures will reduce the expected life of the ink.
Do not use ink that is past the "Use by" date printed on the bag.
Perform Printhead Maintenance every day before printing.
Swab the printheads with UV Flush at least once a week (and as needed) to
dislodge any potential buildup of particles or ink.
Access to MSDS Ink Information
MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets) for each color of ink and the UV Flush are
available on the customer web site at:
http://www.dgs.oce.com/PrinterSupport/Arizona250GT_Customer/. The
information on these sheets is more detailed than the material found in the section
titled "Safety Guidelines for Ink Materials" in this document. Read and periodically
review this safety information to ensure optimal safe handling procedures and proper
emergency responses are followed when using UV inks and flush.
89
How to Change Ink Bags
How to Change Ink Bags
Introduction
The ink is supplied to the printer in 2 liter bags. The bags have a non-spill coupler
bonded into the top corner. When installing onto the printer, the bags are inverted and
the quick connect couplers are pushed into their corresponding female coupling opening up the flow path for the ink. If a bag of ink with an invalid serial number,
expired use-by date, incorrect color, or expired tag is connected to the printer, then
the operator is alerted.
When to do
An ink bag can be replaced at any time. Ink bags should be replaced when:
■
■
■
The operator LCD panel displays an "XXX ink low" message (the ink bag does
not need to be changed immediately but monitor the level of ink remaining and
change the bag before the ink runs out.
The operator sees the bag is empty.
An ink bag is nearly empty and the operator wants to leave the printer unattended
during a long print and does not want the ink to run out. The nearly empty bag
can be reconnected and used up later when the operator is present.
Note: An ink bag can be changed during a print job. it is not necessary to stop the
printer.
Before you begin
Safety Information - Use appropriate safety equipment - nitrile gloves and eye
protectors. Take precautions to avoid ink on your skin or in your eyes.
Caution: Be sure to read the section on Safety Guidelines for Ink Materials
before handling UV inks. Also, read the MSDS sheets available from the
Customer Support web site for more detailed information on ink safety and
handling.
90
Chapter 6 Ink System Management
How to Change Ink Bags
Illustration
[48]
[48] Remove the Quick-Release Coupler
How To Change an Ink Bag
Attention: For personal safety, we recommend that the operator always wear
nitrile gloves, a protective apron, and safety glasses with side shields when
handling inks.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Open the clear plastic door on the Ink Station.
Identify the the ink bag to be replaced.
Press the quick-release coupler button at the bottom corner of the ink bag.
Unhook the bag from the top of the ink station.
Replace with a new ink bag of the same color.
Push the quick-release coupler at the bottom corner of the new bag into place.
Note: If you place a bag in the wrong ink station (for example, yellow ink in the
black ink station) the display will show an error message and the printer will not
print until the correct bag is installed.
91
How to Change Ink Bags
92
Chapter 6 Ink System Management
Chapter 7
Error Handling and
Troubleshooting
93
Troubleshooting Overview
Troubleshooting Overview
Introduction
This section covers general problems that may occur with the printer. Malfunctions
that trigger system error messages can be caused by human error, a system
malfunction, an interface cable malfunction, mechanical printer malfunction and/or
printer firmware failure.
Definition
Printer Errors
Some errors are problems that interfere with the print process but do not shut down
the printer completely. Typically, these errors are problems that prevent starting a
printing job or that interrupt the current print. You should be able to fix these errors
without a service call. Other errors stop the printer and prevent operation until the
error is resolved. The printer interface informs you as to what is wrong by displaying
an error message on the LCD display. If the error message has an obvious solution,
apply the appropriate remedy. Otherwise note the exact error message and associated
error number and what the printer was doing before the error, then place a service
call.
Basic Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting helps you locate the source of errors and fix common problems that
can arise during printing.
Troubleshooting Areas:
■
■
■
Printer behavior
Print quality
Data transfer
Example 1
If There is No Power
Is the printer connected to a working power source?
The service should be a dedicated supply that is not susceptible to voltage
fluctuations. This service must be provided via an independent, double pole, fused
circuit breaker and a circuit ground (computer grade) located near the machine. The
service should meet all local and national standards for this type of installation. The
circuit breaker should be clearly labeled, indicating the On and Off positions, such
as '1' for On and '0' for Off. A suitable air gap should be maintained for safe electrical
isolation when in the Off position. The printer relies on this service for primary
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Chapter 7 Error Handling and Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting Overview
branch protection. If the printer is without power, check the local supply
voltage and verify that it is set correctly.
Example 2
Drops of Ink Appear on the Media
Check that there is no hair or other debris on the underside of the carriage. Objects
can accumulate ink mist and result in small drops of ink.
Check that the ink valves on top of the carriage are all open. If an ink valve is closed,
there is no vacuum pressure to hold the ink and it will drip out of the printhead.
If Problems Persist
If problems persist, perform the followingactions as appropriate for the situation:
• Check for media that is buckling or sitting too high on the table.
• If you just changed ink in the printer, review the procedures in this manual and
check for successful installation.
• Try printing a test print.
• If the printer is not receiving printjobs, check the network cable connection.
Note: If you still have problems, contact your Océ Display Graphics Systems
service representative.
Call for Service
Try to eliminate simple problems before you call your service representative.
However, it is important to know when to call for service. Without training,
servicing the printer yourself may cause further damage. When you have determined
that a service call is required, call as soon as possible. Have the following
information ready:
■
■
■
■
■
Printer serial number — located near the AC power plug.
The volume of media printed — available in the Printer Metrics module.
Error message displayed on the control panel, if any.
The exact circumstances when the error occurred, such as during printing, or
maintenance.
Note any unusual phenomena, such as peculiar printing, noises, and smells
associated with the failure.
95
How To Improve Quality When Banding Occurs
How To Improve Quality When Banding Occurs
Introduction
Banding can occur in an image for a number of reasons. Typically it occurs due to
neighboring nozzles that do not fire or multiple nozzles that fire with poor
directionality. This can occur if the printer sits idle for an extended period of time
(e.g., overnight or longer), or if debris has been picked up from the media or table by
a printhead. If this happens, perform the Printhead Maintenance procedure to clear
the affected printheads (see ‘Printhead Maintenance’ on page 100). If banding is
evident, print a nozzle check to identify which nozzles of a particular print head are
not firing (see ‘Print a Nozzle Check’ on page 121). After you perform the printhead
maintenance, print another nozzle check to confirm whether the problem has been
fixed.
If a print shows banding and a nozzle check print shows more than three separate
nozzles out or two or more adjacent nozzles out, the following procedures for
recovering clogged nozzles is recommended to improve image quality.
Note: Keep the table surface clean and ensure the media is clean and free of dust to
help reduce banding. Use an anti-static brush, if necessary. Also use a micrometer
to accurately measure the media thickness so the proper printhead gap between the
printhead and the media is used. If the printhead gap is less than it should be, there
is a greater probability of picking up debris on the printheads
Recovering Clogged Nozzles
When banding appears in an image and nozzle dropouts appear in the Nozzle Check
print, we recommend that printhead maintenance is performed. In some cases it may
be beneficial to print an image file after maintenance, to exercise the firing of the
nozzles, then run the Nozzle Check again.
If some nozzles are still out, perform a purge of only the printheads with nozzles out.
To do this, close the ink valves of the colors that don't require a purge, then purge to
remove excess inks.
If dropouts still persist, you can also swab the printheads Swab Printheads.
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Chapter 7 Error Handling and Troubleshooting
Chapter 8
Printer Maintenance
97
Maintenance Guidelines
Maintenance Guidelines
Introduction
The Arizona 250 GT operator is responsible for the regular maintenance of the
printer. This section provides detailed information about what is required for proper
printer maintenance.
While Océ Display Graphics Systems furnishes guidelines for periodic maintenance,
the optimum maintenance schedule evolves from careful observation of your printer
over a period of use. For example, some specified maintenance may be required
each time you use a particular media. The type of print job can also determine the
maintenance schedule. If the printer produces a high volume of solid fill prints, it
requires more tending than if it prints low-coverage images. Océ Display Graphics
Systems requires that the operator follows minimum cleaning and replacement
guidelines as described in this User Manual. A few minutes spent cleaning helps to
ensure the highest quality prints. Each production situation is different and involves
different types of print jobs, environmental conditions, duty cycles, and volume of
work. While we provide guidelines for periodic maintenance, the optimum
maintenance schedule depends on operator observation of the printer over a period
of use.
Attention: Keeping the printer clean, especially all parts associated with the
printheads, assures that your printer performs at its optimum and makes it easier
to diagnose a problem, such as a leak. Daily cleaning of all mechanical parts on
the printer is highly recommended.
Who Should Do Maintenance?
If your site has a technician in charge of machine maintenance, that person is the
optimal candidate. While routine maintenance may be performed by any trained
operator, the best maintenance results from familiarity with the printer's internal
operation and history.
Operator Maintenance Schedule
The Arizona 250 GT printer requires regular maintenance. Periodic cleaning should
be scheduled for some components during the week. A few minutes spent cleaning
ensures the highest quality prints. Several areas require maintenance to ensure the
highest print quality, and the printer design gives you easy access to all these areas.
Diligent application of the maintenance schedule ensures optimum performance
from your printer.
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Chapter 8 Printer Maintenance
Maintenance Guidelines
The following table provides our recommended maintenance schedule. This is a
minimum requirement and some procedures may need to be done with greater
frequency. Each of the procedures is explained in detail in this section in the order
of frequency required as presented in this table.
[24]
[24] Maintenance Frequency
Procedure
Frequency
Printhead Maintenance
Daily and as needed
Swab Printheads
Weekly and as needed
Clean Carriage Underside
Daily and as needed
Remove Ink from Table
As needed
Empty the Waste Tray
When ink is visible in maintenance station
Clean UV Lamp Filter
Weekly and as needed
Refill Coolant
Monthly and as needed
Clean Gantry Rails
Monthly and as needed
Change Ink Filter
After 11 bags of ink or if pigment looks weak
Change UV Lamp
When curing is insufficient
Print a Nozzle Check
When print quality is insufficient or banding
occurs
Reprint the Ruler
When the ruler become unreadable
Linear Encoders
Yearly
99
Printhead Maintenance
Maintenance Procedures
Printhead Maintenance
Introduction
The Maintenance Station is located below the carriage. Printhead Maintenance takes
place while the carriage is parked. The station is covered by a sliding door that has
an open grid in the center that allows any waste ink to drip down through the station
and into the waste tray. When you perform printhead maintenance, any excess ink
and associated debris are removed from the nozzles with the result that ink drops can
jet properly when the nozzles are clear.
Ink fill is disabled when the maintenance station sliding door is open. No more than
4 purges can take place (minimum of 10 seconds between purges) without closing
the cover plate and allowing the reservoirs to refill. Multiple purges are not required.
Note: The nozzle plate on the printhead has a non-wetting coating - contact with
this surface may affect the performance of the printhead. Do not wipe the nozzle
plate with anything other than the suction-head (or the supplied swabs when
following the swab procedure) as this can damage the nozzles and impair
performance.
Purpose
To clean the nozzles of the printheads and thus ensure better image quality and avoid
banding.
When to do
Maintenance occurs at the start of the day (after the printer has warmed up) or when
necessary (misfiring nozzles, banding in image, etc.).
Note: More maintenance is required in dusty environments, or when there are fibres
protruding from the media, or when printing on transparent media (more reflected
UV light hits the printheads).
Before you begin
Make sure the carriage is in the parked position. The carriage and gantry
automatically return to this position after an image is printed. Do not move the
carriage or gantry from this position as this will disable the ink pumps and thus
100
Chapter 8 Printer Maintenance
Printhead Maintenance
prevent the performance of an ink purge, which is necessary for printhead
maintenance.
Note: It is not necessary to turn off the UV lamps as they are shuttered. However,
they will be hot if they are on, so avoid touching them.
Ink must be at the operating temperature of at least 40° Centigrade (140° Fahrenheit)
before you perform printhead maintenance. The Job Control module of the User
Interface displays the ink temperature. If the temperature is low, activate the ink
heater by clicking its icon on the UI and then monitor the temperature display.
Required tool
3010104959 Cloth-Poly Wipe 10cmX10cm
Note: Safety glasses and nitrile gloves must be worn when performing maintenance.
Caution: The underside of the UV lamps may be hot, avoid touching them.
Also, be aware that the carriage moves up and down during printhead
maintenance and there is a crushing hazard if your hand or arm are placed
in the area above the three switches.
Attention: Do NOT press up too hard on the printhead while you swipe it with
the suction-head as this can dislodge the printhead and require a service call to
re-seat the printhead.
Note: Maintenance Station Switches:
There are 3 switches inside of the maintenance station . They can be operated in any
order. For example, you can press the second switch to raise the carriage to remove
debris from the underside of the carriage even when a purge isn't required.
1. Switch 1 to purge ink
2. Switch 2 to raise carriage
3. Switch 3 to activate suction pump
101
Printhead Maintenance
Illustration
[49]
[49] Maintenance Station Switches
How To Perform Maintenance
1. Verify that the ink temperature is at least 40° Centigrade (140° Fahrenheit) before
you begin printhead maintenance.
2. Slide the cover out from under the carriage to reveal the maintenance station.
3. Press and release switch 1 to initiate a purge. The carriage will lower to its purge
height (4mm above the table surface). Watch the ink as it falls from the heads. After
a few seconds most of the ink stops dripping and you can then raise the carriage.
4. Press switch 2 to raise the carriage to its maximum height.
Attention: Be careful not to snag the coiled suction-head hose when removing
the suction-head from the holder.
5. Press switch 3 to turn on the suction pump. Pick up the suction-head from the tray at
the left end of the maintenance station. Wipe the suction-head with a new, clean
lint-free wipe to remove any particles that could damage the nozzles in the
printheads.
102
Chapter 8 Printer Maintenance
Printhead Maintenance
[50]
[50] Clean Suction-Head
Note: In the next step, start with the left printhead and work to the right as this limits
the possibility that drops of ink will fall onto the coiled hose. Also, do not push up
too hard on the printhead as you may dislodge it and this will require a service call
to fix.
6. Slide the suction-head slowly along the entire length of each printhead at a speed of
approximately 8mm per second (8 seconds per printhead). The suction-head slides
on stainless steel strips on the printhead. Check to see that all ink is removed – repeat
if necessary.
[51]
[51] Swipe Printhead
7. Wipe the suction-head on a clean piece of new lint-free wipe before proceeding to
the next printhead.
Note: During maintenance, be careful not to touch the nozzle plates as this can
damage the printhead.
8. Slide the maintenance station cover back to its closed position. The carriage will
move back to its previous print-ready height.
9. Printer is now ready to print images.
103
Printhead Maintenance
Check Print Quality
1. Print a Nozzle Check to see if any nozzles are out.
2. Print an image to make sure there is no banding or other print quality issues.
Maintenance for Select Printheads
1. On the top of the carriage there are 4 hand-turnable vacuum shut-off valves. If you
have performed a printhead maintenance and find that one or more printheads
require additional maintenance, turn off the valves of all the other colors.
2. Perform all of the steps for printhead maintenance again, but only on the affected
printheads.
Note: Isolating individual colors to purge does not perform a stronger purge, but it
does conserve ink.
[52]
[52] Vacuum Shutoff Valves with Two Turned Off
3. Remember to open any shut-off valves that were closed for this procedure.
Note: If problems still persist, perform the swab procedure on the affected
printhead.
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Chapter 8 Printer Maintenance
Swab Printheads
Swab Printheads
Introduction
To ensure optimal print quality, it is important to periodically clean the printheads
with a swab to remove any excess ink or any debris that was not removed by
Printhead Maintenance.
Purpose
Important Caution: To maintain print quality it is very important to swab the
printheads at least once a week, or more frequently, if required. Failure to do this
may result in permanent printhead damage.
When to do
At the end of each week, clean the printhead nozzle plates using the swabbing
procedure. This procedure may also be used when regular printhead maintenance
fails to fix blocked or misfiring nozzles or to remove debris from the bottom of the
printhead.
Note: If UV ink has fully cured on a printhead it must be replaced. Contact your Océ
service representative.
Before you begin
Print a Nozzle Check to determine if any nozzles are not firing properly. This will
help to determine whether some or all of the printheads must be swabbed. You can
also do a visual inspection of the nozzles (use a flashlight if the ambient room light
is not adequate).
A small bottle (125ml) is supplied with the printer accessory kit. Label this bottle as
"Flush" and use it only to hold flush for use during the swab procedure. To prevent
contamination of the flush in the bottle, never re-dip a used swab in the flush.
Required tools
Foam Tipped Swabs (3010105434 Swab Foam Flex Tip)
Flush (3010105397 Flush UV 5 Liter)
Bottle-HDPE 125ml for flush (3010105433)
Nitrile Gloves
Safety Glasses
105
Swab Printheads
Attention: Never "scrub" the printhead with a swab as this will drag debris into
other nozzles. Always slowly move the swab across the printhead with the swab
at an angle and not perpendicular to the printhead.
Never use Isopropyl alcohol to clean the printheads. Do not allow swabs to be
contaminated with any dust or dirt prior to use.
Note that the swab has a seam that can damage the printhead nozzles; use only
the semi-curved foam sides of the swab.
Caution: Use appropriate safety equipment — nitrile gloves and eye
protectors.
How to Swab a Single Printhead
Note: Swab one printhead at a time to reduce ink waste during the purge and also
to minimize ink spill on your hand. In order to achieve the most effective swab, it is
best to swab immediately after a purge while the ink is still dripping from the
printheads. Close the ink valve so that the ink is under slight pressure to help clear
debris from around the nozzles.
1. Open the maintenance station cover.
2. Close the ink purge valves of the three other colors, but leave open the valve for the
color you will swab.
3. Dip a swab in a small container of flush.
Note: Use 1 swab per printhead. Do not re-dip a swab into the flush.
4. Press and release switch 1 to initiate a purge.
5. Within 3 seconds of pressing the purge button, close the remaining purge valve. The
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
106
carriage will lower to its purge height (4mm above the table surface) and the ink will
continue to drip from the printheads.
While the ink is still dripping, position the swab at the far end of the printhead and
slowly draw the swab towards you. Hold the swab at an angle to limit dragging
debris from one nozzle to the next. Do not let the seam in the foam touch the nozzle
plate.
Rotate the swab by 180 degrees and repeat the previous step.
Discard the swab and repeat Steps 2 to 6 for all the other printheads (if needed).
Perform Printhead Maintenance.
Run a Nozzle Check print or an image test print and verify that all nozzles are firing
properly.
Chapter 8 Printer Maintenance
Swab Printheads
Note: If the problem persists, you can swab multiple times. Use a new clean side of
the swab each time (this means a maximum of two swipes per swab). It is possible
that as many as ten swipes can be required.
11. Run another nozzle check, if necessary. When the Nozzle Check print does not show
any nozzles out, the printer is ready to produce quality images.
107
Clean Carriage Underside
Clean Carriage Underside
Introduction
To maintain optimal print quality, it is important to periodically clean the underside
of the carriage to remove any excess ink. If the buildup of ink is excessive, it can be
transferred to media and thus reduce print quality.
When to do
As part of the daily maintenance at the start of the day, or as needed, clean any ink
that has accumulated on the underside of the carriage.
Note: The accumulation of ink on the carriage underside is caused, at least in part,
by static particles from the media. Dust particles and other debris from the media
surface tend to attract ink mist when they have a static charge. To remove particles
and to reduce the static charge buildup on the media, use a tack cloth and lightly rub
the media surface before you print (see ‘How to Handle Media’ on page 80) for more
information). You may also need to install a humidifier if humidity is below the
required minimum defined in the Arizona 250 GT Site Preparation Guide (30% to
70%, Non-condensing is the suggested range for operating the printer).
Before you begin
Make sure the carriage is in the parked position. The carriage and gantry
automatically return to this position after an image is printed.
It is not necessary to turn off the UV lamps as they are shuttered. However, they will
be hot if they are on, so avoid touching them.
Required tool
Cloth-Poly Wipe 10cm x 10cm
Note: Safety glasses and nitrile gloves must be worn when you handle ink.
Caution: The underside of the UV lamps may be hot, avoid touching them.
108
Chapter 8 Printer Maintenance
Clean Carriage Underside
Illustration
[53]
[53] Ink Removal Technique
How to Clean the Carriage Underside
1. Slide the maintenance station cover plate out from under the carriage to reveal the
maintenance station.
2. Press switch 2 to raise the carriage to its maximum height.
3. Wrap a clean poly wipe cloth around your index finger.
Attention: In the next step, make sure that you do not touch the nozzles of the
printheads. If you happen to touch one with the cloth, you must perform a
printhead maintenance. Note that contact with the printhead by any object other
than the suction-head used for maintenance can cause damage to the nozzles and
result in poor image quality or possibly require a printhead replacement.
4. Slide the cloth along the metal plate between the first two printheads to remove any
ink that has accumulated.
5. Reposition the wipe so that a clean area is wrapped around your finger.
6. Proceed to the next space between printheads and slide the clean area of cloth along
the metal plate.
7. Repeat steps 3 to 6 until all ink is removed from the spaces between printheads. Use
a new cloth wipe, if necessary.
8. Slide the maintenance station cover to the closed position.
Result
Printer is ready to print quality images.
109
Remove Ink From the Table
Remove Ink From the Table
Introduction
How often you need to perform these procedures will vary, depending on printer
usage and work habits.
Remove Ink from Table
Clean ink from the table whenever necessary. Once UV ink is cured, the best method
for removing it from the table is to use a scraper (it is also possible to achieve good
results with a razor blade that is set into a handle/holder). Be careful not to scratch
the aluminium surface of the table when scraping off the cured ink.
Unplug Vacuum Holes
The vacuum holes in the table surface may become plugged with ink and thus reduce
the efficiency of the vacuum. To clear the holes, use an 1.5mm diameter rigid
material (e.g., a paper clip) to ream them out, as required (this is not likely a daily
task, but must be performed as needed).
Required tools
Poly-Wipe Cloth
Nitrile Gloves
Note: When scraping ink off the table be sure to remove all of the dry ink particles.
Use a portable vacuum and then a wet lint-free cloth to ensure no debris is left on
the table that could be picked up by a printhead.
How to Remove Ink
1. Scrape any cured ink from the surface of the table with a scraper (or a razor blade in
a holder).
2. Use a vacuum cleaner to remove the scraped particles of ink and any other debris on
the table surface.
3. Use a lint-free cloth soaked in isopropyl alcohol to ensure that the table surface is
clear of any remaining particles.
How to Unplug Vacuum Holes
1. Identify any vacuum holes that are plugged with ink.
2. With an 1.5mm diameter rigid material (e.g., a paper clip), ream out any of the holes
that have been plugged.
3. Clear any resulting debris with a vacuum cleaner or a wet lint-free cloth.
110
Chapter 8 Printer Maintenance
Empty the Ink Waste Tray
Empty the Ink Waste Tray
Introduction
The waste tray is located below the Maintenance Station. It accumulates ink that has
dripped from the printheads or ink waste that results from a purge when performing
Printhead Maintenance or Swabbing the Printheads. The ink drops onto a sloped
drain plate at the base of the Maintenance Station and drains from there into the
waste tray.
When to do
Check the waste tray periodically and empty, when needed. When you perform
Printhead Maintnance, it is a good practice to visually examine the sloped drain plate
at the bottom of the Maintanance Station. If ink starts to pool on the drain plate it is
time to empty the waste tray (if you can see ink it means the the waste tray is full and
is now backing up into the maintenance station). The capacity of the waste tray is
approximately 1.5 liters.
Required tools
Cloth or paper towel
Empty semi-transparent plastic container
Nitrile Gloves
How to Empty the Waste Tray
1. Put a cloth or paper towel in place on the floor to catch any drips while the tray is
emptied.
2. Place a suitable empty container that holds at least 1 liter under the waste tray drain.
111
Empty the Ink Waste Tray
[54]
[54] Waste Tray Valve
3. Turn the valve on the waste tray until it starts to drain the waste material.
4. Shut off the valve when ink no longer drains out (or if the container become full).
Note: The valve closes clean (drip free) but because it has long pipe use a piece of
cloth or paper to wipe it clean as some ink can remain inside and drip out later when
the printer is in motion.
5. Dispose of the waste material in a suitable, environmentally-friendly manner.
112
Chapter 8 Printer Maintenance
Clean UV Lamp Filters
Clean UV Lamp Filters
Introduction
The top of the assemblies that house the left and right UV lamp cartidges contains a
filter that can cause overheating of the lamps if it becomes clogged with dust or
debris.
When to do
Check the condition of the filters weekly and clean them as needed. If dust
accumulates, this can lead to overheated lamps and results in an error message. It is
best to clean the filters periodically to avoid overheating, but if you do receive an
error, check for dust or debris. If you get a lamp overheat error and there is no dust
on the filter, call for service immediately.
Required tools
Toothbrush (or similar brush device)
Handheld Vacuum appliance
Attention: Failure to clean the filters can lead to overheating of the lamps and
can result in a shorter lamp life.
Attention: Do not remove the filters and do not diassemble the lamp cartridge
due the danger of high voltage power.
How to Clean the UV Lamp Filters
1. If there is any dust or debris on the surface of the filter, use vacuum cleaner to remove
it.
2. Use a small brush to loosen any dust or debris that is embedded in the mesh of the
filter.
3. Use the vacuum cleaner to remove any material loosened in step 2.
113
Fill the Coolant Reservoir
Fill the Coolant Reservoir
Introduction
The coolant is a thermal fluid used to maintain the temperature of the ink in the
printheads and ink reservoirs on the carriage. Temperature control of the ink is
required in order to achieve the correct ink viscosity, which affects the jetting
velocity of the ink and thus the quality of printed images. The coolant is pumped past
a heater that has a thermostat to maintain the coolant temperature. The coolant flows
in series through each of the printheads and then returns to the coolant reservoir.
Each printhead has an internal sensor that provide temperature feedback. The
reservoir block also has a sensor to provide feedback. The coolant reservoir contains
an optical level sensor. A sight tube on the side of the gantry, at the opposite end from
the carriage, displays the level of coolant in the reservoir. The operator must
maintain this level.
Purpose
If the coolant level is low, the ink and printheads cannot be maintained at the proper
temperature. Periodically check the level of coolant and add more coolant if it is
below the center of the sight tube.
When to do
Check the coolant level sight-tube, located at the side of the gantry, to verify that the
level is low. When filled to the proper level, the fluid will be at the center of the
sight-tube. If the level of coolant is lower than the center, it is time to fill it. Keep the
coolant at the correct level to maintain the proper ink temperature as the coolant is
important to that process.
Before you begin
Verify that the coolant level is below the center of the sight-tube. If it is at the center
or higher, it is not necessary to add coolant. The sight-tube is located on the side at
the right end of the gantry Operator Interface Hardware .
Required tools
Syringe (supplied with Starter kit)
Wear gloves (coolant will not harm the skin, but gloves are recommended).
Coolant
114
Chapter 8 Printer Maintenance
Fill the Coolant Reservoir
Illustration
[55]
[55] Fill Coolant Reservoir
Fill the Coolant Reservoir
1. Open the container of coolant fluid.
2. Insert the syringe into the fluid and draw back the plunger until the syringe is almost
full (leave a small amount of air so that you can expel it at the end to avoid fluid
dripping from the fill nozzle.
3. Wipe any excess fluid from the hose attached to the syringe (if the hose is wet it is
difficult to perform the next step).
4. Insert the hose into the fill nozzle above the coolant level tube.
5. Press on the syringe plunger to inject the fluid. Inject the entire contents of the
syringe. Repeat, if necessary, until the coolant level is above the halfway point on the
sight tube.
Note: Do not overfill the coolant as this can cause temperature variations. If the
coolant does not flow into the fill nozzle the printer may have a defective nozzle and
this will require a service call.
6. Remove the hose and store the syringe and the coolant fluid container until it is
needed again.
115
Clean Gantry Rails
Clean Gantry Rails
Introduction
Dust and debris can accumulate on the gantry rails, which run along the length of the
table. The bearings that run on the rails are equipped with shields that are designed
to keep debris from entering the bearing housing. After a period of time and use,
debris can accumulate on the outside of the bearing shields as the gantry travels
along the table.
When to do
If you notice any dirt or ink on the gantry rails, or an accumulation of debris on the
rails bearings, clean them immediately.
Required tool
Poly-Wipe lint-free Cloth
Attention: In the event of an ink spill on the rail, it should be cleaned
immediately, before the bearings have a chance to run over the spill. After the
area has been cleaned, wipe the spill area again thoroughly with a
water-moistened lint-free cloth to remove any chemical residue before running
the gantry over the area again. Slight ink stains that remain on the rail after
cleaning are not a major problem.
How to Clean the Rails
1. Power OFF the printer at the AC power On/Off switch located at the side of the
electronics enclosure.
2. Turn the switch to the horizontal Lockout position and apply a lock.
3. Use a dry lint-free cloth to remove all visible debris that has accumulated next to the
bearing shields. It is only necessary to clean the outside bearing shields. When
removing debris always wipe away from the shields.
4. Remove the lock from the Lockout switch.
5. Power ON the printer.
116
Chapter 8 Printer Maintenance
Change Ink Filters
Change Ink Filters
Introduction
Each ink color has a filter that removes any particulate matter from the ink as it is
pumped from the ink bag toward the printheads. The ink filters are located at the
electronics end of the printer around the corner from the ink bags.
When to do
The ink filter for a particular color of ink must be replaced after 11 bags of that ink
have been consumed. The printer monitors ink use and provides a warning when it
is time to change an ink filter. If an ink filter becomes clogged it will trap color
pigment and affect the color balance of printed images so it is important to change a
filter before this occurs.
If the Nozzle Check image prints one color weaker than normal, this is an indication
that the ink filter for the affected color is clogged and the filter must be replaced.
Before you begin
IMPORTANT! Open the sliding maintenance station door to disable ink pumps.
Disconnect the ink couplers on all ink bags
Close all four of the vacuum shut-off valves on the top of the carriage.
Required tools
Philips screwdriver (only if enclosure thumb-screws are too tight)
Lint-free cloth
Illustration
[56]
[56] Remove Ink Filter Enclosure Cover
117
Change Ink Filters
How to Change an Ink Filter
1. Open the sliding maintenance station door to disable ink pumps.
2. Remove the two screws that hold the ink filter enclosure cover in place (thumbscrews
can be loosened by hand or use a Philips screwdriver if they are too tight).
3. Use a lint-free cloth to catch ink, and place it below the bleed valve at the bottom of
the filter. Then turn the the bleed valve (white valve with the red circle in the photo
below) counter-clockwise to open it to release pressure, then close it again.
[57]
[57] Replace Ink Filter
4. Remove the ink filter from the metal retainer clips.
5. Unscrew the cap on top of the new filter but keep it for use in the next step.
6. Unscrew the cap at the top connection to the old filter (the blue valve with the circle
shown in the photo above) and screw it into the top connection of the new filter,
being sure to install the filter in the proper direction. Place the cap that came with the
new filter on the old filter to prevent ink from leaking out of the old filter.
7. Repeat the previous step for the bottom connection. Wipe off any spilled ink.
8. Insert the new filter in the metal retainer clips. Be careful not to pinch the ink lines.
9. Close the sliding maintenance station door to enable the ink pumps.
Check
1. Check the new filter to make sure there are no ink leaks.
2. Replace the ink filter enclosure cover.
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Chapter 8 Printer Maintenance
How to Change a UV Lamp
How to Change a UV Lamp
Introduction
The Arizona 250 GT uses two UV lamps, one on each side of the carriage, to
instantly cure the ink during printing. These UV lamps have an expected life of 500
hours and must be replaced by the user when they fail or can no longer cure the ink
at maximum available power. It is recommended that these lamps be replaced in
pairs to ensure even curing in both directions. Each lamp is supplied in a cartridge
that is easy to replace.
When to do
The life expectancy of the UV lamp is 500 hours. Océ recommends that both UV
Lamp Cartridges be replaced simultaneously to ensure that the curing effect is
balanced when printing in opposite directions. In the case of a premature failure or
accidental breakage of one lamp, the operator can decide to replace only one lamp
but should confirm image consistency after the replacement.
Before you begin
Ensure that the printer AC power is turned off and the lockout device is in place (see
‘How to Switch the Printer On and Off’ on page 63).
Required tools
3mm allan key
Lockout device
UV Lamp Cartridge
Caution: The UV lamps and the carriage guard may be hot if the printer
has been active. Avoid touching the guard and the lamp assembly until it is
cool.
119
How to Change a UV Lamp
Illustration
[58]
[58] Remove UV Lamp Cartridge
How to Replace a UV Lamp Cartridge
1. Turn off the AC power and lockout the printer.
2. Remove the carriage guard by lifting it straight up and then away from the carriage.
3. Use a 3mm allan key to loosen the screw at the top of the cartridge with the lamp that
needs to be replaced.
4. Slide the cartridge out of the lamp assembly and replace with a new cartridge.
5. Replace the carriage guard and make sure it is level.
6. Unlock the AC power switch and power on the printer.
120
Chapter 8 Printer Maintenance
Print a Nozzle Check
Print a Nozzle Check
Introduction
The Nozzle Check print fires each nozzle individually in a manner that allows
clogged nozzles to be easily identified by a visual inspection of this special print. The
Nozzle Check print consists of the following elements:
■
■
■
■
■
■
Print Identification - Océ Arizona 250GT Nozzle Check Version and Océ Logo
Solid Rectangle - All nozzles are fired simultaneously to exercise them and this
results in a solid rectangle 2.125"x 6.75" (5.4cmx17cm)
Print Head Identification - Each printhead is printed in the same order as its
position in the carriage. They are numbered from 1 to 8.
Even or Odd Row Identification - Each color has two printheads. One
printhead of a color prints the odd rows and the other prints the even rows.
Different Drop Sizes - Each nozzle is fired at five different drop sizes, resulting
in 5 columns of data. Small tick marks are added to the four corners of the
5-column block of data.
Individual Nozzles Fired - Each nozzle is fired multiple times. Clogged nozzles
can be easily identified because the 5 mm (7/32") line associated with the clogged
nozzle will be missing from the image. This is often referred to as "nozzle
dropout".
Purpose
The Nozzle Check is used to verify the condition of the nozzles. Clogged nozzles
(nozzle dropouts) can cause banding. Perform printhead maintenance or swab a
printhead to unplug clogged nozzles.
When to do
Print a Nozzle Check after performing printhead maintenance or when
troubleshooting banding problems caused by nozzle dropouts.
Before you begin
The Nozzle Check has been designed to fit on a piece of media that is 36" (91.5 cm)
and is 2.125" (5.4 cm) wide. Since you are likely to print more than one when you
diagnose nozzle problems, make sure your media is wide enough.
Ink must be at the operating temperature of at least 40 degrees Centigrade (140
degrees Fahrenheit) before you print a nozzle check. The Job Control module of the
User Interface displays the ink temperature. If the temperature is low, activate the ink
heater by clicking its control button and then monitor the temperature display.
121
Print a Nozzle Check
Required tools
Blue LED view light (sometimes needed to enhance contrast in the Yellow area).
Océ I/O paper
Note: Usually, two or more Nozzle Checks will be printed to verify that nozzle issues
are resolved. To calculate the required offset when you print multiple consecutive
nozzle checks, add a horizontal offset of 2.5" or 60 mm to each consecutive print.
How to Print the Nozzle Check
1. Place a piece of Océ I/O paper on the printer table.
2. Select the Nozzle Check icon at the right end of the Command Toolbar to place the
3.
4.
5.
6.
nozzle check into the Active Print Job list (you can also add a Nozzle Check to the
active print list when you select it from the Special Prints module).
Modify the horizontal offset (only if a previous nozzle check was printed on the same
piece of media).
Confirm media thickness.
Activate the table vacuum.
Push the printer Start button to begin the print.
Check
The Magenta section of the Nozzle Check print shown in the figure below indicates
that multiple nozzles are out.
[59]
[59] Nozzle Check Print Magenta Section
Correction
1. To correct the nozzle dropout problem illustrated above, perform Printhead
Maintenance (see ‘Printhead Maintenance’ on page 100) on the colors that show
dropouts, and then print the Nozzle Check again.
2. If the second Nozzle Check still shows nozzle dropouts, swab the printhead until the
dropouts don't show up in the print (see ‘Swab Printheads’ on page 105)
122
Chapter 8 Printer Maintenance
Print a Nozzle Check
Result
When a printhead does not have any dropouts, it will look like the Nozzle Check
print of the black (K) section illustrated below.
Note: There is an indication of some poor directionality in one of the nozzles
illustrated in the top left section of the sample below, but it will not affect image
quality (although it could, if multiple adjacent nozzles show this problem).
[60]
[60] Nozzle Check Print Black Section
123
Print a Nozzle Check
124
Chapter 8 Printer Maintenance
Appendix A
Application Hints and Tips
125
Hints and Tips
Hints and Tips
Introduction
The following recommendations are based on our experience with the Arizona 250
GT printer. They are offered as starting points or suggestions for dealing with various
situations. Since this information is subject to change please check our web site at
http://www.dgs.oce.com/PrinterSupport/Arizona250GT_Customer/ for the current
list of "Application Hints and Tips". The hints are tips are grouped into three
categories: Maintenance, Printing, and Color and Profiling.
126
Appendix A Application Hints and Tips
Hints and Tips
Maintenance Hints and Tips
[25]
Situation
Hint and Tips
Routine
Maintenance
For optimal printer performance always perform the
recommended preventative maintenance i.e. the daily, weekly,
monthly etc. Refer to the Maintenance Guidelines for details.
Printhead
Maintenance
Always suction the excess ink from the print heads after
purging, and then run a nozzle check to ensure all the print head
nozzles are firing properly. See (see ‘Printhead Maintenance’
on page 100).
Spare Ink Filters
The printer will indicate when it is time to change ink filters
(either in six months or after 11 bags of ink). It is a good idea
to stock at least one or more spare filters.
Spare Lamp
cartridge
When the lamps are nearing end of life, a spare UV Lamp
cartridge can be ordered to minimize the down time when a
lamp needs to be replaced. However, we recommend that you
replace lamps in pairs.
Printing Hints and Tips
[26]
Situation
Hint and Tips
Maximizing
Throughput
To maximize printer throughput, orient jobs so that the long
side of the image to be printed is oriented in the direction of
carriage travel. Also, if possible nest multiple jobs in
ProductionHouse to be printed on either a single or multiple
pieces of media at the same time.
Imaging on
Multiple Pieces of
Rigid Media at the
Same Time
You can image multiple pieces of media at the same time. If
placing multiple pieces of media that are prone to thermal
expansion you should use a gap between the pieces of media
to prevent buckling due to thermal expansion during printing.
The best way to achieve this is to use a template mask
(cutouts where pieces of media are to be placed), with tape or
scrap media that is thinner than the media to be printed on.
Make sure the template mask media is not prone to media
thermal expansion.
127
Hints and Tips
Situation
Hint and Tips
Thermal
Expansion of
Media
Some media, such as Styrene, or Plexiglas, is subject to
expansion when subjected to heat. If multiple pieces of these
media are used, allow enough space between the pieces to
allow for thermal expansion. When overprinting on media
that will expand when heat is applied, we recommend that
you group the desired image with a preceding image so the
media is a consistent temperature when starting to print the
desired image.
Printing on uneven Use a thickness equal to the thickest value of the media, and
surfaces
print unidirectional.
Overprinting
Techniques
Overprinting may be required on some media to build up ink
density - e.g., backlit material. Hitting color and proper
linearization when using overprinting is difficult. One
technique is to print an overprinted Pantone Chart on the
same media then alter the colors of a job in the front-end
software (e.g. Photoshop or ProductionHouse) to match the
desired printed Pantone color. In most cases only one
overprint is required to achieve the desired ink density.
How to set UV
Lamp Power
The default lamp power setting is full power (7). However,
for some media it may be better to reduce the lamp power to
minimize thermal deformation of media, gradient banding,
and ink chipping when post-cutting bleed images.
Printing Double
Sided Jobs
For work-and-turn jobs (flip media in length of table
direction),
1) Measure the exact length of the media and enter this in the
ProductionHouse layout Preview Dialog Media Width
Horizontal field.
2) Select Center Horizontal.
3) Place the media at the origin on the table.
4) Print the Image, then flip the media and print on the
backside.
For work-and-tumble jobs (flip media in the width of the
table direction)
1) Measure the exact width of the media and enter this in the
PosterShop Layout Preview Dialog Height (Vertical) field
2) Then select Center Vertical.
3) Print the image, then flip the media and print the backside.
128
Appendix A Application Hints and Tips
Hints and Tips
Situation
Hint and Tips
Imaging with
Bleed
The Arizona 250 GT is capable of printing full bleed images,
i.e. images printed slightly larger than the media size to
ensure that the printed images goes to the all the way to media
edges. However, since this implies some ink will be printed
off the media is it very important a sacrificial scrap piece of
media - either the same height or up to 1 mm less be placed
on the bleed edges of the media. Failing to do so causes ink
to accumulate on the print head nozzle plates and
carriage face plate and will, over time, degrade printer
performance resulting in banding.
Masking off
unused vacuum
areas
A variety of scrap materials can be used be used to mask off
unused vacuum areas. Vinyl and cut vinyl transfer paper that
is sticky on one side are good choices. The mask media can
hang of the vacuum control side of the table. Masks can either
be strips or templates with cutouts where the piece or pieces
of media are to be placed. Remember to not use a media
masking material that is thicker than the media to be printed
on.
Imaging Porous
and Flexible
Media on the
Flatbed
Use the vacuum bleed valve and gauge to reduce the amount
of vacuum to the minimum amount required to hold the
media to the table when printing on porous and flexible
media. This will reduce artifacts caused by the vacuum holes
in the table. Also, an MDF spoil board (similar to boards used
on a router table) can be used to eliminate artifacts caused by
the vacuum holes.
129
Hints and Tips
Color and Profiling Hints and Tips
[27]
Situation
Hint and Tips
Setting Ink
Restrictions
The Arizona 250 GT uses greyscale variable drop size
technology. Some of the larger drop sizes are not allowed for
a particular print mode. Choose the appropriate ink
configuration for the print mode desired when creating a
media.
Also, when setting restrictions take into account that at some
point adding an additional volume of ink will not increase
the Dmax. Setting the optimal Dmax depends on your
objective, if the goal is to have rich saturated colors and the
largest color gamut possible you should choose a higher
Dmax and if your goal is color accuracy and producing
images in accordance to SWOP standards. For SWOP
standards you may want to choose Dmax values that are
about 0.1 higher than the SWOP targets of C,M 1.4, Y .8, K
1.6.
When a media is created for quality mode, it can also be used
for Quality-matte mode.
Increasing Ink
Density
Use ICC profiles. Or use color replacement to change
100%K to a rich black. 40% C, 30% M, 30% Y, 100 %K
have given good results on a variety of media. The maximum
recommended values are 60% C, 40% M, 40% Y, 100% K.
Using a generic
ICC profile
If an ICC profile is not available for a particular media and
it is not possible/convenient to create one specifically for
that media, select an ICC profile for another media that is
similar in composition and color and the results will very
likely be acceptable. Profiles are much less
media-dependant for UV ink printers like the Arizona 250
GTthan for solvent ink-based printers.
PhotoShop RGB to When converting RGB images to CMYK in PhotoShop we
CMYK conversion recommend that you use a 400% ink limit a, 20% dot gain
compensation, and light black generation. Good results have
been achieved printing linearized with all profiles turned off.
130
Hitting Pantone
Colors
Use ICC profiles and change default rendering intent from
Saturation to Perceptual.
Choosing a
Spectrophotometer
Onyx ProductionHouse supports a variety of
Spectrophotometers for profiling. Our recommendation for a
spectrophotometer that can be used on both rigid and
flexible media is the Gretag MacBeth Eye-One (with a UV
cut filter).
Appendix A Application Hints and Tips
Hints and Tips
Situation
Hint and Tips
Long USB Cable
for Eye-One
Spectrophotometer
We recommend that you purchase a 16' USB cable
(maximum USB cable length spec.) or a 10' USB cable
extension for use with the Eye-One Spectrophotometer.
Exporting
Spectrophotometer
Readings
When making a media model (linearization) or ICC profile
we recommend that the Eye-One Spectrophotometer
readings are exported immediately after reading the patch
values. The reason is that if the patch readings are saved and
backed up, profiles can be reconstructed at a later date if
required.
131
Hints and Tips
132
Appendix A Application Hints and Tips
Index
Index
A
Ink Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42, 88
AC power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
AC power plug . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Alphanumeric input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
B
Banding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Beacon Light States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Beacon Light Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
C
Carriage Collision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Carriage Guard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Carriage Interlock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Change an Ink Bag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Clogged Nozzles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Coolant Reservoir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Custom Vacuum Zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
E
Emergency Stop buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Emergency Stop Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Emergency Stops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Emergency-Stop button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Extended Power Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
44
25
42
25
64
L
Lock Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
M
Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Maintenance Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Maintenance Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42, 100
Measurement Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Media Adhesion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Media Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
media thickness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets) . . . . . . . . . 89
MSDS Ink Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
N
network connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
network connection settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
network name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Nozzle Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105, 121
nozzle plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
O
Flatbed button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Onscreen Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Onyx Printer Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operator Control Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operator Interface Module Tabs . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G
P
F
Gantry Rails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Graphical User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
I
ICC profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ink Bag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ink Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ink delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
80
90
16
86
46
67
42
46
piezoelectric . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Print button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Print Job Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
print quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Printer Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
ProductionHouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
133
Index
R
Reduce Artifacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
S
safety interlock system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Safety Labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Safety Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Special Prints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
suction-head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
T
Thermal Expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
U
Underlay Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
User Interface Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
UV Flush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
V
Vacuum Bleed Valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42, 75
Vacuum Overlay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Vacuum Pump Timeout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Vacuum System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Vacuum Zone Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Vacuum Zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72, 74
VariaDot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Ventilation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18, 86
134
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